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Best Deceased Organism of All Time

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    1
    Roman Brother

    Roman Brother

    Roman Brother (foaled in 1961 in Florida) was an American Champion Thoroughbred racehorse. As a two-year-old, Roman Brother was initially overshadowed by his stable companion Raise a Native before emerging as one of the year's leading juveniles with a win in the Champagne Stakes. As a three-year-old he was highly tried, running twenty times and winning six races including the Jersey Derby and the American Derby. He was also placed second in the Belmont Stakes and the Jockey Club Gold Cup. He reached his peak as a four-year-old in 1965 when he was voted American Horse of the Year in a poll conducted by the Daily Racing Form. Roman Brother was a bay gelding bred by the Ocala Stud Farm in Marion County Florida. He was sired by Third Brother, who won the Long Island Handicap for his owner-breeder Christopher Chenery in 1956. Third Brother showed some promise as a stallion before his death in 1963: in addition to Roman Brother he sired Exceedingly, who defeated Damascus in the William Dupont Jr. Handicap. Roman Brother's dam, Roman Zephyr won four races and was a descendant of the influential broodmare Plucky Liege. In January 1963 Roman Brother was sent to the Florida Breeders' sale
    8.00
    6 votes
    2

    King Timahoe

    King Timahoe was a presidential pet during the Nixon administration. Named after a village in Co Kildare, Ireland, King Timahoe was a male Irish Setter and a fond companion of the late president. King Timahoe is also the name of an anonymous Internet blog, where the writers comment on politics and current events as if they are the former White House hound. Irish Setter,List of United States Presidential pets,Richard Nixon,Watergate,
    7.00
    7 votes
    3
    Shamu

    Shamu

    Shamu was the first orca to survive more than 13 months in captivity and was the star of a very popular killer whale show at SeaWorld San Diego in the mid - late 1960s. She was the fourth killer whale (orca) ever captured (the second female) and was the third orca ever displayed in a public exhibit. After her death in 1971, the name Shamu continued to be used in SeaWorld "Shamu" orca shows for different killer whales in different SeaWorld parks. Shamu represents the first successful intentional live-capture of a healthy orca. Three previous orca captures (including Moby Doll and Namu) had been more opportunistic. The way Shamu got her name was from Namu, She+Namu=Shamu. The very young (14 foot / 4.25m, 2000 lb / 900 kg) Southern Resident orca was captured by Ted Griffin in Puget Sound in October 1965 to be a companion for the orca Namu at Griffin's Seattle public aquarium. But the new orca was soon leased to and then purchased by SeaWorld in San Diego in December 1965. She was retired from performing after an incident in which she grabbed and refused to release the leg of a female SeaWorld employee who was riding her as part of a filmed publicity event.
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    Carbine

    Carbine

    Carbine (1885–1914), was an outstanding New Zealand bred Thoroughbred racehorse, who competed in New Zealand and later Australia. During his racing career he won 30 stakes or principal races. Owing to his performance on the track and his subsequent achievements as a sire, he became one of five inaugural inductees into both the New Zealand Racing Hall of Fame and the Australian Racing Hall of Fame. Carbine was foaled at Sylvia Park Stud near Auckland, New Zealand on 18 September 1885. He was a bay stallion by the English Ascot Stakes winner and successful sire Musket out of the imported mare Mersey (GB) by Knowsley. Carbine was inbred to Brown Bess in the third and fourth generations. He was a half-brother to the stakes winning stallion, Carnage, winner of the VRC Victoria Derby, AJC Champagne Stakes, VRC Spring Stakes and VRC Essendon Stakes. When fully mature, Carbine stood about 16 hands 1 inch in height, possessed good conformation and temperament, although he had some foibles. During his career on the race track, Carbine started 43 times for 33 wins, six seconds and three thirds, failing to place only once due to a badly split hoof. He was popular with racing fans, and sporting
    8.80
    5 votes
    5
    Sparkie

    Sparkie

    • Place of death: Forest Hall
    Sparkie Williams (1954–1962) was a talking budgie who provided the inspiration for a new opera by Michael Nyman and Carsten Nicolai. The opera was performed in Berlin in March 2009. Sparkie had a repertoire of more than 500 words and eight nursery rhymes, becoming a national celebrity after fronting an advertising campaign for Capern’s bird seed, and making a record which sold 20,000 copies. After he died, he was stuffed and put on show at Newcastle’s Hancock Museum. Born and bred in North East England, Sparkie was owned by Mrs Mattie Williams, who lived in Forest Hall, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He earned his name after Mrs Williams called him ‘A bright little spark,' and she taught him to speak, recite songs and sing nursery rhymes. Sparkie had a huge repertoire of words and sayings. By the time he was three-and-a-half, he had won the BBC International Cage Word Contest in July 1958. He was so good, in fact, that he was disqualified from taking part again. Sparkie was courted by bird seed sellers and fronted the advertisement campaign for Capern’s bird seed for two years. He was recorded talking with budgie expert Philip Marsden on BBC radio, and appeared on the BBC Tonight
    6.43
    7 votes
    6
    Traveller

    Traveller

    Traveller (1857–1871) was Confederate General Robert E. Lee's most famous horse during the American Civil War. Traveller, originally named Jeff Davis, was born near the Blue Sulphur Springs, in Greenbrier County, Virginia (now West Virginia) and raised by Andrew Johnston. An American Saddlebred, he was of Grey Eagle stock; as a colt, he took the first prize at the Lewisburg, Virginia fairs in 1859 and 1860. As an adult gelding, he was a sturdy horse, 16 hands (64 inches, 163 cm) high and 1,100 pounds (500 kg), iron gray in color with black points, a long mane and flowing tail. In the spring of 1861, a year before achieving fame as a Confederate general, Robert E. Lee was commanding a small force in western Virginia. The quartermaster of the 3rd Virginia Infantry, Captain Joseph M. Broun, was directed to "purchase a good serviceable horse of the best Greenbrier stock for our use during the war." Broun purchased the horse for $175 (approximately $4,000 in 2008) from Andrew Johnston's son, Captain James W. Johnston, and named him Greenbrier. Major Thomas L. Broun, Joseph's brother recalled that Greenbrier ... was greatly admired in camp for his rapid, springy walk, his high spirit,
    6.43
    7 votes
    7
    Sir Archy

    Sir Archy

    Sir Archy (or Archy, Archie, or Sir Archie; 1805–1833) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse. Born and bred in Virginia by two Americans, Capt. Archibald Randolph and Col. John Tayloe III, Sir Archy's sire was the Epsom Derby winner Diomed, who had been imported from England as an older horse. His dam, a blind mare named Castianira, had been purchased in England by Tayloe for his own Airy Farm, but was bred on shares with his friend Randolph. Sir Archy, Castianira's second foal, was born on Randolph’s Ben Lomond Plantation on the James River in Goochland County. The colt, dark bay with a small patch of white on his right hind pastern, was originally named "Robert Burns"; Tayloe changed the colt’s name in honor of Randolph. When Sir Archy was two, Tayloe and Randolph sold him to Ralph Wormely IV for $400 and an unknown filly. When Wormely later decided to quit horse racing Sir Archy was offered for sale, but there were no takers. Still owned by Wormely, Sir Archy made his first start in the Washington (D.C.) Sweepstakes late in his three-year-old season; by now, he already stood 16 hands high. Though Sir Archy had not yet recovered from a case of strangles Wormely ran him, rather
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    Ah Meng

    Ah Meng

    • Place of death: Singapore Zoo
    Ah Meng (circa 18 June 1960 – 8 February 2008) (Chinese: 阿明) was a female Sumatran Orangutan and a tourism icon of Singapore. She was smuggled from Indonesia and kept illegally as a domestic pet before being recovered by a veterinarian in 1971. She was then eleven years old and was given a home at the Singapore Zoo. Ah Meng was the head of her small clan, which lives in a large enclosure with about twenty other orangutans. She had five children and became a grandmother in 1990. She belonged to the Sumatran Orangutan species, a rarer breed of orangutan now critically endangered due to illegal logging and poaching. There are about only 7,500 Sumatran Orangutans left in the wild in the rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia. Ah Meng died on 8 February 2008. Ah Meng was the poster girl of the Singapore Zoo. Pictures of her have been used in Singapore's tourism advertisements worldwide. She has also been featured in over 30 travel films and more than 300 articles. Some of the foreign dignitaries and celebrities that visited Ah Meng included Prince Philip and Michael Jackson. Due to her early years being raised by a family, Ah Meng was more approachable by humans than other primates in her
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Luna

    Luna

    Luna (September 19, 1999 – March 10, 2006) also known as L98 or Tsuux'iit, was a killer whale (orca) born in Puget Sound. After being separated from his mother as a toddler, Luna spent five years in Nootka Sound, off the west coast of Vancouver Island. Although Luna was healthy and his presence in the area delighted tourists and drew a large paparazzi, there were concerns that his behavior was endangering people. After years of debate, the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) authorized an effort in June 2004 to capture Luna and return him to his family. However, the plan was ultimately thwarted by the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nations, who believed Luna was a reincarnation of a former chief. The orca was killed by a tugboat in 2006. Luna was born into a population known as the Southern Resident Killer Whale community. This population, which consisted of approximately 80 killer whales at the time of Luna's birth, has been extensively studied since the 1970s. Scientists have learned to recognize each individual in the population by photo-identification, and can thus track individual movements and social relationships year after year. Thus it is known that Luna was born
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Eight Belles

    Eight Belles

    Eight Belles (February 23, 2005 – May 3, 2008) was a thoroughbred racehorse owned by Rick Porter's Fox Hill Farms. She finished second to winner Big Brown in the 134th running of the Kentucky Derby held at Churchill Downs, a race run by only thirty-nine fillies in the past. Her collapse just after the Derby's conclusion resulted in immediate euthanasia. Earlier in the year, Eight Belles made history at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Arkansas, by being the first filly in the history of the track to win the Martha Washington Stakes (February 17, 2008, by 13½ lengths, setting a stakes record for margin of victory), the Honeybee Stakes (March 16, 2008, beating stakes winner Pure Clan), and the Fantasy Stakes (April 12, 2008). Eight Belles collapsed immediately after crossing the wire, while being slowed after the race. She suffered compound fractures of both front ankles and was immediately euthanized because of the nature of her injuries. Dr. Larry Bramlage, the on-call veterinarian, claimed that Eight Belles' trauma was too severe to even attempt to move her off the track. According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, Bramlage said the filly had fractures of the cannon and sesamoid
    7.00
    6 votes
    11

    Bamboo Harvester

    Bamboo Harvester was the name of the Palomino horse that portrayed Mister Ed on the 1961–1966 comedy series of the same name. Foaled in 1949 in El Monte, California, the gelding was trained by Will Rogers' protégé, Les Hilton. With Hilton's help, Bamboo Harvester showcased Ed's remarkable intelligence. In 1968, two years after the cancellation of Mister Ed, at the age of 19, Bamboo began to suffer from a variety of age related ailments, including kidney problems and arthritis. He was euthanized in 1970. A second palomino horse, which had posed for still pictures used in press kits for the show, survived until 1979. After Bamboo Harvester's death in 1970, the second horse was unofficially known as Mister Ed. By 1968, Bamboo Harvester was suffering from a variety of health problems. In 1970 he was euthanized with no publicity, and buried at Snodgrass Farm in Oklahoma. However, a different version was given by Alan Young. Young wrote that he'd frequently visit his former "co-star" in retirement. He states that Mr. Ed died from an inadvertent tranquilizer administered while he was "in retirement" in a stable in Burbank, California where he lived with his trainer Lester Hilton. Young
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    Ling Ling

    Ling Ling

    Ling Ling (陵陵, September 1985 – April 30, 2008) was a male Chinese-born, giant panda who resided at the Ueno Zoo, the largest zoo in Tokyo, Japan. At the time of his death at the age of 22, Ling Ling was the only giant panda at the Ueno Zoo and the oldest panda in Japan. He served as an important symbol of the Ueno Zoo and of friendship between Japan and China. Ling Ling, who was given to Japan in 1992, was the only giant panda in the country who was directly owned by Japan. There are eight other giant pandas in Japan as of April 2008, but they are all on loan to Japan from China. Despite being a male panda, Ling Ling's name meant "darling little girl" in Chinese. Ling Ling was born at the Beijing Zoo in Beijing, China, in September 1985. He was given to Japan and the Ueno Zoo in November 1992 by China in exchange for a panda which had been born in Japan. The 1992 panda exchange, between China and Japan, which is often called Panda diplomacy, took place to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the normalization of bilateral Sino-Japanese relations in 1972. He remained one of the Ueno Zoo's most popular attractions for over 15 years. The Ueno Zoo paired Ling Ling with a female panda
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Sir Hercules

    Sir Hercules

    Sir Hercules (1826-1855) was an Irish bred Thoroughbred racehorse, and was later a successful sire. Sir Hercules was by the great sire Whalebone, winner of the Epsom Derby, out of Peri (1822) by Wanderer. Peri was bred to Whalebone at the age of three and Sir Hercules, her first foal, was born in 1826 at Petworth Stud. Sir Hercules was a half brother to Langford (by Starch) who was exported as a stallion to America. Black with white ticking, Sir Hercules was 15 hands 2 inches high, and had a compact build, with identical length "...From the centre of the breast to the hind part of the shoulder, from hind part of shoulder to the hip, and from hip to whirl-bone," with "no more than room for a saddle on his back." Sir Hercules was taken to England where he: He was unplaced in Liverpool's Stand Cup which was his last start. Sir Hercules was purchased by Hercules Landford Rowley, the second Baron Langford of Summerhill in 1831 and was retired to Langford stud at Summer Hill in County Meath, Ireland. Initially he stood for a fee of £10. However, few Englishmen wished to breed their mares to him, and the young stallion was moved in 1832 to Rossmore Lodge at the Curragh. Sir Hercules was
    6.83
    6 votes
    14

    Luks

    Luks, a German Shepherd dog,  was a pet of Josip Broz Tito.
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    Sceptre

    Sceptre

    Sceptre (1899–1926) was a British-bred and British-trained Thoroughbred racemare whose career ran from 1901 to 1904. In 1902, she became the only racehorse to win four British Classic Races outright. Sceptre was bred by Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster at his Eaton Stud in Cheshire and was foaled on 9 April 1899. Her sire, Persimmon, had won the Epsom Derby and St. Leger in 1896 and the Eclipse Stakes and Ascot Gold Cup in 1897. Sceptre's dam, Ornament, was sired by the Duke of Westminster's Bend Or and was herself a full sister to Triple Crown winner Ormonde. The 1st Duke of Westminster died in 1899, and his bloodstock was auctioned. The Duke's trainer, John Porter, wanted the 2nd Duke to buy him, but he was outbid by Robert Sievier, who bought her for 10,000 guineas. Sceptre proved to be a hardy filly. Sievier, who trained her himself for most of her three-year-old season, was in almost constant need for funds, and betting on the filly was one way to keep himself afloat. He ran Sceptre in a number of major races, particularly as a three-year-old, before selling her at the age of four. Sievier sent Sceptre to be trained by Charles Morton at Wantage. She ran three times at
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Agile

    Agile

    Agile (foaled 1902 in Kentucky) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse that was the winner of the 1905 Kentucky Derby. Agile won the Sapphire Stakes as a two year old and the Phoenix Stakes as a three year old. Agile won the Kentucky Derby against two other competitors, Ram's Horn and Layson, in one of the smallest racing fields since Azra won in 1892. Following the death of Capt. Samuel S. Brown, his son Frank bought Agile for $5,700 in the July 1906 dispersal sale of the entire racing stable. The last record of Agile racing was in a November 1907 claiming race at the Aqueduct race track in New York, where he finished dead last. Agile sired three registered Thoroughbred offspring, the fillies Lady Eloise (1913), Chancy M (1915) and Katie Strand (1913) out of Texas bred mares. Lady Eloise is the third dam of American Quarter Horse Champion, Woven Web, who was also a sibling of Assault.
    5.57
    7 votes
    17
    Ruby

    Ruby

    • Place of death: Phoenix
    Ruby (1973 – November 6, 1998) was a 4.5 ton Asian elephant that lived at the Phoenix Zoo and was famous for creating paintings. The most expensive of her paintings sold for $25,000. Ruby was born in Thailand, probably in the summer of 1973, and was shipped to the Phoenix Zoo in February 1974. Her painting career began when her keepers saw her scratching in the dirt of her enclosure with a stick, and offered her a brush and paints. In time, she was moved into the main enclosure with the zoo's two other elephants, both African. African and Asian Elephants are of different species, and Ruby did not get along with the other two. Zoo officials decided to breed her, to provide her with companionship. In 1996, when she was 22, Ruby was shipped to the Tulsa Zoo to mate with a male elephant named Sneezy (who still lives in Tulsa) and lived in Tulsa for about a year. When she became pregnant in 1997, she was returned to Phoenix. Another female Asian elephant, Indu, was loaned from the Houston Zoo to be Ruby's birthing companion. Indu still lives at the Phoenix Zoo. At the end of October 1998, Ruby began to show signs of labor, but the birth didn't start. On Halloween, the zoo's
    6.33
    6 votes
    18
    7.20
    5 votes
    19

    Bart the Bear

    • Place of death: Park City
    Bart the Bear (January 19, 1977 - May 10, 2000) was an Alaskan Kodiak Bear that appeared in several Hollywood films. Previously, Bart's mother appeared in the films Grizzly and Day of the Animals. Animal trainers Doug Seus and Lynne Seus of Wasatch Rocky Mountain Wildlife, Inc., in Heber City, Utah, trained Bart. He grew to 9' 6" (2.90 m) tall and weighed 1,500 pounds (680 kg) throughout his life as an adult. John Candy, Dan Aykroyd, Annette Bening, Ethan Hawke, Steven Seagal, Gregory Peck, Tchéky Karyo, Brad Pitt, Alec Baldwin, and Anthony Hopkins all appeared in films opposite the bear, the latter even twice. All of them were reportedly impressed with how well the bear was trained. In 2000, Bart died of cancer at the age of 23 while filming the television documentary Growing Up Grizzly (2001). Brad Pitt, who appeared in Legends of the Fall with Bart, provided narration. Bart was the "spokes-bear" for the Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University but his greatest role was as ambassador for the Vital Ground Foundation. Vital Ground has procured threatened wildlife habitat along the Rocky Mountain front and on Kodiak Island. Little Bart the Bear is Bart's namesake. Little
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Sun Briar

    Sun Briar

    Sun Briar (foaled 1915 in France) was a Thoroughbred racehorse voted the American Champion Two-Year-Old Colt of 1917 and the American Champion Older Male Horse of 1919. He was a son of Sundridge, the 1911 Champion sire in Great Britain who also sired Epsom Derby winner, Sunstar. Sun Briar was out of the mare Sweet Briar, the daughter of St. Frusquin, a multiple top level race winner including the 1896 British Classic, the 2,000 Guineas Stakes, and who was also a Leading sire in Great Britain and Ireland in 1903 and the Leading broodmare sire in Great Britain & Ireland in 1924. Sun Briar was sent from France to the 1916 Saratoga yearling auction by American bloodstock agent Delbert Reiff where he was purchased for $6,000 by businessman Willis Sharpe Kilmer. Trained by future Hall of Fame inductee, Henry McDaniel, in his Champion two-year-old season the colt won five of his nine starts, including the 1917 Saratoga Special and Hopeful Stakes. Not training well in the spring of 1918, Sun Briar did not run in the Kentucky Derby but by mid summer was in peak form when, under regular rider Willie Knapp, he set a North American record of 1:36 1/5 for one mile on dirt over an oval track
    6.17
    6 votes
    21
    Massa

    Massa

    • Place of death: Philadelphia
    Massa (1930 - 30 December 1984) lived to be 54 years old, and until 2008 was the longest lived gorilla ever recorded. Massa was born in the wild in Ghana. He was shipped to America at an early age and his first owner was Brooklyn eccentric Gertrude Lintz. In 1935, after accidentally spilling water on Massa, which startled him severely, Mrs. Lintz decided to sell him to Philadelphia Zoo. In his prime, Massa weighed 400 lbs. Massa lived at the zoo until his death from a stroke on 30 December 1984, following a special birthday party held by the zoo, complete with a special cake and a live dixieland band. He was buried within the grounds of the zoo. The film Buddy was based on the life of Massa (with some elements from the life of another of Mrs. Lintz's gorillas, Gargantua, who was known at the time as Buddy).
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Scarlett the cat

    Scarlett the cat

    Scarlett (June or July, 1995 - October 11, 2008) was a former feral cat from Brooklyn, New York whose efforts to save her kittens from a fire attracted worldwide media attention, and have been described in a number of non-fiction books. She has also become a featured animal in the fund-raising and public relations efforts of the shelter that treated her and her kittens, the North Shore Animal League. On October 15, 2008, the League announced that Scarlett had died. Scarlett's sire and dam are unknown. She was probably born in June or July 1995. Female domestic cats are fertile from six months of age; their gestation period is about two months. As a stray cat, Scarlett probably had her first litter at about eight months old. If the kittens were her first litter, she was probably about nine months old—the equivalent of the early teens for humans—when she became a heroine. On March 30, 1996, Scarlett and her five kittens were in an abandoned garage allegedly used as a crack house in Brooklyn when a fire started from undetermined causes. The fire department responded to a call about the fire and quickly extinguished it. When the fire was under control, one of the firefighters on the
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Mancs

    Mancs

    Mancs (Hungarian pronunciation: [mɒntʃ]) (1994–2006), a male German Shepherd Dog, was the most famous rescue dog of the Spider Special Rescue Team of Miskolc, Hungary. His name means "paw". Mancs' special talent was locating earthquake survivors who lay trapped deep beneath the rubble, and alerting rescuers. He could differentiate by smell whether the person under the rubble was dead or alive, and could give different signs – if he sensed a dead person, he lay down; when he was sensing that the person beneath was alive, he stood up, wagged his tail and barked. Mancs and his owner, László Lehóczki, took part in several earthquake rescue missions, including the 2001 earthquakes in El Salvador and India. Mancs became famous when he helped rescue a 3-year-old girl who spent 82 hours under the ruins after the Izmit earthquake of 1999 in Turkey. In December 2004, a statue of Mancs was erected in downtown Miskolc, near the Szinva stream and the new public square. The statue was cast by sculptor Borbála Szanyi. Mancs died on October 22, 2006, of pneumonia. In an article published in Dialectical Anthropology, Melinda Kovács discusses the press coverage of Mancs' world-wide rescue efforts as
    6.80
    5 votes
    24

    Pompe

    • Place of death: Toruń
    Pompe was a dog owned by Charles XII of Sweden.
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Appollo

    Appollo

    Appollo was a search and rescue dog who served with the K-9 unit of the New York Police Department. He was awarded the Dickin Medal, the animals' equivalent of the Victoria Cross, in recognition of the work done by all search and rescue dogs following the September 11 attacks. Appollo and his handler were working at the World Trade Center site soon after the attacks. Appollo was a German Shepherd born around 1992, who was in service with the K-9 unit of the New York Police Department (NYPD). In 1994, he graduated from the NYPD Canine Special Operations Division, and was one of the first dogs to learn search and rescue. Appollo passed Type-II training in Florida in 1997, and Type-I in Indianapolis in 1999. He was also part of the first NYPD K-9 team to pass them for Urban Search and Rescue New York Task Force 1. Appollo and his handler Peter Davis also worked in the Dominican Republic after a hurricane. Appollo died in November 2006. Appollo and his handler, Peter Davis, were called in to assist with the rescue operations after the September 11 terror attacks. They arrived at the World Trade Center site fifteen minutes after the attack, making Appollo the first search and rescue
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Gladiateur

    Gladiateur

    Gladiateur (1862–1876) was a French Thoroughbred racehorse who won the English Triple Crown in 1865. Gladiateur is called a legend by France Galop and "One of the best horses ever to grace the turf in any century" by the National Sporting Library of Middleburg, Virginia. Gladiateur was not very successful as a sire but his performance on the track remains one of the most impressive in Thoroughbred horse racing history. A large colt, Gladiateur was a horse who raced best at long distances. He was bred by Count Frederic de Lagrange at his Haras de Dangu at Dangu, Eure in the Upper Normandy region of France.. He was sired by the French horse Monarque on Miss Gladiator, a mare by the British horse Gladiator, who had been purchased by French interests at the age of nine and brought to stand at stud in France. Miss Gladiator was also the dam of Villafranca. Gladiateur's owner sent him to England to be trained by Tom Jennings, Sr. at Newmarket Racecourse. Developing the colt slowly, he did not begin racing until the fall of 1864 and won only one of the three races he entered. At age three, things were very different as Gladiateur was the most dominant horse in European racing while
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    Herman the Bull

    Herman the Bull

    Herman the Bull (16 December 1990 – 2 April 2004) was the first genetically modified or transgenic bovine in the world. The announcement of Herman's creation caused an ethical storm. At the early embryo stage, Herman was genetically engineered in a laboratory by Gen Pharm International of Mountain View, California. Scientists microinjected cells with the human gene coding for lactoferrin. The Dutch Parliament changed law in December 1992 to allow Herman to reproduce. Eight calves were born in 1994 following a breeding program established at Gen Pharm's European laboratory in Leiden, the Netherlands. All calves inherited the lactoferrin production gene. Herman went on to father 55 calves. Dutch law demanded he be slaughtered at the conclusion of his role in the experiment. The Dutch Agriculture Minister at the time, Jozias van Aartsen, agreed, however, to a reprieve, provided Herman did not have more offspring, after public and scientists rallied to his defence. Together with cloned cows named Holly and Belle, he lived out his retirement at Naturalis, the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden. Herman the Bull was one of the oldest bulls ever in the Netherlands. On 2 April
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Tetratema

    Tetratema

    Tetratema (1917-1939) was an Irish-bred, British-trained Thoroughbred racehorse. Owned by Major Dermot McCalmont, Tetratema was bred at McCalmont's Ballylinch Stud on his Mount Juliet estate in Thomastown, County Kilkenny in Ireland. Out of the dam Scotch Gift, his sire was The Tetrarch whom the National Sporting Library's Thoroughbred Heritage website says was "probably the greatest two-year-old of all time", and that he was " possibly the greatest runner ever." At age two, Tetratema showed his sire's speed, winning five important conditions races and earning U.K. Champion 2-Year-Old honors. At three, he won four more important races, the most significant of which was the 2,000 Guineas Classic. On the track at age four, Tetratema continued his winning ways, capturing his second consecutive King George Stakes as well as the July Cup before retiring to breeding duty at his owner's Ballylinch Stud. A successful stallion, in 1929 Tetratema was the leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland. His sons include Mr. Jinks, winner of the 1929 2,000 Guineas, Royal Minstrel winner of the 1929 Eclipse Stakes, Fourth Hand, 1927 Irish 2,000 Guineas winner, and Four Course, winner of the 1931 1,000
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Wojtec, Soldier Bear

    Wojtec, Soldier Bear

    Wojtek (1942–1963; Polish pronunciation: [ˈvɔjtɛk]) usually spelled Voytek in English, was a Syrian brown bear cub found in Iran and adopted by soldiers of the 22nd Artillery Supply Company of the Polish II Corps. During the Battle of Monte Cassino, Wojtek helped move ammunition. The name "Wojtek" is a diminutive form of "Wojciech", an old Slavic name that is still very common in Poland today. It derives from two words: "woj" (the stem of "wojownik", warrior, and "wojna", war); and "ciech", enjoyment. Thus the name has two meanings: "he who enjoys war" or "smiling warrior". In 1942, a local boy found a bear cub near Hamadan, Iran. He sold it to the soldiers of the Polish Army stationed nearby for a couple of canned meat tins. As the bear was less than a year old, he initially had problems swallowing and was fed with condensed milk from an emptied vodka bottle. The bear was fed with fruits, marmalade, honey and syrup, and was often rewarded with beer, which became his favourite drink. He also enjoyed smoking and eating cigarettes. He enjoyed wrestling and was taught to salute when greeted. The bear became quite an attraction for soldiers and civilians alike, and soon became an
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    8.67
    3 votes
    31
    Fala

    Fala

    • Place of death: Hyde Park
    Fala (April 7, 1940 – April 5, 1952) was a famous Scottish Terrier, the beloved dog of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. One of the most famous presidential pets, Fala captured the attention of the public in the United States and followed Roosevelt everywhere, becoming part of Roosevelt's public image. Given to the Roosevelts by a cousin, Fala knew how to perform tricks; his White House antics were widely covered in the media and often referenced both by Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. Fala survived Roosevelt by seven years and was buried alongside him. A statue of him alongside Roosevelt is prominently featured in Washington, D.C.'s Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, the only presidential pet so honored. Fala was born on April 7, 1940, and was given as an early Christmas gift to Roosevelt from Mrs. Augustus G. Kellog of Westport, Connecticut, through Roosevelt's cousin, Margaret "Daisy" Suckley. As a puppy, Fala was given obedience training by Suckley, who taught him to sit, roll over, and jump. His original name was Big Boy; Franklin renamed him Murray the Outlaw of Falahill after John Murray of Falahill, a famous Scottish ancestor. This was later shortened to
    8.67
    3 votes
    32
    Red Rum

    Red Rum

    Red Rum (bay gelding; 3 May 1965 - 18 October 1995; sire: Quorum, dam: Mared) was a champion Thoroughbred racehorse who achieved an unmatched historic treble when he won the Grand National in 1973, 1974 and 1977, and also came second in the two intervening years. The world-famous steeplechase is a notoriously difficult race that has been referred to as being "the ultimate test of a horse’s courage". He was also renowned for his jumping ability, having not fallen in 100 races. Red Rum's 1973 comeback victory from 30 lengths behind is often considered one of the greatest Grand Nationals in history. In a 2002 UK poll, Red Rum's historic third triumph in the Grand National was voted the 24th greatest sporting moment of all time. Red Rum was bred at Rossenarra stud in Kells, County Kilkenny, Ireland, by Martyn McEnery. His sire was Quorum (1954-?). Bred to win one-mile races, he won his National titles over the longest distance, four miles and four furlongs. Red Rum started his career running in cheap races as a sprinter and dead-heated in a five-furlong flat race at Aintree Racecourse. In his early career, he was once ridden by Lester Piggott, and comedian Lee Mack, then a stable boy
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    The Tetrarch

    The Tetrarch

    The Tetrarch (1911 – 1935) was an undefeated Irish Thoroughbred racehorse and an influential sire, who was voted Britain's Two-Year-Old of the 20th Century. Foaled at Straffan Station Stud, near Ardclough, in County Kildare in Ireland, he was sired by Roi Herode (France) out of Vahren. His damsire (Bona Vista) was by Bend Or (after whom Bend-Or spots are named). The Tetrarch was a gangly and less-than-attractive colt whose grey coat was sprinkled with white blotches. Dismissed as having no racing potential by some buyers, he was ultimately sold by his breeder to Major Dermot H. B. McCalmont and placed under the care of trainer Atty Persse. Sent to the track as a two-year-old, under jockey Steve Donoghue The Tetrarch easily defeated his competition. Quickly dubbed the "Spotted Wonder," he easily won all seven of his 1913 starts. In his one real test he came from behind to capture the National Breeders Produce Stakes by a neck, but that one close finish only resulted after a mix-up at the start that left him four or five lengths back. An injury in October 1913 ended The Tetrarch's two-year-old racing campaign. The following spring he reinjured himself in training. His handlers were
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Obaysch

    Obaysch

    Obaysch (1849?- 11 March 1878) was the first hippopotamus seen in England since prehistoric times, and the first in Europe since Ancient Rome. He was captured on an island on the White Nile when he was less than one year old. His name is derived from the name of the island. The Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt, Abbas Pasha, agreed with the British Consul General, Sir Charles Augustus Murray (later known as "Hippopotamus Murray") to swap Obaysch and some other exotic animals for some greyhounds and deerhounds. Obaysch was sent by boat down the Nile to Cairo, accompanied by a herd of cows to provide him with milk. He was sent by P&O steamer to Southampton, and he arrived at London Zoo on 25 May 1850. He was an instant sensation in London, attracting up to 10,000 visitors each day, and spawning a trade in hippo memorabilia and even a Hippopotamus Polka. The number of visitors to the Zoo in 1850 was double the previous year. Abbas Pasha sent a second hippo to London, a female named Adhela who arrived on 22 July 1854. After a wait of over 16 years, the pair finally produced offspring in 1871, but the calf died after 2 days. A second calf died the following year, but a third, born on 5 November
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Barbaro

    Barbaro

    Barbaro (April 29, 2003 – January 29, 2007) was an American thoroughbred who decisively won the 2006 Kentucky Derby, but shattered his leg two weeks later in the 2006 Preakness Stakes, ending his racing career and eventually leading to his death. On May 20, 2006, Barbaro ran in the Preakness Stakes as a heavy favorite, but, after he false-started, he fractured three bones in and around the fetlock of his right hind leg. The injury ruined any chance of a Triple Crown in 2006 and ended his racing career. The next day, he underwent surgery at the New Bolton Center at the University of Pennsylvania for his injuries. In July he developed laminitis in his left rear leg. He underwent five further operations, and his prognosis varied during an exceptionally long stay in the Equine Intensive Care Unit at the New Bolton Center. While his right hind leg eventually healed, a final risky procedure on it proved futile because the colt soon developed further laminitis in both front legs. His veterinarians and owners concluded that he could not be saved, and Barbaro was euthanized on January 29, 2007. He was a third-generation descendant of Mr. Prospector, and as such Barbaro was related to many
    6.40
    5 votes
    36
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Marley the Dog

    Marley the Dog

    • Place of death: Pennsylvania
    This is the dog who inspired the book "Marley & Me" and the subsequent film starring Owen Wilson and Jennifer Anniston.Labrador retriever. He was known as the World's Worst Dog.
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    Sir Barton

    Sir Barton

    Sir Barton, (1916–1937), was a chestnut thoroughbred colt who in 1919 became the first winner of what would come to be known as the American Triple Crown. He was sired by leading stud Star Shoot out of the Hanover mare Lady Sterling. His grandsire was the 1893 English Triple Crown champion, Isinglass. Sir Barton was bred in Kentucky by John E. Madden and Vivian A. Gooch at Hamburg Place Farm near Lexington. Madden raced the colt in his own ownership during his two-year-old season. He was entered in six races, winning none. Madden sold the horse in 1918 for $10,000 to Canadian businessman J. K. L. Ross. Ross placed Sir Barton in the hands of trainer H. Guy Bedwell and jockey Johnny Loftus. At three, Sir Barton made his season debut as a maiden in the Kentucky Derby. He was supposed to be the rabbit (pacemaker) for his highly regarded stablemate, a horse named Billy Kelly. However, Sir Barton led the field of 12 horses from start to finish, winning the race by five lengths. Just four days later, the horse was in Baltimore and won the Preakness Stakes, beating Eternal by four lengths. Again he led all the way. He then won the Withers Stakes in New York and shortly thereafter completed
    6.40
    5 votes
    39
    Beldame

    Beldame

    Beldame (1901–1924) was one an American racehorse and broodmare. The chestnut filly was foaled near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1901. She was by Octagon, out of the English-bred Bella Donna (by the Epsom Derby winner Hermit). Named Beldame, she was a homebred of August Belmont II's (after whose family the Belmont Stakes as well as Belmont Park were named), and though Belmont, Jr. continued to own her, he leased her as a two- and three-year-old to a business associate named Newton Bennington. Although she won two races before going to Bennington, it was while racing for him that Beldame began her great career, earning her place as number 98 in the Blood-Horse magazine List of the Top 100 U.S. Racehorses of the 20th Century. (Aside from Beldame, Belmont bred 129 stakes winners, including Man o' War. The colt was originally named My Man O' War by his wife since August Jr. had enlisted in World War I at the age of 65. Because of the war, he sold his best horse to Samuel D. Riddle for $5,000.) As a two-year-old, Beldame won the Great Filly Stakes at Sheepshead Bay and the Vernal Stakes (wiring the field). When Beldame was three, she won twelve of her fourteen starts, earning the
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Ben Brush

    Ben Brush

    Ben Brush (1893–1918) was a high class Thoroughbred racehorse and sire who won the 1896 Kentucky Derby. He was a bay stallion by Bramble (1879 champion handicap horse) out of Roseville (a sister to Azra, the 1892 Kentucky Derby and Travers Stakes winner) by Reform. Ben Brush was bred at Runnymead Farm. Walter Vosburgh said Bramble was "a breed as tough as pine nuts." On May 6, 1896, Bramble and Roseville's son Ben Brush was the first horse to win the Kentucky Derby at its modern distance of 1¼ miles. (Since its inception in 1875, the Derby had been staged over 1½ miles, the length of the original Derby at Epsom Downs in England.) It was the 22nd running of the Derby and the first to drape a blanket of white and pink roses over the shoulders of the victor. Ben's dam Roseville was purchased by Colonel Catesby Woodford and Colonel Ezekial Clay of Runnymede Farm near Paris, Kentucky in 1891 from the horseman H. Eugene Leigh. At the time she was in foal to Leigh's La Belle Stud stallion, Bramble. When the resulting colt was offered for sale by Clay and Woodford, Leigh and his new partner, the African-American Hall of Famer Ed Brown, bought him for $1,200. Brown named him Ben Brush in
    7.25
    4 votes
    41

    Jambo

    • Place of death: Jersey Zoological Park
    Jambo (April 17, 1961 - September 16, 1992) was a celebrated gorilla housed at Jersey Zoo. He is well known for rescuing a young boy named Levan Merritt who fell into the gorilla enclosure in 1986. Jambo means "hello" in Swahili. The gorilla was born on April 17, 1961, in Zoo Basel, Basel, Switzerland, to mother Achilla and father Stephi. Stephi was acquired from the Columbus (Ohio) Zoo. Stephi was captured in 1950 by Columbus resident and gorilla hunter Bill Said, with two other baby gorillas, in French Equatorial Africa. The three were sold to the Columbus Zoo for $10,000. The two which the Columbus Zoo kept, Baron Macombo and Millie Christina, became the parents of Colo, the first gorilla born in a zoo, at Columbus on December 22, 1956. He was the first male gorilla born in captivity as well as the first gorilla in captivity to be raised by his own mother. Jambo's older sister Goma, born on September 23, 1959 in Basel, was the first gorilla born in Europe and still lives in the Zoo Basel. Before Jambo was transferred to Jersey Zoo Jambo and Goma had a son named Tamtam, who was born at Zoo Basel on May 2, 1971, and died at Wuppertal Zoo on July 23, 2009. Jambo also fathered a
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Stage Door Johnny

    Stage Door Johnny

    Stage Door Johnny (1965–1996) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse best known for his win in the third leg of the 1968 U.S. Triple Crown series, the Belmont Stakes. Stage Door Johnny was a chestnut horse with a white blaze, owned by the Whitney family's Greentree Stable. He was sired by Prince John, a four-time leading broodmare sire in North America. His grandsire was the important stallion Princequillo, a horse of great endurance who won several important races at longer distances. Princequillo broke the Saratoga Race Course record for 1¾ miles and his performances were such that he is considered by many to be the best long-distance runner in American racing history. Stage Door Johnny's damsire was the Irish colt Ballymoss, winner of several races at the Belmont Stakes distance of 1½ miles including the Irish Derby, England's King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and France's Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, Stage Door Johnny did not run in the 1¼ mile Kentucky Derby or the 1 3/16 mile Preakness Stakes. Trained by future U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee John M. Gaver, Sr., he was bred and conditioned for success in the gruelling 1½ mile Belmont Stakes. In 1968, a great deal of
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Isinglass

    Isinglass

    Isinglass (1890–1911) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a career which lasted from 1892 until 1895 he ran twelve times and won eleven races. He was the best British two-year-old of 1892 and went on to become sixth winner of the English Triple Crown by winning the 2000 Guineas at Newmarket, the Epsom Derby and the St. Leger Stakes at Doncaster in the following year. He was undefeated in his last two seasons, setting a world record for prize-money and gaining recognition from contemporary experts as one of the best horses seen in England up to that time. Isinglass was a powerfully-built bay horse standing 16 hands high, bred by his owner Harry McCalmont. He was sired by the double Ascot Gold Cup winner Isonomy out of a mare named Deadlock. Deadlock had a varied career, having been once sold for £20 and working as a carriage-horse before being bought by McCalmont. He was trained at the stable of James Jewitt, who had trained the winner of the 1876 Grand National Steeplechase. Jewett handled the day-to-day conditioning of the horse while his racing campaign and strategy was mapped out by McCalmont's racing manager, James Machell who was described as "one of the most
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Joy

    Joy

    • Place of death: Windsor Park
    Was Alexei Nikolaevich, Tsarevich of Russia's dog who survived the murder of the family and went on to live in England. Eventually Joy was brought to England where he lived out his days in Windsor. They say he missed Alexei to the end.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Miss Woodford

    Miss Woodford

    Miss Woodford (1880-1899) was a brown Thoroughbred racemare that became one of the top American fillies of all time. At one stage, she won 16 consecutive races. She was bred by Colonel Catesby Woodford and Colonel Ezekial Clay of Runnymede Farm near Paris, Kentucky. (Ezekial Clay was chairman of the Kentucky State Racing Commission.) Miss Woodford was by Billet, (imported from England, and the leading sire in America in 1883, due almost entirely to Miss Woodford), out of the unraced Fancy Jane, by Neil Robinson. Miss Woodford was sold to Mike and Phil Dwyer of the Dwyer Brothers Stable to replace Hindoo, their retired champion. They traded Hindoo as a stallion prospect plus a couple of fillies (two daughters of the mare Maggie B.B.: Red and Blue by Alarm, and Francesca by Leamington; Francesca was a stakes winner) to her then owner, George W. Bowen, in exchange for $9,000 cash and his three-year-old filly. Miss Woodford had already raced for Bowen & Company, winning the Spinaway Stakes. After she was purchased by the Dwyers, Miss Woodward, like Hindoo, was trained by National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame inductee James G. Rowe, Sr. A dispute with the Dwyers concerning Miss
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Nijinsky II

    Nijinsky II

    Nijinsky (21 February 1967–15 April 1992), usually known in the United States as Nijinsky II, was a Canadian-bred, Irish-trained Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. He was the outstanding two-year-old in Europe in 1969 when he was unbeaten in five races. In the following season he became the first horse for thirty-five years to win the English Triple Crown. He was also historically important for establishing the international reputation of his sire Northern Dancer. Retired to stud he became the Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland and the Leading broodmare sire in North America. Nijisnky, a bay horse with a white star and three white feet, was bred at E. P. Taylor's Windfields Farm in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. He was from the second crop of foals sired by the Northern Dancer, the winner of the 1964 Kentucky Derby who went on to become one of the most influential sires of the 20th century. His dam, Flaming Page, by Bull Page, was a highly successful racemare, winning the 1962 Queen's Plate. At stud, she produced only two other foals, but one of these was Fleur who produced the 1977 Epsom Derby winner The Minstrel Nijinsky was a big, powerful horse standing 16.3 hands high, resembling
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Buddy

    Buddy

    • Place of death: Chappaqua
    Buddy (September 1997 – January 2, 2002), a male chocolate-colored Labrador Retriever, was one of two pets owned by Bill Clinton while he was President of the United States. The Clintons' other pet was a cat named Socks. Clinton acquired Buddy as a 3-month-old puppy from Caroline County, Maryland in December 1997. He named him after his late great-uncle, Henry Oren "Buddy" Grisham, who had died the previous June and whom Clinton often cited as a major influence on his life. Socks didn't get along with the frisky Buddy, so the White House had to keep the two in separate quarters. Since this arrangement would be no longer possible in the Clintons' smaller home in New York, Socks was left under the care of Bill Clinton's secretary, Betty Currie. According to the police report, Buddy was killed by a car while "playfully chasing a contractor" who had left the Clinton home in Chappaqua, New York, on January 2, 2002. The Clintons were not home at the time of the accident; their home was being watched by Secret Service agents. The agents rushed Buddy to an animal hospital where he was pronounced dead. In 2005, Clinton acquired another chocolate Lab whom he named Seamus. First Lady Hillary
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Leamington

    Leamington

    Leamington (1853–1878) was a Thoroughbred racehorse, and an influential sire in the United States during the second half of the nineteenth century. He was not only a fast horse, but also showed great staying ability. He was a brown horse bred in England by Mr. Halford. Leamington was by the good racehorse and sire Faugh-a-Ballagh (by Sir Hercules), his dam was an unnamed mare bred by the Marquis of Westminster and foaled in 1841 by Pantaloon. Halford began racing him at age two, and then sold the to a Mr. Higgins. Leamington won the Woodcote Stakes at Warwick and the Chesterfield Stakes, before being retired for the year. As a three-year-old, it was planned to run the colt in the Epsom Derby, but he contracted strangles, and this affected his whole three-year-old season. However, his owners and trainers appeared to have planned his losses to help keep his handicap weight down. After losing four small races carrying little weight, he won the Wolverhampton, before his losing several more. He was then "allowed" to win the Stewards' Cup carrying only 98 lb (44 kg). His four-year-old career began with the 2.25 mile Chester Cup. Leamington only carried 93 lb (42 kg), due to his poor
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    Leopard of Rudraprayag

    Leopard of Rudraprayag

    The Leopard of Rudraprayag was a male man-eating leopard, reputed to have killed over 125 people. It was eventually killed by famed big cat hunter and author Jim Corbett. The first victim of the leopard was from village Benji. For eight years, no one dared move alone at night on the road between the Hindu shrines of Kedarnath and Badrinath, for it passed through the leopard's territory, and few villagers would leave their houses. The leopard was apparently so desperate for food that it would break down doors, leap through windows, claw through the mud or thatch walls of huts and drag people from them, devouring them. They even sent a special army of Gurkhas after it, in addition to assigning a number of army personnel known for their marksmanship and tracking abilities. They even employed high powered Gin Traps and deadly poison to eliminate the animal, but without success. The British Parliament requested the aid of Corbett in the autumn of 1925. In the town of Rudraprayag there is a sign-board which marks the spot where the leopard was shot. There is a fair held at Rudraprayag commemorating the killing of the leopard and people there often consider Jim Corbett a Sadhu. Corbett's
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Prometheus

    Prometheus

    Prometheus (aka WPN-114) was the oldest known non-clonal organism, a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva) tree growing near the tree line on Wheeler Peak in eastern Nevada, United States. The tree, which was at least 4862 years old and possibly more than 5000 years, was cut down in 1964 by a graduate student and United States Forest Service personnel for research purposes. The people involved did not know of its world-record age before the cutting (see below). However, the circumstances and decision-making process leading to the felling of the tree remain controversial; not all of the basic facts are agreed upon by all involved. The name of the tree refers to the mythological figure Prometheus, who stole fire from the gods and gave it to man. The designation WPN-114 was given by the original researcher, Donald Rusk Currey, and refers to the 114th tree sampled by him for his research in Nevada's White Pine County. Prometheus was a living member of a population of bristlecone pine trees growing near the tree line on the lateral moraine of a former glacier on Wheeler Peak, in Great Basin National Park, eastern Nevada. Wheeler Peak is the highest mountain in the Snake Range,
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Stone Street

    Stone Street

    Stone Street (foaled 1905 in Kentucky) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse that is primarily remembered for winning the 1908 Kentucky Derby. He was a bay colt sired by Longstreet out of the mare Stone Nellie (by imported Stonehenge). His grandsire was the great racer and top nineteenth century sire Longfellow, himself a son of the important foundation sire Leamington. Stone Street was bred by noted horseman James Ben Ali Haggin, who had won the Derby in 1886 with his entry Ben Ali. Stone Street has also been called Stonestreet in other racing publications and is named after a combination of his sire and dam's names. Stone Street's Derby win, under jockey Arthur Pickens, is notable because the colt had not won any major stakes races before the Derby and did not win another major stakes race in his entire six year racing career after the Derby. The 1908 Kentucky Derby was run on a wet track, with Stone Street easily creating an early lead over the other seven contenders, who were bogged down in the mud and were in poor racing form that day. The $5 minimum bet paid $123.60 to win for Stone Street at 24 to 1 final odds. As of 2009, Stone Street's winning time of 2:15 1/5 is the
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Enos

    Enos

    • Place of death: Holloman Air Force Base
    Enos (died November 4, 1962) was the first chimpanzee that was launched into Earth orbit. Enos was purchased from the Miami Rare Bird Farm on April 3, 1960. He completed more than 1,250 hours of training for his mission at the University of Kentucky and Holloman Air Force Base. His training was more intense than that of Ham, the Americans' first chimp in space, because Enos would be exposed to weightlessness and a higher g for longer periods of time. His training included psychomotor training and aircraft flights. Enos was selected to make the first orbital animal flight only three days before the launch. Two months before allowing a chimp to be launched into orbit, NASA had launched Mercury Atlas 4 on September 13, 1961, to conduct the same mission with a "crewman simulator" in the spacecraft. Enos flew into space on board Mercury Atlas 5 on November 29, 1961. He completed his first orbit in 1 hour and 28.5 minutes. Enos was originally scheduled to complete three orbits, but was brought back after the second orbit because the spacecraft was not maintaining proper attitude. According to observers, Enos jumped for joy and ran around the deck of the recovery ship enthusiastically
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Noah

    Noah

    Noah was the name of species of ox called gaur, cloned and gestated in the womb of a cow named Bessie. Gaur is a vulnerable species according to the IUCN. The baby bull gaur was delivered on January 8, 2001, but died within just 48 hours of a common dysentery on January 10, 2001. Noah's condition was monitored by Dr. Jonathan Hill and his teammates in Iowa. The process used to clone Noah was nuclear transfer. Researchers from Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) in Massachusetts said the problem was unlikely to be related to the cloning procedure itself.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    River Thames whale

    River Thames whale

    The River Thames whale was a juvenile female Northern Bottlenose whale which was discovered swimming in the River Thames in central London on Friday 20 January 2006. According to the BBC, she was five metres (16 ft) long and weighed about seven tonnes (24,400 lb). The whale appeared to have been lost, as her normal habitat would have been around the coasts of the far north of Scotland and Northern Ireland, and in the seas around the Arctic Ocean. It was the first time the species had been seen in the Thames since records began in 1913. She died from convulsions as she was being rescued shortly after 19:00 GMT on 21 January 2006. On Thursday 19 January reports from the Thames Barrier control team were made to the British Divers Marine Life Rescue (BDMLR) that one, or possibly two, pilot whales had come through the barrier. This turned out to be the Bottlenose whale, and BDMLR commenced monitoring the whale that evening. At 08:30 a.m on Friday 20 January, David Dopin was on a train when he phoned the authorities to say that he believed he had been hallucinating, as he thought he had just spotted a whale swimming in the River Thames. Throughout the morning, more and more whale
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Roamer

    Roamer

    Roamer (1911-1920) was an American thoroughbred racehorse. In the Blood-Horse magazine's list of the top 100 U.S. thoroughbred champions of the 20th Century, the gelding Roamer was ranked #99. Roamer's father was a "teaser" stallion named Knight Errant who jumped a fence to get at Rose Tree II, a blind English-bred claiming mare—hence the name of the unexpected ill-bred foal, Roamer. The result was a small bay born in 1911 who was gelded almost immediately. Roamer was bred in Kentucky by the sons of Col. Ezekiel F. Clay of Runnymede Farm, who had sent out some of the best of America's 19th Century champion racehorses: Hall of Famer Ben Brush, winner of the 1896 Kentucky Derby; Hall of Famer Hanover (topped the U.S. sire list 4 times); Runneymede (second in 1882's Derby behind Apollo); and Hall of Famer Miss Woodford (1st U.S. horse to go over $100,000 in earnings). Roamer raced for the Clay brothers as a two-year-old. One of the brothers entered him in a $1,000 selling race, only to see him claimed, and had to buy him back for $2,005. He was then sold for $2,500 to New York City publisher Andrew Miller, the secretary/treasurer of Saratoga. (Miller, one of the founders of Life
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Super Impose

    Super Impose

    Super Impose (5 October 1984 – 23 March 2007) was a New Zealand bred Thoroughbred racehorse who was inducted into the Australian Racing Hall of Fame. In a career spanning 74 starts, Super Impose won eight Group One races and a then Australasian record $5.6 million in prize money. Trained throughout his career by Lee Freedman, and ridden in his Group One wins by Bruce Compton (once), Darren Gauci (once), Darren Beadman (five times), and Greg Hall (once), ‘Super’ created history in winning the AJC Epsom and Doncaster Handicaps two years in a row, in 1990 and 1991, and won the Cox Plate at his penultimate start as an eight-year-old, in 1992. Foaled in New Zealand, Super Impose was a son of the multiple Group One winner Imposing (Todman-Hialeah), out of the unraced mare Pheroz Fancy (Taipan II-Pheroz Jewel). Pheroz Jewel was a stakeswinning mare in New Zealand who defeated Grey Way, while Todman was an explosive Australian racehorse who won the inaugural Golden Slipper in 1957. Super Impose, via Todman and Ritmar (dam of Taipan), had Star Kingdom blood on both sides of his pedigree. The imported Irish stallion was a dominant influence on Australian racing before the preponderance of
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Ormonde

    Ormonde

    Ormonde (1883–1904) was an English Thoroughbred racehorse, an unbeaten Triple Crown winner, generally considered to be one of the greatest racehorses ever. He also won the Champion Stakes and the Hardwicke Stakes twice. At the time he was often labelled as the 'horse of the century'. Ormonde was trained at Kingsclere by John Porter for the 1st Duke of Westminster. His regular jockeys were Fred Archer and Tom Cannon. After retiring from racing he suffered fertility problems, but still sired the top racehorse, Orme, who won the Eclipse Stakes twice. Ormonde was a bay colt, foaled in 1883 at Eaton Stud in Cheshire. Ormonde's sire was the Epsom Derby and Champion Stakes winner Bend Or. Bend Or was a successful stallion, his progeny included Kendal, Ossory, Orbit, Orion, Orvieto, Bona Vista and Laveno. Ormonde's dam was Doncaster Cup winner Lily Agnes. She was sired by another Derby winner, Macaroni. Lily Agnes was a top broodmare also foaling 1000 Guineas winner Farewell, Ormonde's full-brother Ossory and another full-brother Ornament, who produced the outstanding Sceptre, the only racehorse to win four British Classic Races outright. Ormonde was born at half-past six in the evening of
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Sysonby

    Sysonby

    Sysonby (1902-1906) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse. He won every start easily, except one, at distances from one mile to two and a quarter miles. His superiority as a two and three-year-old was unchallenged during his short career of 15 race starts. Foaled in Kentucky, Sysonby was a bay son of the 1885 Epsom Derby winner, Melton, out of the English mare Optime by Orme (by the undefeated Ormonde). The mating of Melton and Optime was arranged by Marcus Daly, who was involved with the Anaconda Copper Mine. Daly died before Optime, stabled in England, foaled. His stock, including the still pregnant Optime, was brought to New York to be auctioned. James R. Keene purchased Optime for $6,600, sending her to his Castleton Stud in Kentucky, which he rarely visited. Apparently Optime's foal, observed in his paddock, was anything but inspiring. Considered unattractive and small, as well as slow, young Sysonby was to be sent back to England for sale. But Keene's trainer, the well-regarded James G. Rowe, Sr., had seen Sysonby in action during some early trials. When it was time for the yearlings to be sent away, Rowe, a leading trainer who had once been a leading jockey (guiding Harry
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Dewey Readmore Books

    Dewey Readmore Books

    Dewey Readmore Books (circa November 1987 – November 29, 2006) was the resident cat at the Spencer Public Library in Spencer, Iowa, garnering worldwide publicity. The cat's story was the subject of a book, Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World, published in 2008 and written by Spencer librarian Vicki Myron. In January 1988, on a freezing winter evening, someone left an eight-week old male kitten in the outside book drop at the Spencer Public Library. The library staff discovered the kitten the next morning. The kitten was badly frostbitten and so filthy that everyone thought he was grey instead of his natural copper and white. Although the entire staff cared for him, library director Vicki Myron took primary responsibility. Although some libraries have had a tradition of resident cats, this was the first such cat in Spencer, so approval was required from both the board of trustees of the library and the Spencer City Council. Once they approved, the kitten was vaccinated and neutered. Thereafter, Myron and the library staff cared for Dewey and accepted donations for his food and care. No public funds were used for his care. A naming contest, "Name the Kitty", was
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Hanover

    Hanover

    Hanover (1884–1899) was a champion American Thoroughbred racehorse that won his first 17 race starts. He was the only American stallion to head the Leading sire in North America list for four consecutive years until Bold Ruler did so in 1965. He was a chestnut colt bred at Colonel E. Clay's Runnymede Farm. Hanover was by Hindoo from Bourbon Belle by Bonnie Scotland. At the farm's yearling sale in May 1885, Hanover was sold to the Dwyer Brothers Stable for $1,250, where he joined Tremont, who was a very precocious two-year-old also born in 1884. Trained by Frank McCabe, at age two, Hanover won all three races he contested: the Hopeful Stakes, the July Stakes, and the Sapling Stakes. With Tremont retired, the Dwyers turned to Hanover as the mainstay for the Dwyer Stable. Hanover started in twenty-seven races at the age of three, racing at distances ranging from four furlongs (800 meters) to two miles (3,200 m.), he won 20 times (including the Belmont Stakes by fifteen lengths) and finished out of the money only once. Before finishing his first two seasons of racing, Hanover had won 17 consecutive races. After several losses at age four, and an obvious lameness to the right forefoot,
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Jake

    Jake

    Jake (1995 – July 25, 2007) was a well-known American black labrador who served as a search and rescue dog following the September 11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Jake served as a rescue dog from 1997 until his retirement because of cancer in 2006. Jake was adopted when he was 10 months old by his owner, Mary Flood. Jake had been found abandoned on the streets with several injuries, including a dislocated hip and a broken leg. Jake's new owner, Mary Flood, is a member of Utah Task Force 1. Utah Task Force 1 is a federal search and rescue team trained to respond to disasters. Following his recovery from his injuries, Flood helped to train Jake to become a federal "U.S. government certified" rescue dog. There are fewer than 200 of these dogs, who are trained to respond within 24 hours to disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, wilderness, water rescue, terrorist attacks, or avalanches. Jake's owner later commented, "...against all odds he became a world-class rescue dog." Jake was most noted for his work following the September 11 attacks, where he helped search for human remains at Ground Zero. Jake, like other rescue workers and dogs, was honored by New Yorkers as a hero.
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    John L. Sullivan

    John L. Sullivan

    John L. Sullivan, (circa 1860 - April 1932), was a tuskless, male Asian elephant, was a performer in the Adam Forepaugh Circus and, later, in the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus. In the early days of his career, John L. (who was named after the boxer John L. Sullivan) performed a boxing act with his trainer, Eph Thompson. John would have a boxing glove placed at the end of his trunk to spar with Thompson. John stayed with the circus as the Forepaugh show joined with the Sells Brothers Circus, which then joined with the Ringling Brothers Circus. Old John, as he came to be known, stayed on with the circus after he retired from performing. He babysat for the performers' children, did heavy lifting, and led the elephant herd to and from the show grounds and train. On 9 April 1922, John, with Dexter Fellows, began a 53 mile pilgrimage from Madison Square Garden to the Elephant Hotel in Somers, New York, to pay tribute to Old Bet, the first elephant in America. John arrived on 13 April 1922. He laid a wreath on the monument to Old Bet. He died of old age or of heart failure in Sarasota, Florida in 1932.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Rin Tin Tin

    • Place of death: Los Angeles
    Rin Tin Tin (often billed as Rin-Tin-Tin in the 1920s and 1930s) was the name given to a dog adopted from a WWI battlefield that went on to star in 23 Hollywood films, gaining worldwide fame. The name was subsequently given to several related German Shepherd dogs featured in fictional stories on film, radio, and television. The first of the line (c. September 10, 1918 – August 10, 1932) was one of a litter of shell-shocked pups found by American serviceman Lee Duncan in a bombed-out dog kennel in Lorraine, then part of the German Empire, less than two months before the end of World War I. When Duncan found him on September 15, he was only 5 days old and nursing. The two pups from the litter that Duncan kept were named for finger puppets called Rintintin and Nénette that French children gave to the American soldiers as good luck charms. Duncan returned to the USA with them at war's end. Rin Tin Tin settled at his home in Los Angeles, California, though Nénette had earlier died. Rin Tin Tin was a dark sable color and had very dark eyes. Nicknamed Rinty by his owner, the dog learned tricks and could leap great heights. He was filmed making an 11-foot leap at a dog show by Duncan's
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Birdcatcher

    Birdcatcher

    Birdcatcher (1833–1860), or Irish Birdcatcher, was a good Thoroughbred racehorse and a leading sire. Foaled in 1833 at the Brownstown Stud, in Ireland, Birdcatcher was by the Irish Thoroughbred stallion Sir Hercules, who lost only once, in the St Leger Stakes in 1829. Birdcatcher's dam, Guiccioli, who had a successful career as a racehorse, foaled the chestnut colt when she was 10. She was also the granddam of another well-known racehorse, Selim, and dam to a full-brother of Birdcatcher, Faugh-a-Ballagh. Birdcatcher was said to have been small, only 15.3 hh, but he had an expressive head, a well-arched neck, and nicely sloping shoulder. His back was short and compact, his loin was deep, and his hindquarters were strong and muscular. His forearms and thighs were large and strong, and attached to fine, light legs. He had an elastic stride, that no doubt helped him to win as many races as he did. Birdcatcher had a large star and narrow blaze, white halfway up to the hock on the left hind. He also had ticking, or white hairs scattered throughout his flanks and at the base of the tail. He passed this trait onto many offspring, including Daniel O'Rourke, so often that the marking became
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Imp

    Imp

    Imp (1894–1909) was a pure black Thoroughbred racing filly with a white diamond shaped star between her eyes. She was sired by Wagner (GB) out of Foundling (by Fonso) and was foaled on March 5, 1894. Owned and bred by Daniel R. Harness of Chillicothe, Ohio, and trained by both Charles E. Brossman and Peter Wimmer (when she was seven), Imp's male line of descent was the great Eclipse. Imp, nicknamed "My Coal Black Lady" after a popular song of the day, was a bit of a homely looking thing, the daughter of parents who each raced only once. Her sire won the Wilton Park Stakes in England but her dam was injured in her only start. Imp, who began racing in Ohio and Kentucky, started out inauspiciously, winning four of eleven starts as a two-year-old. But by her second season she became the talk of the racing world by making fifty starts. She won only 14 of them, but was in the money 33 times. In her fourth season she was shipped to New York to challenge the big-name horses in the Suburban Handicap. She lost that first time, but returned the following year, 1899, and took the race. She was the first mare to ever win the $10,000 Suburban. All in all, Imp started in a grueling 171 races,
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    King Tom

    King Tom

    King Tom (1851–1878) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and a Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland. He was a bay horse foaled in 1851, sired by Harkaway and out of the exceptional mare Pocahontas by Glencoe. King Tom was a half-brother to 14 of Pocahontas' foals including, Auricula (a stakes winner), plus Stockwell and his brother, Rataplan, both being by The Baron. King Tom won races at age two and at age three he was not quite recovered from an injury when he finished second by a length to Andover in the 1854 Epsom Derby. He came out of the Derby with a tendon injury that curtailed his racing for the remainder of the year. At age four, King Tom returned to the track and won one race before breaking down. Retired to stud duty, King Tom became the foundation stallion for Baron Mayer de Rothschild's Mentmore and Crafton Studs. Between 1861 and 1877 he was one of the United Kingdom's top ten sires 14 times and the Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland in 1870 and 1871. King Tom sired the 1866 and 1867 Epsom Oaks winners, Tormentor and Hippia, as well as the 1870 Epsom Derby winner Kingcraft. He also sired 1864 1,000 Guineas Stakes winner Tomato plus another outstanding filly
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Nonja

    Nonja

    Nonja (1952 - December 29, 2007) was a female Sumatran Orangutan who was thought to be the oldest of her species in either the wild or captivity. She was 55 years old when she died in 2007. Nonja, whose name meant "girl" in Malaysian, was captured in the wild and brought to the Wassenaar Zoo in the Netherlands in 1955. She was thought to be about 2-3 years old at the time. She was transferred to the Miami MetroZoo (now Zoo Miami) on October 4, 1983, where she spent the rest of her life. Nonja gave birth to five offspring. Nonja died at the Miami MetroZoo on Saturday, December 29, 2007. Experts believe that she died of either a brain tumor or an aneurysm. She was 55 years old when she died. Most orangutans die before they reach their mid-40s, which made Nonja unique and likely the oldest living orangutan in the world at the time.
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Old Rosebud

    Old Rosebud

    Old Rosebud (1911–1922) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse whose pedigree traced to the influential sire Eclipse, and through Eclipse to the founding stallion, the Godolphin Arabian. In the list of the top 100 U.S. thoroughbred champions of the 20th Century by Blood-Horse magazine, Old Rosebud ranks 88th. Despite a successful racing career, Old Rosebud was plagued by ailments throughout his life, culminating in a fatal injury at a claiming race when he was 11 years old. Bred by John E. Madden, the bay colt (soon to be gelded) was from the stallion Uncle's first crop of foals. Born in Kentucky, he was purchased as a yearling for $500 by the trainer Frank D. Weir. Weir sold a majority interest in the gelding to Hamilton C. Applegate, the treasurer of Churchill Downs. Frank Weir said of the gelding, "Old Rosebud was the kind of horse one sees once in a lifetime. He certainly was the fastest horse I ever trained or saw. If he had been sound, there's no telling how fast he would have run." Old Rosebud was determined to be the historical two-year-old champion of 1913 and was the top earner for the year. At two, Old Rosebud's most important victories included the Flash Stakes and the
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Regret

    Regret

    Regret (1912 - April 11, 1934) was a famous American thoroughbred racehorse and the first of three fillies to ever win the Kentucky Derby. She was foaled at Harry Payne Whitney's Brookdale Farm in Lincroft, New Jersey. The filly was sired by Broomstick, the 1913-1915 leading sire inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame (son of Ben Brush, also inducted into the Hall of Fame). She was out of Jersey Lightning, who goes back to the great Longfellow through his Kentucky Derby-winning son, Riley.) Regret was bred by owner Harry Payne Whitney. Trained by James G. Rowe, Sr., in 1914 Regret became the first of only four horses to ever win all three Saratoga Race Course events for two-year-olds: the Saratoga Special Stakes, Sanford Stakes and Hopeful Stakes. Joining her would be Campfire (1916), Dehere (1993), and City Zip (2000). The following year, campaigning as a three-year-old, she won the 1915 Kentucky Derby, the first filly of three to do so. Regret was retrospectively named American Horse of the Year. 1915 was the year of the Triple Crown fillies, as Rhine Maiden won the Preakness Stakes. Regret's owner had not entered her in that race. Not since 1915 has more
    7.67
    3 votes
    73

    Xiang Xiang

    • Place of death: China
    Xiang Xiang (August 25, 2001 – February 19, 2007) was the first giant panda to be released into the wild after being bred and raised in captivity. Born at the Wolong Giant Panda Research Center in the Sichuan Province, Xiang Xiang endured a three year training regimen intended to equip him with the skills necessary to survive in the wild. Fitted with a radio-collar upon his release in April 2006, the five-year-old male was tracked each month to check his movements and feeding habits. Despite this extensive preparation, Xiang Xiang was found dead less than a year after his release. The Xinhua News Agency announced the panda's death May 31, 2007, over three months after the incident occurred, citing "the need for a full investigation" as the reason for the delay. Officials from the Research Center determined that a fall from the trees was the probable cause of death. Scratches on Xiang Xiang's body suggest that he was probably being pursued by other pandas when he fell.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Aristides

    Aristides

    Aristides (1872–1893) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse who won the first Kentucky Derby in 1875. In 1875 the Derby was raced at a mile and a half, the distance it would remain until 1896 when it was changed to its present mile and a quarter. There were no roses for Aristides; roses weren't introduced until Hall of Famer Ben Brush won in 1896. A chestnut thoroughbred with a white star and two hind stockings, Aristides was bred by Hal Price McGrath and foaled in 1872. He was sired by the great English stud Leamington, which made him a half brother to another great sire, Hall of Famer Longfellow, who, during his racing career, was called "King of the Turf." And yet, Hal McGrath did not consider Aristides first rate, even though his dam (Sarong) was out of one of the United States' greatest sires Lexington, whose bloodline went back to Glencoe and Hall of Famer Boston. Aristides (named for his breeder's good friend and fellow horse breeder, the Pennsylvanian Aristides Welch who owned Erdenheim Stud and who had imported Leamington into the United States) was foaled late in the season, and was small, never standing taller than about 15 hands. It was his stablemate and half-brother,
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Bret Hanover

    Bret Hanover

    Bret Hanover (1962-1992) was an outstanding American Standardbred racehorse. He was also one of only nine pacers to win harness racing's Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers and achieved a fine career total of 62 wins from 68 starts. He was the only horse to have even been made Harness Horse of the Year three times. He was foaled at Hanover Shoe Farms in Hanover, Pennsylvania on May 19, 1962. Bret Hanover was by the leading sire Adios and out of Brenna Hanover by Tar Heel, a Little Brown Jug winner and a leading sire. Trained and driven by Frank Ervin in his 1964 debut season in racing, two-year-old Bret Hanover was undefeated, winning all 24 races he entered and would continue undefeated for 35 races. Bret Hanover then became the first two-year-old ever to be awarded the honour of USTA Horse of the Year. In his second season of racing, he had 24 starts for 21 wins, a 1:55 world record and Horse of the Year honours again. In his last year of racing as four-year-old, he had 20 starts for 17 wins for a career total of 62 wins from 68 starts. He never placed worse than third. He was voted Harness Horse of the Year in 1964, 1965 and 1966 by the US Trotting Association and the US
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Bummer and Lazarus

    Bummer and Lazarus

    Bummer and Lazarus were two stray dogs that roamed the streets of San Francisco, California, USA, in the early 1860s. Recognized for their unique bond and their prodigious rat-killing ability, they became a fixture of city newspapers, were exempted from local ordinances and immortalized in cartoons. San Francisco, in common with other cities in the United States at the time, had a problem with free-ranging dogs. In Los Angeles in the 1840s dogs outnumbered people nearly two to one, and while the situation in San Francisco had not reached this extreme, the large numbers of strays and feral dogs did cause problems. Dogs were regularly poisoned or trapped and killed. Nevertheless, if a dog turned out to be a good ratter or distinguished itself in some other way it was still possible for it to survive. Bummer was a black-and-white Newfoundland or Newfoundland cross who established himself outside the saloon of Frederick Martin in 1860 and quickly proved to be an exceptional rat-killer. His ratting talent spared him the fate of the former owner of the territory, Bruno, who had been poisoned with strychnine shortly before Bummer's arrival. He scraped a living begging scraps from
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Colin

    Colin

    Colin (1905-1932) was one of America's greatest Thoroughbred racehorses. He retired undefeated after 15 starts and as a sire appears in the pedigree of the champion racehorse Alsab. Colin was a brown colt with three white socks and a stripe and snip on his face. He was foaled in 1905 at Castleton Stud in Kentucky and was owned by London-born financier James R. Keene. Colin was from the third crop of foals by the stakes winner and leading sire Commando (by Domino), who had been bred by James Keene. Colin's dam was the English stakes-winning Pastorella (GB), by Springfield. Colin was trained by Hall of Fame inductee James G. Rowe, Sr. Rowe had handled many top horses in his long career, including Sysonby, Hindoo (who was never unplaced), and the first filly to win the Kentucky Derby, Regret. Rowe and his horses Miss Woodford, Luke Blackburn, Whisk Broom II, Commando, and Peter Pan were inducted into the Hall of Fame. James Keene was not initially enthusiastic about Colin, noting his disfiguring curb, or thoroughpin, meaning that the colt had an enlarged hock. He'd been just as disdainful of an earlier purchase: Colin's grandsire Domino, (another eventual Horse of the Year in 1893 and
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Himmy

    Himmy is one of the largest cats who ever lived. Owned by Thomas Vyse of Redlynch, Queensland, Australia, Himmy reportedly weighed 46 pounds 15.25 oz (21.3 kg), and died in 1986 at 10 years of age. He had a 15-inch (38 cm) neck, was 38 inches (97 cm) long, and had a 33-inch (84 cm) waist.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Keiko

    Keiko

    • Place of death: Taknes Fjord, Norway
    Keiko (c. 1976 – December 12, 2003) was a male orca who is best known for portraying Willy in the 1993 film Free Willy. Keiko, whose name means "lucky one" in the Japanese language, was captured near Iceland in 1979 and sold to the Icelandic aquarium in Hafnarfjörður. Three years later he was sold to Marineland in Ontario where he first started performing for the public and developed skin lesions indicative of poor health. He was then sold to Reino Aventura (now named Six Flags Mexico), an amusement park in Mexico City, in 1985. He was the star of the movie Free Willy in 1993. The publicity from his role in Free Willy led to an effort by Warner Brothers Studio to find him a better home. Donations from the studio and Craig McCaw led to the establishment of the Free Willy-Keiko Foundation in February 1995. With donations from the foundation and millions of school children, the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport, Oregon spent over $7 million to construct facilities to return him to health with the hope of returning him to the wild. UPS provided ground transportation to the nearby Newport Municipal Airport in a specialized container. Weighing 3500 kg (7720 pounds), he was transported by
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Pink Star

    Pink Star

    Pink Star (foaled 1904 in Kentucky) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and was the winner of the 1907 Kentucky Derby. He was a grandson of 1883 Kentucky Derby winner Leonatus and his sire, Pink Coat, was an American Derby winner. Pink Star won the Kentucky Derby by two lengths over Zal on a very wet track, with the mud being a fetlock deep in some places. His win was a long shot victory and Pink Star was described by contemporary sources as a lumbering and ugly mount. By May 1908, Pink Star had been gelded and retired from racing due to poor performance and having a bad temperament. He lived the remainder of his life as a farm horse in Kentucky.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Domino

    Domino

    Domino (1891–1897) was a 19th-century American thoroughbred race horse. A dark brown, almost black*, colt, Domino was sired by Himyar out of the mare Mannie Gray.Sam Hildreth writes in his book, "The Spell of the Turf" that he looked black was actually a deep chestnut. Himyar was out of speed horse called Alarm who'd inherited this speed from the great Eclipse. Domino, who also inherited that speed, was foaled at Major Barak Thomas's Dixiana Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. What he did not have was stamina. Owned by James R. Keene, he was purchased as a yearling for $3,000 by his son, Keene. Domino was trained by William Lakeland and ridden by jockey Fred Taral whom Domino hated for his rough style and copious use of whip and spur. Undefeated as a two-year-old, the horse won all nine races entered and was voted Champion Two Year Old colt and the 1893 Horse of the Year. At the age of two, he won the Great Eclipse Stakes, the Futurity Stakes, the Great American Stakes, the Great Trial Stakes, the Hyde Park Stakes, the Matron Stakes and the Produce Stakes. By now, people called him "The Black Whirlwind." About this time heats no longer dominated horse races in America (they'd fallen out
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Eclipse

    Eclipse

    Eclipse (1 April 1764 – 26 February 1789) was an outstanding, undefeated 18th-century British Thoroughbred racehorse who was later a phenomenal success as a sire. Eclipse was foaled during and named after the solar eclipse of 1 April 1764, at the Cranbourne Lodge Stud of his breeder, Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland. It was at this stud that his sire, the Jockey Club Plate winner, Marske (by Squirt from The Ruby Mare) stood, his dam, Spiletta (foaled 1749) was by Regulus, by the Godolphin Arabian. Eclipse was a brother to the successful broodmare, Proserpine. They were inbred to Snake in the fourth generation (4m x 4f) of their pedigree. After the death of Prince William in 1765, Eclipse was sold for 75 guineas to a sheep dealer from Smithfield, William Wildman. Eclipse started racing at the age of five on 3 May 1769 in Epsom. After his second victory in a race in May 1769 the Irish adventurer Colonel Dennis O'Kelly purchased Eclipse in two parts (50 percent in June 1769 for 650 guineas, 50 percent in April 1770 for 1,100 guineas). Supposedly, at this time Captain Denis O'Kelly used the famous phrase "Eclipse first and the rest nowhere," before making his bets for this
    6.50
    4 votes
    83

    Mick the Miller

    Mick the Miller (29 June 1926 – 6 May 1939) was a male brindle Greyhound. He is celebrated as the first great racing greyhound to compete in England (although he was born in Killeigh, Co. Offaly. Despite a short three year racing career, his achievements were highly publicised around the world and by the end of his career he had become an icon in the sport. His achievements include winning nineteen races in a row, including the English Greyhound Derby on two successive occasions. He suffered an injury at Wimbledon Stadium whilst racing which broke the streak in 1931, and once recovered was beaten in the attempt to win a third Derby title. He went on to appear in films, and is still considered one of the greatest sporting heroes in the UK. Mick, a male brindle Greyhound, was born in Killeigh, Co. Offaly, before the introduction of Greyhound track racing in Ireland, and before the sport became popular in Britain. The smallest of a litter of ten puppies, his father was a direct descendant of Master McGrath, a famous Irish Greyhound who won the Waterloo Cup on three occasions. Originally expected to be used for hare coursing, a deal was discussed with dog owner Moses Rebenschied to
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer

    Northern Dancer (May 27, 1961 – November 16, 1990) was a Canadian-bred Thoroughbred racehorse and the most successful sire of the 20th Century. The National Thoroughbred Racing Association calls him "one of the most influential sires in Thoroughbred history". A bay colt, Northern Dancer was by Nearctic and his dam Natalma, was by the Native Dancer. In 1952, Edward P. Taylor, Canadian business magnate and owner of Windfields Farm, had attended the December sale at Newmarket, England where he purchased Lady Angela, a mare in foal to leading English-based sire Nearco. The following spring, Taylor sent Lady Angela to be bred to Nearco once again, then shipped her to his farm in Canada later in 1953, and in 1954, Lady Angela foaled a colt in Canada named Nearctic who was voted the 1958 Sovereign Award for Horse of the Year. At the yearling sales at Windfields in Toronto, Ontario, the diminutive Northern Dancer didn't find a buyer at the $25,000 reserve price, so he eventually joined the Windfields Farm racing stable. Northern Dancer was ridden by Ron Turcotte in his first victory as a two-year-old at Fort Erie Race Track. He won the Summer Stakes and the Coronation Futurity in Canada
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Black Gold

    Black Gold

    Black Gold (February 17, 1921 - January 18, 1928) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse that won the 50th running of the Kentucky Derby in 1924. Black Gold's dam, U-See-it, was owned by Al Hoots. As a race mare, U-See-it was not fashionably bred, but she was fast. There was only one horse the Oklahoma-bred never beat in her 6-furlong races at small western tracks: the Hall of Famer Pan Zareta. U-See-it won 34 starts, and her purse money supported Al Hoots and his wife Rosa. The Hootses lived in Indian territory and were well known on the Texas/New Orleans racing circuit. In 1916, Al Hoots entered U-See-it into a claiming race in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, where she was claimed. When Hoots refused to give the mare to her new owner, he and U-See-it were banned from racing for life. By 1917, Al was dying. In certain versions of the story, he dreamed that if U-See-it were bred to one of the leading sires of the time, the foal she carried would win the Kentucky Derby. In other versions, Al merely hoped that this could happen. When oil was discovered in what is now Oklahoma, Rosa Hoots (who was a member of the Osage Nation) shipped U-See-it to the Idle Hour Stock Farm in Lexington,
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    El Condor Pasa

    El Condor Pasa

    El Condor Pasa (Japanese : エルコンドルパサー, March 17, 1995 - July 16, 2002) was a Japanese racehorse that won the Japan Cup. He became second in Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Fonso

    Fonso

    Fonso (1877–1903) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and was the winner of the 1880 Kentucky Derby. Fonso was bred in Kentucky and was a chestnut colt sired by King Alfonso out of the mare Weatherwitch. Fonso won the Phoenix Stakes as a three year old over Luke Blackburn who finished third, but is best remembered for going on to beat the favored Kimball in the 1880 Kentucky Derby. The track was particularly dry and the dust, up to 5 inches thick, Fonso kicked up obscured the path for the other contenders. Fonso finished the race with a one length lead at a time of 2:37.50 and won $3800. The owner of Kimball called a foul in the race against Fonso, but the placing was not altered. Fonso had a career record of 12 starts, 5 wins, 3 places and 2 shows. Fonso died at the age of 26 while standing as stud at the Oakwood Stud Farm in Lexington, Kentucky in 1903. His most notable offspring was the mare Fondling (br. 1886, out of Kitty Heron by Chillicothe), who produced the champion filly Imp.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Pelorus Jack

    Pelorus Jack

    Pelorus Jack (fl. 1888 – April 1912) was a Risso's dolphin that was famous for meeting and escorting ships through a stretch of water in Cook Strait, New Zealand, between 1888 and 1912. Pelorus Jack was usually spotted in Admiralty Bay between Cape Francis and Collinet Point, near French Pass, a notoriously dangerous channel used by ships travelling between Wellington and Nelson. Pelorus Jack was shot at from a passing ship, and was later protected by a 1904 New Zealand law. "Pelorus Jack" is also a popular Scottish Country dance , named in honor the dolphin. Pelorus Jack was approximately 13 feet (4 m) long and was of a white color with grey lines or shadings, and a round, white head. Although its sex was never determined, it was identified from photographs as a Risso's dolphin, Grampus griseus. This is an uncommon species in New Zealand waters, and only twelve Risso's dolphins have been reported in that area. Pelorus Jack would guide the ships by swimming alongside a water craft for twenty minutes at a time. If the crew could not see Jack at first, they would often wait for him to appear. Despite his name, he did not live in nearby Pelorus Sound; instead, he would often guide
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Potoooooooo

    Potoooooooo

    Potoooooooo or Pot-8-Os (foaled in 1773) was a famous 18th century Thoroughbred racehorse who defeated some of the greatest racehorses and later became an influential sire. Pot-8-Os was a chestnut colt bred by Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon, in 1773. He was sired by Eclipse, his dam Sportsmistress traced to Thwaites' Dun Mare from the number 38 family and she was sired by Warren's Sportsman. He was the first foal of Sportsmistress, who also produced the Epsom Derby winner Sir Thomas along with the winners Jocundo, Roscius and Sulky. Pot-8-Os acquired the strange spelling of his nickname, Potatoes, when a stable lad was asked to write it on a feed bin. The lad's version, Potoooooooo, was said to amuse his lordship so he kept it, and it appears in the General Stud Book. He was a horse of quality and endurance with many of his races being run over the Beacon Course, upwards of four miles. Pot-8-Os won thirty-four races over the span of seven years, including the Jockey Club Purse three times, and the Craven Stakes. In 1778 he was sold to Richard, 1st Earl Grosvenor, for 1,500 guineas, plus an agreed percentage of Pot-8-Os' future winnings. Pot-8-Os was retired in 1783 to
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Rex

    Rex

    Rex (December 16, 1984 – August 31, 1998) was a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel owned by Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy during his term as President of the United States. Rex, along with brother Fred, had belonged as a puppy to conservative commentator William F. Buckley, Jr.. Though Fred remained with Buckley, Buckley's political ally Reagan would give Rex as a Christmas present to his wife Nancy on December 6, 1985. The White House's previous canine occupant, the Reagans' Bouvier des Flandres named Lucky, had grown too large and had been moved to Reagan's Rancho del Cielo estate in California the preceding Thanksgiving. Rex was named for Rex Scouten, White House Chief Usher. One of Rex's first acts that week was helping to throw the switch that lit the National Christmas Tree. Rex would live in the White House from that Christmas until Reagan left office in 1989, once gaining headlines when he underwent a tonsillectomy at an undisclosed veterinary hospital. Rex was treated to a lavishly decorated doghouse built by the Washington Children's Museum, which included framed portraits of Ronald and Nancy and red window draperies. It was designed by Theo Hayes, great-great grandson of
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Terry

    Terry

    • Place of death: Ventura Freeway
    Terry (November 17, 1933 – September 1, 1945) was a Cairn Terrier whose most famous role was Toto in the movie The Wizard of Oz (1939). She appeared in 15 different movies but was only credited in that one, though not as Terry but as Toto. Terry, born in the midst of the Great Depression, was trained and owned by Carl Spitz. Her first film appearance was in "Ready For Love" which was released on November 30, 1934 roughly one month before her first major film appearance, with Shirley Temple, in 1934's Bright Eyes as Rags. Terry, who did her own stunts, almost lost her life during the filming of The Wizard of Oz when one of the Winkie guards accidentally stepped on her, breaking her foot. She spent two weeks recuperating at Judy Garland's residence, and Garland developed a close attachment with her. She wanted to adopt her, but Spitz refused. Her salary, $125 per week, was more than that of many human actors in the film, and also more than many working Americans at the time. She attended the premiere of The Wizard of Oz at Grauman's Chinese Theater; because of the popularity of the film, her name was changed to Toto in 1942. Her last film was Tortilla Flat (1942), in which she was
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Tu'i Malila

    Tu'i Malila

    • Place of death: Nuku'alofa
    Tu'i Malila (1777 - 19 May 1965) was a tortoise given to the royal family of Tonga by Captain James Cook. It was a radiated tortoise (Geochelone radiata) from Madagascar and is the second longest-lived tortoise whose age has been verified. The name means King Malila in the Tongan language. Tu'i Malila was hatched around 1777 and then given by Captain Cook to the Tongan royal family upon his visit to Tonga in July 1777. Tu'i Malila remained in their care until death on 19 May 1965 due to natural causes. The tortoise was estimated to be 188 years old at this time. During Queen Elizabeth II's Royal Tour of Tonga in 1953, Tu'i Malila was one of the first animals shown to the monarch on her official visit to the island nation. In the Tongan National Center on the island of Tongatapu, there is a preserved radiated tortoise labeled Tu'i Malila. Little other information is given in English, but the Center staff attest to the fact that this is indeed the body of the famous tortoise.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Chester Drescher

    Chester Drescher

    Chester Drescher was a performing dog born in 1982 in Queens, New York City, New York, USA; he died in 2000. He was Fran Drescher's Pomeranian. He played C.C. Babcock's dog on The Nanny, who seemed to like nanny Fran Fine better than he did C.C. He was also in the 1990 film Cadillac Man. When Chester died, Drescher had him cremated and placed in a small ceramic box, inscribed, "I just love ya, that's all," which she keeps in her kitchen on her black marble countertop, surrounded by pictures and candles.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Flying Childers

    Flying Childers

    Flying Childers was a famous undefeated 18th century Thoroughbred racehorse, foaled in 1714, and is often cited as the first truly great racehorse in the history of Thoroughbreds. Flying Childers was sired by the great Darley Arabian, one of the three foundation stallions of the Thoroughbred breed. His dam Betty Leedes, was by (Old) Careless and she was inbred to Spanker in the second and third generations (2x3). Betty Leedes was also the dam of the unraced, but successful sire, Bartlett's or Bleeding Childers who was also by the Darley Arabian. (Old) Careless was by the great stallion Spanker, and both were thought to be the best racehorses of their generation. Betty Leedes was one of the few outside mares allowed to breed to the Darley Arabian, who was mostly kept as a private sire by his owner. Flying Childers gained the name of his breeder, Colonel Leonard Childers, in addition to his owner, the Duke of Devonshire, often being referred to as either Devonshire Childers or Flying Childers. Although the Duke received many offers for the colt, including one to pay for the horse's weight in gold, he remained the animal's owner throughout his life. First racing at age six, the 15.2
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Daisy

    Daisy

    Daisy, born as Irina de Pittacus, (20 September 1993 – 24 October 2006) was the dog of the murdered German fashion designer, Rudolph Moshammer. In an interview with the magazine Stern, Moshammer said that he had owned four dogs with this name. The Yorkshire terrier Irina de Pittacus was born a puppy in Jockgrim to the male Drakula in the care of breeder Christel Nicklis. At the age of four months, Moshammer purchased the animal and gave it the name "Daisy". In the arm of the designer, always with a ribbon on her head, Daisy became a trademark of the extravagant designer and was often seen in the German media. Moshammer devoted a book and a website to Daisy. She was also the namesake for a line of grooming products for dogs launched by Moshammer. In addition the designer developed a collection of dog clothing. In 2005, she had a short guest appearance on the RTL series Unter Uns. On the night of 13 to 14 of January 2005, Daisy was probably the single "eyewitness" to Moshammer's murder. Subsequently, there were rumors that Moshammer had put in his will that Daisy should have lifelong living privileges in his villa in Munich. She was to be cared for there by Moshammer's chauffeur,
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Lonesome George

    Lonesome George

    The Pinta Island tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra abingdonii), also known as the Pinta giant tortoise, Abingdon Island tortoise, or Abingdon Island giant tortoise, was a subspecies of Galápagos tortoise native to Ecuador's Pinta Island. The subspecies was described by Albert Günther in 1877 after specimens arrived in London. By the end of the 19th century, most of the Pinta Island tortoises had been wiped out due to hunting. By the mid-20th century, it was assumed that the species was extinct until a single male was discovered on the island in 1971. Efforts were made to mate the male, named Lonesome George, with other subspecies, but no viable eggs were produced. Lonesome George died on 24 June 2012. The subspecies is believed to have become extinct; however, there has been at least one first-generation hybrid individual found outside Pinta Island. This subspecies was originally described in 1877 by German-born British herpetologist Albert Günther, who named it Testudo abingdonii, a new species, in his book The Gigantic Land-tortoises (Living and Extinct) in the Collection of the British Museum. The name, abingdonii, derives from Abingdon Island, now more commonly known as Pinta Island.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Salvator

    Salvator

    Salvator (1886-1909) was an American thoroughbred race horse considered by many to be one of the best racers during the latter half of the 19th century. Bred by Daniel Swigert of Elmendorf Farm in Lexington, Kentucky, Salvator was sired by Prince Charlie out of Salina (by Lexington). (Salvator was the last great horse Swigart bred; his best stallions had grown old and died.) On his sire's side, he went back to the tremendous mare Pocahontas by Glencoe. On his dam's side, through Lexington, he carried the blood of Boston sired by Timoleon sired by Sir Archie sired by Diomed. Unusual for the times, the dark chestnut with a large white blaze was born in 1886 in California. James Ben Ali Haggin had purchased his dam, Salina, and shipped her to his 44,000-acre (180 km) Rancho Del Paso with Salvator in utero. Haggin had made his money in the California Gold Rush of 1849, so much of it he was suddenly one of the wealthiest men in America, and he used his new wealth to establish the biggest horse breeding operations in world history. Aside from the thousands of grazing acres he owned in Arizona, New Mexico and Southern California, he headquartered at the Rancho del Paso near the
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Bull Lea

    Bull Lea

    Bull Lea (1935–1964) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse who is best known as the foundation sire responsible for making Calumet Farm one of the most successful racing stables in American history. In their article on Calumet Farm, the International Museum of the Horse in Lexington, Kentucky wrote that Bull Lea was "one of the greatest sires in Thoroughbred breeding history." Bred by E. Dale Schaffer's Coldstream Stud in Lexington, Kentucky, Bull Lea was sired by Bull Dog and out of the mare, Rose Leaves by Ballot. He was purchased as a yearling by Calumet Farm's Warren Wright, Sr. and sent to race at age two under trainer Frank J. Kearns. The colt finished second in the 1937 Hopeful and Champagne Stakes, two important races for his age group. At age three, Bull Lea set a new Keeneland Race Course record for nine furlongs in winning the 1938 Blue Grass Stakes. Made a 3:1 second choice by bettors for the Kentucky Derby, he finished eighth and then ran sixth in the Preakness Stakes. The following year, the four-year-old's most important win came in the Widener Handicap. Bull Lea entered stud in 1940 at Calumet Farm's operation in Lexington, Kentucky. He became the Leading sire in
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Čabulītis

    Čabulītis

    Čabulītis (ca. 1935 – 21 August 2007) was a captive American Alligator residing at the Riga Zoo in Riga, Latvia. At time of his death he was thought to be one of the oldest captive alligators in Europe. Information at the Riga Zoo, dated 1 April 1935, suggests that he was 1 to 3 years old on arrival. He was 2.9 metres (9 ft 6 in) long and weighed 140 kilograms (310 lb). In 1958, 1970, and 1980 due to problems with heating of the crocodile house, Čabullītis would not consume food for periods of 5 to 7 months. Otherwise he normally ate about 1.5 kilograms (3.3 lb) of beef twice a week in addition to chicken once a week. He also liked herring, but refused to eat furry or live animals. In Latvian, Čabulītis roughly translates to sweet and tender creature. At various times, the alligator was also known by the names Ulmanītis, Ali and Gena. Three other alligators about the same age lived at the zoo in the 1930s — two females and a male. Little is known about Čabulītis' youth — only that the alligators used to fight and Čabulītis bit one of the females in the tail. Apparently the alligators mated as well, but the eggs were not fertile. The other male was moved to the Kiev Zoo in 1965.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Elwood

    Elwood

    Elwood (foaled 1901 in Missouri) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse that is best remembered for winning the 1904 Kentucky Derby and for being the first horse both bred and owned by a woman to win the Derby. Elwood was a bay colt sired by Free Knight out of the mare Petticoat (by Alarm). Free Knight finished third in the 1886 Kentucky Derby. By the time Elwood won the Derby in 1904, Free Knight had been sold for $45 and was used as a farm horse in southern Kentucky. Elwood was bred by Mrs. J.B. Prather at Faustiana Stud in Maryville, Missouri and was bought in 1902 by Charles Durnell while on a horse buying trip to San Francisco, where the yearling was being trained. Durnell named the horse Elwood after his mother's maiden name. Elwood was a mediocre racehorse during his two-year old and early three-year old season, racing mostly in small stakes and a few $300 claiming races in California. He was second in the Competition Stakes and Youngster Stakes as a two-year old and placed a commendable second in the 1904 California Ascot Derby, which was run on a very muddy track that year. Elwood was raced in Charles Durnell's wife's name. Laska Durnell entered the colt in the Kentucky
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Glencoe

    Glencoe

    Glencoe (1831–1857) was a British bred Thoroughbred racehorse, who won the 2,000 Guineas Stakes and the Ascot Gold Cup. He was one of the earliest Thoroughbred stallions imported into the United States and was a top broodmare sire there. Several outstanding sons of Lexington were out of Glencoe mares, including Asteroid, Kentucky and Norfolk. He was a chestnut stallion that was foaled at his breeder's stud, located in Middleton Stoney, Oxfordshire. Glencoe was by Sultan, a versatile stallion who won races from six furlongs to over three miles. Sultan raced until the age of eight, and was leading sire in Great Britain for six consecutive years (1832–1837). The dam of Glencoe Trampoline (by Tramp), was a fairly good racemare, and an even better producer of racehorses, foaling not only Glencoe, but also Glenara and Glencaire (all by Sultan). Glencoe stood 15 hands 1+⁄4 inches (0.044 m) high, with a large star and half-stockinged hind legs. He had a long, hollow back that sagged, especially as he aged, but still had a fine head, lovely neck, sound legs, deep girth, and powerful hindquarters with wide hips, inherited from his sire. Glencoe also inherited great staying power from his
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Kincsem

    Kincsem

    Kincsem (Hungarian for "My Precious" or "My Treasure"; 1874–1887) was the most successful Thoroughbred race horse ever, having won 54 races for 54 starts. Foaled in Tápiószentmárton, Hungary in 1874, she is a national icon, and is revered in other parts of the world, too. Over four seasons she won all her races against both female and male company at various race tracks across Europe, a record that's still unbeaten. Kincsem's sire, Cambuscan, was owned by Queen Victoria. He was sold to Hungarian interests in 1873 and was brought to stand at the Hungarian National Stud, Kisber. Cambuscan, second in England's St. Leger Stakes in 1864, was by Newminster, his dam, The Arrow was by Slane. Kincsem was out of the Hungarian mare Waternymph, a daughter of the English horse Cotswold, by Newcourt (by Sir Hercules). Kincsem's third dam, Seaweed was also by Slane making her inbred to him in the third and fourth generations (3x4). A perhaps apocryphal story surrounds the beginnings of Kincsem. Running with a group of fifty horses on the grounds of her owner's ancestral Hungarian home, she alone was lanky and ungainly. She would stand with her head low and her eyes half-opened. One night she went
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Lucky

    Lucky, a Bouvier des Flandres dog, was a pet of Ronald Reagan.
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Peter Pan I

    Peter Pan I

    Peter Pan (1904-1933) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and sire, bred and raced by prominent horseman, James R. Keene. As winner of the Belmont Stakes, the Brooklyn Derby and the Brighton Handicap, he was later inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. His progeny included many famous American racehorses, including several winners of the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes. Bred and raced by prominent horseman, James R. Keene, Peter Pan was out of the mare Cinderella whose sire was Hermit, the 1867 winner of England's most important race, the Epsom Derby. Peter Pan was sired by Commando, a 1901 American Classic Race winner who in turn was a son of Domino, the American Horse of the Year of 1893. Peter Pan was conditioned by future Hall of Fame trainer James G. Rowe, Sr.. At age two Peter Pan won four of his eight starts including the prestigious 1906 Hopeful Stakes. In 1907, Peter Pan won six of his nine starts with two seconds, one of which was in the spring in the Withers Stakes. As the prestigious U.S. Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing had not at that time been established, the three-year-old Peter Pan was not entered in the Kentucky Derby or the
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    St. Simon

    St. Simon

    St. Simon (1881 – April 2, 1908) was an undefeated British Thoroughbred racehorse and one of the most successful sires in the history of the Thoroughbred. In May 1886 The Sporting Times' carried out a poll of one hundred experts to create a ranking of the best British racehorses of the 19th century. St. Simon was ranked fourth, having been placed in the top ten by 53 of the contributors. Foaled at William Barrow's Paddocks near Newmarket, St. Simon was by the good racehorse and sire Galopin. Galopin won 10 out of 11 races, including the Epsom Derby, and was a leading sire three times. His get included the dams of Triple Crown winner Flying Fox and Bayardo. At the time of St. Simon's birth, however, he had not produced his best stock. St. Simon's dam, St. Angela (by King Tom), was disappointing as a broodmare up to the time she had her sixth foal, St. Simon, at 16. However, she did produce the sisters to St. Simon, Simonne II and Angelica (both by Galopin), dam of the stallion Orme (1889 by Ormonde). St. Simon was a brown colt with a small star on his forehead and a few white hairs on the inside of his pasterns and heels. He also tended to produce bay or brown foals, with the
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Dust Commander

    Dust Commander

    Dust Commander (1967 - October 7, 1991) was an American Thoroughbred Racehorse. The name "Dust Commander" is derived from his dam, Dust Storm, and his sire, Bold Commander. A descendant of Nearco, Dust Commander was bred by the Pullen brothers. He was owned by Robert E. Lehmann and trained by Don Combs. In a 3 year racing career, Dust Commander had 8 wins, 5 places and 4 shows in 42 starts. He finished his career with $215,012 in winnings. Some of the highlights of his career include winning as a 2 year old the City of Miami Beach Handicap and as a 3 year old the Blue Grass Stakes, a Kentucky Derby prep race. On May 2, 1970 with Mike Manganello aboard, Dust Commander won the 96th running of the Kentucky Derby in 2:03.4 ahead of My Dad George and High Echelon. Hunter S. Thompson's seminal 1970 essay "The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved" detailed the running of the Derby won by Dust Commander. Standing at stud, Dust Commander sired the 1975 Preakness Stakes winner, Master Derby. In 2006, the family of the late Robert E. Lehmann donated Dust Commander's Kentucky Derby Trophy to the Kentucky Derby Museum.
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Fair Play

    Fair Play

    Fair Play (1905–1929) was an American-bred Thoroughbred racehorse who was successful on the track, but even more so as a sire. His grandsire was Spendthrift, whose grandsire was the English Triple Crown champion West Australian. While successful on the track until an injury cut short his racing career, Fair Play gained his most fame as a sire. Among his better progeny were: Following the death of owner August Belmont, Jr. in 1924, Fair Play was sold to Joseph E. Widener, proprietor of Elmendorf Farm in Lexington, Kentucky, where he remained until his death on December 17, 1929. Widener, a dedicated horseman, buried Fair Play in the Elmendorf Farm cemetery and erected a nearly life-size bronze statue at the head of his grave.
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    Boston

    Boston

    Boston (1833–1850), was an outstanding chestnut Thoroughbred racehorse and a Leading sire in North America three times from 1851 to 1853. He started in about 45 races, winning 40 of these, including 15 in succession. Boston was later one of the initial inductees into the Hall of Fame. He was a chestnut stallion with a white blaze on his nose and he was foaled in Richmond, Virginia. Boston was bred by the Virginia attorney John Wickham (who had been Aaron Burr's counsel in his trial for treason). He was by the very good racehorse, Timoleon (by the great Sir Archy), his dam was Sister to Tuckahoe by Ball’s Florizel. Boston was inbred to Diomed in the third generation (3m x 3f). He was a half-brother to the Shylock mare who founded a successful family. They were from the number 40 family which traced back to the imported mare, Kitty Fisher. As a two-year-old, Boston was lost by his breeder in a card game and was given to Wickham's friend Nathaniel Rives, of Richmond to repay his debt of $800. He was named after a popular card game and later given the nickname of "Old Whitenose". Boston had a wilful temperament and was difficult to train. Sent to the stable of John Belcher, and then to
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Cindy

    Cinderella (c.1975¬タモJune 18, 2006), though more commonly just called Cindy, was a male bottle-nosed dolphin that made international headlines for an unofficial marriage to a woman. Cindy was taken in 1990 from the Black Sea to the Dolphin Reef dolphinarium in Eilat, Israel, in the Gulf of Aqaba. There, he was seen by British woman Sharon Tendler during a show. Tendler continued visiting for 15 years before she requested permission for the "wedding" in 2005. Permission was granted and the ceremony was held on December 28 of that year. It began with the 41-year-old Tendler walking down the dock in a white silk dress and a pink tiara towards the water where 30-year-old Cindy was waiting. She kissed him and fed him fish, and at the end of the ceremony was thrown into the water. Tendler stated that "the peace and tranquility under water, and his love, would calm me down," and that she loved him. Though the media painted a more romantic picture of the event, Tendler herself admitted that the marriage had no legal standing and that the ceremony was, in her own words, "a bit of fun" after her friends joked about her being single at the age of 41. The marriage was non-exclusive.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Flying Fox

    Flying Fox

    Flying Fox (1896–1911) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse who won the 1899 English Triple Crown Races and was the leading sire in France three times. He was sired by Orme who in turn was sired by Ormonde, the 1886 Triple Crown winner. Their victories made owner Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, the only person to own two English Triple Crown winners. His dam was the high-strung mare, somewhat aptly named Vampire, by Galopin. Vampire also produced these horses from six matings with Orme: Flying Lemur (£1,325, a stud failure); Vamose (£5,604 and at stud in France with limited success) and Pipistrello (a non-winner and useless as a stallion), Wetaria, and Vane (produced the Royal Hunt Cup and Ebor Handicap winner, Weathervane). Flying Fox was intensely inbred (3m x 2f) to Galopin. Flying Fox was a very difficult colt to handle and as such his trainer raced him for only two years. However, he met with enormous success under trainer John Porter, whom the National Horseracing Museum says was "undoubtedly the most successful trainer of the Victorian era." Flying Fox won three of his five starts at age two, and then at age three went undefeated while becoming only the 8th horse in
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Gargantua

    Gargantua

    Gargantua (1929 - November 1949) was a captive lowland gorilla who was famous in his lifetime and has been credited with saving the Ringling Brothers circus from bankruptcy. An acid scar on his face gave Gargantua a snarling, menacing expression, and the circus management attracted attention to him by emphasizing, in their publicity, his alleged hatred of humans. He was also claimed to be the largest gorilla in captivity. Gargantua was captured as a baby in Africa, and was known as "Buddy" for years. After he was sold to Ringling Brothers by his previous owner, Gertrude Lintz, he was renamed after the literary character Gargantua for his large size (the literary Gargantua was a giant) and because the name sounded more frightening. He had a "mate" named Toto, but apparently never showed any interest in her. She was nevertheless advertised by the circus as "Mrs Gargantua". The film Buddy, starring Rene Russo, is very loosely based on the early life of Gargantua/Buddy and another of Mrs Lintz's gorillas, Massa. Gargantua was born wild in the Belgian Congo in approximately 1929. In the early-1930s, the gorilla was given to a Captain Arthur Phillips as a gift from missionaries in
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Matchem

    Matchem

    Matchem (c.1748 – 21 February 1781) was a Thoroughbred racehorse who had a great influence on the breed, and was the earliest of three 18th century stallions that produced the Thoroughbred sire-lines of today, in addition to Eclipse and Herod. He was the Leading sire in Great Britain and Ireland from 1772 - 1774. Bred by John Holmes of Carlisle, he was sired by Cade, a stallion who also got Changeling—the sire of Le Sang, and the grandsire to Bourbon (winner of the St. Leger) and Duchess (winner of the Doncaster Cup)—and Young Cade (who sired many good broodmares). He won many King's Plates in his racing career. Cade was by the Godolphin Arabian, one of the three founding stallions of the Thoroughbred breed. Matchem was out of a bay (1735) mare by Partner (Croft's), who was an undefeated stallion in 1723, 1724, and 1726 in four-mile match races, until his first loss in 1728 to Smiling Ball. Partner also sired Tartar, the sire of Herod. Matchem's dam was also full-sister to Miss Partner. The colt was surprisingly small, only 14 hands 3 inches with good bone and a "racey" build. Although considered dark bay, he produced a great number of chestnuts and a high percentage of blacks, as
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Seabiscuit

    Seabiscuit

    • Place of death: Ridgewood Ranch
    Seabiscuit (May 23, 1933 – May 17, 1947) was a champion Thoroughbred racehorse in the United States. A small horse, Seabiscuit had an inauspicious start to his racing career, but became an unlikely champion and a symbol of hope to many Americans during the Great Depression. Seabiscuit was the subject of a 1949 film, The Story of Seabiscuit; a 2001 book, Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand; and a 2003 film, Seabiscuit, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Seabiscuit was foaled on May 23, 1933, from the mare Swing On and sired by Hard Tack, a son of Man o' War. Seabiscuit was named for his father, as hardtack or "sea biscuit" is the name for a type of cracker eaten by sailors. The bay colt grew up on Claiborne Farm in Paris, Kentucky, where he was trained. He was undersized, knobby-kneed, and given to sleeping and eating for long periods. Initially, he was trained by Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons, who had taken Gallant Fox to the United States Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing. Fitzsimmons saw some potential in Seabiscuit, but felt the horse was too lazy. He devoted most of his time to training Omaha, who won the 1935 Triple Crown. Seabiscuit was
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    The Flying Dutchman

    The Flying Dutchman

    The Flying Dutchman (1846–1870) was an English Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. He raced for four seasons between 1848 and 1851, winning all but one of his fifteen races, including the Epsom Derby and the St Leger. On his final racecourse appearance he defeated Voltigeur in what was probably the most celebrated match race in the history of British thoroughbred racing. He went on to be a success at stud both in Britain and France, where he died in 1870. The Flying Dutchman was regarded by experts as one of the greatest British racehorses of the nineteenth century. The Flying Dutchman, bred at Kirkleatham in Yorkshire, was a dark bay or "brown" horse standing 15.3 hands high. He had a strong back, deep shoulders, powerful hindquarters, good bone, and was a bit "over at the knee" (as were many of his offspring). The roman-nosed animal also had an exceptional stride, a quiet temper and a "fiery eye". The Flying Dutchman was by Bay Middleton, who won every race in his two seasons on the turf until he was retired due to a problem with one of his forelegs. During that time, the colt won the Riddleton Stakes, the Bruton Street Stakes, the 2,000 Guineas, the Buckhust Stakes at Ascot, the
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Wiarton Willie

    Wiarton Willie

    Wiarton Willie is a Canadian groundhog who lived in the community of Wiarton in Bruce County, Ontario. Every February 2, on Groundhog Day, Willie took part in the local Wiarton Willie Festival. His role is to predict whether there will be an early spring. Although the original Wiarton Willie died, the Wiarton Groundhog Day celebrations continue each year with successors of the original Willie, also referred to as "Wiarton Willie." Groundhog Day, featuring Wiarton Willie, is a popular annual festival in Wiarton and is similar to events in other locations in North America. A midwinter celebration involving an animal with predictive powers was an element of Celtic culture. The link between weather prediction and the day is said to have been inspired by an old Scottish couplet: "If Candlemas Day is bright and clear/ There'll be two winters in the year." The story of Wiarton Willie dates back to 1956. A Wiarton resident named Mac McKenzie wanted to showcase his childhood home to his many friends, so he sent out invitations for a "Groundhog Day" gathering. One of these invitations fell into the hands of a Toronto Star reporter. The reporter travelled to Wiarton looking for the Groundhog
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Zarafa

    Zarafa

    • Place of death: Paris
    The Giraffe given to Charles X of France by Muhammad Ali of Egypt (1825-12 January 1845) was a female giraffe in a menagerie in the Jardin des Plantes in Paris for 18 years in the early 19th century. She was one of the first three giraffes to be seen in Europe for over three centuries, since the Medici giraffe was sent to Lorenzo de' Medici in Florence in 1486. She was a present to Charles X of France from the Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt, Mehmet Ali Pasha. In 1824, the army of the Sultan of Turkey was engaged in fighting in the Greek War of Independence, and Sultan Mahmud II called upon the Pasha to send troops in support. The Greeks were supported by France. Bernardino Drovetti, the French consul-general in Egypt, persuaded the Pasha that an extraordinary present would encourage the King of France to stop supporting the Greeks. She was captured as a young animal by Arab hunters near Sennar in Sudan and taken to Khartoum on the back of a camel, from where she was transported by boat down the Nile to Alexandria. She was accompanied by three cows that provided her with 25 litres of milk to drink each day. From Alexandria, she embarked on a ship to Marseilles, with an Arab groom, Hassan,
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Huddersfield Ben

    Huddersfield Ben

    Huddersfield Ben (ca. 1865 – 23 September 1871), an early Yorkshire Terrier, is universally acknowledged to be the foundation sire of the breed. In his day Ben won many prizes, both as a show dog and in ratting contests. He had tremendous influence in setting the breed type for the Yorkshire Terrier, a new breed still under development in Ben's day. Although larger than a standard Yorkshire Terrier, Ben regularly sired stock under 7 pounds. Mr. and Mrs. M.A. Foster of Bradford, in West Yorkshire England, owned Huddersfield Ben. The dog was bred by Mr. W. Eastwood in the town of Huddersfield, England. According to Ben's pedigree, he was linebred (the product of a mother-son pairing), as was his mother Lady. Lady was the great-great-granddaughter of Mr. J. Swift's Old Crab, a long coated black and tan terrier born around 1850. Old Crab and Old Kitty, a Paisley Terrier owned by J. Kershaw of Halifax, West Yorkshire England, are the earliest recorded predecessors to the Yorkshire Terrier. Huddersfield Ben, registration number 3612, had an accomplished career in dog shows. He competed in Manchester in 1869 and placed second. He was shown again at Manchester in 1870 and won first place.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Marske

    Marske

    Marske (1750-July 1779) was a Thoroughbred racehorse, best known as siring the great Eclipse. Bred by John Hutton at Marske Hall, Yorkshire, he was traded to the Prince William, Duke of Cumberland (also the breeder and owner of Herod) as a foal for a chestnut Arabian. In 1754, he won the Jockey Club Plate (Newmarket) against Pytho and Brilliant, and a 300 guineas match against Ginger. The following year, he came third in a race at Newmarket, and did not run again until 1756, when he lost twice again, this time in two 1,000 guineas matches against Snap (by Snip). He was then retired to stud. Marske stood at the Duke's Cumberland stud until his owner died in 1765. Being a rather average horse up to that point, he was then sold for only 20 guineas to William Wildman. It wasn't until his greatest son, Eclipse showed talent on the track that Marske became extremely popular. He was then sold for a considerable profit of 1,000 guineas to the Earl of Abingdon, who raised his stud fee to 100 guineas. During his 22 years at stud Marske sired 154 winners with earnings of ₤71,806. Top offspring include:
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Timothy

    Timothy

    Timothy (c. 1839 – 3 April 2004) was a Mediterranean Spur-thighed tortoise who was thought to be approximately 165 years old at the time of her death. This made her the UK's oldest known resident. In spite of her name, Timothy was female; it was not properly known how to sex tortoises in the 19th century. Timothy was found aboard a Portuguese privateer in 1854 by Captain John Courtenay Everard, of the Royal Navy. The tortoise served as a mascot on a series of Navy vessels until 1892. She was ship's mascot of HMS Queen during the first bombardment of Sevastopol in the Crimean War (she was the last survivor of this war), then moved to Princess Charlotte followed by Nankin. After her navy service she retired to live out her life on dry land, taken in by the Earl of Devon at his home Powderham Castle. On her underside was etched the family motto, "Where have I fallen? What have I done?" In 1926, Timothy's owners decided that he should mate and it was then discovered that "he" was female. Despite this useful information, mating attempts were unsuccessful. Timothy is buried near the place of her demise at the Earl of Devon's home Powderham Castle.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Winnipeg

    Winnipeg

    • Place of death: London Zoo
    Winnipeg, or Winnie, (1914 - 12 May 1934) was the name given to a female black bear that lived at London Zoo from 1915 until her death in 1934. She was bought as a small cub for $20 (probably from the hunter who had shot her mother) at a stop in White River, Ontario, by Lt. Harry Colebourn of The Fort Garry Horse, a Canadian cavalry regiment, en route to the Western Front during the First World War. The bear was smuggled into Britain as an unofficial regimental mascot. Lt. Colebourn, the regiment’s veterinarian, named her after his home city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Before leaving for France, Colebourn left Winnie at London Zoo. Winnipeg's eventual destination was to have been the Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, but at the end of the War, Colebourn decided to allow Winnie to remain at the London Zoo, where she was much loved for her playfulness and gentleness. Among her fans was A. A. Milne's son Christopher Robin, who consequently changed the name of his own teddy bear from "Edward Bear" to "Winnie the Pooh", providing the inspiration for his father's stories about Winnie-the-Pooh. A statue of Winnie and Captain Colebourn stands in Assiniboine Park in Winnipeg, in the park's
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    Bear JJ1

    Bear JJ1 (2004 – 26 June 2006) was a brown bear whose travels and exploits in Austria and Germany in the first half of 2006 drew international attention. JJ1, also known as Bruno in the German press (some newspapers also gave the bear different names, such as Beppo or Petzi), is believed to have been the first brown bear on German soil in 170 years. Previously, the last sighting of a bear in what is now Germany was recorded in 1838 when hunters shot a bear in Bavaria. Initially heralded as a welcome visitor and a symbol of the success of endangered species reintroduction programs, his dietary preferences for sheep, chickens, and beehives led government officials to believe that he could become a threat to humans, and they ordered that he be shot or captured. Public objection to the destruction order resulted in its revision, and the German government tried to use non-lethal means to sedate and capture the bear. JJ1 was described as bloodthirsty, clever, and fast. Bavarian prime minister Edmund Stoiber referred to him as a Problembär ("problem bear"). Farmers claimed the bear "enjoyed killing," because he typically killed sheep without eating them. This behavior, common among
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Diomed

    Diomed

    Diomed, foaled in 1777, was an English Thoroughbred race horse who won the inaugural running of the Epsom Derby in 1780. He was subsequently a successful sire in the United States. A bright chestnut standing 15 hands 3 inches he was named after the Ancient Greek hero Diomedes, he was by the unraced Florizel out of the unraced Pastorella's Dam, aka Sister to Juno (both going back to the Godolphin Arabian, and Sister to Juno going back as well to Darley Arabian), Diomed was bred by the Hon. Richard Vernon and owned by Sir Charles Bunbury. and trained by him at Hilton Hall. He was started 19 times, winning 11, finishing second in 4, and third in 3. Of these eleven wins, ten were consecutive, which included the inaugural running of the Epsom Derby in 1780. During these early bright years of Diomed's life, he was considered by many to be the best colt seen in Britain since Eclipse. He was allowed to rest for a while, but when he was brought back to the races, he wasn't the same horse. Sometimes he would win, and sometimes he wouldn't win, and more often the latter than the former. His last win was a King's Plate in four mile heats carrying 168 pounds. Sir Charles retired Diomed to stud.
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Dolly the Sheep

    Dolly the Sheep

    Dolly (5 July 1996 – 14 February 2003) was a female domestic sheep, and the first mammal to be cloned from an adult somatic cell, using the process of nuclear transfer. She was cloned by Ian Wilmut, Keith Campbell and colleagues at the Roslin Institute and the biotechnology company PPL Therapeutics near Edinburgh in Scotland. The funding for Dolly's cloning was provided by PPL Therapeutics and the Ministry of Agriculture. She was born on 5 July 1996 and she lived until the age of six, at which point she died from a progressive lung disease. She has been called "the world's most famous sheep" by sources including BBC News and Scientific American. The cell used as the donor for the cloning of Dolly was taken from a mammary gland, and the production of a healthy clone therefore proved that a cell taken from a specific part of the body could recreate a whole individual. On Dolly's name, Wilmut stated "Dolly is derived from a mammary gland cell and we couldn't think of a more impressive pair of glands than Dolly Parton's". Dolly was born on 5 July 1996 to three mothers (one provided the egg, another the DNA and a third carried the cloned embryo to term). She was created using the
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Kenmare Sorceress

    Kenmare Sorceress

    Ch. Kenmare Sorceress (1909–??), an Airedale Terrier, was the first of its breed to have won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, in 1912. She was originally from Wales, but was imported into the United States by William P. Wolcott in September 1910. Born in Wales and bred by a bricklayer, Sorceress was purchased by William P. Wolcott of Readville, Massachusetts and imported into the United States at just over one year old in September 1910. Following her arrival in the United States, Sorceress was shown frequently at conformation shows around the country. In 1911, the Airedale Terrier Club of New England offered a new trophy, called the "Airedale Terrier Club of New England Shield" for the best dog or bitch owned by a member. It was awarded for the first time in 1912, to Kenmare Sorceress. The most valuable trophy offered by the club was the "Champion the New King Bowl", given to the best dog or bitch in the show. Kenmare Sorceress won this trophy on the second occasion it was awarded, at the second annual show of the club in November 1912 beating imports Abbey King Nobbler and Abbey King Magic, thought to be the best of their breed from England. In addition at the second annual
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    Laika

    • Place of death: Low Earth orbit
    Laika (Russian: Лайка, literally meaning "Barker"; c. 1954 – November 3, 1957) was a Soviet space dog that became the first animal to orbit the Earth – as well as the first animal to die in orbit. As little was known about the impact of spaceflight on living creatures at the time of Laika's mission, and the technology to de-orbit had not yet been developed, there was no expectation of Laika's survival. Some scientists believed humans would be unable to survive the launch or the conditions of outer space, so engineers viewed flights by animals as a necessary precursor to human missions. Laika, a stray dog, originally named Kudryavka (Russian: Кудрявка Little Curly), underwent training with two other dogs, and was eventually chosen as the occupant of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik 2 that was launched into outer space on November 3, 1957. Laika probably died within hours after launch from overheating, possibly caused by a failure of the central R-7 sustainer to separate from the payload. The true cause and time of her death was not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six, or as the Soviet government initially claimed, she
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Marengo

    Marengo

    Marengo (c. 1793–1831) was the famous war mount of Napoleon I of France. Named after the Battle of Marengo, through which he carried his rider safely, Marengo was imported to France from Egypt in 1799 as a 6-year-old. The grey Arabian was probably bred at the famous El Naseri Stud. Although small (only 14.1 hands.) he was a reliable, steady, and courageous mount. Marengo was wounded eight times in his career, and carried the Emperor in the Battle of Austerlitz, Battle of Jena-Auerstedt, Battle of Wagram, and Battle of Waterloo. He also was frequently used in the 80 mile gallops from Valladolid to Burgos, which he often completed in 5 hours. As one of 52 horses in Napoleon's personal stud, Marengo fled with these horses when it was raided by Russians in 1812, surviving the retreat from Moscow; however, the stallion was captured in 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo by William Henry Francis Petre, 11th Baron Petre. Petre brought the horse back to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and sold him on to Lieutenant-Colonel Angerstein of the Grenadier Guards. Marengo stood at stud (unsuccessfully) at New Barnes, near Ely, at the age of 27. He eventually died at the old age of 38,
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Mill Reef

    Mill Reef

    Mill Reef (1968–1986) was a Champion Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. He was bred in the United States but was trained in the United Kingdom throughout his racing career which lasted from 1970 to 1972. Mill Reef won twelve of his fourteen races and finished second in the other two. He was an outstanding two-year-old in 1970, and proved even better at three, winning the Epsom Derby, the Eclipse Stakes, the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. He won both his starts as a four-year-old before his career was ended by injury. He was an exact contemporary of another British-trained champion, the English-bred Brigadier Gerard who defeated him in their only racecourse meeting in the 2000 Guineas. As the race was over Brigadier Gerard's optimum distance of one mile, the relative merits of the two colts continued to be the subject of debate. Mill Reef was owned and bred in the United States of America at the Rokeby Stables in Virginia of his owner and breeder the philanthropist Paul Mellon. He was a son of Never Bend out of the mare Milan Mill by Princequillo. As a yearling it was thought that his action better suited him to a career on the turf
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Petros the Pelican

    Petros the Pelican

    Petros was a Great White Pelican, who was the official mascot of the Greek island of Mykonos. In 1958 a wounded pelican was found off the coast of Mykonos shore by a local fisherman. The pelican was nursed to health and remained on the island supported by locals. It soon adopted the name “Petros”, as a joke between the locals, as "petro" in Greek means rock, stone but metaphorically Old and Grumpy. To great disappointment by locals and tourists alike, Petros was hit by a car on 2 December 1985 and failed to recover. Subsequently, three new pelicans reside around the main town of Mykonos. One, honorifically, was given the name Petros.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Tickle Em Jock

    Tickle Em Jock

    Ch. Tickle Em Jock (1908–??), a Scottish Terrier, was the first of his breed to win best-in-show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1911, the fifth occasion it was awarded. He was originally sold for a sum of only £2 to Andrew Albright, Jr. Mr Albright would go on to later say he wouldn't sell the dog for $5,000. Jock was also noted in the media of the time for biting a judge's wrist just after winning best of breed at a dog show. Jock was originally sold at Leadenhall Meat Market in London in 1909 for £2 ($15), as he was originally owned by a butcher. Samuel Wilson of Bradford, Yorkshire purchased the dog and paid extra for evidence of the dog's pedigree. Jock was shown around some minor English summer shows with some success, where he was seen by Andrew Albright, Jr. In 1910, Mr. Albright purchased the dog and brought him to America. Jock was entered in the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1911 at the age of 3 years old, and was successful, becoming the first Scottish Terrier to win best-in-show and the first non-Smooth Fox Terrier to win. More than 2,000 dogs were entered at the event and Jock's appearance was criticized by other exhibitors, being described as
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Prince Palatine

    Prince Palatine

    Prince Palatine (1908-1924) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse. He was named for County Palatine of Lancaster near where his breeder William Hall Walker had been raised. Racing at age two, Prince Palatine won three of his six starts. At age three, he began to improve and by September was in top form, winning the St. Leger Stakes by 6 lengths. Prince Palatine was the dominant horse in British racing in 1912 and 1913. Near the end of the 1913 racing season he was sold for a then record price of £45,000 to Jack Barnato Joel to stand at stud at Childwick Bury Stud in St. Albans, Hertfordshire. Although Prince Palatine had a less than stellar stud career in England, he did sire Rose Prince who in turn produced the Belgian racing star Prince Rose, the sire of the important Princequillo. Among Prince Rose's other descendants are Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner, Canonero II, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes winner Risen Star, Triple Crown winners Secretariat and Seattle Slew, American Horse of the Year winners Round Table, A.P. Indy, Cigar (twice) and Lady's Secret, and British Horse of the Year winners, Brigadier Gerard and Mill Reef. Prince Palatine also sired the mare
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    Blushing Groom

    Blushing Groom

    Blushing Groom (1974–1992) was a French Champion Thoroughbred racehorse. He was bred by American businessman John McNamee Sullivan and was raced by HH Aga Khan IV. A descendant of Nearco, Blushing Groom was sired by Red God and out of the mare Runaway Bride. Conditioned by Francois Mathet, Blushing Groom raced six times in 1976 at age two. He finished third in his debut, then won the next five races, including four Group One events, capturing the Prix Robert Papin, Prix Morny, Prix de la Salamandre, and the Grand Critérium. His performances earned him French Champion Two-Year-Old honors. As a three-year-old, Blushing Groom extended his win streak to seven, winning the 1977 Prix de Fontainebleau and the GI Poule d'Essai des Poulains. Sent to England to compete in the Epsom Derby, Blushing Groom faced a 1½ mile challenge, a distance fifty percent longer than he had ever run before. Although he raced well, he was not suited for that distance and finished third to winner The Minstrel, a son of Northern Dancer. In his final race, Blushing Groom finished second in France's GI Prix Jacques Le Marois. Although Blushing Groom met with considerable success in racing, he became an even
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Oolong

    Oolong

    Oolong (ウーロン, Ūron) (July 28, 1994 – January 7, 2003) was a domestic rabbit owned by Hironori Akutagawa, who posted images of the rabbit with objects balanced on its head. Oolong became an Internet phenomenon. Akutagawa's site featured "photo journeys" of Oolong traveling with his master through the house, yard, and other locations. The website became known to a wider audience when it was covered in 2001 by Syberpunk, a site which focuses on odd things in Japanese culture. Oolong was trained to balance objects on his head, an art called "Head Performance" by his owner. The first object balanced on Oolong's head was a 35mm film canister on 25 May 1999. Akutagawa later used tea cups, bread, fruit, pancakes (actually dorayaki), and a rabbit skull. Although most reactions on the Internet were positive, there were some complaints by people who believed the practice to be cruel to animals. In response, Akutagawa wrote in a message to website visitors: "Some visitors have written me e-mails, accusing me of being cruel to my rabbit and that I am abusing my pet. This was never my intention when I included numerous links to photographs, showing Oolong's unique ability to hold objects on his
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Ortino

    Ortino

    Ortino" was Tatiana's French Bulldog. Ortino went with Tatiana into exile, but disappears. The last time we see him Tatiana is struggling to carry Ortino while dragging a heavy suitcase through ankle deep mud and a howling crowd at the Yekaterinburg train station. This was two months before she and her family were murdered. Ortino died with his mistress on the 17th july 1918. Ortino was given to Tatiana in September 1914 by Dmitri Yakovlevich Malama.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Pal

    • Place of death: North Hollywood
    Pal (June 4, 1940 – 1958) was a Rough Collie actor and the first in a line of such dogs to portray the fictional female collie Lassie in film and television. Pal was born in California in 1940 and eventually brought to the notice of Rudd Weatherwax, a Hollywood animal trainer. In 1943, the dog was chosen to play Lassie in MGM's feature film, Lassie Come Home. Following his film debut, Pal starred in six more MGM Lassie films from the mid-1940s to early-1950s, then appeared briefly in shows, fairs, and rodeos around the United States before starring in the two pilots filmed in 1954 for the television series, Lassie. Pal retired after filming the television pilots, and died in 1958. He sired a line of descendants who continued to play the fictional character he originated. The Saturday Evening Post said Pal had "the most spectacular canine career in film history". Pal was born at Cherry Osborne's Glamis Kennels in North Hollywood on June 4, 1940. The son of Red Brucie of Glamis and Bright Bauble of Glamis, Pal's ancestry is traced to the nineteenth century and England's first great collie, "Old Cockie". Because of his large eyes and the white blaze on his forehead, Pal was judged not
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Paul the octopus

    Paul the octopus

    Paul the Octopus (26 January 2008 – 26 October 2010) was a common octopus from Weymouth, England. Paul lived in a tank at a commercial attraction, the Sea Life Centre in Oberhausen, Germany and became internationally famous after his feeding behaviour was used to correctly predict the winner of each of the Germany national football team's seven matches in the 2010 FIFA World Cup, as well as the outcome of the final. The prediction process was designed so that Paul was presented with two boxes containing food in the form of a mussel, each box marked on the outside with the flag of a national football team in a forthcoming match. His choice of which mussel to eat first was interpreted as indicating his prediction of a win for the country whose flag was on that box. Selections by the octopus were correct in four of Germany's six Euro 2008 matches, and were correct in all seven of their matches in the 2010 World Cup. The octopus also correctly selected a win for Spain against the Netherlands in the World Cup Final on 11 July by eating the mussel in the box with the Spanish flag on it. These predictions were 100% (8/8) correct for the World Cup and 86% (12/14) correct overall. Paul the
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Sir Gallahad III

    Sir Gallahad III

    Sir Gallahad III (1920–1949) was a French Thoroughbred racehorse and a very important Sire in the United States. Racing at age two in France for his British breeder/owner, Jefferson Davis Cohn, Sir Gallahad earned victory in three of his five starts but was overshadowed by the 1922 Champion colt, Epinard. At age three, he won four races, most notably the French 2,000 Guineas (Poule d'Essai des Poulains). At four, he won three important races in France and in England won the Lincolnshire Handicap. That year, he also went head-to-head with Epinard, winning a 6½ furlong event. Sir Gallahad was retired after his four-year-old season to stand at stud at Haras du Bois-Roussel in Alençon. In 1926, owner Jefferson Davis Cohn sold him to an American syndicate made up of Robert A. Fairburn, William Woodward, Sr., Marshall Field III, and Arthur B. Hancock. In the United States, he was recorded as Sir Gallahad III for registration clarification. Although he was sent to the various breeding farms of his four owners, he stood primarily at Woodward's Belair Stud in Maryland and at Hancock's Claiborne Farm in Kentucky. Sir Gallahad sired 65 Graded stakes race winners and was the United States
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    West Australian

    West Australian

    West Australian (1850-1870) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a racing career which lasted from October 1852 until June 1854 he ran ten times and won nine races. After being beaten on his debut, he won all his remaining starts including the 2000 Guineas, the Epsom Derby the St Leger and the Ascot Gold Cup. He has been retrospectively recognised as the first Triple Crown winner. West Australian was regarded by contemporary experts as one of the best British horse of the nineteenth century. After his retirement from racing he had some success as a sire of winners in England and France and was largely responsible for the survival of the Godolphin Arabian sire-line. West Australian was a "hard, yellow" bay horse standing 15.3 hands high with a narrow white blaze bred by John Bowes of Streatlam Castle, County Durham. He was described as having a "blood-like head... peculiar ears... good shoulders... clean-looking legs" and "plenty of bone". The New Sporting Magazine called him "one of the finest specimens of English racehorse ever seen". He was foaled in 1850, being by Melbourne the sire of seven classic winners. He was the second foal of his dam Mowerina, a daughter of
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Beeswing

    Beeswing

    Beeswing (1833–1854) was a 19th century British Thoroughbred racehorse from the north of England. In her day, Beeswing was hailed as the greatest mare in Britain and one of the greatest of all time. Her sire was described by the noted racing writer "The Druid" as "...scarcely fifteen hands, very broad at the base of the nose, with open nostrils, an eye full and bright as a hawk's, a high, drooping rump, and on the side view rather short quartered. He was quite a mouse in his colour." But he took the Preston Gold Cup seven times, the Richmond Gold Cup five times, and the The Lancaster Gold Cup five times as well. How many races Dr. Syntax started in is unknown. On both her dam and her sire's side, Beeswing was linebred to the renowned Eclipse (5x5x5) and also to Herod (5x5). Beeswing raced at many venues between 1835 and 1842 and was a real crowd favourite. Entering 63 events, she won an incredible 51 times. Of the 57 races she finished, she was placed lower than second on only one occasion. Her most notable victory was the 1842 Ascot Gold Cup. She won the Newcastle Cup an amazing six times. Beeswing won the Doncaster Cup for the fourth time and was retired afterwards. James Hill of
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Gomek

    Gomek

    Gomek was a large saltwater crocodile captured by George Craig in Papua New Guinea. He was purchased by Terri and Arthur Jones in 1985 and was kept in Ocala, Florida for five years before being sold to the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park in Florida. For 8 years he wowed spectators with both his amazing nutria-tossing abilities and his even more amazing tolerance of people. Feeders of the large croc were allowed to go into the enclosure and get as close as 1 meter from the large animal (a normally suicidal proximity) without any fear of attack. While feeders still used long tongs to feed Gomek, he was generally considered to be a "tame" crocodile and was the favorite of the Alligator farm and people around the nation. After many years, Gomek died of heart disease on March 6, 1997. By then, he was a very old crocodile, and one of the largest and tamest captive crocodile in existence. When he died, he was 5.42 metres (17.8 ft) long, and weighed nearly 2,000 pounds - as confirmed by St. Augustine Alligator Farm - and probably between 60 and 80 years old. There is a tribute to Gomek near his enclosure, which now houses his successor Maximo and his mate Sydney.
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Judge Himes

    Judge Himes

    Judge Himes (1900 – after 1908) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse that was foaled in Kentucky and was the winner of the 1903 Kentucky Derby. Judge Himes was a chestnut colt sired by imported Esher out of the mare Lullaby (by the great racer Longfellow). He was bred at Hartland Stud in Kentucky and was bought by Charles Ellison in September 1901 for $1,700. Judge Himes also won the Chicago Hawthorne Handicap, Whirlpool Stakes and Oak Park Handicap and raced until he was five years old. Judge Himes was sold in New Orleans to turfman Phill Chin in March 1906 for use as a breeding stallion. Judge Himes was listed in a 1908 advertisement for the Heartland Stud Farm. He was auctioned on March 23, 1908 at Callahan's Stables in Warrenton, Virginia, and did sire a few half-bred foals for the farm.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145

    Blondi

    • Place of death: Führerbunker
    Blondi (1941 – 30 April 1945) was Adolf Hitler's German Shepherd dog, given to him as a gift in 1941 by Martin Bormann. Blondi stayed with Hitler even after his move into the Führerbunker located underneath the garden of the Reich Chancellery on January 16, 1945. In March or in early April (likely 4 April) 1945, she had a litter of five puppies with Gerdy Troost's German Shepherd, Harras. Hitler named one of the puppies "Wolf", his favorite nickname and the meaning of his own first name, Adolf (Noble wolf) and he began to train her. One of Blondi's puppies was reserved for Eva Braun's sister Gretl, and Eva sent Gretl a letter containing a photo of Blondi and three of her puppies, Gretl's being indicated with an arrow. Hitler was reportedly very fond of Blondi, keeping her by his side and allowing her to sleep in his bedroom in the bunker. This affection was not shared by Eva Braun, Hitler's mistress (and later his wife), who preferred her two Scottish Terrier dogs named Negus and Stasi (or Katuschka). According to Hitler's secretary (Traudl Junge), Eva hated Blondi and was known to kick her under the dining table. In May 1942 Hitler bought another young German Shepherd "from a
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Gay Crusader

    Gay Crusader

    Gay Crusader (1914–1932) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire who won a wartime version of the English Triple Crown in 1917. In a career which lasted from September 1916 and October 1917 he ran ten times and won eight races, including his last seven in succession. In addition to his three Classic wins he defeated older horses in the Newmarket Gold Cup and the Champion Stakes. Because of wartime restrictions, all of his races were at Newmarket Racecourse. After being injured in training in 1918 he was retired to stud, where his record was disappointing. Gay Crusader was a bay horse of "beautiful quality" bred by his owner Alfred W Cox, who used the name "Mr Fairie" for his racing interests. He was sired by Cox's stallion Bayardo, regarded as the best British racehorse of his time, and was the first foal of the mare Gay Laura, a daughter of Galeottia, who had won the 1000 Guineas for Cox in 1895. Gay Laura won a race as a two-year-old and was the dam of five other winners that won 14 races worth £9,906. The most notable of theses was the successful Steeplechaser Sea Rover. Cox sent the colt into training with Alec Taylor, Jr. at Manton, Wiltshire Gay Crusader was a small and
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Pocahontas

    Pocahontas

    Pocahontas (1837–1870) was an English Thoroughbred racehorse and the dam of three sires who had a great influence on the breed. Although mares are not generally considered to be as influential as sires, Thoroughbred Heritage refers to Pocahontas as "one of the most influential Thoroughbreds of all time, male or female." Bred at the Royal Stud at Hampton Court, Pocahontas was by Glencoe, winner of the 2,000 Guineas, Goodwood Cup, Ascot Gold Cup, and The Whip, and later a renowned sire in America. Pocahontas' dam, Marpessa,won the Nursery Stakes at Newmarket as a two-year-old and the Goodwood Stakes as a three-year-old. She was bred to Glencoe in 1836 and produced her first foal, the filly Pocahontas. She later produced Idas (2,000 Guineas winner), Jeremy Diddler, and Boarding School Miss. After the death of King William IV, the stud at Hampton Court was dispersed. Marpessa and Pocahontas (still a foal) were bought for 230 guineas by Lord Stradbroke. As a yearling, Pocahontas was sold to Mr. Greatorex for 62 guineas. Pocahontas was quite small (maturing only to 14 hands 3 inches 59 inches (150 cm) high) but was said to have had good shoulders and hindquarters, with straight legs.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Secretariat

    Secretariat

    Secretariat (March 30, 1970 – October 4, 1989) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse, that in 1973 became the first U.S. Triple Crown champion in 25 years, setting race records in all three events in the Series—the Kentucky Derby (1:59.4), the Preakness Stakes (1:53) and the Belmont Stakes (2:24) - records that still stand today. He is considered to be one of the greatest Thoroughbreds of all time, ranking second behind Man o' War in The Blood-Horse's List of the Top 100 U.S. Racehorses of the 20th Century. Secretariat was sired by Bold Ruler out of Somethingroyal, by Princequillo. He was foaled at The Meadow in Caroline County, Virginia. Like his famous predecessor Man o' War, Secretariat was a large chestnut colt and was given the same nickname, "Big Red." Secretariat's grandsire, Nasrullah, is also the great-great-grandsire of 1977 Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew. Owned by Penny Chenery, he was trained by Lucien Laurin and mainly ridden by Canadian jockey Ron Turcotte, along with apprentice jockey Paul Feliciano (first two races), and veteran Eddie Maple (last race). He raced in Chenery's Meadow Stable's blue and white checkered colors and his groom was Eddie Sweat.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Sir Peter Teazle

    Sir Peter Teazle

    Sir Peter Teazle (1784 – 18 August 1811) was a good British bred Thoroughbred racehorse, a Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland nine times, and carried on the sire line of Herod. Bred by Edward Smith-Stanley, 12th Earl of Derby, Sir Peter Teazle was by the undefeated Highflyer. Sir Peter's sire, Highflyer was on the Leading Sire list 16 times, producing 469 winners, seven of which won classic races. Highflyer also got the mare Prunella, and the sons Delpini, Diamond, and Traveller. His dam, Papillon, was by Snap, himself on the Leading Sire list four times and a great producer of raw speed. Papillon had some success as a racehorse, finishing third out of 22 in the 1773 Craven Stakes, losing to Firetail and Miss Timms. Sir Peter was her 7th out of 12 living foals, and one of several winners she produced, including the filly Lady Teazle (1781), who was second in the Epsom Oaks and won 11 races during her career. The name comes from a character in the classic comic play The School for Scandal. Sir Peter first came to the track at three, and continued the season undefeated. He won the Epsom Derby at his first start, a sweepstakes at Ascot, the 1,000 Guineas subscription race for his
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Stockwell

    Stockwell

    Stockwell (1849–1871) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and a Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland seven times; he was second on the sires' list a further four times during a 14-year period. Stockwell was foaled in Stockwell, England, at the stud farm of William Theobald. His sire, The Baron was a successful racehorse and sire. His dam Pocahontas was a roarer – a trait never demonstrated in Stockwell himself, but passed to several of his descendants. Pocahontas later also produced the successful sires, Rataplan and King Tom. The chestnut was not a particularly pretty horse; he was described by one turf writer as "the very incarnation of ugliness," possessing a plain head with a slight Roman nose and hindquarters like a carthorse. He had good feet, strong legs and was very powerful, however, giving him the ability to carry high weights. Although a poor mover he was very fast; his speed made up for his terrible temperament, which was considered "a bit savage". Stockwell stood over 16 hands high with a stripe on his nose, a sock on his off (right) hind leg, another mid-cannon sock on his near (left) hind leg and Bend-Or spots on his coat. Although the colt was thought to be
    8.00
    1 votes
    153

    Toto

    Toto (1931–1968) (a.k.a. M'Toto meaning "Little Child" in Swahili) was a gorilla that was adopted and raised very much like a human child. A. Maria Hoyt adopted the baby female gorilla orphaned by a hunt in French Equatorial Africa in 1931. Mrs. Hoyt's husband killed the baby gorilla's father for a museum piece, and his guides killed its mother for fun. Mrs. Hoyt moved to Cuba to provide a more tropical home for Toto. At the age of four or five, Toto adopted a kitten named Principe, carrying the kitten with her everywhere. When Toto became too difficult to manage for a private keeper, she was sold to the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus as a potential mate for another gorilla, Gargantua, a.k.a. Buddy. Toto died in 1968. Toto is buried at "Sandy Lane" Kennels Pet Cemetery in Sarasota, Florida.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Traveler

    Traveler

    Mystery surrounds Traveler (died 1912), as his breeding is completely unknown. He appeared in Texas in the mid-1880s and eventually ended up as a match racehorse and stallion. Some stories have him part of a contractor's work string doing grading work on a railroad being constructed in Eastland County, Texas. Whether or not this story is true, the first recorded owner of Traveler was a man named Brown Seay. He was a light sorrel horse, with light amounts of roaning on his flanks. Markings were a snip, and a streak on the face. Standing around 15 hands high, he was leggy but well muscled, although George Clegg said the horse was the shortest backed horse he'd ever seen. He was also owned by the Shely brothers, who bred most of his most famous offspring. While owned by Seay, Traveler was match raced extensively in Texas. He died in 1912. He sired such influential Quarter Horses as Little Joe, King (later named Possum), Jim Ned, Judge Thomas, Texas Chief, and Captain Joe. Other descendants included Joe Reed II, Hard Twist, Silver King, Tonto Bars Hank, and Tonto Bars Gill. He was inducted into the American Quarter Horse Association's (or AQHA) AQHA Hall of Fame.
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    American Eclipse

    American Eclipse

    American Eclipse (1814 to 1847) was an undefeated American Thoroughbred racehorse, who raced when three to four mile heats were common. American Eclipse was bred on Long Island, New York by General Nathaniel Coles. He was by Duroc (by the founding stallion Diomed), out of Miller's Damsel (known as the "Queen of the Northern Turf," by Messenger). Interestingly enough, Miller’s Damsel’s dam was a mare (foaled in 1792) by Pot8os who was by the original Eclipse. The horse was a chestnut stallion that was only 15 hands 1 inch high and named after the great English champion Eclipse. The original Eclipse (1764 to 1789) so outstanding that may people named their horses Eclipse in the vain hope they had another Eclipse, about whom it was said: "Eclipse first—the rest nowhere." American Eclipse proved himself worthy of his name as soon as he began training and was entered in his first trial. Coles didn't start him until he was a three-year-old, and then he raced him sparingly. He had a few race starts at four and was victorious each time. He was according to all who saw him, the greatest American racehorse of his day. At five he raced for Cornelius W. Van Ranst who had purchased him from
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Ham the Chimp

    Ham the Chimp

    • Place of death: North Carolina Zoo
    Ham (July 1956 – January 19, 1983), also known as Ham the Chimp and Ham the Astrochimp, was the first chimpanzee launched into outer space in the American space program. Ham's name is an acronym for the lab that prepared him for his historic mission — the Holloman Aerospace Medical Center, located at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. Ham was born July 1956 in Cameroon, captured by animal trappers and sent to Rare Bird Farm in Miami, Florida. He was purchased by the United States Air Force and brought to Holloman Air Force Base in 1959. There were originally 40 chimpanzee flight candidates at Holloman. After evaluation the number of candidates was reduced to 18, then to 6, including Ham. Officially, Ham was known as No. 65 before his flight, and only renamed "Ham" upon his successful return to earth. This was reportedly because officials did not want the bad press that would come from the death of a "named" chimpanzee if the mission were a failure. Among his handlers, No.65 had been known as Chop Chop Chang. Beginning in July 1959, the three-year-old chimpanzee was trained under the direction of neuroscientist Joseph V. Brady at Holloman Air Force Base Aero Medical Field
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    India

    India

    • Place of death: White House
    India "Willie" Bush (ca. 1990 – January 4, 2009) was a black cat owned by former U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. She lived with the Bush family for almost two decades. The Bushes acquired India, an all-black, female American Shorthair, as a kitten in late 1991 or 1992 when twin daughters Barbara and Jenna Bush were nine years old. India remained with George and Laura Bush once their daughters left for college. The cat moved with the Bushes to the White House from the Texas Governor's Mansion in Austin in early 2001 following Bush's inauguration as President. There was some controversy reported in India as several people were upset with the cat's name. In the Indian state of Kerala, for example, 101 dogs were reportedly renamed 'Bush' in protest to Bush's cat being called India. In July 2004, demonstrators in the southern Keralian city of Thiruvananthapuram denounced the cat's name as an insult to the nation of India and even burned an effigy of President Bush in protest. The Bushes did not change the cat's name in response to the demonstrations. In actuality, the cat is not named for the country of India, yet rather for baseball player Rubén Sierra who was
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Knut

    Knut

    • Place of death: Zoologischer Garten Berlin
    Knut (German pronunciation: [ˈknuːt] ( listen); 5 December 2006 – 19 March 2011) was a polar bear who was born in captivity at the Berlin Zoological Garden. Rejected by his mother at birth, he was raised by zookeepers. He was the first polar bear cub to survive past infancy at the Berlin Zoo in more than 30 years. At one time the subject of international controversy, he became a tourist attraction and commercial success. After the German tabloid newspaper Bild ran a quote from an animal rights activist that decried keeping the cub in captivity, fans worldwide rallied in support of his being hand-raised by humans. Children protested outside the zoo, and e-mails and letters expressing sympathy for the cub's life were sent from around the world. Knut became the center of a mass media phenomenon dubbed "Knutmania" that spanned the globe and spawned toys, media specials, DVDs, and books. Because of this, the cub was largely responsible for a significant increase in revenue, estimated at about five million euros, at the Berlin Zoo in 2007. Attendance figures for the year increased by an estimated 30 percent, making it the most profitable year in its 163-year history. On 19 March 2011,
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    The Minstrel

    The Minstrel

    The Minstrel (1974-1990) was a champion Thoroughbred racehorse in Great Britain and Ireland. His performances led to him becoming the Horse of the Year in the United Kingdom, Horse of the Year in Ireland and being inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame. Foaled at E.P. Taylor's Windfields Farm in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, The Minstrel was the son of Northern Dancer out of Fleur, a daughter of Victoria Park. He was a three-quarter-brother to the 1970 English Triple Crown champion Nijinsky II (who was by Northern Dancer out of Flaming Page, the dam of Fleur). A powerfully built, handsome chestnut colt with a white blaze, four white stockings and a gentle disposition, The Minstrel was purchased at the 1975 Keeneland Sales yearling auction by a group headed by the flamboyant British racing enthusiast Robert Sangster (1936-2004). Shipped to Ireland under trainer Vincent O'Brien and ridden by champion jockey Lester Piggott, the horse entered only three races as a two-year-old but won them all, including the Dewhurst Stakes at Newmarket. In 1977, The Minstrel won major races at racetracks in England and Ireland. His win in the Epsom Derby, the most prestigious race in the
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Tom Ochiltree

    Tom Ochiltree

    Tom Ochiltree (1872–1897), was an American Thoroughbred racehorse. One of the last by the great foundation stallion, blind Lexington, still standing at what by then was A. J. Alexander's Woodburn Stud in Kentucky, Tom Ochiltree was an enormous colt, eventually reaching 16 hands 2½ inches high with a girth of 76 inches. Purchased by J. F. Chamberlain at the 1872 Woodburn yearling sale for $500, he eventually found himself at age four in the hands of the tobacco heir George Lynde Lorillard (who also owned Duke of Magenta). Trained by Hall of Fame conditioner Wyndham Walden (founder of Bowling Brook Farm in Carroll County, Maryland), Tom Ochiltree won the Preakness Stakes in the last days of the great match races and the very year the Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks were first run: 1875. In the same year as Tom Ochiltree was foaled, another horse was born at the neighboring Nantura Stock Farm that would prove to be one of Tom Ochiltree's greatest rivals, Ten Broeck. One year later, 1873, a third horse was born, Parole (bred by the brother of Tom Ochiltree's owner, Pierre Lorillard IV) who would become a rival to both Tom Ochiltree and Ten Broeck, just as the brothers were intense
    7.00
    2 votes
    161

    Alex

    Alex (1976 – September 6, 2007) was an African Grey Parrot and the subject of a thirty-year (1977–2007) experiment by animal psychologist Irene Pepperberg, initially at the University of Arizona and later at Harvard University and Brandeis University. Pepperberg bought Alex in a regular pet shop when he was about one year old. The name Alex is an acronym for Avian Language EXperiment, but Pepperberg later cited the name as meaning Avian Learning EXperiment to evoke further acceptance in her research field, a then touchy topic (explained in her book, Alex & Me). His successor was Griffin. Before Pepperberg's work with Alex, it was widely believed in the scientific community that a large primate brain was needed to handle complex problems related to language and understanding and that birds were not considered to be intelligent as their only common use of communication was of mimicking and the repetition of sounds to interact with each other. However, Alex's accomplishments indicated that birds may be able to reason on a basic level and use words creatively. Pepperberg wrote that Alex's intelligence was on a par with that of dolphins and great apes. She also reported that Alex had
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Lost in the Fog

    Lost in the Fog

    Lost in the Fog (February 4, 2002 - September 17, 2006) was an American thoroughbred race horse. He won his first 10 starts (including two Breeders' Cup stakes), 11 of his 14 lifetime starts across the country, and career earnings of $978,099 until his life was cut short by lymphoma during his four-year-old season. Bred by Susan Seper and foaled in Florida, his sire was Lost Soldier, (sire of 10 stakes winners and son of Danzig, who was the son of Northern Dancer—ranked #43 by The Blood-Horse in their top 100 U.S. thoroughbred champions of the 20th Century). His dam was Cloud Break, a Dr. Carter mare. Unraced, Cloud Break is proving a successful broodmare; she also produced the stakes-placed How About My Place, by Out of Place. In foal to Speightstown, Cloud Break was acquired by WinStar Farm in 2005's Fasig-Tipton Kentucky November mixed sale for $600,000. In 2006, she was sold to Charles Deter. Lost in the Fog was a $13,000 weanling and a $48,000 yearling. Not reaching his reserve in the 2004 two-year-old Ocala, Florida Breeders' Sale in March (the stopping price was $195,000), he was sold privately for $140,000 to Harry Aleo, and throughout his short career was trained by Greg
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Barry

    Barry

    • Place of death: Berne
    Barry der Menschenretter (1800–1814), also known as Barry, was a dog of a breed which was later called the St. Bernard that worked as a mountain rescue dog in Switzerland for the Great St Bernard Hospice. He predates the modern St. Bernard, and was lighter built than the modern breed. He has been described as the most famous St. Bernard, as he was credited with saving more than 40 lives during his lifetime. The legend surrounding him was that he was killed while attempting a rescue; however, this is untrue. Barry retired to Bern, Switzerland and after his death his body was passed into the care of the Natural History Museum of Bern. His skin has been preserved through taxidermy although his skull was modified in 1923 to match the Saint Bernard of that time period. His story and name have been used in literary works, and a monument to him stands in the Cimetière des Chiens near Paris. At the hospice one dog has always been named Barry in his honor and since 2004 the Foundation Barry du Grand Saint Bernard has been set up to take over the responsibility for breeding dogs from the hospice. The first mention in the Great St Bernard Hospice archives of a dog was in 1707 which simply
    5.00
    4 votes
    164
    Broomstick

    Broomstick

    Broomstick (1901–1931) was a Thoroughbred race horse born and bred at the famous McGrathiana Stud in Kentucky, but more importantly, he was one of the great sires of American racing. Out of another great sire, the Hall of Famer Ben Brush, Broomstick went on after his racing career to produce champion after champion for many years. The important horseman, James R. Keene (who owned Domino, Kingston, Colin and Sysonby among so many other memorable horses), also owned Elf, Broomstick's dam. Believing she was barren, he sold her to Milton Young. One year later she foaled Broomstick. As a yearling Broomstick then went to a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania coal millionaire named Captain Samuel S. Brown who was a member of The Jockey Club and the owner of two racetracks. Broomstick was small, but he won his first three stakes at two. Because of this, he was weighted down rather heavily for such a young horse and consequently won fewer races at that age. He placed in the Saratoga Special, the Walden Stakes, the Flatbush Stakes, the Great Trial Stakes and the Spring Stakes. At three, and under another trainer, he won the Travers Stakes. In the Brighton Handicap he beat older horses and set a record
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Commando

    Commando

    Commando (1898–1905) was an American Hall of Fame Champion Thoroughbred racehorse. Bred at Castleton Stud by owner James R. Keene, Commando raced at age two, winning five of his six starts and finishing second in the other as a result of jockey error. At age three, Commando raced only three times, winning the Belmont Stakes and the Carlton Stakes. In the Belmont Stakes at Morris Park Racecourse he faced two opponents, only one of whom, The Parader was seen as a serious rival. Commando made almost all the running before going clear in the straight and winning easily. Although he finished second, an injury in the Lawrence Realization Stakes ended his racing career. Retired to stand at stud at Castleton Farm, Commando proved to be a successful sire. Unfortunately he died on 13 March 1905 at age seven after developing tetanus from a cut sustained to his foot. He was buried at Castleton Farm. Although his breeding career was limited to four seasons, Commando produced 10 stakes winners from 27 foals and posthumously topped the U.S. sire list in 1907. Among his progeny were Hall of Fame champions Colin and Peter Pan. In 1956, Commando was inducted posthumously into the National Museum of
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Gemina

    Gemina

    Gemina (July 16, 1986 – January 9, 2008) (pronounced Jeh-MEE-nah) was a 12-foot-tall Baringo giraffe who lived in the Santa Barbara Zoo in Santa Barbara, California. She became notable for the peculiar deformity in her neck, which was bent by almost ninety degrees between her C3 and C4 vertebrae. The deformity was not present when she was born, in the San Diego Wild Animal Park, but first became noticeable when she was three years old. Gemina was born on July 16, 1986, at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. She showed no signs of a neck deformity at birth and was moved to the Santa Barbara Zoo when she was approximately one year old. Gemina's deformity did not appear until she was three years old. Her neck vertebrae began to jut out from her neck at this age. Eventually her neck became bent sharply. The last time that this type of a deformity had been documented in a giraffe was 1902. X-rays of Gemina's neck showed that her vertebrae had fused together, but scientists, zoologists and veterinarians could find no explanation for the deformity. Gemina was seen tumbling end over end when she was two years old. However, tests found no sign of injury at the time, and there is no evidence
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Rooster Booster

    Rooster Booster

    Rooster Booster (1994–2005) was a British-bred thoroughbred racehorse, best known for winning the 2003 Champion Hurdle. Rooster Booster was a gelding whose grey coat (inherited from his dam Came Cottege) and racing style made him easily recognisable. He was the only horse of any consequence produced by the unsuccessful racehorse Riverwise. He was originally trained by his owner Norman Richard Mitchell in Dorset, but had his biggest successes after be was bought by Terry Warner in 2000 and sent to the stable of Philip Hobbs at Withycombe in Somerset. Rooster began his racing career in a National Hunt Flat Race at Wincanton in February 1999, where he finished seventh of eighteen runners. He proceeded to have six more runs for Richard Mitchell, winning just one of those in the form a maiden hurdle at Taunton. He was then switched to the yard of Phillip Hobbs and made his debut for him in April 2000, finishing 2nd behind Valiramix in a Novices' Hurdle at Chepstow. He had one more run that season, finishing third in a competitive Novice Hurdle at Punchestown. He began the 2000/01 season with little success, being pulled up at Chepstow at the beginning of November, before falling at
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Shinzan

    Shinzan

    Shinzan(シンザン, 2 April 1961 - 13 July 1996) was a thoroughbred racehorse that won the Japanese Triple Crown. Sired by Irish Derby winner Hindostan and out of the Japanese dam Hayanobori, he was generally considered to be th best Japanese racehorse of the post-war era and became the first horse to win all 5 big titles of Japan including the Japanese Triple Crown. Shinzan was foaled on April 2, 1961, in the Hokkaidō Prefecture. He became the second horse to win the Japanese Triple Crown and was named Japanese Horse of the Year in 1964. Shinzan won the Arima Kinen, Takarazuka Kinen and Tenno Sho (Autumn) as a four-year-old, defending his Horse of the Year title. He was also a successful sire in Japan. His most successful offspring was Miho Shinzan (ミホシンザン) who won the Japanese 2,000 Guineas, Japanese St. Leger, and the Tenno Sho (Spring). Shinzan died in Hokkaidō on July 13, 1996, at the age of 35. Pensioned form stud duties in 1987, Shinzan spent the rest of life at Tanikawa Stud. He lost the sight in his right eye in his later years and also lost all of his teeth. Eventually, he could not stand by himself at times, and his physical weakening became more prominent after February,
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Arbre du Ténéré

    Arbre du Ténéré

    L'Arbre du Ténéré, known in English as the Tree of Ténéré, was a solitary acacia, of either Acacia raddiana or Acacia tortilis, that was once considered the most isolated tree on Earth—the only one for over 400 kilometres (250 mi). It was a landmark on caravan routes through the Ténéré region of the Sahara in northeast Niger, so well known that it and the Arbre Perdu or 'Lost Tree' to the north are the only trees to be shown on a map at a scale of 1:4,000,000. The Tree of Ténéré was located near a 40-metre (131 feet)-deep well. It was knocked down by a drunk truck driver in 1973. The Tree of Ténéré was the last of a group of trees that grew when the desert was less parched than it is today. The tree had stood alone for decades. During the winter of 1938–1939 a well was dug near the tree and it was found that the roots of the tree reached the water table 33–36 meters (108 to 118 feet) below the surface. Commander of the Allied Military Mission, Michel Lesourd, of the Service central des affaires sahariennes [Central service of Saharan affairs], saw the tree on May 21, 1939: In his book L'épopée du Ténéré, French ethnologist and explorer Henri Lhote described his two journeys to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Bandit

    Bandit

    • Place of death: Palmerton
    Bandit (c. 1994 – May 9, 2004) was a raccoon, who came to attention after being named "The World's Fattest Raccoon" by The Guinness Book of World Records. He was born with a thyroid problem which lead to his massive weight gain. He was adopted by a dog and raised as one of her puppies then later taken in by a woman in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. At the time of his death he weighed almost 75 pounds.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Leopard of Panar

    Leopard of Panar

    • Place of death: Kumaon District
    The Leopard of Panar was a man-eating male leopard alleged to have killed and eaten as many as 400 people over a period of several years in Panar region of Almora District, situated in Kumaon Northern India in the early 20th century. The Panar Leopard was hunted down and killed in 1910 by famed big cat hunter and author Jim Corbett. In "Man-Eaters of Kumaon", Jim Corbett mentioned that Leopards are driven to man-eating by acquiring a taste for human flesh due to scavenging on corpses thrown into the jungle during an epidemic. He wrote,"A leopard, in an area in which his natural food is scarce, finding these bodies very soon acquires a taste for human flesh, and when the disease dies down and normal conditions are established, he very naturally, on finding his food supply cut off, takes to killing human beings". Of the two man-eating leopards of Kumaon, which between them killed five hundred and twenty-five people, the Panar Leopard followed on the heels of a very severe outbreak of cholera, while the Rudraprayag Leopard followed the mysterious disease which swept through India in 1918 and was named 'war fever'.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Longfellow

    Longfellow

    Longfellow (1867–1893) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. Longfellow was owned, bred, and trained by "Uncle" John Harper of Nantura Stock Farm in Midway, Kentucky. Harper was worth perhaps a million dollars (a very great sum in the 1850s), yet he lived in a simple cottage on his 1,000 acres (4 km²) adjacent to Robert A. Alexander's famed Woodburn Stud in Woodford County, Kentucky. In 1856, Harper stood both Lexington and Glencoe, two of the country's greatest stallions. Combined, they led America's sire lists for 24 years. Longfellow was sired by Leamington, the successor of Lexington, as noted: America's leading sire for 14 years. His dam was John Harper's foundation mare Nantura by Brawner's Eclipse). A brown colt with a white stripe, a white near hind sock, and white on his off hind coronet, Longfellow was foaled in 1867. When people asked Harper, born in 1800, if he had named his colt for the noted poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harper replied, "Never heared much of that feller but that colt of mine's got the longest legs of any feller I ever seen." At maturity, Longfellow stood 17 hands tall and was said to have a 26-foot stride. Longfellow was unraced at two
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Man O' War

    Man O' War

    Man o' War, (March 29, 1917, Nursery Stud farm, Lexington, Kentucky – November 1, 1947, Faraway Farm) is considered one of the greatest Thoroughbred racehorses of all time. During his career just after World War I, he won 20 of 21 races and $249,465 in purses. Man o' War was by the prominent sire Fair Play. His dam, Mahubah, was by U.K. Triple Crown Champion Rock Sand. Man o' War was owned and bred by August Belmont, Jr. (1851–1924), whose father's accomplishments were recognized through the naming of the Belmont Stakes. Belmont Jr. joined the United States Army at age 65 to serve in France during World War I. While he was overseas, his wife named a new foal "Man o' War" in honor of her husband. However, the Belmonts decided to liquidate their racing stable. At the Saratoga yearling sale in 1918, Man o' War was sold at a final bid of $5,000 to Samuel D. Riddle, who brought him to his Glen Riddle Farm near Berlin, Maryland. The underbidder at the auction was believed to be Robert L. Gerry, Sr. Trained by Louis Feustel and ridden by Johnny Loftus, Man o' War made his debut at Belmont Park on June 6, 1919, winning by six lengths. Three weeks later, he won the Keene Memorial Stakes. In
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Moose

    Moose

    • Place of death: Los Angeles
    Moose (December 24, 1990 – June 22, 2006) was a veteran canine actor. He was a Jack Russell Terrier and is most famous for his portrayal of Eddie Crane on the television sitcom Frasier. Moose was born on Christmas Eve, 1990 in Florida, the youngest littermate. He was the largest puppy in the litter. Like Pal, the original Lassie, the obstreperous puppy was too much for his original owner. According to an article by Lori Golden: In fact, chasing cats was one of the activities that led to this troubled terrier becoming one of TV’s most precious pooches. Originally owned by a Florida family, Sam and Connie Thise, Moose was too hard to handle. He couldn’t be house trained; he chewed everything; he dug and barked a lot; and he was constantly escaping and climbing trees. Eventually given to the Florida manager of Birds and Animals Unlimited, a company that trains animals for TV and motion pictures, Moose was put on a plane at 2½ years old and sent to Mathilde DeCagny, an LA trainer working for the show-biz animal company. Moose won the role on Frasier after only six months of training. Moose had the ability to fix Kelsey Grammer with a long hard stare; this became a running sight gag on
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Nim Chimpsky

    • Place of death: Texas
    Nim Chimpsky (November 19, 1973 – March 10, 2000) was a chimpanzee who was the subject of an extended study of animal language acquisition (codenamed 6.001) at Columbia University, led by Herbert S. Terrace. Chimpsky was given his name as a pun on Noam Chomsky, the foremost theorist of human language structure and generative grammar at the time, who held that humans were "wired" to develop language. The validity of the study is disputed, as Terrace argued that all ape-language studies, including Project Nim, were based on misinformation from the chimps. R. Allen and Beatrix Gardner made a similar earlier study, called Project Washoe, in which another chimpanzee was raised like a human child. Washoe was given affection and participated in everyday social activity with her adoptive family. Her ability to communicate was far more developed than Nim's. Washoe lived 24 hours a day with her human family from birth; Nim at 2 weeks old was raised by a family in a home environment by human surrogate parents to see if he could refute Noam Chomsky's thesis that language is inherent only in humans. Both chimps could use fragments of American Sign Language to make themselves understood. Project
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Real Shadai

    Real Shadai

    Real Shadai (1979-2004) was an American-born Thoroughbred racehorse who raced in France and became a leading sire in Japan. A descendant of Nearco, he was sired by Epsom Derby winner Roberto and out of the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame mare Desert Vixen. Real Shadai was bred by Franklin Groves' North Ridge Farm near Lexington, Kentucky, and sold at the 1980 Keeneland July yearling sale for $360,000 to the renowned Japanese horseman Zenya Yoshida. As he had done before with his Champion colt Northern Taste, Yoshida turned Real Shadai over to trainer John Cunnington, Jr. at the Great Stables in Chantilly. In 1981, Real Shadai was a non-winner in his two starts at age two. Out of his six races the following year, he won two, the most important of which was the 1982Grand Prix de Deauville. His other significant outing was a second-place finish in the 1982 GI Prix du Jockey Club to Robert Sangster's colt Assert. Entered in the 1982 Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, Real Shadai was up against a very strong field that included Assert along with Ardross, April Run, Akiyda, and one of the great international racing fillies of all time, All Along. After finishing fifth to winner Akiyda, Real Shadai was
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Spot Fetcher

    Spot Fetcher

    Spot "Spotty" Fetcher (March 17, 1989 – February 21, 2004) was one of former U.S. President George W. Bush's dogs. She was an English Springer Spaniel, named after Scott Fletcher, a former baseball player with the Texas Rangers, a team George W. Bush owned before becoming Governor of Texas in 1994. Born in the White House, she was the daughter of Millie, who had belonged to President George H. W. Bush and First Lady Barbara Bush. Her father was Tug Farish from Lane's End Farm in Kentucky, better known for its thoroughbred horse breeding program. She was euthanized after suffering a series of strokes. She was 14 years old. She was the only pet to live in the White House during two non-consecutive terms.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    St Lite

    St Lite

    St Lite (セントライト, April 2, 1938 - February 1, 1965) was a Japanese racehorse, who became the first winner of the Japanese Triple Crown when he captured Satsuki Sho (Japanese 2000 Guineas), Tokyo Yushun (Japanese Derby), and Kikuka Sho (Japanese St. Leger) in 1941. He was sired by Diolite (GB) (by Diophon), his dam Flippancy (GB), was the daughter of Flamboyant. St Lite was retired to stud in 1942. He sired Saint O (Kikuka Sho) and Owens (Tenno Sho (Spring)), Oh Lite (Heiwa Sho). He was eighth on the sires list in 1950 and 1952 and ninth in 1951. St Lite's progeny won 253 races worth 32,207,750 yen. However, he died from decrepitude in 1965. In 1984, inducted in JRA Hall of Fame horse.
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Unsinkable Sam

    Unsinkable Sam

    Unsinkable Sam (also known as Oscar) was the nickname of a German ship's cat who saw service in both the Kriegsmarine and Royal Navy during the Second World War, serving on board three vessels and surviving the sinking of all three. The black and white patched cat had been owned by an unknown crewman of the German battleship Bismarck. He was on board the ship on 18 May 1941 when it set sail on Operation Rheinübung, Bismarck's first and only mission. Bismarck was sunk after a fierce sea-battle on 27 May, from which only 115 from its crew of over 2,200 survived. Hours later, Oscar was found floating on a board and picked from the water, the only survivor to be rescued by the homeward-bound British destroyer HMS Cossack. Unaware of what his name had been on Bismarck, the crew of Cossack named their new mascot "Oscar". He served on board Cossack for the next few months as it carried out convoy escort duties in the Mediterranean and north Atlantic. On 24 October 1941, Cossack was escorting a convoy from Gibraltar to the United Kingdom when it was severely damaged by a torpedo fired by the German submarine U-563. Crew were transferred to the destroyer HMS Legion, and an attempt was made
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Goldsmith Maid

    Goldsmith Maid

    Goldsmith Maid (1857- September 23, 1885) was a prominent Standardbred racemare in the 1870s that was called the "Queen of the Trotters" and had a harness racing career that spanned 13 years. Her last race was won at the age of 20 against a much younger horse named Rarus. She was inducted into the Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 1953. Goldsmith Maid was originally named Maid and was foaled in the spring of 1857 at the Deckertown, New Jersey farm of John B. Decker. Decker had purchased Maid's dam Old Ab (sired by Abdallah, the sire of Hambletonian 10) in 1853 from a hat peddler and, taken with the mare's even temperament, had bred her to Alexander's Abdallah (formerly known as Edsell's Hambeletonian) in the hopes of producing a fine farm colt. Alexander's Abdallah was also a grandson of Abdallah, which meant that Maid was very inbred in her male lineage. While Old Ab may have been gentle and even tempered, her first foal was a wild, fiery tempered filly that was quite taken with jumping and crashing through Decker's fences and running through the corn fields of his neighbors. Maid was not able to be trained as a harness horse or for any other occupation that would be of use on a farm
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Socks

    Socks

    • Place of death: Hollywood
    Socks Clinton-Currie (March 23, 1989 – February 20, 2009) was the pet cat of U.S. President Bill Clinton's family during his presidency. An adopted stray cat, he was the only pet of the Clintons during the early years of the administration, and his likeness hosted the children's version of the White House website. After Clinton left office, Socks resided with former Clinton secretary Betty Currie and her husband, due to continuing conflicts with the dog Buddy. Socks was adopted by the Clintons in 1991 after he jumped into the arms of Chelsea Clinton while she was leaving the house of her piano teacher in Little Rock, Arkansas, where he was playing with his sibling, Midnight. Midnight was later taken in by another family. When Bill Clinton became President, Socks moved with the family from the governor's mansion to the White House and became the principal pet of the First Family in Clinton's first term, though he was known to share his food and water with a stray tabby, dubbed Slippers. He was often taken to schools and hospitals. During the Clinton administration, children visiting the White House website would be guided by a cartoon version of Socks. He eventually lost the
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Sunday Silence

    Sunday Silence

    Sunday Silence (1986–2002) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. As a three-year-old he won the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Breeders' Cup Classic, earning distinction as 1989 American Horse of the Year. He was also noted for his rivalry with American Champion Two-Year-Old Male Horse and Hall of Famer Easy Goer, whom he had a 3-1 record against, with two of those victories coming by margins of a nose and a neck, showing his grittiness. This was shown in the fact that, in his career, he had three losses by margins of a head or a neck, two wins by a nose and a neck, and a win and a loss by less than a length. In the Blood-Horse magazine List of the Top 100 U.S. Racehorses of the 20th Century, Sunday Silence is ranked #31. Sunday Silence was Leading sire in Japan on thirteen occasions, surpassing the previous record of ten titles by Northern Taste. Although the relatively insular nature of Japanese racing at the time meant that Sunday Silence's success was initially restricted to his home territory, his descendants have since gone on in recent years to win major races in Australia, France, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, the United States and Dubai. He was foaled in
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Congo

    Congo

    • Place of death: London Zoo
    Congo (1954–1964) was a chimpanzee who learned how to draw and paint. Zoologist and surrealist painter Desmond Morris first observed his abilities when the chimp was offered a pencil and paper at two years of age. By the age of four, Congo had made 400 drawings and paintings. His style has been described as "lyrical abstract impressionism". Congo was born in 1954. He learned to draw near the age of two, beginning when zoologist Desmond Morris offered Congo a pencil. Morris said, "He took Pencil and I placed a piece of card in front of him. This is how I recorded it at the time, 'Something strange was coming out of the end of the pencil. It was Congo's first line. It wandered a short way and then stopped. Would it happen again? Yes, it did, and again and again'." Morris soon observed that the chimp would draw circles, and had a basic sense of composition in his drawings. He also showed the ability of symmetrical consistency between two sides of a sketch; when Morris drew a shape at one side of a piece of paper, Congo would balance the structure by making marks on the other half of the paper. Similarly, if a color on one side contained blue for example, he would add blue to the other
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Rock Sand

    Rock Sand

    Rock Sand (1900–1914) was a British Thoroughbred race horse and sire. In a career which lasted from the spring of 1902 until October 1904 he ran twenty times and won sixteen races. After being a leading British two-year-old of his generation he became the tenth winner of the Triple Crown in 1903, winning the 2,000 Guineas Stakes the Epsom Derby and the St. Leger Stakes. He won another series of major races as a four-year-old before being retired to stud, where he had success in both Europe and North America. Rock Sand was a small brown horse bred by his owner Sir James Miller at his Hamilton Stud in Newmarket. Rock Sand was sired by Sainfoin, the winner of the 1890 Derby, who was bred by Queen Victoria. He was the first foal of Roquebrune by St. Simon who won two races and was a half-sister to Epsom Oaks winner Seabreeze. Rock Sand was trained throughout his career by George Blackwell at Newmarket, Suffolk. Rock Sand was a notably bad mover in his slower paces: those unfamiliar with his gait frequently assumed that he was lame when he trotted or cantered to the start before his races. He was also criticised early in his career by some observers who felt that he was too small to be
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Su-Lin

    Su-Lin

    • Place of death: Brookfield Zoo
    Su Lin (Chinese: 蘇琳; pinyin: Sūlín) was the name given to the giant panda cub captured in 1936 and brought to America by the explorer Ruth Harkness. The first panda kept outside of China, it would die just two years later, but marked the beginning of an extensive series of pandas going abroad from China. Harkness mentioned in her 1938 book The Baby Giant Panda that the capture took place within a day's walk from the Min River in Sichuan. Su Lin, about 9 weeks old at the time of his capture, was named after Su-Lin Young, the sister-in-law of Harkness's Chinese-American expedition partner Quentin Young. Harkness translated Su Lin as meaning "a little bit of something very cute". (Harkness and Young were unaware that the baby panda was, in fact, a male.) Harkness returned to America with the bottle-fed cub, and Su Lin became the first live panda to be displayed in the United States. In April 1937, the panda was purchased by Brookfield Zoo outside of Chicago, where he was visited by such celebrities as Shirley Temple, Kermit Roosevelt, and Helen Hayes. Harkness brought a second panda, Mei-Mei, to be a companion for Su Lin at the zoo in February 1938. However, the two animals fought
    5.33
    3 votes
    187
    Soccer the Dog

    Soccer the Dog

    Soccer (May 17, 1988 - June 26, 2001) was a Jack Russell terrier dog actor. A veteran of many television commercials for companies like Nike Athletics and Mighty Dog Dog Food, he became famous portraying the talking dog Wishbone in the PBS television series of the same name. Chosen from out of more than 100 dogs who auditioned for the role, Soccer appeared in almost every episode of the show during its 1995-1998 run. He lived with his trainer, Jackie Kaptan, on the Plano, Texas ranch where the Wishbone series was filmed.
    4.50
    4 votes
    188
    Akeakamai

    Akeakamai

    Akeakamai (c. 1976 – November 22, 2003) was a female Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, which, along with a companion female dolphin named Phoenix, as well as tankmates Elele and Hiapo, were the subjects of Louis Herman's animal language studies at the Kewalo Basin Marine Mammal Laboratory in Honolulu, Hawaii. The most well-known paper is the original work described in Herman, Richards, & Wolz (1984). Akeakamai was also the subject of many other scientific studies of dolphin cognition and sensory abilities. Physically identifying features of Akeakamai included a straight eyeline, a half-circle-shaped notch in the right side of her tail fluke, a small "Eiffel Tower"-shaped mark above her right eye, a thin notch in the side of her upper mouth, and a particularly wide melon. She also had characteristic in-air whistle calls, including an unusual high-low-high whistle that was well below typical signature whistle frequencies. In the Hawaiian language, Akeakamai means "philosophy", or "lover (ake) of wisdom (akamai)". Akeakamai was also inserted as a character in David Brin's science fiction novel Startide Rising. Akeakamai died of cancer on November 2, 2003.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Herod

    Herod

    Herod (originally King Herod; April 1758 – 12 May 1780) was a Thoroughbred racehorse. He was one of the three foundation sires of the modern Thoroughbred racehorse, along with Matchem and Eclipse. Herod was the foundation sire responsible for keeping the Byerley Turk sire-line alive. Bred by Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, he was by the stallion Tartar, a very good racehorse, who won many races including the King's plate at Litchfield, the King's plate at Guildford, and the King's plate at Newmarket. In addition to Herod, Tartar sired Thais (dam of Silvertail), Fanny (second dam of King Fergus), the O'Kelly Old Tartar mare (dam of Volunteer), and others. Herod's dam, Cypron (1750 bay filly), was bred by Sir W. St Quintin. Herod was a half-brother Lady Bolingbroke (dam of Tetotum, Epsom Oaks) and a mare (1757) (dam of Clay Hall Marske) by Regulus. Herod was a fine, bay horse standing 15.3 hands high with a small star and no white on his legs. He was a powerful horse that was especially good at four-mile distances. Herod began racing at five, the usual age to begin training for this period, in October 1763 winning a race on the four mile Beacon course at Newmarket. At age six, he
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Islero

    Islero

    Islero was a Miura bull known for having killed famed bullfighter Manolete on August 28, 1947. Bulls from the Miura ranch, located near Seville, Spain, are known for being large and ferocious. Islero had poor eyesight and tended to chop with his right horn. On the fateful day, he was the 5th bull of the afternoon, and the 2nd for Manolete, at a bullfight in the town of Linares in the province of Jaén, Andalusia, Spain. The bull's manager begged Manolete to finish him off quickly; as the matador reached over the bull's horns, thrusting his sword deep up to its hilt, Islero thrust his right horn, goring Manolete in the groin, severing his femoral artery. The bullfighter was rushed to the hospital, but he died on the operating table later that evening. Italian automaker Lamborghini named one of its grand tourers "Islero", as part of the company's tradition of naming its cars for Miura bulls and other bullfighting-related terms.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Messenger

    Messenger

    Messenger (foaled 1780) was an English Thoroughbred stallion bred by a John Pratt and imported into the newly formed United States of America just after the American Revolution. Along with three other stallions, (Medley, Sharp, and Diomed), Messenger provided the type of foal, both filly and colt, that was needed for the era of long distance (stamina and speed) racing popular in the early days of the American sport. Messenger was a grey by Mambrino out of an unnamed mare (1774) by Turf. He was inbred to Cade in the third and fourth generations of his pedigree. Mambrino traced straight back to Blaze, the father of trotters. Messenger has crosses to all three of the Thoroughbred foundation sires, particularly Godolphin Arabian. Although his sire was a trotter, Messenger never ran a trot race. While still in England, he started in 16 flat races and won ten of them. Messenger's races, usually less than two and half miles, were mainly "match" races in which the side bets far exceeded the purse. In May 1788 Sir Thomas Benger imported Messenger to Pennsylvania. In 1793, Messenger was sold to Henry Astor. Messenger was once advertised in a Philadelphia newspaper as: Available for service:
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Silky Sullivan

    Silky Sullivan

    Silky Sullivan (February 28, 1955 – November 18, 1977) was an American thoroughbred race horse best known for his come-from-behind racing style. His name is now a term used in sports and politics for someone who seems so far behind the competition that they cannot win, yet they do. There were other great closers—Whirlaway, Stymie, Needles, Gallant Man, Forego, John Henry and Zenyatta—but none could hang so far back, let the field get so far ahead, and still win. Called the "California Comet" and often ridden by the Hall of Fame jockey Willie Shoemaker, Silky once allowed the field to get 41 lengths in front of him and still won by three lengths. To accomplish this, he ran the last quarter in 22 seconds. His trainer, West Coast veteran Reggie Cornell, said "I've never seen a horse in my life, or heard of one either, go faster." Cornell trained horses for movie star Betty Grable and her husband, bandleader Harry James. He was the uncle and mentor of Hall-of-Famer Ron McAnally, who trained John Henry. Willie Shoemaker once said of Silky Sullivan, "You can't do a thing with him, you just have to allow him to run his own race, at his own speed, in his own style in the first quarter or
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Varmint of Burke's Garden

    Varmint of Burke's Garden

    The Varmint of Burke's Garden was the name given to a coyote that terrorized the community of Burke's Garden, Virginia, in 1952. The animal killed over 400 registered sheep and caused damages in excess of $32,000 before being killed. To aid in the creature's capture, the board of supervisors of Tazewell County contacted Clell and Dale Lee, two of the best-known big-game hunters then active in the United States; their dogs were well known for being able to track most kinds of animals. The men were residents of Arizona, but were requested to come to Virginia to help local residents. Dale Lee was in Venezuela hunting jaguars, but his brother Clell was available and answered the call. He arrived in Bluefield to find himself coolly received by local farmers; however, Mrs. Meeks, the wife of one of the men, was kinder, and invited him to stay at her home. Lee identified the animal by a track that had been left in a block of ice. His diagnosis shocked many, as no coyotes had been seen in the area in memory. Accompanied by the sheriff, as well as by local farmers, hunters, and game wardens, Lee and his dogs soon found the scent, following it for around five hours before nightfall. Lee
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Balto

    Balto

    • Place of death: Cleveland
    Balto (1919 – March 14, 1933) was a Siberian Husky sled dog who led his team on the final leg of the 1925 serum run to Nome, in which diphtheria antitoxin was transported from Anchorage, Alaska, to Nenana, Alaska, by train and then to Nome by dog sled to combat an outbreak of the disease. The run is commemorated by the annual Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Balto was named after the Sami explorer Samuel Balto. Balto died at the age of 14. In January 1925, doctors realized that a potentially deadly diphtheria epidemic was poised to sweep through Nome's young people. The only serum that could stop the outbreak was in Anchorage, nearly a thousand miles (1,600 km) away. The engine of the only aircraft that could quickly deliver the medicine was frozen and would not start. After considering all of the alternatives, officials decided to move the medicine by sled dog. The serum was transported by train from Anchorage to Nenana, where the first musher embarked as part of a relay aimed at delivering the needed serum to Nome. More than 20 mushers took part, facing a blizzard with −23 °F (-31° C) temperatures and strong winds. Katie Pryor interviewed the musher after he had finished. News
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Washoe

    Washoe

    Washoe (c. September 1965 Ellensburg – October 30, 2007) was a female chimpanzee who was the first non-human to learn to communicate using American Sign Language, as part of a research experiment on animal language acquisition. Washoe learned approximately 350 words of ASL. She also taught her adopted son Loulis some American Sign Language. Using similar teaching methods, several other chimpanzees were later taught 150 or more signs, which they were able to combine to form complex messages. Washoe was born in West Africa in 1965. She was captured for use by the US Air Force for research for the space program. Washoe was named for Washoe County, Nevada, where she was raised and taught to use ASL. In 1967, Allen and Beatrix Gardner established a project to teach Washoe ASL at the University of Nevada, Reno. At the time, previous attempts to teach chimpanzees to imitate vocal languages (the Gua and Vicki projects) had failed. The Gardners believed that these projects were flawed because chimps are physically unable to produce the voiced sounds required for oral language. Their solution was to utilize the chimpanzee's ability to create diverse body gestures, which is how they
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Cincinnati

    Cincinnati

    'Cincinnatus (ca. 1860–1878) was General Ulysses S. Grant's most famous horse during the American Civil War. He was the son of Lexington, the fastest four-mile thoroughbred in the United States (time 7:19.75 minutes) and one of the greatest sires. Cincinnati was also the grandson of the great Boston, who sired Lexington. At an early age, Grant emotionally bonded to horses. A shy, quiet child, he found joy in working with and riding them. Grant excelled in horsemanship at West Point, and at graduation, he put on an outstanding jumping display. Grant owned many horses in his lifetime, including one named Jeff Davis, so named because he acquired it during his Vicksburg Campaign from Jefferson Davis's Mississippi plantation. Cincinnatus was a gift from an admirer during the War. The horse was large (17 hands), handsome, and powerful, and he quickly became Grant's favorite. When Grant rode Cincinnatus to negotiate Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House, the animal became immortalized. Virtually all depictions of Grant in drawings, granite, and bronze, are astride Cincinnatus including at the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial, located on the Mall in Washington, D.C., at the base of
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Jumbo

    Jumbo

    • Place of death: St. Thomas
    Jumbo (1861 – September 15, 1885) was a large African Bush Elephant, born 1861 in the French Sudan – present-day Mali – imported to a Paris zoo, transferred to the London Zoo in 1865. In November, 1881, Jumbo was sold for $10,000 to P. T. Barnum, who removed the beast to America for exhibition in March, 1882. The giant elephant's name has spawned the common word "jumbo", meaning large in size. Jumbo's height, estimated to be 3.25 metres (10.7 ft) in the London Zoo, was claimed to be approximately 4 metres (13.1 ft) by the time of his death. Jumbo was born in 1861 in the French Sudan, whence he was imported to France and kept in the old zoo Jardin des Plantes, near the railway station Gare d'Austerlitz in Paris. In 1865 he was transferred to the London Zoo, where he became famous for giving rides to visitors, especially children. The London zookeeper association leader Anoshan Anathajeyasri gave Jumbo his name; it is likely a variation of one of two Swahili words: jambo, which means "hello" or jumbe, which means "chief". Jumbo was sold in 1881 to P. T. Barnum, owner of the Barnum & Bailey Circus, known as "The Greatest Show on Earth", for 10,000 dollars. There was popular objection
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Mozart's starling

    Mozart's starling

    For about three years the composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart kept a pet starling. The first record of the starling is the entry Mozart made in his expense book when he bought it on 27 May 1784: The music Mozart jotted down in the book is fairly close to the opening theme of the third movement of his Piano Concerto No. 17 in G, K. 453, which Mozart had completed a few weeks earlier (12 April). Mozart presumably taught the bird to sing this tune in the pet store, or wherever it was that he bought it. According to Mozart's transcription, the starling incorrectly inserted a fermata on the last beat of the first full measure, and sang G sharp instead of G in the following measure. Mozart probably was not joking when he made the transcription, because starlings are known to have a very strong capacity for vocal mimicry. The bird Mozart brought home lived as a pet in his household for three years and died on 4 June 1787. Mozart buried the creature in the back yard and wrote a commemorative poem for the occasion. Deutsch 1965 calls the poem "serio-comic". However, West and King note, based on their extensive experience, that starling pets interact closely with their human keepers, often
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Alan-a-Dale

    Alan-a-Dale

    Alan-a-Dale (1899–1925) is an American Thoroughbred racehorse best known for winning the 1902 Kentucky Derby. He was named for a figure in the Robin Hood legend. According to the stories, he was a wandering minstrel who became a member of Robin's band of outlaws, the "Merry Men." He was bred by Thomas McDowell at his Ashland Stud in Lexington, Kentucky. He was the son of the 1895 Kentucky Derby winner Halma. Raced and trained by McDowell, at age two Alan-a-Dale won three of his four starts but the following year health problems kept him out of racing until Kentucky Derby time. Ridden by future Hall of Fame jockey Jimmy Winkfield, the official Kentucky Derby website says that Alan-a-Dale had a lead of six lengths and despite going lame down the stretch, "carried on with flawless courage to win by a nose." This injury kept Alan-a-Dale out of racing for the rest of the year. At age four, Alan-a-Dale returned to the track and raced successfully for three more years, retiring with seventeen wins from his thirty-seven lifetime starts. At stud, he met with limited success and died in 1925 at age twenty-six.
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    Count Fleet

    Count Fleet

    Count Fleet (March 24, 1940 - December 3, 1973) was born and died at Stoner Creek Stud farm in Paris, Kentucky, United States. He was a Thoroughbred racehorse and Triple Crown champion in 1943. Sired by 1928 Kentucky Derby winner Reigh Count and out of a mare named Quickly, by Haste. Count Fleet was owned by the wife of John D. Hertz (1879–1961), best known for the rental car company bearing his name. John Hertz initially did not think much of Count Fleet and contemplated selling him until jockey Johnny Longden convinced him to keep the colt. Trained by Don Cameron and ridden by future Hall of Fame inductee Longden, as a two-year-old Count Fleet started off slowly, losing several times before getting his first win. He gained respect with his six-length victory in the Champagne Stakes, in which he set a new track record, then followed this up by beating the best horses in the country in the Pimlico Futurity, where he equaled the track record. In the Walden Stakes, he ran away from the field, winning by more than thirty lengths. At season's end, he had won 10 of his 15 races while never being out of the money, a performance that earned him the two-year-old championship honors. He was
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Fashion

    Fashion

    Fashion (1837 to 1860), was a famous Thoroughbred four-mile (6,400 meter) racemare that defeated Boston and set a record of 7:32½, for that distance, before the American Civil War. Until her meeting with Peytona, Fashion had started 24 times, and won 23 races, 14 of which were of four-mile heats, 6 of 3-mile heats and 3 of 2-mile heats for earnings of $35,600. She was sired by Trustee (foaled in Great Britain in 1829) out of Bonnets o' Blue (foaled in 1827 and by Sir Charles by Sir Archy). Trustee was taken out of retirement at the age of twenty to prove to the young folks how good he had been in his racing days. At that age, he ran a four-mile heat in eight minutes flat. Bonnets O'Blue won the National Colt Stakes and a $10,000 match race against Goliah, by Eclipse, over the Union Course in 1831. Her dam was Reahty, by Sir Archy, making Bonnets O'Blue inbred to Sir Archy (by Diomed) in the second generation. Owned and bred by William Gibbons in Madison, New Jersey (the farm was located on land that today accommodates Drew University), the chestnut Fashion was considered the best racemare of her generation, or any generation that came before her. In 36 starts, Fashion won 32 times
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Grey Lag

    Grey Lag

    Grey Lag (1918–1942) was a thoroughbred race horse born in Kentucky and bred by John E. Madden. At his Hamburg Place near Lexington, Kentucky, Maddon had a good stallion called Star Shoot which he bred to all his mares. Out of a failed racemare called Miss Minnie who had produced no previous winners, he got Grey Lag. In his later days, Maddon said Grey Lag was the best horse he ever bred. Sired by Star Shoot (going back to Stockwell and Beeswing, out of Miss Minnie (by Meddler), Grey Lag wasn't grey. He was a chestnut with a few small grey patches on his belly, hidden when he was saddled. With three white feet and a large white blaze, Grey Lag was a minimal Sabino. (A Sabino is inherited and can be as dominant as pinto markings, or as minimal as a white spot on the chin, a small sock with jagged edges, or a few belly spots. Sabinos are capable of producing wildly colored off-spring.) Grey Lag (whose name came from a type of wild European goose) stood 16 and a half hands tall when he was sold as a yearling to Hall of Fame trainer, Max Hirsch. Grey Lag remained a maiden until his fifth start. Hirsch raced him until he won the Champagne Stakes for two-year-olds, then sold him on to
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Gunsynd

    Gunsynd

    Gunsynd (4 October 1967 – 29 April 1983) was a champion Australian Thoroughbred racehorse who won 29 races and A$280,455 in prizemoney. In his seven starts over one mile (1,600 metres) he was only once defeated, by half-a-head in the Epsom Handicap. Foaled in 1967, at The Dip Stud, at Breeza, New South Wales, Gunsynd was by the grey racehorse, Sunset Hue (by the imported sire, Star Kingdom), his dam was a twin foal, Woodie Wonder, that ran third at her only start. Woodie Wonder was by the sire, Newtown Wonder (GB). She was the dam of eight foals, six of which raced for three winners. A full brother to Gunsynd, Sunset Red, who won the WJ McKell Cup was the next best of Woodie Wonder's progeny. G. McMicking formed a syndicate with three others from his home town of Goondiwindi (pronounced Gundawindi) consisting of A. Bishop, J. Coorey and A. Pippos and purchased Gunsynd as a yearling for A$1,300 at the 1969 Brisbane sales. He was affectionately known as the Goondiwindi Grey because his owners came from Goondiwindi and he was a grey in appearance. Originally trained by Bill Wehlow, and later by Tommy Smith, Gunsynd raced from 1969 to 1973. As a four-year-old, under handicap
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    205
    Harriet

    Harriet

    Harriet (c. 1830 – June 23, 2006) was a Galápagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra porteri) who had an estimated age of 175 years at the time of her death in Australia. Harriet is the third oldest tortoise, behind Tu'i Malila, who died in 1965 at the age of 188, and Adwaita, who died in 2006 at the estimated age of 255. She was reportedly collected by Charles Darwin during his 1835 visit to the Galápagos Islands as part of his round-the-world survey expedition, transported to England, and then brought to her final home, Australia, by a retiring captain of the Beagle. However, some doubt was cast on this story by the fact that Darwin had never visited the island that Harriet originally came from. In August 1994, a historian from Mareeba published a letter in the local newspaper about two tortoises he remembered at the Botanic Gardens in 1922 and that the keepers of the time were saying that the tortoises had arrived at the Gardens in 1860 as a donation from John Clements Wickham, who was the First Lieutenant (and later Captain) of HMS Beagle under Fitzroy during the voyage of the Beagle in 1835. Wickham actually brought three tortoises (named Tom, Dick and Harry) to Australia when he
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    206
    Laddie Boy

    Laddie Boy

    Laddie Boy (July 26, 1920 – January 23, 1929) was an airedale terrier owned by US President Warren G. Harding and was a celebrity during the Harding administration. Laddie Boy was a faithful kind of dog. When the president played golf and hit a tree, Laddie Boy would run up to the tree and get the ball. Laddie Boy had his own hand carved chair to sit in during cabinet meetings. The White House held birthday parties for the dog, invited other neighborhood dogs to join, and served them dog biscuit cake. Newspapers published mock interviews with the dog. Laddie Boy was so famous, he even had a caretaker. Purportedly, the dog howled constantly the three days prior to the President's death at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, knowing of his master's imminent demise. In memory of President Harding and honoring his former employment as a paperboy, newsboys collected 19,134 pennies to be remelted and sculpted into a statue of Laddie Boy. Harding's widow died before the statue was completed in 1927 and the statue was presented to the Smithsonian Institution where it currently resides. He was the first "first dog" to be regularly covered in the national press. He originated in Toledo,
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    207
    Nevado

    Nevado

    Nevado (1813? – 1821) was a Mucuchies dog that was given to Simón Bolívar by the local people of Mucuchíes, Mérida, in the Venezuelan Andes. It was given as a kind of present shortly after the Battle of Niquitao during his triumphal Admirable Campaign from New Granada (today Colombia) to Caracas in 1813. Nevado always ran beside Bolívar’s horse, no matter if he traveled through cities or battlefields. Nevado died in the Battle of Carabobo on June 24, 1821. When Bolívar received news that Nevado was badly injured, he rushed to the dog, but he came too late. Several monuments to Nevado stand at the entrance of Mucuchíes town.
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    208
    Opo the Dolphin

    Opo the Dolphin

    Opo was a bottlenose dolphin who became famous throughout New Zealand during the summer of 1955-56 for playing with the children of the small town of Opononi on the Hokianga harbour. Opo was a wild dolphin who started following fishing boats around Opononi in early 1955 after her mother had been killed, and would swim daily in the bay close to town. She was originally named "Opononi Jack", based on Pelorus Jack, since she was presumed to be male. Unlike the majority of dolphins, she had no qualms about human company, and would perform stunts for locals, play with objects like beach balls and beer bottles, and allow children to swim alongside her and make contact. Māori children were more reluctant to play with Opo, as cultural beliefs said the dolphin was a messenger from Kupe. The dolphin became a local celebrity but news of her soon spread, and visitors from throughout the country would come to watch her. On 8 March 1956 official protection for Opo, requested by locals, was made law, but on 9 March she was found dead in a rock crevice at Koutu Point. It is suspected that she was killed accidentally by fishermen fishing with gelignite. Her death was reported nationwide, and she
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    209

    Orangey

    Orangey, a red tabby cat, was a talented animal actor owned and trained by the well-known cinematic animal handler Frank Inn. Orangey (credited under various names) had a prolific career in film and television in the 1950's and early 1960's and was the only cat to win two Patsy Awards (Picture Animal Top Star of the Year, an animal actor's version of an Oscar), the first for the title role in Rhubarb (1951), a story about a cat who inherits a fortune, and the second for his portrayal of the cat, Audrey Hepburn's "poor slob without a name" in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). Other appearances included a regular role as "Minerva" on the television series Our Miss Brooks (1952-1958). The cat was also credited as "Jimmy" and "Rhubarb". Film Television
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    The Barb

    The Barb

    The Barb (1863-1888) was an Australian bred Thoroughbred racehorse, famed for winning the 1866 Melbourne Cup, the Sydney Cup twice, and other quality races. He was bred by George Lee and foaled in 1863 at Leeholme, near Bathurst, New South Wales. The Barb was by Sir Hercules, his dam Fair Ellen (also known as Young Gulnare) was by Doctor (GB). He was a brother to Barbarian (sire of the Melbourne Cup winner, Zulu) and Barbelle (AJC Doncaster Handicap, VRC Flying Stakes [three times] and Sydney Cup). Sir Hercules (by Cap-a-Pie (GB)) was one of the best colonial sires, having sired 18 stakeswinners for 45 stakeswins including, Yattendon, Cossack and Zoe. The Barb was sold for 200 guineas as a yearling. He was owned and trained by Honest John Tait, who owned and trained three other Melbourne Cup winners: Glencoe, The Pearl and The Quack. The Barb proved to be highly strung and temperamental. At his first appearance he threw his rider and bolted and because of this side of his nature was known as the "Black Demon". As a spring three year old, The Barb won the sixth AJC Derby by two lengths at his first start from a spell. The Barb started favourite in the Melbourne Cup and went on to
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    212
    Hanno

    Hanno

    Hanno (Italian, Annone; c. 1510 – 8 June 1516) was the pet white elephant given by King Manuel I of Portugal to Pope Leo X (born Giovanni de' Medici) at his coronation. Hanno, actually an Asian elephant, came to Rome in 1514 with the Portuguese ambassador Tristão da Cunha and quickly became the Pope's favorite animal. Hanno died two years later from complications of a treatment for constipation with gold-enriched laxative. King Manuel had either received him as a gift from the King of Cochin, or had asked Afonso de Albuquerque, his viceroy in India, to purchase him. Hanno was said to be white in colour, and arrived by ship from Lisbon to Rome in 1514, aged about four years, and was kept initially in an enclosure in the Belvedere courtyard, then moved to a specially constructed building between St. Peter's Basilica and the Apostolic Palace, near the Borgo Sant'Angelo (a road in the rione of Borgo). His arrival was commemorated in poetry and art. Pasquale Malaspina wrote: Hanno became a great favourite of the papal court and was featured in processions. Two years after he came to Rome, he fell ill suddenly, was given a purgative, and died on 8 June 1516, with the pope at his side.
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    213
    Pan Zareta

    Pan Zareta

    Pan Zareta, was a chestnut Thoroughbred racehorse born in the United States in 1910. She competed from Mexico to Canada, as well as in eight U. S. states. While she never won a significant race, and only once beat a top-level horse (Old Rosebud), she was still called "Queen of the Turf." Pan Zareta was bred by J. F. and H. S. Newman, from Sweetwater, Texas. Her sire was Abe Frank, and her mother was Caddie Griffith, sired by Rancocas. Pan Zareta's lineage traced back to Hanover and Hindoo on her multiple stakes-winning sire's side (Abe Frank), and to Leamington on her dam's side (Caddie Griffith). Pan Zareta's third dam on her mother's side, the 1869 Texas-born Mittie Stephens, caused a problem; Mittie Stephens was listed in the American Stud Book as a 'non-thoroughbred.' Still, due to some complexities in the rulings, Pan Zareta was considered a Thoroughbred. However, neither Pan Zareta's dam, Caddie Griffith, nor Pan Zareta herself appear in the American Stud Book. Known as "Panzy" (she was named for Panzy Zareta, the daughter of the once mayor of Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico), she traveled the country, appearing virtually anywhere. She was ridden by anyone handy and trained by
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    214
    Bucephalus

    Bucephalus

    Bucephalus or Bucephalas (/bjuːˈsɛfələs/; Ancient Greek: Βουκέφαλος or Βουκεφάλας, from βούς bous, "ox" and κεφαλή kephalē, "head" meaning "ox-head") (c. 355 BC – June 326 BC) was Alexander the Great's horse and one of the most famous actual horses of antiquity. Ancient accounts state that Bucephalus died after the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC, in what is now modern Pakistan, and is buried in Jalalpur Sharif outside of Jhelum, Pakistan. Another account states that Bucephalus is buried in Phalia, a town in Pakistan's Mandi Bahauddin District, which is named after him. A massive creature with a massive head, Bucephalus is described as having a black coat with a large white star on his brow. He is also supposed to have had a "wall", or blue eye, and his breeding was that of the "best Thessalian strain." Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 BC, a thirteen-year-old Alexander won the horse. A horse dealer named Philonicus the Thessalian offered Bucephalus to King Philip II for the sum of 13 talents, but because no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. However, Philip's son Alexander was. He promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was
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    Comanche

    Comanche

    Comanche was a mixed breed horse who survived General George Armstrong Custer's detachment of the United States 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The horse was bought by the U.S. Army in 1868 in St. Louis, Missouri and sent to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. His ancestry and date of birth were both uncertain. Captain Myles Keogh of the 7th Cavalry liked the 15 -hand bay gelding and bought him for his personal mount, to be ridden only in battle. In 1868, while the army was fighting the Comanche in Kansas, the horse was wounded in the hindquarters by an arrow, but continued to carry Keogh in the fight. He named the horse “Comanche” to honor his bravery. Comanche was wounded many more times, but always exhibited the same toughness. On June 25, 1876, Captain Keogh rode Comanche at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, led by Lt Col. George Armstrong Custer. The battle was notable as their entire detachment was killed. US soldiers found Comanche, badly wounded, two days after the battle. After being transported to Fort Lincoln, he was slowly nursed back to health. After a lengthy convalescence, Comanche was retired. In April 1878, Colonel Samuel D. Sturgis issued the following
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    216

    Higgins

    Higgins (December 12, 1957 – November 11, 1975) was one of the best-known dog actors of the 1960s – 1970s. Most people remember him either as "Dog" or as "Benji," two of the most popular roles he played during a 14-year career in show business. The animal trainer Frank Inn found the famous canine at the Burbank Animal Shelter as a puppy. A fluffy black-and-tan mixed breed dog, he was marked like a Border Terrier and Inn believed him to be a mix of Miniature Poodle, Cocker Spaniel, and Schnauzer. Higgins's career was facilitated by Frank Inn, who also trained Arnold Ziffel (the pig) and all the other animals used on the Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and Green Acres sitcoms. His on-set assistant trainers included Gerry Warshauer and Karl Miller. As an actor, he first came to national attention as the uncredited dog who played the character of "Dog" in the television sitcom Petticoat Junction for six of the show's seven seasons, from 1964 to 1970 appearing in 163 episodes. He guest-appeared on the television sitcom Green Acres with Eva Gabor in 1965 and also made a guest appearance on the television sitcom The Beverly Hillbillies. He won a Patsy Award in 1967 and he was
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    217
    Peter McCue

    Peter McCue

    Peter McCue (1895–1923) was a racehorse and sire influential in the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA), although he died before the AQHA was formed. Peter McCue (foaled 1895) was registered in the American Stud Book as a Thoroughbred, sired by Duke of the Highlands, but his breeder and his breeder's family always maintained that he was actually sired by a Quarter Horse stallion named Dan Tucker. His dam was a Thoroughbred mare named Nora M, who was a double-bred descendant of the imported stallion Glencoe. One story has it that, the horse was named after a neighbor of the Watkins' family, Peter McCue. Peter McCue raced for a number of years, then was retired to stud, standing in Illinois, Texas, Oklahoma, and Colorado before his death in 1923. Among his offspring were Hickory Bill, A D Reed, Shiek P-11, Chief P-5, Harmon Baker, John Wilkens and Jack McCue. Peter McCue was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.
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    218
    Skippy

    Skippy

    Skippy aka Asta (born 1931 or 1932; retired 1939) was a Wire Fox Terrier dog actor who appeared in dozens of movies during the 1930s. Skippy starred in many movies. He is best known for the role of the pet dog "Asta" in the 1934 detective comedy The Thin Man, starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. Skippy's name was changed to Asta after the first Thin Man film was released and he was listed under the name Asta in the Thin Man sequels he appeared in. Skippy was trained by his owners Henry East and Gale Henry East, and also by Frank Weatherwax and assistant trainers Rudd Weatherwax and Frank Inn. In 1936, Skippy and several other movie dogs were profiled in the book Dog Stars of Hollywood by Gertrude Orr. At the time Skippy was said to be four and a half years old, giving him a birth year of 1931–32. He was said to be one of the most intelligent of animal stars then working in pictures. In addition to verbal commands, he also worked to hand cues, essential for a dog performing in sound films. According to Orr, his training began when he was three months old, and he made his first professional film appearances at the age of one year, in 1932–1933, as a bit player providing
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    219
    Tuffi

    Tuffi

    Tuffi (c. 1947 - 1989) was a female circus elephant that became famous in Germany in 1950 when she jumped from the suspended monorail in Wuppertal into the river below. On 21 July 1950 the circus director Franz Althoff had Tuffi, then 3 years old, take the Schwebebahn in Wuppertal, as a marketing gag. The elephant apparently did not enjoy the ride, trumpeted wildly and ran through the wagon, broke through a window and fell some 12 metres (39 ft) down into the Wupper river, suffering only minor injuries. A panic had broken out in the wagon and some passengers were injured. Althoff helped the elephant out of the water. Both the circus director and the official who had allowed the ride were fined. Tuffi was sold to Cirque Alexis Gruß in 1968; she died there in 1989. To this day, a manipulated picture of the fall circulates around the world and a building near the location of the incident, between the stations Alter Markt and Adlerbrücke, shows a painting of Tuffi. A local milk-factory has chosen the name as a brand. The Wuppertal tourist information keeps an assortment of Tuffi-related souvenirs, local websites show original pictures. In 1970 Marguerita Eckel and Ernst-Andreas Ziegler
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    220
    Billy

    Billy

    • Place of death: Smithsonian National Zoological Park
    Billy, or William Johnson Hippopotamus, (1920s – October 11, 1955) was a Pygmy Hippopotamus given as a pet to U.S. President Calvin Coolidge. Captured in Liberia, he was given to Coolidge by Harvey Firestone in 1927. Billy spent most of his life in the National Zoo in Washington D.C.. In addition to his fame as an exotic presidential pet—which afforded him a trip to the 1939 New York World's Fair—Billy is also notable as the common ancestor to most pygmy hippos in American zoos. By the time of his death in 1955, Billy had sired 23 calves, 13 of whom survived at least a year. In 1927, Harvey Firestone, the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, acquired Billy in Liberia, where he was captured on one of Firestone Tires' large plantations. Calvin Coolidge, who was the U.S. President at the time, was known for his collection of animals, including many dogs, birds, a wallaby, lion cubs, a raccoon and other unusual animals. At the time, pygmy hippos were virtually unknown in the United States. On May 26, 1927, Coolidge was informed that he would receive the rare hippo, already adult-sized at 6 feet (1.8 m) long and around 600 pounds (270 kg), as a gift. In Coolidge's
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    221
    Haiseiko

    Haiseiko

    Haiseiko (ハイセイコー, Haiseikō) (March 6, 1970 - May 4, 2000) was a Japanese Thoroughbred racehorse. In 1972, at age two, Haiseiko began racing at the Oi Racecourse for the Japanese National Association of Racing. He was undefeated in six starts at Oi Racecourse. The race called the Seiun Sho which he won is today known as the Haiseiko Kinen. At age three, Haiseiko was traded to the Japan Racing Association. He won the Satsuki Sho, the first of the Japanese Classic Races but then finished third Take Hope in the Tokyo Yushun and second to the same horse in the Kikuka Sho. At age four, Haiseiko won the Takarazuka Kinen. Retired to stud, Haiseiko sired the Tokyo Yushun winner Katsurano Haiseiko, the Satsuki Sho winner Haku Taisei, the Tokyo Derby winner King Haiseiko and Outrun Seiko. He was the Leading Sire in NAR for 1990. Haiseiko was inducted in the Japan Racing Association Hall of Fame in 1984.
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    222
    Millie

    Millie

    Mildred "Millie" Kerr Bush (January 12, 1985 – May 19, 1997) was the pet english springer spaniel of Barbara and George H. W. Bush. She was named for Mildred Caldwell Kerr, a long-time friend of the Bushes, which is also the name of Kerr's granddaughter, Millie Kerr. Millie was referred to as "the most famous dog in White House history." Bush mentioned her in a speech during his 1992 bid for re-election, saying “My dog Millie knows more about foreign affairs than these two bozos” in reference to opposition candidates Bill Clinton and Al Gore. Millie is credited as the author of Millie's Book: As Dictated to Barbara Bush (ISBN 0-688-11913-1). In 1989, Millie gave birth to a litter of six puppies with the assistance of Army veterinarian Stephen Caldwell, including Spot Fetcher and Ranger, who became George H. W. Bush's dog. Ranger died of cancer in May 1993. Spot would later become another presidential pet when George W. Bush moved into the White House. Millie was portrayed in an episode of Murphy Brown as well as an episode of Wings and Who's The Boss. Millie made also a cameo appearance in The Simpsons episode Two Bad Neighbors in a scene where the former president Bush is jogging
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    Narita Brian

    Narita Brian

    Narita Brian (Japanese : ナリタブライアン, May 3, 1991 - September 27, 1998) was a Japanese racehorse, sired by Brian's Time, dammed by Pacificus, who in turn was the daughter of Northern Dancer. Narita Brian won the Japanese Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing, as well as the Arima Kinen, and was voted Japanese Horse of the Year in 1994. Elder brother Biwa Hayahide was the Champion horse in Japan in 1993. He died in 1998 because of gastric rupture. He was declared "Horse of the 20th century" in Japan. His most successful offspring was Daitaku Flag who was 4th in the Japanese 2000 Guineas.
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    Touchstone

    Touchstone

    Touchstone (1831-1861) was a British bred Thoroughbred racehorse and a Leading sire in Great Britain & Ireland on four occasions. He was owned and bred by Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster. He was a brown colt, foaled in 1831, by Camel, his dam was the good broodmare, Banter, by Master Henry. Touchstone was a full brother to the St. Leger Stakes winner, Launcelot (br c 1837). Touchstone was a frail foal with badly turned hocks that caused him to travel wide when moving. He measured 15 hands 2 inches and had strong hindquarters. Touchstone was unusual in having 19 dorsal vertebrae and a segment of a nineteenth rib on each side, which contributed to his long back. He was conditioned for racing by the preeminent trainer of the day, John Scott. Touchstone's most important win as a three-year-old came in the 1834 classic, the St. Leger Stakes. He went on to win two Doncaster Cups and two Ascot Gold Cups, retiring having won fifteen of his twenty starts, including six walk-overs. Touchstone was initially retired to stud duty at Moor Park, near Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire, but then was brought to his owner's Eaton Stud in Cheshire. A major success as a stallion, Touchstone
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    227

    Adwaita

    Adwaita (meaning "one and only" in Sanskrit) (c. 1750 – 23 March 2006) was the name of a male Aldabra giant tortoise in the Alipore Zoological Gardens of Kolkata, India. He was amongst the longest-living animals in the world. "Historical records show he was a pet of General Robert Clive of the British East India Company, and had spent several years in his sprawling estate before he was brought to the zoo." It is said that the Aldabra tortoise was a gift to Clive from the British seafarers who captured the tortoise from the Seychelles Islands. Reports show that Clive had four such tortoises in his villa in Latbagan at Barrackpore, in the suburbs of Kolkata. Three of the animals died, while Adwaita was transferred to the Alipore zoo in 1875 by Carl Louis Schwendler, the founder of the zoo. Adwaita lived in his enclosure in the zoo until his death in 2006. Weighing 250 kg (550 lb), Adwaita was a bachelor with no records of his progeny. He lived on a diet of wheat bran, carrots, lettuce, soaked gram, bread, grass and salt. His shell cracked and a wound developed some months before his death from liver failure in March 2006. The age of Adwaita is estimated to be around 255. If
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    Chalky

    Chalky

    Chalky was TV chef Rick Stein's rough-haired Jack Russell Terrier dog, who regularly accompanied Stein when filming his popular cookery shows and became recognised and popular in his own right - many of Stein's friends and interviewees claimed he was more famous than the chef himself. The fearless, ferocious yet frequently affectionate terrier was a perfect foil to Stein's phlegmatic demeanor, and added notes of humour (frequently unintentional) to the series. An example was his name. Chalky had his own line of merchandise, including plushes, teatowels, art prints, art paw prints and two speciality beers - Chalky's Bite and Chalky's Bark, brewed by Sharp's Brewery. Chalky was born in August 1989 and died on 13 January 2007, and was still filming with Rick until the last month of his life. His popularity was such that Conservative Member of Parliament Andrew Pelling tabled a motion in the House of Commons lamenting his death.
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    Dash For Cash

    Dash For Cash

    Dash For Cash was an American Quarter Horse racehorse and an influential sire in the Quarter Horse breed. He won $507,688 during his career. He was elected Racing World Champion in 1976 and 1977. His victory races are the Champion of Champions (1976, 1977), Sun Country Futurity, Los Alamitos Invitational Champ, Los Alamitos Derby, Vessels Maturity, Lubbock Downs Futurity. He is currently the number 2 all-time leading sire by earnings, and the sire of the number 1, First Down Dash. He sired 827 winners (145 stakes winners) from 1,155 starters and the earners of $39,990,245. He is currently number 5 all-time sire by winners. He is currently the all time leading broodmare sire by earnings at $56,104,925. He is currently number 2 all time broodmare sire by winners with 2027 winners (235 stakes winners) from 3154 starters. He is probably the most important modern sire in the Quarter Horse industry. He shows up in the first three generations in 9 of the 10 top earning horses for 2006 as an example. He was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.
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    230
    Durham Ox

    Durham Ox

    The Durham Ox was a castrated bull which became famous in the early 19th century for its shape, size and weight. It was an early example of what became the Shorthorn breed of cattle, and helped establish the standards by which the breed was to be defined. The animal was born in March 1796 and was bred by Charles Colling of Ketton Hall, Brafferton near Darlington in North-East England. Colling, together with his brother Robert who farmed at nearby Barmpton, was one of the pioneers of the cattle-breeding movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. After a visit in 1784 to Robert Bakewell, a successful breeder of Longhorn cattle, Colling began using Bakewell’s techniques to develop and improve the Shorthorn breed. The animal eventually known as the Durham Ox was the grandson of Colling’s original bull “Hubbach” or "Hubback", and became known as the Ketton Ox when it was exhibited in Darlington in 1799. It was painted as such at five years old in 1801 by George Cuit of Richmond. In 1801 the ox was sold to John Day of Harmston, near Lincoln, for £250 (2010: £14,200 ). Day renamed it the Durham Ox and had a carriage specially made to transport it, drawn by four horses. For the
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    231
    Easy Jet

    Easy Jet

    Easy Jet (1967–1992) was an American Quarter Horse foaled, or born, in 1967, and was one of only two horses to have been a member of the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA) Hall of Fame as well as being an offspring of members. Easy Jet won the 1969 All American Futurity, the highest race for Quarter Horse racehorses, and was named World Champion Quarter Race Horse in the same year. He earned the highest speed rating awarded at the time—AAAT. After winning 27 of his 38 races in two years of racing, he retired from the race track and became a breeding stallion. As a sire, or father, he was the first All American Futurity winner to sire an All American Futurity winner, and went on to sire three winners of that race, and nine Champion Quarter Running Horses. Ultimately, his ownership and breeding rights were split into 60 shares worth $500,000 each—a total of $30 million. By 1993, the year after his death, his foals had earned more than $25 million on the racetrack. Longtime Quarter Horse breeder and race-horse owner Walter Merrick of Sayre, Oklahoma produced Easy Jet from two future AQHA Hall of Fame members, Jet Deck and Thoroughbred mare Lena's Bar in 1967. His dam, or
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    232
    Exterminator

    Exterminator

    Exterminator (May 30, 1915 - September 26, 1945) was an American Thoroughbred racehorse and the winner of the 1918 Kentucky Derby, and in 1922 won Horse of the Year honors. The lanky chestnut colt was bred by F. D. "Dixie" Knight (Mrs. M.J. Mizner, Knight's mother, was said to be the actual breeder) and foaled at Almahurst Farm near Lexington, Kentucky. Exterminator was sired by McGee who also produced Donerail, the winner of the 1913 Kentucky Derby. At the Saratoga Paddock sale of 1916, he was bought as a yearling for $1,500 by J. Cal Milam who trained his own horses. The big colt grew fast, reaching 16.3 hands at two but he was awkward and coarse looking. For this reason, Milam had him gelded. On June 30, 1917 at Latonia Race Track in Covington, Kentucky, Exterminator made his debut in a six-furlong maiden race that he won by three lengths. Sent to race in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, he suffered a muscle sprain and Milam gave him time off to grow into his size, which by now was 17 hands. Still, he had earned $1,500 and a potential nomination to the Kentucky Derby. Before Exterminator could begin his third season, Milam sold him to Willis Sharpe Kilmer for $9,000 and a pair of
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    233
    Godolphin Arabian

    Godolphin Arabian

    The Godolphin Arabian (c. 1724 – 1753), also known as the Godolphin Barb, was an Arabian horse who was one of three stallions that were the founders of the modern Thoroughbred horse racing bloodstock (the other two are the Darley Arabian and the Byerley Turk). He was given his name for his best-known owner, Francis Godolphin, 2nd Earl of Godolphin. The veterinary surgeon Osmer, as quoted by Prior, described him in the following manner: "There never was a horse (at least, that I have seen) so well entitled to get racers as the Godolphin Arabian; for, whoever has seen this horse must remember that his shoulders were deeper, and lay farther into his back, than those of any horse ever yet seen. Behind the shoulders, there was but a very small space ere the muscles of his loins rose exceedingly high, broad, and expanded, which were inserted into his hindquarters with greater strength and power than in any horse I believe ever yet seen of his dimensions, viz fifteen hands high." Controversy exists over the ancestry of the Godolphin Arabian; some writers referred to him as a Barb, because of his believed country of origin, Tunisia, on the Barbary Coast, but portraits, showing a horse with
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    Gordo

    Gordo

    • Place of death: Atlantic Ocean
    Gordo was one of the first monkeys to travel into space. As part of the NASA space program, Gordo, also known as "Old Reliable", was launched from Cape Canaveral on December 13, 1958 in the U.S. Jupiter AM-13 rocket. The rocket would travel over 1500 miles and reach a height of 310 miles (500 km) before returning to Earth and landing in the South Atlantic. A technical malfunction prevented the capsule's parachute from opening and, despite a short search, neither his body nor the vessel were ever recovered. Gordo was a South American species of squirrel monkey, about one foot tall and weighing between 1 and 1.5 kg. He was chosen for space travel because of his species' similar anatomical makeup to man and sensitivity to changes in temperature. The use of monkeys in space missions was not new: four monkeys called Albert, as well as monkeys called Patricia and Mike had all flown by 1962. The flight took place at 0353 hours EST when the Jupiter AM-13 rocket containing Gordo was launched from the Atlantic Missile Range at Cape Canaveral. The rocket ascended to a height of 290 miles while travelling 1300 lateral miles. Scientists monitoring the flight found that, aside from a slight
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    235
    Hachiko

    Hachiko

    • Place of death: Shibuya, Tokyo
    Hachikō (ハチ公, November 10, 1923 – March 8, 1935), known in Japanese as chūken Hachikō (忠犬ハチ公 "faithful dog Hachikō" ['hachi' meaning 'eight', a number referring to the dog's birth order in the litter, and 'kō', meaning prince or duke]), was an Akita dog born on a farm near the city of Ōdate, Akita Prefecture, remembered for his remarkable loyalty to his owner, even many years after his owner's death. In 1924, Hidesaburō Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo, took in Hachikō, a golden brown Akita, as a pet. During his owner's life, Hachikō greeted him at the end of each day at the nearby Shibuya Station. The pair continued their daily routine until May 1925, when Professor Ueno did not return. The professor had suffered from a cerebral hemorrhage and died, never returning to the train station where Hachikō was waiting. Every day for the next nine years the dog waited at Shibuya station. Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. Initial reactions from the people, especially from those working at the station, were not
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    John Henry

    John Henry

    • Place of death: Kentucky Horse Park
    John Henry (March 9, 1975 – October 8, 2007) was an American Thoroughbred race horse who had 39 wins, with $6,591,860 in earnings. He was twice voted the Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year in 1981 and 1984, with his 1981 selection is the only one whereby the victor received all votes cast for that award. John Henry was also listed as #23 - Top 100 U.S. Racehorses of the 20th Century. He was named after the folk hero John Henry. As a colt, John Henry had a habit of tearing steel water and feed buckets off stall walls and stomping them flat. This reminded his then-owners of the legendary John Henry, who was known as a "steel-drivin' man". He was gelded both for his temperament as well as his lack of good breeding. A Golden Chance Farm foal, John Henry was from breeding that might best be described as plebeian. His sire, Ole Bob Bowers, once sold for just $900 and was not in much demand by breeders. His dam, Once Double, was an undistinguished runner and producer, but was sired by Double Jay, a brilliantly fast graded stakes race winner who had proven to be a useful broodmare sire. John Henry was sold as a yearling for $1,100 at the Keeneland January Mixed sale to John Callaway who
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    237
    Ksar

    Ksar

    Ksar (1918–1937) was a French Thoroughbred racehorse who had back-to-back wins in France's most prestigious horse race, the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe. Bred by Evremond de Saint-Alary at his Haras de Saint Pair du Mont in Normandy, Ksar was purchased by the renowned French horseman Edmond Blanc. Ksar was inbred to the French Derby winner, Omnium II (3f x 2f) with this giving him three crosses of Dollar (4f x 5m x 6m). Kizil Kourgan was the winner of the French 1000 Guineas and Oaks, the Grand Prix de Paris and other races. Her first foal was Kenilworth, by Childwick. Kenilworth won the Prix Greffulhe, Prix Rainbow and the marathon four mile (6,400 metres) race, Prix Gladiateur before being exported to Australia and becoming a successful sire. Evremond de Saint-Alary died in 1920, and his widow raced Ksar, beginning at age two when he won the Prix de la Salamandre at Longchamp Racecourse. At age three, Ksar was the dominant horse in France, winning five major races, including the coveted Prix du Jockey Club and the first of his two consecutive Prix de l'Arc de Triomphes. He ran poorly in the 1921 Grand Prix de Paris which had previously been won by both Ksar's sire and dam. Ksar
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    238
    Lexington

    Lexington

    Lexington (March 17, 1850 - July 1, 1875) was a United States Thoroughbred race horse who won six of his seven race starts. Perhaps his greatest fame came however as the most successful sire of the second half of the nineteenth century; he was the Leading sire in North America 16 times, and of his many brood mare and racer progeny one was Preakness, the namesake of the famous race at Pimlico. He was a bay colt bred by Dr. Elisha Warfield at Warfield's stud farm, The Meadows, near Lexington, Kentucky. Lexington was by the Hall of Fame inductee, Boston (by Timoleon by Sir Archy) from Alice Carneal by Sarpedon. He was inbred in the third and fourth generations (3m x 4f) to Sir Archy. Lexington stood 15 hands (63 inches), 3 inches high, and was described as having good conformation plus an excellent disposition. Under the name of "Darley" he easily won his first two races for Dr. Warfield and his partner, "Burbridge's Harry," a former slave turned well-known horse trainer. Burbridge, being black, was not allowed to enter "Darley" in races in his own name, so the horse ran in Dr. Warfield's name and colors. He caught the eye of Richard Ten Broeck who asked Dr. Warfield to name his
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    239
    Lin Wang

    Lin Wang

    Lin Wang (Chinese: 林旺; pinyin: Lín Wàng; 1917 – February 26, 2003) was an Asian elephant that served with the Chinese Expeditionary Force during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and later relocated to Taiwan with the Kuomintang forces. Lin Wang lived out most of his life in the Taipei Zoo and unquestionably was the most popular and famous animal in Taiwan. Many adults and children alike affectionately called the bull elephant "Grandpa Lin Wang." After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Sino-Japanese War, which began in 1937, became a part of the greater conflict of World War II. When the Japanese proceeded to attack British colonies in Burma, Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek formed the "Chinese Expeditionary Force" (中國遠征軍) under the leadership of General Sun Li-jen, to fight in the Burma Campaign. After a battle at a Japanese camp in 1943, Lin Wang, along with twelve other elephants, were captured by the Chinese. These elephants were used by the Japanese army to transport supplies and pull artillery pieces. The Allied forces also used these elephants to do similar tasks. At this time, Lin Wang was named "Ah Mei" (阿美), meaning "The Beautiful". In 1945, the Expeditionary
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    240
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    241
    Maskette

    Maskette

    Maskette (1906–1930) was an American Thoroughbred Hall of Fame racehorse who never lost a race against her own sex. Bred by James R. Keene at his Castleton Farm near Lexington, Kentucky, Maskette was trained by future Hall of Fame inductee James G. Rowe, Sr. Although she did not begin racing until late in the summer of 1908, the New York based two-year-old was nonetheless the top filly in the U.S. that year. Of her six starts, she finished second once and won the other five races, including setting a track record for the Saratoga Race Course in winning the Spinaway Stakes, a premier event of the racing season for juvenile fillies. The leading filly again at age three, Maskette repeated with five wins and a second in six starts. Of her several major stakes race wins, she captured the Pierrepont Handicap against colts. At age four, she won two of five starts that included another track record, this time at Aqueduct Racetrack. Retired to broodmare duty at her owner's Castleton Farm near Lexington, Kentucky, after producing a filly in 1912 Maskette was sold to prominent American owner/breeder William Kissam Vanderbilt, who shipped her to his Haras du Quesnay breeding farm near
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    242
    Matilda

    Matilda

    • Place of death: Birmingham
    Matilda (1990 - February 11, 2006) was a fourteen-ounce hen, was the first chicken to receive the title of World's Oldest Living Chicken from Guinness World Records. She is thought to have been descended from the Red Pyle color variation of the Old English Game breed. She was a pet of Keith and Donna Barton of Bessemer, Alabama, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama. Matilda's name was taken from "Waltzing Matilda", an old Australian folk song, and given to her as a result of her penchant for stepping side to side (as if she were waltzing) against the wire panels on the sides of her cage. Unlike most hens, Matilda never produced eggs. Her veterinarians believed Matilda's lack of egg production contributed significantly to her extraordinarily long lifespan of sixteen years. Another contributing factor to Matilda's longevity was her having lived the majority of her life indoors, inside a large wire cage, where she enjoyed a stable, protected environment year-round. On October 19, 1990, Keith and Donna went to the Alabama State Fairgrounds in Fairfield, Alabama, and paid $10.00 to purchase Matilda from Steve Shaffield of Warrior, Alabama. Under the stage names of Mort The Mystifying and
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    243

    Mother of the Forest

    The Mother of the Forest (668 BC – AD 1852) was an ancient and huge Sequoiadendron tree. The tree lived in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in eastern central California, United States. The dead tree's remains are within the Calaveras Grove of Big Trees State Park, in Calaveras County, California. Stretching 321 feet into the air with a girth of 90 feet at ground level, the tree was the largest of 92 Giant Sequoias growing in the valley in 1852 when a man named George Gale discovered the massive tree. In 1854 he had the bark stripped from the trunk. Gale had named the massive tree "the Mother of the Forest" before he sent men to strip the tree of its bark. Once the bark was removed, the tree could not survive for long. And in 1908, a fire that swept through the area burned away much of what was left of the tree. The massive tree had thick bark, two feet thick in some spots, which Gale had stripped. Gale toured with the bark, showing it off to urban crowds. The crowd's reaction was twofold; some of the people believed the bark to be a fraud, reasoning that no tree could grow bark as thick and long as that which Gale possessed. Others felt outrage that someone would destroy such an old
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    244
    Strongheart

    Strongheart

    Strongheart was the screen name of Etzel von Oeringen (October 1, 1917 - June 24, 1929), a male German Shepherd who became one of the earliest canine film stars. After being trained in Germany as a police dog, he was brought to the United States by husband and wife filmmakers Laurence Trimble and Jane Murfin, who had previously worked successfully with Jean, the Vitagraph Dog. He appeared in several movies, including a 1925 adaptation of White Fang. Some of these pictures were highly successful, and did much to encourage the popularity of the German Shepherd breed. A popular celebrity in his day, Strongheart paved the way for the much better remembered Rin Tin Tin. Strongheart and his mate, Lady Jule, had many offspring and their line survives to this day. In August 1928, Etzel Von Oeringen, the canine who played Strongheart, was accused of attacking and killing a young child by the name of Sofie Bedard. Her family brought allegations to court of Etzel's attempt to "eat her" after she was mauled on August 12th. Strongheart's name was later cleared, and the Bedard family was accused of perjury. In 1929, while being filmed for a movie, Strongheart accidentally made contact with a hot
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    245

    Sui

    Sui, a Straffordshire Bull Terrier,  was a pet of Steve Irwin.
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    Sweetheart

    Sweetheart

    Sweetheart was the name given to a 5.1 metre saltwater crocodile responsible for a series of attacks on boats in Australia between 1974 and 1979. Sweetheart attacked outboard motors, dinghies, and fishing boats. In July 1979, Sweetheart was finally caught alive by a team from the Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission, but drowned while being transported when it became tangled with a log. The crocodile's mounted body is now on permanent display at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. The story of Sweetheart has been taken with considerable poetic licence by Greg McLean, director of the film Wolf Creek, and made into a movie titled Rogue. Col Stringer. The Saga of Sweetheart : The Frightening But True Story of the Giant Rogue Crocodile Who Attacked Over 15 Boats on a N.T. River During the 1970s. Adventure Publications, 1986.
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    247
    Todman

    Todman

    Todman (7 October 1954-1976) was one of the greatest Australian Thoroughbred racehorses and an important sire. He was perhaps best known as the winner of the inaugural STC Golden Slipper in 1957, being the first of Star Kingdom’s five successive winners of the race. He was inducted into the Australian Racing Hall of Fame in 2005. Todman was bred at Baramul Stud in the Widden Valley, New South Wales by Stanley Wootton who had imported his sire, Star Kingdom (IRE) and also Newtown Wonder (GB) to Australia. He was a striking chestnut stallion from Oceana (GB) by Colombo. He was a brother to Noholme II (winner of the AJC Epsom Handicap, Cox Plate etc. and a successful sire in US) and the stakes producing sires Faringdon and Shifnal. Todman won from six furlongs to nine and a half furlongs and was successful five times in races that are now classed as Group One races. Todman was an impressive sprinter, winning his first race by 10 lengths. He then won the Golden Slipper Stakes by eight lengths and won the Champagne Stakes by six lengths when he defeated Tulloch. He also won the Canterbury Guineas by eight lengths and ran record times in seven of his 10 wins. Todman raced 12 times for 10
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    248

    Travis

    • Place of death: Stamford
    Travis was a 200 pound chimpanzee that attacked and mauled Charla Nash, on Monday, February 16, 2009 in Stamford, Connecticut.
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    Whisk Broom II

    Whisk Broom II

    Whisk Broom II (1907–1928) was American-bred Thoroughbred racehorse who raced in the United Kingdom (under the name Whisk Broom) and in the United States. Whisk Broom showed high class form during four seasons of racing in Europe, but produced his best performances when returning to America in 1913. He claimed the New York Handicap Triple by winning the Metropolitan Handicap, the Brooklyn Handicap, and the Suburban Handicap, a feat unmatched until Tom Fool achieved it forty years later. Kelso in 1961 and Fit To Fight in 1984 later joined them as the only other horses to win the Handicap Triple. Whisk Broom II's career was ended by injury after his triple success, but he went on to become a successful breeding stallion. A grandson of Ben Brush, Whisk Broom II was sired by the U.S. Hall of Fame stallion, Broomstick. He was bred in 1907 by the late Sam S. Brown's Senorita Stud Farm (now the site of the Kentucky Horse Park). In 1908 New York State passed the Hart-Agnew Law, which made betting on horse-racing illegal, and lead to the closure of many racetracks. Several prominent owners moved the bulk of their operations overseas, with Europe being a popular destination. Harry Payne
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