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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Computer Peripheral of All Time

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    1
    ZX Interface 2

    ZX Interface 2

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Joystick interface
    The ZX Interface 2 was a peripheral from Sinclair Research for its ZX Spectrum home computer released in September 1983. It had two joystick ports and a ROM cartridge slot, which offered instant loading times. The joystick ports were not compatible with the popular Kempston interface, and thus did not work with most Spectrum games released prior to the launch of the ZX Interface 2. In addition, the pass-through expansion bus provided was stripped, only allowing a ZX Printer to be attached. Availability of cartridge software was very limited: The cost was almost twice as much as the same game on cassette tape, and each cartridge could only hold 16 KiB, making it almost immediately obsolete as the majority of Spectrums sold were 48K-models, which the software publishers targeted. Only ten games were commercially released: Paul Farrow has demonstrated that it is possible to produce custom ROM cartridges, including the ability to exceed the 16 KiB design limitation of the ROM cartridges. The interface two came with two joystick ports that (unlike the Kempston which used the IN31 command) were mapped to actual key presses. Player 1 was mapped to 1-5 and player 2 was mapped to 6-0. This
    7.14
    7 votes
    2

    Kempston Mouse Interface

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    The Kempston Mouse Interface allowed a mouse to be connected to the ZX Spectrum via a proprietary protocol.
    6.43
    7 votes
    3

    64 colour ULA

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Supporting games: Subacuatic
    The 64 colour ULA is a replacement ULA for the ZX Spectrum which allows 64 colours to be displayed on screen at once.
    8.60
    5 votes
    4
    Rotronics Wafadrive

    Rotronics Wafadrive

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    The Rotronics Wafadrive was a peripheral for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computer, intended to compete with Sinclair's ZX Interface 1 and ZX Microdrive. The Wafadrive comprised two continuous loop "stringy floppy" tape drives, an RS-232 interface and Centronics parallel port. The drives could run at two speeds, high speed for seeking and low speed for reading/writing, which was significantly slower than that of Microdrives. The cartridges (or "wafers"), the same as those used in Entrepo stringy floppy devices for other microcomputers, were physically larger than Microdrive cartridges. They were available in three different capacities, nominally 16 kB, 64 kB or 128 kB. The same drive mechanism, manufactured by BSR, and cartridges were used in a similar device known as the Quick Data Drive (QDD), designed to connect to the serial port of the Commodore 64 home computer.
    8.60
    5 votes
    5
    8.75
    4 votes
    6
    6.00
    6 votes
    7
    8.00
    4 votes
    8

    TX-2 Tape System

    The TX-2 Tape System was a magnetic tape data storage technology from the late 1950s. It is the direct ancestor of LINCtape, used on the LINC laboratory computer. The tape transports used in the system were made as simple and fool-proof as possible, consisting of a read-write head assembly, two reel drive motors, and a tape guide. The tape system used 10 tracks across a 1/2 inch tape on 10 inch reels. Maximum reel speed was 920 ips. The system used digital speed control based on a clock track on the tape. The 10-track head assembly contains five channels; three information, one timing, and one block mark. Each channel consists of two redundantly paired tracks, and the paired tracks are nonadjacent to minimize the effect of contamination on the tape surface. This redundant track scheme was previously used on the MIT Whirlwind tape system.
    8.00
    4 votes
    9
    9.67
    3 votes
    10

    Multiface 1

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    The Multiface was a hardware peripheral released by Romantic Robot UK Ltd. for several 1980s home computers. The primary function of the device was to dump the computer's memory to external storage, and featured an iconic 'red button' that could be pressed at any time in order to activate it. As most games of the era did not have a save game feature, the Multiface allowed players to save their position. However, this feature also allowed users to create backups or pirate copies of software. Copyright infringement was discouraged, yet possible in earlier models, but was made more difficult in later models by requiring the Multiface to be present when re-loading the dumps into memory. Multifaces were released for 8-bit and 16-bit microcomputers, such as the ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC & Atari ST. Different models had slightly different features. The Multiface One was released in 1986 for the ZX Spectrum 48K. It cost £29.95 and had the capability of saving data to cassette tape, ZX Microdrive, Opus Discovery (an external 3.5 inch disk drive) or Technology Research Beta (an interface that allowed 5.25 inch and 3.5 inch drives to be connected). The device worked on 128K spectrums, but only
    9.33
    3 votes
    11
    6.00
    5 votes
    12
    Beta disc interface

    Beta disc interface

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    Beta Disk Interface is a disk interface for ZX Spectrum computers. It was developed by Technology Research Ltd (United Kingdom), in 1984 and released in 1985 with price £109.25 (or £249.75 with one disk drive). Beta 128 Disk Interface is a 1987 version supporting ZX Spectrum 128 machines (difference is in access points addresses). Beta disk interfaces were distributed with TR-DOS operating system in ROM, also attributed to Technology Research Ltd. Latest firmware version is 5.03 (1986). The interface was possibly based on WD1793 chip. The interface handles single and double sided, 40 and 80 track double density floppy disks, up to 4 drives. This interface was popular for its simplicity, and Beta 128 Disk Interface was cloned all around USSR. First known USSR clones were ones produced by НПВО "Вариант" (Leningrad) in 1989. Beta 128 schematics are included in various Russian ZX Spectrum clones. Some variants of schematics support only 2 drives. Phase correction of drive data signal is made different ways.
    6.00
    5 votes
    13
    Kinect

    Kinect

    • Supporting games: Sonic Free Riders
    Kinect is a motion sensing input device by Microsoft for the Xbox 360 video game console and Windows PCs. Based around a webcam-style add-on peripheral for the Xbox 360 console, it enables users to control and interact with the Xbox 360 without the need to touch a game controller, through a natural user interface using gestures and spoken commands. The project is aimed at broadening the Xbox 360's audience beyond its typical gamer base. Kinect competes with the Wii Remote Plus and PlayStation Move with PlayStation Eye motion controllers for the Wii and PlayStation 3 home consoles, respectively. A version for Windows was released on February 1, 2012. Kinect was launched in North America on November 4, 2010, in Europe on November 10, 2010, in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore on November 18, 2010, and in Japan on November 20, 2010. Purchase options for the sensor peripheral include a bundle with the game Kinect Adventures and console bundles with either a 4 GB or 250 GB Xbox 360 console and Kinect Adventures. After selling a total of 8 million units in its first 60 days, the Kinect holds the Guinness World Record of being the "fastest selling consumer electronics device". 18
    6.00
    5 votes
    14
    6.00
    5 votes
    15
    DECtape

    DECtape

    • Peripheral Class: Magnetic tape data storage
    DECtape, originally called "Microtape", was a magnetic tape data storage medium used with many Digital Equipment Corporation computers, including the PDP-6, PDP-8, LINC-8, PDP-10, PDP-11, PDP-12, and the PDP-15. On DEC's 32-bit systems, VAX/VMS support for it was implemented but did not become an official part of the product lineup. DECtapes were 3/4 inch wide, and formatted into blocks of data that could each be read or written individually. Each tape stored 184K 12-bit PDP-8 words or 144K 18-bit words. Block size was 128 12-bit words (for the 12-bit machines), or 256 18-bit words for the other machines (16, 18, 32, or 36 bit systems). From a programming point of view, DECtape behaved like a very slow disk drive. DECtape had its origin in the LINCtape tape system, which was originally designed by Wesley Clark at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory as an integral part of the LINC computer. The design of the LINC, including LINCtape, was in the public domain, and LINCtape drives were manufactured by several companies, including Digital. DECtape used the same transport mechanism as LINCtape, but the tape was run in the opposite direction, thus the supply and takeup reels were reversed.
    6.75
    4 votes
    16
    ZX Microdrive

    ZX Microdrive

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    The ZX Microdrive was a magnetic tape data storage system launched in July 1983 by Sinclair Research for its ZX Spectrum home computer. The Microdrive technology was later also used in the Sinclair QL and ICL One Per Desk personal computers. It is claimed the Microdrive was originally proposed by Andrew Grillet at an interview with Sinclair Research for what was to become the ZX81. Grillet proposed "a version of the Learjet Stereo 8 system, modified to allow two 64k core images per track for roll-out roll-in swapping using the KUTS protocol". The ZX81 had only 1k of RAM. Grillet was offered better pay by Xerox Corporation, and never worked on the ZX81 or the Spectrum. The primary engineer involved in the development of the Microdrive was Ben Cheese. Typically of Sinclair Research, the ZX Microdrive was comparatively cheap (£49.95 at launch) and technologically innovative but also rather limited. Connecting a ZX Microdrive to a ZX Spectrum required the ZX Interface 1 unit, costing £49.95, although this could be bought packaged with a Microdrive for £79.95. Later, in March 1985, the ZX Spectrum Expansion System was launched for £99.95. This consisted of Interface 1, a Microdrive, a
    6.75
    4 votes
    17
    Commodore 1570

    Commodore 1570

    The Commodore 1570 was a 5¼" floppy disk drive for the Commodore 128 home/personal computer. It was a single-sided, 170KB version of the double-sided Commodore 1571, released as a stopgap measure when Commodore International was unable to provide large enough quantities of 1571s due to a shortage of double-sided drive mechanisms. Like the 1571, it could read and write both GCR and MFM disk formats. The 1570 utilized a 1571 logic board in a cream-colored Commodore 1541 case with a drive mechanism similar to the 1541 except that it was equipped with track zero detection. Like the 1571, its built-in DOS provided a data burst mode for transferring data to the C128 computer at a faster speed than a 1541. Its ROM also contained some DOS bug fixes that didn't appear in the 1571 until much later. The 1570 could read and write all single-sided CP/M format disks that the 1571 could access. Although the 1570 was compatible with the Commodore 64, the C64 wasn't capable of taking advantage of the drive's higher-speed operation, and when used with the C64 it was little more than a pricier 1541. Also, many early buyers of the C128 chose to temporarily make do with a 1541 drive, perhaps owned as
    6.50
    4 votes
    18
    8.00
    3 votes
    19
    Nintendo GameCube controller

    Nintendo GameCube controller

    • Supporting games: Super Smash Bros. Melee
    The Nintendo GameCube controller (DOL-003) is the standard controller for the Nintendo GameCube video game console. Released alongside the Nintendo GameCube console, the standard GameCube controller has a wing grip design. This controller was bundled with all new GameCube systems throughout the console's life cycle and was also available separately. It connects to the console's controller ports via a 2 m/6.5 ft cable. The standard GameCube controller provides haptic feedback by way of a built-in rumble motor rather than using an external Rumble Pak add-on like the Nintendo 64 controller. Also unlike its predecessor, as well as its successor the Wii Remote, this controller does not feature any expansion capabilities. The controller features a total of six digital buttons, two analog sticks, a D-pad and two hybrid analog triggers/digital buttons. The primary analog stick is on the left, with the D-pad below it. The four face buttons are on the right of the controller (a large green "A" button in the center, a smaller red "B" button to its bottom left and two kidney-shaped buttons; "X" to the right and a "Y" to the top) with a yellow "C" stick below those. A Start/Pause button is
    9.50
    2 votes
    20
    DK Bongos

    DK Bongos

    • Supporting games: Donkey Kong Jungle Beat
    DK Bongos are bongo-like controllers for the Nintendo GameCube video game series Donkey Konga, Donkey Konga 2, Donkey Konga 3, and Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat. There are two bongos, each shaped like a classic Donkey Kong barrel with a rubber drumskin fastened on top. It also has a built-in microphone to detect clapping. In Japan the controller is called the "TaruKonga" (or "TaruConga") controller. The name is a multilayered pun, combining "Taru" (the Japanese word for "barrel"), "Kon" or "Con" (a suffix used by Namco when naming their original peripherals, such as the "GunCon", or the "TaTaCon"), and Konga (or Conga). The DK Bongos are featured in Super Smash Bros. Brawl as Donkey Kong's Final Smash attack, the "Konga Beat". The game Donkey Kong Barrel Blast was originally designed as a GameCube title to be used with the DK Bongos. Eventually the game was moved to Wii, and bongo support was scrapped in favor of the Wii's built-in motion controls. The WiiWare title Plättchen Twist 'n' Paint was also going to support the peripheral. However, N-Europe revealed Nintendo wanted DK Bongo functionality removed to avoid alienating users who do not have them.
    6.00
    4 votes
    21
    6.00
    4 votes
    22

    ZXATASP

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: IDE interface
    The ZXATASP is an IDE interface for the ZX Spectrum.
    6.00
    4 votes
    23
    DECtalk

    DECtalk

    • Peripheral Class: Speech Synthesizer
    DECtalk was a speech synthesizer and text-to-speech technology developed by Digital Equipment Corporation in the early 1980s, based largely on the work of Dennis Klatt at MIT, whose source-filter algorithm was variously known as KlattTalk or MITalk. The first DECtalk units were seen in 1984. They were standalone units that connected to any device with an asynchronous serial port. These units were also able to connect to the telephone system by having two telephone jacks. One connected to a phone line, the other to a telephone. The DECtalk units could recognize and generate any telephone touch tone. With that capability the units could be used to automate various telephone-related tasks by handling both incoming and outgoing calls. This included acting as an interface to an email system and the capability to function as an alerting system by utilizing the ability to place calls and interact via touch tones with the person answering the phone. Later units were produced for PCs with ISA bus slots. In addition, various software implementations were produced, most notably the DECtalk Access32. Certain versions of the synthesiser were prone to undesirable characteristics. For example,
    7.33
    3 votes
    25

    +D

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Floppy disk interface
    The +D (or Plus D) was a floppy disk and printer interface for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computer, developed as a successor to Miles Gordon Technology's earlier product, the DISCiPLE. It was designed to be smaller, cheaper, simpler and thus more reliable. It discarded a number of the less important features of the earlier product — the network and joystick ports, the inhibit button and the pass-through connector — and replaced its ancestor's plastic wedge-shaped design which fit under the Spectrum with a simple flat metal slab which protruded from the rear of the computer. It provided only floppy disk and Centronics parallel interfaces, plus a non-maskable interrupt button. The +D's casing was simple folded steel, which was not only stronger than before but acted as a heatsink, improving reliability. Apart from the missing ports, though, it was software-compatible with the larger device. The +D's DOS was named G+DOS, and was compatible with the DISCiPLE's DOS, GDOS. SAM DOS for MGT's SAM Coupé was backwards-compatible with GDOS and G+DOS. In later years a complete new system called UNI-DOS was developed by SD Software for the DISCiPLE and +D interfaces. "The Complete +D
    9.00
    2 votes
    26
    9.00
    2 votes
    27
    Classic Controller

    Classic Controller

    The Classic Controller (クラシックコントローラ, Kurashikku Kontorōra) is a video game controller produced by Nintendo. It is used to play games on the Wii video game console. The Classic Controller is plugged into the Wii Remote in order to be used. It features two analog sticks, a D-pad, face buttons labeled "a", "b", "x" and "y", similar to that of a standard SNES controller. Digital shoulder buttons labeled "L" and "R", and two digital "Z" buttons (labeled "ZL" and "ZR") are located more closely to the center axis on their respective sides. It also has a set of "–", "Home" and "+" buttons like those on the Wii Remote, with the "–" and "+" buttons additionally labeled "Select" and "Start", respectively. The body of the Classic Controller measures 6.57 centimetres (2.59 in) tall, 13.57 centimetres (5.34 in) wide, and 2.6 centimetres (1.0 in) thick. The body of the controller contains slots on the underside, opened via a button at the top of the controller; the function of the slots was never officially clarified, but Nintendo of America employees have unofficially explained that it was intended for use with an unreleased clip that could hold the Wii Remote on the back of the Classic
    7.00
    3 votes
    28
    ZX Printer

    ZX Printer

    • Compatible computers: Sinclair ZX81
    • Peripheral Class: Spark printer
    The Sinclair ZX Printer is a spark printer which was produced by Sinclair Research for its ZX81 home computer. It was launched in 1981, with a recommended retail price of £49.95. The ZX Printer used special 4-inch (100 mm) wide black paper which was supplied coated with aluminium, this was electrically marked during the printing process to reveal its black under-surface. The printer's horizontal resolution was the same as the ZX81's video display, i.e. 256 dots (pixels) or 32 characters (using the standard character definition). The print quality was crude, but no other printer was compatible with the ZX81 without the use of additional software and interface hardware. The ZX Printer was also compatible with the earlier ZX80 computer (when fitted with the 8kB ROM upgrade) and the later ZX Spectrum, and plugged directly into the expansion bus connector via a short cable. The printer drew its power directly from the expansion bus, and was sold with a larger (1-2A) power supply for the ZX81 to accommodate the additional power drain. The Spectrum's user manual noted that this was not needed for the Spectrum as its default 1.1A power supply was sufficient.
    7.00
    3 votes
    29
    R.O.B.

    R.O.B.

    • Compatible computers: Nintendo Entertainment System
    • Supporting games: Stack-Up
    R.O.B. (Robotic Operating Buddy), released in Japan as the Family Computer Robot (ファミリーコンピュータ ロボット), is an accessory for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It was released in July 1985 in Japan and later that year in North America. It had a short product lifespan, with support for only two games which comprised the "Robot Series"; Gyromite and Stack-Up. R.O.B. was released with the intention of portraying the Nintendo Entertainment System as something novel in order to alleviate retail fears following the video game crash of 1983. R.O.B. was available in the Deluxe Set, a configuration for the console that included, among other things, R.O.B. and Gyromite. Stack-Up was purchased separately and included its own physical game pieces. R.O.B. receives commands via optical flashes in the screen. Once it lights up, it is ready to receive six commands. Just like the NES Zapper, R.O.B. only functions correctly when coupled with a CRT (Cathode ray) type television. All the Robot series games include a test feature that sends an optical flash that should make R.O.B.'s LED light up. R.O.B. is only operational with 2 NES games. Gyromite came with 2 gloves, 2 gyros (heavy spintops for
    8.50
    2 votes
    30
    Wii Balance Board

    Wii Balance Board

    • Supporting games: Rock N’ Roll Climber
    The Wii Balance Board is a balance board accessory for the Wii video game console. Along with Wii Fit, it was introduced on July 11, 2007 at the Electronic Entertainment Expo. It was confirmed that the board not only is compatible with Wii games, but will also be compatible with games from its successor console, the Wii U. The Wii Balance Board is shaped like a household body scale, with a plain white top and light gray bottom. It runs on four AA batteries as a power source, which can power the board for about 60 hours. The board uses Bluetooth technology and contains four pressure sensors that are used to measure the user's center of balance—the location of the intersection between an imaginary line drawn vertically through the center of mass and the surface of the Balance Board—and weight. In an interview conducted by gaming web site IGN, Shigeru Miyamoto stated that the Balance Board's ability to measure weight is probably more accurate than that of a typical bathroom scale. Although the Japanese packaging states that it is designed to support people weighing up to 136 kilograms (300 pounds) and the "Western" Balance Board up to 150 kg (330 pounds), they are actually the same
    8.50
    2 votes
    31
    Joystick

    Joystick

    • Supporting games: Tetris 2
    A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling. A joystick, also known as the control column, is the principal control device in the cockpit of many civilian and military aircraft, either as a center stick or side-stick. It often has supplementary switches to control various aspects of the aircraft's flight. Joysticks are often used to control video games, and usually have one or more push-buttons whose state can also be read by the computer. A popular variation of the joystick used on modern video game consoles is the analog stick. Joysticks are also used for controlling machines such as cranes, trucks, underwater unmanned vehicles, wheelchairs, surveillance cameras and zero turning radius lawn mowers. Miniature finger-operated joysticks have been adopted as input devices for smaller electronic equipment such as mobile phones. Joysticks originated as controls for aircraft ailerons and elevators, and is first known to have been used as such on Louis Bleriot's Bleriot VIII aircraft of 1908, in combination with a foot-operated rudder bar for the yaw control surface on the tail. The name
    10.00
    1 votes
    32

    Melodik Interface

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Sound interface
    The Melodik Interface was a peripheral which added additional sound capabilities to the ZX Spectrum. It used the same AY-3-8912 chip and I/O port addresses as the AY interface built into the ZX Spectrum 128 and later models.
    10.00
    1 votes
    33

    SpecDrum

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    SpecDrum was an inexpensive drum machine, designed by Alan Pateman and Peter Hennig between 1984 and 1985, which, unlike most standalone drum machines, was a peripheral for the popular Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computer. It was released under licence by Cheetah Marketing in 1986. It was notable for its low retail price of £29.95, when standalone alternatives typically cost around £250-£300 for a similar functionality. The device connected to the expansion bus on the ZX Spectrum. The ZX Spectrum ran software that was used to program rhythm patterns, and chain these into songs. Patterns and songs could then be loaded and saved onto cassette tape. The SpecDrum was an 8-voice machine (i.e. it allowed the user to load 8 different percussion samples). However it only had 3 output channels (i.e. maximum polyphony of 3 samples at a time) - the first channel could trigger the 'bass drum' voice, the second channel was used for the three snare/tom voices, and the third channel for the remaining four samples. The standard kit consisted of bass drum, snare drum, mid and low tomtoms, cowbell, hi-hat open and closed and hand claps. The sound has been compared to that of a LinnDrum. Cheetah also
    10.00
    1 votes
    34
    8.00
    2 votes
    35
    6.33
    3 votes
    36
    7.50
    2 votes
    37

    SpeccyBoot

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Network interface controller
    The SpeccyBoot is a peripheral for the ZX Spectrum which allow it to load snapshots from a TFTP server.
    7.50
    2 votes
    38

    Videoface

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    Videoface Digitiser is a video digitiser interface for Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computer. It was produced by Data-Skip from The Netherlands and later on Romantic Robot from UK in 1987. It was originally sold for GBP 69, but price dropped to 30 GBP within few years. Videoface takes signal from any video source with composite video out capability. It produces a 256 × 192 pixels, 4 bit screen. Scanning speed is just less than 4 frame/s. These screens can be saved as single pictures or animations with variable speed, and later loaded and edited in some drawing programs for the ZX Spectrum. During scanning, the contrast of the picture can be adjusted by turning the knob on top of the Videoface, and the picture can be shifted horizontally and vertically.
    7.50
    2 votes
    39
    6.00
    3 votes
    40
    Wii Zapper

    Wii Zapper

    The Wii Zapper is a gun shell peripheral for the Wii Remote. The name is a reference to the NES Zapper light gun for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It is mainly used for shooter games, including light gun shooters, first-person shooters, and third-person shooters. According to an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto, the idea of a Zapper-type expansion formed when the Wii Remote was first created. He expressed that "What we found is that the reason we wanted to have a Zapper is when you hold a Wii Remote, it can be difficult for some people to keep a steady hand. And holding your arm out like that can get your arm somewhat tired." A staff member of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess's development team later created a makeshift gun-like frame using rubber bands and wires, which held the Wii Remote and Nunchuk together. In response, Miyamoto stated "this isn't the time or the place to be making things like this!". However, when Miyamoto held the prototype in his hands, he found it very comfortable. He proposed it to the hardware developers, who started on the formal development project. The Wii Zapper underwent an extensive development period involving many design phases,
    6.00
    3 votes
    41
    Commodore 1581

    Commodore 1581

    • Compatible computers: Commodore 128
    • Peripheral Class: Floppy disk interface
    The Commodore 1581 is a 3½ inch double sided double density floppy disk drive made by Commodore Business Machines (CBM) primarily for its C64 and C128 home/personal computers. The drive stores 800 kilobytes using an MFM encoding but format different from MS-DOS (720 kB), Amiga (880 kB), and Mac Plus (800 kB) formats. With special software it's possible to read C1581 disks on a x86 PC system, and likewise, read MS-DOS disks in the C1581 (Big blue reader) provided the PC floppy handles the "720 kB" size format. It was released in the summer of 1987 and quickly became popular with bulletin board system (BBS) operators and other users. Like the 1541 and 1571, the 1581 has an on board MOS Technology 6502 CPU with its own ROM and RAM, and uses a serial version of the IEEE-488 interface. Inexplicably, the drive's ROM contains commands for parallel use, although no parallel interface was available. Like the 1571, it can read various other disk formats using special software. This capability was most frequently used to read MS-DOS disks. However, unlike the 1571, which is nearly 100% backward-compatible with the 1541, the 1581 has limited compatibility with Commodore's earlier drives.
    9.00
    1 votes
    42

    GunCon 2

    • Peripheral Class: GunCon
    The Guncon 2 is a light gun developed by Namco for the PS2. It is connected to the PS2 via USB and connected to the TV through a special AV cable included with the Guncon 2. It does not work with Plasma or LCD televisions. The following games are compatible with the GunCon 2: List of light gun games on the PlayStation 2 Dino Stalker: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/557717.asp Endgame: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/517869.asp Ninja Assault: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/561250.asp Resident Evil Dead Aim: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/562265.asp Starsky and Hutch: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/561397.asp Time Crisis 3: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/569388.asp Time Crisis II: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/476512.asp Time Crisis: Crisis Zone: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/920542.asp Vampire Night: http://www.gamerankings.com/htmlpages2/481081.asp
    9.00
    1 votes
    43
    9.00
    1 votes
    44
    9.00
    1 votes
    45
    5.67
    3 votes
    46
    5.67
    3 votes
    47
    3Dconnexion

    3Dconnexion

    • Supporting games: Second Life
    3Dconnexion manufactures a line of human interface devices for manipulating and navigating computer-generated 3D imagery. These devices are often referred to as 3D motion controllers, 3D navigation devices, 6DOF devices (six degrees of freedom) or a 3D mouse. Commonly utilized in CAD applications, 3D modeling, animation, 3D visualization and product visualization, users can manipulate the controller's pressure-sensitive handle (historically referred to as either a cap, ball, mouse or knob) to fly through 3D environments or manipulate 3D models within an application. The appeal of these devices over a mouse and keyboard is the ability to pan, zoom and rotate 3D imagery simultaneously, without stopping to change directions using keyboard shortcuts or a software interface. 3Dconnexion devices are compatible with over 100 applications including Autodesk Inventor, Solid Edge, Blender, Google Earth, Second Life, NASA World Wind, Virtual Earth 3D, Geomagic, Google SketchUp 6, Cinema4D, Maya, SolidWorks, T-FLEX CAD, Photoshop, and more 3Dconnexion was formed in September 2001 by Logitech, combining the resources of two industry leaders – LogiCAD3D, based in Europe, and Labtec’s 3D
    7.00
    2 votes
    48

    DivIDE

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: IDE interface
    The DivIDE is an IDE interface for the ZX Spectrum.
    7.00
    2 votes
    49
    Satellaview

    Satellaview

    • Peripheral Class: Modem
    The Satellaview (サテラビュー, Saterabyū) is a satellite modem add-on for Nintendo's Super Famicom system that was released in Japan in 1995. Available for pre-release orders as early as February 13, 1995, the Satellaview retailed for between ¥14,000 and 18,000 (then between USD$141 and 182) and came bundled with the BS-X Game Pak and an 8M Memory Pak. The Satellaview system was developed and released by Nintendo to receive signals broadcast from satellite TV station WOWOW's satellite radio subsidiary, St.GIGA. St.GIGA was responsible for file server management, maintenance, and vocalization for "SoundLink games." Nintendo data broadcasts were given a fixed time-slot known as the Super Famicom Hour (スーパーファミコンアワー) during which scrambled Satellaview-related data was streamed via radio waves to be unscrambled by St.GIGA's "BS digital hi-vision TV" (BSデジタルハイビジョンテレビ, BS Dejitaru HaiBijon Terebi). As a subscription-based ambient/New Age music station, St.GIGA listeners were already equipped with "BS tuners" prior to St.GIGA's contract with Nintendo, however Satellaview owners who lacked a "BS tuner" had to purchase one separately from St.GIGA (at a price of ¥33,000) as well as sign up for
    7.00
    2 votes
    50

    Slomo

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    It was black and yellow and had a dial on the top to set the slow-motion speed. I think it also had a red LED to indicate when it was in slow-mode, and had a trigger to turn slow-mo on and off. The icon for the device was a snail and I used it to complete Ultimate's GunFright - that's how I found out that the last gang of baddies repeats and there's no real way to "win" at the game.
    7.00
    2 votes
    51

    ZXCF

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: IDE interface
    The ZXCF is an IDE interface for the ZX Spectrum.
    7.00
    2 votes
    52
    Computer keyboard

    Computer keyboard

    • Supporting games: Tetris 2
    In computing, a keyboard is a typewriter-style device, which uses an arrangement of buttons or keys, to act as mechanical levers or electronic switches. Following the decline of punch cards and paper tape, interaction via teleprinter-style keyboards became the main input device for computers. A keyboard typically has characters engraved or printed on the keys and each press of a key typically corresponds to a single written symbol. However, to produce some symbols requires pressing and holding several keys simultaneously or in sequence. While most keyboard keys produce letters, numbers or signs (characters), other keys or simultaneous key presses can produce actions or computer commands. Despite the development of alternative input devices, such as the mouse, touchscreen, pen devices, character recognition and voice recognition, the keyboard remains the most commonly used and most versatile device used for direct (human) input into computers. In normal usage, the keyboard is used to type text and numbers into a word processor, text editor or other programs. In a modern computer, the interpretation of key presses is generally left to the software. A computer keyboard distinguishes
    5.33
    3 votes
    53

    EyeToy

    • Peripheral Class: Webcam
    The EyeToy is a color digital camera device, similar to a webcam, for the PlayStation 2. The technology uses computer vision and Gesture recognition to process images taken by the camera. This allows players to interact with games using motion, color detection and also sound, through its built-in microphone. It was released in October 2003. The camera is manufactured by Logitech (known as "Logicool" in Japan), although newer EyeToys are manufactured by Namtai. The camera is mainly used for playing EyeToy games developed by Sony and other companies. It is not intended for use as a normal PC camera, although some people have developed unofficial drivers for it. As of November 6, 2008, the EyeToy has sold 10.5 million units worldwide. The EyeToy was conceived by Richard Marks in 1999, after witnessing a demonstration of the PlayStation 2 at the 1999 Game Developers Conference in San Jose, California. Marks's idea was to enable natural user interface and mixed reality video game applications using an inexpensive webcam, using the computational power of the PlayStation 2 to implement computer vision and gesture recognition technologies. He joined Sony Computer Entertainment America
    8.00
    1 votes
    54
    8.00
    1 votes
    55
    8.00
    1 votes
    56
    Beatmania Controller

    Beatmania Controller

    • Supporting games: Beatmania
    The Beatmania Controller for Playstation by Konami (Sony ID: SLEH-00021, Konami product no. RU024) is used with the music video game Beatmania. It features a keyboard with 5 keys and a turntable-like platter. In Europe the controller and game disc were sold as a bundle.
    6.50
    2 votes
    57
    Commodore 1571

    Commodore 1571

    • Compatible computers: Commodore 64
    • Peripheral Class: Floppy disk interface
    The Commodore 1571 was Commodore's high-end 5¼" floppy disk drive. With its double-sided drive mechanism, it had the ability to utilize double-sided, double-density (DS/DD) floppy disks natively. This was in contrast to its predecessors, the 1541 and 1570, which could fully utilize such disks only if the user manually flipped them over to access the second side. (However, the two methods were not interchangeable; disk which had their back side created in a 1541 by flipping them over would have to be flipped in the 1571 too, and the back side of disks written in a 1571 using the native support for two-sided operation could not be read in a 1541). The 1571 was released to match the Commodore 128, both design-wise and feature-wise. It was announced in the summer of 1985, at the same time as the C128, and became available in quantity later that year. The later C128D had a 1571-compatible drive integrated in the system unit. A double-sided disk on the 1571 would have a capacity of 340 KB (70 tracks, 1,360 disk blocks of 256 bytes each); as 8 KB are reserved for system use (directory and block availability information) and, under CBM DOS, 2 bytes of each block serve as pointers to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    58
    5.00
    3 votes
    59
    Commodore 1541

    Commodore 1541

    • Compatible computers: Commodore 64
    • Peripheral Class: Floppy disk interface
    The Commodore 1541 (also known as the CBM 1541 and VIC-1541) is a floppy disk drive (FDD) which was made by Commodore International for the Commodore 64 (C64), Commodore's home computer. The best-known FDD for the C64, the 1541 was a single-sided 170 kilobyte drive for 5¼" disks. The 1541 followed the previous Commodore 1540 (meant for the VIC-20). The disk drive used Group Code Recording (GCR) and contained a MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor, doubling as a disk controller and on-board disk operating system processor. The number of sectors per track varied from 17 to 21 (an early implementation of Zone Bit Recording). The drive's built-in disk operating system was CBM DOS 2.6. The 1541 was priced at under US$400 at its introduction. A C64 plus a 1541 cost about $900, while an Apple II with no disk drive cost $1395: the 1541 became widely popular and the demand caught Commodore by surprise, struggling to produce the drive in adequate quantities. The first 1541 drives produced in 1982 had a label on the front reading VIC-1541 and had a white case to match the VIC-20. Failure rates on the 1541 initially were very high, and the drives were virtually impossible to find. The lead
    6.00
    2 votes
    60
    Magic Mouse

    Magic Mouse

    • Compatible computers: MacBook Pro
    The Magic Mouse is a multi-touch mouse manufactured and sold by Apple, and it was announced and sold for the first time on October 20, 2009. The Magic Mouse is the first consumer mouse to have multi-touch capabilities. Taking after the iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and multi-touch trackpads, the Magic Mouse allows the use of gestures such as swiping and scrolling across the top surface of the mouse to interact with desktop computers. It connects via Bluetooth and runs on two AA batteries. The mouse requires at least Mac OS X 10.5.8. It can be configured as a two-buttoned left-handed or right-handed mouse, but the default is a single button. It uses laser tracking for increased pointer accuracy over previous generation Apple mice. Since its release, it has been included along with a wireless keyboard with the 2009 generation of iMacs, and with a wired keyboard with the 2010 Mac Pro workstations. It can also be purchased separately. Initial reception to the Magic Mouse was mixed, with positive reactions to its scrolling functions but negative reactions to its inability to middle click (without any additional software), or trigger Exposé, Dashboard or Spaces (features offered by its
    6.00
    2 votes
    61
    SuperDrive

    SuperDrive

    • Compatible computers: MacBook Pro
    SuperDrive is a trademark used by Apple Inc. for two different storage drives: from 1988–99 to refer to a high-density floppy disk drive capable of reading all major 3.5" disk formats; and from 2001 onwards to refer to a combined CD/DVD reader/writer. The term was first used by Apple Computer in 1988 to refer to their 1.44 MB 3.5 inch floppy drive. This replaced the older 800 KB floppy drive that had been standard in the Macintosh up to then, but remained compatible in that it could continue to read and write both 800K (double-sided) and 400K (single-sided) floppy disks, as well as the then-new high-density floppies. This drive was also capable of reading and writing MS-DOS formatted disks and FAT file formats, using PC Exchange or other software, unlike the 400K and 800K drives. This was made possible as the SuperDrive now utilitized the same MFM (Modified Frequency Modulation) encoding scheme used by the IBM PC, yet still retained backward compatibility with Apple's variable-speed zoned CAV scheme and Group Code Recording encoding format, so it could continue to read Macintosh MFS, HFS and Apple II ProDOS formats on 400/800K disks. Introduced in 1988 under the Trademark name FDHD
    6.00
    2 votes
    62
    7.00
    1 votes
    63
    7.00
    1 votes
    64
    Wii Remote

    Wii Remote

    • Compatible computers: Wii
    • Supporting games: Super Mario Galaxy
    The Wii Remote (Wiiリモコン, Uī Rimokon), also known colloquially as the Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendo's Wii console. A main feature of the Wii Remote is its motion sensing capability, which allows the user to interact with and manipulate items on screen via gesture recognition and pointing through the use of accelerometer and optical sensor technology. Another feature is its expandability through the use of attachments. The attachment bundled with the Wii console is the Nunchuk, which complements the Wii Remote by providing functions similar to those in gamepad controllers. Some other attachments include the Classic Controller, Wii Zapper, and the Wii Wheel, originally used for Mario Kart. The controller was revealed at the Tokyo Game Show on September 14, 2005, with the name "Wii Remote" announced April 27, 2006. It has since received much attention due to its unique features and the contrast between it and typical gaming controllers. During Nintendo's presentation of Wii's successor console, the Wii U, it was announced that it will have support for the Wii Remote and its peripherals in games where use of its touchscreen-built-in primary controller is not
    7.00
    1 votes
    65
    5.50
    2 votes
    66
    ZX Interface 1

    ZX Interface 1

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Supporting games: TT Racer
    A peripheral from Sinclair Research for its ZX Spectrum home computer, the ZX Interface 1 was launched in 1983. Originally intended as a local area network interface for use in school classrooms, it was revised before launch to also act as the controller for up to eight ZX Microdrive high-speed tape-loop cartridge drives. It also included a DE-9 RS-232 interface capable of operating at up to 19.2 kbit/s — a rare instance of Sinclair using an industry-standard connector. At hardware level it was mainly a voltage adapter, the serial protocol being implemented in software by bit-banging. This led to problems when receiving data, but not when transmitting. A wedge-shaped device fitting underneath the ZX Spectrum, ZX Interface 1 contained 8 kB of ROM comprising the control software for the Microdrives, RS-232 port and network interface. This extended the error handler in the Sinclair BASIC to allow extra keywords to be used. As this became an official standard, other developers quickly used this mechanism to create language extensions to Sinclair BASIC. The device offered two network ports, allowing up to 64 ZX Spectrums to be daisy-chained using network leads up to 3 m (10 ft) long.
    5.00
    2 votes
    67
    NES Zapper

    NES Zapper

    • Peripheral Class: Light gun
    • Supporting games: Wild Gunman
    The NES Zapper, also known as the Beam Gun in Japan, is an electronic light gun accessory for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) and the Japanese Famicom. It was released in Japan for the Famicom on February 18, 1984 (1984-02-18) and alongside the launch of the NES in North America in October 1985. The Famicom version of the Zapper, made for the game Wild Gunman, resembled a revolver-style handgun, but the North American version resembled a futuristic science fiction ray gun with a color scheme matching the NES. Early versions of the Zapper were a dark gray, but later it was changed to orange(green and gray colored Zappers were also produced,but on a much smaller scale), as was now required for all "toy guns" under U.S. Federal Regulations. Although originally included in some configurations of the NES, the Zapper was available for purchase separately. The Zapper allows players to aim at the television set display and shoot various objects such as ducks, clay pigeons, targets, cowboys, or criminals, or other objects. The Zapper was first released in 1985 with the launch of the NES in North America. It came bundled with the NES console, the Robotic Operating Buddy and two
    6.00
    1 votes
    68

    SNES Mouse

    • Compatible computers: Super Nintendo Entertainment System
    • Peripheral Class: Mouse
    • Supporting games: Mario Paint
    The Super NES Mouse is a peripheral released by Nintendo in 1992 for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). Originally designed for use with the game Mario Paint, the SNES Mouse was sold in a bundle with the game and included a plastic mouse pad. Soon after its introduction, several other titles were released with Super NES Mouse support. Although this device closely resembles and mimics the functionality of a two-button computer mouse, it was smaller than most computer mice of the time and had a significantly shorter cord than the standard Super NES controller. The SNES Mouse was supported by many games during its lifetime, and even by the Super Game Boy accessory. Certain games released after the SNES Mouse—such as Tetris & Dr. Mario and Kirby Super Star—display a warning message indicating that the mouse is incompatible with that game. This is an incomplete list of games that support the accessory:
    6.00
    1 votes
    69
    Wii MotionPlus

    Wii MotionPlus

    • Compatible computers: Wii
    The Wii MotionPlus (Wiiモーションプラス) is an expansion device for the Wii Remote video game controller for the Wii that allows it to more accurately capture complex motion. According to Nintendo, the sensor in the device supplements the accelerometer and Sensor Bar capabilities of the Wii Remote to enable actions to be rendered identically on the screen in real time. During Nintendo's presentation of Wii's successor console, the Wii U, it was announced that it will have support for the Wii Remote Plus and its peripherals in games where use of its touchscreen-built-in primary controller is not imperative. The Wii MotionPlus was announced by Nintendo in a press release on July 14, 2008, and revealed the next day at a press conference at the E3 Media & Business Summit. It was released in June 2009. On May 3, 2010, Nintendo announced that starting May 9, 2010, the company will include its Wii Sports Resort game and MotionPlus controller with new consoles with no price increase. The device incorporates a dual-axis tuning fork gyroscope, and a single-axis gyroscope which can determine rotational motion. The information captured by the angular rate sensor can then be used to distinguish true
    6.00
    1 votes
    70

    Joydick

    • Peripheral Class: Joystick
    The Joydick is a wearable haptic device for controlling video gameplay based on realtime male masturbation. Through the use of a carefully designed strap-on interface, the user’s penis is converted into a joystick capable of moving the character onscreen in all four cardinal directions. For games requiring the fire button, a separate ring can be worn which converts hand-strokes into button presses.
    4.50
    2 votes
    71

    Spectranet

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    The Spectranet is a peripheral which adds Ethernet capabilities to the ZX Spectrum.
    5.00
    1 votes
    72

    WiiSpeak

    Wii Speak is a microphone accessory for Nintendo's Wii video game console. Connected to the console via USB, the device can be placed near the video display, allowing voice chat to be conducted with the entire room. The device features an LED to indicate when the microphone is active. Wii Speak was announced at Nintendo's 2008 E3 media briefing. It was released separately and bundled with Animal Crossing: City Folk on November 16, 2008, in North America, and was released on December 5, 2008, in Europe. According to Miyamoto, the microphone is designed to "clearly capture many different voices being spoken in a room at the same time and convey that over the Internet." Addressing concerns over background noise due to the placement of the microphone near a television set, Animal Crossing: City Folk producer Katsuya Eguchi states that the device is designed to filter out video game sound from the audio speakers. Miyamoto notes that the quality of the noise filtering functionality in the Wii Speak is "very good", which may be contributing to the cost of the device. In an IGN product review, the microphone was rated excellent. A switch was originally planned, but the microphone now turns
    5.00
    1 votes
    73
    DISCiPLE

    DISCiPLE

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Floppy disk interface
    The DISCiPLE was a floppy disk interface for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computer. Designed by Miles Gordon Technology, it was marketed by Rockfort Products and launched in 1986. Like Sinclair's own ZX Interface 1, the DISCiPLE was a wedge-shaped unit fitting underneath the Spectrum. It was designed as a super-interface, providing all the facilities a Spectrum owner could need. In addition to floppy-disk, parallel port printer interface and a "magic button" (see Non-maskable interrupt), it also offered twin joystick ports, Sinclair ZX Net-compatible network ports and an inhibit button for disabling the device. At the rear of the unit was a pass-through port for connecting further devices, although the complexity of the DISCiPLE meant that many would not work, or only if the DISCiPLE was "turned off" using the inhibit button. The DISCiPLE was a considerable success but its sophistication meant that it was expensive and the plastic casing, located beneath the computer itself, was sometimes prone to overheating. These factors led to the development of MGT's later +D interface. The DISCiPLE's DOS was named GDOS. MGT's later DOSs (G+DOS for the +D, and SAM DOS for the SAM Coupé) were
    4.00
    2 votes
    74
    Magnum Light Phaser

    Magnum Light Phaser

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Light gun
    • Supporting games: Solar Invasion
    The Magnum Light Phaser is a light gun created in 1987 for the ZX Spectrum computer. A version was also released for the Commodore 64/128. It was Amstrad's last peripheral for the video game console. The Magnum Light Phaser in many ways resembles the Light Phaser, the Sega Master System light gun, released in 1986. It was a Sinclair-branded Far Eastern product which was included in promotional bundles such as the "James Bond 007 Action Pack", along with a small number of lightgun-compatible games. It was also available separately in a £29.95 pack along with six games. Only a few games bothered with lightgun compatibility (Operation Wolf, the original arcade gun game, was the most notable) and fewer still were produced specifically for use with the Magnum. Even so, the lightgun was widely available, largely because Amstrad's bundling policy ensured wide distribution. Software Creations created five exclusive games for the Commodore 64 package. Spectrum: Bundled with the Commodore 64 version: Bundled with the Commodore 64 Lightgun package, and compatible with the Magnum:
    4.00
    1 votes
    75

    Apple Scanner

    In August 1988 Apple introduced the Apple Scanner. It was their first A4 (8.5 in × 14.0 in) flatbed scanner. It was capable of a 4-bit image with 16 levels of grey in a maximum resolution of 300 dpi. The scanner could complete a full scan in 20.4 seconds. It shipped with a SCSI connection with an optional ADB port. The scanner was upgraded to the short lived Apple OneScanner in 1991 with 256 levels of grey.
    0.00
    0 votes
    76
    HP LaserJet 1020

    HP LaserJet 1020

    • Peripheral Class: Laser printer
    The HP LaserJet 1020 is a low cost, low volume, monochromatic laser printer. It was a replacement for the HP LaserJet 1012 but seems to suffer from many of the same flaws and problems owing to overheating and lack of internal cooling. The production started in June 2005. HP LaserJet 1020 Printer Download Drivers The LaserJet 1020 is part of a list of LaserJet printers studied to determine particulate emission and its potential effects on health. The 1020 was said to be a moderate emitter of particulates. A full copy of the report can be found , while HP's response is . It uses a black cartridge (toner) print cartridge number Q2612A with 2000-page capacity at the standard 5 percent coverage. This model or printer has been known to emit steam even after light use with high moisture paper. HP's advice is to reduce printing quality to 75 g/m². (Light printing).
    0.00
    0 votes
    77
    Kempston Interface

    Kempston Interface

    • Compatible computers: ZX Spectrum
    • Peripheral Class: Kempston joystick interface
    The Kempston Interface, produced by Kempston Micro Electronics, was the generic name for any interface on Sinclair's ZX Spectrum series of computers that allowed joysticks complying with the de facto Atari 2600 standard to be used with the machine. It was one of the most widely supported standards on the machine. The interface itself would be attached to the computer's rear expansion port with a single joystick port on the front or top of the system. It came out as the clear winner against other standards such as Protek's cursor-based solution and the Fuller standard during the days of the 48K Spectrum. However, when Amstrad released the ZX Spectrum +2, the computer featured a built-in joystick interface that was software-compatible with Sinclair's ZX Interface 2 standard. Unfortunately, the bundled SJS-1 joystick was electrically incompatible with the Atari standard. The Interface 2 standard simulated keypresses on the numerical keys (1->5 and 6->0 being left, right, down, up, fire for the 'left' and 'right' joysticks respectively) and hence were ideal for games with no official joystick support but in which the keys could be redefined. Problems had also been reported with the
    0.00
    0 votes
    78
    0.00
    0 votes
    79
    0.00
    0 votes
    80
    Xbox 360 Controller

    Xbox 360 Controller

    • Peripheral Class: Game controller
    • Supporting games: Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds
    The Xbox 360 Controller is the primary controller for Microsoft's Xbox 360 console and was introduced at E3 2005. The Xbox 360 controller comes in both wired and wireless versions. Original Xbox controllers are not compatible with the Xbox 360. The controller is also compatible with PCs; the wireless version requires a Wireless Gaming Receiver. The wireless controllers run on either AA batteries or a rechargeable battery pack. The wired controllers may be connected to any of the USB ports on the console, or to an attached USB hub. The Xbox 360 controller has the same basic familiar button layout as the Controller S except that a few of the auxiliary buttons have been moved. The "back" and "start" buttons have been moved to a more central position on the face of the controller, and the "white" and "black" buttons have been removed and replaced with two new bumpers that are positioned over the analog triggers on the back of the controller. The controller has a 2.5 mm TRS connector on the front, allowing users to connect a headset for voice communication. It also features a proprietary USB connector (which is split into 2 parts on either side of the headset connector) for use with
    0.00
    0 votes
    81
    Xbox 360 Wireless Racing Wheel

    Xbox 360 Wireless Racing Wheel

    • Peripheral Class: Racing Wheel
    • Supporting games: Forza Motorsport 2
    The Xbox 360 Wireless Racing Wheel was developed by Microsoft for the Xbox 360 and was introduced at E3 2006. Released in November 2006, the force feedback steering wheel controller includes the standard gamepad buttons along with floor-mounted accelerator and brake pedals. Although the wheel is capable of running truly wirelessly from a standard Xbox 360 battery pack (rechargeable or two AA batteries), use of the force feedback and active resistance features requires an external AC adapter. The original limited edition of the force feedback wheel included a force-feedback capable version of the racing game Project Gotham Racing 3. This was discontinued in November 2007 when the price of the wheel was dropped to $99. The wheel was developed in conjunction with the video game Forza Motorsport 2. The following games are "fully supported" with force feedback for Xbox 360: † Bundled Xbox 360 race game. The following games are supported on Windows Vista x64. This does not include force feedback- steering and rumble only: The following original Xbox games are "fully supported" with force feedback via Xbox 360 backward compatibility: The Microsoft Wireless Gaming Receiver for Windows
    0.00
    0 votes
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