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Best Conducted Ensemble of All Time

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    1

    The Hollywood Studio Symphony

    The Hollywood Studio Symphony is the credited name of the symphony orchestra behind many major soundtracks, including The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Sucker Punch, Jurassic Park 3, Last Samurai, Pirates of the Caribbean, We Are Marshall, Spider-Man 2, Lost and The Bourne Supremacy. Although the name "Hollywood Studio Symphony" may lead listeners to think that it is a conventional symphony orchestra like the London Symphony Orchestra, the actual members of the ensemble are session musicians contracted individually and differ from soundtrack to soundtrack. Note, the Hollywood Studio Symphony bears no relation to the similarly named Hollywood Symphony Orchestra, which is more akin to a traditional orchestra with a set roster. Often in soundtracks, the individual members of the orchestra that performs the actual score are not credited (with some exceptions being the "orchestra leader" or concertmaster). Usually, only the "orchestra contractor" is credited. The use of the "Hollywood Studio Symphony" name is part of a 2002 contract negotiated between the American Federation of Musicians and the Association of Motion Picture & Television Producers to
    7.83
    6 votes
    2
    Brooklyn Philharmonic

    Brooklyn Philharmonic

    The Brooklyn Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, commonly known as the Brooklyn Philharmonic, is an American orchestra based in the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City. It has been called "groundbreaking" and “one of the most innovative and respected symphony orchestras of modern times.” Like the London Symphony Orchestra and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Brooklyn Philharmonic is considered "freelance" in that its musicians are not employed full-time, but rather are paid on a per-performance basis. The Philharmonic has long enjoyed a reputation for championing new music and for ambitious, innovative programming. In addition to performing the so-called classical “standards,” the Brooklyn Philharmonic has commissioned an impressive 65 new works from living composers as well, and has debuted 166 world premiers. The orchestra’s administrative offices are located in the artistic enclave of Dumbo in downtown Brooklyn. Although the present Brooklyn Philharmonic was founded in 1954, Brooklyn has hosted other notable orchestras in its history. The Brooklyn Philharmonic claims to be "one of the oldest living orchestras in the New World," but it has no organizational connection to the
    6.57
    7 votes
    3

    Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart des SWR

    The Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra (German: Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart des SWR) is an orchestra based in Stuttgart in Germany. The ensemble was founded in 1945 by American occupation authorities as the orchestra for Radio Stuttgart, under the name Sinfonieorchester von Radio Stuttgart (Symphony Orchestra of Radio Stuttgart). The radio network later became the Süddeutscher Rundfunk (South German Radio), and the orchestra changed its name in 1949 to the Sinfonieorchester des Süddeutschen Rundfunks (South German Radio Symphony Orchestra). In 1959, the orchestra took on the name Südfunk-Sinfonieorchester, and acquired its current name in 1975. Like many broadcast orchestras in Germany, the orchestra has a reputation for performing contemporary music. Past principal conductors included Sir Neville Marriner (1983–1989), who later held the title of principal guest conductor. Georges Prêtre, who became the orchestra's artistic director in 1996, has the title of Conductor Laureate. From 1998 to 2011, Roger Norrington was principal conductor, and has incorporated his ideas of historically informed performance, including minimal use of vibrato, into the orchestra's style of
    8.60
    5 votes
    4
    London Symphony Orchestra

    London Symphony Orchestra

    The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO), founded in 1904, is the oldest of London's symphony orchestras. It was set up by a group of players who left Henry Wood's Queen's Hall Orchestra because of a new rule requiring players to give the orchestra their exclusive services. The LSO itself later introduced a similar rule for its members. The orchestra underwent periods of eclipse in the 1930s and 1950s when it was regarded as inferior in quality to new London orchestras, to which it lost players and bookings. By the 1960s it had recovered its leading position, which it has retained subsequently. A self-governing body, the orchestra selects the conductors with whom it works. At some stages in its history it has dispensed with a principal conductor and worked only with guests. Among conductors with whom it is most associated are, in its early days, Hans Richter, Sir Edward Elgar, and Sir Thomas Beecham, and in recent decades Pierre Monteux, André Previn, Claudio Abbado, Sir Colin Davis and Valery Gergiev. Since 1982, the LSO has been based in the Barbican Centre in the City of London. It claims to be the world's most recorded orchestra, and in addition to making gramophone recordings since
    8.40
    5 votes
    7
    Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

    Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

    The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, in German Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks is the internationally renowned orchestra of the Bayerischer Rundfunk (Bavarian Radio), based in Munich, Germany. It is one of the three principal orchestras in the city of Munich, along with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and the Bavarian State Orchestra. Its primary concert venues are the Philharmonie am Gasteig and the Herkulessaal in the Munich Residenz. The orchestra was founded in 1949, with members of an earlier radio orchestra in Munich as the core personnel. Eugen Jochum was the orchestra's first chief conductor, from 1949 until 1960. Subsequent chief conductors have included Rafael Kubelík, the longest serving of the orchestra's chief conductors, as well as Sir Colin Davis and Lorin Maazel. Since 2003, the orchestra's chief conductor is Mariss Jansons. His current contract with the orchestra is through August 2015. The orchestra participates in the "Musica Viva" concerts, originally founded by the composer Karl Amadeus Hartmann, to this day. The orchestra received the 2006 Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance for its recording of Shostakovich's 13th Symphony. It was
    7.60
    5 votes
    8

    Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra (CPO) is a Canadian orchestra, based in Calgary, Alberta. The orchestra gives the majority of its performances in the Jack Singer Concert Hall of the EPCOR Centre for the Performing Arts. It is also the orchestra for the Calgary Opera and Alberta Ballet Company. The Orchestra has a relatively short history, which began in 1910 with the founding of the First Calgary Symphony by violinist A.P. Howell. In 1947 the New Calgary Symphony was formed by Clayton Hare with members of the Mount Royal Orchestra and the previous Calgary Symphony. In 1955, the Dutch conductor Henry Plukker created the Alberta Philharmonic, which in the same year merged with the Calgary Symphony. A new name, Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra was chosen. Prelude, the orchestra's program magazine, began publication in October 1975 and continues to be their official concert programme. The Orchestra often features the Calgary Philharmonic Chorus, a chorus of over 100 members. On average the CPO performs over 65 concerts per season to over 100,000 people in Calgary and surrounding area. In 2001, management of the orchestra initiated a lockout and salaries of the players were cut by an
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra

    Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra

    The St. Louis Symphony is an American symphony orchestra based in St. Louis, Missouri. Founded in 1880 by Joseph Otten as the St. Louis Choral Society, the St. Louis Symphony is the second-oldest symphony orchestra in the United States, preceded only by the New York Philharmonic. The St Louis Choral Society performed in the auditorium of the St. Louis Mercantile Library at Locust and Broadway in Downtown St. Louis. During the 1881–82 season the 80-member chorus was joined by an orchestra of 31 members. A disbanded Musical Union joined the group. In 1893 the St. Louis Choral-Symphony was formally incorporated. It remained largely a choral organization through its performances at the 1904 World's Fair under Alfred Ernst when it expanded to a 200-member chorus and an orchestra of 55. Under Max Zach's tenure (1907 to 1921), it changed its name to the St Louis Symphony Orchestra. Before moving to its current home in Powell Hall, it performed for many years at the Kiel Opera House. The orchestra has given concerts regularly at Carnegie Hall and has made overseas tours to Europe and to Japan. The St. Louis Symphony has recorded for the Columbia, RCA Victor, Red Seal, Telarc, Vox/Turnabout
    8.50
    4 votes
    11
    Ulster Orchestra

    Ulster Orchestra

    The Ulster Orchestra is a symphony orchestra based in Belfast, the only full-time professional orchestra in Northern Ireland. The orchestra plays the majority of its concerts in Belfast's Ulster Hall and Waterfront Hall. It gives concerts across Northern Ireland, including performances at the Belfast Festival, the Wexford Opera Festival, the Kilkenny Arts Festival, and the National Concert Hall, Dublin. Since 1985, the Orchestra has been a regular visitor to The Proms. The orchestra currently employs 63 full-time musicians and 17 administrative support staff. The orchestra was founded in 1966 by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, with Maurice Miles as its first principal conductor and with János Fürst as its first concertmaster/leader. Fürst later became the orchestra's assistant conductor. The Orchestra has existed in its present form since 1981, when the BBC Northern Ireland Orchestra (BBC NIO) was disbanded. The Ulster Orchestra Society Ltd was then established (a company limited by guarantee and a registered charity) with funding from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, the BBC, Belfast City Council and Gallaher Ltd., and the size of the Orchestra was increased with
    6.17
    6 votes
    12
    London Chamber Orchestra

    London Chamber Orchestra

    The London Chamber Orchestra (LCO) is the longest established professional chamber orchestra in the UK. Based in London, LCO has a residency at St John's Smith Square in Westminster. The London Chamber Orchestra was founded in 1921 by the English conductor, organist, pianist and composer Anthony Bernard. He conducted the LCO's first performance, in the salon of No. 4 St. James's Square on 11 May 1921. The LCO has given more than 100 UK premieres, including works by Malcolm Arnold, Manuel de Falla, Gabriel Fauré, Leoš Janáček, Maurice Ravel, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Igor Stravinsky, and, most recently, Graham Fitkin and James Francis Brown. In 2006 the LCO premiered Sir Peter Maxwell Davies's The Golden Rule, written to mark Queen Elizabeth's 80th birthday. The LCO performed at Buckingham Palace at the invitation of the Prince of Wales in April 2006, and has performed for the Queen at Kew Palace. The LCO receives no grants and is not supported by any public body. Instead, the orchestra depends upon its audiences and on the support of corporate sponsors and donors. These include HSBC, Waitrose, Petro-Canada, CNN, Lazard and Endeavour. On April 2011 it was announced that the London
    8.25
    4 votes
    13
    Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra

    Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra (Hungarian: Nemzeti Filharmonikus Zenekar; formerly, the Hungarian State Symphony Orchestra, Hungarian: Magyar Állami Hangversenyzenekar) is one of the most prestigious symphony orchestras in Hungary. Based in the capital city of Budapest, it has stood as one of the pillars of the country's musical life since its founding in 1923 as the Metropolitan Orchestra (Hungarian: Székesfővárosi Zenekar). Zoltán Kocsis is the current musical director. Dr. Bor, Dezső; Dr. Bor, György (1998) (in Hungarian). Bor Dezső Emlékkönyv. http://mek.oszk.hu/00200/00206/. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
    9.67
    3 votes
    14
    Prague Symphony Orchestra

    Prague Symphony Orchestra

    The Prague Symphony Orchestra (Prague, Czech Republic, Czech: Symfonický orchestr hlavního města Prahy FOK) was founded in 1934 by Rudolf Pekárek. In the 1930s the orchestra performed the scores for many Czech films, and also appeared regularly on Czech radio. An early promoter of the orchestra was Dr. Václav Smetáček, who, in 1942 became the orchestra's chief conductor, a post he held for the next 30 years. The orchestra has traditionally been known by the acronym FOK, standing for Film-Opera-Koncert, reflecting the orchestra's fields of activity as envisioned by its founder. When the city of Prague made the orchestra its official concert ensemble in 1952, it retained the acronym, giving it the official title Symphony Orchestra of the Capital City of Prague - FOK. The orchestra has travelled extensively in Europe, Japan, and the United States, and has recorded for many different labels. Since 2006, the orchestra's chief conductor is Jiří Kout. Since 1995 the orchestra has been part of several crossover projects, which aim to mix metal and classical music together. The most important are:
    8.00
    4 votes
    15

    Tokyo Symphony Orchestra

    The Tokyo Symphony Orchestra (東京交響楽団, Tōkyō Kōkyō Gakudan), or TSO, was established in 1946 as the Toho Symphony Orchestra (東宝交響楽団). It assumed its present name in 1951. Based in Kawasaki, the TSO performs in numerous concert halls and serves as the pit ensemble for some productions at New National Theatre, Tokyo, the city's leading opera house. It offers subscription concert series at its home the Muza Kawasaki Symphony Hall and at Suntory Hall, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Space, and Tokyo Opera City (all in Tokyo). The orchestra recorded the musical score for the video game Star Fox: Assault.
    8.00
    4 votes
    16

    Collegium Musicum 90

    Collegium Musicum 90 is an English baroque orchestra playing on period instruments. It was founded by violinist Simon Standage and conductor Richard Hickox in 1990 and was jointly directed by them (either together or separately) until the death of Hickox in November 2008. Collegium Musicum means something like musical guild and was used generically as the name of musical societies and ensembles in the baroque era, and is sometimes used similarly today by ensembles playing early music. Simon Standage was leader of baroque orchestra The English Concert under Trevor Pinnock from 1973 to 1991, often performing as violin soloist, while Richard Hickox had an initial background as a Cambridge University organ scholar and then became a conductor. Hickox founded the City of London Sinfonia and the Richard Hickox Singers in 1971 for the performance of Baroque music on modern instruments, for which Standage was concertmaster, then went on to pursue a career as a choral conductor of the London Symphony Chorus, as well as conducting large symphony orchestras and opera. Collegium Musicum 90 was founded to be a standing period instrument orchestra specialising in baroque and early classical music
    6.80
    5 votes
    17

    Netherlands Radio Philharmonic

    The Radio Filharmonisch Orkest (Radio Philharmonic Orchestra; Dutch abbreviation RFO) is a Dutch radio orchestra, based in Hilversum. The RFO performs under the aegis of the Muziekcentrum van de Omroep (Broadcasting Music Centre; NMBC), an umbrella organization bringing together the music departments of the various broadcasting associations affiliated to Nederlandse Publieke Omroep (Dutch Public Broadcasting). The RFO performs on Radio 4 (Netherlands) and gives public concerts in Amsterdam and Utrecht. It has also served as the orchestra for productions at De Nederlandse Opera. The RFO's programmes are decided by the above-mentioned Muziekcentrum, rather than directly by the orchestra's management and chief conductor. The current manager of the RFO is Kees Dijk. Albert van Raalte founded the orchestra in 1945 and served as its first chief conductor. Past chief conductors have included Paul van Kempen, Bernard Haitink, Jean Fournet, Willem van Otterloo, Hans Vonk, and Sergiu Comissiona. Edo de Waart was chief conductor of the RFO from 1989 to 2004 and is now its conductor laureate. Jaap van Zweden was chief conductor and artistic director of the RFO from 2005 to 2012, and now has
    6.80
    5 votes
    18
    Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra

    Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra

    The Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra of the Israel Broadcasting Authority (Hebrew: התזמורת הסימפונית ירושלים, רשות השידור, ha-Tizmoret ha-Simfonit Yerushalayim Rashut ha-Shidur) is a major orchestra of Israel. Since the 1980s, the JSO has been based in the Henry Crown Symphony Hall, part of the Jerusalem Theater complex. The orchestra traces its origins to the national radio orchestra founded in the 1940s as the Kol Israel Orchestra. It acquired its present form (and name) after expanding in the 1970s. Since its foundation, the Orchestra has prided itself on having an extensive repertoire, which not only revisits the masterpieces at the core of the classical canon, but also promotes the work of more recent composers from Israel and abroad. In a home town concert in 2000, the Jerusalem Symphony cooperated with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and conductor Lorin Maazel to give the premiere of Krzysztof Penderecki's seventh symphony, The Seven Gates of Jerusalem, which had been commissioned to conclude the Jerusalem 3000 celebrations. This highly acclaimed performance was repeated by the two orchestras in Munich later that year to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the German
    9.33
    3 votes
    19
    Detroit Symphony Orchestra

    Detroit Symphony Orchestra

    The Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) is an American orchestra based in Detroit, Michigan. Its main performance center is Orchestra Hall at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit's Midtown neighborhood. The DSO performs throughout the metro Detroit area in both paid Neighborhood Series concerts and free Community concerts. The DSO can also be seen and heard live on the web at dso.org/live. The Detroit Symphony was founded in 1914 by ten Detroit society women who each contributed $100 to the organization and pledged to find 100 additional subscribers. They soon hired the orchestra's first music director, Weston Gales, a 27-year-old church organist from Boston. The orchestra's first performance was held on February 26, 1914 at the old Detroit Opera House. The appointment of the Russian pianist Ossip Gabrilowitsch as music director in 1918 brought instant status to the new orchestra. A friend of composers Gustav Mahler and Sergei Rachmaninoff, Gabrilowitsch demanded a new auditorium be built as a condition of his accepting the position. Orchestra Hall was completed for the new music director in 1919 in four months and twenty-three days. Under Gabrilowitsch, the Detroit Symphony
    7.75
    4 votes
    20

    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

    The Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia is one of the best-known orchestras in Italy. It is based at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome. At various times it has been known as the Symphony Orchestra of the Augusteo and Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia and the Orchestra Stabile dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. The current music director is Antonio Pappano. It was founded in 1908. From its foundation until 1936 it performed at Teatro Augusteo. Since 2002, the orchestra has been housed at il Parco della Musica designed by architect Renzo Piano.
    7.75
    4 votes
    21

    Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

    The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (OAE) is a British period instrument orchestra. The OAE is a resident orchestra of the Southbank Centre, London, associate orchestra at Glyndebourne Festival Opera and has its headquarters at Kings Place. The leadership is rotated between four musicians, Alison Bury, Matthew Truscott, Kati Debretzeni and Margaret Faultless. A group of period instrumentalist players formed the OAE as a self-governing ensemble in 1986, and took its name from the historical period in the late 18th century where the core of its repertoire is based. The OAE does not have a principal conductor, but chooses conductors individually. Having no permanent music director gives the orchestra flexibility to work with some of the world’s greatest conductors and soloists across a wide range of music. The current Principal Artists are Sir Simon Rattle, Vladimir Jurowski, Iván Fischer and Sir Mark Elder. Emeritus Conductors are Frans Brüggen, the late Sir Charles Mackerras and Sir Roger Norrington. Other conductors to have worked with the OAE at its invitation include Yannick Nezet-Seguin, Edward Gardner, Robin Ticciati, Philippe Herreweghe, Gustav Leonhardt, Mark Elder,
    7.75
    4 votes
    22

    London Classical Players

    The London Classical Players (LCP) was a British orchestra that specialized in music following historically informed performance (HIP) practices and orchestral performances on period musical instruments. Sir Roger Norrington founded the LCP in 1978. From 1978 to 1992, the concertmaster of the London Classical Players was baroque violinist John Holloway. The LCP made a variety of recordings for EMI Classics. Many of the players in the LCP overlapped with four other major HIP orchestral ensembles, the Academy of Ancient Music, the English Concert, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, and the English Baroque Soloists. Among their famous concert series was "The Beethoven Experience" in 1987, and "The Berlioz Experience" in 1988. In 1996, the LCP was invited to open the Prague Spring Festival in the traditional opening festival concert of Bedrich Smetana's Ma Vlast, a controversial decision at the time. In 1997, the LCP formally dissolved as an organization, and its work was absorbed into the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment .
    9.00
    3 votes
    23

    Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks

    The North German Radio Symphony Orchestra (NDR Symphony Orchestra, German: Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks, or NDR Sinfonieorchester) is a German orchestra, the symphony orchestra of the Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) in Hamburg. The radio orchestra was founded by British occupation authorities after World War II, as Radio Hamburg was the only radio station in what would later be West Germany not to be destroyed during the war. Its first musicians came mostly from the ranks of the old Nazi-controlled Grosses Rundfunkorchester des Reichssenders Hamburg. Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt was living near the Hamburg area, and was given the task of assembling the orchestra, which occurred over a period of six months. The orchestra gave its first concert in November 1945, conducted by Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt, with Yehudi Menuhin as soloist. The orchestra first visited the UK in 1951, as part of the concerts celebrating the re-opening in Manchester of the Free Trade Hall. The orchestra is renowned for its performances of the core classical and romantic repertoire by composers such as Beethoven and Bruckner, but also noted for its interpretations of contemporary works. It rose to
    9.00
    3 votes
    24

    Oakland East Bay Symphony

    The Oakland East Bay Symphony (OEBS) is a leading orchestra based in Oakland, California. The current music director and conductor is Michael Morgan, who has held the position since September 1990. The Paramount Theatre has been the home of the Symphony since 1995. Bryan Nies has been Assistant Conductor since 2002. The Symphony presents six programs of music during the season. Oakland East Bay Symphony (OEBS) was founded in July 1988, when musicians from the former Oakland Symphony and the Oakland Symphony League joined together to form a new orchestra. Under Maestro Michael Morgan's direction, the Symphony has become a leader in music education for young people, bringing orchestral music into schools throughout Oakland and the East Bay. More than 60,000 people attend the Symphony's performances at the Paramount Theatre, at churches and senior centers, and at other community sites each year. The symphony presents both classic and innovative new works. The Symphony is an important positive force in bringing together the talents and resources of diverse arts groups from the community. Whenever possible, OEBS collaborates with local ballet, opera, choral and theatrical groups and
    6.40
    5 votes
    25

    Arditti Quartet

    The Arditti Quartet is a string quartet founded in 1974. The quartet is associated particularly with contemporary music. The quartet was founded in 1974 by violinist Irvine Arditti together with John Senter, Levine Andrade and Lenox Mackenzie. String quartets and other chamber works have been written for the ensemble.. The group has given hundreds of world premieres and some of the most important composers include Thomas Adès, Louis Andriessen, Georges Aperghis, Harrison Birtwistle, Benjamin Britten, John Cage, Elliott Carter, Edison Denisov, James Dillon, Hugues Dufourt, Pascal Dusapin, Ivan Fedele, Morton Feldman, Brian Ferneyhough, Luca Francesconi, Francisco Guerrero, Sofia Gubaidulina, Jonathan Harvey, Toshio Hosokawa, Klaus Huber, Mauricio Kagel, György Kurtág, Helmut Lachenmann, György Ligeti, Bruno Maderna, Conlon Nancarrow, Roger Reynolds, Wolfgang Rihm, Giacinto Scelsi, Salvatore Sciarrino, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis . The ensemble believes that close collaboration with composers is vital to the process of interpreting modern music and therefore attempts to work with every composer whose music it plays. The players' commitment to educational work is exemplified
    7.50
    4 votes
    26
    Los Angeles Philharmonic

    Los Angeles Philharmonic

    The Los Angeles Philharmonic (LA Phil, LAP, or LAPO) is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, United States. It has a regular season of concerts from October through June at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, and a summer season at the Hollywood Bowl from July through September. Gustavo Dudamel is the current Music Director, and Esa-Pekka Salonen is Conductor Laureate. Music critics have described the orchestra as the most "contemporary minded", "forward thinking", "talked about and innovative", "venturesome and admired" orchestra in America. According to Salonen, "We are interested in the future. We are not trying to re-create the glories of the past, like so many other symphony orchestras." The orchestra was founded and single-handedly financed in 1919 by William Andrews Clark, Jr., a copper baron, arts enthusiast, and part-time violinist. He originally asked Sergei Rachmaninoff to be the Philharmonic's first music director; however, Rachmaninoff had only recently moved to New York, and he did not wish to move again. Clark then selected Walter Henry Rothwell, former assistant to Gustav Mahler, as music director, and hired away several principal musicians from East
    7.50
    4 votes
    27

    New World Symphony Orchestra

    The New World Symphony is the United States' only full-time orchestral academy preparing musicians for careers in symphony orchestras and ensembles. It was established in 1987 in Miami Beach, Florida, under the artistic direction of conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, in large part with a grant from Ted Arison, founder of Carnival Cruise Lines. The New World Symphony presents a season of concerts from October to May at the New World Center which opened in 2011 and was designed by architect Frank Gehry and acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota. Performances include full-orchestra concerts, a chamber music series, a new music series, percussion consort series, small ensemble concerts, a family series, and special festivals and recitals. In addition to artistic director Michael Tilson Thomas, guest conductors in recent years have included Paavo Järvi, Neville Marriner, Oliver Knussen, David Robertson and Mark Wigglesworth. On June 29, 2011, the New World Symphony Orchestra received the first place award for "Adventurous Programming" (group 2 orchestras) from ASCAP for its strong commitment to new American music. The intensive, three-year fellowship program offers a wide range of performance and
    7.50
    4 votes
    28

    Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is a British orchestra based in London. It tours widely, and is sometimes referred to as "The Nation's Favourite Orchestra". The British Hit Singles & Albums noted that it was "formed in 1946 by Sir Thomas Beecham, who wanted a first rate ensemble that would attract the country's top musicians." Since his death, it has come under various music maestros including André Previn and Louis Clark (who was behind its biggest sellers). In 1946, Sir Thomas Beecham founded the RPO, which played its first concert in Croydon on 15 September of that year. Beecham was the RPO's music director until his death in 1961. Rudolf Kempe, who became assistant conductor in 1960, became principal conductor in 1961 and music director in 1962. The RPO gave him the title of Conductor for Life in 1970, and he stepped down from the orchestra in 1975. Subsequent music directors and principal conductors have been Antal Doráti, Walter Weller, André Previn, Vladimir Ashkenazy, and Yuri Temirkanov. Daniele Gatti was music director from 1996 to 2009. In 2009, Charles Dutoit became artistic director and principal conductor of the RPO. The orchestra toured the United States in
    7.50
    4 votes
    29

    Boston Philharmonic

    The Boston Philharmonic Orchestra (not to be confused with the Boston Symphony Orchestra) is a semi-professional orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts. It was founded in 1979. Their concerts take place at New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall and at Harvard University's Sanders Theatre. Currently, the orchestra is conducted by Benjamin Zander. Each concert is preceded by a talk which explains the musical ideas and structure of the pieces about to be performed.
    8.67
    3 votes
    30

    Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra

    The Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra (Gewandhausorchester Leipzig; sometimes simply referred to as Gewandhausorchester) is one of the oldest symphony orchestras in the world. It is named after the concert hall in which it is based, the Gewandhaus in Leipzig, Germany. The orchestra's origins can be traced to 1743, when a society called the Grosses Concert began performing in private homes. In 1744 the Grosses Concert moved its concerts to the "Three Swans" Tavern. Their concerts continued at this venue for 36 years, until 1781. In 1780, because of complaints about concert conditions and audience behavior in the tavern, the mayor and city council of Leipzig offered to renovate one story of the Gewandhaus (the building used by textile merchants) for the orchestra's use. The motto Res severa est verum gaudium ("a serious concern is true pleasure", or "true pleasure is a serious business" – from the Roman author Seneca) was painted in the hall, suggesting the priorities of the sponsors. The orchestra gave its first concert in the Gewandhaus in 1781. The orchestra thus has a good claim to being the oldest continuing orchestra in Germany founded by bourgeoisie, while older orchestras were
    8.67
    3 votes
    31

    CBC Radio Orchestra

    The CBC Radio Orchestra was a Canadian orchestra based in Vancouver, British Columbia, that was operated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Until the early 1980s CBC had a number of orchestras located in Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax but due to federal government budget cuts they were eliminated and the CBC Vancouver Orchestra was promoted to national status. It changed names in 2000 to reflect its status as the CBC's only broadcast orchestra; the last radio orchestra in North America. The orchestra was founded in 1938 under the name the CBC Vancouver Chamber Orchestra. A predecessor of the CBC, the Canadian National Railway Radio network also had a radio orchestra. The Canadian National Railway Radio Orchestra was conducted by Henri Miro in 1931-32. Over the years guest conductors have included Raffi Armenian, Kees Bakels, Michel Corboz, Victor Feldbrill, Serge Garant, Monica Huggett, Milton Katims, Gary Kulesha, Sir Ernest MacMillan, Ettore Mazzoleni, Geoffrey Moull, Harry Newstone, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Jaap Schroeder, Georg Tintner, Owen Underhill, Heinz Unger, and Jon Washburn. Most of Canada's leading concert artists have appeared as soloists. The orchestra
    7.25
    4 votes
    32
    National Arts Centre Orchestra

    National Arts Centre Orchestra

    The National Arts Centre Orchestra (NACO) is a Canadian orchestra based in Ottawa, Ontario. The NACO is based at the eponymous National Arts Centre, and also tours throughout Canada and around the world. The NACO also broadcasts nationally on CBC Radio on shows such as In Performance, Studio Sparks, Symphony Hall and Tempo. The NAC Orchestra was founded in 1969 as the resident orchestra of the newly opened National Arts Centre, with Jean-Marie Beaudet as Music Director and Mario Bernardi as founding conductor. Bernardi became Music Director in 1971 and held the post until 1982. He was named Conductor Laureate of the NACO in 1997. Subsequent NACO music directors have included Franco Mannino (1982 to 1987), Gabriel Chmura (1987 to 1990), and Trevor Pinnock (1991-1997). Since 1999, Pinchas Zukerman has served as the NACO's Music Director. He is scheduled to conclude his NACO tenure in 2015. Franz-Paul Decker was Principal Guest Conductor from 1991 to 1999. In 2001, Jean-Philippe Tremblay becamse the NACO's Apprentice Conductor, a then newly created post, for a two-year term. The Orchestra has visited 112 cities in Canada and 122 cities internationally in its 38-year history, including
    7.25
    4 votes
    33
    China National Symphony Orchestra

    China National Symphony Orchestra

    The China National Symphony Orchestra (Chinese: 中国交响乐团; pinyin: Zhōngguó Jiāoxiǎng Yuètuán; abbreviated CNSO) is China's national orchestra. According to its website, it is one of the most outstanding professional orchestras in China. It was originally founded as the Central Philharmonic Orchestra of China in 1956 under the baton of the famous Chinese conductor Li Delun(Chinese: 李德伦). In 1996 it was restructured and renamed the China National Symphony Orchestra. Currently, Xia Guan is the orchestra’s executive director. The orchestra’s artistic director and principal conductor is En Shao, and Xincao Li is the resident conductor. Li Delun conducted the first concert in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Mozart in Beijing after the founding of the orchestra. On October 1st 1959, the concert of Beethoven No.9 was performed by the orchestra in Beijing, and all the musicians were Chinese. In 1996, the Central Philharmonic was restructured and renamed the CNSO. At that time, the CNSO not only played much western classical music such as Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Wagner, but it also introduced lots of works such as Yellow River Cantata by Chinese
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    Houston Symphony Orchestra

    Houston Symphony Orchestra

    The Houston Symphony is an American orchestra based in Houston, Texas. Since 1966, it has performed at the Jesse H. Jones Hall for the Performing Arts in downtown Houston. The first concert of what was to become the Houston Symphony took place on June 21, 1913, sponsored by the Houston philanthropist Ima Hogg. Initially, the orchestra was composed of only 35 part-time musicians. Despite its small stature and budget, the orchestra and its first conductor, Julien Paul Blitz, enjoyed a good response and continued to perform. Blitz conducted until 1916, then Paul Bergé, until the orchestra disbanded in 1918. The orchestra reformed in 1930, still as a semi-professional orchestra, and gave its first full season of concerts the following year conducted by Uriel Nespoli. In the spring of 1936 the symphony society officially became the Houston Symphony Society. Ernst Hoffmann began his tenure that year with increased support from the Society and began hiring professional musicians. The orchestra continued to expand over the next several decades, and its first 52-week contract was signed in 1971. When conductor Leopold Stokowski invited noted African-American opera singer Shirley Verrett to
    10.00
    2 votes
    35

    American Symphony Orchestra

    The American Symphony Orchestra is a New York-based American orchestra founded in 1962 by Leopold Stokowski whose mission is to demystify orchestral music and make it accessible and affordable for all audiences. Leon Botstein is the orchestra's music director and principal conductor. They perform regularly at Carnegie Hall and Symphony Space in New York City, and are also the resident orchestra of the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. Its concertmaster is Erica Kiesewetter. Stokowski was 80 years old when he founded the orchestra. He served as music director together with assistant Amos Meller until May 1972 when, at the age of 90, he returned to England. Following Maestro Stokowski's departure, Kazuyoshi Akiyama was appointed music director from 1973-1978. Music directors during the early 1980s included as principal conductors, Moshe Atzmon and Giuseppe Patanè. In 1985, John Mauceri assumed the post as music director. In 1991, Catherine Comet left her post at the end of her tenure with the orchestra and was succeeded by Bard College president Leon Botstein. Under music director Leon Botstein, the ASO has pioneered the concept of
    7.00
    4 votes
    36

    Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

    The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is a professional American symphony orchestra based in Baltimore, Maryland internationally recognized as having achieved a prominent place among the world’s most important orchestras. The BSO’s home is the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, where it performs more than 130 concerts a year. With the opening of the Music Center at Strathmore in Bethesda in February 2005, the Baltimore Symphony became the nation's first orchestra with year-round venues in two metropolitan areas. Founded in 1916, the BSO is the only major American orchestra originally established with as a branch of the municipal government. In September 2007, Maestra Marin Alsop led her inaugural concerts as the Orchestra’s 12th music director, making her the first woman to head a major American orchestra. Joining Maestra Alsop on the BSO conductor roster are Principal Pops Conductor Jack Everly, and BSO Music Director Emeritus Yuri Temirkanov, who served as Music Director from 2000-2006 and is regarded as one of the most talented conductors of his generation. Founded in 1916, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is the only major American orchestra originally established as a branch of
    9.50
    2 votes
    37
    Guangzhou Symphony Orchestra

    Guangzhou Symphony Orchestra

    The Guangzhou Symphony Orchestra (Chinese: 广州交响乐团; abbreviated GSO) is based in Guangzhou, Guangdong. It was founded in 1957. The orchestra's current artistic director is Long Yu (余隆). It is the only Chinese symphony orchestra that has toured five continents. Greg Patillo, famous beatboxing flutist, was the acting principal flute of the orchestra at one time.
    9.50
    2 votes
    38

    Lucerne Festival Orchestra

    The Lucerne Festival Orchestra is an ad hoc seasonal orchestra, based at the annual Lucerne Festival in Switzerland. The Lucerne Festival had featured a resident orchestra as far back as 1938, with Arturo Toscanini conducting the first concert of that ensemble. From 1943 until its disbandment in 1993, the festival orchestra consisted primarily of musicians from Switzerland. A few years later, a reconstituted festival orchestra arose, based around players from the Gustav Mahler-Jugend Orchester and the European Community Youth Orchestra (now the European Union Youth Orchestra). The most recent incarnation of the Lucerne Festival Orchestra occurred at the instigation of Claudio Abbado, after a 2000 conversation with Lucerne Festival artistic director Michael Haefliger. The core of the ensemble is the Mahler Chamber Orchestra. The LFO features some soloists and orchestral principals from major orchestras in its ranks, including Kolja Blacher, Wolfram Christ, Mirijam Contzen, Diemut Poppen, Natalia Gutman, Jens-Peter Maintz, Jacques Zoon, Reinhold Friedrich, Stefan Dohr, Alessio Allegrini, Mark Templeton, Franz Bartolomey, Alois Posch, Emmanuel Pahud, Jacques Zoon, Albrecht Mayer,
    9.50
    2 votes
    39
    Philadelphia Orchestra

    Philadelphia Orchestra

    The Philadelphia Orchestra is a symphony orchestra based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the United States. One of the "Big Five" American orchestras, it was founded in 1900. The orchestra's home is the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, where it performs its subscription concerts, numbering over 130, in Verizon Hall. From 1900 to 2001, the Philadelphia Orchestra gave its concerts at the Academy of Music. The orchestra continues to own the Academy, and returns there one week per year that includes the Academy of Music's annual gala concert and concerts for school children. The Philadelphia Orchestra's summer home is the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. It also has summer residencies at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center, and since July 2007 at the Bravo! Vail Valley Festival in Vail, Colorado. The orchestra also performs an annual series of concerts at Carnegie Hall. Since 2012, the Music Director is Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Charles Dutoit and Wolfgang Sawallisch are the orchestra's Conductors Laureate. The orchestra was founded in 1900 by Fritz Scheel, who also acted as its first conductor. The orchestra had its beginnings with a small group of musicians led by the pianist
    9.50
    2 votes
    40
    Russian National Orchestra

    Russian National Orchestra

    The Russian National Orchestra (Russian: Российский национальный оркестр) premiered in Moscow in 1990. It was the first Russian orchestra to perform at the Apostolic Palace, Vatican and in Israel. The RNO's first recording (1991) was Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6, Pathétique, released on Virgin Classics. Since then, the orchestra has made over 75 recordings for Deutsche Grammophon, PentaTone Classics, Ondine, Warner Classics and other labels, and with conductors that include RNO Founder and Artistic Director Mikhail Pletnev, Vladimir Jurowski, Kent Nagano, Alexander Vedernikov, Carlo Ponti, José Serebrier and Vasily Petrenko. The RNO’s recording of Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and Beintus's Wolf Tracks, conducted by Kent Nagano and narrated by Sophia Loren, Bill Clinton and Mikhail Gorbachev, was the winner of a 2004 Grammy Award, making the RNO the first Russian orchestra ever to win this honor. A Spanish language version narrated by Antonio Banderas was released in 2007, following a Russian version narrated by actors Oleg Tabakov and Sergei Bezrukov, with a Mandarin edition following in 2011. Narrators in concert versions of these works have included actors Danny Glover, Diana
    9.50
    2 votes
    41

    Vienna Symphony Orchestra

    The Vienna Symphony (German: Wiener Symphoniker) is an orchestra in Vienna, Austria. In 1900, Ferdinand Löwe founded the orchestra as the Wiener Concertverein (Vienna Concert Society). In 1913 it moved into the Konzerthaus, Vienna. In 1919 it merged with the Tonkünstler Orchestra. In 1933 it acquired its current name. Despite a lull in concert attendance after the introduction of the radio during the 1920s, the orchestra survived until the invasion of Austria in 1938 and became incorporated into the German Culture Orchestras. As such, they were used for purposes of propaganda until, depleted by assignments to work in munitions factories, the orchestra closed down on September 1, 1944. Their first post-war concert occurred on September 16, 1945, performing Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 3. Under the direction of Josef Krips, they quickly rebuilt a modern repertoire after ten years of isolation and travelled to the Bregenz Festival for the first time in the summer of 1946. 1946 marked the beginning of the tenure of maestro Herbert von Karajan who, though not principal conductor, worked with the VSO in the "Karajan Series" concerts, going on extensive tours throughout Europe and North
    9.50
    2 votes
    42

    Orchestre Symphonique de Québec

    The Orchestre symphonique de Québec (OSQ; English, Quebec Symphony Orchestra) is a Canadian symphony orchestra based in Quebec City. Founded in 1902 as the Société symphonique de Québec, the OSQ is the oldest active Canadian orchestra. Joseph Vézina was the OSQ's first music director, from 1902 to 1924. In 1942 the orchestra merged with rival orchestra Cercle philharmonique de Québec (founded 1936), at which time it changed its name to the Orchestre Symphonique de Québec. The orchestra holds an annual competition for young Quebec musicians awarding monetary prizes as well as the opportunity to perform as a soloist with the orchestra. The orchestra also performs with the Théâtre lyrique du Québec (Théâtre lyrique de Nouvelle-France), the (defunct) Opéra du Québec, the Opéra de Québec, and the Choeur symphonique de Québec. The most recent music director of the OSQ was Yoav Talmi, from 1998 to 2011. In December 2011, the OSQ announced the appointment of Fabien Gabel as its 11th music director, as of the 2012-2013 season, with an initial contract of 4 years.
    5.80
    5 votes
    43

    Budapest Festival Orchestra

    The Budapest Festival Orchestra (Hungarian: Budapesti Fesztiválzenekar) was formed in 1983 by Iván Fischer and Zoltán Kocsis, with musicians "drawn from the cream of Hungary's younger players", as The Times put it. Its aim was to make the orchestra's concerts into significant events in Hungary's musical life, and to give Budapest a new symphony orchestra of international standing. Between 1992 and 2000, extending its work to a full season, the ensemble operated under the aegis of the Budapest Municipality and the new BFO Foundation, formed by fifteen Hungarian and multinational corporations and banks. From the 2000/2001 season onwards the orchestra was operated by the BFO Foundation, which the Budapest City Council regularly supports under a contract renewable every five years. In 2003 the Ministry of Cultural Heritage declared the orchestra a national institution supported by the state. The Festival Orchestra is now part of Budapest's music life and a frequent guest at venues including: Salzburg (Summer Festival), Vienna (Musikverein, Konzerthaus), Lucerne (Festival), Montreux, Zürich (Tonhalle), New York (Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall), Chicago, Los Angeles (Hollywood Bowl),
    8.00
    3 votes
    44
    Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

    Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (abbreviation IPO; Hebrew: התזמורת הפילהרמונית הישראלית, ha-Tizmoret ha-Filharmonit ha-Yisre'elit) is the leading symphony orchestra in Israel. The IPO was founded by violinist Bronisław Huberman in 1936, at a time when many Jewish musicians were being fired from European orchestras. Its inaugural concert took place in Tel Aviv on December 26, 1936, and was conducted by Arturo Toscanini. In 1958, the IPO was awarded the Israel Prize, in music, being the first year in which the Prize was awarded to an organization. The IPO enjoys frequent international tours, and has performed under some of the world's greatest conductors, including Leonard Bernstein and Zubin Mehta, both of whom are prominent in the orchestra's history. Bernstein maintained close ties with the orchestra from 1947, and in 1988, the IPO bestowed on him the title of Laureate Conductor, which he retained until his death in 1990. Mehta has served as the IPO's Music Advisor since 1968. The IPO did not have a formal music director, but instead "music advisors", until 1977, when Mehta was appointed the IPO's first Music Director. In 1981, his title was elevated to Music Director for Life.
    8.00
    3 votes
    45

    Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

    The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra (MSO) is an orchestra based in Melbourne, Australia. It has 100 permanent musicians. Melbourne has the longest continuous history of orchestral music of any Australian city and the MSO is the oldest professional orchestra in Australia. The MSO performs to more than 250,000 people in Melbourne and regional Victoria in over 150 concerts a year. Following integration with the Melbourne Chorale in 2008, the Orchestra has responsibility for its own choir, the MSO Chorus. The orchestra relies on funding by the Victorian State Government through Arts Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet and the Federal government through the Australia Council and support from private corporations and donors. The MSO's first concert took place on 11 December 1906 under the baton of Alberto Zelman, founder of the MSO, who later became the first Australian conductor to conduct the London and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras. In 1934, the MSO became one of the Australian Broadcasting Commission's radio orchestras. In 1949, the orchestra took on the new name of the Victorian Symphony Orchestra. In 1965, the orchestra's name reverted to the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    46

    Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Sacramento Philharmonic is a symphony orchestra in the Sacramento region, established in 1997 after the disbandment of the Sacramento Symphony that same year. Led by Maestro Michael Morgan, the orchestra performs at the Community Center Theatre and at the Mondavi Center at the University of California, Davis The Sacramento Symphony was established in 1948 and rapidly became a large regional orchestra made up of local professional musicians. However, starting in 1986 and continuing through the mid-nineties, the Sacramento Symphony had severe administrative difficulties and ran into significant operating deficits, repeatedly filing for bankruptcy. Despite several moderate bail-outs from businesses, the general public and local government, in 1997 the Sacramento Symphony officially closed its doors. Directors included Fritz Berens (1956?-1963?), who helped found the Sacramento Youth Symphony, Harry Newstone (1965–78), who oversaw the move from the Memorial Auditorium (Sacramento) to the new Community Center, Carter Nice (1979–92) and Geoffrey Simon. Established the same year as the Symphony shut down, the new Sacramento Philharmonic, composed almost entirely of the same orchestra
    8.00
    3 votes
    47

    Ensemble InterContemporain

    The Ensemble InterContemporain (EIC) is a French chamber orchestra, based in Paris at the Cité de la musique and IRCAM, which specialises in contemporary classical music. The EIC has a comparatively large roster of permanent, salaried musicians, 31 as of 2012, all of whom are nominally 'soloists', including three full-time pianists, and three percussionists. Smaller, unconducted, groups drawn from the EIC are billed as 'Les Solistes de l'Ensemble Intercontemporain'. The EIC, through its association with IRCAM, is also unusual in having an annual open call for scores from composers of any age or nationality. Pierre Boulez founded the EIC in 1976 in association with the French culture minister Michel Guy and the co-founder of the London Sinfonietta, Nicholas Snowman, conceiving it as a group of soloists who could play orchestral literature or literature for any combination of instruments. The idea was for the ensemble to be more flexible than a traditional symphony orchestra, allowing composers to write for a group of instruments of their own choice. Many works that might have been conceived for orchestra are now being written with this instrumentation in mind. For example, Tristan
    6.75
    4 votes
    48

    Orchestre national du Capitole de Toulouse

    The Orchestre national du Capitole de Toulouse is a French orchestra based in Toulouse. It acts as both a symphony orchestra whose main residence is Toulouse's Halle aux Grains, and the permanent orchestra of the Théâtre du Capitole in Toulouse. Initially with the name Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse, past music directors of the orchestra have included André Cluytens (beginning in 1932) and Georges Prêtre (1951–1955). The Orchestre du Capitole rose to prominence during Michel Plasson's tenure as music director, from 1968 to 2003. In 1974, Plasson chose the Halle aux Grains, a former market converted into an arena, to become the orchestra's residence. Until then, the orchestra was not used to giving concerts but was instead confined to the Capitole's pit, and had a very low reputation. Within twelve years, the orchestra had improved enough to qualify to have the term "national" in its name, which it acquired in 1980. Plasson's flamboyant personality, his insistence on playing and recording the French repertoire, especially rarely played pieces, and his record deal with EMI, combined to make the orchestra the "reference" French orchestra, the most visible and most visibly French,
    6.75
    4 votes
    49
    Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra

    Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra (Polish: Orkiestra Filharmonii Narodowej w Warszawie), one of Poland's premier musical institutions, was established in 1901 on the initiative of an assembly of Polish aristocrats and financiers, as well as musicians. Between 1901 and the outbreak of World War II in 1939, a rollcall of virtuoso- and conductor-composers regularly performed their works with the orchestra, including Grieg, Honegger, Leoncavallo, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff, Ravel, Saint-Saëns, Richard Strauss, and Stravinsky. Among the other luminaries who played with the Philharmonic were the pianists Paderewski and Rubinstein, the violinists Heifetz and Sarasate, and the cellist Casals. The Philharmonic has played host to the Chopin International Piano Competition since the contest began in 1927, and also appeared at the inaugural Wieniawski International Violin Competition (1935) and Universal Festival of Polish Art (1937). World War II interrupted the Philharmonic's activity and robbed the orchestra of much of its prominence in European musical life. The orchestra lost half its members to the war, as well as its elegant building, which had been erected and modeled after the
    6.75
    4 votes
    50

    Bournemouth Sinfonietta

    The Bournemouth Sinfonietta was a chamber orchestra founded in 1968 as an off-shoot of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra was initially conducted by George Hurst, who acted as artistic adviser, and Nicholas Braithwaite, in order to perform the classical repertoire in the smaller venues of the south and west of England. In the first months of its existence players interchanged between the Symphony Orchestra and Sinfonietta, some of them having to consult a chart to find out which orchestra they would play with the following week (leading occasionally to players going for the wrong rehearsal). The 'pool of players' idea was scrapped and the Sinfonietta became independent of the BSO, with more players moving across from the BSO in 1969. The Sinfonietta made its London debut on 9 January 1969 at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in a concert of Seiber, Milhaud, Webern and Varèse conducted by Edgar Cosma. Among premieres given by the orchestra were: During its existence the Bournemouth Sinfonietta gained a national reputation, appearing at The Proms in 1977, 1988 and 1992 and also undertook short overseas tours, including Germany (1987), Italy and Turkey (1992), Romania (1994),
    7.67
    3 votes
    51

    Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra (also called Cleveland Philharmonic) is an American orchestra based in Cleveland, Ohio. It was founded in 1938 and its current music director (since 2007) is Victor H. Liva. The Cleveland Philharmonic Orchestra is a full symphony orchestra which was founded in 1938 by three Cleveland area musicians — bass clarinetist Alfred Zetzer, oboist Robert Zupnik, and cellist Irving Klein — who all went on to professional careers. Initially, the orchestra was formed as a young people's symphony, to give concerts and to serve as a training ground for those who were interested in professional careers as orchestra musicians. The Orchestra comprises about 60 musicians and performs six concerts each season at Cuyahoga Community College Metro, Parma, and Highland Hills campuses. A modest ticket price enables families and seniors to afford programs which are comparable to the quality of significantly more expensive offerings. The Cleveland Philharmonic's current Music Director, Victor H. Liva, begins his first season with the orchestra as it celebrates the 70th concert season in 2007-2008. The Philharmonic has traditionally presented outstanding Cleveland area
    7.67
    3 votes
    52

    Staatskapelle Berlin

    The Staatskapelle Berlin is a German orchestra, the orchestra of the Berlin State Opera (Berliner Staatsoper Unter den Linden). The orchestra traces its roots to 1570, when Joachim II Hector, Elector of Brandenburg established an orchestra at his court. In 1701, the affiliation of the Electors of Brandenburg to the king of Prussia led to the description of the orchestra as "Königlich Preußische Hofkapelle" (Royal Prussian Court Orchestra), which consisted of about 30 musicians. The orchestra became affiliated with the Royal Court Opera, established in 1742 by Frederick the Great. Noted musicians associated with the orchestra have included Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, Franz Benda, and Johann Joachim Quantz The first concert by the ensemble for a wider audience outside of the royal courts was on 1 March 1783 at the Hotel Paris, led by Johann Friedrich Reichardt, the ensemble's Kapellmeister. After the advent of Giacomo Meyerbeer as Kapellmeister, from 1842, the role of the orchestra expanded and a first annual concert series for subscribers was launched. The orchestra gave a number of world and German premieres of works by Richard Wagner, Felix Mendelssohn, and Otto Nicolai. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    53
    Opéra National de Lyon

    Opéra National de Lyon

    Opéra National de Lyon is an opera company in Lyon, France which performs in the Nouvel Opéra, a modernized version in 1993 of the original 1831 opera house. The inaugural performance of François-Adrien Boïeldieu's La Dame blanche was given on 1 July 1831. The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries saw some significant French premieres of major operas including Richard Wagner's Die Meistersinger in 1896, Giordano's Andre Chenier in the following year, and Moussorgsky's Boris Godunov in 1913. In addition, many world premieres such as Arnold Schoenberg's Erwartung (1967) have been presented. In the years after the 1969 appointment of Louis Erlo as general director, many innovative productions and premieres of both French operas and Twentieth Century operas have been staged. Two significant French artists who have been associated with the Opéra in recent years are the stage director, Laurent Pelly, and the soprano, Natalie Dessay. Past principal conductors at the company have included André Cluytens, John Eliot Gardiner, Kent Nagano, Louis Langrée, and Iván Fischer. Since 2008, the principal conductor is Kazushi Ono, with an initial contract of 5 years. The associated Lyon Opera Ballet
    6.50
    4 votes
    54

    BBC Concert Orchestra

    The BBC Concert Orchestra is a British orchestra based in London, one of the British Broadcasting Corporation's five radio orchestras. With around fifty players, it is the only one of the five which is not a full-scale symphony orchestra. The parent ensemble of the orchestra was the BBC Theatre Orchestra, which was formed in 1931 and based in Bedford. The orchestra also did opera work and was occasionally billed as the BBC Opera Orchestra. In August 1949, the ensemble was formally renamed the BBC Opera orchestra. In January 1952, the BBC Opera Orchestra was disbanded and the BBC Concert Orchestra was formed from players formerly from the BBC Opera Orchestra. The BBC Concert Orchestra is the BBC's most populist ensemble, playing a mixture of classical music, light music and popular numbers. Its primary role is to produce music for radio broadcast, and it is the resident orchestra of the world's longest running live music programme, Friday Night is Music Night on BBC Radio 2. Until 1972, the orchestra was based at the Camden Theatre. From 1972 to 2004, the orchestra performed regularly at the Golders Green Hippodrome. It also appears regularly at the Royal Festival Hall and The Proms
    9.00
    2 votes
    55
    Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

    Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra was formed in 1882 and is Russia's oldest symphony orchestra. It was initially known as the "Imperial Music Choir" and performed privately for the court of Alexander III of Russia. By the 1900s it had started to give public performances at the Philharmonia and elsewhere. Richard Strauss conducted the orchestra in 1912. After the Russian Revolution the orchestra was taken over by its members, who changed the name to the "State Philharmonic Orchestra of Petrograd". In the 1920s the orchestra began receiving support from the state, and began to be known internationally as an excellent orchestra. Guest conductor appearances were made by Bruno Walter, Ernest Ansermet and Hans Knappertsbusch at this time. Around this time the orchestra was renamed the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra. The orchestra gained its most fame under the lengthy directorship of Evgeny Mravinsky. The orchestra made few tours to the West, but the orchestra recorded a number of studio and live recordings under Mravinsky. Furthermore, it was under Mravinsky that the orchestra premiered seven of Shostakovich's symphonies. In 1991 the orchestra gained its current name after
    9.00
    2 votes
    56

    San Francisco Symphony

    The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) is an orchestra based in San Francisco, California. Since 1980, the orchestra has performed at the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. The San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra and the San Francisco Symphony Chorus are part of the organization. Its current music director is Michael Tilson Thomas, who has held the position since September 1995. The orchestra has long been an integral part of city life and culture in San Francisco. Its first concerts were led by conductor composer Henry Hadley, who led the Seattle Symphony Orchestra from 1909 to 1911. There were sixty musicians in the orchestra at the beginning of their first season. The first concert included music by Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Haydn, and Liszt. There were thirteen concerts in the 1911-1912 season, five of which were popular music. Hadley was followed in 1915 by Alfred Hertz, who had conducted for many years at the Metropolitan Opera and had appeared with the company during their historic performances in San Francisco in April 1906, just prior to the earthquake and fire. Hertz helped to refine the orchestra and convinced the Victor Talking Machine Company to record it at their new studio in
    9.00
    2 votes
    57

    Windsor Symphony Orchestra

    The Windsor Symphony Orchestra is a Canadian orchestra located in Windsor, Ontario. It was founded in 1941, originally as the Windsor Concert Orchestra. The name was changed to The Windsor Symphony in 1948. The first conductor was Matti Holli, who remained with the orchestra until his death in 1977. From 1977 to 1979 Clifford Evens served as interim conductor and artistic adviser. Laszlo Gati was music director from 1979 to 1985 and is credited with raising the level of the orchestra and consolidating community support. The most recent Canadian conductor to be appointed music director was Dwight Bennett in 1986. Under Bennett, the orchestra became fully professional but also ran into financial difficulties through unrealized revenue projections and a musician's strike in 1988. He was succeeded by American conductor Susan Haig in 1991. Music director from 2001 to 2012 was American conductor John Morris Russell. During his tenure the orchestra received several awards including two Ontario Lieutenant Governor's awards for the arts. He conducted his last concert as music director on May 12, 2012. Eight candidates have been invited to audition for the position of music director in the
    9.00
    2 votes
    58

    Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

    The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is an English orchestra with a remit to serve the South and South West of England. Founded in 1893, the BSO has developed a reputation as one of the UK's major orchestras and has worked with many of the world's leading composers, conductors and performers. Originally based in Bournemouth, the BSO moved its offices to the adjacent town of Poole in 1979. The Orchestra has worked with an esteemed array of Principal Conductors including Sir Dan Godfrey, Rudolf Schwarz, Constantin Silvestri, Paavo Berglund, Andrew Litton and Marin Alsop, with Kirill Karabits the current incumbent. It is resident at The Lighthouse, Poole, with other major concert series given at Portsmouth Guildhall, the Great Hall of Exeter University and Colston Hall in Bristol. Shorter series are also given in Bournemouth (Pavilion Theatre) and Basingstoke. The Bournemouth Municipal Orchestra was founded in 1893 by Dan Godfrey as a group of 30 wind players and a drummer, though several of the instrumentalists - as is the current practice with military musicians - were proficient in both wind and string instruments. This flexible approach meant that the musicians could form a
    6.25
    4 votes
    59
    São Paulo State Symphony

    São Paulo State Symphony

    Orquestra Sinfônica do Estado de São Paulo (OSESP) (São Paulo State Symphony) is a symphony orchestra based in São Paulo, Brazil. With more than 130 concerts during its annual season, it is one of the largest and best known orchestras in South America. With broad-based programming, juxtaposing the great works of international classical music with world premieres and pieces by Brazilian composers, OSESP brings to Brazil some of the major current soloists and conductors, such as Kurt Masur, Gennady Rozhdestvensky, Osmo Vänskä, and Marin Alsop, singers such as Barbara Hendricks, Nathalie Stutzmann and Sergei Leiferkus, pianists Stephen Kovacevich, Maria João Pires, Paul Lewis and Nelson Freire, flutist Emmanuel Pahud, cellist Antonio Meneses, and violinists Pinchas Zukerman, Leila Josefowicz and Leonidas Kavakos, among the more than 60 visiting artists each year. Founded by João de Sousa Lima in 1954, OSESP alternated between periods of success and great difficulty, including a hiatus in its activities. After Italian conductor, Bruno Roccela’s stay, the group was under the command of Eleazar de Carvalho for 24 years, until his death in 1996. Under the direction of John Neschling from
    6.25
    4 votes
    60

    Chicago Symphony Chorus

    The history of the Chicago Symphony Chorus began on September 22, 1957, when the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) announced that Margaret Hillis would organize and train a symphony chorus. Music Director Fritz Reiner’s original intent was to utilize the Chorus for the two weeks of subscription concerts that season, performing — George Frideric Handel’s Messiah in December and Giuseppe Verdi’s Requiem in April. When Bruno Walter informed the Orchestra’s management that his March 1958 appearances would be his last in Chicago the board president Eric Oldberg insisted that Walter conduct Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Requiem utilizing the new Chorus. During that first season, it would have been logistically impossible for Hillis to audition and prepare a new Chorus for three major works within less than four months. As an interim fix the Apollo Chorus of Chicago was used for the Christmas Messiah concerts. The Chicago Symphony Chorus gave its informal debut at a private concert for donors on November 30, 1957. Reiner conducted the first half of the concert and Hillis took the podium for the second half — becoming the first woman to conduct the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. She led the
    7.33
    3 votes
    62

    Munich Radio Orchestra

    The Munich Radio Orchestra (German: Münchner Rundfunkorchester) is a German symphony orchestra based in Munich. It is one of the two orchestras affiliated with the Bavarian Radio (Bayerischer Rundfunk), the other being the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. A precursor ensemble to the Munich Radio Orchestra was established in the 1920s. The current Munich Radio Orchestra was formalised in 1952, with Werner Schmidt-Boelke as its first chief conductor. The orchestra's focus has historically been on light music, with particular emphasis in its early years as an orchestra for operettas. The orchestra was also historically known for its Sunday concerts. From the chief conductorship of Lamberto Gardelli (1982-1985) onwards, the orchestra expanded its repertoire into opera, specifically Italian opera. This work continued under the orchestra's next 3 chief conductors, all Italians, Giuseppe Patanè (1988–1989), Roberto Abbado (1992–1998), and Marcello Viotti (1998–2005). This activity extended to commercial recordings of operas and opera excerpts with the orchestra's chief conductors. The orchestra faced budget constraints and the threat of dissolution by Bavarian Radio in 2004. In protest
    7.33
    3 votes
    64
    Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra

    Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra

    The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Its primary concert venue is Music Hall. In addition to its symphony concerts, the orchestra gives ‘pops’ concerts as the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra. The Cincinnati Symphony is the resident orchestra for the Cincinnati May Festival, the Cincinnati Opera, and the Cincinnati Ballet. Several orchestras had existed in Cincinnati between 1825 and 1872. The immediate precursor ensemble to the current orchestra was the Cincinnati Orchestra, founded in 1872. In 1893, Helen Herron (later Helen Herron Taft) founded the Cincinnati Orchestra Association, and the name of the orchestra was formalised to the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra gave its first concerts in 1895 at Pike's Opera House. A year later, the orchestra moved to Music Hall. Its first conductor was Frank Van der Stucken, a Texas-born musician of Flemish ancestry, who served until 1907. In the early years, the orchestra welcomed such composers as Richard Strauss and Edward McDowell. The orchestra also performed the U.S. premiere of the Symphony No. 5 of Gustav Mahler. For three years, the orchestra was disbanded
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    1 votes
    65

    Das Zürcher Kammerorchester

    The Zurich Chamber Orchestra (Zürcher Kammerorchester; ZKO, German abbreviation) is a Swiss chamber orchestra based in Zurich. The ZKO's principal concert venue in Zurich is the Tonhalle. The ZKO also performs in Zurich at the Rietberg Museum, the ZKO-Haus in the Seefeld quarter of the city, and such churches as the Fraumünster and the Kirche St. Peter. The ZKO presents approximately 40 performances in Zurich each year, in addition to performances elsewhere in Switzerland and abroad. The core of the ZKO consists of 22 string players, with other sections (woodwinds, strings, brass, harp, percussion, and keyboard) used as needed. Edmond de Stoutz founded the ZKO in the aftermath of World War II, and led its first concerts in 1945. He served as artistic leader and principal conductor of the ZKO until 1996. He commissioned many works, including Frank Martin's Polyptyque for violin and two small string orchestras (1973) or Peter Mieg's Concerto for oboe and orchestra (1957). In 1996, Howard Griffiths assumed the post of artistic director and served until 2006. Muhai Tang, the ZKO's third principal conductor and artistic director from 2006 through 2011. now has the title of principal
    10.00
    1 votes
    66

    Japan Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Japan Philharmonic Orchestra (日本フィルハーモニー交響楽団, Nihon Firuhāmonī Kōkyō Gakudan), is an orchestra based in Tokyo, Japan. The Japan Philharmonic Orchestra was founded on June 22, 1956, as the exclusive subsidiary orchestra under the Nippon Cultural Broadcasting. Akeo Watanabe served the first Chief (Resident) conductor of the orchestra. In 1958, Jean Fournet conducted "Pelléas et Mélisande" of Debussy, it was the premiere performance in Japan. Japan Philharmonic made a subsidiary contract with Fuji Television in 1959. Between 1961 to 1989, regular concerts were held in Tokyo Bunka Kaikan hall, in Tokyo. Akeo Watanabe completed his recordings of Jean Sibelius symphonies in 1962, which were released from Nippon Columbia Company (now Columbia Music Entertainment). Charles Munch conducted the symphony No. 9 of Ludwig Van Beethoven in 1962. Japan Philharmonic undertook its first overseas tour of the USA and Canada in 1963. Since then the orchestra has toured Europe (4 times), the Netherlands, Estonia, and Hawaii. In March 1972, Nippon Cultural Broadcasting and Fuji Television subsidiary contracts broke away, the orchestra foundation was dissolved. Seiji Ozawa was the principal conductor
    10.00
    1 votes
    67

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    The Philharmonia Orchestra is one of the leading orchestras in Great Britain, based in London. Since 1995, it has been based in the Royal Festival Hall. In Britain it is also the resident orchestra at De Montfort Hall, Leicester and the Corn Exchange, Bedford, as well as The Anvil, Basingstoke. In addition to its concerts in the UK, the Philharmonia undertakes substantial touring activity worldwide. Esa-Pekka Salonen is the orchestra's principal conductor and artistic advisor. The orchestra was founded in 1945 by Walter Legge. As Legge was a recording producer for EMI it was widely believed that the orchestra was primarily formed for recording purposes, but that was not Legge's intention. He had been Sir Thomas Beecham's assistant at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, before World War II, and, assuming that he and Beecham would be in charge there again after the war, Legge planned to establish a first-class orchestra for opera, concerts and recordings. After the war, opera resumed at Covent Garden under a different management, but Legge went ahead with his plans for a new orchestra. His contacts in the musical world during the war enabled him to secure the services of a large
    10.00
    1 votes
    68

    The California E.A.R. Unit

    The California EAR Unit is an American chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of contemporary classical music. The group was founded in March 1981 and is based in Los Angeles, California. The original members of the EAR Unit were Dorothy Stone (flute); James Rohrig (clarinet); Amy Knoles and Daniel Kennedy (percussion); Gaylord Mowrey and Michael McCandless (piano); Robin Lorentz and Mary Terranova (violin); Erika Duke (cello); and Rand Steiger (conductor). By 1983 Terranova, Kennedy and McCandless had departed, and Arthur Jarvinen (percussion) and Lorna Eder (piano) joined. After many years with the same personnel, changes began to occur and one by one original members departed and new performers joined the group. Amy Knoles is the only remaining original member, along with long time pianist Vicki Ray, and violinist Eric KM Clark. The EAR Unit was formed at the California Institute of the Arts in 1981 by a group of students who had all been performing in the CalArts 20th-Century Players under the direction of Stephen "Lucky" Mosko. Inspired by their experiences with Mosko, and aware that Los Angeles at the time did not have a resident contemporary music ensemble, Steiger
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Dallas Symphony Orchestra

    Dallas Symphony Orchestra

    The Dallas Symphony Orchestra (DSO) is an American orchestra. It performs its concerts in the Meyerson Symphony Center in the Arts District of downtown Dallas, Texas, United States. The orchestra traces its origins to a concert given by a group of forty musicians in 1900 with conductor Hans Kreissig. It continued to perform and grow in numbers and stature, so that in 1945 it was in a position to appoint Antal Doráti as music director. Under Doráti, the orchestra became fully professional. Several times during the history of the orchestra it has suspended operations, including periods during the First and Second World Wars from 1914 to 1918 and from 1942 to 1945, and more recently in 1974 due to fiscal restraints. Subsequent music directors have included Georg Solti and Eduardo Mata. Andrew Litton was music director from 1992 to 2006. In 2007, Jaap van Zweden was named the DSO's 15th music director, to begin full-time with the 2008-2009 season, with an initial contract of 4 years. In October 2009, the orchestra announced the extension of van Zweden's contract through the 2015-2016 season. The 2005 recording of the four Rachmaninoff piano concerti and the Rhapsody on a Theme of
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    2 votes
    71
    Ural Philharmonic Orchestra

    Ural Philharmonic Orchestra

    Ural Philharmonic Orchestra (UPO, in Russian Уральский академический филармонический оркестр, УАФО) is a full orchestra based in Yekaterinburg (former Sverdlovsk, Russia) and considered to be one of the leading orchestras in Russia. One of the oldest Russian orchestras, the Ural Philharmonic was founded in 1936, but it was hidden for the rest of the world until 1991 when it became well known in many countries. It was formed by Mark Paverman, famous Russian conductor, in 1936 as the Orchestra of the Sverdlovsk Radio. The most prominent musicians of the Soviet Union – conductors, soloists and composers – worked with the Orchestra. In 1992 it received the new name - 'Ural Philharmonic Orchestra'. In 1995 it was given an "academic" title (this title is conferred to the best theater companies and orchestras of Russia). So its full name is the Ural Academic Philharmonic Orchestra. The orchestra uniting a hundred of musicians is famous for its interpretations of classical as well as modern music. It gives 100 concerts every year. The UPO is the main resident orchestra of all the musical festivals of the Sverdlovsk State Philarmony. In 2000-s the UPO gave some dozens of concerts in
    8.50
    2 votes
    72
    Minnesota Orchestra

    Minnesota Orchestra

    The Minnesota Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Emil Oberhoffer founded the orchestra as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra in 1903, and it gave its first performance on November 5 of that year. In 1968 the orchestra changed to its name to the Minnesota Orchestra. It makes its home in downtown Minneapolis at Orchestra Hall, which was built for the ensemble in 1974. The orchestra's previous hall, starting in 1929, was Northrop Memorial Auditorium on the University of Minnesota's Minneapolis campus. Since the 2003-04 season the orchestra's music director has been Osmo Vänskä. Under Vanska's direction, the orchestra has garnered significant critical praise, including a 2010 description from The New Yorker's Alex Ross as sounding like "the greatest orchestra in the world." Emil Oberhoffer was the orchestra's principal conductor until 1922. He was followed by Bruno Walter (chief guest conductor 1922–23); Henri Verbrugghen (1923–31); Eugene Ormandy (1931–36); Dimitri Mitropoulos (1937–49); Antal Doráti (1949–60); Stanisław Skrowaczewski (1960–79); Neville Marriner (1979–86); Edo de Waart (1986–95); and Eiji Oue (1995–2002). In 2002, Finnish conductor
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    4 votes
    73

    WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln

    The WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne (WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln) is a German orchestra based in Cologne. The orchestra was founded in 1947 by Allied occupation authorities after World War II, as the orchestra of Nordwestdeutschen Rundfunk (NWDR; Northwest German Radio). The orchestra later acquired the names of the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra and the WDR Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra is particularly known for its performances of 20th-century and contemporary music. It has commissioned and premiered works from such composers as Luciano Berio, Hans Werner Henze, Mauricio Kagel, Krzysztof Penderecki, Karlheinz Stockhausen and Bernd Alois Zimmermann. The orchestra's current principal conductor is Jukka-Pekka Saraste, as of the 2010-2011 season. The orchestra has recorded commercially for such labels as Avie, Hänssler, Kairos and CPO.
    6.00
    4 votes
    74

    Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra

    The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra is a major American orchestra based in Indianapolis, Indiana. Annually, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra performs 200 concerts for over 350,000 people. It is the largest performing arts organization in Indiana. The ISO is currently one of only 18 American orchestras that perform year round. It also has a discography of 36 recordings. Since 1982, a popular summer series is the Marsh Symphony on the Prairie, performed at Conner Prairie in Fishers. It has drawn a record 13,000 attendees for the Patriotic Pops night. The ISO's home theatre is the Hilbert Circle Theatre in Downtown Indianapolis on Monument Circle. Previous locations included Clowes Hall on the campus of Butler University and Caleb Mills Hall. The Circle Theatre, a former "movie palace", was renovated and enlarged for the Symphony and re-opened October 12, 1984. An annual holiday performance begun in December 1986 is the Duke Energy Yuletide Celebration, hosted in recent years by Sandi Patty and Daniel Rodriguez, among others. In 2009 the ISO announced its first-ever ensemble-in-residence Time for Three. The Orchestra was founded in 1930 by Ferdinand Schaefer, a local violin
    7.00
    3 votes
    75
    National Symphony Orchestra

    National Symphony Orchestra

    The National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), founded in 1931, is an American symphony orchestra that performs at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. For the first period of its history, the orchestra performed in Constitution Hall. During the tenure of the first music director, Hans Kindler, the musicians received a salary of US$40.00 per week, for three rehearsals and one concert, for five months of the year. Kindler and the orchestra made several 78-rpm recordings for RCA Victor, including the two Roumanian Rhapsodies by George Enescu; much later, in 1960, the orchestra would perform the first of these works under the baton of the visiting Romanian conductor George Georgescu, a close associate and favored exponent of the composer. One of the more unusual RCA recordings with the orchestra was of the complete ballet music from the opera King Henry VIII by Camille Saint-Saëns, one of the very few recordings conducted by Walter Damrosch. Years later, Howard Mitchell made a series of stereophonic recordings with the orchestra for RCA. Antal Doráti recorded with the orchestra for Decca Records. Mstislav Rostropovich made recordings for Teldec, Sony Records,
    7.00
    3 votes
    77
    Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

    Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, founded in 1948, is one of the oldest and most famous orchestras in South Korea. Its first foreign tour came on a 1965 trip to Japan, followed by performances in Southeast Asia in 1977, the United States in 1982, 1986 and 1996, a 1988 tour of Europe before the Seoul Olympics that year, and a 1997 performance in Beijing. The Philharmonic is an incorporated foundation since 2005. Its current music director is Myung-Whun Chung. The Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra (SPO), which was founded in January 1948, has a longer history than any other Korean orchestra. In February 1948, the orchestra held its opening concert, conducted by Maestro Seong-Tae Kim. In October of the same year, the Seoul Philharmonic Society was formed to provide support for the orchestra. The society published the music monthly Philharmony in the following year. After a subscription concert in the Seoul Civic Hall on June 25, 1950, the orchestra had to suspend its activities due to the outbreak of the Korean War, but resumed performance with the name of the Naval Symphony Orchestra, just five months later, to soothe the broken hearts of Koreans during the war. In August 1957, the Seoul
    5.00
    5 votes
    78

    Buffalo Philharmonic

    The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra is an American symphony orchestra located in Buffalo, New York. Its primary performing venue is Kleinhans Music Hall, which is a National Historic Landmark. Its regular concert season features gala concerts, classics programming of core repertoire, Pops concerts, educational Youth Concerts and family concerts. During the summer months, the Orchestra performs at many parks and outdoor venues across Western New York, with Classics, Pops, opera and ballet offerings at Artpark on the Niagara Gorge in Lewiston, New York. Cameron Baird, Frederick Slee, and Samuel Capen founded the orchestra in 1934. (Baird's and Slee's names now grace the two buildings which house the music department at the University at Buffalo, while the university's main administration building is named after Capen.) The BPO first performed during the 1935–1936 season under music director Lajos Shuk, and moved to Kleinhans when it opened in 1947. Past music directors have included William Steinberg, Josef Krips, Lukas Foss, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Semyon Bychkov. During Foss's tenure, the BPO was considered the world leader in performance of 20th century symphonic music. The
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    2 votes
    79
    Chicago Symphony Orchestra

    Chicago Symphony Orchestra

    The Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO) is an American orchestra based in Chicago, Illinois. It is one of the five American orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five". Founded in 1891, the Symphony makes its home at Orchestra Hall in Chicago and plays a summer season at the Ravinia Festival. The music director is Riccardo Muti, who began his tenure in 2010. In 1891 Charles Norman Fay, a Chicago businessman, invited Theodore Thomas to establish an orchestra in Chicago. Conducted by Theodore Thomas under the name "Chicago Orchestra", the Orchestra played its first concert on October 16, 1891 at the Auditorium Theatre. It is one of the oldest orchestras in the United States, along with the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra. Orchestra Hall, now a component of the Symphony Center complex, was designed by Chicago architect Daniel H. Burnham and completed in 1904. Maestro Thomas served as music director for thirteen years until his death shortly after the orchestra's newly built residence was dedicated on December 14, 1904. The orchestra was renamed "Theodore Thomas Orchestra" in 1905 and today, Orchestra Hall still has
    8.00
    2 votes
    81

    NBC Symphony Orchestra

    The NBC Symphony Orchestra was a radio orchestra established by David Sarnoff of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) especially for conductor Arturo Toscanini. The NBC Symphony performed weekly radio concert broadcasts with Toscanini and other conductors and served as house orchestra for the network, beginning November 13, 1937 and continuing until 1954. Tom Lewis, in the Organization of American Historians Magazine of History, described NBC's plan for cultural programming and the origin of the NBC Symphony: Sarnoff devoted considerable resources to create an orchestra of the first rank for NBC. Artur Rodziński, a noted orchestra builder and musical task master in his own right, was engaged to mold and train the new orchestra especially for Toscanini. Prominent musicians from major orchestras around the country were recruited and the conductor Pierre Monteux was hired as well to work with the orchestra in its formative months. A new large broadcast studio was built for the orchestra at NBC's Radio City Studios in Rockefeller Center, New York, "Studio 8-H". In addition to creating prestige for the network, there has been speculation that one of the reasons NBC created the
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    2 votes
    82

    Northern Sinfonia

    Northern Sinfonia is a British orchestra, based initially in Newcastle upon Tyne, and now in Gateshead. For the first 46 years of its history, the orchestra gave the bulk of its concerts at the City Hall, Newcastle upon Tyne. Since 2004, the orchestra has been resident at The Sage Gateshead. Northern Sinfonia Chorus is affiliated with the orchestra. Michael Hall founded the ensemble in 1958 as the first permanent chamber orchestra in Britain. The ensemble gave its first concert on 24 September 1958 as the 'Sinfonia Orchestra', at the City Hall, Newcastle upon Tyne, and gave 6 concerts in its first season, 1958-1959. Hall acted as the organisation's single leader, in effect as "general manager, secretary, artistic director, conductor, and fund-raiser", though without a formal title. The word "Northern" was added to the orchestra's name in 1959. The orchestra became an established institution in 1959, with Humphrey Noble chosen as the first chairman of the ensemble's management committee. Hall resigned from the orchestra in 1964, but returned as a guest conductor in subsequent years. After Hall's departure, Rudolf Schwarz and Boris Brott took over musical leadership of the ensemble
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    2 votes
    83

    Orchestre Métropolitain

    The Orchestre Métropolitain (OM) is a Canadian orchestra based in Montreal, Quebec. The OM primarily gives its concerts in the Montreal Symphony House at Place des Arts, and also performs at Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier and Théâtre Maisonneuve. Outside of the Montreal city centre, the OM also gives concerts in Saint-Laurent, Outremont, Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Rivière-des-Prairies–Pointe-aux-Trembles, Saint-Léonard, Verdun, Ahuntsic, Pierrefonds-Roxboro, and Pointe-Claire. The roots of the orchestra date to 1980, when the ensemble Les Variations became the official orchestra for the Concerts Lachine series. The ensemble consisted of young music graduates from Montreal conservatories. In 1981, Les Variations changed its name to the Orchestre Métropolitain du Grand Montréal, with Robert Savoie as its first chairman (until 1985) and Hun Bang as its first executive director (until 1987). The orchestra's first music director was Marc Bélanger, from 1981 to 1986. Bélanger also served as artistic director from 1986 to 1987. The orchestra gave occasional concerts for its first few years, and staged its first regular season of concerts in 1985. The orchestra compressed its official name to the
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    2 votes
    84
    8.00
    2 votes
    85

    Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra (東京フィルハーモニー交響楽団, Tōkyō Firuhāmonī Kōkyō Gakudan) claims to be the oldest classical orchestra in Japan, having been founded in Nagoya in 1911. It moved to Tokyo in 1938 and has some 166 members as of 2005. The orchestra plays at Orchard Hall, part of the Bunkamura (文化村) shopping and entertainment complex in Shibuya, Tokyo.
    5.75
    4 votes
    86
    Boston Pops Orchestra

    Boston Pops Orchestra

    The Boston Pops Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts that specializes in playing light classical and popular music. The Boston Pops was founded in 1885 as a second, popular identity of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO), founded four years earlier. Consisting primarily of musicians from the BSO, although generally not the first-chair players, the orchestra performs a Spring season of popular music and a holiday program in December, the BSO schedule on break at those times. For the Pops, the seating on the floor of Symphony Hall is reconfigured from auditorium seating to banquet/cafe seating. In addition the Pops also plays an annual concert at the Hatch Shell on the Esplanade every Fourth of July. Identified with its long-time director Arthur Fiedler, in the past the orchestra has recorded extensively, made frequent tours, and appeared regularly on television. The Pops Spring and Holiday seasons allowed the BSO to become one of the first American orchestras to provide year-round employment for its musicians. The current Music Director of the Boston Pops Orchestra is Keith Lockhart. In 1881, Henry Lee Higginson, the founder of the Boston Symphony
    6.67
    3 votes
    87

    Honolulu Symphony

    The Hawaii Symphony Orchestra, formerly known as the Honolulu Symphony Orchestra, was founded in 1900. The symphony is the oldest orchestra in the USA west of the Rocky Mountains. Originally housed in a clubhouse on the slopes of Punchbowl, the Honolulu Symphony now plays from the Neal S. Blaisdell Concert Hall in downtown Honolulu. The Symphony has undergone a series of transformations over the course of its first century, responding to the challenges and opportunities of the times. It has endured two World Wars, the Great Depression, financial crises, and changing musical and cultural fashions. In 2010, facing a multimillion dollar deficit, the symphony disbanded under chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy law, but was quickly revived the next year under the new name "Hawaii Symphony Orchestra" by a group of Honolulu businessmen. JoAnn Falletta was appointed artistic director, and Steven Monder, former director of the Cincinnati Symphony, was appointed president. From 1996 to 2004, the Honolulu Symphony was under the direction of conductor Samuel Wong. Previous music directors include Fritz Hart (1937–49), George Barati, Robert La Marchina, Donald Johanos (1979–94) and JoAnn Falletta.
    6.67
    3 votes
    88

    National Symphony Orchestra

    The National Symphony Orchestra (Mexico) (OSN) (Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional) is the most important classical music and symphonic ensemble in Mexico. With its origins traced back as 1881, it is the second oldest symphony orchestra in the American continent along with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. It performs regularly in the Grand Hall of the Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes) in Mexico City. Not to be confused with the Orquesta Sinfónica del Estado de México (OSEM) or Symphony Orchestra of the State of Mexico, founded in 1971, the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico, as a branch of the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, was created by presidential decree by Miguel Alemán on 18 July 1947, under the name of National Conservatory Symphony Orchestra. Before this, however, there was a predecessor orchestra known as the Symphony Orchestra of Mexico (September 2, 1928-March 8, 1949), a non profit organization founded and conducted by Mexican composer, conductor, teacher, journalist and visionary arts leader Carlos Chávez. On 1 August 1947 Chávez appointed Blas Galindo as the new director of the National Conservatory, official seat of the new orchestra. Chávez reports that
    6.67
    3 votes
    90

    Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

    The Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra (WSO) is a Canadian orchestra based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Its primary concert venue is the Centennial Concert Hall, and the orchestra also performs throughout the province of Manitoba. The WSO gives an average of 80 concerts per year. The WSO also provides orchestral accompaniment to the Royal Winnipeg Ballet and the Manitoba Opera. Established in 1947, the WSO played its first concert on December 16, 1948 in the Civic Auditorium. Walter Kaufmann was the WSO's first music director, from 1948 to 1958. Victor Feldbrill, the WSO's only Canadian Music Director to date, succeeded Kaufmann in 1958. The WSO initially performed out of the Civic Auditorium until April 1968, when the WSO moved to its present home in the 2,300-seat Centennial Concert Hall. In 1992, then-Music Director Bramwell Tovey and the WSO's Composer-in-Residence Glenn Buhr, along with others, created the WSO's New Music Festival. In the 2011-2012 season, the WSO began the 'Sistema Winnipeg' programme, modelled after Venezuela's El Sistema, to provide music education to disadvantaged children in Winnipeg. Andrey Boreyko was the WSO's music director from 2001 to 2006. During his tenure,
    6.67
    3 votes
    91

    BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

    The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra (BBC SSO) is a broadcasting symphony orchestra based in Glasgow, Scotland. One of five full-time orchestras maintained by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), it is the oldest full-time professional orchestra in Scotland. The BBC SSO takes live music to towns and cities across Scotland every season, performs around Europe, and in recent years has toured in China, the USA and South America. It appears annually in Britain's most prestigious events including the BBC Proms and Edinburgh International Festival, and performs at such festivals as the Cheltenham, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and the St.Magnus Festival in Orkney. Broadcasting is still its primary duty, and all of its performances can be heard on the BBC’s radio and television services. The BBC opened its Edinburgh studio in 1930, and decided to form its own full-time Scottish orchestra to complement BBC orchestras already established in London, Manchester and Wales. The BBC Scottish Orchestra was established as Scotland's first full-time orchestra on 1 December 1935 by the BBC's first head of music in Scotland, composer and conductor Ian Whyte. In 1938, the orchestra
    9.00
    1 votes
    92
    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

    The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Dutch: Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest, pronounced [ˌkɔnɪnklək kɔnˈsɛrtɣəbʌu̯ɔrˌkɛst]) is a symphony orchestra of the Netherlands, based at the Concertgebouw (concert hall) in Amsterdam. In 1988, Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands conferred the "Royal" title upon the orchestra. In December 2008, a group of international critics invited by Gramophone ranked the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra as the best symphony orchestra in the world. The Concertgebouw opened on 11 April 1888. The Concertgebouw Orchestra, however, was not founded until a little later. It gave its first concert in the Concertgebouw on 3 November 1888 under the principal conductor for its first seven years, Willem Kes. In 1895, Willem Mengelberg became chief conductor and remained in this position with the organization for fifty years, an unusually long tenure for a music director. He is generally regarded as having brought the orchestra to a level of major international significance, with a particular championing of such then-contemporary composers as Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss. For approximately its first 75 years, the Concertgebouw Orchestra had a somewhat complicated roster
    9.00
    1 votes
    93
    Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

    Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Society is a society based in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, that manages a professional symphony orchestra, a concert venue, and extensive learning programmes through music. The society is the second oldest of its type in the United Kingdom and its orchestra, the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, is the country's longest surviving professional orchestra. In addition to the orchestra, the society administers the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Choir and the Liverpool Philharmonic Youth Orchestra, as well as other choirs and ensembles. It is involved in educational and community projects in Liverpool and its surrounding region. The society and its members have been successful in winning a number of honours and awards and played an important role when Liverpool was the European Capital of Culture in 2008. It is based in the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall, an art deco concert hall built in the late 1930s. The society was established as the Liverpool Philharmonic Society on 10 January 1840 with the purpose of organising concerts of classical music. Its orchestra, then the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, is the oldest surviving professional symphony
    9.00
    1 votes
    94
    Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

    Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

    The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO) is a Canadian orchestra performing in Vancouver, British Columbia. Over 240,000 people attend its live performances each year. It was founded in 1930 and plays in 12 venues. Its home is the Orpheum theatre. With an annual operating budget of $9.5 million, it is the third largest symphony orchestra in Canada. It performs 140 concerts per season. The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO) was founded by the Vancouver Symphony Society in 1930, largely through the efforts of arts patron Elisabeth Rogers. Two previous un-related orchestras had operated under the name the "Vancouver Symphony Orchestra", the first of which was formed in 1897 by Adolf Gregory and lasted for only one season. The second VSO was formed in 1919 by conductor Henry Green and was led by F.L. Beecher (president) and Mrs B.T. Rogers (vice-president). That orchestra existed for two seasons before financial strains and the disappearance of Green forced the orchestra to cease activities in 1921. In addition to their regular concert schedule, the VSO also served as the Vancouver Opera company's orchestra during the 1960s and 1970s, until creation of the separate Vancouver Opera
    5.50
    4 votes
    95

    Bamberg Symphony Orchestra

    The Bamberg Symphony (German: Bamberger Symphoniker - Bayerische Staatsphilharmonie) is a German orchestra based in Bamberg and well known for its artistic excellence and frequent international touring. The orchestra was formed in 1946 mainly from German musicians expelled from Czechoslovakia under the Beneš decrees, who had previously been members of the German Philharmonic Orchestra of Prague. The orchestra received the title of Bayerische Staatsphilharmonie (Bavarian State Philharmonic) in 1993. The orchestra commemorated its 60th anniversary on 16 March 2006. Since 1993, the home of the orchestra is the Konzert- und Kongresshalle (Concert and Congress Hall), which has the nickname Sinfonie an der Regnitz (Symphony on the Regnitz). Concerts before 1993 were given at the Dominikanerbau. The orchestra receives financial support from the Free State of Bavaria, the city of Bamberg, Oberfranken district and the district of Bamberg. The government of Bavaria retired the orchestra's financial debts in 2003. Joseph Keilberth was the orchestra's first principal conductor. Other principal conductors have included Eugen Jochum, James Loughran and Horst Stein, both of whom also held the
    7.50
    2 votes
    96

    Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra

    The Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra is a community orchestra group in the New York City metropolitan area. Founded in 1973, the orchestra consists of a mix of amateur, semi-professional, and professional musicians who play concerts throughout the year at St. Ann and the Holy Trinity Church in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The BSO's Artistic Director is Nicholas Armstrong. Artistic Director Nicholas Armstrong has conducted throughout the United States and Europe, and in his native England, where he began his musical studies. Armstrong subsequently studied conducting at the Conservatorio Benedetto Marcello in Venice, where he was also a member of the Teatro La Fenice orchestra. He has worked with Pierre Boulez, Zubin Mehta, Norman Del Mar, Nino Rota, and Otto Werner Mueller. The Brooklyn Symphony Youth Orchestra was founded by the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra in September 2008. Kelly Howard, a former Concert Master of the BSO, conducts the youth orchestra. In February 2010, the Youth Orchestra notably performed with New York children's band Dan Zanes and Friends. As of the 2011-2012 season, the youth orchestra is no longer officially affiliated with the Brooklyn
    7.50
    2 votes
    97

    City of London Sinfonia

    The City of London Sinfonia (CLS) is an English chamber orchestra based in London. In London, the CLS performs regularly at Cadogan Hall and St Paul's Cathedral. It is also the resident orchestra at Opera Holland Park. The CLS has annual residencies in four towns in Southern England: Ipswich, King's Lynn, High Wycombe and Chatham. It records regularly and makes an overseas tour every year. The CLS performs chamber orchestra and ensemble repertoire from the Baroque period to the present day, and has a particular reputation for its programming focus on the human voice. Richard Hickox founded the CLS in 1971 and remained its music director and artistic director until his death in November 2008. Past principal guest conductors have included Marin Alsop and Douglas Boyd. In November 2009, the CLS announced the appointment of Stephen Layton as its second Artistic Director, effective with the 2010-2011 season, for an initial contract of 3 years. Layton is also to have the title of Principal Conductor. Simultaneously, the CLS announced the appointment of clarinetist Michael Collins also as Principal Conductor, effective in September 2010, for an initial period of 3 years. The CLS has won
    7.50
    2 votes
    98
    European Union Youth Orchestra

    European Union Youth Orchestra

    The European Union Youth Orchestra (EUYO) is a training orchestra for young people in the European Union. It is funded centrally by the European Union and by a number of EU member states. It brings together young musicians from the EU and professional instrumental coaches to form an orchestra composed of players from all 27 EU member states. The European Community Youth Orchestra (later to become the European Union Youth Orchestra) was founded in 1978 by Lionel and Joy Bryer, Chairman and Secretary General of the International Youth Foundation of Great Britain, with a view to creating an Orchestra which would represent the European ideal of a community working together to achieve peace and social understanding. At the same time it was also designed to provide a professional development experience for young orchestral musicians. The proposal for the creation of the Orchestra was first put to the Committee on Cultural Affairs and Youth of the European Parliament in 1974. As a result of an all-party effort, a resolution was adopted by the European Parliament by an overwhelming majority on 8 March 1976 during its plenary session. The European Commission officially confirmed the
    7.50
    2 votes
    99

    Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra

    The Göteborgs Symfoniker (Gothenburg Symphony, or Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra [GSO]) is an orchestra based in Gothenburg, Sweden. Founded in 1905, it was granted the title of the "National Orchestra of Sweden" in 1997. The GSO is resident at the Gothenburg Concert Hall, built in 1935. Although the GSO has a broad repertoire, it has a special affinity for the works of the Nordic Late Romantic composers, such as Jean Sibelius and Edvard Grieg, which has comprised the bulk of its recorded output, as well as Neeme Järvi's specialty, Prokofiev. During Järvi's 22 years as principal conductor, the orchestra's longest, its reputation on the world stage was greatly increased, including sponsorships from Volvo and a recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon. Järvi currently holds the title of Principal Conductor Emeritus (Chefdirigent Emeritus) with the GSO. The orchestra's most recent principal conductor was Gustavo Dudamel, from 2007 to 2012. Dudamel now has the title of hedersdirigent (honorary conductor) of the GSO. The orchestra's current principal guest conductor is Christian Zacharias. In August 2012, the GSO announced the appointment of Kent Nagano as its principal guest
    7.50
    2 votes
    100

    Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra

    Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester (Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra) is a youth orchestra based in Vienna, Austria, founded in 1986 by conductor Claudio Abbado. In 1992, the orchestra became the first pan-European youth orchestra to offer access to young musicians in former communist countries like Hungary and Czechoslovakia, by holding open auditions in the former Eastern Bloc. Since 1992 a jury authorized by Claudio Abbado makes its selection from the many candidates at auditions held in more than twenty-five European cities each year. At present there are more than 100 musicians in the orchestra and they come from various countries, including Germany, Austria, France, Hungary, Russia, Spain, Great Britain, Romania and Switzerland. The members of the jury are prominent orchestral players who continue to assist the orchestra with its musical program during the rehearsal period. The orchestra has a huge structure. More than 130 musicians went on their Easter Tour in 2005, enough to play Richard Strauss' Eine Alpensinfonie in its full orchestration The GMJO tour repertoire ranges from classical to contemporary music with the emphasis on the great symphonic works of the romantic and late
    7.50
    2 votes
    101

    Kansas City Symphony

    The Kansas City Symphony (KCS) is a United States symphony orchestra based in Kansas City, Missouri. The current music director is conductor Michael Stern. The previous home of the Symphony was the Lyric Theatre, located in Downtown Kansas City on 11th Street between Wyandotte and Central Streets. In September 2011, the Symphony moved to the new Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, also located downtown. Kansas City's first symphony orchestra was the Kansas City Symphony, formed in 1911 for Carl Busch. It ceased operations at the start of World War I, as many of the musicians were sent to War. Kansas City's second symphony orchestra was the Kansas City Philharmonic, founded in 1933 and dissolved in 1982. Only months later, seeing the necessity for a new symphony orchestra, businessman and philanthropist R. Crosby Kemper, Jr. founded the Kansas City Symphony. Kemper chose a group of other prominent Kansas Citians, including Hallmark Cards Chairman and CEO Donald J. Hall, Sr. and H&R Block co-founder Henry W. Bloch, to be the founding trustees; together, the first board established the Symphony's initial endowment. They also promulgated the Symphony's mission, to "advance and
    7.50
    2 votes
    102

    Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

    The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra (MSO) was founded in 1959 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Historically the MSO have performed in the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, and held seasons that last from early September that continue through the end of June. The MSO annually performs more than 150 Classics, Classical Connections, Pops, and family concerts for over 200,000 people per season. The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra serves as the orchestra for Florentine Opera productions, and also serves as the state orchestra through an extensive Wisconsin tour program. Outside Wisconsin, the Orchestra has made 12 appearances at Carnegie Hall, most recently at the 2012 Spring For Music Festival, and toured Cuba, Japan, Europe, and the Dominican Republic. The MSO has presented more than 100 world and American premieres of works by composers such as Philip Glass, Daron Hagen, Daniel Schnyder, Roberto Sierra, Gunther Schuller, William Schuman, Lukas Foss, Roy Harris, Gian Carlo Menotti, Richard Rodgers, Ottorino Respighi, Jean Sibelius, Erich Korngold and others. Over 22 compositions have been by MSO musicians. From September through June, Classics Series concerts are performed Friday through
    7.50
    2 votes
    104
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Vienna Philharmonic (in German: Wiener Philharmoniker), founded in 1842, is an orchestra, regularly considered one of the finest in the world. The VPO is based in the Musikverein in Vienna. The members of the orchestra are chosen from the Orchestra of the Vienna State Opera. This process is a long one, with each musician having to prove his or her capability for a minimum of three years' playing for the Opera and Ballet. Once this is achieved the musician can then ask the Board of the Wiener Philharmoniker to consider an application for a position in the Vienna Philharmonic. The orchestra can trace its origins to 1842, when Otto Nicolai formed the Philharmonische Academie; which was a fully independent orchestra and which took all its decisions by a democratic vote of all its members. These are principles the orchestra still holds today. With Nicolai's departure in 1847, the orchestra nearly folded, and was not very active until 1860, when Karl Anton Eckert joined as conductor. He gave a series of four subscription concerts, and since then, the orchestra has given concerts continuously. From 1875 to 1898 Hans Richter was subscription conductor, except for the season 1882/1883
    7.50
    2 votes
    105
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Česká filharmonie (Czech Philharmonic) is a renowned Czech symphony orchestra based in Prague. The orchestra's principal concert venue is the Rudolfinum. The name "Czech Philharmonic Orchestra" appeared for the first time in 1894, as the title of the orchestra of the Prague National Theatre. It played its first concert under its current name on January 4, 1896 when Antonín Dvořák conducted his own compositions, but it did not become fully independent from the opera until 1901. The first representative concert took place on October 15, 1901 conducted by Ludvík Čelanský, the first artistic director of the orchestra. In 1908, Gustav Mahler led the orchestra in the world premiere of his Symphony No. 7. The orchestra first became internationally known under the baton of Václav Talich, who was principal conductor from 1919 to 1931, and again from 1933 to 1941. In 1941 Talich together with Czech Philharmonic made a controversial journey to Germany, where they performed the cycle of symphonic poems My Country by Bedřich Smetana. The concert was enforced by the German offices. Subsequent chief conductors included Rafael Kubelík (1942–1948), Karel Ančerl (1950–1968), Václav Neumann
    6.33
    3 votes
    107
    Sydney Symphony Orchestra

    Sydney Symphony Orchestra

    The Sydney Symphony Orchestra (abbreviation – SSO), commonly known as the Sydney Symphony, is an Australian symphony orchestra based in Sydney. It has the unique privilege of having the Sydney Opera House as its home concert hall. The orchestra's current chief conductor is Vladimir Ashkenazy. His term will conclude in 2013, and David Robertson will succeed him from 2014. The Sydney Symphony is an icon of the Sydney cultural scene, performing around 150 concerts a year to a combined annual audience of more than 350,000. The regular subscription concert series are mostly performed at the Sydney Opera House but other venues around Sydney are used as well, including the City Recital Hall at Angel Place and the Sydney Town Hall. The Town Hall was the home of the orchestra until the opening of the Opera House in 1973. Since then, most concerts have been taking place in the Opera House's Concert Hall (capacity: 2,679 seats). A major annual event for the orchestra is Symphony in the Domain, a free evening outdoor picnic concert held in the summer month of January in the large city park known as The Domain. This event draws audiences of over 80,000 and is a long-established part of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    108

    The Icelandic Symphony Orchestra

    Sinfóníuhljómsveit Íslands (Iceland Symphony Orchestra) (ISO) is an orchestra based in Reykjavík, Iceland. The ISO is an autonomous public institution under the auspices of the Icelandic Ministry of Education. The Iceland Symphony Orchestra made its home in Háskólabíó (University Cinema) from 1961–2011, but moved into the new 1800-seat Harpa (Reykjavík Concert and Conference Center) in spring 2011. The orchestra gives approximately sixty concerts each season. Per a 1982 law, the ISO's primary financial sources are the Icelandic treasury (56%), RÚV (Icelandic National Broadcasting Service) (25%), and the City of Reykjavik (18%), with the remaining 1% coming from the township of Seltjarnarnes. Around 1925, a small orchestra of about 15 players, the Hljómsveit Reykjavíkur (Reykjavík City Orchestra), began to give concerts. Further institutional roots of the orchestra came with the foundation in 1930 of the RÚV and of the Reykjavík College of Music. The RÚV had a radio orchestra for several years. The ISO was formally founded in 1950, giving its first concert on 9 March 1950, with an ensemble of 39 players. Olav Kielland was the ISO's first chief conductor, from 1952 to 1955. The
    6.33
    3 votes
    109
    6.00
    3 votes
    110

    BBC Symphony Orchestra

    The BBC Symphony Orchestra (BBC SO) is a British radio orchestra based in London. Founded in 1930, it was the first permanent salaried orchestra in London, and is the only one of the city's five major symphony orchestras not to be self-governing. The BBC SO is the principal broadcast orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The orchestra was originally conceived as a joint enterprise by the BBC and the conductor Sir Thomas Beecham, but the latter withdrew, and the task of assembling and training the orchestra fell to the BBC's director of music, Adrian Boult. Among its guest conductors in its first years was Arturo Toscanini, who judged it the finest orchestra he had ever conducted. During the Second World War, Boult strove to maintain standards, but the senior management of the post-war BBC denied the orchestra the resources to meet competition from new and well-funded orchestras. From the 1950s to the 1970s the orchestra failed to regain its pre-war standing, but after initiatives begun by the BBC controller of music William Glock, performing standards began to rise. More recently, the orchestra has once again been regarded by critics as of first-class status.
    7.00
    2 votes
    111

    Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

    The Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra (Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin) is a symphony orchestra based in Berlin, Germany. In Berlin, the orchestra gives concerts at the Konzerthaus Berlin and at the Berliner Philharmonie. The orchestra has also given concerts in other German cities such as Aschaffenburg, Essen, Halle, Oldenburg, and Wiesbaden. The orchestra was founded in 1923 as a radio orchestra, and is the oldest active radio orchestra in Germany. Bruno Seidler-Winkler was the first chief conductor, from 1926 to 1932. During its early years, the orchestra had a reputation for its work with contemporary, 20th-century composers. Composers who guest-conducted the orchestra included Paul Hindemith, Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Sergei Prokofiev, Richard Strauss, Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky, as well as Krzysztof Penderecki, Walter Schartner and Udo Zimmermann. After the 1949 division of Germany, the orchestra was under the supervision of Rundfunk der DDR (DDR Radio). Since 2002, the orchestra's chief conductor is Marek Janowski. Janowski has a lifetime contract with the orchestra.
    7.00
    2 votes
    112

    Brno Philharmonic Orchestra

    Brno Philharmonic Orchestra (Czech: Filharmonie Brno) is an orchestra based in Brno, the Czech Republic. Its predecessor was the Czech Symphony Orchestra, dating from the 1870's. The current Brno Philharmonic was formed in 1956 with the merger of the Radio Orchestra and the Brno Region Symphony Orchestra, with Břetislav Bakala as the first principal conductor of the new orchestra. Since 2009, the orchestra's principal conductor is Aleksandar Marković.
    7.00
    2 votes
    113

    Lansing Symphony Orchestra

    The Lansing Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is an American symphony orchestra headquartered in Lansing, Michigan. It was founded in 1929 under the leadership of its first Music Director, Izler Solomon. Since 2006, the orchestra has been headed by Music Director Timothy Muffitt. The LSO presents a wide variety of orchestral programming throughout its seasons. The 2009/2010 Season - "Escape the Everyday" includes a six-concert classical MasterWorks Series, a three-concert Pops Series, a four-concert Chamber Series, two Big Band concerts, a Halloween Spooktacular Family Concert and a performance of Handel's Messiah. MasterWorks and Pops concerts are performed at the Wharton Center for the Performing Arts on the campus of Michigan State University. Chamber concerts are performed at Plymouth Congregational Church in Lansing. Big Band concerts are performed at Dart Auditorium on the campus of Lansing Community College.
    7.00
    2 votes
    114

    Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra of Moscow Radio

    The Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra of Moscow Radio is a Russian classical music orchestra established in 1930. Originally founded as the Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra, it served as the official symphony for the Soviet All-Union Radio network. Following the dissolution of the USSR in 1993, the orchestra was renamed by the Russian Ministry of Culture in recognition of the central role the music of Tchaikovsky plays in its repertoire. The current music director is Vladimir Fedoseyev, who has been in that position since 1974. During Soviet times, the orchestra was sometimes known as the USSR State Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra, the USSR State Radio Symphony Orchestra, or the Symphony Orchestra of All-Union Radio and Television.
    7.00
    2 votes
    115

    Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra

    The Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra,Tokyo (読売日本交響楽団, Yomiuri Nippon Kōkyō Gakudan) is a Japanese symphony orchestra administratively based in Tokyo. The orchestra primarily performs concerts in Tokyo at the Suntory Hall, but also gives concerts at the Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall. The orchestra also performs in Yokohama at the Yokohama Minato Mirai Hall. The orchestra was founded in 1962 by the Yomiuri Shimbun, Nippon Television, and the Yomiuri Telecasting Corporation. Its first principal conductor was the American conductor Willis Page, who served whilst on leave from the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. Hiroshi Wakasugi became the orchestra's first Japanese principal conductor in 1965. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, the orchestra's fourth principal conductor from 1980 to 1983, held the title of principal guest conductor with the orchestra from 1983 to 1990, and was named one of the orchestra's honorary conductors in 1990. Other conductors with the title of honorary conductor include Kurt Masur, since 1979, and Gennady Rozhdestvensky, since 1990. Tadaaki Otaka, the orchestra's sixth principal conductor from 1992 to 1998, now has the title of honorary guest conductor. Gerd Albrecht,
    7.00
    2 votes
    117

    American Composers Orchestra

    The American Composers Orchestra (ACO) is an American orchestra based in New York City. It is the only orchestra in the world dedicated solely to the creation, performance, preservation, and promulgation of music by American composers. Through its concerts at Carnegie Hall and other venues, recordings, radio broadcasts, educational programs, New Music Readings and commissions, ACO identifies today's brightest emerging composers, champions prominent established composers as well as those lesser-known, and increases regional, national and international awareness of the infinite variety of American orchestral music, reflecting geographic, stylistic, and temporal diversity. ACO also serves as an incubator of ideas, research and talent, as a catalyst for growth and change among orchestras, and as an advocate for American composers and their music. To date, ACO has performed music by 500 American composers, including more than 100 world premieres and newly commissioned works. The group was conceived in 1975 by Francis Thorne and Dennis Russell Davies, and gave its first performance in 1977. Among the honors ACO has received are special awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters
    8.00
    1 votes
    118

    BBC Philharmonic

    The BBC Philharmonic is a British broadcasting symphony orchestra and is one of five radio orchestras maintained by the British Broadcasting Corporation. Based at Media City UK, England, the orchestra's primary concert venue is the Bridgewater Hall, Manchester. The 2ZY Orchestra was formed in 1922 for a Manchester radio station of the same name. It gave the first broadcast performances of many famous English works, including Elgar's Dream of Gerontius and Enigma Variations and Holst's The Planets. The orchestra was part-funded by the British Broadcasting Company (precursor of the BBC), and renamed the Northern Wireless Orchestra in 1926. When the BBC Symphony Orchestra was established in London in 1930, the new Corporation cut its regional orchestras' funding. The Northern Wireless Orchestra was downsized to just 9 players, and renamed the Northern Studio Orchestra. Three years later, however, the BBC reversed its decision and maintained a full orchestra again - this time called the BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra. This was the beginning of the orchestra in its present form. The orchestra played at its first Prom in 1961, and enjoyed popularity with performances at the Free Trade
    8.00
    1 votes
    119

    Denver Symphony Orchestra

    The Denver Symphony Orchestra, established in 1934 and dissolved in 1989, was a professional American orchestra in Denver, Colorado. Until 1978, when the Boettcher Concert Hall was built to house the symphony orchestra, it performed in a succession of theaters, amphitheaters and auditoriums. It was the predecessor to the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, although the two ensembles were legally and structurally separate. A community ensemble called the Civic Symphony Orchestra had been formed in Denver in 1922. In 1934, the Civic Symphony Society formed the Denver Symphony as the city's first all-professional orchestra. Its first concert was offered on November 30, 1934 at Denver's Broadway Theatre. Its Tuesday-night concerts were usually performed in the Municipal Auditorium. Both the community and professional orchestras were maintained through the 1946-47 season. Conductor Horace Tureman led both until his 1944 retirement due to illness. In 1945, Saul Caston, who had been associate conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra under both Leopold Stokowski and Eugene Ormandy, became The Denver Symphony's Conductor and Music Director. Caston built the orchestra significantly during his
    8.00
    1 votes
    120
    London Philharmonic Orchestra

    London Philharmonic Orchestra

    The London Philharmonic Orchestra (LPO), based in London, is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. It was founded by Sir Thomas Beecham in 1932 when he was approached by the rising young conductor Malcolm Sargent with a proposal to set up a permanent, salaried orchestra. Originally envisioned as a reshuffled version of the London Symphony Orchestra, Beecham and Sargent formed the orchestra after the LSO balked at weeding out and replacing underperforming players. Since 1951, the LPO has been based in the Royal Festival Hall. In addition, the LPO is the main resident orchestra of the Glyndebourne Festival Opera. The LPO also performs concerts at the Congress Theatre, Eastbourne and the Brighton Dome. The LPO has made several video game and film soundtracks, of which the best known includes The Lord of the Rings film series. At the turn of the twentieth century there were no permanent salaried orchestras in London. The main orchestras were those of Covent Garden, the Philharmonic Society and the Queen's Hall; their proprietors engaged players individually for each concert or for a season. As there were competing demands for the services of the finest players it was an
    8.00
    1 votes
    121

    Nederlands Blazers Ensemble

    The Nederlands Blazers Ensemble (Netherlands Wind Ensemble, NBE) comprises musicians from all the major Dutch symphony orchestras. Playing together for the sheer joy of it, the NBE’s twenty or so members (winds, horns, percussion and double bass) meet up around fifty times per year to perform special programmes both in the Netherlands and abroad. The ensemble is famous for its high level of performance and its unique and adventurous programming. Categorisations such as ‘classical’ or ‘contemporary’ are too narrow for their programmes, but one element they all share is a sense of the theatrical. The NBE is regularly featured in special concert series at Amsterdam’s main venues: the Concertgebouw, Paradiso and the new Muziekgebouw aan 't IJ. The NBE also tours abroad, twice per season on average. Artistic leader of the ensemble is oboist Bart Schneemann. The ensemble was founded in 1959 by Thom de Klerk (1912-1966), principal bassoonist of the Concertgebouw Orchestra who had formed a student wind quintet at the Amsterdam Conservatory (Martine Bakker (flute), Edo de Waart (oboe), George Pieterson (clarinet), Joep Terwey (bassoon) and Jaap Verhaar (horn)), De Klerk wanted to expand the
    8.00
    1 votes
    122

    Orchestre de Paris

    The Orchestre de Paris (French pronunciation: [ɔʁkɛstʁ də paʁi]) is a French orchestra based in Paris. The orchestra performs most of its concerts at the Salle Pleyel. In 1967, following the dissolution of the Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, conductor Charles Munch was called on by the Minister of Culture, André Malraux, and his music director, Marcel Landowski to create a new orchestra in Paris. Soon after its creation, Munch died in 1968, and Herbert von Karajan was hired as an interim music advisor from 1969 to 1971. Successive music directors include Sir Georg Solti, Daniel Barenboim, and Semyon Bychkov. Christoph von Dohnányi served as artistic advisor from 1998-2000. During his tenure, Barenboim saw a need for a permanent chorus for the orchestra, and engaged the English chorus master Arthur Oldham to create the Chœur de l'Orchestre de Paris (Chorus of the Orchestre de Paris) in 1976. Oldham remained with the Chorus till his retirement in 2002. Since 2002, Didier Bouture and Geoffroy Jourdain share direction of the Chorus. Christoph Eschenbach was music director from 2000 to 2010. He conducted recordings of music of Luciano Berio, Marc-André Dalbavie,
    8.00
    1 votes
    123

    Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an American orchestra based in the city of Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Its primary concert venue is the Eastman Theatre at the Eastman School of Music. The RPO was founded in 1922 by industrialist and music-lover George Eastman, founder of Eastman Kodak Company. The Orchestra, which performs more than 150 concerts annually, is currently led by Music Director Arild Remmereit. Remmereit continues the traditions of such notable former music directors as Christopher Seaman, Eugene Goossens, José Iturbi, Erich Leinsdorf, David Zinman, and Mark Elder. The RPO has performed under the batons of such renowned guest conductors as Fritz Reiner, Leonard Bernstein, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Leopold Stokowski. Principal Pops Conductor Jeff Tyzik (1994–present) has earned a national reputation for excellence in pops programming during his tenure with the RPO. On September 15, 2010, the RPO named Norwegian conductor Arild Remmereit as the Orchestra's 11th Music Director. Maestro Remmereit began his tenure with the RPO in September 2011. His inaugural concert on September 30 and October 1, 2011 featured the music of Amy Beach, Johan Halvorsen,
    8.00
    1 votes
    124

    Singapore Symphony Orchestra

    The Singapore Symphony Orchestra is a 96 members professional symphony orchestra. Its main performing venue is the Esplanade Concert Hall in Singapore although it has also toured widely in Asia, Europe and the United States. The orchestra records under the BIS label and released the first recording of the complete cycle of Alexander Tcherepnin's six piano concertos and four symphonies. The SSO was first established in 1979 and its current Musical Director is Lan Shui. Its first Director and Resident Conductor, Choo Hoey, stepped down in 1997 and now holds the position of the SSO's Conductor Emeritus.
    8.00
    1 votes
    125
    8.00
    1 votes
    126
    Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

    Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

    The Academy of St Martin in the Fields (ASMF) is an English chamber orchestra, based in London. Sir Neville Marriner founded the ensemble as The Academy of St.-Martin-in-the-Fields in London as a small, conductorless string group. The original group numbered 11, all male. The ensemble's name comes from Trafalgar Square's St Martin-in-the-Fields church, where the orchestra gave its first concert on November 13, 1959. In 1988, the ASMF dropped the hyphens from its full name. The orchestra incorporated in February 1971 as "A.S.M. (Orchestra) Limited", with Marriner as chairman until 1992, when Malcolm Latchem succeeded Marriner. John Heley took on the post in 1994. Marriner holds the title of Life President with the ASMF. The initial performances as a string orchestra at St Martin-in-the-Fields' church played a key role in the revival of baroque performances in England. The orchestra has since expanded to include winds. It remains flexible in size, changing its make-up to suit its repertoire, which ranges from the Baroque to contemporary works. The orchestra presently has three sections: the main group, which is conducted by Marriner; a chamber ensemble, formed for performing a large
    5.67
    3 votes
    127

    Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra

    The Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra (Finnish: [Yleis]Radion sinfoniaorkesteri, Swedish: [Rund]Radions Symfoniorkester) is a Finnish orchestra based in Helsinki, and the orchestra of the Finnish Broadcasting Company (Yle). The orchestra primarily gives concerts at the Helsinki Music Centre. Primary funding comes from television licence fees from the Finnish population. The ensemble was founded in 1927 as the Radio Orchestra with ten musicians, with Erkki Linko as its first conductor. Though never holding the title of chief conductor, Linko remained affiliated with the orchestra until 1952. Toivo Haapanen became the orchestra's first chief conductor in 1929 and held the post until his death in 1950. The orchestra performed mainly studio concerts for the first portion of its history. Until World War II, the orchestra gave only 20 public concerts, with freelance musicians to bolster the ranks. After World War II, with the new Director General Hella Wuolijoki in place, the orchestra roster expanded to 50 musicians. In September 1947, the orchestra initiated a series of "Tuesday Concerts" at Helsinki Town Hall. The roster grew to 67 musicians by 1953. The orchestra's second chief
    5.67
    3 votes
    129

    Eesti Riiklik Sümfooniaorkester

    The Estonian National Symphony Orchestra (Estonian: Eesti Riiklik Sümfooniaorkester) is the leading orchestra in Estonia and is based in the capital Tallinn. Founded as the Estonian Radio Symphony Orchestra, it gave its first concert in a broadcast by Tallinn Radio on December 18, 1926. During the Soviet regime, in the 1950s, the orchestra became the first in the Soviet Union to perform the work of modernist composers such as Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, and Carl Orff, previously suppressed by Stalin's regime. Following the collapse of Soviet rule, the lifting of emigration restrictions, and the rebirth of independent Estonia in 1991, almost half of the Orchestra's players migrated to the West in search of better career opportunities. This exodus of talent plunged the Orchestra's fortunes into a depression. After the nadir of 1993, the Orchestra enjoyed a strong recovery under the leadership of conductor Arvo Volmer. Estonian National Opera concert hall has been the home of Estonian National Symphony Orchestra for two decades.
    6.50
    2 votes
    131

    Opera Company of Boston

    The Opera Company of Boston was an American opera company located in Boston, Massachusetts that was active from the late 1950s through the 1980s. The company was founded by American conductor Sarah Caldwell in 1958 under the name Boston Opera Group. At one time, the touring arm of the company was called Opera New England. Caldwell served as both director and conductor for most of the company's productions throughout its more than three decade long history. Under her leadership, the company presented a repertoire of more than 75 operas that came from a wide array of musical periods and styles, including a large number of works previously unheard in the United States, and a significant amount of contemporary operas. This commitment to innovative repertoire as well as Caldwell's brilliant stage direction garnered the company international acclaim and earned it a place among the world's leading opera companies during the 1970s and 1980s. After 32 consecutive opera seasons, the company was forced to close due to financial difficulties in 1990. In 1958, Sarah Caldwell and Linda Cabot Black, among others, started the Opera Company of Boston with just $5,000, beginning with a production of
    6.50
    2 votes
    132

    Orchestre Symphonique de Paris

    The Orchestra Symphonique de Paris (Symphonic Orchestra of Paris) was an orchestra active in Paris from 1928 to 1939. The orchestra was co-founded by Ernest Ansermet, Louis Fourestier and Alfred Cortot and gave its first concert on 19 October 1928 at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. The financial support for the orchestra came from wealthy sponsors such as Gustave Lyon, director of Pleyel, two banker Ménard brothers, and the Princess de Polignac. Members of the management board were Robert Lyon (general administrator), Charles Kiesgen (administrative secretary), André Schaeffner (artistic secretary) along with Henri Monnet and Jean Gehret. Financial difficulties forced the orchestra to become an association in mid 1931. The aim of the new orchestra was to present less-known works of major composers as well as contemporary music and the central concert repertoire, playing to a high standard. The standard of the orchestra was considered to be high, partly due to the number of rehearsals before each concert. Of the eighty musicians chosen (out of 600 auditioned) the majority were under 25. From 1929 Pierre Monteux was invited by Cortot to become closely involved with the orchestra as
    6.50
    2 votes
    133

    Sveriges Radios Symfoniorkester

    Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra (Swedish: Sveriges Radios Symfoniorkester) is a radio orchestra based in Stockholm, Sweden, and affiliated with Sveriges Radio (Swedish Radio). The orchestra broadcasts concerts on the Swedish Radio-P2 network. One of the precursor ensembles to the current orchestra was the Radioorkestern (Radio Orchestra), whose chief conductors included Nils Grevillius (1927-1939) and Tor Mann (1939-1959). In 1965, the Radioorkestern was merged with another orchestra from Swedish Radio, the Underhållningsorkestern (Entertainment Orchestra), under the new name of the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Sergiu Celibidache was the newly formed orchestra's first principal conductor, from 1965 to 1971. In 1979, the orchestra took up residence at the Berwaldhallen (Berwald Hall). The Laureate Conductors of the orchestra are Herbert Blomstedt, principal conductor from 1977 to 1982, and Valery Gergiev. Since 2007, the orchestra's principal conductor is Daniel Harding. In September 2009, the orchestra announced the extension of Harding's contract as principal conductor through 2012.
    6.50
    2 votes
    134

    Dresden Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Dresdner Philharmoniker (Dresden Philharmonic) is a symphony orchestra based in Dresden, Germany. The orchestra was founded in 1870 and gave its first concert in the Gewerbehaussaal on 29 November 1870, under the name Gewerbehausorchester. The orchestra acquired its current name in 1915. It receives financial support from the city of Dresden. One of the orchestra's later concert venues was the Kulturpalast, during the existence of the DDR. After German reunification, plans had been proposed for a new concert hall. These had not come to fruition by the time of the principal conductorship of Marek Janowski, who cited this lack of development of a new hall for the orchestra as the reason for his resignation from the post in 2004. In addition to concerts at the Kulturpalast, the orchestra also performs at the Kreuzkirche, the Hochschule für Musik Dresden, the Schloss Albrechtsberg. The choral ensembles affiliated with the orchestra are the Dresden Philharmonic Choir and Dresden Philharmonic Chamber Choir.
    5.33
    3 votes
    135

    Speculum Musicae

    Speculum Musicae is an American chamber ensemble dedicated to the performance of contemporary classical music. It was founded in New York City in 1971 and is particularly noted for its performances of the music of Elliott Carter. Oboist Joel Marangella and cellist Fred Sherry were two of the group's founding members, and Robert Black was also a long-time member. The group is made up of twelve New York-based musicians. Its repertoire includes 25 commissioned works, 52 world premieres, and 32 U.S. premieres. Speculum Musicae has been in residence at Brandeis University, Columbia University, Harvard University, and Rice University, and has recorded for the Albany, Bridge, Cambria, Centaur, Columbia, Composers Recordings, Inc., New World, and Nonesuch labels. It received the Laurel Leaf Award from the American Composers Alliance in 1997.
    5.33
    3 votes
    137
    Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

    Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

    The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Robert Spano has been its music director since 2001. Though earlier organizations bearing the same name date back as far as 1923, the Orchestra was officially founded in 1945 and played its first concert as the Atlanta Youth Symphony under the direction of Henry Sopkin, a Chicago music educator who remained its conductor until 1966. The organization changed to its current name in 1947 and soon began attracting well known soloists such as Isaac Stern and Glenn Gould. In 1967, with the departure of Sopkin, Robert Shaw (founder of the Robert Shaw Chorale) became the Music Director, and a year later the Orchestra became full-time. In 1970, Shaw founded a choir, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus. In 1988, Yoel Levi became Music Director and Principal Conductor. Under him, the Orchestra played at the opening and closing ceremonies of the Centennial 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. Levi became Music Director Emeritus in 2000, and was succeeded as Music Director by Robert Spano. The Orchestra and Chorus made their first recording, a 2-LP Christmas album entitled Nativity, for Turnabout/Vox
    4.50
    4 votes
    138

    Orchestre National de France

    The Orchestre national de France (French National Orchestra) is a symphony orchestra run by Radio France. It has also been known as the Orchestre national de la Radiodiffusion française (French National Radio Broadcasting Orchestra) and Orchestre national de l'Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française (ORTF). Since 1944, the orchestra has been based in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, where it occasionally plays in the pit for opera productions. Some concerts are also held in the Olivier Messiaen Auditorium in the Maison de Radio France (formerly known as Maison de la Radio). Radio France records all its concerts. In 1954, the orchestra, conducted by Hermann Scherchen, premièred Edgard Varèse's Déserts. During the 1950s, the orchestra recorded numerous compositions by the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos under his direction, for EMI. The current music director of the ONF is Daniele Gatti, as of September 2008. Kurt Masur, the previous music director, holds the title of honorary music director.
    7.00
    1 votes
    139

    Utah Symphony Orchestra

    Utah Symphony | Utah Opera is the combined organization following the merger of Utah Symphony and Utah Opera in 2002. At the time of the merger, it was one of only two merged symphony and opera companies in the United States. The Utah Symphony is a full-time orchestra located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The orchestra performs in Abravanel Hall in downtown Salt Lake City near Temple Square. The first attempt to create a symphony group in the Utah area occurred in 1892, before Utah was a state. The Salt Lake Symphony was created and presented just one concert before disbanding. In 1902 the Salt Lake Symphony Orchestra was formed, and it remained in existence until 1911. In 1913 the Salt Lake Philharmonic was formed, and it remained in existence until 1925. During the Great Depression, the Federal Music Project (an employment-assistance program which formed part of Federal Project Number One, an arm of the Works Project Administration) hired Reginald Beales to create a musical group in Utah. He formed the Utah State Sinfonietta with a core of 5 members. That group grew rapidly and toured extensively, presenting concerts in all corners of the state. By 1940 federal funding for arts
    7.00
    1 votes
    140

    Akademische Orchestervereinigung

    The Akademische Orchestervereinigung (AOV) is the local orchestra of Göttingen, Germany. The AOV was organized by a collective of local students and other amateur musicians to bring high-quality music to the community. AOV usually gives four concerts per year. An egalitarian organization, the AOV elects its own conductor, which as of July 2003 is Thomas-Michael Gribow. The orchestra specializes in the performance of classical art music as well as lighter, accessible contemporary music. Since 1991, the orchestra has performed the works of Beethoven, Bizet, Prokofiev, Lutosławski, Weber, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Bernstein, Wagner, Brahms, Henze and more. It gave the world premiere of the "Overture to 'The Bad Room'" by American composer Justin Rizzo-Weaver.
    6.00
    2 votes
    141

    Boston Symphony Orchestra

    The Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is an orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts. It is one of the five American orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five". Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at the Tanglewood Music Center. The most recent music director, James Levine, stepped down from his position as of September 2011, due to ill health. The orchestra was founded in 1881 by Henry Lee Higginson. Its first conductor was George Henschel, who was a noted baritone as well as conductor, and a close friend of Johannes Brahms. For the orchestra, Henschel devised innovative orchestral seating charts and sent them to Brahms, who replied approvingly and commented on the issues raised by horn and viola sections in a letter of mid-November 1881 . The orchestra's four subsequent music directors were all trained in Austria, including the seminal and highly influential Hungarian-born conductor Arthur Nikisch, in accordance with the tastes of Higginson. Wilhelm Gericke served twice, from 1884 to 1889 and again from 1898, to 1906. According to Joseph Horowitz's review of correspondence, Higginson considered 25
    6.00
    2 votes
    142
    Brown University Band

    Brown University Band

    The Brown University Band is the official band of Brown University. Like all Ivy League bands except Cornell's, it is a scatter band. The Brown Band is famous for being the world's best and only ice skating band. It is the source of much of Brown's school spirit, and often appears as a public representation of Brown to the Providence community and to other universities. The Band is present at Brown's football, hockey, and basketball games, in addition to Commencement and many other events each year. It receives funding from Brown's Undergraduate Finance Board. The Band was founded in 1924 by Irving Harris, a freshman who was shocked to find that the University had no band. This established a tradition of a student-run organization that currently has University practice space and a faculty advisor (currently Matt McGarrell), but is primarily driven by its student leadership. The Band creates between 700 and 1000 buttons for each football game. These buttons have short messages that make fun of the opposing team, usually through wordplay and stereotyping the opposing school. Brown Band members proudly display these buttons on their uniforms, often making large patterns out of them.
    6.00
    2 votes
    143
    Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra

    Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia. It was founded in 1951 by Samuil Samosud, as the Moscow Youth Orchestra for young and inexperienced musicians, acquiring its current name in 1953. It is most associated with longtime conductor Kiril Kondrashin under whom it premiered Shostakovich's Fourth and Thirteenth symphonies as well as other works. The Orchestra undertook a major tour of Japan with Kondrashin in April 1967 and CDs of the Japanese radio recordings have been made available on the Altus label. A TO Z OF CONDUCTORS Naxos Educational 8.558087-90 Ballet, Orchestral, Choral - Sacred MYASKOVSKY: Symphonies Nos. 24 and 25 Naxos 8.555376 Orchestral PAVLOVA: Monolog / The Old New York Nostalgia / Sulamith (Suite) Naxos 8.557674 Orchestral SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 7, "Leningrad" BIS BIS-CD-515 Orchestral TISHCHENKO: Symphony No. 7, Op. 119 Naxos 8.557013 Orchestral XENAKIS: DOX-ORKH / MIRA FORNES: Desde Tan Tien BIS BIS-CD-772 Concertos, Orchestral
    6.00
    2 votes
    144
    Cleveland Orchestra

    Cleveland Orchestra

    The Cleveland Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Cleveland, Ohio. It is one of the five American orchestras informally referred to as the "Big Five". Founded in 1918, the orchestra plays most of its concerts at Severance Hall. The music director is Franz Welser-Möst. The orchestra was founded in 1918 by Adella Prentiss Hughes, with Nikolai Sokoloff as its principal conductor. From early in its existence, it toured throughout the eastern United States, made radio broadcasts, and recorded many albums. Subsequent principal conductors, with the title of Music Director, were Artur Rodziński (1933–1943), Erich Leinsdorf (1943–1944), George Szell (1946–1970), Pierre Boulez (Musical Advisor 1970-1972), Lorin Maazel (1972–1982), and Christoph von Dohnányi (1984–2002). Franz Welser-Möst has been Music Director since 2002 and is contracted to remain through the 2017-2018 season. George Szell's long reign as Music Director has been largely credited for the orchestra's rise to eminence. He reformed the orchestra in the late-1940s, firing a dozen musicians in the process with a dozen more leaving of their own volition. Szell is also credited with giving the orchestra its distinct,
    5.00
    3 votes
    145

    Danish National Symphony Orchestra

    The Danish National Symphony Orchestra (Danish: DR SymfoniOrkestret; English abbreviation "DNSO"), is a Danish orchestra based in Copenhagen. The DNSO is the principal orchestra of DR (Danish Broadcasting Corporation). The DRSO is based at the Copenhagen Concert Hall. The roots of the orchestra date back to the singer Emil Holm, who expressed a wish to establish a full-time symphony orchestra in Denmark. In collaboration with fellow musicians Otto Fessel, Rudolf Dietz Mann and Folmer Jensen, the orchestra was founded in 1925, with 11 players in the ensemble and conductor Launy Grøndahl having a leadership role, though without a formal title. The orchestra grew to 30 players within a year. The orchestra performed its first public concert was in 1927, and began to give weekly concerts in 1928. In 1930, Holm recruited Nikolai Malko to a similar key role like Grøndahl as conductor with the orchestra, though again without Malko having a formal title. Early concerts were at the Axelborg building. In 1931, the orchestra began to give concerts at the Stærekassen hall of the Royal Danish Theatre. After going into exile from Germany in the 1930s, Fritz Busch worked extensively as a major
    5.00
    3 votes
    146

    Seattle Symphony

    The Seattle Symphony is an American orchestra based in Seattle, Washington. Since 1998, the orchestra is resident at Benaroya Hall. The orchestra's season runs from September through July, and serves as the pit orchestra for most productions of the Seattle Opera in addition to its own concerts including the opera's annual Richard Wagner presentations in the summer. The orchestra gave its first performance on December 29, 1903, with Harry West conducting. Known from its founding as the Seattle Symphony, it was renamed in 1911 as the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1919, the orchestra was reorganized with new bylaws under the name Seattle Symphony Orchestra. The 1921–22 season was cancelled due to financial problems. Preceding the cancellation of the 1921-22 season, another orchestra, the Seattle Civic Symphony Orchestra conducted by Mary Davenport Engberg, commenced operations and held performances during a portion of the following five-year hiatus. The Engberg family's affiliation with the Seattle Symphony has been subject to many subsequent embellishments, some of which have come from the Seattle Symphony organization itself (including literature celebrating the Symphony's 2003
    5.00
    3 votes
    147

    Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra (DPO) is a fully professional musical group in Dayton, Ohio, formed in 1933. It is a member of the League of American Orchestras (LAO) and the Regional Orchestra Players' Association (ROPA), and presents programs mainly of classical music, but also occasionally performs world music, pops, jazz and rock-n-roll. Between September and May each year, the orchestra performs about 9 full-orchestra concert series, 4 chamber orchestra series, 4 operas with the Dayton Opera, 3 light family concerts, 4 Young People's Concerts, 6 SuperPops series, and several concerts for special occasions. The Dayton Philharmonic has received the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) award for Adventurous Programming of Contemporary Music seven times; and has gained special recognition for its educational and community outreach programs, serving 90,000 children in fourteen counties — more children than any other orchestra of their budget size in the United States. The DPO has been housed in the Benjamin and Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center since 2003. Prior to that, the orchestra played concerts at Montgomery County's Memorial Hall, the Dayton
    5.50
    2 votes
    148

    Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin

    The Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin is an orchestra based in Berlin, Germany. It was founded in 1946 by American occupation forces as the RIAS-Symphonie-Orchester (RIAS being an acronym for "Rundfunk im amerikanischen Sektor" / "Radio In the American Sector"). It was also known as the American Sector Symphony Orchestra. In 1956 the radio orchestra was renamed the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra (Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin). In 1993 the orchestra took on its present name. The Orchestra's first principal conductor was Ferenc Fricsay. Between the chief conductorships of Lorin Maazel and Riccardo Chailly, the orchestra did not have a single chief conductor. The major conductors who worked with the orchestra during this period, from 1976 to 1982, were Erich Leinsdorf, Eugen Jochum, Gerd Albrecht, Gennady Rozhdestvensky and Neville Marriner. The orchestra returned to having a single chief conductor in 1982 with Riccardo Chailly. The most recent principal conductor was Ingo Metzmacher, who took up the post with the 2007-2008 season. His original initial contract was until 2011. However, after reports of disputes over financing and a threatened reduction in the size of the
    5.50
    2 votes
    149

    South Dakota Symphony Orchestra

    The South Dakota Symphony Orchestra (SDSO) is an American orchestra located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota and is a member of the League of American Orchestras. Approximately 90 musicians make up the orchestra, varying from professionals to semiprofessionals. A typical season consists of several touring performances as well as ten concerts with full orchestra, five chamber concerts, and two special event performances. Concerts are held in the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science in downtown Sioux Falls. The SDSO official song is "Alleluias for Orchestra" written by South Dakota composer Stephen Yarbrough. In 2007 the endowment for the SDSO was 2.2 million dollars a growth of 28 times since 1998. The orchestra was founded in 2000 at Augustana College. Conductor and music director Delta David Gier has been with the SDSO since the 2004-2005 season, and is also an assistant conductor for the New York Philharmonic. Michael Manley of the American Symphony Orchestra League said of the SHSO, "...from its visionary music director to its passionate musicians, from its active and dedicated donors and board to its devoted and tireless staff—the South Dakota Symphony is one of those unexpected
    5.50
    2 votes
    150

    The Royal Scottish National Orchestra

    The Royal Scottish National Orchestra (RSNO) is Scotland's national symphony orchestra. Based in Glasgow, the 89-member professional orchestra also regularly performs in Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Dundee, and abroad. Formed in 1891 as the Scottish Orchestra, the company has performed full-time since 1950, when it took the name Scottish National Orchestra. It was awarded royal patronage in 1991. Shortly after the award it briefly used the title Royal Scottish Orchestra before reverting to its present name. Under its first Scottish-born, and longest serving conductor, Sir Alexander Gibson, the orchestra began to develop an international profile. In line with Gibson's own specialities, the orchestra became known for its interpretations of Scandinavian composers, notably Jean Sibelius and Carl Nielsen. This was consolidated in the tenure of Neeme Järvi, who also led the orchestra through its first complete Gustav Mahler cycle. The second Scot to lead the orchestra, Bryden Thomson, maintained the Nordic link with a cycle of Nielsen symphonies. The RSNO's base is at Henry Wood Hall in Glasgow and is also used as its recording venue. The RSNO also performs throughout Scotland, at such venues
    5.50
    2 votes
    151

    Bilbao Orkestra Sinfonikoa

    Bilbao Orkestra Sinfonikoa (BOS, Bilbao Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Sinfónica de Bilbao in Spanish) is a symphony orchestra based in Bilbao, Basque Country. The orchestra's first concert was on May 8, 1922 at the Teatro Arriaga, under the direction of maestro Armand Marsick (nephew of Martin Pierre Marsick). Principal conductors have been Armand Marsick, Vladimir Golschmann, Jesús Arámbarri, José Limantour, Antoine de Babier, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Alberto Bolet, Pedro Pirfano, Urbano Ruiz Laorden and Theo Alcántara. Günter Neuhold has been music director and Chief Conductor since 2008. It has also been conducted by Maurice Ravel, Jesús Guridi, Pablo Sorozábal, Krzysztof Penderecki, Carmelo Bernaola, Luis de Pablo, Ernesto and Cristóbal Halffter and other composers performing their own works. The BOS was invited to perform at Mariinski Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia, for the 300th Anniversary of the city. In 1998 it represented the Basque Country at the World Expo in Lisbon, and in 1999 it took part in the inauguration of the Euskalduna Palace in Bilbao. The BOS performs regularly at the National Auditorium in Madrid and the Musical Fortnight in Donostia, in addition to
    6.00
    1 votes
    152
    Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

    Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

    The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (PSO) is an American orchestra based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The orchestra's home is Heinz Hall, located in Pittsburgh's Cultural District. The orchestra was founded by the Pittsburgh Arts Society with conductor Frederic Archer in 1895, who brought with him a number of musicians from the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and led the PSO in its first concert the following year. Archer left in 1898 and was replaced by Victor Herbert, who took the orchestra on several tours and greatly increased the orchestra's presence. Herbert was replaced by Emil Paur in 1904. The orchestra attracted a number of prominent guest conductors during these early years, including Edward Elgar and Richard Strauss, but was dissolved in 1910 because of financial difficulties. In 1926, the orchestra was resurrected, with its members rehearsing for no fee, and each contributing money to make a new season the following year possible. The orchestra's leader, Elias Breeskin, was also its conductor for the first few years. In 1930, Antonio Modarelli was brought in as conductor. In 1937, Otto Klemperer was brought in to reorganise the orchestra, quickly raising the orchestra to an
    6.00
    1 votes
    153
    Rotterdams Philharmonisch Orkest

    Rotterdams Philharmonisch Orkest

    The Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra (RPhO; Dutch: Rotterdams Philharmonisch Orkest) is a Dutch symphony orchestra based in Rotterdam. Its primary venue is the concert hall De Doelen. The RPhO is considered one of the Netherlands' two principal orchestras of international standing, second to the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam. In addition to symphony concerts, the RPhO performs as the opera orchestra in productions at De Nederlandse Opera, as do other Dutch ensembles. Several musicians founded the RPhO in 1918 as a private "Society of Professional Musicians for Mutual Cultivation of the Arts". It had paying members and the aim was to make music for personal pleasure without pursuit of gain. The first musical director was Willem Feltzer, who was the manager of two Rotterdam music schools. Alexander Schmuller succeeded Felzer as music director, for two years. In May 1930, Eduard Flipse was appointed principal conductor, and held the post until 1962. Under his stewardship, the amateur ensemble evolved into a professional orchestra. When Flipse took over from Feltzer and Schmuller, the orchestra was in poor shape both financially and artistically. However, Filpse had both
    6.00
    1 votes
    154

    Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra

    The Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra (東京都交響楽団, Tōkyo-to Kōkyō Gakudan), also known as Tokyō (都響), is one of the representative symphony orchestras of Japan. The Orchestra was founded in 1965 by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, to commemorate the Tokyo Olympics (1964 Summer Olympics). Their offices are based at the Tokyo Bunka Kaikan, a concert venue owned by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. They perform regularly at Tokyo Bunka Kaikan as well as at Suntory Hall. Occasionally, they also perform at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Space, another venue owned by Tokyo. Traditionally, the Orchestra performs the works of Gustav Mahler as an important part of their repertoire. Hiroshi Wakasugi, Eliahu Inbal and Gary Bertini have performed all the symphonies of Mahler with the orchestra.
    6.00
    1 votes
    155
    NHK Symphony Orchestra

    NHK Symphony Orchestra

    The NHK Symphony Orchestra (NHK交響楽団, NHK Kōkyō Gakudan) is a Japanese orchestra based in Tokyo. The orchestra gives concerts in several venues, including the NHK Hall, Suntory Hall, and the Tokyo Opera City Concert Hall. The orchestra began as the New Symphony Orchestra on October 5, 1926 and was the country's first professional symphony orchestra. Later, it changed its name to the Japan Symphony Orchestra. In 1951, after receiving financial support from NHK, the orchestra took its current name. The most recent music director of the orchestra was Vladimir Ashkenazy, from 2004 to 2007. Ashkenazy now has the title of conductor laureate. Charles Dutoit, the orchestra's music director from 1998 to 2003, is now its music director emeritus. Wolfgang Sawallisch, honorary conductor from 1967 to 1994, now has the title of honorary conductor laureate. The orchestra's current permanent conductors are Yuzo Toyama, since 1979, and Tadaaki Otaka, since 2010. Herbert Blomstedt holds the title of honorary conductor, since 1986. André Previn has the title of principal guest conductor, and is scheduled to relinquish that post in August 2012. In June 2012, the orchestra named Paavo Järvi as its next
    4.50
    2 votes
    156

    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Münchner Philharmoniker (Munich Philharmonic) is a German symphony orchestra located in the city of Munich. It is one of Munich's three principal orchestras, along with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and the Bavarian State Orchestra. Since 1985, the orchestra has been housed in the Gasteig Culture Centre. The orchestra was founded in Munich in 1893 by Franz Kaim, son of a piano manufacturer, as the Kaim Orchestra. In 1895, it took up residence in the city's Tonhalle (concert hall). It soon attracted distinguished conductors: Gustav Mahler first directed the group in 1897 and premiered his Symphony No. 4 and Symphony No. 8 with the orchestra, while Bruno Walter directed the orchestra for the posthumous premiere of Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde. Felix Weingartner was music director from 1898 to 1905, and the young Wilhelm Furtwängler made his auspicious conducting debut there in 1906. Meanwhile Anton Bruckner pupil Ferdinand Löwe established an enduring tradition of Bruckner performance which continues to this day. Throughout this time the orchestra, which by 1910 was known as the Munich Konzertverein Orchestra, was privately funded, but during World War I finances became
    5.00
    1 votes
    157
    Queensland Symphony Orchestra

    Queensland Symphony Orchestra

    Queensland Symphony Orchestra (QSO) is an Australian orchestra, based principally in Brisbane in the state of Queensland. The QSO played its first concert on 26 March 1947, with the orchestra consisting of 45 musicians, conducted by Percy Code. John Farnsworth Hall was recruited from the Sydney Symphony Orchestra as the orchestra's first chief conductor. The orchestra played concerts in various Queensland cities and towns, such as Innisfail and Townsville, travelling up to 3500 miles a year in the process. In 2001, the QSO was merged with the Queensland Philharmonic Orchestra, to form The Queensland Orchestra (TQO). On 14 October 2009, the orchestra announced a reversion of its name back to the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, effective in 2010. The orchestra is funded by private corporations, the state government and the Australian federal government through the Australia Council. Most of the orchestra's performances take place in Brisbane at three venues: In addition, the orchestra tours other parts of the state of Queensland regularly, including the following locations: The orchestra's discography includes Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, and several works of Benjamin Frankel,
    5.00
    1 votes
    158
    Stanford Band

    Stanford Band

    The Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band (LSJUMB) is the student marching band of Stanford University. Billing itself as "The World's Largest Rock and Roll Band", the Stanford Band performs at sporting events, student activities, and other functions. Technically, it is not actually a marching band but rather a scatter band. The LSJUMB was formed in 1893. However, its modern era began in 1963 with the hiring of Arthur P. Barnes as interim director (he got the full-time post two years later). Previous director Jules Schucat had been very popular, and his ouster caused several members to go on strike. However, according to band lore, Barnes immediately won the band's loyalty by ceding any meaningful control over it. To this day, the band is almost entirely student-run. The band and its new director also clicked over his arrangement of "The Star-Spangled Banner", which featured the striking effect of a single trumpet playing the first half of the song, joined later by soft woodwinds and tuba, and finally bringing the full power of the brass only in the final verse. When it was played at the "Big Game" against Cal, just eight days after the assassination of President John F.
    5.00
    1 votes
    159

    BBC National Orchestra of Wales

    The BBC National Orchestra of Wales (BBC NOW) (Welsh: Cerddorfa Genedlaethol Gymreig y BBC) is a Welsh symphony orchestra and one of the BBC's five professional orchestras. The BBC NOW is the only professional symphony orchestra organisation in Wales, occupying a dual role as both a broadcasting orchestra and national orchestra. The BBC NOW has its administrative base in Cardiff, at the BBC Hoddinott Hall on the site of the Wales Millennium Centre, since January 2009. The BBC NOW is the orchestra-in-residence at St David's Hall, Cardiff, and also performs regularly throughout Wales and beyond, including international tours and annual appearances at the Royal Albert Hall in London at the BBC Proms. Broadcasting work includes studio sessions for BBC Radio and television, although the orchestra’s concerts form the bulk of its broadcasts, transmitted primarily on BBC Radio 3 but also on BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Cymru and BBC television. The orchestra records many soundtracks for BBC television, including Doctor Who. The precursor ensemble of the BBC NOW was the Cardiff Station Orchestra, which was founded in 1928. Funding problems resulted in the disbandment of this orchestra in
    4.00
    2 votes
    160

    Charlotte Symphony Orchestra

    The Charlotte Symphony Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Charlotte, North Carolina. As the largest and most active professional performing arts organization in the central Carolinas, the Charlotte Symphony plays approximately 100 performances each season and employs 100 professional musicians, 62 of whom are on full-time contracts. Annual attendance for CSO performances numbers over 200,000. Founded in 1932 by Spanish conductor and composer Guillermo S. de Roxlo leading 15 musicians, the Orchestra was led by conductor Christof Perick from 2001 to 2010. In May 2009, the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra named Christopher Warren-Green its 11th music director, effective with the 2010-2011 season. Perick has continued his association with the orchestra as conductor laureate in the 2010-2011 season. The Orchestra’s principal home is the 1,970-seat Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. The Symphony also serves as the resident orchestra for Opera Carolina and North Carolina Dance Theatre. The Symphony Park amphitheater at SouthPark is home to Charlotte Symphony Orchestra’s free Summer Pops concerts. In 2007, the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra released its first compact
    4.00
    1 votes
    161

    English Chamber Orchestra

    The English Chamber Orchestra (ECO) is a British chamber orchestra based in London. The full orchestra regularly plays concerts at Cadogan Hall, and the ECO Ensemble performs at Wigmore Hall. It is also the resident orchestra at Grange Park Opera, and regularly tours in the UK and internationally. The ECO has its roots in the Goldsbrough Orchestra, founded in 1948 by Lawrence Leonard and Arnold Goldsbrough. The group took its current name in 1960, when it expanded its repertoire beyond the Baroque period for the first time. Its repertoire remained limited by the group's size, which has stayed fairly consistently at around the size of an orchestra of Mozart's time. Shortly afterwards, it became closely associated with the Aldeburgh Festival, playing in the premieres of Benjamin Britten's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Owen Wingrave, Curlew River and several other of his works. Britten conducted the orchestra on several occasions, and made a number of records with the group. The orchestra did not at this time have a principal conductor, but worked closely with a succession of guest conductors including Raymond Leppard, Colin Davis and Daniel Barenboim. In 1985 Jeffrey Tate was appointed
    4.00
    1 votes
    162

    Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra; commonly abbreviated HKPO (港樂), is the largest symphony orchestra in Hong Kong. First established in 1895 as an amateur orchestra, under the name Sino-British Orchestra (中英管弦樂團), it was renamed the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra in 1957, and became a professional orchestra in 1974 under the funding of the Government. The orchestra has promoted Hong Kong-based composers by commissioning and premiering numerous works of contemporary music, including the recent five-work cycle of Voices of Hong Kong, by John Chen, David Gwilt, Daniel Law, Law Ping-leung and Richard Tsang. In February 1986, the HKPO made its debut tour of several cities in the People's Republic of China, with conductor Kenneth Schermerhorn and soloists Stephanie Chase (violin) and Li Jian (piano). In the autumn of 1995, the HKPO travelled to 9 cities in the United States and Canada in its North American début. In 2003, the orchestra made its European début with performances in London's Barbican Hall, Belfast, Dublin and Paris (Théâtre des Champs-Élysées). Edo de Waart was the orchestra's Artistic Director and Chief Conductor, beginning with the 2004-2005 season, and he concluded
    4.00
    1 votes
    163

    Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra

    The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (LACO) is a 40-member American chamber orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, considered by music critic Jim Svejda as "America's finest chamber orchestra". LACO was founded in 1968 as an artistic outlet for the local film and record studios' most gifted musicians to perform the classical music repertoire for a chamber orchestra of about 40-45 members. The orchestra’s artistic founder, cellist James Arkatov, envisioned an ensemble which would allow conservatory-trained players to balance studio work and teaching with artistic collaboration. With the financial backing of philanthropist Richard Colburn and management from attorney Joseph Troy (the orchestra’s first president), LACO presented its first performance in the fall of 1969. Many of the orchestra's musicians are still employed by local recording and film studios. The LACO's first music director was Neville Marriner, and Marriner used the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields as a guiding model for the ensemble. At the beginning of LACO's history, the orchestra did not have a residency at a single concert hall; it performed at the Mark Taper Forum, Occidental College (Thorne Hall), the
    4.00
    1 votes
    164

    New Jersey Symphony Orchestra

    The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO) is a symphony orchestra located in the state of New Jersey, United States. Philip James founded the orchestra in 1922. The orchestra is headquartered in Newark, New Jersey. Neeme Järvi, the NJSO's music director from 2005 to 2009, is currently the orchestra's conductor laureate and artistic advisor. Since January 2007, the NJSO's President and Chief Executive Officer is André Gremillet. During the 1940s, the orchestra performed at Newark Symphony Hall. Currently, the NJSO does not have a single performance venue. Instead, the orchestra gives concerts at venues in seven cities around the state: A 2007 internal evaluation by the orchestra studied the trends of attendance at each of the venues over the six seasons prior to the 2007-2008 season: "Gremillet said the organization looked at every concert performed at the seven venues during the last six seasons and ranked the venues financially and artistically. Financially, the best city was Morristown, where the average concert at the Community Theatre at the Mayo Center for the Arts lost 11 percent over the six-year span. The worst was Trenton, where an average concert at the Patriots Theatre at
    4.00
    1 votes
    165

    New York New Music Ensemble

    The New York New Music Ensemble is a contemporary "Pierrot ensemble" chamber music group. The group formed in 1975 by Robert Black. Current members include: flutist Jayn Rosenfeld, clarinetist Jean Kopperud, violinist Linda Quan, cellist Chris Finckel, pianist Stephen Gosling and percussionist Daniel Druckman.
    4.00
    1 votes
    166

    Norrköping Symphony Orchestra

    Norrköping Symphony Orchestra (Swedish: Norrköpings Symfoniorkester) is a Swedish professional symphony orchestra, based at the concert hall De Geerhallen, in the middle of Norrköping. The orchestra was founded in 1912, and currently consists of 85 musicians; it also performs several times a year in the nearby city of Linköping. Past principal conductors have included Herbert Blomstedt and Franz Welser-Möst. Since 2007, the principal conductor and artistic adviser of the orchestra is the Kazakhstani conductor Alan Buribayev, with an initial contract through 2010. Buribayev is scheduled to conclude his tenure in May 2011. Past principal guest conductors have included Leif Segerstam (1995–1997), Daniel Harding and Josep Caballé-Domenech. Stefan Solyom became the orchestra's principal guest conductor as of the 2009-2010 season. The orchestra has recorded for the BIS, CPO, Denon and Simax labels, including symphonies by Peterson-Berger, complete works for piano and orchestra by Beethoven, and works by John Pickard.
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    167
    Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

    Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Berlin Philharmonic, German: Berliner Philharmoniker, formerly Berliner Philharmonisches Orchester (BPO), is an orchestra based in Berlin, Germany. In 2006, a group of ten European media outlets voted the Berlin Philharmonic number three on a list of "top ten European Orchestras", after the Vienna Philharmonic and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, while in 2008 it was voted the world's number two orchestra in a survey among leading international music critics organized by the British magazine Gramophone (behind the Concertgebouw). Its primary concert venue is the Philharmonie, located in the Kulturforum area of the city. Since 2002, its principal conductor has been Sir Simon Rattle. The BPO also supports several chamber music ensembles. The funding for the organization is subsidized by the city of Berlin and a partnership with Deutsche Bank. The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra was founded in Berlin in 1882 by 54 musicians under the name Frühere Bilsesche Kapelle (literally, "Former Bilse's Band"); the group broke away from their previous conductor Benjamin Bilse after he announced his intention of taking the band on a fourth-class train to Warsaw for a concert. The orchestra was
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    168
    City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

    City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

    The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO) is a British orchestra based in Birmingham, England. The Orchestra's current chief executive, appointed in 1999, is Stephen Maddock. Since 2008, the CBSO's music director is Andris Nelsons. Founded by Neville Chamberlain, the orchestra first performed as the City of Birmingham Orchestra in September 1920, with Appleby Matthews conducting its first concert. The programme included Overture: Saul by Granville Bantock, a strong supporter of the orchestra's foundation. However, its official foundation is generally reckoned to have been the "First Symphony Concert" in November 1920, when Edward Elgar conducted a programme of his own music in Birmingham Town Hall. Appleby Matthews was the orchestra's first chief conductor. Adrian Boult was chief conductor from 1924 to 1930. The CBO became a full time organisation in 1944, changing its name to the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra in 1948. Chief conductors since then included Rudolf Schwarz, the composer Andrzej Panufnik, Boult in an emergency return for a season after Panufnik's sudden resignation, Hugo Rignold and Louis Frémaux. During this time, the orchestra made recordings and gave
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    169

    Monte-Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra

    The Monte-Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra (French: Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo) is the main orchestra in the principality of Monaco. The orchestra gives concerts primarily in the Auditorium Rainier III, but also performs at the Salle des Princes Grimaldi Forum. The orchestra was founded in 1856 and gave its first concert on 14 December 1856, with an ensemble of 15 musicians, at the "Maison de jeux" (the future casino). By 1874, the orchestra had increased in size to 70 musicians. In 1953, Prince Rainier III had ordered the renaming of the ensemble to L'Orchestre National de l'Opéra de Monte-Carlo. It acquired its current name in 1980, again through Rainier III. The orchestra's most recent principal conductor was Yakov Kreizberg, who was named to the post in October 2007, effective with the 2009-2010 season, for an initial contract of 5 years. He held the post until his death in March 2011.
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    170

    Montreal Symphony Orchestra

    Orchestre symphonique de Montréal (OSM) (Montreal Symphony Orchestra) is a symphony orchestra based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Its home is the Montreal Symphony House at Place des Arts, which opened on September 7, 2011. There have been a number of organizations with this name, including one formed in 1897, which lasted ten years, and another formed in 1930, which lasted eleven. The current ensemble, however, traces its roots back to 1934; Wilfrid Pelletier formed an ensemble called Les Concerts Symphoniques which gave its first concert on 14 January 1935 under conductor Rosario Bourdon. The Orchestra acquired its current name in 1954. In the early 1960s, when the Orchestra was preparing to move to new facilities at Place des Arts, patron and prominent Montreal philanthropist, John Wilson McConnell, purchased the Laub-Petschnikoff Stradivarius violin of 1727 for Calvin Sieb, the Symphony's concertmaster. Though it began touring and recording modestly in the 1960s and early 1970s under the batons of a young Zubin Mehta and Franz-Paul Decker, the MSO became a household name under the directorship of Charles Dutoit, who became music director in 1977 after the brief tenure and
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    171
    New York City Opera

    New York City Opera

    The New York City Opera (NYCO) is an American opera company located in New York City. The company, called "the people's opera" by New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, was founded in 1943. The company's stated purpose was to make opera accessible to a wide audience at a reasonable ticket price. It also sought to produce an innovative choice of repertory, and provide a home for American singers and composers. The company was originally housed at the New York City Center theater on West 55th Street. It later became part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts from 1966 to 2010 during which time it produced autumn and spring seasons of opera in repertory and maintained extensive education and outreach programs, offering arts-in-education programs to 4,000 students in over thirty schools. In 2011, the company left Lincoln Center due to financial difficulties, moving its offices and archives to 75 Broad St. in Lower Manhattan.In the 2011–2012 season NYCO will perform four operas at various venues in New York City, including the Brooklyn Academy of Music. During its nearly 70 year history, the NYCO has helped launch the careers of many great opera singers including Beverly Sills,
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    172
    New York Philharmonic

    New York Philharmonic

    The New York Philharmonic (officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York) is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the American orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five". The Philharmonic's home is Avery Fisher Hall, located in New York's Lincoln Center. Organized in 1842, the orchestra is older than any other extant American symphonic institution by nearly four decades; its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004. Alan Gilbert is the Philharmonic's current music director and Zarin Mehta (brother of former music director Zubin Mehta) is the orchestra's current president. The orchestra was founded by the American-born conductor Ureli Corelli Hill in 1842, with the aid of the then famous and feted Irish composer, William Vincent Wallace, Wallace, as the Philharmonic Society of New York – the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, declaring as its purpose "the advancement of instrumental music." The first concert of the New York Philharmonic took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven's Symphony No. 5, led by Hill
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    173

    Orchestre de la Suisse Romande

    The Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (OSR; literal translation, "Orchestra of French-speaking Switzerland") is a Swiss symphony orchestra, based in Geneva at the Victoria Hall. In addition to symphony concerts, the OSR performs as the opera orchestra in productions at the Grand Théâtre de Genève. Ernest Ansermet founded the OSR in 1918, with a contingent of 48 players and a season of six months' duration. Besides Swiss musicians, the OSR players initially came from other countries, including Austria, France, Germany and Italy. Ansermet gradually increased the percentage of Swiss musicians in the orchestra, attaining 80% Swiss personnel by 1946. Ansermet remained the music director of the OSR for 49 years, from 1918 to 1967. A Swiss radio orchestra based in Lausanne was merged into the OSR in 1938. Subsequently, the OSR began to broadcast radio concerts regularly on Swiss radio. The orchestra had a long-standing contract for recordings with Decca Records, dating from the tenure of Ansermet, and made over 300 recordings for Decca, starting in 1947 with Debussy's La mer. The OSR premiered many works of the Swiss composers Arthur Honegger and Frank Martin. During the directorship of
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    174

    Oslo Philharmonic Orcestra

    The Oslo-Filharmonien (Oslo Philharmonic) is a symphony orchestra based in Oslo, Norway. The orchestra was founded in 1919, and has since 1977 had its home in the Oslo Concert Hall. The orchestra consists of 69 musicians in the string section, 16 in the woodwinds, 15 in brass, 5 in percussionists, 1 harpist, and 1 pianist. The orchestra gives an average of sixty to seventy symphonic concerts annually, the majority of which are broadcast nationally on the radio. The orchestra also performs chamber concerts frequently throughout the year. The Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra's roots go to 1879, when Edvard Grieg and Johan Svendsen founded the Christiania Musikerforening (Christiania Musical Association), as a successor of The Philharmonic Society (Det Philharmoniske Selskab, 1847). The orchestra was later conducted by Ole Olsen, Johan Selmer, Iver Holter and Otto Winter Hjelm. Under Holter, the orchestra was merged with the Christiania Theatre Orchestra, which was on the verge of reductions. Holter suggested the founding of a city orchestra which could play at municipal festivities, concerts and in the theatre, and as a result of this, the orchestra gained municipal support from 1889. In
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    175
    Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden

    Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden

    The Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden (Saxon State Orchestra, Dresden, commonly known as the Staatskapelle Dresden) is an orchestra based in Dresden, Germany founded in 1548 by Kurfürst Moritz (Elector Moritz, or Maurice) of Saxony. It is one of the world's oldest orchestras. The precursor ensemble was Die Kurfürstlich-Sächsische und Königlich-Polnische Kapelle (The Saxony Elector and Royal Polish Band). The orchestra is the musical body of the Sächsische Staatsoper (Saxon State Opera). Venue of the orchestra is the Semperoper opera house. The orchestra has had many eminent chief conductors. In its early years, Heinrich Schütz was associated with it, and in the nineteenth century Carl Maria von Weber and Richard Wagner were both chief conductors. In the twentieth century, Richard Strauss became closely associated with the orchestra, as both a conductor and a composer, with several of his works being premiered by the ensemble. Karl Böhm and Hans Vonk were notable among the orchestra's chief conductors in that they served as chief conductors of both the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden and the State Opera simultaneously. Herbert Blomstedt was musical director of the Staatskapelle from
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    176

    San Francisco Symphony Chorus

    The San Francisco Symphony Chorus is the resident chorus of the San Francisco Symphony (SFS). Established in 1972 at the request of Seiji Ozawa, then the San Francisco Symphony's music director, the chorus first performed in the 1973-74 Symphony season. the SFS Chorus today gives a minimum of twenty-six performances each season at Davies Symphony Hall. They have performed with some of the world's greatest conductors such as Michael Tilson Thomas, Kurt Masur, Neville Marriner, Roger Norrington and many others. During its first decade, Louis Magor served as the SFS Chorus director. Magor was succeeded In 1982, by the director of the Chicago Symphony Chorus, Margaret Hillis. In 1983, Hillis was succeeded by Vance George who served as chorus director for twenty-three years until his retirement in 2006. The current director is Ragnar Bohlin, who comes to the SFS Chorus from Stockholm, Sweden where he was awarded with the prestigious Johannes Norrby medalion in 2006, for expanding the horizon of the Swedish choral scene. Emmy Award, Outstanding Classical Music-Dance Program Grammy Award for Best Classical Album Grammy Award for Best Choral Performance Grammy Award for Best Engineered
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    177

    The Chamber Orchestra of Europe

    The Chamber Orchestra of Europe (COE), established in 1981, is administratively based in London. The orchestra comprises about 60 members coming from across Europe. The players pursue parallel careers as international soloists, members of eminent chamber groups, and as tutors and professors of music. The orchestra receives substantial support from the European Commission and The Gatsby Charitable Foundation ; they have no single home resident hall and no appointed resident conductor. The idea for the COE came from musicians in the European Community Youth Orchestra, from members who were past the age limit for the ECYO and who wanted to continue working together in a chamber orchestra context. The founding members included the oboist Douglas Boyd, who served as the COE's principal oboist from 1981 to 2002. Over the years the COE has developed strong relationships with Claudio Abbado, Bernard Haitink and Nikolaus Harnoncourt, together with Thomas Adès, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Emanuel Ax, Lisa Batiashvili, Paavo Berglund, Herbert Blomstedt, Semyon Bychkov, Renaud and Gautier Capuçon, Ivan Fischer, Thomas Hengelbrock, Vladimir Jurowski, Leonidas Kavakos, Yannick
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    178
    Toronto Symphony Orchestra

    Toronto Symphony Orchestra

    The Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) is a Canadian orchestra based in Toronto, Ontario. The TSO was founded in 1922 as the New Symphony Orchestra, and gave its first concert at Massey Hall in April 1923. The orchestra changed its name to the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in 1927. The TSO continued to give regular concerts at Massey Hall from 1923 to 1982. Currently, TSO performances are held in Roy Thomson Hall. Andrew Davis was the TSO's music director from 1975 to 1988, and is currently the orchestra's conductor laureate. The current TSO music director is Peter Oundjian, who was appointed to the post in January 2003 and formally became music director with the 2004-2005 season. In February 2007, Oundjian extended his contract with the TSO to 2012. The orchestra had financial and audience size problems before the appointment of Oundjian as its music director. In 1992, TSO musicians had accepted a 16% pay cut because of a threat of bankruptcy to the orchestra, with a promise from management to make up the loss in subsequent contract negotiations. By 1999, this pay restoration had not happened, which led to an 11-week musicians' strike that autumn. Relations between the musicians and
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