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  • Nov 27th 2012
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  • 621 votes
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Best Dish of All Time

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Best Dish of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Dish of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Dish of All Time has gotten 1.876 views and has gathered 621 votes from 621 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1
    Dahi puri

    Dahi puri

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Dahipuri, or Dahi puri (Marathi: दही पुरी), is an Indian snack which is especially popular in the state of Maharashtra. The dish is a form of chaat and originates from the city of Mumbai. It is served with mini-puri shells (golgappa), which are more popularly recognized from the dish pani puri. Dahi puri and pani puri chaats are often sold from the same vendor. The round, hard, puffy puri shell is first broken on top and partially filled with the main stuffing of mashed potatoes or chickpeas. A small amount of haldi powder or chilli powder, or both, may be added for taste, as well as a pinch of salt. Sweet tamarind chutney and spicy green chutney are then poured into the shell, on top of the stuffing. Finally, sweetened beaten yoghurt is generously poured over the shell, and the finished product is garnished with sprinklings of crushed sev, moong dal and finely chopped coriander leaves. Dahi puri typically comes as 5 or 6 dahi puris per plate. While pani puri is typically served one piece at a time, a plate of many dahi puri is often served together. Each dahi puri is intended to be eaten whole, like pani puri, so that the spectrum of flavors and textures within may all be tasted
    8.71
    7 votes
    2
    Beaten rice

    Beaten rice

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Flattened rice (also called beaten rice) is a dehusked rice which is flattened into flat light dry flakes. These flakes of rice swell when added to liquid, whether hot or cold, as they absorb water, milk or any other liquids. The thicknesses of these flakes vary between almost translucently thin (the more expensive varieties) to nearly four times thicker than a normal rice grain. This easily digestible form of raw rice is very popular across Nepal, India and Bangladesh, and is normally used to prepare snacks or light and easy fast food in a variety of Indian cuisine styles, some even for long-term consumption of a week or more. It is known by a variety of names: Atukulu in Telugu, Aval in Tamil and Malayalam, Chindé in Bengali and parts of Bihar and Jharkhand, Chira in Assamese, Chudaa in Oriya, Chiura (चिउरा) in Nepali, Bhojpuri and Chhattisgarhi, Poha or Pauwa in Hindi, Baji in Newari, Pohe in Marathi, Phovu in Konkani, Avalakki in Kannada, and Pauaa/Paunva (પૌંઆ) in Gujarati. Flattened rice can be eaten raw by immersing it in plain water or milk, with salt and sugar to taste, or lightly fried in oil with nuts, raisins, cardamoms, and other spices. The lightly fried variety is a
    7.43
    7 votes
    3
    Haw flakes

    Haw flakes

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Haw flakes are Chinese sweets made from the fruit of the Chinese hawthorn. The dark pink candy is usually formed into discs one millimeter thick. Some Chinese people take the flakes with bitter Chinese herbal medicine. Also known as "Saan Zaa Beng" (山楂片) in many Cantonese speaking areas around the world. Haw flakes are manufactured in China and are available in many parts of Asia. There has been very little change in the recipe or taste from the original version. Gourmet haw flakes are also available at specialty Chinese markets. Gourmet haw flakes tend to be larger than the Shandong haw flakes (gourmet haw flakes are about 35–40 mm in diameter whereas the Shandong haw flakes are about 25 mm in diameter.) Haw flakes have been seized on several occasions by the United States Food and Drug Administration for containing Ponceau 4R (E124, Acid Red 18), an unapproved artificial coloring.
    8.17
    6 votes
    4
    Swiss Wing

    Swiss Wing

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Swiss Wing is the name given to a kind of sweet soy sauce-flavored chicken wings served in some restaurants in Hong Kong. It is marinated in sauce made up of soy sauce, sugar, Chinese wine, and spices. Despite the name "Swiss," it is unrelated to Switzerland. Instead, it is believed to have originated in either Hong Kong or Guangzhou. There are no concrete answers as to the source of the name of the dish. One story goes that a Westerner came across the dish "sweetened soya sauce chicken wings" in a restaurant, and asked a Chinese waiter what that was. The waiter, who did not speak perfect English, introduced the dish as Sweet Wing. The customer misinterpreted sweet as Swiss, and the name was used ever since. However, this story may be a mere urban legend. Some claim that the dish was invented by a local restaurant, the Tai Ping Koon (太平館). It is a common practice in Hong Kong restaurants to name a new dish after a place, which may or may not have any connection with the dish itself at all. Swiss Wing is also features in the TVB cooking variety series So Good.
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    Bakkwa

    Bakkwa

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Bakkwa (Hokkien: 肉干; BP: bbāhgnuā), also known as rougan, is a Chinese salty-sweet dried meat product similar to jerky, made in the form of flat thin sheets. Bakkwa is made with a meat preservation and preparation technique from China. The general method for production have remained virtually unchanged throughout the centuries, but the techniques have been improved. It is often made with beef, pork, or mutton, which are prepared with spices, sugar, salt, and soy sauce, while dried on racks at around 50°C to 60°C. However, nowadays, products with a softer texture, lighter color, and less sugar are preferred. In Malaysia, Singapore, Riau Islands and the Philippines bakkwa or bagua is the most widely used name derived from the Hokkien Chinese dialect. Cantonese speakers use the term yuhk gōn', Anglicised version long yok, while in China and Taiwan the product is more commonly known as rougan. Commercially available versions are sometimes labeled as "barbecued pork," "dried pork," or "pork jerky." Bakkwa is particularly popular as a snack in East Asia and Southeast Asia. In Beidou, Taiwan, it is regarded as one of the three pork delicacies. In Malaysia and Singapore, bakkwa has become
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    Dolma

    Dolma

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Dolma is a family of stuffed vegetable dishes common in the Balkans and surrounding regions, Middle East, the Caucasus (most of these regions having a common Ottoman heritage), Russia, Central and South Asia. Common vegetables to stuff include tomato, pepper, onion, zucchini, and eggplant. Grape or cabbage leaves wrapped around a filling, which are strictly speaking called 'sarma', are also often called 'dolma' or 'yaprak dolma'. The stuffing may or may not include meat. Meat dolmas are generally served warm, often with egg-lemon or garlic yogurt sauce; meatless ones are generally served cold. Stuffed vegetables are also common in the Italian cuisine, where they are named ripieni ("stuffed"). Dolma is a verbal noun of the Turkish verb dolmak, 'to be stuffed', and means 'stuffed (thing)'. Dolma is a stuffed vegetable, that is, a vegetable that is hollowed out and filled with stuffing. This applies to courgette, tomato, pepper, eggplant, and the like; stuffed mackerel, squid, and mussel are also called dolma. Dishes involving wrapping leaves such as vine leaves or cabbage leaves around a filling are called sarma, though in many languages the distinction is usually not made. Sarma is
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Waffle

    Waffle

    • Typical ingredients: Flour
    • Type of dish: Breakfast
    A waffle is a batter-based or dough-based cake cooked in a waffle iron patterned to give a characteristic size, shape and surface impression. There are many variations based on the type of iron and recipe used, with over a dozen regional varieties in Belgium alone. Waffles are eaten throughout the world, particularly in Belgium, France, Netherlands, and the United States. The word “waffle” first appears in the English language in 1725: "Waffles. Take flower, cream..." It is directly derived from the Dutch ‘’wafel’’, which itself derives from the Middle Dutch ‘’wafele’’. While the Middle Dutch ‘’wafele’’ is first attested to at the end of the 13th century, it is preceded by the French ‘’walfre’’ in 1185; both are considered to share the same Frankish etymological root ‘’wafla’’. Depending on the context of the use of ‘’wafla’’, it either means honeycomb or cake. Alternate spellings throughout contemporary and medieval Europe include wafre, wafer, wâfel, waufre, gaufre, goffre, gauffre, wafe, waffel, wåfe, wāfel, wafe, vaffel, and våffla. Waffles are preceded, in the early Middle Ages, around the period of the 9th-10th centuries, with the simultaneous emergence of fer à hosties /
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Minestrone

    Minestrone

    • Cuisine: Italian
    • Typical ingredients: Bean
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Minestrone (literally big soup) is a thick soup of Italian origin made with vegetables, often with the addition of pasta or rice. Common ingredients include beans, onions, celery, carrots, stock, and tomatoes. There is no set recipe for minestrone, since it is usually made out of whatever vegetables are in season. It can be vegetarian, contain meat, or contain a meat-based broth (such as chicken stock). Angelo Pellegrini, however, argued that the base of minestrone is bean broth, and that Roman beans (also called Borlotti beans) "are the beans to use for genuine minestrone". Minestrone is one of the cornerstones of Italian cuisine, and is almost as common as pasta on Italian tables. Some of the earliest origins of minestrone soup pre-date the expansion of the Latin tribes of Rome into what became the Roman Republic and later Roman Empire, when the local diet was "vegetarian by necessity" and consisted mostly of vegetables, such as onions, lentils, cabbage, garlic, fava beans, mushrooms, carrots, asparagus, and turnips. During this time, the main dish of a meal would have been "pulte" or puls in English, a simple but filling porridge of spelt flour cooked in salt water, to which
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    Sinseollo

    Sinseollo

    Sinseollo or yeolguja tang is an elaborate dish consisting of meatballs, small and round jeonyueo (전유어), mushrooms, and vegetables cooked in a rich broth in Korean royal court cuisine. The dish is a form of jeongol (elaborate chowder-like stew). It is served in a large bundt pan shaped vessel with a hole in the center, in which hot embers are placed to keep the dish hot throughout the meal. Sinseollo is the proper name for the cooking vessel in which this dish is served, which has become to mean the actual dish as well. Sinseollo is a composite word of sinseon (hangul:신선, hanja:神仙), "Taoist immortal spirit" and ro (hangul:로, hanja:爐), brazier. Jeong Hee-Ryang (정희량), a scholar in the court of Joseon Dynasty's King Yeonsan, turned to a hermit-like life in the mountains after being exiled and disillusioned from politics. He made a small brazier to cook his meals, a portable cooking vessel that would cook various vegetables in a single pot. He disappeared in the mountains and legend says he became a sinseon, so the cooking vessel was named "brazier for a sinseon". Sinseollo is also called yeolguja tang, which literally means "a tang (soup) that makes a mouth happy". Although the origin
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Rhubarb pie

    Rhubarb pie

    • Typical ingredients: Sugar
    • Type of dish: Pie
    Rhubarb pie is a pie which is particularly popular in those areas where the rhubarb plant is commonly cultivated, including Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ireland and the New England and Upper Midwestern regions of the United States. Besides diced rhubarb, it almost always contains a large amount of sugar to balance the intense tartness of the plant. Rhubarb pie is often eaten together with ice cream. In Canada and the United States, strawberry rhubarb pie is a popular late-spring pie, generally combining the first strawberries of the season with the last of the rhubarb.
    7.80
    5 votes
    11
    Torta

    Torta

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    Torta (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtorta]) is a Spanish (but also an Italian and Portuguese) word with a huge array of culinary meanings. It originated in different regional variants of flatbread, of which the torta de gazpacho and torta cenceña are still surviving in certain areas of central Spain. Tortas are also mentioned in Leviticus 24:5-9, in the Spanish translation of the Bible. Presently, however, the word "torta" is also applied to different kinds of bread and pastry products according to the region. Historically the difference between torta and bread was its round and flat shape, as well as the absence of yeast in its preparation. The well-known word tortilla, used mainly in Mexico (not in Spain, though), means a 'small torta', while tortada means 'big torta'. In most regions a torta was traditionally considered an inferior form of bread, as the well known Spanish aphorism expresses: In various countries of South America, and in some countries of Europe as well, the word 'torta' means different things. Nowadays the most common usage, however, is for cakes (from the German torte or French tarte) and less for bread products. In many South American countries, as well as in
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Pita

    Pita

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    • Type of dish: Bread
    Pita or pitta ( /ˈpɪtə/ PI-tə) is a round pocket bread widely consumed in many Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, and Balkan cuisines. It is prevalent in Cyprus, Greece, the Balkans, the Levant, Armenia, Turkey, and parts of the Indian Subcontinent. The "pocket" in pita bread is created by steam, which puffs up the dough. As the bread cools and flattens, a pocket is left in the middle. Pita is a slightly leavened wheat bread, flat, either round or oval, and variable in size. Its history extends far into antiquity, since flatbreads in general, whether leavened or not, are among the most ancient breads, requiring no oven or utensils to make. The first evidence of flat breads occurs in and around Amorite Damascus. The term used for the bread in English is a loanword from Greek, pita (πίτα), probably derived from the Ancient Greek pēktos (πηκτός), meaning "solid" or "clotted". In the Arabic world, pita is a foreign word, all breads are called khubz (ordinary bread), and specifically this bread is known as khubz arabi (Arabic bread). The tenth-century Arab cookery book, Kitab al-Tabikh by ibn Sayyar al-Warraq, includes six recipes for khubz, all baked in a tannur oven. Pita is used to scoop
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Stinky tofu

    Stinky tofu

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Stinky tofu or chòu dòufu is a form of fermented tofu that has a strong odor. It is a snack that is usually sold at night markets or roadside stands or as a side dish in lunch bars rather than in restaurants. Unlike cheese, stinky tofu fermentation does not have fixed formula for starter bacteria; wide regional and individual variations exist in manufacture and preparation. The traditional method for producing stinky tofu is to prepare a brine made from fermented milk, vegetables, and meat; the brine can also include dried shrimp, amaranth greens, mustard greens, bamboo shoots, and Chinese herbs. The brine fermentation can take as long as several months. Modern factories often use quicker methods to mass produce stinky tofu. Fresh tofu is marinated in prepared brine for only a day or two, especially for fried or boiled cooking purpose. The process only adds odor to the marinated tofu instead of letting it ferment completely. In Asia, no stinky tofu factories were ever officially licensed or constantly monitored; in most cases, government inspection can only focus on the cooking procedure and ventilation. Since the production methods for stinky tofu are unregulated and typically use
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Nuomizi

    Nuomizi

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Nuomici is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. It is also referred to as glutinous rice dumpling. The glutinous rice ball can be dusted with dried coconut on the outside. The outer layer is made of a rice flour dough and the inside is typically filled with a sweet filling. The most common fillings are sugar with coconut and crumbled peanuts, red bean paste, and black sesame seed paste.
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Red bean ice

    Red bean ice

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Red bean ice is a drink commonly found in Hong Kong. It is usually served in restaurants like cha chaan teng (simplified Chinese: 茶餐厅; traditional Chinese: 茶餐廳; pinyin: chácāntīng). The standard ingredients include azuki beans, light rock sugar syrup, and evaporated milk. It is often topped with ice cream to become a dessert. Red bean ice tea has been around since the 1970s. Some places which serve the drink add in chewy flavoured jelly.
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Seafood birdsnest

    Seafood birdsnest

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Seafood birdsnest is a common Chinese cuisine dish found in Hong Kong, China and most overseas Chinatown restaurants. It is also found within Cantonese cuisine. It is usually classified as a mid to high-end dish depending on the seafood offered. The edible nest holding the seafood is made entirely out of fried taro or noodles. There are different intricate netting used in the nest making. In all cases, the basket is tough and crunchy. Despite the name there is nothing bird-related in this dish, nor are there any dried ingredients. The most common ingredients are scallops, peapods, boneless fish fillet, celery sticks, straw mushrooms, calamari, shrimp.
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Taro cake

    Taro cake

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Taro cake is a Chinese dish made from the vegetable taro. While it is denser in texture than radish cakes, both these savory cakes made in a similar ways, with rice flour as the main ingredient. When served in dim sum cuisine, it is cut into square-shaped slices and pan-fried before serving. It is found in Hong Kong, China, and overseas Chinatowns restaurants. Other ingredients often include pork and Chinese black mushroom, or even Chinese sausages. It is usually topped with chopped scallions. The pan fried square taro cake is semi-crunchy on the outside and medium-soft on the inside. It is also the most consistent version with more or less the same formula in East and Southeast Asia, or among overseas Chinese communities. The other version is the more home-style baked version. Usually it uses the same ingredients and steamed for long periods of time in a deep pan until it is ultra soft and pasty. The formula varies greatly depending on the family recipe or regional tastes. Some restaurants offer taro cakes cut into small cubes as part of a main course appetizer to a major Chinese cuisine. These are sometimes frozen to a more solid state, though it is not nearly as common as the
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Boliche

    Boliche

    • Cuisine: Cuban
    • Typical ingredients: Chorizo
    Boliche (pronounced [bo'litʃe]) is a popular Cuban dish consisting of eye round roast stuffed with chorizo sausages simmered in a tomato sauce base.It is usually served with white rice. The term boliche in Argentina and Uruguay also refers to a disco, club or bar.
    6.33
    6 votes
    19
    Chicken Tikka Masala

    Chicken Tikka Masala

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Chicken meat
    Chicken ṭikka masālā (Hindi: चिकन टिक्का मसाला;Bengali: চিচ্কেন টিক্কা মসলা) is a dish of roasted chicken chunks (tikka) in a spicy (masala) sauce. The sauce is usually creamy, spiced and orange-coloured. Chicken tikka masala has been said to be the most popular dish in British restaurants and it has been called "a true British national dish." Chicken tikka masala is chicken tikka, chunks of chicken marinated in spices and yogurt, that is then baked in a tandoor oven, served in a masala ("mixture of spices") sauce. A tomato and coriander sauce is common, but there is no standard recipe for chicken tikka masala; a survey found that of 48 different recipes, the only common ingredient was chicken. The sauce usually includes tomatoes, frequently as puree; cream and/or coconut cream; and various spices. The sauce or chicken pieces (or both) are coloured orange with food dyes or with orange foodstuffs such as turmeric powder, paprika powder or tomato puree. Other tikka masala dishes replace chicken with lamb, fish or paneer. One explanation of the origins of the dish is that it was conceived in an Indian restaurant. Rahul Verma, an Indian expert on street food from Delhi, has stated that
    9.67
    3 votes
    20
    Peanut butter bun

    Peanut butter bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A peanut butter bun is a Chinese pastry found in Hong Kong as well as overseas Chinatown bakery shops. The bun has layers of peanut butter fillings, sometimes with light sprinkles of sugar mixed with the peanut butter for extra flavor. Unlike other, similar buns, the shape varies, depending on the bakery.
    9.67
    3 votes
    21
    Sweet potato pie

    Sweet potato pie

    • Typical ingredients: Sweet potato
    Sweet potato pie is a traditional side dish in the Southern United States. It is often served during the American holiday season, especially at Thanksgiving, and is similar in many ways to pumpkin pie. Marshmallows are sometimes added as a topping, but this was adapted more in the Northern United States than in the South. It is usually made as a large tart in an open pie shell without a top crust. The filling consists of mashed sweet potatoes, milk, sugar and eggs, flavored with spices such as nutmeg. Other possible ingredients include vanilla or banana extracts. The baked custard filling may vary from a light and silky to dense, depending on the recipe's ratio of mashed potato, milk and eggs.
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    Tabouli

    Tabouli

    • Cuisine: Jewish cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Parsley
    Tabbouleh (Arabic: تبولة‎ tabūlah; also tabouleh or tab(b)ouli) is a Levantine Arab salad traditionally made of bulgur, tomatoes, finely chopped parsley, mint, onion and garlic, and seasoned with olive oil, lemon juice and salt, although there are various other variations such as using couscous instead of bulgur. Traditionally served as part of a mezze in the Arab world, it was adopted by Cypriots, variations of it are made by Turks and Armenians, and it has become a popular ethnic food in Western cultures. The Levantine Arabic tabbūle is derived from the Arabic word taabil, meaning seasoning. The emphatic diminutive structure faʕʕūl is related to the formal Arabic emphatic structure fuʕʕūlun (as in quddūsun "much sacred"). Use of the word in English first appeared in the 1950s. To the Arabs, edible herbs known as qaḍb, formed an essential part of their diet in the Middle Ages, and dishes like tabbouleh attest to their continued popularity in Middle Eastern cuisine today. Originally from the mountains of Syria and Lebanon, tabbouleh has become one of the most popular salads in the Middle East. In Greater Syria, including Lebanon, the wheat variety salamouni cultivated in the region
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Boston cream pie

    Boston cream pie

    A Boston cream pie is a round cake that is split and filled with a custard or cream filling and frosted with chocolate. Although it is called a Boston cream pie, it is in fact a cake, and not a pie. Created by Armenian-French chef M. Sanzian at Boston's Parker House Hotel in 1856, this pudding and cake combination comprises two layers of sponge cake filled with vanilla flavored custard or crème pâtissière. The cake is topped with a chocolate glaze (such as ganache) and sometimes powdered sugar or a cherry. The Boston cream pie is the official dessert of Massachusetts, declared as such in 1996. However, it is not mass produced in Boston. A Boston cream doughnut is a name for a Berliner filled with vanilla custard or crème pâtissière and topped with icing made from chocolate. Honey Dew Donuts in New England, Dunkin' Donuts, and Tim Horton's in Canada, are chains that sell "Boston cream" doughnuts.
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Cart noodle

    Cart noodle

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Cart noodle is a kind of à la carte noodle which became popular in Hong Kong in the 1950s through independent street vendors operating on roadsides and in public housing estates in low-income districts, using carts. Many street vendors have vanished but the name and style of noodle endures as a cultural icon. With many immigrants arriving from mainland China during the 1950s, hawkers would sell food out of a cart roaming the streets. Some vendors specialising in cooked noodles would sell them with an assortment of toppings and styles. Historically, the cart frames were assembled out of wood with metallic basins. It allowed the heat inside to cook the ingredients. In the old days, it was possible to receive large quantities for a cheap price. The noodles were considered "cheap and nasty". Cost was generally low to appeal to the average citizens. It was known for its poor hygiene. As such, they were also commonly referred to as "filthy noodle" (嗱喳麵). Since hygiene standards rose, many street vendors (licensed or otherwise) have vanished. The name and style of the noodle endures, and remain widely available in low- to mid-end eateries. The price may vary depending on the combination
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Quesadilla

    Quesadilla

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Tortilla
    A quesadilla ( /keɪsəˈdiːə/, Spanish: [kesaˈðiʝa]) is a flour tortilla or a corn tortilla filled with a savoury mixture containing cheese and other ingredients, (often) then folded in half to form a half-moon shape. This dish originated in Mexico, and the name is derived from the Spanish word for cheese queso. The specific origin for the quesadilla was in colonial Mexico. The quesadilla as a food changed and evolved over many years as people experimented with different variations of it. A quesadilla is made with a tortilla and is filled primarily with cheese; other ingredients, such as pork, ham, avocado, or other vegetables may be added. The filled tortilla is then warmed until the cheese is melted. Some variations toast or even fry the quesadilla. Once the quesadilla is cooked is ready to eat. Sometimes salsa is added. In the USA the term quesadilla usually refers to what in Mexico is called sincronizada de queso and it is usually cut into slices or wedges. In Mexico the sincronizada is usually translated in menus as quesadilla so tourists would know what it is. Most quesadillas are prepared by just folding and filling a tortilla, but other variations have tortillas specially
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Tom yum

    Tom yum

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Tom yum or tom yam (Lao: ຕົ້ມຍຳ [tôm ɲam]; Thai: ต้มยำ, [tôm jam]) is a spicy clear soup typical in Laos and Thailand. Tom yum is widely served in neighbouring countries such as Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia, and has been popularised around the world. Literally, the words "tom yum" are derived from two Tai words: "tom" and "yam". "Tom" refers to boiling process (soup, in this case). "Yam" refers to a kind of Lao and Thai spicy and sour salad. Thus, "tom yum" is a Lao and Thai hot and sour soup. Indeed, tom yum is characterised by its distinct hot and sour flavours, with fragrant herbs generously used in the broth. The basic broth is made of stock and fresh ingredients such as lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, galangal, lime juice, fish sauce and crushed chili peppers. In neighbouring countries like Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, the name tom yum is used widely for various spicy soups which can differ greatly from true Lao and Thai tom yum soup. As a result, people are often confused by the disparities. Commercial tom yum paste is made by crushing all the herb ingredients and stir frying in oil. Seasoning and other preservative ingredients are then added. The paste is bottled
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Greek salad

    Greek salad

    • Cuisine: Greek
    • Typical ingredients: Olive oil
    • Type of dish: Salad
    Greek salad (Greek χωριάτικη σαλάτα [xorˈjatiki saˈlata] "rustic salad" or θερινή σαλάτα [θeriˈni saˈlata] "summer salad") is a summer salad in Greek cuisine. Greek salad is a summer salad dish made with pieces of tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, green bell peppers, onion, sliced or cubed feta cheese, and olives (usually Kalamata olives, other types of olives may be used as well), typically seasoned with salt and dried oregano, and dressed with olive oil. Common additions include the pickled leaves, buds or berries of capers (especially in the Dodecanese islands), rocket (arugula) leaves, vinegar, lemon juice, and chopped parsley. The term "Greek salad" is also used in North America, Australia, South Africa, and the United Kingdom to refer to a lettuce salad with Greek-inspired ingredients, dressed with oil and vinegar. Lettuce, tomatoes, feta, and olives are the most standard elements in an American-style "Greek salad", but cucumbers, peperoncini, bell peppers, onions, radishes, dolmades, anchovies/sardines and pickled hot peppers are common. In Detroit for example, a "Greek salad" also includes beets; and in Tampa Bay it often includes potato salad. Rather than simple olive oil and
    6.00
    6 votes
    28
    Custard pie

    Custard pie

    A custard pie is any type of uncooked custard mixture added to an uncooked or partially cooked crust and baked together. In North America, custard pie commonly refers to a plain mixture of milk, eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla extract and sometimes nutmeg combined with a pie crust. It is distinctly different from a cream pie, which contains cooked custard poured into a cooled, precooked crust. Some common custard pies include pumpkin pie, lemon and buttermilk chess pie, and coconut custard. True custard is defined as a liquid thickened with eggs. Due to the often large number of whole eggs in custard pie it is a very rich pie. The Ancient Romans were the first to understand the binding properties of eggs. During the Middle Ages, the first custard pies, as we know them, began to appear. Initially, custards were used only as fillings for pies, pastries and tarts. Both Europe and Asia had recipes that contained custards. The word custard is derived from ‘crustade’ which is a tart with a crust. After the 16th century, custards began to be used in individual dishes rather than as a filling in crusts. In 1837, an English chemist named Alfred Bird introduced a form of custard thickened with
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Niçoise salad

    Niçoise salad

    • Cuisine: French
    • Typical ingredients: Tuna
    • Type of dish: Salad
    Salad Niçoise (French pronunciation: [niˈswaz]), is a mixed salad of tomatos and green beans topped with tuna and anchovies and dressed with a vinaigrette. It is served variously on a plate, platter, or in a bowl, with or without a bed of lettuce. The tuna may be cooked or canned. Hard-boiled eggs and Niçoise olives are common accompaniments. Americans are familiar with a version popularized by "the French Chef", Julia Child. Traditionally the salad included raw red peppers, shallots, and artichoke hearts, never potatoes or other cooked vegetables.
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Waldorf salad

    Waldorf salad

    • Cuisine: American
    • Typical ingredients: Celery
    • Type of dish: Salad
    A Waldorf salad is a salad traditionally made of fresh apples, celery and walnuts, dressed in mayonnaise, and usually served on a bed of lettuce as an appetizer or a light meal. The salad was first created between 1893 and 1896 at the Waldorf Hotel in New York City (the precursor of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, which came into being with the merger of the Waldorf with the adjacent Astoria Hotel, opened in 1897). Oscar Tschirky, who was the Waldorf's maître d'hôtel and developed or inspired many of its signature dishes, is widely credited with creating the recipe. In 1896, Waldorf Salad appeared in The Cook Book by 'Oscar of the Waldorf'; the original recipe did not contain nuts, but they had been added by the time the recipe appeared in the Rector Cook Book in 1928. The salad became popular enough that Cole Porter featured it in his 1934 song "You're the Top". Other ingredients, such as chicken, turkey, grapes, and dried fruit (e.g. dates or raisins) are sometimes added. Updated versions of the salad sometimes change the dressing to a seasoned mayonnaise or a yogurt dressing. A variation known as an Emerald Salad replaces celery with cauliflower. The salad also may include zest of
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    White sugar sponge cake

    White sugar sponge cake

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    White sugar sponge cake (also called white sugar cake and white sugar pastry) is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most common pastries in Hong Kong. Overseas, however, it is much more rare in Chinatown bakery shops. It is made from rice flour, white sugar, water, and a leavening agent. While it is called a "cake", it is never served as a circular round cake. It is usually purchased as an individual triangular piece or a mini square. The cake is bright white in color. The consistency is spongy and soft. The taste is sweet, and sometimes has a slightly sour due to fermentation of the batter prior to cooking. Like most Chinese cakes, it is steamed, giving it a moist, soft, and fluffy texture, as opposed to a dry and firm one. If left exposed to the air, it hardens quickly. It is usually kept under some cover to preserve moistness. It is typically served hot, because when it is cold it is not as soft and moist. The batter is either poured over a bowl in a steamer, a Chinese steamer cloth or aluminum foil. If made from brown rice flour and brown sugar it is called a brown sugar sponge cake. A Vietnamese version of the cake, called bánh bò, differs from the Chinese version in
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Dahi vada

    Dahi vada

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Dahi vada (also known as Dahi Bhalla or دہی بھلا in Punjabi and Urdu, thayir vadai in Tamil and Malayalam,perugu vada in Telugu, mosaru vade in Kannada, ଦହି ବରା Dahi Bara in Oriya and Doi Bora in Bengali) is an Indian chaat, prepared by soaking vadas in thick dahi (yogurt). The hot deep fried vadas are first put in water and then transferred to thick beaten yogurt. For best results, the vadas have to soak for at least a couple of hours before serving. To add more flavor, it can be topped with coriander or mint leaves, chili powder, crushed black pepper, chaat masala, cumin, shredded coconut, green chilis or boondi. A sweeter dahi is preferred in some places in India, especially in Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same.A combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as garnishments in addition to those mentioned above. They are mainly popular in south of India e.g. Tamil Nadu and Chennai. Sambhar vadas and Rasam vadas are also popular snacks in southern India.
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Gumbo

    Gumbo

    • Cuisine: Cajun
    • Typical ingredients: Bell pepper
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Gumbo is a stew or soup that probably originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It typically consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and seasoning vegetables, which can include celery, bell peppers, and onions (a trio known in Cajun cuisine as the "holy trinity"). Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used: the African vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either the Bantu word for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo). Several different varieties exist. In New Orleans, what is known as Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a thickener. Cajun gumbo varies greatly, but often has a dark roux with either shellfish or fowl. The Creoles of Cane River make a gumbo focused much more on filé. Sausage or ham are often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Pad see ew

    Pad see ew

    • Cuisine: Thai
    Phat Si Io (often referred to as Pad See Ew or Pad Si Ew) (Thai: ผัดซีอิ๊ว, RTGS: phat si-io, IPA: [pʰàt sīːʔíw] or [pʰàt siʔíw]; Lao ຜັດສີອິ໊ວ) is a Chinese-influenced stir fried noodle dish that is commonly eaten in Laos and Thailand. It is also quite popular in Lao and Thai restaurants around the world. The literal meaning is "fried (with) soy sauce" and it is very similar to the char kway teow of Singapore and Malaysia. Phat Si Io is normally dry stir fry while the other similar dish, Lard Na (in Laos) or Rad Na (in Thai), is topped with a sauce and generally has a lighter taste. It is made with dark soy sauce ("si-io dam"), light soy sauce ("si-io khao"), garlic, broad rice noodles, called "kuai-tiao sen yai" in Thai (commonly abbreviated to just "sen yai" meaning "big strip"), Chinese broccoli, egg, and some form of thinly sliced meat — commonly pork, chicken or beef — or shrimp or mixed seafood. The name comes from the soy sauce used in the dish, which is called "si-io", or "si-io" sauce, a loanword from Teochew. Phat Si Io is sometimes called "kuai tiao pad si ew" which reflects the general practice of using flat rice noodle as the main ingredient. However, other types of
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Pancit

    Pancit

    • Cuisine: Filipino
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 扁食; pinyin: biǎn shí) which means "something conveniently cooked fast." Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias. Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one's birthday. They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have "birthday noodles" listed on their menus. However, she warns that since "noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism." Pancit bihon (aka bijon) is the type usually associated with the word "pancit", very thin rice noodles fried with soy sauce some citrus,
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Saang mein

    Saang mein

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Saang mein is a type of Chinese noodle found in Hong Kong. It is often available among overseas Chinatowns. It is made of wheat flour, tapioca flour, salt, potassium carbonate, and water. Saang mein can be cooked quickly similarly to ramen noodles. It is known for a more smooth and soapy texture. It can be eaten plain or with additional sesame oil. Vegetables like kai-lan can be added. The noodle does have a wheat taste. It is served hot.
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Blueberry pie

    Blueberry pie

    • Typical ingredients: Sugar
    Blueberry pie is a sweet pie filled with blueberries. Blueberry pie was first eaten by early American settlers and remains a popular dessert in the United States and around the world. Blueberry pie made with wild Maine blueberries is the official state dessert of the U.S. state of Maine.
    5.83
    6 votes
    38
    Bacon and egg pie

    Bacon and egg pie

    • Typical ingredients: Egg
    • Type of dish: Pie
    The bacon and egg pie contains bacon, egg and seldom onion. Often has peas for colour and very occasionally a very small amount of tomato. Cheese, especially mozzarella, is a useful addition. It can be eaten hot or cold. Bacon and egg pie may be served with ketchup. Some versions have a raising agent such as baking powder mixed into the egg to make a fluffier filling. The pie is often constructed with a shortcrust or other mechanically stable base crust. This may be open or, more usually, topped with a pastry lid. A bacon and egg pie differs from a quiche most notably the absence of cheese and milk and the presence of an upper crust. The pie also tends to have a heavier texture and feel, and is generally high in calories. Although the bacon and egg combination is not unique to any country, its use in modern cooking is made famous by various New Zealand based home recipes
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    Dilli Haat

    Dilli Haat

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Dilli Haat is an open-air food plaza and craft bazaar located in Delhi, run by Delhi Tourism and Transportation Development Corporation (DTTDC). At present Delhi has two such bazaars, one near the All India Institute of Medical Sciences on Sri Aurobindo Marg, opposite INA Market on Sri Aurobindo Marg established in 1994. The second, Dilli Haat is situated in Pitampura, in North Delhi, at Netaji Subash Place was established in April 2008. Dilli Haat has permanent food stalls representing each state of India, giving a complete variety of tastes available all over India, while the crafts stall change every 15 days. Dilli Haat was established jointly by Delhi Tourism (DTDC), Govt. of Delhi and NDMC, D.C. (Handicrafts) & D.C. (handlooms), Ministry of Textiles & Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India and opened in March 1994. Around 2003, this market became fully wheelchair-accessible, including an accessible bathroom. Delhi's second Dilli Haat, the Dilli Haat, Pitampura, also was developed by DTTDC in Pitampura, close to Pitampura TV Tower and spread over 7.2 hectares, was opened in April 2008. More Dilli Haats are set to be created in other parts of Delhi with the third expected to open
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    Egg bhurji

    Egg bhurji

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Egg bhurji or Egg khagina (as it is known in Pakistan), is a dish popular in north and western India and Pakistan. Its preparation and appearance are similar to scrambled eggs and the Parsi dish akuri. The difference lies in the addition of sautéed chopped onions, chilies, and optional spices. It is usually served with rotis or bread.
    6.60
    5 votes
    41
    Pancake

    Pancake

    • Cuisine: Chinese
    • Typical ingredients: Whole wheat flour
    • Type of dish: Breakfast
    A pancake is a thin, flat, round cake prepared from a batter, and cooked on a hot griddle or frying pan. Most pancakes are quick breads, which use a quick leavening agent such as baking powder, while some use a yeast-raised or fermented batter. Typically, pancakes are cooked one side on a griddle and flipped partway through to cook the other side. Depending on the region, pancakes may be served at any time of day, with a variety of toppings or fillings including jam, chocolate chips, fruit, syrup or meat. Archaeological evidence suggests that varieties of pancakes are probably the earliest and most widespread types of cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies whereby dry carbohydrate-rich seed flours mixed with the available protein-rich liquids, usually milk and eggs, were baked on hot stones or in shallow earthenware pots over an open fire to form a nutritious and highly palatable foodstuff. In the medieval and modern Christian period, especially in Britain, pancakes were made to use up stored items prior to the period of Lent fasting beginning on Shrovetide. Since eggs were forbidden foods during Lent, making pancakes on Shrove Tuesday was a good way to use up eggs before
    6.60
    5 votes
    42
    Chicken 65

    Chicken 65

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chicken 65 is a spicy, deep-fried chicken dish originating from Hyderabad, as a bar snack, entree, or quick snack. The flavour of the dish comes from ginger, cayenne pepper, mustard powder and vinegar although the exact recipe can vary. It can be prepared using chicken on or off the bone. While the name "Chicken 65" is universally used to refer to the dish, there are many different stories for how the name came about. It is generally acknowledged that no one knows which (if any) of these anecdotal theories are correct
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Hoi sam

    Hoi sam

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Sea cucumbers are marine animals of the class Holothuroidea used in fresh or dried form in various cuisines. The creature and the food product are commonly known as bêche-de-mer (lit. "sea-spade") in French, trepang (or trīpang) in Indonesian, namako in Japanese and in Tagalog it is called balatan. In Malaysian it is known as the gamat. Most cultures in East and Southeast Asia regard sea cucumbers as a delicacy. There are a number of dishes made with sea cucumber as this ingredient is expected to have a strong cultural emphasis on health. In most dishes, the sea cucumber has a slippery texture. Common ingredients that go with sea cucumber dishes include winter melon, dried scallop, kai-lan, Shiitake mushroom, and Chinese cabbage. Sea cucumbers destined for food are traditionally harvested by hand from small watercraft; a process anglicised into "trepanging" (after the Indonesian noun trepang). They are dried for preservation purposes and have to be rehydrated by boiling and soaking in water for several days. They are mainly used as an ingredient in Chinese cuisine soups or stews. There are many commercially important species of sea cucumber that are harvested and dried for export
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    Jokbal

    Jokbal

    Jokbal is a Korean dish consisting of pigs' feet cooked with soy sauce and spices. It is usually served in dark braising liquid, made from soy, ginger, garlic, rice wine. The hair is removed from pigs' feet and they are thoroughly washed. Leeks, garlic, ginger, cheongju (rice wine) and water are brought to a boil of. The pigs' feet are added, brought back to a boil and then simmered until tender. Then additional water, sugar and soy sauce are poured into the pot and the contents are slowly stirred. Once the jokbal is fully cooked, bones are removed, and the meat is cut into thick slices. It is then served with fermented shrimp sauce called saeujeot. As jokbal is usually shared with several other diners, it is usually served in large portions on a platter. Due to its unique greasiness and strong flavor, jokbal is eaten like other Korean grilled meats - wrapped in lettuce with other vegetables by hand before it is eaten. As jokbal is considered an anju, it is often eaten with soju as well as other anjus such as bindaetteok. Full with gelatins, jokbal is said to be good for skin and preventing wrinkles. The amino acid of methionine in pork is known to detoxicate alcohol, and prevents
    7.50
    4 votes
    45
    Matnakash

    Matnakash

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Matnakash (Armenian: մատնաքաշ matnakʿaš) is a traditional soft Armenian bread. The word matnakash literally means finger draw or finger pull, referring to the way the bread is prepared. Matnakash is made of wheat flour with yeast or sourdough starter. It is shaped into oval or round loafs with longitudinal or criss-crossed scoring. The characteristic golden or golden-brown color of its crust is achieved by coating the surface of the loaves with sweetened tea essence before baking. Matnakash, along with lavash, a thinner Armenian bread, can be purchased from numerous bakeries in Armenia as well as places with large Armenian populations as a result of the Armenian diaspora. Matnakash was honored in Soviet times. In the 1930s, food specialists in Soviet Armenia wanted to mark the new communist country with a more modern looking bread. The matnakash became a mass-produced urban bread. Even the bakers' patterns on the bread was re-interpreted to fit the soviet agenda. It resembled a plowed field with rows and furrows. The bread's rim was interpreted as an agricultural field and its imprinted lines as tilted rows.
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Pilaf

    Pilaf

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Pilaf (also known as pilau and plov), is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth. In some cases, the rice may also attain its brown color by being stirred with bits of cooked onion, as well as a large mix of spices. Depending on the local cuisine, it may also contain meat and vegetables. Pilaf and similar dishes are common to Balkan, Middle Eastern, Central and South Asian, East African, Latin American, and Caribbean cuisines. The English term pilaf is borrowed directly from Turkish, pilav and/or Uzbek, pilav, which in turn comes from (Classical) Persian polow (پلو), and ultimately derives from Sanskrit pulāka- (पुलाक), "shrivelled or bad grain". The English term is further influenced by Modern Greek pilafi. Due to the vast spread of the dish, there exist variations of the name in many languages, including plov, polou, palov, pilau etc. Persian culinary terms referring to rice preparation are numerous and have found their way into the neighbouring languages: polow (rice cooked in broth while the grains remain separate, straining the half cooked rice before adding the broth and then "brewing"), chelow (white rice with separate grains), kateh (sticky rice), biryani, and
    10.00
    2 votes
    47
    Rice congee

    Rice congee

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Typical ingredients: Rice
    Congee or conjee is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. The word ""congee"" or ""conjee"" comes from Tamil கஞ்சி (kanji); a prominent food of ancient Tamil people, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the original word is from the Sanskrit root kaañjika (काञ्जिक) (meaning the same, but component roots together meaning 'formed in water'). In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇhji /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya), ganji (Kannada/Telugu), juk (Cantonese, Korean), moe (Hokkien and Teochew), zhou (Mandarin), cháo (Vietnamese), deythuk (Tibetan), chok (Thai), kayu (Japanese), lúgaw (Tagalog), Bubur or kanji (Indonesian and Malay) or jaou (Bengali) which
    6.40
    5 votes
    48
    Sausage bun

    Sausage bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A sausage bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is essentially the equivalent of the American hot dog. It is found in Hong Kong as well as many Chinese bakeries overseas. It uses westernized sausages instead of Chinese sausages, which are usually used as a cooking ingredient.
    6.40
    5 votes
    49
    Curry chicken

    Curry chicken

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Chicken meat
    Chicken curry is a common delicacy in South Asia, East Asia, as well as in the Caribbean. The main ingredients in this dish are chicken and curry. The curry powder along with an array of other spices including masala powder, saffron, ginger and so on (depending on cookery style), are mixed to form a sauce to blend in with the chicken. In most places the terms "chicken curry" and "curry chicken" are interchangeable. However, in some regions there is a considered difference between the two terms, even though both dishes include curry and chicken. One such distinction is concerned with the order of preparation: In adding a curry mixture to chicken meat, the act of "currying the chicken", the name generally is derived from the action. Thus "curried chicken" or the derivative term "curry chicken". If however a curry flavoured sauce is prepared and then chicken pieces are added to form a kind of stew, the term "chicken curry" is often used to describe this. When all is said, depending on the regional difference many cultures call any dish consisting primarily of chicken and curry either, curry chicken or chicken curry. This difference of naming is purely what has developed
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Hot and sour soup

    Hot and sour soup

    • Cuisine: Filipino
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Hot and sour soup can refer to soups from several Asian culinary traditions. In all cases, the soup contains ingredients to make it both spicy and sour. Soup preparation may use chicken or pork broth, or may be meat-free. Common key ingredients in the American Chinese version include bamboo shoots, toasted sesame oil, wood ear, cloud ear fungus, day lily buds, vinegar, egg, corn starch, and white pepper. Other ingredients include button mushrooms and small slices of tofu skin. It is comparatively thicker than the Chinese cuisine versions due to the addition of cornstarch. This soup is usually considered a healthy option at most Chinese establishments and, other than being high in sodium, is a very healthy soup overall. "Hot and sour soup" is a Chinese soup claimed variously by the regional cuisines of Beijing and Sichuan as a regional dish. The Chinese hot and sour soup is usually meat-based, and often contains ingredients such as day lily buds, wood ear fungus, bamboo shoots, and tofu, in a broth that is sometimes flavored with pork blood. It is typically made hot (spicy) by red peppers or white pepper, and sour by vinegar. Samlor machu pkong or "Sour Shrimp Stew" is a Cambodian
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Mince pie

    Mince pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Flour
    • Type of dish: Pie
    A mince pie, also known as minced pie, is a small British sweet pie traditionally served during the Christmas season. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits and spices. The early mince pie was known by several names, including mutton pie, shrid pie and Christmas pie. Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet, a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War was frowned on by the Puritan authorities. Nevertheless, the tradition of eating Christmas pies in December continued through to the Victorian era, although by then its recipe had become sweeter and its size reduced markedly from the large oblong shape once observed. Today the mince pie remains a popular seasonal treat enjoyed by many across the United Kingdom. The ingredients for the modern mince pie can be traced to the return of European crusaders from the Holy Land. Middle Eastern methods of cooking, which sometimes combined
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Tofu skin roll

    Tofu skin roll

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Tofu skin roll or Tofu roll is a dim sum dish. It can be found in Hong Kong and among overseas Chinese restaurants. It is usually served in a small plate in twos or threes. In all cases, the outer layer is made of tofu skin. There are a number of cooking styles. The fillings range from pork with vegetable, to fish or beef. The fried version is known as (腐皮捲, fu pei gyun). The first character "fu" comes from tofu, though a more accurate description is that the skin is made from the ingredient bean curd. Some Cantonese restaurants serve the fried crispy version at night, often with mayonnaise as dipping sauce. Another name is the (豆腐捲, tofu gyun). Some ingredients include shrimp, leek, chicken, bamboo shoot, small carrots, tofu, scallions, sesame oil, bean sprouts. The bamboo steamed version is generally known as (鮮竹捲, sin zuk gyun). It is wrapped with dried tofu skin (腐竹, fu zhu). During the cooking process, the tofu skin is hydrated. It makes the roll very soft and tender. This is the version most commonly served as a dim sum dish during yum cha sessions. The steamed tofu skin rolls often contain bamboo shoots.
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Appam

    Appam

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Aappam or Aappam hoppers are a type of food in Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Sri Lankan cuisine. It is called chitau (ଚିତାଉ) Pitha in Oriya, Paddu or Gulle Eriyappa in Kodava. It is known as ආප්ප (Appa) in Sinhala and Arpone (အာ​ပုံမုန့်) in Burmese. It is eaten most frequently for breakfast or dinner. Appum or aapum – pronunciation varies between regions – is a term equivalent to bread. Another form of appam is "Kallappam", where "kall" (Malayalam) means toddy, which is used for fermentation. This type of appam is prepared in an appa kal (mould). Kallappam looks like a pancake. According to Gil Marks "Each of the three separate Indian Jewish communities - Cochin, Mumbai, Calcutta - counts in its culinary repertoire grain dishes called appam.". The palappam dish of Malabar Jews and Malabar Nasrani Christians, akin to dosa, is made from the batter of ground soaked rice, coconut milk. A little kall which means toddy in Malayalam is used for fermentation. This is otherwise known as Kallappam. The presence of Tamils in Malaysia has over the years led to the popularity of the apam. Apam is the term used for a steamed cup-cake sized dessert made from rice flour that is eatened with shredded
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    Baked ziti

    Baked ziti

    Baked ziti is a popular baked Italian casserole dish made with ziti macaroni and sauce. In many recipes, the ziti are first cooked separately while a tomato and cheese sauce is prepared, which may include meat, sausage, mushrooms, peppers, onions, and more. The cooked and drained ziti are then combined with the cooked sauce, which may be layered with additional varieties of cheeses, baked in the oven, and served hot. A similar al forno dish with a different type of pasta is baked mostaccioli which, in Italian means (loosely) "of the chicken".
    8.33
    3 votes
    55
    Chana masala

    Chana masala

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chana masala, also known as chole masala or channay (plural) is a popular Punjabi dish in Pakistani and Indian cuisine. The main ingredient is chickpeas (called "chana" in Hindi-Urdu). It is fairly dry and spicy with a sour citrus note. The dish is found throughout South Asia, and is particularly popular in northern India and Pakistan. Along with chickpeas, the ingredients typically include onion, chopped tomatoes, coriander seed, garlic, chillies, ginger, dried mango powder (amchur, sometimes spelled "amchoor"), crushed pomegranate seed (anardana) and garam masala. It is popular mainly in the Punjab region of northern-India, and also notably in the regions of Gujarat. In Gujarat and Rajasthani areas, it is commonly cooked dry, with tangy spices. In India, it is often eaten with a type of fried bread and is known as chole bhature. It is commonly sold by street vendors but also can be found in restaurants. Aloo chole is a Pakistani variation of chana masala made with potatoes as well as chickpeas. In Lahore, a variation of the dish called "murgh cholay" is popular; the dish consists of chickpeas and chicken.
    8.33
    3 votes
    56
    Cheesecake

    Cheesecake

    • Typical ingredients: Maple syrup
    Cheesecake is a dessert consisting of a topping made of soft, fresh cheese, usually on a crust or base made from biscuit (such as a graham cracker crust), pastry or sponge cake. It may be baked or unbaked. Cheesecake is usually sweetened with sugar and may be flavored or topped with fruit, nuts, fruit sauce and/or chocolate. Various flavours of cheesecake exist, such as lemon, strawberry or toffee. An ancient form of cheesecake may have been a popular dish in ancient Greece even prior to Romans' adoption of it with the conquest of Greece. The earliest attested mention of a cheesecake is by the Greek physician Aegimus, who wrote a book on the art of making cheesecakes (πλακουντοποιικόν σύγγραμμα—plakountopoiikon suggramma). Cato the Elder's De Agri Cultura includes recipes for two cakes for religious uses: libum and placenta. Of the two, placenta is most like most modern cheesecakes, having a crust that is separately prepared and baked. It is important to note that though these early forms are called cheese cakes, they differed greatly in taste and consistency from the cheese cake that we know today. Modern Cheese cake was developed in 1872, William Lawrence, from Chester, New York,
    8.33
    3 votes
    57
    Doogh

    Doogh

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Doogh (Persian: دوغ‎ dūgh; Iraqi: Shinēna) is a yogurt-based beverage. Popular in Iran and also found in Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Pakistan as well as the Balkans, it is sometimes carbonated. Outside of Iran and Afghanistan it is known by different names. Doogh has long been a popular drink and was consumed in ancient Persia. Described by an 1886 source as a cold drink of curdled milk and water seasoned with mint, its name derives from the Persian word for milking, dooshidan. By 2009 it was being referred to as a "minted yogurt drink". Salt (and sometimes pepper) is added, and commonly dried mint or pennyroyal is mixed in as well. One variation includes diced cucumbers to provide a crunchy texture to the beverage. Some varieties of doogh lack carbonation.
    8.33
    3 votes
    58
    Mixed grill

    Mixed grill

    Many regional cuisines feature a mixed grill, a meal consisting of a traditional assortment of grilled meats. Versions of the mixed grill include:
    8.33
    3 votes
    59
    Red curry

    Red curry

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Red curry (Thai: แกงเผ็ด; RTGS: kaeng phet, IPA: [kɛːŋ pʰèt], lit: spicy soup) is a popular Thai dish consisting of curry paste to which coconut milk is added. The base is properly made with a mortar and pestle, and remains moist throughout the preparation process. The main ingredients are garlic, shallots, (dried) red chili peppers, galangal, shrimp paste, salt, kaffir lime peel, coriander root, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, peppercorns and lemongrass. Common additives are fish sauce, sugar, Thai eggplant, bamboo shoots, thai basil (bai horapha), and meat such as chicken, beef, pork, shrimp, frog, snake or duck. Tofu, and meat analogues or vegetables such as pumpkin, can be substituted as a vegetarian option. This dish normally has a soup-like consistency and is served in a bowl and eaten with steamed rice. The standard red curry paste contains shrimp paste, which renders it inappropriate for vegetarians. There are, however, vegetarian red curry pastes available. Red curry paste itself is the core flavouring for a number of other non-related dishes such Thot man pla (fish cakes) and sai ua (grilled Chiang Mai sausage). (bite-sized pieces)
    8.33
    3 votes
    60
    Steak pie

    Steak pie

    A steak pie is a traditional meat pie served in Britain. It is made from stewing steak and beef gravy, enclosed in a pastry shell. Sometimes mixed vegetables are included in the filling. In Ireland Guinness Stout is commonly added along with bacon and onions, and the result is commonly referred to as a Steak and Guinness Pie (or Guinness Pie for short). A Steak and Ale pie is a similar creation, popular in British pubs, using one of a variety of ales in place of the Guinness. The dish is often served with "steak chips" (thickly sliced potatoes fried, sometimes fried in beef dripping). Steak pies are also available from chip shops, served with normal chips, referred to in Scotland as a steak pie supper. A steak pie supper is usually accompanied by salt and vinegar, however around Edinburgh a combination of spirit vinegar and brown sauce, known simply as "sauce" or "chippie sauce", is popular. The precise proportions of each ingredient are unique to each take-away. In Scotland, steak pie is traditionally eaten on Hogmanay (New Year's Eve) or Ne'erday (New Year's Day). Other types of steak pie are available around the world, including in Australia and New Zealand.
    6.20
    5 votes
    61
    Chocolate brownie

    Chocolate brownie

    • Cuisine: American
    • Typical ingredients: Chocolate
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    A chocolate brownie is a flat, baked square or bar developed in the United States at the end of the 19th century and popularized in both the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the 20th century. The brownie is a cross between a cake and a cookie in texture. Brownies come in a variety of forms. They are either fudgy or cakey, depending on their density, and they may include nuts, frosting, whipped cream, chocolate chips, or other ingredients. A variation that is made with brown sugar and no chocolate is called a blondie. Brownies are common lunchbox fare, typically eaten by hand, and often accompanied by milk or coffee. They are sometimes served warm with ice cream (à la mode), topped with whipped cream or marzipan, or sprinkled with powdered sugar. They are especially popular in restaurants, where they can be found in variation on many dessert menus. A chef at Chicago's Palmer House Hotel created the confection after Bertha Palmer requested a dessert for ladies attending the fair; it should be, she said, smaller than a piece of cake, though still retaining cake-like characteristics and easily eaten from boxed lunches. These first brownies featured an apricot glaze and walnuts,
    9.50
    2 votes
    62
    General Tso's chicken

    General Tso's chicken

    • Cuisine: American Chinese cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Chicken meat
    General Tso's chicken (sometimes Governor Tso's chicken, General Tao's chicken, General Tsao's chicken, General Tang's chicken or simply General's Chicken) is a sweet, slightly spicy, deep-fried chicken dish that is popularly served in North American Chinese restaurants. The dish was unknown in China and other lands home to the Chinese diaspora before it was introduced by chefs returning from the United States. The dish is named after General Tso Tsung-tang, or Zuo Zongtang, a Qing dynasty general and statesman, although the connection is tenuous. He is said to have enjoyed it, and perhaps helped create a dish, but there are no recorded recipes. The real roots of the dish lie in the post-1949 exodus of chefs to the United States. The dish is reported to have been introduced to New York City in the early 1970s as an example of Hunan cooking, though it is not typical of Hunanese cuisine, which is traditionally very spicy and rarely sweet. The dish was first mentioned in The New York Times in 1977. The food has been associated with the name of Zuo Zongtang (左宗棠, 1812–1885), a Qing Dynasty general from Hunan. Zuo himself could not have eaten the dish as it is today, and the dish is
    9.50
    2 votes
    63
    Pad Thai

    Pad Thai

    • Cuisine: Thai
    Pad Thai or Phat Thai (Thai: ผัดไทย, RTGS: Phat Thai, ISO p̄hạdịthy, [pʰàt tʰāj], "fried Thai style") is a dish of stir-fried rice noodles with eggs, fish sauce (Thai: น้ำปลา), tamarind juice, red chili pepper, plus any combination of bean sprouts, shrimp, chicken, or tofu, garnished with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime, the juice of which can be added along with Thai condiments (crushed peanuts, garlic, chives, pickled turnip, coriander, lime, spicy chili oil, chili powder, vinegar, fish sauce, sugar). It is usually served with scallions and pieces of raw banana flower. It is listed at number 5 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Pat Thai has been known in Thailand for hundreds of years, the type of noodles having been introduced to Ayuthaya, the former capital, by Vietnamese traders. However, it was made popular by Luang Phibunsongkhram, the prime minister during the late 1930s and 1940s, as part of his campaign to promote Thai nationalism and centralization, seeking to reduce domestic rice consumption. The Thai economy was heavily dependent on rice exports, and the prime minister hoped to increase the amount for available to export by
    9.50
    2 votes
    64
    Rousong

    Rousong

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Rousong (肉鬆), also sometimes called meat wool, meat floss, pork floss, pork sung, is a dried meat product that has a light and fluffy texture similar to coarse cotton, originating from Fujian. Rousong is used as a topping for many foods such as congee, tofu, and savory soy milk. It is also used as filling for various buns and pastries, and as a snack food on its own. Rousong is a very popular food item in Chinese culture, as evidenced by its ubiquitous use in Chinese cuisine. Rousong is made by stewing cuts of pork in a sweetened soy sauce mixture until individual muscle fibres can be easily teased apart with a fork. This usually happens when the collagen and elastin that normally hold the fibres have been cooked out of the meat. The teased-apart meat is then strained and dried in the oven. After a light drying, the meat is mashed and beaten while being dry cooked in a large wok until it is completely dry. Additional flavourings are usually added while the mixture is being dry fried. 5 kg (11 lb) of meat will usually yield about 1 kg (2.2 lb). Fish can also be made into floss (魚鬆; yú sōng) though initial stewing is not required due to the low collagen and elastin content of fish
    9.50
    2 votes
    65
    Chicken Tikka

    Chicken Tikka

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chicken tikka (Hindi: मुर्ग़ टिक्का; [ˌmʊrɣ ˈʈɪkkaː]) is a chicken dish served in Indian cuisine. It is popular in countries all over the world. It is traditionally small pieces of boneless chicken baked using skewers, in a clay-based oven called a tandoor, after marinating in spices and yogurt. The word tikka means "bits, pieces". The Punjabi version of the dish, however, is grilled over red-hot coals, and does not always contain boneless pieces. The pieces are brushed with ghee (clarified butter) at intervals, which gives it taste, while being continuously fanned. It is typically eaten with a green coriander and tamarind chutney, served with onion rings and lemon, or used in preparing a chicken tikka masala. A chicken tikka sizzler is a dish where chicken tikka is served on a heated plate, with onions. The dish is also known and eaten in Afghanistan, though the Afghan version (generally like Persian and Arab dishes) is less spicy compared with the Indian versions.
    7.00
    4 votes
    66
    Scotch pie

    Scotch pie

    • Cuisine: Scottish cuisine
    A Scotch pie is a small, double-crust meat pie filled with minced mutton or other meat. It may also be known as a shell pie or a mince pie (although the latter term is ambiguous) to differentiate it from other varieties of savoury pie, such as the steak pie, steak and kidney pie, steak-and-tattie (potato) pie, and so forth. The Scotch pie is believed to originate in Scotland, where it is often known simply as pie but can be found in other parts of the United Kingdom and widely sold all over Canada. They are often sold alongside other types of hot food in football grounds, traditionally accompanied by a drink of Bovril, resulting in the occasional reference to football pies. The traditional filling of mutton is often highly spiced with pepper and other ingredients and is placed inside a shell of hot water crust pastry. An individual piemaker's precise recipe, including the types and quantities of spice used, is usually kept a close secret, for fear of imitations. It is baked in a round, straight-sided tin, about 8 cm in diameter and 4 cm high, and the top "crust" (which is soft) is placed about 1 cm lower than the rim to make a space for adding accompaniments such as mashed
    7.00
    4 votes
    67
    Soujouk

    Soujouk

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Sujuk, also "sucuk" and soudjouk is a dry, spicy sausage in Turkish, Bulgarian and Armenian cuisine eaten from the Balkans to the Middle East and Central Asia. Sujuk consists of ground meat (usually beef, but pork is used in non-Muslim countries and horse meat in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan), with various spices including cumin, sumac, garlic, salt, and red pepper, fed into a sausage casing and allowed to dry for several weeks. It can be more or less spicy; it is fairly salty and has a high fat content. Sujuk may be eaten cooked (when raw, it is very hard and stiff). It is often cut into slices and cooked without additional oil, its own fat being sufficient to fry it. At breakfast, it is used in a way similar to bacon or spam. It is fried in a pan, often with eggs (e.g. as breakfast in Egypt), accompanied by a hot cup of sweet black tea. Sujuk is sometimes cooked with haricot bean or incorporated into pastries at some regions in Turkey. In Bulgaria, raw, sliced sujuk is often served as an appetizer with rakia or other high alcoholic drinks. In Lebanon, cooked sliced sujuk is made into sandwiches with garlic sauce and tomato. Sujuk is also commonly used as a topping on savoury
    6.00
    5 votes
    68
    Chicken Madras

    Chicken Madras

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chicken Madras (in Indian Cuisine) is a hot, thick gravy, dish that consists of Chicken, and Chili powder, onions, Chili, garlic, Root Ginger, Coriander and Garam Masala. When Cooked, the ingredients are fried together in vegetable oil. The sauce has a lot of smoky heat, and can be compared to some Tex-Mex sauces that have Chipotle chilies in them. It is rich with ghee or oil. The onion, garlic and tomato taste blend well with the heat of the sauce. The curry should be served with or on top of Basmati rice and sprinkled with finely chopped Coriander. Historically, the name of this recipe took the name of the Indian, south Eastern city of Madras (even though it was not invented there). Subsequent to the conception of this curry, the city Madras has been renamed Chennai. Because of this there have been calls to rename this curry "Chennai". Despite this, the curry is still widely known as "Madras curry".
    8.00
    3 votes
    69
    Halo-halo

    Halo-halo

    • Cuisine: Filipino
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Halo-halo (from Tagalog word halò, "mix") is a popular Filipino dessert that is a mixture of shaved ice and evaporated milk to which are added various boiled sweet beans and fruits, and served in a tall glass or bowl. Ingredients include boiled kidney beans, garbanzos, sugar palm fruit (kaong), coconut sport (macapuno), and plantains caramelized in sugar, jackfruit (langkâ), gulaman, tapioca, nata de coco, sweet potato (kamote), cheese, pounded crushed young rice (pinipig). In terms of arrangement, most of the ingredients (fruits, beans, and other sweets) are first placed inside the tall glass, followed by the shaved ice. This is then sprinkled with sugar, and topped with either (or a combination of) leche flan, purple yam (ubeng pula), or ice cream. Evaporated milk is poured into the mixture upon serving. Halo-halo was featured as a Quickfire Challenge dish in the seventh episode of the fourth season of the American reality television series Top Chef. The halo-halo, which featured avocado, mango, kiwi and nuts, was prepared by Filipino-American contestant Dale Talde and named as one of the top three Quickfire Challenge dishes by guest judge Johnny Iuzzini of Jean-Georges. Talde
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    Pasty

    Pasty

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Meat
    • Type of dish: Convenience food
    A pasty ( /ˈpæsti/, Cornish: Hogen; Pasti), (sometimes known as a pastie or British pasty in the United States) is a baked pastry associated in particular with Cornwall in Great Britain. It is made by placing uncooked filling on a flat pastry circle and folding it to wrap the filling, crimping the edge to form a seal. After baking, the result is a raised semicircular end-product. The traditional Cornish pasty, which has Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status in Europe, is filled with beef, sliced or diced potato, swede (also known as a yellow turnip or rutabaga - referred to in Cornwall as turnip) and onion, seasoned with salt and pepper, and is baked. Today, the pasty is the food most associated with Cornwall, it is regarded as the national dish, and it accounts for 6% of the Cornish food economy. Pasties with many different fillings are made; some shops specialise in selling all sorts of pasties. The origins of the pasty are unclear, though there are many references to them throughout historical documents and fiction. The pasty is now popular world-wide due to the spread of Cornish miners, and variations can be found in Australia, the United States, Mexico and elsewhere.
    8.00
    3 votes
    71
    Steamed meatball

    Steamed meatball

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Steamed meatball is a Cantonese dim sum dish. It is popular in Hong Kong and most overseas Chinatowns. The meatball is made of beef, and usually has a tofu skin layer in the bottom, garnished with some vegetables like scallions. It is served with the standardized non-Chinese worcestershire sauce worldwide. The sauce in Hong Kong is known as kip zap (喼汁; Yale: gipjap), and is entirely optional.
    8.00
    3 votes
    72
    Kofta

    Kofta

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Kofta (see section Name for other names) is a Middle Eastern and South Asian meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat—usually beef or lamb—mixed with spices and/or onions. In Pakistan and Iran, koftas are usually made of beef, lamb, mutton, or chicken, whereas Turkish and Arab varieties are usually beef or lamb based. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice and leeks, and served dry. In Iran and Pakistan, koftas are served with a spiced gravy, as dry versioons are considered to be kebabs. In India, vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular, as religious beliefs generally forbid consumption of meat. Shrimp and fish koftas are found in South India, coastal Pakistan, and in some parts of the Persian Gulf states. The meat is often mixed with other ingredients such as rice, bulgur, vegetables, or eggs to form a smooth paste. Koftas are sometimes made with fish or vegetables rather than red meat, especially in India. They can be grilled, fried, steamed, poached, baked or marinated, and may be served with a rich spicy sauce. Variations occur in North
    6.75
    4 votes
    73
    Rendang

    Rendang

    • Cuisine: Singaporean cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    • Type of dish: Main course
    Rendang is a spicy meat dish which originated from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, and is now commonly served across the country. One of the characteristic foods of Minangkabau culture, it is served at ceremonial occasions and to honour guests. Also popular in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, the southern Philippines and southern Thailand, rendang is traditionally prepared by the Indonesian community during festive occasions. Culinary experts often describe rendang as: 'West Sumatra caramelized beef curry'. Though rendang is sometimes described as being like a curry, and the name is sometimes applied to curried meat dishes in Malaysia, authentic rendang is nothing like a curry. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Rendang as the number one dish of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list. Rendang is rich in spices; next to main meat ingredient, rendang uses coconut milk (Minangkabau: karambia), and mixture of ground spices paste, which include ginger, galangal, turmeric leaves, lemon grass, garlic, shallot, chillies and other spices. These spices are called pemasak in Minangkabau language. Spices used in rendang are known as a natural
    6.75
    4 votes
    74
    Bhujia

    Bhujia

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Bhaji is a spicy Indian snack that consists of a core food (like soaked potato or fried onions), similar to potato fritters, with several variants. It is usually used as a topping on various Indian meals but has become popular to eat alone as a snack. It is a popular street food in Maharashtra, India and you can find it on many stalls around the streets, especially in dhabas on highways. It is generally served with Bread (Pav) and called Bhajjipav. Apart from being a must in the traditional Maharashtrian Hindu meal on festivals and alike, bhajjis top the comfort food list when it comes to monsoons and rains. They are generally relished with a stewing hot coffee or tea. The basic recipes consist of chopped onions incorporated into a dough made from rice and gram flour, spices, and sometimes herbs, then fried until golden. Variations like chilli bhajji are more popular in South India. Red chili powder, Turmeric powder and rice powder are used for coating chili bhajjis. Onion Bhajjis are often eaten as starters to main Indian cuisine courses, along with Poppadoms and other Indian snacks. They may be served with a side of salad and slice of lemon, or with mango chutney and are
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Jello salad

    Jello salad

    • Typical ingredients: Jell-O
    • Type of dish: Dessert Salad
    Jell-O salad, also called gelatin salad, jelly salad, and congealed salad is the common name for salad made with flavored gelatin, fruit and sometimes grated carrots or, more rarely, other vegetables. Other ingredients may include cottage cheese, cream cheese, marshmallows, nuts or pretzels. Because of its many elements, the result has speckled bits of color against a colored gelatin background. For example, one might have lime green gelatin with brown nuts or pretzels, bits of white from cottage cheese, and red and orange from the fruit cocktail. Therefore, it has a "salad" appearance. The "salad" theme continues in variants containing mayonnaise or salad dressing. When one uses plain gelatin instead of sweetened gelatin, then the use of vegetables becomes more common, such as in tomato aspic. The name comes from the brand name Jell-O, a common gelatin product. Jell-O salads are a common feature of U.S. communal meals such as potlucks, most probably because they are inexpensive and easy to prepare. In Utah, where Jell-O is the official state snack, Jello salad is available in local restaurants such as Chuck-A-Rama.
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    Za'atar

    Za'atar

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Za'atar (Arabic: زَعْتَر‎ za‘tar, also romanized zaatar, za'tar, zatar, zatr, zattr, zahatar, zaktar or satar) is a generic name for a family of related Middle Eastern herbs from the genera Origanum (Oregano), Calamintha (Basil thyme), Thymus (typically Thymus vulgaris, i.e., Thyme), and Satureja (Savory). The name za'atar alone most properly applies to Origanum syriacum. It is also the name for a condiment made from the dried herb(s), mixed with sesame seeds, dried sumac, and often salt, as well as other spices. Used in Arab cuisine, both the herb and spice mixture are popular throughout the Middle East. Written history lacks an early definitive reference to za'atar as a spice mixture, though unidentified terms in the Yale Babylonian Collection may be references to spice blends. According to Ignace J. Gelb, an Akkadian language word that can be read sarsar may refer to a spice plant. This word could be attested in the Syriac satre, and Arabic za'atar (or sa'tar), possibly the source of Latin Satureia. Satureia (Satureja) is a common name for satureia thymbra, a species of savory whose other common and ethnic names include, "Persian za'atar", "za'atar rumi" (Roman hyssop), and
    9.00
    2 votes
    77
    Beef ball

    Beef ball

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Beef ball is a commonly cooked food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities. As the name suggests, the ball is made of beef that has been finely pulverized. They are easily distinguishable from fish balls due to the beef balls' darker color. Another characteristic is the tiny pieces of tendon in each ball will dissolve with prolonged cooking. Nearly all meatballs (made from pork, beef, fish, etc.) made in Asia differ significantly in texture to their counterparts with European origins. Instead of mincing and forming meats, meat used for making meatballs is pounded until the meat is more or less pulverized. This is also often the case for fillings in steamed dishes. This process is what lends a smooth texture to the meatballs. Pounding, unlike mincing, uncoils and stretches previously wound and tangled protein strands in meat and allows them to cure to a gel with heat in a similar manner as surimi. Beef balls are commonly mixed in with wonton noodles and other fish ball noodles. It is available in traditional markets and supermarkets. Beef balls are also a popular ingredient for hot pot dishes. It has a variety of uses within Chinese cuisine.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Bulgogi

    Bulgogi

    • Cuisine: Korean
    • Typical ingredients: Pork
    Bulgogi (Korean pronunciation: [pulɡoɡi]) or neobiani is a Korean dish that usually consists of grilled marinated beef, chicken or pork. It is listed at number 23 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. The word Bulgogi (불고기) literally means "fire meat" in Korean, derived from Pyongan dialect, equivalent to neobiani in Seoul dialect. It refers to cooked marinated meat, applied old traditional grilling techniques using gridirons or perforated dome griddles that sit on braziers, unlike deep frying or boiling in water. The term is also applied to variations such as dak bulgogi (made with chicken) or dwaeji bulgogi (made with pork), depending on what kind of meat ingredient and corresponding seasoning are used. Bulgogi is believed to have originated during the Goguryeo era (37 BC–668 AD) when it was originally called maekjeok (맥적), with the beef being grilled on a skewer. It was called neobiani (너비아니), meaning "thinly spread" meat, in the Joseon Dynasty and was traditionally prepared especially for the wealthy and the nobility class. Bulgogi is made from thin slices of sirloin or other prime cuts of beef. Before cooking, the meat is marinated to
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Chinese herb tea

    Chinese herb tea

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Chinese herb(al) tea, also known as medicinal herbal tea, is a kind of tea-soup made from purely Chinese medicinal herbs in Guangdong (Kwangtung), China. It usually tastes bitter or lightly sweet and its colour is typically black or dark brown, depending on what kinds of herbs are used. Although it is referred to as "tea", it seldom contains any part of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis). The climate of Guangdong is sub-tropical, with a primarily hot and humid climate. Cantonese people boil what are referred to as cooling herbs in Traditional Chinese medicine to made herbal tea, which is consumed in order to relieve the heat and humidity in the body. Therefore, Chinese herb tea is referred to as cold tea or cooling tea in the Chinese language. There are many kinds of cooling tea. Different kinds of tea are purported to cure or relieve a variety of diseases. Some teas are consumed to alleviate sore throats, some for flu, and others for a number of ailments. Cooling tea is quite popular in Guangdong, Macau and Hong Kong, as well as other subtropical locales. Many families make their tea at home. Some families are herb tea specialists who open their own shops, selling different kinds
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Dry-fried beef with hefen

    Dry-fried beef with hefen

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Beef chow fun is a staple Cantonese dish, made from stir-frying beef, hefen (wide rice noodles) and bean sprouts and is commonly found in yum cha restaurants in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and even overseas, as well as in cha chaan tengs. The main ingredient of this dish is ho fun noodles, which is also known as Shahe fen, originating in the town of Shahe in Guangzhou. The most common methods of cooking ho fun are in soup or stir fried. Ho fun can be dry-fried (fried without sauce) or wet-fried (fried with a sauce). Dry-fried beef ho fun is made by first stir frying beef strips until they are half-cooked. Bean sprouts and onions are then fried in oil. The ho fun is added and stir fried very quickly, along with soy sauce and heated oil. Finally, the beef is added. An important factor in the making of this dish is "wok hei" (鑊氣). The cooking must be done over a high flame and the stirring must be done quickly. Not only must the ho fun be stirred quickly, it must not be handled too strongly or it will break into pieces. The amount of oil also needs to be controlled very well, or the extra oil or dry texture will ruin the flavor. Because of these factors, this dish is a major test for chefs
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Khao soi

    Khao soi

    • Cuisine: Thai
    Khao soi or khao soy (Thai: ข้าวซอย [kʰâw sɔːj]; Lao: ເຂົ້າຊອຍ [kʰȁw sɔ́ːj]) is a Burmese-influenced dish (see on no khauk swe) served widely in northern Laos and northern Thailand. The name means "cut rice". Traditionally, the dough for the rice noodles is spread out on a cloth stretched over boiling water. After steaming the large sheet noodle is then rolled and cut with scissors. Lao khao soi is still made with the traditional noodles and in some markets in Luang Namtha and Muang Sing you can still see the vendors cutting the noodles. There are two common versions of khao soi: Khao soi also features in the cuisine of the Shan people who primarily live in Burma. This version of khao soi can contain pieces of curdled blood.
    7.67
    3 votes
    82
    Taro dumpling

    Taro dumpling

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Taro dumpling is a variety of dim sum served within Chinese cuisine. It is a standard dish in dim sum restaurants in Hong Kong and around the world. Among overseas Chinatowns, it is often sold as a Chinese pastry. The outer shell is made from a thick layer of taro that has been boiled and mashed. The filling is made from seasoned ground pork. The dumpling is deep fried, and the outermost layer of taro becomes crisp, light, and fluffy.
    7.67
    3 votes
    83
    Baklava

    Baklava

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Baklava ( /ˈbɑːkləvɑː/, /bɑːkləˈvɑː/, or /bəˈklɑːvə/;, also Baklawa Ottoman Turkish: باقلوا) is a rich, sweet pastry made of layers of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey. It is characteristic of the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire and those of Central and Southwest Asia. The word baklava is first attested in English in 1650, a borrowing from Ottoman Turkish باقلوا /bɑːklɑvɑː/. The name baklava is used in many languages with minor phonetic and spelling variations. The origin of the name is unclear. Buell argues that the word "baklava" may come from the Mongolian root baγla- 'to tie, wrap up, pile up' composed with the Turkic verbal ending -v; baγla- itself in Mongolian is a Turkic loanword. The Armenian-Turkish linguist Sevan Nişanyan considers its oldest known forms (pre-1500) to be baklağı and baklağu, and labels it as being of Proto-Turkic origin, but without further documentation. Though the suffix -vā might suggest a Persian origin, the baqla- part does not appear to be Persian. Another form of the word is also recorded in Persian, باقلبا (bāqlabā). The Arabic name is doubtless a borrowing from Turkish, though a folk etymology,
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Beef bun

    Beef bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Beef bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong and can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. The bun has a ground beef filling, sometimes include pieces of onions.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Chess pie

    Chess pie

    Chess pie is a dessert characteristic of Southern U.S. cuisine. According to James Beard's American Cookery (1972) chess pie was brought from England originally, and was found in New England as well as Virginia. Recipes vary, but are generally similar in that they call for the preparation of a single crust and a filling composed of eggs, butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar and vanilla. What sets chess pie apart from many other custard pies is the addition of corn meal. Some recipes also call for corn syrup, which tends to create a more gelatinous consistency. The pie is then baked. The finished product is often consumed with coffee. Chess pie is closely related to vinegar pie, and the two terms are often used interchangeably. Vinegar pie generally adds somewhere between a teaspoonful and tablespoonful of vinegar to the above ingredients to reduce the sweetness. Some variations are called Jeff Davis or Jefferson Davis Pie. Although preparation of a pecan pie is similar (with the obvious addition of pecans), pecan pie usually contains corn syrup.
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Hong Kong-style milk tea

    Hong Kong-style milk tea

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong-style milk tea is a beverage originating from Hong Kong consisting of black tea with evaporated milk or condensed milk. It is usually part of lunch in Hong Kong tea culture. Although originating from Hong Kong, it is also frequently found overseas in restaurants serving Hong Kong cuisine and Hong Kong-style western cuisine. In the show Top Eat 100 aired on 4 February 2012, Hong Kong-style milk tea is ranked number 4 in Hong Kong cuisines and Hong Kongers consume a total of 900 million glasses/cups a year. Hong Kong-style milk tea originates from British colonial rule over Hong Kong. The British practice of afternoon tea, where black tea is served with milk and sugar, grew popular in Hong Kong. Milk tea is similar, except with evaporated or condensed milk instead of ordinary milk. It is called "milk tea" (Chinese: 奶茶, Cantonese naai5 cha4) to distinguish it from "Chinese tea" (Chinese: 茶, Cantonese cha4), which is served plain. Outside of Hong Kong it is referred to as Hong Kong-style milk tea. Hong Kong-style milk tea is made of a mix of several types of black tea (the proportion of which is usually a "commercial secret" for some milk tea vendors, often Pu Lei and a type
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Palak Paneer

    Palak Paneer

    Palak paneer (Hindi: पालक पनीर, Urdu: پالک پنیر) is an Indian and Pakistani dish consisting of spinach and paneer (Indian farmer's cheese) in a thick curry sauce based on pureed spinach. It is a popular vegetarian dish. It was created in the kitchen of the Maharaja of Orchreal in 1899. Palak paneer is one type of saag, which can also be made with mustard leaves. Palak paneer may be somewhat more watery than saag paneer. This dish is mainly served with roti, naan or boiled rice. Palak paneer may be accompanied by lassi, a Punjabi yogurt drink. This dish is nutritious and usually eaten in Punjab of India and Pakistan. Dhaba restaurants specialise in palak paneer.
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    Pecan pie

    Pecan pie

    • Cuisine: American
    • Typical ingredients: Corn syrup
    • Type of dish: Pie
    Pecan pie is a pie made primarily of corn syrup or molasses and pecan nuts. It is popularly served at holiday meals and is also considered a specialty of Southern U.S. cuisine. Most pecan pie recipes include salt and vanilla as flavorings. Chocolate and bourbon whiskey are other popular additions to the recipe. Pecan pie is often served with whipped cream. Tradition holds that the French invented pecan pie soon after settling in New Orleans, after being introduced to the nut by Native Americans. Attempts to trace the dish's origin, however, have not found any recipes dated earlier than 1897, and well-known cookbooks such as Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking did not include it before 1940. The makers of Karo syrup popularized the dish and many of its recipes. Karo Syrup's own website contends that the dish was a 1930s "discovery" of a "new use for corn syrup" by a corporate sales executive's wife. Pecan pie is often mentioned in American literature (and television) as associated with Thanksgiving, Christmas, and other special occasions; for example:
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    Rice noodle roll

    Rice noodle roll

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A rice noodle roll (also translated as steamed rice roll) is a Cantonese dish from southern China and Hong Kong, commonly served as a variety of dim sum. It is a thin roll made from a wide strip of shahe fen (rice noodles), filled with shrimp, pork, beef, vegetables, or other ingredients. Sweet soy sauce is poured over the dish upon serving. The rice noodle is also known as chee cheong fun where chee cheong means pig intestine, and fun means noodle; this is because the noodle resembles the small intestine of a pig. The rice noodle sheets are made from a viscous mixture of 1 cup of rice flour and 1/3 cup tapioca or glutinous rice flour and water, this recipe will scale well as long as the ratio of flours and water remain the same. The combination of both types of flour and water should be a consistency of heavy cream. The rice flour serves as the bulk and flavor of rice, the tapioca flour gives the noodle elasticity and springiness, therefore it should never crumble nor being too chewy. It should never have the al dente texture as with Italian pasta. This liquid mixture is poured into a specially made flat pan with holes (similar to a flat colander). Commercial restaurants use
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    Roasted pig

    Roasted pig

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Siu yuk (roasted pig, Chinese: 燒肉; Jyutping: siu1 juk6) is a variety of siu mei, or roasted meat dishes, within Cantonese cuisine. It is made by roasting an entire pig with seasoning in a charcoal furnace at high temperature. Roasted pigs of high quality have crisp skin and juicy and tender meat. Usually the meat is served plain, but it is sometimes served with soy sauce or hoisin sauce. When individual pieces are served, it is known as "roasted pork" or "roasted meat" (Chinese: 燒肉, Mandarin: shāoròu, Cantonese: siu1 juk6). When the entire pig is served, the dish is known as "roasted pig" (Chinese: 燒豬, roasted pig, Mandarin shāozhū, Cantonese: siu1 zyu1). In most cases it is referred to by the former term, since it is always consumed in small quantities. The style of cooking is nearly identical between the different parts of mainland China and Hong Kong. Sometimes the entire pig is purchased for the sake of special family affairs, business openings, or as a ritualistic spiritual offering. For example, in the entertainment industry in Hong Kong, one tradition is to offer one or several whole roast pigs to the Jade Emperor to celebrate a film's opening with a roast pig; the pig is
    10.00
    1 votes
    91
    Tandoori chicken

    Tandoori chicken

    Tandoori chicken is a popular Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani dish consisting of roasted chicken prepared with yogurt and spices. The name comes from the type of cylindrical clay oven, a tandoor, in which the dish is traditionally prepared. The chicken is marinated in yogurt and seasoned with the spice mixture tandoori masala. It is moderately piquant in Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, but the heat is reduced in most Western nations. Cayenne pepper, red chili powder or kashmiri red chili powder is used to give it a fiery red hue in the original version. A higher amount of turmeric produces an orange color. In milder versions, both red and yellow food coloring could sometimes be used to achieve bright colors, however turmeric powder is both mild and brightly colored, as is paprika, a sweet red pepper powder. It is traditionally cooked at high temperatures in a tandoor (clay oven), but can also be prepared on a traditional barbecue grill. The story of its origins lies with Kundan Lal Gujral and his partner Kundan Lal Jaggi, who ran a restaurant called Moti Mahal in Peshawar Pakistan in the 1920s. Following the partition in 1947, Gujral & Jaggi found themselves as one of many Hindu
    10.00
    1 votes
    92
    Tea egg

    Tea egg

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Tea egg is a typical Asian savory food commonly sold as a snack. It is also known as marble egg because cracks in the egg shell create darkened lines with marble-like patterns. Commonly sold by street vendors or in night markets in most Chinese communities throughout the world, it is also commonly served in Asian restaurants. Although it is originated from China and traditionally associated with Chinese cuisine, other similar recipes and variations have been developed throughout Asia. Fragrant and flavorful tea eggs are a traditional Chinese food. The original recipe uses various spices, soy sauce, and black tea leaves. A commonly used spice for flavoring tea eggs is Chinese five-spice powder, which contains ground cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, cloves and Szechuan peppercorns. Some recipes do not use tea leaves, but they are still called "tea eggs". In the traditional method of preparation, eggs are boiled until they reach a hardened, cooked state. The boiled eggs are removed from the water, and the entire shell of each egg is gently cracked all around. Smaller cracks produce more marbling when the egg is peeled for eating. The extra water from the boiling should be allowed
    10.00
    1 votes
    93
    Laksa

    Laksa

    • Cuisine: Singaporean cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Laksa is a popular spicy noodle soup from the Peranakan culture, which is a merger of Chinese and Malay elements found in Malaysia and Singapore, and Indonesia. The origin of the name "laksa" is unclear. One theory traces it back to Hindi/Persian lakhshah, referring to a type of vermicelli, which in turn may be derived from the Sanskrit lakshas (लकशस्) meaning "one hundred thousand" (lakh). It has also been suggested that "laksa" may derive from the Chinese word 辣沙 (Cantonese: [lɐ̀t.sáː]), meaning "spicy sand" due to the ground dried prawns which gives a sandy or gritty texture to the sauce. The last theory is that the name comes from the similar sounding word "dirty" in Hokkien due to its appearance. There are two basic types of laksa: curry laksa and asam laksa. Curry laksa is a coconut curry soup with noodles, while asam laksa is a sour fish soup with noodles. Thick rice noodles also known as laksa noodles are most commonly used, although thin rice vermicelli (bee hoon or mee hoon) are also common and some variants use other types. Curry laksa (in many places referred to simply as “laksa”) is a coconut-based curry soup. The main ingredients for most versions of curry laksa
    6.50
    4 votes
    94
    Sugarcane juice

    Sugarcane juice

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Sugarcane juice is the juice extracted from pressed sugarcane. It is consumed as a beverage worldwide, and especially in regions where sugarcane is commercially grown such as Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Brazil. Evaporated cane juice is a loosely defined term which can include combinations of sugars including glucose, and fructose. It is less processed than bleached white sugar. Nutritional benefits are minimal; evaporated cane juice contains trace minerals and vitamins but has the same amount of calories as table sugar and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration defines evaporated cane juice as any sweetener derived from sugar cane syrup. This is a popular drink in India especially in states such as Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. It is known as "Oosacha Ras" or "Ganneka Ras" in Maharashtra in Marathi and Hindi accordingly ('Ras' translates to 'juice', whereas the former in both terms, 'Oos' and 'Ganna' translate to 'Sugar cane'. It is called Roh in eastern Punjab. People usually like this drink in the summer months. Some other additives are added to the fresh juice like lemon,ginger, mint, and ice.
    6.50
    4 votes
    95
    XO sauce

    XO sauce

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    XO sauce is a spicy seafood sauce invented in Hong Kong. It is commonly used in Chinese cuisine, most notably in southern Chinese regions like Guangdong province. Developed in the 1980s in Hong Kong for Cantonese cuisine, it is made of roughly chopped dried seafoods, including scallops, dried fish and shrimp, and subsequently cooked with chili peppers, onions, and garlic. Spring Moon, the Peninsula Hong Kong's Chinese restaurant is often credited with the invention of XO sauce, although others claim the sauce's origin in the urban area of Kowloon. XO sauce can now be found as a pre-made product on grocery store shelves, produced by Asian food companies like Lee Kum Kee, ANJI, and Amoy. The name XO sauce comes from fine XO (extra-old) cognac, which is a popular Western liquor in Hong Kong and considered by many to be a chic product there. In addition the term XO is often used in the popular culture of Hong Kong to denote high quality, prestige, and luxury. In fact, XO sauce has been marketed in the same manner as the French liquor, using packaging of similar colour schemes. In Hong Kong English, "XO" is pronounced "ix-oh" /ˌɪks ˈoʊ/ instead of "ex-oh" /ˌɛks ˈoʊ/. XO sauce can be
    6.50
    4 votes
    96
    Burek

    Burek

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Börek (also burek and other variants) is a family of baked or fried filled pastries made of a thin flaky dough known as phyllo (or yufka). It can be filled with cheese, often feta, sirene or kaşar; minced meat, or vegetables. Most probably invented in what is now Modern Turkey, in the Anatolian Provinces of the Ottoman Empire in its early era, to become a popular element of Ottoman cuisine. A börek may be prepared in a large pan and cut into portions after baking, or as individual pastries. The top of the börek is often sprinkled with sesame seeds. Börek is also very popular in the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire, especially in North Africa and throughout the Balkans. The Northern Slavic cuisines, historically developed by people living in close contact with the Turkic peoples of Asia and Europe, also feature derivatives of the börek. Börek is also part of Mizrahi and Sephardic Jewish traditions. They have been enthusiastically adopted by the Ottoman Jewish communities, and have been described, along with boyos de pan and bulemas, as forming "the trio of preeminent Ottoman Jewish pastries". Modern Turkey enjoys a wide variety of regional variations of börek among the
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    Chaat

    Chaat

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chaat (Hindi: चाट) is a term describing savoury snacks, typically served at road-side tracks from stalls or carts in India. With its origins in Uttar Pradesh, chaat has become immensely popular in rest of India and the Indian Sub-continent. The word derives from Hindi cāṭ चाट (tasting, a delicacy), from cāṭnā चाटना (to lick), from Prakrit caṭṭei चट्टेइ (to devour with relish, eat noisily). The chaat variants are all based on fried dough, with various other ingredients. The original chaat is a mixture of potato pieces, crispy fried bread Dahi vada or Dahi Bhalla ("Bhalla" in Hindi), gram or chickpeas and tangy-salty spices, with sour home-made Indian chilli and Saunth (dried ginger and tamarind sauce), fresh green coriander leaves and yogurt for garnish, but other popular variants included Aloo tikkis (garnished with onion, coriander, hot spices and a dash of curd), bhel puri, dahi puri, panipuri, dahi vada, papri chaat, and sev puri. There are common elements among these variants including dahi, or yogurt; chopped onions and coriander; sev (small dried yellow salty noodles); and chaat masala. This is a masala, or spice mix, typically consisting of amchoor (dried mango powder),
    8.50
    2 votes
    98
    Green curry

    Green curry

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Green curry (Thai: แกงเขียวหวาน, RTGS: kaeng khiao wan, IPA: [kɛːŋ kʰjǎw wǎːn], literally sweet green curry) is a variety of curry in Thai cuisine. The name "green" curry derives from the color of the dish. Green curries tend to be as hot as red curries, both being hotter than phanang curries. However, green curries, regardless of heat, have a definite and desired sweetness that is not usually associated with red curries. The main ingredients for the sauce consist of coconut milk, green curry paste, eggplant (aubergine), pea aubergine, sugar, fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves, and Thai basil leaves. The consistency of its sauce varies with the amount of coconut milk used. Green curry paste is made by pounding in a mortar green chillies, shallots, garlic, galangal, kaffir lime peel, roasted coriander and cumin seeds, white peppercorns, shrimp paste and salt. The paste is briefly fried in split coconut cream, then coconut milk, meat or fish, and vegetables added along with a pinch of palm sugar. Finally, kaffir lime leaves, phrik chi fa ("sky-pointing chilies", large mild chilies) and Thai basil are added just at the end of cooking for fragrance. When the curry is made with fish or
    8.50
    2 votes
    99
    Pumpkin pie

    Pumpkin pie

    • Cuisine: American
    • Typical ingredients: Ginger
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    Pumpkin pie is a traditional sweet dessert, often eaten during the fall and early winter, especially for Thanksgiving and Christmas in the United States and Canada. The pumpkin is a symbol of harvest time and featured also at Halloween. The pie consists of a pumpkin-based custard, ranging in color from orange to brown, baked in a single pie shell, rarely with a top crust. The pie is generally flavored with nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, and ginger. Pumpkin pie is frequently topped with whipped cream. This pie is often made from canned pumpkin or packaged pumpkin pie filling (spices included); this is a seasonal product available in bakeries and grocery stores, although it is possible to find year-round. The traditional method for preparing a pumpkin pie involves the use of a "pie pumpkin" which is about six to eight inches in diameter, being smaller than a "jack o'lantern" size pumpkin. The pumpkin is sliced in half, and the seeds removed. The two halves are heated until soft. This was traditionally done either in an oven or over an open fire, but nowadays, stove tops and microwaves are frequently used. Sometimes the pumpkin halves are brined to soften the pulp, rather than cooked. At
    8.50
    2 votes
    100
    Almond biscuit

    Almond biscuit

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Almond biscuit (also called almond cake, almond cookie or Ghorayebah) is a type of Chinese pastry. The biscuit is one of the most standard pastries in Canton, and can also be found in some Chinatown bakery shops overseas. Most that are sold overseas are imported from Macau. The biscuits are small with no filling by default. They are also crunchy, sometimes crumbling on first bite. In Macau, the snack has been one of the most popular specialty products. Especially near the Ruins of the Cathedral of St. Paul, streets are packed with 10 to 20 stores, all selling different flavors of almond biscuits next to one another. Hawkers line up on the street to push the merchandise. It is recommended on the official Macau tourism website as a famous Macanese snack. Koi Kei is one of the famous brands of almond cookies from Macau. Read more at: http://www.food.com/recipe/chinese-almond-cookies-348634?oc=linkback
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    Bird's nest soup

    Bird's nest soup

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Typical ingredients: Bird's Nest
    Bird's nest soup is a delicacy in Chinese cuisine. A few species of swift, the cave swifts, are renowned for building the saliva nests used to produce the unique texture of this soup. The edible bird's nests are among the most expensive animal products consumed by humans. The nests have been used in Chinese cooking for over 400 years, most often as bird's nest soup. The Chinese name for bird's nest soup, yàn wō (燕窝), translates literally as "swallow's nest". When dissolved in water, the birds' nests have a gelatinous texture used for soup or sweet tong sui. It is mostly referred to as "yan wo" unless references are made to the salty or sweet soup in Chinese cuisine. The most heavily harvested nests are from the Edible-nest Swiftlet or White-nest Swiftlet (Aerodramus fuciphagus) and the Black-nest Swiftlet (Aerodramus maximus). The white nests and the red nests are supposedly rich in nutrients, which are traditionally believed to provide health benefits, such as aiding digestion, raising libido, improving the voice, alleviating asthma, improving focus, and an overall benefit to the immune system. Most nests are built during the breeding season by the male swiftlet over a period of
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    Buko pie

    Buko pie

    • Cuisine: Filipino
    Buko pie is a traditional Filipino baked young-coconut (malauhog) custard pie. Popular with Filipinos, it resembles a coconut cream pie, except that it is made with young coconuts (buko in Tagalog) and has neither cream in the coconut custard filling or meringue swirls on top of the baked coconut custard. Instead, the pie uses sweetened condensed milk, making it denser and healthier. The pie is made with buko meat. There are also variations of the pie, which are similar but use slightly different ingredients, such as macapuno pie, that uses a special type of coconut which differs from ordinary coconut as it is thick and sticky. The pie was originally a delicacy only available in the Philippines, but blast freezing technology has allowed buko pie-makers the ability to export. Buko pie is traditionally plain, but other flavorings may be used, such as pandan, vanilla, or almond essences. Buko pie is similar to the Dutch-Indonesian klappertaart and the South African klappertert. Klappertaart differs from the Filipino buko pie as it is a baked creamy coconut custard without the crust, and contains raisins and nuts. Klappertert is most akin to the Filipino buko pie as it also has a
    7.33
    3 votes
    103
    Burrito

    Burrito

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Tortilla
    • Type of dish: Convenience food
    A burrito (US English /bəˈritoʊ/, Spanish: [buˈrito]), or taco de harina ['tako ðe a'ɾina], is a type of Mexican food. It consists of a wheat flour tortilla wrapped or folded into a roughly cylindrical shape to completely enclose a filling. (In contrast, a taco is generally formed by simply folding a tortilla in half around a filling, leaving the semicircular perimeter open.) The flour tortilla is usually lightly grilled or steamed, to soften it and make it more pliable. In Mexico, refried beans or meat are sometimes the only fillings. In the United States, however, fillings generally include a combination of ingredients such as Mexican-style rice or plain rice, refried beans or beans, lettuce, salsa, meat, guacamole, cheese, and sour cream, and the size varies, with some burritos considerably larger than their Mexican counterparts. The word burrito means "little donkey" in Spanish, as a diminiuitive form of burro, or "donkey". The name burrito as applied to the food item possibly derives from the appearance of a rolled up wheat tortilla, which vaguely resembles the ear of its namesake animal, or from bedrolls and packs that donkeys carried. In some areas, such as the Lower Rio
    7.33
    3 votes
    104
    Mango pudding

    Mango pudding

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Mango pudding is a dessert. It is usually served at cold. Mango pudding is a Chinese dessert and is very popular in Hong Kong, but pudding itself comes from the British. Mango pudding originated in India and the pudding recipe is introduced from the British, when the Indian Empire was administered by the United Kingdom in the 19th century. There is very little variation between the regional mango pudding's preparation. The dessert is also found in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Macau and is often served as dim sum in Chinese restaurants. There are two types of mango pudding, fresh and factory-made. The fresh variant is prepared by the restaurant or eatery and consists of agar or gelatin, fresh mangoes, evaporated milk and sugar. In addition, some places add fresh fruit such as mango, strawberries, berries and kiwifruit as garnish. Served and eaten refrigerator cold. It has a rich and creamy texture. Some Chinese restaurants make the mango pudding in fish shape because goldfish or koi expresses good luck in Chinese culture. Factory-made mango pudding does not contain fresh mangoes and instead, consists of mango essence and either gelatin or agar. Serves 3-4 Canned mangoes in its
    7.33
    3 votes
    105
    Quiche

    Quiche

    • Cuisine: French
    • Typical ingredients: Milk
    Quiche (/ˈkiːʃ/ KEESH) is a savory, open-faced pastry crust dish with a filling of savory custard with cheese, meat or vegetables. The word quiche comes from French, which ultimately borrowed the word from Lorraine Franconian Küeche ‘cake’ (cf. German Kuchen). Central Franconian typically unrounded the ü (/y/) and shifted the fricative "ch" (/ç/) to "sh" ([ʃ]), resulting in "kishe", which in standard French spelling gives "quiche." Today, quiche is considered as typically French. However, savoury custards in pastry were known in English cuisine at least as early as the fourteenth century. Recipes for custards baked in pastry containing meat, fish and fruit are referred to Crustardes of flessh and Crustade in the fourteenth-century The Forme of Cury and in fifteenth-century cookbooks as well. Quiche has a pastry crust and a filling of eggs and milk or cream which, when baked, become a custard. Quiche lorraine is a popular variant that was originally an open pie with a filling of custard with smoked bacon or lardons. It was only later that cheese was added to the quiche lorraine. The addition of Gruyère cheese makes a quiche au gruyère or a quiche vosgienne. The 'quiche alsacienne'
    7.33
    3 votes
    106
    Sannakji

    Sannakji

    • Typical ingredients: Octopus
    Sannakji or sannakji hoe is a variety of hoe, or raw dish, in Korean cuisine. It consists of live nakji (hangul: 낙지, a small octopus) that has been cut into small pieces and served immediately, usually lightly seasoned with sesame and sesame oil. The nakji pieces are usually still squirming on the plate. It can also be served whole. Because the suction cups on the arm pieces are still active when the dish is served, special care should be taken when eating sannakji. The active suction cups can cause swallowed pieces of arm to stick to the mouth or throat. This can also present a choking hazard for some people, particularly if they are intoxicated. Vocabularies in the two Koreas differ on nakji: South Koreans call a small kind of octopus nakji, while North Koreans call a squid nakji (nakchi in McCune-Reischauer Romanization). Sannakji is served in Korean restaurants that serve sliced raw fish, but it also can be found at bars as a snack to accompany alcoholic beverages, such as soju. Several incidents of choking on Sannakji have been reported. One of the latest incidents occurred in Gwangju.
    7.33
    3 votes
    107
    Wanton mee

    Wanton mee

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Wonton noodles [Mandarin: Yun-tun mian; Cantonese: Wan-tan Min], sometimes called wanton mee ("wanton" is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is "mee" or in Cantonese, "min") is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. The types of leafy vegetables used are usually kailan also known as Chinese kale. Another type of dumpling known as shui jiao is sometimes served in place of wonton. It contains prawns, chicken or pork, spring onions with some chefs adding mushroom and black fungus. In Hong Kong, wonton noodles are usually served in steaming hot soup with shrimp wontons and garnished with leafy vegetables. There are plenty of variations of this popular Cantonese dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry, with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce, dipping the noodles in the soup to eat it. There are four distinct features: First, the wontons are predominantly prawn, with small amounts of minced pork, or no
    7.33
    3 votes
    108
    Turkish Delight

    Turkish Delight

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Turkish delight or Lokum is a family of confections based on a gel of starch and sugar. Premium varieties consist largely of chopped dates, pistachios and hazelnuts or walnuts bound by the gel; the cheapest are mostly gel, generally flavored with rosewater, mastic, or lemon. The confection is often packaged and eaten in small cubes dusted with icing sugar, copra, or powdered cream of Tartar, to prevent clinging. Other common types include such flavors as cinnamon and mint. In the production process, soapwort may be used as an emulsifying additive. The sweet as it is known today was invented by Bekir Effendi, who moved from his hometown Kastamonu to Istanbul and opened his confectionery shop in 1776. Originally, honey and molasses were its sweeteners, and water and flour were the binding agents, with rosewater, lemon peel and bitter orange as the most common flavors (red, yellow and green). Lokum was introduced to Western Europe in the 19th century. An unknown Briton reputedly became very fond of the delicacy during his travels to Istanbul and purchased cases of it, to be shipped back to Britain under the name Turkish delight. It became a major delicacy in Britain and throughout
    6.25
    4 votes
    109
    Jermuk

    Jermuk

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Jermuk (Armenian: Ջերմուկ) is a bottled mineral water originating from the town of Jermuk in Armenia, and bottled since 1951. Jermuk mineral water has been used for its medicinal properties since centuries, as is clear from primitive stone basins, one of which has survived as a reminder of the past. Jermuk was first mentioned in writing in 189 AD, when Jermuk fortress was built, with the eponymous town being founded some time later. According to historical records, Jermuk was the summer residence of the Armenian princes of the neighbouring province of Syunik. The first surveys of the area around Jermuk (including the composition and properties of its mineral waters) were made in 1830 by the Russian geologist and engineer G. Dzoyokoyev-Boykikov; these did not result in the commercial exploitation of "Jermuk" mineral water, however. Only in 1925-1935 did well-known scientists like V. Alexandrov S. Nalbandov, V. Dikin and A. Melik-Aramyan and others subject Jermuk's mineral waters to scientific examination, in the process confirming its unquestionable medicinal properties. In 1945 the Soviet government took the decision to turn Jermuk town into a health resort of nationwide
    5.40
    5 votes
    110
    Beef Wellington

    Beef Wellington

    • Typical ingredients: Pâté
    Beef Wellington is a traditional English preparation of beef tenderloin coated with pâté (often pâté de foie gras) and duxelles, which is then wrapped in puff pastry and baked. Some recipes include wrapping the coated meat in a crêpe to retain the moisture and prevent it from making the pastry soggy. A whole tenderloin may be wrapped and baked, and then sliced for serving, or the tenderloin may be sliced into individual portions prior to wrapping and baking. Many spices may be added to enhance the flavour; some examples are curry, allspice, any grilling mix, or ginger. The origin of the name is unclear. Some theories suggest beef Wellington is named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington; other theories go a step further and suggest this was due to his love of a dish of beef, truffles, mushrooms, Madeira wine, and pâté cooked in pastry, but with a noted lack of evidence to support this. In addition to the dearth of evidence attaching this dish to the famous Duke, the earliest recorded recipe to bear this name appeared in a 1966 cookbook. Other accounts simply credit the name to a patriotic chef wanting to give an English name to a variation on the French filet de bœuf en
    7.00
    3 votes
    111
    Lemon meringue pie

    Lemon meringue pie

    • Typical ingredients: Meringue
    • Type of dish: Pie
    Lemon meringue pie is a type of baked pie, usually served for dessert, made with a crust usually made of shortcrust or shortbread pastry, lemon curd filling and a fluffy meringue topping. Lemon meringue pie is prepared with a bottom pie crust, with the meringue is directly on top of the lemon filling. No upper crust is used, as in a cherry pie. The lemon custard is usually prepared with egg yolks, lemon zest and juice, sugar, and starch. This gives it a texture similar to that of a sturdy pudding. The meringue, which includes well beaten egg whites and sugar, is cooked on top of the pie filling. As the meringue bakes, air bubbles trapped inside the protein of the egg whites will expand and swell. However, if the egg whites are beaten too much, or if a tiny amount of fat is allowed to contaminate the mixture, then the proteins will not be able to form the correct molecular structure when cooked, and the meringue may collapse when cooked. The meringue can be beaten into either soft or stiff peaks. The temperature the pie is baked at and the method by which sugar is added also determines the texture and durability of the meringue. Lemon flavored custards, puddings and pies have been
    7.00
    3 votes
    112
    Rad Na

    Rad Na

    • Cuisine: Thai
    Rat na (Thai: ราดหน้า, IPA: [râːt nâː], also written as rad na, lad na or lard na ) is a Thai-Chinese noodle dish. In Thailand the name of this dish is often pronounced as lat na as many Thais substitute the r for an l. It is made with stir-fried wide rice noodles, a form of meat such as chicken, beef, pork, seafood or tofu, and/or garlic, straw mushrooms and kai-lan. The dish is then covered in a sauce made of stock and tapioca starch or cornstarch. It is seasoned with sweet soy sauce, fish sauce, sugar and black pepper. In Thailand people often sprinkle some additional sugar, fish sauce, sliced chillies preserved in vinegar (with some of the vinegar) and ground dried chillies on the dish. There are variants, including using rice vermicelli instead of the wide noodles, and using deep fried thin egg noodle, with the sauce poured on to soften it. In areas where kai-lan can not be easily obtained, broccoli and kale are often used as a substitute.
    7.00
    3 votes
    113
    Steak tartare

    Steak tartare

    Steak tartare is a meat dish made from finely chopped or minced raw beef or horse. Tartare can also be made by thinly slicing a high grade of meat such as strip steak, marinating it in wine or other spirits, spicing it to taste, and then chilling it. This is often served with onions, capers and seasonings (the latter typically incorporating fresh ground pepper and Worcestershire sauce), sometimes with a raw egg yolk, and often on rye bread. Although less common than the completely raw variety, there is a version served in France of steak tartare called tartare aller-retour. It is a mound of mostly raw steak tartare that is lightly seared on one side of the patty. Although there are many fanciful stories connecting steak tartare with the Tatar or Tartar people of Central Asia, the name is a shortening of the original "à la tartare" or "served with tartar sauce," a dish popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Tartar sauce and steak tartare are found in Eastern Europe cuisines and the label "Tartare" is in reference to the Tartar people of the Russian steppes. The modern version of steak tartare with raw egg was first served in Lavan's house early in the 20th century. What is
    7.00
    3 votes
    114
    Zha cai

    Zha cai

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Zha cai (literally "pressed vegetable") is a type of pickled mustard plant stem originating from Sichuan, China. Other transliterations might include cha tsai, tsa tsai; or jar choy, jar choi, ja choi, ja choy, or cha tsoi (from Cantonese). In English, it is commonly known as Sichuan vegetable, Szechwan vegetable, or Chinese pickled vegetable, although all of these terms may also refer to any of a number of other Chinese pickles, including the several other types in the Sichuan province itself. The pickle is made from the knobby, fist-sized, swollen green stem of Brassica juncea, subspecies tatsai. The stem is first salted, pressed, and dried before being rubbed with hot red chili paste and allowed to ferment in an earthenware jar. This preservation process is similar to that used to produce Korean kimchi. The taste is a combination of spicy, sour, and salty, while the aroma is similar to sauerkraut with hot chili paste. Its unique texture—crunchy, yet tender—can only be vaguely compared to Western pickled cucumbers. Zha cai is generally washed prior to use in order to remove the chili paste. Excess salt in the preserved vegetable is leached out by soaking in fresh water. Depending
    7.00
    3 votes
    115
    Blackberry pie

    Blackberry pie

    Blackberry pie is pie composed of blackberry filling, usually in the form of either blackberry jam, actual blackberries themselves, or some combination thereof. Blackberry pie is quite tart requiring far more sugar than blueberry pie. Blackberries can be stewed or soaked in water prior to baking to prevent burning, a concern not present in preparing blueberry pie.
    6.00
    4 votes
    116
    Makchang

    Makchang

    • Cuisine: Korean
    Makchang gui is the name of a Korean dish that consists of grilled pork (or beef) large intestines similar to chitterlings, but often grilled over coals. The small intestines are often called gopchang. They are often served with a light doenjang sauce and chopped scallions. High calcium content and high catabolism for alcohol makes it a favorite anju (side dish for drinking). Makchang gui is said to be originated from Daegu and the surrounding Gyeongsang region. King Seonjo of Joseon is said to have enjoyed the dish at his inauguration. Makchang is usually grilled over a barbecue, but preparation has to be done beforehand to rid the meat of odd odors and excessive fat. The meat may either be pre-boiled in water seasoned with doenjang, onions, medicinal herbs and such, or pre-marinated in a sauce made of various fruit (apple, Korean pear, pineapple, kiwi, etc.) before grilling. The dipping sauce is made from a mixture of doenjang, ground beans, ground red pepper, and chopped scallions. Fresh green and red peppers, cucumbers, minari and garlic are sometimes added according to personal taste.
    6.00
    4 votes
    117
    Banana cream pie

    Banana cream pie

    The Banana cream pie, is a banana variant of cream pie. It is a dessert often comprised of the following ingredients: a baked pie crust (sometimes made from graham flour), sugar, flour, salt, milk, eggs, butter, vanilla, and banana and banana flavored crust. Commonly the crust is baked first then the custard is made and cooled then the optional cream or meringue topping is made. The pie is assembled by slicing the bananas into thin slices and putting them on the bottom of the crust, pouring the custard over them making sure they are completely covered, then adding the whipped cream or meringue in a thick layer on top. If meringue is used the pie is baked for an additional ten minutes or until light brown. The pie then needs to be refrigerated until completely cool. The banana cream pie has many variations including black bottom (chocolate). Other common variants include the addition of coconut, cinnamon, chocolate, cheese and various fruits.
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    Caesar salad

    Caesar salad

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Crouton
    • Type of dish: Salad
    A Caesar salad is a salad of romaine lettuce and croutons dressed with parmesan cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, egg, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and black pepper. It may be prepared tableside. The salad's creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition. His daughter Rosa (1928–2003) recounted that her father invented the dish when a Fourth of July 1924 rush depleted the kitchen's supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing "by the chef." A number of Cardini's staff have said that they invented the dish. Julia Child said that she had eaten a Caesar salad at Cardini's restaurant when she was a child in the 1920s. The earliest contemporary documentation of Caesar Salad is from a 1946 Los Angeles restaurant menu, twenty years after the 1924 origin stated by the Cardinis. The original Caesar salad recipe (unlike his brother Alex's Aviator's salad) did not contain pieces of anchovy; the slight anchovy flavor comes from the
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    Douhua

    Douhua

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Douhua (Chinese: 豆花, dòuhuā) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花, dòufuhuā) is a Chinese dessert made with very soft tofu. It is also referred to as tofu pudding and soybean pudding. Tofu is thought to have originated in ancient China during the Western Han Dynasty. Chinese people have developed and enriched the recipes for tofu dishes on the basis of their own tastes, such as mapo tofu, stinky tofu, pickled tofu and uncongealed tofu pudding, etc. In northern China, douhua is often eaten with soy sauce, thus resulting in a savory flavor. Northern Chinese often refer to douhua as doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦; pinyin: dòufunǎo; literally "tofu brains"). Douhua in Sichuan is often made without any sugar at all, then served by carrying pole or bicycle vendors with a number of condiments such as chili oil, soy sauce, Sichuan pepper, scallions, and nuts, and is sometimes eaten along with white rice as well. Douhua is served only with sugar in Hubei. It is referred to as either doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花). In Taiwanese cuisine, douhua is served with sweet toppings like cooked peanuts, adzuki beans, cooked oatmeal, tapioca, mung beans, and a syrup flavored with ginger or almond.
    8.00
    2 votes
    120
    Mole

    Mole

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    Mole (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmole]) (Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl mulli or molli, "sauce" or "concoction") is the generic name for several sauces used in Mexican cuisine, as well as for dishes based on these sauces. Outside of Mexico, it often refers to a specific sauce which is known in Spanish by the more specific name mole poblano. The word is also widely known in the combined form guacamole (avocado concoction). In contemporary Mexico, the term is used for a number of sauces, some quite dissimilar to one another, including black, red, yellow, colorado, green, almendrado, and pipián. Mole can be best defined as a very thick, homogeneous sauce with complex flavors. This distinguishes it from most Mexican salsas which have a thinner consistency, often raw, and contain fewer ingredients (usually nothing more than tomato, onion, garlic and chili pepper) in still-identifiable chunks. The most common way to consume mole is over chicken, though any kind of meat may be served with mole sauce. Another preparation, more common in restaurants, is enchiladas (corn tortillas wrapped around chicken, cheese or some other simple filling) baked in mole sauce. Because of the labor-intensive
    8.00
    2 votes
    121
    Sashimi

    Sashimi

    • Cuisine: Japanese Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Fish
    Sashimi (Japanese: 刺身, pronounced [saɕimiꜜ]; /səˈʃiːmiː/) is a Japanese delicacy. It consists of very fresh raw meat or fish, sliced into thin pieces. The word sashimi means "pierced body", i.e. "刺身 = sashimi, where 刺し = sashi (pierced, stuck) and 身 = mi (body, meat). This word dates from the Muromachi period, and was possibly coined when the word "切る = kiru (cut), the culinary step, was considered too inauspicious to be used by anyone other than Samurai. This word may derive from the culinary practice of sticking the fish's tail and fin to the slices in identifying the fish being eaten. Another possibility for the name could come from the traditional method of harvesting. 'Sashimi Grade' fish is caught by individual handline. As soon as the fish is landed, its brain is pierced with a sharp spike; and it is placed in slurried ice. This spiking is called the Ike jime process. The flesh contains minimal lactic acid because it died instantly so it will keep fresh on ice for about ten days, without turning white or otherwise degrading. The word sashimi has been integrated into the English language and is often used to refer to other uncooked fish preparations. Many non-Japanese use the
    8.00
    2 votes
    122
    Turkish coffee

    Turkish coffee

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Turkish coffee is a method of preparing coffee to drink. Roasted and then finely ground coffee beans are boiled in a pot (cezve), usually with sugar, and served in a cup where the grounds are allowed to settle. This method of serving coffee is found in the Middle East, North Africa, the Caucasus, and the Balkans. The earliest evidence of coffee drinking comes from 15th-century Yemen. By the late 15th century and early 16th century, coffee had spread to Cairo and Mecca. In the 1640s, the Ottoman chronicler İbrahim Peçevi reported the opening of the first coffeehouse in Istanbul. In more recent times, the traditional drinking of Turkish coffee has been diminished by the growing availability of other hot beverages such as tea (grown locally and bought without hard currency), instant coffee, and other modern styles of coffee. At the same time, fast food coffee is offered by international coffee chains such as Starbucks and Gloria Jean's Coffees. The word 'coffee' comes from the Arabic word قهوة qahwah. The drinking of coffee as a hot beverage developed in the Ottoman Empire. The importance of coffee in Turkish culture is evident in the word 'breakfast', kahvaltı, whose literal meaning
    8.00
    2 votes
    123
    Almond jelly

    Almond jelly

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Almond jelly, almond pudding, or almond tofu (杏仁豆腐) is a popular dessert in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Japan and often found in dim sum restaurants worldwide, commonly garnished with wolfberries. The name is sometimes misleading, as the dish is often prepared using apricot kernels (杏仁), not almonds, though the flavor is similar, and most recipes do not use soy beans (as are used in tofu, 豆腐), though the consistency is similar. In the traditional recipe, the primary ingredient is southern Chinese almond (南杏, which is in fact apricot kernel) or sweet Chinese almond, soaked and ground with water. The almond milk is extracted, sweetened, and heated with a gelling agent (usually agar). When chilled, the almond milk mixture solidifies to the consistency of a soft gelatin dessert. Almond jelly can be made using instant mix or from scratch. Although the agar-based recipe is vegan, there are numerous nontraditional recipes that are not. Most are based on dairy products and a small amount of almond-flavored extract. Gelatin is also a common substitute for agar. There is also an "instant" almond-flavored soy-based powder with a coagulating agent, which dissolves in hot water
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Chicken lollipop

    Chicken lollipop

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Chicken lollipop is an hors d'œuvre that is made from the middle (and sometimes inner) segments of chicken wings. The middle segment has one of the two bones removed, and the flesh on the segments is pushed to one end of the bone. These are then coated in a spicy red batter and deep fried. It is also a popular item in Indian Chinese cuisine, served with Szechuan sauce.
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Hamburger

    Hamburger

    • Cuisine: American
    • Typical ingredients: Ground beef
    • Type of dish: Convenience food
    A hamburger (also called a hamburger sandwich, burger or hamburg) is a sandwich consisting of a cooked patty of ground meat usually placed inside a sliced bread roll. Hamburgers are often served with lettuce, bacon, tomato, onion, pickles, cheese and condiments such as mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup and relish. The term "burger", can also be applied to the meat patty on its own, especially in the UK where the term "patty" is rarely used. The term may be prefixed with the type of meat as in "beef burger". The term hamburger originally derives from Hamburg, Germany's second largest city, from which many people emigrated to the United States. In High German, Burg means fortified settlement or fortified refuge; and is a widespread component of place names. Hamburger can be a descriptive noun in German, referring to someone from Hamburg (compare London → Londoner) or an adjective describing something from Hamburg. Similarly, frankfurter and wiener, names for other meat-based foods, are also used in Germany and Austria as descriptive nouns for people and as adjectives for things from the cities of Frankfurt and Wien (Vienna), respectively. The term "burger" is associated with many
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Haupia

    Haupia

    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Haupia is a traditional coconut milk-based Hawaiian dessert often found at luaus and other local gatherings in Hawaiʻi. Since World War II, it has become popular as a topping for white cake, especially at weddings. Although technically considered a pudding, the consistency of haupia closely approximates gelatin dessert and is usually served in blocks like gelatin. The traditional Hawaiian recipe for haupia calls for heated coconut milk to be mixed with ground pia (Polynesian Arrowroot, Tacca leontopetaloides) until the mixture thickens. Due to the lack of availability of arrowroot starch, some modern recipes for haupia substitute cornstarch. Haupia is very similar to the European dessert blancmange. In the typical modern recipe, diluted coconut milk, sugar, and salt is mixed with arrowroot or cornstarch and heated until thickened and smooth, then poured into a rectangular pan and chilled as with gelatin. It is traditionally cut into small blocks and served on squares of ti leaf. Some recipes for coconut desserts actually call for unflavored gelatin in place of the cornstarch, but it would be erroneous to call them haupia. Many local confections that contain coconut or coconut
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    Hot pot

    Hot pot

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Hot pot (simplified Chinese: 火锅; traditional Chinese: 火鍋; pinyin: huǒ guō), less commonly Chinese fondue or steamboat, refers to several East Asian varieties of stew, consisting of a simmering metal pot of stock at the center of the dining table. While the hot pot is kept simmering, ingredients are placed into the pot and are cooked at the table. Typical hot pot dishes include thinly sliced meat, leafy vegetables, mushrooms, wontons, egg dumplings, and seafood. Vegetables, fish and meat should be fresh. The cooked food is usually eaten with a dipping sauce. In many areas, hot pot meals are often eaten in the winter. The Chinese hot pot has a history of more than 1,000 years. Hot pot seems to have originated in Mongolia where the main ingredient was meat, usually beef, mutton or horse. It then spread to southern China during the Tang Dynasty and was further established during the Mongolian Yuan Dynasty. In time, regional variations developed with different ingredients such as seafood. By the Qing Dynasty (AD 1644 to 1912), the hot pot became popular throughout most of China. Today in many modern homes, particularly in the big cities, the traditional coal-heated steamboat or hot pot
    9.00
    1 votes
    128
    Roasted goose

    Roasted goose

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Roast goose is a dish found within Chinese and European cuisine. In southern China, roast goose is a variety of siu mei, or roasted meat dishes, within Cantonese cuisine. It is made by roasting geese with seasoning in a charcoal furnace at high temperature. Roasted geese of high quality have crisp skin with juicy and tender meat. Slices of roasted goose are generally served with plum sauce. Roast goose, as served in Hong Kong, is no different from its counterpart in the neighboring Guangdong Province of southern China, but, due to its cost, some Hong Kong restaurants offer roast duck instead. English & German-speaking people roasted geese traditionally only on appointed holidays. Generally replaced by the turkey in the United Kingdom it is eaten on occasions as is the turkey in the United States. Roasted goose is a favoured Christmas dish as well as commonly eaten on St. Martin's Day. The most prevalent stuffings are apples, sweet chestnuts, prunes and onions. Typical seasonings include salt and pepper, mugwort, or marjoram. Also used are red cabbage, Klöße, and gravy, which are used to garnish the goose. Another version of roast goose is the Alsatian-style with Bratwurst-stuffing
    9.00
    1 votes
    129
    Shepherd's pie

    Shepherd's pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Potato
    • Type of dish: Pie
    Cottage pie or shepherd's pie is a meat pie with a crust of mashed potato. The term cottage pie is known to have been in use in 1791, when the potato was being introduced as an edible crop affordable for the poor (cf. "cottage" meaning a modest dwelling for rural workers). In early cookery books, the dish was a means of using leftover roasted meat of any kind, and the pie dish was lined with mashed potato as well as having a mashed potato crust on top. The term "shepherd's pie" did not appear until 1877, and since then it has been used synonymously with "cottage pie", regardless of whether the principal ingredient was beef or mutton. More recently, the term "shepherd's pie" has been used when the meat is lamb, the theory being that shepherds are concerned with sheep and not cattle. This may, however, be an example of folk etymology. Shepherd's pie recipe at Wikibooks "Shepherdess Pie" Recipes
    9.00
    1 votes
    130
    Som tam

    Som tam

    Green papaya salad is a Northeastern Thai / Lao / Cambodian spicy salad made from shredded unripe papaya. Locally known as som tam (Thai: ส้มตำ, pronounced [sôm tam]), tam mak hoong (Lao: ຕໍາໝາກຫຸ່ງ, pronounced [tàm mâk huŋ]) and bok l'hong (Khmer: បុកល្ហុង, pronounced [ɓok lhoŋ]), it was listed at number 6 on World's 50 most delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011. The dish combines the four main tastes of the local cuisine: sour lime, hot chili, salty, savory fish sauce, and sweetness added by palm sugar. The ingredients are mixed and pounded in a mortar; the Thai name som tam literally translates as "sour pounded". The Khmer and Laotian names, bok l'hong and tam mak hoong, respectively, both literally mean "pounded papaya". Despite the use of papaya, which one may think of as sweet, this salad is actually savory. When not yet ripe, papaya has a slightly tangy flavor. The texture is crisp and firm, sometimes to the point of crunchiness. It is this that allows the fruit to withstand being beaten in the mortar. In Thailand, it is customary that a customer ask the preparer to make the dish suited to his or her tastes. To specifically refer to the dish as prepared traditionally in
    9.00
    1 votes
    131
    Biryani

    Biryani

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Biryani, biriani, beryani or beriani (Hindi: बिरयानी, Telugu: బిర్యాని, Urdu: بریانی) is a set of rice-based foods made with spices, rice (usually basmati) and meat, fish, eggs or vegetables. The name is derived from the Persian word beryā(n) (بریان) which means "fried" or "roasted". In India, the recipe of biryani developed to its current form. Local variants of this dish are popular not only in the Indian Subcontinent but also in Southeast Asia, Arabia, and within various Asian expatriate communities in the Western World. The spices and condiments used in biryani may include, but are not limited to, ghee, nutmeg, mace, pepper, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, coriander, mint leaves, ginger, onions, and garlic. The premium varieties include saffron. For a non-vegetarian biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the spices is the meat—beef, chicken, goat, lamb, fish or shrimp. The dish may be served with dahi chutney or Raita, korma, curry, a sour dish of eggplant (brinjal), boiled egg and salad. The difference between biryani and pullao is that while pullao may be made by cooking the items together, biryani is used to denote a dish where the rice (plain or fried) is
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Dal makhani

    Dal makhani

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Dal Makhani (Hindi: दाल मखनी) ("Lentil rich sauce") is a staple food originating from the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. The dish differs from other popular Punjabi dal dishes, such as dal tadka, in that the primary ingredients in dal makhani are whole black lentil (urad) and red kidney beans (rajma), rather than red lentil (masoor). Dal makhani was popularized in India following partition, when many people from the Punjab migrated to the northern regions of India. As the Punjabi diaspora migrated across India and internationally, the dish was introduced to local consumers by entrepreneurial Punjabi migrants who opened restaurant businesses. Dal makhani is now universally recognized as a quintessentially Indian dish, and variations of the fare are served in a wide variety of eateries and restaurants internationally. Dal Makhani’s popularity is due in part to its versatility and the rich vegetarian dish can be served as a main meal, included in a buffet (thali) or as an accompaniment to a principal meal. In India, soups and curries with a red or yellow lentil base are an important staple; however, due to dal makhani's rich texture and lengthy preparation process, many
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Gujeolpan

    Gujeolpan

    • Cuisine: Korean
    Gujeolpan refers to either an elaborate Korean dish consisting of nine different foods assorted on a wooden plate with nine divided sections in an octagon shape or the plate itself. The name is composed of three hanja words: gu (구, "nine" ), jeol (절, "section"), and pan (판, "plate") in Korean. Foods are separated by color and ingredients, and comprise various namul (seasoned leaf vegetables), meats, mushrooms, and seafood items. In the center of the tray is a stack of small jeon (Korean style pancakes) made with wheat flour, which are called miljeonbyeong (밀전병). In addition to its use as a food platter used to serve many dishes of food at once, gujeolpan is also considered a decorative item. The history of gujeolpan dates back as early as the 14th century in which it has become closely associated with the Joseon royalty. The octagonal dish itself can be made of wood or plastic and its divided into eight side sections and one center section; slightly resembling a flower. It also can include elaborate carvings, gem encrustations and detailed drawings. Original royal gujeolpan dish platters can be observed in museums as featured artifacts in royal table setting reconstructions.
    6.67
    3 votes
    134
    Corned beef pie

    Corned beef pie

    Corned beef pie is made from corned beef, onion and often thinly sliced, cubed or mashed potato. It can be eaten hot or cold, making it a suitable common picnic food and also a 'winter warmer'. The corned beef from which the pie derives its name may be leftover corned beef, as from a Sunday dinner, or tinned corned beef (Bully beef). The pie may be made with a mashed potato topping, as in Shepherd's pie, or with a traditional pastry crust.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Fish slice

    Fish slice

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Fish cake or fish slice is a commonly cooked food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities. The fillet is made of fish that has been finely pulverized. It is made of the same surimi used to make fish balls. When production is finished, the fish usually comes in a large frozen rectangular fillet. Prior to cooking, the large rectangular fish mold must be defrosted and cut into smaller slices. Fish slices are often used in Chinese cuisine, especially in noodle dishes. They are commonly found in dai pai dong. Perhaps the most popular use of fish slices is mixing with fish balls or wonton noodles. Another usage in home cooking is to combine them with soft vegetables like cabbage or bean sprouts. Meats like pork are also sometimes used for plate-dishes.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Gobchang

    Gobchang

    Gopchang refers to either a dish of grilled intestines of cattle or pork in Korean cuisine or the intestines themselves. In the latter case, gopchang is commonly referred to as such because of its curvy shape rather than as sochang (소창), which literally means "small intestines." It is the counterpart of daechang (대창), meaning "large intestines." Compared to other cuts of meat, gopchang is high in iron and vitamins. It is relatively inexpensive and has a characteristic flavor and a chewy yet palatable texture. It is used in many Korean dishes such as gui (grilled dishes) or bokkeum (stir-fried dishes). It is similar to makchang, except that it is prepared from the small intestines of pork (or ox).
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Gulai

    Gulai

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Gulai is a type of food contained rich, spicy and succulent curry-like sauce. The main ingredients might be chicken, beef, mutton, various kinds of offals, fish and seafoods, and also vegetables such as cassava leafs and young jackfruit. The gulai sauce commonly have thick consistency with yellowish color because of the addition of ground turmeric. Gulai ingredients consists of rich spices such as turmeric, coriander, black pepper, galangal, ginger, chilli pepper, shallot, garlic, fennel, lemongrass, cinnamon and caraway, all these spices is ground into paste and cooked in coconut milk with main ingredient. Gulai is often described as an Indonesian type of curry, although Indonesian cuisine also recognize kari or kare (curry). Gulai is one of the popular and widely distribute dish in Indonesian archipelago, especially in Sumatra, Java and also Malay peninsula. The dish was originated from Sumatra, and thought to be the local adaptation of Indian curry, developed and derived from Indian cuisine influence on Indonesian cuisine. The thick and yellowish gulai sauce is one of the most common sauce in Minangkabau cuisine to gave rich and spicy taste for meats, fishes or vegetables. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Okonomiyaki

    Okonomiyaki

    • Cuisine: Japanese Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Dashi
    Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き, o-konomi-yaki) is a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning "what you like" or "what you want", and yaki meaning "grilled" or "cooked" (cf. yakitori and yakisoba). Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region. Tokyo okonomiyaki is usually smaller than a Hiroshima or Kansai okonomiyaki. Kansai- or Osaka-style okonomiyaki is the predominant version of the dish, found throughout most of Japan. The batter is made of flour, grated nagaimo (a type of yam), water or dashi, eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally thin pork belly, often mistaken for bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, kimchi, mochi or cheese. Okonomiyaki is sometimes compared to an omelette or a pancake and may be referred to as a "Japanese pizza" or "Osaka soul food". Some okonomiyaki restaurants are grill-it-yourself establishments, where the server produces a bowl of raw ingredients that the customer mixes and grills at tables
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Siu mei

    Siu mei

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Siu mei is the generic name in Cantonese cuisine given to meats roasted on spits over an open fire or a huge wood burning rotisserie oven. It creates a unique, deep barbecue flavor and the roast is usually coated with a flavorful sauce (a different sauce is used for each meat) before roasting. 66,000 tons are consumed in Hong Kong each year. Usually meat of this type is purchased as take-out as siu mei takes a great deal of resources to prepare, and few families in Hong Kong or China have the equipment for it. Shops generally have large ovens and rotisserie-like utilities for cooking the meat. Families order or prepare their own plain white rice to accompany the siu mei. A siu mei meal usually consists of one box comprising half meat and half rice, and maybe some vegetables. Certain dishes, such as orange cuttlefish, or white cut chicken, are not roasted at all, but are often prepared and sold alongside BBQ roasted meats in siu mei establishments, hence they are generally classified as siu mei dishes.
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Strawberry pie

    Strawberry pie

    Strawberry pie is a dessert food consisting mainly of strawberries. Strawberry pie mostly consists of strawberries, sugar, a pie crust, and sometimes gelatin. About 70% of the pie by weight is strawberries, varying on the pie itself, and the baker. It is often served with whipped cream, or sometimes with ice cream. A common variation is the Strawberry-rhubarb pie, which is a derivative of strawberry pie and rhubarb pie.
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Taramosalata

    Taramosalata

    • Cuisine: Greek
    • Typical ingredients: Olive oil
    • Type of dish: Dip
    Taramosalata (Greek: ταραμοσαλάτα, from taramas, from Turkish: tarama "meze made from fish roe" + salata "salad") is a Greek and Turkish meze. The spelling taramasalata is also used and is the only spelling given in most dictionaries. Taramosalata is traditionally made from taramas, the salted and cured roe of the cod or the carp, though blends based on other forms of fish roe have become more common. The roe is mixed with either bread crumbs or mashed potato, and lemon juice, vinegar and olive oil. It is usually eaten as a dip, with bread and/or raw vegetables. The colour can vary from creamy beige to pink, depending on the type of roe used. Mass-produced taramosalata is often a bright pink due to the addition of food colouring. In Greece Taramosalata is mainly eaten at Καθαρά Δευτέρα (Clean Monday), the first day of the Easter lent. A similar dip or spread, salata de icre ('roe salad' in Romanian) is also common in Romania and Bulgaria (known as хайвер, or haiver). It is made with carp roe or herring roe but generally with sunflower or vegetable oil instead of olive oil and without any thickener like bread crumbs or mashed potato. It is mass produced and is widely available in
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Cocktail bun

    Cocktail bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    The cocktail bun is a Hong Kong-style bread with a sweet filling of shredded coconut. It is one of several iconic types of baked goods originating from Hong Kong. The cocktail bun is said to have been created in the 1950s in Hong Kong, when the proprietors of a bakery resisted the wasteful disposal of unsold but perfectly edible buns. The solution was to incorporate these buns into a new product to be sold fresh. The day-old buns were ground up, with sugar and coconut added in, to create a tasty filling mixture; fresh bread dough was wrapped around this mixture to make the first filled "cocktail bun". Its name is said to have come from comparing the baker's mixture of hodgepodge of ingredients to a bartender's exotic mixture of alcoholic liquors, both formulating a "cocktail". The Chinese name is a literal translation of "cocktail", and is called a "chicken-tail bun". Originally, the filling was made of blending day-old buns with granulated sugar. Newer versions saw the addition of shredded coconut and butter or margarine to the recipe, now key ingredients in the cocktail bun filling. Each bun is approximately 6 to 8 inches long and 2 to 3 inches high in the shape of a small
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    Butzaigo

    Butzaigo

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Put chai ko is a snack which originates from Hong Kong. The pudding cake is palm size and is sweet in taste. It is soft, but can hold its molded shape outside of a bowl or small bowl. The cake is made from different forms of steamed sugar and select ingredients. The snack is also known by a number of English names, including Put chai pudding, Earthen bowl cake, Bootjaigo, Red bean pudding, Bood chai ko and the more direct but unofficial translation of Sticky rice pudding. The pudding is made like other traditional Cantonese steam cakes. It is said to have originated in the Chinese county of Taishan, which is 140 km west of Hong Kong. The pudding reached its popularity peak in the early to mid-1980s when hawkers sold it all over the streets in their push carts. At the time, there were only a small handful of flavors. One of the dish's cultural trademarks is that it is served in a porcelain bowl or an aluminium cup. The snack is still available today in select Chinese pastry or snack shops, or from street hawkers. The pudding can also be served like an ice pop, held up by two bamboo sticks.
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Chicken soup

    Chicken soup

    • Cuisine: Jewish cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Vegetable
    • Type of dish: Soup
    Chicken soup is a soup made from chicken, simmered with various other ingredients. The classic chicken soup consists of a clear broth, often with pieces of chicken or vegetables; common additions are pasta (e.g., noodles, although almost any form can be used), dumplings, or grains such as rice and barley. Chicken soup has also acquired the reputation of a folk remedy for colds and flus, and in many countries is considered a comfort food. Traditionally, American chicken soup was prepared using old hens too tough and stringy to be roasted or cooked for a short time. In modern times, these fowl are difficult to come by, and broiler chickens (young chickens suitable for broiling or roasting) are often used to make soup; soup hens or fowl are to be preferred when available. The chicken flavor of the soup is most potent when the chicken is simmered in water with salt and only a few vegetables, such as a mirepoix of onion, carrots, and celery. Variations on the flavor are gained by adding root vegetables such as parsnip, potato, sweet potato and celery root, herbs such as parsley, dill, other vegetables such as zucchini, whole garlic cloves or tomatoes and black pepper. The soup should be
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Curry Mile

    Curry Mile

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    The Curry Mile is a nickname for the part of Wilmslow Road running through the centre of Rusholme in south Manchester, England. The name is earned from the large number of restaurants, take-aways and kebab houses specialising in the cuisines of South Asia and the Middle East, thought to be the largest concentration of South Asian restaurants outside the Indian subcontinent. Within a length of less than a mile there are least seventy establishments of this kind. The Curry Mile is notable for its streets being busy into the early hours of the morning. The area is much visited by local students, because of its location near the Oxford Road and Fallowfield Campuses of the University of Manchester, and the Oxford Road / All Saints campus of the Manchester Metropolitan University From the 1990s to early 21st century, the area was dominated by mainly Indian, Iranian and British cuisines. However, due to the mass migration of South Asians into the Rusholme area, only the Indian market flourished. Since 2000, Pakistani and North Indian restaurants remain dominant. However, there has been a noticeable increase in Afghan and Arab cuisine into the area also. Each year, the Eid festival
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Dabbawala

    Dabbawala

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    A dabbawala (Marathi: डबेवाला); also spelled as dabbawalla or dabbawallah; literally meaning ("box person"), is a person in India, most commonly found in the city of Mumbai, who is employed in a unique service industry whose primary business is collecting freshly cooked food in lunch boxes from the residences of the office workers (mostly in the suburbs), delivering it to their respective workplaces and returning the empty boxes back to the customer's residence by using various modes of transport. "Tiffin" is an old-fashioned English word for a light lunch or afternoon snack, and sometimes, by extension, for the box it is carried in. For this reason, the dabbawalas are sometimes called Tiffin Wallahs. The word "Dabbawala" in Marathi when literally translated, means "one who carries a box". "Dabba" means a box (usually a cylindrical tin or aluminium container), while "wala" is a suffix, denoting a doer or holder of the preceding word. The closest meaning of the Dabbawala in English would be the "lunch box delivery man". Though this profession seems to be simple, it is actually a highly specialized service in Mumbai which is over a century old and has become integral to the cultural
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Gordita

    Gordita

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Tortilla
    A gordita (Spanish pronunciation: [gorˈdita]) in Mexican cuisine is a corn cake made with masa harina (cornmeal) and stuffed with cheese, meat or other fillings. It is similar to a pasty and to the Colombian/Venezuelan arepa. Gordita means "little fat one" in Spanish. A gordita is typically fried in a deep wok-shaped comal or baked on a regular comal. A gordita is typically prepared as a thick tortilla. The dough is most commonly made of nixtamalized corn flour, as also used for tortillas, but can also be of wheat flour, particularly in northern Mexico close to the U.S border. An old variant of corn gorditas uses masa quebrada (broken dough) where the corn meal is coarsely ground, leaving bits of broken grain. Gorditas de migas is a version in which fried pork is mixed with the dough. After cooking, the gordita is allowed to stand to drain excess grease. Then a slit is cut into one side and the gordita is stuffed with additional ingredients. These are usually guisados (meat stew) and salsa. Variations of the gordita include fillings of pork or chicken stew, shredded beef, chicharron, nopalitos, carne al pastor, beans, cheese, rajas (sautéed strips of chile), potatoes, eggs with
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Jerky

    Jerky

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Jerky is lean meat that has been trimmed of fat, cut into strips, and then dried to prevent spoilage. Normally, this drying includes the addition of salt, to prevent bacteria from developing on the meat before sufficient moisture has been removed. The word "jerky" is a corruption of the Spanish charqui which is from the Quechua word ch'arki. which means to burn (meat). All that is needed to produce basic "jerky" is a low-temperature drying method, and salt to inhibit bacterial growth. Modern manufactured jerky is normally marinated in a seasoned spice rub or liquid, and dried, dehydrated or smoked with low heat (usually under 70 °C/160 °F). Some makers still use just salt and sun-dry fresh sliced meat to make jerky. Some product manufacturers finely grind meat, mix in seasonings, and press the meat-paste into flat shapes prior to drying. The resulting jerky from the above methods would be a salty and/or savory snack. However, often a sweet or semi-sweet recipe is used, with sugar being a major ingredient (in contrast to biltong which is a dried meat product that utilizes the acid in vinegar rather than salt to inhibit bacterial growth when drying the meat). Jerky is ready-to-eat
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Sarma

    Sarma

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Sarma is a savory dish of grape, cabbage or chard leaves rolled around a filling usually based on minced meat, or a sweet dish of filo dough wrapped around a filling often of various kinds of chopped nuts. It is found in the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire from the Middle East to the Balkans and Central Europe. Sarma means 'a wrapped thing' in Turkish language, from the verb sarmak 'to wrap' or 'to roll'. Yaprak Sarma (grape leaves with meat) may also be commonly called yaprak dolması 'filled leaf' or simply dolma 'stuffed thing', although linguisticallyit is not correct. Dolma, which properly refers to stuffed vegetables, is often conflated with sarma. Yaprak sarma without meat (grape leaves filled with spicy rice, pinos and black currants) is usually called "yalancı (false) dolma". Besides the savory dish of leaf-wrapped filling, sarma in Greek can also refer to sweet pastries similar to baklava, saray sarma and fıstık sarma, which are prepared by wrapping phyllo dough around a mixture of crushed nuts and syrup. Minced meat (usually beef, pork, veal, or a combination thereof, but also lamb, goat, sausage and various bird meat such as duck and goose), rice, onions, and
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Sugar pie

    Sugar pie

    • Cuisine: French
    Sugar pie is a typical dessert of the western European countries of France and Belgium, the Canadian province of Quebec, and Midwestern United States states such as Indiana, where it is known as sugar cream pie (other names are Hoosier sugar cream pie, Indiana cream pie, Indiana farm pie, and finger pie). Sugar pie is a single-crust pie with a filling made from flour, butter, salt, vanilla, and cream, with brown sugar or maple syrup (sometimes both) often used as additional filler. When baked, these ingredients combine into a homogeneous mixture similar to caramel. If maple syrup is used, it might be referred to as maple pie. The European version is vaguely reminiscent of an American "transparent pie" (the name in the Midwestern and Southern United States for a version of pecan pie without the pecans), of English Canadian butter tarts, or of English treacle tart. The ideal sugar cream pie is supposed to be like Santa Claus in that it should shake "like a bowl full of jelly." The name "finger pie" for the dessert was due to stirring the pie during baking with one's finger. It was stirred this way to avoid breaking the crust. The Indiana version of a sugar pie, known as “sugar cream
    6.33
    3 votes
    151
    Nasi lemak

    Nasi lemak

    • Cuisine: Singaporean cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Nasi lemak (Jawi: ناسي لمق) is a fragrant rice dish cooked in coconut milk and "pandan" leaf commonly found in Malaysia, where it is considered the national dish; Brunei; Singapore; Riau Islands; and Southern Thailand. It is not to be confused with Nasi Dagang sold on the east coast of Malaysia or Terengganu and Kelantan although both dishes can usually be found sold side by side for breakfast. However, because of the nasi lemak's versatility in being able to be served in a variety of manners, it is now served and eaten any time of the day. With roots in Malay culture and Malay cuisine, its name in Malay literally means "fatty rice", but is taken in this context to mean "rich" or "creamy". The name is derived from the cooking process whereby rice is soaked in coconut cream and then the mixture steamed. This is the same process used to make a dish from their neighboring country, Indonesia, which is nasi uduk, therefore the two dishes are quite similar. Sometimes knotted screwpine (pandan) leaves are thrown into the rice while steaming to give it more fragrance. Spices such as ginger and occasionally herbs like lemon grass may be added for additional fragrance. Traditionally, this
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Paper wrapped cake

    Paper wrapped cake

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Paper wrapped cake is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries served in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. In essence, it is a chiffon cake baked in a paper cup. In the bakeries of Chinatown, San Francisco, it is commonly referred to as "sponge cake."
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Trifle

    Trifle

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Fruit
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    Trifle is a dessert dish made from thick (or often solidified) custard, fruit, sponge cake, fruit juice or jelly, and whipped cream. These ingredients are usually arranged in layers. The earliest known use of the name trifle was for a thick cream flavoured with sugar, ginger and rosewater, the recipe for which was published in England, 1596, in a book called "The good huswife's Jewell" by Thomas Dawson. Sixty years later milk was added and the custard was poured over alcohol soaked bread. Research indicates it evolved from a similar dessert known as a fool or foole, and originally the two names were used interchangeably. While some people consider the inclusion of jelly to be a recent variation, the earliest known recipe to include jelly dates from 1747, and the poet Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote of trifles containing jelly in 1861. Some trifles contain a small amount of alcohol such as port, or, most commonly, sweet sherry or madeira wine. Non-alcoholic versions may use sweet juices or soft drinks such as ginger ale instead, as the liquid is necessary to moisten the cake layers. One popular trifle variant has the sponge soaked in jelly (liquid-gelatin dessert) when the trifle is
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Pork pie

    Pork pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    A pork pie is a traditional British meat pie. It consists of roughly chopped pork and pork jelly sealed in a hot water crust pastry. It is normally eaten cold as a snack or as part of a meal. There are two main types of pork pie generally available in commercial outlets: The common pie uses cured meat. Often produced in moulds or form, it gives the outside of the pie a very regular shape and the inside filling a pink colour. It is easier, simpler and cheaper to produce in volume, and hence the more common choice for commercial manufacturers. The Melton Mowbray pork pie is named after a town in Leicestershire. Melton pies became popular among fox hunters in the area during the late nineteenth century. The uncured meat of a Melton pie is grey in colour when cooked; the meat is chopped, rather than minced. The pie is made with a hand-formed crust – this style of production gives the pie a slightly irregular shape after baking. As the pies are baked free-standing, the sides bow out, they are not vertical like mould-baked pies. In light of the premium price of the Melton Mowbray pie, the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association applied for protection under the European "Protected designation
    5.25
    4 votes
    155
    Ayran

    Ayran

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Ayran or laban is a cold beverage of yogurt mixed with cold water and sometimes salt; it is popular in many Central Asian, Middle Eastern and South-eastern European countries. Similar and possibly related beverages include the South Asian lassi and the Iranian doogh. The name 'ayran' (turkish) is used in Turkish According to Turkish sources, ayran was developed by the Göktürks. According to Iranian sources, ayran (doogh) dates to ancient Persia. Turkey is the biggest producer of ayran in the world, and has researched the subject extensively. In Turkey, ayran is often regarded as a separate category from other soft drinks. International fast-food companies in Turkey, such as McDonald's and Burger King, include ayran on their menu. In rural areas of Turkey, ayran is offered as a "standard" drink to guests. Ayran is usually served chilled, and is a common accompaniment to any form of grilled meat, pastry, or rice. In Albania Ayran is called Dhallë. It is made from cow yoghurt mixed with water and is served salted and cold. You can buy it in the market, fast-food chains, Byrektore (A shop where Byrek is made). It is very popular in summer. Ayran also enjoys considerable popularity in
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Bhang

    Bhang

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Bhang (Hindi: भांग, [bʱaːŋɡ]; Punjabi: ਭੰਗ [pə̀ŋɡ]; Bengali: ভাং; [bʱaŋ]) is a preparation from the leaves and flowers (buds) of the female cannabis plant, smoked or consumed as a beverage in the Indian subcontinent. Bhang is illegal in any country where cannabis is prohibited. Bhang has been used as a cheap intoxicant for centuries in the sub-continent. Bhang in India is distributed as a religious offering during Shiva festivals like "Mahashivratri". It has now become synonymous with the Holi festival, to the point where consuming bhang at that time is a standard practice. It is also available as Bhang golis (balls) which is just freshly ground hemp with water. Apart from this, sweetened bhang golis are also widely available. These are not considered a drug, but a traditional sleeping aid and appetizer. Bhang is also part of many ayurvedic medicinal preparations, e.g. bhang powder is available at ayurvedic dispensaries. Bhang Ki Thandai also known as Sardai is a drink popular in many parts of sub-continent which is made by mixing bhang with thandai, a cold beverage prepared with almonds, spices (mainly black pepper), milk and sugar. Bhang was first used as part of the Hindu rite
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Char siu

    Char siu

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Type of dish: Barbecue
    Char siu (also spelled chasu, cha siu, chashao, and char siew), literally "fork-roast", is is a popular way to flavor and prepare barbecued pork in Cantonese cuisine. It is classified as a type of siu mei, Cantonese roasted meat. It is listed at number 28 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Pork cut used for Char siu can vary, but it uses a few main cuts: "Char siu" literally means "fork burn/roast" (Char being fork (both noun and verb) and siu being burn/roast) after the traditional cooking method for the dish: long strips of seasoned boneless pork are skewered with long forks and placed in a covered oven or over a fire. In ancient times, wild boar and other available meats were used to make char siu. However, in modern times, the meat is typically a shoulder cut of domestic pork, seasoned with a mixture of honey, five-spice powder, hóngfǔrǔ (red fermented bean curd), lǎochōu (dark soy sauce), hoisin sauce, red food colouring (not a traditional ingredient but very common in today's preparations) and sherry or rice wine (optional). These seasonings turn the exterior layer of the meat dark red, similar to the "smoke ring" of American
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Dhansak

    Dhansak

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Dhansak is a popular Indian dish, especially popular among the Parsi Zoroastrian community. It combines elements of Persian and Gujarati cuisine. In Parsi homes, dhansak is traditionally made on Sundays owing to the long preparation time. Dhansak consists of lentils, vegetables, spices, cumin seeds, ginger, and garlic together with meat and either gourd or pumpkin. Within the Parsi community, dhansak usually contains goat meat (mutton); it is rarely made with other meats, or without meat. Outside of India, some variants of dhansak use pineapple chunks for sweetness, however the traditional recipes never contain fruit, instead favoring the subtle sweetness of pumpkin, squash or gourd.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Haleem

    Haleem

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Haleem (Arabic: حلیم‎, Urdu: حلیم, Persian: حلیم‎, Bengali: হালিম) is a thick beefy stew popular in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Pakistani, Bengali and Indian cuisine. In Anatolia, Iran, the Caucasus region and northern Iraq, other variations of Haleem, Keşkek and Harisa, are popular. Although the dish varies from region to region, it always includes wheat, barley, lentils and meat. A variation of Haleem called Khichra and Hyderabadi Haleem is very popular in India. Haleem is made of wheat, barley, meat (usually beef or mutton, but sometimes chicken or minced meat), lentils and spices. This dish is slow cooked for seven to eight hours, which results in a paste-like consistency, blending the flavors of spices, meat, barley and wheat. Haleem is sold as a snack food in bazaars throughout the year. It is also a special dish prepared throughout the world during the Ramzaan and Moharram months of Muslim Hijri calendar, particularly amongst Iranian, Pakistani and Indian Muslims. In India, Haleem prepared in Hyderabad, India during the Ramzaan month, is transported all over the world through a special courier service. Haleem is traditionally cooked in large, wood-fired cauldrons. It is
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Water chestnut cake

    Water chestnut cake

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Water chestnut cake is a sweet Cantonese dim sum dish made of shredded Chinese water chestnut. When served during dim sum the cake is usually cut into square-shaped slices and pan-fried before serving. The cake is soft, but holds its shape after the frying. Sometimes the cake is made with chopped water chestnuts embedded into each square piece with the vegetable being visible. One of the main trademark characteristics of the dish is its translucent appearance. It is one of the standard dishes found in the dim sum cuisine of Hong Kong, and is also available in select overseas Chinatown restaurants.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Ham and egg bun

    Ham and egg bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Ham and egg bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is a bread contains a sheet of egg and ham. It is commonly found in Hong Kong as well as some Chinatown bakery shops overseas.
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Nasi goreng

    Nasi goreng

    • Cuisine: Malaysian
    • Typical ingredients: Rice
    • Type of dish: Main course
    Nasi goreng, literally meaning "fried rice" in Indonesian, can refer simply to fried pre-cooked rice, a meal including stir fried rice in small amount of cooking oil or margarine, typically spiced with kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), shallot, garlic, tamarind and chilli and accompanied with other ingredients, particularly egg, chicken and prawns. There is also another kind of nasi goreng which is made with ikan asin (salted dried fish) which is also popular across Indonesia. Nasi goreng has been called the national dish of Indonesia, though there are many other contenders. There are many Indonesian cuisines but few national dishes. Indonesia's national dish knows no social barriers. It can be enjoyed in its simplest manifestation from a tin plate at a roadside warung, travelling night hawker's cart; eaten on porcelain in restaurants, or constructed at the buffet tables of Jakarta dinner parties. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Nasi Goreng as the number two of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list after rendang. Nasi goreng can trace its origin from Chinese fried rice, however it is not clear when Indonesians began to adopt the Chinese
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Pineapple bun

    Pineapple bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A pineapple bun is a kind of sweet pastry popular in Hong Kong, Macau, and some other areas in southern China including Guangzhou and Shenzen, and also in various Chinese communities around the world. They can also be found in bakeries in Taiwan or Canada. It is known in Cantonese as bo lo baau, in which "bo lo" means "pineapple", and "baau" refers to a kind of bun-like item in Chinese cuisine. It is commonly found in Chinese bakeries. The top of the pineapple bun (the part which is made to resemble a pineapple) is made of a dough similar to that used to make sugar cookies, which consists of sugar, eggs, flour, and lard. It is crunchy and is quite sweet compared to the bread underneath. The bread dough underneath is the same used in Chinese style Western breads, which is a softer and sweeter dough compared to Western breads. It is a popular pastry for breakfast or for afternoon tea. Although the pastry is known as "pineapple bun", the traditional version contains no pineapple. The name originated from the fact that its sugary top crust is cooked to a golden-brown color, and because its checkered top resembles the epicarp of a pineapple. It is very similar to the Japanese melonpan
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Poon choi

    Poon choi

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Poon Choi (pronounced: pun4 coi3), also known as pun choi or Big Bowl Feast, is a traditional type of dish originating from Hong Kong village Hakka cuisine. It may also be found in different parts of Hong Kong. It is served in wooden, porcelain or metal basins. It was said that Poon Choi was invented during the late Song Dynasty. When Mongol troops invaded Song China, the young Emperor fled to the area around Guangdong Province and Hong Kong. To serve the Emperor as well as his army, the locals collected all their best food available, cooked it, and because there were not enough containers, put the resulting dishes in wooden washbasins. In this way, Poon Choi was invented. Poon Choi includes ingredients such as pork, beef, lamb, chicken, duck, abalone, ginseng, shark fin, fish maw, prawn, crab, dried mushroom, fishballs, squid, dried eel, dried shrimp, pigskin, beancurd and Chinese radish. Poon Choi is special in that it is composed of many layers of different ingredients. It is also eaten layer by layer instead of "stirring everything up", but impatient diners may snatch up the popular daikon radish at the bottom first using shared chopsticks. Traditional Village Poon Choi is
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Risotto

    Risotto

    • Cuisine: Italian
    • Typical ingredients: Olive oil
    Risotto is a class of Italian dishes of rice cooked in broth to a creamy consistency. The broth may be meat-, fish-, or vegetable-based. Many types of risotto contain Parmesan cheese, butter, and onion. It is one of the most common ways of cooking rice in Italy. Risotto is normally a primo (first course), served on its own before the main course, but risotto alla milanese, pronounced [ɾiˈzɔtːo alːa milaˈneːze], is often served together with ossobuco alla milanese. A high-starch (amylopectin), low-amylose round medium- or short- grain rice is usually used to make risotto. Such rices have the ability to absorb liquids and to release starch and so they are stickier than the long grain varieties. The principal varieties used in Italy are Arborio, Baldo, Carnaroli, Maratelli, Padano, Roma, and Vialone Nano. Carnaroli, Maratelli and Vialone Nano are considered to be the best (and most expensive) varieties, with different users preferring one over the other. They have slightly different properties. For example, Carnaroli is less likely than Vialone Nano to get overcooked, but the latter, being smaller, cooks faster and absorbs condiments better. Other varieties like Roma, Baldo, Ribe and
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Buddha's delight

    Buddha's delight

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Buddha's delight, often transliterated as Luóhàn zhāi, lo han jai, or lo hon jai, is a vegetarian dish well known in Chinese and Buddhist cuisine. It is sometimes also called Luóhàn cài (simplified Chinese: 罗汉菜; traditional Chinese: 羅漢菜). The dish is traditionally enjoyed by Buddhist monks who are vegetarians, but it has also grown in popularity throughout the world as a common dish available as a vegetarian option in Chinese restaurants. The dish consists of various vegetables and other vegetarian ingredients (sometimes with the addition of seafood or eggs), which are cooked in soy sauce-based liquid with other seasonings until tender. The specific ingredients used vary greatly both inside and outside Asia. In the name luóhàn zhāi, luóhàn – short for Ā luóhàn (simplified Chinese: 阿罗汉; traditional Chinese: 阿羅漢; pinyin: Ā LuóHàn) – is the Chinese transliteration of the Sanskrit arhat, meaning an enlightened, ascetic individual or the Buddha himself. Zhāi (simplified Chinese: 斋; traditional Chinese: 齋; pinyin: zhāi) means "vegetarian food" or "vegetarian diet." The dish is usually made with at least 10 ingredients, although more elaborate versions may comprise 18 or even 35
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Dutch apple pie

    Dutch apple pie

    Dutch apple pie (appeltaart or appelgebak) is the Dutch-style apple pie. Recipes for Dutch apple pie go back centuries. There exists a painting from the Dutch Golden Age, dated 1626, featuring such a pie. Though it originated in The Netherlands, it is now a delicacy served around the world. The basis of Dutch apple pie is a crust on the bottom and around the edges. This is then filled with pieces or slices of apple, usually a crisp and mildly tart variety such as Goudreinet or Elstar. Cinnamon and sugar are generally mixed in with the apple filling, and lemon juice is often added. The filling can be sprinkled with liqueur for taste. Atop the filling, strands of dough cover the pie in a lattice, holding the filling in place but keeping it visible. Though it can be eaten cold, warmed is more common, with a dash of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. In The Netherlands it's usually eaten cold with whipped cream. Apple pie, Dutch http://allrecipes.com/recipe/dutch-apple-pie-with-oatmeal-streusel/detail.aspx
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Peach Melba

    Peach Melba

    • Typical ingredients: Peach
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    The Peach Melba (French: pêche Melba, pronounced [pɛʃ mɛl.ba]) is a classic dessert, invented in 1892 or 1893 by the French chef Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel, London to honour the Australian soprano, Nellie Melba. It combines two popular summer fruits: peaches and raspberry sauce accompanying vanilla ice cream. In 1892, Nellie Melba was performing in Wagner's opera Lohengrin at Covent Garden. The Duke of Orléans gave a dinner party to celebrate her triumph. For the occasion, Escoffier created a new dessert, and to display it, he used an ice sculpture of a swan, which is featured in the opera. The swan carried peaches which rested on a bed of vanilla ice cream and which were topped with spun sugar. In 1900, Escoffier created a new version of the dessert. For the occasion of the opening of the Carlton Hotel, where he was head chef, Escoffier omitted the ice swan and topped the peaches with raspberry purée. Other versions of this dessert use pears, apricots, or strawberries instead of peaches and / or use raspberry sauce or melted red currant jelly instead of raspberry purée.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Satay

    Satay

    • Cuisine: Singaporean cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Satay (/ˈsæteɪ/, /ˈsɑːteɪ/ SAH-tay), or sate, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce. Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings. Satay originated in Java, Indonesia. Satay is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish. It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, and Thailand, as well as in the Netherlands, as Indonesia is a former Dutch colony. Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; Indonesia's diverse ethnic groups' culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Baked Alaska

    Baked Alaska

    • Type of dish: Dessert
    Baked Alaska (also known as glace au four, omelette à la norvégienne, Norwegian omelette and omelette surprise) is a dessert made of ice cream placed in a pie dish lined with slices of sponge cake or Christmas pudding and topped with meringue. The entire dessert is then placed in an extremely hot oven for a brief time, long enough to firm the meringue. The meringue is an effective insulator, and the short cooking time prevents the heat from getting through to the ice cream. The name 'Baked Alaska' was coined at Delmonico's Restaurant by their chef-de-cuisine Charles Ranhofer in 1876 to honor the recently acquired American territory. Both the name 'Baked Alaska' and 'omelette à la norvégienne'/'Norwegian omelette' come from the low temperatures of Alaska and Norway. February 1 is Baked Alaska Day in the United States. The Chinese first had the idea of a similar dessert, which used pastry instead of meringue. It was the French who brought in the meringue and made the actual first Baked Alaska, which they called omelette norvégienne ("Norwegian omelette"). A variation called Bombe Alaska calls for some dark rum to be splashed over the Baked Alaska. Lights are then turned down and the
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Banana roll

    Banana roll

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Banana roll is a common Chinese pastry found in Hong Kong, and may occasionally be found in some overseas Chinatowns. The pastry is soft and made with glutinous rice. Ingredients may vary depending on where it is purchased. Each roll is a vanilla flavored circular tube, slightly bigger than an adult sized index finger, thus resembling banana. Sometimes it may have a cinnamon swirl filling. At other times it may have a filling that consists of a very ripe (but not rotten) banana diced finely. Occasionally the more traditional red bean paste may be used.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Cafreal

    Cafreal

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Cafreal is a spicy chicken preparation consumed widely in the Indian state of Goa. The preparation originated from the Portuguese colonies in the African continent. It was introduced into the Goan cuisine by the Portuguese. The generic preparation involves onion, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, pepper, chilli, mace and fresh coriander leaves.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Cheoreg

    Cheoreg

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Çörək,Cheorek, Cheoreg or Çörek is a dinner roll that comes from Turkey. The name "cheoreg" means ring or rounded. Cheoreg is a braided bread. It is especially popular in Turkey, Armenia and the Middle-East. Cheoreg comes in different variations, from sweet to savory. In Armenian tradition, a big batch of choreg is baked for Easter, with one of the choregs containing a coin for good luck to whoever gets it.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Cuisine of Bihar

    Cuisine of Bihar

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Bihari cuisine (Hindi: बिहारी खाना) is predominantly vegetarian. However, unlike Gujarat or some communities of south, non-vegetarian food is also quite acceptable even in traditional homes of Bihar. Some sects of Brahmins like the Maithil Brahmins have traditionally eaten some varieties of fish. Mutton or Goat meat is even used as Prasad in some type of pujas, like devi puja. Traditional Bihar society did not quite eat eggs and chicken, though other types of birds and fowls were highly acceptable. However, such distinctions are no longer current. As stated earlier, much of the food consumed by people in Bihar is vegetarian and very healthy. The staple food is "bhat, dal, roti, tarkari(vegetables) and achar", prepared basically from rice, lentils, wheat flour, vegetables, and pickle. They use uncooked sprouts soaked in water and consumed with choora bhunja and Makhana. The famous "jhal moori" (puffed rice with sprouts and other ingredients) is a famous snack. Traditionally, mustard oil and ghee have been the popular cooking medium. "Khichdi", the broth of rice and lentils, seasoned with spices, and served with several accompanying items like thick curd (yogurt), pickles (more than
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Garland chrysanthemum

    Garland chrysanthemum

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    The garland chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum coronarium or Leucanthemum coronarium, also known as chrysanthemum greens or edible chrysanthemum, is native to the Mediterranean and East Asia. It is a leaf vegetable in the genus Chrysanthemum, or by some botanists in Leucanthemum. A leafy herb, the garland chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum coronarium, is one of the few annual plants in its genus and has yellow florets grouped in small rayed flower heads and aromatic, bipinnately lobed leaves. The vegetable grows very well in mild or slightly cold climates, but will go quickly into premature flowering in warm summer conditions. Seeds are sown in early spring and fall. "The plant is rich in minerals and vitamins with potassium concentrations at 610 mg/100 g and carotene at 3.4 g/100 g in edible portions. In addition, the plant contains various antioxidants (in stem, leaf,and root tissues) that have potential long-term benefits for human health, although toxic (dioxin) properties have also been observed. Extracts from C. coronarium var. spatiosum have been shown to inhibit growth of Lactobacillus casei, a beneficial human intestinal bacterium." The plant’s greens are used in many Asian cuisines.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Sundae

    Sundae

    • Cuisine: American
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    The sundae is an ice cream dessert. It typically consists of a scoop of ice cream topped with sauce or syrup, and in some cases other toppings including chopped nuts, sprinkles, whipped cream, or maraschino cherries. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the origin of the term sundae is obscure, however, it is generally accepted that the spelling "sundae" derives from the word Sunday or, according to one source, from the German name Sonntag, which means Sunday. Among the many stories about the invention of the sundae, a frequent theme is that the dish arose in contravention to so-called blue laws against Sunday consumption of either ice cream or ice cream soda. The religious laws are said to have led druggists to produce a substitute for these popular treats for consumption on Sunday. According to this theory of the name's origin, the spelling was changed to sundae to avoid offending religious conventions. In support of this idea, Peter Bird wrote in The First Food Empire: A History of J. Lyons and Co. (2000) that the name 'sundae' was adopted as a result of Illinois state's early prohibition of ice cream consumption on Sundays, because ice cream with a topping that obscured
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Tom kha gai

    Tom kha gai

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Tom kha gai or Tom kha kai (Lao: ຕົ້ມຂ່າໄກ່; Thai: ต้มข่าไก่, RTGS: tom kha kai, IPA: [tôm kʰàː kàj]), literally "chicken galangal soup") is a spicy hot soup in Lao cuisine and Thai cuisine. This soup is made with coconut milk, galangal, lemon grass and chicken. The fried chillies add a smoky flavor as well as texture, color and heat, but not so much that it overwhelms the soup. The key is to get a taste balance between the spices. Thai-style tom kha gai does not use dill weed, whereas Lao-style tom kha gai usually contains "phak si" (dill weed), which is a common herb used in Lao cuisine. The Thais' answer to dill weed (known in Thailand as "phak chi Lao", since it's known locally as a Lao herb) in Tom kha is coriander or cilantro ("phak chi" in Thai). There are other versions of this soup made with seafood (tom kha thale), mushrooms (tom kha het), pork (tom kha mu) and tofu (tom kha taohu).
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Yuanyang

    Yuanyang

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Yuanyang or Coffee with tea (often spelled according to the Cantonese pronunciation Yuenyeung, Yinyeung, or Yinyong) is a popular beverage in Hong Kong, made of a mixture of three parts of coffee and seven parts of Hong Kong-style milk tea. It was originally served at dai pai dongs (open air food vendors) and cha chaan tengs (cafe), but is now available in various types of restaurants. It can be served hot or cold. The name yuanyang, which refers to Mandarin Ducks, is a symbol of conjugal love in Chinese culture, as the birds usually appear in pairs and the male and female look very different. This same connotation of a "pair" of two unlike items is used to name this drink. There are disputes if there were independent inventions of coffee-and-tea-mixtures in the Western world, some claiming it to be a Dutch serving. Various individuals have combined coffee with tea, sometimes using the name CoffTea or Tea Espress. The concept was suggested on the Halfbakery in 2000, and singer Peter André claimed to have invented CoffTea in an interview in 2004. In an interview in 2006, Sandra Blund recommended combining Savarin with chamomile tea in a ratio of 2 to 1 or combining organic Bolivian
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Aloo gobi

    Aloo gobi

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Cauliflower
    Aloo gobi (Hindi: आलू गोभी)(Urdu: آلو گوبی)(Burmese: အာလူး​​​ဂေါ်ဖီ álù gốphí /alu: gɔpʰi/, also spelled as 'alu gobi' or 'aloo gobhi' and 'alu gawbi' ) is a dry Indian, Nepali and Pakistani cuisine dish made with potatoes (aloo), cauliflower (gob(h)i) and Indian spices. It is yellowish in color, due to the use of turmeric, and occasionally contains kalonji and curry leaves. Other common ingredients include garlic, ginger, onion, coriander stalks, tomato, peas, and cumin. A number of variations and similar dishes exist, but the name remains the same.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Dhaba

    Dhaba

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    In India highways are dotted with local restaurants popularly known as dhabas (singular: dhaba; {Hindi: ढाबा). They generally serve local cuisine, and also serve as truck stops. In India they are most commonly found next to petrol stations, and most are open 24 hours a day. Since most Indian truck drivers are of Punjabi descent, and Punjabi food and music is quite popular throughout India, the word dhaba has come to represent any restaurant that serves Punjabi food, especially the heavily spiced and fried Punjabi fare preferred by many truck drivers. The word has come to represent sub-continental cuisine so much that many Indian restaurants in Europe and America have adopted it as a part of the name. Dhabas were characterized by mud structures and cots to sit upon (called 'chaarpai' in Hindi) while eating. A wooden plank would be placed across the width of the cot on which to place the dishes. With time, the cots were replaced by tables. The food is typically inexpensive and has a 'homemade' feel to it. The word has been alleged in folk etymology to stem from Punjabi dabba, m., box, lunch box, tiffin. Initial consonantal dh- neither give rise to nor develops from consonantal d-.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Gai yang

    Gai yang

    Kai yang (Thai: ไก่ย่าง, pronounced [kàj jâːŋ], lit. meaning "grilled chicken") or ping gai (Lao: ປິງໄກ່ [pîŋ ɡaj]) is a dish originating from the Lao people of Laos and Isan (Northeastern Thailand), but it is now commonly eaten throughout the whole of Thailand. The dish is a standard staple of street markets and readily available at all times. Being a typical Laotian/Isan dish, it is often paired with som tam/tam mak hoong and sticky rice (Thai/Isan: ข้าวเหนียว; [kʰâːw nǐow]; Lao: ເຂົ້າໜຽວ). It is also eaten with raw vegetables, and often dipped in spicy sauces such as Laotian jaew bong. In Thailand there are also many famous Thai Muslim varieties of kai yang which are not of Lao origin at all but more akin to the grilled chicken from Malaysia. The Laotian name for the dish is ປິງໄກ່ ([pîŋ ɡaj]) and means "roast chicken". In Laotian restaurants in the West, it is known as "Laotian barbecued chicken" or "ping gai". The Thai and Isan term is usually spelt ไก่ย่าง (kai yang; Isan: [kàj ɲâːŋ]), although ปิ้งไก่ (ping kai), a Thai letter rendering of the Laotian name, would be understood in Isan and in most of Thailand as well although to Thai ears it would sound a bit quaint, due to
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Mee Goreng

    Mee Goreng

    • Cuisine: Indonesian
    • Typical ingredients: Onion
    Mie goreng (Indonesian: mie goreng or mi goreng; Malay: mee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning "fried noodles") also known as bami goreng is a dish common in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, or beef, sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and acar (pickles). Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers to high-end restaurants. Mie goreng is Indonesian one-dish meal favorite, at the street food hawkers mie goreng is very common to be sold together with nasi goreng (fried rice). It is commonly available at mamak stalls in Singapore and Malaysia and is often spicy. The dish is derived from Chinese chow mein and believed to have been introduced by Chinese immigrants in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. Mie goreng is also similar to Japanese yakisoba. However mie goreng has been more heavily integrated into Indonesian cuisine; for example the application of popular sweet soy sauce, spinkle of fried shallots, addition of spicy sambal and the absence of pork and lard in
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Cream bun

    Cream bun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Cream bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. The bun has either butter cream or whipped cream filling down the middle with coconut sprinkles on the outside. Variations of it include the "Cream Horn", a pastry in a spiral shape, much like a horn, filled with cream.
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Dried shredded squid

    Dried shredded squid

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Dried shredded squid is a dried, seasoned, seafood product commonly found in coastal Asian countries, Russia and Hawai'i, made from squid or cuttlefish. The snack is also referred to as shredded squid, dried seasoned squid, prepared rolled squid or sun dried squid, and dried shredded cuttlefish. It should not be confused with regular dried squid found in the Philippines. Historically, squid is common in Pacific coastal regions of East Asia and Southeast Asia. Only after the packaged form began shipping to English speaking regions, did the translated English-language name "dried shredded squid" get imprinted on packages. The snack was popularized, sold and consumed regularly in Hong Kong during the 1970s. Shredded squid began being sold in Macau as an addition to their almond biscuit. In Japan, dried shredded squid is popularly served as an otsumami (snack consumed while drinking alcohol). In Korean cuisine, dried shredded squid is eaten as anju (food to eat while drinking), and as banchan (small side dishes) such as the dish ojingeochae bokkeum, which is made by stir-frying shredded dried squid seasoned with a mixture of gochujang (chili pepper paste), garlics, and mulyeot
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Banoffee pie

    Banoffee pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    Banoffee pie (also spelled banoffi, or banoffy) is an English dessert pie made from bananas, cream, and toffee from boiled condensed milk (or dulce de leche), either on a pastry base or one made from crumbled biscuits and butter. Some versions of the recipe also include chocolate, coffee or both. Its name is a portmanteau constructed from the words "banana" and "toffee". Credit for the pie's invention is claimed by Ian Dowding (chef) and Nigel Mackenzie (owner) at The Hungry Monk restaurant (now closed) in Jevington, East Sussex. They developed the dessert in 1972, having been inspired by an American dish known as "Blum's Coffee Toffee Pie", which consisted of smooth toffee topped with coffee-flavoured whipped cream. Dowding adapted the recipe to use instead the type of soft caramel toffee created by boiling a can of condensed milk, and worked with Mackenzie to add a layer of bananas. They called the dish "Banoffi" and it was an immediate success, proving so popular with their customers that they "couldn't take it off" the menu. The Hungry Monk closed its doors for the last time in January 2012 due to "increased running costs". It was purchased in 1968 by Nigel Mackenzie and his
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Gulkand

    Gulkand

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Gulkand, or Gulqand (Urdu: گل‏قند, Hindi: गुलक़न्द), is a sweet preserve of rose petals from Pakistan and North India. Gul means flower in both Persian and Urdu whereas qand means sweet in Arabic.In Turkish it is Gül Reçeli and in Hindi it is plant. Place the rose petals and sugar in layers in a wide-mouthed airtight glass jar. Place this jar in sunlight for 6 hours per day for around 3 to 4 weeks. On alternate days, the contents of the jar should be stirred with a wooden stick. The jar should be kept indoors once done. Other ingredients, such as silver foil, Praval Pishti, cardamom seeds, or Muktapishti (powdered pearl) can be added to increase the "cooling" properties of the gulkand. Gulqand is an Ayurvedic tonic. The National Institute of Ayurvedic Medicine provides a list of the benefits obtained from eating gulkand. This includes reduction of pitta and heat in the body, a reduction in eye inflammation and redness, strengthening of the teeth and gums, and the treatment of acidity. A complete list of benefits is available on their website. Gulqand is commonly used as an ingredient of Paan, a popular dessert and digestive of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Gulkand has been
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Taco

    Taco

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Tortilla
    A taco ( /ˈtɑːkoʊ/,  /ˈtækoʊ/) Nahuatl: tlacopan [t͡ɬa.'ko.pan] is a traditional Mexican dish composed of a corn or wheat tortilla folded or rolled around a filling. A taco can be made with a variety of fillings, including beef, pork, chicken, seafood, vegetables and cheese, allowing for great versatility and variety. A taco is generally eaten without utensils and is often accompanied by garnishes such as salsa, avocado or guacamole, cilantro, tomatoes, minced meat, onions and lettuce. According to the Real Academia Española, publisher of Diccionario de la Lengua Española, the word taco describes a typical Mexican dish of a maize tortilla folded around food ("Tortilla de maíz enrollada con algún alimento dentro, típica de México"). The original sense of the word is of a "plug" or "wad" used to fill a hole ("Pedazo de madera, metal u otra materia, corto y grueso, que se encaja en algún hueco"). The Online Etymological Dictionary defines taco as a "tortilla filled with spiced meat" and describes its etymology as derived from Mexican Spanish, "light lunch," literally, "plug, wadding." The sense development from "plug" may have taken place among Mexican silver miners, who used
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Aloo pie

    Aloo pie

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    An aloo pie is a variant of the samosa popular in Trinidad and Tobago. It is a soft, fried pastry made from flour and water, and filled with boiled, spiced and mashed potatoes (aloo being the Hindi word for "potato") and other vegetables like green peas or chana dal (split chickpeas without their seedcoat). Its shape is similar to a calzone, and it is usually larger than a samosa, approximately 5 inches (12.7 cm) long. It is usually ordered with a sweet and sour type Indian dipping sauce known as "imli ki chutney".
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Cochinita pibil

    Cochinita pibil

    • Cuisine: Mexican
    • Typical ingredients: Pork
    Cochinita pibil (also puerco pibil) is a traditional Mexican slow-roasted pork dish from the Yucatán Península. Preparation of traditional cochinita or puerco pibil involves marinating the meat in strongly acidic citrus juice, coloring it with annatto seed, and roasting the meat while it is wrapped in banana leaf. Cochinita means baby pig, so true cochinita pibil involves roasting a whole suckling pig. Alternatively, pork shoulder (butt roast), or pork loin is used in many recipes. The high acid content of the marinade and the slow cooking time tenderizes the meat, allowing otherwise tough pieces of meat to be used. The Yucatecan recipes always employ the juice of Seville or bitter oranges for marinating. In areas where bitter oranges are not common, juice of sweet oranges combined with lemons, limes, or vinegar are employed to approximate the effect of the bitter orange on the meat. Another important ingredient in all pibil recipes is achiote (annatto), which gives the meat its characteristic color and adds to flavor. Traditionally, cochinita pibil was buried in a pit with a fire at the bottom to roast it. The Mayan word pibil means "buried". In the movie Once Upon a Time in
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Sushi

    Sushi

    • Cuisine: Japanese Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Rice
    Sushi (すし, 寿司, 鮨, 鮓, 寿斗, 寿し, 壽司) is a Japanese food consisting of cooked vinegared rice (shari) combined with other ingredients (neta), usually raw fish or other seafood. Neta and forms of sushi presentation vary, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is vinegared rice called sushi-meshi. Raw meat sliced and served by itself is sashimi. The original type of sushi, known today as nare-zushi (馴れ寿司, 熟寿司) was first developed in Southeast Asia possibly along what is now known as the Mekong River and then spread to southern China before introduction to Japan. The term sushi comes from an archaic grammatical form no longer used in other contexts; literally, sushi means "sour-tasting", a reflection of its historic fermented roots. The oldest form of sushi in Japan, narezushi, still very closely resembles this process, wherein fish is fermented via being wrapped in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins break down via fermentation into its constituent amino acids. The fermenting rice and fish results in a sour taste and also one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese. In Japan, narezushi evolved into oshizushi and ultimately Edomae nigirizushi, which is what the
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Apple pie

    Apple pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Shortening
    • Type of dish: Dessert
    An apple pie is a fruit pie (or tart) in which the principal filling ingredient is apples. It is sometimes served with whipped cream or ice cream on top. Pastry is generally used top-and-bottom, making it a double-crust pie, the upper crust of which may be a circular shaped crust or a pastry lattice woven of strips; exceptions are deep-dish apple pie with a top crust only, and open-face Tarte Tatin. Cooking apples (culinary apples), such as the Bramley, Empire, Northern Spy or Granny Smith, are crisp and acidic. The fruit for the pie can be fresh, canned, or reconstituted from dried apples. This affects the final texture, and the length of cooking time required; whether it has an effect on the flavour of the pie is a matter of opinion. Dried or preserved apples were originally substituted only at times when fresh fruit was unavailable. Apple Pie is often served in the style "a la Mode" (topped with ice cream). Alternatively, a piece of cheese (such as a sharp cheddar) is occasionally placed on top of or alongside a slice of the finished pie. English apple pie recipes go back to the time of Chaucer. The 1381 recipe (see illustration at right) lists the ingredients as good apples,
    6.00
    1 votes
    192
    Chennai cuisine

    Chennai cuisine

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Tamil Nadu is famous for its hospitality and its deep belief that serving food to others is a service to humanity, so eating-out in its capital city Chennai, is a great experience and provides a glimpse of the unique lifestyle of the city. Chennai is known for Tamil cuisine, brought to the city by people who have migrated from different parts of Tamil Nadu. Its rich traditions offer a variety of dishes, not only vegetarian but also Non-Vegetarian food. Chennai has a large collection of restaurants, some of them are unique 'Speciality Restaurants', which serve 'Indian Cuisine' with an ambience to match, while most others cater South Indian tiffin and meals, at very reasonable prices. Pure vegetarian restaurants under the brand name of Udupi cuisine, which is synonymous with delicious vegetarian food all over world, serve a variety of tiffin and vegetarian meals, mostly from South Indian state of Karnataka. Many of these restaurants have nowadays diversified and offer other Indian and Indianized Chinese dishes as well. Tiffin or light meals is served for breakfast or as a snack. These are usually one or more dishes like Idli, Dosai, Idiyappam, Pongal and Vadai along with coconut
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    Dal

    Dal

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Lentil
    Dal (also spelled Dahl or Daal) is a preparation of pulses (dried lentils, peas or beans) which have been stripped of their outer hulls and split. It also refers to the thick stew prepared from these pulses, an important part of Indian, Nepali, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is regularly eaten with rice and vegetables in southern India, and with both rice and roti (wheat-based flat bread) throughout northern India and Pakistan. Dal is a ready source of proteins for a balanced diet containing little or no meat. Sri Lankan cooking of dal resembles that of southern Indian dishes. The word dāl derives from the Sanskrit verbal root dal- 'to split'. Dal preparations can be eaten with rice, as well as Indian breads in North India. In Pakistan it is eaten with rice and with wheat bread called Roti. The way Dal is cooked and presented in Pakistan is less oily than other parts of the region. Dal has an exceptional nutritional profile. It provides an excellent source of protein for the Indian subcontinent, particularly for those adopting vegetarian diets or diets which do not contain much meat. Dal is typically around 25% protein by weight, giving it a
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    Goat roti

    Goat roti

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Goat Roti ( /ˈroʊti/ ROH-tee) is a type of wrap roti, a traditional East-Indian dish, popular in the West Indies and Caribbean communities throughout North America. It consists of curried goat served in a roti, often with dal.
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Kebab

    Kebab

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    • Typical ingredients: Lamb
    Kebab (or originally kabab) is a wide variety of skewered meals originating in the Middle East and later on adopted in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Balkans, Spain, as well as Central and South Asia, that are now found worldwide. In English, kebab with no qualification generally refers more specifically to shish kebab (Turkish: "şiş kebap") served on the skewer. In the Middle East, however, kebab refers to meat that is cooked over or next to flames; large or small cuts of meat, or even ground meat; it may be served on plates, in sandwiches, or in bowls. The traditional meat for kebab is lamb, but depending on local tastes and taboos, it may now be beef, goat, chicken or fish. Like other ethnic foods brought by travellers, the kebab has become part of everyday cuisine in many countries around the globe. The origin of kebab may lie in the short supply of cooking fuel in the Near East, which made the cooking of large foods difficult while urban economies made it easy to obtain small cuts of meat at a butcher's shop. The phrase is Persian in origin and Arabic tradition has it that the dish was invented by medieval Persian soldiers who used their swords to grill meat over open-field fires.
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Korma

    Korma

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Korma (sometimes spelled kormaa, qorma, khorma, or kurma) is a dish originating in South Asia or Central Asia which can be made with yogurt, cream, nut and seed pastes or coconut milk; it is usually considered a type of curry. The word Korma (Azid) (قورمه in Persian) derives from the Turkish verb for roasting/grilling of Azid (Kavurma). Korma (Azid) has its roots in the Mughlai cuisine of modern-day India and Pakistan. It is a characteristic Indian dish which can be traced back to the 16th century and to the Mughal incursions into present-day Northern India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Classically, a korma is defined as a dish where meat or vegetables are braised with water, stock, and yogurt or creamy Azid (the name is in fact derived from the Hindi and Urdu words for "braise"). The technique covers many different styles of korma (Azid). The flavour of a korma is based on a mixture of spices, including ground coriander and cumin, combined with yogurt kept below curdling temperature and incorporated slowly and carefully with the meat juices. Traditionally, this would have been carried out in a pot set over a very low fire, with charcoal on the lid to provide all-round heat. A korma
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Kulolo

    Kulolo

    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Kulolo Hawaiian dessert made primarily from mashed taro corms and either grated coconut meat or coconut milk. Considered a pudding, kulolo has a solid consistency like fudge and is often served cut into squares. Its consistency is also described as being chewy and lumpy like tapioca, and its taste something like caramel. Traditional kulolo recipes call for wrapping the mixture in ti leaves and baking it in an imu (underground oven) for 6 to 8 hours. Modern recipes call for placing the mixture in a baking pan, covering it with aluminum foil, and baking in a standard oven for about 1-2 hours.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Pot pie

    Pot pie

    A pot pie is a term for a type of baked savory pie with a bottom and top completely encased by flaky crusts and baked inside a pie tin to support its shape. The pot pie does differ from the Australian meat pie and many British regional variants on pie recipes, which may have a top of flaky pastry, but whose body is usually made from heavier, more mechanically stable shortcrust, hot water crust or similar pastry. The pot pie may be considered a variation of the pasty. An American pot pie typically has a filling of meat (particularly beef, chicken or turkey), gravy, and mixed vegetables (potatoes, carrots, green beans and peas). Frozen pot pies are often available in individual serving sizes. The distinction between a pot pie and other types of savoury pie is specific to the United States of America and parts of Canada. In the United Kingdom a pot pie would simply be called a pie, the word having a much broader application in British English. Some American pie variations have no bottom crust and are more similar to a baked casserole (or chicken and dumplings) than to a traditional meat pie. Since the remaining top crust is not required to offer any structural support, it can be made
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Wedding soup

    Wedding soup

    Wedding soup or Italian wedding soup is an Italian-American soup consisting of green vegetables and meat. It is popular in the United States, where it is a staple in many Italian restaurants. Wedding soup consists of green vegetables (usually endive and escarole or cabbage, lettuce, kale, and/or spinach) and meat (usually meatballs and/or sausage) in a clear chicken-based broth. Wedding soup sometimes contains cavatelli, acini di pepe, pastina, orzo, other pasta, lentils, or shredded chicken. The term "wedding soup" is a mistranslation of the Italian language phrase "minestra maritata," which is a reference to the fact that green vegetables and meats go well together. The minestra maritata recipe is also prepared by the families of Lazio and Campania during the Christmas season (a tradition started from the Spanish domination of Italy to the present days). Some form of minestra maritata was long popular in Toledo, Spain, before pasta became an affordable commodity to most Spaniards. The modern wedding soup is quite a bit lighter than the old Spanish form, which contained more meats than just the meatballs of modern Italian-American versions.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    White cut chicken

    White cut chicken

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    White cut chicken or white sliced chicken is a siu mei. Unlike most other meats in the siu mei category, this particular dish is not roasted. The chicken is salt marinated and is cooked in its entirety in hot water or chicken broth with ginger. Other variations season the cooking liquid with additional ingredients, such as the white part of the green onion, cilantro stems or star anise. When the water starts to boil, the heat is turned off, allowing the chicken to cook in the residual heat for around 30 minutes. The chicken's skin will remain light coloured, nearly white and the meat will be quite tender, moist, and flavourful. The dish can be served "rare" in which the meat is cooked thoroughly but a pinkish dark red blood secretes from the bones. This is a more traditional version of white cut chicken that is rarely served in Chinese restaurants anymore. The chicken is usually cooled before cutting into pieces. The chicken is served in pieces, with the skin and bone, sometimes garnished with cilantro, leeks and/or a slice of ginger. A classic dip is made by combining finely minced ginger, green onion, salt and hot oil. Additional dips can be soy sauce, oyster sauce, or a chili
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Wonton

    Wonton

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Type of dish: Dumpling
    A wonton (also spelled wantan, wanton, or wuntun in transcription from Cantonese; Mandarin: húndùn [xwə̌n.dwə̌n]) is a type of dumpling commonly found in a number of Chinese cuisines. Wontons are made by spreading a square wrapper (a dough skin made of flour, egg, water, and salt) flat in the palm of one's hand, placing a small amount of filling in the center, and sealing the wonton into the desired shape by compressing the wrapper's edges together with the fingers. Adhesion may be improved by moistening the wrapper's inner edges, typically by dipping a fingertip into water and running it across the dry dough to dissolve the extra flour. As part of the sealing process, air is pressed out of the interior to avoid rupturing the wonton from internal pressure when cooked. The most common filling is ground pork with a small amount of flour added as a binder. The mixture is seasoned with salt, spices, and often garlic or finely chopped green onion. Factory-made, frozen varieties are sold in supermarkets. Commonly, they are handmade at the point of sale in markets or small restaurants by the proprietor while awaiting customers. In markets, they are sold by the unit, without being
    4.33
    3 votes
    202
    Kalakukko

    Kalakukko

    Kalakukko is a traditional food from the Finnish region of Savonia made from fish baked inside a loaf of bread. The Cornish pasty from Cornwall has the same basic idea of complete packed lunch. Kalakukko is especially popular in Kuopio, capital city of the Northern Savonia region. Kuopio is home to many kalakukko bakeries. The city also hosts an annual kalakukko baking contest. Traditionally, kalakukko is prepared with rye flour (like ruisleipä), although wheat is often added to make the dough more pliable. The filling consists of fish, pork and bacon, and is seasoned with salt (unless the pork is already salted). After being baked for several hours, traditionally in a masonry oven, kalakukko looks much like a large loaf of rye bread. If prepared correctly, bones of the fish soften and the meat and fish juices cook thoroughly inside the bread. This results in a moist filling. Traditionally, the fish used in kalakukko is either vendace (Finnish: muikku), or European perch (Finnish: ahven). Sometimes salmon is used. In southern Savonia the vendace is advocated as the only fish for the true kalakukko whereas in the northern parts of the province the same is said about the perch.
    5.00
    2 votes
    203
    Lai fun

    Lai fun

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Lai fun is a variety of Chinese noodle. It is commonly found in Pearl River Delta Region, Hong Kong and to some degree among overseas Chinatowns. Its name comes from the Cantonese language. Lai fun may also be referred to as Bánh canh by Vietnamese, in which case, it is made from rice flour and tapioca starch. Lai fun noodles are made from rice flour and/or tapioca starch and are available in short or long varieties. Lai fun has a very similar appearance with silver needle noodles. One way to distinguish the two is to look at the ends of each lai fun piece. The ends of lai fun noodles are often cut straight down as opposed to leaving a tapering "tail."
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Yum cha

    Yum cha

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Yum cha (simplified Chinese: 饮茶; traditional Chinese: 飲茶), also known as Ban ming (品茗), is a Chinese style morning or afternoon tea, which involves drinking Chinese tea and eating dim sum dishes. Yum cha in Cantonese literally means "drink tea", while ban ming is a more poetic "tasting of tea". In the U.S. and UK, the phrase dim sum is often used in place of yum cha; in Cantonese, dim sum (點心) refers to the wide range of small dishes, whereas yum cha, or "drinking tea", refers to the entire meal. The Cantonese name yum cha primarily refers to the tradition of morning tea in Cantonese cuisine exemplified by the traditional tea houses of Guangzhou. Due to the prevalence of Cantonese cuisine outside China, the Cantonese yum cha tradition can be found in many parts of the world. By analogy, yum cha is also used to refer to morning or afternoon teas in other Chinese cultural traditions, even though such meals have different native names. Similarly to a Western morning or afternoon tea, despite the name, yum cha is focused as much on the food items served with the tea as the tea itself. These food items are collectively known as "dim sum", a varied range of small dishes which may
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    Cha chaan teng

    Cha chaan teng

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A cha chaan teng (lit.: tea food hall) meaning tea restaurant, is commonly found in Greater China, including particularly Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and parts of Guangdong. They are known for eclectic and affordable menus, which include many dishes from Hong Kong cuisine and Hong Kong-style Western cuisine. Since the 1980s they can also be found in the Chinatown districts of many Western countries like Australia, Canada, United Kingdom and the United States. Cha chaan teng establishments provide tea (usually weak tea) called "clear tea" (清茶 cing1 caa4), to customers as soon as they are seated. Some patrons use the hot tea to wash their utensils. The name, literally "tea restaurant", serves to distinguish itself from Western restaurants that provide water to customers instead of tea. The "tea" in the name refers to the inexpensive black tea, not the traditional Chinese tea served in traditional dim sum restaurants and teahouses (茶樓 caa4 lau4). Moreover, some cha chaan tengs prefer the use of the word "café" in their names. The "tea" may also refer to tea drinks, such as the Hong Kong-style milk tea and cold lemon tea, which are very popular in cha chaan tengs. The older generations in
    4.50
    2 votes
    206
    Khash

    Khash

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    • Typical ingredients: Tripe
    Kale Pache (Armenian: Խաշ, Azerbaijani: Xaş, Georgian: ხაში, Persian: کله ‌پاچه [Kale Pache], Arabic: باجة[Pacha], Bulgarian: Пача [Pacha], Türkçe: Kelle Paça is a traditional dish in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Georgia, Bulgaria and Turkey. Formerly a nutritious winter food for the poor people, it is now considered a delicacy, and is enjoyed as a festive winter meal, usually by a company of men who sit around in a table, early in the morning. Modern-day convention in Armenia dictates that it should be consumed during the month that has an 'r' in its name, thus excluding May, June, July, and August (month names in Armenian are derivatives of the Latin names). No such restriction on khash consumption exists in Georgia. A similar food is called piti in the vicinity of Kars Province, Turkey, although piti is also made from feet of other livestock, primarily sheep. It may originate from the Armenian verb "khashel," which means "to boil." The Persian name literally translates as head and hoof which are the central ingredients in this dish. Khash remains a purist meal with great parsimony in ingredients. The main ingredient in khash is cow's feet (known in Armenian as
    4.50
    2 votes
    207
    Ararat

    Ararat

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Ararat is an Armenian brandy that has been produced by the Yerevan Brandy Company since 1887. It is made from Armenian white grapes and spring water, according to a traditional method. "Ordinary Brandies" are aged for 3, 4, 5, or 6 years, the soft flavor of the Brandy being based on selected brands of wines and pure spring water, which help to create a unique taste for each type of Ararat Brandy. The "Aged Brandies" of 10, 15, 18, and 20 years each have their own unique taste and specific dark golden color. The distinctive aroma and rich bouquet of these Brandies allowed the Yerevan Brandy Company to enjoy considerable success in international exhibitions and tastings. Ararat Brandy is not only popular in Armenia, but in many of the former states of the Soviet Union, chief among them Russia (where it's known under the name Armjanskij Konjak), Georgia, Ukraine and Belarus. In the Russian-speaking countries of the former Soviet Union the Armenian Brandy is marketed as cognac. This is because in 1900, the brandy won the Grand-prix award in Paris and the company so impressed the French that they have been allowed to legally call the product "cognac". The term "brandy" has never really
    5.00
    1 votes
    208
    Bao yu

    Bao yu

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Typical ingredients: Oyster sauce
    Baoyu is the common Chinese name given to abalone and also the dried seafood product produced from the adductor muscle of abalone. In dried form, it is a highly prized and expensive ingredient used in Chinese cuisine. In certain regional Chinese cuisines, its status ranks with such priced ingredients as shark's fin, sea cucumber and bird's nest. Fresh abalone is rarely used in Chinese cuisine. It is often purchased in dehydrated form and rehydrated prior to cooking. Recently, the use of canned abalone in recipes has risen in popularity. Unlike Japanese cuisine, only the adductor muscle of the abalone is consumed in Chinese cuisine. Abalone innards are rarely, if ever, used in Chinese cooking.
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    Cream pie

    Cream pie

    A cream pie is a type of pie filled with a rich custard or pudding that is made from milk, cream, flour, and eggs. It can come in many forms, including vanilla, lemon, lime, peanut butter, banana, coconut, and chocolate. A constant feature of all cream pies is the whipped cream topping. The custard filling is related to the French crème patissière which is a key component of various French cakes and tarts. It is a one-crust pie. Cream pies are often associated with comedians who use them as a gimmick in their routines. When used for show business purposes, cream pies are generally mock-up pies made from only canned whipped cream or sometimes the less expensive shaving cream.
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    Crispy fried chicken

    Crispy fried chicken

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    • Typical ingredients: Chicken meat
    Crispy fried chicken is a standard dish in the Cantonese cuisine of southern China and Hong Kong. The chicken is fried in such a way that the skin is extremely crunchy, but the white meat is relatively soft. The dish often served with two side dishes, a pepper salt (椒鹽) and prawn crackers (蝦片). The pepper salt, colored dark white to gray, is dry-fried separately in a wok. Traditionally, it is to be eaten at night. It is also one of the traditional chicken dishes used in Chinese weddings and other Asian weddings.
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Ding Ding Tong

    Ding Ding Tong

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Deuk Deuk Tong or commonly referred to as Ding Ding Tong is a type of traditional candy in Hong Kong. It is a hard maltose candy with sesame and ginger flavours. The sweet is made by first melting maltose, then adding to it various ingredients and continuously stirring the mixture. Before the mixture solidifies, it is put on a metal stick and pulled into a line shape, then coiled into the shape of a plate. In Cantonese, deuk means chiselling, breaking things into pieces. When street hawkers sold the candy, it was necessary for them to break apart its original shape with a pair flat chisels, namely "deuk". Chiselling makes noise and attracts children to buy. Deuk Deuk Tong was thus named (Tong means "candy" or "sugar" in Cantonese). Today, in order to cater to young people's tastes, different flavours of Deuk Deuk Tong are also made, including coconut, chocolate, mango, banana, and strawberry flavours.
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Egg tart

    Egg tart

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    The egg tart or egg custard tart (commonly romanized as dan tat) is a kind of custard tart pastry commonly found in Hong Kong and other Asian countries, which consists of an outer pastry crust that is filled with egg custard and baked. It is listed at number 16 on World's 50 most delicious foods compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Custard tarts were introduced in Hong Kong in the 1940s by cha chaan tengs. They were then introduced in western cafes and bakeries to compete with dim sum restaurants, particularly for yum cha. During the economic boom of the 1950s and 1960s, Lu Yu Teahouse took the lead with the mini-egg tart. Ironically, mini egg tarts are now a common dim sum dish and are richer than those served in bakeries. One theory suggests Hong Kong egg tarts are an adaptation of English custard tarts. Guangdong had more frequent contact with the West, in particular Britain, than the rest of China. As a former British colony, Hong Kong adopted some British cuisine. Another theory suggests that egg tarts evolved from the very similar Portuguese egg tart pastries, known as pastel de nata, traveling to Hong Kong via the Portuguese colony of Macau. Today, egg tarts come in many variations
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Flame on the Iceberg

    Flame on the Iceberg

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Flame on the Iceberg is a dessert popular in Hong Kong, similar to Baked Alaska in Western cuisine. The dessert is an ice cream ball in the middle of a sponge cake, with cream on the top. Whisky and syrup are poured over the top and the ball set alight before serving. Decades ago, the delicacy was served only in high-end hotel restaurants, but today it is commonly served in many Western restaurants and even in some cha chaan teng.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Irish stew

    Irish stew

    • Cuisine: Irish
    • Typical ingredients: Potato
    • Type of dish: Stew
    Irish stew (Irish: stobhach / stobhach Gaelach) is a traditional stew made from lamb, or mutton (mutton is used as it comes from less tender sheep over a year old, is fattier, and has a stronger flavour) as well as potatoes, onions, and parsley. It may sometimes also include carrots. —Davidson, Alan. (2006). Oxford Companion to Food. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (p. 409). Stewing is an ancient method of cooking meats that is common throughout the world. However, the Celts did not possess their first bronze cauldrons, copied from Greek models, until the seventh century BC. After the Celtic invasion of Ireland, the cauldron (along with the already established spit) became the dominant cooking tool in ancient Ireland, ovens being practically unknown to the ancient Gaels. The root vegetables and meat (originally goat) for the stew were then all in place, save for the potato. The introduction of the potato, originally a South American crop, did not occur until after the sixteenth century. More recent developments in Irish stews have included the adding of stout beer, starting in the twentieth century. In parts of the Irish diaspora where sheep are less common than in Ireland, such
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Jambalaya

    Jambalaya

    • Cuisine: Cajun
    • Typical ingredients: Pork
    Jambalaya ( /ˌdʒʌmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JUM-bə-LY-ə) is a Louisiana Creole dish of Spanish and French influence. Jambalaya originated in the Caribbean Islands. The Spanish culture mixed with the native foods and created what we know as Jambalaya. Jambalaya is traditionally made in three parts, with meats and vegetables, and is completed by adding stock and rice. It is also a close cousin to the saffron colored paella found in Spanish culture. There are two primary methods of making jambalaya. The first and most common is Creole jambalaya (also called "red jambalaya"). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients. The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Lahmacun

    Lahmacun

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Lahmacun (Turkish: Lahmacun), (Armenian լահմաջուն lahmaǰun or լահմաջո lahmaǰo), from Arabic: لحم بعجين‎, lahm bi'ajīn, "meat with dough", is an item of prepared food consisting of a round, thin piece of dough topped with minced meat (most commonly beef and lamb) and minced vegetables and herbs including onions, tomatoes and parsley. Lahmacun is often served sprinkled with lemon juice and wrapped around vegetables, including pickles, tomatoes, peppers, onions, lettuce, and roasted eggplant; atypical variants may be found employing kebab meat or sauces.
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Drunken noodles

    Drunken noodles

    • Cuisine: Thai
    Drunken noodles (or Pad Kee Mao, less frequently Pad Ki Mao or Pad Kimao, Lao: ຜັດຂີ້ເມົາ; Thai: ผัดขี้เมา, RTGS: phat khimao, [pʰàt kʰîːmaw]) is a Chinese-influenced dish that was made popular by the Chinese people living in Laos and Thailand. It is a stir fried noodle dish very similar to Phat Si Io, but with a slightly different flavor profile. It is made with broad rice noodles, soy sauce, fish sauce, garlic, meat or tofu, bean sprouts, and various seasonings. Chili and basil give rise to its distinctive spiciness. Drunken fried rice or khao phat khimao is a similar dish.
    4.00
    2 votes
    218
    Biscuit roll

    Biscuit roll

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    The biscuit roll, crispy biscuit roll, crisp biscuit roll or cookie roll is a type of biscuit snack commonly found in many parts of Asia. It is crunchy and can be easily broken into pieces. The Chinese name of "蛋卷" is identical to that of the Chinese name for egg roll, despite both items being very different. In Hong Kong, biscuit rolls are made of wheat flour, butter, egg, sugar, and vanilla flavour. The New Territories is one of the places that manufacturers biscuit rolls. It is called barquillos in the Philippines and is commonly sold in souvenir shops or delicacy stores all over towns, cities, and highways along the provinces.
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Coconut bar

    Coconut bar

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Coconut bar is a refrigerated dim sum dessert found in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Southern China and in overseas Chinatowns. It is sweet and has a soft, gelatin-like texture but is white in color rather than translucent like gelatin. It is sometimes referred to as coconut pudding despite not really being a pudding. The dessert is made of coconut milk (preferably freshly made) and set with a mixture of tang flour (wheat starch) and corn starch, or a mixture of agar agar and gelatin. It is sweetened, and sometimes sprinkled with desiccated coconuts. The texture varies from silky springy (if gelatin and agar agar is used as setting agent) to creamy and texture (if wheat starch and corn starch are used to set the dessert) depending on individual preparations, and the standard dim sum version has no filling.
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Got fan

    Got fan

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Gotfan is a traditional pudding-like hot soup within Chinese cuisine. It is considered a more traditional and home-style dish in Hong Kong and China, and is rarely served in restaurants. The soup recipe is simple as it only requires the boiling of water and powder extracted from plant roots. Sugar is added for sweetness. The thickness varies depending on the ratio of water and powder. More powder and less water results in a thicker consistency. It is mostly considered a healthy snack. Sometimes it is used to cleanse the digestive system due to its purity. Different plants offer different powder. The soup ends up looking clear, white or even light green. In all cases, it is served hot.
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Hoe

    Hoe

    Hoe (Korean pronunciation: [ɸø] ~ [ɸe]) may refer to various raw food dishes in Korean cuisine. Saengseon hoe (생선회) or "Hwal-eo hoe" (활어회) is thinly sliced raw fish or other raw seafood (similar to Japanese sashimi); yukhoe (육회) is hoe made with a raw beef and seasoned with soy sauce, sesame oil, and rice wine; and gan hoe (간회) is raw beef liver with a sauce of sesame oil and salt. Fish hoe is usually dipped in a spicy gochujang-based sauce called chogochujang (초고추장), ssamjang (쌈장), or wasabi sauce, and wrapped in lettuce and Korean perilla leaves. When people finish a meal of saengseon hoe at a restaurant, they sometimes order maeuntang (spicy fish stew, from the fish heads and remaining meat) together with various vegetables. It can be assumed that the tradition of eating hoe was introduced from China to Korea during the early Three Kingdoms Period (57 BC-668 AD), facilitated by frequent interchanges between China and the Korean peninsula. According to the Confucian Analects, written in the 1st century BC, Confucius said "Do not shun rice that is well clean; do not shun kuai that is thinly sliced" (食不厭精,膾不厭細). While the term kuai (膾) originally referred to finely sliced raw fish
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Larb

    Larb

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Typical ingredients: Cabbage
    • Type of dish: Salad
    Larb (Lao: ລາບ; Thai: ลาบ, RTGS: lap [lâːp], also spelled laap, larp, laab or lahb) is commonly known as a type of Laotian and Isan (Northeast Thailand) sour and spicy meat salad that is regarded as the national dish of Laos. This type of larb is a creation of the Lao people, and is usually referred to by Westerners as to have originated in Laos. Larb from northern Thailand however, is a very different dish using an elaborate mix of dried spices and fresh herbs. Larb is most often made with chicken, beef, duck, turkey, pork or even fish, flavored with fish sauce, lime juice and fresh herbs. The meat can be either raw or cooked; it is minced and mixed with chili, mint and, optionally, assorted vegetables. Roughly ground toasted rice (khao khua) is also a very important component of the dish. The dish is served at room temperature and usually with a serving of sticky rice and raw vegetables. Fresh Thai basil (bai horapa) is also one of the standard accompaniments for larb in Thailand. The larb from northern Thailand is very different from the internationally more well-known Laotian and Isan style larb. The northern Thai larb does not contain lime or fish sauce, but instead an
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Scrambled eggs

    Scrambled eggs

    • Typical ingredients: Milk
    • Type of dish: Breakfast
    Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken eggs). Beaten eggs are put into a hot pot or pan (usually greased) and stirred frequently, forming curds as they coagulate. Raw eggs are whisked to blend the egg white and yolk into a homogeneous liquid. Liquids such as stock, cream, butter, milk, water, or oil may be added during the whisking to create a softer texture. The amount of liquid added is typically about 2 tbsp (30 mL) liquid per egg. Salt, pepper, or other seasonings can be added to taste. The whisked eggs are poured into a hot greased pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. The pan and the stirring implement, if kept in constant motion, will create small and soft curds. The lower the heat and the more constant the movement, the creamier the finished dish. Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs or cheese may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture
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    224
    Siu yi

    Siu yi

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Siu yeh (Chinese: 宵夜) is a late night meal in the food culture of Hong Kong. It comes after dinner, and is similar to supper. Mealtime may start from about 9pm onwards until 4am, which would be early morning yum cha time. It can range anywhere from a snack to a full-fledged meal. For people working late night shifts, siu yeh is also associated with their post-midnight meals. Siu yeh is also common in some parts of southern China, and is known there as yeh siu (Chinese: 夜宵).
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    225
    Steak and kidney pie

    Steak and kidney pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    Steak and kidney pie is a savoury pie that is filled principally with a mixture of diced beef, diced kidney (often of ox, lamb, or pork), fried onion, and brown gravy. Steak and kidney pie is a representative dish of British cuisine. The gravy typically consists of salted beef broth flavoured with Worcestershire sauce and black pepper, and thickened with refined flour, beurre manié, or corn starch. Hot water crust pastry, puff pastry, and shortcrust pastry are among the pastry crusts prepared for steak and kidney pie. Among the various vernacular rhyming slang names for steak and kidney pie are Kate and Sidney pie, snake and kiddy pie, and snake and pygmy pie.
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    226
    Sweet heart cake

    Sweet heart cake

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    A sweetheart cake or wife cake is a traditional Chinese pastry with flaky and thin skin made with winter melon, almond paste, and sesame, and spiced with five spice powder (Chinese spice blend of fennel seed, star anise, licorice root and cloves). "Wife cake" is the translation of lou po beng from Cantonese, and although the meaning is "wife," the literal translation is "old lady cake," paralleling the colloquial usage of "old lady" for "wife" in American English. The cake is still popular among many in Hong Kong and Mainland China. Many people in Hong Kong, as well as professional chefs, also bake "modern" varieties of this cake. The orthodox version is from the Guangdong-Hong Kong region, where filling consists of wintermelon made by the process of candying. The candied mash is then combined with white sesame seeds and glutinous rice flour. Coconut in the form of mash or desiccated shreds and almond paste as well as vanilla is also sometimes added. The authentic flavour and flaky texture of the pastry is produced by the usage of pork lard shortening then by glazing with egg wash. Due to its rising popularity in Western countries brought about by immigration, butter is sometimes
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    227
    Banana leaf rice

    Banana leaf rice

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Banana leaf rice is a typical dish in South Indian cuisine. In banana leaf rice, white rice (or parboiled rice in authentic South Indian restaurants) is served on a banana leaf with an assortment of vegetables, curried meat or fish, pickles, and/or papadum. Usually, only the gravy of the curry will be served and no meat is served as it is meant to be a traditional Indian vegetarian dish. It is traditionally eaten with the hand. The banana leaf is used as it is believed that the hot rice will release the coating on the banana leaf, which aids in digestion. In Malaysia, to show one's appreciation after a satisfying meal, the guest will fold the banana leaf inward to signify that the meal was good. Folding in the opposite direction (i.e. upward or outward) signifies that the meal was not satisfying.
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    228
    Bhelpuri

    Bhelpuri

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Bhelpuri (Hindi भेलपूरी, Marathi भेळ) is a savoury Indian snack, and is also a type of chaat. It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy tamarind sauce. Bhelpuri is often identified with the beaches of Mumbai (Bombay), such as Chowpatty. Bhelpuri is called Jhaal Muri in Kolkata (meaning "hot puffed rice"). A native Mysore variant of Bhelpuri is known as Churumuri in Bangalore. A dry variant of Bhelpuri popularly known as Bhadang is consumed after garnishing with onions, coriander and lemon juice. There is no clear mention about when and where the bhel puri was first prepared, but it belongs to the food family of chaats. Chaats are the salty and spicy snacks sold on the carts throughout India. It is believed that the bhel puri was first created in Sangli, Maharashtra and got famous through migrants in Mumbai. Bhelpuri is made from puffed rice and Sev (a fried snack shaped like thin noodles made from besan flour) mixed with potatoes, onions, Chat masala and chutney and mixture (a mix of different types of fried snacks), as the base of the snack. Other commonly used ingredients include tomatoes, onions and chilis added to the base; In northern India recipes also made by
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    229
    Bombay mix

    Bombay mix

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Bombay mix is the name used in the United Kingdom and Ireland for a traditional Indian snack known as chiwda, chevdo, bhuso (if made without potato), chevda (चिवडा) or chivdo (चिवडो) in India, or Chanāchura (Oriya: ଚନାଚୁର) in Orissa and chanachur (চানাচুর) in Bengal. The English name originates from the city of Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay), India. It consists of a variable mixture of spicy dried ingredients, which may include fried lentils, peanuts, chickpea flour noodles, corn, vegetable oil, chickpeas, flaked rice, fried onion and curry leaves. This is all flavoured with salt and a blend of spices that may include coriander and mustard seed. The traditional Indian food can be eaten as part of a meal; as a standalone snack, though, it is usually consumed with the hands. Alternative, regional versions include:
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    230
    Butter chicken

    Butter chicken

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Butter chicken (or murgh makhani) is part of Indian cuisine, popular in countries all over the world. The origins of butter chicken can be traced back to New Delhi. Butter chicken is regarded to have been first introduced by Moti Mahal, Daryaganj . Butter chicken is usually served with naan, roti, parathas, roomali roti or steamed rice. It should not be confused with chicken tikka masala, a similarly coloured Indian chicken dish that originated among the South Asian diaspora in the United Kingdom. It is thought that butter chicken was hastily prepared by a Delhi eatery chef post dinner time for a harried VIP customer who wanted "some" chicken dish. A chef named Simon Mahli Chahal first prepared this when he only had half of a Tandoori chicken which he tossed with liberal amounts of butter, tomato, and garam masalas to improvise for an delicious delicacy he was supposed to make for the ruler of Mareelun. He forgot to buy enough ingredients so he ended up with this dish. Though various versions exists for the recipe, typically dressed chicken (with or without bones) is marinated overnight in a yogurt and spice mixture usually including garam masala, ginger, garlic paste, lemon or
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    231
    Callaloo

    Callaloo

    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Callaloo (sometimes calaloo or kallaloo) is a popular Caribbean dish originated from West Africa served in different variants in across the Caribbean. The main ingredient is a leaf vegetable, traditionally either amaranth (known by many local names including callaloo or bhaaji), taro or Xanthosoma. Both are known by many names including callaloo, coco, tannia, bhaaji, or dasheen bush. Because the leaf vegetable used in some regions may be locally called "callaloo" or "callaloo bush", some confusion can arise among the different vegetables and with the dish itself. Outside of the Caribbean, water spinach is occasionally used. Trinidadians primarily use taro/dasheen bush for callaloo, while Jamaicans and Guyanese use the name callaloo to refer to amaranth, and use it in a plethora of dishes and also a drink ('callaloo juice'). It should be understood that the 'callaloo' made in Jamaica is different from the 'callaloo' made in Trinidad and Tobago in terms of main ingredient (the leaf used) and other ingredients included (for example, Jamaicans tend to use only callaloo leaf, salt, onions, escallion and simply steam the vegetable, while Trinidadians use okra and coconut milk to make an
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    232
    Cha Siu Baau

    Cha Siu Baau

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Cha siu bao or char siu bao is a Cantonese barbecue-pork-filled bun (baozi). The buns are filled with barbecue-flavored cha siu pork. They are served as a type of dim sum during yum cha and are sometimes sold in Chinese bakeries. There are two major kinds of cha siu bao: steamed (蒸, zheng) and baked (烤, kao). Steamed cha siu bao has a white exterior, while its baked counterpart is browned and glazed. Cha siu refers to the pork filling; the word bao simply means "bun". Although visually similar to other types of steamed baozi, the dough of steamed cha siu bao is unique since it makes use of both yeast and baking powder as leavening. This unique mix of leavening gives the dough of cha siu bao the texture of a slightly dense, but fine soft bread. Encased in the center of the bun is tender, sweet, slow-roasted pork tenderloin. This cha siu is diced, and then mixed into a syrupy mixture of oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, roasted sesame seed oil, rice vinegar, shaoxing wine or dry sherry, soy sauce, sugar and cornstarch. In Hawaiian pidgin, the item is called Manapua. The word does not mean "chewed-up" (mana) "pork" (puaʻa), as its spelling suggests. Rather, the current form is a shortening
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    233
    Cherry pie

    Cherry pie

    Cherry pie is a pie baked with a cherry filling. Traditionally, cherry pie is made with tart rather than sweet cherries as it is easier to control how sweet the pie eventually becomes and also eventually translates to a sharper taste. Morello cherries are one of the most common kinds of cherry used, but others, like the native black cherry, are also occasionally utilized. Although generally eaten in North America, cherry pie is also known in other parts of the world. It is a very popular treat in North America and prior to the advent of refrigeration it was most commonly eaten in midsummer (harvest of cherries in North America coincides with Canada Day on July 1 and America's Independence Day on July 4.) Cherry pie is also often eaten with whipped cream or ice cream. A common preparation tradition in the United States is to decorate the crust with ornate pastry patterns. Cherry pie as a dish enjoys a strong history in the United States and is often regarded as a "great American dish". A cherry pie figures prominently in Billy Boy, a nursery rhyme. The popular song by Warrant named "Cherry Pie", from their album of the same name is regarded as one of the group's best songs. Three
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    234
    Chinese sausage

    Chinese sausage

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Chinese sausage is a generic term referring to the many different types of sausages originating in China. It is commonly known by its Cantonese name "Lap Cheong" or "Lap Chong" (written as "臘腸" in Chinese). There is a choice of fatty or skimmed sausages. There are different kinds ranging from those made using fresh pork to those made using pig livers, duck livers and even turkey livers. Usually a livery sausage will be darker in colour than one made without liver. Recently, there have even been countries producing chicken Chinese sausages. Traditionally they are classified into two main types. It is sometimes rolled and steamed in dim sum. Chinese sausage is used as an ingredient in quite a number of dishes in southern Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Fujian, Jiangxi, Sichuan and Hunan, and also Hong Kong. Sichuan sausage also contain red chili powder and Sichuan pepper powder which give sausage a special flavor. Two common examples of such dishes include fried rice and lo mai gai. Many other examples include popiah and char kway teow in Fujian, Malaysia and Singapore. The traditional unpackaged forms are usually found in street market or wet markets. Wing Wah is a famous Hong Kong
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    235
    Curry paste

    Curry paste

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Thai curry refers to dishes in Thai cuisine that are made with various types of curry paste; the term can also refer to the pastes themselves. A Thai curry dish is made from curry paste, coconut milk or water, meat, seafood, vegetables or fruit, and herbs. Curries in Thailand mainly differ from the curries in Indian cuisine and other South Asian cuisines in their use of fresh ingredients such as herbs and aromatic leaves over a mix of spices. Thai people refer to dishes that are known as "Thai curries" in the Western world as "kaeng" (also written as "gaeng"; Thai: แกง, IPA: [kɛːŋ]). The first Thai dictionary from 1873 CE (2416 in the Thai Buddhist calendar) defines kaeng as a watery dish to be eaten with rice and utilizing shrimp paste, onions or shallots, chillies, and garlic as essential ingredients. Coconut milk is not included in this definition and many Thai curries, such as kaeng som and kaeng pa, do not feature it. Curries in Lanna (northern Thai) cuisine, with only a few exceptions, do not use coconut milk due to coconut palms not growing well, if at all, in the climate of the Thai highlands. The spiciness of Thai curries depends on the amount and kind of chilli used in
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    236
    Dai pai dong

    Dai pai dong

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Dai pai dong is a type of open-air food stall once very popular in Hong Kong. The government registration name in Hong Kong is "cooked-food stalls", but dai pai dong literally means "restaurant with a big license plate", referring to its size of license which is bigger than other licensed street vendors. There are only 28 such stalls remaining in Hong Kong. A dai pai dong is characterised by its green-painted steel kitchen, untidy atmosphere, the lack of air conditioning, as well as a variety of low priced great-wok hei dishes. Regarded by some as part of the collective memory of Hong Kong people, official dai pai dong are scarce today, numbering only 28, situated in Central (10), Sham Shui Po (14), Wan Chai (1), Tai Hang (2), and Tai O (1). Although the term dai pai dong is often used generically to refer to any food stall operating on the roadside with foldable tables, chairs and no air-conditioning (like those on Temple Street), legally speaking the term can only refer to those 28 stalls which possess the "big licenses". Unlicensed food stalls, which provided cheap everyday food such as congee, rice and noodles to the general public of humble income, appeared as early as the
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    237
    Eggs Benedict

    Eggs Benedict

    • Typical ingredients: Egg
    • Type of dish: Breakfast
    Eggs Benedict is a dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin, topped with ham or bacon, poached eggs and Hollandaise sauce. There are conflicting accounts as to the origin of Eggs Benedict, including: Mr. and Mrs. Benedict, when they lived in New York around the turn of the century, dined every Saturday at Delmonico's. One day Mrs. Benedict said to the maitre d'hotel, "Haven't you anything new or different to suggest?" On his reply that he would like to hear something from her, she suggested poached eggs on toasted English muffins with a thin slice of ham, hollandaise sauce and a truffle on top.
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    238
    Fish ball

    Fish ball

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Fish balls are a common food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities made from surimi (魚漿, yújiāng). They are also common in Scandinavia, where they are usually made from cod or haddock. The term 魚蛋 (literally "fish eggs") is used at street hawker stalls and dai pai dong in Hong Kong, while 魚丸 (yú wán) and 鱼圆 (yú yuán) are more commonly used in Singapore and Malaysia. Fish balls made in Scandinavia are similar to meatballs, only with fish flesh instead of pork or beef. Meatballs made in Asia differ significantly in texture from their European counterparts. Instead of grinding and forming meats, meat used for making meatballs is pounded, which lends a smooth texture to the meatballs. This is also often the case for fillings in steamed dishes. Pounding, unlike grinding, uncoils and stretches previously wound and tangled protein strands in meat. In Faroe Islands, fish balls are called knettir and made with ground fish and fat. In the Fuzhou area, "Fuzhou fish ball" (福州鱼丸) is made from fish and has minced pork filling within the fish ball. There are two kinds of fish balls in Hong Kong. One is smaller in size, yellow in colour, made with cheaper meat, and is sold on a bamboo
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    239
    Galbi

    Galbi

    Kalbi or galbi generally refers to a variety of gui or grilled dishes in Korean cuisine that is made with marinated beef (or pork) short ribs in a ganjang-based sauce (Korean soy sauce). In the Korean language, galbi literally means "rib" and can often indicate uncooked ribs. In addition, the dish's full name is galbi gui, although "gui" (grilling) is commonly omitted to refer to it. Galbi is generally made with beef ribs, and it may be called "sogalbi" (소갈비) or "soegalbi" (쇠갈비). Prefix "so" or "soe" (beef) is often omitted. It is also called bulgalbi when grilled over fire. As the literal meaning is "rib", the galbi dish can also be made with pork ribs or chicken. In such cases, the dish is called "dwaeji galbi" (돼지갈비) or "dak galbi" (닭갈비) to emphasize the main ingredient. It is listed at number 41 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll complied by CNN Go in 2011. The ingredients (often, ribs or meats) are marinated in a sauce made primarily from soy sauce, garlic, and sugar. However, several variations on the marinade exist including recipes that utilize sesame oil, rice wine or hot pepper paste. Fruit juice, lemon-lime soda and honey have become more common additions
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    240
    Gota

    Gota

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    In telephony, GoTa or “Global Open Trunking Architecture” is a CDMA-based digital trunking system. The GoTA system was developed by ZTE, a Chinese manufacturer. The GoTA system can be used for both private and public trunking network applications. GoTa is capable of providing a variety of trunking services: In addition to trunking service, GoTa can provide value-added services such as short messages, location based services and other data services. The original GoTa standard was developed for the 800 MHz band. GoTa is adapted to work in the 450 MHz band as well. PTT PoC or Push to talk over Cellular is a feature similar to walkie-talkie that is provided over a cellular phone network.
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    241
    Halva

    Halva

    • Cuisine: Indian cuisine
    Halva (or halawa, alva, xalwo, haleweh, ħelwa, halvah, halava, helava, helva, halwa, halua, aluva, chalva, chałwa, "حلاوة") refers to many types of dense, sweet confections, served across the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Malta and the Jewish world. The term halva (Arabic: حلوى‎ / ALA-LC: ḥalwà), meaning "sweet", is used to describe two types of desserts: Halva may also be based on numerous other ingredients, including sunflower seeds, various nuts, beans, lentils, and vegetables such as carrots, pumpkins, yams, and squashes. The word halva entered the English language between 1840 and 1850 from the Yiddish halva. The latter term came from the Turkish helva, a word which itself ultimately derived from the Arabic ḥalwā, meaning sweet confection. The Arabic root حلوى ḥalwā means "sweet". Most types of halva are relatively dense confections sweetened with sugar or honey. Their textures, however, vary. For example, semolina-based halva is gelatinous and translucent, while sesame-based halva is drier and more crumbly. This type is made by frying the flour such as semolina in oil into a roux and cooking it
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    242
    Jin deui

    Jin deui

    • Cuisine: Cuisine of Hong Kong
    Jian dui is a type of fried Chinese pastry made from glutinous rice flour. The pastry is coated with sesame seeds on the outside and is crisp and chewy. Inside the pastry is a large hollow, caused by the expansion of the dough. The hollow of the pastry is filled with a filling usually consisting of lotus paste (蓮蓉), or alternatively sweet black bean paste (hei dousha, 黑豆沙), or less commonly red bean paste (hong dousha, 紅豆沙). Depending on the region and cultural area, jian dui are known as matuan (麻糰) in northern China, ma yuan (麻圆) in northeast China, and jen dai (珍袋) in Hainan. In American Chinese restaurants and pastry shops, they are known as Sesame Seed Balls. They are also sometimes referred to as zhimaqiu (芝麻球), which translates to sesame balls in English. The origins of jian dui can be traced back to the Tang dynasty as a palace food in Chang'an, known as lüdui (碌堆). This food item was also recalled in a poem by the Tang poet Wang Fanzhi. With the southward migration of many peoples from central China, the jian dui was brought along and hence became part of southern Chinese cuisine. In Hong Kong, it is one of the most standard pastries. It can also be found in most Chinatown
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    243
    Key lime pie

    Key lime pie

    Key lime pie is an American dessert made of key lime juice, egg yolks, and sweetened condensed milk in a pie crust. The traditional Conch version uses the egg whites to make a meringue topping. The dish is named after the small Key limes (Citrus aurantifolia 'Swingle') that are naturalized throughout the Florida Keys. While their thorns make them less tractable, and their thin, yellow rinds more perishable, key limes are more tart and aromatic than the common Persian limes seen year round in most U.S. grocery stores. Key lime juice, unlike regular lime juice, is a pale yellow. The filling in key lime pie is also yellow, largely due to the egg yolks. During mixing, a reaction between the condensed milk and the acidic lime juice occurs which causes the filling to thicken on its own without requiring baking. Many early recipes for Key lime pie did not require the cook to bake the pie, relying on this chemical reaction (called souring) to produce the proper consistency of the filling. Today, in the interest of safety due to consumption of raw eggs, pies of this nature are usually baked for a short time. The baking also thickens the texture more than the reaction alone. The origin of
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    244
    Kibbeh

    Kibbeh

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Kibbeh or kibbe (also kubbeh, kebbah or kubbi) (Arabic: كبة‎) is an Arab dish made of burghul, minced onions and ground red meat, usually beef, lamb, or goat or rice. The best-known variety is a torpedo-shaped fried croquette stuffed with minced beef or lamb. Other types of kibbeh may be shaped into balls or patties, and baked or cooked in broth. Kibbeh is a popular dish in Levantine cuisine. It is widespread in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt (where it is called kebbah or koubeiba), Cyprus (where they are called koupes), Israel, the Palestinian territories, the Arabian Peninsula, Turkey, and several Latin American nations which received part of the Lebanese and Syrian diaspora during the early 20th century, such as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Honduras and Mexico. The Arabic word kubbah means "ball". Various transliterations of the name are used in different countries: in English, kibbe and kibbeh and in Latin America, quibe, kibe, or quipe (Dominican Republic). Other names for the dish derive either from the Persian word کوفته kofteh (literally "ground [meat]"), such as the Turkish içli köfte, and the Armenian իշլի քյուֆթա išli k’yuft’a;
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    245
    Lavash

    Lavash

    • Cuisine: Armenian
    Lavash (Armenian: լավաշ, Turkish and Azeri: lavaş, Georgian: ლავაში lavaši, Kurdish: Lawaş لاواش, Persian: لَواش‎, lavāš) is a soft, thin flatbread popular in several countries of the northern parts of Western Asia. Traditionally the dough is rolled out flat and slapped against the hot walls of a clay oven. While quite flexible when fresh, lavash dries out quickly and becomes brittle and hard. The soft form is easier to use when making wrap sandwiches; however, the dry form can be used for long-term storage (almost one year) and is used instead of leavened bread in Eucharist traditions by the Armenian Apostolic Church. In villages in Armenia, the dried lavash is stacked high in layers to be used later, and when the time comes to rehydrate the bread, it is sprinkled with water to make it softer again. In its dry form, left-over lavash is used in Iran to make quick meals after being rehydrated with water, butter and cheese. In Armenia the dried bread is broken up into Khash. Fresh lavash is also used with kebabs to make dürüm wraps or in Armenia to make burum which are wraps with herbs and cheese. According to the Encyclopedia International, "Common to all Armenians is their
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    246
    Lemang

    Lemang

    • Cuisine: Indonesian
    Lemang is a traditional Malay food made of glutinous rice and coconut milk and cooked in a hollowed bamboo stick lined with banana leaves in order to prevent the rice from sticking to the bamboo. The cooking method using bamboo container is popular in Iban Dayak tribe of Borneo. Usually prepared for celebrations such as the Iban harvest festival of Hari Gawai, lemang is usually eaten with meat dishes such as chicken curry. In fact, the cooking process used in making lemang, also known as "pansoh/pansuh", is the traditional delicacy preparation by indigenous Dayak communities for a wide variety of meats. Lemang is popular in Malaysia, Malay communities of Indonesia, Minangkabau people and Iban communities of Borneo, Manado usually prepared by using the tapai method. Lemang can now be found throughout Indonesia due to the spread of Minangkabau people throughout the country. Lemang is ubiquitous among Malay communities and commonly eaten to mark the end of daily fasting during the annual Muslim Malaysian holidays of Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Hari Raya Haji. The aboriginal communities of West Malaysia (Orang Asli) also practice cooking rice in bamboo.. In East Malaysia, the Negrito,
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    247
    Massaman curry

    Massaman curry

    • Cuisine: Thai
    • Typical ingredients: Coconut milk
    Massaman curry (Thai: แกงมัสมั่น, RTGS: kaeng matsaman, IPA: [kɛːŋ mát.sa.màn]) is a Thai curry dish that is Muslim in origin. According to one theory, it originated in central Thailand at the court of Ayutthaya in the 16th century CE through a Persian envoy and trader. According to another theory, it originated in southern Thailand and its contacts with Arab traders. Due to its Muslim roots and therefore Islamic dietary laws, this curry is most commonly made with beef, but can also be made with duck, tofu, chicken, or, for non-Muslims, with pork (as pork is a forbidden food for Muslims, this variety is not eaten by observant Thai Muslims). The flavoring for Massaman curry is called Massaman curry paste (nam phrik kaeng matsaman). The dish usually contains coconut milk, roasted peanuts or cashews, potatoes, bay leaves, cardamom pods, cinnamon, star anise, palm sugar, fish sauce, chili and tamarind sauce. Traders brought spices such as turmeric, cinnamon, star anise, cumin, cloves and nutmeg from Indonesia to the south coast of Thailand. The dish is served with rice and sometimes with pickled ginger or "achat" (Thai: อาจาด, [aːtɕàːt]), an accompaniment made with cucumber and chili
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    248
    Samgyeopsal

    Samgyeopsal

    • Cuisine: Korean
    • Typical ingredients: Lettuce
    • Type of dish: Korean barbecue
    Samgyeopsal (삼겹살; Korean pronunciation: [samɡjʌp̚sal]) is a popular Korean dish. Commonly served as an evening meal, it consists of thick, fatty slices of pork belly meat (similar to uncured bacon). The meat, usually neither marinated nor seasoned, is cooked on a grill at the diners' table. Usually diners grill the meat themselves and eat directly from a grill. It is often dipped into a spicy pepper paste. The literal meaning of the word is "three (sam; 삼) layered (gyeop; 겹) flesh (sal;살)," referring to what appears to be three layers that are visible in the meat. One can also find ogyeopsal (오겹살), with o meaning "five". According to a 2006 survey by Agricultural Cooperatives in Korea (농업협동조합), 85% of South Korean adults surveyed stated their favorite pork is samgyeopsal. The survey also showed 70% of recipients eat the meat at least once a week. The high popularity of samgyeopsal makes it one of the most expensive parts of pork. South Korea imports wholesale samgyeopsal from Belgium, Netherlands and other countries for the purpose of price stabilization as imported pork is much cheaper than domestic. The South Korean government was planning to import 70000 t of samgyeopsal with no
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    249
    Stargazy pie

    Stargazy pie

    • Cuisine: British Cuisine
    • Typical ingredients: Sardine
    • Type of dish: Pastry
    Stargazy pie (sometimes called starrey gazey pie or other variants) is a Cornish dish made of baked pilchards, along with eggs and potatoes, covered with a pastry crust. Although there are a few variations with different fish being used, the unique feature of stargazy pie is fish heads (and sometimes tails) protruding through the crust, so that they appear to be gazing skyward. This allows the oils released during cooking to flow back into the pie. The dish originates from the village of Mousehole ( /ˈmaʊzəl/) in Cornwall and is traditionally eaten during the festival of Tom Bawcock's Eve to celebrate his heroic catch during a very stormy winter. According to the modern festival, which is combined with the Mousehole village illuminations, the entire catch was baked into a huge stargazy pie, encompassing seven types of fish and saving the village from starvation. There is evidence that the festival dates back even further, to pre-Christian times. The story of Bawcock was popularised by Antonia Barber's children's book The Mousehole Cat, which featured the star-gazy pie. In 2007 contestant Mark Hix won the BBC's Great British Menu with a variant of the dish. Stargazy pie is a
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    Vindaloo

    Vindaloo

    Vindaloo is an Indian curry dish popular in the region of Goa. The cuisine of the Mumbai-based East-Indians also includes a variation of the dish. However, it is known globally in its Anglo-Indian form as a staple of curry house menus, often regarded as a fiery spicy dish, though it is not necessarily the hottest dish available. The name Vindaloo is derived from the Portuguese dish "Carne de Vinha d' Alhos," which is a dish of meat, usually pork, with wine and garlic. The Portuguese dish was modified by the substitution of vinegar (usually palm vinegar) for the red wine and the addition of red Kashmiri chillies with additional spices to evolve into Vindaloo. Alternative terms are vindalho or vindallo. Nowadays, the Anglo-Indian version of a vindaloo is marinated in vinegar, sugar, fresh ginger and spices overnight and then cooked with the addition of further spices. The end result has a 'sweet sour' taste which is quite different from that adapted by UK restaurants. The restaurant version in the United Kingdom is said to be in response to its reputation as a dish eaten with beer, ale or lager. Restaurants often serve this dish with chicken or lamb sometimes mixed with potatoes.
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