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Best Comic Strip Creator of All Time

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    1
    William Donahey

    William Donahey

    William Donahey (19 October 1883 – 2 February 1970) was a U.S. cartoonist and creator of The Teenie Weenies, a comic strip about two-inch tall people living under a rose bush. The strip appeared in the Chicago Tribune for over 50 years. He drew The Teenie Weenies for a total of about 2100 strips. Donahey was a very shy child when growing up. He would dream up imaginary characters and The Teenie Weenies as a pastime. He later turned them into a profession in the form of comic features in newspapers, books and advertising. Donahey spent much of his childhood alone because he was introverted. One of his pastimes was imagining strange creatures in a small world. He later claimed this was the birth of The Teenie Weenies. His parents, John C. Donahey and Catherine (Chaney) Donahey, noticing his creative work, enrolled him in the Cleveland School of Art. They had hoped that he would follow his older brother James Harrison "Hal" Donahey (1875–1949) into the illustration business. Donahey graduated from college in 1903, worked briefly in advertising and then joined the staff of Cleveland's The Plain Dealer, where his brother Hal was the political cartoonist. While working for the Plain
    8.29
    7 votes
    2

    Angus Allan

    Angus Peter Allan (22 July 1936 – 16 July 2007) was a British comic strip writer and magazine editor who worked on TV Century 21 in the 1960s and Look-in magazine during the 1970s. Most commonly known as Angus Allan and sometimes credited as Angus P. Allan, he was responsible for original comic strip adaptations of numerous popular TV series. Allan's output was prolific, and virtually all the Look-In comic strips were his creations. Some of his comic works included The Six Million Dollar Man, Logan's Run and Charlie's Angels. Allan collaborated with many well-known British comic strip artists, including Jim Baikie and Arthur Ranson. Allan was born in Wimbledon, 22 July 1936 and attended King's College School there. Allan's first job in publishing, in late 1952, was as an office junior at Amalgamated Press (later Fleetway, then IPC). He worked on the weekly comic The Comet, and the monthly titles Cowboy Comics and Super Detective Library, edited by Ted Holmes. Following a period of national service in the Gordon Highlanders from November 1954 to November 1956, having been on active service in Cyprus, Allan returned to Amalgamated Press and after working on Super Detective Library,
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Lyonel Feininger

    Lyonel Feininger

    Lyonel Charles Feininger (July 17, 1871 – January 13, 1956) was a German-American painter, and a leading exponent of Expressionism. He also worked as a caricaturist and comic strip artist. Lyonel Feininger was born to German-American violinist and composer Karl Feininger and American singer Elizabeth Feininger. He was born and grew up in New York City, but traveled to Germany at the age of 16 in 1887 to study. In 1888, he moved to Berlin and studied at the Königliche Akademie Berlin under Ernst Hancke. He continued his studies at art schools in Berlin with Karl Schlabitz, and in Paris with sculptor Filippo Colarossi. He started as a caricaturist for several magazines including Harper's Round Table, Harper's Young People, Humoristische Blätter, Lustige Blätter, Das Narrenschiff, Berliner Tageblatt and Ulk. In 1900, he met Clara Fürst, daughter of the painter Gustav Fürst. He married her in 1901, and they had two daughters. In 1905, he separated from his wife after meeting Julia Berg. He married Berg in 1908 and had several children with her. The artist is represented with drawings at the exhibitions of the annual Berlin Secession in the years 1901 through 1903. Feininger's career as
    7.57
    7 votes
    4
    Tony Millionaire

    Tony Millionaire

    Tony Millionaire (born Scott Richardson, 1956) is an American cartoonist, illustrator and author known for his syndicated comic strip Maakies and the Sock Monkey series of comics and picture books. Millionaire was born in Boston and grew up in and around the seaside town of Gloucester, Massachusetts. He came from a family of artists - his father was a commercial illustrator, his mother and grandparents were painters - and was encouraged to draw from an early age. His grandfather, who was a friend of the cartoonist Roy Crane, had a large collection of old Sunday comics which were an early source of inspiration to Millionaire. He drew his first comic strip, "about an egg-shaped superhero who flew around talking about how great he was and then crashing into a cliff," when he was nine years old. At age 13 he lost his natural front teeth in a car accident; since then he has worn false teeth. During high school Millionaire continued to draw comic strips for his own amusement. After high school Millionaire attended the Massachusetts College of Art, where he majored in painting, but left without graduating after getting three quarters through his fourth year. While in college he began
    6.50
    8 votes
    5
    Jorge Cham

    Jorge Cham

    Jorge Cham (HOR-heh) (born in May 1976) is a Chinese Panamanian cartoonist and roboticist best known for his popular newspaper and web comic strip Piled Higher and Deeper (PhD Comics). Cham lives in the United States, where he started drawing PhD Comics as a graduate student at Stanford University. He has since been syndicated in several university newspapers and in four published book collections. He was featured on NPR on December 20th, 2010. Jorge Cham received his Bachelor's degree from Georgia Tech in 1997, and earned a PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford. He subsequently worked at Caltech as an instructor and as a researcher on neural prosthetics. In 2005, Cham began an invited speaking tour of over 80 major universities delivering his talk titled "The Power of Procrastination". In this lecture, Cham talks about his experiences creating the comic strip and examines the sources of grad students' anxieties. He also explores the guilt and the myths associated with procrastination and argues that in many cases it is actually a good thing. On the 26th of October 2009, after disembarking a flight to England, Cham was detained at London's Heathrow airport for several hours.
    6.71
    7 votes
    6

    Walter Ball

    Walter Ball (born 1911, date of death unknown) was cartoonist for the Canadian comic strip feature Rural Route, which became a familiar fixture in the Toronto Star Weekly between 1956 until the publication's demise in 1968. He was born in Cookstown, Ontario. Ball, who grew up on a farm near Cookstown, originally looked at electrical engineering as a career, but it was his application to the Toronto Daily Star, with only a few sample correspondence school art lessons under his belt, that got him hired as a graphic artist in 1932. Early in his tenure at the Star, Ball (not yet a cartoonist) befriended legendary Canadian artist Jimmy Frise, who accepted a more lucrative offer from the Montreal Standard in the late 1940s. When the Star Weekly made a format change from broadsheet to tabloid in 1956, an editor asked Ball if he knew a cartoonist interested in creating a comic feature for the new publication. Ball suggested some names, but having always had a desire to enter the field, worked concurrently on his own strip. It was quickly accepted and one month into the new format, a reader survey indicated Rural Route had become the most read feature in the publication. Featuring the
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Jerry Holkins

    Jerry Holkins

    Keith Gerald "Jerry" Holkins né Parkinson (born February 6, 1976) is the primary writer of the webcomic Penny Arcade along with its artist Mike Krahulik. He is also a co-founder of Child's Play, a multimillion dollar charity which organizes toy drives for children's hospitals. Holkins sometimes uses the pseudonym "Tycho Brahe," the name of a Penny Arcade character based on Holkins. They are similar in their interests and personalities. However, the character Tycho does not resemble Holkins in appearance (for example, Tycho has mussed hair and sideburns, while Holkins is mostly bald). Holkins, along with Krahulik, posts written updates accompanying each comic. These posts are often computer and video game commentary, but also include personal reflections or rants. It has been mutually agreed between Krahulik and Holkins that Penny Arcade would not be the same with just one of them. The two have been said to give an indication of the diversity of styles among gamers, with Krahulik representing action-oriented gamers and Holkins representing the more cerebral players. Outside of Penny Arcade and Child's Play, Holkins also sings and plays guitar in the band The Fine Print, whose music
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Larry Alcala

    Larry Alcala

    Lauro Zarate Alcala (August 18, 1926 – 2002), also known as Larry Alcala, was a well-known editorial cartoonist and illustrator in the Philippines. He was born on August 18, 1926 to Ernesto Alcala and Elpidia Zarate in Daraga, Albay. Through a scholarship from Manila Times granted by the publisher Ramón Roces, he obtained a degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting at the University of the Philippines (UP) in 1950. He became a professor at the same university from 1951 to 1981. He also received the Australian Cultural Award accompanied by a travel study grant in 1975. He started his cartooning career in 1946 while still attending school. After World War II, he created his very first comic strip, Siopawman, which was printed on the pages of the Filipino comic book, Halakhak (Laughter). In 1947, he created the comic strip Kalabog en Bosyo, using Taglish as the medium of communication of his characters. He pioneered animated cartoons for television commercials of products such as Darigold Milk in 1957 and Caltex in 1965. His campaign for the advancement of illustration and commercial art in the Philippines resulted to the establishment of the Visual Communication Department at the
    7.33
    6 votes
    9

    Ted Osborne

    Ted Osborne (February 6, 1900 or 1901–March 12, 1968) was an American writer of comics, radio shows and animated films, remembered for his contributions to the creation and refinement, during the 1930s, of Walt Disney cartoon characters. Ted Osborne spent a decade (1931–40) at the Walt Disney Studio as a story writer and, between 1932 and 1937, wrote the Mickey Mouse newspaper dailies and Silly Symphonies Sunday comics. These were illustrated by Floyd Gottfredson and Al Taliaferro respectively. With Taliaferro, Osborne has been credited as the co-creator of Huey, Dewey and Louie. Osborne wrote many of the celebrated Mickey Mouse daily strip adventures which were later adapted into the popular Big Little Books of the 30's and 40's ("Pirate Submarine", "The Seven Ghosts", "Oscar the Ostrich", "Race For Riches", "Mickey Mouse Runs His Own Newspaper", and several others). He was succeeded by such quality writers as Merrill de Maris and Bill wright. He was born in Oklahoma and died in San Mateo County, California.
    7.33
    6 votes
    10

    Ron Vivian

    Ron Vivian (1914–1973) was an Australian cartoonist who is perhaps best known as having drawn Ginger Meggs after the original creator, Jimmy Bancks in the early-1940s. He also contributed political cartoons to the Australian Daily Telegraph and illustrated many Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) magazines during the Second World War.
    7.17
    6 votes
    11
    Thomas Yeates

    Thomas Yeates

    Thomas Yeates (born January 19, 1955) is an American comic book and comic strip artist best known for illustrating the comic strips Prince Valiant and Zorro, plus work on characters created by Edgar Rice Burroughs. In 1982, Yeates and writer Martin Pasko revived Swamp Thing, in a new series titled Saga of the Swamp Thing. On April 1, 2012, Yeates began drawing the Prince Valiant comic strip, replacing Gary Gianni.
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Randall Munroe

    Randall Munroe

    Randall Patrick Munroe (born October 17, 1984) is an American webcomic author and former NASA roboticist as well as a programmer, best known as the creator of the webcomic xkcd. He and the webcomic have developed a cult following, and he is one of a small but growing group of professional webcomic artists. Munroe was a fan of the funny pages from an early age, starting off with Calvin and Hobbes. After graduating from the Chesterfield County Mathematics and Science High School at Clover Hill: A Renaissance Program, he graduated from Christopher Newport University in 2006 with a degree in physics. Munroe worked as an independent contractor for NASA at the Langley Research Center before and after his graduation. In October 2006 NASA did not renew his contract and he began to write xkcd full-time. He now supports himself by the sale of xkcd related merchandise. The webcomic quickly became very popular, garnering up to 70 million hits a month by October 2007. He has also toured the lecture circuit, giving speeches at such places as Google's Googleplex in Mountain View, California. As of May 2008, Munroe lived in Somerville, Massachusetts. Munroe announced in September 2011 that he had
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    William Wallace Denslow

    William Wallace Denslow

    William Wallace Denslow (May 25, 1856 – May 27, 1915) – usually credited as W. W. Denslow – was an American illustrator and caricaturist remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his illustrations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Denslow was an editorial cartoonist with a strong interest in politics, which has fueled political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Born in Philadelphia, Denslow spent brief periods at the National Academy of Design and the Cooper Union in New York, but was largely self-educated and self-trained. In the 1880s, he traveled about the United States as an artist and newspaper reporter; he came to Chicago for the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, and chose to stay. Denslow acquired his earliest reputation as a poster artist; he also designed books and bookplates, and was the first artist invited to work at the Roycroft Press. Denslow may have met Baum at the Chicago Press Club, where both men were members. Besides The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Denslow also illustrated Baum's books By the Candelabra's Glare, Father Goose: His Book, and Dot and Tot of Merryland. Baum and Denslow held the copyrights to most of
    8.20
    5 votes
    14

    Kaz

    Kazimieras G. Prapuolenis, or Kaz, (born 1959, Hoboken, New Jersey) is an American cartoonist and illustrator. In the 1980s, after attending New York City's School of the Visual Arts, he was a frequent contributor to the comic anthologies RAW and Weirdo. Since 1992 he has drawn Underworld, an adult-themed syndicated comic strip that appears in many alternative weeklies. Kaz's comics and drawings have appeared in many alternative and mainstream publications including Details, The New Yorker, Nickelodeon Magazine, The Village Voice, The East Village Eye, Swank, RAW, SF Bay Guardian, Eclipse, N.Y. Rocker, New York Press, Screw and Bridal Guide. He has continued to contribute to comics anthologies such as Zero Zero. Kaz has also worked on several animated television shows including SpongeBob SquarePants, Camp Lazlo and is currently working on Phineas and Ferb. With Derek Drymon, Kaz co-wrote pilot episode for the forthcoming Diggs Tailwagger. In September, 2006, Kaz left Camp Lazlo to work on another pilot for a Cartoon Network show, Zoot Rumpus, based on a character from Underworld. Kaz lives in Hollywood, California, with his spouse Linda Marotta.
    6.83
    6 votes
    15
    Charles M. Schulz

    Charles M. Schulz

    Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000), nicknamed Sparky, was an American cartoonist, whose comic strip Peanuts proved one of the most popular and influential in the history of the medium and is still widely reprinted on a daily basis. Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Schulz grew up in Saint Paul. He was the only child of Carl Schulz, who was born in Germany, and Dena Halverson, who was Norwegian. His uncle called him "Sparky" after the horse Spark Plug in Billy DeBeck's comic strip, Barney Google. Schulz loved drawing and sometimes drew his family dog, Spike, who ate unusual things, such as pins and tacks. Schulz drew a picture of Spike and sent it to Ripley's Believe It or Not!; his drawing appeared in Robert Ripley's syndicated panel, captioned, "A hunting dog that eats pins, tacks and razor blades is owned by C. F. Schulz, St. Paul, Minn." and "Drawn by 'Sparky'" (C.F. was his father, Carl Fred Schulz.) Schulz attended St. Paul's Richard Gordon Elementary School, where he skipped two half-grades. He became a shy, timid teenager, perhaps as a result of being the youngest in his class at Central High School. One episode in his high school life was the
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Judd Winick

    Judd Winick

    Judd Winick (born February 12, 1970) is an American comic book, comic strip and television writer/artist and former reality television personality. Winick first gained fame for his 1994 stint on MTV's The Real World: San Francisco, before earning success for his work on comic books as Green Lantern, Green Arrow, and Pedro and Me, his autobiographical graphic novel about his friendship with Real World castmate and AIDS educator Pedro Zamora. He also created the animated TV series The Life and Times of Juniper Lee, which ran for three seasons on Cartoon Network. Winick was born February 12, 1970, and grew up in Dix Hills, New York. He graduated from high school in 1988 and entered the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor's School of Art, intending to emulate his cartoonist heroes, Garry Trudeau and Berkeley Breathed. His comic strip, "Nuts and Bolts", began running in the school’s newspaper, the Michigan Daily, in his freshman year, and he was selected to speak at graduation. U of M also published a small print-run of a collection of his strips called Watching the Spin-Cycle: The Nuts & Bolts Collection. In his senior year, Universal Press Syndicate, which syndicates strips such as
    6.50
    6 votes
    17

    Lloyd Piper

    Lloyd Piper (1923 – 1983) was an Australian cartoonist and art teacher, who drew Wolf for the Sunday Telegraph and later, Ginger Meggs.
    10.00
    3 votes
    18
    Frank Cho

    Frank Cho

    Frank Cho, born Duk Hyun Cho, is a Korean-American comic strip and comic book writer and illustrator, known for his series Liberty Meadows, as well as for books such as Shanna the She-Devil, Mighty Avengers and Hulk for Marvel Comics, and Jungle Girl for Dynamite Entertainment. The artist is noted for his figure drawing, precision lines, and depiction of well-endowed women. The second of three children, Cho was born near Seoul, Korea in 1971, but moved to the United States at the age of six, along with his brothers, Rino and Austin, and their parents, Kyu Hyuk Cho and Bok Hee Cho, who were in search of better economic opportunities. Cho was raised in Beltsville, Maryland. His parents had college degrees, but because they did not speak English well, they took whatever jobs they could to support the family, with his mother working in a shoe factory, and his father as a carpenter during the day and a janitor at a Greyhound Bus station at night. Because money was scarce, Cho, who describes his latchkey childhood as "rough", was relegated to finding his own extracurricular entertainment. When Cho was ten, his older brother, Rino, brought some comic books home, and Cho started copying
    8.25
    4 votes
    19

    Mark O'Hare

    Mark O'Hare is an American cartoonist who created the comic strip Citizen Dog. O'Hare is well known for his work on animated television shows as a writer and storyboard artist for Rocko's Modern Life, SpongeBob SquarePants, Dexter's Laboratory, The Powerpuff Girls and Hey Arnold!. He performed storyboard work on The Ren and Stimpy Show. Throughout the run of the series, O'Hare served as the creative director and supervising producer on Camp Lazlo. He is currently a story artist with Illumination Entertainment, contributing to the films Despicable Me, The Lorax, and the upcoming sequel Despicable Me 2. Although accepted into the aeronautical engineering program at Purdue University, O'Hare shifted focus after his sophomore year to study graphic design, later getting acceptance into the character animation program at California Institute of the Arts. While a student at Purdue University, he drew a strip called Art Gallery for the student newspaper, The Exponent. The comic ran from the autumn of 1987 to the spring of 1990. O'Hare has been nominated four times for an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and won his first Emmy in 2007 for "Outstanding Animated Program" on
    6.17
    6 votes
    20

    Michael Breckenridge

    Michael Breckenridge is an actor, musician, journalist and artist. Breckenridge graduated from the University of Washington, Seattle with a Bachelor's degree in Communications, specializing in Broadcast Journalism. He worked in Nashville, Tennessee, as a music journalist. He has extensively toured the United States. He has been seen in several major motion pictures, and heard (as the composer) in several films, and as the voiceover artist in television commercials. He is also an artist, specializing in wood and stone carvings.
    6.17
    6 votes
    21

    Berkeley Breathed

    Guy Berkeley "Berke" Breathed (/ˈbrɛðɨd/ BRETH-əd; born June 21, 1957) is an American cartoonist, children's book author/illustrator, director and screenwriter, best known for Bloom County, a 1980s cartoon-comic strip that dealt with sociopolitical issues as understood by fanciful characters (e.g., Bill the Cat and Opus the Penguin) and through humorous analogies. Bloom County earned Breathed the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in 1987. Born in Encino, California, and raised in Houston, Texas, Breathed attended Westchester High School. He was a cheerleader his senior year and graduated in 1975. Breathed's first cartoon appeared on one side of the senior boys' T-shirts which were worn on Fridays during football season. He did not have a shirt as he wore cheerleader outfits head to toe. Mark Denison (now an architect) drew the other side of the T-shirt and his shirt is being saved for posterity. He lived in Albuquerque in the 1980s and put pink flamingos in his yard. The Sandia Heights neighborhood association sent him a letter stating that the yard must be earth tone, so he painted them to be compliant. Breathed became published first when he was hired part-time by the
    7.00
    5 votes
    22

    Chic Young

    Murat Bernard Young (January 9, 1901 – March 14, 1973), better known as Chic Young, was an American cartoonist who created the popular, long-running comic strip Blondie. His 1919 William McKinley High School Yearbook cites his nickname as Chicken, source of his familiar pen name and signature. According to King Features Syndicate, Young had a daily readership of 52 million. Stan Drake, who drew Blondie in the 1980s and 1990s, stated that Young "has to go down in history as one of the geniuses of the industry." Born in Chicago, Illinois, Young began drawing with the encouragement of his mother, who was an artist. Although his father, James, was a shoe salesman who didn't think much of artists, all of the children in the family were creative: Walter was a painter, daughter Jamar entered the commercial art field and Lyman, Chic's older brother, drew the Tim Tyler's Luck comic strip for King Features. It was Lyman who spurred Chic to constantly draw. Chic Young grew up in a German-Lutheran neighborhood on the south side of St. Louis. After graduating from high school in St. Louis, he returned to Chicago where he worked as a stenographer while taking night classes at the Art Institute
    7.00
    5 votes
    23

    Mort Walker

    Addison Morton Walker (born September 3, 1923), popularly known as Mort Walker, is an American comic artist best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. He has signed Addison to some of his strips. Born in El Dorado, Kansas, he grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. He had his first comic published at age 11 and sold his first cartoon at 12. At age 14, he regularly sold gag cartoons to Child Life, Flying Aces and Inside Detective magazines. When he was 15, he drew a comic strip, The Lime Juicers, for the weekly Kansas City Journal, and at age 18, he was the chief editorial designer for Hallmark Cards. Graduating from Northeast High School, he attended the University of Missouri, where today a life-sized bronze statue of Beetle Bailey stands in front of the alumni center. In 1943, Walker was drafted into the United States Army during World War II, serving in Italy, where he was an intelligence and investigating officer and was also in charge of a German POW camp. He was discharged as a first lieutenant in 1947. He graduated in 1948 from the University of Missouri, where he was the editor and art director of the college's humor
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Tom Hodges

    Tom Hodges

    Thomas David Hodges (born April 5, 1972 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American artist, who worked on many Star Wars webcomics, as well as Star Wars Insider article The Mandalorians: People and Culture written by Karen Traviss and notable for featuring visual reference on the first female Mandalorian. He also contributed artwork to the book You Can Draw: Star Wars published by DK Publishing. He is married to Terri Fontana-Hodges, for who he named the character Vhonte Tervho and they have a son, Logan, for who he named the character Drake Lo'gaan.
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    Posy Simmonds

    Posy Simmonds

    Rosemary Elizabeth "Posy" Simmonds MBE (born 9 August 1945) is a British newspaper cartoonist and writer and illustrator of children's books. She is best known for her long association with The Guardian, for which she has drawn the cartoons Gemma Bovery (2000) and Tamara Drewe (2005–06), both later published as books. Her style gently satirises the English middle classes and in particular those of a literary bent. Both of the published books feature a "doomed heroine", much in the style of the 18th- and 19th-century gothic romantic novel, to which they often allude, but with an ironic, modernist slant. Posy Simmonds was born in Berkshire and educated at Queen Anne's School, Caversham. She studied at the Sorbonne before returning to London to attend Central School of Art & Design. She started her newspaper career drawing a daily cartoon, “Bear”, for The Sun in 1969. She contributed humorous illustrations to The Times from 1968 to 1970. She also contributed to Cosmopolitan, and a satirical cartoon to Tariq Ali's Black Dwarf magazine. She moved to The Guardian as an illustrator in 1972. In May 1977 she started drawing a weekly comic strip for The Guardian, initially titled The Silent
    6.80
    5 votes
    26

    Bill Holbrook

    Bill Holbrook (born 1958) is an American cartoonist and webcomic writer and artist, best known for his syndicated comic strip On the Fastrack. Born in Los Angeles, Holbrook grew up in Huntsville, Alabama, and began drawing at an early age. While majoring in illustration and visual design at Auburn University, Holbrook served as art director of the student newspaper, doing editorial cartoons and a weekly comic strip. At the same time, his work was being published in the Huntsville Times and the Monroe Journal. After graduation in 1980, he joined the Atlanta Constitution as an editorial staff artist. During a 1982 visit to relatives on the West Coast, Holbrook met Peanuts creator, Charles Schulz. Following his advice and encouragement, Holbrook created a strip in the fall of that year about a college graduate working in a rundown diner. It did not stir syndicate interest, but what he learned on the strip helped him when he created On the Fastrack. Eleven days before On the Fastrack made its syndicated debut (March 19, 1984), Holbrook met Teri Peitso on a blind date. They were married on Pearl Harbor Day, 1985. They have two daughters, Chandler and Haviland. Peitso-Holbrook's novels
    9.00
    3 votes
    27

    Frank Robbins

    Franklin "Frank" Robbins (September 9, 1917 – November 28, 1994) was a notable American comic book and comic strip artist and writer, as well as a prominent painter whose work appeared in museums including the Whitney Museum of American Art, where one of his paintings was featured in the 1955 Whitney Annual Exhibition of American Painting. Born in Boston, Robbins was in his teens when he received a Rockefeller grant and scholarships to the Boston Museum and the National Academy of Design in New York. His early career included work as an assistant to Edward Trumbull on his NBC building murals, and creating promotional materials for RKO Pictures. As a writer/editor, Robbins was instrumental in returning Batman to the character's gothic roots, such as his story "One Bullet Too Many". Working with editor Julius Schwartz and artists Neal Adams and Irv Novick, he would revitalize the character with a series of noteworthy stories reestablishing Batman's dark, brooding nature. In addition to Batman, Robbins' comic book work appeared in Captain America, Daredevil, Detective Comics, Flash, Ghost Rider, House of Mystery, House of Secrets, Human Fly, Invaders, Weird War Tales, and Power Man,
    9.00
    3 votes
    28

    James Swinnerton

    James Guilford Swinnerton (November 13, 1875 – September 8, 1974) was an American cartoonist and a landscape painter of the Southwest deserts. He was known as Jimmy to some and Swinny to others. He signed some of his early cartoons Swin, and on one ephemeral comic strip he used Guilford as his signature. Experimenting with narrative continuity, he played a key role in the development of the comic strip at the end of the 19th century. Born in Eureka, California, the son of Judge J. W. Swinnerton, he was 14 when he entered the San Francisco School of Design, where the painter Emil Carlsen was one of his instructors. He was still a teenager when he became a staff cartoonist for Hearst's San Francisco Examiner in 1892. One of his first assignments was to produce for the children's section of the newspaper a weekly cartoon, successively titled California Bears, The Little Bears and Little Bears and Tykes. Some comic art historians have called the Little Bears the first comic strip, preceding The Yellow Kid by three years. This assertion is debatable, depending on the definition of comic strip, but Swinnerton was certainly drawing multi-panel stories with speech balloons by 1900. In
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Marten Toonder

    Marten Toonder

    Marten Toonder (May 2, 1912 – July 27, 2005) was a Dutch comic creator, born in Rotterdam. He was probably the most successful comic artist in the Netherlands and had a great influence in the Dutch language by introducing new words and expressions. His most famous comic series were the Tom Puss (Tom Poes in Dutch) and Oliver B. Bumble (Olivier B. Bommel in Dutch) series that appeared in a Dutch newspaper from 1941-1986. It has a very characteristic format. Every day there were three drawings and an accompanying text (about a book-page long). It started out as a children's cartoon, but gradually became more relevant to adults. Nowadays his texts are sometimes considered literature and Marten Toonder received several literary prizes for them. He invented many new words and expressions and some of those are now widely used in the Dutch language, or referred to as Prlwytzkofsky language. Because of his specific writing style, so far, it has been impossible to translate adequately. His drawing style is very detailed and might be compared to Pogo, with more room for background drawings, since there are no text 'balloons' in the drawings. Toonder was born in Rotterdam on May 2, 1912. He
    9.00
    3 votes
    30

    Jim Keefe

    Jim Keefe is the most recent artist to contribute original art and stories to the Flash Gordon comic strip. Born January 20, 1965 he attended Joe Kubert's School of Cartoon and Graphic Art after a very brief career at a more traditional institution. From there he went to King Features where he worked as a colorist and briefly ghosted (drew anonymously) Secret Agent Corrigan before getting the assignment to do one of their flagship features. His tenure lasted from January, 1996 to March 2003 when economic issues made it impossible for him to continue. Since then he has devoted his time to teaching, freelance assignments, promoting groups such as the National Cartoonists Society and work on a graphic novel chronicling his Father's service during World War II as a member of Patton's Third Army. His work on Flash Gordon continues to be reprinted in syndication.
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Alex Raymond

    Alex Raymond

    Alexander Gillespie "Alex" Raymond (October 2, 1909 – September 6, 1956) was an American cartoonist, best known for creating Flash Gordon for King Features in 1934. The strip was subsequently adapted into many other media, from a series of movie serials (1936–1940) to a 1970s television series and a 1980 film. Raymond's father encouraged his love of drawing from an early age, leading him to become an assistant illustrator in the early 1930s on strips such as Tillie the Toiler and Tim Tyler's Luck. Towards the end of 1933, Raymond created the epic Flash Gordon science-fiction comic strip to compete with the popular Buck Rogers comic strip and, before long, Flash was the more popular strip of the two. Raymond also worked on the jungle adventure saga Jungle Jim and spy adventure Secret Agent X-9 concurrently with Flash, though his increasing workload caused him to leave Secret Agent X-9 to another artist by 1935. He left the strips in 1944 to join the Marines, saw combat in the Pacific Ocean theater in 1945 and was demobilized in 1946. Upon his return from serving during World War II, Raymond created and illustrated the much-heralded Rip Kirby, a private detective comic strip. In
    5.83
    6 votes
    32
    Matt Groening

    Matt Groening

    Matthew Abram "Matt" Groening ( /ˈɡreɪnɪŋ/ GRAY-ning; born February 15, 1954) is an American cartoonist, screenwriter, and producer. He is the creator of the comic strip Life in Hell (1977–2012) as well as two successful television series, The Simpsons (1989–present) and Futurama (1999–2003, 2008–present) Groening made his first professional cartoon sale of Life in Hell to the avant-garde Wet magazine in 1978. At its peak, the cartoon was carried in 250 weekly newspapers. Life in Hell caught the attention of James L. Brooks. In 1985, Brooks contacted Groening with the proposition of working in animation for the Fox variety show The Tracey Ullman Show. Originally, Brooks wanted Groening to adapt his Life in Hell characters for the show. Fearing the loss of ownership rights, Groening decided to create something new and came up with a cartoon family, The Simpsons, and named the members after his own parents and sisters — while Bart was an anagram of the word brat. The shorts would be spun off into their own series: The Simpsons, which has since aired 510 episodes. In 1997, Groening and former Simpsons writer David X. Cohen developed Futurama, an animated series about life in the year
    6.60
    5 votes
    33

    Hirohiko Araki

    Hirohiko Araki (荒木 飛呂彦, Araki Hirohiko), born Toshiyuki Araki (荒木 利之, Araki Toshiyuki) on June 7, 1960 in Sendai, Miyagi, is a Japanese manga artist. He is best known for his long-running series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, first published in Weekly Shōnen Jump in 1987. The story is full of references to Western music and Italy, both of which Araki is reportedly very fond. Many of Araki's creations have been translated and released in Europe, but so far only Part 3 of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, Baoh and Rohan au Louvre have been released in the United States. One popular theory is that Araki's frequent references to Western music may violate American copyright laws. Viz Media has eluded much of this problem in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure by replacing some band references with album or song references, which do not appear to be as strictly guarded. Araki left school before graduating from Miyagi University of Education, and made his debut in 1980 with the wild west one-shot Buso Poker. Which was a "Selected Work" at that year's Tezuka Award. His first serialization was Magic Boy B.T. in 1982, about a young magician who solves mysteries. But the first series to display his signature amount
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Rick Altergott

    Rick Altergott

    Rick Altergott is a professional illustrator and cartoonist, residing in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, with his wife, fellow cartoonist Ariel Bordeaux. Their collaborative comic book Raisin Pie is published by Fantagraphics. Altergott is best known for Doofus, a long-running series published by Fantagraphics, notorious for its low-brow, scatological humor. Doofus chronicles the misadventures of two small-town weirdos, Doofus and Henry Hotchkiss. Altergott's first published work was in the early 1980s, but he didn't really settle into the comics world until late in the decade, when he contributed regularly to the humor magazine Cracked. Throughout the 1990s Altergott published the small-press comic Douche Bag Dougan (the titular hero of which later made an appearance in Fantagraphics' Zero Zero anthology.) Altergott's work has also appeared in Duplex Planet Illustrated and Hate (both published by Fantagraphics), where he was repeatedly promoted by Peter Bagge. In September 2006, Altergott released a serious biblical mini-comic based on the life of Saint Matthias. In 2008, Altergott and Bordeaux contributed to the anthology Kramers Ergot 7. Altergott is good friends with cartoonist Daniel
    7.50
    4 votes
    35

    Sindre Goksøyr

    Sindre Wexelsen Goksøyr (born 1975 in Oslo) is a comic artist. He also had a brief career as an undistinguished hardcore band musician. His strips have been published by Jippi Comics and Egmont Serieforlaget, as well as some magazines and newspapers. His comic strip Mor, which runs in the Bergen-based tabloid Bergens Tidende, caused some local attention when foul language and obscene content failed to be censored because the editor was away on holiday.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Richard F. Outcault

    Richard F. Outcault

    Richard Felton Outcault (January 14, 1863 – September 25, 1928) was an American comic strip writer-artist. He was the creator of the series The Yellow Kid and Buster Brown, and he is considered the inventor of the modern comic strip. Born in Lancaster, Ohio, Outcault was 15 years old when he went to Cincinnati and enrolled in the McMicken University’s School of Design where he studied for three years. After graduation, Outcault was employed by Thomas Edison as a technical illustrator, going to Paris as the official artist for Edison’s traveling exhibit of electric lighting. In 1890, he moved to New York City, where he joined Electrical World (a magazine owned by one of Edison’s friends) and became a regular contributor to Truth magazine, Judge and Life. After he signed on with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World, Pulitzer placed Outcault's comics in a color supplement, using a single-panel color cartoon on the front page called Hogan's Alley, depicting an event in a fictional slum. Hogan's Alley debuted May 5, 1895. In October 1896, Outcault defected to William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. The result of a lawsuit awarded the title "Hogan's Alley" to the World and "The Yellow
    8.67
    3 votes
    37

    Lee Falk

    Lee Falk, born Leon Harrison Gross (April 28, 1911 - March 13, 1999), was an American writer, theater director and producer, best known as the creator of the popular comic strips The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician. At the height of their popularity, these strips attracted over 100 million readers every day. Falk also wrote short stories, and he contributed to a series of pulp novels about The Phantom. A playwright and theatrical director/producer, Falk directed actors such as Marlon Brando, Charlton Heston, Paul Newman, Chico Marx and Ethel Waters. Falk was born in St. Louis, Missouri, where he spent his boyhood and his youth. His mother was Eleanor Alina (a name he later, in some form, used in both his Mandrake the Magician and The Phantom story lines), and his father was Benjamin Gross. Both of his parents were Jewish. Lee was born and raised Jewish. Benjamin Gross died when Falk was just a boy, and after a time, his mother Eleanor married Albert Falk Epstein, who became the father figure for Lee Falk and his brother, Leslie. Falk changed his surname after leaving college. He took the middle name of his stepfather, but "Lee" had been his nickname since childhood, so he took
    10.00
    2 votes
    38
    Pete Abrams

    Pete Abrams

    Pete Abrams (born August 4, 1970) is the writer and illustrator of the online comic strip Sluggy Freelance. Pete Abrams went to Joe Kubert School of Graphic Design but was unable to get a job in the comics industry after school. Instead he got a job as a web designer for a marketing firm, and started Sluggy Freelance as a creative outlet. He did not believe the attention span on the Internet was long enough for the kind of elaborate graphic novels he was used to drawing, so instead he went for a quickly drawn daily strip . (Since its inception, the strip's production has become more and more sophisticated both in terms of graphical and narrative depth. It no longer conforms strictly to the newspaper model of a short black and white strip on weekdays and a larger, full color Sunday edition.) Sluggy eventually became so successful that it is now his full time job, and he is reputed to be the first person to make a living at drawing webcomics. He currently lives in Denville, New Jersey, U.S., and is married with two daughters, Leah Nicole Abrams and Sarah Emily Abrams.
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    Alfonso Wong

    Alfonso Wong

    Alfonso Wong (Chinese: 王家禧, born 1924) is a popular Hong Kong manhua artist. In 1962, using his eldest son's name "Wong Chak" (王澤) as a pen-name, he created one of the longest running comic strip Old Master Q. He is also referred to as "Alphonso Wong". Wong was born in Tianjin, China. He studied Western art at Fu Jen Catholic University (北京辅仁大学) and was finished with school by 1944. In 1960 he resided permanently in Hong Kong. He was responsible for drawings in bibles for a French Catholic missionary there. He also became the art editor for a Hong Kong Catholic magazine, Le Feng (樂峰報). His career would begin in 1962, when he became the primary author for Old Master Q. The comic was one of the most influential piece of work in the pre-1997 days in Hong Kong before it was transferred back to China. It voiced the opinions of the citizens in an exaggerated comical sense that was able to bypass political censorship. From integration with mainlanders to the education gap, there were no limitations in the sensitive subjects being used to accompany his stories. The comic became legendary for maintaining popularity for over 40 years against endless competition with other HK manhua and
    7.25
    4 votes
    40

    Hy Eisman

    Hy Eisman (b. March 27, 1927) is an American cartoonist who wrote and drew the Sunday strips The Katzenjammer Kids and Popeye. In December 2008, Eisman was the first to introduce the character of Bluto to the Popeye Sunday page. Bluto has continued to appear as the twin brother of Brutus. He entered the comic strip field in 1950 and worked on several strips, including Kerry Drake, Little Iodine and Bunny. In comic books he was the last artist doing Little Lulu before it was cancelled in 1984. He took over The Katzenjammer Kids in 1986 and the Popeye Sunday strip in 1994. An extensive interview with Eisman on his career appeared in Hogan's Alley #15 (2007). In 1976, Eisman, who lives in Glen Rock, New Jersey, became a teacher at the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. He has two daughters by his first marriage. His wife of 42 years died of cancer in the fall of 1997. On June 27, 2004, he married Florenz Greenberg, whose husband had also died in 1997. She is the managing editor at CavanKerry Press, a nonprofit publisher of literary works in Fort Lee, New Jersey. Their wedding invitation was a comic strip with Popeye and Olive Oyl. Eisman won the 1975 National Cartoonists
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Phil Foglio

    Phil Foglio

    Philip "Phil" Foglio (born May 1, 1956) is an American cartoonist and comic book artist best known for his humorous science fiction and fantasy work. Foglio was born on May 1, 1956 in Mount Vernon, New York, and moved with his family to Hartsdale, New York, where he lived until he was 17. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago, Illinois, and was a member of the university's science fiction club, art-directing & co-editing the group's fanzine, Effen Essef. He was nominated for both the Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist and the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation in 1976, and won Best Fan Artist in 1977 and 1978. After living in the DePaul dorms for a few years, Phil moved to the Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago, and hosted weekly Thursday Night Meetings of Chicago-area science fiction fans. He drew the first known Unix daemons for a limited series of T-shirts in 1979. Beginning in 1980, Foglio wrote and illustrated the comic strip What's New with Phil & Dixie for Dragon Magazine from TSR Games, satirizing the world of role-playing games. The strip ran monthly for three years. In the early 1980s, after some time in Chicago attempting to find work doing science
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Quino

    Quino

    Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known by his pen name Quino (born 17 July 1932) is an Argentine cartoonist. His comic strip Mafalda (which ran from 1964 to 1973) is very popular in Latin America and many parts of Europe. Quino was born in Guaymallén, Mendoza Province to Spanish parents. He attended the Escuela de Bellas Artes in Mendoza, hoping to work for the Argentine comic Rico Tipo, but left the school in 1945. In 1950, he sold his first cartoon to a silk shop, but found no success when he visited Buenos Aires for three weeks. When he finished his obligatory military service, he returned to Buenos Aires in 1954, hoping to make living as a graphic artist. Esto Es was the first periodical to publish Quino's work, which was later picked up by many other Buenos Aires-based newspapers and magazines. Some of his cartoons and editorials were then picked up by North American and European periodicals, leading to some international success. In 1963, Quino found a publisher for his first book, a collection of silent comics titled Mundo Quino. Quino's daily newspaper strip Mafalda was his most successful cartooning venture. Mafalda ran from 1964 to 1973. The comic was translated into more
    7.25
    4 votes
    43

    Frank King

    Frank Oscar King (April 9, 1883 – June 24, 1969) was an American cartoonist best known for his popular, long-run comic strip Gasoline Alley. In addition to innovations with color and page design, King introduced the concept of real time continuity to comic strips by showing his characters changing with age over generations. Born in Cashton, Wisconsin, King was the oldest of the two sons of mechanic John J. King and his wife Caroline. When Frank was four years old, he moved with his parents to 1710 Superior Avenue in Tomah, Wisconsin, where they operated their family general store. He started drawing while growing up in Tomah, where he graduated from Tomah High School in 1901. He entered country fair drawing competitions; a sign he drew for a hotel bootblack earned him only 25 cents, but it was seen by a traveling salesman who learned it had been drawn by the son of one of his customers. The salesman arranged an interview for King with a Minneapolis newspaper editor. King began earning $7 a week at the Minneapolis Times, and during his four years there, he doubled his salary while creating drawings and doing retouching. On March 17, 1905, he gave a chalk talk at a Minneapolis St.
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Jimmy Hatlo

    Jimmy Hatlo

    James Cecil Hatlo (September 1, 1897-December 1, 1963), better known as Jimmy Hatlo, was an American cartoonist who created in 1929 the long-running comic strip and gag panel They'll Do It Every Time, which he wrote and drew until his death in 1963. Hatlo's other strip, Little Iodine, was adapted into a feature-length movie in 1946. Hatlo was born in East Providence, Rhode Island on September 1, 1897. His father, James M. Hatlow, a printer, was an immigrant from the Orkney Islands of Scotland. The original spelling of the family name became an inconvenience when, as a budding sports cartoonist, Hatlo fashioned a trademark signature with the "H" drawn as stylized goal posts and the "o" as a descending football. He shrank the "w" into a small apostrophe in the signature but otherwise dropped it entirely. When he was a small child, the family moved to Los Angeles. As a young man, Hatlo began doing incidental artwork and engravings for local newspapers during an era when halftone reproduction of photographs was still limited. When the United States entered World War I, Hatlo went to Kelly Field, hoping to become an aviator despite his poor eyesight. Instead he became a Spanish flu
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    Tove Jansson

    Tove Marika Jansson ( pronunciation (help·info)) (9 August 1914 – 27 June 2001) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. She is best known as the author of the Moomin books. Tove Jansson was born in Helsinki, Finland, which was then a part of the Grand Duchy of Finland. Her family, part of the Swedish-speaking (Swedish: finlandssvensk) minority of Finland, was an artistic one: her father Viktor Jansson was a sculptor and her mother Signe Hammarsten-Jansson was a graphic designer and illustrator. Tove's siblings also became artists: Per Olov Jansson became a photographer and Lars Jansson an author and cartoonist. She studied at University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm in 1930–33, the Graphic School of the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts in 1933–1937 and finally at L'École d'Adrien Holy and L'École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1938. She displayed a number of artworks in exhibitions during the 30s and early 40s, and her first solo exhibition was held in 1943. During her studies, she met her future life partner Tuulikki Pietilä; they collaborated on many works and projects, including the Moomin works, in collaboration with
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Will Eisner

    Will Eisner

    William Erwin "Will" Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an American comic writer, artist and entrepreneur. He is considered one of the most important contributors to the development of the medium and is known for the cartooning studio he founded; for his highly influential series The Spirit; for his use of comics as an instructional medium; for his leading role in establishing the graphic novel as a form of literature with his book A Contract with God and Other Tenement Stories. The comics community paid tribute to Eisner by creating the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, more commonly known as "the Eisners", to recognize achievements each year in the comics medium. Eisner enthusiastically participated in the awards ceremony, congratulating each recipient. In 1987, with Carl Barks and Jack Kirby, he was one of the three inaugural inductees of the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame. Eisner was born in Brooklyn, New York City, the son of Jewish immigrants. His parents provided a modest life for their son. His mother was from Romania and served as the more practical and realistic parent, firmly believing that her son’s artistic tendencies would never amount to any kind of
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Winsor McCay

    Winsor McCay

    Winsor Zenic McCay (September 26, 1869 – July 26, 1934) was an American cartoonist and animator, best known for the comic strip Little Nemo (begun 1905) and the animated cartoon Gertie the Dinosaur (1914). For legal reasons, he worked under the pen name Silas on the comic strip Dream of the Rarebit Fiend. A prolific artist, McCay's pioneering early animated films far outshone the work of his contemporaries, and set a standard followed by Walt Disney and others in later decades. His comic strip work has influenced generations of artists, including creators such as William Joyce, André LeBlanc, Moebius, Maurice Sendak, Chris Ware and Bill Watterson. Winsor Zenic McCay was born in Spring Lake, Michigan, perhaps on 26 September 1869 (this date, found on his tombstone, is debated—his New York Times obituary states 1871). He was the son of Robert McKay (later changed to McCay) and Janet Murray McKay; Robert at various times worked as a teamster, a grocer, and a real estate agent. Winsor's exact place and year of birth are uncertain — he claimed to have been born in Spring Lake, Michigan in 1871, but his gravestone says 1869, and census reports state that he was born in Canada in 1867. He
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    C. W. Kahles

    C. W. Kahles

    Charles William Kahles (pronounced Kah'-less) (January 12, 1878 - January 21, 1931) was a prolific cartoonist responsible for numerous comic strips, notably Hairbreadth Harry. He is credited as the pioneer of daily comic strip continuity with his Clarence the Cop, which he drew for the New York World in the latter 1890s, introducing to newspapers the innovation of continuing a comic strip story in a day-to-day serial format. The cartoonist and comics historian Ernest McGee called Kahles the "hardest working cartoonist in history, having as many as eight Sunday comics running at one time (1905-06) with no assistants to help him." Between 1898 and 1931, Kahles drew a total of 25 comic strips, in addition to paintings, book illustrations and advertisements. At the same time he was contributing single-panel cartoons to Life, Judge, Puck, Browning's Magazine and the Pleiades Club Year Book. Born in Lengfurt, Bavaria, Germany, Kahles arrived in America at the age of seven. His family settled in Brooklyn, New York, living in the Windsor Terrace neighborhood, then a semi-rural area. Young Charles Kahles grew up in Brooklyn, where he lived for many years. With plans to become a painter, he
    6.20
    5 votes
    49

    Doug Allen

    Doug Allen (born February 22, 1956) is an American underground cartoonist, illustrator, and musician. Best known for his long-running comic strip Steven, Allen has over the years collaborated with long-time friend Gary Leib on music, animation, fine art, and comics, including the two-man Fantagraphics anthology Idiotland. In addition to the weekly feature Steven, which ran in college and alternative newspapers from 1977–1994, Allen's comics, gag cartoons, and illustrations have appeared in The New Yorker, BLAB!, Zero Zero, Weirdo, Pictopia, and Duplex Planet Illustrated. In addition to Idiotland, Allen and Leib collaborated on a number of stories in the fund-raising anthology comic Legal Action Comics volume 1, published in 2001. Allen's non-comics work includes plexiglass paintings based on pinball machine art, most of which he produced in the late 1970s; and a more recent series of "fake" marine art paintings, which he sells on his website. Along with Leib, Allen was a founding member of the Grammy-nominated band Rubber Rodeo from 1978–1982. Allen has played bass for many other bands as well. After attending Brown University for a time, Allen graduated from the Rhode Island
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    James Turner

    James Turner

    James Turner is a British cartoonist best known as the creator of the popular webcomic Beaver and Steve. He also created the story "Super Animal Adventure Squad" for the new British children's comic The DFC. He hails from New Malden and apparently loves the fastfood chain, Wimpy's. He is a mathematician and Computer scientist.
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Rob Tornoe

    Rob Tornoe

    Rob Tornoe is the political cartoonist for Politicker.com, a network of state-oriented political websites owned by The New York Observer. He is a member of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists and provides cartoons to The Press of Atlantic City, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The News Journal, and others. Tornoe is one of the only editorial cartoonists in the country who has a staff job for an online media company, and typically draws over 10 cartoons a week on national and local subjects in Politicker.com's network of 15 states. He has drawn political spoofs ranging from Al Gore to Peanuts. In addition to cartooning, Tornoe blogs at Politicker.com on editorial cartooning news and observations. Tornoe graduated from The Kubert School. Tornoe has won several awards for his editorial cartooning, including "Best Cartoon" by the New Jersey chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists in 2007 and second place in 2006. On July 9, 2008, U.S. Representative Jim McDermott (D-Seattle) used one of Tornoe's cartoons as a backdrop for his criticism of officials of the George W. Bush administration and what he described as their true motivations for the Iraq War: In addition to
    7.00
    4 votes
    52

    Tristan A. Farnon

    Tristan Alexander Farnon is an American webcomic author, creator of Leisure Town, and a member of the web comic Jerkcity. Leisure Town is a comic strip, created by Farnon, which features photographs of bendable toy figures digitally superposed onto separately photographed backgrounds to create each frame. While the "characters" are children's toys, the comics explore mature themes. The strip ran from 1997 to 2003 (although in a reduced format from 2001 to 2003); some limited additional content was published in what appears to have been a one-time event in 2005. The strip is still being published on the Internet, but no new content has been published since 2005. Leisure Town gained some notoriety in 1997 when Farnon scanned Dilbert strips and changed the dialogue to become profane and often racist (the story was that a giraffe became irate in his office job and started creating the strips). Dilbert's lawyers came calling and the characters were replaced with stick figures; Farnon then reverted to the Dilbert versions, until the lawyers called again. The original Dilbert comics were restored a second time when the site was relaunched in March 2005. During this period, however, the
    7.00
    4 votes
    53

    Mark Alan Stamaty

    Mark Alan Stamaty is an American cartoonist and children's book writer and illustrator. During the 1980s and 1990s, Stamaty's work appeared regularly in the Village Voice. He is the creator of the long-running comic strip Washingtoon, as well as the earlier comic strip MacDoodle Street, and the online strip Doodlennium for Slate magazine He is also a spot illustrator for Slate. He produced a monthly comic strip in the New York Times Book Review called "Boox" in 2001–2004 that made fun of publishing trends. Stamaty has published several books, including collections of his strips and graphic novels for children, notably Alia's Mission: Saving the Books of Iraq (2004) and the cult classic Who Needs Donuts? (originally published in 1973 and reprinted by Random House in 2003) His late father, Stanley Stamaty, was a professional gag cartoonist, and his mother, Clara Gee Stamaty, is a commercial illustrator and fine artist. Stanley and Clara both attended the Art Academy of Cincinnati.
    8.00
    3 votes
    54

    Russell Myers

    Russell Myers (born 1938) is an American cartoonist best known for his newspaper comic strip Broom-Hilda. Born in Pittsburg, Kansas, Myers was raised in Oklahoma where his father taught at Tulsa University. Myers was interested in cartooning from an early age. After his first submission for syndication failed, he began working for Hallmark Cards in 1960 as an illustrator of greeting cards. He continued to submit comic strip concepts in his free time. The idea for Broom-Hilda originally came from writer Elliott Caplin, brother of cartoonist Al Capp, who described the character to Myers. Myers designed the characters and wrote the script. Caplin acted as Myers' business agent and submitted the strip to the Chicago Tribune Syndicate. The first strip was published on April 19, 1970. Russell and Marina Myers married in 1964. Living near Medford, Oregon, the Myers family also includes son Stewart and daughter Rosie. As Russell Myers noted, "We live in Oregon with seven dogs, three horses, and a pond full of koi and grow moss on our north sides. Hobbies include reading, collecting old cars and hanging out at our local Saturday night dirt track, where I sponsor a car and wish I was brave
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Stephan Pastis

    Stephan Pastis

    Stephan Thomas Pastis (pronounced "Stefen Passtiss") (born January 16, 1968) is an American cartoonist and the creator of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine. A second-generation Greek-American, Pastis was raised in San Marino, California. He started cartooning as a child; his mother brought him pens and paper to amuse him when he was "sick a lot" and had to stay in bed. He dreamed of being a syndicated cartoonist, but figured the odds were against it. Since he enjoyed debating he decided that the law would enable him to earn a living. "I liked to write, and I liked to argue, and I wanted a career that made a lot of money, he said in an interview. "When I look back on it, I think it was those factors, the skills I had matched it. And the money made it something I wanted." He attended the University of California at Berkeley, earning a B.A. in Political Science in 1989. The following year Pastis attended law school at UCLA. He kept drawing all during this time, coming up with the character of the first Pearls Before Swine character, Rat, during a boring class in law school. "When I wrote for him [Rat] it seemed pretty honest. It was the first character where I could really say
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Jussi Tuomola

    Jussi Tuomola

    Jussi Tuomola, pen name Juba (born November 8, 1965 in Lahti) is a Finnish cartoonist. Tuomola is best known for his ongoing comic strip Viivi & Wagner, about the relationship of a woman and a pig. He has also worked on the Punaniska and Myrkky comics and the Finnish version of MAD Magazine. He has even drawn a religious comic book album set in biblical times, called Älä pingota, Paavo! Ota viinirypäleitä... ("Take it easy, Paulie! Have some grapes...") Tuomola first started drawing at pre-school age in Rovaniemi, copying cover art from Finnish Aku Ankka comics. At the age of six and seven he started trying his hand at comics of his own. His first completed comic was called Tom Taylor, an American-style detective comic inspired by the Tex Willer comics and an American TV detective show called Baretta. In 1976, Tuomola moved from Rovaniemi to Turku, and in 1982, he went to the U.S. as an exchange student, which inspired him to become a professional cartoonist. His first published comic was Vauhti-Ville, published in a local newspaper from 1983 to 1984. Tuomola's square-shaped signature "JUBA" was inspired by a similar signature by Jean "Moebius" Giraud.
    6.75
    4 votes
    57

    Mason Williams

    Mason Williams (pseudonym Tailsteak) is a Canadian cartoonist and the creator of the webcomics 1/0 (One Over Zero) and Leftover Soup. As of 2006, he is involved in the tailsteak.com project. He is married to fellow cartoonist Amber Panyko. The website Tailsteak.com (formerly tailsteak.tk) is part blog, part drawing board, part humor and part webcomic. Its content includes ongoing and non-related comics, dystopian science fiction, a chart detailing the relationships between types of facial hair and their owners' political views. At the moment, Tailsteak.com has three ongoing storylines, of which "Band" has received the most screen time. There also are three concluded storylines of varying length and an eclectic mix of other sections from the insightful and the useful to utter non sequiturs.
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Willy Vandersteen

    Willy Vandersteen

    Willy Vandersteen (15 February 1913 – 28 August 1990) was a Belgian creator of comic books. In a career spanning 50 years, he created a large studio and published more than 1,000 comic albums in over 25 series, selling more than 200 million copies worldwide. Considered together with Marc Sleen the founding father of Flemish comics, he is mainly popular in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany. Hergé called him "The Brueghel of the comic strip", while the creation of his own studio and the mass production and commercialization of his work turned him into "the Walt Disney of the Low Countries". Vandersteen is best known for Suske en Wiske (published in English as Spike and Suzy, Luke and Lucy, Willy and Wanda or Bob and Bobette), which in 2008 sold 3.5 million books. His other major series are De Rode Ridder with over 200 albums and Bessy with almost 1,000 albums published in Germany. Willebrord Jan Frans Maria Vandersteen was born in Antwerp in 1913. His family lived in the Seefhoek, a poor quarter of the city, where his father Francis Vandersteen worked as a decorator and stone sculptor. His studio lay next to a printer that produced De Kindervriend, one of the first weekly youth
    6.75
    4 votes
    59

    Billy DeBeck

    William Morgan DeBeck (April 15, 1890 – November 11, 1942), better known as Billy DeBeck, was an American cartoonist. He is most famous as the creator of the comic strip Barney Google (later retitled Barney Google and Snuffy Smith). The strip was especially popular in the 1920s and 1930s, and featured a number of well-known characters, including the title character, Bunky, Snuffy Smith and Spark Plug the race horse. Spark Plug was a merchandising phenomenon, and has been called the Snoopy of the 1920s. DeBeck drew with a scratchy line, and his characters had giant feet and bulbous noses—what is traditionally called a "big-foot" style. His strips often reflected his love of sports. The first awards of the National Cartoonists Society, beginning in 1946, were the Billy DeBeck Memorial Awards (or the Barney Awards). DeBeck was born and grew up on the south side of Chicago, where his father, Louis DeBeck, was a former newspaperman employed by the Swift Company. His father was French, and the name DeBeck evolved from DeBecque. His Irish-Welsh mother, Jessie Lee Morgan, had lived on a farm and was a former schoolteacher. DeBeck attended Hyde Park High School, after which he went to the
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Gustave Verbeek

    Gustave Verbeek

    Gustave Verbeek (born Gustave Verbeck) (1867, Nagasaki, Japan - 1937, New York City, New York) was an illustrator and cartoonist, best known for his newspaper cartoons in the early 1900s featuring an inventive use of word play and visual storytelling tricks. Verbeek was of Dutch ancestry, but was born in Nagasaki, the son of Reformed Church in America missionary Guido Verbeck. He grew up in Japan, but went to Paris to study art, and worked for several European newspapers, creating illustrations and cartoons. In 1900 he moved to the United States, where he did illustrations for magazines such as Harper's, and produced a series of weekly comic strips for newspapers. In the 1920s he started concentrating on engraving and painting. He died in 1937. Verbeek's first strip was Easy Papa, a fairly conventional strip about two mischievous kids and their father, similar to the highly popular contemporary strip The Katzenjammer Kids, which ran in a competing newspaper. Easy Papa appeared in The New York Herald from May 25, 1902 through February 1, 1903. Verbeek is most noted for The Upside Downs of Little Lady Lovekins and Old Man Muffaroo, a weekly 6-panel comic strip in which the first half
    9.00
    2 votes
    61

    Harold Gray

    Harold Lincoln Gray (January 20, 1894 - May 9, 1968) was an American newspaper artist and cartoonist, best known as the creator of Little Orphan Annie, which he worked on for 45 years. Born in Kankakee, Illinois, Gray grew up on a farm near the small town of Chebanse, Illinois. His parents, Ira L. Gray and Estella M. Rosencrans, both died before he finished high school in 1912 in West Lafayette, Indiana, where the family had moved. In 1913, he got his first newspaper job at a Lafayette daily. He graduated from Purdue University in 1917 with a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, but as an artist, he was largely self-taught. In 1917, he found a position with the Chicago Tribune at a salary of $15 a week. During World War I, his rank was lieutenant and he served as a bayonet instructor. Discharged from the military, he returned to the Chicago Tribune and stayed there until 1919 when he left to freelance in commercial art. In 1923, while residing in Lombard, Illinois, he was a charter member of Lombard Masonic Lodge No. 1098, A.F. & A.M. His Masonic career began July 9, 1923 when he became an Entered Apprentice at what was then Lombard Lodge U.D. (Under Dispensation). Gray
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Harry Grant Dart

    Harry Grant Dart

    Harry Grant Dart (1869 – 1938) was an American cartoonist and illustrator known for his futuristic and often aviation-oriented cartoons and comic strips. His first jobs were brochures for the National Crayon Company and illustrations for the Boston Herald. His career took off when the New York World arranged to send him to Cuba. He became a sketch artist for important events, his sketches being published in the newspaper in the days before photographs were used. He rose to become the art editor for The World. It was at this time that he started perhaps his most famous comic strip, The Explorigator. Intended as a rival for Winsor McCay's Little Nemo, The Explorigator concerned the flight of the eponymous airship, headed by a crew of children ages 9–10: Admiral Fudge (who, interestingly, wore a swastika on his hat), Detective Rubbersole, Maurice Mizzentop, Nicholas Nohooks, Grenadier Shift, Teddy Typewriter, and Ah Fergetit. The strip only ran for 14 weeks in 1908, yet its detailed drawings of airships and various other aircraft would later find some fame in the steampunk movement. Dart went on to become a very prolific cartoonist, continuing with Boys Will Be Boys in 1909 and Life
    9.00
    2 votes
    63

    J. D. Frazer

    J. D. Frazer (born 1969), pen name Illiad, is the artist and writer of the webcomic User Friendly. The strip debuted in November, 1997, and is considered to be one of the first major webcomics. It is about a group of characters who work for a fictional Internet service provider, and the comic's readership consists mainly of programmers, self-styled geeks, and other technophiles. The User Friendly website, which Frazer guides, also features general discussions and provides collaborative technical support. Frazer is also an advocate of the open source software movement. Frazer moved to Canada in the mid-1970s, after living in Australia and Asia. He began his career in law enforcement and served as a corrections officer, hoping eventually to join the RCMP. But he changed his mind, leaving law enforcement to pursue more creative endeavours. He worked as a game designer, production manager, art director, project manager, Web services manager, writer, creative director, and cartoonist. He currently lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    Leo Baxendale

    Leo Baxendale (born 27 October 1930 in Preston, Lancashire) is a British cartoonist, who was the creator of the classic Beano strips Little Plum (1953), Minnie the Minx (1953), The Bash Street Kids (created October 1953, began publication February 1954) and The Three Bears (1959). Baxendale was educated at Preston Catholic College. After serving in the RAF, Baxendale took his first job as an artist for the local Lancashire Evening Post drawing adverts and cartoons. In 1952 he began freelance work for the children's comic The Beano, drawing series like Little Plum, Minnie the Minx (started in 1953, taken over by Jim Petrie in 1961), The Three Bears and The Bash Street Kids (initially called When the Bell Rings ). Baxendale also co-operated on the launch of The Beezer in 1956 and Wham! (Odhams Press) in 1964. He left The Beano in 1962. Baxendale worked for Fleetway (IPC Magazines), creating Clever Dick and Sweeny Toddler. In the seventies Baxendale created the Willy the Kid series, published by Duckworths. In the 1980s he fought a seven-year legal battle with D.C. Thomson for the rights to his Beano creations, which was eventually settled out of court. In 1987 Leo Baxendale founded
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Mike Krahulik

    Mike Krahulik

    Mike Krahulik (born 25 September 1977) is the artist for the popular webcomic Penny Arcade and co-founder with Jerry Holkins of Child's Play, a multimillion dollar charity that organizes toy drives for children's hospitals. He goes by the online moniker "Jon(athan) Gabriel" or "Gabe". He does not physically resemble his comic strip counterpart, as the character was not originally meant to represent him. Krahulik credits cartoonist Stephen Silver as a major influence on his drawing style. His style has dramatically changed since he began drawing Penny Arcade in 1998. Krahulik has done promotional comics for Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six and many other video games. He also provided the illustrations for the cover of Agent to the Stars by John Scalzi. In his early career he contributed artwork to the Daily Victim, a regular feature that used to run on GameSpy.com, totaling more than 300 illustrations. Krahulik has been in press online, thanks to hostile phone calls from Jack Thompson regarding an email Krahulik had sent. The email was in response to an offer Thompson had made to video game creators about creating an ultra-violent game based on a man whose son was murdered by a supposedly
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    Bob Dunn

    Bob Dunn (March 5, 1908 – January 31, 1989) was an American cartoonist, entertainer and gagwriter who drew several comic strips. In addition to his own strips, Dunn was known for his work on Jimmy Hatlo's Little Iodine and They'll Do It Every Time. King Features syndicated Dunn's Just the Type from May 5, 1946 to November 24, 1963. It ran in the New York Journal-American and several other newspapers. Comics historian Allan Holtz commented: Never a syndication success, King Features may well have let him do the feature just to keep him happy while working on the Hatlo cash cow feature... When Hatlo died in 1963, though, Dunn's workload presumably got that much heavier and Just the Type was dropped. Dunn finally got an official byline on They'll Do It Every Time starting in 1966. Dunn began his career at King Features. He submitted gags to newspapers and magazines and sold skits to Earl Carroll for his Vanities on Broadway in 1930-31. In 1936, "he invented the knock-knock joke" (according to The World Encyclopedia of Cartoons) in a book he wrote that sold over two million copies. More successful books followed including I'm Gonna Be a Father, Hospital Happy, One Day in the Army and
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    David Reddick

    David Reddick

    David Reddick is an American artist, illustrator and cartoonist. He is the creator of various popular comic strips such as "Legend of Bill," The Trek Life at CBS/ STARTREK.COM, Gene's Journal and Rod & Barry at Roddenberry.com, and he is a full-time cartoonist at Paws, Inc., where he works on the Garfield worldwide property. David's official Star Trek and sci-fi artwork and illustration is represented by Lightspeed Fine Art in California. David also worked as an award-winning staff cartoonist at a daily newspaper for 6 years where his editorial cartoons and single-panel cartoons were distributed to newspapers nationwide through Artizans Syndicate, Scripps Howard News Service and CNHI News Service. David also produces comics and cartoons regularly for magazines like Star Trek Magazine, Knights of the Dinner Table, Renaissance Magazine, Nickelodeon and Scholastic's The New York Times Upfront, to name a few, and has created comic book work for IDW Publishing and Tokyopop, has created product designs for various companies like Paramount Pictures, CBS Studios, Roddenberry Productions, Canson, Inc. and the NCAA, has created mobile content for providers like CBSMobile and ROK Media in the
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    John Reiner

    John Reiner (born 1956) is a cartoonist who collaborates with writer Bunny Hoest on three cartoon series: The Lockhorns, syndicated by King Features, and Laugh Parade and Howard Huge (both for Parade magazine). Born in New York City, Reiner was raised on Long Island, where he graduated from Smithtown High School in 1974. He attended the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he was a contributing artist to Statesman, the student newspaper. He was a psychology major, graduating in 1978. Mad cartoonist Mort Drucker, in 1974, encouraged him to consider cartooning as a career, and the following year, he began work on Joe Simon's humor magazines. Along with pages for Marvel Comics, Reiner did freelance advertising art, humorous illustrations and political caricatures. In 1984, he was an assistant on the comic strip Benchley, which Jerry Dumas and Drucker created to satirize the Washington political scene. King Features syndicated Benchley from 1984 to 1986. Bill Hoest needed an assistant for his strips and cartoons, and in 1986, he hired Reiner to help on The Lockhorns, Agatha Crumm and What a Guy! Eventually, he was assisting on all the Hoest cartoons and strips. After
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    James Kemsley

    James Lawrence Kemsley OAM (15 November 1948 – 3 December 2007) was an Australian cartoonist who drew Jimmy Bancks' original creation, Ginger Meggs. James Kemsley was born in the Sydney suburb of Paddington, but lived for a few years with his parents and sister in New Guinea where his father served as mastor of patrol boats. He then attended the Roman Catholic boarding schools, Our Lady of the Sacred Heart College (1958-60) and Chevalier College (1961-62), both located in Bowral, New South Wales. He also attended the Christian Brothers College at Rose Bay (1962-63). Afterwards he lived for a while with his father in Traralgon, Victoria. Kemsley attended the Independent School of Dramatic Art, North Sydney (1968-71) as well as a National Institute of Dramatic Art Playwright Forum in 1973 and a RADA Professional Workshop in London in 1979. Kemsley's background was in acting and television. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Kemsley was known to children's television audiences as "Skeeter the Paperboy", an on-screen cap-wearing persona (who once said his full name was Amos Skeeter - a play on "a mosquito") that he portrayed as a cast member of The Super Flying Fun Show, and then as
    10.00
    1 votes
    70

    Peter O'Donnell

    Peter O'Donnell (11 April 1920 – 3 May 2010) was a British writer of mysteries and of comic strips, best known as the creator of Modesty Blaise, a female action hero/undercover trouble-shooter/enforcer. He was also an awarded gothic historical romance novelist who wrote under the female pseudonym Madeleine Brent, in 1978, her novel Merlin's Keep won the Romantic Novel of the Year Award by the Romantic Novelists' Association. Born on 11 April 1920 in Lewisham, London, O'Donnell began to write professionally prior to World War II at the age of 16. From 1938 and during the war he served as an NCO in mobile radio detachment (3 Corps) of Royal Signals Corps in the 8th Army in Persia in 1942. Afterwards his unit was moved to Syria, Egypt, the Western Desert, Italy, and Greece in October 1944. After the war O'Donnell began to script comic strips, including the Daily Express adaptation of the James Bond novel, Dr. No. From 1953-1966 he wrote for Garth, and from 1956-1962 Romeo Brown (with Jim Holdaway as an artist). In addition to the comic strips and graphic novels based on Modesty Blaise, O'Donnell published two collections of short stories and twenty novels. He wrote a play which was
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Borin Van Loon

    Borin Van Loon

    Borin Van Loon is a freelance illustrator (since 1976). He is an author, collagist and surrealist painter and has worked for a wide variety of clients in editorial, publishing and promotion. He has created an eclectic collage/cartoon mural on the subject of DNA and genetics for the Health Matters Gallery in London's Science Museum. Van Loon published The Bart Dickon Omnibus of his hero's derring-do in 2005 comprising a surrealist collage graphic novel. Roger Sabin, a writer about comics and lecturer at Central St. Martins in London, England, said of the Bart Dickon series: "Van Loon’s dapper, nay sartorially gifted, creation Bart Dickon is ostensibly an affectionate homage to the boys’ heroes of the 1930s-40s story papers and comics. But look closer and you begin to see that the wonderful collage style of the stories hearkens back to a different period – namely, the high-water mark of underground experimentation in the 1960s and 70s (think Oz/IT/Cyclops) – and that Dickon is a very different kind of hero, again with echoes from that Hippie era (his intra-dimensional adventuring is pure Jerry Cornelius, and his left-wing politics certainly don’t fit the 1930s-40s template). Dickon
    6.50
    4 votes
    72
    Jen Sorensen

    Jen Sorensen

    Jen Sorensen (born September 28, 1974, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) is an American cartoonist who authors Slowpoke, a weekly comic strip that often focuses on current events from a liberal perspective. The comic generally makes use of three recurring characters: Mr. Perkins, Little Gus, and Drooly Julie. Raised in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Sorensen enrolled in the University of Virginia, where she drew a daily comic strip, Li'l Gus, for its student newspaper, University Journal, from 1994 to 1995, as well as contributing to the satirical magazine The Yellow Journal. Sorensen soon became published in various comic anthologies, including Action Girl and the Big Book of the 70's. She later published her own book, Slowpoke Comix #1, in 1998. In 1999, one year after the book was published, Slowpoke became a weekly comic strip, currently published in over 20 alternative newsweeklies throughout America. Sorensen has published three volumes of Slowpoke cartoons, "Slowpoke Cafe Pompous" from 2001, "Slowpoke America Gone Bonkers" from 2004 and her latest book, "Slowpoke One Nation Oh My God!" published in 2008. Besides her weekly political cartoon, she has produced a number of magazine
    6.50
    4 votes
    73
    Warren Ellis

    Warren Ellis

    Warren Girard Ellis (born February 16, 1968) is an English author of comics, novels, and television, who is well known for sociocultural commentary, both through his online presence and through his writing, which covers transhumanist themes (most notably nanotechnology, cryonics, mind transfer, and human enhancement). He is a resident of Southend-on-Sea, England. Ellis was born in Essex in February 1968. Ellis has stated that the televised broadcast of the moon landing is his earliest coherent memory. He was a student at the South East Essex Sixth Form College, commonly known as SEEVIC. He contributed comic work to the college magazine, Spike, along with Richard Easter, who also later followed a career in writing. Before starting his career as a writer, Ellis did "most of the shitty jobs you can imagine; ran a bookstore, ran a pub, worked in bankruptcy, worked in a record shop, lifted compost bags for a living". Ellis's writing career started in the British independent magazine Deadline with a six-page short story published in 1990. Other early works include a Judge Dredd short and a Doctor Who one-pager. His first ongoing work, Lazarus Churchyard with D'Israeli, appeared in
    6.50
    4 votes
    74

    Frank Miller

    Frank Miller (October 2, 1898 – December 3, 1949) was an American cartoonist. Born in Sheldon, Iowa, Miller was most famous for his comic strip Barney Baxter in the Air, created in 1936 for King Features Syndicate, and renamed simply Barney Baxter in 1943. Miller spent his early thirties working on staff at Denver's Rocky Mountain News where he created Barney Baxter in 1935 for the paper's "Junior Aviator" page. Miller sold his first cartoon in 1919 and slowly built up his professional reputation. By the mid-1920s, he decided to make cartooning his full-time profession, working for the Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News. In 1936, Miller took Barney Baxter to King Features. In 1942, he left the strip to Bob Naylor and joined the US Coast Guard, resuming his feature in 1948. An aviator himself, Miller was a member of the Flying Service Club and the National Aeronautics Association. He was a sponsor and instructor of Denver's Junior Flying Club. Miller died from a heart attack on December 3, 1949 at his home in Daytona Beach, Florida, survived by his wife, four children and his father, Charles D. Miller, of Denver.
    5.60
    5 votes
    75

    Albéric Bourgeois

    Albéric Bourgeois (November 29, 1876 – November 17, 1962) was a French-Canadian cartoonist, credited with creating the first continuing comic strip to use word balloons in Canada. Albéric Bourgeois was born November 29, 1876. He studied fine arts in Montréal until 1899, and continued in Boston, where he then landed a job at the Boston Post where he was producing The Education of Annie in 1902. He started at the newspaper La Patrie when he returned to Montréal in 1903. He did political cartoons, as well as the comic strip Les Aventures de Timothée, which may have been the first continuing Québécois comic strip. Later, he spent 25 years as cartoonist for La Presse, where he created a number of series, including Les Aventures de Toinon from 1905 to 1908, and Les Fables du Parc Lafontaine from 1906 to 1908. In February 1905, he took over Le Père Ladébauche from Joseph Charlebois. This was the most famous comic strip in Québec at the time, and he continued with it until his 1957 retirement, also adapting Ladébauche for the theatre. He also created the humorous radio play, Joson Josette. Bourgeois died on 11 November 1962. He became one of the inaugural cartoonists inducted into the
    8.50
    2 votes
    76
    Jim Toomey

    Jim Toomey

    James Patrick Toomey (born 26 December 1960) is a popular American cartoonist famous for his comic Sherman's Lagoon. Toomey received his B.S.E. from Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering in 1983, an M.L.A. from Stanford University in 1995, and a Master's of Environmental Management from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences in 2008. His cartoon strip, Sherman's Lagoon, is distributed by King Features Syndicate, and appears in over 250 newspapers in North America and in over 30 foreign countries.
    8.50
    2 votes
    77

    John McLusky

    John McLusky (1923 – September 5, 2006) is a former comics artist best known as the original artist of the comic strip featuring Ian Fleming's James Bond. McLusky began illustrating the comic strip adaptation of James Bond for the Daily Express. From 1958 to 1966, McLusky adapted 13 of Ian Fleming's James Bond novels or short stories. After Yaroslav Horak had taken over the James Bond strip, McLusky drew Secret Agent 13 for Fleetway. For the magazine TV Comic McLusky illustrated several strips over 15 years, notably Look and Learn and strip adaptations for Laurel & Hardy, and the Pink Panther. In 1982 McLusky returned to illustrate the James Bond strip, collaborating with writer Jim Lawrence to illustrate 4 new original James Bond stories. John McLusky continued other work throughout his career – including substitute teaching and work as a puppeteer on Bournemouth pier. He continued this other work because at one stage he had almost lost the ability to speak due to his isolation from other human beings.
    8.50
    2 votes
    78

    John Ryan

    John Gerald Christopher Ryan (4 March 1921 – 22 July 2009) was a British animator and cartoonist, best known for his character Captain Pugwash. His brother was Roman Catholic theologian and philosopher Columba Ryan. Ryan was born in Edinburgh. He expressed his love of writing and drawing early in life, creating his first book, Adventures of Tommy Brown, at the age of 7. Ryan attended Ampleforth College, a Catholic boarding school. After serving as an officer with the Lincolnshire Regiment in Burma during the Second World War, Ryan studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic. Whilst teaching art at Harrow, Ryan first created Captain Pugwash as a comic strip for The Eagle in 1950, although the strip was dropped after three months as it was felt to be too young for the target audience. Unperturbed, Ryan created Harris Tweed, Special Agent. However, when The Radio Times commissioned him to provide a strip he resurrected the Captain Pugwash strip, and in 1957 he was commissioned by the BBC to produce a series of animation shorts featuring the character, originally running from 1957 to 1958. The animation of these films was done in real time (rather than by the stop-frame animation method)
    8.50
    2 votes
    79

    Roy Crane

    Royston Campbell Crane (November 22, 1901–July 7, 1977), who signed his work Roy Crane, was an influential American cartoonist who created the comic strip characters Wash Tubbs, Captain Easy and Buz Sawyer. He pioneered the adventure comic strip, establishing the conventions and artistic approach of that genre. Comics historian R. C. Harvey wrote, "Many of those who drew the earliest adventure strips were inspired and influenced by his work." Born in Abilene, Texas, Crane grew up in nearby Sweetwater. When he was 14, he took the Charles N. Landon correspondence course in cartooning. He initially attended college at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene and later the University of Texas, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity. At 19, he studied for six months at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. His early work history was a checkered one, including pitching tents for a Chautauqua, a seaman's berth and a stint riding the rails. In 1922, he began his newspaper cartooning career on the New York World, where he assisted H. T. Webster. Crane was also influenced by the work of cartoonist Ethel Hays, especially in the drawing of women. In 1924, Crane approached Charles N.
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Tom Tomorrow

    Tom Tomorrow is the pen name of editorial cartoonist Dan Perkins. His weekly comic strip This Modern World, which comments on current events, appears regularly in over 90 newspapers across the U.S. and Canada as of 2006, as well as on CREDO Action and Daily Kos, where he is its comics curator. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Spin, Mother Jones, Esquire, The Economist and The American Prospect. In 1998 Perkins was asked by editor James Fallows to contribute a bi-weekly cartoon to U.S. News and World Report, but was fired less than six months later, reportedly at the direction of owner Mort Zuckerman. In 1999, Perkins had an animation deal with Saturday Night Live and produced three animated spots that were never aired. In 2000 and 2001 his online animated series was the top-billed attraction in Mondo Media's lineup of mini-shows, in which the voice of Sparky the Penguin was provided by author and Jeopardy champion Bob Harris. Perkins has also collaborated with Michael Moore, according to a 2005 interview with Santa Cruz Metro, in which he stated, "(T)his never got to actual animation, but I did work on a script with Michael Moore for a year. It was right
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Dashiell Hammett

    Dashiell Hammett

    Samuel Dashiell Hammett ( /dəˈʃiːl/; May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories, a screenplay writer, and political activist. Among the enduring characters he created are Sam Spade (The Maltese Falcon), Nick and Nora Charles (The Thin Man), and the Continental Op (Red Harvest and The Dain Curse). In addition to the significant influence his novels and stories had on film, Hammett "is now widely regarded as one of the finest mystery writers of all time" and was called, in his obituary in The New York Times, "the dean of the... 'hard-boiled' school of detective fiction." Time magazine included Hammett's 1929 novel Red Harvest on a list of the 100 best English-language novels published between 1923 and 2005. Hammett was born on a farm called Hopewell and Aim in St. Mary's County, in southern Maryland. His parents were Richard Thomas Hammett and Anne Bond Dashiell. His mother belonged to an old Maryland family whose name was Anglicized from the French De Chiel. Hammett was baptized a Catholic and grew up in Philadelphia and Baltimore. "Sam," as he was known before he began writing, left school when he was 13 years old and
    7.33
    3 votes
    82

    Larry Gonick

    Larry Gonick (born 1946) is a cartoonist best known for The Cartoon History of the Universe, a history of the world in comic book form, which he has been publishing in installments since 1977. He has also written The Cartoon History of the United States, and he has adapted the format for a series of co-written guidebooks on other subjects, beginning with The Cartoon Guide to Genetics in 1983. The diversity of his interests, and the success with which his books have met, have together earned Gonick the distinction of being "the most well-known and respected of cartoonists who have applied their craft to unravelling the mysteries of science" (Drug Discovery Today, March 2005). From 1990 to 1997, Gonick penned a bimonthly "Science Classics" cartoon for the science magazine Discover. Each two-page comic discussed a recent scientific development, often one in interdisciplinary research. During the 1994-95 academic year, Gonick was a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT. In 1997, his 14-issue series, Candide in China, published on the World Wide Web, described Chinese inventions. He also writes the Kokopelli & Company comic that appears in the magazine Muse. He drew the satirical,
    7.33
    3 votes
    83
    Alison Bechdel

    Alison Bechdel

    Alison Bechdel ( /ˈbɛkdəl/ BEK-dəl; born September 10, 1960) is an American cartoonist. Originally best known for the long-running comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, in 2006 she became a best-selling and critically acclaimed author with her graphic memoir Fun Home. Alison Bechdel was born in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania to Roman Catholic parents who were teachers. Bechdel's brother is keyboard player John Bechdel, who has worked with many bands including Ministry. Her family also owned and operated a funeral home. She attended Simon's Rock College and then Oberlin College, graduating in 1981. Bechdel moved to New York City and applied to many art schools but was rejected and worked in a number of office jobs in the publishing industry. She began Dykes to Watch Out For as a single drawing labeled "Marianne, dissatisfied with the morning brew: Dykes to Watch Out For, plate no. 27". An acquaintance recommended she send her work to Womannews, a feminist newspaper, which published her first work in its June 1983 issue. Bechdel gradually moved from her early single-panel drawings to multi-paneled strips. After a year, other outlets began running the strip. In the first years, Dykes to Watch
    6.25
    4 votes
    84
    Geof Darrow

    Geof Darrow

    Geofrey "Geof" Darrow (born October 21, 1955) is an American comic book artist, best known for his work on Hard Boiled and The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot, which was adapted into an animated television series of the same name. Darrow was a student at Hanna-Barbera cartoon studios after studying at the American Academy of Arts in Chicago. In the early 1980s he worked in character design for the Super Friends, Richie Rich, and Pac-Man television series. In 1982, he met French comic book writer and artist Moebius who was working on the film Tron. Two years later, the two collaborated on a portfolio of prints named La Cité Feu, later reprinted for the English speaking market as City of Fire. Geof has stated in interviews that he considers Hergé, Jack Kirby (who he worked with at Hanna Barbera), Tezuka Osamu and Jean Giraud (Moebius) as his artistic influences. In 1986, Geof produced "Comics and Stories", a collection of stories starring his own character Bourbon Thret, for French publisher Editions Aedena. It contains several pin ups colored by Moebius, Tanino Liberatore and Francois Boucq. Moebius introduced Darrow to Frank Miller which led to a friendship and eventually two
    6.25
    4 votes
    85

    Harri Vaalio

    Harri Sakari Vaalio (born 1956 in Järvelä, Kärkölä, Finland), also known by his artist name Wallu, is a Finnish cartoonist. He is known of his "Punaniska" (Finnish for "redneck") comic albums and his strips in Finnish magazines such as the "Mikrokivikausi" (Finnish for "computer stoneage") strip in the computer magazine MikroBitti. He has also written and drawn 12 Winnie the Pooh stories for the Finnish Winnie the Pooh magazine in 1986-1988. His other comics includes Hessu-kissa (1985- ), Armas, also known as Lämsänperäläiset (1977- ), and KyöPelit (1993- ). In the early 1980s he was a teacher in the local elementary school, now known as Vuokkoharjun ala-aste.
    6.25
    4 votes
    86

    Lela Lee

    Lela Lee (born 1974 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and cartoonist, and the creator of the animated cartoons the Angry Little Asian Girl, Five Angry Episodes and the comic strip Angry Little Girls. Angry Little Girls was developed from Kim, the Angry Little Asian Girl, a character she developed in 1994 when she was a sophomore at UC Berkeley. Four years after initially creating the first episode of the Angry Little Asian Girl, she created four more, and sent the five episodes titled Angry Little Asian Girl, Five Angry Episodes to festivals. Later she submitted her comic strips to syndicates in hopes of getting syndicated in newspapers. But after numerous rejection letters and realizing her work would never fit in the mainstream, she decided to buck the system and draw whatever she was inspired to. With the newly created characters, including Deborah the disenchanted princess, Maria the crazy little Latina, Wanda the fresh little soul sistah, and Xyla the gloomy girl, Lee turned it into a weekly comic strip self-published on her website www.angrylittlegirls.com. After finding her true voice, a publishing deal came quickly thereafter. In 2005, the first book of
    6.25
    4 votes
    87

    Mike Peters

    Michael Bartley Peters (born October 9, 1943), better known as Mike Peters, is an American cartoonist, who draws editorial cartoons and his popular, long-running comic strip Mother Goose and Grimm. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri, where his mother, Charlotte Peters, was a local television personality with one of the earliest TV talk shows, interviewing film stars and politicians as early as 1949. Accompanying his mother to the studio, he would meet such celebrities as Bob Hope and Martin and Lewis. The show had an impact on Peters' own life: Growing up in St. Louis, Peters attended Christian Brothers College High School and Washington University, where he studied fine art, became a Sigma Chi member and graduated in 1965. He drew cartoons for the college paper, Student Life, from 1962 to 1965. Peters recalled, "I knew when I was five years old that I wanted to be a cartoonist. As I grew older, I thought it was the only thing I could do." He met his wife Marian while attending Washington University, and they moved to Chicago where he worked for a year on the art staff of the Chicago Daily News. Drafted into the Army, he spent two years of service as an artist for the Seventh
    6.25
    4 votes
    88

    Russ Manning

    Russell Manning (1929 -1981 ) was an American comic book artist who created the series Magnus, Robot Fighter and illustrated such newspaper comic strips as Tarzan and Star Wars. He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2006. Manning studied at the Los Angeles County Art Institute, and later, during his Army service in Japan, drew cartoons for the newspaper at his military base. In 1953, he went to work for Western Publishing and illustrated stories for the wide variety of comics published by Western for Dell Comics, and later for Western's own Gold Key Comics line. His first notable work was on Brothers of the Spear, a backup feature, created by Gaylord Du Bois in the Tarzan comic book. He also drew a few Tarzan stories. He created Gold Key's Magnus Robot Fighter in 1963 and drew the first 21 issues, through 1968. From 1965 to 1969, Manning drew Gold Key's Tarzan series. During this time, he adapted ten of the first eleven Tarzan novels written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, from scripts written by Gaylord Du Bois. (The adaptation of the sixth, Jungle Tales of Tarzan, also scripted by Du Bois, was drawn by Alberto Giolitti rather than Manning). In 1999, the first seven of
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    David Lynch

    David Lynch

    David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946) is an American filmmaker, television director, visual artist, musician and occasional actor. Known for his surrealist films, he has developed his own unique cinematic style, which has been dubbed "Lynchian", a style characterized by its dream imagery and meticulous sound design. The surreal, and in many cases, violent, elements contained within his films have been known to "disturb, offend or mystify" audiences. Born to a middle-class family in Missoula, Montana, Lynch spent his childhood traveling around the United States, before going on to study painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, where he first made the transition to producing short films. Deciding to devote himself more fully to this medium, he moved to Los Angeles, where he produced his first motion picture, the surrealist horror Eraserhead (1977). After Eraserhead became a cult classic on the midnight movie circuit, Lynch was employed to direct The Elephant Man (1980), from which he gained mainstream success. Then being employed by the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group, he proceeded to make two films: the science-fiction epic Dune (1984), which proved
    7.00
    3 votes
    90

    Floyd Gottfredson

    Arthur Floyd Gottfredson (May 5, 1905 – July 22, 1986) was an American cartoonist best known for his defining work on the Mickey Mouse comic strip. He has probably had the same impact on the Mickey Mouse comics as Carl Barks had on the Donald Duck comics. Two decades after his death, his memory was honored with the Disney Legends citation in 2003 and induction into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2006. Gottfredson was born into a large Mormon family in Kaysville, Utah. The three brothers and four sisters traced their roots to their great-grandfather who had immigrated to the United States from Denmark in the 1840s. As a child, Floyd severely injured his arm in a hunting accident. Housebound during a long recovery, he became interested in cartooning and took several cartooning correspondence courses. By the late 1920s, he was drawing cartoons for trade magazines and the Salt Lake City Telegram newspaper. After achieving second place in a 1928 cartoon contest, the 23-year-old Gottfredson moved to Southern California with his wife and family, just before Christmas. At the time, there were seven major newspapers in the area, but he was unable to find work with any. One job he'd held in
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    3 votes
    91
    Hank Ketcham

    Hank Ketcham

    Henry King Ketcham (March 14, 1920 – June 1, 2001), better known as Hank Ketcham, was an American cartoonist who created the Dennis the Menace comic strip, writing and drawing it from 1951 to 1994, when he retired from drawing the daily cartoon and took up painting full time in his home studio. In 1953, he received the Reuben Award for the strip, which continues today in the hands of other artists. Born in Seattle, Washington, Ketcham was the son of Weaver Vinson Ketcham and Virginia King. His great-grandfather was James Weaver, who ran for President twice on third party tickets in the late 19th century. When he was six years old, his father had a guest over for dinner who was an illustrator. After dinner, he showed the youngster his "magic pencil" and drew some illustrations. Ketcham was immediately hooked, and soon his father set up a small desk in the closet of his bedroom at which he could draw. After graduating from Queen Anne High School in 1937, he attended the University of Washington but dropped out after his first year and hitchhiked to Los Angeles, hoping to work for Walt Disney. Ketcham started in the business as an animator for Walter Lantz and eventually Walt Disney,
    7.00
    3 votes
    92

    Paul Murry

    Paul Murry (November 25, 1911 – August 4, 1989) was an American cartoonist and comics artist. He is best known for his Disney comics, which appeared in Dell Comics and Gold Key Comics from 1946 to 1984. Like many Disney comic book artists Murry started his career working at the Walt Disney Studios. During his time there he was an assistant to legendary animator Fred Moore. In the 1940s, Murry worked on Disney newspaper strips, including the Sunday Uncle Remus and His Tales of Brer Rabbit strip from the first installment on October 14, 1945 through July 14, 1946. After leaving the studio in 1946 he began to work for Western Publishing doing stories featuring the Disney characters. Dell Four Color No. 129 (1946) featuring three Uncle Remus stories penciled by Murry was the first comic book containing his artwork. He is best known for his rendition of Mickey Mouse and associated characters. This includes serials starring Mickey and Goofy in Walt Disney's Comics and Stories and Mickey Mouse Magazine. Many of these serials were written by Carl Fallberg. Murry's first published Mickey Mouse story was "Mickey Mouse and the Monster Whale," in Vacation Parade #1 (July 1950). Murry also drew
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    3 votes
    93
    Reg Smythe

    Reg Smythe

    Reginald Smyth (July 10, 1917 – June 13, 1998), best known by his Reg Smythe pseudonym, was a British cartoonist who created the popular, long-running Andy Capp comic strip. Born in Hartlepool, England, Reginald Smyth (without the "e") was the son of Richard Oliver Smyth, a shipyard worker, and his wife, Florence (Florrie) née Pearce. Leaving school at the age of 14, he was unemployed for some years. He joined the Northumberland Fusiliers, serving ten years and rising to the rank of sergeant. During World War II, Smyth saw active service in North Africa, where he developed a talent for cartoon drawing through creating posters for amateur dramatic productions. After being released from active duty, he settled in London and worked as a clerk for the GPO. He continued to draw poster art, but in the 1950s he moved to cartoon work, operating through an agent and adopting the pseudonym Reg Smythe. By the mid-1950s, he was working for the Daily Mirror, where his Andy Capp strip had its debut in 1957. It made its way to the United States in 1963. Smyth described Andy Capp as having been born "on the A1 road at 60 mph" after he had received, during a visit to West Hartlepool, a request from
    6.00
    4 votes
    94

    Dudley Fisher

    Dudley Fisher (1890 – July 10, 1951) was a syndicated newspaper cartoonist, best known for his character Myrtle who was introduced in his Sunday page, Right Around Home, distributed by King Features Syndicate under various titles from 1937 to 1964. Fisher drew Right Around Home until his death on October 6, 1951, after which his assistant, Bob Vittur, managed the strip with assistance from King Features’ bullpen stalwart Stan Randal until its end on May 2, 1965. Born in Columbus, Ohio, Fisher was studying to be an architect at Ohio State University when he dropped out to work as a newspaper layout artist at The Columbus Dispatch. After serving in an aerial photography unit during World War I, he returned in 1919 to Columbus and the Dispatch, where he created the two-color daily panel Jolly Jingles (1924-37). In 1937, tired of devising the Jolly Jingles rhymes, he created Right Around Home depicting a suburban family. He immediately attracted attention with the experimental concept of an elevated down-angle view showing numerous characters in a large single panel filling an entire Sunday page. Five years later, King Features asked Fisher to do a daily version of Right Around Home
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    2 votes
    95

    Elliot Caplin

    Elliot Caplin (December 25, 1913 - February 20, 2000) was a comic strip writer best known as the co-creator (with Stan Drake) of The Heart of Juliet Jones. His name is sometimes spelled with one extra letter: Elliott A. Caplin. He was the younger brother of Al Capp, creator of Li'l Abner. Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Caplin graduated from Ohio State University in 1936. Beginning in 1937, he was employed as a writer for King Features Syndicate. He entered the comic book field as editor of True Comics for the Parents Magazine Institute. By 1940, he was an editorial director with the magazine Parents, leaving during World War II to serve with the Navy in the South Pacific. In the post-WWII years, he returned to Parents, continuing as an editor there until 1948. Caplin co-created the strips Peter Scratch and Big Ben Bolt and served as writer for strips by others, including Abbie an' Slats, Long Sam and Little Orphan Annie. He founded the comic book publisher Toby Press, which operated from 1949 to 1955. In the early 1970s, Caplin wrote Meegan’s Game, a play about arrested adolescence. Directed by Paul E. Davis, it had a 1974 workshop production for several weekends at the Cricket
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    2 votes
    96

    Frederick Burr Opper

    Frederick Burr Opper (January 2, 1857 – August 28, 1937) is regarded as one of the pioneers of American newspaper comic strips, best known for his comic strip Happy Hooligan. His comic characters were featured in magazine gag cartoons, covers, political cartoons and comic strips for six decades. Born to Austrian-American immigrants Lewis and Aurelia Burr Oppers in Madison, Ohio, Frederick was the eldest of three children. At the age of 14, he dropped out of public school to work as a printer's apprentice at the local Madison Gazette, and at 16, he moved to New York City where he worked in a store and continued to draw. He studied briefly at Cooper Union, followed by a short stint as pupil and assistant to illustrator Frank Beard. Opper's first cartoon was published in Wild Oats in 1876, followed by cartoons and illustrations in Scribner’s Monthly and St. Nicholas Magazine. He worked as illustrator at Frank Leslie's Weekly from 1877 to 1880. Opper was then hired to draw for Puck by publishers Joseph Keppler and Adolph Schwarzmann. He stayed with Puck for 18 years, drawing everything from spot illustrations to chromolithograph covers. Opper married Nellie Barnett on May 18, 1881.
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    2 votes
    97

    Ham Fisher

    Hammond Edward Fisher (24 September 1900 (some sources indicate 1901) – 27 December 1955) was an American comic strip writer and cartoonist who signed his work Ham Fisher. He is best known for his popular long-run on Joe Palooka, which ranked as one of the top five newspaper comics strips during the 1940s. Born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Ham Fisher dropped out of school at the age of 16 to work as a brush peddler and truck driver before finding employment as a reporter and ad salesman for the Wilkes-Barre Record and then moving on to a job with the New York Daily News. In 1920, Fisher put together a sample package of Joe Palooka (then titled Joe the Dumbbell) but was unable to attract interest. By 1927, he was working as a traveling strip salesman for the McNaught Syndicate. However, Fisher also hawked his own unpublished, unsold strip. In 1928, after he secured over 20 sales, including to New York's Daily Mirror, Fisher informed his managers at McNaught, who decided to give Joe Palooka a trial run. The comic strip soon became a national success. The strip helped to solidify the word “palooka” as a boxer who lacks grace or ability, although the character Joe Palooka was the
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    2 votes
    98

    Machiko Hasegawa

    Machiko Hasegawa (長谷川町子, Hasegawa Machiko), January 30, 1920 – May 27, 1992, in Taku, Saga Prefecture) was one of the first female manga artists. She started her own comic strip, Sazae-san, in 1946. It reached national circulation via the Asahi Shimbun in 1949, and ran daily until Hasegawa decided to retire in February 1974. All of her comics were printed in Japan in digest comics; by the mid-1990s, Hasegawa's estate had sold over 60 million copies in Japan alone. Her comic strip was turned into a dramatic radio series in 1955 and a weekly animated series in 1969, which is still running as of 2011. Selected comics were translated into English, under the title The Wonderful World of Sazae-san. She received People's Honor Award in 1992. She died of heart failure at the age of 72 on May 27, 1992.
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    2 votes
    99

    T. O. Honiball

    Thomas Ochse Honiball (1905–1990) was a well known South African cartoon artist. T.O. Honiball (as he was commonly referred to) was born on 7 December 1905 in Cradock, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Honiball attended the well known high school for boys in Stellenbosch, Paul Roos Gymnasium. He originally studied architecture at the University of Cape Town. However, he needed a less structured way to express his artistic capabilities and from 1927 to 1930 he lived in Chicago where he studied commercial art. During this period he was introduced to American cartoons. On his return to Cape Town he worked in advertising and later as freelance caricaturist and cartoonist. In 1941 he became the political cartoonist for a major Afrikaans newspaper group, and quickly became one of the best known South African cartoon artists. In addition to his political cartoons he also published the Oom Kaspaas series, wherein Uncle Kaspaas boasts about his colorful past to his "nephew" Nefie - always to be reminded by some unfortunate event of what had really happened. (Note that in Afrikaans "Neef" (diminutive "nefie") can mean either cousin or nephew. "Oom" literally means "uncle", but the contexts
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    2 votes
    100

    Arnold Roth

    Arnold Roth (born February 25, 1929) is an American freelance cartoonist and illustrator for advertisements, album covers, books, magazines and newspapers. Novelist John Updike wrote, "All cartoonists are geniuses, but Arnold Roth is especially so." Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Roth graduated in 1950 from the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts) and began freelancing in 1951. The following year, he married Caroline Wingfield, and the couple later moved to New York City. They have two sons, Charles and Adam. Roth's art is in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Cartoon Art (San Francisco), Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum and Library and the Karikature and Cartoon Museum (Basel, Switzerland), plus many private collections. His traveling solo exhibition, Free Lance, A Fifty Year Retrospective (2001–04), was seen in Philadelphia, Columbus, San Francisco, New York City, London and Basel. He has staged solo exhibitions at the Philadelphia Print Club, University of the Arts, New York's Century Association and Swarthmore College. In addition to his artwork, Roth plays the saxophone. Roth has done covers for The New
    9.00
    1 votes
    101
    Bill Sienkiewicz

    Bill Sienkiewicz

    Boleslav Felix Robert "Bill" Sienkiewicz [pronounced sin-KEV-itch] (born May 3, 1958) is an Eisner Award-winning American artist and writer best known for his comic book work, primarily for Marvel Comics' The New Mutants and Elektra: Assassin. Sienkiewicz often utilizes oil painting, collage, mimeograph and other forms generally uncommon in comic books. Sienkiewicz was born May 3, 1958, in Blakely, Pennsylvania. When he was five years old, he moved with his family to Hainesville, New Jersey, where he attended elementary and secondary school. Sienkiewicz began drawing "when [he] was about four or five", and continued doing and learning about art throughout his childhood. His early comic-book influences include artist Curt Swan Superman comics, and artist Jack Kirby's Fantastic Four. Sieniewicz attended the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Arts in Newark, New Jersey. After art school, he showed a portfolio of his work to DC Comics' art director Vince Colletta, which led to his breaking into the field at age 19. The artist recalled in 1985, "They didn't have any work for me, but that didn't bother me. I just figured that if comics didn't work out I'd have done advertising or
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    1 votes
    102
    Cathy Guisewite

    Cathy Guisewite

    Cathy Lee Guisewite (born September 5, 1950) is an American cartoonist who created the comic strip Cathy, which had a 34-year run. The strip focused on a career woman facing the issues and challenges of eating, work, relationships and having a mother—or as the character put it in one strip, "the four basic guilt groups." Born in Dayton, Ohio, Guisewite grew up in Midland, Michigan and graduated from Midland High School in 1968. She started writing comic strips at the urging of her mother and was first published in 1976 by Universal Press Syndicate, now Universal Uclick. Guisewite has stated that she didn't set out to work in cartooning, saying, "My entire goal with my submission package was to get my mother off my back. My goal was not to do a comic strip. It was to make mom quit telling me I could do a comic strip." She attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where she was a member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority. In 1972, Guisewite earned a Bachelor's degree in English. She also holds seven honorary degrees. In 1987, she received an Emmy for Outstanding Animated Program for the TV special Cathy, which aired on CBS. Guisewite was a frequent guest in the latter years
    9.00
    1 votes
    103
    Chester Brown

    Chester Brown

    Chester William David Brown (born May 16, 1960 in Montreal) is an award-winning, best-selling Canadian alternative cartoonist and, since 2008, the Libertarian Party of Canada's candidate for the riding of Trinity-Spadina in Toronto, Canada. Brown has gone through several periods in his work, most famously the improvised, surreal, scatological Ed the Happy Clown in the 1980s, his revealing, confessional autobiographical comics of the early 1990s, his biographical graphic novel of rebellious Métis leader Louis Riel, and his pro-prostitution polemic, Paying for It. His work has tended towards controversial themes and content, which has caused it to be dropped from a distributor and a printer, and has been held up at the Canadian border. His underground work was initially self-published as a minicomic called Yummy Fur. Yummy Fur was picked up by the Toronto-based independent comics publisher Vortex Comics in 1986, and became a regular black-and-white comic book. Since 1991, most of his output has been published by the Montreal-based Drawn and Quarterly. As of the publication of Paying for It, he has given up on serializing his work and has started to publish his work directly as
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    1 votes
    104

    Dale Messick

    Dalia Messick (April 11, 1906 – April 5, 2005) was an American comic strip artist who used the pseudonym Dale Messick. She was the creator of Brenda Starr, which at its peak during the 1950s ran in 250 newspapers. She was born in South Bend, Indiana, to a seamstress and commercial artist. She had an interest in writing and drawing since childhood. She studied briefly at the Ray Commercial Art School in Chicago but left to begin a career as a professional artist. She began working for a Chicago greeting card company and was successful but quit when her boss lowered her pay during the Great Depression. In 1933, she moved to New York City where she found work with another greeting card company at a higher salary, $50 a week, sending nearly half of it back to her family in Indiana. She recalled, "I had $30 a week to live it up. You could walk down 42nd Street and have bacon and eggs and toast and coffee and hash brown potatoes and orange juice—the works—for 25 cents." She began assembling a portfolio of comic strip samples. Messick was not the first female comic strip creator; Nell Brinkley, Gladys Parker and Edwina Dumm had all achieved success in the field, but there was still a bias
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    1 votes
    105

    Jimmy Bancks

    Jimmy Bancks (1889 – 1952) was an Australian cartoonist best known for his comic strip Ginger Meggs. James Charles Bancks was born in Enmore, New South Wales, Australia on the 10 May 1889, the son of an Irish railway worker, John Spencer Bancks. Bancks left school at the age of 14 and found employment with a finance company. His first illustrations were accepted and published by The Comic Australian in 1913, followed by The Arrow in 1914. This encouraged Bancks to submit work to The Bulletin, where he was offered a permanent position, which he accepted and remained until 1922. Throughout this period he was studying art under Dattilo Rubbo and Julian Ashton and supplying freelance cartoons to the Sunday Sun. He created Ginger (later Ginger Meggs) for the Sunday Sun and Sun News-Pictorial. Bancks created The Blimps for the Melbourne Sun in 1923, and this daily strip ran until 1925, the year when he launched Mr. Melbourne Day by Day for the Melbourne Sun-Pictorial. On 15 October 1931 Bancks married Jessie Nita Tait (daughter of theatrical entrepreneur, Edward 'E.J.' Tait (1878-1947)) at Darling Point. Jessie died in childbirth on 22 November 1936. In 1938 he married Patricia Quinan in
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    1 votes
    106
    Mary Tourtel

    Mary Tourtel

    Mary Tourtel (28 January 1874 – 15 March 1948) was an English artist and creator of Rupert Bear. Tourtel was born as Mary Caldwell and raised in an artistic family, daughter of a stained glass artist and stonemason. She studied art under Thomas Sidney Cooper at the Sidney Cooper School of Art in Canterbury, and became a children's book illustrator. She eventually married an editor of The Daily Express newspaper, Herbert Tourtel. Rupert Bear was created in the 1920s as the Express was in competition with The Daily Mail and its comic strip Teddy Tail, and Pip, Squeak and Wilfred in The Daily Mirror. Rupert Bear was first published as a nameless character in a strip titled Little Lost Bear on 8 November 1920. Published as two cartoons a day and a short story underneath, the strip featured a brown bear until the Express cut inking expenses and made Rupert's colour white. Tourtel retired in 1935 after her eyesight deteriorated, and the strip was continued by a Punch illustrator, Alfred Bestall.
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    1 votes
    107
    Robert Crumb

    Robert Crumb

    Robert Dennis Crumb (born August 30, 1943)—known as Robert Crumb and R. Crumb—is an American artist, illustrator, and musician recognized for the distinctive style of his drawings and his critical, satirical, subversive view of the American mainstream. Crumb was a founder of the underground comix movement and is regarded as its most prominent figure. Though one of the most celebrated of comic book artists, Crumb's entire career has unfolded outside the mainstream comic book publishing industry. One of his most recognized works is the "Keep on Truckin'" comic, which became a widely distributed fixture of pop culture in the 1970s. Others are the characters Devil Girl, Fritz the Cat, and Mr. Natural. He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1991. Robert Crumb was born on August 30, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is of English and Scottish ancestry, and is related to former U.S. president Andrew Jackson on his mother's side. His father, Charles, was a career officer in the United States Marine Corps; his mother, Beatrice, a housewife who reportedly abused diet pills and amphetamines. Their marriage was unhappy and the children —
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    1 votes
    108

    Robert Kirby

    Robert Kirby (born in Detroit, Michigan) is the creator of the syndicated comic Curbside which ran in the gay and alternative presses from 1991 to 2008. Curbside is the story of two young men, Drew, an aspiring writer, and Nathan, an aspiring musician, who meet and eventually form a tumultuous relationship. The comic is syndicated in several periodicals, including Chicago Nightlines, Out In The Mountains, Lavender Magazine and others, as well as on the internet. The series has also been collected into two books. The first book was published after Kirby received a Xeric Foundation award. A third volume, consisting of a Spanish language translation of Curbside, has also been published. In 2002, State Representative Nancy Sheltra (R-Derby) protested the presence of the publication Out In The Mountains in the Vermont Statehouse due to its inclusion of Kirby's strip featuring two bare-chested male cartoon characters kissing, which she deemed "pornographic". Kirby, who is openly gay, had his first venture into producing comics with the comic zine Strange Looking Exile, which also featured work by Diane DiMassa, Roberta Gregory, Nick Leonard and Alison Bechdel. The zine ran from 1991 till
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    1 votes
    109

    Tom Armstrong

    Tom Armstrong is an American cartoonist and a graduate of the University of Evansville in Evansville, Indiana. He was the original artist on the newspaper comic strip John Darling, which he drew from 1979 through 1990. He also created the daily newspaper comic strip Marvin in 1982, and has worked on it continuously since then. He received the Elzie Segar Award in 1996.
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    1 votes
    110

    Tom Batiuk

    Tom Batiuk (born 1947 in Akron, Ohio) is an American comic strip creator. His best-known comic strip is Funky Winkerbean. Batiuk attended Kent State University, from which he graduated in 1969 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in painting. He went on to teach art in junior high school. He put his experiences to use in his gag-a-day Funky Winkerbean, which first appeared in print on March 27, 1972. With the success of the strip, he abandoned his teaching career, occasionally returning to the classroom to refresh his sources. He authored two spinoff strips, John Darling, which ran from 1979 through 1990, and Crankshaft, which began syndication in 1987. These strips sometimes experience crossovers. Over the years, Batiuk's strips have taken on an increasing narrative continuity. Starting in 1986, Funky, and to a lesser extent Crankshaft, sometimes abandoned humor to explore serious, even tragic subject matter. His stories often involve strong drama elements combined with generally rosy outcomes. They also show a strong belief in God, as well as sympathies for the American military. On the other hand, Funky Winkerbean dealt very critically with Intelligent Design, and two students
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    1 votes
    111

    Will Elder

    William Elder (September 22, 1921 – May 14, 2008) was an American illustrator and comic book artist who worked in numerous areas of commercial art but is best known for a zany cartoon style that helped launch Harvey Kurtzman's Mad comic book in 1952. Elder's signature style, with extra humorous detail added upon humorous detail, is routinely described as "chicken fat," a reference to soup preparation. As Elder told an interviewer, "The term just came out of what we both [Kurtzman and Elder] knew were the parts of the strip that gave it more flavor but did very little to advance the storyline. That's what Chicken Fat does... it advances the flavor of the soup and, as we all know now, too much chicken fat will kill you!" Elder's rampant insertion of background gags set the tone for the comic book, quickly spreading into the panels of his fellow artists and Mad's imitators. Kurtzman described their collaborative process: "I would write a story, and as if by magic, all the empty spaces would get filled in by sub-jokes... he was an inexhaustible source." Monty Python's Terry Gilliam said of Elder, "I don't know if anybody's really worked at that level as intensely as Willy did. And it
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    1 votes
    112

    Donald Rooum

    Donald Rooum (born April 20, 1928) is an English anarchist cartoonist and writer. He has a long association with Freedom Press who have published seven volumes of his Wildcat cartoons. In 1963 he played a key role in exposing Harold Challenor, a corrupt police officer who tried to frame him. Donald Rooum was born in Bradford. He registered as a conscientious objector but was pressurised by his family into doing two years military service, starting January 1947. A resettlement grant following his discharge allowed him to study commercial design at Bradford Regional Art School from 1949 to 1953. Rooum's portrait by Frank Lisle, one of his lecturers of the time, is in Wakefield Gallery. From 1954 to 1966 Rooum worked as a layout artist and typographer in London advertising agencies, then as a lecturer in typographic design at the London College of Printing until 1983. He studied life sciences at the Open University from 1973 to 1979, and was awarded a first class degree in 1980. He was elected Member of the Institute of Biology (incorporated into the Society of Biology in October 2009) and became a chartered biologist in 2004. Rooum lived with Irene Brown from 1954 to 1983 and they
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Jim Scancarelli

    Jim Scancarelli

    James Scancarelli (born August 24, 1941), known professionally as Jim Scancarelli, is an American musician and cartoonist. Since 1986, he has been writing and drawing the syndicated comic strip Gasoline Alley for Tribune Media Services. In that role, his predecessors were Frank King, Bill Perry and Dick Moores. Born in New York City, Scancarelli is the son of an archivist for the Italian embassy. When he was still an infant, his family moved to his mother's home state of North Carolina. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he went into radio and television, including a position as art director for The Johnny Cash Show, creating scenery and writing cue cards. Scancarelli had a successful career as a freelance magazine illustrator, and he did slide transparency art until computers made that job obsolete. Scancarelli says his deep appreciation for comics was cultivated during childhood visits to his grandfather's house. His grandfather read the strips to him and pointed out details in each panel. His earliest comic strip recollection is of Gasoline Alley. He now lives in that same house and notes, "Little did I know that 50 years later I’d be working on the comic strip in the next
    6.67
    3 votes
    114

    Oscar Jacobsson

    Oscar Jacobsson (1889-1945) was a Swedish comic creator and cartoonist who started his career in 1918, when his first newspaper illustration was published. In 1920, he created the comic strip Adamson for the publication Söndags-Nisse. Adamson himself was a (usually) silent little cigar-smoking man with a big hat and frequent misadventures. The strip soon became very popular and became published in hundreds of newspapers all over the world. In the United States, it became known as "Silent Sam". In 1965, the Swedish Comic Academy founded the "Adamson Awards" in Jacobsson's honor. This "Nobel Prize of comics" is given to one Swedish and one international comic creator every year.
    6.67
    3 votes
    115

    Rune Andréasson

    Rune Herbert Emanuel Andréasson (August 11, 1925 in Lindome – December 15, 1999 in Viken) was a Swedish comic creator. Andréasson has created children's comics since 1944, mainly for the Swedish market, but his works have been published in several European nations. As a teenager he made his debut with the comic strip "Brum". Influenced by Disney's staff, such as Floyd Gottfredson, Andréasson was often called "the Disney of Northern Europe". Actually, Walt Disney once offered him work, but Andréasson refused, instead choosing to stay with his own creations. Those included the comic features "Lille Rikard och Hans Katt", "Rulle och Maja", "Nicke Bock", "Åsnan Kal", "Nalle Ritar och Berättar", "Teddy" and "Pellefant". His most famous creation, however, is "Bamse", created in the 1960s, a cute and often educational comic featuring "the world's strongest bear". This feature was highly successful, and was followed by several animated cartoons, as well as a comic book. The comic book started in 1973, featured exclusively Swedish material, and is still one of Sweden's most popular comic books today. In the 1970s, Andréasson began contracting other artists to do the artwork, while he still
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Walt Kelly

    Walter Crawford Kelly, Jr. (August 25, 1913 – October 18, 1973), or Walt Kelly, was an American animator and cartoonist, best known for the comic strip, Pogo. He began his animation career in 1936 at Walt Disney Studios, contributing to Pinocchio and Fantasia. Kelly resigned in 1941 at the age of 28 to work at Dell Comics, where he created Pogo, which eventually became his platform for political and philosophical commentary. Kelly was born of Irish-American heritage in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Walter Crawford Kelly, Sr., and Genevieve Kelly (née MacAnnula). When he was two years old, the family moved to Bridgeport, Connecticut. After graduating from Warren Harding High School in 1930, Kelly worked at odd jobs until he was hired as a crime reporter on the Bridgeport Post. He also took up cartooning and illustrated a biography of fellow Bridgeport native P. T. Barnum. Kelly was extremely proud of his journalism pedigree and considered himself a newspaper man as well as a cartoonist. Kelly became close friends with fellow cartoonists Milton Caniff and Al Capp, and the three occasionally referred to each other in their strips. Relocating to Southern California, he found a job at
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Jeremy Nell

    Jeremy Nell

    Jeremy Talfer Nell (born 16 March 1979), often referred to by his pen name Jerm, is an award-winning South African cartoonist, social commentator, and blogger. He is the editorial cartoonist for The New Age and is the creator of a nationally syndicated daily comic strip, The Biggish Five . Nell was born and currently resides, with his wife, in Cape Town, South Africa. With no completed formal training, Nell became a cartoonist in November 2005, immediately following his departure from the mobile media and entertainment industry. Nell's first nationally syndicated comic strip, Urban Trash (first published November 2005), ended 27 June 2008. In 2007, coinciding with the newspaper's launch, Nell became the front page (and soon thereafter, political) cartoonist for The Times. Following the 2009 South African national election results, IEC commissioner Terry Tselane read out one of Nell's political cartoons, from The Times, on national television and cited it as inspiration for a nationwide toast. Playing on the phrase "the Big Five", The Biggish Five (first published 30 June 2008) is a South African daily comic strip written and drawn by Nell, syndicated throughout South Africa in
    5.75
    4 votes
    118

    David Mazzucchelli

    David Mazzucchelli is an American comic book writer/artist, known for his work on seminal superhero comic book storylines Daredevil: Born Again and Batman: Year One, as well as for graphic novels in other genres, such as Asterios Polyp and City of Glass: The Graphic Novel. He is also an instructor who teaches comic book storytelling at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. Mazzucchelli received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, and started working in comics in the early 1980s, first at Marvel Comics where, after a few fill-in jobs, he became the regular artist on Daredevil. He worked with writer Denny O'Neil and culminated his work on this title with the Daredevil: Born Again story arc, written by Frank Miller. Miller and Mazzucchelli collaborated again on the graphic novel, Batman: Year One, serialized in issues 404 - 407 of DC Comics' monthly Batman title, and published in a single volume soon after that. Batman: Year One is considered one of the best Batman stories ever produced. After Batman: Year One Mazzucchelli moved on to focus on more personal projects. He published three issues of his own independent anthology, Rubber Blanket, co-edited by his wife,
    7.50
    2 votes
    119

    Frank Bolle

    Frank Bolle (born June 7, 1924 in New York City) is an American comic strip artist, comic book artist and illustrator. Frank Bolle has done artwork for several American children's works, including some Choose Your Own Adventure books. Bolle illustrated and the Boys' Life adaptation of John Christopher's The Tripods stories, along with other strips in Boys' Life. He has worked on several newspaper comic strips, including Debbie Deere (1966–1969), Alexander Gate (1970–1971), Winnie Winkle (1983–2003), The Heart of Juliet Jones (1991–1999), and Apartment 3-G (1999- ). He started doing the Gil Thorp strip on an interim basis in the late '90s, and again in February 2008. Bolle did the artwork for several Gold Key Comics, including Doctor Solar and Buck Rogers.
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    Gene Deitch

    Gene Deitch

    Eugene Merril "Gene" Deitch (born August 8, 1924) is an American illustrator, animator and film director. He has been based in Prague, capital of Czechoslovakia and the present-day Czech Republic, since 1959. Since 1968, Deitch has been the leading animation director for the Connecticut organization Weston Woods/Scholastic, adapting children's picture books. His studio is located in Prague near the Barrandov studios where many major films were recorded. In 2003, he was awarded the "Annie" by ASIFA Hollywood for a lifetime contribution to the art of animation. Deitch married his wife Zdenka in 1960. His sons Kim Deitch and Simon Deitch are prominent artists in the underground comix and alternative comics movements. He currently resides with his wife in Prague, where he works as an independent animation scenarist/director. He wrote a memoir, For the Love of Prague, based on the experience of being "the only free American in Prague during 30 years of Communism." From 1945 to 1951 Deitch was primary graphics contributor, and eventually art director, for The Record Changer, a jazz magazine. He was also an amateur recording engineer, who made tape recordings of artists like John Lee
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    Jean Tabary

    Jean Tabary

    Jean Tabary (5 March 1930 – 18 August 2011) was a French comics artist. Tabary was born in Stockholm and made his comics debut with Richard et Charlie published in the comics magazine Vaillant on 5 November 1956. For Vaillant (in 1965 renamed Pif) Tabary also drew Grabadu et Gabaliouchtou, and eventually the hit series Totoche in 1959, which produced another series with two if its characters, Corinne et Jeannot, and its own short-lived periodical Totoche Poche. Tabary continued to draw this series until 1976. In 1962 Tabary began a long-lasting collaboration with René Goscinny, creating the series Les aventures du Calife Haroun el Poussah, first published in Record on 15 January 1962. Shifting its focus and title name to the evil protagonist/anti-hero of the series, Iznogoud became a considerable success, and was eventually adapted into a cartoon TV series. In 1968 the series changed serial publication magazine to Goscinny's Pilote. Valentin le vagabond, another series Tabary initially created with Goscinny, also appeared in Pilote since 1962. After Goscinny's death in 1977, Tabary continued to create Iznogoud albums. Tabary's own publishing label, at first named Editions de la
    7.50
    2 votes
    122

    Johnny Hart

    Johnny Hart (February 18, 1931 – April 7, 2007) was an American cartoonist noted as the creator of the comic strip B.C. and co-creator of the strip The Wizard of Id. Hart was recognized with several awards, including the Swedish Adamson Award and five from the National Cartoonists Society. In his later years, he sparked controversy by incorporating overtly Christian themes and messages into the strips. Born in Endicott, New York, Hart's first published work was in Stars and Stripes while he served in Korea as an enlisted member of the United States Air Force. Returning in 1953, he published cartoons in The Saturday Evening Post, Collier's Weekly and other magazines. His pre-cartooning employment included working in a barbecue restaurant and sign painting. Hart's biggest success, B.C., was created in 1957 and began national daily newspapers appearances on February 17, 1958. Hart also co-created and wrote the comic strip The Wizard of Id, drawn by Brant Parker, which has been distributed since November 9, 1964. Hart died of a stroke on April 7, 2007. According to his wife, he was working at his drawing table at the time of his death. His co-creator for Wizard of Id, Brant Parker died
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    Mel Lazarus

    Mell Lazarus (born May 3, 1927) is an American novelist and cartoonist, best known as the creator of two comic strips, Miss Peach (1957–2002) and Momma (1970–present). For his comic strip Pauline McPeril (a 1966-69 collaboration with Jack Rickard), he used the pseudonym Fulton, which also the name of a character in his novel, The Boss Is Crazy, Too. A native of Brooklyn, Lazarus began as a professional cartoonist when he was a teenager. During his twenties, he worked for Al Capp and his brother Elliott Caplin at the Capp family-owned Toby Press, which published Al Capp's Shmoo Comics, among other titles. In 1964, Lazarus talked about his background and working methods: His novel The Boss Is Crazy, Too (Dial, 1954) was inspired in part by his experiences as an editor at Toby Press. mike weber described the storyline: The Neighborhood Watch (Doubleday, 1986) is about an impoverished Brooklyn writer who steals from his wealthy neighbors. It was once optioned for a film. Publishers Weekly reviewed: Lazarus served as President of the National Cartoonists Society for two consecutive terms from 1989 to 1993. He won the National Cartoonists Society's Humor Comic Strip Award for 1973 and
    7.50
    2 votes
    124

    Steven Appleby

    Steven Appleby is a cartoonist and illustrator living in Britain. He is a dual citizen of the UK and Canada. His humour is usually observational or absurd. His work first appeared in the New Musical Express in 1984 with the Captain Star comic strip, which was made into an animated cartoon series in 1997. Captain Star also appeared in The Observer, Zeit Magazin, and various comics in the UK, Europe and America. Other comic strips appeared in many publications including The Times and the Sunday Telegraph. The strip Loomus can currently be seen in The Guardian. His work has also appeared on album covers, most notably on Trompe le Monde by the Pixies. His series of cartoons Steven Appleby's Normal Life was successful enough not only to be translated into German and published in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, but also to be made into a radio series for BBC Radio 4. An earlier series, Small Birds Singing, which ran for eight years in The Times, concerned itself with the usually surreal doings of the occupants of an English country house. Appleby has also had many exhibitions of paintings, published over 20 books and collaborated on a musical play, Crocs In Frocks (with Teresa Early and
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Paul Ryan

    Paul Ryan

    Paul Ryan (born 23 September 1949 in Massachusetts) is an American comic book and comic strip cartoonist. Ryan has worked extensively for Marvel Comics and DC Comics on a number of super-hero comics. He currently pencils and inks the daily comic strip The Phantom for King Features Syndicate. Paul Ryan attended St. Polycarp Grammar School in Somerville, Massachusetts and graduated from St. Mary of the Annunciation High School in 1967. He graduated from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1971 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Graphic Design. After graduation Ryan enlisted in the United States National Guard and was assigned to Fort Dix, New Jersey for Basic Training and AIT (Advanced Individual Training) in automotive mechanics. He later attended Massachusetts Military Academy in Wakefield, Massachusetts for officer training. During this period Ryan landed a job in the Graphics Department of Metcalf & Eddy Engineering in Boston, where he worked for 11 years. The Boston Globe reports that "Ryan began his training as a child, growing up in Somerville. He'd park himself in front of the television each night to watch George Reeves in the Adventures of Superman He has said that as a
    4.80
    5 votes
    126
    Cabu

    Cabu

    Cabu (real name Jean Cabut, born January 13, 1938, Châlons-en-Champagne, France) is a French comic strip artist and caricaturist. He started out studying art at the École Estienne in Paris and his drawings were first published by 1954 in a local newspaper. The Algerian War forced him to be conscripted in Army for over two years, where his talent was used in the army magazine Bled and in Paris-Match. His time in the army caused him to become a strident anti-militarist and adopt a slightly anarchistic view of society. In 1960, after he left the Army, he became one of the founders of Hara-Kiri magazine. In the 70s and 80s, he became a very popular artist, collaborating for a time with the children's TV programme, Récré A2. He continued working in political caricature for Charlie Hebdo and Le Canard enchaîné. His popular characters include Le Grand Duduche and adjudant Kronenbourg, and especially Mon Beauf. So spot-on was this caricature of an average, racist, sexist, vulgar, ordinary Frenchman that the word 'beauf' (short for "beau-frère" i.e. brother-in-law) has slipped into ordinary use. Cabu is also the father of the late French singer/songwriter Mano Solo (24 April 1963 – 10
    5.50
    4 votes
    127

    Crockett Johnson

    Crockett Johnson was the pen name of cartoonist and children's book illustrator David Johnson Leisk (October 20, 1906–July 11, 1975). He is perhaps best known for the comic strip Barnaby (1942–1952) and the Harold series of books begun with Harold and the Purple Crayon. Born in New York City, Johnson grew up in Elmhurst, Queens, studying art at Cooper Union in 1924, and at New York University in 1925. He explained his choice of pseudonym as such: "Crockett is my childhood nickname. My real name is David Johnson Leisk. Leisk was too hard to pronounce -- so -- I am now Crockett Johnson!" He died of lung cancer. Johnson also collaborated on four children's books with his wife, Ruth Krauss. The books were: The Carrot Seed, How to Make an Earthquake, Is This You?, and The Happy Egg. The books Harold and the Purple Crayon, Harold's Fairy Tale, and A Picture for Harold's Room have been adapted for animation by Gene Deitch. The Barnaby #1 to #6 books, published in paperback by Ballantine Books under the Del Rey imprint in 1985, were compilations of the first few years of the comic strip. Additional books were supposed to appear, but publication was suspended upon the death of Judy Lynn Del
    5.50
    4 votes
    128
    Harold LeDoux

    Harold LeDoux

    Harold Anthony LeDoux (born 1926) is an artist best known for his work on the newspaper comic strip Judge Parker. He worked in the realistic style associated with Stan Drake, Leonard Starr, et al. While in the Merchant Marine during World War II, LeDoux saved enough money to be able to attend the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. Arriving in New York City, he began contributing to the Famous Funnies comic books. He then worked as assistant to artist Dan Heilman on the successful Judge Parker strip just as or shortly after the strip debuted in 1952. Ledoux claimed that "by the last week of September 1953, I had the job of drawing Judge Parker for myself." It may be that he was ghosting for or was supervised by Heilman in a studio arrangement, both common circumstances in comic strip history. In any case, it was not until 1965 that LeDoux was credited as artist on the strip, as Heilman relinquished the title to pursue another project (he died shortly after). LeDoux officially held the position for over four decades, with his last strip running on May 28, 2006. Comic book artist Eduardo Barreto replaced him. LeDoux retired in 2006, living in Richardson, Texas.
    5.50
    4 votes
    129

    Signe Wilkinson

    Signe Wilkinson (born July 25, 1959, in Wichita Falls, Texas) is an editorial cartoonist best known for her work at the Philadelphia Daily News. Wilkinson is the first female cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning (1992) and was once named "the Pennsylvania state vegetable substitute" by the former speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. She served as president of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists from 1994-1995. In 2005 she published a collection of her work entitled One Nation, Under Surveillance. In 2007, Wilkinson began a syndicated daily comic strip, Family Tree, for United Media. She decided to end the strip in August 2011, with the last strip appearing on August 27. In 2011, Wilkinson received a Visionary Woman Award from Moore College of Art & Design.
    5.50
    4 votes
    130

    Chris Onstad

    Christopher Onstad (born June 14, 1975) is a writer, cartoonist, and artist known best for Achewood, a regularly updated webcomic. He was born in California and grew up in a small town near Sonora, in the Sierra foothills. Onstad attended Stanford University, where he edited the Stanford Chaparral humor magazine. Onstad has published several books: nine anthologies of Achewood comics; a humorous cookbook featuring recipes purportedly invented by the strip's characters; A Wonderful Tale—a book "written by" a character from the strip; and that same character's second novel A Hilarious Comedy. He has also published six editions of Man Why You Even Got To Do A Thing, an Achewood-centric zine. Onstad reveals little of his private life online, but it is known that he currently lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife, Liz. She assists him as an accountant on the sale of Achewood merchandise. They have a daughter, born on March 14, 2005. Onstad recently had a section on his website about his daughter, titled "current kid status", which he updated regularly with stories and happenings. These are collected in the self-published book Current Baby Status - The Collected Archive. On the subject
    6.33
    3 votes
    131

    Dan Heilman

    Dan Heilman was the first artist of the Judge Parker comic strip. He was born in 1922 (some sources say 1924) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Having served in World War II, Heilman became an assistant to artist Ken Ernst on the Mary Worth comic strip, and to Roy Crane on Buz Sawyer. In 1949 he was the artist for a comic strip called The American Adventure. In 1952 writer Dr. Nicholas Dallis hired Heilman for Judge Parker, which made its debut on 24 November of that year. Heilman stayed with Judge Parker until 1965, when he left and was succeeded by his assistant Harold LeDoux. Heilman was working on a new outer-space-themed comic when he died in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Florida on December 17, 1966
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    David Morgan-Mar

    David Morgan-Mar

    David Morgan-Mar (aka DangerMouse) is a Ph.D. graduate from the University of Sydney, Australia, best known online for his webcomics, and for creating several humorous esoteric programming languages. He is also the author of several GURPS roleplaying sourcebooks for Steve Jackson Games, as well as a regular contributor to Pyramid magazine. He works as an optical engineer at Canon. Morgan-Mar has created a number of esoteric programming languages (including Chef and Piet) and algorithms, some of which have achieved a degree of popularity. Some of them are full Turing-complete languages while others are simple jokes, often based upon the idea of how a given group (e.g., chefs, orangutans, or necromancers) would be expected to program. It is a mark of Morgan-Mar's humor that his algorithms often reflect the practices of or misconceptions about the computing industry, for instance "LenPEG", an image-compression algorithm is designed such that if it is given the standard Lenna image it produces an output file of 1 byte, otherwise implementing a standard JPEG, GIF or PNG compression, therefore beating these in benchmark tests. His intelligent sort algorithm (a parody of intelligent
    6.33
    3 votes
    133

    Herb Gardner

    Herbert George Gardner (December 28, 1934 – September 25, 2003), better known as Herb Gardner, was an American commercial artist, cartoonist, playwright and screenwriter. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Gardner was the son of a bar owner. Gardner's brother, R. Allen Gardner, is a professor of comparative psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno and is famous for teaming with his wife on Project Washoe, the attempt to teach American Sign Language to a chimpanzee named Washoe. Gardner was educated at New York's High School of Performing Arts, Carnegie-Mellon University and Antioch College. While a student at Antioch, he began drawing The Nebbishes. The comic strip was picked up by the Chicago Tribune and syndicated to 60-75 major newspapers from 1959 to 1961. Even before syndication, the Gardner characters were a national craze, marketed on statuettes, studio cards, barware (including cocktail napkins), wall decorations and posters. In 1960, after "the balloons were getting larger and larger, and there was hardly any drawing left", he dropped it and began writing plays. Gardner is best known for his 1962 play A Thousand Clowns, which ran for two years. He received an Oscar nomination
    6.33
    3 votes
    134

    Barry Fantoni

    Barry Ernest Fantoni (born 28 February 1940) is a writer, comic strip cartoonist and jazz musician of Italian and Jewish descent, most famous for his work with the magazine Private Eye, for whom he also created Neasden F.C. As of 2005 he remains a shareholder in the company that owns Private Eye, Pressdram Limited. He has also published books on Chinese astrology. On 27 January 2007 he debuted on BBC Radio Five Live's Fighting Talk. He scored 28 points thus finishing in last place which is a programme tradition for a debutant. In September 2007 he was a guest on Private Passions, the weekly music discussion programme hosted by Michael Berkeley on BBC Radio 3. Fantoni is the cousin of both Roy Deverell the film producer, and John Deverell the tour operator who operated the first-ever charter flights from Britain to the Soviet Union. Fantoni is also the creator and writer of poems supposedly penned by one E. J. Thribb—the fictitious poet-in-residence at Private Eye. His poems are usually about recently deceased famous people, and always begin "So, farewell then...". Thribb also usually mentions the deceased's "catchphrase" or theme song and his poems often feature his friend Keith,
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Franćois Corteggiani

    Franćois Corteggiani

    François Corteggiani (born 1953) is a French comics artist and writer. He was born on 21 September 1953 in France. He got a degree in art before becoming an artist for advertising. He created his first comic in 1974 for S.E.P.P. and Mucheroum for Spirou. He illustrated works for various magazines and then, along with Michel Motti, he drew Pif le chien for Pif gadget. Taking over more work as scenarist, Corteggiani has written for several series, among others succeeding Jean-Michel Charlier as writer for Young Blueberry.
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Jef Mallett

    Jef Mallett

    Jef Mallett (born 1962) is the creator and artist of the comic strip Frazz. He attended nursing school for a period of time before leaving to pursue his artistic interests. He has a longtime interest in bicycling. He is married and lives in Lansing, Michigan, United States. While in high school, Mallett created a comic strip for his local newspaper, the Big Rapids, Michigan, Pioneer. After becoming a graphic artist, he worked in that capacity for regional newspapers, the Grand Rapids Press and the Flint Journal. He then worked in Lansing as art director and editorial cartoonist for Booth Newspapers' Capital Bureau. Afterwards, Mallett left the commercial world to concentrate on Frazz full-time.
    8.00
    1 votes
    137

    Jerry Mills

    Jerry Mills ( February 26, 1951 - January 28, 1993 ) was a gay cartoonist, noted particularly for his creation of the "Poppers" comic strip. The strip told of the adventures of Billy, a West Hollywood muscleboy, and his sidekick Yves (based on Mills), a big-hearted nebbish who offered good advice and caution (usually unheeded) for his glamorous friend. Yves always went along for the ride with Billy, commenting on the action, a function he took over from a witty crab louse that lived on Billy's pubic hair, when it was phased out after the first few strips. In the early 1980s Mills worked in the subscriptions department of In Touch for Men, an adult magazine targeted at the gay male community. John Calendo, editor at the time, encouraged Mills to write a regular comic strip, to add variety to the magazine's content. The result, "Poppers", began in April 1982. (The title referred to "poppers", alkyl nitrites which were commonly used in the gay community.) By the mid-80s the strip was also being published ( in translation ) in Gai Pied Hebdo, a French-language gay magazine, and in the Japanese magazine Barazoko. Reprints of the strip also appeared sporadically in Gay Comix under the
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Kazuo Koike

    Kazuo Koike (小池 一夫, Koike Kazuo, born May 8, 1936 in Daisen, Akita Prefecture) is a prolific Japanese manga writer, novelist and entrepreneur. Early in Koike's career, he studied under Golgo 13 creator Takao Saito and served as a writer on the series. Koike, along with artist Goseki Kojima, made the manga Kozure Okami (Lone Wolf and Cub), and Koike also contributed to the scripts for the 1970s film adaptations of the series, which starred famous Japanese actor Tomisaburo Wakayama. Koike and Kojima became known as the "Golden Duo" because of the success of Lone Wolf and Cub. Another series written by Koike, Crying Freeman, which was illustrated by Ryoichi Ikegami, was adapted into a 1995 live-action film by French director Christophe Gans. Kazuo Koike started the Gekika Sonjuku, a college course meant to teach people how to be a manga artist. In addition to his more violent, action-oriented manga, Koike, an avid golfer, has also written golf manga. He has also written mahjong manga, as he himself is a former professional mahjong player. 75 year-old manga writer Kazuo Koike has announced his plan to write a magical girl manga series titled “Maho Shojo Mimitsuki Mimi no QED.” Koike,
    8.00
    1 votes
    139

    Dan Barry

    Daniel Barry (July 11, 1923 – January 25, 1997) was an American cartoonist. Beginning in comic books during the 1940s with Leonard Starr, Stan Drake and his brother Sy Barry, he helped define and exemplify a particular kind of "New York Slick" style which dominated comics until the Marvel Revolution brought attention to the Jack Kirby style. This style was characterized by careful attention to lines and the clear delineation of textures. From 1947-48 he drew the Tarzan daily strip, then in 1951 revived the Flash Gordon daily strip. At different times science fiction writers Harry Harrison and Julian May both contributed scripts to the series. In addition, at various times during his tenure, he was assisted in his artwork by a number of artists including Bob Fujitani, Fred Kida, Frank Frazetta. When artist Mac Raboy died in 1967, Barry assumed responsibility of the Flash Gordon Sunday strip also. He created the official poster for the 1980 movie version of Flash Gordon. After moving to Cleveland GA, he was assisted in his work by artist Gail Becket. In 1990, he left Flash Gordon altogether, when the syndicate, King Features asked him to take a cut in pay. His last work was for Dark
    5.25
    4 votes
    140

    André Franquin

    André Franquin (3 January 1924 – 5 January 1997) was an influential Belgian comics artist, whose best known comic strip creations are Gaston and Marsupilami, created while he worked on the Spirou et Fantasio comic strip from 1947 to 1969, during a period seen by many as the series' golden age. Franquin was born in Etterbeek in 1924. Although he started drawing at an early age, Franquin got his first actual drawing lessons at École Saint-Luc in 1943. A year later however, the school was forced to close down because of the war and Franquin was then hired by CBA, a short-lived animation studio in Brussels. It is there he met some of his future colleagues: Maurice de Bevere (Morris, creator of Lucky Luke), Pierre Culliford (Peyo, creator of the Smurfs), and Eddy Paape. Three of them (minus Peyo) were hired by Dupuis in 1945, following CBA's demise. Peyo, still too young, would only follow them seven years later. Franquin started drawing covers and cartoons for Le Moustique, a weekly magazine about radio and culture. He also worked for Plein Jeu, a monthly scouting magazine. During this time, Morris and Franquin were coached by Joseph Gillain (Jijé), who had transformed a section of his
    7.00
    2 votes
    141
    Arkas

    Arkas

    Arkas (Greek: Αρκάς) is a Greek comics artist that started his work in middle 80s. He seldom appears at conventions, and generally avoids publicity and appearances on television shows or interviews, as he has been quoted as believing that the artist should be known through his work, not through personal promotion. His real name is unknown, although the Greek newspaper Kathimerini has also mentioned it as Antonis Evdemon. Arkas in Greek means Arcadian or someone from the province of Arcadia. However, the CamelCase style in which his name is written suggests that Arkas may be only his initials. In 1997, Arkas was asked to design the logo of Thessaloniki when the city became the European City of Culture for that year. Arkas has been translated into other languages and has become known outside Greece. Translations of his books can be found in English, French, German, Romanian, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Bulgarian, Polish and Serbian.
    7.00
    2 votes
    142

    Bob Penuelas

    Bob Penuelas is a comic strip illustrator and writer. He was the creator of the comic strip character Wilbur Kookmeyer, which has appeared in Surfer Magazine since 1986. Born and raised in San Diego, California, Bob Penuelas learned to draw at an early age by his father, a technical illustrator. In Bob’s younger years he was heavily influenced by the satirical humor of MAD Magazine. Later in his early teens he learned to surf and soon combined his art with his love for surfing. At that time he was influenced by Rick Griffin whose artwork regularly appeared in Surfer Magazine. Penuelas began his career as a comic strip artist with the creation of the “Maynard and the Rat” strip for Surfer Magazine in 1980. Between 1980 and 1985 he produced twenty-five, two-page episodes for Surfer. In 1985, while working on a “Maynard” strip, Bob introduced a dorky little character named Wilbur into the strip. The laughable, little beginner surfer struck a chord with the surfing public and there was a tremendous positive response from the readers. By 1986, Wilbur had totally eclipsed the “Maynard” strip and the title was then changed to “Wilbur Kookmeyer”. Surfing for almost thirty-five years, Bob
    7.00
    2 votes
    143

    Ernie Bushmiller

    Ernest Paul Bushmiller, Jr. (23 August 1905 – 15 August 1982) was an American cartoonist, best known for creating the long-running daily comic strip Nancy. Born in the South Bronx, New York, Bushmiller was the son of immigrant parents, Ernest George Bushmiller and Elizabeth Hall. His father was an artist, vaudevillian and bartender. Bushmiller quit school at 14 to work as a copy boy at the New York World newspaper, while attending evening art classes at the National Academy of Design. He ran errands for the staff cartoonists and was given occasional illustration assignments, including a Sunday feature by Harry Houdini. Early in 1925, cartoonist Larry Whittington, creator of the comic strip Fritzi Ritz, left to produce another strip, Mazie the Model. Bushmiller then took over Fritzi Ritz, ghostwriting it, before eventually taking over officially. Bushmiller's name did not appear on the strip until May 1926. He expanded to a Sunday strip on October 6, 1929. Bushmiller had already been producing a comic strip for the New York Evening Graphic titled Mac the Manager. The character of Fritzi was modeled after Bushmiller's fiance, Abby Bohnet, the daughter of a train conductor. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    James Kochalka

    James Kochalka

    James Kochalka (born May 26, 1967, in Springfield, Vermont), is an American comic book artist and writer, and rock musician. His comics are noted for their blending of the real and the surreal. Largely autobiographical, Kochalka's cartoon expression of the world around him includes such real-life characters as his wife, children, cat, friends and colleagues, but always filtered through his own observations and flights of whimsy. In March 2011 he was declared the cartoonist laureate of Vermont, serving a term of three years. Kochalka grew up in Springfield, Vermont. He attended the Maryland Institute College of Art and has an MFA in painting. His first published comics work was around 1994. He has cited by cartoonist Daniel Clowes as being a key inspiration in leading him "towards a whole world of comics that [he] never knew existed." Kochalka strongly believes that simplicity is desirable in comics, and says that "Craft is the enemy," and has had public debates in print and online with other cartoonists who disagree with his position. Kochalka's "Craft is the Enemy" essays were collected in the 2005 book The Cute Manifesto. Kochalka spent six years working in a Chinese restaurant
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Leonard Starr

    Leonard Starr

    Leonard Starr (born October 28, 1925) is a Golden Age comic book artist, an advertising artist and award-winning cartoonist, notable for creating the newspaper strip On Stage and reviving Little Orphan Annie. Born in New York City, Starr graduated from Manhattan's High School of Music and Art and then studied at Pratt Institute. While attending Pratt during 1942-43, Starr worked for the Harry "A" Chesler and the Funnies, Inc. studios, contributing to the early comic book features produced at these studios. For Funnies, Inc., he began as a background artist, eventually inking Bob Oksner's pencils. He graduated to drawing for early Timely/Marvel Comics titles, including the Human Torch and the Sub-Mariner. Throughout the 1940s, Starr worked for a plethora of publishers of both comic books and pulps, including Better Publications, Consolidated Book, Croyden Publications, E. R. Ross Publishing, Fawcett Comics (doing Don Winslow of the Navy, 1944–46), Hillman Periodicals and M. C. Combs. He worked with Joe Simon and Jack Kirby on their earlier romance comics titles, in particular the Crestwood/Prize title Young Romance. In the late 1940s, he drew for EC Comics, including War Against
    7.00
    2 votes
    146

    Manuel Gonzales

    Manuel Gonzales (March 3, 1913 – March 31, 1993) was a Spanish-American Disney comics artist. He was born in Fresnadillo a Cabañas, Zamora and died in Los Angeles. Gonzales emigrated from Spain to the USA in 1918 via Ellis Island, and was employed at the Walt Disney Studios in September 1936, where he initially worked as an "in-betweener" on the motion picture, Snow White. Later working in the comic strip department, Gonzales took over the illustrating of the Mickey Mouse Sunday page from Floyd Gottfredson in 1938. Only interrupted by his military service for the USA in World War II from 1942 to 1945, Gonzales performed this job until his retirement in 1981. During the war, he worked for the U.S. Army as an artist animating short newsreel clips promoting war bonds and the war effort. Bill Walsh wrote the scripts for the Sunday pages from 1946 to 1963. These pages told funny stories from Mickey's everyday life (Mickey was portrayed as a "guy next door" - a middle class citizen with a normal life), as well as doing sometimes surrealistic gags featuring Gonzales' specialty, Goofy. Gonzales and Walsh also introduced a new character to the Disney universe, the intelligent and witty bird
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    2 votes
    147
    Nonoy Marcelo

    Nonoy Marcelo

    Severino "Nonoy" Marcelo (January 22, 1939 – October 22, 2002) was a Filipino cartoonist born in Malabon, Metro Manila, Philippines, an alumnus of the Institute of Arts and Sciences from Far Eastern University, and a former cartoonist in the The Advocate (the official student publication of Far Eastern University), best known for creating the character Ikabod Bubwit (literally "Ikabod the Small Rodent" or "Ikabod the Small Mouse" in Tagalog) in the comic strip Ikabod. He also created the comic strips Plain Folks, which appeared in the Daily Mirror during the early 1960s, and Tisoy in 1963 for the Manila Times, which tells about the lifestyle of young Filipinos. His main character, Tisoy (slang for "mestizo"), and cast members such as Aling Otik, Maribubut, Caligula, Tatang, Tikyo and Kinse, soon became established in Philippine pop culture. Tisoy became a 1977 film directed by Ishmael Bernal, starring Christopher de Leon and Charo Santos. Ikabod ran from the late 1970s to 2002. It was a satirical strip that re-cast the Philippines as a nation called Dagalandia. The strip humorously depicted the socio-political woes of ordinary Filipinos, as represented by the tailless Everymouse
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    2 votes
    148
    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams

    Scott Raymond Adams (born June 8, 1957) is the American creator of the Dilbert comic strip and the author of several nonfiction works of satire, commentary, business, and general speculation. His Dilbert series came to national prominence through the downsizing period in 1990s America and was then distributed worldwide. A former worker in various roles at big businesses, he became a full-time cartoonist in 1995. Adams writes in a satirical, often sarcastic way about the social and mental landscape of white-collar workers in modern corporations and other large enterprises. Scott Adams was born in Windham, New York in 1957. He grew up a big fan of the Peanuts comics, and started drawing his own comics at the age of six. He also became a fan of Mad magazine, and began spending long hours practicing his drawing talent, winning a competition at the age of eleven. In 1968, he was rejected for an arts school and instead focused on a career in law. Adams graduated valedictorian at Windham-Ashland-Jewett Central School in 1975, with a class size of 39. He remained in the area and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from Hartwick College in 1979. In his senior year, a vehicle
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    2 votes
    149

    V. T. Hamlin

    Vincent Trout Hamlin (10 May 1900 – 14 June 1993), who preferred the name V. T. Hamlin, created the popular, long-run comic strip Alley Oop, syndicated by the Newspaper Enterprise Association. Born in Perry, Iowa, Hamlin was the son of Erma Trout Hamlin and Dr. Frederick Clarence Hamlin, a dentist. The young Vincent Hamlin began drawing at an early age, and he first drew the character that became Alley Oop at age 11. Four years later, his first cartoons were published in the Perry Daily Chief. At Perry High School, he went by the nickname Snick, which he used as his signature on cartoons he drew for his high school yearbook, The Eclipse. By lying about his age, Hamlin enlisted in the Army at 17 to fight in World War I. He shipped out as part of the Sixth Army's Motor Transport Group, arriving in France where he served with the American Expeditionary Forces in 1918. Recovering from a poison gas attack in France, Hamlin began illustrating the letters of his fellow soldiers, and a newspaper man he met while he was in the Army convinced him he could make a living from his art abilities. After his discharge, Hamlin went back to Perry High School in 1919. He then attended college, first
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    2 votes
    150

    Walter Berndt

    Walter Berndt (November 22, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - August 15, 1979, Port Jefferson, New York) was a cartoonist known for his long-run comic strip, Smitty, which he drew for 50 years. Bernt's job as an office boy at the New York Journal put him in contact with leading cartoonists, as he recalled, "When I was 16, I worked as office boy for Tad, Herriman, Hershfield, Tom McNamara, also Hoban, McCay, Gross, T. E. Powers, C. D. Batchelor, Sterrett and Segar. Not much money but a million dollars worth of experience! Stayed with the New York Journal for five years, sweeping floors, running errands, drawing strips, sport cartoons and what have you. Then one year with World Telegram. From there to the Daily News in 1922 where Smitty and Herby work for me! Golf used to be my love, but it is now taboo. So now it's a little swimmin' in my pool." Ed Black wrote about the method E. C. Segar and Berndt used to generate cartoon ideas: Then the Fun Began was appearing as early as March 3, 1919. When Berndt left that strip on October 13, 1921, it was taken over by Fred Faber, who continued it until 1928. Berndt's first strip, That's Different, drawn for the Bell Syndicate, lasted less than a
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    2 votes
    151

    Bob Karp

    Robert Louis Karp (1911–1975) was an American comics writer. He began working for the Walt Disney Company in the 1930s, and from 1938 to 1974, he wrote the scripts for the daily Donald Duck newspaper strips. These were illustrated by Al Taliaferro and by Frank Grundeen after Taliaferro's death in 1969. Bob Karp's brothers, Hubie and Lynn, were in the comics field as well. From 1946 to 1950, Bob (writer) and Lynn (illustrator) did the newspaper strip "The Middles" together.
    6.00
    3 votes
    152

    Jim Borgman

    James Mark Borgman (born February 24, 1954) is an American cartoonist. He is known for his political cartoons and his nationally syndicated comic strip Zits. Borgman was born in Cincinnati, Ohio to James and Marian Borgman, where he began his career in journalism as a student at Elder High School. He then attended Ohio's Kenyon College where he started as an English major, then switched to being an art major. He graduated in 1976 with Phi Beta Kappa honors. Borgman met his first wife Lynn Goodwin during his senior year of college at a class called "Jesus and the Gospels". They had two children named Dylan and Chelsea. Lynn died in 1999 from a blood clot following a surgery to ease chronic neck and shoulder pain. In 2003 he married Suzanne Soled, an educational psychologist and professor at Northern Kentucky University. At Kenyon College, Borgman drew editorial cartoons for the Kenyon Collegian. Since 1980, his editorial cartoons have been nationally syndicated, at first by King Features Syndicate. In 2007, Universal Press Syndicate took over the distribution of his editorial cartoons. His body of work has included the weekly comic strip "Wonk City," which ran from 1994 to 1996 on
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    3 votes
    153

    Al Scaduto

    Alvaro Scaduto (July 12, 1928 – December 8, 2007), better known as Al Scaduto, was a cartoonist noted for his 61-year span of work for King Features Syndicate on the classic strips, They'll Do It Every Time and Little Iodine, created by Jimmy Hatlo. A New Yorker who was born in the Bronx, Scaduto attended high school at the School of Industrial Art, where he focused on cartooning and won several awards. He also studied at the Art Students League. After graduating from the School of Industrial Art in 1946, he joined the art department at King Features, and two years later, he teamed with cartoonist Bob Dunn on They'll Do It Every Time. Over a 14-year period, Scaduto drew both the Little Iodine newspaper strip and comic books. The character appeared in a series of 56 Dell Comics published between 1949 and 1962. Scaduto continued to work with Dunn after Hatlo's death in 1963. After Dunn's death in 1989, Scaduto took over They'll Do It Every Time, doing the writing and art for both the daily and the Sunday strip. He continued on the feature into his seventies, commenting, "What I like most about being a cartoonist is starting with a fresh piece of paper and ending up with an idea.
    5.67
    3 votes
    154
    Brad Neely

    Brad Neely

    Brad Neely is an American comic book artist and television writer/producer known for his work on TV series such as South Park and China, IL, Wizard People, Dear Reader, and the web series I Am Baby Cakes and The Professor Brothers. Brad Neely is originally from Fort Smith, Arkansas. He briefly attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Neely's work includes the comic series "Creased Comics" and the Harry Potter spoof Wizard People, Dear Reader, which consists of an alternate soundtrack of narration in the style of a book on tape, which viewers can play over the muted movie. Neely is featured in the documentary We Are Wizards. Neely is the creator of the cartoon Cox & Combes' Washington. Aside from occasional one-off videos, he has also created three series: I Am Baby Cakes, The Professor Brothers, and China, IL, all of which take place in the fictional location of China, Illinois. Baby Cakes shorts are typically in the style of diary entries narrated in the first person by Mark "Baby" Cakes, a philosophical and likely autistic 30-year-old man. The Professor Brothers follows the professional and personal misadventures of Frank and Steve Smith, two brothers who are
    5.67
    3 votes
    155

    Brant Parker

    Brant Parker (August 26, 1920 – April 15, 2007) was an American cartoonist. He co-created and drew The Wizard of Id comic strip until passing the job on to his son, Jeff Parker, in 1997. Cartoonist Johnny Hart, his co-creator, continued writing the strip until his own death on April 7, 2007. Parker studied at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, California. He worked for the Walt Disney Studio before and after World War II, taking time off to serve in the United States Navy. After leaving Disney in 1945, he moved to New York to work as a political cartoonist for the Binghamton Press. It was in New York that he met Johnny Hart in 1950; Parker was judging an art contest in which 18-year-old Hart was an entrant. The meeting was the beginning of a friendship that led to the two collaborating on The Wizard of Id in 1964. Parker teamed with Don Wilder on the political commentary strip, Goosemyer, which ran from 1981 to 1983. He collaborated with Bill Rechin and Wilder on the strips Out of Bounds, Crock. Early on, Parker left those strips to devote more time to The Wizard of Id. Parker received the National Cartoonists Society Humor Comic Strip Award for 1971, 1976, 1980, 1982 and 1983.
    5.67
    3 votes
    156

    David Hopkins

    David Hopkins (born May 1, 1977) is an American comic book writer and essayist. His works include Karma Incorporated and Emily Edison from publisher Viper Comics, Astronaut Dad, and a comic book adaptation of Antigone with frequent collaborator artist Tom Kurzanski. He writes a regular comic feature for D Magazine called Souvenir of Dallas with artist Paul Milligan. David is a contributor to the Smart Pop Series from BenBella Books. He is the co-host and co-producer of Fanboy Radio's Indie Show, that showcases independent and small press comics. David lives in Arlington, Texas with his daughter Kennedy. David Hopkins first professional writing was after college in 2002. Aja Jones asked him to write a stage play for her theatre troupe to be performed at the University of Texas at Arlington. The only performance of "Space to Occupy" was on September 14, 2002. Immediately afterwards, Hopkins began writing comics. The first year, Hopkins wrote a five issue series The Insight. Set in Dallas, Hopkins used extensive photo references from actual locations in the city. (He would later do this for Karma Incorporated, which also takes place in Dallas.) Over the course of two years, there were
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Carol Lay

    Carol Lay

    Carol Lay (born 1952) is an American alternative cartoonist best known for her weekly comic strip, Story Minute (later to evolve into the strip Way Lay), which ran for almost twenty years in such US papers as the LA Weekly, the NY Press, and on Salon. Lay has been drawing professionally for over 30 years. Based in Los Angeles, Lay's strips and illustrations have appeared in Entertainment Weekly, Mad, Newsweek, Worth Magazine, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker. Lay was born in Whittier, California. In 1975 she graduated with a B.F.A. in Fine Arts from UCLA. After graduating from UCLA, Lay entered the comics industry at DC Comics and Western Publishing, while simultaneously writing and drawing underground comics for titles such as Weirdo and her own Good Girls #1–6. She is the author of Mythos, a prose novel featuring Wonder Woman (DC/Pocket Books, 2003), Goodnight, Irene: The Collected Stories of Irene Van de Kamp (Last Gasp, 2007), and The Big Skinny: How I Changed My Fattitude, a Memoir (Villard, 2008). In 2012, Lay and a friend started Waylay Comics to adapt her long-out-of-print and never-before-reprinted weekly strips into the Mobipocket format for
    6.50
    2 votes
    158

    Dudley D. Watkins

    Dudley Dexter Watkins (27 February 1907 - 20 August 1969) was a British cartoonist and illustrator. He is best known for his characters Oor Wullie and The Broons; comic strips featuring them have appeared in Scottish newspaper The Sunday Post since 1936, along with annual compilations. Watkins also illustrated for comics such as The Beano, The Dandy, The Beezer and Topper, and provided illustrations for Christian stories. Watkins was born in Manchester, England, although the family moved to Nottingham while he was still a baby. His father was a lithographic print artist who noted the boy's early artistic talent and ensured that he received extra art classes at the Nottingham School of Art. By the age of 10 the local newspaper declared him a "schoolboy genius." He studied at Nottingham School of Art, and while working for Boots Pure Drug company in the early 1920s, Watkins' first published artwork appeared in Boots' staff magazine, The Beacon. In 1924 Watkins entered the Glasgow School of Art. In 1925 the school principal recommended Watkins to the thriving publisher D.C. Thomson, based in Dundee. Watkins was offered a six-months employment with D. C. Thomson, so he moved to their
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    2 votes
    159

    Greg Howard

    Greg Howard (born 1964 in Washington, DC) is a Chapman Stick player from Charlottesville, Virginia. Originally a keyboardist and saxophonist, Greg took up the Stick in 1985. Early recordings include collaborations as Sticks and Stones with guitarist Tim Reynolds. He has appeared with Dave Matthews Band on two albums (Remember Two Things, 1993, and Before These Crowded Streets, 1998) and in several Dave Matthews Band concerts. He has also collaborated with Dave Matthews Band saxophonist LeRoi Moore. In 1999 Greg formed the Greg Howard Band with Dutch musicians Jan van Olffen, Jan Wolfkamp, and Hubert Heeringa. Their first album, Lift, was released in 2000. Greg travels often to teach at Stick seminars in North America and Europe. He has also written two method books and an instructional DVD for the Stick: The Stick Book, Volume One, published by Stick Enterprises in 1997, and The Greg Howard Songbook, published by Greg in 2009 and "Basic Free Hands Technique" DVD, released in 2011.
    6.50
    2 votes
    160

    John Geering

    John Keith Geering (9 March 1941 - 13 August 1999) was a British cartoonist with a distinctive, occasionally flamboyant style, most famous for his work for DC Thomson comics including Sparky, The Topper, Cracker, Plug, Nutty, The Beano and The Dandy. Geerings strips included: Geering's last new strip was Dean's Dino, which he drew for The Beano shortly before his death. He also produced topical and political satire cartoons for British newspapers. He had lived in the village of Comberbach with his wife for many years before his death. He died in Warrington, aged 58.
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    2 votes
    161

    Lalo Alcaraz

    Lalo Alcaraz is a Mexican-American cartoonist. He is most known for being the author of the comic La Cucaracha, the first nationally syndicated, politically themed Latino daily comic strip. Launched in 2002, La Cucaracha has become one of the most controversial in the history of American comic strips. He is also the creator of the figure "Daniel D. Portado", a satirical Hispanic character who in the 1994 called on Mexican immigrants to return south--""reverse immigration"--as a response to the controversial Proposition 187. In 2012, Daniel D. Portado returned to the headlines as a result of Mitt Romneys call, during his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, on illegal immigrants to exercise "self-deportation." A leading figure in the Chicano movement, Alcaraz also contributes political cartoons for LA Weekly and hosts a radio show on KPFK called the "Pocho Hour of Power." He also contributed a work of art to the 2008 Obama campaign called "Viva Obama". Alcaraz teaches as a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design. Alcaraz was born in San Diego in 1964 and grew up on the U.S./Mexico border, giving him a dual outlook on life (not "Mexican" enough for his
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    2 votes
    162
    Loriot

    Loriot

    Bernhard Victor Christoph Carl von Bülow (short: Vicco von Bülow, 12 November 1923, Brandenburg an der Havel – 22 August 2011, Ammerland at Lake Starnberg), more commonly known under the pseudonym Loriot, was a German comedian, humorist, cartoonist, film director, actor and writer. He is best known for his cartoons, the sketches from his 1976 television series Loriot, alongside Evelyn Hamann, and his two movies, Ödipussi (1988) and Pappa Ante Portas (1991). On the television series Unsere Besten (Our Best), Loriot was ranked the 54th best German ever. In a special comedy episode of Unsere Besten, he was ranked as the most famous German comedian ever. Vicco von Bülow was born in Brandenburg an der Havel in Prussia, today Brandenburg, in modern North-Eastern Germany. His family von Bülow belonged to German aristocracy. His parents separated soon after he was born, his mother died when he was six. Von Bülow and his brother grew up in Berlin with their grandmother. Von Bülow was still in school when World War II started. He completed the Notabitur, a shortened A-level, in 1941. In his family's tradition he became a military officer and was deployed to the Eastern Front for three years,
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    2 votes
    163
    Peter Gallagher

    Peter Gallagher

    Peter Killian Gallagher (born August 19, 1955) is an American actor, musician and writer. Since 1980, Gallagher has played roles in numerous Hollywood films. He starred as Sandy Cohen in the television drama series The O.C. from 2003 to 2007. He currently appears in a recurring role on the USA Network drama Covert Affairs, as CIA Clandestine Services Director Arthur Campbell. Gallagher was born in New York City, New York. His mother, Mary Ann (née O'Shea), was a bacteriologist, and his father, Thomas Francis Gallagher II, was an advertising executive. He is of Irish Catholic background and was raised in Armonk, New York. Gallagher graduated from Tufts University, where he had been active in theater, appearing in such shows as Stephen Sondheim's Company and singing with the all-male a cappella group the Beelzebubs. Gallagher's debut film performance was as one of the co-stars in the 1980 film, The Idolmaker. Gallagher appeared on Broadway with Glenn Close in Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing, but first achieved fame for his role in Steven Soderbergh's Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989). He also starred as Sky Masterson in the 1992 Broadway Revival of Guys and Dolls. Gallagher played a
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    2 votes
    164

    T Campbell

    Terrell Campbell (commonly styled T Campbell) is the writer of many webcomics, including Fans, Rip & Teri , Search Engine Funnies and Penny & Aggie . He is also the editor of Graphic Smash and Clickwheel. His articles for Comixpedia led to a book, A History of Webcomics, and he writes another series for Tokyopop. He is the co-creator of Oh No Robot, a webcomics search engine.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    Antonio Prohias

    Antonio Prohías (January 17, 1921 – February 24, 1998), born in Cienfuegos, Cuba, was a cartoonist most famous for creating the comic strip Spy vs. Spy for MAD Magazine. In 1946, Prohías was given the Juan Gualberto Gómez award, recognizing him as the foremost cartoonist in Cuba. By the late 1940s, Prohías had begun working at El Mundo, the most important newspaper in Cuba. In January 1959, Prohías was the president of the Cuban Cartoonists Association; after Fidel Castro seized power, he personally honored the cartoonist for his anti-Batista political cartoons. But Prohías soon soured on Castro's policies. When he drew cartoons to this effect, he was dismissed by his newspapers, which had been taken over by Fidel Castro's government. With his professional career in limbo, Prohías left Cuba for New York on May 1, 1960. Ten weeks later, he had sold his first work to Mad. The Mad staff occasionally took group vacations, traveling en masse to other countries. Prohías took part in these vacations when possible, but as a Cuban exile, he had trouble gaining admission into some countries, and at the airport before a vacation to Italy, an airport official said, "You can leave if you want,
    7.00
    1 votes
    166

    Basil Wolverton

    Basil Wolverton (July 9, 1909 – December 31, 1978) was an American cartoonist, illustrator, comic book writer-artist, and professed "Producer of Preposterous Pictures of Peculiar People who Prowl this Perplexing Planet" whose many publishers included Marvel Comics and Mad. His drawings have elicited a wide range of reactions. Cartoonist Will Elder said he found Wolverton's technique "outrageously inventive, defying every conventional standard yet upholding a very unusual sense of humor. He was a refreshing original," while Jules Feiffer stated, "I don't like his work. I think it's ugly". He was posthumously inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1991. Born in Central Point, Oregon, he later moved to Vancouver, Washington, and worked as a vaudeville performer and a cartoonist and reporter for the Portland News. At age 16 he sold his first nationally published work and began pitching comic strips to newspaper syndicates. His comic strip, Marco of Mars, was accepted by the Independent Syndicate of New York in 1929 but never distributed because it was deemed too similar to Buck Rogers, which debuted that year. Disk-Eyes the Detective and Spacehawks were
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    1 votes
    167

    Bil Keane

    William Aloysius Keane (October 5, 1922 – November 8, 2011), better known as Bil Keane, was an American cartoonist most notable for his work on the long-running newspaper comic The Family Circus. It began in 1960 and continues in syndication, drawn by his son Jeff Keane. Born in the Crescentville suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Keane attended parochial school at St. William Parish and Northeast Catholic High School. While a schoolboy, he taught himself to draw by mimicking the style of the cartoons published in The New Yorker. His first cartoon was published on May 21, 1936 on the amateur page of the Philadelphia Daily News. While in high school, his in-comic signature was spelled "Bill Keane", but early in his career, he omitted the second L from his first name "to be distinctive". Keane served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1945, drawing for Yank and creating the "At Ease with the Japanese" feature for the Pacific edition of Stars and Stripes. While stationed in Australia he met Thelma "Thel" Carne. Bil and Thel were married in Brisbane in 1948 and settled in Roslyn, Pennsylvania. Thel, the inspiration for the "Mommy" character in his long-running strip, died on May 23,
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    1 votes
    168
    Fred Gallagher

    Fred Gallagher

    Frederick Gallagher (born November 15, 1968) is an American illustrator and web cartoonist. He is best known as the artist, co-creator, and now full owner of Megatokyo. He also goes by the name of Piro, the main character of Megatokyo, whom he has stated is an idealized version of himself when he was in college. He took this name from the name of the cat in the visual novel Kanon. Gallagher lives with his wife and son in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Fine Red Cat (1993) is a children's book by Jennifer Ann Gallagher, Fred Gallagher's sister. It is notable as the first published work Gallagher illustrated. The webcomic Megatokyo started its run on August 14, 2000 in collaboration with Rodney Caston, who owned the domain and wrote many of the scripts for the first year and a half, while Gallagher was responsible for the artwork. Due to creative differences, Caston agreed to sell his share in the venture to Gallagher in May 2002. (See Megatokyo for further detail) Megatokyo's success has allowed Gallagher to pursue it as a full-time occupation since October 2002, after being laid off from his job as an architect. Megatokyo in its entirety is available free of charge at the Megatokyo
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    1 votes
    169

    Jimmy Johnson

    Jimmy Johnson is an American comic strip cartoonist who writes and draws Arlo and Janis. Johnson was born and grew up in Lanett, Alabama, graduating from Lanett High School in 1970. He is an alumnus of Auburn University, class of 1974. "My earliest cartoon work was copying Fred and Barney and Yogi Bear. I became quite proficient and was able to amaze my friends," wrote Johnson. Johnson credits his mother with being especially supportive of his early artwork. As a young man just out of college, Johnson briefly worked as a reporter and in the public relations department of Auburn University. In the years before Arlo and Janis, from about 1980 to 1985, Johnson drew cartoons professionally for newspapers. He did so on a part-time basis when he was a reporter and editor, and then full-time as an editorial cartoonist in Jackson, Mississippi. While employed in this role, Johnson won the prestigious Robert F. Kennedy Award. From 1985 to the present, Johnson has drawn Arlo and Janis for national syndication by NEA. Johnson said, "At the time I sold Arlo & Janis to the newspaper syndicate United Media in 1985, there were a lot of "talking animal" strips. Newspaper editors reacted to this by
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Dik Browne

    Dik Browne (August 11, 1917 – June 4, 1989) was born Richard Arthur Allan Browne in New York City. He was a popular cartoonist, best known for writing and drawing Hägar the Horrible and for drawing Hi and Lois. Browne attended Cooper Union and got his start at the New York Journal American as a copy boy and later worked in the art department. He joined the army, producing work for the engineering unit and created Jinny Jeep, a comic strip about the Women's Army Corps. In the 1940s, he worked as an illustrator for Newsweek as well as for an advertising company, where he created the trademark logo for Chiquita. In 1954, Browne and cartoonist Mort Walker co-created the comic strip Hi and Lois, a spin-off of Walker's popular Beetle Bailey strip, featuring Beetle's sister, brother-in-law and their family. Walker wrote the strip, which Browne illustrated until his death. The series is now drawn by his son Chance and written by Walker's sons. In 1973, Browne created Hägar the Horrible about an ill-mannered red-bearded medieval viking. The comic is now produced by his son Chris. Both strips have been successful, appearing in hundreds of newspapers for decades. Browne was recognized for his
    5.33
    3 votes
    171
    Petri Hiltunen

    Petri Hiltunen

    Petri Hiltunen (born 13 October 1967) is a Finnish cartoonist and illustrator. Hiltunen has produced work in a variety of genres, but is most notable for his fantasy and horror work. He has won the prestigious Puupäähattu award in 2002, which is regarded as the highest honour for Finnish comic artists. He is also a well-known figure in Finnish science fiction fandom and a regular panelist and guest of honour at conventions, such as Finncon. His own comic albums include the horror/fantasy tale Laulu yön lapsista ("Song of the children of the night") and a comic version of Macbeth. The fantasy world of Jaconia, created for his Praedor comics, has been adapted into a role-playing game of the same name. His work has also been featured in the science fiction magazine Tähtivaeltaja, the Finnish Conan magazine and twice in the war comics magazine Korkeajännitys: a western story and one story set in the Finnish War. His drawing style is quite detailed, particularly with his characters, and features heavy lines. Hiltunen is best known in the Finnish popular consciousness from his much lighter, humorous newspaper comic strip Väinämöisen paluu ("The Return of Väinämöinen"), published in many
    5.33
    3 votes
    172
    Ruben Bolling

    Ruben Bolling

    Ruben Bolling (born November 30, 1962) is a pseudonym for Ken Fisher, a cartoonist, the author of Tom the Dancing Bug. Bolling, who has no formal art training, read many comics when he was a child, and sometimes features their styles in his work. However, he didn't aspire to be a full-time cartoonist; instead he studied economics as an undergraduate at Tufts University and later attended Harvard Law School. It was at Harvard in the mid-1980s that Bolling came up with the idea for "Tom the Dancing Bug" and his pseudonym, Ruben Bolling (which is a melding of the names of two old-time baseball players, Ruben Amaro and Frank Bolling). After graduation Bolling practiced law for several years before resigning to pursue comic writing full-time. When that didn't work out, comic writing became a side interest and Bolling became a full-time bank employee. He is currently working on building a full-time writing career, driven in part by an ongoing project with New Line Cinema to produce a movie about his character Harvey Richards, Esq., a “Lawyer for Children." His pieces demonstrate concern about the power of large corporations and satirize the way government has been corrupted by money.
    5.33
    3 votes
    173

    Chester Gould

    Chester Gould (November 20, 1900 – May 11, 1985) was an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of the Dick Tracy comic strip, which he wrote and drew from 1931 to 1977, incorporating numerous colorful and monstrous villains. Gould was born and raised in Pawnee, Oklahoma, the son of Alice M. (née Miller) and Gilbert R. Gould, a printer. His grandfather was a preacher. In 1919, his family moved to Stillwater, Oklahoma, where he attended Oklahoma A & M (now Oklahoma State University) and was a member of the Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity until 1921. That year, he moved to Chicago where he transferred to the Northwestern University School of Continuing Studies. He graduated from Northwestern in 1923. Fascinated by the comics since childhood, Gould quickly found work as a cartoonist. He was hired by William Randolph Hearst's Chicago Evening American, where he produced his first comic strips, Fillum Fables (1924) and The Radio Catts. He also drew a topical strip about Chicago, Why It's a Windy City. Gould married Edna Gauger in 1926, and their daughter, Jean, was born in 1927. In 1931, Gould was hired as a cartoonist with the Chicago Tribune and introduced Dick Tracy in the
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    2 votes
    174
    Frank Miller

    Frank Miller

    Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist, and film director best known for his dark, film noir-style comic book stories and graphic novels Ronin, Daredevil: Born Again, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City and 300. He also directed the film version of The Spirit, shared directing duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and produced the film 300. Miller was born in Olney, Maryland, and raised in Montpelier, Vermont, the fifth of seven children of a nurse mother and a carpenter/electrician father. His family was Irish Catholic. Living in New York City's Hell's Kitchen influenced Miller's material in the 1980s. Miller lived in Los Angeles, California in the 1990s, which influenced Sin City. Miller moved back to Hell's Kitchen by 2001 and was creating Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again as the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred about 4 miles from that neighborhood. Miller was formerly married to colorist Lynn Varley, who colored many of his noted works (from Ronin (1984) through 300 (1998), and the backgrounds to the movie 300 (2007)). Miller and Varley divorced in 2005. He has since been romantically linked to New York-based Shakespearean scholar
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    2 votes
    175
    Gene Carr

    Gene Carr

    Gene Carr (January 7, 1881 – December 9, 1959) was an American cartoonist. He was one of the most active early New York City artists in the young field of comic strips. He was doing newspaper cartoons by age 15 and two years later was working for the William Randolph Hearst papers. Carr is considered a pioneer of the use of sequential panels. He did cartoons for the New York Herald, New York World and the New York Evening Journal. His popular cartoons also appeared in reprint books and on postcards.
    6.00
    2 votes
    176
    Harry Hershfield

    Harry Hershfield

    Harry Hershfield (October 13, 1885 - December 15, 1974) was an American cartoonist, humor writer and radio personality. A columnist once labeled him "the Jewish Will Rogers". Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Hershfield was the son of Jewish immigrants. He studied in Chicago at the Frank Holmes School of Illustration and the Chicago Art Institute, and his career began at age 14, drawing sports cartoons and his comic strip about a dog, Homeless Hector, for the Chicago Daily News in 1899. He headed West, drawing for the San Francisco Chronicle by 1907. In 1909, he was hired by Arthur Brisbane to work for William Randolph Hearst's New York Evening Journal. He switched to the New York Graphic where he did If I'm Wrong, Sue Me!, and when the Graphic folded, he went to the New York Herald Tribune and drew Meyer the Buyer. Ron Goulart, in Encyclopedia of American Comics, described the Hershfield approach to cartoon humor: The character was animated in Abie Kabibble Outwitted a Rival (1917). In the 1930s, Hershfield was in demand as a banquet toastmaster, averaging some 200 banquets and dinners annually. During his lifetime, he was toastmaster or emcee at an estimated 16,000 events, including
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    2 votes
    177

    Mac Raboy

    Emmanuel "Mac" Raboy (April 9, 1914 – December 1967) was an American cartoonist whose comic books and strips remain collectibles more than 40 years after his death. He was known for his work on Fawcett Comics' Captain Marvel Jr. and as the Sunday strip artist of Flash Gordon for over 20 years. Born in New York City, Raboy began his art career with the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. In the 1940s he began working for comic books and gained fame as the illustrator for Captain Marvel, Jr. and the Green Lama. In the spring of 1946, King Features hired Raboy to continue the Sunday page adventures of Flash Gordon, which he continued to work on until his death.
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    Milton Caniff

    Milton Caniff

    Milton Arthur Paul Caniff (February 28, 1907 – April 3, 1988) was an American cartoonist famous for the Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon comic strips. Caniff was born in Hillsboro, Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America. Caniff did cartoons for local newspapers while studying at Stivers High School in Dayton Ohio. At Ohio State University, Caniff joined the Sigma Chi Fraternity and later illustrated for The Magazine of Sigma Chi and The Norman Shield (the fraternity's pledgeship/reference manual). Graduating in 1930, Caniff began at the Columbus Dispatch where he worked with the noted cartoonist Billy Ireland, but Caniff's position was eliminated during the Great Depression. Caniff related later that he had been uncertain of whether to pursue acting or cartooning as a career and that Ireland said, "Stick to your inkpots, kid, actors don't eat regularly." In 1932, Caniff moved to New York City to accept an artist position in the Features Service of the Associated Press. He did general assignment art for several months, drawing the strips Dickie Dare and The Gay Thirties, then inherited a panel cartoon
    6.00
    2 votes
    179

    Murray Ball

    Murray Hone Ball, ONZM (born 1939 in Feilding in the Manawatu), a New Zealand-born cartoonist, has become known for his Stanley the Palaeolithic Hero (the longest running cartoon in Punch magazine), Bruce the Barbarian, All the King's Comrades (also in Punch) and the long-running Footrot Flats comic series. In 2002 Ball became an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for his services as a cartoonist. Ball grew up in New Zealand before spending some years in Australia and South Africa, where he attended Parktown Boys' High School and finished his education. As a young man he worked for the Dominion newspaper in Wellington and the Manawatu Times before becoming a freelance cartoonist and moving to England, where he found work with publishers DC Thomson, of Dundee. He developed his character Stanley and had it published in the influential English humour-magazine Punch. Stanley the Palaeolithic Hero featured a caveman who wore glasses and struggled with the Neolithic environment. It became the longest-running strip in Punch's history, and other English and non-English speaking countries syndicated it. Ball continued to contribute to Punch after returning with his family to
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Pol Medina, Jr.

    Pol Medina, Jr.

    Apolonio "Pol" Medina, Jr. (born April 6, 1960) is a Filipino cartoonist best known for creating Pugad Baboy, a black-and-white comic strip first published in the Philippine Daily Inquirer on May 18, 1988. Pol Medina graduated from the University of Santo Tomas in 1983 with a degree in architecture. In 1985, a year after securing his professional license, he went to Iraq at the height of the Iran–Iraq War to work for an Italian construction company. It was at this juncture that he experienced "the most maddening" two years of his life. In 1986, he started scripting and drawing characters for a new cartoon about a community of fatsos and a dog named Polgas. In 1987, he worked as an architect for a firm in San Juan, Metro Manila. In September 1992, he co-founded Pugad Baboy, Inc. with seven other people. The company adopted Ad Astra Per Aspera for its motto, inspired by Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Three years later, the company folded when Pol Medina left in order pursue a career in the advertising industry. Currently he has another company, Pol Medina Jr. Novelties, dedicated to merchandise based on the strip, including compilations. Pol Medina
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    Al Taliaferro

    Charles Alfred Taliaferro (August 29, 1905 – February 3, 1969), known simply as Al Taliaferro, was a Disney comics artist who used to produce Disney comic strips for King Features Syndicate. Many of his strips were written by Bob Karp. He is best known for his work on the Donald Duck comic strip, but he started his career lettering the Mickey Mouse strips (March 1931 – July 1932), and drew the Bucky Bug comics in 1932 as well as Silly Symphonies pages from 1932 to 1939. Taliaferro co-created a number of characters, including Huey, Dewey and Louie, Bolivar, Grandma Duck, and arguably Daisy Duck. He drew Donald Duck comic strips from 1938 until his death in 1969 in Glendale, California. After his family moved to Glendale, Al studied art at the "Institute of Art" in California. On January 5, 1931 he was hired in Disney Studios as an animator, but soon transferred to the comic strip department. At its height the Donald Duck comic strips was published in 322 newspapers. While many of Taliaferro's strips were reprinted in Disney comic books, in only a few instances did he do original artwork for comic books. Among these was the Cheerios Premium Giveaway Donald Duck: Counter Spy (1947)
    5.00
    3 votes
    182
    Garry Trudeau

    Garry Trudeau

    Garretson Beekman "Garry" Trudeau (born July 21, 1948) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. Trudeau was born in New York City, the son of Jean Douglas (née Moore) and Francis Berger Trudeau, Jr. He is the great-grandson of Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau, who created Adirondack Cottage Sanitorium for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis at Saranac Lake, New York. Edward was succeeded by his son Francis and grandson Francis Jr. The latter founded the Trudeau Institute at Saranac Lake, with which his son Garry retains a connection. Among his great-great-great-grandfathers were Bishop Richard Channing Moore (through his father) and New York politician Francis E. Spinner (through his mother). His ancestry includes French (Canadian), English, Dutch, German, and Swedish. Raised in Saranac Lake, Garry Trudeau attended St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire. He enrolled in Yale University in 1966 and became a member of Scroll and Key. Trudeau was confident that his major would end up being theatre, but he discovered a greater interest in art design. A drawing by Trudeau of Yale quarterback Brian Dowling for the Yale Daily News led to the creation of a
    5.00
    3 votes
    183
    Bud Grace

    Bud Grace

    Bud Grace (born c. 1944) is a cartoonist, who has worked on the comic strip Ernie, whose title was later changed to The Piranha Club in the United States. He also drew Babs and Aldo comic strip for King, under the pseudonym Buddy Valentine. Grace was born in Chester, Pennsylvania, grew up in Florida, and currently resides in Oakton, Virginia. Grace has a Ph.D. in physics from Florida State University, and worked as a nuclear physicist at FSU before turning cartoonist 1979. He frequently makes appearances in his own comic strip where he often ends up in a straitjacket. In 1989 the Swedish Academy of Comic Art awarded Bud Grace with the Adamson Statuette, and Grace received the National Cartoonist Society Newspaper Comic Strip Award for 1993 for his work on the strip.
    5.50
    2 votes
    184

    Carl Giles

    Ronald "Carl" Giles (September 29, 1916 – August 28, 1995), often referred to simply as Giles, was a cartoonist most famous for his work for the British newspaper the Daily Express. His cartoon style was a single topical highly detailed panel, usually with a great deal more going on than the single joke. Certain recurring characters achieved a great deal of popularity, particularly the extended Giles family, which first appeared in a published cartoon on 5 August 1945 and featured prominently in the strip. Of these, the most famous is the enigmatic matriarch of the family, known simply as Grandma. Another recurring favourite was Chalkie, the tyrannical school teacher who Giles claimed was modelled on one of his childhood teachers, and Larry, the mop-haired child from next door, often seen with a camera. Giles was born in Islington in London, England, the son of a tobacconist and a farmer's daughter. He was nicknamed "Karlo", later shortened to "Carl", by friends who decided he looked like Boris Karloff. After leaving school at the age of 14 he worked as an office boy for a Wardour Street film company before being promoted to animator for cartoon films. In 1935 he began working for
    5.50
    2 votes
    185
    Chris Riseley

    Chris Riseley

    Chris Riseley (born 1965) is an American author, producer, and university teacher. He is also the co-creator of the syndicated comic strip Rizzo. He got his degree at University of California, Berkeley. He currently teaches at Snow College in Ephraim, Utah. Was a roommate with Joey Cape, of Lagwagon fame when he attended University of California, Berkeley. He has never met Rizzo collaborator Sean Simmans.
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Dan O'Neill

    Dan O'Neill

    Dan O'Neill (born April 21, 1942) is an American underground cartoonist, creator of the syndicated comic strip Odd Bodkins and founder of the underground comics collective the Air Pirates. Odd Bodkins began its run in 1964 in the San Francisco Chronicle when O'Neill was 21 years old. The strip consisted of the adventures of Hugh and Fred the Bird. During the course of the strip's run, it increasingly reflected O'Neill's life in and his critique of 1960s counterculture. Though he considered himself a strong writer, O'Neill said of his artwork, "I had a very weak line. Either that or palsy." As Odd Bodkins became increasingly political, O'Neill feared that the Chronicle, which held the strip's copyright, would fire him and hire another artist. The Chronicle had axed Odd Bodkins a few times already, but it had been reinstated following reader protests. O'Neill decided on an odd tactic to regain control of his strip: he would engage in copyright infringement, which he reasoned would force the paper to surrender the strip's copyright back to him for fear of being sued. O'Neill worked 28 Walt Disney characters, including Mickey Mouse and Pluto, into the strip. In late November 1970, the
    5.50
    2 votes
    187

    Dick Moores

    Richard Arnold Moores (December 12, 1909 – April 22, 1986) was an American cartoonist whose best known work was the comic strip Gasoline Alley, which he worked on for nearly three decades. Moores was born in Lincoln, Nebraska on December 12, 1909. After graduating from high school in Fort Wayne, Indiana, he attended Fort Wayne Art School. He also received a year of training at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts before spending five years working for Chester Gould on Dick Tracy. While working for Gould in Chicago, he met and married Gretchen, a musician. He met Frank King while in Chicago, sharing a studio with him while drawing his own strip from 1936 to 1942: initially known as Jim Hardy, it later became Windy and Padles. That was followed by 14 years working for Disney, drawing Uncle Remus and later Scamp and a short period in the 1950s at Western Publishing drawing funny animal comic books. The best known of these is the Mickey Mouse story "The Wonderful Whizzix" (Four Color #427, Oct. 1952), which some regard as the inspiration for the Disney's The Love Bug. Moores moved to Florida when he was hired by Frank King in 1956 to assist him on the Gasoline Alley dailies. King's former
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Dr. Seuss

    Dr. Seuss

    Theodor Seuss Geisel ( /ˈɡaɪzəl/; March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer, poet, and cartoonist most widely known for his children's books written under the pen names Dr. Seuss, Theo LeSieg and, in one case, Rosetta Stone. Geisel published 46 children's books, which were often characterized by imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use of anapestic meter. His most celebrated books include the bestselling Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, Horton Hatches the Egg, Horton Hears a Who!, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas!. Numerous adaptations of his work have been created, including 11 television specials, four feature films, a Broadway musical and four television series. He won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958 for Horton Hatches the Egg and again in 1961 for And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. Geisel also worked as an illustrator for advertising campaigns, most notably for Flit and Standard Oil, and as a political cartoonist for PM, a New York City newspaper. During World War II, he worked in an animation department of the United States Army, where he wrote Design for Death, a film that later won the
    5.50
    2 votes
    189

    Greg Evans

    Greg Evans (b. November 13, 1947) is an American cartoonist and the creator of the syndicated comic strip Luann. He received the 2003 National Cartoonists Society Reuben Award for the strip. He has been nominated four other times for the same award. In 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, Dennis Wepman wrote that Evans "taught junior and senior high school art in his native California, worked as promotion manager and graphic artist for a TV station in Colorado, and entertained with a robot at trade shows and fairs before he sold Luann to News America Syndicate in 1984." Evans has written a musical based on Luann, Luann: Scenes in a Teen's Life, which debuted March 2008 at Palomar College in San Marcos, California. It was directed by Dana Case. Prior to Luann, Evans published the comic strip Fogarty, distributed free to high school newspapers. It featured the character Mr. Fogarty, who continues in the same role as a character in Luann. Evans lives in San Marcos, California, near San Diego.
    5.50
    2 votes
    190

    Jean-Claude Forest

    Jean-Claude Forest (11 September 1930, Le Perreux-sur-Marne, France – 29 December 1998, Paris, France) was a writer and illustrator of comics and the creator of character Barbarella. Jean-Claude Forest was born in Le Perreux-sur-Marne, a Paris suburb and graduated from the Paris School of Design in the early 1950s and immediately began working as an illustrator. While at the Paris School of Design Forest drew his first comic strip, Flèche Noire (The Black Arrow). After creating Le Vaisseau Hanté (The Ghost Ship) he illustrated several issues of Charlot, a popular French comic book series loosely based on Charlie Chaplin. Forest eventually became the premier cover artist of French publisher Gallimard's leading French science-fiction paperback imprint, Le Rayon Fantastique, also drawing covers for numerous French newspapers and magazines including France Soir. Together with renowned film director Alain Resnais, Forest was one of the founders of the French Comic-Strip Club in the early 1960s. Forest became world famous when he created the sexy sci-fi strip Barbarella, which was originally published in France in V-Magazine in 1962. The strip was an immediate bestseller and was soon
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    2 votes
    191
    John Kovalic

    John Kovalic

    John Kovalic (born Robert John Kovalic, Jr. on November 24, 1962, in Manchester, England) is a cartoonist, illustrator, and writer. Kovalic is best known for his Dork Tower comic book, comic strip and webcomic, and other humorous work set in and about the fantasy role-playing game genre, such as The Unspeakable Oaf. He has illustrated board and card games for several companies, including Steve Jackson Games (notably the Munchkin card game plus its many expansions and derivatives and Chez Geek and its derivatives), Cumberland Games & Diversions (Pokéthulhu), and the third edition of Fantasy Flight Games's Mag Blast. He was also the sole illustrator for the "Super Deluxx" edition of Kobolds Ate My Baby! has subsequently occasionally featured supplemental KAMB material in the Dork Tower comic book. He is a co-founder and co-owner of Out of the Box Publishing where he is the company's art director and designer of the 2003 trivia party game Whad'Ya Know?, based on Michael Feldman's Whad'Ya Know?, as well as the illustrator of Apples to Apples. Kovalic is an award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Wisconsin State Journal. His work has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    Marge

    Marjorie Henderson Buell (December 11, 1904–May 30, 1993) was an American cartoonist who worked under the pen name Marge. She was best known as the creator of Little Lulu. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Buell was 16 when her first cartoon was published. In 1925, she created her first syndicated comic strip, The Boy Friend, which ran through 1926. Marge was friends with Oz author Ruth Plumly Thompson and illustrated her fantasy novel King Kojo (1933). Hired by The Saturday Evening Post in 1934, her first Little Lulu drawing appeared on the back page of that weekly in 1935. Little Lulu replaced Carl Anderson's Henry, which had been picked up for distribution by King Features Syndicate. Little Lulu was created as a result of Anderson's success, as noted by Schlesinger Library curator Kathryn Allamong Jacob: In 1935, she married C. Addison Buell. The couple had two sons, Fred and Larry, and lived in Malvern, Pennsylvania. The Little Lulu panel continued to run weekly in The Saturday Evening Post until December 30, 1944. Buell retained the rights, unusual for the time. In 1950, Little Lulu became a daily syndicated comic strip. Buell marketed Little Lulu widely throughout the
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    2 votes
    193

    Ryoichi Ikegami

    Ryoichi Ikegami (池上 遼一, Ikegami Ryōichi, born 29 May 1944) is a manga artist. He was assistant to manga artist Shigeru Mizuki in 1966. In 2001, he won the Shogakukan Manga Award for general manga as the artist of Heat. He became a professor at Osaka University of Arts in 2005. Ikegami has worked on several popular series, such as Mai, the Psychic Girl with writer Kazuya Kudo, Crying Freeman, with writer Kazuo Koike, as well as Sanctuary and Heat with writer Sho Fumimura. He also wrote and drew Spider-Man: The Manga, a manga version of Spider-Man and collaborated with Garon Tsuchiya for the manga BOX (BOX 暗い箱). His most recent work is Lord currently serialized in Big Comic Superior.
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    2 votes
    194

    Scott Dikkers

    Scott Dikkers is a United States comedy writer and filmmaker. He was the founding editor of The Onion, and the leading creative force behind the publication's rise from a local college newspaper to an internationally acclaimed humor brand name. He co-owned The Onion from 1989–2001, and is the publication's longest-serving editor-in-chief, holding the position from 1988–1999 and 2005–2008. He is the author or co-author of several best-selling humor books. He is also the creator and artist of the comic strip Jim's Journal, which was syndicated to college newspapers from 1987–1997. Dikkers has written and directed several films, including episodes of "The Onion News Network" web videos (2007) and the independent features Spaceman (1997), and Bad Meat (2003), starring Chevy Chase. Dikkers has recently launched a cartoon website featuring general audience shorts, at www.Dikkers.com
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Ted Slampyak

    Ted Slampyak

    Ted Slampyak is an American comic strip cartoonist who until recently drew Little Orphan Annie. He also draws the color webcomic Jazz Age Chronicles, a comic based in 1920s Boston. He is now the artist contributor to the Art of Manliness, a popular blog. Slampyak was born in Philadelphia and is a 1987 graduate of Temple University's Tyler School of Art. He is the creator of Jazz Age Chronicles, which was originally published for two years by EF Graphics and Caliber Comics, and is now a webcomic. During the 90's he worked as an artist on, among other things, Neil Gaiman's Mr. Hero from Tekno Comix. He also contributed to Paradox Press The Big book of... titles and created mini-comics featuring his libertarian heroine Suzi Romaine. He drew on the syndicated comic strip Little Orphan Annie until it was canceled on June 13, 2010. His work has been nominated for an Ignatz Award, and he has been the recipient of a local Addy Award by the American Advertising Federation. He currently resides in New Mexico with his wife, Jennifer Atkins. Jazz Age has been around in one form or another for the past 20 years. It was inspired by the roleplaying game Call of Cthulhu, and were published in
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    2 votes
    196

    Virgil Franklin Partch

    Virgil Franklin Partch (October 17, 1916 - August 10, 1984) was one of the most prominent and prolific American magazine gag cartoonists of the 1940s and 1950s. His unusual style, surreal humor and familiar abbreviated signature (VIP) made his cartoons distinctive and eye-catching. Partch's cartoons expressed a dry, sardonic wit, and his characters were instantly recognizable by their lipless mouths, large triangular noses, thin ankles and thin wrists, and sometimes well-combed bangs. He was a gagwriter for The New Yorker magazine, but his own cartoons were rarely published there because, according to VIP biographer Bhob Stewart, "New Yorker editor Harold Ross couldn't stomach VIP's drawing style." Born on Saint Paul Island, Alaska, Partch attended high school in Tucson, Arizona and studied at the University of Arizona. In 1937, Partch enrolled at Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles, where he attended Rico LeBrun's classes for six months before dropping out. He later began a four-year stint working for Disney studios — his departure was connected to the Disney animators' strike of 1941. Soon he began selling gag cartoons to large-circulation magazines, including Collier's and
    4.67
    3 votes
    197
    Aaron Williams

    Aaron Williams

    Aaron Williams is a cartoonist. He is most famous for his comics Nodwick, PS238 and Full Frontal Nerdity. He also is the creator of Backwards Compatible, a comic found on the gaming news website Crispy Gamer. He also wrote a Wildstorm series called North 40, with art by Fiona Staples. In November 2011, DC Comics started producing a 5 issue mini series of Diablo (series). Written by Aaron Williams. Comics work includes:
    6.00
    1 votes
    198

    Bob Thaves

    Robert Thaves (October 5, 1924 – August 1, 2006) was the creator of the comic strip Frank and Ernest, which began in 1972. Thaves' desire to become a cartoonist began in his childhood. He had no formal training; instead, he practised by studying and drawing the works of other cartoonists. He was so skilled he could identify the cartoonist of a comic strip without looking at the signature. Robert Lee Thaves was born Oct. 5, 1924, in Burt, Iowa, where his father, John, published local newspapers. He attended the University of Minnesota, where he received both a bachelor and masters degree in psychology. While still at university, the first of his cartoons were printed in magazines. He continued to be interested in cartooning, and developed the Frank and Ernest strip while working as an industrial psychologist. Frank and Ernest began appearing in magazines as early as the 1960s. It was first nationally syndicated November 6, 1972 and was eventually carried in 1,300 papers. It was the first single panel strip to appear in the "panel" format, and the first to use block letters for its dialogue. He also drew the short-lived King Baloo strip, which ran during the 1980s. Its format was
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Chris Muir

    Chris Muir

    Chris Muir (born October 30, 1958) is a U.S. cartoonist who draws the daily web comic Day by Day. Prior to that, he drew a single-panel comic called Altered States for about 5 years for Florida Today (a Gannett newspaper). Muir was born in Syracuse, New York and currently lives in Florida. Day by Day is politically conservative. It is popular amongst conservative bloggers, and often mentions bloggers and blog posts. Muir cites the work of several other cartoonists as inspiration, including Gary Larson and Garry Trudeau. In February 2007, Muir visited Iraq and was embedded for five days in Mosul.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    Darby Conley

    Darby Conley is an American cartoonist best known for the popular comic strip Get Fuzzy. Conley was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1970, and grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee. His first cartoons appeared in the Doyle High Trailblazer, his school paper in Knoxville, Tennessee. His single-panel strip of weirdness won him first place in a News-Sentinel student cartoon competition in 1986, thus planting the idea of someday becoming a professional cartoonist. He went on to earn a Fine Arts and Art History degree from Amherst College in Massachusetts, continuing to improve his Far Side clones for the Amherst Student, graduating in 1994. While a student in college, he played rugby, explaining the rugby sport references in his comic strip. Conley was also a member of an all-male, jazz-influenced a cappella group, the Zumbyes. Conley became a vegetarian in 2005. He currently lives in Boston with two cats, Lego and Rugby. Conley's first real job was putting boats and mountain bikes together at an outdoor sports store, work that he says shredded his hands. He says that the best job he's held to date (except cartoonist) was his stint as a lifeguard at a University of Tennessee pool where no
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    James Edward Murphy

    James Edward Murphy

    James Edward Murphy, Jr. (November 20, 1891–March 9, 1965) was a self-taught American cartoonist who is best known for his long-run family comic strip, Toots and Casper. His earliest strips, signed J.E. Murphy, had a crude awkward look, but as his cartooning improved, his full signature of Jimmy Murphy appeared. Born in Chicago, Murphy grew up in Omaha, Nebraska. When he was 15 he began selling political cartoons to the local newspapers, including the Omaha Examiner. He briefly attended Creighton University in Omaha, but he left home in 1910, spending the next eight years drawing political cartoons for the Inland Herald (Spokane, Washington), the Oregon Journal (Portland, Oregon) and the San Francisco Call & Post. In the summer of 1918, William Randolph Hearst beckoned, and Murphy arrived in New York for a job with Hearst's New York Journal and the New York American, where he decided to try a comic strip. For the New York American Murphy created Doc Attaboy, a strip about a middle-aged doctor more concerned with writing the bills instead of curing his patients. That short-lived strip continued until December 1918. The same month he dropped Doc Attaboy, he began Toots and Casper for
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Noel Sickles

    Noel Douglas Sickles (January 24, 1910 - October 3, 1982) was an American commercial illustrator and cartoonist, best known for the comic strip Scorchy Smith. Sickles was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. Largely self-taught, his career began as a political cartoonist for the Ohio State Journal in the late 1920s. At that time he met and shared a studio with cartoonist Milton Caniff, then working for the Columbus Dispatch. Sickles followed Caniff, creator of the Terry and the Pirates comic strip, to New York City in 1933, where both men initially worked as staff artists for the Associated Press. Sickles was assigned to the action/adventure comic Scorchy Smith, whose creator, John Terry, was suffering from tuberculosis. Loosely modeled on Charles Lindbergh, Scorchy was a pilot-for-hire who flew into numerous high-octane globe-trotting adventures. The series, which started in 1930, was heavily influenced by Roy Crane’s adventure strip, Wash Tubbs. Sickles initially illustrated the strip as a ghost artist, but he signed his own name after Terry's 1934 death. Sickles' artwork was much admired and proved highly influential to other comic strip artists. His compositions were cinematic in style,
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    1 votes
    203
    Tatsuya Ishida

    Tatsuya Ishida

    Tatsuya Ishida is the author of the webcomic Sinfest. He was also a penciller for Dark Horse Comics, where he worked on comic books of the licensed properties G.I. Joe and Godzilla. Other than what can be learned through his work, very little is known about him. He remains an enigmatic personality who makes no regular commentary other than the "Notes from the Resistance" feature on the front page of the Sinfest website, which can sometimes cryptically refer to real-life events. Appearances by him on the internet are otherwise very rare, and brief. In the 1990s he co-created and penciled a comic called StrangeLove for Entity Comics with partner Stacy Freeman.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    Vince Locke

    Vincent Locke is an American comic book artist known for his work on Deadworld and A History of Violence and for his ultraviolent album covers for death metal band Cannibal Corpse. Locke began work in 1986 illustrating Deadworld, a zombie horror comic that soon became an underground hit. Since then, his illustrative talents in comics have included The Sandman, American Freak, Batman, Witchcraft: Le Terreur, The Spectre, and A History of Violence, which was later made into a movie directed by David Cronenberg and starring Viggo Mortensen. He has done work for 2000 AD, including one Judge Dredd story. Locke has also gained notoriety by creating ultra-violent watercolor paintings to be used as album covers for the death metal band Cannibal Corpse. Also, he has provided illustrations for the "weird erotica" of dark-fantasy author Caitlín R. Kiernan, providing black and white artwork strongly reminiscent of Aubrey Beardsley's style for her collections Frog Toes and Tentacles and Tales from the Woeful Platypus, as well as for Kiernan's monthly Sirenia Digest. Recent projects have included illustrating the first issue of Polluto: The Anti-Pop Culture Journal. He is also known for
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    Hal Foster

    Harold Rudolf Foster (August 18, 1892 – July 25, 1982), aka Hal Foster, was a Canadian- American illustrator best known as the creator of the award-winning comic strip Prince Valiant, which influenced numerous artists and was adapted to film. Foster was 73 when he was elected to membership in Great Britain's Royal Society of Arts, an honor given to very few Americans. Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Foster was a staff artist for the Hudson's Bay Company in Winnipeg and moved to Chicago in 1919 where he studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and soon found illustration assignments. The illustrator J. C. Leyendecker was an early influence on Foster. Foster's Tarzan comic strip, adapted from Edgar Rice Burroughs' novels, began January 7, 1929, continuing until Rex Maxon took over the Tarzan daily on June 10, 1929. Foster returned to do the Tarzan Sunday strip beginning September 27, 1931, continuing until Burne Hogarth took over the Sunday Tarzan on May 9, 1937. He soon grew tired of working on an adaptation and began planning his own creation. William Randolph Hearst, who had long wanted Foster to do a comic strip for his newspapers, was so impressed with Foster's pitch for Prince
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    206
    Ilkka Heilä

    Ilkka Heilä

    Ilkka Heilä (born 1956) is a Finnish cartoonist who lives in Kaarina. He draws B. Virtanen -comic strip. Comics by Heilä appeared as early as in the beginning of 70s in the comic magazine Sarjis. However, working in a post office replaced professional self-fulfillment of artistic tendencies the nearly 20 years period, until then he created Bulls-syndicate of his comic strip B. Virtanen and took part in comic competition arranged by newspaper Uusi Suomi in 1989. Thanks to this comic strip, Heilä could at last in the 90s move to a full-time comic artist. He got the Puupäähattu, a valued Finnish comic prize of Suomen Sarjakuvaseura (Finnish Comic Club) in year 2006.
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    207

    Jerry Scott

    Jerry Scott (born May 2, 1955) in South Bend, Indiana. He is an American cartoonist, co-creator of Baby Blues and co-creator of Zits. He started cartooning professionally in the mid-1970s by submitting gag cartoons to magazines, and he sold one from his first batch to the Saturday Evening Post. In 1983, Scott took over Nancy, which was created by Ernie Bushmiller (he eventually handed it over to Guy Gilchrist in the 1990s). He became friends with Rick Kirkman and they created Baby Blues, a comic based on family life with little children. Later, Scott and Jim Borgman collaborated to create Zits, which follows family life with a teenaged son. Scott was still working on the last two strips as of 2012.
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    208
    Mads Eriksen

    Mads Eriksen

    Mads Eriksen (born 15 July 1977) is a Norwegian cartoonist, best known for the comic strips M and Gnom. Eriksen was born in Malvik. His career in comics began in 2000, when his first comic strip, Gnom, was accepted into Smult, a magazine dedicated to promoting promising Norwegian cartoonists. Gnom quickly became popular but when Bladkompaniet ceased publication of Smult, Eriksen abandoned Gnom and began his new series, M as a guest strip in the monthly magazine Pondus. The initial of Mads, M is a semi-auto-biographical, surrealistic strip featuring himself and his girlfriend, "Madammen" (English: The Madam). In 2002, M began daily publication in Dagbladet, initially on a "guest" basis, until the strip became a permanent fixture, causing Hägar the Horrible to be removed from the newspaper's comics section. In 2005 Bladkompaniet published an album containing the complete Gnom, and M got its own own dedicated magazine in December 2006 when Schibstedforlagene published the first M magazine, with a new issue once a month. M strips are published six times a week, Monday through Saturday, in the newspapers Dagbladet and Adresseavisen, and subsequently appear on the internet portal
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    209

    Max Cannon

    Max Cannon is author and creator of the independent comic strip Red Meat. Cannon began producing the strip in 1989 for the Arizona Daily Wildcat, the student newspaper of the University of Arizona (although he was not a student there at the time). The strip was later picked up by the Tucson Weekly, and it now appears in over 75 alternative weeklies. It also appears in The A.V. Club section of the satirical newspaper, The Onion. Cannon is also creator of the Comedycentral.com webshow, Shadow Rock available now on Atom.com. Cannon lives in Tucson, Arizona, U.S. with his wife and their two young children. He hosts a monthly short film contest at the Loft Cinema. A longtime fan of Marvel Comics, Cannon recently did work for them. His comic strip can be viewed at www.redmeat.com.
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    210

    George McManus

    George McManus (January 23, 1884 – October 22, 1954) was an American cartoonist best known as the creator of Irish immigrant Jiggs and his wife Maggie, the central characters in his syndicated comic strip, Bringing Up Father. Born in St. Louis, Missouri of Irish parents, McManus had an innate gift for drawing and a sense of humor. He recalled an incident when he was in high school: "My teacher sent home to my parents a picture I had drawn of a classmate named Sweeney. 'This is what your boy has been doing,' the teacher wrote, icily. I laid the note in Pop's lap and headed wearily for the woodshed. But Pop, instead, put on his hat and coat and went to the editor of The Republican. He showed Sweeney to the editor. Next day I had a job on The Republican at $5 a week--as an errand boy." At The Republican, he created his first comic strip, Alma and Oliver. In 1904, after winning $3000 at the racetrack, he headed for New York City and a job with the prestigious New York World, where he worked on several short-lived strips, including Snoozer, The Merry Marcelene, Ready Money Ladies, Cheerful Charlie, Nibsby the Newsboy in Funny Fairyland, Panhandle Pete and Let George Do It. In 1904, when
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    211

    Jim Meddick

    Jim Meddick (born August 1961) is an American cartoonist. While attending Washington University in St. Louis, he won the Chicago Tribune Student Cartoonist Contest for a strip named Paperback Writer. After graduating, in 1983 he became a political cartoonist. In 1985, he created the comic strip Robotman, now known as Monty. Meddick did not own the Robotman property, whereas he created and owns the Monty character. He lives in New York City with his wife.
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    212
    Alan Moore

    Alan Moore

    Alan Oswald Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer primarily known for his work in comic books, a medium where he has produced a number of critically acclaimed and popular series, including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and From Hell. Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in history, he has also been described as "one of the most important British writers of the last fifty years". He has occasionally used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, and Translucia Baboon. Moore started out writing for British underground and alternative fanzines in the late 1970s before achieving success publishing comic strips in such magazines as 2000 AD and Warrior. He was subsequently picked up by the American DC Comics, and as "the first comics writer living in Britain to do prominent work in America", he worked on big name characters such as Batman (Batman: The Killing Joke) and Superman (Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?), substantially developed the character Swamp Thing, and penned original titles such as Watchmen. During that decade, Moore helped to bring about greater social respectability for the medium in the United States and United Kingdom, and has
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    213
    Bill Amend

    Bill Amend

    William J. C. "Bill" Amend III ( /ˈeɪmənd/; born September 20, 1962 in Northampton, Massachusetts) is an American cartoonist, best known for his comic strip FoxTrot. Amend attended high school in Burlingame, California where he was a cartoonist on his school newspaper. Amend is an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America. He attended Amherst College, where he drew comics for the college paper. He majored in physics and graduated in 1984. In 1982 Amend took first place among sophomores in a mathematics prize examination at Amherst. After a short time in the animation business, Amend decided to pursue a cartooning career and signed on with Universal Press Syndicate. FoxTrot first appeared on April 10, 1988. On May 21, 1999, Amherst College awarded him an honorary degree as Doctor of Humane Letters. On December 5, 2006, Universal Press Syndicate issued a press release stating that Amend's strip, FoxTrot, would turn into a Sunday-only strip. Amend stated that he wants to continue doing the strip, but at a less hurried pace. This news was followed by several weeks of the characters discussing a "cartoonist" semi-retiring to Sundays only, and what methods he would use to phase out the
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    214

    Gary Larson

    Gary Larson (born August 14, 1950) is the creator of The Far Side, a single-panel cartoon series that was syndicated internationally to newspapers for 15 years. The series ended with Larson's retirement on January 1, 1995. His 23 books of collected cartoons have combined sales of more than 45 million copies. Larson grew up in University Place, Washington, in suburban Tacoma. His parents are Verner, a car salesman, and Doris, a secretary. He is a graduate of Curtis Senior High School in University Place. He graduated from Washington State University in Pullman with a degree in communications. Larson credits his older brother, Dan, for his "paranoid" sense of humor. Dan pulled countless pranks on Gary, taking advantage of his phobia of monsters under the bed by waiting in the closet for the right moment to pounce. He is also credited for nurturing Gary's love of science. They caught animals in Puget Sound and placed them in terrariums in the basement, even making a small desert ecosystem. Dan Larson died of a myocardial infarction in 1989. According to Larson in his anthology, The Prehistory of the Far Side, he was working in a music store when he took a few days off, after finally
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    215
    Jeph Jacques

    Jeph Jacques

    Jeph Jacques (born Jeffrey Paul Jacques, (1980-06-17)June 17, 1980) writes and illustrates the webcomic Questionable Content. He was born in Rockville, Maryland, and graduated from Hampshire College with a degree in music. He lives in Southampton, Massachusetts with his wife (and business manager) Cristi. He also has a younger brother, Justin. Questionable Content (QC) is a comedic slice-of-life webcomic that Jacques started on August 1, 2003. It was initially published two days a week, and then moved up to three updates a week when Jacques published strip #16. On September 4, 2004 Jacques lost his day job, and decided to try publishing QC every weekday and make a living selling QC-related T-Shirts. Jeph is one of the small number of professional web cartoonists, as he and his wife Cristi both make their living through QC. Jacques is a member of Dayfree Press, an online webcomic syndicate which includs other artists such as Christian Fundin and Pontus Madsen of Little Gamers, Sam Logan of Sam and Fuzzy, and Ryan North of Dinosaur Comics. Jacques launched "indietits" as an anonymous side project on April 1, 2005 to use ideas that did not fit into Questionable Content's setting.
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    216

    Lars Jansson

    Lars Jansson (8 October 1926 – 31 July 2000) was a Finnish author and cartoonist. A native of Helsinki, Jansson was the son of the sculptor, Viktor Jansson, and the illustrator, Signe Hammarsten-Jansson. His siblings included an older sister, writer Tove Jansson, and an older brother, Per Olof Jansson. In 1958, his sister assigned to him the writing of the Moomin comic strip, which he also drew from 1961 to 1974. Between 1990 and 1992, Jansson worked with Dennis Livson to direct the Moomin animated series in Japan. His daughter, Sophia, worked together with him in 1993 to help manage the production of a new series of Moomin strips which Sophia now manages solely.
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    217

    Lore Sjöberg

    Lore Christian Fitzgerald Sjöberg (born June 27, 1970, under the surname "Shoberg") is an internet humorist, co-founder of the Brunching Shuttlecocks humor website and author of The Book of Ratings. (His father, nicknamed Lore and also born a Shoberg, but now legally Lore Coyote Orion, is a writer, illustrator and musician.) He first entered the public eye as one of the Brunching Shuttlecocks in 1997 along with David Neilsen (the Self-Made Critic) and a number of other, minor contributors. This online humor magazine picked up a considerable following during its run, but was, ultimately, terminated after a long period without updates in May 2003. The Brunching Shuttlecocks gained notoriety when Newsweek magazine mentioned the Alanis Morissette Lyric Generator. Lore's largest contribution to Brunching was "Ratings", in which he would give a short commentary and a letter grade to a handful of items in a particular category, such as "breakfast cereals" or "Scooby-Doo characters". In 2002, Sjöberg published a collection of these ratings (as well as a few quizzes from Brunching Shuttlecocks) as The Book of Ratings. Sjöberg then moved on to start a number of other projects, under the
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    218
    Lynn Johnston

    Lynn Johnston

    Lynn Johnston, CM, OM (born May 28, 1947) is a Canadian cartoonist, well known for her comic strip For Better or For Worse, and was the first woman and first Canadian to win the National Cartoonist Society's Reuben Award. Born Lynn Ridgway in Collingwood, Ontario, she was raised in North Vancouver, British Columbia. She attended the Vancouver School of Art with hopes of making a living as an artist. After working briefly in animation, she married in 1969, and moved back to Ontario, where she worked as a medical artist at McMaster University for five years. Johnston's illustrations are currently in storage in McMaster's medical archive. They include depictions of routine hospital happenings, such as a father smoking in the waiting room. While expecting her first child, she drew single-panel cartoons for the ceiling of her obstetrician's office. Those drawings were published in her first book, entitled David We're Pregnant, which was published in 1973. After her divorce, she did free-lance commercial and medical art in a greenhouse which was converted into a studio. Hi Mom! Hi Dad!, a sequel to David, was published in 1975. Shortly thereafter, she met and married dental student Rod
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    219

    George Baker

    George Baker (May 22, 1915 – May 7, 1975) was a cartoonist who became prominent during World War II as the creator of the popular comic strip, The Sad Sack. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Baker grew up in Rock Island, Illinois and Chicago. In Chicago, he attended Lane Technical High School, and graduated from Roosevelt High School, where he played baseball and drew pictures for the high school annual. After six weeks of art training in a night school, he got a job as a commercial artist "but soon grew tired of drawing pots and pans for newspaper advertisements." He moved to California to pursue a minor league career. Instead, he was hired by Walt Disney in 1937, and assisted in the production of the studio's full-length animated features, including Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo and Bambi. His specialty was animation of thunderstorms, waterfalls and other effects. Five months prior to Pearl Harbor, Baker was drafted (June 1941) into the United States Army. He related later that he expected that the Army Classification System would have no use for his artistic experience, noting "They say it makes cooks out of mechanics, and vice versa. But I must say, it worked perfectly in my case."
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    220
    Al Capp

    Al Capp

    Alfred Gerald Caplin (September 28, 1909 – November 5, 1979), better known as Al Capp, was an American cartoonist and humorist best known for the satirical comic strip Li'l Abner. He also wrote the comic strips Abbie an' Slats and Long Sam. He won the National Cartoonists Society's Reuben Award in 1947 for Cartoonist of the Year, and their 1979 Elzie Segar Award (posthumously) for his "unique and outstanding contribution to the profession of cartooning." Born in New Haven, Connecticut of Russian Jewish heritage, Capp was the eldest child of Otto Philip and Matilda (Davidson) Caplin. Capp's parents were both natives of Latvia whose families had migrated to New Haven in the 1880s. "My mother and father had been brought to this country from Russia when they were infants," wrote Capp in 1978. "Their fathers had found that the great promise of America was true—it was no crime to be a Jew." The Caplins were dirt poor, and Capp later recalled stories of his mother going out in the night to sift through ash barrels for reusable bits of coal. In August 1919, at the age of nine, Capp lost his left leg in a trolley accident. This childhood tragedy likely helped shape Capp’s cynical worldview,
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    221
    Bill Watterson

    Bill Watterson

    William "Bill" Boyd Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is an American cartoonist and the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes, which was syndicated from 1985 to 1995. Watterson stopped drawing Calvin and Hobbes at the end of 1995 with a short statement to newspaper editors and his readers that he felt he had achieved all he could in the medium. Watterson is known for his views on licensing and comic syndication, as well as for his reclusive nature. Watterson was born in Washington, D.C., where his father, James G. Watterson (born 1932), worked as a patent examiner while going to George Washington University Law School before becoming a patent attorney in 1960. In 1964, when Watterson was six years old, the family moved to Chagrin Falls, Ohio, where his mother, Kathryn Watterson, became a city council member. James Watterson was elected as a council member in 1997, holding that position for 12 years before retiring on August 31, 2009 to pursue artistic "projects and goals". Watterson, who drew his first cartoon at age eight, spent much time in childhood alone, drawing and cartooning. This continued through his school years, and he drew cartoons for his high school newspaper and
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    222
    Burne Hogarth

    Burne Hogarth

    Burne Hogarth (December 25, 1911 – January 28, 1996) was an American cartoonist, illustrator, educator, author and theoretician, best known for his pioneering work on the Tarzan newspaper comic strip and his series of anatomy books. Burne Hogarth was born in Chicago in 1911, the son of a housewife and a carpenter. His parents were immigrants from Eastern Europe. He displayed an early talent for drawing. His father saved these efforts and, some years later, presented them and the young Hogarth to the registrar at the Art Institute of Chicago. At age 12, Hogarth was accepted and thus began a long formal education that took him through such institutions as Crane College and Northwestern University in Chicago to Columbia University in New York City, all the while studying arts and sciences. Due to his father’s premature death, Hogarth began working at age 15, when he became the assistant at the Associated Editors Syndicate and illustrated a series called Famous Churches of the World. He worked for several years as an editor and advertising artist. This work provided steady and, by 1929, crucial employment. In 1929, he drew his first comic strip, Ivy Hemmanhaw, for the Barnet Brown
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    223

    René Goscinny

    René Goscinny (French pronunciation: [ʁɛne gosini]; 14 August 1926 – 5 November 1977) was an award-winning French comics editor and writer, who is best known for the comic book Astérix, which he created with illustrator Albert Uderzo, and for his work on the comic series Lucky Luke with Morris (considered the series' golden age) and Iznogoud with Jean Tabary. Goscinny was born in Paris in 1926, to a family of Jewish immigrants from Poland; his parents were Stanisław Simkha Gościnny (the surname means hospitable in Polish; Simkha is his Jewish name meaning happiness), a chemical engineer from Warsaw, Poland, and Anna (Hanna) Bereśniak-Gościnna from Chodorków, a small village near Zhitomir, in the Second Polish Republic, now Ukraine. Claude, René's older brother was born 6 years earlier; on 10 December 1920. Stanisław and Anna had met in Paris and married in 1919. The Gościnnys moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina, two years after René's birth, because of a chemical engineer post Stanisław had obtained there. He spent a happy childhood in Buenos Aires, and studied in the French schools there. He had a habit of being the "Class Clown", probably to compensate for a natural shyness. He
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    224
    Aaron McGruder

    Aaron McGruder

    Aaron McGruder (born May 29, 1974) is an American cartoonist best known for writing and drawing The Boondocks, a Universal Press Syndicate comic strip about two young African American brothers from inner-city Chicago now living with their grandfather in a sedate suburb, as well as being the creator and executive producer of The Boondocks television series based on his strip. Through the exceptionally intelligent Huey (named after Huey P. Newton) and his younger brother and wannabe gangsta Riley, the strip explores issues involving African American culture and American politics. Aaron McGruder was born in Chicago, Illinois. When McGruder's father accepted a job with the National Transportation Safety Board, McGruder moved to Columbia, Maryland at age six with his parents and his older brother. He attended a Jesuit school from grades seven to nine, followed by public high school at Oakland Mills High School and the University of Maryland, from which he graduated with a degree in African American Studies. The Boondocks debuted in the campus newspaper, The Diamondback, in late 1997, under its then-editor, Jayson Blair. McGruder created the comic while working at the Presentation
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    225

    Alex Toth

    Alexander Toth (June 25, 1928 – May 27, 2006) was an American professional cartoonist active from the 1940s through the 1980s. Toth's work began in the American comic book industry, but he is also known for his animation designs for Hanna-Barbera throughout the 1960s and 1970s. His work included Super Friends, Space Ghost, The Herculoids, and Birdman. Toth’s work has been resurrected in the late-night, adult-themed spinoffs on Cartoon Network: Space Ghost: Coast to Coast and Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law. He was inducted into the comic-book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990. Toth's talent was noticed early on as a teacher from his poster class in junior high took time to urge that he devote himself to art. Enrolling in the High School of Industrial Arts, Toth studied illustration and sold his first paid freelance art at the early age of 15. Toth launched his career at the age of 15, illustrating true stories for Heroic magazine through a comic-book packager named Steve Douglas. Although he initially aimed to do newspaper strips (“It was my dream to do what Caniff, Raymond, and Foster had done”), he found the industry “dying” and instead moved into comic books. After
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    226

    Brad Anderson

    Brad Anderson (born May 14, 1924, in Jamestown, New York) is an American cartoonist. He graduated from Brocton Central School in Brocton, New York in 1943 and then served with the United States Navy until 1946 and continued to cartoon. Initially aspiring to be an industrial designer, Anderson attended Syracuse University on the G.I. Bill; in 1951 he graduated with a B.F.A. in Fine Arts with a major in advertising. Anderson went to work for Ball & Grier, an advertising agency in Utica, New York; however, in 1953, Anderson decided to focus on freelance magazine cartooning. From 1954 to 1966, Anderson drew the comic strip Grandpa's Boy. He is best known for creating the comic strip Marmaduke in 1955, which he continues to draw to this day. According to Anderson, "During the time, I was drawing various types of dogs in my magazine cartoons, I was also trying to develop a dog character specifically for eventual newspaper syndication [....] you couldn't see the eyes of my shaggy dogs, so as I thought more about it I decided I wanted a dog where I could have an expressive face". Anderson, who says he draws on Laurel and Hardy routines for his ideas, received the National Cartoonists
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    227
    Chris Ware

    Chris Ware

    Franklin Christenson Ware (born December 28, 1967), known professionally as Chris Ware, is an American comic book artist and cartoonist, notable for his Acme Novelty Library series and the graphic novel Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. His works explore themes of social isolation, emotional torment and depression. His works tend to use a vivid colour palette and are full of realistic, meticulous detail. His lettering and images are often elaborate and sometimes evoke the ragtime era or another early 20th-century American design style. Ware often refers to himself in the publicity for his work in self-effacing, even withering tones. He is considered by some critics and fellow notable illustrators and writers, such as Dave Eggers, to be among the best currently working in the medium; Canadian graphic-novelist Seth has said, "Chris really changed the playing field. After him, a lot of [cartoonists] really started to scramble and go, 'Holy [expletive], I think I have to try harder.'" Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Ware resides in the Chicago area of Illinois. His earliest published strips appeared in the late 1980s on the comics page of The Daily Texan, the student newspaper of the
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    228
    Darrell Craig McClure

    Darrell Craig McClure

    Darrell Craig McClure (February 25, 1903 - February 27, 1987), was an American cartoonist and illustrator best known for his work on the comic strip Little Annie Rooney from 1930 to 1966. The strip took its name from an 1890 song by Michael Nolan. McClure was born in Ukiah, California, where his mother was the painter Ethel Jameson Docker. At age nine, McClure moved with his family to San Francisco, where he went to art school at night, doing his first professional jobs at age 14. He was 17 when he began an apprenticeship in animated cartoons, and he studied at the California School of Fine Arts. After work in logging camps as a lumberjack, he was a sailor on commercial freighters in the Pacific, eventually traveling to New York City on a freighter. In New York, he took a job at King Features Syndicate in 1923 and studied under George Bridgman at the Art Student's League. He became a contributor to Yachting in 1924, married that same year and moved to Connecticut. In the late 1920s, his first strips, Vanilla and the Villains and Hard Hearted Hickey, appeared, followed by Donnie. In 1930, he took over Little Annie Rooney (except for Sundays) from two previous artists for the New
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    229

    Dave Coverly

    Dave Coverly (born 1964) is the creator of the single-panel comic Speed Bump. He grew up in Plainwell, Michigan and graduated from Eastern Michigan University (EMU) in Ypsilanti with a degree in philosophy. At EMU, he worked for the student newspaper, the Eastern Echo. He went on to get a master's degree in English from Indiana University. Coverly took a year off from graduate school, and during that time he was an art director for a public relations firm and an editorial cartoonist for the Battle Creek Enquirer. He returned to Indiana in 1990 and became the editorial cartoonist for The Herald-Times in Bloomington, Indiana. His work appeared in Esquire, The Saturday Evening Post, The New York Times and USA Today. After Creators Syndicate picked up his untitled cartoon panel in 1994, it was given the title Speed Bump, and a year later, it was running in more than 90 papers. In 1995, Coverly left The Herald-Times to concentrate on Speed Bump. Dave and Chris Coverly live in Ann Arbor, Michigan, with their children, Alayna and Simone. He has been recognized for his work with the National Cartoonists Society Greeting Card Award for 1997 and another nomination for the same award for
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    230
    E. C. Segar

    E. C. Segar

    Elzie Crisler Segar (8 December, 1894 – 13 October, 1938) was an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of Popeye, a character who first appeared in 1929 in his comic strip Thimble Theatre. Asked how to say his name, he told The Literary Digest it was "SEE-gar". He commonly signed his work simply Segar or E. Segar above a drawing of a cigar. Segar was born on 8 December, 1894, and raised in Chester, Illinois, a small town near the Mississippi River. The son of a handyman, his earliest work experiences included assisting his father in house painting and paper hanging. Skilled at playing drums, he also provided musical accompaniment to films and vaudeville acts in the local theater, where he was eventually given the job of film projectionist at the Chester Opera House, where he also did live performances. At age 18, he decided to become a cartoonist. He took a correspondence course in cartooning from W.L. Evans of Cleveland, Ohio. He said that after work he "lit up the oil lamps about midnight and worked on the course until 3 a.m." Segar moved to Chicago where he met Richard F. Outcault, creator of The Yellow Kid and Buster Brown. Outcault encouraged him and introduced him at
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    231
    Edgar Bergen

    Edgar Bergen

    Edgar John Bergen (February 16, 1903 – September 30, 1978) was an American actor and radio performer, best known as a ventriloquist. Bergen was born Edgar John Bergren in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Swedish immigrants Nilla Svensdotter (née Osberg) and Johan Henriksson Bergren. He grew up in Decatur, Michigan. He taught himself ventriloquism from a pamphlet when he was 11. A few years later, he commissioned Chicago woodcarver Theodore Mack to sculpt a likeness of a rascally Irish newspaperboy he knew. The head went on a dummy named Charlie McCarthy, who became Bergen's lifelong sidekick. At age 16, he went to Chicago, where he attended Lake View High School and worked at a silent movie house. He gave his first public performance at Waveland Avenue Congregational Church which was located on the northeast corner of Waveland and Janssen. He lived across the street from the church. In 1965, he gave that church a generous contribution, a thoughtful letter, and a photograph of himself which had been requested by the minister and was displayed in the church's assembly room which was dedicated to Bergen. His first performances were in vaudeville, at which point he legally changed his
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    232
    Fred Negro

    Fred Negro

    Fred Negro is an Australian satirist, musician, songwriter, and cartoonist. Born in Richmond, a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, in 1959. He has fronted numerous rock, punk and country bands, with significant local success, including: In 1985 he formed The Brady Bunch Lawnmower Massacre, a country-punk fusion group with Garry Mansfield (guitar), Paul Barnett (bass), Scotty Simpson (drums) and Terry Foster (guitar, harmonica); they disbanded in 1991. Punk-influenced I Spit On Your Gravy had also disbanded by the end of the 1980s but Fred has maintained a significant underground presence in Melbourne, Australia with regular appearances in his other bands, and today contributes a weekly 'Pub Strip' to the Melbourne street press, and until major renovation in 2009 MC'd the long running Karaoke night at the Greyhound Hotel, St Kilda, Victoria. Artwork appears in: Honorary appointments: Illustrations for
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    233
    Gahan Wilson

    Gahan Wilson

    Gahan Wilson (born February 18, 1930 in Evanston, Illinois) is an American author, cartoonist and illustrator known for his cartoons depicting horror-fantasy situations. Since 1966, he has been married to the author Nancy Winters (née Nancy Dee Midyette). Wilson's cartoons and illustrations are drawn in a playfully grotesque style and have a dark humor that is often compared to the work of The New Yorker cartoonist and Addams Family creator Charles Addams. But while both feature vampires, cemeteries and other traditional horror elements in their work, Addams' cartoons are gothic, reserved and old-fashioned, while Wilson's work is more contemporary, gross and confrontational, featuring atomic mutants, subway monsters and serial killers. It could be argued that Addams' work was probably meant to be funny without a lot of satirical intent, while Wilson often has a very specific point to make. Wilson was inspired by the irreverent work of the various satiric Mad and Punch cartoonists, as well as the science fiction monster films of the 1950s. His cartoons and prose fiction appeared regularly in Playboy, Collier's and The New Yorker for almost 50 years. In addition to his cartoons for
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    234

    Garth Gerhart

    Garth Gerhart is a cartoonist who may be best known for his Bitterman strip, which currently appears in MAD Magazine.
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    235
    George Herriman

    George Herriman

    George Joseph Herriman (22 August 1880 – 25 April 1944) was an American cartoonist, best known for the comic strip Krazy Kat (1913–1944). Though not popular, Krazy Kat has been widely influential, and was read by many famous people in the arts. Gilbert Seldes' article "The Krazy Kat Who Walks by Himself" was the earliest example of a critic from the high arts giving serous attention to a comic strip. The Comics Journal placed it first on its list of the greatest comics of the 20th century. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, to mulatto Creole parents, Herriman grew up in Los Angeles. After graduating from high school in 1897, he got his first job in newspapers, doing illustrations and engraving. He soon moved on to cartooning and comic strips—a medium then in its infancy. He did a variety of strips until he introduced his most famous character, Krazy Kat, in his strip The Dingbat Family in 1910. Krazy spawned its own daily strip in 1913, and from 1916 appeared on Sundays as well. The strip was noted for its poetic, dialect-heavy dialog, its fantastic, shifting backgrounds, and its bold, experimental page layouts. In its main them, Krazy would be pelted with bricks by Ignatz Mouse,
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    236

    J. Scott Campbell

    Jeffrey Scott Campbell is an American comic book artist. He has had several pen names, including "Jeff Scott", but is best known as J. Scott Campbell. He rose to fame as an artist for Wildstorm Comics, though he has since done work for Marvel Comics (most notably as a cover artist on The Amazing Spider-Man), and the video game industry. Campbell was born in East Tawas, Michigan, though he has no memories of that city, as his family moved when he was very young to the Denver, Colorado, which he regards as his home. He has a younger sister, who is a digital architect, and a younger brother who is a musician. In 1989, Campbell, then age fifteen, entered for and won an "Invent the Ultimate Video Game" contest featured in the issue 6 of Nintendo's official magazine, Nintendo Power, whereby submitted contest entries were to consist of drawings and concepts for a video game. Color drawings from "Lockarm," the videogame idea he pitched, were published in the magazine as the winning entry. Years later, the 200th issue of Nintendo Power included a poster featuring prominent Nintendo characters drawn by Campbell in his unique art style, along with an interview whereby Campbell recalled his
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    237

    Jan Eliot

    Jan Eliot (born 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American cartoonist. She writes and illustrates the comic strip "Stone Soup." She created a previous strip known as "Patience and Sarah," which enjoyed a run of five years in 10 publications. Her next comic strip was called "Sister City." This weekly strip appeared in the Eugene, Oregon, The Register-Guard for five years before the name was changed to "Stone Soup" in 1995, when it became nationally syndicated by Universal Press Syndicate. "Stone Soup" runs in about 200 newspapers in 6 countries. Beginning her career when she was a working mom with two young daughters, Eliot draws subject matter from her own life and the lives of those around her. Before becoming a full-time cartoonist, Jan worked as a waitress, car salesperson, bookmobile driver, advertising copywriter, graphic designer, and greeting card writer. She chose the name Eliot after her divorce, in honor of George Eliot. She lives in Eugene. In addition to seven Stone Soup compilations, Eliot's work has appeared in:
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    238
    Jean Giraud

    Jean Giraud

    Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (French: [ʒiʁo]; 8 May 1938 – 10 March 2012) was a French comics artist, working in the French tradition of bandes dessinées. Giraud earned worldwide fame, predominantly under the pseudonym Mœbius, and to a lesser extent Gir (used for the Blueberry series), the latter appearing mostly in the form of a boxed signature at the bottom of the artist's paintings. Esteemed by Federico Fellini, Stan Lee and Hayao Miyazaki among others, he received international acclaim. He has been described as the most influential bandes dessinées artist after Hergé. Among his most famous works are the Western comic series Blueberry he co-created with writer Jean-Michel Charlier, one of the first Western anti-heroes to appear in comics. Under the pseudonym Moebius he created a wide range of science fiction and fantasy comics in a highly imaginative and surreal almost abstract style, the most famous of which are Arzach, the Airtight Garage of Jerry Cornelius, and The Incal. Blueberry was adapted for the screen in 2004 by French director Jan Kounen. In 1997, Moebius and co-creator Alejandro Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson for using The Incal as inspiration for his movie The Fifth
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    239
    Jim Davis

    Jim Davis

    James Robert "Jim" Davis (born July 28, 1945) is an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of the comic strip Garfield. He has also worked on other strips: Tumbleweeds, Gnorm Gnat, U.S. Acres (aka Orson's Farm) and a strip about Mr. Potato Head. Davis has written (or in some cases co-written) all of the Emmy Award-winning or nominated Garfield TV specials and was one of the producers behind the Garfield & Friends TV show which aired on CBS from 1988 to 1995. Davis is the writer and executive producer of a trilogy of C.G.-direct-to-video feature films about Garfield, as well as one of the executive producers and the creator for the new CGI-animated TV series The Garfield Show. He continues to work on the strip. Born in Marion, Indiana, Davis grew up on a small farm in Fairmount, Indiana, with his father James William Davis, mother Anna Catherine (Carter) Davis, brother Dave and 25 cats. Davis's childhood on a farm parallels the life of Garfield's owner, Jon Arbuckle, who was also raised on a farm with his parents and a brother, Doc Boy. Jon is a cartoonist, who also celebrates his birthday on July 28. Davis attended Ball State University. While attending Ball State, he
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    240
    Jim Unger

    Jim Unger

    Jim Unger (21 January 1937 – 29 May 2012) was a Canadian cartoonist, best known for his syndicated comic strip Herman which ran for 18 years in 600 newspapers in 25 countries. Unger was born in London, England, to Lillian Maud and James Unger. Unger served in the British Army, as a London bobby, and worked as an insurance clerk and a repo man before emigrating to Canada in 1968 at the suggestion of one of his sisters. In Mississauga, Ontario he began his career as a cartoonist at the Mississauga Times newspaper. In 1974, as Herman became popular, Unger moved from Mississauga to Ottawa, Ontario, bringing his parents and brother from Britain. Unger moved to the Bahamas in 1984 and retired as a cartoonist in 1992. Unger's friends encouraged him to give up retirement. He said he would not have suggested it himself, but he liked the idea. On 2 June 1997, Herman made a comeback under the United Media umbrella. "It gives me the opportunity to bring them up to date and to introduce Herman to a new generation," he said in the 31 May 1997, edition of the Detroit News. He did not expect to return to full-time cartooning but planned to add new material. Unger signed a long-term contract to
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    241
    Johan Wanloo

    Johan Wanloo

    Johan Wanloo (born July 16, 1972, in Gothenburg, Sweden) is a comic book creator known for his many comic strips published in newspapers, tabloids, and magazines including the Swedish version of MAD Magazine. His career started in 1987 when he sold a cartoon to the computer magazine Svenska Hemdatornytt. Many of his comics involve satire of those he perceive to be pretentious or out of touch with regular people. Usually this includes snobs and people with radical political beliefs. He greatly dislikes Goth and indie culture and claims that he has "the musical taste of a 60-year old". He is a fan of retro-kitch and likes to incorporate this into his work. Many of his comics are parodies/homages of old pulp fiction and he has even done a number of strips where he alters original artwork to make new stories. Wanloo mostly does strips featuring himself where he comments on society, but he has also created a number of original characters including A parody of classic pulp fiction starring the two famous "alpha males" Felix Gimlet and El Fjongo. Felix is the playboy genius while Fjongo is a wrestler who always wears a Lucha libre-style mask. A violent, possibly psychotic government agent
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    242
    Lynda Barry

    Lynda Barry

    Lynda Barry (born January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist and author. Barry is best known for her weekly comic strip Ernie Pook's Comeek. She garnered attention with her book, The Good Times are Killing Me, about an interracial friendship between two young girls. The book was made into a play. Her novel Cruddy (2000) was well received. One! Hundred! Demons! (2002), a graphic novel she terms "Autobiofictionalography," uses collage and a Zen Ink painting exercise to address personal and social topics. What It Is (2008) is a graphic novel that is part memoir, part collage and part workbook in which Barry instructs her readers in methods to open up their own creativity. What It Is won the 2009 Eisner Award for Best Reality-Based Work. Born in Richland Center, Wisconsin, Barry moved as a child to Washington. She is one quarter-Filipina, half Irish (each parent is half Irish), and one quarter Norwegian. She attended Kimball Elementary School on Seattle's Beacon Hill and used some of her experiences there as an inspiration for her work. Barry hints that her childhood was very unhappy. Barry′s parents divorced when she was 12, the same year in which Barry changed the spelling of her
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    243

    Morrie Turner

    Morris "Morrie" Turner (born December 11, 1923) is the first nationally syndicated African-American cartoonist. Raised in Oakland, California, where he still resides, Turner is the creator of comic strip Wee Pals. He grew up in West Oakland and attended McClymonds High School; in his senior year, he moved to Berkeley to finish his high school years at Berkeley High School. When he began questioning why there were no minorities in cartoons, his mentor, Charles Schulz of Peanuts fame, suggested he create one. In 1965, the strip Wee Pals became the first comic strip syndicated in the United States to have a cast of diverse ethnicity. In 2003, the National Cartoonist Society recognized him for his work on this strip and others with Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award. Turner, who prefers going by the name Morrie, also contributes his talents to concerts by the Bay Area Little Symphony of Oakland, California. He draws pictures to the music and of children in the audience. Turner has the original copy of the book Wee Pals which was burned in a house fire at his home in Berkeley. The fire was 25 years ago and the house has been rebuilt. On May 25, 2009, Turner visited Westlake Middle
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    244

    Patrick McDonnell

    Patrick McDonnell (born March 17, 1956) is the creator of the daily comic strip Mutts. He has also illustrated Russell Baker's Sunday Observer column in The New York Times magazine and created the monthly comic strip Bad Baby for Parents magazine. He has contributed to publications such as Sports Illustrated, Reader's Digest, Forbes, Time, and has co-authored the book Krazy Kat: the Comic Art of George Herriman. McDonnell was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey and grew up in Edison, New Jersey. After graduating from Edison High School in New Jersey in 1974, McDonnell attended the School of Visual Arts. McDonnell began a career as a magazine illustrator and would frequently include a dog in the background of his illustrations. Moving to Hoboken, New Jersey, he met a group of underground cartoonists such as Peter Bagge and Kazimieras G. Prapuolenis (Kaz), and had some of his earliest drawings appearing as Jerseyana in New Jersey Monthly magazine. A book of his life and work, Mutts: The Comic Art of Patrick McDonnell, was published in 2003 by Abrams Publishing. McDonnell is also a member of the Board of Directors of The Humane Society of the United States. In 2009 collaborated with author
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    245
    Philippe Geluck

    Philippe Geluck

    Philippe Geluck (born 7 May 1954 in Brussels, Belgium) is a comedian, humorist and cartoonist. He studied at the INSAS (Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle, National Higher Institute of the Arts of Spectacle). His best-known work is the comic strip Le Chat, which is one of the ten bestselling Franco-Belgian comics series, with in 2008 in French alone 320,000 copies published. He also appears in the French talk show presents by Laurent Ruquier, On a tout essayé ("We've Tried Everything") on the France 2 TV channel. These drawings are published in the magazine VSD. In 2009, King Albert II of Belgium made him a Commander of the Order of the Crown (Belgium).
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    246

    Raymond Macherot

    Raymond Macherot (30 March 1924 – 26 September 2008) was a Belgian cartoonist. Although not nearly as famous as fellow Belgian cartoonists such as Hergé or André Franquin, Macherot's work, both as artist and writer, remains highly regarded among critics and collectors. Raymond Macherot was born in Verviers, Belgium in 1924. He wanted to become a journalist or a painter but, for financial reasons, he became an illustrator and comics artist. Following the end of World War II, Macherot began his career producing a few cartoons in the style of Virgil Partch for the satirical weekly Pan, under the pseudonym "Zara". In 1953, he joined the comics magazine Tintin where he wrote a scenario for Fred Funcken's Le chevalier blanc, and made numerous illustrations and magazine covers. In 1954, Macherot created the series Chlorophylle, featuring anthropomorphic animals. Macherot sets his first adventures in the countryside, where Chlorophylle, a dormouse, and his best friend Minimum, try to defeat animal villains often much bigger than themselves, typically led by the megalomaniac rat, Anthracite. With Les croquillards (1957), Macherot placed his characters to the island of Croquefredouille, a
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    247
    Rodney Caston

    Rodney Caston

    Rodney Caston (born 13 May 1977) is an American systems engineer and writer currently living in Dallas, Texas. He is the co-creator and original writer of the popular comic book series Megatokyo and an active member of the Libertarian Party. He has worked for of Linden Lab, makers of the online game called Second Life, and Riot Games, makers of League of Legends. Caston is currently engaged to Perla Fainstein to be married on April 21, 2012 and is currently running as the Libertarian Party candidate for Texas State Representative District 106 in the 2012 elections. Caston was born and spent most of his early life in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He attended Louisiana State University and majored in Computer Science. After finishing school he moved to Dallas, Texas. Caston is a civil libertarian and active member of the Libertarian Party. He is currently running for Texas State Representative District 106 in the 2012 elections. In 2008, he ran, unsuccessfully, for Constable, in the state of Texas against Republican Chuck Presley, Sr. He received 19,079 votes (19.44% of the total votes cast) to Presley's 79,039 votes (80.56% of the total cast). Caston is the co-creator and writer of the
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    248

    Rudolph Dirks

    Rudolph Dirks (February 26, 1877, Heide, Schleswig-Holstein Province – April 20, 1968, New York City) was one of the earliest and most noted comic strip artists. Dirks was born in Heide, Germany to Johannes and Margaretha Dirks. When he was seven years old, his father, a woodcarver, moved the family to Chicago, Illinois. After having sold various cartoons to local magazines Rudolph moved to New York City and found work as a cartoonist. His younger brother Gus soon followed his brother's example. He held several jobs as an illustrator, culminating in a position with William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. The circulation war between the Journal and Joseph Pulitzer's New York World was raging. The World had a huge success with the full-color Sunday feature, Down in Hogan's Alley, better known as the Yellow Kid, starting in 1895. Editor Rudolph Block asked Dirks to develop a Sunday comic based on Wilhelm Busch's cautionary tale, Max und Moritz. When Dirks submitted his sketches, Block dubbed them The Katzenjammer Kids, and the first strip appeared on December 12, 1897. Gus Dirks assisted his brother with The Katzenjammer Kids during the first few years, until his suicide on June
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    249
    Ryan North

    Ryan North

    Ryan M. North (born October 20, 1980) is a Canadian writer, computer programmer, and occasional songwriter who is the creator and author of Dinosaur Comics, and co-creator of Whispered Apologies and Happy Dog the Happy Dog. North grew up in Ottawa, Ontario, where he studied computer science (minor in film) at Carleton University before moving to Toronto for his master's degree in computer science at the University of Toronto, specializing in computational linguistics; he graduated in 2005. He is a humorist, programmer and longboarding enthusiast and also designs t-shirts as a day job. His parents are Anna and Randall North. He has a younger brother, Victor North. He is married to Jennifer Klug. Dinosaur Comics, a fixed-art webcomic, has run for more than 2,000 issues and has been published by Quack!Media as The Best of Dinosaur Comics: 2003-2005 AD: Your Whole Family Is Made of Meat, among other compilations. In addition to his comics, North has created three tools to aid webcomic authors: Oh No Robot, a webcomic transcription tool that creates searchable text databases for comics; RSSpect, a method of creating RSS feeds for websites; and Project Wonderful, a pay-per-day
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    250

    Wiley Miller

    David Wiley Miller (born April 15, 1951, Burbank, California), an American cartoonist whose work is characterized by wry wit and trenchant social satire, is best known for his comic strip Non Sequitur, which he signs Wiley. Non Sequitur is the only cartoon to win National Cartoonists Society Divisional Awards in both the comic strip and comic panel categories, and Miller is the only cartoonist to win an NCS Divisional Award in his first year of syndication. A California native, Wiley studied art at Virginia Commonwealth University and worked for several Hollywood educational film studios before relocating to North Carolina in 1976 to work as an editorial cartoonist and staff artist for the Greensboro News & Record. Fenton (1982) was his first syndicated strip. In 1985, he was hired as an editorial cartoonist at the San Francisco Examiner. In 1991, Wiley launched his popular Non Sequitur strip, eventually syndicated to 700 newspapers. In 1994, Miller pioneered the use of process color in comic strips, and developed a format in 1995 that allows one cartoon to be used in two different ways for both panel dimensions and strip dimensions. In January 2012, the Non Sequitur character
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