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Best Educational institution extra of All Time

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    1
    UCE Birmingham Conservatoire

    UCE Birmingham Conservatoire

    • Libraries: Conservatoire Library
    Birmingham Conservatoire is an international conservatoire and a major concert venue, its main platform being the Adrian Boult Hall. Prior to 1989, it was known as the Birmingham School of Music and was one of the faculties of Birmingham City University, the only one out of the nine conservatoires in the United Kingdom that was a university faculty. However, in 2008, as part of the re-organisation of faculties it became a part of the Faculty of Performance, Media and English (PME). Situated in Paradise Place, in the centre of Birmingham between Centenary Square and Chamberlain Square, the conservatoire was founded in 1886 as the Birmingham School of Music, which had been a department of, and stands on the original site of, the Birmingham and Midland Institute, since around 1859. The title 'Birmingham Conservatoire' was adopted in 1989, with its undergraduate diploma and award (GBSM and ABSM) renamed from 'Graduate / Associate of the Birmingham School of Music' to 'Graduate / Associate of the Birmingham Schools of Music', to reflect the internal structure adopted of the Schools of Creative Studies, of Orchestral Studies, of Keyboard Studies, and of Vocal Studies. In 1995 the GBSM
    8.14
    7 votes
    2
    Grand Valley State University

    Grand Valley State University

    • Libraries: Steelcase Library
    Grand Valley State University (commonly referred to as GVSU, GV, or Grand Valley) is a public liberal arts university located in Allendale, Michigan, United States. The university was established in 1960, and its main campus is situated on 1,270 acres (5.1 km) approximately 12 miles (19 km) west of Grand Rapids. Classes are also offered at the university's growing Pew Campus in Downtown Grand Rapids, Meijer Campus in Holland, and through centers at Muskegon and Traverse City established in cooperation with local community colleges. GVSU is a comprehensive coeducational university serving more than 24,654 students as of fall 2012, from all 83 Michigan counties and dozens of other states and foreign countries. It is one of America's 100 largest universities in terms of enrollment and employs more than 2,000 people with about 864 regular full-time faculty and 1,170 support staff. The university currently has alumni residing in all 50 U.S. states, Canada, and 25 countries around the world. For the 2010-2011 academic year, GVSU was recognized as a top producer of Fulbright Scholars for Master's institutions by the Chronicle of Higher Education. GVSU has also been noted for its
    8.00
    6 votes
    3
    Leeds Metropolitan University

    Leeds Metropolitan University

    • Libraries: Leeds Metropolitan University Headingley Library
    Leeds Metropolitan University is situated in Leeds, West Yorkshire, with campuses in the city centre and in the suburb of Headingley. It gained university status in 1992; prior to this date it was known as Leeds Polytechnic. The number of students is listed by the HESA 2008/09 data as the 15th largest in Britain. The current Vice Chancellor, Professor Susan Price, joined in January 2010 and three new deputy Vice Chancellors have been appointed to lead the areas of strategic development, research and enterprise, and student experience. The university’s origins can be traced back to 1824, with the foundation of the Leeds Mechanics Institute. Leeds Polytechnic was formed in 1970 and was a constituent part of the Leeds Local Education Authority until it became an independent Higher Education Corporation on 1 April 1989. In 1992 the institution was given University status. Lord Woolmer of Leeds is Chair of the Board at Leeds Metropolitan. Lord Woolmer has been a member of the House of Lords since 1999. He was Chairman of the House of Lords Selection Committee on European Internal Market Policies for four years and is currently a member of the Select Committee on European Economic and
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    • Libraries: Jewish National and University Library
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Hebrew: האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים‎, ha-Universita ha-Ivrit B'irushalayim; Arabic: الجامعة العبرية في القدس‎, al-Ǧāmiʻah al-ʻIbriyyah fil-Quds; abbreviated HUJI) is Israel's second-oldest university, after the Technion. The Hebrew University has three campuses in Jerusalem and one in Rehovot. The world's largest Jewish studies library is located on its Edmond J. Safra Givat Ram campus. The First Board of Governors included Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, Martin Buber, and Chaim Weizmann. Four of Israel's prime ministers are alumni of the Hebrew University. In the last decade, five graduates of the University received the Nobel Prize and one was awarded the Fields Medal. According to the Academic Ranking of World Universities, the Hebrew University is the top university in Israel, overall the 52nd-best university in the world, 16th in Mathematics, 27th in Computer Science and 44th in Business/Economics. In 2012, the Center for World University Rankings ranked the Hebrew University 22nd in the world and second in Israel in its CWUR World University Rankings, while another survey ranked it as the 9th best university to work in, and the 2nd best
    6.57
    7 votes
    5
    Johns Hopkins University

    Johns Hopkins University

    • Libraries: William H. Welch Medical Library
    The Johns Hopkins University (informally Johns Hopkins, JHU, or simply Hopkins) is a private research university based in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. The university was founded on January 22, 1876 and named for its benefactor, the philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Daniel Coit Gilman was inaugurated as the first president on February 22, 1876. Johns Hopkins maintains campuses in Maryland; Washington, D.C.; Italy; China and Singapore. The university is organized into two undergraduate divisions and five graduate divisions on two main campuses—the Homewood campus and the Medical Institutions campus—both located in Baltimore. The university also consists of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the Peabody Institute, the Carey Business School, and various other facilities. Johns Hopkins pioneered the concept of the modern research university in the United States and has ranked among the world's top such universities throughout its history. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has ranked Johns Hopkins #1 among U.S. academic institutions in total science, medical and engineering research and development spending for 31 consecutive years. As of 2011,
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Southern Methodist University

    Southern Methodist University

    • Libraries: Fondren Library Center
    Southern Methodist University (SMU) is a private research university in University Park, Texas, United States. Founded in 1911 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, SMU operates campuses in University Park, Plano, and Taos, New Mexico. SMU is owned by the South Central Jurisdiction of the United Methodist Church. 7,000 of the University's 12,000 students are undergraduates. The university was chartered on April 17, 1911 by the five Annual Conferences in Texas of the United Methodist Church. Classes were originally planned to start in 1913 but were postponed until 1915. SMU was established as the unsuccessful attempt to relocate Southwestern University from Georgetown, Texas to either Fort Worth or Dallas. The first relocation effort by Polytechnic College president Hiram A. Boaz and spearheaded by Southwestern president Robert Stewart Hyer involved merging Southwestern with Polytechnic College (now Texas Wesleyan University). The post-merger university would retain the Southwestern name while occupying Polytechnic's campus in Fort Worth. The merger never came to fruition, primarily because the Dallas Chamber of Commerce set up a committee to raise funds and entice Southwestern
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Eastern Washington University

    Eastern Washington University

    • Libraries: John F. Kennedy Library
    Eastern Washington University is an American public, coeducational university located in Cheney, Washington. Founded in 1882, the university is academically divided into four colleges: Arts and Letters; Business and Public Administration; Science, Health and Engineering; and Social & Behavioral Sciences and Social Work. As of the year 2011, Eastern Washington University enrolled over 12,000 graduate and undergraduate students for the fall semester. Eastern Washington University was established in 1882 by a $10,000 grant from expressman Benjamin Pierce Cheney, and was originally known as Benjamin P. Cheney Academy to honor its founder. In 1889 the school was renamed State Normal School and in 1937 to Eastern Washington College of Education. The campus grew quickly in size following World War II. The school became Eastern Washington State College. During this era, Eastern added various graduate and undergraduate degree programs. In 1977, the school's name was changed for the final time to Eastern Washington University by the Washington State Legislature. The main campus of Eastern Washington University is located in Cheney. A branch campus, known as the Riverpoint Campus is located
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    City University, London

    City University, London

    • Libraries: City University Main Library
    City University London (informally City University or City) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom. It was founded in 1894 as the Northampton Institute and became a university in 1966, when it adopted its present name. The Inns of Court School of Law, which merged with City University in 2001, was established in 1852, making it the university's oldest constituent part. City University has its main campus in the Islington area of central London, with additional campuses in the City of London and the Holborn, Smithfield and Whitechapel areas of London. It is organised into seven Schools, within which there are around 40 academic departments and centres, including the City University Department of Journalism, the Cass Business School and the Inns of Court School of Law (part of the City Law School). City University had a total income of £178.6 million in 2010/11, of which £8 million was from research grants and contracts. In 2012 it was ranked 29th in the UK according to the Times Higher Education 'table to tables', 327th in the world according to the QS World University Rankings and is included inTimes Higher Education's list of the top 100 universities in
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    McGill University Faculty of Law

    McGill University Faculty of Law

    • Libraries: Nahum Gelber Law Library
    The Faculty of Law is a constituent faculty of McGill University, in Montreal, Quebec. Its graduates obtain both a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) and Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.), concurrently, in three to four years, allowing them to practise in both the Canadian, U.S. and UK common law system as well as Quebec's civil law system. The Faculty of Law was officially created in 1848, making it the first to be established in Canada, as a response to a petition from 23 young men who had been studying independently for the bar. Before that, lawyers in Quebec, like in the United States, did not need a law degree and typically pursued five-year apprenticeships to be called to the bar. For most of its history, it offered degrees only based on Quebec law, which features the civil law system in the sphere of private law. For most of the period from 1848 until 1968, the Faculty provided only the Bachelor of Civil Law degree, making McGill's the only law faculty in Canada to teach civil law in English. However, between 1920 and 1924, the Faculty did add a common law degree program, making three-year civil or common law degrees and a four-year joint degree program available. This early incarnation
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    Nottingham Trent University

    Nottingham Trent University

    • Libraries: Boots library
    Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a public teaching and research university in Nottingham, United Kingdom. It was founded as a new university in 1992 from the existing Trent Polytechnic (later Nottingham Polytechnic), however it can trace its roots back to 1843 with the establishment of the Nottingham Government School of Design which still exists within the university today. Nottingham Trent University is one of the largest universities in the United Kingdom with around 24,000 students split over three different campuses. Nottingham Trent University was formed by the amalgamation of many separate institutions of higher education. It originated from the Nottingham Government School of Design founded in 1843. In 1945, the Nottingham and District Technical College was established. In 1958, Nottingham Regional College of Technology opened and in 1959, the Nottingham College of Education began at Clifton. In 1964, Nottingham Regional College was opened and in 1966, the original Nottingham College of Design was linked with the Regional College. Together they merged and the institution was upgraded to Polytechnic status in 1970 to become 'Trent Polytechnic'. In 1975, it amalgamated
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    Camden County College

    Camden County College

    • Libraries: Rohrer E- Library
    Camden County College (CCC) is an accredited, co-educational, two-year, public, community college located in Camden County, New Jersey. Camden County College has four distinct campuses located in Blackwood, Camden, Sicklerville, and Cherry Hill. The main campus is located in Blackwood. As a community college, the school offers both liberal arts and technical training including a Nursing Program, a Laser Engineering Program, an Automotive Training Program. The College also has a liberal arts Honors College. It is currently the second largest school in New Jersey (by enrollment) with around 16,000 students. The College offers degree programs in Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, and Associate in Applied Science degree programs and certificate programs. Camden County College is also home to the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility which provides lecture series and workshops conducted by nationally recognized academic figures. In 1962, a New Jersey State law enabled the establishment of colleges by counties. Camden County created a college board in 1964 and a voter referendum, in 1965, approved the creation of a county college. In 1966, the Freeholders of Camden County
    6.14
    7 votes
    12
    University of Regina

    University of Regina

    • Libraries: Dr. John Archer Library
    The University of Regina is a public research university located in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Founded in 1911 as a private denominational high school of the Methodist Church of Canada, it began an association with the University of Saskatchewan as a junior college in 1925, and was disaffiliated by the Church and fully ceded to the University in 1934; in 1961 it attained degree-granting status as the Regina Campus of the University of Saskatchewan. It became an autonomous university in 1974. The enabling legislation is An Act Respecting the University of Regina, Chapter U-5. The University of Regina has an enrolment of over 12,000 full and part-time students. The university's student newspaper, The Carillon, is a member of CUP. The University of Regina is well-reputed for having a focus on experiential learning and offers internships, professional placements and practicums in addition to cooperative education placements in 41 programs. This experiential learning and career-preparation focus was further highlighted when, in 2009 the University of Regina launched the UR Guarantee Program, a unique program guaranteeing participating students a successful career launch after
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    Mercy College

    Mercy College

    • Libraries: Bronx Campus Library
    Mercy College (Mercy or Mercy NY) is a private, non-sectarian, non-profit liberal arts college with its main campus in Dobbs Ferry, New York, and satellite locations throughout southeastern New York, including the Bronx, Manhattan, and Yorktown. The college was founded in 1950 by the Sisters of Mercy, and offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a wide variety of disciplines, including education, business, counseling, health professions, and liberal arts. Men were first admitted in 1967. The institution experienced significant growth in the 1990s, with a total student population of close to 10,000 by 2006. The main campus and dormitories are in Dobbs Ferry, right on the Hudson River, and is a 30 minute train ride into Manhattan. Commuter students supplement the student populations in Dobbs Ferry and make up the entire student populations at all other campuses. The college provides a variety of scholarships, as part of the institution's mission focus of providing opportunity, and welcomes a diverse student body, while also offering several nationally competitive programs, particularly in the health professions. Mercy's Original Nickname from the School's inception was
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    Chelsea College of Art and Design

    Chelsea College of Art and Design

    • Libraries: Chelsea Library
    Chelsea College of Art and Design, the erstwhile Chelsea School of Art, is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London, and is a leading British art and design institution with an international reputation. It offers further and higher education courses in fine art, graphic design, interior design, spatial design and textile design up to PhD level. The Chelsea College of Art and Design was originally an integral school of the South-Western Polytechnic, which opened at Manresa Road, Chelsea, in 1895 to provide scientific and technical education to Londoners. Day and evening classes for men and women were held in domestic economy, mathematics, engineering, natural science, art and music. Art was taught from the beginning of the Polytechnic, and included design, weaving, embroidery and electrodeposition. The South-Western Polytechnic became the Chelsea Polytechnic in 1922 and taught a growing number of registered students of the University of London. At the beginning of the 1930s, the School of Art began to widen, including courses in craft training and commercial design from 1931. H.S Williamson, the school's appointed headmaster from 1930 to 1958, introduced sculpture
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Vanderbilt University Law School

    Vanderbilt University Law School

    • Libraries: Alyne Queener Massey Law Library
    Vanderbilt University Law School (also known as Vanderbilt Law School or VLS) is a graduate school of Vanderbilt University. Established in 1874, it is one of the oldest law schools in the southern United States. Vanderbilt Law has consistently ranked among the top 20 law schools in the nation, and is currently ranked 16th in the 2012 edition of U.S. News & World Report. In addition to its U.S. News & World Report ranking, VLS was ranked 11th in the inaugural Vault Top Law School Guide. In 2010, The Princeton Review ranked Vanderbilt 6th for Best Classroom Experience, and 6th for Best Quality of Life. Most recently, Vanderbilt Law was ranked 12th in the 2009 National Law Journal job placement study, with slightly over 47% of the graduating class being hired by the NLJ Top 250 firms. The mean starting salary, in private practice, for Vanderbilt Law graduates is $145,000. Vanderbilt Law School enrolls approximately 640 students, with each entering class consisting of approximately 195 students. The dean of the law school is Chris Guthrie, who began a five-year appointment as dean on July 1, 2009. With total enrollment of approximately 640 Juris Doctor and L.L.M. candidates, usually
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    Nottingham University Business School

    Nottingham University Business School

    • Libraries: University of Nottingham Business Library
    Not to be confused with Nottingham Business School which is the business school at nearby Nottingham Trent University Nottingham University Business School (NUBS) is the business school of the University of Nottingham, England situated on the university's Jubilee Campus. The current director of the business school is Professor Martin Binks. The business school was formed from the university's departments of industrial economics, accounting and insurance and its Institute of Management Studies. The school was originally known as the School of Management and Finance. The 2008 Times Good University Guide ranked the School sixth among UK management schools. NUBS also ranks overall 28th in the world in the Aspen Institute's 2007 'Beyond Grey Pinstripes' Global Top 100; within the research category, Nottingham University Business School was placed 2nd for its research into social, environmental, and ethical issues in management. Nottingham University Business School offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes not only in the Nottingham campus but also in their campus in Ningbo and Malaysia. Located on an award winning campus, with over 2,500 students and around 200 staff,
    6.00
    7 votes
    17
    Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

    Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

    • Libraries: Delia Montes-Gallo Library of the Health Sciences El Paso
    The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) offers programs in Allied Health Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy. TTUHSC's main campus is in Lubbock, but campuses are also located in Abilene, Amarillo, Dallas, El Paso and the Permian Basin. Aside from its teaching and research activities, it provides medical services to more than 100 counties, a geographic region larger than most states, as well as to all Texas Department of Corrections facilities in the western portion of Texas. TTUHSC is a separate but equal institution from Texas Tech University, and both universities are part of the Texas Tech University System. The Texas Tech University School of Medicine was created by the 61st Texas Legislature in May 1969 as a multi-campus institution with Lubbock as the administrative center and with regional campuses at Amarillo, El Paso, and the Permian Basin. In 1979, the charter was expanded to become the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, leading the way for establishment of the Schools of Nursing, Allied Health Sciences, and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. In 1993, the Legislature authorized the establishment of a School
    6.83
    6 votes
    18
    Pratt Institute

    Pratt Institute

    • Libraries: Pratt Manhattan Center (PMC) Library
    Pratt Institute is a private art college located in Brooklyn, New York, with satellite campuses in Manhattan and Utica. Pratt offers programs in Architecture, Graphic Design, History of Art and Design, Industrial Design, Fashion Design, Jewelry Design, Illustration, Interior Design, Digital Arts, Creative Writing, Library and Information Science, and other areas. It is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), a consortium of 36 private art schools in the United States. Charles Pratt (1830–1891) was an early pioneer of the natural oil industry in the United States. He was founder of Astral Oil Works in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, New York. He joined with his protégé Henry H. Rogers to form Charles Pratt and Company in 1867. Both companies became part of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil in 1874. Pratt is credited with recognizing the growing need for trained industrial workers in a changing economy. In 1886, he founded and endowed the Pratt Institute, which opened in Brooklyn in 1887. Pratt ended its engineering program in 1993 citing "a continuous decrease in its enrollment and the growth of competition for a shrinking pool of
    7.80
    5 votes
    19
    Hampshire College

    Hampshire College

    • Libraries: Harold F. Johnson Library
    Hampshire College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States. It was opened in 1970 as an experiment in alternative education, in association with four other colleges in the Pioneer Valley: Amherst College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Together they are now known as the Five Colleges, or the Five College Area. The College is widely known for its alternative curriculum, focus on portfolios rather than distribution requirements, and reliance on narrative evaluations instead of grades and GPAs. It is known particularly for facilitating the study of film, music, theater and the visual arts. In some fields, it is among the top undergraduate institutions in percentage of graduates who enroll in graduate school. Fifty-six percent of its alumni have at least one graduate degree and it is ranked 30th among all US colleges in the percentage of its graduates who go on to attain a doctorate degree (notably first among history doctorates). The College opened to students in 1970. Its history dates to the immediate aftermath of World War II. The first The New College Plan was drafted in 1958 by the presidents of
    9.00
    4 votes
    20
    Rider University

    Rider University

    • Libraries: Talbott Library
    Rider University is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian university located chiefly in Lawrenceville, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. It consists of five academic units: the College of Business Administration, the College of Liberal Arts, Education and Sciences, the College of Continuing Studies, and the Westminster College of the Arts. In addition to regional accreditation, the undergraduate and graduate programs in business are accredited by AACSB, and the professional education graduate programs are accredited by NCATE. Rider University is considered selective. It was ranked in the 2012 US News & World Report America's Best Colleges guide at number 21 in the Regional Universities North category. Rider University is also listed in the Princeton Review The Best 376 Colleges 2013 edition, where it is also ranked #15 Least Beautiful Campus, and #17 Least Happy Students. There are 5,982 undergraduate and graduate students attending. At the conclusion of the Civil War, Henry B. Bryant and Henry D. Stratton, operators of a chain of business schools decided to open a school in New Jersey. On October 1, 1865, The Trenton Business College was established in Trenton, New
    7.60
    5 votes
    21
    DePaul University

    DePaul University

    • Libraries: Loop Campus Library
    DePaul University is a private institution of higher education and research in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Founded by the Vincentians in 1898, the university takes its name from the 17th century French priest Saint Vincent de Paul. The student body consists of about 25,400 students (approximately 16,400 undergraduate and 9,000 graduate/law), making DePaul the largest Roman Catholic university and one of the 10 largest private universities in the United States; it is the largest private university in Illinois. DePaul is a member of the Big East Conference. Originally named St. Vincent's College, DePaul University was founded in 1898 by the Congregation of the Mission priests and brothers, known as the Vincentians. Followers of 17th century French priest Saint Vincent de Paul, they founded the university to serve Roman Catholic children of immigrants. Student enrollment grew from 70 in 1898 to 200 in 1903 in what is now the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago. In that year, James Quigley, Archbishop of Chicago, announced plans to create a preparatory seminary, now Archbishop Quigley Preparatory Seminary, for the archdiocese and allow the Jesuit Saint Ignatius College, now
    8.75
    4 votes
    22
    University of Manchester

    University of Manchester

    • Libraries: Eddie Davies Library
    The University of Manchester (informally Manchester University or Manchester) is a public research university located in Manchester, United Kingdom. It was formed in October 2004 by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (established in 1851) and the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (established in 1824). It is a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive British universities and the N8 Group and is regarded as a British "red brick" university, its Victoria University predecessor having gained its royal charter in 1903. The main site of the university is in central Manchester and is home to most of its academic activities. The main residential campus is located in Fallowfield, around two miles south of the main site. There are other university buildings located throughout the city and the wider region, including One Central Park in Moston. As of 2012, the university has around 39,000 students and 10,400 staff, making it the largest single-site university in the United Kingdom. The University of Manchester had an income of £808.6 million in 2010–11, of which £196.2 million was from research grants and contracts. In the 2008 Research
    8.75
    4 votes
    23
    Camberwell College of Arts

    Camberwell College of Arts

    • Libraries: Camberwell Library
    Camberwell College of Arts (formerly known as Camberwell School of Art and Crafts) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London, and is widely regarded as one of the world's foremost art and design institutions. It is located in Camberwell in south London, England, with two sites, located in Peckham Road and Wilson Road. It offers further and higher education programmes, including postgraduate and PhD awards. The College has retained single degree options within Fine Art, offering specialist Bachelor of Arts courses in painting, sculpture, photography and drawing. The College also runs graduate and postgraduate courses in art conservation and fine art as well as in new media such as graphic design, digital arts and 3D design. The College's history is finely intertwined with that of the South London Gallery, with which the College shares its site. Manager of the South London Working Men's College in 1868, William Rossiter, purchased the freehold of Portland House on which the College now stands in 1889. The resulting Gallery opened in 1891, followed by the Technical Institute, the school's first guise in 1898. The philanthropist, John Passmore Edwards, gave a
    6.50
    6 votes
    24
    Dickinson School of Law

    Dickinson School of Law

    • Libraries: H. Laddie Montague, Jr. Law Library
    The Pennsylvania State University – The Dickinson School of Law (also known as Penn State Law) is the law school of Pennsylvania State University. Penn State Law, one of the professional graduate schools of Penn State, operates as a unified two-location operation with facilities in both University Park, Pennsylvania and Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The two campuses operate meaningfully as a single enterprise, with a single identity, single reputation and single stature. The University Park Campus is Penn State's main campus, and it maintains over 40,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Carlisle, approximately 80 miles (130 km) southeast of University Park, is the original home of the law school. The law school was founded by John Reed in 1833, making it the seventh oldest law school in the United States and the oldest law school in Pennsylvania. Having merged with Penn State in 2000, it is home to over 600 law students, most of whom are earning the degrees of Juris Doctor (J.D.) or Master of Laws (LLM). Penn State Dickinson has a faculty and staff of over 100. U.S. News and World Report, in its 2013 edition of America's Best Graduate Schools, ranked Penn State Dickinson 76th among
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    • Libraries: Stone Center Library
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (also known as UNC, UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina) is a public research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. First enrolling students in 1795, it is one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. In recent years, the university has been among the highest ranked public universities in the United States. All undergraduates receive a liberal arts education and have the option to pursue a major within the professional schools of the university or within the College of Arts and Sciences from the time they obtain junior status. UNC has a strong history in athletics, most notably in men's basketball, women's soccer and men's lacrosse. The North Carolina Tar Heels share rivalries with other Tobacco Road schools and have provided many olympians to United States teams. The student newspaper The Daily Tar Heel has won national awards for collegiate media, while the student radio station WXYC provided the world's first internet radio broadcast. Chartered by the North Carolina General Assembly on December 11, 1789, the university's
    8.50
    4 votes
    26
    Delta State University

    Delta State University

    • Libraries: Roberts-LaForge Library
    Delta State University, also known as DSU, is a regional public university located in Cleveland, Mississippi, United States, in the heart of the Mississippi Delta. DSU is one of eight publicly funded universities in the state. The school was established in 1924 as a public institution by the State of Mississippi, using the facilities of the former Bolivar County Agricultural High School, which consisted of three buildings in Cleveland. On February 19, 1924, Senators William B. Roberts and Arthur Marshall cosponsored Senate Bill No. 236, which established Delta State Teachers College, which Mississippi Governor Henry Whitfield signed on April 9, 1924. The three buildings were Hill Hall, an administration and classroom building, Hardee Hall, a men's dormitory, and Taylor Hall, a women's dormitory. On February 14, 1924, James Wesley Broom was appointed president of the college and the college opened its doors on September 15, 1925. In May 1926, Broom died following complications from an ear infection, and William Zeigel was named his successor. The seal of the college was designed in 1928 as a project of an art class. World War II greatly affected the college. Anticipating the war in
    6.33
    6 votes
    27
    High Point University

    High Point University

    • Libraries: Smith Library
    High Point University is a private liberal arts university in High Point, North Carolina, U.S., affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school was founded in 1924 as High Point College, a joint venture between the Methodist Protestant Church and the citizens of High Point. When the college opened, the campus consisted of three buildings, attended by nine faculty members, with a student enrollment of 122. The Methodist Protestant Church, which is now part of the United Methodist Church, first became active in educational pursuits in North Carolina in the middle of the 19th century. Of the various institutions which it sponsored, the most ambitious was Yadkin College, which operated in neighboring Davidson County from 1856 to 1895. After some years of consideration, the statewide governing body of the Methodist Protestant Church finally voted to proceed with establishing a new college in 1921. Shortly afterwards it accepted an offer from the citizens of High Point to contribute 60 acres (240,000 m) of land and $100,000 to the project. The campus was designed by R. E. Mitchell of Washington, D.C., assisted by Herbert Hunter of High Point, in the English Renaissance style.
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    University of Alaska Fairbanks

    University of Alaska Fairbanks

    • Libraries: University of Alaska Fairbanks BioSciences Library
    The University of Alaska Fairbanks, is a public research university located in Fairbanks, Alaska, United States. It serves as the flagship campus of the University of Alaska System, and is abbreviated as Alaska or UAF. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, as well as participating in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. It is also the site where the Alaska Constitution was drafted and signed in 1955 and 1956. UAF was established in 1917 as the Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines, first opening for classes in 1922. UAF is home to seven major research units: the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station; the Geophysical Institute, which operates the Poker Flat Research Range; the International Arctic Research Center; the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center; the Institute of Arctic Biology; the Institute of Marine Science; and the Institute of Northern Engineering. Located just 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle, the Fairbanks campus's unique location is situated favorably for Arctic and northern research. The campus's several lines of research are renowned worldwide, most notably in Arctic biology, Arctic engineering,
    8.25
    4 votes
    29
    Florida State University

    Florida State University

    • Libraries: Strozier Library
    The Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU) is a space-grant and sea-grant public university located in Tallahassee, Florida, United States. It is a comprehensive doctoral research university with medical programs and significant research activity as determined by the Carnegie Foundation. The university comprises 15 separate colleges and 39 centers, facilities, labs and institutes that offer more than 300 programs of study, including professional programs. Florida State was officially established in 1851 and is located on the oldest continuous site of higher education in the state of Florida. Florida State University was declared in 2010 to be a "Budget Ivy" university by the Fiske Guide to Getting into the Right College. In 1935 Florida State University was awarded the first chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in Florida and is among the ten percent of American universities to have earned a chapter of the national academic honor society. Florida State is a flagship university in the State University System of Florida. As one of Florida's primary graduate research universities, Florida State University awards over 2,000 graduate and professional degrees each
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    University of London

    University of London

    • Libraries: Institute for the Study of the Americas Library
    The University of London is a federal public university based in London, United Kingdom. It comprises 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies. It is the second-largest university in the United Kingdom by number of full-time students, with around 135,000 campus-based students and over 50,000 distance learning students in the University of London International Programmes. The university was established by Royal Charter in 1836, which brought together in federation London University (now University College London) and King's College (now King's College London). For most practical purposes, ranging from admissions to funding, the constituent colleges operate as individual universities, and some have recently obtained the power to award their own degrees whilst remaining in the federation. The nine largest colleges of the University are Birkbeck, Goldsmiths, King's College London, the London Business School, Queen Mary, Royal Holloway, the School of Oriental and African Studies, London School of Economics and Political Science and University College London. Formerly a constituent college, Imperial College London left the University of London in
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Georgetown University

    Georgetown University

    • Libraries: Dahlgren Memorial Library
    Georgetown University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Jesuit and Catholic university in the United States. Georgetown's main campus, located in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood, is noted for Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark in the Romanesque revival style. Georgetown operates a law center on Capitol Hill and auxiliary campuses in Italy, Turkey, and Qatar. Georgetown's founding by John Carroll, America's first Catholic bishop, realized efforts to establish a Roman Catholic college in the province of Maryland that were repeatedly thwarted by religious persecution. The university expanded after the American Civil War under the leadership of Patrick Francis Healy, who came to be known as Georgetown's "second founder" despite having been born a slave. Jesuits have participated in the university's administration since 1805, a heritage Georgetown celebrates, but the university has always been governed independently of the Society of Jesus and of church authorities. The university has around 7,000 undergraduate and over 8,000 post-graduate students from a wide variety of religious, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds,
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Suffolk University Law School

    Suffolk University Law School

    • Libraries: Moakley Law Library
    Suffolk University Law School (also known as ""Suffolk Law School"" or ""SULS"") is one of the professional graduate schools of Suffolk University. Suffolk University Law School is a private, non-sectarian law school located in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. Suffolk University Law School was founded in 1906 by Gleason Archer, Sr. to provide a legal education for those who traditionally lacked the opportunity to study law because of socio-economic or racial discrimination. Suffolk is the fourth-oldest New England law school in continuous existence. Suffolk Law School's annual tuition charge is $43,944 per year, approximately in line with Harvard Law School, Boston College Law School, and Boston University Law School. The law school currently has both day and evening, part-time divisions. Suffolk University Law School has been accredited by the American Bar Association since 1953 and the Association of American Law Schools since 1977. The school is located in Sargent Hall on Tremont Street in downtown Boston. Suffolk offers over 200 upper-level electives, the most of any law school in the country, and is consistently ranked one of the most technologically advanced schools in the
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    The University of Hong Kong

    The University of Hong Kong

    • Libraries: The University of Hong Kong Main Library
    The University of Hong Kong (or HKU, Chinese: 香港大學) is the oldest tertiary institution in Hong Kong. Its motto is "Sapientia et Virtus" in Latin, meaning "wisdom and virtue", and "明德格物" in Chinese. The medium of instruction in most classes is English. The school adopts the problem-based learning teaching strategy which aims to train students' problem solving skills. HKU has many great achievements in Humanities, Legal subjects, Political science, Biological science and Medicine, attaining high positions in various University rankings. According to QS World University Rankings 2011/2012, it was at 22nd in the world and the best in Hong Kong as well as Asia. In the 2011–2012 Times Higher Education World University Rankings cooperating with Thomson Reuters as the new data supplier since 2010, it was ranked 34th in the world and 2nd in Asia (after the The University of Tokyo). The Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese (香港華人西醫書院) was founded in 1887 by the London Missionary Society, with its first graduate (in 1892) being Sun Yat-sen (孫中山). Sun later led the Chinese Revolution (1911), which changed China from an empire to a republic. The Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese was
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania

    Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania

    • Libraries: Annenberg School for Communication Library
    The Annenberg School for Communication is the communication school at the University of Pennsylvania. The school was established in 1958 by Wharton School's alum Walter Annenberg as The Annenberg School of Communications. The name was changed to its current title in the late 1980s. Walter Annenberg described the mission of the school in the following words: "Every human advancement or reversal can be understood through communication. The right to free communication carries with it responsibility to respect the dignity of others – and this must be recognized as irreversible. Educating students to effectively communicate this message and to be of service to all people is the enduring mission of this school." Over the years, the school has grown to become the top school for communication in the country, and one of the most prestigious institutions for communication internationally. The current dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania is Michael X. Delli Carpini. The Annenberg School for Communication is also home to FactCheck, an award-winning nonprofit that monitors the factual accuracy of political statements. Factcheck, and the then Dean of
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Tel Aviv University

    Tel Aviv University

    • Libraries: The Elias Sourasky Central Library
    Tel-Aviv University (TAU) (Hebrew: אוניברסיטת תל־אביב‎ Universitat Tel Aviv) is a public university located in Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel. With nearly 30,000 students, TAU is Israel's largest university. Located in Israel's cultural, financial and industrial core, Tel Aviv University is a major center of teaching and research, comprising 9 faculties, 27 schools, 98 departments and 128 research institutes and centers. Its origins go back to 1956, when three research institutes – the Tel Aviv School of Law and Economics, the Institute of Natural Sciences, and the Institute of Jewish Studies – joined together to form the University of Tel Aviv. Initially operated by the Tel Aviv municipality, the university was granted autonomy in 1963. The Ramat Aviv campus, covering an area of 170-acre (0.69 km), was established that same year. The university also maintains academic supervision over the Center for Technological Design in Holon, the New Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, and the Afeka College of Engineering in Tel Aviv. The Wise Observatory is located in Mitzpe Ramon. The Center for World University Rankings ranked Tel Aviv University 56th in the world and fourth in Israel in its
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Universidad de La Sabana

    Universidad de La Sabana

    • Libraries: Biblioteca Octavio Arizmendi Posada
    The University of La Sabana (Spanish: Universidad de La Sabana), is a Colombian private higher education institution founded in 1979. It is located in the municipality of Chía, 7 km north of Bogotá. The university is awarded with the High Quality Institutional Accreditation by the National Ministry of Education. One of the university's characteristics is the integral formation of the student. Apart from enhancing the student's intellectual growth, the university has implemented initiatives to ensure success in the development of a student as a whole. One such program is Personalized Academic Counseling that aims to promote the development of the person as a unique individual. Another program, Pharos, is aimed at students who are in search of excellence, leadership and solidarity. La Sabana has 21 research groups classified by Colciencias, the government office that certifies the quality of research groups in Colombian universities. There are also 20 emerging groups that promote “semilleros de investigación” (research “offshoots”) for students in all programmes. The university currently runs 18 undergraduate programmes. There are also 31 specialization programmes and five master’s
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    University of Salford

    University of Salford

    • Libraries: Adelphi Library
    University of Salford is a campus university in Salford, Greater Manchester, England with approximately 20,000 registered students. The main campus is about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of Manchester city centre, on the A6, opposite the former home of the physicist, James Prescott Joule and the Working Class Movement Library. It is situated in 60 acres (240,000 m) of parkland on the banks of the River Irwell. The university's origins can be traced to 1896 with the opening of the Royal Technical Institute, Salford, a merger of Salford Working Men's College founded in 1858 and Pendleton Mechanics' Institute founded in 1850. The Royal Technical Institute, Salford received royal letters, after the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George V and Queen Mary) officiated at its opening ceremony, an event commemorated in the university's Redbrick Peel Building and which allowed 'Royal' to be appended to name of the institute. At the start of the 20th century, mechanical engineering, chemical works, textiles and construction dominated the industrial scene in Salford. This heavily influenced the choice of subjects offered in the nine departments initially opened. These were Engineering,
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    University of Calgary

    University of Calgary

    • Libraries: University of Calgary Health Sciences Library
    The University of Calgary (U of C or UCalgary) is a public research university located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Founded in 1966 (after operating as the Calgary branch of the University of Alberta since 1945) the U of C is composed of 14 faculties and more than 85 research institutes and centres. More than 25,000 undergraduate and 5,500 graduate students are currently enrolled. The U of C has graduated over 145,000 alumni, including the current Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen Harper, and Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk. The University of Calgary is one of Canada’s top research universities (based on the number of Canada Research Chairs) and is a member of the U15 (the 15 most research-intensive universities in Canada). The U of C is the birthplace of a number of important inventions, including the neurochip. The university's sponsored research revenue of $352 million, with total revenues exceeding $1.1 billion, is one of the highest in the country. Being in Calgary, with Canada's highest concentration of engineers and geoscientists, the Faculty of Science, Department of Geosciences and the Schulich School of Engineering maintain ties to the petroleum and geoscience industry.
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    Texas A&M University

    Texas A&M University

    • Libraries: George Bush Presidential Library
    Texas A&M University (often referred to as A&M or TAMU) is a coeducational public research university located in College Station, Texas, United States. It is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System, the sixth-largest university in the United States and the largest university in Texas. Texas A&M's designation as a land, sea, and space grant institution reflects a broad range of research with ongoing projects funded by agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. The school ranks in the top 20 American research institutes in terms of funding and has made notable contributions to such fields as animal cloning and petroleum engineering. The first public institution of higher education in Texas, the school opened on October 4, 1876 as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. Originally, the admission was limited to white males and education consisted of agricultural and military techniques. Under the leadership of President James Earl Rudder, in the 1960s A&M desegregated, became coeducational, and dropped the requirement for
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    University of Surrey

    University of Surrey

    • Libraries: University of Surrey Library
    The University of Surrey is a university located within the county town of Guildford, Surrey in the South East of England. It received its charter on 9 September 1966, and was previously situated near Battersea Park in south-west London. The institution was known as Battersea College of Technology before gaining university status. Its roots however go back to the Battersea Polytechnic Institute, founded in 1891 to provide further and higher education for London's poorer inhabitants. The university is a member of the 1994 Group. The university conducts extensive research on small satellites and has a high number of staff who are members of learned societies. The Research Assessment Exercise 2001 awarded nine departments at the university 5 or 5* ratings. The university has recently expanded into China by launching the Surrey International Institute with Dongbei University of Finance and Economics. The university's main campus is located on Stag Hill close to the centre of Guildford and adjacent to Guildford Cathedral. A second campus, at Manor Park, is located a short distance away and has been developed to expand upon existing accommodation, academic buildings and sporting
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Adelphi University

    Adelphi University

    • Libraries: Garden City Campus - Swirbul Library
    Adelphi University is a private, nonsectarian university located in Garden City, in Nassau County, New York, United States. It is the oldest institution of higher education on Long Island. For the sixth year, Adelphi University has been named a “Best Buy” in higher education by the Fiske Guide to Colleges. The university was also named a 2010 Best College in the Northeastern Region by The Princeton Review. The institution was awarded the 2010 Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The U.S. News & World Report ranked Adelphi University as #152 among Tier 1 National Universities. Adelphi University began with the Adelphi Academy, founded in Brooklyn, New York in 1863. The academy was a private preparatory school located at 412 Adelphi Street, in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, but later moved to the corner of Lafayette Avenue and Clifton Place, in Clinton Hill. It was formally chartered in 1869 by the Board of Trustees of the City of Brooklyn for establishing "a first class institution for the broadest and most thorough training, and to make its advantages as accessible as possible to the largest numbers
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    University of Guelph

    University of Guelph

    • Libraries: Kemptville Campus Library
    The University of Guelph, also known as U of G, is a comprehensive public research university in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. It was established in 1964 after the amalgamation of Ontario Agricultural College, the Macdonald Institute, and the Ontario Veterinary College, and has since grown to an institution of more than 21,000 students and academic staff. It currently offers over 94 undergraduate degrees, 48 graduate programs, and 6 associate degrees in many different disciplines. The University of Guelph is consistently ranked as a top comprehensive university in Canada by Maclean's magazine, and given top marks for student satisfaction among medium-sized universities in Canada by The Globe and Mail. It has held these rankings with its reputation, innovative research-intensive programs, and lively campus life cited as particular strengths. The University of Guelph has also been ranked 50 among the top 100 universities under 50 years old by Times Higher Education Currently, the faculty at the University of Guelph hold 39 Canada Research Chair positions in the research areas of natural sciences, engineering, health sciences and social sciences. Recent academic achievements include the
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    University of California, Riverside

    University of California, Riverside

    • Libraries: University of California, Riverside Music Library
    The University of California, Riverside, commonly known as UCR or UC Riverside, is a public research university and one of the ten general campuses of the University of California system. UCR is consistently ranked as one of the most ethnically and economically diverse universities in the United States. The main campus sits on 1,200 acres (486 ha) in a suburban district of Riverside, California, United States, with a branch campus of 20 acres (8 ha) in Palm Desert. Founded in 1907 as the UC Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside pioneered research in biological pest control and the use of growth regulators responsible for extending the citrus growing season in California from four to nine months. Some of the world's most important research collections on citrus diversity and entomology, as well as science fiction and photography, are located at Riverside. UCR's undergraduate College of Letters and Science opened in 1954. The Regents of the University of California declared UCR a general campus of the system in 1959, and graduate students were admitted in 1961. To accommodate an enrollment of 21,000 students by 2015, more than $730 million has been invested in new construction
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    University of Chicago

    University of Chicago

    • Libraries: Regenstein Library
    The University of Chicago (U of C, UC, UChicago, or simply Chicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois, United States. The University consists of the College of the University of Chicago, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. The University enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and about 15,000 students overall. In 2008, the University spent $423.7 million on scientific research. University of Chicago scholars have played a role in the development of the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, the school of political science known as behavioralism, and in the physics leading to the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction. The University is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States. The University of Chicago is affiliated with 87 Nobel Laureates, 49 Rhodes Scholars and 9 Fields Medalists. It was founded by the American
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    University of Leicester

    University of Leicester

    • Libraries: David Wilson Library
    The University of Leicester (/ˈlɛstə/ LES-tər) is a research-led university based in Leicester, England. The main campus is a mile south of the city centre, adjacent to Victoria Park and Wyggeston and Queen Elizabeth I College. The university has established itself as a leading research-led university and has been named University of the Year of 2008 by the Times Higher Education. The university has consistently ranked amongst the top 15 universities in the United Kingdom by the Times Good University Guide and The Guardian; it has a vision of becoming an established top ten UK university by 2015. The university was ranked third behind Oxford and Cambridge in the 2011 National Student Survey of 120 mainstream universities in the UK. Research by THE and Opinion Panel published in 2011 rated Leicester third best in England for the quality of lecturing staff. The University was founded as Leicestershire and Rutland University College in 1921. The site for the University was donated by a local textile manufacturer, Thomas Fielding Johnson, in order to create a living memorial for those who lost their lives in First World War. This is reflected in the University's motto Ut Vitam Habeant
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Bryn Mawr College

    Bryn Mawr College

    • Libraries: Rhys Carpenter Library
    Bryn Mawr College ( /ˌbrɪnˈmɑr/ BRIN-MAR; Welsh: [ˌbrɨ̞nˈmaur]) is a women's liberal arts college in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles west of Philadelphia. The phrase bryn mawr means "big hill" in Welsh. Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by Quakers—Swarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. Bryn Mawr College is a highly selective, private, women's liberal arts college founded in 1885. The Graduate School has male and female graduates. It is named after the town of Bryn Mawr in which the campus is located, which had been named by a representative of the Pennsylvania Railroad who found the name in some old records. Bryn Mawr was the name of an area estate granted to Rowland Ellis by William Penn in the 1680s. Ellis's former home, also called Bryn Mawr, was a house near Dolgellau, Merionnydd (Merioneth), Gwynedd, Wales. The College was largely founded through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor, and its first president was James Evans Rhoads. Bryn Mawr was the first
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Samford University

    Samford University

    • Libraries: Harwell Goodwin Davis Library
    Samford University, founded as Howard College, is a private, coeducational university located in Homewood, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama, United States. Affiliated with the Alabama Baptist Convention, it includes the Howard College of Arts and Sciences, Cumberland School of Law, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Brock School of Business, Ida V. Moffett School of Nursing, and Beeson Divinity School. In the 2011 report, Samford was ranked 104 out of 191 top-tier doctoral universities by U.S. News & World Report. Samford was founded in 1841 at Marion, Alabama, when members of Siloam Baptist Church acquired land in the town and invited the Alabama Baptist Convention to build a new Baptist school there. They named it Howard College in honor of John Howard, known for his work in prison reform in England. Among the charter trustees in 1841 was lawyer William Parish Chilton of Talladega. The new college opened its doors to students on January 3, 1842. In 1887 the school relocated to the East Lake community of Birmingham. It also ran Howard College Academy as a preparatory school at the time. Women were first admitted to Howard College in 1895, and the college officially became coeducational
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    University of Notre Dame

    University of Notre Dame

    • Libraries: O’Meara Mathematics Library
    The University of Notre Dame du Lac (or simply Notre Dame /ˌnoʊtərˈdeɪm/ NOH-tər-DAYM) is a Catholic research university located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated community north of the city of South Bend, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States. The name of the university, "Notre Dame," is French meaning "Our Lady," a Catholic honorific salutation in reference to the Virgin Mary, the patron saint of the university. It was founded by Father Edward Sorin, CSC, who was also the school's first president. It was established as an all-male institution on November 26, 1842, on land donated by the Bishop of Vincennes, Indiana. The university first enrolled women undergraduates in 1972. As of 2012 about 47 percent of the student body was female. Due to Notre Dame's Catholic character many Holy Cross priests serve the school (most notably the president of the university), its explicit commitment to the Christian faith, numerous ministries funded by the school, and the architecture around campus, especially the Main Building's gold dome topped by a golden statue of St. Mary, a replica of the Lourdes grotto, the 134-foot-tall (41 m) mosaic of Christ on the side of the Hesburgh Library
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    The College of Wooster

    The College of Wooster

    • Libraries: Flo K. Gault Library
    The College of Wooster is a private liberal arts college primarily known for its Independent Study program. It has roughly 2,000 students and is located in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, United States (approximately 60 miles (97 km) south of Cleveland). Founded in 1866 by the Presbyterian church as the University of Wooster, it was from its creation a co-educational institution. The school is a member of The Five Colleges of Ohio and the Great Lakes Colleges Association. As of June 30, 2011, Wooster's endowment stood at approximately $246 million. Wooster is one of forty colleges named in Loren Pope's influential book Colleges That Change Lives, in which he called it his "...original best-kept secret in higher education." It is consistently ranked among the nation's top liberal arts colleges, according to U.S. News and World Report. In US News' "Best Colleges 2011", Wooster ranked fifth among national liberal arts colleges in the category of "Best Undergraduate Teaching," the second consecutive year in the top ten. Founded as The University of Wooster in 1866 by Presbyterians, the institution opened its doors in 1870 with a faculty of five and a student body of thirty men and four
    6.20
    5 votes
    50
    UCE Birmingham

    UCE Birmingham

    • Libraries: William Kenrick Library
    Birmingham City University (abbrev. as BCU; and previously Birmingham Polytechnic and the University of Central England in Birmingham) is a post-1992 British university in the city of Birmingham, England. It is the second largest of three universities in the city, the other two being the Aston University and University of Birmingham. Initially established as the Birmingham College of Art with roots dating back to 1843 . In 1971 it was designated as a polytechnic until 1992, when it gained university status. The university has eight campuses serving six faculties, and offers courses in art and design, business, the built environment, computing, education, engineering, English, healthcare, law, the performing arts, social sciences, and technology. A proposed £150m campus in the city centre of Birmingham, part of the Eastside development of a new technology and learning quarter, is to open in 2013. The university is a designated Skillset Media Academy, a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for health and social care, and a member of the million+ group of New Universities. Birmingham City University is the West Midlands' largest provider of higher education for undergraduate
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Boston University School of Law

    Boston University School of Law

    • Libraries: Pappas Law Library
    Boston University School of Law (BU Law) is the law school affiliated with Boston University. It is the second-oldest law school in Massachusetts and one of the first law schools in the country to admit students regardless of race or gender. It is also a member of the Association of American Law Schools and a charter member of the American Bar Association. Located in the heart of Boston University's campus on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, Massachusetts, BU Law is housed in the tallest law school building in the United States and the tallest academic building on campus. The U.S. News and World Reports currently ranks the school 26th. BU Law students come from 47 states, 14 countries and more than 238 colleges and universities around the world. The school receives more than 7,000 applications for its entering class of 242 students. More than half of the entering class have worked between college and law school. Admission to Boston University School of Law is very competitive. For the class of 2014, BU Law received approximately 7,073 applications for an entering class enrollment of roughly 242. The median GPA for incoming BU Law students was 3.72, and the median Law School Admission
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    City University of New York

    City University of New York

    • Libraries: Queens College Music Library
    'CUNY redirects here. For those of a similar name, see Cuny (disambiguation) The City University of New York (CUNY;  /ˈkjuːni/) is the public university system of New York City. It is the largest urban university in the United States, consisting of 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the doctorate-granting Graduate School and University Center, the City University of New York School of Law, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, and the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education. More than 270,000 degree-credit students and 273,000 continuing and professional education students are enrolled at campuses located in all five New York City boroughs. Its administrative offices are in Yorkville in Manhattan. CUNY students hail from 205 countries. The Black, White and Hispanic undergraduate populations each comprise more than a quarter of the student body, and Asian undergraduates make up more than 15 percent. Nearly 60 percent are female, and 29 percent are 25 or older. CUNY graduates include 12 Nobel laureates, a U.S. Secretary of State, a Supreme Court Justice, several mayors, members of Congress, state
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Cleveland State University

    Cleveland State University

    • Libraries: C|M|LAW Library
    Cleveland State University (also known as Cleveland State or CSU) is a public university located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio. It was established in 1964 when the state of Ohio assumed control of Fenn College, and it absorbed the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1969. Today it is part of the University System of Ohio and have approximately student alumni. Its mission is to "encourage and engaged learning by providing a contemporary and accessible education in the arts, sciences, humanities and professions, and by conducting research, scholarship, and creative activity across these branches of knowledge." Industrialist James J. Nance served as the first Board of Trustees Chairperson. The name would later be changed to Cleveland State University. President Michael Schwartz ended open admissions and implemented a vision to move from a U.S. News & World Report fourth tier university to a second tier university. Ronald M. Berkman is the current president. Geoffrey S. Mearns, former dean of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, was named provost, as permanent replacement for Rosa, who resigned in 2010. On April 26, 2009, Dr. Ronald M. Berkman was named as the sixth President of
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    University of Sussex

    University of Sussex

    • Libraries: University of Sussex Library
    The University of Sussex is a public research university situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, within the city of Brighton and Hove. Taking its name from the historic county of Sussex, the university received its Royal Charter in August 1961. The university is currently ranked 11th in the UK, 31st in Europe and 99th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. The Guardian university guide 2013 placed Sussex joint 27th, and the Times Good University Guide 2012 ranks Sussex 14th. The 2012/13 Academic Ranking of World Universities placed The University within the top 14 in the United Kingdom and in the top 150 internationally. Sussex is also a founder member of the 1994 Group of research-intensive universities. In an effort to establish a university to serve Brighton, a public meeting was held in December 1911 at the Royal Pavilion in order to discover ways to fund the construction of a university; the project was halted by World War I, and the money raised was used instead for books for the Municipal Technical College. The idea was revived in the 1950s and, in June 1958, the government approved the corporation's scheme for a university at
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    John F. Kennedy University

    John F. Kennedy University

    • Libraries: Robert M. Fisher Library
    John F. Kennedy University is a nonprofit, private university located in Pleasant Hill, California, with satellite campuses in San Jose and Berkeley. It was founded in 1964 to focus on providing continuing opportunities for non-traditional higher education. Enrollment is approximately 1,600 (as of fall 2010) with no campus housing. The faculty consists of over 700 adjunct faculty employed in their subject areas in addition to about 60 full-time academics. JFK University has three colleges — Undergraduate Studies, Graduate and Professional Studies, and Law. The University also has a Continuing Education division. John F. Kennedy University is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. In April 2009, JFKU became an affiliate of the National University System. JFK University retained its name, identity and accreditation as an independent university. The College of Undergraduate Studies offers undergraduate completion programs in Business, Health Sciences, Legal Studies (ABA-approved), and Psychology. Students may advance towards their educational goals with help from two programs: The College also offers a Paralegal Certificate program that is approved by the
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    University at Buffalo Law School

    University at Buffalo Law School

    • Libraries: Charles B. Sears Law Library
    Founded in 1887, the University at Buffalo Law School, the State University of New York (also known as UB Law, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law or SUNY at Buffalo School of Law) is a graduate professional school at the University at Buffalo. It is part of the State University of New York system and is the SUNY system's only law school. U.S. News & World Report ranks the University at Buffalo Law School 82nd in the nation for 2013. However, many lesser known sites rank UB Law much higher. The University at Buffalo Law School is No. 1 in Thomson Reuter's "Super Lawyers" ranking of law graduates practicing in Upstate New York, which includes 54 of the 62 counties in New York State. This is in addition to the UB Law School's 2010 national ranking, where it placed 48th out of the 180 law schools in the country that produced Super Lawyers, a measure which examines "twelve indicators of professional achievement" . Also, Malcolm Gladwell, in the New Yorker Magazine, devised a formula that ranks UB within the top 50 whereas Reuters ranks UB Law as 48th overall in the nation. UB Law School has a favorable student-faculty ratio of 12.5:1. Currently, more than 75 percent
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    University of Minnesota Law School

    University of Minnesota Law School

    • Libraries: University of Minnesota Law Library
    The University of Minnesota Law School, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, is a professional school of the University of Minnesota. The school offers a Juris Doctor (J.D.), Masters of Law (LL.M.) for Foreign Lawyers, and joint degrees with J.D./M.B.A., J.D./M.P.A, J.D./M.A., J.D./M.S., J.D./Ph.D., J.D./M.D., J.D./M.P.P., J.D./M.B.S., J.D./M.P., J.D./M.B.T., J.D./M.U.R.P., and J.D./M.P.H. Founded in 1888, the Law School is consistently ranked among the top 20 law schools in the nation, with the current rank of 19th in the U.S. News & World Report "Best Law Schools" rankings and 18th in the U.S. News & World Report "Law Firm Recruiters Rank Best Law Schools" rankings; tied with UCLA and USC. The school maintains its competitive rankings despite a small number of very large law firms in its region. According to one study, 18.1% of the Law School's 2006 graduates joined the United States' 250 largest law firms. With 847 students, the Law School maintains a 10.9:1 student-to-faculty ratio. Admission is highly competitive. Most classes are graded on a curve; classes with the smallest of enrollments are relieved of the curve. The five-year average bar exam passage rate is 96.91%.
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Mississippi State University

    Mississippi State University

    • Libraries: Mitchell Memorial Library
    The Mississippi State University of Agriculture and Applied Science commonly known as Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States, partially in the town of Starkville and partially in an unincorporated area. Mississippi State, Mississippi, is the official designation for the area that encompasses the university. It is classified as a "comprehensive doctoral research university with very high research activity" by the Carnegie Foundation. Fall 2011 enrollment statistics from the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning show the MSU Starkville campus is the largest university campus in the state. They also have campuses in Meridian, Biloxi, and Vicksburg. In 2009, Mississippi State University was ranked #18 nationally in Forbes magazine's "America's Best College Buys" and 1 in agricultural schools within the Southeastern Conference. Mississippi State was also ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the best universities in the United States for Engineering and Veterinary Medicine where it ranked #84 and #24 respectively. The University began as The Agricultural and Mechanical College of the State of
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Texas Woman's University

    Texas Woman's University

    • Libraries: Blagg-Huey Library
    Texas Woman's University (historically the College of Industrial Arts and Texas State College for Women, commonly known as TWU) is a co-educational university in Denton, Texas, United States with two health science center branches in Dallas, Texas and Houston, Texas. While male students are accepted into all programs, the school is better known as the largest state-supported university for women in the United States. TWU’s nursing doctoral program is the largest in the world. TWU is one of only four "independent" public universities in Texas (i.e., not affiliated with any of Texas' six public university systems). Texas Woman's University was originally established in 1901 by an act of the Texas Legislature as the Girls Industrial College, opening its doors in 1903 and conferring its first degrees in 1904. The college changed its name in 1905 to the College of Industrial Arts and Sciences (CIA) and offered programs in a variety of liberal arts, fine arts, and science programs. The school underwent another name change in 1934 to the Texas State College for Women (TSCW) to reflect its growing reputation as a premiere institution of higher education for women in the state. In 1950,
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    University of Leeds

    University of Leeds

    • Libraries: University of Leeds Health Sciences Library
    The University of Leeds (informally Leeds University, or simply Leeds) is a British Redbrick university located in the city of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. Originally named the Yorkshire College of Science and later simply the Yorkshire College, it incorporated the Leeds School of Medicine and became part of the federal Victoria University alongside Owens College (which eventually became the University of Manchester) and University College Liverpool (which became the University of Liverpool). In 1904, a royal charter was granted to the University of Leeds by King Edward VII. The University is a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities, of which the university's Vice-Chancellor Prof Michael Arthur is the current Chairman, and the N8 Group for research collaboration. The university is also a founding member of the Worldwide Universities Network, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, the White Rose University Consortium, the Santander Network and CDIO and is also affiliated to the Association of MBAs, EQUIS and Universities UK. Leeds has around 33,600 students, the fifth-highest number of any university in the UK.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Chapman University

    Chapman University

    • Libraries: M. Douglas Library of Music
    Chapman University is a private, non-profit university located in Orange, California affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Known for its blend of liberal arts and professional programs, Chapman University encompasses seven schools and colleges: Lawrence and Kristina Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences, George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics, Schmid College of Science, College of Performing Arts, School of Law and College of Educational Studies. For the 2010-2011 academic year, Chapman University enrolled 6,398 students. The year 2011 marked the 150th anniversary of Chapman University's founding as Hesperian College (see below), and was celebrated with a series of on-campus events. Founded as Hesperian College, the school began classes on March 4, 1861. Hesperian admitted students of both sexes and all races—a radical educational concept at that time. In 1920, the assets of Hesperian College were absorbed by California Christian College, which held classes in downtown Los Angeles. In 1934, the school was renamed after the chairman of its board of trustees (and primary benefactor), C.C.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Indian River Community College

    Indian River Community College

    • Libraries: Dixon Hendry Library
    Indian River State College (IRSC) is a state college based in Fort Pierce, Florida which serves the counties of Indian River, Martin, Okeechobee and St. Lucie. It has branch campuses in Okeechobee, St. Lucie West in Port St. Lucie, Stuart and Vero Beach plus other facilities in the area. The college was established in 1959 as Indian River Junior College and located in a former public school building in Fort Pierce. IRJC moved to its current main campus on Virginia Avenue in 1963 after the city of Fort Pierce donated 87 acres (352,000 m²) of land, that was formerly the city landfill, to the institution. In 1970, the Board of Trustees decided a name more fitting of the College's service to the community was needed, and it was renamed Indian River Community College. This was in keeping with the national trend for public junior colleges to drop the word "junior" in favor of 'Community." Within the confines of the College, the school is called The River or 'the ersk', pronouncing the school's acronym, IRSC. The school's mascot is the Pioneer. On 10 September 2007, IRCC's Board of Trustees voted unanimously to change the college's name to Indian River College, to better reflect its
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    University of Wyoming

    University of Wyoming

    • Libraries: Coe Library
    The University of Wyoming is a land-grant university located in Laramie, Wyoming, situated on Wyoming's high Laramie Plains, at an elevation of 7,200 feet (2194 m), between the Laramie and Snowy Range mountains. It is known as UW (often pronounced "U-Dub") to people close to the university. The university was founded in March 1886, four years before the territory was admitted as the 44th state, and opened in September 1887. The University of Wyoming is unusual in that its location within the state is provided by the state's constitution. The university also offers outreach education in communities throughout Wyoming and online. The University of Wyoming consists of seven colleges: agriculture and natural resources, arts and sciences, business, education, engineering and applied sciences, health sciences, and Law. The university maintains the combination of large university benefits matched with the feel of a smaller college. UW also offers a variety of cultural and social activities. The university offers over 190 undergraduate, graduate and certificate programs including Doctor of Pharmacy and Juris Doctor. In the top 15 percent of the country's four-year colleges, the University
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    University of Maine

    University of Maine

    • Libraries: Raymond H. Fogler Library
    The University of Maine (UMaine or UM) is a public research university located in Orono, Maine, United States. The university was established in 1865 as a land grant college and is referred to as the flagship university of the University of Maine System. Having an enrollment of approximately 12,000 students, UMaine is the largest university in the state and is the only institution in Maine classified as a research university (RU/H) by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The University of Maine's athletic teams are nicknamed the Black Bears, and sport blue and white uniforms. UMaine was founded in 1862 as a function of the Morrill Act, signed by President Lincoln. Established in 1865 and originally named the Maine College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, the Maine College opened on September 21, 1868, changing its name to the University of Maine in 1897. By 1871, curricula had been organized in Agriculture, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and electives. The Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station was founded as a division of the university in 1887. Gradually the university developed the Colleges of Life Sciences and Agriculture
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    New England Conservatory of Music

    New England Conservatory of Music

    • Libraries: Harriet M. Spaulding Library
    The New England Conservatory of Music (NEC) in Boston, Massachusetts, is the oldest independent school of music in the United States. The conservatory, located on Huntington Avenue of the Arts near Boston Symphony Hall, is home each year to 750 students pursuing undergraduate and graduate studies along with 1400 more in its Preparatory School as well as the School of Continuing Education. At the collegiate level, NEC offers the Bachelor of Music, Master of Music, and Doctor of Musical Arts, as well as the Undergraduate Diploma, Graduate Diploma, and Artist Diploma. Also offered are five-year joint double-degree programs with Harvard University and Tufts University. NEC is the only music school in the United States designated as a National Historic Landmark. Its primary concert hall, Jordan Hall, hosts approximately 600 concerts each year. In June 1853 Eben Tourjée, at the time a nineteen-year-old music teacher from Providence, Rhode Island, made his first attempt to found a music conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts. He met with a group of Boston's most influential musical leaders to discuss a school based on the conservatories of Europe. The group included John Sullivan Dwight,
    5.80
    5 votes
    66
    Colorado State University

    Colorado State University

    • Libraries: Morgan Library
    Colorado State University (also referred to as Colorado State and CSU) is a public research university located in Fort Collins, Colorado. The university is the state's land grant university, and the flagship university of the Colorado State University System. The current enrollment is approximately 27,500 students, including resident and non-resident instruction students. The university has approximately 1,540 faculty in eight colleges and 55 academic departments. Bachelor's degrees are offered in 65 fields of study, with Master's degrees in 55 fields. Colorado State confers doctoral degrees in 40 fields of study, in addition to a professional degree in veterinary medicine. In 2011, CSU's research expenditures were $330 million - ranking second in the nation for public universities without a medical school. Colorado State University is a land-grant institution classified as a Carnegie Doctoral/Research University-Extensive. CSU was founded as Colorado Agricultural College in 1870, six years before the Colorado Territory gained statehood. It was one of 68 land-grant colleges established under the Morrill Act of 1862. Doors opened to a freshman class of 5 students in 1879. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Dalhousie University

    Dalhousie University

    • Libraries: Sexton Design & Technology Library
    Dalhousie University (commonly known as Dalhousie or Dal) is a public research university with three campuses in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and a fourth, the Dalhousie Agricultural Campus, in Truro, Nova Scotia. It is one of Canada's oldest universities, founded during British colonial rule. Dalhousie offers more than 3,700 courses and 190 degree programs, organized within the twelve undergraduate, graduate, and professional faculties and schools of the school. Dalhousie University was first established as a non-sectarian college in 1818 by the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, George Ramsay, 9th Earl of Dalhousie, whom the university was named after. However, the college did not hold its first class until 1838, until then operating sporadically due to financial difficulties. It reopened for the third time in 1863 following a reorganization which also brought upon the school's first name change to "The Governors of Dalhousie College and University." In 1997, the Technical University of Nova Scotia was officially amalgamated with Dalhousie. The act which amalgamated the two schools also formally changed the name of the university to Dalhousie University. In 2012, Dalhousie
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Singapore Polytechnic

    Singapore Polytechnic

    • Libraries: Singapore Polytechnic Main Library
    Singapore Polytechnic (Abbreviation: SP; Chinese: 新加坡理工学院), the first polytechnic established in Singapore, was founded in 1954. The former campus was originally located at Prince Edward Road. In 1978, it was relocated to its present-day location at Dover next to Dover MRT Station. The year of 2010 saw Singapore Polytechnic's 50th graduation ceremony and 150,000th graduate. To educate and nurture our students to excel in work and in life, and to equip adult learners with skills and knowledge to enhance their employability. A leading institution that prepares our students to be work ready, life ready and world ready. These values are represented by the acronym SP CORE. Singapore Polytechnic's official social media pages: Singapore Polytechnic offers 50 full-time diploma courses and a wide range of continuing education programmes. It has ten academic schools and one academic department: Prior to 2009, this school went by the name of the School of the Built Environment. The School of Architecture and the Built Environment comprises the divisions of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering. The School offers the following six full-time diploma courses: The SP Business School
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    University at Albany, The State University of New York

    University at Albany, The State University of New York

    • Libraries: Dewey Library
    The University at Albany, also known as University at Albany, State University of New York, the University at Albany - SUNY, or simply UAlbany, is an internationally recognized public research institution with campuses in Albany, Guilderland, and East Greenbush, New York, United States. The senior campus of the State University of New York (SUNY) system, founded in 1844, it carries out a broad mission of undergraduate and graduate education, research, and service. The University has three campuses: the Uptown Campus in Albany and Guilderland's McKownville neighborhood, the Downtown Campus in Albany, and the East Campus in East Greenbush, just east of Albany. The University enrolls more than 17,000 students in nine schools and colleges, which offer 50 undergraduate majors and 128 graduate degree programs. The University’s academic choices are diverse and include a range of new and emerging fields such as public policy, nanotechnology, globalization, documentary studies, biotechnology and informatics. Students take advantage of more than 500 study-abroad programs, as well as extensive internship opportunities that offer real-world experience in New York’s capital and surrounding
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Vassar College

    Vassar College

    • Libraries: Thompson Memorial Library
    Vassar College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, in the United States. The Vassar campus comprises over 1,000 acres (4.0 km) and more than 100 buildings, including four National Historic Landmarks, ranging in style from Collegiate Gothic to International, designed over the course of the college’s history by a range of prominent architects, including James Renwick Jr., Eero Saarinen, Marcel Breuer, and Cesar Pelli. A designated arboretum, the campus features more than 200 species of trees, a native plant preserve, and a 400-acre (1.6 km) ecological preserve. Vassar was founded as a women's college in 1861 and became coeducational in 1969. Vassar was the first of the Seven Sisters colleges, higher education schools then strictly for women, and historically sister institutions to the Ivy League. It was founded by its namesake, brewer Matthew Vassar, in 1861 in the Hudson Valley, about 70 mi (115 km) north of New York City. The first person appointed to the Vassar faculty was the astronomer Maria Mitchell, in 1865. Vassar adopted coeducation in 1969. However, immediately following World War II, Vassar accepted a very small number of
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Western Washington University

    Western Washington University

    • Libraries: Western Washington University Main Library
    Western Washington University (WWU or Western) is one of six state-funded, four-year universities of higher education in the U.S. state of Washington. It is located in Bellingham and offers bachelor's and master's degrees. Their mascot is the Viking. Western was established as the New Whatcom Normal School, a teachers' school for women, by Phoebe Judson in Lynden, Washington. Eventually the school moved to Bellingham (then "New Whatcom"), and through the efforts of William R. Moultray and George Judson (Phoebe's son), Governor John McGraw signed legislation establishing the New Whatcom Normal School on February 24, 1893. The first official class entered in 1899, composed of 88 students. The institution that is now Western Washington University has since undergone several name changes. In 1901, the school's name was changed to State Normal School at Whatcom to reflect New Whatcom's name change. Again, in 1904, the name was changed to Washington State Normal School at Bellingham when the townships of Whatcom and Fairhaven joined, and again in 1937, to Western Washington College of Education when it became a 4-year college. Twenty-four years later it became Western Washington State
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design

    Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design

    • Libraries: Central Saint Martins College of Arts & Design Library
    Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design (often abbreviated as Central Saint Martins or CSM) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London. The school has an outstanding international reputation, and is considered one of the world's leading arts and design institutions. Courses are offered at foundation, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design is widely regarded as one of the leading Art and Design institutions in the world. CSM was formed in 1989 from the merger of Central School of Art and Design, founded in 1896, and Saint Martins School of Art, founded in 1854. Central Saint Martins became a constituent College of the London Institute in 1986, a federal body formed by the Inner London Education Authority to bring together London's art, design, fashion and media schools into a collegiate structure for administrative purposes. The London Institute was granted University status and was renamed University of the Arts London in 2004. The Drama Centre London, founded in 1963, and the Byam Shaw School of Art, founded in 1910, joined Central Saint Martins in 1999 and 2003 as integral schools, maintaining their
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    University of Birmingham

    University of Birmingham

    • Libraries: Cadbury Research Library
    The University of Birmingham (informally Birmingham University) is a British red brick university located in the city of Birmingham, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Birmingham Medical School (1825) and Mason Science College (1875). Birmingham was the first Redbrick university to gain a charter and thus university status. It is a member of the Russell Group of research universities and a founding member of Universitas 21. Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) data (2011) placed Birmingham in the 12 institutions in England with highest entry requirements. The student population includes around 16,500 undergraduate and 8,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university in the West Midlands region, and the 11th largest in the UK. As of 2006–07 it is the fourth most popular English university by number of applications. In 2010 Birmingham was ranked as the 10th most popular British university by graduate employers. The annual income of the institution for 2007–08 was £411.6 million, with an expenditure of £393.2 million. Birmingham has the ninth largest financial endowment of any British university at approximately
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    University of Southampton

    University of Southampton

    • Libraries: University of Southampton Health Services Library
    The University of Southampton is a British Russell Group university located in the city of Southampton, United Kingdom. The origins of the university can be dated back to the founding of the Hartley Institution in 1862 following a legacy to the Corporation of Southampton by Henry Robertson Hartley. In 1902, the Institution developed into the Hartley University College, with degrees awarded by the University of London. On 29 April 1952, the institution was granted a Royal Charter to give the University of Southampton full university status. The university is a member of the Russell Group of research universities and the Worldwide Universities Network. It currently has over 17,000 undergraduate and 7,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university by higher education students in the South East region. The University has six campuses - four in Southampton, one in Winchester, and one international branch in Malaysia. A further campus - the Maritime Centre of Excellence - is being developed close to the Highfield Campus. The main campus is located in the Highfield area of Southampton. Three other campuses are located throughout the city - Avenue Campus, National Oceanography
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    University of Waterloo School of Architecture

    University of Waterloo School of Architecture

    • Libraries: Musagetes Architecture Library
    The School of Architecture is one of the professional schools of the University of Waterloo. It offers a professional program in architecture accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board at the master's level (M.Arch.). It is part of the Faculty of Engineering and is located on a satellite campus in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. Some of Canada's most prominent architects are graduates of the school. The school moved to a former factory building in Cambridge in September 2004, to provide more space for the school as well as to spur economic activity in the downtown area. It was designed by Levitt Goodman Architects. The move has been criticized for isolating architecture students from the rest of the university. Waterloo offers an integrated two-degree professional architecture program, accredited by the CACB and NAAB. The majority of the professional coursework is completed in the Bachelor of Architectural Studies program, which is followed by a one year, research-based Master of Architecture degree. The B.A.S. is a five year, preprofessional honours degree in architecture. Design Studios and courses in Cultural History comprise the core of the curriculum. Students
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Savannah College of Art and Design

    Savannah College of Art and Design

    • Libraries: ACA Library
    SCAD, the Savannah College of Art and Design, is a private, degree-granting university with locations in Savannah and Atlanta, Georgia, Hong Kong, and Lacoste, France. SCAD was founded in 1978 by Paula S. Wallace, Richard Rowan, May Poetter and Paul Poetter. In 1979, SCAD opened its doors with five trustees, four staff members, seven faculty members, and 71 students. At that time the school offered eight majors. In May 1981, the first graduate received a degree. The following year, the first graduating class received degrees. In 1982 the enrollment grew to more than 500 students, then to 1,000 in 1986, and 2,000 in 1989. In 2010, the university enrolled 10,461 students. In 2002, SCAD opened a location in Lacoste, France as a residential study-abroad location. In 2003, the college launched the SCAD eLearning program, offering certificates and full master's degrees online. . In 2005, SCAD opened a campus in Midtown Atlanta called SCAD-Atlanta offering B.F.A., M.A. and M.F.A. degrees in 11 majors . In August 2006, the Atlanta College of Art merged with SCAD after approval by the board of trustees of both colleges. In September 2010, SCAD opened its most recent location in Hong Kong in
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Seneca College

    Seneca College

    • Libraries: Seneca College Markham Campus Library
    Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology is a post-secondary educational institution in Toronto, Ontario offering programs at the baccalaureate, diploma, certificate and post-graduate levels. The college was established during the formation of Ontario’s college system in 1967. The Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology were established on May 21, 1965. The school was founded as part of a provincial initiative to provide career-oriented diploma and certificate courses, as well as continuing education programs to Ontario communities. Seneca has 4 main campuses, and a total of 10 campuses located throughout the Greater Toronto Area. Each campus has its own academic specialties. The Newnham Campus is one of the largest college campuses in Canada. It is home to full and part-time programs in the areas of Business, Applied Arts, Applied Science and Engineering Technology. The campus is home to a 1,113 bed residence along with a sports centre. It is located on the north side of Finch Avenue at Hwy. 404 (Don Valley Parkway) and Finch Avenue East. The building was opened in 1969 involving various architects (William H.D. Hurst (Phase 1); John B. Parkin (Phase 2 with Searle, Wilbee and
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    Clark College

    Clark College

    • Libraries: Information Commons at Columbia Tech Center
    Clark College is a community college located in Vancouver, Washington. The college was established in 1933 and currently has about 14,000 students. The college, which celebrated its 75th anniversary on October 1, 2008, was founded as a private, two-year, junior college in 1933. Originally known as Vancouver Junior College, the college was located at the old Hidden House at 100 W 13th Street in downtown Vancouver from 1933-1937, moving several times within the city. The main campus was formerly part of the Vancouver Barracks, which extended from Fourth Plain to the Columbia River but were ceded by the U.S. Army to the city to become Central Park. The college first received state support in 1941, being supervised by the State Board of Education in 1946 with the Vancouver School Board serving as its policy-making body until it was reorganized as a public institution in 1958 and incorporated into the statewide community college system in 1967. In 1951, the Applied Arts Center became its first building at the current location (its sixth), when the college first offered evening classes. After the Kaiser Shipyards boom of World War II, Clark College rapidly grew to meet the educational
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Humber College

    Humber College

    • Libraries: Humber Orangeville Campus Library
    Humber College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning is a polytechnic college in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Humber offers more than 150 programs including: bachelor’s degree, diploma, certificate, post-graduate certificate and apprenticeship programs, across 40 fields of study. Humber serves 25,000 full-time and 60,000 part-time learners. Humber was established in 1967. under its founding President, Gordon Wragg. The first new element Humber College opened on Monday Sept, 11, 1967 at James S. Bell Elementary School, public school on Lake Shore Boulevard West. The Lakeshore Campus began with the addition of the manpower retraining programs on Queen Elizabeth Way in Etobicoke. In November 1968, North Campus was officially opened by Mayor E. A. Horton of Etobicoke and Mayor Jack Moulton of York. In the early 1970s, student enrollment was rapidly increasing which led Humber to expand its business and technology programs at both the North and Lakeshore Campuses. Humber College had the largest group of Business students in the province. Three year co-op programs were developed in the early 1970s in a range of technology and business programs. After such relation with industry
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Indiana University Bloomington

    Indiana University Bloomington

    • Libraries: Herman B. Wells Library
    Indiana University Bloomington (IU Bloomington) is a public research university located in Bloomington, Indiana, in the United States. IU Bloomington is the flagship campus of the Indiana University system. Being the flagship campus, IU Bloomington is often referred to simply as IU or Indiana. However, in recent years, the name "Indiana University" has been applied more broadly to the entire Indiana University system. Of students enrolled in the Spring 2012 term, 1,664 were African-Americans, 1,655 were Asian, 1,488 were Hispanic, and 64 were Native American. More women (20,290) were enrolled than men (20,189). While 55.2% of the student body was from Indiana, students from 49 of the 50 states, Washington D.C., and 165 foreign nations were also enrolled. Indiana University Bloomington also has a wide variety of extracurricular organizations and clubs to keep students active and involved beyond academics. IU is also home to a Greek system of about 17 percent of undergraduates. Indiana's state government in Corydon founded Indiana University in 1820 as the "State Seminary." It was originally located at what is now called Seminary Square Park near the intersection of Second Street and
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Indiana University South Bend

    Indiana University South Bend

    • Libraries: Franklin D. Schurz Library
    Indiana University South Bend is the third largest campus of the Indiana University system. It is popularly known as IUSB or IU South Bend. It is located in South Bend, Indiana, in St. Joseph County, Indiana. Indiana University began offering classes in South Bend in 1916 as an extension of the main campus of Indiana University Bloomington. In the Depression, the superintendent of South Bend schools asked that more classes be added for those who could not afford to attend the Bloomington campus. The classes were offered at Central High School in downtown South Bend and within a few years enrollment reached 500. Classes were taught by local high school teachers with master's degrees and occasionally by Bloomington faculty who traveled once a week for class. The university appointed a resident director in 1940. Lynton Keith Caldwell, then a graduate student at the University of Chicago, took on the job. In 1941, Ernest Gerkin was named the first permanent full-time faculty member. Donald Carmony became the director from 1944 to 1950, followed by Jack Detzler, who remained in the job until 1964. In 1961 the first IUSB building was constructed on newly acquired land on the north shore
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Rochester Institute of Technology

    Rochester Institute of Technology

    • Libraries: Wallace Library
    Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) is a private university located within the town of Henrietta in the Rochester, New York metropolitan area. RIT is composed of nine academic colleges, including the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. It is most widely known for its fine arts, computing, engineering, and imaging science programs; several fine arts programs routinely rank in the national "Top 10" according to the US News & World Report. Rochester Institute of Technology ranks #30 among "Best Engineering Colleges By Salary Potential" in the United States The Institute as it is known today began as a result of an 1891 merger between the Rochester Athenaeum, a literary society founded in 1829 by Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and associates, and the Mechanics Institute, a Rochester institute of practical technical training for local residents founded in 1885 by a consortium of local businessmen including Captain Henry Lomb. The name of the merged institution at the time was called Rochester Athenaeum and Mechanics Institute (RAMI). In 1944, the university changed its name to Rochester Institute of Technology. The Institute originally resided within the city of Rochester, New
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    University of Ottawa

    University of Ottawa

    • Libraries: Brian Dickson Law Library
    The University of Ottawa (French: Université d'Ottawa) (also known as uOttawa or U of O) is a bilingual public research university with campuses located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 42.5 hectares (105 acres) in the residential neighbourhood of Sandy Hill, adjacent to Ottawa's Rideau Canal. The University offers a wide variety of academic programs, administered by ten faculties. It is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada. The University of Ottawa was first established as the College of Bytown in 1848 by the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa Joseph-Bruno Guigues (French priest). Placed under the direction of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, it was renamed the College of Ottawa in 1861 and received university status five years later through royal charter. On 5 February 1889, the University was granted a pontifical charter by Pope Leo XIII, elevating the institution to a pontifical university. The University was reorganized on 1 July 1965 as a corporation, independent from any outside body or religious organization. As a result, the civil and pontifical charters were kept by the newly created Saint
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    New York University

    New York University

    • Libraries: NYU Abu Dhabi Library
    New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian American research university based in New York City. NYU's main campus is situated in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan. Founded in 1831, NYU is one of the largest private nonprofit institutions of American higher education. NYU was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1950. The university counts 36 Nobel Prize winners, 3 Abel Prize winners, 10 National Medal of Science recipients, 16 Pulitzer Prize winners, 30 Academy Award winners, 4 Putnam Competition winners, Russ Prize, Gordon Prize, and Draper Prize winners, Turing Award winners, and Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. NYU also has MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty. NYU is organized into 18 schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn, as well as more than a dozen other sites across the world, with plans for further expansion. According to the Institute of International Education, NYU sends more students to study abroad than any other US college
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Pepperdine University

    Pepperdine University

    • Libraries: West Los Angeles Graduate Campus
    Pepperdine University is an independent, private, medium-sized research university affiliated with the Churches of Christ. The university's 830-acre (340 ha) campus overlooking the Pacific Ocean in unincorporated Los Angeles County, California, United States, near Malibu, is the location for Seaver College, the School of Law, the Graduate School of Education and Psychology, the Graziadio School of Business and Management, and the School of Public Policy. Courses are taught in Malibu, at six graduate campuses in southern California, and at international campuses in Germany, England, Italy, China, Switzerland, and Argentina. In February 1937, against the backdrop of the Great Depression, George Pepperdine founded the university as a Christian liberal arts college in the city of Los Angeles. On September 21, 1937, 167 new students from 22 different states and two other countries entered classes on a newly built campus on 34 acres (14 ha) at West 79th Street and South Vermont Avenue in the Vermont Knolls neighborhood of South Central Los Angeles, referred to later as the Vermont Avenue campus. By April 6, 1938, George Pepperdine College was fully accredited by the Northwest
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    UHI Millennium Institute

    UHI Millennium Institute

    • Libraries: Lews Castle College Library
    The University of the Highlands and Islands (Scottish Gaelic: Oilthigh na Gàidhealtachd agus nan Eilean) is a federation of 13 colleges and research institutions in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland delivering higher education. Its executive office is in Inverness. In April 2001, the Scottish Parliament awarded UHI Higher Education Institute status, and it now provides university level courses. UHI degrees were authenticated by the Open University Validation Service, the University of Strathclyde and the University of Aberdeen until 2008 when the UHI was awarded taught degree awarding powers (tDAP) by the Privy Council under recommendation from the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA); Higher National Certificate and Higher National Diploma courses are awarded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. University status was awarded by the Privy Council in February 2011, and UHI became the University of the Highlands and Islands. UHI has a number of undergraduate, postgraduate and research programmes, most of which can be studied at a range of locations across the area. In the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, courses such as Honours programmes in
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    University of South Florida

    University of South Florida

    • Libraries: Tampa Library
    The University of South Florida, also known as USF, is a member institution of the State University System of Florida, one of the state's three flagship universities for public research, and is located in Tampa, Florida, USA. Founded in 1956, USF is the eighth largest university in the nation and the third largest in the state of Florida, with a total enrollment of 47,122 as of 2009. USF has an autonomous campus in St. Petersburg, and branch centers in Sarasota and Lakeland. USF is classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a "very high research" institution. In its 2010 ranking, the Intellectual Property Owners Association placed USF 9th among all universities worldwide in the number of US patents granted. The university has an annual budget of $1.8 billion and an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion. In a ranking compiled by the National Science Foundation, USF has the 50th highest research expenditure in the United States and in the state of Florida only trails the University of Florida. Twenty USF graduate programs are ranked in the top 100 of the 2012 America’s Best Graduate Schools edition of U.S. News & World Report. USF is also one of the
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    John A. Burns School of Medicine

    John A. Burns School of Medicine

    • Libraries: University of Hawaii at Manoa Health Sciences Library
    The John A. Burns School of Medicine is a public, co-educational institution of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi and is one of the leading medical education institutions in the United States. In 1992, Harvard University identified the John A. Burns School of Medicine as one of ten "leaders in the reform and improvement of medical education," for its innovative problem-based learning curriculum. Named after Governor of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns, it is the only US-LCME accredited medical school in the Pacific. The John A. Burns School of Medicine is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. Residency programs are affiliated with accredited teaching hospitals: Queen's Medical Center, Kapi'olani Medical Center for Women & Children, Kuakini Medical Center, and Tripler Army Medical Center. In addition to being declared a national leader because of its problem-based curriculum, the world set its sights on the John A. Burns School of Medicine in 1998 when Dr. Ryuzo Yanagimachi and his team of scientists developed what is now called the
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    Bakersfield College

    Bakersfield College

    • Libraries: Grace Van Dyke Bird Library
    Bakersfield College (BC) is a public community college located in Bakersfield, California, USA. Its main campus is located on a 153-acre (62 ha) plot in northeast Bakersfield, and it also operates two satellite campuses: the Weill Institute in downtown Bakersfield, and at the Delano Center in Delano, California, approximately 35 miles (56 km) north of Bakersfield. BC serves more than 18,000 students each semester and is part of the Kern Community College District (KCCD). Currently there are a total of 184 Associate's degree and certificate programs for students to choose from. BC is a part of the California Community Colleges system. BC was founded in 1913 and initially housed on the campus of Bakersfield High School (then Kern County Union High School) before moving in 1956 to its current location "on the hill" in northeast Bakersfield. Bakersfield College is one of the oldest continually operating community colleges in the nation. The BC Renegades ('Gades) compete in the Western State Conference (WSC). Renegades football has a long tradition of success in Junior College-level competition, and plays out of the 20,000-seat, on-campus Memorial Stadium. The college has an extensive
    5.40
    5 votes
    90
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    • Libraries: Stapleton Library
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania (or IUP) is a public university in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, USA. The university is 55 miles (89 km) northeast of Pittsburgh. It is the largest university in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PaSSHE) and is the commonwealth's fifth largest university. It is governed by a local Council of Trustees and the Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. IUP has branch campuses at Punxsutawney, Northpointe, and Monroeville. IUP was conceived as Indiana Normal School, first chartered in 1871 by Indiana County investors. The school was created under the Normal School Act, which passed the Pennsylvania General Assembly on May 20, 1857. Normal schools established under the act were to be private corporations in no way dependent upon the state treasury. They were to be "state" normal schools only in the sense of being officially recognized by the commonwealth. The school opened its doors in 1875 following the mold of the French Ecole Normale. It enrolled just 225 students. All normal school events were held within a single building which also contained a laboratory school for model teaching. Control and
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    McMaster Faculty of Health Sciences

    McMaster Faculty of Health Sciences

    • Libraries: McMaster University Health Sciences Library
    The McMaster Faculty of Health Sciences is one of six faculties at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The faculty was established in 1974 to oversee the School of Nursing, the School of Medicine, and Graduate programs in health sciences. Today, the Faculty of Health Sciences oversees 5,000 students, 770 full-time faculty, more than 1,800 part-time faculty, and 28 Canada Research Chairs. The faculty currently houses the following programs: The faculty currently operate a number of facilities on the McMaster's main campus and around Ontario for both education and research. The faculty also operates its own library at the university, known as the Health Science Library. The Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning and Discovery, which houses the faculty's medical school also houses more than 250 scientists and McMaster's medical institutes including, the Centre for Function Genomics, Centre for Gene Therapeutics, Institute for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Research, Robert E. Fitzhenry Vector Laboratory, Centre for Asthma and Allergy Research (Allergen) and North American Headquarters for West Nile studies. The faculty also operate two regional campses in St. Catharines,
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    New York University School of Law

    New York University School of Law

    • Libraries: New York University Law Library
    The New York University School of Law (NYU Law) is the law school of New York University in the Manhattan borough of New York City. Established in 1835, It is the oldest law school in New York City. The school offers J.D., LL.M., and J.S.D. degrees in law, and is located in Greenwich Village, in downtown Manhattan. NYU Law is one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious law schools. Considered to be among the top five best law schools in the United States, it is currently ranked #6 by the U.S. News & World Report , alternating between 4th, 5th, and 6th places in recent years. In terms of specialization, NYU Law is ranked # 1 in both Tax Law and International Law by U.S. News. The school is especially known for its dedication to the public sector, emphasis on diversity, and large firm placement. The median starting salary of NYU Law graduates working in the private sector was $160,000 for the class of 2010 (a figure which does not include bonuses). NYU Law publishes eight student-edited law journals, which are, in order of their founding: The law school's longstanding commitment to public service is exemplified by its many notable alumni and the Root-Tilden-Kern Scholarship
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    University of South Carolina

    University of South Carolina

    • Libraries: Thomas Cooper Library
    The University of South Carolina (also referred to as USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States, with 7 surrounding satellite campuses. Its historic campus covers over 359 acres (145 ha) in downtown Columbia not far from the South Carolina State House. The University has been recognized by the Carnegie Foundation for its research and engagement, has received a Top-10 ranking from U.S. News & World Report for being "most promising and innovative," and for decades has received annual recognition for its prestigious undergraduate and graduate International Business programs. It also houses the largest collection of Robert Burns and Scottish literature materials outside of Scotland, and the largest collection of Ernest Hemingway collection in the world. Founded in 1801, USC is the flagship institution of the University of South Carolina System and offers more than 350 programs of study leading to bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees from fourteen degree-granting colleges and schools to an enrollment of approximately 45,251 students, 30,967 on the main Columbia campus. USC also has several thousand
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    DePaul University College of Law

    DePaul University College of Law

    • Libraries: Rinn Law Library
    DePaul University College of Law is a law school located in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Founded in 1897 as the Illinois College of Law, the school became part of DePaul University in 1912 and is one of the academic colleges of DePaul, a Big East Conference university. The College is known for its Intellectual Property Law program , headed by Professor Barbara B. Bressler, and its Health Law program, formerly headed by Professor Nanette Elster. Both programs have garnered top 20 placements in the U.S. News & World Report rankings in recent years. In 2004, the school established the International Aviation Law Institute, the first of its kind in the United States. DePaul University College of Law is ranked amongst the "Top 100 Law Schools" in the United States by the U.S. News & World Report Graduate School Ranking. DePaul University College of Law was formed in 1912 when the Illinois College of Law (founded in 1897) affiliated with DePaul University. In 1912, DePaul awarded an LL.D., its first honorary degree, to the founder and then president of the Illinois College of Law, Howard N. Ogden.. In 1915, after the death of Ogden, complete ownership of the college transferred to DePaul. In
    8.00
    2 votes
    95
    Earlham College

    Earlham College

    • Libraries: Lilly Library
    Earlham College is a liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. It was founded in 1847 by Quakers and has approximately 1,200 students. Earlham is by some measures the most internationally diverse liberal arts college in the United States. In keeping with Friends' belief in equality, everyone addresses each other at Earlham by his or her first name, without the use of titles such as "doctor" or "professor"; likewise, "freshmen" are referred to as "first year (student)(s)". While Earlham is primarily a residential undergraduate college, it also has two graduate programs — the master of arts in teaching and the master of education — which provide a route for teacher licensure to students with liberal arts undergraduate degrees. Earlham College is listed in Loren Pope's book, Colleges That Change Lives. Earlham was founded in 1847 as a boarding high school for the religious education of Quaker adolescents. In 1859, Earlham became Earlham College, upon the addition of collegiate academics. At this time, Earlham was the second Quaker college in the United States (Haverford College was first), and the second to be coeducational (Oberlin College was first). Though the college initially
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    Georgetown University Law Center

    Georgetown University Law Center

    • Libraries: The Georgetown Law Library
    Georgetown University Law Center is the law school of Georgetown University, located in Washington, D.C. Established in 1870, the Law Center offers J.D., LL.M., and S.J.D. degrees in law. As the second largest law school in the United States, Georgetown Law often touts the advantages of its wide range of program offerings and proximity to federal agencies and courts, including the Supreme Court. Georgetown Law is one of the most prestigious institutions of legal education in the United States. The Law Center is one of the top ten most selective law schools in the United States, as well as one of the 14 law schools that consistently rank at the very top of U.S. News and World Report's annual rankings. Georgetown Law is one of the T14 law schools, which have been consistently ranked in the top 14 by U.S. News & World Report since the inception of that magazine's law school rankings. In the 2013 edition, Georgetown was ranked the #13 law school in the nation overall. Additionally, it ranked #1 in clinical programs, #6 in environmental law, #5 in trial advocacy, #7 in healthcare law, #2 in international law, #2 in tax law (LL.M.), and #1 part-time J.D. program. This means that of the
    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    Medaille College

    Medaille College

    • Libraries: Medaille College Library
    Medaille College a private liberal arts college located in the historic Olmsted Crescent of Buffalo, New York, that draws extensively from the Western New York and Southern Ontario regions. It is a private, nonsectarian, co-educational institution. Founded in 1875 as the Sisters of Saint Joseph to train teachers. The school obtained a state charter and became Mount Saint Joseph College in 1937. In 1968, the school enlarged its mission and gained its current name. Enrollment is now at 2,759 students. Medaille is structured similar to AMCC universities such as Penn State Erie and St. John Fisher College. The curriculum is patterned around Liberal Arts & Science foundations, which emphasize interdisciplinary coursework and private university standards. Within the past year, numerous faculty members have been awarded research grants through such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts, National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health. A member of the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC), Medaille fields 11 NCAA Division III athletic teams for men and women. In 2011, Medaille was ranked as one of the best colleges in the nation for veterans by
    8.00
    2 votes
    98
    New Mexico State University

    New Mexico State University

    • Libraries: Zuhl Library
    New Mexico State University at Las Cruces (officially New Mexico State University, although also commonly referred to as NMSU-Las Cruces, NMSU, or NM State), is a major land-grant university in Las Cruces, New Mexico, United States. It is the second largest four year university in the state in terms of total enrollment across all campuses as of 2011, with campuses in Alamogordo, Carlsbad, Doña Ana County, and Grants, with extension and research centers across New Mexico. It was founded to teach agriculture in 1888 as the Las Cruces College, and the following year became New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. It received its present name in 1960. NMSU has 18,497 students enrolled as of Fall 2009, and has a faculty-to-student ratio of about 1 to 19. NMSU offers a wide range of programs and awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees through its main campus and four community colleges. NMSU is the only research-extensive, land-grant, USA-Mexico border institution classified as Hispanic serving by the federal government. In 1888, Hiram Hadly, a respected educator from Indiana, set up the small Las Cruces College. One year later, the Territorial Assembly
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    University College London

    University College London

    • Libraries: UCL Bartlett Library
    University College London (UCL) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1826, UCL was the first university institution to be founded in London and the first in England to be established on an entirely secular basis, to admit students regardless of their religion and to admit women on equal terms with men. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals located elsewhere in central London. UCL is organised into 10 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL had a total income of £802 million in 2010/11, of which £283 million was from research grants and contracts. For the period 1999 to 2009 it was the 13th most-cited university in the world (and the most-cited in Europe). UCL has around 4,000 academic and research staff and 650 professors, the highest number of any British university. There are 26 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    University of Miami

    University of Miami

    • Libraries: Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library
    The University of Miami (informally referred to as UM, U of M, U Miami, Miami, or The U) is a private, non-sectarian university founded in 1925 with its main campus in Coral Gables, Florida, a medical campus in Miami city proper at Civic Center, and an oceanographic research facility on Virginia Key. As of 2009, the university currently enrolls 15,629 students in 12 separate colleges, including a medical school, law school, and a school focused on the study of oceanography and atmospheric sciences. These colleges offer approximately 115 undergraduate, 114 master’s, 51 doctoral, and two professional areas of study. Over the years, the University's students have represented all 50 states and close to 150 foreign countries. With more than 13,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, UM is the sixth largest employer in Miami-Dade County. Research is a component of each academic division, with UM attracting $326 million per year in sponsored research grants. UM also offers a large library system with over 3.1 million volumes and exceptional holdings in Cuban heritage and music. UM also offers a wide range of student activities, including fraternities and sororities, a student newspaper
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Boalt Hall

    Boalt Hall

    • Libraries: Berkeley Law Library
    The University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, commonly referred to as Berkeley Law and Boalt Hall, is one of 14 schools and colleges at the University of California, Berkeley. Berkeley Law is consistently ranked as one of the top law schools, with acceptance rates lower than every U.S. law school except Yale and Stanford. The law school has produced leaders in law, government, and society, including: Chief Justice of the United States Earl Warren, Secretary of State of the United States Dean Rusk, Attorney General of the United States Edwin Meese, United States Secretary of the Treasury and Chairman of the Federal Reserve G. William Miller, Solicitor General of the United States Theodore Olson, and lead litigator of the Korematsu v. United States Civil Rights Case Dale Minami. The Department of Jurisprudence was founded at Berkeley in 1894. In 1912, the department was renamed the School of Jurisprudence, which was then renamed the School of Law in 1950. The School was originally located in the center of the main UC Berkeley campus in the Boalt Memorial Hall of Law, built in 1911 with funds largely from Elizabeth Josselyn Boalt donated in memory of her late husband, John
    9.00
    1 votes
    102
    Butler University

    Butler University

    • Libraries: Irwin Library
    Butler University is a private university located in Indianapolis, Indiana. Founded in 1855 and named after founder Ovid Butler, the university offers 60 degree programs to 4,400 students through six colleges: business, communication, education, liberal arts and sciences, pharmacy and health sciences, and fine arts. It comprises a 290-acre (1.2 km) campus located 7 miles (11 km) from downtown Indianapolis. Butlers's athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are collectively known as the Butler Bulldogs. On July 1, 2012, the Bulldogs left the Horizon League, their conference home since 1979, for the Atlantic 10 Conference. Since the A10 does not sponsor football, the Butler football team plays in the FCS's Pioneer League. Butler's women's golf team will also remain outside the A10, as that conference sponsors the sport only for men. On January 15, 1850, the Indiana State legislature adopted Ovid Butler's proposed charter for a new Christian university in Indianapolis. After five years in development, Butler University opened on November 1, 1855, as North Western Christian University at 13th street and College Avenue on Indianapolis' near north-side at the eastern edge of
    9.00
    1 votes
    103
    Georgia State University

    Georgia State University

    • Libraries: Georgia State University Library
    Georgia State University (GSU) is a research university in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Founded in 1913, it is one of the University System of Georgia's four research universities. With more than 40,000 students, it is second in size only to The University of Georgia. The College of Education at Georgia State University offers more than 60 graduate and undergraduate degree and nondegree programs spread across six academic departments with more than 1,000 faculty members. Since its inception, 192,785 degrees have been conferred, with 6,737 of them conferred during fiscal year 2011. The university has a full-time faculty count of 1,142, with 69 percent of those faculty members either tenured or on tenure track. The university has an economic impact on the Atlanta economy of more than $1.4 billion annually. The President of Georgia State University (currently Mark P. Becker) is the head administrator and is appointed and overseen by the Georgia Board of Regents. The University comprises eight schools and colleges, and although some divisions use "college" and some use "school", the title does not indicate any distinction between the eight colleges and schools that constitute the
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    Lund University

    Lund University

    • Libraries: Lund University History Library
    Lund University (Swedish: Lunds universitet) is one of Europe's most prestigious universities and Scandinavia's largest institutions for education and research, consistently ranked among the world's top 100 universities. The university, located in the city of Lund in the province of Scania, Sweden, traces its roots back to 1425, when a Franciscan studium generale was founded in Lund next to the Lund Cathedral, arguably making it the oldest institution of higher education in Scandinavia followed by studium generales in Uppsala in 1477 and Copenhagen in 1479. The current university was however not founded until 1666 after Sweden had won Scania in the 1658 peace agreement with Denmark. Lund University has eight faculties, with additional campuses in the cities of Malmö and Helsingborg, with 47,000 students in more than 280 different programmes and around 2,250 separate courses. The University has some 680 partner universities in over 50 countries and it belongs to the League of European Research Universities as well as the global Universitas 21 network. Two major facilities for materials research are currently under construction in Lund: MAX IV, which will be a world-leading
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Marshall University

    Marshall University

    • Libraries: John Deaver Drinko Library
    Marshall University is a coeducational public research university in Huntington, West Virginia, United States founded in 1837, and named after John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. The university is composed of eight undergraduate colleges and schools: the College of Liberal Arts (COLA), the College of Fine Arts (COFA), the College of Education and Human Services (COEHS), the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), the Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business (LCOB), the College of Science (COS), the College of Health Professions (COHP), and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC), and four graduate colleges, the general Graduate College, the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, the School of Pharmacy, and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, a regional center for cancer research which has a national reputation for its programs in rural health care delivery. The forensic science graduate program is one of a small number of post-graduate-level academic programs in the United States accredited by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and considered by many to be an acceptable
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

    Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

    • Libraries: Manchester Campus Library
    The Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS, informally MCP) is an accredited, private institution located in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area of Boston, Massachusetts. As an institution with a prominent history of specializing in medical careers, the college provides traditional and accelerated programs of study that combine in-depth knowledge with hands-on clinical practice focused on professional education in Pharmacy and the Health Sciences. Its location within the Longwood Medical Area provides students with academic and clinical opportunities at various prestigious medical and research institutions. Since 2000, MCPHS has expanded to include two additional campuses, located in Worcester, Massachusetts and Manchester, New Hampshire. Founded as the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy in 1823 by fourteen Boston pharmacists, MCPHS is the oldest institution of higher education in Boston. It is also the second-oldest and largest College of Pharmacy in the United States, preceded only by the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy (Now University of the Sciences in Philadelphia), which was founded in 1821. In 1825, the college published the First American
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Teachers College, Columbia University

    Teachers College, Columbia University

    • Libraries: Gottesman Library
    Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a graduate school of education located in New York City, New York, United States. It was founded in 1887 and has been affiliated with Columbia University since 1898. Teachers College was founded in 1887 by the philanthropist Grace Hoadley Dodge and philosopher Nicholas Murray Butler to provide a new kind of schooling for the teachers of the poor children of New York City, one that combined a humanitarian concern to help others with a scientific approach to human development. Beginning as a school to prepare home economists and manual art teachers for the children of the poor, the College affiliated with Columbia University in 1898 as the University's Graduate School of Education. Unlike normal schools, after 1893 Teachers College required all students to have a high school diploma. Its professional teacher education was considered the equivalent of the junior and senior years of college. Many early students who lacked preparation for the advanced coursework first took
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    University of Illinois at Chicago

    University of Illinois at Chicago

    • Libraries: Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago
    The University of Illinois at Chicago, or UIC, is a state-funded public research university located in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Its campus is in the Near West Side community area, adjacent to the Chicago Loop. The second campus established under the University of Illinois system, UIC is also the largest university in the Chicago area, having approximately 28,000 students enrolled in 15 colleges. UIC's medical school is arguably its most prominent program. UIC operates the largest medical school in the United States, and serves as the principal educator for Illinois’ physicians, dentists, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare professionals. UIC's medical school has research expenditures exceeding $412 million and consistently ranks in the top 50 U.S. institutions for research expenditures. Additionally, UIC serves as the state’s major public medical center. In the 2013 U.S. News & World Report's ranking of colleges and universities, UIC ranked as the 147th best national university. UIC competes in NCAA Division I Horizon League as the UIC Flames in sports. The UIC Pavilion is home to all UIC basketball games. It also serves as a venue for concerts. The University of
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    University of Pittsburgh School of Arts and Sciences

    University of Pittsburgh School of Arts and Sciences

    • Libraries: Frick Fine Arts Library
    The Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) is one of the 17 schools and colleges of University of Pittsburgh located in Pittsburgh, PA. A direct descendent of the Pittsburgh Academy chartered in 1787, and the oldest part of the university, the school serves as the liberal arts core of the university and provides instruction in natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences for all students studying at the Oakland campus, including more than 10,000 students registered as Arts and Sciences undergraduates. In addition, the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences educates 15% (over 1,500) of the University’s graduate and graduate professional students, making it the largest graduate program in the Pittsburgh area. Founded by Hugh Henry Brackenridge as the Pittsburgh Academy and chartered in 1787, the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences may have originally grew out of a school that was active before the charter was granted, perhaps as early as 1770. Thus the Dietrich SAS began its life as a preparatory school, presumably in a log cabin, in what is now downtown Pittsburgh, which was then on the frontier of the United States. The school was established on the principles of
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Brevard Community College

    Brevard Community College

    • Libraries: BCC/UCF Joint-Use Library
    Brevard Community College, founded in 1960, is a community college on Florida's Space Coast, in Brevard County, Florida. It has four campuses in Cocoa, Melbourne, Palm Bay, and Titusville, as well as an Aerospace program at Kennedy Space Center and a Virtual Campus. BCC is a member institution of the Florida College System. Most of BCC's students take part in its Associate in Arts transfer program. In 2007, BCC was listed 21st in the nation in awarding AA degrees. In 2010, the college reported 25,000 students enrolled for courses. There were 1,200 employees in 2011, including support personnel and faculty. The president's office, and therefore the college's headquarters, is on the Cocoa campus. A four-day summer workweek, instituted in 2008, has proved popular. Then called Brevard Junior College, the school opened with 768 students in the fall of 1960 in the former Cocoa High School on Forrest Avenue in Cocoa. Dr. Bruce J. Wilson was president. There were 31 faculty members. Four associate degrees were offered. Segregation prevailed. It was an all-white college. To accomplish desegregation in compliance with the law, it merged with the all-black Carver Junior College in 1963 to
    6.67
    3 votes
    111
    California State University, Chico

    California State University, Chico

    California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the twenty-three-campus California State University system. It is located in Chico, California, about ninety miles north of Sacramento. California State University, Chico is commonly known as Chico State or Cal State, Chico. On March 12, 1887, a legislative act was enacted to create the Northern Branch State Normal School of California. Less than a month later, Chico was chosen as the location. On June 24, 1887, General John Bidwell donated 8 acres (3.2 ha) of land from his cherry orchard. Then on July 4, 1888, the first cornerstone was laid. On September 3, 1889, doors opened for the 90 enrolled students. The library opened on January 11, 1890 with 350 books. On June 20, 1891 the first graduation took place, a class of 15. In 1910, Annie Bidwell donated an additional 2 acres (0.81 ha) of land to be used for work with elementary agriculture. The next year Mrs. Bidwell donated an orange orchard lot 55 × 440 feet (130 m) as the children's playground, which is connected to the Training School. Twenty years later in 1921, legislation was enacted to change the school's name to Chico State Teacher's College. In 1922, Chico
    6.67
    3 votes
    112
    California State University, San Bernardino

    California State University, San Bernardino

    California State University, San Bernardino, also known as Cal State San Bernardino or CSUSB is a public university and one of the twenty three general campuses of the California State University system. The main campus sits on 441 acres (178 ha) in the suburban University District of San Bernardino, California, United States, with a branch campus of 40 acres (16 ha) in Palm Desert, California, opened in 1986. In 2011, California State University, San Bernardino was named a 2012 Best College in the Western Region by The Princeton Review for the eighth straight year in a row, ranking CSUSB among the top 25 percent of universities across the nation. Also in 2011, California State University, San Bernardino’s College of Business and Public Administration was recognized by European CEO Magazine as one of the top 20 schools of business in the world and one of the world's 18 most innovative business schools. Founded in 1965, Cal State San Bernardino's enrollment annually tops 17,500. Overall, in 2011 only 19.1 percent of the students whom applied to the university were accepted. CSUSB's sports teams are known as the Coyotes and play in the California Collegiate Athletic Association in
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Drexel University

    Drexel University

    • Libraries: Queen Lane Library
    Drexel University (DU) is a private research university with the main campus located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It was founded in 1891 by Anthony J. Drexel, a noted financier and philanthropist. Drexel offers over 70 full-time undergraduate programs and accelerated degrees. At the graduate level, the university offers over 100 masters, doctoral, and professional programs, many available part-time. Drexel is best known for the cooperative education program (Co-op). Drexel's Co-op is regularly ranked as one of the best co-op programs in the United States. Participating students have a variety of opportunities to gain up to 18-month paid full-time working experience before graduation. The university has a large network of more than 1,600 corporate, governmental, and non-profit partners in 28 states and 25 international locations. The employers consists of top ranked multinational law firms, banks, corporations, and many Fortune 500 companies, such as Goldman Sachs, Microsoft, and Procter & Gamble. Times Higher Education World University Rankings placed Drexel among the top 200 universities in the World. In U.S. News & World Report's annual "America's Best Colleges List", the
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    University of Hawaii at Manoa

    University of Hawaii at Manoa

    • Libraries: Hamilton Library
    The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is a public co-educational research university and is the flagship campus of the greater University of Hawaiʻi system. The school is located in Mānoa, an urban neighborhood community of Honolulu CDP, City and County of Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, United States, approximately three miles east and inland from downtown Honolulu and one mile (1.6 km) from Ala Moana and Waikīkī. The campus occupies the eastern half of the mouth of the greater Mānoa Valley. It is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and is governed by the Hawaiʻi State Legislature and a semi-autonomous Board of Regents, which in turn hires a president to be administrator. The university campus houses the main offices of the UH System. The University of Hawaii at Mānoa was founded in 1907 as a land grant college of agriculture and mechanical arts. In 1912 it was renamed the College of Hawaii and moved to its present location. William Kwai Fong Yap petitioned the territorial legislature six years later for university status which led to another renaming to the University of Hawai'i in 1920. This is also the founding year of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1931 the
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    University of Hertfordshire

    University of Hertfordshire

    • Libraries: College Lane Campus Learning Resources Centre
    The University of Hertfordshire (informally "Hertfordshire University") is a British new university based largely in Hatfield, in the county of Hertfordshire, England, from which the university takes its name. It has more than 27,500 students, over 2500 staff, with a turnover of over £181m. It has over 5200 international students and a global network of over 160,000 alumni. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, over 85% of the submitted research was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour. University of Hertfordshire was shortlisted for the THE University of the Year Award in 2008 and for the University of the Year Award in 2009. It was declared the ‘Entrepreneurial University of the Year,' 2010 by Times Higher Education. It is regarded as one of the UK's greenest universities. The university has been awarded a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Chair for Information and Computer Ethics; the fourteenth to be established in the UK. For seven consecutive years, members of staff have achieved lifelong Fellowship Awards as outstanding teachers, as part of the National Teaching Fellowship. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    University of Missouri–St. Louis

    University of Missouri–St. Louis

    • Libraries: Thomas Jefferson Library
    The University of Missouri–St. Louis (UMSL, commonly pronounced "uhm-suhl") is one of four universities in the University of Missouri System. Established in 1963, it is the newest university in the UM System. As of 2011, it is the largest university by enrollment in the St. Louis area with 16,809 students. UMSL's campus is located on the former grounds of the Bellerive Country Club in Saint Louis County, Missouri, United States, within the municipalities of Bellerive, Bel-Nor and Normandy. Additional facilities are located at the former site of Marillac College. Bachelor's, Master's, and doctoral programs are offered through the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business Administration, the College of Education, the College of Fine Arts and Communication, the College of Nursing, and the College of Optometry. The business school is AACSB-accredited and is the only university in the St. Louis area to also be AACSB-accredited in accounting. Preprofessional, a joint engineering program with Washington University in St. Louis, and evening programs are also offered. UMSL is home of an optometry school, providing its students with a doctorate (OD). Only 17 optometry schools
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Yeshiva University

    Yeshiva University

    • Libraries: Gottesman Library of Hebraica and Judaica
    Yeshiva University is a private university in New York City, with six campuses in New York and one in Israel. Founded in 1886, it is a research university ranked as 45th in the US among national universities by U.S. News & World Report in 2012. It also ranked as 68th in the world by The Times Higher Education in 2011 and among 400 in world by THES—QS World University Rankings. Yeshiva University’s undergraduate schools—Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Syms School of Business "offer a unique dual curriculum inspired by Modern-Centrist-Orthodox Judaism's hashkafa (philosophy) of Torah Umadda ("Torah and secular knowledge") combining the finest, contemporary academic education with the timeless teachings of Torah.” Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, and other graduate and professional schools promote a “dual emphasis on professional excellence and personal ethics.” Yeshiva University is an independent institution chartered by New York State. It is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and by several professional agencies. Yeshiva University is the
    5.75
    4 votes
    118
    Centennial College

    Centennial College

    • Libraries: Centennial College Ashtonbee Campus Library
    Centennial College is the oldest publicly funded college in Ontario. It is located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; its four campuses are situated to serve the eastern portion of the Greater Toronto Area. The enabling legislation is the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Act. Centennial College is recognized as one of the most culturally diverse post-secondary institutions in Ontario. Almost 100 ethno-cultural groups are represented and 80 languages are spoken on campus. It offers more than 120 applied degree, diploma and certificate programs on a full- and part-time basis in business, communication arts, community and consumer services, science and engineering technology, health sciences and transportation. Centennial College supports enrolments of 16,000 full-time students and 22,000 part-time learners annually. Centennial College was the first to be opened in Ontario during the formation of the province's public college system in the 1960s. Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology were established on May 21, 1965 under the direction of the Hon. William Davis, Minister of Education. The system has grown to encompass 24 public colleges serving 200 communities in
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Chapman University School of Law

    Chapman University School of Law

    • Libraries: Harry and Diane Rinker Law Library
    Chapman University School of Law, commonly referred to as Chapman Law or Chapman Law School, is a private, non-profit law school located in Orange, California. The school offers the Juris Doctor degree (JD), combined programs offering a JD/MBA and JD/MFA in Film & Television Producing, and LL.M. degrees with emphasis options in Business Law and Economics, Entertainment Law & Media, International & Comparative Law, Prosecutorial Science, Trial Advocacy, and Taxation. Currently, the school has a full-time faculty of fifty-three and a law library with holdings in excess of 290,000 volumes and volume equivalents. Established in 1995 as part of Chapman University, Chapman Law gained provisional accreditation from the American Bar Association (ABA) in 1998. In 2002, the ABA awarded the school full accreditation. In addition to its ABA membership, the Association of American Law Schools has admitted Chapman Law as one of its members in 2006, noting that "the school has an outstanding physical facility and has developed a faculty with a strong commitment to teaching and scholarship." Chapman University School of Law is currently ranked 104th (3rd Tier) in the 2011 US News and World
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    Concordia University

    Concordia University

    • Libraries: Webster Library
    Concordia University is a comprehensive Canadian public university located in Montreal, Quebec, one of the two universities in the city where English is the primary language of instruction. For the 2010-2011 academic year, there were 45,963 students enrolled at Concordia, making the university among the largest in Canada by enrollment. Concordia has well recognized programs and ranks highly in Canada and internationally in fields such as fine arts, social science, journalism and engineering. In the THES - QS World University Rankings of the top 500 universities in the world for 2010, Concordia University placed 401-450, and 19th overall in Canada. According to a worldwide ranking by the École des Mines de Paris, Concordia ranks first among Canadian and 33rd among world universities in terms of graduates occupying the rank of Chief Executive Officer at Fortune 500 companies. The university's John Molson School of Business is consistently ranked within the top ten Canadian business schools, and within the top 100 worldwide. Concordia was created following the 1974 merger of Loyola College (1896) and Sir George Williams University (1926). Concordia University has changed its logo four
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    Hope College

    Hope College

    • Libraries: Nykerk Hall Music Library
    Hope College is a medium-sized (3,200 undergraduates), private, residential liberal arts college located in downtown Holland, Michigan, United States, a few miles from Lake Michigan. It was opened in 1851 as the Pioneer School by Dutch immigrants four years after the community was first settled. The first freshman college class matriculated in 1862, and Hope received its state charter in 1866. It has been historically associated with the Reformed Church in America, and it retains a conservative Christian atmosphere. The school's campus—now 91 acres (368,000 m²), adjacent to the downtown commercial district—has been shared with Western Theological Seminary since 1884. Since 1999, Hope has been led by president and alumnus James E. Bultman. The college offers 90 majors leading to a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. It has a student population of about 3,205 and a student-to-faculty ratio of 13:1. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report included Hope College in a list of 33 institutions noted for outstanding undergraduate research programs. As of 2012, it is the only small liberal arts college in the country to receive
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Lahore University of Management Sciences

    Lahore University of Management Sciences

    • Libraries: Gad and Birgit Rausing Library
    The Lahore University of Management Sciences, usually referred to by its acronym LUMS, is a highly distinguished residential academic research university located in Lahore, Pakistan. LUMS was established in 1984 by a group of industrialists and professionals belonging to Pakistan's leading private and public sector corporations, to provide rigorous academic and intellectual training to students. According to the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan, LUMS is the top ranked Pakistani university among institutions that offer degrees in Business Management and Information Technology in South Asia. In 2011 globally renowned Pakistani intellectual Dr. Adil Najam was appointed the third Vice Chancellor of Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). The university was granted a charter by the Government of Pakistan in March 1985. The LUMS Board of Trustees comprises leading members of the domestic business community, academics, and government representatives. The principal functions of the board are to set policy guidelines and to review the operations of the university. The Board of Governors, as the sponsor of LUMS, raises funds necessary for the university's operation and
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Mercer University

    Mercer University

    • Libraries: Monroe F. Swilley, Jr. Library
    Mercer University is a private, coeducational university located in the U.S. state of Georgia. Mercer is the only university of its size in the United States that offers programs in eleven diversified fields of study: liberal arts, business, education, music, engineering, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, law, theology, and continuing and professional studies. Mercer enrolls approximately 8,300 students in its eleven colleges and schools. Mercer's twelfth academic unit, the College of Health Professions, will open on July 1, 2013. Mercer has three campuses: the main campus in Macon, which has been recognized as one of the five most beautiful college or university campuses in the United States; a graduate and professional education campus in Atlanta; and a four-year campus of the School of Medicine in Savannah. Mercer also has regional academic centers in Henry County, Douglas County, Eastman, and Newnan; teaching hospitals in Macon, Savannah, and Columbus; a university press and a performing arts center, the Grand Opera House, in Macon; and the Mercer Engineering Research Center in Warner Robins. The Mercer University Health Sciences Center encompasses Mercer's medical, nursing, and
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

    • Libraries: National Oceanographic Library
    The National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) describes the integrated collaboration between the Southampton-based part of the Natural Environment Research Council’s National Oceanography Centre, and University of Southampton Ocean and Earth Science. The waterfront campus, on Southampton's Empress Dock, was opened in 1996 as the Southampton Oceanography Centre by Prince Philip (he also renamed it the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, in 2005), NOCS is located near the Ocean Village development in the dock area of Southampton. It is one of a group of centres specialising in marine science, earth science and marine technology, and provides a platform for interdisciplinary research (such as the Autosub Under Ice programme) alongside a comprehensive teaching facility. The NOCS comprises the University of Southampton’s Ocean and Earth Science academic unit which operates alongside five NERC research divisions and the NERC's National Marine Facilities Sea Systems . In addition to housing some 520 research scientists and staff, over 700 undergraduate and postgraduate students call the NOCS home. The NOCS's on-site resources include the UK National Oceanographic Library,
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    National University of Singapore

    National University of Singapore

    • Libraries: National University of Singapore Medical Library
    The National University of Singapore (Abbreviation: NUS; Malay: Universiti Kebangsaan Singapura; Jawi script: اونيۏرسيتي كبڠسأن سيڠاڤورا; Chinese: 新加坡国立大学; pinyin: Xīnjiāpō Guólì Dàxué; Abbreviated 国大; Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசியப் பல்கலைக்கழகம், Ciṅkappūr Tēciyap Palkalaikkaḻakam ) is Singapore's oldest university. It is the largest university in the country in terms of student enrollment and curriculum offered. The university's main campus is located in southwest Singapore at Kent Ridge, with an area of approximately 1.5 km (0.58 sq mi). The Bukit Timah campus houses the Faculty of Law, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and research institutes, while the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore is located at the Outram campus. The former British Prime Minister Tony Blair had named NUS as the headquarters of his Asian Faith and Globalization Initiative together with Durham University in the UK and Yale University in the USA to deliver an exclusive programme in partnership with Tony Blair Faith Foundation. The university is widely considered to be one of the most prestigious universities in Asia. In 2012, NUS was ranked 25th in the world and 2nd in Asia by the QS World University
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Pennsylvania State University

    Pennsylvania State University

    • Libraries: H. Laddie Montague, Jr. Law Library
    The Pennsylvania State University, commonly referred to as Penn State or PSU, is a public, state-related research university with campuses and facilities in Pennsylvania. Founded in 1855, the university has a stated threefold mission of teaching, research, and public service. Its instructional mission includes undergraduate, graduate, professional and continuing education offered through resident instruction and online delivery. Its University Park campus, the flagship campus, lies within the Borough of State College and College Township. The Penn State Dickinson School of Law has facilities located in both Carlisle and State College and the College of Medicine is located in Hershey. Penn State has another 19 commonwealth campuses and 5 special-mission campuses located across the state. Annual enrollment at the University Park campus totals more than 44,000 graduate and undergraduate students, making it one of the largest universities in the United States. It has the world's largest dues-paying alumni association. The university's total enrollment in 2009–10 was approximately 94,300 across its 24 campuses and online through its World Campus. The university offers more than 160
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    • Libraries: UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Library of Health Sciences
    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS) is a public medical school located in Piscataway and New Brunswick, New Jersey, and one of the eight schools of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). In cooperation with Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the medical school’s principal affiliate, they comprise New Jersey’s premier academic medical center. In addition, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has 34 other hospital affiliates and ambulatory care sites throughout the region. It is ranked among the top 100 U.S. medical schools in both research and primary care by U.S. News & World Report. The school's 2,800 full-time and volunteer faculty support its stated mission of medical education, research, health care delivery, and the promotion of community health. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School encompasses 22 basic science and clinical departments, as well as several centers and institutes including the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the Child Health Institute of New Jersey, the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, and the Stem Cell Institute of New Jersey. The medical school is
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    UCLA School of Law

    UCLA School of Law

    • Libraries: Hugh & Hazel Darling Law Library
    The UCLA School of Law is the law school of the University of California, Los Angeles. It has been approved by the American Bar Association (ABA) since 1950. It joined the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in 1952. Founded in 1949, UCLA School of Law is currently one of five law schools within the University of California system. The others are UC Berkeley School of Law, King Hall at UC Davis, UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, and UC Irvine School of Law. UCLA Law's first dean was L. Dale Coffman, who recruited elderly Harvard dean Roscoe Pound as one of the school's first professors. The school was forced to operate in a Quonset hut for its first two years until a proper building was constructed. In September 1949, Pound insisted on delivering the school's first ever keynote address in the Latin language, in the Quonset hut. The UCLA Law Review, the law school's flagship scholarly journal, was first published in 1953. Additionally, the first scholarly journal in the nation focused on issues affecting Latinos, the Chicana/o Latina/o Law Review, was first published in 1971 as the Chicano Law Review. The school offers the standard Juris Doctor degree as well
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    University of Birmingham Medical School

    University of Birmingham Medical School

    • Libraries: Barnes Library
    The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britain's largest and oldest medical schools with over 400 Medics graduating each year. It is based at the University of Birmingham in Edgbaston, Birmingham, England. Since 2008, and following a departmental restructure, the school became an entity within The College of Medical and Dental Sciences. The roots of the Birmingham Medical School were in the medical education seminars of John Tomlinson, the first surgeon to the Birmingham Workhouse Infirmary and later to the General Hospital. These classes were the first held in the winter of 1767-68. The first clinical teaching was undertaken by medical and surgical apprentices at the General Hospital, opened in 1779. Birmingham Medical School was formally founded in 1825 by William Sands Cox, who began by teaching medical students in his father's house in Birmingham. A new building was used from 1829 (on the site of what is now Snow Hill Station). Students at this time took the licentiate/membership examinations of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries. In 1836, Earl Howe and a number of prominent
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

    Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

    • Libraries: Lippincott Library
    The Wharton School is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Wharton was United States' first business school and the world’s first collegiate business school, established in 1881 through a donation from Joseph Wharton. Alone and in conjunction with the other schools and colleges of the university, Wharton grants B.S. and MBA degrees, offers a Ph.D. program, and houses or co-sponsors several diploma programs. With the most electives of any business school, Wharton offers concentrations in accounting, business and public policy, entrepreneurial management, environmental management, finance, health care systems, human resource and organizational management, insurance and risk management, legal studies and business ethics, management, marketing, multinational management, operations and information management, real estate, retailing, statistics and strategic management. The school currently has 278 faculty members, translating to a 17:1 student-to-faculty ratio. The school's faculty is the world’s most published and most cited among business schools. Business Week and Financial Times have ranked Wharton among the
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    DePauw University

    DePauw University

    • Libraries: Roy O. West Library
    DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, USA, is a private, national liberal arts college and School of Music with an enrollment of approximately 2,400 students. The school has a Methodist heritage and was originally known as Indiana Asbury University. DePauw is a member of both the Great Lakes Colleges Association and the North Coast Athletic Conference. The Society of Professional Journalists was founded at DePauw. DePauw is home to the world's first modern-day sorority. Indiana Asbury University was founded in 1837 in Greencastle, Indiana, and was named after Francis Asbury, the first American bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The people of Greencastle raised $25,000, equivalent to around $500,000 in 2007 terms, to entice the Methodists to found the college in Greencastle, which was little more than a village at the time. It was originally established as an all men's school, but began admitting women in 1867. In 1884 Indiana Asbury University changed its name to DePauw University in honor of Washington C. DePauw, who made a sequence of substantial donations throughout the 1870s, which culminated in his largest single donation that established the School of Music during
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    University of Pittsburgh School of Law

    University of Pittsburgh School of Law

    • Libraries: Barco Law Library
    The University of Pittsburgh School of Law ("Pitt Law") was founded in 1895, and became a charter member of the Association of American Law Schools in 1900. One of 17 schools constituting the University of Pittsburgh, the School of Law has roots as far back as 1843 when a law department at the university was founded despite the fact that the chief method of legal education in America was apprenticeship. The first four law degrees were conferred in 1847. Classes were held in a stone building at Third Street until the building was destroyed in the fire of 1845 and were then held in the university's building on Duquesne Way until that building was burned in 1849. Classes were continued after the second fire in the basement of the Third Presbyterian Church until the universities first law professor, Walter H. Lowrie, was elected to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in 1851 and forced him to abandon his teaching at the school. This, along with the fires that destroyed many of the university's facilities and resources, disrupted the development of the School of Law. Although various attempts were made to reestablish law instruction beginning in 1862, a permanent law school was not
    5.50
    4 votes
    133
    City College of New York

    City College of New York

    • Libraries: Morris Raphael Cohen Library
    The City College of the City University of New York (known more commonly as the City College of New York or simply City College, CCNY, or colloquially as City) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), in New York City. It is also the oldest of the City University's twenty-three institutions of higher learning. City College's thirty-five acre Manhattan campus along Convent Avenue from 130th Street to 141st Street is on a hill overlooking Harlem; its neo-Gothic campus was mostly designed by George Browne Post, and many of its buildings are landmarks. CCNY was the first free public institution of higher education in the United States and also for many years has been considered the flagship campus of the CUNY public university system. The City College of New York was originally founded as the Free Academy of the City of New York in 1847 by wealthy businessman and president of the Board of Education Townsend Harris. A combination prep school and college, it would provide children of immigrants and the poor access to free higher education based on academic merit alone. The Free Academy was the first of what would become a system of municipally-supported colleges.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    State University of New York System

    State University of New York System

    • Libraries: UAlbany Science Library
    The State University of New York, abbreviated SUNY ( /ˈsuːniː/), is a system of public institutions of higher education in New York, United States. It is the largest comprehensive system of universities, colleges, and community colleges in the United States, with a total enrollment of 465,000 students, plus 1.1 million adult education students spanning 64 campuses across the state. The SUNY system has 88,000 faculty members and some 7,660 degree and certificate programs overall and a $10.7 billion budget. SUNY includes many institutions and four University Centers: Albany (1844), Binghamton (1946), Buffalo (1846), and Stony Brook (1957). SUNY's administrative offices are in Albany, the state's capital. The State University of New York was established in 1948 by Governor Thomas E. Dewey, through legislative implementation of recommendations made by the Temporary Commission on the Need for a State University (1946–1948). The Commission was chaired by Owen D. Young, who was at the time Chairman of the General Electric Company. The system was greatly expanded during the administration of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, who took a personal interest in design and construction of new SUNY
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    University of Chicago Law School

    University of Chicago Law School

    • Libraries: D'Angelo Law Library
    The University of Chicago Law School was founded in 1902 (by a coalition of donors led by John D. Rockefeller) as the graduate school of law at the University of Chicago and consistently ranks among the highest-rated law schools in the United States. The U.S. News & World Report ranks it fifth among U.S. law schools, and it is noted particularly for its influence on the economic analysis of law. University president William Rainey Harper requested assistance from the faculty of Harvard Law School in establishing a law school at Chicago, and Joseph Henry Beale, then a professor at Harvard, was given a two-year leave of absence to serve as the first Dean of the law school. During that time Beale hired many of the first members of the law school faculty and left the fledgling school "one of the best in the country." The Law School experienced a period of profound growth and expansion under the leadership of Dean Edward Hirsch Levi, AB 1932, (1945–1962). Levi later served as university Provost (1962–1968) and President (1968–1975), and then as United States Attorney General under Gerald Ford. During his time at the Law School, Levi brought world-renowned scholars to the faculty and
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    University of Waterloo

    University of Waterloo

    • Libraries: Davis Centre Library
    University of Waterloo (commonly referred as Waterloo or UW) is a public research university whose main campus is located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 400 hectares (990 acres) of land in Uptown Waterloo, adjacent to Waterloo Park. The university offers a wide variety of academic programs, which is administered by six faculties, and four affiliated university colleges. Waterloo is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada. The university traces its origins to 1 July 1957 as the Waterloo College Associate Faculties, a semi-autonomous entity of Waterloo College (which later evolved into the present-day Wilfrid Laurier University). The entity had formally separated from Waterloo College in 1959, and was incorporated as a university. The university was established in order to fill the need of a program to train engineers and technicians for Canada’s growing postwar economy. Since then, the university had greatly expanded, adding a faculty of arts in 1960, and the College of Optometry of Ontario moving from Toronto in 1967. The university is co-educational, and has nearly 26,000 undergraduate and over 4,000 post-graduate
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Lews Castle College

    Lews Castle College

    • Libraries: Lews Castle College Library
    Lews Castle College (Scottish Gaelic: Colaisde a' Chaisteil, meaning literally "College of the Castle") is a further and higher education college in the Western Isles of Scotland. The main campus is in the grounds of Lews Castle, Stornoway. The College also has two learning centres in Benbecula and Barra. The College is part of the University of the Highlands and Islands. The College opened in 1953, its first principal was Colonel John Macsween. It was originally run by the local authority. In 1993, the College became an independent entity under the Further and Higher Education (Scotland) Act 1992. The Lews Castle was originally used as accommodation for the students, but it is currently needing renovation. The College has a subsidiary company, Lews Castle College (Trading) Limited, which provides Gaelic translation services.
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Massey University

    Massey University

    • Libraries: Turitea Library
    Massey University (Māori: 'Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa') is one of New Zealand's largest universities, with approximately 34,000 students, 16,000 of whom are extramural students. The University has campuses in Palmerston North (sites at Turitea and Hokowhitu), Wellington (in the suburb of Mount Cook) and Auckland (at Albany), with the largest in terms of student numbers being the Turitea site. Massey offers most of its degrees extramurally within New Zealand and internationally. It has the nation's largest business college. Research is undertaken on all three campuses. Massey University is the only university in New Zealand offering degrees in aviation, dispute resolution, veterinary medicine and nanoscience. Having been accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Massey's veterinary school now has the distinction of having its degree recognised not only by New Zealand, but also the United States, Australia, Canada, and Britain, as well as most other countries in the world. From 2008 Annual Report The New Zealand Agricultural College Act of 1926 established the sixth college of the University of New Zealand (UNZ) at Turitea, across the Manawatu River from Palmerston
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Mount Allison University

    Mount Allison University

    • Libraries: R.P. Bell Library
    Mount Allison University (also Mount A or MTA) is a primarily undergraduate Canadian liberal arts and science university situated in Sackville, New Brunswick. With a combination of historical architecture and modern facilities as well as its well-kept grounds, the campus is among the most beautiful in Canada. It has been ranked first or second in the country for the last 20 years by Maclean's magazine (in the category of "primarily undergraduate" universities) and given top ratings in Maclean's annual alumni survey. Mount Allison University was the first university in the British Empire to award a baccalaureate to a woman (Grace Annie Lockhart, B.Sc, 1875). Mount Allison graduates have been awarded a total of 51 Rhodes Scholarships, the most per capita of any university in the Commonwealth. Mount Allison is the wealthiest university in Canada on an endowment per student basis. Mount Allison's origins go back to a boys' academy founded in June 1839 by a local Methodist merchant, Charles Frederick Allison. Charles Allison's grandfather had emigrated from Ireland to Canada in the late 18th century because of the after effects of a dinner with the local government tax collector.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    University of Bedfordshire

    University of Bedfordshire

    • Libraries: University of Bedfordshire Bedford Campus Library
    The University of Bedfordshire is based in Bedford and Luton, the two largest towns in Bedfordshire, England. A campus in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire is for students studying Nursing and Midwifery. It has more than 24,000 students. Nearly 3,000 international students study with the university. The university was created by the merger of the University of Luton and the Bedford campus of De Montfort University in August 2006 following approval by the Privy Council. In 2012 it achieved Fair Trade status. The university’s two main campuses are in Luton town centre and Bedford, on Polhill Avenue. Both have been recently modernised with new teaching and social facilities and new on-campus accommodation. The University of Luton has its roots in the Luton Modern School, which was established in 1908 and the Luton Modern School and Technical Institute which opened in 1937. This became Luton College of Higher Education with the merger of Luton College of Technology and Putteridge Bury College of Education in 1976.It obtained university status in 1993. The Bedford campus of De Montfort University was originally the Bedford Teacher Training College, founded 1882 and Bedford Physical Training
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    University of Gloucestershire

    University of Gloucestershire

    • Libraries: Oxstalls Library
    The University of Gloucestershire is a university primarily based in Gloucestershire, England, spread over four campuses, three in Cheltenham and one in Gloucester. A campus in London was sold in April 2010. The Vice-Chancellor and Chief Executive Officer (until July 2011) was Dr. Paul Hartley. In 2009/2010 several formerly senior figures in the university resigned. The University Council appointed Mr. Stephen Marston as Vice-Chancellor. In February 2012 Baroness Rennie Fritchie DBE was announced as the new Chancellor. Sir Henry Elwes was announced as the new Pro-Chancellor in addition to the Bishop of Gloucester Michael Perham, who is the University’s current Pro-Chancellor. The university is the recent successor of a large number of merged and name-changed institutions of further and higher education. Its history began with the Mechanics' Institute founded in 1834. From 1992, Cheltenham & Gloucester College of Higher Education (CGCHE) was permitted to award first and postgraduate degrees and 1998 it achieved Research degree awarding powers. However, it was only in 2001 that the University of Gloucestershire was awarded university status. Its history spans nearly two
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    • Libraries: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Education and Social Science Library
    The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (U of I, University of Illinois, UIUC, or simply Illinois) is a public research-intensive university in the U.S. state of Illinois. It is the flagship campus of the University of Illinois system. The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign is the second oldest public university in the state, second to Illinois State University, and is a founding member of the Big Ten Conference. It is considered a Public Ivy and is a member of the Association of American Universities. The university is designated as a RU/VH Research University (very high research activities). The campus library system possesses the second-largest university library in the United States and the fifth-largest in the country overall. The university comprises 17 colleges that offer more than 150 programs of study. Additionally, the university operates an extension that serves 2.7 million registrants per year around the state of Illinois and beyond. The campus holds 286 buildings on 1,468 acres (594 ha) in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana; its annual operating budget in 2011 was over $1.7 billion. The Morrill Act of 1862 granted each state in the United States a
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Wake Forest University

    Wake Forest University

    • Libraries: Coy C. Carpenter Library
    Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, founded in 1834. The university received its name from its original location in Wake Forest, north of Raleigh, North Carolina, the state capital. The Reynolda Campus, the university's main campus, is located north of downtown Winston-Salem, after the university moved there in 1956. The Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center campus is located nearby. The University also occupies lab space at the Bowman Gray Technical Center, at the downtown Piedmont Research Park, and at the Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials. The University's Babcock Graduate School of Management maintains a presence on the main campus in Winston-Salem and in Charlotte, North Carolina. In the 2013 U.S. News America's Best Colleges report, Wake Forest ranked 13th for "Best Undergraduate Teaching" and 27th overall among national universities. In the 2009 BusinessWeek Undergraduate Business Schools Rankings, the Calloway School of Business and Accountancy was ranked 14th overall, and #1 in terms of Academic Quality. Wake Forest University was founded after the North Carolina Baptist State Convention purchased a
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Westminster College, Salt Lake City

    Westminster College, Salt Lake City

    • Libraries: Giovale Library
    Westminster College is a private liberal arts college located in the Sugar House neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. The college comprises four schools: the School of Arts and Sciences, the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business, the School of Education, and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences. It is the only accredited liberal arts college in the state of Utah. The school was founded in 1875 as the Salt Lake Collegiate Institute, a prep school under the supervision of the First Presbyterian Church of Salt Lake City. At that time, members of many Protestant Christian denominations flocked to Salt Lake City in order to try to convert people who belonged to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Westminster is the only remaining vestige of a trend in the late 19th century in which the Protestants set up private primary and secondary schools and offered free tuition to children in order to try to convert them from other religions. College level classes were first offered in 1897 as Sheldon Jackson College. It was given that name after a Presbyterian minister and its primary benefactor, Sheldon Jackson. High school level classes ceased to be offered in
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Wright State University

    Wright State University

    • Libraries: Paul Laurence Dunbar library
    Wright State University is a public research university in Fairborn, Ohio just outside of Dayton. The school offers degrees at the associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral level. The university has a branch campus on Grand Lake St. Marys with a Celina, Ohio, mailing address. As of 2012, the university enrolls over 19,000 students. Wright State is divided into eight colleges and three schools. The colleges are: The schools, which award graduate and professional degrees, are: Founded in 1964, Wright State University was originally the Dayton branch campus of both Miami University and Ohio State University. At that time it comprised only a single building, Allyn Hall (named for Stanley Allyn, then-president of National Cash Register and one of the university's founders). Most of the land was donated by the United States Air Force, from excess acreage of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. A 1965 act of the Ohio General Assembly created the university. Several names were considered, including Dayton State University, Southwest Ohio State University, Shawnee University, Four Rivers University (after the four nearby rivers: the Great Miami, the Mad, the Stillwater, and Wolf Creek), and
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

    Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

    • Libraries: Technion Aerospace Library
    The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology (Hebrew: הטכניון – מכון טכנולוגי לישראל‎) is a public research university in Haifa, Israel. Founded in 1912, Technion is the oldest university in Israel. The university offers degrees in science and engineering, and related fields such as architecture, medicine, industrial management and education. It has 18 academic departments and 52 research centers. Since its founding, it has awarded 95,821 degrees and its graduates are cited to have provided the skills and education behind the creation and protection of the State of Israel. The university's principal language of instruction is Hebrew, and Technion was the scene of a critical struggle over the language of instruction which helped consolidate Hebrew as the spoken language in the State of Israel. Technion's 616 faculty members include three Nobel Laureates in chemistry. On December 19, 2011, a bid by a consortium of Cornell University and Technion won a competition to establish a new high-tier applied science and engineering institution in New York City. The competition was established by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg in order to increase entrepreneurship and job growth in the
    5.25
    4 votes
    147
    Campbell University

    Campbell University

    • Libraries: The Gilbert T. Stephenson Business Library
    Campbell University is a coeducational, Baptist university in North Carolina. Its main campus is located in the community of Buies Creek; its law school moved from Buies Creek to a new campus in the state capital of Raleigh in 2009. Campbell has an approximately equal number of male and female students. The school consciously promotes the awareness and application of Christian principles. It is a university of the liberal arts and sciences, offering both theory and vocational education and hosting several professional schools. Campbell University was founded as a community school on January 5, 1887 called Buies Creek Academy. It was founded by North Carolina minister James Archibald Campbell, under the conviction that no student should be denied admission because of lack of funds. In 1926, the school attained junior college status and changed its name from Buies Creek Academy to Campbell Junior College. In 1961, Campbell became a senior college. The name was changed to Campbell University on June 6, 1979 with the addition of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law. The Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law was founded in 1976, and the Lundy-Fetterman School of Business was begun in
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

    Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

    • Libraries: Adelson Library
    The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a member-supported unit of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York which studies birds and other wildlife. It is housed in the Imogene Powers Johnson Center for Birds and Biodiversity in Sapsucker Woods Sanctuary. Approximately 250 scientists, professors, staff, and students work in a variety of programs devoted to the Lab's mission: interpreting and conserving the Earth's biological diversity through research, education, and citizen science focused on birds. Work at the Lab is supported primarily by its 45,000 members. The Cornell Lab issues two quarterly publications, Living Bird magazine and the BirdScope newsletter, and manages numerous citizen-science projects and websites, including the Webby Award-winning All About Birds. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology was founded by Arthur A. "Doc" Allen who lobbied for creation of the country's first graduate program in ornithology, established at Cornell University in 1915. Initially, the Lab of Ornithology was housed in the university's entomology and limnology department. Birder/businessman Lyman Stuart, donors, and landowners purchased or donated farmland in 1954 which was set aside for the sanctuary.
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Essex County College

    Essex County College

    • Libraries: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library
    Essex County College is an open-door, public two-year college located in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. Established in 1966 as the public, two-year, open access community college of Essex County, it admitted its first students in temporary quarters in Downtown Newark in 1968. It moved to its current permanent site in the University Heights district of the city in 1976. ECC offers AS, AA, and AAS degree programs in over 70 different majors. Approximately 25,000 people enroll each year in Essex County College's various degree and non-degree programs. The college is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. Essex County College teams are represented in the Garden State Athletic Conference (GSAC) and Region 19 of the National Junior College Athletic Association. Its teams have produced All-Americans in soccer, men's and women's basketball, cross country, and indoor and outdoor track. ECC's primary campus is in Newark. Other facilities include the West Essex Campus in West Caldwell and other satellite centers around Essex County. The Newark campus neighbors both the NJIT and Rutgers Newark campuses. Less than a year into the job, President Edythe
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    George Mason University School of Law

    George Mason University School of Law

    • Libraries: George Mason University Law Library
    George Mason University School of Law (Mason Law or GMUSL) is the law school of George Mason University, a state university in Virginia, United States. The law school is located in Arlington, further east of the university's main campus in Fairfax. George Mason University School of Law was authorized by the Virginia General Assembly in March 1979 and was founded on July 1, 1979. The American Bar Association provisionally approved the school in the fall of 1980 and granted full approval in 1986. Because of its advantageous location and growing reputation, George Mason University School of Law is a selective institution. The law school received 5,092 applications for fall 2008 JD admission and made offers of admission to twenty percent of those applicants. George Mason has 717 students in its J.D., LL.M., and J.M. programs. The median LSAT score among those offered admission to the full-time program for the fall 2011 entering J.D. class was 164 and the median GPA was 3.72. Over 15% of the students in the first year class hold graduate degrees including Ph.D.s. Merit-based scholarships are offered to the most qualified applicants and average $12,000 per year, which is sufficient to
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Miami Dade College

    Miami Dade College

    • Libraries: Carrie P. Meek Entrepreneurial Education Center Library
    Miami Dade College, or simply Miami Dade or MDC, is a state college located in Miami, Florida, United States. Miami Dade has eight campuses and twenty-one outreach centers located throughout Miami-Dade County. Founded in 1959, Miami Dade is the largest college in the Florida College System with over 161,000 students. Additionally, MDC is also the largest institution of higher education in Florida, and the second-largest in the United States. Miami Dade College's main campus, the Wolfson Campus, is in Downtown Miami. Miami Dade College was established in 1959 and opened in 1960 as Dade County Junior College. The original campus was located at the recently built Miami Central High School. The campus consisted of a portion of the school and an adjacent farm. In 1960, a facility was built on an old naval air station near Opa-Locka Airport (known as Amelia Earhardt field), which would soon become the College's North Campus. The College enrolled African American students and Cuban exiles who could not afford other schools, becoming Florida's first integrated junior college. As the college grew, a temporary satellite campus opened in what is today Pinecrest at Miami Palmetto High School
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Mohawk Valley Community College

    Mohawk Valley Community College

    • Libraries: MVCC Rome Campus Library
    Mohawk Valley Community College is a two-year college of the State University of New York located in Oneida County, New York in the United States. The college has campuses in Rome and Utica. Mohawk Valley Community College offers degrees and certificates in more than 90 areas and reported in the Spring 2011 semester that it currently had about 7,200 full- or part-time students. Mohawk Valley Community College was the first community college established in New York State. Founded in 1946 as the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences at Utica, it was one of five post-secondary institutions established on an experimental basis after World War II. The two-year public college offered programs leading to technical and semiprofessional employment in business and industry. In 1948, the State University of New York was created and authorized to recommend the establishment of community colleges. The College became a constituent unit of the State University in 1950. The following year, the College was authorized to grant the Associate in Applied Science degree. In 1953, the County of Oneida assumed the sponsorship of the College, then known as Mohawk Valley Technical Institute,
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Nova Southeastern University

    Nova Southeastern University

    • Libraries: Alvin Sherman Library
    Nova Southeastern University, commonly referred to as NSU or Nova, is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian, research university located in Broward County, Florida, United States, with its main campus in the town of Davie. The university is the eighth-largest not-for-profit private university in the nation. NSU operates eight Student Educational Centers in Florida, the largest being a 300 acres (120 ha) campus located approximately 24 miles (39 km) north of Downtown Miami. The university was founded as the Nova University of Advanced Technology on a former Naval Outlying Landing Field. The field was built during World War II. The university first offered graduate degrees in the physical and social sciences. Leo Goodwin, Sr. left a $16 million bequest to the university in 1971 which funded its expansion throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In 1994, the university merged with the Southeastern University of the Health Sciences and assumed its current name. NSU currently consists of 18 colleges and schools offering over 175 programs of study with more than 250 majors. The university offers professional degrees in law, business, osteopathic medicine, allied health, pharmacy, dentistry,
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Perelman School of Medicine

    Perelman School of Medicine

    • Libraries: Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Library
    The Perelman School of Medicine (commonly known as Penn Med) is the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania. It is located in the University City section of Philadelphia. Founded in 1765, Penn Med is the oldest medical school in the United States. Today, the Perelman School of Medicine is widely regarded as one of the country's top medical schools. It currently shares the #2 ranking on U.S. News & World Report's "Best Medical Schools: Research" list with the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The school's young founder, John Morgan, was among the school's Edinburgh, Scotland and London, England educated faculty. In 1765, after spending five years training in London and Edinburgh, Dr. Morgan returned to Philadelphia and persuaded the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania to found the first medical school in America. Shortly thereafter, he delivered an address, "Upon the Insitution of Medical Schools in America" during which he expressed his desire for the new medical school to become a model institution: That autumn, students enrolled for "anatomical lectures" and a course on "the theory and practice of physick." Modeling the School after the University of Edinburgh,
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Roger Williams University

    Roger Williams University

    • Libraries: Roger Williams University Law Library
    Roger Williams University, commonly abbreviated as RWU, is a private, coeducational American liberal arts university located on 140 acres (0.57 km) in Bristol, Rhode Island, above Mt. Hope Bay. Founded in 1956, it was named for theologian and Rhode Island cofounder Roger Williams. The university has no religious affiliation. The university’s operations date to 1919, when Northeastern University opened a branch campus in the YMCA building in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1940, the YMCA Board of Directors took over the school and the YMCA Institute granted its first associate’s degrees in 1948. In 1956, the Institute received a state charter to become a two-year, degree-granting institution under the name of Roger Williams Junior College. During the 1960s, Roger Williams College began granting bachelor’s degrees. Needing a larger campus, the college purchased 80 acres (32 ha) of waterfront land and moved its main campus to Bristol in 1969. (RWU continues to operate a branch campus in Providence.) In 1989 new president Dr. Natale A. Sicuro initiated the Roger Williams Plan for the 90s, and became concurrently the president of the newly established Roger Williams School of Law and, in
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    University of Alberta

    University of Alberta

    • Libraries: Rutherford Library
    The University of Alberta (U of A, UAlberta) is a public research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It was founded in 1908 by Alexander Cameron Rutherford, the first premier of Alberta, and Henry Marshall Tory, its first president. Its enabling legislation is the Post-secondary Learning Act. The university comprises four campuses in Edmonton, the Augustana Campus in Camrose, and a staff centre in downtown Calgary. The original north campus consists of 150 buildings covering 50 city blocks on the south rim of the North Saskatchewan River valley, directly across from downtown Edmonton. More than 38,000 students from across Canada and 144 other countries participate in nearly 400 programs in 18 faculties. The University of Alberta is a major economic driver in Alberta. The university’s impact on the Alberta economy is an estimated $12.3 billion annually, or five per cent of the province’s gross domestic product. With more than 15,000 employees, the university is Alberta's fourth-largest employer. The University of Alberta has been recognized by the Academic Ranking of World Universities, the QS World University Rankings and the Times Higher Education World University
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    University of Brighton

    University of Brighton

    • Libraries: Aldrich Library
    The University of Brighton is a UK university of over 21,000 students and 2,500 staff based on five campuses in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings on the south coast of England. It has one of the best teaching quality ratings in the UK and a strong research record, factors which contribute to its reputation as a leading post-1992 university. Its roots can be traced back to 1859 when the Brighton School of Art was opened in the Brighton Royal Pavilion. The university focuses on professional education, with the majority of degrees awarded also leading to professional qualifications. In 2012 the University of Brighton came third in the People & Planet’s Green League table of UK universities ranked by environmental and ethical performance. The university has five campuses. Three in Brighton at Grand Parade, Moulsecoomb, and Falmer, one in Eastbourne and one in Hastings. The Faculty of Arts (University of Brighton) is the oldest faculty of the university, its history can traced back to 1859 when the original Brighton School of Art opened its doors. In 2009 it took its new name, replacing the former "Faculty of Arts & Architecture". Subject areas offer study in arts, design and
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    University of California, San Diego

    University of California, San Diego

    • Libraries: University of California, San Diego Biomedical Library
    The University of California, San Diego (also referred to as UC San Diego or UCSD) is a public research university located in the La Jolla neighborhood of San Diego, California, United States. The university occupies 2,141 acres (866 ha) near the coast of the Pacific Ocean with the main campus resting on approximately 1,200 acres (490 ha). One of America's Public Ivies, UCSD is the seventh oldest of the ten University of California campuses, and offers over 200 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, enrolling about 23,000 undergraduate and about 5,500 graduate students from the United States and around the world. Undergraduate education is organized into six residential colleges, each with its own curricular focus. Established in 1960 near the pre-existing Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the university was first envisioned by Roger Revelle, then director of Scripps, to be a graduate school of science and engineering comparable in quality to Caltech. The university was admitted to the Association of American Universities in 1982. UC San Diego is a designated sea and space grant institution and has a very high level of research activity with $879.3 million in research and
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    University of Cambridge

    University of Cambridge

    • Libraries: Cambridge University - Squire Law Library
    The University of Cambridge (informally known as Cambridge University or simply as Cambridge) is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after the University of Oxford), and the third-oldest surviving university in the world.. In post-nominals the university's name is abbreviated as Cantab, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge). The university grew out of an association of scholars that was formed in 1209, early records suggest, by scholars leaving Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk. The two "ancient universities" have many common features and are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to cultural and practical associations as a historic part of British society, they have a long history of rivalry with each other. Cambridge has performed consistently in various league tables over the years, achieving the top spot in the world according to the QS World University Rankings in both 2010 and 2011; in 2012, the same editors ranked Cambridge second. Other results include a sixth place in the world in the 2011
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    University of Glasgow

    University of Glasgow

    • Libraries: The University of Glasgow Main Library
    The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, United Kingdom, the university was founded in 1451 and is currently one of nineteen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the world. A major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century, in the 19th century (while continuing to educate the upper classes), Glasgow became a pioneer in British higher education by providing for the needs of students from the growing urban and commercial middle classes. Glasgow served all of these students by preparing them for professions: the law, medicine, civil service, teaching, and the church. It also trained smaller numbers for careers in science and engineering. In 2007, the Sunday Times ranked it as "Scottish University of the Year." The university is a member of the elite Russell Group and of Universitas 21. Since 1870, the main University campus has been located on Gilmorehill in the West End of the city. Additionally, a number of university buildings are located elsewhere: a facility at Loch Lomond, the University Marine Biological Station
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    University of Kentucky

    University of Kentucky

    • Libraries: Shaver Engineering Library
    The University of Kentucky, also known as UK, is a public co-educational university and is one of the state's two land-grant universities, located in Lexington, Kentucky. Founded in 1865 by John Bowman as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky, the university is the largest in the Commonwealth of Kentucky by enrollment, with 28,094 students as of Fall 2011, and is also the highest ranked research university in the state, according to U.S. News and World Report. In 2012, the University of Kentucky boasted record high new student enrollment with over 4,600 first-year students. Also at a record high is the number of African-American, Hispanic, international and out-of-state students. The University of Kentucky strives for a diverse and international student population, with a selective admissions process. Students are divided into 16 colleges, a graduate school, 93 undergraduate programs, 99 master programs, 66 doctoral programs, and four professional programs. The University of Kentucky has fifteen libraries on campus. The largest is William T. Young Library, a federal depository, hosting subjects related to social sciences, humanities and life sciences collections. In
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    University of Liverpool

    University of Liverpool

    • Libraries: Leahurst Campus Library
    The University of Liverpool is a teaching and research university based in the city of Liverpool, England. Founded in 1881 (as a university college), it is also one of the six original "red brick" civic universities. It comprises three faculties organised into 35 departments and schools. The university has an enviable international reputation for innovative research. It is a founding member of the Russell Group of large research-intensive universities and the N8 Group for research collaboration. The university has produced eight Nobel Prize winners and offers more than 230 first degree courses across 103 subjects. It was the world's first university to establish departments in Oceanography, Civic Design, Architecture and Biochemistry. In 2006 the university became the first in the UK to establish an independent university in China making it the world's first Sino-British university. It has an annual turnover of £410 million, including £150 million for research. The University was established in 1881 as University College Liverpool, admitting its first students in 1882. In 1884, it became part of the federal Victoria University. In 1894 Oliver Lodge, a professor at the University,
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    University of Manitoba

    University of Manitoba

    • Libraries: Victoria General Hospital Library
    The University of Manitoba (U of M in short), in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, is the largest university in the province of Manitoba. It is Manitoba's most comprehensive and only research-intensive post-secondary educational institution. It was founded in 1877, making it Western Canada’s first university. It is placed in SJTU's list of the world's Top 500 Universities. According to U.S. News & World Report, the University of Manitoba is among the top 20 universities in Canada and top 400 universities in the world as of 2009. The University of Manitoba has three main locations—the Bannatyne Campus, the Fort Garry Campus and the William Norrie Centre. The downtown Bannatyne campus of the University comprises a complex of ten buildings located west of the Health Sciences Centre between McDermot Ave and William Ave in Central Winnipeg. This complex houses the medical and dental instructional units of the University. The Faculty of Dentistry, the Faculty of Medicine, the School of Medical Rehabilitation, and the School of Dental Hygiene are the major health sciences units located on this campus. The Faculty of Pharmacy officially joined the Bannatyne campus with the opening of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    University of Massachusetts Lowell

    University of Massachusetts Lowell

    • Libraries: Lydon Library
    The University of Massachusetts Lowell (also known as UMass Lowell or UML) is a public university in Lowell, Massachusetts, United States, and part of the University of Massachusetts system. With more than 1100 faculty members and more than 16,000 students, it is the largest university in the Merrimack Valley, the third-largest state institution behind UMass Amherst and UMass Boston. The university offers more than 120 degree choices, internships, bachelor’s to master’s programs and doctoral studies in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Management, the School of Health and Environment, and the Graduate School of Education. UMass Lowell's men's hockey program has produced numerous professional players for the National Hockey League. The University of Lowell was formed in the 1975 merger of Lowell Technological Institute, formerly Lowell Textile School (1895), and Lowell State College, formerly Lowell Normal School (1894). Their respective campuses became the North Campus and South Campus of the new institution, which was merged into the University of Massachusetts system in 1991 and renamed as the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The two original colleges had
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    University of Nottingham

    University of Nottingham

    • Libraries: Hallward Library
    The University of Nottingham (informally known as Nottingham University or Nottingham) is a public research university based in Nottingham, England. Its main site, University Park Campus, is situated on the outskirts of the City of Nottingham. Tracing its roots to 1881, Nottingham is one of the oldest and largest institutions of British higher education. Nottingham is organised into five faculties and offers about 50 subjects. In 2010/11, Nottingham had 30,370 full-time students and 2,735 full-time staff based on its UK campuses. In the same year, Nottingham had a total income of ₤511 million. The university is associated with three Nobel Prize winners and its graduates include D.H. Lawrence and Sir Andrew Witty. Its alumni have won 11 Olympic medals in the last 20 years. The university is located in seven sites; five in Nottingham, one in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and one in Ningbo, China. It is a member of the Russell Group of research-led British universities and the Universitas 21. In post-nominal letters, the university's name is abbreviated as Nott.. The University of Nottingham traces its origins to the founding of an adult education school in 1798, and the University Extension
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Duke University School of Law

    Duke University School of Law

    • Libraries: Goodson Law Library
    Duke University School of Law (also known as Duke Law School or Duke Law) is the law school and a constituent academic unit of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. One of Duke's 10 schools and colleges, the School of Law began as the Trinity College School of Law in 1868. In 1924, following the renaming of Trinity College to Duke University, the school was renamed the Duke University School of Law. The School features programs in Business, Comparative and International Law, Environmental Law, and Intellectual Property, among others. Duke Law is routinely ranked within the top 10 law schools, and is a member of the "T-14" law schools, a prestigious group of 14 schools that have national recognition. Duke Law along with only three other T-14 schools (Harvard, Yale, and Columbia) has graduated a President of the United States. In 2011, law firm recruiters ranked Duke Law as the 8th best law school in the country. In addition, Duke Law was ranked by Forbes as having graduated lawyers with the 2nd highest median mid-career salary amount. The School has approximately 640 J.D. students and 75 students in the LL.M. and S.J.D. programs. The class of 2013 posted a median
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology

    Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology

    • Libraries: SIAST Palliser Campus Library
    Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) is a diploma-granting college that has four campuses across Saskatchewan. More than 12,000 students are enrolled in its programs and has approximately 29,000 additional individual registrations. SIAST offers 160 programs in business and agriculture, health and science, technology, industry, nursing, hospitality services, community services and basic education. In addition, SIAST provides training to apprentices in almost 30 trades. The Institute operates the following campuses: The four schools that make up the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology started off as four individual schools. Palliser Campus in Moose Jaw started off as the Saskatchewan Technical Institute in 1959. Kelsey Campus in Saskatoon began as the Central Saskatchewan Technical Institute in 1963. Wascana Campus in Regina began as the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences in 1972. Woodlands Campus in Prince Albert began as the Northern Institute of Technology in 1986. In January 1988, The Institute Act and the Regional Colleges Act amalgamated Saskatchewan's technical institutes, urban community colleges and the
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Santa Clara University School of Law

    Santa Clara University School of Law

    • Libraries: Edwin A. Heafey Law Library
    The Santa Clara University School of Law (Santa Clara Law) is the law school of Santa Clara University, a Jesuit university in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley region. The School of Law was founded in 1911. The Jesuit affiliation of the university is manifested in a concern with ethics, social justice, and community service. Santa Clara Law offers the Juris Doctor (J.D.) law degree. It also offers several joint degree programs, including J.D./Master of Business Administration (J.D./M.B.A.) and J.D./Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS) offered in conjunction with Santa Clara University's Leavey School of Business, ranked 10th in graduate programs on the U.S. News & World Report graduate schools rankings. In addition, the School offers Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees in Intellectual Property Law, in U.S. Law for Foreign Lawyers, and in International and Comparative Law. Santa Clara Law also features specialized curricular programs in High Tech and Intellectual Property law, International Law, and Public Interest and Social Justice law. The School offers more summer study abroad programs than any law school in the United States, with 13 different programs in 17
    5.00
    4 votes
    169
    Bard College

    Bard College

    • Libraries: Stevenson Library
    Bard College, founded in 1860 as St. Stephen's College, is a private liberal arts college in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Bard's main, 600-acre (240 ha), rural campus is located near the town of Red Hook. The campus overlooks the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains, and is within the Hudson River Historic District, a National Historic Landmark. The institution consists of a liberal arts college, a conservatory, as well as 8 graduate programs offering over 20 graduate degrees in the arts and sciences. The undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 10:1. The college has a network of over 35 affiliated programs, institutes, and centers, spanning 12 cities, 5 states, 7 countries, and 4 continents. Bard's Annandale campus serves as an important regional cultural institution. Both the CCS Hessel Museum of Contemporary Art and the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts are located on campus. The college also hosts two acclaimed annual arts festivals, Bard SummerScape, and the Bard Music Festival. During much of the nineteenth century, the land now owned by Bard was mainly composed of several country estates. These estates were called Blithewood, Bartlett, Sands, Cruger's
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Iona College

    Iona College

    • Libraries: Ryan Library
    Iona College is located in New Rochelle, New York, 20 miles north of Manhattan in suburban Westchester County. The college occupies 35 acres (140,000 m) on North Ave. The college also operates a Graduate Center in Pearl River, Rockland County, New York. The College offers BA, BS, BPS, and BBA degrees to undergraduate students, and several masters degree programs. The BA, BS, and BPS degrees require a total of 120 credits for completion; for BBA degrees, a total of 126 credits are required. An honors program, with special courses, seminars, mentoring, advising, and off-campus opportunities, is available to top students. Founded in 1940 by the Congregation of Christian Brothers, Iona College is a private, coeducational institution of learning in the tradition of American Catholic higher education. In 1989, Elizabeth Seton College of Yonkers, New York merged with Iona. Iona College completed renovations of their Ryan Library, and the library was fully operational by the beginning of 2009's fall semester. Iona College opened its doors in 1940, with nine Christian Brothers and six lay faculty greeting the first class. The Christian Brothers named the College after Iona, the island
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Newcastle University

    Newcastle University

    • Libraries: Newcastle University Law Library
    Newcastle University is a public research university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north-east of England. It was established as a School of Medicine and Surgery in 1834 and became the University of Newcastle upon Tyne by an Act of Parliament in August 1963. Newcastle University is a member of the Russell Group, an association of research-intensive UK universities. The University has one of the largest EU research portfolios in the UK. The post-nominal letters of graduates commonly have N'cle attached to indicate the institution. The University has its origins in the School of Medicine and Surgery, which was established in Newcastle upon Tyne in October 1834, when it provided basic lectures and practical demonstrations to around 26 students. In June 1851, following a dispute amongst the teaching staff, the School split into two rival institutions. The majority formed the Newcastle College of Medicine, and the others established themselves as the Newcastle upon Tyne College of Medicine and Practical Science. By 1852, the majority college was formally linked to the University of Durham. It awarded its first 'Licence in Medicine' (Lic.Med) in 1856, and its teaching certificates
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Syracuse University

    Syracuse University

    • Libraries: Syracuse University Science and Technology Library
    Syracuse University, commonly referred to as Syracuse, 'Cuse, or SU, is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York, United States. Its roots can be traced back to Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, founded by the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1832, which also later founded Genesee College. Following several years of debate over relocating the college to Syracuse, the university was founded independent of the college in 1870. Since 1920, the university has identified itself as nonsectarian, although it maintains a relationship with The United Methodist Church. Syracuse was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1966 but withdrew its membership in 2011 due to diverging views in evaluating criteria between the University and the AAU. The campus is located in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, east and southeast of downtown, on one of the larger hills. Its large campus features an eclectic mix of buildings, ranging from nineteenth-century Romanesque structures to contemporary buildings. SU is organized into 13 schools and colleges, with nationally recognized programs in information studies and library science, architecture, communications, business
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    University of San Diego School of Law

    University of San Diego School of Law

    • Libraries: Katherine M. and George M. Pardee Jr. Legal Research Center
    The University of San Diego School of Law, commonly referred to as USD Law, is a law school located on the 182-acre (0.74 km) campus of the University of San Diego in San Diego, California in the community of Linda Vista. Founded in 1954, the law school has held ABA approval since 1961. It joined the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in 1966. USD Law offers Juris Doctor (J.D.) degrees in either a three-year full-time or a four-year part-time program. Advanced law degree programs offered include Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees in taxation law, international law, criminal law, health law, intellectual property law, business and corporate law, and in Comparative Law for graduates of international law schools. Concurrent degree programs are offered to achieve a J.D. degree with either a Masters in Business Administration, International Master of Business Administration, or Master of Arts in International Relations. USD Law placed 65th among the nation's "Top 100" law schools by the 2013 U.S. News and World Report rankings. In April 2010, USD was ranked 6th in the nation in tax law and first in the Western United States among law schools with graduate tax programs. In January
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    University of Toronto Scarborough

    University of Toronto Scarborough

    • Libraries: Bladen Library
    The University of Toronto Scarborough (also known as U of T Scarborough or UTSC) is a satellite campus of the University of Toronto. Based in the Scarborough district of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the campus is set upon suburban parkland in the residential neighbourhood of Highland Creek. It was established in 1964 as Scarborough College, a constituent college of the Faculty of Arts and Science. The college expanded into a mid-sized university campus following its designation as an autonomic division of the university in 1972. Academics of the campus are centered on a variety of undergraduate studies in the disciplines of management, arts and sciences, whilst also hosting limited postgraduate research programs. Its neuroscience program was the first to be offered in the nation. The campus is noted for being the university's sole provider of cooperative education programs, as well as the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Through affiliation with Centennial College of Applied Arts and Technology, it also offers enrolment in joint programs. The campus has traditionally held the annual F. B. Watts Memorial Lectures, which has hosted several internationally renowned scholars,
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University

    Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University

    • Libraries: NSCAD University Main Library
    NSCAD University also known as the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, is a post-secondary art school located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. During the 1970s NSCAD was hailed as a cutting edge art school, which emphasized artistic innovation, and political art. Currently the university is forging relationships with galleries, museums and other cultural institutions in Canada and around the world. NSCAD offers Bachelor's degrees in Fine Art (BFA), Design (BDes), and Art History (BA). It also offers Master of Fine Art and Master of Design degrees at the graduate level. NSCAD was founded in 1887 by Anna Leonowens of Anna and the King of Siam fame. It was originally called the Victoria School of Art and Design to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. One the notable artists to be associated with the school in its early years was Arthur Lismer, who was a member of the Group of Seven and spent several years as the school president. In 1967, the artist Garry Kennedy was appointed President, and he immediately moved to remake the College from a provincial art school into an international centre for artistic activity. He invited notable artists to come to NSCAD as visiting
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Santa Rosa Junior College

    Santa Rosa Junior College

    • Libraries: Frank P. Doyle Library
    Santa Rosa Junior College (SRJC) is a community college located in the city of Santa Rosa in Sonoma County, California. Founded in 1918, it is the tenth oldest community college in the state. Santa Rosa Junior College was modeled as a "junior" version of nearby University of California at Berkeley. It was intended to be a feeder school for the University of California system, and still is to this day, with a special program designed for the direct transfer of students to various campuses in the U.C. system upon the completion of certain prerequisites. It has a remarkable number of accomplished professors for a community college. The school also has an unusually large grant and scholarship system that is the legacy of the Doyle family, resulting in one of the largest trusts for any community college in the nation. It is the only college operated by the Sonoma County Community College District. SRJC is located 52 miles (84 km) north of San Francisco and has a beautiful and traditional-style 100-acre (0.40 km) campus with ivy-covered brick buildings on a backdrop of rolling green lawns, dotted with ancient oak trees, redwoods, flower gardens, and manicured lawns in a park like setting
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

    Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

    • Libraries: Allyn and Betty Taylor Library
    The Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry is the medical school of the University of Western Ontario, and is one of 17 medical schools in Canada and one of six in Ontario. The University of Western Ontario founded a medical school in 1881 and a dentistry school in 1964; these schools merged in 1997, and the merged school was given its current name in 2005. The school is based in London. A new undergraduate medical campus was established at the University of Windsor in Windsor that opened in the fall of 2008. Organizations and programs within the school include the Pre-clerkship & Transition Period Committee, the Clerkship & Electives Committee, Governance & Committees and Clinical Skills Programs. The Doctor of Medicine program at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry receives approximately 2000 applications each year, of which 450 applicants are invited to interview for 171 spots (133 London and 38 Windsor campus). Schulich Medicine is unique in that it does not require prerequisite courses, thus encouraging students from a variety of disciplines to apply. Furthermore, no preference or advantage is given to specific programs. Schulich Medicine does not accept international
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    University of Michigan

    University of Michigan

    • Libraries: Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library
    The University of Michigan (commonly referred to as Michigan, U-M, UMich, or U of M) is a public research university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan in the United States. It is the state's oldest university and the flagship campus of the University of Michigan. It is one of the original eight Public Ivy universities and is one of the founding members of the Association of American Universities. It has been ranked among the top five research universities in the US, and among the top 20 universities in the world, including one ranking, as high as the 4th best university in the world. U-M also has satellite campuses in Flint and Dearborn. The university was founded in 1817 in Detroit as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, about 20 years before the Michigan Territory officially became a state. What would become the university moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university has physically expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 31 million gross square feet (712 acres or 2.38 km²), and transformed its academic program from a strictly
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    University of Michigan Law School

    University of Michigan Law School

    • Libraries: University of Michigan Law Library
    The University of Michigan Law School (Michigan Law) is the law school of the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. Founded in 1859, the school has an enrollment of about 1,200 students, most of whom are seeking Juris Doctor (J.D.) or Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees, although the school also offers a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) degree. The Law School has 81 full-time faculty members (60 tenured and tenure-track and 21 in clinical and legal practice). Michigan Law School consistently ranks among the highest-rated law schools in the United States. It was ranked third in the initial U.S. News & World Report law school rankings in 1987, only below Yale and Harvard, and is one of seven schools never to appear outside the magazine's top 10. Michigan Law is also one of the "T14" law schools, that is, schools that have consistently ranked within the top 14 law schools since U.S. News began publishing rankings. In the 2012 U.S. News ranking, Michigan Law is ranked 10th overall. Other 2009 rankings place Michigan as high as second. Michigan Law is currently ranked 6th for International Law. In a 2011 U.S. News "reputational ranking" of law schools by hiring partners at the nation’s
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    University of Pittsburgh

    University of Pittsburgh

    • Libraries: Barco Law Library
    The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. Founded as Pittsburgh Academy in 1787 on what was then the American frontier, Pitt is one of the oldest continuously chartered institutions of higher education in the United States. Pitt evolved into the Western University of Pennsylvania with an alteration to its charter in 1819, and upon relocating to its current campus in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh in 1908, the school received its current moniker, the University of Pittsburgh. For most of its history Pitt was a private institution, until it became part of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education in 1966. Pitt has consistently placed in the top cluster of U.S. public research universities and among the overall top 25 research universities according to the Center for Measuring University Performance, is listed as one of U.S. News & World Report's top 20 public universities, and has been listed among the best colleges for the quality of life of its students. Pitt has also been named as a "best value" by various publications, and has appeared in multiple rankings of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    University of Texas at Austin

    University of Texas at Austin

    • Libraries: University of Texas at Austin Life Science Library
    The University of Texas at Austin (informally University of Texas, UT Austin or UT) is a state research university, and is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System. Founded in 1883, its campus is approximately 0.25 miles (400 m) from the Texas State Capitol in Austin. The institution has the fifth-largest single-campus enrollment in the nation as of fall 2010 (and had the largest enrollment in the country from 1997 to 2003), with over 50,000 undergraduate and graduate students and over 24,000 faculty and staff. It currently holds the second largest enrollment in Texas behind Texas A&M University. The University of Texas at Austin was named one of the original eight Public Ivy institutions and was inducted into the American Association of Universities in 1929. The university is a major center for academic research, with research expenditures exceeding $640 million for the 2009–2010 school year. The university houses seven museums and seventeen libraries, including the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum and the Blanton Museum of Art, and operates various auxiliary research facilities, such as the J. J. Pickle Research Campus and the McDonald Observatory. Among
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Eastman School of Music

    Eastman School of Music

    • Libraries: Sibley Music Library
    The Eastman School of Music is a music conservatory located in Rochester, New York. The Eastman School is a professional school within the University of Rochester. It was established in 1921 by industrialist and philanthropist George Eastman, founder of the Eastman Kodak Company. Today, there are more than 900 students enrolled in the collegiate division of the Eastman School (approximately 500 undergraduate and 400 graduate students). Students come from almost every state of the United States, and approximately 25% of students are from foreign countries. Each year about 260 new students enroll (approximately 135 freshmen and 125 graduate students), selected from more than 2,000 applicants. Only about 13 percent of applicants are admitted. About 1,000 students (ranging in age from 18 years to over 80 years of age) are enrolled in the Eastman School’s Community Music School. In the 1997 and 2004 surveys conducted by U.S. News & World Report, the Eastman School was ranked first among graduate school music programs in the United States. In 1994, Eastman tied with The Juilliard School and the Jacobs School of Music of Indiana University among the top graduate programs in music. Alfred
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Niagara College

    Niagara College

    • Libraries: Niagara College Welland Campus Library
    Niagara College is a College of Applied Arts and Technology within the Niagara Region of Southern Ontario, Canada. The College has four campuses: the Welland Campus in Welland, the Niagara-on-the-Lake Campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake, the Maid of the Mist Campus in Niagara Falls, home of the Tourism Industry Development Centre, and the Ontario Street Site in St. Catharines. With 8,000 full-time students, including more than 500 international students from more than 60 countries, the College offers over 90 post-secondary diploma, baccalaureate degrees and advanced level programs. The Continuing Education Division attracts approximately 15,000 registrants to more than 400 courses each year. Niagara College employs 245 faculty, 73 administration staff and 208 support staff and has graduated more than 50,000 students. - Source: Niagara College Fast Facts (2010) On May 21, 1965, Ontario led the way for Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology with the creation of its college system. In 1967, Niagara College’s Welland Campus was established in response to the provincial initiative to create many such institutions, providing career-oriented diploma and certificate courses, as well as
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Nova Scotia Community College

    Nova Scotia Community College

    • Libraries: NSCC Burridge Campus Library
    Nova Scotia Community College, commonly referred to as NSCC, is a community college serving the province of Nova Scotia. The college delivers a diverse range of programs in the schools of Trades and Technology, Health and Human Services, Applied Arts and New Media, Business and Access. The college has 13 campuses located across Nova Scotia and six community learning centres. The NSCC organization includes four nationally recognized specialized institutes : the Nova Scotia Nautical Institute, the School of Fisheries, the Aviation Institute, and the Centre of Geographical Sciences a world-renowned leader in Geomatics training. The college has a growing commitment to applied research , and has recently embarked on an ambitious international program . Educating over 25,000 students a year, the NSCC provides the majority of technical and apprenticeship training in the province of Nova Scotia. Originally Nova Scotia's post-secondary specialized training and vocational institutes operated independently, however on 2 April 2006, the Nova Scotia Community College was created by an act of the provincial legislature as a means to centralize administration, coordinate funding and remove
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Ohio University

    Ohio University

    • Libraries: Southeast Ohio Regional Depository
    Ohio University is a public research university located on a 1,850-acre (7.5 km) campus in Athens, Ohio and the state's first university. Founded in 1804, it was the first university established in the Northwest Territory and is the ninth oldest public university in the United States. The Athens campus enrolls more than 21,000 students, who come from nearly every state and approximately 100 nations. Five regional campuses and e-learning programs further extend educational access and opportunity to students across southern Ohio and bring the total student population to more than 35,000. Ohio University offers more than 250 areas of undergraduate study. On the graduate level, the University grants master’s and Ph.D. degrees in many of its major academic divisions and doctoral degrees in selected departments. Ohio University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classifications designate Ohio University as a Research University (high research activity) under the Basic Classification category. The University’s students have succeeded in winning a number of prestigious national academic honors.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Portland Community College

    Portland Community College

    • Libraries: Cascade Library
    Portland Community College (or PCC) is Oregon's largest community college, located in Portland, United States. It serves over one million residents in the five-county area of Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC enrolls over 83,000 (55% female, 45% male) students annually in this 1,500 square miles (3,900 km) area in northwest Oregon. The college was founded in 1961 as an adult education program for the local public school system, operating out of the former Failing Elementary School since 1959 and renamed Portland Community College in 1961. Voters approved the establishment of an independent district for the college in 1968. Amo DeBernardis (ca 1914-2010), former assistant superintendent of Portland Public Schools, was the founding president of the school, serving from 1961 to 1979. In 1971 the Cascade Campus opened in North Portland, and the Rock Creek Campus in Washington County opened in 1976. The district passed a $374 million bond measure in 2008. PCC's $25 million Willow Creek Center opened in 2009 and earned a platinum LEED certification the next year. A new campus in Newberg, named Newberg Center, opened in October 2011, replacing a
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    University of Hull

    University of Hull

    • Libraries: Brynmor Jones Library
    The University of Hull (known informally as "Hull University") is an English university, founded in 1927, located in Kingston upon Hull, a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. Though classed as a "redbrick university", its expansion in recent decades has seen the addition of a variety of building styles from the traditional main buildings, 1960s teaching blocks to modern 'state-of-the-art' additions. The main campus is located in a residential district of North Hull on Cottingham Road. The University has a smaller campus in Scarborough on the North Yorkshire coast. It is a partner in the proposed University Centre of Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education in North East Lincolnshire. The main campus is home to the Hull York Medical School, a joint initiative with the University of York. Students are served by Hull University Union. The University's Brynmor Jones Library was the workplace of the poet Philip Larkin who served as its Head Librarian for thirty years. The Philip Larkin Society organises activities in remembrance of Larkin including the Larkin 25 festival which was organised during 2010 in partnership with the University. The Library was also the workplace of
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Wichita State University

    Wichita State University

    • Libraries: Ablah Library
    Wichita State University (WSU) is a public university in Wichita, Kansas. It is one of six state universities governed by the Kansas Board of Regents. Wichita State University offers more than 60 undergraduate degree programs in more than 200 areas of study in six undergraduate colleges: W. Frank Barton School of Business, College of Education, College of Engineering, College of Fine Arts, College of Health Professions and Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The Graduate School offers an extensive program including 44 master's degrees in more than 100 areas and a specialist in education degree. It offers doctoral degrees in applied mathematics; chemistry; communicative disorders and sciences; psychology (programs in human factors, community and APA-accredited clinical psychology); educational administration; and aerospace, electrical, industrial and mechanical engineering. With an enrollment of more than 14,000, the university's students come from almost every state in the United States and 110 foreign countries. 87 percent are from Kansas, representing nearly all counties in the state. Wichita State has 479 full-time faculty and 41 part-time faculty. Of the total, 73
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Colgate University

    Colgate University

    • Libraries: Chapel Library
    Colgate University is a private liberal arts college in Hamilton, New York, USA. The school was founded in 1819 as a Baptist seminary and later became non-denominational. It is named for the Colgate family who greatly contributed to the university's endowment in the 19th century. Colgate has 52 undergraduate concentrations that culminate in a Bachelor of Arts degree. The student body comes from 47 states and 42 countries. In its 2013 edition, U.S. News and World Report ranked Colgate as the 18th best liberal arts college in the country. Colgate ranked 37th in the 2011 edition of "America's Best Colleges" from Forbes.com. It is also listed as one of thirty Hidden Ivies and as one of Newsweek's "New Ivies". Colgate is located on a rural 515 acre (2.08 km²) campus in Central New York which was listed as the most beautiful in the country in the 2010 edition of the Princeton Review. Despite an undergraduate population of only 2,800, Colgate is a member of the Patriot League conference of the NCAA Division I. In 1817, the Baptist Education Society of the State of New York was founded by thirteen men (six clergymen and seven laymen). Two years later, in 1819, the state granted the
    5.33
    3 votes
    190
    Concordia University College of Alberta

    Concordia University College of Alberta

    • Libraries: Arnold Guebert Library
    Concordia University College of Alberta is a Canadian independent university in Edmonton, Alberta. The enabling legislation is the Post-secondary Learning Act. Concordia was founded in 1921 by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod to prepare young men for preaching and teaching Christian ministries. It introduced co-education in 1939, offering general courses of study, and an accredited high school program. In 1967, Concordia began offering first-year university courses in affiliation with the University of Alberta. Concordia College is a denominational college previously affiliated with the public sector. The Province of Alberta allowed Concordia College to operate as a private degree-granting university in the 1987. The affiliation with the University of Alberta officially ended in 1991 by mutual agreement. In order to better reflect what Concordia offers, in 1995 Concordia was renamed from Concordia College to Concordia University College of Alberta. Throughout its history, Concordia has remained grounded in the belief that the Christian faith gives purpose to life and that success depends upon spiritual maturity. Concordia fosters a Christian lifestyle on campus and encourages a
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Gonzaga University

    Gonzaga University

    • Libraries: Foley Center Library
    Gonzaga University is a private Roman Catholic university located in Spokane, Washington, United States. Founded in 1887 by the Society of Jesus, it is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and is named after the young Jesuit saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The campus houses 105 buildings across 131 acres (437,000 m²) of grassland along the Spokane River, in a residential setting half a mile (800 m) from downtown Spokane. The university was founded by Father Joseph Cataldo, SJ, an Italian-born priest and missionary who wished to create a Catholic school in the Pacific Northwest for local Native Americans. Foley Center Library is the main graduate and undergraduate library for Gonzaga University. Chastek Law Library primarily serves Gonzaga University School of Law. Gonzaga is host to many unique historical pieces of artwork. For example, a wide range of statues located around campus gives visitors and students alike a taste of the Gonzaga culture. Statues of St. Ignatius, St. Joseph, and St. Aloysius are among the most notable religious landmarks on campus, and there is also a statue of Bing Crosby. The 2009–10 operating budget is $206.6
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    INSEAD

    INSEAD

    • Libraries: Doriot Library
    INSEAD (the name was formerly an acronym for the French name "INStitut Européen d'ADministration des Affaires", or European Institute of Business Administration) is an international graduate business school and research institution. It has campuses in Europe (France), Asia (Singapore), and the Middle East (Abu Dhabi), as well as a research center in Israel. The school offers a full-time Master of Business Administration (MBA) programme, a PhD in management programme, and several executive education programmes (including an executive MBA). The school is widely considered by top business publications as the world's best business school and its full-time MBA as the best global MBA program. INSEAD MBA students and PhD candidates have the chance to study in three continents (through a multi-campus structure, an alliance with the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a student exchange programme with the Kellogg School of Management). INSEAD also has a reciprocal agreement with Harvard Business School, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Kellogg School of Management to share career services. Alumni of the four schools have exclusive access to job opportunities
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Saint Louis University

    Saint Louis University

    • Libraries: Pius XII Memorial Library
    Saint Louis University (SLU,  /ˈsluː/) is a private, co-educational Jesuit university located in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Founded in 1818 by the Most Reverend Louis Guillaume Valentin Dubourg SLU is the oldest university west of the Mississippi River. It is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. The university is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. SLU's athletic teams compete in NCAA's Division I and the Atlantic 10 Conference. It has a current enrollment of 13,785 students representing all 50 states and more than 77 foreign countries. There are currently 8,406 undergraduate students enrolled in SLU as well as 2,437 graduate students and 2,942 professional students. This year’s enrollment marks the first year that SLU’s enrollment passed 13,000. Of all the students, 59 percent are from out of state. The university provides undergraduate, graduate and professional programs. Its average class size is 23 and the student-faculty ratio is 13:1. Its Madrid, Spain campus has from 600–650 students, a faculty of 110, an average class size of 18 and a student-faculty ratio of 8:1. Saint
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Weizmann Institute of Science

    Weizmann Institute of Science

    • Libraries: The Frankel Mathematics Library
    The Weizmann Institute of Science (Hebrew: מכון ויצמן למדע‎ Machon Weizmann LeMada) is a university and research institute in Rehovot, Israel. It differs from other Israeli universities in that it offers only graduate and post-graduate studies in the sciences. It is one of the world’s leading multidisciplinary research centers, with around 2,500 scientists, postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D. and M.Sc. students, and scientific, technical, and administrative staff working at the Institute. Founded in 1934 by Chaim Weizmann and Benjamin M. Bloch as the Daniel Sieff Research Institute, it was renamed the Weizmann Institute of Science in his honor on November 2, 1949. Before he became President of the State of Israel, Weizmann pursued his research in organic chemistry at its laboratories. The Weizmann Institute presently has about 2,500 students, postdoctoral fellows, staff, and faculty, and awards M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, biological chemistry and biology, as well as several interdisciplinary programs.The symbol of the Weizmann Institute of Science is the multi-branched ficus tree. In 2011, the magazine The Scientist rated the Weizmann
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Baylor University

    Baylor University

    • Libraries: Armstrong Browning Library
    Baylor University is a private, Christian university in Waco, Texas. Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas, Baylor is the oldest university in Texas and was one of the first educational institutions west of the Mississippi River. The university is located in the central part of the state of Texas, an hour south of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and an hour north of Austin, the state capital. Its main 800 plus acre campus is located to the east of the historic area of downtown Waco and the major freeway I-35 on the banks of the Brazos river. Baylor University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Baylor is also the most selective school in the Big 12 Conference for undergraduates with a 39.7% acceptance rate. In 1841, 35 delegates to the Union Baptist Association meeting voted to adopt the suggestion of Reverend William Milton Tryon and R.E.B. Baylor to establish a Baptist university in Texas, then a self-declared republic still claimed by Mexico. Baylor, a Texas district judge and onetime U.S. Congressman and soldier from Alabama, became the school's namesake. In the fall of 1844, the Texas Baptist Education Society petitioned the Congress of the
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Broward Community College

    Broward Community College

    • Libraries: University / College Library
    Broward College, previously known as "Broward Community College", is a state college in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S., and part of the Florida College System. It was established in 1959 as part of a move to broaden Florida's two-year community college system. In 2008 it adopted its current name, reflecting that it is one of the schools designated a "state college", meaning it can offer four-year bachelor's degrees. In 2012, Broward College was named one of the top 10 community colleges in the nation by the Washington D.C.-based Aspen Institute. The institution was founded in 1959 as the Junior College of Broward County (JCBC). It opened its doors the following year under the leadership of President Joe B. Rushing, with a faculty of 28 serving a class of 701 students. Until the college’s first permanent buildings were completed in 1963, students attended classes in the former Naval Air Station Junior High buildings on the western edge of the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. After helping JCBC through its formative years and onto firm footing, Rushing in 1965 announced he was returning to his home state of Texas to become founding president of Tarrant County
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion

    Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion

    • Libraries: Klau Library, New York
    The Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (also known as HUC, HUC-JIR, and The College-Institute) is the oldest extant Jewish seminary in the Americas and the main seminary for training rabbis, cantors, educators and communal workers in Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR has campuses in Cincinnati, New York, Los Angeles and Jerusalem. The Jerusalem campus is the only seminary in Israel for training Reform Jewish clergy. HUC was founded in 1875 under the leadership of Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise in Cincinnati, Ohio. The first rabbinical class graduated in 1883. The graduation banquet for this class included food that was not kosher, such as clams, soft-shell crabs, shrimp, frogs' legs and dairy products served immediately after meat. This feast was known as the treifah banquet. At the time, Reform rabbis were split over the question of whether the Jewish dietary restrictions were still applicable. Some of the more traditionalist Reform rabbis thought the banquet menu went too far, and were compelled to find an alternative between Reform Judaism and Orthodox Judaism. This was a major cause of the founding of American Conservative Judaism. In 1950, a second HUC campus was created in New
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    2 votes
    198
    Michigan State University College of Law

    Michigan State University College of Law

    • Libraries: John F. Schaefer Law Library
    The Michigan State University College of Law is a private law school located in East Lansing, Michigan which is affiliated with Michigan State University. Established in 1891 as the Detroit College of Law, it was the first law school in the Detroit, Michigan area and the second in the state of Michigan. Detroit College of Law opened in 1891 with 69 students and was incorporated in 1893. It was the oldest continuously operating independent law school in the United States until it was assimilated by MSU in 1997. Detroit College of Law is commemorated by a plaque at Comerica Park, the home stadium of the Detroit Tigers baseball team. Detroit College of Law's first home was in the Detroit College of Medicine building from 1892 to 1913. From 1913 to 1924 it was housed in the YMCA building. In 1935 the college broke ground for a new building at 130 E. Elizabeth Street. Among the first class of 69 students to graduate were a future circuit judge and an ambassador. A woman in the first class and an African American in the second were precursors of the Law College’s commitment to excellent educational opportunity for all sectors of the population. The college became affiliated with Michigan
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    2 votes
    199
    The New School

    The New School

    • Libraries: Scherman Music Library
    The New School is a university in New York City, located mostly in Greenwich Village. From its founding in 1919 by progressive New York academics, and for most of its history, the university was known as the New School for Social Research. Between 1997 and 2005 it was known as New School University. The university and each of its colleges were re-branded to their current names in 2005. The school is renowned for its teaching, housing the international think tank, World Policy Institute, and hosting the prestigious National Book Awards. Parsons The New School for Design is the university's highly competitive art school. Some 9,300 students are enrolled in graduate and undergraduate degree programs, organized into seven different schools, which teach a variety of disciplines, including the social sciences, liberal arts, humanities, architecture, fine arts, design, music, drama, finance, psychology and public policy. The graduate school of The New School began in 1933 as the University in Exile, an emergency rescue program for threatened scholars in Europe. In 1934 it was chartered by the New York state board of regents and its name was changed to the Graduate Faculty of Political and
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    2 votes
    200
    University of Connecticut Health Center

    University of Connecticut Health Center

    • Libraries: Lyman Maynard Stowe Library
    The University of Connecticut Health Center is an integrated academic medical center that is involved in three areas: academics, research, and clinical care. The UConn Health Center is at the center of Bioscience Connecticut, a plan introduced by Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy and approved by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2011. Based in Farmington, Connecticut – a suburb of the state’s capitol of Hartford – the UConn Health Center is home to the School of Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, John Dempsey Hospital, UConn Medical Group, UConn Health Partners, University Dentists and a thriving research enterprise. With approximately 5,000 employees, the UConn Health Center is closely linked with the University's main campus in Storrs through multiple, cross-campus academic projects. John Dempsey Hospital: The university hospital, John Dempsey Hospital provides specialized and routine inpatient and outpatient services for adults. It is active in geriatrics, maternal fetal medicine, cardiology programs, cancer care and orthopaedics. In addition, the John Dempsey Hospital is home to the only full service Emergency Department in the Farmington Valley. Through Bioscience
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    University of Queensland

    University of Queensland

    • Libraries: Dorothy Hill Engineering and Sciences Library
    The University of Queensland (UQ) is a public university located in state of Queensland of Australia. Founded in 1909, it is the oldest and largest university in Queensland and the fifth oldest in Australia. The main campus is located in the suburb of St Lucia, southwest of the Brisbane City Central Business District, with other major campuses in Gatton, Ipswich and Herston with a number of other satellite facilities. The University of Queensland is a member of the Australia's Group of Eight, and the international research-intensive universities network Universitas 21. UQ is colloquially known as a "sandstone university" and is ranked among the top universities in Australia and the top 1 percent in the world. The University of Queensland (UQ) was established on 10 December 1909 by the Queensland Parliament to mark the 50th anniversary of Queensland’s independence from New South Wales. The University's first classes in the Government house were held in 1911 with 83 commencing students and Sir William MacGregor is the first chancellor (with Reginald Heber Roe as vice-chancellor). The development of the University was delayed by World War I, but after the first world war the
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    University of Winnipeg

    University of Winnipeg

    • Libraries: Institute of Urban Studies Library
    The University of Winnipeg (U of W) is a public university in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada that offers undergraduate faculties of art, business and economics, education, science and theology as well as graduate programs. The U of W's founding colleges were Manitoba College and Wesley College, which merged to form United College in 1938. The University of Winnipeg was established in 1967 when United College received its charter. Maclean's magazine and the Globe and Mail newspaper consistently rank the university in the top ten of all Canadian universities whose primary focus is undergraduate education in the category of student satisfaction. In 2011 the U of W ranked 10th out of 20 primarily undergraduate institutions. Research InfoSource ranks the University of Winnipeg last out of 50 schools in its annual list of top 50 research universities in Canada in terms of dollars spent on sponsored research expenditures. The U of W's founding colleges were Manitoba College and Wesley College, which merged to form United College in 1938. George Creeford Browne (architect) & S. Frank Peters designed Wesley Hall (1894–5), which is now part of the University of Winnipeg. The University of
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Liverpool John Moores University

    Liverpool John Moores University

    • Libraries: IM Marsh LRC
    Liverpool John Moores University (informally LJMU) is a British new university located in the city of Liverpool, England. The university is named after John Moores and was previously called Liverpool Mechanics' School of Arts and later Liverpool Polytechnic before gaining university status in 1992, thus becoming Liverpool John Moores University. The university is a member of the University Alliance, a mission group of British universities established in 2007. It is also a member of the European University Association and the North West Universities Association. At present, LJMU serves more than 24,000 students comprising 20,270 undergraduate students and 4,100 postgraduate students, making it the largest university in Liverpool by student population – as well as the twentieth largest in the United Kingdom. Originally founded as a small mechanics institution (Liverpool Mechanics' School of Arts) in 1823, the institution grew over the centuries by converging and amalgamating with different colleges before eventually becoming Liverpool Polytechnic. The University also has a long history of providing training, education and research to the maritime industry, dating back to the
    4.67
    3 votes
    204
    St. John's University

    St. John's University

    • Libraries: Rittenberg Law Library
    St. John's University (also known as SJU or STJ) is a private, Roman Catholic, coeducational university located in New York City, United States. Founded by the Congregation of the Mission (C.M., the Vincentian Fathers) in 1870, the school was originally located in the borough of Brooklyn in the neighborhood of Bedford–Stuyvesant. Beginning in the 1950s, the school was relocated to its current location in the borough of Queens. St. John's also has campuses in Staten Island, Manhattan, and Rome, Italy, as well as a graduate center in Oakdale, New York. A campus in Paris, France opened in the Spring of 2009. The school is named after Saint John the Baptist. St. John's is organized into five undergraduate schools and six graduate schools. As of 2011, the university has a total of 15,720 undergraduate students and 5,634 graduate students. In 2011, St. John's was ranked as a Tier One university by U.S. World News' college rankings. St. John's University was founded in 1868, by the Vincentian Fathers of the Roman Catholic Church in response to an invitation by the first Bishop of Brooklyn, John Loughlin, to provide the poor youth of the city with an intellectual and moral education. St.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    University of Essex

    University of Essex

    • Libraries: Albert Sloman Library
    The University of Essex is a British campus university whose original and largest campus is near the town of Colchester, England. It was established in 1963 and received its Royal Charter in 1965. The University is a member of the 1994 Group. It has 18 main teaching departments and 36 centres and institutes in subjects including biological sciences, computer science, acting, economics, business, health/human sciences, history, language and linguistics, mathematical sciences, human rights, law, literature, film studies, theatre studies, philosophy, art history, psychology, psychoanalytic studies, sociology and government. The university's main campus is located within Wivenhoe Park in the English county of Essex, less than a mile (1.6 km) from the town of Wivenhoe & 2 miles (3.2 km) from the town of Colchester. Apart from the Wivenhoe Park campus, there is a rapidly developing campus in Southend-on-Sea (Essex's largest town), and the East 15 Acting School is based in Loughton. The University's motto, Thought the harder, heart the keener, is adapted from the Anglo-Saxon poem The Battle of Maldon. The university enjoys collaborative partnerships with a number of institutions across
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    University of Stirling

    University of Stirling

    • Libraries: Highland Health Sciences Library
    The University of Stirling is a campus university founded by Royal charter in 1967, on the Airthrey Estate in Stirling, Scotland. The main campus is situated around 2 miles (3.2 km) from the centre of Stirling, but is much closer to the town of Bridge of Allan. It was formerly the estate of the Robert Adam-designed Airthrey Castle, which the University has retained and incorporated into the campus as teaching facilities and offices. It is regularly described as one of the most beautiful campuses in the world, and nestles at the foot of Abbey Craig and the Ochil Hills in 300 acres (1.2 km) of grounds centred around the 18th century man-made Airthrey Loch. In 2002, the University of Stirling and the landscape of the Airthrey Estate was designated by the International Council on Monuments and Sites as one of the top 20 heritage sites of the 20th century within the UK. Stirling University is a Plate Glass University, along with Heriot-Watt University, the University of Dundee and the University of Strathclyde. This increased the number of universities in Scotland from four to eight. Stirling was however the only completely new institution of its kind established in Scotland since the
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    1 votes
    207
    Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Wayne State University School of Medicine

    • Libraries: Shiffman Medical Library
    The Wayne State University School of Medicine (WSUSOM) is the largest single-campus medical school in the United States with more than 1,000 medical students. In addition to undergraduate medical education, the school offers master’s degree, Ph.D., and M.D.-Ph.D. programs in 14 areas of basic science to about 400 students annually. WSUSOM has had four predecessor institutions since its founding in 1868. The Detroit College of Medicine was founded in 1868 in a building on Woodward Avenue adjacent to Harper University Hospital. The Michigan College of Medicine was incorporated in 1879 and offered classes in the former Hotel Hesse at the intersection of Gratiot Avenue, Madison Avenue and St. Antoine Street. In 1885 the two schools merged to form the Detroit College of Medicine, taking residence in the old Michigan College of Medicine building. In 1913, the college was reorganized and refinanced as the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery. In 1918, control of the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery was transferred to the Detroit Board of Education . In 1933 the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery was united by the Board of Education with the colleges of Liberal Arts,
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    1 votes
    208
    Pacific Lutheran University

    Pacific Lutheran University

    • Libraries: Robert A. L. Mortdvedt Library
    Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) is a private university offering liberal arts and professional school programs located in Parkland,, a suburb of Tacoma, Washington, United States. Founded by Norwegian Lutheran pioneers in 1890, PLU is sponsored by the 580 congregations of Region I of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. PLU has approximately 3,500 students enrolled. As of 2012 the school employs 236 full-time professors on the 156-acre (630,000 m2) woodland campus. PLU consists of the College of Arts and Sciences (including of the Divisions of Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences), the School of Arts and Communication, the School of Business, the School of Education and Movement Studies, and the School of Nursing. Pacific Lutheran University was founded in 1890 by Scandinavian immigrants. Classes first began in 1894 with the student body consisting of 30 students. Tuition at the time cost $1 per week. Bjug Harstad was the school’s first president. The entire university was housed in one building from 1894-1912. This building was formally known as Old Main but has since been renamed Harstad Hall in honor of the school’s founding president. In 1898 the
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    Leiden University

    Leiden University

    • Libraries: Walaeus Library
    Leiden University (Dutch: Universiteit Leiden), located in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The university was founded in 1575 by William, Prince of Orange, leader of the Dutch Revolt in the Eighty Years' War. The royal Dutch House of Orange-Nassau and Leiden University still have a close relationship. The Queens Juliana and Beatrix and crown-prince Willem-Alexander studied at Leiden University. Leiden University has six faculties, over 50 departments and enjoys an outstanding international reputation. In 2012 Leiden was the highest ranked university in the Netherlands in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, where it was rated as the 64th best university worldwide. Shanghai Jiao Tong University's 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities ranked Leiden University as the 65th best university worldwide. The Times Higher Education World University Rankings consistently rank Leiden University as the best university in Continental Europe for Arts and Humanities. The University is associated with ten leaders and Prime Ministers of the Netherlands including the current Prime Minister Mark Rutte, eight foreign leaders among them the 6th
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    2 votes
    210
    University of Missouri–Kansas City

    University of Missouri–Kansas City

    • Libraries: University of Missouri–Kansas City Dental Library
    The University of Missouri–Kansas City (often referred to as UMKC) is a public research university located in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It is a branch of the University of Missouri System. Its main campus is in Kansas City's Rockhill neighborhood east of the Country Club Plaza. The university's enrollment is 15,473. The University of Missouri - Kansas City was ranked 181st in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report among the national universities in 2012. The school has its roots in the Lincoln and Lee University movement first put forth by the Methodist Church and its Bishop Ernest Lynn Waldorf in the 1920s. The proposed university (which was to honor Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee) was to be built on the Missouri-Kansas border at 75th and State Line Road, where the Battle of Westport (the largest battle west of the Mississippi River during the American Civil War) took place. The centerpiece of the school was to be a National Memorial marking the tomb of an unknown Union soldier and unknown Confederate soldier. Proponents of the school said it would be a location "where North met South and East met West." The Methodist interest reflected the church's important role in the
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    2 votes
    211
    Washington College of Law

    Washington College of Law

    • Libraries: Pence Law Library
    American University Washington College of Law (WCL) is the law school of American University. Located on Massachusetts Avenue in the Spring Valley neighborhood of northwest Washington, WCL is ranked 49th among law schools by U.S. News & World Report. The school is fully accredited by the American Bar Association. WCL was founded in 1896 by Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett in response to a lack of legal educational opportunities for women in the region. Mussey herself learned the law by apprenticeship at her husband's law offices. She was rejected by several schools in the area, including the National University School of Law, which later merged into the George Washington University Law School, because "women did not have the mentality for the law." Gillette however, found admission at Howard University School of Law, and graduated in 1882 with an LL.B and in 1883 with an LL.M. She passed the bar in the District of Columbia the same year. Additionally, President Garfield appointed her to be the first female notary public in the United States. Mussey and Gillett began teaching in Mussey's law offices after they were approached by three women who wished to study with them. With
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    2 votes
    212
    Colorado School of Mines

    Colorado School of Mines

    • Libraries: Arthur Lakes Library
    Colorado School of Mines (also referred to as "Mines") is a small public teaching and research university devoted to engineering and applied science, with special expertise in the development and stewardship of the Earth's natural resources. Located in Golden, Colorado, United States, CSM was ranked 29th in America among national public universities in 2011, tying the University of Iowa. Undergraduate admissions at Mines is fairly selective, with an admissions rate of 46% for the 2011-2012 school year. The college was originally founded in 1873 by the Episcopal Church, but in 1874 control was transferred to the Colorado Territory, and CSM became a state institution when Colorado attained statehood in 1876. The school mascot is Blaster the Burro, the athletic teams are called the Orediggers, and the logo (designed by architect Jacques Benedict) is a Reuleaux triangle. Golden, Colorado, established in 1859 as Golden City, served as a supply center for miners and settlers in the area. In 1866, Bishop George Maxwell Randall of Massachusetts arrived in the territory and, seeing a need for higher education facilities in the area, began planning for a university which would include a
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    1 votes
    213
    London College of Fashion

    London College of Fashion

    • Libraries: London College of Fashion Library
    London College of Fashion (LCF) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London, offering undergraduate, postgraduate, short courses and business-training in fashion, make-up, beauty-therapy and lifestyle industries. It is the only college in Britain to specialise in fashion education, research and consultancy. The college was originally founded by the former London County Council in 1906 as the Shoreditch Technical Institute Girls School and the Bartlett St and Clapham Trade School, which were opened to train young girls in the art of dressmaking, millinery, embroidery and hairdressing. The college was formerly home to The Lady Eleanor Holles School (which relocated to Hampton, Surrey). The London County Council was later abolished and replaced with the Inner London Education Authority until 1986. The two institutions later amalgamated to form one college for the garment trades: London College of Fashion. Cordwainers College is now an integral school of the London College of Fashion. Formerly Cordwainers' Technical College, it was a vocational college for the footwear and leather trades. The former head of college, Sandra Holtby, was awarded the OBE in the 2006 New
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    1 votes
    214
    McGill University

    McGill University

    • Libraries: McGill University Humanities and Social Sciences Library
    McGill University is a public research university located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The university bears the name of James McGill, a prominent Montreal merchant from Glasgow, Scotland and alumnus of Glasgow University, whose bequest formed the beginning of the university. Founded in 1821, McGill was chartered during the British colonial era, 46 years before the Canadian Confederation, making it one of the oldest universities in Canada. As of 2012, McGill ranked 18th in the world in the QS World University Rankings, maintaining its position among top 20 universities globally for the sixth consecutive year. According to the 2011 Emerging/Trendence Global Employability Ranking, McGill was ranked 19th in the world for popularity among major employers. In the Maclean's 21st Annual University Ranking (2011), McGill was ranked 1st in Canada among all institutions offering medical and doctoral degrees, maintaining this ranking for the seventh year in a row. With almost 215,000 living alumni worldwide, students and professors at McGill have been recognized in fields ranging from the arts and sciences, to business, politics, and sports. Notable alumni include eight Nobel Laureates, one
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    1 votes
    215
    Schulich School of Law

    Schulich School of Law

    • Libraries: Sir James Dunn Law Library
    The Schulich School of Law is a faculty of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Formerly called Dalhousie Law School, it was established in 1883, making it the oldest university-affiliated common law school in the Commonwealth. It is the largest law school in Atlantic Canada and attracts students from all parts of Canada and abroad. The law school is a member of the North American Consortium on Legal Education. The school was renamed the Schulich School of Law in October 2009. Dalhousie Law School lays claim to being "the first university-based common law school in the Commonwealth." Unlike Ontario's Osgoode Hall, which was first established in 1862 under the auspices of the Law Society of Upper Canada and subsequently shut down several times before re-opening in 1889, Dalhousie Law School sought to treat the study of law as a liberal education. It was not, as Osgoode was, an outpost for the province's professional law society where the law was "merely a technical craft." In fact, at that time the establishment of a full-time professional university common law school was so radical and the School's influence so great that legal historians cite Dalhousie Law
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    1 votes
    216
    Suffolk County Community College

    Suffolk County Community College

    • Libraries: SCCC Eastern Campus Library
    Suffolk County Community College (SCCC) is a two-year public college on Long Island, NY sponsored by SUNY and Suffolk County, New York in the USA. Founded in 1959, Suffolk County Community College has three main campuses in Selden, Brentwood and Riverhead. It also has two "satellite" centers in Sayville and downtown Riverhead. The school was founded largely through the efforts of Albert Ammerman (1914-November 26, 2008) who was the school's President from its founding December 1959 until 1983. In its first year it had 13 faculty with 171 full-time students at the Sachem High School in Ronkonkoma and 335 part-time students at Riverhead High School until what is now called the Ammerman campus opened in 1962 in the former Suffolk County Tuberculosis Sanatorium (originally built in 1912). By 1977 it had opened a campus in Riverhead and one on the edge of the Pilgrim Psychiatric Center in Brentwood. Suffolk County Community College is one of the largest community colleges in the SUNY (State University of New York) system and offers the lowest college tuition on Long Island. It offers more than 70 degree and certificate programs in a wide variety of areas. It also boasts a low
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    1 votes
    217
    University of Canberra

    University of Canberra

    • Libraries: University of Canberra Library
    The University of Canberra (UC) is a public university that is located in Bruce Canberra. Canberra is the national capital of Australia which is 280km from Sydney and 660km from Melbourne. UC offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses covering six main learning areas: Applied Science; Health; Art and Design; Business, Government and law; Education and Information Sciences and Engineering. UC is partnered with two local ACT schools UC Senior Secondary College Lake Ginninderra (formerly Lake Ginninderra Senior Secondary College) and University of Canberra High School (formerly Kaleen High School). The University of Canberra College also provides other pathways into university for domestic and international students. The campus is within walking distance of the Westfield shopping and entertainment complex of Belconnen, and just 12 minutes by regular bus service or car from Canberra’s Civic Centre.[5] Stephen Parker is the Vice Chancellor of the university. The ACT Government provides around one percent of the university's operating budget. The University of Canberra was first established in 1967 as the Canberra College of Advanced Education. The Canberra College of Advance
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    1 votes
    218
    University of Melbourne

    University of Melbourne

    • Libraries: Brownless Biomedical Library
    The University of Melbourne is a Australian public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. Founded in 1853, it is Australia's second oldest university and the oldest in Victoria. The main campus is located in Parkville, an inner suburb just north of the Melbourne CBD. The university also has several other campuses located across Victoria. It is a member of Australia's "Group of Eight" lobby group, the Universitas 21 and Association of Pacific Rim Universities networks. In 2010, it reported an investment fund value of AU$1.173B and spent $767.5m on research. The university has been placed top in Australia by the Times Higher Education Rankings (2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013), HEEACT(Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan), and Academic Ranking of World Universities(2011 and 2012). The latest Rankings of Times Higher Education ranked The University of Melbourne No.28 in the world, up from 37 last year, ranked number two in the Asia region and 31st in the world by QS 2011-2012 ranking. The university's coat of arms is a blue shield on which a depiction of Victory in white colour holds her laurel wreath over the stars of the Southern Cross. The motto,
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    1 votes
    219
    University of Memphis

    University of Memphis

    • Libraries: University of Memphis Communication Sciences Library
    The University of Memphis is an American public research university located in the Normal Station neighborhood of Memphis, Tennessee and is the flagship institution of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. With an enrollment of more than 23,000 students, the University of Memphis has 25 Chairs of Excellence and five state-approved Centers of Excellence. The University maintains the Journalism and Public Relations department, Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI), Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, Loewenberg School of Nursing, FedEx Institute of Technology and the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology. A faculty of approximately 900 professors serves about 15,000 undergraduate and 5,000 graduate students. The Daily Helmsman, the independent daily newspaper on the campus, in operation since 1925, remains a prominent student organization. In addition, many other student organizations and academic departments, such as the University of Memphis Institute for Egyptian Art and Archaeology, the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law Moot Court Board, the University of Memphis Advertising Federation and the University of Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Student Society
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    1 votes
    220
    University of Minnesota Duluth

    University of Minnesota Duluth

    • Libraries: University of Minnesota Duluth Library
    The University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) is a regional branch of the University of Minnesota system located in Duluth, Minnesota, USA. As Duluth's public research university, UMD offers 13 bachelor's degrees in 74 majors, graduate programs in 24 different fields, a two-year program at the School of Medicine, a four-year College of Pharmacy program, and a Doctor of Education program. The chief executive officer of UMD is Chancellor Dr. Lendley C. Black. Black began his tenure on August 1, 2010. The previous chancellor, Kathryn A. Martin, served from 1995-2010. Although the University of Minnesota Duluth didn’t officially make its appearance until 1947, plans for a strong college in the Duluth area were made in the 1890s. The state legislature planned for a teaching school for women (then referred to as a normal school) and in 1895 they announced the formation of the Duluth Normal School. In 1896, the City of Duluth donated 6 acres (2.4 ha) of land to serve as a foundation for the Duluth Normal School, and the state legislature donated additional funds for the construction costs for the main building, which was built in 1900. In February 1901, a fire caused extensive damage to the
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    1 votes
    221
    University of Texas at San Antonio

    University of Texas at San Antonio

    • Libraries: John Peace Library
    The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is a state research university in San Antonio, Texas, United States. It is the largest university in San Antonio, the third-largest of the nine academic institutions in the University of Texas System and the eighth-largest in the state of Texas. It has three campuses with over 747 acres of land and 30,968 students, offering 133 undergraduate, 51 graduate and 24 doctoral programs. In 2012, it was selected by Times Higher Education as one of the best universities in the world under 50 years old. UTSA serves the San Antonio metropolitan area and the South Texas region through three campuses: the Main Campus, the Downtown Campus in Downtown San Antonio, and the HemisFair Park Campus (Institute of Texan Cultures). The Main Campus, located about 15 miles northwest of Downtown San Antonio, is on 600 acres (2.4 km), at the intersection of Interstate 10 and Loop 1604 near the northwestern edge of the city of San Antonio, in Bexar County. UTSA was ranked No. 53 out of the top 100 universities around the world that have been in existence less than 50 years, according to the London-based higher education publication. Webometrics University
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    1 votes
    222
    Furman University

    Furman University

    • Libraries: Maxwell Music Library
    Furman University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college in Greenville, South Carolina, United States. Furman is one of the oldest institutions in South Carolina. Founded in 1826, Furman enrolls approximately 2,800 undergraduate and 525 graduate students on its 750-acre (304 ha) campus. In recent years, more Furman University graduates have gone on to earn more Ph.D. degrees than those of any other private liberal arts college in the South, according to a survey conducted by the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research Center. Today Furman offers majors and programs in 42 subjects. Most of Furman's 2,800 undergraduates are from the South Atlantic region, but more than 40 states and 15 foreign countries are represented in the student population. Furman is a member of Associated Colleges of the South. Furman was founded in 1826 at Edgefield, SC as a Men's Academy and Theological Institute. It relocated in Greenville, South Carolina in 1850. It was named for Richard Furman of Charleston, SC, a prominent minister and president of the first Baptist convention in America, the Triennial Convention. The original school building from that campus was transported to the
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    1 votes
    223
    London College of Communication

    London College of Communication

    • Libraries: London College of Communication Library
    The London College of Communication (LCC) (formerly the London College of Printing and, briefly, London College of Printing and Distributive Trades) is a constituent college of the University of the Arts London, located in Elephant and Castle. Professor Elizabeth Rouse is Head of College. It has about 5,000 students on 60 courses in media and design preparing students for careers in the creative industries. Courses cover diploma, foundation, undergraduate and postgraduate level. Multi-media convergence now influences LCC’s specialist areas, including graphic design and advertising, photography, film and animation, journalism, publishing and public relations, sound arts and design and interactive and spatial design. In 1894 the Saint Bride Foundation Institute Printing School opened in Saint Bride Lane as a social, educational and cultural centre, housing both a technical library and printing school to provide tuition for local printers and students. At the same time another of LCC's forebears, the Guild and Technical School, opened in Clerkenwell Road, moving the follow year to 6 Bolt Court. It became the Bolt Court Technical School and was rebuilt in 1911. It was renamed London
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    McMaster University

    McMaster University

    • Libraries: Innis Library
    McMaster University (commonly referred as McMaster or Mac) is a public research university whose main campus is located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The main campus is located on 121 hectares (300 acres) of land in the residential neighbourhood of Westdale, adjacent to Hamilton's Royal Botanical Gardens. The university operates six academic faculties: Engineering, Health Science, Humanities, Social Sciences, Science, and the DeGroote School of Business. It is a member of the U15, a group of research-intensive universities in Canada. The university bears the name of Honourable William McMaster, a prominent Canadian Senator and banker who bequeathed C$900,000 to the founding of the university. McMaster University was incorporated under the terms of an act of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in 1887, merging the Toronto Baptist College with Woodstock College. It opened in Toronto in 1890. Inadequate facilities and the gift of land in Hamilton prompted the institution to relocate in 1930. McMaster was controlled by the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec until it became a privately chartered, publicly funded non-denominational institution in 1957. The university is
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    225
    University of Barcelona

    University of Barcelona

    • Libraries: University of Barcelona Philosophy, Geography and History Library
    The University of Barcelona (Catalan: Universitat de Barcelona, UB; IPA: [uniβərsiˈtad də βərsəˈɫonə]; Spanish: Universidad de Barcelona) is a public university located in the city of Barcelona, Catalonia in Spain. With 75 undergraduate programs, 353 graduate programs and 96 doctorate programs to over 63,700 students, UB was considered to be the best University in Spain in the 2011 QS World University Rankings, which ranked the university 148th overall in the world. Its subject rankings were: 74th in Life Sciences & Biomedicine, 89th in Arts & Humanities, 87th in Natural Sciences, 143rd in Social Sciences and 175th in Engineering & IT. In 2010, according to University Ranking by Academic Performance (URAP), it is the best university in Spain and 83rd university in the world. The University of Barcelona is the principal centre of university research in Spain and has become a European benchmark for research activity, both in terms of the number of research programs it conducts and the excellence these have achieved. According to the 2011 CYD Report, it is the highest-placed Spanish university in terms of scientific output, with a total of 15,290 papers published between 2006 and
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    226
    University of Rochester Medical Center

    University of Rochester Medical Center

    • Libraries: Edward G. Miner Library
    The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), located in Rochester, New York, is one of the main campuses of the University of Rochester and comprises the university's primary medical education, research and patient care facilities. URMC is one of the largest facilities for medical treatment and research in Upstate New York and includes a regional Perinatal Center, Trauma Center, Burn Center and the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, an Epilepsy Center, Liver Transplant Center and Cardiac Transplant Center and also includes a major AIDS Treatment Center and an NIH-designated AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Unit. A large portion of the university's biomedical research is conducted in the Arthur Kornberg Medical Research Building and the Aab Institute of Biomedical Sciences. URMC occupies a 4,000,000-square-foot (370,000 m) complex located between Elmwood Avenue, Mount Hope Avenue, Genesee Valley Park, and Lattimore Road. In January 2008 the University of Rochester announced a $500 million strategic plan geared toward expansion in research and patient services. The plan will potentially add 800 new jobs to the university. Part of the expansion will include building a new 6-story, 123-bed
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    227
    Austin Community College

    Austin Community College

    • Libraries: Austin Community College Northridge Campus Library
    The Austin Community College District (ACC) is a regional community college district with 8 campuses and 12 centers located in and around the city of Austin, Texas, United States. ACC is the second largest institution of higher learning in Central Texas with a service area that stretches over eight counties and 7,000 square miles (18,000 km). ACC is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, tax exempt institution of higher education as defined in Section 61.003 of the Texas Education Code. As of Fall 2011, ACC has 4,500 faculty and staff, 45,100 credit students, 15,000 non-credit students, and offers over 235 associate degree and certificate programs. In 1972, residents of Austin ISD voted to create the Austin Community College District. ACC opened its doors at its Ridgeview Campus (closed in 1988 due to structural issues) on September 17, 1973 with 177 faculty and staff, 1,726 students, and 30 academic programs. Classes were first held at Rio Grande, ACC's oldest currently open campus, on September 4, 1975. The college held its first commencement ceremony on May 15, 1974. Fifteen students were awarded associate degrees, and 71 adults were honored for receiving their GED certificates. ACC became
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    228
    Candler School of Theology

    Candler School of Theology

    • Libraries: Pitts Theology Library
    Candler School of Theology at Emory University is one of thirteen seminaries affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Founded in 1914, the school was named after Warren Akin Candler, a former President and Chancellor of Emory University and a Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Currently more than 500 students from over 50 denominations attend Candler School of Theology. The Candler School is located on the Emory campus in the metropolitan Atlanta area in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. The school also houses the World Methodist Evangelism Institute, which is a joint project with the World Methodist Council. Candler offers four degree programs and seven certificate programs: Certificates are awarded along with Masters degrees and cannot be earned separately Nine people have held the deanship at the Candler School of Theology:
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    229
    Darden Graduate School of Business Administration

    Darden Graduate School of Business Administration

    • Libraries: Camp Library
    The University of Virginia Darden School of Business is the graduate business school associated with the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Darden School is one of the world's leading business schools, offering MBA, Ph.D. and Executive Education programs. The unique Darden experience combines the case study method, the highest-ranked faculty whose research advances global managerial practice and business education, and a tight-knit learning environment to develop principled and complete leaders who are ready to make an impact. The School was founded in 1954 and is named after Colgate Whitehead Darden, Jr., a former Democratic congressman, governor of Virginia, and former president of the University of Virginia. Darden is unique because of the combination of three key elements: These elements create an environment that develops Darden students into principled and complete leaders who are ready for anything after graduation. Designed for students who seek to strengthen their leadership, business and communication skills, Darden’s two-year MBA program — ranked #1 in student satisfaction by Bloomberg Businessweek — combines core and elective courses in
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    230
    Haverford College

    Haverford College

    • Libraries: Magill Library
    Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, United States, a suburb of Philadelphia. All students of the College are undergraduates, and nearly all reside on campus. The College was founded in 1833 by area members of the Orthodox Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) to ensure an education grounded in Quaker values for young Quaker men. Although the College no longer has a formal religious affiliation, the Quaker philosophy still influences campus life. Originally an all-male institution, Haverford began admitting female transfer students in the 1970s and became fully co-ed in 1980. Currently, more than half of Haverford's students are women. For most of the 20th century, Haverford's total enrollment was kept below 300, but the school went through two periods of expansion after the 1970s, and its current enrollment is 1,190 students. Haverford is a member of the Tri-College Consortium, which allows students to register for courses at both Bryn Mawr College and Swarthmore College. The College enjoys an especially close relationship with Bryn Mawr College. It is also a member of the Quaker
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    231
    Manchester Metropolitan University

    Manchester Metropolitan University

    • Libraries: Aytoun Library
    Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) is a British university located in North West England. Its headquarters and central campus are in the city of Manchester, and there are outlying facilities in the county of Cheshire. The university has its roots in the Manchester Mechanics’ Institution (1824) and the Manchester School of Design (1838). It is the sixth largest university in the United Kingdom in terms of student numbers. Teaching quality inspections place the university within the top twenty in the UK, according to The Complete University Guide. Teaching standards have also been described as 'among the highest in the country' by the Quality Assurance Agency. The university is ranked fourth of the new universities in attracting research funds from the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The university is an accredited member of the Association of MBAs, a member of the University Alliance, the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the North West Universities Association and the European University Association. The university is home to the Manchester School of Art, the Manchester School of Theatre and, in conjunction with the University of Manchester, the
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    232
    Rice University

    Rice University

    • Libraries: Fondren Library
    William Marsh Rice University, commonly referred to as Rice University or Rice, is a private research university located on a 295-acre (1.19 km) campus in Houston, Texas, United States. The university is situated near the Houston Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. Opened in 1912 after the murder of its namesake William Marsh Rice, Rice is now a preeminent research university with a distinct undergraduate and graduate focus. Its emphasis on education is demonstrated by a small student body and 5:1 student-faculty ratio, among the lowest in the top American universities including the Ivy League. Rice alumni are prominent in every sector of society today. The university has produced 101 Fulbright Scholars, 20 Marshall Scholars, and 12 Rhodes Scholars. The university has a very high level of research activity for its size, with $115.3 million in sponsored research funding in 2011. Rice is noted for its applied science programs in the fields of artificial heart research, structural chemical analysis, signal processing, space science, and nanotechnology. It was ranked first in the world in materials science research by the Times Higher Education (THE) in 2010. The
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    233
    Sheridan College

    Sheridan College

    • Libraries: Sheridan College Library
    Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning is a diploma and degree granting Canadian polytechnic institute with approximately 17,000 full-time students and 35,000 continuing education students. Founded in 1967, the college offer programs in animation and illustration, music theatre, film and design, business, applied computing, engineering technology, community studies, and liberal studies. There are campuses in Oakville, Brampton, and Mississauga. Sheridan College was established during the formation of Ontario’s college system, and opened in 1967. It was part of a provincial initiative from May 21, 1965 to create many such institutions providing career-oriented diploma and certificate courses, as well as continuing education programs to Ontario communities. The school's founding president, Jack Porter, immediately began putting multiple programs and courses into action, which would grow into complete departments. In the 1960's and early 1970's, the Canadian animation industry was little formed and virtually non-existent, excepting animation pioneers of the National Film Board. In 1968 President Porter organized the school's first course in classical animation,
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    234
    Texas Tech University

    Texas Tech University

    • Libraries: Texas Tech University Architecture Library
    Texas Tech University, often referred to as Texas Tech or TTU, is a public research university in Lubbock, Texas, United States. Established on February 10, 1923, and originally known as Texas Technological College, it is the leading institution of the Texas Tech University System and has the seventh-largest student body in the state of Texas. With 1,839 acres (744 ha), it has the second largest contiguous campus in the United States and is the only school in Texas to house an undergraduate institution, law school, and medical school at the same location. The university offers degrees in more than 150 courses of study through 13 colleges and hosts 60 research centers and institutes. Texas Tech University has awarded over 200,000 degrees since 1927, including over 40,000 graduate and professional degrees. The Carnegie Foundation classifies Texas Tech as having "high research activity". Research projects in the areas of epidemiology, pulsed power, grid computing, nanophotonics, atmospheric sciences, and wind energy are among the most prominent at the university. The Spanish Renaissance-themed campus, described by author James Michener as "the most beautiful west of the Mississippi
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    235
    Tulane University

    Tulane University

    • Libraries: Howard-Tilton Memorial Library
    Tulane University (officially The Tulane University of Louisiana or simply TU) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. Founded as a public medical college in 1834, the school grew into a comprehensive university in 1847 and was eventually privatized under the endowments of Paul Tulane and Josephine Louise Newcomb in 1884. Tulane is a member of the Association of American Universities. The university was founded as the Medical College of Louisiana in 1834 partly as a response to the fears of smallpox, yellow fever and cholera in America. The university became only the second medical school in the South, and the 15th in the United States at the time. In 1847, the state legislature established the school as the University of Louisiana, a public university, and the law department was added to the university. Subsequently, in 1851, the university established its first academic department. The first president chosen for the new university was Francis Lister Hawks, an Episcopalian priest and prominent citizen of New Orleans at the time. The university was closed from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. After reopening, it
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    236
    Universiteit van Amsterdam

    Universiteit van Amsterdam

    • Libraries: Universiteit van Amsterdam University Library
    The University of Amsterdam (Dutch: Universiteit van Amsterdam) or the UvA is a public research university located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Founded in 1632 as the Athenaeum Illustre by the scholars Gerardus Vossius and Caspar Barlaeus, it is the third-oldest university in the Netherlands. The UvA is one of Europe's largest research universities with an endowment of €613.5 million, 32,739 students, 5,090 staff, and 7,900 scientific publications each year. It is the largest university in the Netherlands by enrollment and has the second-largest university endowment in the country. The campus of the UvA is located primarily in the City Centre of Amsterdam, with a few faculties located in adjacent bouroghs. The school lies within the largest megalopolis in the Netherlands, the Randstad, with a population of 7.2 million inhabitants. There are seven faculties: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Economics and Business, Science, Law, Medicine, and Dentistry. The university offers 59 Bachelor's programs, 133 Master's programs, and 10 postgraduate programs. In addition, the university has developed a strong internationalization program and offers over 58 Master programs taught
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    University of Cincinnati

    University of Cincinnati

    • Libraries: Langsam Library
    The University of Cincinnati (commonly referred to as Cincinnati or UC) is a comprehensive public research university in Cincinnati, in the U.S. state of Ohio, and a part of the University System of Ohio. Founded in 1819 as Cincinnati College, it is the oldest institution of higher education in Cincinnati and has an annual enrollment of over 40,000 students, making it the second largest university in Ohio and one of the largest universities in the United States. In the 2010 survey by Times Higher Education (UK), the university was ranked in the top 100 universities in North America and as one of the top 200 in the world. In the 2012 edition of US News and World Report, the University of Cincinnati was ranked as a Tier One university. In 2011-2012 academic year the Leiden University ranking put the University of Cincinnati at the 93rd place globally and at the 63rd place in North America by the proportion of top-cited publications. The university garners nearly $500 million per annum in research funding, ranking 22nd among public universities in the US. Numerous programs across the university are nationally ranked, including: aerospace engineering, anthropology, architecture,
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    University of Cincinnati College of Law

    University of Cincinnati College of Law

    • Libraries: Marx Law Library
    The University of Cincinnati College of Law was founded in 1833 as the Cincinnati Law School. Then-dean and future 27th President of the United States, William Howard Taft (1880), merged it with the University of Cincinnati in 1896. The school has produced both a President of the United States (William Howard Taft) and a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (both Taft and Willis Van Devanter). The school has also produced a Vice President of the United States, Charles G. Dawes, and a Secretary of Commerce, Charles W. Sawyer. The American Bar Association does not officially rank law schools. U.S. News & World Report is perhaps the most well-known publisher of unofficial law school rankings. U.S. News & World Report organizes rankings into two main sections. The first section is a "Top 145" that lists the top one hundred forty-five schools in order from highest ranked to lowest ranked. While the top 145 law schools are ranked individually, U.S. News groups the remaining schools, or the bottom 25 percent of those that are ranked, into a "Rank Not Published" group. Schools that fall into this category are listed alphabetically and not by actual ranking. U.S. News also
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    239
    University of Denver

    University of Denver

    • Libraries: Penrose Library
    The University of Denver (DU), founded in 1864, is the oldest private university in the Rocky Mountain Region of the United States. The University of Denver is a coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. DU currently enrolls approximately 5,000 undergraduate students and 6,000 graduate students. The 125-acre (0.51 km) main campus is a designated arboretum and is located primarily in the University Neighborhood, about seven miles (11 km) south of downtown Denver. The university was founded in March 3, 1864 as the Colorado Seminary by John Evans, the former Governor of Colorado Territory, who had been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln. John Evans, who also founded Northwestern University prior to founding DU, is the namesake of the town in Illinois named Evanston (the site of the Northwestern campus) as well as Mount Evans, a 14,264 foot mountain visible from the DU campus. Evans founded the school to help civilize the newly-created (1858) City of Denver, which was little more than a mining camp at that time. As a co-educational institution, according to College Board, under a competitive standard, the average admitted applicant is at his or her top 25% of their
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    240
    University of Edinburgh

    University of Edinburgh

    • Libraries: Darwin Library
    The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a public research university located in Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. Edinburgh receives approximately 47,000 applications every year, making it the third most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants. Entrance is intensely competitive, with 12 applications per place in the last admissions cycle. Regarded as one of the most prestigious universities in the world, the university is ranked 6th and 7th in Europe according to the 2011 QS and Times Higher Education Ranking and 21st in the world by the 2012 QS rankings. It is a member of both the elite Russell Group, and the League of European Research Universities, a consortium of 21 of Europe's most prominent and renowned research universities. In addition, the University has both historical links and current partnerships with prestigious academic institutions in the United States and Canada, including members of the Ivy League and U15. It has the third largest endowment of any university in the UK. The university played an
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    241
    University of Evansville

    University of Evansville

    • Libraries: Clifford Memorial Library
    The University of Evansville (UE) is a small, private university with approximately 3,050 students located in Evansville, Indiana. Founded in 1854 as Moores Hill College, it is located near the interchange of the Lloyd Expressway and U.S. Route 41. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The University features liberal arts and sciences degrees, most with strong cooperative learning opportunities both on and off campus. UE operates a satellite campus, Harlaxton College, in Grantham, England. UE athletic teams participate in NCAA Division I athletics as a member of the Missouri Valley Conference. The teams are known as the Purple Aces. The University of Evansville is nationally renowned for its Theatre and Physical Therapy departments. The University is known as a leader in the area of New Formalism poetry as the home of The Formalist and its successor journal, Measure. The University of Evansville Press also publishes exclusively books and anthologies on formal poetry, including an annual winner of its Richard Wilbur Award. On April 9, 2010 the Board of Trustees selected Thomas A. Kazee, former Executive Vice President and Provost at Furman University, as the University
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    242
    University of Hawaii at Hilo

    University of Hawaii at Hilo

    • Libraries: Edwin H. Mookini Library
    The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, UHH, or UH Hilo is one of the ten branches of the University of Hawaiʻi system anchored by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, United States. The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is a public and co-educational university with the main campus located at 200 West Kawili Street, Hilo, the county seat for Hawaiʻi County. The University is composed of six colleges, and has received recognition for numerous academic programs including the marine biology, volcanology, astronomy, Hawaiian language, pharmacy, agriculture, computer science, and nursing programs. Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, College of Hawaiian Language is the only school in the United States to offer graduate degrees for study in an indigenous language. The College of Pharmacy is the only ACPE approved pharmacy school in the State of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific Islands. UH Hilo ranks in the top 10 for having both the most ethnic diversity and the lowest percentage of students with debt at graduation, according to U.S. News & World Report. The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo primarily serves residents of Hawaiʻi but also enjoys a diverse student body from many Pacific Island and
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    243
    University of Louisville

    University of Louisville

    • Libraries: Brandeis Law School Library
    The University of Louisville is a university in Louisville, Kentucky. When founded in 1798, it was the first city-owned public university in the United States and one of the first universities chartered west of the Allegheny Mountains. The university is mandated by the Kentucky General Assembly to be a "Preeminent Metropolitan Research University". U of L enrolls students from 118 of 120 Kentucky counties, all 50 U.S. states, and 116 countries around the world. The University of Louisville Health Sciences Center participated in the development of a highly effective vaccine against cervical cancer in 2006, the first fully self-contained artificial heart transplant surgery, the first successful hand transplantation, and the development of the Pap smear test. The University Hospital is also credited with the first civilian ambulance, the nation's first accident services, now known as an emergency room (ER), and one of the first blood banks in the US. Since 1999, U of L has made the largest gains of any university in National Institutes of Health research ranking, with its NIH funding increasing 277 percent and its rank increasing 30 places. As of 2006 among public U.S. universities,
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    244
    University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

    University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

    • Libraries: University of Missouri–Kansas City Health Sciences Library
    The University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine began in 1971. The school offers an accelerated combined Bachelor/MD program based on a six-year curriculum. The school of medicine admits students into the program directly from high school and within six years the graduates attain an undergraduate and a doctor of medicine degree (BA/MD) from UMKC. The curriculum integrates the liberal arts, basic sciences, and clinical sciences with a team approach to learning. More than 2,000 physicians have graduated from the UMKC–SOM six-year combined degree program. The school of medicine is located in the Hospital Hill neighborhood of Kansas City, MO, and is physically attached to the Truman Medical Center hospital complex (the primary teaching hospital). A distinctive aspect of the UMKC School of Medicine is the docent experience. In the docent education system, students are divided into groups of about 12 and are assigned to a practicing Internal Medicine physician who is then referred to as their "Docent." In the first two years, students are assigned to docents for internal medicine (year one), pediatrics/OB-Gyn, Psychiatry, Geriatrics, and other primary care fields (year two).
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    245
    University of New Brunswick

    University of New Brunswick

    • Libraries: I.U.C. Science and Forestry Library
    The University of New Brunswick (UNB) is a non-denominational university located in New Brunswick. It is the oldest English language university in Canada and one of four schools that claim the title of oldest public university in North America (the University of Georgia, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The College of William and Mary also claim this title). UNB was founded by a group of seven Loyalists who left the United States after the American Revolution. UNB has two main campuses: the original campus, founded in 1785 in Fredericton, and a smaller campus which opened in Saint John in 1964. In addition, there are two small satellite health sciences campuses located in Moncton and Bathurst, New Brunswick, and two offices in the Caribbean and in Beijing. UNB offers over 75 degrees in fourteen faculties at the undergraduate and graduate levels with a total student enrollment of approximately 11,400 between the two principal campuses. In the fall of 2010, UNB partnered with Dalhousie University and the government of New Brunswick to open the first English-language medical school in the province at the Saint John campus. In 1783, Loyalist settlers began to build
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    246
    University of South Carolina Aiken

    University of South Carolina Aiken

    The University of South Carolina Aiken is a four-year, public coeducational university in Aiken, South Carolina. The school offers undergraduate degree programs as well as master's degrees in elementary education, educational technology and applied clinical psychology. Additional graduate courses and degree programs are offered through the University of South Carolina Extended Graduate Campus program. University of South Carolina Aiken awards baccalaureate degrees in more than 30 major areas of study. Founded in 1961 in a historic mansion in downtown Aiken, USCA moved to its present site in 1972. Under authority granted by the South Carolina General Assembly, the Aiken County Commission for Higher Education entered into an agreement with the University of South Carolina in 1961 to establish a two-year, off-campus center of the University in Aiken County. A small cadre of faculty and staff was assigned the mission of establishing a college community with acceptable operations and standards. The campus opened its doors in September 1961 with 139 students, three full-time faculty members, and a secretary. Mr. Chris Sharpe served as the first Director of the University of South
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    247
    University of Washington, Bothell

    University of Washington, Bothell

    • Libraries: UWB/CCC Campus Library
    The University of Washington Bothell (UW Bothell) is a four-year undergraduate and graduate campus in northeast King County, one of the three campuses of the public University of Washington (the flagship campus is in Seattle and the third campus is in Tacoma. The campus was established in 1990, the same year the University of Washington Tacoma opened). UW Bothell shares a campus with Cascadia Community College. UW Bothell is the largest branch campus in the state. UW Bothell is located just northwest of the junction of Interstate 405 and State Route 522. Classes are offered day and evening for full or part-time students. Programs are offered in business, education, nursing, computing, and interdisciplinary arts and sciences. UW Bothell currently offers 30 bachelor's and master's degrees in six programs: Business Administration, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Computing and Software Systems, Education, Nursing, and Science and Technology. Undergraduate Programs Post-Baccalaureate Graduate Business students and alumni participate in the Business Development Center and the Center for Student Entrepreneurship. UW Bothell is the largest branch campus in the state. Freshman
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    248
    University of Western Ontario

    University of Western Ontario

    • Libraries: Allyn and Betty Taylor Library
    The University of Western Ontario, commonly referred to among Canadian universities as Western, is a public research university located in London, Ontario, Canada. The university's main campus covers 455 hectares (1,120 acres) of land, with the Thames River running through the eastern portion. Western administers a wide variety of academic programs between 12 faculties, professional schools and three affiliated university colleges. The university was founded in 1878 as the Western University of London, Ontario, a denominational school of the Church of England, by Bishop Isaac Hellmuth and the Anglican Diocese of Huron. The university became secular in 1908 and was renamed to its present name in 1923. The school has over 23,000 undergraduate and 5,000 graduate students. More than 220,000 alumni and former students of Western can be found in over 100 countries around the world. The Western varsity athletic teams are known as the Western Mustangs, and are members of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport. The university was founded on 7 March 1878 by Bishop Isaac Hellmuth (1817–1901) of the Anglican Diocese of Huron as "The Western University of London Ontario." It incorporated Huron
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    249
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    • Libraries: Golda Meir Library
    The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (also known as UW–Milwaukee, UWM or Milwaukee) is a public urban research university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States. It is the largest university in the Milwaukee metropolitan area and a member of the University of Wisconsin System. It is also one of the two doctoral degree-granting public universities and the second largest university in Wisconsin. The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee has a total student enrollment of 30,502 and 1,623 faculty members. It is located in Milwaukee's upper East Side close to Lake Michigan, and is home to the only graduate school of freshwater science in the U.S., the largest School of Architecture, College of Nursing and College of Health Sciences in the State of Wisconsin. The University consists of 14 schools and colleges, and 70 academic centers, institutes and laboratory facilities. It offers a total of 181 degree programs, including 94 bachelor's, 53 master's and 33 doctorate degrees. The university is categorized as an RU/H Research University (high research activity) in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. In the year 2010, the university had a total
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    250
    Washington State University

    Washington State University

    • Libraries: Pullman Campus Libraries
    Washington State University is a public research university based in Pullman, Washington, in the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest. Founded in 1890, WSU (colloquially referred to as Wazzu) is the state's original and largest land-grant university. The university is well known for its programs in veterinary medicine, agriculture, animal science, food science, plant science, architecture, neuroscience, criminal justice, and communications. It is ranked in the top-ten universities in the US in terms of clean technology and it is one of 96 public and private universities in America with "very high research activity," as determined by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. WSU is ranked among the top half of national universities at 115th according to U.S. News and World Report. The university also operates campuses across Washington known as WSU Spokane, WSU Tri-Cities, and WSU Vancouver, all founded in 1989. In 2012, WSU launched an Internet-based Global Campus, which includes its online degree program, WSU Online. These campuses award primarily bachelor's and master's degrees. Freshmen and sophomores were first admitted to the Vancouver campus in 2006 and to
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