Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 2.682 views
  • 620 votes
  • 620 voters
  • 5%
Best Disaster survivor of All Time

More about Best Disaster survivor of All Time:

Best Disaster survivor of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Disaster survivor of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Disaster survivor of All Time has gotten 2.682 views and has gathered 620 votes from 620 voters. O O

Best Disaster survivor of All Time is a top list in the Local category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of Local or Best Disaster survivor of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Local on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Disaster survivor of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Disaster survivor of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    Eberhard Bosch

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    1943-1944 Address: isolated house on the Naardense Driftweg, in Huizen He was musician and a German citizen living in the Netherlands, who married a Jew, Lientje. They had a daughter, Kathinka, and were hiding people in their house. At first, he avoided the service by going on a starvation diet. He soon had to go into hiding, though. In 1943, they combined households with his sister-in-law, Jannie, but they were arrested in the summer of 1944. With Jannie's help, he escaped a prison van, and he hid in the house of some friends. (Lientje and Jannie were meanwhile sent to the camps, where they would meet the Franks.) After the war, he and Lientje had another daughter, and sometimes they all performed together. At some point he moved near East Berlin: he was living there as recently as May 2005 (see program including an interview — in Dutch, within a two hour long program -- link no longer works, 3-20-11). (see Lientje's entry for references; according to HLOF p. 184-5, his last name was really Rebling. During the war period, he used Bosch -- so much so that two references other than HLOF called him Bosch)
    7.43
    7 votes
    2

    Marjorie Newell Robb

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Marjorie Newell Robb (February 12, 1889 – June 11, 1992) was one of the last remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic. She was the last remaining survivor who was a first class passenger, and one of the last two survivors (the other being Ellen Shine) who were adults at the time of the disaster, being at age 23 at the time. Marjorie Anne Newell, was born on February 12, 1889 in Lexington, Massachusetts, in the United States; she was the daughter of Arthur Webster Newell and Mary E. Greeley. Marjorie was returning from a trip to the Middle East with her father and her sister, Madeleine Newell. They boarded the RMS Titanic at Cherbourg, France. The night the ship struck the iceberg, Arthur Newell awoke his daughters and ordered them to dress themselves. They then headed up to the boat deck, where Arthur reluctantly placed his daughters into Lifeboat Number Six. Marjorie and Madeleine both survived. Arthur perished in the sinking however, and his body was recovered by the CS Mackay-Bennett. In the Winter of 1912, Att. Amos Taylor & Att. Robert Goodwin represented Mary Newell against Oceanic Steam Navigation Company for the sum of $110,400.00 together with costs from April
    7.43
    7 votes
    3
    8.00
    6 votes
    4

    Alfred Siegfried Cohen

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Anne Frank probably met this little kid because he was living for a time in 1942 with Miep, and also his grandmother was friends with Anne's father. Little Alfred survived the war in hiding, reportedly in Eemnes, at any rate in the Utrecht area. He had an older sister, Alida.
    7.00
    7 votes
    5
    Jacob Avigdor

    Jacob Avigdor

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Yaakov Avigdor (also Jacob) (1896–1967) was a Polish rabbi, author and Holocaust survivor, who served as Chief Rabbi of the Ashkenazi Jewish community in Mexico. He was born into a rabbinic family in Tyrawa Wołoska, a shtetl in the Austrian province of Galicia between the cities of Sanok and Przemyśl (now southeast Poland) in 1896. He excelled in religious studies and was ordained at the young age of 16 years. Later he attended the universities of Kraków and Lviv, obtaining a PhD in Philosophy. Acquiring a high reputation as an orator and Talmudist, he was named Chief Rabbi of Drohobych and Boryslav, then in southeast Poland (now western Ukraine), in 1920, where he officiated until the Nazi occupation. During the Holocaust, he lost his wife, his two daughters and his brother David the Rabbi of Andrychów, among many family members. After his liberation from the Buchenwald concentration camp, Avigdor became extremely active in the efforts of rescue and rehabilitation of Jewish refugees in postwar Europe. Upon immigrating to the U.S. in 1946, he accepted a pulpit in Brooklyn, New York, and six years later he was offered the rabbinate of Mexico, holding that position until his death in
    6.86
    7 votes
    6

    Valeen Schnurr

    • Survived disasters: Columbine High School massacre
    Valeen Schnurr was one of the survivors of the Columbine High School Massacre. She was shot and was asked by one of the shooters if she believed in God...she said "yes". They taunted her then left her alone and she was able to escape.
    6.86
    7 votes
    7
    Ed Silberberg

    Ed Silberberg

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Matthew James Perry Jr. (August 4, 1921 – July 29, 2011) was a United States federal judge. Born in Columbia, South Carolina, Perry was in the United States Army from 1943 to 1946, and then received a Bachelor of Science degree from South Carolina State College in 1948 and an LL.B. from South Carolina State College in 1951. He was in private practice in Spartanburg, South Carolina from 1951 to 1961, and in Columbia from 1961 to 1976. He defended Gloria Blackwell and her daughter Lurma Rackley. He led the successful court case to integrate Clemson University in 1963 and led a major South Carolina reapportionment case in 1972. He ran for the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1974, but lost to Republican incumbent Floyd Spence. Perry was the first African American lawyer from the Deep South to be appointed to the federal judiciary. In 1976, President Gerald Ford appointed Perry to the United States Military Court of Appeals (now the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces) in Washington, D.C. On July 5, 1979, Perry was nominated by President Jimmy Carter to a new seat on the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina created by 92 Stat.
    5.88
    8 votes
    8
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Robert Hart

    Robert Hart

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Robert Hart was a passenger on TWA flight 128. He was seated in seat 28E and survived the crash on November 20,1967 and was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Frederick Fleet

    Frederick Fleet

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Frederick Fleet (15 October 1887 – 10 January 1965) was a crewman and survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic after it struck an iceberg on 14 April 1912. Employed as a lookout aboard Titanic, it was Fleet who first sighted the iceberg, ringing the bridge to proclaim, "Iceberg, right ahead!" Fleet testified at the inquiries that if he had been issued binoculars, he would have seen the iceberg sooner, because it was a blue iceberg in calm seas on a moonless night. Fleet was born in Liverpool on 15 October 1887. He never knew his father, and his mother abandoned him and ran away with a boyfriend to Springfield, Massachusetts never to be heard from again. Frederick was raised by a succession of foster families and distant relatives. In 1903 he went to sea as a deck boy, working his way up to able seaman. Before joining Titanic he had sailed for over four years as a lookout in Oceanic. His address was given as Norman Road, Southampton. As a seaman, Fleet earned five pounds per month plus an extra 5 shillings for lookout duty. And it was as a lookout that Fleet joined the Titanic in April 1912. Fleet was one of the Titanic crewmembers assigned to man the lifeboats, after the ship
    6.00
    7 votes
    11

    Emily Lyons

    • Survived disasters: Birmingham abortion clinic bombing
    Emily Lyons (born July 18, 1956) is an American nurse who was gravely injured when Eric Robert Rudolph bombed an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Alabama, where she worked. She was a prominent figure during Rudolph's trial and sentencing, and has also become an activist for abortion rights. Lyons was born in 1956 in Montgomery, Alabama. She received a degree in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, with a focus on reproductive health, after which she worked in various nursing fields and locations, and taught nursing at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. At the time of the bombing, she was director of nursing at the New Woman All Women Clinic in Birmingham, having originally answered an advertisement for a part-time nurse. The morning of January 29, 1998, Lyons was approaching the clinic, when Robert Sanderson, a security guard, bent to inspect an unfamiliar potted plant in the front yard. The flowerpot contained a remote-controlled nail bomb, which exploded and killed Sanderson immediately. Lyons was severely injured: one eye was destroyed and the other damaged, her hand was mangled, a hole was torn in her abdomen that necessitated the removal of 10 inches of
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    Louis-Christophe Zaleski-Zamenhof

    Louis-Christophe Zaleski-Zamenhof

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Louis-Christophe Zaleski-Zamenhof (born Ludvik Zamenhof, 23 January 1925) is a civil and marine engineer, specializing in the design of structural steel and concrete construction. He is a grandson of L. L. Zamenhof, the originator of the international auxiliary language Esperanto. Since the 1960s he has lived in France. He was born in Warsaw. After his father Adam Zamenhof was arrested and shot to death by the Nazis occupying Poland, he and his mother Wanda barely escaped deportation to the Nazi death camp at Treblinka where his aunts Zofia Zamenhof and Lidia Zamenhof were murdered. The teenager remained in hiding within Poland under the false name of 'Krzysztof Zaleski', a name he maintained afterwards in remembrance of the ordeal. During that time, he worked in a tomato field together with a Pole who happened to speak Esperanto; this person once tried to recruit him to the cause, asking him: Ĉu vi konas Esperanton? ("Do you know Esperanto?"). 'Christoph' blurted out: Ho jes, mi konas; ĝin inventis mia avo! ("Oh yes, I know it; my grandfather invented it!") He immediately feared that he had been indiscreet and would be denounced and arrested, but nothing untoward occurred. After
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Simon Wiesenthal

    Simon Wiesenthal

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Simon Wiesenthal, KBE (December 31, 1908 – September 20, 2005) was an Austrian Holocaust survivor who became famous after World War II for his work as a Nazi hunter. After four and a half years in the German concentration camps such as Janowska, Plaszow, and Mauthausen during World War II, Wiesenthal dedicated most of his life to tracking down and gathering information on fugitive Nazis so that they could be brought to justice for war crimes and crimes against humanity. In 1947, he co-founded the Jewish Historical Documentation Center in Linz, Austria, in order to gather information for future war crime trials. Later he opened the Jewish Documentation Center in Vienna. Wiesenthal wrote The Sunflower, which describes a life-changing event he experienced when he was in the camp. Wiesenthal died in his sleep at age 96 in Vienna on September 20, 2005, and was buried in the city of Herzliya in Israel on September 23. He is survived by his daughter, Paulinka Kriesberg, and three grandchildren. The Simon Wiesenthal Center, located in Los Angeles, is named in his honor. Wiesenthal was born at 11:30 pm on Thursday, December 31, 1908 in Buczacz, Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria (then part of
    7.80
    5 votes
    15

    Corrie ten Boom

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Cornelia "Corrie" ten Boom (Amsterdam, The Netherlands April 15, 1892 – Orange, California, April 15, 1983) was a Dutch Christian, who with her father and other family members helped many Jews escape the Nazi Holocaust during World War II. Her family was arrested due to an informant in 1944, and her father died 10 days later at Scheveningen prison. A sister, brother and nephew were released, but Corrie ten Boom and her sister Betsie were sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp, where Betsie died. Corrie wrote many books and spoke frequently in the post-war years about her experiences. She also aided Holocaust survivors in the Netherlands. Her autobiography, The Hiding Place (1971) was later adapted as a film of the same name in 1975 and starred Jeannette Clift as Corrie. In 1940, the Nazis invaded the Netherlands. Among their restrictions was banning a club which Corrie had run for young girls. In 1942, Corrie and her family had become very active in the Dutch underground, hiding refugees. They rescued many Jews from the Nazi SS. They had long been involved in charitable work, and Corrie had worked with disabled children. They believed the Jews are God's chosen people. They provided
    9.00
    4 votes
    16

    Lucia van Dijk

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Lucia "Lucie" van Dijk was a Christian friend from Montessori school. Lucie's mother was an adamant member of the NSB until the end of the war, but Lucie's disillusioned father left the party in 1942. Anne was shocked when the van Dijks became party members, but Otto Frank patiently explained to her that they could still be good people even if they had distasteful politics. Lucie herself was briefly a rather conflicted and nervous member of the "Jeugdstorm" (Nazi youth group) but between her father's later abandonment of the party, and her grandmother's absolute abhorrence of anything connected with National Socialism, Lucie dropped out of the Jeugdstorm in late 1942. She married after the war and has lived her whole life in Amsterdam. In the group picture of Anne's tenth birthday, Lucie is the girl on the extreme left.
    6.67
    6 votes
    17
    Herbert Pitman

    Herbert Pitman

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Herbert John "Bert" Pitman MBE (20 November 1877 – 7 December 1961) was the Third Officer on board the RMS Titanic. He was the only deck officer who was not a member of the Royal Naval Reserve. Pitman was born in the village of Sutton Montis near Castle Cary, Somerset, England. He was the son of farmer Henry Pitman and Sarah (née Marchant) Pitman. After his father's death in 1880, his mother remarried, to Charles Candy. In 1881, a census shows Herbert Pitman was living on 112 acres (0.45 km) farm on Sutton Road with his brother, sister, and widowed mother. He first went to sea in 1895 at the age of 18 by joining the merchant navy. He received the shore part of his nautical training in the navigation department of the Merchant Venturers' Technical College, under Mr E. F. White, and qualified as a master mariner in August 1906. He served a four year apprenticeship with James Nourse Ltd. followed by five years as a deck officer. From 1904, he served one year as a deck officer with the Blue Anchor Line before moving to the Shire Line, where he served for six months. He moved to the White Star Line in 1906. While with White Star, he served as Fourth, Third and second officer on the
    8.75
    4 votes
    18

    Charles Joughin

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Charles John Joughin (3 August 1878—9 December 1956) was the chief baker aboard the RMS Titanic. He survived the ship's sinking, and became notable for having survived in the freezing water for an exceptionally long time before being pulled onto the overturned Collapsible B lifeboat with virtually no ill effects. Charles Joughin was born in Patten Street, next to the West Float in Birkenhead, England, on August 3, 1878. He first went to sea aged 11, in the year 1889, and later become chief baker on various White Star Line steamships, notably, aboard the Olympic, Titanic's sister ship. He was part of the victualling crew of the RMS Titanic during its maiden and final trip in April 1912. He was on board the ship during its delivery trip from Belfast to Southampton. He signed on again in Southampton on 4 April 1912. In the capacity of Chief Baker, Joughin received monthly wages of £12 (equivalent to £880 today, adjusted for inflation), and had a staff of thirteen bakers under him. When the ship hit an iceberg on the evening of 14 April, at 23:40, Joughlin was off-duty and in his bunk. According to his testimony, he felt the shock of the collision and immediately got up. Word was being
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    7.40
    5 votes
    20

    Kurt Schumacher

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Dr. Kurt Schumacher (13 October 1895 - 20 August 1952), was chairman of the Social Democratic Party of Germany from 1946 and first Leader of the Opposition in the West German Bundestag parliament from 1949 until his death. A fierce opponent of both the East German Socialist Unity Party and Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's government, he was one of the founding fathers of post-war German democracy. Kurt Schumacher was born in Kulm in West Prussia (now Chełmno in Poland), the son of a small businessman, member of the liberal German Free-minded Party and deputy in the municipal assembly. The young man was a brilliant student, but when the First World War broke out in 1914 he immediately abandoned his studies and joined the German Army. In December, at Bielawy west of Łowicz in Poland, he was so badly wounded that his right arm had to be amputated. After contracting dysentery, he was finally discharged from the army and was decorated with the Iron Cross 2nd class. He returned to his law and politics studies in Halle, Leipzig and Berlin, where he graduated in 1919. Inspired by Eduard Bernstein, Schumacher became a dedicated socialist and in 1918 joined the Social Democratic Party (SPD)
    7.40
    5 votes
    21
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    Akiko Futaba

    Akiko Futaba

    • Survived disasters: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    Akiko Futaba (二葉 あき子, Futaba Akiko, born Yoshie Kato (加藤 芳江); February 2, 1915 – August 16, 2011) was a Japanese popular music (ryūkōka) singer. As of the end of the World War II, she was one of the most popular female singers in Japan, competing with Hamako Watanabe and Noriko Awaya. In addition, she took part in the Kōhaku Uta Gassen, one of Japan's most famous annual musical television shows, ten times. She was born in the city of Hiroshima, and raised in Miyoshi city, Hiroshima Prefecture. She graduated from the Tokyo Music School. Impressed by Takeo Masunaga (also known as Ichiro Fujiyama) at a performance held by the music school, she debuted in 1936. Her famous song "Furuki Hanazono" (古き花園, lit. "Old Flower Garden") was released in 1939. On August 6, 1945, she narrowly avoided the atomic bombing of Hiroshima because she was riding a train traveling through a tunnel at the time of the explosion. She ceased activity as a singer in 2003, and retired in Hiroshima Prefecture.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Chaim Blachman

    Chaim Blachman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Chaim Blachman, the son of a hardware store owner, grew up in Lodz, Poland. He had three brothers and a sister, and they lived comfortably in a non-Jewish area of the city. A large city, and home to over 233,000 Jews, Lodz was a major textile center. Its diverse population of Jews, Poles, and Germans had lived together in relative peace for years. Chaim worked in his father's store every day after school. He helped his father repair everything from shoes to appliances. When the Germans occupied Lodz in September 1939, Chaim was twelve years old. Antisemitic restrictions were immediately passed. Jews were forbidden to congregate for religious services and they were forced to wear the yellow star. Curfews were imposed and radios were confiscated. In addition, Jews were barred from most professions, and all Jewish communal institutions were ordered to disband. On February 8, 1940, all Jews were forced to live in a run-down part of the city. On May 1, 1940, the overcrowded ghetto was closed off. Living conditions were horrible. There was no heat, little food and medicine, and sanitation was inadequate. People fell dead in the street from starvation, disease, and exposure. Still, there was an attempt to maintain normal city life. There were schools, hospitals, and a police force. Chaim was lucky to obtain a job as a page boy in a hospital. The Nazis began rounding up the Jews of Lodz for deportation to death camps. On September 1, 1942, they raided the hospital where Chaim worked. Arrested with the sick and dying patients, Chaim was thrown into a truck and driven out of the ghetto. When the truck stopped to pick up more prisoners, Chaim slipped out and ran home. As the search intensified, it became increasingly difficult to hide and Chaim was eventually caught in a boiler room. Fourteen year-old Chaim was sent to work as a slave laborer in a German-run munitions factory in Czestochowa, about 124 miles southwest of Warsaw. Working day and night, Chaim somehow survived the brutality, disease, and lack of adequate nutrition. The factory was closed on January 16, 1945, after a typhus epidemic broke out, and Chaim was sent to a concentration camp near Munich, Germany. He was liberated in April 1945. One and a half million Jewish children were murdered by the Germans and their collaborators in the Holocaust. Chaim was one of the few children who survived.
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    Rene Guttmann

    Rene Guttmann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rene, his twin sister, Renate, and their German-Jewish parents lived in Prague. Shortly before the twins were born, Rene's parents had fled Dresden, Germany, to escape the Nazi government's policies against Jews. Before leaving Germany to live in Czechoslovakia, Rene's father, Herbert, had worked in the import-export business. His mother, Ita, was an accountant. Rene and his sister survived and were reunited in America in 1950. They learned that as one pair of the "Mengele Twins," they had been used for medical experiments.
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Eva Mozes Kor

    Eva Mozes Kor

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Eva Mozes Kor is a survivor of the deadly genetic experiments conducted by Josef Mengele in the deathcamp Auschwitz during 1944-1945. Her parents, grandparents, two older sisters, uncles, aunts and cousins were killed in the Holocaust.
    8.00
    4 votes
    27

    Misha Defonseca

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Misha Defonseca (born 1937), born as Monique de Wael, is a Belgian writer and the author of Misha: A Mémoire of the Holocaust Years, first published in 1997 and at that time professed to be a memoir. It became an instant success in Europe and was translated into 18 languages. The French version of the book was a derivative work based on the original with the title Survivre avec les loups that was published in 1997 by the Éditions Robert Laffont; this second version was adapted into the French film Survivre avec les loups (Surviving With Wolves). On 29 February 2008, the author as well as her lawyers admitted that the bestselling book was a hoax, despite its having been presented as autobiographical. Defonseca was born in 1937 in Etterbeek, a suburb of Brussels, Belgium, to Robert De Wael and Josephine Donvil. Her family was not Jewish, as her professed autobiography states. Her parents were resistance fighters arrested by the Germans. Her father subsequently was forced to collaborate with the Gestapo and was released to live in Germany, dying from natural causes later in the war. Defonseca and her husband, Maurice, moved to the United States from Paris in 1988 and bought a house in
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    Peter Fischl

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Peter L. Fischl (born July 19, 1930) is a survivor of the Holocaust, a poet and a public speaker, who has dedicated much of his life to educating people about the Holocaust and the importance of acceptance of others. Fischl is currently working on a project with the sculptor Raymond Persinger to create a monument to "The Little Polish Boy." During the Holocaust, Fischl hid in a Catholic school in Budapest, Hungary with 60 other Jewish children. His father was taken by the Nazis and never seen again. A documentary on Fischl's life and his efforts to educate young people about intolerance, is in the final stages of editing. The film, produced by Peter Musurlian of Globalist Films, is called, "Holocaust Soliloquy." (See Sources below)
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Sol Kimel

    Sol Kimel

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    "A short, fat, fair-haired friendly boy, with a great sense of humor." Friends for years, starting in Kindergarten, Anne was quite fond of him, even later while in hiding. She wrote: "A week ago, even yesterday, if you had asked me, 'Which of your friends do you consider would be the most suitable to marry? I would have answered: 'Sally, for he makes me feel good, peaceful and safe!'" He had blonde hair and blue eyes. He lived with his mother, possibly with his Aunt and cousins. Sally was born in Berlin. In the fall of 1942, his mother was taken in a roundup in Amsterdam (she later died in Auschwitz). He was taken in by distant relatives and then put into hiding, with several other Jews, on a farm. The farm was raided in early 1945. Sol was sent to Westerbork on the 8th of February, where he remained until it was liberated, on April 12th. He studied chemistry in Amsterdam and America, and then moved to Israel, where he remains. He has a wife and two children and was a professor working in cancer research (now retired).
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    A2C Ruben Torres

    A2C Ruben Torres

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Ruben Torres was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128. He survived the crash on November 20,1967 while enroute to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He went to the Stephens house from the crash site with Ellie Kurtock, Sheila O'Brian, and 5 year old Chris Haile. He was transferred to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky and several days later, sent to a military hospital in Texas.
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Eva Goldberg

    Eva Goldberg

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    When the Goldberg family visited a relative’s home in prewar Amsterdam, young Eva only spoke German. She was delighted to meet two young German girls in the neighborhood with whom she could play.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32

    Edward Edwards

    • Survived disasters: HMS Pandora
    Admiral Edward Edwards (1742–1815) was a British naval officer best known as the captain of HMS Pandora, the frigate which the Admiralty sent to the South Pacific in pursuit of the Bounty mutineers. The fifth of six children, Edward Edwards was born in Water Newton, a village near Peterborough, to Richard Edwards, of Water Newton and Mary Fuller of Caldecot. He was born in 1742 and christened in St Remegius Church, Water Newton. He never married. On 7 September 1759, age 17, he was commissioned a lieutenant. To qualify for this commission he would have been required, in addition to passing a lieutenant’s exam, to produce evidence of at least six years of sea time. No documents have been located to date which would establish exactly when, and under whose patronage, he started his naval career. It is likely he first went to sea as a captain's servant when about 10 years old and subsequently completed at least part of the required sea time as a midshipman. His naval career after he was commissioned included service in the following ships, before being appointed to Pandora: He spent the following six years on half-pay after the end of the American Revolutionary war; until 6 August 1790
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Lydia Reich

    Lydia Reich

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Lydia Reich - Friend of Anne Frank, Survivor of both Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    5.83
    6 votes
    35
    Mel Mermelstein

    Mel Mermelstein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Mel Mermelstein (born September 25, 1926, Örösveg (or Oroszvég, Ukrainian: Rosvyhove, German: Rosswegau), near Munkacs) is a Hungarian-born Jew, sole-survivor of his family's extermination at Auschwitz concentration camp who defeated the Institute for Historical Review in an American court and had the occurrence of gassings in Auschwitz during the Holocaust declared a legally incontestable fact. Before World War II broke out, Mermelstein lived in Munkacs, then part of Czechoslovakia (occupied by Hungary in 1938). On May 19, 1944 he was deported to Auschwitz along with the rest of the Jewish community. In 1980, the Institute for Historical Review (IHR) promised a $50,000 reward to anyone who could prove that Jews were gassed at Auschwitz. Mermelstein wrote a letter to the editors of the LA Times and others including The Jerusalem Post. The Institute for Historical Review wrote back, offering him $50,000 for proof that Jews were, in fact, gassed in the gas chambers at Auschwitz. Mermelstein, in turn, submitted a notarized account of his internment at Auschwitz and how he witnessed Nazi guards ushering his mother and two sisters and others towards (as he learned later) gas chamber
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Kurt Julius Goldstein

    Kurt Julius Goldstein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Kurt Julius Goldstein (November 3, 1914 – September 24, 2007) was a German journalist and a former broadcast director. Goldstein was born to a Jewish merchant family in Dortmund, Germany. At school, he experienced Germany's growing anti-Semitism and it had the effect of politicising him. In 1928, he joined the Young Communist League and two years later, the Communist Party of Germany, then headed by Ernst Thälmann. When the Nazis took power in 1933, Goldstein fled. He first lived in Luxembourg, working as a gardener, then moved to France. In 1935, he went to Palestine. A year later, the Spanish Civil War erupted and many German Communists volunteered to fight. Goldstein soon joined them. When the Second Spanish Republic collapsed in early 1939, Goldstein escaped across the border into France. As return to Germany was impossible, he was interned and held in Camp Vernet. Once France fell, his situation became perilous but it was three years before he was detected by the Vichy French authorities and deported to Germany. On arrival, he was sent to Auschwitz concentration camp, where he worked in the coal pits for 30 months. Along with Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel (described in
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Martha van den Berg

    Martha van den Berg

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Martha, on the far right in the photograph, survived the war. Martha was a Montessori schoolmate, being seen in another picture with Anne taken during Anne's last term at Montessori.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Thomas Buergenthal

    Thomas Buergenthal

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Thomas Buergenthal (born 11 May 1934, in Ľubochňa, Czechoslovakia, today Slovakia) is a former judge of the International Court of Justice. He resigned his post as of 6 September 2010. Buergenthal is returning to his position as Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at The George Washington University Law School. Thomas Buergenthal, born to German-Jewish/Polish-Jewish parents who had moved from Germany to Czechoslovakia in 1933, grew up in the Jewish ghetto of Kielce (Poland) and later in the concentration camps at Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen. After the War he lived with his mother in Göttingen. On 4 December 1951, he emigrated from Germany to the United States. He studied at Bethany College in West Virginia (graduated 1957), and received his J.D. at New York University Law School in 1960, and his LL.M. and S.J.D. degrees in international law from Harvard Law School. Judge Buergenthal is the recipient of numerous honorary degrees. Buergenthal is a specialist in international law and human rights law. Since 2000, he has served as a judge on the International Court of Justice at The Hague. He resigned from the court in September 2010. Prior to his election to the
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Hans Frankenthal

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Hans Frankenthal (July 15, 1926, Schmallenberg, Westphalia – December 22, 1999) was a German Jew who was deported to the Auschwitz concentration camp in occupied Poland in 1943. Having survived the Holocaust along with his brother Emil, Frankenthal returned to his home in Germany where he experienced the common disbelief and denial of Nazi war crimes. Frankenthal eventually put his biography to paper in the 1990s in his book Verweigerte Rückkehr which was published half a year before his death. The English edition was published in 2002 under the title The Unwelcome One: Returning Home from Auschwitz. Frankenthal was born into a family of prominent Jewish butchers in Schmallenberg, Province of Westphalia. In the Frankenthal home the Jewish religion was strictly followed mainly due to the Orthodox Jewish traditions of Frankenthal's mother, Adele Frankenthal. In the village of Schmallenberg there was a strong Christian, mainly Roman Catholic, presence. After Jewish businesses began to be boycotted following the Nazi Party's seizure of power in 1933, the Frankenthal family was no longer able to properly provide themselves with basic necessities. Due to attempts to get around the new
    8.67
    3 votes
    40

    Ilse Silten-Teppich

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Born: Berlin, Germany February 23, 1909 Ilse, born Ilse Teppich, was the eldest of two daughters born to a Jewish family in the German capital of Berlin. Her father owned a dry cleaning business in the city. When Ilse finished secondary school, she was sent to a finishing school in Switzerland where she studied to be a photographer. In 1931 she married Fritz Silten. 1933-39: In 1933 Ilse gave birth to the couple's only child, a daughter named Gabriele. Five years later, when Fritz's father was forced by the Nazis to sell his business for a fraction of its value to an "Aryan" German [Aryanization], Fritz resolved to move his family out of Berlin. He went to Amsterdam, opened a pharmacy and then sent for Ilse and their daughter. Fritz's mother, Marta, joined them a year later. 1940-44: In May 1940 German troops occupied Amsterdam. Soon after, Ilse's husband was named to the German-appointed Jewish council. The majority of Amsterdam's Jews were herded into a ghetto in the city, but Ilse and her family were allowed to stay in their apartment. In June 1943 the Siltens were sent to the Westerbork transit camp. A month later, rather than be deported, Ilse's mother-in-law committed suicide. In early 1944 Ilse and her family were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto in Czechoslovakia. Ilse, Fritz and Gabriele were liberated when Soviet troops took Theresienstadt in May 1945. The Silten family returned to Amsterdam in June of that same year.
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Israel Pellew

    Israel Pellew

    • Survived disasters: HMS Amphion
    Admiral Sir Israel Pellew, KCB, RN (25 August 1758 – 19 July 1832), was an English naval officer who spent his career under the shadow of his more successful older brother Edward Pellew. Pellew first went to sea aboard the sloop Falcon in 1771, serving in the West Indies. He went to the North American station on the frigate Flora in 1776. Pellew was promoted to lieutenant in the Royal George in April 1779 and then served on the frigates Danae and Apollo. He was placed in command of the cutter Resolution in the North Sea in 1782, and he retained command when she was transferred to the Irish station serving until 1787. In March 1789 he joined Salisbury, and was promoted to commander in 1790, but was not employed again during the peace. On the outbreak of war in 1793 Pellew was temporarily without a ship, and served as a volunteer aboard his brother's command Nymphe, being in charge of her aft guns when she captured the French frigate Cléopâtre on 18 June, the first British naval victory of the French Revolutionary Wars. For this action, his brother was knighted and he was presented to King George III and made post captain of Squirrel. In April 1795 he was made captain of a larger
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Chaim Michael Dov Weissmandl

    Chaim Michael Dov Weissmandl

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Chaim Michael Dov Weissmandl (Hebrew: חיים מיכאל דב וויסמנדל‎) (25 October 1903, Debrecen, Hungary – 29 November 1957, Mount Kisco, New York) (known as Michael Ber Weissmandl) was a rabbi and shtadlan who became known for his efforts to save the Jews of Slovakia from extermination at the hands of the Nazis during the Holocaust. Thanks to the efforts of his "Working Group", which bribed German and Slovakian officials, the mass deportation of Slovakian Jews was delayed for two years, from 1942 to 1944. Largely by bribing diplomats, Weissmandl was able to smuggle letters or telegrams to people he hoped would help save the Jews of Europe, alerting them to the progressive Nazi destruction of European Jewry. It is known that he managed to send letters to Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and he entrusted a diplomat to deliver a letter to the Vatican for Pope Pius XII. He also begged the Allies to bomb the rails leading to Auschwitz, but to no avail. He believed that if the Hungarian Jews would resist, then only a small number of them would be deported, as the Germans in 1944 couldn't garner enough soldiers to leave the front and deal with the Jews simultaneously. Of around
    8.33
    3 votes
    44

    Beatrice Sandström

    Beatrice Irene Sandström (August 9, 1910 – September 3, 1995) was one of the last remaining survivors of sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Beatrice Irene Sandström was born on August 9, 1910 in San Francisco, California to Hjalmar Sandström and Agnes Bengtsson. Beatrice had an older sister, Marguerite Rut, born March 23, 1908. Hjalmar and Agnes had emigrated to the United States from Sweden in 1908 shortly after Marguerite's birth, and settled in San Francisco. However, they didn't enjoy the lifestyle too much and by 1911 they had saved up enough money to get by for a while and were planning to move back home to Sweden. Beatrice, her mother and sister had been visiting her mother's parents in Hultsjö as well as friends in Forserum before boarding the RMS Titanic to return to the United States. The Sandströms boarded the Titanic at Southampton, England on April 10, 1912 as third-class passengers. The family shared cabin G6 with Elna Ström and her two-year-old daughter, Selma. Shortly after Titanic's collision with the iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14, Agnes and Elna were woken by a steward and told to get up to the boat deck. The women dressed their daughters and made
    6.20
    5 votes
    45
    Arthur Godfrey Peuchen

    Arthur Godfrey Peuchen

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Godfrey Peuchen (April 18, 1859 – December 7, 1929) was a Canadian businessman and RMS Titanic survivor. Born in Montreal, Quebec, Peuchen was the son of a railroad contractor; his maternal grandfather managed the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway. He was educated in private schools. In 1888 he entered military life and became a lieutenant of The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada. Peuchen moved up the ranks and in 1911 was marshalling officer at the coronation of George V. In 1897 Peuchen perfected plans for extracting useful chemicals from coarse hardwoods and waste woods, the principal products being acetic acid, acetate of lime, acetone, methanol and formaldehyde. The dyeing industries used the acids, formaldehyde was used by wheat growers in Canada, and acetone was used to manufacture high explosives like cordite. Peuchen subsequently became president of Standard Chemical, Iron & Lumber Company of Canada, Ltd. The company had many plants and facilities in Canada as well as refineries located in Montreal, London, France and Germany. Because some company facilities were located abroad, Peuchen often traveled to Europe by ship. Peuchen owned a yacht
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Charles Lightoller

    Charles Lightoller

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Charles Herbert Lightoller DSC & Bar, RD, RNR (30 March 1874 – 8 December 1952) was the second mate (second officer) on board the RMS Titanic, and the most senior officer to survive the Titanic disaster. Lightoller was decorated for gallantry as a naval officer in the First World War and later, in retirement, further distinguished himself in the Second World War by providing and sailing as a volunteer one of the "little ships" during the perilous Dunkirk evacuation. Charles Herbert Lightoller was born in Chorley, Lancashire, on 30 March 1874. His mother, Sarah Lightoller, died shortly after giving birth to him. He was born into a cotton family who owned the Lightoller Mill in Chorley. His father, Fred Lightoller, abandoned young Charles and left for New Zealand. Not wanting to end up with a factory job like most of Britain's youth at the time, at the age of 13 young Charles began a four-year seafaring apprenticeship on board the Primrose Hill. On his second voyage, he set sail with the crew of the Holt Hill. During a storm in the South Atlantic, the ship was forced to put in at Rio de Janeiro — in the midst of a small pox epidemic and revolution — where repairs were made. Another
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Samuel Chester Reid

    Samuel Chester Reid

    • Survived disasters: General Armstrong
    Samuel Chester Reid (24 August 1783 – 28 January 1861) was an officer in the United States Navy who commanded a privateer during the War of 1812. He is also noted for having helped design the 1818 version of the flag of the United States, which first established the rule of keeping thirteen stripes and adding one star for each U.S. state. Reid was born in Norwich, Connecticut, to John and Rebecca (Chester) Reid. John Reid, a lieutenant in the British Navy, was captured during the American Revolutionary War before resigning and joining the American side. Rebecca Chester's father, John Chester, was among the soldiers at Bunker Hill, and afterward a member of the Connecticut convention which ratified the United States constitution. Reid entered the Navy in 1794. He served in Constellation with Commodore Thomas Truxtun and in 1803 became master of the brig Merchant. During the War of 1812 he commanded the privateer General Armstrong. One notable capture was that of the Fanny because of the legal cases that arose from her capture and recapture. At the Battle of Fayal Reid inflicted severe casualties on boats from a British force en route to Jamaica and New Orleans, Louisiana. In the
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Jack London

    Jack London

    • Survived disasters: 1906 San Francisco earthquake
    John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel, The Iron Heel and his non-fiction exposé, The People of the Abyss. Jack London's mother, Flora Wellman, was the fifth and youngest child of Pennsylvania Canal builder Marshall Wellman and his first wife, Eleanor Garrett Jones. Marshall Wellman was descended from Thomas Wellman, an early Puritan settler in the Massachusetts Bay
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Kurt Klein

    Kurt Klein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Kurt Klein was born and raised in Walldorf, Germany. After Hitler came to power, the Kleins began to realize they did not have much future in Germany. His sister emigrated to the United States, and 17-year-old Kurt followed her in 1937. The next year they were joined in America by their brother. During the Kristallnacht attacks on German Jews, the Kleins' home was vandalized. Later Klein's parents were forced to move into a room over a stable, and in 1940 they were deported to a detention camp in France. The children tried to obtain visas that would enable their parents to join them in America, but they were hampered by bureaucratic red tape and a shortage of money. When they finally succeeded in obtaining the visas in 1942, their parents had already been deported to Eastern Europe. Kurt Klein was drafted in 1942, and served in the U.S. Army during the war as an intelligence officer. After the end of the war, he learned that his parents had died at Auschwitz. He married Gerda Weissmann in 1946, and brought her to live with him in Buffalo, New York, where he operated a printing business. Kurt Klein frequently travels with his wife to lecture about their experiences during the war. He is also featured in the PBS series, America and the Holocaust: Deceit and Indifference.
    7.00
    4 votes
    50

    Alden Caldwell

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Alden Gates Caldwell (June 10, 1911 – December 18, 1992) was a survivor of the RMS Titanic, at only ten months. He was born on June 10, 1911 in Bangkok, Siam (now known as Thailand), to Albert and Sylvia Mae Harbaugh Caldwell, who were Presbyterian missionaries in the country before Alden was born. The couple decided to return to America, and on the journey home, they passed through Naples, Italy and learned that a steamship called the Titanic would soon go on its inaugural voyage from Southampton to New York City. The family boarded the ship as second-class passengers. On April 14, 1912, aboard the ship, Alden was fussy, and his parents handed him the keys to their trunk as a makeshift toy. They didn't realize that Alden lost the keys until the ship crashed into an iceberg that night and they were awakened by the crew. The Caldwells tried to get into their locked trunk to get Alden's coat out, but the keys were gone. The search for the keys proved fruitless, and the Caldwells had to wrap Alden in a blanket. They also had to leave their savings, $100 in American gold pieces, in the trunk. Because Sylvia was ill and couldn't hold Alden, Albert was encouraged by the crew to get
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Miep Gies

    Miep Gies

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Hermine Santruschitz (15 February 1909 – 11 January 2010), better known as Miep Gies, was one of the Dutch citizens who hid Anne Frank, her family and four other Jews from the Nazis in an annex above Anne's father's business premises during World War II. She was Austrian by birth, but in 1920, at the age of only eleven, was taken in as a foster child by a Dutch family to whom she became very attached. Although she was initially only to stay for six months, this stay was extended to one year because of frail health, after which she chose to remain with them, living the rest of her life in the Netherlands. In 1933 she began working for Otto Frank, a businessman who had moved with his family from Germany to the Netherlands in hopes of sparing his family Nazi persecution because they were Jewish. Miep became a close friend of the family and was a great support to them during the two years they spent in hiding. She retrieved Anne Frank's diary after the family were arrested and kept the papers safe until Otto Frank returned from Auschwitz and learned of his daughter's death. Born Hermine Santruschitz in Vienna, (later spelled as Santrouschitz in the Netherlands), she was transported to
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Roman Polański

    Roman Polański

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Roman Polanski (born Rajmund Roman Thierry Polański, 18 August 1933) is a Polish-French film director, producer, writer and actor. Having made films in Poland, Britain, France and the USA, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers." Polanski's films have inspired diverse directors, including the Coen brothers, Atom Egoyan, Darren Aronofsky, Park Chan-wook, Abel Ferrara, and Wes Craven. Born in Paris to Polish parents, he moved with his family back to Poland in 1937, shortly before the outbreak of World War II. He survived the Holocaust and was educated in Poland and became a director of both art house and commercial films. Polanski's first feature-length film, Knife in the Water (1962), made in Poland, was nominated for a United States Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film but was beaten by Federico Fellini's 8½. He has since received five more Oscar nominations, along with two Baftas, four Césars, a Golden Globe Award and the Palme d'Or of the Cannes Film Festival in France. In the United Kingdom he directed three films, beginning with Repulsion (1965). In 1968 he moved to the United States, and cemented his status by directing the horror film
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Sebastião de Melo, Marquis of Pombal

    Sebastião de Melo, Marquis of Pombal

    • Survived disasters: 1755 Lisbon earthquake
    D. Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, 1st Count of Oeiras (Marquês de Pombal, Portuguese pronunciation: [mɐɾˈkeʃ dɨ ˈpõbaɫ]; 13 May 1699 – 8 May 1782) was an 18th century Portuguese statesman. He was Secretary of the State of the Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves (the equivalent to a today's prime minister) in the government of Joseph I of Portugal from 1750 to 1777. Undoubtedly the most prominent minister in the government, he is considered today to have been the de facto head of government. Pombal is notable for his swift and competent leadership in the aftermath of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. He implemented sweeping economic policies in Portugal to regulate commercial activity and standardize quality throughout the country. Pombal was instrumental in weakening the grip of the Inquisition. The term Pombaline is used to describe not only his tenure, but also the architectural style which formed after the great earthquake. Pombal introduced many fundamental administrative, educational, economic, and ecclesiastical reforms justified in the name of "reason" and instrumental in advancing secularization. However, historians argue that Pombal’s "enlightenment,"
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Winnifred Quick

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Winnifred Vera Quick Van Tongerloo (January 23, 1904 – July 4, 2002) was one of the last four remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Winnifred Vera Quick was born in Plymouth, England in 1904 to Frederick Charles Quick, a plasterer, and his wife, Jane Richards Quick. A second daughter, Phyllis May, was born on July 27, 1909. In 1910, Winnifred's father decided to emigrate from England to Detroit to make a better life for his family. He travelled alone, and would later send for his wife and daughters when he was financially secure. In the meantime, the Quicks would live with Jane Quick's mother in Plymouth. By early 1912, Frederick was established and secure and sent for his family. Soon after his wife booked passage for herself and their two daughters, she was notified that her ship's sailing had been cancelled due to a coal strike, but that they would be transferred to the RMS Titanic which was set to sail on April 10, 1912. Eight-year-old Winnifred, along with her mother and sister, boarded the Titanic as second-class passengers at Southampton, England. Despite calm seas, Winnifred was seasick for most of the first four days. On April 14,
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Archibald Gracie IV

    Archibald Gracie IV

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Colonel Archibald Gracie IV (January 17, 1859 – December 4, 1912) was an American writer, amateur historian, real estate investor, and survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic. He survived the sinking by climbing aboard an overturned collapsible lifeboat, and wrote a popular and valuable book about the disaster which is still in print today. Gracie was born in Mobile, Alabama, a member of the wealthy Scottish-American Gracie family of New York. He was a namesake and direct descendant of the Archibald Gracie who had built Gracie Mansion, the current official residence of the mayor of New York City, in 1799. His father, Archibald Gracie III, had been an officer with the Washington Light Infantry of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, serving at the Battle of Chickamauga before dying at Petersburg, Virginia, in 1864. Young Archibald attended St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire and the United States Military Academy (though he did not graduate), eventually becoming a colonel of the 7th New York Militia. Gracie was a keen amateur historian and was especially fascinated by the Battle of Chickamauga at which his father had served. He spent a number of years
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Elinor Rose Kurtock

    Elinor Rose Kurtock

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Elinor Kurtock was a flight hostess for Trans World Airlines. She was onboard TWA flight 128 and was seated in a flight attendant jump seat near the exits at the rear of the airliner. She survived the crash on November 20, 1967. Exiting the aircraft, she found 5 year old Chris Haile in the debris field and picked him up. She encountered Sheila O'Brian and Rebuen Torres, who was badly burned, and together they went to the Stephens house to find help. She was eventually transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.  less
    7.67
    3 votes
    59

    Elisabeth Walton Allen

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Elisabeth Walton Allen was one of the surviors on the ship RMS Titanic witch sank on the night of April 15, 1912.She was 29 years old during the sinking she was in first class.She was returning to her home in St. Louis with her aunt, Mrs Edward Scott Robert , and her cousin, fifteen-year-old Georgette Alexandra Madill.Miss Madill was the daughter of Mrs Robert from a former marriage.The entire family travelled under ticket number 24160.She escaped with her relatives in lifeboat 2, one of the last boats to leave the Titanic, under the command of Fourth Officer Joseph Boxhall. After the sinking, Elisabeth filed a $2,427.80 claim against the White Star Line the builder company of the Titanic for the loss of personal property after the Titanic disaster. After reaching St.Louis she soon returned to England in June 1912 and she married Dr. James Beaver Mennell, she and her sister were both married in the same wedding.On December 12 1967 she died in her home in Tunbridge Wells, England at age 85 of heart failure.
    7.67
    3 votes
    60

    Fortunée Chouraki Messouda Benguigui

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Fortunée Chouraki Messouda Benguigui was born in 1904 in Oran, Algeria. She was arrested in Marseilles in 1943, believing her three sons to be safe at Izieu; her baby daughter Yvette was entrusted to local farmers and survived the raid. She lost her sons—Jacques (12), Richard (7), and Jean-Claude (6)—in the raid, which took place while she was a prisoner in Auschwitz. Having survived brutal medical experiments, she was assigned to a sorting shed where she learned of her children’s deaths by finding her son’s hand-knit sweater on the shoulders of a camp doctor’s teenage boy. Although Fortunée had been declared seventy-five percent incapacitated at the end of the war, she agreed to go to Munich in September 1971, to join Beate Klarsfeld in protesting against the German government’s dismissal of criminal proceedings against the former Lyons Gestapo head. The two women sat on the steps of the Palace of Justice with Mme Benguigui holding a sign in one hand: “I will continue my hunger strike until the Munich prosecutor’s office reopens proceedings against Klaus Barbie, the murderer of my three children.” In the other hand she held a photo of her three little boys. The women’s success resulted in both a renewed effort to prosecute the war criminal and an important lead as to his whereabouts in La Paz, Bolivia. At Barbie’s trial some sixteen years later, Fortunée would state that she testified “to honor the memory of my three sons; ... I survived [the medical] tests because I was sure my children were safe. ... [When I saw the sweater in Auschwitz] I realized something had happened and started crying.” Benguigui died less than two years later, in December 1988, on the day that she was awarded the Legion of Honor medal.
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Harold Lowe

    Harold Lowe

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Commander Harold Godfrey Lowe RD RNR (21 November 1882 – 12 May 1944) was the Fifth Officer of the RMS Titanic. Harold Lowe was born in Eglwys Rhos, Caernarfonshire, North Wales on 21 November 1882, the third of eight children, born to George and Harriet Lowe. His father had ambitions for him to be apprentice to a successful Liverpool businessman, but Harold Lowe was determined to go to sea. At 14, he ran away from his home in Barmouth where he had attended school and joined the merchant navy, serving along the West African Coast. Lowe started as a Ship's Boy aboard the Welsh coastal schooners as he worked to attain his certifications. In 1906, he passed his certification and gained his second mate's certificate, then in 1908, he attained his first mate's certificate. By the time he started with the White Star Line, in 1911, he had gained his Master's certificate and, in his own words, "experience with pretty well every ship afloat – the different classes of ships afloat – from the schooner to the square-rigged sailing vessel, and from that to steamships, and of all sizes." He served as third officer on White Star's the Belgic and the Tropic before being transferred to the Titanic
    7.67
    3 votes
    62

    Violet Jessop

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Violet Constance Jessop (2 October 1887 – 5 May 1971) was an ocean liner stewardess and nurse who achieved fame by surviving the disastrous sinkings of both the RMS Titanic and the HMHS Britannic in 1912 and 1916 respectively. In addition, she had been on board the RMS Olympic, their sister ship, when it collided with the protected cruiser HMS Hawke in 1911. Violet Jessop was born to William and Katherine Jessop, Irish emigrants living near Bahía Blanca, Argentina. William Jessop had emigrated from Dublin in the mid-1880s to try his hand at sheep farming in the Argentina. His fiancée, Katherine Kelly, followed him out there from Dublin in 1886. Violet was the first of nine children, only six of whom survived. Violet herself contracted tuberculosis at an early age, but, despite doctor's predictions, she survived. After her father died, Violet and her family moved to Great Britain, where she attended a convent school. After her mother became ill she left school to join a high-class liner. At age 23, Violet Jessop boarded the RMS Olympic on 14 June 1911 to work as a stewardess. The Olympic was a luxury ship that was the largest civilian liner at that time, being nearly 100 ft (30 m)
    7.67
    3 votes
    63

    Bertha Watt

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Robertha Josephine "Bertha" Watt (11 September 1899 – 4 March 1993) was one of the last remaining living survivors of the sinking of RMS Titanic. Robertha Josephine "Bertha" Watt was born on 11 September 1899 in Aberdeen, Scotland. Watt was 12 years old when she boarded Titanic in Southampton on 10 April 1912 as a second-class passenger together with her mother, Elizabeth "Bessie" Inglis Watt. They shared their cabin with Ellen Mary Toomey and Rosa Pinsky. Aboard the ship, Watt befriended a 8-year-old girl named Marjorie Charlotte "Lottie" Collyer. When the Titanic hit an iceberg on the night of 14 April 1912, Watt was roused from her sleep. She was told to pray because the Titanic was in danger. Watt's mother was told by a man from Edinburgh that Titanic hit an iceberg. Watt, her mother and their roommates survived in lifeboat 9. On the lifeboat, a minister sat with his chin on his walking stick moaning on about all the years of sermons he lost. A woman said, "If you can give me back my husband and my son I'll pay you for your sermons." They were rescued by RMS Carpathia. There was a rope ladder with a belt. Watt's mother said, "Go on, you can climb that. I went up without the
    10.00
    1 votes
    64

    Halina Birenbaum

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Halina Birenbaum (born 1929) is a Holocaust survivor, writer, poet and translator. Born in Warsaw, Birenbaum spent her childhood in the Warsaw Ghetto and later on in Nazi concentration camps: Majdanek, Auschwitz (Oświęcim), Ravensbrück and Neustadt-Glewe, from which she was liberated in 1945. In 1947 she moved to Israel, where she started a family. In March 2001 she was awarded a title of Person of Unity 2001 by Polish Rada Chrzescijan i Żydów.
    10.00
    1 votes
    65

    Odd Nansen

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Odd Nansen (6 December 1901 – 27 June 1973) was a Norwegian architect, author, and humanitarian, credited with his humanitarian efforts on behalf of Jews in the early years of World War II and for being a founder of UNICEF. Odd Nansen was the son of the scientist and explorer Fridtjof Nansen and was raised at Lysaker outside of Oslo. After his mother, Eva Nansen, died in 1907, he was raised in the home of shipowner Klaveness. Educated an architect and apprenticed to Arnstein Arneberg, he formed Nansenhjelpen in 1939 to provide relief for Jews fleeing Nazi persecution in central Europe, focusing his efforts on the situation in Czechoslovakia. His wife Kari Nansen, he, and Tove Filseth established a field office in Prague and traveled extensively in Europe in 1939 to get attention and help for refugees facing imminent destruction. After returning to Norway, he joined the nascent Norwegian resistance and was himself arrested and detained by the Gestapo, and ultimately deported to the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen Nansen maintained a diary during his imprisonment that he hid and preserved. These diaries were published after the war and provide an in-depth, first hand account of
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    William Alden Smith

    William Alden Smith

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    William Alden Smith (May 12, 1859 – October 11, 1932) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. Smith was born in Dowagiac, Michigan and attended the common schools. He moved with his parents to Grand Rapids in 1872, where he attended school, sold popcorn, and was a newsboy and messenger boy. He was appointed a page in the Michigan House of Representatives in 1875 (or 1879) at Lansing, Michigan. He studied law in the office of Burch & Montgomery (Marsden C. Burch was a one-time U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Michigan), studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1882. Mr. Smith practiced law alone for some time, but later became associated with Fredrick W. Stevens. This firm afterwards became Smiley, Smith & Stevens. He was general counsel of the Chicago and West Michigan Railway and the Detroit, Lansing and Northern Railroad. While in this practice, Mr. Smith became an expert on railroad law and finance. He was assistant secretary of the Michigan State Senate in 1883 and the State Game Warden 1887-1891, reportedly the first salaried state game warden in the nation. He was a member of the Republican State Central Committee from 1888 to
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Barbara Schechter

    Barbara Schechter

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Barbara was the only daughter of Jetka and Philip Schechter. Jetka grew up in Stanislawow, Poland, where she had lived with her parents, two sisters and a brother. Stanislawow was a large city that had a population of over 30,000 Jews in 1942. Jetka's father, a decorator, had his own store, where her mother also worked. Jetka worked as a bookkeeper in a large factory. When she and Philip married in 1940, they moved 50 miles away, to the town of Buczacz. Life was difficult, but the young married couple was optimistic. Their daughter, Barbara, was born in 1941. Soon after, the Germans invaded eastern Poland, immediately setting out to annihilate the Jews of the region. In August 1942, Jetka received a desperate, pleading letter from her father. He had been a witness, the previous year, to the mass murder of over 10,000 Jews in Stanislawow. The Jews had been rounded up and driven out of their homes to the town hall square. Thousands were marched out of town to the Jewish cemetery, beaten as they were herded along. Forced to undress and leap into previously prepared graves, they were machine-gunned to death. Jetka's sisters and brother were sent to the Belzec death camp. Frantic, Jetka and Philip knew that it was just a matter of time before it would be their turn. They somehow managed to obtain false papers giving them new identities as non-Jews. Mr. and Mrs. Schechter resolved to leave their town, where their identities were known, and to try to save their family. They decided to separate, feeling that it would be safer if they were not together. On foot, they left in opposite directions, not knowing if they would ever see one another again. Mrs. Schechter and her baby made their way to a tiny village in Germany, near the Austrian border. She arranged for a German woman to care for Barbara. The woman was willing to raise Barbara on condition that Jetka would not call or visit often. Barbara did not know her mother. She was afraid of her on the few occasions when Jetka was permitted to visit. When the war ended in Spring 1945, Barbara was four years old. Jetka claimed her child and was reunited with Philip.
    6.50
    4 votes
    69
    Eva Schloss

    Eva Schloss

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Eva Geiringer shared an amazingly similar history to Anne. The Geiringers lived on the opposite side of Merwedeplein, the square where the Frank's apartment was located, and Eva and Anne were almost exactly the same age. Eva was also a close friend of Sanne Ledermann, and she knew both Anne and Margot. Eva described herself as an out-and-out tomboy, and hence she was in awe of Anne's fashion sense and worldliness, but she was somewhat puzzled by Anne's fascination with boys. "I had a brother, so boys were no big thing to me" Eva wrote. But Anne had introduced Eva to her father when the Geiringers first came to Amsterdam "so you can speak German with someone" as Anne had said, and Eva never forgot Otto's kindness to her. Though they did know each other on a first-name basis, Eva and Anne were not especially close, as they had different groups of friends aside from Sanne Ledermann. Her brother Heinz was called up for deportation to labor camp on the same day as Margot Frank, and the Geiringers went into hiding at the same time the Franks did, though the Geiringer family split into two groups to do so - Eva and her mother, and Heinz and his father. Though hiding in two separate locations, all four of the Geiringers were betrayed on the same day, about three months before the Frank family. Eva survived Auschwitz, and when the Russians liberated Birkenau, the women's sector of the camp, she walked the mile-and-a-half distance to the men's camp to look for her father and brother, finding out much later that they had not survived the prisoner march out of Auschwitz. But when she entered the sick barracks of the men's camp, she recognized Otto Frank, who had a warm reunion with her. Eight years later, Otto married Eva's widowed mother Fritzi, thereby making Eva a stepsister of Anne. Eva later wrote her autobiography "Eva's Story" which served as the inspiration for the development of a very popular multimedia stage presentation about the Holocaust called "And Then They Came for Me".
    6.50
    4 votes
    70
    John Bigham, 1st Viscount Mersey

    John Bigham, 1st Viscount Mersey

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    John Charles Bigham, 1st Viscount Mersey (3 August 1840 – 3 September 1929) was a British jurist and politician. After early success as a lawyer, and a less successful spell as a politician, he was appointed a judge, working in commercial law. After his retirement, Mersey remained active in public affairs, and is probably best remembered for heading the official Board of Trade inquiries into the sinking of steamships, most notably the RMS Titanic, the RMS Lusitania, and the RMS Empress of Ireland. Bigham was born in Liverpool, the second son of John Bigham, a prosperous merchant, and his wife Helen, née East. He was educated at the Liverpool Institute High School for Boys, and the University of London, where he studied law. Bigham left the university without taking a degree. He then travelled to Berlin and Paris to continue his education. Called to the bar in 1870 by the Middle Temple, he practised commercial law in and around his native city. On 17 August 1871 he married Georgina Sarah Rogers, also from Liverpool. The first of their three sons, Charles Clive Bigham (2nd Viscount Mersey), was born in 1872. In 1883, Bigham was named a Queen's Counsel. His commercial practice
    6.50
    4 votes
    71

    Fritz Silten

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Born: Berlin, Germany February 16, 1904 Fritz was the youngest of two sons born to a Jewish family in the German capital of Berlin. In the late 1920s he earned a doctorate in chemistry and pharmacy. In 1931 he married Ilse Teppich, and in 1933 the couple had a daughter, Gabriele. 1933-39: Fritz worked in his father's pharmacy until 1938, when the Nazis forced them to sell the business for a fraction of its value to an "Aryan" German [Aryanization]. Leaving his parents behind was agonizing, but concern for the safety of his wife and daughter forced Fritz to move in 1938 to Amsterdam. He opened a pharmacy and then sent for Ilse and Gabriele. One year later his mother joined them. His father elected to remain in Berlin. 1940-44: In May 1940 Germany invaded the Netherlands. Fritz was made a member of the German-appointed Jewish council, and tried to use his position to protect his family from deportation by getting their names on "protective lists." But eventually, in June 1943, they were all deported to the Westerbork transit camp. A month later, Fritz's mother committed suicide: she had learned that she was to be sent to Auschwitz. In 1944 Fritz, Ilse and Gabriele were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto. Fritz and his family were liberated when Soviet troops took Theresienstadt in May 1945. After the war, Fritz returned to Amsterdam and re-established his pharmacy.
    8.50
    2 votes
    72
    George Brokaw

    George Brokaw

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    George Brokaw was a passenger on TWA flight 128. He survived the crash on November 20,1967 by placing his head between his knees after seeing sparks from the front of the airliner. He had been sitting in seat 11-A two seats behind Robert Cooley. Mr. Brokaw was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    8.50
    2 votes
    73
    8.50
    2 votes
    74

    Michel Thomas

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Michel Thomas (born Moniek (Moshe) Kroskof, February 3, 1914 – January 8, 2005) was a polyglot linguist, language teacher, and decorated war veteran. He survived imprisonment in several different Nazi concentration camps after serving in the Maquis (World War II) of the French Resistance and worked with the U.S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps during World War II. After the war, Thomas emigrated to the United States, where he developed a language-teaching system known as the Michel Thomas Method. In 2004 he was awarded the Silver Star by the U.S. Army. Thomas was born in Łódź, Poland, to a wealthy Jewish family who owned textile factories. When he was seven years old, his parents sent him to Breslau, Germany (now Wrocław, Poland), where he fit in comfortably. The rise of the Nazis drove him to leave for the University of Bordeaux in France in 1933, and subsequently the Sorbonne and the University of Vienna. Thomas's biography gives an account of his war years. When France fell to the Nazis, he escaped to Nice, which was nominally neutral under the Vichy government, changing his name to Michel Thomas so he could operate in the French Resistance movement more easily. He was arrested
    8.50
    2 votes
    75
    Berek Wolfowicz

    Berek Wolfowicz

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Berek, the only child of Nesza (Nugielman) and Aron Wolfowicz, grew up in a tiny town in central Poland. His family was not religious, but because most community members were, Berek received a religious education. Mr. Wolfowicz owned a tannery. Berek did not have non-Jewish friends, and did not venture into non-Jewish areas for fear of being beaten. His community was surrounded by extremely hostile Polish peasants, and antisemitism was rampant. His father's family were all in the United States, and Berek and his parents seemed always on the verge of leaving. In September 1939, the Germans invaded Poland. A curfew was established for the Jews, and they were brutalized by German soldiers. Many were shot for violating the curfew. Between 1939 and 1942, the Germans gradually increased the persecution. Jews were not permitted to attend school. Berek had a tutor who secretly came to his home to prepare him for his Bar Mitzvah. Jewish businesses were closed or confiscated. The Jews were confined in a sealed-off ghetto, where there was little food. Individuals survived by selling their possessions. Berek's father smuggled food into the ghetto so his family could eat. There was much brutality. The Germans would beat Jews, shoot them at random, and arrest them in sudden raids. In July 1942, when Berek was fourteen years old, he and his father were picked up in a raid. They had been hiding in a cornfield, when a Pole, who had seen them, pointed them out to the Germans. They were forced to work as slave laborers in a nearby munitions factory. They attempted an escape by bribing a camp employee, but he never showed up and they were caught. Berek's father died as a result of the horrendous conditions and inadequate food. Young Berek received extra food and was given some protection by the two German women who ran the factory. In 1944, he was moved to another labor camp. When the Russians began their advance into Poland, the Germans packed up their machinery and moved to a factory near the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany. Somehow Berek "fell through the cracks" and managed to remain alive. The day before Buchenwald was liberated, on April 9, 1945, Berek and 5,000 other inmates were marched out of the camp and put on a "death train." The train simply went around in circles and the inmates were never given food. Only 800 were alive on May 5, 1945, when the train finally stopped in Theresienstadt , Czechoslovakia. On May 8, Theresienstadt was liberated. Berek was physically broken. He had lost most of his teeth and was in the last stages of starvation. His parents had been murdered, and he had no home. He was seventeen years old.
    7.33
    3 votes
    76

    Emil František Burian

    • Survived disasters: SS Cap Arcona
    Emil František Burian (June 11, 1904 – August 9, 1959) was a Czech poet, journalist, singer, actor, musician, composer, dramatic adviser, playwright and director. He was also active in Communist Party of Czechoslovakia politics. Burian was born in Plzeň, Czechoslovakia, where he came from a musical family. His father, Emil Burian, was an opera singer. E. F. Burian is the father of singer and writer Jan Burian. In 1927, he graduated from the Prague Conservatory, in the class of J. B. Foerster, but he began participating in cultural life much sooner. E. F. Burian was a member of Devětsil, an association of Czech avant-garde artists. In 1926–1927, he worked with Osvobozené divadlo, but after disputes with Jindřich Honzl, he and Jiří Frejka left the theatre. Later, they founded their own theatre, Da-Da. He also worked with the Moderní studio theatre scene. In 1927 he founded the musical and elocutionary ensemble Voiceband. In 1923, he joined the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia. His work, strongly influenced by communist ideas, bordered on political agitation. In May 1933, he founded the D 34 theatre, with a strongly leftist-oriented program. In 1941, Burian was arrested and spent the
    7.33
    3 votes
    77
    7.33
    3 votes
    78

    Hara Tamiki

    • Survived disasters: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    Tamiki Hara (原 民喜, Hara Tamiki, November 15, 1905–March 13, 1951) was a Japanese author and survivor of the bombing of Hiroshima, known for his works of Atomic bomb literature. Hara was born in Hiroshima in 1905. Hara was a survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. While he was a middle school student, Hara became familiar with Russian literature, and also began to write poetry. He particularly admired the poets Saisei Murou and Paul Verlaine. He graduated from the English literature department of Keio University, and worked at a professional author from 1935 onwards. Hara's wife Sadae fell ill in 1939, and died in 1944. He had once said of her, "If I should lose my wife, I would live only one year to leave a collection of sad and beautiful poems behind". A year later, just before the first anniversary of her death, he was exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima at his parents' home in Motomachi. These two traumatic experiences became central to his work. Natsu no Hana (Summer Flowers), his best-known work, for which he was awarded the first Takitaro Minakami Prize, was completed by August 1946 but not published until June 1947. Two further sections of the work were later
    7.33
    3 votes
    79
    7.33
    3 votes
    80
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    George Brady

    George Brady

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    George Brady, O.Ont (born February 9, 1928, Nové Město na Moravě, Czechoslovakia) is a Holocaust survivor of both Theresienstadt (Terezin) and Auschwitz (Oswiecim, Poland), who became a Canadian businessman and was awarded the Order of Ontario. The son of Marketa and Karel Brady, and brother of Hana Brady, George Brady lived an ordinary childhood in interwar Czechoslovakia until March 1939, when Nazi Germany took control of Bohemia and Moravia. After that, his Jewish family encountered increasing restrictions and persecution by the German occupiers. By the year 1942, Brady's parents had been separated from their children and sent to prisons and concentration camps. They perished in Auschwitz before the end of the Second World War. George and Hana stayed with an aunt and uncle (the uncle was not Jewish, and thus the couple was a "privileged" mixed marriage and not subject to deportation) for a short time until they too were deported to Theresienstadt, a ghetto-camp not far from Prague, Czechoslovakia where he shared kinderheim L417 with around forty boys including Petr Ginz and Yehuda Bacon. George and Hana remained in Theresienstadt until 1944, when they were sent in separate
    6.25
    4 votes
    82
    Gertrud Naumann

    Gertrud Naumann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    The Frankfurterin Gertrud Naumann became the important time witness of the fate of the Anne Frank. Impressively beak 1958 in its publication "Anne Frank has seriously - trace of a child" Gertrud Naumann lauded, questioned become is the time of its life again and again by journalists and organic counts. The teacher daughter is born on the 28 March 1917 as a boy of six siblings in Frankfurt/main. You verlebt in a Catholic stamped parental home an unencumbered youth time. The family lives at the Marbachweg. Gertrud is opened and maintains lively contacts with all children out of the neighborhood. Remained photos receive show the cheerful girl with the dear face and the long thick braids usually in the middle of a large children multitude. Gertrud is very loveful of children and is concerned especially with all small. It can go past no children vehicle, carried away without before and fascinates to have in show. When the Jewish family Frank in the year 1927 in the Marbachweg pulls, Gertrud Naumann closes quickly friendship with the new neighbors, for there there is the one-year daughter Margot. Through the children, the families meet Naumann and Frank more closely. The first of all dependable neighborly ratio develops to an intensive friendship. The sociable families invite themselves mutually to different occasions. Beginning of the thirties years the political zeitgeist becomes apparent also in Frankfurt/main. That the Franks Jews are, does not disturb the Naumanns however. The families treat themselves mutually unrestricted sovereign and friendly. When Gertrud commits its first holy communion, the small Margot remains in the festivitys obviously not uninvited. Is reversed also Gertrud often guest in the family Frank. The Franks are liberal Jews. --. - Gertrud plays with Margot and takes is possible itself its careful on, whenever it its. Soon there will be photos with Gertrud, Margot, woman Frank and other neighbor children that the frequently photographing father Frank received. There and again also Bernhard Elias is to be seen there. Bernhard, the somewhat older cousin of Margot, is named Buddy. Its mother is the sister of Margots father. The family Elias the emigration will succeed into Switzerland on time. Gertrud loves the small Margot Frank with the "gigantic black Kulleraugen" (1). Woman Edith Frank has in the end so much confidence in Gertrud that it the girl asks sometimes to pay attention to Margot if cares are to be settled and the small cannot be brought. Gradually Gertrud to the family belongs and is "child in the house" (2) of the Franks. It learns there much grant and generosity. The three-year Margot gets in June 1929 a little sister Annelies Marie that is named late Anne. For the Gertrud twelve-year now, that is a further reason to join yet more closely the Franks. The baby is furthermore 'the sensation' at all other neighbor children of the Marbachweg. Father Frank lets emerge new photos: Baby Anne in the arm of mother Edith and sister Margot as a midpoint, of enchanted neighbor children surrounds whereby also Gertrud is. Everyone marvels at the new child. The neighbors like the family Frank. Gertrud remembers a jolly occurrence. When the already grown up Anne Frank is invited once to the afternoon coffee with family Naumann, it stares steadfast to Gertruds father in order to say then directly over the table away to it: "You have yes cats eye!" (3) -- Gertruds older sister Elisabeth is an adept tailor. Because also it the children Frank loves, it sews for the little girls Margot and Anne dress. They are bleu and out of a silky material (4). After the pressure of the Nazis increases on the Jews, the businessman Otto Frank 1933 leaves its home town Frankfurt/main. First of all it seeks work alone in Holland and a shelter for its family. He establishes himself in Amsterdam and makes up somewhat later moment to one its members. Its wife Edith pulls first of all Aachen with the daughters of Frankfurt into its home town. To that moment, the seven year old Margot and the four-year-old Anne are therefore on the passage and (yet) under the protection of its Aachener grandma (mütterlicherseits). A photograph emerged in Aachen from the year 1933 documents the sisters before they must leave Germany. Both carry the dresses sewed by Gertruds sister Elisabeth. I latch the photo so very into the heart that I select it as a stimulation for my watercolor, that I give Gertrud in December 1998. It is the prelude of our intensive sincere friendship. After the emigration of the Franks into the Netherlands, the contact of the families does not dismantle Naumann and Frank also the following years. Numerous traces belay that: Existing postcard of the Margot learning just letter at Gertrud, later also by Anne letter, birthday congratulations or simply only "would love greetings to Gertrud. Your Anne". Until 1937, Otto Frank can there and again from Amsterdam to Frankfurt travel. In a visit, it says to Gertrud during a joint walk suddenly: "If we would be discovered now so together, we would become" arrested (. 5) it becomes for long time the last stay Otto Franks in its home town Frankfurt be. Mr. Frank in the summer 1942 to the occasion takes the proclamation to the working use for the sixteen year-old Margot Frank to Germany, immediately with its wife and the daughters into the long prepared Amsterdamer ambush Prinsengracht submerging. Here the persons with even further four persons remain. They are betrayed, are arrested on the 4 August 1944 and displaced in concentration camp. On the 27 January 1945, Otto Frank in Auschwitz is freed through the red army. It survived as more only out of its family: its wife Edith dies die 1945 in mountains-Belsen on the 6 January 1945 in Auschwitz, its daughters Margot and Anne in March. When according to Otto Frank 1945 is for the first time again in Frankfurt/main, it takes immediately to the Gertrud Naumann contact remained there up. Father Frank becomes acquainted with here its fiancees Karl Trenz, that is returned recently out of the captivity to Frankfurt. Gertrud and Karl marry 1949 and get three children. Otto Frank remains with Gertrud and its family to its death in the year 1980 in narrow friendly connection. Gertrud and Karl fallen in love jointly the vacation with its children in Switzerland, they cannot be taken it to visit its "papa Frank" and its second wife Fritzi in Birsfelden. On the 1 December 2002, Gertrud Trenz-Naumann dies at the age of 85 years in Frankfurt/main. Your man Karl follows its at the 15 September 2003. Gertrud Naumann, often babysits the Frank girls. She is the youngest of six children. She has three children wit husband.
    6.25
    4 votes
    83

    Ietje Swillems

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rie "Ietje" Swillens was another good friend of Anne's all the way through Montessori school. Ietje was the girl that Anne breathlessly shared the news with concerning one of her uncles who had been arrested by the Nazis and sent to labor camp (he later was released and emigrated to the United States). Being Christian, Ietje's family was able to live out the war in Amsterdam. She became a teacher in later years, and today lives in Amstelveen, outside of Amsterdam. She is the girl second from right in the "tenth birthday" picture.
    6.25
    4 votes
    84
    Miriam Mozes

    Miriam Mozes

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Twin sister of Eva Mozes Kor. She died from a cancer that resulting from Auschwitz eperiments, on 06/06/1993.
    6.25
    4 votes
    85
    6.25
    4 votes
    86
    7.00
    3 votes
    87
    Carl E. C. Weekley

    Carl E. C. Weekley

    • Survived disasters: American Airlines Flight 383
    Carl Weekley was an American Airlines captain on board flight 383 as a non revenue passenger. He survived the crash on November 8,1965 and escaped through a hole in the side of the fuselage. He encountered Toni Ketchell on the ground, picked her up,and carried her away from the wreckage just before it exploded. He was transferred to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Ky.
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    Charlotta Kaletta

    Charlotta Kaletta

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Charlotta Kaletta, the common law wife of Fritz Pfeffer was not Jewish and therefore was able to remain in her Amsterdam apartment during the occupation. Miep Gies was especially touched by the devotion Pfeffer and Kaletta displayed to each other, and frequently passed letters from one to the other, an act which the other members of the household viewed as imprudent, but which she felt was important. Kaletta's Jewish husband and their son both died in Auschwitz, but she held hope for some time after the war's end that Pfeffer had survived. When she learned of his death, she married him posthumously, Otto Frank making the arrangements for her. Frank was always sympathetic to her, and continued to offer her assistance, but in the mid-1950s she severed all contact with him and with Miep and Jan Gies, because she was offended by the unflattering depiction of Pfeffer in Anne's diary. She died in Amsterdam, 13 June 1985.
    7.00
    3 votes
    89
    Jasia Starkopf

    Jasia Starkopf

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Jasia, the daughter of Adam and Pela (Miller) Starkopf, was born in the Warsaw ghetto. Her parents were childhood sweethearts. Before the war, her father was the office manager and chief accountant of a leather goods factory. Mr. and Mrs. Starkopf lived with Jasia's grandparents in a spacious Warsaw apartment. After the German invasion, Mr. Starkopf went into business selling toys and novelties. When the Germans occupied Warsaw, they enacted harsh anti-Jewish measures causing great hardship. On October 14, 1940, the Warsaw ghetto was established. In November, the ghetto was sealed off. Jasia was born on January 14, 1941, delivered by a midwife on the dining room table. She was swaddled in a pillowcase that was tied with a belt. Her grandparents sold what little they still possessed, mostly clothes, just to buy her milk. By the summer of 1941, starvation was a major problem in the ghetto. People were collapsing and dying in the street. In order to obtain food for Jasia and her mother, Mr. Starkopf began making trips outside the ghetto to the non-Jewish area of the city. After a close escape during the first massive roundup of Jews for deportation to death camps, he determined that the only way his family might survive, would be to escape from the ghetto. Jasia's father was able to obtain false documents for his family, giving them new identities as non-Jews. Unable to trust Jasia, only eighteen months old, to keep quiet while being smuggled out of the ghetto, Mr. Starkopf gave Jasia medication that put her to sleep. Her parents placed her in a coffin and arranged that she be taken to the Jewish cemetery for burial. Her mother bribed guards so that she could follow the hearse to the cemetery. From there, they slipped into the adjacent Catholic cemetery and the non-Jewish sector of the city. Jasia and her parents spent the rest of the war posing as Christians in the Polish countryside. They constantly feared discovery. They returned to Warsaw in January 1945, after it was liberated. Jasia was four years old.
    7.00
    3 votes
    90

    Jeannine Burk

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Jeannine Burk was born on September 15, 1939 in Brussels, Belgium. When World War II started, her mother, Sarah Bluman Rafalowicz took her three children including Jeannine into hiding. Though Belgium was meant to be neutral territory during the war, Hitler disregarded the treaties and with the help of the King of Belgium himself, he took the war into the country and began concentration camps there. Jeannine’s father took her to a safe house where she was to live for two years, never mistreated, but never loved, and never allowed to go further than the backyard for the whole two years she lived there. Jeannine did not have friends during the war, at least not ones of flesh and blood. She had to make them up, and these imaginary friends were all she had for two years. “I do not remember being hugged and kissed. That was my life for two years” (Jeannine Burk). At one point, some neighbors ratted them out to the Gestapo. They came and invaded the house, taking her father away and trying to take her mother. She refused to go, saying: "You can shoot me here, but I will not leave my daughter." They saw Jeannine’s older sister who was in a body cast due to a bone disease called
    7.00
    3 votes
    91

    Kate Florence Phillips

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Miss Kate Florence Phillips, 19, from Worcester, England boarded the Titanic, as a second class passenger, at Southampton. She was eloping with Henry Samuel Morley and travelled under the name of Mrs Marshall. Miss Phillips was rescued (possibly in lifeboat 11).
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Noach Szejniuk

    Noach Szejniuk

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Noach's parents, Fania and Motel Szejniuk, left Poland before he was born to make a better life for themselves in the more liberal atmosphere of France. Jews in France were treated with equality and were well-integrated into the society. The Szejniuks settled in Paris, a sophisticated city, where the large Jewish population lived in harmony with their non-Jewish neighbors. Noach's father worked in a soda factory. Noach was a seven year-old schoolboy when the Germans invaded France in June 1940. The Nazis immediately enacted harsh antisemitic measures, barring Jews from most professions and from public schools. Many Jews became impoverished. Foreign-born Jews were deported to concentration camps in May 1941. In June 1942, the Jews of France were forced to wear the yellow star. Soon after, the Nazis arrested almost 13,000 Jews living in Paris and sent them to the nearby Drancy concentration camp. Noach's desperate parents found him a home with sympathetic Christians, who were willing to risk their lives in order to hide him. Arrests and deportations of Jews to various concentration camps in France continued. If they managed to survive the horrendous conditions in those camps, they were sent on to the Auschwitz death camp in Poland. Noach's mother and father were arrested and sent to concentration camps. His mother was sent to a camp near the Spanish border. Somehow she managed to escape and make her way over a treacherous route through the Pyrenees mountains to refuge in Barcelona, Spain. Noach's father also managed to escape from the concentration camp where he had been interned. He returned to Paris, where he hid in constant fear for his life. On March 21, 1943, he was discovered hiding in a barn by the Nazis, and he was shot. In August 1944, Paris was liberated by Allied troops. Noach's mother managed to make her way back through war-torn Europe to Paris in order to be reunited with her ten year-old son.
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Pinhas Wajcmus

    Pinhas Wajcmus

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Pinhas, the son of Jacob and Brucha (Rozguwaje) Wajcmus, lived in the tiny rural village of Zarubka-Nadrybia in eastern Poland. Pinhas was a twelve year-old schoolboy when the Germans invaded Poland in September 1939. Though the Germans persecuted the Jews in this area, the Jews of Zarubka were, at first, better off than most of the others in occupied Poland. They were not forced to live in a ghetto until the beginning of 1942. In 1942, however, the Jews of the village were forced to move 25 miles to the sealed-off ghetto in Wlodawa, where they lived under terrible conditions. The ghetto was overcrowded and lacked food and medicine. People died daily of disease and hunger. The Nazis began deporting the Jews of Wlodawa to the nearby Sobibor death camp in May 1942. In June 1942, all children under the age of ten were deported and gassed. At the end of October 1942, before the ghetto was to be completely emptied, hundreds of Jews escaped to the surrounding forests. Pinhas was among them. Many formed their own resistance units, while others joined Soviet partisan bands operating in the area. The resistance fighters also set up family camps to offer refuge to women and children who were being hunted down like animals. Soon, those who lacked weapons or who had problems enduring the hardships of the forest were enticed back into the ghetto when the Germans promised to end the deportations. The deportations resumed, however, in 1943, and the ghetto was emptied of its remaining inhabitants by the middle of that summer. Pinhas hid in the forests until July 1944, when the Russians liberated the area. He was seventeen years old when he came out of hiding. Pinhas came to the United States in 1949, where he became a butcher. Pinhas was murdered in April 1989. He was trying to stop a thief from stealing his car, which was loaded with food for the Passover holiday.
    7.00
    3 votes
    95

    Saartje Stoppelman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    A friend of Otto Frank's, she was also Miep and Jan Gies's landlady. Mrs. Stoppelman was among those in the Gies' wedding party (16 July 1941), so Anne did meet her (and there is a photo of her in AFR). She and her husband had a daughter, Froukje, and son, Max. In May 1940, the Germans invaded and Mr. Stoppelman was, fortunately for him, in England. Otto took out an ad to help her find a boarder, and he also told Miep about the rooms for rent. She and Jan rented the ground floor rooms soon after. Mrs Stoppelman went into hiding in Bussum or Hilversum in September 1942. She kept in touch with Miep and Jan, who were even able to visit her from time to time. (She was hidden at Karel van der Horst's mother's.) She survived the war. Her grandson and her son, Max, also survived. But his wife, Stella, did not. Mrs. Stoppelman's daughter, Froukje, son-in-law, and granddaughter also did not survive. (AFB p. 258, 300; AFR p. 62-3, 119-120 — she is called "Mrs. Samson" in that book;.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Tracy Jeanne Smith

    Tracy Jeanne Smith

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Tracy Smith was with her grandmother, Jeanne Raben, on TWA flight 128 when it crashed in Hebron, Kentucky on November 20,1967. She was found in the foliage of Mr. Wagner's apple orchard and was transferred to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky by the Hebron, Kentucky Fire Department.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Millvina Dean

    Millvina Dean

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Elizabeth Gladys Millvina Dean (2 February 1912 – 31 May 2009) was the last remaining survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, which occurred on 15 April 1912. At 2 months old, she was also the youngest passenger aboard. Millvina Dean was born in Branscombe, England, to Bertram Frank Dean and Georgette Eva Light. She had a brother, Bertram Vere Dean, born 21 May 1910. Millvina Dean never married and had no children. Dean's father died on the Titanic; her mother died on 16 September 1975, aged 96; and her brother Bertram Vere died, aged 81, on 14 April 1992. Millvina Dean's parents decided to leave England and emigrate to Wichita, Kansas, where her father had family and his cousin owned a tobacco shop that her father was going to co-own. The Deans were not supposed to be aboard the Titanic, but owing to a coal strike, they were transferred to the ship and boarded it as third-class passengers at Southampton, England. Dean was barely two months old when she boarded the ship. Her father felt the ship's collision with the iceberg on the night of 14 April 1912, and after investigating, returned to his cabin telling his wife to dress the children and go up on deck. Dean, her mother,
    5.20
    5 votes
    98

    Max Stoppelman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    He was a protector and model to Peter van Pels while they were in Auschwitz. He and Otto had known Max in Amsterdam and Max's mother was Miep and Jan's landlady: there is a fair chance that Anne met him at some point before going into hiding. Max was a textiles businessman. During the war, business was slow and difficult, so he also worked as a courier, for the Jewish Council. In the fall of 1943, Jan found Max and his wife a hiding place in Laren. (Miep probably did not know this: her book does not mention that Jan had found them a safe place and seems to say that Jan honestly did not know where Max was when the Omnia men grilled Jan about where Max was, in the spring of 1944. In fact, it was at about that time, that Max was discovered and sent to the camps.) He survived the war and is still alive in Bussum, the Netherlands.
    6.00
    4 votes
    99

    Eva Hart

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Eva Miriam Hart MBE (31 January 1905 - 14 February 1996) was a survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Eva Miriam Hart was born on 31 January 1905 in Ilford, Essex, England to Benjamin Hart and Esther Bloomfield. She was educated at St. Mary's Convent (Later St. Mary's Hare Park) in Gidea Park, Essex. In early 1912, Benjamin decided to take his family and emigrate to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he planned to open a tobacco store. Hart was seven years old when she and her parents, Benjamin and Esther, boarded the Titanic as second-class passengers on April 10, 1912 at Southampton, England. Almost instantly, Hart's mother felt uneasy about the ship and feared that some catastrophe would happen. To call a ship unsinkable was, in her mother's mind, flying in the face of God. With such fear, Esther slept only during the day and stayed awake in her cabin at night fully dressed. Hart was sleeping when the Titanic struck the iceberg at 11:40 pm on April 14. Hart's father rushed into her cabin to alert her and her mother, and after wrapping her in a blanket, he carried her to the boat's deck. He placed his wife and daughter in Lifeboat No. 14 and told Hart to 'hold
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    8.00
    2 votes
    101

    Dina Babbitt

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Dina Babbitt (born Dina Gottliebová; January 21, 1923, Brno, Czechoslovakia – July 29, 2009, Felton, California) was an artist and Holocaust survivor. A U.S. citizen, she resided in Santa Cruz, California. As Dina Gottliebova, she was imprisoned in the Auschwitz Concentration Camp during WWII, where she drew portraits of Romani inmates for the infamous Dr. Mengele. Following the liberation of the camp and the end of the war she emigrated to the United States and became an animator. She had been fighting the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum for the return of her paintings. She was featured alongside fellow concentration camp survivors and artists Jan Komski and Felix Nussbaum in the 1999 documentary film Eyewitness, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject. In 1944, while in Auschwitz Concentration Camp, she was chosen by Josef Mengele to draw portraits of Romani inmates. Mengele wished to capture the Romanis' skin coloration better than he could do it with camera and film at that time. Gottliebova agreed if her own mother's life were spared as well. As of 2009, seven watercolors survive, all located in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum. According to
    9.00
    1 votes
    102

    Evelyn Marsden

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Evelyn Marsden (later married as Evelyn James) (15 October 1883 – 30 August 1938) was the only Australian female survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic and was rescued in lifeboat 16. She was the daughter of railway worker Walter Henry Marsden (Hoyleton Stationmaster in 1912) and Annie Bradshaw. Her birthplace of Stockyard Creek is about 80 km north of Adelaide, South Australia and is now ruins. Evelyn, who previously worked onboard the ship RMS Olympic, signed-on to the RMS Titanic on 6 April 1912, and gave her address as 7 West Marlands Terrace, The Polygon, Southampton. She was 28 and single at the time and as a stewardess she was paid monthly wages of £3 10s. She assisted also as a nurse for the First Class passengers. There is mention of Evelyn in a letter by Mary Sloan to her sister on 27 April 1912, stating that they both were taken to Dr. Simpson's room for a little whiskey and water during the disaster. Dr. Simpson then hurried away and was never seen by them again. Evelyn and Mary escaped on Boat 16 which was lowered at 1.35 a.m. from the Port side by 6th Officer Moody. This boat held about 40 people with no incidents recorded while loading. They were in this boat all
    9.00
    1 votes
    103
    Harold Sydney Bride

    Harold Sydney Bride

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Harold Sydney Bride (11 January 1890 – 29 April 1956) was the junior wireless officer on the ocean liner RMS Titanic during its ill-fated maiden voyage. After the Titanic struck an iceberg at 11:40 pm 14 April 1912, Bride and his senior colleague Jack Phillips were responsible for relaying SOS messages to ships in the vicinity, which led to the survivors being picked up by the RMS Carpathia. The men remained at their posts until the ship's power was almost completely out. Bride was washed off the ship as the boat deck flooded, but managed to scramble onto the upturned lifeboat Collapsible 'B', where he remained until being rescued by the Carpathia the following morning. Despite being injured, he helped the Carpathia's wireless operator transmit survivor lists and personal messages from the ship. Harold Bride was born in Nunhead, London, England in 1890 to Arthur Bride and Mary Ann Lowe. The youngest of five children, Bride lived with his family in Bromley. After primary school Bride decided he wanted to become a wireless operator and he worked in his family's business to help pay for training. He completed training for the Marconi Company in July, 1911. Working for Marconi, his
    9.00
    1 votes
    104

    Jack Lesberg

    • Survived disasters: Cocoanut Grove fire
    Jack Lesberg (February 14, 1920 - September 17, 2005) was a jazz double-bassist. He performed with many famous jazz musicians, including Louis Armstrong, Sarah Vaughan, and Benny Goodman. Lesberg had the misfortune of playing in the Cocoanut Grove on the night in 1942 when 492 people lost their lives in a fire. His escape was memorialized by fellow bassist Charles Mingus in an unpublished section of Mingus's autobiography "Beneath the Underdog"; this passage was read by rapper Chuck D. on the Mingus tribute album "Weird Nightmare". According to Mingus's telling, Lesberg used his double bass to "make a door" inside the club which aided in his escape. Lesberg continued to tour in the 1980s and was interviewed for KCEA radio in 1984 following a performance in Menlo Park, CA. During the taped interview Jack spoke of the many bands and performers he worked with and expressed his feelings that he felt blessed to be a musician.
    9.00
    1 votes
    105

    Janet Evans

    • Survived disasters: Centennial Olympic Park bombing
    Janet Beth Evans (born August 28, 1971) is a former American competition swimmer who specialized in distance freestyle events. Evans was a world champion and world record-holder, and won gold medals at the 1988 and the 1992 Olympics. Born in Fullerton, California, Evans grew up in neighboring Placentia, where she started swimming competitively as a child. By the age of 11, she was setting National Age Group records in distance events. After graduating from El Dorado High School, she initially attended Stanford University, where she swam for the Stanford Cardinal swimming and diving team from 1989 to 1991. When the NCAA placed weekly hours limits on athletic training time, she quit the Stanford swim team to focus on training. She later attended the University of Texas at Austin before graduating from the University of Southern California in 1994 with a bachelor's degree in communications. Evans was distinctive for her unorthodox "windmill" stroke and her apparently inexhaustible cardio-respiratory reserves. Slight of build and short of stature, she more than once found herself competing and winning against bigger and stronger athletes, some of whom were subsequently found to have
    9.00
    1 votes
    106

    Lillian Asplund

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Lillian Gertrud Asplund (October 21, 1906 – May 6, 2006) was one of the last three living survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912; and also the last survivor with actual memories of the disaster. Lillian Asplund was born on October 21, 1906 in Worcester, Massachusetts to a Swedish immigrant family father Carl Oscar Vilhelm Gustafsson Asplund and mother Selma Augusta Emilia Johansson. Lillian had a twin brother, Carl Edgar, and two older brothers; Filip Oscar, born in 1898 and Clarence Gustaf Hugo, born in 1902. A fourth brother, Edvin Rojj 'Felix', was born in 1909. In 1907, Lillian's father had taken his family to Småland, Sweden to help his widowed mother settle problems with the family farm. By early 1912, the family was ready to return to the United States, and Lillian's father booked passage for his family aboard the Titanic. Lillian, her parents and 4 brothers boarded the Titanic at Southampton, England on April 10, 1912 as third-class passengers. Lillian was five years old at the time and recalled that the Titanic "was very big, and it had just been painted. I remember not liking the smell of fresh paint." When the Titanic struck the iceberg at 11:40 pm
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Margaret Brown

    Margaret Brown

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Margaret "Molly" Brown (née Tobin) (July 18, 1867 – October 26, 1932) was an American socialite, philanthropist, and activist who became famous due to her survival of the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic, after exhorting the crew of Lifeboat No. 6 to return to look for survivors. It is unclear whether any survivors were found after Lifeboat No. 6 returned to search. She became known after her death as "The Unsinkable Molly Brown", although during her life, her friends called her "Maggie". A 1960 Broadway musical, and a 1964 film adaptation of the musical were produced, based on her life. Both were titled The Unsinkable Molly Brown. Born Margaret Tobin in Hannibal, Missouri, her parents were Irish Roman Catholic immigrants John Tobin (1820–1899) and Johanna Collins (1825–1905). Her siblings were Daniel (born 1863), William (born 1869), and Helen (born 1871). Added to these, Margaret had two half-sisters: Catherine Bridget Tobin, by her father's first marriage, and Mary Ann Collins, by her mother's first marriage. Both her mother and father had been widowed young. At age 18, Margaret relocated to Leadville, Colorado with her sister, and got a job in a department store. It was here she
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    9.00
    1 votes
    110

    Richard Castaldo

    • Survived disasters: Columbine High School massacre
    Richard Castaldo, born 1981, was critically injured during the Columbine High School Massacre. A friend of Rachel Scott, he was eating lunch with her on the day she was killed. Castaldo was shot eight times in the arm, chest, back, and abdomen, becoming permanently paralyzed from the chest down. He witnessed Scott being killed from the corner of his eye during the shooting. He was 17 years old, and a Columbine High School student, when the shootings occurred. He has appeared in many documentaries about the shooting, including Bowling for Columbine about Columbine and its connections to youth gun violence and its influences on gun control laws. Castaldo was the second victim of the shooting, after Rachel Scott. He was in the grassy knoll outside the cafeteria eating lunch with Scott. Minutes into their lunch, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold approached them. Harris threw a pipe-bomb that exploded, attracting the attention of both Scott and Castaldo. Harris then killed Scott and seriously wounded Castaldo with eight shots to the arm, back, chest, and abdomen from a Carbine rifle. He was one of the first evacuted during the massacre, and remained permanently disabled and in a wheel-chair
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Viktor Frankl

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Viktor Emil Frankl, MD, PhD (26 March 1905 – 2 September 1997) was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor. Frankl was the founder of logotherapy, which is a form of existential analysis, the "Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy". His best-selling book, Man's Search for Meaning (published under a different title in 1959: From Death-Camp to Existentialism, and originally published in 1946 as Trotzdem Ja Zum Leben Sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager), chronicles his experiences as a concentration camp inmate which led him to discover the importance of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most sordid ones, and thus a reason to continue living. Frankl became one of the key figures in existential therapy and a prominent source of inspiration for humanistic psychologists. Frankl was born in Vienna into a Jewish family of civil servants (Beamtenfamilie). His interest in psychology surfaced early. For the final exam (Matura) in Gymnasium, he wrote a paper on the psychology of philosophical thinking. After graduating from Gymnasium in 1923, he studied medicine at the University of Vienna and later specialized in neurology
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Jacqueline van Maarsen

    Jacqueline van Maarsen

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    )Jacqueline Yvonne Meta van Maarsen (Born January 30, 1929), simply known as "Jacque van Maarsen" is a Dutch bookbinder and writer. She is best known for her friendship with diarist Anne Frank. Jacque's Christian mother was able to remove the J (Jew) signs from the family's identity cards (Jacque's father was Jewish) during the Second World War, an act which helped the van Maarsens to escape the Nazis. Jacque was born in Amsterdam to a Dutch Jewish father, Hijman van Maarsen, and a French, Christian mother, Elline van Maarsen. Jacque has a sister, Christiane. [1] Jacque studied in a normal school of Amsterdam until 1940- when the Nazis invaded the Netherlands. Then Jacque had to move to a Jewish school. In the Jewish school, Jacqueline befriended many girls, including Anne Frank and Hanneli Goslar. Anne and Jacque became best friends, and they often visited each others' houses and did their homeworks together. Jacque was the secretary of the pingpong club Little Bear Minus Two (the club was opened by her friends). In July 1942, Anne's family went into hiding, although Jacque didn't know about this. Meanwhile, the Nazis were arresting Jews of the whole country. Jacque, who was half-Jewish felt threat of arrest. Jacque's French mother, who was a Christian, was successfully able to remove the "J" (Jew) signs from the family's ID cards. These acts helped the van Maarsens to have a escape from the Nazis. Jacque was shifted to a normal school from the Jewish school. After the war, Jacque came to know Anne didn't survive the war. Otto Frank, Anne's father, got in touch with Jacque. Jacque was one of the first people whom Otto Frank showed Anne's diary. In 1947 The Diary of a Young Girl was published. Jacque became a bookbinder. She married her childhood friend, Ruud Sanders, in 1954. [2] They had three children, Marteen, Joost and Lili. Since 1987, Jacque has been giving speeches about Anne Frank in different schools of Germany and United States. Jacque has written four books about her friendship with Anne Frank. Jacque still lives in Amsterdam, and has seven grandchildren.
    6.67
    3 votes
    113

    Kathe Egyedi

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Käthe "Kitty" Egyedi: Kitty was another lifelong friend of Anne's, and was, like Mary Bos, a fine artist. Schoolmates at Montessori, Anne and Kitty attended different schools after sixth grade, and hence they had drifted apart somewhat. But shortly before the Franks went into hiding, Kitty visited Anne one day when Anne was in bed with a slight fever. They chatted the whole afternoon, and Kitty was impressed and pleased that the shrill, blunt and boy-crazy friend she remembered from Montessori school had begun to mature into a somewhat more introspective and thoughtful girl. This drew them closer together again. In the picture of Anne's 10th birthday referenced above under "Mary Bos", Kitty is the girl in the center with the dark pleated skirt. Kitty never felt that Anne was specifically thinking of her when she addressed her diary passages to "Kitty", and most Anne scholars and biographers, who believe Anne borrowed the name from the Joop ter Heul books, agree. Kitty's entire family survived internment at Theresienstadt, and, following her father's profession, she became a dentist after the war.
    6.67
    3 votes
    114

    Robert Hichens

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Robert Hichens (16 September 1882 – 23 September 1940) was a British sailor who was part of the deck crew on board the RMS Titanic when she sank on her maiden voyage on 15 April 1912. He was one of six quartermasters on board the vessel and was at the ship's wheel when the Titanic struck the fatal iceberg. Quartermaster Hichens gained notoriety after the disaster because of his conduct in Lifeboat No. 6, of which he was in charge. Passengers accused him of refusing to go back to rescue people from the water after the ship sank, that he called the people in the water "stiffs", and that he constantly criticized those at the oars while he was controlling the rudder. Hichens was later to testify at the US Inquiry that he had never used the words "stiffs" and that he had other words to describe bodies. He would also testify to have been given direct orders by Lightoller and the Captain to row to where a light could be seen (a steamer they thought) on the port bow, drop off the passengers and return. Later it was alleged he complained that the lifeboat was going to drift for days before any rescue came. When the RMS Carpathia came to rescue Titanic's survivors he said that the ship was
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Victor Goldschmidt

    Victor Goldschmidt

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Victor Moritz Goldschmidt ForMemRS (Zürich, January 27, 1888 – March 20, 1947, Oslo) was a mineralogist considered (together with Vladimir Vernadsky) to be the founder of modern geochemistry and crystal chemistry, developer of the Goldschmidt Classification of elements. Goldschmidt was born in Zürich. His parents, Heinrich Jacob Goldschmidt and Amelie Koehne named their son after a colleague of Heinrich, Victor Meyer. There was a history of great scientists and philosophers in both families. The Goldschmidt family came to Norway 1901 when Heinrich Goldschmidt took over a chair as Professor of Chemistry in Kristiania (Oslo). Goldschmidt’s first important contribution was within the field of geology and mineralogy. His two first larger works were his doctor thesis Die Kontaktmetamorphose im Kristianiagebiet and Geologisch-petrographische Studien im Hochgebirge des südlichen Norwegens. A series of publications under the title Geochemische Verteilungsgesetze der Elemente (geochemical laws of distribution of the elements) is usually referred to as the start of geochemistry, the science that describes the distribution of the chemical elements in nature. The geochemistry has not only
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Doris Wohlfarth

    Doris Wohlfarth

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Doris was born October 28, 1937 in Amsterdam, Holland. Her parents, Siegfried and Helene, had left their home in Frankfurt, Germany, three years earlier to escape persecution by the Nazis. Prior to that, Doris's father was an accountant working in the German courts, and her mother was the owner of a small mail order business. Doris's father lost his job in 1933 simply because he was Jewish. Realizing that things would only get worse, Siegfried and Helene decided to cross the border into Holland. Holland accepted many refugees from Germany, and the Jews there enjoyed equal rights. But in 1940, the Nazis invaded the tiny country and immediately began persecuting its Jews. Fearing that the Germans would arrest them, Doris's parents began looking for someone to shelter their daughter. Knowing that they might never see Doris again, Siegfried and Helene tried to prepare their daughter for the separation by distancing themselves from her emotionally. With untold pain in their hearts, they stopped hugging and holding her. Doris was only three years old at the time. With the help of the Dutch resistance, Doris's parents were able to place their child with a childless Dutch couple. Then they went into hiding. On Friday, August 25, 1944, the Gestapo located their hiding place and arrested them. Less than a month later, they were sent to the Auschwitz death camp in Poland. Doris's father was murdered there, but her mother was transferred to a slave-labor camp in Czechoslovakia. Doris's mother miraculously survived the Holocaust. With the defeat of Nazi Germany and her liberation, Helene now began her trek back to Holland. Deathly ill and weighing only 70 pounds, she kept herself alive by hoping that the Germans had not found her little girl. When Helene finally located her daughter, Doris, now eight, she did not even recognize her mother.
    5.75
    4 votes
    117
    Paula Wolf

    Paula Wolf

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Paula Wolf was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128. She survived the crash on November 20,1967 and was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky. She suffered severe burns over the majority of her body. The Burns Institute of Cincinnati helped save her life, She is still alive and doing well, however, she still has permanent injuries as a result of this accident. Her husband, Dr. Frederick Wolf died in this accident. They had five young children at the time of this accident. She will always appreciate the visits she received from Robert Hart and Robert Deters (two other survivors) during her long recovery.
    5.75
    4 votes
    118

    Alice Lok Cahana

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Renowned artist, poet, and the foremost painter of the Holocaust. A Holocaust survivor, Alice Lok Cahana's life was changed forever when she was brutally uprooted from the security of her home in Sarvar, Hungary, as the Nazis took her and her family to the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. Her mother, sister, two younger brothers, grandfather, aunts and uncles did not survive. In 1945, at the time of liberation, Cahana was still a young girl, one of the few children who were able to survive the torture and deprivation of concentration camp life. In 1978, she felt compelled to use her art to tell her story and the story of all the children who suffered in the Holocaust. Her lecture, slide show and the exhibit of her works are entitled, "The Soul of the People: Commemorating The Shoah."
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    Chris Haile

    Chris Haile

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Chris Haile was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128 and survived the crash on November 20,1967. He was picked up and carried by Stewardess Ellie Kurtock to the Stephens house. He later was transported to St. Elizabeth Memorial Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    Ernest Mandel

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Ernest Ezra Mandel (also known by various pseudonyms such as Ernest Germain, Pierre Gousset, Henri Vallin, Walter; 5 April 1923, Frankfurt – 20 July 1995, Brussels), was a revolutionary Marxist theorist. Born in Frankfurt, Mandel was recruited to the Belgian section of the international Trotskyist movement, the Fourth International, in his youth in Antwerp. His parents, Henri and Rosa Mandel, were Jewish emigres from Poland, the former a member of Rosa Luxemburg's and Karl Liebknecht's Spartacist League. Ernest's entrance to university studies was cut short when the German occupying forces closed the university down. During World War II, he escaped twice after being arrested in the course of resistance activities, and survived imprisonment in the German concentration camp at Dora. After the war, he became a leader of both the Belgian Trotskyists and the youngest member of the Fourth International secretariat, alongside Michel Pablo and others. He gained respect as a prolific journalist with a clear and lively style, as an orthodox Marxist theoretician, and as a talented debater. He wrote for numerous media outlets in the 1940s and 1950s including Het Parool, Le Peuple,
    7.50
    2 votes
    122

    Franciszek Gajowniczek

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Franciszek Gajowniczek (15 November 1901 – 13 March 1995) was a Polish army sergeant whose life was saved from the Nazis when (the later Sainted) Maximilian Kolbe offered to die in Gajowniczek's place. Gajowniczek had been sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp for aiding the Jewish resistance in Poland. Gajowniczek and Kolbe were both prisoners in 1941 at Auschwitz when a prisoner appeared to have escaped. Sub-Commandant Karl Fritzsch ordered that ten other prisoners die by starvation in reprisal. Franciszek Gajowniczek was one of those selected. When the Franciscan priest Kolbe heard Gajowniczek cry, "My poor wife! My poor children! What will they do?" Kolbe offered himself instead. Kolbe's exact words have been forgotten, but one version records his words as, "I am a Catholic priest from Poland; I would like to take his place, because he has a wife and children." The switch was permitted; after all his cellmates died, Kolbe was put to death with an injection of carbolic acid. Gajowniczek was sent from Auschwitz to another camp on 25 October 1944 and after spending five years, five months, and nine days in Nazi camps was liberated by the Allies. Though his wife, Helena,
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Gerda Weissmann Klein

    Gerda Weissmann Klein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Gerda Weissmann Klein (Bielsko, Poland May 8, 1924) is a Polish-born American author, humanitarian, historian, inspirational speaker, naturalized citizen and Holocaust survivor. For over six decades she has captivated audiences worldwide with her powerful message of hope, inspiration, love and humanity. In her speeches and books, she draws from her wealth of life experiences: from surviving the Holocaust and meeting her future husband on the day of her liberation, to her journey to the United States, accepting an Academy Award and Emmy for a documentary based on her life, and her constant fight to promote tolerance, encourage community service and combat hunger. On September 3, 1939 fifteen year-old Gerda's life changed forever as German troops invaded her home in Bielsko, Poland. Shortly after the invasion began, the family received a telegram from Gerda's uncle saying that the Germans were advancing quickly and the family should leave Poland immediately. However, Gerda's father had just suffered a myocardial infarction heart attack, and doctors advised that he not be moved or subjected to undue stress. Julius Weissmann ordered his children to flee Poland. When the invasion ended,
    7.50
    2 votes
    124

    Inge Auerbacher

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Inge Auerbacher (born December 31, 1934 in Kippenheim) is an American chemist of German origin. She is a survivor of the Holocaust and has published many books about her experiences in the Second World War. Inge Auerbacher was the last Jewish child born in Kippenheim, a village in South-Western Germany located at the foot of the Black Forest, close to the borders of France and Switzerland. She was the only child of Berthold (1898–1987) and Regina Auerbacher (née Lauchheimer, 1905–1996). Both of her parents came from observant Jewish families who had lived for many generations in Germany. On November 10th,1938, her father and grandfather were arrested and taken away during the chaos of Kristallnacht (Night of the Broken Glass) and sent to the Dachau concentration camp. Inge, her mother and her grandmother were able to hide in a shed during Kristallnacht and were not harmed. A few weeks later Inge's father and grandfather returned home, but her grandfather died shortly after in May, 1939 of a heart attack. Inge’s father was a soldier in the German Army during World War I. He was wounded badly and consequently awarded the Iron Cross for service to his country. Inge’s father was a
    7.50
    2 votes
    125

    Lin Jaldati

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    She and her younger sister, Jannie, both verified to Otto that Anne and Margot had died in Bergen-Belsen and the approximate date.
        She was the oldest of three children of hard working grocery store owners and she became a dancer and singer. She married Eberhard Bosch and they had a daughter, Kathinka. In 1943, Lientje and her sister, Jannie, combined households, bringing along people that she and Eberhard were keeping in hiding. In the summer of 1944, their home was raided and she threw a wild fit to get the children sent to stay with a doctor (which they did, but a guard was stationed outside). She was arrested and interrogated with Jannie and most of the others. See Jannie's entry for more details: their paths were fairly parallel while they were in custody.
        She, Eberhard, and Kathinka all survived. They had another daughter. Lientje changed her own name to Lin Yaldati and performed "Yiddish songs of celebration, defiance, and remembrance" in the decades afterward. (Singing had been very important to her and other Dutch Jews in Bergen-Belsen.) Sometimes she, her husband, and daughters performed together. She died in the late 1980's.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Renata Guttmann

    Renata Guttmann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Renate, her twin brother, Rene, and their German-Jewish parents lived in Prague. Shortly before the twins were born, Renate's parents had fled Dresden, Germany, to escape the Nazi government's policies against Jews. Before leaving Germany to live in Czechoslovakia, Renate's father, Herbert, worked in the import-export business. Her mother, Ita, was an accountant. 1933-39: Our family lived in a six-story apartment building along the #22 trolley line in Prague. A long, steep flight of stairs led up to our apartment, where my brother, Rene, and I shared a crib in our parents' bedroom; a terrace overlooked the yard outside. Rene and I wore matching outfits and were always well-dressed. Our days were often spent playing in a nearby park. In March 1939 the German army occupied Prague. Renate and her brother survived and were reunited in America in 1950. They learned that as one pair of the "Mengele Twins," they had been used for medical experiments.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127

    Sankichi Tōge

    • Survived disasters: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    Sankichi Tōge (峠三吉, Tōge Sankichi, February 1917 – March 1953) was a Japanese poet, activist, and survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. He was born Mitsuyoshi Tōge in Osaka as the youngest son of Ki'ichi Tōge, a successful manufacturer of bricks. From the start Tōge was a sickly child, suffering from asthma and periodic vomiting. He graduated from Hiroshima Prefecture's school of commerce in 1935, and started working for the Hiroshima Gas Company. In 1938 Tōge was diagnosed, wrongly, as having tuberculosis. Believing himself to have only a few years to live, he spent most of his time as an invalid. In 1948 Tōge learned that the diagnosis was wrong. He had bronchiectasis, an enlargement of the bronchial tube. He started composing poems in the second year of middle school. Early influences included Tolstoy, Heine, Toson Shimzaki, and Haruo Sato. In 1938 he read his first proletarian literature. In December 1942, he was baptized into the Catholic Church. By 1945 he composed three thousand tanka and even more haiku. They were mostly lyric poems. Twenty-four-year-old Tōge was in Hiroshima when the A-bomb was dropped on the city. By 1951 he was writing poetry startlingly different
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Alicia Appleman-Jurman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Alicia Appleman-Jurman (born 9 May 1930, Rosulna, Poland [present-day Rosil'na, Ukraine]) is a Polish-born Israeli–American memoirist, who has written and spoken about her experiences of the Holocaust in her autobiography, Alicia: My Story. The following are non-verbatim excerpts, by section, from the autobiography. The sole female and the second-youngest child of Sigmund and Frieda Jurman in a family of five children, she was raised from the age of five in Buczacz, which was roughly 1/3 Jewish at that time. She was sheltered relatively well from anti-Semitism, however that would change on 1 September 1939, when German troops invaded Poland. Her parents and brothers were all murdered during the Holocaust. In June 1941, the Germans broke the pact with the Soviets and swept through eastern Poland on their way to Russia (Operation Barbarossa). The Germans' plan for Europe's Jews was known as "Endlosung" (aka "The Final Solution"). In Buczacz, a decree was issued that all Jewish men were to "register". 600 leaders of the Jewish community, including Sigmund Jurman, Alicia's father, were detained and taken out to a large meadow, where they were massacred by firing squad. Before the truth
    5.50
    4 votes
    130
    Frida Scheps Weinstein

    Frida Scheps Weinstein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Frida Scheps was born in 1936 to a Russian-Jewish immigrant family living in Paris, France. Frida's father, an engineer by profession, wanted to move the family to Palestine. Shortly before the war, Mr. Scheps travelled to Jerusalem to pave the way for the move. While he was making the necessary arrangements, war broke out in Europe, and Frida and her mother were trapped in France. In 1940, the Nazis invaded France and the persecution of the Jews of France began. At first, various laws restricting the rights of the French Jewish community were enacted. But by 1942, the Germans began rounding up Jews and shipping them to various death camps in Poland. Seeking somehow to save her six year-old daughter, Mrs. Scheps placed Frida in a Catholic convent school at the Chateau de Beaujeu. Isolated from her past, Frida soon began to forget her Jewish roots. She soon became the best student in her class at catechism and asked to be baptized as a Catholic. Mrs. Scheps wrote to her daughter, begging her not to abandon her faith. Frida received packages from her mother on a regular basis. One day, however, the packages stopped coming. Frida understood that the Germans had taken her mother away. In the middle of the night, Frida was haunted by dreams reminding her of her Jewish heritage. At the end of the war, nine year-old Frida left the convent school. Two years later, she was reunited with her father in Jerusalem.
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    6.33
    3 votes
    132

    Kathinka Bosch

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Daughter of someone Anne would later know in the camps.
        Kathinka was rescued out of guarded Nazi custody in the summer of 1944, and then there were wanted posters for her, a three-year-old. She survived the war and became a cellist living in East Berlin.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Elfriede Geiringer

    Elfriede Geiringer

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Elfriede Geiringer (February 13, 1905 – October 2, 1998) was a Jewish survivor of the Second World War. She was the second wife of Otto Frank, who was the father of Anne and Margot Frank. Elfriede Markovits was born in Vienna, Austria, on February 13, 1905. She married Erich Geiringer and the couple had two children: a son, Heinz, born in 1926, and a daughter, Eva, born on May 11, 1929. The family fled first to Belgium and then to the Netherlands in 1938, where they settled down as neighbours to the Frank family. Eva and Anne knew each through mutual friends. When the Germans invaded Holland and Heinz received a call-up to a work-camp, the family went into hiding. They successfully hid for two years and might have survived the war if they had not been betrayed in May 1944. They were then captured by the Nazis and sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. They were liberated in January 1945 by the Russians, but Erich and Heinz Geiringer had perished in the forced march to Mauthausen that came just before the war ended. Elfriede and her daughter Eva returned to Amsterdam on June 13, 1945. Otto Frank visited them at their apartment not long after. Elfriede Geiringer and Otto
    8.00
    1 votes
    134

    Ernst Goldenbaum

    • Survived disasters: SS Cap Arcona
    Ernst Goldenbaum (15 December 1898, Parchim, Mecklenburg-Schwerin – 13 March 1990) was an East German politician. Goldenbaum was born in Parchim. During World War I he served as a military and he participated in the German November Revolution. In 1919 he joined the left-wing USPD and a few years later the Communist Party of Germany. From 1923 to 1925 he was a member of the city council of Parchim and from 1924 to 1932 he was a member of the Landtag of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. From 1932 to 1933 he was the editor of Volkswacht, a communist newspaper. After the Nazis seized power he became a farmer and a member of the German resistance. In 1944 he was arrested and he spent the last year of the war in concentration camp Neuengamme. After the war he joined the Socialist Unity Party, but in 1948 he co-founded the communist-sponsored Democratic Farmers' Party of Germany (DBD). The DBD was a close ally of the Socialist Unity Party. Until 1982, Goldenbaum was the Chairman of the party. From 1949 to 1982 Goldenbaum was a member of the People's Chamber. From 1949 to 1950 Goldenbaum was the GDR's first Minister of Agriculture and Forestry. Goldenbaum supported the Socialist Unity Party's
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Helen Churchill Candee

    Helen Churchill Candee

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Helen Churchill Candee (October 5, 1858 – August 23, 1949) was an American author, journalist, interior decorator, feminist and geographer. Today she is best known as a survivor of the sinking of RMS Titanic in 1912 and for her later work as a travel writer and explorer of southeast Asia. Helen was born Helen Churchill Hungerford, the daughter of New York City merchant Henry Hungerford and his wife Mary Churchill. She spent most of her childhood in Connecticut. She married Edward Candee of Norwalk, Connecticut, and had two children by him, Edith and Harold. After her abusive husband abandoned the family, Helen Candee supported herself and children as a writer for popular magazines such as Scribner's and The Ladies' Home Journal. She initially wrote on the subjects most familiar to her—genteel etiquette and household management—but soon branched into other topics such as child care, education, and women's rights. For several years she resided in Oklahoma, and her stories about that region helped to catapult her to national prominence as a journalist. Helen Candee divorced her husband in 1896, after a lengthy separation Candee was a strong feminist, as evidenced by her best-selling
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Helene Herta Katz Wohlfarth

    Helene Herta Katz Wohlfarth

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Born: Offenbach, Germany April 14, 1909 Helene, called Herta, was born to a Russian-Jewish father and a German-Jewish mother in a town on the Main River, near Frankfurt. Her father had immigrated to Germany from Russia in 1890. Her mother had automatically taken on her husband's Russian citizenship when she married. In 1914 Russia and Germany went to war, and Russians living in Germany were considered "enemy aliens." 1933-39: Herta married Siegfried Wohlfarth in 1933 and could change from being "stateless" to taking on his German citizenship. The Nazis were in power and Siegfried had been fired from his job because he was Jewish. Now that Herta had citizenship, she could get a German passport and leave the country. In 1934 the couple left for Amsterdam. There Herta gave birth to a daughter, Doris, and by 1937 had become an interior decorator. 1940-44: The Germans occupied the Netherlands in May 1940. When the Wohlfarths were told to report to the train station at 1:30 a.m. on July 15, 1942, to go to a work camp, Siegfried and Helene decided to go into hiding. For a year they had prepared for this by not kissing or hugging their daughter so she wouldn't miss them when they left her with Christian friends. Aided by the Dutch underground, Helene and Siegfried hid together in several locations until August 25, 1944, when they were both arrested. Herta survived deportation to Auschwitz and was liberated in the Kratzau work camp by Russian troops on May 9, 1945. She and her daughter emigrated to the U.S. in 1947.
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Marcel Marceau

    Marcel Marceau

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Marcel Marceau (22 March 1923 – 22 September 2007) was an internationally acclaimed French actor and mime most famous for his persona as Bip the Clown. He was born Marcel Mangel in Strasbourg, France to a Jewish family. His parents were Ann Werzberg and Charles Mangel, a kosher butcher. When Marcel was four years old, the family moved to Lille, but they later returned to Strasbourg. When France entered World War II, Marcel, 16, fled with his family to Limoges. In 1944 Marcel's father was captured and deported to the notorious Auschwitz concentration camp, where he was killed. Marcel's mother survived. Marcel and his older brother, Alain, adopted the last name "Marceau" during the German occupation of France; the name was chosen as a reference to François Séverin Marceau-Desgraviers, a general of the French Revolution. The two brothers joined the French Resistance in Limoges, where they saved numerous children from the race laws and concentration camps, and, after the liberation of Paris, joined the French army. Owing to Marcel's excellent command of the English language, he worked as a liaison officer with General George Patton's army. Marcel started miming as a way of keeping
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Mary Murphy

    Mary Murphy

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Mary Murphy was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128. She survived the crash on November 20,1967 was pregnant at the time event. Mary was transported to Booth Memorial Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Norman Spector

    Norman Spector

    • Survived disasters: American Airlines Flight 383
    Norman Spector (born March 6, 1949) is a Canadian journalist, diplomat, civil servant, and newspaper publisher. Born in Montreal, Quebec, Spector received a Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Political Science, from McGill University in 1970. Awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, he received a Master of Philosophy degree in Political Science from Columbia University in 1972 and a Ph.D. in 1977. In 1974, as a Newhouse Fellow, he received a Master of Science degree in Television, Film and Radio from Syracuse University. In 1974-75, Spector was a lecturer at St. Paul's College of the University of Ottawa. In 1975, he joined the Ontario civil service in the Ministry of Transportation and Communications and held the positions of Manager, Director, and Executive Director. In 1980, he joined the British Columbia civil service serving as Deputy Secretary, Policy for the Ministry of Intergovernmental Relations. From 1982 to 1986, he was Deputy Minister in Bill Bennett's Office of the Premier. From 1986 to 1990, he was Secretary to the Cabinet for Federal-Provincial Relations in Ottawa. From 1990 to 1992, he was Brian Mulroney's Chief of Staff in the Office of the Prime Minister. From 1992 to
    8.00
    1 votes
    141

    Rose Van Thyn

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rozette Lopes-Dias Van Thyn (September 19, 1921 – June 27, 2010), known as Rose Van Thyn, was a survivor of the World War II Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, who as a naturalized United States citizen residing in Shreveport, Louisiana, was involved for three decades in education about the Holocaust. In 1942, when the Nazis occupied Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Rose and her family were taken to Auschwitz. They were placed on a railroad cattle car with nearly one hundred other people and two buckets, one for drinking, and one for waste. At Auschwitz, she underwent gruesome medical experiments. Later she was dispatched to Ravensbrueck and managed to survive a "death march" at the end of the war. She was liberated by American soldiers. Rose lost both parents, a sister, and her first husband, Moses Lezer, in the death camps. She met a fellow survivor, Levie/Louis van Thijn (July 6, 1919 – August 27, 2008), whose first wife, Esther Halberstad, had died in the Holocaust at Sobibor. Rose and Louis married in Amsterdam in 1946. Nine years later, the Van Thijns and their two children, Nico and Elsa, immigrated to Shreveport, where the spelling of their name was changed to "Van Thyn".
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    8.00
    1 votes
    143

    Tadeusz Sobolewicz

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Tadeusz Sobolewicz (Polish pronunciation: [taˈdɛuʂ sɔbɔˈlɛvit͡ʂ]; born March 25, 1923) is a Polish actor and author, and a survivor of six Nazi concentration camps, a Gestapo prison, and a nine-day death march. Tadeusz Sobolewicz was born in Poznań, Poland. Prior to the outbreak of World War II, he attended Pederewski Gymnasium (secondary school) and was a member of the boy scouts. When the war broke out, he and his mother and younger brother were forced to flee from Poznań. During the German occupation of Poland, together with his father, who was a Polish army officer, Sobolewicz became an active member of the Polish resistance movement. He served as a liaison officer for the area command of the Union of Armed Struggle (Związek Walki Zbrojnej, or ZWZ), first in Tarnów, and then later in Częstochowa. Living underground and under a false name, he was eventually betrayed, and was arrested by the Gestapo on September 1, 1941, and transferred to Zawodzie (Częstochowa) Gestapo prison. In prison the Gestapo interrogated and severely beat him in order to learn the names of other resistance movement fighters from him, but he revealed nothing, and as he was being led away, he saw that his
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    Yvette Benguigui

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Yvette Benguigui was the little sister of three Benguigui brothers at the home. At two, she was too young to be received with her brothers, so she was placed with the Héritier, who lived in the centre of the village. Madame Héritier did the laundry for the home. Her daughter Jeannette was the same age as Yvette. Independently from the home, two Jewish children were placed with the Borgey family. All three escaped the 6th April 1944 raid.
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Henry Rosmarin

    Henry Rosmarin

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Henry Rosmarin appeared in the Survivors of the Holocaust documentary film.
    5.25
    4 votes
    146
    5.25
    4 votes
    147

    Joni Lentz

    • Survived disasters: brutally attacked
    Joni Lenz-Found in the basement bedroom of a house she shared with other girls in Seattle on January 5, 1974, the eighteen-year-old Lenz survived a horrendous attack which included being beaten on the head and face with a bed frame rod and having a speculum, a medical vaginal probe, jammed viciously inside her. Lenz suffered brain damage and internal organ injuries. Bundy had apparently entered and exited via an unlocked basment window.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148

    Louise Laroche

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Louise Laroche (2 July 1910 - 28 January 1998) was one of the last remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. It is believed that she, her sister and her father, Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche, were the only people of black descent aboard. Louise Laroche was born on July 2, 1910 in Paris, France to Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche and his wife, Juliette Lafargue. She was preceded in birth by a sister Simonne Marie Anne Andrée Laroche in 1909. Although Louise's father had a degree in engineering and was nephew to the then President of Haiti (Cincinnatus Leconte), his race prevented him from finding steady employment. Given this, he decided to move his family back to his native Haiti. The family planned to leave in late 1912, but Juliette discovered she was pregnant for a third time, and Joseph decided to bump up their travel arrangements so the child could be born in Haiti. The family originally had plans to travel on the France, but the ship's policy stipulated that children were required to remain in the nursery and were not permitted to eat with their parents, a policy that the Laroches did not like. They instead transferred their tickets to sail
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Peter Heywood

    Peter Heywood

    • Survived disasters: HMS Pandora
    Peter Heywood (6 June 1772 – 10 February 1831) was a British naval officer who was aboard HMS Bounty during the mutiny of 28 April 1789, in which he took part. He was later captured, tried and condemned to death as a mutineer, but subsequently pardoned. He resumed his naval career and eventually retired with the rank of post-captain, after 29 years of honourable service. The son of a prominent Isle of Man family with strong naval connections, Heywood joined Bounty under Lieutenant William Bligh at the age of 15 and, although unranked was given the privileges of a junior officer. Bounty left England in 1787 on a mission to collect and transport breadfruit from the Pacific, and arrived in Tahiti late in 1788. Relations between Bligh and certain of his officers, notably Fletcher Christian, became strained, and worsened during the five months that Bounty remained in Tahiti. Shortly after the ship began its homeward voyage Christian and his discontented followers seized Bligh and took control of the vessel. Bligh and 19 loyalists were set adrift in an open boat; Heywood was among those who remained with Bounty. Later, he and 15 others left the ship and settled in Tahiti, while Bounty
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Peter Somogyi

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Peter and his twin brother, Thomas, were the youngest of three children born to an observant Jewish family. They lived in Pecs, an industrial center where goods such as bricks and ceramics were produced. Peter's father owned a prosperous business selling accessories and parts for cars, motorcycles and bicycles. He was also a regional sales representative for Ford automobiles. 1933-39: A German nanny took care of Thomas, my older sister and me. She taught us German and we became quite fluent. When my brother and I turned 5, we began piano lessons at home. The next year we joined a boy scout troop. On September 1, 1939, Thomas and I began school. That day we heard on the radio that Germany had invaded Poland. Five years later, we were deported to Auschwitz with my mother and sister. 1940-44: Male twins and some dwarfs lived in our half of the barracks. Right outside was a crematorium, where bodies, stacked like logs, waited to be burned. An older twin was assigned to watch over us; he taught us math and geography. Sometimes the guards took all the twins to a soccer field to kick around a rag ball. Then there were all our visits to the infamous Dr. Mengele. Thomas and I were examined together. He measured our heads and compared our eyes. An assistant took blood. Dr. Mengele liked us because we spoke German. Peter and his brother were liberated from Auschwitz by the Soviet army on January 27, 1945. They returned to Pecs before emigrating to Israel in mid-1949.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Sam Pivnik

    Sam Pivnik

    • Survived disasters: SS Cap Arcona
    Sam Pivnik is a Holocaust survivor (birthname Szmuel Piwnik) born on 1 September 1926 in Bedzin, in South-western Poland near the border with Germany, the second son of Lajb Piwnik, a tailor, and Feigel Piwnik. As a Jewish family, the Piwniks were forced to live in the Kamionka Ghetto in Bedzin from early 1943 and on 6 August 1943 the family were deported to Auschwitz II/Birkenau. Sam Piwnik's father and mother, younger sister Chana and younger brothers Meir, Wolf and Josef were murdered on arrival. His older sister Handel survived for a period of around ten days before she was also 'selected' for the gas chambers. Sam Pivnik was registered in the camp and tattooed with prisoner number 135913. After a period of approximately two weeks in the 'Quarantine' area of Birkenau, Pivnik was assigned to the Rampkommando where he worked unloading newly arrived trains after the prisoners had been taken away for entry to the camp or gassing. This gave him access to food and valuables from prisoners luggage and he was able to use this to keep himself fed and to bribe Kapos, prisoner-overseers and trusties. On 27 December 1943 Pivnik was admitted to the prisoner infirmary in the Quarantine area
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Thomas Gibson-Carmichael, 1st Baron Carmichael

    • Survived disasters: SS Medina
    Thomas David Gibson-Carmichael, 1st Baron Carmichael GCSI, GCIE, KCMG, DL (18 March 1859 – 16 January 1926), known as Sir Thomas Gibson-Carmichael, Bt, between 1891 and 1912, was a Scottish Liberal politician and colonial administrator. Born at Edinburgh, Scotland, Carmichael was the eldest son of Reverend Sir William Henry Gibson-Carmichael, 10th Baronet, and Eleanora, daughter of David Anderson. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge. He succeeded his father as 11th Baronet in 1891. Carmichael was Private Secretary to George Trevelyan and Lord Dalhousie, when Secretaries for Scotland. He unsuccessfully contested Peebles and Selkirk in 1892 but was successfully returned as Liberal Member of Parliament for Midlothian in 1895, succeeding William Ewart Gladstone. He continued to represent this constituency until the 1900 general election. Carmichael was appointed Governor of Victoria in 1908 and served from 27 July 1908 to 19 May 1911. As Governor, Carmichael permitted Victoria Premier Sir Thomas Bent who had lost a no-confidence vote on 3 December 1908 to dissolve the assembly and call for fresh elections. Thomas Bent, however, lost the elections and John Murray became the
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Alex Dekel

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Alex Shlomo Dekel was a survivor of Auschwitz, a victim of Dr. Josef Mengele's horrible medical experiments there.
    6.00
    3 votes
    154

    Erwin Geschonneck

    • Survived disasters: SS Cap Arcona
    Erwin Geschonneck (December 27, 1906 – March 12, 2008) was a German actor. His biggest success occurred in the German Democratic Republic, where he was considered one of the most famous actors of the time. Geschonneck was born in Bartenstein, East Prussia (now Bartoszyce, Poland), the son of a poor shoemaker. The family moved to Berlin in 1909 so his father could work as a nightwatchman. In 1919, the younger Geschonneck joined the Communist Party of Germany. After the Nazi takeover in 1933, he emigrated to the Soviet Union via Poland, but was expelled in 1938 and moved to Prague. After the German occupation of Bohemia and Moravia, he was arrested on March 31, 1939. During the war, he was imprisoned in several concentration camps. In 1945, Geschonneck was one of the few prisoners who survived the RAF sinking of the Cap Arcona. Immediately following the war, Geschonneck acted in theaters in Hamburg, Germany, and made his film debut in 1947 in In jenen Tagen. He subsequently moved to East Germany, worked with Bertolt Brecht, and became a successful actor. The German movie "Jacob the Liar" by Frank Beyer was nominated for Best foreign language film at the Academy Awards in 1977 - the
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Imre Kertész

    Imre Kertész

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Imre Kertész (Hungarian: [ˈimrɛ ˈkɛrteːs]; born 9 November 1929) is a Hungarian author of Jewish descent, Holocaust concentration camp survivor, and recipient of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Literature, "for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history". Born in Budapest, Hungary, he resides in Berlin with his wife. During World War II, Kertész was deported at the age of 14 with other Hungarian Jews to the Auschwitz concentration camp, and was later sent to Buchenwald. His best-known work, Fatelessness (Sorstalanság), describes the experience of 15-year-old György (George) Köves in the concentration camps of Auschwitz, Buchenwald and Zeitz. Some have interpreted the book as quasi-autobiographical, but the author disavows a strong biographical connection. In 2005, a film based on the novel, for which he wrote the script, was made in Hungary. Although sharing the same title, the film is more autobiographical than the book: it was released internationally at various dates in 2005 and 2006. Kertész's writings translated into English include Kaddish for a Child Not Born (Kaddis a meg nem született gyermekért) and Liquidation
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    John Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe

    John Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe

    • Survived disasters: HMS Victoria
    Admiral of the Fleet John Rushworth Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe, GCB, OM, GCVO SGM (5 December 1859 – 20 November 1935) was a British Royal Navy admiral who commanded the Grand Fleet at the Battle of Jutland in World War I. His handling of the fleet at that battle was controversial: he made no serious mistakes and the German High Seas Fleet retreated to port – at a time when defeat would have been catastrophic for Britain – but at the time the public were disappointed that he had lost more ships (mainly due to dangerous ammunition-handling procedures on British battlecruisers) and had not won a victory as crushing as Trafalgar. Jellicoe later served as First Sea Lord (professional head of the Royal Navy), but he was removed at the end of 1917 because of differences over policy regarding the war against the U-Boats and his perceived pessimism about Britain's ability to carry on the war. Viscount Jellicoe served as the Governor-General of New Zealand in the 1920s. Born in Southampton into a seafaring family, Jellicoe joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1872 and was posted to HMS Britannia. He was made a midshipman on the wooden, steam, fully rigged frigate HMS Newcastle in September
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Marion Barry

    Marion Barry

    • Survived disasters: 1977 Hanafi Siege
    Marion Shepilov Barry, Jr. (born March 6, 1936) is an American Democratic politician who is currently serving as a member of the Council of the District of Columbia, representing DC's Ward 8. Barry served as the second elected mayor of the District of Columbia from 1979 to 1991, and again as the fourth mayor from 1995 to 1999. In addition to his current term, Barry also served two other tenures on the D.C. Council, as an At-Large member from 1975–79, and as Ward 8 representative from 1992–95. In the 1960s he was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, serving as the first president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Barry came to national prominence as mayor of the national capital, the first prominent civil-rights activist to become chief executive of a major American city; he gave the presidential nomination speech for Jesse Jackson at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. His celebrity transformed into international notoriety in January 1990, when Barry was videotaped smoking crack cocaine and arrested by FBI officials on drug charges. The arrest and subsequent trial precluded Barry seeking re-election, and Barry served six months in a federal prison.
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Theodate Pope Riddle

    Theodate Pope Riddle

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of RMS Lusitania
    Theodate Pope Riddle (February 2, 1867 – August 30, 1946) was an American architect. She was one of the first American women architects as well as a survivor of the Lusitania. Born Effie Brooks Pope in Salem, Ohio, she was the only child of industrialist and art collector Alfred Atmore Pope and his wife Ada Lunette Brooks. When Effie was 19, she changed her name to Theodate in honor of her grandmother Theodate Stackpole. She was a graduate of Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Connecticut. She hired faculty members to tutor her privately in architecture. The first woman to become a licensed architect in both New York and Connecticut, in 1926 she was appointed a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. She designed Hill-Stead, the family estate (now Hill-Stead Museum) in Farmington and designed and founded the famous Avon Old Farms School in Avon, as well as Westover School. Among her other well known architectural commissions was the 1920 reconstruction of the birthplace in New York City of former President Theodore Roosevelt. She was a first cousin to the mother of architect Philip Johnson. Theodate Pope was a member of the Architectural League of New York, the
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Toni Ketchell

    Toni Ketchell

    • Survived disasters: American Airlines Flight 383
    Toni Ketchell worked as a Flight Attendant for American Airlines. She was on board American Airlines Flight 383 when it crashed on November 8, 1965. During the descent into the Greater Cincinnati Airport she was sitting in a jump seat near Captain Weekley who was sitting in the most forward passenger seat on the right side of aircraft. Upon impact, she was thrown from the aircraft and was critically injured with two broken legs and internal injuries. She was the only member of the 5 person flight crew to survive . She was transferred to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Ky. Her first words to her parents in the hospital following the incident were "Am I going to live?"

    In subsequent years, Toni has become a strong, vocal advocate of airline cabin safety and, to this observer, she has  become a pillar of strength and hope to victims and families of aviation events. Her continued commitment to aviation safety has become a tribute to her life. {see Rodney McGlasson}.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Barbara Ledermann

    Barbara Ledermann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Barbara was the older of two daughters born to Jewish parents in Germany's capital, Berlin. Barbara's father was a successful lawyer. As soon as Barbara was old enough to walk, he would take her around Berlin to see the sights and tour the city's art museums. Barbara liked to go horseback riding and dreamed of becoming a dancer.
    1933-39: After the Nazis came to power in January 1933, it was illegal for my father to have non-Jewish clients. His law practice quickly folded. Later that year when I was 7, our family moved to the Netherlands where my mother had relatives. I continued my schooling in Amsterdam and quickly learned Dutch. Although we no longer lived in a big house with servants, I enjoyed Amsterdam--it had a much less formal atmosphere than Berlin.
    1940-44: The Germans invaded the Netherlands in May 1940. Two years later, when they began to deport many Jews, my boyfriend, Manfred, told me that these deportations to "labor camps" really meant death. He got false IDs for me and my family, and told me, "If you get called up, don't go." I asked, "What will happen to my parents if I don't go?" "Nothing that wouldn't happen otherwise," he answered. "What do you mean?" I asked, and he responded, "Everyone who goes will be killed. They are all going to die."
    Barbara remained in hiding until May 1945, when Amsterdam was liberated by Canadian troops. She emigrated to the United States in November 1947.
    5.00
    4 votes
    161

    Reginald Lee

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Reginald Robinson Lee (May 19, 1870 – August 6, 1913) was a lookout stationed in the crow's nest of the RMS Titanic when the ship collided with an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14, 1912. Born in Benson, England, Lee joined the Titanic's crew on April 6, 1912, having been transferred from its sister ship, RMS Olympic. On April 14, Lee joined lookout Frederick Fleet in the crow's nest beginning at 10 p.m. The binoculars the two were supposed to use were not on board, forcing the lookouts to use their own eyesight. Lee was ordered to man lifeboat No. 13, which was launched from the starboard side of Titanic at 1:30 a.m. As a result, Lee survived the sinking, as did Fleet. Lee testified before the Board of Trade Inquiry into the disaster, but died shortly thereafter from complications from pneumonia, in Kenilworth, on August 6, 1913. Reginald Lee at Findagrave
    5.00
    4 votes
    162
    Hannah Pik-Goslar

    Hannah Pik-Goslar

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Hannah 'Hanneli' Elisabeth Goslar (born 12 November 1928) is best known for her friendship with diarist Anne Frank. Both Hannah and Anne attended the Sixth Public Montessori School (now the Anne Frank School) in Amsterdam and then the Jewish Lyceum. Hanneli Elizabeth Pick-Goslar was born in Berlin, Germany on 12 November 1928, the eldest child of Hans Goslar and Ruth Judith Klee. Her father was deputy minister for domestic affairs in Germany until 1933 and her mother was a teacher. Both of her parents were observant Jews. Her mother died giving birth to the third child. The baby also died. Her father and maternal grandparents all died of a sickness before the liberation. In 1933, after the election of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party to the Reichstag and Hitler's appointment as Chancellor, Hans Goslar was forced to resign his governmental job. After an abortive attempt to move to England, where Hans Goslar could not find work that would allow him to stay home on the Sabbath, the Goslars moved to Amsterdam, Holland. Hannah attended the Sixth Public Montessori school in Amsterdam, where she became friends with Anne Frank. Anne and Hannah were also close friends with Susanne ''Sanne''
    5.67
    3 votes
    163

    James Morrison

    • Survived disasters: HMS Pandora
    James Morrison (1760–1807) was a British seaman and mutineer who took part in the mutiny on the Bounty. James Morrison was a native of Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland where his father was a merchant and land entrepreneur. He joined the navy at 18, serving as clerk in the Suffolk, midshipman in the Termagant, and acting gunner in the Hind. In 1783, he passed his master gunner's examination. James Morrison was the boatswain's mate on board the Bounty. The master gunner's position having been filled two days prior to his application, he may have taken the lesser post because of his eagerness to go along on the 'scientific expedition.' After the mutiny, Morrison was one of 16 mutineers who returned to Tahiti after the failed attempt to build a colony on Tubuai, while Fletcher Christian and 8 others sailed the Bounty on to Pitcairn Island. Along with the others who then lived as 'beachcombers' in Tahiti, he was captured here by Captain Edward Edwards of Pandora on 29 March 1791, and brought back to England for court martial. While on Tahiti, he led an eight-month effort to build a schooner from local timber with which he secretly hoped to get to Batavia in the Dutch East
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Mary Steinhauser

    Mary Steinhauser

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Mary, the daughter of Jakob and Jenny Steinhauser, was born only a few months after Germany's annexation of Austria in March 1938. The Nazis in Austria immediately began persecuting and brutalizing Austria's Jewish citizens. Mr. Steinhauser lost his job as a accountant with a Jewish-owned textiles firm when it was confiscated by the Nazis. Mary's parents began searching for a way to leave Austria, but few countries granted entry permits to Jews. Through word-of-mouth, the Steinhausers heard that the port city of Shanghai, China, was allowing Jews to enter. Thousands of refugees attempted to book passage on ships going there. Mary's father offered his accounting services free of charge to the director of a shipping company. The director eventually helped him to get passage for the family. Mary and her parents set sail for China in April 1939. Mary had her first birthday on the ship. Shanghai, a metropolis of over four million inhabitants, was China's largest port. Five refugee camps were set up to house and feed the thousands of Jews who had fled Europe. Some of the refugees were able to support themselves by finding work in the city. Under German pressure, the Japanese occupiers of Shanghai forced the Jews into a crowded, sealed-off ghetto in February 1943, when Mary was four. Economic restrictions caused extreme hardship and ghetto residents often sold their clothes to buy food. Even so, educational, social, religious and cultural activities were still maintained. Mary began school and had many friends including Chinese children. Mary and her family lived in a little three-room hut with other families. Electricity was restricted and food was difficult to obtain. The hard-pressed ghetto residents worried that the Japanese would carry out Germany's murderous policies toward the Jews. But with Japan' defeat, these fears evaporated. The ghetto was opened with the end of the war in September 1945. The refugees danced in the streets for joy. Mary was seven years old.
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Joseph Boxhall

    Joseph Boxhall

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Commander Joseph Groves Boxhall RD RNR (23 March 1884 – 25 April 1967) was the Fourth Officer on the RMS Titanic, and later served as a naval officer in World War I. Boxhall was born in Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, the second child of Miriam and Captain Joseph Boxhall sr.. He was born into an established seafaring tradition: His grandfather had been a mariner, his uncle was a Trinity House buoymaster and Board of Trade official, and his father was a respected master with the Wilson Line of Hull. Boxhall followed in the footsteps of his ancestors on 2 June 1899, when he joined his first ship, a barque of the William Thomas Line of Liverpool. Boxhall's apprenticeship lasted four years, during which time he travelled extensively. He then went to work with his father at Wilson Line and, after obtaining his Master's and Extra-Master's certifications in September 1907, joined the White Star Line. He served on White Star's liners RMS Oceanic and Arabic before moving to the Titanic as Fourth Officer in 1912; he was then 28 years old. Like the ship's other junior officers, Boxhall reported to White Star's Liverpool offices at nine o'clock in the morning on 26 March 1912,
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Arthur Rostron

    Arthur Rostron

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Sir Arthur Henry Rostron, KBE, RD, RNR (14 May 1869 – 4 November 1940) was a Captain for the Cunard Line and was the master of the ocean liner RMS Carpathia when it rescued the survivors of the RMS Titanic which sank on 15 April 1912 after striking an iceberg. Captain Rostron won wide praise for his energetic efforts to reach the Titanic before she sank, and his efficient preparations for and conduct of the rescue of the survivors. He was awarded a Congressional Gold Medal by the U.S. Congress, and after World War I was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire. He was made the Commodore of the Cunard fleet before retiring in 1931. Arthur Rostron was born in Astley Bridge, north of Bolton, Lancashire, England to James and Nancy Rostron. Educated at Bolton Grammar School from 1882 to 1883 and Bolton Church Institute in 1884, Rostron then joined the Merchant Navy Cadet School Ship HMS Conway as a cadet. After two years of training on the Conway, he was apprenticed to the Waverley Line of Messrs, Williamson, Milligan and Co. in Liverpool on the iron clipper ship, Cedric the Saxon. In 1887 Rostron joined the barque Red Gauntlet as a second mate. Soon after, he left
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Edith Brown

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Edith Haisman (27 October 1896 – 20 January 1997) was one of the last remaining and oldest survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic in April 1912. She was the last survivor born in the 19th century, although seven younger survivors outlived her. Edith Eileen Brown was born on 27 October 1896 in Cape Colony, South Africa (under British rule) to Thomas William Solomon Brown and his wife, Elizabeth Catherine (née Ford). Thomas owned and operated a hotel in Cape Town, South Africa. Edith was 15 years old when she and her parents boarded the RMS Titanic in Southampton, England as second-class passengers. Edith's father was taking the family to Seattle, Washington where he was going to open a hotel business. Titanic's hold contained tableware, furnishings, and 1,000 rolls of bed linen for the intended hotel. Edith remembered clearly when RMS Titanic struck the iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on 14 April 1912. In a series of interviews in her later years and a biography, A Lifetime on the Titanic, published in 1995, Mrs. Haisman gave a vivid account of the ship's final moments, although some details have been called into question. Father appeared a few minutes later. He told us, 'You'd better
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    Elliot Welles

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Elliot Welles (18 September 1927, Vienna, Austria — 28 November 2006, Bronx, New York, USA) whose original name was Kurt Sauerquell was a Holocaust survivor who for more than two decades until his retirement in 2003, directed the B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League's task force on Nazi war criminals. Welles was a survivor of both the Riga Ghetto and the Stutthof concentration camp in Poland. Welles is known in particular for his work on the case of Boļeslavs Maikovskis, who had been charged with ordering the arrests that led to the mass execution of 200 Latvian villagers during the war. A native of Latvia, Maikovskis was sentenced to death in absentia by a Soviet court in 1965. He continued to live quietly in Mineola, New York, where he had settled after the war, before fleeing to Germany in 1987. Because of Welles' tireless work on this case, Maikovskis (then 86) was put on trial in Germany in 1990. The trial was suspended in 1994 because of Maikovskis' failing health. Maikovskis died two years later. Another well-known case that Welles assisted with was the extradition of Josef Schwammberger, a Nazi labor camp commander, from Argentina where he had been living for at least 40
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    J. Bruce Ismay

    J. Bruce Ismay

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Joseph Bruce Ismay (12 December 1862 – 17 October 1937) was an English businessman who served as chairman and managing director of the White Star Line of steamships. He came to international attention as the highest-ranking White Star official among the 705 survivors (vs. 1,517 fatalities from crew and passengers totaling 2,223) of the maiden voyage of his company's marquee ocean liner, the RMS Titanic. Ismay was born in Crosby, Lancashire, a small town near Liverpool. He was the son of James Ismay (7 January 1837 – 23 November 1899) and Margaret Bruce (13 April 1837 – 9 April 1907), daughter of ship-owner Luke Bruce. Thomas Ismay was the senior partner in Ismay, Imrie and Company and the founder of the White Star Line. The younger Ismay was educated at Elstree School and Harrow, then tutored in France for a year. He apprenticed at his father's office for four years, after which he toured the world. He then went to New York City as the company representative, eventually rising to the rank of agent. On 4 December 1888, Ismay married Julia Florence Schieffelin (1871 - 31 December 1963), daughter of George Richard Schieffelin and Julia Matilda Delaplaine of New York, with whom he had
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Leon Feldhandler

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Leon Feldhendler (Lejb Feldhendler) (1910 – 6 April 1945), was a Polish-Jewish resistance fighter known for his role in organizing, with Alexander Pechersky, the 1943 prisoner uprising at the Sobibor extermination camp. Prior to his deportation to Sobibor, Feldhendler had been head of the Judenrat (Ger. "Jewish Council") in his village of Żółkiewka, Lublin Voivodeship, in German-occupied Poland. In the spring of 1943, Feldhendler led a small group of Sobibor prisoners formulating an escape plan. Their initial plan had been to poison camp guards and seize their weapons, but the SS discovered the poison and shot five Jews in retaliation. Other plans included setting the camp on fire and escaping in the resulting confusion, but the mining of the camp perimeter by the SS in the summer of 1943 rendered the plan impractical. The arrival in a transport of Soviet POWs of Red Army officer Alexander Pechersky in late September gave new impetus to the escape plans. A seasoned soldier, Pechersky soon assumed the leadership of the group of would-be escapees and, with Feldhendler as his deputy, the group formed a plan that involved killing the camp's SS personnel, sending the Soviet POWs to raid
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Witold Pilecki

    Witold Pilecki

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Witold Pilecki (13 May 1901 – 25 May 1948; Polish pronunciation: [ˈvitɔlt piˈlɛt͡skʲi]; codenames Roman Jezierski, Tomasz Serafiński, Druh, Witold) was a soldier in the Second Polish Republic, the founder of the Secret Polish Army (Tajna Armia Polska) resistance group and a member of the Home Army (Armia Krajowa). As the author of Witold's Report, the first intelligence report on Auschwitz concentration camp, Pilecki enabled the Polish government-in-exile to convince the Allies that the Holocaust was taking place. During World War II, he volunteered for a Polish resistance operation to get imprisoned at Auschwitz in order to gather intelligence and escape. While in the camp, Pilecki organized a resistance movement and as early as 1941, informed the Western Allies of Nazi Germany's Auschwitz atrocities. He escaped from the camp in 1943 and took part in the Warsaw Uprising. He remained loyal to the London-based Polish government-in-exile and was executed in 1948 by the Stalinist secret police Urząd Bezpieczeństwa on charges of working for "foreign imperialism", thought to be a euphemism for MI6. Until 1989, information on his exploits and fate was suppressed by the Polish communist
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Israel Horowitz

    Israel Horowitz

    • Survived disasters: American Airlines Flight 383
    Israel Horowitz was a passenger on board American Airlines flight 383. He occupied a seat next to Bruce Hart. They were scheduled to record the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. He survived the crash on November 8,1965. He was able to crawl away from the aircraft before blacking out. He was brought down from the hillside and transferred to Booth Memorial Hospital in Covington, Ky. In 1966, Mr. Horowitz returned to Cincinnati for Decca Records. He remained in his beloved profession until he retired in the late 1980's. He passed away on December 26, 2008.
    5.33
    3 votes
    178

    Karel van den Heuvel

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Starting in September 1942, his mother kept Miep and Jan's landlady, Mrs Stoppelman, in hiding. In the spring of 1943, like many other university students, Karel refused to sign the German loyalty oath required of students. Because of this, he was in imminent danger of prison if he stayed at home. Miep and Jan hid him in their home in Amsterdam. Anne does not mention him in her diary: Jan and Miep did not tell the annexers about him. He rarely ventured out but in late March 1944, he went to the racetrack and was questioned by Nazis. Concerned that the Nazis would come after him there, he went back to hide at home. Because the Nazis never came looking for him in the weeks after this, Jan and Miep let him return. After the raid on the annexe (4 August 1944), knowing that the Nazis could be watching Miep, they all decided that Karel was safer hiding at home again. He survived the war and emigrated away from Holland and is reportedly still alive. (AFR p. 148-9, 175-9, 206, 239, and many other pages, of course, because he was a regular part of Miep's and Jan's lives during the war. He is called "Karel van der Hart" in the book.)
    5.33
    3 votes
    179

    Maria Nackid

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Miss Maria Nackid, 18m, was born in 1910 the first born daughter of Mary and Said Nackid. According to her death certificate she was born in Athens, Austria but the family originated from Syria. The family boarded the Titanic at Cherbourg as third class passengers, they were travelling to Waterbury, CT. They were rescued in collapsible C. Mary (or Maria) Nackid was the first survivor of the Titanic to die. She contracted Meningitis and died on 30th July 1912. She was buried in an unmarked grave at the Calvary Cemetery in Waterbury, Connecticut.
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Michel Marcel Navratil

    Michel Marcel Navratil

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Michel Marcel Navratil, Jr. (June 12, 1908 – January 30, 2001) was one of the last survivors of the sinking of RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Michel, along with his brother, Edmond Navratil (1910–1953), were known as the "Titanic Orphans", having been the only children rescued without a parent or guardian. He was the last male survivor of the Titanic. Michel Marcel Navratil was born on June 12, 1908 in Nice, France to Michel Navratil, a tailor and Slovak immigrant to France, and Marcelle Caretto, an Italian, who had married in London. Michel had a younger brother, Edmond Roger Navratil, who was born on March 5, 1910. The marriage was troubled, and in early 1912, Michel and Marcelle separated. Marcelle was awarded full custody of their two children. Marcelle allowed her sons to stay with their father over the Easter weekend; however, when she went to collect them, they had disappeared. Michel had decided to emigrate to the United States and to take his children with him. After a brief stay in Monte Carlo, the three traveled to England where they boarded RMS Titanic. Michel, his brother, and his father boarded RMS Titanic at Southampton, England on April 10, 1912, as second-class
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    R. Gabriele S. Silten

    R. Gabriele S. Silten

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Born: Berlin, Germany May 30, 1933 Gabriele was the only child of Jewish parents living in the German capital of Berlin. Her grandfather owned a pharmacy and a pharmaceuticals factory, where Gabriele's father also made his living. 1933-39: In 1938 the Nazis forced my grandfather to sell his factory and pharmacy for very little money to an "Aryan" German. After that, my father decided we should move to Amsterdam where it was safer for Jews. I was 5 years old and wanted to stay in Berlin. I didn't understand why I had to leave my toys and friends. In Amsterdam I had to learn a whole new language when I began elementary school, but I soon began to make new friends there. 1940-44: In May 1940 Germany invaded the Netherlands. I remember being frightened seeing the German troops march into the city. When I went to school I had to wear a yellow Jewish star, and I couldn't play with my Christian friends anymore. When I was 9, my family was deported to a camp in the eastern Netherlands called Westerbork. There, during the day while my parents worked, I learned to steal things to barter for food. A year later we were sent to the Theresienstadt ghetto. In the ghetto I was hungry all the time. Twelve-year-old Gabriele and her parents were liberated from Theresienstadt in May 1945. That June, the Silten family returned to Amsterdam, where they resettled.
    5.33
    3 votes
    182

    Robert Maxwell

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Ian Robert Maxwell MC (10 June 1923 – 5 November 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and Member of Parliament (MP). He rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing empire. His death revealed huge discrepancies in his companies' finances, including the Mirror Group pension fund, which Maxwell had fraudulently misappropriated. He escaped from Nazi occupation, joining the Czechoslovak army in exile in the Second World War and then fighting in the British army where he was decorated. After the war he worked in publishing, building up Pergamon Press to a major publishing house. After six years as an MP during the 1960s, he again put all his energy into business, successively buying the British Printing Corporation, Mirror Group Newspapers and Macmillan, Inc, among other publishing companies. He had a flamboyant lifestyle, living in Headington Hill Hall in Oxford from which he often flew in his helicopter, and sailing in his luxury yacht, the Lady Ghislaine. He was notably litigious and often embroiled in controversy, including about his support for Israel at the time of its War of Independence in 1948. In 1989 he had to sell successful business including
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Alfred Ament

    Alfred Ament

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Alfred and his brother Hans were born in Vienna, Austria. After the German invasion in 1938, Alfred's family managed to flee to Belgium. They applied for American visas, and got them in early 1940. Unfortunately, the were put on a waiting list for a space on a ship to the U.S. Alfred assimilated quickly to Flemish society. He made friends easily at school, learned the language, and participated in such sports as soccer and swimming. But by the spring of 1942, Alfred's mother was forced to sell her engagement ring and her son's stamp collection to buy food for the family. One year later, the Ament family got a postcard ordering them to report for deportation. They fled to Marseilles, France, which was unoccupied at the time. But Mrs. Ament became extremely ill and had to be hospitalized. Because the Nazis had already sent their father to an internment camp, Afred and Hans had to go to a children's home. At the home, Alfred worked in the kitchen, but usually went hungry. When the Nazis raided the children's home in 1943, Alred was able to escape to a farm with two other children. He hid there, but had to help out with the daily farm labors. Alfred spent his time milking cows and cleaning pig pens until a false identity card allowed him to join a transport to Switzerland. After scaling a ten-foot, barbed wire fence, Alfred and 30 other children found their way to a refugee camp in Switzerland. Alfred was able to communicate with his mother until she died of tuberculosis. Alfred was freed in May 1945, and learned that his grandparents and little brother Hans were murdered in the Auschwitz death camp. At 17, Alfred had to face the rest of his life as an orphan with no surviving family.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    6.00
    2 votes
    186

    Laureen Nussbaum

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Hannelore "Hansi" Klein (Laureen Nussbaum) was exactly midway in age between Anne and Margot. Hansi was an exception among those who knew Anne - she was rather indifferent about Anne, idolizing her sister Margot instead. But Anne, Hansi, and Hansi's two sisters performed in a holiday play about a vain princess who is punished with a long nose for her vanity, until she sees the error of her ways. Anne played the princess, and Hansi noted that she played the role to perfection, and had "natural charisma". Most people felt that Margot was the more beautiful of the Frank sisters, but Hansi observed that Anne, in her opinion, was prettier than Margot because "she was always smiling". Aside from those anecdotes, however, Hansi thought of Anne primarily as a noisy chatterbox, and "a shrimp", and she was surprised and impressed with Anne's inner depth upon reading the diary much later. Hansi married a young physician after the war, and upon emigrating to America, changed her first name to "Laureen", and became a professor of foreign literature and languages at Portland State University.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Lili Silberman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    404 Not Found The resource could not be found. No entry for 27324584 in cdb_static
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Ruth Elizabeth Becker

    Ruth Elizabeth Becker

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Ruth Elizabeth Becker (October 28, 1899 – July 6, 1990) was one of the last remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. She was born on October 28, 1899 in Guntur, India, to American Lutheran missionary Allen Oliver Becker and his wife Nellie E. Baumgardner. A younger brother, Luther ( Becker ), was born in Lima, Ohio, in March 1905, but died in Guntur just before his second birthday on February 7, 1907. In December 1907, Nellie gave birth to a second daughter, Marion Louise, and a son, Richard, was born in June 1910 at Kodaikanal. In early 1912, Richard contracted an illness in India, and Nellie decided to take him and her two daughters to Benton Harbor, Michigan to seek treatment. Allen was expected to join his family the following year. Twelve-year-old Becker boarded the Titanic along with her mother Nellie, four-year-old sister Marion and one-year-old brother Richard as second-class passengers on April 10, 1912 at Southampton, England. Shortly after the ship's collision with the iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14, Ruth recalled that a steward told her mother, "We've had a little accident. They're going to fix it, and then we'll be on our way."
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Anna McGowan

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Anna McGowan (July 5, 1897 - January 30, 1990) was one of the last living survivors of the sinking of RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Anna "Annie" McGowan was born on July 5, 1897 at Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA. She is the daughter of John McGowan and Marie Heneghan. Annie boarded RMS Titanic at Queenstown (now known as Cobh) as a third-class passenger together with her aunt Katherine McGowan. They didn't share the same ticket. Her aunt led a group of passengers included Anna Kelly, Bridget McDermott, John Bourke, Mary Bourke, Catherine Bourke, Patrick Canavan, Mary Canavan, James Flynn, Mary Mangan, Bridget Donohoe and Honora Fleming. Annie remembered people saying that God or man could not sink the ship. "I felt so sure of the safety, everybody did" Annie said. "Wealthy people had waited on lists to get on the ship." She enjoyed luxuries on board. She also took part in the activities, including the adult dance on Sunday, April 14. Annie was rescued on lifeboat 13. "They just grabbed me the way I was, wearing just a dress and shoes. They would not even let me take my purse," Annie recalled. "I was just numb and it was so cold out on the ocean." Annie and the other survivors heard
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    Louise Kink

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Louise Kink Pope (April 8, 1908 – August 25, 1992) was one of the last remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Louise Gretchen Kink was born on April 8, 1908 in Zurich, Switzerland to storekeeper Anton Kink and his wife, Luise Heilmann. In 1912, the Kinks decided to immigrate to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, along with Anton's brother, Vinzenz, and sister, Maria. Louise and her parents boarded the RMS Titanic as third-class passengers on April 10, 1912, at Southampton, England. Anton and his brother were in a cabin on G-Deck while his wife, sister, and daughter occupied a cabin at the ship's stern. The Titanic's collision with the iceberg at 11:40 pm on April 14 woke Anton and his brother and the two ran to the ship's welldeck where they clearly saw the iceberg. They returned to their cabin and dressed, barely finishing before water began to pour into their cabin. Anton ran to his wife's cabin and woke its occupants. The entire Kink family made their way to the boat's deck, but Maria and Vinzenz were lost in the crowd. Louise and her mother were loaded into Lifeboat No. 2, but Anton had to remain on the deck. At the last minute, Anton jumped into the
    5.00
    3 votes
    191

    Eva Untermann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Eva Untermann, a survivor of Auschwitz, together with her amazing circle of friends, supporters, and non-Jewish teachers, the story of Hana's Suitcase was shared with more than 2,000 students, teachers, and parents in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
    4.25
    4 votes
    192

    Eleanor Ileen Johnson

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Eleanor Ileen Johnson Shuman (August 23, 1910 - March 10, 1998) was one of the last remaining survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912.Eleanor Ileen Johnson has a great great niece called Caitlin Jade Johnson (born 23rd September 1998)and a great great nephew called Jake Micheal Johnson (Born 27th May 2000). Eleanor Ileen Johnson was born in St. Charles, Illinois to newspaper editor Oskar Walter Johnson and his wife, Alice Wilhelmina Backberg (1885-1968). She had an older brother, Harold Theodore (1908-1968). In early 1912, Alice and her two children had been in Finland visiting Alice's dying father. When the three arrived back in England, they were informed that due to a coal strike, the ship they were supposed to sail on had cancelled its trip. It was only at the last minute that they were informed that the Titanic had space available. The Johnsons bought third class tickets to go to New York to get jobs and visit family. Eighteen-month-old Eleanor boarded the Titanic along with her mother and brother as third class passengers on April 10, 1912 at Southampton, England. The Johnsons shared a cabin with Elin Braf and Helmina Nilsson. Shortly after the Titanic
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    Rose Warfman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rose Warfman (née Gluck) (born 4 October 1916) is a French survivor of Auschwitz and heroine of the French Resistance. Rose Gluck was born on 4 October 1916 in Zürich, Switzerland, the daughter of Paul (Pinhas) Gluck-Friedman (1886–1964) and Henia Shipper (1887–1968). Her father was a direct descendant of Hasidic Masters, going back to the Magid Dov Ber of Mezeritch (1704–1772), the disciple and successor of the Baal Shem Tov (1698–1760). She had two sisters, Antoinette Feuerwerker born in 1912 in Antwerpen, Belgium and Hendel (Hedwig) Naftalis, born in 1913 in Zürich, as was also her brother Salomon Gluck in 1914. Her parents had moved from Tarnów in Galicia, Poland, to Belgium, then to Switzerland, during World War I. The family moved further to Germany, and finally to France in 1921, settling in Strasbourg. There she went to the famous Lycée des Pontonniers, now called Lycée International des Pontonniers. After moving to Paris, with her family, she studied in 1941 and 1942 to become a nurse, in the modern Ecole de puériculture, 26, boulevard Brune, in Paris 14. She worked before World War II at the COJASOR, a Jewish social service organization, together with Lucie Dreyfus (née
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Alexander Grothendieck

    Alexander Grothendieck

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Alexander Grothendieck (German: [ˈgroːtn̩diːk]; French: [gʁɔtɛndik]; born 28 March 1928) is a mathematician and the central figure behind the creation of the modern theory of algebraic geometry. His research program vastly extended the scope of the field, incorporating major elements of commutative algebra, homological algebra, sheaf theory, and category theory into its foundations. This new perspective led to revolutionary advances across many areas of pure mathematics. Within algebraic geometry itself, his theory of schemes has become the universally accepted language for all further technical work. His generalization of the classical Riemann-Roch theorem launched the study of algebraic and topological K-theory. His construction of new cohomology theories has left deep consequences for algebraic number theory, algebraic topology, and representation theory. His creation of topos theory has had an impact on set theory and logic. One of his most celebrated achievements is the discovery of the first arithmetic Weil cohomology theory: the ℓ-adic étale cohomology. This key result opened the way for a proof of the Weil conjectures, ultimately completed by his student Pierre Deligne. To
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Anita Lasker-Wallfisch

    Anita Lasker-Wallfisch

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Anita Lasker-Wallfisch (born 17 July 1925 in Breslau, Germany (now Poland)) is a German-born cellist of world renown and is a surviving member of the Women's Orchestra in Auschwitz. Lasker was born in Breslau (Wrocław), Lower Silesia, to a professional Jewish family, one of three sisters (Marianne and Renate). Her father was a lawyer; her mother a violinist. They suffered discrimination from 1933, but as their father had fought at the front in World War I, gaining an Iron Cross, the family felt some degree of immunity from Nazi persecution. Marianne, the eldest sister, fled to England in 1941. In April 1942, Lasker's parents were taken away and are believed to have died near Lublin in Poland. Lasker and her sister Renate were not deported because they were working in a paper factory. There, they met French prisoners of war and started forging papers to enable French forced labourers to cross back into France. "I could never accept that I should be killed for what I happened to be born as, and decided to give the Germans a better reason for killing me." In September 1942 they themselves tried to escape to France, but were arrested for forgery at Breslau station by the Gestapo. Only
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Elisabeth Kaufmann

    Elisabeth Kaufmann

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    It is evening, seven o'clock, and I am "celebrating" my birthday. I really never had such a sad birthday; I have never been alone on my birthday before. Dad is in the camp. …Peter has been in the camp for just as long and we have seen him just as little. …The grandparents are still in Vienna. The other grandmother along with Uncle Paul and Aunt Edith are in London, and Uncle Arthur, Aunt Annie, and Hederl are in San Francisco. Everyone is scattered around and no one is with me. …Today, I cooked my own birthday meal and, sitting in the kitchen, I am writing in my diary and I am sad. Today I am sixteen. Elisabeth Kaufmann was born to a sophisticated and cultured Jewish family in Austria. In 1938, at the age of fourteen, Elisabeth and her family fled to France to escape the Nazis. Already a refugee for two years before beginning her diary, Elisabeth's entries reflect the struggles, hardships and complexities of life far from home in a hostile and alien world. Her immediate family was often separated for long periods of time, as her father and brother were held in French internment camps as "enemy aliens". At the same time, she did her best to adjust to her new life, attending art school, making friends, and bicycling around the city of Paris. Beginning in May 1940, as the Germans prepared their attack on France, Elisabeth and her mother were uprooted once more. Elisabeth recorded all the details of their journey south as they tried desperately to stay ahead of the German army. A gifted artist, Elisabeth filled a sketchbook with illustrations that correspond to her diary entries about life as a refugee in France and their chaotic flight south. She and her family were eventually reunited and emigrated to America. Her brother Peter returned to France in 1944 as a soldier in the American Army. He lost his life in battle at age nineteen fighting the Germans. Elisabeth's diary and her sketchbook are now in the collections of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198

    Eugene Hollander

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Eugene Hollander was a Hungarian survivor of the Holocaust. He wrote a memoir, From the Hell of the Holocaust: A Survivor's Story, about his ordeal in Nazi Germany. Separated from his wife Monica for 14 months, they eventually reunited and moved to the United States.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Greti Skala

    Greti Skala

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Greti, the daughter of Emery and Stefania (Bley), was three years old when the Germans occupied Czechoslovakia. Her father worked in the family hardware store. The Germans immediately began persecuting and brutalizing the Jewish residents of her town. When they confiscated her father's store, he lost his livelihood. Greti's father desperately searched for a way to survive. Through a friend, he was able to obtain false baptism certificates, giving the family a new identity. They changed their last name to Skala and moved to Bratislava, the capital city of the region. The family lived as best as they could under wartime conditions. They constantly lived in fear that they would be betrayed. Greti began school and became the top student in her class. She even helped her Christian classmates with their religious lessons. In early 1944, Hungary seemed to be a relatively safe haven. Greti's father obtained visas for Hungary. Soon after their arrival at a Hungarian hotel, the Germans occupied Hungary. The Skala's were recognized as Jews and denounced. Handed over to the Nazis, Greti and her parents were deported to the Ravensbrueck concentration camp in Germany. Conditions in Ravensbrueck barely sustained life. The Germans were determined to stave their prisoners to death. Typhus-carrying vermin infested the entire camp. Eight year-old Greti and her mother managed to stay alive. In April 1945, as the Allies approached, Greti and her mother, along with thousands of sick and starving inmates, were evacuated from Ravensbrueck and forced to march westward. Many hundreds died of exhaustion, while others were shot. Some were even killed by allied bombs. They arrived at Bergan-Belsen, a camp filled with dead and dying prisoners. In May 1945, the camp was liberated. Greti, who had contracted typhus in Bergen-Belsen, and her mother were sent home in trucks to Bratislava. Greti was immediately hospitalized. She soon died. Greti was only nine years old.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Sumiteru Taniguchi

    Sumiteru Taniguchi

    • Survived disasters: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
    Sumiteru Taniguchi (谷口 稜曄, Taniguchi Sumiteru) (born 1929) is a survivor of the 1945 atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, prominent activist against nuclear proliferation, and chairman of the Nagasaki Council of the A-Bomb Sufferers. In 1943, Taniguchi began working as a carrier for the Nishiura-Kami post office in Nagasaki. On the morning of August 9, 1945, he was delivering mail on his bicycle when "Fat Man" exploded in the sky over Urakami. The blast heavily injured Taniguchi and threw him clear off his bicycle. Heavy burns melted skin from his back and left arm, but Taniguchi states that he did not bleed or feel any pain due to the nerve endings being burned away. Tired and disoriented, he walked over to a nearby munitions plant, where a female survivor assisted in cutting off loose portions of skin and rubbed machine oil on his damaged arm. Come nightfall Taniguchi was carried to a hill to rest, where he was surrounded by confused and thirsty survivors. The next morning everyone but Taniguchi was dead. During the next two days rescue teams passed by without noticing him, as he was too weak to muster a call for help. Taniguchi was finally rescued on August 11 and taken to a
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Alice Herz-Sommer

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Alice Herz-Sommer, also known as Alice Sommer-Hertz and Alice Sommer, (born 26 November 1903) is a Jewish pianist, music teacher from the former Czechoslovakia, and a survivor of the Theresienstadt concentration camp. Herz-Sommer has lived in North London, United Kingdom since 1986, and is the world’s oldest known Holocaust survivor. Herz-Sommer was born in Prague, Austria-Hungary, along with her twin sister Mariana, to Friedrich and Sofie Herz; he was a merchant and her mother was highly educated and moved in circles of well-known writers. Herz-Sommer's older sister Irma taught her how to play piano, which she studied diligently. She also studied under Vaclav Stepan, and at the Prague German Conservatory of Music. She had begun giving concerts and making a name for herself before the Germans took over her city. She married businessman and amateur musician Leopold Sommer in 1931 and they had a son, Raphael (1937-2001). After the invasion of Czechoslovakia, most of her family and friends emigrated to Palestine via Romania, including Max Brod and brother-in-law Felix Weltsch, but Herz-Sommer stayed in Prague to care for her ill mother, who was one of the first to be sent to
    5.00
    2 votes
    203

    Barbara West

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Barbara Joyce Dainton (née West; 24 May 1911 – 16 October 2007) was the second-to-last remaining survivor of the sinking of the RMS Titanic on 15 April 1912 after hitting an iceberg on its maiden voyage. She was the last living survivor that traveled second-class on the ship. Barbara Joyce West was born in Bournemouth, England on 24 May 1911 to Edwy Arthur West and Ada Mary Worth. Ada had given birth to a daughter, Constance, in 1907, and was pregnant with a third child when she boarded the Titanic. Edwy decided to start a new life in the fruit culture business in Gainesville, Florida and, along with his wife and two children, were immigrating there by way of the Titanic. Barbara, her parents, and older sister, Constance, boarded the Titanic on 10 April 1912 at Southampton, England as second-class passengers. Barbara was just 10 months and 18 days old making her the second youngest passenger on board. When the Titanic collided with an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on 14 April 1912 Barbara was asleep in her cabin. Her mother, Ada, later recalled: We were all asleep when the collision took place, but were only jolted in our berths-my husband and children not even being awakened, and it was
    5.00
    2 votes
    204

    Chapse Gerenstein

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Chapse, miraculously survived the horrors of the Holocaust and emigrated to the United States after the war. He died in 1979, never knowing the fate of his children.
    5.00
    2 votes
    205

    John Bryant

    • Survived disasters: Murfreesboro Tornado
    John's wife and daughter, Koria and Olivia Brant,  were victims of the Murfreesboro Tornado in 2009.
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Robert Cooley

    Robert Cooley

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Robert Cooley was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128 on business with the International Machine Company. He survived the crash on November 20,1967. He was sitting by the window in seat 9-A over the wing of the airliner. Ethel Brown was sitting directly next to him. He told the Cincinnati newspapers at St. Elizabeth Hospital the day after the crash, "I honestly have no idea how I got out of that plane. I don't know how I made it".
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    Eloise Hughes Smith

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Mary Eloise Hughes Smith (August 7, 1893 - May 3, 1940), also referred to as Eloise Smith or Mrs. Lucien P. Smith, was a survivor of the 1912 RMS Titanic disaster. Her first husband, Lucien P. Smith, died in the sinking; she later married a fellow survivor. Mrs. Smith's recollections of the sinking have been quoted in numerous documentaries about the sinking of the ship, and she has been portrayed in at least one fictional depiction of the disaster. Eloise Smith was a member of the Vinson political family; the daughter of United States Representative James A. Hughes and Belle Vinson. As children, Eloise and her sister had made the acquaintance of President Theodore Roosevelt. Having recently married Lucien P. Smith and newly pregnant, she was returning from her honeymoon when the Titanic sank. She survived to give birth to her son Lucian Jr. in November 1912. She later married a fellow survivor, Robert Daniel, a bank executive. Smith was quoted extensively in the 1912 best-selling book The Sinking of the Titanic by Jay Henry Mowbray. Her letters and other recollections were also used by the documentary filmmaker Melissa Jo Peltier in the A&E Network documentaries Titanic: Death of
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    Nannete Konig-Blitz

    Nannete Konig-Blitz

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Nanette Konig, born Nanette Blitz, is best known for her friendship with diarist Anne Frank. Nanny was a friend of Anne from the Jewish Lyceum. At some point of the Second World War, Nanny and her family was arrested, sent to the Westerbork transit camp, and eventually deported to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where she was briefly reunited with Anne. Nanny survived the war, and stayed in a sanatorium of Belsen for three years. She continued her education in the Sanatorium. Nanny was reunited with Anne's father, Otto Frank, who was very kind to her. After the war, Nanny completed a secretarial course in the United Kingdom, and got a job in merchant bank of London. She married John Frederick Konig, and they had three children: Elizabeth, Judith and Martin. Nanny and her family reside in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    4.50
    2 votes
    209

    Tadeusz Borowski

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Tadeusz Borowski (Polish pronunciation: [taˈdɛuʂ bɔˈrɔfskʲi]; 12 November 1922 – 1 July 1951) was a Polish writer and journalist. His wartime poetry and stories dealing with his experiences as a prisoner at Auschwitz are recognized as classics of Polish literature and had much influence in Central European society. Borowski was born in 1922 into the Polish community in Zhytomyr, Ukrainian SSR (today Ukraine, then Soviet Union; Ukrainian: Тадеуш Боровський). In 1926, his father, whose bookstore had been nationalized by the communists, was sent to a camp in the Gulag system in Russian Karelia because he had been a member of a Polish military organization during World War I. In 1930, Borowski's mother was deported to a settlement on the shores of the Yenisey, in Siberia, during Collectivization. During this time Tadeusz lived with his aunt. In 1932 Borowski and his brother were repatriated from the USSR to Poland thanks to the efforts of the Polish Red Cross. They settled in Warsaw. Their father was freed in a prisoner exchange with communists arrested in Poland, and their mother was released in 1934. In 1940 Borowski finished his secondary schooling in a secret underground lyceum in
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Bep Voskuijl

    Bep Voskuijl

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Elisabeth "Bep" Voskuijl (Elli Vossen) (5 July 1919, Amsterdam – 6 May 1983, Amsterdam) helped conceal Anne Frank and her family from Nazi persecution during the occupation of the Netherlands. Bep was born in Amsterdam. She was one of the eight children of Johannes Hendrik Voskuijl and Mrs Voskuijl. She was hired by Otto Frank in 1937 as a secretary and by 1942 was the administration manager of his company, Opekta, based at 263 Prinsengracht, the address which would become the Frank family's hiding place. She agreed to help bring provisions to his family and four other people concealed in the back rooms of the office building, from July 1942, until their betrayal and arrest in August 1944. She also ordered correspondence courses, such as shorthand, and Latin. During the Gestapo raid she managed to escape, but returned to assist Miep Gies in collecting the personal possessions of the captured Jews, amongst which were Anne Frank's diaries and manuscripts. She left the company after her marriage to Cornelius van Wijk on 15 May 1946 and they went on to have four children; Ton, Cor, Joop, and a daughter, Anne-Marie, born in 1960, who was named after Anne. She was honoured in later years
    5.00
    1 votes
    211

    Bertram Vere Dean

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Bertram Vere Dean (21 May 1910 - 14 April 1992) was a passenger aboard RMS Titanic during her maiden voyage. Bertram Dean was the son of Bertram Frank Dean, and his wife, Georgette Eva Light. He had a younger sister, Millvina Dean. The Deans boarded Titanic as third class passengers at Southampton, intending to take passage to America, where they hoped to settle in Wichita, Kansas and open a tobacco shop. On the night of the sinking, the one-year old Bertram, with his sister and his mother, were placed in Lifeboat 10, and survived to be picked up by RMS Carpathia. His father was lost in the sinking, with his body never being recovered. Bertram, his mother and sister survived the sinking. They reached New York and were quartered in hospital for a time before returning to England aboard the Adriatic. In his later years Bertram was educated at King Edward’s school in Southampton, paid for by compensation from the various Titanic relief funds. He went on to work at Husband’s Shipyard in Southampton where he met George Beauchamp (not to be confused with the famous performer) who, he learned, may have been in the same lifeboat as he. The two became good friends. Bert Dean was married to
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Madeleine Astor

    Madeleine Astor

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Madeleine Talmage Astor Dick (née Force, formerly Fiermonte) (June 19, 1893 – March 27, 1940) was the second wife and widow of millionaire John Jacob Astor IV and a survivor of RMS Titanic. She was born as Madeleine Talmage Force on June 19, 1893, in Brooklyn, New York to William Hurlbut Force and his wife, the former Katherine Arvilla Talmage (1863-c.1930). She had one sibling, Katherine Emmons Force. Her father William Hurlbut Force (1852–1917) was a member of a well-established business family. He owned the successful shipping firm William H. Force and Co and his father had been prosperous in the manufacturing industry. In 1889 William had married Katherine Tulmage who was the granddaughter of Thomas Tulmage, a former Mayor of Brooklyn. William and his wife were part of the Brooklyn society and he was a member of numerous prestigious clubs in this city. He also owned a notable art collection. The family were members of the Episcopal Church which was also the church of the Astor family. Madeleine was educated at Miss Ely’s School and then for four years at Miss Spence’s School, which was located at West 48th Street in Manhattan. According to one report she was “counted an
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Robert Deters

    Robert Deters

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Robert Deters was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128. He survived the crash on November 20,1967 by escaping through a hole in the aircraft which opened before him. Before he escaped the inferno, he turned to his wife and yelled, "Edith, Edith!" She gave no response.They were returning from a bankers convention in Los Angeles. Mr. Deters was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Sheila O'Brien

    Sheila O'Brien

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Sheila O'Brien was a flight attendant for Trans World Airlines. She was onboard TWA flight 128 and seated in a flight attendant jump seat near the exits in the rear of the airliner. She survived the crash on November 20,1967 and escaped from the aircraft despite a broken back. She encountered stewardess Ellie Kurtock holding 5 year old Chris Haile, and Reuben Torres, who was badly burned. By crawling, she went with them to the Stephens house. She eventually was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    4.00
    2 votes
    219

    Audrey Pearl

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of RMS Lusitania
    Audrey Lawson-Johnston, née Audrey Warren Pearl (5 February 1915 – 11 January 2011) was the last survivor of the sinking of the RMS Lusitania on 7 May 1915. Born in New York City, she was the fourth of six children born to Major Frank Warren Pearl (26 August 1869 –2 January 1952) and Amy Lea (née Duncan; died 1 February 1964). She was only three months old when she boarded the Lusitania in New York with her parents, three siblings and two nurses. Her life and that of her brother, Stuart, were saved by their English nursemaid Alice Lines, then 18 years old, who jumped off the boatdeck and escaped in a lifeboat. Her parents also survived, but her sisters Amy and Susan were lost. Alice M. Lines, with whom Lawson-Johnston remained close throughout her life, died in 1997, aged 100. Audrey Lawson-Johnston died at age 95 in 2011. She married Hugh de Beauchamp Lawson-Johnston, second son of George Lawson Johnston, 1st Baron Luke on 18 July 1946. They had three children, and lived in Melchbourne, Bedfordshire. Hugh was High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1961.
    4.00
    1 votes
    220

    Berthe Meijer

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Jewish teenager Anne Frank did her best to distract younger children from the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp by telling them fairy tales, according to a new book. After her discovery hiding in the attic of an Amsterdam house Anne was taken to Bergen Belsen. That Anne had a gift for storytelling was evident from the diary she kept during two years in hiding with her family in Amsterdam. The scattered pages were collected and published after the war in what became the most widely read book to emerge from the Holocaust. But the new account by fellow inmate Berthe Meijer, now 71, being published in Dutch later this month, is the first to mention Anne's talent for spinning tales even in the despair of the camp. The memoir deals with Ms Meijer's acquaintance with Anne Frank in only a few pages, but she said she titled it "Life After Anne Frank" because it continues the tale of Holocaust victims where the famous diary leaves off. "The dividing line is where the diary of Anne Frank ends. Because then you fall into a big black hole," she said. Anne's final diary entry was on August 1, 1944, three days before she and her family were arrested. She and her older sister Margot died in March 1945 in a typhus epidemic that swept through Bergen Belsen, just two weeks before the camp was liberated. Anne was 15. The stories Anne told were "fairy tales in which nasty things happened, and that was of course very much related to the war," Ms Meijer said. "But as a child you get lifted out of the everyday nastiness. That's something I remember. You're listening to someone telling something that has nothing to do with what's happening around you -- so it's a bit of escape." The stories she told in the camp were "about princes and elves and those kind of figures," Ms Meijer said. Despite having unhappy twists, the tales were "quite a bit less terrible than what we saw around us. So you thought: they didn't have it so bad. As a child, you think very primitively about that kind of thing." Around 140,000 Jews lived in the Netherlands before the 1940-45 Nazi occupation. Of those, 107,000 were deported to Germany and only 5,200 survived.
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Mary Berg

    Mary Berg

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Wattenberg was born in Lódz on October 10, 1924. She began a wartime diary in October 1939, shortly after Poland surrendered to German forces. The Wattenberg family fled to Warsaw, where in November 1940, Miriam, with her parents and younger sister, had to live in the Warsaw ghetto. The Wattenbergs held a privileged position within this confined community because Miriam's mother was a U.S. citizen. Shortly before the first large deportation of Warsaw Jews to Treblinka in the summer of 1942, German officials detained Miriam, her family, and other Jews bearing foreign passports in the infamous Pawiak Prison. German authorities eventually transferred the family to the Vittel internment camp in France, and allowed them to emigrate to the United States in 1944. Published under the penname “Mary Berg” in February 1945, Miriam Wattenberg's diary was one of the very few eyewitness accounts of the Warsaw ghetto available to readers in the English-speaking world before the end of World War II.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Mary Bos

    Mary Bos

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Mary Bos was a schoolmate from the Montessori school. She was an invited guest at Anne's tenth birthday party, and in the well-known photo of that gathering, she is the very slender girl third from the right. Mary was a gifted artist whose drawings and paintings were much admired by her peers. She is mentioned in passing in Anne's diary, when Anne writes of dreaming about Peter Schiff. She and Peter are looking "at a book of drawings by Mary Bos". Little else is known about Mary, but it is known that she did survive the war.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    4.00
    1 votes
    227

    Reverend William Mompesson

    • Survived disasters: Eyam
    William Mompesson (1639–1709) was an historically important clergyman, whose decisive action when his Derbyshire parish, Eyam, became infected with the plague in the 17th century averted more widespread catastrophe. The earliest reference to him is in Alumni Cantabrigienses and records that he was born at Collingham, West Yorkshire, on 28 April 1639, attended Sherburn School and went to Peterhouse, Cambridge University in 1655, graduating BA 1659 and MA 1662. After a period of service as Chaplain to Sir George Saville, later (1679) Lord Halifax, he came to Eyam with his wife Catherine, (daughter of Ralph Carr, Esq., of Cocken, County Durham) in 1664. In 1665 plague hit England, and a consignment of cloth bound for his village brought with it the infectious fleas which spread the disease. After an initial flurry of deaths in the autumn of that year it died down during the winter only to come back even more virulently in the spring of 1666. Mompesson, in conjunction with another clergyman, the out-of-favour Puritan, Thomas Stanley, took the courageous decision to isolate the village. In all, 260 of the village's inhabitants, including his wife Catherine, died before the plague
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Stanley Lord

    Stanley Lord

    • Survived disasters: Sinking of the Titanic
    Stanley Lord (13 September 1877 – 24 January 1962) was captain of the SS Californian, a ship that was in the vicinity of the RMS Titanic the night it sank on 15 April 1912. Lord was born on 13 September 1877 in Bolton, Lancashire, England. He began his training at sea when he was thirteen, aboard the barque Naiad, in March 1891. He later obtained his Second Mate’s Certificate of competency and served as Second Officer in the barque Lurlei. In February 1901, at the age of 23, Lord obtained his Master's Certificate, and three months later, obtained his Extra Master’s Certificate. He entered the service of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company in 1897. The company was taken over by the Leyland Line in 1900, but Lord continued service with the new company, and was awarded his first command in 1906. Lord was given full command of the SS Californian in 1911. On the night of 14 April 1912, as the Californian approached a large ice field, Captain Lord decided to stop around 10:21 PM and wait out the night. Before turning in for the night, he ordered his sole wireless operator, Cyril Evans, to warn other ships in the area about the ice. When reaching the Titanic, Evans tapped
    4.00
    1 votes
    229

    AIbert Abraham Cauvern

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    An old friend of Otto's: husband of his former secretary, Isa. Anne put a copy of their daughter, Ruth's, birth announcement in her diary. He was one of the people Otto asked to edit the diary manuscript known as Typescript I. In 1947, he took in Otto and the Gies, in his large apartment, where Otto apparently stayed until moving to Basel in mid-1952. (CE86 p. 63-4, 193; HLOF p. 213, 228, 238; AFR p. 249) He was born in Amsterdam. Prior to the anti-Jewish laws, he did bookkeeping and payroll at a Hilversum radio station. (Louis Cohen had also worked there, in the music department.) Ab was the only member of his family to survive the war. It is likely he was in hiding during part of the war. His mother (Roosje), father (Emanuël), and brother Joseph died in the camps. (His other brother, Leonard, died before the occupation.) (An Anne Frank researcher sent this information. The italicized links are to the Joodsmonument pages which back this up.) Regarding his first name, a researcher explained how it is that many references mistakenly call him "Albert" when his real name was Abraham: "Cauvern called himself Ab. Anyone thought it was short for Albert, as usual in Holland. The Critical Edition took it over … due to the fact that the NIOD at that time did not have any information on Abraham Cauvern … Using his real name Abraham would be dangerous in wartime, because Abraham is a Jewish name. He then could be easily recognized [as Jewish]."
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    0.00
    0 votes
    231

    Antoinette Feuerwerker

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Antoinette Feuerwerker (1912–2003) was a French jurist and an active fighter in the French Resistance during the Second World War. Antoinette (Antonia, Toni, Toibe Rochel) Gluck was born on November 24, 1912, in Antwerp (Borgherout), Belgium. She was the daughter of Paul (Pinchas) Gluck-Friedman and Henia Shipper. Her father was a direct descendant of Hasidic leaders going back to the Magid Dov Ber of Mezeritch. During World War I, the family moved from Poland to Belgium, and from there to Switzerland where her three siblings, Rose Warfman, Hedwig [Heidi], and Salomon Gluck were born, then to Germany, and finally to France, where they became citizens. Feuerwerker studied at the Lycée des Pontonniers (now Lycée international des Pontonniers) in Strasbourg. After her Baccalauréat, she studied law, a rarity in those days for a woman. One of her professors, René Capitant, became Minister of Education (1944–1945) in the Provisional Government and Minister of Justice (Attorney General) (1968–1969) under Charles de Gaulle. She worked in René Capitant's law firm. She also graduated from business school (HEC). With her family, she moved to Paris, where she met David Feuerwerker, a young
    0.00
    0 votes
    232
    Buddy Elias

    Buddy Elias

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Anne's cousin, a few years older than her. Like her, he was born in Frankfurt. While in hiding, she wrote about fantasies she had about going on outings with him. He survived the war and had a ice-skating career. He is currently (2007) the chairman of the Anne Frank Foundation.
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Charles Baron

    Charles Baron

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Charles Baron was 16 years old when he was deported on convoy 34 of September 18, 1942. His parents, Anna and Moritz, had preceded him on convoy 10. They lived at 38 rue Fessart in Paris (19th arr.). Charles Baron survived and became an activist devoted to keeping alive the memory of those who were deported.
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Ed van Thijn

    Ed van Thijn

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Eduard "Ed" van Thijn (Dutch pronunciation: [first name: ɛt, family name: vɑn ˈtɛi̯n, together: ˈɛt fɑn ˈtɛi̯n]; born August 16, 1934) is a retired Dutch politician of the Labour Party (PvdA). He served as a Member of the House of Representatives from February 23, 1967 until September 11, 1981. When Joop den Uyl became Prime Minister, Van Thijn became the Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives, serving from May 15, 1973 until January 16, 1978. He became Minister of the Interior serving from September 11, 1981 until May 29, 1982 in the Cabinet Van Agt II. And again a Member of the House of Representatives from September 16, 1982 until June 16, 1983. He became Mayor of Amsterdam, he served as Mayor from June 16, 1983 until resignation on January 18, 1994 te become again Minister of the Interior serving from January 18, 1994 until May 27, 1994 when he resigned following the IRT-affair. He later served as a Member of the Senate from June 8, 1999 until June 12, 2007. Although not raised religiously observant, in recent years he orients himself with Progressive Judaism.
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Eileen Haile

    Eileen Haile

    • Survived disasters: TWA Flight 128
    Eileen Haile was a passenger onboard TWA flight 128. She survived the crash on November 20,1967 and was transported to St. Elizabeth Hospital in Covington, Kentucky by Harold "Hook" Vines of the Hebron, Kentucky Fire Department.
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Gabi Goslar

    Gabi Goslar

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Anne's friend's toddler sister, who she saw regularly. Gabi (and Hanneli) was sent to Bergen-Belsen and had very bad ear infections there. She (and Hanneli) survived. After the war, she went with Hanneli to Switzerland, something Anne's father arranged at least part of (they had an uncle in Geneva).
    0.00
    0 votes
    238

    Heinz Lord

    • Survived disasters: SS Cap Arcona
    Heinz Lord (born March 21, 1917– died February 4, 1961) was a German-American surgeon. A survivor of Nazi concentration camp, Lord was elected Secretary-General of the World Medical Association shortly before his death in 1961. Lord, a Peruvian citizen of Swiss and German descent, was born in Germany, grew up in Hamburg and studied in Zurich, Berlin and Hamburg, receiving his first degree at the University of Hamburg in 1942. He was involved in the Swing Kids subculture, persecuted by Nazi authorities. For his poorly disguised anti-Nazi sentiments and for his contacts with a British Secret Service agent, Lord was arrested in 1943 and interred at Neuengamme concentration camp, a "correctional" institution set up according to Robert Ritter' theory of race hygiene. In April 1945, as the Allies invaded Hamburg, Dr. Lord and thousands of other prisoners were herded by the Nazis onto several cruise ships (including the former luxury liner Cap Arcona), sailed a few miles off the coast of Hamburg into a British-declared free fire zone, and were abandoned by their German guards. RAF bombers sank all the vessels. Lord was apparently on one of the smaller ships. According to cited 1961
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Janny Brandes-Brilslijper

    Janny Brandes-Brilslijper

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Janny Brandes-Brilleslijper (August 24, 1916- August 15, 2003) was the person who informed Otto Frank about the deaths of Anne Frank and Margot Frank. Janny and her sister Lientje were in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp with Anne and Margot. Janny was born in Amsterdam, the middle of three children of her parents. One of her sisters was Lientje Brilleslijper. In 1939, Janny married Bob Brandes, and they had two children: Rob, born on 1939, and Lilo, born in 1941. After the Nazis invaded the Netherlands, Janny and Bob, along with Lientje, began to work in the Resistance. Janny kept Jewish people hidden in her home, and she never officially registered as a Jew. However, the Nazis often wanted to arrest Janny and her family, and they made some narrow escapes. Finally, Janny and Lientje were arrested in in the summer of 1944, and were transported to the Westerbork Transit camp. In Westerbork, they were listed as criminals and had to work hard in the work barracks. In those barracks, Janny and Lientje met Anne and Margot and befriended them. Janny and Lientje were later, along with the Franks, transported to Auschwitz. Janny and Lientje were later transported to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where Anne and Margot were also transported in October 1944. Janny, who was made a nurse in the camp, took care of the ill prisoners. In March 1945, Anne and Margot died. Janny and Lientje buried them in the mass graves of the camp. After the war, Janny was reunited with her husband and children. Through the Red Cross, she contacted with Otto Frank and informed him about Anne and Margot's death. Janny gave interviews about Anne and Margot's final days in the documentary movie The Last Seven Months of Anne Frank (1987), which was directed by Willy Lindwer. Janny died in August 15, 2003.
    0.00
    0 votes
    240

    John Gaeta

    • Survived disasters: Beltway sniper attacks
    John Gaeta is an Academy Award winning visual effects designer best known for his work on the Matrix film trilogy and Speed Racer, where he explored and advanced the effects methods known as "Bullet Time", "Virtual Cinematography", and "Photo Anime". John C. Gaeta's career began in New York City. While acquiring a BFA degree with honors from New York University's film school, he was introduced to the industry as a staff production assistant for the Saturday Night Live film unit. Following NYU, he began camera and lighting work for a variety of media types including stop-motion animation, nature documentary, and holography. A few years later, he was drafted into the camera department of the newly formed Trumbull Company, founded in Berkshire County, Massachusetts by Douglas Trumbull. Trumbull was visual effects supervisor for such films as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Blade Runner, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as the director of such films as Silent Running and Brainstorm. It was at Trumbull Company that Gaeta was introduced and educated in a spectrum of innovative film formats such as 48fps VistaVision, 70mm Showscan, IMAX, OMNIMAX and stereo CGI (partnered with
    0.00
    0 votes
    241

    Joseph Muscha Mueller

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Joseph Muscha Mueller Roma (Gypsy) Born Bitterfeld, Germany 1932 Joseph was born in Bitterfeld, Germany, to Gypsy parents. For reasons unknown, he was raised in an orphanage for the first one-and-a-half years of his life. At the time of Joseph's birth, some 26,000 Gypsies--members of either the Sinti or Roma tribes--lived in Germany. Though most were German citizens, they were often discriminated against by other Germans and subjected to harassment. 1933-39: At age one-and-a-half, Joseph was taken into foster care by a family living in Halle, a city some 20 miles from Bitterfeld. That same year, the Nazi party came to power. When Joseph was in school, he was often made the scapegoat for pranks in the classroom and beaten for "misbehaving". He was also taunted with insults like "bastard" and "mulatto" by classmates who were members of the Hitler Youth movement. 1940-44: When Joseph was 12 he was taken from his classroom by two strangers who said he had "appendicitis" and needed immediate surgery. He protested, but was beaten and forcefully taken into surgery where he was sterilized, a procedure legalized by a Nazi law allowing the forced sterilization of asocials, a category that included Gypsies. After his recovery, Joseph was to be deported to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, but his foster father managed to have him smuggled from the hospital and hidden. Joseph survived the remainder of the war by hiding for five months in a garden shed.
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    0.00
    0 votes
    243

    Norman Spector

    • Survived disasters: American Airlines Flight 383
    Norman Spector was onboard American Airlines flight 383. He survived the crash on November 8,1965. He was sitting in a rear seat and was thrown from the plane. He rolled away from the ensuing fire suffering from "burns on his face, neck, arms and hands, a broken ankle, and multiple cuts and bruises" {Cincinnati Post and Times Star}. He was brought down the hill and transferred to Booth Memorial Hospital in Covington, Kentucky.
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Otto Frank

    Otto Frank

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Otto Heinrich "Pim" Frank (12 May 1889 – 19 August 1980) was a German-born businessman and the father of Anne Frank and Margot Frank. As the sole member of his family to survive the Jewish Holocaust, he inherited Anne's manuscripts after her death, arranged for the publication of her diary in 1947, and oversaw its translation to the stage and screen. Otto Frank was born in Frankfurt. He was the second son of Michael Frank and Alice Stern Frank. His siblings were Robert Frank, Helene (Leni) Frank, and Herbert Frank. Otto was a cousin of the well known furniture designer Jean-Michel Frank, and a grandson of Zacharias Frank. Frank served in the German army as an officer during the First World War. He worked in the bank his family ran until it collapsed in the early 1930s. He married Edith Holländer—an heiress to a scrap-metal and industrial-supply business—on 12 May 1925 in Frankfurt, and their first daughter, Margot Betti, was born on 16 February 1926, followed by Anne (Annelies Marie) on 12 June 1929. As the tide of Nazism rose in Germany and anti-Jewish decrees encouraged attacks on Jewish individuals and families, Frank decided to evacuate his family to the safer western nations
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Rudolf Vrba

    Rudolf Vrba

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rudolf "Rudi" Vrba (11 September 1924 – 27 March 2006) was a professor of pharmacology at the University of British Columbia. Originally from Slovakia, he is known for his escape, at the age of 19, from the Auschwitz concentration camp in German-occupied Poland during the Second World War, and for having provided some of the earliest and most detailed information about the mass murder that was taking place there. Vrba and a fellow prisoner, Alfréd Wetzler (1918–1988), managed to flee Auschwitz on 10 April 1944, three weeks after German forces had invaded Hungary (a German ally), and after SS-Obersturmbannführer Adolf Eichmann had arrived in Budapest, the Hungarian capital, to begin the deportation to Auschwitz of the country's Jewish population. The 40 pages of information the men passed to Jewish officials when they arrived in Slovakia on 24 April – which included information about the use of gas chambers and crematoria – became known as the Vrba-Wetzler report. While it confirmed material in earlier reports from Polish and other escapees, Miroslav Kárný writes that it was unique in its "unflinching detail." Mass transports of Hungary's Jews to Auschwitz began by train on 15 May
    0.00
    0 votes
    246

    Rudy Kennedy

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Rudy Kennedy (October 27, 1927 – November 10, 2008) was a British rocket scientist, Holocaust survivor, and a protester for Jewish causes. He spent a substantial period of his youth in German concentration camps of Auschwitz, Mittelbau-Dora, and Bergen-Belsen. After liberation, he worked as a rocket scientist and led the campaign for compensation for the survivors of the German policy of "extermination through labour". Kennedy was born on October 24, 1927 in Rosenberg (now Olesno, Poland), a place near Breslau, Germany (now Wrocław, Poland). He was six years of age when Hitler was elected and had to face antisemitism and physical attacks from other boys when he went to school, as he was the only Jewish boy in class. After fighting back against boys from the school who had attacked him, Kennedy's father then enrolled him to an all-Jewish school in Breslau. Rudy's whole family, which consisted of his father (Ewalt), mother and a younger sister (Kaitie), were moved to the ghetto in Breslau in 1939. By 1941, Kennedy started working as an electrician with his father. Rudy's family was forcibly relocated by the Schutzstaffel (SS) to Auschwitz concentration camp in 1943. At his father's
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Stephen of England

    Stephen of England

    • Survived disasters: The White Ship
    Stephen (c. 1092/6 – 25 October 1154), often referred to as Stephen of Blois (French: Étienne de Blois, Medieval French: Estienne de Blois), was a grandson of William the Conqueror. He was King of England from 1135 to his death, and also the Count of Boulogne in right of his wife. Stephen's reign was marked by the Anarchy, a civil war with his cousin and rival, the Empress Matilda. He was succeeded by Matilda's son, Henry II, the first of the Angevin kings. Stephen was born in the County of Blois in middle France; his father, Count Stephen-Henry, died while Stephen was still young, and he was brought up by his mother, Adela. Placed into the court of his uncle, Henry I, Stephen rose in prominence and was granted extensive lands. Stephen married Matilda of Boulogne, inheriting additional estates in Kent and Boulogne that made the couple one of the wealthiest in England. Stephen narrowly escaped drowning with Henry I's son, William Adelin, in the sinking of the White Ship in 1120; William's death left the succession of the English throne open to challenge. When Henry I died in 1135, Stephen quickly crossed the English Channel and with the help of his brother Henry of Blois, a powerful
    0.00
    0 votes
    248

    Tuviah Friedman

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Tuviah Friedman (23 January 1922 – 13 January 2011) was a Nazi hunter and director of the Institute for the Documentation of Nazi War Crimes in Haifa, Israel. Friedman was born in Radom, Poland in 1922. During World War II he was imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp near Radom, from which he escaped in 1944. The following year he was appointed an interrogation officer in the Danzig jail. From 1946 to 1952 he worked for Haganah Wien in Austria, as Director of the Staff of The Documentation-Center in Vienna where he and his colleagues hunted down numerous Nazis. Afterwards, in Israel, he played a role in the capture of Adolf Eichmann.
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Werner Angress

    Werner Angress

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Werner Angress was born in Berlin on June 27, 1920. He grew up in a comfortable middle-class family of assimilated German Jews. After the Nazis took power in 1933, his life was shadowed by the darkening cloud of anti-Semitism and the growing sense that Germany, the country with which he continued to identify, was no longer his. As a teenager, Angress sought refuge at Gross Breesen, a farming community near Berlin where young Jews learned the agricultural skills that were supposed to prepare them for emigration. Here, under the leadership of the community’s charismatic leader, Curt Bondy, he formed friendships that would last throughout his long and eventful life. In 1937, the Angress family fled Germany. Two years later, Werner left for the United States while the rest of his family remained in Amsterdam. His mother and two brothers survived the war in hiding; his father, arrested by Gestapo after the German invasion of the Netherlands, died in Auschwitz. In America, Angress worked on a farm in Virginia. When he applied for citizenship, he changed his middle name from Karl to Thomas and from then on he would be known as Tom to most of his friends. Drafted into the army in 1941, he was trained as an interrogator at Camp Ritchie (he is featured in the film, The Ritchie Boys, about this remarkable institution), and parachuted (his first jump) into France with the 82nd Airborne on D-Day. Despite his extraordinarily youthful appearance and rather small stature, Angress was a tough and resourceful soldier who was eventually promoted to Master Sergeant and awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. In May 1945, he drove a borrowed jeep to Amsterdam, where he was reunited with his mother and brothers, from whom he had heard nothing since the beginning of the war. Angress got his BA in history from Wesleyan University and his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley, where he worked with Raymond J. Sontag. He taught at Berkeley and then, for 25 years, at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook. Angress’s first book, based on his Berkeley dissertation, was Stillborn Revolution: The Communist Bid for Power in Germany, 1921–23 (Princeton Press, 1963, translated into German as Die Kampfzeit der KPD, 1921–23 and published by Droste Verlag in 1973). Deeply researched and forcefully argued, Stillborn Revolution traces the German Communist Party’s difficult evolution as it tried to come to terms with the failure of its revolutionary aspirations, the political vacuum left by the murder of its most effective leaders, and the growing influence of the Soviet Union. After 50 years, Stillborn Revolution remains the standard work on German Communism in the early Weimar Republic. Although Angress continued to publish articles on Weimar politics, his interests turned more and more to the history that most powerfully shaped his own life, the history of Germany’s Jews and their long, complex, and ultimately tragic relationship to German politics and society. Over the next three decades, Angress produced a series of extraordinary articles. To mention just three of them: “Juden im politischen Leben der Revolutionszeit” (1971), “Prussia’s Army and the Jewish Reserve Officer Controversy before World War I” (1972), and—my own favorite—“The German Army’s ‘Judenzählung’ of 1916: Genesis-Consequences-Significance” (1978). Unlike those books that could easily have been articles, many of Angress’s articles were weighty and significant enough to have been books. In 1965, Angress published a brief essay in the Year Book of the Leo Baeck Institute on Gross Breesen. This turned out to be the first of a number of autobiographical pieces that increasingly absorbed his energies and attention. The most significant products of this were two books. Generation zwischen Furcht und Hoffnung: Jüdische Jugend im Dritten Reich (Christians Verlag, 1985, translated as Between Fear and Hope: Jewish Youth in the Third Reich and published by Columbia University Press in 1988) begins with a long essay on the fate of young German Jews under the Nazis and then prints letters and documents about Angress’s time in Gross Breesen and his heroic (and ultimately successful) efforts to save the members of the community who were arrested in 1938. Angress’s last book, …immer etwas abseits: Jugenderinnerungen eines jüdischen Berliners, 1920–45 (Edition Hentrich, 2005), tells the story of his childhood, the increasingly toxic atmosphere of Nazi Berlin, his emigration, and his military service. It is, in many ways, the story of sorrow and of loss, but also of resilience, courage, and, ultimately, survival, vividly illustrated by the photograph of Angress and his extended family with which the book concludes. Throughout his long career, Tom Angress was a dedicated and effective teacher who was twice honored with prestigious awards at SUNY Stony Brook. After his retirement and return to Berlin in 1988, he continued to teach, to mentor young scholars, and to share his experiences with high school students who were growing up in a very different Berlin. Like all of us, Angress had his faults: his temper, usually directed at the many mechanical devices that defied his will, was legendary. But to those hundreds of people whose lives he touched, Tom Angress will be remembered for his fundamental decency, tolerance, and generosity. He was an attentive and devoted friend, a thoughtful companion at times of joy and sadness. Tom’s memory will be cherished by many throughout the world and especially by the family whose love was at the center of his life: his two brothers, Hans and Fred; his former wives, Millie and Claudia; his sons, Dan and Percy; his daughters, Nadine and Miriam; his daughters and sons-in-law; grandchildren; and the companion of his final years, Elma Gaasbeek. Werner Thomas Angress died in Berlin on July 5, 2010, a week after his 90th birthday.
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Yekusiel Yehudah Halberstam

    Yekusiel Yehudah Halberstam

    • Survived disasters: Holocaust
    Yekusiel Yehudah Halberstam (January 10, 1905 – June 18, 1994) was an Orthodox rabbi and the founding rebbe of the Sanz-Klausenburg Hasidic dynasty. Halberstam became one of the youngest rebbes in Europe, leading thousands of followers in the town of Klausenburg, Romania, before World War II. His wife, eleven children and most of his followers were murdered by the Nazis while he was incarcerated in several concentration camps. After the war, he moved to the United States and later to Israel, rebuilt Jewish communal life in the displaced persons camps of Western Europe, re-established his dynasty in the United States and Israel, founded a Haredi neighborhood in Israel and a Sanz community in the United States, established a hospital in Israel run according to Jewish law, and rebuilt his own family with a second marriage and the birth of seven more children. Halberstam was born in 1905 in the town of Rudnik, Poland. He was a great-grandson (through the direct male line) of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Sanz (the Divrei Chaim), one of the great Hasidic leaders of Polish Jewry, and a grandson of the Gorlitzer Rebbe, Rabbi Baruch Halberstam (1829–1906). His father, Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Disaster survivor of All Time

    Top List Voters