Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 893 views
  • 621 votes
  • 621 voters
  • 14%
Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time

More about Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time:

Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time has gotten 893 views and has gathered 621 votes from 621 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time is a top list in the Sports category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Sports or Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Sports on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    Washington Senators

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Washington Senators were a 19th century baseball team. The team was also known as the Washington Statesmen and the Washington Nationals. The team played at Boundary Field. The team started out in the American Association as the Washington Statesmen in 1891. The American Association folded after that season, and the team was purchased by J. Earl Wagner, who would own the team for the remainder of its existence. The Statesmen moved to the National League for the 1892 season, becoming the Senators. When the NL contracted from twelve teams to eight after the 1899 season, the Senators were one of the eliminated teams. The Senators did not fare well in their nine years as a franchise, which might have been the reason they were contracted. Washington never had a winning season and compiled a winning percentage of 0.366. Among their more famous players were Deacon McGuire and Hall of Famer Jim O'Rourke. After a one year hiatus, the Senators returned, but they were no longer the same franchise that played at Boundary Field. In fact the Original Senators were the first of three teams, all called the Washington Senators, and were in the Capital continuously until the third Senators
    7.38
    8 votes
    2

    Rochester Jeffersons

    • Sport: American football
    The Rochester Jeffersons from Rochester, New York played in the National Football League from 1920 to 1925. Formed as an amateur outfit by a rag-tag group of Rochester-area teenagers after the turn of the twentieth century (a 1925 report has the team being founded in 1898), the team became known as the Jeffersons in reference to the locale of their playing field on Jefferson Avenue. Around 1908 a teenager by the name of Leo Lyons joined with the club as a player, and within two years began to manage, finance, and promote the team on a full-time basis. For their first decade of their existence the "Jeffs" played other amateur and semi-pro teams from the upstate New York area such as the Rochester Scalpers and the Oxfords. By the fall of 1917, the Jeffs had started to look past state borders not only for big-name opponents, but for big-name talent as well. At the end of October 1917, Lyons managed to secure a match against the country's greatest team, the Canton Bulldogs, who had the legendary Jim Thorpe as their star attraction. Thorpe's squad crushed the Jeffs 41-0, but the audacity of challenging such a superior team to a match won Lyons and his club a bit of notoriety, and three
    9.17
    6 votes
    3
    7.86
    7 votes
    4

    New York Gothams

    The New York Gothams were an American basketball team based in New York, New York, that was a member of the American Basketball League. The team was previously known as the Westchester Indians. The team moved to New York during the 1944/45 season and became known as the New York Gothams. After the 1945/46 season, the team became known as the Brooklyn Gothams.
    7.57
    7 votes
    5
    8.50
    6 votes
    6
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    7.83
    6 votes
    8
    8.80
    5 votes
    9

    Wilmington Quicksteps

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Wilmington Quicksteps were an 1884 late season replacement baseball team in the Union Association. They finished with a 2-16 record and were managed by Joe Simmons. The team played home games in Union Street Park in Wilmington, Delaware. In 1883, the Inter-State Association of Professional Baseball Clubs was founded and local capital was invested for a franchise in Wilmington. In 1884, The Interstate Association re-organized under the name "Eastern League" (not to be confused with the double A Eastern League of today); this was one of the very first "minor leagues" and is considered a forerunner of today's AAA International League. The Wilmington Quicksteps quickly began to dominate the league. So highly regarded was the club that major league clubs began to show up to play exhibition games. (They defeated both the Washington Nationals and the Baltimore Monumentals during the season.) By August, the Quicksteps had already sewed up the league championship with a 50-12 record. Unfortunately, their dominance nearly destroyed fan interest in the Eastern League; even in Wilmington, attendance averaged only 400 per game. Late into the season, Henry Lucas, the Union Association
    8.60
    5 votes
    10

    Altoona Mountain Citys

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Altoona Mountain Citys were a professional baseball franchise that played in Altoona, Pennsylvania in 1884. The Mountain Citys were a charter member of the Union Association, but folded after 25 games with a 6-19 record. Some sources call the team the Altoona Pride. For its one year of existence, the Altoona Mountain Citys were managed by Ed Curtis and played in Altoona's Columbia Park. Among its roster, catcher Jerrie Moore and shortstop Germany Smith were two of its best players. John Murphy and Jim Brown were the team's ace pitchers. When Henry Lucas, president of the newest major league, the Union Association, could only find seven teams for his league, he convinced the team, then part of the Inter-State Association, to join the league, with the promise that the Pennsylvania Railroad would provide some backing. The Mountain Citys began the 1884 season by playing the top teams in the league, the St. Louis Maroons and the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds, and losing 11 straight. After finally winning their first game on May 10, the Mountain Citys went 6-8 before folding. The team's final game was on May 31. The team was a disaster – attendance was as low as 200 on some games, and
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    7.00
    6 votes
    12

    St. Louis Terriers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Louis Terriers were a baseball club that played in the short-lived Federal League in 1914 and 1915. They played their home games at Handlan's Park. The St. Louis Chapter of SABR placed a marker at the site of Handland's Park, now on the campus of St. Louis University, on October 17, 2007. The team was owned by ice magnate Phil Ball, who later was owner of the St. Louis Browns. In their inaugural season, the Terriers posted a 62-89 record (.411) and finished in last place, 25 games behind the league champion Indianapolis Hoosiers. The team improved significantly the next year as they were pennant contenders up until the last game of the season. The Terriers had a 87-67 mark (.565), ending up in second place 1/10 of a percentage point behind the champion Chicago Whales, who finished 86-66 (.566). Among the St. Louis Terriers players who had experience in the American and/or National Leagues were Al Bridwell, Mordecai Brown, Ward Miller (baseball), Bob Groom, Fielder Jones, Eddie Plank, Jack Tobin and Ed Willett.
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    7.80
    5 votes
    14

    Pittsburgh Stogies

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Pittsburgh Stogies were a baseball team in the short-lived Union Association of 1884. They played in Recreation Park. The team began play in 1884 as the Chicago Browns but after suffering $15,000 in losses, the owner A. H. Henderson, moved the team to Pittsburgh. The Stogies, a nickname for a cigar, were managed by Joe Battin and Joe Ellick.The team suffered from poor attendance and after 19 games, in which they won 7, lost 11 (including one forfeit), and 1 tie, the Stogies were dissolved with many of the players joining the Baltimore Monumentals.
    7.80
    5 votes
    15

    Chicago Bulls

    • Sport: American football
    The Chicago Bulls were a professional American football team that competed in the first American Football League in 1926. Owned by Joey Sternaman (brother of Chicago Bears co-owner Dutch Sternaman), the Bulls also had AFL founders C. C. Pyle and Red Grange as shareholders (Pyle and Grange were also the co-owners of the New York Yankees and the Los Angeles Wildcats of the AFL). Joey Sternaman was also the coach and blocking back for the Bulls throughout their brief existence. The newly-minted Bulls had adverse effects on the more established NFL. First, the Bulls leased Comiskey Park, forcing the Chicago Cardinals to play in the (older and much smaller) Normal Field. Second, the Bulls made an offer for Cardinals star Paddy Driscoll that the reigning NFL champions could not match (Cardinals owner Chris O’Brien arranged a trade with the Bears, who did match the Bulls' offer to Driscoll, keeping him in the established league but knocking the Cardinals out of championship contention). Failing to sign Driscoll, the Bulls built up their roster by signing up men who played their college football in the American Midwest. Despite playing in front of 16,000 people in their first home game
    6.67
    6 votes
    16

    Reading Red Sox

    • Later known as: Pittsfield Red Sox
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Reading Red Sox are a defunct minor league baseball affiliate of the Boston Red Sox baseball franchise. The ball club was based in Reading, Pennsylvania, and played in the Class A New York-Pennsylvania League (1933–34) and its successor league, the Class AA Eastern League (1963–64). During the latter period, the manager was Eddie Popowski and the team featured such star players as veteran former Red Sox slugger Dick Gernert, a Reading native, and prospects Mike Andrews, Joe Foy, Tony Horton, Rico Petrocelli and Reggie Smith. In 1965, Boston moved its AA affiliate to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and the Cleveland Indians re-established a farm club in Reading, where the Indians had a successful affiliate from 1950-61. Since 1967, the Philadelphia Phillies have based their AA affiliate in the city; it led the Eastern League in attendance in 2006.
    6.67
    6 votes
    17

    New York Yankees

    • Sport: American football
    The New York Yankees were a short-lived professional American football team from 1926 to 1928. The team was a member of the first American Football League in 1926, and later the National Football League from 1927-1928. They played their home games at Yankee Stadium. The team featured Red Grange at running back. The Yankees arose as a result of a contract dispute between Grange and his previous team, the NFL's Chicago Bears. During the early 1920s, Grange was the star attraction for the Bears, in fact he was the greatest attraction in the history of football and his play had done a lot to promote the fledgling NFL. However Red's agent, Grange's services, his agent, C. C. "Cash and Carry" Pyle challenged the Bears owner George Halas in 1926, by stating that Red's contract was owned by himself, and not Halas. Pyle then approached Halas to demand for Grange a generous salary and one-third ownership of the Bears. Halas refused. Pyle then took his quest for an NFL franchise to the NFL's 1926 winter meeting. There he showed to the other owners that he had the rights to Grange. As a result he wanted an NFL team of his own and he wanted it in New York City's Yankee Stadium. If he would be
    8.75
    4 votes
    18

    Toronto St. Pats

    • Later known as: Toronto Maple Leafs
    The Toronto St. Patricks were a professional hockey team in the National Hockey League based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.The Toronto Arenas were re-named the Toronto St. Patricks for start of the 1919-20 National Hockey League season. They won the Stanley Cup in 1921-22.The St. Patricks would later be re-named the Toronto Maple Leafs when Charlie Querrie sold his team to Conn Smythe in 1927.
    8.75
    4 votes
    19

    Austin Wranglers

    The Austin Wranglers were an arena football team based in Austin, Texas. They played four seasons in the Arena Football League from 2004 to 2007 and spent one season in AF2, the AFL's developmental league, in 2008. They made playoff appearances in the AFL in 2006 and in AF2 in 2008. They played their home games at the Frank Erwin Center at the University of Texas at Austin. The Wranglers began play in February 2004 as an expansion team in the Arena Football League. They played their home games at the Frank Erwin Center on the University of Texas campus, playing in the Southern Division of the National Conference. The franchise is not to be confused with another Arena Football team called the Oklahoma Wranglers, who played the 2000 and 2001 seasons in Oklahoma City. In 2004, the Wranglers accumulated an 8-8 record with such notables as quarterback John Kaleo, Charlie Davidson, and Darryl Hammond leading the Wrangler's respectable offensive campaign. The Wranglers however were unable to qualify for the playoffs, after stumbling to 3 losses to close out the season. The 2004 off-season was relatively quiet; signings included former All-Rookie teamer OL/DL Bryan Henderson, OS Ira Gooch,
    6.50
    6 votes
    20
    7.40
    5 votes
    21
    8.50
    4 votes
    22

    Baltimore Blades

    The Baltimore Blades were a hockey team based out of Baltimore that played in the World Hockey Association. They only played part of one season in Baltimore. Previously, the franchise were known as the Los Angeles Sharks and the Michigan Stags. While in Baltimore, the team played at the Baltimore Arena.
    8.50
    4 votes
    23

    Charlotte Hornets

    • Later known as: New Orleans Hornets
    The Charlotte Hornets were a professional American basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. They played in the Atlantic, Midwest, and Central divisions of the National Basketball Association. The Hornets began play during the 1988–89 NBA season as an expansion franchise, along with the Miami Heat. Following the 2001–02 season, the team relocated to New Orleans, Louisiana, where they currently play as the New Orleans Hornets. In fourteen seasons in Charlotte, the Hornets compiled an overall record of 542–574, and qualified for the post-season seven times. In 1985, the NBA was planning to expand by four teams. George Shinn, an entrepreneur from Kannapolis, North Carolina, wanted to bring an NBA team to the Charlotte area, and he assembled a group of prominent local businessmen to head the prospective franchise. The Charlotte area had long been a hotbed for college basketball. The Atlantic Coast Conference's four North Carolina teams, as well as local teams Charlotte, Davidson and Johnson C. Smith, have large and loyal fan bases in the city. Charlotte was also one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States, and was previously one of the three in-state regional homes
    8.50
    4 votes
    25

    Pittsburgh Burghers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Pittsburgh Burghers were a baseball team in the Players' League, a short-lived Major League that existed only for the 1890 season. The team included a number of players who had jumped from the National League's Pittsburgh Alleghenys (now the Pittsburgh Pirates), including Hall of Famers Pud Galvin, Ned Hanlon, and Jake Beckley. Hanlon served as the team's Manager. Meanwhile, John Tener, who would go on to represent Pittsburgh in the United States Congress and be elected the 25th Governor of Pennsylvania, finished his pitching career with the Burghers in 1890. Later Tener would become the president of the National League, and a director of the Philadelphia Phillies. In its only season, the Burghers finished in 6th place with a 60-68 record. The team played at the Alleghenies' former home, Exposition Park. The stadium and the team was located in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, which was not incorporated into the city of Pittsburgh until 1907. The area is currently known today as the North Side of Pittsburgh, and the site of Exposition Park was later used for Three Rivers Stadium. In an indirect way, it can be argued that the Burghers, alone among the old Players' League franchises,
    8.25
    4 votes
    26

    Cleveland Panthers

    • Sport: American football
    The Cleveland Panthers were a professional American football team that competed in the first American Football League in 1926. Owned by General C. X. Zimmerman (the vice president of the AFL), the Panthers played their home games in Luna Bowl in Luna Park. Coached by Roy Watts, the team drew its players from Ohio colleges and universities and raided the rosters of National Football League teams based in Ohio The veteran squad led by tailback Al Michaels was one of only two AFL franchises (the other was the New York Yankees) to average more than 12 points per game. Other former Cleveland Bulldogs Dave Noble and Doc Elliott helped provide offensive firepower, while two-sport star Cookie Cunningham excelled at end, scoring twice on long passes in an October 3, 1926, game against the Los Angeles Wildcats. In terms of fan support, the Panthers appeared to have had a good start, defeating the Yankees in their first game, at Luna Bowl in front of a reported 22,000 people, but after a second home victory (17-13, against the Wildcats) in which the attendance figures were apparently not reported, and a third straight home win (this time 23-7 against the Rock Island Independents) in front of
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    Third Lanark A.C.

    Third Lanark A.C.

    • Sport: Football
    Third Lanark Athletic Club was a football club that existed for 95 years between 1872 and 1967, in Glasgow, Scotland. Third Lanark was known as Thirds, the Warriors, the Redcoats and the Hi Hi. The last nickname was rumoured to have started during a match in the late 1890s, when a defender kicked the ball so high out of the ground that the crowd started screaming "High High High" and that nickname stayed with the club ever since. The fans invariably started to sing "Hi Hi Hi!" as a battle cry to encourage the team to victory during the club's matches. There was a public house called The Hi Hi Bar at the southern end of Crown Street in the Gorbals area of Glasgow, about one mile from the club's Cathkin Park stadium, until the late 1960s, after Third Lanark's demise. One of the more successful clubs in early Scottish Football, Third Lanark was not the first major club to be declared bankrupt and dissolved. Former Scottish Cup winners Renton and near neighbours Vale of Leven suffered similar fates, although Vale of Leven was resurrected as a Junior side later on. Third Lanark's demise was considered more remarkable as the club had finished third in Scotland's top division behind
    7.00
    5 votes
    28

    Buffalo Bisons

    • Sport: Baseball
    The original Buffalo Bisons baseball club played in the National League between 1879 and 1885. The Bisons played their games at Riverside Park (1879-83) and Olympic Park (1884-85) in Buffalo, New York. The NL Bisons are included in the history of the minor-league team of the same name that still plays today. Brouthers, Galvin, O'Rourke and Radbourn are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame.
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Nashua Pride

    Nashua Pride

    • Later known as: American Defenders of New Hampshire
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Nashua Pride were a professional baseball team based in Nashua, New Hampshire, in the United States, not affiliated with Major League Baseball. They played home games at Holman Stadium from 1998 through 2008, when they were sold and renamed the American Defenders of New Hampshire. In 2010 that team moved to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and became the Pittsfield Colonials. The franchise itself no longer exists, as the Colonials folded after the 2011 baseball season. The Nashua Pride was one of the founding members of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball in 1998. The team name was based on the fact that Money magazine twice named Nashua the "best place to live" in the America. The team's primary home uniform logo was the word "Pride" in script, and included the number "1" inside the capital "P." In the 2000 season, the team swept the Somerset Patriots in three games to win the Atlantic League Championship Series. However, the Patriots answered that loss by defeating the Pride in the 2003 and 2005 championships. Despite their on-field success, the Pride suffered as a result of having one of the lowest average attendances and being the farthest team from the core of the
    9.33
    3 votes
    30
    9.33
    3 votes
    31

    St. Louis Gunners

    • Sport: American football
    The St. Louis Gunners, were an independent professional football team based in St. Louis, Missouri, who played the last three games of the 1934 National Football League season, replacing the Cincinnati Reds on the league schedule after the Reds' league membership was suspended. They won their first game against the Pittsburgh Pirates (now Steelers) 6-0, but lost the last two to the Detroit Lions (40-7) and the Green Bay Packers (21-14). Six of the Reds players joined the team for the last two games. The team was headquartered at the St. Louis National Guard Armory, which accounts for its nickname the 'Gunners'. In 1931, the 126th Field Artillery of the Missouri National Guard, announced through its spokesman that it would sponsor a team for the upcoming football season. The club was originally called the Batter A Gunners from its association with the Guard. Future Hall-of-Famer Jimmy Conzelman, was named the team's first head coach. Bud Yates was named the team's general manager. The Gunners posted a 5-2-1 record in 1931. However they lost to the NFL's Chicago Cardinals, 26-6. After the game Cardinals captain, Ernie Nevers, called the Gunners the "best independent club we have ever
    9.33
    3 votes
    32

    La selecta

    • Later known as: El Salvador national football team
    La Selecta and La Azul (Spanish for The Blue) are the popular names assigned to El Salvador¬タルs national soccer team. La Selecta is Salvadorian slang for the ¬タワselected¬タン group of players representing the country in international soccer tournaments. Traditionally La Selecta have worn a blue jersey-short-stockings uniform, hence the name The Blue. Rather than using the national soccer federation logo shield the initials ES appear in the left side of the jersey (short for El Salvador).
    5.29
    7 votes
    33
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    8.00
    4 votes
    35

    Louisville Grays

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Louisville Grays were a 19th century U.S. baseball team and charter member of the National League, based in Louisville, Kentucky. They played two seasons, 1876 and 1877, and compiled a record of 65–61. Their home games were at the Louisville Baseball Park. The Grays were owned by businessman Walter N. Haldeman, owner and publisher of the Louisville Courier-Journal newspaper. The Grays were undone by major league baseball's first gambling scandal. The team was in first place in August 1877, then suddenly lost seven games and tied one against the Boston Red Stockings and Hartford Dark Blues. Boston ended up winning the pennant, seven games ahead of the second-place Grays. A Courier-Journal story questioning the team's conduct was written by John Haldeman, the owner's son. Team president Charles Chase received two anonymous telegrams. One noted that gamblers were favoring the less talented Hartford team in an upcoming series. The second telegram predicted Louisville would throw the next game versus Hartford on August 21. The Grays committed a number of suspicious errors and lost that game 7–0. League president William Hulbert investigated and ordered players to authorize Western
    6.80
    5 votes
    36

    Worcester Ruby Legs

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Worcester Worcesters were a 19th century Major League Baseball team from 1880 to 1882 in the National League. The team is referred to, at times, as the Brown Stockings or the Ruby Legs; however, no contemporary sources from the time exist that support the use of either name. The Ruby Legs played their home games at the Worcester Driving Park Grounds in the Worcester Agricultural Fairgrounds, located south of Highland Street between Sever Street and Russell Street in Worcester, Massachusetts. In 1879, Worcester played in the minor league National Association. The National League was interested in Worcester as a potential replacement for the failed Syracuse Stars franchise primarily based on the performance of their ace pitcher, Lee Richmond, who pitched several exhibition games against National League opponents and went 6–2. He also pitched and won one game for the Boston Red Stockings. To admit Worcester to the National League, the league's board of directors waived the requirement that league cities have a population of at least 75,000 (Worcester's population was 58,000). To raise the capital to support their entry into the major leagues, the team sold shares for $35 (with the
    7.75
    4 votes
    37

    Baltimore Colts

    • Later known as: Baltimore Colts
    • Sport: American football
    The Baltimore Colts were a professional American football team based in Baltimore, Maryland. The first team to bear the name Baltimore Colts, they were members of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1947–1949, and then joined the National Football League (NFL) for one season before folding. In 1953, the franchise that had previously been the Boston Yanks (1944-48), New York Bulldogs (1949), New York Yankees (1950-51), and Dallas Texans (1952) revived the Baltimore Colts name; this team is now the Indianapolis Colts. The Colts' origin is with the Miami Seahawks, one of the charter franchises of the AAFC. After playing a single disastrous season the Seahawks were confiscated by the league, and were purchased and reorganized by a group of businessmen as the Baltimore Colts. The new team struggled through the next three seasons, but managed to grow a sizable fan base in Baltimore. In 1949 the Colts were one of three AAFC teams, along with the San Francisco 49ers and the Cleveland Browns, to be brought into the NFL following the AAFC-NFL merger. They played only during the 1950 season before financial pressures forced them to fold. The All-America Football Conference had
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Brooklyn Tip-Tops

    Brooklyn Tip-Tops

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Brooklyn Tip-Tops were a team in the short-lived Federal League of professional baseball from 1914 to 1915. The team was named by owner Robert Ward, who owned the Tip Top Bakery. They were sometimes informally called the Brooklyn Feds or BrookFeds due to being the Brooklyn team of the Federal League. The Tip Tops played in old Washington Park, which the Brooklyn Dodgers had abandoned after the 1912 season to move to Ebbets Field. The team finished a disappointing 4th in 1914. Federal League officials believed it was important to have a successful franchise in the New York area and when the Indianapolis Hoosiers were transitioned to Newark, New Jersey, the "Federal League Ty Cobb", as 1914 FL batting champ Benny Kauff was known, was placed on the Brooklyn roster. In 1915, Kauff led the league with a .342 batting average and 55 stolen bases, but the Tip-Tops still finished in seventh place. The Newark and Brooklyn FL teams played three holiday doubleheaders during the 1915 season where one game was in Newark and the second was in Brooklyn. On September 19, 1914, Tip-Top Ed Lafitte threw the only no-hitter in Federal League history, beating the Kansas City Packers 6-2. Had the
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    10.00
    2 votes
    43

    Seibu Lions

    • Later known as: Saitama Seibu Lions
    • Sport: Baseball
    Seibu Lions is a former Japanese baseball team which was active from 1979 to 2007.
    7.25
    4 votes
    44

    St. Louis Maroons

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Louis Maroons were a professional baseball club based in St. Louis, Missouri from 1884-1886. The club, established by Henry Lucas, were the one near-major league quality entry in the Union Association, a league that lasted only one season, due in large part to the dominance of the Maroons. The St. Louis Maroons debuted on April 20, 1884 at the Union Base Ball Park, defeating the UA Chicago club, 7-2. The Maroons went 94-19 in that season, which would translate to 134 wins in a modern 162 game schedule, although such an extrapolation is of questionable merit. Their closest rivals, the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds ball club, finished 21 games behind, which would translate to 106 wins. Those figures indicate something of the quality of the remainder of the organization, which many derided as the "Onion League". One of the Maroons' major stars was pitcher Charlie Sweeney, best known today as the pitcher who left Old Hoss Radbourn to shoulder the pitching burden alone with the Providence Grays of the National League. Radbourn went on to pitch most of the rest of the Providence club's games, winning a total of 60. Sweeney won 24 with the Maroons after having already won 17 with the
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    Cincinnati Reds

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Cincinnati Reds, also known as the Cincinnati Red Stockings, were a professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio that played from 1875–1880. The club predated the National League of which it became a charter member. John Joyce, who was an organizer of the Red Stockings club dismantled in 1870, reformed the club through a new company in 1875. Two players from the 1870 season returned as part of a new professional nine which played local amateur clubs. Joyce then sold the Reds to wealthy Cincinnati meat packer Josiah "Si" Keck during the winter. When the National League was formed on February 2, 1876 at the Grand Central Hotel in New York City, eight cities were selected to compete in the new major league: St. Louis, Hartford, Louisville, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston and Keck's Cincinnati club. The Reds began the 1876 season at Avenue Grounds. They were managed by player/manager Charlie Gould, and outfielder Charley Jones led the Cincinnati offense with 4 home runs and 38 runs batted in. The 1876 team finished a dismal 9-56, last in the new eight-team National League. In 1877, helmed by the managing trio of Lip Pike, Bob Addy, and Jack Manning, the Reds
    8.33
    3 votes
    46

    Kansas City Blues

    • Later known as: Kansas City Cowboys
    • Sport: American football
    Kansas City, Missouri had a National Football League team prior to the Chiefs that operated under two different names: The Blues in 1924 and the Cowboys from 1925-1926. The Blues competed as a traveling team, playing all of their NFL games in other cities' stadia in their only year under that name. LeRoy Andrews acted as the team's player-coach.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    Miami Seahawks

    • Later known as: Baltimore Colts
    • Sport: American football
    The Miami Seahawks were a professional American football team based in Miami, Florida. They played in the All-America Football Conference for one season, 1946, before folding. They are notable as the first major league sports franchise in Miami and the state of Florida's first professional football team. The Seahawks were a charter franchise in the All-America Football Conference, a league that formed in 1946 and competed with the National Football League until folding in 1949. They were coached initially by Jack Meagher and then by Hamp Pool. The team faced a difficult schedule filled with many early road games, and finished the fourteen-game regular season with only three wins. The franchise, which by that time had accrued $350,000 in debt, was confiscated by the AAFC after the end of the season, and its assets were purchased by a group of entrepreneurs who reorganized it as the original incarnation of the Baltimore Colts. Florida would not have another major league-level football team until the American Football League added the Miami Dolphins in 1966. The Miami Seahawks were the last of the original All-America Football Conference teams to be established. They were formed to
    8.33
    3 votes
    48

    Milwaukee Brewers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The 1891 Milwaukee Brewers were an American professional baseball team and a member of the minor league Western Association and Western League and the major league American Association. They were managed by Charlie Cushman and finished their major league stint with a record of 21-15. They played home games at Borchert Field, which was known as Athletic Field or Athletic Park in 1891. Seven of the eight AA clubs completed the 1891 season, but on August 17 the Cincinnati Kelly's Killers dropped out and the Brewers were recruited to finish the season. Afterward, four clubs joined the National League, and the others were left out as the AA folded. The Brewers moved on to the newly re-formed Western League, but lasted just one more season before folding itself.
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    Providence Chiefs

    • Later known as: Providence grays
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Providence Chiefs, sometimes known as the Cranston Chiefs, were a Rhode Island-based minor-league baseball club in the class-B New England League. From 1946-47 the club was known as the Chiefs, and its team logo was a fire chief. In 1948 and 1949 the team was known as the Providence Grays. Providence disbanded on June 20, 1949, in the middle of the New England League's final season. "New England League," page on baseball-reference.com http://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/New_England_League#1946-1949 . "New England League 1946-1949," http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http://www.geocities.com/big_bunko/newengland4649.htm&date=2009-10-25+13:33:35 .
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Chicago Whales

    Chicago Whales

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Chicago Whales were a professional baseball team based in Chicago. They played in the Federal League, a short-lived "third Major League", in 1914 and 1915. They originally lacked a formal nickname, and were known simply as the "Chicago Federals" (or "Chi-Feds") to distinguish them from the Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox. The team was founded by Charles Weeghman. They came in second in the Federal League rankings in 1914 and won the league championship in 1915. They came to an end when the Federal League came to a deal with the National and American Leagues that disbanded all its teams. As a result of the deal owner Weeghman was allowed to purchase a stake in the Chicago Cubs. The Whales are notable as the original occupants of the stadium now known as Wrigley Field, the current home of the Cubs and the only Federal League stadium still in use. Founded by Charles Weeghman, the club finished 1½ games behind the Indianapolis Hoosiers in the inaugural season for the league, during which the team lacked a formal nickname and was known simply as the Chicago Federals . Prior to the start of the season, Weeghman built a stadium for the team, called Weeghman Park, designed by
    6.20
    5 votes
    53

    Los Angeles Buccaneers

    • Sport: American football
    The Los Angeles Buccaneers were a traveling team in the National Football League during their one season 1926, ostensibly representing the city of Los Angeles, California. Like the Los Angeles Wildcats of the first American Football League, the team never actually played a league game in Los Angeles. It was operated out of Chicago with players from California colleges. The historian Michael McCambridge has stated that the Buccaneers originally planned to play in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and became a road team only after the Coliseum Commission banned pro teams from its stadium. However, the difficulty of transcontinental travel in the era before modern air travel must have been a major factor in the decision to base the team in the Midwest, especially considering there were numerous other stadium options available for the league (the Rose Bowl and Wrigley Field of Los Angeles being among them) had the league desired to pursue that route. Despite being rejected by the Coliseum, the Buccaneers did play two true home games in Los Angeles, both of them exhibition games against the AFL's New York Yankees in January 1927. The Buccaneers also played two games in San Francisco,
    6.20
    5 votes
    54

    Racine Legion

    • Later known as: Racine Tornadoes
    • Sport: American football
    The Racine Legion was a professional American football team based in Racine, Wisconsin of the National Football League from 1922 to 1924. Its official name was the Horlick-Racine Legion. The team then operated as the Racine Tornadoes in 1926. In 1915 the Racine Regulars formed Wisconsin's first important semi-pro team. They primarily played against teams from Illinois and Indiana. The team became known as the Racine Battery C in 1916 after many of the players joined the First Wisconsin Reserve Artillery Battery C. Because of World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 the team took a hiatus. It was reorganized in 1919 with sponsorship from the local American Legion post and William Horlick, president of his family's malted milk company. The reorganized team was known as the Horlick-Racine Legion. In 1922, the American Professional Football Association changed its name to the National Football League. Racine, now known simply as the Racine Legion, was one of four new teams admitted to membership that season. Led by fullback-kicker Hank Gillo, who led the league in scoring with 52 points, Racine finished sixth in the 18-team league with a 6-4-1 record. Despite two more
    6.20
    5 votes
    55

    Westchester Indians

    • Later known as: New York Gothams
    The Westchester Indians were an American basketball team based in White Plains, New York that was a member of the American Basketball League. During the 1944/45 season, the team became the New York Gothams on January 20, 1945.
    6.20
    5 votes
    56

    Albany Attack

    • Later known as: San Jose Stealth
    The Albany Attack was the name of a franchise which played in the National Lacrosse League (NLL) from the 2000 season through the 2003 season. The Attack played in the former Pepsi Arena in Albany, New York (now known as the Times Union Center). After the 2003 season, the franchise was sold and moved to San Jose, California and renamed the San Jose Stealth. The 2002 Albany Attack team was the most successful Attack team during the franchise's four years in Albany, NY. It is the only Attack team to have made the NLL playoffs. (Note: The San Jose Stealth made the NLL playoffs in their inaugural season, 2004, as well as the 2007 and 2008 seasons.) The team went 14-2 in the regular season winning the Central Division championship, and went 15-3 overall having lost to the Toronto Rock in the 2002 NLL Champion's Cup Game in Albany. For various reasons, the Albany Attack were plagued by poor attendance most of their existence with average attendances in the 3000–4000 range which was not enough for the franchise to be profitable. On June 14, 2001, Albany Attack owner Herb Chorbajian, a banker with CharterOne Bank, and Albany River Rats owner Walter Robb announced an agreement in which Robb
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Philadelphia Quakers

    • Later known as: Philadelphia Athletics
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Philadelphia Athletics were a short-lived Major League Baseball franchise that existed for two seasons from 1890 to 1891. Known alternatively as the Philadelphia Quakers, and sometimes informally as "Buffinton's Beauties", they played their first season in the newly created Players' League (PL) of 1890, and were managed by Jim Fogarty and Charlie Buffinton. After the demise of the PL following the 1890 season, the team switched to the American Association (AA) for the 1891 season, and were managed by Bill Sharsig and George Wood. For each season, the franchise used Forepaugh Park as their home field. Before the 1890 season, the PL was founded by the first organized professional sports union, the The Brotherhood of Professional Base Ball Players, in an attempt to compete with the existing major leagues, the National League (NL) and the AA. Their intent was to break free from the standard business practices of the two leagues that they claimed stifled players' salaries; such as the reserve clause, and the Brush Classification System, as well as their ability to sell players to another team without the consent of the player. The Quakers were controlled by a group of investors,
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Providence Grays

    Providence Grays

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Providence Grays were a Major League Baseball team based in Providence, Rhode Island who played in the National League from 1878 until 1885. The Grays played at the Messer Street Grounds in the Olneyville neighborhood. The team won the National League title twice, in 1879 and 1884. The team folded after the 1885 season. Rhode Island was a hotbed of baseball in the 1870s with several notable amateur clubs along with Brown University's powerhouse collegiate team. In 1875, the semi-pro "Rhode Islands" were formed. After successful seasons (along with excellent paid attendance) in 1875, 1876, and 1877, the team drew the attention of the recently formed National League. When the League elected to drop the Hartford franchise after the 1877 season, Providence was awarded a franchise to replace the Connecticut club. The new team was officially organized on January 16, 1878 by Benjamin Douglas, who became the team's general manager. Henry Root was hired as the team president‚ and Tom Carey was initially hired to be the on-field captain, whose duties were similar to the modern-day manager. On January 21, 1878, Providence applied for membership in the NL, and was officially approved on
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    Salt Lake City Gulls

    • Later known as: Calgary Cannons
    The Salt Lake City Gulls were a former minor league professional baseball team in the Pacific Coast League, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Gulls were the Triple-A (AAA) affiliate of the California Angels from 1975 to 1981, and of the Seattle Mariners from 1982 to 1984. While with the Angels, the Gulls won the PCL title in 1979. Before being renamed the Gulls for 1975, the team was known as the Salt Lake City Angels for four seasons (1971–74), and won the league title in 1971. Following the 1984 season, the franchise was moved to Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and became the Calgary Cannons in 1985. During the 1981 season, KMPC (the original at 710AM which is now KSPN, not the current station at 1540AM) broadcast most of the Gulls' games that were held during the major league players' strike. Bob Starr called the play-by-play. Some notable players from the Salt Lake City Gulls:
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Pottsville Maroons

    Pottsville Maroons

    • Later known as: Boston Bulldogs
    • Sport: American football
    The Pottsville Maroons were an American football team based in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1920, they went on to play in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons, from 1925–1928. In 1929 they relocated to Boston, where they played one season as the Boston Bulldogs. Originally known as the Pottsville Eleven, the team was initially an independent team playing in the local eastern Pennsylvania circuit. Home games were played at Minersville Park, a high school stadium in nearby Minersville. They joined the local Anthracite League in 1924, the same year they adopted the "Maroons" nickname, and clinched the league title. The next season they joined the NFL under owner John G. Streigel. Though dominant on the field, a controversial suspension cost them the 1925 NFL Championship. They were reinstated the following year, but after two successive losing seasons in 1927 and 1928, Streigel sold the Maroons to a group in Boston, where they played one season before folding. 1925 was their best season. The 1928 roster included three future Pro Football Hall of Fame members - Johnny "Blood" McNally, Walt Kiesling, and coach Wilbur "Pete" Henry - but posted the worst record in
    6.00
    5 votes
    61

    Boston Americans

    • Later known as: Boston Red Sox
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Boston Americans entered the American League in 1901, and eventually became the Boston Red Sox. (1907) Though primarily known by that nickname, they were also occasionally called the Boston Somersets and later the Boston Pilgrims. All nicknames prior to 1908 were inventions of the headline writers and were in no way official. The Boston Americans won the first ever World Series in 1903, beating the Pittsburgh Pirates 5 games to 3. The Americans were managed by Hall of Fame third baseman Jimmy Collins, and they finished second in the new American League with a record of 79-57. They played their home games at the Huntington Avenue Grounds.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62

    Buffalo Bills

    • Sport: American football
    The Buffalo Bills was an American Football team, based in Buffalo, NY, that played in the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1949. During its first season in 1946, the team was known as the Buffalo Bisons. Unlike the Cleveland Browns, San Francisco 49ers, and Baltimore Colts, the franchise was not one of the three AAFC teams that merged with the National Football League prior to the 1950 season. The team is named after a popular barbershop quartet , whose name was a play on the name of the famed Wild West showman Buffalo Bill Cody. The team was the successor to the Buffalo Tigers/Indians team from the 1940 American Football League; that league had folded as a result of World War II. The franchise is not officially related, other than in name, to the current NFL franchise, the Buffalo Bills, that began play in 1960 in the American Football League. There was some controversy over Buffalo's exclusion from the enlarged NFL. Buffalo had experienced more success on the field and at the gate than Baltimore, and the original three-team plan would have left the league with 13 teams, not only a odd number, but also one considered to be bad luck. The move had left Buffalo as the
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    Oorang Indians

    • Sport: American football
    The Oorang Indians were a traveling team in the National Football League from LaRue, Ohio (near Marion). The franchise was a novelty team put together by Walter Lingo to market his Oorang dog kennels. All of the Indians players were Native American, with Jim Thorpe serving as its leading player and coach. The team played in the National Football League in 1922 and 1923. Of the 20 games they played over two seasons, only one was played at "home" in nearby Marion. With a population well under a thousand people, LaRue remains the smallest town ever to have been the home of an NFL franchise, or probably any professional team in any league in the United States. In 1919 Oorang Kennel owner, Walter Lingo, met and became friends with Jim Thorpe of the Canton Bulldogs, a future Pro Football Hall of Famer who was considered the greatest athlete of his time. Lingo had had a deep passion for the Airedales, for which he raised, and Native-American culture. LaRue, Ohio was once the site of an old Wyandot village and Lingo believed that a supernatural bond existed between the Indians and the Airedales. Thorpe first came to Lingo's defense after neighboring farmers accused the Lingo's Oorang
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    6.75
    4 votes
    65

    Brooklyn Dodgers

    The Brooklyn Dodgers were an American basketball team based in Brooklyn, New York that was a member of the Eastern Basketball Association.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    Iowa Barnstormers

    • Later known as: New York Dragons
    • Sport: Arena football
    This topic is for the original Iowa Barnstormers franchise who went on to become the New York Dragons, not the current af2 Iowa Barnstormers.
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    St. Louis Brown Stockings

    St. Louis Brown Stockings

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Louis Brown Stockings were a professional baseball club based in St. Louis, Missouri from 1875 to 1877. Joining the National Association (NA) in the final season of that league, the Brown Stockings were the first team to represent St. Louis in a professional baseball association (Spink 1911). The original Brown Stockings, or Browns (different from the St. Louis Browns or future Orioles), were a charter member of the National League in 1876 and completed the first two NL seasons. Like the White Stockings in Chicago (est. 1870), the Brown Stockings in St. Louis (est. 1875) adopted uniforms and acquired a nickname by descent with variation from the famous Red Stockings of Cincinnati (est. 1869), the first professional baseball team, which garnered much public interest due to an undefeated streak during a barnstorming tour in 1869-1870. The Brown Stockings played their games at Grand Avenue Grounds, which later would be the site of Sportsman's Park. Brown Stocking George Bradley pitched the very first no-hitter in major league history, on July 15, 1876. The Brown Stockings slipped to 28-32 in 1877 after going 45-19 and finishing third in 1876. The team signed stars Jim Devlin
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Boston Reds

    Boston Reds

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Boston Reds were a 19th century baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts that played in the Players' League in 1890 and in the American Association in 1891. They played in the Congress Street Grounds in the 1890s. The team took its name from the successful Boston club of the National Association and National League formerly known as the (Boston) Red Stockings, who had changed their name to the Beaneaters in 1883. The club lasted only two seasons, but in those two seasons they were league champions. In 1890 the Reds won the Players' League pennant when they finished first ahead of the New York Giants, and then won the American Association pennant when they finished first ahead of the St. Louis Browns (now the Cardinals). The Boston Reds are one of two major league teams to win back-to-back pennants spanning two different leagues. The Brooklyn Dodgers did it also, winning the AA pennant in 1889 and the NL pennant in 1890. At the conclusion of the 1891 season, the National League pressed for the consolidation of the American Association with the National League. Part of the posturing included the National League directing its champion Boston Beaneaters not to play the Reds
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    Nyköpings BIS

    • Later known as: Nyköpings Hockey
    Nyköpings BIS is a Swedish football club located in Nyköping. Since their foundation in 1966 Nyköpings BIS has participated mainly in the middle divisions of the Swedish football league system in particular Divisions 2 and 3. In the period 1971 until 1980 and again in 1984 Nyköpings BIS played in Division 2 which at that time was the second tier of Swedish football. The club currently plays in Division 2 Södra Svealand (Swedish football). They play their home matches at the Rosvalla IP in Nyköping. The club is affiliated to the Södermanlands Fotbollförbund.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    7.67
    3 votes
    73

    York White Roses

    • Later known as: York Pirates
    • Sport: Baseball
    The York White Roses was the name of a minor league baseball team in the city of York, Pennsylvania, USA, that existed from 1894–1969. The York White Roses began as members of the short-lived Keystone Association in 1884. The league disbanded after only 20 games. The White Roses transferred to the Eastern League after the Harrisburg Olympics folded. The team remained in the Eastern League until the 1893 season when York joined the Pennsylvania State League. York joined the Tri-State League as the York Penn Parks in 1904. The name was quickly changed back to White Roses for the 1905 season. The 1906 season was full of controversy when the rival Lancaster Maroons changed their name to the Red Roses. George Heckert, White Roses manager, publicly denounced Lancaster's team and predicted that Lancaster would end the season in last place after it unveiled new jerseys and a new name days before the season opener against York. Yorkers viewed the change as a copycat maneuver since York had called itself the White Roses since 1884. The Red Roses went on to win the first game, 9–4, and an even heavier rivalry began. Some sources indicate that the rival teams were named for the opposing
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Edmonton Oil Kings

    • Later known as: Portland Winter Hawks
    • Sport: Ice Hockey
    This article refers to the original Oil Kings franchises that existed until 1978. For the current team that began play in 2007, see Edmonton Oil Kings The Edmonton Oil Kings were a junior ice hockey team, and founding member of the Western Hockey League. They played at the Edmonton Gardens in Edmonton, Alberta, and later the Northlands Coliseum. In 1976 they moved to Portland, Oregon to become the Portland Winter Hawks. A second incarnation of the team played only one season in 1977–78 before moving to Great Falls, Montana. The Edmonton Oil Kings have a history that predates the founding of the Western Hockey League. They won the Memorial Cup in 1963 and 1966 as members of the senior men's Central Alberta Hockey League. The team was required to defeat the Alberta Junior Hockey League champion to earn the right to play for the national junior championship. They were also cup finalists seven different years between 1954 and 1971. In 1966, Bill Hunter, the team's General Manager, was concerned about the state of junior hockey in western Canada. Each of the west's four provinces all had their own junior league, and Hunter felt that this put them at a disadvantage when competing
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    FC Anzhi-Bekenez Makhachkala

    FC Anzhi-Bekenez Makhachkala (Russian: «Анжи‑Бекенез» (Махачкала)) was a Russian football team from Makhachkala. It played professionally from 1995 to 1997. It was founded when FC Argo Kaspiysk team moved to Makhachkala in 1995. Their best result was 3rd place in Zone 1 of the Russian Third League in 1995. They were the farm club of FC Anzhi Makhachkala.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Lotte Orions

    • Later known as: Chiba Lotte Marines
    • Sport: Baseball
    Lotte Orions is the former name of Japanese baseball team Chiba Lotte Marines from 1969 to 1991.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Rock Island Independents

    Rock Island Independents

    • Sport: American football
    The Rock Island Independents were a professional American football team based in Rock Island, Illinois. One of the first professional football teams, they were founded in 1907 as an independent club. They later played in what is now the National Football League from 1920 to 1925. They joined the first American Football League in 1926, but folded in 1927. They played in Douglas Park and Browning Field. Walter Flanigan owned the team from 1915 to 1923; Dale Johnson took over and owned the team until 1926, when the team eventually folded. Their best finish in the National Football League standings was fifth, which they accomplished three times: in 1921 and 1922 under Jimmy Conzelman, and in 1924 under Johnny Armstrong. The Independents were first formed in 1907, when a group of men formed an Independent team with no Athletic Club affiliation, no Social Club ties and no Corporate Company backing or sponsorship. As a result the team was named the Independents. The team went undefeated and unscored upon in five games. Many of the same players from that 1910 reunited in 1912, under the leadership of John Roche, they won eight games without giving up a score. In 1913 Walter Flanigan joined
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    St. Joe Blacksnakes

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Joe Blacksnakes, in Saint Joseph, Missouri, were a member of the American Association of Independent Professional Baseball. On December 16, 2005 the team announced that the primary owner would be Van Schley and that the field manager would be Chris Carminucci. On December 27, St. Joe acquired its first player — outfielder Jake Whitesides from New Jersey. On Tuesday January 10th, pitchers Josh Jarman and Jason Navarro and infielder Josh Shaffer, all of whom played in the Golden Baseball League during the 2005 season, were added to the team. The team announced its name and logo on February 10, 2006, becoming the Blacksnakes. St. Joseph played its first home game against the Sioux Falls Canaries on May 19, 2006, at Phil Welch Stadium. The Blacksnakes played in the Northern Division both years. They finished third in each half of the 2006 season with a 26-22 record in the first half and 23-24 in the second half, for an overall record of 49-46 (.516) for the season. Attendance in that inaugural season was 59,107, for an average of 1,180. The team's manager in that first season was Chris Carminucci. "Dirty" Al Gallagher was signed to manage the team for the 2007 season. The
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Staten Island Stapletons

    • Sport: American football
    The Staten Island Stapletons also known as the Staten Island Stapes were a professional American football team founded in 1915 that played in the National Football League from 1929 to 1930. The team was based in the Stapleton section of Staten Island. Under the shortened nickname the "Stapes" they played an additional two seasons from 1931 to 1932. Jack Shapiro, who was a blocking back for the Stapletons, was the shortest player in NFL history. The team was based in Staten Island, New York. The Staten Island Stapletons were originally founded in 1915 as a neighborhood team. The team was organized by Dan Blaine, who also served as the team's halfback. Blaine later became rich by building up a chain of restaurants. The Stapletons played similar semi-pro neighborhood teams from the New York City area. During those early years the Stapes played more for fun than money. Crowds were small and player salaries averaged $10 per game. The team won several local semi-pro titles before World War I. The team was inactive in 1918, due to Blaine's service commitment to the military and involvement in the war. However the team was renewed in 1919. By that time, Blaine was the team's sole owner. He
    10.00
    1 votes
    82

    Toledo Blue Stockings

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Toledo Blue Stockings formed as a minor league baseball team in Toledo, Ohio in 1883. They won the Northwestern League championship in 1883. Their home ballpark was League Park. The following year, they joined the major league American Association. That year, they finished 8th with a 46-58 record. The team returned to the minors the next year and disbanded after the 1885 season. Historically, the team is best known for being the only major league team with black players (Moses Fleetwood Walker and his brother, Welday Walker) prior to Jackie Robinson's appearance with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Washington Senators

    Washington Senators

    • Later known as: Texas Rangers
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Washington Senators were an American League professional baseball team that played from 1961 to 1971 and then became the Texas Rangers.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84

    Washington Senators

    • Sport: American football
    Washington Senators, also referred to as the Washington Pros or Washington Presidents, was a professional football club from Washington, D.C.. The team played in the American Professional Football Association (now the National Football League) during the 1921 season, and continued to operate as a football club until 1941. The Senators played and practiced at American League Park. The Senators were formed specifically for the 1921 APFA season. Officials from the Washington Professional Football Club met at the Arlington Hotel on May 19, 1921 to finalize plans for the team, then referred to as the Washington Pros. Tim Jordan was appointed the team's business manager, and the squad was coached by former Georgetown star Jack Hegarty. The Senators would play a full 11-game schedule, however only four of those games would be against other APFA squads. The featured Benny Boynton who would be involved in all three Senator touchdowns that were scored in APFA contests, throwing for two and running in the third. The Senators began their 1921 campaign with a 33-0 win over the Wilmington Collegians. Led by quarterback Bullets Watson, the victory featured touchdowns by Jack Sullivan, Watson and
    10.00
    1 votes
    85

    Brooklyn Dodgers

    • Sport: American football
    The Brooklyn Dodgers was an American Football team that played in the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1948. The team is unrelated to the Brooklyn Dodgers that played in the National Football League from 1930 to 1943. The team folded prior to the 1949 season and was merged with the New York Yankees to form the Brooklyn-New York Yankees. Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties
    6.50
    4 votes
    86

    Chicago Tigers

    • Sport: American football
    The Chicago Tigers of the American Professional Football Association (now the NFL) played only in the first year of the league (1920) and, because of this, have the distinction of being the first NFL team to fold. They had a record of 2 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie. The team played its home games at Chicago's Wrigley Field (then called Cubs Park) and was the first NFL team to do so. The Tigers were never formally members of the APFA. However, since the team played seven games against APFA teams in 1920, resulting in a 1-5-1 league record, they're generally included in the league standings. According to Emil Klosiinkski in the book, Pro Football in the Days of Rockne, the Tigers' main offensive weapon was their passing game. This is specifically referred to the passes thrown by Johnny Barrett and Milt Ghee to Jack Meagher and Oscar Knop. On October 24, 1920, the Decatur Staleys (renamed the Chicago Bears in 1922) played a game against the Tigers at Cubs Park and billed it as "the season's most professional game" that would also determine the "pro title". Many Decatur games, at the time, were billed as championships in an attempt to lure crowds. The Staleys defeated the Tigers 10-0. In
    6.50
    4 votes
    87

    Indianapolis Hoosiers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Indianapolis Hoosiers were an American Association baseball team for one season. (1884) Their home games were played at Seventh Street Park in Indianapolis. They won 29 and lost 78 for a winning percentage of .271, and finished 46 games behind the first-place New York Metropolitans.
    6.50
    4 votes
    88

    East Germany men's national volleyball team

    • Later known as: Germany men's national volleyball team
    • Sport: Volleyball
    The East Germany men's national volleyball team was from 1949 to 1990 the men's Volleyball team of the German Democratic Republic. After German reunification in October 3, 1990, they ceased to exist.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Los Angeles Wildcats

    Los Angeles Wildcats

    • Sport: American football
    The Los Angeles Wildcats (also reported in various media as Pacific Coast Wildcats, Los Angeles Wilson Wildcats and Wilson’s Wildcats) was a traveling team of the first American Football League that was not based in its nominal home city but in Chicago, Illinois (it trained in Rock Island). Coached by Jim Clark, the team was designed to be a showcase for University of Washington star back George “Wildcat” Wilson. Compared to most traveling teams in professional football, the Wildcats were successful, compiling a 6-6-2 record in the only season of the team’s – and the league’s – existence. The existence of the Wildcats began with the 1926 formation of the American Football League by C. C. Pyle, a sports agent who represented star back Red Grange. Pyle’s application for a National Football League franchise in New York was rejected as Tim Mara, owner of the New York Giants objected to Pyle proposed intrusion into the Giants’ territory. Armed with a five-year lease at Yankee Stadium, Pyle subsequently announced the formation of the American Football League as a showcase for his client. The league was also a showcase for another Pyle client who was an All-American on the West Coast:
    8.50
    2 votes
    92

    St. Paul White Caps

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Paul Saints, also known as the Apostles or the White Caps, were a replacement Major League Baseball team that represented St. Paul, Minnesota in the short-lived Union Association, which existed for the 1884 season only. The team began the 1884 season in the Northwestern League as the Apostles. In September of that year, after compiling a 24-48 record, the team jumped to the Union Association along with the Milwaukee Brewers. The club finished its short stint in the Association with a 2-6-1 record in nine road games, earning the distinction of being the only major league team not to play a single home game. The team was managed by Andrew Thompson. They played their home games at Fort Street Grounds. Their top-hitting regular was pitcher/outfielder Jim Brown, who had five hits in 16 at bats, for a batting average of .312, hit four doubles, and a slugging percentage of .562. The team also included Charlie Ganzel, their catcher, who went on to play in 786 games in a 14 season career, most notably with the Detroit Wolverines and the Boston Beaneaters.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    Evansville Crimson Giants

    • Sport: American football
    The Evansville Crimson Giants were a professional American football team based in Evansville, Indiana and were a part of the National Football League in 1921 and 1922. The Giants home games were played at Bosse Field. According to the Evansville Courier and Press in 1921, 'they surprised local fans in developing a winning team' and 'the Giants' one-sided victories over inferior non-league teams has had good fan reaction.' However the team did not succeed mostly due to scheduling mistakes, and management problems. Evansville's local sporting enthusiasts also failed to respond favorably and attend the home games. The Crimson Giants history is rooted in Evansville's first significant semi-pro team, the Evansville Ex-Collegians, who began play in 1920. The Ex-Collegians played and followed the typical semi-professional template of the era. The team employed mostly local players almost exclusively. They paid those players a small sum based on gate receipts and on a game-by-game basis. The team also operated without any real management oversight, meaning that the players looked after the team's finances, and scheduled games haphazardly. In 1920, group of local businessmen tried to
    7.33
    3 votes
    94

    Nankai Hawks

    • Later known as: Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks
    • Sport: Baseball
    Japan Series Titles: 2 (1959, 1964) Pacific League Pennants: 10 (1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1973) - also won the one-league format in 1946 and 1948 Franchise Players: Katsuya Nomura, Mutsuo Minagawa, Hiromitsu Kadota, Chusuke Kizuka, Kohei Sugiyama The were the top team in the first twenty years of the Pacific League, but fell on hard times and finished in the second division every year from 1978 to 1988, at which point the team was sold to the Daiei corporation to become the Daiei Hawks. They begun to rebound after that and re-established themselves as one of the top Pacific League teams in the late 1990s. *
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Newark Bears

    • Sport: American football
    The Newark Bears were a professional American football team that competed in the first American Football League in 1926. Owned by the New Jersey Athletic Association (headed by NJAA president William Coughlin), the Bears played their home games in Davids' Stadium. Coached by player-coach Hal Hansen, the majority of the team played their college football in Georgia and Florida. Tailback Doug Wycoff scored the club’s only points in its existence, having a touchdown run and kicking the extra point to tie the Chicago Bulls in both teams’ opening game of the season. While the Bears’ defense was respectable (yielding only five points per game), the lack of offensive production resulted in a record of no wins, three losses, and two ties. While the Bears played in front of (an announced total of) 40,000 spectators in Philadelphia (a 9-0 loss to the Quakers on October 16), the total attendance for three home games in Newark was less than 5000. After only 400 fans attended a scoreless game (with the Rock Island Independents) in Davids’ Stadium on October 24, 1926, the Bears withdrew from the AFL… the first team to call it quits in the American Football League. The exodus from the league
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    New York Mutuals

    New York Mutuals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Mutual Base Ball Club of New York was a leading American baseball club almost throughout its 20-year history. It was established during 1857, the year of the first baseball convention, just too late to be a founding member of the National Association of Base Ball Players. It was a charter member of both the first professional league in 1871 and the National League in 1876. Failing on the field and in the coffer, it declined to make its last western trip of the inaugural season. For the transgression it was expelled in December, and soon found itself defunct. The Mutual club initially played its home games at Elysian Fields in Hoboken, with the New York Knickerbockers and many other Manhattan clubs, but moved to the enclosed Union Grounds in Brooklyn in 1868. The Mutuals chose open professionalism in 1869–70 after NABBP liberalization. They joined the first professional league, the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, for its 1871 to 1875 duration. In 1876, the Chicago White Stockings initiated the National League and recruited its members from West to East, partly to wrest control of professional baseball from Eastern interests. The Mutuals were one of eight
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Akron Pros

    Akron Pros

    • Later known as: Akron Indians
    • Sport: American football
    The Akron Pros were a professional football team located played in Akron, Ohio from 1908–1926. The team originated in 1908 as a semi-pro team named the Akron Indians, however name was changed to the Pros in 1920 as the team set out to become a charter member of the American Professional Football Association Fritz Pollard, the first African-American head coach in the NFL, co-coached the Pros in 1921. Paul Robeson played for the team in 1921 as well. He was among the earliest stars of professional football, before it became segregated from 1934 to 1946. In 1926, the name was changed back to the Akron Indians, after the earlier semi-pro teams. Due to financial problems, the team suspended operations in 1927 and surrendered its franchise the following year. Prior to 1908, several semi-pro and amateur teams dominated the Akron football scene. The most dominant of these was a team known as the Akron East Ends. The East Ends' dominance of Ohio football went unmatched until the Massillon Tigers paid several ringers from the recently defunct Pittsburgh Stars to defeat the East Ends in 1903. The Akron Indians date as far back as 1908. The early Indians teams went on to win Ohio League
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Brooklyn Dodgers

    Brooklyn Dodgers

    • Later known as: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Brooklyn Dodgers were an American baseball team based in Brooklyn, New York, playing in the National League from 1890 until 1957. The team was first known as the Brooklyn Bridegrooms (due to seven members of the team having been married shortly before the formation of the ballclub) and later the Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (due to Brooklyn's complex system of trolley trains at that time) before being shortened to the Brooklyn Dodgers. From 1913, the team was based at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn's Flatbush section. The Brooklyn Dodgers won 12 National League pennants and one World Series, in 1955. In 1958, the team moved to Los Angeles, California, becoming the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Brooklyn Dodgers was also the name of three separate american football teams existing variously between the 1930s and the 1960s; additionally, it was the name of a short-lived team in the Eastern Basketball Association during the 1977-78 season.
    8.00
    2 votes
    102

    Cincinnati Celts

    • Sport: American football
    The Cincinnati Celts (pronounced with a hard C) was the first professional football team to play in Cincinnati, Ohio. The team played in the unofficial "Ohio League" and the American Professional Football Association (renamed the National Football League in 1922). The Celts were a traveling team, playing all of their APFA games in other cities' stadia. In its only season in the APFA, 1921, the team had a record of 1-3. For the entire span of the team's existence, the Celts were coached by Mel Doherty, who was also the team's center. The Celts were established in 1910 as a semi-pro team made up primarily of players from Miami University in nearby Oxford, Ohio. During the first 10 years of their existence, the team flourished playing numerous semi-pro teams from Ohio. An early member of squad, George Roudebush, referred to the team as being run “by a bunch of wild Irishmen”. In 1914 Lou Partlow played for the Celts. Probably the greatest moment in the team's early existence came against a team from Pine Village, Indiana, in 1916. While Pine Village consisted of only 300 residents, it was the top team in Indiana before World War I, compiling a record of undefeated for 13 seasons. In
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Cincinnati Kelly's Killers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Kelly's Killers were a Major League baseball team that played in Cincinnati, Ohio during the 1891 baseball season. The team played in the American Association, which was a major league from 1882 to 1891. By contemporary newspaper accounts, the club was mainly referred to as the Cincinnati Reds, the same name as their cross-town rivals in the National League. This in addition to variants on the informal name "Kelly's Killers". It is the latter name, however, by which they are more broadly known today. The Cincinnati Kelly's Killers were a response by the American Association to fill the void that the Cincinnati Reds had left when the club vacated the league after the 1889 season and again before the 1891 season. The Reds played in the National League for the 1890 season but was losing money and facing bankruptcy. Reds' ownership sold the club to Players League investor Albert Johnson. Johnson then withdrew his newly acquired Reds club and moved them to the Players League for the 1891 season. After the Players League collapsed, Johnson then committed the Reds to the American Association. Meanwhile the National League placed a new franchise in Cincinnati which was to be owned by
    8.00
    2 votes
    104

    Cincinnati Outlaw Reds

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Cincinnati Outlaw Reds of 1884, also called the Cincinnati Unions, were a member of the short-lived Union Association. One of the league's best teams, they finished third with a record of 69-36. The team was owned by former Cincinnati Red Stockings owner Justus Thorner and John McLean, and played at the Red Stockings' old ballpark, the Bank Street Grounds. They were managed first by outfielder "Hustling Dan" O'Leary (20-15), then by second baseman Sam Crane (49-21). Their top-hitting regular was outfielder/pitcher Dick Burns, who batted .306 with 4 home runs. The Outlaw Reds had three pitchers with outstanding records: Jim McCormick (21-3, 1.54), George Bradley (25-15, 2.71), and Burns (23-15, 2.46). On August 26, 1884, Burns threw a no-hitter against the Kansas City Cowboys and was the first ever hurled by a major league ballplayer of a Cincinnati club. External links
    8.00
    2 votes
    105

    Hankyu Braves

    • Later known as: Orix Blue Wave
    • Sport: Baseball
    Hankyu Braves is the former name of Japanese baseball team Orix Blue Wave from 1947 to 1988.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    Milwaukee Grays

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Milwaukee Grays were a short-lived baseball team that spent one year, 1878, in the National League. The team was part of the League Alliance, loosely affiliated with the National League, in 1877. It won 19 games and lost 13 (including a 10-7 loss to the Chicago White Stockings of the NL), ending up in fourth place. "The team's sharp style and strong hometown support won them a National League berth in 1878." They won 15 games and lost 45 in 1878, finishing sixth and last in the league. Their home games were played at Eclipse Park II. The Grays were managed by former major league right fielder Jack Chapman, whose nickname was "Death to Flying Things." Their best hitter was left fielder Abner Dalrymple, who led the team in batting average (.354), slugging percentage (.421), runs (52), and doubles (10). Their top pitcher was Sam Weaver, who was only 12-31 but had the fourth-best ERA in the league, a very low 1.95. The club is remembered in the name of a vintage base ball club. Along with the Milwaukee Cream Citys, the Grays are dedicated to preserving and presenting the rich history of organized baseball in Milwaukee. Current players wear replica uniforms based upon the original
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Pittsburgh Rebels

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Pittsburgh Rebels were a professional baseball club based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The team was a member of the short-lived Federal League, which was a minor league in 1913 but a full-fledged outlaw major league the next two years. The team was originally called the Pittsburgh Filipinos after their manager, Deacon Phillippe, and began play in 1912 in the United States Baseball League. The team then moved to the new Federal League in 1913 and, for a short time, was later renamed the Pittsburgh Stogies after an earlier Pittsburgh team that played in the Union Association in 1884. They finished the year as the Pittsburgh Rebels. The team played all of its home games at Exposition Park, located on Pittsburgh's Northside. The Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League left the stadium for Forbes Field in 1909. After the Rebels left Exposition Park in 1915, the field was demolished and its property became part of the rail yards. In 1912, a Pittsburgh-based team was established and began play in the outlaw United States Baseball League. The team was known as the Pittsburgh Filipinos in honor of their manager, Deacon Phillippe, a former pitcher with the Pittsburgh Pirates and a
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Stratford Nationals

    • Later known as: Mississauga Twins
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Stratford Nationals were an independent, minor league baseball team of the, semi-pro, Intercounty Baseball League based in Stratford, Ontario. They played their home games at National Stadium. The team was moved from St. Thomas, Ontario, to Stratford in 2004 after several years of dwindling fan support in St. Thomas. On November 25, 2008, the team announced that the league had approved the sale of the Stratford Nationals to Elliott Kerr, president of the Landmark Sports Group, and the transfer of the franchise to the City of Mississauga. Prior to its re-location, the team changed its name from the Storm to the Nationals for the 2006 season, in view of the Canadian National Railway's historical importance to Stratford. The Nationals struggled in their final seasons, missing the playoffs regularly. For many years, however, Stratford was a premier franchise in the Intercounty League and also one of its founding members in 1919 (along with Galt, Guelph and Kitchener), operating at various times as the Stratford Nationals, the Stratford Kraven Knits and Stratford Hillers. Derrick Franklin hit the first RBI for the nationals as a new team in 2006. Intercounty League The Stratford
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Washington Nationals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Washington Nationals of 1884 were a short-lived baseball team in the American Association. They won 12 games and lost 51. Their home games were played at Athletic Park in Washington, D.C. They are also known as the Washington Statesmen. The Nationals were managed for all but one game by former player Holly Hollingshead. John Bickerton managed their final game on August 2, 1884, a loss to the New York Metropolitans. Their top hitter was shortstop Frank Fennelly, who went 75-for-257, a batting average of .292. By far their best pitcher was Bob Barr, who was 9-23 with an ERA of 3.46. This team should not be confused with the other 1884 Washington Nationals franchise, a different team which played in the Union Association during its only year of operation. In 1891 the AA had another team in Washington, that moved to the National League in 1892.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Albuquerque Dukes

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Albuquerque Dukes were a minor league baseball team based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The first Dukes team was formed in 1915 as part of the Class-D Rio Grande Association. The team finished in third place with a 32-25 record. Frank Huelman was the league leader in home runs, hitting 10 dingers for the season. These Dukes folded that same year. Albuquerque was host to two other Class-D minor-league teams (the Dons and the Cardinals, the latter for which Tingley Field was built) before the Dukes returned in 1942, this time with the Class-D West Texas-New Mexico League. The Dukes went 24-30, but withdrew from competition in June of that year. The league was silent from 1943 to 1945 due to World War II, but play resumed in 1946 with the Dukes returning to the league, which was reclassified as Class-C. In 1955 the West Texas-New Mexico League stepped up one more level, to Class-B. In 1956 the Dukes began play in the Class-A Western League as an affiliate of the New York Giants (now San Francisco). In 1958 they switched to being the Cincinnati Reds affiliate, but the Western League folded at the end of the season. The Dukes returned to Albuquerque in 1960, playing as an
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Alcyon

    Alcyon is a former French professional cycling team that was active from 1906 to 1955. It was owned by Alcyon, a French bicycle, automobile and motorcycle manufacturer. The team won the Tour de France four times before World War I with François Faber in 1909, Octave Lapize in 1910, Gustave Garrigou in 1911 and Odile Defraye in 1912. Alcyon won the team prize at the Tour de France from 1909 to 1912 and then from 1927 to 1929. Immediately after the First World War, Alcyon like many other bicycle companies joined a Consortium that employed many riders under the La Sportive name. This consortium would win the Tour de France from 1919 to 1921. The Consortium stopped in 1922 and the member companies which included Automoto, Peugeot and Alcyon re-started up their separate cycling teams. Alcyon grew into a very strong team that dominated the Tour de France with three wins in with Nicolas Frantz in 1927 and in 1928 and Maurice De Waele in 1929. Alcyon dominated the Tour de France during the 1920s. In the 1929 edition, Maurice Dewaele won the race despite the fact that he was sick when the race went through the Alps. This was because no one attacked the Alcyon rider there. The organisers of
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Baltimore Orioles

    Baltimore Orioles

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Baltimore Orioles were a 19th-century American Association and National League team from 1882 to 1899. The club, which featured numerous future Hall of Famers, finished in first place three consecutive years (1894–1896) and won the Temple Cup championship in 1896 and 1897. Despite their success, the Orioles were contracted out of the league after the 1899 season. The team was founded in 1882 as a charter member of the American Association, which was then a major league. After several years of mediocrity, the team dropped out of the league in 1889, but re-joined in 1890 to replace the last-place Brooklyn Gladiators club which had dropped out during the season. After the Association folded, the Orioles joined the National League in 1892. The beginnings of what was to become a legendary team can be traced to June 1892, when Harry Von der Horst hired Ned Hanlon to manage the Orioles, giving him stock in the team and full authority over baseball operations. Ned moved his growing family to a house that stood a block away from Union Park. After two years finishing near the bottom of the league, the Orioles won three consecutive pennants with several future Hall of Famers under
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Dayton Triangles

    • Sport: American football
    The Dayton Triangles were an original franchise of the American Professional Football Association (now the National Football League) in 1920. The Triangles were based in Dayton, Ohio, and took their nickname from their home field, Triangle Park, which was located at the confluence of the Great Miami and Stillwater Rivers in north Dayton. They were the longest-lasting traveling team in the NFL (1920–1929), and the last such "road team" until the Dallas Texans in 1952, who, coincidentally, descended from the Dayton franchise. The original Dayton Triangles members first began playing together as basketball players at St. Mary's College, now the University of Dayton, from 1908 until 1912. After graduation, the players organized a basketball team of alumni, students, and other local athletes. They went by the name of the St. Mary's Cadets. The Cadets claimed the title of "World Basketball Champions" by defeating the Buffalo German Ramblers In the fall of 1913, the St. Marys Cadets organized a football team. The team was coached by Louis Clark, who coached the St. Mary's college football team as well. Al Mahrt was elected team captain. The team finished their first season with a 7–0
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Duluth Kelleys

    • Later known as: Duluth Eskimos
    • Sport: American football
    Duluth, Minnesota, hosted a professional football team called the Kelleys (officially the Kelley Duluths after the Kelley-Duluth Hardware Store) from 1923 to 1925 and the Eskimos (officially Ernie Nevers' Eskimos after their star player) from 1926 to 1927 in the National Football League. After being a traveling team during most of their time as the Eskimos, they withdrew from the league after the 1927 season. The Kelleys, residing in the northernmost city in the NFL at the time, had the disadvantage of not being able to play at home during late November and early December, due to the harsh winters in northern Minnesota. This meant that Duluth either played unusually short seasons (they played only 16 games in three years as the Kelleys—seven in 1923, six in 1924 and three in 1925) or had to play on the road (as the Eskimos did, which allowed them to have much longer schedules). Duluth's best season came in 1924, when the Kelleys went 5–1. Under modern NFL tiebreaking procedures, the Kelleys would have won a share of the NFL title with the league champion Cleveland Bulldogs. (Assuming the league would have implemented a tiebreaker, it would be assumed Cleveland would have been given
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Fukuoka Daiei Hawks

    • Later known as: Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks
    • Sport: Baseball
    Fukuoka Daiei Hawks is the former name of Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks from 1989 to 2004.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    New York Giants

    • Later known as: San Francisco Giants
    • Sport: Baseball
    The New York Giants played under that name from 1885 to 1957.  The Giants were originally the New York Gothams (founded in 1883 by John B. Day and Jim Mutrie).  Their home stadium was the original Polo Grounds and its successors.  The New York Giants ceased to be after the 1957 when the Team moved west and became the San Francisco Giants.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Providence Steam Roller

    • Sport: American football
    The Providence Steam Roller (also referred to as the Providence Steam Rollers, the Providence Steamroller and the Providence Steamrollers) was a professional American football team based in Providence, Rhode Island in the National Football League from 1925 to 1931. Providence was the first New England team to win an NFL championship. The Steam Roller won the league's championship in 1928. They are the last team to win a championship and no longer be in the league. Most of their home games were played in a 10,000-seat stadium that was built for bicycle races called the Cycledrome. The Steam Roller was established in 1916 by members of the Providence Journal; sports-editor Charles Coppen and part-time sports-writer Pearce Johnson. Three men shared in the ownership and management of the team: Coppen, James Dooley, and Peter Laudati. Meanwhile Johnson stayed on as the team's manager for each year of its existence. The team soon became a regional power and by the mid-1920s was known as the best independent team in the country. By 1919 the team was drawing in more spectators than Brown University by a margin of 2-1, due to newspaper reports at the time. However it seemed unlikely since
    9.00
    1 votes
    121

    Cincinnati Reds

    • Sport: American football
    The Cincinnati Reds were a National Football League team that played the 1933 season and the first eight games of the 1934 season. The football Reds played most of their home games at Crosley Field. Other home games were played at Dayton's Triangle Park, Portsmouth's Universal Stadium and Xavier University's Corcoran Stadium in a rare night game against the Chicago Cardinals. The team was eventually suspended for failure to pay league dues during the 1934 season and the St. Louis Gunners, an independent team, replaced the Reds on the schedule for the last three games. The Reds hold the dubious distinction of having the two lowest officially recognized season scoring totals in NFL history. In 1933 they scored 38 points in 10 games, tying the 1942 Detroit Lions for second on that list. In 1934 the Reds and Gunners combined for only 37 points in 11 games with the Reds, themselves, scoring only 10 points in 8 games before their suspension. The franchise was shut out in twelve of its eighteen games. By comparison, the 75 points scored by the Reds and Gunners in 21 games over two seasons only exceed by two the 73 points scored by the Chicago Bears in the 1940 NFL Championship Game and by
    5.00
    5 votes
    122

    Brooklyn Lions

    • Sport: American football
    The Brooklyn Lions was a National Football League team that played in 1926. The team was formed as the league's countermove to the original American Football League, which also planned to field a team in Brooklyn called the Brooklyn Horsemen. In the months before the regular season began, both leagues battled with each other for fan support and the right to play at Ebbets Field. The NFL emerged as the winner, as the Lions signed the lease to use the stadium on July 20. Neither the Lions or the Horseman had much success. In fact, the teams merged just after four games into the regular season, continuing in the NFL as the Brooklyn Lions. In a last-ditch effort to attract paying fans, the Lions then adopted the Horsemen nickname of the old AFL team - and lost the last three games of their existence by shutout.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    New York Giants

    New York Giants

    • Sport: American football
    The New York Giants (informally known as Brickley's Giants and Brickley's New York Giants) were a professional football team with the American Professional Football Association (now the National Football League) whose only season played was in 1921. The team has also been referred to as the Brooklyn Giants and Brickley's Brooklyn Giants. The Brickley's Giants were the first of 17 professional football teams to represent New York City at one time or another. The team was originally founded in 1919 by Charles Brickley, who received All-American honors while at Harvard. Brickley's Giants played two games in their only season, losing to the Buffalo All-Americans, 55-0, and the Cleveland Tigers, 17-0. It was the second shortest lived franchise in NFL history, behind only the Tonawanda Kardex, who played only one game in the same 1921 season. The team was sponsored by the New York Giants professional baseball team, and coached by Brickley, a halfback who was generally considered the finest kicker of his day. Home games were to be played at the Polo Grounds. The team was originally formed with the intent of competing in 1919. However after the team's first practice, the 1919 schedule,
    6.67
    3 votes
    125

    New York Metropolitans

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Metropolitan Club (the New York Metropolitans or the Mets) was a 19th-century professional baseball team that played in New York City from 1880 to 1887. Metropolitan Baseball Club of New York was the name originally chosen in 1960 for the current day New York Mets franchise, although the legal name has changed since then. The Metropolitans were founded in 1880 as an independent professional team by business entrepreneur John B. Day and baseball manager Jim Mutrie. Initially the team played its games in Brooklyn and in Hoboken, New Jersey as the other New York area clubs did at the time. However, by September, Day had arranged the use of a polo field just north of Central Park bounded by 5th & 6th Avenues and 110th & 112th Streets in Manhattan that became known as the Polo Grounds, the first professional baseball park in Manhattan. The National League had expelled the New York Mutuals following the 1876 season for failing to make their final road trip of the year and by 1881 had still not replaced them with another New York City franchise. The upstart American Association therefore saw a significant opportunity when it invited the Metropolitans to join the new league for its
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Philadelphia-Pittsburgh Steagles

    Philadelphia-Pittsburgh Steagles

    • Later known as: Philadelphia Eagles
    • Sport: American football
    The Steagles is the name for the team created by the temporary merger of two National Football League (NFL) teams, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles, during the 1943 season. The teams were forced to merge because both had lost many players to military service during World War II. The league's official record book refers to the team as "Phil-Pitt Combine". But the unofficial "Steagles", despite never being registered by the NFL, has become the most enduring moniker. The prospect of a unified Pittsburgh-Philadelphia team actually predated World War II by several years. The Pennsylvania Keystoners were a team that was proposed in 1939, conceived with the intention of the Steelers and Eagles owners buying into one of the two teams, then spinning the other off to an ownership group in Boston, Massachusetts. League officials rejected the plan, though it resulted in a convoluted ownership "two-step" that left Eagles owner Bert Bell with a share in the Steelers franchise. America entered World War II on December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Most of the young men who were of the age to play professional football were also of the age to fight for their
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    5.75
    4 votes
    128

    Baltimore Terrapins

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Baltimore Terrapins were one of the most successful teams in the short-lived Federal League of professional baseball from 1914 to 1915, but their brief existence led to litigation that led to an important legal precedent in baseball. The team played its home games at Terrapin Park. Most of the professional baseball teams in Baltimore have been called the Orioles, in reference to the Baltimore Oriole bird. There was already a minor league Baltimore Orioles, and the new Federal League club built their ballpark directly across the street from the Orioles park. The new club chose to call itself the Baltimore Terrapins, after the diamondback terrapin, the state reptile of Maryland. That nickname would later become primarily associated with the University of Maryland, College Park sports teams called the Maryland Terrapins. While the 1914 team posted a respectable 84–70 record and finished only 4½ games out of first place under player-manager Otto Knabe, the team was less than successful at the box office, even though four of the eight teams in the league (Chicago, Brooklyn, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis) were competing with one and even two (Chicago and St. Louis) other major league
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    7.50
    2 votes
    130

    Coastal Bend Aviators

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Coastal Bend Aviators were a minor league baseball team which played in Robstown, Texas, in the United States from 2003 to 2007. They were a member of the Central Baseball League, then the American Association and were not affiliated with any Major League Baseball team. The team played at Aviators Stadium.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Hartford Blues

    Hartford Blues

    • Sport: American football
    The Hartford Blues of the National Football League played only in the 1926 NFL season, with a record of 3-7. The team was based in Hartford, Connecticut but played at the East Hartford Velodrome. The Blues began as the Waterbury Blues and were owned by George Mulligan, the leading sports promoter in Connecticut during the 1920s. He hired local men, both former college players and walk-ons, at a per game wage. The players practiced once a week, on Sunday morning, just before each game. In 1925 Mulligan set his sights on signing Harry Stuhldreher, the quarterback of the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame. He immediately accepted Mulligan's offer to play for the Blues for $7,500, plus a $500 bonus. Waterbury's other top backs at the start of the 1925 season were Ken Simendinger, from Holy Cross, and Dutch Forst, from Villanova. The line featured two other Notre Dame alumni. Ed Hunsinger played with the Four Horsemen in 1924 and rejoined Stuhldreher as an end in Waterbury. Art Garvey, a brawny tackle, had played pro ball for several years since leaving Notre Dame in 1922. He had received some All-League mention as a Chicago Bear in 1923. Another lineman, Dick McGrath, doubled as captain and
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Lancaster Red Roses

    Lancaster Red Roses

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Lancaster Red Roses baseball team, originally known as the Maroons, changed its name at the start of the 1906 season during a bitter match with the York, Pennsylvania-based White Roses. Some sources indicate that the rival teams were named for the opposing factions in England's historic Wars of the Roses. The Lancaster Red Roses played at Stumpf Field, which is still used today by local baseball and softball leagues. Organized baseball first came to Lancaster in 1884 when Lancaster had two teams for a brief period of time. The Lancaster Red Stockings played 19 games as a member of the short-lived Keystone Association before the league broke up in June 1884. The Lancaster Ironsides played in the Eastern League beginning in 1884. The team remained in Lancaster for the 1885 season under a new name, the Lancaster Lancasters. Baseball returned for Lancaster in the 1894 season when the Pennsylvania State League Altoona, Pennsylvania franchise moved to Lancaster for most of the 1894 season and the 1895 season. In 1896, the Atlantic League Lancaster Maroons began play when the New Haven, Connecticut team moved to Lancaster. The Maroons became very popular and became one of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Nishitetsu Lions

    • Later known as: Saitama Seibu Lions
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Nishitetsu Lions were one of a dominant team in the Pacific League during the 1950s, winning four pennants three straight Japan Series against the Yomiuri Giants behind famed manager Osamu Mihara. The team struggled through the following decade and did witness much success on the field. In November 1972 was sold to the Fukuoka Baseball Corporation, also a part of Nishi-Nippon Railroad. Following the sale, the team was renamed the Taiheiyo Club Lions. The Nishitetsu Lions called Heiwadai Stadium home for their entire existence.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Syracuse Pros

    • Sport: American football
    The Syracuse Pros, also sometimes referred to as the Syracuse Eleven, were a professional American football team from Syracuse, New York. It is suspected, though not known for sure, that the team joined the American Professional Football Association (now the National Football League) in 1921 and left the same year. The team was coached by Mike Purdy and managed by Andy Friedman. Though most of today's records state that the Pros did indeed exist and were a member of the APFA, this is not entirely certain. For instance, research centered around the Tonawanda Kardex suggests that the team was still known as All-Syracuse, an independent team, and it is sometimes said that the Rochester Jeffersons only won two games against NFL opponents in their existence, against Tonawanda and the Columbus Panhandles—even though Rochester beat Syracuse in 1921. The game is counted in Syracuse's records but not Rochester's. A third game, against the Washington Senators, was also played against a league opponent. No record of the league admitting "The Pros" to the league or removing them from the league exists; only a statement from the team itself says it was (and even that uses the erroneous name
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Tonawanda Kardex

    • Sport: American football
    The Tonawanda Kardex (also known as the Tonawanda Lumbermen and, during its first season, the All-Tonawanda Lumberjacks) was an American football team active between 1916 and 1921. It played its games in City of Tonawanda, New York, a suburb of Buffalo with close ties to North Tonawanda, New York where American Kardex was founded. The team is most notable for its one game as a member of the National Football League, the shortest lived team in the league's history. The Tonawanda Kardex began playing games in 1916 as the All-Tonawanda All-Stars. They played their home games on the Tonawanda High School field, sometimes drawing up to 3,500 fans for a game. For the team's entire history, they were coached by Syracuse standout Walter "Tam" Rose. In 1917, they defeated the Rochester Jeffersons for the state championship. In 1919, they made the state playoffs, but lost in the semifinals to the Buffalo Prospects, who went on to win the title. The 1920 All Tonawanda Lumberjacks were a very successful team, garnering a record of 7-1 against two local American Professional Football Association (the predecessor to the NFL) franchises and other independent teams, only allowing more than 6
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    5.50
    4 votes
    137

    Kenosha Maroons

    • Sport: American football
    The Kenosha Maroons were a National Football League football team in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Officially, the club only played in the league during the 1924 season, dissolving after posting no wins in five games. Prior to the 1924 season, the NFL ordered the Toledo Maroons, based in Toledo, Ohio, to either transfer or suspend operations. Then on September 16, 1924, the Kenosha Evening News reported that the City of Kenosha agreed to purchase the Toledo franchise. However no conclusive evidence exists that the Toledo franchise was officially transferred to Kenosha. Kenosha felt that the team would be successful under the direction of George Johnson, an umpire in the Midwest baseball league. Johnson began scouting for talent to stock the new club. Financial support was offered by the Nash and Simmons companies, long-time sponsors of local athletic teams. Johnson soon signed Marv Wood, a 195-pound fullback from the University of California, and Walt Cassidy, a wide receiver and 1923 graduate of the University of Detroit. Others on the official roster were quarterback Jimmy Simpson, also out of the University of Detroit; running back George Seasholtz from Lafayette College; and Clete
    5.50
    4 votes
    138

    Brooklyn Gladiators

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Brooklyn Gladiators were a Major League Baseball team in the American Association during the 1890 season. They finished ninth and last in the league with a 26-73 record. The Gladiators were managed by Jim Kennedy and played their home games at Ridgewood Park. Their top-hitting regular was first baseman Billy O'Brien, who had a .278 batting average, a .415 slugging percentage, and led the club by far in RBI with 67. Their best pitcher was Ed Daily (10-15, 4.05), who was also their starting right fielder when he was not pitching. The Gladiators lasted for one season only, a year when Brooklyn boasted three professional ballclubs: Also competing for local fans' interest were the National League's first-place Bridegrooms, who had been Brooklyn's American Association club from 1884 to 1889, and the Brooklyn Ward's Wonders of the Players' League, managed by future Hall of Famer John Montgomery Ward. By August, there were rumors that club management, frustrated by a lack of public interest, would move the struggling team to Washington, D.C. That midseason move never came to pass, and while 1891 did see the addition of the Washington Statesmen to the American Association's final
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    Brooklyn Horsemen

    • Sport: American football
    The Brooklyn Horsemen was a professional football team that competed in the American Football League during the 1926 season. On November 12, 1926, the team withdrew from the AFL and merged with Brooklyn Lions of the National Football League. The new team created by the merger was initially called the Brooklyn Lions and competed in the NFL from November 22, 1926. For the last three games of the 1926, the merged team competed as the Brooklyn Horsemen. After three consecutive losses by shutout, the merged team winked out of existence. The Horsemen of the first AFL were owned by boxing promoter Humbert Fugazy and played their home games in Brooklyn's Commercial Field. Coached by Eddie McNeely, the Horsemen got the team name after McNeely's signing of Elmer Layden and Harry Stuhldreher, two of Notre Dame's Four Horsemen. While the team's first game was decided by a 60-yard touchdown pass from Stuldreher to Ed Harrison, the team had trouble maintaining a steady offense (and, ultimately maintaining a fan base). After losses to the Los Angeles Wildcats and Boston Bulldogs in front of decreasing crowds, a scheduled game at Ebbets Field against league leader (and eventual champion)
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    Chicago Rockets

    • Later known as: Chicago Hornets
    • Sport: American football
    The Chicago Rockets was an American football team that played in the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1949. During the 1949 season, the team was known as the Chicago Hornets. Unlike the Cleveland Browns, San Francisco 49ers, and Baltimore Colts, the franchise was not one of the three AAFC teams that joined the National Football League prior to the 1950 season. The Chicago Rockets franchise was owned by Chicago trucking executive John L. "Jack" Keeshin, president of the National Jockey Club that owned and operated Sportsman's Park race track in Cicero, Illinois. He originally attempted to purchase the Chicago White Sox from the Comiskey family but was turned down. Chicago Tribune sports editor Arch Ward suggested starting a pro football team in the AAFC. In a market where the NFL Chicago Bears and the Chicago Cardinals were already well established, Keeshin stood little chance of success. He did cause a stir by attempting to sign Chicago Bears stars Sid Luckman, George McAfee and Hugh Gallarneau without success. The Rockets played their home games at Soldier Field. Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team

    • Sport: Road bicycle racing
    Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team (UCI Team Code: DSC) was a United States-based professional road bicycle racing team. It was the continuation of the 2004 U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling Team. Lance Armstrong, seven-time Tour de France winner, was its leader (albeit only during the Tour) until July 2005. From 2005 until 2007, the team was one of the 20 teams that competed in the new UCI ProTour. On June 15, 2004, the Discovery Channel signed a deal to become sponsor of the team for the 2004–2007 seasons. As part of the sponsorship deal, Armstrong provided on-air appearances for the Discovery Networks TV channels. The deal did not affect the rights of secondary sponsor OLN, now known as NBC Sports Network in the US, to air major cycling events such as the Tour de France, although the two channels are competitors. The team was directed by Belgian Johan Bruyneel, who also managed U.S. Postal. The chief mechanic was Julien DeVries. The team was co-owned by Tailwind Sports Corp. of San Francisco and Capital Sports & Entertainment of Austin, Texas. On February 10, 2007 Discovery Channel announced that it would not renew its sponsorship of the team at the end of the 2007 season. On
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    St. Louis Eagles

    • Sport: Ice Hockey
    The St. Louis Eagles were a professional ice hockey team and a former member of the National Hockey League (NHL) based in St. Louis, Missouri. The Eagles existed for only one year, playing in the 1934–35 NHL season. The team was originally founded in 1883 as the Ottawa Senators, a successful independent team that joined the NHL as a charter member in 1917. From the mid-1920s onward, they endured financial strain caused in part by being in the NHL's smallest market. The financial problems forced the Senators to suspend operations for the 1931–32 season. Upon their return to play, the Senators finished in last place for two straight seasons and continued to lose money. Following the second last place finish, the team decided it could not survive in Ottawa and hoped to move to a bigger market. In an attempt to recoup losses and pay debts, the Senators moved the NHL franchise to St. Louis, where it was nicknamed the Eagles. However, the team continued to bleed money due to travel expenses, and it was forced to make ends meet by selling players to other teams. After the season, the owners asked the NHL for a second time for permission to suspend operations. This time, the NHL refused
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Toronto Arenas

    Toronto Arenas

    • Later known as: Toronto Maple Leafs
    The Toronto Arenas, Toronto Blueshirts or Torontos was a professional men's ice hockey team that played in the first two seasons of the National Hockey League (NHL). It was operated by the owner of the Arena Gardens, the Toronto Arena Company. As the ownership of the National Hockey Association (NHA) Toronto Blueshirts franchise was in dispute, the new NHL league was started, and a temporary Toronto franchise was operated. The NHL itself was intended to only be a one-year entity until the NHA could be reactivated, although it never was. For the first season, 1917–18, the team operated without a formal organization separate from the Arena Company. and without an official club nickname. However, the press would dub the team the "Blue Shirts" or "Torontos" as they had done with the NHA franchise. After the 1918-1919 season, the Arena Company was granted a permanent franchise in the NHL, which evolved into today's Toronto Maple Leafs. By the fall of 1917, a dispute between Eddie Livingstone, owner of the Blueshirts, and the owners of the NHA's other four clubs—the Montreal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Ottawa Senators and Quebec Bulldogs had come to a boil. The other NHA owners were
    6.33
    3 votes
    144

    Albany Baseball Team

    • Sport: Baseball
    The South Georgia Peanuts were a member of the South Coast League, based at the Paul Eames Sports Complex in Albany, Georgia. The team was not affiliated with Major or Minor League Baseball. Wally Backman was the club's manager in its inaugural season. The team's one season was chronicled in the documentary television series Playing for Peanuts produced by John J. Fitzgerald. On July 20, 2007, the South Georgia Peanuts were involved in an on-field brawl with the Macon Music. After the brawl was broken up by the umpires the Peanuts refused to retake the field and forfeited the game. Backman was suspended 8 games for the incident despite the fact that he was not on the field when everything happened. youtube.com/playingforpeanuts
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    Brooklyn Dodgers

    • Later known as: Brooklyn Tigers
    • Sport: American football
    The Brooklyn Dodgers were an American football team that played in the National Football League from 1930 to 1943, and in 1944 as the Brooklyn Tigers. The team played its home games at Ebbets Field. In 1945, because of financial difficulties, the team was merged with the Boston Yanks. The franchise is not related to the Brooklyn Dodgers franchise that played in the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1948; nor is it related to the American Football League franchise that played as the Brooklyn Tigers for the first half of the 1936 season before moving to Rochester and playing as the Rochester Tigers. Another NFL team that played in Brooklyn was the Brooklyn Lions (which became the Brooklyn Horsemen after merging with an AFL team of the same name) in 1926. The team began play in 1930 after two Brooklyn businessmen bought the Dayton Triangles for $2,500 and moved the team into Ebbets Field. These two individuals were Bill Dwyer, a past owner of the New York Americans and Pittsburgh Pirates of the National Hockey League, and Jack Depler, a player-coach for the NFL's Orange Tornadoes. Dwyer and Depler then renamed the Triangles the Brooklyn Dodgers, borrowing the name of
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Canton Bulldogs

    Canton Bulldogs

    • Sport: American football
    The Canton Bulldogs were a professional American football team, based in Canton, Ohio. They played in the Ohio League from 1903 to 1906 and 1911 to 1919, and its successor, the National Football League, from 1920 to 1923 and again from 1925 to 1926. The Bulldogs would go on to win the 1917, 1918 and 1919 Ohio League championships. They were the NFL champions in 1922 and 1923. In 1921–1923, the Bulldogs played 25 straight games without a defeat (including 3 ties), which as of 2012 remains an NFL record. As a result of the Bulldogs' early success along with the league being founded in the city, the Pro Football Hall of Fame is located in Canton. Jim Thorpe, who was considered the best all-around athlete of his era, was Canton's most-recognized player. In 1924, Sam Deutsch, the owner of the NFL's Cleveland Indians, bought the Canton Bulldogs and took the Bulldogs name and its players to Cleveland and named his franchise the Cleveland Bulldogs. He then offered to sell the Canton franchise back to the city of Canton to play in the 1924 season, however there were no buyers interested in the team, so he "mothballed" the Canton club. The Canton Bulldogs were however re-established in 1925,
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Los Angeles Dons

    • Sport: American football
    The Los Angeles Dons were an American football team in the now defunct All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1949 that played in the Los Angeles Coliseum. The Dons were the first professional football team to play a regular season game in Los Angeles, beating the rival Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League by two weeks. In 1946 a new professional football league was launched to do battle with the long-established National Football League (NFL). This league, the All-American Football Conference (AAFC), included eight teams — an Eastern Division with three teams based in the state of New York and another in Miami, and a Western Division with teams in Cleveland, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. The AAFCs Southern California franchise, which was to compete directly with the newly relocated Los Angeles Rams of the NFL, was known as the Los Angeles Dons. The leader of the ownership group was Benjamin Lindheimer, a Chicago real estate and race track executive. Other owners included Hollywood notables Louis B. Mayer, Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, and Don Ameche. The Dons' head coach was "Dud" DeGroot, a Stanford football player who had gone on to earn a PhD from that
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Philadelphia Athletics

    • Later known as: Kansas City Athletics
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Philadelphia Athletics were a professional baseball team that played from 1901-1954 int the American League.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    Toledo Maroons

    • Later known as: Kenosha Maroons
    • Sport: American football
    The Toledo Maroons were a professional American football team based in Toledo, Ohio in the National Football League in 1922 and 1923. Prior to joining the NFL, the Maroons played in the unofficial "Ohio League" from 1902 until 1921. The Maroons originated as a semi-pro football team known as the Toledo Athletic Association, in 1902. The Association formed the Toledo Maroons in 1906 as a farm team for teenagers who could later move up to playing for the Association's senior team. However in 1908, the Association was forced to disband the owners of Armory Park, where the team played, no longer wanted the field torn up by cleats. Despite the setback, the Maroons kept playing on other fields. By 1909, the former teenagers were adults, still playing organized football, and they began to play against numerous amateur and semi-pro opponents from outside the area. Beginning in 1915, the Maroons were playing some very strong opposition, including such future NFL teams as the Columbus Panhandles, the Dayton Gym Cadets (later known as the Dayton Triangles), and the Cincinnati Celts. When the American Professional Football Association was organized in 1920, Toledo chose to remain an
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    Syracuse Nationals

    • Later known as: Philadelphia 76ers
    The Syracuse Nationals were an American professional basketball team that existed in Syracuse, New York from 1946 to 1963 as part of the National Basketball League and National Basketball Association. They are currently known as the Philadelphia 76ers. In 1946, the Nationals were established as a new team in the National Basketball League, becoming the largely Midwest-based league's easternmost team. In 1949, the Nationals were one of seven NBL teams that merged with the Basketball Association of America (BAA) to form the NBA. In 1955, the Nationals (led by forward Dolph Schayes) won the NBA championship. 1946/47: Owned by Italian immigrant Danny Biasone, the Syracuse Nationals began play in the National Basketball League, in the same year professional basketball was finally gaining some legitimacy with the rival Basketball Association of America that was based in large cities like New York and Philadelphia. While in the NBL with teams largely consisting of small Midwestern towns, the Nationals put together a 21–23 record, finishing in 4th place. In the playoffs, the Nats would be beaten by the fellow upstate neighbor Rochester Royals in 4 games. 1947–48: In their second season the
    5.25
    4 votes
    153

    Buffalo Bisons

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Buffalo Bisons of 1890 were a member of the short-lived Players' League. This baseball team was managed by Jack Rowe and Jay Faatz, and they finished eighth (last) with a record of 36-96 while playing their home games at Olympic Park. Hall of Famer Connie Mack was a part-owner of the franchise, having invested his life savings of $500 in the team, none of which he ever recouped. In addition to owning part of the team, Mack also played catcher, batting .266 in 123 games with the league. Famed deaf player Dummy Hoy played for the 1890 Bisons, as did two players who appeared in the previous NL incarnation of the Bisons, Jack Rowe and Deacon White. The PL Bisons were an outlaw franchise that played concurrently with the minor league Buffalo Bisons and apparently used the stock Bisons name without the permission of the legitimate team; the legitimate Bisons played at Buffalo Baseball Park across town. The current Bisons franchise does not recognize the PL Bisons as part of their history.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Hartford Senators

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Hartford Senators were a minor league baseball team based in Hartford, Connecticut. They operated in the Connecticut League from 1902-1912, the Eastern Association from 1913-1914, the Eastern League from 1916-1932 and the Northeastern League in 1934. For the 1932 season they were affiliated with the Brooklyn Dodgers. The team's most famous player was Lou Gehrig who played for the Senators on three separate occasions before being a starting first baseman for the New York Yankees. The team won league championships in 1909, 1913, 1923 and 1931. From the Mar 12,1933 "Hartford Courant" obituary of James H. Clarkin,"quarter of a century owner of the Hartford Baseball Club" indicates he sold both the Eastern League Franchise and Clarkin Field "now the Bulkeley Stadium" in 1928 when he retired. Mr. Clarkin entered league baseball in 1904 when he purchased the league franchise from William J. Tracey of Bristol, CT., as a partner, but soon after was the sole owner of The Hartford Club. "Although he had many acrimonious disputes with fellow magnates, he came to their assistance in more than one crisis and saved the Eastern League during the World War, when the league's fortunes were at a
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Kansas City Cowboys

    Kansas City Cowboys

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Kansas City Cowboys was the name of three different baseball Major League Baseball teams in Kansas City, Missouri in the 19th century. The first Cowboys were a team in the Union Association during its only season, 1884. Referred to as the "Cowboys" mostly by historians, they had no official nickname during their short life and were most frequently referred to by local press of the day as the "Unions" and by the press of other cities as the "Kaycees". They were the first professional baseball team to represent Kansas City as well as the city's first major league team. They began play as a replacement for the Altoona Mountain City, which collapsed in May, and played out the remainder of the season. Despite a 16-63 (.203 WL percentage) finish, the franchise was one of only two (the St. Louis club being the other) in the league to make a profit. In contemporary newspaper reports, the team had Altoona's record (6-19) combined with their own and were considered to have finished last in an eight-team league. The Unions disbanded shortly after the Union Association voted to dissolve. The second Cowboys were a National League for a single season in 1886. They played at Association Park
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Milwaukee Badgers

    • Sport: American football
    The Milwaukee Badgers were a professional American football team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that played in the National Football League from 1922 to 1926. The team played its home games at Athletic Park, later known as Borchert Field, on Milwaukee's north side. The team was notable for having a large number of African-American players for the time. After the team folded following the 1926 season (largely due to being left broke because of a $500 fine by the NFL for using four high-school players in a 1925 game against the Chicago Cardinals, a game arranged after the Badgers had disbanded for the season), many of its members played for the independent semi-pro Milwaukee Eagles. A few of the players from this team went on to play for the original Pittsburgh Pirates football team in 1933; the team later became the Steelers. This has led some to mistakenly believe that either the Badgers or Eagles became the Steelers. The Milwaukee market is now claimed by the Green Bay Packers, who played three or four regular season games there from 1931-94, including the 1939 NFL Championship Game and a 1967 playoff game. The Packers still reserve two games a season for their old Milwaukee
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    Muncie Flyers

    • Sport: American football
    The Muncie Flyers from Muncie, Indiana played in the National Football League (then called the American Professional Football Association) from 1920-1921. The origins of the team show that it evolved from the Congerville (Muncie) Athletic Club, which dates back to at least 1905. Local newspapers provided spotty coverage of the team. An occasional reference was made to a game being scheduled and sometimes the game results with a brief game account was in the Monday paper. In 1910, the Congerville Athletic Club finished with a 10–0–1 record, outscoring their opponents 145 to 0. All of the home games were played against other local Muncie teams, while the road games were played in nearby Hartford City, Dunkirk and Alexandria. In 1916 the Congerville Athletic Club team and the Congerville Flyers team merged and Muncie was represented by the Congerville Flyers. The Congerville Muncie Flyers evolved from a team called the Congerville Thirds This team was later renamed the Congerville Flyers. The 1915 edition of the Flyers proved to be a respectable team, finishing with a 5-3-3 record. Their star player was local player, Cooney Checkeye. Playing all its games on the road, the 1916 Flyers
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    New England Blazers

    • Later known as: Boston Blazers
    The New England Blazers were a member of the Major Indoor Lacrosse League (MILL) from 1989 to 1991. They were based in Worcester, Massachusetts, playing at the Worcester Centrum. After the 1991 season, they moved to Boston, Massachusetts, becoming the Boston Blazers.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    7.00
    2 votes
    161

    Saint Paul Apostles

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Saint Paul Apostles is a former minor league baseball team that was based in St. Paul, Minnesota. The Apostles also played one major league season with the Union Association in 1884.
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    7.00
    2 votes
    164

    Southern Sting

    The Southern Sting were a netball team based in Invercargill, New Zealand that competed in The National Bank Cup competition, formerly known as the Coca Cola Cup. The Southern Sting team won the National Bank Cup seven times and are the only team to have competed in all 10 of the finals of the competition. In 2008, the Sting were merged with Otago Rebels to compete as the Southern Steel in the trans-tasman ANZ Championship. The new Southern Steel are still based in Invercargill and play the majority of their matches on the Sting's home court, Stadium Southland. 1998 Season (Sting first) Sting's website entry: 1998 season 1998 was the beginning of the Sting phenomenon. Ascot Park Hotel Southern Sting was not even ranked by pundits at the start of the new Coca-Cola Cup season and franchise holder Southern TeamCo was hoping for a top four finish. But the team had other ideas, and so did its supporters. From day one, Southlanders were behind the team and players were astonished when they arrived for their first game at Centennial Hall on Friday, March 27. The car park and surrounding streets were full and the game was a sell-out. The starting lineup against the Auckland Diamonds was
    7.00
    2 votes
    165

    Vancouver Whitecaps

    • Sport: Football
    Vancouver Whitecaps FC was a Canadian professional soccer club based in Vancouver, British Columbia. Founded in 1986, the team played its final year in the second tier of the United States soccer pyramid in the NASL Conference of the USSF Division 2 Professional League coached by Teitur Thordarson. The team played its home games at Swangard Stadium in nearby Burnaby, British Columbia. The team's colours were blue and white. On March 19, 2009, an ownership group led by Vancouver Whitecaps FC principal Greg Kerfoot was granted a Major League Soccer expansion franchise which began play in 2011 under the same name. In addition to its men's side the Whitecaps also field a women's team in the USL W-League, two developmental teams (Vancouver Whitecaps Residency, in the USL Premier Development League, and the Whitecaps FC Prospects, in the Pacific Coast Soccer League), and four youth teams in the USL Super Y-League (Coastal WFC, Mountain WFC, Surrey WFC and Okanagan WFC) ranging in age from U13 to U17 for both boys and girls. The team was previously known as the Vancouver 86ers of both the Canadian Soccer League and later the A-League. The club later played in several second tier leagues
    7.00
    2 votes
    166

    Boston Bulldogs

    • Sport: American football
    The Boston Bulldogs were a professional American football team that competed in the first American Football League in 1926. Owned by Robert McKirby, the Bulldogs lasted only six games into the AFL season, playing one home game in Braves Field and one in Fenway Park. Coached by player-coach Herb Treat, the majority of the team played their college football in New England, Pennsylvania, and New York. The offense led by Joe McGlone (who started the season playing for the Providence Steam Roller) was inconsistent, scoring a total of 20 points in its existence… 17 of which were tallied in one game (a 17-0 victory over the Brooklyn Horsemen on October 17, 1926). Erwin Gehrke and Carl Etelman shared the kicking duties. Bill Cronin, a tailback, scored the team’s only offensive touchdown (the other TD was scored on a fumble recovery by Charlie Morrison). While Robert McKirby was the owner of the team, it was subsidized by league founders C. C. Pyle and Red Grange (who owned the New York Yankees, the Los Angeles Wildcats, and a portion of the Chicago Bulls). While the team’s first home game (a 13-0 loss to the Yankees at Fenway Park, October 9, 1926) drew 12,000 fans, only 2000 fans
    6.00
    3 votes
    167

    Cleveland Infants

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Cleveland Infants were a one-year baseball team in the Players' League. Owned by Al Johnson, the Infants finished 1890, their lone season, with 55 wins and 75 losses. Their home games were played at Brotherhood Park. 1890 Cleveland Infants season
    6.00
    3 votes
    168

    New York Yanks

    • Sport: American football
    The New York Yanks American football team played in the National Football League under that name in the 1950 and 1951 seasons. In 1949, Boston Yanks owner Ted Collins had requested the NFL to fold his Boston team and give him a new one in New York City. Collins' new team played as the New York Bulldogs and shared the Polo Grounds with the New York Giants during the 1949 season. In 1950, Collins changed his franchise's name to the New York Yanks and moved to Yankee Stadium. Only four players from the 1949 Bulldogs (Joe Domnanovich, Joe Golding, John Nolan and John Rauch) played for the Yanks in 1950. In contrast, there were 18 players from the New York Yankees of the All-America Football Conference (Bruce Alford, George Brown, Brad Ecklund, Don Garza, Sherman Howard, Duke Iverson, Harvey Johnson, Bob Kennedy, Lou Kusseow, Pete Layden, Paul Mitchell, Barney Poole, Martin Ruby, Jack Russell, Ed Sharkey, Joe Signaigo, John Wozniak and Buddy Young). The Yanks finished the 1950 NFL season with a winning record, however the team collapsed back to a single victory in 1951. The franchise was reported to have been "sold back" to the league following the 1951 season, but it is more likely the
    6.00
    3 votes
    169

    Philadelphia Quakers

    • Sport: American football
    Not to be confused with the defunct Philadelphia Quakers team of the National Hockey League, the Philadelphia Quakers baseball team who became the Philadelphia Phillies in 1890 or the University of Pennsylvania athletics teams, the Pennsylvania Quakers. The Philadelphia Quakers were a professional American football team that competed in the first American Football League in 1926 and won the league’s only championship. Owned by L. S. Conway, the Quakers played their home games in Sesquicentennial Stadium on Saturdays because of Pennsylvania’s Blue laws prohibiting work or business on Sundays. Coached by Bob Folwell, the majority of the team played their college football in Pennsylvania. The Quakers had nine players (including Century Milstead, Charlie Way, Butch Spagna, and Bull Behman) who had previously played for various National Football League teams. The combined experience gave the team an edge in line play, particularly on defense (the Quakers yielded only five points per game for the 1926 season). The addition of All-American Glenn Killinger merely added to the defensive riches: he intercepted four passes in his league debut (November 4, 1926, in a 24-0 victory over the Rock
    6.00
    3 votes
    170

    New York Yankees

    • Sport: American football
    The New York Yankees were a professional American football team that played in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1946 to 1949. The team played in Yankee Stadium in the Bronx and often played in front of sold-out crowds. They were owned by Dan Topping, who brought many of his Brooklyn football players from the National Football League to the AAFC. The team's coach was Ray Flaherty, who had coached the Washington Redskins in the early 1940s. The NFL canceled its Brooklyn team. The Yankees appeared in the 1946 AAFC championship game, but lost to the Cleveland Browns by a score of 14-9. The same two teams appeared in the championship game the following year, with the Browns winning again 14-3. Before the 1949 season, the Brooklyn Dodgers football team folded and merged into the Yankees, which became the Brooklyn-New York Yankees, but this was the final season of the AAFC, which then merged with the NFL. The Yankees players were divided between the New York Giants and New York Bulldogs, who returned to their Yanks (from Boston) nickname in 1950. Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties
    5.00
    4 votes
    171

    Toulouse FC

    Toulouse Football Club was a French association football team playing in the city of Toulouse, Haute-Garonne. The team was founded in 1937 and disappeared in 1967, in a merge with Red Star Olympique. Even though this team held the same name as Toulouse's current main club (Toulouse FC), the two teams are not to be confused. They are not a continuation of each other.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172

    Baltimore Marylands

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Baltimore Marylands were a short-lived professional baseball team that existed in the 1873 National Association season. Their existence consisted of a six games from April 14 to July 11, and finished with a win–loss record of 0-6. In those six games, two of which were against the Washington Blue Legs and four versus the Baltimore Canaries, the team allowed 152 runs to score, while scoring 26 for themselves. The team was managed by Bill Smith, who also played in the outfield and at catcher. They played their one and only home game on April 14, at Madison Avenue Grounds, and officially folded after the July 11, 1873 game.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Columbus Panhandles

    Columbus Panhandles

    • Later known as: Columbus Tigers
    • Sport: American football
    The Columbus Panhandles were a professional American football team based in Columbus, Ohio. The club was founded in 1901 by workers at the Panhandle shops of the Pennsylvania Railroads. They were originally a part of the Ohio League from 1904 before folding after one season. Three years later, the team tried again and playing the Ohio League from 1907 to 1919, not winning a championship, before becoming charter members of the National Football League (NFL)—firstly named American Professional Football Association (APFA). The Panhandles are credited with playing in the first NFL game against another NFL opponent. They have zero NFL championships, but Joseph Carr, the team's owner from 1907 to 1922, is enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his work with NFL commissioner. The earliest existence of the Panhandles was in 1900; the Columbus Press-Post reported Jack Walsh creating the "Panhandle railroad team" consisting of "big hardy railroad men." No other articles in 1900 was written about the Panhandles. A game was scheduled for October 19 of next year, however, no source provided an outcome. In 1901, managed by William Butler of the Ohio Medical University, the Panhandles
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Indianapolis Hoosiers

    • Sport: Baseball
    Indianapolis Hoosiers was the name of three major league and at least three minor league baseball clubs based in Indianapolis, Indiana.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176

    Kansas City Blues

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Kansas City Blues are a former minor league baseball team located in Kansas City, Missouri, in the Midwestern United States. The team was one of the eight founding members of the American Association. The Blues did not field particularly competitive teams unil 1918, when they won the AA pennant. The team won again in 1923, and again in 1929. They won the Junior World Series championship that year, defeating the Rochester Red Wings of the International League in a best-of-nine series. In 1936, the Blues became a farm club of the New York Yankees. They won the AA championships five times in the 1930s and 1940s. When the American League Philadelphia Athletics moved to Kansas City in 1955, the Blues moved to Denver, Colorado. The official website of Minor League Baseball calls the Blues teams of 1929 and 1939 two of the 100 greatest Minor League Baseball teams ever. Well-known members of the 1929 Junior World Series-winning Kansas City Blues included: Other well-known players and managers include:
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    Kansas City Packers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Kansas City Packers were a Federal League baseball club in Kansas City from 1914 to 1915. They finished sixth in 1914 with a 67-84 record, and fourth in 1915 with an 81-72 record. The Packers moved to Kansas City in July 1913 from Covington, Kentucky when the Federal League was an independent minor league. When the league declared itself major, the Packers’ first signing was of former St. Louis Browns manager, George Stovall, reportedly the first signing of a major league player in violation of his reserve clause. The Packers began their major league life on April 23, 1914 as the visiting team in the first game played in what is now known as Wrigley Field. George “Chief” Johnson was the Packers’ starting pitcher in that historic game, but was removed after two innings when served with an injunction from his former team, the Cincinnati Reds. The Packers’ home season ended early for them, when a flash flood that hit Kansas City after a heavy downpour knocked down the walls of the ballpark, Gordon and Koppel Field. The Packers finished on the road, and ended in sixth place, 20 games behind the pennant-winning Indianapolis Hoosiers. During the 1914-1915 off-season, the Federal
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    Los Angeles Sharks

    • Later known as: Michigan Stags
    The Los Angeles Sharks were an ice hockey team that played in the World Hockey Association from 1972 to 1974. Their primary home arena was the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena but they sometimes played at the Long Beach Sports Arena when the Sports Arena had other contractual obligations. After the 1973–74 season, the franchise moved to Detroit to become the Michigan Stags and again mid-season to Baltimore to become the Baltimore Blades. The franchise was originally referred to as the "Los Angeles Aces", but took the "Sharks" name after the proposed San Francisco Sharks franchise (not to be confused with the current NHL San Jose Sharks) was transferred to Quebec and became the Nordiques before the WHA began play. They kept the original colors from the name Aces; red and black being the colors of the suits in a deck of cards. The Sharks' first season was moderately successful on and off the ice as they finished 3rd in the Western Division (losing in the first round of the playoffs to the Houston Aeros in six games) and attendance was respectable. Gary Veneruzzo led the team with 43 goals, although nobody else had more than 20. The Sharks made up for lack of offensive depth with
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Orange Tornadoes

    Orange Tornadoes

    • Later known as: Newark Tornadoes
    • Sport: American football
    The Orange Tornadoes and Newark Tornadoes were two manifestations of a long-lived professional American football franchise that existed in some form from 1887 to 1971, having played in the National Football League from 1929 to 1930, the American Association from 1936 to 1941, the Atlantic Coast Football League from 1963 to 1964 and 1970 to 1971, and the Continental Football League from 1965 to 1969. The team was based for most of its history in Orange, New Jersey, with many of its later years in Newark. Its last five years of existence were as the Orlando Panthers, when the team was based in Orlando, Florida. The franchise was sold back to the NFL in October 1930. The team had four head coaches in its two years in the NFL - Jack Depler in Orange, and Jack Fish, Al McGall and Andy Salata in Newark. The Orange Tornadoes can trace their roots back to the Orange Athletic Club. The Orange A.C. was originally an amateur football team that began play in 1887. The team's first ever game was a 36-0 loss to Seton Hall University football team. By the 1890s the Orange became a semi-pro team. In 1892, the team practiced under electric lights at night to prepare for an October 8 game against
    6.50
    2 votes
    181

    Philadelphia Keystones

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Philadelphia Keystones (aka Keystones of Philadelphia) was a professional baseball franchise. In 1884, they were a member of the short-lived Union Association. The team was owned by former player Tom Pratt. The Keystones were managed by catcher Fergy Malone and finished eighth in the league with a 21-46 record. Their top-hitting regular was left fielder/infielder Buster Hoover, who batted .364 with a slugging percentage of .495, and their best pitcher was Jersey Bakely, who was 14-25 with an ERA of 4.47. Their home games were played at Keystone Park. Jack Clements, who played for 17 seasons and was the last (and virtually the only) left-handed catcher in major-league history, made his big-league debut with the Keystones. Like several other teams in the Union Association, the Keystones did not make it through the entire season, folding after the game of August 7. The entire league ceased operations after 1884, its first and only season.
    6.50
    2 votes
    182

    St. Louis Cardinals

    • Later known as: Phoenix Cardinals
    • Sport: American football
    The St. Louis Cardinals, who are the modern day Arizona Cardinals, were an American football team based in St. Louis, Missouri who played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1960 through 1987.
    6.50
    2 votes
    183

    Utica Blue Sox

    • Later known as: Aberdeen IronBirds
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Utica Blue Sox were a minor league baseball team based in Utica, New York. In their most recent incarnation, the Blue Sox played in the Short-Season A classification New York - Penn League from 1977–2001, with their home games at Donovan Stadium at Murnane Field. The NYP Blue Sox affiliations through the years include: Toronto Blue Jays from 1977–80, independent from 1981–85, Philadelphia Phillies from 1986–87, Chicago White Sox from 1988–92, Boston Red Sox from 1993–95, and Florida Marlins from 1996 until 2001. On February 7, 2002, Cal Ripken, Jr. and the Ripken Professional Baseball Association purchased the Blue Sox and moved the club to northern Maryland, where it became the Aberdeen IronBirds. The city needed a standard level ball park and Donovan Stadium needed repairs in order to keep the Blue Sox team. Utica's first baseball team took the field in 1878. The city fielded a team in the New York State League from 1899–1917, then was without professional baseball until 1939, except for one year, 1924, when the Utica Utes, a member of an earlier edition of the New York-Pennsylvania League, moved to Oneonta, New York, in midseason. Baseball returned with the Utica Braves of
    6.50
    2 votes
    184

    Chicago Pirates

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Chicago Pirates were a baseball team in the Players' League for a single season in 1890. The team played their home games at South Side Park (II). Their powerful National League rivals were the Chicago White Stockings which later became the Cubs. The Pirates recruited most of the White Stocking's players, and for this reason the Pirate's attendance was nearly fifty percent higher than the White Stockings. The Pirate's owner, John Addison, was a wealthy contractor. Although Addison and his partner White Stocking second baseman Fred Pfeffer had signed mostly White Stocking players, they also signed four players from the St. Louis Browns of the American Association as well as a pitcher from the Columbus Solons of the American Association. The team was managed by Charles Comiskey. Comiskey and Duffy are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. On June 21, 1890, Silver King pitched the only ever Player's League no-hitter. The team had two nicknames: 1) White Stockings - player wore white hose - which was appropriate because this PL franchise signed away many NL Chicago White Stocking players, 2) Pirates - name applied not for "pirating" away NL players but rather because the team
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    7.00
    1 votes
    186

    Detroit Heralds

    • Sport: American football
    Detroit, Michigan had four early teams in the National Football League before the Detroit Lions. The Heralds played in 1920, and had played as an independent as far back as 1905. The Tigers, a continuation of the Heralds, played in 1921, folding midseason and sending its players to the Buffalo All-Americans. The Panthers from 1925–1926 and the Wolverines in 1928. In 1905, several University of Detroit football players, led by Bill Marshall, organized the Heralds as an amateur team after the University did not field a squad due to financial issues. It was at this time that the team adopted the school's colors, red and white, as their own. While the University's football team reesumed play in 1906, the Heralds continued to play as an amateur team. In 1911, the team dropped its amateur status and became semi-professional and left the campus. Admission to the team's games was soon charged and the players were paid a small sum. In 1916, several out-of-town players were brought in to replace some of the older players, several of whom had been with the Heralds since 1905. Despite not being based in Ohio, the Heralds played many of their games against teams in the Ohio League. In 1917, the
    7.00
    1 votes
    187

    HSG Nordhorn

    • Later known as: HSG Nordhorn-Lingen
    • Sport: Team handball
    HSG Nordhorn-Lingen (HSG Nordhorn until September 2008) is a team handball club from Nordhorn, Germany. Currently, HSG Nordhorn-Lingen competes in the Second Division of the German Bundesliga, following a mandatory relegation from the First Division in 2009 owing to insolvency. In 2008 Nordhorn won the EHF Cup.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188

    Indianapolis Blues

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Indianapolis Blues were a baseball team in the National League only during the 1878 season and finished fifth in the six-team league with a 24-36 record. They were managed by outfielder/first baseman/catcher John Clapp, and played their home games at South Street Park. Their top-hitting regular was right fielder Orator Shafer, who batted .338 with a slugging percentage of .455. Their winningest pitcher was The Only Nolan (13-22, 2.57), but had two other starters with better ERAs: Jim McCormick (5-8, 1.69) and Tom Healey (6-4, 2.22).
    7.00
    1 votes
    189

    Washington Nationals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Washington Nationals were the first important baseball club in the nation's capital. They played part of one season or parts of two seasons in the National Association, the first professional league, so they are considered a major league team by those who count the NA as a major league. Several baseball clubs in Washington have used the historic name Nationals; indeed, there is disagreement whether the 1872 and 1875 NA members should be considered the same club. The first team in Washington, the Potomac Club, was formed in the summer of 1859, and the Nationals were formed in November of the same year; both teams consisted mostly of government clerks. The two teams practiced in the backyard of the White House and played each other in the spring of 1860; the Nationals consistently lost to the superior Potomacs, but the latter disbanded on the outbreak of the Civil War while the Nationals kept playing, and by the end of the war were "solidly in the esteem of Washington fans, with the club's shortstop, slight, 23-year-old Arthur Pue Gorman, the darling of the spectators. Young Gorham quickly rose to stardom on the not-too-brilliant Nationals." (Gorman later became a senator from
    7.00
    1 votes
    190

    Hammond Pros

    • Sport: American football
    The Hammond Pros from Hammond, Indiana played in the National Football League from 1920 to 1926 as a traveling team. The Pros were established by Paul Parduhn and Dr. Alva Young who was a boxing promoter, owner of a racing stable and a doctor and trainer for a semi-pro football team operated by the Hammond Clabby Athletic Association from 1915-17. It's believed that Dr. Young was part owner of the team. Dr. Young presided over a new team known as the "Hammond All-Stars," played against many of the teams that would become the backbone of the American Professional Football Association that year (including the Racine Cardinals, Detroit Heralds, Rock Island Independents, Minneapolis Marines, Cleveland Tigers, Canton Bulldogs, and Toledo Maroons), and went to the meeting in Canton, Ohio at which the APFA was formed in 1920. (It is said that the game between Hammond and Canton, which drew between 10,000 and 12,000 spectators, was the game that convinced team owners that a league would be viable.) In 1919, the team starred George Halas at wide receiver; Halas left for the Decatur Staleys -- the future Chicago Bears -- the next year and remained with that franchise as a player, coach and
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Buffalo Buffeds

    Buffalo Buffeds

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Buffalo Blues were a professional baseball club that played in the short-lived Federal League, which was a minor league in 1913 and a full-fledged outlaw major league the next two years. It was the last major league baseball team to be based in the city of Buffalo. In 1913 and 1914, as was the standard for Federal League teams, the franchise did not have an official name, instead going by the generic BufFeds. The Buffalo team played at International Fair Association Grounds. Due to delays in construction of their new ballpark, the team did not play their first home game until a month after the Federal League season had started. Buffalo sold shares of stock of the team to the public through a series of newspaper ads. Preferred shares were sold for $10 each. In the 1914 season, the team posted a 80-71 record (.530) and finished in fourth place, seven games behind the league champion Indianapolis Hoosiers. In the league's second and final season, the team, then known as the Buffalo Blues, ended in sixth place with a 74-78 mark (.487), 12 games behind the Chicago Whales. An unusual player who played for the Blues in 1914 was Ed Porray; the only major leaguer whose birthplace is not
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Dallas Texans

    Dallas Texans

    • Sport: American football
    The Dallas Texans played in the National Football League for one season, 1952, with a record of 1–11. They were one of the worst teams in NFL history, both on and off the field. After the 1951 NFL season, the financially troubled New York Yanks franchise were put on the market. Ted Collins had founded that franchise in 1944 as the Boston Yanks, moved it to New York City in 1949 as the Bulldogs, and renamed it the Yanks in 1950. The franchise was reported to have been "sold back" to the league by Collins, but it is more likely the NFL revoked it. A few months later, a Dallas-based group led by a young millionaire, Giles Miller, bought the franchise and moved it to Dallas--the first-ever major league team to be based in Texas. Home games were scheduled to be played at the Cotton Bowl. Miller originally wanted to rename the team the Rangers, but later decided to rename them the Texans instead. Miller thought that Texas, with its longstanding support of college football, would be a natural fit for the NFL, and NFL owners approved the move with an 11-1 vote. Miller declared, "There is room in Texas for all kinds of football." However, the first game, against the New York Giants, set the
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    6.00
    2 votes
    194

    Halifax Town A.F.C.

    • Later known as: F.C. Halifax Town
    • Sport: Football
    Halifax Town Association Football Club were an English football team who most recently played in the Conference National, although prior to that they participated in the Football League for over eighty years. The club went into administration during the 2007–08 season, and after finishing 20th in the Conference National, were demoted by three divisions to the Northern Premier League Division One North when the club failed to get a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) passed. The club was reformed as F.C. Halifax Town in July 2008. The club played at The Shay (hence the reason for their nickname "The Shaymen") in Halifax, West Yorkshire, which is now the home of F.C. Halifax Town. The club was formed on 24 May 1911 at the Saddle Hotel. They played in the Yorkshire Combination and the Midland League and were one of the founder members of Football League Third Division North in 1921, and remained in that division until restructuring in 1958. They joined the Football League Third Division North in 1921–22 and remained in the league until World War II. Their highest position in this period was second in 1934–35. The club's fortunes were turned around in 1967 when Alan Ball Sr took over
    6.00
    2 votes
    195

    Montreal Expos

    • Later known as: Washington Nationals
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Montreal Expos (French: Les Expos de Montréal) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec from 1969 through 2004, holding the first MLB franchise awarded outside the United States. After the 2004 season, MLB moved the Expos to Washington, D.C. and renamed them the Nationals. Named after the Expo 67 World's Fair, the Expos started play at Jarry Park Stadium under manager Gene Mauch. The team's initial majority owner was Charles Bronfman, a major shareholder in Seagram. Following the 1976 Summer Olympics, starting in 1977 the team's home venue was Montreal's Olympic Stadium. After a decade of losing seasons, the team won a franchise-high 95 games in 1979, finishing second in the National League East. The Expos began the 1980s with a core group of young players, including catcher Gary Carter, outfielders Tim Raines and Andre Dawson, third baseman Tim Wallach, and pitchers Steve Rogers and Bill Gullickson. The team won its only division championship in the strike-shortened split season of 1981, ending its season with a 3 games to 2 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series. After a number of up-and-down seasons, the team was sold
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Los Angeles Raiders

    Los Angeles Raiders

    • Later known as: Oakland Raiders
    • Sport: American football
    The Los Angeles Raiders, who are the modern day Oakland Raiders, were an American football team based in Los Angeles, California who played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1982 through 1984.
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    5.00
    3 votes
    198

    Boston Yanks

    • Sport: American football
    The Boston Yanks were a National Football League team based in Boston, Massachusetts that played from 1944 to 1948. The team played its home games at Fenway Park. Games that conflicted with the Boston Red Sox schedule were held at the Manning Bowl in Lynn, Massachusetts. Team owner Ted Collins, who managed singer Kate Smith, picked the name "Yanks" because he originally wanted to run a team that played at New York City's Yankee Stadium. Unfortunately, the Yanks could only manage a 2-8 record during their first regular season. Because of a shortage of players caused by World War II, the Yanks were merged with the Brooklyn Tigers for the 1945 season, and styled as just the "Yanks" with no home city. The merged team played four home games in Boston and one in New York. But fans from neither city cared as they finished with a 3-6-1 record. When Brooklyn Tigers owner Dan Topping announced his intentions to join the All-America Football Conference in 1946, his NFL franchise was revoked and all of its players were assigned to the Yanks. After three continuous losing seasons, Collins finally was allowed to move to New York. But instead of an official relocation, he asked the league to
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    Hartford Dark Blues

    • Later known as: Brooklyn Hartfords
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Hartford Dark Blues were a 19th century baseball team. The team was based in Hartford, Connecticut. They were a member of the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players in 1874 and 1875 and the National League in 1876 and 1877. In 1877 the team played in Brooklyn, New York as the Brooklyn Hartfords. Playing at the Hartford Ball Club Grounds, in 1876 they joined the National League as a charter member. The team's owner, Morgan G. Bulkeley, was also the first president of the National League. Managed by their third baseman, Bob Ferguson, the Dark Blues went on to finish third in 1876 with a record of 47–21. The team's strong suit was pitching, with both Tommy Bond and future Hall of Famer Candy Cummings finishing with an earned run average under 2. The pitching staff recorded the most complete games (69) and allowed the lowest number of home runs throughout the 70-game 1876 campaign (the Philadelphia Athletics also accomplished this feat that season). The team's best hitter was right fielder Dick Higham, who led the team in most offensive categories. The team left Hartford and moved to Brooklyn, New York for the 1877 season to become the Brooklyn Hartfords. Managed
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    5.50
    2 votes
    201

    Oshawa Dodgers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Oshawa Dodgers were an independent, minor league baseball team of the semi-pro Intercounty Baseball League based in Oshawa, Ontario. They played their home games at Kinsmen Stadium. The team was founded by local amateur baseball coach Troy May and began play in the 2002 season. In addition to owning the Dodgers, May managed the club for their first four seasons before passing over the managerial duties to Mike Prosper in 2006. Troy May died during the final week of the 2006 season on July 19, four days after being involved in a serious automobile accident. Following the 2009 season, the Dodgers announced that they would be suspending all baseball operations indefinitely. The lack of fan support and high cost of operating the team were ownership's primary concerns.
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Team RadioShack

    Team RadioShack

    • Sport: Road bicycle racing
    Team RadioShack was a professional road bicycle racing team, with RadioShack as the title sponsor, the creation of which was announced on July 23, 2009. Lance Armstrong co-owned and led the team, which raced in the Grand Tours and the UCI ProTour. The team was managed by Capital Sports and Entertainment, an Austin, Texas sports and event management group that also manages the Trek-Livestrong U23 development cycling team and that ran the former Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team. Johan Bruyneel was Team RadioShack's initial overall manager and Dirk Demol is the directeur sportif. Former Discovery Channel cyclists Viatcheslav Ekimov from Russia and José Azevedo from Portugal was also part of the managerial squad. Armstrong said that the team will promote the Livestrong anti-cancer campaigns of his Lance Armstrong Foundation, and will also be sponsored by Trek Bicycle Corporation, SRAM Corporation and Nike, Inc. sportswear. The team ceased to exist in its current structure from the end of the 2011 season as Radioshack returned their World Tour Licence to the UCI. Their two main sponsors, Radioshack and Nissan have moved their sponsorship to Team Leopard Trek. Sporting Director Johann
    5.50
    2 votes
    204

    Thames Ironworks F.C.

    • Later known as: West Ham United F.C.
    Thames Ironworks Football Club, the club that later became West Ham United, was founded by Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Co. Ltd owner Arnold Hills and foreman Dave Taylor in 1895. Thames Ironworks took over the tenancy of The Old Castle Swifts' Hermit Road ground in Canning Town until their eventual eviction in October 1896. They would briefly play at Browning Road in East Ham, before moving to the Memorial Grounds, a stadium which was situated close to where West Ham station now stands. The ground was built at Arnold Hills' own expense, costing £20,000. Thames Ironworks were West Ham Charity Cup winners in 1895-96 and London League runners up and champions in 1896-97 and 1897-98. They were promoted to Southern League Division One in 1898-99 as Southern League Division Two Champions. They retained their Southern League status the following season by beating Fulham 5-1 in a Test Match. At the end of June 1900, Thames Ironworks F.C. resigned from the Southern League and were officially wound up. On 5 July 1900 they reformed under the new name of West Ham United F.C. and accepted an offer of the Southern League place left vacant by Thames Ironworks. Thames Ironworks F.C. was
    5.50
    2 votes
    205

    Brooklyn Ward's Wonders

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Brooklyn Ward's Wonders was a team who played in the Players' League in 1890. The team's nickname derived from its superstar shortstop, hall of famer John Montgomery Ward. The team finished with a 76-56 record, good enough to finish in second place. Other notable players for Brooklyn that year were Dave Orr, George Van Haltren, and Gus Weyhing. The team folded after the season along with the entire league. The team played its home games at Eastern Park.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Buffalo All-Stars

    Buffalo All-Stars

    • Later known as: Buffalo Niagaras
    • Sport: American football
    Buffalo, New York had a turbulent, early-era National Football League team that operated under three different names and several different owners between the 1910s and 1920s. The early NFL era franchise was variously called the Buffalo All-Stars from 1915 to 1917, Buffalo Niagaras in 1918, the Buffalo Prospects in 1919, Buffalo All-Americans from 1920–1923, Buffalo Bisons from 1924–1925, 1927 and 1929, and the Buffalo Rangers in 1926. The franchise, experiencing financial problems in 1928, did not participate in league play that season. The All-Stars played from 1915 to 1917 under the leadership of Barney Lepper; in 1917, Lepper took the team on a barnstorming tour of midwestern pro football teams. In 1918, the city's teams were not allowed to play outside the area because of the 1918 flu pandemic, and Lepper discontinued the All-Stars. Shoe salesman Warren D. Patterson, at the same time as this, formed a new team known as the Buffalo Niagaras, signing former Youngstown Patricians quarterback Ernest "Tommy" Hughitt as his quarterback. As the Niagaras, the team won a city-wide championship in 1918, going undefeated with a 6-0-0 record (including a forfeit), having only one touchdown
    6.00
    1 votes
    207

    Chicago Browns

    • Later known as: Pittsburgh Stogies
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Chicago Browns/Pittsburgh Stogies (also known as Chicago/Pittsburgh) were a short-lived professional baseball team in the Union Association of 1884. They were to battle the Chicago White Stockings, of the National League, for the Chicago baseball market, however the Browns lost that battle to the White Stockings. After a Baltimore mattress maker gave the club a degree of financial support, the Browns then tried to entice the White Stockings' Larry Corcoran, one of the 1880s top pitchers, to join the team. However the club did not succeed in doing so. The Chicago Browns disbanded after a game on August 22 1884. The club then moved to Pittsburgh and became the Stogies, which disbanded after a game played on September 18, 1884. Many of the club's players then joined the Baltimore Monumentals. Altogether, they won 41 games, lost 50 (including one forfeit), and tied 2, finishing sixth in the twelve-team league. While in Chicago, they played their home games at the first South Side Park. After they moved to Pittsburgh, their home games were played at Exposition Park. The Union Association officially folded on January 15, 1885 after only one season in existence.
    6.00
    1 votes
    208

    Louisville Brecks

    • Later known as: Louisville Colonels
    • Sport: American football
    Louisville, Kentucky had two professional American football teams in the National Football League: the Breckenridges (or Brecks for short) from 1921 to 1923 and the Colonels in 1926. The NFL intended for the Brecks to be a traveling team, however the team played a series of "home" games. All Brecks home games were played at Eclipse Park, until the stadium caught fire and burned to the ground on November 20, 1922. Meanwhile, the Colonels played all of their games on the road. While the Colonels were really a traveling team out of Chicago they are usually accepted as a continuation of the Brecks franchise. The Brecks dated their beginnings back to 1899. Officially the name of the team was the Louisville Breckenridge Club. The club was located in Louisville at corner of Fifth and St. Catherine Streets at what was then the city's perimeter. The Louisville Courier-Journal reported in 1922 that the Brecks dated "back fifteen years, springing from a boys neighborhood team, the Floyds and Brecks, that has kept itself intact probably longer than any independent team in the country." At first the team was considered an amateur team, made up of mostly neighborhood boys. However by 1919, the
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Philadelphia Athletics

    Philadelphia Athletics

    • Sport: Baseball
    Athletic of Philadelphia (also known as the Philadelphia Athletics) was a prominent National Association, and later National League, professional baseball team that played in the second half of the 19th century. The city of Philadelphia "had been a baseball town from the earliest days of the game", fielding amateur teams since at least the early 1830s. In 1860, James N. Kerns formed a club, simply named "Athletic Base Ball Club", that soon dominated amateur play in the area (Jordan 1999). Harper's Weekly chronicled a match between Athletic and Atlantic of Brooklyn for the baseball championship in 1866. A famous Harper's illustration shows the Athletic players in uniforms with the familiar blackletter "A" on front. When newspapers developed stand-alone game scores and league standings, the club was termed Athletic (Base Ball Club being dropped in any case). In prose the team was commonly called the Athletics, plural, and later generations have usually called both club and team the "Philadelphia Athletics". Athletic of Philadelphia is a compromise that contemporary readers would understand as an abbreviation for something like Athletic Base Ball Club, of Philadelphia in distinction
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Seattle Supersonics

    Seattle Supersonics

    • Later known as: Oklahoma City Thunder
    The Seattle SuperSonics (also commonly referred to as the Sonics) were an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington that played in the Pacific and Northwest Divisions of the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1967 until 2008. Following the 2007–08 season, the team relocated to Oklahoma City, and now plays as the Oklahoma City Thunder. The SuperSonics nickname, logo, and color scheme will be made available to any subsequent NBA team in Seattle, and according to the team's Oklahoma-based owners, the Sonics' franchise history would be shared between the Thunder and any future Seattle club. The SuperSonics won the NBA Championship in 1979, and are one of three teams out of the six major-league men's professional sports franchises that have existed in Seattle (the Sonics, Mariners, Pilots, Seahawks, Sounders, and Metropolitans, winners of the 1917 Stanley Cup) to have won a championship. Sam Schulman owned the team from its 1967 inception until 1983. It was also owned by Barry Ackerley (1983–2001), and the Basketball Club of Seattle, headed by Starbucks chairman Howard Schultz (2001–2006). On October 31, 2006, the SuperSonics' purchase by Oklahoma City
    6.00
    1 votes
    211

    Cleveland Blues

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Cleveland Blues were a Major League Baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio that operated in the National League from 1879 to 1884. In six seasons their best finish was third place in 1880. Hugh Daily threw a no-hitter for the Blues on Sept. 13, 1883. Besides Daily, notable Blues players included Baseball Hall of Fame member Ned Hanlon. The team was purchased by Charles Byrne in 1885 for $10,000 and folded into his Brooklyn Grays team. The franchise had two presidents during their existence; J. Ford Evans from 1879 to 1881, and C. H. Bulkeley from 1882 to 1885.
    5.00
    2 votes
    212

    Philadelphia Warriors

    • Later known as: Golden State Warriors
    The Philadelphia Phillies were an American basketball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that was a member of the American Basketball League. During their first season, the team was renamed the Philadelphia Warriors (also known as the Quakers).
    5.00
    2 votes
    213

    Toledo Maumees

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Toledo Maumees were originally formed in 1888. The team was based in Toledo, Ohio and formed part of the Tri-State League for one season. Their home games were played at Speranza Park in Toledo. In 1889, the Maumees moved to the International Association, where they were also known as the Toledo Black Pirates. Managed by former player Charlie Morton, the team finished in fourth place with a 54-51 record. Toledo first baseman Perry Werden won the batting title with a .394 average and also led the league in hits (167). In 1890 the team joined the American Association. Again with Morton at the helm, the Maumees won 68 games, lost 64, and finished fourth in the nine-team league. Their top hitters were right fielder Ed Swartwood, who batted .327 with a slugging percentage of .444, and first sacker Werden, who hit a .295 average and a .456 of slugging. Egyptian Healy (22-21, 2.89) and Fred Smith (19-13, 3.27) led the pitching staff. At the end of the season, the team folded. To date, they are in no relation to the Toledo Black Pirates of 1892, a club member of the original Western League which was based in the city. Led by manager Ed MacGregor, the Black Pirates went 28-29 to finish
    5.00
    2 votes
    214

    Cleveland Bulldogs

    • Later known as: Cleveland Indians
    • Sport: American football
    The Cleveland Bulldogs was a team that played in Cleveland, Ohio in the National Football League. They were originally called the Indians in 1923, not to be confused with the Cleveland Indians NFL franchise in 1922. However after team owner Samuel Deutsch purchased the Canton Bulldogs in 1924, he merged the Canton team with his Indians and renamed his franchise the Cleveland Bulldogs. The Canton Bulldogs remained a part of the team until 1925, when they were sold back to Canton. The Cleveland Bulldogs played in the NFL until 1928 when they were relocated to Detroit and became the Detroit Wolverines. The team was later incorporated into the New York Giants in 1929. The Cleveland Bulldogs won the 1924 NFL championship. Sam Deutsch, a Cleveland jeweler and boxing promoter who also owned a minor-league baseball team, bought an NFL franchise in 1923 and named the team the Indians. They played only seven games in that first season, but they had a shot at the championship, with a 3-0-3 record going into their final game against the Canton Bulldogs, who were also undefeated. The Indians were defeated 46-0 and posted a 3-1-3 league record, finishing fifth in the league, which comprised
    4.50
    2 votes
    215

    SG Wallau-Massenheim

    • Later known as: HSG Frankfurt RheinMain
    • Sport: Team handball
    SG Wallau-Massenheim is a team handball club from Wallau (which belongs to Hofheim), Germany. Currently, the club competes in the 2. Bundesliga Süd
    4.50
    2 votes
    216

    Washington Nationals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The 1884 Washington Nationals were a member of the Union Association. They were managed by Mike Scanlon and finished in seventh place with a record of 47-65. Their home games were played at Capitol Grounds. The Nationals folded with the rest of the Union Association when that league was discontinued after 1884, its only season of operation. This team should not be confused with the other 1884 Washington Nationals franchise, a different team which played in the American Association that year.
    4.50
    2 votes
    217

    Card-Pitt

    • Later known as: Chicago Cardinals
    • Sport: American football
    Card-Pitt was the name for the team created by the temporary merger of two National Football League (NFL) teams, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Chicago Cardinals, during the 1944 season. It was the second such merger for the Steelers, who had combined with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1943 to form the "Steagles". The arrangement was made necessary by the loss of numerous players to World War II military service, and was dissolved upon completion of the season. The war ended before the start of the 1945 season, and both teams resumed normal operations. Card-Pitt finished with a 0–10 record in the Western Division, which led sportswriters to derisively label the team the "Car-Pitts", or "carpets". Sixty-five years after the merger, the Steelers met the Cardinals, by then based in Arizona, in Super Bowl XLIII. The Boston Yanks joined the NFL in 1944, while the Cleveland Rams, who had been unable to field a team in 1943, re-joined the league. This resulted in an 11-team league, and the NFL was unable to devise a schedule that was amenable to all registered teams. NFL commissioner Elmer Layden contacted Art Rooney and Bert Bell of the Steelers to request that their team again merge as a
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Detroit Shock

    • Later known as: Tulsa Shock
    • Sport: Basketball
    The Detroit Shock was a Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Auburn Hills, Michigan. They were the 2003, 2006 and 2008 WNBA champion. As of 2011, they remain the only Eastern Conference franchise (other than the 1997 Houston Comets, who moved to the Western Conference the following year) to win a WNBA Championship. Debuting in 1998, it was one of the league's first expansion franchises. It was also the first WNBA expansion franchise to win a WNBA Championship. The team was the sister team of the Detroit Pistons and during the 2009 season was coached by Pistons legend Rick Mahorn. On October 20, 2009, it was announced that the Shock would be moving to Tulsa, Oklahoma to play in the new downtown arena, the BOK Center. Former men's college coach Nolan Richardson was named the team's new head coach. The Shock roster and history was retained along with the Shock name, but the team colors were changed to black, red, and gold. The Shock were one of the first WNBA expansion teams and began play in 1998. The Detroit Shock quickly brought in a blend of rookies and veterans. The Shock's first coach was hall of famer Nancy Lieberman. The Shock would start out their
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Detroit Wolverines

    Detroit Wolverines

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Detroit Wolverines were a 19th century baseball team that played in the National League from 1881 to 1888 in the city of Detroit, Michigan. In total, they won 426 games and lost 437, taking their lone pennant (and World Series) in 1887. The team was disbanded following the 1888 season. Founded at the suggestion of Detroit mayor William G. Thompson, the Wolverines played the first game of major league baseball in Detroit on May 2, 1881, in front of 1,286 fans. Their home field was called Recreation Park, and it consisted of a wooden grandstand located between Brady Street and Willis Avenue. This stadium was demolished in 1894, though its location is indicated by a historical marker in what was once left field. The name of the ball club derives from Michigan being known as "The Wolverine State". The team name "Wolverines" is now primarily associated with University of Michigan sports. Though they folded after only eight seasons, the Wolverines occupy an important place in baseball history. On September 6 1883, they conceded 18 runs in a single inning against the Chicago White Stockings, the most ever in MLB. In 1885, new owner Frederick Kimball Stearns began spending heavily in
    5.00
    1 votes
    220

    Kansas City Unions

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Kansas City Unions were a major league baseball team in the Union Association in its only season, 1884. Sometimes called the "Cowboys", they had no official nickname during their short life and were rarely referred to by the local press of the day as anything but the "Unions" or the "Kaycees". They were the first professional baseball team to represent Kansas City as well as the city's first major league team. They began play as a replacement for the Altoona Mountain City, which collapsed in May, and played out the remainder of the season. Despite a 16-63 (.203 WL percentage) finish, the franchise was one of only two (the St. Louis club being the other) in the league to make a profit. In contemporary newspaper reports, the team had Altoona's record (6-19) combined with their own and were considered to have finished last in an eight-team league. The Unions disbanded shortly after the Union Association voted to dissolve. Kansas City was represented in the minor league Western League the next season, and had at least one professional baseball team in town continuously until 1968.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Los Angeles Rams

    Los Angeles Rams

    • Later known as: St. Louis Rams
    • Sport: American football
    The LA Rams (now known as the Saint Louis Rams) was an American Football team that played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum from 1946-1979 and then Anaheim Stadium from 1980-1994. They won an NFL championship in 1951
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    San Francisco Seals

    San Francisco Seals

    The San Francisco Seals were a minor league baseball team in San Francisco, California, that played in the Pacific Coast League from 1903 until 1957 before transferring to Phoenix, Arizona. They were named for the abundant California Sea Lion and Harbor Seal populations in the Bay Area. Along with the Los Angeles Angels, Portland Beavers, Oakland Oaks, Sacramento Solons, and Seattle Indians, the Seals were charter members of the Pacific Coast League which was founded in 1903. The team played its home games at Recreation Park at Harrison and 8th Streets until it was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake. The mild climate of the West Coast allowed the PCL to play a much longer season than the majors and the other eastern professional baseball leagues. Seasons often ran 200 games or more, especially in the early years. In the 1905 season, the Seals set the all-time PCL record by playing in 230 games (Pacific Coast Baseball League Record Book 1903-1969, compiled by William J. Weiss, League Statistician; published by the PCL, 1969; p. 30). The Seals finished out the 1906 season playing home games at Freeman's Park in Oakland. A new Recreation Park was constructed at 14th and Valencia Streets
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    5.00
    1 votes
    224

    Baltimore Monumentals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Baltimore Monumentals were an American baseball team in the short-lived Union Association. In their lone season of 1884, they finished fourth in the UA with a 58-47 record. The team was managed by William Henderson. Their top-hitting regular was left fielder Emmett Seery, who batted .311 with a slugging percentage of .408, and their ace pitcher was Bill Sweeney, who was 40-21 with an earned run average of 2.59, and pitched 538 of the team's 946 innings. The Monumentals were disbanded after the Union Association folded at the end of the 1884 season. The Monumentals' home ground was the Belair Lot, which was sometimes known as the Union Association Grounds. On July 4, 1884, Baltimore played a split double header against the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds and the run-away league leaders, the St. Louis Maroons, which saw a sellout crowd in attendance. The field also hosted a home game for the traveling Chicago Browns team. The team did play one game on August 25, 1884 at the larger Madison Avenue Ground, in a win against the Washington Nationals. However, the playing field was deemed unfit to use and they returned to the Belair Lot. Baltimore was the first city to erect a monument to
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    Louisville Colonels

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Louisville Colonels were a Major League Baseball team that played in the American Association throughout that league's ten-year existence from 1882 until 1891, first as the Louisville Eclipse (1882–1884) and later as the Louisville Colonels (1885–1891), the latter name derived from the historic Kentucky colonels. They then joined the National League after the AA folded and played through the 1899 season. It was also the name of several minor league baseball teams that played in Louisville, Kentucky, in the 20th century. After spending several years as a well-known semi-pro team, the Eclipse joined the new American Association in 1882. The team's backer, local distiller J. H. Pank, was named vice-president of the AA, and the team was to be run by a consortium led by W. L. Lyons. Accompanying them to the major leagues was their star player, infielder Pete Browning, who had already achieved some measure of local fame. The team got off to a good start, finishing in second place that first season. That would be their best finish for several seasons. Ownership troubles were also afoot, as managing partner Lyons resigned in mid-1888, with team secretary Mordecai Davidson taking over.
    4.00
    1 votes
    227

    Pittsfield Red Sox

    • Later known as: Pittsfield Senators
    • Sport: Baseball
    The Pittsfield Red Sox was the name of an American minor league baseball franchise based in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, from 1965 through 1969. It was the Double-A Eastern League affiliate in the Boston Red Sox farm system and produced future Major League Baseball players such as George Scott, Sparky Lyle, Reggie Smith and Hall of Famer Carlton Fisk. The team played at Wahconah Park. The Berkshire city fielded its first team in Organized Baseball in 1894 when the Pittsfield Colts debuted in the New York State League, but the Colts folded after 30 games. After the Pittsfield Electrics played two seasons (1913–14) in the Class B Eastern Association, which folded after the 1914 campaign, Pittsfield was first represented in the Eastern League (then Class A) in 1919-20 as the Hillies, and won the 1919 EL pennant. Pittsfield then fielded a team in the Class C Canadian-American League from 1941 through 1951 (although the league suspended operations for 1943-45 due to World War II). This club, initially nicknamed the Electrics, was affiliated with the Detroit Tigers (1942), Cleveland Indians (1946–50) and Philadelphia Phillies (1951). After 1948, it dropped the Electrics identity and was
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    4.00
    1 votes
    229

    St. Louis All Stars

    • Sport: American football
    St. Louis All-Stars was a professional football team that played in the National Football League during the 1923 season. The team played at St. Louis, Missouri's Sportsman's Park. Ollie Kraehe owned, managed, coached and played guard for the team. The idea came for the All-Stars came to Ollie Kraehe, while he was still a substitute offensive lineman playing for the Rock Island Independents. Kraehe figured that if small towns markets, like Green Bay and Rock Island, could be successful operating a professional football team, then operating in a larger market, like St. Louis would bring in even more income. He was a local football hero in St. Louis since he had played college football at Washington University in St. Louis, alongside Jimmy Conzelman and had captained the 1921 team. In 1923, NFL President Joe Carr gave Kraehe an NFL franchise. He paid $100 for the franchise and began organizing a team, about a month before the 1923 season was to start. He also named his club the "All-Stars," however he soon discovered that there was a lack of All-American talent available. Many of the players were locals who came from St. Louis University and Washington University. Kraehe alater stated
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Syracuse Stars

    Syracuse Stars

    • Sport: Baseball
    Syracuse Stars was the name of two separate 19th century major league baseball teams and several minor league teams:
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    Washington Nationals

    Washington Nationals

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Washington Nationals, sometimes referred to as the Washington Statesmen, was a professional baseball team in the mid to late 1880s. They existed for a period of four years as a member of the National League (NL) from 1886 to 1889. During their four-year tenure they had six different managers and compiled a record of 163-337, for a .326 winning percentage. The franchise played their home games at Swampoodle Grounds. Their most notable player was catcher Connie Mack, who went on to a Hall of Fame career as manager of the American League Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1950. Outfielder Dummy Hoy, notable for being deaf, played for the 1888 and 1889 Washington teams.
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    0.00
    0 votes
    234

    Cleveland Indians

    • Sport: American football
    The Cleveland Indians was a professional football team in the National Football League for the 1931 season. The 1931 team was a league-sponsored club that only played games on the road. The NFL intended to locate this team permanently in Cleveland. However no suitable owner was found, so the franchise folded after just one season. The "Indians" name was used previously for two other Cleveland-based NFL teams. They first use of the Indians name came in 1921, when the Cleveland Tigers became the "Cleveland Indians" before folding after the 1921 season. A second "Indians" NFL team arose in 1923. That team played as the "Indians" for the 1923 season before changing their name to the Cleveland Bulldogs in 1924. These three Cleveland teams are viewed as three totally different franchises by the NFL.
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Cleveland Spiders

    Cleveland Spiders

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Cleveland Spiders were a Major League Baseball team which played between 1887 and 1899 in Cleveland, Ohio. The team played at National League Park from 1889 to 1890 and at League Park from 1891 to 1899. The Spiders first fielded a team in the American Association (then a major league) in 1887. At the time, they were known as the Cleveland Forest Citys or Cleveland Blues. The team was organized by Frank Robison, who eventually brought his brother Stanley aboard to help run the club. The Forest Citys were a weak team in their early years. In 1889, they moved to the National League and became known as the Spiders. They started to improve in 1891, largely due to the signing of future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young. The Spiders had their first taste of success in 1892 when they finished 93-56 overall; winning the second half by three games over Boston with a 53-23 record. Other than standout second baseman Cupid Childs, the Spiders had an unremarkable offense. Their success in 1892 was built on pitching strength; Young was the NL's most dominant hurler, and 22-year-old Nig Cuppy had an outstanding rookie year. Following the season, a "World's Championship Series" exhibition
    0.00
    0 votes
    236

    Cleveland Tigers

    • Sport: American football
    The Cleveland Tigers were the first Cleveland, Ohio team franchise in what became the National Football League. The Tigers played in the "Ohio League" before joining the American Professional Football Association (later renamed the National Football League in 1922) during the 1920 and 1921 seasons. The Cleveland Indians football team was originally established in 1916 and played in the Ohio League. The team was formed after the Massillon Tigers raid the Akron Indians roster in 1915 and took away many of their star players. That year Peggy Parratt, the Akron Indians player-coach formed the Cleveland Indians with several former ex-Akron Indians players and a few new ex-college players. Despite a winning record, the 1916 Indians season was disappointing, losing twice to the Canton Bulldogs, who were led by Jim Thorpe, and splitting a pair of games with the Columbus Panhandles. In 1920, when owners of professional teams organized a more structured league, Jimmy O'Donnell, a local sports promoter, obtained the Cleveland franchise. O'Donnell, also the owner of a semi-pro baseball team called the Tigers, was aided in his football venture by Stan Cofall, a football star at Notre Dame from
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Frankford Yellow Jackets

    Frankford Yellow Jackets

    • Sport: American football
    The Frankford Yellow Jackets were a professional American football team, part of the National Football League from 1924 to 1931, though its origin dates back to as early as 1899 with the Frankford Athletic Association. The Yellow Jackets won the NFL championship in 1926. The team played its home games from 1923 in Frankford Stadium (also called Yellow Jacket Field) in Frankford, a section in the northeastern part of Philadelphia, noted for the subway-elevated transit line that terminates there. The Frankford Athletic Association was organized in May 1899 in the parlor of the Suburban Club. The cost of purchasing a share in the association, was $10. However there were also contributing memberships, ranging from $1 to $2.50, made available to the general public. The Association was a community-based non-profit organization of local residents and businesses. In keeping with its charter, which stated that "all profits shall be donated to charity". All of the team's excess income was donated to local charitable institutions. The beneficiaries of this generosity included Frankford Hospital, the Frankford Day Nursery, the local Boy Scouts and the local American Legion Post 211. The
    0.00
    0 votes
    238

    Kintetsu Buffaloes

    • Later known as: Osaka Kintetsu Buffaloes
    • Sport: Baseball
    Kintetsu Buffaloes is the former name of the Japanese baseball team Osaka Kintetsu Buffaloes from 1962 until 1998.
    0.00
    0 votes
    239

    Michigan Stags

    • Later known as: Baltimore Blades
    The Michigan Stags were a professional ice hockey team based in Detroit, Michigan that played a portion of the 1974–75 season in the World Hockey Association. On January 18, 1975, the franchise was moved to Baltimore where it was known as the Baltimore Blades. The Stags originated as the Los Angeles Sharks, one of the WHA's original twelve teams. The Stags played at Cobo Arena, and the Blades at the Baltimore Civic Center. Having made their fortunes in industrial chemicals, Detroiters Charles Nolton and Peter Shagena bought the Los Angeles Sharks from Dennis Murphy and relocated the club to Detroit as the Michigan Stags. Coached by former Red Wing player and coach Johnny Wilson, the Stags began play in the 1974–75 season. The owners believed the Stags could be an alternative to the NHL's Detroit Red Wings, who had not been a factor in the NHL for most of the decade. Unfortunately, the Stags were as much of a disaster on ice as were the Red Wings. The team was composed of journeymen at best, with the exceptions of star left winger Marc Tardif, veteran Western leaguer Gary Veneruzzo and beleaguered ex-NHL goaltender Gerry Desjardins. On a side note Desjardins found his way back to
    0.00
    0 votes
    240

    Minneapolis Marines

    • Later known as: Minneapolis Red Jackets
    • Sport: American football
    The Minneapolis Marines were an early professional football team that existed from 1905 until 1924. The team was later resurrected from 1929 to 1930 under the Minneapolis Red Jackets banner. The Marines were owned locally by Minneapolitans John Dunn and Val Ness, and composed primarily of working-class teenagers. Some of the first games were played at Camden Park, Parade Stadium, and Bottineau Field. Later games were played at larger stadiums such as Nicollet Park and Lexington Park. The Minneapolis Marines are of historical value to Minnesota, as they are the first Minnesota-based team to join the National Football League, predating the Duluth Eskimos (1923) and Minnesota Vikings (1961). The Marines, formed mostly in 1905, were composed of working-class teenagers that came from the area that is located close to the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome at the junction between Cedar and Washington Avenues. The team began play in the 115-pound weight class, and by 1907 had moved up to the 145-pound weight class. The team's 1907 roster consisted of future professional stars Walt Buland, Sheepy Redeen, Dutch Gaustad and its star player Rube Ursella. In 1909 future boxer, Labe Safro, joined the
    0.00
    0 votes
    241

    New York Giants

    • Sport: Baseball
    In 1890, the short-lived Players' League included a team called the New York Giants. This baseball team was managed by Hall of Famer Buck Ewing, and they finished third with a record of 74-57. Besides Ewing, who was also a catcher on this team, the roster several former members of the National League New York Giants, such as Hall of Famers Roger Connor, Jim O'Rourke, and Tim Keefe. The team played its home games at the Polo Grounds. After the season, their owner, Edward Talcott, bought a minority stake in the National League Giants--in effect, merging the two clubs.
    0.00
    0 votes
    242

    Newark Peppers

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Newark Peppers, originally known as the Indianapolis Hoosiers, were a Federal League baseball team from 1914-1915. The Federal League (FL) was a third major league during its brief existence. When the FL opened for business in 1914 as a challenger to the two major leagues, one franchise was placed in Indianapolis, Indiana. Primarily owned by oil magnate Harry F. Sinclair, this team won the Federal League championship in 1914 with an 88-65 record. The team played at Federal League Park. The team's roster included future Baseball Hall of Fame members Edd Roush and Bill McKechnie. Although the FL had placed a team (the Tip-Tops) in Brooklyn, from the outset FL officials felt they could more effectively compete commercially against the American and National leagues by placing a team in Manhattan. All attempts were effectively blocked by principals of the two existing Manhattan teams (the New York Giants and the New York Yankees). FL executives decided to relocate the Indianapolis franchise to a major city in the New York metropolitan area, and Newark was chosen. Although the team was christened the Newark Peppers (and called "The Peps" for short), the team actually played at
    0.00
    0 votes
    243

    North Shore Spirit

    • Sport: Baseball
    The North Shore Spirit was a minor-league baseball team based in Lynn, Massachusetts from 2003 to 2007. The Spirit played in the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball (the "Can-Am League," also known as the Northeast League), an independent league that is not affiliated with Major League Baseball or with the Minor League Baseball organization. The team was originally known as the Waterbury Spirit, based out of Waterbury, Connecticut. The Spirit were owned by Nicholas Lopardo throughout their five-year history in Lynn. The Waterbury Spirit began play in 1997 in the Northeast League. During the team's four year stint in Connecticut, they made the playoffs three times, losing in the first round all three times. The team folded following the 2000 season. Originally, the team was to be known as the "Waterbury Wizards" but a potential lawsuit with the Fort Wayne Wizards prompted the team to seek alternate names. Lopardo acquired the team in 2002 when he purchased the inactive franchise. After the formation of the team was announced in August 2002, Lopardo funded a massive, expensive renovation of Fraser Field. $2 million was put into improvements in seating, comfort, and
    0.00
    0 votes
    244

    Philadelphia Athletics

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Philadelphia Athletics were a professional baseball team, one of six charter members of the American Association, a 19th-century major league, which began play in 1882 as a rival to the National League. The other teams were the Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Red Stockings, Eclipse of Louisville, Pittsburgh Alleghenys, and St. Louis Brown Stockings. The team took its name from a previous team, which played in the National Association from 1871 through 1875 and in the National League in 1876. Over the ten years of their existence, the Athletics were a successful club on the field, winning 633 games and losing 564, for a winning percentage of .529. The team won the AA pennant in 1883, finishing one game ahead of the St. Louis team. That same year, however, the National League set up its own team in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Quakers (later Phillies). The Quakers finished last in 1883, but soon improved on the field and at the gate. Their home games were played at Oakdale Park in 1882, and at the Jefferson Street Grounds from 1883 to 1890. In addition, games were also occasionally played at Gloucester Point Grounds. They had eight different managers, with co-owner Bill Sharsig
    0.00
    0 votes
    245

    Philadelphia Pirates

    • Later known as: Philadelphia Liberty FC
    The Philadelphia Pirates were a WPSL soccer club based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The club ceased operations after the 2006 season. Philadelphia Liberty FC now represents the Philadelphia area in the WPSL.
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    0.00
    0 votes
    247

    St. Thomas Elgins

    • Sport: Baseball
    The St. Thomas Elgins was an independent, minor league baseball team of the semi-professional Intercounty Baseball League based in St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada. They began play as the St. Thomas Legion in 1948 and were renamed the Elgins in 1953; the team disappeared in 1961 and re-emerged as few years after and lasted until 1996. The team was folded in 1996 and were replaced by the Storm in 2000. Intercounty League
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Team HTC-Columbia

    Team HTC-Columbia

    HTC-Highroad (UCI team code:THR) is a former professional cycling team competing in international road bicycle races. Their last title sponsor was HTC Corporation, a Taiwanese manufacturer of smartphones but dissolved at the end of the 2011 season from a failure to find a new sponsor. High Road Sports was the management company of team manager Bob Stapleton. Past title sponsors include Columbia Sportswear and Deutsche Telekom. The team was founded in 1991 as Team Telekom, sponsored by Deutsche Telekom. In 2004 their name changed to the T-Mobile-Team. It contains a total of 29 riders, 9 physiotherapists or nurses, 9 mechanics and service persons, and has 22 partners. The team is under the management of Bob Stapleton and Rolf Aldag. Former leaders include Olaf Ludwig, Walter Godefroot and Eddy Vandenhecke (managers), Luuc Eisenga (spokesperson) and Brian Holm, Valerio Piva (sports directors). At the end of 1988, former World Champion Hennie Kuiper set up a German cycling team that was sponsored by the city of Stuttgart and rode on Eddy Merckx cycles. The team was called Stuttgart-Merckx-Gonsor for the 1989 season and had nine riders (which included Udo Bölts). At that time when there
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Toronto Maple Leafs

    Toronto Maple Leafs

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Toronto Maple Leafs were a high-level minor league baseball club located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that played from 1896 to 1967. While the Maple Leafs had working agreements with numerous Major League Baseball clubs after the introduction of farm systems in the 1930s, they achieved great success as an unaffiliated club during the 1950s, when they were the strongest team on the field and in attendance in the AAA International League. Toronto was without professional baseball from 1968–1976; in 1977 it received an expansion club in the American League, called the Blue Jays; the team still plays today. The first Toronto club, Toronto Baseball Club, played in the Canadian League in 1885, playing its home games at William Cawthra's Jarvis Street Lacrosse Grounds (Old Lacrosse Grounds) at the northwest corner of Jarvis and Wellesley Street. It finished the season in third place. The next year, Toronto left the Canadian League along with Hamilton to join the original International League (also called the International Association), where it played from 1886–1890. The baseball stadium that would come to be known as Sunlight Park was built for the team and opened on May 22, 1886,
    0.00
    0 votes
    250

    Troy Trojans

    • Sport: Baseball
    The Troy Trojans were a Major League Baseball team in the National League for four seasons from 1879 to 1882. Their home games were played at Putnam Grounds (1879), Haymakers' Grounds (1880-1881), and Troy Ball Clubs Grounds (1882), all in the upstate New York city of Troy. Overall, the franchise won 131 games and lost 194. They were disbanded after the 1882 season. In 1883 the New York Gothams, later the New York and San Francisco Giants, took the Trojans' place in the National League. Nearly half of the original Gotham players were members of the recently disbanded Trojans. Notable players for the Trojans included Hall of Famers Dan Brouthers, Roger Connor, Buck Ewing, Tim Keefe, and Mickey Welch.
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Defunct Sports Team of All Time

    Top List Voters