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Best Composer of All Time

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    1
    Leevi Madetoja

    Leevi Madetoja

    Leevi Antti Madetoja (17 February 1887, Oulu – 6 October 1947, Helsinki) was a Finnish composer. Born in Oulu, he was the son of Antti Madetoja and Anna Hyttinen. His father emigrated to the United States to earn money for the family, but died of tuberculosis by the Mississippi river, never having seen his son. Madetoja studied music in Helsinki (1906–1910), Paris (1910–1911), Vienna and Berlin (1911–1912). In 1913, he married the writer Hilja Onerva Lehtinen (1882–1972), who wrote under the pseudonym L. Onerva. His music is strongly influenced by the traditional music of his home region, Ostrobothnia. His three symphonies are based on the legacy of Sibelian and Russian romanticism, Gallic clarity and folk elements. The sombre Symphony Nº 2 was written during the civil war and could be described as a war symphony. Another fine work written in the same year is the elegant piano piece Kuoleman Puutarha (Garden of Death), dedicated to his brother, who had died during the war. His finest works are considered the opera The Ostrobothnians, the Third Symphony, Comedy Overture, the ballet Okon Fuoko, and his songs for male choir. His inspiration slowly dried up, though a fully scored
    8.00
    7 votes
    2
    Carl Mikuli

    Carl Mikuli

    Karol Mikuli, often seen as Carl Mikuli or Charles Mikuli (Armenian: Կարոլ Միկըլի or Կարոլ Պստիկյան; 20 October 1819 – 21 May 1897) was an Armenian-Polish pianist, composer, conductor and teacher. Mikuli (aka Bsdikian) was born in Czerniowce, then part of the Austrian Empire (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine) to an Armenian family. He studied under Frédéric Chopin for piano (later becoming his teaching assistant) and Anton Reicha for composition. He toured widely as a concert pianist, becoming Director of the Lviv Conservatory in 1858. He founded his own school there in 1888. His students included Moriz Rosenthal, Raoul Koczalski, Aleksander Michałowski, Jaroslaw Zieliński and Kornelia Parnas. He died in Lemberg, then part of Austria-Hungary (now Lviv, Ukraine) and is buried in the courtyard of the Armenian church in Lviv. He is most well known as an editor of works by Chopin. Dover Publications currently publishes reprints of his 1879 editions of Chopin's piano music, originally published by F. Kistner (Leipzig). His goal, as stated in the foreword of the edition, was to provide more reliable editions. He used several verified sources, most of which were written or corrected by Chopin
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Ingram Marshall

    Ingram Marshall

    Ingram Marshall (born May 10, 1942 in Mount Vernon, New York) is an American composer and a former student of Vladimir Ussachevsky and Morton Subotnick. Son of Bernice Douglas and Harry Reinhard Marshall, Sr. He was a talented soprano in the Boy's Choir at the Mt. Vernon Community Church, and was influenced early by noted music instructor, Victor Laslo, Mt. Kisco, NY. After graduating from the Fox Lane School in 1960, he pursued musical studies at Lake Forest College, Columbia University and the California Institute of the Arts. He later joined the music faculty at Evergreen College and is now at the Yale School of Music. He was the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship and studied gamelan in Bali. Many of his compositions have been premiered at Carnegie Hall. "These are works so rich in associations, profound in their connection to our time and place in history, and so carefully and subtly made, that when they do sink in, they can very well come to haunt you." —Mark Swed, Chamber Music Magazine Though the composer uses the term "expressivist" to describe his music, he is often associated with post-minimalism. His music often reflects an interest in world music, particularly
    7.71
    7 votes
    4
    Lech Janerka

    Lech Janerka

    Lech Janerka (born 2 May 1953 in Wrocław, Poland) is a Polish songwriter, vocalist and bassist. In the 1980s he was leader of a notable Polish post-punk/new wave band called Klaus Mitffoch, based in Wrocław.
    8.50
    6 votes
    5
    Félicien-César David

    Félicien-César David

    Félicien-César David (April 13, 1810 – August 29, 1876) was a French composer. Félicien David was born in Cadenet (Vaucluse), France, and began to study music at five under his father, whose early death however left him an impoverished orphan. His good voice enabled him to study as a choirboy at the Church of Saint-Saveur in Aix-en-Provence, which he left at the age of 15 with a sound knowledge of music, and a scholarship which enabled him to study literature at a Jesuit college. However, after three years, he abandoned these studies to pursue a musical career. He first obtained a position in the orchestra of the theatre at Aix. In 1829, he became maître de chapelle at Saint-Saveur, but realised that to complete his musical education he needed to study at Paris. An allowance of 50 francs per month from a rich uncle made this possible. In Paris in 1830 he convinced Cherubini, the director of the Conservatoire, to enrol him as a pupil: despite his reservations, Cherubini recognised the talent shown by David's choral setting of Beatus vir. Despite the sudden withdrawal of his uncle's subsidy, David's studies, with Fétis and others, continued successfully. On leaving the Conservatoire,
    9.00
    5 votes
    6
    Richard Jacques

    Richard Jacques

    Richard Jacques (born 2 April 1973 in Leamington Spa, England) is a British music composer. He is best known for his video game music, most notably for numerous video games created by Sega. Born in musical family, Jacques was interested in composing from early age. He wrote his first music achievement, a piano duet, at age of nine. Richard began studying music at Colchester Institute School of Music and Wells Cathedral School, but he got his primary music education at Royal Academy of Music, where was exposed to a number of instruments and was taught to play in various genres, from jazz to rock. Jacques finished the academy with Bachelor's Degree "In Music Composition" in 1995 and two days after his graduation set as in-house composer at Sega Europe. At Sega Europe, Jacques began with doing soundtracks for a plenty of Sega Saturn games, most notably jazz, eurodance and powerpop-influenced scores for Sonic R (with vocals by TJ Davis) and Sonic 3D (the Sega Saturn and PC versions). In 2000, he also created the interactive radio system and some tracks for Metropolis Street Racer (again with vocals by TJ Davis) and composed additional hip-hop tunes for Jet Set Radio, but Jacques's most
    8.80
    5 votes
    7
    Keith Tippett

    Keith Tippett

    Keith Tippett (originally Keith Graham Tippetts, born 25 August 1947, in Bristol) is a British jazz pianist and composer. Tippett, the son of a local police officer, went to Greenway Boys Secondary Modern school in Southmead, Bristol. He formed his first jazz band called The KT7 whilst still at school and they performed numbers popular at the time by The Temperance Seven. In the late 1960s, he led a sextet featuring Elton Dean on saxophone, Mark Charig on trumpet and Nick Evans on trombone. Tippett married singer Julie Driscoll and wrote scores for TV. In the early 1970s, his big band Centipede brought together much of a generation of young British jazz and rock musicians. As well as performing some concerts (limited economically by the size of the band), they recorded one double-album, Septober Energy. He formed, with Harry Miller and Louis Moholo a formidable rhythm section at the centre of some the most exciting combinations in the country, including the Elton Dean quartet, and Elton Dean's Ninesense. Around the same time, he was also in the vicinity of King Crimson, contributing piano to several of their records including Cat Food (and even appearing with them on Top of the
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Don Black

    Don Black

    • Works Composed: Sail the Summer Winds
    Don Black, OBE (born 21 June 1938) is an English lyricist. His works have included numerous musicals, movie themes and hit songs. He has provided lyrics for John Barry, Charles Strouse, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Quincy Jones, Lulu, Jule Styne, Henry Mancini, Michael Jackson, Elmer Bernstein, Michel Legrand, Hayley Westenra, A. R. Rahman, Marvin Hamlisch and Debbie Wiseman. Black was born Donald Blackstone in London, England, the youngest of five children of Russian Jewish immigrants Morris and Betsy (née Kersh) Blackstone. During his childhood the family lived in a flat in Tornay House, Shore Place, South Hackney. He began his music industry career as an office boy with a music publishing firm, and later worked as a song-plugger. He also had a brief spell as a comic. He was personal manager to the singer Matt Monro for many years and also provided songs for him (usually writing English language lyrics to continental songs). These included "Walk Away" (music: Udo Jürgens) and "For Mamma" (music: Charles Aznavour). Black's first film work was the lyrics for the theme of the James Bond entry Thunderball (1965). His association with the Bond series continued over several decades, with
    8.40
    5 votes
    9
    Johann Christoph Pepusch

    Johann Christoph Pepusch

    Johann Christoph Pepusch (1667 – 20 July 1752), also known as John Christopher Pepusch and Dr Pepusch, was a German-born composer who spent most of his working life in England. Pepusch was born in Berlin. At the age of 14, he was appointed to the Prussian court. About 1700, he settled in England where he was one of the founders, in 1710, of The Academy of Vocal Music, which in 1726 was renamed The Academy of Ancient Music. In Joseph Doane's Musical directory for the year 1794, the founding of the Academy is discussed; on page 76, it states that: In the year 1710 (memorable for Handel’s first appearance among us) a number of the most eminent composers and performers in London [agreed] to concert a plan of an Academy for the study and practice of Vocal and Instrumental Music, which was no sooner announced than it met the countenance and support of the principal persons of rank. Among the foremost in this undertaking were Mr. John Christopher Pepusch, Mr. John Earnest Galleard, an excellent composer and performer on the Oboe, Mr. Bernard Gates of the Queen’s Chapel, Henry Niedler, etc. Pepusch remained Director of the Academy until his death in 1752, whereupon he was succeeded by
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Phill Niblock

    Phill Niblock

    Phill Niblock (born 2 October 1933, in Anderson, Indiana) is a composer, filmmaker, videographer, and director of Experimental Intermedia, a foundation for avant-garde music based in New York with a parallel branch in Ghent, Belgium. After an early period studying economics (BA, Indiana University, 1956) Niblock came to New York in 1958. Initially he worked as a photographer and filmmaker. Much of this activity centered around photographing and filming jazz musicians. Thereafter he made a number of films in a series titled The Movement of People Working. Filmed in primarily rural environments in many countries (China, Brazil, Portugal, Lesotho, Puerto Rico, Hong Kong, the Arctic, Mexico, Hungary, the Adirondacks, Peru), the films look at everyday work, frequently agrarian or marine labor. These films are remarkable for their realistic quality and absence of artifice, their use of long takes in high resolution and their supposedly artless juxtaposition of compelling images in vivid colors. These scenes of the movement of human manual labor are treated abstractly without explicit anthropological or sociological meaning. As in the music, a surface slowness is countered by an active,
    7.80
    5 votes
    11
    Anthony Johnson Showalter

    Anthony Johnson Showalter

    Anthony Johnson Showalter (May 1, 1858 – September 14, 1924) was an American gospel music composer, teacher and publisher. He was born in Cherry Grove, Virginia. Showalter was trained in the Ruebush-Kieffer School of Music and was teaching in singing schools by age fourteen. In 1884, he formed the Showalter Music Company of Dalton, Georgia. He was also an elder of the First Presbyterian Church in Dalton. Showalter's best known song is "Leaning on the Everlasting Arms", which was published in 1887. He wrote the music and chorus, and Elisha A. Hoffman wrote the verses. The song features prominently in the score of Night of the Hunter and forms about a quarter of the score of the 2010 film True Grit. Showalter authored several rudimentary books on music theory and a book on harmony and song composition. These were widely used in singing schools across the South. He died in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1924 and is buried at West Hill Cemetery in Dalton.
    8.75
    4 votes
    12
    Christian Sinding

    Christian Sinding

    • Works Composed: Frühlingsrauschen
    Christian August Sinding (11 January 1856 – 3 December 1941) was a Norwegian composer. He was born in Kongsberg as a son of mine superindendent Matthias Wilhelm Sinding (1811–1860) and Cecilie Marie Mejdell (1817–86). He was a brother of the painter Otto Sinding and the sculptor Stephan Sinding. He was a nephew of Nicolai Mejdell (1822–1899) and Thorvald Mejdell (1824–1908), and through the former a first cousin of Glør Thorvald Mejdell, who married Christian's sister Thora Cathrine Sinding. Christian Sinding was also a first cousin of Alfred Sinding-Larsen and the three siblings Ernst Anton Henrik Sinding, Elisabeth Sinding and Gustav Adolf Sinding. Through his brother Otto he was the uncle of painter Sigmund Sinding. In November 1898 he married actress Augusta Gade, née Smith-Petersen (1858–1936). She had been married to Fredrik Georg Gade for seventeen years, and was a daughter of Morten Smith-Petersen and maternal granddaughter of Jacob von der Lippe. He studied music first in Christiania before going to Germany, where he studied at the conservatory in Leipzig under Salomon Jadassohn and fell under the musical influences of Wagner and Liszt. He lived in Germany for much of his
    8.75
    4 votes
    13
    George Bridgetower

    George Bridgetower

    George Augustus Polgreen Bridgetower (11 October 1778–29 February 1860) was an Afro-Polish-born virtuoso violinist, who lived in England for much of his life. He was born in Biała in Galicia, where his father worked for Hieronim Wincenty Radziwiłł, in 1778. He was baptised Hieronimo Hyppolito de Augusto on 11 October 1778. His father, John Frederick Bridgetower, was probably a West Indian (possibly Barbadian) servant of the Hungarian Prince Esterházy (Joseph Haydn's patron), although he also claimed to be an African prince. His mother was from Schwabia, probably a domestic servant in the household of Sophie von Turn und Taxis. He exhibited considerable talent in his childhood, giving successful violin concerts in Paris, London, Bath and Bristol in 1789. In 1791, the British Prince Regent (later George IV) took an interest in him, and oversaw his continuing musical education. At the Prince's direction, he studied under François-Hippolyte Barthélémon (leader of the Royal Opera), with Croatian-Italian composer Giovanni Giornovichi (Ivan Jarnovic), and with Thomas Attwood (organist at St Paul's Cathedral and professor at the Royal Academy of Music). He performed in around 50 concerts
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Jim Brickman

    Jim Brickman

    Jim Brickman (born November 20, 1961) is an American songwriter and pianist. He has been named the most charted male Adult Contemporary artist to date, with six of his albums receiving Gold and Platinum status. He is known for his solo piano compositions, pop-style instrumentals, and vocal collaborations with artists such as Michael W. Smith, Martina McBride, Donny Osmond, Delta Goodrem, Misha Omar, Olivia Newton-John, Lady Antebellum, and others. He earned a Grammy nomination in 2003, SESAC "Songwriter of the Year" award, Canadian Country Music Award for "Best Vocal/ Instrumental Collaboration", and a Dove Award presented by the Gospel Music Association. His CD entitled Faith has been nominated for a 2010 Grammy Award for Best New Age Album. Since 1997, he has hosted his own radio show called Your Weekend with Jim Brickman, which is carried on radio stations throughout the United States. Brickman has also released three PBS specials, and hosts an annual fan cruise. He is founder of Brickhouse Direct, a company that provides strategic marketing and e-commerce solutions for clients in a variety of industries. Brickman was born and raised in Shaker Heights, Ohio and attended Shaker
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Francesco Corbetta

    Francesco Corbetta

    Francesco Corbetta (ca. 1615 – 1681, in French also Francisque Corbette) was an Italian guitar virtuoso, teacher and composer. He spent his early career in Italy. He seems to have worked as a teacher in Bologna where the guitarist and composer Giovanni Battista Granata may have been one of his pupils. He was then attached to the Court of Carlo II, Duke of Mantua in various capacities. He was however frequently granted leave of absence and travelled abroad to Spain where he amazed the Court in Madrid with his virtuosity; he may possibly also have traveled to Germany. He also visited the Spanish Netherlands, dedicating his fourth book, Varii scherzi di sonate to the governor, the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm. He was in Paris in the 1650s where he took part in a ballet by Jean-Baptiste Lully. He came to the attention of the English King Charles II in exile and at the Restoration accompanied him to London. During the last 20 years of his life he divided his time between London and Paris. He is regarded as one of the greatest virtuosos of the Baroque guitar. Five collections of music for the five-course guitar survive today. At least two others are lost. His first book includes mostly
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Anna Bartlett Warner

    Anna Bartlett Warner

    Anna Bartlett Warner (August 31, 1827 – January 22, 1915) was an American writer, the author of several books, and of poems set to music as hymns and religious songs for children. She was born on Long Island and died in Highland Falls, New York. The best known of the hymns is almost certainly "Jesus Loves Me, This I Know"; however some stanzas of this appear in modern hymnals rewritten by David Rutherford McGuire. She wrote some books jointly with her sister Susan Warner (Elizabeth Wetherell) which included Wych Hazel (1853), Mr. Rutherford's Children (1855) and The Hills of the Shatemuc (1856). She sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Amy Lothrop. She wrote thirty-one novels on her own, the most popular of which was Dollars and Cents (1852), Others were Gold of Chickaree, In West Point Colors (1904), Stories of Blackberry Hollow and Stories of Vinegar Hill (1872). She also wrote a biography of her sister Susan. Her former family home is now a museum on the grounds of The United States Military Academy, which was opposite the house during her lifetime and where her uncle had been chaplain from 1828-1838.
    7.20
    5 votes
    17
    Carl Georg Reutter

    Carl Georg Reutter

    Johann Adam Joseph Karl Georg Reutter (the Younger) (6 April 1708 – 11 March 1772) was an Austrian composer. According to Wyn Jones, in his prime he was "the single most influential musician in Vienna". Reutter was born and died in Vienna. His father Georg Reutter (the Elder) was also a notable composer. He was the 11th of 14 children and received his early musical training from his father, assisting him as court organist. A period of more formal instruction from Antonio Caldara ensued, leading to the composition of an oratorio in 1726 and, in 1727, his first opera for the imperial court, Archidamia. On three separate occasions during this period, Reutter applied for a position as court organist and was each time rejected by Johann Joseph Fux. At his own expense he travelled to Italy in 1730 (possibly in 1729); in February 1730 he was in Venice and in April 1730 in Rome. He returned to Vienna in autumn 1730, and early in the following year he successfully applied for a post as court composer, the formal beginning of a lifetime of service at the Habsburg court. After his father's death he became Kapellmeister of St. Stephen's Cathedral in 1738. The Kapellmeister position had existed
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Franz Wilhelm Abt

    Franz Wilhelm Abt

    Franz Wilhelm Abt (22 December 1819 – 31 March 1885) was a German composer and choral conductor. He composed roughly 3,000 individual works mostly in the area of vocal music. Several of his songs were at one time universally sung, and have obtained a more or less permanent place in the popular repertory. During his lifetime, Abt was a renowned choral conductor and he spent much of the last three decades of his life working as a guest conductor with choirs throughout Europe and in the United States. Abt was born at Eilenburg in Prussian Saxony, and showed musical talent at an early age. His father was a clergyman and a talented pianist, and it is he who gave Franz his earliest instruction in music. Like his father, Abt was interested in both music and theology, and he followed both pursuits at the Thomasschule Leipzig and the University of Leipzig with the ultimate intention of becoming a member of the clergy. While in school, Abt became friends with Albert Lortzing, Felix Mendelssohn, and Robert Schumann. Upon the death of his father in 1837, Abt abandoned his theological studies and decided to concentrate entirely on music. It is at this time that he began to compose and publish
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Chris Wood

    Chris Wood

    Christopher Gordon Blandford 'Chris' Wood (24 June 1944—12 July 1983) was a founding member of the English rock band Traffic, along with Steve Winwood, Jim Capaldi, and Dave Mason. Born in Harborne, Birmingham, Chris Wood had an interest in music and painting from early childhood. Self-taught on flute and saxophone, which he commenced playing at the age of fifteen, he began to play locally with other Birmingham musicians who would later find international fame in music; Christine Perfect (later Christine McVie), Carl Palmer, Stan Webb, and Mike Kellie. Wood played with Perfect in 1964 in the band Shades of Blue and with Kellie during 1965-1966 in the band Locomotive. He attended the Foley College of Further Education and College of Art in Stourbridge and subsequently was awarded a grant to attend the Royal Academy of Art. His younger sister Stephanie designed clothes for the Spencer Davis Group, based in Birmingham, and it was through her that Wood was first introduced to fellow Birmingham native Steve Winwood. In Traffic, Wood primarily played flute and saxophone, occasionally contributing keyboards and vocals. Wood also co-wrote several of Traffic's songs, particularly during the
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Tadeusz Baird

    Tadeusz Baird

    Tadeusz Baird (26 July 1928 – 2 September 1981) was a Polish composer. Baird was born in Grodzisk Mazowiecki, to Scottish immigrant parents. He studied composition, piano and musicology in Warsaw with, among others, Kazimierz Sikorski. In 1956, with Kazimierz Serocki, he founded the Warsaw Autumn international contemporary music festival. In 1974 he began to teach composition at the State College of Music (currently the Music Academy) in Warsaw. In 1977 as a full professor he was offered a teacher position of a composition class at the Warsaw Academy of Music, and also a membership of the Academie der Künste der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik – Berlin in 1979. He died in 1981, aged 53. He wrote both large scale symphonies and chamber music, however, of great importance in his output are numerous vocal cycles inspired by poetry. He wrote Tomorrow, a musical drama based on a short story by Joseph Conrad. He was also a composer of a film and theatre music. Baird's music is usually lyrical, very expressive, and intensely subjective. It is often rooted in the post-Romantic tradition, despite serial techniques. Baird's works have limited exposure on record, the principal recordings
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    José Antonio Labordeta

    José Antonio Labordeta

    José Antonio Labordeta Subías (Zaragoza, Spain, 10 March 1935 – Zaragoza, Spain, 19 September 2010), described by The Gran Enciclopedia Aragonesa 2000 (Great Aragonese Encyclopedia) as “The most important Aragonese singer-songwriter”, began singing in an attempt to give more relevance to his poetry. His songs are anthems, not only in Aragón, but all around Spain. Poetic songs like “Aragón”, “Canto a la Libertad” (Song for Freedom) or “Me dicen que no quieres” (They tell me you don’t want to) are known all around the Iberian Peninsula. He was also the founder of the Andalán newspaper, which was very influential during the 1970s. From 2000 until retiring in 2008, he represented Zaragoza in the Spanish Congress for Chunta Aragonesista (Aragonese Union), an Aragonese political party. José Antonio Labordeta was born in Zaragoza, Aragón, in 1935. In 1953, his father died. José Antonio went to live with his older brother Miguel, who was married and fourteen years his senior. In 1963, Labordeta married Juana de Grandes, and the newly wed couple moved to Teruel. Two of their daughters, Ana and Ángela, were born while the couple was living there.
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Bernhard Stavenhagen

    Bernhard Stavenhagen

    Bernhard Stavenhagen (24 November 1862 – 25 December 1914) was a German pianist, composer and conductor. His musical style was influenced by Franz Liszt, and as a conductor he was a strong advocate of new music. Born in Greiz, he commenced piano study in 1868. His family moved to Berlin in 1874 where he began studying with Theodor Kullak. He entered university there in 1878, privately studying composition with Friedrich Kiel. In 1885 Stavenhagen became a pupil of Franz Liszt in Weimar, travelling with him to Rome, Budapest, Paris, London and Bayreuth. After Liszt's death in 1886, Stavenhagen embarked on a ten-year series of piano concert tours in Europe and to North America. In April 1890 he was appointed court pianist to the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar and the following July he married Agnes Denninghof (better known as Agnes Denis-Stavenhagen, 1860-1945), a soprano with the Weimar Court Opera. In 1893 he composed his Third Piano Concerto in B minor. He fulfilled conducting appointments in Weimar, where he was appointed court Kapellmeister and conducted Weimar premieres of six new operas in eighteen months, and from 1898 a similar appointment in Munich. Then in 1907 he moved to
    9.33
    3 votes
    23
    Napoléon Coste

    Napoléon Coste

    Claude Antoine Jean Georges Napoléon Coste (June 27, 1805 – January 14, 1883) was a French guitarist and composer. Napoléon Coste was born in Amondans (Doubs), France, near Besançon. He was first taught the guitar by his mother, an accomplished player. As a teenager he became a teacher of the instrument and appeared in many concerts in the Franche-Comté. In 1829, at the age of 24, he moved to Paris where he studied under Fernando Sor and quickly established himself as the leading French virtuoso guitarist. However, the demand for guitarists was in decline and, though his brilliance provided financial stability, he failed to find a publisher for his music. As such, he had to fund its publication himself. Coste broke his arm in 1863 as a result of an accident, which brought his performing career to a premature end. He hired an assistant and continued to teach guitar and composition. After Sor's death, Coste edited and republished Sor's original method for guitar as "Méthode complète pour la Guitare par Ferdinand Sor, rédigée et augmentée [refingered and expanded] de nombreux exemples et leçons par N. Coste". Coste was a member of the masonic lodge Les Frères Unis
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Woldemar Bargiel

    Woldemar Bargiel

    Woldemar Bargiel (3 October 1828 – 23 February 1897) was a German composer of classical music. Bargiel was born in Berlin, and was the half brother of Clara Schumann. Bargiel’s father Adolph was a well-known piano and voice teacher while his mother Mariane had been unhappily married to Clara’s father, Friedrich Wieck. Clara was nine years older than Woldemar. Throughout their lives, they enjoyed a warm relationship. The initial opportunities which led to the success and recognition he enjoyed were due to Clara, who introduced him to both Robert Schumann and Felix Mendelssohn. Bargiel received his first lessons at home and later with the well-known Berlin teacher of music theory Siegfried Wilhelm Dehn. Upon the suggestion of Schumann and the recommendation of Mendelssohn, Bargiel at age 16 went to study at the famous Leipzig Conservatory with some of the leading men of music: Ignaz Moscheles (piano) and Niels Gade (composition), and also with Julius Rietz. After leaving Leipzig in 1850, he returned to Berlin where he tried to make ends meet by giving private lessons. Eventually, Clara and Robert were able to arrange for the publication of some of his early works, including his First
    6.00
    6 votes
    25
    František Škroup

    František Škroup

    • Works Composed: Kde domov můj?
    František Jan Škroup (3 June 1801, Osice near Hradec Králové – 7 February 1862, Rotterdam; Czech pronunciation: [ˈfraɲcɪʃɛk ˈjan ˈʃkroup]) was a Czech composer and conductor. His brother Jan Nepomuk Škroup was also a successful composer and his father, Dominik Škroup, and other brother Ignác Škroup were lesser known composers. At the age of eleven he moved to Prague where he supported himself as a choir boy and flautist. He continued his schooling at one of the most important Czech national revival movement centres, Hradec Králové, where he was a choirboy at the cathedral. While there he studied with the local choirmaster and composer Franz Volkert (1767–1831). He later moved back to Prague to study at the university. He became a fairly successful opera and singspiel composer producing more than a dozen stage works. Among Škroup's part time jobs was organist at the "Temple of the Israelite Society for Regulated Worship," known since the late nineteen-forties as the "Spanish synagogue." His last position was as the musical director of the German opera in Dutch Rotterdam. He died there and, as a person without means, was buried in a mass grave. He also produced an oratorio, a mass,
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    Bill Hopkins

    Bill Hopkins

    G.W. (Bill) Hopkins (5 June 1943 – 10 March 1981) was a British composer, pianist and music critic. Hopkins was born in Prestbury, Cheshire and educated at Rossall School, Lancashire; his mother's learning difficulties meant she was unable to look after him, and he was raised by aunts. An encounter with Luigi Nono at Dartington consolidated his interest in serialism; subsequently he studied at Oxford University with Edmund Rubbra and Egon Wellesz. In 1964 he went to Paris, ostensibly to study with Olivier Messiaen but with the prime objective of meeting and studying with Jean Barraqué. Returning to England, he supported himself as a music critic in London and then, after moving first to Tintagel, Cornwall and subsequently to Peel, Isle of Man, by translation and writing music criticism. He married Clare Gilbert in 1972. Subsequently he taught at Birmingham University and University of Newcastle upon Tyne before succumbing to a heart attack, in Chopwell, near Newcastle, at the age of 37. He was upset at an under-rehearsed first performance of 'En Attendant' in 1977 and this possibly discouraged him from composition for a while. He was working on an opera project, tentatively called
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    David First

    David First

    David First (born August 20, 1953) is an American composer. His music most often deals with drones and interference beats, the latter aligning his music with that of Alvin Lucier. He usually plays computer or guitar and has led the World Casio Quartet, Joy Buzzers and The Notekillers which originally existed from 1977–81 and reformed in 2004. He is also a member of Matter Waves, which includes Kid Millions on drums and Bernard Gann on bass, and the music collective New Party Systems. His albums include 1991's Resolver, instrumental pieces influenced by minimalism and 2002's relatively pop-oriented Universary, which consists of "songs and drones". More recent releases include 2010's We're Here to Help (Prophase Records) by The Notekillers and Privacy Issues, a 3-CD set of droneworks on the XI label. In 1995 First, along with visual artist Patricia Smith created an opera, The Manhattan Book of the Dead, which was presented at La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club's Annex Theater in 1995 and The Washaus in Potsdam, Germany in 1996. In 2001 he was awarded a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists Award. In January 2012, the music collective, New Party Systems, an
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    George Onslow

    George Onslow

    André George Louis Onslow (27 July 1784 – 3 October 1853) was an Anglo-French composer. He was widely recognised as a gifted composer during his lifetime but is virtually forgotten today. George Onslow was born in Clermont-Ferrand, the son of an English father, Edward Onslow, and a French mother; his paternal grandfather was George Onslow, 1st Earl of Onslow. As a young man he lived in London, where he studied piano with Johann Baptist Cramer and also studied composition with Dussek. His principal composition teacher was Anton Reicha with whom he studied in Paris between 1807–1808; later he spent two years studying in Vienna and was again a student of Reicha in the 1820s, when he wished to broaden his technique to write opera. He died in Clermont-Ferrand. His 36 string quartets and 34 string quintets were, during his own lifetime and up to the end of the 19th century, held in the highest regard, particularly in Germany, Austria and England, where he was regularly placed in the front rank of composers. His work was admired by both Beethoven and Schubert, the latter modelling his own 2-cello quintet (D.956) on those of Onslow and not, as is so often claimed, on those of Boccherini.
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Anton Karas

    Anton Karas

    Anton Karas (July 7, 1906 – January 10, 1985) was a Viennese zither player, best known for his soundtrack to Carol Reed's The Third Man. Born in Vienna, of Hungarian and Czech origin, one of five children of a factory worker, Anton Karas was already keen on music as a child. He desired to become a band leader, which due to the family's financial situation was impossible. However, he was allowed to learn to play an instrument, as were his two brothers and two sisters. He later reported that his first zither was one he found in his grandmother's attic, at the age of 12. As ordered by his father, he started an apprenticeship as a tool and die maker at the age of 14, while also taking music evening courses at a private institution. He successfully finished his apprenticeship in 1924 and worked in a car factory until being unemployed in January 1925. As he had already begun to study at the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna in 1924, he subsequently earned his living as an entertainer in a Heuriger (a wine bar, typically with a garden, usually selling the year's new wine) and soon found himself earning more income than his father. He continued his studies until 1928. In
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Guiraut Riquier

    Guiraut Riquier

    Guiraut Riquier (c. 1230–1292) is among the last of the Occitan troubadours. He is well known because of his great care in writing out his works and keeping them together—the New Grove Encyclopedia considers him an "anthologist" of his own works. He served under Aimery IV, Viscount of Narbonne, as well as Alfonso el Sabio, King of Castile. He is also believed to have worked under Henry II, Count of Rodez. He composed a partimen with the Jewish troubadour Bonfilh.
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Johann Kirnberger

    Johann Kirnberger

    Johann Philipp Kirnberger (also Kernberg, 24 April 1721, Saalfeld - 27 July 1783, Berlin) was a musician, composer (primarily of fugues), and music theorist. A pupil of Johann Sebastian Bach, he became a violinist at the court of Frederick II of Prussia in 1751. He was the music director to the Prussian Princess Anna Amalia from 1758 until his death. Kirnberger greatly admired J.S. Bach, and sought to secure the publication of all of Bach's chorale settings, which finally appeared after Kirnberger's death; see Kirnberger chorale preludes (BWV 690–713). Many of Bach's manuscripts have been preserved in Kirnberger's library (the "Kirnberger collection"). He is known today primarily for his theoretical work Die Kunst des reinen Satzes in der Musik (The Art of Strict Composition in Music, 1774, 1779). The well-tempered tuning systems known as "Kirnberger II" and "Kirnberger III" are associated with his name (see Kirnberger temperament), as is a rational version of equal temperament (see schisma). More information, including full text, of Kirnberger's Grundsätze des Generalbasses (178?) in the University of North Texas Music Library Virtual Rare Book Room
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Nikolaos Mantzaros

    Nikolaos Mantzaros

    • Works Composed: Hymn to Liberty
    Nikolaos Halikiopoulos Mantzaros (Greek: Νικόλαος Χαλικιόπουλος Μάντζαρος or Italian: Niccoló Calichiopoulo Manzaro, 26 October 1795 - 12 April 1872) was a Greek composer born in Corfu and the major representative of the so called Ionian School of music (Επτανησιακή Σχολή). He was of mixed Greek and Italian noble descent, coming from one of the most important and wealthy families of the "Libro d'Oro" di Corfu and therefore he never considered himself a "professional composer". Recent research and performances have led to a re-evaluation of Mantzaros as a significant composer and music theorist He was taught music in his native city by the brothers Stefano (pianoforte) and Gerolamo Pojago (violin), Stefano Moretti from Ancona (music theory) and cavalliere Barbati, possibly a Neapolitan (music theory and composition). Mantzaros presented his first compositions (three concert or substitute arias and the one-act azione comica Don Crepuscolo) in 1815 in the theatre of San Giacomo of Corfu. More works of this genre were to follow until 1827. From 1819 onwards he was regularly visiting Italy (Venice, Bologna, Milan, Naples), where, among others, he met the veteran Neapolitan composer
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Shelly Palmer

    Shelly Palmer

    • Works Composed: The Palmer News Package
    Shelton Leigh “Shelly” Palmer is an advertising, marketing and technology consultant and business adviser who is well known as a composer/producer/writer/director. He hosts Fox Television’s Shelly Palmer Digital Living, Comcast/NBC Universal’s Live Digital with Shelly Palmer, United Stations Radio Network’s MediaBytes and Mevio.com’s Shelly Palmer Digital Living Daily. At the age of 12, encouraged by his father’s clients and colleagues, Shelton Leigh Palmer (known to his friends as “Shelly”) started his career as a professional musician. He began by working as a sideman (Saxophone, Clarinet & Flute) for various society orchestras around the New York metropolitan area. Palmer’s lifelong quest to combine art and technology began after being introduced to Robert Moog and Mr. Moog’s Electronic Music Synthesizer at a meeting of the National Association of Music Merchants show in Chicago. By the time he was a teenager, Palmer had taught himself enough electronics to build several computer-controlled musical instruments of his own, converting his parents’ music room and den into an 8-track recording studio in the process. After graduating from New York University’s Tisch School of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Hans Helfritz

    Hans Helfritz

    Hans Helfritz (25 July 1902, Chemnitz – 21 October 1995, Duisburg) was a German composer and photographer. Through pressure from his parents, Helfritz originally began an apprenticeship as a banker, a career path which he then soon after gave up in order to start studying music and composition in Berlin and Vienna. Inspired by his teacher Erich von Hornbostel in 1930 he travelled to Egypt, Palestine, Syria and Iraq to collect samples of folk music, in order to research and develop understanding of musical ethnology. In 1935 he continued his travels to India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, the Republic of China and Singapore. Helfritz also made films about Yemen and Mexico as an assignment for Ufa. In these films he knowingly upheld the right-wing line of Joseph Goebbels, presenting foreign ethnicities as culturally unimportant. In 1939 Helfritz fled Germany because of his homosexuality and political beliefs which meant he was labelled an enemy of the Nazi state. He fled first to Brazil and Bolivia, before settling in Chile. He continued to work, taking part in the Chilean Antarctic Expedition as the official photographer. At the end of the 1940s he received Chilean citizenship. Throughout
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Larry Polansky

    Larry Polansky

    Larry Polansky (born 1954) is a composer, guitarist, mandolinist, and a professor at Dartmouth College. He is a founding member and co-director of Frog Peak Music (a composers' collective). He co-wrote HMSL (Hierarchical Music Specification Language) with Phil Burk and David Rosenboom. There are several recordings of his work, including an album of mensuration canons, Four-Voice Canons. He also served as co-producer of 'Asmat Dream: New Music Indonesia, Vol. I of three with his wife, composer Jody Diamond. He is the brother of novelist Steven Polansky. His notable students include Jin Hi Kim.
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

    Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

    • Works Composed: The Song of Hiawatha
    Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (15 August 1875 – 1 September 1912) was an English composer who achieved such success that he was once called the "African Mahler". Coleridge-Taylor was born in 1875 in Holborn, London, to Alice Hare Martin, an English woman, and Dr Daniel Peter Hughes Taylor, a Sierra Leonean Creole. They were not married. He was named Samuel Coleridge Taylor. His surname was Taylor, and his middle name of Coleridge was after the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. His family called him Coleridge Taylor. He later affected the name Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, allegedly following a printer’s typographical error. Daniel Taylor returned to Africa by February 1875 and did not know that he had a son in London. He was appointed coroner for the British Empire in The Gambia in the late 1890s. Coleridge-Taylor was brought up in Croydon by Martin and her father Benjamin Holmans. Martin's brother was a professional musician. Taylor studied the violin at the Royal College of Music and composition under Charles Villiers Stanford (who would conduct the first performance of his Hiawatha's Wedding Feast in 1898.) He also taught, he was appointed a professor at the Crystal Palace School of Music, and
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Ferenc Erkel

    Ferenc Erkel

    • Works Composed: Himnusz
    Ferenc Erkel (Hungarian: Erkel Ferenc(z) Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈfɛrɛnts ˈɛrkɛl], German: Franz Erkel; November 7, 1810 – June 15, 1893) was a Hungarian composer, conductor and pianist. He was the father of Hungarian grand opera, written mainly on historical themes, which are still often performed in Hungary. He also composed the music of "Himnusz", the national anthem of Hungary, which was adopted in 1844. He died in Budapest. Erkel was born in Gyula, a son of Joseph Erkel who was a musician. His mother was the Hungarian Klára Ruttkay. The libretti of his first four operas were written by Béni Egressy. Beside his operas, for which he is best known, he wrote pieces for piano and chorus, and a majestic Festival Overture. He acquainted Hector Berlioz with the tune of the Rákóczi March, which Berlioz used in The Damnation of Faust. He headed the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra (founded in 1853). He was also the director and piano teacher of the Hungarian Academy of Music until 1886. The Hungarian State Opera House in Budapest was opened in 1884, of which he was the musical director. In 1839, he married Adél Adler, and they had four sons - Gyula (July 4, 1842, Pest – March 22, 1909,
    5.67
    6 votes
    38
    Johan Svendsen

    Johan Svendsen

    Johan Severin Svendsen (30 September 1840 – 14 June 1911) was a Norwegian composer, conductor and violinist. Born in Christiania (now Oslo), Norway, he lived most his life in Copenhagen, Denmark. Svendsen's output includes two symphonies, a violin concerto, and the Romance for violin, as well as a number of Norwegian Rhapsodies for orchestra. At one time Svendsen was an intimate friend of the German composer Richard Wagner. His father was a music teacher and Svendsen learned both the violin and clarinet from him. By the time he finished school, he was working as an orchestral musician, and occasionally made short concert tours as a violinist. In Lübeck, on one of his tours, he came to the attention of a wealthy merchant who made it possible for him to study from 1863-67 at the Leipzig Conservatory. He began his studies with Ferdinand David, but problems with his hand forced him to switch to composition, which he studied with Carl Reinecke. He completed his studies in Leipzig in 1867, receiving first prize in composition. During this period, Svendsen had a son out of wedlock, Johann Richard Rudolph (1867–1933). Gradually his attention turned to conducting. After spending time in
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    John Stafford Smith

    John Stafford Smith

    • Works Composed: The Star-Spangled Banner
    John Stafford Smith (30 March 1750 – 21 September 1836) was a British composer, church organist, and early musicologist. He was one of the first serious collectors of manuscripts of works by Johann Sebastian Bach. Stafford Smith is best known for writing the music for "The Anacreontic Song", which became the tune for the American patriotic song The Star-Spangled Banner following the War of 1812, and in 1931 was adopted as the national anthem of the United States of America. John Stafford Smith was baptised in Gloucester Cathedral, England on 30 March 1750, the son of Martin Smith, organist of Gloucester Cathedral from 1743-1782. He attended the Gloucester cathedral school where he became a boy-singer. He furthered his career as a choir boy at the Chapel Royal, London and also studied under the famous Dr. William Boyce. By the 1770s he had gained a reputation as a composer and organist. He was elected as a member of the select Anacreontic Society which boasted amongst its membership such persons as Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Sir Joshua Reynolds and Henry Purcell. In the 1770s, Smith composed music for the society's constitutional song entitled "To Anacreon in Heaven" (The
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Frederik Magle

    Frederik Magle

    Frederik Magle (born 17 April 1977) is a Danish composer, concert organist, and pianist. He writes contemporary classical music as well as fusion of classical music and other genres. His compositions include orchestral works, cantatas, chamber music, and solo works (mainly for organ), including several compositions commissioned by the Danish Royal Family. Frederik Magle was born in Stubbekøbing, the son of actress and writer Mimi Heinrich and organist, painter and sculptor Christian Reesen Magle (1925–96). He is the great-nephew of the composer Emil Reesen (his grandmother's brother). Recognized early as a child prodigy, he appeared on television and in the news media at the age of 9. He has gained a reputation as an organ virtuoso. Magle was educated as a private student of Leif Thybo (composition and music theory), and Ib Bindel (organ). He was taught piano, score reading, and music theory from the age of six. At the age of 16, he was admitted to the Royal Danish Academy of Music, where he was taught music theory by Yngve Jan Trede, but after one and a half years he decided to leave the music academy, explaining that he "could not both study at the conservatory and work
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Henry Bishop

    Henry Bishop

    • Works Composed: Home! Sweet Home!
    Sir Henry Rowley Bishop (18 November 1786 – 30 April 1855) was an English composer. He is most famous for the songs "Home! Sweet Home!" and "Lo, Hear the Gentle Lark". He was the composer or arranger of some 120 dramatic works, including 80 operas, light operas, cantatas, and ballets. Knighted in 1842, he was the first musician to be so honoured. Bishop worked for all the major theatres of London in his era — including the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, Vauxhall Gardens and the Haymarket Theatre, and was Professor of Music at Oxford University. His second wife was the noted soprano Anna Bishop, who scandalised British society by leaving him and conducting an open liaison with the harpist Nicolas-Charles Bochsa until the latter's death in Sydney. Bishop was born in London, where his father was a watchmaker and haberdasher. At the age of 13, Bishop left full-time education and worked as a music-publisher with his cousin. After training as a jockey at Newmarket, he took some lessons in harmony from Francisco Bianchi in London. In 1804 he wrote the music to a piece called "Angelina", which was performed at Margate. Bishop's "operas" were written in a
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Sylvano Bussotti

    Sylvano Bussotti

    Sylvano Bussotti (born 1 October 1931) is an Italian composer of contemporary music whose work is unusually notated and often creates special problems of interpretation. Born in Florence, Bussotti learned to play the violin as a child, becoming a prodigy. Later he studied at the Florence Conservatory (where he developed an opposition to modernism), with Luigi Dallapiccola and with Max Deutsch in Paris. As a composer he was influenced by the twelve-tone music of Webern and later John Cage. Examples of his use of graphic notation in his pieces, often reflecting his personal life, include Lorenzaccio and La passion selon Sade. He pursues other disciplines including painting, graphic art, and journalism. Bussotti is also a well-known film director, actor, and singer. His uncle Tono Zancanaro and his older brother Renzo Bussotti strongly influenced his style in painting. He has written most of the librettos of his Operas. As a writer, his style is considered one of the most refined among the Italian poets and novelists of 20th century. French culture has fascinated him since he was a boy. His great friend Cathy Berberian (Luciano Berio's wife) was one of his most famous interpreters. He
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Carlisle Floyd

    Carlisle Floyd

    • Works Composed: Of Mice and Men
    Carlisle Floyd (born June 11, 1926, in Latta, South Carolina) is an American opera composer. The son of a Methodist minister, he based many of his works on themes from the South. His best known opera, Susannah (1955), is based on a story from the Apocrypha, transferred to contemporary, rural Tennessee, and is set in a Southern dialect. In 1943, Floyd entered Converse College, in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and studied piano under Ernst Bacon. When Bacon accepted a position at Syracuse University, in New York, Floyd followed him there, where he received a Bachelor of Music in 1946. The following year, Floyd became part of the piano faculty at Florida State University, in Tallahassee. He was to remain there for thirty years, eventually becoming Professor of Composition. He received a master's degree at Syracuse, in 1949. While at Florida State, Floyd gradually became interested in composition. His first opera was Slow Dusk, to his own libretto (as was to remain his custom), and was produced at Syracuse in 1949. His next opera, The Fugitives, was seen at Tallahassee in 1951, but was then withdrawn. His third opera was to be Floyd's greatest success: Susannah. It was first heard at
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Sándor Veress

    Sándor Veress

    Sándor Veress ((1907-02-01)February 1, 1907 - March 4, 1992(1992-03-04)) was a Swiss composer of Hungarian origin. He was born in Kolozsvár/Klausenburg, then Austria-Hungary, later Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and died in Bern. The first half of his life was spent in Hungary; the second, from 1949 until his death, in Switzerland, of which he became a citizen in the last months of his life. Veress studied and later taught at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest. Among his teachers were Zoltán Kodály, with whom he studied composition, and Béla Bartók, with whom he studied piano; as an assistant to László Lajthaat he did field research on Hungarian, Transylvanian, and Moldovan folk music. Among the composers who studied under him are György Ligeti, György Kurtág, Heinz Holliger, Heinz Marti, Jürg Wyttenbach and Roland Moser. He wrote numerous chamber music pieces and symphonic works. He wrote one opera, Hangyegyek lázadása (1931). Veress was awarded the Kossuth Prize in 1949 in Hungary (though as an émigré he was unable to collect this award) and the Bartók-Pásztory Prize in 1985; in Switzerland he received the Berne canton prize in 1976.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Johann Crüger

    Johann Crüger

    Johann Crüger (9 April 1598 – 23 February 1662) was a German composer of well-known hymns. Crüger was born in Groß Breesen (now part of Guben) as the son of an innkeeper. He studied at the Lateinschule in Guben until 1613, after which he traveled to Sorau and Breslau and finally to Regensburg, where he received his first musical training from Paulus Homberger. In 1615 he traveled to Berlin, where he studied theology at the Berlinisches Gymnasium zum Grauen Kloster. From 1620 he studied theology at the University of Wittenberg and trained himself further in music through private study. From 1622 to his death, a period of 40 years, he was simultaneously a teacher at the gymnasium Zum Grauen Kloster and cantor of the Nikolaikirche in Berlin. Crüger composed numerous concert works and wrote extensively on music education. In 1643 he became acquainted with the famous hymn writer Paul Gerhardt, for whom he wrote the music for various hymns. In 1647 he edited the most important German Lutheran hymnal of the 17th century, Praxis pietatis melica. He died in Berlin.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Michael Arne

    Michael Arne

    Michael Arne (1740 or 1741 – 14 January 1786) was an English composer, harpsichordist, organist, singer, and actor. He was the son of composer Thomas Arne and lauded soprano Cecilia Young, the latter of which belonged to the famous Young family of musicians of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Like his father, Arne worked primarily as a composer of stage music and vocal art song, contributing little to other genres of music. He wrote several songs for London's pleasure gardens, the most famous of which is Lass with the Delicate Air (1762). A moderately prolific composer, Arne wrote nine operas and collaborated on at least 15 others. His most successful opera, Cymon (1767), enjoyed several revivals during his lifetime and into the early nineteenth century. Michael Arne was born in either late 1740 or early 1741 in the Covent Garden area of London. Music historian Charles Burney, a close friend of the Arne family, indicates that he was Thomas Arne's natural son but there is some speculation among modern scholars that he may have been adopted. There is no record for Michael Arne at St Paul's, Covent Garden, where most of the Arne family were christened. His father, Thomas
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Carl Friedrich Zelter

    Carl Friedrich Zelter

    Carl Friedrich Zelter (11 December 1758  – 15 May 1832) was a German composer, conductor and teacher of music. Zelter was born and died in Berlin. He became friendly with Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and his works include settings of Goethe's poems. During his career, he composed about two hundred lieder, as well as cantatas, a viola concerto (performed as early as 1779) and piano music. Amongst Zelter's pupils (at different times) were Felix Mendelssohn, Fanny Mendelssohn Giacomo Meyerbeer, Otto Nicolai and Heinrich Dorn. Felix Mendelssohn was perhaps Zelter's favorite pupil and Zelter wrote to Goethe boasting of the 12-year old's abilities. Zelter communicated his strong love of the music of J. S. Bach to Mendelssohn, one consequence of which was Mendelssohn's 1829 revival of Bach's St. Matthew Passion at the Singakademie under Zelter's auspices. This epochal event sparked a general re-evaluation and revival of Bach's works, which were then largely forgotten and regarded as old-fashioned and beyond resuscitation. Mendelssohn had hoped to succeed Zelter on the latter's death as leader of the Singakademie, but the post went instead to Carl Friedrich Rungenhagen. Zelter was married
    6.20
    5 votes
    48
    Arjen Anthony Lucassen

    Arjen Anthony Lucassen

    • Works Composed: Beneath the Waves
    Arjen Anthony Lucassen (born 3 April 1960, Hilversum) is a progressive metal/rock songwriter, singer, multi-instrumentalist musician and record producer from the Netherlands, best known for his long-running progressive opera project titled Ayreon. Lucassen started his career in 1980 as the guitarist and backing vocalist of Dutch band Bodine as Iron Anthony, before joining Vengeance in 1984. After eight years he left the band, wanting to go into a more progressive direction, and released two years later an unsuccessful solo album entitled Pools of Sorrow, Waves of Joy under the nickname Anthony. In 1995, Lucassen released an album uncredited to any artist called Ayreon: The Final Experiment, in which he sang, wrote every song and played most of the instruments. The album conducted to the creation of successful progressive rock/metal project Ayreon, which established Lucassen as a notable composer of rock operas. Following Ayreon's success, Lucassen as been involved in many other projects: He is the creator and current guitarist/keyboardist of Star One, Guilt Machine, the currently inactive band Ambeon, and the creator and former guitarist of Stream of Passion. He composes and
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Diane Arkenstone

    Diane Arkenstone

    Diane Arkenstone is a New Age musician. Arkenstone wrote her first song at the age of three and started playing guitar at the age of seven. She is trained as an opera singer. In her early career she co-formed with a friend named Melanie the duo Enaid & Einalem. Arkenstone's album Jewel in the Sun debuted at number 16 on Billboard's New Age charts when it was released in 2002, highest position was number 11. In 2005, The Best of Diane Arkenstone was ranked #1 on Zone Music Reporter's Top 100 Airplay Chart, out of 2800 recordings reported that year. In her career, she has done work on more than 45 albums and played various instruments such as guitar, keyboard, wood flutes, dulcimer, and percussion. Arkenstone, together with her ex-husband David Arkenstone, created their own record label called Neo Pacifica Recordings. In addition to releasing their own music on the label, they have included other bands such as Earth Trybe, Enaid, and the Marquis Ensemble. She was previously married to musician David Arkenstone. She has also worked with David Arkenstone on the albums Music Inspired by Middle Earth, The Celtic Book of Days and the album Trance World from Earth Trybe. With Misha Segal
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Jonathan Powell

    Jonathan Powell

    Jonathan Powell (born 1969) is a British pianist and self taught composer. He was a student of Denis Matthews and Sulamita Aronovsky. He made his performing debut at the age of 20 in the Purcell Room in London. His repertoire is broad and ranges from Bach to many contemporary works (he is associated with composers as varied as Michael Finnissy, John White, Ambrosini, Staud and Sirodeau). He specialises in the late Romantic era, and made his first acquaintance with Sorabji's music, with which he has since become strongly associated, in 1984 through the radio broadcasts of Yonty Solomon and through the scores that were then still published and available through Curwen. He was encouraged to contact the composer, and obtained copies of several later works which he premiered starting in 1990, and has been recording and performing regularly. He has played Sorabji's complete Opus clavicembalisticum (1929–30) at several concerts and both performed and premiered other works by Sorabji, including the substantial Fourth Piano Sonata (1928–29) and the 7-hour Sequentia cyclica super "Dies irae" ex Missa pro defunctis (1948–49). He has also recorded CDs, of Sorabji's music and of others', for
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Amy Denio

    Amy Denio

    Amy Denio (born June 9, 1961) is a Seattle (USA)-based multi-instrumental composer of soundtracks for modern dance, film and theater, as well as a songwriter and music improviser. Often called an unclassifiable avant-garde jazz musician, she is also deeply inspired by world music. She is probably best known as a vocalist, accordionist and saxophone-player. Among her current musical involvements are The Tiptons Sax Quartet (formerly The Billy Tipton Memorial Saxophone Quartet) and Die Resonanz Stanonczi, a radical folk group based in Salzburg, Austria. She has also collaborated repeatedly with the Pat Graney Dance Company, David Dorfman Dance Company, Victoria Marks, and with many other choreographers. Her first recording was No Bones released as a cassette on her record label Spoot Music in 1986. Her first LP was with the Entropics. She founded Tiptons in 1987, and also started Tone Dogs with bassist Fred Chalenor. Tone Dogs' first release Ankety Low Day was nominated to be nominated (sic) for a Grammy Award. She has performed and recorded with (among others) Matt Cameron, KMFDM, Curlew, Fred Frith, Pointless Orchestra, Francisco López, Danny Barnes, Pale Nudes, Blowhole, the
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Arthur De Greef

    Arthur De Greef

    Arthur De Greef (10 October 1862 – 29 August 1940) was a Belgian pianist and composer. Born in Louvain, he won first prize in a local music composition when he was only 11, and subsequently enrolled at the Brussels Conservatoire. His main teacher there was Louis Brassin, a former pupil of Ignaz Moscheles, although he also took lessons from other staffers at the institution, including Joseph Dupont, François-Auguste Gevaert and Fernand Kufferath. After graduating with high distinction from the Conservatoire at the age of 17, De Greef went to Weimar to complete his studies under Franz Liszt. He was a Liszt pupil for two years. Following the Weimar sojourn, De Greef embarked on a successful career as a concert pianist, travelling widely. He was a friend of Edvard Grieg, whose Piano Concerto he had played publicly in 1898, and who called him "the best performer of my music I have met with". In addition, he enjoyed the endorsement of Camille Saint-Saëns. British critic Jonathan Woolf has written: "De Greef was, in all respects, an intensely musical, non-sensationalist, eloquent and impressive musician and whilst not being averse to some of the interventionist tactics of his
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Eugène Gigout

    Eugène Gigout

    Eugène Gigout (23 March 1844 – 9 December 1925) was a French organist and a composer, mostly of music for his own instrument. Gigout was born in Nancy, and died in Paris. A pupil of Camille Saint-Saëns, he served as the organist of the French capital's Saint-Augustin Church for 62 years. He became widely known as a teacher and his output as a composer was considerable. Renowned as an expert improviser, he also founded his own music school. His nephew by marriage was Léon Boëllmann, another distinguished French composer and organist. The 10 pièces pour orgue (composed 1890) include the Toccata in B minor, Gigout's best-known creation, which turns up as a frequent encore at organ recitals. Also fairly often played, and to be found in the same collection, is a Scherzo in E major. Other notable pieces by Gigout are Grand chœur dialogué and Marche religieuse. Gigout's works are now available on several commercial recordings. His pupils included the aforementioned Boëllmann, André Fleury, Henri Gagnon, André Marchal, André Messager, and Albert Roussel.
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Francesco Antonio Bonporti

    Francesco Antonio Bonporti

    Francesco Antonio Bonporti (11 June 1672 – 19 December 1749) was an Italian priest and amateur composer. He was born in Trento. In 1691, he was admitted to the Collegium Germanicum in Rome, where he studied theology. There, he also studied composition under the guidance of Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni and, although it is not confirmed, violin with Arcangelo Corelli. Back in his native Trento, he was ordained a priest in 1695. In 1740 he moved to Padua, where he lived until his death. He influenced Johann Sebastian Bach in the development of the invention, and in fact several of his works were mistakenly included in a set of Bach's inventions. In reality, Bach had transcribed for harpsichord four violin pieces from Bonporti's op. X (1712). Bonporti's musical work consists of twelve opera, published between 1696 and 1736. He died in Padua in 1749. This is a listing of his twelve opera, first the Italian original generally by Giuseppe Sala in Venice, then the French edition as published by Estienne Roger in Amsterdam and finally the English edition by John Walsh in London. Notice not every opus seem to have survived in all languages. As listed in an article published by Studi Trentini in
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Michel Corrette

    Michel Corrette

    Michel Corrette (10 April 1707 – 21 January 1795) was a French organist, composer and author of musical method books. Corrette was born in Rouen, Normandy. His father, Gaspard Corrette, was an organist and composer. Corrette served as organist at the Jesuit College in Paris from about 1737 to 1780. It is also known that he traveled to England before 1773. In 1780 he was appointed organist to the Duke of Angoulême and some 15 years later died in Paris at the age of 87. Corrette was prolific. He composed ballets and divertissements for the stage, including Arlequin, Armide, Le Jugement de Midas, Les Âges, Nina, and Persée. He composed many concertos, notably 25 concertos comiques. Aside from these works and organ concertos, he also composed sonatas, songs, instrumental chamber works, harpsichord pieces, cantatas, and other sacred vocal works. Aside from playing the organ and composing music, Corrette organized concerts and taught music. He wrote nearly twenty music method books for various instruments—the violin, cello, bass, flute, recorder, bassoon, harpsichord, harp, mandolin, voice and more—with titles such as l'Art de se perfectionner sur le violon (The Art of Playing the Violin
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel

    Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel

    Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel (13 January 1690 in Grünstädtel – 27 November 1749 in Gotha) was a prolific German composer. Stölzel grew up in Schwarzenberg, Saxony in the Erzgebirge. From 1707 he was a student of theology in Leipzig, and of Melchior Hofmann, the musical director of the Neukirche. He studied, worked and composed in Breslau and Halle. Then an eighteen-month sojourn in Italy from 1713 — where he met Antonio Vivaldi in Venice — rendered him au courant with the latest musical taste. After working for three years in Prague, he became briefly court Kapellmeister in Bayreuth and Gera. Then in 1719 he married, and the next year took up an appointment in Gotha, where he worked until his death for the dukes Frederick II and Frederick III of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, composing a cantata each week. From 1730 the Kapellmeister of the court at Gotha also wrote for Sondershausen. Stölzel supplied numerous festive occasional pieces and arias for court performance; the archive at Schloss Sondershausen retains many of his manuscripts, found in a box behind the organ in 1870. Half of Stölzel's output, never engraved, is lost. Stölzel's immediate successor at the court in Gotha, Georg Benda,
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Déodat de Séverac

    Déodat de Séverac

    Déodat de Séverac (pronounced: [deoda də sevəʁak]) (Saint-Félix-de-Caraman, Haute-Garonne, July 20, 1872 – Céret, Pyrénées-Orientales, Roussillon, March 24, 1921) was a French composer. Of aristocratic background, Déodat de Séverac was profoundly influenced by the musical tradition of his native Languedoc. He is noted for his vocal and choral music, which include settings of verse in Provençal (the historic language of Languedoc) and Catalan (the historic language of Roussillon) as well as French poems by Verlaine and Baudelaire. His compositions for solo piano have also won critical acclaim, and many of them were titled as pictorial evocations and published in the collections Chant de la terre, En Languedoc, and En vacances. A popular example of his work is The Old Musical Box in B-flat major, but his masterpiece is the suite Cerdaña (written 1904—1911), filled with the local color of Languedoc. His motet Tantum ergo is also still sung on occasion. He left his native Toulouse to study in Paris, under Vincent d'Indy and Albéric Magnard at the Schola Cantorum, an alternative to the training offered by the Paris Conservatoire. He worked as an assistant to Isaac Albéniz and returned
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Edward Vesala

    Edward Vesala

    Edward Vesala (15 February 1945 – 4 December 1999), born Martti Vesala, was a Finnish avant-garde jazz composer, bandleader and drummer. Born in Mäntyharju, he began as a drummer playing jazz and rock in the 1960s, among all in such bands as the early line-up of Blues Section and Apollo. In the 1970s, he led his own jazz groups, led a quartet with Polish trumpet player Tomasz Stańko, played with Toto Blanke's Electric Circus, and recorded with Norwegian saxophonist Jan Garbarek. In the 1980s and 1990s, Vesala recorded several albums of his own compositions exhibiting a unique style that combines jazz, classical music, tango, and folk music with his own group Sound and Fury, which was an ensemble of about ten players made up mostly of Vesala's students. Prominent players in Sound and Fury included saxophonists Jorma Tapio and Pepa Päivinen, guitarists Raoul Björkenheim and Jimi Sumen, and harpist and keyboardist Iro Haarla who was Vesala's wife. Vesala died from congestive heart failure in Yläne, Finland at the age of 54. With Tomasz Stańko With Kenny Wheeler
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    John Wall Callcott

    John Wall Callcott

    John Wall Callcott (20 November 1766 – 15 May 1821) was an eminent English musical composer. Callcott was born in Kensington, London. He was a pupil of Haydn, and is celebrated mainly for his glee compositions and "catches". In the best known of his catches he ridiculed Sir John Hawkins' History of Music. Although ill-health prevented Callcott from completing his Musical Dictionary, His Musical Grammar(1806) remained in use throughout the 19th Century. His glees number at least 100, of which 8 won prizes. Callcott set lyrics by leading poets of his day, including Thomas Gray, Sir Walter Scott, Thomas Chatterton, Robert Southey and Ossian. They include (selective list): A number of his glees specify two Soprano or Treble (boy soprano) voices, the second of which has a range appropriate to a female mezzo-soprano or contralto (but would have been thought too high for a counter-tenor of this period). Callcott also composed solo songs and religious music including psalms and sacred canons. Callcott's daughter Elizabeth married William Horsley who, in 1824, published A collection of Glees Canons and Catches, an edition of his father-in-law's works together with a Memoir of Dr Callcott.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Knut Nystedt

    Knut Nystedt

    Knut Nystedt (born 3 September 1915) is an orchestral and choral composer. Nystedt was born in Kristiania (now Oslo), Norway, and grew up in a Christian home where hymns and classical music were an important part of everyday life. His major compositions for choir and vocal soloists are mainly based on texts from the Bible or sacred themes. Old church music, especially Palestrina and Gregorian chants, have had a major influence on his compositions. He has studied with Aaron Copland, among others. Nystedt was organist in Torshov kirke (Torshov Church) in Oslo from 1946 to 1982 and taught choir conducting at the Universitetet i Oslo from 1964 to 1985. Nystedt founded and conducted Det Norske Solistkor from 1950 to 1990. He also founded and conducted Schola Cantorum from 1964 to 1985. The choir Ensemble 96 has published «Immortal Nystedt» (2005). This CD has been nominated in two categories in the Grammy Awards 2007. This is the first Norwegian cd nominated in two categories. Also the first cd with a Norwegian composer nominated to Grammy. In 2005 he was honoured by several concerts around the world, celebrating his 90th birthday. In 1966, the King of Norway made him Knight of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Max Richter

    Max Richter

    Max Richter (born 1966) is a German-born British composer. Richter studied composition and piano at University of Edinburgh, the Royal Academy of Music and with Luciano Berio in Florence. After finishing his studies, Richter co-founded the contemporary classical ensemble Piano Circus. He stayed with the group for ten years, commissioning and performing works by Arvo Pärt, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, Julia Wolfe and Steve Reich. The ensemble was signed to Decca/Argo, producing five albums. In 1996, Max collaborated with Future Sound of London on their album Dead Cities, beginning as a pianist, but ultimately working on several tracks, as well as co-writing one track (titled "Max"). Richter subsequently worked with the band over a period of two years, also contributing to the albums The Isness and The Peppermint Tree and Seeds of Superconsciousness. In 2000, Richter worked with Mercury Prize winner Roni Size on the Reprazent album In the Mode. Richter produced Vashti Bunyan's 2005 album Lookaftering and Kelli Ali's 2008 album Rocking Horse. In 2002, Richter released his solo debut Memoryhouse, an experimental album of "documentary music" recorded with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra,
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Nicolas Dalayrac

    Nicolas Dalayrac

    • Works Composed: L'amant statue
    Nicolas-Marie d'Alayrac, known as Nicolas Dalayrac (born 8 June 1753 in Muret, Haute-Garonne, France; died 26 November 1809, in Paris), was a French composer, best known for his opéras-comiques. Trained as a lawyer, Dalayrac was encouraged by his father to abandon his career and follow his passion for music. His earliest works were violin duets, string trios and quartets, but his main fame was as a prolific composer of operas for the Comédie-Italienne (later remamed the Opéra-Comique). He was a Freemason and is said to have composed the music for the induction of Voltaire to his lodge. He married the actress Gilberte Pétronille Sallarde. After the French Revolution he changed his name from the aristocratic d'Alayrac to Dalayrac. In 1804, he received the Légion d'honneur
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Otto Sutro

    Otto Sutro

    Otto Sutro (1833–1896) was a German-born American organist, conductor, minor composer, publisher and music store owner, and a leading figure in the musical life of Baltimore, Maryland. Sutro was born in Aachen, Germany. He studied the organ with Nicolas Lemmens in Brussels and moved to the United States in 1851, undertaking further studies at the Peabody Institute. He hosted a musical appreciation society known as the Wednesday Club. With fellow alum Fritz Finke, Sutro helped found the Oratorio Society of Baltimore, and became its main conductor. He married Arianna Handy, a pianist, singer, and daughter of a former chief justice of Mississippi. His brother Adolph Sutro became Mayor of San Francisco, and built the Sutro Baths. Sutro sat for portrait artist David Dalhoff Neal in 1889 (see image). Rapheal Tuck & Son created a litho art card Charactor Otto Sutro His daughters Rose and Ottilie Sutro were the first recognised piano-duo team.
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    André Cardinal Destouches

    André Cardinal Destouches

    • Works Composed: Issé
    André Cardinal Destouches (sometimes called des Touches) (baptised 6 April 1672  – 7 February 1749) was a French composer best known for the opéra-ballet Les élémens. Born in Paris, the son of Étienne Cardinal, a wealthy merchant, André Cardinal was educated by Jesuits. With the Jesuit Father Guy Tachard, he went on a mission to Siam for two years, leaving in January 1687, and spending some time at the Cape of Good Hope, arriving in Siam in September. Coming back to France, in September 1688, he spent several months at the academy in the Manège royale, rue de Tournon. In 1692 he joined the army and participated in the invasion of Namur, discovering his musical talent while not occupied by combat. When his father died in August 1694, André Cardinal added "Destouches" to his name in memory of his father's title, Seigneur des Touches et de Guilleville. He quit the army in 1696 to pursue his musical aspirations. Destouches' opera Issé was performed for Louis XIV at the Trianon in 1697. Louis was impressed and said that he enjoyed his music as much as that of Jean-Baptiste Lully. The opera was successfully repeated at the Opéra a few weeks later. The following year found him dining with
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Domenico Allegri

    Domenico Allegri

    Domenico Allegri (ca. 1585 – September 5, 1629) was an Italian composer and singer of the early Baroque Roman School. He was the second son of the Milanese coachman Costantino Allegri, who lived in Rome with his family, and was a younger brother of the more famous Gregorio Allegri. Costantino sent three sons, Gregorio, Domenico and Bartolomeo, to study music at San Luigi dei Francesi, under the maestro di capella Giovanni Bernardino Nanino, brother of Giovanni Maria Nanino. The little boy had as schoolmate his elder brother Gregorio and then Antonio Cifra and Domenico Massenzio and Paolo Agostini. In 1606 Allegri was maestro di cappella of the church of Santa Maria at Spello, and from September 1609 until April 1610 served in the same role at the church of Santa Maria in Trastevere in Rome. From 3 April 1610 until his death, he held the same position at the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, where he was buried. Allegri is mainly famous as being one of the first to include specific instrumental accompaniments to sacred vocal music on a small scale. While much of his music is lost, one piece which has survived is the Modi quos expositis in choris of 1617 which has accompaniments to
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Conradin Kreutzer

    Conradin Kreutzer

    • Works Composed: Das Nachtlager in Granada
    Conradin Kreutzer or Kreuzer (Messkirch in Baden, 22 November 1780 – Riga, 14 December 1849) was a German composer and conductor. His works include the opera for which he is remembered, Das Nachtlager in Granada, and Der Verschwender, both produced in 1834. Kreutzer owes his fame almost exclusively to Das Nachtlager in Granada (1834), which kept the stage for half a century in spite of changes in musical taste. It was written in the style of Carl Maria von Weber, and is remarkable especially for its flow of genuine melody and depth of feeling. The same qualities are found in Kreutzer's part-songs for men's voices, which at one time were extremely popular in Germany, and are still listened to with pleasure. Among these Das ist der Tag des Herrn ("The Lord's Day") may be named as the most excellent. His Septet for winds and strings, Op. 62, remains in the chamber music repertory. He was one of the 50 composers who wrote a Variation on a waltz of Anton Diabelli for Part II of the Vaterländischer Künstlerverein (published 1824). Kreutzer abandoned his studies in the law and went to Vienna about 1804, where he met Haydn and may have studied with Albrechtsberger, while he tried his hand
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Giovanni Legrenzi

    Giovanni Legrenzi

    Giovanni Legrenzi (baptized August 12, 1626 – May 27, 1690) was an Italian composer of opera, vocal and instrumental music, and organist, of the Baroque era. He was one of the most prominent composers in Venice in the late 17th century, and extremely influential in the development of late Baroque idioms across northern Italy. Legrenzi was born at Clusone, near Bergamo, then part of the Republic of Venice. His father, Giovanni Maria Legrenzi, was a professional violinist and, to some extent, a composer. We know Legrenzi had two brothers and two sisters, though one of the brothers, Marco, apparently a talented musician who performed with his father and brother in the 1660s, is not mentioned in Legrenzi’s will: it is presumed that he died young. His remaining brother and sisters are both mentioned in his will. Legrenzi was probably taught largely at home, and his performance skills developed at the local church, and it can also be assumed there was music-making in the house. Legrenzi received his first appointment in Bergamo, as Organist at Santa Maria Maggiore, a magnificent church with a celebrated musical history. Following ordination as a priest in 1651, he was appointed as a
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Henry W. Petrie

    Henry W. Petrie

    Henry W. Petrie (March 4, 1857 - May 25, 1925) was an American composer and performer of popular music. Petrie was born in Bloomington, Illinois and died in Paw Paw, Michigan.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Marilyn Crispell

    Marilyn Crispell

    Marilyn Crispell (born March 30, 1947 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American jazz pianist and composer. Crispell studied classical piano and composition at the New England Conservatory of Music. She has been a resident of Woodstock, NY since 1977 when she came to study and teach at Karl Berger's Creative Music Studio. She discovered jazz through the music of John Coltrane, Cecil Taylor and other contemporary jazz players and composers as Paul Bley and Leo Smith. For ten years she was a member of Anthony Braxton's Quartet and the Reggie Workman Ensemble. She has been a member of the Barry Guy New Orchestra as well as a member of the Henry Grimes Trio, the Europea Quartet Noir (with Urs Leimgruber, Fritz Hauser and Joëlle Léandre), and Anders Jormin's Bortom Quintet. In 2005 she performed and recorded with the NOW Orchestra in Vancouver, Canada and in 2006 she was co-director of the Vancouver Creative Music Institute and a faculty member at the Banff Centre International Workshop in Jazz. Crispell has performed and recorded as a soloist and leader of her own groups. She has also performed and recorded music by contemporary composers John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, Robert Cogan,
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    José Vianna da Motta

    José Vianna da Motta

    José Vianna da Motta (sometimes spelt 'Viana da Mota') (22 April 1868 – 1 June 1948) was a distinguished Portuguese pianist, teacher, and composer. He was one of the last pupils of Franz Liszt. The José Vianna da Motta Music Competition was founded in 1957 in his honor. José Vianna da Motta was born on São Tomé Island, a Portuguese territory at the time where his father, also a great amateur musician, had opened a pharmacy. Moving with his family to Continental Portugal, he settled in Colares, near Sintra, where he soon showed his unusual skills in music, and in playing and composing works for the piano. In Berlin he had lessons from Xaver Scharwenka and Philipp Scharwenka before studying with Franz Liszt at Weimar in 1885 and with Hans von Bülow two years later. In the following years he undertook many concert tours all round the world. Although he was renowned for his virtuosity he was also dedicated to the music of J. S. Bach and Beethoven - playing all of the latter's 32 piano sonatas in a series of concerts in Lisbon in 1927. He also included lesser known composers in his recitals, playing, for example, works by Charles-Valentin Alkan at the Wigmore Hall in London in 1903. He
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Chancellor Olcott

    Chancellor Olcott

    Chancellor "Chauncey" Olcott (July 21, 1858 – March 18, 1932) was an Irish American stage actor, songwriter and singer. Born in Buffalo, New York, in the early years of his career Olcott sang in minstrel shows and Lillian Russell played a major role in helping make him a Broadway star. Amongst his songwriting accomplishments, Olcott wrote and composed the song "My Wild Irish Rose" for his production of A Romance of Athlone in 1899. Olcott also wrote the lyrics to "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" for his production of The Isle O' Dreams in 1912. He retired to Monte Carlo and died there in 1932. His body was brought home and interred in the Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx. His life story was told in the 1947 Warner Bros. motion picture My Wild Irish Rose starring Dennis Morgan as Olcott. In 1970, Olcott was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Friedrich Kuhlau

    Friedrich Kuhlau

    Friedrich Daniel Rudolf Kuhlau (11 September 1786 – 12 March 1832) was a German-born Danish composer during the Classical and Romantic periods. He was a central figure of the Danish Golden Age and is immortalized in Danish cultural history through his music for Elverhøj, the first true work of Danish National Romanticism and a concealed tribute to the absolute monarchy. To this day it is his version of this melody which is the definitive arrangement. During his lifetime, Kuhlau was known primarily as a concert pianist and composer of Danish opera, but was responsible for introducing many of Beethoven's works, which he greatly admired, to Copenhagen audiences. Considering that his house burned down destroying all of his unpublished manuscripts, he was a prolific composer leaving more than 200 published works in most genres. Kuhlau was born on 11 September 1786 just south of Lüneburg in Uelzen district of Lower Saxony. At the age of seven, he lost his right eye when he slipped on ice and fell. His father, grandfather, and uncle were military oboists. Even though Kuhlau was born to a poor family, his parents managed to pay for piano lessons. Later he studied the piano in Hamburg where
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Wilhelm Peterson-Berger

    Wilhelm Peterson-Berger

    • Works Composed: Arnljot
    Olof Wilhelm Peterson-Berger (27 February 1867, Ullånger, Ångermanland – 3 December 1942, Östersund) was a Swedish composer and music critic. As a composer, his main musical influences were Grieg, August Söderman and Wagner as well as Swedish folk idiom. Peterson-Berger studied at the Stockholm Conservatory from 1886–89 and then in Dresden for a year. He is best known for three albums of national romantic piano pieces entitled Frösöblomster I, II and III (Flowers of Frösö), which includes the often performed Vid Frösö kyrka (At Frösö Church) and Sommarsång (Summer Song). The sets, which were composed over a period of 18 years (1896 - 1914) and brought together afterwards as a collection have gained a reputation of representing a quintessential "Swedishness" in the romantic, nationalistic vein of their time. The most famous of the pieces, Sommarsång (Summer Song) recalls the warm, calm, harmonious and bright pre-summer evenings where the sun in the north almost never goes down; they were the great breakthrough for Wilhelm. Sommarsång is still known to most Swedes, even to people generally uninterested in music: the majority of young piano students in the Nordic countries have been
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Eduard Tubin

    Eduard Tubin

    Eduard Tubin (June 18, 1905 – November 17, 1982) was an Estonian composer and conductor. Tubin was born in Torila, Estonia, then part of the Governorate of Livonia, Russian Empire. Both his parents were music lovers, and his father played trumpet and trombone in the village band. His first taste of music came at school where he learned flute and balalaika. Later, his father swapped a cow for a piano, and the young Eduard soon became known in the village for his playing. Tubin was also somewhat accomplished as a violinist, and wrote two concerti and numerous chamber works for the instrument. Tubin entered the Tartu Teacher's College in the newly independent Estonia in 1920. It was here he began to take an interest in composition. In 1924 he was admitted to the Tartu Higher Music School starting his studies under the guidance of the famous Estonian composer Heino Eller. He married a fellow student, Linda Pirn, in 1930 and their son Rein was born in 1932. Tubin took up work conducting in the Vanemuine theatre. During this time he conducted and made several trips abroad, on one occasion meeting Zoltán Kodály, who encouraged his interest in folk songs. After the Soviet Union illegally
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Jacob Gade

    Jacob Gade

    Jacob Thune Hansen Gade (Vejle, Denmark, November 29, 1879 – February 20, 1963, Assens) was a Danish violinist and composer, mostly of orchestral popular music. Today he is remembered for a single tune, the familiar Jalousie 'Tango Tzigane', also known as Tango Jalousie, or simply Jalousie, premiered September 14, 1925. The tango, written to accompany a silent film when Gade was leader of the orchestra of the Palads Cinema, was an instant international hit. When talkies were introduced it was featured in over 100 films. The royalties allowed Gade to devote himself to composition fulltime for the rest of his life. Arthur Fiedler made the first recording of the piece with the Boston Pops, further increasing Gade's income. The royalties now fund a foundation for young musicians. In an interview two years before his death, Fiedler recalled that Gade came especially to Boston to thank him for the recording. Gade also presented Fiedler with a score of a symphony which Fiedler recalled as "one of the worst pieces of music I ever looked at." Lyrics in many languages have been fitted to the composition. Among the many versions of the Tango Jalousie is a transcription for Spanish guitar by
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Kerry Mills

    Kerry Mills

    Kerry Mills (February 1, 1869 - December 5, 1948) was an American composer of popular music during the Tin Pan Alley era. His stylistically diverse music ranged from ragtime to cakewalk to marches. He was most prolific between 1895 and 1918. Mills was born Frederick Allen Mills in Philadelphia. He trained as a violinist and was working as head of the Violin Department of the University of Michigan School of Music when he began composing. Mills moved to New York City in 1895 where he started a music publishing firm (F. A. Mills Music Publisher) from which he published his own music and that of others. Mills died in Hawthorne, California.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Klaus Doldinger

    Klaus Doldinger

    • Works Composed: Tatort Titelmelodie
    Klaus Doldinger (born 12 May 1936) is a German saxophonist, especially well known for jazz and as a composer of film music. He was the recipient of 1997's Bavarian Film Awards (Honorary Award). Doldinger was born in Berlin, and entered a Düsseldorf conservatory in 1947, originally studying piano and then clarinet, graduating in 1957. In his student years, Doldinger gained professional performing experience, starting in 1953 in the German Dixieland band The Feetwarmers, and recording with them in 1955. Later that year he founded Oscar's Trio, modeled on Oscar Peterson's work. During the 1960s he worked as a tenor saxophonist, working with visiting American jazz musicians and recording in his own right. Doldinger is perhaps best known for his film scores to the acclaimed German U-boat film Das Boot (1981) and later The NeverEnding Story (1984). Doldinger married Inge Beck in 1960; they have three children, Viola, Melanie and Nicolas Doldinger. Since 1968 they have resided in Icking, a small Bavarian village, south of Munich. Doldinger's recurring jazz project Passport, started in 1971 (then called "Klaus Doldinger´s Passport"), still enjoys huge success in Germany. In its influence
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Michael Daugherty

    Michael Daugherty

    • Works Composed: Bells for Stokowski
    Michael Kevin Daugherty (born April 28, 1954) is an American composer, pianist, and teacher. Influenced by popular culture, Romanticism, and Postmodernism, Daugherty is one of the most colorful and widely performed American concert music composers of his generation. Daugherty's notable works include his Superman comic book-inspired Metropolis Symphony for Orchestra (1988–93), Dead Elvis for Solo Bassoon and Chamber Ensemble (1993), Jackie O (1997), Niagara Falls for Symphonic Band (1997), UFO for Solo Percussion and Orchestra (1999) and for Symphonic Band (2000), Bells for Stokowski from Philadelphia Stories for Orchestra (2001) and for Symphonic Band (2002), Fire and Blood for Solo Violin and Orchestra (2003) inspired by Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Time Machine for Three Conductors and Orchestra (2003), Ghost Ranch for Orchestra (2005), and Deus ex Machina for Piano and Orchestra (2007). Daugherty has been described by The Times (London) as "a master icon maker" with a "maverick imagination, fearless structural sense and meticulous ear." Currently, Daugherty is Professor of Composition at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Since
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Mykola Lysenko

    Mykola Lysenko

    • Works Composed: Taras Bulba
    Mykola Vitaliyovych Lysenko (Ukrainian: Мико́ла Віта́лійович Ли́сенко, 22 March [O.S. 10 March] 1842 – 6 November [O.S. 24 October] 1912) was a Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and ethnomusicologist. Lysenko was born in Hrynky, Kremenchuk Povit, Poltava Governorate, the son of Vitaliy Romanovych Lysenko (Ukrainian: Віталій Романович Лисенко). From childhood he became very interested in the folksongs of Ukrainian peasants and by the poetry of Taras Shevchenko. When Shevchenko's body was brought to Ukraine after his death in 1861, Lysenko was a pallbearer. During his time at Kiev University, Lysenko collected and arranged Ukrainian folksongs, which were published in seven volumes. One of his principal sources was the kobzar Ostap Veresai (after whom Lysenko later named his son). Lysenko was initially a student of Biology at the Kharkiv University, studying music privately. On a scholarship which he won from the Russian Music Society he pursued further professional music studies at the Leipzig Conservatory. It is there that he understood the importance of collecting, developing and creating Ukrainian music rather than duplicating the work of Western classical composers. On his
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Frank Vaganée

    Frank Vaganée

    Frank Vaganée (born 19 March 1966 in Mechelen) is a Belgian jazz saxophonist and composer. He has his own trio with Philippe Aerts recently replaced by Rosario Bonnacorso on the double bass, and Dré Pallemaerts on drums. He is co-leader of the Frank Vaganée/Mike Del Ferro Quartet and also is the artistic leader of the Brussels Jazz Orchestra. He won the Belgian Golden Django award for best artist in 2001.
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Harry Tierney

    Harry Tierney

    Harry Austin Tierney (May 21, 1890 – March 22, 1965) was a successful American composer of musical theatre, best known for long-running hits such as Irene (1919), Broadway's longest-running show of the era (620 performances), Kid Boots (1923) and Rio Rita (1927), one of the first musicals to be turned into a talking picture (and later remade starring Abbott and Costello). Born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, he was most active between about 1910 and 1930, often collaborating with the lyricist Joseph McCarthy. His mother was a pianist, his father a trumpeter, and he himself toured as a concert pianist in his early years. After a brief spell working in London for a music publisher, he returned to the United States in 1916. Over the next couple of decades many of his songs were used in the famous Ziegfeld Follies, and were performed by the premier singers of the day, such as Eddie Cantor, Anna Held and Edith Day. The year 1919 saw his greatest Broadway hit, the show Irene, which contained perhaps his most well-known song, "Alice Blue Gown", as well as "Castle of Dreams," an adaptation of Chopin's Minute Waltz. This same show was made into a film in 1926, then remade in 1940 with Anna
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Antonio Smareglia

    Antonio Smareglia

    • Works Composed: La falena
    Antonio Smareglia (5 May 1854 – 15 April 1929) was an Austro-Hungarian opera composer of Italian ethnicity. Antonio Smareglia was born in the town of Pola (on the Istrian peninsula, then located in Austria-Hungary, now in Croatia), in a house on Via Nettuno which still stands and in which there is now a small museum of his life and work. He was the sixth, but first surviving, child of an Italian father, Francesco Smareglia from Dignano - and a Croatian mother - Giulia Stiglich from Ičići. The composer chose to set his most famous opera, Nozze istriane, in his father's village. Smareglia married Maria Jetti Polla, and they had five children. He became blind at the age of 46. Various people took dictation from him including his sons Ariberto and Mario, and students and friends including Primo dalla Zonca, Gastone Zuccoli, and Vito Levi. Smareglia died in Grado in 1929.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Henri Herz

    Henri Herz

    • Works Composed: Hexameron
    Henri Herz (6 January 1803 – 5 January 1888) was a pianist and composer, Austrian by birth, and French by domicile. Herz was born Heinrich Herz in Vienna. He was Jewish by birth, although he asked the musical journalist Fétis not to mention this in the latter's musical encyclopaedia, perhaps a reflection of endemic anti-semitism in nineteenth-century French cultural circles. As a child Herz studied with his father and in Coblenz with the organist Daniel Hünten. In 1816 he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Victor Dourlen and Anton Reicha. His brother Jacques Herz (1794-1880) was a fellow-pupil at the Conservatoire, and also became a noted pianist and teacher. A celebrated pianist, Herz traveled worldwide, including tours in Europe, Russia, Mexico, South America, and in the United States of America in 1846-50, where he concertised all the way to San Francisco, California, where his performances were compared to the more extravagant manner of Leopold de Meyer, concertising in the United States during the same period (1845-47).. He wrote a book about his experiences abroad, Mes voyages en Amérique (Paris: Achille Faure, 1866). Herz taught at the Conservatoire
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Philippe Manoury

    Philippe Manoury

    Philippe Manoury (born 19 June 1952) is a French composer. Philippe Manoury was born in Tulle. His first composition studies were at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris, with Gérard Condé and Max Deutsch. He continued his studies from 1974 to 1978 at the Conservatoire de Paris with Michel Philippot, Ivo Malec, and Claude Ballif. From 1975 he undertook studies in computer assisted composition with Pierre Barbaud. He joined IRCAM in 1980. He is currently on the composition faculty at the University of California, San Diego where he teaches courses in composition, real-time signal processing, and musical analysis. Manoury's work is strongly influenced by Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Iannis Xenakis, and his early work from 1972–76 combines serial Punctualism with the densely massed elements characteristic of the music of Stockhausen and Xenakis, and the paintings of Jackson Pollock. Works such as Sound and Fury are of interest because of the use of computer assisted composition. Sound and Fury also uses a very large orchestra, which is symmetrically disposed, and makes quite extensive use of left-right spatial effects. The Sonus ex machina series of works, which were
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Adam Schlesinger

    Adam Schlesinger

    • Works Composed: That Thing You Do!
    Adam Schlesinger is an American songwriter, composer and record producer. He has won Emmy and Grammy Awards, and has also been nominated for Oscar, Tony, and Golden Globe Awards. He is also a winner of the ASCAP Pop Music Award. He is the bassist for the bands Fountains of Wayne, Ivy and Tinted Windows. He is an owner of Scratchie Records and Stratosphere Sound, a recording studio in New York City. Schlesinger grew up in Manhattan and Montclair, New Jersey. Schlesinger was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award for writing the title track of the Tom Hanks-directed film That Thing You Do! as well as two other songs for the film. Fountains of Wayne was nominated for two Grammy Awards in 2003 for Best New Artist and Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for "Stacy's Mom". Schlesinger and David Javerbaum were nominated for a 2008 Tony Award for Best Original Score for his music for the musical Cry-Baby. Schlesinger and Javerbaum received a 2012 Emmy award for Oustanding Music And Lyrics for their song "It's Not Just For Gays Anymore", performed by Neil Patrick Harris as the opening number of the Tony Awards telecast. They also received a 2009 Emmy
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Ambrogio Minoja

    Ambrogio Minoja

    Ambrogio Minoja (22 October 1752 – 3 August 1825) was a classical composer from Italy, born in Ospedaletto Lodigiano, in the territory of Lodi, in the region of Lombardy. He was professor of composition and writer on vocal music, having written Solfeggi, and Lettera sopra il canto (Luigi Mussi, Milan). Minoja began his musical studies when he was fourteen years old, acquiring further musical training from renowned professor Nicola Sala, in Naples. On his return to Milan from Rome in 1772, where he stayed for a short period of time, he was appointed first klavier player at the theatre, succeeding then Giovanni Battista Lampugnani as director of music. From 1789 to 1809 he was maestro al cembalo at Teatro alla Scala (1789-1809). A highly esteemed composer, chapel-master and honorary member at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Milan, he became inspector of studies at the conservatory from 1814 to 1824. Minoja was a composer of opera and church-music. He composed two operas, which were performed successfully, Tito nelle Gallie (1787) and Zenobia (1788), a march and a funeral symphony on the death of General Hoche, having him received then a gold medal from Napoleon Bonaparte, and four
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Bernhard Romberg

    Bernhard Romberg

    Bernhard Heinrich Romberg (November 13, 1767 – August 13, 1841), was a German cellist and composer. Romberg was born at Dinklage. His father, Anton Romberg, played the bassoon and cello and gave Bernhard his first cello lessons. He first performed in public at the age of seven. In addition to touring Europe with his cousin Andreas Romberg, Bernhard Romberg also joined the Münster Court Orchestra. Together with his cousin, he later joined the court orchestra of the Prince Elector Archbishop of Cologne in Bonn (conducted by the Kapellmeister Andrea Luchesi) in 1790, where they met the young Beethoven. Beethoven admired and respected Bernhard Romberg as a musician. However, Romberg had difficulty understanding some of Beethoven's musical ideas, and rejected Beethoven's offer of a cello concerto for him, saying that he primarily performed his own compositions Romberg is notable for several innovations in cello design and performance. He lengthened the cello's fingerboard and flattened the side under the C string, thus giving it more freedom to vibrate. He suggested that half-size and 3/4 size cellos should be designed to make it easier for young children to play the instrument. Romberg
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Dudley Buck

    Dudley Buck

    Dudley Buck (March 10, 1839 – October 6, 1909) was an American composer, organist, and writer on music. He published several books, most notably the Dictionary of Musical Terms and Influence of the Organ in History, which was published in New York in 1882. He is best known today for his organ composition, Concert Variations on the Star-Spangled Banner, Op. 23, which was later arranged into an orchestral version. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, Buck was the son of a merchant who gave him every opportunity to cultivate his musical talents. After attending Trinity College, for four years (1858–1862) he studied in Leipzig at the Leipzig Conservatory where he was a pupil of Louis Plaidy. He then pursued further studies in Dresden and Paris. On returning to America he held positions of organist in Hartford, Chicago (1869), and Boston (1871). In 1875 Buck went to New York to assist Theodore Thomas as conductor of orchestral concerts, and from 1877 to 1902 was organist at Holy Trinity Church in Brooklyn. By this time he had become well known as a composer. His compositions included church music, a number of cantatas (Columbus (1876), Golden Legend (1880), Light of Asia (1885), etc.), a
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    John Bacchus Dykes

    John Bacchus Dykes

    • Works Composed: Lead, Kindly Light
    John Bacchus Dykes (10 March 1823 Kingston upon Hull – 22 January 1876 Ticehurst, Sussex) was an English clergyman and hymnist. He was born in Hull, England, the fifth child and third son of William Hey Dykes and his wife Elizabeth Dykes (née Huntington), and a younger brother of the poet and hymnist Eliza Alderson. By the age of 10, he was the assistant organist at St John's Church in Drypool, Hull, where his grandfather, the Rev. Thomas Dykes, was vicar. He learned the violin and the piano. He studied at Wakefield and St Catharine's College, Cambridge, earning a BA in Classics in 1847. He cofounded the Cambridge University Musical Society. He was ordained as curate of Malton in 1847. For a short time, he was canon of Durham Cathedral, then precentor (1849 – 1862). In 1862 he became vicar of St. Oswald's, Durham, until his death in 1876. He published numerous sermons and articles on religion; however, he is best known for over 300 hymn tunes he composed. Among those still in wide use are: Nicaea, commonly sung to the words "Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!"; Wir Pflügen, harmonised by Dykes and commonly sung to the words "We plough the fields, and scatter" (a translation of
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    John Bull

    John Bull

    John Bull (1562 or 1563 – 15 March 1628) was an English composer, musician and organ builder. He was a renowned keyboard performer of the virginalist school and most of his compositions were written for this medium. Bull's place of birth is shrouded in uncertainty. In an article published in 1952, Thurston Dart presumed that Bull's family originated in Somerset, where it is possible the composer was born. It was the 17th century antiquarian Anthony Wood who first proposed that he was related to the Bull family of Peglich, Somerset, but in 1959 Dart wrote that Bull was probably the son of a London goldsmith…. Then, in the second edition of his Calendar of the Life of John Bull Dart proposed Hereford as a third possibility. More recent research by Susi Jeans suggests that Bull was born in the Radnorshire parish of Old Radnor within the diocese of Hereford, although no birth records have yet been discovered. Bull's appointment as organist of Hereford Cathedral in 1582 lends credence to this diocese being his place of birth: it was customary at this time for organists to return to their home cathedrals after training in London (cf: Thomas Morley). In 1573 he joined the choir at
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Julius Klengel

    Julius Klengel

    Julius Klengel (24 September 1859 – 27 October 1933) was a German cellist who is most famous for his etudes and solo pieces written for the instrument. He was the brother of Paul Klengel. A member of the Gewandhaus Orchestra at fifteen, he toured extensively throughout Europe as cellist and soloist of the Gewandhaus Quartet. His pupils include Emanuel Feuermann, Gregor Piatigorsky and Alexandre Barjansky. Born in Leipzig, the son of a lawyer who was a fine amateur musician and a friend of Mendelssohn, Klengel studied with Emil Hegar in his youth. After his 15th birthday, Klengel joined the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra where Hegar played first cello, and began touring in Europe and Russia. Klengel also became a soloist at that point, frequently giving solo performances. Klengel rose to become principal cellist of the orchestra, aged 22, in 1881. There he remained for over four decades: to celebrate his fifty years of service, Wilhelm Furtwängler conducted a jubilee concert, in which Klengel played the cello part in a double concerto he composed for the occasion. During that time period, Klengel became professor at the Leipzig Conservatory, and began composing. He ultimately composed
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Paulus Melissus

    Paulus Melissus

    Paulus Melissus (also: Paul Melissus, Paul Schede, or Paulus Schedius Melissus; 20 December 1539 – 3 February 1602) was a humanist Neo-Latin writer, translator and composer. Melissus was born in Mellrichstadt. He studied and attended school in Zwickau from 1557 to 1559, and studied philology in Erfurt and Jena. From 1560 to 1564 he lived in Vienna, where in 1561 he became poet laureate. He stayed in Prague, Wittenberg and Leipzig, and was called to the court of the bishop of Würzburg and went on a campaign to Hungary with him. He was an ambassador in the service of Emperor Maximilian II and Rudolf II, and traveled to France, Switzerland, Italy, and England and was ultimately director of the Electoral library (the Bibliotheca Palatina) in Heidelberg, where he died. Melissus translated works of Clément Marot and Théodore de Bèze for the Hugenot church services in rhyme using the Psalms in German. He was the first to use the sonnet and the terza rima in German lyric. In his lifetime he was recognized as an author fully versed in Latin love poetry.
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Rhys Chatham

    Rhys Chatham

    Rhys Chatham (born September 19, 1952, New York City) is an American composer, guitarist, and trumpet player, primarily active in avant-garde and minimalist music. He is best known for his "guitar orchestra" compositions. He has lived in France since 1987. Chatham began his musical career as a piano tuner for avant-garde pioneer La Monte Young as well as harpsichord tuner for Gustav Leonhard, Rosalyn Turek and Glenn Gould. He soon studied under electronic music pioneer Morton Subotnick and minimalist icon La Monte Young and was a member of Young's group, The Theater of Eternal Music, during the early seventies; Chatham also played with Tony Conrad in an early version of Conrad's group, The Dream Syndicate. In 1971, while still in his teens, Chatham became the first music director at the experimental art space The Kitchen in lower Manhattan. His early works, such as Two Gongs (1971) owed a significant debt to Young and other minimalists. His concert productions included experimenters Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Pauline Oliveros, Steve Reich, and early alternative rockers such as Fred Frith, Robert Fripp, Arto Lindsay, and John Lurie. He has worked
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Ronald Smith

    Ronald Smith

    Ronald Sam Smith (London, 3 January 1922 – Hythe, 27 May 2004) was an English classical pianist, composer and teacher, born in London. He entered the Royal Academy of Music at the age of 16 with the Sir Michael Costa Scholarship for composition. After leaving the academy he studied privately in Paris with Marguerite Long, while also taking an external BMus degree from Durham University. He was influenced by the pianist Edwin Fischer, whom he impressed as a contestant in the 1949 Geneva international piano competition. When Fischer visited London he selected Smith and Denis Matthews to play the second and third piano parts in his recording of Bach's triple keyboard concerto. Smith said he learnt more in four days working with Fischer than he had in his years of previous study. As a performer, he championed piano works from the romantic period. In the 1940s he was first asked to record music by the then neglected Charles-Valentin Alkan, his Concerto for Solo Piano. He was sent the score by Humphrey Searle: when he first saw it he thought it "seemed unplayable". He later recorded many of Alkan's works, and also wrote a biography. His efforts played a major role in rekindling interest
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Joe Monzo

    Joe Monzo

    Joe Monzo (born January 5, 1962) is an American microtonal composer and tuning-theorist who has authored books and multiple webpages on music theory. He specializes in applying tuning-theory and computing to microtonal musical composition, and tutors people in computing and music composition. Monzo was born and rasied in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, graduated from Ocean City High School (class of 1979), attended Manhattan School of Music in New York, lived in Philadelphia again during the 1990s, and since 2000 has been living in San Diego, California. From the mid-1980s to early 1990s Monzo was a keyboard player for several bands in South Jersey and Philadelphia: Meanstreak, (most notably) the Midnight Riders, Viper, Tsunami, and finally One Night Affair. Monzo wrote the book JustMusic: A New Harmony in the mid-1990s, and the book-length webpage A Century of New Music in Vienna in the early 2000s, reflecting his deep admiration for, and research into, the lives and work of composers Gustav Mahler and Arnold Schoenberg. In 2002 he became co-founder of Tonalsoft software company, initially for the purpose of developing Tonescape software (which he conceived in 1984). Monzo is
    5.40
    5 votes
    96
    Christian Wolff

    Christian Wolff

    Christian G. Wolff (born March 8, 1934) is an American composer of experimental classical music. Wolff was born in Nice in France to German literary publishers Helen and Kurt Wolff, who had published works by Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, and Walter Benjamin. After relocating to the U.S. in 1941, they helped found Pantheon Books along with other European intellectuals who had fled Europe during the rise of fascism. The Wolffs published a series of notable English translations of mostly European literature, as well as an edition of the I Ching that would prove influential upon John Cage after Wolff gave it to him as a present. After the family moved to the United States in 1941, Wolff became an American citizen in 1946. At the age of sixteen he was sent by his piano teacher Grete Sultan for lessons in composition with new music composer John Cage and quickly became a close associate of Cage and his artistic circle, which included fellow composers Earle Brown and Morton Feldman, pianist David Tudor, and dancer/choreographer Merce Cunningham. Cage relates several anecdotes about Wolff in his one-minute Indeterminacy pieces. Almost completely self-taught as composer, Wolff studied music
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    George James Webb

    George James Webb

    George James Webb, born on June 24, 1803 near Salisbury in Wiltshire, England, died on October 7, 1887 in Orange, New Jersey was an English-American composer.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Henri Bertini

    Henri Bertini

    Henri Jérôme Bertini (October 28, 1798 – September 30, 1876) was a French classical composer and pianist. Henri Jérôme Bertini was born in London on October 28, 1798, but his family returned to Paris six months later. He received his early musical education from his father and his brother, a pupil of Muzio Clementi. He was considered a child prodigy and at the age of 12 his father took him on a tour of England, Holland, Flanders, and Germany where he was enthusiastically received. After studies in composition in England and Scotland he was appointed professor of music in Brussels but returned to Paris in 1821. It is known that Bertini gave a concert with Franz Liszt in the Salons Pape on April 20, 1828. The program included a transcription by Bertini of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7 in A major for eight hands (the other pianists were Sowinsky and Schunke.) He was also admired as a chamber music performer, giving concerts with his friends Antoine Fontaine (violin) and Auguste Franchomme (cello). He remained active in and around Paris until around 1848 when he retired from the musical scene. In 1859 he moved to Meylan (near Grenoble) where he died on September 30, 1876. Bertini
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Henri Sauguet

    Henri Sauguet

    Henri Sauguet (18 May 1901 – 22 June 1989), was a French composer. Born in Bordeaux as Henri-Pierre Poupard, he adopted his mother's maiden name as his pseudonym. His output includes operas, ballets, four symphonies (1945, 1949, 1955, 1971), concertos, chamber and choral music and numerous songs, as well as film music. Although he experimented with musique concrète and expanded tonality, he remained opposed to particular systems and his music evolved little: he developed tonal or modal ideas in smooth curves, producing an art of clarity, simplicity and restraint. Sauguet started learning the piano at home when he was five years old. Later he was taught by the organist of the church of Sainte-Eulalie de Bordeaux. Because of the mobilization of his father in 1914, he was required to earn a living at a very young age. Eventually employed by the Prefecture of Montauban in 1919-1920, he formed a friendship with Joseph Canteloube, a former pupil of Vincent d'Indy. Together they collected and harmonized traditional songs under the title Chants d'Auvergne (Songs of Auvergne). During this period too he continued his musical education with local organists and himself served as organist at
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Johann Kuhnau

    Johann Kuhnau

    Johann Kuhnau (6 April 1660 – 5 June 1722) was a German composer, organist and harpsichordist. He was the predecessor of Johann Sebastian Bach as Thomaskantor in Leipzig from 1701 to 1722. Kuhnau was born in Geising, Saxony. He grew up in a religious Lutheran family. At age nine, he auditioned successfully for the Kreuzschule in Dresden. He sang in the Dresdner Kreuzchor and studied with Hering and Bental, later with Vincenzo Albrici. In 1680 he moved to Zittau, because Dresden was struck with the plague. He taught and worked in churches in Zittau. Kuhnau studied French and Italian, and left translations from Hebrew, Greek, and Latin as well. Kuhnau also studied law, attaining the rank of advocate. In addition to composition, much of his time was spent as a lawyer, a poet, and a non-fiction author. He preceded Johann Sebastian Bach as cantor of the Thomaskirche (St Thomas Church) in Leipzig, directing the Thomanerchor from 1701 to 1722. He was also music director of the Paulinerkirche. In Leipzig, Kuhnau taught Johann David Heinichen and Christoph Graupner. Kuhnau died in Leipzig on 5 June 1722. Kuhnau wrote sacred music on Bible stories, such as The Marriage of David Gideon and
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    John Ireland

    John Ireland

    • Works Composed: Piano Concerto
    John Nicholson Ireland (13 August 1879 – 12 June 1962) was an English composer. John Ireland was born in Bowdon, near Altrincham, Manchester, into a family of Scottish descent and some cultural distinction. His father, Alexander Ireland, a publisher and newspaper proprietor, was age 70 at John's birth. John was the youngest of the five children from Alexander's second marriage (his first wife had died). His mother, Annie née Nicholson, was 30 years younger than Alexander. She died in October 1893, when John was 14, and Alexander died the following year, when John was 15. John Ireland was described as "a self-critical, introspective man, haunted by memories of a sad childhood". By that time he began at the Royal College of Music. He studied piano and organ there, and later composition under Charles Villiers Stanford. He subsequently became a teacher at the College himself, his pupils including Richard Arnell and Ernest John Moeran (who both admired him); Benjamin Britten (who found Ireland's teaching less interesting); the socialist composer Alan Bush; Geoffrey Bush (no relation to Alan), who subsequently edited or arranged many of Ireland's works for publication; and Anthony
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Josef Dessauer

    Josef Dessauer

    Josef Dessauer (28 May 1798, Prague – 8 July 1876, Mödling, near Vienna), was a Czech-born composer who wrote many popular songs, and also some less successful operas. Dessauer was born into a wealthy Jewish family, and studied piano in Prague with Bedřich Diviš Weber and composition with Wenzel Tomaschek. Dessauer began as a song composer, but later began composing operas, of which very few were performed. In 1821 he settled in Vienna, from which he made many European tours. He was a friend of many composers of his time, such as Gioachino Rossini, Franz Schubert, Hector Berlioz, Felix Mendelssohn, Franz Liszt and Frédéric Chopin, who dedicated some pieces to him.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Pierre Baillot

    Pierre Baillot

    Pierre Marie François de Sales Baillot (1 October 1771 – 15 September 1842) was a French violinist and composer born in Passy. He studied the violin under Giovanni Battista Viotti and taught at the Paris Conservatoire together with Pierre Rode (also a pupil of Viotti) and Rodolphe Kreutzer, who wrote the conservatoire's official violin method (published in the early 19th century). He was sole author of the instructional L'art du violon (1834). Baillot's teachings had a profound influence on technical and musical development in an age in which virtuosity was openly encouraged. He was leader of the Paris Opéra, gave solo recitals and was a notable performer of chamber music. He died in Paris in 1842. Pierre Marie François de Sales Baillot, who was associated with Rode and Kreutzer in the compilation of the celebrated "Methode du Violon," was born at Passy, near Paris, in 1771, and became one of the most excellent violinists that France ever produced. His eminence in his profession was not obtained without a long struggle against great difficulties, for at the age of twelve he lost his father, who had kept a school, and became dependent upon friends for his education. His musical
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Tobias Matthay

    Tobias Matthay

    Tobias Augustus Matthay (19 February 1858 – 15 December 1945) was an English pianist, teacher, and composer. Matthaw as born in London in 1858 to parents who had come from northern Germany and were naturalised British subjects. He studied at the Royal Academy of Music under Sir William Sterndale Bennett and also taught there from 1876 to 1925 as professor of advanced piano. With Frederick Corder and John Blackwood McEwen, he co-founded the Society of British Composers in 1905. He founded a piano school in 1900 and soon became known for his teaching (known as the Matthay System) that stressed proper piano touch and analysis of arm movements. He published several books of technique, which brought him international recognition. Many of his pupils went on to define a school of 20th century English pianism, including York Bowen, Myra Hess, Clifford Curzon, Moura Lympany, Eunice Norton, Lytle Powell, Irene Scharrer, Lilias Mackinnon, Guy Jonson, Vivian Langrish and Harriet Cohen. He was also the teacher of Canadian pianist Harry Dean and English conductor Ernest Read. Matthay also composed a quantity of piano music but it is little known. His wife Jessie née Kennedy, whom he married in
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Vincent P. Bryan

    Vincent P. Bryan

    Vincent Patrick Bryan (June 22, 1878 – April 27, 1937) was a composer and lyricist. In the 1903-1909 production of The Wizard of Oz he was called upon to introduce new songs in numerous revisions. He was a close behind-the-scenes collaborator of Charlie Chaplin from 1915 to 1917. Along with Hal Roach he directed three Harold Lloyd films in 1919: He Leads, Others Follow, Soft Money and Pay Your Dues. An addiction to heroin prematurely ended his promising career in motion pictures. He was born in St. John's, Newfoundland and died in Los Angeles, California.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Cezary Ostrowski

    Cezary Ostrowski

    Cezary Maciej Ostrowski (born 30 September 1962) is a Polish composer, musician, songwriter, author, visual artist and journalist. Ostrowske was born in Brzeg, Lower Silesia. He is best known for his work as a leader of the critically acclaimed new wave band Bexa Lala, established in 1983. Before that, he had fronted the groups: Taz and Leo Patett in the early 1980s, bands renowned for their rough, and violent sound influenced by free jazz, electronica, and post-punk. In 2001, he formed the jazz duo Trzaska & Ostrowski that released the album Blades. In 2003 his another duo Swietlicki & Ostrowski released the album Crawl. Ostrowski's music is generally characterised by intensity and a wide variety of influences. Cezary Ostrowski's work was selected for 60x60 International mix in 2005. Cezary Ostrowski currently lives in Poznań, Poland. Ostrowski was born in the small town of Brzeg in the Lower Silesia, Poland, to Izabela and Tomasz Ostrowski. As a child, Ostrowski lived in Brzeg and then Zielona Góra in Poland. His father Tomasz was a lawyer, with a love of literature, and his mother was a teacher. In spite of this Ostrowski was often in trouble with the local school authorities.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Ernest Reyer

    Ernest Reyer

    • Works Composed: Sigurd
    Ernest Reyer, the adopted name of Louis Étienne Ernest Rey, was a French opera composer and music critic (December 1, 1823 – January 15, 1909). Ernest Reyer was born in Marseilles. His father, a notary, did not want his son to take up a career in music. However, he did not actively block his son's ambitions and allowed him to attend classes at the Conservatoire from age six to sixteen. In 1839, when he was 16 years old, Ernest traveled to north Africa to work under his brother-in-law, head of accounting for the Treasury Department in Algeria. The job was not a good fit with Reyer's nonchalant and undisciplined temperament. From administrative documents, it is apparent that Reyer wrote innumerable youthful essays and stories, and original dance pieces. Some of his early compositions achieved local notoriety and received favorable comments in the Algerian press, including a Mass performed at the cathedral that was performed for the arrival of the Duke of Aumale in 1847. Reyer returned to Paris during the events 1848. During this period, he was introduced to various eminent artists, including Gustave Flaubert and Théophile Gautier. Southern France and Provence held its allure, and
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Felipe Pedrell

    Felipe Pedrell

    Felip Pedrell (Spanish: Felipe)(19 February 1841, Tortosa – 19 August 1922, Barcelona), was a Spanish Catalan composer. He worked as a musicologist and early music specialist and edited Victoria’s opera omnia and the requiem of Joan Brudieu. This and other of his writings fostered a keen interest in the early music of Spain. Among his notable pupils was composer Rosa García Ascot. Roberto Gerhard set 8 of Pedrell's folk tunes as Cancionero de Pedrell. Operas Songs
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Ludvig Schytte

    Ludvig Schytte

    Ludvig Schytte (28 April 1848, Aarhus – 10 November 1909, Berlin) was a Danish composer, pianist, and teacher. Born in Aarhus, Denmark, Schytte studied with Niels Gade and Edmund Neupert. In 1884, he travelled to Germany to study with Franz Liszt. Schytte lived and taught in Vienna between 1886 and 1907 and spent the last two years of his life teaching in Berlin. Originally trained as a pharmacist, Schytte composed a Piano Concerto in C-sharp minor, Op. 28, and a Sonata in B-flat, among numerous other piano works. He also wrote two operas: Hero (25 September 1898 Copenhagen) and Der Mameluk (22 December 1903 Vienna). His shorter works are still used today as educational studies for piano students.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Mikołaj Gomółka

    Mikołaj Gomółka

    Mikołaj Gomółka (c. 1535 – after 30 April 1591, most probably 5 March 1609) was a Polish Renaissance composer, member of the royal court of Zygmunt II August, where he was a singer, flautist and trumpeter. Gomółka was born in Sandomierz. Between 1545 and 1563 he stayed at the royal court, where initially he was a descantist, learned to play the flute, the 'sztort' (an old Polish wind instrument, prototype of the bassoon), the violin and the lute, and then he became a royal chapel musician with full rights. Having left the court he fulfilled various social and legal functions in Sandomierz; for some time he stayed at the court of the Kraków bishop Piotr Myszkowski (to whom he dedicated his work "Melodies for the Polish Psalter"); he conducted mining researches near Muszyna and also stayed at the court of Jan Zamoyski in Kraków, where he was still living in 30 April 1591; this is the last known date of his life. The only preserved work by Gomółka is a collection of 150 independent compositions to the text of David's Psalter by Jan Kochanowski, for four-part unaccompanied mixed choir. The music is fully subordinated to the contents and the expressive layer of the text; he illustrates
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Sylvius Leopold Weiss

    Sylvius Leopold Weiss

    Sylvius Leopold Weiss (12 October 1687 – 16 October 1750) was a German composer and lutenist. Born in Grottkau near Breslau, the son of Johann Jacob Weiss, also a lutenist, he served at courts in Breslau, Rome, and Dresden, where he died. Until recently, he was thought to have been born in 1686, but recent evidence suggests that he was in fact born the following year. Weiss was one of the most important and most prolific composers of lute music in history and one of the best-known and most technically accomplished lutenists of his day. He wrote around 600 pieces for lute, most of them grouped into 'sonatas' (not to be confused with the later classical sonata, based on sonata form) or suites, which consist mostly of baroque dance pieces. Weiss also wrote chamber pieces and concertos, but only the solo parts have survived for most of them. In later life, Weiss became a friend of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach and met J.S. Bach through him. J.S.Bach and Weiss were said to have competed in improvisation, as the following account by Johann Friedrich Reichardt describes: "Anyone who knows how difficult it is to play harmonic modulations and good counterpoint on the lute will be surprised and
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Augusta Holmès

    Augusta Holmès

    Augusta Mary Anne Holmès (18 December 1847 – 28 January 1903) was a French composer of Irish descent. At first she published under the pseudonym Hermann Zenta. In 1871, Holmès became a French citizen and added the accent to her last name. She herself wrote the lyrics to almost all her songs and oratorios, as well as the libretto of the opera La Montagne Noire. Holmès was born in Paris. Despite showing talent at the piano, she was not allowed to study at the Paris Conservatoire, but she took lessons privately. She developed her piano playing under the tutelage of local pianist Mademoiselle Peyronnet, Versailles' cathedral organist Henri Lambert, and Hyacinthe Klosé. Also, she showed some of her earlier compositions to Franz Liszt. Around 1876, she became a pupil of César Franck, whom she considered her real master. (She led the group of Franck's students who in 1891 commissioned for Franck's tomb a bronze medallion from Auguste Rodin.) Camille Saint-Saëns wrote of Holmès in the journal Harmonie et Mélodie, "Like children, women have no idea of obstacles, and their willpower breaks all barriers. Mademoiselle Holmès is a woman, an extremist." Holmès never married, but she cohabited
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Bernhard Sekles

    Bernhard Sekles

    Bernhard Sekles (20 March 1872 – 8 December 1934) was a German composer, conductor, pianist and pedagogue. Bernhard Sekles was born in Frankfurt am Main, the son of Maximilian Seckeles and Anna, (née Bischheim). The family name Seckeles was changed by Bernhard Sekles to Sekles. From 1894 to 1895 he was the third Kapellmeister at the Stadttheater in Mainz. In 1896 he became a teacher at the Hoch'sche Konservatorium in Frankfurt am Main; here he started the first jazz class anywhere in 1928. He was the director of the Hoch'sche Konservatorium from 1923 to 1933. His composition students included Paul Hindemith, Rudi Stephan, Theodor W. Adorno, Max Rudolf, and Erich Schmid. He was one of the first German Jewish academics to lose his job when Hitler came to power in Germany. He died in his native Frankfurt am Main.
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington

    Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington

    Garret Colley Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington (19 July 1735 – 22 May 1781) was an Anglo-Irish politician and composer, best known today for fathering several distinguished British military commanders and politicians. He was born at the family estate of Dangan, near Summerhill, a village near Trim in County Meath, Ireland, to Richard Wesley, 1st Baron Mornington, and Elizabeth Sale. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and was elected its first Professor of Music in 1764. As a composer he is remembered chiefly for glees such as "Here in cool grot" (lyrics by William Shenstone) and for a double Anglican chant. Wesley represented Trim in the Irish House of Commons from 1757 until 1758, when he succeeded his father as 2nd Baron Mornington. In 1760, in recognition of his musical and philanthropic achievements, he was created Viscount Wellesley, of Dangan Castle in the County of Meath, and Earl of Mornington. He was elected Grandmaster of the Grand Lodge of Ireland in 1776, a post he held until the following year. He married The Hon. Anne Hill-Trevor, eldest daughter of the banker Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount Dungannon, and wife, Anne Stafford, in 1759. They had six
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Ignaz Holzbauer

    Ignaz Holzbauer

    • Works Composed: Günther von Schwarzburg
    Ignaz Jakob Holzbauer (18 September 1711 – 7 April 1783) was a composer of symphonies, concertos, operas, and chamber music, and a member of the Mannheim school. His aesthetic style is in line with that of the Sturm und Drang "movement" of German art and literature. Holzbauer was born in Vienna. His operas include Il figlio delle selve, which was the opening performance of the Schlosstheater Schwetzingen in 1753. Its success led to a job offer from the court at Mannheim, where he stayed for the rest of his life, continuing to compose and to teach, his students including Johann Anton Friedrich Fleischmann (1766-1798), the pianist, and Carl Stamitz. Holzbauer died in Mannheim, Germany. His opera Günther von Schwarzburg, based on the life of the eponymous king (and described here), was an early German national opera, a performance of which Mozart and his sister attended, through which they met Anton Raaff, who was later to premiere a role in Idomeneo. This opera has recently been recorded on the label cpo. Mozart also composed nine numbers for insertion in a Miserere by Holzbauer on commission by the Parisian Concert Spirituel in 1778, but they have been lost. They have been given the
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Italo Montemezzi

    Italo Montemezzi

    • Works Composed: La nave
    Italo Montemezzi (August 4, 1875 – May 15, 1952) was an Italian composer. He is best known for his opera L'amore dei tre re (The Love of the Three Kings), once part of the standard repertoire. Montemezzi was born in Vigasio, near Verona. He studied music at the Milan Conservatory and subsequently taught harmony there for one year. His opera L’amore dei tre re, written in 1913, launched his career and enabled him to devote himself to composition. His opera La nave had its world premiere in Milan in 1918. In 1919 he visited the United States, conducting the American premiere of La nave at the Chicago Opera Association on November 18. He lived in Southern California from 1939 and commemorated Italy's surrender with Italia mia (1944), but later made frequent trips to Italy and returned permanently in 1949. Other non-operatic works include the symphonic poem Paolo e Virginia (after Paul et Virginie) and the cantata The Song of Songs. As a composer, Montemezzi was admired for combining traditional Italian lyricism with a Wagnerian approach to the use of the orchestra in opera, with instrumental color influenced by the works of Debussy.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    John Medeski

    John Medeski

    Anthony John Medeski (born June 28, 1965) is an American jazz keyboards player and composer. Medeski is a veteran of New York's 1990s avant-garde jazz scene and is known popularly as a member of Medeski Martin & Wood. He plays the acoustic piano and an eclectic array of keyboards, including the Hammond B3 organ, melodica, mellotron, clavinet, ARP String Ensemble, Wurlitzer electric piano, Moog Voyager Synthesizer, Wurlitzer 7300 Combo Organ, and Yamaha CS-1 Synthesizer (a "kids' toy"), among others. When playing acoustic piano, Medeski plays the Steinway piano exclusively and is listed as a Steinway Artist. Medeski was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up in Florida. After studying piano as a child (starting when he was five years old), he began as a teenager to perform with musicians such as Mark Murphy and Jaco Pastorius. He attended Pine Crest School. In 1983, after graduating high school, he began studying piano at the New England Conservatory in Boston, where he performed as a sideman with Dewey Redman, Billy Higgins, Bob Mintzer, Alan Dawson and Mr. Jellybelly. Medeski attributes his early interest in playing improvised music and jazz to listening to Oscar
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Julius Fučík

    Julius Fučík

    • Works Composed: Entrance of the Gladiators
    Julius Fučík (Czech pronunciation: [ˈjuːlɪjus ˈfutʃiːk]) (18 July 1872 – 25 September 1916) was a Czech composer and conductor of military bands. Fučík spent most of his life as the leader of military brass bands. He became a prolific composer, with over 400 marches, polkas, and waltzes to his name. As most of his work was for military bands, he is sometimes known as the "Bohemian Sousa". Today his marches are still played as patriotic music in the Czech Republic. However, his worldwide reputation rests on one work: his Opus 68 march, the Entrance of the Gladiators (Vjezd gladiátorů), which is universally recognized, often under the title Thunder and Blazes, as one of the most popular theme tunes for circus clowns. Another composition, The Florentiner March, is not as popular as Entrance of the Gladiators, but it is regularly performed and recorded by wind ensembles. Fučík was the uncle of the famous journalist Julius Fučík, who was executed by the Nazi regime. Fučík was born in Prague on 18 July 1872 when Prague was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. As a student, he learned to play the bassoon with Ludwig Milde, violin with Antonín Bennewitz, and various percussion instruments,
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Michael Gordon

    Michael Gordon

    • Works Composed: Yo Shakespeare
    Michael Gordon is an American composer and co-founder of the Bang on a Can festival and ensemble. His music is associated with the genres of totalism and post-minimalism. Michael Gordon was born in Florida in 1956 (July, 20) and grew up in Nicaragua and an Eastern European Jewish community on the outskirts of Managua until moving to Miami Beach at age 8. His music is an outgrowth of his experience with underground rock bands in New York City and his formal training in composition at Yale where he studied with Martin Bresnick. Tuneful, rhythmic and raw, Gordon has embraced elements of dissonance, minimalism, modality and popular culture in what has been considered by some people as a bold and direct sound. Gordon is one of the founders and artistic directors of New York's Bang on a Can Festival, alongside fellow composers Julia Wolfe, his wife, and David Lang. He has collaborated with them on several projects. The opera The Carbon Copy Building, a collaboration with comic book artist Ben Katchor, received the 2000 Village Voice OBIE Award for Best New American Work, a projected comic strip accompanies the singers, interacting with each other so that the frames fall away in the
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Oscar Straus

    Oscar Straus

    • Works Composed: The Last Waltz
    Oscar Nathan Straus (6 March 1870 – 11 January 1954) was a Viennese composer of operettas and film scores and songs. He also wrote about 500 cabaret songs, chamber music, and orchestral and choral works. His original name was actually Strauss, but for professional purposes he deliberately omitted the final 's', since he wished not to be associated with the musical Strauss family of Vienna. However, he did follow the advice of Johann Strauss II in 1898 about abandoning the prospective lure of writing waltzes for the more lucrative business of writing for the theatre. He studied music in Berlin under Max Bruch, and became an orchestral conductor, working at the Überbrettl cabaret. He went back to Vienna and began writing operettas, becoming a serious rival to Franz Lehár. When Lehár's popular The Merry Widow premiered in 1905, Straus was said to have remarked "Das kann ich auch!" (I can also do that!). In 1939, following the Nazi Anschluss, he fled to Paris, where he received the honour of a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur, and then to Hollywood. After the war, he returned to Europe, and settled at Bad Ischl, where he died. Straus' best-known works are Ein Walzertraum (A Waltz
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Henri Mulet

    Henri Mulet

    Henri Mulet was a French organist and composer. He was born on 17 October 1878 in Paris, France, and died on 20 September 1967 in Draguignan, France. Most of his published compositions were for the organ. His works for organ have been called "expressive in a post-Romantic manner." He won first prize for cello in Delsart's class in 1893. He won second prize for organ in 1897. He studied organ with Guilmant and Widor. He served as an organist in several churches in Paris; he was a professor at the Ecole Niedermeyer and at the Schola Cantorum. In 1937 Mulet burnt his manuscripts and left Paris for Draguignan in Provence. Most of his surviving music is largely unknown. He served as organist at the cathedral in Draguignan until 1958, and entrusted himself to the care of the monks at the abbey there. He was married but had no children. He spent the last 30 of his 89 years in seclusion. Original source of this article is the Henri Mulet page at the Classical Composers Database (from January 2004), which was written by Ioannis Dimitroulis. Organ Harmonium Orchestral Vocal Chamber and instrumental
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    John Greaves

    John Greaves

    John Greaves (born 23 January 1950) is a British bass guitarist and composer, best known as a member of Henry Cow and his collaborative albums with Peter Blegvad. He was also a member of National Health and Soft Heap, and has recorded several solo albums, including Accident (1982), Parrot Fashions (1984), The Caretaker (2001) and Greaves Verlaine (2008). John Greaves was born in Prestatyn, North Wales, but grew up in Wrexham in north-east Wales. At the age of 12, he was given a bass guitar by his father, a Welsh dancehall bandleader, and within six months, he was playing in his father's orchestra. He continued playing in the orchestra for four years, during which time its varied musical styles gave Greaves valuable musician and arranger skills. He was educated at Grove Park Grammar School in Wrexham from 1961 to 1968. In 1968, Greaves entered Pembroke College, Cambridge to study English, and at Cambridge he met members of the burgeoning English avant-rock group Henry Cow in 1969. The band had been established the previous year by fellow Cambridge students Fred Frith and Tim Hodgkinson and had undergone numerous personnel changes up to that point. They were looking for a bassist and
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Jørgen Bentzon

    Jørgen Bentzon

    Jørgen Bentzon (February 14, 1897 – July 9, 1951) was a Danish composer, father of Danish composer Niels Viggo Bentzon and flautist Johan Bentzon. He was a student of Carl Nielsen from 1915 until 1919. His works include six works entitled Racconto, the first for flute, alto saxophone, bassoon and double bass, the second for flute and string trio, the third of which is for woodwind trio, etc.; a Sinfonia Buffo Op. 35 and two symphonies (the first, Op. 37, inspired by Charles Dickens); a piano concerto (recorded on private tape); "Three expressive sketches" for violin and cello; a string quartet; an opera Saturnalia; and other works. Free scores by Jørgen Bentzon at the International Music Score Library Project
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Moritz Moszkowski

    Moritz Moszkowski

    Moritz (Maurice, Maurycy) Moszkowski (23 August 1854 – 4 March 1925) was a German-Jewish composer, pianist and teacher of Polish descent on his paternal side only. His brother Alexander Moszkowski was a famous writer and satirist in Berlin. Moszkowski belongs to the Schumann school and indulges at times in abstruse and morbid harmonies. But these give an individuality of color that is quite alluring on closer acquaintance. Ignacy Paderewski said: "After Chopin, Moszkowski best understands how to write for the piano, and his writing embraces the whole gamut of piano technique." Although little known today, Moszkowski was well respected and popular during the late nineteenth century. He was born in Breslau, Prussia (now the Polish city of Wrocław), into a wealthy Polish-Jewish family whose parents had come to Breslau from Pilica, near Zawiercie, in 1852. He was an ardent Jew at a time when many Jews downplayed their Jewishness. He showed early talent from a very tender age, beginning his musical training at home until 1865, when his family moved to Dresden. There he continued his piano studies at the conservatory. He moved to Berlin in 1869 to continued his studies first at the
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Spyros Samaras

    Spyros Samaras

    Spyros Samaras, Spiro Samara (Greek: Σπύρος Σαμάρας; 1861-25 March 1917) was a Greek composer born in Corfu. His most famous work is the Olympic Anthem, the words of which were contributed by Kostis Palamas. The Anthem was first performed during the opening ceremony of the 1896 Summer Olympics, the first modern Olympic Games. It was declared the official anthem of the Olympic movement by the International Olympic Committee in 1958 and has been used at every Olympic opening ceremony since the 1964 Summer Olympics. Nonetheless, beyond this populistic image Samaras, who apart from Greece was educated also in Paris (Leo Delibes composition class), was a well known figure in the Italian musical theatres of late 'ottocento' and actually it was his career as opera composer that contributed to the commission of the Olympic Anthem's composition in 1895. Before that year, Samaras, among others, had already presented two of his most famous operas, Flora Mirabilis (1886) and La martire (1894), the latter based on a libretto by Luigi Illica with many naturalistic elements, which gave space to Samaras musical personality for an equal treatment. After 1896, Samaras's career as opera composer
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Johann Joachim Quantz

    Johann Joachim Quantz

    Johann Joachim Quantz (30 January 1697 – 12 July 1773) was a German flutist, flute maker and composer. Quantz was born in Oberscheden, near Göttingen, Germany, and died in Potsdam. He began his musical studies as a child with his uncle's son-in-law (his blacksmith father died when Quantz was young; on his deathbed, he begged his son to follow in his footsteps), later going to Dresden and Vienna. He studied composition extensively and pored over scores of the masters to adopt their style. During his tenure in Dresden, he abandoned the violin and the oboe in order to pursue the flute. He studied with Pierre Gabriel Buffardin. It was during his time as musician to Frederick Augustus II of Poland that he began to concentrate on the flute, performing more and more on the instrument. He gradually became known as the finest flautist in Europe, and toured France and England. He became a flute teacher, flute maker and composer to Frederick II of Prussia (Frederick the Great) in 1740. He was an innovator in flute design, adding keys to the instrument to help with intonation, for example. He often criticized Vivaldi for being too wild when he played. Although Quantz wrote many pieces of
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Bernhard Cossmann

    Bernhard Cossmann

    Bernhard Cossmann (17 May 1822 – 7 May 1910) was a German cellist. Born in Dessau, he first studied under Theodore Muller. During his life, he worked for the Grand Opera in Paris and became acquainted with Franz Liszt, with whom he went to Weimar. In 1866, Cossmann was appointed professor of cello studies at the Moscow Conservatory. However, in 1878, Cossmann helped found the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt, where he occupied the post of teacher of cello. Cossmann was not only a frequent soloist and quartet member, but was also a composer. His works include three fantasias, Tell, Euryanthe, and multiple solo works for various instruments. In addition, he composed many etudes and studies for the cello, many of which are still used today. In 1890 Cossmann adapted the Erlkönig from Franz Schubert for solo cello for the exclusive use of his student Heinrich Kiefer. He wrote this in his score on Frankfurt 28. Nov. 1890 by B. Cossmann. Bernhard Cossmann, author of many original works and of diverse “Phantasien” on motifs from operas (such as Freischutz, Euryanthe, etc.) as well as on well-known pieces (also for solo cello such as “Paraphrase sur une chanson populaire allemande Ach, wie
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Carl Tausig

    Carl Tausig

    Carl (or Karl) Tausig (4 November 1841 – 17 July 1871) was a Polish virtuoso pianist, arranger and composer. Tausig was born in Warsaw to Jewish parents and received his first piano lessons from his father, pianist and composer Aloys Tausig, a student of Sigismond Thalberg. His father introduced him to Franz Liszt in Weimar at the age of 14. He quickly became a favorite pupil of Liszt's, travelling with him on concert tours and studying counterpoint, composition and orchestration in addition to his piano lessons. At the age of 16 he met Richard Wagner, of whom he became a devoted follower and friend. He also became a great admirer and friend of Johannes Brahms. Tausig made piano arrangements of many of Wagner's operas. He also introduced to Wagner his friend Peter Cornelius, another Wagner devotee. In 1858 Tausig made his debut in Berlin at a concert conducted by Hans von Bülow. While some critics admired his technical feats at the keyboard, others found his playing noisy and overbearing. Even some who were more accommodating of Tausig's "Lisztian eccentricities" felt he would play better as he matured. Tausig toured through various German towns in 1859-60, making Dresden his base.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Deems Taylor

    Deems Taylor

    Joseph Deems Taylor (December 22, 1885 – July 3, 1966) was an American composer, music critic, and promoter of classical music. Nat Benchley, author of The Lost Algonquin Roundtable, referred to him as "the dean of American music." Deems Taylor was born in New York City to JoJo and Katherine Taylor. He attended New York University. Taylor married three times. His first wife was Jane Anderson. They married in 1910 and divorced in 1918. In 1921, he married an actress and writer named Mary Kennedy. They had a daughter, Joan Kennedy Taylor, in 1926, and divorced in 1934. Taylor married his third and final wife, costume designer Lucille Watson-Little, in 1945. They divorced eight years later. Taylor initially planned to become an architect; however, despite minimal musical training he soon took to music composition. The result was a series of works for orchestra and/or voices. In 1916 he wrote the cantata The Chambered Nautilus, followed by Through the Looking-Glass (for orchestra) in 1918, earning him public praise and recognition. In 1921 Taylor secured a job as music critic for the New York World, a post he held when approached by the Metropolitan Opera to suggest a composer to write
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Muhal Richard Abrams

    Muhal Richard Abrams

    Muhal Richard Abrams (born September 19, 1930, in Chicago, Illinois) is an American educator, administrator, composer, arranger, clarinetist, cellist, and jazz pianist in the Free jazz medium. Abrams compresses both contemporary and traditional ideas into lean, elegant pieces. Abrams attended DuSable High School in Chicago. By 1946, he decided to enroll in music classes at Roosevelt University. “I didn’t get too much out of that, because it wasn’t what I was hearing in the street,” he says. “I decided to study on my own. I don’t know why, but I’ve always had a natural ability to study and analyze things. I used that ability, not even knowing what it was (it was just a feeling) and started to read books." The books of Joseph Schillinger were very influential in Abrams' development. "From there, I acquired a small spinet piano and started to teach myself how to play the instrument and read the notes - or, first of all, what key the music was in. It took time and a lot of sweat. But I analyzed it and before long I was playing with the musicians on the scene. I listened to Art Tatum, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell and many others and concentrated on Duke and Fletcher
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Paolo Agostino

    Paolo Agostino

    Paolo Agostino (or Agostini; Augustinus in Latin; ca. 1583 – 1629) was an Italian composer and organist of the early Baroque era. He was born perhaps at Vallerano, near Viterbo. He studied under Giovanni Bernardino Nanino, according to the dedication in the third and fourth books of his masses. Subsequently, he married Nanino's daughter. He held a series of positions as organist and maestro di cappella (choirmaster) between 1607 and 1626, when he succeeded Vincenzo Ugolini as maestro of the Cappella Giulia's choir in St. Peter's Basilica. All of his surviving works are sacred music, and most are written in the prima pratica, the conservative polyphonic style of the late 16th century, although some of his motets use some of the new concertato style. He was a highly sophisticated contrapuntist, often using strict canonic techniques; in addition, he used colorful sonorities, changes of meter between sections, and colorful chromaticism, showing an acquaintanceship with contemporary secular practice as well as the work of the Venetian School. An Agnus Dei for eight voices is especially admired.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Per Nørgård

    Per Nørgård

    Per Nørgård (pronounced [ˈpʰeɐ̯ ˈnɶɐ̯ɡ̊ɒːˀ]) (born July 13, 1932) is a Danish composer. Nørgård was born in Gentofte, Denmark. He studied with Vagn Holmboe at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen, and subsequently with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. To begin with, he was strongly influenced by the Nordic styles of Jean Sibelius, Carl Nielsen and Vagn Holmboe. In the 1960s, Nørgård began exploring the modernist techniques of central Europe, eventually developing a serial compositional system based on the "infinity series" (Nørgård 1975), which he used in his Voyage into the Golden Screen, the Second and Third Symphonies, I Ching, and other works of the late 1960s and 70s (Mortensen [n.d.]). Later he became interested in the Swiss artist Adolf Wölfli, who inspired many of Nørgård's works (Anon [n.d.]), including the 4th symphony, the opera Det Guddommelige Tivoli and Papalagi for solo guitar. Nørgård has composed works in all major genres: six operas, two ballets, eight symphonies and other pieces for orchestra, several concertos, choral and vocal works, a very large number of chamber works (among them ten string quartets) and several solo instrumental works. These include a
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Samuel A. Ward

    Samuel A. Ward

    • Works Composed: America the Beautiful
    Samuel Augustus Ward (December 28, 1847 – September 28, 1903) was an American organist and composer. Born in Newark, New Jersey, Ward studied music in New York and became an organist at Grace Episcopal Church in Newark in 1880. He is remembered for his hymn "Materna" (1882) which was used for the anthem "America the Beautiful", with words by Katharine Lee Bates. However, Ward never met Bates. He died in 1903 in Newark and was buried in Mount Plea­sant Cem­e­te­ry. He was the last in an unbroken line of Samuel Wards beginning with Rhode Island Governor and Representative to the Continental Congress Samuel Ward. He had no children who lived to adulthood. Ward was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Antonio Caldara

    Antonio Caldara

    • Works Composed: Sebben, crudele
    Antonio Caldara (1670  – 28 December 1736) was an Italian Baroque composer. Caldara was born in Venice (exact date unknown), the son of a violinist. He became a chorister at St Mark's in Venice, where he learned several instruments, probably under the instruction of Giovanni Legrenzi. In 1699 he relocated to Mantua, where he became maestro di cappella to the inept Charles IV, Duke of Mantua, a pensionary of France with a French wife, who took the French side in the War of the Spanish Succession. Caldara removed from Mantua in 1707, after the French were expelled from Italy, then moved on to Barcelona as chamber composer to Charles VI of Austria, the pretender to the Spanish throne who kept a royal court at Barcelona. There, he wrote some operas that are the first Italian operas performed in Spain. He moved on to Rome, becoming maestro di cappella to Francesco Maria Marescotti Ruspoli, 1st Prince of Cerveteri. While there he wrote in 1710 La costanza in amor vince l'inganno (Faithfulness in Love Defeats Treachery) for the public theatre at Macerata. In 1716, he obtained a similar post in Vienna to serve the Imperial Court, and there he remained until his death. Caldara is best known
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    Dimitri Klebanov

    Dimitri Klebanov

    Dmitri Lvovich Klebanov (Ukrainian: Дмитрo Львович Клебанiв; Russian: Дмитрий Львович Клебанов; 25 July [O.S. 12 July] 1907 in Kharkiv – 6 June 1987 in Kharkiv) was a renowned Ukrainian composer. He studied at the Kharkiv Music and Drama Institute (graduated 1926) with S. Bogatyryov. He taught at the Kharkiv Conservatory (professor, 1960). Among his students were Valentin Bibik, Vitaliy Hubarenko, and Viktor Suslin. Ukrainian composer Dmitri Lvovich Klebanov (1907–1987) is one of a long row of Soviet composers who have more or less disappeared completely from sight. He composed in most genres, including operas and symphonies. Klebanov studied music academically as a pianist, violist, conductor, and composer, and became a professor of composition at the Kharkov Conservatory. In the late 1930s and early 1940s a couple of ballets, a violin concerto, and a symphony received major performances in Moscow and Kiev. Unfortunately, the first symphony "In Memoriam to the Martyrs of Baba Yar" (1945) fell afoul of Stalinist critics who found it anti-patriotic. Being accused of distortion of the historic truth about the Soviet people and of national narrow-mindedness it was exiled for a life in
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Emil von Sauer

    Emil von Sauer

    Emil Georg Conrad von Sauer (October 8, 1862 – April 27, 1942) was a notable German composer, pianist, score editor, and music (piano) teacher. He was a pupil of Franz Liszt and one of the most distinguished pianists of his generation. Josef Hofmann called von Sauer "a truly great virtuoso." Martin Krause, another Liszt pupil, called von Sauer "the legitimate heir of Liszt; he has more of his charm and geniality than any other Liszt pupil." Sauer was born in Hamburg, Germany on October 8, 1862 as Emil Georg Conrad Sauer. He studied with Nikolai Rubinstein at the Moscow Conservatory between 1879 and 1881. On an 1884 visit to Italy he met the Countess von Sayn-Wittgenstein, who recommended him to her former paramour, Franz Liszt. He went on to study with Liszt for two years, but did not for some time consider himself a Liszt pupil. In an 1895 interview, he even denied it: "It is not correct to regard me as a pupil of Liszt, though I stayed with him for a few months. He was then very old, and could not teach me much. My chief teacher has been, undoubtedly, Nicholas Rubinstein." In his later years, however, Sauer realized the influence of Liszt on himself and on music in general. From
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Harry B. Smith

    Harry B. Smith

    Harry Bache Smith ( December 28, 1860 – January 1, 1936 ) was a writer, lyricist and composer. The most prolific of all American stage writers, he is said to have written over 300 librettos and more than 6000 lyrics. Some of his best-known works were librettos for the composer Victor Herbert. He also wrote the book or lyrics for several versions of the Ziegfeld Follies. Harry was born in Buffalo, New York to Josiah Bailey Smith ( born 1837 ) and Elizabeth Bach ( born 1838 ). According to his autobiography First Nights and First Editions ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1931 ), Harry's actual name at birth was Henry Bach Smith. Harry married twice. His first wife was Lena Reed ( born August 21, 1868 ), whom he married on October 12, 1887 in Chicago, Illinois. Harry and Lena had a son named Sydney Reed Smith ( born July 15, 1892 ). Harry's second wife was the actress Irene M. Bentley ( 1870 - June 3, 1940 ). Harry married Irene on November 23, 1906 in Boston, Massachusetts, after she had been divorced on June 12, 1906 by her first husband James Thomas Sothoron, Jr. ( 1867–1913 ). Irene retired from the stage in 1910, and died at Allenhurst, New Jersey. She is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery (
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    James Swearingen

    James Swearingen

    James Swearingen is an American composer and arranger. He holds a Masters Degree from Ohio State University and a Bachelors Degree from Bowling Green State University and is currently Professor of Music, Department Chair of Music Education at Capital University, Columbus, Ohio. The music he writes is part of a small genre known throughout American high school band classes as Concert Literature, generally two to six-minute long pieces played for high school band concerts. He is a recipient of numerous ASCAP awards. He is currently one of several resident composers at Capital University and also serves as a staff arranger for The Ohio State University Marching Band. Prior to his appointment at Capital in 1987, he spent eighteen years teaching instrumental music in the public schools of central Ohio. His first teaching assignment took him to the community of Sunbury, Ohio. He then spent fourteen years as Director of Instrumental Music at Grove City High School, where his marching, concert and jazz bands all received acclaim for their high standards of performing excellence. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, Swearingen manages to be very active as a guest conductor,
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Johanna Kinkel

    Johanna Kinkel

    Johanna Kinkel (8 July 1810 – 15 November 1858) was a German composer, writer, and revolutionary. Kinkel was born in Bonn. In 1840, after five months of unhappy marriage, she was divorced from the Cologne bookseller Matthieux. Her second marriage, in 1843, was to the German poet Gottfried Kinkel. They had four children. Following the 1848 Revolutions she was forced to abandon Germany and flee to London. She was found dead in her garden in 1858 from a fall; although suicide was suspected, there was no way to verify this. Her tombstone was inscribed Freiheit, Liebe und Dichtung (meaning Freedom, Love, and Poetry). Kinkel was an author of considerable merit. She wrote on musical subjects, including regular review articles of music events for the Bonner Zeitung, a newspaper she and her husband edited in cooperation with Carl Schurz. An autobiographical novel of hers, Hans Ibeles in London, was published posthumously in 1860. She also had a substantial output of musical compositions. Many of these compositions were written for the Maikäferbund (Maikäfer Group — the Maikäfer being the beetle Melolontha melolontha which emerges from the ground in May), a group of poets — or people who
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Kyrylo Stetsenko

    Kyrylo Stetsenko

    Kyrylo Hryhorovych Stetsenko (Ukrainian: Кирило Григорович Стеценко) (May 12, 1882 – April 29, 1922) was a prolific Ukrainian composer, conductor, critic, and teacher. Late in his life he became a Ukrainian Orthodox Priest and head of the Music section of the Ministry of Education of the short-lived Ukrainian People's Republic. Kyrylo Stetsenko was born in Kvitkiv, in the land of Cherkashchyna, in Ukraine. His father, Hryhoriy Mykhailovych, was a painter of icons and was known around for painting churches in nearby villages. His mother, Maria Ivanivna, was the daughter of a deacon in the same village. Kyrylo was eighth of eleven children. When Kyrylo Stetsenko was aged 10, his uncle (mother's brother) Danylo Horyanskyi took him to study at the Saint Sophia Church School, where the boy was enrolled for five years, from 1892 to 1897. The young boy lived with his uncle in Kyiv, only returning home to his parents during the summer. However, since his family was poor, the boy had to work during this "vacation", and his mother would spend the money that he earned on on new clothes for him. During his studies at the school, Stestenko sang in the school choir and after three years, he
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Orlando Gibbons

    Orlando Gibbons

    Orlando Gibbons (baptised 25 December 1583 – 5 June 1625) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day. Gibbons was born in and christened at Oxford – thus appearing in Oxford church records. Between 1596 and 1598 he sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where his brother Edward Gibbons (1568–1650), eldest of the four sons of William Gibbons, was master of the choristers. The second brother Ellis Gibbons (1573–1603) was also a promising composer, but died young. Orlando entered the university in 1598 and achieved the degree of Bachelor of Music in 1606. James I appointed him a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, where he served as an organist from at least 1615 until his death. In 1623 he became senior organist at the Chapel Royal, with Thomas Tomkins as junior organist. He also held positions as keyboard player in the privy chamber of the court of Prince Charles (later King Charles I), and organist at Westminster Abbey. He died at age 41 in Canterbury of apoplexy, and a monument to him was built in Canterbury Cathedral. A suspicion immediately arose that Gibbons had died of
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Paul Dirmeikis

    Paul Dirmeikis

    Paul Dirmeikis (b. 1954, Chicago, Illinois, United States) is a Francophone poet, composer, singer, and painter who lives in Brittany. He is of Lithuanian ancestry (Kazlauskaitė 2003, 13), and a member of the Lithuanian Composers Union. Seventy compositions are now listed in his catalogue, including: Paul Dirmeikis has been working since 2003 on a 22-part cycle, TAROT, for various instruments and/or electronic and concrete music.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Rikard Nordraak

    Rikard Nordraak

    • Works Composed: Ja, vi elsker dette landet
    Rikard Nordraak (12 June 1842 – 20 March 1866) was a Norwegian composer. He is best known as the composer of the Norwegian national anthem. Rikard Nordraak was born and grew up in Oslo, Norway. His family came from the Nordraak farm in the Randsfjorden area in the county of Oppland. His father was a brother of Inger Elise Nordraach, the mother of the Norwegian writer and poet, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson. Nordraak's musical gifts became evident at an early age, but as for many other artists at that time, a different career was already planned. He was going to pursue a career within business, and when he was fifteen he was sent to business school in Copenhagen. Nonetheless his musical interests prevailed and instead of studying business he ended up studying music, and in 1859 he went to Berlin for advanced studies. After six months he had to return home and he continued studies in Oslo, and his first compositions came during the winter of 1859–60. In 1861 he went back to Berlin to continue his studies, and he stayed there for two more years. The compositions that he himself marked opus 1 were published in 1863, and contained six songs with texts by his cousin Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson,
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Tomaž Pengov

    Tomaž Pengov

    Tomaž Pengov is a Slovenian singer-songwriter, guitarist, lutist, and poet. He was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, then part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. He recorded his first album Odpotovanja in 1973. This album is considered to be the first singer-songwriter album in former Yugoslavia It was reissued in 1981 in stereo; the original mono edition is very rare now. Pengov sings and plays lute, steel-string acoustic guitar and twelve-string guitar. His music is lauded by many as being original, and his style is very similar to that of the early Leonard Cohen. He took eight years, from 1980 to 1988, to record his second album, Pripovedi, recorded with guest musicians. The music is still acoustic, but more varied. In the 1990s, he recorded two more albums, Rimska cesta (1992) and Biti tu (1995). In 2011, he published the audiobook Drevo in zvezda (Tree and Star), in which he recites his poems.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Friedrich Kiel

    Friedrich Kiel

    Friedrich Kiel (8 October 1821 – 13 September 1885) was a German composer and music teacher. Writing of the chamber music of Friedrich Kiel, the famous scholar and critic Wilhelm Altmann notes that it was Kiel’s extreme modesty which kept him and his exceptional works from receiving the consideration they deserved. After mentioning Johannes Brahms and others, Altmann writes, “He produced a number of chamber works, which . . . need fear no comparison.” Kiel was born in Bad Laasphe, Puderbach. He was taught the rudiments of music and received his first piano lessons from his father, but was in large part self-taught. Something of a prodigy, he played the piano almost without instruction at the age of six, and by his thirteenth year he had composed much music. Kiel eventually came to the attention of Prince Albrecht Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, a great music lover. Through the Prince's efforts, Kiel was allowed to study violin with the concertmaster of the Prince’s fine orchestra with which he later performed as a soloist. Kiel was also given theory lessons from the renowned flautist Kaspar Kummer. By 1840, the eighteen-year-old Kiel was court conductor and the music teacher to the
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Henry Hugo Pierson

    Henry Hugo Pierson

    Henry Hugh Pearson (12 April 1815–28 January 1873) was an English composer resident from 1845 in Germany. He is also known as Edgar Mansfeld, and when living in Germany as Heinrich Hugo Pierson. He had success in his adopted country with his operas and songs but little in his own, and his music is now rarely performed. Hubert Parry took lessons with him in 1867. Many of Pierson's manuscript full and vocal scores, including those of his oratorios and operas, appear not to have survived. The funeral march Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet and The Maid of Orleans were his only orchestral compositions to be published in full score (copies of which are held by the Library of Congress amongst other locations), whilst Jerusalem and Faust were only published in vocal score, with no orchestral material seeming to be extant. His operas remained unpublished, excepting the libretti. Manuscript material for several works does, however, survive including the Romantische Ouverture (orchestral parts, University Of Pennsylvania Library Ms Coll 217), Salve eternum (full score, Royal College of Music, London, RCM MS 502), the funeral march Hamlet (full score, Landesbibliothek, Coburg, Ms Mus 364),
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Johann Adam Hiller

    Johann Adam Hiller

    • Works Composed: Lisuart und Dariolette
    Johann Adam Hiller (25 December 1728, Wendisch-Ossig, Saxony – 16 June 1804, Leipzig) was a German composer, conductor and writer on music, regarded as the creator of the Singspiel, an early form of German opera. In many of these operas he collaborated with the poet Christian Felix Weiße. Furthermore, Hiller was a teacher who encouraged musical education for women, his pupils including Elisabeth Mara and Corona Schröter. He was Kapellmeister of Abel Seyler's theatrical company, and became the first Kapellmeister of Leipzig Gewandhaus. By the death of his father in 1734, Hiller was left dependent to a large extent on the charity of friends. He came from a musical family, and also learned the basics of music from a school master in his home town, Wendisch-Ossig. From 1740 to 1745, he was a student at the Gymnasium in Görlitz, where his fine soprano voice earned him free tuition. In 1746 he went to study at the famous Kreuzschule in Dresden. There he took keyboard and basso continuo lessons with Gottfried August Homilius. In 1751, he enrolled in the University of Leipzig to study law, supporting himself by giving music lessons, and also by performing at concerts both on the flute and
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Karol Lipiński

    Karol Lipiński

    Karol Józef Lipiński (30 October 1790 – 16 December 1861) was a Polish virtuoso violinist and composer. Lipiński was born in Radzyń Podlaski. In 1810 he became the first violin and two years later the conductor of the opera orchestra at Lwów (now Lviv, Ukraine). In 1817 he went to Italy in the hope of hearing Niccolò Paganini. The two met in Milan, met daily to play, and even performed two concerts together in April 1818, which added immensely to Lipiński's reputation. Paganini dedicated his Burlesque Variations on "La Carnaval de Venise", Op. 10 for unaccompanied violin to Lipiński. Later, in 1827, Lipiński returned the honour by dedicating his "Three Caprices for Violin" to Paganini. In 1818 on his return to Germany he stopped in Trieste to receive instruction from Dr Mazzurana, a very elderly former pupil of Giuseppe Tartini; Mazzurana was ninety years old, and could no longer play himself, but gave his criticism of Lipiński's performance of one of Tartini's sonatas. In 1820 he travelled to Berlin where he met Louis Spohr, and to Russia. In 1829 he went to Warsaw, and played a series of concerts with Paganini that summer that were attended by the nineteen-year-old Frédéric
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Nicola Fago

    Nicola Fago

    Francesco Nicola Fago, 'II Tarantino' (26 February 1677 – 18 February 1745) was an Italian Baroque composer and teacher. He was the father of Lorenzo Fago (1704-1793). Born in Taranto, he studied music under Francesco Provenzale at the Conservatorio della Pietà dei Turchini in Naples between 1693 and 1695. Between 1704 and 1708 he worked at the Conservatorio Sant'Onofrio, but from 1705 to 1740 he was based at the Conservatorio della Pietà dei Turchini, where his pupils included Leonardo Leo, Francesco Feo, Giuseppe de Majo, Niccolo Jommelli, Nicola Sala, Michele de Falco, Carmine Giordani as well as his own son Lorenzo Fago. From 1709 to 1731 he also served at the Tesoro di San Gennaro. He died in Naples in 1745.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Rutland Boughton

    Rutland Boughton

    • Works Composed: The Immortal Hour
    Rutland Boughton (23 January 1878 – 25 January 1960) was an English composer who became well known in the early 20th century as a composer of opera and choral music. A pupil of Charles Villiers Stanford and Walford Davies, Boughton's output included three symphonies, several concertos, part-songs, songs, chamber music and opera (which he called "Music Drama" after Wagner). His best known work was the opera The Immortal Hour. His Bethlehem (1915), based on the Coventry Nativity Play and notable for its choral arrangements of traditional Christmas carols also became very popular with choral societies worldwide. Other operas by Boughton were: The Birth of Arthur (1913), The Round Table (1916), The Lily Maid (1934), Avalon and Galahad (1945) (all four from the Arthurian cycle of music dramas), The Moon Maiden (1919), Alkestis (1922), and The Queen of Cornwall (1924). Through the Boughton Trust (see below), many of his major works have been recorded and are available on disc including The Immortal Hour, Bethlehem, Symphony No 1 Oliver Cromwell, Symphony No 2 Deirdre, Symphony No 3, Oboe Concerto No 1, string quartets and various chamber pieces and songs. In addition to his compositions,
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Jean Paul Egide Martini

    Jean Paul Egide Martini

    • Works Composed: Plaisir d'Amour
    Jean Paul Égide Martini, (August 31, 1741 – February 10, 1816) was a composer of classical music. Sometimes known as Martini Il Tedesco, he is best known today for the vocal romance "Plaisir d'Amour," on which the 1961 Elvis Presley standard "Can't Help Falling in Love" is based. He is sometimes referred to as Giovanni Martini, resulting in a confusion with Giovanni Battista Martini, particularly with regard to the composition Plaisir d'Amour. Martini was born Johann Paul Aegidius Schwarzendorf in Freystadt, Bavaria. He adopted the family name Martini after moving to France as a young man. There, he established a successful career as a court musician. Having directed concerts for the Queen, he adapted to the changing regimes throughout the French Revolution, and later wrote music for Napoleon's marriage as well as for the restored Royal Chapel. In 1764, he married Marguerite Camelot. His melodic opera L'amoureux de quinze ans written in 1771 enjoyed great success. In addition, his highly popular church music combined old forms with modern theatricality, and his chansons including "Plaisir D'Amour" were influential. In 1800 he became a professor of composition at the Paris
    5.25
    4 votes
    152
    Samuel Adler

    Samuel Adler

    Samuel Hans Adler (born March 4, 1928) is an American (German-born) composer and conductor. Adler was born to a Jewish family in Mannheim, Germany, the son of Hugo Chaim Adler, a cantor and composer, and Selma Adler. The family fled to the United States in 1939, where Hugo became the cantor of Temple Emanuel in Worcester, Massachusetts. Sam followed his father into the music profession, earning degrees from Boston University and Harvard University (where he studied with Aaron Copland, Paul Hindemith, Paul Pisk, Walter Piston, and Randall Thompson and earned an M.A. in 1950). He studied conducting with Serge Koussevitzky at Tanglewood in 1949. Adler has been awarded honorary doctorates from Southern Methodist and Wake Forest Universities, St. Mary’s College of Notre Dame and the St. Louis Conservatory of Music. While serving in the United States Army (1950–1952), Adler founded and conducted the Seventh Army Symphony Orchestra. After his military service he was offered a conducting position just vacated by Leonard Bernstein on the faculty of Brandeis University but instead accepted a position as music director at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas, Texas, where the rabbi, Levi Olan, was a
    5.25
    4 votes
    153
    Alvin Curran

    Alvin Curran

    Composer Alvin Curran (born December 13, 1938), is the co-founder, with Frederic Rzewski and Richard Teitelbaum, of Musica Elettronica Viva, and a former student of Elliott Carter. Curran's music often makes use of electronics and environmental found sounds. Curran was born in Providence, Rhode Island. He was a professor of music at Mills College in California until 2006 and now teaches privately in Rome, Italy, and sporadically at various institutions. His works include solo performance pieces such as Endangered Species, TransDadaExpress, and Shofar; radio works such as Crystal Psalms, Un Altro Ferragosto, I Dreamt John Cage Yodeling at the Zurich Hauptbahnhof, and Living Room Music; large scale musical choreographic works such as Oh Brass on the Grass Alas, for 300 amateur brass-band musicians, and the Maritime Rites series of performances on and near water; sound installation works such as Magic Carpet, Floor Plan, The Twentieth Century, and Gardening with John; chamber music such as For Cornelius for piano, the trio Schtyx, the string quartet VSTO, the saxophone quartet Electric Rags II, the percussion quartet THEME PARK, a series of works for chorus SATB, and the work for
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    David Hogan

    David Hogan

    David Hogan (July 1, 1949 in Nokesville, Virginia – July 17, 1996 off East Moriches, New York) was a composer and musical director of CIGAP -- Le Choeur Int'l Gai de Paris -- a choir made up of men who loved music and wanted to show pride in their identity as gay men. A native of Virginia, Hogan graduated from the Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins University with a bachelor's degree in 1971, and would go on to earn a master's degree in voice in 1975. He would later help found The Walden School, a summer program based on the campus of Dublin School in Dublin, New Hampshire. When the previous musical director of CIGAP resigned three weeks before its auditions, Hogan was tapped to fill in the position. During his tenure, he whipped CIGAP members into shape, chorally and vocally. During his career, Hogan had also been tenor soloist with the Washington National Cathedral (Episcopal) in Washington, DC. Hogan and CIGAP baritone Jean-Paul Galland were killed when TWA Flight 800 exploded off the coast of Long Island, killing all 230 passengers and crew on board. Choral Works Magnificat and Nunc dimittis "Washington", unison treble/organ (written for the Choir Washington National Cathedral
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Ervin Drake

    Ervin Drake

    • Works Composed: Good Morning Heartache
    Ervin Drake, born Ervin Maurice Druckman (April 3, 1919) is an American songwriter whose works include such American Songbook standards as "It Was a Very Good Year". He has written in a variety of styles and his work has been recorded by musicians from all over the world in a multitude of styles. In 1983, he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Born in New York City, New York Ervin Drake had his first song published at age 12, in 1931. The son of Max Druckman and Pearl Cohen, he attended Townsend Harris High School in the borough of The Bronx, New York, graduating in 1935, and went on to receive a bachelor of arts degree in social science from the City College of New York in 1940. His elder brother, Milton, also became a songwriter, with work including "The Java Jive" and "Nina Never Knew"; and his younger brother Arnold Drake, become a writer for DC Comics, Marvel Comics, and others, as well as an author and playwright. Duke Ellington's recording of Perdido (music by Juan Tizol and lyrics by Ervin Drake) was a highlight in the young composer's career. Besides composing music and lyrics for dozens of pieces he was also a television producer and worked with performers
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    John Stanley

    John Stanley

    Charles John Stanley (17 January 1712 – 19 May 1786) was an English composer and organist. John Stanley was born in London on 17 January 1712. At about the age of two, he had the misfortune to fall on a marble hearth with a china basin in his hand, an accident which left him almost blind. He began studying music at the age of seven. Under the guidance of Maurice Greene, composer and organist at St. Paul's Cathedral, he studied "with great diligence, and a success that was astonishing" (Burney). At the age of nine he played the organ, probably as an occasional deputy, at All Hallows Bread Street. The organist died on 23 September 1723 and exactly one month later eleven-year-old Stanley was appointed organist to the church at a salary of £20 per annum. When he was fourteen "in preference to a great number of candidates" (Burney) he was chosen as organist at St Andrew's, Holborn and at the age of seventeen became the youngest person ever to obtain the Bachelor of Music degree (B.Mus.) at Oxford University. In 1734 he was appointed organist to the Society of the Inner Temple - a position which he held until his death in 1786. It was at the ancient Temple Church that his brilliant
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Maurice Greene

    Maurice Greene

    • Works Composed: Hearken Unto Me Ye Holy Children
    Maurice Greene (12 August 1696 – 1 December 1755) was an English composer and organist. Born in London, the son of a clergyman, Greene became a choirboy at St Paul's Cathedral under Jeremiah Clarke and Charles King. He studied the organ under Richard Brind, and after Brind died, Greene became organist at St Paul's. With the death of William Croft in 1727, Greene became organist at the Chapel Royal, and in 1730 he became Professor of Music at Cambridge University. In 1735 he was appointed Master of the King's Musick. At his death, Greene was working on the compilation Cathedral Music, which his student and successor as Master of the King's Musick, William Boyce, was to complete. Many items from that collection are still used in Anglican services today. He wrote very competent music in the Georgian style, particularly long Verse Anthems. However his acknowledged masterpiece, Lord, let me know mine end, is a Full Anthem. Greene sets a text full of pathos using a polyphonic texture over a continuous instrumental walking bass, with a particularly effective treble duet in the middle of the work. Both this section and the end of the anthem contain superb examples of the Neapolitan sixth
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    William Walker

    William Walker

    William Walker (May 6, 1809 – September 24, 1875) was an American Baptist song leader, shape note "singing master", and compiler of four shape note tunebooks, most notable of which was The Southern Harmony. Walker was born in Martin's Mills (near Cross Keys), South Carolina, and grew up near Spartanburg. To distinguish him from other William Walkers in Spartanburg, he was nicknamed Singing Billy. He married Amy Golightly, whose sister Thurza married Benjamin Franklin White, publisher of The Sacred Harp, and died in Spartanburg in 1875. Walker is buried in Magnolia Cemetery, Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, SC. In 1835, Walker published a tunebook entitled The Southern Harmony, using the four-shape shape note system of notation. This collection was revised in 1840, 1847 and 1854. In 1846 he issued The Southern and Western Pocket Harmonist. Intended as an appendix to the Southern Harmony, the Pocket Harmonist contains a large number of camp-meeting songs with refrains. In 1867 (preface signed October 1866), Walker published a tunebook entitled Christian Harmony, in which he adopted a seven shape notation. He incorporated over half of the contents of The Southern Harmony in the
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Alois Hába

    Alois Hába

    Alois Hába (21 June 1893 – 18 November 1973) was a Czech composer, musical theorist and teacher. He is primarily known for his microtonal compositions, especially using the quarter tone scale, though he used others such as sixth-tones and twelfth-tones. Hába was born at Vizovice, Moravia, into a musical family; his brother Karel Hába was also a composer, and their father was a folk musician. He began to compose during the studies in Kroměříž (1908–12). He was a student of composer Vítězslav Novák in 1914–15 at the Prague Conservatory, graduated with a Sonata for Violin and Piano. Hába studied also at the Imperial Academy of Music and the Performing Arts in Vienna (1918–20), where among his teachers was Richard Stöhr, and in Berlin 1920–22. In 1920, as a student of Franz Schreker, he composed his first quarter-tone work—String Quartet No. 2. He was supported by Josef Suk and with his help was able to found a microtonal department of teaching and research at the Prague Conservatory in 1924. In 1923–48 he worked first as an instructor, later (since 1936) as professor at the Prague Conservatory. During World War II, Hába was endangered by Nazis, because he tried to help his Jewish
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Bob Powell

    Bob Powell

    Bob Powell (1961 - ) is a U.S. composer. In 2004 Bob released the Bob Powell Anthology as open source audio on the Internet. Discography also includes Evil Flower Volume One, Dreamscape Of The Falcon, Pussywillow Patch, Pretzel Head, Room 417, Leftover Noodles and Los Angeles. Born in Rochester, New York, Bob currently lives in self imposed exile in Los Angeles, California working on solo projects and does not believe in collaboration or groups of any kind. "Bob is a wandering minstrel, and as our greedy time has harvested every attention, he's sneaking into neighboring backyards while we're sleeping, luring lucid dreamers to pasture. It may be years before he hops your fence, and longer still will his tales of irreversible lovliness shake your sealed windows and charm your fluffy warm blankets before you repent....but you must!! This music will slip in and out of your indecision, ring true when the bells are tolling, and rest on your weary back as wings whilst you run with hastened resignation for the hills....and like a wandering minstrel, gone far too soon." - Tom Grimley Room 417 is Part Two of Pretzel Head Trilogy by Bob Powell, released in the year 2002 as open source audio.
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Chevalier de Saint-Georges

    Chevalier de Saint-Georges

    Joseph Bo(u)logne, Chevalier de Saint-George (sometimes erroneously spelled Saint-Georges) (December 25, 1745 – June 10, 1799) was an important figure in the Paris musical scene in the second half of the 18th century as composer, conductor, and violinist. Prior to the revolution in France, he was also famous as a swordsman and equestrian. Known as the "black Mozart" he was one of the earliest musicians of the European classical type known to have African ancestry. Joseph Bologne was born in Guadeloupe to Nanon, a Wolof former slave, and a white French plantation owner, Georges Bologne de Saint-George. Although his father called himself de Saint-George, after one of his properties, he was not born into the nobility. Some biographers have mistaken him for Pierre Tavernier-Boulogne, Controller-General of Finances, whose nobility dated back to the 15th century. The confusion surrounding the nobility of Saint-George's father originated with Roger de Beauvoir’s novel of 1840 ("Le Chevalier de Saint-George"). However, Georges Bologne was not ennobled until 1757, when he acquired the title of Gentilhomme ordinaire de la chambre du roi, and noble rank was hereditary only for children born
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Heinz Holliger

    Heinz Holliger

    • Works Composed: Schneewittchen
    Heinz Holliger (born 21 May 1939) is a Swiss oboist, composer and conductor. He was born in Langenthal, Switzerland, and began his musical education at the conservatories of Bern and Basel. He studied composition with Sándor Veress and Pierre Boulez. Holliger took first prize for oboe in the International Competition in Geneva in 1959. He has become one of the world's most celebrated oboists, and many composers (including Olivier Messiaen, Luciano Berio, Elliott Carter, Frank Martin, Hans Werner Henze, Witold Lutosławski, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Isang Yun) have written works for him. He began teaching at the Hochschule für Musik Freiburg, Germany in 1966. In 1972 Holliger, Maurice Bourgue (oboe), Klaus Thunemann (bassoon), and Christiane Jaccottet (continuo) et al. recorded the Six Trio Sonatas for Oboe and Bassoon by Jan Dismas Zelenka. This recording is credited for the "Zelenka Renaissance". Holliger has also composed many works in a variety of media. Many of his works have been recorded for the ECM label. Invited by Walter Fink, he was the 17th composer featured in the annual Komponistenporträt of the Rheingau Musik Festival in 2007 in chamber music and a symphonic concert
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Johann Baptist Cramer

    Johann Baptist Cramer

    Johann Baptist Cramer (24 February 1771 – 16 April 1858) was an English musician of German origin. He was the son of Wilhelm Cramer, a famous London violinist and musical conductor, one of a numerous family who were identified with the progress of music during the 18th and 19th centuries. Cramer was born in Mannheim and was brought to London as a child, where he worked for most of his musical career, lived most of his life and died. From 1782 to 1784, he studied piano under Muzio Clementi and soon became a renowned professional pianist both in London and on the continent. He enjoyed a worldwide reputation, and was particularly appreciated by Beethoven when he visited Vienna, concertized and competed with him. Both were considered the greatest pianists of their time, Beethoven excelling in interpretive expressiveness, Cramer in pure technical perfection. He was the English publisher of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 5 and is credited with giving it its nickname, "The Emperor". Cramer was one of the most renowned piano performers of his day. He met Beethoven in Vienna, initiating a mutually rewarding relationship, while renewing his friendship with Haydn. After 1800, he was based
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Stephen Schwartz

    Stephen Schwartz

    • Works Composed: Defying Gravity
    Stephen Lawrence Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theatre lyricist and composer. In a career spanning over four decades, Schwartz has written such hit musicals as Godspell (1971), Pippin (1972) and Wicked (2003). He has also contributed lyrics for a number of successful films, including Pocahontas (1995), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Pippi Longstocking (1997), The Prince of Egypt (1998; music and lyrics) and Enchanted (2007). Schwartz has won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lyrics, three Grammy Awards, three Academy Awards and has been nominated for six Tony Awards. Schwartz was born in New York City, the son of Sheila Lorna (née Siegal), a teacher, and Stanley Leonard Schwartz, who worked in business. He grew up in the Williston Park area of Nassau County, New York, where he graduated from Mineola High School in 1964. He also studied piano and composition at the Juilliard School while attending high school. Schwartz graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 1968 with a BFA in drama. Upon returning to New York City, Schwartz went to work as a producer for RCA Records, but shortly thereafter began to work in the Broadway theatre. He was asked to be
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Gustav Ernesaks

    Gustav Ernesaks

    Gustav Ernesaks (12 December 1908 in Peningi, Governorate of Estonia, Russian Empire – 24 January 1993 in Tallinn, Estonia) was an Estonian composer and a choir conductor. He played an integral role in the Singing Revolution and was one of the father figures of the Estonian Song Festival tradition; one of his songs, set to Lydia Koidula's poem Mu isamaa on minu arm, became an unofficial national anthem during the years of Soviet occupation; ironically, he was also the composer of the Anthem of Estonian SSR used between 1945 and 1990. A statue of him was erected in 2004 on the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Hans Bronsart von Schellendorff

    Hans Bronsart von Schellendorff

    Hans Bronsart von Schellendorff (11 February 1830 – 3 November 1913) was a classical musician and composer who studied under Franz Liszt. (Some sources write Schellendorf with one F, but the correct German surname of this family is written with double FF). (Source: Adelslexikon) Bronsart von Schellendorff (also called Bronsart - see) was born into a Prussian military family, and educated at Berlin University. He studied piano with Adolph Jullack. He went to Weimar in 1853 where he met Liszt and became familiar with all the musicians in Liszt's circle at the time, including Hector Berlioz and Johannes Brahms. It is a measure of his close relationship with Liszt that it was he who played the solo part in the first Weimar performance of Liszt's second piano concerto, with the composer conducting. When the concerto was published, Liszt dedicated it to Bronsart. After having trained for several years with Liszt, he worked as a conductor in Leipzig and Berlin, and then took the post of general manager of the royal theatre in Hanover from 1867 to 1887. He held a similar post in Weimar from 1887 until his retirement in 1895. He met his second wife Ingeborg Bronsart von Schellendorf (née
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Jan A. P. Kaczmarek

    Jan A. P. Kaczmarek

    Jan Andrzej Paweł Kaczmarek (born 29 April 1953) is a Polish composer who has lived and worked in the United States since 1989. He has written the scores for more than 50 feature films and documentaries, including Finding Neverland (2005), for which score he won an Academy Award and National Board of Review award. Other notable scores were for Unfaithful, Evening, The Visitor (2008), and Washington Square. Jan A.P. Kaczmarek was born in 1953 in Konin, Poland. Studying music from an early age, he graduated in law studies from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. In the late 1970s, Kaczmarek started working with Jerzy Grotowski and his innovative Theater Laboratory. He created the Orchestra of the Eighth Day in 1977. He recorded his first album, Music for the End (1982), for the United States (US) company Flying Fish Records. In 1989, Kaczmarek moved to Los Angeles, California in the US. In 1992 he won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music in a Play for his incidental music for 'Tis Pity She's a Whore. His music has been released by Sony Classical, Decca, Varèse Sarabande, Verve, Epic, Milan, and Savitor Records. He gives concerts in the United States and Europe. In 2005,
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Jérôme-Joseph de Momigny

    Jérôme-Joseph de Momigny

    Jérôme-Joseph de Momigny (20 January 1762 – 25 August 1842) was a Belgian/French composer and music-theorist. He was born in Philippeville, Belgium, and composed music and wrote books, which he printed himself. He was very good at writing poetry and other types of books. His theories about rhythm and musical phrasing were ahead of his time. From 1803 to 1806 he published his most notorious work Cours complet d'harmonie et de composition, d'après une théorie neuve et générale de la musique (in 3 volumes). It features, among others, a new theory about the significance of the upbeat over the downbeat, which was later taken up by Hugo Riemann. Stressing the upbeat instead of the downbeat as commonly taught, gives a jazzlike and fluid quality to all music. This upbeat-phrasing is one of the main characteristics of jazz, but a few classical interpreters use it as well. He died in France in 1842 in the Charenton asylum.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Jim McNeely

    Jim McNeely

    Jim McNeely (born May 18, 1949) is a Grammy award winning jazz pianist, composer, and arranger. Jim was born in Chicago, Illinois. He earned a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Illinois, and moved to New York City in 1975. In 1978 he joined the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Big Band. He spent six years as a featured soloist with that band and its successor, Mel Lewis and the Jazz Orchestra (now The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.) 1981 saw the beginning of Jim’s 4-year tenure as pianist/composer with the Stan Getz Quartet. From 1990 until 1995 he held the piano chair in the Phil Woods Quintet. In 1996 he re-joined the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra as pianist and composer-in-residence, a position that he still holds. From 1998 to 2003 he was chief conductor of the DR Big Band in Copenhagen, Denmark, and is currently chief conductor of the HR (Hessischer Rundfunk) Big Band in Frankfurt, Germany. He continues to appear as guest with many of Europe's leading jazz orchestras such as The Metropole Orchestra (The Netherlands) and The Stockholm Jazz Orchestra (Sweden). Jim also leads his own tentet, his own trio, and appears as soloist at concerts and festivals worldwide. He has recorded more than
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Joseph Marx

    Joseph Marx

    Joseph Rupert Rudolf Marx (May 11, 1882, Graz - September 3, 1964, Graz) was an Austrian composer, teacher and critic. Marx pursued studies in philosophy, art history, German studies, and music at Graz University, earning several degrees including a doctorate in 1909. He began composing seriously in 1908 and over the next four years he produced around 120 songs. In 1914 he joined the faculty of the Vienna Music Academy, later becoming the institution's director in 1922. When the school was reorganized as the Hochschule für Musik in 1924 he was appointed to the position of rector, holding that post for three years. Some of his notable students include Johann Nepomuk David and Paul Ulanowsky. From 1931 to 1938 he was music critic for the Neues Wiener Journal and following World War II he was critic for the Wiener Zeitung. A collection of Marx's criticisms and essays, Betrachtungen eines romantischen Realisten was published in Vienna in 1947. Just before he died he published a book on acoustics, tonality, aesthetics and musical philosophy entitled Weltsprache Musik (Vienna, 1964). As a composer Marx is chiefly remembered for his vocal music contributions, particularly his more than
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Louis-Claude Daquin

    Louis-Claude Daquin

    Louis-Claude Daquin (or d'Acquin), (July 4, 1694 – June 15, 1772) was a French composer of Jewish birth writing in the Baroque and Galant styles. He was a virtuoso organist and harpsichordist. Louis-Claude Daquin was born in Paris, to a family originating from Italy (where their name was D'Aquino). One of his great-uncles was a professor of Hebrew at the Collège de France. Daquin was a musical child prodigy. He performed for the court of King Louis XIV at the age of six. He was for a while a pupil of Louis Marchand. At the age of 12, he became organist at the Sainte-Chapelle, and in the following year took a similar post at the church of the Petit St. Antoine. Claude Daquin never lacked for work as an organist. In 1727 he was appointed organist at the church of St. Paul in Paris, ahead of Jean-Philippe Rameau who was also a candidate. Five years later he succeeded his teacher Louis Marchand as organist at the Église des Cordeliers. In 1739 he became organist to the king. In 1755 he was made titular organist at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris, succeeding Antoine Calvière. By reputation a dazzling performer at the keyboard, Daquin was courted by the aristocracy and his great
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Paweł Szymański

    Paweł Szymański

    Paweł Szymański (born 27 March 1954 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish composer. His music is based on strict technical discipline and the initial sound material of Szymański’s pieces has roots in past conventions but is always processed and composed from the beginning. Szymański himself talks of his music using the qualification “surconventionalism”.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Samuel Wesley

    Samuel Wesley

    Samuel Wesley (24 February 1766 – 11 October 1837) was an English organist and composer in the late Georgian period. Wesley was a contemporary of Mozart (1756–1791) and was called by some "the English Mozart." Born in Bristol, he was the son of noted Methodist and hymn-writer Charles Wesley, the grandson of Samuel Wesley (a poet of the late Stuart period) and the nephew of John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist church. Samuel informed his mother of his philosophical conviction that his marriage had been constituted by sexual intercourse, precluding any civil or religious ceremony, but after a scandalous delay he married Charlotte Louise Martin in 1793, and they had 3 children. A book published in 2001 provides a fascinating account of how Samuel Wesley's marriage to Charlotte finally broke up with her discovery of Samuel's affair with the teenage domestic servant Sarah Suter. Samuel and Sarah never married but had 4 children together, among them Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810–1876) who was a cathedral organist. In 1784, Wesley converted to Roman Catholicism. Samuel showed his musical talent early in life. He played the violin as well as the organ, and worked as a conductor as
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Grzegorz Turnau

    Grzegorz Turnau

    Grzegorz Turnau is a Polish composer, pianist, poet and singer. He was born on 31 July 1967 in Kraków, Poland. At age seventeen he won First Prize (Grand Prix) at The Student Song Festival in Kraków in 1984. He went on to join the Piwnica pod Baranami Cabaret, composing such hits as "Znów wędrujemy", and released his first album, Naprawdę nie dzieje się nic ("Really, nothing is happening") in 1991. He has released eleven albums to date, including one (Cafe Sułtan) made up of his own versions of songs by Jeremi Przybora and Jerzy Wasowski, and most have enjoyed considerable chart success. His characteristic style consists of strong, clear lyrics and music composed in special keys and harmonies, using instruments such as piano (played by himself), saxophone, violin and various horns. Influenced by such artists as Marek Grechuta and Jan Kanty Pawluśkiewicz, his music style has been described as "soft jazz". He did participate in the Aleksander Glondys's "Ellington po krakowsku" ("Ellington Kraków way"), a concert based upon idea of notable composers of Piwnica pod Baranami playing their interpretations of Duke`s music. Other participants include Pawluśkiewicz, Zbigniew Raj and several
    4.75
    4 votes
    175
    Antonio de Cabezón

    Antonio de Cabezón

    Antonio de Cabezón (30 March 1510 – 26 March 1566) was a Spanish Renaissance composer and organist. Blind from childhood, he quickly rose to prominence as performer and was eventually employed by the royal family. He was among the most important composers of his time and the first major Iberian keyboard composer. Cabezón was born in Castrillo Matajudíos, a municipality near Burgos, in the north of Spain. Nothing is known about his formative years. He became blind in early childhood, and he may have been educated at the Palencia Cathedral by the organist there, García de Baeza. At the time, the country was slowly entering its Golden Age. On 14 March 1516 Charles V was proclaimed King of Castile and of Aragon jointly with his mother, the first time the crowns of Castile and Aragon were united under the same king. After the death of his paternal grandfather, Maximilian, in 1519, Charles also inherited the Habsburg lands in Austria, and later went on to become Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire and one of the most powerful monarchs in the world. In 1525 Charles married Isabella of Portugal, further strengthening his position in Spain. It was Isabella who employed Cabezón into her service
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Barbara Strozzi

    Barbara Strozzi

    Barbara Strozzi (also called Barbara Valle; baptised 6 August 1619  – 11 November 1677) was an Italian Baroque singer and composer. Born in Venice, Barbara was adopted and baptized into the Strozzi family. She was most likely illegitimate, the daughter of Giulio Strozzi and Isabella Garzon, his long-time servant and heir. Giulio encouraged his daughter's talent, even creating an academy in which Barbara’s performances could be validated and displayed publicly. He seemed to be interested in exhibiting her considerable vocal talents to a wider audience. However, her singing was not her only talent. She was also compositionally gifted, and her father arranged for her to study with composer Francesco Cavalli. It is conceivable that Strozzi may have been a courtesan, however, she also may have merely been the target of jealous slander by her male contemporaries. She appears to have led a quiet, if not slightly unusual life; there is evidence that at least three of her four children were fathered by the same man, Giovanni Paolo Vidman. He may have been her husband or a paramour. After Vidman's death it is likely that Strozzi supported herself by means of her savvy investments and by her
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Deane Ogden

    Deane Ogden

    Deane Ogden (born November 26, 1974) is an American drummer and composer. As a film composer, Deane has written and conducted the scores for films such as Dreams on Spec, Family, Ball & Chain, Sharkskin 6, Lava Lounge, and Oranges. Deane has also written music for episodes of Survivor and LAX, and the TNT remake of Stephen King's 'Salem's Lot. He is the founder of SCOREcastOnline.com, an online community for film music industry professionals.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Morten Lauridsen

    Morten Lauridsen

    Morten Johannes Lauridsen (born February 27, 1943) is an American composer. A National Medal of Arts recipient (2007), he was composer-in-residence of the Los Angeles Master Chorale (1994–2001) and has been a professor of composition at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music for more than 40 years. A native of the Pacific Northwest, Lauridsen worked as a Forest Service firefighter and lookout (on an isolated tower near Mt. St. Helens) before traveling south to study composition at the University of Southern California with Ingolf Dahl, Halsey Stevens, Robert Linn, and Harold Owen He began teaching at USC in 1967 and has been on their faculty ever since. In 2006, Lauridsen was named an 'American Choral Master' by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2007 he received the National Medal of Arts from the President in a White House ceremony, "for his composition of radiant choral works combining musical beauty, power and spiritual depth that have thrilled audiences worldwide." His works have been recorded on more than 200 CDs, five of which have received Grammy Award nominations, including O Magnum Mysterium by the Tiffany Consort, A Company of Voices by
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Nicu Covaci

    Nicu Covaci

    Nicolae (Nicu) Covaci (born 19 April 1947 in Timişoara, Romania) is a Romanian painter, music composer, best known as the leader of Romanian Rock and cult band Phoenix, for which he is vocalist and guitar player, with more than 40 years of activity. Nicolae Covaci was born in Timişoara, on 19 April 1947. He took up playing guitar at the age of 15 and in 1962 he, together with Moni Bordeianu, founded a band called Sfinţii (The Saints). Monumental tours in Romania. PHOENIX releases a new 3 song maxi-CD with Numai Una, Iovano, and Ora-Hora and performs November concerts in Germany at "Works" and "Erdbeerblau" in Osnabrück, and in the "Osterfeldhalle" in Esslingen Baba Novak (2005) A new album, called Baba Novak is released. The guitarist Cristi Gram joins the band in 2004. The release of the album is followed by a tour of the band in many cities of Romania. Break-up (2007) Following some conflicts between Nicu Covaci and the vocalist of the band, Mircea Baniciu, the latter leaves Phoenix. Soon, the bassist, Ioji Kappl, and the violinist, Mani Neumann, leave the band. While Mani continues his musical activity with his band "Farfarello", in Germany, Mircea Baniciu hooks up with Ioji
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Emmanuel Chabrier

    Emmanuel Chabrier

    • Works Composed: Briséïs
    Emmanuel Chabrier (pronounced: [ɛmanɥɛl ʃabʁie]; January 18, 1841 – September 13, 1894) was a French Romantic composer and pianist. Although known primarily for two of his orchestral works, España and Joyeuse marche, he left an important corpus of operas (including the increasingly popular L'étoile), songs, and piano music as well. These works, though small in number, are of very high quality, and he was admired by composers as diverse as Debussy, Ravel, Richard Strauss, Satie, Schmitt, Stravinsky, and the group of composers known as Les six. Stravinsky alluded to España in his ballet Petrushka, Ravel wrote that the opening bars of Le roi malgré lui changed the course of harmony in France, Poulenc wrote a biography of the composer, and Richard Strauss conducted the first staged performance of Chabrier's incomplete opera Briséïs. Chabrier was also associated with some of the leading writers and painters of his time. He was especially friendly with the painters Claude Monet and Édouard Manet, and collected Impressionist paintings before Impressionism became fashionable. A number of such paintings from his personal collection are now housed in some of the world's leading art museums.
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Alexander Arutiunian

    Alexander Arutiunian

    • Works Composed: Trumpet Concerto
    Alexander Grigorevich Arutiunian (Arm. Ալեքսանդր Գրիգորի Հարությունյան), also known as Arutunian, Arutyunyan, Arutjunjan or Harutiunian (23 September 1920 – 28 March 2012) was a Soviet and Armenian composer and pianist, Professor of Yerevan State Conservatory (1977), widely-known particularly for his Trumpet concerto described as flashy by the New York Times. He was awarded by the Stalin Prize (1949) and State Prize of Armenia (1970), People's Artist of the USSR (1970) and Armenian SSR (1964) honorary titles, Aram Khachaturian Prize (1986), "St Mesrop Mashtots" and "Khorenatsi" Armenian medals, "Alexandrov" Gold medal (1976), the Orpheus Award (Kentucky, USA) and "St Sahak and St Mesrop" Order by Holy Etchmiadzin (2004). Arutiunian was born in Yerevan, Armenia, in the family of Grigor and Eleonora Arutiunian. His father was a military serviceman. At an early age Arutiunian met famous composer Alexander Spendiarian. In 1927 Arutiunian became a member of the Yerevan State Conservatory’s children group, then, at the age of fourteen, he was admitted to the Conservatory to the studios of O.Babasyan (piano), and S.Barkhudaryan and V. Talyan (composition). He graduated from the Music
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Alfredo Keil

    Alfredo Keil

    • Works Composed: A Portuguesa
    Alfredo Cristiano Keil (3 July 1850 – 4 October 1907) was a Portuguese romantic composer and painter. Keil was born in Lisbon, the son of Johann Christian Keil (son of Johann Georg Keil and wife Elisabeth ...) and wife (m. Lisbon, 30 August 1848) Maria Josefina Stellflug (daughter of Matias Stellflug and wife Barbara ...). He was of German origin, and was the great Portuguese romantic composer. He was also considered the last important Portuguese painter in the romantic style. He studied in Munich and Nuremberg with the German romantic painters Kaulbach and von Kreling. Returning to Portugal, where he continued his studies, he became a well known romantic painter, being also the contemporary of the naturalist generation, with his melancholic intimate scenes and landscapes. As a composer, he gained prominence with his operas "D. Branca" (1883), "Irene" (1893) and "Serrana" (1899), then considered the best Portuguese opera. He composed the music of A Portuguesa, the Portuguese national anthem, in 1891, with lyrics by poet and playwright Henrique Lopes de Mendonça; it was adopted in 1911, after the proclamation of the Republic the previous year. Ironically, he died, in Hamburg,
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Félix Lajkó

    Félix Lajkó

    Félix Lajkó (Serbian: Феликс Лајко, Feliks Lajko; born December 17, 1974, Bačka Topola, SR Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia) is a Hungarian violinist, zither player and composer. He plays a variation of musical styles: traditional string music of the Pannonian plain, Romani music, folk music, classical music, rock, blues, jazz and improvised melodies. In concert, he plays mostly the violin either with his small band or solo. Lajkó was born in Bačka Topola, in the Serbian province of Vojvodina (then part of Yugoslavia) to ethnic Hungarian parents. He started playing the zither at the age of 10. His first contact with the violin was at the age of 12. He has finished the six years of musical school in three years time. Lajkó finished his formal studies and turned towards concerting. Lajkó has played together with a large number of well-known bands and musicians. He was a member of György Szabados' band, Makúz and Boris Kovač's band, Ritual Nova. He performed together with the world-famous Japanese butoh dancer, Min Tanaka and the French Noir Desir band a number of times. He has had many concerts together with the London-based Romanian violin player Alexander Balanescu and with Boban Marković's
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Johan Halvorsen

    Johan Halvorsen

    Johan Halvorsen (15 March 1864 – 4 December 1935) was a Norwegian composer, conductor and violinist. Born in Drammen, Norway he was an accomplished violinist from a very early age and became a prominent figure in Norwegian musical life. He received his musical education in Kristiania (now Oslo) and Stockholm, and was a concertmaster in Bergen before joining the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. He was a concertmaster in Aberdeen, Scotland, then a professor of music in Helsinki, and finally became a student once again, in St Petersburg, Leipzig (with Adolph Brodsky), Berlin (with Adolf Becker), and Liège (with César Thomson). Returning to Norway in 1893, he worked as conductor of the theatre orchestra at Den Nationale Scene in Bergen and of the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra. He became concertmaster of the Bergen Philharmonic in 1885, and principal conductor in 1893. In 1899 he was appointed conductor of the orchestra at the newly-opened National Theatre in Kristiania, a position he held for 30 years until his retirement in 1929. As well as theatre music, Halvorsen conducted performances of over 30 operas and also wrote the incidental music for more than 30 plays. Following his
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Joseph McCarthy

    Joseph McCarthy

    Joseph McCarthy (September 27, 1885 – December 18, 1943) was an American lyricist whose most famous songs include You Made Me Love You, and I'm Always Chasing Rainbows, based upon the haunting melody from the middle section of Chopin's "Fantasie Impromptu". McCarthy, who was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, was a frequent collaborator of composers Harry Tierney (1890–1965) and Fred Fisher (1875–1942). He was the director of ASCAP from 1921 to 1929, and is not to be confused with U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy (1908–57).
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Leonardo Vinci

    Leonardo Vinci

    • Works Composed: Li zite 'ngalera
    Leonardo Vinci (1690 – 27 May 1730) was an Italian composer, best known for his operas. He was born at Strongoli and educated at Naples under Gaetano Greco in the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo. He first became known for his opere buffe in Neapolitan dialect in 1719; he also composed many opere serie. He was received into the Congregation of the Rosary at Formiello in 1728. He died in May 1730. Vinci is rumoured to have been poisoned in the wake of an ill-advised affair, a story which is given by several reliable authorities without evident contradictions. Vinci's opere buffe, of which Li zite 'ngalera (1722) is generally regarded as the best, are full of life and spirit; his opere serie, of which Didone Abbandonata (Rome, 1728) and Artaserse (Rome, 1730) are the most notable, have an incisive vigour and directness of dramatic expression praised by Charles Burney. The well-known aria "Vo solcando," from Artaserse, is a good example of his style. In addition to operas, Vinci wrote a few cantatas, sonatas, a serenata, and two oratorios (Oratorio di Maria dolorata ca. 1723 & Oratorio per la Santissima Vergine del Rosario ca. 1730). His sonata in D major for flute and basso
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Louis James Alfred Lefébure-Wely

    Louis James Alfred Lefébure-Wely

    Louis James Alfred Lefébure-Wely (13 November 1817, Paris – 31 December 1869, Paris) was a French organist and composer. Lefébure-Wely played a major role in the development of the French symphonic organ style and was a close friend of the organ builder Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, inaugurating many new Cavaillé-Coll organs. He began to study music aged 4 with his father, who was the organist of Saint-Roch. By the age of 8 he was advanced enough to substitute for his father when the latter was stricken by paralysis. When his father died six years later (in 1831), he became the church's regular organist (where he remained until 1846). In 1832 he was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire, studying the organ under François Benoist, and the piano under Laurent and Pierre Zimmermann. His ability on both instruments won him second prizes in 1834, and first prizes in 1835. His composition teachers were Berton and Halévy. He also took private lessons from Adolphe Adam. He learned much of organ effects and improvisation from the celebrated Nicolas Séjan at Saint-Sulpice. His own fame as an improviser dates from his acceptance of the post of Organist at the Église de la Madeleine, which he held
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Gaspar Sanz

    Gaspar Sanz

    Gaspar Sanz (1640–1710) was an Aragonese composer, guitarist, organist and priest born to a wealthy family in Calanda in the Spanish comarca of Bajo Aragón. He studied music, theology and philosophy at the University of Salamanca, where he was later appointed Professor of Music. He wrote three volumes of pedagogical works for the baroque guitar that form an important part of today's classical guitar repertory and have informed modern scholars in the techniques of baroque guitar playing. His birth date is unknown but he was baptized as Francisco Bartolome Sanz y Celma in the church of Calanda de Ebro, Aragon on 4 April 1640 later adopting the first name "Gaspar". After gaining his Bachelor of Theology at the University of Salamanca, Gaspar Sanz travelled to Naples, Rome and perhaps Venice to further his music education. He is thought to have studied under Orazio Benevoli, choirmaster at the Vatican and Cristofaro Caresana, organist at the Royal Chapel of Naples. He spent some years as the organist of the Spanish Viceroy at Naples. Sanz learned to play guitar while studying under Lelio Colista and was influenced by music of the Italian guitarists Foscarini, Granata, and Corbetta.
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    Charles Amirkhanian

    Charles Amirkhanian

    Charles Amirkhanian (born January 19, 1945; Fresno, California) is an American composer. He is a percussionist, sound poet, and radio producer of Armenian extraction. He is mostly known for his electroacoustic and text-sound music. Performance artist Laurie Anderson praises his work: "The art of audio collage has been reinvented here...A brilliant sense of imaginary space." Amirkhanian was Music Director of Pacifica Radio's KPFA-FM in Berkeley, California from 1969 to 1992; he directs the Other Minds Music Festival in San Francisco. He has played a key role in recording and championing the work of Conlon Nancarrow, among others. In 1984, the American Music Center awarded him its Letter of Distinction for service to American composers through his work at KPFA FM in Berkeley, California. This was followed in 2005 by another for his co-founding and directing the Other Minds Festival in San Francisco, California. From ASCAP in 1989 he received the Deems Taylor Award, also for service to American composers. As a composer he was awarded a grant in 1997 from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in New York City. In 2009, Chamber Music America and ASCAP honored him for his Adventurous
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Edd Kalehoff

    Edd Kalehoff

    • Works Composed: The Price Is Right Theme Song
    Edward Woodley "Edd" Kalehoff (born 1946) is a music composer who specializes in compositions for television. Composer of about 1,000 pieces, mainly for television, his credits include the majority of music cues used on The Price is Right (although the 1972 theme is officially attributed to Sheila Cole) and the Nickelodeon game show Double Dare; a music package for ABC Sports that updated and expanded the Monday Night Football theme; music for WNBC-TV's famous 1992 promotional campaign "We're 4 New York"; and many television news music and station image packages used on stations such as WEWS-TV in Cleveland, and WNYW-TV, WCBS-TV and WNBC-TV in New York City. The NBC Stations package composed in 1995 for WNBC was used by the station until 2003. Due to its long run as the music package for NewsChannel 4 it is widely known in the Tri-State Region. He has long been associated with Score Productions and Mark Goodson Productions and is a favorite composer. Currently Kalehoff is the chosen composer for ABC News and is a member of BMI who calls him a "legend" along the lines of Mike Post. Kalehoff is a noted keyboard player, being a featured performer in the documentary film Moog and
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Francesco Morlacchi

    Francesco Morlacchi

    Francesco Morlacchi (14 June 1784 - 28 October 1841) was an Italian composer of more than twenty operas. During the many years he spent as the royal Royal Kapellmeister in Dresden, he was instrumental in popularizing the Italian style of opera. Born in Perugia, Morlacchi composed from a very young age, first studying with his uncle Giovanni Mazzetti and later with Luigi Caruso. He later studied at Loreto with Zingarelli. Finally, he ended up in Bologna at the school of Stanislao Mattei where he met Gioacchino Rossini. Morlacchi's first operatic works were written in 1807, and were a farce and a comic opera. His first truly effective theatre work was the opera seria Corradino (Parma, 1808), and lead to commissions from opera houses in Rome and Milan. In 1810 he was brought to Dresden by contralto Marietta Marcolini, and in 1811 Morlacchi was made Kapellmeister of the Italian Opera in Dresden. While in Dresden, he had to work to establish himself in the eyes of critics. By this time, German opera was well established, and Morlacchi and his compositions were seen to represent the old order both of composers and the aristocracy. Morlacchi set Il barbiere di Siviglia in the very same
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Giovanni Battista Bononcini

    Giovanni Battista Bononcini

    • Works Composed: Xerse
    Giovanni Battista Bononcini [or Buononcini] (18 July 1670 – 9 July 1747) was an Italian Baroque composer and cellist, one of a family of string players and composers. Bononcini was born in Modena, Italy, the oldest of three sons. His father, Giovanni Maria Bononcini (1642–1678), was a violinist and a composer, and his younger brother, Antonio Maria Bononcini, was also a composer. Giovanni Battista studied the cello in Bologna. He then served as maestro di cappella at San Giovanni in Monte and afterwards worked in Milan, Rome, Vienna and Berlin. From 1720 to 1732 he was in London, where for a time his popularity rivaled George Frideric Handel's, who had arrived in London in 1712. The tories favored Handel, while the whigs favored Bononcini. Their competition inspired the epigram by John Byrom that made the phrase "Tweedledum and Tweedledee" famous. Handel steadily gained the ascendancy, and Bononcini became a pensioner of the Duchess of Marlborough, who had led his admirers. Bononcini left London after charges of plagiarism were proven against him: he had palmed off a madrigal by Antonio Lotti as his own work. He remained for several years in France, and in 1748 was summoned to
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry

    Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry

    • Works Composed: Ode to Newfoundland
    Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, 1st Baronet (27 February 1848 – 7 October 1918) was an English composer, teacher and historian of music. Parry's first major works appeared in 1880. As a composer he is best known for the choral song "Jerusalem", the coronation anthem "I was glad" and the hymn tune "Repton", which sets the words "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind". He was director of the Royal College of Music from 1895 until his death and was also professor of music at the University of Oxford from 1900 to 1908. He also wrote several books about music and music history. Some contemporaries rated him as the finest English composer since Henry Purcell, but his academic duties prevented him from devoting all his energies to composition. Parry was born in Bournemouth, the youngest of six children of Thomas Gambier Parry (1816–1888) of Highnam Court, Gloucestershire, a painter, art collector and inventor of the "spirit fresco" process, and his first wife, Isabella née Fynes-Clinton (1816–1848). Three of their children died in infancy, and Isabella Parry died twelve days after the birth of her sixth child. Parry grew up at Highnam Court with his surviving siblings, (Charles) Clinton and
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Michna

    Michna

    Adam Václav Michna z Otradovic – literally Adam Václav Michna of Otradovice – (ca. 1600 Jindřichův Hradec – 1676, Jindřichův Hradec) was a Czech Catholic aristocrat, poet, composer, hymn writer, organist and choir leader of the early Baroque era. He is also known in simplified form as Adam Michna and during his life as Adamus Wenceslaus Michna de Ottradowicz. He was the most important Czech composer and poet of the early Baroque who initiated the development of Czech art in that era and became a significant inspiration for Czech artists of future generations. Michna was descended from the noble and musical family of Michna Ottradovic in Jindřichův Hradec in South Bohemia, bearing the title of Knight. His father was the organist and trumpeter Michael Michna (many of his other relatives were also trumpeters). In the 1620s the literary fraternity in the town was restored by the highest Lord Chancellor of the Kingdom of Bohemia Vilém Slavata and that act, together with the activities of the Jesuit College, founded in 1594, contributed greatly to the development of cultural life in the town. Adam Michna became the first student at the Jesuit College, where he studied in 1611–1612 and
    4.67
    3 votes
    195
    Adalbert Gyrowetz

    Adalbert Gyrowetz

    Vojtěch Matyáš Jírovec (Adalbert Gyrowetz) (20 February 1763 in České Budějovice (Budweis) – 19 March 1850 in Vienna) was a Bohemian composer. His father was the choirmaster in Budweis' cathedral, and Adalbert first studied with him. Adalbert then travelled to Prague, where he studied law but continued to learn music. At around this time he was in the employment of Count Franz von Fünfkirchen in Brno, whose employees were all musicians. Here he started composing, among other things, symphonies, of which he was eventually to write over 60. In 1785 he moved to Vienna, where he met Mozart, who performed one of Jírovec's symphonies in the same year. From 1786 to around 1793, he travelled throughout Europe. He spent some time in Paris, where he established that some symphonies that had been published as the work of Joseph Haydn were in fact his work. He spent three years in Italy, meeting Goethe in Rome and studying with Nicola Sala in Naples. In 1791, he met Haydn, whom he idolized, in London. While in London, Johann Peter Salomon commissioned symphonies from Gyrowetz to be performed at his Hannover Square Room Concerts. He was a prolific composer. His operas and singspiele numbered
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Alexander Alyabyev

    Alexander Alyabyev

    Alexander Aleksandrovich Alyabyev, also rendered as Alabiev or Alabieff (Russian: Александр Александрович Алябьев) (15 August [O.S. 4 August] 1787 – 6 March [O.S. 22 February] 1851) was a Russian composer. He wrote seven operas, twenty musical comedies, a symphony, three string quartets, more than 200 songs, and many other pieces. Born to a wealthy family in Tobolsk in Siberia, Alyabyev learned music in his early years. He joined the Russian Army in 1812, during the Napoleonic War, and fought as an officer until 1823. He participated in the entry of the Russian forces into Dresden and Paris, and he won two awards. After the mysterious death of a man he spent all night gambling with in February 1825, he was arrested on a charge of murder. While the evidence was not conclusive, Tsar Nicholas I expressly ordered him into exile to his native town of Tobolsk. Freed in 1831, he spent some years in the Caucasus before returning to Moscow, where he died in 1851. Alyabyev's most famous work is The Nightingale (Solovey), a song based on a poem by Anton Delvig. It was composed while Alyabyev was in prison, in 1825. It has entered Russian consciousness as akin to a folk song. The song became
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Antoine Duhamel

    Antoine Duhamel

    Antoine Duhamel (born 30 July 1925), is a French composer, orchestra conductor and music teacher. Born in Valmondois in the Val-d'Oise département of France, Antoine Duhamel is the son of french writer Georges Duhamel and actress Blanche Albane. He studied music at the Sorbonne. He wrote the score for his first film in 1960, going on to work with many of Europe's most outstanding film directors. In 2002 he was awarded the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for his music for the Bertrand Tavernier directed film, Laissez-passer. Antoine Duhamel has scored several of Jean Luc Godard's films, including Pierrot le Fou and Week End.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Antonio Rosetti

    Antonio Rosetti

    Francesco Antonio Rosetti (c. 1750–June 30, 1792, born Franz Anton Rösler, changed to Italianate form by 1773) was a classical era composer and double bass player, and was a contemporary of Haydn and Mozart. The occasional disambiguation with a supposed, but non-existent, "Antonio Rosetti born 1744 in Milan," is due to an error by Ernst Ludwig Gerber in a later edition of his Tonkünstler-Lexikon having mistaken Rosetti for an Italian in the first edition of his own Lexikon, and therefore including Rosetti twice - once as an Italian, once as a German-Czech. Rosetti was born around 1750 in Litoměřice, a town in Northern Bohemia, and was originally called Franz Anton Rösler. He is believed to have received early musical training from the Jesuits. In 1773 Rosetti left this native country and joined the Hofkapelle of Prince von Öttingen-Wallerstein, whom he served for sixteen years, before becoming Kapellmeister to the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1789. In 1777, he married Rosina Neher, with whom he had three daughters. In 1781 he was granted leave to spend five months in Paris. Many of the finest ensembles in the city performed his works. Rosetti arranged for his music to be
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    David Jackson

    David Jackson

    • Works Composed: A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers
    David Nicholas George Jackson (born 15 April 1947), nicknamed Jaxon, is an English progressive rock saxophonist, flautist, and composer. He is best known for his work with the band Van der Graaf Generator and his work in Music and Disability. He has worked with artists including Peter Gabriel, Keith Tippett and Howard Moody. Jackson was a member for most of the 1970s and for their 2005 reunion tour. His specialty was then electric saxophones, using octave devices, wah-wah and powerful amplification. His saxophone-playing is characterized by the frequent use of double horns, playing two saxophones at the same time, a style he copied from Rahsaan Roland Kirk (whose style and technique influenced Jackson). He also plays flutes and whistles. In the NME reviewer Jonathan Barnett called David Jackson "the Van Gogh of the saxophone - a renegade impressionist, dispensing distorted visions of the world outside from his private asylum window". In addition to his work in Van der Graaf Generator, Jackson has collaborated with other musicians (frequently with other members of Van der Graaf Generator, as on The Long Hello project). He collaborated on a number of projects with Van der Graaf
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Josef Bohuslav Foerster

    Josef Bohuslav Foerster

    Josef Bohuslav Foerster (30 December 1859 – 29 May 1951) was a Czech composer of classical music. He is often referred to as J. B. Foerster. The surname is sometimes spelled Förster. Foerster was born in Prague. His was a musical family normally living in Prague, where his father, a composer also named Josef Foerster, taught at the Conservatory. (His father's students included Franz Lehár.) His brother was artist Viktor Foerster. Josef was educated accordingly, and duly studied there. He also showed an early interest in the theatre, and even thought of becoming an actor. From 1884 he worked as a critic, and he would prove to be a writer of distinction. In 1893 he married the leading Czech soprano Berta Lautererová (Bertha Lauterer) in Hamburg, during ten years making his living there as a critic, and she was engaged at the Hamburg Staatsoper. In 1901 he became a teacher at the Hamburg Conservatory. In 1903 Berta went to sing at the Vienna Hofoper, and so Josef moved there with her, continuing to make a living as a music critic. He returned to Prague on the foundation of the Czechoslovak Republic in 1918, thereafter teaching at the conservatory and the university. In 1946 he was
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Josef Suk

    Josef Suk

    • Works Composed: Asrael
    Josef Suk (4 January 1874 – 29 May 1935) was a Czech composer and violinist. Suk was born in Křečovice. He studied at Prague Conservatory from 1885 to 1892, where he was a pupil of Antonín Dvořák and Antonín Bennewitz. In 1898, he married Dvořák's eldest daughter, Otilie Dvořáková (1878–1905), affectionately known as Otilka. In 1901, she bore him their only son, Josef (1901–1951). Otilie died in 1905, and the composer never remarried. The noted violinist Josef Suk (1929-2011) was his grandson. He formed the Czech Quartet with three of his fellow students — Suk played second violin with them for most of his life. From 1922 he taught at the Prague Conservatory, where his pupils included Bohuslav Martinů, Rudolf Firkušný and Manoah Leide-Tedesco. He died in Benešov. Suk's early works show the influence of Dvořák and Johannes Brahms, while later pieces use more extended harmonies to create a personal and complex style. Unlike many of his countrymen, he made little use of Czech folk music. His best known works are probably the youthful Serenade for Strings (1892) and the Asrael Symphony in C minor, (1906), a work written in response both to the death in 1904 of his father-in-law, and
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Agathe Backer Grøndahl

    Agathe Backer Grøndahl

    Agathe Ursula Backer-Grøndahl (1 December 1847 – 4 June 1907) was a Norwegian pianist and composer. She married the conductor and singing teacher Olaus Andreas Grøndahl in 1875, and was generally known thereafter as Agathe Backer-Grøndahl. Her son Fridtjof Backer-Grøndahl (1885-1959) was also a pianist and composer, who promoted his mother's compositions in his concerts. Agathe Backer was born in Holmestrand in 1847, in a wealthy and art-loving home, as the second youngest of four sisters, all gifted in drawing and music. In 1857 she moved with her family to Christiania, where she studied with Otto Winther-Hjelm, Halfdan Kjerulf and Ludvig Mathias Lindeman. Between 1865-1867 she became a pupil of Theodor Kullak and studied composition under Richard Wuerst at the Akademie der Tonkunst in Berlin, where she lived together with her sister Harriet Backer. There where she won fame with her interpretation of Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto. In 1868 she debuted with the then 26 year old Edvard Grieg as conductor of the Philharmonic Society. A recommendation from Ole Bull opened for further studies with Hans von Bülow in Florence in 1871. Later the same year she played at the Gewandhaus in
    5.00
    2 votes
    203
    Brian Blade

    Brian Blade

    Brian Blade (born July 25, 1970) in Shreveport, Louisiana is an American jazz drummer, composer, session musician, and singer-songwriter. As a young boy, Blade grew up in a home in Shreveport, Louisiana in which he frequently heard Gospel music and soul music. In elementary school, his music appreciation classes furthered this musical upbringing, and at age nine he began playing the violin; he continued to do so until age thirteen, when he, inspired by his brother, Brady Blade, Jr., became a drummer. During highschool Brian began listening to the music of John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk, Elvin Jones, and Joni Mitchell. By the age of eighteen, Brian moved to New Orleans to attend Loyola University. During this period, he was able to study and play with most of the master musicians living in New Orleans, such as: John Vidacovich, Ellis Marsalis, Steve Masakowski, Bill Huntington, Mike Pellera, John Mahoney, George French, Germaine Bazzle, David Lee, Jr., Alvin Red Tyler, Tony Dagradi and Harold Battiste. Blade made his first recorded appearances as a sideman with Kenny Garrett and Joshua Redman and continued to work in that capacity with other
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Craig S. Harris

    Craig S. Harris

    Craig S. Harris (born September 10, 1953) is a Jazz trombonist and composer who has been a major figure in the jazz avant-garde movement since his stint with Sun Ra in 1976. Subsequently, Harris has worked with such notable jazz artists as Abdullah Ibrahim, David Murray, Lester Bowie, Cecil Taylor, Sam Rivers, Muhal Richard Abrams and Charlie Haden. Harris has also recorded since 1983 as leader for labels like India Navigation, Soul Note and JMT. For the latter he recorded with two different groups: the Tailgaters Tails was a quintet with clarinetist Don Byron, trumpeter Edward E. J. Allen, Anthony Cox on bass and Pheeroan akLaff on drums. His large ensemble project Cold Sweat was a tribute to the music of James Brown. Harris was born in Hempstead, New York, and is a graduate of the music program of State University of New York College at Old Westbury, was profoundly influenced by its founder and director Makanda Ken McIntyre. Craig's move to New York City in 1978 quickly established him in the forefront of young trombonists such as Ray Anderson, George Lewis and Joseph Bowie. He first played alongside another of his teachers at SUNY, baritone saxophonist Pat Patrick in Sun Ra's
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    Eirik Glambek Bøe

    Eirik Glambek Bøe

    Eirik Glambek Bøe (born 25 October 1975, Bergen, Norway) is a musician, writer and vocalist, best known for being part of the pop duo Kings of Convenience together with Erlend Øye. He has studied psychology at the University at Bergen. Although his native language is Norwegian, many of his writings are in English. His wife is model Ina Grung, who also appears on the Kings of Convenience CD covers. He formed the band Skog together with Øye in the 1990s. They formed Kings of Convenience in 1998 and released their first album Quiet is the New Loud in 2001. Øye had become interested in electronic music and in October 2001 they released the remix album Versus. The single "Toxic Girl" brought Bøe's music to the attention of fans and received critical acclaim for its unpretentious simplicity and lyrical quality. In 2004 Kings of Convenience released Riot on an Empty Street which was followed by a European and North American tour in 2005. In 2006 he supported Øye's band The Whitest Boy Alive at some dates on their Scandinavian tour with another band Kommode. Kommode features members of Skog, except for Øye. In a rare guest vocal appearance, Bøe sings on the track "How My Heart Behaves" on
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Hans Huber

    Hans Huber

    Hans Huber (28 June 1852 – 25 December 1921) was a composer from Switzerland. He was born in Eppenberg-Wöschnau (Canton of Solothurn). The son of an amateur musician, Huber became a chorister and showed an early talent for the piano. In 1870 he entered Leipzig Conservatory, where his teachers included Oscar Paul. In 1877 he returned to Basel to teach, but did not obtain a post in the Conservatory there until 1889; seven years later he became director. Among his notable students were Hans Münch and Hermann Suter. He wrote eight symphonies and several concertos. His last years he lived in Minusio in File:Villa Ginia. He died at Locarno. Huber's first symphony, in D minor, subtitled "Tellsinfonie" has a slight programmatic element, derived from the story of the Swiss national hero William Tell. The symphony is perhaps somewhat similar in style and formal restraint to Brahms, although there is perhaps a foreshadowing of Sibelius in some of the orchestral textures. Between 1894 and 1918 Huber composed five operas. Huber's piano concertos are slightly unusual for the form in that they have four movements (scherzos are included in addition to the usual fast, slow, and fast tempo
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    James Hannigan

    James Hannigan

    James Hannigan (born 1971) is an award-winning British film, television and video game composer who has composed music for various entries in the Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings, Command & Conquer, Wing Commander, Warhammer and Grand Prix series' of games. Notable early game credits of Hannigan include Sim Theme Park, Space Hulk, Conquest: Frontier Wars, Wing Commander: Privateer 2: The Darkening and FreeLancer, and he has created and remixed tracks for numerous titles on the EA Sports label, along with creating scores for the BAFTA-nominated titles Evil Genius and Republic: The Revolution. Hannigan also composes for television, most recently contributing to BBC America sci-fi TV series Primeval. Some of his recent VG credits include Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1, Command and Conquer: Red Alert 3, Command & Conquer: Tiberian Twilight, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Art Academy and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. In the earlier stages of his career, between 1995 and 1997, James Hannigan held the position of in-house composer at Electronic Arts, before he based himself at the world-famous Pinewood Studios complex in West London, often
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Jean Antoine Zinnen

    Jean Antoine Zinnen

    • Works Composed: Ons Hémécht
    Jean Antoine Zinnen (25 April 1827 – 16 May 1898) was a Luxembourgian composer, best known for the Luxembourgian national anthem, Ons Hémécht. Zinnen was born in Amsterdam, in the Prussian Rhineland, close to the border with Luxembourg. When he was six, his family moved to Luxembourg. After serving as a musician in the army, he naturalised as a Luxembourg citizen in 1849. In 1851, he became the first director of the Diekirch choral society Sangerbond. In 1852, he was appointed Luxembourg City's director of music, and, soon after, director of the city conservatoire. In 1863, he was appointed the director of the newly founded Allgemeiner Luxemburger Musikverein (ALM) which, in 1947, was renamed Union Grand-Duc Adolphe, the national umbrella organisation for music societies, bands, choirs and orchestras. The following year, at the first celebration of the ALM in Ettlebrück, Ons Hémecht was sung by a choir. Michel Lentz, the national poet who was a member of the ALM's central committee, had written the words, wishing to convey a powerful feeling of patriotism. Zinnen set the poem to music, later transforming it into a solemn hymn. On 25 June 1865, on the occasion of a music festival in
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Pierre Degeyter

    Pierre Degeyter

    • Works Composed: The Internationale
    Pierre Chretien De Geyter (also known as Pierre Chrétien Degeyter) (8 October 1848 – 26 September 1932) was a Belgian socialist (who later became a communist) and a composer, known for writing the music of The Internationale. De Geyter was born in Ghent, Belgium, where his parents, originally from the French Flanders, had moved to work in the textile factories. When he was seven, the family, who already counted five children, returned to France and settled in Lille. Pierre worked there as a thread maker and learned how to read and write at workers' evening classes. At age sixteen, he enrolled at the Lille Academy where he first took drawing classes, which allowed him to find a job as a woodcarver. He later took music classes, and joined the workers' choir "La Lyre des Travailleurs", founded by the socialist leader of Lille, Gustave Delory. On 15 July 1888, Delory contacted De Geyter to compose music for several "Chants révolutionnaires" that were often sung at popular events with Lille socialists. Among these was a song that was to become the International Workingmen's Association anthem, The Internationale. The lyrics had been written by Eugène Edine Pottier during the "Semaine
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Oskar Nedbal

    Oskar Nedbal

    Oskar Nedbal (26 March 1874 – 24 December 1930) was a Czech violist, composer, and conductor of classical music. Nedbal was born in Tábor, in southern Bohemia. He studied the violin at the Prague Conservatory under Antonín Bennewitz. He was principal conductor with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra from 1896 to 1906 and was a founder member of the Bohemian String Quartet. Although a great admirer of his teacher Antonín Dvořák, Nedbal paid homage to other composers. For example in his 1910 composition, Romantic Piece, Op. 18 for cello and piano, Nedbal cleverly inserts a theme usually associated with Mozart, Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman. The waltz from his ballet Lazy Hans (Der faule Hans) is played on the piano at a key moment by one of the characters in Heimito von Doderer's great novel of the inter-war years in Vienna, The Demons (Die Dämonen) (1956). His works include one (unsuccessful) opera, Jakob the Peasant (1919–1920), and the operettas Chaste Barbara (1910), Polish Blood (1913), The Vineyard Bride (1916), and Beautiful Saskia (1917). Because of mounting personal debts, Nedbal committed suicide by jumping out of a window of the Zagreb Opera House on 24 December 1930.
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Charles A. Zimmerman

    Charles A. Zimmerman

    • Works Composed: Anchors Aweigh
    Charles A. Zimmermann (1861 – 16 January 1916) was an American composer of marches and popular music. A graduate of the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, he was appointed bandmaster at the United States Naval Academy in 1887 at the age of 26. He served as the Academy's bandmaster until his death from a brain hemorrhage in 1916. He is buried at the Naval Academy cemetery. Zimmerman composed his most famous march, "Anchors Aweigh", in 1906 when he was a Lieutenant in the United States Navy. The lyrics were written by Alfred Hart Miles, a cadet. The march was intended from the beginning to serve as a rousing tune for football games. Zimmerman also composed numerous songs for the 1902 stage play The Wizard of Oz.
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Christofer Johnsson

    Christofer Johnsson

    Christofer Johnsson (born 10 August 1972 in Upplands Väsby, Stockholm County) is a Swedish musician. He is a founding member and the guitar player for Therion and used to be in Carbonized, Liers in Wait, Messiah and Demonoid. He is a member of the order Dragon Rouge. On 21 March 2006, he announced he will no longer sing for Therion, though he will continue playing guitar for the group. In his childhood Christofer enjoyed listening to classical music, and gradually became more interested in his father's 50's and 60's rock music. Popular music played on the radio in this era generally had a lot of strings in it, and even though much of it didn't fall in his taste, it still managed to influence him. As a 7-year-old he heard his first progressive rock as a theme in a Norwegian children TV-program. As 9-year old, he started to listen to The Beatles, who also used brass and strings in songs like "Penny Lane". At an age of 11, his taste for music took a turn as he started to listen to hard rock and heavy metal bands like Accept, Judas Priest, W.A.S.P., Iron Maiden, Saxon, Motörhead, Venom, Manowar, Ozzy Osbourne, Black Sabbath, and Uriah Heep. Many of these bands had orchestral elements
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    David Grisman

    David Grisman

    David Grisman (born March 23, 1945 in Hackensack, New Jersey) is an American bluegrass/newgrass mandolinist and composer of acoustic music. In the early 1990s, he started the Acoustic Disc record label to help spread acoustic and instrumental music. Grisman grew up in a Conservative Jewish household in Hackensack, New Jersey. He started his musical career in 1963 as a member of Even Dozen Jug Band. His nickname "Dawg" was affectionately assigned by his close friend Jerry Garcia in 1973 (the two met in 1964 at a Bill Monroe show at Sunset Park in West Grove, Pennsylvania). "Dawg Music" is what he calls his mixture of bluegrass and Django Reinhardt/Stéphane Grappelli-influenced jazz, as highlighted on his album Hot Dawg (recorded Oct. 1978, released 1979). Stephane Grappelli played on a couple of tracks on Hot Dawg and then the 1981 recording Stephane Grappelli and David Grisman Live. It was Grisman's combination of Reinhardt-era Jazz, bluegrass, folk, Old World Mediterranean string band music, as well as modern Jazz fusion that came to embody "Dawg" music. Grisman's father had been a professional trombonist at one time and had young David begin piano lessons at the age of seven. In
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    Evaristo Felice dall'Abaco

    Evaristo Felice dall'Abaco

    Evaristo Felice dall'Abaco (12 July 1675, Verona, Italy — 12 July 1742, Munich, Bavaria) was an Italian composer and violinist. Dall'Abaco was born in Verona, the son of renowned guitarist Damiano dall'Abaco. His father, after seeing his son's musical talent in school, let him take on violin and cello lessons. He is thought to be Torelli's pupil from whom he would have learned violin and cello. He launched his musical career as a violinist with Tommaso Antonio Vitali in Modena, and in 1704 he joined the court of Maximilian II Emanuel, elector of Bavaria as Kammermusiker. Dall'Abaco was only a few months in Munich, when he was forced to flee with the court to Brussels, following Maximilian's defeat at the Battle of Blenheim. On Maximilian's restoration and return to Munich, in 1715, dall'Abaco was appointed Concert-meister. He continued to compose chamber music at the French and Dutch courts until 1740 when he retired. While in Brussels, dall'Abaco fathered a son named Joseph Abaco (1710–1805). Dall'Abaco's music is especially indebted to Vivaldi and Corelli. However, when he went into exile with the Munich court, he spent time in France and absorbed some of the influences there.
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    Johnson

    Johnson

    Johnson (Malayalam: ജോൺസൺ) (26 March 1953 – 18 August 2011) was an Indian film score composer and music director who has given music to some of the most important motion pictures of Malayalam cinema, including those for Koodevide, Namukku Parkkan Munthiri Thoppukal, Oru Minnaminunginte Nurunguvettam, Vadakkunokkiyantram, Perumthachan, Njan Gandharvan, Ponthan Mada, and Bhoothakkannadi. He was noted for his lyrical and expressive melodies together with simple but rich tonal compositions of thematic music. Johnson is a recipient of National Film Awards twice and Kerala State Film Awards five times. He started his career as an assistant to G. Devarajan in 1970s, and debuted as an independent composer in late seventies with Aaravam. He was a recurrent collaborator for directors Padmarajan, Bharathan, Sathyan Anthikkad, T. V. Chandran, Kamal, Lohithadas, Balachandra Menon and Mohan. He has composed music for more than 300 Malayalam films, the most by any composer except for Devarajan. He was the first Music Director from Malayalam Film Fraternity to be honored with the National Award. He died of a heart attack in Chennai on August 18, 2011. Johnson was born in a musically affluent
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    Kassia

    Kassia

    Kassia (also Kassiane, Kassiani, Casia, Ikasia, Cassia, Cassiane, Kassiana, or Eikasia; between 810 - bef. 865) was a Byzantine abbess, poet, composer, and hymnographer. She is one of the first medieval composers whose scores are both extant and able to be interpreted by modern scholars and musicians. Approximately fifty of her hymns are extant and twenty-three are included in Orthodox Church liturgical books. The exact number is difficult to assess, as many hymns are ascribed to different authors in different manuscripts and are often identified as anonymous. In addition, some 789 of her non-liturgical verses survive. Many are epigrams or aphorisms called "gnomic verse", for example, "I hate the rich man moaning as if he were poor." She was born between 805 and 810 in Constantinople into a wealthy family and grew to be exceptionally beautiful and intelligent. Three Byzantine chroniclers, Pseudo-Symeon the Logothete, George the Monk (a.k.a. George the Sinner) and Leo the Grammarian, claim that she was a participant in the "bride show" (the means by which Byzantine princes/emperors sometimes chose a bride, by giving a golden apple to his choice) organized for the young bachelor
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    Milosz Magin

    Milosz Magin

    Miłosz Magin (6 July 1929 – 4 March 1999) was a Polish composer and pianist. Born in Lodz, Poland, Milosz Magin showed considerable musical abilities from early childhood. He was a student of piano with Margerita Trombini-Kazuro and composition with both Kazimierz Sikorski and Jan Maklakiewicz; the latter he considered his spiritual father. Magin also studied violin, cello and ballet. In 1957, he completed his piano, composition and conducting studies and graduated from the Warsaw Higher School of Music with highest distinction. Milosz Magin won prizes in several international competitions: the International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, the Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibaud Competition in Paris and the Vianna da Motta Competition in Lisbon. He left his native country together with his wife Idalia Magin and stayed in Portugal, Germany, and England until finally settling in Paris in 1960. His brilliant career as an international soloist was interrupted in 1963 because of a serious car crash in which his left wrist was broken. With remarkable courage, he regained his technique and by 1968 was able to start recording the complete works of Chopin for Decca, a set regarded as a
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    Ondřej Soukup

    Ondřej Soukup

    Ondřej Soukup (born 2 May 1951) is a Czech music composer. He has written soundtracks for twenty feature films, including Jan Svěrák's Kolya, an Academy Award winner for best foreign film in 1997, and Dark Blue World, for which Soukup received his second Czech Lion award for best soundtrack in 2001. Ondřej was also a jury member for the talent show Česko Hledá SuperStar.
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    Pietro Nardini

    Pietro Nardini

    Pietro Nardini (April 12, 1722 – May 7, 1793) was an Italian composer and violinist. He was born in Fibiana and studied music at Livorno, later becoming a pupil of Giuseppe Tartini. Having been a student of Giuseppe Tartini, he moved to Germany where he joined the court chapel in Stuttgart where he became conductor in 1762. However, he abandoned his duties in Württemberg in 1765 to become Kapellmeister, in 1770, to the Grand Duke of Tuscany in Florence. As a violinist, he earned the admiration of Leopold Mozart. Nardini is mentioned in Hester Lynch Piozzi's Observations and Reflections Made in the Course of a Journey Through France, Italy, and Germany (1789) as playing a solo at a concert Mrs Piozzi and her husband, Gabriele Piozzi, gave in Florence in July 1785. As a violinist, Nardini wrote a few compositions, though not numerous. Each are melodious and highly playable, useful in technical studies. Best known are the Sonata in D major and the Concerto in E minor. As friend of Leopold Mozart, he witnessed the arrival of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on his first visit to Italy and his attempts to find a sustainable position in 1770-1771. He also met the bohemian composer Václav Pichl,
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    Johann van Beethoven

    Johann van Beethoven

    Johann van Beethoven (14 November 1740 – 18 December 1792) was a German musician, teacher, and singer who sang in the chapel of the Archbishop of Cologne, whose court was at Bonn. He is best known as the father of the celebrated composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827). Bonn was the place of his birth and death. Johann van Beethoven was the son of Lodewijk (Ludwig) van Beethoven (1712 in Mechelen – 1773 in Bonn) and Maria Josepha Ball (married 1733). His father was probably born in or near the Brabantian town of Mechelen (now in Flanders, Belgium), and had served as a musician in several communities in Flanders before moving to Bonn in 1733. There he served as a musician at the court of Prince-Archbishop-Elector of Cologne Clemens August of Bavaria, rising to the post of Kapellmeister in 1761. Johann also showed musical talent, and joined the court, primarily as a singer, in 1764. In addition to singing (his range, while usually described as that of a tenor, may have extended into alto and even higher registers), he played the violin and zither, and played and taught keyboard instruments of the day, including the harpsichord and the clavichord. He probably met his future wife,
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    John Field

    John Field

    • Works Composed: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A flat
    John Field (26 July 1782 [?], baptized 5 September 1782 – 23 January 1837) was an Irish pianist, composer, and teacher. He was born in Dublin into a musical family, and received his early education there. The Fields soon moved to London, where Field studied under Muzio Clementi. Under his tutelage, Field quickly became a famous and sought-after concert pianist; together, master and pupil visited Paris, Vienna, and St. Petersburg. The Russian capital impressed Field so much that he eventually decided to stay behind when Clementi left, and from about 1804 was particularly active in Russia. Field was very highly regarded by his contemporaries and his playing and compositions influenced many major composers, including Frédéric Chopin, Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann, and Franz Liszt. He is best known today for originating the piano nocturne, a form later made famous by Chopin, as well as for his substantial contribution, through concerts and teaching, to the development of the Russian piano school. Field was born in Golden Lane, Dublin in 1782, the eldest son of Irish parents who were members of the Church of Ireland. His father, Robert Field, earned his living by playing the violin
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    Mieczysław Karłowicz

    Mieczysław Karłowicz

    Mieczysław Karłowicz (11 December 1876 – 8 February 1909) was a Polish composer and conductor. Karłowicz was born in Vishneva (now part of Belarus) into a noble family, being part of the Clan of Ostoja. His father Jan was a Polish linguist, lexicographer and musician. As a child he studied the violin, for which instrument he later wrote his only concerto. Karłowicz studied at Warsaw with Zygmunt Noskowski, Piotr Maszyński and Gustaw Roguski. He later studied in Berlin with Heinrich Urban, for whom he dedicated his Serenade for Strings which he composed and performed when he was still Urban's student. From 1906 to 1907 he studied conducting with Arthur Nikisch. Karłowicz's music is of a late Romantic character. He was great admirer of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky whose Symphony No. 6 he praised. Tchaikovsky's influence can be heard in Karłowicz's earlier works, most notably the E minor symphony and the violin concerto. Like most of the late Romantics he also fell under the considerable influence of Richard Wagner, especially with Tristan und Isolde. Nevertheless he managed to develop an original musical language expressed in harmony and orchestration, the latter of which he mastered
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    Baude Cordier

    Baude Cordier

    Baude Cordier (born c. 1380 in Rheims, died before 1440) was a French composer from Rheims; it has been suggested that Cordier was the nom de plume of Baude Fresnel. Cordier's works are considered among the prime examples of ars subtilior. In line with that cultural trend, he was fond of using red note notation, also known as coloration, a technique stemming from the general practice of mensural notation. The change in color adjusts the rhythm of a particular note from its usual form. (This musical style and type of notation has also been termed "mannerism" and "mannered notation.") Ten of Cordier's secular pieces survive, most of which are rondeaux: Two of the composer's chansons are in the Chantilly Manuscript and are well-known examples of eye music: His mass movement in the Apt MS is in the later, simpler fifteenth-century style.
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    Bernhard Gál

    Bernhard Gál

    Bernhard Gál (born 1971) is an Austrian artist, composer and musicologist. Bernhard Gál (a.k.a. Gal) works between the categories, creating music for instruments and electro-acoustic compositions, as well as art installations. Many of his intermedia art projects and sound installations present combinations of sound, light, objects, video projections and spatial concepts. He is director of the Austrian art organization "sp ce" and runs the record label Gromoga Records. Gals work has been presented in concerts, installations and exhibitions throughout Europe, Asia and The Americas. He has been invited to music and art festivals including Donaueschinger Musiktage Germany; Donaufestival Austria; FILE São Paulo; ICMC Berlin; Inventionen Berlin; Jeunesse Festival Vienna; MaerzMusik Berlin; MATA Festival New York; Musashino Public Art Festival Tokyo, Musicacoustica Beijing; Mutek Montreal; Nuova Consonanza Rome; New Sound, New York-Festival, NYC; Sonambiente Berlin; Soundfield Festival Chicago; Festival Stimme+, ZKM, Karlsruhe; Wien Modern Festival. He has collaborated with artists such as Yumi Kori, P. Michael Schultes, G.S. Sedlak, and Emre Tuncer. For his work, Gal has received
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    Bob Cole

    Bob Cole

    Robert Allen "Bob" Cole (July 1, 1868 – August 2, 1911) was an American composer, actor, playwright, and stage producer and director. In collaboration with Billy Johnson, he wrote and produced A Trip to Coontown (1898), the first musical entirely created and owned by black showmen. The popular song La Hoola Boola (1898) was also a result of their collaboration. Cole later partnered with brothers J. Rosamond Johnson, pianist and singer, and James Weldon Johnson, pianist, guitarist and lawyer, which resulted in over 200 songs. Their vaudeville act featured classical piano pieces and their musicals featured sophisticated lyrics without the usual stereotypes such as "hot-mamas" and watermelons. Success enabled Cole and Rosamond to tour America and Europe with their act. The trio's most popular songs were Louisiana Lize and Under the Bamboo Tree (1901?). Their more successful musicals were The Shoo-Fly Regiment (1906) and The Red Moon (1908, written without Weldon). Cole committed suicide by drowning in the Catskills in 1911 after a nervous breakdown and period of clinical depression that worsened in 1910. “Bob” Cole, or Robert Allen Cole, Jr., was the preeminent leader in the world of
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    Jaromír Vejvoda

    Jaromír Vejvoda

    • Works Composed: Beer Barrel Polka
    Jaromír Vejvoda (28 March 1902 – 13 November 1988) was a Czech composer and the author of the "Beer Barrel Polka". Vejvoda was born and died in Zbraslav. He learned to play the fiddle and flugelhorn in a band led by his father. Later he played these instruments in a military band. He started to compose in the 1920s while he worked as a bartender in a pub owned by his father-in-law. In 1929 he wrote the Modřanská polka named after Modřany, a suburb of Prague where it was played the first time. This catchy tune became a hit and allowed Vejvoda to pursue music as a full-time professional. It was published in 1934 with lyrics Škoda lásky, kterou jsem tobě dala... Publishing house Shapiro Bernstein acquired the rights shortly before World War II and the polka, now the "Beer Barrel Polka" with the English lyrics "Roll out the barrel...", became the most popular song of the Allies in the West, although the original Czech lyrics have a very different meaning and do not speak about beer. After the war this polka became popular around the world, in German-speaking countries as Rosamunde-Polka. Vejvoda wrote many other hits, such as Kdyby ty muziky nebyly ("If those bands did not exist") and
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    Johann Wilhelm Hertel

    Johann Wilhelm Hertel

    Johann Wilhelm Hertel (9 October 1727 – 14 June 1789) was a German composer, harpsichord and violin player. He was born in Eisenach, into a family of musicians. His father, Johann Christian Hertel (1697-1754) was Konzertmeister (from 1733) and director of music at the Eisenach court, while his grandfather, Jakob Christian Hertel (ca. 1667-ca. 1726), had been Kapellmeister in Oettingen and later Merseburg. At an early age Johann Wilhelm accompanied his father, an accomplished viol player, on tour at the harpsichord. He also learned the violin, which he studied with Franz Benda. In 1742 he came with his father to Mecklenburg-Strelitz where he was active playing both instruments. Among his pupils there was Carl Friedrich Christian Fasch (1736-1800). After further music studies in Zerbst and Berlin, Hertel moved to the Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, where he made a successful career, initially as principal and later becoming court composer, and likewise undertaking teaching. During the reign of Duke Christian Ludwig II, Hertel wrote primarily representative instrumental music, while during the reign of his successor, Friedrich (called 'the pious') he focused on sacred music. In 1770 he
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    John Sheahan

    John Sheahan

    John Sheahan (born 19 May 1939) is a notable Irish violinist, folk musician, composer and member of folk band The Dubliners since 1964. Sheahan was born in Dublin and lives in Mulhuddart, County Dublin, though his family are natives of Glin, County Limerick. He is well known for his composition "The Marino Waltz", which achieved popularity in the 1980s when it featured on a television advertisement for Bord na Móna. He has won a number of awards at feiseanna. He had also played with Andre Rieu live at Dublin; their most famous piece they had play together is The Irish Washerwoman. John Sheahan is the grand newphew of Patrick Sheahan, a Royal Irish Constable, who in 1905 died tragically trying to save the life of a pipe workman who was overcome by toxic gasses in a sewer on Hawkins Street, Dublin, where a memorial statue stands today. http://www.limerickcity.ie/media/Media,4161,en.pdf
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    Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga

    Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga

    Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola (January 27, 1806 – January 17, 1826) was a Spanish composer. He was nicknamed "the Spanish Mozart" after he died, because, like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, he was both a child prodigy and an accomplished composer who died young. Whether by design or coincidence, they also shared the same first and second baptismal names; and they shared the same birthday, January 27 (fifty years apart). Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga was born in Bilbao, Biscay, on what would have been Mozart's fiftieth birthday. His father and older brother first taught him music. He then studied the violin under Pierre Baillot, and counterpoint and harmony under François-Joseph Fétis at the Paris Conservatoire. He was so talented that he soon became a teaching assistant in Fétis's class. He died in Paris at the age of nineteen, of a lung ailment, or exhaustion, perhaps both. The amount of music by Arriaga which has survived to the present day is quite small, reflecting his early death. It includes: Arriaga's music is "elegant, accomplished and notable for its harmonic warmth" (New Grove Concise Dictionary of Music). His greatest works are undoubtedly the three string
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    Pēteris Vasks

    Pēteris Vasks

    Pēteris Vasks (born 16 April 1946) is a Latvian composer. Vasks was born in Aizpute, Latvia, into the family of a Baptist pastor. He trained as a violinist at the Jazeps Vitols Latvian Academy of Music, as a double-bass player with Vitautas Sereikaan at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, and played in several Latvian orchestras before entering the State Conservatory in Vilnius in the neighboring Lithuania to study composition with Valentin Utkin, as he was prevented from doing this in Latvia due to Soviet repressive policy toward Baptists. He started to become known outside Latvia in the 1990s, when Gidon Kremer started championing his works and now is one of the most influential and praised European contemporary composers. Vasks' early style owed much to the aleatoric experiments of Witold Lutosławski, Krzysztof Penderecki and George Crumb. Later works included elements of Latvian folk music, such as his gentle and pastoral cor anglais concerto (1989). His works are generally extremely clear and communicative, with a solid and muscular sense of harmony. Lyrical passages may be followed by agitated dissonances, or interrupted by sombre sections with a march-like feel. He
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    Walter Parazaider

    Walter Parazaider

    Walter Parazaider (born March 14, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois) is best known for being a founding member and saxophone player for the rock band Chicago. He also plays the flute and other woodwind instruments in the band, including clarinet. On the hit "You're Not Alone," he played backing rhythm guitar. Parazaider began playing the clarinet at the age of 9. As a teenager, his growing talent was being groomed for a career as a professional orchestral musician, and he gained a Bachelor of Arts degree in classical clarinet performance from DePaul University. Inspired by the Beatles hit "Got To Get You Into My Life", Parazaider became enamored with the idea of creating a rock 'n' roll band with horns. Early practice sessions at Parazaider's house included guitarist Terry Kath and drummer Danny Seraphine, who were both friends during his teenage years. Another friend who became involved was future Chicago producer James William Guercio. The band, originally called The Big Thing, eventually became Chicago with the addition of Lee Loughnane on trumpet, James Pankow on trombone, Robert Lamm on keyboards and Peter Cetera on bass. Parazaider's primary musical role in the band has consisted of
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    Zygmunt Konieczny

    Zygmunt Konieczny

    Zygmunt Konieczny (born 3 January 1937) is a Polish composer of theatre music and film music. Zygmunt Konieczny spent his childhood in the village of Szczyrzyc. He debuted in the 1950s in the cabaret Piwnica pod Baranami in Kraków. Since then Konieczny composed many pieces for film, theater performances and singers such as Ewa Demarczyk and Joanna Słowinska. He lives in Kraków.
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    Abraham Ellstein

    Abraham Ellstein

    Abraham "Abe" Ellstein (Yiddish: אַבֿרהם "אײב" עלשטײן, Avrom Ellstein, July 7, 1907, New York - March 22, 1963) was an American composer for Yiddish entertainments. Along with Shalom Secunda, Joseph Rumshinsky, and Alexander Olshanetsky, Ellstein was one of the "big four" composers of his era in New York City's Second Avenue (Manhattan) Yiddish theatre scene. His musical Yidl Mitn Fidl became one of the greatest hits of Yiddish-language cinema. Ellstein's only opera, The Golem, had its world premiere at the New York City Opera under the baton of music director Julius Rudel on March 23, 1962. The libretto was created by the composer and his wife, Sylvia Regan, based on the mythical Golem tale of the Central European Jews. He was born on the Lower East Side, Manhattan, at that time an Eastern European Jewish immigrant area.
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    Alessandro Piccinini

    Alessandro Piccinini

    Alessandro Piccinini (30 December, 1566  – ca. 1638), was an Italian lutenist and composer. Piccinini was born in Bologna into a musical family: his father Leonardo Maria Piccinini taught lute playing to Alessandro as well as his brothers Girolamo (d. 1615) and Filippo (d. 1648). He held appointments at the Este court in Ferrara (from 1582 to 1597) and with Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, papal legate at Bologna and Ferrara. Piccinini died around 1638, probably in Bologna. He is best known for his two volumes of lute music: Intavolatura di Liuto et di Chitarrone, libro primo (Bologna, 1623) and Intavolaturo di Liuto (Bologna, 1639), the latter published posthumously by his son Leonardo Maria Piccinini. The 1623 collection is of particular importance because of Piccinini's lengthy preface, which includes a detailed manual on performance, as well as claims to have invented the archlute (Piccinini also made important modifications to the chitarrone). Piccinini concentrated on toccatas, courantes and galliards, as well as different kinds of variations. No other works by Piccinini are known; his music for La selva sin amor, the first opera performed in Spain, composed by his brother
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    Boris Blacher

    Boris Blacher

    Boris Blacher (19 January [O.S. 6 January] 1903 – 30 January 1975) was a German composer. Blacher was born when his parents were living within a Russian-speaking community in the Manchurian town of Niuzhuang (Chinese: 牛庄镇) (hence the use of the Julian calendar on his birth record). He spent his first years in China and in the Asian parts of Russia, and in 1919, he eventually came to live in Harbin. In 1922, after finishing school, he went to Berlin where he began to study architecture and mathematics. Two years later, he turned to music and studied composition with Friedrich Ernst Koch. His career was interrupted by National Socialism. He was accused of writing degenerate music and lost his teaching post at the Dresden Conservatory. His career resumed after 1945, and he later became director of the Music Academy of Berlin, and is today regarded as one of the most influential music figures of his time. His students include Aribert Reimann, Isang Yun, Maki Ishii, Fritz Geißler, Giselher Klebe, Heimo Erbse, Klaus Huber, Francis Burt, Gottfried von Einem, Karl Rucht, and Richard Wernick. Blacher was married to the pianist Gerty Blacher-Herzog. They had four children including the
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    236
    Charles-Louis Hanon

    Charles-Louis Hanon

    • Works Composed: The Virtuoso Pianist in 60 Exercises
    Charles-Louis Hanon (2 July 1819 – 19 March 1900) was a French piano pedagogue and composer author of a system of piano exercises. He is best known for his work The Virtuoso Pianist in 60 Exercises, which has become the most widely used set of exercises in modern piano teaching. He was born in Renescure, France in 1819, and died in Boulogne-sur-Mer in 1900. Charles-Louis Hanon was born in northern France in the village of Renescure on July 2, 1819. Trained as an organist by a local teacher, it is not known if he received more advanced musical education. At age 27, he moved a short distance east from Renescure to Boulogne-sur-Mer where he lived with his brother François who was also a musician. Music was never the exclusive focus of Hanon’s life: he was also a devout Roman Catholic, a Third Order Franciscan and a member of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. Given his spirituality, Boulogne-sur-Mer may have been an ideal choice for a home: in addition to its fine churches, the city also contained numerous religious schools and charitable organizations. It is known from an 1869 article that Hanon was involved with a monastic order called “Les Frères Ignorantins,” also known as
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    Dionisio Aguado

    Dionisio Aguado

    Dionisio Aguado y García (8 April 1784 – 29 December 1849) was a Spanish classical guitarist and composer. Born in Madrid, he studied with Miguel García. In 1826, Aguado visited Paris, where he met and became friends with and for a while lived with Fernando Sor. Sor's duo Les Deux Amis ("The Two Friends") commemorated the friendship: one part is marked "Sor" and the other "Aguado." Aguado's major work Escuela de Guitarra was a guitar tutor published in 1825. As of 2011, it is still in print, with Tecla Editions releasing a reprint in 2005. In the Escuela Aguado describes his use of fingernails on the right hand as well as his invention of a "tripodion": a device that held the guitar and thus minimized the damping effect of the player's body on the guitar's back and sides. Aguado's other works include Trois Rondos Brillants (Opus 2), Le Menuet Affandangado (Opus 15), Le Fandango Varie (Opus 16), as well as numerous waltzes, minuets, and other light pieces. The more extended works require a virtuoso technique and left-hand stretches that are almost impossible on the longer string lengths of modern guitars. (See Frederick Noad, "The Classical Guitar") Aguado returned home to Madrid in
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    Eric Stewart

    Eric Stewart

    • Works Composed: I'm Not in Love
    Eric Stewart (born Eric Michael Stewart, 20 January 1945, Droylsden, near Manchester, Lancashire, England) is an English musician, songwriter and record producer most known for his tenure with The Mindbenders in the 1960s, and 10cc from 1972 to 1995. In 1968 he became a co-owner of Strawberry Studios in Stockport, England, where he developed skills as a recording engineer and record producer. His involvement in Strawberry was instrumental in the eventual formation of 10cc. He collaborated with Paul McCartney on three McCartney albums between 1982 and 1986, has recorded three solo albums and released Viva La Difference in 2009. Stewart was invited to join local band Jerry Lee and the Staggerlees, which after a year changed its name to the Emperors of Rhythm. Stewart remained with the band for two years and was at the Oasis club in Manchester in early 1963 on the evening that Wayne Fontana had an audition with a record company representative. Wayne Fontana's drummer and guitarist did not turn up for the audition and Wayne asked Eric and drummer Ric Rothwell if they would 'sit in' for the audition. After a few minutes' rehearsal, the quartet played three well known songs of the time.
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    Ethel Smyth

    Ethel Smyth

    • Works Composed: The Wreckers
    Dame Ethel Mary Smyth, DBE (23 April 1858 – 8 May 1944) was an English composer and a leader of the women's suffrage movement. Smyth was born in Woking, Surrey. J. H. Smyth, her father, was a Major-General in the Royal Artillery. She was one of eight siblings. Her family was opposed to her making a career in music. She studied with Alexander Ewing when she was seventeen and took an interest in Wagner and Berlioz. After a major battle with her family about it, she was allowed to study music in Leipzig, with Carl Reinecke, amongst others, and then, after leaving the conservatoire, privately with Heinrich von Herzogenberg. While at the conservatory she met some important composers including Dvořák, Grieg and Tchaikovsky, but she considered the tuition substandard and left after a year. Through Herzogenberg she met Clara Schumann and Brahms. Later she wrote her Mass in D in 1891 (in spite of being an atheist), which is very much in the style of Brahms's A German Requiem. She also wrote some German songs in his style and the Seven Short Chorale Preludes. Ethel Smyth's works included chamber pieces, symphonies, choral works and operas (most famously The Wreckers). In 1910 Smyth joined
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    Henryk Melcer-Szczawiński

    Henryk Melcer-Szczawiński

    Henryk Melcer-Szczawiński (September 21, 1869 – April 18, 1928) was a Polish composer, pianist, conductor, and teacher. His works include two piano concertos, one in E minor (1892-4) and one in C minor (1898); a violin sonata (1907), and a piano trio in G minor (probably written 1892-4); a tragedy "Protesilas i Laodamia" (1902, libretto by S. Wyspiański), and a Symphony in C minor. Both piano concertos were recorded in the past on Olympia and on Muza, and in 2007 on Hyperion. The Violin Sonata for Violine in G major, the Dumka for Violin and Piano and the Piano Trio, Op. 2 were recorded by the Warsaw Trio for the AP label.
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    Ignaz Friedman

    Ignaz Friedman

    Ignaz Friedman (also spelled Ignace or Ignacy; full name Solomon (Salomon) Isaac Freudman(n), Yiddish: שְׁלֹמֹה יִצְחָק פֿרײדמאַן; February 13, 1882 – January 26, 1948) was a Polish pianist and composer. Critics (e.g. Harold C. Schonberg) and colleagues (e.g. Sergei Rachmaninoff) alike placed him among the supreme piano virtuosi of his day, alongside Leopold Godowsky, Moriz Rosenthal, Josef Hofmann and Josef Lhévinne. Born to an itinerant Jewish musician in Podgórze near Kraków, Ignaz Friedman was a child prodigy. He studied with Hugo Riemann in Leipzig and Theodor Leschetizky in Vienna, and participated in Ferruccio Busoni's masterclasses. Friedman lived in Berlin until 1914 and settled in Copenhagen in 1920. His official début in Vienna in 1904 featured a program of three piano concertos, rivaling the similar programs of established titans like Busoni and Godowsky, and he remained a titan throughout his career. His style was quiet and effortless, imbued with a sense of rhythm and color, grounded in a sovereign technique, and much has been written about his peerless interpretations of Chopin in particular. As with his compatriot and contemporary Moriz Rosenthal, Friedman's Chopin
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    242
    Jair-Rohm Parker Wells

    Jair-Rohm Parker Wells

    Jair-Rôhm Parker Wells (born October 13, 1958) is an American free jazz bassist (bass guitar and electric upright bass), composer and conceptualist. He is one of the founding members of the improvising band Machine Gun which featured Thomas Chapin. Resident in Stockholm, Sweden since 1985, he has been active internationally as a  promoter of improvised and  experimental music performing and recording extensively. He has collaborated with Karl Berger, Daniel Carter, Jaron Lanier and Tony Scott among others. Raised in southern Germany, Jair-Rôhm moved to New York in 1978. After touring the United States for a year with a top forty band he attended Tulane University in New Orleans. While at Tulane, he regularly performed with local jazz and rhythm and blues artists. He also performed as a member of Tulane University's Tulanians, met and studied with Richard Payne (the first person to record with the electric bass) and discovered the music of Harry Partch. He returned to the New York area in the fall of 1980 where he met and started work study under saxophonist/composer Ken Simon. During this period Jair-Rôhm also met Anthony Braxton and became involved in the study of his music. In
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    243
    Jean-Henri d'Anglebert

    Jean-Henri d'Anglebert

    Jean-Henri d'Anglebert (baptized 1 April 1629 – 23 April 1691) was a French composer, harpsichordist and organist. He was one of the foremost keyboard composers of his day. D'Anglebert's father Claude Henry dit Anglebert was an affluent shoemaker in Bar-le-Duc. Nothing is known about the composer's early years and musical education. Since he at one time composed a tombeau for Jacques Champion de Chambonnières, it is possible that Chambonnières was his teacher—or at any rate a friend for whom D'Anglebert had much respect. The earliest surviving manuscript with D'Anglebert's music dates from 1650–1659. It also contains music by Louis Couperin and Chambonnières, and possibly originated in their immediate circle; thus already by the mid-1650s D'Anglebert must have been closely associated with the most prominent French harpsichordists of the time. The earliest reference to D'Anglebert survives in his marriage contract from 11 October 1659. D'Anglebert married Magdelaine Champagne, sister-in-law of the organist François Roberday. In the contract, he is described as bourgeois de Paris, suggesting that by 1659 he was already well established in Paris. How he left Bar-le-Duc and settled in
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    244
    Mihály Mosonyi

    Mihály Mosonyi

    Mihály Mosonyi (born 4 September 1815 in Boldogasszony, Hungary (now in Austria) – died 31 October 1870 in Budapest) was a Hungarian composer. Born Michael Brand, he changed his name to Mosonyi in honor of the district of Moson (where his place of birth was located), with Mihály being the Hungarian equivalent of "Michael". Like many of his peers, he was interested in creating a Hungarian musical style. Mosonyi was primarily an instrumental composer, writing much piano music, epecially of Hungarian character. His best-known works include Funeral Music and Feast of Purification. He also composed a Piano Concerto in E minor (1844), two symphonies, several masses, an opera (Szep Ilonka), and chamber music (including seven String Quartets, a String Sextet, and works for Piano Trio.).,
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    Mykhaylo Verbytsky

    Mykhaylo Verbytsky

    • Works Composed: Ukraine's glory has not perished
    Mykhailo Mykhailovych Verbytsky (Ukrainian: Михайло Михайлович Вербицький) (born March 4, 1815 in Jawornik Ruski, Russian Empire (now Poland) - died December 7, 1870 in Mlyny) was a Ukrainian Greek Catholic priest and composer. He is considered to be one of the first professional Ukrainian composers of Halychyna. Verbystky is known for composing an alternate melody to the song Shche ne vmerla Ukrainy (Ukraine's glory has not perished), which later became the national anthem of Ukraine. His first name is sometimes translated to the English version of Michael, Polish Michal, Russian and other languages (see Michael for more). Mykhailo Verbytsky was born in the Nadsyannya. Sources often differ as to the exact location of his birth. He was however born in Jawornik Ruski and christened 8 km away in Ulucz (the site of the oldest wooden church in Poland where his father was the local priest. Both are now in Subcarpathian Voivodeship, Poland.) Verbytsky as born into the family of a priest. He left an orphan at the age of 10, and was raised by his father's brother, bishop Ivan Snihurskiy, from then on. Snihurskiy took Mykhailo to live with him in Peremysl, where his uncle was very active:
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    246
    Noble Sissle

    Noble Sissle

    Noble Sissle (July 10, 1889 – December 17, 1975) was an American jazz composer, lyricist, bandleader, singer and playwright. Noble Lee Sissle was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on the 10th of July, 1889, around the time his father, the Rev George A. Sissle, was pastor of the city’s Simpson M. E. Chapel. His mother, Martha Angeline (née Scott) Sissle, was a school teacher and juvenile probation officer. As a youth Sissle sang in church choirs and as a soloist with his high school's glee club in Cleveland, Ohio. Sissle attended De Pauw University in Greencastle, Indiana on scholarship and later transferred to Butler University in Indianapolis before turning to music full-time. On October 1, 1918, Sissle joined the New York 369th Infantry Regiment at New York City where he helped Lieutenant James Reese Europe form the 369th Regimental Band. Sissle played violin and also served as drum major for the 369th that, under Europe as bandmaster, is now considered amongst the greatest jazz bands of all time. Sissle sang several vocals on the last album recorded by the band that was released in March 1919. He left the army after the war as a second lieutenant with the 370th Infantry Regiment and
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    247
    Oliver Lake

    Oliver Lake

    Oliver Lake (b. Marianna, Arkansas, September 14, 1942) is an American jazz saxophonist, flutist, composer and poet. He is known mainly on alto saxophone but also performs on soprano saxophone and flute. During the 1960s Lake worked with the Black Artists Group. In 1977 Lake co-founded the World Saxophone Quartet, with David Murray, Julius Hemphill and Hamiet Bluiett. Lake is a resident of Montclair, New Jersey. His son is jazz drummer Gene Lake (b. 12 January 1966). With World Saxophone Quartet With Anthony Braxton With Michael Gregory Jackson With James Blood Ulmer
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    248
    Richard Willis

    Richard Willis

    • Works Composed: It Came upon a Midnight Clear
    Richard Storrs Willis (February 10, 1819 – May 10, 1900) was an American composer, notably of hymn music. One of his hymns is "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (1850), with lyrics by Edmund Sears. He was also a music critic and journal editor. Willis, whose siblings included Nathaniel Parker Willis and Fanny Fern, was born on February 10, 1819, in Boston, Massachusetts. He attended Chauncey Hall, the Boston Latin School, and Yale College where he was a member of Skull and Bones in 1841. Willis then went to Germany, where he studied six years under Xavier Schnyder and Moritz Hauptmann. While there, he became a personal friend of Felix Mendelssohn. After returning to America, Willis served as music critic for the New York Tribune, The Albion, and The Musical Times, for which he served as editor for a time. He joined the New-York American-Music Association, an organization which promoted the work native of naturalized American composers. He reviewed the organization's first concert for their second season, held December 30, 1856, in the Musical World, as a "creditable affair, all things considered". Willis began his own journal, Once a Month: A Paper of Society, Belles-Lettres and
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    249
    Robert Simpson

    Robert Simpson

    • Works Composed: Symphony No. 1
    Robert (Wilfred Levick) Simpson (2 March 1921 – 21 November 1997) was an English composer and long-serving BBC producer and broadcaster. He is best known for his orchestral and chamber music (including 11 symphonies and 15 string quartets), and for his writings on the music of Beethoven, Bruckner, Nielsen and Sibelius. He studied composition under Herbert Howells. Remarkably for a composer who was still alive, a Robert Simpson Society was formed in 1980 by individuals concerned that Simpson's music was unfairly neglected. The Society works to bring Simpson's music to a wider public by sponsoring recordings and live performances of his work, by issuing a journal and other publications, and by maintaining an archive. Simpson was born in Leamington, Warwickshire. His father, Robert Warren Simpson, was a descendent of Sir James Young Simpson, the Scottish pioneer of anaesthetics; his mother, Helena Hendrika Govaars, was the daughter of Gerrit Govaars, founder of the Leger des Heils, the Dutch arm of The Salvation Army. Simpson studied at Westminster School. He was intended for a medical career and studied in London for two years before his determination to be a musician gained the
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    250
    Salomon Jadassohn

    Salomon Jadassohn

    Salomon Jadassohn (13 August 1831, Breslau – 1 February 1902, Leipzig) was a German pianist, composer and a renowned teacher of piano and composition at the Leipzig Conservatory. Jadassohn was born to a Jewish family living in Breslau, the capital of the Prussian province of Silesia. This was a generation after the emancipation of the Jews in Central European German-speaking lands and during a time of relative tolerance. First educated locally, Jadassohn enrolled at the Leipzig Conservatory in 1848, just a few years after it had been founded by Felix Mendelssohn. There he studied composition with Moritz Hauptmann, Ernst Richter and Julius Rietz, as well as piano with Ignaz Moscheles. At the same time, he studied privately with Franz Liszt in Weimar. On 13 April 1851 in Weimar he was the soloist at the first performance, under Liszt's baton, of Liszt's arrangement for piano and orchestra of Carl Maria von Weber's Polonaise (Polacca) brillante "L'hilarité" in E major, Op. 72. Because he was Jewish, Jadassohn could not qualify for the many church jobs as music directors or organists which were usually available to Christian graduates of a conservatory such as Leipzig, as they required
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