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Best Cricket Umpire of All Time

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    1

    William Shakespeare

    Wing Commander William Harold Nelson Shakespeare OBE MC AFC (24 August 1893 – 10 July 1976) was an English cricketer, and pilot in the Royal Flying Corps and its successor the Royal Air Force. As a pilot, in July 1918 Shakespeare won the Military Cross. His medal was awarded after he successfully carried out two patrols, one in "very bad weather" and one under intense fire. The citation praised him as "a gallant and determined pilot". A few months later, he gained the Air Force Cross. T./Capt. William Harold Nelson Shakespeare,R.F.C. was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out a most successful contact patrol in very bad weather at a height of 400 feet and brought back very valuable information. Later, he carried out another successful contact patrol at a low altitude, his machine being subjected to intense rifle and machine-gun fire. He is a gallant and determined pilot and has set a fine example to his squadron. Shakespeare played 26 first-class matches for Worcestershire between 1919 and 1931. He made his first-class debut in August 1919 against Warwickshire; this was a friendly match as Worcestershire did not enter the County
    8.29
    7 votes
    2

    Richard Callaway

    Richard Callaway (2 August 1860 – 19 March 1935 at Sydney, New South Wales) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired 3 Test matches between Australia and England in the 1901/02 season. In his first match, at Sydney on 13 December to 16 December 1901, he stood with Bob Crockett in a match which England won by an innings.
    7.67
    6 votes
    3

    Alfred Dipper

    Alfred Ernest Dipper (9 November 1885, Apperley, Gloucestershire, England – 7 November 1945, Lambeth, London, England) was a cricketer who played for Gloucestershire and once for England. Dipper made his first-class debut in 1908 when called into the Gloucestershire side which was a man short for the match against Kent at Tonbridge. He batted at number nine and top scored, but failed to keep a regular place in the team. He re-emerged as an opening batsman in 1911 and was then a regular in the team until 1932, when he retired. A defensive batsman in what was, until the arrival of Walter Hammond in the mid 1920s, usually a weak batting line-up, Dipper exceeded 1,000 runs in a season 15 times and went on to 2,000 five times. His full aggregate of 28,075 runs puts him 73rd on the all-time list of run-getters and he made 53 centuries. Dipper played in just one Test match for England, against Australia at Lord's in 1921, the year when many new players were tried against the all-conquering team led by Warwick Armstrong. Dipper scored 40 and 11, but was dropped. His lack of mobility as a fielder probably cost him further consideration. In retirement, Dipper stood as a first-class umpire.
    5.88
    8 votes
    4

    Allen Hill

    Allen Hill (14 November 1843, Kirkheaton, Huddersfield, Yorkshire – 28 August 1910, Leyland, Lancashire) played in the first-ever cricket Test, taking the first wicket. Hill also went on to umpire in the Test match played at Lord's in 1890. Allen Hill was the son of Francis (Frank) Hill, a Hand Loom Fancy Weaver, and Elizabeth Thornton (married 5 September 1825, Kirkheaton). In 1851 Frank and Betty were living at Shaw Cross, Kirkheaton with 6 children. In 1861 they had moved to Cheesbourgh (sic) Fold with only Allen age 17, described as a Fancy Weaver, then living with them. Allen married Ellen Jessop in 1868 and in 1871 they were living at Common End, Lepton, Yorkshire. Allen's occupation at this time was described as Fancy Weaver. There was a son Frank born c. 1869 who died in 1876 age 7. By 1891 Allen had moved to 3 Stanley Street (Goulding Terrace), Leyland, Lancs. In that year's census he was a widower, his wife Ellen having died in 1889, and his occupation was then shown as 'Professional Cricketer'. There were 4 daughters - Alice (19), Kathleen Mary (12), Gertrude (10) and Mabel (7). In the 1901 census Allen was living at Fox Lane in Leyland with his 2nd wife Margaret
    7.50
    6 votes
    5

    Mervyn Kitchen

    Mervyn John Kitchen (born 1 August 1940), is a former English first-class cricketer and international umpire. In his playing days he was a left-handed batsman for Somerset County Cricket Club, making 15,230 runs in his 354 first-class games between 1960 and 1979. He topped the Somerset averages in 1966 and 1968. After retiring as a player he went on to become a first-class cricket umpire and he umpired in 20 Test matches and 28 One-Day Internationals before retiring from that at the age of 65 in 2005. Kitchen was born in Nailsea, Somerset where his father played local club cricket. He was educated locally at Backwell Secondary Modern School. He joined the playing staff at Somerset County Cricket Club as a 16-year-old in 1957 and appeared in the next three seasons for the county's second eleven in Minor Counties matches and, from 1959, in games in the newly-constituted Second Eleven Championship. He made his debut for the Somerset first eleven in 1960 as a middle-order batsman, but made little impact in that or the next season, and in 1962 and 1963, although he played in around half of Somerset's first-class matches, his batting average was below 20 and his place was often dependent
    7.33
    6 votes
    6

    P. Coady

    P. Coady (dates unknown) umpired one Test cricket match played between Australia and England in Melbourne on 2–4 January 1879. The match, which was won by Australia by 10 wickets, was notable for the first Test match hat-trick, achieved by Fred Spofforth of Australia. Coady's colleague was George Coulthard.
    7.33
    6 votes
    7

    Tony McQuillan

    Anthony John McQuillan, (born 19 March 1951 in Greenslopes, Queensland), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Queensland.. He umpired one Test match in 1993 between Australia and New Zealand at Perth on 12 November to 16 November 1993, a match drawn through Australia’s”unaccountable dithering” (Wisden, 1995 ed., pp. 1054–5). Ian Healy in the first innings and Mark Taylor in the second, scored centuries, while Michael Slater scored 99. McQuillan’s partner was Darrell Hair. McQuillan umpired 14 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1993 and 1999. Altogether, he umpired 54 first-class matches in his career between 1989 and 2001. McQuillan played in the Brisbane Grade cricket competition for Easts, Colts and Wynnum-Manly clubs.
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Alfred Shaw

    Alfred Shaw

    Alfred Shaw (Burton Joyce Nottinghamshire, 29 August 1842 – 16 January 1907 in Gedling, Nottinghamshire) was an eminent Victorian cricketer and rugby footballer, who bowled the first ball in Test cricket and was the first to take five wickets in a Test innings (5/35). He who organised the first British Isles rugby tour to Australasia in 1888. He made two trips to North America and four to Australia, captaining the English cricket team in four Test matches on the all-professional tour of Australia in 1881/82, where his side lost and drew two each. He was also, along with James Lillywhite and Arthur Shrewsbury, co-promoter of the tour. Shaw was one of the few cricketers of his time whose Christian name was used more frequently than his initials. Standing only 5'6½" tall, he put on copious weight near the end of his career, when his naturally corpulent build was dramatically accentuated. It is unfortunate, therefore, that most photographs of him were taken so late in his cricketing life. A man of droopy aspect, bushed eyes, some classically Victorian facial hair and a belt nearer his breast than his substantial waist, he certainly didn't look the part of the era's finest medium-pacer,
    9.25
    4 votes
    9

    George Griffith

    George Griffith (December 20, 1833 at Ripley, Surrey – May 3, 1879 at Stoke-next-Guildford, Surrey) was an English cricketer. Known by his nickname "Ben" or the altogether more stirring "Lion Hitter", he was a high-quality all-rounder. Left-handed both as a batsman and bowler, he could bowl either fast roundarm or slow underarm, and he was also a fine fielder. Griffith's first-class career, in which he played primarily for Surrey, lasted from 1856 to 1872. He also played for the United All-England Eleven, including appearing in their prestigious fixtures against the All-England Eleven. Having initially worked as a baker, he played for the Priory Park Club in Chichester until 1856, joining Surrey the following year. He left the staff at the end of the 1863 season because of a disagreement over terms, but he continued to play for the club until 1872. 1864 was a great year for George Griffith. Regarded at the time as the biggest hitter in cricket, he played seventeen first-class matches and scored 489 runs. His left-handed round-arm fast bowling was also very highly thought of, and he took 69 wickets that season - although some of them came via slow lobs. That figure was supplemented
    6.00
    7 votes
    10

    Reg Ledwidge

    Reginald Ross (Reg) Ledwidge, (1922 in Australia – 10 December 1977 in Sydney, New South Wales), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired three test matches between 1975 and 1977. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Perth on 12 December to 16 December 1975, easily won by the visitors by an innings with Roy Fredericks belting 169 runs off 145 balls and Andy Roberts taking 7/54 in an innings. Only Ian Chappell with 156 on the first innings provided any real resistance. Ledwidge’s partner was Max O’Connell. His last Test match was between Australia and Pakistan at Sydney on 14 January to 18 January 1977, won by Pakistan by 8 wickets, their first Test victory in Australia, with Imran Khan taking 6/102 and 6/63. Ledwidge’s colleague was Tom Brooks. Ledwidge umpired 21 first-class matches in his career between 1972 and November 1977. He took ill and died less than a week before he was due to stand in a Test match against India. Wisden described him as “a firm and imperturbable umpire”. As a player, Ledwidge represented Randwick club in Sydney Grade Cricket, scoring over 8000 runs and taking over 500 wickets between 1946 and 1961.
    6.50
    6 votes
    11

    Eddie Nicholls

    Edward Albert "Eddie" Nicholls (born 10 December 1947 in British Guiana) is an international Test and One Day International cricket umpire. Nicholls officiated in 17 Tests from 1997 to 2001 and 46 ODIs from 1995 to 2005. Nicholls is one of four West Indian umpires on the International Cricket Council's elite panel of international umpires. A former police officer, Nicholls played club cricket for the Guyanese police force cricket team. He is married and has a son and two daughters.
    7.40
    5 votes
    12

    Mohammad Nazir

    Mohammad Nazir (born 8 March 1946) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in 14 Tests and 4 One Day International matches from 1969 to 1984 and became a cricket umpire after he retired from professional cricket. He took 7 wickets for 99 runs on debut in the first innings of the 1st Test between Pakistan and New Zealand in 1969.
    7.40
    5 votes
    13

    Walker Wainwright

    Walker Wainwright (21 January 1882 – 31 December 1961) was an English first-class cricketer, who played twenty four matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club, and one for the MCC, between 1903 and 1905. He also umpired one Test match. He was the younger brother of Ted Wainwright. Born in Rotherham, Yorkshire, England, Wainwright was a left-handed batsman, who scored 652 runs at 18.62, with a top score of 62 against Essex. He took twenty one catches and nineteen wickets at 30.63, with his slow left arm spin. His best bowling, 6 for 49, came against the MCC. His game playing for the MCC came in 1904. Wainwright also played for the Yorkshire Second XI from 1901 to 1903, Yorkshire Colts (1900-1902) and a non first-class match for Yorkshire in 1903. After retiring he umpired in first-class cricket, mainly in games featuring Cambridge University at Fenners. His only Test match as an umpire came when South Africa played England at Durban in January 1923. Wainwright died on New Year's Eve 1961, in Winchester, Hampshire.
    7.40
    5 votes
    14

    Charlie Parker

    Charles Warrington Leonard "Charlie" Parker (14 October 1882, Prestbury, Gloucestershire – 11 July 1959, Cranleigh, Surrey) was an English cricketer, who stands as the third highest wicket taker in the history of first-class cricket, behind Wilfred Rhodes and Tich Freeman. Parker took no serious attention to cricket in his childhood, preferring to concentrate on golf. He only took to cricket around 1900 and was recommended to Gloucestershire by W. G. Grace in 1903. However, he played only twice in first-class cricket before 1907. From then on, he played regularly, and despite several excellent performances, he was always overshadowed by George Dennett until World War I put a halt to county cricket. By 1914, Parker had not taken 100 wickets in a season and his last two years had been very expensive, suggesting that his was to be an insignificant career. In 1919, with Dennett serving as an officer in the Army, Parker was forced to become Gloucestershire's chief bowler. He took more wickets than ever before in a season, but he was still expensive even when the dry weather was taken into account. However, from 1920 Parker became one of the best left arm spin bowlers in England. A
    8.50
    4 votes
    15

    A. P. Williams

    Alfred Percy Williams (died 22 May 1933) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match, between Australia and England, played at Sydney on 19 December to 27 December 1924. This match was notable for being the first Test match in which the 8-ball over was used, for Bill Ponsford’s century on debut, and for the 127 run partnership for the 10th wicket between Johnny Taylor and Arthur Mailey, still Australia’s best for this wicket. Williams' colleague was Alfred Jones.
    7.20
    5 votes
    16

    Bill Ashdown

    William Henry Ashdown (27 December 1898 – 15 September 1979) was an English cricketer, and one of only a handful of players who played first-class cricket before the First World War and after the Second World War. Ashdown was born in Bromley, Kent. He first played first-class cricket in 1914, playing for Gerry Weigall's XI against Oxford University in The Parks, aged 15. He played for Kent County Cricket Club after the First World War. He scored 39 centuries, including a highest score of 332 against Essex in 1934. He scored more than 1,000 runs in 11 seasons of county cricket. He was also successful as a bowler, taking 602 wickets at a bowling average of 32.47. He retired in 1937. However, he returned to play a final first-class match in 1947, aged 48, for Maurice Leyland's XI against the Rest of England at Harrogate when he scored 42 and 40 and took 5 for 73. He became an umpire after retiring from first class cricket, and stood in two Tests against New Zealand in 1949 and one against the West Indies in 1950. He stepped down from the umpire's list resume his playing career as captain of Leicestershire 2nd XI until he was 55, doubling up as their coach and scorer. He died in Rugby,
    7.20
    5 votes
    17

    George Cooper

    George Stephen Cooper (1 March 1907 - 29 December 1980), was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired two Test matches between 1948 and 1950. His first match was between Australia and India at Melbourne on 6 February to 10 February 1948, a match won by Australia by an innings with Neil Harvey scoring 153 in his second Test, and Australia claiming 16 wickets for 147 runs on the final day. Cooper’s partner in this match was Andy Barlow. Cooper’s other Test was the second match of the series between Australia and England at Melbourne on 22 December to 27 December 1950, won narrowly by Australia with no innings reaching 200. Ron Wright was the other umpire. Cooper died at Adelaide, South Australia.
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    David Shepherd

    David Shepherd

    David Robert Shepherd MBE (27 December 1940 – 27 October 2009) was one of the cricket world's best-known umpires. He stood in 92 Test matches, the last of them in June 2005, and officiated in three World Cup finals. Shepherd had a reasonably successful, though late-starting, first class playing career for Gloucestershire, stretching from 1965 to 1979, and though he never came close to international selection he was popular both with his team-mates and the Gloucestershire supporters. He started with a bang, scoring 108 on debut against Oxford University, and made eleven more hundreds over the years, though only twice (in 1969 and 1975) did he average over 30. Never the slimmest of men even in his younger days, he relied more on his fine shot placement than speed across the ground, and his bowling was almost non-existent: he took only two wickets in his entire career. One famous incident at the Gloucestershire Cricket Club saw Shepherd hitting the ball so hard into the crowd that it knocked out a spectator reading a newspaper. The spectator was taken to hospital and recovered with only minor injuries. In 1981, David Shepherd began his second career in cricket, and the one which was
    7.00
    5 votes
    19

    Ian Howell

    Ian Lester Howell (born 20 May 1958 in Port Elizabeth, Cape Province, South Africa) is a South African cricket umpire. As a player he played first-class cricket for Border and Eastern Province in South Africa. A left-hand batsman and a left-arm medium bowler he played 119 first-class games scoring 3767 runs with 5 hundreds and 13 fifties and a batting average of 26.90. His top score was 115 not out. He took 243 first-class wickets with 5 five-wicket hauls with a best of 6/38 and a bowling average of 35.74. Howell has been a member of the International Cricket Council's panel of International Umpires since 2002. He is eligible to officiate in ODI's in South Africa as the home umpire, and as the TV umpire in Test matches. In December 2006 he replaced Mark Benson on-field during a Test match in Centurion when Benson was taken to hospital with heart palpitations, making him the first person to umpire in a Test match in his native country since the introduction of the Elite Panel of umpires in 2002. Howell is also regularly appointed by the ICC to stand in Test matches and ODI's away from South Africa to support the ICC Elite umpire panel at busy times in the cricket calendar. Howell
    8.00
    4 votes
    20

    Tim Robinson

    Tim Robinson (born Robert Timothy Robinson, 21 November 1958 in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire) is a former English cricketer, and current cricket umpire who played in 29 Tests and 26 ODIs for England from 1984 to 1989. Robinson played for Nottinghamshire from 1978 to 1999, receiving his first team cap in 1983. Robinson was club captain between 1988 and 1995, and was made one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1986. Robinson was educated at High Pavement Grammar School in Nottingham. Robinson was an opener who modelled his batting style upon Geoff Boycott's. He made a promising start to his England career, with a 160 in the second Test in 1984-5 against India in Delhi, and two big centuries against Australia in the 1985 Ashes series. However, he was found out, as were many other England batsmen, by the West Indies pace attack in the 1985-6 series. Robinson managed just 72 runs in eight innings. Robinson returned to form with a 166 against Pakistan the following year. He toured with England in the winter of 1987-88 playing in the 1987 Cricket World Cup and tours of Pakistan, Australia and New Zealand. It was a disappointing winter for Robinson, whose World Cup is probably
    8.00
    4 votes
    21

    Aleem Dar

    Aleem Sarwar Dar (Urdu:علیم سرور ڈار) (born June 6, 1968 in jhang, Punjab) is a retired Pakistani first-class cricketer and a member of the ICC Elite umpire panel. He won three consecutive ICC Umpire of the Year awards 2009, 2010 and 2011, after being nominated twice in 2005 and 2006. Aleem Dar and Simon Taufel are the only umpires to have received the award since its inception. He has played for Allied Bank, Gujranwala Cricket Association, Lahore, and Pakistan Railways as a right-handed batsman and a leg-break bowler. Since his retirement as a player, he has gained prominence as one of the leading umpires in international cricket. He was educated at Islamia College, Civil Lines, Lahore. Dar is best known as an international cricket umpire. He made his international umpiring debut in an ODI between Pakistan and Sri Lanka at Gujranwala on February 16, 2000. In 2002 he became a member of ICC's International Panel of umpires. He impressed the ICC with his accurate decision making, and was chosen to umpire at the ICC Cricket World Cup in early 2003, where he was one of the better-performing umpires. His high standard was again rewarded when he was appointed to stand in his first Test
    6.80
    5 votes
    22

    Don Weser

    Donald Gordon (Don) Weser, (born 8 February 1937), is a retired Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Western Australia. He umpired 3 Test matches between 1979 and 1980. His first match was between Australia and England at Sydney on 10 February to 14 February 1979, won by England by 9 wickets, thus retaining The Ashes. Australian captain Graham Yallop scored 121 of the first innings total of 198, but the rest of the batting in both innings failed against Ian Botham, John Emburey and Geoff Miller. Weser's partner was fellow debutant Tony Crafter. Weser's last Test match was between Australia and New Zealand at Perth on 12 December to 14 December 1980, won by Australia by 8 wickets, with a bowling attack of Dennis Lillee, Rodney Hogg, Len Pascoe, and Jim Higgs proving too powerful. Weser's colleague was again Tony Crafter. Weser also umpired 8 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1979 and 1981. On 1 February 1981, during the third World Series Cup final at the MCG between Australia and New Zealand, Weser was informed by Greg Chappell that his brother Trevor would bowl the final ball underarm, thus denying New Zealand the chance to hit a six and tie the game. It was
    6.80
    5 votes
    23

    Billy Bestwick

    William (Billy) Bestwick (24 February 1875 – 2 May 1938) was an English cricketer who played for Derbyshire between 1898 and 1926. He was a demon medium-fast bowler who took over 1400 wickets for the county, including 10 in one innings. From his wild temperament and reckless behaviour, he was known as a "bad boy" of cricket. Bestwick was born at Tag Hill, Heanor, Derbyshire the son of a miner and worked at Coppice Pit from the age of 11. He debuted for the Derbyshire team in 1898, as a professional although still working in the mine in winter. He is one of only two bowlers to have hit ten wickets in a single innings for Derbyshire, a feat he achieved in June 1921, the other being five-time Test cricketer Tommy Mitchell. He was a true tailender batsman, who never averaged above eight with the bat in a single season for Derbyshire, and did not once reach twenty in his last two hundred and eighty first-class innings, a run of batting failures equalled only by Eric Hollies between 1939 and 1954. This extreme weakness as a batsman (and also in the field) was probably why Bestwick never managed to gain a single Test cap. Though Bestwick finished with the second-weakest average of his
    7.75
    4 votes
    24

    Henry Horton

    Henry Horton (born at Colwall, Herefordshire on 18 April 1923 and died there on 2 November 1998) was an English sportsman who played cricket for Hampshire in the 1950s and 1960s, having previously played a handful of times for Worcestershire in the 1940s. He also played football for Blackburn, Southampton, Bradford Park Avenue and Hereford. A right-handed batsman with a curious and ungainly crouching stance, Horton came late to full-time cricket, having spent most of his 20s concentrating on his football career. He joined Hampshire in 1953, but did not achieve a regular place in the side until 1955, the season when the West Indian Test batsman Roy Marshall qualified for the county. For the next dozen years, Horton batted mostly at No 3, usually following the opening partnership of Marshall and the all-rounder Jimmy Gray, and the three players were responsible for a high proportion of the runs scored by a side that was perennially weak in batting but strong in bowling. Horton was essentially a defensive player, contrasting with the flamboyance of Marshall. But he made a lot of runs at a good average, and passed 1,000 runs in 12 consecutive seasons, going on to 2,000 in three of
    7.75
    4 votes
    25

    Jeremy Lloyds

    Jeremy William Lloyds (born November 17, 1954 in Penang, Malaya) is an English cricket umpire. Lloyds was educated at Blundell's School. Lloyds in the late 1970s, while playing county cricket in Somerset, played rugby union for Taunton R.F.C. and was at one point captain. Lloyds was a groundsman at Lord's Cricket Ground before joining Somerset County Cricket Club. Lloyds later played for Gloucestershire County Cricket Club and Orange Free State. A left-handed batsman and a right-arm offbreak bowler, Lloyds played 267 first-class matches scoring 10679 runs at an average of 31.04 with 10 hundreds and 62 fifties. His top score was 132 not out. He also took 229 catches. With the ball in first-class cricket he took 333 wickets at an average of 38.86 with 13 five-wicket hauls and one ten-wicket haul. His best bowling in first-class cricket was 7/88. Lloyds made his first-class umpiring debut in 1996 and graduated to county cricket in 1998. He progressed to international level in 2000, when he umpired his first one day international match. In his first ball as an umpire at Test level he gave out a Bangladeshi batsman leg before wicket. Lloyds was a member of the International Cricket
    7.75
    4 votes
    26

    Kevan Barbour

    Kevan Christopher Barbour (born October 23, 1949) is an international cricket umpire from Zimbabwe. Previous roles have included being president, chairman and provincial manager of the Manicaland Cricket Association. Barbour was born in Bulawayo and educated at Milton High School. He played for Matabeleland from 1968 until 1970, when he moved to work in Mutare, and then played for Manicaland until 1975. He also played for the Rhodesia B cricket team. After a further move to Kwekwe, he played for Midlands until 1977. He settled back in Mutare and played for Manicaland again until 1979. He retired as a cricketer in 1996, and took up umpiring. He made his international umpiring debut in 1998 during an ODI game between Zimbabwe and Pakistan before making his Test umpiring debut the following year in the 1st Test between Zimbabwe and Sri Lanka at Bulawayo in November 1999. He umpired three further Tests in 2001, all in Zimbabwe: the 1st Test against Bangladesh at Bulawayo in April 2001, the 2nd Test against West Indies at Harare in July 2001, and then 2nd Test against South Africa at Bulawayo in September 2001. He was an umpire at the 2003 Cricket World Cup and is a member of the ICC's
    7.75
    4 votes
    27

    Ted Wykes

    Edgar Frederick Wykes, OAM, (born 28 April 1921 in Little Brington, Northampton, England) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. His family emigrated from the UK to Australia in 1925 as assisted immigrants. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England at Brisbane on 30 November to 5 December 1962, a match drawn with England requiring 100 runs to win with 4 wickets in hand. Brian Booth scored a century and there were 13 other scores of at least 50. Wykes’ partner in this match was Colin Egar. Wykes joined the NSW Cricket Umpires’ Association in 1949, became a first-class umpire in 1956, and retired from first-class umpiring in 1972, after 85 appearances. He retained his involvement in umpiring, as President of the NSW Cricket Umpires’ Association from 1967 to 1989, and was still Vice-president in 2000. He received an Order of Australia medal for his services to cricket in 1980, and became a Life Member of the NSW Cricket Association in 1982. He died on 22 November 2008 at Wollongong Australia. His ashes were buried with full honours at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Feb 9, 2009 in two locations near the Test Pitch.
    7.75
    4 votes
    28

    Javed Akhtar

    Javed Akhtar (born November 21, 1940, Delhi, India) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in one Test in 1962. An off spinner, he had success at first-class level, taking his wickets at an average of 18.17, but struggled in his only Test, failing to take a wicket. He later became an umpire, standing in 18 Tests and 40 ODIs from 1980 to 1999.
    6.60
    5 votes
    29

    Jim Hammond

    Herbert Edward 'Jim' Hammond was an English professional football (soccer) player for Fulham and a cricket player for Sussex. Having been signed from non-league side Lewes F.C., Hammond played for Fulham between 1928 and 1938, scoring 150 goals in 342 games. He was once called up for duty with the national team, although never played. When he eventually retired, it was forced on him by injury. His nickname was "the galloping hairpin". He meanwhile had a batting average of 18.73 (4,251 runs) and a bowling average of 28.71 (428 wickets), and became an umpire in his retirement.
    6.60
    5 votes
    30

    Dick French

    Richard Allan (Dick) French, (born 7 August 1938 in Sydney, New South Wales), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired 19 Test matches between 1977 and 1987. His first match was between Australia and India at Perth on 16 December to 21 December 1977, won by Australia by 2 wickets with Tony Mann becoming the first Australian night-watchman to score a century, and the 41 year-old Bob Simpson scoring his 1st century for 10 years, having come out of retirement to lead an Australian team depleted by defections to World Series Cricket. His partner was Robin Bailhache. French’s last Test match was between Australia and New Zealand at Melbourne on 26 December to 30 December 1987, a drawn match with the last Australian batsmen (Craig McDermott and Mike Whitney). Richard Hadlee took 10 wickets for the match. French’s colleague was Tony Crafter. French also umpired 57 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1979 and 1988. He umpired 68 first-class matches in his career between 1976 and 1988. French is NSW State Director of Umpiring, and a current member of the Cricket Australia Umpire Selection Panel and its Technical Committee. He attended Sydney Boys High School,
    5.67
    6 votes
    31
    Dave Gregory

    Dave Gregory

    David William Gregory (15 April 1845 – 4 August 1919) was an Australian cricketer of the 19th century. A right-handed batsman, Gregory was the first Australian national cricket captain, leading the side for the first three recognised Test matches between England and Australia in March and April 1877 and January 1879. Gregory was also the captain of the New South Wales team, notably during the Sydney Riot of 1879 when he rebelled against an unpopular decision by Victorian umpire George Coulthard during a game against the touring English team. Gregory was part of a large cricketing family: his father, Edward William Gregory, was a "capable cricketer" with eight sons, five of whom played for New South Wales in international or intercolonial matches between 1861 and 84; in all, twenty of Edward William Gregory's descendants represented New South Wales in cricket and other sports. David William Gregory was a man of striking appearance, he "looked like an Old Testament prophet not long out of training college." David William Gregory was born on 15 April 1845 at Fairy Meadow, near Wollongong, the son of Edward William Gregory, a bootmaker, and his wife Mary Anne née Smith, who were
    7.50
    4 votes
    32

    Brian Aldridge

    Brian Leslie Aldridge QSM (born 30 June 1940 in Christchurch, New Zealand) is a retired professional cricket player and professional cricket umpire, and the National Umpiring Manager for New Zealand cricket. He was one of the umpires in the 1992 Cricket World Cup final between England and Pakistan. Aldridge was awarded the Queen's Service Medal in the 2012 New Year Honours, for services to cricket administration.
    8.67
    3 votes
    33

    Enamul Haque

    Enamul Haque (also Haq) (Bengali: এনামুল হক) (born February 27, 1966, in Comilla, Chittagong) is a former Bangladeshi cricketer who played in 10 Tests and 29 ODIs from 1990 to 2003. After retiring from competitive cricket he became an umpire made his first appearance in an ODI between Bangladesh and Zimbabwe on December 3, 2006. He is the first Bangladeshi Test-match cricketer to umpire in international cricket. Enamul Haque, commonly known as Moni, first came into prominence in the 1988–89 season, as he helped Bangladesh Biman cricket team to the Dhaka league title. He was selected for the national side next season, and remained an integral part of the team for more than a decade. Though he failed to impress at the highest level, he was lot more successful against the lesser lights. Though he was an all-rounder, he was mostly successful with his bowling in ICC Trophy cricket. In total, he took 35 wickets in 3 ICC Trophy tournaments, in 1990,94 & in 97. His most memorable match was the 2nd round encounter against Denmark in the 1990 ICC Trophy. batting first the Danes reached 233/9 from their 60 overs. In reply, the Chittagong trio Nurul Abedin (85), Akram Khan 50, & Minhajul
    10.00
    2 votes
    34

    Frank Field

    Frank Field (also Frank Ernest Field or Ernest Frank Field; September 23, 1874, Weethley, Warwickshire, England – August 25, 1934, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England) was a Warwickshire fast bowler who is best remembered for sharing with Frank Foster the bowling honours in Warwickshire's flukish County Championship triumph in the abnormally dry summer of 1911 - the only time any county outside the "Big Six" (Yorkshire, Lancashire, Nottinghamshire, Middlesex, Kent and Surrey) won between 1890 and 1935. However, aside from this triumph, Field had a long career before Foster even played for Warwickshire. Indeed, if Foster's career was tragic, Field's was in many ways more so, for a succession of serious accidents hampered him at exactly the time he would otherwise have become a top-class fast bowler and a candidate for representative honours. Field first played for Warwickshire in 1897, but it was only the following year with a tireless 8 for 144 in an innings of 509 against Gloucestershire that he was seen as possibly a major acquisition for the county. Despite occasional setbacks, he advanced rapidly to be Warwickshire's leading bowler in the dry summer of 1899 with 73 wickets for
    10.00
    2 votes
    35

    K. T. Francis

    K. T. Francis, full name Kandiah Thirugnansampandapillai Francis (born October 15, 1939, Kegalle, Sri Lanka), is a former cricket umpire. Francis officiated in 25 Tests and 56 One Day Internationals between 1982 and 1999, mostly in his own country. He has since retired. Francis' first Test as umpire was the one-off Test between Sri Lanka and England in February 1982; this was the first recognised Test match played by Sri Lanka. Three days earlier, Francis made his debut as a One Day International umpire, in a match that also featured the debut of future Sri Lankan cricket captain Arjuna Ranatunga. K. T. Francis is married and has two children.
    6.40
    5 votes
    36

    Arthur Fagg

    Arthur Edward Fagg (18 June 1915, Chartham, Kent – 13 September 1977, Tunbridge Wells, Kent) was an English cricketer, who played for Kent and England. A right-handed opening batsman who first played for Kent at the age of 17, Fagg was a Test match player at 21 against India in 1936. But he caught rheumatic fever on the tour of Australia the following winter, and missed the whole of the 1937 season. The evidence was strong in 1938 that Fagg was back to his best form. He set a first-class world record playing for Kent against Essex at Colchester, scoring 244 in the first innings and an undefeated 202 in the second innings in a drawn match, becoming the only batsman in first-class cricket history to score double centuries in both innings of a match. But 1938 was a year of record-breaking, and the young Leonard Hutton cemented his place as England's first choice opener with his 364 against the Australians at The Oval. Fagg played only one more Test, though he remained a consistent scorer in county cricket until the mid 1950s. In all, he scored 58 centuries and more than 25,000 runs. After retirement, he became a well-known cricket umpire, officiating in eighteen Test matches and seven
    7.25
    4 votes
    37

    Arthur Wyeth

    Arthur Edwin Wyeth (3 July 1887 at Melbourne, Victoria – 18 October 1971 at Brisbane, Queensland) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match in 1931 between Australia and the West Indies at the Brisbane Exhibition Ground on 16 January to 20 January 1931. Australia won by an innings with Don Bradman scoring 223, Bill Ponsford a century, and Clarrie Grimmett taking 9 wickets for the match. Wyeth's partner, James Orr, was also standing in his only Test match.
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    Bobby Peel

    Bobby Peel

    Robert "Bobby" Peel (12 February 1857 – 12 August 1941) was a Yorkshire and England cricketer: a left-arm spinner who ranks as one of the finest bowlers of the 1890s. He was also a capable batsman, who once hit 210 not out (out of a record County Championship total of 887 against Warwickshire). He was also first player in Test cricket history to have been dismissed four times in succession without scoring (in 1894/1895). Born at Churwell, near Leeds, Yorkshire, Peel emerged in first-class cricket for Yorkshire in 1882, and quickly established himself as a skillful and accurate left-arm spin bowler with the ability to bowl a fast ball that obtained many wickets. He was considered good enough that, even though he was relatively inexperienced, Alfred Shaw took him to Australia in 1884/1885 where he appeared in all three Tests. He took 21 wickets, including five wickets in the second innings on debut, but played disappointingly in the dry summer of 1885. Despite recovering his form, Peel did not play in the three 1886 Tests, but in 1887/1888 he played superbly at the Sydney Cricket Ground, taking nine wickets for 58 runs and being England's match-winner. In the wet summer of 1888, Peel
    7.25
    4 votes
    39

    George Searcy

    George Henry Graff Searcy (15 January 1855 – 6 January 1927 at Adelaide, South Australia) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England in Adelaide on 11 January to 15 January 1895, standing with 'Dimboola' Jim Phillips. Australia won by a comfortable 382 runs, with Albert Trott taking 8 wickets for 43 runs in an innings and scoring 110 runs without dismissal on debut.
    7.25
    4 votes
    40

    Jack Cowie

    John Cowie OBE (30 March 1912, Auckland – 3 June 1994, Lower Hutt, Wellington) was a New Zealand cricketer who played in nine Tests from 1937 to 1949. His Test opportunities were restricted by New Zealand's limited programme, and his cricket career was interrupted by World War II from 1939 to 1945. Following the 1937 tour of England, Wisden commented: "Had he been an Australian, he might have been termed a wonder of the age." A lower-order right-handed batsman and a fast-medium right-handed bowler, Cowie played first-class cricket for Auckland from the 1932-33 season, appearing regularly in Plunket Shield matches from 1934-35. According to his obituary in Wisden in 1995, he started as a batsman but converted himself into a bowler because the Auckland side had too many batsmen for him to be guaranteed a place. As a bowler, he relied on accuracy and the ability to move the ball after it pitched, and Wisden likened him to a latter-day New Zealand bowler, Richard Hadlee. But his success in domestic cricket was limited until the 1936-37 season, when he took 21 wickets in four first-class matches, and in the match against Wellington at Auckland took five wickets in an innings for the
    7.25
    4 votes
    41

    Ranjan Madugalle

    Ranjan Senerath Madugalle (born April 22, 1959, Kandy) is a former Sri Lankan cricketer who became a match referee in 1993. He was educated at Trinity College, Kandy, and Royal College Colombo. He represented Sri Lanka in international cricket between 1979 and 1988, making his debut in the 1979 ICC Trophy final against Canada. He had the honor of being in the first Sri Lankan Test team in 1982, and top-scored in the first innings with 65 - making a 99-run partnership with Arjuna Ranatunga. Madugalle represented Sri Lanka in 21 test matches and 63 One Day Internationals and also captained Sri Lankan cricket team in two test matches and 13 ODIs. Ranjan Madugalle retired from international cricket in 1988. Subsequently he has become a match referee for the International Cricket Council and currently serves as the chief match referee of the ICC.. He courted controversy by exhibiting bias against Asian teams the most notable of which happened during the Indian tour of Australia in 1999-2000. Madugalle continued as a vital part of the Sri Lankan Test and ODI team, only missing one international game between 1979 and 1984. However, his ODI performances worried the Sri Lankan selectors,
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Ajith C. S. Perera

    Ajith C. S. Perera

    Ajith Chrysantha Stephen Perera, JP, CChem., FRSC (born 29 February 1956), is a Chartered Chemist by Profession, a scholar, a former senior manager in industry, a qualified training instructor, also a former test-match-panel Cricket Umpire, disability rights activist and an accessibility adviser. The international admiration Perera has won and the national recognition he has gained have come through his achievements, acquired both in Sri Lanka and in England in different fields: cricket, analytical chemistry and quality assurance, in all of which he is academically and professionally well qualified and widely experienced. He is the founder and, as of 25 May 2012, holds the honorary position of Chief Executive / Secretary-General of IDIRIYA - (a registered, not-for-profit humanitarian service organisation in Sri Lanka). Almost on the eve of umpiring his first cricket test match in Colombo, Sri Lanka vs New Zealand, a large wayside tree crashed on and straddled his moving car, killing his chauffer and leaving him instantaneously a paraplegic for life. Born to Instructor Commander M. G. S. Perera, former Director of Naval Training, Royal Ceylon Navy and former Senior Staff Captain
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Billy Doctrove

    Billy Doctrove

    Billy Raymond Doctrove (born 3 July 1955, Marigot, Dominica, Windward Islands) is a former international football referee, but is best known as an international cricket umpire. During his time as a referee Doctrove took charge of several international matches, including a World Cup qualifier between Guyana and Grenada in 1996. Despite retiring from international refereeing in 1997 he is still a keen follower of world and English football, supporting Liverpool F.C. and being nicknamed Toshack, after the ex-Liverpool striker. He is also President of the Dominican Football Referees Association, and President of the Windward Islands Cricket Umpires Association. After retiring from football refereeing in 1997 Doctrove was able to concentrate more on his career as a first-class umpire. In April 1998 the West Indies Cricket Board appointed Doctrove to his first One Day International (ODI), the match between West Indies and England at Kingstown, St. Vincent. In that match he stood alongside Steve Bucknor. He was appointed to his first test match, the third test between West Indies and Pakistan at the Antigua Recreation Ground, in May 2000. In 2002 he became a member of the Emirates
    8.33
    3 votes
    44

    John Langridge

    John George Langridge (10 February 1910 – 27 June 1999) was a cricketer who played for Sussex. His obituary in Wisden called him "one of the best English cricketers of the 20th century never to play a Test match". Born into a cricketing family at Newick, north of Lewes, John Langridge followed his elder brother James into the Sussex side in 1928 and stayed there until he retired in 1955. In between, he scored more than 34,000 runs as an opening batsman and made 76 centuries. Only Alan Jones of Glamorgan of non-Test players has scored more runs, and no one who scored this many centuries failed to win international recognition. In addition, Langridge took 784 catches, mostly at slip, including 69 in his last season at the age of 45; only five players have taken more catches in a career or in a season. Langridge became a first-class umpire on retirement and stood in seven Test matches. He was awarded the MBE for services to cricket. He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1950.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    Harry Elliott

    Harry Elliott (2 November 1891 - 2 February 1976) was an English cricketer who kept wicket for Derbyshire from 1920 to 1947 and for England between 1927 and 1934 and was an international Test umpire. Elliot was born at Scarcliffe, Derbyshire and became a miner. He played cricket for his local club at Scarcliffe and later at Shirebrook where Derbyshire bowler Billy Bestwick was playing. In 1913 he obtained a job as a groom at Wiseton Hall in North Nottinghamshire, the home of Sir Joseph Laycock, where he looked after the cricket ground and played for Laycock's team. When World War I broke out he joined the artillery battery Laycock commanded, the 1st Notts RHA, and was sent to Egypt. After the war Archibald White was playing at Wiseton and was so impressed with Elliott that he sought to recruit him for Yorkshire. However the rule of birthplace prevented this, so he went instead to his native Derbyshire. Elliott played his first first-class match for Derbyshire against Essex in June 1920. He quickly took over as wicketkeeper from George Beet. He continued playing for Derbyshire every year until 1939, and was a member of the team when the club won the County Championship in 1936. He
    9.50
    2 votes
    46

    Richard Benjamin Terry

    Richard Benjamin Terry (dates unknown) umpired the historic first Test match played between Australia and England in Melbourne on 15 March to 19 March 1877. His colleague was Curtis Reid. He also umpired in the second Test match, played two weeks later in Melbourne, partnered by Sam Cosstick. As a player, Terry played three matches for Victoria from 1877 to 1881. He scored 60 runs at an average of 12 with a top score of 30, and took 6 wickets at an average of 15.66, with best figures of 3 for 23.
    9.50
    2 votes
    47

    Andrew Barlow

    Andrew Nicholas Barlow (3 July 1899 – 13 July 1961) was a cricket Test match umpire. Barlow was born at Newport, Victoria. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in 1916 at the age of 17 years and 2 months. His Service number was 6726. Barlow umpired eleven Test matches between 1931 and 1951. His first match, at the age of 31, was between Australia and the West Indies at the Melbourne on 13 February to 14 January 1931, Australia taking just two days to win by an innings, with Don Bradman scoring 152 and Bert Ironmonger taking 11 wickets. Barlow's partner in this match, Joseph Richards, was standing in his only Test match. Barlow did not umpire another Test match until the series against India in the 1947/48 season, when he stood in four Test matches. He stood in four matches against Freddie Brown's English team in 1950/51. He finished his career as he began it, in a match against the West Indies, at Sydney on 30 November to 5 December 1951. He died at Melbourne, Victoria.
    7.00
    4 votes
    48

    Arthur Jenkins

    Arthur George Jenkins (1886 – 19 May 1963 at Adelaide) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match, the first between Australia and the West Indies, played at Adelaide on 12 December to 16 December 1930. The match was comfortably won by Australia by 10 wickets. Jenkins' colleague was George Hele.
    7.00
    4 votes
    49

    Jim Phillips

    James Phillips (1 September 1860, Pleasant Creek, now Stawell, Victoria – 21 April 1930 at Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada) was a Victorian First-class cricketer and Test match umpire. He did not play his first first-class match until 1885/86, and altogether played 124 matches for Canterbury, Middlesex and Victoria between 1885/86 and 1898/99 as a right-hand batsman and right-arm medium bowler. He scored 1827 runs at an average of 12.59 with a highest score of 110 not out, and took 355 wickets at an average of 20.00 with best figures of 8 for 69. Seven times he took 10 or more wickets in a match. He also took 50 catches. As a player and umpire he travelled between Australia and England, following the cricket seasons. Middlesex valued his contribution so highly that he was given a benefit match, Australia v. Middlesex, in 1899. He was also able to help Australian players, such as Albert Trott find jobs and play cricket in England. For a while he coached in Christchurch, New Zealand and played first-class cricket for Canterbury. Phillips umpired a total of 29 Test matches. His first match was between Australia and England in Melbourne on 21 March 1885 to 25 March 1885, comfortably
    7.00
    4 votes
    50

    Charlie Elliott

    Charles Standish 'Charlie' Elliott MBE (24 April 1912 - 1 January 2004) was an English footballer, a first-class cricketer who played for Derbyshire between 1932 and 1953 and an international cricket umpire. Elliott was born in Bolsover, Derbyshire. In the 1931-1932 season, he played football for Coventry City, where he was a capable defender, but did not play again for them for several years. In the summer of 1932 he began his cricketing career at Derbyshire where he was an opening batsman and fine close fielder. Elliott's first spell for Derbyshire lasted from 1932 to 1937 and he played for the side that won the County Championship in 1936. Because of a financial crisis at the club he was released and became a professional for Stourbridge. At the start of the Second World War he joined the Coventry Fire Brigade, and was on the roof of Coventry Cathedral during the blitz which destroyed it. After the war, he played again for Derbyshire and he scored 1,000 runs in six consecutive seasons from 1947 to 1952. In total he played 468 innings in 275 matches with nine centuries and an average of 27.25. His best score was 215 against Nottinghamshire in 1947, when he shared a stand of 349
    8.00
    3 votes
    51

    Frank Hearne

    Frank Hearne (23 November 1858 in Ealing, England – 14 July 1949 in Cape Town, South Africa) was a cricketer and a member of the Hearne family of cricketers. One of the few men to play Test cricket for more than one country, he played for both England and South Africa. At Newlands Cricket Ground , Cape Town, in March 1892, he made his debut for South Africa having already appeared twice for his native England. In the one-off Test match he faced his brothers Alec and George who made their only appearances for England. He also umpired in 6 Tests. He played for Kent County Cricket Club from 1879 to 1889.
    8.00
    3 votes
    52

    John Hampshire

    John Harry Hampshire (born 10 February 1941, Thurnscoe (near Barnsley, Yorkshire) better known as Jack Hampshire, is a former English cricketer, who played eight Tests and three ODIs for England between 1969 and 1975. He played first-class cricket for Yorkshire from 1961 to 1981, and for Derbyshire from 1982 to 1984. Overseas, he was a successful captain of Tasmania in the period before the state was included in the Sheffield Shield. Cricket writer, Colin Bateman, remarked, "Hampshire thrilled English cricket supporters when he scored a century at Lord's on his Test debut - a unique achievement for an England player. An attractive middle-order stroke-player, Hampshire looked one for the future but he was dropped after one more match". Hampshire made his debut for his native Yorkshire in 1961, where he had a twenty year career with the club. Hampshire was a surprise choice for the 1969 Test side having made only fourteen centuries in eight seasons. On his debut against the West Indies at Lord's, he made a dashing 107 and he appeared set for a glittering Test career. He was the first Englishman to score a Test hundred on debut at Lord's. Strangely, he was dropped after the next
    8.00
    3 votes
    53

    Asad Rauf

    Asad Rauf, (Urdu, Punjabi: اسدرؤف, born 12 May 1956) in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan, was a first class cricketer and is now a member of the Emirates ICC Elite Umpire Panel. His career as a first-class cricket player lasted from 1977/78 to 1991/92. His most successful season was 1986/87 when he made 672 first-class runs at an average of 35.36 including one century and five fifties, but he fell into poor form after this. Rauf became a first-class umpire in 1998. By February 2000 the Pakistan Cricket Board appointed him to his first One Day International (ODI), the match between Pakistan and Sri Lanka at Gujranwala, Pakistan, on 16 February 2000. In 2004, with the promotion of Aleem Dar to the ICC Elite Umpire Panel, Rauf was included in the International Panel of Umpires for the first time. In January 2005 the ICC appointed him to his first test match, the fixture between Bangladesh and Zimbabwe at Chittagong (MAA). In December 2005 stood in the Boxing Day Test at the MCG between Australia and South Africa. In April 2006 Rauf's umpiring was rewarded with a promotion to the Emirates Elite Panel of ICC Umpires. In September 2012 Rauf umpired the ICC World Twenty20 group stage match
    9.00
    2 votes
    54

    Cammie Smith

    Cameron Wilberforce Smith (born July 29, 1933, Upper Dayrells Road, Saint Michael, Barbados) is a former West Indian cricketer who played in five Tests from 1960 to 1962. Smith also umpired 42 Tests and 118 ODIs.
    9.00
    2 votes
    55

    Rob Bailey

    Rob Bailey (born Robert John Bailey, 28 October 1963, Biddulph, Staffordshire) is a former English cricketer who played in 4 Tests and 4 ODIs from 1985 to 1990. A courageous middle order batsman with a short backlift, Bailey hit the ball extremely hard, with shots all around the ground. Accompanied by this was his ability in the field, and as a part-time off spinner. He took the now prize wicket of Kevin Pietersen for nought, in a County Championship game against Nottinghamshire, at Derby in 2001. He made his first-class debut for Northamptonshire in 1982 before being selected to represent England - his debut match against the formidable West Indies attack of 1988, leading to his selection for the winter tour to India, a trip that was cancelled due to political reasons - he and several members of the England squad had sporting links to South Africa. He had specifically passed up the opportunity to participate in the England 1989 Rebel Tour to South Africa. His form at the beginning of the 1989 season can only be considered as poor, returning in time for his selection to the 1989–90 West Indies tour. He was given his first game of the series in the third Test where he bagged a pair.
    9.00
    2 votes
    56

    Ron Aspinall

    Ronald Aspinall (26 October 1918 – 16 August 1999) was an English former cricketer, who played for Yorkshire, and a cricket umpire. Aspinall was born in Almondbury, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. A useful lower order right-handed batsman and a fast-medium right arm bowler, Aspinall was twenty seven before he made his first-class cricket debut in 1946, and four years later his career was over, ended by Achilles' tendon injury. His most successful game came in 1947 against Northamptonshire, when he took 8 for 42 and then 6 for 23 to dismiss the home team for 146 and 118 to hand Yorkshire victory by 351 runs. In 1948, he played fairly regularly as the successor to Bill Bowes, opening the Yorkshire bowling with Alec Coxon. Against Don Bradman's 'Invincibles' in the so-called 'Sixth Test' and he dismissed Bradman in Australia's second innings, caught by Len Hutton for 86, as well as Sid Barnes, Doug Ring, Ernie Toshack and Keith Miller. In the season before his first-class career ended, 1949, he headed the national bowling averages in England, by taking 30 wickets in just four matches, at an average of less than 10 runs per wicket, before injury finished his season in May. After leaving
    9.00
    2 votes
    57

    Terry Prue

    Terry Arthur Prue, (born 11 December 1948), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Western Australia. He umpired 9 Test matches between 1988 and 1994. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Perth on 2 December to 6 December 1988, won by the West Indies by 169 runs, in spite of Merv Hughes taking 5/130 and 8/87, including a hat-trick spread over two innings and three overs. Prue’s partner was Robin Bailhache, standing in his final Test match. Prue’s last Test match was between Australia and South Africa at Adelaide on 28 January to 1 February 1994, won by Australia by 191 runs with a century to Steve Waugh and 7 wickets to Craig McDermott. Prue’s colleague was Darrell Hair. Prue umpired 39 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1988 and 1999. Altogether, he umpired 75 first-class matches in his career between 1983 and 2000.
    9.00
    2 votes
    58

    Tony Hill

    Anthony Lloyd Hill (born June 26, 1951, Auckland), commonly known as Tony Hill, is an international cricket umpire from New Zealand. He is currently a member of the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires. His first international fixture was an ODI between New Zealand and Zimbabwe at Napier in March 1998, and he stood in his first test match in December 2001 between New Zealand and Bangladesh at Hamilton. During his time on the International Panel the ICC has appointed Hill to matches away from New Zealand as a neutral umpire (to support the Elite Panel), and particular highlights are the third test between South Africa and Australia at Johannesburg in March 2006, as well as officiating on-field in three Group A matches at the 2007 Cricket World Cup in St. Kitts. Hill was appointed to the ICC Elite Panel of umpires in 2009. As of the 3 August 2010:
    9.00
    2 votes
    59

    George Harrison

    George Puckrin Harrison (11 February 1862 – 14 September 1940) was an English first-class cricketer, who played fifty nine first-class matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1883 and 1892. He also appeared in first-class cricket for the Players (1883), T Emmett's XI (1883), Lord Sheffield's XI (1884), an England XI (1884) and L Hall's Yorkshire XI (1891). Born in Scarborough, Yorkshire, England, Harrison was a right arm fast medium bowler, who took 249 wickets at 15.70, with a best of 7 for 43 against Lancashire in a Roses match. He took 5 wickets in an innings fourteen times and 10 wickets in a match on three occasions, against Surrey, Kent and the MCC. Harrison was a right-handed tail ender, scoring 484 runs at 6.72, with a top score of 28 against Surrey at Bramall Lane in 1885, and he took 39 catches. He began his career at Lord's when he dismissed A. N. Hornby in the first innings, and bowled out Lord Harris for 2 in the second innings. In the 1883 season, Harrison took 100 wickets at 13.26 each. Harrison was a success in League cricket and for Bowling Old Lane C.C. from 1883 to 1898, he took 878 wickets at nine each, and in three seasons for Idle C.C. took 215
    7.67
    3 votes
    60

    Archie Fowler

    Archibald John Burgess Fowler (April 1, 1891 - May 7, 1977) was an English cricketer. Archie Fowler represented Middlesex County Cricket Club in 26 first-class matches between 1921 and 1930 and received his County Cap. He never quite established himself, but did well in 1924, when he took 5/29 versus a strong Lancashire team. He scored 133 runs at an average of 7.00, with a highest score of 21. He took 14 catches and 41 wickets at an average of 26.75, with a personal best of 5/29. He succeeded George Fenner as the County Coach at Middlesex during the mid 1930s and is remembered as an outstanding coach. He constantly umpired at Lord's and finally acted as 1st XI Scorer, following the retirement of Patsy Hendren in 1960, before being succeeded by Jim Alldis. His connection with Lord's lasted for over fifty years.
    10.00
    1 votes
    61

    Barrie Meyer

    Barrie John Meyer (born 21 August 1932) in Bournemouth is a former English footballer and cricketer, and later a cricket umpire. Meyer played football for Bristol Rovers in 139 league matches, scoring 60 goals. He also played for Plymouth Argyle, Newport County, Bristol City and Hereford United. In the summer, he worked as a member of the groundstaff at Gloucestershire CCC. A good wicket-keeper, he played for Gloucestershire CCC in 406 first-class cricket matches from 1957 to 1971. He took 707 catches and 119 stumpings, but was a relatively poor batsman - his career first-class batting average is only 14.19, with a highest score of 63. When he retired, he became a cricket umpire. He umpired 26 Tests in England from 1978 to 1993, including the 1981 Ashes Test at Headingley. He also umpired 23 One Day Internationals from 1977 to 1993, including the Cricket World Cup finals at Lord's in 1979 and 1983. In 2006, he published an autobiography, Getting It Right, co-authored with Andrew Hignell. Meyer's son Adrian was also a footballer, making 144 appearances for Scarborough, many in the Football League, before injury curtailed his career.
    10.00
    1 votes
    62
    Fred Root

    Fred Root

    Charles Frederick (Fred) Root (16 April 1890 – 20 January 1954) was an English cricketer who played for England in 1926 and for Derbyshire between 1910 to 1920 and for Worcestershire between 1921 and 1932. Root was born in Somercotes, Derbyshire and initially served on ground staff of Leicestershire before beginning his first-class career for Derbyshire, making his debut in the 1910 season. He played for five seasons for Derbyshire before cricket was suspended in England because of World War I, doing very little apart from a couple of promising performances in 1913. During the war, Root was hit in the chest while serving as a dispatch rider, but recovered and resumed his cricketing career after the war. Root moved to Worcestershire in 1921 after two seasons in league cricket. After a season and a half when he failed to establish himself as an orthodox fast-medium bowler, Root became an exponent of the leg theory style of bowling, and achieved great success with it. His ability to swing the ball in and make it gain pace off the ground made him very difficult on anything like a fiery pitch, whilst his powerful physique and consequent stamina made Root respected even on pitches giving
    10.00
    1 votes
    63

    Henry Rawlinson

    Henry Rawlinson (dates unknown) was a Test match umpire. He officiated in one match between Australia and England in Sydney on 28 January to 31 January 1887, won by England by 13 runs after scoring a paltry 45 runs in their first innings. His colleague was Charles Bannerman, the scorer of the first Test century in 1877, standing in the first of his 12 matches as umpire. Note: The personal details given above are from the CricInfo website. Wisden Australia, 2004-05 (p. 237) lists "Rawlinson, Elisha Barker, Test umpire, b. Apr. 10, 1837. d. Feb. 17, 1892".
    10.00
    1 votes
    64

    Hugo Yarnold

    Henry Yarnold, known as Hugo, who was born at Worcester on 6 July 1917 and died in a road accident at Leamington Spa on 13 August 1974, was an English first-class cricketer who became a Test cricket umpire. Yarnold was a diminutive lower-order right-handed batsman and a wicketkeeper who played for Worcestershire. He made his first-class debut in an end-of-season match in the 1938 season as the deputy for Syd Buller, who would later be an umpiring colleague. He was then Buller's replacement for two months of the 1939 season after Buller was seriously injured in the car crash that took the life of opening batsman Charlie Bull during the Whitsun match with Essex. Returning to Worcestershire after the Second World War, Yarnold again understudied Buller, who played in 25 of the county's 27 first-class matches. But Yarnold himself played in 17 games, mainly as a batsman. Early in the season, in the match against Sussex at Hove, he made 64 in the first innings, his first score of more than 50. There were, however, to be only six other scores of more than 50 in his entire career and his season's batting average for 1946, at 15.45 runs per innings, was higher than he achieved in any other
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    Julius Caesar

    Julius Caesar

    Julius Caesar (Godalming, Surrey, 25 March 1830 – 6 March 1878) was a Surrey cricketer who played 194 first-class cricket matches between 1849 and 1867. Julius Caesar was born to Benjamin Caesar, an English professional cricketer, and his wife Anne (née Bowler). Benjamin and Anne had seven children. George, Richard, Lawrence William, Ann, Benjamin, Frederick Bowler and finally Julius. He was brought up in Godalming, a town with approximately 4,000 inhabitants, in Surrey, England. He was almost certainly educated in one of the two schools in Godalming at the time, and could read and write with a legible hand. Benjamin himself played cricket, and his brother Fred later played first-class cricket too. Caesar's cricketing skills first attracted local press attention when he was 16. On 7 July 1846 the Surrey Gazette wrote: He found an influential friend in the Marshall family, proprietors of a local timber merchants. Henry Marshall was the first mayor of Godalming in 1836. He was also a prominent member of Surrey County Cricket Club, which was formed in 1845, and president of Surrey club from 1856 to 1867. In 1848 Caesar first played at the Oval, for Goldalming cricket club against
    10.00
    1 votes
    66

    Les Townsend

    Leslie Hyde Townsend (born 4 October 1914 at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; died 30 January 1986) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England at Melbourne on 13 February to 18 February 1959, won by Australia by 9 wickets with a century to Colin McDonald and 5 wickets each to Alan Davidson and Richie Benaud. Townsend’s partner in this match was Ron Wright.
    10.00
    1 votes
    67

    Mohammad Aslam

    Mohammad Aslam Khokhar (5 January 1920 – 22 January 2011) was a Pakistani cricketer who played in one Test in 1954. He played in 45 first class matches and in doing so scored the first ever century in first class cricket in Pakistan. He also umpired 3 Tests in the 1970s. He was born in Lahore, Punjab and died in a Lahore hospital after a prolonged illness, on 22 January 2011. Before his death, he was Pakistan's oldest surviving Test cricketer.
    10.00
    1 votes
    68

    Peter Willey

    Peter Willey (born 6 December 1949, Sedgefield, County Durham) is a former English cricketer, who played as a right-handed batsman and right-arm offbreak bowler. In and out of the England team, he interrupted his international career for three years by taking part in the first of the England players' South African rebel tours in 1982. After his playing career ended, he became a Test umpire. Although widely respected, he got tired of the constant travelling, and decided to leave the international panel to spend more time with his family. However, as of the 2011 season he remains an umpire on the English first class list. His son David Willey has gone on to be a professional cricketer, making a half century on his debut for Northamptonshire County Cricket Club against Leicestershire County Cricket Club. As his career developed, Willey became a leading exponent of the "open stance" style of batting, where the batsman looks squarely at the bowler, rather than the traditional "side-on" style, looking past his own shoulder at the bowler. Advocates of the MCC Coaching manual derided the stance for its "ugliness", and asserted technical reasons why its exponents were doomed to fail, but
    10.00
    1 votes
    69

    Sailor Young

    Harding Isaac "Sailor" Young (February 5, 1876, Leyton, Essex – December 12, 1964, Rochford, Essex) was a cricketer who played for Essex and England. Young was a left-arm medium-pace bowler and a capable lower-order batsman. His bowling achieved considerable turn off the wicket, and was described in Wisden as having "a deceptive curl". Young's cricketing successes in minor matches led Essex to buy him out of the Royal Navy. He played a few games in 1898, but came to prominence early the following year, when he took eleven wickets for 74 runs against a powerful Australian touring side and gave Essex a surprising victory by 126 runs. The Times, describing his bowling in the second innings when he took seven for 32, said "Young's bowling could not be played", that he "came off the pitch at a great pace" and "turned six inches with his arm".. He continued to bowl so well in a very dry summer of prolific run scoring that by July he was regarded by some as "the best hard wicket bowler at England's disposal". Sailor Young was picked for two Test matches that season against the and took six wickets in each of them, finishing at the top of the England averages. However, as a result of him
    10.00
    1 votes
    70

    Col Timmins

    Colin Douglas Timmins, (born 2 April 1947 in Brisbane, Queensland), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Queensland. He umpired 4 Test matches between 1989 and 1993. His first match was between Australia and Sri Lanka at Brisbane on 8 December to 12 December 1989, a drawn match on which the bat dominated, Tom Moody and Mark Taylor scoring centuries. Timmins' partner was Tony Crafter. Timmins' last Test match was between Australia and the West Indies at Perth on 30 January to 1 February 1993, won before lunch on the third day by the visitors by an innings and 25 runs. Australia's batting was inept against Curtly Ambrose (7/25 in the first innings) and Ian Bishop (6/40 in the second). Timmins' partner was Steve Randell. Timmins umpired 20 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1988 and 1995. He umpired one women's Test match in 1985. Altogether, he umpired 67 first-class matches in his career between 1981 and 1995.
    6.50
    4 votes
    71

    David Denton

    David Denton (4 July 1874 – 16 February 1950) was an English first-class cricketer. An attacking batsman, he had a long career with Yorkshire and played eleven Tests for England. His nickname of 'Lucky' came from his habit of surviving the numerous chances, that his attacking batting style naturally created for the opposition. He was a fine deep fielder, and was said to be an excellent judge of a high catch, but did little bowling: his only really significant contribution with the ball came in 1896, when he took 5-42 against South of England. He also had one first-class stumping to his name, against Cambridge University in 1905. Denton was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire, and showed promise as a teenager, scoring a half-century in a Colts game in 1892. After three friendly (but nevertheless first-class) matches for Yorkshire in 1894, he made his Championship debut for the county in Yorkshire's final game of the season against Somerset, though he did not bat, bowl or take a catch. The following year, he scored useful runs against Cambridge University and also Lancashire, to establish his place in the side. That year he made a thousand runs for the first time, only once thereafter (in
    6.50
    4 votes
    72

    HH Stephenson

    Heathfield Harman "HH" Stephenson (3 May 1833 in Esher, Surrey – 17 December 1896 in Uppingham, Rutland) was a famous English cricketer during the game's roundarm era. Stephenson bowled right-arm fast roundarm, batted right-handed and was an occasional wicket-keeper. His known first-class career spanned the 1853 to 1871 seasons. He took 303 wickets in 256 matches at 16.37 with a best analysis of 8/28. He had 17 5wI and 4 10wM. He scored 7360 runs at 17.90 with a highest score of 119, making 3 centuries. He took 152 catches and made 25 stumpings. HH Stephenson was the first cricketer to be awarded a hat for taking three wickets in consecutive balls, the origin of the hat-trick. He performed the feat for the All-England Eleven against the twenty-two of Hallam at the Hyde Park ground, Sheffield in 1858. A collection was held for Stephenson (as was customary for outstanding feats by professionals) and he was presented with a cap or hat bought with the proceeds. At the end of the 1859 English cricket season, Stephenson was one of the 12 players who took part in cricket's first-ever overseas tour when an England cricket team led by George Parr visited North America. In the 1861-62
    6.50
    4 votes
    73

    Philip Argall

    Philip Argall (27 February 1855 at Adelaide, South Australia – 3 April 1912 at Adelaide, South Australia) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired seven Test matches between Australia and England. His first match, at Adelaide on 17 January to 23 January 1902 was a close affair, eventually won by Australia who successfully chased 314 in the fourth innings, and notable for Clem Hill's dismissal in the 90s in both innings. In all his matches, Argall was partnered by Bob Crockett who had a high opinion of him. Argall’s last match was at Melbourne on 7 February to 11 February 1908, a match won comfortably by Australia with Warwick Armstrong scoring a century and Jack Saunders taking 9 wickets for the match. The name Argall is of Cornish origin.
    6.50
    4 votes
    74

    Billy Wade

    Walter Wareham 'Billy' Wade (born 18 June 1914 in Durban, Natal, died 31 May 2003 in Durban, Natal) was a South African cricketer who played in 11 Tests between 1938 and 1950. His brother, Herby, also played Test cricket for South Africa.
    5.60
    5 votes
    75

    George Burton

    George Burton (1 May 1851 Hampstead, London - 7 May 1930 Covent Garden, Westminster, London) was an English cricketer. He began in North London club cricket, before appearing with the Middlesex Colts in 1875. He made his first-class debut for Middlesex as a right-handed batsman and round arm right-arm slow bowler in 1881 and played in 111 matches until 1893. From 1883 until 1904 he was a member of the M.C.C. groundstaff and appeared in several matches between 1883 and 1892. He took 608 wickets at an average of 17.18, with a personal best of 10/59. He was awarded two benefit matches at Lord's in 1892 and 1905. He acted as the official scorer of Middlesex CCC for a number of years and also stood as a first-class umpire between 1898 and 1899. By occupation he was a master coachsmith. His son Frederick Alfred (1885-1978) also played professional cricket for Hertfordshire and M.C.C. and married a daughter of Herbert Hearne.
    8.50
    2 votes
    76

    Ian Robinson

    Ian David Robinson (born March 11, 1947), in Oxford, England, was a Zimbabwean cricket umpire who officiated in 28 Test Matches and 90 One Day Internationals. He had made his umpiring debut in Zimbabwe's inaugural Test, against India at Harare in 1992. He has not made an appearance as an umpire since he was sacked by the Zimbabwe Cricket Union in 2004, reportedly without being told why.
    8.50
    2 votes
    77

    John Scott

    John Drake (Jack) Scott (31 January 1888 – 7 April 1964) was an Australian cricketer and Test match umpire. Scott played as a right-arm fast bowler and was also a useful lower-order right-handed batsman. He was the first man to dismiss Don Bradman in first-class cricket, in December 1927. Scott went on to umpire fifty games, including ten Ashes tests. Born in Sydney, Scott's first-class playing career ran for two decades, from the 1908-09 to the 1928-29 Australian seasons. During this time he played 59 matches. The bulk of his career was spent with New South Wales, but he moved to South Australia for the 1925-26 season. Scott's best bowling figures were 6-48 against Victoria, taken in the 1909-10. The 1913-14 season saw him make his only century, exactly 100 against Queensland. After his retirement from playing, Scott stood as a first-class umpire on more than 50 occasions, including ten Test matches between 1936 and 1947. His first match was between Australia and England at the Brisbane Cricket Ground on 4 December to 9 December 1936, a match convincingly won by the visitors. Scott's partner in that match was George Borwick. Scott and Borwick went on to stand in another nine Ashes
    8.50
    2 votes
    78

    Norman Townsend

    Norman E. Townsend (born 24 October 1924) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match between Australia and Pakistan at Adelaide on 22 December to 27 December 1972, won by Australia by an innings with Ian Chappell scoring 196, Rod Marsh becoming the first Australian wicket-keeper to score a century, and Ashley Mallett taking 8/59 in Pakistan’s second innings. Townsend’s partner in this match was Max O’Connell. In the previous season, 1971/72, a scheduled tour of Australia by South Africa had been cancelled following political and moral protests against the apartheid policies of the South African government. In its place a ‘World Team’ visited Australia and played a series of Test standard, although never officially recognised. Townsend stood in one of these matches, in Perth, and witnessed the young tearaway bowler Dennis Lillee take 8/29 and 4/63 to help Australia to an innings win against a powerful batting line-up.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79

    Shakoor Rana

    Shakoor Rana (April 3, 1936 – April 9, 2001) was a Pakistani cricketer and umpire Shakoor Rana had an undistinguished playing career, making only 11 first class appearances and accumulating just 226 runs and 12 wickets. He was overshadowed by his brothers Shafqat Rana and Azmat Rana who both represented Pakistan at test level. Shakoor Rana became much more notable - not always for the right reasons - for his umpiring than his playing career. He made his international debut as an umpire in 1974 at Lahore, the city that had become his hometown. The match was between Pakistan and the West Indies. His career continued until his last match between Pakistan and New Zealand in 1996 also at Lahore. He stood in 18 test matches and 22 One Day International. In one of the most controversial incidents in cricketing history, Shakoor Rana notably came face-to-face with Mike Gatting in the finger-wagging incident that stopped the Faislabad test in 1987. The image of the English cricket captain and an international umpire shouting at each other with fingers waved in the other's face was a shocking one for the image of the game. The incident in question occurred on the second day of the test as
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Billy Barnes

    William Barnes (27 May 1852 in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, England – 24 March 1899 in Mansfield Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire, England) was a professional cricketer who played for Nottinghamshire between 1875 and 1894 and England between 1880 and 1890. In 1890 he was named as one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year. Barnes also toured Australia three times and North America once. Barnes was on the groundstaff at Lord's between 1895 and 1898 and umpired as required. He was landlord of the Angel Inn, Mansfield Woodhouse in the off-season. It is there that he died in March 1899. A little-known fact about him is that he had no teeth. He wife was named Eliza. Although he played cricket professionally, this was only a summer occupation, and in the 1881 Census he listed his profession as a cotton weaver. His brother, Thomas, and nephew, James Barnes, both played first-class cricket.
    7.33
    3 votes
    81

    Curtis Reid

    Curtis Alexander Reid (16 July 1836 at Inverary Park, New South Wales – 1 July 1886 at Hawthorn, Victoria) umpired the historic first Test match played between Australia and England in Melbourne on 15 March to 19 March 1877. His colleague was Richard Terry. As a player, Reid was a left-hand batsman and right-arm bowler who played three matches for Victoria from 1869 to 1871. He took 16 wickets at an average of 10.87, with best figures of 6 for 5. Less successful with the bat, he scored 12 runs in 5 innings. According to Moyes, Reid was the first paid secretary of the Melbourne Cricket Club, appointed in 1877–78. Moyes, A. G., Australian Cricket: A History, Sydney, Angus & Robertson, 1959, p. 35.
    7.33
    3 votes
    82

    John Payne

    John William Payne (1844 – 12 May 1928 at Glebe Point New South Wales) was a Test match umpire. He officiated in one match between Australia and England in Sydney on 20 February 1885 to 24 February 1885, won by Australia by only six runs thanks to an 80 run tenth wicket partnership, and a 10 wicket bag by Fred Spofforth. Payne's colleague was Ted Elliott. Payne had played for the XXII of New South Wales against the visiting English team under George Parr in 1863/64.
    7.33
    3 votes
    83

    Sam Cosstick

    Samuel Cosstick (1 January 1836 – 8 April 1896) was an important figure in developing cricket in Victoria in its formative years. Cosstick was born at Croydon, Surrey, England. He was attracted to Victoria by the gold fever of the early 1850s and joined the Melbourne Cricket Club on arrival. There he was employed as a ground bowler, bowling in the nets to the members for hours at a time for a salary of £150 a year. Cosstick was a right-hand batsman and right-arm medium-fast roundarm bowler. He played 18 matches for Victoria from 1860 to 1876. As a batsman he scored 315 runs at an average of 9.84 with a highest score of 36. He took 106 wickets at an average of 9.41, with best figures of 9 for 61. He took five wickets in an innings 11 times, and ten wickets in a match on 5 occasions. He also took 14 catches. In 1869 Cosstick took 6 wickets for 1 run against Tasmania. In the match between Eighteen of Victoria and the All-England Eleven led by H. H. Stephenson played at Melbourne in January 1862 – the first international match played in Australia – Cosstick made 8 and 11, and took 1 wicket for 31 runs for a team that was decisively beaten by an innings in spite of its advantage in
    7.33
    3 votes
    84

    Emmott Robinson

    Emmott Robinson (16 November 1883 – 17 November 1969) was an English first-class cricketer, who played for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1919 to 1931. He was awarded his county cap in 1920. Robinson was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm fast-medium pace. Robinson was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, England. He is remembered as a distinctive Yorkshire character with a dry sense of humour and a solid sense of purpose. Sir Neville Cardus often wrote about him with great affection in his newspaper articles, frequently referring to him as "the old Emmott". This was not an unfair description for Robinson did not make his first-class debut until the 1919 season, when cricket resumed in England after World War I. Robinson was aged 35 by then and yet he continued playing until 1931, when he was 47. Cardus imagined that the Lord one day gathered together a heap of Yorkshire clay, and breathed into it, saying, "Emmott Robinson, go on and bowl at the pavilion end for Yorkshire". Robinson himself had a different take on his spawning: "I reckon Mr Cardus invented me". Although he was not himself an outstanding individual player (he never played for England), he was a great team
    6.25
    4 votes
    85

    Frank Smith

    Frank Ernest Smith (May 13, 1872, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk – December 3, 1943, Sedbergh, Yorkshire) was a first-class cricketer who played 68 games, and later umpired. His first-class playing career lasted from 1893 to the 1906/07 season during which time he represented Surrey, London County and Transvaal. He was noted as a slow orthodox left hand bowler. As an umpire, he stood in five Test matches between 1902 and 1910.
    6.25
    4 votes
    86

    Henry Armstrong

    Henry James Armstrong (died 23 March 1945 at Sydney, New South Wales) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match in 1931 between Australia and the West Indies at Sydney on 27 February to 4 March 1931. In this match, in which the West Indies gained their first win over Australia, he was partnered by Walter French.
    6.25
    4 votes
    87

    John Keene

    John William Keene (25 April 1873 - 3 January 1931) was an English cricketer, who played first-class cricket for Surrey, Worcestershire and Scotland around the turn of the 20th century. Almost exclusively a bowler, his highest score in 36 innings was a mere 12. He later stood twice as an umpire: in Scotland's home matches against the Australians and South Africans in 1912. Having already made a number of appearances for Surrey Second XI, Keene's first-class debut for the county came against Warwickshire at Edgbaston in June 1897: he took 3-61 in the first innings, his maiden victim being Walter Quaife. He also played against Sussex at the end of the summer, but despite playing more games for the Second XI in subsequent seasons, those two appearances in 1897 were the sum total of his first-class career for Surrey. Keene reappeared in county cricket in 1903, when he played 13 times for Worcestershire, and collected a season's best aggregate of 36 wickets at an average of 17.88. This included an outstanding performance against Leicestershire at Leicester, when he took 6-22 (his career best) in the first innings and 5-16 in the second; Worcestershire crushed their opponents by an
    6.25
    4 votes
    88

    Lloyd Barker

    Lloyd Hamilton Barker (born 26 September 1943, Barbados) is a cricket umpire who officiated in 29 Tests and 37 One Day Internationals from 1984 to 1997. Barker's first Test as umpire was the Third Test between West Indies and Australia in 1984. He officiated in the first ever Test between Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe at Harare in October 1994 as the neutral umpire; his colleague was Ian Robinson. Barker has since retired.
    6.25
    4 votes
    89

    Patrick McShane

    Patrick George McShane (18 April 1858 at Keilor, Victoria – 11 December 1903 at Kew, Victoria) was an Australian cricketer who played in 3 Test matches between 1885 and 1888. McShane is rare in that he was a Test match umpire before he played in a Test match. He officiated in one match between Australia and England in Sydney on 14 March 1885 to 17 March 1885, won by Australia by eight wickets after George Bonnor scored a century in 100 minutes, the fastest in Test matches to that time. McShane’s colleague was Ted Elliott. He was then selected for the match in Melbourne the following week, making 9 and 12 not out. He was a left-hand bat who played in 36 First-class cricket matches for Victoria between 1880/81 and 1892/93. He scored 1117 runs at an average of 18.31 and highest score of 88. As a left-arm medium pace bowler he took 72 wickets at an average of 25.36 with best figures of 9/45 in an innings. He also took 24 catches. McShane was selected to play in two more Test matches against England in the 1887-88 season, failing with the bat – his last three innings were ducks, and taking only one wicket. Altogether he scored 26 runs at an average of 5.20, and took 1 wicket for 48
    6.25
    4 votes
    90

    Alec Skelding

    Alexander Skelding (September 5, 1886 in Leicester – April 18, 1960 in Westcoates, Leicester) was a first-class cricketer and umpire, who is remembered as one of the great characters in the game. After playing for local clubs, he joined the Leicestershire CCC ground staff as a fast bowler in 1905 but, because he wore spectacles, was not re-engaged at the end of the season. He then joined Kidderminster in the Birmingham League and achieved such success that in 1912 the county re-signed him and he continued with them until he retired in 1929. He made his debut in county cricket in 1912, and played fairly regularly in the two seasons before the first world war. It was in the middle and late 1920s, however, when he was around his 40th year and far past the retirement age of most bowlers of his pace, that he showed remarkable skill as a genuinely fast bowler. In a sometimes bleak era for English fast bowling, he was at times the fastest bowler in the country. His best season was 1927 - his benefit year - when he took 102 wickets, at an average of 20.81. His most outstanding performance was to dismiss eight Nottinghamshire batsmen for 44 runs on a flat batting track at Grace Road in
    7.00
    3 votes
    91

    Bill Whitridge

    William Oswald Whitridge (14 August 1853 – 12 February 1919) was an Australian Test Cricket umpire. Whitridge was also an administrator with the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA). He was born on 14 August 1853 in Kensington, South Australia. He umpired 1 Test match between Australia and England in Adelaide on 24 March to 28 March 1892, standing with George Edward Downs, also in his only Test match. England won easily by an innings and 230 runs – the largest victory margin to that date – in Jack Blackham’s last match. He died on 12 February 1919 in Adelaide, South Australia.
    7.00
    3 votes
    92

    George Hodges

    George James Hodges (dates unknown) was a Test match umpire. He officiated in one match between Australia and England in Melbourne on 21 March 1885 to 25 March 1885, comfortably won by England by an innings and 98 runs. Hodges' colleague was Jim Phillips, standing in the first of his 13 matches in Australia. Some authorities believe that this umpire was John Robart Hodges who played in the first two Test matches.
    7.00
    3 votes
    93

    Jack Collins

    John Richard (Jack) Collins, (born 1 August 1932 in Melbourne, Victoria) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired five Test matches between 1972 and 1975. His first match was between Australia and Pakistan at Melbourne on 29 December 1972 to 3 January 1973, won by Australia by 92 runs with Ian Redpath, Greg Chappell, Paul Sheahan, and John Benaud all scoring centuries. Collins' partner in this match was Peter Enright, also standing in his first Test match. In the preceding season, 1971/72, a scheduled tour of Australia by South Africa was cancelled following political and moral protests against the apartheid policies of the South African government. In its place a 'World Team' visited Australia and played a series of Test standard, although never officially recognised. Collins stood in one of these matches, and witnessed Garfield Sobers score 254, an innings he later regarded as the greatest he ever saw. Collins' last Test match was between Australia and the West Indies at Melbourne on 26 December to 30 December 1975, won by Australia by 8 wickets with centuries to Ian Redpath and debutant Gary Cosier, with Dennis Lillee and Jeff Thomson taking 13 wickets between
    7.00
    3 votes
    94

    James Lillywhite

    James Lillywhite (23 February 1842 – 25 October 1929) was a Test cricketer and an umpire. He was the first ever captain of the English cricket team in a Test match, captaining two Tests against Australia in 1876–77, losing the first, but winning the second. Lillywhite was born in Westhampnett in Sussex, the son of a bricklayer, John Lillywhite. He was the nephew of William Lillywhite, and so cousin to William's sons, James, John, Fred and Harry. He became a professional cricketer, and played first-class cricket for Sussex from 1862 and 1883. He played one final first-class match in 1885. Before the pre-Ashes Test-playing tour to Australia in 1876–77, Lillywhite also joined tours to North America in 1868 in a team led by Edgar Willsher, to Australia in 1873–74 in a team led by W.G. Grace. He also joined three further tours to Australia in teams led by Alfred Shaw, in 1881–82, 1884–85 and 1886–87. He stood as a first-class umpire between 1883 and 1901, including six Test matches. He umpired all four Test matches between Australia and England in the 1881–82 season (being partnered by John Swift in three matches and George Coulthard in the other). He was one of the organisers of Arthur
    7.00
    3 votes
    95

    Lou Rowan

    Louis Patrick “Lou” Rowan (born 2 May 1925 in Murwillumbah, New South Wales), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired 25 Test matches between 1963 and 1971. His first match was between Australian and England at Sydney on 11 January to 15 January 1963, when Alan Davidson took 9/79, and Bobby Simpson took 5/57 and made 91 and 36 not out to beat England. Rowan’s partner was Bill Smyth. Rowan became senior umpire after the retirement of the respected Col Egar. He was a policeman by profession, a Detective Sergeant with the Queensland drug squad, took no nonsense, and was inclined to stand on his authority. Rowan umpired all the Test matches in the acrimonious 1970-71 Ashes series, but was heavily criticised by Ray Illingworth, Geoff Boycott and John Snow. After the series Boycott and Snow were called to a disciplinary hearing at Lords over their behaviour, and Illingworth and Snow never toured again. In six full Tests no Australian batsman was given out lbw in the series, which was the clearest evidence of umpiring bias in the minds of the England players. It must be remembered that at the time umpires had no recourse to slow motion replays and had to make decisions
    7.00
    3 votes
    96

    Tiger Smith

    Ernest James "Tiger" Smith (February 6, 1886, Birmingham, Warwickshire – August 31, 1979, Northfield, Warwickshire) was an English wicket-keeper who played in 11 Tests from 1911/1912 to 1914. In county cricket, he had a much longer career as the successor to Dick Lilley: he played for Warwickshire on a regular basis until 1930. After that, Tiger Smith took to umpiring and became so good in this new role that he umpired several Test matches between 1933 and 1938. Originally an employee with the Cadbury confectionery firm in Birmingham, he was first engaged by Warwickshire as a professional in 1904 but played only irregularly for over half a decade owing to the presence of Lilley behind the stumps. When, after losing his Test place Lilley decided to concentrate on batting, Tiger Smith took his opportunity remarkably well, and developed a remarkable understanding with Frank Foster in his first full season in 1910. The following year Warwickshire achieved an astonishing triumph in the County Championship even though the abnormally dry and hot weather made it an utter fluke based around the pace bowling of Foster and Frank Field. Smith kept wicket superbly - standing up to Foster even
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    Tony Crafter

    Anthony Ronald (Tony) Crafter, (born 5 December 1940 in Mount Barker, South Australia), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired 33 Test matches between 1979 and 1992, the highest number by an Australian umpire to that time. (The previous highest was Bob Crockett’s 32 matches.) His first match was between Australia and England at Sydney on 10 February to 14 February 1979, won by England by 9 wickets, thus retaining The Ashes. Australian captain Graham Yallop scored 121 of the first innings total of 198, but the rest of the batting in both innings failed against Ian Botham, John Emburey and Geoff Miller. Crafter’s partner was fellow debutant Don Weser. Crafter’s last Test match was between Australia and India at Perth on 1 February to 5 February 1992, won by Australia by 300 runs, with David Boon, Dean Jones, and Tom Moody scoring centuries, and Mike Whitney taking 11 wickets. Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar also scored a century. Crafter’s colleague was Terry Prue. Crafter also umpired 84 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1979 and 1992. He umpired two women’s Test matches in 1979 and 1984. He umpired 94 first-class matches in his career between 1974 and
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Gerry Gomez

    Gerry Ethridge Gomez (10 October 1919 – 6 August 1996) was a West Indian cricketer who played 29 Tests for the West Indies between 1939 and 1954, scoring 1,243 runs and taking 58 wickets. He captained in one match for the West Indies when England toured in 1947/8. Gomez was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad. During his career at the domestic level, he was an all-rounder of good standard, playing 126 matches and scoring runs at a batting average of nearly 45, in addition to taking 200 wickets at an average just above 25 with his medium pace. He remained involved with cricket, as manager and administrator, and also served as an umpire in the Test match between West Indies and Australia in Georgetown, Guyana, in April 1965, when the appointed umpire, Cecil Kippins, pulled out on the day before the match. Kippins was ordered to withdraw by the British Guiana umpires' association, as Barbadian umpire Cortez Jordan was appointed as the second umpire, the first time a West Indian umpire had stood in a Test match outside his home territory. This was the first first-class match that Gomez umpired, and his only Test as an umpire. Gomez also played football for Trinidad, and both his father and
    6.00
    4 votes
    99

    Russell Tiffin

    Russell Blair Tiffin (born 4 June 1959) is a current international cricket umpire, and a former Test cricket umpire. He has been a member of the ICC International umpire panel since 1995. He became a member of the ICC Elite Panel in April 2001, but was demoted in February 2004 along with Asoka de Silva and Dave Orchard. He officiated in 38 Test matches, the most for any Zimbabwean umpire. He continues to be a regular umpire in One Day Internationals. He has officiated in over 100 ODI's, making him one of the most capped umpires in world cricket. In December 2007 he stood in his 39th Test match, after a 3 year lay-off from umpiring Tests. Tiffin was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe). His family were farmers in the Tengwe area in the north of the country. Tiffin was educated at Banket Primary School and Prince Edward High School in Harare, where he became a wicketkeeper-batsman. After three years of military service, he played for Mashonaland in the days before Zimbabwean provincial cricket had first-class status, while working as a manager for Castrol Zimbabwe. He became an umpire in 1986, but continued with his day job until May 2002, when he became a full-time
    6.00
    4 votes
    100

    Bill Alley

    William (Bill) Edward Alley (3 February 1919 in Sydney, Australia – 26 November 2004 in Taunton, Somerset, England) was a cricketer who played 400 first-class matches for New South Wales, Somerset and a Commonwealth XI. Whilst in Australia, Alley was also a middleweight boxer, and was undefeated in 28 contests when he was forced to give it up after being hit on the head in the nets at cricket practice. Later he was tipped to play Tests by Don Bradman, the Australian cricket captain, but missed out after fracturing a jaw. This prompted him to leave New South Wales and come to Lancashire, England, playing league cricket there for Colne Cricket Club for five years from 1948, becoming the only player to score 1000 runs in each of five consecutive seasons in the league's history. He moved to play for Blackpool CC in the newly established Northern League where he scored 19 centuries, and joined Somerset CCC when he was 38. He played his last and 350th first-class game for Somerset when he was 49. After stopping playing, he umpired first-class games for 16 years and also stood in 10 Test matches and 9 One Day Internationals as umpire. He so loved the West Country area of England that he
    8.00
    2 votes
    101

    Bill Copson

    Bill Copson (27 April 1908 – 14 September 1971) was an English cricketer who played for Derbyshire between 1932 and 1950, and for England between 1939 and 1947. He took over 1,000 wickets for Derbyshire, and was prominent in their 1936 Championship season. Cricket correspondent, Colin Bateman, noted Copson was, "a flame-haired pace bowler with a temper to match, became a cricketer by accident". William Henry Copson was born in Stonebroom, Derbyshire, and became a miner. Like his fellow bowler, Thomas Mitchell, he was a cricketing product of the 1926 General Strike. He took no interest in cricket until the Strike, when some fellow miners persuaded him to join in cricket on the local recreation ground while they were absent from work. His ability as a bowler of considerable pace and exceptional straightness, who made the batsmen play every ball was clearly revealed. In the next season he was given a place in the Morton Colliery team and, from there, he progressed to Clay Cross club in the Derbyshire League, and his success was such that Derbyshire engaged him in 1932. He made his debut in first-class cricket for Derbyshire against Surrey when he sensationally dismissed Andy Sandham
    8.00
    2 votes
    102

    Emrys Davies

    David Emrys Davies (June 27, 1904 – November 10, 1975) was a Glamorgan cricketer and in his later years a Test cricket umpire. Davies was born in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, Wales. His first class career for Glamorgan lasted for thirty one years, from 1924 till 1954. He was a left-handed top order batsman and a slow left-arm orthodox bowler. Two years after retirement he umpired his first Test match, going on to umpire nine in total. Davies died in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, Wales. At the end of his 621 game career he had scored 26564 runs and 903 wickets as he put himself into the record books at Glamorgan.
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    George Hele

    George Alfred Hele (16 July 1891 at Hindmarsh, South Australia – 28 August 1982 at Preston, Victoria) was a cricket Test match umpire. Hele was born in 1891 to Andrew William Hele and Elizabeth Ann Hele, née Patterson. His father was a cricketer who played for the Bowden Cricket Club as a wicketkeeper before umpiring two first-class cricket matches. In 1918 Hele married Matilda Jane Hann in Adelaide. They had a son Raymond George Hele who later became a first-class umpire, making three generations of first-class cricket umpires. Hele played for the Brompton Methodists as a wicketkeeper. Following his father into umpiring, Hele umpired his first district cricket match in 1918 at the Adelaide Oval. In 1921 he made his first class debut in a match between South Australia and a touring MCC team. He umpired sixteen Test matches, between 1928 and 1933. He made his debut in the first Test match played at the Exhibition Ground in Brisbane on 30 November 1928. This match, which also saw the debut of Don Bradman, was won by England by 675 runs, still the largest victory by runs in Test match history. His last match was played at Sydney on 23 February to 28 February 1933. This was the last
    8.00
    2 votes
    104

    Jack Birkenshaw

    Jack Birkenshaw, MBE (born 13 November 1940, Rothwell, near Leeds, Yorkshire) was an English cricketer, who later stood as an umpire and worked as a coach. Cricket commentator, Colin Bateman, stated "Jack Birkenshaw was the epitome of a good all-round county cricketer: a probing off-spinner who used flight and guile, a handy batsman who could grind it out or go for the slog, a dependable fielder and great competitor". Birkenshaw attended John Lawrence cricket school at Rothwell from the age of seven, and when aged 14 he appeared for Rothwell Grammar School and Yorkshire Schools. He was also a stand-off in the school rugby team. He played cricket for Lofthouse, Farsley and Leeds. Birkenshaw played a single County Championship match for Yorkshire at the age of 17 in 1958, taking the wicket of Jim Parks in both innings, but did not make another first-class appearance until 1959. That year he took 40 wickets at an average of 27.39, and also played for Minor Counties against the touring Indians; he made a second and final Minor Counties appearance against the South Africans the following year. In all, he played thirty games for Yorkshire, but failed to win his county cap, and in 1961 he
    8.00
    2 votes
    105

    Jack Newman

    John Alfred 'Jack' Newman (born 12 November 1884 at Southsea, Hampshire; died 21 December 1973 at Groote Schuur, Cape Town, South Africa) was an English cricketer who played for Hampshire. He was an all-rounder, a right-handed batsman and right-arm bowler, able to bowl fast-medium outswing with the new ball and then brisk offspin. In a long first-class career that lasted from 1906 to 1930, he took 2054 wickets at an average of 25.02, with best innings figures of 9/131. Newman took ten or more wickets in a match on 35 occasions. In 1927 he took 16 wickets for 88 runs against Somerset. Only two players taking more wickets in a career were never capped by England. For a number of years he and Alec Kennedy carried the Hampshire attack with little support, on two occasions bowling unchanged through both innings of a match. He scored 15,364 runs at 21.57, with ten centuries of which the highest was 166 not out. He also held 318 catches. He completed the 'double' of 1000 runs and 100 wickets in a season five times between 1921 and 1928. In 1921 he was the first that season to do so. His best all-round performance in a match was in 1926 against Gloucestershire; he scored 66 and 42 not out
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    Jack Tooher

    John Andrew Tooher (18 November 1846 at Sydney, New South Wales – 23 May 1941 at Neutral Bay, New South Wales) was a First-class cricketer for New South Wales and an cricket Test match umpire. Tooher was a right-hand batsman who played one match in 1875/76, scoring 0 not out in his only innings. He umpired 1 Test match between Australia and England in Sydney on 29 January to 3 February 1892, standing with Tom Flynn. He witnessed Alick Bannerman scoring only 67 runs in a complete day's play, and a hat-trick to England's Johnny Briggs in a match in which Australia came from over 150 runs behind on the first innings to win by 72 runs. In a match between Victoria and New South Wales in January 1894, Tooher delayed the start of the last day's play because he believed the pitch was too wet. When play did start, Victoria collapsed and lost the match. Their captain, Jack Blackham, blamed Tooher for the defeat, saying that he had delayed the start until the pitch was sticky and favoured the bowlers. Tooher took exception to the remarks and retired, but later accepted an apology.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Nadir Shah

    Nadir Shah (born February 7, 1964) is an international cricket umpire from Bangladesh. A member of the ICC International umpire panel, he made his umpiring debut in a One Day International (ODI) between Bangladesh and Kenya at Bogra in March 2006. His brother Jahangir Shah, played ODI cricket for Bangladesh. In October 2012 he was caught in a TV sting operation appearing to agree to give decisions on demand for money as an umpire during the 2012 ICC World Twenty20. He has denied the allegations.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Bill Hitch

    John William "Bill" Hitch, born Radcliffe, Lancashire, on 7 May 1886, and died at Cardiff on 7 July 1965, was a cricketer who played for Surrey and England. A Lancastrian, Hitch was bowling for a club in Cambridgeshire when he was spotted by Surrey's batsman Tom Hayward and recommended to The Oval. From his debut in 1907, he quickly established himself as one of the fastest bowlers in first-class cricket, and his rumbustious lower-order batting and general enthusiasm made him a favourite with the crowds. In 1908 he took 58 wickets including 13 in a remarkably heavy win against Kent at the Oval, but it was not until the latter part of 1910 that Hitch entered the public eye. His aggressive hitting brought him such innings as 74 against Middlesex on a difficult wicket, whilst at Northampton he made 54 and took 9 for 101 - bowling unchanged with Razor Smith throughout both innings apart from one over. However, it was Hitch's brilliant close catching that garnered the critics' attention and helped Smith to a bag of wickets unrivalled for Surrey except by Tom Richardson in his great days between 1893 and 1897. In the abnormally dry summer of 1911, Hitch was the third-highest wicket-taker
    9.00
    1 votes
    109

    Buddy Oldfield

    Norman 'Buddy' Oldfield (30 April 1911, Dukinfield, Cheshire–19 April 1996, Cleveleys, Lancashire) was an English cricketer and umpire who played in one Test in 1939 and later umpired in two others. Between 1935 and 1939 he played first-class cricket for Lancashire, before the Second World War interrupted and ended a promising start to his Test career. Oldfield changed clubs and played for Northamptonshire between 1948 and 1954. Oldfield joined the Lancashire staff in 1929, but had to wait until 1935 before he could make his debut. His performance prompted Neville Cardus, a cricket journalist, to compare Oldfield's strokeplay to that of Johnny Tyldesley. Oldfield shared in a 271 run partnership with Eddie Paynter when Paynter scored 322 in five hours in 1937 (the innings is the third highest individual score for Lancashire). Oldfield again successfully paired up with Paynter in 1938 when they set a record of 306 for the third wicket; this record stood until 1990 when it was bettered by Michael Atherton and Neil Fairbrother. On 19 August 1939, Oldfield made his Test debut, aged 28, against the West Indies. He made scores of 80 and 19 in what was his only Test match. A few days after
    9.00
    1 votes
    110

    John Bowles

    John Jesse Bowles (3 April 1890 – 27 November 1971), known as Jack, was an English cricketer who played 80 first-class games in two spells: he was with Gloucestershire from 1911 to 1920, though he played only 18 times for the county in those years. He made the bulk of his appearances, 62, for Worcestershire between 1926 and 1928. Born in Lower Slaughter, Gloucestershire, Bowles made his first-class debut for that county in late July 1911 against Nottinghamshire, and took two wickets, his first being that of Notts' opener George Gunn. He played another two matches in 1911, but had little success, taking only one more wicket. For the next three seasons he played only occasionally, and the same was the case when cricket resumed after the First World War in 1919; never did he play more than four games in a summer, and never did he take more than six wickets. His best bowling for Gloucestershire was the 3-47 he took against Lancashire in 1919. Bowles spent five seasons out of first-class cricket after leaving Gloucestershire at the end of 1920, having played only one match for them that season, although he did appear in the Lancashire League as Enfield's professional. In 1926, however,
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Mel Johnson

    Melville William (Mel) Johnson (born 17 May 1942) is an Australian Test cricket match umpire who accumulated a ten-year career total of 67 first-class matches between 1978 and 1988. A native of the Brisbane suburb of Herston, Mel Johnson umpired 21 Test matches between 1980 and 1987. His first match, between Australia and West Indies, held at Adelaide Oval from 26 January to 30 January 1980, was won by the visitors by a massive 408 runs. Johnson’s partner was Max O’Connell. Johnson’s last Test match was between Australia and New Zealand at Brisbane Cricket Ground from 4 December to 7 December 1987. It was won by Australia by 9 wickets with David Boon scoring a century and Craig McDermott, Bruce Reid and Merv Hughes sharing the wickets. Johnson’s colleague was Tony Crafter. Johnson also umpired 49 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1979 and 1988. He was also an English teacher at Anglican Church Grammar school circa 1983.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112

    Mel McInnes

    Melville James "Mel" McInnes (30 August 1915, Prospect, South Australia – 23 July 1996, Adelaide, South Australia) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired 16 Test matches between 1951 and 1959. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Adelaide on 22 December to 25 December 1951 (the first Test to include play on Christmas Day), won by the West Indies after dismissing Australia for 82 in the first innings. McInnes’ partner in this match was Ron Wright. McInnes’ first international match was the England against South Australia match in January 1951. He no-balled Doug Wright three balls in succession for over-stepping, and this courageous act may have led to his first Test appointment the following year. His last match – also at Adelaide and with Ron Wright as his partner - was between Australia and England on 30 January to 5 February 1959. This was won by Australia by 10 wickets largely due to 170 by Colin McDonald and 9 wickets to Richie Benaud. McDonald pulled a thigh muscle and had resumed batting with a runner, when a Run out appeal was made at the bowler’s end. McInnes had moved to the same side as the runner to view the action, and after
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Sam Cook

    Cecil "Sam" Cook (23 August 1921 – 4 September 1996) was an English cricketer who played for Gloucestershire and in one Test match for England. Born in Tetbury, Gloucestershire, Cook was a small and stocky slow left-arm spinner, who took a wicket with his first ball in first-class cricket, and 133 wickets in his first season (1946). No great spinner of the ball, Cook relied on accuracy and flight: if he lacked penetration as a bowler, he was also very rarely mastered. Before Gloucestershire acquired spinning riches in the form of John Mortimore and David Allen, Cook regularly took 100 wickets a season, and later on the county side often played three spinners, right up to the time when Cook retired in 1964. Cook's one Test match was unfortunate. He was called into the England team to play the South Africans on the batsman's pitch at Trent Bridge in 1947, after taking six South African wickets in the second innings of the MCC match in May. But in the Test match, he took no wickets for 127 runs, scored 0 and 4, and was never picked again. The Kent fast bowler Jack Martin, who had done equally well in the MCC match, was also picked for the Trent Bridge Test, also fared badly, and was
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Allan Arthur Jones

    Allan Arthur Jones (born 9 December 1947 in Horley, Surrey) is an English cricket umpire and a retired cricketer. Allan Jones was educated at St John's College, Horsham and he became the first cricketer to represent four English first-class counties, when he joined Glamorgan in 1980. He was a tall right-arm fast-medium bowler and a tail end right-handed batsman who represented Sussex (1966-1969), Somerset (1970-1975; Cap 1972), Northern Transvaal (1972/1973), Orange Free State (1976/1977), Middlesex (1976-1979; Cap 1976) and Glamorgan (1980-1981). In 214 first-class matches, he scored 799 runs (average 5.39, with a personal best of 33 for Middlesex versus Kent at Canterbury in 1978) and took 549 wickets (at an average 28.07, with a personal best of 9/51 for Somerset versus Sussex at Hove in 1972). He also took 3 wickets in four balls for Somerset versus Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge in 1972 and became the first Middlesex bowler to take a hat-trick in limited over cricket. He was appointed to the First-Class Umpires list in 1985 and is currently standing in his 22nd consecutive English season. He stood in one One Day International in 1996.
    6.67
    3 votes
    115

    Peter McConnell

    Peter John McConnell, (born 11 November 1944), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Western Australia. He umpired 22 Test matches between 1983 and 1992. His first match was between Australia and Pakistan at Perth on 11 November to 14 November 1983, won by Australia by an innings and 9 runs, with Wayne Phillips scoring a century on debut, Graham Yallop also scoring a century and Carl Rackemann taking 11 wickets. McConnell’s partner was Mel Johnson. McConnell’s last Test match was between Australia and India at Adelaide on 25 January to 29 January 1992, won by Australia by 38 runs with second innings centuries to David Boon and Mark Taylor after a first innings of only 145, and two 5-wicket bags by Craig McDermott. Wisden (1993 ed.) noted that the game was “marred … by controversy over lbw decisions – eight times Indians were given out, while all but two of their own appeals were rejected”. McConnell’s colleague was Darrell Hair. During the 1990-91 England tour more controversy arose when England spinner Phil Tufnell asked McConnell how many balls were left in his over. McConnell replied "Count them yerself, yer Pommy bastard" putting in question his neutrality as
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Chris Balderstone

    John Christopher Balderstone (16 November 1940, Longwood, Huddersfield – 6 March 2000, Carlisle, Cumberland) was an English professional in cricket and football, and one of the last sportsmen to combine both sports over a prolonged period. He played football as a midfielder for Huddersfield Town, Carlisle United, Doncaster Rovers and Queen of the South. He played and umpired first class cricket making it to international level - he in played in two Tests in 1976 and umpired two ODIs from 1994 to 1998. In a long club career he was a key part of the five trophy winning Leicestershire side of the early and mid 1970s. Balderstone's football career started with Huddersfield Town where he was signed by Bill Shankly in May 1958. He made 117 Football League appearances for Huddersfield, and played a total of 131 senior games for them (scoring 25 goals). In June 1965 he moved for £7,000 to Carlisle United who had just been promoted to the second tier of English football for the first time in their history. As Balderstone later said, "They gave me a bit of stick at first because I wasn't the quickest player or the hardest tackler. I used to think I made up for it with speed of thought and
    5.75
    4 votes
    117

    Dave Orchard

    David Lynton Orchard (born 24 June 1948) is South African former first-class cricketer, and former international umpire who stood in 44 Tests and 107 ODI. Orchard was born in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He played first-class cricket as an all-rounder for Natal and Natal B between 1967/8 and 1978/9, scoring 1,634 runs at a batting average of 24.38 and taking 47 wickets at a bowling average of 29.02. He also played 5 games of List A cricket for Natal between 1969/70 and 1971/2, and played as a professional for Rawtenstall in the Lancashire League in 1972 and 1973. His father, Kenneth Orchard and uncle Eric Orchard played first-class cricket for Natal, and his son Justin Orchard for Free State. Orchard became a first-class umpire in 1992. He made his international debut as an umpire at the One Day International "Mandela Tournament" in late 1994, standing in the match between Pakistan and Sri Lanka at Durban on 2 December 1994. He umpired several matches in the 1999 Cricket World Cup and 2003 Cricket World Cup. His last ODI as umpire was played between Pakistan and New Zealand at Rawalpindi on 7 December 2003. He umpired his first Test in December 1995, standing with Steve Bucknor
    5.75
    4 votes
    118

    Alfred Jones

    Alfred Charles Jones (6 June 1859 - 10 February 1949 at New South Wales) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired 7 Test matches, involving Australia, six against England and one against South Africa. His first match, at Sydney on 11 December to 17 December 1903 was won comfortably by England in spite of Victor Trumper's 185 not out. Reggie Foster of England scored 287, still the highest score by a batsman on debut. Of slight build, Jones was photographed with the Australian team of that series, an event not likely to occur today. Jones' career lasted more than 25 years, as his last match was at Melbourne on 8 March to 16 March 1929, where he saw Don Bradman score a century in a victorious team.
    7.50
    2 votes
    119

    Bill Smyth

    William Joseph (Bill) Smyth AO (8 July 1916 - 16 September 2007) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. Smyth born at Maryborough, Victoria, took up umpiring in 1947 when injury ended his fast bowling career, and umpired four Test matches between 1962 and 1966. His first match was between Australia and England at Melbourne on 29 December 1962 to 3 January 1963, won by England by 7 wickets. Smyth's partner in this match was Colin Egar. Smyth stood (again with Egar) in the first Test match played by Pakistan in Australia, at Melbourne on 4 December to 8 December 1964, a match drawn when Australia required only 78 further runs with 8 wickets in hand. This was Ian Chappell's debut match. Smyth's last match, also against England at Melbourne with Egar as his colleague, took place exactly three years after his first, on 30 December 1965 to 4 January 1966, resulting in a draw. He continued to umpire at lower levels until 1972. On retirement, Smyth became a long-term President of the Victorian Cricket Association Umpires' Association, adviser to the panel of VCA umpires, and lecturer on the Laws of Cricket, providing precise explanations of the complex code. He was awarded the Order
    7.50
    2 votes
    120

    Doug Cowie

    Douglas Bruce Cowie (born 2 December 1946 in Kaitaia), was a New Zealander who umpired in international cricket. He officiated at New Zealand first-class level for over two decades, before a 10 years spell in international cricket which saw him officiate in 22 Tests and 71 ODIs. He umpired in the 1999 World Cup in England.
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    George Watson

    George Albert Watson (dates unknown) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired two Test matches, making his debut in the match between Australia and South Africa, played at Adelaide on 7 January to 13 January 1911. This resulted in the first win by South Africa over Australia, in spite of Victor Trumper scoring 214 not out. Watson's other match was between Australia and England, played at Adelaide on 12 January to 17 January 1912, won by England. In both matches Watson's colleague was Bob Crockett.
    7.50
    2 votes
    122

    Jack Crapp

    John "Jack" Frederick Crapp (14 October 1912 - 13 February 1981) was an English cricketer, who played first-class cricket for Gloucestershire between 1936 and 1956, and played for England on tour in the winter of 1948-49. Cricket writer, Colin Bateman, noted that Crapp was a "sound rather than spectacular batsman who scored 1,000 runs in all but one of his fifteen seasons - that was 1954, when he struggled with the Gloucestershire captaincy". Crapp went on to become an umpire for twenty two seasons, including standing in four Test matches. Crapp was born in St Columb Major, Cornwall, and began his career with Stapleton Cricket Club in Bristol, scoring a 'duck' for the third team on his debut. However, he soon moved up to the first XI following some spectacular performances, and was spotted by Wally Hammond who invited him for trials with Gloucestershire. In 1936, he made his debut for Gloucestershire and was a fixture in their team for the next twenty seasons, eventually becoming their captain. Crapp was a dependable left-hand batsman and a fine slip fielder, who early in his career was thought of as a potential Test batsman. However, World War II intervened and it was not until
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    James Laing

    James Laing umpired one Test match, involving Australia against England, played at Adelaide on 10 January to 16 January 1908. His colleague was Bob Crockett. The match was notable for the match-winning 8th wicket partnership of 243 between Clem Hill and Roger Hartigan, still Australia's highest partnership for the 8th wicket. Hartigan, with 116 in the second innings, scored a century on his debut.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124

    Len King

    Leonard John King (born 30 November 1941) was an Australian Test cricket match umpire from Victoria. He umpired 6 Test matches between 1989 and 1993. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Sydney on 26 January to 30 January 1989, won by Australia by 7 wickets, with David Boon scoring a century and Allan Border a career-best 11 wickets and 75 runs, "an all-round performance seldom surpassed in Test cricket," according to Wisden. King’s partner was Terry Prue. King’s last Test match was also between Australia and the West Indies at Adelaide on 23 January to 26 January 1993, a fluctuating match won by the visitors by a mere one run when Australia’s No. 11, Craig McDermott, was dismissed after a 40-run partnership with Tim May had brought Australia so close to victory. May and Merv Hughes both took 5 wickets in an innings. King's colleague was Darrell Hair. King umpired 23 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1988 and 1993. In 1988 he umpired a women’s ODI match. Altogether, he umpired 41 first-class matches in his career between 1984 and 1994.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125

    Mahbubur Rahman

    Mahbubur Rahman (born February 1, 1969, Mymensingh District, Dhaka) is a former Bangladeshi cricketer who played in one ODI in 1999. In the 1980s Mymensingh was a great hub for producing cricketing talent in Bangladesh. Mahbubur Rahman, also known as Selim, was one of the finest talents to come from there. A right-handed middle order batsman, he occasionally bowled spin as well. In the 1989 U-19 Asia cup he scored 40 against Sri Lanka and 28 against Pakistan. Unfortunately he took too long to make the transformation to the senior team. Thus he played in only one ODI, against Zimbabwe, at Dhaka in 1999.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126

    Peter Cronin

    Peter Michael Cronin, (born 21 December 1947), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from South Australia. He umpired 1 Test match in 1980 between Australia and England at Melbourne on 1 February to 6 February 1980, won by Australia by 8 wickets, with Greg Chappell scoring a century and Dennis Lillee taking 11 wickets in a match-winning effort. Cronin’s partner was Robin Bailhache. Cronin umpired 6 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1979 and 1981. Altogether, he umpired 18 first-class matches in his career between 1977 and 1988.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127

    Tom Brooks

    Thomas Francis Brooks OAM (28 March 1919 – 16 July 2007) was an Australian Test cricket match umpire who was born in Paddington, New South Wales. Brooks had earlier played first class cricket for NSW and was the last Australian umpire to have both umpired in a Test match and played first class cricket. ew South Wales Blues|New South Wales]], between 1946/47 and 1952/53 seasons, taking 65 wickets at an average of 22.50, and scoring 192 runs at 16.00. Jack Pollard described him as a “spirited” bowler “who moved the ball appreciably in the air. He played first with the Waverley club but later with the Manly club. He umpired 23 Test matches between 1970 and 1978. His first match was between Australia and England at Brisbane on 27 November to 2 December 1970, a drawn match in which Keith Stackpole scored 207 and Doug Walters a century. Brooks’ partner was Lou Rowan. He was appointed to umpire what would have been the third of that series, with Rowan, which was scheduled for Melbourne, but the test was abandoned without a ball bowled. Notwithstanding that Brooks and Rowan were required to make decisions on several occasions during the first three days scheduled for play, relating to the
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    Walter Price

    Walter Price (9 October 1834 - 4 September 1894) was an English cricketer and umpire who played 33 first-class games between 1868 and 1882. Most of his matches were for MCC, but he also appeared five times in county cricket for Nottinghamshire, as well as appearing for the Players in both Gentlemen v Players games in 1870. As an umpire, Price stood on 72 occasions, mostly at Lord's, from 1865 to 1893. He made his only half-century, 57, for Nottinghamshire against Surrey at The Oval in July 1869, while his only five-wicket innings haul, 5-88, was achieved for MCC against Gloucestershire at Lord's in August 1870. Price was born in Ruddington, Nottinghamshire, and died there at the age of 59. Three sons had brief first-class careers. Alfred Price played seven matches, including one for Lancashire and three for Nottinghamshire; Frederick Price had one game for North of England; and William Price turned out twice for Liverpool and District.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Arthur Woodcock

    Arthur Woodcock was a first class cricketer who played in 121 first-class matches for Leicestershire CCC from 1894 to 1908 and appeared for London County in 1900. During the late 1890s Arthur Woodcock was regarded as the second-fastest bowler in England , shaded only by Charles Kortright. His 548 wickets at 22.28 included 102 in 1895 and 9 for 28 against MCC at Lord's in 1899. A right-handed tail-ender, he averaged 8.31 with a top score of 62 not out. In 1906 he umpired first-class matches. Arthur Woodcock was born in Northampton on 23 Sep 1865 and died at Billesdon from 'self-administered poison' on 14 May 1910.
    4.80
    5 votes
    130

    Frank Tarrant

    Frank Tarrant (in full Francis Alfred Tarrant (Melbourne, Australia, 11 December 1880 – 29 January 1951 in Melbourne) was an Australian all-rounder who played with great success for Middlesex in the County Championship in the years before World War I. His record is sufficient to establish Tarrant as one of the best cricketers never to play a Test match, though he could never be considered after his move to Middlesex in 1903 according to the rules of the time, for he moved back and forth to play occasionally with Victoria. Tarrant first played for Victoria in 1898/1899, and met with little success either as a batsman or a bowler then or in 1900/1901. However, he moved to England in 1903 to join the Lord's ground staff and played a number of matches for the MCC whilse qualifying for Middlesex. In these, he showed himself developing into a left-arm spinner of above average pace but with nothing beyond steadiness when pitches did not help him. In 1904, he showed development as a solid right-handed batsman, and in 1905, when fully qualified, he was a valuable aid to Middlesex. his superb batting on a difficult pitch to draw the game with Essex at Leyton showed he was a player of
    5.50
    4 votes
    131

    W. A. Young

    W A Young (dates unknown) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match, between Australia and England, played at Melbourne on 9 February to 13 February 1912 and won easily by England, following a record first-wicket partnership of 323 between Jack Hobbs and Wilfred Rhodes. Young’s colleague was Bob Crockett.
    5.50
    4 votes
    132

    Darrell Hair

    Darrell Bruce Hair (born 30 September 1952 in Mudgee, New South Wales) is an Australian former Test match cricket umpire, from New South Wales. He stood on the Emirates International panel of umpires from 2002 to 2003, before he, along with fellow Australian Simon Taufel, and New Zealander Billy Bowden, was appointed to the ICC Elite umpire panel. After an ICC board meeting discussed his actions in a Test match between Pakistan and England in 2006 it was decided he should not umpire matches involving the test playing nations. He was restored to the Elite Panel by the ICC on 12 March 2008 and stood in the England v New Zealand tests at Old Trafford in May and Trent Bridge in June 2008. However, he still remains a controversial figure in cricket. Hair umpired his first Test match in January 1992, between Australia and India in Adelaide. The test was won by Australia and according to the Wisden was “marred … by controversy lbw decisions – eight times Indians were given out, while all but two of their own appeals were rejected”. Hair's umpiring partner was Peter McConnell, who was standing in his last Test match. In 1994 the International Cricket Council (ICC) introduced a policy of
    6.33
    3 votes
    133

    George Sharp

    George Sharp (born 12 March 1950 in West Hartlepool, County Durham, England) is an English former first class cricketer who is currently a first class umpire. Sharp spent 17 years at Northamptonshire and played over 300 games, as a wicketkeeper batsman. Sharp umpired 15 Tests and 31 One Day Internationals. He umpired over 300 matches in both First class and List A cricket.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134

    Mark Benson

    Mark Richard Benson (born 6 July 1958) is an English former cricketer who currently umpires first-class cricket. Benson played for England in one Test match and one One Day International in 1986. He later took up umpiring and spent time on the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires. Benson was born in Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex, England. He was educated at Sutton Valence school in Kent and worked for a time as a marketing assistant for Shell. He then took up full time cricket with Kent. Benson made his first-class debut as a left-handed opening batsman in 1980 and was virtually an "ever-present" in the Kent side for the next fifteen seasons scoring over 18,000 runs (48 centuries) for the county. He was Kent's third highest aggregate run scorer in the post-war era and his batting average of 40.27 was the fourth highest for a major batsman in Kent's history (after Les Ames, Frank Woolley and Colin Cowdrey). He scored 1,000 runs in a season 12 times, with a best of 1,725 runs (average 44.23) in 1987. Benson played 268 One Day matches (5 centuries, 53 fifties, 6 "man of the match" awards) for Kent scoring 7814 runs at an average of 31.89. For the 1991 Benson was appointed captain of Kent and on his
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    Rod Tucker

    Rodney James Tucker (born 28 August 1964, Auburn, Sydney, New South Wales) is a cricket umpire and member of the ICC Elite Umpire Panel. He was a cricketer who played briefly for New South Wales from 1985/86 to 1987/88, before moving to Tasmania who he played for from 1987/88 to 1998/99. He was also vice-captain of Tasmania from 1991/92 until 1995/96. He briefly played as Captain/Coach for the Canberra Comets in the 1999/00 season before retiring. A versatile left hand batsman, he scored 5076 first class runs at an average of 36.25, and took 123 first class wickets at 41.40 bowling right arm medium. He played in Tasmania's sides that were twice runners-up in the Sheffield Shield in 1993-94, and 1997-98. After his playing career, Tucker turned to umpiring. He appointed to the ICC International Panel of Umpires in 2008 and was quickly promoted to the ICC Elite Umpire Panel in 2010. On 16 August in a test match between South Africa and England at Lords, Rod Tucker made a very controversial decision as a 3rd umpire. England bowler Finn made an appeal against Jacques Kallis for a catch down the leg side but umpire Kumar Dharmasena gave it not out. England reviewed the decision and Rod
    6.33
    3 votes
    136

    Walter French

    Walter G French (died 1961) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired two Test matches in 1931 between Australia and the West Indies. He made his debut in the second Test match played at Sydney on 1 January to 5 January 1931, won by Australia by an innings with Bill Ponsford scoring 183. In this match, French was partnered by another debutant umpire, George Borwick, who went on to umpire 24 Test matches. In his other match, the fifth of that series, in which the West Indies gained their first win over Australia, he was partnered by Henry Armstrong, standing in his only Test match.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Bob Crockett

    Robert Maxwell Crockett (1863, Hepburn, Victoria – 11 December 1935 at Footscray, Victoria), was an Australian Test match umpire. Crockett umpired a total of 32 Test matches, the highest number by an Australian umpire until passed by Tony Crafter in his last match in 1992. His first match was between Australia and England at Sydney on 12 December to 16 December 1901, a match which England won by an innings.. His colleague was Richard Callaway, also standing in his first Test match. Crockett was inspired to take up cricket umpiring at the age of 25 by the brave deeds of ‘Dimboola Jim’ Phillips who waged war on the chuckers of the 1890s, bowlers who threw the ball instead of bowling it. For more than 20 years he was a regular Test umpire, and his first-class career lasted for 38 years. Known as the ‘Chief Justice’ he was, in Pollard’s view, “a softly-spoken, imperturbable character … precise, unemotional, lacking in sentiment … He was a stickler for decorum … [and] highly regarded by all players for his accuracy and impartiality.” Johnnie Moyes, who knew him well "appreciated his skill, his modesty, his love for cricket" and ranked him in the top three umpires he had seen, along with
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Bruce Martin

    Bruce Edward Martin, (born 11 June 1942 in South Australia), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from South Australia. He umpired one Test match in 1985 between Australia and New Zealand at Sydney on 30 December 1984 to 2 January 1985, won by Australia by 4 wickets in a come-from-behind effort led by David Boon and Wayne Phillips with the bat, and 10 wickets by Bob Holland. Martin's partner was Mel Johnson. Martin umpired 25 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1981 and 1987. All together, he umpired 31 first-class matches in his career between 1979 and 1987.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139

    Col Hoy

    Colin Hoy (9 May 1922 at Windsor, Queensland – 24 March 1999 at Brisbane, Queensland), was an Australian cricket Test match umpire, the first Queenslander to be appointed. Hoy took to umpiring after becoming frustrated by a run of batting failures in Brisbane's grade cricket competition, and stood in his debut First-class match in January 1952. He umpired nine Test matches between 1954 and 1961. His first match was between Australia and England at Brisbane on 26 November to 1 December 1954, won by Australia by an innings with centuries to Neil Harvey and Arthur Morris. Hoy's partner in this match was Mel McInnes. Johnnie Moyes, writing in 1959 when Hoy was a current Test umpire, stated that "he is young, has excellent eyesight and the keenness to study his art. … He should be in the forefront for years." His last Test match – in front of a world record crowd of over 90,000 on the second day - was between Australia and the West Indies on 10 February to 15 February 1961, a close match won by Australia by 2 wickets. In this most dramatic of all Test series, Hoy stood in every Test with Col Egar. In the first Test, at Brisbane, Hoy gave Ian Meckiff run out to record the first tie in
    8.00
    1 votes
    140

    George Thompson

    George Joseph Thompson (27 October 1877 – 3 March 1943) was the mainstay of the Northamptonshire county cricket eleven for a long period encompassing both its days as a minor county and its earliest years in the County Championship. A huge man, standing well over six feet tall and weighing more than 16 stone (102 kg), Thompson was an excellent all-rounder. Despite his huge frame, his batting relied chiefly on a very watchful eye that made him a very hard man to dismiss when pitches were hard and firm. Though at times he would hit very hard, he had very little backlift and could play only a restricted range of strokes, and his size made him rather slow of foot and hence seldom likely to make many runs on the numerous rain-affected pitches of his day. As a bowler, he was above medium pace and could gain a great deal of spin, which made him respected when pitches were hard and frequently unplayable after rain or on a crumbling pitch. His large hands and long reach made him an excellent fieldsman at slip: in 1914 he achieved the unequalled feat of taking three catches off consecutive balls against Warwickshire. George Thompson was educated at Wellingborough School (1890–93). He first
    8.00
    1 votes
    141

    Jimmy Stone

    James 'Jimmy' Stone (29 November 1876 - 15 November 1942) was an English first class cricketer. A wicketkeeper, he played for both Hampshire and Glamorgan. Stone was the first choice keeper for Hampshire from 1900 until 1914 before the war intervened. Following the war he moved to Wales and in 1923, his final year of first class cricket, Stone scored the first ever century by a Glamorgan batsman against a touring team. His innings of 108 was made against the West Indies and he was 46 years of age. After retiring, Stone became a first class cricket umpire. He quit umpiring in 1934 and died 8 years later in Berkshire.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Len Braund

    Len Braund

    Leonard Charles Braund, born 18 October 1875, at Clewer, Berkshire, and died 23 December 1955, Putney Common, London, was a cricketer who played for Surrey, Somerset and England. Len Braund was an all-rounder, a versatile batsman who could defend or attack according to the needs of the game and a leg break bowler who used variation more than accuracy to take wickets. He was also regarded by contemporaries as the best slip fielder of his time. Braund played 21 times from 1896 for Surrey before joining Somerset, where he had to qualify for County Championship games by residence. On his Somerset debut, he hit 82 against the 1899 Australians. The following year, he made his Championship debut for Somerset against Middlesex at Lord's, in Andrew Stoddart's last match; but this was also Braund's last match of the season for Somerset, as MCC ruled that he was not properly qualified. To fill in the waiting, he played for W. G. Grace's London County side. Braund's proper career starts from 1901, and in his first full season he scored more than 1,000 runs and took over 100 wickets. He scored 107 in a remarkable match at Headingley when Somerset, 238 behind Yorkshire on the first innings, put
    8.00
    1 votes
    143

    Michael Gough

    Michael Gough (born December 18, 1979) is a retired English cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman and a right-arm off-break bowler. Having played in two Youth Test matches in 1997, he impressed enough to become a fully fledged member of the Durham side of 1998, having previously been an occasional member of their Second XI side, and carrying on in this role for five more years. In his debut in Second XI cricket, he finished his first innings admirably, but went out in the second innings for a duck. Gough played in eleven Youth Test Matches, debuting in South Africa in December 1997, in a match which ended up as a draw having seen England Under-19s follow on from 130 runs behind. He subsequently played against Pakistan, New Zealand and Australia Under-19s. Gough has most recently umpired in the Second XI Championship and in the Second XI trophy, officiating his first game in April 2006.
    5.25
    4 votes
    144

    Alan Mackley

    Alan E Mackley, (born 1913; died 1982 at Perth, Western Australia was the first Australian cricket Test match umpire from Western Australia. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England at Adelaide on 25 January to 30 January 1963, a match drawn with England requiring 132 runs to win with 6 wickets in hand. Neil Harvey and Norm O'Neill both scored centuries and Graham McKenzie took 5 wickets in England’s first innings. Mackley’s partner in this match was Colin Egar. He umpired 51 first-class matches between 1951 and 1965, all (except his Test match) in Perth. Mackley was later a member of the Western Australian Cricket Association Appeals Board, and the Umpires’ Appointment Board.
    7.00
    2 votes
    145

    Arthur Dolphin

    Arthur Dolphin (24 December 1885 – 23 October 1942) was an English first-class cricketer, who kept wicket for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1905 and 1927. He is part of a tradition of Yorkshire wicket-keepers, stretching from Ned Stephenson, George Pinder, Joe Hunter and David Hunter before him, to Arthur Wood, Jimmy Binks, David Bairstow plus Richard Blakey to the present day. The successor to David Hunter as Yorkshire's wicket-keeper he served to the county for twenty two years. He also played first-class cricket for the MCC. Dolphin was born in Wilsden, Bingley, Yorkshire, England, and became the first Bradford League player chosen to represent Yorkshire. Dolphin was 14 years old when he first played for Wilsden Britannia, and 19 when he made his county debut in 1905. After playing for the Yorkshire Second XI, he took over as Yorkshire's first choice wicket keeper in 1910, and retained his position for seventeen years. He served in World War I alongside his county colleagues, Roy Kilner and Major Booth, with the Leeds Pals but returned to Yorkshire's ranks in 1919, and enjoyed his most successful season with the gloves claiming 82 dismissals in the first post-war summer.
    7.00
    2 votes
    146

    Eric Tindill

    Eric William Thomas Tindill (18 December 1910 – 1 August 2010) was a New Zealand sportsman. Tindill held a number of unique records: he was the oldest ever Test cricketer at the time of his death, the only person to play Tests for New Zealand in both cricket and rugby union (a so-called "double All Black"), and the only person ever to play Tests in both sports, referee a rugby union Test, and umpire a cricket Test: a unique "double-double". Tindill was born in Nelson and was raised in Motueka. His family moved to Wellington in 1922, and he was educated at Wellington Technical College until 1925. He trained as an accountant, and worked as a civil servant for 40 years in the government audit office. He was nicknamed "Snowy" due to his fair hair. He married his wife Mary in 1937, shortly before he left on a cricket tour to England. An all-round sportsman, in addition to cricket and rugby, Tindill also played football for Wellington in 1927, and was a founder of the Wellington Table Tennis Association in 1932. In cricket, Tindill played club cricket for the Midland club (now Eastern Suburbs Cricket Club). He played domestic first-class cricket for Wellington from 1932–33 to 1949–50 as
    7.00
    2 votes
    147

    George Borwick

    George Eric Borwick (2 April 1896 at Pyrmont, New South Wales – 1 August 1981 at Hornsby, New South Wales) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired twenty-four Test matches, between 1931 and 1948. He made his debut in the second Test match played between Australia and the West Indies, played at Sydney on 1 January to 5 January 1931. In this match Borwick was partnered by another debutant umpire, Walter French. Borwick's last match was played between Australia and India, played at Adelaide on 23 January to 28 January 1948. In this match, in spite of a century in each innings by Vijay Hazare, Australia won by an innings with Bradman scoring a double century. Borwick's partner in this match was Ron Wright, standing in his first match. Moyes remarked that Borwick had the confidence of all Australian players and "ranks among the best we have seen". Standing in all the "Bodyline" Tests with George Hele, Borwick was later critical of the tactics used by England's captain, Douglas Jardine.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148

    George Edward Downs

    George Edward Downs (25 July 1856 – 2 April 1936 at Adelaide, South Australia) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England in Adelaide on 24 March to 28 March 1892, standing with Bill Whitridge, also in his only Test match. England won easily by an innings and 230 runs – the largest victory margin to that date – in Jack Blackham’s last match.
    7.00
    2 votes
    149

    Henry Bagshaw

    Harry Bagshaw, christened Henry Bagshaw, (1 September 1859 – 31 January 1927) was an English cricketer who played first-class cricket for Derbyshire between 1887 and 1902 and was also a cricket umpire. Bagshaw was born at Foolow, Derbyshire, where he became a lead miner. He played for the Derbyshire Colt's team in 1880. His first-class career with Derbyshire began in the 1887 season when, as a 28-year-old, he played against Marylebone Cricket Club. Derbyshire lost first class status in the 1888 season, but Bagshaw continued to take part in matches between future first-class sides and Derbyshire and was top scorer for the club in the 1892 and 1893 seasons. Derbyshire's matches were accorded first class status again in the 1894 season Bagshaw took part in his first County Championship match when Derbyshire joined the Championship in the 1895 season. He played consistently during the season, and had a top-score of 127 not out against Yorkshire, the highest of his career. During his time at Derbyshire he was an opening or number 3 batsman. In the 1896 season he scored 115 against Yorkshire and 121 against Leicestershire. He scored three centuries in 1897 - 124 against Leicestershire,
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Joe Hardstaff senior

    Joseph (Joe) Hardstaff senior (9 November 1882 in Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire – 2 April 1947, in Nuncargate, Nottinghamshire), was an English cricketer who played for Nottinghamshire and England. Hardstaff made his debut during 1902, playing one match against Lancashire scoring 2. He was a central figure in the Notts side until he retired at the end of the 1924 season. He was primarily a middle-order batsman, though he occasionally bowled medium, especially after the war. Having helped his county to its first County Championship in 1907, he was picked for the tour to Australia in 1907/08, captained by the Nottinghamshire county captain Arthur Jones. Hardstaff was a big success on the tour, scoring more runs in first-class matches than any other batsman, and coming third, behind George Gunn and Jack Hobbs, in the Test matches. His subsequent form precluded further selection for although he passed 1000 runs seven times in England, and once on his sole overseas tour. Apart from 1911, he rarely featured amongst the leading batsmen in the averages. He was selected, surprisingly, in 1910, for the Players against the Gentlemen at Lords. He appeared three times in this fixture at
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    Martin Bodenham

    Martin John Dale Bodenham (born 23 April 1950) is an English former football referee and current cricket umpire. He was born in Brighton, but lived for part of his life in Looe, Cornwall. He now hails from Ferring, in Sussex. In 2008, Bodenham was named by the England and Wales Cricket Board as a first-class umpire for the 2009 County cricket season. "He will make history as the first man to have officiated at top-flight football and umpire at first-class cricket in England and Wales." As a referee, his career highlights have included "the 1997 League Cup Final, and replay, between Leicester City and Middlesbrough." He first took up refereeing in Brighton 'parks' football in 1966. His progression to top level refereeing was finally achieved in 1978. In Europe, on 18 May 1994, he was fourth official at the 1994 European Cup Final in Athens, AC Milan defeating Barcelona 4–0. His most prestigious appointment domestically was the League Cup Final at Wembley on 6 April 1997, when Leicester City drew 1–1 with Middlesbrough after extra time. A replay was necessary, during which Martin presided over Leicester's 1–0 victory at Hillsborough (also after extra time), the goal coming from Steve
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Nazar Mohammad

    Nazar Mohammad (Urdu: نذر محمد) (March 5, 1921, Lahore, Punjab – July 12, 1996, Lahore) was a Pakistani cricketer who played in 5 Tests in 1952. His son Mudassar Nazar also represented Pakistan. He was the first player to score a century for Pakistan, and the only player to remain on the ground for an entire Test match. He was an opening batsman. He was educated at Islamia College,Lahore.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Roger Dill

    Roger Dill (born 5 July 1957, Bermuda) is an international cricket umpire. He became the first umpire from the ICC Associates panel to officiate in a full ODI in May 2006, during the triangular series between Bermuda, Canada and Zimbabwe. To date, he has officiated in 18 ODIs. He is also a sergeant in the Bermudian fire brigade.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan

    Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan (Tamil: ஸ்ரீனிவாசன் வெங்கடராகவன்);  pronunciation (help·info) (informally Venkat, born 21 April 1945) is a former Indian cricketer. He played for Derbyshire in English county cricket from 1973 to 1975. He played Test cricket for the Indian cricket team, and later became an umpire on the elite International Cricket Council Test panel. His Test career was one of the longest for any Indian player. An off spin bowler, he was one of the famed Indian quartet of spin bowlers in the 1970s (the others being Bhagwat Chandrasekhar, Bishen Bedi and Erapalli Prasanna). He was also a strong close-in fielder and a useful tail-end bat. Venkat came on to the Test scene at the age of 20 when he was selected to play against the touring New Zealand side. By the end of the series he had emerged as a world-class spinner, taking 12 wickets in the Delhi test that led India to victory. He was the vice-captain of the Indian team that toured the West Indies and England in 1970–71. India won both series. Venkat played an important role, claiming five wickets in the Trinidad Test and 13 wickets in the three Tests in England. He captained India in both the 1975 and 1979 World
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Arthur Bannister

    Arthur Frederick Bannister (18 June 1875 – 17 November 1958) was an English cricketer: a right arm slow bowler who played 38 times for Worcestershire between 1900 and 1902. Born in Somers Town, London, Bannister made his first-class debut on 7 May 1900 against Yorkshire. Although Worcestershire lost by an innings, Bannister made an immediate impact, taking 5-30 in the Yorkshire first innings; his first victim was Test cricketer Ted Wainwright, and he also claimed the scalps of three other England players including Yorkshire captain Lord Hawke. However, his achievement was rather overshadowed by Yorkshire's Wilfred Rhodes, who took 7-20 in Worcestershire's second innings. Two matches later, against Hampshire, Bannister enjoyed what was to remain his best bowling performance, when he turned in an outstanding innings analysis of 20.4-8-29-7; 1900 was the first year in which six-ball overs were used in England. Another excellent effort came in August, when he took five wickets in each innings (his only ten-wicket match haul) against Kent, despite his county slipping to a 231-run defeat. Bannister ended the season with 65 wickets at 20.47 to top the county's bowling averages. 1901 was a
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Arthur Richardson

    Arthur John Richardson (24 July 1888, Clare, South Australia – 23 December 1973, Semaphore, South Australia) was an Australian Test cricketer who played nine Tests for Australia. Richardson was one of the few Australians to play with spectacles. In October 1927 Richardson was appointed by the Western Australian Cricket Association as state coach for a two year contract. In 1935, Richardson served as an umpire in two Tests in the West Indies. Richardson played for Bacup and Burnley Cricket Clubs in the Lancashire League in the 1930s. At his first match at Todmorden Cricket Club's ground Richardson was so overwhelmed by the scenery he stopped Todmorden player Fred Root in his bowling run up so he could admire the view. Arthur Richardson is unrelated to Victor Richardson, his former Australian and South Australian team-mate.
    6.00
    3 votes
    157

    Asoka de Silva

    Ellawalakankanamge Asoka Ranjit De Silva (born March 28, 1956) is a Sri Lankan cricketer who played in 10 Tests and 28 ODIs from 1985 to 1992. He later became an umpire. De Silva served on the ICC Elite Umpire Panel between 2002 and 2004 when he was dumped down to the International Panel, but was invited back to the Elite level in April 2008 when the panel was expanded to twelve members. He continued as a member of the ICC International umpire panel in the interim period, being used by the ICC to support the Elite Panel during busy periods in the International cricket season. He umpired in the Cricket World Cup tournaments in 2003, 2007 and 2011. De Silva was moved to less crucial matches during the 2011 Cricket World Cup after a review of his performance. He was subsequently expelled from the Elite Panel for the second time in his career in May 2011. He is the only person to have been given two chances on the Elite Panel, and so holds the dubious record of having his position on the panel terminated twice. As of the 4 June 2010:
    6.00
    3 votes
    158

    Doris Turner

    Doris Mildred Coysh (1908-1986) was an English cricketer. She played in the first four Test matches, which were played during England's successful tour of Australia and New Zealand in 1934-35,, although her personal performances were disappointing. She also played for East Women, Middlesex Women, South Women and Sussex Women. Coysh was born Doris Mildred Turner in 1908 in West Ham, Essex, the daughter of Henry Turner and Mildred Caroline (Carrie) Palmer. In 1936, Turner married Arthur William Henry Coysh (1896-1992), a divorced man with no children, in Wandsworth. They had no children. Coysh died in 1986 in Wandsworth, and was followed by her husband, Arthur, in Bath, Somerset in 1992. In 1959, as Doris Coysh she became the first woman cricket umpire. She went on to umpire in two women's Test matches, the second Test between England and Australia in 1963, and the third Test between England and New Zealand in 1966.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    James Orr

    James Patrick Orr (18 July 1868 at Brisbane, Queensland – 26 December 1940 at Brisbane, Queensland) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match in 1931 between Australia and the West Indies at the Brisbane Exhibition Ground on 16 January to 20 January 1931. Australia won by an innings with Don Bradman scoring 223, Bill Ponsford a century, and Clarrie Grimmett taking 9 wickets for the match. Orr's partner, Arthur Wyeth, was also standing in his only Test match.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Ted Elliott

    Edward Hudspith Elliott (19 April 1851, Sunderland, Tyne and Wear – 19 March 1885 at Carlton North, Victoria) was a Victorian first-class cricketer and Test match umpire. Having arrived in Victoria at the age of one, he played eight matches for Victoria as a right-hand batsman, scoring 117 runs at an average of 8.35 with a highest score of 20 not out. He also kept wickets, taking 13 catches and 8 stumpings. Elliott umpired seven Test matches, and was the first Australian to regularly officiate. He made his debut in the match between Australia and England in Melbourne on 30 December 1882 to 2 January 1883. In this series he and John Swift stood in all four Test matches, the first time two umpires had officiated throughout an entire series. Moyes commented that "apparently we had reached the time when some kind of qualification was required and some consistency in appointment was observed." Elliott also umpired in three matches in the 1884–85 series, and died two days after his last appearance of a cerebral embolism (stroke). Off the field, Elliott was a carpenter. He was married and left four children.
    4.40
    5 votes
    161

    Douglas James Smith

    Douglas James Smith (29 May 1873 – 16 August 1949) was an English cricketer and umpire. He played first-class county cricket for Somerset and Worcestershire, as well as appearing for Glamorgan, not at the time a first-class county, in the Minor Counties Championship. He also umpired one Test match. Born in Batley, Yorkshire, Smith made his debut in May 1896, for Somerset against Gloucestershire at Bristol, but made only 8 and 0. He then had a relatively good period, his next three games (six innings) yielding 175 runs and including his only two half-centuries: 62 against Middlesex at Lord's and 54 against Sussex at Hove. His form then fell away and 12 further innings that year produced only 164 more runs. The 1896 season also saw his only bowling in first-class cricket, though he took no wickets. Smith played seven games in the middle of the 1897 season, and two more the following summer, but enjoyed no success at all, recording just 97 runs in 17 innings. His next first-class game was not until 1901, when he turned out for Worcestershire against Hampshire at Worcester, making 3 and 10. He played a handful more games for the county over the next few years, but did nothing of note
    5.00
    4 votes
    162

    Arthur Cocks

    Arthur F. Cocks was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match between Australia and England at Adelaide on 2–8 February 1951. Australia won comfortably with Arthur Morris scoring 206, Jim Burke scoring a century in his first Test, and Bill Johnston taking 7 wickets. Cocks' partner in his only match was Andy Barlow.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163

    Herbert Elphinstone

    Herbert Alfred Rhys (Herb) Elphinston (25 February 1905 at Sydney, New South Wales – 8 July 1966 at Sydney, New South Wales, was an Australian Test Cricket Umpires. Wife: Miriam. Daughters Joan, Rhonda and Lynne. He umpired ten Test matches between 1948 and 1953. His first match was between Australia and India at Melbourne on 1 January to 5 January 1948, a match comfortably won by Australia with Don Bradman scoring a century in each innings. Elphinston's partner in this match was Andy Barlow. His last match was between Australia and South Africa at Sydney on 9 January to 13 January 1953, where the home team won by an innings with Neil Harvey scoring 190 and Ray Lindwall taking 8 wickets. Mel McInnes was Elphinston's partner in this match. Herb Elphinston was a leader in intervening against persistent use of short-pitched deliveries (bouncers) by fast bowlers, resulting in Australian first-class umpires being given more power to intervene against intimidatory bowling.
    5.67
    3 votes
    164

    John Cuffe

    John Alexander Cuffe (26 June 1880 – 5 May 1931) was an Australian-born English cricketer who played more than 200 times in first-class cricket for Worcestershire between 1903 and 1914, having previously made a single appearance for New South Wales. After retiring from county cricket, he stood as an umpire for three years in the 1920s. He also played at least once as a professional for Lowerhouse in the Lancashire League. Cuffe was also a footballer and played ten seasons for Glossop North End in the Football League Second Division. Born in Coonamble, New South Wales, Cuffe made his first-class debut for that state side, against Queensland at Sydney on Boxing Day 1902. He made 5 and 25 with the bat, and took the single wicket of Charles Patrick. This was the only time Cuffe played in a first-class match outside England. (He did turn out for Worcestershire against Glamorgan at Cardiff Arms Park in 1910, but this game did not have first-class status.) Cuffe then came to England, making his Worcestershire debut against Oxford University at The Parks in May 1903. He was not yet qualified to appear in the County Championship, but also played against Cambridge University and the
    5.67
    3 votes
    165

    Mordecai Sherwin

    Mordecai Sherwin (26 February 1851 in Greasley, Nottinghamshire, England – 3 July 1910 in Nottingham, England) was a professional footballer and cricketer who played in goal for Notts County and as a wicket-keeper for Nottinghamshire between 1878 and 1896. As a footballer, Sherwin played in goal for County during the 1870s and early 1880s and was, according to the sportswriter "Tityrus" (the pseudonym of J.A.H. Catton, editor of the Athletic News), the idol of the crowd despite his unpromising physique: As a cricketer, Sherwin captained Nottinghamshire in 1887 and 1888. He also played three Test matches for England on the tour to Australia in 1886/7. He was named as one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1891. After he retired as a cricketer, he umpired until 1901, and even stood in one Test in 1899. By trade, Sherwin was a publican. Sherwin had a wife, Emma, and at least six children, Mary, William, Emma, Ellen, Mordecai and Frederick. The name of Arthur Conan Doyle's most famous character, Sherlock Holmes, is said to have been inspired partially by Sherwin, and partially by Frank Shacklock.
    5.67
    3 votes
    166

    Simon Taufel

    Simon James Arthur Taufel, (born 21 January 1971 in St Leonards, New South Wales), is an Australian cricket umpire who was a member of the ICC Elite umpire panel. He won five consecutive ICC Umpire of the Year awards between 2004 and 2008, and is generally considered to be one of the best umpires in the world. On 26 September 2012 he announced his retirement from international cricket after the 2012 ICC World Twenty20 final and would be taking new role of Umpire Performance and Training Manager. Taufel played for Cammeray Cricket Club in the Northern Suburbs Cricket Association as a fast-medium bowler. After the 1990–1991 season he won the club's best and fairest award, was leading wicket-taker and had the lowest bowling average in the association. His career was cut short by a back injury. Despite initially having no intention of becoming an umpire, he agreed to go along with a friend to an umpiring course. After he passed the subsequent exam he began umpiring grade cricket. He quickly progressed through the ranks and made his first-class debut in 1995, aged just 24. He has officiated in 74 Test matches and 174 One-Day Internationals, Including the 2012 World Twenty20 final 34
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    Steve Randell

    Stephen Grant Randell, (born 19 February 1956 in Hobart, Tasmania), is a former Australian Test cricket match umpire, the first to come from Tasmania. He umpired 36 Test matches between 1984 and 1998 the highest number by an Australian umpire to that time. (The previous highest was Tony Crafter’s 33 matches.). His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Melbourne on 22 December to 27 December 1984, a drawn match with Australia holding on in the final innings, thanks to a determined century by Andrew Hilditch to deny the West Indies a 12th consecutive Test victory. Randell’s partner was Peter McConnell. In 1994 the International Cricket Council introduced a policy of appointing one umpire to each Test match from a non-participating country. Ten of Randell’s matches were played outside Australia, and did not involve Australia. His last Test match involving Australia was against South Africa at Adelaide on 30 January to 3 February 1998, a drawn match in the visitor’s favour, with captain Mark Taylor dominating the first innings with 169 and Mark Waugh scoring a century in the second innings. Randell’s colleague was the New Zealander, Doug Cowie. In this match, Mark
    5.67
    3 votes
    168

    Alan Hill

    Alan Hill (born 29 June 1950) is a former English cricketer and umpire who played for Derbyshire from 1972 to 1986 and for Orange Free State in South Africa in 1976/77. Hill was born in Buxworth, Derbyshire and began playing for Derbyshire Juniors in 1965. He progressed to the Second XI by 1970 and in 1972 made his first class debut against Somerset. He was a right-handed middle-order batsman and an occasional off-break bowler. In first-class cricket, he hit 65 fifties and 18 hundreds, giving him a career average of 30.89. His occasional off-break bowling took only a modest 9 wickets. Hill is one of only two cricketers to make a century without hitting a boundary, a record that he shares with Paul Hibbert, making 103 in the match for Orange Free State v Griqualand West in 1976-77. After he retired Hill became an umpire at first-class and List A level, but stopped after only two seasons. He began coaching cricket, working in many schools, and until the end of the 2009 season, was head coach for Newcastle-under-Lyme School. His brother, Bernard Hill, made several appearances for the Derbyshire Second XI, but never made it to major cricket level.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Charles Bannerman

    Charles Bannerman

    Charles Bannerman (3 July 1851 – 20 August 1930) was an Australian Test cricketer, a right-hand batsman, who played domestic cricket for New South Wales. Bannerman was born in Woolwich, Kent, England, son of William Bannerman and his wife Margaret, née Murphy. Not long afterwards the family migrated to New South Wales. He joined Warwick Cricket Club in Sydney. He first played first-class cricket in 1870-71, and came to prominence by scoring 81 and 32 not out against Victoria in 1874. He played in the very first Test match, held at Melbourne in March 1877, and had the honour of facing the first ball ever bowled in Test cricket (the bowler being England's Alfred Shaw) and scoring the first ever run in Test cricket. Dropped before he reached double figures, he went on to 165 when he was forced to retire hurt, his finger being broken by a ball from George Ulyett. This was not only the first century scored in a Test match, but remains, more than 130 years later, the highest score by an Australian batsman on debut. Also, his 165 runs, out of Australia's total of 245, is still the highest proportion (67.35%) of a completed innings in a Test match. No other Australian exceeded 20 in either
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Clement Garing

    Clement Garing (17 December 1873 – 1951 at Melbourne, Victoria) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match, between Australia and England, played at Melbourne on 1 January to 8 January 1925. This match was won by Australia in spite of a 283 run opening partnership by Jack Hobbs and Herbert Sutcliffe, the latter scoring centuries in each innings, the first time this had occurred against Australia. Garing’s colleague was Bob Crockett.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    George Beet snr.

    George Beet (24 April 1886 – 13 December 1946) was an English cricketer who played for Derbyshire between 1910 and 1925 and for MCC in 1920. He was later an umpire. Beet was born in Somercotes, Derbyshire. Beet's first class cricketing career began during the 1910 season, when he came in as wicket-keeper against Kent. At the time Derbyshire depended primarily on Joe Humphries behind the stumps. Beet appeared again two years later in the 1912 season, keeping wicket in a three games and losing his own wicket only once. In the 1913 and 1914 season he earned a regular place in the Derbyshire team as a batsman until the First World War interrupted his career. On his return in the 1919 season he was Derbyshire's regular wicket-keeper and also scored five half-centuries, including his career high score of 92 not out. He played occasionally during the first half of the 1920 season, but was displaced behind the stumps by Harry Elliott. He also played one game for MCC in 1920. From then on he appeared in just two further matches for the Derbyshire first team in the 1922 and 1925 season, the last being at the age of 39. When Fred Root was the Derbyshire fast bowler and Beet was taking the
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Ian Gould

    Ian James Gould (born 19 August 1957) is an ICC Elite Panel cricket umpire and a former English cricketer. He is also chairman of English football club Burnham FC. Gould represented Middlesex (1975–1980 and 1996), Sussex (1981–1991) and Auckland in 1979/80 as a left-handed batsman and a wicketkeeper. He captained Sussex in 1987. He returned to Middlesex as a county coach between 1991 and 2000. Gould toured the West Indies with the England Young Cricketers in 1976. He played 18 One Day Internationals for England in 1983 including that year's World Cup as a wicketkeeper/batsman. Wicket keeper Bob Taylor represented England in Test matches during 1983. Gould also played cricket in Devon, where he represented Budleigh Salterton and Exmouth but struggled to find form on the slower wickets in the South West. Elsewhere, his son Michael Gould has played cricket for Sussex Second XI. As an Umpire, Gould was appointed to stand in 3 matches of the 2007 Cricket World Cup in the Caribbean. He umpired his first Test match - South Africa v Bangladesh at Bloemfontein, Nov 19-22, 2008. Gould was promoted to the ICC Elite Panel of Umpires in 2009. As of 31 August 2012: Gould played football as a
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Jack Board

    John Henry Board (February 23, 1867 – April 15, 1924) was an English cricketer who played in six Tests from 1899 to 1906. Jack Board was a wicketkeeper and a right-handed batsman who started out as a tail-ender but developed into a useful player who often opened the innings for his county, Gloucestershire. Picked by W. G. Grace out of Bristol club cricket for the South v North match at Lord's in 1891, Board went straight into the Gloucestershire side afterwards and stayed there for 20 years. In 1895, he set the county record for dismissals in a season, with 75. As a batsman, he scored 214 against Somerset in 1900, the highest by a Gloucestershire wicketkeeper, and in 1903 he shared in a sixth wicket partnership of 320 with Gilbert Jessop against Sussex at Hove, though his share was just 71, while Jessop scored 286. The stand remains the county record for the sixth wicket. Board was picked for two overseas tours, both to South Africa. He went with Lord Hawke in 1898-99, and won his first two Test caps; he top-scored in his first Test innings, but then never exceeded the 29 he scored in that match. In 1905-06, he played in four Test matches in the tour led by Plum Warner. He was
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Max O'Connell

    Maxwell George O'Connell (born 4 April 1936 in Alberton, South Australia) was an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired 19 Test matches between 1971 and 1980. His first match, was the Fifth Test in the 1970–71 Ashes series at Melbourne on 21 January to 26 January 1971. In his first over as Test umpire he called "over" and turned to walk to square leg after John Snow bowled the last ball. As a result he missed the England wicket-keeper Alan Knott catching Keith Stackpole and had to give him not out. Snow wrote that he 'could quite understand his actions which illustrate the pressure umpires are also under in a Test', and they were able to joke about it afterwards. Stackpole continued to 30, Ian Chappell scored a century and Australian captain Bill Lawry declared the second innings closed with Rod Marsh on 92, depriving him the chance of becoming the first Australian wicket-keeper to score a century. O'Connell's partner was Lou Rowan. In 1971/72 season, a scheduled tour of Australia by South Africa was cancelled following political and moral protests against the apartheid policies of the South African government. In its place a 'World Team' visited Australia and played a
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Schofield Haigh

    Schofield Haigh (19 March 1871 – 27 February 1921) was a Yorkshire and England cricketer. He played for eighteen seasons for Yorkshire County Cricket Club, for England from the 1898/99 tour to 1912, and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1901. Born in Berry Brow, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, Haigh played club cricket for Keighley Cricket Club, and made his debut for Yorkshire in 1895, playing for the Tykes until 1913. He played sporadically for England from 1898/99 to 1912, and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year. He bowled right-hand medium pace, but could vary it with slower or faster deliveries, and when the pitch helped him he made the ball spin back from the off. The usefulness of Haigh's break-back saw over 74 per cent of his wickets taken without assistance from fieldsmen - the highest of any bowler with over 500 wickets. However, because he was of slight build, Haigh was not able to undertake arduous spells of bowling, and his output of overs was always low for a frontline bowler. Moreover, he lacked the pace to be threatening against top batsmen on a good pitch. Haigh was never considered for a tour of Australia, and his record in Test cricket - apart from one match
    6.50
    2 votes
    176

    Steve Davis

    Stephen James Davis, (born 9 April 1952), is a current Australian Test cricket match umpire, from South Australia. He was appointed to the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires in April 2008. Davis' first Test match was between Australia and New Zealand at Hobart on 27 November to 1 December 1997, a rain-affected match in which the last two New Zealand batsman held on to deny victory to Australia. Since 2002 both umpires in Test matches have been appointed from non-participating nations, by the International Cricket Council. This resulted in his last Test match involving Australia to be against New Zealand at Hobart on 22 November to 26 November 2001, a rain-affected draw. Davis suffered a knee injury and was replaced after the second day by local umpire John Smeaton. Davis officiated in 3 matches in the 2007 Cricket World Cup, which led to his promotion to the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires in 2008. On 3 March 2009, Davis was one of the officials caught in the attack on the Sri Lanka cricket team by terrorists in Lahore, Pakistan. In the aftermath, he and his colleagues, Simon Taufel and Chris Broad, were critical of the Pakistan security forces' response to the incident. On 9 March 2011 Davis
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    Yashpal Sharma

    Yashpal Sharma  pronunciation (help·info) (born August 11, 1954) is a former Indian cricketer. He was a middle order batsman who played at the turn of the 1980s. Born in a Brahmin family, Yashpal Sharma first drew attention when he scored 260 for Punjab schools against Jammu & Kashmir schools in 1972. Within two years he was in the state team, and a member of the North Zone team that won the Vizzy Trophy. His first major innings in first class cricket was a 173 in the Duleep Trophy for North, against the South Zone which had Chandrasekhar, Erapalli Prasanna and Venkataraghavan. But he missed the tour to Australia that followed immediately afterwards. A 99 runout in the Irani Trophy the next year got Sharma a place in the team to Pakistan a few weeks later. He played two one day matches in the tour. He went to England in 1979 as a part of the team that played in the World Cup. He did not play in any match but appeared in three Tests in the series that followed. He scored 884 runs at an average of 58 in the tour matches. His form in England assured him of a Test place in the next few games. After scoring a pair against Australia in the Kanpur Test, Sharma scored his first Test
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    Cec Pepper

    Cecil George Pepper (15 September 1916 - 22 March 1993) was an Australian first-class cricketer. An allrounder, he was the first to complete the double twice in the Central Lancashire League. With the bat he once hit 38 runs off an eight ball over. He fought in World War II in the Middle East and New Guinea. After retiring he became an umpire in county cricket from 1964 until 1980. He remained in England and died in 1993 at Lancashire. Career highlights included an innings he played for New South Wales at Brisbane in 1940-41 when he made 81 with all but 7 of them coming in boundaries. His best bowling figures of 6 for 33 came in 1949-50 when touring India with a Commonwealth side. He took a hat-trick in the match. Pepper became embroiled in a row that is widely believed to have cost him Test selection. Teammates Keith Miller and Dick Whitington regarded him as one of the best all rounders in the world and a certainty for Australian Test selection. Pepper appealed for leg before wicket against Australian captain Don Bradman in a match against South Australia. The appeal was turned down and Pepper complained to the umpire, prompting Bradman, who was also a member of the Australian
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Fred Price

    Wilfred Frederick (Fred) Frank Price (25 April 1902 in Westminster, London, England – 13 January 1969 in Hendon, Greater London, England) was a cricketer who played for Middlesex County Cricket Club from 1926 to 1947. Price also stood as an umpire from 1950 to 1967. He played in one Test match and officiated as an umpire in eight. Price was a wicket-keeper who took 648 catches and 316 stumpings in his first-class career. He was named as one of the Wisden Cricketers of the Year in 1940. Price was unfortunate to be around in the same era as Les Ames, which limited Price's opportunities for an international career. He toured abroad twice, once with the Honourable Freddie Calthorpe's side in 1929/30, when he went as a replacement for Rony Stanyforth, and then on a non-Test tour to South America in 1937/8. Price's reputation as an umpire was as someone who would stand up strongly for what he felt was right. He once no-balled Tony Lock, the Surrey and England spin bowler for throwing against India. He also lay down at square-leg, refusing to get up, to stop barracking at a Surrey-Yorkshire game.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Neil Mallender

    Neil Mallender (born Neil Alan Mallender, 13 August 1961, Kirk Sandall, Yorkshire) is a former English cricketer. A right-arm fast-medium bowler and a right-hand lower order batsman who improved as his career progressed, Mallender played first-class cricket in England for Northamptonshire (1980–1986 and 1995–1996) and for Somerset (1987–1994). He also played for Otago (1983–84 to 1992–93), captaining the side in 1990–91 and 1991–92. Neil Mallender was born in Yorkshire, His dad was a cricket player (however his mother was a Rooster) but spent the early part of his childhood in Somerset, before moving to Lincolnshire where he attended Bourne Grammar School, showing himself as a natural sportsman in cricket and football. During this time he gained representative honours at schoolboy level for county and country, captaining England youth on a tour of the West Indies. After school, he was courted by several counties, including his birth county of Yorkshire, but began his first-class career for Northamptonshire in 1980, having impressed on a tour of the West Indies with England Young Cricketers. A right-arm fast-medium bowler, and an increasingly useful lower-order batsman, he was
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    Paul Gibb

    Paul Gibb (11 July 1913 – 7 December 1977) was an English cricketer, who played in eight Tests for England from 1938 to 1946. He also played first-class cricket for Cambridge University and Yorkshire, mostly as a batsman but occasionally also keeping wicket. Gibb was educated at St Edward's School, Oxford, and played first-class cricket for Cambridge University from 1935 to 1938. He was initially chosen as a batsman in his first year, 1935, and also started playing for Yorkshire. He scored 157 not out, his first first-class century and ultimately his second highest score in first-class cricket, in his first innings for Yorkshire in 1935, and toured in Jamaica in 1935-36. Cricket writer, Colin Bateman, described Gibb as "a slight, bespectacled man, Paul Gibb was a solitary teetotaller yet his value was always appreciated by his team-mates. He was a resolute run-maker and broke through as a specialist batsman in South Africa in 1938-39, scoring 93 and 106 on his debut". Paul Anthony Gibb was born in Acomb, York, Yorkshire. Gibb kept wicket occasionally in his second year at Cambridge, 1936, deputising when Billy Griffith was unavailable (Griffith himself later kept wicket for England
    7.00
    1 votes
    182

    Syd Buller

    John Sydney (Syd) Buller, MBE (23 August 1909 – 7 August 1970) was an English first-class cricketer, and notable international cricket umpire. Buller was born in Wortley, Leeds, Yorkshire. As a player, he was a competent wicket-keeper and lower-order right-hand bat. He played for Worcestershire between 1935 and 1946, having played once for Yorkshire in 1930. In 1939, he was severely injured in the car crash that the killed Worcestershire opening batsman Charlie Bull, on the Sunday evening of the Whitsun match with Essex, and missed the next two months of cricket. He made his debut as a first-class umpire in 1951. He umpired in 33 Tests between 1956 and 1969. He was awarded the MBE in 1965. In August 1970, Buller collapsed and died at Edgbaston, Birmingham, during a break for rain when officiating in a match between Warwickshire and Nottinghamshire. A fearless umpire, he repeatedly called Geoff Griffin for throwing, in the exhibition match staged following the early conclusion of the Lord's Test between England and South Africa in 1960, after Frank Lee had called him during the Test itself. This had the effect of ending Griffin's Test career.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183

    Vanburn Holder

    Vanburn Alonzo Holder (born October 10, 1945) is a former West Indian cricketer who played in forty Tests and twelve ODIs from 1969 to 1979. Holder played in the golden era of West Indian fast bowling. A fast-medium bowler, he bowled alongside the likes of Charlie Griffith and Wes Hall. He debuted in the tour of England in 1969 and returned again in 1973 as part of an improving side which ended a 6 and a half year streak of not having won a Test series. In 1974 he was part of Worcestershire's Championship winning side and earlier in the year he scored his only first class century, 122 for Barbados. He took 6 for 39 in 1974–75 against India to help his side win the series. Eventually however he lost his place in the side as younger and faster bowlers were emerging. Holder played more tests when leading players were playing World Series Cricket in 1977–78 and took 6 for 28 against Australia in Trinidad. After retiring he was appointed as a first-class umpire in England in 1992.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    William Curran

    William Gregory Curran (birth details unknown; died 24 December 1921 at New South Wales) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired two Test matches, making his debut in the match between Australia and South Africa, the first match between these nations in Australia, played at Sydney on 9 December to 14 December 1910. Australia won comfortably by an innings, scoring 6 for 494 on the first day, the then highest number of runs by one side in a day. Curran’s other match was between Australia and England, played at Sydney on 15 December to 21 December 1911. This was won by Australia with Victor Trumper scoring a record eighth century, and 'Ranji' Hordern taking 12 wickets on debut against England. Johnnie Moyes, who played during his era, describes him as “little Billy Curran of Sydney, who, we thought, had a perfect horror of giving batsmen out leg-before-wicket.” Only two LBW decisions were given in his two Test matches – perhaps both were given by Bob Crockett, Curran’s colleague on both occasions!
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    George Coulthard

    George Coulthard

    George Coulthard (1 August 1856 in Boroondara, Victoria – 22 October 1883 in Carlton, Victoria) was a star Australian rules footballer who played for Carlton. He was also a notable cricketer who played for the Melbourne Cricket Club and briefly for Australia. As a cricketer he played only six first-class matches, five for Victoria and a Test match for Australia. Coulthard played in the first match between Victoria and South Australia, taking 3 wickets for 29. He was also a prominent umpire of the time, standing in two Tests. Off the field, Coulthard was a shopkeeper. He died at Lygon Street in 1883, at the age of 27 years, of tuberculosis after an illness of 16 months. He was married with a baby daughter. Coulthard commenced with the Carlton club in the (then) Victorian Football Association (VFA) in 1876. During a short seven-season career he became one of the Association's outstanding players. He was a crucial member of the Carlton team that won the inaugural VFA premiership in 1877. He was said to have speed, grace and near-perfect balance. 'He is the grandest player of the day. It is doubtful if, for general excellence, his equal has ever been seen.' said The Australasian
    5.33
    3 votes
    186

    Richard Kettleborough

    Richard Allan Kettleborough (born 15 March 1973, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England) is an English international cricket umpire, and former first-class cricketer who appeared in 33 first-class matches for Yorkshire and Middlesex. He was a left-handed top order batsman and occasional right-arm medium pace bowler. Having been appointed to the ECB list of first-class umpires in 2006, he officiated with Ian Gould in an international Twenty20 between England and Australia in August 2009 and was subsequently elevated to the full International Panel of ICC Umpires in November 2009 and the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires in May 2011. He made his debut for Yorkshire in 1994, and scored his only century in 1996 against Essex. He played for the Tykes until 1997 when, after failing to establish a permanent place in the first team, he moved to Middlesex for two further seasons. In 2000, he appeared for the Yorkshire Cricket Board in one day cricket and helped his club, Sheffield Collegiate, win both the Yorkshire ECB County Premier League and the National Club Championship. He toured Australia with an MCC team in 2002. After progressing through the Yorkshire age group set up, he scored 1,258 runs in his
    5.33
    3 votes
    187

    William Hannah

    William Hannah (1867 – 18 October 1942 in Victoria) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired 4 Test matches, involving Australia, two against England and two against South Africa. His first match, at Sydney on 13 December to 19 December 1907 was a close affair, won by Australia by 2 wickets after they were 7 wickets down with 90 runs to get. Hannah’s last match was at Melbourne on 17 February to 21 February 1911, won by Australia by a massive 530 runs, the highest margin to that date.
    5.33
    3 votes
    188
    Barrie Leadbeater

    Barrie Leadbeater

    Barrie Leadbeater (born 14 August 1943, Harehills, Leeds, Yorkshire, England) is a retired English first-class cricketer and umpire. Leadbeater played for Yorkshire County Cricket Club as a middle-order batsman from 1966 to 1979, although he preferred to open the innings. His promise went largely unfulfilled; his average of 25.34 in 147 first-class matches (the norm for a county cricketer of the period was around 30.00), scoring just one century. The highlight of his playing career was a man-of-the-match winning 76 in the 1969 Gillette Cup Final, a match in which he was not expected to play. Leadbeater broke a finger in the County Championship game the day before, and would have been omitted had Geoffrey Boycott not suffered a worse injury. Leadbeater said: "I almost forgot about the fact that I had a broken finger. Then when it came to lunchtime, I was changing my clothing because of perspiration, and ate my lunch in a jockstrap and left batting glove! I couldn’t get the glove off because my finger had swollen." Leadbeater posted a top score of 90 in 106 one day games. Leadbeater was touted by Colin Cowdrey (amongst others) as a future Test match cricketer. However, batting lower
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Brian Jerling

    Brian George Jerling (born August 13, 1958 in Port Elizabeth), is a South African Test and ODI umpire. He first officiated in a game in October 2000, in a game between South Africa and New Zealand. He has since umpired in over 50 ODI games. Jerling has been umpire in only 4 Test matches, all coming in 2006.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190

    Dick Pougher

    Arthur Dick Pougher (19 April 1865, Humberstone, Leicester, England – 20 May 1926, Aylestone Park, Leicester, England) was a cricketer who played for Leicestershire County Cricket Club between 1894 and 1901. Pougher was awarded a benefit by Leicestershire in 1900. He also played one Test match for England, which was against South Africa in Cape Town in 1891-92. His greatest moment came when he took five Australian wickets for no runs in three five-ball overs with his deceptive off spin for MCC at Lord's in 1896. The tourists were bundled out for a humiliating 18. Unfamiliar with Pougher's bowling they failed to realise that he kept the ball lower and turned it less than seemed possible with his strong finger and wrist action. He umpired 49 first-class matches. All but two of these were between 1903 and 1909; the exceptions were one match in Australia in 1888-89 and Leicestershire's game against the West Indians in 1923. He also officiated in Yorkshire's game against Kent in July 1904, but this match is not included in the total, as he and fellow umpire William Shrewsbury (brother of Arthur) declared the match void after the first day because of illegal changes made to the
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Fred Goodall

    Frederick Robert Goodall (born 1938) is a former international cricket umpire from New Zealand who officiated in 24 Tests and 15 one-day internationals between 1965 and 1988. His debut as One Day International umpire was at Christchurch in February 1973, in the first one-day cricket match played in New Zealand; he made his Test debut eight years earlier, also in Christchurch. One of the most notorious matches involving Fred Goodall was the Second Test between New Zealand and West Indies at Christchurch's Lancaster Park in February 1980. Goodall had previously turned down several appeals against New Zealand batsmen, claiming unsubstantial evidence. So incensed with what the tourists considered poor umpiring, the West Indies refused to emerge from their dressing room after the tea break on Day 3, unless Goodall was immediately replaced. After a delay of twelve minutes, organisers managed to coax the tourists back onto the field for a spiteful third session. Goodall enjoyed the support of match organisers in New Zealand, and continued his role in the Test. This resulted in an even more spiteful fourth day, in which Goodall was, at one stage, shoulder-charged by bowler Colin Croft.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Harry Butt

    Henry ("Harry") Rigden Butt (27 December 1865 in Sands End, Fulham, Middlesex, England – 21 December 1928 in West Hill, Hastings, Sussex, England) was a cricketer who played first-class cricket for Sussex County Cricket Club and the Marylebone Cricket Club between 1890 and 1912. Butt also played three Test matches for England on their tour to South Africa in 1895-96. He later went on to become an umpire, and stood in that role in six Tests. His popularity was such that when he retired as an umpire due to ill-health, the County captains wrote to the Secretary of the Marylebone Cricket Club asking him to write to Butt to express their regret at the cause. Butt, a short man, was Sussex's wicket-keeper for twenty years. He was awarded two benefits: the matches between Sussex and Yorkshire at Hove in 1900, and between Sussex and Middlesex at Lord's in 1928.
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    Ken Palmer

    Kenneth Ernest Palmer, (born 22 April 1937), is an English former cricketer and umpire, who played in one Test in 1965, and umpired 22 Tests and 23 ODIs from 1977 to 2001. He was born in Winchester, Hampshire. A reliable all-rounder for Somerset between 1955 and 1969, Palmer was a right-handed middle-order batsman and fast-medium bowler with a whippy action, whose best season was 1961, when he achieved the double of 1,000 runs and 100 wickets. Palmer played one Test. Because of injuries to other bowlers (John Price, David Brown and Tom Cartwright), he was called up while coaching in Johannesburg to play in the fifth Test at Port Elizabeth, on the 1964-65 England tour of South Africa. It was a poor debut on a pitch made for batting, and Palmer's one wicket cost 189 runs, which meant his bowling average is the second worst in England's Test history (after John Warr). Palmer was appointed as an umpire in 1972, and made his international debut in the England versus Pakistan Test in June 1978. His brother, Roy Palmer, also played for Somerset, and equally became a first-class and Test match umpire. His son Gary played as an all-rounder for Somerset also.
    6.00
    2 votes
    194

    Trevor Jesty

    Trevor Edward Jesty (born 2 June 1948 in Gosport, Hampshire) was a cricketer. He played 10 One Day Internationals for England. He was an all rounder (right hand batsman and medium pace bowler) who played 490 first-class matches, scoring 21,916 runs and 585 wickets, between 1966 to 1991. He played for Hampshire, Surrey and Lancashire in the English County Championship. He played overseas for Border and Griqualand West in South Africa and Canterbury in New Zealand. Jesty played 10 one day internationals for England most of them during the Benson & Hedges World Series Cup tournament in 1983. His highlight was scoring 50 off 35 balls v New Zealand at Adelaide. He was named in the England squad for the 1983 World Cup, but did not appear in any of the matches. Following his retirement as a player, Jesty became a cricket umpire in England and served as the reserve umpire for the Fourth Test Match at The Oval between England and Pakistan in 2006.
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    David Lloyd

    David Lloyd

    David Lloyd (born 18 March 1947) is a former English cricketer who played county cricket for Lancashire and Test and One Day International cricket for England. He also played semi-professional football for Accrington Stanley. He is known through the cricketing world as "Bumble" due to the similarity between his facial profile and "Bumblies", characters of Michael Bentine's children's television programmes. A left-handed batsman and left-arm spin bowler, he played nine Tests, with a highest score of 214 not out, and eight One Day International matches. In first class cricket he was a successful all-rounder, scoring a career aggregate of more than 19,000 runs and taking 237 wickets. He captained his county from 1973 to 1977. Following his retirement as a player, he became a first class umpire, and subsequently Lancashire and England cricket coach, resigning the latter post following the 1999 Cricket World Cup. He then became a renowned cricket commentator for Test Match Special, and later Sky Sports, with whom he currently broadcasts. He is also an author, journalist and columnist. Lloyd was born in Accrington, Lancashire in March 1947, and was educated at Accrington Secondary
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    John Steele

    John Frederick Steele (born 23 July 1946 in Brown Edge, Staffordshire) is a former English first class cricketer for Leicestershire and Glamorgan. An allrounder, he made 15,054 runs and took 584 wickets in his career which started in 1970 and ended in 1986.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    Joseph Richards

    Joseph Richards was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired one Test match in 1931 between Australia and the West Indies at the Melbourne on 13 February to 14 January 1931, Australia taking just two days to win by an innings, with Don Bradman scoring 152 and Bert Ironmonger taking 11 wickets. Richards' partner in this match, Andy Barlow, was standing in the first of his 11 Test matches.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    Peter Parker

    Peter Douglas Parker, known affectionately as 'Porky' or 'Spiderpig', (born 20 July 1959 in Herston, Queensland), is an Australian Test cricket match umpire. He has been a member of the International Panel of ICC Umpires since April 2003. He umpired eight Test matches between 1993 and 2007. His first match was between Australia and New Zealand at Brisbane on 3 December to 7 December 1993, won by Australia by an innings and 96 runs, with Allan Border and Steve Waugh scoring centuries, and Shane Warne and Craig McDermott taking 8 and 6 wickets respectively. Parker’s partner was Steve Randell. Parker’s last Test match in Australia was between Australia and the West Indies at Perth on 1 December to 3 December 2000, won by Australia by an innings and 27 runs with Mark Waugh scoring a century, and wickets being shared by Glenn McGrath (who took a hat-trick), Brett Lee, Jason Gillespie and Stuart MacGill. Parker’s partner was the English umpire John Hampshire. Parker retired to focus on his career away from the game on October 2008.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    Tom Spencer

    Thomas William Spencer (22 March 1914 – 1 November 1995) was a London-born English first-class cricketer and international umpire. He played 76 games for Kent before going on to officiate in 17 Test matches. He was awarded the OBE in 1976 for services to cricket. He also was an umpire at the 1975 Cricket World Cup final.
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Steve Bucknor

    Steve Bucknor

    The Honourable Stephen Anthony Bucknor OJ, also known as Steve Bucknor, is a former international cricket umpire. He was born in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on 31 May 1946. He became a high school mathematics teacher and sports coach before becoming an international football referee and a cricket umpire. In October 2007, he was awarded the Order of Jamaica, Commander Class, for "outstanding services in the field of sports". Bucknor's first international cricket fixture was a One Day International (ODI) between the West Indies and India at Antigua on 18 March 1989. His first Test match was at Sabina Park, Kingston, Jamaica, between 28 April and 3 May 1989, with the competing teams again being the West Indies and India. After umpiring in a few international matches, he was selected to umpire at the 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia, and went on to stand in the final despite being quite inexperienced. Bucknor also stood in the next four World Cup finals in 1996, 1999, 2003 and 2007, with the 2007 World Cup taking place in his native West Indies. In 1994 the ICC introduced a policy whereby one of the umpires in each Test match would be independent of the competing nations, selected from
    4.67
    3 votes
    201

    Albert Moss

    Albert E Moss (1863 - 11 December 1945) was a cricketer: a fast bowler who had a short first-class career of just four games, all in 1889-90, but who nevertheless holds a unique record: he is the only man to have taken all ten wickets in an innings in an 11-a-side match on his first-class debut. Albert Edward Moss was born on 3 October 1863 in Hugglescote, Coalville, where his family lived at 32 Station Street. Moss moved to New Zealand after his father succumbed to tuberculosis, hoping to avoid sharing his fate. He made his debut for Canterbury against Wellington at Christchurch on 27 December 1889, and the following day took 10-28 in 21.3 six-ball overs as Wellington were dismissed for 71; he also claimed three wickets in the second innings as Canterbury won by 33 runs. His first-innings achievement remains (as of 2007) the only instance of ten wickets in an innings in New Zealand. Moss took such pride in his achievement, especially as the ball was mounted with a plaque and presented to him by his cricket club, Lancaster Park C.C. He took thirteen wickets in his next three matches between January and March 1890, and shortly afterwards stood for the only time as an umpire. Albert
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Daryl Harper

    Daryl John Harper, (born 23 October 1951 in Mile End, South Australia) is an Australian cricket umpire, who was a Test umpire between 1998 and 2011. He was a member of the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires from 2002 until 2011 when the ICC announced that Harper was being stood down at the termination of his contract in July 2011. In June 2011, following criticism from India during the India-West Indies Test series Harper retired from umpiring. Harper was born in the Adelaide suburb of Mile End in 1951 and attended Norwood High School before taking up primary school teaching. He had a brief career as an Australian rules football umpire before injury forced him to quit. Harper played as a right-handed batsman in Adelaide grade cricket competition for the Teachers' College and East Torrens clubs. In 1983 he switched to umpiring, making his first-class cricket debut in 1987. Harper made his first appearance in an international fixture in January 1994 when he umpired a One Day International (ODI) in Perth between New Zealand and South Africa. In November 1998 Harper made his test match debut when appointed to stand in the 2nd Ashes test at the WACA ground alongside umpire Venkat; Harper also
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Eddie Phillipson

    William Edward Phillipson (3 December 1910 - 25 August 1991) was an English first class cricketer who was born in Cheshire. He played for Lancashire for 15 years before becoming a Test cricket umpire.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Harold "Dickie" Bird

    Harold "Dickie" Bird

    Harold Dennis "Dickie" Bird, OBE (born 19 April 1933, Barnsley, Yorkshire, England), is a retired English international cricket umpire. The son of a miner, he gained the nickname 'Dickie' at school. He resides in the South Yorkshire village of Staincross. In 1944 Bird failed his Eleven-plus exam and went to Raley Secondary Modern, leaving in 1948 at the age of 15. For a while, he worked at a coal mine on the surface, but gave it up, deciding it was not for him. Instead, he set out for a career in sport. When a knee injury put paid to playing football professionally, he followed his second love, cricket. In his early career in Barnsley, he played club cricket in the same team as Geoff Boycott, and journalist and chat show host Michael Parkinson, who became a lifelong friend. In 1956, Bird signed up with his home county, Yorkshire. Boycott has spoken highly of Bird's ability as a batsman, but feels that his attempt to forge a career as a county cricketer were hampered by his inability to control his nerves. Between 1956 and 1964, Bird played first-class cricket as a batsman for Yorkshire and Leicestershire in the English County Championship. After his county career, he coached and
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    John Swift

    John Sheddon Swift (3 February 1852 – 28 February 1926 at Kew, Victoria) was a Victorian first-class cricketer and Test match umpire. He played three matches for Victoria as a right-hand batsman, scoring 65 runs at an average of 13.00 with a highest score of 28. He also kept wicket, taking two catches. Swift umpired eight Test matches, and was the first Australian to regularly officiate. He made his debut in the match between Australia and England in Melbourne on 31 December 1881 to 4 January 1882, officiating with James Lillywhite. In 1882–83 he and Ted Elliott stood in all four Test matches, the first time two umpires had officiated throughout an entire series. Moyes commented that "apparently we had reached the time when some kind of qualification was required and some consistency in appointment was observed." This was the series that saw presentation of The Ashes urn to the English captain, Ivo Bligh. Swift's last match was between Australia and England in Sydney from 25 February to 1 March 1887.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206

    Joseph Rowbotham

    Joseph Rowbotham (8 July 1831 – 22 December 1899) was an English first-class cricketer, who played six matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club, in their pre-county incarnation from 1861 and 1862, and 94 for them as a full county club from 1863 to 1876. He played for the MCC in 1856, and also appeared for Sheffield (1854), All England Eleven (1862-1868), The Players (1864-1869), England (1864), Cambridgeshire and Yorkshire (1864), Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire (1872), United North of England Eleven (1870-1875), North of England (1857-1875) and Players of the North (1874-1876), all in first-class games. He played non first-class cricket for an All England Eleven in 1865. Rowbotham was born in Highfield, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England. He was Yorkshire's captain in 1873 and 1875. In 141 first-class matches, he scored 3,694 runs at 15.92, with three centuries and a best score of 113 against Surrey. An occasional wicket-keeper, he took seventy catches and completed five stumpings. He also took 3 for 37 against Gloucestershire, in his only first-class bowling spell. He umpired in one Test Match; England versus Australia at Manchester from 10 to 12 July 1884. Rowbotham died in December
    6.00
    1 votes
    207

    Nadeem Ghauri

    Mohammad Nadeem Ghauri (Urdu: محمد نديم غورى, born October 12, 1962, Lahore, Punjab) is a former Pakistani cricketer who played in one Test and six One Day Internationals (ODI) in 1990. He had the unfortunate record of scoring neither a run nor taking a wicket in his Test career. In 2005, Nadeem Ghauri officiated in his first Test as umpire, making his debut at Dhaka in a Test between Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. Five years earlier, he made his debut as a One Day International umpire in his hometown in match played between Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Nadeem Ghauri has officiated in five Tests, 43 ODIs and four T20Is. As of the 13 December 2011:
    6.00
    1 votes
    208

    Peter Enright

    Peter Robert Enright, (born 18 January 1925 in Brisbane, Queensland) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire. He umpired three Test matches between 1972 and 1974. His first match was between Australia and Pakistan at Melbourne on 29 December 1972 to 3 January 1973, won by Australia by 92 runs with Ian Redpath, Greg Chappell, Paul Sheahan, and John Benaud all scoring centuries. Enright’s partner in this match was Jack Collins, also standing in his first Test match. In the preceding season, 1971/72, a scheduled tour of Australia by South Africa was cancelled following political and moral protests against the apartheid policies of the South African government. In its place a ‘World Team’ visited Australia and played a series of Test standard, although never officially recognised. Enright stood in one of these matches, a rain-affected draw strongly in Australia’s favour. Enright’s last Test match was between Australia and New Zealand at Adelaide on 26 January to 31 January 1974, a match that Australia won by an innings. Enright’s colleague was Jack Collins.
    6.00
    1 votes
    209

    Rex Whitehead

    Rex Vernon Whitehead, (born 26 October 1948), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Victoria. He umpired 4 Test matches between 1981 and 1982. His first match was between Australia and India at Sydney on 2 January to 4 January 1981, won by Australia by an innings and 4 runs, with Greg Chappell scoring 204 and Dennis Lillee and Len Pascoe taking 13 wickets. Whitehead’s partner was Mel Johnson. Whitehead stood in all three Test matches in that series against India. In the third match, at Melbourne, India won by 59 runs, in spite of nearly forfeiting the match. Whitehead gave the Indian captain Sunil Gavaskar out LBW at a critical point in the match, but the batsman indicated he had edged the ball and reluctantly started to leave the field. Gavaskar urged his partner Chetan Chauhan to follow him. The Indian team manager intervened before Chauhan had left the field, ordering him to continue, and the match resumed. Wisden (1982 ed.) described the event as “a dreadful scene”, saying that “such a bizarre incident … brought controversy over the umpiring to a head”. Gavaskar later claimed he ordered Chauhan to join him in leaving the field in response to a racist remark made by
    6.00
    1 votes
    210

    Richard Ashman

    Richard Gerald Alfred Ashman (24 November 1899, Westminster, London, England – 15 May 1965, Bloemfontein, South Africa) was a South African cricket umpire. His umpiring career commenced in 1935 when he officiated in the second South Africa vs. Australia Test at Johannesburg in December. Ashman's fourteenth and final Test as umpire was in 1950. In domestic first-class cricket, Ashman played six games for Orange Free State in the 1930s.
    6.00
    1 votes
    211

    T. N. Cole

    Thomas Nicholas Cole (12 July 1844 – 27 January 1924) was an umpire in one Test match in Australia . Cole was born in Australia. His sole Test match as umpire was the 1st Ashes Test played between Australia and England at the Adelaide Oval in December 1884, when the Australian captain Billy Murdoch refused to accept the experienced English player and administrator James Lillywhite as umpire. This was also the only Test match umpired by fellow Australian umpire Isaac Fisher. A timeless Test, the match lasted four days, starting on 12 December and ending on 16 December, with 14 December as a rest day. Despite the batting prowess of Australia's Percy McDonnell (124 and 83 out of Australia's totals of 243 and 191), England won by 8 wickets, with Bobby Peel taking 8 wickets in the match (3/68 and 5/51) and Billy Bates 5/51 in Australia's first innings. The Australian side had been weakened by the absence of Fred Spofforth and Billy Midwinter; George Giffen played despite suffering from rheumatism, and Alec Bannerman damaged his finger attempting to stop a ball in the field and was absent hurt in the Australian second innings. Cole died in Australia.
    6.00
    1 votes
    212

    Frank Chester

    Frank Chester (20 January 1895 - 8 April 1957) was briefly an English first-class cricketer before the First World War. After losing an arm in active service in 1917, he was a Test cricket umpire for 31 years. Wisden stated in his obituary that he "raised umpiring to a higher level than had ever been known in the history of cricket". Chester was born in Bushey. An all-rounder, Alec Hearne suggested that he qualify for Worcestershire. Chester played as a left-handed middle-order batsman and a slow left-arm bowler in 55 first-class matches for Worcestershire as a teenager from 1912 to 1914. In 1913, when he was 17 years old, he scored 108 against Somerset to become the youngest player then to score a county century, a record that still stood until the 1950s. During 1913 Chester was summoned to meet Dr W G Grace who wished to congratulate him on a century scored at Lord's that season. He was praised in the 1913 Wisden as the "youngest professional regularly engaged in first-class cricket ... Very few players in the history of cricket have shown such form at the age of seventeen and a half". In 1914, he scored his highest first-class score, 178 not out, against Essex. He volunteered to
    5.00
    2 votes
    213

    Frederick Jakeman

    Frederick Jakeman (10 January 1920 – 17 May 1986) was an English first-class cricketer, who played for Yorkshire County Cricket Club in 1946 and 1947, and for Northamptonshire from 1949 to 1954. He also played first-class cricket for the MCC in 1952. Born in Holmfirth, Yorkshire, England, Jakeman was a left-handed batsman, who played 134 games in all, scoring 5,952 runs at 32.00, with a best score of 258 not out against Essex. Another notable innings include an unbeaten 176 against Surrey and 169 against Derbyshire. He scored eleven centuries in all with 42 fifties. He took 42 catches and took five wickets at an average of 32.40. He also appeared for an England XI in 1951, the Rest of England in 1952, for Yorkshire Second XI from 1946 to 1948, for a Scotland XI in 1945 and the Minor Counties in 1948. His son, Ronald Stuart Jakeman, also played three games for Northants in 1962 and 1963. Jakeman was a first-class umpire from 1961 to 1972. A heavy scorer in League cricket, he had engagements with Lightcliffe C.C., Salts C.C. and David Tractors C.C. and, in 1949, he scored a century for Holmfirth C.C. before Easter, the first batsman to do so in senior League cricket. He died in May
    5.00
    2 votes
    214

    Harry Parks

    Henry William 'Harry' Parks (born July 18, 1906 at Haywards Heath, Sussex; died May 7, 1984 at Taunton, Somerset) was an English cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman whose first-class career with Sussex lasted from 1926 to 1948. In 483 matches he scored 21,725 runs at an average of 33.57, with 42 centuries and a highest score of 200* . He scored 1000 runs in a season 14 times, with a best of 2,122 in 1947. Before World War Two he was a middle-order batsman, but after it he became John Langridge's opening partner. He was a member of a notable cricketing family, being the brother of Jim Parks senior and the uncle of Jim Parks junior. He stood as a first-class umpire in 1949 and 1950, and played one match for the Commonwealth XI in India in 1949-50, his last first-class match. Afterwards he was a coach at Taunton School.
    5.00
    2 votes
    215

    Harry Sharp

    Harry Philip Hugh Sharp (6 October 1917 – 15 January 1995) was an English cricketer, cricket coach and scorer. Harry Sharp was born in Kentish Town and played for London Schools. He was spotted by Jack Durston while practising at the Middlesex Indoor School at Acton. Seconded to MCC, his duties included rolling the wicket. He joined Middlesex CCC in 1934 and made his 1st XI debut in 1946. He played in 162 first-class matches as a right-handed batsman before his retirement in 1955. He scored 6,141 runs at an average of 25.80, with 9 hundreds and 30 fifties. He took 59 catches and 50 wickets with his off-spin at an average of 32.56, with a personal best of 5/52. He was awarded his county cap in 1948. His best season was in 1953, when he scored 1,564 runs. He was awarded a joint benefit with Alec Thompson by Middlesex in 1955 and a joint testimonial by MCC with Len Muncer in 1971. He served as an Able Seaman with the Eastern Front in the Indian Ocean, during the Second World War, but saw little action. Despite this, he gained the nickname of 'Admiral', which remained with him for the rest of his life. He played in several matches, while docked at Durban. He joined the MCC coaching
    5.00
    2 votes
    216

    Nigel Llong

    Nigel James Llong (born 11 February 1969 in Ashford, Kent) was a cricketer with Kent. He made his debut in 1990 and won his county cap in 1993. He was a left hand bat and off spin bowler. Llong has since become an umpire, officiating his maiden first class match in June 2000. Llong was appointed to the ECB's panel of first class umpires in 2002. In 2004 he became a member of the ICC International umpire panel as a specialist third umpire, and in 2006 he became a full member of the International Panel. As with all members of the ICC International umpire panel, Llong is eligible to serve as the home umpire in ODI's in England, and can also be appointed by the ICC to stand in ODI's and Test matches away from England as a neutral official. The highlights of Llong's career so far include his appointment to the final of the 2004 Twenty20 Cup, his first ODI, which took place at Lord's and was between England and Sri Lanka in June 2006, and his first overseas appointment which was the ODI between Pakistan and West Indies at Lahore in December 2006. Llong umpired his first Test match in January 2008, between New Zealand and Bangladesh at Dunedin. Llong was selected to be a reserve umpire
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Paul Reiffel

    Paul Reiffel

    Paul Ronald Reiffel (born 19 April 1966, Box Hill, Victoria) is a former Australian cricketer who played in 35 Tests and 92 ODIs from 1992 to 1999. He was part of Australia's victorious 1999 World Cup team. After retirement he became a First Class cricket umpire. Reiffel's career best bowling figures of 6-71 came at Edgbaston in 1993. Throughout his career he took 104 wickets at 26.96 in 35 Tests, taking 5 or more wickets in an innings five times. An accurate bowler whose main attacking weapon was seam bowling, Reiffel was a more than handy batsman. While limited in his shotmaking ability, he had a solid defence. Reiffel was a Victorian cricket captain who was notorious for declaring the Victoria innings closed in 2001 with Michael Klinger on 99 not out. Reiffel made his first class umpiring debut in the 2004/2005 season after first umpiring in Melbourne grade cricket in 2002. Reiffel joined the Cricket Australia National Umpire's Panel in the 2005/2006 season. He later became a member of the International Cricket Council International Panel of Umpires and Referees and made his international on-field umpiring debut in a One Day International match between Australia and New Zealand
    5.00
    2 votes
    218

    Robin Bailhache

    Robin Carl Bailhache, (born 4 May 1937 in Adelaide, South Australia), is a former Australian Test cricket match umpire. He umpired 27 Test matches between 1974 and 1988. His first match was between Australia and England at Brisbane on 29 November to 4 December 1974, won by Australia by 166 runs with Jeff Thomson taking 9 wickets. His partner was Tom Brooks and together they umpired all six Test matches in that series. Bailhache’s last Test match was between Australia and the West Indies at Perth on 2 December to 6 December 1988, won by the visitors by 169 runs, in spite of Merv Hughes taking 5/130 and 8/87, including a hat-trick spread over two innings and three overs. Bailhache’s colleague was Terry Prue. Bailhache also umpired 27 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1975 and 1989. He umpired one women’s Test match in 1991 and one women’s ODI in 1988. He umpired 95 first-class matches in his career between 1967 and 1992. Bailhache is remembered in particular for the controversial no-balling of New Zealand medium pace bowler Lance Cairns for bowling a bouncer to Australian tailender Jim Higgs. The Kiwis thought they had got the last batsman, Higgs, out by catching him behind
    5.00
    2 votes
    219

    Ross Emerson

    Ross Alexander Emerson (born 26 February 1954) was an international cricket umpire from Australia who is best known for calling Sri Lankan off-spinner Muttiah Muralitharan for throwing. He also played grade cricket for Petersham-Marrickville in the Sydney grade cricket competition. He is the brother-in-law of former Australian swing bowler Terry Alderman. After making his first-class umpiring debut in the 1982-83 season, Emerson was promoted to the National Umpires panel in 1993-94. He made his ODI debut in a match between Sri Lanka and the West Indies in Brisbane in January, 1996. He immediately became controversial, no-balling Muralitharan seven times, and continuing to do so even when he switched to bowling legbreaks, which are regarded as being impossible to throw. This led to Muralitharan being dropped by Sri Lanka for the rest of the tour, as he was unable to bowl without being called. Emerson continued to officiate in ODIs for the next three years, standing in nine more games, all in Australia, but it was his last game which overshadowed even the first. Standing at square leg, Emerson once again called Muralitharan, leading to Sri Lankan captain Arjuna Ranatunga to lead his
    5.00
    2 votes
    220

    Tom Flynn

    Thomas Flynn (birth date unknown, died 21 April 1931 at Charters Towers, Queensland) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired 4 Test matches, making his debut in the match between Australia and England in Melbourne on 1 January to 6 January 1892, standing with Jim Phillips. His last match, also with ‘Dimboola Jim’ as colleague, was in Melbourne on 1 March to 6 March 1895.
    5.00
    2 votes
    221
    Billy Bowden

    Billy Bowden

    Brent Fraser "Billy" Bowden (born 11 April 1963) is an international cricket umpire from New Zealand. He was a player until he began to suffer from rheumatoid arthritis and took up umpiring. He is well known for his dramatic signalling style which includes "crooked finger of doom" out signal. In March 1995 Bowden officiated his first One Day International between New Zealand and Sri Lanka at Hamilton. In March 2000 he was appointed his first Test match as an on-field umpire, and in 2002 he was included in the Emirates Panel of International Umpires. A year later he was asked to umpire at the Cricket World Cup in South Africa, and was chosen to be the fourth umpire in the final between Australia and India. Shortly after this he was duly promoted to the Emirates Elite Panel of ICC Umpires, of which he is still a member. He reprised his role as fourth umpire in the 2007 Cricket World Cup final and was involved in the wrong decision that caused the match to end in darkness. Bowden was involved in an incident at the 2006 Brisbane Ashes test while standing at the square leg fielding position, when knocked to the ground by a ball hit by Geraint Jones. In January 2007, Bowden became the
    4.50
    2 votes
    222

    Rudi Koertzen

    Rudolf Eric Koertzen (/ˈkɜrtsən/; born 26 March 1949) otherwise known as Rudi Koertzen is a former international cricket umpire. Koertzen was born in Knysna in the Western Cape, South Africa. A cricket enthusiast since his youth, Koertzen played league cricket while working for South African Railways. He became an umpire in 1981. His "slow death" style of indicating that a batsman is out makes him at once recognisable anywhere in the cricket world. He officiated in his first One Day International match when South Africa played India at Port Elizabeth on 9 December 1992, and in his first Test match during the same tour, when South Africa played India at Port Elizabeth on 26-29 December 1992. This series was also the first in which television replays were used to assist with run out decisions. He became a full-time ICC umpire in 1997, and was one of the original members of the Emirates ICC Elite umpire panel when it was founded in 2002. Following the retirement of Steve Bucknor in March 2009, he and Daryl Harper are the last two umpires from the original elite panel to continue standing in Test matches. He has officiated in world record number of ODIs, having overtaken David
    4.50
    2 votes
    223

    Desmond Fell

    Desmond Robert Fell (16 December 1912 - 22 January 1992) was a South African cricketer who played first-class cricket in for Natal either side of the Second World War, later becoming an umpire. He was born in Pietermaritzburg, and died aged 79 in Durban. His most successful season was 1946-47, when he scored 496 first-class runs at 49.60, including two centuries, the higher of these being the career-best 161 he hit against Rhodesia. He also passed 400 runs in 1937-38, but after that his highest aggregate was the 219 runs he accumulated in 1947-48. Fell's only first-class match outside South Africa was the game he played for Dominions against England at Lord's in late August 1945; he made 12 and 28 in what was the first first-class match to be played in England after the war. After his retirement from playing, Fell umpired 15 first-class matches in the 1950s and 1960s, almost all involving Natal. The two exceptions were the first Test between South Africa and New Zealand at Durban in 1961-62, and a non-Test game between a South African XI and the Australians at Pietermaritzburg in 1966-67.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224

    Frank Lee

    Frank Stanley Lee, born at St. John's Wood on July 24, 1905 and died in Westminster on March 30, 1982 was an English first-class cricketer and an umpire who officiated in Test matches. As a player, Lee was a solid, rather slow-scoring left-handed opening batsman. He played a couple of matches for Middlesex in 1925, but unable to command a regular place in the side he moved to Somerset, where he became qualified to play in 1929. He scored 107 in his third match for his new county, and though he struggled for runs in 1930 and did not complete 1,000 runs in a season for the first time until 1933, he was then a regular in the side until he retired after the 1947 season. His best batting year was 1938, when he scored 2,019 runs at an average of 44.86. He bowled only occasionally, but against Warwickshire at Taunton in 1933 he took five wickets for 53 runs. For several seasons right up to his retirement, he acted as reserve wicketkeeper if regular Somerset keeper Wally Luckes was ill or injured. Lee's first first-class match as an umpire came while he was still a player: he stood in the Somerset match with Cambridge University at Bath in 1947, and then played in the other matches of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    225

    Frederick Hunt

    Frederick Hunt (13 September 1875 - 31 March 1967) was an English cricketer who played county cricket for Kent between 1897 and 1898, and for Worcestershire between 1900 and 1922. He also played for Worcestershire between 1895 and 1896, before that county's elevation to the County Championship. He made his first-class debut for Kent against Gloucestershire at Maidstone in late May 1897. In a heavy defeat, he took three wickets, his maiden victim being Harry Wrathall. Hunt played four more games in that year's Championship, and also appeared against MCC at Lord's in 1898, but made no real impression and did not play for Kent again thereafter. The rest of Hunt's career was an on-off affair with Worcestershire. Only in 1908, when he played 14 matches, and 1913, when he turned out eight times, did he appear more than five times in a season, and in several years (1904, 1905 and 1912) he was entirely absent. In the aforementioned 1908 season Hunt took 14 wickets at 35.64 and scored 143 runs at 11.00, in both cases his best season's aggregates. His best bowling was 4-36 in May 1910, when he helped reduce Essex from 159/4 to 190 all out and allowed Worcestershire to chase just 84 for
    5.00
    1 votes
    226

    George Pope

    George Henry Pope (27 January 1911 – 29 October 1993) was an English cricketer, who played for Derbyshire from 1933 to 1948, and in one Test for England in 1947. Pope was born at Tibshelf, Derbyshire, and followed his older brother Alf Pope into the Derbyshire side in 1933. He made his debut in an innings victory against Worcestershire and played one more first class match that season. He became a regular player in 1934 and 1935. In 1936 a cartilage injury early in the season caused him to miss all but a handful of matches in the county's County Championship-winning side. He returned in 1937 and scored more than 1,000 runs with 92 wickets, and toured India with Lord Tennyson's XI in 1937-38. Pope was Derbyshire's leading all-rounder in both 1938 and 1939, achieving the all-rounder's double of 1,000 runs and 100 wickets in 1938. He played League cricket in 1946, the first season after World War II, but returned to Derbyshire for 1947, when he took 114 wickets. He was back again in 1948, when he completed the second double of his career and made his highest score, an unbeaten 207 against Hampshire at Portsmouth, sharing an unbroken seventh wicket stand of 241 with Albert Rhodes that
    5.00
    1 votes
    227

    Ray Isherwood

    Raymond Charles Isherwood, (born 29 January 1938 in Melbourne, Victoria), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Victoria. He umpired 3 Test matches between 1984 and 1985. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Sydney on 30 December 1984 to 2 January 1985, won by Australia by an innings and 55 runs, upsetting the powerful West Indians on a turning pitch. Kepler Wessels scoring 173 and Bob Holland taking 10 wickets. Isherwood’s partner was Mel Johnson. Wisden reported that “relations between the teams, already strained following incidents earlier in the series, were further affected by a verbal clash … following an unsuccessful appeal. The umpires reported the matter to the Australian Cricket Board, but no action was taken against the players involved”. Isherwood’s last Test match was between Australia and India at Melbourne on 26 December to 30 December 1985, a drawn match in which Australia was saved by the weather and the Indians lack of urgency. Allan Border and Greg Matthews scored centuries, and Bruce Reid took 6 of the 12 Indian wickets to fall. It was Steve Waugh’s first match. Isherwood’s colleague was Dick French. Isherwood umpired 21 One
    5.00
    1 votes
    228
    William Attewell

    William Attewell

    William Attewell ( /ˈætwɛl/; commonly known as Dick Attewell) (12 June 1861, Keyworth, Nottinghamshire, England – 11 June 1927, Long Eaton, Derbyshire, England) was a cricketer who played for Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club and England. Attewell was a medium pace bowler who was renowned for his extraordinary accuracy and economy. On the many sticky or crumbling pitches encountered in his prime Attewell could get on a great deal of spin so as to always beat the bat, whilst his accuracy would make slogging - the only way to make runs under such conditions - very difficult. He was responsible for the development of "off theory" - bowling wide of the off stump to a packed off-side field to frustrate batsmen on the rapidly improving pitches of the 1890s. At times Attewell was a useful batsman for his county, and he scored 102 against Kent in 1897. It is true that against the extremely fleet-footed Australian batsmen of his time, Attewell was fairly ineffective. Moreover, with bowlers such as Lohmann and J.T. Hearne available who could do all Attewell could, he had trouble maintaining his place at Test level despite all he did for Nottinghamshire and the Marylebone Cricket
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    1 votes
    229

    Bill Copeland

    William John (Bill) Copeland, (16 August 1929 – 20 September 2011) was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Warrnambool, Victoria. He umpired 1 Test match in 1980 between Australia and England at Sydney on 4 January to 8 January 1980, a low-scoring game with bowlers Dennis Lillee, Geoff Dymock, and Len Pascoe giving Australia a victory by 6 wickets, after a number of controversial decisions went against England. Copeland’s partner was Robin Bailhache. Copeland umpired one One Day International (ODI) match in December 1979. In January 1979 he umpired one women’s Test match. Altogether, he umpired 14 first-class matches in his career between 1973 and 1980, the Test match being his last. Off the field Copeland was a member of the Victorian police force. Copeland died peacefully on the 18th September 2011 aged 82.
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    230

    Bill Sheahan

    William Peter Sheahan, (born 12 December 1953), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Victoria. He umpired two Test matches in the 1993/94 season. His first match was between Australia and New Zealand at Bellerive Oval, Hobart on 26 November to 29 November 1993, won by Australia by an innings and 222 runs, with Michael Slater, David Boon and Mark Waugh scoring centuries, and Shane Warne and Tim May taking 9 and 7 wickets respectively. Sheahan's partner was Darrell Hair. Sheahan's other Test match was between Australia and South Africa at Sydney on 2 January to 6 January 1994, won by the visitors by 5 runs when Australia failed to reach a target of 117 runs. Shane Warne took 12 wickets in the match. Sheahan's partner was Steve Randell. Sheahan umpired 5 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1993 and 1994. Altogether, he umpired 34 first-class matches in his career between 1989 and 1999.
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    231

    David Constant

    David John Constant (born 9 November 1941, at Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire, England) played 61 first-class cricket matches from 1961 to 1968 for Kent and Leicestershire. He later became an international cricket umpire, officiating in 36 Tests from 1971 to 1988 and 33 one-day internationals from 1972 to 2001. Constant commenced his first-class cricket career with English county side Kent, later moving to Leicestershire. His first Test as umpire was the Third Test between England and Pakistan in July 1971; his colleague was Arthur Fagg. England won the match by 25 runs. Constant has not umpired in an international cricket match since the England v. Australia One Day International at The Oval, London in June 2001.
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    232

    John Nichols

    John Ernest Nichols (20 April 1878 – 29 February 1952) was an English cricketer who played five first-class games for Worcestershire between 1902 and 1904, as well as making one first-class appearance for Minor Counties in 1912. He had little success in any of these matches. Nichols also played for Norfolk and Staffordshire in the Minor Counties Championship, playing into his fifties for Norfolk. In 1927 he returned an analysis of 12.2–6–14–7 for Norfolk against Leicestershire Second XI. He stood in one match as an umpire: that between Minor Counties and the South Africans at Lakenham in 1924. Nichols was born in Acle, Norfolk; he died at the age of 73 in Thorpe, also in Norfolk.
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    233

    Luke Greenwood

    Luke Greenwood (13 July 1834 – 1 November 1909) was an English first-class cricketer, who played 48 matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club from 1861 to 1874. He had also played two matches for the club in 1862 and 1863 when they were still a 'pre county' club. Born in Cowmes, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, Greenwood was a useful player verging on all-rounder, who also played for Yorkshire with Stockton-on-Tees (1861), the North of England (1863-1864), the United England Eleven (1865), the Players (1865-1866), England (1867), North of the Thames (1868) and the United North of England Eleven (1870-1875), appearing in sixty nine matches all together. A right-handed lower order batsman, he scored 1,244 runs at 11.96, with a best of 83 against Surrey. A right arm fast round arm bowler, he took 113 wickets at 18.28, with a best of 8 for 35 against Cambridgeshire. He also took 6 for 43 against Surrey in the County Championship. Greenwood turned to umpiring even before his playing career was finished. He umpired forty six first-class matches between 1862 and 1886. With Bob Thoms, he officiated in one Test match, at The Oval between England and Australia in August 1882. It was after
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    234

    Peter Hartley

    Peter John Hartley (born 18 April 1960, Keighley Yorkshire, England) is an English first-class cricketer and umpire. Hartley made his debut for Warwickshire in 1982. He moved to Yorkshire in 1985, and stayed there until 1997, when he relocated to Hampshire. When he retired at the end of the 2000 season, Hartley was Hampshire's opening bowler. As of 2007, he was a Test official, performing television umpire duties in four Test matches, and four One Day Internationals. He has also umpired in two Twenty20 internationals between England and Pakistan in 2006, and England and West Indies in 2007.
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    235

    Tony Clarkson

    Anthony "Tony" Clarkson (born 5 September 1939, Killinghall, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England) is an English former first-class cricketer, who played for Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Somerset County Cricket Club. Clarkson was a right-handed opening batsman and off break bowler, and played his early cricket for the Harrogate Club, for whom he opened both the batting and the bowling. After first playing for the Yorkshire Second XI in 1958, he made his debut for his native county in 1963, playing when the Test stars were away. He moved to Somerset in 1966 and played until 1971, winning his Somerset cap in 1968. Clarkson's father had been a league professional for Rothwell C.C. in the Leeds League before World War II. In 110 matches he scored 4,458 runs at 25.18, with two centuries and a best of 131 for an average of 25.18. He took 13 wickets at 28.25. He played 50 one day games, scoring 752 runs with a best of 102* at 16.93, and taking two wickets. He played for several clubs as a professional until 1991, when he retired aged 51. He had five successful years in the North Yorkshire-South Durham league, scoring more than 1,000 runs each season and, in the Bradford League, playing for
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    236

    B. C. Cooray

    Bulathsinghalage Cyril Cooray (born May 15, 1941 in Colombo), was an international cricket umpire from Sri Lanka. He officiated in 21 Test matches and 48 ODI's.
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    237

    Barry Dudleston

    Barry Dudleston (born 16 July 1945, in Bebington, Cheshire, England) is a former first-class cricketer and umpire. He was a right-handed batsman and occasional wicketkeeper who played cricket for Rhodesia, Gloucestershire and Leicestershire. By the end of his career of 295 first-class games he had made 14,747 runs at 32.48, with 32 hundreds and 241 dismissals. After his playing career ended he became an umpire and officiated in two Test matches and four ODI games. Along with John Hampshire, he umpired the last Benson and Hedges Cup final in 2002, thirty years after helping Leicestershire beat Yorkshire (including John Hampshire) by five wickets in the first Benson and Hedges Cup final in 1972.
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    238

    Colin Egar

    Colin John "Col" Egar (30 March 1928 – 4 September 2008) was an Australian Test cricket umpire. Born in Malvern, South Australia, Egar umpired 29 Test matches between 1960 and 1969. Egar started his career as an umpire of Australian rules football and he quickly gained a reputation for being a forthright arbiter. He became an umpire in district cricket, and gained a reputation for his willingness to no-ball suspicious bowlers for throwing. In his district career, he called bowlers on eight occasions, not counting multiple no-ball calls against a bowler in the same match. Egar made his first-class umpiring debut during the 1956–57 season when he stood in South Australia's home Sheffield Shield match against Queensland at the Adelaide Oval. This was Egar's only appointment for the season. At the time, there were no neutral umpires, and the host association provided the officials, so Egar's Sheffield fixtures all took place at the Adelaide Oval. During that era, the Shield program consisted of eight matches for each state, with four home games. The following season, Egar became more of a regular, standing in three of the four matches at Adelaide Oval. In 1958–59, Egar stood in all but
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    239

    Dave Elder

    David Alexander Elder (29 April 1865 at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) – 22 April 1954 at Deepdene, Victoria) was a cricket Test match umpire. He umpired twelve Test matches, all between Australia and England. He made his debut in the match played at Melbourne on 30 December 1911 to 3 January 1912, won by England by 8 wickets. All Elder's other matches were after the First World War. His last match was played at Adelaide on 1 February to 8 February 1929, won narrowly by England in spite of Archie Jackson's 164 on debut. His colleagues were Bob Crockett and George Hele. His most controversial decision was to give Alan Kippax out bowled from square-leg in the second Test of the 1928-29 series. Kippax tried to glance a ball and missed, and the bails were seen to fall off. Hele, at the bowler's end, gave it not out, and an appeal was made to Elder, who made a decision he had no right to. This decision, the absence of the young Don Bradman who had been dropped, a serious injury to Bill Ponsford and 251 to Wally Hammond of England, made this a miserable game for Australia. Perhaps it affected Elder, as his Test career ended later that season. Johnnie Moyes thought that, after
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    240

    Ellis Achong

    Ellis Edgar ("Puss") Achong (16 February 1904 – 29 August 1986) was a sportsman from Trinidad and Tobago in the West Indies. He played cricket for the West Indies and was the first person of Chinese descent to play in a Test match. Left-arm unorthodox spin (left-arm wrist spin) is sometimes known as "slow left-arm chinaman" (SLC) which is thought to be in his honour. Achong was born in Belmont, Port of Spain. He played football as a left-winger for a local team, Maple, in the 1920s and 1930s, and represented Trinidad and Tobago from 1919 to 1932. Achong is better known for playing cricket. He was mainly a bowler. His stock ball was left-arm orthodox spin (left-arm finger spin), but one of his variations was unorthodox left-arm spin. After bowling this variation to have Walter Robins stumped at Old Trafford in 1933, it is reputed that Robins said to the umpire Joe Hardstaff Sr., "fancy being done by a bloody Chinaman". Learie Constantine is said to have replied: "Do you mean the bowler or the ball?" An unorthodox left-arm spin delivery (spinning from the off side to the leg side for a right-handed batsman) is known as a "chinaman" as a result. However, Achong was not the earliest
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    241

    Isaac Fisher

    Isaac Alfred Fisher (12 April 1851 – 19 June 1944) was an umpire in one Test match in Australia. Fisher was born in Adelaide, South Australia. He was an umpire in first-class cricket from February 1884 to October 1897. He made his debut as a first-class umpire in a match between South Australia and Victoria at Adelaide in February 1884. His second first-class match as umpire was also the only Test match in which he officiated, the 1st Ashes Test played between Australia and England at the Adelaide Oval in December 1884, when the Australian captain Billy Murdoch refused to accept the experienced English player and administrator James Lillywhite as umpire. This was also the only Test match umpired by fellow Australian umpire T. N. Cole. A timeless Test, the match lasted four days, starting on 12 December and ending on 16 December, with 14 December as a rest day. Despite the batting prowess of Australia's Percy McDonnell (124 and 83 out of Australia's totals of 243 and 191), England won by 8 wickets, with Bobby Peel taking 8 wickets in the match (3/68 and 5/51) and Billy Bates 5/51 in Australia's first innings. The Australian side had been weakened by the absence of Fred Spofforth and
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    242

    John Arnold

    John Arnold (30 November 1907, Cowley, Oxford – 4 April 1984, Southampton, Hampshire) was an English cricketer who played in one Test in 1931. John Arnold was an attacking opening batsman for Hampshire for 20 years from 1930, when he qualified by residence, having previously played Minor Counties cricket for Oxfordshire. He scored 1,000 runs in his first full first-class season and missed out on that feat only once in his career. In 1934, he scored 2,261 runs at an average of 48 runs per innings, the only time he passed 2,000 runs in a season. His one poor season, 1938, led to him not being re-engaged by Hampshire, but the county had second thoughts and he returned for the 1939 season and for five more seasons after the Second World War. He fell ill during the 1950 season, and retired without playing again. He was a first-class umpire for 14 seasons from 1961. Arnold played only one Test match: with Fred Bakewell, he formed an experimental opening partnership for England against New Zealand at Lord's in 1931, following the retirement from Test cricket of Jack Hobbs and injury to Herbert Sutcliffe. The move was not a success. Arnold was out for 0 in the first innings, and though he
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    243

    Khizer Hayat

    Khizer Hayat (Urdu: خضرحيات, born 5 January 1939) is a Pakistani former cricket player and umpire. He played first-class cricket for ten years before taking up umpiring and retired having officiated in 34 Test matches ("Tests") and 55 One Day International matches. Hayat was born in Lahore, Punjab, when it was part of British India. His brother Sikander played three first-class matches for Lahore B cricket team in 1962–63. Before becoming an umpire, Hayat played in 21 first-class matches. He played once for the Punjab A cricket team in January 1957, in the 1956/7 Quaid-e-Azam Trophy against Pakistan Railways, and bagged a pair. He then played for Pakistan Railways in January 1960, in their 1959/60 Quaid-e-Azam Trophy quarter-final match against Lahore, making small scores. He played twice for a combined Railways and Quetta team in January 1961, helping them to win the semi-final and final of the 1960/1 Ayub Trophy, scoring 52 not out in their winning first-innings score of 468 in the final. He played as wicket-keeper for Pakistan Railways from 1961 to 1965, scoring 121 against the Pakistan Universities cricket team in December 1962, and bowling 10 balls against Karachi Blues in a
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    244

    Mick Harvey

    Clarence Edgar (Mick) Harvey, (born 17 March 1921 at Newcastle, New South Wales), is a former first-class cricketer and Australian Test cricket umpire. He was the brother of Test batsmen Merv and Neil Harvey. Harvey made his first-class debut in 1948–49, playing in the first three matches of the season for Victoria as an opening batsman. However, he was unproductive, scoring only 91 runs at a batting average of 15.16, and was dropped. He moved to Queensland the following season in search of more opportunities and was selected in one match. Harvey had his best first-class season in 1950–51, scoring 490 runs at 37.69, including his maiden first-class century against a full-strength New South Wales team with several Test bowlers. However, he struggled the following season and was dropped, and did not play a single first-class match in 1952–53. Recalled the following season, he overcame a slow start to score two centuries later in the summer to end with 421 runs at 38.27 for the summer. After a poor season, Harvey was dropped late in the 1955–56 season. Harvey was dropped after two matches in 1956–57, ending his first-class career. After his playing career was over, Harvey took up
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    245

    Nigel Plews

    Nigel Trevor Plews (5 September 1934 – 19 October 2008) was a cricket umpire, who stood in first class and international level matches. He was born in Nottingham. Plews was unusual for a top level English umpire, in that he was one of only four umpires who have stood in Tests in England since World War II who did not play first class cricket,. He stood in 11 Test matches between 1988 and 1995. A big man - he was 6ft 6in - with a commanding but calm presence, he had a sound temperament and excellent judgment, and held the respect of all those for whom he officiated. He took up umpiring full-time after retiring from a 25-year career with the Nottingham city police force, where he was a detective sergeant - he was nicknamed "Serge" on the field - in the Fraud Squad. He also worked for a large firm of accountants. He also stood in 16 one day international matches before retiring. Plews died of renal cancer on 19 October 2008.
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    246

    Ric Evans

    Richard James Evans, (born 20 November 1942), was an Australian Test cricket match umpire, from Western Australia. He umpired 3 Test matches between 1989 and 1990. His first match was between Australia and the West Indies at Adelaide on 3 February to 7 February 1989, a drawn match on a batting pitch too good for a result. Dean Jones scored 216 in Australia’s first innings of 515, and Mike Whitney took 7/89 in the West Indies’ reply. Evans’ partner, as in all his matches, was Peter McConnell. Wisden (1990 ed., pp. 976–8) thought that “obdurate umpiring made it a contentious, albeit interesting, match” where “each day brought disputed decisions”. Several players showed “unconcealed dissent”, and after the game the captains “considered it ill-advised of the Australian Board to have appointed one umpire (Evans) to such an important Test match when he had not stood in one before”. Evans’ last Test match was between Australia and Pakistan at Melbourne on 12 January to 16 January 1990, won by Australia by 92 runs with only 22 minutes left. Mark Taylor scored a century, Terry Alderman took 8 wickets, and Merv Hughes 6 wickets. Six LBW decisions went Australia’s way in Pakistan’s second
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    247
    Richard Illingworth

    Richard Illingworth

    Richard Illingworth (born Richard Keith Illingworth on 23 August 1967) is an English former cricketer, who is currently a first-class cricket umpire. The bulk of his domestic cricketing career occurred with Worcestershire, although he had a spell with Derbyshire, and overseas with Natal. He played in nine Tests and twenty five ODIs for England, including participating in the 1992 and 1996 Cricket World Cups. Playing mainly as a left-arm spinner, Illingworth made his first-class debut in 1982, promoted to the Worcestershire first team after just two Second XI appearances and taking 3-61 against Somerset. His figures that year were fairly modest; eighteen first-class wickets cost him over 45 apiece, and he bowled just eight overs in one-day cricket; but Worcestershire saw potential and persevered. By 1983, he was a first-team regular, taking forty eight first-class wickets, a figure he improved on (with 57) the following year. He did play one season (1988/89) in the South African Currie Cup for Natal, but otherwise played only English domestic cricket. For most of his twenty-season county cricket career, Illingworth remained with Worcestershire, but after he failed to win a contract
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    248

    Robert Burrows

    Robert Dixon Burrows (6 June 1871 – 12 February 1943) was a first class cricketer who played for Worcestershire CCC between 1899 and 1919, he also umpired one test match and set a world record in 1911 when he sent a bail spinning 67 yards and 6 inches when he bowled Huddleston at Old Trafford. He bowled right arm fast medium and was a more than handy right-handed batsman. He took 96 wickets in 1901 and exactly 100 wickets in 1910, at 23.46 and 1913 at 21.41, leading his county's attack for some years. Burrows scored 112 against Gloucestershire CCC at Worcester in 1907 and averaged 25.28, but his bowling fell to 57 wickets at 24 runs apiece, as Arnold and Cuffe came to the fore. He recorded his second first-class century, 107* again against Gloucestershire, at Worcester in July 1914, when he batted number ten. In all first class cricket he scored 5223 runs at 14.07 and took 894 wickets, with a best of 8 for 48 at 26.40 apiece. He held 138 catches, mostly at point. In 1923 he joined the first-class umpire's list and served during nine seasons. His sole test match in charge came in the England v Australia match at Trent Bridge from 12 to 15 June 1926.
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    249

    Robert Carpenter

    Robert Pearson Carpenter (18 November 1830 in Mill Road, Cambridge – 14 July 1901 in Cambridge) was a noted English cricketer and umpire. A right-handed batsman and occasional wicket-keeper, he played for Cambridgeshire during its brief period as a first-class county in the 1850s and 1860s, as well as for the United All-England Eleven. He umpired in two Tests between England and Australia in the 1880s. Carpenter's known first-class career spanned the 1855 to 1876 seasons. He scored 5220 runs in 141 matches @ 24.39, making four centuries with a highest score of 134. He took 190 catches and made 2 stumpings. At the end of the 1859 English cricket season, Carpenter was one of the 12 players who took part in cricket's first-ever overseas tour when an England cricket team led by George Parr visited North America. He also toured Australia with Parr in 1863. In the early 1860s, Carpenter and his Cambridgeshire contemporary Thomas Hayward were rated as the finest batsmen in England. Richard Daft was among those ranking them as equal first, but George Parr reckoned Carpenter the better of the two. W. G. Grace said of Carpenter that "he may be safely placed as one of the finest of our great
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    250

    Ron Wright

    Ronald James John (Ron) Wright (1913 – 14 June 1968) was an Australian cricket test match umpire. He umpired 13 Test matches between 1948 and 1959. His first match was between Australia and India at Adelaide on 23 January to 28 January 1948, a match won by Australia by an innings, with Don Bradman scoring 201 (following a century in each innings in the previous Test), Lindsay Hassett scoring 198 not out, and Ray Lindwall taking 7 wickets in the second innings. Wright’s partner in this match was George Borwick. His last match was between Australia and England at Melbourne on 13 February to 18 February 1959, where the home team won comfortably. Les Townsend, officiating in his only Test match, was Wright’s partner in this match.
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