Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 3.144 views
  • 621 votes
  • 619 voters
  • 4%
Best Computer Scientist of All Time

More about Best Computer Scientist of All Time:

Best Computer Scientist of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Computer Scientist of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Computer Scientist of All Time has gotten 3.144 views and has gathered 621 votes from 619 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Computer Scientist of All Time is a top list in the Technology category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Technology or Best Computer Scientist of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Technology on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Computer Scientist of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Computer Scientist of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Robert Tarjan

    Robert Tarjan

    Robert Endre Tarjan (born April 30, 1948) is an American computer scientist. He is the discoverer of several graph algorithms, including Tarjan's off-line least common ancestors algorithm, and co-inventor of both splay trees and Fibonacci heaps. Tarjan is currently the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University, and is also a Senior Fellow at Hewlett-Packard. He was born in Pomona, California. His father was a child psychiatrist specializing in mental retardation, and ran a state hospital. As a child, Tarjan read a lot of science fiction, and wanted to be an astronomer. He became interested in mathematics after reading Martin Gardner's mathematical games column in Scientific American. He became seriously interested in math in the eighth grade, thanks to a "very stimulating" teacher. While he was in high school, Tarjan got a job, where he worked IBM card punch collators. He first worked with real computers while studying astronomy at the Summer Science Program in 1964. Tarjan obtained a Bachelor's degree in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1969. At Stanford University, he received his Master's degree in
    7.63
    8 votes
    2
    Christopher Blizzard

    Christopher Blizzard

    Christopher Blizzard is a Developer Relations lead at Facebook,. Formerly, he's worked as an Open Source Evangelist at the Mozilla Corporation, and has been a long-time contributor to open source projects, notably with Mozilla, Red Hat, and One Laptop Per Child. Prior to his position as Open Source Evangelist he was the Software Team Lead for the One Laptop Per Child project at Red Hat and sat on the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors. Before joining the One Laptop Per Child project he was a Systems Engineer and Open Source software developer working at Red Hat. Blizzard was the Software Team Lead for the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program through Red Hat. He helped to develop the modified version of Fedora Core Linux that ran on the new laptops, handled all integration and community work with the OLPC project, and unveiled the laptop in a video on Friday, June 2, 2006. Chris was also involved with the development of the OLPC's Sugar interface.
    9.00
    5 votes
    3
    Fred Brooks

    Fred Brooks

    Frederick Phillips Brooks, Jr. (born April 19, 1931) is a software engineer and computer scientist, best known for managing the development of IBM's System/360 family of computers and the OS/360 software support package, then later writing candidly about the process in his seminal book The Mythical Man-Month. Brooks has received many awards, including the National Medal of Technology in 1985 and the Turing Award in 1999. Born in Durham, North Carolina, he attended Duke University, graduating in 1953, and he received a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics (Computer Science) from Harvard University in 1956. Howard Aiken was his advisor. Brooks joined IBM in 1956, working in Poughkeepsie, New York and Yorktown, New York. He worked on the architecture of the IBM 7030 Stretch, a $10m scientific supercomputer of which nine were sold, and the IBM 7950 Harvest computer for the National Security Agency. Subsequently, he became manager for the development of the System/360 family of computers and the OS/360 software package. During this time he coined the term computer architecture. It was in The Mythical Man-Month that Brooks made the now-famous statement: "Adding manpower to a late software
    6.71
    7 votes
    4
    Robert Kowalski

    Robert Kowalski

    Robert "Bob" Anthony Kowalski (born May 15, 1941) is a British logician and computer scientist, who has spent most of his career in the United Kingdom. He was educated at the University of Chicago, University of Bridgeport (BA in mathematics, 1963), Stanford University (MSc in mathematics, 1966), University of Warsaw and the University of Edinburgh (PhD in computer science, 1970). He was a research fellow at the University of Edinburgh (1970–75) and has been at Imperial College London since 1975, attaining a chair in Computational Logic in 1982 and becoming Emeritus Professor in 1999. He was inducted as a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence in 1991, of the European Co-ordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence in 1999, and the Association for Computing Machinery in 2001. He began his research in the field of automated theorem proving, developing both SL-resolution with Donald Kuehner and the connection graph proof procedure. However, he is best known for his contributions to the development of logic programming, starting with the procedural interpretation of Horn clauses. He also developed the minimal model and the fixpoint semantics of Horn clauses
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Steve Wozniak

    Steve Wozniak

    Steve Wozniak or Stephen Wozniak (born August 11, 1950), known as Steve Wozniak or Woz, is an American computer engineer and programmer who founded Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.) with Steve Jobs and Ronald Wayne. Wozniak single-handedly invented the Apple I computer and the Apple II computer in the 1970s. These computers contributed significantly to the microcomputer revolution. The name on Wozniak's birth certificate is "Stephan Gary Wozniak", but Steve's mother said that she intended it to be spelled "Stephen", and "Stephen" is what he uses. Wozniak has been referred to frequently by the nickname "Woz" or "The Woz"; "WoZ" (short for "Wheels of Zeus") is also the name of a company Wozniak founded. Wozniak met Steve Jobs when a fellow Homestead High School student, Bill Fernandez, introduced them to each other. In 1970, they became friends when Jobs worked for the summer at Hewlett-Packard (HP), where Wozniak was working on a mainframe computer. According to Wozniak's autobiography, iWoz, Jobs had the idea to sell a computer as a fully assembled printed circuit board. Wozniak, at first skeptical, was later convinced by Jobs that even if they were not successful they could at least
    8.40
    5 votes
    6
    Bruce Webster

    Bruce Webster

    Bruce Webster is an internationally recognized expert on information technology, as well as a software engineer, an entrepreneur and a former game programmer. Webster is a 1978 graduate of Brigham Young University with a bachelor's degree in computer science. He also did graduate work in computer science at the University of Houston–Clear Lake in southeast Houston, Texas. Webster performed the co-design and programming of the original Apple II version of the computer game SunDog: Frozen Legacy for FTL Games. The game was somewhat of a success and is still recognized today as one of the landmark games for early home computers. After finishing version 2.0 of SunDog, Webster quit FTL due to burn-out. His disenchantment with programming was so severe that he did not take another programming job for four years. Instead Webster went on to write for BYTE and Macworld and taught computer science at his alma mater of Brigham Young University. He later went on to help found another software startup (Pages Software Inc.), where he served as Chief Technical Officer and chief software architect for five years. Webster is the author of several books regarding programming and the programming
    7.17
    6 votes
    7
    Oded Goldreich

    Oded Goldreich

    Oded Goldreich (Hebrew: עודד גולדרייך‎; b. 1957) is a professor of Computer Science at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science of Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. His research interests lie within the theory of computation. Specifically, the interplay of randomness and computation, the foundations of cryptography and computational complexity theory. Goldreich has contributed to the development of pseudorandomness, zero knowledge proofs, secure function evaluation, property testing, and other areas in cryptography and computational complexity. Goldreich has also authored several books including: Foundations of Cryptography which comes in two volumes (volume 1 in 2001 and volume 2 in 2004), Computational Complexity: A Conceptual Perspective (2008), and Modern Cryptography, Probabilistic Proofs and Pseudorandomness (1998).
    9.50
    4 votes
    8
    Tim Berners-Lee

    Tim Berners-Lee

    Sir Timothy John "Tim" Berners-Lee, OM, KBE, FRS, FREng, FRSA (born 8 June 1955), also known as "TimBL", is a British computer scientist and the inventor of the World Wide Web. He made a proposal for an information management system in March 1989, and on 25 December 1990, with the help of Robert Cailliau and a young student at CERN, he implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet. Berners-Lee is the director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversees the Web's continued development. He is also the founder of the World Wide Web Foundation, and is a senior researcher and holder of the Founders Chair at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He is a director of the Web Science Research Initiative (WSRI), and a member of the advisory board of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence. In 2004, Berners-Lee was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his pioneering work. In April 2009, he was elected a foreign associate of the United States National Academy of Sciences. He was honoured as the "Inventor of the World Wide Web" during the 2012 Summer Olympics opening
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Carl Adam Petri

    Carl Adam Petri

    Carl Adam Petri (12 July 1926 – 2 July 2010) was a German mathematician and computer scientist. He was born in Leipzig. Petri nets were invented in August 1939 by Carl Adam Petri – at the age of 13 – for the purpose of describing chemical processes. In 1941 his father told him about Konrad Zuse's work on computing machines and Carl Adam started building his own analog computer. After earning his Abitur at the Thomasschule he was in 1944 drafted into the Wehrmacht and eventually went into British captivity. Petri started studying mathematics at the Darmstadt University of Technology in 1950. He documented the Petri net in 1962 as part of his dissertation, Kommunikation mit Automaten (communication with automata). He worked from 1959 until 1962 at the University of Bonn and received his PhD degree in 1962 from the Darmstadt University of Technology. Petri's work significantly advanced the fields of parallel computing and distributed computing, and it helped define the modern studies of complex systems and workflow management. His contributions have been in the broader area of network theory which includes coordination models and theories of interaction, and eventually led to the
    6.14
    7 votes
    10
    Abdul Waheed Khan

    Abdul Waheed Khan

    Abdul Waheed Khan (1947) was the Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), a role he has held from 2001 to 2010. He is currently President of a start-up business university in Manama, Bahrain. Khan attended Agra University in India, earning a Master's degree in Agricultural Extension in 1965, before relocating to the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin. There, he earned a second Master's degree in Agricultural Journalism in 1970 before earning his Doctor of Philosophy in Mass Communication in 1973. He was born in Agya(Sant kabir Nagar) Prior to joining the United Nations, Khan was affiliated with the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in New Delhi, India and Commonwealth of Learning in Canada. Founding director of the former, Khan was also Professor of its Communications Division until 1992. In his last year in that capacity, he simultaneously acted as a visiting professor at the National Institute of Multimedia Education in Chiba, Japan. He began working at Commonwealth of Learning as Senior Programme Officer in 1992. In 1995, he spent a year as Acting Head of the
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Ken Perlin

    Ken Perlin

    Ken Perlin is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at New York University, founding director of the Media Research Lab at NYU, and the Director of the Games for Learning Institute. His research interests include graphics, animation, multimedia, and science education. He developed or was involved with the development of techniques such as Perlin noise, hypertexture, real-time interactive character animation, and computer-user interfaces such as zooming user interfaces, stylus-based input, and most recently, cheap, accurate multi-touch input devices. He is also the Chief Technology Advisor of ActorMachine, LLC. His invention of Perlin noise in 1985 has become a standard that is used in both computer graphics and movement. Perlin was founding director of the NYU Media Research Laboratory and also directed the NYU Center for Advanced Technology from 1994 to 2004. He was the System Architect for computer generated animation at Mathematical Applications Group, Inc. 1979-1984, where he worked on Tron. He has served on the Board of Directors of the New York chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH, and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Software Industry Association.
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Vernor Vinge

    Vernor Vinge

    Vernor Steffen Vinge ( /ˈvɪndʒiː/; born October 2, 1944, in Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S.) is a retired San Diego State University (SDSU) Professor of Mathematics, computer scientist, and science fiction author. He is best known for his Hugo Award-winning novels and novellas A Fire Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), Rainbows End (2006), Fast Times at Fairmont High (2002) and The Cookie Monster (2004), as well as for his 1984 novel The Peace War and his 1993 essay "The Coming Technological Singularity", in which he argues that the creation of superhuman artificial intelligence will mark the point at which "the human era will be ended," such that no current models of reality are sufficient to predict beyond it. Vinge published his first short story, "Bookworm, Run!", in the March 1966 issue of Analog Science Fiction, then edited by John W. Campbell. The story explores the theme of artificially augmented intelligence by connecting the brain directly to computerised data sources. He became a moderately prolific contributor to SF magazines in the 1960s and early 1970s. In 1969, he expanded the story "Grimm's Story" (Orbit 4, 1968) into his first novel, Grimm's World. His
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    Alan Turing

    Alan Turing

    Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS ( /ˈtjʊərɪŋ/ TEWR-ing; 23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954), was a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist. He was highly influential in the development of computer science, giving a formalisation of the concepts of "algorithm" and "computation" with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of computer science and artificial intelligence. During World War II, Turing worked for the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park, Britain's codebreaking centre. For a time he was head of Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including the method of the bombe, an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine. After the war he worked at the National Physical Laboratory, where he created one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, the ACE. In 1948 Turing joined Max Newman's Computing Laboratory at Manchester University, where he assisted in the development of the Manchester computers and became interested in
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    David L. Mills

    David L. Mills

    David L. Mills (born June 3, 1938) is an American computer engineer and Internet pioneer. Mills earned his PhD in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan in 1971. While at Michigan he worked on the ARPA sponsored Conversational Use of Computers (CONCOMP) project and developed DEC PDP-8 based hardware and software to allow terminals to be connected over phone lines to an IBM 360 mainframe. Mills was the chairman of the Gateway Algorithms and Data Structures Task Force (GADS) and the first chairman of the Internet Architecture Task Force. He invented the Network Time Protocol (1981), the DEC LSI-11 based fuzzball router that was used for the 56 kbit/s NSFNET (1985), the Exterior Gateway Protocol (1984), inspired the author of ping for BSD (1983), and had the first FTP implementation. He has authored numerous RFCs. In 1999 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, and in 2002, he was inducted as a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). In 2008, Mills was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Currently, Dr. Mills is an emeritus professor at the University of Delaware, where he was
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Jonathan Bowen

    Jonathan Bowen

    Jonathan P. Bowen FBCS FRSA (born 1956) is a British computer scientist. He is Chairman of Museophile Limited, an Emeritus Professor at London South Bank University where he has headed the Centre for Applied Formal Methods, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Westminster. Formerly he was a Visiting Professor at King's College London and a visiting academic at University College London. Bowen was born in Oxford, the son of Humphry Bowen, and was educated at the Dragon School, Bryanston School, prior to his matriculation at University College Oxford (Oxford University) where he received the MA degree in Engineering Science. Bowen later worked at Imperial College, London, the Oxford University Computing Laboratory, and the University of Reading. His early work was on formal methods in general, and later the Z notation in particular. He was Chair of the Z User Group from the early 1990s until 2011. In 2002, Bowen was elected Chair of the British Computer Society FACS Specialist Group on Formal Aspects of Computing Science. Since 2005, Bowen has been an Associate Editor-in-Chief of the journal Innovations in Systems and Software Engineering. From 2008–09, he was an Associate
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Stuart Feldman

    Stuart Feldman

    Stuart Feldman received an A.B. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University and a Ph.D in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is best known as the creator of the computer software program make for UNIX systems. He was also an author of the first Fortran 77 compiler, and he was part of the original group at Bell Labs that created the Unix operating system. Until recently, he was the Vice President of Computer Science at IBM Research. He is currently Vice President, Engineering, East Coast, at Google. Feldman has served on the board of the Computing Research Association (CRA) and of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International). He was chair of ACM SIGPLAN and founding chair of ACM SIGecom. He was elected the President of the ACM in 2006. Feldman is also a member of ACM Queue's Editorial Advisory Board, a magazine he helped found with Steve Bourne. He has also served on the editorial boards of IEEE Internet Computing and IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. Feldman became a Fellow of the IEEE in 1991 and a Fellow of the ACM in 1995. In 2003, he was awarded ACM's Software System Award for his creation
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Don Hopkins

    Don Hopkins

    Don Hopkins is an artist and programmer specializing in human computer interaction and computer graphics and an alumni of the University of Maryland and a former member of the University of Maryland Human – Computer Interaction Lab. He inspired Richard Stallman, who described him as a "very imaginative fellow", to use the term copyleft. He coined Deep Crack as the name of the EFF DES cracker, and built "AJAXian" applications for the NeWS window system 17 years before the term was coined. He ported the SimCity computer game to several versions of Unix and developed a multi player version of SimCity for X11, did much of the core programming of The Sims, and developed robot control and personality simulation software for Will Wright's Stupid Fun Club. He developed and refined pie menus for many platforms and applications including window managers, Emacs, SimCity and The Sims, and published a frequently cited paper about pie menus at CHI'88 with Jack Callahan, Ben Shneiderman and Mark Weiser. He has published many free software and open source implementations of pie menus for X10, X11, NeWS, Tcl/tk, ScriptX, ActiveX, JavaScript, OpenLaszlo, Python and OLPC, and also proprietary
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    David A. Patterson

    David A. Patterson

    David Andrew Patterson (born November 16, 1947) is an American computer pioneer and academic who has held the position of Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley since 1977. Patterson is noted for his pioneering contributions to RISC processor design, having coined the term RISC, and by leading the Berkeley RISC project. He is also noted for his research on RAID disks. His book on computer architecture (co-authored with John L. Hennessy) is widely used in computer science education. Patterson is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. A native of Evergreen Park, Illinois, David Patterson attended UCLA, receiving his B.A. in 1969, M.S. in 1970 and Ph.D. (advised by David F. Martin and Gerald Estrin) in 1976. He is an important proponent of the concept of Reduced Instruction Set Computer and coined the term "RISC". He led the Berkeley RISC project from 1980 and onwards along with Carlo H. Sequin, where the technique of register windows was introduced. He is also one of the innovators of the Redundant Arrays of Independent Disks (RAID) (in collaboration with Randy Katz and Garth Gibson), and Network of Workstations (NOW) (in
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Sophie Wilson

    Sophie Wilson

    Sophie Wilson (born 'Roger Wilson' in Leeds, England, in 1957) is a British computer scientist. She is known for designing the Acorn Micro-Computer, the first of a long line of computers sold by Acorn Computers Ltd, as well as the instruction set of the highly successful ARM processor. Wilson was educated at Cambridge University. In 1978, she designed the Acorn Micro-Computer, the first of a long line of computers sold by Acorn Computers Ltd. In 1981, Wilson extended the Acorn Atom's BASIC programming language dialect into an improved version for the Acorn Proton, a microcomputer that enabled Acorn to win the contract with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for their ambitious computer education project, whereupon the Proton became the BBC Micro and its BASIC was developed into BBC BASIC. In 1983, she designed the instruction set for one of the first RISC processors, the Acorn RISC Machine (ARM), later to become one of the most successful IP-cores (i.e., a licenced CPU core) of the 1990s and 2000s. Wilson designed Acorn Replay, the video architecture for Acorn machines. This included the operating system extensions for video access as well as the codecs themselves,
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Wolfgang Wahlster

    Wolfgang Wahlster

    Wolfgang Wahlster (born February 2, 1953) is a German Artificial Intelligence researcher. He is CEO and Scientific Director of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence and full professor in computer science at Saarland University, Saarbrücken. He was awarded the Deutscher Zukunftspreis ("German Future Award") in 2001 and is a foreign member of the Class for Engineering Sciences of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences since 2003. In 2004, he was elected as a fellow of the Gesellschaft für Informatik.
    6.17
    6 votes
    21
    Harald Tveit Alvestrand

    Harald Tveit Alvestrand

    Harald Tveit Alvestrand (born 1959) is a Norwegian computer scientist. He was the chairman of the Internet Engineering Task Force from 2001 until 2005. He is an author of several important RFCs, many in the general area of Internationalization and localization. He was born in Namsos, Norway, received his education from Bergen Katedralskole and the Norwegian Institute of Technology, and has worked for Norsk Data, UNINETT, EDB Maxware and Cisco Systems, Inc.. He currently (2008) lives in Trondheim, Norway, and works for Google. At the end of 2007 Harald Alvestrand was selected for the ICANN Board., where he remained until December 2010. In 2001 he became a member of the Unicode Board of Directors. He has more recently been a co-Chair of the IETF EAI and USEFOR WGs. Harald Alvestrand is the Executive Director of the Linux Counter Organization. He is a member of the Norid Board, and the RFC Independent Submissions Editorial Board.
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Julian Lombardi

    Julian Lombardi

    Julian Lombardi (born November 11, 1956) is an American inventor, author, educator, and computer scientist known for his work with socio-computational systems, scalable virtual world technologies, and in the design and deployment of deeply collaborative virtual learning environments. Lombardi was born to a concert pianist and an Italian actress living in New York City. His family soon moved back to Rome, Italy where he lived until the age of six. He went on to attend Buckley Country Day School and public schools in Great Neck, New York and elsewhere on Long Island. In 1974 Lombardi began his undergraduate studies at Dowling College and graduated cum laude in the Biology major and Physics minor in 1977. He attended Graduate School at Clemson University where he received his MA in 1980 and was granted a PhD in Zoology in 1983. Upon graduation, Lombardi accepted a postdoctoral appointment and lectureship in the biological sciences at the University of North Carolina which he held until 1986. In 1986, Lombardi was appointed an Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In 1990, he received tenure and was named Director of Graduate Studies in
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Max Levchin

    Max Levchin

    Max Rafael Levchin (Ukrainian: Максиміліан Левчин Maksymilian R. Levčyn), born on July 11, 1975 in a Jewish family, is a Ukrainian-born American computer scientist and internet entrepreneur widely known as one of the co-founders (along with Peter Thiel and Elon Musk) and for his role as the former chief technology officer of PayPal. Levchin is considered a member of the PayPal Mafia. Born in Kiev, Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union) to a Jewish family he moved to the United States under political asylum, and settled in Chicago in 1991. He attended Mather High School and then earned his bachelor in Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1997 and co-founded two companies that made Internet-tools, NetMeridian Software and SponsorNet New Media. In 1998, Levchin founded Fieldlink with John Bernard Powers (who left the company shortly thereafter) and Peter Thiel. After changing the company name to Confinity, they developed a popular payment product known as PayPal. After a merger with X.com, the combined entity was renamed PayPal Inc. PayPal Inc. went public in February 2002, and was subsequently acquired by eBay. Levchin worked there with Peter Thiel,
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Niklaus Wirth

    Niklaus Wirth

    Niklaus Emil Wirth (born February 15, 1934) is a Swiss computer scientist, best known for designing several programming languages, including Pascal, and for pioneering several classic topics in software engineering. In 1984 he won the Turing Award for developing a sequence of innovative computer languages. Wirth was born in Winterthur, Switzerland, in 1934. In 1959 he earned a degree in Electronics Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich (ETH Zürich). In 1960 he earned an M.Sc. from Université Laval, Canada. Then in 1963 he was awarded a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) from the University of California, Berkeley, supervised by the computer designer pioneer Harry Huskey. From 1963 to 1967 he served as assistant professor of Computer Science at Stanford University and again at the University of Zurich. Then in 1968 he became Professor of Informatics at ETH Zürich, taking two one-year sabbaticals at Xerox PARC in California (1976–1977 and 1984–1985). Wirth retired in 1999. Wirth was the chief designer of the programming languages Euler, Algol W, Pascal, Modula, Modula-2, Oberon, Oberon-2, and Oberon-07. He was also a major part of
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Zeev Suraski

    Zeev Suraski

    Zeev Suraski (Hebrew: זאב סורסקי‎ IPA: /zeˈʔev suˈʁaski/) is an Israeli programmer, PHP developer and co-founder of Zend Technologies. A graduate of the Technion in Haifa, Israel, Suraski and fellow student Andi Gutmans created PHP 3 in 1997. In 1999 they wrote the Zend Engine, the core of PHP 4, and founded Zend Technologies, which has since overseen PHP advances. The name Zend is a portmanteau of their forenames, Zeev and Andi. Suraski is an emeritus member of the Apache Software Foundation, and was nominated for the FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software in 1999. Zeev Suraski is the CTO for Zend Technologies.
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    David D. Clark

    David D. Clark

    David Dana Clark (born April 7, 1944) is an American computer scientist. He graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966. In 1968, he received his Master's and Engineer's degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he worked on the I/O architecture of Multics under Jerry Saltzer. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1973. From 1981 to 1989, he acted as chief protocol architect in the development of the Internet, and chaired the Internet Activities Board, which later became the Internet Architecture Board. He has also served as chairman of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. In 1990 he was awarded the SIGCOMM Award in recognition of his major contributions to Internet protocol and architecture. Clark received in 1998 the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal. In 2001 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. In 2001, he was awarded the Telluride Tech Festival Award of Technology in Telluride, Colorado.
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    Donald Michie

    Donald Michie

    Donald Michie (November 11, 1923 – July 7, 2007) was a British researcher in artificial intelligence. During World War II, Michie worked for the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park, contributing to the effort to solve "Tunny," a German teleprinter cipher. Michie was born in Rangoon, Burma. He attended Rugby School and won a scholarship to study classics at Balliol College, Oxford. In Spring 1943, however, looking for some way to contribute to the war effort, Michie instead attempted to enroll on a Japanese language course in Bedford for intelligence officers. On arrival, it transpired that the course was full, and instead he trained in cryptography, displaying a natural aptitude for the subject. Six weeks later, he was recruited to Bletchley Park and was assigned to the "Testery," a section which tackled a German teleprinter cipher. During his time at Bletchley Park he worked with Alan Turing, Max Newman and Jack Good. Between 1945 and 1952 he studied at Balliol College, Oxford; he received his DPhil, in mammalian genetics, in 1953. In 1960, he developed the Machine Educable Noughts And Crosses Engine (MENACE), one of the first programs capable of learning to play a
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    Charles H. Moore

    Charles H. Moore

    Charles H. Moore (also known as Chuck Moore) (born 1938) is the inventor of the Forth programming language. In 1968, while employed at the United States National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Moore invented the initial version of the Forth language to help control radio telescopes. In 1971 he co-founded (with Elizabeth Rather) FORTH, Inc., the first, and still one of the leading, purveyors of Forth solutions. During the 1970s he ported Forth to dozens of computer architectures. In the 1980s, Moore turned his attention and Forth development techniques to CPU design, developing several stack machine microprocessors and gaining several microprocessor-related patents along the way. His designs have all emphasized high performance at low power usage. He also explored alternate Forth architectures such as cmForth and machine Forth, which more closely matched his chips' machine languages. These later evolved in 1996 into colorForth for the IBM PC. In 1983 Moore founded Novix, Inc., where he developed the NC4000 processor. This design was licensed to Harris Semiconductor which marketed it as the RTX2000, a radiation hardened stack processor which has been used in numerous NASA
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Leonard Kleinrock

    Leonard Kleinrock

    Leonard Kleinrock (born June 13, 1934) is an American engineer and computer scientist. A computer science professor at UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, he made several important contributions to the field of computer networking, in particular to the theoretical side of computer networking. He also played an important role in the development of the ARPANET, the precursor to the Internet, at UCLA. His most well-known and significant work is his early work on queueing theory, which has applications in many fields, among them as a key mathematical background to packet switching, the basic technology behind the Internet. His initial contribution to this field was his doctoral thesis at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1962, published in book form in 1964; he later published several of the standard works on the subject. He described this work as: "Basically, what I did for my PhD research in 1961–1962 was to establish a mathematical theory of packet networks..." His theoretical work on hierarchical routing, done in the late 1970s with his then-student Farouk Kamoun, is now critical to the operation of today's worldwide Internet. Kleinrock was
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Radia Perlman

    Radia Perlman

    Radia Joy Perlman (born 1951 in Portsmouth, Virginia, USA) is a software designer and network engineer sometimes referred to as the "Mother of the Internet.", a title which she dislikes. She is most famous for her invention of the spanning-tree protocol (STP), which is fundamental to the operation of network bridges, while working for Digital Equipment Corporation. She also made large contributions to many other areas of network design and standardization, such as link-state protocols, including TRILL, which she invented to correct some of the shortcomings of spanning-trees. She obtained a Bachelor's, Master's in Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT. Her doctoral thesis at MIT addressed the issue of routing in the presence of malicious network failures. Perlman is the author of one textbook on networking and coauthor of one textbook on network security. She is currently employed by Intel. She holds more than fifty patents from Sun alone. As an undergraduate at MIT she undertook a UROP (Undergraduate Research Opportunity), in lieu of course units, within the LOGO Lab at the (then) MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Working under the supervision of Seymour
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Rudy Rucker

    Rudy Rucker

    Rudolf von Bitter Rucker (born March 22, 1946) is an American mathematician, computer scientist, science fiction author, and philosopher, and is one of the founders of the cyberpunk literary movement. The author of both fiction and non-fiction, he is best known for the novels in the Ware Tetralogy, the first two of which (Software and Wetware) both won Philip K. Dick Awards. At present he edits the science fiction webzine Flurb. Rucker was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the great-great-great-grandson of the philosopher G. W. F. Hegel. Rucker attended St. Xavier High School before earning a B.A. in mathematics from Swarthmore College in 1967 and M.S. (1969) and Ph.D. (1973) degrees in mathematics from Rutgers University. Rucker taught at the State University of New York at Geneseo from 1972–1978. Thanks to a grant from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Rucker taught math at the Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg from 1978–1980. He then taught at Randolph-Macon Women's College in Lynchburg, Virginia from 1980–1982, before trying his hand as a full-time author for four years. Inspired by an interview with Stephen Wolfram, Rucker became a computer science
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Shafi Goldwasser

    Shafi Goldwasser

    Shafrira Goldwasser (Hebrew: שפרירה גולדווסר‎; born 1958) is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and a professor of mathematical sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. Born in New York City, Goldwasser obtained her B.S. (1979) in mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University, and M.S. (1981) and PhD (1983) in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. She joined MIT in 1983, and in 1997 became the first holder of the RSA Professorship. She is a member of the Theory of Computation group at MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Goldwasser has two siblings, Nathan Goldwasser and Rivka Goldwasser. Goldwasser's research areas include computational complexity theory, cryptography and computational number theory. She is the co-inventor of zero-knowledge proofs, which probabilistically and interactively demonstrate the validity of an assertion without conveying any additional knowledge, and are a key tool in the design of cryptographic protocols. Her work in complexity theory includes the classification of approximation problems, showing that some problems in NP remain hard even when only an approximate
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Andrew Viterbi

    Andrew Viterbi

    Andrew James Viterbi (born Andrea James Viterbi; March 9, 1935) is an Italian-American electrical engineer and businessman who co-founded Qualcomm Inc. Viterbi was born in Bergamo, Italy to Jewish parents and emigrated with them in 1939 to the United States as a refugee. His original name was Andrea, but when he was naturalized in the US, his parents changed it to Andrew, since Andrea is a female name in many English-speaking countries. Viterbi attended the Boston Latin School, and then entered MIT in 1952, studying electrical engineering. He received both BS and MS in Electrical Engineering in 1957 from MIT. He worked at Raytheon and later at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, where he started working on telemetry for guided missiles, also helping to develop the phase-locked loop. Simultaneously, he was carrying out a PhD study at the University of Southern California, where he graduated in 1963 in digital communications. After receiving his Ph.D., he applied successfully for an academic position at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Viterbi was later a professor of electrical engineering at UCLA and UCSD. In 1967 he invented the Viterbi algorithm, which he used for
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    Sebastian Thrun

    Sebastian Thrun

    Sebastian Burkhard Thrun (born May 14, 1967 in Solingen, Germany) is a German educator and computer scientist. He is a Google VP and Fellow and a part-time Research Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University and former director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL). He led the development of the robotic vehicle Stanley which won the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge, and which is exhibited in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. His team also developed a vehicle called Junior, which placed second at the DARPA Urban Challenge in 2007. Thrun led the development of the Google self-driving car. Thrun is also known for his work on probabilistic programming techniques in robotics, with applications including robotic mapping. In recognition of his contributions, and at age 39, Thrun was elected into the National Academy of Engineering and also into the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina in 2007. In 2011, Thrun received the Max-Planck-Research Award. and the inaugural AAAI Ed Feigenbaum Prize. Fast Company selected Thrun as the fifth most creative person in business in the world. Thrun was born in 1967 in Solingen, Germany (then West
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Anu Garg

    Anu Garg

    Anu Garg (born April 5, 1967), an Indian author and speaker, is best known as the founder of Wordsmith.org, an online community comprising word lovers from an estimated 200 countries. His books explore the joy of words. He has authored several books about language-related issues for magazines and newspapers. He is a columnist for MSN Encarta and Kahani magazine. Garg was born in rural India. His schooling took place under a mango tree, his classroom consisting of a few broken sticks of chalk and a blackboard made by painting a flat piece of wood with soot. The only language he knew was Hindi, and he did not see a library until college. Garg graduated from Harcourt Butler Technological Institute in Computer Science in 1988. He lives in the Seattle area with his wife, Stuti and daughter, Ananya. He is a vegan. He started his career from United States to receive graduate studies in Computer Science at Case Western Reserve University, and then worked as a Computer Scientist at AT&T and other corporations. He founded Wordsmith.org in 1994, during his graduate work. In 2010, the number of subscribers to Wordsmith.org's "A Word A Day" email list reached one million.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Marshall Kirk McKusick

    Marshall Kirk McKusick

    Marshall Kirk McKusick (born January 19, 1954 in Wilmington, Delaware) is a computer scientist, known for his extensive work on BSD, from the 1980s to FreeBSD in the present day. He was president of the USENIX Association from 1990 to 1992 and again from 2002 to 2004, and still serves on the board. He is also on the editorial board of ACM Queue Magazine. He is known to friends and colleagues as "Kirk". McKusick received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University, and 2 M.S. degrees (in 1979 and 1980 respectively) and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1984. McKusick is openly gay and lives in California with Eric Allman, his domestic partner since graduate school. McKusick is an avid wine collector and the temperature and vital statistics of his house and wine cellar are available on the web from his homepage. McKusick started with BSD by virtue of the fact that he shared an office at Berkeley with Bill Joy, who in essence spearheaded the beginnings of the BSD system. Some of his largest contributions to BSD have been to the file system. He helped design the original Berkeley Fast File System (FFS). More recently, he
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Stephen Cook

    Stephen Cook

    Stephen Arthur Cook (born December 14, 1939, Buffalo, New York) is a renowned American-Canadian computer scientist and mathematician who has made major contributions to the fields of complexity theory and proof complexity. He is currently a University Professor at the University of Toronto, Department of Computer Science and Department of Mathematics. Cook received his Bachelor's degree in 1961 from the University of Michigan, and his Master's degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University, respectively in 1962 and 1966. He joined the University of California, Berkeley, mathematics department in 1966 as an Assistant Professor, and stayed there until 1970 when he was denied reappointment. In a speech celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Berkeley EECS department, fellow Turing Award winner and Berkeley professor Richard Karp said that, "It is to our everlasting shame that we were unable to persuade the math department to give him tenure." Cook joined the faculty of University of Toronto, Computer Science and Mathematics Departments in 1970 as an Associate Professor, where he was promoted to Professor in 1975 and University Professor in 1985. Cook is considered one of the forefathers of
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Ben Shneiderman

    Ben Shneiderman

    Ben Shneiderman (born August 21, 1947) is an American computer scientist, and professor for Computer Science at the University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the University of Maryland, College Park. He conducted fundamental research in the field of human–computer interaction, developing new ideas, methods, and tools such as the direct manipulation interface, and his eight rules of design. He is a graduate of the Bronx High School of Science, and received a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from the City College of New York in 1968, and then went on to study at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he received an M.S. in Computer Science in 1972 and graduated with a Ph.D. in 1973. He was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery in 1997, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2001, a Member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2010, and an IEEE Fellow in 2012. In 2002 his book Leonardo's Laptop: Human Needs and the New Computing Technologies was Winner of a IEEE-USA Award for Distinguished Contributions Furthering Public Understanding of the Profession. He also received Honorary Doctorates by
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Bryan Cantrill

    Bryan Cantrill

    Bryan M. Cantrill is an engineer who worked at Sun Microsystems and later at Oracle Corporation following its acquisition by Sun. He left Oracle on July 25, 2010 to become the Vice President of Engineering at Joyent. Cantrill was born in Vermont, later moving to Colorado, where he attained the rank of Eagle Scout. He studied computer science at Brown University, spending two summers at QNX Software Systems doing kernel development. Upon completing his B.Sc. in 1996, he immediately joined Sun Microsystems to work with Jeff Bonwick in the Solaris Performance Group. In 2005 Bryan Cantrill was named one of the 35 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, MIT's magazine. Cantrill was included in the TR35 list for his development of DTrace, a function of the OS Solaris 10 that provides a non-invasive means for real-time tracing and diagnosis of software. Sun technologies and technologists, including DTrace and Cantrill, also received an InfoWorld Innovators Award that year. In 2006, "The DTrace trouble-shooting software from Sun was chosen as the Gold winner in The Wall Street Journal's 2006 Technology Innovation Awards contest." In 2008, Cantrill, Mike Shapiro and Adam Leventhal were
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    George Sadowsky

    George Sadowsky

    George Sadowsky (born September 30, 1936 in Russia) is an American computer scientist who has worked in a number of entities, related to promotion of the Internet worldwide. He is well-known all over the world through his decades of work with developing countries. In many of these countries, he was the one to actually bring the Internet, or make it affordable, or help change the legislation, to make sure it minimized government control and regulation. Sadowsky's first work was at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (1958–1962), where he was an applied mathematician and programmer for the Nuclear Division. He then went to Yale University (1962–1963), where he was Manager of Operations of Yale Computer Center and Research Assistant in Economics. For three years (1962–1965), while in graduate school at Yale, Sadowsky was a consultant to government agencies and research projects, e.g. he introduced the use of computers for revenue estimation in the Office of Tax Analysis of the U. S. Treasury Department and developed a large computer-based microanalytic simulation model to analyze the revenue and distributional effects of preliminary versions of the Revenue Act of 1964. He then went to the
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Jeff Rulifson

    Jeff Rulifson

    Johns Frederick (Jeff) Rulifson (born August 20, 1941) is an American computer scientist. Johns Frederick Rulifson was born August 20, 1941 in Bellefontaine, Ohio. His father was Erwin Charles Rulifson and mother was Virginia Helen Johns. He married Janet Irving on June 8, 1963 and had two children. Rulifson graduated with a BS in mathematics from the University of Washington in 1966. Rulifson joined the Augmentation Research Center, at the Stanford Research Institute (now SRI International) in 1966. He led the software team that implemented the oN-Line System (NLS), a system that foreshadowed many future developments in modern computing and networking. Although Douglas Engelbart was the founder and leader of ARC, Rulifson's innovative programming was essential to the realization of Engelbart's vision. Rulifson was SRI's representative to the "network working group" in 1968, which led to the first connection on the ARPANET. He described the Decode-Encode Language (DEL), which was designed to allow remote use of NLS over ARPANET. Although never used, the idea was small "programs" would be down-loaded to enhance user interaction. This concept was fully developed in Sun Microsystems's
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Newton Lee

    Newton Lee

    Newton Lee is the author of Facebook Nation: Total Information Awareness and co-author of Disney Stories: Getting to Digital. Lee is the founding president of the 501(c)(3) nonprofit Institute for Education, Research, and Scholarships (IFERS) dedicated to improving society by providing resources to high achieving students, scientific researchers, nonprofits, and educational organizations. He is the founder and editor-in-chief of the ACM Computers in Entertainment (CIE) magazine, a nonprofit educational publication to promote research and development in all aspects of entertainment technology. Published by the Association for Computing Machinery, the online magazine has garnered the support of more than 100 leading professionals and scholars representing major universities, Hollywood studios, and Fortune 500 companies. Many of whom have won the Academy Awards, Emmys, and Grammys. Previously, Lee was the founding director of the NUS Hollywood Lab with Adrian David Cheok, computer science and artificial intelligence researcher at AT&T Bell Laboratories, senior producer and lead engineer at The Walt Disney Company,, research scientist at VTLS, and research staff member at the Institute
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Peter H. Salus

    Peter H. Salus

    Peter H. Salus is a linguist, computer scientist, historian of technology, author in many fields, and an editor of books and journals. He has conducted research in germanistics, language acquisition, and computer languages. He has a 1963 PhD in Linguistics from New York University. After an intense academic career serving as professor and dean at several universities, he is now largely retired. He has also been Executive Director of both the USENIX Association and the Sun User Group, and Vice President of the Free Software Foundation; in addition, he has worked for several high tech startups. From 1987 to 1996, he was Managing Editor of the technical journal Computing Systems (MIT Press and the USENIX Association). He is best known for his books on the history of computing, particularly A Quarter Century of UNIX and Casting The Net (a history of the Internet up to 1995).
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Udi Manber

    Udi Manber

    Udi Manber (Hebrew: אודי מנבר‎) is an Israeli computer scientist. He is one of the authors of agrep and GLIMPSE. As of April 2006, he is employed by Google as vice president of engineering. He earned both his bachelor's degree in 1975 in mathematics and his master's degree in 1978 from the Technion in Israel. At the University of Washington, he earned another master's degree in 1981 and his Ph.D. in computer science in 1982. He has won a Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, 3 best-paper awards, and the Usenix annual Software Tools User Group Award software award in 1999. He developed suffix array, a data structure for string matching, with Gene Myers. He was a professor at the University of Arizona and authored several articles while there. He wrote Introduction to Algorithms — A Creative Approach. He became the chief scientist at Yahoo! in 1998. In 2002, he joined Amazon.com, where he became "chief algorithms officer" and a vice president. He later was appointed CEO of the Amazon subsidiary company A9.com. He filed a patent on behalf of Amazon. In 2006, he was hired by Google as one of their vice presidents of engineering. In December 2007, he announced Knol, Google's
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Yves Cochet

    Yves Cochet

    Yves Cochet is a French politician, member of Europe Écologie–The Greens. He was minister in the government of Lionel Jospin. On December 6 2011, he was elected member of the European Parliament. He wrote Apocalypse pétrole which was published in 2005.
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Marvin Minsky

    Marvin Minsky

    Marvin Lee Minsky (born August 9, 1927) is an American cognitive scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), co-founder of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's AI laboratory, and author of several texts on AI and philosophy. Marvin Lee Minsky was born in New York City to a Jewish family, where he attended The Fieldston School and the Bronx High School of Science. He later attended Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. He served in the US Navy from 1944 to 1945. He holds a BA in Mathematics from Harvard (1950) and a PhD in mathematics from Princeton (1954). He has been on the MIT faculty since 1958. In 1959 he and John McCarthy founded what is now known as the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He is currently the Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, and Professor of electrical engineering and computer science. Isaac Asimov described Minsky as one of only two people he would admit were more intelligent than he was, the other being Carl Sagan. Minsky's inventions include the first head-mounted graphical display (1963) and the confocal microscope (1957, a predecessor to today's widely used confocal laser scanning microscope). He
    10.00
    2 votes
    47
    James Hendler

    James Hendler

    James Alexander Hendler (born April 2, 1957) is an artificial intelligence researcher at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA, and one of the originators of the Semantic Web. Hendler completed his Doctor of Philosophy degree at Brown University with a thesis on automated planning and scheduling Hendler's research interests are in the semantic web and artificial intelligence. Hendler held a longstanding position as professor at the University of Maryland where he was the Director of the Joint Institute for Knowledge Discovery and held joint appointments in the Department of Computer Science, the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the Institute for Systems Research. Hendler was the Director for Semantic Web and Agent Technology at the Maryland Information and Network Dynamics Laboratory. He is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the British Computer Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the AAAS. On June 14, 2006, James A. Hendler was appointed senior constellation professor of the Tetherless World Research Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and he became a professor at that institute starting on
    6.40
    5 votes
    48
    Annie Easley

    Annie Easley

    Annie J. Easley was an American mathematician and rocket scientist who was born on April 23, 1933 in Birmingham, Alabama and died June 25, 2011 in Cleveland, Ohio. She is an African American computer scientist who worked for the Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). She was a leading member of the team which developed software for the Centaur rocket stage and one of the first African-Americans in her field. Annie J. Easley was born to Samuel Bird Easley and Mary Melvina Hoover and was raised in Birmingham, Alabama. In the days before the Civil Rights Movement, educational and career opportunities for African American children were very limited. African American children were educated separately from white children and their schools were most often inferior to white schools. Annie was fortunate in that her mother told her that she could be anything she wanted but she would have to work at it. She encouraged her to get a good education and from the fifth grade through high school, she attended a parochial school and was valedictorian of her graduating class. After
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Richard Bird

    Richard Bird

    Prof. Richard Simpson Bird (born 1943, London) is a Supernumerary Fellow of Computation at Lincoln College, Oxford, England, and former director of Oxford University Computing Laboratory. Bird's research interests lie in algorithm design and functional programming, and he is known as a regular contributor to the Journal of Functional Programming and the author of Introduction to Functional Programming using Haskell and other books. His name is associated with the Bird-Meertens Formalism, a calculus for deriving programs from specifications in a functional programming style. Previously Bird was at the University of Reading.
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Donald B. Gillies

    Donald B. Gillies

    Donald Bruce Gillies (October 15, 1928 – July 17, 1975) was a Canadian mathematician and computer scientist, known for his work in game theory, computer design, and minicomputer programming environments. Donald B. Gillies was born in Toronto, Canada and attended the University of Toronto Schools, a laboratory school originally affiliated with the University. Students at this Ontario school skipped a year ahead and so he finished his 13th-grade studies at the age of 18. Gillies attended the University of Toronto (1946–1950), intending to major in Languages and started his first semester taking seven different language courses. In his second semester he quickly switched back to majoring in Mathematics which was his love while in high school. In the Putnam exam competition of 1950, Gillies placed in the top 10 in North America, following his University of Toronto classmates John P. Mayberry and Richard J. Semple who were top 5 Putnam Fellows. Toronto would likely have won the competition in 1950 had Gillies been on the faculty-designated team.. After one year of graduate school at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1951), Gillies transferred to Princeton University at the
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Rasmus Lerdorf

    Rasmus Lerdorf

    Rasmus Lerdorf (born 22 November 1968 in Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland) is a Danish programmer with Canadian citizenship and is most notable as the creator of the PHP scripting language. He authored the first two versions. Lerdorf has also participated in the development of later versions of PHP led by a group of developers including Jim Winstead (who later created blo.gs), Stig Bakken, Shane Caraveo, Andi Gutmans and Zeev Suraski, and is still a contributor. He graduated from King City Secondary School in 1988, and in 1993 he graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Bachelor of Applied Science in Systems Design Engineering. He contributed to the Apache HTTP Server and he added the LIMIT clause to the MSQL DBMS. The LIMIT clause was later adapted by several other DBMS, including MySQL. From September 2002 to November 6, 2009, he was employed by Yahoo! Inc. as an Infrastructure Architecture Engineer. In 2010, he joined WePay in order to develop their API. Throughout 2011 he was a roving consultant for startups. On February 22nd, 2012, he announced on Twitter that he had joined Etsy. Lerdorf is a frequent speaker at Open Source conferences around the world. During his keynote
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Kenneth E. Iverson

    Kenneth E. Iverson

    Kenneth Eugene Iverson (17 December 1920 – 19 October 2004) was a Canadian computer scientist noted for the development of the APL programming language in 1962. He was honored with the Turing Award in 1979 for his contributions to mathematical notation and programming language theory. The Iverson Award for contributions to APL was named in his honor. Ken Iverson was born on December 17, 1920 in Camrose, a town in central Alberta, Canada. His parents were farmers of Norwegian descent who came to Alberta from North Dakota. While he showed an early aptitude for mathematics, teaching himself calculus while a teenager, he left school after the 9th grade to work on his parents' farm. However, during World War II, while he served in the Royal Canadian Air Force, he qualified for a high school diploma by taking correspondence courses. After the war, he was able to enter Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and graduated in 1950 with a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics and Physics. Continuing his education at Harvard University, he received a Master's degree in 1951 in Mathematics and started working with Howard Aiken and Wassily Leontief. Howard Aiken had developed the Harvard Mark I,
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Steven Rudich

    Steven Rudich

    Steven Rudich (born October 4, 1961) is a professor in the Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science. In 1994, he and Alexander Razborov proved that a large class of combinatorial arguments, dubbed natural proofs were unlikely to answer many of the important problems in computational complexity theory. For this work, they were awarded the Gödel prize in 2007. He also co-authored a paper demonstrating that all currently known NP-complete problems remain NP-complete even under AC or NC reductions. Amongst Carnegie Mellon students, he is best known as the teacher of the class "Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science" (formerly named "How to Think Like a Computer Scientist"), often considered one of the most difficult classes in the undergraduate computer science curriculum. He is an editor of the Journal of Cryptology, as well as an accomplished magician. His Erdős number is 2. Rudich (and Merrick Furst, now a Distinguished Professor at Georgia Tech) began the Andrew's Leap summer enrichment program for high school (and occasionally, middle school) students in 1991. The summer enrichment program focuses mainly on theoretical aspects of Computer Science in the morning, followed by
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Butler Lampson

    Butler Lampson

    Butler W. Lampson (born December 23, 1943) is a renowned computer scientist. After graduating from the Lawrenceville School (where in 2009 he was awarded the Aldo Leopold Award, also known as the Lawrenceville Medal, Lawrenceville's highest award to alumni), Lampson received his Bachelor's degree in Physics from Harvard University in 1964, and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1967. During the 1960s, Lampson and others were part of Project GENIE at UC Berkeley. In 1965, several Project GENIE members, specifically Lampson and Peter Deutsch, developed the Berkeley Timesharing System for Scientific Data Systems' SDS 940 computer. Lampson was one of the founding members of Xerox PARC in 1970, where he worked in the Computer Science Laboratory (CSL). His now-famous vision of a personal computer was captured in the 1972 memo entitled "Why Alto?". In 1973, the Xerox Alto, with its three-button mouse and full-page-sized monitor was born. It is now considered to be the first actual personal computer (at least in terms of what has become the 'canonical' GUI mode of operation). All the subsequent computers built at Xerox
    5.33
    6 votes
    55
    Alan Kay

    Alan Kay

    Alan Curtis Kay (born May 17, 1940) is an American computer scientist, known for his early pioneering work on object-oriented programming and windowing graphical user interface design, and for coining the phrase, "The best way to predict the future is to invent it." He is the president of the Viewpoints Research Institute, and an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also on the advisory board of TTI/Vanguard. Until mid 2005, he was a Senior Fellow at HP Labs, a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University, and an Adjunct Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Alan Kay showed remarkable ability at an early age, learning to read fluently at three years old. In an interview on education in America with the Davis Group Ltd. Alan Kay said, "I had the fortune or misfortune to learn how to read fluently starting at the age of three. So I had read maybe 150 books by the time I hit 1st grade. And I already knew that the teachers were lying to me." Originally from Springfield, Massachusetts, Kay attended the University of Colorado at Boulder, earning a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics and Molecular Biology. Before and
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Nicholas Metropolis

    Nicholas Metropolis

    Nicholas Constantine Metropolis (June 11, 1915 – October 17, 1999) was a Greek American physicist. Metropolis received his B.Sc. (1937) and Ph.D. (1941) degrees in physics at the University of Chicago. Shortly afterwards, Robert Oppenheimer recruited him from Chicago, where he was at the time collaborating with Enrico Fermi and Edward Teller on the first nuclear reactors, to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He arrived in Los Alamos, on April 1943, as a member of the original staff of fifty scientists. After the World War II he returned to the faculty of the University of Chicago as an Assistant Professor. He came back to Los Alamos in 1948 to lead the group in the Theoretical (T) Division that designed and built the MANIAC I computer in 1952 that was modeled on the IAS, and the MANIAC II in 1957. (He chose the name MANIAC in the hope of stopping the rash of such acronyms for machine names, but may have, instead, only further stimulated such use.) (John von Neumann may have encouraged him to use this acronym.) From 1957 to 1965 he was Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago and was the founding Director of its Institute for Computer Research. In 1965 he returned to Los
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Pat Hanrahan

    Pat Hanrahan

    Pat Hanrahan is a computer graphics researcher, the Canon USA Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering in the Computer Graphics Laboratory at Stanford University. His research focuses on rendering algorithms, graphics processing units, as well as scientific illustration and visualization. Hanrahan received a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1985. In the 1980s, he worked at the New York Institute of Technology Computer Graphics Laboratory, Digital Equipment Corporation, and at Pixar. In 1989, he joined the faculty of Princeton University. In 1995, he moved to Stanford University. As a founding employee at Pixar Animation Studios in the 1980s, Hanrahan was part of the design of the RenderMan Interface Specification and the RenderMan Shading Language. More recently, Hanrahan has served as a co-founder and CTO of Tableau Software. He has been involved with several Pixar productions, including Tin Toy, The Magic Egg, and Toy Story. In 2005, Stanford University was named the first Regional Visualization and Analytics Center (RVAC), where Hanrahan assembled a multidisciplinary team of researchers, focused on broad-ranging problems in
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    J. Brant Arseneau

    J. Brant Arseneau

    Joseph Brant Arseneau (born September 3, 1967) is generally known in finance and technology for first formally defining finance techniques for third world housing by describing the securitization of excess cash flow from renewable energy with the use of Renewable Energy Derivatives. The technique was first based on microfinance methods and it continues to gain popularity as both financial and technical infrastructure matures. His team was also involved in the development of the Renewable Energy Derivative, which is a structured product that securitizes renewable energy into property-based debt obligations backed by the cash flows of excess energy. Thus providing a responsible use of the environment to finance properties in third world countries. The method was initially intended to finance lower income housing in developing countries by replacing the credit risk with the operational risk of the renewable energy assets' capability to generate predictable cash flows. The financing is structured so that the risk is to be underwrite until the cost of the houses can be claimed by the banks. The new method includes operational risk transfer and mitigation through insurance, weather
    6.00
    5 votes
    59
    Edward Felten

    Edward Felten

    Edward William Felten (born March 25, 1963) is a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University. On November 4, 2010 he was named the Chief Technologist for the United States Federal Trade Commission, a position he officially assumed January 3, 2011. Felten has done a variety of computer security research, including groundbreaking work on proof-carrying authentication and work on security related to the Java programming language, but he is perhaps best known for his paper on the Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI) challenge. Felten attended the California Institute of Technology and graduated with a degree in Physics in 1985. He worked as a staff programmer at Caltech from 1986 to 1989 on a parallel supercomputer project at Caltech. He then enrolled as a graduate student in Computer Science at the University of Washington. He was awarded an Master of Science degree in 1991 and a Ph.D in 1993. His Ph.D. thesis was on developing an automated protocol for communication between parallel processors. In 1993, he joined the faculty of Princeton University in the Department of Computer Science as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to Associate Professor in
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Eli Biham

    Eli Biham

    Eli Biham (Hebrew: אלי ביהם‎) is an Israeli cryptographer and cryptanalyst, currently a professor at the Technion Israeli Institute of Technology Computer Science department. Starting from October 2008, Biham is the dean of the Technion Computer Science department, after serving for two years as chief of CS graduate school. Biham received his Ph.D. for inventing (publicly) differential cryptanalysis, while working under Adi Shamir. It had, it turned out, been invented at least twice before. A team at IBM discovered it during their work on DES, and was requested/required to keep their discovery secret by the NSA, who evidently knew about it as well. Among his many contributions to cryptanalysis one can count: Biham has taken part in the design of several new cryptographic primitives:
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Gary Drescher

    Gary Drescher

    Gary L. Drescher is a scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), author of the book Made-Up Minds: A Constructivist Approach to Artificial Intelligence. His book describes a theory of how a computer program might be implemented to learn and use new concepts that have not been programmed into it. It introduces the Schema Mechanism, a general learning and concept-building mechanism inspired by Jean Piaget's account of human cognitive development. The Schema Mechanism is intended to replicate key aspects of cognitive development during infancy. It takes Piaget's theory of human development as source of inspiration for an artificial learning mechanism; and it extends and tests Piaget's theory by seeing whether a specific mechanism that works according to Piagetian themes actually exhibits Piagetian abilities. He was a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University, which is directed by the American philosopher Daniel Dennett. As a result of his studies there, he has written a book, Good and Real: Demystifying Paradoxes from Physics to Ethics, in which he defends a rigorously mechanistic materialism. In this book, he discusses quantum mechanics,
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Jack Dennis

    Jack Dennis

    Jack Dennis is a computer scientist and retired MIT professor. Dennis entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1949 as an electrical engineering major; he received his MS degree in 1954, and continued doctoral research and received his ScD in 1958. He became a full professor at MIT in 1969. He was involved in early work on time-sharing through the PDP-1 which his research group owned at MIT; that hardware later became famous in computer science history as the machine on which hacker culture started. He also sponsored the MIT student-run Tech Model Railroad Club in its early years, where the hacker culture is said to have taken root before spreading to the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab. Later, he was one of the founding members of the Multics project, to which he contributed one of its most important concepts, the single-level memory. Multics, though not particularly commercially successful in itself, was an inspiration for Ken Thompson to develop Unix. The latter part of his career was devoted to non-von Neumann models of computation, architecture, and languages. He wanted to free programs from the concept of a program counter. So adopting the concept of
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Leslie Valiant

    Leslie Valiant

    Leslie Gabriel Valiant (born 28 March 1949) is a British computer scientist and computational theorist. Valiant is world-renowned for his work in theoretical computer science. Among his many contributions to complexity theory, he introduced the notion of #P-completeness to explain why enumeration and reliability problems are intractable. He also introduced the "probably approximately correct" (PAC) model of machine learning that has helped the field of computational learning theory grow, and the concept of holographic algorithms. His earlier work in automata theory includes an algorithm for context-free parsing, which is (as of 2010) still the asymptotically fastest known. He also works in computational neuroscience focusing on understanding memory and learning. One of his significant research papers, written with Vijay Vazirani, was proving UNIQUE-SAT ∈ P ⇒ NP = RP (Valiant–Vazirani theorem). He was educated at King's College, Cambridge, Imperial College London, and University of Warwick where he received his Ph.D. in computer science in 1974. He started teaching at Harvard University in 1982 and is currently the T. Jefferson Coolidge Professor of Computer Science and Applied
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Nick Palmer

    Nick Palmer

    Nicholas Douglas Palmer (born 5 February 1950, London) is a British Labour Party politician. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Broxtowe in Nottinghamshire from 1997 until he lost the seat at the 2010 general election to Conservative Anna Soubry, by 390 votes. Described by Andrew Roth as "quietly effective", he was Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) to the Minister of State, Margaret Beckett, in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs until April 2005. He then became PPS to the Minister of State, Malcolm Wicks, first in the Department of Trade and Industry, and later in the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform until Wicks stood down in October 2008. He is fond of animals, keeps several pets and is the patron of his favourite charity, Cats Protection. In August 2010, pursuing his interest in animals, he joined the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection as their Director of International and Corporate Relations. He remains the spokesperson for Broxtowe Labour Party. Palmer's father was a translator/editor and his mother was a language teacher. He is the cousin of Lieutenant-General Anthony Palmer, Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Carl Sassenrath

    Carl Sassenrath

    Carl Sassenrath (born 1957 in California) is an architect of operating systems and computer languages. He brought multitasking to personal computers in 1985 with the creation of the Amiga Computer operating system kernel, and he is currently the designer of the REBOL computer language as well as the CTO of REBOL Technologies. Carl Sassenrath was born in 1957 to Charles and Carolyn Sassenrath in California. His father was a chemical engineer involved in research and development related to petroleum refining, paper production, and air pollution control systems. In the late 1960s his family relocated from the San Francisco Bay Area to the small town of Eureka, California. From his early childhood Sassenrath was actively involved in electronics, amateur radio, photography, and filmmaking. When he was 13, Sassenrath began working for KEET a PBS public broadcasting television station. A year later he became a cameraman for KVIQ (American Broadcasting Company affiliate then) and worked his way up to being technical director and director for news, commercials, and local programming. In 1980 Sassenrath graduated from the University of California, Davis with a B.S. in EECS (electrical
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Rosalind Picard

    Rosalind Picard

    Rosalind W. Picard (born May 17, 1962 in Massachusetts) is Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT, director and also the founder of the Affective Computing Research Group at the MIT Media Lab, and co-director of the Things That Think Consortium. In 2005, she was named a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Picard is credited with starting the branch of computer science known as affective computing with the publication of Affective Computing. This textbook described the importance that recognizing human emotions has to relationships between people, and the possible effects of such recognition by robots. Her work in this field has led to an expansion into autism research and developing devices that could help humans recognize nuances in human emotions. Picard holds a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and a certificate in computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (1984), and master's (1986) and doctorate degrees (1991), both in electrical engineering and computer science, from MIT. Her thesis was titled Texture Modeling: Temperature Effects on Markov/Gibbs Random Fields. She has been a member of the faculty at the MIT
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Stephen Wolfram

    Stephen Wolfram

    Stephen Wolfram (born 29 August 1959) is a British scientist and the chief designer of the Mathematica software application and the Wolfram Alpha computational knowledge engine. Stephen Wolfram's parents were Jewish refugees who emigrated from Westphalia, Germany, to England in 1933. Wolfram's father Hugo was a textile manufacturer and novelist (Into a Neutral Country) and his mother Sybil was a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford. He has a younger brother, Conrad. Wolfram was educated at Eton, where he amazed and frustrated teachers by his brilliance and refusal to be taught, instead doing other students' math homework for money. Wolfram published an article on particle physics but claimed to be bored and left Eton prematurely in 1976. He entered St John's College, Oxford at age 17 but found lectures "awful". Working independently, Wolfram published a widely cited paper on heavy quark production at age 18 and nine other papers before leaving in 1978 without graduating. He received a Ph.D. in particle physics from the California Institute of Technology at age 20, joined the faculty there and received one of the first MacArthur awards in 1981, at age 21. According to
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Gordon Moore

    Gordon Moore

    Gordon Earle Moore (born January 3, 1929) is an American co-founder and Chairman Emeritus of Intel Corporation and the author of Moore's Law (published in an article April 19, 1965 in Electronics Magazine). Moore was born in San Francisco, California, but his family lived in nearby Pescadero where he grew up. He received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1950 and a PhD in Chemistry and minor in Physics from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1954. Prior to studying at Berkeley, he spent his freshman and sophomore years at San José State University, where he met his future wife Betty. Moore completed his post-doctoral work at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory until 1956. He joined Caltech alumnus William Shockley at the Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory division of Beckman Instruments, but left with the "traitorous eight", when Sherman Fairchild agreed to back them and created the influential Fairchild Semiconductor corporation. In July 1968, Moore co-founded Intel Corporation with Bob Noyce and served as Executive Vice President until 1975 when he became President. In April 1979, Dr. Moore became
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Leonid Levin

    Leonid Levin

    Leonid Anatolievich Levin (le-oh-NEED LE-vin; Russian: Леони́д Анато́льевич Ле́вин; born November 2, 1948) is a Soviet-American computer scientist. He obtained his master degree in 1970 and a Ph.D. equivalent in 1972 at Moscow University where he studied under Andrey Kolmogorov. Later, he emigrated to the U.S. in 1978 and also earned a Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1979. His advisor at MIT was Albert R. Meyer. He is well known for his work in randomness in computing, algorithmic complexity and intractability, average-case complexity, foundations of mathematics and computer science, algorithmic probability, theory of computation, and information theory. His life is described in a chapter of the book Out of Their Minds: The Lives and Discoveries of 15 Great Computer Scientists. Levin and Stephen Cook independently discovered the existence of NP-complete problems. This NP-completeness theorem, often called the Cook-Levin Theorem, was a basis for one of the seven Millennium Prize Problems declared by the Clay Mathematics Institute with a $1,000,000 prize offered. The Cook–Levin theorem was a breakthrough in computer science and an important step in the
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    David Cheriton

    David Cheriton

    David Ross Cheriton (born March 29, 1951) is a Canadian-born computer science professor at Stanford University who has investments in technology companies. With an estimated net worth of US$1.3 billion (as of March 2012), Cheriton was ranked by Forbes as the 19th wealthiest Canadian and 692nd in the world. Born in Vancouver, Cheriton attended public schools in the Highlands neighborhood of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He briefly attended the University of Alberta where he had applied for both mathematics and music. Having being rejected by the music program, Cheriton went on to study mathematics and received his bachelor's degree from the University of British Columbia in 1973. Cheriton received his Masters and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of Waterloo in 1974 and 1978, respectively. He spent three years as an Assistant Professor at his alma mater, the University of British Columbia, before moving to Stanford in 1981. Cheriton founded and led the Distributed Systems Group at Stanford University, which developed the V operating system. Cheriton co-founded Granite Systems with Andy Bechtolsheim, a company developing gigabit ethernet products; Granite was acquired
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    David Harel

    David Harel

    David Harel (Hebrew: דוד הראל‎; born 1950) is a professor of computer science at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. Born in London, England, he was Dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science at the institute for seven years. Harel is best known for his work on dynamic logic, computability and software engineering. In the 1980s he invented the graphical language of Statecharts, which has been adopted as part of the UML standard. He has also published expository accounts of computer science, such as his award winning 1987 book "Algorithmics: The Spirit of Computing" and has made appearances on Israeli radio and television. He currently works on many diverse topics, including visual languages, graph layout, systems biology and the communication of odours. Harel completed his Ph.D. at MIT between 1976 and 1978, which is exceptionally fast. In 1987, Harel co-founded software company I-Logix. He is now working on a computer model of a nematode, 'Caenorhabditis elegans', which was the first multicellular organism to have its genome completely sequenced. The eventual completeness of such a model depends on his updated version of the test developed by Alan Turing to
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Hans Reiser

    Hans Reiser

    Hans Thomas Reiser (born December 19, 1963) is an American computer programmer, entrepreneur, and convicted murderer. He is the creator and primary developer of the ReiserFS computer file system, which is contained within the Linux kernel, as well as its attempted successor, Reiser4. In 2004, he founded Namesys, a corporation meant to coordinate the development of both file systems. In April 2008, Reiser was convicted of the first degree murder of his wife, Nina Reiser, who disappeared in September 2006. He subsequently pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of second-degree murder, as part of a settlement agreement that included disclosing the location of his wife's body, revealed to be in a shallow grave near the couple's home. Hans Reiser was born to Ramon Reiser and Beverly Palmer on December 19, 1963. He grew up in California and dropped out of junior high school before he was 14. He was accepted at the University of California, Berkeley, at the age of 15, which he attended off and on until he received a BA in computer-science in 1992, aged 28. Reiser did not pursue a Ph.D. He worked part- to full-time in the computer field while founding the California-based software company
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Kurt Bollacker

    Kurt Bollacker

    Dr. Kurt Bollacker is a computer scientist with a research background in the areas of machine learning, digital libraries, semantic networks, and electro-cardiographic modeling. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from The University Of Texas At Austin. He was co-creator of the CiteSeer research tool as a visiting researcher at the NEC Research Institute, the technical director of the Internet Archive, and a biomedical research engineer at the Duke University Medical Center. He is currently pursuing research on long term digital archiving as the Digital Research Director at the Long Now Foundation. His previous position was Chief Scientist at Metaweb Technologies until Feb, 2009, after which he has been spending time as a philanthropist. In January, 2011 he joined Infochimps as a consulting Data Scientist.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Martin Fowler

    Martin Fowler

    Martin Fowler is an author and international speaker on software development, specializing in object-oriented analysis and design, UML, patterns, and agile software development methodologies, including extreme programming. Fowler started working with software in the early 1980s and has written six books on the topic of software development (see Publications). In March 2000, he became Chief Scientist at ThoughtWorks, a systems integration and consulting company. Fowler is a member of the Agile Alliance and helped create the Manifesto for Agile Software Development in 2001, along with more than 15 co-authors. He maintains a bliki, a mix of blog and wiki. He popularized the term Dependency Injection as a form of Inversion of Control. Fowler was born in Walsall, England, and lived in London a decade before moving to United States in 1994. He lives near Boston, Massachusetts in the suburb of Melrose. He went to Queen Mary's Grammar School for his secondary education.
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Abraham Lempel

    Abraham Lempel

    Abraham Lempel (Hebrew: אברהם למפל‎, born 10 February 1936) is an Israeli computer scientist and one of the fathers of the LZ family of lossless data compression algorithms. Lempel was born on 10 February 1936 in Lwów, Poland (now Lviv, Ukraine). He studied at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, and received a B.Sc. in 1963, M.Sc. in 1965, and D.Sc. in 1967. Since 1977 he has held the title of full professor. Lempel is now a professor emeritus in Technion. His historically important works start with the presentation of the LZ77 algorithm in a paper entitled "A Universal Algorithm for Sequential Data Compression" in the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory (May 1977), co-authored by Jacob Ziv. He is the recipient of the 1998 Golden Jubilee Award for Technological Innovation from the IEEE Information Theory Society; and the 2007 IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal, for "pioneering work in data compression, especially the Lempel-Ziv algorithm". Lempel founded HP Labs—Israel in 1994, and served as its director until October 2007. The LZ77 and LZ78 algorithms authored by Lempel and Jacob Ziv have led to a number of derivative works, including the Lempel–Ziv–Welch algorithm, used in
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    David Wagner

    David Wagner

    David A. Wagner (1974) is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and a well-known researcher in cryptography and computer security. He is a member of the Election Assistance Commission's Technical Guidelines Development Committee, tasked with assisting the EAC in drafting the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines. He is also a member of the ACCURATE project. Wagner received an A.B. in Mathematics from Princeton University in 1995, an M.S. in Computer Science from Berkeley in 1999, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Berkeley in 2000. He has published two books and over 90 peer-reviewed scientific papers. His notable achievements include:
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Lenore Blum

    Lenore Blum

    Lenore Blum (December 18, 1942, New York) is a distinguished professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968. Her dissertation was on Generalized Algebraic Structures and her advisor was Gerald Sacks. She then went to the University of California at Berkeley as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in Mathematics. In 1973 she joined the faculty of Mills College where in 1974 she founded the Mathematics and Computer Science Department (serving as its Head or co-Head for 13 years). In 1979 she was awarded the first Letts-Villard Chair at Mills. In 1983 Blum won an NSF CAREER award to work with Michael Shub for two years at the CUNY Graduate Center. They worked on secure random number generators and evaluating rational functions, see Blum Blum Shub. In 1987 she spent a year at IBM. In 1989 she published an important paper with Michael Shub and Stephen Smale on NP completeness, recursive functions and universal Turing machines, see Blum–Shub–Smale machine. In 1990 she gave an address at the International Congress of Mathematicians on computational complexity theory and real computation. In 1992
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Steve Furber

    Steve Furber

    Stephen Byram Furber CBE, FRS, FREng (born 1953 in Manchester, England) is the ICL Professor of Computer Engineering at the School of Computer Science at the University of Manchester but is probably best known for his work at Acorn, where he was one of the designers of the BBC Micro and the ARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor. Furber was educated at Manchester Grammar School and represented the UK in the International Mathematical Olympiad in Hungary in 1970 and won a bronze medal. He went up to Cambridge and received a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics in 1974. In 1978, he was appointed the Rolls-Royce Research Fellow in Aerodynamics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge and was awarded a PhD in 1980 on the Fluid dynamics of the Weis-Fogh principle. From 1980 to 1990, Furber worked at Acorn Computers Ltd where he was a Hardware Designer and then Design Manager. He was a principal designer of the BBC Micro and the ARM microprocessor. In August 1990 he moved to the Victoria University of Manchester to become the ICL Professor of Computer Engineering and established the Amulet research group. In 2003, Furber was a member of the EPSRC research cluster in biologically-inspired novel computation. On
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Thomas H. Cormen

    Thomas H. Cormen

    Thomas H. Cormen is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. He is a Full Professor of computer science at Dartmouth College and currently Chair of the Dartmouth College Department of Computer Science. Between 2004 and 2008 he directed the Dartmouth College Writing Program. Thomas H. Cormen was born in New York City in 1956. He grew up in Oceanside, New York. He received his bachelor's degree summa cum laude in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Princeton University in June 1978. He then went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned his master's degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in May 1986 with a thesis on "Concentrator Switches for Routing Messages in Parallel Computers" and his PhD with a thesis on "Virtual Memory for Data-Parallel Computing" in February 1993. During his career he received several honors and awards:
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Vint Cerf

    Vint Cerf

    Vinton Gray "Vint" Cerf (/ˈsɜrf/; born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist, who is recognized as one of "the fathers of the Internet", sharing this title with American computer scientist Bob Kahn. His contributions have been acknowledged and lauded, repeatedly, with honorary degrees and awards that include the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and membership in the National Academy of Engineering. In the early days, Cerf was a program manager for the United States Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funding various groups to develop TCP/IP technology. When the Internet began to transition to a commercial opportunity during the late 1980s, Cerf moved to MCI where he was instrumental in the development of the first commercial email system (MCI Mail) connected to the Internet. Vinton Cerf was instrumental in the funding and formation of ICANN from the start. Cerf waited in the wings for a year before he stepped forward to join the ICANN Board. Eventually he became the Chairman of ICANN. Cerf was elected as the president of the Association for Computing Machinery in May 2012. Cerf also went to Van
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    William A. Pailes

    William A. Pailes

    William Arthur Pailes (Colonel, USAF) (born June 26, 1952) was a USAF astronaut in the Manned Spaceflight Engineer Program during the mid-1980s. He served as a Payload Specialist on STS-51-J Atlantis (October 3–7, 1985). Pailes was born in Hackensack, New Jersey, but considers Kinnelon, New Jersey, to be his hometown. He is married and is a former deacon and treasurer of his church in El Segundo, California. He now teaches the AFJROTC Program at Temple High School in Temple, TX. He is the Senior Aerospace Science Instructor. Pailes graduated from Kinnelon High School in Kinnelon, New Jersey in 1970. He then received his Bachelor of science degree in computer science at the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado four years later. From 1974 to 1975 he attended pilot training at the Williams Air Force Base, Arizona where he trained as a HC-130 rescue pilot in the Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Service. In 1978, he attended the Squadron Officer School. Pailes received his Master of science degree in computer science at Texas A&M University in 1981. He was an HC-130 pilot in Air Force Rescue from December 1975 to July 1980 in McClellan Air Force Base, California and Royal Air Force
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Grady Booch

    Grady Booch

    Grady Booch (born February 27, 1955) is an American software engineer. Booch is best known for developing the Unified Modeling Language with Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh. Grady is recognized internationally for his innovative work in software architecture, software engineering, and collaborative development environments. He has devoted his life's work to improving the art and the science of software development. Grady served as Chief Scientist of Rational Software Corporation since its founding in 1981 and through its acquisition by IBM in 2003. He now is part of the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center serving as Chief Scientist for Software Engineering, where he continues his work on the Handbook of Software Architecture and also leads several projects in software engineering that are beyond the constraints of immediate product horizons. Grady continues to engage with customers working on real problems and maintains deep relationships with academia and other research organizations around the world. Grady is one of the original authors of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and was also one of the original developers of several of Rational's products. Grady has served as
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Landon Curt Noll

    Landon Curt Noll

    Landon Curt Noll (born October 28, 1960) is an American computer scientist, co-discoverer of the 25th Mersenne prime and discoverer of the 26th, which he found while still enrolled in high school and concurrently at Cal State Hayward. He was also a member of the Amdahl Six team which discovered another record prime in 1989; this prime remains unusual as a record large prime as it was not a Mersenne prime. Noll was born in Walnut Creek, California, United States. At age 18, he became the youngest person to break the record for the largest known prime. He has held or co-held the record three times. He is also the co-inventor (with John Horton Conway) of a system for naming arbitrarily large powers of 10. He also helped start the International Obfuscated C Code Contest, and is a co-inventor of the Fowler Noll Vo hash function. Noll is an avid astronomer. He was also involved in politics as a Sunnyvale, California city council member and vice-mayor.
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Philip Wadler

    Philip Wadler

    Philip Wadler (born 8 April 1956, USA) is a computer scientist known for his contributions to programming language design and type theory. In particular, he has contributed to the theory behind functional programming and the use of monads in functional programming, the design of the purely functional language Haskell, and the XQuery declarative query language. In 1984, he created the Orwell programming language. He is also author of the paper "Theorems for free!" that gave rise to much research on functional language optimization (see also Parametricity). Wadler received a BS degree in Mathematics from Stanford University in 1977, an MS degree in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1979. He completed his PhD in Computer Science at Carnegie-Mellon University in 1984. His thesis was entitled "Listlessness is Better than Laziness" and was supervised by Nico Habermann. Wadler was a Research Fellow at the Programming Research Group (part of the Oxford University Computing Laboratory) and St Cross College, Oxford during 1983–87. He was progressively Lecturer, Reader, and Professor at the University of Glasgow from 1987–96. Wadler was a Member of Technical Staff at Bell
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Philippe Kahn

    Philippe Kahn

    Philippe R. Kahn (born March 16, 1952) is a technology innovator and entrepreneur, who is credited with creating the first camera phone sharing pictures instantly on public networks. Kahn has founded four technology companies: Fullpower Technologies, Starfish Software, LightSurf Technologies and Borland. Kahn grew up in Paris, France, born to Jewish immigrants of modest means. His mother was an Auschwitz survivor, his father a mechanical engineer with a Socialist bent. Kahn was educated in mathematics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland (Swiss Federal Polytechnic Institute), and University of Nice, France. He received a masters in mathematics. He also majored in musicology and classical flute at the Zurich Music Conservatory in Switzerland. As a student, Kahn developed software for the MICRAL, the earliest non-kit personal computer based on a microprocessor. The MICRAL is now credited by the Computer History Museum as the first ever microprocessor-based personal computer. Kahn is married to Sonia Lee, who co-founded Fullpower Technologies, LightSurf and Starfish Software, and with whom he has a daughter. Kahn has three other children from a prior marriage. Under Kahn's direction, Borland
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Jon Postel

    Jon Postel

    Jonathan Bruce Postel ( /pəˈstɛl/; August 6, 1943 – October 16, 1998) was an American computer scientist who made many significant contributions to the development of the Internet, particularly with respect to standards. He is known principally for being the Editor of the Request for Comment (RFC) document series, and for administering the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) until his death. The Internet Society's Postel Award is named in his honor, as is the Postel Center at Information Sciences Institute. His obituary was written by Vint Cerf and published as RFC 2468 in remembrance of Postel and his work. In 2012, Postel was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame by the Internet Society. Postel attended Van Nuys High School. Postel attended UCLA where he earned his B.S. (1966) as well as his M.A. (1968) in Engineering. Attending UCLA, he completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1974. His PhD. thesis advisor was Dave Farber. While at UCLA, he was involved in early work on the ARPANET. He worked briefly at Mitre Corporation, then helped set up the Network Information Center at SRI. In March 1977 he joined the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern
    5.60
    5 votes
    87
    Robert Swirsky

    Robert Swirsky

    Robert Swirsky (born December, 1962, Brooklyn, NY) is a computer scientist, author, and pianist. In the early 1980s, Swirsky was one of the first regular contributors to the nascent computer magazine industry. His articles appeared in magazines ranging from Popular Computing, Kilobaud Microcomputing, and Interface Age to Creative Computing. Robert Swirsky holds Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Computer Science from Hofstra University, and is one of Hofstra's Alumni of Distinction. At Hofstra University, he met VOIP pioneer Jeff Pulver who attended Hofstra as an undergraduate student. After graduating, he worked on projects ranging from aircraft avionics to one of the first all-software digital radio receivers for a VLF submarine application. In 1989, Swirsky moved to California, and joined Olivetti Advanced Technology's Unix group. He was a frequent speaker at Uniforum, Usenix, and other Unix shows, and hosted parties where he entertained people with song parodies about the Unix computer operating system, some of which were featured in a special Evatone Soundsheet issue of Interface Age magazine. Mr. Swirsky studied music and piano at Hofstra University with professor Morton
    5.60
    5 votes
    88
    Arthur Whitney

    Arthur Whitney

    Arthur Whitney is a Canadian computer scientist most notable for developing the APL-inspired programming languages A+ and K. He also wrote the initial prototype of J, a terse and macro-heavy single page of code, in one afternoon, which then served as the model for J implementor Roger Hui, and was responsible for suggesting the rank operators in J. He studied pure mathematics at graduate level at the University of Toronto (Canada) in the early 1980s. He then worked at Stanford University (California, USA). Currently he is the CEO and co-founder of Kx Systems.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Charlotte Froese Fischer

    Charlotte Froese Fischer

    Charlotte Froese Fischer PhD (b. 1929) is a Canadian-American applied mathematician and computer scientist who gained world recognition for the development and implementation of the Multi-configurational Hartree-Fock (MCHF) approach to atomic structure calculations and for her theoretical prediction concerning the existence of the negative calcium ion (Physical Review Letters, vol. 59, pp. 2263–2266, 1987). For this last honor, she was elected to fellowship in the American Physical Society. Charlotte Froese Fischer was born on September 21, 1929 in Nikolayevka, Ukraine to parents of Mennonite descent. Her parents immigrated to Germany on the last train allowed to cross the border before its closure by Soviet authorities. After a few months in a refugee camp, her family was allowed to immigrate to Canada, where they eventually established themselves in Chilliwack, British Columbia. She obtained both a B.A. degree, with honors in Mathematics and Chemistry, and an M.A. degree in Applied Mathematics from the University of British Columbia in 1952 and 1954, respectively. She then obtained her Ph.D. in applied mathematics and computing at Cambridge University in 1957 pursuing coursework
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Donald Knuth

    Donald Knuth

    Donald Ervin Knuth ( /kəˈnuːθ/ kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is a computer scientist and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of the seminal multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming. Knuth has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it. In the process he also popularized the asymptotic notation. In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces. As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB/CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures. Knuth was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where his father owned a small printing business and taught bookkeeping at Milwaukee Lutheran High School, where he enrolled, earning achievement awards. He applied his intelligence in
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Gérard Berry

    Gérard Berry

    Gérard Philippe Berry (born 1948) is a French computer scientist, member of French Academy of Sciences (Académie des sciences), French Academy of Technologies (Académie des technologies), and Academia Europaea. He was the Chief Scientist Officer of Esterel Technologies from 2000 to 2009. He held the 2007-2008 yearly Liliane Bettencourt chair of Technological Innovation at the Collège de France. He is currently Director of Research at INRIA and is holding the 2009-2010 yearly Informatics and Digital Sciences chair at the Collège de France. Berry's work, which spans over more than 30 years, brought important contributions to three main fields: Berry is best known as the conceptor of the Esterel programming language.
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Hal Abelson

    Hal Abelson

    Harold (Hal) Abelson is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, a fellow of the IEEE, and is a founding director of both Creative Commons and the Free Software Foundation. Abelson holds an A.B. degree from Princeton University and obtained a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from MIT under the tutelage of mathematician Dennis Sullivan. In 1992, Abelson was designated as one of MIT's six inaugural MacVicar Faculty Fellows, in recognition of his significant and sustained contributions to teaching and undergraduate education. Abelson was recipient in 1992 of the Bose Award (MIT's School of Engineering teaching award). Abelson is also the winner of the 1995 Taylor L. Booth Education Award given by IEEE Computer Society, cited for his continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science, and the winner of the 2012 ACM SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education. Abelson has a longstanding interest in using computation as a conceptual framework in teaching. He directed the first implementation of Logo for the Apple II, which made the language widely available on personal computers beginning in 1981; and
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Jeffrey Ullman

    Jeffrey Ullman

    Jeffrey David Ullman (born November 22, 1942) is a computer scientist and professor at Stanford University. His textbooks on compilers (various editions are popularly known as the Dragon Book), theory of computation (also known as the Cinderella book), data structures, and databases are regarded as standards in their fields. Ullman received a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Mathematics from Columbia University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 1966. He then worked for several years at Bell Labs. From 1969 to 1979 he was a professor at Princeton. Since 1979 he has been a professor at Stanford University, where he is currently the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science (Emeritus). In 1995 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and in 2000 he was awarded the Knuth Prize. Ullman is also the co-recipient (with John Hopcroft) of the 2010 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, “For laying the foundations for the fields of automata and language theory and many seminal contributions to theoretical computer science.” Ullman's research interests include database theory, data integration, data mining, and
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Michael Stonebraker

    Michael Stonebraker

    Michael Ralph Stonebraker (born October 11, 1943) is a computer scientist specializing in database research. Through a series of academic prototypes and commercial startups, Stonebraker's research and products are central to many relational database systems on the market today. He is also the founder of a number of database companies, including Ingres, Illustra, Cohera, StreamBase Systems, Vertica, VoltDB, and Paradigm4. He was previously the Chief Technical Officer (CTO) of Informix. He is also an editor for the book Readings in Database Systems. Stonebraker earned his bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1965 and his master's degree and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1967 and 1971, respectively. He has received several awards, including the IEEE John von Neumann Medal and the first SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award. In 1994 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. In 1997 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Michael Stonebraker was a Professor of Computer Science at University of California, Berkeley, for twenty-nine years, where he developed the Ingres and Postgres relational database systems.
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Tom Cross

    Tom Cross

    Tom Cross, also known as Decius, is an American computer security expert and hacker. Cross was born in 1976 in Toronto, Canada and grew up in Tennessee. His father worked in telecommunications policy and his mother was a Registered Nurse's Assistant. He attended Brentwood High School in Brentwood, Tennessee, before attending Georgia Tech in Atlanta, receiving a Bachelor's Degree in computer engineering. He co-founded the EFGA (Electronic Frontiers Georgia) in 1995. In 1996, he co-founded Computer Sentry Software, known for their award-winning "CyberAngel" software, a laptop anti-theft program. From 1999-2000, he was Chief Engineer at Dataway, a computer security firm in San Francisco. From 2000-2001 he worked at iAsiaWorks, as the Director of Global Security Engineering. In 2001, he founded Industrial Memetics, which developed the popular collaborative blogging community MemeStreams. Cross has been a speaker at several technology conferences, including PhreakNIC; Summercon; "The First International Hackers' Conference in Seoul Korea" (IS2K); "InternetWorld" in Singapore; and APRICOT, the Asia-Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies. He was also among the
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Van Jacobson

    Van Jacobson

    Van Jacobson is an American computer scientist, renowned for his work on TCP/IP network performance and scaling. He is one of the primary contributors to the TCP/IP protocol stack—the technological foundation of today’s Internet. His work redesigning TCP/IP's flow control algorithms (Jacobson's algorithm) to better handle congestion is said to have saved the Internet from collapsing in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He is also known for the TCP/IP Header Compression protocol described in RFC 1144: Compressing TCP/IP Headers for Low-Speed Serial Links, popularly known as Van Jacobson TCP/IP Header Compression. Is co-author of several widely used network diagnostic tools, including traceroute, tcpdump, and pathchar. He was a leader in the development of the multicast backbone (MBone) and the multimedia tools vic, vat, and wb. For his work, Jacobson received the 2001 ACM SIGCOMM Award for Lifetime Achievement, the 2003 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006. In January 2006 at Linux.conf.au, Jacobson presented another idea about network performance improvement, which has since been referred to as network
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    Andy Bechtolsheim

    Andy Bechtolsheim

    Andreas "Andy" von Bechtolsheim (born September 30, 1955) is an electrical engineer who co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 and was its chief hardware designer. He later became an investor, writing the first major check to fund Google, and starting several computer networking companies. Bechtolsheim was born near Ammersee, in the German state of Bavaria. He grew up on a farm with the Alps in the distance, the second of four children. Since the isolated house had no television and distant neighbors, he experimented with electronics as a child. In 1963 the family moved to Rome, Italy and then in 1968 to Nonnenhorn on Lake Constance in Germany. When he was only 16, he designed an industrial controller based on the Intel 8008 for a nearby company. Royalties from the product supported much of his education. As an engineering student at University of Technology Munich Bechtolsheim entered the jugend forscht contest for young researchers, and after entering for three years, won the physics prize in 1974. Bechtolsheim received a Fulbright Award and moved to the US in 1975 to attend Carnegie Mellon University, where he received his master's degree in computer engineering in 1976. In 1977
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Barry Boehm

    Barry Boehm

    Barry W. Boehm (born 1935) is an American software engineer, TRW Emeritus Professor of Software Engineering at the Computer Science Department of the University of Southern California, and known for his many contributions to software engineering. Boehm received a B.A. in mathematics from Harvard University in 1957, and a M.S. in 1961, and Ph.D. from UCLA in 1964, both in mathematics as well. In 1955 he started working as a Programmer-Analyst at General Dynamics. In 1959 he switched to the RAND Corporation where he was Head of the Information Sciences Department until 1973. From 1973 to 1989 he was Chief Scientist of the Defense Systems Group at TRW Inc.. From 1989 to 1992 he served within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) as Director of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Office, and as Director of the DDR&E Software and Computer Technology Office. Since 1992 he is TRW Professor of Software Engineering, Computer Science Department, and Director, USC Center for Systems and Software Engineering, formerly Center for Software Engineering. He has served on the board of several scientific journals, including the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer, IEEE
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Bruce Bastian

    Bruce Bastian

    Bruce Wayne Bastian (born March 23, 1948, Twin Falls, Idaho) is an American computer programmer, businessman, philanthropist and social activist. He co-founded the WordPerfect Software Company with Alan Ashton in 1978 (originally known as Satellite Software International (SSI) and then changed to WordPerfect Corporation in 1982). While enrolled as a student at Brigham Young University, where he originally majored in music and was for a time the director of the BYU Cougar Marching Band, he developed a software program to help choreograph marching band performances, with the help of an instructor, Alan Ashton. When he lost his position with the marching band it was suggested that he get his Master's Degree in computer science rather than in music. When he graduated in the spring of 1978, Bastian worked for a short time for Ashton and another partner, developing word processing software. When that company stopped because of inadequate funding, Bastian took a job with the Eyring Research Institute (ERI). At ERI, Bastian briefly worked on a language translation program (unrelated to WordPerfect). Within a few months of his employment at ERI, ERI signed a contract with Orem City to
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    James H. Clark

    James H. Clark

    James H. Clark (born March 23, 1944) is an American entrepreneur and computer scientist. He founded several notable Silicon Valley technology companies, including Silicon Graphics, Inc., Netscape Communications Corporation, myCFO and Healtheon. His research work in computer graphics led to the development of systems for the fast rendering of three-dimensional computer images. Clark was born in Plainview, Texas and endured a difficult childhood. He dropped out of high school after being suspended, and spent four years in the Navy. Clark began taking night courses at Tulane University's University College where, despite his lack of a high school diploma, he was able to earn enough credits to be admitted to the University of New Orleans. There, Clark earned his Bachelor's and a Master's degrees in physics, followed by a PhD in computer science from the University of Utah in 1974. After completing his PhD, Clark worked at NYIT's Computer Graphics Lab, serving as an assistant professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz from 1974 to 1978, and then as an associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University from 1979 to 1982. Clark's research work concerned
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Wang Xuan

    Wang Xuan

    Wang Xuan (simplified Chinese: 王选; traditional Chinese: 王選; pinyin: Wáng Xuǎn; February 5, 1937 - February 13, 2006), born in Wuxi, Jiangsu, China, innovator of the Chinese printing industry, was an academician at both the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering. He is a well-known computer application specialist, who was awarded the State Preeminent Science and Technology Award in 2001 by President of the People's Republic of China Jiang Zemin in Beijing. Started in 2000, this highest degee prize of science and technology in China, has only been awarded to 9 scientists by 2006. He was also the vice-president of the CPPCC. Wang Xuan graduated from the Department of Mathematics and Mechanics at Peking University in 1958 and devoted himself to computer science education and research ever since. He was mainly involved in research into computer processing of words, graphics and images. Since 1975, he had been in charge of the research and development of laser typesetting systems in the Chinese language and of electronic publishing systems. Surpassing Japan's second-generation optical designation and the third-generation CRT designation, the fourth-generation
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    David A. Bader

    David A. Bader

    David A. Bader (born May 4, 1969) is a Professor and Executive Director of High-Performance Computing in the Georgia Tech College of Computing. In addition, Bader was selected as the director of the first Sony Toshiba IBM Center of Competence for the Cell Processor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is an IEEE Fellow, National Science Foundation CAREER Award recipient and an IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Speaker. His main areas of research are in parallel algorithms, combinatorial optimization, and computational biology and genomics. David Bader is an expert in the design and analysis of parallel and multicore algorithms for real-world applications such as those in computational biology. He has won highly-competitive awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF), IBM, Microsoft Research, Sony, and Sun Microsystems. He has co-chaired a series of meetings, the IEEE International Workshop on High-Performance Computational Biology (HiCOMB), written several book chapters, and co-edited a special issue of the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing on High-Performance Computational Biology. He has co-authored over 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals and
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Gerald Jay Sussman

    Gerald Jay Sussman

    Gerald Jay Sussman (February 8, 1947) is the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his S.B. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from MIT in 1968 and 1973 respectively. He has been involved in artificial intelligence research at MIT since 1964. His research has centered on understanding the problem-solving strategies used by scientists and engineers, with the goals of automating parts of the process and formalizing it to provide more effective methods of science and engineering education. Sussman has also worked in computer languages, in computer architecture and in VLSI design. Sussman is a coauthor (with Hal Abelson and Julie Sussman) of the former introductory computer science textbook used at MIT. This textbook, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, has been translated into several languages. Sussman's contributions to artificial intelligence include problem solving by debugging almost-right plans, propagation of constraints applied to electrical circuit analysis and synthesis, dependency-based explanation and dependency-based backtracking, and various language structures for expressing
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    John Ousterhout

    John Ousterhout

    John Kenneth Ousterhout ( /ˈoʊstərhaʊt/, born October 15, 1954) is the chairman of Electric Cloud, Inc. and a professor of computer science at Stanford University. He founded Electric Cloud with John Graham-Cumming. Ousterhout previously was a professor of computer science at University of California, Berkeley where he created the Tcl scripting language and the Tk platform-independent widget toolkit. Ousterhout also led the research group that designed the experimental Sprite operating system and the first log-structured file system. Ousterhout is also the original author of the Magic VLSI Computer-aided design program. He received his Bachelor's degree in Physics from Yale University in 1975, and his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1980. Ousterhout received the Grace Murray Hopper Award in 1987 for his work on CAD systems for very-large-scale integrated circuits . For the same work, he was inducted in 1994 as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. Ousterhout is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1994, Ousterhout left Berkeley to join Sun Microsystems Laboratories, which hired a team to join him in Tcl development. After
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Jon Kleinberg

    Jon Kleinberg

    Jon Michael Kleinberg (born October 1971) is an American computer scientist, MacArthur Fellow, Nevanlinna Prize winner, Infosys Prize winner, and the Tisch University Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. Jon Kleinberg was born in 1971 in Boston, Massachusetts. He received a B.S. in computer science from Cornell University in 1993 and a Ph.D., also in computer science, from MIT in 1996. Since 1996 he has been a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Cornell, as well as a visiting scientist at IBM's Almaden Research Center. His work has been supported by an NSF Career Award, an ONR Young Investigator Award, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Packard Foundation Fellowship, a Sloan Foundation Fellowship, and grants from Google, Yahoo!, and the NSF. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2011, he was elected to the United States National Academy of Sciences. Kleinberg is best known for his work on networks and particularly for his HITS algorithm, developed while he was at IBM. HITS is an algorithm for web search that builds on the eigenvector-based methods used in algorithms and served as the
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Samson Abramsky

    Samson Abramsky

    Samson D. Abramsky FRS, FRSE is a computer scientist who currently holds the Christopher Strachey Professorship at Oxford University Computing Laboratory. He is well known for playing a leading role in the development of game semantics. He has made significant contributions to the areas of domain theory, the lazy lambda calculus, strictness analysis, concurrency theory, interaction categories, and the geometry of interaction. Samson Abramsky is the grandson of Rabbi Yehezkel Abramsky. Since the Year 2000, he has been a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford and Christopher Strachey Professor of Computing at Oxford University Computing Laboratory. He has also been a Fellow of the Royal Society since 2004. His research achievements include the development of game semantics, domain theory in logical form, and categorical quantum mechanics. He was educated at Hasmonean Grammar School for Boys, Hendon and at King's College, Cambridge (BA 1975, MA Philosophy 1979, Diploma in Computer Science) and Queen Mary, University of London (PhD Computer Science 1988, supervised by Richard Bornat). His earlier positions include: Samson Abramsky is Christopher
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Damian Conway

    Damian Conway

    Damian Conway (born 5 October 1964) is a prominent member of the Perl community, a proponent of object-oriented programming, and the author of several books. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University. Damian completed his B.Sc. (with honours) and Ph.D. at Monash. He is perhaps best known for his contributions to CPAN and Perl 6 language design, his entertaining and erudite conference talks, and his Perl training courses. He has contributed the following modules (among others) to CPAN: He has won the Larry Wall Award three times for CPAN contributions. His involvement in Perl 6 language design has been as an interlocutor and explicator of Larry Wall. He is one of the authors of the Significantly Prettier and Easier C++ Syntax.
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Kai Krause

    Kai Krause

    Kai Krause (born 1957) is a software and graphical user interface designer, best known for founding MetaCreations Corp., his Kai's Power Tools series of products, and for his contributions to graphical user interface design. Born in Dortmund, Germany, Krause moved to California, United States in 1976. He worked with early synthesizers and vocoders. He worked on almost thirty records and movies. Krause has a Master's degree from the Brooks institute in Santa Barbara, California (1996), and a honorary doctorate from the University of Essen, Germany (1999). Today Kai Krause lives and works in the 1000-year-old castle Burg Rheineck near Bonn in Germany, which he called Byteburg. In February 2005, the "DEMO" conference acknowledged him as one of the Top 15 Innovators of the last 15 years. Krause significantly broadened conventional notions of the graphical user interface by applying innovative design principles and providing realtime interaction for the user, neither of which were widely deployed in the 1980s because of the low graphics abilities of the current hardware, and most users found them too oblique to learn and remember. Krause's products pioneered user interface techniques
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    Bill Joy

    Bill Joy

    William Nelson Joy (born November 8, 1954), commonly known as Bill Joy, is an American computer scientist. Joy co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 along with Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy and Andy Bechtolsheim, and served as chief scientist at the company until 2003. He is widely known for having written the essay "Why the Future Doesn't Need Us", where he expresses deep concerns over the development of modern technologies. He played an integral role in the early development of BSD UNIX while a graduate student at Berkeley, and he is the original author of the vi text editor. Joy was born in the Detroit suburb Farmington Hills, Michigan to William Joy, a school vice-principal and counselor, and Ruth Joy. Joy received a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan and a Master of Science in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1979. Joy's graduate advisor was Bob Fabry. As a UC Berkeley graduate student, Joy worked for Fabry's Computer Systems Research Group CSRG in managing the BSD support and rollout where many claim he was largely responsible for managing the authorship of BSD UNIX, from which
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Bob Braden

    Bob Braden

    Robert Braden is an American computer scientist who played a role in the development of the Internet. His research interests include end-to-end network protocols, especially in the transport and internetwork layers. Braden received a Bachelor of Engineering Physics from Cornell University in 1957, and a Master of Science in Physics from Stanford University in 1962. After graduating, he worked at Stanford and Carnegie Mellon University. He taught programming and operating systems courses at Stanford, Carnegie Mellon, and also UCLA, where he moved next. He remained at UCLA for 18 years, 16 of them at the campus computing center. He spent 1981–1982 at the Computer Science Department of University College London. While there, he wrote the first relay system connecting the Internet with the U.K. academic X.25 network. He joined the networking research group at the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) in 1986, and is currently a project leader in the Computer Networks Division. He was named an ISI Fellow in 2001. While at UCLA, Braden was responsible for attaching UCLA's IBM 360/91 supercomputer to the ARPAnet, beginning in 1970. He was active in the ARPAnet Network Working Group,
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Dana Scott

    Dana Scott

    Dana Stewart Scott (born October 11, 1932) is the emeritus Hillman University Professor of Computer Science, Philosophy, and Mathematical Logic at Carnegie Mellon University; he is now retired and lives in Berkeley, California. His research career has spanned computer science, mathematics, and philosophy, and has been characterized by a marriage of a concern for elucidating fundamental concepts in the manner of informal rigor, with a cultivation of mathematically hard problems that bear on these concepts. His work on automata theory earned him the ACM Turing Award in 1976, while his collaborative work with Christopher Strachey in the 1970s laid the foundations of modern approaches to the semantics of programming languages. He has worked also on modal logic, topology, and category theory. He is the editor-in-chief of the new journal Logical Methods in Computer Science. He received his BA in Mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1954. He wrote his Ph.D. thesis on Convergent Sequences of Complete Theories under the supervision of Alonzo Church while at Princeton, and defended his thesis in 1958. Solomon Feferman (2005) writes of this period: After completing his
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Lance James

    Lance James

    Lance James is an American computer scientist, considered an expert on computer security techniques such as anti-phishing. He is the author of the book "Phishing Exposed" and is quoted on the subject of emerging cyber threats in multiple media outlets, including CBC, CNN, the BBC, the David Lawrence Show, ZDNet, Wired News, CSO, USA Today, Fox News, and the Washington Post. He is currently working as Director of Intelligence at Vigilant, LLC. He was born in 1978 in Wenatchee, Washington. His father was a Marine, and his mother was a diplomat working in the Canadian foreign service. His maternal grandfather Eric Maughan, is notable for being a centenarian, having turned 100 on August 31, 2005. Because of his father's career, the family moved often, and James attended multiple high schools, from North Carolina to Burnaby North Secondary School, in Burnaby, British Columbia (the same school from which Michael J. Fox graduated), and Mount Vernon High School in Mount Vernon, Washington, from where he graduated. His first career was as a musician. He studied violin under Sherry Kloss, and then played jazz flamenco music in various locations in San Diego, with the band "Gatos Papacitos,"
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Marc Levoy

    Marc Levoy

    Marc Levoy is a computer graphics researcher and Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He is noted for pioneering work in volume rendering. Levoy first studied computer graphics as an architecture student under Donald P. Greenberg at Cornell University. He received his B.Arch. in 1976 and M.S. in Architecture in 1978. He developed a 2D computer animation system as part of his studies, receiving the Charles Goodwin Sands Memorial Medal for this work. Greenberg and he suggested to Disney that they use computer graphics in producing animated films, but the idea was rejected by several of the Nine Old Men who were still active. Following this, they were able to convince Hanna-Barbera Productions to use their system for television animation. Despite initial opposition by animators, the system was successful in reducing labor costs and helping to save the company, and was used until 1996. Levoy worked as director of the Hanna-Barbera Animation Laboratory from 1980 to 1983. He then did graduate study in computer science under Henry Fuchs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and received his Ph.D. in 1989. While there, he published
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr.

    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr.

    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr. is a pioneer of object-oriented computer programming and the principal architect, designer and implementor of five generations of Smalltalk environments. He designed the bytecoded virtual machine that made Smalltalk practical in 1976. He also invented Bit blit, the general-purpose graphical operation that underlies most bitmap graphics systems today, and pop-up menus. He designed the generalizations of BitBlt to arbitrary color depth, with built-in scaling, rotation, and anti-aliasing. His major contributions to the Squeak system include the original concept of a Smalltalk written in itself and made portable and efficient by a Smalltalk-to-C translator. Ingalls received his B.A. in Physics from Harvard University, and his M.S. in Electrical engineering from Stanford University. While working toward a Ph.D. at Stanford, he started a company, to sell a software measurement invention that he perfected and never returned to academia. Ingalls' first well known research was at Xerox PARC, where he began a lifelong research association with Alan Kay, and did his award winning work on Smalltalk. He then moved to Apple Inc. He left research for a time to run
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    David P. Reed

    David P. Reed

    David Patrick Reed (born January 31, 1952) is an American computer scientist, educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, known for a number of significant contributions to computer networking. He was involved in the early development of TCP/IP, and was the designer of the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), though he finds this title "a little embarrassing". He was also one of the authors of the original paper about the end-to-end principle, End-to-end arguments in system design, published in 1984. He is also known for Reed's law, his assertion that the utility of large networks, particularly social networks, can scale exponentially with the size of the network. (It was first cited in "The Law of the Pack," Harvard Business Review (February 2001) pp 23–4.) Dr. Reed is an Adjunct Professor at the MIT Media Lab in the Viral Communications group and is one of six principal architects of the Croquet project (along with Alan Kay, Julian Lombardi, Andreas Raab, David A. Smith, and Mark McCahill). He is also on the advisory board of TTI/Vanguard.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Dennis Ritchie

    Dennis Ritchie

    Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie (born September 9, 1941; found dead October 12, 2011) was an American computer scientist who "helped shape the digital era." He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system. Ritchie and Thompson received the Turing Award from the ACM in 1983, the Hamming Medal from the IEEE in 1990 and the National Medal of Technology from President Clinton in 1999. Ritchie was the head of Lucent Technologies System Software Research Department when he retired in 2007. He was the 'R' in K&R C and commonly known by his username dmr. Ritchie was born in Bronxville, New York. His father was Alistair E. Ritchie, a longtime Bell Labs scientist and co-author of The Design of Switching Circuits on switching circuit theory. He moved with his family to Summit, New Jersey, as a child, where he graduated from Summit High School. Ritchie graduated from Harvard University with degrees in physics and applied mathematics. In 1967, he began working at the Bell Labs Computing Sciences Research Center, and in 1968, he received a PhD from Harvard under the supervision of Patrick C. Fischer, his doctoral dissertation being "Program
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Ian Goldberg

    Ian Goldberg

    Ian Avrum Goldberg (born March 31, 1973) is a cryptographer and cypherpunk. He is best known for breaking Netscape's implementation of SSL (with David Wagner), and for his role as Chief Scientist of Radialpoint (formerly Zero-Knowledge Systems), a Canadian software company. Goldberg is currently an associate professor at the School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo. He attended high school at the University of Toronto Schools, graduating in 1991. In 1995, he received a B.Math from the University of Waterloo in Pure Mathematics and Computer Science. He obtained a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in December 2000. His thesis was entitled A Pseudonymous Communications Infrastructure for the Internet. His advisor was Eric Brewer. As a high school student, Goldberg was a member of Canada's team to the International Math Olympiad from 1989 to 1991, where he received a bronze, silver, and gold medal respectively. He was also a member of University of Waterloo team that won the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest in 1994. In 1998, Wired Magazine chose him as a member of the "Wired 25". In 2011 he won the EFF Pioneer Award. In 1995, Ian Goldberg with
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Jeff Sutherland

    Jeff Sutherland

    Dr. Jeff Sutherland is one of the inventors of the Scrum software development process. Together with Ken Schwaber, he created Scrum as a formal process at OOPSLA'95. They have extended and enhanced Scrum at many software companies and IT organizations. Jeff is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Military Academy, a Top Gun of his USAF RF-4C Aircraft Commander class and flew 100 missions over North Vietnam. Jeff has advanced degrees from Stanford University and Ph.D from University of Colorado School of Medicine. He is currently a Chief executive officer of Scrum, Inc in Boston, Massachusetts and Senior Advisor to OpenView Venture Partners .
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Jeff V. Merkey

    Jeff V. Merkey

    Jeffrey Vernon Merkey (Cherokee: Waya Getlvhvsdi - ᏩᏯ ᎨᏢᎲᏍᏗ "Howling Wolf") is an American computer scientist and entrepreneur. After working as a chief scientist for Novell, Merkey left to create his own company, Wolf Mountain Group, to develop a set of clustering technologies. Later renamed Timpanogas Research Group (TRG), Merkey and his company were sued by Novell, who alleged misappropriation of trade secrets. When the legal battle with Novell ended, TRG announced its intention to develop an open source, NetWare-compatible operating system. After a brief spat with Microsoft over the NTFS source code TRG licensed from the company in 2000, Merkey set out to develop an open source, NetWare-compatible operating system, one that would run the Linux kernel atop a NetWare microkernel, called GaDuGi. According to at least one report, Merkey became a controversial figure on the Linux kernel mailing list, for announcing that he would purchase a version of the Linux kernel without the GNU General Public License, among other things. Wolf Mountain Group later announced plans for a new file system for Linux and Windows, called the Wolf Mountain File System. Merkey is recognized as the
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    John von Neumann

    John von Neumann

    John von Neumann ( /vɒn ˈnɔɪmən/; December 28, 1903 – February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian-American mathematician and polymath who made major contributions to a vast number of fields, including mathematics (set theory, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, numerical analysis, and many other mathematical fields), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and fluid dynamics), economics (game theory), computer science (linear programming, computer architecture, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics. He is generally regarded as one of the greatest mathematicians in modern history. The mathematician Jean Dieudonné called von Neumann "the last of the great mathematicians", while Peter Lax described him as possessing the most "fearsome technical prowess" and "scintillating intellect" of the century, and Hans Bethe stated "I have sometimes wondered whether a brain like von Neumann's does not indicate a species superior to that of man". He was born in Budapest around the same time as Theodore von Kármán (b. 1881), George de Hevesy (b. 1885), Leó Szilárd (b. 1898), Eugene Wigner (b. 1902), Edward Teller (b. 1908), and Paul Erdős (b. 1913). Von Neumann was a
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Les Hatton

    Les Hatton

    Les Hatton (born 5 February 1948) is a British-born computer scientist and mathematician most notable for his work in failures and vulnerabilities in software controlled systems. He was educated at King's College, Cambridge 1967-1970 and the University of Manchester where he received a Master of Science degree in Electrostatic waves in Relativistic plasma and a Doctor of Philosophy in 1973 for his work on Computational fluid dynamics in Tornadoes. Although originally a geophysicist during which time he was awarded the 1987 Conrad Schlumberger Award for his work in computational geophysics, he switched careers in the early 1990s to study software and systems failure. He has published 4 books and over 100 refereed journal publications and his theoretical and experimental work on software systems failure can be found in IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, IEEE Computer, IEEE Software, Nature, and IEEE Computational Science and Engineering. His book Safer C pioneered the use of safer language subsets in commercial embedded control systems. He was also cited amongst the leading scholars of systems and software engineering by the Journal of Systems and Software for the period
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Shimon Even

    Shimon Even

    Shimon Even (Hebrew: שמעון אבן‎; June 15, 1935 – May 1, 2004) was an Israeli computer science researcher. His main topics of interest included algorithms, graph theory and cryptography. He was a member of the Computer Science Department at the Technion since 1974. Shimon Even was the PhD advisor of Oded Goldreich, a prominent cryptographer.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Steve Omohundro

    Steve Omohundro

    Stephen Omohundro has had a wide-ranging career as a scientist, university professor, author, software architect, and entrepreneur.

    He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University with Honors and Distinction in Physics and with Distinction in Mathematics. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley and published the book Geometric Perturbation Theory in Physics on his dissertation work. His first company, Om Sonic Systems, designed and built custom music synthesizers. As a scientist at Thinking Machines Corporation, he co-developed StarLisp, the programming language for the massively parallel Connection Machine. He was a computer science professor at the University of Illinois at Champaign/Urbana where he co-founded the Center for Complex Systems Research, supervised 4 Masters theses and 2 Ph.D. theses, and was ranked as an excellent teacher. He wrote the three-dimensional graphics portion of Wolfram Research’s Mathematica program as one of the original seven developers. At the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, he led an international team in developing the object-oriented programming language Sather (featured in O’Reilly’s History of Programming Languages). He also developed a variety of novel neural network and machine learning algorithms and built systems which learned to read lips, control robots, and learn grammars. At the NEC Research Institute in Princeton, he worked on a variety of applications of artificial intelligence and co-authored a patent on the PicHunter image search system. While at these institutions, he served on 6 conference program committees and 2 journal editorial boards, gave many invited talks, and produced 48 scientific publications.

    He founded Olo Software in Palo Alto to provide technology and business consulting to a variety of startup companies and research labs including InterTrust Technologies, Xerox PARC, Fuji-Xerox PAL, Ask Jeeves Inc., VideoScribe, LinuxMatix, and Video Memoirs, and Molecular Objects. He founded the think tank Self-Aware Systems to work toward building wisdom into our technologies and institutions. He serves on the advisory board of the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence and the scientific advisory board of the Lifeboat Foundation.

    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Stuart J. Russell

    Stuart J. Russell

    Stuart Russell (born 1962) is a computer scientist known for his contributions to artificial intelligence. Stuart Russell was born in Portsmouth, England. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree with first-class honours in Physics from Wadham College, Oxford in 1982, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1986. He then joined the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he is currently Professor of Computer Science. He also holds an appointment as Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, where he pursues research in computational physiology and intensive-care unit monitoring. Stuart Russell was co-winner, in 1995, of the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award, the premier international award in artificial intelligence for researchers under 35. In 2003 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and in 2011 he became a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2005 he was awarded the ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award. In 2012, he was appointed to the Blaise Pascal Chair in Paris, awarded to "internationally acclaimed foreign
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Wesley A. Clark

    Wesley A. Clark

    Wesley Allison Clark (born 1927) is a computer scientist and one of the main participants, along with Charles Molnar, in the creation of the LINC laboratory computer, which was the first mini-computer and shares with a number of other computers (such as the PDP-1) the claim to be the inspiration for the personal computer. Clark was born in New Haven, Connecticut and grew up in northern California. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1947, and received an electrical engineering degree from MIT in 1955. Clark worked for Washington University from 1964–72, and as a consultant thereafter. He founded Clark, Rockoff, and Associates in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, Maxine Rockoff. His oldest son, Douglas, is a professor of computer science at Princeton University. The New York Times series on the history of the personal computer had this to say in an article on August 19, 2001 "How the Computer Became Personal": In the pantheon of personal computing, the LINC, in a sense, came first—more than a decade before Ed Roberts made PC's affordable for ordinary people. Work started on the Linc, the brainchild of the M.I.T. physicist Wesley A. Clark, in May 1961, and
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Robert L. Cook

    Robert L. Cook

    Robert L. Cook (December 10, 1952) is a computer graphics researcher and developer, and the co-creator of the RenderMan rendering software. Cook was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and educated at Duke University and Cornell University. While at Cornell, Cook worked with Donald P. Greenberg. He is now Vice President of Software Engineering at Pixar Animation Studios. גלית שומסקי סקסית
    5.00
    5 votes
    127
    Adi Shamir

    Adi Shamir

    Adi Shamir (Hebrew: עדי שמיר‎; born July 6, 1952) is an Israeli cryptographer. He is a co-inventor of the RSA algorithm (along with Ron Rivest and Len Adleman), a co-inventor of the Feige–Fiat–Shamir identification scheme (along with Uriel Feige and Amos Fiat), one of the inventors of differential cryptanalysis and has made numerous contributions to the fields of cryptography and computer science. Born in Tel Aviv, Shamir received a BS degree in Mathematics from Tel Aviv University in 1973 and obtained his MSc and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the Weizmann Institute in 1975 and 1977 respectively. His thesis was titled, "Fixed Points of Recursive Programs and their Relation in Differential Agard Calculus". After a year postdoc at University of Warwick, he did research at MIT from 1977–1980 before returning to be a member of the faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute. Starting from 2006, he is also an invited professor at École Normale Supérieure in Paris. In addition to RSA, Shamir's other numerous inventions and contributions to cryptography include the Shamir secret sharing scheme, the breaking of the Merkle-Hellman knapsack cryptosystem,
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Edsger Dijkstra

    Edsger Dijkstra

    Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɛtsxər ˈʋibə ˈdɛikstra] ( listen); May 11, 1930 – August 6, 2002) was a Dutch computer scientist. He received the 1972 Turing Award for fundamental contributions to developing programming languages, and was the Schlumberger Centennial Chair of Computer Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin from 1984 until 2000. Shortly before his death in 2002, he received the ACM PODC Influential Paper Award in distributed computing for his work on self-stabilization of program computation. This annual award was renamed the Dijkstra Prize the following year, in his honor. Born in Rotterdam, Dijkstra studied theoretical physics at Leiden University, but quickly realized he was more interested in computer science. Originally employed by the Mathematisch Centrum in Amsterdam, he held a professorship at the Eindhoven University of Technology, worked as a research fellow for Burroughs Corporation in the early 1980s, and later held the Schlumberger Centennial Chair in Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin, in the United States. He retired in 2000. Among his contributions to computer science are the shortest path algorithm, also known
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Eric Allman

    Eric Allman

    Eric Paul Allman (born September 2, 1955) is an American computer programmer who developed sendmail and its precursor delivermail in the late 1970s and early 1980s at UC Berkeley. Born in El Cerrito, California, Allman knew from an early age that he wanted to work in computing, breaking into his high school's mainframe and later using the UC Berkeley computing center for his computing needs. In 1973, he entered UC Berkeley, just as the Unix operating system began to become popular in academic circles. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC Berkeley in 1977 and 1980 respectively. As the Unix source code was available at Berkeley, the local hackers quickly made many extensions to the AT&T code. One such extension was delivermail, which in 1981 turned into sendmail. As an MTA, it was designed to deliver e-mail over the still relatively small (as compared to today's Internet) ARPANET, which consisted of many smaller networks with vastly differing formats for e-mail headers. Sendmail soon became an important part of the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) and continues to be the most widely used MTA on Unix based systems today, despite its somewhat complex configuration syntax and
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Martin Kay

    Martin Kay

    Martin Kay is a computer scientist known especially for his work in computational linguistics. Born and raised in the United Kingdom, he received his M.A. from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1961. In 1958 he started to work at the Cambridge Language Research Unit, one of the earliest centers for research in what is now known as Computational Linguistics. In 1961, he moved to the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, California, USA, where he eventually became head of research in linguistics and machine translation. He left Rand in 1972 to become Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine. In 1974, he moved to the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center as a Research Fellow. In 1985, while retaining his position at Xerox PARC, he joined the faculty of Stanford University half-time. He is currently Professor of Linguistics at Stanford University and Honorary Professor of Computational Linguistics at Saarland University. He was born in Great Britain and he studied linguistics and computational linguistics at Trinity College in Cambridge. In the autumn, he generally teaches 182/282 "Human and Machine Translation" described in the catalog as follows: The
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Seymour Papert

    Seymour Papert

    Seymour Papert (born February 29, 1928 in Pretoria, South Africa) is an MIT mathematician, computer scientist, and educator. He is one of the pioneers of artificial intelligence, as well as an inventor of the Logo programming language. Papert attended the University of the Witwatersrand, receiving a B.A. in 1949 and a PhD in mathematics in 1952. He then went on to receive another PhD, also in mathematics, at Cambridge University in 1959. He was a leading figure in the revolutionary socialist circle around Socialist Review while living in London in the 1950s. Papert worked as a researcher in a variety of places, including St. John's College, Cambridge, the Henri Poincare Institute at the University of Paris, the University of Geneva and the National Physical Laboratory in London before becoming a research associate at MIT in 1963. He held this position until 1967, when he became professor of applied math and director of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, until 1981; he also served as Cecil & Ida Green professor of education at MIT from 1974-1981. Papert worked on learning theories, and is known for focusing on the impact of new technologies on learning in general and in
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Wayne Stevens

    Wayne Stevens

    Wayne P. Stevens (1944 - 1993) was an American software engineer, consultant, author, pioneer, and advocate of the practical application of software methods and tools. Stevens grew up in Missouri, spent two years in India, where he attended the Woodstock School, and earned his M.S. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1967. He eventually became the chief architect of application development methodology for IBM's consulting group. The annual Stevens Award Lecture on Software Development Methods is named after him. He belonged to the IEEE and the ACM as well as the following honorary societies: Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and Eta Kappa Nu. He wrote a seminal paper on Structured Design, with Larry Constantine and Glenford Myers, and was the author of a number of books and articles on application design methodologies. He also worked with John Paul Morrison to refine and promote the concepts of what is now called Flow-based programming, including descriptions of FBP in several of these references. Stevens published several articles and books, including:
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Daphne Koller

    Daphne Koller

    Daphne Koller (born 1968) is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University and a MacArthur Fellowship recipient. She's also one of the founders of Coursera, an online education platform. Her general research area is artificial intelligence and its applications in the biomedical sciences. Koller was featured in an article by MIT Technology Review titled "10 Emerging Technologies That Will Change Your World" concerning the topic of Bayesian Machine Learning. She received a bachelor's degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1985, at the age of 17, and a master's degree from the same institution in 1986. Koller completed her Ph.D. at Stanford in 1993 under the supervision of Joseph Halpern, and joined the faculty of the Stanford University Computer Science Department in 1995. She was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2004. In April 2008, Daphne Koller was awarded the first ever $150,000 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in Computing Sciences. In 2009, she published a textbook on probabilistic graphical models together with Nir Friedman. She offered a free online course on the subject starting in February 2012. She is married to Dan Avida.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Gerard J. Holzmann

    Gerard J. Holzmann

    Gerard J. Holzmann (born 1951) is an American computer scientist, best known as the developer of the SPIN model checker. Holzmann was born in Amsterdam, Netherlands and received an Engineer's degree in Electrical Engineering from the Delft University of Technology in 1976. He subsequently also received his PhD degree from Delft University in 1979. For much of his career (c1980–2003), Holzmann was at Bell Labs, USA, where he worked in the Computing Science Research Center (the former Unix research group). Currently, Holzmann leads the NASA JPL Laboratory for Reliable Software in Pasadena, California. Holzmann is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering. In 2011 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    James Cordy

    James Cordy

    James Reginald Cordy, born January 2, 1950(1950-01-02), is a Canadian computer scientist and educator who is a Professor in the School of Computing at Queen's University. As a researcher he is currently active in the fields of source code analysis and manipulation, software reverse and re-engineering, and pattern analysis and machine intelligence. He has a long record of previous work in programming languages, compiler technology, and software architecture. He is currently best known for his work on the TXL source transformation language , a parser-based framework and functional programming language designed to support software analysis and transformation tasks originally developed with M.Sc. student Charles Halpern-Hamu in 1985 as a tool for experimenting with programming language design. His recent work on the NiCad clone detector with Ph.D. student Chanchal Roy, the Recognition Strategy Language with Ph.D. student Richard Zanibbi and Dorothea Blostein, and the Cerno lightweight natural language understanding system with John Mylopoulos and others at the University of Trento is based on TXL. The 1995 paper A Syntactic Theory of Software Architecture with Ph.D. student Thomas
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    John Backus

    John Backus

    John Warner Backus (December 3, 1924 – March 17, 2007) was an American computer scientist. He directed the team that invented the first widely used high-level programming language (FORTRAN) and was the inventor of the Backus-Naur form (BNF), the almost universally used notation to define formal language syntax. He also did research in function-level programming and helped to popularize it. The IEEE awarded Backus the W.W. McDowell Award in 1967 for the development of FORTRAN. He received the National Medal of Science in 1975, and the 1977 ACM Turing Award “for profound, influential, and lasting contributions to the design of practical high-level programming systems, notably through his work on FORTRAN, and for publication of formal procedures for the specification of programming languages.” Backus was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and grew up in nearby Wilmington, Delaware. He studied at the The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and was apparently not a diligent student. After entering the University of Virginia to study chemistry, he quit and was conscripted into the U.S. Army. He began medical training at Haverford College and, during an internship at a hospital, he
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    John McCarthy

    John McCarthy

    John McCarthy (September 4, 1927 – October 24, 2011) was an American computer scientist and cognitive scientist. He invented the term "artificial intelligence" (AI), developed the Lisp programming language family, significantly influenced the design of the ALGOL programming language, popularized timesharing, and was very influential in the early development of AI. McCarthy received many accolades and honors, such as the Turing Award for his contributions to the topic of AI, the United States National Medal of Science, and the Kyoto Prize. John McCarthy was born in Boston, Massachusetts on September 4, 1927 to an Irish immigrant father and a Lithuanian Jewish immigrant mother, John Patrick and Ida Glatt McCarthy. The family was obliged to relocate frequently during the Great Depression, until McCarthy's father found work as an organizer for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers in Los Angeles, California. McCarthy was exceptionally intelligent, and graduated from Belmont High School two years early. He showed an early aptitude for mathematics; during his teens he taught himself college mathematics by studying the textbooks used at the nearby California Institute of Technology (Caltech).
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Joseph Goguen

    Joseph Goguen

    Joseph Amadee Goguen (28 June 1941 – 3 July 2006) was a computer science professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, USA, who helped develop the OBJ family of programming languages. He was author of A Categorical Manifesto and founder and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Consciousness Studies. Standard implication in product fuzzy logic is often called "Goguen implication". Goguen received his Bachelor's degree in mathematics from Harvard University in 1963, and his PhD in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1968, where he was a student of the founder of fuzzy set theory Lotfi Zadeh. He taught at UC Berkeley, the University of Chicago and University of California, Los Angeles, where he was a full professor of computer science. He held a Research Fellowship in the Mathematical Sciences at the IBM Watson Research Center, where he organized the "ADJ" group. He also visited the University of Edinburgh in Scotland on three Senior Visiting Fellowships. From 1979 to 1988, Goguen worked at SRI International in Menlo Park, California. From 1988 to 1996, he was a professor at the Oxford University
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Rob Pike

    Rob Pike

    Robert C. Pike (born 1956) is a Canadian software engineer and author. He is best known for his work at Bell Labs, where he was a member of the Unix team and was involved in the creation of the Plan 9 from Bell Labs and Inferno operating systems, as well as the Limbo programming language. He also co-developed the Blit graphical terminal for Unix; before that he wrote the first window system for Unix in 1981. Pike is the sole inventor named in AT&T's US patent 4,555,775 or "backing store patent" that is part of the X graphic system protocol and one of the first software patents. Over the years Pike has written many text editors; sam and acme are the most well known and are still in active use and development. Pike, with Brian Kernighan, is the co-author of The Practice of Programming and The Unix Programming Environment. With Ken Thompson he is the co-creator of UTF-8. Pike also developed lesser systems such as the vismon program for displaying images of faces of email authors. Pike also appeared once on Late Night with David Letterman, as a technical assistant to the comedy duo Penn and Teller. As a joke Pike claims to have won the 1980 Olympic silver medal in Archery; however,
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Timothy M. Chan

    Timothy M. Chan

    Timothy Moon-Yew Chan is Professor and University Research Chair in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo, Canada. He graduated with BA (summa cum laude) from Rice University in 1992, and completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science at UBC in 1995 at the age of 19. He was awarded the Governor General's Gold Medal (as Head of Graduating Class in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of British Columbia during convocation), the NSERC doctoral prize, and the Premier's Research Excellence Award (PREA) of Ontario, Canada. He is currently an associate editor for the ACM Transactions on Algorithms (TALG), and the International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications. He is also a member of the editorial board of Algorithmica, Discrete and Computational Geometry, as well as Computational Geometry: Theory and Applications. Chan has published extensively. His research covers area of Data Structure, Algorithms and Computational geometry.
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Jack Dongarra

    Jack Dongarra

    Jack J. Dongarra (born July 18, 1950) is a University Distinguished Professor of Computer Science in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Tennessee. He holds the position of a Distinguished Research Staff member in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is an Adjunct Professor in the Computer Science Department at Rice University. Dongarra holds the Turing Fellowship in the schools of Computer Science and Mathematics at the University of Manchester. He is the founding director of Innovative Computing Laboratory. Dongarra received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Chicago State University in 1972 and a Master of Science in Computer Science from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1973. He received his Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Mathematics from the University of New Mexico in 1980 under the supervision of Cleve Moler. He worked at the Argonne National Laboratory until 1989, becoming a senior scientist. He specializes in numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, the use of advanced-computer architectures, programming methodology, and tools for parallel
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    Ken Schwaber

    Ken Schwaber

    Ken Schwaber is a software developer, product manager and industry consultant. Ken worked with Jeff Sutherland to formulate the initial versions of the Scrum development process and to present Scrum as a formal process at OOPSLA'95. They have extended and enhanced Scrum at many software companies and IT organizations. Schwaber and Sutherland are initial signers of the Agile Manifesto. They are co-authors of the definitive Scrum Guide, which is made available for free by Scrum.org. Today Schwaber runs Scrum.org, which provides Scrum resources, training, assessments, and certifications for Scrum Masters, Scrum Developers, Scrum Product Owners, and organizations using Scrum. He is one of the leaders of the agile software development movement. He is a founder of the Agile Alliance, and he is responsible for founding the Scrum Alliance and creating the Certified Scrum Master programs and its derivatives. Ken left the Scrum Alliance in the fall of 2009 after a serious bicycle accident. He then founded Scrum.org with Alex Armstrong. At Scrum.org, he led the development of new courseware, assessments, and partnerships to improve the quality and effectiveness of Scrum. He has recently
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    Andy Hopper

    Andy Hopper

    Andrew "Andy" Hopper CBE FRS FREng FIET (b. 1953 in Warsaw, Poland) is the Professor of Computer Technology and Head of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory and an Honorary Fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. Hopper studied computer technology at the Swansea University before going to the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory and Trinity Hall, Cambridge in 1974 to start a PhD under the supervision of David Wheeler. Hopper was awarded his PhD in 1978. Hopper’s PhD was in the field of communications networks and he worked with Maurice Wilkes on the creation of the Cambridge Ring and its successor, the Cambridge Fast Ring. The expertise gained in these networking projects put the Computer Laboratory at the forefront of research in chips for communications networks. The Cambridge Ring ran at 10 megabits per second and the Cambridge Fast Ring ran at 100 megabits per second (in 1980). The Cambridge Fast Ring was further developed into ATM. Hopper has supervised approximately fifty PhD students. Hopper's research interests include multimedia systems, Virtual Network Computing and sentient computing. His most cited paper describes the indoor location system called the
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Clifford Stein

    Clifford Stein

    Clifford Stein, a computer scientist, is currently a professor of industrial engineering and operations research at Columbia University in New York, NY, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Computer Science. Stein is chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department at Columbia University. Prior to joining Columbia, Stein was a professor at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. Stein's research interests include the design and analysis of algorithms, combinatorial optimization, operations research, network algorithms, scheduling, algorithm engineering and computational biology. Stein has published many influential papers in the leading conferences and journals in his fields of research, and has occupied a variety of editorial positions including in the journals ACM Transactions on Algorithms, Mathematical Programming, Journal of Algorithms, SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics and Operations Research Letters. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation. Stein is the winner of several prestigious awards including an NSF Career Award, an Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship and the Karen Wetterhahn Award for
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Daniel Jurafsky

    Daniel Jurafsky

    Daniel Jurafsky is a Professor of Linguistics and Computer Science at Stanford University. With James Martin, he wrote the textbook Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Speech Recognition, and Computational Linguistics. He was given a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002.
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    John George Kemeny

    John George Kemeny

    John George Kemeny (Hungarian: Kemény János György) (May 31, 1926 – December 26, 1992) was a Jewish-Hungarian American mathematician, computer scientist, and educator best known for co-developing the BASIC programming language in 1964 with Thomas E. Kurtz. Kemeny served as the 13th President of Dartmouth College from 1970 to 1981 and pioneered the use of computers in college education. Kemeny chaired the presidential commission that investigated the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. Born in Budapest, Hungary, Kemeny attended the Rácz private primary school in Budapest and was a classmate of Nandor Balazs. In 1938 his father left for the United States alone. In 1940, he took the whole Kemeny family to the United States when Hungary's invasion by Nazi Germany became imminent. His grandfather, however, refused to leave and perished in the Holocaust, along with an aunt and uncle. Kemeny's family settled in New York City where he attended George Washington High School. He graduated with the best results in his class three years later. In 1943 Kemeny entered Princeton University where he studied mathematics and philosophy, but he took a year off during his studies to work on the
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Steve Gibson

    Steve Gibson

    Steve M. Gibson (born March 26, 1955, Dayton, Ohio) is a computer enthusiast, software engineer and security researcher who studied Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Gibson lives in Laguna Hills, California. In 1985, Gibson founded Gibson Research Corporation, which is best known for its SpinRite software. Gibson has had a very long career in the technology field; his resume lists jobs he had held back to the age of 13. He began in hardware projects but moved more toward software development in the 1980s. One of his early successes during this period was a light pen graphics system for the Apple II. Gibson is an advocate of assembly language programming, and prides himself on writing smaller applications mostly in Intel x86 assembly language, including much of the code of the SpinRite hard disk utility used from the beginning of the PC era. He is one of several advocates of optimizing computer programs and reducing the size of their executables. In the 1990s, Gibson began to move into the computer security field, developing and distributing a number of free security tools, including the ShieldsUp! port-scanner, and the LeakTest
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Alfred Z. Spector

    Alfred Z. Spector

    Alfred Z. Spector has been Vice President of Research and Special Initiatives at Google since November 2007. Prior to that he was a researcher and software executive at IBM. For several years, he was in charge of all of IBM's software research, including the position of Vice President of Strategy and Technology within IBM's Software Group. Spector was a founder of Transarc Corporation which built and sold distributed transaction processing and wide area file systems software. Prior to founding Transarc, Spector was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. While there, he served as doctoral advisor to Randy Pausch and Joshua Bloch. In 2001, Spector received the IEEE Computer Society's Tsutomu Kanai Award for his contributions to distributed computing systems and applications. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2004. In 2006 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. Spector received his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Applied Mathematics from Harvard.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Bert Bos

    Bert Bos

    Gijsbert (Bert) Bos (born 10 November 1963, The Hague) is a computer scientist. He studied mathematics at the University of Groningen, and wrote his PhD thesis on Rapid user interface development with the script language Gist. In 1996, he joined the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to work on Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). He is a former chairman and the current W3C Staff Contact of the CSS Working Group. He is based in Sophia Antipolis, France. Bos has, along with Håkon Wium Lie, written a book about Cascading Style Sheets.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    D. Richard Hipp

    D. Richard Hipp

    Dwayne Richard Hipp (born April 9, 1961) is the architect and primary author of SQLite as well as Fossil SCM. He and his wife, Ginger G. Wyrick, currently live and work in Charlotte, North Carolina. He also authored the Lemon Parser Generator and CVSTrac. CVSTrac became the inspiration for Trac. He is also a member of the Tcl core team. Hipp uses Richard as his first name, or D. Richard Hipp when using his whole name. The name "Dwayne" appears in his dissertation at Duke University. Hipp was born in Charlotte on April 9, 1961 but grew up in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia. He graduated from Stone Mountain High School in 1979 and enrolled at Georgia Tech. He graduated from Georgia Tech in 1984 with Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. After graduating from Georgia Tech, Hipp worked at AT&T for three years before returning to graduate school at Duke University to study under Alan W. Biermann in the Department of Computer Science. He took the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Duke in 1992 and finding the academic market for Ph.D.s saturated with what he believed to be better qualified candidates, started his own software development consulting company. He married Ginger G.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    David Eppstein

    David Eppstein

    David Arthur Eppstein (born 1963) is an American computer scientist and mathematician. He is professor of computer science at University of California, Irvine. He is known for his work in computational geometry, graph algorithms, and recreational mathematics. Born in England of New Zealander parents, Eppstein is a United States citizen. He received a B.S. in mathematics from Stanford University in 1984, and later an M.S. (1985) and Ph.D. (1989) in computer science from Columbia University, after which he took a postdoctoral position at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center. He joined the UC Irvine faculty in 1990, and was co-chair of the Computer Science Department there from 2002 to 2005. In computer science, Eppstein's research is focused mostly in computational geometry: minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, dynamic graph data structures, graph coloring, graph drawing and geometric optimization. He has published also in application areas such as finite element meshing, which is used in engineering design, and in computational statistics, particularly in robust, multivariate, nonparametric statistics. Eppstein served as the program chair for the theory track of the ACM Symposium on
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Donald Norman

    Donald Norman

    Donald Arthur Norman (born December 25, 1935) is an academic in the field of cognitive science, design and usability engineering and a co-founder and consultant with the Nielsen Norman Group. He is the author of the book The Design of Everyday Things. Much of Norman's work involves the advocacy of user-centered design. His books all have the underlying purpose of furthering the field of design, from doors to computers. Norman has recently taken a controversial stance in saying that the design research community has had little impact in the innovation of products, and that whereas academics can help in refining existing products, it is technologists that accomplish the breakthroughs. Norman splits his time between co-directing the dual-degree MBA and Engineering program Northwestern University and consulting with the Nielsen Norman Group. Norman announced that he would no longer teach full-time after the 2009-2010 academic year. Norman is an active Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology where he spends two months a year teaching. He also holds the title of Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Science at the University of California, San
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    John Hopcroft

    John Hopcroft

    John Edward Hopcroft (born October 7, 1939) is an American theoretical computer scientist. His textbooks on theory of computation (also known as the Cinderella book) and data structures are regarded as standards in their fields. He is the IBM Professor of Engineering and Applied Mathematics in Computer Science at Cornell University. He received his master's degree and Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1962 and 1964, respectively. He worked for three years at Princeton University and since then has been based at Cornell University. John Hopcroft is the grandson of Jacob Nist, founder of the Seattle Box Company. In addition to his research work, he is well known for his books on algorithms and formal languages coauthored with Jeffrey Ullman and Alfred Aho, regarded as classic texts in the field. He received the Turing Award – the most prestigious award in the field and often recognized as the "Nobel Prize of computing", – jointly with Robert Tarjan in 1986. The citation states that he received the award "for fundamental achievements in the design and analysis of algorithms and data structures." Along with his work with Tarjan on planar graphs he is also known for the Hopcroft–Karp
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Leslie Lamport

    Leslie Lamport

    Leslie Lamport (born February 7, 1941 in New York City) is an American computer scientist. Lamport is best known for his seminal work in distributed systems and as the initial developer of the document preparation system LaTeX. A graduate of the Bronx High School of Science, he received a B.S. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1960, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from Brandeis University, respectively in 1963 and 1972. His dissertation was about singularities in analytic partial differential equations. Professionally, Lamport worked as a computer scientist at Massachusetts Computer Associates from 1970 to 1977, SRI International from 1977 to 1985, and Digital Equipment Corporation and Compaq from 1985 to 2001. In 2001 he joined Microsoft Research in Mountain View, California. Lamport’s research contributions have laid the foundations of the theory of distributed systems. Among his most notable papers are These papers relate to such concepts as logical clocks (and the happened-before relationship) and Byzantine failures. They are among the most cited papers in the field of computer science and describe algorithms to solve many fundamental
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Michael J. C. Gordon

    Michael J. C. Gordon

    Michael John Caldwell Gordon, British computer scientist (born February 28, 1948). Mike Gordon led the development of the HOL theorem prover. The HOL system is an environment for interactive theorem proving in a higher-order logic. Its most outstanding feature is its high degree of programmability through the meta-language ML. The system has a wide variety of uses from formalizing pure mathematics to verification of industrial hardware. There has been a series of international conferences on the HOL system, TPHOLs. The first three were informal users' meetings with no published proceedings. The tradition now is for an annual conference in a continent different to the location of the previous meeting. From 1996 the scope broadened to cover all theorem proving in higher-order logics. Gordon was born in Ripon, Yorkshire, England. He gained his Ph.D. at University of Edinburgh in 1973 with a thesis entitled Evaluation and Denotation of Pure LISP Programs. He has worked at the Cambridge University Computer Laboratory since 1981, initially as a Lecturer and moving to Reader in 1988 and Professor in 1996. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1994, and in 2008 a two day research
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    Ron Kimmel

    Ron Kimmel

    Ron Kimmel (Hebrew: רון קימל‎, b. 1963) is a professor of Computer Science at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology. He holds a D.Sc. degree in electrical engineering (1995) from the Technion, and spent a post-doctoral position at UC Berkeley and Berkeley Labs, and a visiting professorship at Stanford University. He has worked in various areas of image and shape analysis in computer vision, image processing, and computer graphics. Kimmel's interest in recent years has been non-rigid shape processing and analysis, medical imaging, computational biometry, numerical optimization of problems with a geometric flavor, and applications of metric geometry and differential geometry. Kimmel is an author of two books, an editor of one, and an author of numerous articles. He is the founder of the Geometric Image Processing Lab , and a founder and advisor of several successful image processing and analysis companies. Kimmel's contributions include the development of fast marching methods for triangulated manifolds (together with James Sethian), the geodesic active contours algorithm for image segmentation, a geometric framework for image filtering (named Beltrami flow after the Italian
    8.00
    1 votes
    157
    Stephen Downes

    Stephen Downes

    Stephen Downes (born April 6, 1959) is a designer and commentator in the fields of online learning and new media. Downes has explored and promoted the educational use of computer and online technologies since 1995. In 2008, Downes and George Siemens designed and taught an online, open course reported as a "landmark in the small but growing push toward 'open teaching.'". Born in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) Downes lived and worked across Canada before joining the National Research Council of Canada as a senior researcher in November 2001. Currently based in Moncton, New Brunswick, Downes is a researcher at the NRC's Institute for Information Technology's e-Learning Research Group. Downes was the winner of the Edublog Award for Best Individual Blog in 2005 for his blog OLDaily. Downes is Editor at Large of the International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning. Downes was a presenter at the February 2007 Online Connectivism Conference. He was an instructor for the first Connectivism Massive open online course (MOOC) in 2008. Downes ran for Mayor of Brandon in 1995, when he was working at the Assiniboine Community College. A member of the New Democratic Party, he ran
    8.00
    1 votes
    158
    Steve Deering

    Steve Deering

    Stephen Deering is a former Technical Leader at Cisco Systems, where he worked on the development and standardization of architectural enhancements to the Internet Protocol. Prior to joining Cisco in 1996, he spent six years at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center, engaged in research on advanced Internet technologies, including multicast routing, mobile internetworking, scalable addressing, and support for multimedia applications over the Internet. He is a former member of the Internet Architecture Board, a present or past chair of numerous Working Groups of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the inventor of IP Multicast, and the lead designer of the new version of the Internet Protocol, IPv6. Deering received his B.Sc. (1973) and M.Sc. (1982) from the University of British Columbia, and his Ph.D. (1991) from Stanford University, he attended high school at Shawnigan Lake School on Vancouver Island. Deering is the recipient of the 2010 IEEE Internet Award for his work in IP multicasting and IPv6. He was declared the 1994 "Geek of the Year" by Internet Talk Radio.
    8.00
    1 votes
    159
    Vaughan Ronald Pratt

    Vaughan Ronald Pratt

    Vaughan Ronald Pratt (born 1944), a Professor Emeritus at Stanford University, was one of the earliest pioneers in the field of computer science. Publishing since 1969, Pratt has made several contributions to foundational areas such as search algorithms, sorting algorithms, and primality testing. More recently his research has focused on formal modeling of concurrent systems and Chu spaces. A pattern of applying models from diverse areas of mathematics such as geometry, linear algebra, abstract algebra, and especially mathematical logic to computer science pervades his work. Raised in Australia and educated at Knox Grammar School where he was dux in 1961, Pratt attended Sydney University where he completed his masters thesis in 1970, related to what is now known as natural language processing. He then went to the United States, where he completed a Ph.D. thesis at Stanford University in only 20 months under the supervision of advisor Donald Knuth. His thesis focused on analysis of the shellsort sorting algorithm and sorting networks. Pratt was an Assistant Professor at MIT (1972 to 1976) and then Associate Professor (1976 to 1982). In 1974, working in collaboration with Knuth and
    8.00
    1 votes
    160
    Craig Larman

    Craig Larman

    Craig Larman is a Canadian computer scientist specializing in Iterative and incremental development, Agile software development, Object-oriented analysis, Object-oriented design, and agile modeling. He is the author of several texts. His education and background are in the fields of object-oriented programming, artificial intelligence, and case-based reasoning. Currently, he is chief scientist at Valtech, a technology consulting and skills transfer organization based in Paris, France. He also serves as an independent author and consultant with a focus on organizational redesign and systems thinking for businesses and organizations adopting iterative and agile practices, agile modeling, or OOA/D, and he has been helpful in forensic investigations with failed software projects and as an expert witness in legal disputes.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Dave Cutler

    Dave Cutler

    David Neil Cutler, Sr. (born March 13, 1942) is an American software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including RSX-11M, VMS and VAXELN at Digital Equipment Corporation and Windows NT at Microsoft. David Cutler was born in Lansing, Michigan and grew up in DeWitt, Michigan. After graduating from Olivet College in 1965, Cutler went to work for DuPont. One of his tasks was developing and running computer simulations on Digital machines. He developed an interest in operating systems and left DuPont to pursue that interest. Cutler's software career started at a small company he founded called Agrippa-Ord, located in Monument Square, Concord, Massachusetts (or possibly in Acton, Massachusetts), marketing software for the LINC and PDP-8 computers. Cutler holds over 20 patents and is an affiliate professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Washington. David Cutler summarised his own career in the foreword to Inside Windows NT. In addition to his engineering skills, Cutler is known for his sardonic humor. Sometimes even his error messages turn out to have a double meaning. David is also an avid auto racing driver. He has previously competed
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    F. Thomson Leighton

    F. Thomson Leighton

    Frank Thomson "Tom" Leighton is a professor of Applied Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served as the head of the Algorithms group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory since 1996, and co-founded Akamai Technologies with student Daniel Lewin in 1998. In 1974, while a senior in high school, he was named one of the Westinghouse Science Talent Search Finalists (now the Intel STS). Leighton received his B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 1978, and his Ph.D. in Mathematics from MIT in 1981. He was the first winner of the Machtey Award in 1981 and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 2008, he was appointed as a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences. He has an Erdős number of 2. His brother David T. Leighton is a full professor at the University of Notre Dame, specializing in transport phenomena. He also serves on the Society for Science & the Public's board of trustees.
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Gene Spafford

    Gene Spafford

    Eugene Howard Spafford (born 1956), commonly known as Spaf, is a professor of computer science at Purdue University and a leading computer security expert. A historically significant Internet figure, he is renowned for first analyzing the Morris Worm, one of the earliest computer worms, and his prominent role in the Usenet backbone cabal. Spafford was a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee 2003-2005, has been an advisor to the National Science Foundation (NSF), and serves as an advisor to over a dozen other government agencies and major corporations. Spafford attended State University of New York at Brockport for three years and completed his B.A. with a double major in mathematics and computer science in that time. He then attended the School of Information and Computer Sciences (now the College of Computing) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his M.S. in 1981, and Ph.D. in 1986 for his design and implementation of the original Clouds distributed operating system kernel. During the early formative years of the Internet, Spafford made significant contributions to establishing semi-formal processes to organize and manage Usenet, then
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Jef Raskin

    Jef Raskin

    Jef Raskin (March 9, 1943 – February 26, 2005) was an American human–computer interface expert best known for starting the Macintosh project for Apple in the late 1970s. Raskin was born in New York City to a secular Jewish family. (The surname "Raskin" is a matronymic from "Raske", Yiddish nickname for Rachel.) He received degrees in mathematics (B.S. 1964) and philosophy (B.A. 1965) at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. In 1967 he earned a master's degree in computer science at Pennsylvania State University. His first computer program, a music program, was part of his master's thesis. Raskin later enrolled in a graduate music program at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), but stopped to teach art, photography and computer science there, working as an assistant professor in the Visual Arts dept from 1968 until 1974. He was awarded a National Science Foundation grant to establish a Computer and Humanities center which used a 16 bit Data General Nova computer and graphic display terminals rather than the teletypes which were in use at that time. Along with his undergraduate student Jonathan (Jon) Collins, Jef developed the Flow Programming Language for use
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    John Gage

    John Gage

    John Burdette Gage (born 1942) was the 21st employee of Sun Microsystems, where he is credited with creating the phrase "the network is the computer." He served as Chief Researcher and Vice President of the Science Office for Sun, until leaving on June 9, 2008 to join Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as a partner to work on green technologies for global warming; he departed KPCB in 2010 to apply what he had learned "to broader issues in other parts of the world". He is also best known as one of the co-founders of NetDay in 1995. Gage received his bachelor's degree in 1975 from the University of California, Berkeley. He also attended the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and the Harvard Business School. While at Berkeley, he was a three-time All-American swimmer. He was a leader in the anti-war movement and was a delegate for Robert Kennedy in 1968 for the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, representing Berkeley and Alameda County, California. He co-chaired the Robert Kennedy campaign in Alameda County. Gage had worked at Berkeley with Bill Joy, the person largely responsible for the authorship of Berkeley UNIX, also known as BSD, from which springs many modern forms of
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Leonard Adleman

    Leonard Adleman

    Leonard Max Adleman (born December 31, 1945) is an American theoretical computer scientist and professor of computer science and molecular biology at the University of Southern California. He is known for being a co-inventor of the RSA (Rivest–Shamir–Adleman) cryptosystem in 1977, and of DNA computing. RSA is in widespread use in security applications, including https. Born in California, Adleman grew up in San Francisco, and attended the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his BA degree in mathematics in 1968 and his Ph.D. degree in EECS in 1976. In 1994, his paper Molecular Computation of Solutions To Combinatorial Problems described the experimental use of DNA as a computational system. In it, he solved a seven-node instance of the Hamiltonian Graph problem, an NP-complete problem similar to the travelling salesman problem. While the solution to a seven-node instance is trivial, this paper is the first known instance of the successful use of DNA to compute an algorithm. DNA computing has been shown to have potential as a means to solve several other large-scale combinatorial search problems. In 2002, he and his research group managed to solve a 'nontrivial'
    7.00
    2 votes
    167
    Philip Greenspun

    Philip Greenspun

    Philip Greenspun is a semi-retired American computer scientist, educator, and early Internet entrepreneur who was a pioneer in developing online communities. Greenspun was born on September 28, 1963, grew up in Bethesda, Maryland, and received an S.B. in Mathematics from MIT in 1982. After working for Hewlett Packard Research Labs in Palo Alto and Symbolics, he became a founder of ICAD, Inc. Greenspun returned to MIT to study electrical engineering and computer science, eventually receiving a Ph.D. Among software engineers, Greenspun is known for his Tenth Rule of Programming: "Any sufficiently complicated C or Fortran program contains an ad hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of half of Common Lisp." In 1993, Greenspun founded photo.net, an online community for people helping each other to improve their photographic skills. He seeded the community with Travels with Samantha, a photo-illustrated account of a trip from Boston to Alaska and back. photo.net, having grown to 600,000 registered users, was acquired by NameMedia in 2007 for $6 million, according to documents filed in connection with a planned public offering of NameMedia shares (news
    7.00
    2 votes
    168
    William Martens

    William Martens

    William Martens (born August 1964) is a computer engineer and magazine editor. He is primarily a programmer who dabbles in the hardware realm and enjoys writing science fiction in addition to writing articles for the magazine Call-A.P.P.L.E., including the long surviving "Bytes from the A.P.P.L.E." a product introduction article. His invention of The Library 1.1 allows A.P.P.L.E to produce the software and document libraries in a matter of seconds covering the entire range of Apple computers. Bill's early years were spent traveling around the world with his father, Michael, a U.S. Army soldier. His early interests included Rocketry, space exploration, and flying. This may have been due to his stepmother, Betty Lou Miller, being a Westinghouse clean-room supervisor. From an early age, she began putting electronics kits, books on space and satellites and other science related items in his room. Bill built his first radio at age 9 from one of the kits Betty had provided. Bill's first contact with a computer came in 1976 through a copy of Creative Computing, a popular hobbyist magazine at the time. When Bill moved to Germany with his father in 1977, the school had a DEC PDP/11-4 series
    7.00
    2 votes
    169
    Andrei Broder

    Andrei Broder

    Andrei Zary Broder (Hebrew: אנדרי זרי ברודר‎) is a Distinguished Scientist at Google. Previously he was a Research Fellow and Vice President of Computational Advertising for Yahoo!. Prior to Yahoo he worked for AltaVista as the vice president of research, and for IBM Research as a Distinguished Engineer and CTO of IBM's Institute for Search and Text Analysis. Broder's research centers around the internet, and internet searching. He is credited with being one of the first people to develop a CAPTCHA, while working for AltaVista. He also invented the MinHash locality sensitive hashing scheme for quickly estimating the similarity between two sets, which was applied within AltaVista to find near-duplicate web documents, and he also developed the bow-tie model of the web graph Broder earned his bachelor's degree (summa cum laude) from the Technion in Israel, and a master's degree and Ph.D. (1985) from Stanford University, where his advisor was Donald Knuth. He is a fellow of ACM and IEEE.
    6.00
    3 votes
    170
    Lawrence L. Larmore

    Lawrence L. Larmore

    Professor Lawrence L. Larmore is a theoretical computer scientist, and a professor at University of Nevada Las Vegas. He is best known for his work with competitive analysis of online algorithms, particularly for the k-server problem. His contributions, with his co-author Marek Chrobak, led to the application of T-theory to the server problem. In addition, he developed the package-merge algorithm for the length-limited Huffman coding problem, as well as an algorithm for optimizing paragraph breaking in linear time. He earned a Ph.D. in Mathematics in the field of algebraic topology from Northwestern University in 1965. He later earned a second Ph.D., this time in Computer Science, in the field of theoretical computer science from University of California, Irvine. He is a Past Member of Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ and Gastwissenschaftler at the University of Bonn.
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    Ronald Fedkiw

    Ronald Fedkiw

    Ronald Paul "Ron" Fedkiw ( /ˈfɛdkoʊ/; born February 27, 1968) is an associate professor in the Stanford University department of computer science and a leading researcher in the field of computer graphics, focusing on topics relating to physically based simulation of natural phenomena and level sets. His techniques have been employed in over twenty motion pictures. He has earned recognition at the 80th Academy Awards as well as from the National Academy for Science. His Oscar was awarded for developing techniques that enabled many technically sophisticated adaptations including the visual effects in 21st century movies in the Star Wars, Harry Potter, Terminator, and Pirates of the Caribbean franchises. Fedkiw has designed a platform that has been used to create many of the movie world's most advanced special effects since it was first used on the T-X character in Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines. Although he has won an Oscar for his work, he does not design the visual effects that use his technique. Instead, he has developed a system that other award-winning technicians and engineers have used to create visual effects for some of the world's most expensive and highest-grossing
    6.00
    3 votes
    172
    Ronald Rivest

    Ronald Rivest

    Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer. He is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He is a member of the Election Assistance Commission's Technical Guidelines Development Committee, tasked with assisting the EAC in drafting the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines. Rivest is one of the inventors of the RSA algorithm (along with Adi Shamir and Len Adleman). He is the inventor of the symmetric key encryption algorithms RC2, RC4, RC5, and co-inventor of RC6. The "RC" stands for "Rivest Cipher", or alternatively, "Ron's Code". (RC3 was broken at RSA Security during development; similarly, RC1 was never published.) He also authored the MD2, MD4, MD5 and MD6 cryptographic hash functions. In 2006, he published his invention of the ThreeBallot voting system, an innovative voting system that incorporates the ability for the voter to discern that their vote was counted while still protecting their voter privacy. Most importantly, this system does not rely on cryptography at all.
    6.00
    3 votes
    173
    Tim Finin

    Tim Finin

    Tim Finin (born 1949 in Walworth, Wisconsin) is a Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). His research has focused on the applications of Artificial intelligence to problems in information systems and has included contributions to natural language processing, expert systems, the theory and applications of multiagent systems, the semantic web, and mobile computing. Finin holds degrees from MIT and the University of Illinois. Prior to joining the UMBC, he held positions at the Unisys Paoli Research Center, the University of Pennsylvania, and the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He is the author of more than 350 refereed publications and has received research grants and contracts from a variety of sources. He has been an organizer of several major conferences, including the IEEE Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Applications, ACM Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, ACM Autonomous Agents conference, ACM Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing and International Semantic Web Conference. He is an editor in chief of the Journal of Web Semantics and on the editorial board of several
    6.00
    3 votes
    174
    Vijay P. Bhatkar

    Vijay P. Bhatkar

    Dr Vijay Pandurang Bhatkar (born 11 October 1946) is an IT computer scientist from India. He is best known as the architect of the PARAM series of Supercomputers, GIST(Graphics and Intelligence based Script Technology) multilingual technology and Education-To-Home mission. Widely recognized for his noteworthy contributions in bringing information and communication technologies to the masses through a series of path-breaking initiatives, he is also credited with creation of several national institutions, notably amongst them being the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing, – India’s national initiative in Supercomputing; the Electronics Research & Development Centre (ER&DC), Trivandrum – India’s largest R&D Centre in application oriented R&D in electronics; the ETH Research Laboratory, Pune for launching Education-To-Home mission; the International Institute of Information Technology I2IT, Pune – India’s largest Post-Graduate Institute for advanced education in IT; and the India International Multiversity (IIMv) – an educational initiative for promoting the concept of integral education. Bhatkar was born on 11 October 1946 into a Maratha family at Muramba, Akola, Maharashtra.
    6.00
    3 votes
    175
    Grace Hopper

    Grace Hopper

    Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term "debugging" for fixing computer glitches (motivated by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace." The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 "Hopper" supercomputer at NERSC. Hopper was born Grace Brewster Murray in New York City. She was the oldest in a family of three children. She was curious as a child, a lifelong trait. At the age of seven she decided to determine how an alarm clock worked. She dismantled seven alarm clocks before her mother realized what she was doing; she was then limited to one clock. For her preparatory school
    5.00
    4 votes
    176
    Luis von Ahn

    Luis von Ahn

    Luis von Ahn, PhD (born in 1979 in Guatemala City, Guatemala) is an entrepreneur and an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. He is known as one of the pioneers of the idea of crowdsourcing. He is the founder of the company reCAPTCHA, which was sold to Google in 2009. As a professor, his research includes CAPTCHAs and human computation, and has earned him international recognition and numerous honors. He was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship (a.k.a., the "genius grant") in 2006, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship in 2009, a Sloan Fellowship in 2009, and a Microsoft New Faculty Fellowship in 2007, and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2012. He has also been named one of the 50 Best Brains in Science by Discover Magazine, and has made it to many recognition lists that include Popular Science Magazine's Brilliant 10, Silicon.com's 50 Most Influential People in Technology, Technology Review's TR35: Young Innovators Under 35, and FastCompany's 100 Most Innovative People in Business. Siglo Veintiuno, a leading newspaper in Guatemala, chose him as the person of the year in 2009. In 2011, Foreign
    5.00
    4 votes
    177
    Charles Molnar

    Charles Molnar

    Charles Edwin Molnar (1935–1996) was a co-developer of one of the first minicomputers, the LINC (Laboratory Instrument Computer), while a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1962. His collaborator was Wesley A. Clark. The LINC originated decades before the advent of the personal computer. Its development was the result of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) program that placed 20 copies of an early LINC prototype in selected biomedical research laboratories nationwide. Later, the LINC was produced in greater numbers by Digital Equipment Corp. and other computer manufacturers. Later he was on the faculty of Washington University in St. Louis. Charlie Molnar was also well known as a pioneer in the modeling of the auditory system, especially numerical models of the function of the cochlea (the inner ear). When he died in 1996, he was working at Sun Microsystems on asynchronous circuits with Ivan Sutherland. Molnar received a bachelor's degree (1956) and a master's degree (1957) in electrical engineering from Rutgers University, where he was a member of the Cap and Skull Society, and received a doctoral degree (1966) from MIT in electrical
    5.67
    3 votes
    178
    Kim Polese

    Kim Polese

    Kim Karin Polese (born November 13, 1961) is a previous CEO of SpikeSource, and was one of the most prominent Silicon Valley executives during the dot-com era. In 1997, she made Time Magazine's list of "The 25 Most Influential Americans". She received a BA degree in biophysics in 1984 from the University of California, Berkeley and studied Computer Science at the University of Washington. Polese is a fellow at Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Engineered Innovation. After a stint at Intellicorp, Ms. Polese spent more than seven years with Sun Microsystems, where she was the original Java product manager who influenced the transition of its internal name of "Oak" to "Java". After leaving Sun in 1996 she co-founded Marimba, a Java-based business, where she served as CEO until 2000, leading Marimba through its public offering in 1999 and bringing it to profitability. In July 2000, she was replaced as CEO by John Olsen, who in turn was replaced in a year by Rich Wyckoff, who led the sale of Marimba to BMC Software for $239 million in 2004. Since September 2004 and until recently , Polese has been CEO of SpikeSource, a provider of business-ready open source solutions. The company
    5.67
    3 votes
    179
    Andi Gutmans

    Andi Gutmans

    Andi Gutmans (Hebrew: אנדי גוטמנס‎) is an Israeli programmer of Jewish ancestry from Switzerland, PHP developer and co-founder of Zend Technologies. A graduate of the Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Gutmans and fellow student Zeev Suraski created PHP 3 in 1997. In 1999 they wrote the Zend Engine, the core of PHP 4, and founded Zend Technologies, which has since overseen PHP advances, including the current PHP 5 release. The name Zend is a portmanteau of their forenames, Zeev and Andi. Gutmans currently serves as CEO of Zend Technologies. Before being appointed CEO in February 2009 he led Zend's R&D including development of all Zend products and Zend's contributions to the open-source Zend Framework and PHP Development Tools projects. He has participated at Zend in its corporate financing and has also led alliances with vendors like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, and Oracle. Gutmans is also a board member of the Eclipse Foundation (which he joined in October 2005), an emeritus member of the Apache Software Foundation, and was nominated for the FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software in 1999. In 2004 he wrote a book called "PHP 5 Power Programming" together
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Chu Bong-Foo

    Chu Bong-Foo

    Chu Bong-Foo is the inventor of the Cangjie method, the most widely available Chinese input method. He is said to be the father of the modern Chinese computing, as his public domain input method, created in 1976, has sped up the computerization of Chinese society. Chu spent his childhood in Taiwan, but worked at Brazil, United States, Taiwan, Shenzhen and Macau. Chu was born in 1937 in Huanggang, Hubei to father Chu Wan-Yin, also called Chu Huai-bing. His family led a wandering life during the turbulent days of mainland China, and they finally settled down in Taiwan. There he studied at a local high school. He was an imaginative teenager who also spent much time reading fictions, but so much so that it negatively affected his studies. Later he also became interested in cinema. After graduating from Taiwan Provincial Agriculture Institute and his military service, he taught briefly at an elementary school in Hualien. In this period he witnessed the poverty of countryside, and developed a sense of mission for rural development and cultural improvement. Finding teaching not to his taste, he went to Brazil instead to develop his career, only to find life more difficult. Over that
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Karl Sims

    Karl Sims

    Karl Sims is a computer graphics artist and researcher, who is best known for using particle systems and artificial life in computer animation. Sims received a B.S. from MIT in 1984, and a M.S. from the MIT Media Lab in 1987. He worked for Thinking Machines as an artist-in-residence, for Whitney-Demos Production as a researcher, and co-founded Optomystic. He currently heads GenArts, a Cambridge, Massachusetts company that develops special effects plugins used by motion picture studios. At Optomystic, Sims developed software for the Connection Machine 2 (CM-2) that animated the water from drawings of a deluge by Leonardo da Vinci, used in Mark Whitney's film Excerpts from Leonardo's Deluge. Sims' animations Particle Dreams and Panspermia used the CM-2 to animate and render various complex phenomena via particle systems. Panspermia was also used as the video for Pantera's cover of Black Sabbath's Planet Caravan. Sims wrote landmark papers on virtual creatures and artificial evolution for computer art. His virtual creatures used an artificial neural network to process input from virtual sensors and act on virtual muscles between cuboid 'limbs'. The creatures were evolved to display
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Maurice Vincent Wilkes

    Maurice Vincent Wilkes

    Sir Maurice Vincent Wilkes FRS, FREng, DFBCS (26 June 1913 – 29 November 2010) was a British computer scientist credited with several important developments in computing. At the time of his death, Wilkes was an Emeritus Professor of the University of Cambridge. He received a number of distinctions: he was a knight bachelor, Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the Royal Society. Wilkes was born in Dudley, Worcestershire, England and grew up in Stourbridge, West Midlands, England, where his father worked on the estate of the Earl of Dudley. He was educated at King Edward VI College, Stourbridge and during his school years he was introduced to amateur radio by his chemistry teacher. He went on to read Mathematics at St John's College, Cambridge from 1931-34, continuing to complete a Ph.D. in physics on the topic of radio propagation of very long radio waves in the ionosphere in 1936. He was appointed to a junior faculty position of the University of Cambridge through which he was involved in the establishment of a computing laboratory. He was called up for military service during WWII and worked on radar at
    6.50
    2 votes
    183
    Mike Cowlishaw

    Mike Cowlishaw

    Mike Cowlishaw is a retired IBM Fellow, a Visiting Professor at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Warwick, and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (roughly the equivalent of the NAE in the USA), the Institute of Engineering and Technology (formerly IEE), and the British Computer Society. Cowlishaw joined IBM in 1974 as an electronic engineer but is best known as a programmer and writer. He is known for designing and implementing the REXX programming language (published in IBM Systems Journal in 1984) and the NetRexx programming language (1996–1997), his work on color perception and image processing (1982–1985), the STET folding editor (1977), the LEXX live parsing editor (1985, possibly the first editor with color highlighting) for the Oxford English Dictionary, electronic publishing, SGML applications, PMGlobe, the IBM Jargon file (IBMJARG) through 1990, Java-related languages, the Acorn System 1 simulator, MemoWiki, and decimal arithmetic. He has also contributed to and/or edited numerous computing standards, including ISO (SGML, COBOL, C, C++), BSI (SGML, C), ANSI (REXX), IETF (HTTP 1.0/RFC 1945), W3C (XML Schema), ECMA (ECMAScript, C#, CLI),
    6.50
    2 votes
    184
    Nicholas Negroponte

    Nicholas Negroponte

    Nicholas Negroponte (born December 1, 1943) is an American architect best known as the founder and Chairman Emeritus of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab, and also known as the founder of the One Laptop per Child Association (OLPC). Negroponte was born to Dimitri John Negroponte, a Greek shipping magnate, and grew up in New York City's Upper East Side. He is the younger brother of John Negroponte, former United States Deputy Secretary of State. He attended Buckley School in New York City, Le Rosey in Switzerland, and The Choate School (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Wallingford, Connecticut, from which he graduated in 1961. Subsequently, he studied at MIT as both an undergraduate and graduate student in Architecture where his research focused on issues of computer-aided design. He earned a Master's degree in architecture from MIT in 1966. Negroponte joined the faculty of MIT in 1966. For several years thereafter he divided his teaching time between MIT and several visiting professorships at Yale, Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley. In 1967, Negroponte founded MIT's Architecture Machine Group, a combination lab and think tank which studied new
    6.50
    2 votes
    185
    Olivier Danvy

    Olivier Danvy

    Olivier Danvy is a French computer scientist specializing in programming languages, partial evaluation, and continuations at the University of Aarhus in Denmark. He is notable for the number of scientific papers which acknowledge his help. Writing in Nature, editor Declan Butler reports on an analysis of acknowledgments on nearly one third of a million scientific papers and reports that Danvy is "the most thanked person in computer science". Danvy himself is quoted as being "stunned to find my name at the top of the list", ascribing his position to a "series of coincidences": he is multidisciplinary, is well traveled, is part of an international PhD programme, is a networker, and belongs to a university department with a long tradition of having many international visitors.
    6.50
    2 votes
    186
    Charles Bachman

    Charles Bachman

    Charles William "Charlie" Bachman (born December 11, 1924) is an American computer scientist, who spent his entire career as an industrial researcher rather than in academia. He is particularly known for his work in the area of databases. Charles Bachman was born in Manhattan, Kansas in 1924, where his father, Charlie Bachman, was the head football coach at Kansas State College. He attended high school in East Lansing, Michigan. In World War II he joined the United States Army and spent March 1944 through February 1946 in the South West Pacific Theater serving in the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Corps in New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippine Islands. Here he was first exposed to and used fire control computers for aiming 90 mm guns. After his discharge in 1946 he attended Michigan State College and graduated in 1948 with a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering (Tau Beta Phi). He then attended the University of Pennsylvania. In 1950, he graduated with a master's degree in Mechanical Engineering, and had also completed three-quarters of the requirements for an MBA from the university's Wharton School of Business. In 1950 he started working at Dow Chemical in Midland, Michigan.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Hector Garcia-Molina

    Hector Garcia-Molina

    Héctor García-Molina ( b. in Monterrey, Nuevo León, México) is a Professor in the Departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He has served at the U.S. President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) from 1997 to 2001, as chairman of the Computer Science Department of Stanford University from January 2001 to December 2004 and has been a member of Oracle Corporation's Board of Directors since October 2001. In 1999 he was laureated with the ACM SIGMOD Innovations Award. García-Molina graduated in 1974 with a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Studies (ITESM) and received both a master's degree in Electrical Engineering (1975) and a doctorate in Computer Science (1979) from Stanford University. From 1979 to 1991 he worked as a professor of the Computer Science Department at Princeton University in New Jersey. In 1992 he joined the faculty of Stanford University as the Leonard Bosack and Sandra Lerner Professor in the Departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering and has served as Director of the Computer Systems Laboratory (August 1994 – December 1997) and
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    James H. Wilkinson

    James H. Wilkinson

    James Hardy Wilkinson FRS (27 September 1919 – 5 October 1986) was a prominent figure in the field of numerical analysis, a field at the boundary of applied mathematics and computer science particularly useful to physics and engineering. Born in Strood, England, he attended the Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School in Rochester. He studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated as Senior Wrangler, or top of the class. Taking up war work in 1940, he began working on ballistics but transferred to the National Physical Laboratory in 1946, where he worked with Alan Turing on the ACE computer project. Later, Wilkinson's interests took him into the numerical analysis field, where he discovered many significant algorithms. He received the Turing Award in 1970 "for his research in numerical analysis to facilitate the use of the high-speed digital computer, having received special recognition for his work in computations in linear algebra and 'backward' error analysis." In the same year, he also gave the John von Neumann Lecture at the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The J. H. Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software is named in his honour. Wilkinson married
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Matthias Ettrich

    Matthias Ettrich

    Matthias Ettrich (born 14 June 1972 in Bietigheim-Bissingen, Baden-Württemberg) is a German computer scientist known for his contributions to the KDE and LyX projects. Matthias went to School in Beilstein, as he lived with his parents in Oberstenfeld, not too far away from the place he was born. He passed the Abitur in 1991. Ettrich studied for his MSc in Computer Science at the Wilhelm Schickard Institute for Computer Science at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He currently resides in Berlin, Germany. He works for Nokia on the Qt graphical widget toolkit and the Qt Creator IDE. Ettrich founded and furthered the LyX project in 1995, initially conceived as a university term project. LyX is a graphical frontend to LaTeX. Since LyX's main target platform was Linux, he started to explore different ways to improve the graphical user interface, which ultimately led him to the KDE project. Ettrich founded KDE in 1996, when he proposed on Usenet a "consistent, nice looking free desktop-environment" [sic] for Unix-like systems using Qt as its widget toolkit. On 6 Nov 2009, Ettrich was decorated with the Federal Cross of Merit for his contributions to Free Software.
    5.33
    3 votes
    190
    Philippe Flajolet

    Philippe Flajolet

    Philippe Flajolet (1 December 1948 – 22 March 2011) was a French computer scientist. A former student of École Polytechnique, Philippe Flajolet received his Ph.D. in computer science from University Paris Diderot in 1973 and state doctorate from Paris-Sud 11 University in 1979. Most of Philippe Flajolet's research work was dedicated towards general methods for analyzing the computational complexity of algorithms, including the theory of average-case complexity. He introduced the theory of analytic combinatorics. With Robert Sedgewick of Princeton University, he wrote the first book-length treatment of the topic, the 2009 book entitled Analytic Combinatorics. A summary of his research up to 1998 can be found in the article "Philippe Flajolet's research in Combinatorics and Analysis of Algorithms" by H. Prodinger and W. Szpankowski, Algorithmica 22 (1998), 366-387. At the time of his death from a serious illness, Philippe Flajolet was a research director (senior research scientist) at INRIA in Rocquencourt. From 1994 to 2003 he was a corresponding member of the French Academy of Sciences, and was a full member from 2003 on. He was also a member of the Academia Europaea.
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Terry Allen Winograd (born February 24, 1946, Takoma Park, Maryland) is an American professor of computer science at Stanford University, and co-director of the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group. He is known within the philosophy of mind and artificial intelligence fields for his work on natural language using the SHRDLU program. SHRDLU was written as a PhD thesis at MIT in the years from 1968-70. In making the program Winograd was concerned with the problem of providing a computer with sufficient "understanding" to be able to use natural language. Winograd built a blocks world, restricting the program's intellectual world to a simulated "world of toy blocks". The program could accept commands such as, "Find a block which is taller than the one you are holding and put it into the box" and carry out the requested action using a simulated block-moving arm. The program could also respond verbally, for example, "I do not know which block you mean." The SHRDLU program can be viewed historically as one of the classic examples of how difficult it is for a programmer to build up a computer's semantic memory by hand and how limited or "brittle" such programs are. In 1973, Winograd
    5.33
    3 votes
    192
    Ken Thompson

    Ken Thompson

    Kenneth Lane Thompson (born February 4, 1943), commonly referred to as ken in hacker circles, is an American pioneer of computer science. Having worked at Bell Labs for most of his career, Thompson is notable for his work with the B programming language (basing it mainly on the BCPL language he had used to write Unix while in the MULTICS project), the C programming language, and as one of the creators and early developers of the Unix and Plan 9 operating systems. Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle, and most recently the co-creation of Google's programming language Go. Thompson was born in New Orleans. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1965 and a master's degree in 1966, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, from the University of California, Berkeley, where his master's thesis advisor was Elwyn Berlekamp. In the 1960s, Thompson and Dennis Ritchie worked on the Multics operating system. While writing Multics, Thompson created the Bon programming language. The two left the Multics project
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Klaus Knopper

    Klaus Knopper

    Klaus Knopper (born 1968 in Ingelheim) is a German electrical engineer and free software developer. Knopper is the creator of Knoppix, a well-known live CD Linux distribution. He received his diploma in electrical engineering from the Kaiserslautern University of Technology (in German: Technische Universität Kaiserslautern), co-founded LinuxTag in 1996 (a major European Linux expo) and has been a self-employed information technology consultant since 1998. He also teaches at the Kaiserslautern University of Applied Sciences. Knopper is married to Adriane Knopper, who has a visual impairment. She has been assisting Knopper with a version of Knoppix for blind and visually impaired people, released in the third quarter of 2007 as a Live CD. Her name has been given to the distribution: Adriane Knoppix. Adriane is more of a desktop or "Non-graphical-userinterface" for blind computer beginners than a "distribution". It will work on top of any GNU/Linux distribution that has a screenreader (Preferably SBL) and some text-based tools for internet access and normal work.
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Lennart Johnsson

    Lennart Johnsson

    Lennart Johnsson (born 1944) is a Swedish computer scientist and engineer. Johnsson started his career at ABB in Sweden and moved on to UCLA, Caltech, Yale University, Harvard University, the Royal Institute of Technology ("KTH" in Sweden), Thinking Machines Corporation and the University of Houston, where he holds the Hugh and Lillie Roy Cranz Cullen Distinguished Chair of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Johnsson is a world class researcher in grid computing.
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Rodney Brooks

    Rodney Brooks

    Rodney Allen Brooks (born December 30, 1954) is the former Panasonic professor of robotics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since 1986 he has authored a series of highly influential papers which have inaugurated a fundamental shift in artificial intelligence research. Outside the scientific community Brooks is also known for his appearance in a film featuring him and his work, Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control. He is now the chairman and chief technical officer for Rethink Robotics (formerly Heartland Robotics) in Boston. In his paper, "Elephants Don't Play Chess.", Brooks argued that interacting with the physical world is far more difficult than symbolically reasoning about it. Symbolic computational approaches to creating intelligent machines had long been the focus of AI since the days of Alan Turing, directly tracing back to the work of Gottlob Frege. Brooks focused instead on biologically-inspired robotic architectures (e.g., the subsumption architecture) that address basic perceptual and sensorimotor tasks. In the late 1980s Brooks and his team introduced Allen, a robot using subsumption architecture. Currently, Brooks' work focuses on engineering intelligent
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Carver Mead

    Carver Mead

    Carver Andress Mead (born 1 May 1934, in Bakersfield, California) is a US computer scientist. He currently holds the position of Gordon and Betty Moore Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), having taught there for over 40 years. Mead studied electrical engineering at Caltech, getting his BS in 1956, his MS in 1957, and his PhD degree in 1960. Carver Mead and Lynn Conway co-wrote the landmark text Introduction to VLSI systems in 1980, an important spearhead of the Mead & Conway revolution. A pioneering and well-written textbook, it has been used in VLSI integrated circuit education all over the world for decades. Mead is credited by Intel's (at that time Fairchild Semiconductor's) Gordon Moore of coining the term Moore's Law, denoting the observation/prediction Moore did in 1965 about the growth rate of the transistor amount fitting on a single integrated circuit. In relation to his 2002 award with the National Medal of Technology, his biography at a webpage of the Technology Administration of the United States government says: Carver Mead is a key pioneer of modern microelectronics. His 40-year academic and
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Yukihiro Matsumoto

    Yukihiro Matsumoto

    Yukihiro Matsumoto (松本行弘 (まつもとゆきひろ), Matsumoto Yukihiro, a.k.a. Matz, born 14 April 1965) is a Japanese computer scientist and software programmer best known as the chief designer of the Ruby programming language and its reference implementation, Matz's Ruby Interpreter (MRI). As of 2011, Matsumoto is the Chief Architect of Ruby at Heroku, an online cloud platform-as-a-service in San Francisco. He is a fellow of Rakuten Institute of Technology, a research and development organization in Rakuten Inc. Matsumoto's name can be written using kanji: 松本行弘, but is normally written using hiragana: まつもとゆきひろ. Born in Osaka Prefecture, he was raised in Tottori Prefecture from the age of four. According to an interview conducted by Japan Inc., he was a self-taught programmer until the end of high school. He graduated with an information science degree from University of Tsukuba, where he was a member of Ikuo Nakata's research lab on programming languages and compilers. Matsumoto is married and has four children. He is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, did standard service as a missionary and is now a counselor in his church ward. Matz released the first version of the
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    James Pustejovsky

    James Pustejovsky

    James Pustejovsky is the TJX Feldberg professor of computer science at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. His expertise includes theoretical and computational modeling of language, specifically: Computational linguistics, Lexical semantics, Knowledge representation, temporal and spatial reasoning and Extraction. His main topics of research are Natural language processing generally, and in particular, the computational analysis of linguistic meaning. Pustejovsky proposed Generative Lexicon theory in lexical semantics. His other interests include temporal reasoning, event semantics, spatial language, language annotation, computational linguistics, and machine learning. Pustejovsky's research group's current projects include the TimeML and ISO-Space projects. The TimeML project is a standard markup language for temporal events in a document, and has recently been adopted as ISO-TImeML by the ISO. ISO-Space is an ISO-directed effort to create an expressive specification for the representation of spatial information in language. His previous work included the Medstract project, an effort to extract information from medical documents using current natural language processing
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Lee Felsenstein

    Lee Felsenstein

    Lee Felsenstein (born 1945 in Philadelphia) is an American computer engineer who played a central role in the development of the personal computer. He was one of the original members of the Homebrew Computer Club and the designer of the Osborne 1, the first mass-produced portable computer. Before the Osborne, Felsenstein designed the Intel 8080 based "SOL" computer from Processor Technology, the PennyWhistle modem, and other early "S-100 bus" era designs. His shared-memory alphanumeric video display design, the Processor Technology VDM-1 video display module board, was widely copied and became the basis for the standard display architecture of personal computers. Many of his designs were leaders in reducing costs of computer technologies for the purpose of making them available to large markets. His work featured a concern for the social impact of technology and was influenced by the philosophy of Ivan Illich. Felsenstein was the engineer for the Community Memory project, one of the earliest attempts to place networked computer terminals in public places to facilitate social interactions among individuals, in the era before the commercial Internet. As a young man, Felsenstein was a
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Marissa Mayer

    Marissa Mayer

    Marissa Ann Mayer (pronounced /ˈmaɪər/) (born May 30, 1975) is an American business executive. She is the current president and CEO of Yahoo!. Previously, she was a long-time executive and key spokesperson for Google. She is the youngest CEO of a Fortune 500 company, and has been ranked number 14 on America's most powerful businesswoman of 2012 by Fortune magazine. Mayer was born in Wausau, Wisconsin, the daughter of Margaret Mayer, an art teacher of Finnish descent, and Michael Mayer, an engineer. After graduating from Wausau West High School in 1993, Mayer was selected by Wisconsin governor Tommy Thompson as one of the state's two delegates to attend the National Youth Science Camp in West Virginia. Mayer graduated with honors from Stanford University with a B.S. in symbolic systems and an M.S. in computer science. For both degrees, she specialized in artificial intelligence. In 2009, the Illinois Institute of Technology granted Mayer an honoris causa doctorate degree in recognition of her work in the field of search. Mayer joined Google in 1999 as employee number 20 and was the company's first female engineer. During her 13 years with the company, she was an engineer, designer,
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Stephen Cole Kleene

    Stephen Cole Kleene

    Stephen Cole Kleene (January 5, 1909 – January 25, 1994) was an American mathematician who helped lay the foundations for theoretical computer science. One of many distinguished students of Alonzo Church, Kleene, along with Alan Turing, Emil Post, and others, is best known as a founder of the branch of mathematical logic known as recursion theory. Kleene's work grounds the study of which functions are computable. A number of mathematical concepts are named after him: Kleene hierarchy, Kleene algebra, the Kleene star (Kleene closure), Kleene's recursion theorem and the Kleene fixpoint theorem. He also invented regular expressions, and was a leading American advocate of mathematical intuitionism. Kleene pronounced his last name /ˈkleɪniː/ KLAY-nee. Commonplace mispronunciations include /ˈkliːniː/ and /ˈkliːn/. (His son, Ken Kleene, wrote: "As far as I am aware this pronunciation is incorrect in all known languages. I believe that this novel pronunciation was invented by my father.") Kleene was awarded the BA degree from Amherst College in 1930. He was awarded the Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University in 1934. His thesis, entitled A Theory of Positive Integers in Formal
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Guido van Rossum

    Guido van Rossum

    Guido van Rossum (born 31 January 1956) is a Dutch computer programmer who is best known as the author of the Python programming language. In the Python community, Van Rossum is known as a "Benevolent Dictator For Life" (BDFL), meaning that he continues to oversee the Python development process, making decisions where necessary. He is currently employed by Google, where he spends half his time developing the Python language. Van Rossum was born and grew up in the Netherlands, where he received a masters degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Amsterdam in 1982. He later worked for various research institutes, including the Dutch Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam, the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland, and the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), Reston, Virginia. In December 2005, Van Rossum was hired by Google. He wrote a web-based code-review tool for Google in Python. Guido van Rossum is the brother of Just van Rossum, a type designer and also a programmer. Just van Rossum designed the typeface that is used in the "Python Powered" logo. Guido lives in California
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    J Strother Moore

    J Strother Moore

    J Strother Moore (his first name is the alphabetic character "J" – not an abbreviated "J.") is a computer scientist, and he is a co-developer of the Boyer–Moore string search algorithm and the Boyer–Moore automated theorem prover, Nqthm. An example of the workings of the Boyer–Moore string search algorithm is given in Moore's website. Moore received his SB in mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970 and his Ph.D in computational logic at University of Edinburgh in Scotland in 1973. In addition, Moore is a co-author of the ACL2 automated theorem prover. He and others used ACL2 to prove the correctness of the floating point division operations of the AMD K5 microprocessor in the wake of the Pentium FDIV bug. For his contributions to automated deduction, Moore received the 1999 Herbrand Award with Robert S. Boyer, and in 2006 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. He is currently the Admiral B.R. Inman Centennial Chair in Computing Theory at The University of Texas at Austin. Before joining the Department of Computer Sciences as the chair, he formed a company, Computational Logic Inc., along with others including his close friend at
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Martin Newell

    Martin Newell

    Martin Newell is a British-born computer scientist specializing in computer graphics who is perhaps best known as the creator of the Utah teapot computer model. Before emigrating to the USA, he worked at what was then the Computer-Aided Design Centre (CADCentre) in Cambridge, UK, along with his brother Dr. Richard (Dick) Newell (who went on to co-found two of the most important UK graphics software companies - Cambridge Interactive Systems (CIS) in 1977 and Smallworld in 1987). At CADCentre, the two Newells and Tom Sancha developed Newell's algorithm, a technique for eliminating cyclic dependencies when ordering polygons to be drawn by a computer graphics system. Newell developed the Utah teapot while working on a Ph.D. at the University of Utah, where he also helped develop a version of the painter's algorithm for rendering. He graduated in 1975, and was on the Utah faculty from 1977 to 1979. Later he worked at Xerox PARC, where he worked on JaM, a predecessor of PostScript. JaM stood for "John and Martin" - the John was John Warnock, co-founder of Adobe Systems. He founded the computer-aided design software company Ashlar in 1988. In 2007 Martin Newell was elected to the National
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Nancy Davis Griffeth

    Nancy Davis Griffeth

    Dr. Nancy D. Griffeth (born October 26, 1945) is a Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Lehman College of The City University of New York. She did seminal work in defining the feature interaction problem and organizing a community of researchers around the Feature Interaction Workshops to study the problem. Also, she was an author of the most frequently-cited paper on feature interactions Her current research interests include testing networks to determine whether they interoperate correctly; modeling network protocols for test case generation; and management of interactions between network protocols. Her previous work in the Next Generation Networking Lab at Lucent Technologies included interoperability testing of Voice over IP networks. She was born in Oak Park, Illinois, lived in Laurel, Mississippi and Memphis, Tennessee as a child, and attended Harvard University as an undergraduate, Michigan State University for her master's, and the University of Chicago for her doctorate. In 1995, Dr. Griffeth was chosen one of the Top 100 Women in Computing by McGraw-Hill's Women in Computing Newsletter for her work in feature interactions in telecommunications systems,
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Rudi Studer

    Rudi Studer

    Rudi Studer (born 1951 in Stuttgart) is a German computer scientist and professor at KIT, Germany. He is the head of the knowledge management research group at the Institute AIFB and one of the directors of the Karlsruhe Service Research Institute (KSRI). He is a former president of the Semantic Web Science Association, an STI International Fellow, and a member of numerous programme committees and editorial boards. He was one of the inaugural editor-in-chiefs of the Journal of Web Semantics, a position he held until 2007. He is a co-author of the Semantic Wikipedia proposal. He obtained a degree (1975) and a PhD (1982) in Computer Science at the University of Stuttgart. From 1985 to 1989 he was project leader and manager at IBM Germany, Institute of Knowledge Based Systems. November 1989 he became professor in Karlsruhe. Since then, he led his research group to become one of the world leading institutions in Semantic Web technology, and he played a leading role in establishing highly acknowledged international conferences and journals in this area. Rudi Studer is also director in the department Information Process Engineering at and one of the presidents of the FZI Research Center
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Wau Holland

    Wau Holland

    Herwart Holland-Moritz, known as Wau Holland, (20 December 1951 - 29 July 2001) cofounded the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) in 1981, one of the world's oldest hacking clubs. The CCC became world famous when its members exposed security flaws in Germany's "Bildschirmtext" (Btx) online television service by getting a bank to send them DM 134,000 for accessing its Btx page many times. They returned the money the following day. Holland also co-founded the CCC's hacker magazine Datenschleuder in 1984, which praised the possibilities of global information networks and powerful computers, and included detailed wiring diagrams for building your own modems cheaply. The then-monopolist phone company of Germany's Deutsche Bundespost had to approve modems and sold expensive, slow modems of their own. The telecommunications branch of Deutsche Bundespost was privatized and is now Deutsche Telekom. Because of Holland's continuing participation in the club, the CCC gained popularity and credibility. He gave speeches on information control for the government and the private sector. Holland fought against copy protection and all forms of censorship and for an open information infrastructure. He compared
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    B. J. Fogg

    B. J. Fogg

    B.J. Fogg was the first scientist to articulate the concept of "captology," a word he coined to describe the overlap between persuasion and computers. Fogg was named in article on Fortune Magazine "10 new gurus you should know." As a doctoral student at Stanford University (1993-1997), Fogg used methods from experimental psychology to demonstrate that computers can change people's thoughts and behaviors in predictable ways. His thesis was entitled "Charismatic Computers." Fogg founded the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab. He directed the Stanford Web Credibility Project, which published How Do People Evaluate a Web Site's Credibility? Results from a Large Study in 2002. The Lab received a grant from the National Science Foundation in 2005 to support experimental work investigating how mobile phones can motivate and persuade people, an area the lab calls "mobile persuasion." In 2003 Fogg published the book "Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do." This book lays the foundation for captology. In 2007, Fogg created a Stanford course about Facebook Apps. Using what Fogg calls "Mass Interpersonal Persuasion," his students engaged over 16 million people
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    John C. Reynolds

    John C. Reynolds

    John Charles Reynolds (born June 1, 1935) is an American computer scientist. John Reynolds studied at Purdue University and then earned a PhD in theoretical physics from Harvard University in 1961. He was Professor of Information science at Syracuse University from 1970 to 1986. Since then he has been Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He has held visiting positions at Aarhus University (Denmark), University of Edinburgh, Imperial College London, Microsoft Research (Cambridge) and Queen Mary, University of London (UK). Reynolds's main research interest is in the area of programming language design and associated specification languages, especially concerning formal semantics. He invented the polymorphic lambda calculus (System F) and formulated the property of semantic parametricity; the same calculus was independently discovered by Jean-Yves Girard. He wrote a seminal paper on definitional interpreters, which clarified early work on continuations and introduced the technique of defunctionalization. He applied category theory to programming language semantics. He defined the programming languages Gedanken and Forsythe, know for its use of intersection
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Andrew S. Tanenbaum

    Andrew S. Tanenbaum

    Andrew Stuart "Andy" Tanenbaum (sometimes referred to by the handle ast) (born March 16, 1944) is an American computer scientist and professor of computer science at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam in the Netherlands. He is best known as the author of MINIX, a free Unix-like operating system for teaching purposes, and for his computer science textbooks, regarded as standard texts in the field. He regards his teaching job as his most important work. Since 2004 he has operated a web site dedicated to analysis of polling data in U.S. federal elections. He was born in New York City and grew up in suburban White Plains, New York. He received his B.Sc. degree in Physics from MIT in 1965. He received his Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1971. Tanenbaum served as a lobbyist for the Sierra Club. He moved to the Netherlands to live with his wife, who is Dutch, but he retains his United States citizenship. He teaches courses about Computer Organization and Operating Systems and supervises the work of Ph.D. candidates at the VU University Amsterdam. He is well recognized for his textbooks on computer science: Operating Systems: Design and Implementation
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Barbara Simons

    Barbara Simons

    Barbara Simons (born 1941) is a computer scientist and past president of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). She has held various technical, administrative, and public policy positions with the ACM since the early 1990s ; she is founder and former Chair of USACM, the ACM U.S. Public Policy Committee. Her main areas of research are compiler optimization and scheduling theory. Together with Douglas W. Jones, Simons coauthored a book on electronic voting entitled Broken Ballots. After receiving her Ph.D. in 1981 in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, she joined the Research Division of IBM, from which she took early retirement in 1998. In 1992, Science featured her in a special edition on women in science. In 2005 Simons became the first woman to receive the Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award from the College of Engineering of U.C. Berkeley. She served on the President’s Export Council’s Subcommittee on Encryption and on the Information Technology-Sector of the President's Council on the Year 2000 Conversion. She is on the Board of Directors of VerifiedVoting.org. She has also been on the boards of the U. C. Berkeley Engineering Fund, the
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    John Mauchly

    John Mauchly

    John William Mauchly (August 30, 1907 – January 8, 1980) was an American physicist who, along with J. Presper Eckert, designed ENIAC, the first general purpose electronic digital computer, as well as EDVAC, BINAC and UNIVAC I, the first commercial computer made in the United States. Together they started the first computer company, the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation (EMCC), and pioneered fundamental computer concepts including the stored program, subroutines, and programming languages. Their work, as exposed in the widely read First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC (1945) and as taught in the Moore School Lectures (1946), influenced an explosion of computer development in the late 1940s all over the world. Mauchly was born on August 30, 1907 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland while his father Sebastian Mauchly was a physicist at the Carnegie Institute of Washington, D.C. He earned the Engineering Scholarship of the State of Maryland, which enabled him to enroll at Johns Hopkins University in the fall of 1925 as an undergraduate in the Electrical Engineering program. In 1927 he enrolled directly in a Ph.D. program there and transferred to the graduate
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Ramanathan V. Guha

    Ramanathan V. Guha

    Ramanathan V. Guha (1965) is a computer scientist. He graduated with B.Tech (Mechanical Engineering) from Indian Institute of Technology Madras, MS from University of California Berkeley and Ph.D from Stanford University. Since May 2005, he has been working at Google. Guha was one of the early co-leaders of the Cyc Project where he worked from 1987 through 1994 at Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation. He was responsible for the design and implementation of key parts of the Cyc system, including the CycL knowledge representation language, the upper ontological layers of the Cyc Knowledge Base and some parts of the original Cyc Natural Language understanding system. Leaving what became Cycorp, Guha founded Q Technology, which created a database schema mapping tool called Babelfish. In 1994, he moved to work at Apple Computer, reporting to Alan Kay, where he developed the Meta Content Framework (MCF) format. In 1997 he joined Netscape Corporation where together with Tim Bray, he created a new version of MCF that used the XML language and which became the main technical precursor to W3C's Resource Description Framework (RDF) standard. Guha also contributed to the "smart
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Andrew Yao

    Andrew Yao

    Andrew Chi-Chih Yao (Chinese: 姚期智; pinyin: Yáo Qīzhì) is a Chinese-born American computer scientist and computational theorist. Yao used the minimax theorem to prove what is now known as Yao's Principle. Yao was born in Shanghai, China. He completed his undergraduate education in physics at the National Taiwan University, before completing a Doctor of Philosophy in physics at Harvard University in 1972, and then a second PhD in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1975. In 1996 he was awarded the Knuth Prize. He received the Turing Award, the most prestigious award in computer science, in 2000, "in recognition of his fundamental contributions to the theory of computation, including the complexity-based theory of pseudorandom number generation, cryptography, and communication complexity". From 1982 to 1986, he was a full professor at Stanford University. From 1986 to 2004, he was the William and Edna Macaleer Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at Princeton University, where he continued to work on algorithms and complexity. In 2004, he became a Professor of the Center for Advanced Study, Tsinghua University (CASTU) and the director of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Lynn Conway

    Lynn Conway

    Lynn Conway (born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, electrical engineer, inventor, trans woman, and activist for the transgender community. Conway is notable for a number of pioneering achievements, including the Mead & Conway revolution in VLSI design, which incubated an emerging electronic design automation industry. She worked at IBM in the 1960s and is credited with the invention of generalised dynamic instruction handling, a key advance used in out-of-order execution, used by most modern computer processors to improve performance. Conway grew up in White Plains, New York. Although shy and experiencing gender dysphoria as a child, she became fascinated and engaged by astronomy (building a 6-inch (150 mm) reflector telescope one summer) and did well in math and science in high school. Conway entered MIT in 1955, earning high grades there. She attempted a gender transition in 1957-8, but this effort failed due to the medical climate at the time, and Conway left MIT in despair. After working as an electronics technician for several years, Conway resumed her education at Columbia University's School of Engineering and Applied Science, earning her B.S. and
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Barbara Liskov

    Barbara Liskov

    Barbara Liskov (born Barbara Jane Huberman on November 7, 1939 in California) is a computer scientist. She is currently the Ford Professor of Engineering in the MIT School of Engineering's Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department and an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She earned her BA in mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley in 1961. In 1968 Stanford University made her one of the first women in the United States to be awarded a Ph.D. from a computer science department. The topic of her Ph.D. thesis was a computer program to play chess end games. Liskov has led many significant projects, including the Venus operating system, a small, low-cost and interactive timesharing system; the design and implementation of CLU; Argus, the first high-level language to support implementation of distributed programs and to demonstrate the technique of promise pipelining; and Thor, an object-oriented database system. With Jeannette Wing, she developed a particular definition of subtyping, commonly known as the Liskov substitution principle. She leads the Programming Methodology Group at MIT, with a current research focus in Byzantine
    4.00
    1 votes
    217
    Frieder Nake

    Frieder Nake

    Frieder Nake (born December 16, 1938 in Stuttgart) is a professor for computer graphics at the department for computer science at the University of Bremen and visiting professor for hypermedia design at the University of the Arts Bremen. He lives and works in Bremen, Germany. He has taught in Stuttgart, Toronto and Vancouver, and has been in Bremen since 1972. He specializes in interactive computer graphics, digital media, computer art, and semiotics. He has been a visiting professor at Universitetet Oslo, Aarhus Universitet, Universität Wien, University of Colorado at Boulder. He was one of the first to exhibit digital computer art in 1965 (Galerie Wendelin Niedlich, Stuttgart). In the same year, other exhibitions were staged by Georg Nees in Stuttgart and A. Michael Noll in New York. Nake, Nees and Noll are generally recognized as pioneers of computer art, and in this context are sometimes called the three big 'N's. He also was one of the first to analyze links between aesthetics and information theory. His book Ästhetik als Informationsverarbeitung (1974) is one of the first in this field, and greatly helped to promote research on the borderline between science and art. In the
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    Greg Stein

    Greg Stein

    Greg Stein (born March 16, 1967 in Portland, Oregon), living in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, is a programmer, speaker, sometime standards architect, and open-source software advocate, appearing frequently at conferences and in interviews on the topic of open-source software development and use. He is a director of the Apache Software Foundation, and served as chairman from 21 August 2002 to 20 June 2007. He is also a member of the Python Software Foundation, was a director there from 2001–2002, and a maintainer of the Python programming language and libraries (active from 1999 to 2002). Stein has been especially active in version control systems development. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he helped develop the WebDAV HTTP versioning specification, and is the main author of mod_dav, the first open-source implementation of WebDAV. He was one of the founding developers of the Subversion project, and is primarily responsible for Subversion's WebDav networking layer. Stein most recently worked as an engineering manager at Google, where he helped launch Google's open-source hosting platform. Stein publicly announced his departure from Google via his blog on July 29, 2008. Prior to Google,
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Jacob Ziv

    Jacob Ziv

    Jacob Ziv (Hebrew: יעקב זיו‎; born 1931) is an Israeli computer scientist who, along with Abraham Lempel, developed the LZ family of lossless data compression algorithms. Ziv was born in Tiberias, British-ruled Palestine, on November 27, 1931. He received the B.Sc., Dip. Eng., and M.Sc. degrees, all in electrical engineering, from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in 1954, and 1957, respectively, and the D.Sc. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1962. Ziv joined the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in 1970 and is Herman Gross Professor of Electrical Engineering and a Technion Distinguished Professor. His research interests include data compression, information theory, and statistical communication theory. Ziv was Dean of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering from 1974 to 1976 and Vice President for Academic Affairs from 1978 to 1982. Since 1987 Ziv has spent three sabbatical leaves at the Information Research Department of Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, USA. From 1955 to 1959, he was a Senior Research Engineer in the Scientific Department Israel Ministry of Defense, and was assigned to the research and development of
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Richard Stearns

    Richard Stearns

    Richard Edwin Stearns (born July 5, 1936) is a prominent computer scientist who, with Juris Hartmanis, received the 1993 ACM Turing Award "in recognition of their seminal paper which established the foundations for the field of computational complexity theory" (Hartmanis and Stearns, 1965). In 1994 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. Stearns earned his PhD from Princeton University in 1961. His PhD thesis adviser was Harold W. Kuhn. Stearns is now Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at the University at Albany, which is part of the State University of New York.
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Robert Metcalfe

    Robert Metcalfe

    Robert Melancton "Bob" Metcalfe (born April 7, 1946 in Brooklyn, New York) is an electrical engineer from the United States who co-invented Ethernet, founded 3Com and formulated Metcalfe's Law. As of January 2006, he is a general partner of Polaris Venture Partners. Starting in January 2011, he holds the position of Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of Innovation at The University of Texas at Austin. In 1964, Metcalfe graduated from Bay Shore High School. He graduated from MIT in 1969 with two B.S. degrees, one in Electrical Engineering and the other in Industrial Management from the MIT Sloan School of Management. He then went to Harvard for graduate school, earning his M.S. in 1970. While pursuing a doctorate in computer science, Metcalfe took a job with MIT's Project MAC after Harvard refused to let him be responsible for connecting the school to the brand-new ARPAnet. At MIT's Project MAC, Metcalfe was responsible for building some of the hardware that would link MIT's minicomputers with the ARPAnet. Metcalfe was so enamored with ARPAnet, he made it the topic of his doctoral dissertation. However, Harvard flunked him. His inspiration for a new dissertation came
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Robert Tappan Morris

    Robert Tappan Morris

    Robert Tappan Morris (born November 8, 1965) is an American computer scientist, best known for creating the Morris Worm in 1988, considered the first computer worm on the Internet - and subsequently becoming the first person convicted under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. He went on to co-found the online store Viaweb, one of the first web-based applications, and later the funding firm Y Combinator - both with Paul Graham. He is a tenured professor in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His father was the late Robert Morris, a coauthor of UNIX and the former chief scientist at the National Computer Security Center, a division of the National Security Agency (NSA). Morris created the worm while he was a graduate student at Cornell University. The original intent, according to him, was to gauge the size of the Internet. He released the worm from MIT to conceal the fact that it actually originated from Cornell. The worm exploited several vulnerabilities to gain entry to targeted systems, including: However, the worm had a design flaw. The worm was programmed to check each computer it found to determine if the
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Sam Ruby

    Sam Ruby

    Sam Ruby is a prominent software developer who has made significant contributions to many of the Apache Software Foundation's open source software projects, and to the standardization of web feeds via his involvement with the Atom web feed standard and the feedvalidator.org web service. He currently holds a Senior Technical Staff Member position in the Emerging Technologies Group of IBM. He resides in Raleigh, North Carolina. He is a co-chair of the W3C's HTML Working Group. Sam Ruby received a B.A. in Mathematics from Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Virginia. Sam was hired immediately out of college by IBM and has worked there since. Ruby has been active within various open source projects. Ruby is a current Director of the Apache Software Foundation, as well as being both the foundation's Assistant Secretary and Vice President of Legal Affairs, and the former Chair of the Apache Jakarta Project. He also actively contributes to numerous Apache projects; the ASF Committers page provides a complete and current listing of Apache projects to which he is actively contributing. Notably, he was one of the early Ant contributors, as well as being the creator of Gump. Ruby is
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Ada Lovelace

    Ada Lovelace

    Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron and now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine; thanks to this, she is sometimes considered the world's first computer programmer. Ada was the only legitimate child of the poet Lord Byron (with Anne Isabella Milbanke, 11th Baroness Wentworth). She had no relationship with her father, who died when she was nine. As a young adult, she took an interest in mathematics, and in particular Babbage's work on the analytical engine. Between 1842 and 1843, she translated an article by Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea on the engine, which she supplemented with a set of notes of her own. These notes contain what is considered the first computer program — that is, an algorithm encoded for processing by a machine. Ada's notes are important in the early history of computers. She also foresaw the capability of computers to go beyond mere
    0.00
    0 votes
    225
    Amir Pnueli

    Amir Pnueli

    Amir Pnueli (Hebrew: אמיר פנואלי‎; April 22, 1941 – November 2, 2009) was an Israeli computer scientist. Pnueli was born in Nahalal, Israel and received a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics from the Technion in Haifa, and Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Weizmann Institute of Science. His thesis was on the topic of "Calculation of Tides in the Ocean". He switched to computer science during a stint as a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University. His works in computer science focused on temporal logic and model checking, particularly regarding fairness properties of concurrent systems. He returned to Israel as a researcher; he was the founder and first chair of the computer science department at Tel Aviv University. He became a professor of computer science at the Weizmann Institute in 1981. From 1999 until his death, Pnueli also held a position at the Computer Science Department of New York University, New York, U.S.. Pnueli also founded two startup technology companies during his career. He had three children and, at his death, had four grandchildren. Pnueli died on November 2, 2009 of a brain hemorrhage.
    0.00
    0 votes
    226
    Bernard Chazelle

    Bernard Chazelle

    Bernard Chazelle (born November 5, 1955) is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. Much of his work is in computational geometry, where he has found many of the best-known algorithms, such as linear-time triangulation of a simple polygon, as well as many useful complexity results, such as lower bound techniques based on discrepancy theory. He is also known for his invention of the soft heap data structure and the most asymptotically efficient known algorithm for finding minimum spanning trees. Chazelle originally grew up in Paris, France, where he received his bachelors degree and masters degree in applied mathematics at the Ecole des Mines de Paris in 1977. Then, at the age of 22, he came to Yale University in the United States, where he received his Ph.D. in computer science under the supervision of David P. Dobkin. He went on to claim important research positions at institutions such as Carnegie Mellon, Brown, NEC, Xerox PARC, and the Paris institutions École Normale Supérieure, École Polytechnique, and INRIA. As of 2004, he has 191 published articles, 93 of which are journal articles, and published two books. He has received 18 grants, 12 of
    0.00
    0 votes
    227
    C. A. R. Hoare

    C. A. R. Hoare

    Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare (born 11 January 1934), commonly known as Tony Hoare or C. A. R. Hoare, is a British computer scientist best known for the development (in 1960, at age 26) of Quicksort, a well-known sorting algorithm. He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language. Born in Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) to British parents, he received his Bachelor's degree in Classics from the University of Oxford (Merton College) in 1956. He remained an extra year at Oxford studying graduate-level statistics, and following his National Service in the Royal Navy (1956–1958). While he studied Russian, he also studied computer translation of human languages at the Moscow State University in the Soviet Union in the school of Kolmogorov. In 1960, he left the Soviet Union and began working at Elliott Brothers, Ltd, a small computer manufacturing firm, where he implemented ALGOL 60 and began developing major algorithms. He became the Professor of Computing
    0.00
    0 votes
    228
    Charles Simonyi

    Charles Simonyi

    Charles Simonyi (Hungarian: Simonyi Károly [ˈʃimoɲi ˈkɑːroj]; born September 10, 1948, son of Károly Simonyi) is a Hungarian-American computer software executive who, as head of Microsoft's application software group, oversaw the creation of Microsoft's flagship Office suite of applications. He now heads his own company, Intentional Software, with the aim of developing and marketing his concept of intentional programming. In April 2007, aboard Soyuz TMA-10, he became the fifth space tourist and the second Hungarian in space. In March 2009, aboard Soyuz TMA-14, he made a second trip to the International Space Station. His estimated net worth is US$1 billion. Simonyi was born in Budapest, Hungary, the son of Simonyi Károly (the elder), a professor of electrical engineering at Technical University of Budapest. While in high school he worked part-time as a night watchman at a computer laboratory, overseeing a large Soviet Ural II mainframe. He took an interest in computing and learned to program from one of the laboratory's engineers. By the time he left school, he had learned to develop compilers and sold one of these to a government department. He presented a demonstration of his
    0.00
    0 votes
    229
    Craig Nevill-Manning

    Craig Nevill-Manning

    Craig Nevill-Manning is a New Zealand computer scientist who founded Google's first remote engineering center, located in midtown Manhattan, where he is an Engineering Director. He also invented Froogle, a product search engine. Prior to joining Google in 2001 as a senior research scientist, he was an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at Rutgers University, and was a post-doctoral fellow in the Biochemistry department at Stanford University. His research interests center on using techniques from machine learning, data compression and computational biology to provide more structured search over information. Dr. Nevill-Manning graduated with a BSc in computer science from the University of Canterbury. He received his PhD from the University of Waikato where he worked on the Weka machine learning suite.
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Danny Hillis

    Danny Hillis

    William Daniel "Danny" Hillis (born September 25, 1956, in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American inventor, scientist, engineer, entrepreneur, and author. He co-founded Thinking Machines Corporation, a company that developed the Connection Machine, a parallel supercomputer designed by Hillis at MIT. He is also co-founder of the Long Now Foundation, Applied Minds, Metaweb Technologies, Applied Proteomics, and author of The Pattern on the Stone: The Simple Ideas That Make Computers Work. Danny Hillis was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1956. His father, William Hillis, was a US Air Force epidemiologist studying hepatitis in Africa and relocated with his family through Rwanda, Burundi, Republic of the Congo, and Kenya. He spent a brief part of his childhood in Calcutta, India when his father was a visiting faculty at ISI, Calcutta. During these years the young Hillis was home schooled by his mother Aryge Briggs Hillis, a biostatistician, and developed an early appreciation for mathematics and biology. His younger brother is David Hillis, a professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Texas at Austin, and his sister is Argye E. Hillis, a professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    David Chaum

    David Chaum

    David Chaum is the inventor of many cryptographic protocols, including blind signature schemes, commitment schemes, and ecash. In 1982, Chaum founded the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR), which currently organizes academic conferences in cryptography research. He has contributed to the industry advancement of electronic cash, partially in his role as founder of DigiCash, an electronic cash company, in 1990. Chaum gained a doctorate in Computer Science and Business Administration from the University of California, Berkeley. Subsequently, he taught at the New York University Graduate School of Business Administration and at the University of California. He is currently a visiting professor at K.U. Leuven. His contributions to cryptography include the invention of two anonymity networks: mix networks (the basis for virtually all modern anonymity networks) and DC-Nets; silo watching techniques; invention of several important digital signatures: blind signatures, undeniable signatures, unconditionally secure signatures, and group signatures; tamper-safing sensor systems (foreshadowing many concepts in side-channel cryptanalysis); various techniques for anonymous
    0.00
    0 votes
    232
    David Parnas

    David Parnas

    David Lorge Parnas (born February 10, 1941) is a Canadian early pioneer of software engineering, who developed the concept of information hiding in modular programming, which is an important element of object-oriented programming today. He is also noted for his advocacy of precise documentation. Parnas earned his Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon University in electrical engineering. Parnas also earned a professional engineering license in Canada and was one of the first to apply traditional engineering principles to software design. He worked there as a professor for many years. He also taught at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (U.S.), the Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany), the University of Victoria (British Columbia, Canada), Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and University of Limerick (Republic of Ireland). David Parnas received several awards and honors In modular design, his double dictum of high cohesion within modules and loose coupling between modules is fundamental to modular design in software. However, in Parnas's seminal 1972 paper On the Criteria to Be Used in Decomposing Systems into Modules, this
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Edwin Catmull

    Edwin Catmull

    Edwin Earl Catmull, Ph.D. (born March 31, 1945) is a computer scientist and current president of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios. As a computer scientist, Catmull has contributed to many important developments in computer graphics. Edwin Earl Catmull was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia. Early in life, Catmull found inspiration in Disney movies such as Peter Pan and Pinocchio and dreamed of becoming a feature film animator. He even made primitive animation using so-called flip-books. However, he assessed his chances realistically and decided that his talents lay elsewhere. Instead of pursuing a career in the movie industry, he used his talent in math and studied physics and computer science at the University of Utah. After graduating, he worked as a computer programmer at The Boeing Company in Seattle for a short period of time and also at the New York Institute of Technology, before returning to Utah to go to graduate school in fall of 1970. Back at the university he became one of Ivan Sutherland's students and part of the university's ARPA program, sharing classes with Fred Parke, James H. Clark, John Warnock and Alan Kay. Catmull saw Sutherland's
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Erik Demaine

    Erik Demaine

    Erik D. Demaine (born February 28, 1981), is a professor of Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Erik was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His parents are Martin Demaine and Judy Anderson. At age 7, he spent time travelling North America with his father, Martin Demaine, an artist and sculptor; he was home-schooled. Demaine was a child prodigy. He entered Dalhousie University in Canada at the age of 12, completed his bachelor's degree when only 14 and completed his PhD when only 20 years old. His PhD dissertation, a seminal work in the field of computational origami, was completed at the University of Waterloo. This work was awarded the Canadian Governor General's Gold Medal from the University of Waterloo and the NSERC Doctoral Prize (2003) for the best PhD thesis and research in Canada (one of four awards). This thesis work was largely incorporated into a book. He joined the MIT faculty in 2001 at age 20, reportedly the youngest professor in the history of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2003 he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He is a member of the Theory of Computation group at MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Friedrich L. Bauer

    Friedrich L. Bauer

    Friedrich Ludwig Bauer (born June 10, 1924 in Regensburg) is a German computer scientist and professor emeritus at Technical University of Munich. Bauer earned his Abitur in 1942 and served in the Wehrmacht (German armed forces) from 1943 to 1945. In 1946 he started studying mathematics and theoretical physics at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich (until 1950). Since 1963, he worked as a professor of mathematics and (since 1972) computer science at Technical University of Munich. He retired in 1989. Bauer's early work involved the construction of computing machinery (e.g. the logical relay computer Stanislaus in 1951). In this context, he was the first to propose the widely used stack method of expression evaluation. Bauer also worked in the committees that developed the imperative computer programming languages ALGOL 58 and its successor ALGOL 60, important predecessors to all modern imperative programming languages. In 1968, Bauer coined the term Software Engineering which has been in widespread use since. Bauer was an influential figure in establishing computer science as an independent subject in German universities. His scientific contributions spread from numerical
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Gerard Salton

    Gerard Salton

    Gerard Salton (8 March 1927 in Nuremberg - 28 August 1995), also known as Gerry Salton, was a Professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. Salton was perhaps the leading computer scientist working in the field of information retrieval during his time. His group at Cornell developed the SMART Information Retrieval System, which he initiated when he was at Harvard. Salton was born Gerhard Anton Sahlmann on March 8, 1927 in Nuremberg, Germany. He received a Bachelor's (1950) and Master's (1952) degree in mathematics from Brooklyn College, and a Ph.D. from Harvard in Applied Mathematics in 1958, the last of Howard Aiken's doctoral students, and taught there until 1965, when he joined Cornell University and co-founded its department of Computer Science. Salton was perhaps most well known for developing the now widely used Vector Space Model for Information Retrieval. In this model, both documents and queries are represented as vectors of term counts, and the similarity between a document and a query is given by the cosine between the term vector and the document vector. In this paper, he also introduced TF-IDF, or term-frequency-inverse-document frequency, a model in which the
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Henri Gouraud

    Henri Gouraud

    Henri Gouraud (born 1944) is a French computer scientist. He is the inventor of Gouraud shading used in computer graphics. He is the great nephew of general Henri Gouraud. During 1964–1967, he studied at École Centrale Paris. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah College of Engineering in 1971, working with Dave Evans and Ivan Sutherland, for a dissertation entitled Computer Display of Curved Surfaces. The famous human face images showing the effect of his shading were done using his wife Sylvie Gouraud as the model.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Ivan Sutherland

    Ivan Sutherland

    Ivan Edward Sutherland (born May 16, 1938) is an American computer scientist and Internet pioneer. He received the Turing Award from the Association for Computing Machinery in 1988 for the invention of Sketchpad, an early predecessor to the sort of graphical user interface that has become ubiquitous in personal computers. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, as well as the National Academy of Sciences among many other major awards. Sutherland earned his Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), his Master's degree from Caltech, and his Ph.D. from MIT in EECS in 1963. He invented Sketchpad, an innovative program that influenced alternative forms of interaction with computers. Sketchpad could accept constraints and specified relationships among segments and arcs, including the diameter of arcs. It could draw both horizontal and vertical lines and combine them into figures and shapes. Figures could be copied, moved, rotated, or resized, retaining their basic properties. Sketchpad also had the first window-drawing program and clipping algorithm, which allowed zooming. Sketchpad ran on the
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Jacques Vallée

    Jacques Vallée

    Jacques Fabrice Vallée (born September 24, 1939 in Pontoise, Val-d'Oise, France) is a venture capitalist, computer scientist, author, ufologist and former astronomer currently residing in San Francisco, California. In mainstream science, Vallée is notable for co-developing the first computerized mapping of Mars for NASA and for his work at SRI International in creating ARPANET, a precursor to the modern Internet. Vallée is also an important figure in the study of unidentified flying objects (UFOs), first noted for a defense of the scientific legitimacy of the extraterrestrial hypothesis and later for promoting the interdimensional hypothesis. Vallée was born in Pontoise, France. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from the Sorbonne, followed by his Master of Science in astrophysics from the University of Lille. He began his professional life as an astronomer at the Paris Observatory in 1961. He was awarded the Jules Verne Prize for his first science-fiction novel in French. He moved to the United States in 1962 and began working in astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin, at whose MacDonald Observatory he worked on NASA's first project making a detailed
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    James Gosling

    James Gosling

    Dr. James A. Gosling, OC (born May 19, 1955 near Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a computer scientist, best known as the father of the Java programming language. In 1977, Gosling received a B.Sc in Computer Science from the University of Calgary. In 1983, he earned a Ph.D in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and his doctoral thesis was titled "Algebraic Constraints". His thesis advisor was Bob Sproull. While working towards his doctorate, he wrote a version of Emacs (gosmacs), and before joining Sun Microsystems he built a multi-processor version of Unix while at Carnegie Mellon University, as well as several compilers and mail systems. Between 1984 and 2010, Gosling was with Sun Microsystems. He is known as the father of the Java programming language. On April 2, 2010, Gosling left Sun Microsystems which had recently been acquired by the Oracle Corporation. Regarding why he left, Gosling cited reductions in pay, status, and decision-making ability; change of role; and ethical challenges. He has since taken a very critical stance towards Oracle in interviews, noting that "During the integration meetings between Sun and Oracle, where we were being grilled about the
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Jean E. Sammet

    Jean E. Sammet

    Jean E. Sammet (born 1928 in New York City) is an American computer scientist who developed the FORMAC programming language in 1962. She received her B.A. in Math from Mount Holyoke College in 1948 and her M.A. in Math from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1949. She received an honorary D.Sc from Mount Holyoke College in 1978. Sammet was employed by Sperry Gyroscope from 1955 to 1958 where she supervised the first scientific programming group. From 1958 to 1961, she worked for Sylvania as a staff consultant for programming research and a member of the original COBOL group. She joined IBM in 1961 where she developed FORMAC, the first widely used computer language for symbolic manipulation of mathematical formulas. At IBM she did research on the use of restricted English as a programming language and the use of natural language for mathematical programs. She was Programming Technology Planning Manager for the Federal Systems Division from 1968 to 1974, and was appointed Software Technology Manager in 1979. Sammet founded the ACM Special Interest Committee on Symbolic and Algebraic Manipulation (SICSAM) in 1965 and was Chair of the Special Interest Group on Programming
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Jean Ichbiah

    Jean Ichbiah

    Jean David Ichbiah (25 March 1940 – 26 January 2007) was a French-born computer scientist and the chief designer (from 1977–1983) of Ada, a general-purpose, strongly typed programming language with certified validated compilers. At the time, he was a member of the Programming Research division at CII Honeywell Bull (CII-HB) in Louveciennes, France. He had previously designed an experimental system implementation language called LIS (1972–1974), based on Pascal and Simula (in fact, he had been chairman of the Simula User's Group), and was one of the founding members of IFIP WG 2.4 on Systems Implementation Languages. Ichbiah's team submitted the language design called "Green" to the competition to choose the United States Department of Defense's embedded programming language. When Green was selected in 1978, he continued as chief designer of the language, renamed "Ada". In 1980, Ichbiah left CII-HB and founded the Alsys corporation in La Celle-Saint-Cloud, which continued language definition to standardize Ada 83, and later went into the Ada compiler business, also supplying special validated compiler systems to NASA, the US Army, and others. He later moved to the Waltham,
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Konrad Zuse

    Konrad Zuse

    Konrad Zuse (German: [ˈkɔnʁat ˈtsuːzə]; 1910–1995) was a German civil engineer, inventor and computer pioneer. His greatest achievement was the world's first functional program-controlled Turing-complete computer, the Z3, which became operational in May 1941. Zuse was also noted for the S2 computing machine, considered the first process-controlled computer. He founded one of the earliest computer businesses in 1941, producing the Z4, which became the world's first commercial computer. From 1943 to 1945 he designed the first high-level programming language, Plankalkül. In 1969, Zuse suggested the concept of a computation-based universe in his book Rechnender Raum (Calculating Space). Much of his early work was financed by his family and commerce, but after 1939 he was given resources by the Nazi German government. Due to World War II, Zuse's work went largely unnoticed in the United Kingdom and the United States. Possibly his first documented influence on a US company was IBM's option on his patents in 1946. There is a replica of the Z3, as well as the original Z4, in the Deutsches Museum in Munich. The Deutsches Technikmuseum in Berlin has an exhibition devoted to Zuse, displaying
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Michael O. Rabin

    Michael O. Rabin

    Michael Oser Rabin (Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל עוזר רַבִּין‎, born September 1, 1931), is an Israeli computer scientist and a recipient of the Turing Award. Rabin was born in 1931 in Breslau, Germany, (today Wrocław, in Poland), the son of a rabbi. In 1935, he emigrated with his family to Mandate Palestine. As a young boy, he was very interested in mathematics and his father sent him to the best high school in Haifa, where he studied under a significant practicing mathematician, Elisha Netanyahu, who was then a high school teacher. After high school, he was drafted into the army during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The mathematician Abraham Fraenkel, who was a professor of mathematics in Jerusalem, intervened with the army command, and Rabin was discharged to study at the university in 1949. He received an M.Sc. from Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1953 and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1956. In the late 1950s, he was invited for a summer to do research for IBM at the Lamb Estate in Westchester County, New York with other promising mathematicians and scientists. It was there that he and Dana Scott wrote the paper "Finite Automata and Their Decision Problems". Soon, using
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Mitchel Resnick

    Mitchel Resnick

    Mitchel Resnick is LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research, Director of the Okawa Center, and Director of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab. Resnick currently serves as the head of the Media Arts and Sciences academic program, the academic program that grants master's degrees and Ph.Ds at the MIT Media Lab. Resnick's research group has developed a variety of educational tools that engage people in new types of design activities and learning experiences, including the "programmable bricks" that were the basis for the award-winning LEGO Mindstorms and StarLogo software. He co-founded the Computer Clubhouse, an award-winning network of learning centers for youth from under-served communities. Resnick is also a co-founder and a co-principal investigator of the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Resnick's group has developed a new programming language, called Scratch, that makes it easier for kids to create their own animated stories, video games, and interactive art. Resnick is also involved in the next generation of Programmable Bricks and in the $100 laptop project. Resnick, a graduate of Haverford High School (Pa.), earned a BA in physics at Princeton University
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Oren Patashnik

    Oren Patashnik

    Oren Patashnik (born 1954) is a computer scientist. He is notable for co-creating BibTeX, and co-writing Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science. He is a researcher at the Center for Communications Research, La Jolla, and lives nearby in San Diego. Oren and his wife Amy have three children, Josh, Ariel, and Jeremy. Oren Patashnik graduated from Yale University in 1976, and later became a doctoral student in computer science at Stanford University, where his research was supervised by Donald Knuth. While working at Bell Labs in 1980, Patashnik proved that Qubic can always be won by the first player. Using 1500 hours of computer time, Patashnik's proof is a notable example of a computer-assisted proof. In 1985, Patashnik created the bibliography-system, BibTeX, in collaboration with Leslie Lamport, the creator of LaTeX. LaTeX is a system and programming language for formatting documents, which is especially designed for mathematical documents. BibTeX is a widely used bibliography-formatting tool for LaTeX. In 1988, Patashnik assisted Ronald Graham and Donald Knuth in writing Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, an important mathematical publication
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Robby Garner

    Robby Garner

    Robby Garner (born 1963) is a natural language programmer and software developer. He won the 1998 and 1999 Loebner Prize Contests with the program called Albert One. He is listed in the 2001 Guinness Book of World Records as having written the "most human" computer program. A native of Cedartown, Georgia, Robby attended Cedartown High School. He worked in his father's television repair shop and began programming for his family's business at age 15. Forming a software company called Robitron Software Research, Inc. in 1987 with his father, Robert J. Garner, and his sister Pam, he worked as a software developer until 1997 when his father retired and the company was disbanded. One of the first web chatterbots, named Max Headcold, was written by Garner in 1995. Max served two purposes, to collect data about web chat behavior and to entertain customers of the FringeWare online bookstore. This program was eventually implemented as a Java package called JFRED, written by Paco Nathan based on the C++ FRED CGI program, and his own influences from Stanford and various corporations. Garner and Nathan took part in the world's largest online Turing test in 1998. Their JFRED program was
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Scott Fahlman

    Scott Fahlman

    Scott Elliott Fahlman (born March 21, 1948, in Medina, Ohio, U.S.) is a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University. He is notable for early work on automated planning in a blocks world, on semantic networks, on neural networks (and, in particular, the cascade correlation algorithm), on the Dylan programming language, and on Common Lisp (in particular CMU Common Lisp). Recently, Fahlman has been engaged in constructing a Knowledge Base, "Scone", based in part on his thesis work on the NETL Semantic Network. Fahlman received his bachelor's degree and master's degree in 1973 from MIT, and his Ph.D. from MIT in 1977. His thesis advisors were Drs Gerald Sussman and Patrick Winston. He is a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. Fahlman acted as thesis advisor for Donald Cohen, David B. McDonald, David S. Touretzky, Skef Wholey, Justin Boyan, Michael Witbrock, and Alicia Tribble Sagae. From May 1996 to July 2000, Fahlman directed the Justsystem Pittsburgh Research Center. Fahlman is credited with originating the first smiley emoticon, which he thought would help people on a message board at Carnegie Mellon to distinguish serious posts from jokes. He
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Simon Peyton Jones

    Simon Peyton Jones

    Simon Peyton Jones (born in South Africa on 18 January 1958) is a British computer scientist who researches the implementation and applications of functional programming languages, particularly lazy functional programming. He is an honorary Professor of Computer Science at the University of Glasgow and supervises PhD Students at the University of Cambridge. Peyton Jones graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge in 1980, and worked in industry for two years before serving as a lecturer at University College London and, from 1990 to 1998, as a professor at the University of Glasgow. Since 1998 he has worked as a researcher at Microsoft Research in Cambridge, England. He is married to Dorothy, a priest in the Church of England, and they have three children. He is a major contributor to the design of the Haskell programming language, and a contributor of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC). He is also co-creator of the C-- programming language, designed for intermediate program representation between the language-specific front-end of a compiler and a general-purpose back-end code generator and optimiser. C-- is used in GHC. He was also a major contributor to the 1999 book Cybernauts
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Tim Bray

    Tim Bray

    Timothy William Bray (born June 21, 1955) is a Canadian software developer and entrepreneur. He co-founded Open Text Corporation and Antarctica Systems. Bray was also one of the main authors of the original XML specification . Bray was Director of Web Technologies at Sun Microsystems from early 2004 to early 2010. Since then he has served as a Developer Advocate at Google, focusing on Android and then on Identity. Bray was born on June 21, 1955 in Alberta, Canada. He grew up in Beirut, Lebanon and graduated in 1981 with a Bachelor of Science (double major in Mathematics and Computer Science) from the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario. Tim described his switch of focus from Math to Computer Science this way: "In math I’d worked like a dog for my Cs, but in CS I worked much less for As—and learned that you got paid well for doing it." In June 2009, he received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Guelph. Fresh out of university, Bray joined Digital Equipment Corporation in Toronto as a software specialist. In 1983, Bray left DEC for Microtel Pacific Research. He joined the New Oxford English Dictionary project at the University of Waterloo in 1987 as its
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Computer Scientist of All Time