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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Comic Book Story of All Time

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Best Comic Book Story of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Comic Book Story of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Comic Book Story of All Time has gotten 445 views and has gathered 616 votes from 616 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1
    6.60
    10 votes
    2
    8.00
    8 votes
    4
    7.86
    7 votes
    5

    Elektra Lives Again

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Elektra Lives Again is a 1990 graphic novel by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley that was published through the Marvel Comics imprint Epic Comics. It is a spin-off from Miller's run on Daredevil and tells the story of the return of Ninja warrior Elektra from death. (Over the years Miller has had a complex relationship with his creation Elektra, having killed her off once but brought her back to life several times since.) Elektra Lives Again was innovative in that it was originally only available in a hardback edition (ISBN 093621127X). (It was also a few centimetres taller and wider than the usual graphic novel.) Elektra Lives Again has been reprinted a number of times (1991 ISBN 0-87135-738-0, 1996 ISBN 0-7851-0279-5), most recently in 2002 (ISBN 0-7851-0890-4), and would get a paperback release in 1993 (ISBN 0871357984). Elektra Lives Again was also included in the 2008 hardcover Elektra by Frank Miller Omnibus (ISBN 0-7851-2777-1), along with the Elektra: Assassin limited series and a number of shorter stories. Elektra Lives Again was also the first time that Miller dispensed with the inks of Klaus Janson, instead pencilling and inking the work himself. In this Elektra Lives Again
    8.00
    6 votes
    6
    7.83
    6 votes
    7

    New Mutants

    The New Mutants are a group of teenaged mutant superheroes-in-training published by Marvel Comics. They have been the main characters of three successive comic book series, which were spin-offs of the X-Men franchise. The first team of New Mutants characters was created by Chris Claremont and artist Bob McLeod. They first appeared in 1982's Marvel Graphic Novel #4 and were subsequently featured in their own title from 1983 until 1991. Also, like its parent title, The New Mutants highlighted interpersonal and group conflict as well as action and adventure, and featured a large ensemble cast. With the end of the first series, the characters were relaunched as X-Force in a new, eponymous series. The second New Mutants series, launched in 2003, featured a new group of teenage mutants; but unlike the original New Mutants, they were only part of a huge cast of students at the Xavier Institute. In 2004, it was relaunched as New X-Men: Academy X, after which the central group was formally dubbed the "New Mutants." In the aftermath of the "M-Day" crossover storyline in late 2005, the remaining students were merged into one junior team, the New X-Men. The third New Mutants series, reuniting
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    8.60
    5 votes
    9
    7.33
    6 votes
    10

    Film Flam

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Film Flam is the first of two stories published in Madman Atomic Comics #8. In it, we get confirmation that Luna Romy (It Girl) and Joe Lombard have merged into Luna Joe. Frank and Luna go to a Cool Cat movie, and Frank seems to spend the whole time daydreaming about what his life would be like as a movie. This story introduces the black boxes which seem to be speaking to Frank, and in fact they are the only text until the last panel of the story.
    7.33
    6 votes
    11
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    7.60
    5 votes
    18

    Batman: The Killing Joke

    • Characters: Joker
    • Pencils: Brian Bolland
    • Script: Alan Moore
    Batman: The Killing Joke is a one-shot superhero graphic novel written by Alan Moore and drawn by Brian Bolland. Published by DC Comics in 1988, it has remained in print since then, and has also been reprinted as part of the trade paperback DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore. The story would affect the mainstream Batman continuity in that it features the shooting and paralysis of Barbara Gordon (a.k.a. Batgirl) by the Joker, an event which laid the groundwork for her to develop the identity of Oracle, an expert computer hacker and a vital source of information for Batman and other superheroes. In 2008 DC Comics reprinted the story in a deluxe hardcover edition. This Deluxe Edition features new coloring by Bolland, meant to illustrate his original intentions for the book, with more somber, realistic, and subdued colors than the original. The plot revolves around the Joker's attempt to drive Gotham City Police Commissioner James Gordon insane, and is intercut with the villain's flashbacks to his early, pre-disfigurement life. The man who will become the Joker is an unnamed engineer who quits his job at a chemical company to become a stand-up comedian, only to fail miserably.
    8.75
    4 votes
    19
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    5.43
    7 votes
    23
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    9.33
    3 votes
    25

    Dead Reckoning, Part 3

    • Characters: Batman
    • Pencils: Tommy Castillo
    • Script: Ed Brubaker
    The Riddler visits Scarecrow to warn him that the Penguin is dead and someone is likely to be after them next. Moreover it looks like it's the Scarecrow's fault, as "he" was supposed to be dead. Meanwhile, Batman follows a series of leads which seem to suggest that former actor Paul Sloan is involved in the affair. At a theatre, Batman encounters the man, who gets away and visits the Scarecrow himself.
    8.00
    4 votes
    26

    X-Men: Phoenix - Warsong

    • Characters: Sophie Cuckoo
    X-Men: Phoenix – Warsong is an American five-issue comic book limited series released in 2006, beginning in September. The series is a sequel to X-Men: Phoenix - Endsong. It is written by Greg Pak and illustrated by Tyler Kirkham. In an interview, Author Greg Pak said "This is not a Jean Grey resurrection story." A hardcover "Marvel Premiere Edition" was released on July 18, 2007, compiling all five issues. The story revolves around the Stepford Cuckoos and includes the team from Astonishing X-Men. In the first issue, a piece of the Phoenix Force attaches itself to the three remaining Stepford Cuckoos, amplifies their telepathic power, and gives them the power of telekinesis. With their newfound abilities, the girls overcome Emma Frost's psychic detention and resurrect their deceased sisters Esme and Sophie. Kid Omega also wakes, once again, from his stasis in Beast's lab. In the second issue, several revelations come to the forefront: both for the audience, as well as the Cuckoos themselves. It is shown that the girls' bones are actually composed of or bonded to a yet-to-be disclosed metal. We also learn that they have the ability to mentally communicate with each other in binary
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    6.80
    5 votes
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    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    7.75
    4 votes
    32

    Daredevil: Born Again

    • Characters: Kingpin
    • Pencils: David Mazzucchelli
    • Script: Frank Miller
    "Born Again" is a 1986 comic book story arc that appeared in the Marvel Comics series Daredevil. Written by Frank Miller, and drawn by David Mazzucchelli, the storyline first appeared in Daredevil #227-#233. The story details Daredevil's descent into insanity and destitution at the hands of the Kingpin, as well as his subsequent struggle to build a new life for himself. Karen Page, the former secretary of the Nelson & Murdock law offices and girlfriend of Matt Murdock, had left the series years earlier to pursue an acting career in Hollywood. Her plans did not work out, and she became a star of pornographic movies and a heroin addict. Her addiction finally drives her to sell Matt Murdock's secret identity for a shot of heroin. This information eventually reaches the Kingpin, who proceeds to test it. Over the next six months, he uses his vast influence to hound Murdock, causing his accounts to be frozen by the IRS, the bank to foreclose on his house and in general make Murdock's life increasingly unbearable. He even manipulates police lieutenant Nicholas Manolis into testifying that he saw Murdock pay a witness to perjure himself in a case. In the resulting trial, Murdock manages to
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight

    • Script: Joss Whedon
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight is a comic book series published by Dark Horse Comics from 2007 to 2011. The series serves as a canonical continuation of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and follows the events of that show's final televised season. It is produced by Joss Whedon, who wrote or co-wrote three of the series arcs and several one-shot stories. The series was followed by Season Nine in 2011. The series was originally supposed to consist of about 25 issues, but eventually expanded to a 40-issue run. The series also spawned a handful of spin-off titles, including a Tales of the Vampires follow-up and one-shots featuring Willow and Riley. The success of the series prompted IDW Publishing and Joss Whedon to publish a concurrent continuation of the Angel television series, titled Angel: After the Fall, and a Spike comic book series, which bridges some aspects of continuity between After the Fall and Season Eight. A motion comic version of the series debuted in 2010. A year after the end of the television series, Buffy and Xander now lead command-central, which is situated at a citadel in Scotland. At their disposal are a wide array of psychics, seers,
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Chris Claremont

    Chris Claremont

    Christopher S. Claremont (born November 30, 1950, in London, England) is an award-winning American comic book writer and novelist, known for his 17-year (1975–1991) stint on Uncanny X-Men, far longer than any other writer, during which he is credited with developing strong female characters, and with introducing complex literary themes into superhero narratives, turning the once underachieving comic into one of Marvel’s most popular series. During his tenure at Marvel, Claremont co-created numerous important X-Men characters, such as Rogue, Psylocke, Shadowcat, Phoenix, Mystique, Lady Mastermind, Emma Frost, Siryn, Jubilee, Rachel Summers, Madelyne Pryor, Sabretooth, Strong Guy, Captain Britain, Mister Sinister, and Gambit, scripted many classic stories, including "The Dark Phoenix Saga" and "Days of Future Past", and along with collaborators such as John Byrne, developed the character of Wolverine into a popular fan favorite. X-Men #1, the 1991 spinoff series premiere that Claremont co-wrote with Jim Lee, remains the best-selling comic book of all time, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Claremont was born November 30, 1950 in London, England, the son of an internist
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Jack of Fables : Jack Frost

    • Pencils: Steve Leialoha
    • Script: Matthew Sturges
    Jack finagles his way into the heart of the Queen of Winter, and borrows her powers while she's sick. The story is told as a flashback from the main story of Jack's adventures.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Hard Boiled

    • Script: Frank Miller
    Hard Boiled is a three-issue comic book mini-series written by Frank Miller and drawn by Geof Darrow. Its first issue was published by Dark Horse Comics in 1990. Frank Miller and Geof Darrow won the 1991 Eisner award for Best Writer/Artist for Hard Boiled. In it, Carl Seltz, an insurance investigator, discovers he is also a homicidal cyborg tax collector who happens to be the last hope of an enslaved robot race. In a dystopian, near-future Los Angeles, city tax collector Nixon is badly injured during a violent encounter with one of his targets, and undergoes extensive surgery in order to survive. Nixon wakes up in a bedroom sometime later, believing his previous experience was a bad dream, and that he is really Carl Seltz, an insurance investigator for the Benevolent Assurance Corporation, with a wife, two children, a dog, and a normal life. However, when his persistent dreams disturb his sleep, his wife distracts him with sex while his children inject him with a sleep-inducing drug, indicating not all is as it seems with Carl's "normal" life. The next day, Carl heads out to pursue a delinquent account, talking to himself the whole way. His ramblings reveal increasingly large
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    X-Men

    • Characters: Professor X
    • Pencils: Jack Kirby
    • Script: Stan Lee
    The first adventure of the X-Men.  The team meets Jean Grey, trains, and then foils Magneto's attempt to take over an air force base.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42

    Twilight Zone literature

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    Twilight Zone literature is an umbrella term for the many books and comic books which concern or adapt The Twilight Zone television series. Numerous novelizations were published based upon episodes of Twilight Zone, as were several volumes of original short stories published under the Twilight Zone brand and edited by Rod Serling himself. An example is Twilight Zone: 19 Original Stories on the 50th Anniversary, though it was edited by Serling's widow Carol Serling. Gold Key Comics published a long-running Twilight Zone comic that featured the likeness of Serling introducing both original stories and occasional adaptations of episodes. The comic outlived the television series by nearly 20 years and Serling by nearly a decade. A later revival of Twilight Zone comics was published by Now Comics, spinning off of the 1980s revival of the show. In 2008, The Savannah College of Art & Design and publisher Walker & Company collaborated to produce a series of graphic novel adaptations of episodes from the series that were written by Rod Serling. In 1982, Marc Scott Zicree published an episode-by-episode guide of the original series, The Twilight Zone Companion (published by Bantam Books)
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    9.50
    2 votes
    48

    Cerebus the Aardvark

    • Pencils: Dave Sim
    • Script: Dave Sim
    Cerebus ( /ˈsɛrəbəs/; also Cerebus the Aardvark) was a comic book series created by Canadian cartoonist Dave Sim, which ran from December 1977 until March 2004. The title character of the 300-issue series was an anthropomorphic aardvark who takes a number of roles throughout the series—barbarian, prime minister and Pope among them. The series stands out for its experimentation in form and content, and for the dexterity of its artwork, especially after background artist Gerhard joined in with the 65th issue. As the series progressed, it increasingly became a platform for Sim's controversial beliefs. The 6000-page story is a challenge to summarize. Beginning as a parody of sword and sorcery comics, it moved into seemingly any topic Sim wished to explore — power and politics, religion and spirituality, gender issues, and more. It progressively became more serious and ambitious than its parodic roots — what has come to be dubbed "Cerebus Syndrome". Sim announced early on that the series would end with the death of the title character. The story has a large cast of characters, many of which began as parodies of characters from comic books and popular culture. Starting with the High
    7.00
    4 votes
    49

    Marvel Zombies vs. The Army of Darkness

    Marvel Zombies vs. The Army of Darkness is a five-issue 2007 comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in association with Dynamite Entertainment, an intercompany crossover in which Ash Williams, hero of the popular Evil Dead film and comic book, finds himself in the Marvel Zombies setting, a world of flesh-eating zombified Marvel Comics heroes. The crossover is continuous with the Marvel Zombies prequel Marvel Zombies: Dead Days and explains events happening in the prequel (such as information regarding the zombified Sentry, which initially spread the plague). Prior to the release of the first issue, Newsarama published a preview, revealing the birth of the zombified Avengers, Ash's descent into the Marvel Zombie universe, and the infection of Spider-Man. Ash has died in the previous 'Army of Darkness' storyline and is now in (what appears to be) Heaven. The superpowered entity known as 'The Sentry' shows up in the afterlife and begins consuming everyone in sight. Ash and the Sentry end up shunted into another reality. Along the way, Ash receives a prophecy warning him that "an army of the dead will rise" and that this world will fall. In this alternative version of the
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    7.00
    4 votes
    53

    The Walking Dead

    • Characters: Morgan Jones
    The Walking Dead is a monthly black-and-white comic book series chronicling the travels of Rick Grimes, his family, and other survivors of a zombie apocalypse. First issued in 2003 by publisher Image Comics, the comic was created by writer Robert Kirkman and artist Tony Moore (who was later replaced by Charlie Adlard from issue #7 onward, though Moore continued to do the covers through issue #24.) The Walking Dead received the 2010 Eisner Award for Best Continuing Series at San Diego Comic-Con International. The series was adapted into the AMC television series The Walking Dead, which premiered in 2010. The television program has inspired a Kirkman-approved full length novel prologuing the comic book's timeline. The series has been translated into numerous languages such as Danish, Portuguese, Spanish, Serbian, Polish, French and Japanese. Wounded in the line of duty, Cynthiana, Kentucky police officer Rick Grimes awakens from a coma in the hospital to find his town filled with walking corpses. He travels to Atlanta, Georgia in search of his wife Lori and seven-year-old son Carl, and finds them in a small camp outside the ruined city, under the leadership of his partner and best
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    Batman: Son of the Demon

    • Characters: Ibn al Xu'ffasch
    Batman: Son of the Demon is a graphic novel by Mike W. Barr and Jerry Bingham, published in 1987 by DC Comics. It was released in both hardcover and softcover formats. It was initially considered to be a retroactive Elseworlds story due to several criticisms, most notably concerning the characters, until Grant Morrison followed up the events of the story in the 4-issue story "Batman & Son" in 2006. DC Comics published a new printing of Batman: Son of the Demon in 2006 featuring new cover art by Andy Kubert for the first time in standard comic book size with a cover price of $5.99 US, tying in with the "Batman & Son" arc. The story centers on the eco-terrorist and head of the League of Assassins, Ra's al Ghul aiding Batman in his quest to solve the murder of Harris Blaine, one of Gotham City's most prominent scientists. Ra's al Ghul and Batman turn out to be searching for the same man, the terrorist known as Qayin. Qayin is a rogue assassin who had murdered Ra's al Ghul's wife Melisande, mother to his favorite daughter and heir-apparent, Talia. Batman has shared a stormy, on-again, off-again romance with Talia for many years, despite his ideological conflict with Ra's. During the
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Frank in the River

    Frank in the River is a 24-page comic story by Jim Woodring. Like all Frank stories, Frank in the River is virtually wordless and the story is conveyed entirely in pantomime. It was published by Tundra in 1992 in a special full-color issue of Tantalizing Stories, Tantalizing Stories Presents Frank in the River, and features Woodring's signature character, Frank. The special issue also included a shorter full-color story by Mark Martin featuring his character Montgomery Wart. While trespassing inside an elaborate ornamental garden, Frank accidentally knocks over a huge statue, destroying it and part of a wall. Receiving a bill for the damages, he takes a job cleaning the inside and grounds of a large building which seems to be a palace. While he is cleaning he notices a red cistern in the center of one of the palace rooms. At the end of the day he is fed a meal of gruel by Manhog, who apparently is also a palace employee. The next morning a swarm of strange monsters clamber out of a nearby river and onto the palace grounds. Frank runs out to do battle with them, and by the end of the day has killed them all. He buries their corpses in a hole which he covers with a large rock.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    Spawn

    • Script: Frank Miller
    Spawn is a fictional character, a comic book superhero who appears in a monthly comic book of the same name published by Image Comics. Created by writer/artist Todd McFarlane, the character first appeared in Malibu Sun #13 (May 1992). Spawn was ranked 60th on Wizard magazine's list of the Top 200 Comic Book Characters of All Time, 50th on Empire magazine's list of The 50 Greatest Comic Book Characters and recently 36th on IGN's Top 100 Comic Book Heroes. The series has spun off several other comics, including Angela, Curse of the Spawn, Sam & Twitch, and the Japanese manga Shadows of Spawn. Spawn was adapted into a 1997 feature film, an HBO animated series lasting from 1997 until 1999, and a series of action figures whose high level of detail made McFarlane Toys known in the toy industry. Spawn enjoyed considerable popularity upon its initial release in the 1990s. Comic book collecting was enjoying a marked upswing at the time, fueled by the speculator boom looking for the next hot book that would jump in value after its release. McFarlane had also already enjoyed superstar status among comic fans with his work on Spider-Man, which had featured McFarlane's name prominently as both
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    6.75
    4 votes
    63

    Only a Poor Old Man

    Only A Poor Old Man is a comic story written by Carl Barks for the first issue of Uncle Scrooge. It was the first story with Scrooge McDuck as its main character (he had already made his debut as a supporting character in "Christmas on Bear Mountain"). The story was published in 1952 and is one of the most reprinted Uncle Scrooge comics. Gemstone selected it as the Free Comic Book of 2005. Barks expert Michael Barrier has dubbed the story a masterpiece. The story begins with Scrooge McDuck swimming in his money bin, speaking his now-famous line, "I love to dive around in it like a porpoise, and burrow through it like a gopher, and toss it up and let it hit me on the head!" He is watched by his nephew Donald, and they discuss the relative merits of having so much money. While looking through the window, Scrooge is alarmed to see that the Beagle Boys have bought the lot next to the money bin. Scrooge understands that they plan to build a house on it so they can secretly drain Scrooge's money out of the bin. Scrooge immediately faints. Huey, Dewey and Louie ask Scrooge why he is so attached to his money, and he explains that to him it is not just money: his fortune is the result of a
    6.75
    4 votes
    64

    John Doe

    John Doe is an Italian comic book by Roberto Recchioni and Lorenzo Bartoli, published by Eura Editoriale. Graphically, it was created by Massimo Carnevale, who is also the current cover artist. Artist who worked for the series include Alessio Fortunato, Marco Farinelli, Walter Venturi and Riccardo Burchielli, now working for the US DC Vertigo publisher. John Doe is an employee of "Trapassati Inc.", a firm dealing with the management of death. His direct superior is Death herself, portrayed as a very beautiful and sarcastic woman. Doe has a relationship with Tempo (which is the Italian word for "Time"), who is in fact an incarnation of time itself. In his missions, he is helped by several characters, some also employees of Trapassati Inc., other coming from the "Regno" (Italian word for "Kingdom"), a place out of space and time where figures such as War, Famine and Pestilence live.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    9.00
    2 votes
    67

    Swiped From Dimension X

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Astroman (in the form of Mr. Excitement) projects into Frank's dreamworld in an attempt to rescue him, reconnecting his mind and body. The majority of the panels are drawn in another artist's style - as a tribute to Allred's many influences, and as a metaphor for the psychic journey that Frank is undergoing.
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Wolverine

    Wolverine

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    Wolverine is a fictional character, a superhero who appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Born James Howlett and commonly known as Logan, Wolverine is a mutant who possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, three retracting bone claws on each hand and a healing factor that allows him to recover from virtually any wound, disease or toxin, at an accelerated rate. The healing factor also slows down his aging process, enabling him to live beyond a normal human lifespan. His powerful healing factor enabled the supersoldier program Weapon X to bond the near-indestructible metal alloy adamantium to his skeleton and claws without killing him. He is most often depicted as a member of the X-Men, Alpha Flight, or later the Avengers. The character first appeared in the last panel of The Incredible Hulk #180 (his first full appearance is in issue #181, November 1974) and was created by writer Len Wein and Marvel art director John Romita, Sr., who designed the character, and was first drawn for publication by Herb Trimpe. Wolverine later joined the X-Men's "All New, All Different" roster in Giant-Size X-Men #1 (May 1975). X-Men writer Chris Claremont played a
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    MADGIRL!

    • Characters: Madman
    This story is told almost entirely in split pages, with Madman on the top and Joe Lombard and It Girl on the bottom. Madman overcomes various obstacles as he rushes home to check on the fate of Joe and Luna. Meanwhile, we see Joe and Luna adjusting to life in two bodies again. The stories combine at the end when Monstatd captures Joe, Luna, Gum, and Frank, and appears to through them into a furnace. The title comes from the outfit Joe Lombard is wearing for most of the story - a fitted version of one of the costumes she made for Frank, complete with freckles.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    6.25
    4 votes
    88
    5.40
    5 votes
    89

    Testament : Babel

    • Pencils: Liam Sharp
    • Script: Douglas Rushkoff
    The story Babel was published as issues 13 and 14 of the comic Testament.
    4.67
    6 votes
    90
    7.00
    3 votes
    91

    Black Kiss

    • Pencils: Howard Chaykin
    • Script: Howard Chaykin
    Black Kiss is a hardboiled erotic American comic book limited series written and drawn by Howard Chaykin, which was originally published in 1988 by Vortex Comics. Black Kiss became one of the most controversial North American comics of the late 1980s, due to the comic having the sort of explicit scenes of sex and violence unseen in most comics published at the time. The twelve-issue series was written and drawn by Howard Chaykin, best known for his American Flagg! series which often hinted at the sort of sexual content which Black Kiss showed in detail. In fact, the publisher Vortex's usual printer refused to print the book due to its content. To help retailers who had worries over selling what could be described as pornography, Vortex released the series sealed in a plastic bag. This meant that casual browsers could not open the comic, or obviously see the internal content (however, this was not done when Vortex released a series of collected editions called Big Black Kiss in 1989). The series attracted a vast amount of controversy, mainly over its sexual content, but also because of the pairing of sex and violence that Chaykin used throughout the series, and especially in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    Archie Marries Veronica/Archie Marries Betty

    "Archie Marries Veronica/Archie Marries Betty" is an American comic book story by writer Michael Uslan and artists Stan Goldberg and Bob Smith that was originally presented in Archie # 600-605. In Issues # 600-602, the story features a futuristic look into the life of Riverdale teen Archie Andrews in the years that follow his college graduation when Archie makes his ultimate decision to marry spoiled rich girl Veronica Lodge instead of sweet girl next door Betty Cooper. In Issues # 603-605, the story switches and Archie proposes marriage to Betty instead of to Veronica. In May 2009, Archie Comics released plans for what they would call "The Archie Story Of The Century" and announced that Archie Andrews would ask Veronica Lodge to marry him in Archie Comics # 600, the first issue of a six part story arc detailing their engagement, marriage and life together. The publishers of Archie Comics did not expect the response they would get from readers and long time fans telling them they made a mistake in Archie's choice. The New York Times would later reveal that the whole story is simply a fantasy and that the first half of the story would show Archie's life with Veronica, and the second
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
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    2 votes
    102
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
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    2 votes
    104
    8.00
    2 votes
    105

    The Terror of the River

    "The Terror of the River" is a funny animal comic book story starring Donald Duck and his nephews Huey, Dewey and Louie. It was written and drawn by Carl Barks, and published in May 1946 by the Dell Publishing Co., Inc. as #108 in the Four Color series. The story was based on Prehistoric Mickey, an unproduced Disney animated short starring Mickey Mouse and his friends. Donald and his nephews take a houseboat journey on the Ohio River and are terrorized by a fake sea serpent operated by a madman in a submarine. "Terror" has been reprinted numerous times in the United States and elsewhere, principally Europe. The tale reflects the anxieties Americans felt about submarine attacks during World War II and their postwar concerns about assimilating the many returning servicemen into civilian and family life. Carl Barks (1901–2000) began his career in the 1920s drawing risqué cartoons for The Calgary Eye Opener, but joined the Disney animation and story departments in 1935 where he learned to develop Donald Duck plots and gags. In 1942, he collaborated with colleagues to complete Donald Duck's first original comic book, "Donald Duck Finds Pirate Gold", but left the Disney studios the same
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    113
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    114

    Back to the Klondike

    Back to the Klondike is a Donald Duck comic book story written by Carl Barks in March 1953. Scrooge McDuck returns to Klondike where he has made his fortune, bringing Donald and the three nephews along, to find back gold he has left there. Don Rosa has stated that this is his favorite story, and has expanded greatly upon it with The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck Chapter 8 and its sequels, 8B and 8C, along with other stories set in the time period. According to his notes in the LATOFSMD Companion, he enjoys telling this story because it captures Scrooge at his physical and mental peak. It also corresponds with the "center" of Scrooge's heroic journey, being the point where his life is decided. In its first printing, the story was cut from 32 to 27 pages, since the editors did not believe the bar fight and abduction scenes were appropriate for a Disney comic. Later, all cut art, except for a half page, was recovered and the story was published in its entirety in 1981 with the missing half page reconstructed by Carl Barks. At the beginning of the story, Scrooge McDuck seems to be suffering from memory lapses to the point he can not even recognize Donald. Donald drags him to a
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    115

    Become Like They Are

    • Characters: Luna Joe
    This story is told in one contiguous panel - as though it would best be read as a scroll or accordion-style book. In it Madman, Mr. Gum, and others battle bizarre flying worms that are attempting to make off with an unconscious Luna Joe.
    6.67
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    117
    Dead Space: Salvage

    Dead Space: Salvage

    • Script: Antony Johnston
    Dead Space: Salvage is a 2010 comic book interquel in the Dead Space series. It is published by IDW Publishing and is written by Antony Johnston, with art by Christopher Shy. Antony Johnston also wrote the game's dialogue and the previous comic Dead Space. Set between the events of Dead Space and Dead Space: Aftermath, a group of freelance miners, known as "magpies," discover the abandoned USG Ishimura in deep space. Their once-fortunate luck turns into a catastrophe as they realize they are in the middle of a living nightmare. Not only is the Earth Government racing to claim the Ishimura, but the Necromorphs are also reanimating across the ship. Captain Benedykt Malyech of the Magpie ship Black Beak is chased in the halls of the Ishimura by a multitude of Necromorphs and subsequently turns into one before waking up. His adjutant, Julia Copland, comforts him before directing their attention to a motherlode of minerals. In the meantime, the Earth Government's Defense Secretary David Chang arrives at the Aegis VII blockade. He is on orders to find the Marker and the Ishimura, both of which they are unable to locate. In addition, they are joined by the Oracles, who take control of the
    6.67
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    120

    Mostly I'm Silent

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    The story of Madman's journey through space as he attempts to come to grips with the death of his girlfriend, Joe Lombard. The story is told entirely through images and a few sparse sound effects; the story doesn't show any speech at all. This is the final chapter of the Madman in Space story arc, and ends with Madman reuniting with Mott and with It Girl, who turns out to have melded in some way with Joe at the moment of her death, becoming Luna Joe.
    6.67
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    121
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    123

    Batman: The Long Halloween

    • Characters: Holiday
    • Script: Jeph Loeb
    Batman: The Long Halloween is a 13-issue comic book limited series written by Jeph Loeb with art by Tim Sale. It was originally published by DC Comics in 1996 and 1997. It was inspired by the three Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Halloween Specials by the same creative team. The entire series has been collected in both trade paperback, and as part of the DC Comics Absolute Editions. The series' success led to Loeb and Sale to reteam for two sequels, Batman: Dark Victory and Catwoman: When in Rome, which parallels the events in Dark Victory. Taking place during Batman's early days of crime fighting, The Long Halloween tells the story of a mysterious killer named Holiday, who murders people on holidays, one each month. Working with District Attorney Harvey Dent and Lieutenant James Gordon, Batman races against the calendar as he tries to discover who Holiday is before he claims his next victim each month, while attempting to stop the crime war between two of Gotham's most powerful families, Maroni and Falcone. This novel also acted as a main introduction for one of Batman's most eluding foes, The Calendar Man, who knows the true identity of the Holiday killer but refuses to share
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    124

    Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot

    • Script: Frank Miller
    The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot is a 1995 comic book written by Frank Miller, drawn by Geof Darrow and published by Dark Horse Comics. The comic book was adapted into an animated TV series of the same name. After appearing in various comic book pin-up and poster pages,, the Big Guy first appeared without Rusty in issues #6 and 7 of Mike Allred's Madman Comics, which was part of Dark Horse Comics' now defunct Legend imprint. The property graduated to its own series, a large format two-issue mini-series in 1995, written by Frank Miller and illustrated by Geof Darrow. The story revolves around an attack on Tokyo by a giant reptilian creature that is originated in an experiment gone wrong, and the failure of the newly-commissioned Rusty the Boy Robot to stop the threat. Subsequently, Japan requested help from the U.S. Armed Forces, whose ultimate defense, the robot Big Guy, launches from his air carrier base and uses his awesome arsenal and good old-fashioned American know-how to save the day. Big Guy also makes an appearance in Frank Miller and Dave Gibbons' Martha Washington Stranded in Space and cameo appearances in the last Sin City book, 'Sin City: Hell and Back.
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    125

    Brit : Old Soldier

    • Pencils: Cliff Rathburn
    • Script: Robert Kirkman
    Old Soldier is the name of the first trade paperback volume of the Brit comic book series by Robert Kirkman. It was originally published in individual comic form as:
    • BRIT
    • BRIT: Cold Death
    • BRIT: Red, White and Blue
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    126
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    132

    Sheriff of Bullet Valley

    • Characters: Donald Duck
    Sheriff of Bullet Valley is a Donald Duck comic story from October 1948, written and illustrated by Carl Barks. In this story Donald applies for a job as the Sheriff of Bullet Valley and his nephews plan on helping him despite how dangerous he tells them it is. They investigate the mysterious cattle theft from the Diamond Brand Ranch and find out that the thief is none other than Blacksnake McSquirt. It's a fight to the finish when Donald finally defeats Blacksnake. This story is probably the longest western story that Carl Barks has ever written. Donald quotes classical western movies throughout the story, as being his source of knowledge to guide his actions.
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    138

    Phantoms of Paradise

    • Characters: Bonnie
    Frank goes to visit his (Zane Townsend's) father's house - revealed to him in the previous issue by Dr. Flem. He encounters various ghosts as he explores, culminating in meeting Zacheous a friend from a previous life who refers to Frank as Prometheus, and who turns out to be the source of the mysterious black boxes that Frank has been hearing since MAC #8.
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    141

    Island in the Sky

    Island in the Sky is a Donald Duck story written by Carl Barks in March 1960. The asteroid 2730 Barks was named after Barks by a scientist at Cornell University who was inspired by the story. Scrooge and his nephews go on a quest in outer space to find an island in space to store his money on. They land on small asteroid occupied by aliens and (normal) birds. Donald accidentally chases the birds away to a nearby planet, and with them, the only source of food for the aliens is gone. The aliens who were friendly at first are now mad at the Ducks. Huey, Dewey and Louie make Scrooge find a solution for the problem they caused. Scrooge sacrifices his fuel to get the aliens to the tropical planet nearby them. This detour results in a fuel stop at the space gas station, which gives Scrooge a high bill. This story also shows how the emotions Scrooge has can be more important than his money.
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    146
    Spore, Part 4

    Spore, Part 4

    • Characters: Batman
    • Pencils: Michel Gagné
    • Script: J.C. Gagné
    Superman battles the spore-infected Batman, but soon both he and the planet are absorbed into the spore.
    8.00
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    148
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    149

    Void Indigo

    • Pencils: Val Mayerik
    • Script: Steve Gerber
    Void Indigo was a short-lived and controversial comic book series written by Steve Gerber and drawn by Val Mayerik. It was published by Epic Comics from 1983 to 1984. Void Indigo focuses on an alien named Jaghur from a peaceful extraterrestrial race (he is known on earth as "Mick Jagger"). Jaghur had been a human on Earth in his previous incarnation, and he returns to Earth with a spirit of vengeance against the seven demons who had tortured and killed him in his previous life. He comes to Los Angeles at the end of the graphic novel. Originally a pitch for revamping DC Comics' Hawkman, Gerber reworked the story into one of the first graphic novels (Marvel Graphic Novel #11) published by Epic Comics in 1983. It was then meant to spin out into a six-issue limited series by Epic. There were minor references implying that the story was set in the Marvel Universe in spite of it being a creator-owned title. Due to the comic's extreme (for its time) portrayal of violence, however, distributor reaction to the first issue of the limited series was negative. Critical reaction (to the violence) was also harsh: in his Comics Buyer's Guide column, "The Law is a Ass," Bob Ingersoll cited the
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    150

    Astonishing Tales

    Astonishing Tales is an American anthology comic book series published by Marvel Comics originally from 1970-1976. Its sister publication was Amazing Adventures vol. 2 In 2008 and 2009, Marvel produced 11 webcomics starring different characters under the umbrella title Astonishing Tales. Several stories were reprinted in the six-issue miniseries Astonishing Tales vol. 2 (April-Sept. 2009). Astonishing Tales began as a split title with solo features starring the jungle lord Ka-Zar and the supervillain and principality-sovereign Doctor Doom in 10-page stories each. The latter feature was dropped after issue #8 (Oct. 1971). The creative team of "Doctor Doom" was initially composed of writer Roy Thomas and penciler-inker Wally Wood, a veteran of 1950s EC Comics stories and one of the early, signature artists of Daredevil. Wood remained as artist through issue #4 (Feb. 1971), succeeded by penciler George Tuska for two issues and Gene Colan for the final two. Larry Lieber was writer for #3-6, succeeded by Gerry Conway. "Ka-Zar" was initially by the longstanding and highly influential team of writer and Marvel editor-in-chief Stan Lee and penciler and co-plotter Jack Kirby, the duo who
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    156

    Maus

    Maus is a graphic novel completed in 1991 by American cartoonist Art Spiegelman. In it, Spiegelman interviews his father about his experiences as a Polish Jew and Holocaust survivor. The book makes use of postmodern techniques in its presentation, most strikingly in its depiction of different races of humans as different kinds of animals, with Jews as mice, Germans as cats and Poles as pigs. Maus has been variously labeled as memoir, biography, history, fiction, autobiography, or a mix of genres. It was the first graphic novel to win a Pulitzer Prize. The story alternates between two main timelines. In the "present" frame tale, beginning in 1978 in Rego Park, New York, Spiegelman talks with his father about his Holocaust experiences, gathering material for the Maus project he is about to begin. In the "past", Spiegelman depicts his father's experiences, starting in the years immediately leading up to World War II. Much of the story revolves around Spiegelman's troubled relationship with his father, and the absence of his mother. She committed suicide when he was 20. Her grief-stricken husband destroyed her written accounts of Auschwitz. Formally, Spiegelman struggles with problems
    6.00
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    162

    Zot!

    • Pencils: Scott McCloud
    • Script: Scott McCloud
    Zot! is a comic book created by Scott McCloud in 1984 and published by Eclipse Comics until 1990 as a lighthearted alternative to the darker and more violent comics that predominated the industry during that period. There were a total of 36 issues, with the first ten in color and the remainder in black and white. McCloud credited Astro Boy creator Osamu Tezuka as a major influence on the book, making it one of the first manga-inspired American comic books. Zot and his friends faced a number of enemies, including: Using a portal created by Uncle Max, a link is created from contemporary Earth to the alternate reality of Zot. It is a retro-futuristic technological utopia, reminiscent of imagery from Golden Age SF, flying cars, robots and interplanetary travel are common and nearly all of its inhabitants benefit from peace, prosperity and a marked lack of conventional social ills. There also seem to be subtle differences in the essential nature of the two Earths, as on Zot's world events naturally favor the "good guys" in any conflict. Still, there are several commonalities between Zot's world and the "real" Earth, such as the careers of several popular musicians. In Zot's utopian
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    163
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    164

    All Star Batman and Robin

    • Script: Frank Miller
    All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder is an American comic book series written by Frank Miller and penciled by Jim Lee. It was published by DC Comics, with a sporadic schedule, between 2005 and 2008. The series was to be rebooted under the title Dark Knight: Boy Wonder in 2011, when both Miller and Lee were to finish the last six issues. This was the first series to be launched in 2005 under DC's All Star imprint. These series are helmed by renowned writers and artists in the American comic book industry and attempt to retell some of the history of prominent DC Universe characters, but outside of DC Universe continuity, and not be restricted by it, in order to appeal to new and returning readers. Each title under the All Star imprint is set in its own continuity and separate universe. In a retelling of the origin of Batman's sidekick, Robin: Bruce Wayne and Vicki Vale are at the circus watching "The Flying Graysons," an acrobat family consisting of twelve-year-old Dick Grayson and his parents. When Grayson's parents are shot to death by a hit man, he is escorted from the scene by several cops of the Gotham City Police Department in a threatening manner. Vicki and Alfred
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    171

    Marvel Zombies: Dead Days

    Marvel Zombies: Dead Days is a comic book one-shot first published in May 2007 by Marvel Comics. It was written by Robert Kirkman and drawn by Sean Phillips, with cover art by Arthur Suydam. It is part of the Marvel Zombies series. The issue is a prequel to Marvel's first Marvel Zombies limited series, which had the same creative team. The story shows the events of the zombie plague first infecting the Marvel Zombies Universe. The story takes place during the events of the second issue of Marvel Zombies vs. The Army of Darkness. Spider-Man reaches Mary Jane Watson-Parker and Aunt May to find them safe and sound. When questioned about the current situation, Peter confesses to being bitten by Captain America. Peter then succumbs to the virus, attacking Mary Jane as Aunt May runs into the room in dismay. As the battle between infected heroes and non-infected rages on, Magneto, onboard Asteroid M, feels sorry for bringing the virus to Earth-2149 and returns to the planet to help. Nova arrives at the Parker flat to find the zombified Spider-Man and tries to reason with him. At this point Daredevil shows up to explain to Nova what is going on, and that the rules have changed. Daredevil
    5.33
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    175

    300

    • Characters: Gorgo, Queen of Sparta
    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    • Script: Frank Miller
    300 is a historically inspired 1998 comic book limited series written and illustrated by Frank Miller with painted colors by Lynn Varley. The comic is a fictional retelling of the Battle of Thermopylae and the events leading up to it from the perspective of Leonidas of Sparta. 300 was particularly inspired by the 1962 film The 300 Spartans, a movie that Miller watched as a young boy. The work was adapted in 2007 to a film of the same name. Every page of the comic was illustrated as a double-page spread. When the series was gathered into hardcover form, the individual pages were twice as wide as a normal comic. Miller's art style for this project was similar to his Sin City work, although the addition of consistent color is an obvious difference. 300 was initially published as a monthly five-issue comic book limited series by Dark Horse Comics, the first issue published in May 1998. The issues were titled Honor, Duty, Glory, Combat and Victory. The series won three Eisner Awards in 1999: "Best Limited Series", "Best Writer/Artist" for Frank Miller and "Best Colorist" for Lynn Varley. The work was collected as a hardcover volume in 1999. The popularity of the film has boosted sales
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    176

    Batman & Son

    • Characters: Ibn al Xu'ffasch
    "Batman & Son" is a comic book story arc from DC Comics by Grant Morrison and Andy Kubert, featuring Batman in the monthly title of the same name. It ran from September (#655) to December (#658) 2006. This marked Morrison's debut as the writer of the flagship Batman title, a post he continued to hold until Batman #683 in 2008. This marked artist Andy Kubert's first work for DC Comics in nearly 15 years, as he and his brother Adam had just signed a new exclusive contract for the publisher. The Joker has managed to poison Commissioner Gordon and is crouched over what appears to be a bloody and beaten Batman. As Joker gloats over his "victory," the beaten Batman pulls out a handgun and manages to shoot the Joker in the face. At that moment, the real Batman appears and captures the Joker, throwing him into a dumpster. After visiting Gordon in the hospital, Batman learns that in his short time back in Gotham, he has managed to rid the city of supercrime. In the Batcave, Alfred tells Batman that he has been so focused on his war on crime that he has started to lose touch with his Bruce Wayne identity. Robin states that he believes a vacation away from Gotham could be beneficial, so
    7.00
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    177
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    179

    Martha Washington

    • Pencils: Dave Gibbons
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Martha Washington is a fictional character created by Frank Miller, first appearing in the four-issue comic book series Give Me Liberty, published in 1990 by Dark Horse Comics. Born on March 11, 1995 and died on March 11, 2095, Martha Washington grew up in the Cabrini–Green housing project in Chicago (called "The Green") with her mother and two brothers in abject poverty brought on by the economic policies of the President Erwin Rexall. She is an average student, but one who displays a gift for computer programming and hacking. Her teacher, Donald, encourages her to be a better student and, because he lives outside the Green, brings her contraband items. One night Martha shows up at Donald’s classroom and finds that he’s been murdered by the Ice Man, a large thug who works for a local gangster called the Pope. Before dying, Donald managed to stab the Ice Man in the wrist. This distraction allowed Martha to seize his weapon, a longshoreman’s hook, and plunge it into his shoulder. The Ice Man chases her through the school to a locker room, but before he can kill her, he dies of blood loss. Martha is later remanded to a psychiatric hospital. In the institution, she discovers that
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    181
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    182

    Daredevil

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Daredevil is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist Bill Everett, with an unspecified amount of input from Jack Kirby, and first appeared in Daredevil #1 (April 1964). Living in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of New York City, Matt Murdock is blinded by a radioactive substance that falls from an oncoming vehicle. While he no longer can see, the radioactive exposure heightens his remaining senses beyond normal human ability. His father, a boxer named Jack Murdock, supports him as he grows up, though Jack is later killed by gangsters after refusing to throw a fight. After donning a yellow and black, and later a dark red, costume, Matt seeks out revenge against his father's killers as the superhero Daredevil, fighting against his many enemies including Bullseye and the Kingpin. Daredevil's nickname is "the Man Without Fear". Although Daredevil had been home to the work of many legendary comic-book artists — Everett, Kirby, Wally Wood, John Romita, Sr., and Gene Colan, among others — Frank Miller's influential tenure on the title in the late 1970s and early 1980s is
    6.00
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    183

    Last Night the Atomics Saved My Life

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Joelle Jones
    • Script: Jamie S. Rich
    A short story currently being written by Jamie Rich and illustrated by Joelle Jones, likely to be published in Madman Atomic Comics #16.
    6.00
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    184
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    188
    The Sandman: Dream Country

    The Sandman: Dream Country

    • Characters: Dream
    • Pencils: Colleen Doran
    • Script: Neil Gaiman
    Dream Country is the third trade paperback collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. It collects issues #17-20. It is written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Kelley Jones, Charles Vess, Colleen Doran and Malcolm Jones III, coloured by Robbie Busch and Steve Oliff, and lettered by Todd Klein. It was first issued in paperback in 1991, and later in hardback in 1995. This volume contains four independent stories. The first story, "Calliope," contains the first reference to Dream's son Orpheus, who will play an important role later in the series. The second story, "A Dream of a Thousand Cats," is one of the most enduringly popular issues of the entire series. Sandman #19, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," introduces Morpheus' creative partnership with William Shakespeare, and was the first and only comic book to win a World Fantasy Award. Lastly, this volume has the first story in which Dream does not appear, "Façade." The collected edition also includes Gaiman's script for "Calliope." It is preceded by The Doll's House and followed by Season of Mists. Like the sixth collection, Fables and Reflections, and the eighth, Worlds' End, Dream Country consists of short
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    189
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    192

    We Are Atomic

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Dr. Flem and friends discover that Frank was not truly dead when they buried him in space. Frank appears to the gang in a vision, letting them know that It Girl, Mr. Gum, and the Slug must all act together to prevent the destruction of all existence. They (together with Metal Man, Horn and the Black Crystal) are transported across the galaxy, where Frank tells them that their mission is to defeat the Crimson King.
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    193
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    Manhunter : Street Justice

    • Pencils: Jesus Saiz
    • Script: Marc Andreyko
    The Street Justice trade paperback is a collection of the first 5 issues of the Manhunter comic book series.
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    196
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    198

    Elektra: Assassin

    • Characters: Elektra Natchios
    • Pencils: Bill Sienkiewicz
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Elektra: Assassin is an eight-issue limited series published by Epic Comics, an imprint of Marvel Comics, between August 1986 and March 1987. Written by Frank Miller and illustrated by Bill Sienkiewicz, Elektra: Assassin satirizes ultra-violence, politics, comic book clichés like ninjas and cyborgs, and the portrayal of women. Frank Miller and Bill Sienkiewicz were at the height of their popularity with comic book fans when this series was released, shortly on the heels of Miller's hugely successful Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, and Miller & Sienkiewicz's Marvel Graphic Novel Daredevil: Love and War. As with Daredevil: Love and War, Sienkiewicz illustrated Elektra: Assassin using watercolors as opposed to the traditional pencilling/inking method. His exaggerated art was unique amongst mainstream comics of the time, bringing to mind the illustration style of adult-oriented comics magazines like Heavy Metal. The story starts out with Elektra in a mental institution in South America, attempting to recover her memory. The first issue is very disjointed, as Elektra pieces together jumbled memories ranging from the murder of her mother, molestation by her father (which she says is
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    199

    For the Man Who Has Everything

    "For the Man Who Has Everything" is a comic book story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, first published in Superman Annual #11 (1985) and later adapted into a Justice League Unlimited episode in 2004. Batman, Robin and Wonder Woman visit the Fortress of Solitude with gifts on Superman's birthday, only to find him in a vegetative state, a large alien plant stuck to his chest, its tendrils wrapped around his body. As they analyze the situation, the alien Mongul steps into the scene, revealing the name of the plant (the "Black Mercy") and how it has put Superman into a coma, feeding him an extremely realistic and plausible dream based on his "heart's desire". As he explains, Mongul touches the Mercy while wearing a pair of protective, oversized gauntlets. Interspersed with the scenes in the Fortress are pages of Superman's dream of living a normal life on his long-destroyed home planet of Krypton, happily married with two children. While Wonder Woman battles Mongul, whose power and strength exceed hers, Batman and Robin try to free Superman. Meantime, Superman's fantasy takes a dark turn. His father Jor-El's prediction of Krypton's doom was unfulfilled in the fantasy, leading to Jor-El
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    200

    Riot at Xavier's

    • Characters: Sophie Cuckoo
    "Riot At Xavier's" is a four part storyline that ran from New X-Men #135-138 (2003). It was written by Grant Morrison and features artist Frank Quitely's last work on the title. The story centers around an original character of Morrison's, the teenage mutant Quentin Quire. According to Morrison, the storyline was inspired by a playground riot he witnessed in his youth. The story centers around Quentin Quire, who had appeared at first in issue #122. Quire is fleshed out as a super-intelligent young teenager, who is a pupil of Professor X's mutant school at the X-Mansion. When he finds out he is adopted, and a mutant celebrity called Jumbo Carnation is killed by anti-mutant racists, Quire begins to mock Xavier's pacifistic teachings, hero-worships the mutant supremacist Magneto, and assembles a gang of militant class mates to kill humans in retaliation. Their rage is fueled by consumption of the fictional drug "Kick", which supercharges their mutant abilities. Side-plots are the workings of mysterious mutant teacher Xorn, Quire's crush on Sophie of the Stepford Cuckoos, the relationship between flirty Angel Salvadore and the ugly Beak and the growing estrangement of Cyclops from his
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    201
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    Marvel Zombies

    Marvel Zombies is a five-issue limited series published from December 2005 to April 2006 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Robert Kirkman with art by Sean Phillips and covers by Arthur Suydam. It was the first series in the Marvel Zombies series of related stories. The story begins with a virus reaching Earth, turning most of Earth's superheroes (and some civilians) into zombies. Within the Marvel Multiverse is an alternate Earth designated Earth 2149, which contains alternate versions of Marvel superheroes. The story begins as a zombie Sentry crash lands before infecting the Avengers. The infection spreads via contact with the blood of the victim, usually through a bite by an infected individual. The zombie super beings largely retain their intellect and personality, although they are consistently driven by the hunger for fresh meat. Ash Williams of the Evil Dead franchise gets transported to Earth 2149 where he attempts to locate the Necronomicon, which he believes is the cause of the zombie outbreak. He goes to Doctor Doom who informs Ash that this was not the case. He then commands the 'Necronomicon to reawaken the dead in order to fight the zombies, in an attempt to
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    Spaced And Lost

    • Characters: Whelworne the Seer Tree
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Frank awakens to find that he's been buried in space with Astroman. Astroman attempts to find help but runs out of gas while entering the atmosphere. Meanwhile, Frank is rescued by Haley Foofou and taken to meet Whelworne the Seer Tree on her master ship. There he discovers that the fate of the universe depends on him going with them on a journey to their home world of Nehlog in Celestia.
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    4.50
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    209

    American Widow

    American Widow (2008, Random House), written by Alissa Torres and drawn by Sungyoon Choi, is a graphic memoir about Torres's experience as a widow of the September 11 attacks in 2001. The story is told in non-chronological order, alternating between Torres's post-9/11 experience of widowhood, pregnancy, media attention and bureaucratic nightmares; and backstory about her and her husband Eduardo (Eddie). Most of the images are drawn by Choi, but photos of Eddie also appear in two sections, as well as a photo of Alissa and her son. The story starts on September 11, 2001, with TV announcements about the attacks on the World Trade Center, where Eddie has just started a new job as a currency trader with Cantor Fitzgerald. Chapters 2 and 3 give the backstory from Alissa and Eddie's first meeting in August 1998 to Alissa's pregnancy and Eddie's new job at Cantor Fitzgerald. Chapter 4 depicts the night before the attacks and suggests conflict between them, although the nature of the conflict is not revealed. Then it depicts Alissa going downtown after the attacks to look for Eddie. Chapters 5 and 6 depict Alissa's continuing search for Eddie until she confirms his death, the funeral
    5.00
    1 votes
    210

    Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also referred to as DK2) is a three-issue comic book limited series about Batman, written and drawn by Frank Miller and colored by Lynn Varley. It was originally published by DC Comics's imprint Elseworld. The series is a sequel to Miller's 1986 miniseries, The Dark Knight Returns, and tells story of an aged Bruce Wayne who comes out of hiding after three years of planning his return and training his followers, though his efforts bring him into conflict with the dictatorial rulers of the American Empire as well as an enigmatic enemy from his past. The series was originally published as a three-issue limited series (November 2001 - July 2002) by DC Comics, and since collected into hardcover and paperback one-volume editions, and Absolute Dark Knight edition (which also features The Dark Knight Returns). Like its predecessor, this story takes place in a timeline that is not considered canonical in the current continuity of DC Comics. After going underground, Batman (Bruce Wayne) and his young sidekick, Catgirl (Carrie Kelly, Robin from Batman: The Dark Knight Returns), train an army of "batboys" to save the world from a "police-state"
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
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    1 votes
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    214

    Halloween

    • Characters: Buffy Summers
    • Pencils: Joe Bennett
    • Script: Andi Watson
    Story in Buffy the Vampire Slayer #2
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    5.00
    1 votes
    216

    Is There Anybody Out There?

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Madman wrestles with what he's been told - that he's all that's real, and that everything else is just a projection of his consciousness. In the end he discovers that he's been trapped and lied to by his old nemesis Monstatd in an extra-dimensional prison - as revenge and so that Monstatd can use Frank "to make my way back to the living world where my reconstituted body awates."
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
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    224

    Batman: The Last Arkham

    "The Last Arkham" was a four-part Batman story arc that started the Shadow of the Bat comic book series in mid-1992. The storyline began in Shadow of the Bat #1 (Jun, 1992), and finished in Shadow of the Bat #4 (Sept, 1992). DC Comics later compiled the four issues into a trade paperback in 1996. The comic was written by Alan Grant and drawn by Norm Breyfogle and was responsible for the introduction of several new characters into the Batman universe. "The Last Arkham" begins with the destruction of the old Arkham Asylum at the hands of its new administrator, Jeremiah Arkham, who inherited it from his deceased uncle, Amadaeus Arkham. The asylum is revamped and fitted with numerous new security measures. When Batman stumbles upon a series of murders, resembling the serial killer Zsasz's MO, Batman begins to investigate only to find Zsasz has been imprisoned in Arkham Asylum during the course of the murders. Determined to prove Zsasz guilty, Batman and Commissioner Gordon stage Batman's insanity in order to get him committed to Arkham and further investigate. However, Jeremiah Arkham is unaware of this plot and begins to break down Batman mentally and physically. Learning of Batman's
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    Crushed In The Court Of The Crimson King

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Working together, Madman, It Girl, Mr. Gum and the Slug are able to defeat the Crimson King and stop his plan to invert the universe. The victory though is marred by two tragic deaths - Metal Man (whose body Haley revives as a zom-bot) - and Joe Lombard, who Haley brings to Celestia in a bubble to join in the festivities. This inadvertently brings Joe in contact with the deadly energetic remnants of the Crimson King, killing her. The story ends with Frank flying off in a rocket with Warren.
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    1 votes
    227
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    1 votes
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    232
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    0 votes
    233

    American Flagg!

    • Pencils: Howard Chaykin
    • Script: Howard Chaykin
    American Flagg! is an American comic book series created by writer-artist Howard Chaykin, published by First Comics from 1983 to 1989. A science fiction series and political satire, it was set in the U.S., particularly Chicago, Illinois, in the early 2030s. Writers besides Chaykin included Steven Grant, J.M. DeMatteis, and Alan Moore. American Flagg, which ran 50 issues (Oct. 1983 – March 1988), was one of the first titles to be published by First Comics, an early alternative press comics company founded in Evanston, Illinois in 1983. Unusually for the time, the company offered its freelance writers and artists creator rights, including ownership of their creations. Regardless, writer-artist Howard Chaykin, then living in New York City, felt trepidation when First Comics approached him to do a project. He recalled in 2010, Chaykin devised a series set in 2031, a high-tech but spiritually empty, consumerist world in which the American government has relocated to Mars, leaving what remains of the U.S. to be governed by the all-encompassing corporation the Plex. The series star is Reuben Flagg, a former TV star drafted into the Plexus Rangers and posted as a deputy in Chicago,
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    234
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    236
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    0 votes
    237

    Find A Penny Pick It Up

    • Characters: Dr. Gillespie Flem
    • Script: Mike Allred
    In the second story of MAC #8, Frank loses a penny made of Transferium on the streets of Snap City. The penny causes random hijinx to happen whereever it goes (like a cat and a cabbie exchanging bodies) until the gang finally neutralizes it.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
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    239

    Jumping Silent Cars That Sleep At Traffic Lights

    • Characters: Madman
    • Pencils: Mike Allred
    • Script: Mike Allred
    Madman's run with Image Comics begins as Madman / Frank Einstein finds himself in a horrifying scenario: the last person alive, and then told that the world he knows is an illusion of his own devising. He reviews all that he remembers as he tries to come to grips with what's happening around him - which serves as a recap of his history in previous series.
    0.00
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    240
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    241
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    242

    Sin City

    • Pencils: Frank Miller
    • Script: Frank Miller
    Sin City is the title for a series of neo-noir comics by Frank Miller. The first story originally appeared in "Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special" (April, 1991), and continued in Dark Horse Presents #51–62 from May 1991 to June 1992, under the title of Sin City, serialized in thirteen parts. Several other stories of variable lengths have followed. All stories take place in Basin City, with frequent recurring characters and intertwining stories. A movie adaptation of Sin City, co-directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller with "special guest director" Quentin Tarantino, was released on April 1, 2005. A sequel was confirmed by Miller in 2011. Miller has stated that the film will be based primarily on Miller's original story A Dame to Kill For, and two new stories. However it will be an open storyline so that characters that appeared in the previous film could return. Basin City, almost universally referred to by the nickname Sin City, is a fictional town in the American west. The climate is hot and arid, although Sacred Oaks is characterized as being heavily wooded. A major river runs through the city, which has an extensive waterfront. Usually twice a year, a major
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    243
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    The Hard Goodbye

    "The Hard Goodbye" is the first Sin City story. It was serialised, as "Sin City," in the comics anthology Dark Horse Presents by Dark Horse Comics and named "The Hard Goodbye" in the trade paperbacks. It was created by Frank Miller, and led to a metaseries that has been adapted into a movie. The comic was first published as "Sin City" in Dark Horse Presents: 5th Anniversary Special (April 1991) and then in the continuing series Dark Horse Presents issues #51-62 and 5th Anniversary Special (June 1991–June 1992) and was written, drawn and lettered by Frank Miller. The original issues were edited by Randy Stradley, and Diana Schutz is editor of the 2005 collected edition. Published in Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special and the debut of the Sin City series appeared with part one of thirteen in The Hard Goodbye and only eight pages long. The Story starts when Marv is approached by Goldie in Kadie's Bar. They end up sleeping together in a hotel, but three hours later, Marv wakes to find Goldie dead. He gets ready and tries to remember what had happened that night when he was drunk. The next thing he hears are the police sirens which leads him to believe that someone else also
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    246
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    247

    The Sandman: A Game of You

    • Characters: Thessaly
    A Game of You (1993) is the fifth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. Written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Shawn McManus, Colleen Doran, Bryan Talbot, George Pratt, Stan Woch and Dick Giordano, and lettered by Todd Klein. The issues in the collection first appeared in 1991 and 1992. The collection first appeared in paperback and hardback in 1993. Barbie, a minor character from The Doll's House, has recently divorced and is trying to rediscover her own identity. At the same time, Barbie's rich but childish fantasy world is threatened by a malevolent creature called the Cuckoo. Her hard-pressed imaginary friends reach out into the real world for help, resulting in blood and death in both worlds. Gaiman often characterises Sandman stories as "male" or "female"; A Game of You, dominated by female characters and points of view, is one of his female stories. Gaiman described A Game of You as "probably" his favorite volume in the series, "because it's most people's least favourite volume, and I love it all the more for that." This fifth collection continues the story of some of the characters of the second, The Doll's House, and is closely linked with the ninth,
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