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Best Courthouse of All Time

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    1
    Caldwell County Courthouse

    Caldwell County Courthouse

    The Caldwell County Courthouse is a courthouse located in Lockhart, Texas. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The courthouse was built in the Second Empire architectural style.
    7.38
    8 votes
    2
    Tippecanoe County Courthouse

    Tippecanoe County Courthouse

    The Tippecanoe County Courthouse is located on the public square in the city of Lafayette in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. The public square is located on 4th Street between Main and Columbia Streets. When the county was first organized in 1826, rooms were rented in which to conduct county business, until 1829 when the first courthouse was built; it was a two-story brick building. It was replaced by a larger brick building in 1845 at a cost of about $3,000; there was a fire in this building in the 1840s, but it was extinguished before it could do any damage. The third and current courthouse was built on the site from 1881 to 1884 at a cost of about $500,000. It is built of Indiana limestone and is two-and-a-half stories tall on a raised basement. Architecturally, it is a pastiche of styles including Second Empire, Beaux Arts, Baroque, Rococo, Georgian and Neo-Classical. Paul Goeldner in his study of Midwestern courthouses called the building the "epitome of county capitals". When Samuel Clemens visited Lafayette he was asked his opinion about the Tippecanoe County Courthouse by a local newspaper reporter; Clemens replied: "Striking, striking indeed! It must have struck the taxpayers
    7.25
    8 votes
    3
    Baltimore City Circuit Courthouses

    Baltimore City Circuit Courthouses

    The Baltimore City Circuit Courthouses are located in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. Facing each other in the 100 block of North Calvert Street, the Clarence M. Mitchell, Jr, Courthouse and Courthouse East (the old Baltimore Post Office) house the 30 judges of the 8th judicial circuit for the state of Maryland. In addition to the criminal, civil and family courts, the courthouses also contain the Office of the State's Attorney for Baltimore City, the Clerk of the Court, the Baltimore City Law Library, the Sheriff's Office, the Baltimore Courthouse and Law Museum, the Pretrial Release Division of the Maryland Division of Corrections, several pretrial detention lockups, jury assembly rooms, land records, court medical offices and Masters hearing rooms. In 1894, 79 local and national architectural firms responded to a design competition under the Tarsney Act for the new courthouse. This act required competition in the design of federal buildings and was administered by the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Department of the Treasury. Of the entries, a Greek Revival–styled courthouse proposed by the Baltimore firm of Wyatt and Nolting was chosen. The cornerstone for the
    8.00
    6 votes
    4
    Four Courts

    Four Courts

    The Four Courts (Irish: Na Ceithre Cúirteanna) in Dublin is Ireland's main courts building. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. The building until 2010 also formerly was the location for the Central Criminal Court. Work based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the old High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    Pierce Courthouse

    Pierce Courthouse

    Pierce Courthouse, also known as Pierce Historic Site, is a historic wooden building located in Pierce, Idaho. It was built in 1862 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The courthouse, and the town of Pierce itself, is named after Elias D. Pierce, a local metal prospector active in the mid-19th century. Later the town of Pierce became the Shoshone County (Washington Territory) seat. The Pierce Courthouse housed governmental functions until 1885. The site is operated by the Idaho State Historical Society.
    8.00
    6 votes
    6
    Highlands County Courthouse

    Highlands County Courthouse

    The Highlands County Courthouse (constructed in 1927) is a historic U.S. courthouse in Sebring, Florida. It is located at 430 South Commerce Avenue. On August 14, 1989, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    7.67
    6 votes
    7
    Old Clay County Courthouse

    Old Clay County Courthouse

    The Old Clay County Courthouse in Clay, West Virginia was designed by Frank L. Packard and built in 1902. The Beaux-Arts building was located on a hill overlooking the county seat. The courthouse was the site of three notable trials: the Sarah Ann Legg trial of 1905, the first trial of a woman in Clay County for murder, the Booger Hole trial of 1917, in which citizens nearly lynched the defendants, and the Oscar Bail trial of 1953, in which Bail was convicted of killing a mine guard in the Great Widen Coal Strike. Since a new courthouse opened across the street, the old courthouse houses magistrate's offices and the county extension agent.
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Weston County Courthouse

    Weston County Courthouse

    The Weston County Courthouse in Newcastle, Wyoming was designed by Charles A. Randall and built in 1910-11. The Beaux-Arts style courthouse is the most elaborate building in Newcastle, and a symbol of the community's prosperity at the time of its construction. The courthouse features a two story central pavilion supported by paired Ionic columns supporting an entablature and pediment. The parapet is ornamented by galvanized metal globes with astatue of Justice on the top of the pediment. An octagonal cupola with arched windows crowns the building. A renovation has replaced the original doors with aluminum-framed units, infilled many windows with glass block and closed the cupola windows with wood panels. Construction of the courthouse was attended by difficulties with contracting. The first contractor was fired and replaced by John L. Sundstrom, Oscar Linden, Carl Sjostrum and Robert Linden with experience in stonemasonry. Work was complete in 1911, in time for a visit in October and an address from the courthouse steps by U.S. President William Howard Taft. A three story wing dedicated as a war memorial was added on the west side of the building in 1953. The addition uses
    9.00
    4 votes
    9
    Lyon County Courthouse

    Lyon County Courthouse

    Lyon County Courthouse is a courthouse in Yerington, Nevada, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It currently it serves as a courthouse for Lyon County, Nevada.
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Dade County Courthouse

    Dade County Courthouse

    The Dade County Courthouse, now known as the Miami-Dade County Courthouse, is a historic courthouse located at 73 West Flagler Street in Miami, Florida. Constructed over four years (1925–28), it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on January 4, 1989. The building is 360 feet (120 m) tall with 28 floors. When built, it was the tallest building in Miami and in Florida. It is still in use as the main civil courthouse of Miami-Dade County. When county government was established following the Civil War, public records were so sparse they could be carried in a carpetbag and most probably were. Therefore, the "courthouse" was wherever the county's chief office holder decided to do business. In 1890, Miami-Dade County's first courthouse stood in the town of Juno, Florida some ten miles north of West Palm Beach. At that time, Miami-Dade County covered more territory than it does today, stretching from Bahia Honda Key, in the middle Keys up to the St. Lucie River north of Palm Beach. Juno was chosen as the "county seat" because of its strategic location at the southern terminus of the Jupiter-Juno railroad, as well as, the northern terminus of the boat and connecting
    8.75
    4 votes
    11
    Ashtabula County Courthouse Group

    Ashtabula County Courthouse Group

    Ashtabula County Courthouse Group is a registered historic district in Jefferson, Ohio, listed in the National Register on 1975-06-30. The Ashtabula County Courthouse Group is a cluster of buildings built at various times in the history of the county. The center of the district and the oldest building is the 1850 courthouse designed in the popular Italianate style so prevalent in the Victorian era. The courthouse was once the only building in this group, but the increasing population and confined spaces forced the county to develop the area into a judicial and administrative campus. Ashtabula County was settled around 1796 and was part of the Connecticut Western Reserve of the Northwest Territory. The county was officially established by the Ohio General Assembly in 1807 with the county seat located in Jefferson. A courthouse was constructed around the same time and was completed in 1811. The building was two stories high and was a simple brick structure. This building lasted until 1836 when it was razed for the construction of a new courthouse. The second courthouse was designed by architect Willis Smith from Kinsman. The structure is basically the same in appearance as the
    7.40
    5 votes
    12
    Walton County Courthouse

    Walton County Courthouse

    The Walton County Courthouse is an historic courthouse building located in DeFuniak Springs, Florida. It is a contributing property in the DeFuniak Springs Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 28, 1992. A new addition to the courthouse was opened in October 2007 and the original courthouse is being renovated. The Confederate monument was erected in 1871 on the old courthouse grounds in Valley Church, then moved to a new courthouse site in Euchee Anna and finally moved to DeFuniak Springs when this courthouse was built. It was erected in memory of the county's war dead and was reportedly the first such monument built.
    7.40
    5 votes
    13
    Bristol County Courthouse

    Bristol County Courthouse

    Bristol County Courthouse is an historic courthouse on High Street in Bristol, Rhode Island, USA. The Federal style courthouse was built in 1816 by Russell Warren and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.
    8.50
    4 votes
    14
    Jefferson County Courthouse

    Jefferson County Courthouse

    The Jefferson County Courthouse is an historic Classical Revival style courthouse building located in Monticello, Florida. Built in 1909, it was designed by Georgia-born American architect Edward Columbus Hosford, who is noted for the courthouses and other buildings that he designed in Florida, Georgia and Texas. The builder was Mutual Construction Company of Louisville, Kentucky whose bid for the project was $39,412. The motto, Suum Cuique, Latin for To each his own, which is inscribed over the doors of the courthouse, is jokingly pronounced Sue ‘em quick by some local residents. The building is a contributing property in the Monticello Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 19, 1977
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Logan County Courthouse

    Logan County Courthouse

    The Logan County Courthouse is a historic Second Empire building located on the southeastern corner of Main Street and Columbus Avenue in downtown Bellefontaine, Ohio, United States. Built in 1870 at a cost of $105,398.08, the courthouse was constructed primarily of locally-mined sandstone, and it is covered with a mansard roof. The courthouse is adjacent to Court Avenue, the first concrete street in the United States. On June 4, 1973, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Middlesex County Courthouse

    Middlesex County Courthouse

    The Middlesex County Courthouse is a historic courthouse building in East Cambridge, Massachusetts, now on the National Register of Historic Places. It was initially designed in 1814-1816 by noted architect Charles Bulfinch (1763–1844), and subsequently enlarged in 1848 by Ammi B. Young. The original courthouse was given by Andrew Craigie as part of his scheme to develop East Cambridge. Bulfinch created its plans, and it was erected 1814-1816 on Third Street between Otis and Thorndike Streets. His original stuccoed building is now known by only one surviving sketch, and forms the central core of today's building. In 1848 architect Young enlarged and refaced the building in brick, adding late Federal and Greek Revival details such as a monumental cupola, Palladian windows, and recessed wall arches. A later 1924 addition obscured his 1848 entry facade. In 1973 the buildings were slated for demolition to make a parking lot, but saved by a preservation effort led by architect Graham Gund. Restoration efforts removed the 1924 addition, recreated Young's entry portico, restored its large clock tower, and cleaned and repaired the cupola's gold dome, brickwork, cast-iron trim, wrought-iron
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Pioneer Courthouse

    Pioneer Courthouse

    The Pioneer Courthouse is a federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, United States. Built beginning in 1869, the structure is the oldest federal building in the Pacific Northwest, and the second oldest west of the Mississippi River. Along with Pioneer Courthouse Square, it serves as the center of downtown Portland. It is also known as the Pioneer Post Office because a popular downtown Portland post office was, until 2005, located inside. The courthouse is one of four primary locations where the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit hears oral arguments. It also houses the chambers of the Portland-based judges on the Ninth Circuit. Built in stages between 1869 and 1903, it was first occupied in 1875 by judge Matthew Deady. At that time the building was named the United States Building. Pioneer Courthouse has survived several attempts to demolish it, while continuing to function as a federal facility. On March 20, 1973, the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1977. In March 1933, city engineer Olaf Laurgaard proposed tearing down the building to open a parking garage. John C. Ainsworth asked
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Vandalia State House State Historic Site

    Vandalia State House State Historic Site

    The Vandalia State House, built in 1836, is the fourth capitol building of the U.S. state of Illinois. It is also the oldest capitol building in Illinois to survive, as the first, second, and third capitol buildings have all disappeared. The brick Federal style state house has been operated by the state of Illinois as a monument of Illinois pioneer years since 1933. It is located in Vandalia, Illinois, on the National Road. The Vandalia State House, Illinois's fourth capitol, was built when Illinois was in its eighteenth year as a state. Admitted to the Union in 1818, Illinois quickly abandoned its first governmental center of Kaskaskia, Illinois, and its capitol building (active in 1818-1820). A second "state house" was built of lumber at the new capital of Vandalia, but it burned to the ground after only three years (1820–1823). The third capitol building (1824–1836), also built in Vandalia, was the scene of most of the service of Abraham Lincoln as a member of the Illinois state legislature. Lincoln did not, however, become a beloved figure in Vandalia. Elected from Sangamon County, closer to the geographic center of Illinois, Lincoln led a central Illinois caucus that called
    6.33
    6 votes
    19
    Hanover County Courthouse

    Hanover County Courthouse

    Hanover County Courthouse, built in 1735, is an historic courthouse located in Hanover Court House, Virginia. In 1763, Patrick Henry, who lived and practiced law in Hanover County, argued the case of the Parson's Cause, a case involving King George III's requirement that Virginians pay taxes to support the local Anglican ministry despite their objections and those of the House of Burgesses. Henry, representing the County, accused the King of tyranny in overturning colonial law without regard to the wishes of his subjects. A new modern government complex with two court buildings was built and opened in 1979 adjacent to the 1735 courthouse, which is still actively used for periodic judicial proceedings to alleviate crowded court dockets and also for handling ceremonial events. On December 30, 1970, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and on November 7, 1973 it was designated a National Historic Landmark. It is the focal point of the Hanover County Courthouse Historic District.
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Steele County Courthouse

    Steele County Courthouse

    The Steele County Courthouse, located at 111 East Main Street in Owatonna, Steele County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a three-story Austin red-brick building with red mortar, accented with Lake Superior brown stone. It was designed by T. D. Allen of Minneapolis in a Romanesque Revival and Italianate style, featuring corner towers, a turret, and a large clock on four sides. Windows are arched and a statue representing Mercy, Law, and Justice sits above the north face of the building. Polished granite columns support double arches at the entrances. The interior is decorated with wainscoting, woodwork, and an ornate oak staircase.
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Boone County Courthouse

    Boone County Courthouse

    The Boone County Courthouse is the location of the 13th Judicial Circuit of Missouri covering Boone and Callaway counties. The courthouse is located in the Boone County Government Complex in downtown Columbia, Missouri. It is the third court at this location. The first of which housed a studio of George Caleb Bingham and is the subject of the painting 1855 painting "Verdict of the People. The courthouse is a contributing property to the Downtown Columbia Historic District.
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Allegheny County Courthouse

    Allegheny County Courthouse

    Allegheny County Courthouse is a government building of Allegheny County located in Downtown of the county seat, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The complex is bordered by wide thoroughfares named for city founders James Ross (Ross Street), John Forbes (Forbes Avenue) and James Grant (Grant Street). Pittsburgh's original courthouse, first occupied in 1794, was a wooden structure located on one side of Market Square. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court and from December 7, 1818 until 1841 the Western District of Pennsylvania also held court sessions at Market Square. Land for a new courthouse was purchased in April, 1834. This was a tract of land on the corner of Fourth and Grant Streets, on Grant's Hill. Construction took place between 1836 and 1840. This court house was built with polished gray sandstone, quarried at Coal Hill (present-day Mount Washington), opposite Ferry Street along the Monongahela River. The building was designed by John Chislett. The Greek Revival design included a domed cupola housing a rotunda 60 feet (18 m) in diameter and 80 feet (24 m) high. The building was completed in 1841. The buildings second floor again served as the headquarters for both the Commonwealth
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Jacksonville Museum

    Jacksonville Museum

    The Jackson County Courthouse is a former county courthouse in Jacksonville, Oregon, United States, built in 1883. The courthouse is a contributing property of the Jacksonville Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). It was formerly the Jacksonville Museum owned by Jackson County and operated by the Southern Oregon Historical Society, which also managed several other historic properties in Jacksonville. The museum in the courthouse closed in 2006 because of lack of funding. In 2010, the Jacksonville Heritage Society was formed to assume managemet of the historic Courthouse, the 1873 Cornelius C. Beekman House, the 1863 Cornelius C. Beekman Bank, and the 1868 St. Joseph's Catholic Rectory. The Southern Oregon Historical Society still operates Hanley Farm in Central Point and a research library in Medford. The current Jackson County Courthouse, also listed on the NRHP, is in Medford, where the county seat was moved in 1926.
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Sandra Day O'Connor United States Courthouse

    Sandra Day O'Connor United States Courthouse

    The Sandra Day O'Connor United States Courthouse is an American courthouse at 401 West Washington Street in Phoenix, Arizona. Pursuant to S. 1595, enacted by the United States Congress, it is named after Sandra Day O'Connor, who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from September 21, 1981 to January 31, 2006. The building is home to the United States District Court for the District of Arizona, and also hosts Circuit Judges William C. Canby, Jr.; Michael Daly Hawkins; Mary H. Murguia; Mary M. Schroeder; and Barry G. Silverman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Built at a cost of $123 million and dedicated in October 2000, the building was championed by Senior United States District Judge Robert C. Broomfield, and designed by architect Richard Meier, with local executive architects of Langdon Wilson Architecture in Phoenix. The building is in Meier's signature monochrome style. Standing six stories with no public parking, it encompasses more than 550,000 square feet (51,000 m), the building's public atrium features a six-story glass curtain wall on the north face, and contains a drum-shaped special-proceedings courtroom
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Hunterdon County Courthouse

    Hunterdon County Courthouse

    The Hunterdon County Courthouse is an historic site located in Flemington, the county seat of Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States, that is best known as the site of the 1935 "Trial of the Century" of Bruno Hauptmann and his conviction and sentence of death for his role in the Lindbergh kidnapping. While Hunterdon County was established in 1714, the first courthouse in the county was built in 1791, replacing a facility that existed in Trenton, in Mercer County. This first courthouse lasted until it was destroyed by fire in 1828, with arson the suspected cause. The current courthouse was built in 1828 on the site of the original facility, with stone from the first building used to construct the jail behind the courthouse. The jail was used until 1985 when it was replaced by a new county jail; the courthouse remained in use until 1996 when a new justice center was opened. The trial of Hauptmann attracted sightseers to the courthouse and the attached jail. In October 1934, The New York Times reported that the courthouse was drawing hundreds of curious spectators. Edward J. Reilly was hired by the Daily Mirror to serve as Hauptmann's attorney. Two other lawyers, Lloyd Fisher and
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Old Martin County Courthouse

    Old Martin County Courthouse

    The Old Martin County Court House, built in 1937, is an historic Art Deco style courthouse building located at 80 East Ocean Boulevard in Stuart, Martin County, Florida. In 1989, it was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press. On November 7, 1997, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. On March 15, 2007, it was added to the Martin County Historic Register by the Martin County Historic Preservation Board. It is now known as the Courthouse Cultural Center and is the headquarters of the Arts Council, Inc., the designated local arts agency for Martin County. The building was designed by architect L. Phillips Clarke of West Palm Beach and built by Chalker & Lund of poured concrete walls with terrazzo floors in the Art Deco style for the WPA as a northern addition to the first Martin County courthouse, which had been built in 1908 as a Palm Beach County public school building and converted to courthouse use after Martin County was created in 1925. The four words, Martin County Court House, were prominently etched into the front of the addition, where they still remain. Because of this, both the National
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Todd County Courthouse, Sheriff's House, and Jail

    Todd County Courthouse, Sheriff's House, and Jail

    The Todd County Courthouse, Sheriff's House, and Jail, located at 215 First Avenue South in Long Prairie, Todd County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is an avant garde Italian Renaissance buff-colored brick structure, built on a prominent knoll. It was designed by the Minneapolis architecture firm of Kees and Fisk, and built by John Aiton of Glenwood, for $20,000. The jail cells were provided by J.P. Pauley and Bros of St Louis. The building is surrounded by a fieldstone retaining wall and topped with a cupola. The courthouse was vacated in 2006. It was on the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota's 2010 list of the 10 Most Endangered Historic Places. Long Prairie residents voted on whether to renovate or demolish the building on Election Day, November 2, 2010.
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Fayette County Courthouse

    Fayette County Courthouse

    The Fayette County Courthouse is a historic courthouse building located at 110 East Court Street in Washington Courthouse, Ohio. On July 2, 1973, it was added to the National Register. The area that is currently Fayette County was once part of the Virginia Military District and was established as a county in 1810 from part of Ross County. The county seat was placed at Bloomingburg and court was held in the hoe of John Devault. The county seat was moved to Washington courthouse in 1812 and a wooden structure was built that year. This building was replaced by a brick structure in 1813, and ultimately burned downed in 1828. The county rebuilt at the same site in 1828, erecting a structure with 40 square feet (3.7 m) and an additional wing measuring 14 x 30 feet (9.1 m). This was soon deemed too small and a new courthouse was designed by architect David W. Gibbs and began construction in 1882. The courthouse closely resembles the county courthouse in Marion. The courthouse was completed in 1885 and has served the county since. The Second Empire style building rises three-stories on its square foundation. The ground floor consists of smooth stone blocks and rectangular windows. The
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Barbour County Courthouse

    Barbour County Courthouse

    The Barbour County Courthouse in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia, USA is a monumental public building constructed between 1903 to 1905 in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. It dominates the town center and is the county's chief symbol of government. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The present courthouse building replaced the original courthouse, a wood-frame Greek Revival structure built in 1843 which had been used to house Union troops during the American Civil War. J. Charles Fulton of Uniontown, Pennsylvania was contracted in 1901 and designed the building in the Richardsonian Romanesque (Romanesque Revival) style. It was constructed by contractor J.P. Conn during 1903-1905. The 1905 structure was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. A restoration effort began in 1995 and included repair and replacement of the original stained glass interior dome. This project was named "Best Interior Rehabilitation Project" in 1999 by the Main Street Project of the West Virginia Development Office. The Barbour County Courthouse is situated in Court Square, facing Main Street, in Philippi. Its plan is a modified rectangle of solid
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    Effingham County Courthouse

    Effingham County Courthouse

    The Effingham County Courthouse, in the county seat of Effingham County, Illinois, Effingham, is listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places. The courthouse joined the Register in September 1985. The building is one of Effingham County's two Registered Historic Places. The other, in Altamont, is the Charles M. Wright House. The 1871 structure is still in use. Effingham County has constructed a new building, named the Effingham County Government Center, one block west of the 1871 courthouse. In September 2007, the new building began use and the old courthouse no longer is used on a daily basis. The Effingham County Courthouse was started in 1871 and completed in 1872 at a cost of $40,000. Its style is known as Second Empire, a style popular in the United States 1865-1880 that came from France's Second Empire period during the late 18th century. There have been two minor changes to the exterior. The bell tower was changed from the Second Empire style to a simple square with a pyramidal roof, which enclosed the tower during the 1940s. The southeast exterior door was changed to become handicapped accessible, and a small porch roof was added to shelter the door.
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Mille Lacs County Courthouse

    Mille Lacs County Courthouse

    The Mille Lacs County Courthouse, located at 635 2nd Street Southeast in Milaca, Mille Lacs County in the U.S. state of Minnesota was built in 1923. The facade consists of Bedford limestone over reinforced concrete. A two-story entrance pavilion is topped with concrete "turnings" on the corners and a carved swag and wreath in the center. The windows are adorned with small balustraded balconies. The interior is finished with terrazzo floors and a Wright-inspired leaded glass skylight over the octagonal atrium. Marble steps rise from the front door to the first level and continue to the second floor. Red wood woodwork is used throughout the building. In 1978 the building was renovated by Johnson and Forberg Associates of Minneapolis.
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Federal Building

    Federal Building

    The Federal Building is a historic post office, courthouse and custom house on Kennedy Plaza at Providence, Rhode Island. It is a courthouse for the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island. It was built in 1908 by Clarke & Howe of limestone and steel and has a courtyard in the center. In 1900 the rapidly growing city of Providence began pressing Rhode Island’s congressional delegation and officials in Washington about the need for a new federal building to replace the U.S. Customshouse. Congress was ultimately persuaded, in 1902, to appropriate $1,000,000 for a Post Office, Court House and Custom House. In return, the city donated a site across from City Hall, at the eastern end of Exchange Place, to the federal government. The transfer was completed July 7, 1902. The following year, the U.S. Treasury Department held a national design competition that attracted ten entries. The local firm of Clarke and Howe was unanimously selected as the winner. The jury, which consisted of James Knox Taylor, Supervising Architect of the Treasury, and several other prominent architects, remarked that the design was "an artistic building, excellently planned for its purpose,"
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Old Gulf County Courthouse

    Old Gulf County Courthouse

    The Old Gulf County Courthouse is an historic redbrick courthouse building located at 222 North 2nd Street in Wewahitchka, Florida. It was built in 1927 in the Classical Revival style after Wewahitchka was designated the county seat of newly created Gulf County. In 1965 the county seat was moved to Port St. Joe and a new courthouse was built there. The old courthouse still functions as an auxiliary to the Port St. Joe courthouse. In 1989, the Old Gulf County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Old McHenry County Courthouse

    Old McHenry County Courthouse

    The Old McHenry County Courthouse, in McHenry County, Illinois, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 1, 1974. Once the courthouse in the county seat of McHenry County, Woodstock, today the courthouse is occupied by various private tenants including a restaurant and an art gallery. It is one of the key structures in the Woodstock Square Historic District. The 1857 Italianate Old Courthouse was constructed to closely resemble the 1853 Cook County Courthouse (which was eventually destroyed during the Great Chicago Fire). The adjoining structure, the Sheriff's House and Jail was built in 1887. It was there, in the Sheriff's House and Jail that Eugene Debs was held for his refusal to comply with an injunction during the Pullman Strike. Until the early 1970s McHenry County government office were located in the Old Courthouse. Today the two buildings house two restaurants, one in each building, and art gallery (in the courthouse), a pottery shop (in the jail building) and the Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum. Chester Gould, creator of Dick Tracy comic strips, was a 50-year Woodstock resident. The Chester Gould-Dick Tracy Museum features original comic strips
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Guernsey County Courthouse

    Guernsey County Courthouse

    The Guernsey County Courthouse is located on U. S. Route 40 in Cambridge, Ohio. The property was listed on the National Register on 1973-07-16. Guernsey County was formed in 1810 and the county constructed its courthouse on Public Square in Cambridge. The courthouse was a Greek Revival style building with red brick facade. Two large double doors were located at the north and south ends and long rectangular windows with dark shutters lined the sides. A large spire stood eighty-seven feet tall with a cupola capped by a weathervane shaped like a fish. This courthouse lasted for seventy more years. Need for a second courthouse became apparent as the county grew in population. The city of Cambridge contracted Joseph W. Yost to design and build the new courthouse. Yost designed the courthouse in the popular Second Empire style. During this time, Old Washington petitioned to be granted the county seat claiming that they were more central. This petition failed and the foundation to the second courthouse was laid in 1881, with the cornerstone bearing the date August 4, 1881. The building was dedicated on 1883-09-11. The exterior is of fine sandstone block with a hipped roof and
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    New York Surrogate's Court

    New York Surrogate's Court

    The Surrogate's Court handles all probate and estate proceedings in the state of New York. All wills are probated in this court and all estates of people who die without a will are handled in this court. Unclaimed property of the deceased without wills is handled by the Judge of this court. Each of New York's 62 counties has one surrogate judge, with New York County having two, and Kings County having two since 2006. Surrogate judges are elected countywide for 10-year terms, except for the five counties within New York City where surrogate judges are elected for 14-year terms. In some rural counties, surrogate judge duties are handled by the county court judge. There have been frequent efforts to abolish the surrogate's court and redistribute its powers to the New York Supreme Court (the general trial court) and the Family Court. The most recent efforts stem from the corruption scandal surrounding former Brooklyn Surrogate Michael Feinberg, who was removed from the bench in 2005.
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Paulding County Courthouse

    Paulding County Courthouse

    The Paulding County Courthouse is a historic governmental building in downtown Paulding, Ohio, United States. A Richardsonian Romanesque building erected in 1886, it is the third courthouse to serve the residents of Paulding County. When Paulding County was established in 1820, the small community of Charloe was named the county seat. This arrangement proved to be short-lived: the older community of Paulding grew significantly while Charloe stagnated, and the county seat was eventually moved to the larger village. Once Paulding had been named the county seat, the county's second courthouse was erected on the village's central square in 1837. After approximately fifty years of service, this frame structure was demolished, and the present structure was built on the same location in 1886. Designed by the E.O. Fallis Company and built by workers under the direction of general contractor Rudolph Ehrhart, the courthouse is a brick structure with a stone foundation and a roof of asphalt. Two-and-one-half stories tall with a central tower, the courthouse features nearly identical entrances on each of its four sides. Measuring 60 feet (18 m) square, and 163 feet (50 m) tall at the tip of
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Aitkin County Courthouse and Jail

    Aitkin County Courthouse and Jail

    The Aitkin County Courthouse and Jail, in Aitkin, Minnesota, serves as the county seat of Aitkin County, Minnesota. The building is actually the second courthouse for the county. The first courthouse was built in 1888, but in 1920, a grand jury reported that the building was dangerous and "falling apart". After difficulties securing financing, the county commissioners approved a plan for a new courthouse, which was finished in 1929. The design mixes Beaux-Arts architecture and Moderne elements. The interior features marble wainscoting, oak woodwork, terrazzo floors, and stained glass skylights.
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Wood County Courthouse and Jail

    Wood County Courthouse and Jail

    The Wood County Courthouse and Jail, located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA, is Wood County's third courthouse. It was built after citizens decided to move the county seat from Perrysburg to Bowling Green. Ground was broken on November 28, 1893, and the cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1894. The architectural firm of Yost & Packard of Columbus designed the courthouse and construction was overseen by T.B. Townsend of Youngstown. The winning tender for the project was $153,803 and the final construction costs totaled $255,746. The County Commissioners took possession of the new building on August 31, 1896, and the new Common Pleas Courtroom was dedicated on September 7, 1896. Sandstone from Amherst, Ohio, granite from Vermont, and marble from Italy were used in the construction of the courthouse. Architecturally, it is H. H. Richardson Romanesque in design with architectural sculpting throughout the building done by Whyte and Priest of Dayton, Ohio. Ornate stained glass panels cover much of the ceiling on the third floor and are visible from ground level due to the large open staircase which ascends through the middle of the second floor. The staircase consists of polished marble steps
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Cuyahoga County Courthouse

    Cuyahoga County Courthouse

    The Cuyahoga County Courthouse stretches along Lakeside Boulevard at the north end of the Cleveland Mall in downtown Cleveland, Ohio. The building was listed on the National Register along with the mall district in 1975. Other notable buildings of the Group Plan are the Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse designed by Arnold Brunner, the Cleveland Public Library, the Board of Education Building, Cleveland City Hall, and Public Auditorium. Cuyahoga County was established in 1807 with the county seat still in the air. The county decided to place the temporary county seat was in the largest settlement of Cleveland. The courts met in various taverns and inns around town while waiting for the courthouse to be built. This first courthouse was designed and built by Levi Johnson. The building was completed in 1813 and was a simple Federal style stone structure. The structure was five bays wide and two piles deep, with doors located in the center and to the right corner of the facade. A rectangular window was located between these doors with a smaller square window to the left of the central door. Five rectangular windows lit the second floor. The pitched roof was framed by brick chimneys
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Bulloch County Courthouse

    Bulloch County Courthouse

    The Bulloch County Courthouse is a historic courthouse that is located in downtown Statesboro, Georgia. It was built in 1894 to house the county government. On September 18, 1980, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Bulloch County was officially established on February 8, 1796. Bryan and Screven counties were the two counties that Bulloch County was created from by an act of the Georgia General Assembly. Bulloch County was named after Archibald Bulloch who was Georgia’s first provisional governor from 1776 to 1777. In 1796 three men were appointed to be commissioners: Drury Jones, John Mikell and Israel Bird. They were in charge of finding a proper place to build the courthouse and the jail. In May 1797 the first Superior Court was held in Bulloch County at Stephen Mills’ home and continued to be held there until the courthouse was built. The fourth Mondays in April and October were the only two days that the superior court met each year. The inferior court, however, met every first Monday of the month. When Bulloch County first started having court, there were no local lawyers or judges. Bulloch County obtained its first lawyers and judges after the
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Halifax Court House

    Halifax Court House

    The Halifax Court House is a historic building in downtown Halifax, Nova Scotia. Its main section was completed in 1863, with the east wing, built in 1930, being the newest portion. The Italian renaissance style building was designed by William Thomas, a Toronto architect who built prominent structures across Canada.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Indian River County Courthouse

    Indian River County Courthouse

    The Old Indian River County Courthouse is a historic courthouse in Vero Beach, Florida. Located at 2145 14th Avenue, the Old Indian River County Courthouse was constructed from April 1936 to March 1937 in the Masonry Vernacular, Art Moderne style by architect W. H. Garns. The structure was built by James T. Vocelle after he sought federal funding during 1933 and 1934 from the Public Works Administration to build the newly formed county a courthouse. The structure later became the Courthouse Executive Center after the county courthouse moved its seat to a new building at 2000 16th Avenue. On July 19, 1999, the Old Indian River County Courthouse was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Old Supreme Court

    Old Supreme Court

    The old Supreme Court building sat to the west of Parliament Hill in Ottawa and was home to the Supreme Court of Canada from 1889 to 1945. Prior to 1882, the Supreme Court conducted their business in various committee rooms on Parliament Hill, including the Railway Committee Room. The court finally got a permanent home within a decade of their existence. The first building for the Supreme Court was built on Bank Street near Parliament. The design was considered quaint and was less elegant compared to other government buildings in Ottawa. The building was similar in design to the West Block and the East Block, but it was a more subdued modern Gothic Revival design. With the Supreme Court moved to their new site to the west of Parliament, this building was demolished in 1955 after the building was condemned as a fire hazard. It is the only building on Parliament Hill to be demolished. The site is currently a parking lot for Parliament Hill.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Howard County Circuit Courthouse

    Howard County Circuit Courthouse

    The Howard County Circuit Courthouse is located at 8360 Court Avenue in Ellicott City, Maryland. The courthouse houses the chambers and courtrooms for the 5 judges of the Circuit Court for Howard County, as well as the clerk's offices, jurors' assembly room, the law library and masters' offices. The law library is on two levels. The bottom level houses the general collection and 2 computers for online use and Westlaw research. Above this level is the Maryland Room, with the Maryland collection which includes all Maryland reports and the Annotated Code of Maryland.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse

    John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse

    The John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse is a federal courthouse for the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, located on Fan Pier on the Boston, Massachusetts waterfront. Named after Congressman Joe Moakley, the 675,000-square-foot (62,700 m) building was completed in 1999 at a cost of $170 million and has won many design awards. The courthouse is served by a stop on Boston's Silver Line. The courthouse serves as headquarters for the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts. The building houses two courtrooms for the Court of Appeals and 25 courtrooms for the District Court, as well as 40 judges' chambers, a Circuit law library, the office of a United States Congressman, offices for the United States Attorney, extensive support facilities for the United States Marshals service and Pre-Trial and Probation services, as well as a day-care facility. The 675,000-square-foot (62,700 m) building, clad in water-struck brick with granite trim, has ten floors above grade and one below. It was the first major project
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Lexington History Center

    Lexington History Center

    The Lexington History Center in downtown Lexington, Kentucky is located along East Main Street between North Upper and Cheapside. The facility was the Fayette County Courthouse from 1901 to 2001. The Lexington History Center is host to four museums:
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Sofia Court House

    Sofia Court House

    The Sofia Court House (Bulgarian: Съдебна палата, Sadebna palata) is a building in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, accommodating all the courts in the city. Stylistically a simplistic yet monumental structure, it is located on 2 Vitosha Boulevard, surrounded by Alabin Street, Laveleye Street and Positano Street. The need for a common building to house all the courts in Sofia was raised in 1926 with the foundation of the Judicial Buildings fund. Construction began in 1929 and finished in 1940. While it was the first structure in this strict monumental style in the city, it was followed by the Bulgarian National Bank in the 1930s and the Largo in the 1950s. The initial architectural plan was the work of Nikola Lazarov, later redesigned by Pencho Koychev. The Court House has a syenite plinth, a facing of white limestone and a noticeable cornice below the top floor. The four-storey building (with two additional underground floors) spreads over a ground area of 8,500 square metres and has 430 premises, of which 24 courtrooms, a library and a bank hall, totalling 48,000 square metres of used area. The facade features five large gates and 12 columns. In its style, the Court House is
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Sumter County Courthouse

    Sumter County Courthouse

    The Sumter County Courthouse, built in 1912-1914, is an historic courthouse building located in Bushnell, Florida, It was designed by Atlanta-based architect William Augustus Edwards who designed one other courthouse in Florida, two in Georgia and nine in South Carolina as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. He designed most of the original buildings on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville. In 1989, The Sumter County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press. There is now a much larger Sumter County Judicial Building nearby which bears a striking resemblance to the 1912-1914 courthouse because it incorporates much of its architectural features in its central facade.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Washington County Courthouse

    Washington County Courthouse

    The Washington County Courthouse in Hillsboro, Oregon is the courthouse for Washington County, Oregon, in the United States. Washington County was established in 1843 and the first government building was finished in 1852. The current courthouse was built in 1928 with an addition and renovations to the structure in 1972. Currently the building houses courtrooms, the county sheriff’s dispatch, staff offices, and the office of the district attorney. The county jail was previously attached to the courthouse. Washington County was created as Twality District on July 5, 1843, as part of the Champoeg Meetings that created the Provisional Government of Oregon. The county became Washington County by an act of the Territorial Legislature in 1849, and in 1850 the community that would become Hillsboro was selected as the county seat. The first courthouse in the county was a log cabin near what is now Northwest 253rd, located on the land claim of Edward Constable where court sessions were held briefly. In 1850, David Hill sold 40 acres (160,000 m) and a cabin from his land claim to the county for $200. This cabin was used to house the court until 1852 when a two-story building was finished to
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Spencer

    Spencer

    Spencer is a town in Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana, United States. The population was 2,217 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Owen County. Spencer is part of the Bloomington, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area. Spencer is located at 39°17′13″N 86°45′51″W / 39.28694°N 86.76417°W / 39.28694; -86.76417 (39.286848, -86.764225). According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 1.26 square miles (3.3 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,508 people, 1,090 households, and 659 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,984.6 people per square mile (768.5/km²). There were 1,193 housing units at an average density of 944.0 per square mile (365.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.52% White, 0.20% African American, 0.40% Asian, 0.24% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.60% of the population. There were 1,090 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 35.0% of all households were made up of
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Washington County Courthouse

    Washington County Courthouse

    The Washington County Courthouse in Salem, Indiana is a Richardsonian Romanesque building that was built in 1886. It was designed by Harry P. McDonald of Louisville and his brother in 1888, and is the third courthouse at that location. Limestone from the area was used in the construction. It is located within the Salem Downtown Historic District.
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Somerville Court House

    Somerville Court House

    The Somerville Court House is an Historic Building (on the National Register of Historic Places) in Somerville, New Jersey (the county seat of Somerset County). Constructed in 1907 of white marble in the Neo-classical style, it has been the scene of a number of famous trials. In spite of its monumental proportions, it was once considered for demolition for not being large enough to accommodate the growing county. Saved by a number of concerned individuals, it is on the National Historic Register, although superseded by a much larger, modern masonry and glass structure behind it (left side of photo), now serving its judicial functions.
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Cannon County Courthouse

    Cannon County Courthouse

    The Cannon County Courthouse is an historic building located at Court Square in Woodbury, Tennessee, the seat of Cannon County. It was constructed in 1935 in the Colonial Revival style. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 14, 1992.
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Crow Wing County Courthouse and Jail

    Crow Wing County Courthouse and Jail

    The Crow Wing County Courthouse, in Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, is a Beaux-Arts courthouse built in 1920. The building, along with its adjoining jail, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Beaux-Arts style was popular in the first quarter of the 20th century for Minnesota courthouses. The first floor has a rough-cut stone exterior, while the floors above are built of smooth-cut gray stone. The interior has polished marble floors and walls, with a rotunda surrounded by a balcony. The dome has both a colored glass skylight and a fine brass electrolier.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Elko County Courthouse

    Elko County Courthouse

    Elko County Courthouse is a historic building listed on the National Register of Historic Places and located at 571 Idaho Street in Elko, Nevada. The original courthouse building was finished in 1869. It was torn down in 1910 and replaced with the current building. The site was "a scene of terror" on the night of July 18, 1870, when a giant burning chandelier fell into a throng of people. The courthouse withstood an earthquake rated 6.0 on the Richter scale, on February 21, 2008. However, the epicenter of this earthquake was over 50 miles east, and thus only minimal shaking was felt in Elko.
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Kanabec County Courthouse

    Kanabec County Courthouse

    The Kanabec County Courthouse, located at 18 Vine Street North in Mora, Kanabec County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a beige brick, Romanesque building, featuring a prominent 4-story center tower. The courthouse sits on a stone foundation. Arched windows and doorways with brown sandstone sills lend distinction. The eaves were built with unusual corbelled brick and the corners of the tower are decorated with tourelles. Hardwood floors and oak balusters lead to the second-floor courtrooms. Charles Skoglund built the building in 1894 for $7,200. It was designed by architects Buechner and Jacobson.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Palace of Justice

    Palace of Justice

    The Palace of Justice (Romanian: Palatul Justiţiei), located in Bucharest, Romania, was built between 1890 and 1895. Located on the banks of the Dâmboviţa River, it houses the Bucharest Court of Appeal and the Sector 5 Court. Its last major restoration was between 2003 and 2006. The Palace has 690 rooms with a total area of 33,235 m (357,740 sq ft).
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    United States Supreme Court building

    United States Supreme Court building

    The Supreme Court Building is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States. It is situated in Washington, D.C. at 1 First Street, NE, on the block immediately east of the United States Capitol. The building is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol. On May 4, 1987, the Supreme Court Building was designated a National Historic Landmark. It is one of a handful of National Historic Landmarks which are not listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Prior to the establishment of the Federal City, the United States government resided briefly in New York City, New York. As such, the Supreme Court met there during this time in the Merchants Exchange Building. When the capital moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Court moved with it and began meeting in Independence Hall, before settling in Old City Hall at 5th and Chestnut Streets from 1791 until 1800. After the federal government moved to Washington, D.C., the court had no permanent meeting location until 1810. When the architect Benjamin Latrobe built the second US Senate chamber directly on top of first US Senate chamber, the Supreme Court took up residence in what is now referred to as the Old Supreme
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Old Polk County Courthouse

    Old Polk County Courthouse

    The Old Polk County Courthouse (also known as the Imperial Polk County Courthouse) (constructed in 1908-09) is a historic courthouse in Bartow, Florida, located at 100 East Main Street. It was designed in the Classical Revival style by noted architect Edward Columbus Hosford. On August 7, 1989, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. The Polk County Historical Museum is located in the courthouse.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Old Wakulla County Courthouse

    Old Wakulla County Courthouse

    The Old Wakulla County Courthouse (constructed in 1892-1893) is a historic site in Crawfordville, Florida, located at Church Street. On May 3, 1976, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Thought to be Florida's last wood-frame courthouse still in use, it was restored and became a Wakulla County library.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Palace of Justice

    Palace of Justice

    Nuremberg Palace of Justice (German Justizpalast) is a building complex in Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany. It was constructed from 1909 to 1916 and houses the appellate court Nuremberg (Oberlandesgericht), the regional court Nuremberg-Fürth (Landgericht), the local court Nuremberg (Amtsgericht) and the public prosecutor's office Nuremberg-Fürth (Staatsanwaltschaft). The building was the location of the Nuremberg Trials that were held in 1945-1949 after World War II for the main Nazi Germany personalities presumed to be still alive. Colonel Burton C. Andrus was both the commandant of Nuremberg Prison (where the prisoners were kept) and Military Officer commanding the garrison protecting the Palace. Among the indicted who made their appearance were Hermann Göring (suicide by potassium cyanide), Rudolf Hess (life internment), Franz von Papen (Vice-Chancellor under Hitler, acquitted), Arthur Seyss-Inquart (Austrian Chancellor, Nazi Commissioner, hanged) and Joachim von Ribbentrop (Foreign Minister, hanged). Göring was not hanged as sentenced, but committed suicide by taking a cyanide pill smuggled into his cell. His suicide note stated that "being hanged is not appropriate for a man of
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse is an Art Deco building in Medford, Oregon, United States that was built in 1932, six years after county residents voted to move the county seat from Jacksonville to Medford. The former Jackson County Courthouse, built in Jacksonville, Oregon in 1883, once served as the Jacksonville Museum. It is a contributing property of the Jacksonville Historic District.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Old Calhoun County Courthouse

    Old Calhoun County Courthouse

    The Old Calhoun County Courthouse built in 1904 is an historic building located at 314 East Central Avenue in Blountstown, Florida. On October 16, 1980, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In 1989, the Old Calhoun County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press. The listing calls it: "one of two Romanesque Revival courthouses extant in Florida."
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Old Citrus County Courthouse

    Old Citrus County Courthouse

    The Old Citrus County Courthouse (constructed in 1912) is a historic site in Inverness, Florida located at 1 Courthouse Square. On April 17, 1992 it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. The building was designed by J. R. MacEachron and Willis R. Biggers. The Old Courthouse Heritage Museum opened in the building in 2000, and is operated by the Citrus County Historical Society. Exhibits focus on local county history. The second floor of the courthouse was restored to its original appearance in 2000. In 1961, scenes from the movie Follow That Dream, starring Elvis Presley, were filmed in the courtroom.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Roane County Courthouse

    Roane County Courthouse

    The old Roane County Courthouse building in Kingston, Tennessee, built in the 1850s, is one of six remaining antebellum county courthouses in the state of Tennessee. It was used as a courthouse until 1974, when Roane County's court and government offices were relocated to a new courthouse building on an adjacent site. The old courthouse currently houses a museum. Architect Augustus Fisher gave the building its Greek Revival design. In 1971, the courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Clay County Courthouse

    Clay County Courthouse

    The Clay County Courthouse (constructed in 1874) is a historic site in Green Cove Springs, Florida, located at 915 Walnut Street (Brabantio Avenue). On June 20, 1975, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Coshocton County Courthouse

    Coshocton County Courthouse

    The Coshocton County Courthouse, designed in Second Empire style, is a historic courthouse building located at 349 Main Street in Coshocton, Ohio. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on 1973-05-22. Coshocton County was established in 1811 with the county seat placed at Coshocton. The courts first met in Colonel Charles Williams Tavern and paid the owner $300 a year for rent. The county found this amount to large for the budget and instead turned to another location, a building owned by Wilson McGowan. The courts remained in this location until 1824, when an actual courthouse was built. The courthouse was located in the central business district on a landscaped public square, which is still the current site. The building cost almost $2,000 to construct and furnish and was two-stories tall. A central belltower crowned the building and contained a bell that would also be used in the next courthouse. The 1824 courthouse was showing its age and use by a growing population. The county officials were soon looking for plans for a new courthouse. These plans were drawn up by the architectural firm of Carpenter & Williams from Meadville, Pennsylvania in the Second Empire
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Hampden County Courthouse

    Hampden County Courthouse

    Hampden County Courthouse is a historic courthouse on Elm Street in Springfield, Massachusetts designed by Henry Hobson Richardson. This was the county's second courthouse. The first courthouse was built in 1822, but by the 1860s, popular pressure was developing for a new courthouse. A grand jury indicted the county commissioners in 1869 for official misconduct since the courthouse did not have fireproof storage for the registry of deeds and the safekeeping of public records. This forced the county to build a new courthouse. Construction began in late 1871, and the building was dedicated on April 28, 1874. The original building cost $214,068. The site, within the middle of a city block and measuring 160 by 90 feet, cost $75,716. The building is shaped roughly like the capital letter I, with the main facade emphasizing vertical lines, tall windows, and two tall dormers on either side of the bell tower. The facades were built of light gray Monson granite in rough-faced random ashlar masonry, with smooth-faced trim. The overall design reflects Richardson's evolution as a designer, showing development from the Brattle Square Church. The county's growth eventually pushed the probate
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Justice Center Complex

    Justice Center Complex

    The Justice Center Complex is a building complex located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio that opened in 1976. It consists of the Cleveland Police Headquarters Building, the Cuyahoga County and Cleveland Municipal Courts Tower, and the Correction Center. It occupies a city block bounded by Lakeside Avenue, Ontario Street, West 3rd Street, and St. Clair Avenue. The Lakeside Avenue entrance faces the Cuyahoga County Court House, erected in 1912. When the Justice Center was proposed in 1969, then-Mayor Carl B. Stokes did not want to be part of the Justice Center project. At the time, the Cleveland Police were at an older headquarters on East 22nd Street. In 1971, voters elected Mayor Ralph Perk, who accepted the police department recommendation to move to the proposed Justice Center. The original cost for the Justice Center was set at $60 million, but infighting between Cuyahoga County and City of Cleveland officials escalated the cost from $60 million dollars to $128 million dollars. On October 20, 1972 ground was broken for the Justice Center. The Courts Tower was designed by Prindle, Patrick and Partners. The Brutalist 26-story structure stands 420 ft (128 m) high and contains 44 court
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Lac Qui Parle County Courthouse

    Lac Qui Parle County Courthouse

    The Lac Qui Parle County Courthouse, located at 600 6th Street in Madison, Lac Qui Parle County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a Richardsonian Romanesque style building featuring a high central tower, built in 1899 at a cost of $30,689. Architects Buechner and Jacobson designed it and Olaf Swenson of Saint Paul built it. The foundation is of river boulders; the outside walls are red brick with sandstone accents. The interior features oak cabinetry, stairways, doors, and paneling. Floors are hardwood, except for the quarry tile in the hallways and marble treads on the stairs.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    McLean County Courthouse and Square

    McLean County Courthouse and Square

    The McLean County Courthouse and Square is located in downtown Bloomington, Illinois. The site is on the National Register of Historic Places and encompasses the old McLean County Courthouse and the courthouse-facing sides of three downtown blocks. The historic buildings at the other side of the square were destroyed by fire in the 1980s. The Square is bordered by four Bloomington streets: Main Street, Center Street, Jefferson Street and Washington Street. The site was home to three previous courthouses before the current one was built around 1900. The first courthouse at the site was built in 1832, the second in 1836 and the third was built shortly before the present building but was destroyed by fire. The McLean County Courthouse housed the McLean County Circuit Court from 1900 to 1976. The building itself was designed by William Reeves and John M. Baillie of the Peoria firm Reeves and Bailey. The original construction was completed in 1900 at a cost of $461,640. Shortly after its completion, a fire destroyed many of the buildings in the square and the courthouse. The courthouse was rebuilt in 1903 as before following the fire. The rebuild of many buildings in the downtown was
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Old Lake County Courthouse

    Old Lake County Courthouse

    The Old Lake County Courthouse, also known as Lake County Courthouse, in Lakeport, California is a building built in 1870. It served Lake County as a seat of government from 1871 until 1968. Precedent-setting trials on water rights were held here, along with the "White Cap" murder trial, a notorious episode in vigilantism held here in 1890. This brick courthouse, constructed by A.P. Pettit in 1870–71, was one of the few buildings in the vicinity to survive the 1906 San Francisco earthquake with only minor damage. It is now California Historical Landmark #897 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NPS-70000134). The county schools library was located in the basement until at least 1968. It is surrounded by a Lakeport City Park.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Winona County Courthouse

    Winona County Courthouse

    The Winona County Courthouse in Winona, Winona County, Minnesota, U.S. is an historic Richardsonian Romanesque structure built in 1888. It was the first courthouse in Minnesota listed on the National Register of Historic Places, having been added in 1970. The original cost of the courthouse was $125,000. From the 1970s to 2000, nearly $2.5 million was spent restoring and remodeling the building, but on September 3, 2000, the ceiling of a fourth floor courtroom collapsed and broke fire sprinkler pipes resulting in the flooding the building with over 4500 gallons of water and causing much other damage. The county offices were relocated to other buildings, and the building was again renovated to repair water damage and to bring the building up to current standards. Insurance paid for over half the cost of repairs, and the Minnesota Historical Society contributed $50,000 for exterior work. The renovation also returned much of the building to its original appearance, including even the old fireplaces. The total cost of interior renovation was $5.6 million, with another $1.5 million spent on external renovation.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Baltimore County Circuit Courthouses

    Baltimore County Circuit Courthouses

    The Baltimore County Courthouses are located in Towson, the Baltimore County Courthouse ("historic Courthouse") houses many of the offices of county government, while the County Courts Building ("new" courthouse) is dedicated to the civil, criminal, family and juvenile divisions of the Circuit Court for Baltimore County, as well as the Baltimore County Sheriff's Office. The historic Baltimore County Courthouse is an edifice two stories in height and nine bays in length surrounded by a modest park. The east facade is Greek Revival porte-cochere with a pediment supported by fluted Doric columns. A shallow A-frame roof of the main block is crowned with a centered, eight-windowed, pilastered, frame cupola bearing a domed copper roof. Originally constructed in 1855, the building is one of the few H-plan buildings, public or private, remaining in the state. All of the original exterior treatments are preserved intact. The cornerstone of the courthouse was laid on October 19, 1854, in what was then called "Towsontown". Coleman Yellott, a local attorney delivered the official address saying: "The ceremony which you had assembled to witness, has now been performed. The Corner Stone of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    McDonough County Courthouse

    McDonough County Courthouse

    The McDonough County Courthouse is located in the McDonough County city of Macomb, in the U.S. state of Illinois. The courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It joined the list in 1972. Macomb, the county seat, is home to five other Registered Historic Place, this one at Western Illinois University. It is the Western Illinois State Normal School Building.
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    Old State Capitol State Historic Site

    Old State Capitol State Historic Site

    The Old State Capitol State Historic Site, in Springfield, Illinois, is the fifth capitol building built for the U.S. state of Illinois. It was built in the Greek Revival style in 1837-40, and served as the state house in 1840-1876. It is the site of candidacy announcements by Abraham Lincoln in 1858 and Barack Obama in 2007. From 1820 through 1837, the political capital of the young state of Illinois was the small village of Vandalia, Illinois in the south center of the state. On the National Road, Vandalia was initially well-situated to fulfill its governmental role. As northern Illinois opened to settlement in the 1830s, however, public pressure grew for the capital to be relocated to a location closer to the geographic center of the state. A caucus of nine Illinois lawmakers, including the young Whig Party lawyer Abraham Lincoln, led the effort to have the capital moved to the Sangamon County village of Springfield. Their efforts were successful in 1837, when the Illinois General Assembly passed a law creating a two-year transition period and asking the state to move its capital to Springfield in 1839 . Workers built a state office building, large for the time, on the central
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Hernando County Courthouse

    Hernando County Courthouse

    The Hernando County Courthouse, built in 1913, is an historic courthouse building located in Brooksville, Florida, It was designed by Atlanta-based architect William Augustus Edwards who designed one other courthouse in Florida, two in Georgia and nine in South Carolina as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. He designed most of the original buildings on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville. It has been called the Brooksville crown. In 1989, The Hernando County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press. Media related to Hernando County Courthouse (Florida) at Wikimedia Commons
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Kendall County Courthouse

    Kendall County Courthouse

    The Kendall County Courthouse is a former courthouse in Yorkville, Kendall County, Illinois, United States. The original building was completed in 1864 but was later destroyed by fire. A replica of the Italianate structure was erected in 1887. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1998. Construction on the Kendall County Courthouse began in 1862 in Yorkville, Illinois on a bluff overlooking the Fox River. The limestone and brick building was completed in 1864 and went into service as the primary judiciary building for Kendall County. The original completed structure stood four and a half stories tall including its two story cupola. At about 4 a.m on March 25, 1887 the courthouse was struck by fire; Yorkville, without a fire department at the time, was forced to rely upon railroad water cars from nearby Aurora to extinguish any blazes. Citizens of Yorkville rescued the sheriff, his family and two prisoners being held in the jail. Though the exact cause of the fire was never determined, it is believed to have started in a coal stove in the sheriff's residence. The railroad cars did not arrive to Yorkville in time and the building was almost completely
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Ogle County Courthouse

    Ogle County Courthouse

    The Ogle County Courthouse is a National Register of Historic Places listing in the Ogle County, Illinois, county seat of Oregon. The building stands on a public square in the city's downtown commercial district. The current structure was completed in 1891 and was preceded by two other buildings, one of which was destroyed by a group of outlaws. Following the destruction of the courthouse, the county was without a judicial building for a period during the 1840s. The Ogle County Courthouse was designed by Chicago architect George O. Garnsey in the Romanesque Revival style of architecture. The ridged roof is dominated by its wooden cupola which stands out at a distance. In addition to the courthouse building, the public square contains several outbuildings and sites that are also historic in nature and considered contributing properties to the Oregon Commercial Historic District, including a sculpture by Lorado Taft and a cast-iron fountain. The courthouse joined the Register in 1981 and was included as a contributing property to the historic district in 2006. After initially joining the Register the structure underwent a careful restoration. The courthouse no longer serves as the
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Old Colony House

    Old Colony House

    The Old Colony House, also known as Old State House or Newport Colony House, is located at the east end of Washington Square in the city of Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It is a brick Georgian-style building completed in 1741, and became the meeting place for the colonial legislature. From independence to the early 20th century the state legislature alternated its sessions between here and the Rhode Island State House in Providence. It has not been altered much since its construction. As one of the best-kept surviving Georgian public buildings in the United States from the colonial era, it was designated a National Historic Landmark (NHL) in 1960. It is also a contributing property to the Newport Historic District, later designated an NHL itself. It is still owned by the state, but managed as a museum by the Newport Historical Society. Besides its political and architectural importance, the building was the site of many important Revolutionary events in Rhode Island. George Washington and Dwight Eisenhower have both been guests at the building. It has been used as a barracks, hospital, courthouse and a location for a Steven Spielberg film. The two-and-a-half-story seven-bay
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Old Pinellas County Courthouse

    Old Pinellas County Courthouse

    The Old Pinellas County Courthouse (constructed in 1918) is a historic site in Clearwater, Florida, located at 315 Court Street. The building was designed by Francis Kennard]. On June 25, 1992, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Rice County Courthouse and Jail

    Rice County Courthouse and Jail

    The Rice County Courthouse, located at 218 3rd Street NW in Faribault, Rice County, in the U.S. state of Minnesota, is an Art Deco building constructed of natural-face Faribault stone horizontally banded at intervals with sawed-faced stone. Nairne W. Fisher of St. Cloud was the architect for the courthouse, and is also credited with designing the Pope County Courthouse. The main rotunda has metal fixtures and Art Deco glass. Polished black and gray Tennessee marble is used extensively in the walls, floors, and stairs, with a terrazzo map of Rice County centered on the floor. The 16-foot-high (4.9 m) courtroom on the third floor was finished with fine-grained walnut walls with matching custom-built furnishings. The building was built in 1934 at a cost of $200,000. A guidebook to Minnesota architecture described the courthouse building as "A near-perfect mixture of the classical and the Zigzag Moderne. Relief sculpture on the sides of the building along 4th and 3rd Streets extols civic virtue, industry and farming. Within, a central rotunda is approached by a Zigzag Moderne staircase; Moderne metal and glass light fixtures abound." The brick jail building, located at 128 3rd Street
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Ventura County Courthouse

    Ventura County Courthouse

    The Ventura County Courthouse, also known as Ventura City Hall, located in Ventura, California, was designed in 1910 by one of the early pioneers of architecture in Southern California: Albert C. Martin, Sr. It now serves as the Ventura City Hall. When Albert C. Martin's plans were unveiled in 1911, the Los Angeles Times reported that the "Roman Doric order" design would be "one of the most imposing public structures in California, and a credit to the seat of government of the prosperous lima bean section." Built in 1912 at a cost of $225,000, the courthouse was dedicated in July 1913. An outstanding example of neo-classical architecture manifested in Beaux-Arts style, prevalent in public projects in the United States at the turn of the 20th century. The building is rich in details including a terra cotta facade with scrolls, floral designs, and whimsical faces of Franciscan padres, the order that founded the city of Ventura in 1782. The original central courtroom, now the City Council chambers, features dark mahogany woodwork, a stained-glass skylight (pictured at left) and arched windows. In 1968, the courthouse was condemned as an earthquake risk, but the city bought the
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Franklin County Courthouse

    Franklin County Courthouse

    The current Franklin County Courthouse in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, built in 1865, is the third courthouse building on the site. The site was originally purchased from Colonel Benjamin Chambers in 1785. The current building replaced its predecessor that was burnt on July 30, 1864 by Confederate forces under Brigadier General John A. McCausland in the American Civil War. McCausland was acting under the orders of General Jubal A. Early. Early was commander of the Shenandoah Valley, which was subject to much destruction by the Union forces. He was eager to retaliate against the North. Chambersburg deserved this retaliation, in his view, in part for its sympathy with John Brown while planning his raid on Harpers Ferry. McCausland offered the people of Chambersburg the chance to ransom the town for $100,000 in gold or $500,000 in greenbacks. When they did not pay, he carried on with the destruction of the town, including the second courthouse. Only the walls and pillars remained after the burning. The current Greek Revival structure was designed by S. Hutton. The construction was superintended by Samuel Seibert. They designed and built the structure around the remaining walls and
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    John Milton Bryan Simpson United States Courthouse

    John Milton Bryan Simpson United States Courthouse

    The Bryan Simpson United States Courthouse is a courthouse and U.S. federal government facility in Jacksonville, Florida. It houses: The courthouse was completed in late 2002 at a cost of $84 million and opened in early 2003. It replaced the old former courthouse, which was built in 1933 and had many indoor air quality problems, including illness-inducing mold and mildew. The new courthouse comprises 492,000 square feet (45,700 m) over 14 floors, with a secure parking facility in the basement. It was named after John Milton Bryan Simpson after an act of Congress introduced by Florida U.S. Senator Bill Nelson was passed. The courthouse was officially dedicated on August 11, 2008.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Mohave County Courthouse and Jail

    Mohave County Courthouse and Jail

    Mohave County Jail is at 310 North Fourth Street in Kingman, Arizona. The jail was built in 1909-10 and is of Classical Revival architecture style. Pauley Jail Co. were the architects and John Mulligan was the contractor. The new jail replaced the old jail, because the prisoners were breaking out too easily. It is one of the few remaining County Jails in the state. Mohave County Court House is at 310 North Fourth Street in Kingman, AZ. The court house was built in 1915. Lescher & Kibbey were the architects from Phoenix and J. M. Wheeler and Collamore & Sons (from Arkansas) were the contractors. The court house was built with native stone from Metcalfe Quarry. The court house was used for county government for 70 years. The buildings were added to the register in 1983 as Mohave County Municipal Complex. Both buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places and the number 83002990.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Washington County Courthouse

    Washington County Courthouse

    The Washington County Courthouse is an historic brick courthouse building located in Chipley, Florida. It was built in 1932 in the Classical Revival style after Chipley won a 1927 referendum to move the county seat from Vernon In 1989, the Washington County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Suwannee County Courthouse

    Suwannee County Courthouse

    The Suwannee County Courthouse (constructed in 1904) is an historic government building located at 200 South Ohio Avenue on the southwest corner of Warren Street in Live Oak, Florida. On November 12, 1998, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Union County Courthouse

    Union County Courthouse

    The Union County Courthouse is an historic redbrick courthouse building located in Lake Butler, Florida. Designed by John Pearson of Gainesville in the Classical Revival style, it was built in 1936 by the Works Project Administration to serve Union County, which had been carved out of Bradford County in 1921. It is located on the site of a former courthouse that served the county of New River, Bradford's original name. In 1967 additions to the courthouse were designed by Harry E. Burns, Jr., and were built by Vinson J. Forrester, Jr. In 1989, the Union County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Dutchess County Court House

    Dutchess County Court House

    The Dutchess County Courthouse is located at 10 Market Street in downtown Poughkeepsie, New York, United States. It is the third county courthouse to stand on that site. The first was authorized by the provincial assembly in 1717 and built in 1720, and would host New York's debate on ratifying the U.S. Constitution during the brief period when Poughkeepsie served as the state capital in 1788. It was destroyed in an 1806 fire. Three years later the state legislature appropriated funds for a new one, which stood for almost a century. An early tenant beside the courts was Matthew Vassar, later founder of Vassar College, who ran a saloon and oyster bar in the basement. It was replaced by the current structure, built in 1903 at a cost of a half million dollars and opened and dedicated just before the end of the year. It was designed by local architect William J. Beardsley in a Classical Revival style, a four-story building with red brick facing and Palladian windows in the second and fifth-story center bays with stucco decoration above. Because of a requirement in the original deed for the land, one of the original 1720 courthouse's jail cells must remain in the basement of this or any
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Fulton County Courthouse

    Fulton County Courthouse

    The Fulton County Courthouse is a building listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Rochester, Indiana, United States. It is a prominent building in the Rochester Downtown Historic District. It is a Richardsonian Romanesque Fulton County Courthouse. The limestone courthouse, which was already on the National Register as of September 22, 2000, is located on Ninth Street. Four different memorials are on its grounds: one for the Pottawatomies' Trail of Death, a cornerstone for the Rochester College, and two war memorials. Although most of the buildings in the district are constructed of brick, after the construction of the courthouse, with its rusticated limestone construction, it is believed that other buildings were renovated to match the courthouse using faux stone that was cemented to their brick structures. Limestone is also used on the name blocks of buildings. The historic fire department has an engraved limestone name block above its door. The city hall not only has a similar limestone name block, but the right and left bays of the hall have limestone diamonds above them.
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Kuala Lumpur Courts Complex

    Kuala Lumpur Courts Complex

    The Kuala Lumpur Courts Complex (Malay: Kompleks Mahkamah Kuala Lumpur) is a large courthouse complex in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, housing much of the country's judicial system, the rest being in the Palace of Justice in Putrajaya. The complex is situated at Duta Road (Jalan Duta), 4km away from the earlier location of the judicial system at a collection of colonial buildings affront the Independence Square. The building was constructed beginning March 1, 2004 at a final cost of RM290 million, was opened for use on April 18, 2007, and was fully operational on May 3, 2007. The Kuala Lumpur Courts Complex houses the High Court, the Sessions Court and the Magistrates' Court of Kuala Lumpur. The Court of Appeal and Federal Court are based in the Palace of Justice in Putrajaya. Night courts are also conducted to handle cases pertaining to traffic offenses. The Kuala Lumpur Courts Complex was primarily planned to hold a larger number of relevant court cases at once, as well as centralise judicial branches in the city into one building. Prior to the complex's opening, courts in Kuala Lumpur were scattered among several former colonial municipal buildings affront the Independence Square
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Old Bradford County Courthouse

    Old Bradford County Courthouse

    The Old Bradford County Courthouse (constructed in 1902) is a historic courthouse in Starke, Florida. It is located at 209 West Call Street, off U.S. Route 301. On December 27, 1974, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In 1976 it became the Andrews Center campus of Santa Fe College.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Putnam County Courthouse

    Putnam County Courthouse

    New York's Putnam County Courthouse is located on Gleneida Avenue (NY 52) across from the eastern terminus of NY 301 in downtown Carmel, the county seat, overlooking Lake Gleneida. First built in 1814, two years after the county itself was established, it is the second-oldest county courthouse still in use in the state after Fulton County's. In 1847 it was renovated extensively. At that time the Classical Revival portico and columns were added. Architect James Townsend used commercially available (although inexact) copies of the Corinthian capitals from the Monument of Lysicrates in Athens. For this and its historic importance in the county's history it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. The courthouse is a two-story, 5-by-8-bay rectangular gable-roofed frame building, with clapboard siding on the north and south sides and horizontal planks on its west (front) facade. The pedimented gable is supported by the four Corinthian columns, behind which is the main entrance, with molded classical detail. Similar ornamentation can be found on the window lintels. The two front corners have large pilasters; the original stone plinth blocks have been replaced with
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Lincoln County Courthouse

    Lincoln County Courthouse

    Lincoln County Courthouse is the building in Stanford, Kentucky, the county seat of Lincoln County, where trial courts conduct their affairs, and other county governmental offices are located. The building was added to the United States National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Stanford, originally called Logan's Fort, was named the county seat of Lincoln County in 1786. The current building was constructed in 1909 at the site of the original building. This structure was the fourth building used as courthouse. Never destroyed by fire or flooding, the courthouse contains original documents dating back to 1781, and are the oldest courthouse records in the state. Constructed in the Beaux-Arts architectural style, the building features include a cupola with a clock on each side at the top of the building. The Ionic order portico fronting includes round brick columns.
    6.00
    4 votes
    98
    Tweed Courthouse

    Tweed Courthouse

    The Old New York County Courthouse at 52 Chambers Street in Manhattan, New York City , more commonly known as the Tweed Courthouse, was built in Italianate style with Romanesque Revival interiors, using funds provided by the corrupt William M. "Boss" Tweed, whose Tammany Hall political machine controlled the city and state governments at the time. The outer shell of the building was constructed from 1861–1872 by the architect John Kellum, with the political appointee Thomas Little. Construction was interrupted when the kickbacks and corruption involved in the construction of the building were disclosed to the public. The project was completed by architect Leopold Eidlitz who added the rear wing and interior renovations from 1877–1881, departing from Kellum's classicism with "an American version of organic architecture expressed through medieval forms". The building was designated a New York City landmark and added to the National Register of Historic Places, both in 1984, when it was called "one of the city's grandest and most important civic monuments". It was named a National Historic Landmark in 1986. Modern restoration and historic preservation of the courthouse were completed
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    Wayne County Courthouse District

    Wayne County Courthouse District

    The Wayne County Courthouse is located in Wooster, Ohio and was constructed by Thomas Boyd's design from 1877-1879. The building is designed in classic Second Empire style and is composed of sandstone. The architect originally designed a symmetrical building separate from the old north annex of the previous courthouse. The reluctant county officials cited money issues and ordered the new building to be built connected to the old, thus giving it an offset appearance. The entrances are flanked by the Atlantes supporting a pediment. The first floor consists of smooth stone blocks. The windows are high arched and set back into the wall, above each is a small arch with a decorative keystone. The second and third floor is of a rougher, darker stone than the first. Doric and Corinthian columns flank the windows around the facade. The second floor windows are high arched and recessed. Here the buildings on either side of the tower differ, the northern half ending with a hipped roof, the southern half continuing on above. The third floor of the southern end contains rectangular recessed windows, the roof resting on a decorative moulding above. On the southern side sits a broken pediment
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Butler County Courthouse

    Butler County Courthouse

    The Butler County Courthouse is a government building of Butler County located in the county seat, Butler, Pennsylvania. The current structure is the third courthouse to have been built for the county. The original courthouse, built in 1807, was a small structure made of stone. James P. Bailey, who was responsible for the construction of Old Main at Geneva College became the architect of the new courthouse after the second one was destroyed by a fire in 1883. Bailey's courthouse still stands today, and is currently the tallest structure in downtown Butler. The Butler County Courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Cassia County Courthouse

    Cassia County Courthouse

    The Cassia County Courthouse is a historic building located at Fifteenth Street and Overland Avenue in Burley, Idaho, the seat of Cassia County, USA. It was constructed in 1939. The courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 27, 1987.
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Gibson County Courthouse

    Gibson County Courthouse

    Since 1815, three separate buildings have served as the Gibson County Courthouse in Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana. The current building was constructed in 1884 and is located at the intersection of Indiana State Road 64 and Indiana State Road 65. It is an example of Romanesque Revival architecture and was the model for Department 56's Original Snow Village Courthouse. Gibson County's Courthouse is of similar design to the Johnson County Courthouse in Franklin, Indiana. The residence of Judge William Harrington was first used to conduct court business. Work on the first courthouse began on September 1, 1814. The building was constructed of bricks which were made nearby on the public square. It had two floors and measured 33 feet by 40 feet. It was first occupied in June 1815. The second courthouse was also made of brick and was completed in 1843 at a cost of about $9,000. The third (and current) courthouse was built on the site of the previous building. The cornerstone was laid on June 17, 1884, accompanied by a Masonic ceremony attended by several thousand people. The McDonald Brothers of Louisville, Kentucky designed the Romanesque Revival building, which was constructed by
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    McPherson County Courthouse

    McPherson County Courthouse

    McPherson County Courthouse is an historic building at Maple and Kansas Avenuves in McPherson, Kansas. The building was built in 1893 and added to the National Historic Register in 1976.
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Old Court House, Perth

    Old Court House, Perth

    Old Court House is located in the Supreme Court Gardens in Barrack Street, Perth, Western Australia, adjacent to the Supreme Court building. It is a single-storey cream rendered building, with a wooden shingle roof. The Old Court House is the city's oldest surviving public building and is one of two remaining examples of the work of Henry Reveley, the colonial civil engineer. It is one of the few remaining buildings designed in the classical Greek revival style of the 19th century in Perth. The Old Court House building stands at the south-east corner of Stirling Gardens in Perth. It is a simple looking building of Georgian style architecture. It is of stone rubble construction with a stucco finish. It is a small simple building with a hipped roof which was originally clad with slate. The entry portico, which was added later, is supported by doric pillars. The area around the north and west of the building is paved in sandstone coloured interlocking concrete paving bricks. In 1836, Governor James Stirling gave orders for the construction of a Court House in Perth. In February 1836, Henry Willey Reveley, the colonial civil engineer from 1829-1938 prepared plans and specifications for
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Pipestone County Courthouse

    Pipestone County Courthouse

    The Pipestone County Courthouse, located at 416 South Hiawatha in the city of Pipestone, Pipestone County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a Beaux Arts style building featuring a Renaissance dome on a clock tower with heavily rusticated masonry and Sioux quartzite. A bronze Lady Justice stands on the dome. The interior is finished with elaborate oak woodwork. A multicolored mantle in the foyer was constructed from pipestone in a Native American motif. The building was constructed by C.H. Peltier of Faribault for $45,175.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Red Lake County Courthouse

    Red Lake County Courthouse

    The Red Lake County Courthouse, located at 124 Langevin Avenue Red Lake Falls, Red Lake County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a red brick Beaux Arts building featuring a small dome at each corner. Originally the building also had a large central dome, but it was removed in the 1940s. The courthouse was completed in 1911 at a cost of $37,070. The building was designed by Fremont D. Orff and James Brady. The front entrance of the courthouse is flanked by faux columns, topped by a classic pediment. The interior atrium is open to a two-story rotunda with arched openings to the second-level walkway.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Wise County Courthouse

    Wise County Courthouse

    The Wise County Courthouse is located at 206 East Main Street in downtown Wise, Virginia. As well as being home to Wise County's judicial system, it also serves as the chief administrative building for the county. It was built in 1896 to replace a much smaller court building. The original courthouse was completed in 1858, two years after the formation of Wise County, but was destroyed by Union troops during the Civil War in 1864. The current courthouse was designed in the Renaissance style of architecture. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Wood County Courthouse

    Wood County Courthouse

    The Wood County Courthouse is a Neo-Romanesque building in Parkersburg, West Virginia, in the United States. The courthouse was built in 1899 by local contractors Caldwell & Drake, according to the plans of architect L. W. Thomas of Canton, Ohio, replacing an earlier courthouse. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 for its architectural significance.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Grant County Courthouse

    Grant County Courthouse

    The Grant County Courthouse is an historic building located at Park Avenue and Main Street in Milbank, South Dakota. It was built in 1915 in the Classical Revival style and was designed by architect C.E. Bell, who also designed the South Dakota State Capitol in Pierre. On February 10, 1993, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Osceola County Courthouse

    Osceola County Courthouse

    The Osceola County Courthouse (constructed in 1889-90) is a historic courthouse in Kissimmee, Florida, located at 2 Courthouse Square. On August 16, 1977, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Kissimmee City has the oldest Courthouse in the State of Florida. The county Courthouse was formed in 1887; this county came up about from the parts of Orange and Brevard Counties. To determine the name of the county, the county commissioners decided to hold elections on February 6, 1887; the names they come up with for the county was Kissimmee City, Runnymeade, and Hell or Hades- Kissimmee City won with 421 votes. When the elections were done the committee was formed and they started right away to find a location to build a Courthouse and jail for the new County Seat. The D.B. Stewart family helped purchased the Historic Osceola Courthouse in 1888 for $2,205.32. The new designs for the Courthouse and a jail were ready in August 1888 so they could start building the blue print “building plans” by F.C. Johnson. The type of design is a Typical of Romanesque revival Courthouse that was constructed throughout the United States during the late 1800s. The Osceola Courthouse
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Suffolk County Courthouse

    Suffolk County Courthouse

    The Suffolk County Courthouse, also known as the "John Adams Courthouse", is a historic courthouse building on Pemberton Square in Boston, Massachusetts that is home to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The Court was built in 1893. From 1893 to 1938, the Supreme Judicial Court and the Social Law Library occupied the building, known then as the Suffolk County Courthouse. In 2002, the Supreme Judicial Court, the Massachusetts Appeals Court, and the Social Law Library returned to the restored building, which was renamed the John Adams Courthouse. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Ashland County Courthouse

    Ashland County Courthouse

    Ashland County Courthouse was constructed from 1928–1929 on West 2nd Street in Ashland, Ohio. The courthouse was added to the National Register on 1979-12-21. Ashland County was formed in 1846 from land taken from Richland, Wayne, Lorain and Huron counties. The county used a church for the purpose of a courthouse until a more permanent building could be constructed. This first courthouse dates from 1853 and was built with red brick and white painted wood trimming. Large Corinthian columns lined the front with Corinthian pilasters lining the sides. Large rectangular windows allowed abundant amounts of light into the interior and courtrooms. A tower rose gracefully above the sloped roof and ended in a small spire. The old county jail was built next door and was a simple stone structure. After this structure was destroyed, the current courthouse was built on its foundations. The design of the current courthouse was designed by Vernon Redding and showcases the popular Classical Revival style of the late 1920s, consisting of clean lines with flat smooth stone and few embellishents. The solid exterior facade consists of rectangular windows and is disrupted by a central projection with
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Blue Earth County Courthouse

    Blue Earth County Courthouse

    The Blue Earth County Courthouse is the courthouse of Blue Earth County, Minnesota, in the city of Mankato, the county seat. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building, completed in 1886, was the second courthouse in the county. The first courthouse in the county, a 20-by-24 foot one-story stone building, was built in 1857. It served as the location for the trial of 392 Dakota Indians after the Sioux Uprising. Thirty-eight Dakota were simultaneously hanged in December 1862. By the late 1800s, the county commissioners felt that the previous buildings were a "disgrace and gave strangers that we were behind the times. That the county was either poverty stricken or greatly lacking in enterprise." The new building combined a Second Empire roof and dome with Italianate features. The stone was provided by a local quarry, with various techniques giving it both rusticated and ashlar surfaces. The copper-sheathed dome is capped with a statue of Lady Justice.
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    Chowan County Courthouse

    Chowan County Courthouse

    Chowan County Courthouse is a Georgian style building in Edenton, North Carolina. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1970. It is located on East King Street, at the head of Green Street, in Edenton.
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Dirksen Federal Building

    Dirksen Federal Building

    The Everett McKinley Dirksen United States Courthouse, commonly referred to as the Dirksen Federal Building, is a skyscraper in downtown Chicago, Illinois, at 219 South Dearborn Street. It was designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and completed in 1964. The building is 384 feet (117 m) tall, with 30 floors; it was named for U.S. Congressman and Senator Everett Dirksen. The building houses the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, the United States Bankruptcy Court the United States Marshal for the Northern District of Illinois, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, and local offices for various court-related federal agencies, such as the Federal Public Defender, United States Probation Service and United States Trustee. It is one of three buildings making up the modernist Federal Plaza complex designed by van der Rohe, along with the U.S. Post Office (Loop Station) and the Kluczynski Federal Building. Separate from the Federal Plaza, but opposite the Kluczynski Building across Jackson Boulevard, is the Metcalfe Federal Building. In 1960, Congress authorized the U.S.
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Grant County Courthouse

    Grant County Courthouse

    The Grant County Courthouse is an historic 3-story redbrick building located on West Guthrie Street in Medford, Oklahoma. It was built in 1909 in the Classical Revival style. On August 23, 1984, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Miami County Courthouse and Power Station

    Miami County Courthouse and Power Station

    The Miami County Courthouse is an historic building in Troy, Ohio, United States. Built in 1885, it was designed by noted Ohio (and later New York) architect, Joseph W. Yost, who also designed the similar Belmont County Courthouse built at the same time in St. Clairsville. It has high arched windows, Corinthian columns supporting the outthrust corners and main entrance. A flight of stairs runs to the main entrance. The central pediment rests on an arch supported by Corinthian columns. The corners of the building thrust out and support a pediment, on top of each rests a tower crowned with an urn. A central tower rises from the middle of the building supporting the clock tower and dome, a statue of justice stand at the very top. On May 30, 1975, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Miami County Courthouse and Power Station.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Old City Hall

    Old City Hall

    Toronto's Old City Hall was home to its city council from 1899 to 1966 and remains one of the city's most prominent structures. The building is located at the corner of Queen and Bay Streets, across Bay Street from Nathan Phillips Square and the new City Hall in the centre of downtown Toronto. The heritage landmark has a distinctive clock tower which heads the length of Bay Street from Front Street to Queen Street as a terminating vista. Old City Hall was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1984. Toronto's Old City Hall was one of the largest buildings in Toronto and the largest civic building in North America upon completion in 1899. It was the burgeoning city's third city hall. Designed by prominent Toronto architect Edward James Lennox, the building took more than a decade to build and cost more than $2.5 million. Work on the building began in 1889. It was constructed of sandstone from the Credit River valley, grey stone from the Orangeville, Ontario area, and brown stone from New Brunswick. Angry councillors, due to cost overruns and construction delays, refused E.J. Lennox a plaque proclaiming him as architect for the completed building in 1899. Not to be denied,
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Old Lake County Courthouse

    Old Lake County Courthouse

    The Old Lake County Courthouse (constructed in 1922) is a historic courthouse in Tavares, Florida, located at 315 West Main Street. On September 25, 1998, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. The Lake County Historical Museum is located on the first floor of the courthouse. Open Monday through Friday, the museum's exhibits focus on the county's history and cultural heritage.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Sarasota County Courthouse

    Sarasota County Courthouse

    The Sarasota County Courthouse is a historic courthouse building located at 2000 Main Street in Sarasota, Florida. Designed by architect Dwight James Baum in the Mediterranean Revival style, it was built in 1926-1927 by Stevenson and Cameron, Inc. On March 22, 1984, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Bexar County Courthouse

    Bexar County Courthouse

    The Bexar County Courthouse is an historical building in Downtown San Antonio, Texas, USA. The building was designed by architect J. Riely Gordon, and borders Main Plaza, along with such other architectural landmarks as the Cathedral of San Fernando. The style is Romanesque Revival, and the main material used is red sandstone. Ground was broken for Gordon's structure on August 4, 1891 and the cornerstone was laid December 17, 1892. After several delays, construction was fully completed in 1896. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. The Courthouse currently functions as the County Seat of Bexar County.
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center

    Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center

    The Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center (formerly known as the Criminal Courts Building) is the county courthouse in downtown Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. It is located at 210 West Temple Street, between Broadway and Spring Street. Originally known as the Criminal Courts Building, in 2002 it was renamed the Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center, after Clara S. Foltz, the first female lawyer on the west coast of the United States (and also the first person to propose the creation of a public defender's office). Notable trial judge Lance Ito holds trials in this building. High profile trials are held on the Ninth Floor of the building, because of a secondary screening area in addition to the main screening at the ground floor level. The building also houses the main offices of the Los Angeles County District Attorney and the Los Angeles County Public Defender.
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Clinton County Courthouse

    Clinton County Courthouse

    The Clinton County Courthouse is located at 50 North Jackson Street in Frankfort, Indiana, United States. The Clinton County Courthouse dates from 1882-1884. It was designed by George W. Bunting, who also designed courthouses in Anderson (Madison County) and Franklin (Johnson County). The Clinton County Courthouse is a three story limestone building adorned with statuary and a 165 foot domed central tower with a clock. The courthouse cost $170,450 to build in 1882. The courthouse is still in use as the county courthouse. A virtual duplicate of the Clinton Courthouse was built in Anderson, Indiana (razed) in red brick at the same time as the Clinton County Courthouse.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square

    Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square

    The Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square is the former courthouse of Denton County located in at the county seat Denton, Texas. The Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square was constructed in 1896. In addition to county offices, the "Courthouse-on-the-Square Museum" also calls it home. The courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Courthouse is also the final resting place of John B. Denton, the county's and city's namesake. The Courthouse-on-the-Square Museum is located at the Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square. The museum is one of three Denton County museums, which also include the Bayless-Selby House Museum, and the Denton County African American Museum. The Courthouse-on-the-Square Museum focuses on the history and culture of Denton County. Exhibits include African American and Hispanic heritage, farming, weapons, dolls, Southwest American Indian and Denton County pottery, furniture, and special collections of American pressed blue glass, thimbles, Pecan folk art and quilts.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Harrison County Courthouse

    Harrison County Courthouse

    The Harrison County Courthouse in Cadiz, Ohio was constructed during 1893 to 1895 by Joseph W. Yost. The courthouse mirrors others of his design, with large arched windows, mansard-roofed towers and a central clock tower domed and topped with a statue Justice. The porches to the entrances are covered with a balcony. After the building was constructed, a mechanic's lien was filed by the Greer family to prevent the county from taking possession of the property. The issue was finally resolved and the county officials moved in. Like other courthouses, the Harrison County courthouse fell into disrepair. In 1993, the courthouse saw renovations of the premises, including an elevator, replacement of the roof, dome, and stairs, as well as other much needed repairs.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Mason County Courthouse

    Mason County Courthouse

    The Mason County Courthouse is in Mason County, Michigan. It is in the town of Ludington in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The area early in its history attracted several lumbermen because of the abundance of white pine timber. Among these early settlers in the area were Burr Caswell, Charles Mears, James Ludington, and Eber Brock Ward. The area began settlement when Burr Caswell moved to the area in 1847 from the state of New York. He built a frame house from driftwood in 1849. This was the first frame building in Mason County and is still at White Pine Village. The Caswell farmhouse served as the first official county seat and as the first courthouse structure. Caswell moved his family upstairs and turned the first floor of his farmhouse over to Mason County to use for a courthouse and trading post. There was even a jail below the house. The Mason County Historical Society restored Caswell's house and the house is now part of "Historic White Pine Village". There were two additional structures before the final present day fourth structure was built in 1893 to serve as Mason County's courthouse. Mason County was officially organized in 1855. The official county seat of Mason County
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Minneapolis City Hall

    Minneapolis City Hall

    Minneapolis City Hall and Hennepin County Courthouse (also known as the "Municipal Building"), designed by Long and Kees in 1888, is the main building used by the city government of Minneapolis, Minnesota as well as by Hennepin County, Minnesota. The structure has served many different purposes since it was built, although today the building is 60 percent occupied by the city and 40 percent occupied by the County. The building is jointly owned by the city and county divided right down the middle and controlled by the Municipal Building Commission. The Commission consists of the chair of the County Board, the mayor of the City of Minneapolis, a member of the County Board and a member of the Minneapolis City Council. The County Board chair serves as the president of the Commission and the mayor serves as the vice president. The building bears a striking resemblance to the city hall buildings in Cincinnati and Toronto. The City Hall and Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. The building replaced an earlier City Hall that existed from 1873 until 1912 near the old intersection between Hennepin Avenue and Nicollet Avenue. That structure eventually was
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Sumter County Courthouse

    Sumter County Courthouse

    The Sumter County Courthouse, built in 1907, is an historic courthouse located at 141 North Main Street in the city of Sumter in Sumter County, South Carolina. It was designed in the Beaux Arts style by Darlington native William Augustus Edwards who designed eight other South Carolina courthouses as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. It was built in an I-shape. In the early 1960s it was enlarged and remodeled. On June 16, 2004, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    1841 Goshen Courthouse

    1841 Goshen Courthouse

    The 1841 Goshen Courthouse is located along Main Street (NY 207) in the center of Goshen, New York, the seat of Orange County, New York, USA. It was designed by popular local architect Thornton Niven in a Greek Revival style, meant to be a twin of the one he had already built in Newburgh, which at that time shared seat duties with the larger city. It was used as a courthouse until 1970, when the recently-constructed Orange County Government Center made more space available. It was individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. It is also a contributing property to the Church Park Historic District. Today it houses the archives of the Orange County Genealogical Society.
    5.50
    4 votes
    130
    Beltrami County Courthouse

    Beltrami County Courthouse

    The Beltrami County Courthouse, located at 619 Beltrami Avenue in Bemidji, Beltrami County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a Beaux Arts style, three-story red brick and sandstone structure, built in 1902-1903. It was designed by Kinney and Detweiler of Minneapolis-Saint Paul and built by Schmidt Brothers contractors for $39,975. Above three round windows in a central tower is an arcaded tower topped with a dome and a statue representing Blind Justice.
    5.50
    4 votes
    131
    Washington County Courthouse

    Washington County Courthouse

    The historic Washington County Courthouse in Washington County, Minnesota is one of the oldest standing courthouses in Minnesota. It is located in the county seat of Stillwater, Minnesota. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. The courthouse was designed by Augustus Knight of St. Paul, in the Italianate style. When the courthouse opened in 1870, the county was doing a booming business in the lumber industry. The courthouse reflected the county's wealth and overlooked the city from atop Zion's Hill. The foundation is built of limestone, and the building has a brick facade and is topped with a prominent dome, cupola, and flagpole. When the county offices were moved to the new Washington County Government Center in 1975, efforts began to reuse the structure. Restoration has been funded through donations from local businesses and community groups, as well as grants from foundations. The historic courthouse is still in operation and serves as a gathering place and as a venue for community, cultural, and private events. The mission statement states, "The purpose of the operation of the Washington County Historic Courthouse is to preserve, re-adapt, restore
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    Dakota County Courthouse

    Dakota County Courthouse

    The Dakota County Courthouse, in Hastings, Minnesota, is the original courthouse for Dakota County. It was designed by A.M. Radcliff, one of Minnesota's first architects, in an Italian Villa style. Although an addition built in 1955 in an entirely different style damaged the building's integrity, the building remains a prominent structure in downtown Hastings. The courthouse served as the seat of Dakota County government from 1871 until September 1974, when the county commissioners held their last meeting in the building. It then became the Hastings City Hall in 1993.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Faribault County Courthouse

    Faribault County Courthouse

    The Faribault County Courthouse in Blue Earth, Faribault County, Minnesota is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building was completed in December 1892 at a cost of $70,000. Materials included Kasota limestone, sand from the Blue Earth River bottoms, red brick above the rusticated sandstone ground floor, and clay tile for the roof. The arches at the entrance rest on short columns with foliated capitals, a hallmark of the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Between the arches is a gargoyle in the form of a satyr's head. The most prominent feature is a seven-story tower on the corner.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Harrison Courthouse Square Historic District

    Harrison Courthouse Square Historic District

    The Harrison Courthouse Square Historic District is an area of Harrison, Arkansas. It is known by residents simply as "the Square". The Harrison Courthouse Square Historic District includes the 1911 Boone County Courthouse, two pharmacies, several clothing stores and restaurants, and a Marine Corps museum. The District also has a bank and the Lyric Theater. The District is the site of several annual festivals, including Crawdad Days and the Fall Festival. Several war memorials stand on the Courthouse lawn. The Square is known as the site of the shooting of famous outlaw Henry Starr.
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Old Todd County Courthouse

    Old Todd County Courthouse

    Old Todd County Courthouse (1835–1857) Todd County, Kentucky's first courthouse was built at the direction of Major John Gray, and completed in 1835. The courthouse is a sister building to the Green River Girls School which was built in the same year. Bricks used were fired on the site. The construction of the courthouse which occupies the center square in Elkton, was authorized by the Fiscal Court, Tuesday, November 11, 1834, at which time they arranged for the selection of a building site. The Commissioners further mandated the county to meet the cost in three payments, the first of which would come from unappropriated funds, which were being held by the sheriff. Thereafter, the balance would be remitted in two equal payments. Jesse Russell, of Elkton, was employed to supervise the construction, along with Commissioner Hazel Petrie. There are two accounts of the building of the walls. Russell is said to have hired four brickmasons, each of whom was to construct a wall: the mason with the best wall was to receive a gold watch. In another account, Jesse Russell and another brick mason were said to have boasted on their masonry skills. To settle the dispute, each was told to build a
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Rhea County Courthouse

    Rhea County Courthouse

    The Rhea County Courthouse, located in Dayton, Tennessee was the scene of the Scopes Trial of July 1925, in which teacher John T. Scopes faced charges for including Charles Darwin's theory of evolution in his public school lesson. The trial became a clash of titans between the lawyers William Jennings Bryan for the prosecution and Clarence Darrow for the defense, and epitomizes the tension between fundamentalism and modernism in a wide range of aspects of American society. A $1-million project which restored the second-floor courtroom to the way it looked during the Scopes trial was completed in 1979. The Rhea County Museum, also called the Scopes Trial Museum, is located in its basement and contains such memorabilia as the microphone used to broadcast the trial, trial records, photographs, and an audiovisual history of the trial. Every July local people re-enact key moments of the trial in the courtroom. In front of the courthouse stands a commemorative plaque erected by the Tennessee Historical Commission: Here, from July 10 to 21, 1925 John Thomas Scopes, a County High School teacher, was tried for teaching that a man descended from a lower order of animals in violation of a
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Washington County Courthouse

    Washington County Courthouse

    The Washington County Courthouse is located in on Main Street in downtown Washington, Pennsylvania and is currently still in operation. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 30, 1974. It is designated as a historic public landmark by the Washington County History & Landmarks Foundation.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Wirt County Courthouse

    Wirt County Courthouse

    The Wirt County Courthouse in Elizabeth, West Virginia was built to replace a courthouse that burned May 15, 1910. The new neoclassical courthouse was designed by B.F. Smith and subsequently built by his company. The courthouse is the most significant building in the small community of Elizabeth, with a population of less than 1000. The brick courthouse features a two-story columned pediment and is surmounted by a clock tower.
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Abbeville County Courthouse

    Abbeville County Courthouse

    The Abbeville County Courthouse, built in 1908, is an historic courthouse located in the east corner of Court Square, in the city of Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina. It was designed in the Beaux Arts style by Darlington native William Augustus Edwards who designed several other South Carolina courthouses as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. An arcade connects it to the adjoining Abbeville Opera House and Municipal Center, which Edwards also designed. In 1964, the courthouse was renovated by Lyles, Bissett, Carlisle, and Wolff of Columbia. On October 30, 1981, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. It is included in the Abbeville Historic District. The current courthouse is the sixth courthouse to serve Abbeville County. The history of the previous courthouses is as follows: Located inside the central hallway is a portrait of John C. Calhoun, twice vice-president and longtime senator from South Carolina. Calhoun was born southwest of the town on his father's plantation. He practiced law for a short time on the county square. The courthouse is located on land that once housed the law firm in which
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Chicago Federal Building

    Chicago Federal Building

    The Chicago Federal Building in Chicago, Illinois was constructed between 1898 and 1905 for the purpose of housing the midwest's federal courts, main post office, and other government bureaus. It stood in The Loop neighborhood on a block bounded by Dearborn, Adams and Clark Streets and Jackson Boulevard. The site held an 1880 post office, courthouse and customhouse which was cleared to make way for the new building. The push for a new building was spearheaded by postmaster Washington Hesing with backing by civic leaders and the Illinois' members of Congress. The explosion of Chicago's population, especially after the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893, strained the earlier facility beyond capacity. When the Exposition began, the Post Office Department in Chicago employed 998 clerks and 935 carriers. By the time Congress approved funding for a new building, the post office had expanded to 1,319 clerks and 1,096 carriers. Other agencies housed in the building complained of poor planning and shoddy construction which resulted in crumbling plaster, broken plumbing and flooding. The building was designed in the Beaux-Arts style by architect Henry Ives Cobb. The floorplan was a
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Douglas County Courthouse

    Douglas County Courthouse

    Douglas County Courthouse is a historic courthouse at 1616 Eighth Street in Minden, Nevada, United States. When the county seat moved to Minden from Genoa in 1916, architects Frederick DeLongchamps and George L.F. O'Brien were hired to design a new courthouse for $700. The building was finished the same year by contractors Friedhoff and Hoeffel for $25,000.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Jefferson County Courthouse

    Jefferson County Courthouse

    The Jefferson County Courthouse is located at 301 Market Street in Steubenville, Ohio. It is the original courthouse constructed for Jefferson County. It was constructed in 1871 through 1874 by Heard & Blythe architectural firm. The courthouse was originally designed and built with six floors, high arched windows with hood-moulds and keystones, sectional Corinthian columns, and a flight of stairs to each entrance. Above the entrances are high Corinthian columns supporting a pediment. The main entrance has Justice standing on the peak of the pediment. The mansard roof contained dormer windows with a central tower capped with a mansard roof. The sandstone building is severely discolored due to the polluted air from the surrounding steel factories and heavy traffic. In 1950 during a ferocious snowstorm, the top floor collapsed, destroying the ornate roof and tower. Instead of reconstructing the mansard roof and tower, the county officials decided to keep the roof flat, cutting the number of floors to five. The courthouse stands diagonal from the site of Fort Steuben. A plaque to the left of the main entrance is in memoriam to the USS Maine (ACR-1) and is made from metal recovered from
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Old Courthouse, Warren County

    Old Courthouse, Warren County

    The Old Courthouse, Warren County, also known as Warren County Courthouse, sits prominently on a hill in Vicksburg, Mississippi and was a symbol of Confederate resistance during the siege of Vicksburg. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1968 and a Mississippi Landmark in 1986. The landmarked area is the entire Courthouse Square, which includes the courthouse and four cistern buildings.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Belmont County Courthouse

    Belmont County Courthouse

    The Belmont County Courthouse is located at 101 West Main Street in St. Clairsville, Ohio. It sits on the highest point in the St. Clairsville area and is thus visible from Interstate 70 and many other points in the Ohio Valley. It is a contributing property in the St. Clairsville Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1969 . Belmont County was formed in 1801 and the county seat was Pultney, now called Shadyside. This courthouse was a simple two-story brick building. The courthouse was only used for a few years until the county seat was removed to the more central St. Clairsville. St. Clairsville was a developing community along the National Road and the courthouse was planned along this road. This 1805 courthouse constructed was a log structure standing two-stories high and cost the county just over $1,000. When this building was destroyed a new courthouse rose from its site. This new building was made of brick in the popular Federal style in 1815. The courthouse stood two-stories high with long rectangular windows lining the facade. A cupola rose from the pitched roof and would serve the county until 1885. The new courthouse built
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Bergen County Court House

    Bergen County Court House

    Bergen County, New Jersey had a series of court houses. The current one stands in Hackensack, New Jersey. The current Bergen County Courthouse is not the first courthouse but actually the sixth courthouse built for Bergen County. In 1683 four counties were created in East Jersey and they were Bergen, Essex, Middlesex and Monmouth. In 1710 Hackensack became the county seat in Bergen. In 1715 the first courthouse was built and it was located three blocks from the current courthouse. The courthouse also housed a jail. The second courthouse was built in 1734 near the “Green”, but was burned by the British in 1780 during the Revolutionary War. The third courthouse, a log building, was then built in Oakland. This was considered a temporary location and the courthouse later moved to the home of John Hopper in Ho-Ho-Kus. After the war, the courthouse was moved to the house of Archibald Campbell of Hackensack. Freeholder Peter Zabriskie later donated land near his Hackensack home located at the northeast corner of Main and Bridge Streets and in 1786 a new courthouse and jail opened. Peter Zabriskie’s home, called “The Mansion” was also called “Washington’s Headquarters” because George
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Harris County Courthouse

    Harris County Courthouse

    The Harris County Courthouse is an historic courthouse building located in Hamilton, Georgia. Built in 1908, it was designed by Georgia-born American architect Edward Columbus Hosford, who is noted for the courthouses and other buildings that he designed in Florida, Georgia and Texas. This was the second courthouse he had ever designed. On September 18, 1980, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Marion County Courthouse

    Marion County Courthouse

    The Marion County Courthouse is a Beaux-Arts style building in Fairmont, West Virginia, in the United States. The courthouse was constructed from 1897 to 1900, and was designed by the architectural firm of Yost & Packard of Columbus, Ohio. Its dome is topped by a figure carrying the scales of justice. The courthouse, located at the intersection of Adams and Jefferson Streets in downtown Fairmont, and the adjacent American Foursquare-style sheriff's residence, were jointly added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 for their architectural, artistic and governmental significance.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Martin County Courthouse

    Martin County Courthouse

    The Martin County Courthouse is located at 201 Lake Avenue Fairmont, Martin County in the U.S. state of Minnesota. It is a Bedford limestone Beaux Arts building featuring a high copper dome with four clock faces. The first floor was made out of Michigan sandstone. The arched entrance is flanked by polished double Corinthian order columns and topped by a pediment. The building was designed by Charles E. Bell and built by J.B. Nelson for $125,000 in 1907. Interior murals of figures representing peace, war, inspiration, genius, sentence, and execution were painted by Franz E. Rohrbeck of Milwaukee. Interior finishing includes marble countertops, metalwork, and stained glass. The building is connected to the Martin County security building by skyway.
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Monroe County Courthouse

    Monroe County Courthouse

    The Monroe County Courthouse is located in Woodsfield, Ohio and is one of few courthouses located in a town square. The building is of red brick with yellow brick quions, pillars and pediments, which are said to represent the colors of fall in the surrounding countryside. The main entrance is reached by a small flight of stairs between Ionic columns and a pediment of fine arched stone. The courthouse has one of ten largest clocks in the world, which can be seen from miles away. Its four faces were installed in 1908 by Howard Clock Company of New York. The cost of the clock was $2,775. The dome of the courthouse was once a bright copper plating, but was removed due to public dissatisfaction.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Montgomery County Circuit Courthouses

    Montgomery County Circuit Courthouses

    The Montgomery County Circuit Courthouses are part of the Montgomery County Judicial Center located in downtown Rockville, Maryland. The Red Brick Courthouse, located at 29 Courthouse Square, houses the refurbished Grand Courtroom; the newer Circuit Court building, located at 50 Maryland Avenue, houses the remainder of the county's justice system. The Montgomery County Judicial Center, a Brutalist building constructed in the 1980s, houses the Montgomery County Circuit Court, the Offices of the Sheriff, the Register of wills, the Orphans' Court and the State's Attorney for Montgomery County. The Judicial Center and District Court buildings, together with the Rockville City Hall are located in downtown Rockville, Maryland, at the corner of Maryland Avenue and Jefferson Street (Rte 28). The District Court is on the west side of Maryland Avenue, across the street from the Judicial Center. There have been four court houses in Rockville since it was established as the County seat in 1776. Court was originally held at the Hungerford Tavern until a frame court house was erected in the 1790s. By 1810, a new court house was needed. In 1835 the General Assembly authorized a new brick court
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Old Vanderburgh County Courthouse

    Old Vanderburgh County Courthouse

    The Old Vanderburgh County Courthouse, often simply called the "Old Courthouse," was once the center of Vanderburgh County, Indiana government. Construction started in the spring of 1888 and was completed in November 1890. The building was ready to be occupied by the county government in early 1891. It sits in the heart of downtown Evansville. The building was designed by architect Henry W. Wolters of Louisville, Kentucky and constructed by the Charles Pearce & Company of Indianapolis. The 19th century German Beaux-Arts architecture masterpiece cost $379,450 to build. The Old Courthouse occupies an entire city block, bounded by Court, Fourth, Vine and Fifth Streets, with each side being encrusted with sculptures and stone carvings in Indiana limestone. The fourteen main statues of human figures are the work of Franz Engelsmann, who studied under the great German masters before setting up his studio in Chicago. In addition, carvings of vegetables, fruits, and flowers indigenous to the area adorn the capitals of the forty-eight pairs of pilasters around the entire building. Before the courthouse was built, the site was a basin where canal boats on the Wabash and Erie Canal would
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Orange County Courthouse - Old

    Orange County Courthouse - Old

    The old Orange County Courthouse, located in Orlando, Florida, United States, serves as the home of the Historical Society of Central Florida and the Orange County Regional History Center. Constructed in 1927, the Courthouse stands in the vicinity of a number of previous judicial buildings. An earlier courthouse was built in 1892 and demolished in 1957. A Courthouse Annex was also constructed in 1960. The notorious serial killer Ted Bundy was tried for the murder of Kimberly Leach at the Orange County Courthouse beginning on January 7, 1980. Defense attorneys Julius Africano and Lynn Thompson attempted a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity, but on February 7 the verdict of "Guilty" was issued. Ted Bundy while being tried for murder engraved his name on the corner of the table at which he was sitting.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Pasco County Courthouse

    Pasco County Courthouse

    The Pasco County Courthouse (constructed in 1909) is a historic site in Dade City, Florida, located at 37918 Meridian Avenue. It was designed by noted architect Edward Columbus Hosford in the Classical Revival style. On September 20, 2006, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In recent years, a Valentine's Day tradition has developed where the Pasco County Clerk offers a complimentary wedding ceremony on the steps of the Historic Courthouse. Media related to Pasco County Courthouse at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Peace Palace

    Peace Palace

    The Peace Palace (Dutch: Vredespaleis) is a building situated in The Hague, Netherlands. It is often called the seat of international law because it houses the International Court of Justice (which is the principal judicial body of the United Nations), the Permanent Court of Arbitration, the Hague Academy of International Law, and the extensive Peace Palace Library. In addition to hosting these institutions, the Palace is also a regular venue for special events in international policy and law. The idea of the Palace started from a discussion in 1900 between the Russian diplomat Friedrich Martens and the US diplomat Andrew White, over providing a home for the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA), which was established through the first Hague Peace Conference in 1899. White contacted his friend the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie about this idea. Carnegie had his reservations, and at first was only interested in donating money for the establishment of a Library of International Law. White however was able to convince Carnegie, and in 1903 Carnegie agreed to donate the US$1.5 million ($40,000,000, adjusted for inflation) needed for a Peace Temple that would house the PCA as well as to
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Hippodrome State Theatre

    Hippodrome State Theatre

    The Hippodrome Theatre (often referred to by residents as the Hipp) is a regional professional theatre in downtown Gainesville, Florida, United States. It was founded in 1980 by local actors. The address is 25 Southeast 2nd Place. The building itself was completed in 1911, and served as a U.S. Post Office (on the first floor) and a Courthouse of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida (on the second floor). It was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on July 10, 1979. The interior is in good condition, maintaining much of the original walls, doors and beams from its Post Office and Courthouse era. It is a relatively small location, with a 266-seat thrust-stage Main stage theatre on the second floor and 80-seat cinema space on the first floor. The Hippodrome building also has one of the oldest working elevators in Florida which requires the operator to manually close the screen, the door, and then pull a crank to operate. The Hippodrome uses professional actors and has its own set designers, costume designers, sound engineers and lighting engineers for each of its main stage productions. It also provides youth theatre education
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Manatee County Courthouse

    Manatee County Courthouse

    The Manatee County Courthouse, built in 1913, is a historic courthouse building located at 1115 Manatee Avenue, West, in Bradenton, Florida. On June 11, 1998, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Norfolk County Courthouse

    Norfolk County Courthouse

    The Norfolk County Courthouse is a National Historic Landmark at 650 High Street in Dedham, Massachusetts. The Greek Revival courthouse was built in 1827 with modifications by Solomon Willard. It was the site of the famous Sacco-Vanzetti trial. The courthouse was added to the National Historic Register in 1972.
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Pueblo County Courthouse

    Pueblo County Courthouse

    The Pueblo County Courthouse is a historic courthouse in Pueblo, Colorado. The building, designed by New Yorker Albert Ross, and executed in 1908—1912 in brick and white sandstone, was the third building to serve as the county courthouse.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    York County Court House

    York County Court House

    The York County Court House is a major court in Toronto, Canada located behind Osgoode Hall. It was built in 1967 at 393 University Avenue north of Queen Street West. It was the York County Courts from 1967 to 1980, then for Toronto since 1980. Today it is home to Superior Court of Justice - Estates Division. The old York County Court House was located on King Street (between Toronto Street and Church Street) and was home to the County Court from 1800 to 1824. It served as home to the Parliament Buildings of Upper Canada from 1829 to 1832. Other sites of the County Court:
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Queen Anne's County Courthouse

    Queen Anne's County Courthouse

    The Queen Anne's County Courthouse is the oldest courthouse still in use in the state of Maryland. The building houses the judge for the Queen Anne's County Circuit Court, the judge's chambers, a courtroom, a jurors' assembly room, clerks offices and a small detention lock-up. The courthouse was authorized by acts of the Maryland General Assembly after the removal of the county seat from Queenstown to Chester Mills and then Centreville. It was erected between 1791 and 1796 on land purchased from Elizabeth Nicholson from her portion of the Chesterfield Estate, the estate of her grandfather, William Sweatman. Later, her father, Judge Nicholson became Chief Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit (then comprising Baltimore and Harford counties) and a judge of the Court of Appeals.
    5.00
    4 votes
    161
    Saint Paul City Hall and Ramsey County Courthouse

    Saint Paul City Hall and Ramsey County Courthouse

    The Saint Paul City Hall and Ramsey County Courthouse, located at 15 Kellogg Boulevard West in Saint Paul, Ramsey County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a twenty-story Art Deco skyscraper built during the Great Depression era of high unemployment and falling prices. For this reason, the $4,000,000 budgeted for the building was underspent, while the quality of materials and craftsmanship were higher than initially envisioned. The exterior consists of smooth Indiana limestone in the Art Deco style known as "American Perpendicular", designed by Thomas Ellerbe & Company of Saint Paul and Holabird & Root of Chicago and inspired by Finnish architect, Eliel Saarinen. The vertical rows of windows are linked by plain, flat, black spandrels. Above the Fourth Street entrance and flanking the Third Street entrance are relief sculptures carved by Lee Lawrie. The interior design in the "Zigzag Moderne" style drew its inspiration from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, which promoted soft ornamentation and sensuous curves. In Memorial Hall the white marble floor contrasts with three-story black marble piers leading to a gold-leaf ceiling. At the end of
    5.00
    4 votes
    162
    Kings County Museum

    Kings County Museum

    The Kings County Museum is a museum located in Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada exploring the history of Kings County, Nova Scotia. It is housed in the restored 1903 Kings County Courthouse. The Museum hosts a variety of permanent and changing displays about Kings County. It is also home to the Parks Canada National Commemorative New England Planters Exhibit. The courthouse was built in 1903, replacing a wooden courthouse from 1850 located just to the north which was so decrepit it was subsequently used as a shed to store apples. The new courthouse was built by Wolfville builder and architect Leslie R. Fairn. It combined Courts, County municipal offices and Land Registry as well as providing offices for Probate, Prothonotory, Treasurer, County Clerk and Sheriff. Fireproof safety vaults were built into the walls and were said to be "the best in the province". The Courthouse was built at a cost of $20,000 from brick and decorative pressed brick made in Avonport, Kings County and sandstone quarried at nearby Cumberland County. The courthouse opened officially with the first meeting of Kings County Council in the new building on January 12, 1904. The first major trial at the courthouse
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Athens Governmental Buildings

    Athens Governmental Buildings

    The Athens Governmental Buildings are a complex of buildings in central Athens, Ohio, United States. Among these buildings are the Athens County Courthouse, the Athens City Hall, and the former post office, now Haning Hall of Ohio University. The current post office is a much more recent building away from the town center, on East Stimson Avenue. The oldest of the buildings included was built in 1804. Together, they were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Butler County Courthouse

    Butler County Courthouse

    The Butler County Courthouse is located in Hamilton, Ohio and was constructed from 1885-1889 by architect David W. Gibbs. The courthouse is a registered historic building listed in the National Register on 1981-06-22 Butler County was established in 1803 from a section of Hamilton County. The county seat selected was Hamilton and the first courthouse was built 1806 and the second in 1817 on the site of the present structure. When the county realized that the courthouse was too small for the population, a new plan by D.W. Gibbs and was designed in the Second Empire style with features from the Italianate style. The main entrance is reached by stairs which enter into a covered porch. Above the porch is a high design arch supported by Ionic columns. This arch in turn holds a pediment capped with an urn. The mansard-roof gives way to a central tower. The original tower was once four-tiered, domed, and capped with a statue of Justice. This was destroyed in a fire in 1912 when the tower collapsed. It was replaced shortly thereafter with a massive tower and dome designed by local architect Frederick Mueller, but the dome was removed in 1926 after it was struck by lightning. The octagonal
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Coweta County Courthouse

    Coweta County Courthouse

    The Coweta County Courthouse is an historic government building located at Courthouse Square in the U.S. city of Newnan, Georgia, the seat of Coweta County. It was constructed in 1904. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 18, 1980.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Duval County Courthouse

    Duval County Courthouse

    The Duval County Courthouse is the local courthouse for Duval County, Florida. It houses courtrooms and judges from the Duval County and Fourth Judicial Circuit Courts. The current facility is located in Downtown Jacksonville, Florida; a new facility currently under construction will open in 2012. Duval County was created on August 12, 1822 and was formerly part of St. Johns County. Although the county's area was huge, it took more than twenty years before the first courthouse was constructed during the 1840s A second courthouse was constructed in 1886, but was burned in the Great Fire of 1901. The third courthouse was constructed in 1902 and closed in 1958, when it was replaced by the current facility. A new courthouse funded by the Better Jacksonville Plan was planned in 2000, but budget issues and rising costs delayed its construction until 2009. The first courthouse erected in Duval County was constructed of wood during the 1840s where Forsyth and Market Street intersect. It was burned to the ground during the Civil War. It took another twenty years before it was replaced with a brick building, constructed in 1886, which lasted until the Great Fire of 1901, which destroyed most
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Fulton County Courthouse

    Fulton County Courthouse

    The Fulton County Courthouse, built between 1911 and 1914, is an historic courthouse building located at 160 Pryor Street SW in Atlanta, Georgia, the Fulton county seat. It was designed by noted Atlanta-based architect A. Ten Eyck Brown (1878–1940), along with the Atlanta firm of Morgan & Dillon. It is officially the Lewis B. Slaton Courthouse. On September 18, 1980, the original building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. An annex across the street is connected via skywalk. Both are located in the South Downtown. In March 2006, Brian Nichols escaped from a sheriff's deputy at the courthouse, causing her brain damage, and then killing the judge in his rape trial, a court reporter, and another deputy, and later a man at another location, before kidnapping and holding a woman hostage. He was found guilty of all 54 counts against him at his trial, which was moved to Atlanta Municipal Court to avoid the crime scene where most of the killing spree occurred.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Hawkins County Courthouse

    Hawkins County Courthouse

    The Hawkins County Courthouse is the seat of county government for Hawkins County, Tennessee, located in the city of Rogersville. It was built in 1836, it is one of six antebellum courthouses still in use in Tennessee, and it is the oldest courthouse still in use in the state. Hawkins County was first organized in 1786 by the State of North Carolina; Rogersville, then called Hawkins Courthouse, was selected as the county seat due to the diligence of its founder and tireless promoter, Joseph Rogers (son-in-law to a prominent local settler, Colonel Thomas Amis, a French Huguenot who worked with the Irish-born Rogers after Rogers wedded Amis' daughter Mary). The seat of county government was first established in the back of Rogers' first tavern, a log structure that boasted an attached lean-to with jail-stocks. In 1796, when Tennessee attained statehood, it was in this log structure that the vote was tallied and proclaimed. In 1810, the State set up a Circuit Court for Hawkins County, prompting the county justices to build a newer, larger log-and-clapboard structure on what had become Rogersville's Main Street (which corresponded to the Great Stage Road connecting Washington, D.C.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Metamora Courthouse State Historic Site

    Metamora Courthouse State Historic Site

    The Metamora Courthouse State Historic Site is a historic American courthouse located in Metamora, Illinois, the former county seat of Woodford County. The courthouse was built in 1845 as the governmental center for Woodford County and as a circuit court for the former Illinois Eighth Circuit. The courthouse is best known for being one of only two surviving Illinois circuit courthouses where future U.S. President Abraham Lincoln practiced law. Surviving records from Eighth Circuit courthouses such as Metamora show that Lincoln and his colleagues practiced general, unspecialized law. They served as criminal defense counsel, handled divorce and family-law cases, oversaw the passage of estates through probate, and were available to handle a wide variety of civil suits and disputes. Lincoln handled more than 70 cases here, including two murders and two cases of fugitives from slavery. Lincoln's law firm, Lincoln & Herndon, in which he practiced with his partner William Herndon, consisted of only two lawyers. It was based in Springfield, Illinois, and Lincoln was the circuit partner, traveling from county seat to county seat throughout the Eighth Circuit when the circuit court was in
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Old Baker County Courthouse

    Old Baker County Courthouse

    The Old Baker County Courthouse built in 1908, is an historic building located at 14 McIver Avenue West in Macclenny, Florida. It was designed by Edward Columbus Hosford of Eastman, Georgia. On August 21, 1986, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. It is now the Emily Taber Public Library,
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Ouray County Courthouse

    Ouray County Courthouse

    The Ouray County Courthouse, constructed in 1888, is the seat of government of Ouray County, Colorado. It is located at the corner of 6th Avenue and 4th Street in Ouray, Colorado. This structure is a [[contributing property of the Ouray Historic District. The courtroom was used in the John Wayne movie, True Grit.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Palais de Justice

    Palais de Justice

    The Palais de Justice (French pronunciation: [palɛ də ʒystis]), located in the Île de la Cité in central Paris, France, is built on the site of the former royal palace of Saint Louis, of which the Sainte Chapelle remains. Thus the justice of the state has been dispensed at this site since medieval times. From the sixteenth century to the French Revolution this was the seat of the Parlement de Paris. The Palais also contains the ancient structure of the Conciergerie, a former prison, now a museum, where Marie Antoinette was imprisoned before being executed on the guillotine. The architects of the monumental white-marble Second-Empire Palais de Justice (built from 1857 to 1868) were Joseph-Louis Duc and Honoré Daumet. The exterior includes sculptural work by Jean-Marie Bonnassieux. Security is maintained by gendarmes.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Worcester County District Courthouses

    Worcester County District Courthouses

    The District Court of Maryland for Wocester County District Courthouses are located in Ocean City and Snow Hill and serve as the courts of first impression for the majority of residents in Worcester County, Maryland. All minor traffic and most misdeamenor criminal cases are handled in these courts. The District Court of Maryland for Worcester County Ocean City Courthouse is located at 6505 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Maryland, just two blocks from the beach. There is one courtroom, a judge's chambers and offices for the clerks of the District Court of Maryland. The Courthouse is part of the new Ocean City Public Safety Complex which consolidates numerous municipal services in one place. The complex also provides 55,000 square feet (5,100 m) of space for Police, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Emergency Operations Center (EOC), and the Department of Juvenile Services. The Snow Hill District Courthouse is located at 301 Commerce Street in Snow Hill, Maryland. There is one courtroom, a judge's chambers, a modest law library, offices of the clerk of the District Court for Worcester County and the office of the court commissioner.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Allen County Courthouse

    Allen County Courthouse

    The Allen County Courthouse in Fort Wayne, Indiana is one of 37 United States National Historic Landmarks in the state of Indiana. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976 and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2003. Designed by Brentwood S. Tolan, construction began in 1897, the cornerstone was laid November 17, 1897. The building was dedicated September 23, 1902 with a final cost of $817,553.59. On September 23, 2002, the building was re-dedicated on its centennial after a seven-year restoration effort, which cost $8.6 million. The Beaux-Arts architecture-style structure includes such features as four 25 by 45-foot (14 m) murals by Charles Holloway, twenty-eight different kinds of scagiola covering 15,000 square feet (1,400 m), bas-reliefs and art glass. Each of the five court rooms has its own color scheme. Atop the building is a 255-foot (78 m)-high copper-clad domed rotunda, itself topped by a 14-foot (4.3 m) statue wind vane of Lady Liberty. The larger than life statue has feet that would wear a woman's shoe size of 28. The building materials include Bedford Limestone and Vermont granite with Italian marble details. A tunnel was
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Bay County Courthouse

    Bay County Courthouse

    The Bay County Courthouse is an historic yellow brick courthouse building located at 300 East 4th Street in Panama City, Florida. Built in 1915 in the Classical Revival style, it is Bay County's first and only courthouse. After a 1920 fire gutted the building, it was rebuilt in a much simpler form without its entrance pediment, gabled roof system and ornate central clock tower. The entrance columns and entablature, however, were retained. Later additions have been built on its left side. In August 1961 the Bay County Courthouse was the scene of the trial and conviction of Clarence Earl Gideon for felony theft. The court's refusal to provide Gideon with legal representation was overturned in the famous U. S. Supreme Court case of Gideon v. Wainwright. Gideon was retried here in August 1963 and was acquitted. In 1989, the Bay County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Douglas County Courthouse

    Douglas County Courthouse

    The present Douglas County Courthouse is located at 1701 Farnam Street in Omaha, Nebraska. Built in 1912, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Notable events at the courthouse include two lynchings and the city's first Civil Rights Era sit-in protest. Five years after it was opened, the building was almost destroyed by mob violence in the Omaha Race Riot of 1919. The 1912 building was designed in the French Renaissance Revival style by local architect John Latenser, Sr.. Decorative stonework covers the structure's exterior, and the building serves as a prominent landmark in Downtown Omaha. Three years after the city was founded in 1854, on March 18, 1857 the City of Omaha built a jail and courthouse in an area known as Washington Square. It bounded by 15th, 16th, Douglas and Farnam streets. The original courthouse in Douglas County, with a council room and mayor’s court room, several offices and jail cells, was opened January 4, 1858. The original building was found to be too small as early as 1869. The current site, a block between 17th, 18th, Farnam and Harney Streets, became available in 1878, and in 1879, a jail was built on the southwest corner of
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Green Street Court House

    Green Street Court House

    Green Street Court House, Dublin, was the home of the Special Criminal Court until it moved to the new Criminal Court of Justice building near Phoenix Park in 2010. The Green Street court house (located on Green Street) is in the Smithfield area of Dublin and now handles civil cases, particularly custody cases. It was built in 1797 on the site of the old Newgate Gaol. The architect is believed to have been Whitmore Davis. The building was remodelled between 1837 and 1842 by Michael Semple. There was a royal visit in 1849, and the court was the venue of several noted trials such as those of Wolfe Tone, Robert Emmett in 1803, John Mitchel in 1848 and other Fenian leaders. It was extensively used during the troubles 1970 to 1990s including in 1976 the trial arising from the Herrema kidnapping.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Law Courts of Brussels

    Law Courts of Brussels

    The Law Courts of Brussels or Brussels Palace of Justice (French: Palais de Justice, Dutch:  Justitiepaleis (help·info)) is the most important Court building in Belgium, and is a notable landmark of Brussels. It was built between 1866 and 1883 in the eclectic style by architect Joseph Poelaert. The total cost of the construction, land and furnishings was somewhere in the region of 45 million Belgian francs. It is the biggest building constructed in the 19th century. In 1860, during the reign of Léopold I, a Royal decree announced the building of the Palace of Justice and an international architecture contest was organised for its design. The designs entered in the contest were found to be unacceptable and were thus rejected. The then minister of justice Tesch appointed Joseph Poelaert to design the building in 1861. The first stone was laid on October 31, 1866, and the building was inaugurated on October 15, 1883, after Poelaert's death. For the building of the Palace of Justice, a section of the Marollen neighbourhood was demolished, while most of the park belonging to the House of Mérode was also expropriated. The 75 landlords owners of the houses, many of whom lived in their
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Marion County Courthouse

    Marion County Courthouse

    The Marion County Courthouse is the seat of government for Marion County, Ohio, United States. Located at the heart of the city of Marion, it is a sister of the courthouses that stand in Washington Court House in Fayette County, Ohio, and Charlotte, Eaton County, Michigan. All three were designed by architect David W. Gibbs,; however, the Fayette County Courthouse was built from 1882–1885, the Eaton County Michigan courthouse was also built from 1882-1885 and uses brick and stone for its exterior rather than stone for the Ohio built structures. The Marion County Courthouse was built during 1884-1886. The blueprints are a modification from even older designs for the Henry and Union County Courthouses. The building is predominant in its setting. The entrance is reached by a flight of stairs and a landing running along the facade. A projecting portico with a high arched opening and arched windows greet you at the front door. The other windows are long rectangular panels. A balustrade runs across the balcony above, which is supported by Corinthian columns. A pediment rises above with the County seal. A tower rises from the center of the building supporting the four faced clock and a
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Old Hendry County Courthouse

    Old Hendry County Courthouse

    The Old Hendry County Courthouse (constructed in 1926) is a historic courthouse in LaBelle, Florida, located at the corner of Bridge Street and Hickpochee Avenue. It was designed in the Mediterranean Revival-Mission Revival styles by noted architect Edward Columbus Hosford. On November 8, 1990, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Talbot County District Courthouse

    Talbot County District Courthouse

    The District Court of Maryland for Talbot County District Courthouse is located in Easton, Maryland. Jurisdiction of the District Court includes most landlord- tenant cases, small claims for amounts up to $5,000, replevin actions, motor vehicle violations, misdemeanors, certain felonies, and peace and protective orde with one judge, Hugh Adkins, presiding.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Wilkin County Courthouse

    Wilkin County Courthouse

    The Wilkin County Courthouse, located at 316 Fifth Avenue South in Breckenridge, Wilkin County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a two-story Beaux Arts cream-colored brick and Bedford limestone structure with a high parapet. Over the doorway is a four-foot stone eagle, carved rosettes and garlands, and the inscription, To None Will We Delay, To None Will We Deny, Right or Justice. Tall brick pilasters extend to the high cornice. The Saint Paul architects, Buechner and Orth designed the structure and Redlinger and Hanson were paid $203,492 to build it. Interior features include terrazzo floors, steel and bronze doors, ornamental plaster, pink Tennessee marble wainscoating, and brass trim. An interior dome is adorned with a stained glass skylight. Murals represent life in 19th century Wilkin County.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Baltimore City District Courthouses

    Baltimore City District Courthouses

    The Baltimore City District Courthouses of the District Court of Maryland are located at North Avenue, Wabash Avenue, Patapsco Avenue and E. Fayette Street in Baltimore, Maryland, and serve as the courts of first impression for the majority of residents in Baltimore City. Jurisdiction of the District Court includes most landlord- tenant cases, small claims for amounts up to $5,000, replevin actions, motor vehicle violations, misdemeanors, some felonies, and peace and protective orde. 39°18′44.65″N 76°35′55.31″W / 39.3124028°N 76.5986972°W / 39.3124028; -76.5986972 The Eastside District Court Building, also known as North Avenue, is located at 1400 E. North Avenue in the North-Eastern area of Baltimore at the intersection of North Avenue and Harford Road. The building was formerly a Sears store and was converted into a courthouse after the store closed in September 1981. The building, which stood at five stories height, was constructed in 1938 out of molded concrete on the site of the former Samuel Ready School. It was painted grey with black granite trim, with its windows and doors highlighted by molded bronze. The corner of the building at the intersection of North Avenue and
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Multnomah County Courthouse

    Multnomah County Courthouse

    Multnomah County Courthouse serves as the courthouse for Multnomah County, Oregon and its Sheriff's Office. It is located in downtown, Portland, Oregon, the county seat. It currently includes 39 courtrooms, 36 of which are district courts, two are traffic courts, and one used for forced eviction detainment. Multnomah County Courthouse was built in two phases between 1909 and 1914 at a total cost of $1.6 million; to make it fire-resistant, it was constructed of concrete-encased steel, with concrete slab floors and walls of terra-cotta brick, covered with plaster. At the time, it was the largest courthouse on the west coast and served also as county seat and county jail. Originally, the building had a central courtyard, where prohibition-era confiscated alcohol was poured down a drain; over time, this courtyard was filled in to make room for more offices and a jury room. The courthouse has four two-story courtrooms which feature most of the courthouse's original design; some two-story courtrooms were split horizontally during the 1950s, expanding capacity and resulting in new floors. Further renovation of the courthouse has been under consideration since at least 1970, with studies
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Waseca County Courthouse

    Waseca County Courthouse

    The Waseca County Courthouse, located at 307 North State Street in the city of Waseca, Waseca County in the U.S. state of Minnesota is a two-story Kasota limestone and buff-colored brick building with a large bell- and clock-tower. It was designed by Minneapolis architects Orff and Joralemon and constructed by J. D. Carroll of St. Paul Park for $55,833. The Richardson Romanesque building features polished granite columns supporting triple arches at the entrance. The interior is decorated with wainscoting, oak woodwork, tiled fireplaces, etched glass, paneled doors, and marble flooring.
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Old Lee County Courthouse

    Old Lee County Courthouse

    The Old Lee County Courthouse (constructed in 1915) is a historic site in Fort Myers, Florida, located at 2120 Main Street. It was designed by Francis J. Kennard. On March 16, 1989, the building was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
    4.50
    4 votes
    187
    Clark County Court House

    Clark County Court House

    The Clark County Court House is a Greek Revival courthouse in downtown Winchester, Kentucky, United States. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. It is the centerpiece of the Winchester Downtown Commercial District, also NRHP-listed.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Colusa County Courthouse

    Colusa County Courthouse

    The Colusa County Courthouse, in Colusa, California was erected in 1861. This Federal/Classic Revival style building is the oldest remaining courthouse in the Sacramento Valley. The "Southern" style reflects the county's heritage and states' rights sympathies during the American Civil War, largely due to the influence of the local newspaper editor Will S. Green. In its early years, the courthouse also served as a center for cultural, social, and religious activities. The courthouse is California Historical Landmark #890.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Dubuque County Courthouse

    Dubuque County Courthouse

    The Dubuque County Courthouse is located in Dubuque, Iowa. The current building was built in 1891 to replace an earlier building that was built in 1839. The courthouse is a dominant landmark in the downtown Dubuque area, located at Seventh Street and Central Avenue. A number of county government offices are located at the courthouse. These include the county auditor, treasurer, and attorney. The Iowa District Court for Dubuque County, Iowa is located at the courthouse, along with the offices for the district court judges. The Dubuque County Sheriff is located at the law enforcement complex, which is across the street from the courthouse. The Sheriff's department shares the facility with the city of Dubuque's police force. Due to recent expansion of the law enforcement center, teleconferencing between the court house and the jail is now an option, as are holding hearings directly in the center itself. The Dubuque County Courthouse is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was one of the first buildings in the Dubuque area so honored. Fridolin Heer - who designed several other notable buildings in Dubuque, including Sacred Heart Church - was chosen as the architect for this
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Hudson County Courthouse

    Hudson County Courthouse

    The Hudson County Courthouse or Justice William J. Brennan Jr. Courthouse is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. The six-story structure was originally built between 1906 and 1910 at a cost of $3,328,016.56. It is considered to be an outstanding example of the Beaux-Arts architectural style in the United States. The courthouse was used as the primary seat of government for Hudson County from its opening on September 20, 1910 until the construction of the Hudson County Administration Building in 1966. The courthouse was vacant for many years and was scheduled for demolition. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 25, 1970. Restoration began in the mid-1970s, and the building was reopened in 1985. In 1984, the Hudson County Board of Chosen Freeholders renamed the building in honor of Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr. The restoration of the courthouse was acknowledged by a Victorian Society in America Preservation Award in 1988. As of 2012, the courthouse has seven working courtrooms and also houses the offices of the County Executive, the Hudson County Surrogate and the Hudson County Bar Association; in the past it has been used in a
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Jefferson County Courthouse

    Jefferson County Courthouse

    The Louisville Metro Hall, formerly the Jefferson County Courthouse or Louisville Courthouse, is the center of Louisville, Kentucky's government. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Construction began in 1837, and both the City of Louisville and Jefferson County governments starting using it in 1842. The architect, Gideon Shryock, had intended for the courthouse to have a six-column Doric portico, a cupola, and additional porticos on the wings. The building would be completed by metopes and plain friezes as a full entablature, and engaged pilasters regularly sequenced. Shryock resigned from the project in 1842. It was finally completed in 1860, with Albert Fink, a bridge engineer, and Charles Stancliff in charge. Fink reduced the number of columns for the Doric portico, and did not build the additional porticos and cupola. The Louisville Daily Journal said it was a "elephantine monstrosity". Construction on the courthouse began in 1837, and both the City of Louisville and Jefferson County governments starting using it in 1842. Slave-trading was held by the courthouse in the 1840s, as were speeches calling for the abolition of slavery. When
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    2 votes
    192
    Montgomery County Courthouse

    Montgomery County Courthouse

    The Montgomery County Courthouse (MCC), built in 1847, is an historic Greek Revival building located on the northwest corner of Third and Main streets in Dayton, Ohio. It is referred to locally as the Old Courthouse. The limestone building, modeled on the 5th century BC Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, Greece, is the nation’s best surviving example of a Greek Revival style courthouse. The design was suggested by Dayton citizen Horace Pease, who had a book of sketches of the Acropolis in Athens which showed the Temple of Theseus, which he admired. Pease showed it to the Montgomery County Commissioners, who also were favorably impressed, and agreed it would be a good model for their new Courthouse. They hired architect Howard Daniels of New York to draw the plans in which he captured the form and beauty of the ancient Greek temple. The building, now restored, stands as a tribute to the leaders of old Dayton and to the artisans of the Miami Valley who built it. The Dayton Historical Society, which became The Montgomery County Historical Society, then Dayton History, is housed in the Old Court House. The Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 26,
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    2 votes
    193
    Houston County Courthouse and Jail

    Houston County Courthouse and Jail

    The Houston County Courthouse and Jail, located at 304 Marshall Street South in Caledonia, Houston County in the U.S. state of Minnesota consists of a Romanesque stone courthouse featuring a prominent center tower, built in 1883 and Italianate stone jail and sheriff residence built in 1875. Both were designed by C. G. Maybury & Son of Winona. In the late nineteenth century there was considerable disagreement about the location of the Houston County seat. In 1874, Caledonia was named and construction soon began on the jail and sheriff's residence. By 1882 planning began on the now-historic courthouse. Construction was by Noonan and Stellwager at a cost of $60,000, and the building was completed in 1885. Taxpayers criticized the expense of ornamental carpentry and five chandeliers, while county taxes doubled. The current building includes additions built in 1965 and 1977. In 2010, construction began on a new justice center next to the old courthouse. It will replace the old jail.
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    3 votes
    194
    Lancaster County Courthouse

    Lancaster County Courthouse

    Lancaster County Courthouse is a building that is attributed to the architect Robert Mills. "In continuous use as a courthouse since its completion in 1828, it features fine reeded woodwork and vaulted ceilings." "A series of double barrel brick vaults supports the second floor and forms the ceiling of the first." It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1973. It may be included within the Lancaster Downtown Historic District, also listed on the National Register. At approximately 5 a.m. on Aug. 4, 2008, the courthouse was heavily damaged, but not destroyed by fire caused by arson, and will be rebuilt. On September 19, 2008, a local 17-year-old, Martavious Carter, admitted to setting the fire while being interviewed for other crimes, he had recently committed. The courthouse has the distinction of being the site of the last witch trials to take place in the United States.
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Tift County Courthouse

    Tift County Courthouse

    The Tift County Courthouse, built in 1912-1913, is a historic courthouse building located in Tifton, Georgia. It was designed by Atlanta-based architect William Augustus Edwards who designed one other courthouse in Georgia, two in Florida and nine in South Carolina as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. On September 18, 1980, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Auglaize County Courthouse

    Auglaize County Courthouse

    The Auglaize County Courthouse is located between West Mechanic, Willipie, West Pearl and Perry Streets in downtown Wapakoneta, Ohio, United States. Completed in 1894, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Auglaize County was formed in 1848 and Wapakoneta was chosen by the voters as the county seat. This caused many bad feelings from St. Marys, the other choice for the county seat, as they had already planned an area for the courthouse along appropriately named Court Street. The county's first courthouse was the Methodist Episcopal church. A frame building completed in 1834, it was used by the county in exchange for the free provision of a pulpit for the congregation. Until the county's first permanent courthouse was built in 1854, the courts rotated around the city's various churches, and the local government officials used rented rooms in buildings throughout Wapakoneta. The first purpose-built courthouse was a Greek Revival style structure of red brick and white trim window and door frames. Two Corinthian columns framed the entrance and supported a pedimented roof above. A rectangular drum rose above the roof which contained corinthian column supports and was
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    2 votes
    197
    DeKalb County Courthouse

    DeKalb County Courthouse

    The DeKalb County Courthouse is located in the county seat of DeKalb County, Illinois, U.S.A., the city of Sycamore. The Classical Revival structure sits on a square facing Illinois Route 64 as it passes through the city. The current courthouse was constructed in 1905 amid controversy over where the courthouse and thus, ultimately, the county seat would be located. The current building is the third structure to bear the name "DeKalb County Courthouse." DeKalb County's Courthouse still serves as the county's primary judicial center and is a contributing property to the Sycamore Historic District. The district joined the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. As the county's primary courthouse for over 100 years, the site has been host to many trials, including prominent murder cases. The building is cast in the Classical Revival architectural style and contains elements common to that style. Stained glass, columns and a pediment are among the more noticeable features at a glance. The rear facade of the building is designed to resemble a temple and also features stained glass windows. A stone porte-cochere covers the rear driveway. Inside the building's third floor courtroom
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Fulton County Courthouse

    Fulton County Courthouse

    The Fulton County Courthouse, built in 1870, is a historic courthouse building located in Wauseon, Ohio. On May 7, 1973, it was added to the National Register. Fulton County was established in 1850 from parts of Williams and Lucas counties. The Ohio General Assembly appointed three commissioners to select the county seat of the newly formed county, and selected Ottokee, named after an Indian chief of the area. The courts were held in the home of Robert Howard until a courthouse could be constructed. In 1851 the completed two-story wood-frame structure rising to a dome. This courthouse burned in a fire in 1864 forcing the county to hastily plan a new second courthouse. This second courthouse was constructed out of brick. The facade was punctuated by pilasters separating the arched windows. This courthouse served the county until a decision was made to move the county seat. Years after the move the old courthouse was still in use as a county infirmary. Ottokee remained the county seat and defeated many attempts to move the courts, until 1869, when a railroad company surveyed the area and chose Wauseon as a stopping point. The county seat relocated there shortly thereafter. The same
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    2 votes
    199
    Oregon Supreme Court Building

    Oregon Supreme Court Building

    The Oregon Supreme Court Building is the home to the Oregon Supreme Court, Oregon Court of Appeals, and the Oregon Judicial Department. Located in the state’s capitol of Salem, it is Oregon’s oldest state government building. The three story structure was completed in 1914 and currently houses the state’s law library, and once housed the Oregon State Library. The state supreme court used to hold session in various locations in downtown Salem. In 1854 Oregon Territory began construction of the Territorial Capitol Building in Salem that was finished in 1855. The court was briefly located in that building on the second floor. However, on December 29, 1855 after the building was partially occupied, it was razed by fire. Then in 1876 the state finished construction on a second capitol building where the court was located on the third floor. In 1911, a bill was introduced in the Oregon Legislature by John A. Carson (grandfather of future Chief Justice Wallace P. Carson, Jr.) to expand the 1876 capitol building to add a wing for the court. This bill was later amended to allow for the construction of a separate building instead. Construction began in 1913 with the design by local architect
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Providence County Courthouse

    Providence County Courthouse

    The Providence County Courthouse (also known as the Licht Judicial Complex) is a Georgian-styled building in the College Hill neighborhood of Providence, Rhode Island. At a height of 216 ft (66 m), it is the 11th-tallest building in the city. Architectural historian McKenzie Woodward lauds the building for its contextualism, which defers in its design to the buildings surrounding. Woodward also commends the fragmentation of the building's large mass into "visually digestible units". The Rhode Island Supreme Court and Providence Superior County Court are located within the building.
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    Allegany County Courthouse

    Allegany County Courthouse

    The Allegany County Courthouse is the Maryland Circuit court for Allegany County, Maryland, United States. It is located in Cumberland's Washington Street Historic District. Although many church spires dot the Cumberland landscape, it is the Allegany County Courthouse that dominates this city's skyline. The building is prominently sited along Washington Street, which rises sharply from Wills Creek running through the heart of Cumberland. Historically, courthouses in America have been one of the most architecturally impressive buildings within a community. In this way, the architecture of the building was able to convey the authority of a local government, as well as instill respect and recognition. In 1789, the Allegany County Court was created by Act of the Maryland General Assembly. As part of the Act, Washington County had been subdivided and Allegany County, a name derived from the Indian word "Oolikhanna," meaning beautiful stream, was formed. Local historians have reported that the first court cases in Allegany County were held in the home of John Graham and court business was held in a Green Street tavern owned by Abraham Faw. This was a temporary measure until a proper
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    1 votes
    202
    Battleford Court House

    Battleford Court House

    Battleford Court House is the facility located in Battleford to provide a public forum used by the Saskatchewan legal system to adjudicate disputes and dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under its laws. In 1785, a fur trading post was built at Battleford. The Dominion government acquired the North-West Territories from the Hudson's Bay Company in 1870, and in 1873, created the North-West Mounted Police to maintain law and order. In 1876 Fort Battleford was established, a North-West Mounted Police post. Shortly thereafter, in 1877 the capital of the North West Territories moved from Fort Pitt to Battleford. In 1883 the capital of the North West Territories moved again, this time to Regina. In 1886 the Supreme Court of the North-West Territories with five puisne judges was established and resided in Regina. The original Provincial Regina Supreme Court House was constructed in 1895 and replaced in 1965. Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. The Judicature Act, 1907, established the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan. The Battleford Court House was designed by the architectural firm of Storey and Van Egmond, and constructed in 1907, marking the end of the old
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    1 votes
    203
    Carlton County Courthouse

    Carlton County Courthouse

    The Carlton County Courthouse in Carlton, Minnesota is the county seat of Carlton County, Minnesota. The county seat was originally located in Cloquet, with a jail located at the town of Northern Pacific Junction. In 1890, residents of Northern Pacific Junction raised funds to build a courthouse, which was a two-story brick building with a high-pitched gable roof. The current building took about two years to build, being completed in 1924. It is a three-story building with cream-colored brick and stone. The Carlton County Vidette praised Clyde Kelly, the architect, with these words: "Unquestionably, the man who assumes the responsibility of being the architect for a building like this is entitled to great consideration. To him is left the superintending of the placing of every stock and stone in the building ... to make the structure as perfect as possible."
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    1 votes
    204
    Hennepin County Government Center

    Hennepin County Government Center

    The Hennepin County Government Center is the courthouse and primary county government administration building for Hennepin County in the State of Minnesota. It is located in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, the county seat of Hennepin County. Before its construction, the Hennepin County government offices were housed in the Minneapolis City Hall-Hennepin County Courthouse. The building was designed by the architectural firm of John Carl Warnecke & Associates. It was dedicated in 1973 and completed in 1977. It is 403 feet (123 meters) tall and has 24 stories. When viewed from the northeast or southwest sides, it takes on the appearance of a stylized letter H. This shape serves as the logo of Hennepin County. Each side of the "H" is a separate tower. The towers are connected by catwalk bridges on several floors. The whole is enclosed by glass windows to form an atrium. The Southeast side is known as the court tower. It houses courtrooms, county attorney offices, and the Hennepin law library. The Northwest side houses county administrative offices such as social services and county records. The Hennepin County Government Center is built over 6th Street using the air rights over the
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    1 votes
    205
    New Castle County Court House

    New Castle County Court House

    New Castle Court House Museum, also known as New Castle Courthouse Museum, is the center of a circle with a 12-mile radius that defines most of the border of the states of Delaware and Pennsylvania and a small part of the border of Delaware and Maryland. It is one of the oldest courthouses in the United States. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972. The building known today as the "Old Court House" was built in sections during three centuries of colonial and federal government. Prior to the Revolution it served as the meeting house for the governments of the three counties comprising Delaware. For one year (1776–1777) it served as the state house of Delaware. Thence it became the New Castle County courthouse for three centuries. An occasional court held there serves to keep alive the claim that this building is the oldest continuously used chamber of justice in the United States.
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    1 votes
    206
    Orange County Courthouse

    Orange County Courthouse

    The Orange County Courthouse is located on Courthouse Square in Paoli, Indiana at the intersection of State Roads 37, 56 and US Highway 150. The courthouse is one of the two oldest courthouses in Indiana that have been used continuously. The other being in Rising Sun, Indiana (Ohio County). The Orange County Courthouse was built 1847-1850. It is a good example of the Greek Revival style of architecture. The court house is distinguished by a Doric portico with six fluted columns.
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    1 votes
    207
    Renville County Courthouse and Jail

    Renville County Courthouse and Jail

    The Renville County Courthouse and Jail is a historic building located at 500 East DePue Avenue in Olivia, Minnesota, the seat of Renville County. It was constructed in 1902. The courthouse and jail were added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 13, 1986.
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    1 votes
    208
    Stockholm Court House

    Stockholm Court House

    Stockholm Court House (Swedish: Stockholms Rådhus) is situated on Kungsholmen in Central Stockholm, Sweden. The building was constructed between 1909 and 1915. The architecture is influenced by the Castles of the Vasa era and it bears a resemblance to Vadstena Castle. The building is connected to Stockholm Police House through a culvert. A fire ravaged the third floor of the south/left wing of the building in June 2008.
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    1 votes
    209
    Mason County Courthouse

    Mason County Courthouse

    The Mason County Courthouse is an historic courthouse building located in Mason, Texas. Built in 1909 to 1910 at a cost of $39,786, it was designed by Georgia-born American architect Edward Columbus Hosford, who is noted for the courthouses and other buildings that he designed in Florida, Georgia and Texas. Mutual Construction Company of Louisville, Kentucky built it of Fredericksburg granite and rusticated stone. There are gable front porticoes on all four sides, each or which is supported by four 2-story Doric columns. The building is a contributing property in the Mason Historic District which was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 17, 1974.
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    3 votes
    210
    Manatee County Courthouse

    Manatee County Courthouse

    The Old Manatee County Courthouse, built in 1859-1860, is an historic building now located at 1404 Manatee Avenue, East, in Bradenton, Florida. It was Manatee County's first courthouse and is the oldest surviving Florida county courthouse (that was built originally as one) left in the state, and is now part of the Manatee Village Historical Park. On June 29, 1976, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. After it ceased being used as a courthouse, it became the Manatee Methodist Church and then the Manatee Methodist Church Parsonage. Manatee County courthouses (disambiguation)
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    2 votes
    211
    Courthouse Square Historic District

    Courthouse Square Historic District

    Courthouse Square Historic District, also known as Courthouse Square District, is a historic district in Greencastle, Indiana, United States. Centered around the Putnam County Courthouse, the district includes seventy-six different contributing properties. Since the first years after Greencastle was platted in the early nineteenth century, the land included in the district has been the center of commerce and government for the area. The current courthouse, built in 1905, is the fourth building to occupy the site. In 1984, the historic district was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
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    3 votes
    212
    Bonde Palace

    Bonde Palace

    The Bonde Palace (Swedish: Bondeska palatset) is a palace in Gamla stan, the old town in central Stockholm, Sweden. Located between the House of Knights (Riddarhuset) and the Chancellery House (Kanslihuset), it is, arguably, the most prominent monument of the era of the Swedish Empire (1611–1718), originally design by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder and Jean De la Vallée in 1662-1667 as the private residence of the Lord High Treasurer Gustaf Bonde (1620–1667) it still bears his name, while it accommodated the Stockholm Court House from the 18th century and since 1949 houses the Swedish Supreme Court. On the south side of the building is the street Myntgatan and the square Riddarhustorget, while the alleys Riddarhusgränd and Rådhusgränd are passing on its western and eastern sides. The original design by Simon de la Vallée and Tessin the Younger, based on French Baroque and Renaissance prototypes, was H-shaped in plan, the planned two southern wings flanking a main court, while the northern wings surrounded a small Baroque garden. The central building was covered by a tall steep-pitched, copper-dressed roof surrounded by the cupolas of the corner pavilions, while the façades were
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    1 votes
    213
    Cahokia Courthouse State Historic Site

    Cahokia Courthouse State Historic Site

    The Cahokia Courthouse State Historic Site is a reconstructed French-Canadian structure built about 1740 at what is now 107 Elm Street, Cahokia, Illinois. At various times it has served as a house and as a courthouse. It is currently interpreted to resemble its appearance about 1800 as a frontier courthouse of the Northwest Territory. The courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 9, 1972. Following the explorations of Marquette, Jolliet and La Salle in the 1670s, the Mississippi Valley became part of New France. The adventurous French had mapped more territory than their numbers could settle, but their attention soon focused on a section of the valley south of the mouth of the Missouri River. In this region, which would later be known as the American Bottom, the alluvial soil was exceptionally fertile, and the local Native Americans, members of the Illiniwek nation or Illinois Confederacy, were friendly to the newcomers. In the early 18th century, French-speaking immigrants, mostly from Canada, settled villages in the American Bottom such as Kaskaskia, Prairie du Rocher, and Cahokia. They lived in harmony with the Indians and named several of
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    1 votes
    214
    Caroline County Courthouse

    Caroline County Courthouse

    The Caroline County Courthouse is located at 109 Market Street in Denton, Maryland. The courthouse houses the chambers and courtrooms for the judge of the Circuit Court for Caroline County, as well as the clerk's offices, jurors' assembly room, the Office of the State's Attorney for Caroline County, the Register of Wills and the master's office. After Caroline County, Maryland, was established in 1773, it held its early courts at seven different locations until 1797 when its first courthouse was built on the same site where the current courthouse now stands, an area once known as Pig Point. The courthouse green was purchased in 1791 for 121 shillings. The building served the County for one hundred years and there were many changes during this period. Even with the changes, vaults that stored records were overflowing and in 1894, the Caroline County commissioners asked for and received authority to raze the old courthouse and build a new one. The current courthouse was built in 1895 at the cost of $21,000 and was extensively renovated in 1966. Franklin Delano Roosevelt came to Caroline County in 1938. He spoke in front of the courthouse in Denton on Labor Day. The speech was
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    1 votes
    215
    Chardon Courthouse Square District

    Chardon Courthouse Square District

    The Chardon Courthouse Square District is located in Chardon, Ohio, and contains the Geauga County Courthouse as well as the several buildings serving as the courthouse annexes. The district was added to the National Register on 1974-10-18.
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    1 votes
    216
    Dennis Chavez Federal Building

    Dennis Chavez Federal Building

    The Dennis Chavez Federal Building is a highrise federal office building and courthouse in downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. It was built in 1965 to house the U.S. District Court as well as offices of various federal agencies including the U.S. Postal Service, Veterans Administration, U.S. Public Health Service, and Bureau of Indian Affairs. Originally known simply as the U.S. Courthouse and Federal Office Building, the building was renamed in honor of longtime U.S. Senator Dennis Chavez in 1976. The Dennis Chavez Building was designed by the Albuquerque firm of Flatow, Moore, Bryan, and Fairburn, which had previously been responsible for other local highrises like the Simms Building and Bank of the West Tower. The steel-framed building is faced with polished granite, with New Mexico marble used in the ground floor lobby. It is 197 feet (60 m) in height and has 13 above-ground floors with a basement and underground parking garage. When built, it was the third-tallest building in New Mexico after the Bank of the West Tower and the Gold Building. It is currently the seventh-tallest building in Albuquerque. The District Court relocated to the newly-built Pete V. Domenici United States
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    1 votes
    217
    Levy County Courthouse

    Levy County Courthouse

    The Levy County Courthouse, built in 1937, is an historic redbrick Classical Revival style courthouse building located in Bronson, Florida. It was designed by architect Henry L. Taylor and built by O. R. Woodcock. It is Levy County's fourth purpose-built courthouse and the third one built in Bronson. Some material salvaged from the previous (1906) courthouse were used in its construction. An annex has been added to it. In 1989, the Levy County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
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    1 votes
    218
    Madison County Courthouse

    Madison County Courthouse

    The Madison County Courthouse, built in 1913, is an historic courthouse building located in Madison, Florida. It is Madison County's fourth courthouse and the third built in Madison. The first log building at San Pedro was abandoned along with the town. The second courthouse built in 1840 in Madison burned in 1876 and was replaced by an 1880 brick structure which burned in 1912. The present building is unusual among Florida courthouses of its vintage in never having been added on to or expanded. In 1989, the Madison County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
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    1 votes
    219
    Ottawa Courthouse

    Ottawa Courthouse

    The Ottawa Courthouse (French: Palais de justice d'Ottawa) is an Ontario provincial courthouse in Ottawa, Ontario. It is the main provincial court for the Ottawa area, and as such handles most of the region's legal affairs. The building is home to small claims, family, criminal, district, and the Ottawa branch of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice. It is also home to the local land registry office. Some 1,000 people use the nine storey building each day. At the base of the building is a parking garage and the temporary holding cells for prisoners. The central levels are composed of the court rooms and a large atrium. The top levels contain offices for judges. The courthouse on Elgin Street building opened in 1986. The courthouse is located at the corner of Elgin Street and Laurier Avenue. Previously the site had been home to Cartier Square, and for many decades was covered by temporary buildings erected during the Second World War. The courthouse is next door to the current Ottawa City Hall, formerly the Ottawa Regional Headquarters building, which was built only a few years later. Previously the courts had been spread throughout the city. The first courthouse and jail, which
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    1 votes
    220
    Washington County Court House

    Washington County Court House

    The former Washington County Courthouse is an historic building at 3481 Kingstown Road in South Kingstown, Rhode Island. Built in 1892, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 as Washington County Court House. Since 1991, court has been held in the McGrath Judicial Complex at 4800 Tower Hill Road in the village of Wakefield, also in South Kingstown. The building is now the Courthouse Center for the Arts at Historic Washington County Courthouse
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    1 votes
    221
    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse

    The Jackson County Courthouse, located at 413 4th Street in the city of Jackson, Jackson County in the U.S. state of Minnesota consists of a Bedford limestone Beaux Arts courthouse featuring a high, segmented dome adorned with a cast statue of Lady Justice, columns supporting a gable overhang, a shield pediment, and symmetrical pavilions. The building was built by Charles Skooglun of Saint Paul at a cost $117,435 in 1908-1909. The imposing structure is topped by a two-plus-story dome with stained glass windows. This sits over an octagonal atrium with terrazzo floors, marbled plaster walls, and a second-floor courtroom painted by immigrants with extensive murals; they depict scenes such as a frontier cabin, a railroad, Romans engaged in engineering and construction, and three women (justice, liberty, and equality) guarding a judge's bench.
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    2 votes
    222
    Appanoose County Courthouse

    Appanoose County Courthouse

    The Appanoose County Courthouse is located in the center of the Courthouse Square Historic District in the county seat of Centerville, Iowa. The architects were Smith and Gage of Des Moines, Iowa. In February 1903 the contract, exclusive of heating and plumbing, was awarded to William Peatman, the amount of his bid being $69,900. The cornerstone was laid on May 21, 1903. The courthouse was dedicated on September 12, 1904 and rededicated in a festive ceremony on September 12, 2004. The courthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.
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    1 votes
    223
    Bristol County Courthouse Complex

    Bristol County Courthouse Complex

    The Bristol County Courthouse Complex Historic District contains three historic buildings located along Court Street in Taunton, Massachusetts, including the Bristol County Superior Courthouse, the Bristol County Registry of Deeds and the former First District Courthouse. The city’s Korean War and World War II Memorials are also located on the lawn in front of the superior courthouse. The Bristol County Courthouse Complex directly abuts the Taunton Green Historic District, the City's central square. In 2008, an $86 million expansion and renovation project began at the site which is scheduled to include the construction of a new trial court and restoration of the superior courthouse. The Bristol County Superior Courthouse was designed by architect Frank Irving Cooper from nearby Bridgewater and built in 1894 in the Romanesque-style. The stone structure contains a 170-foot (52 m) tall central tower capped with a copper dome. The building's large hip roof is also entirely clad in copper. The dome was originally topped with a large copper flame, which was taken down in the recent past for fear that it may fall. The flame is currently in storage, and the hope is that it will be restored
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Clallam County Courthouse

    Clallam County Courthouse

    The Clallam County Courthouse was built in 1914 and is located in Port Angeles, Washington. The court house has a bell tower containing a bell which was shipped from Boston all the way around the horn. The building has had at least one addition since it was built. The building uses 126 solar panels, which were installed in 1979, to produce an estimated 20 percent of the electric power needed for the building.
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    1 votes
    225
    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse is a Classical Revival building built in 1879 in Jefferson, Georgia. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Jefferson Market Library

    Jefferson Market Library

    The Jefferson Market Branch, New York Public Library, still familiar to New Yorkers as Jefferson Market Courthouse, is located at 425 6th Avenue (SW corner of West 10th St) in Greenwich Village, New York City on a triangular plot formed by Greenwich Avenue and West 10th Street. The building was originally built as the Third Judicial District Courthouse between the years 1874-1877 from a design by architects Frederick Clarke Withers and Calvert Vaux. Faced with demolition, public outcry led to its reuse as a branch of the New York Public Library. A tall octagonal wooden fire lookout tower was the first building on the site, built circa 1833, located in the center of the merchants' sheds at the Jefferson Market that had been established at this site in 1832 and named for the late President. Court sessions were held in the Jefferson Assembly Rooms that rose above the market sheds. The wood tower and the market structures were swept away for a new courthouse, an adjacent jail building that stood on the corner of West 10th Street and Greenwich Avenue and new coordinated market housing (built in 1883). Of the carefully massed picturesque group, only the former Courthouse now remains. Its
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    1 votes
    227
    Prince Kuhio Federal Building

    Prince Kuhio Federal Building

    The Prince Kūhiō Federal Building, formally the Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Federal Building and United States Courthouse, is the official seat of the United States federal government and its local branches of various agencies and departments in the state of Hawaiʻi. Its address is 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850. The building was completed in 1977 with a total of 929,857 square feet (86,386.5 m) of working space. It houses the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii. the United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (Honolulu Division), the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Senators, the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Representatives for Hawaii's 1st congressional district and Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, and branch offices of the United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, United States Department of Justice, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, among other entities. The building was named after Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole, heir to the throne of the overthrown Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, who
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    1 votes
    228
    Theodore Levin United States Courthouse

    Theodore Levin United States Courthouse

    The Theodore Levin United States Courthouse (also known as the Detroit Federal Building) is a large high-rise courthouse and office building located at 231 West Lafayette Boulevard in Downtown Detroit, Michigan. The building is named after the late Theodore Levin, a lawyer and United States District Court judge. This building occupies an entire block in Downtown Detroit, Michigan, bordered by Shelby Street, Washington Boulevard, West Fort Street, and West Lafayette Boulevard. Construction began in 1932 and finished in 1934. It stands at 10 stories in height, with its top floor at 50 metres (150 feet) from the first floor entrance, with the roof being 56.1 metres, or 184 feet (56 m) in height from the top of the roof to the streets below. The building was designed in the Art Deco and art moderne styles of architecture, incorporating granite and limestone into the structure. The main facade is limestone, above a polished black stone. The building occupies a full office block, girdled by Shelby Street (east), Washington Boulevard (west), West Fort Street (south), and West Lafayette Boulevard (north). Inside the building, there is an open-center court above the second floor. The
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    Union County Courthouse

    Union County Courthouse

    The Union County Courthouse in Morganfield, Kentucky was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 17, 1978. The current courthouse is the third one for Union County, and was opened in 1872. The Public Works Administration would later double the size on the courthouse. Union County was named due to the near unanimous decision of the county's citizens to split from the county it was previously in, Henderson. The first county courthouse for Union County was built in 1811-1812. The second courthouse was built in 1819-1820. That courthouse would be destroyed during the Civil War. The current courthouse was built in 1871-1872. Although born in Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln gave only one political speech in that state. This speech was presented at the Union County courthouse. It was in 1840 when Lincoln, at the age of 31 and an elector from Illinois, campaigned for the Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. This was done after Lincoln led a parade from Shawneetown, Illinois, with white horses pulling floats carrying ladies.
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    Allen County Courthouse

    Allen County Courthouse

    The Allen County Courthouse is an historic courthouse building located at the corner of North Main Street & East North Street in Lima, Ohio, USA. On July 24, 1974, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Allen County was formed in 1820 and Lima was selected as the county seat. The first courthouse was a simple log structure consisting of two floors, a small hipped roof and a single chimney. The courthouse served the county until 1840 when the county realized the space was not adequate for the growing population. A contest was announced and seventeen bids were submitted. The contract was awarded to Orlando Boughton and was designed in the Classical Revival style. The amount was $13,325 and construction was underway. The courthouse was two-stories tall and was built out of brick and stone. Pilasters lined the facade between the long windows with dark shutters. The entrance was framed with four fluted Doric columns supporting a portico. A square drum rose from the roof and supported large rectangular windows capped with a dome ending in a weather vane. The tower contained a large bell which rang periodicall through the years, including the 14th of April in 1865 in
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    Cecil County Circuit Courthouse

    Cecil County Circuit Courthouse

    The Cecil County Circuit Courthouse is located at The courthouse houses the chambers and courtrooms for the 3 judges of the Circuit Court for Cecil County, as well as the clerk's offices, jurors' assembly room, the law library and masters' offices. The first courthouse in Elkton was completed in 1792. It was renovated in 1884 but by the early 1900s, county officials realized more room was needed and decided to build a new courthouse. This "new" courthouse was built in 1940 and is still in use today.
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    Courthouse Place

    Courthouse Place

    Courthouse Place, also known as the Cook County Criminal Court Building, is a Richardsonian Romanesque-style building at 54 West Hubbard Street in the Near North Side of Chicago. Designed by architect Otto H. Matz and completed in 1893, the build stands on the prior location of a public market. The structure housed the Cook County Criminal Courts for 35 years, and was the site of many legendary trials, including the Leopold and Loeb murder case and the Black Sox Scandal. Newspaperman Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur based much of their 1928 play, The Front Page, on the daily events in this structure. Other authors of the Chicago’s 1920s literary renaissance that used the fourth floor pressroom include Carl Sandburg, Sherwood Anderson, and Vincent Starrett. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 13, 1984 and later designated a Chicago Landmark on June 9, 1993. In 1929, the Criminal Courts left the 54 West Hubbard Street location, and the building was then occupied by the Chicago Board of Health and other city agencies. After poor alterations and years of neglect, the building was acquired by Friedman Properties, Ltd in 1985. The property was
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    Cumberland County Courthouse

    Cumberland County Courthouse

    The Cumberland County Courthouse is located in the Cumberland County, Illinois village and county seat of Toledo. The courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the estate joined that list in June 1981. It can be found in Toledo's Courthouse Square. Of the three Registered Historic Places in Cumberland County two can be found in or near Toledo, the other being the Thornton Ward Estate.
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    Edgar County Courthouse

    Edgar County Courthouse

    The Edgar County Courthouse is a courthouse in the U.S. state of Illinois. It is located in the Edgar County, Illinois county seat city of Paris. The courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was added to that list in June 1981. All six of Edgar County's Historic Places are located in and around Paris. Others include the Paris Carnegie Public Library and the Asher Morton Farmstead.
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    Essex County Court Buildings

    Essex County Court Buildings

    Essex County Court Buildings are historic buildings at 32 Federal Street in Salem, Massachusetts. The original court was built in 1785 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. The Old Granite Courthouse, also known as the County Commissioner's Building, was built in 1841 in the Greek Revival architectural style. Adjacent to that is the Superior Court, pictured below. Built in 1862, the Superior Court is an Italianate structure later remodeled into the Richardsonian Romanesque style of architecture. A large new court is being constructed down the street, leaving the future of these buildings uncertain. Not pictured is the probate court to the left (west) of the Superior Court seen below.
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    Glades County Courthouse

    Glades County Courthouse

    The Glades County Courthouse is an historic courthouse building located at 500 Avenue J in Moore Haven, Florida. Built in 1928 in the Classical Revival style, it was designed by Georgia-born American architect Edward Columbus Hosford, who is noted for the courthouses and other buildings that he designed in Florida, Georgia and Texas. In 1989, the Glades County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
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    Hampshire County Courthouse

    Hampshire County Courthouse

    The Hampshire County Courthouse is a Neoclassical edifice in the center of downtown Romney, county seat of Hampshire County, West Virginia. The present building was constructed in 1922 to replace the previous 1833 Neoclassical courthouse that had been destroyed by fire in 1921. The original bell from the 1833 courthouse hangs in the domed bell tower. The original cast iron fence that surrounded the 1833 courthouse was removed during reconstruction of the present courthouse and relocated to the Hiett Graveyard on North River between the communities of North River Mills and Pleasant Dale.
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    Hays County Courthouse

    Hays County Courthouse

    The Hays County Courthouse is an historic courthouse located in San Marcos, Hays County, Texas. It was built in the Classical Revival style in 1908. It is recognized by both the National Register of Historic Places and Texas Historical Commission.
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    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse

    Jackson County Courthouse in Kansas City, Missouri is located at 415 E. 12th Street in Downtown Kansas City. It was built in 1934, designed by Wight and Wight in an Art Deco style. Harry S. Truman who was presiding judge of the Jackson County Court at the time had wanted it designed similar to the Caddo Parish, Louisiana courthouse in Shreveport, Louisiana. Edward F. Neild who designed the Shreveport courthouse was hired as consulting architect-engineer. Neild would later die while designing the Truman Library. It replaced the previous Kansas City courthouse annex at 5th and Oak, which was a fire hazard and needed to be replaced. It was approved in a 1931 $4 million bond issue (which also included construction of the neighboring Kansas City City Hall. It was dedicated in December 1934. Truman had an office in the new courthouse building during most of his first term as U.S. Senator from 1935 to 1939. In 1922, Harry S. Truman won election as county judge for eastern Jackson County as a candidate of the Tom Pendergast faction of the Democratic Party. He failed to be re-elected in 1924, but, then won election as presiding judge in 1926. Truman served in this position in effect as
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    King County Courthouse

    King County Courthouse

    The King County Courthouse is the administrative building housing the judicial branch of King County, Washington government. It is located in downtown Seattle, Washington, just north of Pioneer Square. The 1916 structure houses courtrooms for King County Superior Court and Seattle District Court, Prosecutor, and Sheriff; King County Work and Education Release, the chambers of the King County Council, and other court and county functions. It is located just north of City Hall Park at 516 Third Avenue, between Dilling Way and James Street. An enclosed skybridge connects the courthouse to the King County Jail, and a pedestrian tunnel connects it to the King County Administration Building. In 1911, King County voters first turned down, then approved plans to build a new structure for county government. The site settled on had once been owned by city founder Henry Yesler. Architect A. Warren Gould proposed a twenty-three story tower to handle anticipated growth in county functions, but the county commissioners preferred a more modest beginning. Starting in 1914, a five-story steel frame and reinforced concrete structure was built, and dedicated May 4, 1916 as the five-story City-County
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    Knox County Courthouse

    Knox County Courthouse

    The Knox County Courthouse is a historic building located at 300 Main Street in Knoxville, Tennessee, United States. Built in 1885, it served as Knox County's courthouse until the completion of the City-County Building in 1979, and continues to house offices for several county departments. John Sevier, Tennessee's first governor, is buried on the courthouse lawn. The courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture and its role in the county's political history. The courthouse is a 2.5-story brick structure with an imposing clock tower. It contains a mixture of architectural styles, including Colonial elements in the clock tower and Gothic elements (including quatrefoil patterns) in the balcony and porch. Much of the interior has been altered. The Knox County Courthouse sits on what was originally Lot 36 of Charles McClung's 1791 plat of Knoxville. The lot across the street to the north (Lot 37), currently occupied by the federal courthouse, was the lot set aside by James White for the county courthouse. The county's first courthouse was completed circa 1793, but was considered an eyesore. Thomas William Humes stated that a "frolicsome Irishman"
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    Knox County Courthouse

    Knox County Courthouse

    The Knox County Courthouse is a historic building located on High Street in Mount Vernon, Ohio, United States. It was built in 1855 in the Greek Revival style of architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
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    Lafayette County Courthouse

    Lafayette County Courthouse

    The Lafayette County Courthouse, built in 1908, is an historic courthouse building located in Mayo, Florida, It was designed by Atlanta-based architect Edward Columbus Hosford in the Classical Revival style, who designed other courthouses in Florida and other states. It was built of Indiana limestone by the Mutual Construction Company of Louisville, Kentucky. Because there was no railroad into Lafayette County, the limestone and other materials were shipped by rail to O'Brien in Suwannee, County and then transported by wagon to Mayo, crossing the Suwannee River via Grant's Ferry north of Troy Springs. It is Lafayette County's third courthouse, the first at New Troy having burned down New Year's Eve 1892 and the second wooden structure in Mayo having been moved across the street to make way for a fireproof building. In 1989, the Lafayette County Courthouse was listed in A Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture, published by the University of Florida Press.
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    Lake County Courthouse and Sheriff's Residence

    Lake County Courthouse and Sheriff's Residence

    The Lake County Courthouse and Sheriff's Residence, located at 601 3rd Avenue in Two Harbors, Lake County in the U.S. state of Minnesota was built in 1906. In 1888 a two-story brick sheriff's residence and jail was erected with an adjacent Queen Anne style style courthouse. A 1904 fire destroyed the courthouse, but the jail and residence remained. The replacement building, designed in the Beaux Arts style by James Allen MacLeod was built of brick and limestone, featuring quoin blocks, stone window surrounds with large keystones, dentil moulding, and four large columns supporting the entry overhang. The courtroom was topped with an open semi-circular dome covered with metallic scaled shakes. In 1945, the dome was enclosed from below. Axel Edward Soderberg was commissioned to paint murals depicting "Law and Justice", commerce, mining, and logging, at a cost of $1,500 in 1905. The jail and residence building were razed in the 1990s.
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    Old County Courthouse

    Old County Courthouse

    Old County Courthouse (also known as Plymouth Old County Courthouse or Old Town House) is an historic court house on Leyden Street and Market Street in Plymouth, Massachusetts near Burial Hill and First Parish Church in Plymouth. The courthouse was built in 1749 and is allegedly the oldest wooden courthouse in America. The building added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Currently the building is known as the 1749 Court House and Museum, and is open from June to September with exhibits of early Plymouth history.
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    Old State House

    Old State House

    The Old State House on College Hill in Providence, Rhode Island, known also as Providence Sixth District Court House, Providence Colony House, Providence County House, or Rhode Island State House is located on 150 Benefit Street. It is a brick Georgian-style building completed largely in 1762. It was used as the meeting place for the colonial and state legislatures for 149 years. From colonial times to the mid-19th century, the Rhode Island General Assembly rotated meetings between the state's five county court houses, and five former Rhode Island state houses survive nowadays. In 1760 The General Assembly built the Old State House to replace an earlier wooden courthouse built 1730 on Meeting Street. It was largely finished by 1762 with some details being completed by 1771. Many of the Georgian architecture details were borrowed from the larger and more ornate Newport Colony House. Before 19th century alterations to the Providence State House, the two buildings resembled one another greatly. In the 19th century the large center-front tower was added. After 1853 the state legislature ceased meeting at Kent, Washington and Bristol county courthouses, but continued to alternate its
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    Palace of Justice

    Palace of Justice

    The Palace of Justice (Malay: Istana Kehakiman; Jawi: ايستان كهكيمن) houses the Malaysian Court of Appeal and Federal Court, which moved to Putrajaya from the Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur in the early 2000s. Due to the need for a proper office of the head of the Judicial system in Malaysia, a location within the Precinct 3 of Putrajaya was identified for this purpose. aQidea Architect was once again called to be commissioned to design the building after finishing the Prime Ministers Office not far from the Palace of Justice. It replaces the Sultan Abdul Samad building in Kuala Lumpur to be the back drop of Merdeka events during the National Day Parade. It has 2 Appeal Courts and 6 Federal courts which has intdicate network of passages segregating the Judges, witnesses, public, and the accused leading to the courts right from the car park or area of arrival. This is for the safety and security of everyone involved in order to achieve the desired courts functions and ambiance. The design is about bringing about "Order" and order is the theme of the day as the layouts are fashioned in an orderly manner, right from the smallest of rooms to the biggest and from the public
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    Santa Barbara County Courthouse

    Santa Barbara County Courthouse

    The Santa Barbara County Courthouse is located at 1100 Anacapa Street, in downtown Santa Barbara, California. The Spanish Colonial Revival style building was designed by William Mooser III and completed in 1929. Architect Charles Willard Moore called it the "grandest Spanish Colonial Revival structure ever built," and the prime example of Santa Barbara's adoption of Spanish Colonial as its civic style. The building replaced a smaller Greek Revival courthouse built at the same location in 1872–88 and badly damaged in an earthquake on June 29, 1925. The courthouse is composed of four buildings, totaling 150,000 square feet (14,000 m). It includes a Jail Wing, which is no longer used to hold prisoners. Visitors may take elevators to the summit of the 85 ft (26 m) "El Mirador" clock tower, which has labeled photographs that show what the viewer is looking at in all directions. Currently, the Santa Barbara County Courthouse is undergoing several restoration projects in the various wings, and just finished restoring the disintegrating fountain in the front. Occupying an entire city block, the grounds contain a collection of palms and specimen trees from more than 25 countries. The
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    Talbot County Courthouse

    Talbot County Courthouse

    The Talbot County Courthouse is located at 11 North Washington Street in Easton, Maryland. The courthouse houses the chambers and courtrooms for the judge of the Circuit Court for Talbot County, as well as the clerk's offices, jurors' assembly room, the master's office and the offices of the Talbot County Council . In 1709, 2 acres (8,100 m) of land as "Armstrong's old field, near Pitte's bridge was designated by a group of leading citizens to be the site of the new court house. Philemon Hemsley oversaw the construction of the building which was twenty feet by thirty feet in size. The new courthouse was finished in 1712 but 60 years later the county had out grown it. An act of the Maryland General Assembly in 1789 authorized the building of and most of the funds for a newer and larger courthouse at the site of the old one. The courthouse was razed and replaced with a new structure by 1794. This new and present courthouse was remodeled in 1958 which included removal of the front porch and the addition of two wings. The left wing, which once housed the District Court of Maryland for Talbot County and the Office of the State's Attorney for Talbot County, now houses the Talbot County
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    Thomas County Courthouse

    Thomas County Courthouse

    The Thomas County Courthouse is an historic government building built in 1858 and located on North Broad Street in Thomasville, Georgia, the seat of Thomas County. It was designed by architect John Wind. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 22, 1970.
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