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Best Electric locomotive class of All Time

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    1
    SNCF Class BB 9200

    SNCF Class BB 9200

    The SNCF Class BB 9200 1500 V DC electric locomotives were built by Schneider-Jeumont/CEM between 1958-1964. 92 of them were built and 20 remain. These train engines are products of the Jacquemin product family of train engines (locomotives), offspring of the prototype BB 9004, and named after the engineer who designed their bogies. The locomotives were designed for a maximum speed of 160 km/h (99 mph) and were the first such train engines in France. In the late sixties, a small group of train engines was converted for 200 km/h (120 mph) operation, hauling prestige TEE trains like the Capitole - these train engines were called the BB 9200 Capitole. These types were later superseded by the CC 6500 train engines. Some of these train engines have been in service for more than 10,000,000 kilometers (6,200,000 mi) since they have been set to service. The regular services of the remaining BB 9200 train engines are inter-regional trains between Paris Montparnasse and Le Mans, between Paris Austerlitz and Tours and between Paris Gare de Lyon, Dijon and Lyon. Some few are in service for freight trains. Phasing out of the series of train engines was expected for 2007. The BB 9200 Capitole
    7.43
    7 votes
    2
    PKP class EM10

    PKP class EM10

    PKP class EM10 is a class of Polish electric locomotives used by the Polish railway operator Polskie Koleje Państwowe (PKP). They were built for shunting purposes. Designed in 1988, the EM10 was intended to function as a shunting locomotive and short distance passenger locomotive. Only four prototypes were ever built, and are operated by PKP.
    8.17
    6 votes
    3
    FS class E646

    FS class E646

    The FS E.645 and E.646 are two classes of similar electric locomotives used on Italian railways. They were introduced during the 1950s and they have been retired in 2009. The E.646 and E.645 locomotives project was started in 1953, with a new model engine that was to be installed on the modified chassis of the already-existing six-axle locomotive E.636. A similar concept for a 4-axle locomotive led to the development of the E.444 high-speed locomotive in the 1960s. The first prototypes were delivered in October 1958. The first thirty-seven individual locomotives differed only in their livery: twenty built for passenger traffic were painted in grey-green, while seventeen built for goods were painted in auburn. Later, the freight locomotives were reclassed E.645. The total number of locomotives built amounted to 295 units. Several locomotives from each class are still in service with FS Trenitalia, on push-pull services, and many have been converted in E.645 and assigned to goods services until 2009. They are substituted by E.464 engines on regional services. Class E.646 does not follow the standard Italian class numbering rules where the last digit indicates the number of motors, as
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    SS7 electric locomotive

    SS7 electric locomotive

    The SS7 is a type of electric locomotive used on the People's Republic of China's national railway system. They are widely used on electrified lines in the southwest part of China. The design of SS7 was influenced by the 6K, an electric locomotive model imported from Japan. Derivatives of SS7 include SS7B, SS7C, SS7D and SS7E.
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    NSB El 14

    NSB El 14

    NSB El 14 is a Norwegian electric locomotive operated by CargoNet for freight trains hauling. Built between 1968 and 1973 by Thune as a general purpose engine for the Norwegian State Railways (NSB), they were seen hauling passenger trains until the 1980s. Of the 31 units numbered 14 2164 to 14 2190 and 14 2197 to 14 2200, all but one remain in service. The electrification of the Dovre Line in the late 1960s forced NSB to buy a more powerful universal locomotive than the El 13. Based on the Swiss Ae 6/6 and NSB El 13, both developed in the 1950s, the El 14 introduced three-axle boogies in Norway while the power was increased to 5,097 kW and the weight reduced to 105 tonnes; remaining more powerful than its successors El 16 and El 17. With the delivery of more powerful El 18 in 1996-97, the El 14s were transferred to freight service alone, with the maximum speed reduced from 120 to 100 km/h (62 mph). The only scrapping occurred in December 2005 when one hit a large pile of rocks from a landslide near Evanger, Hordaland.
    9.20
    5 votes
    6
    SNCF Class BB 36000

    SNCF Class BB 36000

    The SNCF Class BB 36000 locomotives (named Astride) are a class of triple voltage 4 axle Bo'Bo' electric locomotives built by GEC-Alsthom (later Alsthom) between 1996 and 2001 for SNCF. Sixty units were built, with thirty units later converted to subclasses 36200, and 36300 - locomotives with additional safety equipment for cross border trains between France and Italy. As of 2012 there are 30 units of the original 36000 class and 30 units of the 363000 subtype. Locomotives operating from Italy have been given the Italian designation E436. The subgroup 36001-36030 mostly operate on French-Belgian freight corridors. The first 30 locomotives of Class BB 36000 were built as a result of a modification of an order for 264 of the dual voltage SNCF Class BB 26000 (Sybic); instead only 234 Sybics were built, the last 30 of the order were instead built as a triple voltage design capable of also operating on 3 kV DC with a different electric motor type (AC induction) and newer power semiconductor device technology (GTO type); the multi-voltage specifications came from an expectation of increase cross border traffic, as encouraged by the European Unions specification of "freight corridors".
    6.86
    7 votes
    7
    SJ Ra

    SJ Ra

    The SJ Class Ra (or Rapid) is an electric locomotive operated by Statens Järnvägar of Sweden. Ten units were built by ASEA, two in 1955 and eight in 1961. Ra was used on express trains until the 1990s. During the 1940s SJ had a need for quicker locomotives for their express trains. In 1953 two bogie-locomotives were ordered from ASEA. Inspiration for the appearance came from North America, with round shapes and a bulldog nose. The two first units were successful and SJ ordered additional eight units from ASEA, delivered in 1961. Though never being used for more than 130 km/h, it was capable for 150 km/h, and served mainly on Stockholm - Göteborg and Stockholm - Oslo. They were mainly taken out of service in the late 1980s, though two remained in service until 1996. Most have been preserved, including at the Swedish Railway Museum and at Nässjö Railway Museum.
    9.00
    5 votes
    8
    SJ D

    SJ D

    D is a series of locomotives used by Statens Järnvägar (SJ) of Sweden. 333 units were built by ASEA between 1925-43. It was used for both passenger and freight trains until it was taken out of service in 1988. Though SJs first electric locomotive was the Oa series used on Malmbanan, it was not suitable for use on the main lines, due to low speeds. To solve this problem SJ surveyed a large section of locomotives abroad, before concluding with a design and placed an order with ASEA for 50 units. While ASEA was responsible for the electrical components, ASJ, NOHAB and Motala Verkstad were responsible for the mechanical parts. The first series consisted of two models, the Ds used for express trains and the Dg for freight trains. The former had 90 km/h as maximum speed while Dg only had 70 km/h. The first units were delivered in 1925 and tested on Malmbanan until Västra Stambanan between Stockholm and Göteborg was finished in 1926. Additional deliveries were made until 333 units had been delivered by 1943. Through the history of production the original wooden body was replaced with a steel construction. The subdesignation of the D-locomotives follows the function and not the appearance
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    SNCB Class 18

    SNCB Class 18

    The new SNCB/NMBS Class 18 is a series of Siemens EuroSprinter ES60U3 locomotives. 60 were ordered in December 2006 for delivery between January 2009 and June 2010. The order is worth € 211 million (€ 3.52M apiece). In December 2008, an option to order 60 more locomotives was exercised for an amount of € 222M (€ 3.70M apiece), for delivery between June 2010 and April 2012. Road number 1860 was officially presented at InnoTrans 2008. Road number 1801 was observed at Velim railway test circuit on December 6, 2008. On March 3, 2009, the first unit (roadnumber 1802) was officially delivered to SNCB/NMBS for test and homologation purpose. Homologation issues have delayed commercial introduction (originally planned for the summer timeschedule - May 2011). Siemens was obliged to pay the maximum amount of penalties (€ 21.12 million). On July 6, 2011, units 1801 and 1803 hauled their first passenger trains on the Ostend - Brussels - Eupen Intercity-A service (also running through the HSL 2 at 200 km/h). The original Class 18 were built in 1973-1974 by Alsthom and were retired between 1997 and 1999.
    8.60
    5 votes
    10
    CFL Class 3600

    CFL Class 3600

    These locomotives have lost their duties to the newer class 4000s. Examples are still to be found dumped in yards awaiting their final trip for disposal. Two have been saved:
    7.33
    6 votes
    11
    NSB El 7

    NSB El 7

    NSB El 7 was a series electric locomotives delivered between 1911 and 1918 to Norsk Transport that operated Rjukanbanen and Tinnosbanen, where they were designated RjB.1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8. The locomotives were built by AEG (motor) and Skabo (chassis). The first three locomotives were delivered to Rjukanbanen along with two smaller units, RjB 4 and 5 (which were given the designation El 6 by NSB. El 7 is exactly two El 6; it has two transformers, four motors instead of two, Bo'Bo' instead of Bo axle arrangement, two pantographs, the same speed, and could haul twice the load. The locomotives cost NOK 52,090 in 1911. When two of the locos (no. 1 and 3) were transferred to Norges Statsbaner in 1920 after NSB took over Tinnosbanen, where they were designated El 7 and numbered 2501 and 2502. Number 1 was sold back to Norsk Transport in 1932 while number 3 was transferred to Narvik in 1927 after it had been converted from 10 to 15 kV. It returned to Drammen in 1936 and remained there until it was taken out of service in 1956; RjB 6 was retired in 1960, the rest remained in service with Norsk Transport in 1966 when they were replaced with NSB El 1 (given numbers 14 and 15). No. 2501 is
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    NZR ED class

    NZR ED class

    The New Zealand ED class locomotive was a class of electric locomotive used in Wellington, New Zealand. They were built by English Electric and the New Zealand Railways Department between 1938 and 1940, and hauled mainly passenger trains on the Wellington region's 1500 V DC electrification, and banked freight trains on the steep section between Paekakariki and Pukerua Bay. The locomotives featured a unique wheel arrangement, 1-Do-2 under the UIC classification system, and incorporated a quill drive to the driving wheels. They were found to be hard on the tracks, leading to speed restrictions on these locomotives and their replacement by the EW class on the Johnsonville Line. Like all other electric locomotives in New Zealand, the leading letter of the locomotives' classification is E. There are two predominant theories about how the ED class acquired the second letter, D. The first is that it comes from the "Do" of its 1-Do-2 wheel arrangement. The second is from its original allocation to two locations, Wellington and Otira - Arthur's Pass, hence "duplicated". Official records provide no confirmation of either theory. New Zealand Railways purchased one ED class locomotive in 1938
    6.14
    7 votes
    13
    British Rail Class 83

    British Rail Class 83

    The British Rail Class 83 electric locomotives were built by English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows as part of the West Coast Main Line electrification. Fifteen engines of British Rail Class 83 were built between 1960 and 1962 by English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, as part of British Rail's policy to develop a standard electric locomotive. Five prototype classes (81-85) were built and evaluated, which eventually led to the development of the Class 86 locomotive. Three of these engines were to have been built as Type B, geared for freight trains, but as it was only two were so built, becoming E3303 and E3304. The third Type B, E3305, was never built as such. Instead it was used as a test bed with silicon rectifiers and transducers, this being the first step towards thyristor control. It became a Type A, geared for passenger trains, and numbered E3100. The other two Type B locomotives were eventually rebuilt as Type A, being renumbered E3098 (ex E3303) and E3099 (ex E3304). Power was provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. As with the Class 84, the Class 83 suffered with problems due to the mercury-arc rectifiers. After spending several years in storage
    7.00
    6 votes
    14
    Seibu Class E851

    Seibu Class E851

    The Class E851 was a class of four DC electric locomotives operated by Seibu Railway in Japan. Built in 1969 by Mitsubishi to haul 1,000-tonne cement trains, the design was based on the JNR Class EF65 and used bogies similar to those used on the JNR Class EF81 locomotives. From 30 November 1990, the discontinuation of freight services to Sayamagaoka eliminated the need for double-heading, and the end of all Seibu freight services from 7 March 1996 saw the E851s become surplus to requirements. Final farewell Sayonara runs were organized in May 1996 hauling JR 12-series passengers coaches from Tokorozawa to Yokoze. Locomotive E854 remains preserved at Yokoze Depot, but the other three locomotives in the class were cut up. Media related to Seibu Class E851 at Wikimedia Commons
    9.25
    4 votes
    15
    PKP class ET40

    PKP class ET40

    ET40 is the name for Bo-Bo+Bo-Bo two-unit freight electric locomotive in service of Polish national rail operator, PKP. The locomotive was produced by Škoda Works in the Czechoslovakia. During the 1960s and 1970s a massive increase in freight transport was seen in Poland, especially on the routes between Silesian coal mines and Polish Baltic ports. In the beginning of the 1970s the whole Trunk Coal Line (Pl: Magistrala Węglowa), which was the main route for exporting Polish coal, had been electrified. This situation caused an urgent need for suitable locomotives able to pull heavy freight trains. As a result negotiations with Škoda Works in Plzeň started. Poland sent an order for 60 articulated freight locomotives, based on the EU05, which was currently in service at the time. As of 2007, ET40 locomotives work mostly for Bydgoszcz engine shed, but in 2000 several units were sent to Wrocław in order to serve on the highland Wrocław-Jelenia Góra line, where they are intended to replace ET21 locomotives. One locomotive from the series - ET40-41 was rebuilt in 1990 into EP40 standard, for high-speed passenger trains (up to 160 km/h), but as the result was not satisfactory, PKP resigned
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    SNCF Class BB 22200

    SNCF Class BB 22200

    The BB 22200 is a class of electric locomotives in service with the French railways SNCF, built by Alsthom between 1976 and 1986. They are a dual voltage version (1500 V DC and 25 kV 50 Hz AC) of the BB 7200 and BB 15000 classes. From 1994 nine of the class were used for hauling freight trains through the Channel Tunnel as the Class 92 locomotives were not yet delivered. These were numbered 22379/380/399-405, and were used until 1995. For use on British railways these locomotives were allocated the UK traction number Class 22. After the first test held in 1976, the BB 22200 were introduced on the Marseille-Nice-Ventimiglia line in southern France-northern Italy. The following year they started to haul longer distance trains such as the Train Bleu (1000 km from Ventimiglia to Paris) and the car transport train between Marseille and Paris. The BB 22200 are capable of a maximum speed of 160 kilometres per hour (99.4 mph). 8 locomotives, having a maximum power of 5,600 kilowatts (7,500 hp), were equipped for services up to 200 kilometres per hour (124 mph) and can work on TGV lines.
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    British Rail Class 85

    British Rail Class 85

    The British Rail Class 85 is an electric locomotive built during the early 1960s, as part of BR's policy to develop a standard electric locomotive. Five prototype classes (81-85) were built and evaluated, which eventually led to the development of the Class 86 locomotive. The locomotives of Class 85 were originally fitted with germanium rectifiers which were eventually replaced by silicon rectifiers. Forty of these locomotives were built from 1961-64 by BR at Doncaster Works. The class were used to haul trains on the then newly electrified West Coast Main Line, from Birmingham, to Crewe, Manchester Piccadilly, Liverpool and later Preston. By 1965, electrification had spread south to London Euston. Under the earlier BR classification, the type was given the designation AL5 (meaning the 5th design of 25 kV AC locomotive), and locomotives were numbered E3056-E3095. In 1968, this was changed to Class 85, when BR introduced a new computer numbering system. From 1971 onwards, locomotives were progressively renumbered into the 85001-040 series. Fifteen locomotives were converted for freight only use, numbered in the 85/1 series - see table below. These locomotives were restricted to
    8.50
    4 votes
    18

    TCDD E4000

    TCDD E4000 was the first electric locomotive used by the Turkish State Railways, TCDD. The three units, numbered E4001 - E4003 were built by Alsthom and Jeumont in France. The units are currently disused. In 1955 the first railway in Turkey was electrified, on the 28-kilometre (17 mi) commuter rail from Sirkeci to Halkalı in Istanbul. In addition to delivery of 18 electric multiple units, TCDD wanted to be able to use electrical engines instead of steam engines on long-haul trains on the last few kilometers into Istanbul. Because the line the locomotives were to serve on was flat and did not allow high speeds, the E4000 was a simple and conservative locomotive, utilizing a direct, single phase AC motor fed directly from the transformer. But even by 1957 the development of rectifiers directly fed AC motors obsolete. The design of the locomotives are based on Paul Arzens of Alsthom, and resemble many of the concurrent locomotives produced by them.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    NZR EA class

    NZR EA class

    The New Zealand Ea class (EO from 1968) of electric locomotives was used on the New Zealand rail network between 1968 and 1997 on the Otira – Arthur's Pass section of the Midland line in the South Island, through the Otira Tunnel. Following reconditioning, three were used by KiwiRail's Tranz Metro in Wellington from 2008 to 2011 to top and tail Metlink suburban passenger trains as an interim measure before new rolling stock arrived. The class replaced the E class of 1923, by then largely worn out, on Otira Tunnel duties in 1968. Like their predecessors, the E class operated as a group of three, with two on standby at Otira. They were more powerful at 1,290hp than the original E class at 680hp, and so could handle heavier trains. This was to prove useful when West Coast coal exports began in the late 1970s/early 1980s. By the 1990s, the reclassified EO class locomotives were no longer as efficient as they had once been. The larger coal trains were beyond the capacity of the EO class to haul, and the diesel locomotives which hauled these trains on the non-electrified sections were often kept on the train to help. Rail operator Tranz Rail began experimenting again with diesel traction
    9.67
    3 votes
    20
    SS9

    SS9

    The SS9 is a type of electric locomotive used on China Railways. They are mainly used in pulling sub-highspeed passenger trains. Developed and built by CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Works, the SS9 was designed for the fifth national railway speedup, and 2 prototypes were completed on December 26, 1998. Zhuzhou built 43 first generation SS9's. Beginning in 2002, a modified version of SS9 was designed and built, with body shape similar to the Re 460 locomotive running on Switzerland's national railway, SBB. Number SS9-0004 was scrapped and replaced by a new one due to a derailment accident occurred on November 19, 2004.
    9.67
    3 votes
    21
    DR Class 250

    DR Class 250

    The Deutsche Reichsbahn (East Germany) Class 250 (known since 1992 as Deutsche Bahn AG Class 155) is a German electric locomotive used on freight trains. Nicknamed the “Electric Container” or “Powercontainer” due to its distinctive carbody shape. The less favorable nickname “Stasi-Container” is also heard every now and then. It was the most powerful locomotive in the former GDR. In the mid-1960s, it became apparent that engine classes 211 and 242, in production since 1961, were not powerful enough, so DR built a new, 6-axled, electric locomotive suitable for all classes of traffic. In 1974 three prototypes were built by LEW Hennigsdorf, the leading builder of railway locomotives in the GDR. A series of 270 locomotives were delivered between 1977 and 1984. They were mainly used for heavy cargo trains as well as the fast Städteexpress-train services of DR (comparable with InterCity). After the reunification of Germany, railway traffic in East Germany slumped. The locomotives were renumbered as class 155, and many of them also operated in West Germany. After Deutsche Bahn was restructured, the engines were assigned to DB Cargo (later Railion, now DB Schenker Rail) for freight
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Seibu Class E31

    Seibu Class E31

    The Class E31 was a class of four DC Bo-Bo wheel arrangement electric locomotives operated by Seibu Railway in Japan until March 2010 and subsequently by the Ōigawa Railway. Four locomotives (numbered E31 to E34) were built at Seibu's Tokorozawa factory between 1986 and 1987 to replace ageing first-generation electric locomotives on freight services and track maintenance train duties. The DT-20A bogies were reused from former JNR 80 series EMUs, and the traction motors were modified from former EMU motors. They were normally used in pairs by Seibu, top-and-tailing permanent way maintenance trains and to haul newly-delivered rolling stock. Locomotive number E33 was withdrawn on 31 January 2009, becoming the first of the class to be withdrawn. The remaining three locomotives were withdrawn on 28 March 2010. In September 2010, three of the withdrawn Class E31 locomotives (E32 - E34) were transferred to the Ōigawa Railway to replace the ageing E10 and ED500 locomotives used there. Locomotive E31 remains preserved at Seibu's Yokoze Depot.
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    PKP class ET41

    PKP class ET41

    ET41 is the name for a Polish electric locomotive used by the Polish railway operator (PKP). Three such locomotives were briefly rented to the Croatian Railways between 1995 and 1996 and were given the designation HŽ series 1081 there. ET41 is a modification of the EU07 locomotive, and was designed for the purpose of heavy transport. It is made of two connected bodies of EU07. The design for this machine was ready in 1976. Basically it consists of two EU07 locomotives but with two driver's cabs removed. Two locos are semi-permanently coupled in multiple operation. Because of this, the current collection must be done independently for each section. Production started in 1977 and continued until 1983. A total number of 200 machines were produced. For some time number 100 carried a special white-red livery and was used on the special PZPR (Polish communist party) trains. ET41 are mainly used for coal transport from Upper Silesia to main harbours like Gdynia and Szczecin. Seldom are those locomotives used for hauling passenger trains.
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    PKP class EP05

    PKP class EP05

    The EP05 is a Polish modification of Czech electric locomotive EU05 used by Polish railway operator (PKP) The locomotive was produced in the years 1957–1960 in three types: 20E1, the prototype, 30E1 and 30E2. In need of modern electric locomotives for passenger trains, and unable to get timely delivery of EU06 locomotives from England, Poland bought 30 locomotives from its southern neighbours. In 1969, PKP started testing several changes to enable EU05 locomotives to achieve speeds up to 160 km/h. First trials were made with the EU05-29 locomotive, and soon it became clear that it was possible to safely achieve speeds up to 170 km/h after changing the transmission rate. The decision was made to rebuild all locomotives of EU05 class during first servicing. As a result, by 1977 almost all locomotives had been rebuilt to EP05 class, except for locomotives 09, 12 and 19, which had been scrapped earlier. To distinguish the new series from its predecessor, the color scheme was changed from two-tone green to orange. All modifications were conducted in Zakłady Naprawcze Taboru Kolejowego in Gdańsk. In the beginning of the 1980s, EP05 was being prepared for pulling express trains. Most of
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    DB Class E 40

    DB Class E 40

    The Baureihe E 40 is a German Standard electric locomotive (German: Einheits-Elektrolokomotive) commissioned by the Deutsche Bundesbahn in 1955, designed for freight trains. Since the 1968 renumbering, it is listed as Class 140 and Class 139. In 1950, the Deutsche Bundesbahn introduced two general types of electric locomotives with standardised components: A twelve wheel (UIC: Co'Co') freight train locomotive as successor for the class E 94 and an eight wheel (UIC: Bo'Bo') general purpose electric locomotive as successor for the class E 44. A new feature was that the driver was seated, whereas formerly they had to stand. During the construction period the speed requirement for a general purpose locomotive (working title E 46, then changed to class E 10) was increased to that point that the layout was one for an express train locomotive. Two types were not found sufficient to cover all needs, so the Einheits-Elektrolokomotiven program was changed to four general types: Light passenger train locomotive (class E 41), express train locomotive (class E 10), freight train locomotive class E 40 and heavy freight train locomotive (class E 50). All four classes were designed to share as
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Milwaukee Road class EP-2

    Milwaukee Road class EP-2

    The Milwaukee Road's class EP-2 comprised five electric locomotives built by General Electric in 1919. They were often known as Bipolars, which referred to the bipolar electric motors they used. Among the most distinctive and powerful electric locomotives of their time, they epitomized the modernization of the Milwaukee Road. They came to symbolize the railroad during their nearly 40 years of use, and remain an enduring image of mainline electrification. In 1917, following the tremendous success of the 1915 electrification of the Mountain Division, the Milwaukee Road decided to proceed with electrifying the Coast Division. As part of this project it ordered five new electric locomotives from General Electric for $200,000 apiece. Their design was radically different from the boxcab locomotives previously provided by GE for the initial electrification of the Mountain Division two years earlier. The Milwaukee Road was the only railroad to order this design of locomotive from GE. The most remarkable mechanical improvement was arguably the traction motors used on the new locomotives. They were known as bipolar motors because each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles,
    7.75
    4 votes
    27

    ASEA Rz

    Rz was an electric locomotive built by ASEA to test out asynchronous motors. It was built in 1982 and closely related to the Rc-series. It was test run until 1989 on Siljansbanan, but there was never any mass production of it. After ASEA merged with Brown, Boveri & Cie to form Asea Brown Boveri in 1988 the development of asynchronous motors was moved to Switzerland. The Rz-technology was utilized for the development of the X2-train and the Rc5-locomotive. In 1992 the engine was donated to the Swedish Railway Museum, but they were not particularly interested in it and in 1999 it was moved to Örebro to become a parts locomotive.
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    SNCF Class BB 27000

    SNCF Class BB 27000

    The SNCF Class BB 27000 "Prima" electric locomotives were built by Alstom between 2001–2005. These are dual-voltage freight-only locomotives; they are not fitted with a 1500 V DC electrical line for train heating and accessories. One hundred and eighty of the locomotives, numbered 27001–27180, were built for Fret SNCF, for use on freight traffic. Their introduction led to the withdrawal of several elderly electric types, including Classes CC 7000, CC 7100, BB 8100 and BB 12000. They have also made significant inroads into Classes CC 6500, BB 8500, BB 16500 and BB 25500. They can be seen largely in North and Eastern France and the lines through Dijon to Lyon, and the lines to Rouen and Caen.
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    DB Class 111

    DB Class 111

    The Baureihe 111 is a class of electric locomotives built for the Deutsche Bundesbahn, and now owned by Deutsche Bahn AG. Class 111 is the successor of the Class 110 express Einheitslokomotive. Since demand for fast electric locomotives was high even after production of the 110 ended, the Deutsche Bundesbahn decided to commission a new batch in the 1970s. The bogies were replaced with a different type, significantly improving the locomotive's behaviour at higher speeds. The engineer's workplace also was significantly improved by the DB-Einheitsführerstand (jointly developed by the Bundesbahn-Zentralamt München and Krauss-Maffei and designed under ergonomic aspects) that was first used for Class 111 locos and whose basic layout nowadays still forms part of the cab design found in many of DB's locomotives and control cars. For the first time, a digital cab car interface in addition to the then-standard conventional interface was used in new Deutsche Bundesbahn locomotives. The first locomotive, 111 001, left the Krauss-Maffei workshop in December 1974. Up to 1984, 226 more engines were produced, not only at Krauss-Maffei but also including parts from Henschel, Krupp, Siemens, AEG and
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    SS8 electric locomotive

    SS8 electric locomotive

    The SS8 is a 25kV 50 Hz AC electric locomotive used on the Peoples' Republic of China's national railway system. The only route they were used on was the Jingguang line, the railway line linking Beijing West Railway Station with Guangzhou, Guangdong. The SS8 is based on its predecessor, the SS5, and was developed and built by CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Works. A total of 245 (0001–0243, 2001–2002) SS8s have been built since 1994. Batch production commenced in 1997. On June 24, 1998, the SS8 broke the Chinese rail speed record by achieving a top speed of 240 km/h (150 mph) on a test run between Xuchang and Xiaoshangqiao. The locomotive used was fleet number 0001. When the Guangzhou-Shenzhen Railway was electrified, China Railway extended Through Trains into Hong Kong via KCR East Rail. These trains initially had an SS8 locomotive, however, their pantographs are considered harmful to KCR's catenary. So for a long time, DF11 locomotive were used. After KCR provided their technical requirements of HK-compliance pantographs to China Railway, the company adapted some ot their SS8's in order to meet the pantograph requirements. As of March 2010, the SS8 is still the only allowed China
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    CFL Class 4000

    CFL Class 4000

    The CFL class 4000 is a variant of the Bombardier TRAXX locos found working across Europe. Within Luxembourg they work on the local passenger services (crossing the borders into France or Belgium as necessary. They also work freight traffic. Their 15kV capability allows them to work across the border to Germany. Even though they are capable of running in France, they are not allowed to do so for security reasons. Their slab sided body work has been used for advertising.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    FS Class E464

    FS Class E464

    The E.464 is a class of Italian railways electric locomotives. They were introduced in the course of the 1990s for hauling light trains, especially for commuter service. They were acquired by FS Trenitalia to replace the old E.424 and E.646, dating from the 1940s and 1950s. The class was originally designed by ABB Trazione, later ADTranz (now part of the Bombardier group), and produced in the Italian plant of Vado Ligure. Cost per unit is 2.6 million Euro. With 570 locomotives currently in service, the E.464 is the largest class in use in Italy. The E.464 derives from a project launched by the Italian Ferrovie dello Stato in the 1980s for a "modular" class of locomotives which would be easily adapted to commuter, inter-regional and cargo services. Initially, types with 4-axle (Bo-Bo, E.453/E.454) and 6-axle (Bo-Bo-Bo, E.665/E.666) were devised, the latter for cargo services. However, the E.666 class was cancelled due to availability of the new E.652 Tigre class, capable of hauling massive cargo trains. Moreover, the new inverter technology was developed in those years, and the E.454 became suddenly obsolete. In 1994 FS requested ABB to design a new class which, to save money, was
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Little Joe

    Little Joe

    The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road) classes EF-4 and EP-4 comprised 12 electric locomotives built by General Electric as part of a larger 20-unit order for export to the Soviet Union (USSR) in 1946. The locomotives had twelve axles, eight of them powered, in a 2-D+D-2 arrangement. They were originally designed to operate on Soviet Railways (SZhD) 3,300 volt DC overhead line system. GE built 20 locomotives of this type, but they were prohibited from delivering them to the Soviet Railways (SZhD) due to relations between the US and USSR deteriorating into what became known as the Cold War. Fourteen were built to the Russian gauge (broad gauge) of 5 ft (1,524 mm) and the final six were built to 4 ft 8 ⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge. The Milwaukee Road had offered to buy all twenty, plus the spare parts inventory for $1 million, little more than scrap value. However the Milwaukee's Board of Directors would not release the money. After the start of the Korean War, the Milwaukee needed more locomotives on their electrified mainline, and so the Board of Directors returned to GE only to discover that eight locomotives and all the spares had been sold, and
    6.40
    5 votes
    34
    DB Class E 41

    DB Class E 41

    The Baureihe E 41 is the first class of German Einheits-Elektrolokomotive (see related article for more details on development) commissioned by the Deutsche Bundesbahn in 1956. Class E 41 was designed for local traffic and branch lines. Since the 1968 renumbering, it is listed as class 141. Its nickname is Knallfrosch (firecracker), as the steering makes loud cracking noises when accelerating. A total of 451 units was built. Originally designed as an effective means of traction for light passenger trains, and with a top speed of 120 kilometres per hour (75 mph) and an axle load below 17 tons, class E 41 was also designated for passenger services on smaller lines. In the 1950s, due to general lack of locomotives, class E 41 was also used for express train service. However, after speed of express trains was raised to 140 kilometres per hour (87 mph) in the early 1960s, the class mostly lost its express services. In its original role for hauling local trains, class E 41 proved both reliable and efficient, especially with push-pull trains. Less successful was the usage with S-Bahn trains, as class E 41 was not equipped with an electric brake, which would have helped to reduce abrasion.
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    British Rail Class 76

    British Rail Class 76

    The British Rail Class 76, also known as Class EM1 (Electric Mixed-Traffic 1), is a class of 1.5 kV DC, Bo-Bo electric locomotive designed for use on the now-closed Woodhead Line in Northern England. The prototype, LNER No. 6701 was completed at Doncaster Works in 1941 to a design by Sir Nigel Gresley, but electrification of the Woodhead Route was delayed by the Second World War. It was tested on the few sections of 1500 V DC lines owned by the LNER but had not worked any great distance by 1947 when it was loaned to Dutch Railways to help with their post war shortage of locomotives. In September 1945 the LNER assigned it the classification EM1; previously it had been unclassified. The prototype locomotive, renumbered 6000 in June 1946, remained on Dutch Railways until 1952 when the Woodhead electrification was complete. While in the Netherlands it gained the name Tommy after the nickname given to British soldiers and ran for the rest of its working life with a name plate which included an explanation of the origin - "So named by drivers of the Netherlands State Railway to whom this locomotive was loaned 1947-1952". It was renumbered to 26000 following the formation of British
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    HHP-8

    HHP-8

    The HHP-8 (High Horse Power 8000) is a type of twin-cab electric locomotive manufactured by a consortium of Bombardier Transportation and Alstom for use by Amtrak and the Maryland Area Regional Commuter system. The locomotive's electrical drive technology is directly derived from the SNCF BB 36000 manufactured by Alstom. A small class size, and reliability problems with correspondingly high per capita maintenance, and replacement costs caused Amtrak to seek service replacements for its fifteen units at the same time as the older EMD AEM7s after only a decade in service. Displaced units are being considered for push-pull use as a cheaper interim solution to a need for additional Acela trainsets. An initial order of 15 HHP-8s was made by Amtrak at the same time (~1999) as the acquisition of the Acela Express trainsets; the locomotives have similar external styling as the Acela trainsets, but are designed to operate as true locomotives, hauling conventional passenger rolling stock. The units were ordered to replace Amtrak's GE E60s and supplement the aging EMD AEM-7. Maryland Area Regional Commuter (MARC) also acquired six HHP-8s. The locomotives were for use on its Penn Line between
    8.33
    3 votes
    37
    SJ Rm

    SJ Rm

    The SJ Class Rm is a electric locomotive operated by Statens Järnvägar and later Green Cargo. The six locomotives are variants of the Rc locomotive and built by ASEA in 1977. The difference is smaller wheels giving higher pulling force, but lower maximum speed. They were used in triple-unit configuration on Malmbanan as supplements to Dm3-units, but later moved to other parts of the Swedish rail network after the transport needs on Malmbanan were reduced. When originally used to haul iron ore they were ballasted, fitted with SA3 coupelings and additional set of brakes, but all these modifications were removed when the locomotives were put in ordinary freight operation. In the 1990s they were repainted from orange to blue. When SJ was split up, they were transferred to Green Cargo. All still remain in service, stationed in Malmö.
    8.33
    3 votes
    38
    SNCB Class 12

    SNCB Class 12

    SNCB's class 12 locomotives are dual-voltage (25 kV AC and 3000 V DC) with a design based on single-voltage class 21 locomotives. They were built to work freight and passenger services between Belgium and Lille in France. With the introduction of AM96 EMUs they have been displaced from passenger duty.
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    DRG Class ET 91

    DRG Class ET 91

    The Baureihe ET 91 was a series of electric multiple units built for the Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft of Germany. The units colloquially known as Gläserner Zug (Glass Train) were equipped with large panorama windows, providing an excellent outside view to the passengers. The vehicles were used for recreational trips only, especially in southern Germany and Austria. Two units with the wheel arrangement Bo'2' were built in 1935 by Waggonfabrik Fuchs in Heidelberg and AEG. ET 91 02 was destroyed on March 9, 1943 in a bomb attack on the Munich shunting yard. ET 91 01 survived World War II without major damage and was taken over by the Deutsche Bundesbahn From 1968 on, it was listed as Baureihe 491 in the DB numbering scheme, being assigned the number 491 001-4. On December 12, 1995 the remaining unit suffered extensive damage in a frontal crash at Garmisch-Partenkirchen and was subsequently taken out of service. The unit has been stationed at the Bahnpark Augsburg in Augsburg since May 2005. The unit is currently being renovated, however due to economical reasons it will not be put into a usable state again, the power bogie having been destroyed in the 1995 accident.
    7.00
    4 votes
    40
    SNCB Class 16

    SNCB Class 16

    The class 16 locomotives were built to work cross border services from Belgium. They are equipped to run in France, Netherlands and Germany. They have been displaced from these workings by Thalys electric multiple units and now can be found working a few Commuter "P" trains. When built they were classified as type 160.
    7.00
    4 votes
    41
    SNCB Class 23

    SNCB Class 23

    Class 23 locomotives are seen across Belgium on freight trains. They are fitted for multiple working, and are often found in pairs. In the peak periods during the week they also work "P" trains, commuter trains which serve towns and cities throughout Belgium. Recently they have displaced 22s and 25s from their commuter "P" train duties. The new class 28 is also expected to take some of their freight workings away. The arrival of the new Class 18 locomotives in early 2012 marked the end of the class, during the Spring of 2012 all were withdrawn except a few for banking duties at Liège-Guillemins. Before 1 January 1971 the locomotives were numbered 123.001-123.083 but from this date the class became 2301-2383.
    7.00
    4 votes
    42

    British Rail Class 80

    Class 80 was the TOPS classification allocated by British Rail to the prototype 25 kV AC electric locomotive. This locomotive was built by Metropolitan-Vickers, initially as a prototype Gas turbine-electric locomotive, numbered 18100. British Rail allocated the number E1000 (and later E2001) to the locomotive following its conversion from gas turbine propulsion. Its new electric propulsion meant it was rated at 2500hp, giving a maximum speed of 90mph and weighing 109 tons. In addition, it was also converted from Co-Co to A1A-A1A wheel arrangement when the centre traction motor from each bogie was removed. The new traction motor rating (with four motors) was about the same as the original rating (with six motors). This suggests that new traction motors were fitted. The conversion of the locomotive began in January 1958 when the locomotive was moved from storage at Dukinfield Works to the Bowesfield Works at Stockton-on-Tees. The work involved the removal of the gas turbine unit, main generator, fuel tank, air filters, the centre traction motor from each bogie and all of the ancillary equipment used for the gas turbine unit. Once the locomotive had been stripped, the new electrical
    8.00
    3 votes
    43
    British Rail Class 84

    British Rail Class 84

    The British Rail Class 84 was a 25 kV AC electric locomotive that operated on the West Coast Main Line of the London Midland Region. As part of the modernization of the West Coast Main Line, which included electrification, 100 locomotives of five types were acquired from different manufacturers. Ten Class AL4 locomotives numbered E3036 - E3045 were built in 1960 to a design by GEC by the North British Locomotive Company in Springburn, Glasgow. The locomotives always worked on power provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. However, the main transformer, normally operated with the four windings in series, could be operated at 6250V AC with the transformer windings in parallel. This voltage was initially to be used where limited clearances gave concern over use of the higher voltage. Problems with the mercury-arc rectifiers plagued this class and in 1962 E3036 was returned to GEC, the builder of the electrical equipment, in an attempt to find a solution. Within a year, all ten were out of service for repair. The problems persisted and in 1967 they were once more placed into storage, along with Class AL3. During this time E3043 went to Rugby Testing Centre for
    8.00
    3 votes
    44
    British Rail Class 90

    British Rail Class 90

    The British Rail Class 90 electric locomotives were built by BREL at Crewe in 1987-1990, weighing 84.5 tonnes and with a top speed of 110 mph (180 km/h). They operate from 25 kV AC overhead lines and produce 5,000 bhp (3,700 kW). The class is employed on express passenger and heavy freight trains. Fifty Class 90/0 locomotives were built in the late 1980s, numbered 90001-050. They were developed from the Class 87, with many improvements and new features. The Class 90s were primarily built to replace the ageing Classes 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85 dating from the early 1960s, which were prone to fire damage. The class is fitted with rheostatic brakes in addition to standard Westinghouse air brake equipment. A Time-Division Multiplexer (TDM) is fitted to enable two or more locomotives to work in multiple. It also allows a Class 90 to work a push-pull passenger train with a Driving Van Trailer (DVT), DBSO or Propelling Control Vehicle. A Class 90 with a rake of eight British Rail Mark 3 coaches and a Driving Van Trailer (DVT) will reach 60 mph (97 km/h) in just over 1 mile (1.6 km), and 100 mph (161 km/h) in another 1+⁄2 miles (2.4 km).|pre-text=|date=March 2011}}{{citation needed|reason= In
    8.00
    3 votes
    45
    CFL Class 3000

    CFL Class 3000

    The CFL class 3000 is a class of twenty mixed use 200km/h Tractis type electric locomotives ordered by the Chemins de Fer Luxembourgeois (CFL) in 1995 as part of a joint order with SNCB of 80 units from Alstom. The CFL 3000 class have the same mechanical and electrical design as the SNCB 13 locomotives. The were ordered in 1995 to replace electric and diesel locomotives dating from the 1950/60s. The class were constructed between 1998 and 1999, and entered service from 1998 to 2001. On introduction the class experienced a number of problems relating to electrical/electromagnetic interference with track circuits, signalling systems, and issues with noise introduction onto power supplies. The locomotives share the work on Brussels - Luxembourg services, and exclusively work the Liège - Luxembourg trains. They are also used on freight services between Luxembourg and France/Belgium.
    8.00
    3 votes
    46
    Indian locomotive class WAP-7

    Indian locomotive class WAP-7

    WAP 7 is a high speed locomotive indigenously developed by Chittaranjan Locomotive Works. It is capable of hauling trains at speeds ranging between 140 and 160 km per hour and is now largely used by Northern Railways (NR), South Central Railways (SCR), South Western Railway (SWR) Southern Railways (SR), Eastern Railways (ER), South East Central Railway (SECR), and East Central Railways (ECR). The current locomotive sheds which house this locomotive are: The WAP-7 is actually a modified version of the WAG 9 freight locomotive with modified gear ratios and is set to replace the fleet of WAP 4's, the most widely used passenger locomotive today. The process will be a very slow one however, with WAP-4s still being produced and the production of WAP-7's increasing at a slow pace. With a maximum speed rating of 180 km/h (IR restricts it to 130 km/hr), the WAP-7 has the highest acceleration figures while hauling mail/express trains. The WAP-7 can also haul loads of 24-26 passenger coaches (1430-1550t) at 110+ km/h per hour. It is also known to haul 16 heavyweight Air Conditioned coaches (1120t) in 1:40 inclines single-handedly. At a trial conducted by Indian Railways, it clocked a speed of
    8.00
    3 votes
    47
    JNR Class EF63

    JNR Class EF63

    The JNR Class EF63 is a class of 1,500 V DC electric locomotives formerly operating in Japan. A total of 25 Class EF63 locomotives were built between 1962 and 1976 exclusively for use as bankers on the steeply-graded Usui Pass section of the Shinetsu Main Line between Yokokawa and Karuizawa. They replaced the Class ED42 electric locomotives previously used on the rack-and-pinion line between these two stations. The prototype, EF63 1, was produced in 1962 by Toshiba for testing before full production of the class started in 1963 spread between manufacturers Kawasaki, Mitsubishi and Toshiba. The class was equipped with a number of special safety features to cope with the unique conditions of operating on the 66.7‰ gradient of the Usui Pass. These included independent dynamic brakes on all six axles (hence the large louvres along the bodysides for heat dissipation), magnetic adhesion brakes operating directly on the rails, and mechanical locking brakes. Small wheels attached to the centre bogie were used to measure the train speed and apply the brakes in the case of run-away. The class used the same 425 kW MT52 traction motors used on the EF62s and also the EF70s. The entire class was
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    JR Freight Class EF210

    JR Freight Class EF210

    The Class EF210 (EF210形) is a Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement DC freight locomotive type operated by Japan Freight Railway Company (JR Freight) in Japan. The locomotives are built at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries factory in Kobe. Based at Okayama, Shin-Tsurumi, and Suita (Osaka) depots, they are primarily used on freight on the Tōkaidō Main Line and Sanyō Main Line, replacing class EF66s. As of 1 April 2009, 74 EF210s were operated by JR Freight. Nine EF210 locomotives are scheduled to be delivered during fiscal 2009, with nine more scheduled for fiscal 2010. The pre-production prototype, EF210-901, was delivered to Shin-Tsurumi depot in 1996. Following evaluation of the prototype version, the first full-production locomotive, EF210-1, was delivered to Okayama in July 1998. A number of minor improvements were incorporated, with the main external differences from the prototype being as follows. All 18 of the EF210-0s are allocated to Okayama Depot. The EF210-100 incorporates a number of minor improvements were incorporated, including the use of single-arm pantographs, and IGBT replacing GTO. EF210-100s are based at Okayama, Shin-Tsurumi, and Suita (Osaka) depots, with 55 locomotives in
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Milwaukee Road class EP-3

    Milwaukee Road class EP-3

    The Milwaukee Road's class EP-3 comprised ten electric locomotives built in 1919 by Baldwin and Westinghouse. They were nicknamed Quills because of their use of a quill drive. Although they were good haulers and well liked by engineers, poor design and constant mechanical problems plagued them for their entire lives and they were the first of the Milwaukee Road's electric locomotives to be retired. When the Milwaukee Road decided to electrify the Coast Division in 1917, it attempted to re-equip with equipment bought from General Electric. The United States Railroad Administration, however, dictated that the order for electrical equipment be split between GE and Westinghouse. This meant that of the 15 electric locomotives needed, five (the EP-2s, or bi-polars) came from GE and 10 - the EP-3s - came from Westinghouse. The EP-3s, while designed to meet the same specifications as the bi-polars, were a completely different design from their GE counterparts. Their appearance was sleeker, albeit less distinctive, with a single long boxcab-style carbody containing all of the electric equipment. Their wheel arrangement was the same as a back-to-back pair of 4-6-2 "Pacific" steam engines,
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    PKP class EP08

    PKP class EP08

    PKP class EP08 is the name for a Polish electric locomotive used by the Polish railway operator Polskie Koleje Państwowe (PKP), produced between 1972 and 1976 in Pafawag, Wrocław. The construction is based on the EU07 locomotive. In the 1970s PKP tended to increase speed of Polish passenger trains, what resulted mainly in building CMK line (Trunk Line) and modernisation of EU05 locomotives into EP05 series. Meanwihile a project was opened to introduce new electric locomotive able to pull trains with speed exceeding 125 km/h, based on British EU06 and local EU07 machines. In 1972 the first prototype left Pafawag works and until 1976 a total number of 15 units had been produced. Further production was ceased due to huge orders of freight locomotives and insufficient funds for importing foreign parts for the machine. EP08 were the first locomotives in Poland to exceed the top speed limit of 125 km/h and contributed (alongside with EP05 class) into fast development of high speed passenger connections. All machines of this class station in Warsaw but as top speed on Warsaw-Poznań line had been increased to 160 km/h they are no longer used on regular basis and serve as auxiliary
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    SNCF Class CC 7100

    SNCF Class CC 7100

    SNCF's CC 7100 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alsthom. The prototype 'CC 7000' (7001 & 7002) were built in 1949 and the production series locomotives CC 7101-CC 7158 followed during 1952–1955. Two of the class are notable for setting world rail speed records: CC 7121 reaching 243 kilometres per hour (151 mph) on 21 February 1954, and CC 7107 reaching 331 kilometres per hour (206 mph) on 28/29 March 1955. Developed from the CC 7000 class prototype, these locomotives were the first DC electric locomotives on the SNCF to run at more than 100 kilometres per hour (62.1 mph). During the 1950s, SNCF investigations into high speed rail saw some CC 7100 class locomotives specially modified for operation at speeds far higher than their regular service speed. These experiments provided valuable test data for the SNCF to develop increasingly more rapid regular services, including the 200 kilometres per hour (124 mph) Mistral of 1967, and ultimately the TGV. CC 7121 broke the rail speed record when it achieved 243 kilometres per hour (151 mph) on the PLM mainline between Dijon and Beaune on 21 February 1954. Preparations for further high speed tests proceeded, and
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    JNR Class EF55

    JNR Class EF55

    The EF55 class of 2Co+Co1 wheel arrangement electric locomotives consisted of three locomotives built in 1936 by Hitachi, Kawasaki, and Tōyō Electric in Japan. They were originally intended to haul limited express trains on the Tōkaidō Line. Although based on the earlier EF53 design, the EF55s featured a unique non-symmetrical wheel arrangement with a streamlined cab at only one end. The number 2 end had a traditional-style cab with access deck. The need to turn locomotives in regular use proved to be the downfall for this small class, and the locomotives were placed in storage from 1958, and then officially withdrawn in 1964. Following withdrawal, EF55 1 was moved to the former Chūō Railway Institute near Nishi-Kokubunji Station for apprentice training purposes. EF55 3 was cannibalized to donate motors and other components to the ED30 prototype AC electric locomotive, and EF55 2 was also cut up shortly after. In 1978, EF55 1 was designated as an important piece of railway heritage, and was subsequently restored to running condition, re-entering service in 1986 for use hauling special event trains. It was operated by JR East, based at Takasaki depot, until it was finally withdrawn
    6.75
    4 votes
    53

    New South Wales 85 class locomotive

    The New South Wales 85 class were a class of 10 mainline electric locomotive introduced from 1979 in the state of New South Wales, by the State Rail Authority. They were built by Commonwealth Engineering of Granville, New South Wales. The fleet were based in Lithgow and served coal haulage across the Blue Mountains. When FreightCorp merged into Pacific National, it was decided to withdraw the fleet from service owing to a rising cost in electricity. 8501 & 8507 are the survivors of the fleet when they were saved from scrap. 8501 is owned by the Sydney Electric Train Society, but currently stored at Werris Creek & 8507 is owned by the Dorrigo Steam & Railway Museum and also stored at Werris Creek.
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    VL10

    VL10

    The VL10 (ru: ВЛ10) is an electric two-unit mainline DC freight locomotive used in the Soviet Union and is still operated today by the state owned Russian rail company RZhD and Ukrainian Railways. The initials VL are those of Vladimir Lenin (ru: Владимир Ленин), after whom the class is named. The VL10 series was built as a replacement for the ageing VL8 which, by 1960, no longer met Soviet rail requirements. The VL10s were manufactured at the Tblisi Electric Locomotive Works (ТЭВЗ) between 1961–1977, as well as the Novocherkassk Electric Locomotive Plant (НЭВЗ) during 1969 and 1976. It was also there that all the mechanical components for the series were produced. The first prototype of the VL10 series was built in the Tblisi works under the designation Т8-001. It was built in 1961 to coincide with the 40th anniversary of Soviet rule in Georgia.
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    DB Class 120

    DB Class 120

    The DB Baureihe 120 is a class of electric locomotives operated by DB Fernverkehr in Germany. The locomotives' prototypes, delivered in 1979 (Mark 120.0), were one of the first electric locomotives with three-phase motors. They were based on experiences made in the 1970s with diesel-electric test platforms (Mark DE 2500/ DB Mark 202). In Norway, a new four-axle Locomotive, Mark El-17, was launched during 1983 with top speeds up to 93 mph. The design was intended to be the first truly universal locomotive, capable of pulling fast passenger trains as well as heavy freight trains. While the electric equipment exceeded expectations, the mechanical part suffered from its lightweight construction necessitated by the heavy electronics of the time. After extensive tests, a series of 60 locomotives (Mark 120.1) were ordered in 1984 and delivered in 1986–1988. Original plans to build up to 2,000 machines were ultimately ended by DB's privatisation. The 120s went to DB Fernverkehr, the other divisions of Deutsche Bahn ordered locomotives that featured technologies from the 120, but were not direct successors.
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    FS Class E424

    FS Class E424

    The FS E.424 is a class of Italian railways electric locomotives. They were built in 1943-1951 and have been decommissioned in 2008. A design for a small multi-service Bo-Bo locomotive, with speed up to 90 km/h (56 mph), had been devised by Giuseppe Bianchi as early as in the 1930s, but the project had been halted by the introduction of the E.326 and E.428. After the realization of the 6-axle E.636, it was however decided to revamp the project by adapting to it some solutions already in use on the E.636 (engines, bogies, suspension etc.). Breda SpA workshop provided the three prototypes of E.424 in 1943-1944. Mass production, however, could begin only after the end of World War II, part of the funds provided by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration program. The locomotives have been built in four series starting from year 1943: Class E.424, having DC type motors, and like all the Italian locomotives of the time, is a rheostatic-type locomotive; on start, a rheostat is connected in series to the motors and is gradually excluded as speed builds up allowing more current to flow to the motors; but unlike other rheostatic locomotives of that time, this is not
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    NSB El 15

    NSB El 15

    NSB El 15 is a class of electric locomotives which are now operated by the Swedish company Hector Rail as Class 161 locomotives. The locomotives were originally built for the Norwegian State Railways (NSB) in 1967 to replace the NSB El 3 and NSB El 4 engines on Ofotbanen. The main task there is to pull heavy iron ore freight trains, and the El 15 is the most powerful engine which NSB has ever used. After the electrification of Ofotbanen in 1923 NSB had been using El 3 and El 4 stock on the line. But in the 1960s these were getting worn out, and NSB decided that it needed to get new stock. NSB first acquired the El 12 stock parallel to the Swedish acquisition of the Dm3 locomotive. But unlike Statens Järnvägar, NSB chose to instead buy a newer technology locomotive from ASEA, based on the Romanian CFR 040. Thus NSB managed to get the same power out of their two-engined El 15s as the Swedish got out of their three-engined Dm3s. Since the locomotives were to be operated in pairs, NSB considered only installing driver cabins on one end, but chose in the end to install them on both ends to allow the locomotives to operate more flexibly, including allowing them to operate passenger
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    SNCB Class 21

    SNCB Class 21

    These locomotives, although lower in power, work interchangeably with class 27s. They haul both passenger and freight trains, often in push-pull mode. During 1993 locomotive 2130 was converted for use as a test bed for class 13 development. It was renumbered 1901 for a time. Subsequently in 2001, it has been restored to standard condition and regained its 2130 number.
    9.00
    2 votes
    59

    NSB El 3

    NSB El 3 was an electric locomotive used by Norges Statsbaner (NSB) to transport iron ore on the Ofotbanen. Five twin-locomotive sets were in service from 1925 to 1967. The Swedish part of the ore line, Malmbanan, was electrified in 1915 but Norway kept using steam locomotives until the Norwegian electrification in 1923. As Norwegian traction the El 3 was chosen along with five triple-engine El 4 units. Eight El 3 were built with delivery on August 9, 1925, two more on October 19, 1929. The El 3 and El 4 had about the same characteristics and used for the same purpose and ordered simultaneously; choosing two models like this is atypical for railway companies because of higher maintenance costs. By 1922 SJ had placed an order on the new Of-locomotives, yet NSB chose to base the El 3 on the older Oe. Build by ASEA, they were equipped with quill drive and regenerative braking; the latter only caused problems though, excessively increasing the current that caused damage. They only served on the Norwegian lines until 1949, after which they were where put into through trains to Kiruna. In 1950 LKAB decided to increase the mine output, requiring trains now to haul 3,100 tonnes (3,051 long
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    NSB El 8

    NSB El 8

    The NSB El 8 was a Norwegian electric locomotive which was built between 1940 and 1949. Although fast, the El 8 did not have bogies, making it rather stiff in the turns, a problem which was remedied with the introduction of the NSB El 11 and NSB El 13. There were 16 El 8 engines produced. Four manufacturers were involved in building it: AEG, Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri, Per Kure and Thune. The engines were numbered 8 2054 to 8 2061 and 8 2065 to 8 2072. The last El 8 was retired in 1987. Engine no. 8 2060 is preserved.
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    British Rail Class 82

    British Rail Class 82

    The British Rail Class 82 electric locomotives were built by Beyer, Peacock and Company between 1960 and 1962 as part of the West Coast Main Line electrification. Ten locomotives were designed by the Metropolitan-Vickers division of AEI (Associated Electrical Industries) and built by Beyer, Peacock and Company at their works in Gorton, Manchester. They were originally classified as AL2 under the pre-TOPS classification scheme and were originally numbered E3046 - E3055. During manufacture it was realised that the locomotives would be heavier than anticipated and some redesign was required to meet the British Transport Commission specification. The design modifications included replacing heavy parts with lighter aluminium or fibreglass parts, replacing heavy electrical equipment with lighter versions. The locomotives always worked on power provided by overhead catenary energized at 25,000 V AC. However, the main transformer, normally operated with the four windings in series, could be operated at 6250V AC with the transformer windings in parallel. This voltage was initially to be used where limited clearances gave concern over use of the higher voltage. The last locomotive built,
    6.50
    4 votes
    62
    DB Class E 10

    DB Class E 10

    The class E 10 is an electric locomotive of the Deutsche Bundesbahn, introduced in 1952. It belongs to the Einheits-Elektrolokomotiven (standardised electric locomotives) program and was built for express passenger service. In 1968 the series was redesignated as class 110 (E10) and class 112 (E10.12). In 1988 the last series of class 112 locomotives were designated as class 114, and in 1991 the remaining locomotives of class 112 were designated as class 113. In 2006 38 locomotives were designated as class 115. In 1950, the Deutsche Bundesbahn decided to develop two base types of electric locomotives with largely standardised components: A twelve wheel (UIC: Co'Co') freight train locomotive as successor for the Class E 94, and an eight wheel (UIC: Bo'Bo') general purpose electric locomotive as successor for the Class E 44. As a new feature the engineers should be able to be seated, whereas formerly they had to stand in order to boost their attentiveness. This multi-purpose locomotive received the working title E 46, but was then renamed to Class E 10, once the required maximum speed was increased from 125 to 130 km/h (78 to 81 mph), which formally made this model an express train
    6.50
    4 votes
    63
    NSB El 9

    NSB El 9

    NSB El 9 is a retired class of three electric locomotives built by Thune for the Norwegian State Railways (NSB), with electrical equipment from Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri (NEBB) and Per Kure. The locomotives were delivered in 1947 after a three-year delay caused by wartime sabotage in response to the of the German occupation of Norway. They were used nearly exclusively on the Flåm Line and Hardanger Line, two steep branch lines. The units were used on the Flåm Line until 1983, when they were replaced by El 11. They were then used as shunters until being retired in 1988. Two of the locomotives have been preserved. The class was custom-made for steep hills and slow speeds; it featured a low 48 tonnes (47 long tons; 53 short tons) weight which, with a Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement, allows for a 12-tonne (12-long-ton; 13-short-ton) axle load. This made the locomotives only 10.2 meters (33 ft) long. They had a power output of 712 kilowatts (955 hp), a tractive effort of 108 kilonewtons (24,000 lbf) and a maximum speed of 60 kilometres per hour (37 mph). They were given road numbers 2062 though 2064. With the construction of the Bergen Line, which was completed in 1909, it was decided
    6.50
    4 votes
    64
    CityRail V set

    CityRail V set

    The V set or DDIU (Double Deck Inter-Urban) is a class of electric multiple unit operated by CityRail in New South Wales, Australia. These stainless steel double deck trains operate on the Interurban lines of the CityRail network, serving the Blue Mountains and the Central Coast to Newcastle. The V sets were Ordered and Delivery over a span of 20 years. Series 1 NSWGR Contract 8/68 - ComEng Contract 68/11 - Specification 2384 - Into Service 1970 Series 2 NSWGR Contract 2/76 - ComEng Contract 76/3 - Specification 2505 - Into Service 1977 Oerlikon Brake Valves. Wood Interior. Sigma Blue Light Air Conditioning. No Crew A/C. Low Dashboard. Coloured Fault Lights. Mesh Resistor covering on roof. Series 3 NSWGR Contract 3/80 - ComEng Contract 79/5 - Specification 2505 - Into Service 1982 Davies & Metcalf Brake Valves. Wood Interior. Sigma Blue Light Air Conditioning. No Crew A/C. Low Dashboard. Coloured Fault Lights. Mesh Resistor covering on roof. NSWGR Contract 3/80E - ComEng Contract 8007 - Specification 2505 Davies & Metcalf Brake Valves. Wood Interior. Sigma Blue Light Air Conditioning. No Crew A/C. Low Dashboard. Coloured Fault Lights. Mesh Resistor covering on roof. Series 4 NSWGR
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    DRG Class E 91

    DRG Class E 91

    Three different types of German electric goods train locomotive belonged to the Deutsche Reichsbahn's DRG Class E 91. In addition to the standard locomotives (Einheitslokomotive) described below there was also a Prussian class that was given the designation E 91 in 1927. As early as 1922 the first order was placed by the Deutsche Reichsbahn for 30 heavy goods train electric locomotives with a C+C wheel arrangement for mountain railway services, as part of their procurement plan for electric locomotives. They were delivered by Krauss (mechanical elements) and WASSEG (electrical equipment) in 1925 and 1926. Sixteen units were allocated to the Bavarian railway network. They were given the designation EG 5 22 501 – 516 by the Bavarian Group Administration. The other 14 machines were deployed to the Silesian network as EG 581 Breslau to EG 594 Breslau. From 1927 they were given operating numbers E 91 01 – 16 and E 91 81 – 94. In 1927 a further four locomotives were delivered that had been ordered with Bavarian operating numbers, but were delivered with the new numbers E 91 17 – 20. Classes E 91 and E 77 were very similar. The three-axle driven bogies had an inside frame. Each had a
    10.00
    1 votes
    66

    New South Wales 45 (later 71) class locomotive

    The New South Wales 45 class was a class of mainline electric locomotive introduced on to the NSW rail system in 1952 by the New South Wales Government Railways. With only a single locomotive in the class, it was later renumbered as the 71 class and the number group was reused for a class of diesel-electric locomotives in 1962. The sole member of this class was designed by the New South Wales Government Railways and was built at their Chullora Workshops using components supplied by Commonwealth Engineering. It was completed in June, 1952 and bore the initial classification number 4501. 4501 has a one-hour power rating of 2,700 horsepower (2,000 kW) with a total weight of 108 long tons (110 t). Its maximum speed is 70 miles per hour (110 km/h) It has a driving compartment at each end of its very box-shaped body. Its colour scheme being bottle green, with chrome lining, it became affectionately known as the Green Beetle. Its purpose was to provide the necessary experience of operating powerful electric locomotives prior to the arrival of the 46-class locomotives which had been ordered from England for use on the electrified line to Lithgow. Once the electrification project had
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    NZR EF class

    NZR EF class

    The New Zealand EF class locomotive (originally Class 30) is a class of 22 25 kV AC electric locomotives that operate on the North Island Main Trunk between Palmerston North and Te Rapa (near Hamilton) in New Zealand. They are the only class of 25 kV AC locomotives to operate in New Zealand, and following the withdrawal of the EO class 1500 V DC locomotives in November 2011 from Tranz Metro service are the only electric locomotives in operation. The EF class was built by Brush Traction in Loughborough, United Kingdom between 1986 and 1988 to run on the new electrified central section of the NIMT. The locomotives, at 3,000 kilowatts (4,000 hp), are the most powerful locomotives to operate in New Zealand, and the design of the class has been used in designing other electric locomotives overseas, including the Le Shuttle Eurotunnel Class 9 electric locomotives that operate in the Channel Tunnel between the United Kingdom and France. The North Island Main Trunk is a 681-kilometre (423 mi) long rail line that links New Zealand's capital Wellington and New Zealand's largest city Auckland, and is one of the major backbones of the country's rail network. The line was completed in 1908 and
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    PKP class ET42

    PKP class ET42

    The Soviet-made ET42 is PKP's (Polish National Railways) most powerful standard gauge electric freight locomotive. Due to its provenance, it is often referred to by its nickname of Rusek (Polish derogatory word for a native of Russia) or Chapayev (Russian: Чапаев). The locomotive's construction is based on that of the Soviet VL10 and VL11 (Russian: ВЛ10 & ВЛ11, respectively) and is characterised by its straightforward design as well as ease of use and reliability. The ET42 was designed to be a dual section locomotive from the outset, as opposed to the remaining dual section locomotives operated by PKP, such as the ET41 or ET40. For this reason a "single version" of the ET42 doesn't exist; nor is it possible to modify one of the sections to run as an independent unit. Since there aren't any empty spaces left by surplus cabs, the locomotive is much shorter than other dual section locomotives built from single units. The ET42 is also equipped with facilities for heating carriages and can therefore be used for hauling passenger trains. Fifty ET42s were purchased between 1978 and 1982 and were all based at the Zduńska Wola Karsznice depot. They were all built at the Novocherkassk
    10.00
    1 votes
    69

    SJ O

    O is a series of electric locomotives used by Statens Järnvägar for hauling heavy iron ore trains on Malmbanan in Sweden. The locomotives were built by ASEA. The O series was built for the first electrified railway in Sweden, Malmbanan. ASEA started testing out technology with a test unit in 1908, and by 1914 the first Oa locomotive was delivered, along with the passenger hauling Pa. At first it was the northern part of Malmbanan, from Kiruna to Narvik that was electrified. The steam locomotives had been hauling 28 wagons at 10 km/h, but the new agreement signed in 1913 with LKAB meant that SJ had to haul 40 wagons at 30 km/h to transport enough ore. The solution lay in a joint production between Siemens of Germany and ASEA. The Siemens locomotives were designated Oa while the ASEA locomotives were designated Ob. The trains had 657 kW motors. These stayed in service on the northern section until 1923 when the southern section to Luleå also was electrified, at which time they were moved to the southern section. A new series of Oe and Of locomotives were delivered. In the 1950s when larger trains were put into service, some of the Ofs were rebuilt to triple units, designated Of3.
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    TCDD E40000

    TCDD E40000

    TCDD E40000 is a series of electric locomotives used by the Turkish State Railways. The batch consisted of 15 units delivered in 1969. The locomotives have a power output of 2,945 kW and are capable of 130 km/h.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    China Railways HXD3

    China Railways HXD3

    HXD3 is an electric locomotive built in Mainland China by CNR Dalian Locomotives. The locomotive is designed for hauling 5,000t freight trains on main lines. It was jointly developed by CNR Dalian Locomotives and Toshiba. The first prototype (SSJ3-0001) was rolled out from Dalian and underwent testing on the loop track of Beijing CARS in 2004. Dalian commenced mass production of the locomotive in 2004 with an order of 60 pieces by the Ministry of Railways (MOR). The first mass produced locomotive was rolled out in 2006. MOR later increased the order from 60 to 240, than to 640, and finally to 1040 locomotives. Most of these locomotives were allocated to run Jinghu railway and Jingguang railway freight schedules.
    7.33
    3 votes
    72
    EF57 electric locomotive

    EF57 electric locomotive

    The EF57 class of 2-C+C-2 wheel arrangement electric locomotives was a development of the previous JNR Class EF56. The 15 EF57s were built between 1939 and 1943 by Hitachi and Kawasaki. Introduced on Tōkaidō Line passenger services, they were seen at the head of expresses such as the Tsubame, complete with train headboard mounted precariously on the front of the cab decks. With the introduction of the newer semi-streamlined EF58s on Tōkaidō Line services, the EF57s were transferred to the Tōhoku Main Line. At the same time, their steam-heating boilers were removed and replaced by electric-heating generators. The class remained in use on long-distance express trains on the Tōhoku Main Line until the 1970s. Only one member of the class is preserved: EF57 7 in a park in Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture. An N gauge model of the EF57 was made by Micro Ace in 2000 (A1503, EF57-5), and the same loco was included in the 10/43 series Hakkōda express set (A1560) released in 2006, albeit in the later electric heat style (with cabside indicator lights). The Kato catalogue also includes an N-gauge EF57 model (#3003), although this is no longer in production. In the 1970s, Endo produced a brass
    7.33
    3 votes
    73
    PKP class EP09

    PKP class EP09

    PKP class EP09 is a Polish electric locomotive used by the Polish railways, Polskie Koleje Państwowe (PKP) and produced by Pafawag of Wrocław between 1986 and 1997. Work on designing new family of Polish locomotives, able to pull trains with speeds higher than 125 km/h, started in the 1970s. Of those plans only one was finally realised, which resulted in construction of EP09 locomotives. In the beginning of 1980s the CMK line (rail trunk line) was suited for passenger transport. Before that time it had been used exclusively for freight transport. At first EU05 and EP05 locomotives were used to service this line, but Polish railways needed faster locomotives, reaching 160 km/h. The machine was designed in Ośrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Pojazdów Szynowych (Rolling Stock Research and Development Centre) in Poznań. The prototype was ready in 1986, built in Pafawag in Wrocław. The machine was intended to be built with western parts, but severe financial restrictions caused many modern solutions to be abandoned. Co-operation with USSR gave little effect as well. Additionally, after the collapse of Eastern Bloc Poland was forced to use old EP07 solutions in later series of EP09. It is
    7.33
    3 votes
    74
    TCDD E52500

    TCDD E52500

    TCDD E52500 is a series of electric locomotives used by the Turkish State Railways, comprising 22 class 441-9 locomotives leased from Željeznice Federacije Bosne i Hercegovine in Bosnia-Herzegovina. They are used throughout the electrified parts of the Turkish rail network. The locomotives have a power output of 3,860 kW and are capable of 120 km/h. The locomotives were originally built from 1967 onwards for Yugoslav Railways by ASEA of Sweden and Končar in Croatia, then part of Yugoslavia. They were based on ASEA's Rb design for Swedish Railways. The first fifteen locomotives were delivered to TCDD in 1998, followed by five more in 1999 and two in 2004 and 2005 respectively. They have been modernised by having the diodes replaced with thyristor rectifiers, making them similar to the Rc, the thyristor-based successor to the Rb. Two units were scrapped after the Tasvancil accident in 2004. The two replacement units delivered in 2004-05 have higher top speeds that the other units, who could only run at 140 km/h.
    7.33
    3 votes
    75

    Victorian Railways E class

    The Victorian Railways E class was a class of electric locomotive that ran on the Victorian Railways from 1923 until 1984. Introduced shortly after the electrification of the suburban rail system in Melbourne, Australia, and based on the same electrical and traction equipment as Melbourne's early suburban electric multiple unit fleet, they provided power for suburban goods services and shunting for six decades. With the rapid expansion of Melbourne's suburban electrification scheme, becoming by 1924 the largest in the world at 346 miles (557 km), the Victorian Railways decided to utilise the advantages of electric traction for suburban goods services, which until then had been hauled by steam locomotives such as the Y class 0-6-0, E class 2-4-2T and later Dde class 4-6-2T. In 1923 it introduced two electric locomotives of 620 hp (460 kW), built at VR's Newport and Jolimont Workshops with the same General Electric traction motors and related electrical equipment that had been installed in Melbourne's Tait and Swing Door electric suburban train sets. The first two locomotives were built with a steeplecab-style appearance. Despite their appearance and unlike other steeplecab
    7.33
    3 votes
    76
    FS Class E444

    FS Class E444

    The FS E.444 is a class of Italian railways electric locomotives. They were introduced in the course of the 1960 until 1975. Starting from 1995, all E.444s were upgraded as E.444R. The locomotives are nicknamed Tartaruga (turtle). The E.444 locomotive was designed in the 1960s as the first Italian electric locomotive capable to reach 200 km/h (120 mph) (in that period first high-speed trains like the Japanese Shinkansen and the French TGV were appearing). Italian railways could boast fast trains like the ETR 200, but they were getting old and the Pendolino project was just moving its first phaces. The first 4 prototypes, built at Savigliano, made their debut in 1967-1968: their power output 3,000 kW (4,000 hp) was respectable for the time, but they proved unable to held the fast international services required for the new locomotive, and the bogies were limited to 180 km/h (110 mph). They proved anyway that Italian industry could produce locomotive capable of more than 200 km/h (120 mph) was registered on November 8, 1967 in the maiden trip Rome-Milan. The series production saw the introduction of the more powerful T750 motors, which boosted the power to {{convert|4,200 kW, while
    6.25
    4 votes
    77
    NS Class 1600

    NS Class 1600

    The NS Class 1600 is a type of B-B electric locomotive built by Alsthom between 1980 and 1983 based on the SNCF Class BB 7200, and in use by the Dutch Railways since 1981. They were styled by the French industrial designer Paul Arzens. The Class 1600 was ordered in 1978, after several types of locomotives were tested in the 1970s. One of those was the SNCF BB 7200, on which the 1600 is based. The 58 locomotives were delivered between 1981 and 1983. As a result of their delivery, the old Class 1000 and Class 1500 units were taken out of service. Thanks to the electronic power control, these locomotives were not only the most economical but also the most powerful locomotives that Dutch Railways had. In 1999 the freight division of NS, NS Cargo, was sold to Deutsche Bahn became part of Railion as Railion Nederland. The locomotives that became the property of Railion kept their old number (1601–1637). Loco 1637 was repainted red as an advertisement for the Dutch brewery Heineken and was repainted in NS Yellow in 2004. Currently, Railion Nederland is looking to replace the 1600 loco's with new multi-current loco's type BR 189 from Germany. In early 2008 these started running into the
    6.25
    4 votes
    78
    British Rail Class 92

    British Rail Class 92

    The British Rail Class 92 is a dual-voltage electric locomotive which can run on 25 kV AC from overhead wires or 750 V DC from a third rail. It was designed specifically to operate services through the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France. Eurotunnel indicates the Class 92 locomotive as the reference for other locomotives which railway undertakings might want to get certified for usage in the Channel tunnel. Locomotives of this type are operated by Eurotunnel and DB Schenker. In France, a number were also owned and operated by SNCF; these were classified as CC 92000 on French railways. The fleet of 46 locomotives was built by a consortium of Brush Traction and ABB Traction. Parts construction was sub-contracted, with only final construction and commissioning being undertaken at Brush's erecting shops at Loughborough between 1993 and 1996 (First unit was produced from 1992, and was finished in April 1993) The bodyshells, shared with the Class 60 diesel locomotives but with a modified front end, were fabricated by Procor (UK) of Horbury and delivered pre-painted in the then-standard triple grey livery. Propulsion is provided by two ABB traction converters using GTO devices, with
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    DBAG Class 128

    DBAG Class 128

    128 001, as registered at Deutsche Bahn, or 12X, as named by its manufacturer AEG Schienenfahrzeuge and its successive owners ADtranz and Bombardier Transportation, is an experimental high-performance electric locomotive built in 1994, which was operated as testbed and test locomotive until 2010. The design of the locomotive featured several technological innovations, including power electronics using new types of semiconductors and water cooling, a new final drive concept, a new bogie concept, and protruding windflaps for improved aerodynamics that gave the locomotive a unique look. The development of the locomotive was initiated in anticipation of a major tender for universal locomotives by German railways, but moved towards a modular design when the railways moved towards tendering different types of locomotives for different services. The 12X was the basis of a locomotive class for medium-weight freight trains, the DBAG Class 145, the further development of which ultimately led to Bombardier's TRAXX modular locomotive product platform. DB Class 120 was the first locomotive class of West German federal railway Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB) with three-phase asynchronous AC induction
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    DRG Class E 16

    DRG Class E 16

    The DRG Class E 16 were German electric locomotives in service with the Bavarian Group Administration of the Deutsche Reichsbahn were conceived as motive power for express trains. They were initially designated as the Bavarian Class ES 1, before being incorporated into the DRG numbering plan as E 16. The first series (E16 01-10) was delivered in 1926, the second (E16 11-17) in 1927. The third, re-worked series (E16 18-21) was transferred to the Deutsche Reichsbahn in 1932 and 1933. Numbers E 16 11 and E 16 13 were lost in the Second World War, E 16 12 was retired in 1967 after an accident. With the introduction of the DB classification system on 1 January 1968, the remaining 18 Class E 16 engines were regrouped into Class 116. Between 1973 and 1980 the engines were gradually withdrawn from service. On 31 January 1980, the last Class 116 locomotive, number 116 009, was finally retired. One technical feature is the Buchli drive, in which the motors drive the driving wheels on one side only via outside gears; the other side is not driven. As a result an E 16 has an asymmetric appearance. On one side you can see the Buchli drive, one the other just the bare spoked wheels. The E 16 is
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Korail Electric Locomotive 8200

    Korail Electric Locomotive 8200

    Korail Class 8200 is a South Korean electric locomotive operated by the Korean national railroad operator Korail. This locomotive has HEP capabilities in place of an dynamo car, which could be used with up to 12 passenger cars. The EL 8200 is the successor model of the EL 8100, which was introduced back in 1999. This locomotive is based on the Siemens EuroSprinter model ES64F, assembled by Rotem. With four 1300 kW electric motors, the total power output is 5200 kW. The maximum speed is 150 km/h, although changing the bogies would allow 220 km/h. After the introduction of the 8200, Korail made a trial run in Chungbuk Line, which had just been electrified. After electrifying several lines such as Jungang, Taebaek, Gyeongbu, Yeongdong and Honam Line, it is used for Mugunghwa trains with maximum speed of 150 km/h. The HEP feature of 8200's has caused some problems in Korea. Power generated by regenerative brake has limits, and if the locomotive has many carriages, the HEP supply will be innsufficient. Because of this problem, a dynamo car is attached when operating with 5 or more passenger cars in case of emergency.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Milwaukee Road class ES-2

    Milwaukee Road class ES-2

    The Milwaukee Road's class ES-2 comprised four electric switcher locomotives . Two were built in 1916 and the final two in 1919. They were of steeplecab design, with a single roof-mounted pantograph to access the Milwaukee's 3,000 V DC overhead line. Originally numbered 10050–10053, they were renumbered E80–E83 in March 1939. The E80 was the Deer Lodge, Montana switcher.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    PKP class EP02

    PKP class EP02

    EP02 is a name for a Polish electric locomotive. It was made for passenger transport purposes. Few improvements were brought in with this locomotive type. The front and back of the box had dragging and bumping devices installed. The whole body was given a more aerodynamic shape compared to previous models. This machine is of Bo-Bo type, meaning that each axle is powered separately. The axles are installed in pairs on two bogies. The bogies had lighter, welded construction which gave the whole vehicle better contact with the rails. The engines used in EP02 were not modern ones, and had a large weight compared with power and small rotation. The engine contained two engineer's compartments on each end, with all the devices necessary for running the locomotive inside. The engine and high voltage compartments were situated in the middle part of the body. After World War II almost no electric locomotives survived in Poland, and local industry was not yet able to start the production of such vehicles. The solution for this problem was sought mainly abroad and resulted in a decision to buy some components from England. The design for EP02 by Central Rail Industry Construction Office in
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    SJ Pa

    Pa is an electric locomotive used by Statens Järnvägar for hauling passenger trains on Malmbanan. It was delivered by ASEA in 1914-15 and was in service until the 1950s. Malmbanan was the first electrified railway in Sweden, and SJ needed a fast locomotive to haul the passenger trains on the line. One of the units is preserved.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    NS Class 1700

    NS Class 1700

    The Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) Class 1700 electric locomotives were built by Alsthom in 1990-1994. 81 of these locomotives, numbered 1701-1781, were built. The Class 1600 was ordered in 1978, after several types of locomotives were tested in the 1970s. One of those was the French Class BB 7200, on which the 1600 is based. The 58 locomotives were delivered between 1981 and 1983. As a result of their delivery, the old Class 1000 and Class 1500 were taken out of service. Thanks to the electronic power control, these locomotives were the most economical but also the most powerful locomotives that Dutch Railways had. The Class 1700 are similar but not entirely equal to the Class 1600/1800. The newer 1700 series have updated and extended electronics, a newer safety system (ATB phase 4 vs ATB phase 3 in the 1600 series) and a different braking system. The locomotives are fitted with monomotor bogies. Most visual difference between the 1700 and 16/1800 series is the automatic coupler on 1701-1728 subseries. These locomotives are used with NS DD-AR double-decker coaches in a push-pull setup and treated as an EMU. The couplers, from BSI (Bergische Stahl Industrie, Germany), allow a
    6.00
    4 votes
    86
    NZR EW class

    NZR EW class

    The NZR EW class locomotive was a class of electric locomotive used in Wellington, New Zealand. The classification 'EW' was due to their being electric locomotives allocated to Wellington. They were built by English Electric in 1952 and hauled mainly passenger trains on the region's 1500 V DC electrification, and banked trains between Paekakariki and Pukerua Bay. They were the first class of locomotive in New Zealand to utilise the Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement, the other classes being the DJ class and the EF class. In both cases, this wheel arrangement was used to provide a lower axle-load due to track conditions. The EW class is different though, as the locomotive is articulated in the middle over the centre or Jacobs bogie whereas the two newer classes have sideplay in the centre bogie. During the 1960s the tunnels on this section were lowered so that DA class diesel locomotives could handle trains all the way through to Wellington. With the introduction of the EM class units in 1982, the class was further displaced. An attempt was made to use two members of the class on the Otira - Arthur's Pass electrified section in the South Island, but the locomotives simply could not cope
    6.00
    4 votes
    87
    6K electric locomotive

    6K electric locomotive

    The 6K is a Japanese-built electric locomotive used in China. It is developed and built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries and Mitsubishi Electric. The design of 6K is based on JNR Class ED75 and EF66 electric locomotives . It is the first locomotive with Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement used in China. In total 85 6Ks were built between 1986 and 1987. Each 6K locomotive uses CLG-616 phase splitter and 6 Mitsubishi Electric MB-530-AVR DC traction motors. 6K was one of the most reliable electric locomotives in China compared with SS1, SS2 and SS3 at the time of entering service. China later made SS7 locomotive with reference to the Tri-Bo wheel arrangement of 6K, the breakdown rate, however, was still high, until its modified version SS7B, SS7C and SS7D designed.
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    NS Class 1500

    NS Class 1500

    The Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) Class 1500 were built by Metropolitan-Vickers in 1953-1955. They were originally built for British Railways (BR) as Class EM2 (later Class 77) for use on the Woodhead Route between Manchester and Sheffield. They were withdrawn by BR in 1969 and acquired by NS in 1969 following a locomotive shortage. Seven locomotives of this type were constructed. They had been withdrawn en masse in September 1968 by BR, and were stored at Bury in the hope of sale to a foreign railway. Around this time, NS had been suffering from a shortage of electric locomotives. In August 1969, Dutch officials inspected no. E27002, which then performed a test run between Sheffield and Reddish. NS were so impressed that they purchased all seven locomotives. The class was shipped to the Netherlands in September 1969 by ferry from Harwich to Zeebrugge. They were then tripped to Tilburg workshops for assessment and repairs. One locomotive, no. E27005 Minerva was considered to be in too poor a state to be repaired and so was broken up for spare parts. The remaining six locomotives entered the workshops for various modifications, including the fitting of Dutch headlight clusters, new
    7.00
    3 votes
    89
    SNCF Class BB 27300

    SNCF Class BB 27300

    The SNCF Class BB 27300 are a series of 67 electric locomotives, built as part of the "Prima" range by Alstom. Painted in the blue and white livery of Transilien, the brand name for the SNCF network around Paris, these locomotives are the passenger equivalent of the freight-only Class BB 27000 and are equipped for push-pull operation on suburban passenger services in the Île-de-France region around Paris, working with refurbished VB2N double-deck carriages. The first batch of 60 locomotives was ordered in 2004, and following testing of the first two units in 2005, delivered progressively into 2008. Follow-up orders for five and two locomotives respectively were placed. The locomotives are numbered in series from 27301-27367, although the number carried on the locomotive is prefixed with the number 8, to denote the unit as belonging to the Île-de-France division of SNCF. The first locomotives entered service in 2006 on suburban trains from Paris-Montparnasse. Current deployment sees a total of 23 locomotives operating services from Paris-Montparnasse on trains to Dreux, Mantes-la-Jolie and Rambouillet. At Montparnasse they have displaced older BB 8500 and BB 25500 locomotives. A
    7.00
    3 votes
    90
    VL80

    VL80

    The VL80 (ru: ВЛ80) is a Soviet (and later Russian) built electric AC mainline freight locomotive. The initials VL are those of Vladimir Lenin (ru: Владимир Ленин), after whom the class is named. Designed by the Vsesoyuzny nauchno-issledovatel'ski i proektno-konstruktorski institut elektrovozostroeniya (en: USSR national scientific research and design-engineering institute of electric locomotive construction; Всесоюзный научно-исследовательский и проектно-конструкторский институт электровозостроения) – usually abbreviated to VElNII (ВЭлНИИ) – the VL80 enjoys the accolade of having the longest production span of any Soviet electric locomotive: 33 years. All variants of the series were built at the Novocherkassk Electric Locomotive Plant (NEVZ; ru: НЭВЗ) between the years 1961 and 1994. All the mechanical parts, traction motors, and auxiliary electric machinery were manufactured at the Novocherkassk plant. Some of the important components, such as the tractive transformer, were sourced from other factories. The first VL80s were characterised by their mercury arc rectifiers. Later, they were replaced with silicon ones, thus giving birth to the ВЛ80 (en: VL80) series. The К stands for
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    DR Class 243

    DR Class 243

    The DR Class 243 is a universal electric locomotive of the Deutsche Reichsbahn which is used for general rail service. Deutsche Bahn lists the locomotive as Class 143. The locomotives of class 143/243 still belong to the most successful class of German electric locomotives. Since 1980 the Deutsche Reichsbahn of the GDR started increasing track electrification due to rising oil prices. Before that the DR had mainly used locomotives driven by Russian diesel fuel. VEB Lokomotivbau und Elektrotechnische Werke Hennigsdorf, the only manufacturer of electric locomotives in the GDR, received the order to develop, a lighter, four-axle and technically modern electric locomotive for passenger transport and medium cargo service based on the heavy cargo locomotive DR Class 250. The mechanical components were developed and produced in Hennigsdorf. The electric motors were manufactured by EMW Dresden. The prototype locomotive 212 001 was built in 1982 and presented to the public in the same year with a designed maximum speed of 140 kilometres per hour (87 mph). It did several testing before it was modified in order to operate at a maximum speed of 120 km/h (75 mph) with also changing the number
    8.00
    2 votes
    92
    FS class E656

    FS class E656

    The Class E.656 is an Italian articulated rheostatic-type electric locomotive built from 1973 to 1989. An evolution of the E.646, they are all-purpose locomotives, and have been used on every kind of train, ranging from freight to intercity passenger transport. The E.656 is nicknamed "Caimano" (Caiman). The hull is divided in two parts, each one with its own twin axle bogie, plus a central bogie in the middle. Each bogie mounts four DC motors, each providing 400 kW (540 hp), for a total of 12. The initial project speed was 160 km/h (99 mph), but later it was reduced to 150 due to stability problems; further, the heavy mass of the locomotive did not allow the use of rheostatic braking. Recently many E.656s have been transferred to the Cargo Division of Trenitalia to haul freight trains. The gear ratio has been reduced from 28/61 to 23/66, and the speed limit to 120 km/h (75 mph). The modified units form the Class E.655. The E.656 class is officially subdivided by FS into three series: The differences between series regard electrical and mechanical equipment. The 3rd series locomotives have four field weakening shunts in parallel and super-parallel motor combinations (where the other
    8.00
    2 votes
    93
    Indian locomotive class WAG-5

    Indian locomotive class WAG-5

    The WAG-5 is a type of electric locomotive used in India. It is the second most widely used locomotive on Indian railways, with a total of 1100 units built including variants. This class was introduced in 1984.
    8.00
    2 votes
    94
    JNR Class EF64

    JNR Class EF64

    The JNR Class EF64 is a class of 1,500 V DC electric locomotives operating in Japan. The class was designed to replace the ageing EF16 class locomotives used on the steeply-graded Ōu and Chūō mainlines in the early 1960s. Two prototype locomotives, EF64 1 and 2, were delivered in 1964, built by Tōshiba and Kawasaki Sharyō respectively. The basic body design was based on that of the earlier EF62s but with the more usual Japanese Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement. Livery from the start was all-over blue with just the lower cab ends painted cream. Full production started in 1965, continuing to 1976 with loco EF64 79. Minor variations within the class included the discontinuation of the cab ventilation grilles above the marker lights from EF64 46 onward. Locos EF64 1 to 12 and EF64 29 to 55 were equipped with train-heating generators for passenger use, and are distinguishable by the train heating indicator lights next to the cab doors. The DT120A/DT121A bogies were virtually identical to those used on the EF70 class. The first batch of locos, consisting of EF64 1 to 12, were assigned to the Ōu Main Line between Fukushima and Yonezawa, where their duties included assisting KiHa80 Tsubasa DMUs
    8.00
    2 votes
    95
    NSB El 17

    NSB El 17

    The NSB El 17 is a class of twelve electric locomotives built by Thyssen-Henschel and Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri (NEBB) for the Norwegian State Railways (NSB). The class was built in two batches, the first delivered in 1982 and numbered 2221–2226, and the second delivered in 1987 and numbered 2227–2232. The traction system of the El 17 was based on the DB Class 120 of Germany (BBC, AEG and Siemens) and were among the first in the world to feature three-phase asynchronous motors. The units were ordered to be used on the intercity Bergen, Dovre and Sørland Lines, but were plagued with technical faults (overheating traction equipment, transient voltages, etc.). The unreliability and lack of sufficient power forced NSB to instead use them in the regional Vestfold and Gjøvik Lines. With the delivery of the El 18, the first series was retired or used as shunters. The second series has been used on the Flåm Line since 1998. The locomotives have a maximum 3,000 kilowatts (4,000 hp) power output and a 240 kN (54,000 lbf) tractive effort, allowing the locomotive to haul a six-car train. They run on a 15 kV 16⅔ Hz AC power supply and are capable of operating at 150 km/h (93 mph). The
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    NZR EO class

    NZR EO class

    The New Zealand EO class of 1923 were electric locomotives used on the steep Otira to Arthur's Pass section of the Midland Line. They were primarily for pulling trains through the 8.5 km Otira Tunnel to avoid the buildup of steam, smoke and soot. When the Otira tunnel was being built, steam locomotives were not considered for use in the tunnel, because smoke would build up in the tunnel and be difficult to clear. Tenders were received from English Electric, and a company in New York. Due to the economic situation at the time, the tender was given to English Electric. And so on 10 April 1923 six electric locomotives arrived, numbered EO 2 to EO 6 (1 was the Class E battery electric loco built in 1922). They were later reclassified EO to avoid confusion with the EC class locomotives. The locomotives coped well in service, and from 1942 it became standard practice to run three locomotives together with only two pantographs up, and have their pantographs linked by jumper cables. This was deemed dangerous however, and soon each locomotive ran with its own pantograph up. This often resulted in heavy sparking. Once it became normal to run three locomotives together, they were altered in
    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    SNCF Class BB 7200

    SNCF Class BB 7200

    The SNCF Class BB 7200 is a class of 1.5 kV DC electric locomotives. They are part of the "Nez Cassé" family of locomotives, this being the DC version. Class BB 15000 is the AC version while the Class BB 22200 is a dual-voltage version. They are numbered to show that the DC and AC class make the dual-voltage locomotives (7200 + 15000 = 22200). Another relative is the Dutch NS 1600 Class, a DC locomotive based on the BB7200. 7209, 7210, 7308 and 7348 have all been destroyed in accidents. The class are numbered 7201 - 7440. Some have cast plates. Some of the class carry names:
    8.00
    2 votes
    98

    British Rail Class EF1

    The British Rail Class EF1 (Electric Freight 1) was a class of electrically powered locomotives used by British Rail in England. They were used during the pre-TOPS period. They were also classified as British Rail Class EB1 for a short period of time, although only a single locomotive was completely modified to EB1 condition. These locomotives were built by the North Eastern Railway to haul coal trains from the mines at Shildon to the docks at Middlesbrough. During the 1920s the coal traffic declined and some of the locomotives became surplus to requirements. In 1928 a plan was devised to convert one of them to a Diesel-electric, using a 1,000 hp Beardmore diesel engine driving an English Electric generator. This plan did not come to fruition. Electric traction on the Shildon line was discontinued in 1935 but the locomotives were retained for possible future use. Number 11 (later BR 26510) was rebuilt in 1942 for use on the Manchester-Sheffield line, and given the classification EB1. Horsepower was increased from 1,100 to 1,256 and the twin pantographs were replaced by a single central one. In common with other LNER electric locomotives, no classification was given to these
    9.00
    1 votes
    99

    Milwaukee Road class ES-1

    The Milwaukee Road's class ES-1 comprised a single electric switcher locomotive built in 1915. It was designed to run on the unique 1,500 V DC electrification in the yard at Great Falls, Montana. It was originally numbered #10000 and was numbered E85 in March 1939. It was retired in November 1939.
    9.00
    1 votes
    100

    NSB El 4

    NSB El 4 was an electric locomotive used by Norges Statsbaner (the Norwegian State Railways, NSB) to transport iron ore on Ofotbanen. NSB had a total of five triple-locomotive sets. In 1923, Ofotbanen and Malmbanan were electrified and NSB had to acquire electric locomotives to haul the trains. NSB chose to order five double-engine El 3 units and five triple-engine El 4 units for the purpose. The El 4 were built at NEBB, Thune and Hamar Jernstøberi. After World War II, the production of iron ore in Kiruna and Malmberget increased dramatically and the train length was increased, with the consequence that each train needed more propulsion. NSB chose to order eight new El 12 locomotives at the same time it combined the ten El 3 locomotives to make three triple-engine sets with one reserve. When the El 15 locomotives were delivered in 1967, the El 3 and El 4 units were taken out of service. None of the locomotives have been preserved.
    9.00
    1 votes
    101
    SNCF Class BB 16000

    SNCF Class BB 16000

    The SNCF BB 16000 are a class of 25kv 50 Hz AC electric locomotives produced by MTE. They are the AC version of the BB 9200s A total of 62 were originally built between 1959 and 1963, although some have since been withdrawn. 15 BB 16000s were reclassified as BB 16100s after being fitted with TDM control equipment for Paris Nord to St. Quentin/Amiens. Certain units of the class are fitted for push pull operations.
    9.00
    1 votes
    102
    SNCF Class BB 26000

    SNCF Class BB 26000

    The SNCF BB 26000 locomotives are a class of dual voltage, four axle B'B' electric locomotives capable of a top speed of 200 km/h built by GEC Alsthom between 1988 and 1998 for SNCF. The locomotives are also commonly known as the Sybics. The class were built to fulfil both freight and passenger roles; the specifications included the ability to haul 16 Corail coaches at 200 km/h (120 mph) on a 0.25% gradient, and to haul a 2,050 t (2,020 long tons; 2,260 short tons) freight train at 80 km/h (50 mph) on a 0.88% gradient. The locomotives are a two cabin design with the body built out of steel, two pantographs are fitted; one for 1500 V operation, the other for 25 kV operation. A 25 kV AC supply is stepped down and rectified to 1500 V, a 1500 V supply feeds the power electronics directly. Each of the three elements of the thyristor bridge based three phase inverter circuits are connected in parallel, with the two three phase supplies per motor being series connected. For speeds below 15 km/h (9.3 mph) one supply voltage reducing chopper circuit (French:hacheur) per motor bogie is used to assist control. The power electronics of the two motor bogies are connected in parallel, and are
    9.00
    1 votes
    103

    British Rail Class EE1

    British Rail Class EE1 (Electric Express 1) was an electric locomotive commissioned by the North Eastern Railway in 1922. Ownership passed to the London and North Eastern Railway in 1923 and to British Railways in 1948. It was an electrically powered locomotive in the pre-TOPS period. In the 1910s the North Eastern Railway made plans to electrify its York-Newcastle main line and this locomotive was built for hauling passenger trains. It had an electrically-heated boiler to generate steam for train heating. The wheels were arranged as in a 4-6-4 steam locomotive and the driving wheels were 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) diameter. Each of the three driving axles was powered by a pair of traction motors. Electric locomotives of this design were common in continental Europe and the United States, but this was the only example on a British railway. After grouping in 1923 the London and North Eastern Railway dropped the electrification project so (apart from some trials on the Shildon line) the locomotive was never used. It survived into British Railways ownership but was withdrawn in August 1950, and scrapped on 15 December 1950. In common with other LNER electric locomotives, no classification was
    6.67
    3 votes
    104

    JR Freight Class ED500

    The ED500 class consisted of a single Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement dual voltage AC/DC electric locomotive built experimentally by Hitachi Ltd. in Japan. The design was derived from the DC Bo'Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement Class EF200 also built by Hitachi, and was intended to replace Class ED75 locomotives on Tōhoku Main Line freight services. The locomotive was loaned to JR Freight for testing, but the design was not selected for full production due to problems with restarting a single Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement locomotive on the 25‰ gradients of the Tōhoku Main Line and in the Seikan Tunnel. The Class EH500 articulated Bo-Bo+Bo-Bo design was ultimately chosen instead. Visually resembling the EF200 locomotives, the ED500 was finished in all-over black with red cab doors.
    6.67
    3 votes
    105
    NSB El 1

    NSB El 1

    NSB El 1 is the first electric locomotive series used by Norges Statsbaner, from 1922 until 1973. Twenty-four engines were delivered from ASEA and Thune, twenty-two in 1922 and two in 1930. Based on the German DB E 71 and Swedish SJ Oc it has two two-axeled bogies with one motor in each. When Drammenbanen from Oslo V to Brakerøya was electrified as the first NSB line in 1922, NSB was in need of electric traction. The engines were used both for passenger- and freight trains. At first it was used on Drammenbanen, then on Sørlandsbanen. In 1966 two of the locos, no. 2001 and 2002, were sold to Rjukanbanen where they served until 1988. Two of the locomotives have been preserved (no. 2001 and 2011).
    6.67
    3 votes
    106
    OSE class 120

    OSE class 120

    Class 120 or HellasSprinter is the first class of electric locomotives of the Hellenic Railways Organisation. A total of 30 locomotives were built in two batches between 1996 and 2005. Class 120 locomotives are based on the EuroSprinter "ES 64 P" prototype, which was adapted for a lower power of (5,000 kW/6,700 hp), a lower weight of 80 tonnes and electric components suitable for the Greek 25 kV AC - 50 Hz system. These locomotives currently operate on the electrified sections Thessaloniki-Idomeni and Thessaloniki-Larissa-Domokos, hauling freight and passenger trains. The following table summarizes the class:
    6.67
    3 votes
    107
    SBB-CFF-FFS Re 620

    SBB-CFF-FFS Re 620

    The Re 620, Re 6/6 in the old numbering scheme, are six-axle, electric locomotives of the SBB-CFF-FFS, which were acquired as a replacement for the Ae 6/6 for heavy services on the Gotthardbahn. They are the most modern of the so-called "Gotthard locomotives". To reach the necessary tractive effort, a construction comprising six driven axles was necessary. In order to still get good running characteristics in curves, they were built into three two-axle bogies instead of two three-axle bogies as on the Ae 6/6. The middle bogie can move sideways, and the three bogies are connected by elastic cross couplings. Two of the four prototypes were built with a split locomotive body, whereby the joint may only move on an horizontal transverse axis, not on a vertical axis, to accommodate to gradient changes. The other two prototypes got a softer secondary suspension instead of the joint, which proved to be so reliable in everyday use that all series locomotives were built this way. Nevertheless, the two prototypes with a split body are still in regular operation. The exterior design is similar to the Re 4/4, as are the driver's controls and the conventional transformer technology with fixed
    6.67
    3 votes
    108
    SNCF Class BB 25500

    SNCF Class BB 25500

    SNCF's BB 25500 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alstom. They are the dual system version of the BB 17000 (AC) and BB 8500 (DC) locomotives (17000+8500=25500). They are fitted with monomotor bogies with two different gear ratios. This allows them to have increased tractive effort in exchange for a reduction in top speed. This makes them suitable for both freight and passenger trains. They were built in three distinct batches leading to detail differences. They remain in use as mixed traffic locomotives, mostly with TER and Transilien. Locomotives 25517, 25518, 25523, 25528, 25572 & 25576 have been exported to Romania. They work with former SNCF Rio carriages for Regiotrans. Services worked are: The locomotives have been renumbered by adding 400,000 to their SNCF numbers.
    6.67
    3 votes
    109
    SJ Ma

    SJ Ma

    The SJ Class Ma is an electric locomotive used by Statens Järnvägar and later other railways. 41 copies were built by ASEA between 1953 and 1960. It is derived from the older Mg-series, but unlike its predecessor it is used for freight and passenger trains. It is the loco that has been in use the longest in Sweden. When the freight traffic on the Norrland lines was increasing towards the end of the 1940s, the need for more and stronger locomotives appeared. SJ decided to develop the Ma series based on the experience gained from the Mg series. Availability of more powerful motors made the locomotive capable of hauling heavy trains at 100 km/h, making the series quite flexible. Equipment was placed inside the locomotive, removing the noses and giving the Ma a very different appearance from the Mg series. ASEA delivered 32 locomotives to SJ, in addition to 9 to TGOJ. It was put into service on passenger and freight trains in Central and Northern Sweden. When TGOJ got electric locomotives it also chose the Ma series. The nine locos were delivered from 1954 to 1958, and originally used on iron ore traffic between Ludvika and Oxelösund. They differ from the ones delivered to SJ with that
    4.80
    5 votes
    110
    ALP-45DP

    ALP-45DP

    The ALP-45DP is a type of single cab dual-mode locomotive being built by Bombardier Transportation for use by New Jersey Transit and Agence métropolitaine de transport. In 2008 New Jersey Transit placed an €178 million order for 26 electro-diesel locomotives from Bombardier, part of capital investment program including acquisition of 329 Bombardier Multi Level Coaches, 27 ALP-46A electric locomotives, dual power multiple units and over 1300 buses. Funding for an additional ten units ($78.8 million) was approved in July 2010, as part of NJ Transit's 2011 capital budget. The order has since been lowered by one for a total of 35 locomotives. The first of the NJT locomotives was displayed at Innotrans in 2010. The locomotives are expected to be used on the Raritan Valley Line, (changing to electric power on the Northeast Corridor Line), and the North Jersey Coast Line. Use on the 'Trans-Hudson Tunnel' (see ARC Tunnel) was also planned, prior to the cancelling of the scheme. The units are currently being used on the Morristown Line, and the Montclair-Boonton Line. They are numbered 4500 upwards. The first locomotive was officially unveiled at Newark Penn Station on May 11, 2011. Unit
    7.50
    2 votes
    111
    ED62 electric locomotive

    ED62 electric locomotive

    The ED62 is a class of Japanese Bo-1-Bo wheel arrangement electric locomotives. The ED62 class locomotives were created between 1974 and 1979 by modifying the 18 earlier JNR Class ED61 Bo-Bo electric locomotives with the addition of a centre non-driven axle. Rebuilding was carried out at JNR's Nagano Works. The primary aim of rebuilding was to reduce the axle load (from 15 t to 13 t) for use on the Iida Line, where the class displaced vintage JNR Class ED18 (English Electric) and JNR Class ED19 (Westinghouse) locomotives, and later JNR Class EF10 locomotives. One highlight of the class's career was when ED62 15 hauled the Imperial Train on the Iida Line in 1979. It was also not uncommon to see ED62s close to Tōkyō when they worked to Shin-Tsurumi depot for examinations. Eight members of the class were still in service in 1987 when JNR was split into separate JR Group companies, and ED62 17 was repainted into the new JR Freight livery shortly after. When freight operations ceased on the Iida Line in 1997, the remaining locomotives were placed in storage before finally being withdrawn in 2002. The ED62 was produced by Tomix in N gauge in both standard blue (#2137) and the JR-Freight
    7.50
    2 votes
    112
    EMD AEM-7

    EMD AEM-7

    The AEM-7 is a twin-cab B-B electric locomotive that is used in the United States on the Northeast Corridor between Washington DC and Boston and the Keystone Corridor between Philadelphia and Harrisburg in Pennsylvania. They were built by Electro-Motive Division from 1978 to 1988. In the Boston Mechanical Department of Amtrak they are known as "Meatballs" and in the Washington Mechanical Department they are known as ASEAs since some of their major parts and components were designed in Sweden by ASEA (Allmänna Svenska Elektriska Aktiebolaget; translation: General Swedish Electrical Inc), which merged with Brown Boveri in 1988 forming ABB. They are also referred to as "toasters" by railfans, owing to their boxy appearance. There are two versions of the AEM-7 as of 1999: the original AEM-7DC which has DC propulsion equipment and the newer, modified AEM-7AC which uses AC propulsion equipment. 70 new locomotives, designated the ACS-64, are expected to replace Amtrak's AEM-7s and HHP-8s; they will enter service over several years, starting in 2013. In the mid-1970s. Amtrak began to look for a successor to the Pennsylvania Railroad GG1 electric locomotive and ordered 26 General Electric
    7.50
    2 votes
    113
    Lok 2000

    Lok 2000

    The Re 460 (popularly known as the Lok 2000) series are modern four-axle electric locomotives of the Swiss Federal Railways. They originally replaced Re 420, Re 440, Re 620 locomotives. They were introduced as part of the Rail 2000 project, a massive project to modernise and improve capacity on Switzerland's railways. They are now mainly used for passenger services, often in conjunction with the IC 2000 double decker trains (often used to pull InterCity and InterRegio trains in German and French language areas), their freight role having been assumed by Re 482s. They are maintained at Yverdon. When SBB was split up on 1 September 1999, Re 460 079–118 were assigned to the freight division, later becoming SBB Cargo. It was seen as an advantage to use all Re 460, which had been designed for 200 km/h, for passenger service. The passenger division passed the Re 6/6 to SBB Cargo and bought 079–095 on 1 January 2003, 096–102 2004 and the rest 2005. Due in part to their large, mainly flat bodysides, Swiss Federal Railways were approached early on with requests for the Re 460 to be used as mobile advertising hoardings. Despite opposition from some quarters, the money that could be earned
    7.50
    2 votes
    114
    NSB El 18

    NSB El 18

    NSB El 18 is a class of 22 electric locomotives built by Adtranz and Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works (SLM) for the Norwegian State Railways (NSB). The class is a modification of the Swiss Federal Railways Re 460 locomotive and built at Adtranz Strømmen in 1996 and 1997. The class remains the only mainline electric locomotive used by NSB, and is predominantly used on some intercity services and all night trains on the Bergen Line, Dovre Line and Sørland Line, as well as some regional trains. The locomotives are 18.5 meters (61 ft) long and weigh 83 tonnes (82 long tons; 91 short tons). They have a three-phase asynchronous motors with a maximum power output of 5,880 kilowatts (7,890 hp), giving a tractive effort of 275 kilonewtons (62,000 lbf) and a maximum speed of 200 km/h They have a Bo'Bo' wheel arrangement and regenerative brakes. The exterior was designed by Pininfarina and the cabs have pressurization. The units are numbered 2241 through 2262. During the early 1990s, NSB was in need of new electric haulage for their passenger trains, as both classes El 11 and El 13 were in need of replacement. El 17, the latest purchase, had proved unreliable, and NSB wanted to remove them
    7.50
    2 votes
    115

    SJ Da

    Da is a series of locomotives used by Statens Järnvägar (SJ) of Sweden. 93 units were built by ASEA between 1953-60. They remained in service until the 1990s. After the last D-locomotive had been delivered in 1943, SJ needed more locomotives during the late 1940s with new lines being electrified. The solution was the Da, a modernised version of the D-type including the rigid-frame coupling rod layout that was by then regarded as obsolete by most other undertakings. It was used as a universal locomotive throughout the SJ system. A more powerful, but slower Dm series was delivered at the same time for use on Malmbanan. During the 1970s the Da's were rebuilt, including increased cab comfort. SJ started retiring the locos during the 1980s and had finished the task by the mid 1990s. Some units were bought by Tågfrakt and Tågkompaniet, later being sold to NetRail. One unit has been preserved by the Swedish Railway Museum.
    7.50
    2 votes
    116
    SJ U

    SJ U

    U is a class of 152 electric shunter locomotives operated by the Swedish State Railways (SJ) and Trafikaktiebolaget Grängesberg–Oxelösunds Järnvägar (TGOJ) of Sweden, and the Norwegian State Railways (NSB), LKAB and Norsk Jernverk of Norway. They were built by ASEA, Nyqvist och Holm, Motala, ASJ Falun and Thune between 1926 and 1956. NSB gave the class the designation El 10. During the 1920s, the Swedish State Railways started a program to electrify parts of their network. This caused a need for electric shunters on the West Main Line. A procurement was attempted from Switzerland, but no order was ever made. With the order of the D Class locomotives, SJ decided to order a shunter built with the same components. The initial order was for three Ua-locomotives were made in 1926 with delivery the following year. The motors were built by ASEA while the mechanical components were built by Nydqvist och Holm (NOHAB). The locomotives worked well, but had problems with the sight from the cab in the one direction, so further models were built with a center cab. The Ub series was built by both NOHAB and ASJ Falun. The first delivery was ordered in 1929, and from 1930 to 1950, 90 units were
    7.50
    2 votes
    117
    SNCF Class BB 16100

    SNCF Class BB 16100

    The SNCF Class BB 16100 electric locomotives were converted from class BB 16000s by fitting TDM push-pull equipment to work the Paris Nord to St. Quentin/Amiens services as well as Paris St Lazare - Rouen.
    7.50
    2 votes
    118
    NS Class 1100

    NS Class 1100

    NS Class 1100 locomotives were based upon the SNCF Class BB 8100 design. They were extensively rebuilt between 1978 and 1982. They operated in the Netherlands. They have been out of service since 1999 although many were out of service before then. They operated all services, freight and passenger, and were NS main locomotive until the arrival of Class 1600s. 1156 had an accident near Tilburg in 1961 and 1131 was involved in the largest railway accident in the Netherlands at Harmelen. 1129 was involved in an accident in Westervoort in 1978, this locomotive was not destroyed, and was put back in service. In 1986 1141 derailed at Heeze. In 1991 some of the locos were withdrawn with the arrival of DD-AR double-deck coaching stock and Class 1700 locos were introduced. The 1100 series locomotives were unpopular with NS drivers. The locomotives used an unusual design: the buffers are attached to the wheel assembly instead of the main body. Buffers attached to the main body are a common design feature, which provides a steady ride as the body is stabilized because it is pressed against the car it is pulling. The 1100 series lacked this stability, resulting in a very nervous bouncy ride
    5.50
    4 votes
    119
    British Rail Class 81

    British Rail Class 81

    The British Rail Class 81 is an AC electric locomotive that formerly operated on the West Coast Main Line of the London Midland Region of British Rail. Originally designated AL1, it was the first type of AC electric locomotive to be delivered to British Railways. As part of the modernization of the West Coast Main Line which included electrification, 100 locomotives of five types were acquired, each type from a different manufacturer. The first locomotives to be delivered were of type AL1 designed by British Thomson-Houston (BTH), an order being placed for 25 examples. Of these, 23 were for use on passenger trains with a top speed on 100 mph and were designated Type A. The two remaining locomotives were to be for use on freight trains with a top speed of 80 mph, and were designated Type B. Before the work was completed, BTH amalgamated with Metropolitan Vickers to form AEI (Associated Electrical Industries) traction division, and it was under this name that the locomotives were built in 1959 under subcontract by Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon in Smethwick. The first engine, number E3001, was handed over to British Railways on November 27, 1959. The type was initially used for
    6.33
    3 votes
    120
    Indian locomotive class WAP-4

    Indian locomotive class WAP-4

    WAP-4 is one of the most important electric locomotives used in India. It is a very powerful class, capable of hauling 26 coaches at a speed of 130 km/h. It is also among the most widely used locomotives. The locomotive was developed, after a previous class WAP-1 was found inadequate to haul the longer, heavier express trains(24-26 coaches) that were becoming the mainstay of the Indian Railways network. It was introduced in 1994, with a similar bodyshell to the WAP-1 class, but with Hitachi traction motors developing 5000 hp (5350 hp starting). Electricals are traditional DC loco type tap changers, driving 6 traction motors arranged in Co-Co fashion. This locomotive has proved to be highly successful, with over 700 units in service and more being produced. Newer examples have been fitted with Microprocessor Controlled diagnostics, Static Converter units (instead of arnos) and roof mounted Dynamic (Rheostatic) Brakes. The locomotive can be seen in service across the electrified network of Indian Railways and are homed at 13 sheds (depots). Sheds holding WAP4s as on September 2012 : In future Kalyan (KYN) shed of Central Railways will home these locos once entire Central Railway is
    6.33
    3 votes
    121
    PKP class EP03

    PKP class EP03

    The PKP class EP03 is a type of electric locomotive used by Polish railway operator Polskie Koleje Państwowe (PKP). In 1946 PKP purchased eight locomotives from the Swedish manufacturer Allmänna Svenska Elektriska Aktiebolaget (ASEA) of a type not used in Sweden. EP03 locomotives were introduced in 1951–1952. Their main purpose was operating light passenger and freight trains. The EP03 locomotives were in service until about 1970; the last of the class was withdrawn in 1974. The only locomotive in operation is EP03-01, currently in the railway museum in Chabówka.
    6.33
    3 votes
    122
    SNCB Class 11

    SNCB Class 11

    The SNCB class 11 locomotives were built in the 1980s for hauling the Benelux trains between Brussels, Belgium, and Amsterdam, The Netherlands. They operated in push pull mode - remote controlled from a leading driving carriage when at the rear of the train. They are numbered 1181 and higher to avoid clashing with the NS Class 1100 locos that were still in use at that time. In 2009 they were replaced by Bombardier TRAXX locomotives that have been leased from Angel Trains. The class 11 locomotives are no longer used for international services, they have been moved to peak hour services within Belgium. They are painted to match the Nederlandse Spoorwegen coaching stock they used to work with. The class 11 locomotives are dual-voltage (1500 V DC and 3000 V DC) with a design based on single-voltage class 21 locomotives. Due to their limited number and extensive mileage, these locomotives are aging fast and subject to failures, leading to frequent service disruptions. The fleet is allocated to Schaerbeek depot.
    6.33
    3 votes
    123

    SNCF Class CC 6500

    The SNCF Class CC 6500 is a class of 1.5 kV DC electric locomotives. The CC6500 was, together with the CC40100 and diesel CC72000, the first generation of the Nez Casse family of locomotives and designed for hauling express trains with speeds up to 200 km/h (120 mph) but also used for heavy freight trains. Between 1969 and 1976 a total of 74 were built, with the last of this class taken out of service in 2007. Four more were built as 25 kV AC locomotives, series CC21000. In 1997 these were reconfigured for use as DC locomotives, taking the total of CC6500 locomotives to 78.
    6.33
    3 votes
    124

    46 class

    The New South Wales 46 class are a class of mainline electric locomotive introduced onto the NSW rail system from 1956 under New South Wales Government Railways. Metropolitan-Vickers and its partner Beyer, Peacock and Company obtained the contract to build 40 of these locomotives. The locomotives were built at Bowesfield Works, Stockton-on-Tees, England, with electrical equipment supplied by Metropolitan-Vickers from its Trafford Park and Sheffield plants. Metropolitan-Vickers drew on experience gained from its earlier class EM1 and EM2 electric locomotives, which were used on the Woodhead Line in the UK and in The Netherlands. These electric locomotives were originally purchased as part of the Blue Mountains electrification works, and spent their life hauling coal, freight and passenger carriages under the wires. The 46 class locomotives were often seen double or triple heading coal and freight services. The class 46 was the most powerful locomotive in Australia for many years, with a one hour rating of 3,780 horsepower (2,820 kW) and ability to deliver more than that for short periods. They proved to be very reliable and were generally considered superior to the much newer and
    7.00
    2 votes
    125
    British Rail Class 87

    British Rail Class 87

    The British Rail Class 87 is a type of electric locomotive built from 1973-75 by British Rail Engineering Limited (BREL). 36 of these locomotives were built to work passenger services over the West Coast Main Line (WCML). They were the flagships of British Rail's electric locomotive fleet until the late 1980s, when the Class 90s started to come on stream. The privatisation of British Rail saw all but one of the fleet transferred to Virgin Trains they continued their duties until the advent of the new Pendolino trains, when they were transferred to other operators or withdrawn. There is only one Class 87 still in use in Britain, and that is 87002, owned by the AC Locomotive Group but is solely used alongside 86101 for the occasional charter train. A large proportion of the fleet have now been exported to Bulgaria. A requirement for more electric locomotives came about after the electrification of the WCML was extended from Weaver Junction north of Crewe to Preston, Carlisle and Glasgow. Initially, three Class 86 locomotives were used as test-beds to trial equipment (mainly electrical equipment and suspension) that would be used in the new locomotives; effectively, these locomotives
    7.00
    2 votes
    126
    DBAG Class 101

    DBAG Class 101

    The DB Class 101 is a class of three-phase electric locomotives built by Adtranz and operated by DB Fernverkehr in Germany. 145 locomotives were built between 1996 and 1999 to replace the 30-year old and aging Class 103 as the flagship of the DB AG. This class encompasses the latest generation of locomotives of the DB. In the United States, the ALP-46 locomotive is derived from the DB Class 101. Bombardier's TRAXX shares a common heritage. In the early 1990s it became apparent that the current electric locomotives serving the heavy and fast (speeds over 160 km/h/99 mph) InterCity services, the Class 103, were wearing out. Their annual mileage of up to 350,000 km (217,000 mi), and the faster and heavier trains, for which these units were not constructed, meant increasing damage to the control units, traction motors, and bogie frames. In addition, as part of the Program DB 90, and to optimise costs, the theory of "Drive to Deterioration" (Fahren auf Verschleiß) was utilised, which strengthened the negative effect on the units. Another class in similar service, the 60 units of the Class 120 three-phase locomotive, had also reached a stage where both their age and their construction
    7.00
    2 votes
    127
    NS Class 1200

    NS Class 1200

    The Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) Class 1200 were a class of electric locomotives that were in service from 1951 until 1998. They were designed by Baldwin and built by Werkspoor (Utrecht) between 1951 and 1953. The electrical parts were built by Heemaf (Hengelo) to a design by Westinghouse. Some parts (the bogies, and the electrical installation) were made in the United States as part of the Marshall Plan. Originally 75 locomotives were ordered, but the order was reduced to 25 locomotives, instead more locomotives of the French Class 1100locomotives were ordered. After more than 40 years of service the Class 1200 was retired from service in 1998. Numbers 1201, 1202 and 1211 were preserved for museums, whilst 1214, 1215, 1218, 1221 and 1225 were bought by the Dutch freight operator ACTS Nederland BV in 1999 and were renumbered to 1251-1255. Engine 1253 was taken out of service in 2003 and is now used for spare parts. In 2007 engine 1252 was taken out of service. In 2009 and 2010 the remaining 3 engines were taken out of service by ACTS and engines 1251, 1252, 1254 and 1255 were acquired by Euro-Express-Treincharter BV (EETC). As of January 2011 engines 1251 and 1252 are again in
    7.00
    2 votes
    128
    RC-locomotive

    RC-locomotive

    The SJ Class Rc is the most used electric locomotive in Sweden. Rc is a universal locomotive used both in freight and passenger trains. The largest operators are SJ and Green Cargo, although Veolia Transport, Tågåkeriet and the Swedish Transport Administration operate it as well. The Rc-locomotive first appeared in 1967 to replace the 1950s Ra-locomotive, the 1940s F-locomotive and the older D- and Da-locomotives. Altogether there have been 8 versions of the Rc-locomotive in Sweden including the freight locomotive Rm designed to pull iron ore trains. Rc1, Rc2, Rc4, and Rc5 have a maximum allowed speed of 135 km/h. Rc3 and Rc6 have a maximum allowed speed of 160 km/h. Rc7 was a rebuild of Rc6 meant to haul replacement trains needed when the X 2000 trains were canceled or delayed. Rc7 had a maximum allowed speed of 180 km/h. However, the maximum speed permitted without emergency electromagnetic track brakes is 160 km/h, and converting the carriages proved too expensive. For that reason all Rc7 were subsequently converted back to Rc6. Rc1-Rc7 all weigh between 75 and 80 tonnes, whilst the Rm weighs 90 tonnes. The Rm's top speed is only 100 km/h, but due to the nature of their work,
    7.00
    2 votes
    129
    SNCB Class 22

    SNCB Class 22

    SNCB Class 22 Locomotives are run by the National Railway Company of Belgium, also known as Nationale Maatschappij der Belgische Spoorwegen (or NMBS, Dutch) or Société Nationale des Chemins de fer Belges (or SNCB, French), the Belgian national railway operator. The locomotives are electric powered. The class was withdrawn in 2009, their last working duties included Commuter "P" trains, and banking duties at Liège. They were originally designated as series 122 prior to introduction of the 1971 numbering system. 2201 has survived into preservation.
    7.00
    2 votes
    130

    SNCB Class 28

    The original NMBS/SNCB Class 28 locomotives were produced by Baume-Marpent in 1949. 3 were built, originally classified as class 120. They were built as prototypes, production series locomotives becoming class 101. This number series has been reused for Bombardier TRAXX locomotives.
    7.00
    2 votes
    131
    Toei Class E5000

    Toei Class E5000

    The E5000 (E5000形) is a class of four DC electric locomotives operated by Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation (Toei) in Japan. Four locos (numbered E5001 to E5004) were delivered from Kawasaki Heavy Industries in 2005 for use in hauling linear-motor powered Ōedo Line trainsets to the Magome Workshops on the Asakusa Line in Ōta, Tokyo for heavy overhaul from 2006 following the completion of the Shiodome Link Line. They are single-ended locomotives which work as permanently coupled pairs.
    7.00
    2 votes
    132
    British Rail Class 91

    British Rail Class 91

    The British Rail Class 91 is a class of 140 mph (225 km/h), 6,300 hp (4,700 kW) electric locomotives ordered as a component of the East Coast Main Line modernisation and electrification programme of the late 1980s. The Class 91s were given the auxiliary name of InterCity 225 to indicate their envisaged top speed of 225 km/h (140 mph). The other end of the InterCity 225 train set is formed of a Driving Van Trailer, built with a similar body shell to the Class 91 locomotives. The locomotive body shells are of all-steel construction. Unusually, the motors are body mounted and drive bogie mounted gearboxes via cardan shafts. This reduces the unsprung mass and hence track wear at high speeds. The locomotive also features an under-slung transformer so that the body is relatively empty compared to contemporary electric locomotives. Much of the engineering was derived from the research and operational experience of the APT-P. In 1985, ASEA, Brush and GEC tendered for the design and construction of the Class 91s. GEC subsequently won the bid and the fleet was built by sub-contractors BREL in Crewe between 1988 and 1991. The Class 91s began passenger service on 3 March 1989 when 91001 worked
    6.00
    3 votes
    133
    JR Freight Class EF200

    JR Freight Class EF200

    The EF200 class of electric locomotives are Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement DC freight locomotives operated by JR Freight in Japan. Between 2006 and 2009, the entire fleet was repainted into a new livery similar to that used for the later EF210 locomotives. The EF200 is produced in model form in N gauge by Kato. Media related to JR Freight EF200 at Wikimedia Commons
    6.00
    3 votes
    134
    British Rail Class 89

    British Rail Class 89

    The Class 89 is a prototype design for an electric locomotive. Only one unit was built, no. 89001, which was officially named Avocet by the then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on 16 January 1989 at Sandy, Bedfordshire - the home of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (whose logo is an Avocet). It was built in 1986, by BREL at their Crewe Works, and was used on test-trains on both the West Coast Main Line and East Coast Main Line. It was fitted with advanced power control systems and develops over 6,000 bhp (4,500 kW). It was given the nickname "Aardvark" although railfans used to call it "The Badger" owing to its sloping front ends. The Class 89 locomotive was designed by Brush Traction of Loughborough to meet a specification issued by British Rail, which subsequently changed the requirements, but not before Brush had already committed to build the prototype locomotive. It was initially delivered in the old-style InterCity livery, with no British Rail double arrows, but these were added later when British Rail bought the locomotive from Brush. As the development of the ECML Electrification continued the engine was painted into the new style "InterCity Swallow" livery
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Indian locomotive class WAM-4

    Indian locomotive class WAM-4

    WAM-4 is the name of a type of electric locomotive used in India. It is a very successful locomotive in Indian Railways' fleet. The first one was indigenously designed and built by CLW in 1970-71. They were produced until about 1997. They use the same power bogies as the successful WDM-2 class. These locos feature rheostatic braking, and MU capability. Being designed specially for mixed traffic these locos has rendered excellent service.
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    JR Freight Class EH500

    JR Freight Class EH500

    The EH500 class of electric locomotives are two-unit multi-system AC/DC freight locomotives operated by JR Freight in Japan. They have a Bo-Bo+Bo-Bo wheel arrangement. The locomotives are built at the Toshiba factory in Fuchū, Tokyo. Initially, they were all based at Sendai depot for use on long-distance container trains from the Tokyo area to Hokkaido via the Tōhoku Main Line, replacing DC EF65s south of Kuroiso, pairs of AC ED75s north of Kuroiso, and pairs of AC ED79s through the Seikan Tunnel. In 2004, locomotives EH500-25 and EH500-27 were loaned in turn to Kitakyushu depot for trials. From 2007, a number of EH500s were transferred to Kitakyushu depot for use on 1,300 tonne freight trains between Honshu and Kyushu through the Kanmon Tunnel, replacing ageing AC ED76s and dual-voltage EF81-300s and EF81-400s. As of 1 April 2012, the fleet totalled 76 locomotives (EH500-901 and EH500-1 to EH500-75). The pre-production prototype, EH500-901, was delivered to Sendai depot in March 1998 for extensive testing. The livery is red and grey with black cab surrounds. Two pre-production locomotives were delivered in March 2000. The livery is maroon and grey with black cab surrounds. Built
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Milwaukee Road class EP-1, EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, and EF-5

    Milwaukee Road class EP-1, EF-1, EF-2, EF-3, and EF-5

    The Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road) classes EP-1 and EF-1 comprised 42 boxcab electric locomotives built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) in 1915. Electrical components were from General Electric. The locomotives were composed of two half-units semi-permanently coupled back-to-back, and numbered as one unit with 'A' and 'B' suffixes. As built, 30 locomotives were assigned to freight service, classified as EF-1 and numbered 10200–10229. The remaining twelve locomotives were assigned to passenger service as class EP-1, numbered 10100–10111, with higher-speed passenger gearing. The design was highly successful, replacing a much larger number of steam locomotives, cutting costs and improving schedules. In 1919, with the arrival of a newer generation of passenger power, the EP-1 locomotives were converted to EF-1 freight locomotives, and renumbered 10230–10241. In this role, they served until the 1950s, when the arrival of the Little Joe locomotives began to replace them in freight service. They were fitted with multiple-unit train control systems, and could thus be joined together into larger sets and operated from a single control station.
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    New South Wales 86 class locomotive

    New South Wales 86 class locomotive

    The New South Wales 86 class is a class of 50 mainline electric locomotives introduced from 1982 in the state of New South Wales by the State Rail Authority. The locomotives were built by Commonwealth Engineering of Granville, New South Wales, with electrical equipment supplied by Mitsubishi. They were also based at Lithgow for predominately freight operation, and were lighter than the preceding 85 class. When FreightCorp was sold to Pacific National, all were withdrawn when Pacific National decided to discontinue electric locomotive haulage. All except 2 were sold to Silverton Rail in 2002 and then to Allco Finance with some on sold while most were scrapped at Broken Hill. John Hurst Railway Pages at www.csse.monash.edu.au:
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    NSB El 16

    NSB El 16

    NSB El 16 is an electric locomotive which is used on the Norwegian railway system by CargoNet to haul freight trains. Until it was replaced by the El 18, the El 16 engines also pulled passenger trains on the Norwegian State Railways In the 1970s NSB was faced with a challenge on the steep and wintry Bergen Line and the El 14 was not adequate enough for the task. The solution seemed to be thyristor locomotive that had successfully been tested by ASEA and Canadian Pacific Railway with possibilities to pull 50% heavier trains than equivalent diesel electric locomotives were capable of. This was partly due to a system of dynamic slip control, where speed of traction motors was controlled and adjusted to avoid slippage and loss of adhesion. The Swedish Rc4 locomotives were tested on the Northeast Corridor with success and NSB also chose to try the units on the Bergen Line. In 1976 NSB ordered six unites of a modified Rc4 design, with dynamic breaks, increased traction power (from 4x900 kW on Rc4 to 4x1100 kW on El16) and a pointed nose which is able to force through the occasional snowdrifts. In 1980 another four units were delivered and the final seven in 1984. The sets were numbered
    8.00
    1 votes
    140

    SNCB Class 19

    Class 19 is a class of electric locomotives operated by SNCB, the national railway of Belgium. During 1993 Class 21 locomotive 2130 was converted for use as a test bed for class 13 development. It was renumbered 1901 for a time. Subsequently in 2001, it has been restored to standard condition and regained its 2130 number.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    VR Class Sr2

    VR Class Sr2

    The Sr2 is a class of electric locomotives of the VR Group. They were built by SLM / ABB and later by Adtranz and finally Bombardier Transportation and assembled by Transtech Oy. They are closely based on the class Re 460 (or Lok 2000) locomotives of Swiss Federal Railways. The nicknames of this class are Alppiruusu (Edelweiss), Käkikello (Cuckoo clock), both referring to the Swiss origin of the locomotive, and Marsu (Guinea pig), from the looks of the locomotive. In 1992, VR odered the first 20 class Sr2 locomotives; later 20 more were ordered with 12 options. Finally only six of the 12 options were transformed into orders, forming a total fleet of 46 engines. The locomotives are used on both passenger trains and freight trains, and they are the primary locomotives of the fast InterCity trains in Finland. When introduced, the Sr2 was the strongest and fastest locomotive of the VR. It was designed with a top speed of 230 km/h (140 mph) and early units had that speed marked on them. During test runs, it has achieved a speed of 232 km/h (144 mph). However, VR later limited the top speed to 210 km/h (130 mph). During normal service the locomotives do not exceed 160 km/h (99 mph). The
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    NSB El 6

    NSB El 6 was twp electric locomotive delivered in 1912 to Norsk Transport that operated Rjukanbanen and Tinnosbanen, where they were designated RjB.4 and 5. The locomotives were built by AEG (motor) and Skabo (chassis) and delivered at the same time as RjB.1–3 (later El 7) locomotives for the electrification of Rjukanbanen. They were exactly "half" of the larger 1–3 units, with two motors, one pantograph and one transformer. In 1920 RjB.4 was transferred to Norges Statsbaner and designated El 6, numbered 2503. In 1934 it was rebuilt from 10 to 15 kV and moved to Drammen. It was taken out of service in 1956, while Rjukanbanen took its out of service in 1960; neither have been preserved.
    5.00
    4 votes
    143
    ČD Class 380

    ČD Class 380

    The Class 380 is Škoda's entry into the modern electric locomotive market. Internally designated Type 109E, the locomotives were originally conceived in 2004 and designed for operation in Austria, Germany, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia as well as the Czech Republic. The 109E Škoda has a top speed of 200 kph and is compatible with both AC and DC catenaries; basic characteristics of a multisystem locomotive nowadays. The locomotives are equipped to work on three electrification systems, 3 kV DC 25 kV 50 Hz AC and 15 kV 16.7 Hz AC, drawing power from overhead lines. Škoda's first export order for 109Es came from ŽSSK in Slovakia. Initially two locomotives have been ordered. These were made at the Škoda factory in Plzeň. They have a licensed top speed of 160 km/h (99 mph), the max speed on Slovak Railways, and are fitted with GSM-R/ETCS Level 1. They are designated as class 381 of ZSSK, numbers 381 001-8 & 381 002-6 and being used mostly on the Bratislava - Nové Mesto nad Váhom - Žilina route.
    5.67
    3 votes
    144
    DB Class 103

    DB Class 103

    The Baureihe 103 is a class of electric locomotives in Germany, originally operated by Deutsche Bundesbahn. For a long period, they were perceived as flagships of the DB rolling stock. In the decades following World War II, the Deutsche Bundesbahn focused on purchasing a large number of standardised electric locomotives. The goal was to promote the electrification program and to replace older types of electric locomotives. A maximum speed of 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph) was deemed sufficient. With growing economic prosperity, competition with other means of transportation, especially automobiles, was increasing. During the 1950s, plans were made to enhance pre-war class E 19 locomotives to have a top speed of 180 kilometres per hour (110 mph), but the technical layout was out-dated and the braking system was deemed inefficient. The plans were revised to demand a top speed of 200 kilometres per hour (120 mph), combined with a Co'Co' wheel arrangement to limit the axle load to 18 tons. Elements of the new class, such as high speed bogies, were tested with existing class E 10 units. Four prototypes were finished in 1965. They were introduced to the public at the Internationale
    5.67
    3 votes
    145
    FS Class E428

    FS Class E428

    The FS E.428 was a class of Italian railways electric locomotives. They were introduced in the course of the 1930s, for fast services on the Florence-Rome line, being decommissioned in the 1980s. When in the 1930s, in the course of the Fascist government's program of railways development, a new locomotive was needed to provide a fast service on the newly-electrified Milan-Rome mainline at 3,000 V DC. This was also permitted by the introduction of new metallic passenger cars, capable of relative higher speeds. The requirement was shipped the to the FS design team of Ing. Giuseppe Bianchi at Florence. The new locomotive was impressive for the times: huge, heavy, powerful and fast. They were 4 metres (13 ft 1 in) longer than the E.626, the first Italian DC electric locomotives, and weighed 10/20 tons more. The original requirement asked for the notable service speed of 150 km/h (93 mph), but this was later reduced to 130 km/h (81 mph). The E.428 was to be built in conjunction with a lighter version, the E.326, but those proved unsuccessful and were limited to lower speeds. The first wheel arrangement devised was a 2-Do-2, with four trailing axles at the fronts and a single motor
    5.67
    3 votes
    146
    Indian locomotive class WAG-7

    Indian locomotive class WAG-7

    WAG-7 is the name of a type of electric locomotive used in India. It is a very powerful locomotive in Indian Railways' fleet. Built by Chittaranjan Locomotive Works and BHEL, Jhansi to RDSO specifications. WAG7 is an uprated version of WAG-5 locomotive with high capacity transformer, rectifier, traction motor, compressor and other matching associated equipments. These are six axles loco with axle and nose suspended drive. The loco is fitted with six Hitachi designed DC series traction motors type HS15250A, controlled by a tap changer are used in this locomotive. Indian Railway is going to achieve 7,00 million tonnes of traffic, WAG-7 is the main stay of loco. In the locomotive vehicle market WAG-7 is more economical option and one of the cheapest in the world.
    5.67
    3 votes
    147

    SJ Rb

    Rb is a electric locomotive operated by Statens Järnvägar of Sweden. Six locomotives were built by ASEA, in three series designated Rb1, Rb2 or Rb3. During the 1950s SJ saw the need for a new universal locomotive, since the D-series was aging. In 1955 the Ra-series had proved successful with bogie wheels. At the same time there was interest to make a locomotive that could be exported abroad. The result was an agreement between ASEA and SJ where six test engines were delivered. The testing of the Rb was successful and based on this exports were made to the Yugoslav Railways (JŽ class 441) and Căile Ferate Române of Romania (CFR class 40). The result of the testing was the Rc locomotive that was produced in 360 copies for SJ, in addition to export to Amtrak, Norges Statsbaner and Österreichische Bundesbahnen. The Rb-series was in use on passenger- and freight trains until the mid 1970s. Rb1 was equipped with direct current (DC) motors with higher efficiency and thus more economical. The utilization of thyristors could convert from the alternating current (AC) used in the railway electrification system of Sweden, and one of the Rb1 locos was rebuilt to thyristor in 1965, getting the
    5.67
    3 votes
    148
    SNCF Class BB 8500

    SNCF Class BB 8500

    The SNCF Class BB 8500 class are part of a series of electric locomotives built by Alsthom for SNCF. They are the direct current version of the 25kV alternating current SNCF BB 17000 and dual system SNCF BB 25500. The locomotives are fitted with monomotor bogies with two different gear ratios. This allows them to increase their tractive effort in exchange for a reduction their top speed. This makes them suitable for both freight and passenger trains. They acquired the nickname Danseuses (dancers) due to their tendency to sway from side to side at speed. This tendency lead to them being blacked at a number of depots. They were built a three distinct batches leading to detail differences. They remain in use as mixed traffic locomotives, mostly with TER and but with some remaining for special duties. 30 locomotives, dedicated to empty stock moves, have been reclassified as BB 88500. Likewise in 2001, 20 of the class were dedicated for workings on the Ligne de la Maurienne. They were classified BB 8700 for this period.
    5.67
    3 votes
    149
    British Rail Class 86

    British Rail Class 86

    • Electric system(s): 25 kV AC railway electrification
    The British Rail Class 86 was the standard electric locomotive built during the 1960s, developed as a result of testing with the earlier Classes 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85. One hundred of these locomotives were built from 1965-1966 by either English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows, or British Rail (BR) at their Doncaster works. The class was built to haul trains on the then newly electrified West Coast Main Line, from London Euston, to Birmingham, Crewe, Manchester Piccadilly, Liverpool and later Preston and Glasgow. They helped to replace steam locomotives, which were finally withdrawn by BR in 1968. Under the earlier BR classification, the type was given the designation AL6 (meaning the 6th design of AC Locomotive), and locomotives were numbered E3101-E3200. In 1968, this was changed to Class 86, when BR introduced the TOPS classification system. In the early years the locomotives became notorious for track damage, being fitted with axle-hung traction motors, in place of the bogie-frame-mounted motors of the earlier designs. This additional unsprung mass was causing damage at high speeds. In 1969 number E3173, was fitted experimentally with the large helical 'flexicoil'
    6.50
    2 votes
    150
    EH200 electric locomotive

    EH200 electric locomotive

    The EH200 class of electric locomotives are Bo-Bo+Bo-Bo wheel arrangement two-unit DC freight locomotives operated by JR Freight in Japan. The locomotives are built at the Tōshiba factory in Fuchū, Tokyo. They are all based at Takasaki depot, and are primarily used on oil tank trains north of Tōkyō and on the steeply-graded Chūō Main Line and Shinonoi Line, replacing pairs of EF64s. As of 1 April 2009, the fleet totalled 21 locomotives (EH200-901 and EH200-1 to EH200-20). Three EH200 locomotives are scheduled to be delivered during fiscal 2009, with two more scheduled for fiscal 2010. The pre-production prototype, EH200-901, was delivered to Takasaki depot in 2001, and entered revenue service in October 2002 following extensive testing. Following evaluation of the prototype version, the first full-production locomotive, EH200-1, was delivered to Takasaki in March 2003. A number of minor improvements were incorporated, with the main external differences from the prototype being as follows. The EH200 is available in model form in N gauge from Kato.
    6.50
    2 votes
    151
    GE E60

    GE E60

    The GE E60 is a C-C electric locomotive made by GE Transportation Systems. The E60's were based on existing locomotives designed for freight service. There are several versions of E60's: E60C, E60CP, E60CH, and E60C-2. Black Mesa and Lake Powell Railroad (BM&LP) ordered 6 E60C's between 1972 and 1976 to transport coal 78 miles from the Black Mesa Mine near Kayenta, Arizona to the Navajo Generating Station power plant at Page, Arizona. These E60C's have only single cabs and single pantographs. The E60C's collect the power via 50,000 volt overhead catenary supplied by their power plant at Page, Arizona. The road numbers are between 6001 and 6006. At this time March 2012, Black Mesa is operating six ex NdeM E60's and the 6006. The 6001 was donated to a railway museum. Deseret Power Railway located near Rangely, Colorado is also a 50kv operation and started out with two new E60's which were built in 1983 along with 39, 25kv locomotives that were built for NdeM in Mexico. Deseret acquired two second hand NdeM units in 1998 and put one in service with their spare 50kv transformer. Three additional NdeM units that had not been energized since manufacture were acquired in 2009, one is in
    6.50
    2 votes
    152
    JNR Class EF62

    JNR Class EF62

    A total of 54 Class EF62 DC electric locomotives were built between 1962 and 1969 for use hauling passenger and freight on the Shinetsu Main Line and particularly over the extreme 66.7‰ gradient of the Usui Pass between Yokokawa and Karuizawa. The prototype, EF62 1, was built by Kawasaki Sharyō in 1962, with the full-production locomotives built by Kawasaki, Tōshiba, and Tōyō & Kisha delivered from 1963 onward. The EF62s were the first adhesion locomotives used on the Shinetsu Main Line following the abandonment of the under-powered ED42 rack-and-pinion locos dating from the 1930s. They were designed to work in multiple with pairs of the specially-designed JNR Class EF63 "Sherpa" locomotives between Yokokawa and Karuizawa. While high adhesion was clearly an important requirement, the locos had to be designed with a low axle load (16 t, compared to 18 t for the EF63s) allowing them to be used on other sections of the Shinetsu Main Line with stricter axle-load restrictions. The need to reduce overall weight was one reason behind the decision to use the unique Co-Co wheel arrangement rather than the more commonly used Bo-Bo-Bo arrangement. The need to reduce unnecessary weight led to
    6.50
    2 votes
    153
    JNR Class EF66

    JNR Class EF66

    The EF66 is a 6-axle (Bo-Bo-Bo) electric locomotive designed for fast freight used by Japanese National Railways (JNR) and currently operated by its descendents JR West and JR Freight. Originally these locomotives were designed for express freight on the Tōkaidō Main Line and Sanyō Main Line, in an attempt to counter the increasing market share being gained by road transport, by providing a fast alternative to road transport using wagons suitable for containerised freight. The prototype (initially numbered EF90 1, later becoming EF66 901) was built by Kawasaki Sharyō in 1966; at the time with a power of 3.9 MW it was the world's most powerful narrow-gauge locomotive. The EF66 901 locomotive was retired from front-line service in 1996 and since 2001 is stored at Hiroshima Depot. The production series of locomotives were delivered from 1968, with 55 built between 1968 and 1974. Due to increased demand, JR Freight began building more EF66s in 1989 - this second tranche of locomotives was classified EF66-100, with locomotive numbered EF66-101 to EF66-133. The locomotives were designed to be able to haul a 1,000-tonne train at 100 km/h. Each motor has a 650 kW power output, (about 50%
    6.50
    2 votes
    154
    SNCB Class 25.5

    SNCB Class 25.5

    In 1973 a programme to modify 8 class 25 locos to work into the Netherlands was undertaken, to use them in push-pull trains operating on the Benelux intercity service between Amsterdam and Brussels. This included fitting of 1500 V electrical equipment and various safety modifications. These locos are now classified as class 25.5. In 1986 they were replaced by the newly built SNCB Class 11, from that year the class 25.5 was used in cross-border freight services in the Antwerp area until they were retired in 2009.
    6.50
    2 votes
    155
    ALP-46

    ALP-46

    The ALP-46 is an electric locomotive built in Germany by Bombardier between 2001 and 2002 for use in the United States. It is derived from the German Class 101. New Jersey Transit (NJT) is the only railroad to operate this locomotive model. They can be found all over the electrified NJT system, but are primarily used for service to and from Penn Station in New York City. NJT ordered 29 locomotives: the first 24 ALP-46 locomotives in December 1999 and an additional five locomotives in September 2001. They were built by Bombardier (formerly ADtranz) at their Kassel, Germany plant. The first two locomotives were built as preseries locomotives for testing—4600 was tested on the TTCI test plant in Pueblo, Colorado, 4601 was sent to Kearny for testing on the NJT network. All locomotives were transported via road to the port of Bremen and shipped on Roro-ships of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics to Port Elizabeth (NJ). In February 2008, NJT ordered twenty seven 125 mph (201 km/h) top speed ALP-46A locomotives from Bombardier, which were to haul Bombardier MultiLevel Coaches. The estimated value of the order was €155 million (approximately $230 million). In June 2009 NJT took up an option
    5.33
    3 votes
    156
    VR Class Sr1

    VR Class Sr1

    The Sr1 is a class of electric locomotives built for VR (Finnish railways). These 25kV locomotives were built in the Soviet Union at the Novocherkassk Electric Locomotive Factory between 1973 and 1985. Two additional locomotives of this class were built at the VR Hyvinkää Machine Workshop in 1993 and 1995, number 3111 from spare parts and number 3112 from the original prototype locomotive (number 3000) that was never used by the VR. The nicknames for these locomotives are "Siperian susi" (Wolf of Siberia; in Finnish slang "susi" can also mean a poorly manufactured object, compare English "dog" or "lemon"), "Kaalihäkki" (Cabbage Cage) and "Sähköryssä" (Electric Russkie). In 1970, Valtionrautatiet ordered 27 electric locomotives from Energomachexport, which were delivered between September 1973 and the end of the year 1975. 82 additional locomotives were ordered and delivered between 1973 and 1985. The first prototype locomotive, number 3000, was bought from the constructor in 1994 by VR, which rebuilt it into number 3112. The trains have been used in passenger and cargo transport on Finland's electrified rail network. The locomotives originally carried a dark red livery, with light
    5.33
    3 votes
    157

    British Rail Class EB1

    The British Rail Class EB1 (Electric Banking 1) was an electrically powered locomotive used by British Rail in England. It was used during the pre-TOPS period. The other NER electric locos built at the same time were classified as EB1 but were never modified, they later became British Rail Class EF1. These locomotives were built by the NER to haul coal trains from the mines at Shildon to the docks at Middlesbrough. During the 1920s the coal traffic declined and some of the locomotives became surplus to requirements. In 1928 a plan was devised to convert one of them to a Diesel-electric, using a 1,000 hp Beardmore diesel engine driving an English Electric generator. This plan did not come to fruition. Electric traction on the Shildon line was discontinued in 1935 but the locomotives were retained for possible future use. Number 11 (later BR 26510) was rebuilt in 1942 for use on the Manchester-Sheffield line. Horsepower was increased from 1,100 to 1,256 and the twin pantographs were replaced by a single central one. In common with other LNER electric locomotives, no classification was given to the locomotive until 4 October 1945, when nos. 3-12 were all classified EB1 (Electric
    7.00
    1 votes
    158
    SBB-CFF-FFS Ae 6/6

    SBB-CFF-FFS Ae 6/6

    The Ae 6/6 is a heavy electric locomotive used by the SBB-CFF-FFS. It is sometimes also referred to as canton locomotive ("Kantonslokomotive"), because the first 25 locomotives were named after the cantons, and carried the canton's coat of arms on the side and chrome embellishments (a single raised stripe on each side and three raised stripes on each end), and the Swiss coat of arms on the front, between the chrome stripes. These adornments made them internationally famous. The other 95 locomotives received the names of capital cities of Swiss cantons, and other towns and cities, but without the chrome embellishments. The namings were held as ceremonies in the respective cities. Originally designed for heavy services on the Gotthard route, as many Swiss locomotives were, the Ae 6/6 was one of the classic Gotthard locomotives. All locomotives were originally painted in the SBB CFF FFS green livery, with the number, and either SBB CFF, or SBB FFS on each side, all raised numerals in chrome. Nowadays about half are painted red, and a proportion of the fleet have been repainted in SBB Cargo livery, with all raised chrome embellishments removed apart from the Swiss coat of arms on each
    7.00
    1 votes
    159
    SNCB Class 28

    SNCB Class 28

    The SNCB Class 28 number series has been brought back into use for 43 Bombardier TRAXX locomotives which have been hired from Angel Trains Cargo for use with B-Cargo, the freight division of NMBS/SNCB. They are numbered in two series - they carry their original numbers, E186 123 to E186 125, and E186 196 to E186 220, and have also been numbered into the SNCB number series, 2801 to 2843. It was planned that they would work passenger services between Brecht and Antwerp, but so far, this has been done by SNCB Class 13 locs. Therefore, their primary use remains the heavy freight corridor between Aachen-West, Antwerp, and Zeebrugge. The original SNCB Class 28 locomotives were produced by Baume-Marpent in 1949.
    7.00
    1 votes
    160
    EF58 electric locomotive

    EF58 electric locomotive

    The EF58 is a class of Japanese 2-C+C-2 wheel arrangement electric locomotives. 172 locomotives were built between 1946 and 1958. In 1984, 64 out of 172 EF58 locos built were still in service or temporary storage. However, they were withdrawn en masse from Tōkaidō and Sanyō Main Line freight duties in 1984, and by 1987, immediately prior to privatization of JNR, there were just four members of the class (EF58 61, 89, 122, and 150) remaining in service. Details of the locomotives currently in operational service are as follows. Owned by JR East and based at Tabata Depot in Tōkyō, this locomotive was built in 1953 by Hitachi specially for use as the official Imperial Train loco, a role it performs to the present day. While other locos had chrome-plated “whiskers” on the cab ends, this loco was built with stainless steel whiskers extending as a thin band along the body sides. The loco remains in its original brown livery, and is maintained in immaculate condition. In 1988, EF58 61 was used for Orient Express. Owned by JR Central and based at Shizuoka Depot, this loco was built in 1957 by Hitachi. It was repainted in 1992 from the standard blue/cream livery to its current all-over
    6.00
    2 votes
    161
    FS class E636

    FS class E636

    The FS E.636 is a class of Italian articulated electric locomotives. They were introduced in the course of the 1940s until the 1960s, and have been decommissioned in 2006. They have been one of the most numerous Italian locomotive group, and have been widely employed during their long career, hauling every type of train, ranging from freight to long range passenger services. Their introduction also saw the employment of some revolutionary (for the time) design concepts, such as the articulated carbody and the three bogies scheme. The E.636 was designed to overcome the problems showed in the 1930s by both the E.626 multi-purpose and E.326 high-speed locomotives, in order to better handle the increasing railway traffic in Italy. The E.636 was the first Italian locomotive adopting the Bo-Bo-Bo configuration with chassis divided into two articulated parts pivoting on the central bogie, which is very well suited for the often tortuous lines of Italy and that would have been later repeated on the E.645/646 and E.656 classes. The presence of a great number of wheels was considered important due to the presence of a number of high-slope lines in the Italian railroad network as it increases
    6.00
    2 votes
    162
    SBB-CFF-FFS Re 420

    SBB-CFF-FFS Re 420

    • Electric system(s): 15 kV AC railway electrification
    The Re 420, originally (and still widely called) Re 4/4, series are the most common electric locomotives of the Swiss Federal Railways. They are used for passenger services throughout Switzerland alone or in pairs. For freight services, they are sometimes paired with the Re 620, especially in mountainous regions. That pairing is referred to by the term Re 10/10. The Re 430, originally known as the Re 4/4, are a derivative of the Re 420 modified for higher traction but lower speed. The Re 420 locomotives were produced over a period of 21 years, from 1964 to 1985. Re 4/4 (Re 430 SBB/Re 436 Private) Subseries: When Südostbahn had the opportunity to buy one of the first batch of 50 Re 4/4 locomotives before delivery, they decided to have the gear modified for higher traction but lower speed for the steep routes of the SOB. This locomotive was delivered as number 41 (and is now SBB 11350). Based on the SOB experience, the SBB ordered a batch of 20 Re 4/4 in 1969 for use on the Gotthard route (three of those loks were sold to the SOB in the 1980s and were renumbered Re 4/4 42–44. Those loks were returned to the SBB between 1996 and 1998 in exchange for the four prototype Re 4/4 which
    6.00
    2 votes
    163

    SJ Mg

    Mg is an electric locomotive used by Statens Järnvägar of Sweden for hauling freight trains. It was built in 17 copies by ASEA and was in service until 1980. The Mg-series was built for the electrification of Norra Stambanan in the 1940s. It was steeper and more curved than the main lines in Southern Sweden, and single track sections meant that long freight trains had to be used to make best use of line capacity. The D-series was not powerful enough and the Of-series was to long for the curves. But as experience of the building bogie-locomotives increased, a Co'Co'-design was chosen for Mg, as the first bogie-locomotive in Sweden. More power also meant that the direct current motors from the D-series had to be replaced with the alternating current motors of the F-series. The machine room was not symmetric, so the loco was not the same on the right and left side. Mg was the basis for the Ma-series built in the 1950s.
    6.00
    2 votes
    164
    FS Class E626

    FS Class E626

    The FS E.625 and E.626 are two classes of Italian electric locomotives produced for the Ferrovie dello Stato. They were introduced in the course of the 1920s and remained in service until the 1990s. The E.626 was the first locomotive fed by 3,000 V DC catenary in Italy. The E.626 class is the result of a requirement issued in 1926 by the Ferrovie dello Stato (FS, Italian Railways) for a new locomotive to be used under the new 3,000 V DC line being built between Foggia and Benevento. The design was carried out by the team of Giuseppe Bianchi, the "founder" of modern Italian railroads, at the FS Traction and Material Service in Florence. The requirement specified the locomotive should have 6 traction axles, to improve adhesion in steep lines. The E.626 series was built in 448 units and three series, each with only slight electro-mechanic differences: unadvanced but reliable, it subsequently constituted the mainstay of the new FS lines at 3,000 V DC, which gradually spread to the whole peninsula. The firsts tests occurred on the Foggia-Benevento line in the September 1927, using three prototypes built at Savigliano, with the electric part provided by the Metropolitan-Vickers of
    5.50
    2 votes
    165
    PKP class EU07

    PKP class EU07

    EU07 is the name for a Polish electric locomotive in service of the Polish railway operator PKP. This locomotive was designed as a mixed traffic locomotive, and as such is used both in freight and passenger traffic. EU07 have driving cabins on both ends of the box. The locomotive is equipped with multiple unit control system which allows a single driver to drive two coupled engines from one cabin. This engine is able to pull passenger trains of up to 650 t weight with speed of 125 km/h and freight trains of up to 2000 t weight with speed of 70 km/h. These figures apply to driving on horizontal track. The EU07 is strongly connected with the EU06 locomotive. The EU06 was a British derivative of the Class 83 locomotive built for the Polish system. In 1959 an agreement was signed with the producer of the EU06, English Electric, under which Poland bought the license for the EU06 and started its production in Pafawag Wrocław, under build number 4E. The first item was finished in 1965, and by 1974 a total number of 240 locomotives had been built. The EU07 locomotives only differed slightly from EU06 thanks to some minor improvements that had been made with comparison to their
    5.50
    2 votes
    166
    Victorian Railways L class electric

    Victorian Railways L class electric

    The Victorian Railways L class was a class of mainline electric locomotive that ran on the Victorian Railways and its successor V/Line from 1953 until 1987. Introduced in conjunction with the electrification of the Gippsland line, these locomotives hauled both passenger and freight services between Traralgon and Melbourne until the overhead electrification was decommissioned in favour of diesel electric traction. Australia was a relatively early adopter of electric traction and Electric Multiple Unit trains, with a General Electric advertisement in Railway Age magazine of 1924 claiming that Melbourne had the largest suburban electrification scheme in the world at 346 miles (557 km). However, electrification in Victoria had until the 1950s only extended as far as the Melbourne suburban network. Apart from the EMU fleet the only electric locomotives operated by the VR were a fleet of 12 small 620 hp (460 kW) E class electric locomotives, built at VR's Newport Workshops for suburban goods service, using the same General Electric traction motors and electrical equipment employed on Melbourne's EMU fleet. During the early 1950s, Victorian Railways embarked on an £80 million program
    5.50
    2 votes
    167
    Korail Electric Locomotive 8000

    Korail Electric Locomotive 8000

    Korail Class 8000 is a series of South Korean electric locomotives operated by Korail. This locomotive was introduced from 1972, after electrification of several industrial lines. It was assigned both passenger and freight duty until the introduction of the 8200 series, after which it was only used in freight service. The locomotive was designed by the 50 C/S group, which consisted of European manufacturers Alsthom, Siemens, GEC, MTE, Brown-Boveri, ACEC, and AEG, and was led by Alsthom. The locomotive has three bogies in Bo-Bo-Bo arrangement. With six 650 kW (870 hp) DC motors, the total power is 3,900 kW (5,200 hp). The gear ratio is 15:96, and top speed 85 km/h (53 mph), optimized for mountain lines with steep grades and short radius curves. The design was inspired by contemporary French locomotives, such as SNCF Class BB 15000 and SNCF Class CC 6500. On November 3, 1975, units 8056 and 8058 fell off the Seonam bridge, on the Taebaek Line. 8056 was refurbished in KNR Seoul Factory in January 1977, 8058 was rebuilt by Daewoo Heavy Industry in January 1979.
    4.67
    3 votes
    168

    EMD GM6C

    The GM6C was a solitary testbed electric locomotive for freight duties built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of the United States in collaboration with ASEA of Sweden. It was rolled out from EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant on May 1, 1975. Equipped with close to standard C-C HTC trucks and traction motors, it was designed for lower-speed drag freight service. At the time, high oil prices had a number of large US railroads contemplating electrification of their most heavily used lines, while the only major US railroad with freight-hauling electrification, the Penn Central, had a fleet of aging locomotives needing replacement. Circumstances changed after the GM6C and GM10B locomotives were developed; oil prices declined, which wiped out the interest freight railroads had in electrification, while diesel locomotive power and adhesion were improved. Meanwhile, the bankruptcy of Penn Central led to the division of the railroad's physical plant between Amtrak, which inherited much of the electrified region, and Conrail. Increased access charges on the part of Amtrak led to Conrail ceasing electric operations in 1982, dismantling the electrification on its lines and avoiding
    6.00
    1 votes
    169
    EuroSprinter

    EuroSprinter

    The EuroSprinter family of electric locomotives is a modular concept of locomotives for the European market built by Siemens. The internal Siemens product name is ES 64, with ES for EuroSprinter and the number 64 indicating the 6,400 kW power at rail. Additional information is given in the name on the usage (U as universal, P as prototype and F as freight) and on the number of electric power systems supported (e. g. 2 as two types, 4 as all four commonly used systems in Europe). The first prototype ES 64 P was built in 1992, as Deutsche Bahn AG was expected to issue a large order of locomotives as a replacement for the ageing Einheits-Elektrolokomotiven. The external appearance was similar to the earlier Siemens/Krauss-Maffei made dual voltage Spanish RENFE Class 252, delivered in 1991, which in turn used three phase asynchronous drive technology introduced with the DB Class 120. The prototype was used for extensive tests in some countries in Europe (Norway, Spain, Portugal, Germany). The prototype was given the DB reporting name Class 127. It is still in service with Dispolok, a formerly Siemens-owned locomotive pool for on-hire use. The ES 64 F is an electric freight locomotive
    6.00
    1 votes
    170
    JR Freight Class EF500

    JR Freight Class EF500

    The EF500 class consisted of a single Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement multi-voltage AC/DC electric locomotive formerly operated by JR Freight in Japan. The sole member of the class, EF500-901, is stored at JR Freight's Hiroshima Depot.
    6.00
    1 votes
    171
    NSB El 11

    NSB El 11

    The NSB El 11 was an electric locomotive which was operated for both passenger and freight trains by NSB. It was the third type of Norwegian electric locomotive with bogies, after the NSB El 7 and NSB El 9. They were manufactured by Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri (NEBB) and Thune mekaniske verksted. The first 35 engines were built between 1951 and 1956 and numbered 11 2078 to 11 2112, a second series of 6 engines, the El 11b, was built between 1963 and 1964 and numbered 11 2145 to 11 2150. The b-series had minor modifications such as a windshield consisting of two large windows instead of four small ones. A further upgrade of the El 11 became the NSB El 13 locomotive. Between 1982 and 1983 three El 11s were upgraded for use on the steep Flåmsbana branch line. They have since been replaced by multiple units such as the NSB BM69 and, later, by locomotives such as the NSB El 17. The El 11s was withdrawn from service during the 1990s, with the last use in 1998. There are four preserved engines, two by the Norwegian Railway Club for use on special trains, and two by the Norwegian Railway Museum in Hamar.
    6.00
    1 votes
    172
    SNCF Class BB 16500

    SNCF Class BB 16500

    The SNCF Class BB 16500 electric locomotives were built by Alsthom between 1958-1964. They are part of the family of locomotives: SNCF Class BB 8500, SNCF Class BB 88500, SNCF Class BB 17000, SNCF Class BB 20200 and SNCF Class BB 25500.
    6.00
    1 votes
    173
    SNCB Class 20

    SNCB Class 20

    Class 20 is a class of electric locomotives operated by SNCB, the national railway of Belgium. Prior to the introduction of the class 13s Class 20s were the most powerful NMBS/SNCB electric locomotives. They commonly work on the Brussels - Luxembourg services sharing duties with the CFL Class 3000s. Unusually for Belgium they are Co-Co locomotives. They have had a chequered past having suffered from a number of defects. The class also work freight services from Antwerp to Montzen.
    4.33
    3 votes
    174
    JNR Class EF65

    JNR Class EF65

    The EF65 is a 6-axle (Bo-Bo-Bo) electric locomotive designed for freight used by Japanese National Railways (JNR) and currently operated by its descendents JR West, JR East, and JR Freight. As of 1 April 2009, JR Freight operated 77 locomotives, JR East operated 8 (EF65-1000), and JR West operated 10 (EF65-1000) locomotives. Originally these locomotives were designed for freight on the Tōkaidō Main Line and Sanyō Main Line, in an attempt to counter the increasing market share being gained by road transport, by providing a fast alternative to road transport using wagons suitable for containerised freight. The production series of locomotives were delivered from 1965, with 308 built between 1965 and 1979. During the JNR era, these locomotives were used for freight trains and also for passenger work - primarily hauling night trains such as the Izumo sleeping car limited express and Ginga sleeping car express.
    5.00
    2 votes
    175
    PKP class ET22

    PKP class ET22

    PKP class ET22 is a Polish six-axle electric freight locomotive built by Pafawag from 1969 to 1989.. Due to the sharp drop in heavy industry production (and hence cargo transport) after 1989, this class is now also frequently used for passenger service. Soon after Pafawag started the production of EU07 The Rolling-stock Industry Central Bureau of Construction (Pl.: Centralne Biuro Konstrukcyjne Przemysłu Taboru Kolejowego) began to develop a new heavy Co-Co locomotive. The electrical part of the locomotive including the traction motors was based on the equipment used in EU07 locomotive. The first two prototypes of the class 201E were ready in 1969. Large scale production started in 1971 PKP bought 1183 locomotive until the production was ceased in 1989. This made the ET22 class one of the largest locomotive series built in Europe, trailing to some 8000 pieces of Russian Class TEM2 and Class CHME3 (built in Czechoslovakia). During the production the design of the ET22 locomotive was slightly altered. Some changes were also made during repair and maintenance. The body of the locomotives in use is different from the prototypes. There are two basic types of locomotive bodies where the
    5.00
    2 votes
    176
    SNCF Class BB 15000

    SNCF Class BB 15000

    The SNCF class BB 15000 is a class of 25 kV 50 Hz electric locomotives built by Alsthom and MTE between 1971 and 1978. Initially 65 locomotives strong, the series was widely used on the whole French 25kV network before losing services to TGV trains when the LGV Est went into service in 2007. In the mid-1960s, SNCF sought a new type of dual-current electric locomotives. As thyristor technology advanced rapidly, SNCF decided to adopt the new technology for a new series of locomotives, later known as the "Nez Cassés (Broken Noses, due to their cab styling by Paul Arzens)" or "BB 4400kW". Given that the need for pure AC-locomotives was greatest, SNCF placed an initial order of five locomotives in 1968. In 1969 a second order of 10 locomotives followed, in 1970 a third order was made for another 10 locomotives. The remaining 40 locomotives were ordered in 1973. The first five locomotives were delivered in 1971 in the overall-green "Maurienne" livery. The rest followed between 1973 and 1978, painted in the striking TEE-Arzens livery. Initially meant to support BB16000 locomotives on eastern and northeastern lines, which could not keep up with the timetables anymore after top speed on
    5.00
    2 votes
    177
    JR Freight Class EF510

    JR Freight Class EF510

    The Class EF510 (EF510形) locomotives are Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement multi-voltage AC/DC electric locomotives operated by JR Freight and East Japan Railway Company (JR East) in Japan. The design used many components common with the JR Freight Class EF210, and was intended to replace ageing JNR Class EF81 locomotives on freight services operating along the Sea of Japan coastal routes. The first locomotive, EF510-1, was delivered in February 2002 and initially based at Shin-Tsurumi Depot. The first full-production locomotive, EF510-2, was delivered in November 2003, and this and subsequent locomotives delivered featured "Red Thunder" bodyside branding. As of 1 April 2009, the fleet totalled 16 locomotives (EF510-1 to EF510-16). Four EF510 locomotives are scheduled to be delivered during fiscal 2009. None are on order for fiscal 2010. The EF510-500 subclass consists of 15 locomotives on order by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) to replace its fleet of EF81 locomotives used to haul Cassiopeia and Hokutosei overnight sleeping car trains from June 2010. These are the first locomotives to be ordered by any of the JR passenger companies since privatization. The new locomotives cost
    4.50
    2 votes
    178
    SNCB Class 15

    SNCB Class 15

    Class 15 is a type of electric locomotives operated by SNCB/NMBS. The locomotives were originally used for cross-border services into France and the Netherlands, and like the class 16 they have become surplus after the introduction of Thalys and Class 11s. They now earn their keep on a few Commuter "P" trains in the Liège area. Before the January 1, 1971, renumbering, they were known in the six-number scheme as Type 150.
    4.50
    2 votes
    179
    British Rail Class 77

    British Rail Class 77

    The British Rail Class 77, also known as Class EM2, is a class of 1.5 kV DC, Co-Co electric locomotive. They were built by Metropolitan-Vickers in 1953–1954 for use over the Woodhead Line between Manchester and Sheffield. Seven locomotives of this type were constructed. They represented the first Co-Co type of overhead electric locomotive built for use in the United Kingdom. The design was based on that of the smaller Class EM1, which dated from 1941. Initially, 27 locomotives of this type had been planned, but by the early 1950s, the benefits of using the 25 kV AC system had been demonstrated, which meant that the Woodhead Line would be an isolated electric system. Consequently the order was cut to just seven locomotives. The locomotives were initially numbered 27000-27006 and were painted in BR black livery. Construction took place at Gorton Works, Manchester with electrical equipment supplied by Metropolitan-Vickers. All seven were named after characters from Greek mythology in 1959-1960. They were primarily used for express passenger trains between Manchester Piccadilly and Sheffield Victoria. In 1957, the class was renumbered with the addition of an "E" prefix to the number.
    5.00
    1 votes
    180
    China Railways SS1

    China Railways SS1

    The SS1 is a type of AC-powered electric locomotive used on China Railways. This locomotive was the first Chinese electric main line locomotive, made by the Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Works with the assistance of the Soviet Union and following the design of the Soviet-H60 electric locomotive. The power supply was industrial-frequency single-phase AC, and the axle arrangement Co-Co. The first prototype locomotive, 6Y1-001, which used ignitron-controlled rectifier, was produced in 1958. Further 6 prototypes (002 to 007) were produced between 1962 and 1966. Silicon semiconductor-controlled rectifier was used from No. 004 onwards. In reference to technology of French-made 6Y2 locomotive, Zhuzhou Plant made major modification on design of the 6Y1 locomotive, improving the reliability of rectifier, traction motor and rheostatic braking system. The eighth locomotive, No. 008, was produced in 1968. The series also renamed from 6Y1 to SS1 (SS means Shaoshan, birth place of leader Mao Zedong). The locomotive is 19.4 meters (63 ft 8 in) long, with a maximum speed of 80 km/h (50 mph), and continuous power output of 3,780 kilowatts (5,070 hp). The model went out of production in 1988 with a
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    1 votes
    181
    DB Class 151

    DB Class 151

    The Class 151 is an electric heavy freight locomotive built for German Federal Railways between 1972 and 1978. They were built as a replacement to the aging Class 150, in order to cope with the increased requirements of this type of locomotive, in particular the desire of a 120 km/h (75 mph) top speed. On 21 November 1972 the first locomotive, 151001, was delivered by AEG and Krupp. It was followed by 11 further pilot locomotives, which were extensively tested before the main order was built. Altogether 170 locomotives were ordered, which were based at first in Hagen and Nuremberg. Originally the Class 151 was also suitable for passenger service, however it is now not possible due to not having required safety equipment. Some engines were fitted with automatic coupling (type unicupler AK69e) to haul heavy ore-trains.
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    182
    DRG Class E 77

    DRG Class E 77

    The German DRG Class E 77 was a Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft electric locomotive class, which was ordered in 1923 and entered service in 1924. The 56 units of this class were specifically intended for the Halle (Saale) - Leipzig line and for routes in southern Germany. The E 77 had been designated a light multi-purpose locomotive within DRG's first classification programme. Later it was mainly used on freight trains. The engines were delivered by BMAG, Krauss and LHW and had originally still held the State Railways' Class EG 3 title with numbers 22 001 through 031 (Bavarian) or EG 701 to 725 (Prussian). BMS delivered the electrical parts. In service, the E 77 distinguished itself with a rather limited result. One was never really satisfied with its running abilities. Moreover, there were often problems due to the many flexible electric cables. During World War II all engines ended at the Reichsbahndirektionen Halle und Hanover in exchange for Class E 75. At the end of the war, 53 locomotives were left. 42 thereof, as well as parts of engines E 77 02, 09, 19, 28, 56, 67, 71 and 73, which had been taken out of service due to damages, were ceded to the Soviet Union as reparations.
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    183
    DRG Class ET 85

    DRG Class ET 85

    The DRG Class ET 85 was a German electric locomotive with the Deutsche Reichsbahn and, later, the Deutsche Bundesbahn. In 1924 the Waggonfabrik Fuchs coach factory in Heidelberg converted four Bavarian MCCi steam railbuses into Class ET 85 electric railbuses with running numbers 01–04. After this conversion an order for 32 new vehicles of this type was delivered to Fuchs and BBC to be built from 1927 to 1933. In 1927 it was still not possible to locate the entire electric engine unter the coach floor. The transformer and the switching (Schaltwerk) was therefore installed in an engine compartment. The nine railbuses were only a little longer than their "prototypes". The doors to the passenger section were recessed like those of their predecessors, however there was only a single door to the engine compartment on the right hand side of the vehicle. All units up to number ET 85 30 originally had front doors and gangways that were later removed. In identical form and with the same internal layout - instead of the engine room, there was a luggage compartment - driving cars ES 85 01–34 appeared from 1927 to 1933. Rebuilt six-wheeled Bavarian passenger coaches, numbers EB 85 01–70, acted
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    1 votes
    184
    FS Class E632

    FS Class E632

    The FS E.632 and E.633 are two classes of Italian railways electric locomotives. They were introduced in the course of the 1980s. The locomotives are nicknamed Tigre ("tiger"). The E.632/E.633 were the first Italian locomotives to be provided with electronic traction control system, on the basis of the experiments made with the E.444.005 test locomotive. They were designed to fulfill a requirement from the Ferrovie dello Stato (or FS, then the quasi-monopolist of Italian railways) for a new locomotive to be used with medium-weight passenger trains and a similar one for cargo services on steep lines. The first unit ran on October 11, 1979. After a troublesome program of tests with the first five prototypes, a first order for 90 engines (75 E.633, the cargo version, and 15 E.632) was issued. Regular services began in 1983 in northern Italy. Once the teething problems were solved, the class proved highly successful and reliable. Differently from many of the previous FS classes, the E.632/633 carbody is not articulated. The power plant is made of three {{convert|1,635 kW FS T850 DC motors, mounted on single-engined bogies, each with two axles. Each motor is provided with a
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    1 votes
    185
    Indian locomotive class WAP-5

    Indian locomotive class WAP-5

    WAP 5 is the name of a class of electric locomotive used by Indian Railways. The first 10 locomotives were imported from ABB in Switzerland in 1995. They are supposed to be a variant of the Lok 2000. Chittaranjan Locomotive Works (CLW) started production in 2000. It was designed to haul 18 coach passenger trains at 162 km/h (101 mph). It is the first 3-phase locomotive in India. Other notable features of this locomotive are the provision of taps from the main transformers for hotel load, pantry loads, flexible gear coupling, wheel-mounted disc brakes, and a potential for speed enhancement to 225 km/h (140 mph). Braking systems include regenerative braking (160 kN), loco disc brakes, automatic train air brakes, and a charged spring parking brake. MU operation possible with a maximum of two locos. At trials, a WAP-5 has been tested up to 184 km/h (114 mph). The WAP-5 series of locomotives haul the premium trains on Indian Railways like the Mumbai Rajdhani Express, Bhopal Shatabdi Express, Lucknow Shatabdi Express, Thiruvananthapuram Rajdhani, Prayagraj Express, etc. The Bhopal Shatabdi hauled by a WAP-5 travels at 150 km/h (93 mph) in the New Delhi - Agra Cantt section. Around 50 of
    5.00
    1 votes
    186
    SNCB Class 25

    SNCB Class 25

    SNCB Class 25 locomotives are a type of electric locomotive used by the SNCB/NMBS. These locomotives were eking out an existence on freight and commuter trains. By 2009 the whole class had been withdrawn. In 1973 a programme to modify 8 class 25 locos to also be able to operate in the Netherlands was undertaken. This included fitting of 1500 V electrical equipment and various safety modifications. These locos were classified as class 25.5.
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    1 votes
    187
    SNCB Class 26

    SNCB Class 26

    NMBS/SNCB class 26s are single voltage freight locomotives. Unusually for Belgium these locomotives are classified as B-B rather than Bo-Bo, being fitted with Schneider monomotor bogies. They could be found working the heaviest freight trains in Belgium. They were fitted for multiple working with class 23, and occasionally strayed onto their commuter "P" train duties. All class 26s were taken out of the service in December 2011.
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    1 votes
    188
    DBAG Class 145 and 146

    DBAG Class 145 and 146

    The DBAG Class 145 and DBAG Class 146 are Bo'Bo' mainline electric locomotives built by Adtranz primarily for the Deutsche Bahn at the end of the 1990s. The Class 145 is the freight version for DB Cargo; the Class 146 is the passenger version for DB Regio. Additional freight machines were built for the former Swiss railway Mittelthurgaubahn as well as for various private operators and leasing companies. The classes of locomotives are predecessors of the Bombardier TRAXX locomotives. The AdTranz DBAG Class 145 derives from the prototype locomotive 128 001 (also known as 12X) (see DBAG Class 128) that was built by AEG and Henschel; like competitor Krauss-Maffei’s 127 001 (See EuroSprinter), it uses asynchronous electric motors to drive the locomotive: based on experiences gained from DB Class 120. The prototype resulted in an order from DB AG for eighty locomotives for medium-weight freight trains. These locomotives were delivered starting in 1997. By the end of production in 2000, 80 locomotives had been produced; built for DB Cargo. Later the locomotives were inherited by the successor organisations Railion followed by DB Schenker. A further six units were built for the private
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    2 votes
    189
    SNCF Class BB 37000

    SNCF Class BB 37000

    The SNCF Class BB 37000 "Prima" electric locomotives are currently being built by Alstom. These locomotives are the triple-voltage version of the Class BB 27000. Sixty of these locomotives, numbered 37001-37060, have been ordered by Fret SNCF for international freight traffic. 37007 was destroyed in the terrible Zoufftgen train accident on 11 October 2006.
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    2 votes
    190
    WCAM Class

    WCAM Class

    WCAM (W -broad gauge ; CA -Both DC and AC ; M -for both goods and passenger service) is the dual-power AC/DC series locomotive used by Indian Railways. These locomotives can run under both DC traction and AC traction. All the WCAM locos were made by BHEL. They have 750V DC traction motors, using resistance banks in DC mode and a variable ratio auto-transformer with rectifier units in AC mode, for power control. The WCAM class locomotives are in service only in the Mumbai region. The dual-voltage WCAM series locomotives haul intercity trains out of Mumbai DC suburban region which is still on a 1500V DC overhead system, as opposed to other parts of India which have 25000 V AC overhead. Central Railways section only needs the change-over for the traction, being DC inwards near Mumbai and AC on the outer side. Western Railways doesn't need WCAM Locos now because Western Railways Mumbai section has been converted to AC Section. On the Central Railway line they are in service on Mumbai - Igatpuri line. Sometimes they travel to Manmad There are four types of Locomotives under WCAM class: Comparative Specifications of different type of WCAM
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    2 votes
    191
    DRG Class E 18

    DRG Class E 18

    The Deutsche Bundesbahn (DRG) Baureihe E 18 is a class of electric locomotives in Germany, originally operated by Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft (DRG). With exception of Class E 19 it was Deutsche Reichsbahn's fastest electric locomotive. The Austria Federal Railways (ÖBB) also used modified versions of the locomotives as Class ÖBB 1018. Electric traction passenger services in Germany dates back to the year 1881, when near Berlin the first public line was taken into service in Berlin. Despite successful test runs with three-phase current electric railcars up to a top speed of 210 km/h (130 mph) in 1903, the German state railways decided to use single-phase alternating current because the overhead line of three-phase current was very complicated. The first mainline electric locomotives were all equipped with large, slow-going single electric motors. Obviously the large single engines and the resulting power transmission by connecting rods made for poor operation characteristics at high speed. Nevertheless it was not before 1913 that first electric main line locomotives with nose-suspended, fast-going single motors were commissioned. This development was further delayed by World
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    192
    PKP class ET21

    PKP class ET21

    PKP ET21 is a name for a Polish electric freight locomotive produced between years 1957 - 1971 in Pafawag. It was the first post-war Polish electric locomotive, designed in 1955. Besides being delivered for PKP, ET21 locomotives were delivered to the mining industry, where they are used up to now. Mechanical part of the locomotive was designed in the Rolling-stock Industry Central Bureau of Construction (Pl.: Centralne Biuro Konstrukcyjne Przemysłu Taboru Kolejowego) in Poznań, basing on instructions from the Railway Electrification Office (Pl.: Biuro Elektryfikacji Kolei). Electrical part of ET21 locomotive was tightly based on Soviet VL22 locomotive. Production started in 1957 at Pafawag in Wrocław in co-operation with Dolmel (Wrocław), Elta (Łódź), Elester (Łódź) and Apena (Bielsko-Biała) companies. After first two units (prototypes) were ready the serial production started. At the beginning those locomotives bore E600 designation, which was changed to E06 and after introducing RN-58/MK0001 norm to present ET21. By the end of 1958 18 new machines were ready. After producing 70 first units and gaining significant experience Pafawag decided to introduce several technical changes
    4.00
    1 votes
    193
    SJ Dm3

    SJ Dm3

    Dm and Dm3 is a series of locomotives used by the Swedish State Railways (SJ) and later Malmtafik i Kiruna (MTAS) for pulling iron ore trains on the Iron Ore Line in Sweden and Ofoten Line in Norway. A total of 39 double-locomotives (Dm) were delivered between 1953 and 1971, built by ASEA. A further 19 center locomotives (Dm3) were later delivered. Norwegian State Railways also operated 12 similar locomotives, designated NSB El 12. The Dm is a slower, freight-optimized version of the Da-locomotive. The iron ore trains on the Iron Ore Line between Luleå in Sweden and Narvik in Norway had been using the Of for a long time, and the Swedish State Railways chose to order new locomotives for the Iron Ore Line at the same time as they ordered the Da-locomotives. At first 24 double locomotives were delivered in 1953, but in the 1960s SJ ordered additional 15 double sets. These were given more powerful engines, though the older five double sets were later rebuilt. These double locomotives could pull 3,400 tonne trains, but this was not sufficient during the end of the 1960s so SJ ordered 19 new center locomotives. These were mounted permanently between each of the Dm-locomotives, without
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    1 votes
    194
    TCDD E43000

    TCDD E43000

    TCDD E43000 is a series of electric locomotives used by the Turkish State Railways. The batch consisted of 45 units delivered in 1987 and used throughout the electrified parts of the Turkish rail network. The locomotives have a power output of 3,180 kW and are capable of 120 km/h.
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    195
    DS3

    DS3

    DS3 (Ukrainian: ДС3) — AC electric locomotive manufactured by Dnipropetrovsk research-and-production association for electric locomotive engineering (NPO DEVZ) (Ukrainian: Дніпропетровський електровозобудівний завод, ДЕВЗ) jointly with Siemens. DS3 was designed as dual-purpose locomotive for both passenger and freight service, but now is used primary for pulling express passenger trains. Siemens provides power electronics while DEVZ produces chassis, traction motors, auxiliary machinery etc.
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    196
    EF60 electric locomotive

    EF60 electric locomotive

    The EF60 class was the first Japanese second-generation DC electric locomotive type with six driven axles (classes EF60 to EF67), and the first versions used the same MT49 390 kW traction motors as the ED60 and ED61 designs. A total of 143 locomotives were built between 1960 and 1964 by Kawasaki, Tōshiba, Tōyō & Kisha, and Mitsubishi. The class was split between 129 freight locomotives (classified EF60-0) designed to supersede the mammoth EH10s on Tōkaidō and Sanyō Main Line freight, and 14 passenger locomotives (EF60-500) to replace EF58s on sleeping car trains on the Tōkaidō and Sanyō Mainlines. The third-batch build of locos (EF60 84 to 129 and EF60 512 to 514) had up-rated traction motors and differed slightly in having twin headlamps (like the EF65 and other later types) rather than the single large headlamp on earlier versions. Unlike the ED60s, these locos were designed to operate singly rather than in pairs, and so cab-end gangway doors were not included. The EF60-0s initially appeared in the standard all-over brown livery, but were repainted into blue from 1965 onward. The role of the EF60-500s at the head of the premier Blue Trains was short-lived, however, with the
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    197

    EMD GM10B

    The GM10B was a solitary testbed electric locomotive for freight duties built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of the United States in collaboration with ASEA of Sweden. It was built at EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant entering service in August 1976. Equipped with B-B-B trucks and a high proportion of Swedish ASEA design and technology, the locomotive was designed for high-speed freight service. At the time, high oil prices had a number of large US railroads contemplating electrification of their most heavily used lines, while the only major US railroad with freight-hauling electrification, the Penn Central, had a fleet of aging locomotives needing replacement. Circumstances changed after the GM10B and earlier GM6C locomotives were developed; oil prices declined, which wiped out the interest freight railroads had in electrification, while diesel locomotive power and adhesion were improved. Meanwhile, the bankruptcy of Penn Central led to the division of the railroad's physical plant between Amtrak, which inherited much of the electrified region, and Conrail. Increased access charges on the part of Amtrak led to Conrail ceasing electric operations in 1982, dismantling the
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    198
    Indian locomotive class WAG-9

    Indian locomotive class WAG-9

    WAG-9 is the name of a type of electric locomotive used in India. Homed mainly at Gomoh, Ajni,Lallaguda,Tughlakabad and Bhilai, it is currently the most powerful locomotive in Indian Railways' fleet. It is very similar to the class WAP-7; The only difference being the gear ratio which makes it suitable for heavy freight operations. In November 1998, CLW started producing these with indigenous components. The first one, 'Navyug' (translated, 'New Era'), was flagged off on Nov. 14. They have ,like the WAP-5 units, GTO thyristor converters and 3-phase asynchronous motors. Newer versions starting from Wag-9 31248 feature full igbt traction control. The class is named as Wag-9i There is a technical variant of this class named WAG-9H. This locomotive is referred to as the "Heavy Haul" freight locomotive of the Indian Railways This locomotive was conceived owing to the extreme growth in the rail freight transportation sector. The growth in this sector is considered to be of great importance in the growth of the economy of India. This need had arisen the need for more electrification and electric locomotives in India. Around 60 to 65% of the freight haulage of the Indian Railways takes
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    199
    IORE

    IORE

    Iore, often stylized IORE, is a class of 26 electric locomotives built by Adtranz and its successor Bombardier Transportation for the Swedish mining company LKAB's railway division Malmtrafik. The class is a variation of Adtranz's Octeon modular product platform, thus related to Bombardier's later TRAXX platform. The locomotives haul iron ore freight trains on the Iron Ore Line and Ofoten Line in Sweden and Norway, respectively. The 8,600-tonne (8,500-long-ton; 9,500-short-ton) 68-car trains are hauled by two single-ended Co′Co′ locomotives, each with a power output of 5,400 kilowatts (7,200 hp). Each operates with 600 kilonewtons (130,000 lbf) tractive effort and has a maximum speed of 80 kilometres per hour (50 mph). Delivery of the first series of 18 locomotives was made from 2000 to 2004, and they replaced some of the aging Dm3 and El 15 units. In 2007, eight more vehicles were ordered, with production to be completed by 2011. The Ofoten Line and the Iron Ore Line are two railroad lines which were built to allow iron ore to be hauled from the LKAB's mines in Kiruna, Svappavaara and Malmberget in Sweden to Luleå on the Baltic Sea in Sweden and to Narvik on the Norwegian Sea in
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    200
    JNR Class EF81

    JNR Class EF81

    The EF81 class of electric locomotives are Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement multi-voltage AC/DC electric locomotives operated on passenger and freight services in Japan. 152 locomotives built from 1968 to 1979 in 3 batches and numbered EF81 1 to EF81 152. Four locomotives were built in 1975 with corrugated stainless steel bodies for use on services through the Kanmon Tunnel to Kyushu. 14 locomotives built in 1986 and 1987 and mostly operated along the Kanmon Tunnel, although some locomotives operating on a few "Blue Train" services served some railway lines in Kyushu, in particular sections of the Kagoshima Main Line and the Nippō Main Line as well as the entire Nagasaki Main Line. Five locomotives built in 1991 and 1992 for use hauling freight services through the Kanmon Tunnel. Locomotives EF81 451 and 452 have modern-style headlight clusters. Three locomotives built in 1989 for JR Freight.
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    201

    JNR Class EH10

    The EH10 class of electric locomotives were Bo-Bo+Bo-Bo wheel arrangement two-unit DC freight locomotives operated by Japanese National Railways in Japan. The exterior was designed by industrial designer Masao Hagiwara. The EH10 was used for 1,200 tonne freight trains on the Tōkaidō Main Line between Tokyo (Shiodome) and Osaka (Umeda). One example, EH10 61, is preserved at Higashi-Awaji Minami Park in Osaka. The EH10 is available in model form in N gauge from Kato.
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    202
    NS Class 1300

    NS Class 1300

    The Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) Class 1300 was a Dutch locomotive in service for 48 years from 1952 until 2000. It was built at the same time as the NS Class 1100 at Alsthom and was based on the SNCF Class CC 7100. The Class 1300 is a bigger 6-axle version of the Class 1100. The first loco, the 1301, was delivered in 1952 and was first used at the opening of the electric service between Zwolle and Groningen. After being in service for less than a year 1303 was damaged beyond repair when it collided with EMU 642 at Weesp on June 19, 1953. After this accident Alsthom delivered a new loco that was originally to be delivered as a CC 7100 to the SNCF. 1303 was scraped on the spot although some equipment was salvaged to be used in replacement loco 1311. The locos numbered 1312-1316 were delivered in 1956 in a Berlin blue colour scheme (the locos delivered in 1952 were delivered in a turquoise colour scheme, but were painted Berlin blue in 1955). During the 1980s the entire Class 1300 got prolonging maintenance and were painted yellow, with a big NS logo at the side. Also, the locos were all named after a Dutch city: In 2000 the last locomotives were withdrawn from service. 1302, 1304,
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    203

    NSB El 12

    NSB El 12 was an electric locomotive used by Norges Statsbaner (the Norwegian State Railways, NSB) to haul iron ore trains on Ofotbanen between 1957 and 1990. The locomotives were based on the Swedish Dm that was used with success on the connecting Malmbanan. The eight units were always operated in pairs or in triples and were numbered 12 2113 - 12 2120. Four double sets remain as heritage locomotives. After World War II the production resumed at the mines operated by LKAB at Kiruna and Malmberget with estimates of a 50% production increase within few years. To solve the problems with increased traffic, the railway companies had the choice of either building double track or hauling longer trains. The latter solution was chosen, and on the Norwegian side the ten El 3 locomotives were converted from five double sets to three triple sets with one reserve and the two El 4 converted to a double set. But this solution would require more locomotives. The Swedish Statens Järnvägar (SJ), who operated the trains from the mines to Riksgränsen, chose to buy 12 Dm units in 1952, based on the Da units from 1950. NSB chose to buy six more or less identical units from Motala Verkstad in 1954 and
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    204

    NSB El 2

    NSB El 2 was a series of two electric locomotives built by Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri and Thune for Norges Statsbaner in 1923. They remained in service until 1967. Neither has been preserved.
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    205
    NSB El 5

    NSB El 5

    NSB El 5 was an electric locomotive built by AEG, Norsk Elektrisk & Brown Boveri, Siemens, Hamar Jernstøperi and Thune between 1927 to 1936, with a total of 12 units being delivered to Norges Statsbaner. They were capable of 1,044 kW and top speed of 70 km/h. Number 2039 is preserved by the Norwegian Railway Museum.
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    206
    NZR EC class

    NZR EC class

    The New Zealand EC class was a class of electric locomotive used in Christchurch, New Zealand. They replaced steam locomotives on trains through the Lyttelton rail tunnel between Lyttelton and Christchurch. In 1929 the Christchurch to Lyttelton line was electrified in order to reduce the smoke nuisance in the 2.6 km (1.6 mi) Lyttelton Tunnel, which had been opened in 1867. Six EC class locomotives were purchased from English Electric exclusively for this work. They worked for more than 40 years until the section was dieselised in 1970, by which stage three locos had been withdrawn. Class leader EC 7 along with EO 3 was transported to Ferrymead by road in 1972 and stored by the tramway section until 1977 when it was shifted onto the railway tracks. In 1978, part of the Ferrymead line was fitted with catenary overhead and in 1980, some test runs were done with EC 7 at 600V using the tramway power supply. Construction of a substation able to supply the railway, tramway and trolley buses was subsequently commenced and in November 1988, it was officially opened with trains hauled by EC 7 on the electrified section of the Railway. EC 7 is periodically operated at the Park, sometimes
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    207
    PKP class EP07

    PKP class EP07

    PKP class EP07 is the name for a Polish electric locomotive used by the Polish railway operator Polskie Koleje Państwowe (PKP). The EP07 is a later modification of the EU07 locomotive. The changes are:
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    208
    PKP class EU06

    PKP class EU06

    EU06 is a class of electric locomotives in service with the Polish state railway PKP. EU06 has driving cabs at both ends. The locomotives are equipped for multiple working which allows one driver to drive two coupled engines from one cab. One locomotive can haul passenger trains of up to 650 tonnes at 125 kilometres per hour (78 mph) and freight trains of up to 2,000 tonnes at a speed of 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph). Two locomotives coupled in multiple can haul a freight train of up to 3,600 tonnes. These figures apply to driving on level gradients. All members and panels are made of Cor-Ten steel and the underframe is a shallow, cellular structure with closely spaced light-gauge longitudinal and transverse members plated above and below to make a set of closed cells. The body sides were built up on rectangular vertical tubes forming a set of pillars and are double-skinned for additional strength and rigidity. This is to maintain the shape of the locomotive because the roof of the entire machine space between the two cabs is removable to allow machinery to be lifted out and replaced. The superstructure is built to withstand buffing loads up to 295 long tons (300 t). English
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    209

    SJ F

    The SJ Class F is an electric locomotive used by Statens Järnvägar (SJ) of Sweden for hauling passenger trains. It was built in 24 copies by ASEA 1942-49 and was in service to 1983. In 1930 the Västra Stambanan line between Stockholm and Göteborg was improved so the top speed was increased to 120 kilometres per hour (75 mph). At the time SJ did not have locomotives that could reach that speed, so an intensive work was initiated to construct a fast locomotive in cooperation with ASEA. The alternatives were traditional wheel construction or the newer bogie technology. SJ chose the latter with wheel arrangement 1'Do1', with four powered axles. Exterior wise the F-series was very similar to the D-series. The three test engines delivered in 1942 had different configurations of power transmission. After testing an additional 21 locomotives were delivered during the 1940s. They differed by only having two instead of three front windows, though the first three were later rebuilt. The F-series was put into fast express trains on the lines between Malmö and Stockholm, between Malmö and Göteborg, between Stockholm and Göteborg, and between Stockholmn and Oslo, Norway. When the Rc-series came
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    210
    SNCB Class 13

    SNCB Class 13

    The SNCB class 13 are a type of mixed use 200 km/h multivoltage electric locomotive of type Tractis designed by Alstom in the late 1990s for the Belgian and Luxembourgish railways (CFL class 3000). The locomotives operate push-pull trains with coaches of type I11, as well as freight trains. At the beginning of the 1990s SNCB had a requirement to renew its mainline locomotive fleet: it required fast high power passenger locomotives for intercity trains on lines between Ostend, Brussels, Liege and Eupen, as well as needing replacements for SNCB diesel locomotive classes 52, 53 and 54 which dated to the 1950s and were used on freight trains for the steel industry on the Maas-Athus line and into Luxembourg. These requirements led to the decision to acquire a universal locomotive design. The design specifications included a minimum top speed of 200 kilometres per hour (120 mph) and capability to operate under 3kV DC and 25kV AC electrification. Luxembourg state rail company CFL also had a locomotive fleet dating from the 1950/60s, including electric CFL 3600s and GM-EMD diesel engined locomotives CFL 1800. The company also planned to electrify its entire network, the majority at 25kV
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    211
    SNCB Class 18

    SNCB Class 18

    Class 18 was a type of electric locomotive operated by NMBS/SNCB. These locomotives are no longer in service with NMBS/SNCB. They were derived from the SNCF class CC 40100 express passenger locomotives. Their multi-voltage capabilities allowed them to work beyond Belgium's borders, mainly Paris - Brussels/Liège and Oostende - Cologne.
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    212
    SNCB Class 27

    SNCB Class 27

    Class 27 locomotives are the staple power for SNCB/NMBS. They work all over the electrified lines including the occasional trip through to Luxembourg.
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    213
    SNCF Class BB 9300

    SNCF Class BB 9300

    The SNCF Class BB 9300 electric locomotives were built by Schneider-Jeumont/CEM between 1967–1969. In recent years they have been more common on services around Marseille, Avignon, Nîmes, Narbonne and Toulouse. All are allocated Toulouse depot. They work passenger services and do not operate freight services. The main service they operate is between Marseille and Toulouse, but can be seen elsewhere in the south west.
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