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Best Comic Strip of All Time

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    1
    Quirksmith

    Quirksmith

    Quirksmith is a newspaper comic strip and webcomic by Grant Woolard. It runs in the University of Virginia newspaper The Cavalier Daily. Quirksmith gained national attention in September 2006 for two of its strips, one of which illustrated Jesus Christ crucified on a Cartesian x/y axis, and the other depicted a nativity scene in which Mary responds to Joseph’s concerns about a “bumpy rash” by saying “I swear, it was immaculately transmitted!” Shortly after appearing in the newspaper, the comics began to receive criticism on a number of blogs, including the American political weblog RedState. The issue culminated when it was featured on The O'Reilly Factor, in which commentator Bill O'Reilly denounced the comics for being “an unbelievable assault on Christianity”, and encouraged that UVA alumni not donate money to the school until the newspaper is "forced off campus." He added that, had the university founder Thomas Jefferson been alive today, he would have abolished the newspaper from the school campus. Several weeks later the two strips were removed from the Cavalier Daily website and replaced with the following statement from the artist: "The sole intent of my comic strip is to
    7.00
    7 votes
    2

    Between Friends

    • Genre: Politics
    Between Friends is an internationally syndicated comic strip written by Canadian Sandra Bell-Lundy. The comic strips appear in more than 175 newspapers in ten countries around the world. Three middle-aged professional women and the problems that they face in their lives are the main focus throughout the comic strip series. Initially, Maeve, Susan, and Kimberly were all childless, but Susan and Kimberly are now mothers. Bell-Lundy's original artwork used for the strips was displayed at Artway Gallery in Brampton, Ontario, in 2009. All the minor characters are connected to Kim, Maeve, or Susan. Kimberly previously wrote a column on women's issues from home. She is currently a homemaker and struggling to find a new source of intellectual fulfilment. Maeve is a spicy divorcée who always has a snappy comeback. She's the one that a person always remembers at parties. She's a great Sales Director at the office, less great with her personal life. Susan like Maeve, works in a professional office. Previously she and her husband Harvey were DINKYs. After struggling with infertility treatments, they adopted a daughter, Emma. The strip is drawn in detail and appears in colour. It usually runs
    7.83
    6 votes
    3
    Buster Brown

    Buster Brown

    Buster Brown was a comic strip character created in 1902 by Richard Felton Outcault who was known for his association with the Brown Shoe Company. (The name "Buster" came either directly or indirectly from the popularity of Buster Keaton, then a child actor in vaudeville.) This mischievous young boy was loosely based on a boy near Outcault's home in Flushing, New York. His physical appearance, including the pageboy haircut, was utilized by Outcault and later adopted by Buster Brown. The actual boy's name was Granville Hamilton Fisher, son of Charles and Anna Fisher of Flushing. The family subsequently moved to Amityville, New York where Charles Fisher ran a real estate and insurance business on Merrick Road. Granville operated a phonograph and radio sales and repair shop across the street from his father until his sudden death in 1936. Richard Barker played Buster Brown in the Brown Shoe Company advertising campaign as a small child. There is a book written about Richard Barker and his life as Buster Brown in the advertising campaign. The book about Richard Barker is titled “Buster Brown and the Cowboy”. Buster Brown, his sister Mary Jane, and his dog Tige, an American Pit Bull
    7.83
    6 votes
    4

    Garfield

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Garfield
    Garfield is a comic strip created by Jim Davis. Published since June 19, 1978, it chronicles the life of the title character, the cat Garfield (named after Davis's grandfather); his owner, Jon Arbuckle; and Arbuckle's dog, Odie. As of 2007, it was syndicated in roughly 2,580 newspapers and journals, and held the Guinness World Record for being the world's most widely syndicated comic strip. Though this is rarely mentioned in print, Garfield is set in Muncie, Indiana, the home of Jim Davis, according to the television special Garfield Goes Hollywood. Common themes in the strip include Garfield's laziness, obsessive eating, and hatred of Mondays and diets. The strip's focus is mostly on the interactions among Garfield, Jon, and Odie, but recurring minor characters appear as well. Originally created with the intentions to "come up with a good, marketable character", Garfield has spawned merchandise earning $750 million to $1 billion annually. In addition to the various merchandise and commercial tie-ins, the strip has spawned several animated television specials, two animated television series, two theatrical feature-length live-action films and three CGI animated direct-to-video
    6.57
    7 votes
    5

    Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer

    • Genre: Humour
    Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer is a weekly comic strip written and drawn by Ben Katchor since 1988. It is published in The Forward and various alternative weekly newspapers. Katchor embodies his love of the fading small-business community of New York City in the title character, a downtrodden schlep who wanders the streets taking pictures and being sidetracked into surreal escapades. Strips often depict Knipl's chance encounters with obscure, marginal businesses (e.g. a company that distributes newspaper weights to newsstands), eccentric hobbyists, and enigmatic details of the urban landscape. There is rarely continuity between the strips, and Knipl is the only recurring character. A collection of Julius Knipl strips was published in 1991 by Penguin Books (as a RAW One-Shot) as Cheap Novelties: The Pleasures of Urban Decay. Another collection was published in 1996 by Little, Brown and Company under the title Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories. Pantheon Books published a third volume of strips, The Beauty Supply District, in 2000. Each book includes one long story in addition to the self-contained weekly strips. Translated collections of the strip in French and
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    Genetics for Beginners

    Genetics for Beginners

    Genetics is the newest of all sciences. Nothing useful was known about inheritance until just over a century ago and what Mendel learned then was used to justify eugenics and racism. Now genetics is exploding and we have discovered the complete sequence of the DNA letters of the 60,000 working genes needed to make a human being. Introducing Genetics takes us from Mendel to the human gene map and the treatment of inborn disease. It shows how DNA was discovered and explains how some genes may act in their own interests as much as in the interests of those who carry them. No one can afford to be ignorant of genetics and, like it or not, many of us will have to make moral decisions in which genetics play a part. This documentary comic book gives us the information needed to do so.
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    Bart Dickon Omnibus

    Bart Dickon Omnibus

    Reborn into a New Dark Age, Bart Dickon, the ideologically-sound secret agent, bursts once again onto a complacent world of mediocrity to spread High Adventure and Derring-do to those astute enough to read of his doings. Drawing on the Ancient Egyptian myths of Isis and Osiris, the bandes desinée of Tintin, Jock and Snowy, the high drama of Dixon of Dock Green and the heroic works of the Reverend W. Audrey, our protagonist spends most of this epic tale "in corporeal desuetude", i.e. as a bodyless head. The Odyssey pursues him from procreation, via birth, schooldays and an Apprenticeship In The University Of Life (i.e. dicking about spending Daddy's money), to his ultimate vocation as 'The English Assassin', pith helmet-wearing conqueror of something-or-other and subversive spy in a world of wickedness and intrepidity. During a romantic interlude, he is decapitated in flagrante delicto and his dismembered body is scattered to the four winds. Bart's trusty, youthful and - lets face it - female sidekick Snowy quests though multiple realities, meets her doppelganger and after several gender-swaps achieves an unexpected denouement to the tale. Wildly funny, wildly unlikely and unique in its combination of intertwining language and image. "Van Loon’s dapper, nay sartorially gifted, creation Bart Dickon is ostensibly an affectionate homage to the boys’ heroes of the 1930s-40s story papers and comics. But look closer and you begin to see that the wonderful collage style of the stories hearkens back to a different period – namely, the high-water mark of underground experimentation in the 1960s and 70s (think Oz/IT/Cyclops) – and that Dickon is a very different kind of hero, again with echoes from that hippie era (his intra-dimensional adventuring is pure Jerry Cornelius, and his left-wing politics certainly don’t fit the 1930s-40s template). Dickon may be a delightful mish-mash of influences and styles, but call him ‘postmodern’ and he’s likely to want to ‘teach you a lesson’ – without getting his Jermyn Street tailored shirt creased, of course." - Roger Sabin, comics and graphic novel expert
    7.00
    6 votes
    8

    Li'l Folks

    Li'l Folks, the first comic strip by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, was a weekly panel that appeared mainly in Schulz's hometown paper, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, from June 22, 1947 to January 22, 1950. The first two panels ran in the Minneapolis Tribune. Li'l Folks can almost be regarded as an embryonic version of Peanuts, containing characters and themes which were to reappear in the later strip: a well-dressed young man with a fondness for Beethoven a la Schroeder, a dog with a striking resemblance to Snoopy and a boy named Charlie Brown. Schulz was 24 at the time he drew Li'l Folks, and he was living with his father in a four-bedroom apartment above his father's barber shop. He earned $10 for each submission to the paper, and although the newspaper never returned his original artwork, he clipped each week's strip from the paper and placed it in his scrapbook, which eventually housed over 7,000 pieces of artwork. He quit two years into the strip after the editor turned down his requests for a pay increase and a move of Li'l Folks from the women's section to the comics pages. In 2004, the complete run of the strip was collected by the Charles M. Schulz Museum (Santa Rosa,
    7.00
    6 votes
    9

    Broom-Hilda

    • Genre: Humour
    Broom-Hilda is an American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Russell Myers. Distributed by the Tribune Media Services, it depicts the misadventures of a man-crazy, cigar-smoking, beer-guzzling, 1,500-year-old witch and her motley crew of friends. The original idea for Broom-Hilda came from Elliott Caplin, brother of Li'l Abner cartoonist Al Capp. He described the main character to Myers, who responded with a sketch of the witch and several samples. Caplin, acting as Myers' business manager, submitted these to the Chicago Tribune Syndicate. Introduced on April 19, 1970, it became an immediate success. Broom-Hilda was reprinted in several collections during the 1970s and 1980s. Although events mostly take place during the present in an unidentified forest, the setting is fluid. Locales change drastically from day to day—and background details can change from panel to panel within the same strip, while the characters remain stationary (much like the backgrounds in Krazy Kat ). Broom-Hilda is capable of time travel, reappearing in various centuries throughout history to chat with (burlesque versions of) diverse historical figures. Broom-Hilda (a pun on Brünnhilde) is a witch
    9.00
    4 votes
    10

    For Better or For Worse

    • Genre: Drama
    For Better or For Worse is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that ran for 30 years, chronicling the lives of a Canadian family, The Pattersons, and their friends. The story is set in the fictitious Toronto-area suburban town of Milborough, Ontario. Johnston's strip began in September 1979, and ended the main story on August 30, 2008, with a postscript epilogue the following day. Starting on September 1, 2008, the strip began re-telling its original story by means of a combination of newly drawn strips (set in the past) and reruns. This new format, however, was dropped after less than two years and switched entirely to reruns, thus officially ending its run (of new material) by mid 2010. It is seen in over 2,000 newspapers throughout Canada, the United States and about 20 other countries, and is translated into eight languages from its native English. The title is a reference to the marriage service found in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer as well as in the wedding ceremonies of other faith traditions: A signature element of For Better or For Worse during the first 28 years of the strip's existence was that the characters aged in real time. Beginning on September 3, 2007, For Better
    9.00
    4 votes
    11

    Frumpy the Clown

    • Genre: Humour
    Frumpy the Clown is a comic-strip written and illustrated by Judd Winick and appeared from 1996 to 1998. Despite the fact that it only ran for two years and appeared only in 30 newspapers (the largest being the Chicago Sun-Times), it had a fair sized fan base. The strip began when Brad Bragg, a 10 year old kid, brought back a clown to live with his family. The parents were reluctant, but since the kids loved him, they decided to let him stay. Frumpy is a far cry from a normal clown. Though he has the white face, green hair, red nose, huge feet and polka-dotted jumpsuit one might expect, he's fairly grouchy, a chain-smoker, and twice divorced. He doesn't enjoy being stereotyped as an entertainer, and doesn't do magic tricks, balloon animals, or comedy bits. He does love children, however, and teaches elementary school in order to help kids grow up right in the modern world. In the summer, he works as a camp counselor. Characters other than Frumpy include Mike and Mona Bragg, parents, and their kids Kim and Brad. It is notable that the Bragg family was Jewish, setting them apart from the average generic comic strip family. This fact was not treated as a big deal, and was only an
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    The Phoenix Requiem

    The Phoenix Requiem

    The Phoenix Requiem is a fantasy webcomic written and drawn by Sarah Ellerton, author and artist of Inverloch, which takes place in a setting similar to Victorian-era England. The comic's first pages were published on September 27, 2007, and the final pages were published on March 16, 2011. During its run, The Phoenix Requiem updated with 2-3 new pages on Mondays and Thursdays. Ellerton described The Phoenix Requiem as "the story of one man trying to forget the ghosts of his past against a backdrop of a Victorian-era world, where magic, long lost to the people, may be returning." The story begins when Jonas Faulkner is found unconscious with two gunshot wounds in the woods outside the small town of Esk. He is nursed back to health by Anya Katsukova, a doctor-in-training, and the two became friends. Around the same time Jonas arrives, however, a supernatural plague begins to affect the town of Esk, killing several of its inhabitants. In the meantime, Robyn Hart, a former soldier who holds unreciprocated romantic feelings for Anya, begins seeing ghostly apparitions around the town. During a ride in the forest, Jonas, Anya, Robyn, and their friend Petria encounter a "spirit," one of
    9.00
    4 votes
    13

    Crock

    Crock (1975 - May 20, 2012) is an American comic strip created by Bill Rechin and Brant Parker depicting the French Foreign Legion. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, the strip began in 1975 and ended in May 2012. As of January 2012, it appeared in 250 newspapers in 14 countries. Don Wilder took over the writing duties in 1976 as Parker returned his focus to The Wizard of Id. Following the death of Bill Rechin in May 2011, the strip was drawn by Kevin Rechin and written by Bob Morgan, who is Rechin's brother-in-law. Publication of new Crock strips ended with the May 20, 2012, Sunday comic, though reprints of older strips by Bill Rechin will continue to run until at least 2015. King Features describes Crock "as the greatest and longest-running parody of the Foreign Legion classic, Beau Geste," written in 1924 by P.C. Wren and filmed several times. The comic strip is set in the middle of a barren desert at a desolate fort, where the tyrannical Commandant Vermin P. Crock rules over a curious group of beleaguered legionnaires: the cowardly Captain Poulet, the simple-minded Maggot, Figowitz (who just wants a kind word), camp follower Grossie (who now owns Le Cesspool, a favorite,
    6.67
    6 votes
    14

    Buck Rogers

    • Genre: Science Fiction
    • Characters: Wilma Deering
    Buck Rogers is a fictional character who first appeared in Armageddon 2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan in the August 1928 issue of the pulp magazine Amazing Stories as Anthony Rogers. A sequel, The Airlords of Han, was published in the March 1929 issue. Philip Nowlan and the syndicate John F. Dille Company, later known as the National Newspaper Syndicate, contracted to adapt the story into a comic strip. After Nowlan and Dille enlisted editorial cartoonist Dick Calkins as the illustrator, Nowlan adapted the first episode from Armageddon 2419, A.D. and changed the hero's name from Anthony Rogers to Buck Rogers. The strip made its first newspaper appearance on January 7, 1929. Later adaptations included a serial film, a television series (where his first name was changed from Anthony to William) as well and other formats. The adventures of Buck Rogers in comic strips, movies, radio and television became an important part of American popular culture. This pop phenomenon paralleled the development of space technology in the 20th century and introduced Americans to outer space as a familiar environment for swashbuckling adventure. Buck Rogers has been credited with bringing into
    7.60
    5 votes
    15

    Dog eat Doug

    • Genre: Humour
    Dog eat Doug (often abbreviated DeD) is a comic strip written and illustrated by Brian Anderson. It began in 2004 as a webcomic that ran on the cartoonist's homepage and Comics Sherpa, and was later picked up for newspaper syndication through Creators Syndicate. The newspaper run began on November 14, 2005. The "Dog" in the title refers to Sophie, a female chocolate lab; Doug is the baby of Sophie's owners. The two share a love-hate relationship in their everyday lives and imaginations. Doug's parents also make appearances in the strip as minor characters, though they are only seen from the neck down.
    8.75
    4 votes
    16

    Outland

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: Milquetoast the Cockroach
    Outland was a Sunday-only comic strip written and illustrated by Berkeley Breathed from 1989 until 1995. It was a spin-off of Breathed's strip Bloom County, featuring many of the same characters. On September 3, 1989, a month after retiring Bloom County, Breathed began his second syndicated strip with a minor character from the previous strip. Ronald-Ann Smith, a little girl from the "wrong side of the tracks" in Bloom County, entered a magic doorway in a grimy alley that looked down into a cheery world of "cotton-candy trees" known as the Outland (the ground of her world did not align with that of Outland, so the door originally appears to be hovering in the sky above it). In its earliest form, Outland had been intended to be an experimental strip for Breathed, featuring a channel for creativity in the forms of new characters (such as Mortimer Mouse, based on the rejected name for Disney's Mickey Mouse) and bizarre backgrounds (many of which initially resembled those seen in Krazy Kat). However, Opus the Penguin returned in the strip's third installment, and Bill the Cat appeared months after that. Before long, the premise of another world beyond a magic door had been lost
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Girl Genius

    Girl Genius

    • Genre: Steampunk
    Girl Genius is an ongoing comic book series turned webcomic, written and drawn by Phil and Kaja Foglio and published by their company, Studio Foglio LLC under the imprint Airship Entertainment. The comic has won five WCCA awards including 2008 Outstanding Comic, and been nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist, an Eagle Award and twice for an Eisner Award; in 2009, 2010, and 2011 it won the Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story. Girl Genius has the tagline of "Adventure, Romance, MAD SCIENCE!". It features a female lead character in an alternate-history Victorian-style "steampunk" setting, although elements veer from what is usually thought of as steampunk. Kaja Foglio, one of the co-creators, describes it as "gaslamp fantasy" instead to suggest its more fantastic style. The Foglios have also released two Girl Genius novels, Agatha H. and the Airship City and Agatha H. and the Clockwork Princess. The specific idea for the style of Girl Genius came about when Kaja Foglio went through some of Phil's loose drawings: "I was going through all of Phil's old files and I was filing all of the old sketches, and I was coming across weird airships and cats in tophats with walking
    6.33
    6 votes
    18

    Weltschmerz

    Weltschmerz is a weekly comic strip in Canada, written and drawn by cartoonist Gareth Lind. The strip, which is published in alternative newsweeklies such as Eye Weekly, offers political and social satire with a regular cast of characters, similar to Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau, but with more emphasis on caricature. Characters in the strip include computer geek Horst Weltschmerz, his girlfriend Celia Jones, his friends Frank, Cindy, Cosmo and Max, and Max's partner Des. Political figures such as George W. Bush, Stephen Harper and Dalton McGuinty also appear as characters. Current storylines include: Horst and Celia attempt to have a child (so far unsuccessfully); Raj is first held in prison on a security certificate, then extradited to Pakistan on suspicion of being a terrorist, then kidnapped by terrorists; and Frank runs for Liberal leader on a porn-based platform. The Weltschmerz web site has recently been expanded to a blog-based format, allowing an archive that can be sorted by theme and character. The first Weltschmerz collection, Attack of the Same-Sex Sleeper Cells, was self-published in spring 2006.
    9.67
    3 votes
    19

    Achewood

    Achewood is a webcomic created by Chris Onstad in 2001. It portrays the lives of a group of anthropomorphic stuffed toys, robots, and pets. Many of the characters live together in the home of their owner, Chris, at the fictional address of 62 Achewood Court. Another address used in the strip is 11 Via Verde, the home of a main character, the extravagant Ray Smuckles. The events of the strip mostly take place in and around the house, as well as around the town of Achewood, the fictional suburb which gives its name to the comic. The comic's humor is most often absurdist, typically lacking a traditional set punchline, and very often moves to the highly surreal. The world of the strip is expansive, featuring many major and minor characters with detailed backstories, and often references previous events, making it an ongoing narrative. As Onstad is a food and cooking enthusiast, many Achewood strips contain some reference to food or drink. Originally published regularly, the comic began to skip days in late 2010, and in March 2011 Onstad announced that Achewood would be going on indefinite hiatus. In November 2011 the comic returned, followed by an announcement in December that the
    7.20
    5 votes
    20

    Brewster Rockit: Space Guy!

    Brewster Rockit: Space Guy! is a satirical retro-futuristic comic strip created by Tim Rickard. It chronicles the misadventures of the dim-witted Brewster Rockit, captain of the space station R.U. Sirius, and his crew. Many of the comic's characters and elements are derived from the Star Trek franchise, American science fiction films of the 1950s, and science fiction comics of the '40s and '50s. It debuted on July 5, 2004 (the same month, Rickard was interviewed for the online magazine SciFiDimensions.com.) and is nationally syndicated by Tribune Media Services. The weekday strips usually feature extended serial storylines, often running several weeks at a time. The Sunday strips are stand-alone, self-contained gags which are often more elaborately illustrated and action-oriented than the dailies, and are sometimes presented in medias res style. The comic's humor ranges from satire, metahumor, slapstick, dark humor, running gags, word play, and puns. The R.U. Sirius is a space station orbiting Earth that acts as both an embassy for visiting aliens as well as a first line of defense against hostile aliens. Its mission statement is (probably) "Try not to die a horrible death." The
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    Introducing Hinduism (Introducing (Icon))

    Introducing Hinduism (Introducing (Icon))

    This documentary comic book provides an overview of one of the most ancient religions in the world. One of the most famous practioners in comparatively recent times, Mahatma Gandhi, gave it as his opinion that "a man may not believe in God and still call himself a Hindu."
    7.20
    5 votes
    22

    Garth

    Garth was a comic strip in the British newspaper Daily Mirror from July 24, 1943, to March 22, 1997. The strip belonged to the action-adventure genre and recounted the exploits of the title character, an immensely strong hero who battled various villains throughout the world and many different chronological eras. Garth was widely syndicated throughout English-speaking countries during its long run. Steve Dowling and Gordon Boshell were the originators of the Garth character, and at the time, took on 15-year-old John Allard, who stayed with the strip for its entire lifetime. After 59 adventures Dowling retired and handed Garth over to Allard, which he carried on until 1971 when Eagle comics' Dan Dare artist, Frank Bellamy, took over the art with Allard writing the scripts. Garth's longevity had been established by Don Freeman, who created almost every basic Garth plot on which the saga was built. Peter O'Donnell, Jim Edgar and Angus Allan also wrote extensively for the strip during its decades-long existence. Philip Harbottle is a leading Garth expert and collector of the strips, and he wrote several of the stories during the 1990s. Martin Asbury became Garth's artist after Frank
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Katzenjammer Kids

    Katzenjammer Kids

    The Katzenjammer Kids is an American comic strip created by the German immigrant Rudolph Dirks and drawn by Harold H. Knerr for 37 years (1912 to 1949). It debuted December 12, 1897 in the American Humorist, the Sunday supplement of William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. After a series of legal battles between 1912 and 1914, Dirks left the Hearst organization and began a new strip, first titled Hans und Fritz and then The Captain and the Kids. It featured the same characters seen in The Katzenjammer Kids, which was continued by Knerr. The two separate versions of the strip competed with each other until 1979, when The Captain and the Kids ended its six-decade run. The Katzenjammer Kids is still distributed by King Features, making it the oldest comic strip still in syndication and the longest-running ever. The Katzenjammer Kids was inspired by Max and Moritz, a children's story of the 1860s by German author Wilhelm Busch. The Katzenjammer Kids (three brothers in the first strip but soon reduced to two) featured Hans and Fritz, twins who rebelled against authority, particularly in the form of their mother, Mama; der Captain, a shipwrecked sailor who acted as a surrogate father;
    8.25
    4 votes
    24

    Nippur de Lagash

    Nippur de Lagash (English: Nippur from Lagash) is an Argentine historic comic series set on the XXIII century BC (according to the short chronology), about a fictional homonym warrior of Sumer, created by comic scriptwriter Robin Wood and illustrated by Lucho Olivera. It was published by Columba Publishing on the D'Artagnan and later Nippur Magnum comic books from 1967 to 1998, and is considered one of the most important Argentine comics. Other comic artists who worked later on this comic are: Sergio Mulko, Néstor Barrón, Gustavo Amézaga, Ricardo Villagrán and Jorge Zaffino, among others. His parents named him after the ancient city of Nippur, where they were born. He later gained the epithet "from Lagash" after leaving his home city, Lagash, in forced exile. His adventures, loosely framed on actual history, start when Nippur, a general of Lagash, is forced to escape from Mesopotamia after its invasion, carried out by Lugal-Zage-Si. He then wanders around the bronze age known world, the Middle East and east Mediterranean, making friends and enemies, before taking part on the Akkadian conquest of the Fertile Crescent. He thus become king of Lagash, but choose to abdicate and comes
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    Red Ryder

    Red Ryder was a popular long-running Western comic strip created by Stephen Slesinger and artist Fred Harman. Beginning Sunday, November 6, 1938, Red Ryder was syndicated by Newspaper Enterprise Association, expanding over the following decade to 750 newspapers, translations into ten languages and a readership in the United States of 14 million. The 26-year run of the strip came to an end in 1964. Harman was on a Colorado ranch when he decided to draw a comic strip. He headed for Hollywood in the early 1930s, borrowed some money and began Bronc Peeler, which he syndicated himself. Bronc Peeler was a rough cowboy who fought bandits and rustlers with the help of his pal, Coyote Pete. Harman's rough-hewn art style had a dramatic appeal, but his characters, who killed animals and people, coupled with the affected use of slang and thin storylines, were not in keeping with the content standards needed for wide syndication. In 1938, when Harman met publisher/comic syndicator Slesinger, he headed toward happier trails. Slesinger brought Harman to New York and worked with him for a year before Red Ryder was ready to be syndicated. Slesinger then embarked on a successful campaign of
    8.25
    4 votes
    26

    The Better Half

    The Better Half is the title of a comic strip created by Bob Barnes. It follows the lives of a married couple, Stanley and Harriet Parker, and the usual annoyances couples have with one another after years of marriage. It has been distributed by King Features Syndicate since 1956, and in 1958 won Barnes the National Cartoonist Society Newspaper Panel Cartoon Award. James Coco and Lily Tomlin made a sitcom pilot based on the strip for ABC in the early 1970s, but no series was ever made. Cartoonists who have worked on the strip include Bob Barnes (1956-1972), Ruth Barnes and Dick Rogers (1973-1979), Vinnie Vinson (1979-1982), and Randy Glasbergen (1982-present). Between 1982 and 1992, Glasbergen wrote under the pseudonym "Jay Harris", so as not to confuse publishers who were familiar with his different style of humor and character design. As he was able to transform the characters to his own style, he began using his own name. In the process, Stanley became much shorter than Harriet and lost his scruffy mustache. "Harris" was his wife's maiden name. The strip is seen by many as a much tamer version of The Lockhorns, but with a few differences:
    8.25
    4 votes
    27

    F Minus

    F Minus is a horizontally oriented single panel comic strip by Tony Carrillo, started when he was a sophomore at Arizona State University. It ran daily in The State Press, an independent newspaper at ASU, from 2002 until 2004, when Carrillo graduated. In an online mtvU strips contest with Scott Adams of Dilbert fame as member of the jury and with almost 200,000 people voting to find the best college comic strip, F Minus came in first place. Having won a development deal with United Features Syndicate through the contest, syndication of F Minus (in daily newspapers) began on April 17, 2006 in 75 newspapers throughout the United States. According to Tony Carrillo, most of the comics are about stupidity and losers. It doesn't feature any story lines and is often compared to one of his favorites, The Far Side by Gary Larson. In 2007, F Minus was nominated in the 2007 Reuben Awards for Best Newspaper Panel but lost to Rhymes with Orange by Hilary B. Price. The Phoenix New Times named F Minus as the best syndicated comic strip in its Best of Phoenix 2007 issue. There are two collections of F Minus.
    7.00
    5 votes
    28

    Steel Claw

    The Steel Claw was one of the most popular comic book heroes of British weekly adventure comics of the 1960s and 1970s. The character was revived in 2005 for Albion, a six issue mini-series published by the Wildstorm imprint of DC Comics. The Steel Claw first appeared in the debut edition of Valiant dated 6 October 1962. The strip was one of several put together for the comic by Fleetway editors Ken Mennell, Jack Le Grand and Sid Bicknell, and was then refined by writer Ken Bulmer and artist Jesús Blasco. After the first three serials, Bulmer left the title, and was replaced by Tom Tully. The Steel Claw appeared in Valiant throughout much of the 1960s and was one of the most popular strips in the comic. Tully wrote the series for the remainder of its run. The story ended briefly in May 1970, but a year later was back, retitled Return of the Claw, which would run until 1973. In 1967, Fleetway featured the character in a number of digest-size original stories in their Stupendous Series of Super Library comics. The Steel Claw would alternate with The Spider from Lion in these books, with the Claw featuring in the odd-numbered editions. Because of the pressures of deadlines, these
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Dueling Analogs

    Dueling Analogs

    • Genre: Video game
    Dueling Analogs (a pun on the Dual Analog Controller) is a webcomic by Steve Napierski (also the creator of The Outer Circle). The website was launched on November 17, 2005, and new comics are posted every Monday and Thursday. Dueling Analogs is a gaming comic and as such most of the comics take place in the universe of the games discussed. There are few ongoing stories or plotlines as all of the comics are self-encapsulated (one exception is the trial of King Bowser); however, there are repeated themes such as 'Rejected Mega Man Villains', 'Games that I am glad were never made' and 'What if...?'. Dueling Analogs is also a founding member of a webcomic group of gaming comics. The comic came to prominence in the webcomic community after the "So Dark the Contra of Man" strip. Dueling Analogs is a color semi-weekly webcomic that lampoons the characters, culture and subtext of modern gaming culture Dueling Analogs has featured such games as Final Fantasy VII, The Smurfs, Mega Man, Karnov, Super Smash Brothers and Final Fantasy X-2. Dueling Analogs has been nominated for two Web Cartoonist's Choice Awards Dueling Analogs has been voted best gaming webcomic of the week by the readers of
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    No Need for Bushido

    No Need for Bushido

    No Need for Bushido is a webcomic started on April 11, 2002 on Keenspace (now Comic Genesis). The comic is drawn by Alex Kolesar and written by Joseph Kovell. Its content and title are based on various influences from such anime and manga as Tenchi Muyo! (which has a series of volumes titled "No Need for Tenchi") and Rurouni Kenshin, a famous manga/anime series which No Need For Bushido obviously parodies at many points. Kolesar's artistic style is influenced by, but not restricted to, the manga and anime styles, while Kovell's writing style is humorous, unique and random. The series is a mixture of anachronism, exaggerated action, veiled drama, and comedy based in a parodied feudal Japan. No Need for Bushido begins with the announcement of an arranged marriage between Eijiro Wataro and Ina Senshin. Their respective clans are among the most powerful in Japan, and the ambitions of Hirotomo Wataro, the ruthless head of the Wataro clan, for total dominion of Japan has the two clans on the brink of war. The marriage is supposed to serve as both a means to avoid war and unite the two great clans into one. However, when Ina hears the news she is horrified both by never being consulted
    8.00
    4 votes
    31

    Sweet Tooth

    Sweet Tooth was a fictional character in a comic strip in the British comic Whizzer and Chips, first appearing in January 1973. A "Whizz-Kid" in the comic, and about a boy who has a fixation for sweets, continually hounded by Greedy Greg (originally Bully Bloggs), it joined Buster after Whizzer and Chips merged with it in 1990. It remained in the comic until the end, a rerun by this time. A main feature of the comic was the prominent front tooth that the character always displayed. Though other artists, including Vic Neill drew strips from time to time, Trevor Metcalfe was the main artist throughout, though Jack Edward Oliver included Sweet Tooth on the last page of the final issue of Buster in January 2000, explaining that Sweet Tooth's "sweet tooth" eventually went bad from all the sweet eating.
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    The Devil's Panties

    The Devil's Panties

    • Genre: Comedy
    The Devil's Panties is a webcomic created by Jennie Breeden. It is based widely on her own life experiences and interactions with other people. The humour contained within it draws from a decidedly eccentric and slightly exaggerated view of the creator's surroundings, sometimes leading to surrealistic moments and other slightly absurd events transpiring throughout the course of any given strip of the comic. Breeden also produces another webcomic, Geebas on Parade, which centers around a live action role-playing game. The comic seems to abandon a continual story in lieu of offering up a series of experiences conveyed into the comic style format based on what happens to Breeden in reality. It is updated daily except under special circumstances. Typically, weekday comics are multi-panel comedic pieces, Saturday comics are single-panel comedic pieces, and Sunday "comics" are non-comedic artwork, usually in ink or watercolor. The comic addresses a wide array of subjects throughout its run, making it often hard to attach any single recurring theme to it. The style of humour also tends to vary, ranging from the more blatant and widely recognised jokes to more subtle attempts at humour
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    Endtown

    Endtown

    • Genre: Comedy
    Endtown is a webcomic by Aaron Neathery. The story centers around several characters living in the fictional post-apocalyptic underground city of Endtown. The world is plagued by a mutagenic virus that turns exposed humans into anthropomorphic animals. It is published five times a week (Monday through Friday) on ModernTales since January 2009, and on GoComics since January 2011. Endtown is based on two of Neathery's previous comics, Albert and The Daily Grind. In the Near Future, conflicts between various countries results in all of them launching a variety of weapons at each other all at once. The resulting unpredictable combination of side effects wiped out the majority of the population and turned most of the Earth's surface into a wasteland. The survivors were divided up into roughly two groups: those who became mutants (or were immune to mutations), and those not yet exposed to the mutagen. The first group, collectively known as "mutants", either roam the surface raiding city ruins for food, or live in survival bunkers. One such bunker, located a mile underground, is Endtown. The second group are the "Topsiders", highly prejudiced "pure humans" who live in an undisclosed
    6.80
    5 votes
    34

    Kokopelli & Company

    • Characters: Mimi
    Kokopelli & Company is a comic strip drawn by science historian and cartoonist Larry Gonick, aimed generally at ten- to fifteen-year-olds. Appearing monthly in Muse magazine, the strip relates the adventures of the nine New Muses, talented but definitely eccentric personalities tasked with helping humanity. Unlike the Muses of Greek mythology, the new lot includes Muses of Plants, Animals, Hardware, Software, Getting Along with People, Bad Poetry, Tunes and Tricks, and Factoids. The ninth New Muse, Urania, the muse of astronomy, is a holdover from the original group. The Muses appear to be somewhat clueless about their predecessor muses: Feather has been able to state only 5 or 6 offhand. When asked if there was one about pottery because the ancient Greeks were good at pottery, his reply was "Beats me. They were good at spinach pie, too, but I don't think they had a Muse for it." Gonick began drawing the strip in 1996. In April 2005, he published Attack of the Smart Pies, an illustrated novel featuring the New Muses and an orphan girl named Emma . The New Muses inhabit a desert region called Kokonino County . This name is an homage to George Herriman's Krazy Kat, which takes place
    6.80
    5 votes
    35

    Little Iodine

    Little Iodine was a popular Sunday comic strip, created by Jimmy Hatlo, which was syndicated by King Features and had a long run from 1943 until 1985. The strip was a spin-off from an earlier Hatlo creation. First seen during the 1930s in a supporting role in Hatlo's popular gag panel, They'll Do It Every Time, Little Iodine was the daughter of Henry Tremblechin and his wife, Cora. Her purpose was to serve as a pesky nuisance to the strip's star, Henry, and her behavior caused endless misery for her mild-mannered, easily unsettled father. However, Iodine proved to be popular in her own right, stealing the strip from her parents, so Hatlo promoted the character into her own strip in 1943. Iodine's antics gave the Sunday comics page a female precursor to Hank Ketcham's Dennis the Menace. From 1943 to 1963, Little Iodine was written and drawn by Hatlo, who said, "I tried to make her the embodiment of all the brats I knew... I tried to make her naughty as hell—and still likable." Al Scaduto also contributed to the strip in 1966, with Hy Eisman and Bob Dunn taking the strip from 1967 through its end in 1985. Iodine also appeared in a series of 56 Dell Comics between 1949 and 1962. In
    6.80
    5 votes
    36
    The Adventures of Dr. McNinja

    The Adventures of Dr. McNinja

    • Genre: Comedy
    The Adventures of Dr. McNinja is a webcomic written and drawn by Christopher Hastings, and inked formerly by Kent Archer and since 2010 by Hastings himself . Published three times a week on its own website, it features the fictional adventures of a character named Dr. McNinja, a thirty-five-year-old doctor who is also a ninja. Dr. McNinja is highly story-driven, with twenty- to ninety-page issues. The first story was published in the summer of 2004 as a one-off, and the comic has been in regular publication since late 2005. The site also sells Dr. McNinja merchandise. The Adventures of Dr. McNinja is a member of Dayfree Press. An August 31, 2006 announcement in the news section of the Dr. McNinja website indicates that an exclusive monthly installment of Dr. McNinja will appear in the British magazine .net. It was announced on April 11, 2012 that Christopher Hastings had entered into a partnership with Fat Cat Gameworks to create a Video Game based on the comic for mobile and web. Titled "Dr. McNinja's Radical Adventures", it is slated for release by July, 2012. The project is using the Kickstarter platform for funding, to avoid the need for a publisher. In 2003, when Chris
    6.80
    5 votes
    37
    Bigtime Consulting

    Bigtime Consulting

    Bigtime Consulting is a webcomic parody based on Andersen Consulting, now known as Accenture. It was created by an employee, James Sanchez, who initially posted the cartoons anonymously on a Geocities account. The first cartoons focused on the new Andersen Consulting logo ("A to the C") and the conflicts with their parent and sister companies, Andersen Worldwide and Arthur Andersen ("Bigtime Worldwide" and "Burton Bigtime"). There were several obvious parallels between Bigtime Consulting and Andersen Consulting, including their CEOs (George Shaheen vs. "George Unseen"), training facilities (St. Charles vs. "St. Charlene") and numerous acronyms. The author of Bigtime Consulting became the target of an Andersen Consulting internal manhunt. Rumors circulated regarding the origin of the comics. Even when the comic moved to its own domain name and developed merchandise sales, the author remained unknown to Andersen Consulting staff. When Andersen Consulting rebranded as accenture, the comic changed to indenture, releasing their matching colors and logo before the official 01-01-01 release. James Sanchez went public after leaving Andersen Consulting. James died November 11, 2009.
    9.00
    3 votes
    38

    El Eternauta

    El Eternauta is a science fiction comic created by Argentine comic strip writer Héctor Germán Oesterheld with artwork by Francisco Solano López. It was first published in Hora Cero Semanal from 1957 to 1959. Oesterheld returned to El Eternauta with a remake and a sequel, published in 1969 and 1975 respectively. Both featured a more political script in tune with Oesterheld joining the Montoneros leftist guerrilla. After his kidnapping and disappearance, El Eternauta would continue in different versions by a plethora of writers and artists. The Eternauta first appeared in Hora Cero Suplemento Semanal on September 4, 1957. Quickly becoming a success, the serial publication ran until 1959 and was reissued in 1961 in a dedicated magazine, Eternauta, published by Editorial Emilio Ramírez. In 1969, Oesterheld rewrote El Eternauta, with changes to the story, more political references and more violent. It became an open critique of dictatorial regimes and United States' imperialism. This version featured artwork by Alberto Breccia who drew the story in an experimental and unique style diverging from the original expression. It was first published on May 29, 1969 in the weekly Gente. The
    9.00
    3 votes
    39

    Tom the Dancing Bug

    • Genre: Politics
    Tom the Dancing Bug is a weekly satirical comic strip by cartoonist and political commentator Ruben Bolling that covers current events from a liberal point of view. The strip appears in mainstream and alternative weekly newspapers, as well as on the Boing Boing website. Tom the Dancing Bug won the 2007, 2008 and 2009 Association of Alternative Newsweeklies Awards for Best Cartoon. In 2011, the strip was awarded the Sigma Delta Chi Award for editorial cartooning by the Society of Professional Journalists. Tom The Dancing Bug has no real narrative continuity, however, certain recurring features within the strip are seen frequently on a rotating basis. They include: A recurring feature, Super Fun-Pak Comix consists of four to six smaller strips, grouped together. These collections of smaller comic strips poke fun at the typical conventions and clichés of modern comic strips. For example, they commonly make fun of stereotypical New Yorker cartoon settings, such as two people sitting across a desk or a husband and wife at home reading the paper. Individual comics can also be based around peculiar or bizarre concepts, like 'Funny Only to Six-year-olds' or 'Comic Designed to Fit Vertical
    9.00
    3 votes
    40
    Bob the Squirrel

    Bob the Squirrel

    Bob the Squirrel is a comic strip by Frank Page. Its name refers to the main character, a squirrel named Bob, who represents the strip's creator's consciousness. Because of this premise, Frank Page actually appears in the comic strip as one of the central characters. The squirrel represents the cartoonist's inner voice... a voice that verbalizes everything that the cartoonist wants to say but is afraid to do so. Page is not afraid to put real events from his life into the strip. Everything from divorce, emotional distress as well as life changing triumphs are all fair game. Bob the Squirrel - Bob originally started out as a motown music loving squirrel. Bob met Frank one day at a park---Frank was under a tree drawing in his sketchbook--- Bob was in that tree on a limb trying to get a closer look at what Frank was sketching when he fell out. A friendship was born. Bob is Frank's connection to the outside world. He is the friend that Frank always wanted. And, he's cute too. Frank - Frank is literally the creator of the strip. In the comic, he, like his real life counterpart, is a cartoonist just trying to make his way in the big cold world. He is an introvert that would rather draw
    5.83
    6 votes
    41
    Space Moose

    Space Moose

    Space Moose was a Canadian underground comic strip that appeared in the University of Alberta's student newspaper, The Gateway, between October 3, 1989 and 1999. Almost all of the strips were penned by Adam Thrasher, a student at the university. For career-related reasons, many archives refer to the author by his post-production pen name Mustafa Al-Habib. Macleans Canada said that Space Moose "was deliberately provocative." Ellen Schoek, the author of I Was There: A Century of Alumni Stories about the University of Alberta, 1906-2006, said that Space Moose "left no subject unscathed, from fraternities to Christianity and obesity, from sexual proclivities to racism." In addition to The Gateway, the newspapers of the University of Manitoba (The Manitoban) and Langara College (The Gleaner) also carried Space Moose. The strip follows the adventures of Space Moose, an anthropomorphic, nihilistic moose with asymmetrical eyes and a Star Trek uniform, as he violates every behavioral norm and societal taboo he can find. His roommates Marlo Smefner, Billy the Bionic Badger, and Bald Dwarf are often the accomplices or victims of his actions. Macleans Canada said that Space Moose was "probably
    6.60
    5 votes
    42

    The Piranha Club

    • Genre: Humour
    Piranha Club is the title of a comic strip written and illustrated by Bud Grace. It was originally called Ernie, but the title was changed to the current one in 1998. The club is meant as a parody on Lions Club International, and the strip made its debut in February 1988. In 1989, the Swedish Academy of Comic Art awarded Bud Grace with the Adamson Statuette. Grace received the 1993 National Cartoonists Society's Newspaper Comic Strip Award for his work on the strip. The strip is highly popular in the Scandinavian countries Norway and Sweden, where it is published in a bimonthly (previously monthly) comic book under the original title, Ernie. It is also one of the most popular comic strips regularly published in newspapers in Estonia and Latvia (if not the most popular). It is published in Scandinavia's largest and second largest newspapers by circulation, Aftonbladet and Dagens Nyheter. It is also syndicated to Japan's Daily Yomiuri along with Calvin and Hobbes. The characters reside in or around Bayonne, New Jersey, which is where most of the storylines take place. The characters are shown around their city block, in their apartments, at church and in their club. Prominent scene
    6.60
    5 votes
    43
    8-Bit Theater

    8-Bit Theater

    • Genre: Comedy
    8-Bit Theater is a completed sprite comic created by Brian Clevinger, and published in 1,225 episodes from March 2, 2001 to June 1, 2010. One of the most popular web comics, it won the Web Cartoonists' Choice Awards for best fantasy comic in 2002. In its feature on gaming webcomics, 1UP.com described 8-Bit Theater as the sprite comic "that took the style to its fullest expression and greatest popularity." The comic is also part of the Create a Comic Project. The plot of 8-Bit Theater is loosely based on that of the video game Final Fantasy, in which four adventurers, the Light Warriors, must save the world by defeating four powerful demons that represent the four elements, thus relighting four magical orbs tied to the same elements, and, finally, defeating the personification of evil, Chaos. However, while many of the original plot points and characters are present, the way they come about is often radically different. The Light Warriors themselves tend to cause far more harm than good on their travels and mostly have to be blackmailed, bribed, or threatened into accepting quests. The comic is also not a serious epic; the protagonists and many of the supporting characters are based
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    College Roomies from Hell!!!

    College Roomies from Hell!!!

    College Roomies from Hell!!! or CRFH!!! as it is known to fans, is a webcomic strip by Maritza Campos-Rebolledo. It started January 1, 1999. Since 2010 it updated only sporadically and went on hiatus between January 2, 2012 and March 30, 2012, when irregular updates resumed. College Roomies from Hell!!! depicts the lives of six college students attending an unnamed college somewhere in the United States. Forced out of their dormitory by a gas leak explosion, Mike Green, David Jones, Roger Pepitone, Marsha Hart, Margaret Browning, and April Sommers now live in an apartment building near their college and suffer natural, supernatural, and academic indignities and drama in this alternately humorous and dark serial comic strip. College Roomies from Hell!!! was formerly hosted by Keenspot. Its author, Maritza Campos-Rebolledo, is a resident of Yucatán state, Mexico. The comic is part of the Create a Comic Project. Funky horror is a meme within this webcomic, its audience and its forum. The phrase "The horror! The funky horror!" is one of the catchphrases in the comic - adapted from the last lines of Francis Ford Coppola's film Apocalypse Now: "The horror... the horror...", which in turn
    7.50
    4 votes
    45

    Mutts

    • Genre: Humour
    Mutts is a daily comic strip created by Patrick McDonnell in 1994. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, it follows the adventures of a dog, Earl, and a cat, Mooch. Earl and Mooch interact with each other, their human owners and a large cast of neighborhood animals. Peanuts creator Charles Schulz praised Mutts, calling it "one of best comic strips of all time." The friendship of Mooch and his neighbor Earl focuses on the differences between cats and dogs as pets and friends: Earl is friendly, loves the company of his human companion and likes to play outside; Mooch is often indifferent to his human companions, except for being fed, and prefers to stay inside and play by himself. Both animals frequently express themselves through thought balloons when their owners are present. Earl is an innocent Jack Russell terrier who lives with his human companion Ozzie, a bachelor. They love spending time together and taking frequent walks. Earl often howls in loneliness when Ozzie is away from home. Earl spends much of his free time with Mooch, either inside or wandering around town visiting other domesticated and wild animals. He loves to eat both human food and his own dog food. It is
    7.50
    4 votes
    46

    Old Master Q

    Old Master Q (Chinese: 老夫子; pinyin: Lǎo Fū Zi) is a popular Chinese manhua created by Alfonso Wong. The cartoon first appeared in the newspapers and magazines in Hong Kong in 1962, and later serialized in 1964. The comic is still in publication today. The series features the now well-known characters such as Old Master Q and Big Potato, as well as Mr Chin, Mr Chiu and Miss Chan, in many different hilarious situations. They are usually portrayed in a variety of social statuses, professions and time periods, ranging from beggars and office workers to actors and ancient warriors, allowing a wide variety of settings and ideas. More outlandish scenarios include close encounters with aliens, ghost sightings and the afterlife. In the context of the strips, Old Master Q, Big Potato and Mr. Chin are close friends; Mr. Chiu often play an antagonistic role toward the trio; finally, Miss Chan is often portrayed as a love interest to Old Master Q. The comic is now copyrighted by WangZ Inc, a company established by Joseph Wong Chak (Alfonso Wong's eldest son) in Taipei, Taiwan. While Old Master Q comics primarily focuses on humor, it also reflects changing social trends, particularly from the
    7.50
    4 votes
    47

    Pickles

    Pickles is a daily and Sunday comic strip by Brian Crane focusing on a retired couple in their seventies, Earl and Opal Pickles. Inspired by Crane's in-laws, the strip describes their efforts to enjoy retirement, which instead proves quite imperfect for both. Earl is characterized as having a bald head, glasses, and a bushy white mustache, and wears suspenders. Opal is characterized as somewhat chubby, bespectacled, and is often seen wearing purple polka-dotted dresses and white sneakers. When sitting, she is usually seen with her pet cat in her lap. Both characters were drawn with their eye pupils visible through their glasses during the strip's early years, but their glasses were later drawn so that they are opaque to readers. The comic is set in Crane's hometown of Sparks, Nevada. The cast includes their dog Roscoe and their cat Muffin; their grandson Nelson Wolfe and his parents– their daughter Sylvia and her husband Dan, a wildlife photographer. Pickles has been published since 1990. In 2001, it was named best newspaper comic strip of the year by the National Cartoonists Society.
    7.50
    4 votes
    48

    Little Lulu

    "Little Lulu" is the nickname for Lulu Moppett, a comic strip character created in the mid-1930s by Marjorie Henderson Buell. The character debuted in The Saturday Evening Post on February 23, 1935 in a single panel, appearing as a flower girl at a wedding and strewing the aisle with banana peels. Little Lulu replaced Carl Anderson's Henry, which had been picked up for distribution by King Features Syndicate. The Little Lulu panel continued to run weekly in The Saturday Evening Post until December 30, 1944. Little Lulu was created as a result of Anderson's success. Schlesinger Library curator Kathryn Allamong Jacob wrote: A daily comic strip, entitled Little Lulu, was syndicated from June 5, 1950 through May 1969. Artists included Woody Kimbrell (1950–1964), Roger Armstrong (1964–1966), and Ed Nofziger (1966–1969). Little Lulu appeared in ten issues of Dell Comics' Four Color comic book series (#74, 97, 110, 115, 120, 131, 139, 146, 158, 165), before graduating to her own title: Marge's Little Lulu in 1948. With the Dell Comics/Western Publishing split that created Gold Key Comics, Little Lulu went to Gold Key with issue #165. Tubby got his own comic series from 1952 to 1961, first
    8.67
    3 votes
    49
    Queens Counsel

    Queens Counsel

    Queens Counsel is a British cartoon strip created by Alexander Williams and Graham Francis Defries, which has been published in the law pages of The Times since 1993. It is a satire on law and lawyers. The strip is published under the pseudonym "Steuart and Francis", these being the middle names of the two authors. The jokes in the strip make fun of law and lawyers, with a particular focus on legal pomposity and over-billing. The characters are mostly legal archetypes, the barristers inhabiting the mythical Chambers of 4 Lawn Buildings, while the solicitors ply their trade at the firm of Fillibuster and Loophole. The authors of the strip are both lawyers themselves, though Williams left the Bar to pursue a career in film animation. Sir Geoffrey Bentwood QC is the main protagonist of the comic strip. He is a leading silk, Head of Chambers, part time Recorder and all around master of the legal universe. Extremely pompous, Sir Geoffrey is obsessed with law in general, and with being elevated to the High Court in particular. Even his family call him "Your Honour". Edward Longwind is a barrister and junior tenant at 4 Lawn Buildings. He aspires one day to be as pompous as Sir
    8.67
    3 votes
    50

    Skippy

    Skippy was an American comic strip written and drawn by Percy Crosby that was published from 1923 to 1945. A highly popular, acclaimed and influential feature about rambunctious fifth-grader Skippy Skinner, his friends and his enemies, it was adapted into movies, a novel and a radio show. It was commemorated on a 1997 U.S. Postal Service stamp and was the basis for a wide range of merchandising that includes Skippy peanut butter. An early influence on cartoonist Charles Schulz and an inspiration for his Peanuts, Skippy is considered one of the classics of the form. In Vanity Fair, humorist Corey Ford described it as "America's most important contribution to humor of the century", while comics historian John A. Lent wrote, "The first half-century of the comics spawned many kid strips, but only one could be elevated to the status of classic... which innovated a number of sophisticated and refined touches used later by Charles Schulz and Bill Watterson..." Comics artist Jerry Robinson said, Nothing like Skippy had ever been seen before in the comic strips. It was not just Skippy's expert draftsmanship or remarkable flair, although that artistry earned its creator a reputation as "the
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    Agnes

    • Genre: Humour
    Agnes is an American syndicated comic strip written and drawn by Tony Cochran. It was first syndicated in 1999. It is currently syndicated by Creators Syndicate. Agnes chronicles the adventures of an elementary school-aged girl living in an Ohio trailer park called "The People's Court" with her kind yet weary grandmother (whom Agnes refers to as “Granma”). We are not told what happened to Agnes' parents or how she came to be in her grandmother's custody. Agnes is poor and not what one would consider a classical beauty, yet is a dreamer and schemer, whose limitless imagination and ambitions are constantly brought down to Earth by her limited resources and social standing. Agnes is constantly confronted with the harsh realities of the life of the poor working class but still manages to find the optimism to carry on, frequently with a bit of sarcasm and wit using surprisingly sophisticated vocabulary. A typical strip will show Agnes finding new schemes in hopes of getting rich or attaining celebrity, or just using her imagination to get through everyday terrors and frustrations. Although quite intelligent, Agnes does not do well in school; she frequently exasperates her teachers and
    8.33
    3 votes
    52

    Eyebeam

    Eyebeam was a daily comic strip written and illustrated by Sam Hurt at the University of Texas at Austin. Unlike most college strips, its popularity led to a print life past Hurt's graduation. The strip ran in the college's Daily Texan from 1980–1990, though examples from 1978-1979 exist. In 1983, Austin's daily paper, the American-Statesman, picked up the strip. Other newspapers around the U.S. followed suit, although Eyebeam's family of subscribers was never greater than a few dozen. By 1982, Eyebeam's popularity was such that a monster character called Hank the Hallucination won the school's election for the Student Government's presidency. A figment of Eyebeam's imagination even within the boundaries of the comic, Hank received more votes than the two human candidates combined. After it was ruled that imaginary characters could not serve in the post, future Democratic adviser and CNN talking head Paul Begala was the campus' second choice. Following his loss, Begala wrote a tongue-in-cheek complaint for the Texan, arguing "I cannot help but feel Hank's platform is illusory at best .... I must say that the candidate himself lacks substance." The strip developed a devoted enough
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    George Holt Thomas

    George Holt Thomas

    George Holt Thomas (31 March 1869 - 1 January 1929) aviation industry pioneer and newspaper proprietor. Holt Thomas founded, in 1911, the business which became Aircraft Manufacturing Company Limited or Airco. Son and grandson of successful artists he initially followed his father into The Graphic and Daily Graphic newspaper business in 1890, later making his own name and fortune by founding The Bystander and Empire Illustrated magazines. Something of a shrewd visionary he turned to aircraft in 1906. George Holt Thomas was the seventh son of William Luson Thomas (1830-1890) and his wife Annie, daughter of John Wilson Carmichael. Born at Hampton House, Stockwell, south London, educated privately and at King’s College School, London he left Queen’s College Oxford in 1890 after two years and without taking a degree. In 1894 he married Gertrude daughter of architect Thomas Oliver of Newcastle upon Tyne, there were no children of the marriage. After he left university in 1890 he joined his father’s newspaper business as a director then became its general manager and later founded The Bystander with its comic strip character "Old Bill" and Empire Illustrated so making his own name and
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    Sosiaalisesti rajoittuneet

    Sosiaalisesti rajoittuneet

    Sosiaalisesti rajoittuneet ("The Socially Challenged") is a Finnish webcomic written by Ossi Mäntylahti and Pekka Piira and drawn by Jukka Piira. The comic is about a fictional software company and IT industry in general. The setting is somewhat similar to Dilbert, but the style differs by concentrating more on actual nerd trivia and less on business stereotypes and zany interaction between characters. The comic was a pioneer of Finnish webcomics and one of the few that are still regularly published. Its site receives over 250,000 hits per month (in a language with 5.2 million speakers) and has been featured in Ilta-Sanomat, Iltalehti Online and ITviikko. Frequent visiting of the Sosiaalisesti rajoittuneet web site is regarded as a sign of a nerd behaviour. The more notable characters are:
    8.33
    3 votes
    55

    Betty Boop

    Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick. She originally appeared in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop film series, which were produced by Fleischer Studios and released by Paramount Pictures. She has also been featured in comic strips and mass merchandising. Despite having been toned down in the mid-1930s to appear more demure, she became one of the most well-known and popular cartoon characters in the world. Betty Boop made her first appearance on August 9, 1930, in the cartoon Dizzy Dishes; the sixth installment in Fleischer's Talkartoon series. Although Clara Bow is often given as being the model for Boop, she actually began as a caricature of singer Helen Kane. The character was originally created as an anthropomorphic French poodle. Max Fleischer finalized Betty Boop as a human character in 1932, in the cartoon Any Rags. Her floppy poodle ears became hoop earrings, and her black poodle nose became a girl's button-like nose. Betty Boop appeared as a supporting character in 10 cartoons as a flapper girl with more heart than brains. In individual cartoons, she was called "Nancy Lee" or "Nan McGrew" –
    6.20
    5 votes
    56

    Rip Kirby

    Rip Kirby was a popular comic strip featuring the adventures of the eponymous lead character, a private detective created by Alex Raymond in 1946. Displaying the talents of more than a dozen writers and illustrators, the strip had a long run, spanning five decades. After World War II, Raymond did not return to work on any of his previous successful comic strips (Flash Gordon, Jungle Jim, Secret Agent X-9) but instead began work on a new strip in which ex-Marine Rip Kirby returns from WWII and goes to work as a private detective, sometimes accompanied by his girlfriend, fashion model Judith Lynne "Honey" Dorian. Her given name and nickname were borrowed from the names of Raymond's three daughters. Rip Kirby was based on the suggestion by King Features editor Ward Greene that Raymond try a "detective-type" strip. First published on March 4, 1946, the strip was given a huge promotional boost, even including fully painted promotional art, a rarity in comic strip promotions. The strip enjoyed enormous success, and Raymond received the Reuben Award in 1949. During Raymond’s years on the strip, the stories were initially written by Ward Greene and later, following Greene's death, by Fred
    5.33
    6 votes
    57
    George

    George

    George is a webcomic written and illustrated by John R. Norton. The strip has been in existence for several years, making its first appearance on the web as early as 1999. As of December 4, 2009, there have been 529 full-color comics published. The current George website was established in January 2005, using a strip from the old site to make its debut. Since then, however, all content has been entirely new. New comic strips were originally posted every Monday and Thursday before going to a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule. In early 2006, the strip went on hiatus for most of the year, but returned with regular, though unscheduled, updates in January 2007. Currently, new comics are once again posted on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The strip is centered around a fairly normal freelance cartoonist, George, and his circle of friends. The strip often deals with computers, technology, and generally "geeky" things like World of Warcraft and Star Wars, though a myriad of light-hearted subjects are commonly explored. The strip takes place in the fairly small, fictional town of Perkton, located in the heart of California, presumably somewhere near Fresno. It is not particularly close to
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    The Teenie Weenies

    The Teenie Weenies

    The Teenie Weenies was a comic strip created and illustrated by William Donahey that first appeared in 1914 in the Chicago Tribune and ran for over 50 years. It consisted of normal-size objects intermingled with tiny protagonists. The comic strip characters were two inches tall and lived under a rose bush. They lived with "real world" size materials made from discarded objects like hats, jars, barrels, kegs, and boxes - all of which were gigantic to them. The strip was inspired by Palmer Cox's The Brownies and was done in the form of text with a single large picture. Unlike the Brownies where the text was written in verse, Donahey wrote in prose. The Teenie Weenies first appeared in black and white in the women's section of the Chicago Tribune on June 14, 1914. This first story was of the Top Hat house burning down. The comic strip ran as a one panel story with a picture until 1923. It then moved to the comics page as a strip cartoon. Color versions soon appeared in the magazine section of the newspaper printed in rotogravure. Donahey drew the comic strip until October 26, 1924 when it was then temporarly discontinued. Donahey's comic characters then went into advertising when the
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    Monica's Gang

    Monica's Gang (originally titled Turma da Mônica in Portuguese) is a popular Brazilian comic book series. The series was created by Mauricio de Sousa, who signs his work as "Mauricio". Plots are centered on the adventures of a group of seven-year-old friends in the fictional neighborhood of "Limoeiro" in São Paulo. The neighborhood was inspired by the neighborhood of Cambuí, in Campinas and the city of Mogi das Cruzes, where de Sousa lived his childhood. Mauricio began his comic universe in 1959 with a newspaper comic strip titled Bidu, printed on Folha da Manhã, the newspaper where Mauricio worked as police reporter. Cebolinha followed in 1960. The character Mônica first saw the light of day in 1963. Comic books featuring the characters started appearing: "Bidu" (1960 - cancelled after a few editions),Mônica (1970), Cebolinha (1972), and many more. The stories have been translated to several languages and sold in dozens of countries. The series has been running steadily for over forty years, and generated uncountable spin-offs in the realms of merchandising, animated cartoons, video games, theme parks, and more. Mauricio employs a large staff on his company Estúdios Mauricio de
    6.00
    5 votes
    60

    Baby Blues

    • Genre: Humour
    Baby Blues is an American comic strip created and produced by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott since January 7, 1990. Distributed by King Features Syndicate since 1995, the strip focuses on the MacPherson family and specifically on the raising of the three MacPherson children. When the strip debuted, the MacPherson family consisted of Wanda and Darryl MacPherson and newborn Zoe. The first strip took place in the hospital room shortly after Zoe was born. Later, two more children—Hammie, the middle child and the only son, and Wren, the youngest child—were added to the family. Both Kirkman and Scott have drawn from their own parenting experiences as a source for the strip's content. The strip features three families, according to the strip's "Family Tree" page. The children in Baby Blues have aged as the strip has progressed, although at a slower rate than real-time. Kirkman and Scott have stated that the strip's timeline is "about a 3 to 1 ratio." As of 2011, Zoe, Hammie and Wren are 10, 7, and 1, respectively. In 2000, Baby Blues was adapted into an animated cartoon series which aired on The WB Television Network for a few weeks in the summer, from July 28, 2000 to August 25, 2000. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    Blondie

    • Genre: Humour
    Blondie is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Chic Young. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, the strip has been published in newspapers since September 8, 1930. The success of the strip, which features a well-endowed blonde and her sandwich-loving husband, led to the long-running Blondie film series (1938–1950) and the popular Blondie radio program (1939–1950). Chic Young drew Blondie until his death in 1973, when creative control passed to his son Dean Young, who continues to write the strip. Young has collaborated with a number of artists on Blondie, including Jim Raymond, Mike Gersher, Stan Drake, Denis Lebrun, and John Marshall. Through these changes, Blondie has remained popular, appearing in more than 2,000 newspapers in 47 countries and has been translated into 35 languages. Since 2006, Blondie has also been available via email through King Features' DailyINK service. Originally designed to follow in the footsteps of Young's earlier "pretty girl" creations Beautiful Bab and Dumb Dora, Blondie focused on the adventures of Blondie Boopadoop—a carefree flapper girl who spent her days in dance halls. The name "Boopadoop" derives from the flapper catchphrase
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Buddha for Beginners

    Buddha for Beginners

    Meditation, Karma, Zen, Tantric, Nirvana - these are some of the many Buddhist ideas that have entered our Western popular idiom, usually inappropriately. What is the truth of Buddhism, its history and variety of practices? This vast and complex non-theistic religion is woven into the fabric of Asian civilizations from India to the Himalayan regions, China, Vietnam, Korea, Japan and elsewhere. Introducing Buddha describes the life and teachings of the Buddha. Author Jane Hope, who has herself taught Buddhism extensively, also shows that enlightenment is a matter of experiencing the truth individually and by inspiration which is passed from the teacher to the student. The documentary comic book illuminates this process through a rich legacy of stories and explains the practices of meditation, Taoism and Zen. It goes on to describe the role of buddhism in modern Asia and its growing influence on Western thought. Introducing Eastern Philosophy provides an interesting companion-piece.
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Introducing Mathematics

    Introducing Mathematics

    "Most mathematicians are born not made. I fall into the latter category (as so often in these abstruse subjects, I represent "the beginner" in the making of the book). Having done very badly at Pure Maths at 'A' Level when at school I feel amply qualified to be appalled by the rarified and mystifying mental contortions of the mathematician. Hence my pride at the end result of what must rank as one of my most taxing 'Introducing' documentary comic titles of the lot."
    8.00
    3 votes
    64

    Sid's Snake

    Sid's Snake (also titled Sid and his Snake) was a long-running comic strip in the British comic Whizzer and Chips. It first appeared in issue 1, dated 18 October 1969, and was originally drawn by Mike Lacey, with Jimmy Hansen taking over later on. The strip's simple premise featured Sid, and his pet snake Slippy. Slippy had the ability to morph into various useful shapes. Sid was also the leader of the "Whizz-Kids" (characters who featured in the Whizzer section of the comic, as opposed to the "Chip-ites") and, bar the first issue (in which he appeared on the front cover of Chips, usually Shiner's job) he appeared on the front cover of the comic until the mid 1980s. The strip survived the merger with Buster in 1990. Though the strip was no longer the leader of the Whizz-Kids, it still appeared in Buster until the comic's last issue at the beginning of 2000. As with all other strips by this time, it had since become a reprint.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65

    Backbench

    Backbench is a panel cartoon appearing in The Globe and Mail. The strip is written and drawn by Graham Harrop. It consists of multiple- and single-panel jokes, generally drawn from and satirizing Canadian politics. Graham Harrop also has an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Sun three days a weeks as well as publishing books and cards for special occasions through his website: www.grahamharrop.com
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    Genius

    Genius was a newspaper cartoon series by Scottish (Glaswegian) artist John Glashan that appeared in The Observer newspaper in the United Kingdom from 1978 to 1983. The chief characters were Anode Enzyme and Lord Doberman. Their adventures were mostly surreal and the humour relied heavily upon Glashan's imaginative watercolour artwork. Anode Enzyme was the chief protagonist (along with Lord Doberman) of "Genius". With an IQ of 12790 (was 12794-but lost four points watching TV) and only requiring seven minutes of sleep a day, Anode Enzyme is characterised by his genius. He meets Lord Doberman, the world's richest man, and devises ways of getting rid of his wealth by inventing a machine that fires 40 TV sets into the sea every minute and a device that can stack £300,000,000 into a continuous pile. Other inventions include a paint that incorporates its own paint stripper, a "Doom Module" that runs in terror from anything that moves, and a game that involves striking a solid melamine sphere, coach bolted to a billiard table with a 3lb vanadium steel, leather faced hammer - one point for each hit.
    6.75
    4 votes
    67

    Mallard Fillmore

    • Genre: Politics
    Mallard Fillmore is a comic strip written and illustrated by Bruce Tinsley that has been syndicated by King Features Syndicate since May 30, 1994. The strip follows the exploits of its title character, an anthropomorphic green-plumaged duck who works as a politically conservative reporter at fictional television station WFDR in Washington, D.C. Mallard's name is a pun on the name of the 13th president of the United States, Millard Fillmore. In 1991, Bruce Tinsley, who was an editorial cartoonist for the Charlottesville, Virginia paper The Daily Progress, was asked to create a cartoon character as a mascot for the newspaper's entertainment page. A duck, which Bruce named "Mallard Fillmore," was accepted, and made his debut in the paper. Tinsley started sending samples of Mallard Fillmore, then known as The Fillmore File, to newspapers across the country and was eventually picked up by The Washington Times, which began running it in 1992. The strip was later picked up for national syndication by King Features Syndicate, which began distributing it in May 1994. Mallard Fillmore is the main character in the comic strip. He is a seasoned conservative reporter for fictional television
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Mutt and Jeff

    Mutt and Jeff

    Mutt and Jeff was a long-popular American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Bud Fisher in 1907 about "two mismatched tinhorns." It is commonly regarded as the first daily comic strip. The concept of a newspaper strip featuring recurring characters in multiple panels on a six-day-a-week schedule had previously been pioneered through the short-lived A. Piker Clerk by Clare Briggs, but it was Mutt and Jeff as the first successful daily comic strip that staked out the direction of the future trend. It remained in syndication until 1982, employing the talents of several cartoonists, chiefly Al Smith who drew the strip for nearly 50 years. The series became a comic book (initially published by All-American Publications and later by DC Comics, Dell Comics and Harvey Comics), as well as cartoons, films, merchandising and reprints. Under its initial title, A. Mutt debuted on November 15, 1907 on the sports pages of the San Francisco Chronicle. The featured character had previously appeared in sports cartoons by Fisher, but was unnamed. Fisher had approached his editor, John P. Young about doing a regular strip as early as 1905, but was turned down. According to Fisher, Young told
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Roadkill Bill

    Roadkill Bill

    Roadkill Bill is a comic strip created by Ken Avidor. The cartoon has an anti-car theme and frequently advocates the theories of Ivan Illich The main character, Roadkill Bill, is a squirrel with distinctive tire tracks across his torso and tail. The cartoon ran weekly for nearly four years in the Twin Cities alternative newspaper, Pulse of the Twin Cities and has been published in book form by Carbusters Magazine, proponents of the car-free movement, as well as Funny Times.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Superman

    Superman

    Superman was a daily newspaper comic strip which began on January 16, 1939, and a separate Sunday strip was added on November 5, 1939. These strips ran continuously until May 1966. In 1941, the McClure Syndicate had placed the strip in hundreds of newspapers. At its peak, the strip was in over 300 daily newspapers and 90 Sunday papers, with a readership of over 20 million. During the National Comics Publications v. Fawcett Publications court case, the District Court ruled that McClure Syndicate failed to place the copyright notice on some of the strips and thus those strips are in the public domain. The daily strip was host to many storylines, unique from the regular Superman comic series. The early years consisted of Siegel-era Superman stories, many of which have yet to be republished. The strips contained the first appearance of a bald Lex Luthor, the first appearance of Mr. Mxyzptlk and the first telephone booth costume change in comics. Other stories of note include Superman saving Santa Claus from the Nazis, WWII-era stories of Superman protecting the American home front and Clark Kent marrying Lois Lane (and they lived together for years without her figuring out that he's
    9.00
    2 votes
    71

    They'll Do It Every Time

    They'll Do It Every Time was a single-panel newspaper comic strip, created by Jimmy Hatlo, which had a long run over eight decades. It first appeared on February 5, 1929 and continued until February 2, 2008. The title of the strip became a popular catchphrase, still used today by many people who have no idea of its origin. Hatlo, a sports cartoonist, created the panel to fill space on the comics page of the San Francisco Call-Bulletin. The feature proved so popular that it was eventually syndicated by King Features Syndicate beginning in 1936, with a Sunday panel added on July 4, 1943. The gags illustrated minor absurdities, frustrations, hypocrisies, ironies and misfortunes of everyday life. These were displayed in a single-panel or two-panel format. If two panels, the left-side panel showed some deceptive, pretentious, unwitting or scheming human behavior, with the second panel revealing the truth of the situation. Hellish scenes were the subjects of his topper strip, The Hatlo Inferno, which ran with They'll Do It Every Time from 1953 to 1958. An occasional feature of They'll Do It Every Time was "Hatlo's History" which enabled the cartoonist to satirize memorable moments from
    9.00
    2 votes
    72

    Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky was a fictional character who had his own comic strip in the UK comic Cor!!. Similar to Roger the Dodger in The Beano, the strip was about a boy of the same name (Dicky), who would 'trick' his way out of things like washing the car or carrying heavy cases. Unlike Roger, however, his schemes would usually backfire on him.
    5.80
    5 votes
    73

    Big Ben Bolt

    Big Ben Bolt was a comic strip drawn by John Cullen Murphy, written by Elliot Caplin and distributed by King Features Syndicate. Illustrator Murphy entered the Army in 1940, joining the 7th Regiment. He spent several years in the Pacific, beginning in Australia and ending in Tokyo. During the war, Murphy continued to illustrate, sending work to the Chicago Tribune and painting portraits of military figures. Returning to the United States in 1946, he resumed his art career, illustrating for magazines, including Columbia, Liberty and Sport. In 1950, writer Elliot Caplin (brother of Li'l Abner cartoonist Al Capp) suggested that Murphy illustrate a boxing comic strip he had in mind. The strip followed the adventures of boxer and journalist Ben Bolt. Murphy was the artist of Big Ben Bolt from 1950 to 1978. Comics historian Don Markstein wrote: Murphy occasionally used assistants, including Al Williamson (Flash Gordon), Alex Kotzky (Apartment 3-G), Neal Adams (Deadman), John Celardo (Tarzan) and Stan Drake (The Heart of Juliet Jones). In 1971, Murphy took over Prince Valiant, and Gray Morrow stepped in to draw Big Ben Bolt, eventually signing the strip starting August 1, 1977. Big Ben
    7.67
    3 votes
    74

    Le Chat

    Le Chat (French for "the cat") is a comic strip by the Belgian cartoonist Philippe Geluck. It is one of the bestselling Franco-Belgian comics series. The title character, an adult, human-sized, anthropomorphic cat, first appeared in March 22nd 1983. Le Chat often comes up with elaborate reasonings which lead to hilariously absurd conclusions e.g. by taking metaphors literally or by adding increasingly unlikely what-ifs to ordinary situations. One page in length, it appears weekly in the "Victor" supplement of Belgian newspaper Le Soir. For Le Chat's 20th anniversary in 2004, Le Soir allowed Geluck to illustrate that day's entire newspaper. An exhibition of Le Chat's history (and that of his creator), "Le Chat s'expose", was first held at the Autoworld Motor Museum in Brussels in Spring 2004, and has since toured Europe. It was most recently (March-October 2006) at Les Champs Libres in Rennes.
    7.67
    3 votes
    75

    Redeye

    Redeye was a comic strip created by cartoonist Gordon Bess that was syndicated by King Features Syndicate to more than 100 newspapers. The strip debuted on September 11, 1967. Redeye is a comic about a tribe of Native Americans during the 19th century, portraying the Indians in a similar way as what Hägar the Horrible did with the Vikings. It has also been compared to Tumbleweeds. Bess wrote and drew the strip from 1967 until 1988, when he was forced by illness to pass it on to Bill Yates (writing) and Mel Casson (artwork). Casson took over both roles in 1999 when Bill Yates became ill. Yates died in 2001. Casson continued the strip alone from 1999 until his own death in May 2008. Casson was not replaced, and publication ended as submitted material ran out. The strip came to an end on July 13, 2008. In recent years, a small number of newspapers have been carrying the strip on Sundays only, reprinting from the 1988-99 Yates/Casson era. Beginning in 1968, Redeye was collected in paperbacks published by Saalfield Publishing. Redeye was especially popular in Europe, where it appeared in Tintin magazine between 1969 and 1990 and received the 1976 Best Foreign Comical Work Award at the
    7.67
    3 votes
    76

    The Fosdyke Saga

    The Fosdyke Saga was a British comic strip by cartoonist Bill Tidy, published in the Daily Mirror newspaper from March 1971 - February 1985. Described as "a classic tale of struggle, power, personalities and tripe", the strip was a parody of John Galsworthy's classic novel series The Forsyte Saga, however the slightly bizarre and strange antics of the characters and those around them had a Lancashire/Cheshire lean with mangles, chimneys and soot ever present. The Fosdyke Saga was the story of Roger Ditchley, a wastrel son of tripe magnate, Old Ben Ditchley, who was deliberately disinherited by his father in favour of Jos Fosdyke. Roger, blinded by rage, seeks to regain his rightful inheritance over the next twelve years. His wicked plans are always thwarted as he enlists the most inept allies and twisted methods to attain his goal. Each book included bizarre settings such as the rugby game between a Welsh choir and a lady's casual rugby team held in a Salford hotel (the stairs collapsed in the first half if you must know), the hunt for the Tripe Naughtee and the unforgettable "Brain of Salford" competition. The series was axed from the Daily Mirror in 1985, the year after tycoon
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    Ask Shagg

    Ask Shagg is a syndicated daily comic strip drawn by cartoonist Peter Guren since 1980. It is currently distributed by Creators Syndicate; it had been distributed by United Feature Syndicate from 1980 until 1995. The strip has run in dozens of newspapers including the Boston Globe, Columbus Dispatch, and Seattle Post-Intelligencer. In each strip Guren, through his Shagg E. Dawg character, answers questions from readers about the animal kingdom. The strip features lead character Shagg E. Dawg answering questions about animals that are sent in by readers. Questions about particular animals are sometimes answered by the strip's other characters, Rosko the cat, Mouth the myna bird, and Slippy the flying squirrel. In 1995 Guren was receiving more than 15,000 letters a year, with about 75% of them from children. Readers receive a free Shagg doll if their question appears in the strip. The strips generally feature a joke of some sort about the subject animal in addition to providing an accurate answer to the day's question. (For example, this strip answered a question about hamsters storing food in their cheeks and then compared it to a human carrying their money in their mouths. The last
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Battle for Britain

    Battle For Britain was a comic strip cartoon published in the fortnightly satirical magazine Private Eye in the United Kingdom during the 1980s. It depicted Margaret Thatcher's second term of office as Prime Minister but with the politicians shown as British soldiers or Nazi officials in a World War II-like setting. The strip was attributed to Monty Stubble, which was a nom de plume of editor Ian Hislop and his artistic collaborator Nick Newman. The name "Monty Stubble" is a play on the film-title I Was Monty's Double; the film being based upon the career of M. E. Clifton James, an actor who was employed during World War II to impersonate General Montgomery for the purposes of espionage and to confuse the enemy. Battle For Britain appeared in Private Eye between 1983 and 1987. The series ended after the 1987 General Election; this was explained by Private Eye as happening because Stubble "was tragically lost in action in the last week of the war, believed to have been hit by a stray pencil sharpener". The collected strips were then published in book form by André Deutsch. The strip is considered to rank alongside the best to appear in the magazine. It was a satirical presentation
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Beaver and Steve

    Beaver and Steve

    Beaver and Steve (also known as The Unfeasible Adventures of Beaver and Steve) was a webcomic by James Turner. The comic, which debuted on 10 September 2004 and continued since on a semi-weekly basis until going on indefinite hiatus per 20 June 2008, chronicled the bizarre and humorous escapades of Steve, a green reptilian creature, and the eponymously-named Beaver. The comic is light-hearted in its tone, favouring short, self-contained storylines with minimal continuity. The brightly coloured artwork and loose drawing style is a reflection upon this whimsical nature. The humour (each comic ends on a joke) is often of a visual form. Also frequent is humour derived from the juxtaposition of the absurd goings-on in Beaver and Steve's world (often caused by Steve), with the down-to-earth reactions of the characters (often Beaver). A mainstay of the strip is the use of Onomatopoeias, "sounds" made in the world of the comic. Though it is common for comics to contain some sound effects (such as the BEEP! of a car horn) this concept is far extended in the unfeasible adventures of Beaver and Steve. Many actions have their own "sound effect" including "INDIFFERENCE!" (from Emotibot) and
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Gaston Lagaffe

    Gaston is a comic strip created in 1957 by the Belgian cartoonist André Franquin in the comic strip magazine, Spirou. The series focuses on the every-day life of Gaston Lagaffe, a lazy and accident-prone (his surname means "the blunder") office junior. It is very popular in large parts of Europe (especially in Belgium and France), but except for a few pages by Fantagraphics in the early 90s (as Gomer Goof), there is no published English translation. Gaston Lagaffe goes by different names in various languages and countries: Guust Flater in Dutch, Tomás el Gafe in Spanish, Sergi Grapes in Catalan, Gastão Dabronca in some Portuguese translations, Gastón Sequivoc in Argentina, Gaston Zmotanec in Croatian, Gastono Lafuŝ in Esperanto, Viggo in Norwegian, Vakse Viggo in Danish, Viggó Viðutan in Icelandic, Niilo Pielinen in Finnish, Gaša Šeprtlja in Serbian, Şapşal Gazi in Turkish and simply Gaston in German as well as in Swedish and Greek. In German he was also called (very briefly during a syndication) Jo-Jo. Since the 1980s Gaston has appeared on a wide variety of merchandise. André Franquin who was then in charge of Spirou et Fantasio, the primary series of Le journal de Spirou, first
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Heathcliff

    Heathcliff is a comic strip created by George Gately in 1973 featuring the title character, a wisecracking cat. Now written and drawn by Gately's nephew, Peter Gallagher, it is distributed to over 1,000 newspapers by Creators Syndicate, who took over the comic from McNaught Syndicate in 1988. The strip takes place in a port town called Westfinster. Heathcliff as seen in the strip is predisposed to annoying Mr. Schultz, the manager of the local fish store, called the Elite Fish Market; tipping over, and much more often somersaulting garbage cans into the air, to the annoyance of the local sanitation workers; annoying the milkman to get milk (usually by tricking them into dropping a milk bottle or two); bothering the hard-working sailors who work on the Tuna Fleet; harassing and abusing the dog population; being an informant to the local Dog Catchers; and pursuing female cats. His girlfriend is a girl cat named Sonja; but he has been the target of unrequited affection by another female cat named Crazy Shirley. Sonja's owner, Herb Jablonski, sees Heathcliff as a nuisance, especially when he brings Sonja home late; but his wife sees Heathcliff as a cat who truly loves Sonja and treats
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Intellectual Bull

    Intellectual Bull

    The 1978 one-man comic book 'Intellectual Bull' by Borin Van Loon published by old friend Alan Courtney, who I first met whilst working on the Wandsworth community magazine 'Lower Down' and his imprint Suburban Books, who also published 'Urban Paranoia'. Oddly, this tiny publication has suddenly cropped up on the book search under 'Borin Van Loon' on amazon.co.uk!
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Maakies

    Maakies

    • Genre: Humour
    Maakies is a syndicated weekly comic strip by Tony Millionaire. It began publication in February 1994 in the New York Press. It currently runs in many American alternative newsweeklies including The Stranger, LA Weekly and Only. It also appears in several international venues including the Italian comics magazine Linus and the Swedish comics magazine Rocky. Maakies focuses on the darkly comic misadventures of Uncle Gabby (a "drunken Irish monkey") and Drinky Crow (a crow), two antiheroes with a propensity for drunkenness, violence, suicide, and venereal disease. According to Millionaire, "Maakies is me spilling my guts... Writing and drawing about all the things that make me want to jump in the river, laughing at the horror of being alive." Maakies strips typically take place in an early 19th century nautical setting. There is rarely any continuity between strips. Maakies often includes visual references to historic works of art, especially to the popular graphic arts such as Japanese ukiyo-e, European engravings, and early American newspaper comics. Like many early 20th century Sunday strips, each Maakies comic usually includes a second, smaller strip (known as a "topper") that
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Mafalda

    Mafalda

    Mafalda is a comic strip written and drawn by Argentine cartoonist Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known by his pen name Quino. The strip features a 6-year-old girl named Mafalda, who is deeply concerned about humanity and world peace and rebels against the current state of the world. The strip ran from 1964 to 1973 and was very popular in Latin America, Europe, Quebec, and in Asia, leading to two animated cartoon series and a movie. The character Mafalda and a few other characters were created by Quino in 1962 for a promotional cartoon that was intended to be published in the daily Clarín. Mafalda's name was inspired by David Viñas's novel Dar la cara. Ultimately, however, Clarín broke the contract and the campaign was canceled altogether. Mafalda became a full-fledged cartoon strip on the advice of Quino's friend Julián Delgado, at the time senior editor of the weekly Primera Plana. Its run in that newspaper began on 29 September 1964. At first it only featured Mafalda and her parents. Her friend Felipe came on the scene in January 1965. A legal dispute arose in March 1965, which led to the end of Mafalda's Primera Plana run on 9 March 1965. One week later, on 15 March 1965
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Mr. Block

    Mr. Block

    Mr. Block is a United States comic strip character commemorated in a song written by Joe Hill. Mr. Block, who has no first name, was created November 7th, 1912 by Ernest Riebe, a member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Block appeared that day in the Spokane newspaper Industrial Worker, smoking a cigar and wearing a checkered suit with top hat. Subsequently, Mr. Block lost the fancy clothes but often kept a hat, ten sizes too small, perched on one corner of his wooden blockhead. "Mr. Block is legion," wrote Walker C. Smith in 1913. "He is representative of that host of slaves who think in terms of their masters. Mr. Block owns nothing, yet he speaks from the standpoint of the millionaire; he is patriotic without patrimony; he is a law-abiding outlaw... [who] licks the hand that smites him and kisses the boot that kicks him... the personification of all that a worker should not be." Joe Hill wrote Mr. Block to the tune of "It Looks to Me Like a Big Time Tonight". The song, like the comic strip, is bitterly satirical about the AFL and the Socialist Party. Sometimes also called "Please Give Me Your Attention", it has remained a popular number through multiple editions of
    10.00
    1 votes
    86

    Peanuts

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Charlie Brown
    Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday American comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward. The strip is the most popular and influential in the history of the comic strip, with 17,897 strips published in all, making it "arguably the longest story ever told by one human being", according to Robert Thompson of Syracuse University. At its peak, Peanuts ran in over 2,600 newspapers, with a readership of 355 million in 75 countries, and was translated into 21 languages. It helped to cement the four-panel gag strip as the standard in the United States, and together with its merchandise earned Schulz more than $1 billion. Reprints of the strip are still syndicated and run in almost every U.S. newspaper. Peanuts achieved considerable success with its television specials, several of which, including A Charlie Brown Christmas and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, won or were nominated for Emmy Awards. The holiday specials remain popular and are currently broadcast on ABC in the United States during the corresponding seasons. The Peanuts franchise met acclaim in theatre with the stage
    10.00
    1 votes
    87

    Pogo

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: P. T. Bridgeport
    Pogo is the title and central character of a long-running daily American comic strip, created by cartoonist Walt Kelly (1913–1973) and distributed by the Post-Hall Syndicate. Set in the Okefenokee Swamp of the southeastern United States, the strip often engages in social and political satire through the adventures of its anthropomorphic funny animal characters. Pogo combined both sophisticated wit and slapstick physical comedy in a heady mix of allegory, Irish poetry, literary whimsy, puns and wordplay, lushly detailed artwork and broad burlesque humor. The same series of strips can be enjoyed on different levels by both young children and savvy adults. The strip earned Kelly a Reuben Award in 1951. Walter Crawford Kelly, Jr. was born in Philadelphia on August 25, 1913, although his family relocated to Bridgeport, Connecticut during his second year. He migrated to California at the age of 22, to work on Donald Duck cartoons at Walt Disney Studios in 1935. He stayed until the strike in 1941, long enough to animate on The Nifty Nineties, The Little Whirlwind, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo and The Reluctant Dragon. After leaving Disney, Kelly worked for Dell Comics, a division of Western
    10.00
    1 votes
    88

    The Buckets

    • Genre: Family
    The Buckets is also an informal name used to describe the former Disneyland attraction, the Skyway. The Buckets is a comic strip originally created by Scott Stantis. It has been syndicated since 1990, first by Tribune Media, and currently by United Feature Syndicates, Inc.. The comic centers on a suburban family of five; two parents, two boys, Toby, a moody adolescent and Eddie, a young boy, and their paternal grandfather. The Stantis family pet, Dogzilla, was the only character to keep his own name when Scott first created the strip based on his own family. The real world Dogzilla died in 2006 at the age of 17. Greg Cravens had sole responsibility of the strip at Dogzilla's death, and says Dogzilla will live on in the comic strip. His own dog is named Gi'Tli, which is Cherokee for 'Dog'. Stantis left The Buckets completely to focus on politically-oriented Prickly City and The Buckets is currently being handled by Greg Cravens. Cravens was hired just after the tenth anniversary of the strip. He went from being the art assistant to credited art assistant to partner and eventually sole writer and artist of the strip. The two sons in the strip, Toby and Eddie, began as younger
    10.00
    1 votes
    89

    Kid Chameleon

    Kid Chameleon was a weekly 2-page colour comic strip appearing in the British Comic Book Cor!! from its first issue in 1970 until 1972. It was written by Scott Goodall and drawn by Joe Colquhoun, both uncredited. Stranded in the Kalahari Desert by a plane crash, a British boy is raised by lizards as a feral child, and weaves himself a skin-tight suit of transparent lizard scales which covers his entire body except the top of his head (to avoid the appearance of complete nudity, he also wears a pair of flesh-coloured briefs underneath). Only one strip shows how the suit comes off. It consists of two pieces: a top that opens at the front, and leggings. The suit allows him to camouflage himself like a chameleon by making the scales change colour, although how he does it is never explained. When he reaches adolescence he is told by his only human contact, an ancient Bushman, that the wreckage of the plane contained the bodies of his parents, who had been shot. The only clue to the murderer's identity was a silver skull brooch. Subsequent strips trace Kid's journey across Africa and beyond as he searches for his parents' killer and uses his camouflage to help people (often other
    6.50
    4 votes
    90
    The Jimi Homeless Experience

    The Jimi Homeless Experience

    The Jimi Homeless Experience (webcomic) is an online social/political cartoon strip created and written by J. F. Kinyon. The webcomic is drawn by underground artist Big Tasty who is a frequent contributor to Girls and Corpses Magazine. The strip is primarily about a small group of social outcasts and proudly flaunts its Grotesque orientation and black humor. This webcomic has been part of the BuzzComix web portal since January 2006.
    6.50
    4 votes
    91
    Spike and Suzy

    Spike and Suzy

    Spike and Suzy, the British title for Suske en Wiske in Dutch, is a comics series created by the Belgian comics author Willy Vandersteen. The strip is known as Bob et Bobette in French and Willy and Wanda in the U.S. It was first published in De Nieuwe Standaard in 1945 and soon became popular. Although not in its earlier form, the strip adapted to the Ligne claire style pioneered by Hergé, a change taking place when the strip became serialised in Hergé's comics magazine Tintin from 1948 to 1959. The books revolve around the adventures of the eponymous Spike and Suzy, two children (pre-adolescent or adolescent depending on the album), along with their friends and family. The stories combine elements of comedy, fantasy and science fiction, such as talking animals, time travel and ghosts. The strip still runs daily in De Standaard, and new books continue to be published: as of 2008, 300 books have been published. While they remain popular among readers from the Netherlands, their popularity in Belgium has plummeted since the mid 1990s. The main characters are a group of friends. In the first regular comic, Suzy and her Aunt Sidonia meet the orphan Spike and unrelated Professor
    5.60
    5 votes
    92
    Six By Nine College

    Six By Nine College

    Six By Nine College (also "6X9 College") is a webcomic loosely based on the college lives of writer Amber Marshall and artist 10er Bradley. The creators attended UNH from 2001-2005 and continued to write comics about their fictional school "UGH" throughout the duration. Many of the principal characters appear in an earlier work by Bradley known simply as "Six By Nine". The comic follows Jack (a werewolf) and Luci (a vampire) as they cultivate their budding relationship and endure the general absurdities of college life. Common themes are laziness, talking through movies, video games, and the aggression of UGH student organizations like The Junior Christian Coalition and the vegan party. One storyline includes the evil members of the school board (monstrous shapes cloaked in shadow) testing an experimental form of Crystal Light on the UGH students, which causes them to sprout horrifying mutant appendages. The series has incorporated several crossover events, including one with a similar college webcomic the UC and one with another of Bradley's works, Sacrilicious. The comic was listed 6th in College OTR's "Eight Great College Webcomics". Jack-the main male protagonist of Six By Nine
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    Bad Reporter

    • Genre: Topical humor
    Bad Reporter is a semi-weekly editorial cartoon in comic strip format that first appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle on September 25, 2003. It typically contains four panels, the first a simple black panel with a caricature of creator Don Asmussen and the slogan "The lies behind the truth, and the truth behind those lies that are behind that truth". The remaining three are spoofs (parodies) of newspaper articles containing a mock-up of a prominent newspaper masthead (such as the Chronicle or the New York Times), a headline, a simulated photograph, and a short text introduction or lead. Images are often obviously doctored file photographs or images from recent newspapers. Often there are humorous sidebars and other graphics. The strip grew out of an earlier effort for the paper titled The San Francisco Comic Strip. Its first topic was the recall of Governor Gray Davis. It then moved on to cover the 2004 presidential election and events beyond. The humor is generally topical and absurdist, describing one local or national current event in the terms and context of another. The strip often focuses on political scandals in San Francisco, California. For example, a panel from one
    7.33
    3 votes
    94

    Frank and Ernest

    • Genre: Satire
    Frank and Ernest is a play on the English words frank and earnest, which can both mean "candid". It may refer to:
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Candorville

    • Genre: Politics
    Candorville is a syndicated newspaper comic strip written and illustrated by Darrin Bell, a former editorial cartoonist, and the first African-American cartoonist to have two different comic strips in syndication concurrently. Candorville, launched in September 2003 by The Washington Post Writers Group, features young Black and Latino characters living in the inner city. Using the vehicle of humor, Candorville presents social and political commentary as well as the stories of its protagonists. Candorville grew out of a comic strip called Lemont Brown, which appeared in the student newspaper of UC Berkeley, The Daily Californian, from 1993 to 2003. It still appears in the Daily Californian under its new title, and it is that newspaper's longest-running comic strip. Candorville appears in most of America's largest newspapers. It also runs in Spanish language newspapers where it is translated by the author's wife, Laura Bustamante. Because of its political content, Candorville, like Doonesbury, sometimes appears on a newspaper's editorial page rather than its comics page; like G.B. Trudeau's strip, Candorville has been accused of having a liberal slant, which has prevented the strip
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Ghastly's Ghastly Comic

    Ghastly's Ghastly Comic

    Ghastly's Ghastly Comic is a webcomic by Chris Cracknell, A.K.A. "Ghastly" or "Uncle Ghastly", dealing with anime fetish and paraphilias. One of the most notable themes is tentacle rape, as the subtitle of the comic is "Tentacle Monsters and the Women Who Love Them". In July, 2006, the author suddenly announced that the comic was indefinitely suspended, later clarifying that this was due to a serious illness. The comic is currently on an artist-imposed hiatus. The plot begins with two tentacle monsters (their origins are not specified), Glemph and Nort, who hang around in a Canadian bar, "The Spanked Monkey". As it progresses they meet several people who have trouble fitting into normal society because of their deviant behaviour or sexual preferences, for example Freddy who is a transgender version of James from Pokémon and Sue who is trapped in a chibi form. The comic features a variety of cultural phenomena: Chick Tracts, Cthulhu and of course, tentacle rape. Chris Cracknell (born September 13, 1965) is a musician and webcartoonist, best known for this comic. He is also the leader of the band Science Ninja Big Ten, AKA Big Fake Heart Attack. Since 2009, he has been pursuing a
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Terry and the Pirates

    Terry and the Pirates was an action-adventure comic strip created by cartoonist Milton Caniff. Captain Joseph Patterson, editor for the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate, had admired Caniff’s work on the children's adventure strip Dickie Dare and hired him to create the new adventure strip, providing Caniff with the title and locale. (The precise reason behind including "the Pirates" in the title is a subject of some debate, but see Dragon Lady (stereotype) for one plausible version.) The daily strip began October 22, 1934, with the Sunday color pages beginning December 9, 1934. Initially, the storylines of the daily strips and Sunday pages were different, but on August 26, 1936 they merged into a single storyline. In 1946, Caniff won the first Cartoonist of the Year Award from the National Cartoonists Society for his work on Terry and the Pirates. The adventure begins with young Terry Lee, "a wide-awake American boy," arriving in contemporary China with his friend, two-fisted journalist Pat Ryan. Seeking a lost gold mine they meet George Webster "Connie" Confucius, interpreter and local guide. Initially, crudely drawn backgrounds and stereotypical characters surrounded Terry
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    The Phantom

    • Genre: Adventure
    The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. A popular feature adapted into many media, including television, film and video games, it stars a costumed crimefighter operating from the fictional African country Bangalla. The Phantom is the 21st in a line of crimefighters that originated in 1536, when the father of British sailor Christopher Walker was killed during a pirate attack. Swearing an oath to fight evil on the skull of his father's murderer, Christopher started the legacy of the Phantom that would be passed from father to son, leaving people to give the mysterious figure nicknames such as "The Ghost Who Walks", "The Man Who Cannot Die" and "Guardian of the Eastern Dark", believing him to be immortal. Unlike many fictional costumed heroes, the Phantom does not have any supernatural powers, but instead relies on his strength, intelligence, and fearsome reputation of being an immortal ghost to defeat his foes. The 21st Phantom is married to Diana Palmer, whom he met while studying in the United States; they have two children, Kit and Heloise. Like all previous Phantoms, he lives in the ancient Skull Cave, and has
    6.25
    4 votes
    99

    Brickman

    Brickman is a humour comic strip and character created by UK cartoonist Lew Stringer, and appears to be Stringer's most recurring character. A parody of Batman, the spoof features the adventures of zillionaire Loose Brayne and his partner Tina Trowel who fight crime in Guffon City, fighting villains such as the Poker, the Mad Cobbler and Gnat-Woman. The strip's humour uses heavy amounts of puns, sight gags and absurdism. The strip began in the fanzine After Image No.3 in 1979, before moving on to other small press fanzines and minicomics. Brickman then turned up in his own title published by short-lived UK independent Harrier Comics in 1986, featuring guest pages drawn by Dave Gibbons, Mike Collins, Mark Farmer, and Kevin O'Neill (with an introduction written by Alan Moore). He also made a cameo, alongside discontinued Marvel UK comedy characters in a The Prisoner homage, in Stringer's Combat Colin. After a ten-year gap while Stringer focused on his other comic characters, Brickman was revived in 1996 in the small press comic Yampy Tales; the character returned to a crime-stricken Guffon City to defeat the evil Mr Cheese and his own sidekick Tina, who had gone rogue. In 2005, the
    5.40
    5 votes
    100

    Calvin and Hobbes

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Calvin
    Calvin and Hobbes is a syndicated daily comic strip that was written and illustrated by American cartoonist Bill Watterson, and syndicated from November 18, 1985, to December 31, 1995. It follows the humorous antics of Calvin, a precocious and adventurous six-year-old boy, and Hobbes, his sardonic stuffed tiger. The pair are named after John Calvin, a 16th-century French Reformation theologian, and Thomas Hobbes, a 17th-century English political philosopher. At the height of its popularity, Calvin and Hobbes was featured in over 2,400 newspapers worldwide; as of January 2010, reruns of the strip still appear in more than 50 countries. Nearly 45 million copies of the 18 Calvin and Hobbes books have been sold. Calvin and Hobbes is set in the contemporary United States in an unspecified suburban area. The strip depicts Calvin's flights of fantasy and his friendship with Hobbes, and also examines Calvin's relationships with family and classmates. Hobbes' dual nature is a defining motif for the strip: to Calvin, Hobbes is a live anthropomorphic tiger; all the other characters see him as an inanimate stuffed toy. Though the series does not mention specific political figures or current
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Introducing Media Studies

    Introducing Media Studies

    Icon Books' Introducing Media Studies is written by Professor Ziauddin Sardar (regular columnist for The New Statesman and Society, expert on Postmodernism, Islam and Cultural Studies, editor of the journal Futures, author of Muhammad, Cultural Studies, Chaos and Mathematics in this series), designed and illustrated by Borin Van Loon. A vitriolic, vituperative, voluble and slightly affectionate dissection of the mass media and the way in which it shapes the events and trends it purports merely to reflect. Ah, the media... Love them or loathe them, they swamp, saturate and submerge us. The effect is to inform, educate entertain and bore us to death in equal parts. Surely it's possible to be so well-informed that you end up knowing everything about nothing very much. Of course, television isn't necessarily the shibboleth shown here; it's had the power to move us and bring the joys and horrors of the world into our living rooms. Now the internet promises to do "the same but more so" (on command with interactivity) through interactive televisions, flat screens, palm-top computers and mobile 'phones. So much information and so little knowledge; so much cleverness and so little intelligence.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Lackadaisy

    Lackadaisy

    Lackadaisy (also known as Lackadaisy Cats) is a webcomic created by artist Tracy J. Butler. Set in a Prohibition-era 1927 St. Louis with a population of anthropomorphic cats, the plot chronicles the fortunes of the Lackadaisy speakeasy after its founder is murdered. The comic won multiple Web Cartoonists' Choice Awards in 2007 and 2008, and in April 2011 was nominated for the Eisner Award for "Best Digital Comic". The style of the comic is highly detailed, with elegantly attired cartoon characters that resemble styles from animated films of Walt Disney and Don Bluth. The strips are sepia-toned, resembling aged photographs of the 1920s era. Launched on July 19, 2006, the comic updates on an irregular basis, with 23 pages in 2006, 25 in 2007, and continuing on a trimonthly basis through 2012. Butler creates the comic by pencil sketching original images, then scanning and adjusting them with software such as Photoshop, where the panels are then assembled. Lighting is then added in grey tones, sharpening where needed, and dialogue and sound effects are added in a separate layer. The sepia tones are added in the final pass. Some of the feline characters are based on Butler's own pets,
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Life in Hell

    Life in Hell

    • Genre: Satire
    Life in Hell was a weekly comic strip by Matt Groening, which was published from 1977 to 2012. The strip features anthropomorphic rabbits and a gay couple. Groening uses these characters to explore a wide range of topics about love, sex, work, and death. His drawings are full of expressions of angst, alienation, self-loathing, and fear of inevitable doom. Life in Hell started in 1977 as a self-published comic book Groening used to describe life in Los Angeles to his friends. It was inspired by his move to the city that year; in an interview with Playboy, Groening commented on his arrival: "I got [to Los Angeles] on a Friday night in August; it was about a hundred and two degrees; my car broke down in the fast lane of the Hollywood Freeway while I was listening to a drunken deejay who was giving his last program on a local rock station and bitterly denouncing the station's management. And then I had a series of lousy jobs." In the comic book, Groening attacked what many young adults found repellent: school, work, and love. He described it as "every ex-campus protester's, every Boomer idealist's, conception of what adult existence in the '80s had turned out to be." Groening
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Mac Hall

    Mac Hall

    Mac Hall (debut: November 7, 2000) is a webcomic which was created through a bet between the creator Ian McConville and a friend who claimed he "couldn't make a comic like Penny Arcade". After the fifteenth comic, McConville was joined by Matt Boyd who began to write the comic. Mac Hall follows the exploits of a group of college students who are typical slackers. The series primarily focused on the events that occurred between classes and after hours and only rarely references actual class work. The comic takes its name from MacDonald Hall, a dormitory at Bowling Green State University. Later in the series, the cast moves into a house, where they reside until graduation, and the comic's conclusion. Mac Hall concluded on September 22, 2006, with McConville explaining that creating the comic was no longer fun. He also mentioned that the comic would continue in a new phase in October 2006, and after some delay a new project began. In early March 2007, Boyd linked to the pair's new webcomic, Three Panel Soul, which had been updating unannounced since November 5, 2006. A note posted on February 5 welcomed visitors who managed to find the site on their own, but called it "(not) quite
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    Real Life Adventures

    Real Life Adventures is a nationally syndicated comic strip created by Lance Aldrich and Gary Wise. It is most often a single-panel strip, except for weekends. The strip deals with everyday foibles.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    Yo, Matías

    Yo, Matías is an Argentine comic strip, created by the cartoonist Fernando Sendra in 1993. It currently appears in the Clarín newspaper. Matías: He is the main character in the comic, with his mother. His little world is his school, his home and his neighbourhood. His fantasy, imagination, worries and wishes, create the core of the story. He usually appears with his mother in most of the episodes. He almost always uses the same red T-shirt, blue shorts and black shoes. His best friend used to be Tatiana, but now that Malena and he are in love, he doesn't spend so much time with her. His surname is Urtizú.[citation needed] Matías' mother: She is a woman who loves her son, with all of a mother's passion but that also wants to keep her identity as a woman and her individuality as a person without immolating in her only role of mother. She wants to make other people love her, to be attractive. She never appears in the comic, although you can imagine her using many different kinds of facial masks. The psychoanalyst: He is the only adult and male character in the comic that appears in it with some frequency. His function is to allow some space for reflections that a boy or a woman
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    The Night Owls

    The Night Owls

    • Genre: Comedy
    The Night Owls is a twice weekly webcomic by Peter and Bobby Timony appearing every Tuesday and Thursday on DC Comics Zuda imprint. It was selected as Zuda's Instant Winner in December, 2007. Set in 1920's New York, the strip follows the adventures of a group of Detectives who solve supernatural crimes. The strip alternates between single gags and longer story arcs, though each episode is designed to stand on its own. Although it often deals with bizarre and disturbing themes, the strip maintains a light-hearted tone that is generally suited for all ages. Each strip is usually six to eight panels long, has an art deco banner across the top and is colored in warm sepia hues. Professor Ernest Baxter A bookwormish and kind of shy fellow who uses his vast knowledge of the supernatural world to try to help people. Mindy Markus A feisty flapper with a modern "liberated" outlook on life. She is not afraid to get into a scrap with the forces of evil. Roscoe the Gargoyle A gargoyle from Coney Island with an insatiable appetite. He provides additional comic relief with his flippant and lighthearted approach to things. Detective Bill McRory An honest cop who occasionally seeks help from the
    5.20
    5 votes
    108
    Clan of the Cats

    Clan of the Cats

    Clan of the Cats is an urban fantasy webcomic by Jamie Robertson. It chronicles the adventures of a witch, Chelsea Chattan, who is also afflicted by an ancient family curse. In times of stress she transforms into a black panther. This, coupled by her increasing magickal power, makes having an ordinary life rather challenging. The stories deal with supernatural themes mainly, but also creep into the realm of normal everyday life. The comic was first posted on June 20, 1999. There are three spinoff comics: Sebo, Mythos and Magick, and Melpomene. Clan of the Cats was hosted by Big Panda from 1999 to 2000; Keenspot now hosts Clan of the Cats. The main characters of Clan of the Cats are Chelsea Urania Kate Chattan, Alexander Jubal McRae, Ruth Netta Madison Chattan, Corrine Elizabeth Melpomene Chattan (aka Mel), Paul Winston McRae, Cynthia Marie Angeline Thalia McRae Monroe, and Sebastian (aka Sebo). Chelsea was born to Peter and Diane Chattan in 1974, five years after they were married on October 31st, Halloween. There was nothing to indicate that great things were in store. Like the famous Hotel Chelsea she was named for, Chelsea is a living embodiment of all things different. In 1996,
    6.00
    4 votes
    109

    Hazel

    Hazel is a single-panel cartoon series by Ted Key about a live-in maid who works for a middle-class family. The character of Hazel came to Key in 1943 during a dream that he drew the next morning and sent to The Saturday Evening Post, where it quickly became a popular series. In 2008, the cartoonist's son, Peter Key, talked about the origin of the character, "Like a lot of creative people, he kept a notepad near his bedside. He had a dream about a maid who took a message, but she screwed it up completely. When he looked at the idea the next day, he thought it was good and sold it to The Post." Shortly afterward, the wry and bossy household maid was given the name Hazel, along with employment at the Baxter household. Peter Key recalled, "He picked the name Hazel out of the air, but there was an editor at The Post who had a sister named Hazel. She thought her brother came up with the name, and she didn’t speak to him for two years." The cartoon ran until the weekly magazine ceased publication in 1969. Hazel was then picked up for newspaper syndication by King Features Syndicate. Key, who continued to draw Hazel until his retirement in 1993. Ted Key died in May 2008. Key's cartoons
    6.00
    4 votes
    110

    Stone Soup

    • Genre: Politics
    Stone Soup, named for the stone soup fable, is an internationally syndicated American comic strip written and illustrated by Jan Eliot. The comic strip began as a weekly in 1990. The syndicated daily strip debuted in November 1995. The Stone family features a family headed by single mother Val, an uncommon contrast with the ordinary nuclear family depicted in more traditional strips. As the author explained, It is common for strip storylines to consist of household squabbles and arguments that are not resolved. Unlike many strips, the characters do age, but at a very slow rate. Val has celebrated her 38th and 39th birthdays in the strip; Alix and Holly were 9 and 12 when the strip began, and are now 10 and 13. The apple of Max's eye, but to everyone else, a "yappy little mutt". Officially Holly and Alix's dog, found as a stray, the girls bring her home and promise to take care of the little pup - originally named "Lily" but the family decided on "Biscuit" since she seems to answer to the name. Val provides care and Max provides adoration. Biscuit has a thing for Val's bunny slippers. During Biscuit's first visit to Susan the vet, it is revealed that Biscuit is female. Val belongs
    6.00
    4 votes
    111

    Beetle Bailey

    • Genre: Humour
    Beetle Bailey (begun on September 4, 1950) is an American comic strip created by cartoonist Mort Walker. Set in a fictional United States Army military post, it is among the oldest comic strips still being produced by the original creator. Over the years, Mort Walker has been assisted by (among others) Jerry Dumas, Bob Gustafson, Frank Johnson and Walker's sons Neal, Brian and Greg Walker. The latter is currently credited on the strip. Beetle was originally a college student at Rockview University. The characters in that early strip were modeled after Walker's fraternity brothers at the University of Missouri. During the strip's first year, Beetle quit school and enlisted in the U.S. Army on March 13, 1951, where he has remained ever since. Most of the humor in Beetle Bailey revolves around the inept characters stationed at Camp Swampy (inspired by Camp Crowder, where Walker had once been stationed while in the Army). Private Bailey is a lazy sort who usually naps and avoids work, and thus is often the subject of verbal and physical chastising from his supervisor, Sergeant Snorkel. The characters never seem to see combat themselves, with the exception of mock battles and combat
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Cucalón

    Cucalón (Spanish for "pith helmet") is a Chilean comic book created by Themo Lobos, containing complete Mampato adventures (first seen in serialized form in the magazine also called "Mampato"), as well as other characters and stories. The main series tells the adventures of Chilean boy Mampato, whom one day receives a telepathic message from an alien called Xseturlz (Xse), asking for help. Mampato saves Xse's life and they both travel to planet Xagus, where Xse's race is suffering the presence of another evil alien race, called the Verdines ("Greenies"). After many adventures including a time travel to Earth's Roman Empire, they win the battle and take back control of Xse's planet; the king of Xagus offers Mampato any reward he would like. He asks for a ride back home but he gets something more: the "space-time belt", the fantastic device that allows travel to anywhere in time and space. The first journey that Mampato takes is back to the prehistoric period, where he meets Ogú, a strong caveman. They become close friends, and their many adventures in different times and places make up most of the series. In another adventure, Mampato goes forward to the 40th century, where he meets
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Get Fuzzy

    Get Fuzzy

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Bucky Katt
    Get Fuzzy is an American daily comic strip written and drawn by Darby Conley. The strip features the adventures of Boston advertising executive Rob Wilco and his two anthropomorphic pets: dog Satchel Pooch and cat Bucky Katt. Get Fuzzy has been published by United Feature Syndicate since September 6, 1999. It appears in over 700 newspapers worldwide. The strip's humor comes from the conflict between Bucky's and Satchel's personalities, which are extreme stereotypes of cats and dogs. Sweet, trusting, naïve Satchel is routinely subjected to the exploitation of cruel, self-centered Bucky, who is always torturing the poor canine. Rob, the middleman, is often frazzled from dealing with them, or more specifically, from dealing with Bucky's destructive nature and overall nastiness. The three characters live in an apartment on Boston's Longwood Avenue. Get Fuzzy often eschews the traditional "setup-punchline" format of most funnies, instead building on absurd dialog between characters. The unusual title of the strip comes from a concert poster that Darby Conley once created for his brother's band, the Fuzzy Sprouts. "Life's too short to be cool," the poster read, "Get Fuzzy." Many
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Hugo Hercules

    Hugo Hercules

    The creation of cartoonist William H.D. Koerner, Hugo Hercules was the titular hero of a comic strip that ran from September 1902 to January 1903 for the Chicago Tribune. A good-natured man endowed with superhuman strength, the character of Hugo wandered about town, helping people with their problems and shocking them with his surprising displays of power. He was so strong he could pick up an elephant, kick a house like a football, wield an artillery cannon like a handgun, and lift a locomotive engine off the tracks and pull its cargo behind him at train speeds. Sometimes referred to as the first superhero, the strip was not a great success and Koerner eventually left comics to become a painter.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    Brevity

    • Genre: Humour
    Brevity is a single-panel newspaper comic strip created by Guy Endore-Kaiser and Rodd Perry. Brevity originally began on Comics Sherpa (a site which helps beginning comic strips make their work public over the web). It debuted in 55 newspapers on January 3, 2005. Today, Brevity is published in over 130 newspapers in the USA and Canada. There are currently four published collections and one treasury. The comic often features talking animals interacting with each other and with humans in otherwise mundane situations. For example one strip features a family of bears shopping for a new house, asking if the neighbors taste good. Another strip features a songbird complaining about a woman who's staring at him, but all she hears is beautiful singing. In the past few years the comics.com site has allowed visitors to submit comments on each strip. There are four collections and one treasury published by Andrews McMeel Publishing
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Cliff Hanger

    Cliff Hanger is the name of two different 1983 comic strips, one published in the United Kingdom and the other in the United States. The British Cliff Hanger was written and drawn by Jack Edward Oliver. It first appeared in the 25 June 1983 issue of the comic Buster. Watching a television show called 'Now Get Out of This' (a parody of Now Get Out of That), Cliff remarks that he thinks he could get out of everything. This is overheard by the Evil Spies, agents of M.E.S.S. (the Mysterious Evil Spies Society). They tell Cliff that he's now a guinea pig in their traps, and if he doesn't survive, they'll know the traps will be good enough to use against secret agents. From then on, the premise of the strip every week would be that Cliff is suddenly transported into a dangerous situation by the spies, using the Atomic Matter Transmitter. Three options would be presented to the readers, who would select one by ticking one of the boxes, and turning to another page to see whether their choice was correct or not. For example, in the first strip, Cliff is stranded on a moving artificial desert island. Just as it's about to hit the shore, the current changes and Cliff is driven back into the
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Create a Comic Project

    Create a Comic Project

    • Genre: Humour
    The Create a Comic Project (CCP) is a youth literacy program and webcomic created by John Baird. The program uses comics, many taken from the Internet, to encourage children to write their own narratives. The program began in November 2006 at the main branch of the New Haven Free Public Library as an after-school program. The project has since worked with several other groups, including the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh, Braddock Carnegie Library, and the Pittsburgh YMCA. Baird has presented the results of his work on the project at several conventions and conferences, including South by Southwest Interactive and SXSWedu. The project has been praised for its work in engaging children in learning by Marjorie Scardino, CEO of Pearson, and Arne Duncan, the US Secretary of Education. The webcomic side of the project posts comics made by the children. The website was launched January 4, 2007. Archives of the Taiwan comics, labeled "Create a Comic Project ROC" or "CCP Version 1.0," go from July 9, 2005 through November 28, 2006. Comics generated in America, labeled "CCP Version 2.0," were first posted November 29, 2006 to present. The Create a Comic Project was first conceived in the
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Erfworld

    Erfworld

    • Genre: Comedy
    Erfworld is a story-driven fantasy/comedy webcomic about a master strategy gamer stuck in a wargame. The first book, The Battle for Gobwin Knob was written by Rob Balder and illustrated by Jamie Noguchi. It was recognized as one of the top 10 graphic novels of 2007 by Time Magazine. The second book, Love is a Battlefield is instead illustrated by Xin Ye. Erfworld is also currently being published as a bi-weekly mobile comic by Robot Comics. Erfworld follows a graphic novel format, with a new page added with each update. The setting is Erfworld, a fantasy world that adheres to the rules of a turn-based strategy wargame. The narrative focuses on a complex story about warring factions within this world, but most installments also contain humor about strategy-fantasy video games, role-playing games, and references to history or popular culture. There are frequent puns and side-gags, as well as letter changes in frequently used names, particularly replacing "r" with "w" (spidews, dwagons and twolls instead of spiders, dragons and trolls). The comic was originally started as an attempt to bring all of author Rob Balder's Fantasy-related strips from his other comic, PartiallyClips, into
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Introducing Critical Theory (Introducing...(Totem))

    Introducing Critical Theory (Introducing...(Totem))

    The last few decades have seen an explosion in the production of critical theories: deconstructionists, poststructuraliststs, postmodernists, second-wave feminists, new historicists, cultural materialists, postcolonialists, black critics, queer theorists... to name but a few. The world around us can look very different depending on the critical theory applied to it. This vast range of interpretations can leave one feeling confused and frustrated. Introducing Critical Theory provides a route through the tangled jungle of competing theories. It provides a context for these recent developments by situating them within the longer-term tradition of critical analysis going back to the rise of Marxism. The essential methods of each theoretical school are presented in an incisive and accessible manner. Special attention is paid to recurrent themes and concerns that have preoccupied a century of critical activity.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Introducing Psychotherapy

    Introducing Psychotherapy

    Psychotherapy is now hardly contentious, an accepted safety net for the perils of modern life. But what - really - is it all about? Nigel C.Benson offers a unique summary of this complex profession, focusing on the main types of therapies. An essential for everyone with an emotional life. Dealing with an astonishing range of therapies, counselling and complementary techniques this documentary comic book provides a valuable summary of the 'talking cures' of psychoanalysis, behavioural and cognitive techniques, somatic solutions, humaninst, gestalt and existential approaches individual and group therapies. Introducing Psychotherapy is a comprehensive guide for anyone who wants to understand more about the subject, whether approaching it for the first time or expanding on existing knowledge. Useful for anyone seeking help for themselves or others (including parents and other carers), it also provides important theory and practice for those considering training to be counsellors or therapists, and any other students or professionals concerned with welfare.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Krazy Kat

    Krazy Kat

    • Genre: Romance
    • Characters: Ignatz Mouse
    Krazy Kat is an American comic strip created by cartoonist George Herriman, published daily in newspapers between 1913 and 1944. It first appeared in the New York Evening Journal, whose owner, William Randolph Hearst, was a major booster for the strip throughout its run. The characters had been introduced previously in a side strip with Herriman's earlier creation, The Dingbat Family. The phrase "Krazy Kat" originated there, said by the mouse by way of describing the cat. Set in a dreamlike portrayal of Herriman's vacation home of Coconino County, Arizona, Krazy Kat's mixture of offbeat surrealism, innocent playfulness and poetic, idiosyncratic language has made it a favorite of comics aficionados and art critics for more than 80 years. The strip focuses on the curious love triangle between its title character, a guileless, carefree, simple-minded cat of indeterminate gender (referred to as both "he" and "she"); the obsessive antagonist Ignatz Mouse; and the protective police dog, Offissa Bull Pupp. Krazy nurses an unrequited love for the mouse. However, Ignatz despises Krazy and constantly schemes to throw bricks at Krazy's head, which Krazy misinterprets as a sign of affection,
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    Li'l Abner

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: Joe Btfsplk
    Li'l Abner is a satirical American comic strip that appeared in many newspapers in the United States, Canada and Europe, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the impoverished town of Dogpatch, Kentucky. Written and drawn by Al Capp (1909–1979), the strip ran for 43 years, from August 13, 1934 through November 13, 1977. It was distributed by United Feature Syndicate. Read daily by scores of millions of people, the strip's characters and humor had a powerful cultural impact. Li'l Abner Yokum: The star of Capp's classic comic strip was hardly "little." Abner was 6' 3" in his stockinged feet (if he wore stockings), and perpetually 19 "y'ars" old. A naïve, simple-minded and sweet-natured hillbilly boy, he lived in a ramshackle log cabin with his pint-sized parents. He inherited his strength from his irascible Mammy, and his brains from his less-than-brainy Pappy. Capp derived their family name "Yokum" as a portmanteau of yokel and hokum. In Capp's satirical and often complex plots, Abner was a country bumpkin Candide — a paragon of innocence in a sardonically dark and cynical world. A priceless rube, Abner was so gullible that he could be tricked by a small child. The loutish
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    The Outbursts of Everett True

    The Outbursts of Everett True

    The Outbursts of Everett True (originally titled A Chapter from the Career of Everett True) was a two-panel newspaper comic strip created by A.D. Condo and J.W. Raper that ran from 1905 until 1927, when Condo was obliged to abandon it for health reasons. Two contemporary collections appeared in 1907 and 1921, and the strip languished forgotten until 1983. When one of the collections was reprinted that year, comic book writer Tony Isabella and various artists employed the character in a new strip for the Comics Buyer's Guide and The Comics Journal. In this modernization, Everett True directed his outbursts at comic book artists, writers, publishers and distributors. The original strip revolved around a portly, ill-tempered man who was typically dressed in a suit and bowler hat of antiquated and comical appearance for the time. The first panel of each strip generally had someone inconveniencing or annoying True. In the second panel, True exacted his revenge by either berating or (if confronting a man) pummelling the offender. The only character who occasionally turned the tables on True was his wife, who appeared occasionally to berate or beat him for some unacceptable behavior. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    124

    U.S. Acres

    • Genre: Humour
    U.S. Acres (known as Orson's Farm outside the United States) is a comic strip that originally ran from 1986 to 1989 created by Jim Davis, author of the popular comic strip Garfield. When the strip was launched, Jim Davis expected it to become quickly popular, but criticism forced it to end after 3 years in 1989. The comic strip was launched on March 3, 1986 in a then-unprecedented 505 newspapers by United Feature Syndicate. For most of the last year of the strip's existence, Brett Koth, who had been assisting Davis on Garfield at that time, was given co-creator's credit in the strip, and signed his name to the strips along with Davis. The strip was centered on a group of barnyard animals, with the main character being Orson, a small pig who had been taken from his mother shortly after being born. At the peak of the comic's popularity, there were children's books, plush animals (particularly of the characters Roy, Booker, Sheldon, and Orson), and posters of the main characters. Its animated adaptation was included in the TV show Garfield and Friends, and continued to be so for several years after the strip ended. The final daily strip was printed on April 15, 1989, while the final
    9.00
    1 votes
    125

    Urban Trash

    • Genre: Humour
    Urban Trash is a satirical South African comic strip created by Jeremy Nell, originating on 14 March 2005. It focuses on the exploits of urban street life in and around South Africa, and features a regular cast of characters, and is regularly published across South Africa, and in parts of Namibia and England. Urban Trash appears daily from Monday to Saturday, and one Sunday strip per month is created. On 28 May 2008, Nell announced that he is retiring Urban Trash. Urban Trash is predominantly gag-a-day humour, containing ongoing themes such as corruption, violence, drugs, and politics. There are no Urban Trash books yet.
    9.00
    1 votes
    126

    Cole Black

    Cole Black is an underground comic book hard-boiled detective created by Rocky Hartberg in 1976. The detective first appeared in the self-published full-sheet newspaper-sized Cole Black Comix #1 (1976) which had a print run of only 200 copies all distributed in the Aberdeen, South Dakota area. Hartberg submitted Cole Black to Marvel Comics for inclusion in Epic Magazine in the late-1970s. Although Marvel initially like the concept and accepted the submission, changes in editorial direction at Epic scrapped the project. In 1980, Hartberg initiated a second Cole Black series, this time in newspaper strip format. Between 1980 and 1983, five issues of Cole Black were published in this format. Each of these issues had national distribution and circulated between 1,000 and 1,500 copies. Informed by Bud Plant and other comics distributors that the newspaper strip format was limiting sales, Hartberg prepared African Dream in traditional comic book format. Although intended for publication in 1984 as the concluding chaper of the first story arc, African Dream was dropped in favor of a less fantastic World War II tale. The previously unpublished story was printed in a limited edition by
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Cul de Sac

    Cul de Sac

    Cul de Sac was a comic strip created by Richard Thompson and distributed by Universal Press Syndicate to 150 worldwide newspapers. The central character is four-year-old Alice Otterloop, and the strip depicts her daily life at pre-school and at home. Thompson, also known for his weekly Richard's Poor Almanac strip in the Washington Post, began Cul de Sac as a limited strip in the Washington Post in February 2004. In September 2007, Cul de Sac entered daily syndication with the Universal Press Syndicate. Digital distribution is by Uclick GoComics. On September 23rd, 2012, Thomson, who suffers from Parkinson's disease, ended production of the strip in order to focus on his health. Universal Press Syndicate describes Cul de Sac as "a light-hearted comic strip centered around a four-year-old girl and her suburban life experiences on a cul-de-sac with her friends Beni and Dill, older brother Petey and her classmates at Blisshaven Academy pre-school. Alice describes her father's car as a Honda-Tonka Cuisinart and talks to the class guinea pig, Mr. Danders. She has the typical older brother who plays jokes on her, and she contemplates ways to keep the scary clown from jumping out of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    Laugh Parade

    Laugh Parade was a group of weekly gag cartoons written by Bunny Hoest and drawn by John Reiner. It ran in Parade, a Sunday newspaper magazine supplement. Laugh Parade displayed three or four single-panel cartoons, one of which was Howard Huge. Reiner used an ink wash to give the strip a greyish, monochromatic tone. Hoest and Reiner collaborate on another cartoon series called The Lockhorns, which is distributed by King Features Syndicate. The Lockhorns was created in 1968 by Bill Hoest, who followed with the creation of Laugh Parade in 1980 and Howard Huge in 1981. In 1986, the publishers of Parade, Advance Magazine Publishers, Inc., filed for a trademark of Laugh Parade, and they renewed that trademark in 2007. The Hoest and Reiner feature had no association with the humor magazine Laugh Parade, published during the 1960s and 1970s by Magazine Management. That publication featured cartoons by Don Orehek and others. Reiner won the National Cartoonists Society's Gag Cartoons Award in 1994.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Sparkling Generation Valkyrie Yuuki

    Sparkling Generation Valkyrie Yuuki

    • Genre: Fantasy
    Sparkling Generation Valkyrie Yuuki is a webcomic by the artist Kittyhawk that began in 2002 and is a member of the Create a Comic Project. The series features a magical girl scenario and transgender issues. The series won a Web Cartoonists' Choice Awards in 2004 for "Best Superhero Comic" and was nominated again in 2006. The comic's plot largely parodies the tropes seen in magical girl series and follows male high school Kanazuchi Yuuki, who has been chosen by an animal mentor to be the next Valkyrie. Valkyries in the webcomic are superheroes with little connection to the mythological entities and are always female. Yuuki is transformed before the mentor notices that he is male, which is a source of consternation and humor through the series. Sparkling Generation Valkyrie Yuuki has been drawn by Kittyhawk, who had previously worked on the webcomic The Jar. The artist has stated that her influences include Tex Avery and CLAMP, as well as her childhood in Japan. Kittyhawk has worked on several different webcomic series, including The Dragon Doctors, Itari Party!, Quickies! and Model. Kittyhawk currently works as a graphic designer and lives in the Southern United States with her
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Brenda Starr

    Brenda Starr

    Brenda Starr, Reporter (often referred to simply as Brenda Starr) is a comic strip about a glamorous, adventurous female reporter. It was created in 1940 by Dale Messick for the Chicago Tribune Syndicate. Although set in Chicago, Brenda Starr, Reporter initially was the only Chicago Tribune Syndicate strip not to appear in the Chicago Tribune itself. When the strip debuted June 30, 1940, it was relegated to a comic book supplement that was included with the Sunday Chicago Tribune. Soon the strip appeared in the Sunday paper and a daily strip was added in 1945. During the 1950s, at the height of its popularity, the strip appeared in 250 newspapers. In 2010, the strip appeared in 65 newspapers with 36 being international papers. Following Messick's retirement as Brenda Starr's artist in 1980, the strip was continued by different female writer and illustrator teams. From 1980 through 1982, Messick continued scripting, and the strip was illustrated by Ramona Fradon. In 1982, Linda Sutter took over writing. Mary Schmich began scripting the strip in 1985, with Fradon continuing as the illustrator until her 1995 retirement. From 1995 onward, June Brigman illustrated Schmich's scripts. The
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    Girly

    Girly

    Girly is a webcomic created by Josh Lesnick which generally centers around the romantic relationship between two girls named Otra and Winter, as well as other citizens of the city of Cute-Town. It ran from April 2003 and finished on September 16, 2010. On October 15, 2005 Girly became a part of the Dayfree Press collective, and on June 28, 2006 the first Girly print collection was published via Radio Comix. The webcomic serves as a sequel to Lesnick's previous work, Cutewendy. It tells the tale of Otra, a fashion designer who feels something missing in her life until she meets Winter, the daughter of Wendy and Other Girl from Cutewendy, who declares Otra her sidekick. After a few adventures, Otra becomes attracted to Winter and the two become a couple going on adventures together. Girly launched in April 2003, originally intended as a sequel/retelling of one of Lesnick's previous works called CuteWendy, and originally was not intended to run for more than 50 strips. However, Lesnick became enamored with the characters, with the comic reaching 764 chapters by its end. Lesnick originally hosted Girly on KeenSpot. In November 2004, he moved Girly over to his own server, where it has
    5.75
    4 votes
    132

    Adam@home

    Adam@Home (previously titled Adam) is a syndicated comic strip created by Brian Basset and currently drawn by Rob Harrell. Started in 1984, it follows the life of Adam Newman, a stay-at-home dad, as he juggles his family and career. Originally focusing on office-place humor, the comic's tone shifted when Adam became a stay-at-home consultant. Basset drew the daily strip from its inception until February 21, 2009, when he decided to focus on his other daily strip, Red and Rover. Since February 23, 2009 Harrell, formerly of Big Top, has drawn Adam@Home. Strips drawn by Basset continued to appear on Sundays until March 15, 2009, with Harrell's first Sunday strip appearing the following week. Basset is still credited as the artist in many papers and in the Sunday strip's title box. On July 1, 2011, it was reported that former National Hockey League referee and Hockey Hall of Famer Andy Van Hellemond served the creators of Adam@home with a notice of intention to sue for libel over a comic which used the word "evil" in referring to Van Hellemond as "the worst and most evil ref ever." Newspapers carrying the strip on May 28, 2011 were also served, such as the Toronto Star and The Boston
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Animal Crackers

    Animal Crackers is the title used for several comic strips over decades. The third began in 1967 and continues though today. Rog Bollen drew the strip through 1994, and then Fred Wagner took over. It features a group of animals who live in a fictional jungle called Freeborn. This strip was adapted into a cartoon television series in 1997. Passive, insecure, and a momma's boy, Lyle Lion is not what one might call "King of the Jungle". He's more intent on talking philosophy and ordering a pizza (preferably vegetarian) than be the dominant predator. His number one goal in life is to date Lana, being very persistent about it despite the multiple failed attempts; outside of that, his other goal is to be an astronomer. From the show, it is believed that he is left-handed. He is the last remaining dodo alive, and is Lyle's best friend. Rash, impatient, and slightly self-centred, he is extremely hot-headed and refuses to believe that he lacks the ability to fly. This leads to multiple failed attempts to take flight, sometimes using some very innovative yet unusual techniques. Despite his size and nature, this pachyderm is really an "overgrown baby" who craves attention. He is rather
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Close to Home

    Close to Home is a daily, one-panel comic strip by American cartoonist John McPherson that debuted in 1992. The comic strip features no ongoing plot, but is instead a collection of one-shot jokes covering a number of subjects that are "close to home," such as marriage, children, school, work, sports, health and home life. It runs in nearly 700 newspapers worldwide. Born and raised in Painted Post, New York, John McPherson began drawing cartoons at age five on the dining room wall. After graduating from Bucknell University in 1983 with a B.S. in mechanical engineering, he worked for seven years as a design engineer. It was during this period that he again took up cartooning, discovering that his drawings looked much the same as they had 20 years earlier. Nonetheless, McPherson was able to moonlight his way to a thriving free-lance cartooning career, working as a regular contributor to The Saturday Evening Post, Campus Life, Yankee, Christianity Today and 30 other national publications. In 1990 he decided to leave his engineering job and pursue full-time freelance cartooning. After freelancing for two years and publishing five collections of his cartoons with Zondervan Publishing
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Lazy Bones

    Lazy Bones was originally a comic strip in the British comic Whizzer and Chips. It made its first appearance in 1978. The strip was about a boy called Benny Bones, who would constantly fall asleep everywhere, much to the annoyance of his parents. Until 1986 the strip was drawn by Colin Whittock, and moved to Buster in 1990 after Whizzer and Chips ended. Here it stayed, surviving on reprints, until the final issue. Artist Jack Edward Oliver included Benny in the last page of that issue, revealing how all the characters in the comic came to an end. It featured Benny explaining to a Doctor that he's suffering from insomnia.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Miss Peach

    Miss Peach was a syndicated comic strip created by American cartoonist Mell Lazarus. It ran for 45 years, from February 4, 1957 to September 8, 2002. The strip came into being because of a United Features Syndicate talent search contest for new comic strips. Lazarus recalled, “I scanned the papers, and there was nothing about schools, so I invented Miss Peach.” Although he did not win the United Features contest, Miss Peach was launched in the New York Herald Tribune and eventually was published internationally in 300 newspapers. The daily strips often contained only a single panel. The format was "gag-a-day". The drawing was stylized: the children had tiny bodies and large heads with flounder faces (both eyes on the same side of the nose). The November 29, 1963 episode was pulled from syndication because one of the characters fantasized about saving the President of the United States' life—one week after John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Cartoonists prepare their strips many weeks before publication. From 1982, several television movies were based on the strip: Miss Peach of the Kelly School featured a live actor as Miss Peach and puppets as the children (some voiced by Martin
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    The Yellow Kid

    The Yellow Kid

    The Yellow Kid was the name of a lead comic strip character that ran from 1895 to 1898 in Joseph Pulitzer's New York World, and later William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. Created and drawn by Richard F. Outcault in the comic strip Hogan's Alley (and later under other names as well), it was one of the first Sunday supplement comic strips in an American newspaper, although its graphical layout had already been thoroughly established in political and other, purely-for-entertainment cartoons. The Yellow Kid is also famous for its connection to the coining of the term Yellow Journalism. Mickey Dugan, better known as The Yellow Kid, was a bald, snaggle-toothed boy who wore an oversized yellow nightshirt and hung around in a slum alley typical of certain areas of squalor that existed in turn of the 19th to 20th century New York City. Hogan's Alley was filled with equally odd characters, mostly other children. With a goofy grin, the Kid habitually spoke in a ragged, peculiar slang, which was printed on his shirt, a device meant to lampoon advertising billboards. The character who would later become the Yellow Kid, first appeared on the scene in a minor supporting role in cartoon
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Urban paranoia

    Urban paranoia

    One of Borin Van Loon's earliest engagements with the community/radical press which burgeoned in the early 1970s was with the Wandsworth/Balham/Tooting community magazine 'Lower Down'. Bof, his post-sixties character wanders through these tiny one-liner strips, more-or-less as they appeared in the pages of the magazine with an additional strip drawn when Borin and partner escaped the IRA bombs of London to the Suffolk countryside ('Rural Paranoia', naturally). Weighing in at a mighty 36 pages and only 7.5 by 21 cm in size, this tiny book proved very popular.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Wigu

    Wigu

    Wigu is a webcomic created by Jeffrey Rowland. It was publicly launched on January 7, 2002. Wigu is the successor to Rowland's earlier web comic When I Grow Up and derives its name from the earlier strip's initials. Wigu has been nominated for the 2004 Web Cartoonists' Choice Awards categories Outstanding Short Form Comic and Outstanding Story Concept. There have been some guest appearances from When I Grow Up, but Wigu is otherwise a different comic with a new set of characters. Wigu was originally intended to end on December 31, 2004, but resumed on April 18, 2005. The webcomic ended again on December 31, 2005 so that Rowland could continue the title as a series of printed books. It was intended that there be a new book every month, but due to various delays, only three have been published, and Wigu returned to its original online format on November 22, 2006. Rowland started the precursor to Wigu, When I Grow Up, June 14, 1999. The strip's setting was the fictional town of Shallow Brook, Oklahoma. The story focused on four friends living in an apartment building in Shallow Brook; Zoe, Gina, Roger, and Neal. Other characters often recurring in the story include Helmut and Donkey.
    7.50
    2 votes
    140

    Pearls Before Swine

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Angry Bob
    thumbnail Pearls Before Swine is an American comic strip written and illustrated by Stephan Pastis, who was formerly a lawyer in San Francisco, California. It chronicles the daily lives of four anthropomorphic animals, Pig, Rat, Zebra, and Goat, as well as a number of supporting characters. Although created in 1997, it was not published until 2000, when United Feature Syndicate ran it on its website. Its popularity rose after Dilbert creator Scott Adams, a fan of the strip, showed it to his own fans. United Feature launched the strip in newspapers beginning December 31, 2001, in The Washington Post. On January 7, 2002, it began running in approximately 150 papers. As of September 2011, the strip was appearing in 650 newspapers worldwide. The strip has become somewhat controversial due to its use of adult humor, mock profanity, violence, drinking and drug references and references to Middle-Eastern terrorism. Prior to creating Pearls Before Swine, Pastis worked as a lawyer in California. In law school, he became so bored during classes, he started to doodle a rat, eventually casting it in a non-syndicated comic strip he called Rat. The title character of Rat would later become one
    5.50
    4 votes
    141
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    Sir Bagby

    Sir Bagby was a daily strip created by brothers Rick Hackney and Bill Hackney, who signed the strip R&B Hackney. It ran in a small number of United States newspapers from March 1959 until 1966. The setting was a medieval world filled with anachronisms and puns. In that, it resembled Jack Kent's King Aroo. The main characters are Sir Bagby, a knight, King Filbert I, II ("King Filbert I was my father. He built the business up so I decided to keep the name."), a wizard named Snerk, a jester named Solly, a playwright named Faro, and his assistant Billingsgate. The only reprints of the strip have been in Comics Revue. Strickler, Dave. Syndicated Comic Strips and Artists, 1924-1995: The Complete Index. Cambria, CA: Comics Access, 1995. ISBN 0-9700077-0-1.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143

    Bloom County

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: Milquetoast the Cockroach
    Bloom County is an American comic strip by Berkeley Breathed which ran from December 8, 1980, until August 6, 1989. It examined events in politics and culture through the viewpoint of a fanciful small town in Middle America, where children often have adult personalities and vocabularies and where animals can talk. It originated from a comic strip known as The Academia Waltz, which Breathed produced for the student newspaper, The Daily Texan, while attending the University of Texas. Breathed set Bloom County in a small town, despite the fact that, during the time, small towns in the United States became increasingly marginalized due to cultural, economic, and political forces. Breathed said he made the choice because he had followed a girlfriend to Iowa City, Iowa; Breathed commented "You draw—literally—from your life if you’re going to write anything with some juice to it. I did just that." Breathed's hand-printed signature on his strips is usually presented in mirror image, i.e. right to left. Berke Breathed was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in editorial cartooning in 1987 for Bloom County. At the very beginning of the strip (December 1980), the central setting was the Bloom boarding
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Copper

    Copper

    Copper is a comic strip by Kazu Kibuishi that has enjoyed both webcomic and print appearances. The web comic began in April 2002 in a much larger than usual square format. Except for the first strip, the comic is in color. The large format may account in part for the slow schedule - updates occur monthly at best. The comic went on a brief hiatus at the end of 2004 but resumed in March 2005. Each page tells a self-contained story, but there are a few recurring characters. Copper was named one of the best webcomics of 2004 by The Webcomics Examiner. In May 2005 all of the 25 web strips that had been published to date were published as a series of 13" square archival prints by Nucleus, together with some other prints of Kibuishi's artwork. In July 2006, Kibuishi put the comic on hiatus again due to work on his graphic novel, Amulet, among other projects, and it returned in September 2007. The last comic was posted in mid-2009 and it is assumed that Copper is now again in hiatus. The comic theme anthology Flight Volume One, edited by Kibuishi (ISBN 978-1-58240-381-6, 2004) contains two short Copper stories: the 18-page "Maiden Voyage", and the 4-page "Picnic". Both of these stories
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Darwin for Beginners

    Darwin for Beginners

    "The first "big one" after I had won my spurs with Capitalism for Beginners in 1981. Working with Jonathan Miller, thespian, director, writer, biologist and all-round good egg, proved difficult at times, only because he was always taken up with "lighting Rigoletto" at the Royal Opera House or making a television series on the human body. Apart from the book on Buddha - someone who left little trace of his actual life - this is the only "biographical" book in this series on which I have worked. Darwin proves to be an oddly likeable but contradictory character. As a young man he was a wastrel: hobnobbing with the gentry, shooting, gambling and drinking his time away. Later, plagued by anxiety, nausea and headaches, he became a virtual recluse while developing his revolutionary theory of Evolution. He even delayed the publication of his monumental work The Origin of Species for some years in the fear of its repercussions on conservative Victorian siciety. He was proved right in the reactions when it did finally see the light of day. In many ways Darwin stands shoulder to shoulder with those other revolutionary thinkers of the era: Marx and Freud. A large format hardback of the book with colour plates was also published in the original series. This title is a bit of a classic, even though I say so myself." -Borin Van Loon
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Great Pop Things

    Great Pop Things was a comic strip by Colin B. Morton and Chuck Death (the latter a pseudonym for the musician and painter Jon Langford of The Mekons). It first appeared in Record Mirror in 1987, transferred to the New Musical Express in 1991, and was also published in LA Weekly, Chicago's New City and very briefly The Onion. The strip was a satirical faux-history of rock and pop music. It lampooned many fashionable groups and singers of the time, as well as presenting the "stories" of established stars. Morton and Langford had a particular liking for rock stars of the 1970s, and presented multi-part histories of such luminaries as Led Zeppelin, The Sex Pistols, Bruce Springsteen, Frank Zappa and the Rolling Stones. One of their most featured characters was David Bowie, invariably referred to as "Dave" and depicted (even as a child) with a lightning bolt design on his forehead, similar to the make-up he wore on the cover of his Aladdin Sane LP. Unlike the real-life Bowie, "Dave" was shown to be particularly proud of his early single "The Laughing Gnome", which was described as "a mod anthem" and referred to at every opportunity. The history presented by the strip was hugely
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Los Kitos

    Los Kitos is a comic strip. It is the brain-child of Martha Montoya, who began drawing in her native country, Colombia. Los Kitos is derived from the Spanish term “muñequitos" meaning little dolls or cartoons. Los Kitos were published for the first time in La Opinion and now is in over 300 newspapers around the world. You can see them locally through their website and in Newspapers In Education, also with La Opinion. Martha and her characters are on the 1020AM Univision airwaves every day at 6AM giving "consejos" and fun topics about and for kids. Martha derived the name "Los Kitos" from the word "Los Muñequitos," meaning "little dolls," the ending "ito" in Spanish meaning "little, cute or dear." It is this endearing quality that has made Los Kitos a popular favorite among children and parents alike. When she was a teacher she used her characters to teach chemistry; one of the hardest subjects to maintain the attention of students. She made the class fun and entertaining while teaching. The concept of Edu-Entertaining was born. Drawn to America as a land of vast opportunity, Martha left her home at age twenty-five determined to turn her dream into a reality and held positions in
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Opus

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: Opus the Penguin
    Opus was a Sunday strip drawn by Berkeley Breathed for a period of five years, 2003 to 2008. It was Breathed's fourth comic strip, following The Academia Waltz, Bloom County and Outland. Set in Bloom County, the strip documented the adventures of Breathed's popular character Opus the Penguin, parodying both pop culture and politics along the way. It was launched with much fanfare on November 23, 2003, and was syndicated by Washington Post Writers Group. In early October 2008 the author declared he was terminating the strip because of his expectation that the United States is going to face tough times and his desire to depart from his most famous character "on a lighter note". Opus is the title character and protagonist of the strip. Though he returned to Antarctica at the end of Outland, Opus traveled back home to Bloom County, only to find that time has changed everything and everyone he once held dear. His employment usually depended on the week's joke - since Opus began, he has so far been a political operative, a garbageman, and a newspaper ombudsman - but he was most often depicted as a syndicated cartoonist. While his mother was no longer "long-lost," she was not all he had
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Prickly City

    • Genre: Politics
    Prickly City is a daily comic strip drawn by Scott Stantis, the editorial cartoonist for the Chicago Tribune, and distributed through United Features Syndicate. The cartoon follows the adventures of Carmen, a young Hispanic girl in pigtails, and a coyote pup named Winslow. The strip is frequently politically oriented with a conservative leaning. Carmen - a 'feisty' conservative and a Republican. For a brief time, she had a crush on Tucker Carlson. Carmen made her first appearance at least 4 months before the strip began, in one of Stantis's editorial cartoons. Winslow - named for the town of Winslow, Arizona, is a coyote with political aspirations who acts patronizing, condescending and impulsive. His liberal responses are typically the source of the strip's humor. Carmen is continuously frustrated by Winslow's assumption that she should be a liberal feminist. Early in the strip's run, Winslow had a crush on Condoleezza Rice, even writing a poem about her (which Carmen initially misunderstood as being a poem about herself). The Chicago Tribune refused to run the February 7, 2005 strip, which inaccurately quoted Ted Kennedy. According to Stantis, the syndicate erroneously added
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    Shirley and Son

    Shirley and Son was an American comic strip drawn by Jerry Bittle. The strip dealt with the life of eight-year-old Louis, whose parents, Shirley and Roger, are divorced. Louis hopes Shirley and Roger will remarry but they are each getting along with their own lives.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    The Wizard of Id

    The Wizard of Id is a daily newspaper comic strip created by American cartoonists Brant Parker and Johnny Hart. Beginning in 1964, the strip follows the antics of a large cast of characters in a shabby medieval kingdom called "Id". From time to time, the king refers to his subjects as "Idiots". (The title is a play on The Wizard of Oz, combined with the Freudian psychological term Id, which represents the instinctive and primal part of the human psyche.) In 1997 Brant Parker passed his duties on to his son, Jeff Parker, who had already been involved with creating Id for a decade. As of late 2002, the strip appears in some 1,000 newspapers all over the world, syndicated by Creators Syndicate. In the early 1960s, Johnny Hart, having already created the successful B.C., began collaborating with his friend, then-unpublished cartoonist Brant Parker, on a new comic strip. (Parker would go on to create or co-create the strips Goosemyer, Crock and Out of Bounds.) Having already drawn cartoons about the Stone Age, Hart advanced through time to the Middle Ages, taking an idea from a deck of playing cards. The Wizard of Id was first syndicated on November 9, 1964, drawn by Parker and
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    Thrud the Barbarian

    Thrud the Barbarian is a comics character created by Carl Critchlow in 1981. Although Thrud himself is a parody of Conan the Barbarian, particularly as depicted in the Arnold Schwarzenegger films, inspiration for the character's adventures and adversaries has been drawn from several fantasy sources. During the 1980s, a Thrud comic strip was a regular and popular feature in the roleplay and wargame magazine White Dwarf with Thrud's grotesque and comic antics forming a memorable part of the magazine's golden age. In 2002, continued interest in the character from role-playing enthusiasts and a desire to be free to experiment with a new artistic style prompted Critchlow to self-publish a series of award-winning full-length Thrud the Barbarian comics. Since October 2002, Critchlow has continued to develop his new artistic style in several different 2000 AD stories, contributing to the success of Lobster Random in particular. While Critchlow's use of muted palettes has been criticised, his style has received praise for being highly recognisable and unique. The character of Thrud was created by the then 18-year-old Critchlow in 1981 while he was at foundation art college. His graphic
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Capitalism for beginners

    Capitalism for beginners

    "This is another of the excellent documentary "comic books" published by Pantheon Books. However, just because it is a "comic book" and uses well-selected illustrations to drive home its point (often with considerable good-natured humor), do not think that it isn't also an insightful and well-researched guide into the workings of the capitalist system. This book isn't a piece of "free market" propoganda. The author consistantly points out the shortcomings, absurdities, and out right injustice of the system. In fact, his examination of why so many Americans continue to support the capitalist system, when it is clearly contrary to the best interests of 9 out of 10 of us, is among the best I've seen. After reading this book you will know the basic textbook concepts of economics. You will know mercantilism from moneterism, and microeconomics from macroeconomics. You will be familiar with the theories of Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, F.A. Hayek, and Milton Freidman. You will understand the law of the falling rate of profit, and how paying lower wages can only temporarily offset this. You will know what a multinational corporation is and how they operate. Indeed, the author's warning about "corporatism" (in 1981) is down right prophetic. Some people might be tempted to write this book off as dated or obsolete because it was first published in 1981. On the contrary, because of the good old "business cycle" conditions are once again very simular to those of the early eighties.... The author is no wild-eyed radical. He was a Distinguished Professor of Economics at the City University of New York." [5 star review] (http://www.fetchbook.info)
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    FoxTrot

    • Genre: Family
    • Characters: Jason Fox
    FoxTrot is an American comic strip written and illustrated by Bill Amend. As of December 2006, FoxTrot was carried by more than 1,200 newspapers worldwide. From its inception in 1988 it was published daily until December 31, 2006, when Amend switched to a Sunday-only format. The strip revolves around the daily lives of the Fox family, composed of parents Andrea (Andy, 42) and Roger Fox (45), and their children, Peter (16), Paige (14), and Jason (10). It covers a wide range of subject matter, including spoofs of pop culture fads, nerd culture, and popular consumer products. Amend states that after he submitted strips for three years, in 1987 Universal Press Syndicate offered him a contract. FoxTrot was first published on April 10, 1988, under the syndication of Universal Press Syndicate. On December 5, 2006, Universal Press Syndicate issued a press release stating that Amend's strip, FoxTrot, would turn into a Sunday-only strip. Amend stated that he wants to continue doing the strip, but at a less hurried pace. This news was followed by several weeks of the characters discussing a "cartoonist" semi-retiring to Sundays only, and what methods he would use to phase out the daily
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Little Jimmy

    • Genre: Humour
    Little Jimmy, originally titled Jimmy, was a newspaper comic strip created by Jimmy Swinnerton. With a publication history from February 14, 1904 to 1958, it was one of the first continuing features and one of the longest running. The title character was a little boy who was constantly forgetting what he was supposed to do and ended up getting into trouble. Don Markstein described the strip's characters: Swinnerton drew his strip in a clear, open style, unlike most cartoonists of his time. In this, he anticipated dominant styles of the 20th century, less crowded and more easily read – quite appropriate for newsprint production, where the printing isn't always as clear as it should be. The strip first appeared sporadically in The New York Journal. It soon became a regular in the Sunday comics section and was picked up as a feature in other newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst. When King Features Syndicate was created in 1915, Little Jimmy went into nationwide syndication. In 1920, a daily strip was added and ran until the late 1930s. The Sunday strip continued until Swinnerton retired in 1958. Little Jimmy appeared in silent film animation and later in the 1936 Betty Boop
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Non Sequitur

    • Genre: Comedy
    Non Sequitur is a comic strip created by Wiley Miller (usually credited as just Wiley) in 1992 and syndicated by Universal Press Syndicate to over 700 newspapers. The strip can be found online at gocomics.com, and it is also available via email and on mobile phones. Translated from Latin as "it does not follow", Non Sequitur is often political and satirical, though other times, purely comedic. The strip has undergone many changes through its history. Originally, the comic was a single panel gag cartoon, similar to Gary Larson's The Far Side. It grew more political (from a moderately liberal perspective) in tone during the 1990s, to the point where it often became a borderline editorial cartoon. Today, the comic has become more traditional, with a multi-panel format and recurring characters. The horizontal daily strip sometimes displays only a single panel. Non Sequitur has been honored with four National Cartoonists Society Awards, including the Newspaper Panel Cartoon Award for 1995, 1996 and 1998, and the Newspaper Panels Award for 2002. It is the only comic strip to win in its first year of syndication and the only title to ever win both the best comic strip and best comic panel
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    The Kin-der-Kids

    The Kin-der-Kids

    The Kin-der-Kids and Wee Willie Winkie's World were early newspaper comics by painter Lyonel Feininger and published by the Chicago Sunday Tribune in 1906-07. Similar in form to Little Nemo and the later Sunday editions of Krazy Kat, most of Feininger's comics occupied a full-page and were rendered in color. The Kin-der-Kids began running in Tribune papers from on April 29, 1906. Feininger's second feature, Wee Willie Winkie's World, ran concurrently with The Kin-der-Kids from August 19, 1906 until The Kin-der-Kids's cancellation on November 18, 1906. Wee Willie Winkie's World ended three months later, on February 17, 1907. The series' short lives have been attributed to several causes, including a Feininger being unable to produce two strips of finely detailed artwork on a weekly schedule, and personal conflict between Feininger and his publishers. Much like The New York Herald's Little Nemo, Tribune publishers envisioned The Kin-der-kids as a highbrow alternative to the comical, and at times violent, antics of Happy Hooligan and The Katzenjammer Kids, strips published in Hearst and Pulitzer-owned papers. The Kin-der-Kids followed an ongoing story about the three Kin-der brothers
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Eastern Philosophy for Beginners

    Eastern Philosophy for Beginners

    Eastern philosophy is the most ancient form of thought known to man, predating Western philosophy by some centuries. Dissatisfaction with materialism is turning Westerners towards the integrated approach of Eastern thought, but often in a vague and generalized form. Introducing Eastern Philosophy is a documentary comic book which focuses on India and China, the two oldest and most influential origins of Eastern thought. It elucidates the complex schools of Hindu philosophy, the offshoots of Indian Buddhism, the traditions of Confucius and the Tao in China and demonstrates their fundamental differences from Western notions of truth. It makes clear the Eastern view of ultimate reality, the emphasis on selfless ethics and the quest for Enlightenment and shows how these ideas are set in a cosmic whole in contrast to the Western individual and scientific perspective.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Oojah

    Oojah

    Oojah was an Elephant comic strip character as featured in the Daily Sketch Newspaper and various children's books. The first Oojah comic strip was issued on 18 February 1919. By the early 1920s the newspaper was issuing a 4-page 'The Oojah Paper' supplement starting Saturday, 8 October 1921. It later became The Oojah Sketch that ran until 23 November 1929, the 4 page section reduced to 3 pages from 29 April 1922 and 2 pages from 22 July 1922. Other characters were Snooker, a small black Kitten cat who always wears bedsocks and lives with the Great Oojah and Don, a little boy who is the Little Oojah and the Jum-Jarum. Later additional characters included Jerrywangle (aka Jerry), who was the Oojah's elephant nephew who was always up to mischief with his tricks, as well as Lord Lion and his family. The character name for the large elephant that came to be known simply as 'Oojah' is quoted as initially being 'Flip-Flap the Great Oojah'. The 'Oojah House' book gives this description: 'FLIP-FLAP is a magic elephant who lives in a strange animal-country called Oojahland. He is the Great Oojah'. Later annuals and comic strips name him 'Uncle Oojah'. There are some phrases that are
    6.00
    3 votes
    161

    Rudy Park

    Rudy Park is a syndicated comic strip created by Darrin Bell and Theron Heir that is distributed by United Media. The strip started in early 2001, when its principal character was laid off from his job at a dot-com company but eventually found a new job as a barista in a coffee shop/internet cafe, the House of Java Cybercafe. Because of its early allusion to the dot-com bust, the strip occasionally takes on current events but in a more lightweight manner compared to Bell's other creation, Candorville. The strip usually focuses on Rudy and his nemesis Sadie Cohen, a frequent customer and octogenarian who disdains Rudy's love for new technology. Other characters include: Armstrong Maynard, Rudy's cheapskate boss; Randy "The Rock" Taylor, a neurotic ex-athlete that frequently hangs out around the bar; and Rudy's Uncle Mort, an aging social liberal prone to protesting in the bar with his trusty bullhorn. In January 2007, the strip's creators had Mort die of a heart attack, just weeks after his wedding to Mrs. Cohen. He died during a heated argument with Donald Rumsfeld, who had begun visiting the cafe after his ouster as Defense Secretary. For reasons yet to be revealed, Mort came back
    6.00
    3 votes
    162

    The Snorks

    Snorks is an animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera which ran on NBC from September 15, 1984 to May 13, 1989. Although not as popular as the animated series The Smurfs, the program continued to be available in syndication from 1986 to 1989, on the BBC in the late 1990s, and from 2009–2011 on Boomerang. Freddy Monnickendam of Belgian character licensing firm SEPP originally developed the "Snorks" concept in 1982. Belgian comics artist Nicolas Broca created the original character designs, which were originally created for characters called "Diskies" he wished to include in the Spirou et Fantasio Franco-Belgian comic he was drawing at the time. A page and a few images were realized, and were published in the limited edition album Les Mémoires de Spirou in 1989. The show was relatively successful and has a considerable fan following. In May 2011, the series was added to Hulu as a part of their Hulu Plus instant streaming for paying subscribers. The Snorks are a race of small, colorful beings that live happily in the (saltwater) underwater world of Snorkland. They have snorkels on their heads, which are used to propel them swiftly through the water. As evidenced by the
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Piled Higher and Deeper

    Piled Higher and Deeper

    Piled Higher and Deeper - Life (or the lack thereof) in Academia (also known as PhD Comics), is a newspaper and web comic strip written and drawn by Jorge Cham that follows the lives of several grad students. First published in the fall of 1997 when Cham was a grad student himself at Stanford University, the strip deals with issues of life in graduate school, including the difficulties of scientific research, the perils of procrastination, the complex student–supervisor relationship and the endless search for free food. Cham continued the strip as an Instructor in mechanical engineering at Caltech, and now draws and gives talks about the strip full-time. Originally, the strip was drawn in crude black-and-white, eventually became grayscale, and finally became color in June 2004. Piled Higher and Deeper introduced its main characters early in its run, and their personalities have remained fairly constant during the strip's several years of publication. In the strip's first few seasons, the characters were clearly Stanford University students, though the number of school-specific references and jokes has decreased since. The title of the comic comes from an old joke about becoming a
    5.67
    3 votes
    164

    Gardhab Das

    Gardhab Das created by cartoonist brothers Neelabh Banerjee and Jayanto Banerjee was a comic section run in the Indian youth magazine Target. The main character Gardhab Das had a donkey face and was always depicted wearing a kurta and pajamas. His main trait was his singing or lack of it. He was a perpetually unemployed music teacher. Famously known for disturbing the peace with his vocals and his harmonium, he was always at loggerheads with his landlord, being a penniless 'singer'. In various strips, he gets jobs as a siren for the fire department, as a weapon during a war, and he also manages to fight and get the better of people like Tike Myson, a play on Mike Tyson and Bruce Lee. He also trains the double of Mykill Packson (Michael Jackson) on his tour to India. His only weapon: his vocals and his harmonium. The name Gardhab itself means 'donkey' in Sanskrit and Das is a common Indian surname. The strips were simplistic, and their appeal lay in the funky illustrations. This along with Detective Moochwala made Target a highly anticipated magazine for children all over India during the mid 80's through till the early 90's.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Vampire Knight

    Vampire Knight

    Vampire Knight (ヴァンパイア騎士, Vanpaia Naito) is a shōjo manga and anime series written by Matsuri Hino. The series premiered in the January 2005 issue of LaLa magazine and is still on-going. Chapters are collected and published in collected volumes by Hakusensha, with fifteen volumes currently released in Japan. The manga series is licensed in English by Viz Media, who has released fourteen volumes so far. The English adaptation premiered in the July 2006 issue of Viz's Shojo Beat magazine, with the collected volumes being published on a quarterly basis. Two drama CDs were created for the series, as well as a twenty-six episode anime adaptation. Produced by Studio Deen, the anime series' first season aired in Japan on TV Tokyo between April 8, 2008 and July 1, 2008. The second season, aired on the same station from October 7, 2008 and December 30, 2008. The anime uses many of the same voice actors as were used for the drama CDs. The anime adaptations were licensed for release in North America by Viz Media, the DVD released on July 20, 2010. Yuki's earliest memory is of a stormy night in winter, where she was attacked by a vampire... And then rescued by another. Now 10 years later, Yuki
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Viivi & Wagner

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Viivi
    Viivi & Wagner is a somewhat absurdist Finnish newspaper comic strip drawn by Jussi "Juba" Tuomola. The titular main characters are Viivi, a Finnish woman in her twenties, and Wagner, a mature male pig. Wagner is fully anthropomorphic and sentient, yet still considers himself a pig instead of a human. Though often mistaken for married, the two are cohabitating in an Odd Couple-ish relationship and genuinely fond of each other when not bickering. The comic originally appeared in Kultapossu, a promotional children's magazine by a Finnish bank. In the original version of the comic, Viivi was a small girl and Wagner was her animate piggy bank. When the Kultapossu magazine was discontinued, Tuomola adapted the characters to fit a newspaper comic strip style, also changing the characters to adults in the process. Viivi & Wagner is extremely popular in Finland, above all because of its quirky humour. Most of the strips concern either arguments between Viivi and Wagner ("You ate the wrapper, too?!" "I always eat the wrapper."), or Wagner getting into totally absurd situations, either in everyday life or in a fantasy world ("I'm stuck in the moment before the Big Bang"). Some strips break
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Seven-O-Heaven

    Seven-O-Heaven

    Seven-O-Heaven is a weekly comic strip created and written by Andrew Goff that appears in an alternative weekly newspaper in the United States. The comic is notable for being a rare example of a weekly strip published in a newspaper to exclusively use photographs as opposed to drawings. Seven-O-Heaven debuted in the North Coast Journal on May 6, 2009 concentrating mainly on local issues and locations. The strip stars its creator Andrew Goff and Will Startare. Andrew Goff later went on to write the hit "Friday" for Rebecca Black. Will Startare played in Humboldt County bands lithic, Double Threat, Eustace, Major Major and Two Words. In a 2012 comic while running for congress, Will is startled to discover that he has been "Santorum'd" and that his name has been defined on the internet as being "A Northwestern, forward-thinking, post-modern liberal who cares greatly for social and environmental justice yet is oddly clean-shaven."
    4.75
    4 votes
    168
    DNA- a graphic guide to the molecule that shook the world

    DNA- a graphic guide to the molecule that shook the world

    When it was originally published, DNA for Beginners was one of the most popular titles in The Beginners Series- a well-reviewed collection of documentary comic books for lay readers. Borrowing from the genre of bon image in France, these books struck a popular nerve by virtue of their ability to explain complicated ideas accurately,briefly, and in a quirky compelling manner. Now, Israel Rosenfeld and Ed Ziff, both leading researchers and writers in the field of neuroscience and psychology, have written a completely new edition of DNA for Beginners, which ambitiously addresses all the larger social, political, economic and philosophical issues surrounding DNA today. Once again Borin Van Loon brings his unique artistic talents to the subject. He uses, for instance, machine analogies to convey the central molecular processes of replication, transcription, translation and genetic regulation. The authors trace the progress in understanding the structure, control and replication of DNA and its cellular influences. They will address the genome project and its implications for health and understanding organic evolution, recent advances in understanding the control of biological development and species diversity, and stem cell research and its ethical dilemmas. Columbia University Press (250 pp.) Autumn 2010
    5.33
    3 votes
    169

    Get Your War On

    Get Your War On is a series of satirical comic strips by David Rees about political topics — originally the effects of the September 11 attacks on New York City but quickly switching focus to more recent ones, in particular the "War on Terrorism". The series achieved a cult following on the Internet, and in particular on discussion forums and blogs, very soon after debuting on October 9, 2001. From a technical standpoint the strips are very crude, being assembled from about a dozen simple clip art pictures of office workers (with a few exceptions, most notably Voltron) that are repeated, often in the same strip. Almost all are in red on a white background. There is a heavy emphasis on dialogue and almost no action. Highly disillusioned and cynical, it is heavily laden with expletives. The majority of the clip art used in Get Your War On is taken from Office and Business Illustrations, designed by Tom Tierney and first published by Dover Publications in 1988. In 2009, American restaurant chain Jamba Juice was criticized for running an ad campaign which looked similar to the Get Your War On series as it used the same clip art. Get Your War On has been published in book form, with the
    5.33
    3 votes
    170

    Ballard Street

    Ballard Street is a comic panel created by Jerry Van Amerongen and distributed by Creators Syndicate that has run since 1991. The panel features numerous characters; some recurring faces are Dottie and Will Farrington, the neighborhood skipping aficionados, Millie, who earnestly lectures the naughty person inside herself, and Scooter, the dog who loves to take baths, but only with his scuba gear. In April 2004, Jerry’s Giclee Prints and some original pieces were presented during a one-man show at the Every Picture Tells A Story Gallery in Santa Monica, CA. In May 2006 Ballard Street was awarded the Best Newspaper Cartoon Panel Of The Year Award by the National Cartoonist Society. Ballard Street was awarded the same honor in 2004. From 1980 to 1990, Jerry Van Amerongen’s cartoon panel, The Neighborhood appeared in the comic pages of newspapers across the country. Van Amerongen discontinued The Neighborhood and began Ballard Street in 1991. It ran in strip form for nearly two years before returning to the single panel format.
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Ctrl+Alt+Del

    Ctrl+Alt+Del

    • Genre: Humour
    Ctrl+Alt+Del (abbreviated CAD) is a gaming-related webcomic and animated series written by Tim Buckley. The name of the comic refers to the Windows command Control-Alt-Delete. Premiering on October 23, 2002, the comic's focus has gradually shifted away from single strip gags towards longer story arcs and greater continuity through the use of video game references. Ctrl+Alt+Del currently is updated every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Ctrl+Alt+Del has provided Buckley with enough income to make a living, placing Ctrl+Alt+Del in a small group of web comics that receive full-time devotion from their artist. Beginning June 2008, a number of smaller, humour themed batch-released strips entitled "CAD Sillies" began running on the news feeds, although they were soon given their own section on the site. By May 2009, the commercially viable Ctrl+Alt+Del had received 38 million page views and was receiving 1.8 million monthly unique visitors. Along with Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, Penny Arcade and Cyanide and Happiness, Ctrl+Alt+Del has formed a reputation for being one of the longest running webcomics. The plot of Ctrl+Alt+Del revolves around Ethan, the protagonist and an over-the-top
    7.00
    1 votes
    172

    Lucky Cow

    • Genre: Satire
    Lucky Cow is a syndicated comic strip created by Mark Pett and distributed by Universal Press Syndicate. It focuses around the fictional fast food chain Lucky Cow and its workers. In the strip, the restaurant's advertisements advocate obesity and unhealthy eating habits. The strip began on April 21, 2003, and the last strip ran on February 2, 2008. The strip appeared in about 50 papers. Pett previously created the comic strip "Mr. Lowe," which was distributed through Creators Syndicate from 2000 to 2001. Characters from Pett's previous strip make occasional cameos in "Lucky Cow." A "Lucky Cow" strip earned a place in Guinness World Records as the World's Largest Comic Strip, after students at Gentry High School in Indianola, Mississippi assembled a strip that was 135 feet (41 m) wide and almost 48 feet (15 m) high. All of the main characters are employees of the same Lucky Cow fast food restaurant. In January 2008, Universal Press Syndicate confirmed reports that Pett had decided to end "Lucky Cow." According to the Daily Cartoonist, Pett had been thinking about the decision for a while, and he ultimately ended it when the timing felt just right and the strip seemed to have run its
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Soup To Nutz

    Soup to Nutz is a daily comic strip drawn by The Mullets artist Rick Stromoski. It centers around the Nutz family, namely the three children in the family. Roy Nutz: The patriarch of the Nutz family, your typical blue collar working slob. Enjoys watching TV and drinking beer. Has a relatively short fuse. Pat Nutz: Roy's wife, who seems to be the only normal one in the family. Roy Nutz, Jr., aka Royboy: The oldest of the three Nutz children. Is built "husky", is rather slow witted, and enjoys sports. Tortures his younger brother, Andrew, on a regular basis. Andrew Nutz: The youngest of the three Nutz children. Enjoys playing with dolls. Is bossed around on a regular basis by both of his older siblings. Is easily distracted. Could also be called gullible. Babs Nutz: The middle of the three Nutz children, and the only girl. Babs is the smartest of the three, apparently. She is able to manipulate both Royboy and Andrew to her advantage.
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Stealth

    Stealth

    Stealth is a webcomic created, written and drawn by William Satterwhite. Set in the fictional Terminus City, the series centers on Allen White, a young man who, as Stealth, fights crime and protects the innocent. Originally published on the Web, material can be purchased in print online. A shy, reserved, sensitive and thoughtful young man, Allen is a member of Cleburne High School's senior class. One night, while caught in a storm, he was struck by lightning. Instead of dying, he began to develop superhuman abilities. At first, he was unsure what to do with these newfound abilities. Then, tragedy struck when his older brother Eric, a rookie police officer, was gunned down by a drug dealer. Since then, Allen has sworn to use his abilities to battle the criminal element in Terminus City. When he dresses up as Stealth, he adopts an entirely different persona. Whereas Allen is smart, quiet, shy and sensitive, Stealth is sarcastic, arrogant, and quite brutal. Stealth can best be described, and has been, as Allen's dark side. Stealth has enhanced strength (capable of lifting one ton), superhuman speed and agility, X-ray vision and a low-level healing factor. He also possesses a
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    The Smurfs

    The Smurfs

    The Smurfs (French: Les Schtroumpfs) is a Belgian comic and television franchise centered on a group of small blue fictional creatures called Smurfs, created and first introduced as a series of comic strips by the Belgian cartoonist Peyo (pen name of Pierre Culliford) on October 23, 1958. In total, there are 101 'Smurfs', whose names are based on adjectives that emphasize their characteristics, e.g. 'Jokey Smurf', who likes to play practical jokes on his fellow smurfs, 'Clumsy Smurf', who has a habit of creating havoc unintentionally, and 'Smurfette' -- the only female member of the Smurfs. At the time he came up with the creative idea for the Smurfs, Peyo was the creator, artist, and writer of the Franco-Belgian comics series titled Johan et Pirlouit (translated to English as Johan and Peewit), set in Europe during the Middle Ages and including elements of sword-and-sorcery. Johan serves as a brave young page to the king, and Pirlouit (pronounced Peer-loo-ee) functions as his faithful, if boastful and cheating, midget sidekick. In 1958, Spirou magazine started to publish the Johan et Pirlouit story La Flûte à six trous ("The Flute with Six Holes"). The adventure involved them
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Torkan

    Torkan is a heroic fantasy comic strip written and illustrated by Roger Fletcher. It first appeared in the Sunday Telegraph in 1976. During the early 1970s, Fletcher began developing a comic strip about an Australian soldier-of-fortune, titled Nathan Cole - until he was introduced to the world of sword & sorcery by science-fiction writer Fritz Leiber that would have a profound impact on his future. In particular, the pair of characters called Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser influenced Fletcher greatly. Fletcher worked on a fantasy comic strip called Orn the Eagle Warrior in 1974, but the strip received no attention from publishers. Fletcher subsequently started drawing Torkan. Torkan continues to win new generations of readers; something which Flectcher believes is attributable to the character’s enduring appeal. Fletcher claims; "the paradigm for heroic adventure was first written in the Bible, as David and Goliath. Whether it’s in Arthurian legend or Harry Potter, the paradigm itself doesn’t change much - but fashions do change." Levels of violence in the stories have dropped since the strip’s early years.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Town Called Dobson

    Town Called Dobson

    • Genre: Politics
    Town Called Dobson is a liberal editorial cartoon in the form of a webcomic written and illustrated by Storm Bear. The week-daily cartoon deals with being a liberal in red America. The cultural clash between left vs. right politics is the main focus of the cartoon and reflects the creator's life growing up in Dobson, NC. It debuted on June 4, 2004. The first three strips were initially created as a one day art project and was abandoned until the controversy over the Mohammad cartoons erupted. In the original strips, one of the main characters was named Johnny Allah. It was not until then that the creator reconsidered the cartoon and decided to go back into production and settling into a week-daily publishing schedule. After a redraw of the characters, development of new characters, props and sets, Town Called Dobson restarted publication on March 21, 2006. Town Called Dobson has been featured in daily newspapers such as the Greensboro News and Record and Winston Salem Journal as well as newsweeklies including Yes! Weekly and Relish. The strip appears week-daily on large political blogs such as Daily Kos, My Left Wing, Bilerico Project, Blue NC, Diatribune and MyDD, and was also
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    Triple Take

    Triple Take was an innovative comic strip that featured three separate punch lines in each daily installment. The King Features Syndicate strip, which ran from April 4, 2005 to August 26, 2007, was produced by the team of Todd Clark and Scott Nickel. Clark provided the majority of the writing with Nickel drawing the strip and contributing gags. At its peak, Triple Take was syndicated to 40 newspapers. When it ended, the strip was appearing in 29 papers. The idea for Triple Take came from the late Jay Kennedy, comics editor at King Features, who developed the strip with Nickel and Clark. Kennedy died in a drowning accident in March 2007 at the age of 50. In 2005, Kennedy commented, "What separates Triple Take from other comic features is that it delivers three different punchlines in one strip. Ask any cartoonist who has labored all day on one punch line and they will tell you how difficult it is to create three ideas for one gag. It takes true talent. This is a business where your talent will get you far. You don’t need to 'know someone' or have 'a connection'. If you have the talent, you’re made. These men (Clark and Nickel) have the talent." Nickel noted:
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Xkcd

    Xkcd

    • Genre: Nerd
    xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe. The comic's tagline describes it as "a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language." It has received mention from The Guardian and The New York Times. The subject matter of the comic varies, including statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although it has a cast of stick figures, the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip No. 17 "What If" shows an Apollonian gasket), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during "Parody Week"). The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License. New comics are added three times a week, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; although, on seven occasions so far, they have been updated every weekday: Parody Week, the "Choices" series, the "1337" series, the "Secretary" series, the "The Race" series, the set of three "Five Minute Comics", and Guest Comic Week. As of July 3, 2012, there has been a branch off of xkcd called "xkcd What-Ifs", updated every
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Andy Capp

    Andy Capp

    Andy Capp is a British comic strip created by cartoonist Reg Smythe (1917–1998), seen in The Daily Mirror and The Sunday Mirror newspapers since 5 August 1957. Originally a single-panel cartoon, Smyth later expanded it to four panels. The strip is syndicated internationally by Creators Syndicate. The character is also licensed as the mascot for a line of snack foods (Andy Capp's fries) and a defunct chain of miniature golf courses in Brevard County, Florida. Minor characters include various constables, barmaids, barmen, referees, footballers, pub locals and door-to-door salesmen. Andy is a working class figure who never actually works, living in Hartlepool, a harbour town in northeast England. The title of the strip is a pun, a perfect phonetic rendition of that region's pronunciation of the word "handicap". His hobbies include pigeon racing, darts, snooker (his cue's name is "Delilah" ), football (which always involves fights with the other players, and frequently ends with Andy being sent off), occasionally cricket and rugby, betting on horses, getting drunk in the local pub (often falling into the canal and being fished out by a constable, and always, seven nights a week,
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Mortadelo y Filemón

    Mortadelo y Filemón

    • Genre: Humour
    Mort & Phil (Spanish: Mortadelo y Filemón) is one of the most popular Spanish comics series, published in more than a dozen countries. It appeared for the first time in 1958 in the children's comic-book Pulgarcito drawn by Francisco Ibáñez. The series features Mort (Spanish: Mortadelo), the tall, bald master of disguise named after mortadella, and his bossy partner, the shorter, pudgier Phil (Spanish: Filemón) Pi. Initially, they were private detectives operating as Mortadelo y Filemón, Agencia de Información, but now both serve as secret agents in the Técnicos de Investigación Aeroterráquea (TIA is the Spanish word for "aunt", a spoof on CIA, with T.I.A. translating into "Aeroterraquatic (air, land, sea) Investigation Technicians". Mort and Phil can be described as a pair of walking catastrophes, and no matter what kind of mission they are assigned they always manage to get it wrong. The results are almost invariably extremely violent, and most often directed towards Filemón (Phil). At TIA (Spanish for "aunt", a parody of the CIA), which combats "enemy organizations" like RANA ("frog") or ABUELA ("grandmother"), they interact with their boss, the bad-tempered Superintendente
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Prayer For Ruin

    Prayer For Ruin

    Prayer For Ruin is a webcomic hosted by Comic Genesis involving a group of robots that awake to find themselves on a jungle planet inhabited by demons. It has been described by the creators as "a war between demonic forces and amnesiac robots" "a comic about cheap jokes" and "a verifiable bonanza of madcap adventure". The comic achieved mild notoriety upon its appearance on the WebComics Super 100 List and various comic forums. The comic was created in 2009 by writer Kyle Wilkins (previous works unknown) and artist 10er Bradley (Six By Nine College). In 2010, a supplemental writer, Morgan C Reynolds, was added. Abel-The main protagonist of Prayer For Ruin. He is often depicted as easy-going, or even naive. Goliath-The second robot introduced in the story (comic 10) and something of a giant. He seems to be only able to reply with the phrases "affirmative" and "negative". Veesg-The fist major demon character introduced (comic 21). Veesg holds a place in the demon hierarchy. He is generally shown to be murderous and animalistic. Inkiah-The second major demon character to appear (comic 22) and the first female in the story. Inkiah is Veesg's right-hand servant.
    6.00
    2 votes
    183

    Penny Arcade

    • Genre: Computer and video game industry
    • Characters: Tycho
    Penny Arcade is a webcomic focused on video games and video game culture, written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. The comic debuted in 1998 on the website loonygames.com. Since then, Holkins and Krahulik have established their own site, which is typically updated with a new comic strip each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The comics are accompanied by regular updates on the site's blog. Penny Arcade is among the most popular and longest running gaming webcomics currently online, listed in 2010 as having 3.5 million readers. Holkins and Krahulik are among the few and first webcomic creators successful enough to make a living from their work. In addition to the comic, Holkins and Krahulik also created Child's Play, a children's charity; PAX, an annual gaming convention; and three games. (Penny Arcade Adventures: On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness episodes 1 and 2 with Hothead Games and episode 3 with Zeboyd Games) The strip features Krahulik and Holkins' cartoon alter egos, John "Gabe" Gabriel and Tycho Brahe, respectively. While often borrowing from the authors' experiences, Holkins and Krahulik do not treat them as literal avatars or caricatures of
    5.00
    3 votes
    184

    Cathy

    • Genre: Women
    Cathy is a comic strip drawn by Cathy Guisewite. It featured a woman who struggled through the "four basic guilt groups" of life — food, love, mom, and work — the strip gently poked fun at the lives and foibles of modern women. Cathy's characteristics and issues both made fun of and sometimes fed into negative stereotypes about women. The strip debuted on November 22, 1976, and at its peak appeared in over 1,400 newspapers. The strips have been collected into more than 20 books. Three television specials were also created. Guisewite received the National Cartoonists Society Reuben Award in 1992 for the strip. Initially, the strip was based largely on Guisewite's own life as a single woman. However, Guisewite had Cathy's longtime boyfriend Irving propose marriage on Valentine's Day 2004. The two characters married in the February 5, 2005 strip. That same year, Cathy appeared in the 75th anniversary party of Blondie and Dagwood. On August 11, 2010, Cathy Guisewite announced the decision to end the run of Cathy. On October 3, 2010, the final strip ran, with the revelation that Cathy is pregnant with a girl. Defined by Cathy Guisewite, the four basic guilt groups are four types of
    5.50
    2 votes
    185
    Hitlercito

    Hitlercito

    • Genre: Humour
    Hitlercito is a Spanish webcomic written and drawn by Alejandro Cavallazzi and Tormentas. The comic is a spoof on historical conquerors, and has been reviewed in the Mexican newspaper Reforma, in an article of the student newspaper 8/ochenta of the Universidad Iberoamericana, in an article in the online magazine TVA, and in nationwide magazine Emeequis. It was also listed as an example of a webcomic in the weekly magazine Milenio. Hitlercito has recently been published in the magazine Replicante and the comic strip magazine ¡#$%&! Cómics from Monterrey. Hitlercito was first published online in October 2005, but was dropped by the authors after a couple of months. The project was restarted in January 2008. After a couple of months, the authors began another webcomic, Perro, gato y ardilla. In May 2008 Hitlercito began appearing regularly in the bimonthly publication Replicante. The main character is Hitlercito, a small version of Hitler obsessed with world domination. His lack of success has been a constant in the story. The strip draws heavily on historical jokes and anachronisms. The other main characters are Napoleon and Julius Caesar. At different times, they may be supportive
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Radio Patrol

    Radio Patrol

    Radio Patrol was a police comic strip carried in newspapers from 1933 to 1950 in the dailies, with a Sunday strip that ran from 1934 to 1946. It was created by artist Charles Schmidt and writer Eddie Sullivan, who both worked for the Boston American. Eddie Sullivan was a newspaper reporter who specialized in crime reporting. Because of the popularity of Dick Tracy, William Randolph Hearst wanted a strip in his King Features Syndicate to compete. The strip, which started in 1933 in the Boston Record, was originally called Pinkerton, Jr., since the main character was a boy named Pinky. (Dick Tracy also had a boy as a key character at the time.) The new strip was popular with Boston readers and the main character shortly became Sergeant Pat, while Pinky grew older quite rapidly. Sergeant Pat was a composite of many of the real-life Boston Police Department officers Sullivan knew personally. When the strip was picked up by King Features Syndicate in 1934, it was retitled Radio Patrol. The central characters were Sergeant Pat, his partner Sam and policewoman Molly Day. Later retitled Sgt. Pat of Radio Patrol, the strip is notable for its serious tone, with little evidence of the
    5.50
    2 votes
    187

    The Academia Waltz

    • Genre: College life
    • Characters: Steve Dallas
    The Academia Waltz was Berkeley Breathed's first cartoon, published daily from 1978 to 1979 in The Daily Texan at The University of Texas at Austin, where he was a student. The strip focused primarily on college life, although it sometimes made references to big news stories of the time (such as the incident at Three Mile Island in 1979). Two of the characters from The Academia Waltz would be resurrected for Breathed's next strip, Bloom County: Steve Dallas and Saigon John (renamed "Cutter John"). Rabies also became a character early on in the strip, but disappeared around the time that Opus the Penguin (who would later become Breathed's most popular character) appeared; Breathed cites one reason for Rabies being "retired" is that there was "no shortage of cartoon dogs". Kitzi later made a guest appearance in Bloom County in 1985, although the character had been altered to be Steve's younger sister rather than his girlfriend (jailed for protesting Apartheid, even though their sorority doesn't even admit blacks). Two collections featuring the comic were published. They are currently out of print and extremely rare, or as Breathed's website claims, "eBay is your only hope." A few
    5.50
    2 votes
    188

    The Boondocks

    • Genre: Satire
    • Characters: Huey Freeman
    The Boondocks was a daily syndicated comic strip written and originally drawn by Aaron McGruder that ran from 1996 to 2006. Created by McGruder in 1996 for The Diamondback, the student newspaper at the University of Maryland, College Park, the strip moved from the college pages and was printed in the monthly hip hop magazine The Source in 1997. As it gained popularity, the comic strip was picked up by the Universal Press Syndicate and made its national debut on April 19, 1999. A popular and controversial strip, The Boondocks satirizes African American culture and American politics as seen through the eyes of its protagonist, 10-year-old black radical Huey Freeman. McGruder sold the television and film rights for the strip to Sony Pictures Entertainment. The Boondocks animated TV series premiered on the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim programming November 6, 2005. The strip debuted in The Diamondback under editor Jayson Blair on December 3, 1996, paying McGruder $30 per strip—$17 more than other cartoonists. McGruder ended the strip's run in The Diamondback on March 18, 1997, two weeks after the strip was omitted due to a technical error and a Diamondback staffer printed the word
    5.50
    2 votes
    189

    The Meaning of Lila

    The Meaning of Lila is a comic strip written by John Forgetta, and three co-workers (writer Kathy Dow and illustrators Justin Raines, Jackie Gentile, and Tony Calabro) who are identified as "L. A. Rose." It is syndicated by Creators Syndicate. The strip centers around Lila, her cubicle partner and close friend Boyd, and their friend and co-worker Drew. The central theme of the comic is about Lila trying to find the right man (or any man for that matter) but always fails due to her pickiness and bad luck. Other themes include her dislike of her job, popular culture and her obsession with shopping, (especially shoes). The trio of friends are most often shown either at work, having drinks at the bar, shopping, or watching TV at home. On September 29, 2012 John Forgetta announced that he could no longer afford to continue with the comic and would no longer produce new ones. He left the final story arc as a cliff-hanger and stated, on his blog, that he hopes to reactivate the strip in the future. The strip continues to appear as re-runs. Lila, until she was fired for multiple infractions including chronic lateness, worked as a customer service representative, answering telephones for
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Wolverine

    Wolverine

    Wolverine is a fictional character, a superhero who appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Born James Howlett and commonly known as Logan, Wolverine is a mutant who possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, three retracting bone claws on each hand and a healing factor that allows him to recover from virtually any wound, disease or toxin, at an accelerated rate. The healing factor also slows down his aging process, enabling him to live beyond a normal human lifespan. His powerful healing factor enabled the supersoldier program Weapon X to bond the near-indestructible metal alloy adamantium to his skeleton and claws without killing him. He is most often depicted as a member of the X-Men, Alpha Flight, or later the Avengers. The character first appeared in the last panel of The Incredible Hulk #180 (his first full appearance is in issue #181, November 1974) and was created by writer Len Wein and Marvel art director John Romita, Sr., who designed the character, and was first drawn for publication by Herb Trimpe. Wolverine later joined the X-Men's "All New, All Different" roster in Giant-Size X-Men #1 (May 1975). X-Men writer Chris Claremont played a
    5.50
    2 votes
    191

    Zits

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Jeremy Duncan
    Zits is a comic strip written by cartoonist Jerry Scott and illustrated by Jim Borgman about the life of Jeremy Duncan, a 16-year-old high school sophomore (previously a 15-year-old for the life of the comic). The comic debuted in July 1997 in over 200 newspapers and has since become popular worldwide and received multiple awards. As of 2010, it continues to be syndicated by King Features and is now included in 1,500 newspapers. Set in central Ohio suburbia, the strip centers on Jeremy as he tries to balance his family life, social life, the academic demands of high school and his plans for the future, often with a heavy dose of surrealism, making it stand out from being just a typical teenager cartoon strip. In 1996, Jerry Scott was drawing Baby Blues, a comic strip about raising children he co-wrote with Rick Kirkman. He realized, however, that his profession as an independent cartoonist was limited to whatever joke he could conceive next. A friend suggested he begin a strip about a teenager. Scott heeded the proposition but was unsatisfied with his character's sketches, finding them similar to those of his existing strip. After Scott discussed the issue with his artist friend
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Buzz Beamer

    Buzz Beamer

    Buzz Beamer is a full-page comic feature in the magazine Sports Illustrated KIDS. It is based on sports-related topics. The cartoon is written and drawn by Bill Hinds who has also created other sports-related comic strips, such as Cleats and Tank McNamara. There is also a weekly Flash-animated Buzz Beamer cartoon at sikids.com: http://www.sikids.com/buzzbeamer/. Hinds does all of the art, animation and most of the voices.
    4.67
    3 votes
    193

    Male Call

    Male Call was a comic strip created and drawn by Milton Caniff on a volunteer basis, exclusively for US military publications during World War II. The strip began January 24, 1943. Caniff continued Male Call until seven months after V-J Day, bringing it to a conclusion on March 3, 1946. To contribute to the war effort, Caniff decided to draw a weekly comic strip and make it available at no cost to military camp newspapers. The Camp Newspaper Service was launched to syndicate Caniff's weekly page and contributions from other civilians. For CNS, Caniff created a unique version of his Terry and the Pirates, completely different in content from his regular daily and Sunday strips for the Chicago Tribune Syndicate. It premiered October 11, 1942. Minus Terry, the CNS version focused on beautiful adventuress Burma, and she was seen in single-page situations rather than a continuity storyline. After three months, however, The Miami Herald objected to this competing use of the character and complained to the Tribune Syndicate. The military spin-off version of Terry and the Pirates came to an end on January 10, 1943. To launch Male Call two weeks later, Caniff introduced a new character,
    4.67
    3 votes
    194

    One Big Happy

    • Genre: Humour
    One Big Happy is a daily comic strip written and illustrated by Rick Detorie, detailing the daily adventures of a six-year-old girl named Ruthie. The strip also features her eight-year-old brother Joe, their parents Frank and Ellen, and their grandparents Nick and Rose, who live next door. The strip's title is a takeoff on the phrase, "One big happy family." It debuted on September 11, 1988. The strip takes place on Buena Vista Avenue and in an unspecified city based on Baltimore, Maryland., where the creator grew up. It is syndicated by Creators Syndicate. The strip focuses on the daily lives of the children and their interactions with their family, friends and neighbors. Grandparents Nick and Rose are featured often, as they live next door and have a close relationship with the kids. Together they watch television, play cards, bake, and participate in imaginative games. Ruthie often visits the local public library for story hour with the Library Lady, and annoys her with ceaseless questions and variations on her own tales. At school Ruthie dodges the affections of never-seen classmate Buggy Crispino, argues with her snotty rich friend Cylene, and she and Joe play with their ditzy
    4.67
    3 votes
    195

    And Her Name Was Maud

    And Her Name Was Maud was a comic strip by Frederick Burr Opper. It first appeared in the Hearst newspapers on July 24, 1904. After work as a magazine cartoonist, Opper was hired by Hearst in 1899 to draw comic strips for the New York Journal, launching Happy Hooligan, Alphonse and Gaston and And Her Name Was Maud. Maud was a revenge-seeking mule belonging to farmer Si Slocum and his wife Mirandy. Most of the action was a build-up to Maud kicking someone into the air. Si was the most frequent victim. As was common in the early years of comic strips, the title under which Maud the Mule appeared might change from week to week. The character sometimes had crossover appearances in Opper's other strips, Happy Hooligan and Alphonse and Gaston. Maud was phased out in the 1910s, but reappeared from 1926 to the last appearance on October 14, 1932. A century after it was created by Opper, And Her Name Was Maud was included in an exhibition at Ohio State University. This exhibit, Ohio Cartoonists: A Bicentennial Celebration, was mounted during the summer and early fall of 2003 at two venues, the Philip Sills Exhibit Hall, William Oxley Thompson Memorial Library and the Reading Room Gallery of
    6.00
    1 votes
    196

    Badmash.org

    Badmash is a Hindi word that means "naughty". Badmash.org hosts animations, sketches and video clips. Their weekly email and print-media newsletters reach over a million people. Their works have a mix of political and social satire. It was started by three friends, Sandeep Sood, Nimesh Patel and Sanjay Shah. Their weekly South Asian-themed animations — like an Indian spoof of The Simpsons opening theme, nicknamed The Singhsons — draw millions of visitors to the website. Their success has helped them earn consulting work for MTV, New Line Cinema and Sony. Their comic strip features regular characters. The regular characters include Raju, one of the comic strip creators who is a Gujarati-American Hindu, his sister Beti, his traditional grandmother, his mom, his belligerent dad and his Sikh Punjabi friend who is also one of the comic strip creators. Beti also has a Desi friend named Meena. Also, there is an old Sikh taxicab driver and two culturally removed young Punjabi-American party boys named Motu and Chotu and Raju's dark skinned friend named Vivek. The comic strip deals with racial issues involving Indian Americans in the United States. Some strips deal with South Asians being
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Buttercup Festival

    Buttercup Festival

    Buttercup Festival is a webcomic created by poet and author David Troupes. The comic's first run, from February 17, 2000 to January 10, 2005, began as a feature in the University of Massachusetts Amherst newspaper, The Daily Collegian, where Troupes was an editor during his college years. It was written under the pseudonym "Elliott G. Garbauskas." At various times during its first run it was published in the newspaper, on its own web site, and in other student newspapers and independent periodicals. The second series, which is ongoing, began on January 28, 2008. Buttercup Festival's typical format is a strip of three or four panels, with the last often a non sequitur. Early installments feature simple two-value illustrations; as the author's skills matured, he began drawing larger tableaus and events. The comic's humor is marked by whimsy, puns, parody, and a gentle, eccentric madness. However, not all strips are wholly humorous; many are intended simply to evoke a sense of beauty or wonderment at nature (especially Sunday issues, painted in watercolor and often lacking dialogue), somewhat reminiscent at times of Calvin and Hobbes. Individual strips were collected in three print
    6.00
    1 votes
    198

    Dick Tracy

    • Genre: Action
    Dick Tracy is a comic strip featuring Dick Tracy, a hard-hitting, fast-shooting and intelligent police detective. Created by Chester Gould, the strip made its debut on October 4, 1931, in the Detroit Mirror. It was distributed by the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate. Gould wrote and drew the strip until 1977. Chester Gould introduced a raw violence to comic strips, reflecting the violence of 1930s Chicago. Gould did his best to keep up with the latest in crime fighting techniques; while Tracy often ends a case in a shootout, he uses forensic science, advanced gadgetry, and wits to track the bad guy down. The strip was an early example of the police procedural mystery story. Actual "whodunit" plots were relatively rare in the stories; the focus is the chase, with a criminal committing a crime and Tracy solving the case during a relentless pursuit of the criminal, who becomes increasingly desperate as the detective closes in. The strip's villains are arguably the strongest appeal of the story. Tracy's world is decidedly black and white. The bad guys are sometimes so evil that their very flesh is deformed to announce their sins to the world. The evil sometimes is raw and
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Happy Hooligan

    Happy Hooligan

    Happy Hooligan was a popular and influential early American comic strip, the first major strip by the already celebrated cartoonist Frederick Burr Opper. It debuted with a Sunday strip on March 11, 1900 in the William Randolph Hearst newspapers, and was one of the first popular comics with King Features Syndicate. The strip told the adventures of a well-meaning hobo who encountered a lot of misfortune and bad luck, partly because of his looks and his low position in society, but who did not lose his smile over it. He was contrasted by his two brothers, the sour Gloomy Gus and the snobbish Montmorency, both just as poor as Happy. Montmorency wore a top hat and monocle but was otherwise as ragged as his siblings. Like the other major comics by Opper, And Her Name Was Maud and Alphonse and Gaston, Happy Hooligan initially did not run on a regular schedule, skipping Sundays from time to time, while some other weeks two pages appeared at once; the character also played a role in some of Opper's daily strips. After a few years though, Happy Hooligan became a regular feature with both daily strips and Sunday pages. Opper was one of the most popular comic creators of his time. Happy
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    Kaz's Underworld

    Underworld is an adult-themed comic strip written and drawn by the artist Kaz since 1992. It runs in many American alternative weeklies such as the New York Press and the SF Bay Guardian. It features regular characters such as Smoking Cat, Sam Snuff, Creep Rat, Nuzzle, Petit Mort, and others, interacting within an archetypal inner-city environment. The strip's humor is often abstract, with observations such as that God's favorite form of life is the doofus. Five book collections of Underworld strips have been published by Fantagraphics Books:
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Nero

    Nero

    The Adventures of Nero or Nero is a Flemish comic strip drawn by Marc Sleen and the name of its main character. The original title ranged from De Avonturen van Detectief Van Zwam in 1947 to De Avonturen van Nero en zijn Hoed in 1950, and finally De Avonturen van Nero & Co from 1951. Nero is a Dutch language comic strip which appeared in Flemish newspapers between 1947 and 2002. Originally called The adventures of Detective Van Zwam, it quickly changed its name to The adventures of Nero after a character met by Van Zwam in the first adventure who was locked in an asylum and thought he was emperor Nero. He came quickly to his senses, but the name stuck. Nero is one of the quintessential Flemish newspaper comics, together with Spike and Suzy. With two strips published a day, six days a week, the comic followed the daily news events quite closely and often incorporates puns and real life events. References to news events or cameos of Belgian and internationally famous politicians like Jozef Stalin, Richard Nixon, Idi Amin, Khomeini occurred frequently. The drawing style was initially very amateurish but got polished quickly. Following a legal dispute with his publishers in 1965, Sleen
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Professor Hobo

    Professor Hobo is the title of an original comic strip, and its subsequent animated series, created by Justin Young and David Rothwell. The first comic strip was created and issued in January of 2002 in the Murray State News,the school newspaper of Murray State University, where Young and Rothwell were students at the time. Often dismissed as being too smart for its readers, Hobo nevertheless found an audience on the MSU campus, often satirizing current events or lampooning the goings-on of the college and its faculty. Unlike other comics set in a university environment, Hobo often focused on the faculty and their problems and adventures, though the students and other assorted characters did get their fair share of the spotlight. The titular character himself (only ever referred to as "Professor") is a faculty member, hired off the streets in the first strip, hence the name. Around the middle of its two year run, the comic strip spawned an animated counterpart. The animated series, also simply titled Professor Hobo, consisted of short episodes ranging anywhere from 5 minutes to 23 minutes in length, and was animated in a simpler style similar to Space Ghost Coast to Coast, or
    6.00
    1 votes
    203

    Sad Sack

    The Sad Sack is an American fictional comic strip and comic book character created by Sgt. George Baker during World War II. Set in the United States Army, Sad Sack depicted an otherwise unnamed, lowly private experiencing some of the absurdities and humiliations of military life. The title was a euphemistic shortening of the military slang "sad sack of shit", common during WWII. The phrase has come to mean "an inept person" or "inept soldier". Originally drawn in pantomime by Baker, The Sad Sack debuted June 1942 as a comic strip in the first issue of Yank, the Army Weekly. It proved popular, and a hardcover collection of Baker's wartime Sad Sack strips was published by Simon & Schuster, Inc. in 1944, with a follow-up, The New Sad Sack (1946). The original book was concurrently published as an Armed Services edition mass market paperback, in that edition's standard squarebound, horizontal, 5 5/8" x 4" format, by Editions for the Armed Services, Inc., a non-profit organization of The Council on Books in Wartime; it was #719 in the series of Armed Service editions. After the war ended, The Sad Sack ran in newspaper syndication in the United States until 1957. Baker then sold the
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Patoruzú

    Patoruzú

    Patoruzú is a comic character created in 1928 by Dante Quinterno and is considered the most popular hero of Argentine comics. Patoruzú is a wealthy Tehuelche cacique with great state properties in Patagonia, and is possessed of both superhuman physical strength and a charitable yet naive heart. Patoruzú was the first comic superhero in the world. Patoruzú first appeared on October 19, 1928, in the Las Aventuras de Don Gil Contento strip in the Crítica newspaper, under the name of Curugua Curuguagüigua; last cacique of the giant Tehuelches, of whom Don Gil becomes tutor. The name was deemed too difficult to pronounce and was soon changed to Patoruzú, after the then-popular candy Pasta de Orozú. Nevertheless, the strip was canceled by the newspaper after only a few days. Later that year Dante Quinterno started working for La Razón newspaper with the strip Don Julián de Monte Pío (predecessor of another of Quinterno's popular characters: the playboy Isidoro Cañones). In September 1930, Patoruzú was again introduced into the strip when Don Julián became his tutor. Slowly, Patoruzú assumed greater importance in the strip, which on December 11, 1931, was renamed to Patoruzú. In 1935
    4.33
    3 votes
    205

    Buck Danny

    Buck Danny is a Franco-Belgian comics series about a military flying ace and his two sidekicks serving (depending on the plots) in the United States Navy or the United States Air Force. The series is noted for its realism both in the drawings and the descriptions of air force procedures as part of the storyline. In particular the aircraft depicted are extremely accurate. Mixing historical references with fiction, Buck Danny is one of the most important 'classic' Franco-Belgian comic strips. Starting in 1947, the first albums were set against the backdrop of World War II, but from 1954 onwards, the series started to play in 'the present' and has so ever since. Like this, the series reads as a chronology of military aviation as well as the events that were catching people's imagination at the time of publishing, ranging from the Korean war, the cold war, UFO's international terrorism and drug running, the space race, rogue atomic bombs, the collapse of the Soviet bloc and recently the conflicts in Sarajevo and Afghanistan. True to the Franco-Belgian tradition the adventures are first published as a series in a weekly comic book magazine. After a complete story has run its course, it
    5.00
    2 votes
    206

    The Gumps

    The Gumps, a popular comic strip about a middle-class family, was created by Sidney Smith in 1917, launching a 42-year run in newspapers from February 12, 1917 until October 17, 1959. As revealed in Life in 1937, Smith's strip was inspired by a real-life person he met through his brother: "Born 47 years ago in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, as Andy Wheat, he acquired his unusual physiognomy as the result of an infection following the extraction of a tooth, which eventually necessitated the removal of his entire lower jaw. Through Dr. Thomas Smith of Bloomingdale, Illinois, a dentist and a brother of Sidney Smith, he met the cartoonist, who saw in him an ideal comic character. Andy subsequently had his name legally changed to Gump. His wife's name is Min and he has two children named Chester and Goliath, now living in San Francisco, and an Uncle Bim who lives in Georgia. His home is in Tucson, Arizona, but he also has a farm near his birthplace in Mississippi." The Gumps were utterly ordinary: chinless, bombastic blowhard Andy Gump, who is intimidated by his wife, Min (short for Minerva), their son Chester, wealthy Uncle Bim and their annoying maid Tilda. They had a cat called Hope and
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    2 votes
    207
    The Order of the Stick

    The Order of the Stick

    • Genre: Comedy
    • Characters: Roy Greenhilt
    The Order of the Stick (OOTS) is a comedic webcomic that celebrates and satirizes tabletop role-playing games and medieval fantasy through the ongoing tale of the eponymous fellowship of adventurers. The comic is written and drawn by Rich Burlew, who illustrates the comic in a colorful stick figure style. Taking place in a magical world that loosely operates by the rules of the 3.5 edition of the role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons (D&D), the comic follows the sometimes farcical exploits of six adventurers as they strive to save the world from an evil lich sorcerer. Much of the comic's humor stems from these characters either being aware of the game rules that affect their lives or having anachronistic knowledge of modern culture, which in turn is often used by the author to parody various aspects of role-playing games and fantasy fiction. While primarily comedic in nature, The Order of the Stick features a continuing storyline serialized in one- to four-page episodes, with over 800 such episodes released so far. Although it is principally distributed online at the website Giant in the Playground, seven book collections have been published, including several print-only stories
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    2 votes
    208
    Bob the Angry Flower

    Bob the Angry Flower

    Bob the Angry Flower is a black-and-white comic strip that tells the exploits of an easily angered anthropomorphic flower named Bob and his interactions with the world, often in search of either global domination or love. Though the strip features a range of recurring characters, most strips stand alone with little or no continuity. Bob has an intense hatred of the incorrect use of the apostrophe to form plurals, and is also often found in outlandish but self-inflicted predicaments. The strips themselves range from absurdist humor to dadaist "anti-humor". Bob's two sidekicks are "Stumpy" (a talking tree stump) and "Freddie the Flying Fetus" (self-explanatory). While Stumpy's appearance and demeanour epitomise existential ennui, Freddie – as befits his tender years – is a vital and innocent spirit, insuppressibly enthusiastic and trusting; the pair provide two different counterpoints to the single-minded irascibility of the protagonist. Other recurring minor characters include robots (and their natural enemies, bears), ninjas, Daleks (from Doctor Who) and various evil masterminds. Dick Cheney, Kofi Annan, and other world leaders have also appeared as characters on occasion. Bob the
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    2 votes
    209

    Tundra

    Tundra is a comic strip written and drawn by Wasilla, Alaska, cartoonist Chad Carpenter. The comic usually deals with wildlife, nature and outdoor life. Tundra began in December 1991 in the Anchorage Daily News and is currently self-syndicated to over 500 newspapers. The strip was named the best newspaper panel of 2007 by the National Cartoonists Society and nominated again in 2011. Tundra is primarily drawn in two styles, single-panel gag comics using puns in combination with wildlife and the outdoors, and a three-panel strip that employs regular characters: Sherman the Squirrel, Dudley the Bear, Chad the Cartoonist, Andy Lemming, Whiff Skunk, and Hobart the Wise. These comics, usually Sunday strips, contain more written dialogue and generally more complex jokes. Major characters in Tundra include: The main character. As a classically trained cartoonist, Chad makes a living that provides him both a lack of social status and a lack of funding. Primarily his job is to pay for everything especially any damage that any of the animals living in his place cause; this applies almost exclusively to Sherman. He is above dumpster diving with Dudley, but only because he has already been
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    2 votes
    210

    Vid Kid

    Vid Kid was a comic strip in the British comic Buster, first appearing in 1987 when it replaced Cliff Hanger (though when reprints of the latter started appearing in 1992, Vid Kid remained in the comic). Drawn throughout by Jack Edward Oliver under the pseudonym "Sue Denim" (as it was a different drawing style than how he usually drew) the strip was about a boy called Vic who owned a special remote control, which could play, pause, rewind, or fast-forward many things, including people. Though the actual artist behind the pseudonym was originally a secret, some clues were given out about Sue's true identity. Firstly, Jack would draw himself as a background character in every strip. Secondly, in the set of artist profiles printed in Buster during 1990 and 1991, Sue's profile revealed that her middle name was "Thisisnotamadeupname", she hates drawing "self portraits (especially those of other people)", and that her favourite artist was J. Edward Oliver. Further evidence was given in Jack's profile, which saw Vid Kid (along with Cliff Hanger and Master Mind) clearly in the background of his self-portrait. This caused some Buster readers to write in to the letters page asking if Sue and
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Cultural studies for beginners

    Cultural studies for beginners

    Cultural Sudies signals a major academic revolution as we move into the new millennium. But what exactly is it and how is it applied? It is a discipline which claims not to be a discipline - a radical critical approach for understanding racial, national, social and gender identities. Introducing Cultural Studies provides an incisive tour through the minefield of this complex subject, charting its origins in Britain and its migration to the USA, Canada, france, Australia and Southern Asia, examining the ideas of its leading exponents and providing a flavour of its use around the world. Covering the ground from Gramcsi to Raymond Williams, postcolonial discourse to the politics of diaspora, feminism to queer theory, technoculture and the media to globalization, itserves as an insightful guide to the essential concepts of this fascinating area of study. This documentary comic book is essential reading for all those concerned with the quickening pulse of old, new and emerging cultures.
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    1 votes
    212

    Doonesbury

    • Genre: Politics
    • Characters: Mike Doonesbury
    Doonesbury is a comic strip by American cartoonist Garry Trudeau, that chronicles the adventures and lives of an array of characters of various ages, professions, and backgrounds, from the President of the United States to the title character, Michael Doonesbury, who has progressed from a college student to a youthful senior citizen in the 40+ years of the strip's daily existence. Frequently political in nature, Doonesbury features characters representing a range of affiliations, but the cartoon is noted for a liberal viewpoint. The name "Doonesbury" is a combination of the word doone (prep school slang for "someone who is out to lunch", that is, someone who is clueless, inattentive, or careless) and the surname of Charles Pillsbury, Trudeau's roommate at Yale University. Doonesbury is written and pencilled by Garry Trudeau, then inked and lettered by his assistant Don Carlton. Doonesbury began as a continuation of Bull Tales, which appeared in the Yale University student newspaper, the Yale Daily News, beginning September 1968. It focused on local campus events at Yale. The executive editor of the paper in the late 1960s, Reed Hundt, who later served as chairman of the FCC, noted
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    1 votes
    213
    Fetus-X

    Fetus-X

    Fetus-X is a controversial weekly romantic horror comic written and drawn by Eric Millikin, award-winning American cartoonist and former human anatomy lab embalmer and dissectionist. Fetus-X has been published in newspapers, books, and as a webcomic since late 1999. The first Fetus-X comics were drawn by artist Casey Sorrow, who later left to create the comic Feral Calf. The storylines of Fetus-X generally revolve around Millikin's use of the occult in both romantic relationships and battles with various ghosts, demons, aliens, and monsters. The artwork is mixed media, combining expressionist paintings with found objects. The text is often written in free verse. Millikin began drawing horror comics by age one-and-a-half, when he made crayon drawings of ghosts terrorizing him during toilet-training. By second grade, he was making teachers' birthday cards showing his school burning down captioned "Fuck you." The first Fetus-X newspaper strips were published in spring 2000 in Michigan State University's The State News. Immediately there were problems with censorship, Catholic League protests, and threatened cancellation. After six months, The State News cancelled the comic strip
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    Mister Boffo

    • Genre: Humour
    Mister Boffo is an American comic strip created by Joe Martin. The strip has been in syndication since 1986, originally distributed by Tribune Media Services and now distributed by Martin's own Neatly Chiseled Features. The strip's main character is a balding, big-nosed man named Earl who is usually shown as married to a pretty blonde named Nadine and as the owner of a small white "wonder dog" named Weederman. However, there is no particular continuity in the strip from day to day; the characters may turn up in prehistoric times or in a futuristic spaceship, or in heaven or hell. Even in the strips set in contemporary times, Earl is depicted variously as a corporate executive, a working-class person, a prisoner, or a homeless beggar. Strips often illustrate recurring themes, such as "A Time to Worry" and "People Unclear on the Concept". "Mister Boffo" strips have been collected in the books Mister Boffo: Unclear on the Concept (1989) (ISBN 0-316-54859-6), Mister Boffo: Shrink Wrapped (1995) (ISBN 0-8362-1777-2), Mister Boffo: The First Decade (1996) (ISBN 0836214420), and Boffo (2008) (ISBN 0974596752). Many of the cartoons have also been reprinted in the newspaper strip On The
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    1 votes
    215
    New Adventures Of Queen Victoria

    New Adventures Of Queen Victoria

    The New Adventures of Queen Victoria is a daily webcomic created by Pab Sungenis. It uses the photo-manipulation technique popularized by Adobe Photoshop and other image editing programs to insert actual photographs and paintings of the characters into situations, instead of more conventional methods. It is syndicated on-line by uClick Universal, a division of Andrews McMeel Universal, and has been collected into four trade paperback editions. The strip first debuted in a discussion on a LiveJournal blog on February 8, 2006. Sungenis, who had been planning on creating a webcomic called In The Land Of Wonderful Clipart (the title was an homage to Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland) did the first strip as a one-shot joke commenting on what he perceived as a lack of humor in the comic strip Garfield. Inspired by the humorous potential, Sungenis decided to add the strip to his own blog and keep doing it. Eventually, he moved the strip to its own blog. On April 5, 2006, the strip joined Comics Sherpa, an online service of uClick. On April 3, 2007, uClick announced that 'Queen Victoria' had been picked up for inclusion on its GoComics.com and MyComicsPage.com services, and began
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    1 votes
    216
    Standup Comics

    Standup Comics

    Standup Comics is a webcomic by Basil White, debuting on October 23, 2003. The comic is material from Basil White's live standup comedy performances presented in comic strip format. The unchanging single image of White is a tongue-in-cheek reference to White's deadpan performance style. Several comics were adapted for two mass-market joke books in 2006, It's a Man's World (ISBN 0-7607-6829-3) and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Jokes (ISBN 1-59257-538-2). The setting is Basil White, presumably onstage, with Basil White's unchanging head in front of a Featureless Void. As every comic is based on White's stage act, the storyline mirrors the same topics: science fiction conventions, murder, religion, and sex. As the strip is a transcription of a comedy show, there is no time frame beyond an individual strip, and there are no obvious story arcs among any two strips. The comic has one character: Basil White, rendered as a static image that almost never changes. The only image in the strip is a single clip art rendering of White.
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    1 votes
    217

    The Other Coast

    The Other Coast is a comic strip, drawn by Adrian Raeside. It has been syndicated by the Creator's Syndicate since 2001. It is syndicated to more than 150 newspapers worldwide. The strip blends environmental, political, and animal rights issues with comedy.
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    1 votes
    218

    This Modern World

    • Genre: Politics
    This Modern World is a weekly satirical comic strip by cartoonist and political commentator Tom Tomorrow (real name Dan Perkins) that covers current events from a liberal point of view. Tomorrow also runs a weblog that informs readers about stories of interest, often presented as a follow up to his cartoons. This Modern World appears mainly in alternative weekly newspapers. Visually This Modern World draws inspiration from a retro, 1950s sensibility, with brightly colored illustrations that are also inspired by clip art. Initially, the strip was almost completely composed of actual vintage clip art and magazine cutouts, assembled collage-style and often manipulated and retouched. However, Tomorrow has gradually replaced cutouts with his own drawings, which merely mimic the clip art look. Usually drawn in four panels, it is not uncommon for all panels to be identical or nearly so, with only the dialogue and/or facial expressions changing. The '50s theme extends to the typically verbose dialogue of his human characters which is often bubbly, over-enthusiastic, and naïve. The stupidity of the humans is countered by Sparky, a fast-talking penguin (although the strip occasionally
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    Hägar the Horrible

    • Genre: Humour
    Hägar the Horrible is the title and main character of an American comic strip created by cartoonist Dik Browne (1917–1989), and syndicated by King Features Syndicate. It first appeared in February 1973, and was an immediate success. Since Browne's retirement in 1988 (and subsequent death), his son Chris Browne has continued the strip. As of 2010, Hägar is distributed to 1,900 newspapers in 58 countries and translated into 13 languages. The strip is a caricature and loose interpretation of medieval Scandinavian life. "Hagar the Terrible" was the nickname given to the late Dik Browne by his sons; Browne adapted the name to Hägar the Horrible for the purposes of alliteration. After his death Dik Browne's sons changed the title of the strip to Dik Browne's Hägar the Horrible in tribute. The name is pronounced Hay-gar by Chris Browne. Hägar (sometimes written "Hagar") is a shaggy, scruffy, overweight, red-bearded Viking. He regularly raids England and sometimes France. Animation-industry writer Terence J. Sacks notes the juxtaposition of contrary qualities that make Hägar endearing to the reader: "Hägar's horned helmet, rough beard and shaggy tunic make him look somewhat like a caveman
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    2 votes
    220

    Arnold

    • Genre: Humour
    Arnold was a syndicated comic strip by Kevin McCormick that ran at its height in 56 newspapers, including the LA Times and the Detroit Free Press, from 1982 through 1988. The strip was characterized by an off-beat sense of humor and random interjections by the title character, Arnold. The main characters were Arnold Melville, a strange, volatile child; Tommy Jordan, his well-meaning but clueless friend; and Mr. Lester, Arnold and Tommy's schoolteacher. Arnold often yelled "AIEEE" at random moments, and both characters had run-ins with the school cafeteria ladies—specifically Arnold, who referred to mayonnaise as WHITE DEATH at the top of his lungs. Tommy had a particular aversion to "wet bread." Tommy would often walk away from his football coach wearing his helmet backwards, as apparently the coach did not think much of Tommy's suggestions. Tommy occasionally brought a thinly veiled Christian attitude to his reactions to the other characters. Mr. Lester was often perplexed with Arnold at school. Toward the end of the run, a baby brother to Arnold, named Sid, was born. Sid frequently grabbed hold of others by holding on with his mouth. In the last strip, a giant bird grabbed Arnold
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    1 votes
    221
    Fokke & Sukke

    Fokke & Sukke

    Fokke & Sukke is a Dutch comic strip created by writer and illustrator Jean-Marc van Tol, and writers John Reid and Bastiaan Geleijnse. The strip is published in the daily newspaper NRC Handelsblad. Fokke & Sukke first appeared in 1994, in the student magazine Propria Cures. The one-panel comic, usually featuring humor of a politically incorrect nature, became very popular in the Netherlands. The strip has appeared in numerous Dutch publications, as well as over a dozen compilations. In 2003, Fokke & Sukke were awarded the Stripschapprijs, the Netherlands’ premier cartoon award. The strip stars are Fokke, a duck wearing a small sailor's cap, and Sukke, a canary bird wearing a backwards baseball cap. In the tradition of Donald Duck and Porky Pig, neither of them wear pants. Not in the tradition, however, their genitals are clearly (and consistently) shown - sometimes even when they are wearing pants. In 2006, the strip began to appear in English speaking countries under the title "Duck and Birdie." While the creators have pointed out that "Fokke" and "Sukke" are ordinary West Frisian-language names, they decided to avoid unnecessary controversy and use a name that would not be so
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    1 votes
    222

    Franklin Fibbs

    • Genre: Humour
    Franklin Fibbs is the main character of and the name of a comic strip written by Hollis Brown and illustrated by Wes Hargis. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, it began September 6, 2004, and ran for two years. The cartoon revolves around Franklin Fibbs, Franklin's bemused and loyal wife Paloma, whose main job around the store is to keep her husband and his imagination in check, and Josh, a neighborhood boy who works at Fibbs' General Store. Josh's curiosity and wide-eyed enthusiasm make him the perfect audience for Franklin's absurd tales. When Franklin's stories are particularly outlandish or borderline pathological, Paloma will often throw Josh a raised eyebrow or toss Franklin a choice retort in her native Spanish. On May 7, 2006, Brown and Hargis changed the name of the strip to Little Fibbs and changed the premise, focusing on the younger Fibbs as a precocious boy. The transition from the old format to the new began with the elder Franklin using a time machine to visit his younger self. After a series of strips involving both characters, readers learned that the elder Franklin was a figment of the younger boy's imagination, and Franklin's elder self disappeared. King
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    1 votes
    223
    Makeshift Miracle

    Makeshift Miracle

    Makeshift Miracle is a surreal fantasy coming-of-age story created by Jim Zubkavich suitable for young teen readers. The story was originally serialized online 3 pages per week (Monday, Wednesday and Friday updates) as a web comic from September 2001 through to March 2003. In February 2002 Makeshift Miracle became one of the launch titles part of the web comics umbrella known as Modern Tales and stayed as part of the MT archive structure until it finished its run in March 2003. In July 2003 Makeshift Miracle was offered for 99 cents as a complete digital graphic novel through Bitpass. It was the second comic content offered for sale through Bitpass, the first being Scott McCloud's story 'The Right Number'. In November 2006, The Makeshift Miracle was released in print as a 200 page graphic novel published by UDON Entertainment, making it the first wholly creator-owned content published by the Toronto based comic company. The published version of Makeshift Miracle has been remastered for print, with crisper line art and higher quality lettering than its original 72 dpi web comic version. (taken from the plot recap on the Makeshift Miracle site) Colby Reynolds is a disillusioned youth
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    1 votes
    224

    Tales of the Green Beret

    Tales of the Green Beret is a comic strip created by Robin Moore and Joe Kubert. It began as a daily strip, running for 72 numbered strips starting 20 September 1965. The following year it returned daily and Sunday, beginning 4 April, with scripts by Howard Liss. There were 8 Kubert stories: Kubert left the strip in January 1968. His last Sunday was Jan 7, his last daily Jan 10. The strip continued for a short time with art by John Celardo. The first story was reprinted in a Signet Books paperback from The New American Library; most of the strip has been reprinted in three books from Blackthorne and in two magazines from Dragon Lady Press. Falling between the two reprint sets is most of May 1967. The last few Kubert strips, December 31, 1967 and later, have not been reprinted, nor have any of the Celardo strips. Tales of the Green Beret continued to be published as an American comic book by Dell Publishing from 1967 - 1969.
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    1 votes
    225
    The Black Cherry Bombshells

    The Black Cherry Bombshells

    The Black Cherry Bombshells is a webcomic from DC imprint Zuda Comics, created by Johnny Zito and Tony Trov, illustrated by Sacha Borisich and colors by John Dallaire. It was selected as winner of Zuda's March 2008 competition. Violent girl gangs fight for supremacy in a dark future where all men have been mutated into flesh-eating zombies. In Las Vegas, Nevada, the Black Cherry Bombshells, led by the outcast Regina, are gaining a reputation as tough bootleggers. This does not sit well with a powerful, local crime boss, a woman called The King. The Black Cherry Bombshells was nominated for a Harvey Award in 2009 for Best Online Comic Work. In January 2009, DC announced the Black Cherry Bombshells to be the third Zuda Comic to be printed into a graphic novel.
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    1 votes
    226
    Theater Hopper

    Theater Hopper

    Theater Hopper (or simply TH) is a webcomic based on a movie fan (Tom), his wife (Cami), and their friends. It debuted August 5, 2002 and is written and drawn by Tom Brazelton. In 2003, Theater Hopper became a member of the Dayfree Press Webcomics Network, but in 2005, moved to the Boxcar Comics collective. Two book collections have been released, Theater Hopper: Year One and Theater Hopper: Year Two. The majority of Theater Hopper strips lean towards the gag-a-day style of joke telling, usually either focusing on a specific movie or set of upcoming releases, or making an all out parody of a classic film. During the slow release times however, the strip has been known to shift gears and allow a longer more involved story to unfold, such as the introduction of the character Charlie or the unfortunate circumstances surrounding Jimmy losing his job. The schedule of Theater Hopper is the common webcomic schedule of Monday, Wednesday and Friday every week. Since its creation, Brazelton has usually ensured a strip is up every one of these days, although occasionally with guest comics from comic creator peers such as Mitch Clem, Ryan Sias, Joe Dunn and others. Starting on April 23, 2007,
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    1 votes
    227
    Zipi y Zape

    Zipi y Zape

    Zipi y Zape are the names of two iconic Spanish comic book characters created by José Escobar Saliente in 1947, and of their eponymous strip. With Mortadelo y Filemón, they are the most popular and most translated Spanish comic books. Their name is derived from the Spanish word zipizape, meaning "turmoil" or "chaos." Zipi and Zape Zapatilla are two young twins who do poorly in school. Mischievous and energetic, they are fans of soccer. They are distinguished solely by their hair color: Zipi is blond, Zape black-haired. Other featured characters are their father, Don Pantuflo Zapatilla, a professor of Philately and Colombophilia (pantuflo/a and zapatilla are both Spanish names for slippers); their mother, the hard-pressed Doña Jaimita; Don Minervo, their strict teacher; Peloto , the teacher’s pet (and thus the twins’ enemy); Sapientín (sometimes called "Pitagorin", as a reference to Pithagoras), their genius cousin and Pepe and Felisa Plómez, the extremely annoying friends of their parents, whose undesirable visits they try to avoid or cut short. Their stories are usually short, about one to eight pages long, but occasionally some are longer, about 44 or 48 pages, like "El tonel del
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    1 votes
    228

    Alley Oop

    • Genre: Science Fiction
    Alley Oop is a syndicated comic strip, created in 1932 by American cartoonist V. T. Hamlin, who wrote and drew the popular and influential strip through four decades for Newspaper Enterprise Association. Hamlin introduced an engaging cast of characters, and his storylines entertained with a combination of adventure, fantasy and humor. Alley Oop, the strip's title character, was a sturdy citizen in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo. He rode his pet dinosaur, Dinny, carried a stone war hammer and wore nothing but a fur loincloth. He would rather fight dinosaurs in the jungle than deal with his fellow countrymen in Moo's capital (and only) cave-town. In spite of these exotic settings, the stories were often satires of American suburban life. The first stories took place in the Stone Age and centered on Alley Oop's dealings with his fellow cavemen in the kingdom of Moo. Oop and his pals had occasional skirmishes with the rival kingdom of Lem, ruled by King Tunk. The names Moo and Lem are references to the fabled lost continents of Mu and Lemuria. On April 5, 1939, Hamlin introduced a new plot device, which greatly expanded his choice of storylines: a time machine, invented by the
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    229

    Charlie Peace

    The Astounding Adventures of Charlie Peace was a comic strip in the UK comic Buster, based on the real-life exploits of nineteenth-century thief Charles Peace, though the first strip appeared July 20, 1964 in Valiant. When it started it was set in Victorian times, but in an episode published in January 1968, Charlie was tricked by an inventor into entering a time machine disguised as a safe, and transported to modern London. In 2005, Peace was featured in the Alan Moore-written series Albion.
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    230

    Dilbert

    • Genre: Humour
    • Characters: Dilbert
    Dilbert is an American comic strip written and drawn by Scott Adams. First published on April 16, 1989 Dilbert is known for its satirical office humor about a white-collar, micromanaged office featuring the engineer Dilbert as the title character. The strip has spawned several books, an animated television series, a video game, and hundreds of Dilbert-themed merchandise items. Adams has also received the National Cartoonist Society Reuben Award and Newspaper Comic Strip Award in 1997 for his work on the strip. Dilbert appears in 2000 newspapers worldwide in 65 countries and 25 languages. The comic strip originally revolved around Dilbert and his "pet" dog Dogbert in their home. Many plots revolved around Dilbert's engineer nature or his bizarre inventions. Also prominent were plots based on Dogbert's megalomaniacal ambitions. Later, the location of most of the action moved to Dilbert's workplace, and the strip started to satirize technology, workplace, and company issues. The comic strip's popular success is attributable to its workplace setting and themes, which are familiar to a large and appreciative audience; Adams said that switching the setting from Dilbert's home to his
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    231
    Dinosaur Comics

    Dinosaur Comics

    • Genre: Humour
    Dinosaur Comics is a constrained webcomic by Canadian writer Ryan North. It is also known as "Qwantz", after the site's domain name, "qwantz.com". The first comic was posted on 1 February 2003, though there were earlier prototypes. Dinosaur Comics has also been printed in three collections and in a number of newspapers. Comics are posted on most weekdays. Each comic uses the same artwork, with only the dialogue changing from day to day. There are occasional deviations from this, such as several episodic comics. It has been compared to David Lynch's The Angriest Dog in the World comic, and makes references to it. The strips take on a wide variety of topics, including ethical relativism, the nature of happiness, and the secret to being loved. The main characters' names are each dinosaur's genus (with the notable exception being "T-Rex", an abbreviation of the Tyrannosaurus' full binomial name). Although other dinosaurs have been mentioned in the strip, they are rarely shown. i received several dozen emails about utahraptor either being a girl or being gay in yesterday's comic! he is gay, guys. only he doesn't talk about it all the time, on account of having interests outside of being
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    232
    Doodles

    Doodles

    Doodles is a children's activity comic strip drawn by Steve Sack and Craig MacIntosh. Originally syndicated in 1985 as "Professor Doodles' Just For Kids Corner", the strip was renamed "Doodles" in 1998. The comic is distributed by Creators Syndicate. The comic strip features Professor Doodles, a wacky scientist with a love of kids and animals. The professor and his menagerie of zoo characters lead kids in several activities in each cartoon, including mazes, jokes, drawing tips, and riddles. Among the Doodles helpers are Bosco, a lovable and inquisitive koala; Toby, a fun-loving hippo; Zak, a sarcastic but goofy giraffe, and Steve, an ape who became the main star of the strip when Professor Doodles was cut back to a rare occasional appearance as of 1998 when the strip was renamed "Doodles". Kids can also send in their favorite jokes to Professor Doodles for inclusion in the weekly comic.
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    233
    Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend

    Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend

    • Genre: Morality play
    Dream of the Rarebit Fiend was a newspaper comic strip by American cartoonist Winsor McCay which began 10 September 1904. Bizarre dreams made up the content of the strip, as they would the following year in McCay's signature strip, Little Nemo. It was McCay's second successful strip, after Little Sammy Sneeze secured him a position on the cartoon staff of the New York Herald. Rarebit Fiend was printed in the Evening Telegram, a newspaper published by the Herald. For contractual reasons, McCay signed the strip with the pen name "Silas". The strip had no continuity or recurring characters. Instead, it had a recurring theme: a character has a nightmare or other bizarre dream, usually after eating a Welsh rarebit (a cheese-on-toast dish). The character awakens from the dream in the last panel, regretting having eaten the rarebit. The dreams often revealed the darker sides of the dreamers' psyches—their phobias, hypocrisies, discomforts, and dark fantasies. This was in great contrast to the colorful, childlike fantasy dreams in Little Nemo. The strip is mostly recognized as an adult-oriented precursor to Nemo. The popularity of Rarebit Fiend and Nemo led to McCay being hired for William
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    Elvis

    Elvis is a Swedish comic strip created in 2000 by Tony Cronstam for the free daily newspaper Metro, as well as other more local newspapers. Elvis Tonysson, the main character of the comic is a middle-aged man portrayed as a tortoise, who is according to Cronstam loosely based on himself, like most of the recurring characters are based on friends and family. The main plot of the strip is according to Cronstam based on day-to-day annoyances encountered in real life. The plot of the strips published in the daily newspaper usually don't stretch over multiple strips, making the strip easy to understand even for non-daily readers, which is the case with most daily newspaper strips. There are also several comic books released, some of which feature a main plot. Nowadays, Tony's wife Maria Cronstam is a main part in the development of the comic.
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    235

    Fuss Pot

    Fuss Pot was originally a comic strip in the UK comic Knockout. It made its first appearance in Issue 1, dated 12 June 1971. The strip was about a girl with a pointy nose of the same name, who fussed about everything and everyone in her path. At one stage the full title was: "Fuss Pot, the Fussiest Girl of the Lot!" Fuss Pot joined Whizzer and Chips in 1973 after Knockout merged with it and became a Chip-ite. She then joined Buster in 1990 after Whizzer and Chips merged with that. Through the medium of reprints, the strip stayed with Buster until the end. Although the strip was mainly drawn by Norman Mansbridge, replaced in the 1990s by Trevor Metcalfe whose strips introduced Fuss Pot's cousin Scruff Pot. Artist Jack Edward Oliver included Fuss Pot on the last page of Buster's final issue, revealing how all the characters in the comic came to an end. Fuss Pot's excuse was that she was too fussy to appear in the comic. Fuss pot is also a common term used today to describe someone who is in an angry state. For example, Jessica knows that shane is angry, she exclaims that, "Shane is being a fuss pot today"
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    236
    Introducing Science

    Introducing Science

    Our world is inconceivable without science. Its discoveries benefit us - antibiotics, computers, space travel, gene mapping - and reveal the secrets of human evolution, the cosmos and our place in it. Science also threatens us with the risks of nuclear holocaust, eugenics and the pollution of our ecosystem. How do we reconcile the advantages of science with its perils? What do scientists actually do? Is science 'value free'? How has science evolved and where is it leading us? Introducing Science explores these troubling questions. It reveals how science itself and our approach to studying science have changed radically over the last few decades. The development of Science Studies is traced from its origin in the ideas of Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Paul Feyerabend and others. Sociological, feminist and postcolonial criticisms reveal that uncertainty and ignorance tend to increase with changes in the production of knowledge. We have arrived at the threshold of post-normal science.
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    237
    Leftover Soup

    Leftover Soup

    Leftover Soup is a webcomic created by Mason Williams (pseudonymously known as “Tailsteak”). It is an entirely fictional slice-of-life style webcomic that updates Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. New strips are posted at midnight Central Standard Time, since that is where the server is located. The author strives to keep Leftover Soup officially Safe For Work, i.e., free of nudity, gore, and hate speech. There will, however, be swearing and descriptions of sexuality, violence, and opinions that some people may consider offensive. Leftover Soup may not be R-rated, but it isn't really intended for children. Here is a list of major characters in Leftover Soup:
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    238
    Liō

    Liō

    Liō is a daily comic strip created by American artist Mark Tatulli and distributed by the Universal Press Syndicate since May 15, 2006. As a pantomime strip, it has an international appeal. In 2008, the strip brought Tatulli a National Cartoonists Society Newspaper Comic Strip Award. The strip focuses on the adventures of a creative little boy, Liō, who lives with his father (unnamed in the strip) and his pets. Liō's mother is deceased. It is currently unknown how she died. The setting of the story varies from Liō's house to his school and the general outside world. The time period appears to be contemporary, except for an episode set in the year 2101, when Liō is in his nineties but still very much capable of mischief. The story is told visually, with little or no dialogue. Gags frequently involve the supernatural, alien invasion or mass destruction of many sorts, creating a surreal, disturbing atmosphere. Some of the strip's recurring themes involve Liō getting even with grade-school bullies, helping animals (most of which are non-anthropomorphic but display obvious intelligence) defend themselves against humans or their predators, and performing mad scientist style experiments.
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    239
    Motley's Crew

    Motley's Crew

    • Genre: Marriage
    Motley's Crew was an American newspaper comic strip by Ben Templeton and Tom Forman with satirical social commentary. With readership spread among 250 newspapers in the United States alone, the comic strip acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans during its 23 years of operation. The comic strip in general was about a blue-collar worker named Mike Motley and his wife Mabel Motley. Truman Motley (Mike and Mabel's son) eventually fell in love and married a woman named Tacoma. From that marriage came two sons. Mabel's older brother Abel was often collaborating with his wife Buffy. Her role in creating a rivalry between Abel and his brother-in-law Mike is muted by the fact that he respected Abel and his wife just a little bit. As a part of his wife's family unit, Mike had to face Abel and Buffy whether he liked it or not. According to a 1997 comics poll conducted by the New York Daily News, Motley's Crew was elected as the 28th most favorite comic strip among readers and visitors to the official Internet site. The comic strip was considered to be more popular than B.C. (still in publication) but less popular than Broom-Hilda (still in publication). However, it also
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    240
    PartiallyClips

    PartiallyClips

    PartiallyClips is a webcomic, created by Rob Balder, which has been running since 2002. At the start of 2010, Balder handed authorship of the comic to Tim Crist, the comedy musician behind Worm Quartet. PartiallyClips is unusual in that it has no original art and no recurring characters or plots. Each three-panel strip consists of a single clip art image, repeated and unchanged in each panel, with added speech balloons and/or captions, which create the joke. PartiallyClips is updated twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Fridays. PartiallyClips tends to use dark humor; frequently, the picture used is rather idyllic, which is common in public-domain clip art, but the added dialogue or captions twist the scene. PartiallyClips also frequently comments on modern life and culture, especially aspects of Internet culture. In addition to its online audience, the strip is also self-syndicated to print, targeted at alternative weekly newspapers. It has appeared in roughly 25 newspapers and magazines, and has produced a book, Suffering For My Clip Art: The Best Of Partially Clips Volume 1. In addition, it was listed in a short list of webcomics included in NPR's annotated Guide to webcomics. Its name
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    241

    Rusty Riley

    Rusty Riley was an American comic strip which ran from 1948 to 1959. It was created and drawn by Frank Godwin for King Features. The line work in Rusty Riley shows an obvious influence of James Montgomery Flagg and Charles Dana Gibson, although Godwin used a variety of styles in his book and magazine illustrations. Contemporaries such as Hal Foster, Milton Caniff and Alex Raymond continue to be reprinted with regularity, while Godwin's two strips are difficult to find. He receives more attention in Europe, specifically France, though even there it is quite sparse. With art by Godwin and scripts by Rod Reed, the first Rusty Riley daily appeared on January 26, 1948. The storyline follows the adventures of a redheaded orphan youth, Rusty Riley, who flees the orphanage with his faithful fox terrier, Flip. In the Bluegrass region of Kentucky, he is hired as a stable boy by wealthy racehorse owner Mr. Miles, owner of Milestone Farm. Encountering crooks and corruption as he grows up in the world of horse racing and horse breeders, Rusty's goal is to establish himself as a jockey. Rusty's girlfriend is Patty Miles, the daughter of his boss. Godwin made research trips to Lexington,
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    242
    Scary Go Round

    Scary Go Round

    • Genre: Comedy
    Scary Go Round was a webcomic set in the fictional West Yorkshire town of Tackleford, England, and written by John Allison. Scary Go Round was named one of the best webcomics of 2004 by The Webcomics Examiner. The Sunday Times describes it as "postmodern Brit horror" that is "subtle and stylishly drawn, with a bold cartoon edge". The Morning Star has called it "brilliant, bonkers" and "the best British strip that I've yet found". Scary Go Round won the Web Cartoonist's Choice Awards in 2003 for Outstanding Original Digital Art, in 2005 and in 2007 for Outstanding Comic. Scary Go Round started on June 4, 2002 as part of Modern Tales, roughly following on from Allison's previous comic, Bobbins. It featured bizarre happenings, a "quirky cast", strange creatures, parallel universes, zombies, time travel, reincarnation, "and random spots of tea". Initially set as the lives of the barmaids Tessa and Rachel, it soon came to focus on another set of characters entirely. Amy Chilton, one of the core characters to succeed Tessa and Rachel, successfully made the transition from the author's 17-year-old scribblings, through the Bobbins era, and into Scary Go Round. Shelley Winters, another of
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    243

    Sherman's Lagoon

    • Genre: Humour
    Sherman's Lagoon is a comic strip by Jim Toomey that is syndicated daily in over 150 newspapers worldwide. It first appeared in the Escondido Times-Advocate on May 13, 1991. It takes place at the fictional Kapupu Lagoon by the island of Kapupu in the South Pacific Ocean, west of the Elabaob Islands in the Palauan archipelago of Micronesia. It is centered on the misadventures of an overweight, lazy great white shark named Sherman, his controlling, hot-tempered wife Megan, and the friends and foes they share their tropical home with. The main character of the strip. Sherman is overweight, lazy and an eating machine. His immaturity and childlike personality frustrates his wife, Megan, to no end, and provides ample opportunities for some of his friends to blindly rip him off. Although not the most intelligent of all the characters, Sherman is a good-hearted great white shark and often tries to please his friends and family, but most of the time falls short because of his low IQ. On rare occasions, he has been shown bringing Megan gifts for no special reason and acting romantic; however, these instances are few and far between and most of the time he's obnoxious, lazy and hopelessly out
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    244
    Snafu Comics

    Snafu Comics

    Snafu Comics is a webcomics site maintained by David Stanworth, an American known online as "SnafuDave". It serves as the home of several comics, including Stanworth's own creations, as well as those of other artists. It is also the source for the free to use Comic PHP script which automates webcomic sites using PHP. In the past, Snafu also hosted Digital Purgatory and This Comic Sucks. Its current features include the following. David Stanworth's original series, Snafu Comics is a gaming comic that debuted on May 15, 2002. The strip has two main characters, Dave and Travis, and the two characters originally spent much of their time playing and commenting on video games, forming the basis of the humor in the strip. The current theme is generally current events ranging from movies, politics, and random social commentary. The strip also sometimes refers to other Internet subcultures, and sometimes features in-jokes that are explained by the news posts accompanying each comic. Although multi-part strips occasionally appear, it mostly follows a gag-a-day format. It is a weekly comic, typically updating on Mondays. Stanworth says that he altered the art style for different strips to fit
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    Sociology for Beginners

    Sociology for Beginners

    What is sociology? Simply, it is the study of how science functions, or in some cases, does not function. Various competeing schools of sociology have attempted to fit observations of social phenomena into different conceptual systems. Introducing Sociology traces the origins of these systems from Enlightenment thought and the pioneering work of Auguste Comte to subsequent developments in Karl Marx, Herbert Spencer, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber. The rapid expansion of sociology in twentieth century America and Britain, the post World War II dominanace of Talcott parsons, the Chicago School and the rise of structuralism are oulined in a clear graphic form. The documentary comic book also examines the array of concepts and methiods of research that have been applied to the study of society by the key analysts.
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    246

    The Far Side

    • Genre: Satire
    The Far Side is a popular single-panel comic created by Gary Larson and syndicated by Universal Press Syndicate, which ran from January 1, 1980, to January 1, 1995. Its surrealistic humor is often based on uncomfortable social situations, improbable events, an anthropomorphic view of the world, logical fallacies, impending bizarre disasters, or the search for meaning in life. Larson's frequent use of animals and nature in the comic is popularly attributed to his background in biology. Reruns are still printed in many newspapers. The Far Side was carried by more than 1,900 daily newspapers, translated into 17 languages, and collected into calendars and 22 compilation books. The series was preceded by a similar panel called Nature's Way, also by Larson. Most The Far Side cartoons are a single rectangular panel, occasionally split into small sections of four, six, or eight for the purposes of a storyline. A caption or dialogue usually appears under the panel as typed text, although word-balloons are sometimes used for conversations. Sunday comics were double-sized, done in watercolor or colored pencils, with captions handwritten in Larson's own cursive. Most of Larson's comics relied
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    247
    Toonerville Folks

    Toonerville Folks

    Toonerville Folks (aka The Toonerville Trolley That Meets All the Trains) was a popular newspaper cartoon feature by Fontaine Fox, which ran from 1908 to 1955. It began in 1908 in the Chicago Post, and by 1913, it was syndicated nationally by the Wheeler Syndicate. From the 1930s on, it was distributed by the McNaught Syndicate. The single-panel gag cartoon was a daily look at Toonerville, situated in what are now called the suburbs. Central to the strip was the rickety little trolley called the "Toonerville Trolley that met all the trains," driven in a frenzy by the grizzly old Skipper to meet each commuter train as it arrived in town. A few of the many richly formed characters included the Terrible-Tempered Mr. Bang, the Physically Powerful Katrinka, Little Woo-Woo Wortle, Aunt Eppie Hogg (The Fattest Lady in 3 Counties) and Mickey McGuire, the town bully. Fox described the inspiration for the cartoon series in an article he wrote for The Saturday Evening Post titled "A Queer Way to Make a Living" (February 11, 1928, page six): Between 1920 and 1922, 17 Toonerville silent film comedy adaptations were scripted by Fox for Philadelphia's Betzwood Film Company. These starred Dan
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    248
    Toothpaste for dinner

    Toothpaste for dinner

    Toothpaste for Dinner is a webcomic created by Drew. The comic was launched on January 1, 2002. A new drawing is posted every day at 12:01 AM, EST. Each comic features small, simple drawings, paired with short captions or dialogue. The style of humor on Toothpaste for Dinner encompasses surrealism, irony, social commentary, cynicism, and schadenfreude, among other sub-types of humor. Each cartoon is entirely self-contained (except in certain cases of a series, such as the horoscope series.) The art for Toothpaste for Dinner is drawn with ink on paper (Uni-Ball Micro pens and 300 lb. wt. Bristol board illustration paper). Although the art is primarily black and white, a color comic is occasionally posted. The art style, although minimalist, stands out due to its disjointed style. The artist often draws people with misaligned eyes, and only three, flipper-like fingers. Official site
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    249
    Toots and Casper

    Toots and Casper

    Toots and Casper was a long-run family comic strip by Jimmy Murphy, distributed to newspapers for 37 years by King Features Syndicate, resulting in many merchandising tie-ins, including books, dolls, paper dolls, pins, bisque nodders and comic books. Comics historian Coulton Waugh commented on the strip's portrait of a happy, idealized family life: "Like Blondie, Toots is the picture of contentment, and if all homes were like these, the American Dream would be nearly realized." It began as a gag-a-day strip but soon settled into a successful pattern of serialized stories of romance and mystery involving newlyweds Toots and Casper Hawkins, their child Buttercup and dog Spare-Ribs (which entered a dog race with a $2500 prize in 1933). Murphy began Toots and Casper for the New York American and other Hearst newspapers during December 1918. He used his wife, Matilda Katherine Murphy, as the model for Toots. The daily strip was picked up by King Features in 1919, and the Sunday strip began the following year (July 1920). The Sunday page carried a topper strip by Murphy, It's Papa Who Pays! Toots and Casper had a child, a boy named Buttercup, in November 1920. Buttercup remained a baby
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    250
    Unspeakable Vault

    Unspeakable Vault

    The Unspeakable Vault (of Doom) or Weird Tales from the Old Ones is a webcomic by François Launet, which chronicles the "daily" lives of the Great Old Ones, including Cthulhu, Nyarlathotep, and Yog-Sothoth, among others. It takes a lighthearted view of H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos to inspire laughter rather than the more usual soul-blasting horror. The comic was used as the basis of the second expansion set to the Cthulhu Mythos themed version of Steve Jackson Games' card game Munchkin. The webcomic's name is often shortened to UVoD. In 2003 the Essen Game Fair in Germany, the author, who was there signing books for the Pegasus Spiele game publisher (as illustrator of the German Call of Cthulhu RPG), witnessed the craziness about Cthulhu plushes, sold on different booths: many old players of the Call of Cthulhu role-playing games wanted to buy this icon of the Lovecraftian Mythos. On the train that took him back to Paris, he started drawing the first funny Cthulhoo and Nyarly draft, along with a few layout of strips. Characters were designed in a very cartoonish style, with simplified features and layout, that contrast strongly with the author's illustrations style, more
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