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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Comic Strip Character of All Time

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Best Comic Strip Character of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Comic Strip Character of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Comic Strip Character of All Time has gotten 1.790 views and has gathered 620 votes from 620 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1

    Dawn

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Dawn is the mate of Bob the Dinosaur in the Dilbert comic strip
    7.38
    8 votes
    2

    Xerixe

    • Appeared in comic strips: Everwas
    A level 1 Slacker who dreams of multiclassing to Artist or Mage, but is plagued by low self-confidence (and laziness) in the former case, and a nearly complete lack of magical talent in the latter. A total RPG fanatic, what Xerise lacks in gaming skill or knowledge, she makes up for in enthusiasm. In fact, the same could be said for most things she does.
    7.50
    6 votes
    3
    8.40
    5 votes
    4

    Asok

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Asok ( /ˈɑːʃʊk/ AH-shok) is an Indian intern in the Dilbert comic strip. His first appearance was March 18, 1996. He is a brilliant graduate from the Indian Institute of Technology. The character is named after a friend and co-worker of strip creator Scott Adams at Pacific Bell. "Asok" is a common Indian name, though it is usually spelled "Ashok" and pronounced "Ah-shok". Scott Adams confesses in his book Dilbert 2.0: 20 years of Dilbert that he had a coworker whose name was also Asok, with the same spelling he later used, and that he (Scott Adams) had no idea it was spelled differently. The name is an English variation of the name of the first major emperor of India, Emperor Ashoka. Asok himself is Indian, but that fact was not mentioned until September 2003, although in the animated series 1999 episode "Holiday", Asok mentions he has family living in India. Adams says in Seven Years of Highly Defective People that this is because "I only like characters who have huge, gaping character flaws. The world is far too sensitive to let me get away with a highly flawed minority member." Asok appears to be a fan of Indian music: in the animated episode "Art" he is shown listening
    6.29
    7 votes
    5
    Sally Brown

    Sally Brown

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. She was first mentioned in early 1959 and throughout a long series of strips before her first appearance in August 1959. Sally Brown has blonde hair with a curly fringe. She wears pink or blue polka dotted dresses with matching colored socks and she also wears white shoes with black laces. In late 1965, she wore an eyepatch over her left eye. She had been diagnosed with lazy eye, which Linus immediately recognizes as Amblyopia ex anopsia. She wears the patch for a short while, and once she's told she can stop wearing it, gives it to Snoopy (who uses it to pretend that he is a pirate). Sally has blonde hair with curly bangs and sometimes a bow in front, and she wears a polka dot dress, usually pink or light blue. In the winter, and most of the time in the later years of the strip, she switched to a shirt and pants. She has a "take it easy" approach to life, preferring to slide by while doing as little work as possible. Her favorite pastime is sitting in her beanbag chair watching TV. In a series of strips from 1982, Sally actually went to "beanbag camp", which consisted of nothing but
    6.29
    7 votes
    6

    The World's Smartest Garbageman

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Dilbert's "sanitation engineer" is a mysterious character who has inexplicable knowledge of all subjects from science to philosophy. He shows up occasionally to solve impossibly complex problems for Dilbert or Dogbert.

    His role has diminished somewhat in recent years but he'll be back.
    8.20
    5 votes
    7

    Marcie

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Marcie is a bespectacled fictional character featured in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. She serves as comedic foil and best friend to tomboy Peppermint Patty, plays a supporting role in some of Snoopy's heroic fantasies, and displays a romantic interest in Charlie Brown, who seems to love her in return. Marcie is one of the few bespectacled characters in the strip. She has dark brown chin-length hair and she usually wears a t-shirt and shorts, like Peppermint Patty. She and Peppermint Patty were the only girls in the strip to wear a t-shirt and shorts (although the girls wore pants during the winter in the strip). Marcie made her first appearance in the daily strip from July 20, 1971, but her name wasn't mentioned until the strip from October 11. She first appeared on television in the 1973 special There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown. A forerunner of Marcie's character, a girl named Clara, made an appearance in a sequence at a girl's camp in June 1968. As Marcie became a part of the regular cast, she appeared in the same class as Peppermint Patty, sitting in the desk behind her. In the animated special You're In the Super Bowl, Charlie Brown, Marcie's surname is given
    7.00
    6 votes
    8
    8.00
    5 votes
    9

    Paulus the woodgnome

    • Appeared in comic strips: Paulus the woodgnome
    Paulus the woodgnome is a newspaper comic strip and children's book character, created by Jan van Oort.
    7.80
    5 votes
    10
    Phil, the Prince of Insufficient Light

    Phil, the Prince of Insufficient Light

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Phil is a fictional character in Scott Adams's Dilbert comic strip. He is the Prince of Insufficient Light and the Ruler of Heck, abode of the darned. He punishes people (usually Dilbert) for minor infractions not worthy of damnation in hell, such as using copier paper for the printer or stealing a chair from another cubicle (both of which Dilbert has done). He also serves as manager of limbo, which in the strip is a subsidiary of Heck. He is the Pointy-Haired Boss's younger brother, though this has been mentioned only twice, most recently in a strip involving Phil outsourcing the housing of sinners who partake of carbohydrates to the Pointy-Haired Boss's workers' cubicles. Adams says that Phil's relation to PHB came from the suggestion of several readers, due to the character's similarity to the Boss in early strips. Phil manages to make money via a corporate sponsorship from Procter & Gamble — he is paid to stay away from them. Originally, Adams planned to have Satan, the Prince of Darkness, become a regular member of the Dilbert cast, but eventually softened the character after suggestions by his editor. Instead of a pitchfork, Phil carries an enormous spoon, which Dilbert was
    7.80
    5 votes
    11

    Frobisher

    Frobisher is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who in the 1980s. He was a companion of the Sixth and Seventh Doctors. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is open to interpretation. Frobisher is a Whifferdill, one of a shape-changing extraterrestrial race. What is assumed to be his natural form, as seen in his first comic strip appearance, is humanoid, pale yellow in color, three to four feet in height, with a round, featureless head, and wearing spectacles. However, he preferred to spend his free time in the form of a penguin. When he first appeared in The Shape Shifter (DWM #88-#89), written by Steve Parkhouse with art by John Ridgway, Frobisher was a private investigator calling himself "Avan Tarklu" (a play on the phrase "Haven't a clue"). He came across the Doctor when an enemy, Dogbolter, had placed a bounty on the Doctor. After infiltrating the TARDIS, instead of turning the Doctor in for the money, Tarklu decided that he liked the Time Lord and helped him against Dogbolter. He then joined the Doctor on his journeys. He
    6.67
    6 votes
    12

    Zeke Brenner

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Zeke Brenner is a character in the comics strip Doonesbury. Zeke started out as the caretaker to Uncle Duke's Aspen house, while the latter was away on his various jobs, such as being governor of American Samoa and ambassador to China. Zeke was terribly irresponsible, and spent most of his time stealing drugs from Duke's private stash. He even burned the house down once, while Duke was out. Zeke was engaged to J.J. for a while, but she grew increasingly fed up with his antics, and finally left him after the house burning incident. She eventually married Mike Doonesbury. When Duke disappeared during the 1980s and was presumed dead (he later resurfaced as a hostage) Zeke "wrote" a book on him (actually ghostwritten) which became a bestseller. Zeke's job in Aspen ended when he was shot by Duke, who mistook him for a prowler one night, and he spent some time in the hospital recovering. He also set the police on Duke, and there has been some animosity between them ever since. Zeke and J.J. met each other again in 1994. As she and Mike were experiencing marital strife, she ended running away with Zeke. They have been together ever since, and got married in 2003. This was much to the
    6.67
    6 votes
    13

    Ronald-Ann Smith

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Ronald-Ann Smith was a character in Berkeley Breathed's comic strips Bloom County and Outland. Named after Ronald Reagan, Ronald-Ann was a young African American girl "from the wrong side of the trax" in Bloom County. Appearing late in the strip's run, Ronald-Ann was presented as a polar opposite of the kind of greedy materialism that the 1980s represented. During a conversation with Donald Trump in Bill the Cat's body, it was revealed that Ronald-Ann's family lived in a single broken-down room with nine beds. Her best friend was her doll Reynelda, who had no head as a result of being "caught in the crossfire during the Christmas drug turf battles". After Bloom County ended in 1989, Ronald-Ann became the protagonist in Breathed's next syndicated strip, Outland. She is seen traveling to this realm through portals in her big city neighborhood. Her existence in the Outland was clearly more laid-back than it had been in her Bloom County days. Before long, though, she was overshadowed by her Bloom County compadres, such as Opus the penguin and Bill the Cat, among others. She faded away from Outland just months before it ended in 1995, leaving no clue as to her current whereabouts in
    7.60
    5 votes
    14

    Roland Hedley

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Roland Burton Hedley, III is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau, inspired by the on-air style of the veteran US reporter Sam Donaldson. Hedley is a journalist who covers sports at the Saigon bureau for Time and, once called back, is commissioned to write an article about Walden Commune, where most of the strip's characters live during the 1970s. They fill his head with a lot of nonsense, convincing him that the hippie movement is coming back and that they represent a national trend. He is even convinced that Zonker's lilacs are marijuana plants. Later he resurfaces in the strip as a television reporter for ABC. By this point he has developed an extraordinarily large ego, which remains his defining trait to this day. He is a total sensationalist, willing to stretch the truth and say anything that would further his career. Often he is sent on very dangerous assignments, and it is implied that his superiors send him on these intentionally, hoping get rid of him. He plays along, knowing that the danger of his job will earn him higher ratings. As such, he has covered pretty much all of the dangerous political developments of the last 30 years, although
    8.75
    4 votes
    15

    Death's Head

    Death's Head is a fictional comic book character, a robotic bounty hunter (or rather, as he calls himself, a "freelance peace-keeping agent") appearing in the books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer Simon Furman and artist Geoff Senior for the company's Marvel UK imprint. Furman decided to use Death's Head in his Transformers stories, but believed that characters appearing in Transformers "were prone to be absorbed into that title's catchall copyright" (allowing Hasbro to contest their ownership) and led to a one-page strip titled "High Noon Tex" (which was subsequently published in various Marvel UK titles) being hastily created to establish Marvel's ownership of the character. Furman has stated that he chose the name Death's Head for the character while unaware of the "Nazi-connotations of the name". The character was later redesigned and relaunched as Death's Head II, acting as one of the flagship characters for Marvel UK's 1990s expansion. This version of Death's Head also inspired two spin-off characters, Death Wreck and Death Metal, each of which starred in its own limited series. Later, in 2005, fans used a poll on Marvel's website to vote for
    7.40
    5 votes
    16

    Phred

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Phred, also known as Nguyen Van Phred, Phredrick or Phreddy, is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. He first appeared during B.D.'s tour of Vietnam. Phred was a Viet-Cong guerilla (though he proudly referred to himself as a terrorist) who captured B.D., and attempted to take him to a POW camp, but they got lost on the way. After days of being lost together in the jungle they finally found a cache of supplies that had been captured and abandoned by Phred's fellow guerillas. It turned out to contain beer. While drunk, Phred and B.D. put aside their differences and became friends. For the rest of B.D.'s tour of duty, they continually met to share stories and consume alcohol. Despite being on different sides of the war, they got along fine, particularly since Phred made it clear that he had no great devotion to his superiors, and was as cynical and jaded about the war as most American G.I.s. In the process of "re-negotiating" his contract with the Viet Cong after a period of down-time, Phred unexpectedly found himself "traded" to the Pathet Lao in Laos. During his stint there, he took a vacation to Cambodia, where the devastation wrought by the "secret bombings" inspired him to
    8.50
    4 votes
    17

    Carol

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Carol Cerberus is the Pointy-Haired Boss's misanthropic and bitter secretary in the Dilbert comic strip, who feels she is underappreciated and demeaned by her job and therefore takes out her frustration on all employees, especially her boss. Occasionally, when other major characters are plotting against the PHB, she will be privy to their schemes. She is drawn as having short brown (or gray) hair in a triangular shape on her head, and usually wears a pair of pearl earrings. Initially a minor character in the strip, her character grew enough in popularity over the years that Adams started creating complete storylines for her. Her character was based on all the bad experiences Adams ever had with any secretary. As early as 1991, the boss' secretary was referred to as "Miss Cerberus", who in later strips was revealed to have a first name of Carole, then Carol. Frustrated and resentful of her boss and co-workers for referring to her as a secretary instead of by the more politically-correct "Administrative Assistant" title, Carol has always been difficult to work with throughout the history of the strip. She orders office supplies nobody will use (such as green pens, which will never
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Urania

    Urania

    • Appeared in comic strips: Kokopelli & Company
    Urania ( /jʊˈreɪniə/; Greek: Οὐρανία; which stems from the Greek word for 'heavenly' or 'of heaven') was, in Greek mythology, the muse of astronomy. Some accounts list her as the mother of the musician Linus. She is usually depicted with a globe in her left hand. She is able to foretell the future by the arrangement of the stars. She is often associated with Universal Love and the Holy Spirit. Eldest of the divine sisters Urania inherited Zeus' majesty and power and the beauty and grace of her mother Mnemosyne. Urania dresses in a cloak embroidered with stars and keeps her eyes and attention focused on the Heavens. Those who are most concerned with philosophy and the heavens are dearest to her. During the Renaissance, Urania began to be considered the Muse for Christian poets. In the invocation to Book 7 of John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost, the poet invokes Urania to aid his narration of the creation of the cosmos, though he cautions that it is "[t]he meaning, not the name I call" (7.5). Muse magazine features Urania as one of the characters in the "Kokopelli and Co." comic strip by Larry Gonick published in each issue of the magazine. She is the only original muse who remains
    7.20
    5 votes
    19

    Chase Talbott III

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Chase Talbott III is a character from the comic strip Doonesbury. He was introduced shortly after Mark Slackmeyer realized that he was homosexual. For a while he invented an imaginary boyfriend for himself called Neil, who he pretended to talk to on the air. Later on he met Chase at a bar and he appeared on Mark's NPR show as a conservative foil to Mark's own liberalism. At first they pretended that their relationship was platonic, but Mark persisted in dropping hints that clued the audience into what was really going on. Chase announced that he had no intention of outing himself on the air, but didn't realize that they were still on the air as he said it. Unlike Mark, Chase is very conservative. Indeed, the two are such polar opposites when it comes to any sort of opinion at all that people wonder what the attraction between them can possibly be. When asked, Chase replied "Well, it's physical of course". After Chase's initial appearance on Mark's show became a hit, the two began to collaborate regularly on a weekly program called All Things Reconsidered. Mark and Chase eventually got married in 1999. To do so they had to go to Pago Pago, to be married by MacArthur, who was Uncle
    8.00
    4 votes
    20

    Patty

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Patty is a character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz (often confused with Peppermint Patty, a different and later character from the same strip). Her closest friend is Violet. The two appeared very early — Patty even appeared in the first strip, along with Charlie Brown and Shermy — but lacking the distinguishing characteristics of characters such as Lucy, Linus, or Sally, she became less prominent as years went by. As the only female character in the strip's very earliest days (as well as the first female character in the strip), Patty often acted as a sort of mother-hen, looking out for the younger characters; however, she also set the tone for the strong female characters in the Peanuts universe. In her (and the strip's) second appearance, Patty is shown walking down the sidewalk reciting "Little girls are made of sugar and spice and everything nice." She then punches Charlie Brown in the face and, without missing a beat, continues, "That's what little girls are made of!" Patty's name was first mentioned on October 26, 1950, 24 days after her first appearance. She was apparently the oldest child in the strip (possibly along with Shermy), as she attended
    8.00
    4 votes
    21

    Koichi Hirose

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Koichi Hirose is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. Echoes Acts 1,2,3 Unlike most other Stands, Echoes has three distinct forms, or Acts (Koichi can only call upon one at any given time). Act 1 resembles a flying (although wingless) turtle with a long tail and wheels surrounding its beak. Its power is to write a given sound effect in kana on a surface. The effect will then constantly sound with increasing volume, until Echoes dispels the writing. Until his confrontation with Yukako, this was the only Act that Koichi could access. During that battle, he gained access to Act 2, which has a more humanoid form. Rather than just making sounds, Act 2's tail can create sound effect writings that actually invoke the associated quality when activated (e.g. if "whoosh" is written, activation will create an actual wind current). Finally, during his first confrontation with Kira, Koichi discovered Act 3, a completely humanoid Stand with turtle shell-like bosses on its body (and a somewhat independent, foul-mouthed personality who quotes Bruce Willis from Die Hard). Unlike the first two Acts, Act 3 cannot fly, and has a much shorter active range. However, it
    6.80
    5 votes
    22
    6.80
    5 votes
    23

    Okuyasu Nijimura

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Okuyasu Nijimura is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. Okuyasu isn't exactly the brightest character in the Jojo story, and tended to rely on his elder brother Keicho to make hard decisions. After his brother died, he sought revenge against the User of Red Hot Chili Pepper, Otoishi Akira. During this time and the following events surrounding Kira Yoshikage, he became fast friends with Josuke and Koichi. Okuyasu tends to be jealous of Koichi's relationship with Yukiko, and enjoys Tonio's cooking. He also befriends Fatty, after doing battle with his Harvest with Josuke. This friendship is why became further enraged when Fatty was killed by Yoshikage Kira. Okuyasu's father is a bizarre creature, mutated by Dio's spores when Okuyasu was only 7. He rather dislikes Rohan because of what Rohan tried to do to him when they first met. Eventually Okuyasu seemingly "dies" after suffering mortal wounds during a battle with Yoshikage Kira, only to return after meeting his brother in a dream who asks him where he wants to go, and Okuyasu says "I want to go back to Morioh" which results in Okuyasu waking up. The Hand The Hand uses its right hand to erase the
    7.75
    4 votes
    24
    Kokopelli

    Kokopelli

    • Appeared in comic strips: Kokopelli & Company
    Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with feathers or antenna-like protrusions on his head), who has been venerated by some Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. Like most fertility deities, Kokopelli presides over both childbirth and agriculture. He is also a trickster god and represents the spirit of music. Among the Hopi, Kokopelli carries unborn children on his back and distributes them to women; for this reason, young girls often fear him. He often takes part in rituals relating to marriage, and Kokopelli himself is sometimes depicted with a consort, a woman called Kokopelmana by the Hopi. It is said that Kokopelli can be seen on the full and waning moon, much like the "rabbit on the moon". Kokopelli also presides over the reproduction of game animals, and for this reason, he is often depicted with animal companions such as rams and deer. Other common creatures associated with him include sun-bathing animals such as snakes, or water-loving animals like lizards and insects. In his domain over agriculture, Kokopelli's flute-playing chases away the winter and brings about spring. Many tribes, such as the Zuni,
    6.60
    5 votes
    25

    Dilbert

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Dilbert is a fictional character and the main character and protagonist of the Dilbert comic strip. He is a white collar office worker who has a rare medical condition characterized by an extreme intuition about all things mechanical and electrical (and utter social ineptitude), an idea that an animated television episode explored and is titled "The Knack". He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a degree in Electrical Engineering. Although his ideas typically are sensible and occasionally even revolutionary, seldom does anyone pursue them because he is powerless. He finds himself easily frustrated by the incompetence and/or malevolence of his co-workers (most often the Pointy-Haired Boss) and often is sarcastic and snide. Dilbert's unusual name was suggested to Scott Adams by a co-worker; Adams later found that the name likely came from a cartoon character used by the United States Navy during World War II. In an interview with The New York Times Adams said that he based Dilbert's character on someone he knew, saying: "I worked around engineers for most of my 16 years of corporate life. Dilbert is actually designed after one person in particular.
    7.50
    4 votes
    26
    Hercules

    Hercules

    Hercules is a fictional character that appears in publications by Marvel Comics. The character first appears in Journey into Mystery Annual #1 (1965) and was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby. Debuting in the Silver Age of Comic Books, the character is based on Heracles of Greek mythology, although the name Hercules is associated with the version from Roman mythology. The character has starred in three self-titled limited series and been a perennial member of the superhero team the Avengers, appearing in each of the three titles. In 2008, Hercules debuted in his own series titled The Incredible Hercules. The character has also appeared in associated Marvel merchandise including animated television series; toys; trading cards and video games. Hercules debuted in Avengers #10 (Nov. 1964) as a minion of Immortus, although his appearance was revealed in the limited series Avengers Forever #1 - 12 (Dec. 1998 – Nov. 1999) as being an impostor. The character's first formal appearance in the Marvel Universe became Journey into Mystery Annual #1 (1965), which established Hercules as being a rival of the Thunder God Thor. Hercules became a regular guest star
    7.50
    4 votes
    27

    Sid Kibbitz

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Sid Kibbitz is a fictional character from the popular comic strip "Doonesbury" by Garry Trudeau. Sid is a Hollywood agent and producer, and is used in the strip to satirize show business people in general. He behaves in a very stereotypical manner, fast-talking and name-dropping in order to appear stylish and influential. In truth, he seems to have very little clout in the movie business, as he can never get famous people to return his calls and mostly represents people with no star power, such as Boopsie. It is entirely possible that none of his projects has ever gotten made, although he seems to have plenty of money. Sid is the very essence of Hollywood decadence, spending most of his time lounging in a hot tub and dating young would-be starlets. Sid is Jewish, but doesn't practice. So much so that he sent away for a mail order priesthood, much to the dismay of his father who also happened to be his rabbi. He first appeared in the strip during a series in which Duke and Alice tried to get a movie made about the life of John DeLorean, but it fell through.
    7.50
    4 votes
    28

    Tina

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    Tina is completely devoted to her husband Wedge, but she considers it her sacred duty to keep him and his idiot friends in line. She enjoys using her femininity to put dudes off their game, before pwning the bitches with her 1337 online skills.
    7.50
    4 votes
    29

    Anjuro "Angelo" Katagiri

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Anjuro "Angelo" Katagiri is a minor, fictional character appearing in the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure (ジョジョの奇妙な冒険, Jojo no kimyōna bōken), by Hirohiko Araki. The character is portrayed as an enemy of the protagonist. Despite having an IQ of 160, Katagiri Anjuuro (Angelo to the newspapers) chose to embark on a life as a depraved career criminal. He was caught after attempting to ransom a kidnapped heir, and sentenced to death for slaughtering him (long before he tried to collect the ransom). However, while awaiting execution, he was visited by Nijimura Keicho, who had been guided to him by the Arrow his father had received from Enya Geil. After being cut by the Arrow, resulting in the awakening of Aqua Necklace, Angelo somehow survived his hanging, then escaped prison and returned to his old hunting grounds of Moriou, where he would ultimately confront Josuke Higashikata. He acted as a milkman to Toshiko, hiding his Stand underneath one of the bottles and waited until he was carried inside. When Josuke returns home, she inadvertently drinks Aqua Necklace. Josuke saves her by punching her stomach with Crazy Diamond and trapped the perpetrator within a spare whiskey
    8.67
    3 votes
    30

    Jon Arbuckle

    • Appeared in comic strips: Garfield
    Jonathan "Jon" Quentin Arbuckle is a fictional character from the Garfield comic strip by Jim Davis. He has also appeared in the animated television series Garfield and Friends, the computer-animated The Garfield Show, and two live-action feature films. A nerdy and clumsy man, Jon is the owner of Garfield and Odie. He converses with Garfield and is often the butt of his jokes. In the animated Garfield and Friends, he was frequently portrayed as being incredibly gullible when faced with unscrupulous salesmen and rather dumb in general. On The Garfield Show, however, he's portrayed as being smarter, but still a little gullible. Jon's birthday is July 28, 1950 (or 1951) as Jon tells Garfield that he is 29 years old in a December 23, 1980 strip. However, in the episode "T3000" he is described as 23. In the animated show Garfield and Friends, we learn that Jon has an Italian ancestor whose name was Tony Arbuccli. Some episodes of the show suggested that Jon and his pets live in Muncie, Indiana. Jon wears contact lenses, his eyes are green, and his favorite music style is polka. His personal will states that he wishes to be cremated and have his ashes spread over his accordion. He can
    8.67
    3 votes
    31

    Michael Binkley

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Michael Binkley is a fictional character in Berke Breathed's cartoon strip Bloom County. Michael, known to all simply as 'Binkley,' is a 10-year-old boy who lives at the Bloom County Boarding House with his father Tom (his mother, Margret, had divorced Tom and moved to Oakland with a Hells Angel). Binkley is in the same class as Milo Bloom, his best friend. Binkley introduces Opus to his group, at first believing him to be a dog. Binkley is described as "an airhead" by everyone who knows him (except Opus). Binkley is the first recurring child character after Milo to appear in the strip and largely replaced the dog Rabies as Milo's sounding board. Binkley originally appears as a player on Milo's elementary school football team. The coach is Major Bloom, who uses the team to live out his fantasy of being a great military commander. Binkley is originally depicted as a stereotypical nerd; he is much smaller than the other children and has thick glasses, bad skin, and messy hair. Soon afterwards, Binkley appears in his "classic" look (Opus at one point comments that Binkley looks like a carrot). Binkley's father initially calls him "Mad Dog" and hopes he will live out his failed dreams
    8.67
    3 votes
    32
    Pye

    Pye

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Watering Hole
    Pye the Python is a recurring character in the O'Reilly webcomic The Watering Hole.  Pye is based on the Programming Python cover.  Pye is kind of a middle of the road character, not as reckless as Ruby or as unadventurous as Philip.  He also has a thing for romantic encounters with Cat5 wiring closets.
    8.67
    3 votes
    33

    Betty Boop

    Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick. She originally appeared in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop film series, which were produced by Fleischer Studios and released by Paramount Pictures. She has also been featured in comic strips and mass merchandising. Despite having been toned down in the mid-1930s to appear more demure, she became one of the most well-known and popular cartoon characters in the world. Betty Boop made her first appearance on August 9, 1930, in the cartoon Dizzy Dishes; the sixth installment in Fleischer's Talkartoon series. Although Clara Bow is often given as being the model for Boop, she actually began as a caricature of singer Helen Kane. The character was originally created as an anthropomorphic French poodle. Max Fleischer finalized Betty Boop as a human character in 1932, in the cartoon Any Rags. Her floppy poodle ears became hoop earrings, and her black poodle nose became a girl's button-like nose. Betty Boop appeared as a supporting character in 10 cartoons as a flapper girl with more heart than brains. In individual cartoons, she was called "Nancy Lee" or "Nan McGrew" –
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    6.40
    5 votes
    35

    Shayde

    Shayde is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is open to interpretation. Shayde is an artificial being, a construct of the Gallifreyan Matrix — the massive computer network that serves as the repository of all Time Lord knowledge. He was created by the minds of the dead Time Lords that reside within the Matrix, and was a servant of Rassilon. He first appeared in the story The Tides of Time, published in DWM #61-#67, written by Steve Parkhouse and drawn by Dave Gibbons. In that story, he aided the Fifth Doctor in defeating the otherdimensional demon Melanicus, at first covertly but then, as the Time Lords increased his power levels, he was able to manifest himself and help the Doctor directly. Among Shayde's powers are the abilities to travel through space and time unaided, fire deadly self-generated "psychic bullets" and be invisible to security systems. He can also phase through solid objects and track people through time and space given enough data. Shayde next appeared when the TARDIS was
    6.40
    5 votes
    36

    Sláine

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sláine
    Sláine (Irish pronunciation: [ˈslɑnʲə]) is a comic hero from the pages of 2000 AD - one of Britain's most popular comic books. Sláine is a barbarian fantasy adventure series based on Celtic myths and stories which first appeared in 1983, written by Pat Mills and initially drawn by his then wife, Angela Kincaid. Most of the early stories were drawn by Mike McMahon and Massimo Belardinelli. Other notable artists to have worked on the character include Glenn Fabry and Simon Bisley. The current artist is Clint Langley, whose artwork combines painting, photography and digital art. Sláine's favourite weapon is an axe called "Brainbiter". He has the power of the "warp spasm", based on the ríastrad or body-distorting battle frenzy of the Irish hero Cú Chulainn, in which earth power "warps" through his body, turning him into a terrifying, monstrous figure who knows neither friend nor foe. He is a devotee of the earth goddess Danu. At the start of the series Sláine was a wanderer, banished from his tribe, the Sessair. He explored the Land of the Young (Irish Tír na nÓg) in the company of an unscrupulous dwarf called Ukko (Finnish for "old man", and the name of the Finnish pagan Thunder god),
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Bluto

    Bluto

    • Appeared in comic strips: Popeye
    Bluto (also known as Brutus) is a cartoon and comics character created in 1932 by Elzie Crisler Segar as a one-time character, named "Bluto the Terrible", in his Thimble Theatre comic strip (later renamed Popeye). Bluto made his first appearance September 12 of that year. Fleischer Studios adapted him the next year (1933), to be the recurring villain in their theatrical Popeye animated cartoon series. Bluto is a large, bearded, muscle-bound fellow who serves as Popeye's nemesis. He mostly uses his physical brawn to accomplish what he is trying to do, but does display some ability for tactical planning. His voice is a very loud, harsh and deep one, with a bear-like growl between sentences or between words in sentences, and which growling contains words that often can't be comprehended. Dave Fleischer wanted Bluto's voice to resemble that of the character Red Flack in 1930's "The Big Trail," played by Tyrone Power Sr. Bluto, like Popeye, is attracted to Olive Oyl, and usually attempts to kidnap her. However, with the help of some spinach, Popeye usually ends up defeating him. Some cartoons portray Popeye and Bluto as friends and Navy buddies, although Bluto usually turns on Popeye
    7.25
    4 votes
    38

    Bob

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    One day Dilbert determined that it was impossible for all dinosaurs to be extinct. Lo and behold, Bob the Dinosaur appeared from behind the couch.

    Bob is dumb, cheerful and follows Dogbert's commands without question. Dinosaurs may no longer rule the Earth but Bob is the king of the wedgies.

    Bob has a mate -- Dawn, and a son -- Rex. Dawn and Rex still live in Dilbert's house, but as with most living dinosaurs, they prefer to hide behind the furniture when people are around.
    7.25
    4 votes
    39

    Cutter John

    • Appeared in comic strips: Bloom County
    Cutter John is a fictional character in the 1980s comic strip Bloom County by Berke Breathed. Cutter, a wheelchair-user and Vietnam War veteran was one of the county's most well-liked citizens. Despite being somewhat childish and awkward at times, he was very popular with the ladies, particularly schoolteacher Bobbi Harlow. Cutter also was a good friend to many of the animal characters of Bloom County, often role-playing Star Trek with them (using his wheelchair as the "Enterpoop"). Cutter claims he was injured outside Quang-Tri in 1969, in a booby-trapped tunnel. He says that three of his buddies risked their lives to save him. Because he was inside a tunnel, he probably was a tunnel rat during the war. In one story arc, he and Opus the Penguin were lost at sea (after Oliver Wendell Jones had converted Cutter's wheelchair into a helium balloon) while attempting to cause havoc at the South African embassy in Washington, D.C. (their goal was to turn the South African ambassador black). Having blown off course and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, Cutter was captured by a Soviet submarine and held as a spy. Opus developed amnesia during the incident and found his way back to the Bloom
    7.25
    4 votes
    40

    The Great Pumpkin

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    The Great Pumpkin is an unseen character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. The Great Pumpkin is a holiday figure (comparable to Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny) that seems to only be mentioned by Linus van Pelt. Every year, Linus sits in a pumpkin patch on Halloween night waiting for the Great Pumpkin to appear. Invariably, the Great Pumpkin fails to turn up, and a humiliated but undefeated Linus vows to wait for him again the following Halloween. The Great Pumpkin was first mentioned by Linus in Peanuts in 1959, but the premise was reworked by Schulz many times throughout the run of the strip, and also inspired the 1966 animated television special It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. The best-known quote regarding Linus and the Great Pumpkin, originally from the comic strip but made famous by the TV special, is: "There are three things I have learned never to discuss with people: religion, politics, and the Great Pumpkin." Linus's seemingly unshakable belief in the Great Pumpkin, and his desire to foster the same belief in others, has been interpreted as a parody of Christian evangelism by some observers. Others have seen Linus's belief in the Great Pumpkin as
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    8.33
    3 votes
    42

    Gyro Zeppeli

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Gyro Zeppeli (ジャイロ・ツェペリ, Jairo Tseperi), birth name Julius Caesar Zeppeli (ユリウス・カエサル・ツェペリ, Yuriusu Kaesaru Tseperi), is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. In Steel Ball Run's alternate universe version of the world, he most likely takes the place of Will A. Zeppeli, Caesar Anthonio Zeppeli or another previously unseen member of the Zeppeli family. He is the main character of this series alongside Johnny Joestar. Gyro has a cocky and flamboyant personality, appearing to have a high opinion of himself. However, he can be driven by emotions for other people and become realistic and serious when a problem presents itself, as Gyro is incredibly intelligent when he needs to be. His most distinguishable body features are his long hair, western hat and his gold teeth which have "GO! GO! ZEPPELI" written on them, revealed whenever he smiles at someone. His signature laugh/chuckle is "Nyo ho ho ho~". Gyro is from the Zeppeli family, a line of practised executioners in Italy. They use an ancestral technique named the 'Spin' which allows people to die painlessly, usually applied through the use of an iron ball. Gyro lived this way until his late teens,
    8.33
    3 votes
    43

    John Hartigan

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sin City
    Detective John Hartigan is a major protagonist in the Sin City series of graphic novels, written by Frank Miller. He is the central character in That Yellow Bastard, and has a small cameo in Just Another Saturday Night. Miller has announced he will be the main character of another story, set before That Yellow Bastard. At the start of That Yellow Bastard, Hartigan is "pushing 60." He has a distinguishing cross-shaped scar on his forehead. He is presented as a muscular and imposing man, capable of holding his own in almost any fight. He also suffers from angina, which consistently affects his work, despite his attempts to ignore and fight through it. He is almost always dressed professionally, most commonly wearing an oxford shirt, tie, and dress slacks, along with his signature trenchcoat. A veteran police detective of Basin City, Hartigan is gruff, stoic, and cynical. He is also completely selfless; he cares little about his own well-being as long as he can protect his fellow citizens. He risks his own safety and reputation to achieve safety for those he cares about, but this dedication eventually destroys his life. Hartigan possesses a seemingly indomitable will, able to
    8.33
    3 votes
    44

    Portnoy

    • Appeared in comic strips: Bloom County
    Portnoy is a character in Berke Breathed's comic strip Bloom County. Portnoy was one of the critters that could talk, and was often surly mouthed and bigoted, usually leading Hodge-Podge, his best friend, to have to cover his mouth. When Bill the Cat became a televangelist denouncing "penguin lust", Portnoy helped run Opus the penguin out of town. The character was named for Portnoy's Complaint, a novel about sexual frustration. Portnoy changed physically over the years; sometimes into an entirely different animal. It was initially unknown what species he was; sometimes a squirrel, a possum, or a gopher. Finally he was revealed as a groundhog, which he had hidden because Hodge didn't associate with "pigs". Eventually the two made up. Portnoy and Hodge enjoy human-like entertainment, such as strip bars and playing jokes on others (Portnoy once pretended to be stuffed).
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    6.20
    5 votes
    46

    Zipper Harris

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Zipper Harris is a fictional character in the long-running American comic strip Doonesbury. He is the nephew of Zonker Harris, the son of Zonker's sister (who has never been shown). Zipper idolizes his uncle and seeks to follow in his footsteps. The fact that Zonker is a penniless slacker who ekes out a living by working as a babysitter for his friends or working minimum wage jobs, does not deter him from wasting both his life and his mother's money spending his days at college doing nothing. Zipper attends Walden College, the alma mater of most of the adult characters. His roommate was Jeff Redfern, and the two of them were constantly scheming to strike it rich with as little work as possible. Success fell into their reach a couple of times, including once when Jeff accidentally obtained a priceless antique scroll, and once when Zipper thought up MyVulture.com, the overstock trading site that Mike and Alex Doonesbury and Kim Rosenthal now own. They ended getting just a few hundred bucks for the scroll (from Honey Huan, who didn't know what it was really worth), and a mere $5000 for the site (which is now worth a fortune), but their losses never seemed to deter them, possibly
    6.20
    5 votes
    47

    Peggy Jean

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Peggy Jean is a fictional character in the comic strip Peanuts. She was the girlfriend of Charlie Brown during the 1990s. Charlie Brown first met her at summer camp in 1990, and she appeared intermittently in the strip until mid-1999, a few months before the strip ended. Because of Charlie Brown's extreme nervousness upon meeting her, he mistakenly gave his name as "Brownie Charles," which she continued to use thereafter. Peggy Jean and Charlie Brown's relationship hit a brief snag almost immediately after it began, however. At summer camp, Peggy Jean once held the football down for Charlie Brown, who apparently declined, worried that she would pull it away like Lucy did. The fact that he took so long to make up his mind led Peggy to think that he did not trust her and she allegedly went home enraged. She later came back and made up, kissing Charlie Brown in the process. Charlie Brown went so far as to call Linus on the phone and tell him that she kissed him. But the phone was actually answered by Lucy who asked "What is this, an obscene phone call??!!" Later, Charlie Brown wanted to buy her some gloves for Christmas but didn't have the money for them (Linus suggested he send her a
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Moominmamma

    Moominmamma

    • Appeared in comic strips: Moomin
    Moominmamma (Muminmamman) is a character in the Moomin series of books by Finnish author Tove Jansson. Moominmamma is married to Moominpappa and is the mother of Moomintroll. She very rarely gets cross and takes even the most distressing circumstances (such as the arrival of a comet, or being washed away by a flood) in her stride. Moominmamma would permit anything to her child and his friends, even drinking strong coffee. Moominmamma is almost never without her handbag, which contains essentials like woolly socks, tummy powder, and bark. She makes bark boats every summer, and the first one goes to her favourite.
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    7.00
    4 votes
    51

    Abslom Daak

    Abslom Daak (sometimes misspelled Absalom Daak) is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Weekly comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. He is a Dalek Killer, or DK, a convicted criminal given a reprieve from the death penalty in exchange for fighting the alien creatures known as the Daleks. He was created by Steve Moore and Steve Dillon. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is open to interpretation. Daak was introduced in the comic strip "Abslom Daak, Dalek Killer". Convicted of "23 charges of murder, pillage, piracy, massacre and other crimes too horrible to bring to the public attention" in the mid-26th Century, when the galaxy was embroiled in the Dalek Wars, he was given the choice between being vapourised or entering into exile and becoming a Dalek Killer. Transported to the planet Mazam which was under attack by the Daleks, he destroyed a Dalek task force single-handedly and rescued the Princess Taiyan, with whom he fell in love. Tragically, however, she was killed by a Dalek survivor that Daak had overlooked, leaving Daak grief-stricken and vowing to exterminate every
    8.00
    3 votes
    52

    Andy Lippincott

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Andy Lippincott is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury. The character first appears in January 1976, in a law library. Joanie Caucus becomes attracted to him while working before Lippincott confesses he is gay. Joanie is heartbroken, and takes some time to recover. Lippincott contributes position papers to Virginia Slade's failed run for Congress in 1976. He disappears from the strip for a few years after this storyline. In 1982, the character reappears as an organizer for the Bay Area Gay Alliance, and contributes to the congressional re-election of Lacey Davenport. In 1989 he returns to the strip again when he is diagnosed with AIDS. Over the course of the next year, Lippincott's battles with the disease, and eventual death from it, helped bring the AIDS crisis into popular culture. Ultimately, he is shown dying to the sound of the Beach Boys' song "Wouldn't It Be Nice", finally fulfilling his wish to hear the (then newly-released) CD version of their album Pet Sounds. Shortly thereafter, Andy made posthumous appearances in the strip, first declaring "Brian Wilson is God" in a note found in his hand (having been listening to Pet Sounds on CD as he died), and then
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    8.00
    3 votes
    54

    Franklin

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Franklin is a character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. Introduced on July 31, 1968, Franklin was the first African-American character in the strip. He goes to school with Peppermint Patty and Marcie. In his first story arc, he met Charlie Brown when they were both at the beach. Franklin's father was a soldier fighting in Vietnam, to which Charlie Brown replied "My Dad's a barber...he was in a war too, but I don't know which one." Franklin later paid Charlie Brown a visit and found some of Charlie Brown's other friends to be quite odd. His last appearance was in 1999, the year before Schulz's death. In an interview in 1997, Schulz discussed receiving a letter from a Southern editor "who said something about, 'I don't mind you having a black character, but please don't show them in school together.' Because I had shown Franklin sitting in front of Peppermint Patty. [...] I didn't even answer him." Franklin's skin color was mentioned in The Charlie Brown Dictionary, a picture dictionary using the Peanuts characters; he was referred to in the definition of "black" in showing a picture of him talking on the telephone, where the color of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    55

    Joanie Caucus

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Joanie Caucus is a fictional character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. She first appeared in September 1972 in which she has a fight with her husband, Clinton, over her rights as a woman. She finds that her recently acquired feminist beliefs clash with his idea of how a wife should behave, and she promptly walks out on him. She catches a ride with Mike Doonesbury and Mark Slackmeyer, who happen to be traveling cross-country on motorcycle at the time, and travels with them back to Walden Commune. There she spends several years living with the other characters while running a day-care service for local children (whose parents often aren't too thrilled when their little girls came home talking about Women's Rights). While running Walden Day Care, Caucus sends off applications to several real-life law schools (whose actual students petitioned the schools to accept her as a student). She eventually accepts an offer from Boalt Hall for the class of 1977, and moves to California. She shares an apartment with Ginny Slade while there, and helps Ginny in an unsuccessful bid for the United States Congress. After becoming a lawyer, Joanie spends many years working for Congresswoman
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Ratbert

    Ratbert

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Ratbert is a regular character from the Dilbert comic strip. He was not originally intended to be a regular, instead being part of a series of strips featuring a lab scientist's cruel experiments (Ratbert's name at this stage was XP-39C²). Ratbert soon realized that he was the subject of a hideous macaroni and cheese experiment (the scientist made him eat huge amounts of it and writes in his notebook that it causes paranoia in rats) and escaped, eventually finding a refuge in Dilbert's house. He was not initially accepted by the residents, especially Dilbert, who was highly prejudiced against rats. However, he finally allowed Ratbert to become a permanent member of the household. Ratbert chose his name through a discussion with Dogbert. Dogbert suggested names such as 'Rodney the Rodent' and 'Vernon the Vermin'. XP-39C² suggested the name 'Bill the Rat' before finally settling on 'Ratbert'. As a simple rat, and having been specially bred to be susceptible to peer pressure, Ratbert is very gullible and innocent, although optimistic. Sometimes his actions can become quite annoying, such as doing "rat dances". Like Dogbert, he has made inroads into business, once working as an intern,
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Sonic the Hedgehog

    Sonic the Hedgehog

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sonic the Hedgehog: Sonic Colors
    Sonic the Hedgehog (ソニック・ザ・ヘッジホッグ, Sonikku za Hejjihoggu), trademarked Sonic The Hedgehog, is a title character and the protagonist of the Sonic the Hedgehog series released by Sega, as well as in numerous spin-off comics, cartoons, and a feature film. The first game was released on June 23, 1991, to provide Sega with a mascot to rival Nintendo's flagship character Mario (see 1991 in video gaming). Since then, Sonic has become one of the world's best-known video game characters, with his series having sold more than 80 million copies. In 2005, Sonic was one of the first game character inductees into the Walk of Game, alongside Mario and Link. While many individuals at Sega had a hand in Sonic's creation, programmer Yuji Naka and artist Naoto Ōshima are generally credited with the creation of the character, a blue 15-year-old anthropomorphic hedgehog, who has the ability to run at supersonic speeds and the ability to curl into a ball, primarily to attack enemies. This is a major part of the gameplay of the series. While Sega were seeking a flagship series to compete with Nintendo's Mario series along with a character to replace Alex Kidd as the company's mascot, several character
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    Belkar Bitterleaf

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Belkar Bitterleaf is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written and drawn by Rich Burlew. A barefoot halfling ranger at the start of the Order's adventures, he has since taken at least one level of barbarian. Very little has been definitely revealed about Belkar's early life. He once spun a sob-story about how he was ostracized in the halfling community for being exceptionally small even by halfling standards and that he has since strived to be a great adventurer in order to assert himself and eventually return to the village and exact a murderous and bloody revenge. While he subsequently claimed to have done this purely to gain extra experience points for role-playing, much of the story rings true. Belkar is indeed quite sensitive about his height and when Vaarsuvius hits him with a crushing despair spell he laments that he is going to die alone and unloved. It has been suggested that at least some members of his family share his general disdain for the lives of others and have a similar bloodthirst - it has been suggested that he has an Aunt Judy who is as vicious as he is. He also seems to believe that spending time with one's family is a form of cruel and
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Uncle Duke

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Uncle Duke is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau. He is nominally Zonker Harris's uncle, albeit an "uncle by courtesy" only. Duke was originally a straightforward caricature of the late gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson (see Raoul Duke) but eventually took on a life of his own and a succession of ill-fated ventures in the areas of politics, business and crime. Duke is an epic consumer of drugs and alcohol, and an amoral trickster with a fondness for firearms. He has a son called Earl who resembles him in most ways, but is sober and more clever. Duke's early life is murky. His mother is mentioned very few times in the strip; a flashback has her noting at Duke's college graduation that "one of three men I used to know would be very proud of you." He recalls having been born wearing Ray Bans, and is almost never seen without sunglasses in the strip. Despite Zonker calling him "Uncle Duke", Duke appears to be his surname; the back matter for the Doonesbury collection "Death of a Party Animal" refers to him as "Raoul Duke," a throwback to the character's origins. Conversely, in one exposé of his past he is revealed to have no last name. Since his
    6.75
    4 votes
    63

    Milquetoast the Cockroach

    • Appeared in comic strips: Bloom County
    Milquetoast the Cockroach is a fictional character in Berkeley Breathed's comic strips Bloom County and Outland. The character has also appeared in other works by Breathed. Though Breathed had sporadically used cockroaches in Bloom County beforehand, Milquetoast was the first cockroach to become a significant player in the strip. First appearing in the strip's later years, he is a purple cockroach with a large nose, and is often depicted as disgusting and unsavory. He is Opus' recurring nemesis, and frequently bests him in battles of wit. Milquetoast has also done such things as squirt chemicals (like Liquid-Plumr, for instance) up Opus' nose and claim he has no control over his behavior. He also steals food and sends subliminal messages to the other members of the Bloom Boardinghouse while they sleep. Milquetoast was also one of the original Bloom County characters to cross over into Outland, where he became a major player. During Outland's run, he is revealed to be an occasional cross-dresser. Also during Outland, Milquetoast is depicted as Opus' best friend, after Ronald-Ann Smith. In the animated Outland Christmas special A Wish for Wings That Work, Milquetoast was voiced by
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Winslow

    Winslow

    • Appeared in comic strips: Questionable Content
    Winslow is Hannelore's AnthroPC.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Roy Greenhilt

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Roy Greenhilt is a major character in the webcomic, The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. A 29-year-old veteran fighter, Roy assembled the Order and acted as party leader. Roy is a counterstereotype of the traditional dumb fighter cliché. Roy was the son and eldest child of Eugene Greenhilt, a highly accomplished illusionist, who wished for his son to follow in his footsteps and enroll in Mage College. Roy, however, had other ideas. Inspired by tales of his grandfather and the greatsword that he wielded, he enrolled in Bash University (Bash U), a college for those intending to become fighters. Roy, being highly studious, found himself to be something of a social outcast. After three years of study, he was surprised to receive a visit from his father, who had disowned him when he chose the fighter's path. Eugene explained to his son that he was dying of old age and that Roy and his younger sister Julia would inherit a blood oath of vengeance that he had sworn against the sorcerer Xykon, who had slain Eugene's mentor many years earlier. Despite his father's firm belief that Roy, as a lowly fighter, would be incapable of facing Xykon (now having become a lich) successfully,
    5.80
    5 votes
    66

    Yoshikage Kira

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Yoshikage Kira (吉良 吉影, Kira Yoshikage) is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. Kira, the main antagonist of series 4 of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, longs for a simple life, and doesn't wish to be bothered. Although he reveals many talents, this yearning shows in his dislike of coming in first, as the cast eventually realizes. He becomes quite bothered when someone disrupts his "simplicity", and goes to extreme lengths to get it back. He keeps a collection of his own fingernail clippings (sorted in jars by year, with the length of each recorded in a notebook), and believes when they grow quickly he has trouble. Kira also has a bizarre fetish for the female hand, stemming from an erotic fascination with the hands of the Mona Lisa. Unfortunately, his desire has never extended to the rest of the female person. This results in his murdering women in order to acquire their (severed) hands as "girlfriends"--when one "girlfriend" begins to decay, he goes off in search of a replacement. Originally, Kira murdered his victims by stabbing them so viciously they were left with horrific back wounds (their hideous nature is implied by the fact that the reader is
    5.80
    5 votes
    67

    Charlie Brown

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Charles "Charlie" Brown is the protagonist in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. Charlie Brown and his creator are both the sons of barbers, but whereas Schulz's work is described as the "most shining example of the American success story", Charlie Brown is an example of "the great American un-success story" in that he fails in almost everything he does. Charlie Brown is a lovable loser, a child possessed of endless determination and hope, but who is ultimately dominated by his insecurities and a "permanent case of bad luck," and is often taken advantage of by his peers. He and Lucy Van Pelt star in a running gag that recurs throughout the series: Lucy holds a football for Charlie Brown to kick, but pulls it away before he can kick it, causing Charlie Brown to fly into the air and fall on his back. Schulz acknowledged that he created Charlie Brown as somewhat of a self-portrait, in that the character shares Schulz's self-doubt and insecurities. Charlie Brown was one of the original cast members of Peanuts when it debuted in 1950, and the subject of the first joke in the strip. Aside from some stylistic differences in Schulz's art style at the time, Charlie Brown looked
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Dwight McCarthy

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sin City
    Dwight McCarthy is a main protagonist in Frank Miller's Sin City universe. He appears in A Dame to Kill For, The Big Fat Kill, Family Values, The Babe Wore Red and That Yellow Bastard. He is the character that appears the most in all the Sin City yarns. In the 2005 film adaptation, he was portrayed by Clive Owen. In Dwight's first appearance in A Dame To Kill For, his head is shaved and he is nearing middle age. During the events of A Dame to Kill For, the Old Town girls perform Facial reconstruction on him at Gail's behest. They change his facial appearance dramatically, and he allows his hair to grow again as well. By his next appearances in The Big Fat Kill and Family Values, he sports a more natural look. In terms of clothing, in the first half of A Dame to Kill For he wears just a shirt and pants. Afterwards, he takes to wearing a black shirt and a trench coat. He wears red Converse sneakers both before and after his transformation; shown in color on the cover of The Big Fat Kill #1 and in the movie adaptation. Three years before A Dame to Kill For, Dwight rescues Miho from two Tong gangsters. In the time span of That Yellow Bastard, Ava Lord leaves Dwight and marries another
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Elan

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Elan (pronounced /ˈiːlən/) is a major character in the webcomic, The Order of the Stick, written and drawn by Rich Burlew. Originally a Bard, he has now taken a level as a Dashing Swordsman, an obscure prestige class (made up specifically for the webcomic). His name is also possibly a French pun, as "élan" means "spirit" or "vigor". Elan and his identical twin brother, Nale, were born in a small village, the sons of a ruthless general and a barmaid. Elan was bullied practically from birth by his brother, who repeatedly hit him in his soft, underdeveloped skull. This may be responsible for Elan's intelligence, or lack thereof. Their parents soon divorced, citing irreconcilable differences of alignment - the father being Lawful Evil while the mother was Chaotic Good. The twins were separated, Elan remaining with his mother, while Nale was taken by his father. They seem to have taken the alignments of their parents. As he grew up, Elan remained unaware that he possessed a twin; it's unclear whether their father told Nale about his sibling or not. After becoming a bard, Elan spent some time working as assistant to a paladin named Sir Francois, a job which he was quite spectacularly bad
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    V

    V is a title character from the comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. He is a mysterious anarchist, vigilante, and freedom fighter (easily recognizable by his Guy Fawkes mask, long hair, and dark clothing). According to Moore, he was designed to be both the protagonist and antagonist at the same time, so that readers could decide for themselves whether he was a hero fighting for a cause or simply insane, thus the character is depicted as somewhat of an enigma. The background and identity of V is largely unknown. He is at one point an inmate at "Larkhill Resettlement Camp"—one of many concentration camps where political prisoners, homosexuals, Black people, Jews, Muslims, Indians and Pakistanis are exterminated by Britain's new fascist regime. While there, he is part of a group of prisoners who are subjected to horrific medical experimentation, conducted by Dr. Delia Surridge, involving artificially-designed hormone injection. Lewis Prothero is the camp's commandant, and a paedophile vicar, Father Lilliman, is at the camp to lend "spiritual support". All prisoners so injected soon die under gruesome circumstances, with the sole exception of "the
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    Alex Doonesbury

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Alex Doonesbury is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury. She is the daughter of Mike Doonesbury and J.J. Caucus. From her early years Alex has shown herself to be highly intelligent, and an excellent student. She is brilliant at all things related to computers, and is an exceptional hacker. Her intelligence and eager nature often cause her to leap well ahead of reality, building grandiose plans off of extremely minor events (such as assuming that a student film she shot was bound for the Sundance Film Festival). Although she gets along fairly well with her father, she harbors some resentment for her mother, whom she blames for the break up of her and Mike's marriage. This was made worse when Mike remarried to Kim Rosenthal, whom Alex adores, and J.J. remarried to "Uncle Stupidhead", whom Alex loathes. Alex has a good relationship with her grandmother Joanie as they have bonded over the strangeness of J.J. Alex has some differences with her father as well, whom she considers a sellout for voting Republican (he was formerly a liberal) and for driving an SUV. She is politically very liberal and was a supporter of Howard Dean in the 2004 election. She also supports file
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Bill the Cat

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Bill the Cat, or Bill D. Cat (according to the final Outland strip), is a fictional cat appearing in the works of cartoonist Berkeley Breathed, beginning with the comic strip Bloom County in the 1980s and continuing in Outland and Opus in the following decades. Bill also appeared in some of Breathed's illustrated children's books, including A Wish for Wings That Work, which was also made into an animated Christmas television special, and also on greeting cards and other sundry merchandise. The cat's most frequent spoken sentiments are "Ack!" and "Thbbft!", unlike most other animals (and children) in Breathed's work, who not only can speak English, but have advanced vocabularies. The former is a result of his regularly choking on hairballs, the latter sound an approximation of the "raspberry". Bill the Cat is commonly seen as a parody of Jim Davis' Garfield (Milo Bloom appears to fear a visit from United Feature Syndicate's copyright lawyers surrounding Bill's similarities to Garfield). Breathed has also described Bill as his attempt to create a character so repulsive that it would have absolutely no merchandising potential. But surprisingly, Bill the Cat trinkets and figurines have
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sesame Street
    Cookie Monster is a Muppet on the children's television show Sesame Street. He is best known for his voracious appetite and his famous eating phrases: "Me want cookie!", "Me eat cookie!", and "Om nom nom nom" (said through a mouth full of food). He often eats anything and everything, including danishes, donuts, lettuce, apples, bananas, as well as normally inedible objects. However, as his name suggests, his preferred food is cookies. Chocolate chip cookies are his favorite kind; oatmeal cookies are his second favorite. In a song in 2004, Cookie Monster revealed that, before he ate his first cookie, he believes his name was Sid. Showing awareness of healthy eating habits for children, since 2006 he has said that cookies are "a sometime snack" and that he also likes fruits and eggplant. He is known to have a mother, a younger sister, and an identically-designed cousin, who all share his characteristic blue fur and "googly eyes". He also has a father, who appeared in a Monsterpiece Theater sketch promoting energy conservation, water conservation and environmentalism. Both Cookie Monster's mother and father have his enormous appetite. He and his Sesame Street friends are popular
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
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    75
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Little Red-Haired Girl

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, and is a symbol of unrequited love. While never seen in the strip, she appears onscreen in several television specials. Her name is sometimes cited in these as Heather. She serves as the object of Charlie Brown's desire. He most often notices her while eating lunch outdoors, and often tries to get up the courage to speak to her, but always in vain. Anything touched by her or associated with her is precious to him. For example, in one strip he finds her pencil dropped in the hallway, notices that it has been chewed and declares, "She's human!" Presumably, this common habit makes her seem more approachable, but, typically, he is prevented from following through when Lucy snatches the pencil and returns it to the Little Red-Haired Girl with a brusque, "Hey, kid! Here's your stupid pencil!" She also figures prominently in Valentine's Day strips, several of which focus on Charlie Brown's hope of getting a valentine from her (or anyone for that matter; typically Charlie gets nothing and Snoopy gets tons of valentines). Charlie Brown typically attempts to give her a valentine but chickens
    6.50
    4 votes
    77

    Ssard

    Ssard is a fictional character in the Radio Times comic strips based upon the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. The Eighth Doctor and Stacy Townsend first met the Ice Warrior in the comic strip Descendance by Gary Russell, and he went on to become one of his companions. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-offs, is unclear. Ssard first met the Doctor and Stacy on Mars in 3998. After the Doctor resolved a conflict between two rival families of Ice Warriors, Ssard joined them as a companion in the TARDIS. Their further adventures included defeating an alien infiltrator in Victorian era London. The stories featuring the Eighth Doctor, Stacy and Ssard were terminated prematurely due to a change of management at the Radio Times, resulting in the hurried two-part final story Coda being written to tie up the loose ends and terminate the story. At some point after Coda, Stacy and Ssard left the TARDIS and eventually their friendship turned into something more. In the Eighth Doctor Adventures novel, Placebo Effect by Gary Russell, the Eighth Doctor was invited to attend their wedding, which took place on Micawber’s World in 3999.
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    Annie

    • Appeared in comic strips: Little Orphan Annie
    Annie is an orphan of no definite age, perhaps between ten and twelve. Her distinguishing physical characteristics are a mop of red, curly hair, a red dress and vacant circles for eyes. Her catch phrases are "Gee whiskers" and "Leapin' lizards!" Annie attributes her lasting youthfulness to her Leap Day, February 29, birthday, and so only ages one year in appearance for every four years that pass. Annie is a plucky, generous, compassionate and optimistic youngster who can hold her own against bullies and has a strong and intuitive sense of right and wrong.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Durkon Thundershield

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Durkon Thundershield is a major character from The Order of the Stick, created, written and drawn by Rich Burlew. A 39-year-old dwarf, Durkon is the party's cleric, with Thor as his deity. Durkon's early history is described in Rich Burlew's paperback comic On the Origin of PCs, a prequel to the webcomic. Durkon was born in the dwarven lands and stayed there throughout his early life. He joined the temple of Thor as a cleric and lived within its walls. Seventeen years prior to the formation of the Order of the Stick, Durkon was visited by Hurak, the high priest of Thor, who informed him that the deity had selected him for a mission to human lands. Durkon was to remain with humans indefinitely, ostensibly until he was summoned home to act as a cultural instructor to his people. However, the true reason for the "mission" was that the priest of Odin had arrived at the temple that morning with a prophecy that, when Durkon next returned home, he would bring death and destruction upon his people. In order to thwart the prophesy, the high priest had no intention of ever calling Durkon home, leaving him effectively banished for life; possibly an unnecessary deception, as given Durkon's
    8.50
    2 votes
    81

    Kim Rosenthal

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Kim Rosenthal is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. She first appeared as a baby in the 1970s, as the last child evacuated from Vietnam. She was adopted by the Jewish Rosenthal family. Her early appearances in the strip had her learning how to talk entirely from television commercials. Her first words were "Big Mac", and she soon was quoting entire commercials by heart. This became even more extreme during the 1976 presidential campaign, during which she took a liking to the campaign advertisements of Jimmy Carter, and would instantly say "Hi, I'm Jimmy Carter", followed by a summary of his political positions to anyone who would listen. She was later seen becoming a national honor student in high school, which her classmates considered unfair because they believed the stereotype that both Asian and Jewish people are good at math. After this Kim disappeared from the strip for many years, and reappeared in February 1996, where she met Mike Doonesbury at the CyberCitizens-For-Steve-Forbes Organizational meeting. By then she was in her twenties and was a brilliant computer programmer (she dropped out from a doctorate program at MIT because she found it too easy). She, like
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    82
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    83

    Mordac

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    He's the evil-hearted director of Information Services for Dilbert's company. He believes his mission is to make it as difficult as possible for employees to use their computers or the network.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Riley Freeman

    Riley Freeman

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Boondocks
    Riley Freeman is a fictional character and the deuteragonist from the syndicated comic strip The Boondocks written by Aaron McGruder and its TV series adaptation. He often refers to himself as "Riley Escobar," and in season two of the TV series, he also refers to himself as "Young Reezy." He is Huey's eight-year old brother who aspires to be like the rap artists and the gangsters that he admires. Riley, who grew up on the south side of Chicago, was moved along with his brother to the peaceful, predominately white suburb of Woodcrest by their granddad. In some episodes, Riley and Huey would have a single storyline and in others, the two would each have their own in a single episode. Riley, like Huey, is voiced by Regina King. It is strongly suggested that Huey and Riley's birth parents are deceased. This is, in part, based on Robert's dialog from the first episode stating that he spent the boys' "inheritance" on their new house in Woodcrest. Riley is an impressionable third grader who embraces the stereotypical "gangsta" lifestyle and lives his life like his idol rappers. Influenced by rap music and television, he frequently uses poor grammar, and tends to defend his idols even when
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Vawce

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    Vawce is an undead husk empowered to be the agent of an implacably evil Old One. Vawce himself isn't necessarily evil per se, just utterly amoral. It remains to be seen whether he will remain on the side of angels, or turn on Dave and his companions in obedience to his master's wishes to usher in the tidal wave of blood that would result from the harvesting of humanity.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Lucy van Pelt

    Lucy van Pelt

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Lucille "Lucy" van Pelt is a fictional character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. She is the main bully and the older sister of Linus and Rerun. Lucy is a crabby and cynical eight-year-old girl, and often bullies the other characters in the strip, particularly Linus and Charlie Brown. She is often referred to as the world's greatest fussbudget, mostly by her mother. Lucy was introduced into the strip on March 3, 1952, as a wide-eyed baby who constantly tormented her parents. She soon grew into her familiar persona of a bossy, crabby, manipulative and selfish girl. Very early on, Schulz eliminated the circles around her eyes and allowed her to mature to the age of the other characters; she does have tiny half circles around her eyes (as do the other van Pelt siblings). Lucy wears a blue dress with white and black saddle shoes for most of the strip's original run. However, in later years, towards its end, she was seen more often in T-shirts and pants, until her dress was phased out altogether. Perhaps Lucy's most famous gimmick in her long existence as a character is the one in which she pulls the football away from Charlie Brown right as he
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Marv

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sin City
    Marv is a fictional character in the graphic novel series Sin City, created by Frank Miller. In the 2005 film adaptation, he is played by Mickey Rourke. He first appears in The Hard Goodbye and follows with appearances in A Dame to Kill For, Just Another Saturday Night, and Silent Night. He makes a brief cameo in Blue Eyes (as featured in Lost, Lonely, and Lethal). Marv has been well received both as a comic book character and a film character. Marv is one of the major characters of the series, and appears or is mentioned in nearly every book. He is the protagonist of the first Sin City "yarn", The Hard Goodbye, as well as two shorter installments, Silent Night and Just Another Saturday Night. He also has a supporting role in A Dame to Kill For. The Hard Goodbye begins as Marv has sex with a beautiful blonde prostitute named Goldie, only to wake up to find her dead and himself framed for her murder. He escapes from the cops and vows that he will avenge Goldie's death. He kills his way through a chain of small-time thugs to find the people responsible, eventually finding out that Goldie was murdered by a mute, cannibalistic serial killer named Kevin. Kevin is the ward of Cardinal
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Phil Slackmeyer

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Phil Slackmeyer was a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. Phil was Mark Slackmeyer's father. He held a number of jobs during his span in the comic, from a trader at a Wall Street financial firm, to a tobacco company executive, to a member of Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Affairs. He was also imprisoned briefly in the late 1980s for insider trading and later pardoned by former president Ronald Reagan for any crime committed during the Cold War following its demise. He divorced Mark's mother and re-married, having sought a "trophy wife." Phil's religious background is Jewish. Phil was never close to his son, unable to accept his hippie lifestyle, and later, his homosexuality. The two made peace shortly before his death. Phil died off-strip sometime in early 2002. Mark was unable to get former friends and family to attend, not even the family's rabbi. The Reverend Scot Sloan officiated the funeral service. Mark hired some drama club teenagers from a local high school to act as mourners.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Pointy-Haired Boss

    Pointy-Haired Boss

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    The pointy-haired boss (often abbreviated to just PHB or "The Boss") is Dilbert's boss in the Dilbert comic strip. He is notable for his micromanagement, gross incompetence and unawareness of his surroundings, yet somehow retains power in the workplace. In the Dilbert TV series, in which he is voiced by comedian Larry Miller, the character is notably smarter (although still quite stupid and inept) and more openly corrupt. He is also parodied in Bee Movie as Dean Buzzwell, also voiced by Larry Miller. The PHB's real name is unknown in the comic, although in one episode of the TV series ("The Return") he signs for a package using his line dancing pseudonym "Eunice". Later in that episode, two other aliases are posted on the "Most Wanted" board in the post office (however, he thinks that is because they like him). In another episode of the series, "Art", the boss, signs for another package with his real name (which is unseen), and the delivery man seems shocked when reading it. Creator Scott Adams has said it is easier to imagine the PHB as one's own boss when he is not given a name. The Pointy-Haired Boss is mostly bald, except for a fringe of hair across the back of the head, and
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Ron Headrest

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Ron Headrest is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury. During the 1980s, Garry Trudeau thought it would be fun to do a political parody of the television program Max Headroom (of which he was a fan). He combined the concept with then-president Ronald Reagan, to produce Ron Headrest, the world's first electronically simulated politician. The idea was that Ron had been created to serve as a backup president during the long periods Reagan spent on vacation. He appeared as a stylized version of Reagan’s head and shoulders on a television screen, complete with sunglasses. Because he was electronic, he would have no memory troubles, and his sense of humor and attitude were designed to appeal to young voters. It ends up being a disaster: Headrest openly mocks the administration he is designed to serve, and causes nothing but trouble. During the first week of his appearance he flashes the White House's phone number on his screen, and tells children to call if they wanted "rock-solid information on safe sex". (Because the number printed was accurate, the real world White House got thousands of calls which jammed their lines. Eventually they got revenge by giving callers the
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Ruby

    Ruby

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Watering Hole
    Ruby the Striped Jackal is a recurring character in the O'Reilly webcomic The Watering Hole.  Ruby is based on the cover of The Ruby Cookbook.  Ruby is the young kid on the block at the compound, a hacker / mad scientist who also thinks that she's the hottest thing around.  She had a feud with Pearl early on, but now is more of an ally.
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    7.33
    3 votes
    94

    Boopsie

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Boopsie (aka Barbara Ann Boopstein) is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. She was first introduced in the strip's early years as B.D.'s airheaded girlfriend. At this point of the strip she was supremely unintelligent, and almost incapable of finishing a sentence without giggling or exclaiming "Whee!". She was also almost completely subservient to B.D., which Nicole deplored. Nicole tried to teach Boopsie about feminism, and failed miserably. After college, she and B.D, moved to Malibu, where she attempted to start a career as an actress. By this point her intelligence and self-reliance had increased, and she was far less of a bimbo. B.D. became her manager. To date she has yet to land a really decent part, and is best remembered for roles like "Third Girl in shower" in the fictional Porky's IX. She has, however, developed something of a cult following among frat-boys who believe that of all the bit-part playing airheads in Hollywood, she is the best. Despite having matured, Boopsie is still easily influenced, and has gotten heavily into new age practices, which B.D. considers absurd. She firmly believes in reincarnation, ESP and channeling. She herself has had a great deal
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
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    4 votes
    96

    Jolyne Kujo

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Jolyne Kujo (空条 徐倫, Kūjō Jorīn) is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. Jolyne is the main heroine of Series 6. She is the daughter of the third arc's hero, Jotaro Kujo, and is the only female "JoJo" to date. Born to Jotaro Kujo and her unnamed mother in Florida, Jolyne Kujo is the sixth generation Joestar in the Joestar bloodline. Her childhood was often spent with the absence of her father, and it was often that Jotaro was mostly at work, even when Jolyne was in need of the most attention. At 14, her life as a teen would spiral downward on then upon being mistaken for a suspect in a robbery she didn't commit and fleeing from an officer by stealing a motorcycle. Upon being arrested and detained in a holding cell, falsely charged with the crime, she and her mother pleaded her innocence and even begged Jotaro to bail her out, but in the end, did not believe her, sending Jolyne to juvenile detention. When her mother divorced Jotaro, she became even more frustrated when he left the family, and soon joined the Hell Riders motorcycle/carjacking gang and spent more time getting into more trouble. At 19, having cleaned her act and left the gang, during
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Odie

    • Appeared in comic strips: Garfield
    Odie is a fictional character in the Jim Davis comic strip Garfield. He has also appeared in Garfield and Friends, The Garfield Show, two live-action feature films, and 3 CGI films. He is a kind but (slightly) unintelligent yellow-furred, brown-eared beagle (however between his first appearance and September 1979 his ears were black). In the live-action films based on the Garfield franchise, he is played by a dachshund though an actual beagle was seen at the talent show scene as one of the dogs barking at Garfield. In the comic of August 26, 2007, Garfield describes Odie's species as "purebred clown" after trying to find out what kind of dog Odie is with the help of a book. Odie usually has a large tongue and slobbers in his appearances. After October 1997, he began walking on two feet, instead of all fours, just like Garfield, though this was demonstrated as early as 1989 (on the comic strips, Odie's first appearance on two feet was in the 1987 special Garfield Goes Hollywood). Also by this time his whiskers disappeared, and he was no longer depicted as a puppy, even if he hasn't become officially as a full-grown dog. In the television series, Odie's appearance is usually
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    Popeye

    • Appeared in comic strips: Popeye
    Popeye the Sailor is a cartoon fictional character created by Elzie Crisler Segar, who has appeared in comic strips and animated cartoons in the cinema as well as on television. He first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip Thimble Theatre on January 17, 1929. Popeye also became the strip's title in later years. Although Segar's Thimble Theatre strip was in its tenth year when Popeye made his debut in 1929, the sailor quickly became the main focus of the strip and Thimble Theatre became one of King Features' most popular properties during the 1930s. Thimble Theatre was continued after Segar's death in 1938 by several writers and artists, most notably Segar's assistant Bud Sagendorf. The strip, now titled Popeye, continues to appear in first-run installments in its Sunday edition, written and drawn by Hy Eisman. The daily strips are reprints of old Sagendorf stories. In 1933, Max and Dave Fleischer's Fleischer Studios adapted the Thimble Theatre characters into a series of Popeye the Sailor theatrical cartoon shorts for Paramount Pictures. These cartoons proved to be among the most popular of the 1930s, and the Fleischers—and later Paramount's own Famous Studios—continued
    6.25
    4 votes
    99

    Ranger Smith

    • Appeared in comic strips: A Day in the Life of Ranger Smith
    Ranger John Francis Smith (originally voiced by Don Messick) is a fictional character in the Yogi Bear cartoon series. A former US Army soldier, he is the serious and stern authority figure in Jellystone Park, in contrast to the antics of the troublesome Yogi, and he greatly disapproves of Yogi's picnic basket thievery, mainly because it repels parkgoers and creates a lot of extra work for him. In the original Yogi Bear shorts on Huckleberry Hound, the then-unnamed character that would become Ranger Smith had a much different appearance, appearing older and with a white mustache, though his voice was the same. Even after his trademark appearance had been established, Ranger Smith's design was notably inconsistently drawn throughout each episode of "The Yogi Bear Show". In one episode, he appears as his young self, but this is apparently his first actual encounter with Yogi as he doesn't recognize and refers to him as that bear. Ranger Smith's relationship with Yogi seems to change with every episode. Sometimes he's very friendly with Yogi and was even reluctant to send him to a zoo in one episode; in other episodes, he wants nothing more than to send Yogi to the St. Louis Zoo. The
    6.25
    4 votes
    100

    Rerun van Pelt

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Rerun van Pelt is Linus and Lucy's younger brother in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. Rerun started as a minor character in the Peanuts universe, only becoming a main character in the last decade of the comic strip. Rerun was first mentioned in the strip on May 23, 1972, during a storyline in which Lucy threw Linus out of the house only to learn that yet another little brother had just been born. Upon learning the news, Lucy exclaimed "A new baby brother?!! But I just got rid of the old one!!!" With that, she let Linus back in, uttering in misery, "You can't shovel water with a pitchfork". The irony of the situation wasn't lost on Linus, who laughed himself silly over his sister's scheme being defeated, thus causing her to lose her temper and tie his blanket over his mouth. Lucy, who always wanted to be an only child (or to have a younger sister), is less than thrilled at the prospect of having a second younger brother, and comments that getting one was like watching reruns on television; thus, Linus comes up with the idea of calling the family's new addition "Rerun". "Rerun van Pelt! Good Grief!" mutters Lucy with a less-than-thrilled look on her face. Rerun's first
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
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    102
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    103

    Jimmy Thudpucker

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Jimmy Thudpucker is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury, created by Garry Trudeau. He first appeared in the strip in 1978. He is generally seen as a combination of Bob Dylan and John Denver (and to some extent, Loudon Wainwright III), and became a rock star in the seventies, when he was only 19. Others have compared Thudpucker to a young Jackson Browne. Unlike many of the other parodied and fictional celebrities in the strip, who are often portrayed as shallow and conceited, Jimmy is essentially a good person. He is very moral and not afraid to turn down money for what he feels is right. He even wrote a song about Doonesbury character Ginny Slade to help her raise money for her campaign for free, because he agreed with her politics. Jimmy is also extremely devoted to his fans. Jimmy expatriated to Vietnam during the 1990s, and became the number one act in the country. While there he performed in a benefit organized by Kim Rosenthal to help the poorly paid workers at a Nike plant. He has since returned to America. Jimmy's biggest fault seems to be his habit of "reinventing" himself, often switching musical genres on a whim. When he does so he changes his name to
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Josuke Higashikata

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Josuke Higashikata (東方 仗助, Higashikata Jōsuke), also known as Josuke Joestar Higashikata (東方 ジョースター 仗助, Higashikata Jōsutā Jōsuke), is a fictional character created by Hirohiko Araki as the protagonist of part four, Diamond Is Not Crash, of the manga series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, which debuted in 1992. The arc begins with Jotaro Kujo looking for him, as Josuke is the illegitimate son of Jotaro's grandfather Joseph Joestar. Josuke is confronted by Jotaro to eradicate evil Stand users from his hometown, Morioh. He refuses at first, believing that it is not any of his business to worry about the threat posed by other Stand users. However, he quickly changes his mind when his grandfather is killed by Angelo, a career criminal and murderer gifted with a Stand. They track down and fight several Stand users in order to retrieve the Bow and Arrow, the object that creates Stand users. But eventually they learn of a serial killer Stand user, and after he kills one of their friends, vow to find him. When they do find Yoshikage Kira a fight ensues, however he is able to flee and, using another person's Stand, changes his face and assumes someone else's identity. They eventually find him
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Knuckles the Echidna

    Knuckles the Echidna

    Knuckles the Echidna (ナックルズ・ザ・エキドゥナ Nakkuruzu za Ekiduna) is a video game character who appears in the Sonic the Hedgehog series released by Sega. He is one of the most significant characters in the series. He also appears in spin-off games, comics, and a feature film. His debut appearance was in Sonic the Hedgehog 3, released in 1994 to introduce a new rival for Sonic. He was presented as an antagonist who was tricked by the game's villain, Dr. Eggman Knuckles is a 16-year-old red anthropomorphic echidna, who is both physically powerful and highly resilient. In most Sonic games, his skills include climbing on ledges or walls and gliding in the air for short periods of time. He has a white crescent on his chest and four knuckles total, two on each hand, which are overgrown bones. During conception of Sonic the Hedgehog 3, the development team wanted to create a new rival for Sonic. The final design of Knuckles was the result of dozens of possible designs inspired by numerous different animals. The emphasis of the character was to break walls. Knuckles was introduced in Sonic the Hedgehog 3 as an "intimidator" because of his powerful abilities. He was given a headlining role in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
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    107

    President King

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    President King is a character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. His name was inspired by that of Kingman Brewster, who was the president of Yale University when Trudeau was a student there. King is the president of Walden College, which was attended by most of the main characters in the 1970s. His first appearance coincided with the introduction of Mark Slackmeyer, one of the primary characters. The left-wing radical "Megaphone Mark", protested (nothing in particular, just general protesting) by demanding that King surrender his office to him. Mark had hoped to be violently opposed in order to get publicity and public sympathy for his myriad causes, and was unpleasantly surprised when King happily vacated, even going so far as to offer to show Mark where the brandy and cigars were kept. Despite this initial portrayal as incredibily genial, King's later appearances show him as a much more cynical man. Indeed, Mark tried the same trick a couple of years later, and King responded simply by having a water cannon fired at him. Garry Trudeau often used Walden College to reflect the state of education in America and, as its president, King had an intricate role in these
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    3 votes
    108
    7.00
    3 votes
    109

    Rohan Kishibe

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Rohan Kishibe is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. It is likely that it is a self-insert of Hirohiko Araki. Rohan Kishibe also appeared in the one shot "Thus Spoke Rohan Kishibe". The title is reminiscent of Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Heaven's Door - Ability to literally open up a person like a book to read the opponent like a book. Contents inside are the person's memories since birth. The "pages" of the book can be ripped out, which the person's memory got ripped would lose body weight. Further more, the stand user has the ability to write to the blank pages of the book that represents the future memories of the victim. So if he wrote into the blank pages, the victim will do as it was written like a hypnotic suggestion.
    7.00
    3 votes
    110

    Bernie

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Bernie is a character from the comic strip Doonesbury. He was first introduced as Mike Doonesbury's laboratory partner in a science class they both took at Walden College. Bernie was portrayed as a typical mad scientist, and was clearly as insane as he was brilliant. Over the strip's early years much humor was derived from Mike's deadpan reactions to Bernie's crazy antics. In the first strip he appeared in, he drank a potion of his own creation that turned him into a werewolf. He later on came up with variations on this such as a giraffe and a warthog. He also frequently blew things up, teleported, travelled through time and space, and cleaned himself in a washing machine along with his laundry. He also had aspirations of world domination, but kept them mainly to himself. In 1976 Bernie went on a hunt for the Loch Ness Monster, but was unsuccessful. When the other characters moved onto Walden Commune, Bernie joined them along with his girlfriend Didi, who had hair so long she resembled Cousin Itt from the Addams Family. They later broke off in the 80s as Bernie found nothing he could relate to her. At Walden he continued his scientific exploits, but became a more minor character,
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    111
    Dogbert

    Dogbert

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Dogbert is Dilbert's anthropomorphic pet talking dog from the Dilbert comic strip. According to creator Scott Adams, the character is being based on, if not a member of, the beagle breed. Dogbert was originally created only so Dilbert would have someone to talk to, but as the strip progressed, Adams developed the character to be an anti-hero, metophorically personifying the dark, cynical side of Adams own personality. According to the strip from June 8 1997, Dogbert even celebrates Scott Adams' birthday as his own, as Dogbert is written as being born on June 8, 1957. Dogbert is a megalomaniac; one of his dreams is to conquer the world and enslave all humans, and he has actually achieved this status several times through methods such as hypnosis and masquerading as a space alien or a prophet. Oftentimes, though, he quickly relinquishes his post, for instance due to boredom, someone foiling his chance, his conviction that people do not deserve to have him as leader, or his desire to go nap on a soft pillow. In both the strip and TV show he ended up the ruler of Elbonia, although he quickly relinquished the title. He has also run for President of the United States on at least two
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    2 votes
    112

    Frieda

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Frieda is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. According to Schulz, Frieda's character was inspired by his longtime friend Frieda Rich, a local artist whom he met while taking classes at the Art Instruction Schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She was a regular in Peanuts throughout the 1960s, but as newer characters were phased in towards the end of the decade, she began appearing less often, and she ceased to be a featured character after 1985, making only cameo appearances since then in various television specials. Today she is best remembered as the Peanuts character with naturally curly hair, of which she is extremely proud. Frieda has red naturally curly hair, of which she is quite proud. She was the only girl on Charlie Brown's baseball team to not wear a cap because it would cover up her naturally curly hair. She often wears dresses, usually purple. She also wears tennis shoes and has an upturned nose. Frieda made her debut on March 6, 1961, when Linus introduced her to Charlie Brown. She was the eleventh permanent character to join the cast, and the first since Sally was born in 1959. She was initially presented, in both the advance press release and the
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    2 votes
    113
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    2 votes
    114

    Izzy Sinclair

    Isabelle "Izzy" Sinclair, is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. She was a companion of the Eighth Doctor. The continuity of the comic strip with respect to the television series, like other Doctor Who spin-offs, is open to interpretation. Izzy was born on October 12, 1979 (the same day that the first issue of Doctor Who Weekly was published). However, she did not know where she had been born, nor did she know who her biological parents were. She was adopted by Les and Sandra Sinclair, but because of her unknown ancestry chose to call herself Izzy S (for "Izzy Somebody") instead. Izzy was introduced in End Game, which ran in issues #244-#247 of DWM, written by Alan Barnes and drawn by Martin Geraghty, where she was a 17-year-old science fiction fan and amateur paranormal investigator who lived in the town of Stockbridge, England. She was also a friend of Maxwell Edison, a UFO enthusiast who had encountered the Fifth Doctor several years before. When Izzy first met the Doctor, she and Max had stolen an artifact that was being sought by the Doctor's old enemy, the
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    2 votes
    115

    Jotaro Kujo

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Jotaro Kujo (空条 承太郎, Kūjō Jōtarō) is a fictional character created by Hirohiko Araki as the protagonist of part three, Stardust Crusaders, of the manga series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, which debuted in 1989. He has a recognizable attire of a blue trenchcoat-length school uniform jacket with yellow chains on the collar and a matching hat. He is the only JoJo to make an appearance in four different series. Jotaro is Holly Kujo's son and Joseph Joestar's grandson. When Jotaro first appears, in part 3 Stardust Crusaders, he turned himself in to the police because he believes his Stand is an evil spirit possessing him. To demonstrate, he steals a gun from a prison guard, and tries to shoot himself in the head -- a phantom hand emerges from his arm and catches the bullet, however, only Holly sees the hand. Joseph comes to Jotaro's aid with Mohammed Avdol. A brief fight ensues due to Jotaro's defiance, getting Avdol involved. After learning about Stands, Jotaro gets used to Star Platinum -- a fierce, muscular, vaguely Aztec-looking spirit. It is revealed that the stands manifested recently because of the return of Dio Brando. As Dio attached his head to Johnathan Joestar's body, this
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    116
    Miles "Tails" Prower

    Miles "Tails" Prower

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sonic the Hedgehog: Sonic Colors
    Miles Prower (マイルス・パウアー, Mairusu Pauā), also known by his nickname Tails (テイルス, Teirusu), is a video game character of the Sonic the Hedgehog series released by Sega. He also appears in comic books, cartoons, as well as a feature film. The name "Miles Prower" is a pun on "miles per hour", a reference to the famed speed of Sonic the Hedgehog. He is an eight year old fox with two tails, hence the nickname. He is known to be Sonic's sidekick, best friend, and a mechanic. He is able to use his two tails to propel himself into the air like a helicopter for a limited time. He debuted in October 16, 1992 in the 8-bit version of Sonic the Hedgehog 2; the 16-bit version was released that November. When he was first introduced in Sonic the Hedgehog 2, Tails' fur was orange. The color was changed to yellow-orange for Sonic Adventure, and later to light yellow for Sonic Heroes. In 1993 and 1995, he starred in his own games: Tails and the Music Maker for the Pico; Tails Adventure, and Tails' Skypatrol for the Game Gear. Tails is the third most popular character of the series, behind Sonic and Shadow, according to official polls. Yasushi Yamaguchi, originally the main artist and zone designer
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    2 votes
    117

    Milo Bloom

    • Appeared in comic strips: Bloom County
    Milo Bloom is a fictional character in the American comic strip Bloom County. He was originally the main character, but was soon overshadowed by his best friend Michael Binkley and later on by Opus the penguin. Milo is the most worldly and cynical of all the characters; he is seemingly the only county resident who cares about politics and goings-on in the world outside his small town. He lives in the Bloom County Boarding House with his grandparents, Major Bloom and Bess Bloom. Said grandparents run the boarding house where most of the characters live. To amuse himself when alone, Milo likes to do casually odd things like going spear fishing at a small creek with a whale harpoon. Milo is also a reporter for the Bloom Beacon and later the Bloom Picayune, where he engages in controversial reporting (he says he graduated from the "Rupert Murdoch School of Exuberant Journalism"). In early strips, he regularly bothers Senator Bedfellow with ridiculous questions, asking for confirming accusations (usually about the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa), and attempting to convict him for virtually anything, although Bedfellow is not his only target. A noteworthy scandal he creates (with some help
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    2 votes
    118

    Nicole

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Nicole is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury, known for her radical feminist beliefs. Nicole was originally the lead female in the strip and remained so for a couple of years. After Joanie Caucus was introduced and became far more prominent, Nicole was relegated to secondary character status. Nicole lived on Walden commune during the seventies (along with the other characters) and often tried to convince Boopsie to stand up for her rights, but the latter was too dim to really understand that she was oppressed. After the strip's hiatus (and scattering of the characters) she didn't appear for several years. Finally, in 1988 she showed up at a college reunion, and sparks instantly went off between her and Mike Doonesbury. In the intervening years she had become extremely attractive, and stopped wearing glasses (which she never needed; she just wore them to be taken seriously). Her name was also now spelled Nicole (it had been "Nichole" previously), and has remained so ever since. Mike and J.J.'s marriage was on the rocks, and, when Nicole blatantly invited him to join her in an affair, he was sorely tempted. Minutes after the proposition, J.J. revealed that she was pregnant
    8.00
    2 votes
    119

    Opus the Penguin

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Opus the Penguin (Opus T. Penguin) is a character in the comic strips and children's books of Berkeley Breathed, most notably the popular 1980s strip Bloom County. Breathed has described him as an "existentialist penguin" and the favorite of his many characters. Until November 2, 2008 he ran in the comic strip Opus. Opus was originally introduced in June, 1981, as a one-time gag about hapless Mike Binkley bringing home what he thought was a German Shepherd, which turned out to be a penguin, much to the disappointment of his father. After being featured in a few strips, the character was dropped for several months, before being gradually re-introduced in January, 1982, and eventually becoming a central character in Bloom County. Opus' popularity quickly grew until he became the signature character of Bloom County and of Breathed's subsequent comic strips. Opus' appearance changed since his inception - he originally looked like a common penguin, but between 1982 and 1986 his nose grew dramatically (developing its signature bump in the middle, of which Opus is very self-conscious). Mike Binkley, during one Sunday strip, points out the fact that Opus more closely resembles a puffin, a
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    120
    Stephan Pastis

    Stephan Pastis

    • Appeared in comic strips: Pearls Before Swine
    Stephan Thomas Pastis (pronounced "Stefen Passtiss") (born January 16, 1968) is an American cartoonist and the creator of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine. A second-generation Greek-American, Pastis was raised in San Marino, California. He started cartooning as a child; his mother brought him pens and paper to amuse him when he was "sick a lot" and had to stay in bed. He dreamed of being a syndicated cartoonist, but figured the odds were against it. Since he enjoyed debating he decided that the law would enable him to earn a living. "I liked to write, and I liked to argue, and I wanted a career that made a lot of money, he said in an interview. "When I look back on it, I think it was those factors, the skills I had matched it. And the money made it something I wanted." He attended the University of California at Berkeley, earning a B.A. in Political Science in 1989. The following year Pastis attended law school at UCLA. He kept drawing all during this time, coming up with the character of the first Pearls Before Swine character, Rat, during a boring class in law school. "When I wrote for him [Rat] it seemed pretty honest. It was the first character where I could really say
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    2 votes
    121

    Wilma Deering

    • Appeared in comic strips: Buck Rogers
    Wilma Deering is a fictional character featured in the various iterations of Buck Rogers which have spanned many media over the years. Through all the versions of Buck Rogers, Wilma Deering has maintained some clear characteristics. She is a sometimes romantic interest for Buck, always a loyal defender of Earth, and an attractive and smart woman. She is generally depicted as having a spunky attitude and a penchant for getting herself into trouble. As with other science fiction heroines from the pulp sf genre and others, she has sometimes been depicted as a damsel in distress but mostly as an assertive adventurer in her own right. In this way, her character resembles that of Dale Arden of the Flash Gordon comic books and movie serials, and also the character of Lois Lane from Superman. Wilma Deering appears in the very first Buck Rogers story, Armageddon 2419 A.D., and the basic elements are present. She is depicted as adventurous, heroic and beautiful, and of course a romantic interest for the hero. Wilma features in the Buck Rogers comic strip from its inception, as she the first person of Earth to meet Buck when he awakens in the 25th century. Depicted from the start as a love
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    2 votes
    122
    Charlotte Braun

    Charlotte Braun

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Charlotte Braun is a long-forgotten character from Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts, who first appeared on November 30, 1954. She was originally intended as a female counterpart of the strip's protagonist, Charlie Brown (hence her self-applied nickname "Good Ol' Charlotte Braun"). This role was later taken by Sally Brown, Charlie Brown's little sister. Charlotte also bore a resemblance to Frieda, who appeared several years later. Despite the physical resemblance and similarity of the name, she bore no relation to Charlie Brown (and objected vehemently to the suggestion). In the few comic strips that she appeared in, Charlotte Braun had the trait of speaking too loudly, a trait later adopted by Lucy van Pelt, although the two characters never appeared together (she did appear with Linus). Schulz decided to abandon Charlotte Braun after only ten appearances because "he had run out of ideas" for her, and also didn't think that the character's personality was very developed. The last time she appeared was on February 1, 1955. In 2000, it became known that a fan of Peanuts had written Schulz a letter in 1955, requesting that Charlotte Braun be removed. Schulz wrote back,
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    December

    • Appeared in comic strips: Everwas
    The youngest in a venerable family of witches, December is the owner of "The Geekery", the game shop where the girls go for most of their entertainment needs. December also acts as the DM for the group's tabletop sessions, due to a near-encyclopedic knowledge of the rules of various systems.
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Little Nemo

    Little Nemo

    • Appeared in comic strips: Little Nemo in Slumberland
    Little Nemo is the main fictional character in a series of weekly comic strips by Winsor McCay that appeared in the New York Herald and William Randolph Hearst's New York American newspapers respectively from October 15, 1905 – July 23, 1911 and September 3, 1911 – July 26, 1914. The strip was first called Little Nemo in Slumberland and then In the Land of Wonderful Dreams when it changed papers. A brief revival of the original title occurred from 1924 to 1927. The original set-up of the comic revolved around the nightly dreams of a little boy named Nemo (meaning "nobody" in Latin). The purpose of his early dreams was to reach 'Slumberland', the realm of King Morpheus, who wanted him as a playmate for his daughter, Princess Camille. The last panel in each strip was always one of Nemo waking up, usually in or near his bed, and often being scolded (or comforted) by one of the grownups of the household after crying out in his sleep and waking them. In the earliest strips, the dream event that woke him up would always be some mishap or disaster that seemed about to lead to serious injury or death, such as being crushed by giant mushrooms, being turned into a monkey, falling from a
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    1 votes
    125

    Oliver Wendell Jones

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Oliver Wendell Jones is a fictional character in Bloom County, Outland and Opus, three comic strips by American cartoonist Berkeley Breathed. The genius of the bunch, he was always hacking into forbidden files with his Banana Jr. 6000 computer, and would be grounded or spanked by his father when he was caught. His father never approved of his focus on computers and once demanded he take up a more "normal activity" like football. This was not received well by him. Oliver once framed Steve Dallas for breaking into the IRS computers. His first such hacking endeavor in Bloom County occurred only days after his first introduction to the series, where he alters the print newspaper's front page of the New York Times, which has the headline, "Reagan Calls Women 'America's Most Valuable Resource'". Milo, who accompanies Oliver, immediately alters it on the basis of being "too wordy" and the final edition reads "Reagan Calls Women 'America's Li'l Dumplin's'", sparking nationwide outrage and a mass dumpling pelting attack on the White House by feminist activists but earning the administration praise from Phyllis Schlafly (the comment was based on a real comment made by Hayden Fry, the
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    126
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    127

    Violet Gray

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Violet Gray is a fictional character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. Violet has shoulder-length dark hair, and she frequently wears green dresses (switching to pants and jeans in the winter and in later years). Schulz changed her hairstyle between pigtails, a ponytail, and a bun in the early strips, but after a few years she dropped the braids and went exclusively with the ponytail, which became arguably her most famous trademark. Violet also wears front bangs. It became so rare to see her without a ponytail, in fact, that when she showed up without it on the way to school one day, Linus was startled enough to ask why she was wearing her hair down. She yelled that it was because her mother hadn't had time to comb her hair, since she was in such a hurry to go to Linus's house to play pool with his mother. Based on the character of Elizabeth Taylor in National Velvet, she only wears braids when she is wearing blue jeans. Her birthday is unofficially celebrated by Peanuts fans on June 17, as Charlie Brown and Pig-Pen attended her birthday party on that date in 1962. This appears to be a retcon; prior to 1962, earlier strips implied that her birthday was January 28 (in
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    128
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    129
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    130

    Sandy

    • Appeared in comic strips: Little Orphan Annie
    Sandy enters the story as a puppy of no particular breed whom Annie rescues from a gang of abusive boys in a January 1925 strip. She is working as a drudge in Mrs. Bottle's grocery store at the time and manages to keep him concealed briefly, but eventually relinquishes him to Paddy Lynch, a gentle man who owns a "steak joint" and is able to give Sandy a good home. Sandy is a mature dog when he suddenly and astonishingly reappears in a May 1925 strip to rescue Annie from gypsy kidnappers. Annie and Sandy remain together thereafter.
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Schroeder

    Schroeder

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. He is distinguished by his precocious skill at playing the toy piano, as well as by his love of classical music and the composer Ludwig van Beethoven in particular. Schroeder is also the catcher on Charlie Brown's baseball team, though he is always seen walking back to the mound with the baseball, never throwing it—admitting in one strip he didn't want the other team to discover his lack of ability. He is also the object of the unrequited infatuation of Lucy van Pelt, who constantly leans on Schroeder's piano. Charlie Brown, Sally Brown, Peppermint Patty, Frieda and Snoopy are also occasionally depicted as leaning on Schroeder's piano. After Linus and Snoopy, Schroeder is probably Charlie Brown's closest friend; he once angrily berated Violet for giving Charlie Brown a used valentine well after Valentine's Day had come and gone, only to be undercut when Charlie Brown eagerly accepted it. Schroeder also joined Linus in dressing down the girls (Lucy, Patty, Violet and Frieda) and Snoopy in Charlie Brown's All-Stars, when it was discovered Charlie Brown wouldn't sacrifice the
    6.67
    3 votes
    132

    Biggs

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    It's a good thing that Biggs keeps company with moral and sensible friends, as he is easily swayed and recklessly impulsive. He is a total munchkin, having repeatedly rerolled his Dexterity stat for the maximum. Biggs is an unrelentingly blind and fanatical supporter of the PlayStation brand.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Shermy

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Shermy was a character in the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles Schulz. Schulz named him after a friend from high school. When Peanuts made its debut on October 2, 1950, Shermy had the first line of dialogue in the series. As Peanuts matured, however, Shermy became an extraneous character who was used less and less frequently, until his final appearance in 1969. In a television interview, Schulz said that in the 1950 debut of the strip, it was solely Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and a few minor characters, then showed the first strip, in which the "minor characters" he spoke of were clearly Patty and Shermy. Shermy's name was first mentioned on December 18, 1950, making him the last of the original characters to have the name revealed. In Schulz's Peanuts-precursor strip Li'l Folks, a character resembling Shermy went by the name "Charlie Brown". Shermy was often portrayed as Charlie Brown's superior at the things that mattered to Charlie Brown, especially athletics. Though he spoke the only lines of dialogue in the first strip and was one of the strip's primary figures in its first few years, he was mainly utilized as a "straight man" for Charlie Brown and soon began to be eclipsed by
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    134
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    135

    Tamara Drewe

    • Appeared in comic strips: Tamara Drewe
    Tamara Drewe is a fictional character from 2010 comedy film Tamara Drewe.
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    136
    7.50
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    137

    Bobbi Harlow

    • Appeared in comic strips: Bloom County
    Bobbi Harlow is a fictional character in Berke Breathed's comic strip Bloom County. A schoolteacher, Bobbi was popular among her students, particularly Milo Bloom and Michael Binkley, who both harbored crushes on her. However, the conservative adults in the town were suspicious of her liberal, feminist views. Their suspicions turned to outrage when she brought her left-wing, radical feminist politics into the classroom, such as having the students wear gas masks in case "the fascists" (or, as the children called them "fishes") tear gassed them, throwing fake blood at "the war mongerers" ("war monkeys" in kid-speak) and teaching them about women's liberation. Bobbi originally started dating Steve Dallas, but was swept off her feet (figuratively and literally) by Cutter John. Bobbi started out as a major recurring character in the strip, but as time went on her role became more and more limited. As the strip began to focus more on children and animal characters (with the notable exception of Steve), there was less room for Bobbi. By 1983, she was gone completely, without explanation. In 1988, Bobbi was mentioned in a Sunday strip, where it was revealed that she had joined the staff
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    Honey Huan

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Honey Huan (real name Huan Ching, though it is rarely mentioned, and she is nearly always referred to as "Honey") is a fictional character in the comic strip Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau. Honey is from China, and first appeared when Uncle Duke became an ambassador there, as his assistant and translator. She had a very odd position in the government; after Chairman Mao suffered a stroke, she was the only interpreter who was (mostly) able to understand his babbling. It has been implied that the entire cultural revolution may have been caused by Honey misunderstanding Mao. After Duke returned to the states, Honey became a foreign exchange student, and came to the U.S. herself. She was roommates with J.J., and attended classes taught by Henry Kissinger. By this point she had developed feelings for Duke, and began telling people that they were involved. This was really just her own wishful thinking; Duke was more or less oblivious to her, as he was toward everything else. Although Doonesbury has a fairly rigid and reliable continuity for a humor strip, one of its most notable goofs involved Honey; when J.J. encountered her on the Trump Princess they showed no signs of having ever met
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    Olaf

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Olaf is Snoopy's brother.  He is slightly overweight compared to his brothers.
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    140
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    141

    Dolph

    • Appeared in comic strips: Wulffmorgenthaler
    Dolph also known as Dolph the Fascist Hippo is a fictional character appearing in the Danish television show Dolph og Wulff med venner (Dolph and Wulff with friends), played by Danish actor Jonas Schmidt, who is otherwise known in Denmark from another popular comedy series, P.I.S., and a longrunning series of Toyota commercials. Dolph is a large, fascist, baby-blue hippopotamus usually appearing armed with a baseball bat. He first appeared as a minor character in the Danish cartoon strip Wulffmorgenthaler, which appears daily in the newspaper Politiken, though he had already been created for the yet unaired TV-show at that point, and a very early version had appeared in the music video for the song "Oak Tree Girl" by Powersolo in early 2004, directed by Anders Morgenthaler. In 2005, the TV station DR2 aired a show based on the cartoon. Four characters appeared in the show, the two authors of the strip (Mikael Wulff and Anders Morgenthaler) plus two of its minor characters; Dolph and Margit, a feminist and politically correct squirrel. As could be expected, Dolph had a very strained relationship with the show's other characters. The show ran for 10 episodes. It quickly turned out
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    142

    Lila

    Lila was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. She was the original owner of Snoopy, before his eventual life with Charlie Brown and friends. Lila was first mentioned in the strip in the 1960s. It was revealed that she had taken Snoopy home from the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm (where he was born and raised), but was forced to return him after her family moved to an apartment building where dogs were forbidden. While she was initially an unseen character who was only recollected by Snoopy in the third person, she eventually made an appearance in the strip in 1968. In 1972 Lila appeared in the animated film Snoopy, Come Home, voiced by Johanna Baer. Seriously ill, she is unexpectedly reunited with Snoopy when he comes to visit her at a hospital in Nebraska, and now that she is recovering and will be released very soon, asks him to return to her (forcing him to choose between his "old" life with Lila or his "new" one with Charlie Brown). Finally, out of love for Lila, Snoopy chooses to return to her, but is also heartbroken over leaving Charlie Brown. However, in an ironic twist when Snoopy arrives at Lila's new apartment, Snoopy finds out (to his
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    143
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    144

    Mr. Butts

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Mr. Butts is a character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. When Mike Doonesbury was asked to create an ad campaign aimed at teenage smokers, he suffered a morality crisis, and the hallucinatory Mr. Butts was the result. An eight-foot-tall (2.5 meter) cigarette with a goofy smile, Mr. Butts is the anthropomorphic personification of the tobacco industry. Stylistically he is reminiscent of Zap Comix, as pointed out by J.J. when first described to her by Mike. At first "Buttsy" only appeared in Mike's dreams, and he took them as a sign of his morality rebelling. But Doonesbury often bends the line between fantasy and reality, and it wasn't long before Mr. Butts was being treated as a real person, interacting with other characters and even testifying before congress. Butts seems to have a very naive personality when it comes to the product he represents. He honestly can't see that there is any connection between cigarettes and cancer, and he is fully convinced that smoking will help make kids cool. He usually treats his appearances as public service announcements, addressing the audience directly to tell them "good news" about the tobacco industry. In the real world, Mr. Butts
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    1 votes
    145

    Wedge

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    Wedge is a fierce and resolute warrior with a tremendous sense of responsibility and a hatred for injustice. He carries that over to his family life, where he dotes on his wife Tina, son Spartacus, and everyone he calls friend. His unwavering courage belies an overly sensitive girliness.
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    1 votes
    146

    Joseph Joestar

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Joseph Joestar (ジョセフ・ジョースター, Josefu Jōsutā) is a fictional character created by Hirohiko Araki as the protagonist of part two, Battle Tendency, of the manga series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, which debuted in 1987. He also plays a significant role in Parts 3 and 4. In his younger days, he had black hair and muscular build, but in his older age, he wears a hat and sports a yellow shirt and khaki pants. One of his hands is synthetic, a result of his fight with Kars. Joseph is also one of the oldest human characters to appear, along with Yoshikage's father. Joseph lives in New York with his grandmother Erina and seems to have inherited the power of Ripple (波紋, Hamon), as he has a natural ability to use it. When old family friend Speedwagon is reported dead in Mexico, Joseph takes it on himself to go check it out. His curiosity is piqued when he is attacked in New York City by an old friend turned vampire. When he goes to Mexico he discovers a secret underground Nazi facility where the Nazis are trying to revive a man who seems to have been trapped in a stone pillar for 2,000 years. The Nazis are successful in awakening the man, who is christened "Santana" before he kills most of them.
    5.25
    4 votes
    147
    5.25
    4 votes
    148
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Jeff Redfern

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Jeff Redfern is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. He is the son of Joanie Caucus and Rick Redfern, and was born in December 1982 when Joanie actually went into labor during lamaze class. As a child he spent a great deal of time in daycare because both of his parents had full time jobs. Although this doesn't appear to have affected him adversely, he used to pretend it did in order to manipulate his parents. Jeff has now graduated from Walden College, unlike Zipper Harris. The two were roommates and spent all their time playing video games and coming up with crazy business plans which they hoped would allow them to get rich without having to actually do any work. Jeff is so video-game addicted, that he ceases to blink while playing, and becomes oblivious to anyone else in the room, no matter who they are or how loud they are speaking. An exception to this is that he can notice people who are delivering pizza. He rarely attended class. He also shared a crush on Alex Doonesbury with Zipper, however he backed off after Zipper pointed out that Jeff's mother (Joanie Caucus) was also Alex's grandmother, making the two of them "like kin". Indeed, Jeff's much-older half sister,
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    Kroton

    Kroton is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. He was a companion of the Eighth Doctor. The canonicity of the comic strip with respect to the television series, like other Doctor Who spin-offs, is open to interpretation. He should not be confused with the Krotons, the villains of the 1968 serial The Krotons. Kroton is a Cyberman, a member of the cybernetically augmented race that is one of the most persistent enemies of the Doctor. However, unlike other Cybermen, Kroton still retains human feelings despite undergoing cyber-conversion. Kroton first appeared in the comic strip Throwback — The Soul of a Cyberman, published in Doctor Who Weekly #5-#7 (as it then was), written by Steve Moore and drawn by Steve Dillon. In Throwback, the Cybermen invade the planet Mondaran, but continue to encounter heavy human resistance. Among the reinforcements from the Cyberman colony world Telos is Junior Cyberleader Kroton, who discovers that he sympathises with the rebels. He helps the surviving rebels escape the planet, even to the point of killing his fellow Cybermen to defend the
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Pearl

    Pearl

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Watering Hole
    Pearl the Camel is one of the recurring characters in the O'Reilly comic strip, The Watering Hole.  Pearl is someone of the old pro in the compound, she's been around for a long time, something that Ruby the Jackal is fond of pointing out.  On several occasions, it's been implied that Pearl is Jewish, since she references her childhood in Tel Aviv and is spinning a dreidel in one of the holiday strips.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Zonker Harris

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Zonker Harris (his full name is revealed in Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy to be Edgar Zonker Harris) is the stereotypical hippie character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. He made his first appearance as a perennial pot-smoking pest plaguing B.D.'s football team in 1971. He moved with Mike, B.D., and the gang to a rural commune (named Walden in homage to Thoreau's 19th century idyll). Zonker's family consists of his mother, father, "Uncle" Duke, his nephew Zipper, and his sister. His mother and father have a habit of fighting, which leads to the mother leaving for a short time to clear her head (but always returning in time to water the plants). Whenever this happens, Zonker's father becomes upset and visits Zonker, within minutes of the argument. On one occasion, Zonker's mother never actually left; his father thought she did, only to find her instead in the garden after calling his son for help. Although Zonker's sister never appears in the series, she is the mother of Zipper Harris, Zonker's nephew. Zonker's ancestors from Colonial America are mentioned several times in the series. Nathan Harris was a minuteman (who could literally be ready in one minute) as well as an
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    J. J.

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    J.J. is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. She is the daughter of Joanie Caucus, estranged from her mother for seven years after the latter left her family over differences with her husband over feminism. J.J. first appeared in the strip in 1973 while Joanie and Clinton were filing for divorce. They were reunited when she arrived at Joanie's house before attending college. In college J.J. was roommates with Honey Huan at Georgetown. J.J.'s first name, like her mother's, is Joan, although she seldom uses it. J.J. was originally a nickname for "Joan Junior". J.J. was initially engaged to Zeke Brenner, but Joanie soon set her up with Mike Doonesbury, and the two were married during the strip's hiatus. It wasn't long before the two of them began to have marital strife. J.J. had become increasingly obsessed with modern art, and seemed to think of her own husband as an accessory of her career, changing his hair and clothing to fit her artistic ideals. She also got into surreal performance art, and became increasingly detached from the real world. J.J. designed bathrooms for a local club, and this got her a commission to design them for Donald Trump's cruise ship as well. She and
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Nancy Callahan

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sin City
    Nancy Callahan is a fictional character from the graphic novel series Sin City, created by Frank Miller. She first appeared in The Hard Goodbye before becoming a more prominent character in later stories, most notably That Yellow Bastard. Nancy is an exotic dancer working at Kadie's Bar, a popular Basin City tavern populated by several key characters. She is depicted as a sensitive, caring woman who occasionally becomes involved in the town's criminal underworld. Her full history is explained in That Yellow Bastard, in which she is rescued from Roark Junior by John Hartigan and begins to mature as a woman. At the age of 11, Nancy is kidnapped by Roark Junior, a serial killer of young girls who has already claimed three victims. Hartigan, a police officer one day from retirement, defies his corrupt partner, Bob, and pursues Junior. Hartigan successfully defeats Junior's bodyguards before pursuing him to the town docks, where he shoots Junior in the ear, hand, and genitals, sending him into a coma. Suddenly, Bob appears and shoots Hartigan several times in the back, moments before the police arrive; during this time, Nancy comforts Hartigan and subsequently visits him in the
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Catbert

    Catbert

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Catbert is a fictional cat, and the "evil director of human resources" in the Dilbert comic strip. He was supposed to be a one-time character but resonated with readers so well that Adams brought him back as the HR director. An unnamed cat appeared in two 1992 strips as the companion of Dilbert's "perfect romantic match"; he or she strongly resembled the later Catbert design. The real Catbert, unnamed, first appeared in a series of comic strips from September 12 to 16, 1994, when he attacked Ratbert and rebooted Dilbert's computer before Dogbert finally kicked him out of the house. Reader response asked for "more Catbert," despite the cat never having been named, and Adams decided to bring him back as the "evil director" of human resources. Catbert appeared again on March 20, 1995, when Dogbert hired Catbert to handle downsizing (a process that leads to Alice and Wally running for the new org chart and colliding so hard while that they ended up wearing each other's clothes, backwards). With the help of his "random policy generator", he comes up with sadistic, illogical, and often evil policies to enforce on the employees, such as permanently branding employees, requiring employees
    5.67
    3 votes
    158

    Dave the Direman

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    Dave is the pinnacle of creation...the pure template from which corruption begat the rest of us wretched impotents. He is a dire man, a plus five man. Despite his obvious superiority, or perhaps because of it, he demonstrates a surprisingly resilient capacity to suffer the buffoonery of lesser men.
    5.67
    3 votes
    159

    Hobbes

    • Appeared in comic strips: Calvin and Hobbes
    Hobbes is a character in the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson. He is Calvin's stuffed tiger and best friend, and is depicted with two distinct identities. Hobbes is seen in two differentiating perspectives. The creator, Bill Watterson, clearly states it's not Calvin's imagination that makes him come to life when he's around. Calvin views him as a live tiger; as best friend. To everybody else he's a stuffed tiger. When he was captured by Susie (because he took Binky Betsy) he was very willing, it seemed to Calvin's point of view. Hobbes is often shown to be smarter and wiser than Calvin when he is pictured as a real tiger. He is seen reading more often than his owner and tries to be the voice of reason when Calvin tries to perform a risky stunt or engage in a dubious scheme. Hobbes' advice mostly has no effect on Calvin, who usually ignores Hobbes's reasoning and winds up getting in trouble for his actions. Because of this, some fans say that Hobbes represents Calvin's conscience. Hobbes is named after Thomas Hobbes, a philosopher who at times had a poor outlook on life and human nature. When Hobbes is shown to be alive, he is proud of his species and glad not to be a
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Oscar the Grouch

    Oscar the Grouch

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sesame Street
    Oscar the Grouch is a Muppet character on the television program Sesame Street. He has a green body (during the first season he was orange), has no (visible) nose (although he claims to have one), and lives in a trash can. His favorite thing in life is trash; evidence for this is the song "I Love Trash". A running theme is his compulsive hoarding of seemingly useless items. "The Grouch" aptly describes his misanthropic interaction with the other characters. His birthday, as noted by Sesame Workshop, is on June 1. Regarding his species, he is a Grouch. The character is performed by Caroll Spinney, and has been performed by him since the show's first episode. Initially, the Muppet characters on Sesame Street would not actually appear on Sesame Street itself, but be relegated to the intermediary segments. Muppets creator Jim Henson wanted them to be integrated into the series, suggesting a giant bird and creature living in the neighborhood's trash. The character was developed by Sesame Street head writer Jon Stone and Henson, based on the personality of a “magnificently rude” waiter. Based on the character outline, puppeteer Caroll Spinney was inspired by the voice of a New York City
    5.67
    3 votes
    161

    Pig-Pen

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    "Pig-Pen" is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. He is a young boy who is, except on very rare occasions, very dirty. "Pig-Pen" is a nickname, invariably written in quotation marks in the strip. In the character's first appearance on July 13, 1954, in a strip directly parodying the first chapter of Lord of the Flies, he declares, "I haven't got a name . . . People just call me things . . . Real insulting things." If he does have a real name, it is never mentioned. In a 2000 Gallup Poll "Pig-Pen" was found to be the fifth most popular Peanuts character. "Pig-Pen" is known for his perpetually filthy overalls and the cloud of dirt and dust that follows him wherever he goes. When he takes a deep breath (to sing, for example), the dust rises briefly around him. He sometimes refers to the cloud that surrounds him with pride as the dust of ancient civilizations. He cannot seem to rid himself of the dust for more than the briefest of periods--indeed, in spite of his best efforts, it appears that he cannot stay clean. He is referred to in an early strip as the only person who can get dirty while walking in a snowstorm. Nevertheless, on rare occasions he has very
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    Muriel Frost

    Muriel Frost is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. An officer in the British Army, she worked for UNIT (United Nations Intelligence Taskforce), an international organisation that defends the Earth from alien threats. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is unclear. A fiery redhead, both in hair colour and temperament, Frost was a no-nonsense and efficient UNIT operative who nonetheless had problems maintaining personal relationships. She first appeared, with the rank of Captain, in the comic strip story The Mark of Mandragora, published in DWM #169-#172, written by Dan Abnett and drawn by Lee Sullivan and Mark Farmer. Frost was working undercover and investigating Stranks, the owner of a night club suspected of selling a potent street drug called Mandrake. At the same time, the Seventh Doctor and Ace had been drawn to Earth at the close of the 20th century by the alien energy structure known as the Mandragora Helix, which the Doctor had last encountered 500 years before. When told of Frost's investigation, the Doctor pointed out
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    Snoopy

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. He is Charlie Brown's pet dog. Snoopy began his life in the strip as a fairly conventional dog, but eventually evolved into perhaps the strip's most dynamic character—and among the most recognizable comic characters in the world. The original drawings of Snoopy were "greatly patterned" after Spike, one of Schulz's childhood dogs. Snoopy, whose fictional birthday has been established as August 10, made his first appearance in the strip of October 4, 1950, two days after the strip premiered. He was first identified by name on November 10. Schulz was originally going to call him "Sniffy" (as described in the 25th anniversary book), until he discovered that name was used in a different comic strip. He changed it to "Snoopy" after remembering that his late mother Dena Schulz had commented that if their family were ever to acquire a third dog, it should be called Snoopy, an affectionate term in Norwegian (the actual term is "Snuppa"). In earlier strips it is not clear to whom Snoopy belongs. For instance, in the February 2, 1951 strip, Charlie Brown accuses Snoopy of following him, only to be
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Vaarsuvius

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Vaarsuvius is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. A high-elven wizard, Vaarsuvius' gender is intentionally unclear. Vaarsuvius, or 'V' as he/she is often called, was born to ranger parents in the Great Elven Forest. He/she was introduced to magic at an early age by a close family friend who later took Vaarsuvius on as an apprentice, a position that V filled for sixty years. His/her master, however, became concerned that, while V excelled at the academic aspects of magic, the apprentice had become too isolated from the real world and thus Vaarsuvius was sent out into the world to learn more (via a Bixby's Evicting Hand spell). Vaarsuvius decided that the best way to make a name in magic was to challenge one of the Iron Mages, a group who specialised in the artistic side of magic. One of the Mages would accept the challenge and Mage and challenger would be given an hour to research one or more spells using a given material as a component. Whoever was judged to have created the most effective and artistically pleasing set of spells would be deemed the winner. Vaarsuvius issued a challenge, with the aim of outdoing his/her opponent and thus
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    4.75
    4 votes
    168

    Joe Btfsplk

    • Appeared in comic strips: Li'l Abner
    Joe Btfsplk was a character in the satirical comic strip Li'l Abner by cartoonist Al Capp (1909–1979). He's well-meaning, but is the world's worst jinx, bringing disastrous misfortune to everyone around him. A small, dark rain cloud perpetually hovers over his head to symbolize his bad luck. Hapless Btfsplk and his ever-present cloud became one of the most iconic images in Li'l Abner. One storyline in the early 1970s features him trapping his cloud in a special anti-pollutant jar. Joe becomes romantically involved with a gal for the first time—until her crazed ex-boyfriend shows up to kill him. Joe reluctantly opens the jar and releases his cloud in order to take care of the boyfriend, and wistfully realizes that he wasn't meant for any other kind of life. As he returns to his normal, loner existence, his cloud once again in tow, he is for the moment satisfied to be who he really is. In addition to the obvious comic effect, Capp often used Joe Btfsplk as a deus ex machina to produce miraculous rescues or to effect plot twists. Joe was later licensed for use in a series of animated TV commercials for Head & Shoulders, a dandruff shampoo. According to Al Capp, btfsplk is a rude
    7.00
    1 votes
    169

    Stacy Townsend

    Stacy Townsend, or simply Stacy, is a fictional character in the Radio Times comic strips based upon the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. The Eighth Doctor first met her in the comic strip Dreadnought by Gary Russell, and she went on to become one of his companions. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-offs, is unclear. Stacy was born in 2220. In 2246, at the age of 26, her ship, the Dreadnought came under attack from the Cybermen. The Eighth Doctor, having left Sam Jones at a Greenpeace rally, responded to the Dreadnought's distress call and defeated the Cybermen, but not in time to save the ship's crew, except Stacy. She then joined him in his travels. Although the Doctor was supposed to (and did) pick Sam up after an hour had elapsed for her, he took three years to eventually get back. With Stacy, the TARDIS materialised on Mars in 3998. There, she met an Ice Warrior named Ssard, who subsequently also joined her and the Doctor in the TARDIS. The stories featuring the Eighth Doctor, Stacy and Ssard were terminated prematurely due to a change of management at the Radio Times, resulting in the hurried two-part final story Coda being
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    Eliana

    • Appeared in comic strips: Everwas
    Versatile and adaptable, Eliana's personality can change from playful and flirty to compassionate or stern, as needed. Similarly, her varied taste in games includes everything from MMOs to FPSes; however, her interest in tabletop RPGs has waned, despite Xerise's constant efforts (by begging, pleading or whining) to bring her back to the table.
    5.33
    3 votes
    171

    Johnny Joestar

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Johnny Joestar (ジョニィ・ジョースター, Jonyi Jōsutā), birth name Jonathan Joestar (ジョナサン・ジョースター, Jonasan Jōsutā), is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. In Steel Ball Run's alternate universe version of the world, he takes the place of Jonathan Joestar. He is a paraplegic, and is usually seen wearing a hat with a horse shoe decoration on the front. He is the main character of this series alongside Gyro Zeppeli. Johnny Joestar, born Jonathan Joestar and also known as "Joe Kid" or "JoJo", was a racing prodigy. However, when waiting in line for a play, the girl he was with convinced him to cut to the front of the line and bribe the bouncers to throw out the youth in the front of the line, who had been waiting through the night. The youth shot Johnny, resulting in his being paralyzed from the waist down and sent to a hospital, where he was physically abused. Having lost all the friends and respect he had earned as a jockey, no one visited him during his stay in the hospital. Near the beginning of the series Steel Ball Run, Johnny Joestar encountered Gyro Zeppeli and was brought to his feet upon touching Gyro's steel ball. Believing Gyro to be capable of
    5.33
    3 votes
    172

    Scot Sloan

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Reverend Scot Sloan is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. He was first introduced in January 1972, just before most of the major characters went to live on Walden Commune. He had been described by a magazine article as "The fighting young priest who can talk to the young", and this went straight to his head. He constantly parroted this quote to anyone who would listen. Ironically, this caused him to be seen as out of touch by the other characters, and he seemed completely incapable of inspiring anything other than sarcastic scorn, bemused confusion, or annoyed resignation amongst them. Over time his character was broadened, and he became a better influence. Sloan has fairly liberal beliefs, and takes seriously his job as a minister. He is often the first to point out and condemn any corruption or hypocrisy he perceives in religious issues, and as such is a positive example of what Garry Trudeau thinks a priest should be; he puts faith and humanity first, and has little patience for dogma or self-righteousness. For example, he supported Joe Lieberman in 2000 because he was a man of God, even though he is Jewish and Sloan is Christian. When Joanie Caucus was introduced, Scot
    5.33
    3 votes
    173

    Victorian Dad

    Victorian Dad is a character in the British comic Viz. First appearing in Viz in the 1990s, Victorian Dad lives in the contemporary age but dresses and acts like a parody of a stereotypical gentleman of the Victorian era. He has a large top hat, always wears a suit, and sports a walrus moustache and monocle. According to Viz editor Chris Donald, Victorian Dad is similar to his creator Graham Dury because Dury himself is actually a puritan. Victorian Dad's first name is given by his wife as Lupin in one episode, and the family name is revealed to be Pooter in another, presumably taken from the name of one of the central characters in the satirical Victorian novel Diary of a Nobody by George and Weedon Grossmith. He is married with a young son and daughter, and an older married daughter. The rest of his family do not share his conservative, prudish beliefs, which usually results in misery for them. For example, Victorian Dad once reacted with fury and horror when he realised his daughter was left handed, based on the old belief that left handed people were somehow evil. On another occasion, he threw his grown up daughter, who was married three years previously, out of the house
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    4.50
    4 votes
    175

    Alice

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Alice is an engineer from the Dilbert comic strip. She is one of Dilbert's co-workers in the department. She has long curly hair, which transformed into a large and distinctive triangular hairstyle when the character became a regular. Her character was based on a former colleague of cartoonist Scott Adams. Before Alice became a fictional regular character, there were a variety of generic fluffy haired women at Dilbert's Company. Many of them had bit parts and were only used one or two times. The name Alice was used at least once, in a series of strips where she was forced to give birth at the office. Some of these characters had personalities very similar to the later Alice; these characters eventually disappeared when Alice began to be featured regularly. Like the Pointy-Haired Boss, Alice's hairstyle became more distinct over time. More recent female bit parts have smooth, semicircle hair. The first time that Alice could be seen with her typical pink suit and curly triangle hair was on August 25, 1992. In the summer of 2010, Alice's regular work uniform changed from her trademark pink suit to a white turtleneck and a black skirt. Alice is generally depicted as being one of the
    6.00
    2 votes
    176
    6.00
    2 votes
    177

    Helen Moynihan

    • Appeared in comic strips: Squishy Comics
    Helen Moynihan is too good for Squishy Comics. Despite her obvious brilliance, she has serious doubts about her self-worth. She graduated from Brown University at 18, but found it hard to gain recognition in an industry now flooded with computer science majors. After nearly a decade of bouncing from one IT job to the next, Helen found herself broke, alone, and in the middle of both an unfamiliar city and a near-suicidal depression. It was at this lowest point in her life that she stumbled upon Squishy Comics, and found the prospects of working there slightly more appealing than self-termination. She cares about her coworkers, and her coworkers try their damnedest to keep her from abandoning them for bigger and better things.
    6.00
    2 votes
    178

    Huey Freeman

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Boondocks
    Huey Freeman is a fictional character of The Boondocks syndicated comic strip written by Aaron McGruder, as well as the protagonist and recurrent principal narrator of the animated TV series of the same name. Politically sapient and borderline militant, Huey, being a self-described revolutionary left-wing radical, regularly reflects upon current events as well as the plight of African Americans as it relates to a greater American society. Huey's character has often been described as "misanthropic," and "cynical," as often presented in his pessimistic personality. He is named after Huey P. Newton, one of the co-founders and leaders of the Black Panther Party. He is voiced by actress Regina King. Huey, who grew up with his younger brother Riley (also voiced by King) on the south side of Chicago, was moved along with his brother to the peaceful, predominately white Baltimore-suburb of Woodcrest, Maryland by their Granddad. It strongly suggested that Huey and Riley's birth parents are deceased. This is, in part, based on Robert's dialogue from the first episode stating that he spent the boys' "inheritance" on their new house in Woodcrest. Huey is a highly intelligent ten-year-old who
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
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    2 votes
    180
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    2 votes
    181
    5.00
    3 votes
    182
    Olive Oyl

    Olive Oyl

    • Appeared in comic strips: Popeye
    Olive Oyl is a cartoon character created by Elzie Crisler Segar in 1919 for his comic strip Thimble Theatre. The strip was later renamed Popeye after the sailor character that became the most popular member of the cast; however Olive Oyl was a main character for 10 years before Popeye's 1929 appearance. In the strip as written by Segar, Olive was something of a coy flapper whose extremely thin build lent itself well to the fashions of the time; her long black hair was usually rolled in a neat bun, like her mother's. She was the more-or-less fiancée of Harold Hamgravy, a "lounge lizard" or slacker type who did as little work as possible and was always borrowing money. His attraction to other women—particularly if they were rich—naturally incensed Olive, and she once succumbed to a fit of "lunaphobia" (a kind of angry madness) over one of his amours. (When she recovered, she continued to pretend to have the disorder to win him back.) She was not immune to flattery from other men, but remained committed to Ham until Popeye's appearance. The two did not fall in love at once (her first words to him were "Take your hooks offa me or I'll lay ya in a scupper"), but instead fought bitterly
    5.00
    3 votes
    183

    Jonathan Joestar

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Jonathan Joestar (ジョナサン・ジョースター, Jonasan Jōsutā) is a fictional character created by Hirohiko Araki as the protagonist and hero of part one, Phantom Blood, of the manga series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, which debuted in 1987. He is the son of the wealthy George Joestar. He is an honest, kind and positive young man whose life is fraught with tragedy. As an infant, his mother died in a carriage accident. That same accident indirectly brought Dio Brando into his life, because Dario, Dio's father, unwittingly saved Jonathan's father while he was preparing to steal from the wrecked carriage. Twelve years later, Dario apparently died of an illness and Dio went to the Joestars. Dio, despite Jonathan trying to be friends with him, would become his nemesis both as a childhood rival and as an undead enemy. At the age of 12, when Dio came into his life, he meets and falls in love with Erina Pendleton. However, Dio shatters this relationship by kissing Erina in front of everyone and boasting about it. Dio continues to torment Jonathan and later kills his dog, Danny, by burning it alive. Nonetheless, Jonathan is able to maintain his sanity and his studies in archaeology. Among his interests is
    5.50
    2 votes
    184
    6.00
    1 votes
    185

    Beep the Meep

    Beep the Meep is a fictional alien who appeared in the Doctor Who Weekly comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The cute and cuddly appearance of Beep the Meep — a round, furry biped with large, expressive eyes and long ears — belies his true nature as a malevolent, homicidal would-be conqueror and dictator. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is open to interpretation. Beep first appeared in the comic strip Doctor Who and the Star Beast, written by Pat Mills and John Wagner and drawn by Dave Gibbons, which ran in issues #19-#26 of Doctor Who Weekly. The Meeps were an advanced and peaceful race, who lived in harmony and happiness until their natures were radically altered by their planet's orbit passing close to the Black Sun. The radiation from the black star mutated them into an aggressive, expansionist species who began to mercilessly conquer and subjugate other planets. Eventually, the Star Council authorized the use of the Wrarth Warriors, a genetically engineered insectoid race who acted as interstellar law enforcers. The war against the Meeps came to an end with the destruction of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    186

    Caspar Milquetoast

    Caspar Milquetoast was a comic strip character created by H. T. Webster for his cartoon series, The Timid Soul. In 1912, Webster drew a daily panel for the New York Tribune, under a variety of titles—Our Boyhood Ambitions, Life's Darkest Moment, The Unseen Audience. In 1924, Webster moved to the New York World and soon after added The Timid Soul featuring the wimpy Caspar Milquetoast. Webster described Caspar Milquetoast as "the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick". In 1927, Webster trained himself to draw left-handed in three months after a severe case of arthritis impaired the use of his right hand. In 1931, the World folded, and that same year, Simon & Schuster published a collection of The Timid Soul reprints. Webster then went back to the Tribune, where he launched a Timid Soul Sunday strip. He alternated his various features throughout the week: Caspar Milquetoast was seen on both Sunday and Monday. Webster continued to produce this syndicated panel until his death in 1952, after which his assistant Herb Roth carried it on for another year. The character's name is a deliberate misspelling of the name of a bland and fairly inoffensive food, milk toast. Milk
    6.00
    1 votes
    187

    Eurydice

    • Appeared in comic strips: Everwas
    Fiery and easily angered, Eurydice loves any activity that involves hurting people, whether it's in the physical world or a game. Her only soft spot is her sister Rissa - especially her cooking. Forget sending her flowers; she'd rather have a flaming greatsword any day.
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    188
    Kite-Eating Tree

    Kite-Eating Tree

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    The Kite-Eating Tree is a fictional tree featured in the comic strip Peanuts created by Charles M. Schulz. A Kite-Eating Tree is a deciduous tree of indeterminate type, once referred to as a "Kiteus Eatemupus". According to Charlie Brown, it is impossible to tell a kite-eating tree from non-kite-eating trees by sight until it catches a kite in its branches, which it slowly devours. Charlie Brown often envisioned such a tree with a huge grin on its "face". Many of the kites that Charlie Brown attempted to fly were eaten by a particular Kite-Eating Tree, which he frequently engaged in one-sided dialogue. Once Lucy van Pelt threw Schroeder's piano into the Kite-Eating Tree, which it also ate, proving that the phenomenon was not simply a product of Charlie Brown's imagination. Besides being able to eat inedible objects, the Kite-Eating Tree has some other strange characteristics. It is apparently not rooted to the ground, seeing as on one occasion it walked straight up to Charlie Brown's front door, which Charlie Brown says that he hates. Apparently the Kite-Eating Tree can even distinguish between different "flavors" of kites; in a 1982 strip, Charlie Brown wonders what "flavor" kite
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    189
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    190

    Rex

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Rex is the son of Bob and Dawn the Dinosaurs in the Dilbert comic strip
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    191
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    192
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    193

    Alice

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Alice P. Schwarzman is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. She was first seen in a series of strips in the 1970s, during which Zonker Harris was working behind a bar. His most regular customer was Alice, a poor garment worker who could barely afford food and who continually mistook Zonker's name for "Bonker". Her character was later recast as a homeless woman living on the streets of Washington, D.C. She was first found by Uncle Duke (who she mistakenly called "Duck"), and later Rick Redfern encountered her while doing a report on the homeless. Redfern spent some time studying her way of life. Shortly after, he saved her from dying of exposure after he was unable to find her. He badgered the police (who didn't seem to consider her disappearance "their problem") and finally had her found and brought to a hospital. Alice was Garry Trudeau's way of personifying the destitute of America, allowing him to tackle the delicate issue of poverty with grace and sensitivity. She has maintained a major presence in the strip for years. Alice eventually married Crazy Elmont, simply so that they could get moved up the list in order to get an apartment. The two obviously care for each other
    5.00
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    194

    B. D.

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    B.D. is a fictional character in Garry Trudeau's popular comic strip Doonesbury. In the comic strip, nobody is certain what "B.D." is short for (he gives his last name as "D"), but he was based on Brian Dowling, quarterback at Yale University, where Trudeau attended college. In the stage adaptation of the strip, Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy, his full name was revealed to be Brian John Dowling (that of his real life namesake). B.D. was first introduced on September 30, 1968, in Trudeau's strip "Bull Tales" in the Yale Daily News. At the time, B.D.'s helmet was white, with a block letter "Y" for Yale. B.D. was reintroduced in the first Doonesbury strip in 1970 in which the popular quarterback became roommate to the nerdy, awkward Mike Doonesbury at Walden College. At Walden, B.D. wore a football helmet with a star on the side, replacing the Yale "Y". Mike and B.D. had many differences and initially could not stand each other. As captain of the Walden football team, B.D. faced many tests of his short patience. His teammates could rarely keep their minds on the game, opting to have intense philosophical and political discussions during huddle. This became much worse when self-described
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    195

    Dan Dare

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future
    Dan Dare is a British science fiction comic hero, created by illustrator Frank Hampson who also wrote the first stories, that is, the Venus and Red Moon stories, and a complete storyline for Operation Saturn. Dare appeared in the Eagle comic story Dan Dare, Pilot of the Future in 1950, dramatised seven times a week on Radio Luxembourg. The stories were set in the late 1990s but the dialogue and manner of the characters is reminiscent of British war films of the 1950s. Dan Dare has been described as "Biggles in Space" and as the British equivalent of Buck Rogers. Dan Dare was distinguished by its long, complex storylines, snappy dialogue and meticulously illustrated comic-strip artwork by Hampson and other artists, including Harold Johns, Don Harley, Bruce Cornwell, Greta Tomlinson, Frank Bellamy and Keith Watson. The most recent mainstream story was a Dan Dare mini-series published by Virgin Comics. It was written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Gary Erskine and is a completely new and somewhat darker interpretation of Dan Dare. Since October 2003, however, Dare's adventures have also continued in Spaceship Away, a specialist magazine created by Rod Barzilay by agreement with the
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    196
    Nermel

    Nermel

    • Appeared in comic strips: Garfield
    cute, energetic but annoying. Why does Nermel always want to replace Garfield?
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    197
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    198
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    199

    Rick Redfern

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Rick Redfern is a character in the comics strip Doonesbury. He worked as a reporter for the Washington Post, where he often reported on the antics of the president and his associates. Rick is a very upstanding journalist who takes his job seriously and desperately wants to break a big news story. Rick met his wife Joanie Caucus when she was working for Ginny Slade's unsuccessful congressional bid. They went out and, in a very daring and controversial move for a seventies strip, were shown in bed together shortly afterward. Eventually they married, and gave birth to Jeff Redfern. Rick often appears in conjunction with Mark Slackmeyer and Roland Hedley, particularly when attending White House press conferences. Between the three of them they represent the three major forms of journalism (print, radio and television) and are often sent to cover the same stories. Of the three, Rick is usually the most level-headed and reasonable, as Mark has a liberal bias, and Roland is a total sensationalist. Although Roland treats him with a rather condescending attitude because he is a print journalist, Rick has nevertheless broken some reasonably big stories, including a drug scandal among the
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    200

    Tentacleye

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    Tentacleye is a symbiotic parasite who assists Vawce in his skulduggery. Tentacleye's penetratingly keen insight and sparkling personality is rendered useless by the fact that it's mute (has no mouth), but it accepts this irony with equanimity.
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    201
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    202

    Wally

    • Appeared in comic strips: Dilbert
    Wally is a fictional character from the Dilbert comic strip. He is characterized as an employee so deeply jaded that instead of doing any real work, he spends all his time and effort successfully gaming the system. Wally was inspired by a coworker of creator Scott Adams at Pacific Bell. In Seven Years of Highly Defective People and What Would Wally Do, Adams explained that his co-worker at Pacific Bell had made a bad judgment call, so management froze him at his position and pay scale rather than fire him. Then Pacific Bell started offering a generous severance package for the lowest ten-percent of workers, so the coworker, knowing management had hinted that he should leave the company and knowing it was better to leave with money than without, had an incentive to become a low performing worker. Adams was inspired by this co-worker's serious dedication toward this goal, and the concept of a completely shameless employee with no sense of loyalty became Wally. Another co-worker of Adams provided the inspiration for the "Wally Report" (see below). In early strips, there were characters who resembled Wally in appearance and had bit parts, not unlike Ted the Generic Guy. Some of the
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    203

    Woodstock

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. He is Snoopy's closest friend and, after Snoopy, the most recognized non-human in the strip. Snoopy began befriending birds in the early 1960s, when they started using his doghouse for various purposes: a rest stop during migrations, a nesting site, or a place to play cards. None of these birds were ever given names, or even used speech balloons; they simply looked at Snoopy and he understood them. What set Woodstock apart from all these earlier birds was the fact that he attached himself to Snoopy and assumed the role of Snoopy's sidekick and assistant. There had been no recurring relationships between Snoopy and the earlier birds who visited the yard of the Brown family, and Snoopy was as often as not more hostile than friendly toward those birds. But, in the April 4, 1967, Peanuts daily comic strip, a single bird flew in after a long flight while Snoopy was lying on top of his dog house. He chose Snoopy's nose as a good place to rest, and Snoopy uncharacteristically accepted this intrusion. Over the next two days, Charles Schulz began to establish character traits for Snoopy's new friend by revealing
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    204

    Captain Pugwash

    • Appeared in comic strips: Captain Pugwash
    Captain Pugwash is a fictional pirate in a series of British children's comic strips and books created by John Ryan. The character's adventures were adapted into a TV series, using cardboard cut-outs filmed in live-action (the first series was performed and broadcast live), also called Captain Pugwash, first shown on the BBC in 1957, a later colour series, first shown in 1974–75, and a traditional animation series, The Adventures of Captain Pugwash, first aired in 1998. The eponymous hero – Captain Horatio Pugwash – sails the high seas in his ship called the Black Pig, ably assisted by cabin boy Tom, pirates Willy and Barnabas, and Master Mate. His mortal enemy is Cut-Throat Jake, captain of the Flying Dustman. Captain Horatio Pugwash made his debut in a comic-strip format in the first issue of The Eagle in 1950, then appeared regularly as a strip in Radio Times. In 1957 the BBC commissioned a series of short cartoon films produced by Gordon Murray. Ryan produced a total of 86 five-minute-long episodes for the BBC, shot in black-and-white film, but later transferring to colour. Ryan used a real-time technique of animation in which cardboard cutouts of the characters were laid on
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    205

    Cecilia

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Watering Hole
    Cecilia is a character in the O'Reilly comic strip "The Watering Hole"  She is based on the the cow from the O'Reilly 'C' programming language books.
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    206
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    207

    Miho

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sin City
    Miho (ミホ) is a character in Frank Miller's Sin City graphic novel series. In the film adaptation of Sin City, she is portrayed by Devon Aoki, who is expected to reprise this role in Sin City 2. Miho is a mute female assassin of Japanese descent (Miho is easily offended by anti-Japanese racial slurs, such as "Jap slut" and "Jap slag"; in response, she behaves in an even more sadistic way than she normally does). Along with Gail, she serves as an enforcer and defender of the city's Old Town. She is often referred to as "Deadly Little Miho" by the character Dwight McCarthy in his narrations. Despite residing in Old Town, there is nothing to suggest that she herself is a prostitute (contrary to the opinion expressed by some film critics such as Andrew Sarris and Ty Burr, as well as by IGN). Much of Miho's past remains a mystery. Three years before the events of A Dame To Kill For, she was saved by Dwight during an attack by Tong gangsters. As Dwight himself explains to Goldie and Wendy, "three of the Tong who attacked Miho were dead by her hand. But the last two had her dead to rights. Point blank range." Because of this incident, she owes a debt of honor to Dwight. Subsequently,
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    208

    Steve Dallas

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Steve Dallas is a fictional character in the American comic strips of Berke Breathed, most famously Bloom County in the 1980s. He was first introduced as an obnoxious frat boy in the college strip The Academia Waltz, which ran in the University of Texas's Daily Texan during 1978 and 1979. Steve then reappears in Bloom County after graduation as a self-employed, unscrupulous lawyer. He was the first character to have been featured in all four of Breathed's comic strips. He appeared regularly, albeit much older, in the Sunday-only Opus. In the early days of Bloom County, Steve was usually seen hitting on schoolteacher Bobbi Harlow, whom he briefly dated and failed to ever woo back once she left him for Cutter John. He frequently dated Bobbi's dimwitted cousin, Quiche Loraine, to make her jealous (the plan did not work). Most residents of Bloom County, especially women, either despised him or indifferently tolerated his presence. The one exception was Opus the Penguin, who idolized him and tagged along with him like a younger brother. Steve often used Opus' hero worship to manipulate the hapless penguin into doing his dirty work (although occasionally Steve was heard to have
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    209
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    210

    Destrii

    Destrii, or to give her full title, the Primatrix Destriianatos, is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. She was a companion of the Eighth Doctor. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is open to interpretation. Destrii is an amphibious humanoid with scaly skin, claws and a face resembling that of a fish. She first appears in Ophidius, which ran in issues #300-#303 of DWM, written by Scott Gray and drawn by Martin Geraghty and Robin Smith. The Doctor and Izzy encounter her inside the gargantuan snake-like spacecraft known as Ophidius, which has swallowed the TARDIS. She is extremely agile, shows remarkable combat abilities and has a knowledge of Earth popular culture, but is also initially unprincipled and quick to violence. Destrii has survived on her own inside the belly of Ophidius for quite a while, and is being pursued by the aliens that control the world-snake. To evade pursuit, she tricks Izzy into using a machine which places their minds in each others' bodies. Destrii tries to pose as Izzy and escape with the Doctor in the
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    211

    Haley Starshine

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Order of the Stick
    Haley Starshine is a major character in the webcomic The Order of the Stick, written by Rich Burlew. She is a 26-year-old red-haired human rogue. Few details have yet emerged about Haley's childhood. What is known is that she is the daughter of First Edition thief Ian Starshine and his partner Mia and that, at the age of 15, she was a goth, referring to herself as "Dark Mistress Shadowgale". She stated that she grew up in Greysky City, a town full of criminals. On one occasion she lamented that all good people (her mother and the names Kyran and Rachel were mentioned) in her life left her when they found out what she was really like and that she must thus conceal her true nature. She joined the Thieves' Guild of Greysky City at the age of 17, her father having given them special permission to train her. Her skills developed quickly and she became a favourite of Guildmaster Bozzok, who considered her to be one of his best earners - as well he might, given that the Guild automatically took half of any take, then added on as many fees as possible, so that Haley's earnings after stealing a diamond worth six thousand gold pieces eventually amounted to the princely sum of fifty-eight
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    212

    Lacey Davenport

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Lacey Davenport is a fictional character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. She is often said to be based on Millicent Fenwick, a Republican member of Congress from New Jersey, although Trudeau has denied this link. She and Dick Davenport, her husband, were first introduced as attendees at a Walden College Alumni Reunion in 1974. The two had been "living in sin" for decades, and finally decided to get married. Lacey later became a major character when she ran as the Republican candidate for a seat in the United States House of Representatives in the mid-1970s, serving a district comprising the San Francisco Bay Area. Her opponents in the election were Virginia "Ginny" Slade, who ran as an independent, and the incumbent, Congressman Ventura, the Democratic nominee. For a while the race was close, but with Lacey and Ginny fighting over votes, their mutual opponent (whom they both found to be highly immoral) was unifying his support and coming out ahead. Deciding that anything was better than having him win, and that Lacey was more qualified than herself, Ginny dropped out of the race and supported Lacey, who won. Lacey was challenged again for her seat in Congress in 1986 by
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    213

    Linus van Pelt

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Linus van Pelt is a character in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. The best friend of Charlie Brown, Linus is also the younger brother of Lucy van Pelt and older brother of Rerun van Pelt. He first appeared on September 19, 1952; however, he was not mentioned by name until three days later. He was first referenced two months earlier, on July 14. Linus spoke his first words in 1954, the same year he was shown with his security blanket. On the various specials, Christopher Shea first voiced Linus van Pelt in 1965. His younger brother, Stephen, voiced Linus from 1971 until 1975. Various actors (among them Jeremy Miller of Growing Pains fame) have played Linus since then. Also, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit star B.D. Wong portrayed Linus in the Broadway revival of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. He was played by Colton Haynes in FunnyOrDie's "Charlie Brown: Blockhead's Revenge. Though young, Linus is unusually smart, and he acts as the strip's philosopher and theologian, often quoting the Gospels. He invented his own legendary being, the Great Pumpkin, who, Linus claims, appears every Halloween at the most "sincere" pumpkin patch, bearing gifts. Linus is the only one who
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    214
    Moominpappa

    Moominpappa

    • Appeared in comic strips: Moomin
    Moominpappa (Muminpappan, i.e. "The Moomin Dad") - is a character in the Moomin series of books by Finnish author Tove Jansson. Orphaned in his youth, Moominpappa is a somewhat restless soul who left the orphanage to venture out into the world but has now settled down, determined to be a responsible father to his family: his wife Moominmamma and their son Moomintroll. He has slightly aristocratic and bohemian leanings, and is inexplicably drawn to the sea. He is almost always wearing his black top-hat, inside which is painted, "M.P. from your M.M." to differentiate it from all the other top hats in the world. Moominpappa also lived on a ship with three Hattifatteners for a few days, observing their behaviour. According to his family, he writes down all of his adventues in a book called "Memoirs". He once commented that because so many adventures happen to him, he might never finish the book. According to Moomintroll, he can fix anything if he is able to get around to it.
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    215

    Oliver "Daddy" Warbucks

    • Appeared in comic strips: Little Orphan Annie
    Lieutenant General Oliver "Daddy" Warbucks is a fictional character from the comic strip Little Orphan Annie. He first appeared in the Annie strip on September 27, 1924. His age in the series is around 52 years old. Warbucks was born about 1894, near the small town of Supine. (In the 1982 film, he says he was born in Liverpool.) His father, a section boss on the railroad, was killed when he was a month old. His mother was left with only "gumption" and a house in which she was able to keep boarders. His early youth in Supine involved cornering all the marbles in town at age nine, serving as a messenger for the telegraph company, having a girlfriend named Millie, fishing, swimming and raiding melon patches with Spike Spangle and beating up the son of the banker who planned to foreclose on his mother's house. Then on June 7, 1905 when he was 11 years old, his mother died at age 30, of typhoid. On the night of the funeral he was put on the outbound Limited. Presumably he later spent some time in the city for he and Paddy Cairns were companions together in the old 8th Ward. For a few semesters he attended college studying engineering but found no time for football or girls because he
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    216

    Pwt

    • Appeared in comic strips: Kokopelli & Company
    Pwt is a character who appears solely in the magazine Muse, which is published by Smithsonian. Pwt is the muse of animals, in the same way that Urania is the muse of astronomy, or Crraw is the muse of bad poetry. This is not bias; Muse refers to Crraw's poetry specifically as bad poetry. Pwt is in a constant battle to catch Crraw, for reasons only known by Pwt and a select few devoted Muse readers. In order to accomplish this, Pwt is typically seen carrying a large net. Pwt has not been referred to as male or female since the November/December issue in 2005, so his/her gender is up in the air. Pwt wears a skirt, which may be a tip-off of being female, but Kokopelli also wears one, and he's a boy. Also, Pwt wears a shirt-like thing that covers what any bathing suit would cover on a girl, but would be rather useless on a boy except for decoration. However, only a boy would be single-minded enough to continue to chase Crraw after he succeeds in getting away so many times. Still, it's different for fictional characters.
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    217
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    218

    Spider-Man

    Spider-Man is a fictional character, a comic book superhero who appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko, he first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962). Lee and Ditko conceived the character as an orphan being raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben, and as a teenager, having to deal with the normal struggles of adolescence in addition to those of a costumed crimefighter. Spider-Man's creators gave him super strength and agility, the ability to cling to most surfaces, shoot spider-webs using devices of his own invention which he called "web-shooters", and react to danger quickly with his "spider-sense", enabling him to combat his foes. When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, a teenage high school student and person behind Spider-Man's secret identity to whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate. Unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man did not benefit from
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    219
    Giorno Giovana

    Giorno Giovana

    • Appeared in comic strips: JoJo's Bizarre Adventure
    Giorno Giovanna (ジョルノ・ジョバァーナ, Joruno Jobāna) is a fictional character from the Japanese manga JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. Giorno is the main hero of Part 5. He is the son of the main villain of the series, Dio Brando. Born Haruno Shiobana (汐華 初流乃, Shiobana Haruno), Giorno is the son of Dio (fathered using Jonathan Joestar's body, which logically that would make him part of the Joestar family) and a Japanese woman. As a young child his mother remarried to an Italian man, and they moved to Italy; hence Haruno Shiobana became Giorno Giovana. Giorno's great ambition in life is to become a mafia boss (a "Gang Star"), and as such he eventually joins the mob squad Passione. Though he is its youngest and newest member, he quickly proves his mettle and eventually becomes the de facto leader of the group. Unlike typical mafia bosses, he wanted to give divested riches to the poor, giving him an agenda similar to Robin Hood. He eventually influences all of Passione except their Boss, who later became their worst enemy. Gold Experience - A golden stand capable of changing inorganic objects into living organisms. In the beginning of Part 5, Giorno frequently produces small life forms (frogs,
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    220

    Calvin

    • Appeared in comic strips: Calvin and Hobbes
    Calvin is a fictional character, and one of the two principal characters in the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson. Calvin demonstrates a level of wisdom, vocabulary and humor unusual for a six year-old boy. However, in many ways he is typical for his age: he absolutely hates baths, and fears and hates his babysitter, refuses to go to school, always disobeys his parents 24/7, and is lazy, very tired and selfish. Calvin is also a Creator Curator, and frequently loses himself in various fantastical worlds of his own imagining. On the rare occasions on which he applies himself, Calvin's projects in school are very well received, to his confusion or indifference. He shows relatively minor interest or success in interacting with any "real" characters, choosing instead to spend the majority of his time with Hobbes, with whom he frequently embarks on imaginary adventures, debates philosophical issues, plots various pranks against girls, and fights. Calvin appeared in almost every Calvin and Hobbes strip printed and published. Named after 16th century theologian John Calvin, the character of Calvin is presented as being intelligent and verbose, with an imagination that usually
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    221

    Garfield

    • Appeared in comic strips: Garfield
    Garfield is a fictional character and the title protagonist from the comic strip Garfield created by Jim Davis. Garfield was born June 19, 1978, in the kitchen of Mamma Leoni's Italian Restaurant and loved Lasagna the day he was born. Ever since then, it has always been his favorite food. According to his grandfather, he was born five pounds six ounces (2.4 kg). (He was out of town at the time, and when Garfield asks how, his grandfather said he heard the scream), surprisingly enough, he managed to fit in a tiny bed. Later in his life, Garfield accidentally runs across his mother again one Christmas Eve, and meets his other grandfather for the first time. On June 18, 1978, when Jon came to the store, he had to choose between Garfield, an iguana, and a pet rock. In his cartoon appearances, Garfield usually causes mischief in every episode. In June 1983, comic strips introduced Amoeba Man, one of Garfield's alter-egos, yet he was only shown in six strips (June 20–25). In February 2010, another alter ego was introduced called Super Garfield, and his sidekick Odieboy (Odie). Amoeba Man, and Super Garfield are only two of his few imaginary alter egos though, his most common one being
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    222
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    223

    Mark Slackmeyer

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Mark Sheldon Slackmeyer is a character in the comic strip Doonesbury. Mark starts out as a radical at Walden College, and leads several peace rallies (in his first appearance, he referred to himself as "'Megaphone' Mark Slackmeyer"). The character was initially modeled after Mark Rudd, then in the news as a leader of Columbia University's student protests of 1968. Mark seized the office of Walden's President King twice (he considers the first time a failure as President King was far too cooperative), and in 1972 took a cross-country trip with Michael Doonesbury to Washington, and eventually to that year's Republican National Convention in Miami, Florida. Mark gives up his radical ideas and becomes the radio personality at Walden, going by the moniker "'Marvelous' Mark". His father, Phil Slackmeyer, goes to the college for a reunion, and is astounded that his son is taking fewer business classes so he can become a radio man. However, Mark has never really cared about his father's positions on things (having referred to his father as a "fascist" in early strips). They have always simply agreed to disagree. After graduating (in Doonesbury: A Musical Comedy, where his full name is
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    224

    Rissa

    • Appeared in comic strips: Everwas
    Rissa, Eurydice's sister,  would happily receive flowers - still in their pot, of course, and with a goodly supply of fertilizer. Gardening and baking are her favorite pastimes, when she's not gaming with the other girls. Gentle and motherly, she tends to play healers or support classes, and prefers cooperation over competition.
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    227
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    228

    Bamse

    Bamse – Världens starkaste björn ("The world's strongest bear") is a Swedish cartoon created by Rune Andréasson. The highly popular children's cartoon first emerged as a series of television short films as well as a weekly half page Sunday strip in 1966, before being published periodically in its own comic magazine since 1973. Andréasson did all the artwork himself until 1975 and wrote all comics until 1990. Francisco Tora did all the illustrations from 1976 until he was joined by Bo Michanek in 1983. In the early 1990s several new writers and illustrators were hired, including Claes Reimerthi and Tony Cronstam. Andréasson continued to do the magazine cover illustrations until 1992. The series somewhat changed direction when Bamse had children, specifically triplets, in 1982. In 1986 he had a fourth child, Lille Skutt having one at the same time. Family life is now in focus, and here also the basic values shine through, like that of gender equality. In 1989 Skalman noticed that Bamse's fourth child Brumma had a mental disability, later defined as Asperger's syndrome, which again brought up the subject of equality. The children did develop in real-time within the magazine, but seem
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    229

    Bianca Darksomething

    • Appeared in comic strips: Squishy Comics
    Despite being a succubus from the dark infernal nether regions, Bianca is a sweet girl. She joined Squishy after being accidentally summoned by Dave. Her whole purpose now in life is to make him happy by fulfilling his every wish...which she does by being the best secretary possible.
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    230
    Big Bird

    Big Bird

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sesame Street
    Big Bird is a protagonist of the children's television show Sesame Street. Officially performed by Caroll Spinney since 1969, he is an eight-foot two-inch (249 cm) tall bright primrose-yellow bird. He can roller skate, ice skate, dance, sing, write poetry, draw and even ride a unicycle. But despite this wide array of talents, he is prone to frequent misunderstandings, on one occasion even singing the alphabet as one big long word (from the song called "ABC-DEF-GHI," pronounced "ab-keddef-gajihkel-monop-quristuv-wixyz"), pondering what it could ever mean. He lives in a large nest behind the 123 Sesame Street brownstone and has a teddy bear named Radar. As Muppeteer Caroll Spinney has aged, the show has gradually started to train new performers to play Big Bird. These apprentices include both Rick Lyon in the opening theme song of the show's 33rd season on, and Matt Vogel in the show's Journey to Ernie segment. Caroll Spinney was sick during the taping of a few first-season episodes, so Daniel Seagren performed Big Bird in those episodes. He also performed Big Bird when he appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1969 and on The Hollywood Squares in the 1970s. According to The Story of
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    231
    Egg Pawn

    Egg Pawn

    • Appeared in comic strips: Sonic the Hedgehog: Sonic Colors
    Egg Pawns are perhaps the most quantitatively numerous of Eggman's robots ever mass-produced. The ubiquitous workforce of the Eggman Empire for games between Sonic Adventure 2 and Sonic the Hedgehog, Egg Pawns take design inspiration from the humanoid E-100 Series of Sonic Adventure and the Egg Robos of Sonic & Knuckles. As is often the case with Dr. Eggman's creations, the robots play into the fat scientist's ego-trip by populating his dominion with machines built in his own image.
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    Fey Truscott-Sade

    Fey Truscott-Sade, also known as Fey or Feyde, is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. She was a companion of the Eighth Doctor. The canonicity of the comic strip with respect to the television series, like other Doctor Who spin-offs, is open to interpretation. Fey is a native of Earth in the early 20th century. She first appeared in the comic strip story Tooth and Claw, published in DWM #257-#260, written by Alan Barnes and drawn by Martin Geraghty and Robin Smith. In 1939, Fey was an undercover operative working for the British government, and had previously encountered the Doctor in an unpublished adventure involving psychic weasels in Russell Square. The Doctor had given her a Stattenheim Summoner — a device disguised as a tin whistle that could contact the TARDIS — and Fey called on the Doctor and his companion Izzy to help her investigate the sinister Varney. The events of Tooth and Claw proved costly for the Doctor. Although they ultimately defeated Varney, the Doctor had injected himself with a deadly bacillus and was dying. Fey somehow managed to pilot the
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    Mike Doonesbury

    • Appeared in comic strips: Doonesbury
    Michael James "Mike" Doonesbury is the main character in Garry Trudeau's comic strip Doonesbury. He started out as a nerdish freshman from Tulsa at the fictional Walden College, and shared a dorm room with B.D. Currently he is married to Kim Rosenthal, and divorced from J.J. Caucus. Mike's daughter, Alex continued to live with Mike and Kim, until she left to attend MIT. He has a younger brother, Benjamin (who during some time as a punk rocker was known as "Sal Putrid"), and a widowed mother who died in late 2010. Mike is the everyman of the strip. He is a fairly normal, well-adjusted person who is easy for most readers to relate to, in contrast to the often surreal, crazy and extreme characters that populate the strip. Trudeau based Mike's personality on his own and for this reason it is usually Mike who speaks the creator's own viewpoints. Mike's name was taken from the word "doone", meaning a person who is not afraid to appear foolish, and Charles Pillsbury, the roommate of Trudeau's at Yale. In the early strips (from 1970), his primary traits were his inability to hit it off with any girl, and his refusal to admit his lack of success with women. Mike was initially set as a
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    Moomintroll

    Moomintroll

    • Appeared in comic strips: Moomin
    Moomintroll (Swedish: Mumintrollet) is the main character in the Moomin books by Tove Jansson. He lives in the Moominhouse together with his father Moominpappa and his mother Moominmamma and has a keen spirit of adventure. Moomintroll is a 'moomin' - a little white troll with a hippopotamus-like big round nose. His best friend is Snufkin, though he has other friends, including Sniff and Little My. It is hinted many times that he is in love with the Snork Maiden. Moomintroll appears in the following books:
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    Mortimer Mouse

    • Appeared in comic strips: Outland
    Mortimer Mouse is a cartoon character created by Walt Disney and used in Walt Disney films and stories. He has been presented as both the uncle of Minnie Mouse, and later presented as an unrelated mouse who was Mickey's rival for Minnie's affections. Mickey Mouse was first going to be named Mortimer. However, Lillian Disney, Walt's wife, believed the name "Mortimer" sounded too much like 'mortified' and 'mortician' and suggested the name Mickey instead, so "Mortimer" later became the name of Mickey's rival. The first was created by Floyd Gottfredson for Disney studio. He was Minnie Mouse's ranch-owning cattleman uncle. He first appeared in the comic strip Mickey Mouse in Death Valley (1930). After that, he appeared in many Mickey Mouse comic strip adventures in the early 1930s. In the 1936 cartoon short Mickey's Rival, Mortimer Mouse was introduced as Mickey's competition for Minnie's affections. In the comics, this Mortimer was briefly renamed Montmorency (Monty) Rodent (pronounced "Ro-Dawn"), in an attempt to differentiate him from the pre-existing uncle, but the new name did not stick. Mickey's rival was once again called Mortimer in later comics — and in the animated series
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    Peppermint Patty

    • Appeared in comic strips: Peanuts
    Patricia "Peppermint Patty" Reichardt is a fictional character featured in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. A freckle-faced auburn/brunette, she is one of a small group in the strip who lives across town from Charlie Brown and his school friends. She generally displays the characteristics of a tomboy/hippie, although that was slightly changed when Marcie was paired with her in There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown in 1973. She made her first appearance on August 22, 1966. The following year, she made her animated debut in the TV special You're in Love, Charlie Brown and began (in the comics) coaching a baseball team that played against Charlie Brown and since has had other adventures with him. She calls Charlie Brown "Chuck" and Lucy "Lucille" and is the only character to do so (although Peppermint Patty's close friend Marcie has been known to call Charlie Brown "Chuck" on occasion, she usually calls him "Charles"). Peppermint Patty's birthday is on October 4, as determined from the October 4, 1970, strip in which Patty's father (who always calls her his "little gem") gives her roses on her birthday. One story about Peppermint Patty has it that Charles Schulz named the
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    Philip

    Philip

    • Appeared in comic strips: The Watering Hole
    Philip the Eagle is a recurring character in the O'Reilly webcomic The Watering Hole.  Philip is based on the cover of the Learning PHP5 book from O'Reilly.  Philip is probably the most conservative of the Watering Hole characters, not in his politics (although he once did a stint as the eagle on the intro to the Colbert Report), but in his general approach to life.
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    PonFarr

    • Appeared in comic strips: Adventures of Dave the Direman
    You really don't want to get to know this man.
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    Sanmao

    Sanmao (Chinese: 三毛; pinyin: sān máo) is a manhua character created by Zhang Leping in 1935. He is one of the world's longest running cartoon characters and remains one of the most famous and beloved fictional characters in China today. The name Sanmao means "three hairs" in Chinese. While the character has undergone a number of transitions over time, he has always been drawn with the trademark three strands of hair, which implies malnutrition as a result of poverty. Most Chinese comic books prior to Sanmao featured adults and the Sanmao stories were also unusual in that they lacked dialogue. When Zhang Leping created the manhua comic series, his main goal was to dramatize the confusion brought about to society by the Second Sino-Japanese War war. He wanted to express his concern for the young victims of the war, particularly the orphans living on the streets. Most of the changes in the characters would come after WWII during the liberation in 1949. Sanmao's image has also been evolving throughout time, and in some modern continuation of the comics, he is depicted as a healthy, normal student. The character has also been portrayed as living through some of the most important
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    Sharon

    Sharon (last name not given) is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. She was a companion of the Fourth Doctor. The canonicity of the comic strips, like other Doctor Who spin-off media, is unclear. Sharon was introduced in Doctor Who and the Star Beast, which ran in issues #19-#26 of Doctor Who Weekly (as it then was), written by Pat Mills and John Wagner, and drawn by Dave Gibbons. She was a secondary school student living in the city of Blackcastle, England. She was the first non-white companion, albeit not on television. One night, a spacecraft crash-landed in Blackcastle, bringing with it the intergalactic tyrant Beep the Meep. The Meep was fleeing the galactic law enforcers called the Wrarth, but he used his appearance as a cute, furry alien to gain Sharon's sympathy. Sharon sheltered Beep for a time, and it was while doing this that she met the Doctor. Beep's ruse was eventually uncovered and he was handed over to the Wrarth, and the Doctor prepared to take Sharon back to Earth. However, at this time the TARDIS was being particularly unreliable, so the Doctor
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    Sniff

    Sniff

    • Appeared in comic strips: Moomin
    Sniff (original Swedish: Sniff) is a character in the Moomin series of books by Finnish author Tove Jansson. Sniff is Moomintroll's immature friend and later adopted brother. He is the son of the Muddler and the Fuzzy. He is one of the few characters in the Moomin series who is sincerely interested in money, and is always on the lookout for another way to get rich quick. This trait in him is often played as a contrast to Snufkin, who doesn't care much about worldly belongings, and their two different philosophies sometimes clash—although Snufkin is generally portrayed as the wiser of the two. Particularly in the earlier books, Sniff seems to be younger than the other major characters, and many of his negative qualities can be said to be those of a thoughtless child; he is selfish, greedy and quick to push all responsibility over on other people, but he is not malicious or mean-spirited. He's also easily frightened or upset, and not very fond of taking risks, although he will often overcome his fears if there's a chance of treasure or wealth. Sniff is one of the first characters introduced in the series; in fact, he is the first person Moomintroll and Moominmamma encounter on their
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    Snork Maiden

    Snork Maiden

    • Appeared in comic strips: Moomin
    The Snork Maiden (Swedish: Snorkfröken) is a character in the Moomin series of books by Finnish author Tove Jansson. She is a member of the species known as Snorks, and is the sister of the Snork and Moomintroll's beloved, although their relationship is very innocent. Her appearance is very similar to Moomins, being round and furry, with a large snout that resembles a hippopotamus's. The Snork Maiden differs from the Moomins by having a curly fringe of hair at the front of her head, of which she is very proud. She is very loyal to her friends and somewhat emotional. All Snorks change colour with their moods, although this is only mentioned in two books, Comet in Moominland and (very briefly) Finn Family Moomintroll. She has a little gold anklet that she wears and likes to wear a flower behind her ear (usually in a color that compliments her current body color). She is also able to make a fruit soup using fruit and lemonade and make a cure for stomach aches. The Snork Maiden and her brother the Snork are first mentioned in Chapter 6 of Comet in Moominland, and encountered in the following chapter, when they accompany Moomintroll and his friends back to Moominvalley after Moomintroll
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    Spaceman Spiff

    Spaceman Spiff

    • Appeared in comic strips: Calvin and Hobbes
    Spaceman Spiff is Calvin's alter ego. Spiff, "interplanetary explorer extraordinaire," explores the outermost reaches of the universe ("by popular request") in a red flying saucer with a bubble canopy. He talks in third person in all but one strip, and the saucer is tiny, with just enough room for Spiff and apparently little else. Yet, the craft is equipped with an astounding array of weapons, detectors and propulsion devices. The design of the ship appears to be based on a toy spaceship Calvin owns which appeared in one strip. Spiff wears square glasses, or goggles, whose front openings change their shape according to his emotions. The galaxy is a cruel place where Spiff is often zapped, shot down, captured by ferocious and disgusting aliens (who, in reality, are people such as Calvin's parents, Miss Wormwood, etc.), or stranded on a planet. Most planets seem devoid of civilization, and often have hostile environments or alien predators. Spaceman Spiff appeared long before Calvin's other alter-egos. His first appearance was in the twelfth strip of Calvin and Hobbes.
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