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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Comic Book Series of All Time

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    1
    El Gato Negro

    El Gato Negro

    El Gato Negro (The Black Cat) was an independent comic book series featuring the eponymous character created by Richard Dominguez and published by Azteca Productions. The series began in October 1993 with critical acclaim, the first edition actually selling all 5,000 copies within two months, but was placed on a seven year hiatus after the fourth issue was published. Dominguez later returned in 2005 with the new series El Gato Negro: Nocturnal Warrior. The events in "El Gato Negro" occur in South Texas, specifically within the Lower Rio Grande Valley area, where social worker Francisco "Pancho" Guerrero is motivated by the gruesome murder of his best friend by drug-traffickers, to fight crime under the guise of El Gato Negro. He is assisted in his goals by his grandfather Agustin Guerrero and several other supporting characters. The first of the self-titled series published in 1993 under Dominguez's own Azteca Productions imprint. The identity El Gato Negro is in fact Francisco Guerrero, grandson of the original El Gato Negro, and heir to his legacy. Francisco adopted the identity of the El Gato Negro shortly after the murder of his friend Mario Bustamonte. Despite being popular
    8.82
    11 votes
    2
    War of the Independents

    War of the Independents

    War of the Independents (WOTI) is a graphic novel featuring several different independent comic book characters and will be published by Red Anvil Comics. The story started with the events that occurred in Dave Ryan's indie comic book from 2000 Penance. The two villains Kane and Orcus are attempting to open the doorway to RazorJack's world and conquer Earth. The heroes combined powers are not enough to stop the two alone, so they recruit heroes throughout space and time to help. War of the Independents saga is the brainchild of comics creator Dave Ryan, who credits his inspiration to the internet: The story revolves around the villains Kane, Orcus and others gathering relics to empower a gateway to RazorJack's world and conquer Earth. The villains make their first appearance in Ryan’s own book “Penance,” The heroes in Penance are not strong enough to deal with Orcus and Kane, so they recruit heroes from throughout time and space. The graphic novel features a variety independent characters such as Mike Allred's Madman, Stan Sakai's Usagi Yojimbo, Sam Keith's The Maxx, Erik Larsen’s Savage Dragon,Scott McCloud’s Zot, Jeff Smith's Bone, and hip-hop legends of Public Enemy (who have
    8.82
    11 votes
    3

    War of the Gods

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: George Pérez
    War of the Gods was an American four-issue comic book mini-series published by DC Comics in 1991. Primarily centered on the character Wonder Woman, this storyline was intended to celebrate the character's 50th anniversary. It was written and drawn by George Pérez, who would leave the Wonder Woman (vol. 2) title following this storyline with #62. As shown in the Wonder Woman (vol. 2) issues #51-57, after the Amazons announced themselves to the world in #50, Circe has been behind the scenes watching Diana's every move. Circe is responsible for a series of brutal murders that have occurred where various artifacts have been stolen. The Amazons are framed for these crimes and public hysteria is whipped up against them. With the disappearance of Queen Hippolyta, General Phillipus wounded by gunfire and the death of Hellene, some Amazons are taken into custody. Steve Trevor is forced by General George Yedziniak to attack Themyscira; an oncoming war is about to begin. Worldwide, ancient gods suddenly begin trying to destroy the Earth and each other. While the ancient Roman gods wage war with the Olympian gods, the Egyptian, African, Norse, Babylonian and Thanagarian gods each want to
    6.73
    11 votes
    4
    Car Warriors

    Car Warriors

    • Publisher: Epic Comics
    Car Warriors is a four-issue comic book series published in 1991 by Epic Comics. It was followed by a three-volume series of novels set in the same world but featuring different characters. The series was conceived by Steve Jackson and Sharleen Lambard of Steve Jackson Games based on the board game Car Wars. 2038 America after a series of natural and man-made disasters have changed the country. The Grain Blight destroyed crops causing widespread famine, and wars over dwindling resources culminated in a limited nuclear exchange. During the dark years, life in America was similar to the post-apocalyptic world of Mad Max and the roads were ruled by heavily armed biker-gangs. In response, average citizens had to arm their cars in self defense, and by the time the country began to recover autoduelling had become the nation's most popular sport (both on the open road and in specially built arenas). The main character, Chevy Vasquez, lost his parents and sister to a biker gang attack during those dark years, and is now a successful arena autoduellist. He is approached by a wealthy individual who wants to back Vasquez in The Delorean Run! (think Cannonball Run and Death Race 2000, but the
    6.18
    11 votes
    5

    Adventures of Barry Ween, Boy Genius

    The Adventures of Barry Ween, Boy Genius is a comic book metaseries created, written and illustrated by Judd Winick. It follows the comical escapades of the eponymous character, a 10-year-old boy who secretly possesses the most powerful intellect on Earth, along with his impulsive best friend Jeremy and his crush Sara. Barry puts his genius to work primarily in creating outlandish inventions that are centuries ahead of their time, such as teleportation devices, jetpacks and wallet-sized nuclear devices. Many of the storylines involve one of Barry's inventions going horribly wrong (usually due to Jeremy's clumsiness) and the two boys' efforts to right the situation before anyone can find out. Barry takes great care to keep his genius a secret and maintains Jeremy as his only confidant. The pair's dialogue is rife with profanity, often complex in its construction, and this foul-mouthed irreverence is reflected to a lesser extent in several of the other characters. Barry Ween's adventures were first published in a three-issue mini-series by Image Comics in 1999. Oni Press picked up the title for two additional miniseries: three issues in 2000, and six issues in 2001 and 2002. The most
    6.50
    10 votes
    6

    The Book of Lost Souls

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: J. Michael Straczynski
    The Book of Lost Souls was an American comic book series published under the Icon Comics imprint, owned by Marvel Comics. It was written by J. Michael Straczynski and pencilled by Colleen Doran. The comic follows Jonathan, a man who lived over a century ago who was transported to the 21st century during an attempted suicide. His new life involves supernatural mysteries and enigmatic characters such as a talking cat named Mystery and the Dark Man, whose plans for Jonathan are unclear. Jonathan is given the power to "save" the Lost, those individuals who have lost all hope in their lives. The Dark Man may be God or the Devil, and it is, as yet, unclear which one he may be. An individual the Dark Man wants saved may be working for either, depending on your point of view. Issue One: Jonathan meets Mystery and the Dark Man. Before jumping off a bridge a man gives him a book, the first three lines are: "You name:"' "The words that brought you here:" "The words that will release you:" Jonathan writes his name and "All love is unrequited. Haven't you heard?". Mystery said to leave the last line blank for now. Jonathan and Mystery start looking for "The lost". Issue Two: Jonathan and
    7.71
    7 votes
    7
    The K-Metal from Krypton

    The K-Metal from Krypton

    "The K-Metal from Krypton" is an unpublished Superman story written by Jerry Siegel in 1940 and originally illustrated by the Joe Shuster Studio. Although the comic contained story developments that DC Comics (National Comics at the time) may have ultimately concluded could be potentially damaging to the franchise, the reason that the story was never published is not known. This storyline features the precursor to Kryptonite called "K-Metal" and Lois learns that Clark Kent is Superman; thus helping him with his escapes and his adventures. This might have altered the status quo from that point on. Like all Superman stories of the 1940s, the adventure originally had no title. The earliest known occurrence of the name "The K-Metal from Krypton" for the tale was in Gerard Jones' 2004 book Men of Tomorrow. The story remained forgotten and unknown from 1941 until 1988, when Jerry Siegel's original script and story outline was rediscovered in deep storage in the DC Comics library by Mark Waid. The surviving original story pages were worked on by Wayne Boring, Paul Cassidy, Dan Komisarow, Leo Nowak, and John Sikela. Artist Jon Bogdanove has agreed to contribute new artwork to the project.
    6.63
    8 votes
    8
    Echo

    Echo

    • Publisher: Abstract Studio
    • Created By: Terry Moore
    Echo is an American comic book independently-published by Terry Moore under his Abstract Studio imprint. The first issue was released on March 5, 2008 with silver foil accents not to be included on future printings. Echo's story revolves around Julie, a young photographer who inadvertently discovers a hi-tech Battle suit. Moore has said the premise of Echo is a woman living in today's America who is dealing with a sudden unbelievable change to her daily life. On November 19, 2007 Terry Moore announced in his blog that his new self-published series would be named Echo and its first issue would appear on March 5, 2008. Echo ran for 30 issues, published on a roughly monthly basis, and concluding in June 2011, with periodic collections of five issues each. Following the series conclusion, a single collection of the entire series was published. In 2009, the film rights for Echo were purchased by producer Lloyd Levin, known for the film versions of Watchmen, Mystery Men and Hellboy. The movie is expected to begin production in late 2011. While taking photographs in the desert, Julie Martin witnesses the explosion of a battle suit and its pilot, the end result of a live munitions
    8.17
    6 votes
    9

    The Sensational Spider-Man

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Sensational Spider-Man was first used as the title for a prestige format one-shot special called The Sensational Spider-Man: Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut (ISBN 0-87135-572-8) in 1989 from Marvel Comics which reprinted The Amazing Spider-Man issues #229 and #230 (originally published in 1982). The Sensational Spider-Man was later also used as the name of a comic book series starring Spider-Man published by Marvel Comics for 35 issues (#0-33, with # -1 published in July 1997 between #17 and #18), from January 1996 until November 1998. The title was initially conceived to be the flagship showcase for the new Ben Reilly Spider-Man. It replaced the Web of Spider-Man series. The initial seven issues (#0-6, January-July, 1996) were written and pencilled by Dan Jurgens, who had helped revive interest in Superman for DC Comics in the mid 1990s. Jurgens pushed strongly for the restoration of Peter Parker as the true Spider-Man and plans were made to enact this soon, but Bob Harras, the new Editor-in-chief, demanded the story be deferred until after the Onslaught crossover. Jurgens had by this stage become disillusioned with the immense amount of group planning and constant changes of
    6.38
    8 votes
    10
    Kick-Ass

    Kick-Ass

    • Featured Characters: Dave Lizewski
    • Publisher: Icon Comics
    • Created By: John Romita, Jr.
    Kick-Ass is a creator-owned comic book series written by Mark Millar and illustrated by John Romita, Jr. It is published by Marvel Comics under the company's Icon imprint. It is the story of Dave Lizewski, a teenager who sets out to become a real life superhero. His actions are publicized on the Internet and inspire others. He gets caught up with ruthless vigilantes Hit-Girl and Big Daddy who are on a mission to take down the gangster John Genovese. The comic was adapted into a 2010 film of the same name directed by Matthew Vaughn, starring Aaron Johnson, Chloë Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Mark Strong and Nicolas Cage. Dave Lizewski, an otherwise ordinary New York City high school student and the child of James Lizewski, a loving single father, takes his interest in comic books as inspiration to become a real-life superhero. He buys a wetsuit from the website eBay, which he wears under his normal clothing, begins exercising, and practices things like walking on roofs, satisfying his ambitions for a time. He eventually seeks to fight crime, with his first attempt leading him to receive a severe beating and stabbing by thugs, followed by his wandering into the street and
    7.14
    7 votes
    11

    The Power of Shazam!

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Jerry Ordway
    The Power of Shazam! is a 1994 hardcover graphic novel, written and painted by Jerry Ordway for DC Comics. The 96-page story, depicting the revamped origins of former Fawcett Comics superhero Captain Marvel, was followed by an ongoing series, also titled The Power of Shazam!, which ran from 1995 to 1999. After a previous retcon by Roy Thomas and Tom Mandrake in 1987 with the Shazam! The New Beginning miniseries, Captain Marvel was again given a revised origin in the 1994 graphic novel The Power of Shazam!. Captain Marvel's origin would also be retold in in Jeff Smith's Shazam!: The Monster Society of Evil limited series in 2007, though this origin takes place outside of DC continuity. As The Power of Shazam! graphic novel opens, ten-year-old Billy Batson's parents, both archeologists, are working in Egypt, excavating the tomb of Ramses II with their associate Theo Adam. Murdering the elder Batsons, Adam also kidnaps their young daughter Mary and steals a scarab necklace once attached to one of the sarcophagi in the tomb. Billy had been left behind at home in Fawcett City because of poor school grades. As in the Fawcett Comics origin story from Whiz Comics #2 (1940), Billy is
    7.00
    7 votes
    12

    Underworld Unleashed

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Underworld Unleashed was a multi-title comic book cross-over event released by DC Comics in 1995. As well as the core story-line of the three-issue Underworld Unleashed mini-series, most of the DC titles published in November and December 1995 and a number of one-off titles were part of the series. The main theme of Underworld Unleashed involved the new ruler of Hell, a demon called Neron, offering many of the DC Universe villains and a number of the superheroes their greatest desires in exchange for their soul or completing a task for him; and the consequences of these deals. Underworld Unleashed is one of very few DC Comics major crossovers not to directly involve Superman; at the time of the series he was off-planet as part of The Trial of Superman story arc. This is important to the Underworld Unleashed storyline, since the superheroes involved are driven by the belief that Superman is key to Neron's plans. Five of the The Flash's 'Rogues Gallery': Captain Boomerang, Captain Cold, Heat Wave, Mirror Master II, and Weather Wizard are approached with an offer by Abra-Kadabra, who had become an agent of the demon Neron in exchange for true magical powers to replace his
    6.13
    8 votes
    13

    Adventures of Bob Hope

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Adventures of Bob Hope is a comic book series that was published by National Periodical Publications (an imprint of DC Comics). The series featured stories based on comedian Bob Hope, as well as assorted other humorous stories. The series ran for 109 issues from 1950 through 1968. In the early 1950s, with sales for superhero themed comics on the decline, National Periodical Publications began licensing the right to use celebrity images, including Jerry Lewis, Dean Martin, Alan Ladd, and Bob Hope. Issue #1 (cover dated February–March 1950) set the tone for most of the 1950s. The lead story would feature Hope in a misadventure similar to his film roles; the back up stories tended to revolve around movie-related themes or characters. For example, issue #1 had a story on Rhonda Fleming, Hope's co-star in the 1949 film The Great Lover. By the 1960s, sales for the Hope series began to flag. The editors attempted to add some contemporary humor by introducing the character Super-Hip in issue #95. Despite the changes, the series was canceled with issue #109 (March 1968). The first four issues featured photographs of Hope on the cover; subsequent covers were illustrated. Owen Fitzgerald
    7.50
    6 votes
    14

    NYX

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    NYX is a limited series of comic books by Marvel Comics, consisting of seven issues, published between 2003 and 2005. It is written by Joe Quesada with art by Joshua Middleton (issues #1–4) and Rob Teranishi (issues #5-7). NYX stands for District X, New York City. The series features homeless teenage mutants in New York City: time-freezing Kiden, shape-shifting Tatiana, body-shifting Bobby, his mysterious brother Lil Bro, the female-Wolverine X-23 and Cameron, a woman with no powers. The series featured the first comic book appearance of X-23, a character originally created on the X-Men: Evolution cartoon. Although the series was cancelled in 2005, 2009 saw the 6-issue miniseries, NYX: No Way Home. In 2001 writer Brian Wood developed a concept of the series for Marvel with artist David Choe that was to launch Marvel's MAX imprint. The ongoing series, focusing on the characters and how their powers affect their lives, friends and family, was to star Gambit, Rogue, and Jubilee, as well as Angie and Purge, two new characters Wood had created for the series. After Marvel aborted the project, deeming it not suitable for their audience, Wood used parts of this concept for his series
    7.50
    6 votes
    15

    Civil War: Young Avengers/Runaways

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Civil War: Young Avengers/Runaways (also called Civil War: Young Avengers & Runaways in the collected edition) is a comic book mini-series tie-in to Marvel Comics' Civil War crossover event. The series serves as a team-up between the characters from Young Avengers and Runaways. The series was written by Zeb Wells with art by Stefano Caselli. Young Avengers co-creator Allan Heinberg and Runaways co-creator Brian K. Vaughan served as creative consultants to Wells. Civil War: Young Avengers/Runaways bridged the gap between the first and second volumes of the Young Avengers series, which went on hiatus due to writer Allan Heinberg's busy schedule with various television projects and his run on DC's Wonder Woman. It takes place after the events of Runaways v2 #21 and Young Avengers v1 #12 and before Civil War #3 The Runaways intervene in a fight between the Flag-Smasher and S.H.I.E.L.D. Cape-Killers, whose agents damage Victor. The Young Avengers see the altercation on television, and something about it causes the Vision to suffer a seizure. The Young Avengers steal a Quinjet and use Wiccan's magic to find the Runaways. Molly attacks the Young Avengers, thinking that they are working
    6.29
    7 votes
    16
    Ghost in the Shell

    Ghost in the Shell

    • Featured Characters: Motoko Kusanagi
    • Publisher: Kodansha
    • Created By: Masamune Shirow
    Ghost in the Shell (攻殻機動隊, Kōkaku Kidōtai, literally "Mobile Armored Riot Police") is a media franchise based on the Japanese seinen manga series written and illustrated by Masamune Shirow. The first manga was originally serialized in Young Magazine from April 1989 to November 1990 and was followed by a sequel, Man-Machine Interface, from September 1991 to August 1997; each series was later published as its own tankōbon volume by Kodansha. The manga presents itself as a collection of scenarios featuring counter-terrorist organization Public Security Section 9, led by protagonist Major Motoko Kusanagi, in a futuristic Japan. The series was first adapted as a film by Production I.G. in 1995, followed by a sequel, Innocence, in 2004. Two anime television series, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG, were also produced by Production I.G. and aired on Animax from 2002 to 2005; there were also several OVA produced based on the anime series. Video games, soundtracks, light novels, art books and other merchandise have also been released. In 2003, Kodansha published Ghost in the Shell 1.5: Human-Error Processer, a collection of manga chapters
    6.83
    6 votes
    17

    Battle Chasers

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Battle Chasers is an American fantasy comic book series by Joe Madureira, launched in April 1998. It was one of the most popular American comics series in the late 1990s, but suffered from extreme scheduling problems, with an average of about six months between issues, including a delay of 16 months for issue #7. Madureira produced a total of nine issues in four years (publishing two to three a year), a pace for which he was criticized. Originally published by WildStorm under its Cliffhanger imprint (founded by Madureira with J. Scott Campbell and Humberto Ramos), the series moved to Image Comics in 2001. The last issue, #9, was published in September 2001 and had a cliffhanger-ending that was never concluded, as #10 (scheduled for November 2001) was never released and Joe Madureira left the comic industry to pursue a career as a video game designer. Battle Chasers was one of the initial three comic book series published under the Cliffhanger label, which Madureira founded with fellow artists J. Scott Campbell (Danger Girl) and Humberto Ramos (Crimson) for Jim Lee's Image Comics imprint, WildStorm. When, effective in 1999, Wildstorm was sold to DC Comics, the Cliffhanger titles
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    G.R.A.V.E. GRRRLS: DESTROYERS OF THE DEAD

    G.R.A.V.E. GRRRLS: DESTROYERS OF THE DEAD

    • Publisher: Midnight show
    • Created By: Ken Wolak
    G.R.A.V.E. Grrrls: Destroyers of the Dead is a 2005 comic book mini-series. G.R.A.V.E. Grrrls: Destroyers of the Dead was published as a monthly three-issue comic book limited series by Midnight Show in 2005. It was re-released by The Scream Factory in a digital edition for a brief time only on WOWIO April 2008 A new nano-technology developed to cure Alzheimer’s disease (the Project: Born Again chip) is somehow bringing the dead back to life with an insatiable hunger for human flesh, and it’s going to take three “enhanced” female government ops known as the G.R.A.V.E. (Genetically Refined And Virally Enhanced) Grrrls to solve the mystery and put the dead back to bed. But that only raises more questions- both to the zombie plague and their own origins.
    6.67
    6 votes
    19

    Genesis

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Genesis" was a comic book crossover storyline that ran through a self titled, four-issue, weekly mini-series and published by DC Comics in August 1997. The series was written by John Byrne and drawn by Ron Wagner and Joe Rubinstein. The series was critically panned for the lack of long-term effects on continuity and retroactively changing the nature of the powers of various superheroes by suggesting that all superpowers were actually manifestations of the Source in the form of a Grand Unified Theory. The storyline centers on the New Gods of New Genesis and their enemy Darkseid and involves all of DC's super-powered characters. The storyline introduced the concept of the "Godwave", an interstellar phenomenon that, on its first pass, created gods on various planets through the universe, such as the Greek, Egyptian, and Norse pantheons on Earth. The Godwave then reached the edge of the universe and bounced back, creating superhumans on its second pass. The series focused on how the wave threatens reality when it rebounds back to its starting point on its third pass. Darkseid attempts to seize the power of the Godwave, which disrupts the abilities of various superheroes, either
    6.67
    6 votes
    20

    Last Planet Standing

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Tom DeFalco
    Last Planet Standing is a 5-issue comic book limited series, published by Marvel Comics in 2006. It was written by Tom DeFalco and drawn by Pat Olliffe (who also co-plotted the series). It stars many characters from the MC2 Universe. It is a sequel to the 2005 miniseries Last Hero Standing. The limited series begins with Reed and Sue Richards investigating some strange phenomena in another galaxy. Reed realizes that the entire Earth might be in danger within a week. However, an alien vessel causes a sun in the middle of the galaxy to overload and implode, creating a massive shockwave. Reed’s ship is destroyed before a warning message to Earth can be completed. The occupant of the alien vessel is revealed to be Dominas the Wavemaster, a Herald of Galactus. Dominas flies toward the Shi'ar Imperial Throneworld where he battles Gladiator and the rest of the Shi'ar Imperial Guard. On Earth, the rest of the Fantastic Five receive Reed’s transmission. They rush into a rescue operation, while Doom stays behind to warn the President and the other heroes. He informs A-Next about the current situation, but they are busy dealing with their lifelong adversaries, the Red Queen and her Revengers.
    6.67
    6 votes
    21

    Ultimate Spider-Man

    • Featured Characters: Spider-Man
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Brian Michael Bendis
    Ultimate Spider-Man was a superhero comic book series that was published by Marvel Comics from 2000 to 2009. The series is a modernized re-imagining of Marvel's long-running Spider-Man comic book franchise as part of its Ultimate Marvel imprint. Ultimate Spider-Man exists alongside other revamped Marvel characters in Ultimate Marvel titles including Ultimate X-Men, Ultimate Fantastic Four, and the Ultimates. The protagonist of Ultimate Spider-Man is Peter Parker, a science prodigy teenager who lives in Queens, New York. He is bitten by a genetically altered spider and inherits its powers, including enhanced strength, agility and reflexes. When an armed thief, whom Peter had a chance to stop earlier but didn't, kills his uncle Ben, he feels guilty and dedicates his life to fighting crime as the costumed vigilante Spider-Man. Peter tries to balance school, a job, a girlfriend, his family life with his widowed aunt May, and his activities as Spider-Man. Ultimate Spider-Man first saw print in 2000 under veteran Spider-Man artist Mark Bagley and writer Brian Michael Bendis, who expanded the original 11-page origin story into a 180-page, seven issue story arc. This duo continued to
    5.86
    7 votes
    22
    Highlander

    Highlander

    • Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment
    Dynamite Entertainment has published two comic book mini series based on the Highlander franchise. The first is a series of 13 issues simply titled Highlander that was later released in a 3 volume set. The second series is a 4 issue prequel to first Highlander film called Highlander: Way of the Sword. Simply titled Highlander, the first limited series comic book was originally released in 2006 and ran for one year ending in 2007. It was written by Brandon Jerwa and Michael Avon Oeming in close collaboration with David Abramowitz, who was Creative Consultant in charge of the writing on Highlander: The Series and the subsequent Highlander movies. It was published by Dynamite Entertainment. The preview issue released in July 2006 had over 100,000 copies pre-sold. It is inspired from Highlander, the franchise about Immortals battling each other throughout history. The comic book series deals with what the main characters of the franchise, Connor MacLeod and Duncan MacLeod, do concerning happenings from the films and television series. It spawned a second comic book mini-series, Highlander: Way of the Sword. The initial issues (issues 0-4) deal with Connor MacLeod after the events that
    6.50
    6 votes
    23
    Fallen Angel

    Fallen Angel

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Peter David
    Fallen Angel is an American fictional comic book heroine created and owned by writer Peter David and artist David Lopez, who appears in her self-titled monthly series. It was published by DC Comics from July 2003 until it was canceled with issue #20 in May 2005 because of low sales. It resumed publication through IDW Publishing in December 2005, and ran for 33 issues. It has since been followed by two mini-series, Fallen Angel: Reborn and Fallen Angel: Return of the Son. While not completely without humor, it is a very dark book with morally ambiguous characters. It was also one of the few "mature readers" books that DC published outside of its Vertigo imprint and was created to serve as a "bridge" between the general-audience DC titles and its Vertigo titles. The first series was illustrated in the typical pen-and-ink method of the comic book industry by penciller David Lopez and inker Fernando Blanco. The first five-issue arc of the second series was painted by J. K. Woodward, though both Woodward and guest artists have utilized the traditional pen-and-ink method since then. Launched by DC comics in 2003, the book had reportedly low sales by its eleventh issue. When asked why
    7.40
    5 votes
    24

    Batman: The Man Who Laughs

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Ed Brubaker
    Batman: The Man Who Laughs is a one-shot prestige format comic book by Ed Brubaker and Doug Mahnke, released in February 2005, and intended as a successor to Batman: Year One. It tells the story of Batman's first encounter with the Joker in post-Crisis continuity. The plot is based on the Joker's original introduction in Batman #1 (1940). The story "Images" in Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #50 (September 1993), is another, alternate take on the same story. The title is a reference to the movie The Man Who Laughs, whose star, Conrad Veidt, was an inspiration for The Joker. The story has been reprinted, in both hard and softcover, with Detective Comics #784-786–a storyline entitled "Made of Wood" (pairing Batman with the Green Lantern Alan Scott,) also written by Brubaker with art by Patrick Zircher. Captain James Gordon and other officers are investigating a building filled with mutilated corpses. Batman enters and converses with Gordon. Next, Bruce Wayne is seen at a social event talking to fellow millionaire Henry Claridge. On a TV in the next room, a reporter is overheard announcing that Arkham Asylum is being reopened. She suddenly begins laughing and soon dies with a face
    5.71
    7 votes
    25

    Freshmen

    • Publisher: Top Cow Productions
    Freshmen is a comic book series published by Top Cow, co-created by Seth Green and Hugh Sterbakov. The publication is marketed as "The adventures of college freshmen with extraordinary powers." Issue #1 was dated June 8, 2005. Freshmen II was released between November 2006 and July 2007. Fourteen college freshmen are cast out of the main dormitory and forced to live in temporary housing in the Boughl Science Building where they are given superhuman powers by the "ax-cell-erator" after an explosion. Dr. Theodore Tomlinson asks for the help of the super-powered freshmen to repair the device. Kenneth "Norrin" Weismeyer (aka Wannabe) who is obsessed with comic book superheroes but who went for pizza at the time of the accident and has no superpowers talks the freshmen into becoming superheroes and fighting criminals. At first the Freshmen are mostly concerned with learning how to use their powers, but later some of the team begin wearing costumes. Although the team's first field assignment is successful their second field assignment is not and Seductress is critically injured by Rob the frat guy and his Hulking Frat Guys. After the fallout of their first major battle with Rob the frat
    7.20
    5 votes
    26
    Seven Years in Dog-Land

    Seven Years in Dog-Land

    Seven Years in Dog-Land is a webcomic produced by Singapore graphic novelist Johnny Tay, who wrote the 18-chapter children’s fantasy comic Anima: Age of the Robots in 2003. It is the first graphic novel in Singapore to be published internationally as an e-book. In October 2011 it was one of Graphicly.com's 'featured titles' . Seven Years in Dog-Land is vastly different from Anima in both story and art direction. It is drawn in black and white instead of full-color like Anima, with heavily rendered and detailed images. The story is also much grimmer, targeted at older readers. Part of the comic is hosted on the author's new portal and the rest can be read via the e-book version. This synopsis of Seven Years in Dog-Land is presented on the webcomic site. The seven years in this story correspond with the idea of the Seven Ages of Man. Alice Carroll is a ten year-old girl staying with her widower father and pet dog Charlie in a run-of-the-mill suburban neighborhood. While on a sightseeing trip one day, Charlie runs off into the forest for no apparent reason. Alice is devastated that the police cannot help her and all her searches amount to nothing. In the following months she begins to
    7.20
    5 votes
    27
    Dead Corps

    Dead Corps

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Dead Corps, subtitled Dead Corpse is a four-issue comic book mini-series published in 1998 under the short-lived DC Comics imprint, Helix. Written by Christopher Hinz and illustrated by Steve Pugh, the story is set in a near-future earth where medical technology has opened the possibility for the re-animation of human beings and the dead play an active but sometimes unwilling role in everyday society. The title met with little success commercially as it was published by Helix some time after the cancellation of the entire imprint had been announced. The year is 2101 and thirty three years have passed since the first successful brain tissue remodulation and body reanimation of a human being. Vitals, ordinary living human beings, share their lives with Expireds, an underclass of once dead people who have been restored to life to perform a variety of specialist but unwanted tasks. Apart from the pallor of their skin and the putrid chemical unction which they are forced to consume as a food-substitute, the dead are otherwise indistinguishable from ordinary functioning human beings. Detective Sergeant CJ Rataan is the senior officer in a squad of the Paladin Dead Corps an elite but
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Lucha Libre

    Lucha Libre

    Lucha Libre is an anthology comic book series written by Jerry Frissen. It is published in France by Les Humanoïdes Associés and reprinted in North America by Image Comics. It is also published in Spain, Italy and Korea. It is regularly illustrated by Gobi, Bill, Fabien M., Hervé Tanquelle, Nikola Witko, Romuald Reutimann, Christophe Gaultier along with several other guest artists. The Image Comics translation started in September 2007 and a first trade paperback collecting the first three stories of The Luchadores Five, Tequila and The Tikitis was released in 2008 under the title Heroing's A Full Time Job (Tips Appreciated). A group of five middle aged Latino men don Lucha Libre masks and protect East L.A., together they face the likes of stereo stealing werewolves, Tiki warriors, deep sea greasers and rude gun toting rednecks. The Luchadores 5 never take their masks off and only respond to their Luchador names. Although they consider themselves superheroes, most people think of them as overgrown nerds. The first Luchadores 5 story appeared in the pages of Métal Hurlant. Tequila faces the daily rigors of married life in a trailer park, but is forced to go on the run after being
    7.00
    5 votes
    29

    Ms. Tree

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Ms. Tree was the best-known comic book creation of author Max Allan Collins prior to his graphic novel, Road to Perdition. Terry Beatty was the series' artist. The title character is Michael Tree, a female private detective who takes over her husband's investigation business when he is murdered. In her first case, she captures the murderer and discovers his link to the Muerta organized crime family. Ms. Tree's dead husband was named Michael Tree, the joke being that after the marriage they had the same name. Series creator/writer Max Allan Collins makes no secret of the fact that Ms. Tree was inspired by Velda, Mike Hammer's secretary, a stacked, gun carrying, six-foot tall brunette and Mike's lover, who was almost as tough as he was. The basic premise of Ms. Tree was, "What if Velda and Mike Hammer eventually got married, and on their honeymoon he was murdered?" Throughout the series, in addition to isolated cases, Ms. Tree's vendetta against the Muerta family is a major plot thread. Her methods often include deadly violence which she uses with little hesitation. In contrast to genre conventions, she faces serious consequences throughout the series for these violent actions
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Runaways

    Runaways

    • Featured Characters: Nico Minoru
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Brian K. Vaughan
    Runaways is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. The series features a group of teenagers who discover that their parents are part of an evil crime group called the Pride. Created by Brian K. Vaughan and Adrian Alphona, the series debuted in July of 2003 as part of Marvel Comics' "Tsunami" imprint. The series had been canceled in September 2004 at issue eighteen, but due to high numbers of trade collection sales, Marvel revived the series in February 2005. Originally, the series featured a group of six kids whose parents routinely met every year for a charity event. One year, the kids spy on their parents and learn they are "the Pride", a criminal group of mob bosses, time-travelers, dark wizards, mad scientists, alien invaders and telepathic mutants. The kids steal weapons and resources from their parents, and learn they themselves inherited their parents' powers; Alex Wilder, a prodigy, leads the team while Nico Minoru learns she is a powerful witch, Karolina Dean discovers she is an alien, Gertrude Yorkes learns of her telepathic link to a dinosaur, Chase Stein steals his father's futuristic gloves, while young Molly Hayes learns she is a mutant with incredible
    7.00
    5 votes
    31

    Teen Titans

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Mike McKone
    The Teen Titans, also known as the New Teen Titans, New Titans, or simply the Titans, is a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, often in eponymous monthly series. As the group's name suggests, its membership is usually composed of teenaged superheroes. The first incarnation of the team unofficially debuted in The Brave and the Bold #54 (1964) as a "junior Justice League" featuring Robin (Dick Grayson), Kid Flash (Wally West), and Aqualad, the sidekicks of Leaguers Batman, the Flash, and Aquaman, respectively. The group then made its first appearance under the name "Teen Titans" in The Brave and the Bold #60, joined by Wonder Girl (Donna Troy), the younger sister of Wonder Woman. Green Arrow's sidekick, Speedy (Roy Harper), later took Aqualad's place in the lineup. While only a modest success with its original incarnation, the series became a hit with its 1980s revival, under the stewardship of writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Pérez. In 1980, the two relaunched the team as The New Teen Titans, aging the characters to young adulthood. Original members Robin, Wonder Girl, and Kid Flash were joined by new characters Cyborg, Starfire, and Raven,
    6.00
    6 votes
    32

    Ghost Rider 2099

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ghost Rider 2099 is a comic book series that was published by Marvel Comics, under the Marvel 2099 imprint, from 1994 to 1996. The series is set in the year 2099, in a dystopian possible future of the Marvel Universe, and features Kenshiro "Zero" Cochrane, a hacker who was killed but resurrected as the Ghost Rider — his mind controlling a powerful and well-armed robot. As with most of the Marvel 2099 titles, the protagonist was a futuristic version of a commercially successful Marvel Universe character — in this case, the supernatural anti-hero known as the Ghost Rider. The series was heavily influenced by cyberpunk science fiction, particularly that of William Gibson. The Ghost Rider 2099 series was not one of the initial titles launched for the 2099 imprint and contained few direct crossovers with the other titles. The series ran for 25 issues, ending in May 1996. The title character's story was concluded in the final issue, but Zero Cochrane did reappear as an important character in the final 2099 story in the one-shot 2099: Manifest Destiny. Hacker Kenshiro "Zero" Cochrane was shot and facing death in Transverse City after being hunted down for stealing information from the
    6.80
    5 votes
    33

    Trouble

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Trouble is a five-issue romance comic book limited series published in 2003 by Marvel Comics as a part of its Epic Comics imprint. Written by Mark Millar and illustrated by Terry and Rachel Dodson the series deals with teen pregnancy. The basic concept was created by Bill Jemas and Joe Quesada. Trouble was considered by Marvel's editorial group as the possible origin of Spider-Man. It was also meant to re-popularize romance comics (which were very popular in the 1950s (see 1950s in comics), selling millions of copies), but failed. A trade paperback collecting the five issues was originally scheduled to be published on 18 February 2004, but canceled when Epic was shut down after Bill Jemas, who had been a driving force behind the imprint, resigned as president of Marvel Comics. May and her best friend Mary work in a resort in the Hamptons during their summer vacation, looking for some fun away from home. Soon they make friends with fellow service staff members Richard and his brother Ben and the four of them, after a couple of days of hard work and being bossed about by the guests, go to a dance together. After the dance and a round of night swimming they head back to their rooms:
    7.75
    4 votes
    34

    All Star Superman

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Grant Morrison
    All-Star Superman is a twelve-issue comic book series featuring Superman that ran from November 2005 to October 2008. The series was written by Grant Morrison, drawn by Frank Quitely, digitally inked by Jamie Grant and published by DC Comics. DC claimed that this series would "strip down the Man of Steel to his timeless, essential elements". The series was the second to be launched in 2005 under DC's All-Star imprint, the first being All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder. These series are attempts by DC to allow major comics creators a chance to tell stories showcasing these characters without being restricted by DC Universe continuity. Grant Morrison's approach to writing this series was to make the reading as universal as possible. He stated that he wasn't interested in "re-doing origin stories or unpacking classic narratives" but instead wanted to do "a total update, rehaul and refit". However, rather than just creating a "fresh and relevant" update for new readers, Morrison wanted to write a "collection of ‘timeless’ Superman issues". The origins of this lie in a revamp of Superman, Superman Now, which began when Morrison and editor Dan Raspler were unsuccessfully
    5.83
    6 votes
    35

    Annihilation

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    "Annihilation" was a 2006 crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics, highlighting several outer space-related characters in the Marvel Universe. The central miniseries was written by Keith Giffen, with editor Andy Schmidt. A 48-page one-shot issue, Annihilation: Prologue, was released on March 15, 2006. It was followed by four concurrent 4-issue mini-series, Silver Surfer (April 1, 2006), Super-Skrull (April 12, 2006), Nova (April 19, 2006), and Ronan the Accuser (April 26, 2006). Annihilation was published as a six issue mini series beginning in August 2006. It was followed by two issues of Annihilation: Heralds of Galactus and a new volume of Nova. While not published with the Annihilation banner, Drax the Destroyer: Earth Fall #1-4 (Sept 2005) and Thanos #7-12 (2004) were preludes to the event. Thanos visits the intergalactic prison, the Kyln. With the help of Star-Lord, he defeats the Beyonder. Thanos also befriends Skreet, a chaos mite, and enslaves a former herald of Galactus, the Fallen One. Drax the Destroyer is on a prison transport ship that crashes in Alaska. He befriends a teenage girl named Cammi and protects the locals from the Blood Brothers, Lunatik, and
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Superman: Last Son

    Superman: Last Son

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Last Son" is a five-issue comic book story arc featuring Superman in the monthly Action Comics. It is written by Geoff Johns and Richard Donner, the director of the well-known 1978 film Superman: The Movie and a portion of Superman II, with pencils by Adam Kubert. This story introduces the original character, Christopher Kent and adapts the classic Superman film villains, General Zod, Ursa and Non into the regular DC Universe continuity. The arc's first three parts were published in Action Comics #844 through #846. The next parts were delayed to give Kubert sufficient recovery time from health problems he did not wish to disclose. Because of this, the fourth part was delayed and released with issue #851. The eleventh annual of Action Comics, released in May 2008, completed the storyline. Because the better part of 19 months passed between the publication of the first part and the final installment of the story, much criticism has been centered on the creative team and DC Comics in general. The hardcover edition of the complete series was released on July 2, 2008. Reminded by the Fortress of Solitude's AI (in the guise of his Kryptonian father Jor-El) that, despite his appearance,
    6.60
    5 votes
    37

    1963

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    1963 is an American six-issue comic book limited series written by Alan Moore in 1993, with art by his frequent collaborators Steve Bissette, John Totleben, and Rick Veitch; other contributors included Dave Gibbons, Don Simpson, and Jim Valentino, and published by Image Comics. The six issues hark back to the Silver Age of American comics (in particular, the early Marvel Comics), and feature spoof advertisements on the rear covers—in a manner to be repeated with a twist by Moore and Kevin O'Neill in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Moore's homage to Marvel clichés included fictionalizing himself and the artists as the "Sixty-Three Sweatshop", describing his collaborators in the same hyperbolic and alliterative mode Stan Lee used for his "Marvel Bullpen"; each was given a Lee-style nickname ("Affable Al," "Sturdy Steve," "Jaunty John," etc.—Veitch has since continued to refer to himself as "Roarin' Rick"). The parody is not entirely affectionate, as the text pieces and fictional letter columns contain pointed inside jokes about the business practices of 1960s comics publishers, with "Affable Al" portrayed as a tyrant who claims credit for his employees' creations. Moore also
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Hunter × Hunter

    Hunter × Hunter

    • Featured Characters: Kurapika
    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Yoshihiro Togashi
    Hunter × Hunter (ハンター×ハンター, Hantā Hantā), is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Yoshihiro Togashi. The story focuses on a young boy named Gon, who discovers that his father, whom he was told was dead, is actually alive and well. He learns that his father, Ging, is a world-renowned Hunter: a licensed profession for those who specialize in fantastic pursuits such as locating rare or unidentified animal species, treasure hunting, surveying unexplored enclaves, or hunting down lawless individuals. Despite Ging having left his son with his relatives in order to pursue his own dreams, Gon departs upon a journey to follow in his father's footsteps, pass the rigorous Hunter Examination, and eventually find his father. Along the way, Gon meets various other kinds of Hunters and also encounters the paranormal. The original inspiration for the manga came from Togashi's own collecting hobby. Hunter × Hunter began its manga serialization on March 3, 1998 in the Shueisha magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump. As of April 2012, 320 chapters have been published in 30 tankōbon (chapter collections) in Japan. However, the manga has frequently gone on hiatus since 2006. Hunter × Hunter was
    8.67
    3 votes
    39

    Batman: The Dark Knight Returns

    • Featured Characters: Batman
    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Frank Miller
    Batman: The Dark Knight Returns is a four-issue comic book limited series comprising The Dark Knight Returns, The Dark Knight Triumphant, Hunt The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Falls, written and drawn by Frank Miller, originally published by DC Comics under the title Batman: The Dark Knight in 1986. When the issues were released in a collected edition later that year, the story title for the first issue was applied to the series as a whole. The Dark Knight Returns tells the story of a 55-year-old Bruce Wayne who comes out of retirement to fight crime, only to face opposition from the Gotham City police force and the United States government. A sequel (written and illustrated again by Miller), The Dark Knight Strikes Again, was published in 2001. The Dark Knight Returns is set in a dystopian near-future version of Gotham City. A year is never specified, though it has been a full decade since the last reported sighting of Batman, the current American President appears to be Ronald Reagan or someone using his image, and the Cold War is still ongoing. The author also alludes to the deaths of Bruce Wayne's parents as being on the night of a movie theater showing of Tyrone Power in
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    DC: The New Frontier

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Darwyn Cooke
    DC: The New Frontier is an Eisner, Harvey, and Shuster Award-winning six-issue comic book limited series written and drawn by Darwyn Cooke, published by DC Comics in 2003-2004. It was then collected into two trade paperback volumes from 2004–2005 and then an Absolute Edition in 2006. The story was adapted as an animated movie titled Justice League: The New Frontier, and released on February 26, 2008. The series was influenced by works such as Kingdom Come, The Golden Age, Watchmen, and The Dark Knight Returns. Much like The Golden Age, New Frontier takes place primarily in the 1950s, and depicts the Golden Age superheroes Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman meeting Silver Age characters the Flash, Green Lantern, and Martian Manhunter. The story bridges the gap from the end of the Golden Age to the beginning of the Silver Age in the DC Universe. World War II is over and the Cold War has begun. The Age of the Superhero is in decline. Superman, Wonder Woman and Batman, who survived the anti-hero sentiment of the Cold War, as well as eager newcomers like test pilot Hal Jordan and scientists Barry Allen and Ray Palmer, team up to defeat a threatening alien presence on Earth. The New
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    The Red Series

    The Red Series

    • Created By: Willy Vandersteen
    The Red Series of Suske en Wiske (known in English as Spike and Suzy) are the best known series of Dutch comics. The name of these series originated in the red covers of the albums. They comprise of most of the Spike and Suzy books, all others fitting into The Blue Series or the specials. In this section, the date refers to the date of the first (i.e. non-coloured until 1964) print of the given album. All the following albums have the same date, until a new date has been given to an album. This date is not the same as the date of the first 'coloured' print. A reference between those editions has been given. Note: the title of album 21 (De cirkusbaron) has been reprinted with the corrected title (De circusbaron) from 1956 onwards. A few other titles have minor changes between the original edition and reeditions as well. Some reeditions are also redrawn, some are only retexted. If an album has been published in English, the English title is given as well, preceded by S&S (if the series was titled Spike and Suzy), W&W (for Willy and Wanda), or B&B (for Bob & Bobette). All of these books have also been published in French, though in a slightly different order. 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950
    7.50
    4 votes
    42

    Bone

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Bone is an independently published comic series originally serialized in 55 irregularly released issues from 1991 to 2004. Bone was drawn and written by Jeff Smith. Smith's black-and-white drawings were inspired by animated cartoons and comic strips, a notable influence being Walt Kelly's Pogo: "I was ... a big fan of Carl Barks and Pogo, so it was just natural for me to want to draw that kind of mixture of Walt Kelly and Moebius." Accordingly, the story is singularly characterized by an effective combination of both light-hearted comedy and dark, epic fantasy: Time Magazine has called the series "as sweeping as the Lord of the Rings cycle, but much funnier." The series was published bimonthly with some delays from June 1991 to June 2004. The series was self-published for issue #1 through issue #19. It was published by Image Comics from issue #20 through issue #28. It reverted to its original self-publishing company, Cartoon Books, for issue #29 through issue #55 (the last one). Bone has received numerous awards, among them ten Eisner Awards and eleven Harvey Awards. In 2005, Time chose the 1,342 page compilation as one of the 10 best English language graphic novels ever
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Killing

    Killing

    Killing is an Italian photo comic series featuring an eponymous character. The series was entitled Satanik in the French edition, Kiling in Argentina as well as being published in Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Germany and Venezuela. Sold as "Photostories for Adults", it ran for 62 issues (19 in France) starting in 1966, and was published by Ponzoni and editor Pietro Granelli with each episode directed by actor and singer Rosario Borelli. The character was also known as KiLiNK, the star of several unauthorized films shot in Turkey during the late 1960s and early 70s. The Argentinean series ran out of the Italian stories and began shooting new adventures that lasted until the 1980s. The series is currently being revived by American editor and comics creator Mort Todd, under the new title, Sadistik: The Diabolikal Super-Kriminal. The documentary about the character The Diabolikal Super-Kriminal directed by SS-Sunda had its US premiere at the San Diego Comic-Con on July 25, 2009 where it received Special Mention by the judges. Killing is a vicious criminal, totally without mercy and portrayed throughout the series without credit by Aldo Agliata. Wearing a black and white costume styled on
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Dominion: Tank Police

    Dominion: Tank Police

    • Publisher: Hakusensha
    • Created By: Masamune Shirow
    Dominion: Tank Police (ドミニオン, Dominion) is a two volume manga series written and illustrated by Masamune Shirow. Set in the fictional city of Newport, Japan, in a future in which bacterial air pollution has become so severe that people must wear gas masks when outdoors, the series follows a police squadron that uses tanks. Dominion has been adapted into three OVA series: Dominion Tank Police, New Dominion Tank Police (特捜戦車隊ドミニオン, Tokusō Sensha-tai Dominion) and TANK S.W.A.T. 01 (警察戦車隊 TANK S.W.A.T., Keisatsu Sensha-tai TANK S.W.A.T.). The first OVA was animated by Agent 21 and released in 1988. New Dominion was animated by J.C.Staff. The manga was published by Hakusensha, Kodansha and later by Seishinsha. It has been published in English by Dark Horse Comics. The anime has been released in English translation in the United Kingdom and Australia by Manga Entertainment and in the United States by Central Park Media, under their US Manga Corps division. The Dominion: Tank Police OVA is a prequel to the original manga series. New Dominion Tank Police appears to be a direct sequel to the original manga, right down to where Leona's Bonaparte is a different color, and minor differences to
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    Legends

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Legends" was a comic book crossover story line that ran through a six-issue, self titled limited series and various other titles published by DC Comics in 1986 and 1987. Each of the individual crossover/tie-in issues had a Legends Chapter # header added to their trade dress. The series was plotted by John Ostrander, scripted by Len Wein, pencilled by John Byrne, and inked by Karl Kesel. The six issues of the Legends series could be read as an abbreviated story by themselves, or all 22 chapters could be read as a longer story that included the Legends issues as well as issues from other titles including Batman, Superman, and Secret Origins. It was also the first major DC Universe crossover after the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths. Legends served mainly as a launching pad for several new comic series, including the latter-day Flash title, Keith Giffen and J. M. DeMatteis' comedy/action take on the Justice League, and the villain-based black ops Suicide Squad. The series also saw the post-Crisis introduction into the DC Universe of Captain Marvel (who was spun off in the miniseries Shazam: The New Beginning) as well as Wonder Woman, who had been rebooted by DC Comics at the same
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Love and Rockets

    Love and Rockets

    • Publisher: Fantagraphics Books
    • Created By: Gilberto Hernandez
    Love and Rockets (often abbreviated L&R) is a comic book series by Gilbert Hernandez and Jaime Hernandez, sometimes cited jointly as Los Bros Hernandez. Their brother Mario Hernandez is an occasional contributor. It was one of the first comics in the alternative comics revolution of the 1980s. The Hernandez brothers self-published the first issue of Love and Rockets in 1981, but since 1982 it has been published by Fantagraphics Books. The magazine temporarily ceased publication in 1996 after the release of issue #50, while Gilbert and Jaime went on to do separate series involving many of the same characters. However, in 2001 Los Bros revived the series as Love and Rockets Volume 2. Love and Rockets contains several ongoing serial narratives, the most prominent being Gilbert's Palomar stories and Jaime's Hoppers 13 (aka Locas) stories. It also contains one-offs, shorter stories, surrealist jokes, and more. Palomar tells the story of a fictional village in Latin America and its inhabitants. Its vibrant characters and sometimes-fantastic events are sometimes compared to the magical realism literary style of authors such as Gabriel García Márquez. The series is also sometimes referred
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    The Golden Age

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Golden Age is a 1993 four-issue Elseworlds comic book mini-series by writer James Robinson and artist Paul Smith. It concerns the Golden Age DC Comics superheroes entering the 1950s and facing the advent of McCarthyism. The series opens showing how various Golden Age heroes have adjusted to life after World War II. The members of the Justice Society of America and All-Star Squadron have retired. Tex Thompson, formerly the Americommando, has returned from Europe a war hero, and has used his fame to start a political career, resulting in him being elected a Senator. He then recruits several former heroes to create a new group of heroes for the 1950s. The group includes Robotman, who is losing his sense of human ethics, the Atom and Johnny Thunder, who are both looking for somewhere to belong, and Dan the Dyna-Mite (Daniel Dunbar), who is lost after the death of his mentor TNT. Thompson oversees various experiments on Dunbar which change him into the incredibly powerful Dynaman. Other retired heroes are suffering from their own problems. The McCarthy hearings have resulted in Green Lantern being blacklisted due to his job as the head of a media corporation. Johnny Quick and
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    X-Men: Legacy

    X-Men: Legacy

    • Featured Characters: Mystique
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    X-Men: Legacy is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics featuring the mutant superhero team, the X-Men. The title began its publication in October 1991 as X-Men. From 2001 until 2004 it was published as New X-Men. It had reverted (as of issue #157) to its original title, but changed again (from issue #208) to X-Men: Legacy. It is usually referred to as X-Men, vol. 2 because the first series, currently Uncanny X-Men, was titled The X-Men prior to 1981. In 1991, Marvel launched X-Men, vol. 2 as a spinoff of the parent title Uncanny X-Men, with co-writers Chris Claremont and Jim Lee, previously the penciler on Uncanny, moving over to X-Men, while studio mate Whilce Portacio took over penciling duties on Uncanny. X-Men #1 is still the bestselling comic book of all time, with sales of over 8.1 million copies (and nearly $7 million), according to Guinness Book of World Records, which presented honors to Claremont at the 2010 San Diego Comic-Con (however, it probably sold closer to 3 million copies). The sales figures were generated in part by publishing the issue with five different variant covers, four of which showed different characters from the book that combined into a
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Blaze of Glory: The Last Ride of the Western Heroes

    Blaze of Glory: The Last Ride of the Western Heroes

    • Created By: John Ostrander
    Blaze of Glory (full cover title: Blaze of Glory: The Last Ride of the Western Heroes) is a four-issue comic book limited series published in 2000 by Marvel Comics. It was written by John Ostrander and drawn by Leonardo Manco. The series featured a more historically realistic update of Marvel's Western heroes. In contrast to characters' standard looks until then, Blaze of Glory depicted them as grizzled, weather-beaten cowboys and gunfighters, wearing less stylized, more historically appropriate outfits than their classic ones. Blaze of Glory retconned some of the Marvel Western stories of years past as being dime novel fictions of the characters' actual lives. Series' writer John Ostrander declared: A lot of the stories that have been printed, like in old issues of Rawhide Kid and Two-Gun Kid, those are great legends, but not necessarily the truth. We're gonna tell you more of the truth. It is going to have a bit of a historical grounding to it. Look for reinterpretations of classic Marvel characters. Blaze of Glory was originally intended to be released as two forty-eight page issues, as writer John Ostrander revealed in a 1998 interview: It's called Blaze of Glory, sometimes
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    Buddha

    Buddha

    • Publisher: HarperCollins (UK)
    • Created By: Osamu Tezuka
    Buddha (ブッダ, Budda) is a manga drawn by Osamu Tezuka and is Tezuka's unique interpretation of the life of Gautama Buddha, the founder of Buddhism. The critically acclaimed series is often referred to as a gritty, even sexual, portrayal of the Buddha's life. The series began in September 1972 and ended in December 1983, as one of Tezuka's last epic manga works. Buddha received the 2004 and 2005 Eisner Award. As of early 2006, each volume had sold an average of 8,500 copies, with Kapilavastu having sold 20,000 copies. Due to differences between the ways in which Japanese and English are read, the American volumes published by Vertical Inc. are presented as mirror images of Tezuka's original work so they can be read from left to right, rather than from right to left. Nearly three decades after the manga was completed, an anime film adaptation was released in 2011. In ancient India, the lives of many people are plagued by drought, famine, constant warfare and injustices in the caste system. The intertwining lives of many unhappy souls are drawn together by the birth of the young prince Siddhartha, who embarks on a spiritual journey, becomes Gautama Buddha, "the Enlightened One," and
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    Contest of Champions II

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Contest of Champions II is a five-issue comic book limited series published from September to November 1999 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Chris Claremont and pencilled by Oscar Jimenez and Michael Ryan. The series is unrelated to the original limited series of the same name - Contest of Champions - published in 1982. A group of Earth's heroes are invited by an apparently benevolent race to participate in a series of contests against one another in exchange for advanced technology. This, however, is a ruse staged by the alien race the Brood. The Brood Queen plans to absorb the powers of the strongest heroes and channel them into the captive mutant heroine Rogue, to whom the Brood Queen has transferred her conciusness using Rogue's mutant power, subsequently using the winning heroes as hosts for Brood embryoes for the new invasion of Earth.. Courtesy of microscopic nanites, all the heroes (with the exception of Iron Man, whose armor's automatic life support systems protected him from infection) are drugged, and become indifferent to everything except the contest. After Iron Man loses his second match against X-Force, however, he is able to use his resources to reprogram
    7.25
    4 votes
    52

    Day of Vengeance

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Day of Vengeance is a six-issue comic book limited series written by Bill Willingham, with art by Justiniano and Walden Wong, published in 2005 by DC Comics. Day of Vengeance is one of four limited series leading up to DC Comics' Infinite Crisis event. It focuses on the Spectre and other magical beings of the DC Universe, especially a hastily formed group known as the Shadowpact. The series has tie-ins to other ongoing DC Comics series, including JSA #73-76 and Blood of the Demon #6. The events of this series were preceded by the story arc teaming Superman and Captain Marvel from Action Comics #826, Adventures of Superman #639 and Superman #216. Jean Loring, ex-wife of Ray Palmer (The Atom) and murderer of Sue Dibny in 2004's seven-issue limited series Identity Crisis, is transformed into a new version of the villainous Eclipso by mysterious forces. Loring escapes from her Arkham Asylum cell to unknown whereabouts. Meanwhile, the Spectre, the vengeful right hand of God, is now without a host since the revival of Hal Jordan. Eclipso persuades the Spectre that magic is evil because it breaks the laws of nature set by God. This logic makes sense to the hostless Spectre, who vows to
    7.25
    4 votes
    53

    Hawkworld

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Hawkworld is a comic book series that was published by DC Comics. The initial story line was published as a three-issue mini-series and then, based on the high sales and interest level generated by this limited series, launched as an ongoing monthly book. Katar Hol and Shayera Thal were rebooted in the prestige format limited series. The three-issue limited series by Timothy Truman was published in 1989. The ongoing series lasted for four years (1990–1993) and included 32 issues, along with 3 annuals. Timothy Truman contributed to the plotting of the first six issues, which were scripted by John Ostrander. Ostrander was the sole credited writer for the remainder of the series. After the Hawkworld ongoing series was ended in 1993, a new series simply named Hawkman (vol. 3) picked up the story line and ran from 1993 to 1996. Ostrander wrote the first six issues of this new series, tying up some dangling plot threads from Hawkworld. Katar Hol was a young police officer on the planet Thanagar, and a child of a privileged family. But his homeworld had the policy to conquer and mine other worlds for their resources to maintain its high standard of living, and Hol realized that this was
    7.25
    4 votes
    54

    Infinity Inc.

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Roy Thomas
    Infinity, Inc. is a team of superheroes appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. The team is mostly composed of the children and heirs of the Justice Society of America, making them the Society's analogue to the Teen Titans, which is composed of sidekicks of Justice League members. Created by Roy Thomas, Jerry Ordway, and Mike Machlan, they first appeared in All-Star Squadron #25 (September 1983). There was also an eponymous comics series starring the group, which ran from March 1984 through June 1988. Roy Thomas and his wife, Dann Thomas, wrote the series throughout its run. Artists on the series included Jerry Ordway, Don Newton, Todd McFarlane, Vince Argondezzi, and Michael Bair. The group was organized by Sylvester Pemberton, the original Star-Spangled Kid, in Infinity Inc. #1, when a number of JSA protégés were denied admission to the JSA. They instead formed their own group. Members of Infinity, Inc. were known as Infinitors. The series ended in 1988 with the death of the Star-Spangled Kid (by then known as Skyman), and presumably the group disbanded shortly thereafter. Several members have gone on to supporting roles in other comics series. Fury filled a pivotal role
    7.25
    4 votes
    55
    Ragman

    Ragman

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Ragman is a fictional DC Comics mystic vigilante and superhero who first appeared in the short-lived comic-book series named after him. He is one of a limited number of Jewish superheroes, and his continuity is tied to that of DC Comics' Golem, derived from the Golem of Prague of Jewish folklore. Ragman was created by writer Robert Kanigher and artist Joe Kubert. Ragman is sometimes compared to the other nighttime defender of Gotham City, Batman. A Vietnam veteran, Rory had grown up helping his father, a junk man who owned a pawn shop named Rags'n'Tatters. His father always dreamed of making a better life for Rory and constantly promised that someday he would make Rory rich. While drinking with his friends one night, his father discovered 2 million dollars stuffed inside an old mattress that had been pawned just recently. He and his friends decided to hide the money for Rory, since they were too old to truly benefit from it. The money turned out to be the loot from an armored car heist and when the hoods came to the shop one night to get it, they shot down some electrical wires and used them to torture Rory's father and his friends into revealing where the money was hidden. Rory
    7.25
    4 votes
    56

    The Batman Strikes!

    The Batman Strikes! is a DC comic book series featuring Batman. It is different from other Batman titles in that it is set in the continuity (and style) of the television animated series The Batman as opposed to the regular DC Universe.
    7.25
    4 votes
    57
    The Black Lamb

    The Black Lamb

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Black Lamb is a six-issue comic book limited series that takes place in a science fantasy setting. Published in late 1996 and early 1997 by DC Comics as part of their now defunct Helix imprint, the series was written and drawn by Tim Truman. Set in an unnamed near future city that has a cyberpunk appearance and feel, The Black Lamb stars a character named Diarmaid Donn, a centuries old vampire who is originally from medieval Ireland. Donn, known as the Black Lamb, is a figure authorized by the supernatural elements of the city, known collectively as the Tribes of the Night, as judge, jury and executioner in matters pertaining to the protection of the Tribes of the Night. Told mostly from the point of view of the title character, a significant amount of time also finds the story told from the point of view of a supporting character named Commissioner Damn. Damn is a police officer who has the ability to sense supernatural beings. Although some members of the Tribes of the Night live above ground, the majority reside, hidden in secret, in a huge maze of underground caverns beneath the city. In the back of issue #1, Tim Truman wrote a column titled "Out for Blood" in which he
    7.25
    4 votes
    58
    Secret Invasion

    Secret Invasion

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    "Secret Invasion" is a comic book crossover storyline that ran through a self-titled eight issue limited series and several tie-in books published by Marvel Comics from April through December 2008. The story involves a subversive, long-term invasion of Earth by the alien Skrulls. Capable of shapeshifting, the Skrulls have secretly replaced many of Marvel's heroes with impostors over a period of years, prior to the overt invasion. Marvel's promotional tagline for the event was "Who do you trust?" Writer Brian Michael Bendis stated in interviews that the motivation for the invasion is the destruction of the Skrull Empire in the Annihilation storyline. Bendis said the Skrulls believe Earth "is religiously and rightfully theirs," and that there are hints as to the plot placed in the limited series Secret War and the title New Avengers from the first issue. The limited series concluded the plot and was, according to Bendis, "a hell of an end." In November 2007, several ongoing titles and mini-series were branded as tie-ins to the main Secret Invasion storyline, with the tagline: Secret Invasion: The Infiltration. In addition to the core story, the Avengers titles provided additional
    5.50
    6 votes
    59

    DC One Million

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Grant Morrison
    "DC One Million" was a crossover storyline that ran through a self titled, weekly limited series and through special issues of almost all "DCU" titles published by DC Comics in November 1998. It featured a vision of the DC Universe in the 853rd century (chosen because that is the century in which, if the company had maintained a regular publishing schedule, DC Comics would first publish an issue numbered one million (specifically, Action Comics, their longest running title). The mini-series was written by Grant Morrison and drawn by Val Semeiks. The core of the event was a four-issue mini-series, in which the 20th-century Justice League of America and the 853rd-century Justice Legion Alpha co-operate to defeat a plot by the supervillain Vandal Savage (who, being practically immortal, exists in both centuries as well as all the ones in between) and future Superman nemesis Solaris, the Living Sun. Thirty-four other series then being published by DC also put out a single issue numbered #1,000,000, which either showed its characters' involvement in the central plot or gave a glimpse of what its characters' descendants/successors would be doing in the 853rd century. Hitman #1,000,000
    6.20
    5 votes
    60

    Hawaiian dick

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Hawaiian Dick is a comic book created by writer B. Clay Moore and artist Steven Griffin, and published by Image Comics. The first Hawaiian Dick mini-series hit comic shops in December of 2002, and was subsequently followed in late 2003 by a second four issue mini-series called Hawaiian Dick: the Last Resort. The second series ran into numerous publication delays, but was completed in July of 2006. The trade paperback collecting the second mini-series was published in October 2006. The comic book received extensive media attention upon its arrival, including favorable reviews in Entertainment Weekly and Publishers Weekly. In 2004, Hawaiian Dick was optioned by New Line Cinema for development as a feature film. Screenwriters Mark Swift and Damian Shannon (Freddy vs. Jason) were signed on to develop a screenplay. The option was subsequently renewed in 2006, at which time director Frank Coraci (The Wedding Singer, The Waterboy, Click) was tabbed to direct the film, although no movement toward actual casting and production has been made. Artist and colorist Steven Griffin was nominated for the 2003 Russ Manning Award for his work on the book, and subsequently received three separate
    7.00
    4 votes
    61

    Justice League Europe

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of the comic book Justice League America (which was then named Justice League International (vol 1) for issues #7 to #25). Justice League Europe was published for 68 issues (plus five annuals) from 1989 to 1994. Starting with issue #51 the title was renamed Justice League International (vol. 2). Like Justice League America, the series featured tongue-in-cheek humor but was a much more action-centric series than Justice League America. The action-themed nature of the series was most overt with the series' most famous arc "The Extremists". The arc featured the JLE fighting The Extremists, a cadre of psychopathic villains patterned after Marvel Comics villains; Doctor Doom, Magneto, Doctor Octupus, Sabretooth and Dormammu. The team was originally headquartered in Paris, France but later moved to an abandoned castle in Great Britain. After the membership of the Justice League had grown to an unwieldy number of characters, DC split it into two teams. The original Justice League of Europe consisted of: Later members of the original team included: "Breakdowns" was a 15-issue crossover between the Justice League America and
    7.00
    4 votes
    62

    Spitfire

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Spitfire and the Troubleshooters (renamed to Codename: Spitfire with issue #10) was a short-lived comic book series from Marvel Comics' New Universe line. It followed "Spitfire" (Professor Jenny Swensen) and a group of brilliant but eccentric college students as they used various high-tech exoskeletons to combat crime (the M.A.X. Armor, standing for Man-Assisted eXperimental). However, Swensen proved to be a popular character and was later included in the Pitt one-shot. Swensen was exposed to the Pitt itself, which was created by the Black Event, and was transformed into an armor-skinned Paranormal, later becoming a semi-regular character in the longer running DP7 comic and adopting the codename Chrome. A different version of the character - Dr Jennifer Swann - was introduced in 2007, as part of Warren Ellis' newuniversal. a single-title reworking of the New Universe concepts. An alternate version of Jenny Swensen is introduced as Dr. Jennifer Swan in Warren Ellis's re-imagining of New Universe called newuniversal. Dr. Jennifer Swann works for Project Spitfire, continuing her father's work on the H.E.X. (Human Enhancement eXperimental) Initiative, working to create a robotic battle
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    Supreme Power

    Supreme Power

    The Squadron Supreme is a fictional superhero team that appears in publications under the mature-audience MAX imprint by Marvel Comics. The team first appears in Supreme Power #1 (Jan. 2003) and was created by writer J. Michael Straczynski and artist Gary Frank. The series Supreme Power features the rebooted version of the superhero team Squadron Supreme and is set in Earth-31916. Alien Hyperion arrives on Earth as an infant, and is taken into custody by the US government and raised in a controlled environment. Army corporal Joseph Ledger is given a strange crystal removed from Hyperion's spaceship by the government that bonds to him causing him to fall into a coma for years. Discovering Hyperion has superhuman abilities, the government uses him as a secret weapon, and is eventually outed by the media. The government then announces and introduces Hyperion as state-sponsored hero, which encourages other beings to appear, such as Blur who can move at superspeed. Ledger awakens, and harnessing the energy powers of the crystal becomes Doctor Spectrum. Hyperion and Spectrum are initially hostile to one another and fight, with Hyperion accessing lost memories when coming in contact with
    7.00
    4 votes
    64

    The American Way

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The American Way is an eight-issue American comic book limited series produced under DC Comics' Wildstorm Signature imprint. The series debuted in April 2006, and was created by John Ridley and Georges Jeanty. In an interview with National Public Radio, John Ridley stated that the inspiration for this story came from President Lyndon Johnson's wish to include an African-American in the Mercury Space Program. The series represented a skewed parallel history of America, where the United States Government created its own super powered "heroes" and "villains". In the early 1940s, the United States government hatched a plan to create the Civil Defense Corps: a group of supposed "super-heroes" who could fight alien invasions, evil super-powered beings, and communism, all in front of an adoring public, courtesy of television. When an African-American hero named the New American is inserted into 1962's premier superteam, the turmoil begins. The first issue introduces the Civil Defense Corps, a team of superheroes, and their handlers the FDAA (Federal Disaster Assistance Administration). The FDAA stages showdowns between "superheroes" and "supervillains", who are in reality little more than
    7.00
    4 votes
    65
    Transformers: The Reign of Starscream

    Transformers: The Reign of Starscream

    • Publisher: IDW Publishing
    Transformers: The Reign of Starscream is an IDW Publishing comic book, a sequel to their adaptation of the 2007 live action Transformers film. The comic follows Starscream. The first issue was released in May 2008. The first issue follows the story of the film from Starscream's perspective, with him organizing his team to follow Megatron to Earth. During the battle in Mission City, Starscream is enraged by Megatron's uncaring attitude towards the death of his comrades. Following his leader's death, Starscream meets with a wounded Barricade (whom Ironhide caused to crash into a barrier and thus miss the battle) and is told the dead Frenzy had important files on Sam Witwicky and the All Spark. Starscream tells Barricade to carry on his role as his spy on Earth, while he flies to the Hoover Dam to recover Frenzy. In the second issue, Starscream retrieves Frenzy but is injured, and he is forced to return to Mars in F-22 Raptor form. He explains to Thundercracker he likes his Earth form though, admitting he admires the humans for killing Megatron and destroying the All Spark. The two Seekers decide to return to Cybertron, using Frenzy's data to recreate the All Spark. They begin
    7.00
    4 votes
    66

    Watchmen

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Alan Moore
    Watchmen is a twelve-issue comic book limited series created by writer Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons, and colorist John Higgins. The series was published by DC Comics during 1986 and 1987, and has been subsequently reprinted in collected form. Watchmen originated from a story proposal Moore submitted to DC featuring superhero characters that the company had acquired from Charlton Comics. As Moore's proposed story would have left many of the characters unusable for future stories, managing editor Dick Giordano convinced the writer to create original characters instead. Moore used the story as a means to reflect contemporary anxieties and to critique the superhero concept. Watchmen depicts an alternate history where superheroes emerged in the 1940s and 1960s, helping the United States to win the Vietnam War. The country is edging towards a nuclear war with the Soviet Union, freelance costumed vigilantes have been outlawed and most former superheroes are in retirement or working for the government. The story focuses on the personal development and struggles of the protagonists as an investigation into the murder of a government sponsored superhero pulls them out of retirement, and
    7.00
    4 votes
    67

    Witches

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Witches is a supernatural comic book limited series that was published by Marvel Comics in 2004. Plotted by Bronwyn Carlton, with scripts by Brian Walsh, it featured art by Mike Deodato and Will Conrad. Marvel Comics originally green-lit this storyline in late 2000 and released promotional art for the series in 2001 at both Comic-Con International (Marvel: 2001 Official Convention Preview Book, pages 18–19) and various comic book based websites. According to those original website advertisements, Marvel had planned on releasing the series (then titled The Way of the Witches) during the last week of September 2001. Marvel Comics had planned to capitalize on the female-based television shows and movies that were popular at the time such as Charmed, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Charlie's Angels with a comic book title of their own. The three characters decided upon were mostly unused magical female characters in their universe: Jennifer Kale from the Man-Thing comic, Topaz from the Werewolf by Night comic, and Satana - the Devil's Daughter - from several of Marvel's horror comics, primarily Son of Satan, The Haunt of Horror and Vampire Tales. They were to be led by the most
    7.00
    4 votes
    68

    Battle Pope

    • Created By: Robert Kirkman
    Battle Pope is an independent comic book created by Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore, which was published by their own small press company under the moniker of Funk-O-Tron originally in 2000. The series was reprinted in color by Image Comics in 2005, with plans to possibly continue it with new stories after collecting the original material. The book tells the tale of a hard drinking, womanizing Pope condemned by God for his own evil ways, who is called to action to save Saint Michael, with the help of Jesus H. Christ, becoming mankind's final hope in a world overrun by demons following the Rapture. The opening panels show Pope Oswald Leopold II sitting in a bar drinking and reminiscing. There is a flashback to a young child preparing to accept the mantle of Pope. He undergoes martial arts training from Bruce Lee because, "The Pope needs to be ready for anything." After becoming Pope, Leopold leads a life full of drinking, sex and debauchery. Eventually, God casts judgement on the entire human race, condemning them all. He allows the gates to Hell to open and the world is invaded by swarmed of demons. After a great war, a treaty is formed and Hell's gates are closed. Human and demon
    5.33
    6 votes
    69
    Angel: After The Fall

    Angel: After The Fall

    • Publisher: IDW Publishing
    • Created By: Joss Whedon
    Angel: After the Fall is a comic book published by IDW Publishing. Written by Brian Lynch and plotted with Joss Whedon, the series is a canonical continuation of the Angel television series, and follows the events of that show's final season. Angel: After the Fall was prompted by IDW Publishing and Joss Whedon after the success of Dark Horse Comics' Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight which is the official comic continuation of Angel's mothershow, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Angel: After the Fall sees the heroic vampire, Angel, coping with the apocalyptic aftermath of the television series after he took over and subsequently betrayed the demonic law firm, Wolfram & Hart. The city of Los Angeles has since been sent to hell by Wolfram & Hart as a result of Angel's actions. The series follows his attempts to rescue the people he has sworn to protect. The first issue was released on November 21, 2007. Originally intended as a 12-issue limited series, After the Fall expanded into a 17-issue Angel series. After the Fall was then followed by an ongoing series, with rotating writers and artists but without the input of Joss Whedon. In addition to this, After the Fall has also spawned
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    Clan Destine

    Clan Destine

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The ClanDestine (also known simply as ClanDestine) is a superhero comic book series created by writer/artist Alan Davis and published by Marvel Comics. The series stars the Destines, a secret family of long-lived, British superhuman beings, who first appeared in Marvel Comics Presents #158 (July 1994). The name "ClanDestine" is used primarily as the title of the series in which the family stars, and is not generally used by the characters, having first been used in the 2012 book Wolverine Annual (vol. 2) #1. Creator Alan Davis explained that he likes the superhero genre in general, and the group book dynamic in particular, and was drawn to the opportunity to create a group of new characters unencumbered by a long and complex continuity, though he set it in the Marvel Universe in order to use characters like the Silver Surfer and MODOK in cameo roles. Since the range of superhuman abilities is limited, and good gimmicks rare and short-lived, Davis observed that the greatest opportunity for originality is in character development and interaction. Davis chose to make the group a family because the familial bond is not one of choice, and can be either rewarding or painful. Davis was
    8.00
    3 votes
    71
    Forgotten Realms

    Forgotten Realms

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Rags Morales
    Forgotten Realms is a fantasy based comic book set in Dungeons & Dragons Forgotten Realms campaign setting, written by Jeff Grubb and illustrated by Rags Morales and Dave Simons Labelas is Vartan's deity. During the Time of Troubles he uses Vartan as a host body. He attempts to use the Realm Master and the crew to defeat the god Helm and restore his divinity. Jeff Grubb uses various references to the world of Forgotten Realms, using known characters like Elminster. He uses as Labelas Enoreth one of elven pantheon of gods described in the Forgotten Realms world as Vartan's patron. He sets one of his story arcs "An Avatar Story" during the Time of Troubles.
    8.00
    3 votes
    72
    Spike and Suzy

    Spike and Suzy

    • Created By: Willy Vandersteen
    Spike and Suzy, the British title for Suske en Wiske in Dutch, is a comics series created by the Belgian comics author Willy Vandersteen. The strip is known as Bob et Bobette in French and Willy and Wanda in the U.S. It was first published in De Nieuwe Standaard in 1945 and soon became popular. Although not in its earlier form, the strip adapted to the Ligne claire style pioneered by Hergé, a change taking place when the strip became serialised in Hergé's comics magazine Tintin from 1948 to 1959. The books revolve around the adventures of the eponymous Spike and Suzy, two children (pre-adolescent or adolescent depending on the album), along with their friends and family. The stories combine elements of comedy, fantasy and science fiction, such as talking animals, time travel and ghosts. The strip still runs daily in De Standaard, and new books continue to be published: as of 2008, 300 books have been published. While they remain popular among readers from the Netherlands, their popularity in Belgium has plummeted since the mid 1990s. The main characters are a group of friends. In the first regular comic, Suzy and her Aunt Sidonia meet the orphan Spike and unrelated Professor
    8.00
    3 votes
    73
    Cyberella

    Cyberella

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Howard Chaykin
    Cyberella is a comic book series first published in 1996 as part of the short-lived DC Comics imprint, Helix. The title was initially scheduled to be an on-going monthly, but owing to poor sales figures for both it and the Helix line generally, was cancelled after twelve issues in 1997. Written by Howard Chaykin and drawn by Don Cameron the title has been variously described as a techno-satire and a populist cyberpunk dystopia. Sunny Winston is an 'ordinary citizen' who exhibits aberrant behaviour living in the insular consumer-driven society of a near-future Earth. Karoshi/Macrocorp has designed a program to keep the human masses under its sway by exploiting their affinity with popular culture. This program is based on 'Lil Ella a cartoon character created by Kelton Mosby the founder of Karoshi/Macrocorp, based on Ella Fiscus, a child star who died in a factory accident. Following Mosby's death, Karoshi/Macrocorp falls under the sway of Bronson Travis and his descendents including Bronson Travis III, the one time lover of Sunny Winston. The Karoshi/Macrocorp plan back-fires and leads to the merging of the persona of Sunny Winston with the 'Lil Ella program. The end-product of this
    6.00
    5 votes
    74
    Ninja High School

    Ninja High School

    • Publisher: Malibu Comics
    Ninja High School (also known as NHS) is a comic book series created, written, and illustrated by Ben Dunn, and currently published by Antarctic Press. It was at first published by Eternity Comics. On occasion other artists and writers have contributed to the series including Carlos Kastro, Eric Meheu and Fabian Doles. NHS takes place in a suburban town known as Quagmire, located "Somewhere in the Midwest". The series originally centers on the misadventures of one Jeremy Feeple, a 16 year old boy attending Quagmire High School, an alien princess named Asrial from a planet called Salusia, and a young female ninja named Ichi-Kun Ichihonei, from Japan. Originally intended as a mini-series, the comic hit such a boom of popularity that it became a full series, currently totalling over 160 issues (as well as two mini-series, "Ninja High School V2" and "Quagmire USA" and the color mini-series "The Prom Formula"). There has also been two-issue furry parodies which went by the name "Furry Ninja High School" and "Furry Ninja High School Strikes Back". Fan-contributed editions of the series include the "Ninja High School Yearbook" and "Ninja High School Swimsuit Edition". The series plot
    6.75
    4 votes
    75

    Son of M

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Son of M is an American comic book limited series, a follow up to Marvel Comics' "House of M" event, starring the depowered Quicksilver. Quicksilver was one of the many mutants to lose his powers as part of the Decimation, which he was, in part, responsible for. Following his sister's nervous breakdown, Pietro convinced Wanda that she could undo her wrongs by using her powers to turn the world into a world of peace. Wanda warped reality into the House of M, a world where mutants were the majority, humans the minority, and Magneto was the ruler. During a battle between Magneto's forces and heroes having regained their memories, a mutant named Layla Miller was able to restore Magneto's memories of the original reality. Enraged, Magneto confronted Pietro, angry that he had done all of this in his name. Pietro said he believed his father would have let Wanda be killed by the other heroes, that he was protecting her, but Magneto replied Pietro had only used Wanda and himself. Furious, Magneto killed Pietro. Wanda revived her brother and declared "No more mutants", changing the world back to its original form and causing approximately ninety percent of the mutant population to lose their
    6.75
    4 votes
    76

    Ultimate Extinction

    Ultimate Extinction is a comic book published by Marvel Comics and set within Ultimate Marvel continuity. The five-issue (it was originally to be six) limited series began in January 2006 and was written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Brandon Peterson. Ultimate Extinction is the conclusion of the Ultimate Galactus trilogy, which began with Ultimate Nightmare, and continued with Ultimate Secret. This trilogy focuses on the arrival of "Gah Lak Tus", the Ultimate Marvel Comics version of Galactus. Ultimate Extinction features the introduction of the Ultimate versions of several Marvel characters including Silver Surfer and Misty Knight. Despite fan speculation and argument to the contrary, the comics in the Ultimate Galactus trilogy and recently published reference materials clearly state that the events of Ultimate Extinction take place before the second volume of The Ultimates. General Nick Fury, Sam Wilson, Susan Storm, Carol Danvers and Mahr Vehl watch Reed Richards present a timetable and scenario for Galactus' destruction of the Earth. Although the group still does not know what Galactus is, they know what it will do: unleash a panic-inducing psychic broadcast upon
    6.75
    4 votes
    77

    Uncanny X-Men

    • Featured Characters: X-Men
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Uncanny X-Men, first published as The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series for the X-Men franchise. It is the mainstream continuity featuring the adventures of the eponymous group of mutant superheroes. While hugely successful now, the book was initially met with a lukewarm reception, and took a number of years for the X-Men's first issue (cover dated September 1963) to secure even mild success. The series was cancelled in 1970, but interest was rekindled with 1975's Giant-Size X-Men and the debut of a new, international team. Under the guidance of writer Chris Claremont (whose 16-year stint began with August 1975's Uncanny X-Men #94), the series grew in popularity worldwide, eventually spawning a franchise with numerous spin-off "X-books," including New Mutants, X-Factor, Excalibur, X-Force, Generation X, the simply titled X-Men, and a number of prefixed titles such as Astonishing X-Men and New X-Men. The series concluded after the "Schism" storylines with #544 in October 2011. In November 2011 it was relaunched as Uncanny X-Men #1, showing the X-Men that stayed in Utopia under Cyclops's leadership. As part of Marvel NOW! relaunch of Marvel titles, Uncanny X-Men
    6.75
    4 votes
    78

    C.O.P.S.

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    C.O.P.S. (Central Organization of Police Specialists) was a fifteen-issue comic book series created based on a Hasbro toy line. The series was written by Doug Moench and published by DC Comics. The Case of COPS File #1: BadVibes – Dr. BadVibes join forces with Big Boss and his gang of Crooks and creates a device that shakes buildings to the ground. Special Agent Baldwin P. Vess arrives in Empire City to experience the following: get blown up by an attack made by Turbo Tu-tone and Rock Krusher on the 647 Precinct (A.K.A. "Purgatory"), fixed with a cybernetic torso, apprehending Berserko, and forming a team of the best law enforcers there is in the country known as C.O.P.S. (Central Organization of Police Specialists). Together, Baldwin Vess (Code name: Bulletproof) and his C.O.P.S. team, with the help of Donny Brooks in his armored assault vehicle and Tina Cassidy in front of the terminal, destroys the vibrating machine built by Dr. BadVibes at an old abandoned sewage plant, thwarting the first of many of Big Boss' crooked plans. As a result Bulletproof graciously welcomed Tina (Codename: Mainframe) and Donny (Codename: Hardtop) to the C.O.P.S. team. The Case of the COPS File #2:
    7.67
    3 votes
    79

    Eclipso: The Darkness Within

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Eclipso: The Darkness Within was a 1992 comic book mini-series and crossover storyline published by DC Comics. It featured the heroes of the DC Universe fighting against Eclipso. Issue #1 debuted July 1992, and was created and co-plotted by Robert Loren Fleming and Keith Giffen. Keith Giffen also did pencil layouts for the series, and Bart Sears provided the finished artwork. Within this series it was retconned that Eclipso was not simply Bruce Gordon's dark half, but a vengeance demon who had possessed Gordon. After an unsuspecting Daxamite hero named Valor frees Eclipso from his palace on Earth's moon, he uses hate as a trigger to possess other beings. Whenever someone who has a black diamond in their possession gets angry, Eclipso can instantly take control of that particular person even while trapped in his lair on the moon. He then uses an eyeblast to take control of others. He can also create monsters from a person's anger, which happens with characters like Hawkman and James Gordon. Furthermore, there are thousands of black diamonds scattered around the world, through which Eclipso can possess his victims by playing upon their darkest emotions and desires. It is further
    7.67
    3 votes
    80

    Justice League International

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Justice League International (or JLI for short) is a DC Comics superhero team written by Keith Giffen and J. M. DeMatteis, with art by Kevin Maguire, created in 1987. Writer J. M. DeMatteis was given the Justice League title after finishing the previous Justice League of America series. Paired with writer Keith Giffen and artist Kevin Maguire he set out to create a "big seven" title similar to the original lineup and Grant Morrison's subsequent JLA title. However, at the time, Superman was being revamped by John Byrne's reboot while George Pérez was handling the relaunched Wonder Woman and Mike Baron was handling his relaunch of The Flash. Aquaman was off limits as well due to the character being in creative limbo for some time. According to the introduction to the trade paperback of the series, Denny O'Neil took pity on the team and gave them Batman to be used in the series. Dr. Fate's inclusion coincided with DeMatteis and Giffen writing a Dr. Fate series. Editor Andy Helfer (also editor of Green Lantern at the time) suggested using the newer Guy Gardner instead of Hal Jordan. The resulting comedic tone was Giffen's idea; in terms of the industry, it served as heavy competition
    7.67
    3 votes
    81

    Solo Avengers

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Solo Avengers was an American comic book series, published by Marvel Comics, and was a spin-off from the company's superhero team title Avengers. It ran for 20 issues (December 1987 - July 1989) until it was renamed Avengers Spotlight with issue 21 (August 1989). The series was cancelled after issue 40 (January 1991). The format of the title was usually two stories, one featuring the character Hawkeye, and the other a back-up strip showcasing a current or former member of the Avengers. With issue 35, Hawkeye was dropped from the series (apart from issue 36, which carried a Hawkeye story intended for #35, but not completed in time) and the format changed to exclusively focus on one full-length story featuring other characters. In October 2011, a five-part limited series called Avengers: Solo was released following the same format as Solo Avengers. Once again, the central story, written by Jen Van Meter and illustrated by Roger Robinson, starred Hawkeye with the cast of Avengers Academy, by Jim McCann and Clayton Harris, providing the back-up story.
    7.67
    3 votes
    82

    Ultimate X4

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate X4 is a Marvel Comics miniseries, set in the Ultimate Marvel universe outside the mainstream continuity. It features a crossover between the Ultimate X-Men and the Ultimate Fantastic Four. This miniseries is the first canonical team-up of the X-Men and the Fantastic Four in the Ultimate Marvel universe. The arc consists of two parts, UX4 #1 (December 2005) and UX4 #2 (January 2006). In this story, the X-Men receive a seemingly alien distress signal and fly away with the Blackbird to track it down. Only Wolverine, Shadowcat and Iceman stay behind. In the meanwhile, Rhona Burchill, the Mad Thinker, raids the understaffed X-Mansion and steals Cerebro, and also manages to frame the Fantastic Four for this crime. Having stolen Cerebro, Rhona revealed that she was contracted by Advanced Idea Mechanics to steal Cerebro and turn it over to them. After being paid for her work, Rhona betrays and kills the A.I.M. operatives sent to retrieve Cerebro, since her true intention was to use Cerebro's technology to increase her intellect even further. The X-Men trio raids the Baxter Building and fights a surprised and angry F4, but are easily subdued. Burchill then reveals herself as the
    5.80
    5 votes
    83

    Araña

    Anya Sofia Corazon is a fictional half Mexican and half Puerto Rican superheroine in the Marvel Comics Universe. She formerly went by the codename Araña, but is currently known as Spider-Girl. Araña was created by writer Fiona Avery and artist Mark Brooks and is based on ideas J. Michael Straczynski used in his run on The Amazing Spider-Man. She was the star of the resurrected Amazing Fantasy comic book in 2004. After her storyline ended in Amazing Fantasy vol. 2 #6, she appeared in her own title, Araña: The Heart of the Spider, starting in January 2005 as part of Marvel Next. This series ran for twelve issues. Anya next appeared in the Ms. Marvel title as a recruit for service as a licensed superhero under the Superhuman Registration Act. She then appears next teaming up with Nomad to fight the secret empire in a backup story in Captain America #602-605. Chronologically, her next appearance was during the "Grim Hunt" storyline in The Amazing Spider-Man; however, her appearance in the new Young Allies series was published first. As the new Spider-Girl, she starred in a monthly Spider-Girl comic that debuted on November 17, 2010 as a tie-in to the "Big Time" storyline in The Amazing
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Fuma no Kojirou

    Fuma no Kojirou

    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Masami Kurumada
    Fūma no Kojirō (風魔の小次郎, lit. "Kojirō of the Fūma") is a manga series by Japanese author Masami Kurumada, later adapted to anime. It tells the story of sword legends and rivalry between ninja clans. The main character Kojirō is a young boy who is a member of the Fūma clan. On June 1, 1989, an OVA was released featuring animation character designs by Michi Himeno and Shingo Araki (both of whom also worked on the respective anime adaptations of Kurumada's other manga works; Ring ni Kakero, Saint Seiya and B't X. In 2003, Masami Kurumada authored an additional short story titled Fūma no Kojirō: Ryūsei Ansatsuchō. On October 3, 2007, a tokusatsu drama adaptation began airing on Tokyo Metropolitan Television starring Ryouta Murai in the lead role of Kojirō. The opening theme was "Ryūsei Rocket" performed by An Cafe and the ending theme was "Eien no Setsuna" (永遠の刹那, "Eternal Moment") performed by On/Off. Hakuō Academy used to be a prestigious high school, and famous for martial arts. However, because its rival school Seishikan has been cowardly luring its superior students, Hakuō was going to decline. In order to recover from the situation, the acting principal of Hakuō; Himeko Hōjō,
    6.50
    4 votes
    85

    Infinite Crisis

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Infinite Crisis is a 2005 - 2006 comic book storyline published by DC Comics, consisting of an eponymous, seven-issue comic book limited series written by Geoff Johns and illustrated by Phil Jimenez, George Pérez, Ivan Reis, and Jerry Ordway, and a number of tie-in books. The main miniseries debuted in October 2005, and each issue was released with two variant covers: one by Pérez, and one by Jim Lee and Sandra Hope. The series storyline was a sequel to DC's 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths. It revisited characters and concepts from that earlier Crisis, including the existence of DC's Multiverse. Some of the characters featured were alternate versions of comic icons such as an alternate Superman named Kal-L, who came from parallel universe called Earth-Two. A major theme was the nature of heroism, contrasting the often dark and conflicted modern-day heroes with memories of "lighter" and ostensibly more noble and collegial heroes of American comic books' earlier days. Infinite Crisis #1 was ranked first in the top 300 comics for October 2005 with pre-order sales of 249,265. This was almost double the second ranked comic House of M #7 which had pre-order sales of
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Rasl

    Rasl

    RASL is an independently published black and white comic book series, written and drawn by Bone creator Jeff Smith. The series showed Smith's "dark side", as it was much more mature than his previous works. The series originally ran with 3 issues a year with repeated delays, but has now been changed to a bimonthly schedule. The series follows the art thief RASL, who jumps to parallel universes in attempts to steal parallel paintings, but soon runs into dangerous scenarios as he is pursued by the government. RASL is written and drawn as a sci-fi noir. It draws influences from real life events, people and places in addition to Southwestern Native American culture and hardboiled crime fiction. The art style is high contrast black and white and is notably more detailed and "human" than Smith's previous work, Bone. The story follows a central story, but is narrated extensively through RASL's thoughts. Smith also utilizes flashbacks to tell the story of RASL's past. The first issue of the series was released in February 2008. Originally planned for a 3 issues a year at 32 pages, the format was changed as of issue 5 to 24 pages (22 pages of comics, and a 2 page letter column titled
    8.50
    2 votes
    87

    The Punisher

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Punisher was a five-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in 1986, starring the fictional vigilante the Punisher. It was written by Steven Grant, and illustrated by Mike Zeck and Mike Vosburg. In the early 1980s, Grant and Zeck proposed creating a Punisher miniseries. The company was initially uncomfortable with the idea of a protagonist who killed in cold blood. However, as crime increased nationally throughout the decade, Marvel responded by testing the market for such a character and then publishing though not initially promoting a miniseries which debuted in January 1986. The initial issue had a banner indicating that the series would be four issues long; however, the series had always been intended to have five issues, and the banner was an error that recurred throughout the entire run except for issue #2 which says 2 of five. In keeping with its hard-boiled premise, The Punisher included several events rare in Marvel Comics publisher in the mid-1980s: a suicide, the death of an innocent child, and the main character having intercourse. In issue #3, the warden of Rykers prison (who assisted in the Punisher's prison break) committed suicide when faced
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Gold Digger

    Gold Digger

    • Publisher: Antarctic Press
    Gold Digger is a manga-reminiscent comic book series, written and drawn by Fred Perry, and published by Antarctic Press. Fred came up with the initial inspiration for Gold Digger during his tour of duty in the First Gulf War, and released the debut oneshot in Antarctic Press' Mangazine, in 1991. A four-issue miniseries followed in 1992 and 1993, followed by a regular monthly black-and-white series, and finally the current colour series beginning in 1999. It is the second most extensive, long-running, entirely original creator-controlled, self-contained North American comicbook in history, only exceeded by Cerebus, and has the most issues among comics that are still regularly published, followed by Usagi Yojimbo and Savage Dragon. Fred himself describes the book as a mixture of Indiana Jones and Final Fantasy. He has recently been inspired by the way the current Doctor Who TV series develops storylines, and adapted the series to a similar consistently self-contained format from issue 101 and onwards, with each issue easily accessible and possible to enjoy for new readers. Gold Digger focuses on the adventures of Gina Babette Diggers, superscientist, archeologist, teacher,
    5.60
    5 votes
    89
    X-Men: Search for Cyclops

    X-Men: Search for Cyclops

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    X-Men: The Search for Cyclops was a four-issue limited series published in 2000 by Marvel Comics. The series is written by Joseph Harris, and drawn by Tom Raney. X-Man Cyclops has been thought dead by his teammates following the cataclysmic events of the Twelve saga, when Cyclops sacrificed himself to defeat the ancient mutant, Apocalypse, but only to be merged with the villain, creating an all-new being of unlimited power. An amnesiac and powerless Cyclops regained control of the merged form. A follower of Apocalypse, Anais guides Cyclops through his problems, but is secretly hoping that she would be the one to host Apocalypse's essence. However, Apocalypse is slowly beginning to re-emerge. Jean Grey and Cable track Cyclops down to Egypt, where they separate him from Apocalypse. Cable himself destroys Apocalypse's spirit in the process.
    5.60
    5 votes
    90

    Batman Confidential

    • Featured Characters: Batman
    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Batman Confidential is an American monthly comic book series from DC Comics which debuted on December 6, 2006 and concluded on March 2, 2011. Like a previous Batman series, Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, Batman Confidential featured stories by rotating creative teams set in the early years of modern Batman’s career, post-Batman: Year One, and illustrated formative moments in the character’s past, such as first encounters with allies and foes. The first story arc by Andy Diggle and Whilce Portacio features Batman, roughly a year after he started fighting crime, in his first encounter with Superman’s nemesis Lex Luthor. A long-distance laser sniper rifle is used to kill a murderer Batman is questioning. Batman begins investigating the type of weapon, and discovers the only thing that his company had created as far as energy weapons go could not be simply carried by one man. The next day, Bruce Wayne and Lex Luthor are competing for a military contract concerning a stealth interceptor robot and the O.G.R.E. disaster rescue robot. The robot tries to kill Lex Luthor, who successfully escapes into the sewers. The machine flies away. At Wayne Enterprises Captain Jim Gordon
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    DP7

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    D.P. 7 was a 32-issue comic book series published by Marvel Comics as a part their New Universe imprint. It ran from 1986 to 1989. Along with Justice and Psi-Force, it was one of the few New Universe titles to last for 32 issues. The title stands for Displaced Paranormals and refers to the seven main characters of the series (who never referred to themselves by this name). All of them received superhuman powers as a result of the stellar phenomenon known as the White Event. Randy O'Brien first encounters David Landers when he's wheeled into the hospital in incredible pain. Landers rages until two dark arms spring from O'Brien's torso that restrain him long enough for O'Brien to give Landers a tranquilizer that renders him unconscious. The two compare their experiences, and O'Brien reads a classified ad for the Clinic for Paranormal Research, a facility designed to help individuals who've acquired strange abilities. Through his Antibody (see above), he relays the information to Landers and they travel to the Clinic under assumed names. They are at first convinced of the Clinic staff's sincerity and are enrolled into Therapy Group C, where they meet Walters, Beck, Cuzinski,
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Dragon Head

    Dragon Head

    Dragon Head (ドラゴンヘッド, Doragon Heddo) is a post-apocalyptic disaster manga by Minetaro Mochizuki. It was published by Kodansha in Young Magazine from 1995 and 2000 and collected in ten tankōbon volumes. It is licensed in English by Tokyopop, with Volume 10 released 2008-04-01. In 1997, the manga won the Kodansha Manga Award for general manga. The series was adapted as a live-action movie written and directed by Jôji Iida, released in Japan in August 2003. It starred Satoshi Tsumabuki and Sayaka Kanda. The story begins with Teru Aoki (青木 輝), the main protagonist, on a train to Tokyo after a school trip. Just before entering a tunnel, Teru briefly sees something in the distance, though he doesn't understand what he saw. Soon after entering the tunnel, a powerful earthquake makes the train derail and partially destroys it, and blocks both sides of the tunnel with rubble. Knocked unconscious during the derailment, when he reawakens Teru finds, much to his horror, that all of his teachers and classmates have died in the crash. Wandering the wrecked wagons of the train, he finds Nobuo Takahashi (高橋 のぶお), a highly unnerved boy who apparently was being bullied at school, and Ako Seto (瀬戸
    7.33
    3 votes
    93

    Kinetic

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Kelley Puckett
    Kinetic was a comic book series created by Allan Heinberg and written by Kelley Puckett and Warren Pleece and published by DC Focus, a short-lived imprint of DC Comics. The aim of the imprint was to feature super-powered characters who did not follow the traditional format of classic superhero adventures. It was cancelled after eight issues. One Editorial Review called the book "Unbreakable or Donnie Darko." The series focused on Tom Morell, a high school boy suffering from a combination of medical conditions such as hemophilia, diabetes, muscular dystrophy and others. His life at school is characterized by constant mockery and abuse, and his home life consists of his highly protective mother who fears that he could die at any moment. As an escape from his normal life, Tom immerses himself in the adventures of his favorite comic book superhero, Kinetic. However, Tom suddenly manifests his own superpowers. The majority of the story focuses on his reactions to this sudden change and its dramatic effects on his life. After a bad first day a school, Tom Morell thinks of killing himself. He is hit by a semi-trailer truck and lives, but is in shock. He walks home and goes to bed. He
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Majid

    Majid

    This article is about a children comic book [[Category:1979 comic debuts|]] Majid (Arabic: ماجد‎) is a pan-Arabian comic book anthology and children's magazine published in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates by the Abu Dhabi Media Company. It has been in circulation, and is released on a weekly basis, since February 28, 1979. Majid is widely read in most Arab states, and it had a weekly distribution of 175,000 as of 2005. Syria does not have Majid. One of the series in Majid is Kaslan Jiddan, a story of a boy named Kaslan, who tries to act like an adult and finds himself in conflicts because of it.
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Shadowpact

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Shadowpact is a fictional group of magic-based heroes who fought against the Spectre in the 2005 limited series Day of Vengeance, published by DC Comics. They are a sort of Justice League for the supernatural elements of the DC Universe. Some of the team members are Homo magi. Their self-titled series ended in May 2008, after 25 issues and a 2 year run, but the team appeared in the Reign in Hell series in July 2008. The group is founded on a spur of the moment impulse by Enchantress, Ragman, and Detective Chimp to get rid of the Spectre because of his decision to destroy all magic in the universe. They are joined by Blue Devil, Nightshade, and Nightmaster, the latter christening the group the "Shadowpact". During the course of the story, it is revealed by the wizard Shazam that the name "Shadowpact" has been used repetitively throughout history by groups of mystics who champion lost causes and who are doomed to failure. In their fight with the Spectre, the group is aided by others such as the Phantom Stranger, who advised Detective Chimp even though he had been transformed into a rodent; Captain Marvel; the wizard Shazam; and Black Alice. At the end of the limited series,
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Uncle Sam

    Uncle Sam

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Alex Ross
    Uncle Sam is a two-part prestige format comic book mini-series published by DC Comics' Vertigo imprint in 1997. It was written by Steve Darnall with art by Alex Ross. The story centers around Sam, an obviously distressed homeless man, who wanders the streets of an unnamed city speaking mostly in odd quotes and sound bites. As he wanders, he has disturbing visions of events of injustice in American history (dealing with Indian Wars, slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, and others). Throughout his wanderings, he occasionally encounters a woman named Bea, and has conversations with Britannia. Eventually, Sam has a profoundly disillusioning vision of him participating in the bloody crushing of Shays' Rebellion. Eventually, he comes to the remains of the 1893 Columbian Exposition, where he sees Bea once more, now recognizing her as Columbia. She helps Sam gain a more nuanced perspective of his visions of America's negative moments of its history, such as how Shay's Rebellion prompted the writing of the Constitution of the United States to help create a more stable government. He has further encounters with Britannia, Marianne and the Russian Bear, before he confronts a dark, corrupt,
    7.33
    3 votes
    97

    Avengers Infinity

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Avengers: Infinity is a four-issue American comic book limited series published from September to December 2000 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Roger Stern and drawn by Sean Chen, Scott Hanna, Steve Oliff and Troy Peteri. Writer Roger Stern has explained a number of the decisions that went into the planning of the series. On the diverse team line-up he said "I just put together a list of Avengers who would be at loose ends, and who would be good choices for a big, cosmic adventure ... with a welcome bit of kibitzing from Kurt Busiek and Tom Brevoort." The idea or the huge hand "came from the image that Carlos Pacheco gave us in Avengers Forever #10. Kurt and I had asked him for a shot of a gigantic hand bigger than the star it was reaching for -- and, boy, did he deliver!" The story also partly led into the "Maximum Security" storyline. The cosmic hero Quasar receives a distress call from a colony of the alien Rigellians in deep space. The character arrives to find the colony destroyed and a single survivor - the superhero Jack of Hearts - who is in a coma. Quasar summons all nearby members of the superhero team the Avengers, with the Thunder God Thor, the Titanian
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Mafalda

    Mafalda

    Mafalda is a comic strip written and drawn by Argentine cartoonist Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known by his pen name Quino. The strip features a 6-year-old girl named Mafalda, who is deeply concerned about humanity and world peace and rebels against the current state of the world. The strip ran from 1964 to 1973 and was very popular in Latin America, Europe, Quebec, and in Asia, leading to two animated cartoon series and a movie. The character Mafalda and a few other characters were created by Quino in 1962 for a promotional cartoon that was intended to be published in the daily Clarín. Mafalda's name was inspired by David Viñas's novel Dar la cara. Ultimately, however, Clarín broke the contract and the campaign was canceled altogether. Mafalda became a full-fledged cartoon strip on the advice of Quino's friend Julián Delgado, at the time senior editor of the weekly Primera Plana. Its run in that newspaper began on 29 September 1964. At first it only featured Mafalda and her parents. Her friend Felipe came on the scene in January 1965. A legal dispute arose in March 1965, which led to the end of Mafalda's Primera Plana run on 9 March 1965. One week later, on 15 March 1965
    6.25
    4 votes
    99

    Rex Mundi

    • Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
    Rex Mundi is an American comic book series published by Image Comics (2003–2006) and Dark Horse Comics (2006–2009), written by Arvid Nelson and drawn by Argentinian artist Juan Ferreyra. In all, 19 issues were published by Image before the series moved to Dark Horse, where a further 19 were published before the title ended. The series is a quest for the Holy Grail told as a murder mystery. It is set in the year 1933, in an alternate history Europe, where magic is real, feudalism persisted, and the Protestant Reformation was crushed by a still politically powerful Catholic Church. All of this is woven together as "... a meditation on the prophecies surrounding the advent of the Bahá'í era." The book takes its name from the Latin term meaning King of the World. It is derived from the Cathar heresies of the Middle Ages, and taken up in works like The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. Within the Cathar context it seems to have been equated with the Demiurge. Rex Mundi writer and co-creator Arvid Nelson came up with Rex Mundi while in Paris helping to film a documentary on The Paris Review, a literary magazine founded by Ivy League ex-pats in the 1950s Surrounded by the juxtaposition of
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Meridian

    Meridian

    Meridian was a comic book series published by CrossGen Comics. It was written by Barbara Kesel, and penciled by a number of artists including Joshua Middleton and Steve McNiven. Meridian ran for 44 issues, from July of 2000 to April of 2004. Meridian, the series' namesake, is one of many island city-states upon the world of Demetria. At some point in the world's history, a great natural cataclysm threw massive chunks of earth into the sky, creating the current system of floating islands. The islands, as well as the airships crucial to trade and transport, defy gravity due to the mysterious properties of a certain 'ore' which is not named. Each island is headed by a Minister, who has more or less monarchic power over their respective island, and while many communities still survive on the surface, contact and trade between the surface and the islands is rare. The main character of the series is Sephie, the daughter of Turos, the Minister of Meridian. Her father dies at the beginning of the series, and Sephie becomes Minister of Meridian, acquiring at the same time a mysterious Sigil, a mark upon her forehead, which grants her an array of powers. Gradually, she learns to use it to
    9.00
    1 votes
    101

    Mighty Avengers

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Brian Michael Bendis
    The Mighty Avengers is a comic book series that was published by Marvel Comics. Originally written by Brian Michael Bendis, also the writer of New Avengers, the title first featured an officially sanctioned Avengers team of registered superheroes, residing in New York as part of the Fifty State Initiative, as opposed to the unlicensed team featured in The New Avengers. This first incarnation of the team is led by Iron Man and Ms. Marvel, with the later lineup featuring Hank Pym as the leader. The team first appears in The Mighty Avengers #1 (May 2007), written by Brian Michael Bendis and pencilled and inked by Frank Cho. The roster, led by Ms. Marvel, also consisted of Iron Man, The Wasp, Wonder Man, Ares, the Sentry and the Black Widow. In the wake of the superhero "Civil War", Iron Man recruits Ms. Marvel as leader of the revamped team, and together they select the first roster. The Mighty Avengers was originally intended to run parallel with New Avengers, with characters and events crossing over and being viewed from both perspectives. However, artist Cho fell behind schedule, and left the book after six issues and an additional cover. Successor Mark Bagley drew the series from
    9.00
    1 votes
    102
    Ric Hochet

    Ric Hochet

    • Publisher: Dargaud
    Ric Hochet is a Franco-Belgian comics series created by Tibet (drawings) and André-Paul Duchâteau (scripts). It first appeared on March 30, 1955 in the comics magazine Tintin. The series features the adventures of Ric Hochet, a reporter for the newspaper La Rafale in Paris. The series' name deviated as translations were published across Europe, with the result that it is known as Rick Master in Germany, Rik Ringers in The Netherlands and Flanders, Riku Oksa in Finland and Alan Falk and Rick Hart in Scandinavia. Ric Hochet's stories were also published in South India in Tamil Language by Prakash Publishers. Ric Hochet is known as "Reporter Johnny" in Tamil.
    9.00
    1 votes
    103
    Simon Sues

    Simon Sues

    Simon Sues is a comic originally published by Tokyopop during their Pilot Program. The work is currently being hosted at the comics site MangaMagazine.net. The story focuses on the titular character as he battles supernatural forces using various laws of logic and psychology. The format of each stand alone story arc is similar to that of a police procedural, with each case being won by Simon uncovering some contractual loophole. Most of the themes of the comic are based on various detective stories such as Sherlock Holmes, as well as H. P. Lovecraft and M. R. James. Simon is a former law students at the fictional campus of Haversford. Since leaving the university's prestigious law school for mysterious reasons, the students have been plagued with bizarre cases of both extraordinary good fortune and tragedy. With the start of a record breaking winning streak for the university's basketball team, comes several suicides and fatal accidents. Following a grad student's ground breaking research appearing in the papers, an unexplained illness rampages through the chemistry lab. Only a few people are aware that these are the effects of students entering into contracts with demonic-like
    9.00
    1 votes
    104

    The Kingdom

    "The Kingdom" is a story arc that ran through a two-issue, self titled comic book limited series and multiple one shot comics published by DC Comics in 1999, written by Mark Waid and drawn by Ariel Olivetti/Mike Zeck. This is both a sequel and, in some ways, prequel to Kingdom Come, also by Mark Waid. Both books form an Elseworlds saga, meaning they are abstracted from official DC Comics continuity. The storyline extended into one-shot books entitled Gog, The Kingdom: Kid Flash, The Kingdom: Nightstar, The Kingdom: Offspring, The Kingdom: Planet Krypton, and The Kingdom: Son of the Bat. The entire storyline was later collected into a trade paperback. The Kingdom does not use the same visual style created by Alex Ross, which was used in the four-issue Kingdom Come series. The storyline in The Kingdom is a direct continuation and extension of the original storyline fleshing out areas of the future that were not explored in the original four-part series. While Kingdom Come can easily exist as a stand-alone story, The Kingdom is not a complete storyline in and of itself and exists only as a continuation of the previous storyline. Twenty years after the events of Kingdom Come, a
    9.00
    1 votes
    105

    Ultimate Adventures

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate Adventures was a six-issue comic book, written by Ron Zimmerman and drawn by Duncan Fegredo, and published by Marvel Comics. It starred Hawk-Owl and Woody, two characters who were purposefully designed as blatant parodies of Batman and Robin. At the time of its publication, it was the only Ultimate title to introduce characters who were not explicitly based on pre-existing Marvel characters. (Ultimate Spider-Man followed suit with Geldoff and the series Ultimate X-Men has since added the characters of Syndicate and Magician.) It is notable for its involvement in the U-Decide campaign, and for being plagued by chronic lateness, taking a year and four months (from September 2002 to January 2004 to complete what was a supposedly monthly series (in contrast, the relaunched Captain Marvel series, which debuted the same week (as part of U-Decide) - had its eighteenth issue released the same week as Ultimate Adventures #6 finally made it to shops). Hawk-Owl, the Midnight Avenger/Jack Danner - A Batman pastiche, complete with secret lair ("the Nest") and crime-fighting gadgets. Unlike Bruce Wayne, Danner is far from being any sort of genius. Rather, he's a socially inept
    9.00
    1 votes
    106

    Ultimate War

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate War is a comic book limited series produced by Marvel Comics featuring the Ultimates and the Ultimate X-Men. The series contains four books, released between December 8, 2002 and February 23, 2003. It was written by Scottish comics author Mark Millar with art by Chris Bachalo. It is collected as part of the Ultimate X-Men series of trade paperbacks. This was the first time the Ultimates as a team had crossed over with characters from the Ultimate Marvel Universe. Previously, the X-Men defeated Magneto and pronounced him dead. Rather than turning Magneto over to the authorities and virtually ensuring the death penalty for him, Professor X secretly brainwashed his old friend and tried to rehabilitate him. However, the Beast inadvertently leaked this plan to Magneto's Brotherhood, believing that he was chatting with an online girlfriend. The Brotherhood used this to entrap Beast and gained enough knowledge to free their leader. Meanwhile, Iceman has left the X-Men, forced out by his worried parents after he sustained injuries in the fight against Proteus, while three more X-Men, Wolverine, Cyclops and Kitty Pryde, are on a mission to the Savage Land. The US government is
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    A Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner

    A Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner is the comic book adaptation of the film Blade Runner, published by Marvel Comics in 1982. It was written by Archie Goodwin with art by Al Williamson, Carlos Garzon with Dan Green and Ralph Reese. The Jim Steranko cover leads into a 45-page adaptation which includes one possible explanation of the title's significance in story context: the narrative line, "Blade runner. You're always movin' on the edge." This was issue 22 of the Marvel Comics Super Special series of titles which by this time only printed Marvel's movie adaptations. It was reprinted in a two issue mini series but without the feature content contained in the special.In some printings,several pages of the comic were published out of order.Other printing set these pages in the correct order. In the UK it was reprinted as the Blade Runner Annual published by Grandreams. Again, the feature content of the original special was not reprinted.
    7.00
    3 votes
    108

    America vs. The Justice Society

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    America vs. The Justice Society is a four-issue comic book mini-series starring the Justice Society of America which was first published by DC Comics between January and April 1985. The series was written by Roy and Dann Thomas and featured artwork from Rafael Kayanan, Rich Buckler and Jerry Ordway among others. The series was set on Earth-Two and began with the discovery of Batman's diary (The pre-Crisis Earth-Two Bruce Wayne had been murdered by a criminal named Bill Jensen prior to this adventure as indicated in this story) which indicated that the Justice Society was guilty of treason during World War II and conspired to cover-up their treason after the war was over. The group is put on trial and their history is reviewed. All the historical adventures involving the JSA are remembered, and details are added. It eventually reveals that the diary is a hoax created by Batman in an effort to have the JSA apprehend Per Degaton at a future time that Batman believed he would not be alive for. Degaton is apprehended by the Justice Society, but he apparently commits suicide at the end of the story (though he would return in later stories; these are younger versions of the character, so
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Blokhedz

    Blokhedz

    Blokhedz is an independent comic book/graphic novel series created by the Madtwiinz, Mark and Mike Davis. Since the release of Issue #1 in 2004, the 4-book comic series has developed a small but dedicated underground fanbase. It is characterized by a gritty style, and its "unflinching" look at the harsh realities of inner city life. In February 2009, the creators announced a partnership with Gatorade to create an animated web-series for Blokhedz. You can watch the trailer and webisodes on Gatorade's Mission G website. Talib Kweli plays the main character, Young Blak. Lauren London plays Essence, Blak's love interest. Bobbito García plays Eatho, the smart Puerto Rican b baller. Gary Sturgis plays Biskit, the leader of the biker gang, Wild Dawgs. Dorian Harewood plays King Tubby, the Rastafarian store owner technician. Episode 1 "thinking of a Master Plan" Set in mythical, gang-ridden streets of Empire City, BLOKHEDZ is the animated story of a teenage rapper, Blak. With the help of his crew, “G-Pak, Blak fights off temptations of the streets and dreams of making it big in the rap game. But when he gets caught in the middle of a crime lord-turned-media-mogul’s plan to control the
    7.00
    3 votes
    110

    Magik

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Magik was a four-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in 1983–1984, starring the fictional characters Magik and Storm. It was written by Chris Claremont and illustrated by John Buscema, Ron Frenz, Sal Buscema, and Tom Palmer. Because of the popularity of the Uncanny X-Men during the 1980s under Chris Claremont, a number of mutant related properties were created, most notably The New Mutants from which this series spun off of. The main plot takes place in mere seconds of canonical Marvel time, but covers seven years of Illyana's life in Limbo. The events occur between panels of The Uncanny X-Men #160 (August '82), with a very brief cameo in The New Mutants #14 (April '84). In X-Men #160 Illyana is kidnapped by Belasco at age 6 and returns in the same issue at age 13. Magik details the transition of Illyana Rasputin from a six-year-old child to a thirteen-year-old mutant/sorceress. The narrative takes place as a flashback on Illyana's fifteenth birthday, which would have been her eighth had she not travelled to Limbo. Belasco, demon lord of Limbo, wants to use Illyana to help the Elder Gods destroy Earth. To do this he has to place five bloodstones in a pentagon
    7.00
    3 votes
    111
    Star Ocean: The Second Story

    Star Ocean: The Second Story

    • Publisher: Enix
    • Created By: Mayumi Azuma
    Star Ocean: The Second Story (スターオーシャン セカンドストーリー, Sutā Ōshan Sekando Sutōrī) is a seven volume manga series written and illustrated by Mayumi Azuma. Based on the tri-Ace role-playing video game Star Ocean: The Second Story, it follows the exploits of Claude C. Kenny, a young ensign in the Earth Federation who finds himself stranded on the Planet Expel. He meets Rena Lanford, a young girl living in the village of Arlia who declares that he is the legendary warrior their legends speak of who will save their troubled world from disaster. The series was serialized in Shōnen Gangan, premiering June 22, 1999 and running until December 21, 2001 when it ended without reaching the conclusion of the story. Studio Deen adapted the manga series into a twenty six episode anime series entitled Star Ocean EX which aired on TV Tokyo from April 3, 2001 until September 25, 2001. The anime series was released to Region 1 DVD by Geneon Entertainment. To complete the story left unfinished by both the manga and anime, five drama CDs were released in Japan, using the same voice actors from the anime series. Twenty years after the events of the Star Ocean video game, Ronixis J. Kenni and his son, Claude
    7.00
    3 votes
    112

    The Pulse

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Brian Michael Bendis
    The Pulse is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, about the people who work on "The Pulse", a weekly section in the fictional Daily Bugle newspaper, focusing on superheroes. The main star of the book is Jessica Jones, a former superhero and private investigator, previously seen in the Alias series. Jones works as a specialist consultant for "The Pulse" with journalists Ben Urich and Kat Farrell. Other cast members include Luke Cage, superhero and boyfriend to Jessica, the Bugle's publisher, J. Jonah Jameson, and senior editor Joseph "Robbie" Robertson. In the first story arc, the Green Goblin's true identity is revealed to the public after an investigation by The Daily Bugle into the murder of a Bugle journalist. After an extended battle with Spider-Man and Luke Cage, the Goblin is arrested and sent to prison for the first time in the character's 40-year history. Also, Ben Urich reveals to Peter Parker that he is aware that Peter is Spider-Man. In the second story arc, in a tie-in to the Secret War mini-series, Jessica and Luke are attacked by a mystery woman who leaves Luke in a coma. The hospital where Luke is being cared for at is
    7.00
    3 votes
    113
    Wasteland

    Wasteland

    • Publisher: Oni Press
    Wasteland is a monthly comic book series written by Antony Johnston, drawn by Christopher Mitten with covers by Ben Templesmith, and published by Oni Press. Issue #1 debuted in July 2006. The series is set one hundred years after the Big Wet, an unspecified disaster that destroyed modern society and, it is assumed, changed the world's coastlines. The story takes place somewhere in America, now a barren desert and dustbowl without modern technology. The seas are poisonous, and subsistence farming with small amounts of livestock appears to be the norm. The book also has theme music, composed and performed by Johnston, which can be downloaded from the official website. Each issue of Wasteland is 32 pages long (with the exception of issue #1, which was a special double length premiere) and contains 22 pages of comic story, one episode of the prose serial travelogue Walking The Dust, a letters column and preview page for the following issue. The remainder of the pages are taken up by ads, normally for other series from Oni Press and/or by Wasteland's creators. The letters column sometimes contains pieces of submitted fan art, and Johnston himself often answers the letters. The F.A.Q.
    7.00
    3 votes
    114
    Afro Tanaka

    Afro Tanaka

    • Publisher: Shogakukan
    • Created By: Masaharu Noritsuke
    Afro Tanaka (アフロ田中, Afuro Tanaka) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Masaharu Noritsuke. It will be adapted into a live action film in 2012. The theme song of the film is Yoru wo Koete by Tsuru.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    Champions

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Don Heck
    The Champions are a team of superheroes that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The team first appears in The Champions #1 (October 1975), and were created by writer Tony Isabella and artists Gil Kane and Don Heck. Writer Tony Isabella developed the concept of a new team of superheroes and originally wanted the roster to consist of former X-Men Angel and Iceman, and the newly created Black Goliath. Black Goliath, however, became unavailable when the character debuted in his own title, forcing Isabella to rethink the concept. Editor Len Wein insisted on at least five members, and Isabella added three established heroes: Russian spy Black Widow (team leader), the Greek god Hercules, and the supernatural avenger Ghost Rider. Captain Marvel, Power Man and Son of Satan were all considered for the final place on the roster before selecting Ghost Rider. Writer and publisher David Anthony Kraft is credited with naming the team, with the title originally intended to be published in Giant-Size format as Giant-Size Champions. Production difficulties, which caused a three month delay between the first and second issues, prevented this. The title was eventually published
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Maze Agency

    Maze Agency

    • Publisher: Innovation Publishing
    The Maze Agency is an American mystery comic book series created by Mike W. Barr and first published in 1988. It revolves around a pair of detectives (Jennifer Mays and Gabriel Webb) and their adventures solving puzzling murders. The Maze Agency was a 1989 nominee for the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards for Best New Series. The Maze Agency was first published by Comico Comics for 7 issues in 1988-1989, and shortly before that company ceased operations, it moved to Innovation Comics for another 16 issues (8-23), plus an annual and a special continuing the numbering and running to 1991. Alpha Productions released a single Maze Agency story in the anthology comic, The Detectives #1 in 1993, as well as a prose story in Noir #1 in 1994. Caliber Comics brought it back in the late 90s as a three-issue miniseries. IDW Publishing printed a three issue miniseries in 2005/2006. They also reprinted #1-5 of the original series in trade paperback. A second prose story appeared in the anthology, "Sex, Lies and Private Eyes," published by Moonstone in 2009. The Maze Agency is notable for being one of the few mystery comic books to "play fair" with the reader — i.e. giving out sufficient clues
    8.00
    2 votes
    117

    Rann-Thanagar War

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Rann–Thanagar War is a six-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics in 2005. Written by Dave Gibbons, and illustrated by Ivan Reis, Marc Campos, and John Kalisz, the series concerns a war between the planets Rann and Thanagar, and features Adam Strange, the Green Lantern Corps, Hawkman, Hawkgirl, L.E.G.I.O.N. and Captain Comet, along with other DC space adventurers. The series was followed in early 2006 with the one-shot book Rann-Thanager War: Infinite Crisis Special. Rann-Thanagar War, along with Villains United, The OMAC Project, and Day of Vengeance, is one of four miniseries which lead up to DC Comics' Infinite Crisis event. Unlike most of the other tie-ins, it is also a continuation of storylines from two other series: Adam Strange: Planet Heist and Green Lantern: Rebirth. In the continuity which existed prior to the Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series, a war erupted between the planets Rann and Thanagar. Rann's adopted hero Adam Strange and Thanagarian law enforcement officers Hawkman (Katar Hol) and Hawkgirl (Shayera Hol) worked desperately to end the conflict. The trio succeeded, eventually revealing that events leading up to the war were manipulated by
    8.00
    2 votes
    118

    Star Brand

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Star Brand is the name of a number of similar fictional comic book objects of power all of which exist in the multiverse created by the shared universes of Marvel Comics. Two of these Star Brands have been prominently featured in two separate series published by Marvel. The original Star Brand is a star-shaped tattoo-like mark that first appeared in the comic book series Star Brand, published by Marvel Comics as a part of its New Universe imprint from 1986 to 1989. All of the other Star Brands are alternates of this original version. The Star Brand gave its bearer infinite, god-like powers, limited only by the wielder's imagination (see below). After the end of the series and the New Universe imprint, the Star Brand made appearances in Marvel's main shared universe, the Marvel Universe. The second notable Star Brand is a glowing glyph, shaped like the original Star Brand and giving identical powers. This Star Brand is featured in newuniversal, a series featuring a universe that is a reimagining of the original New Universe that began publication in 2006. The most easily attainable powers of the Star Brand are flight, incredible strength, invulnerability and the ability to
    8.00
    2 votes
    119

    Touch

    By John Francis Moore and Wesley Craig. Cancelled after six issues. A Vegas huckster named Cooper Santiago makes a living finding people with super-human abilities like Rory Soodman (Super-strong, Invulnerable, Charismatic) and becoming their agent. How long can he pretend to help make the world a better place.
    8.00
    2 votes
    120

    JLA/Avengers

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    JLA/Avengers (Issues #2 and #4 titled Avengers/JLA) is a comic book limited series and crossover published in prestige format by DC Comics and Marvel Comics from September 2003 to May 2004. The series was written by Kurt Busiek, with art by George Pérez. The series features the two companies' teams of superheroes, DC Comics' Justice League of America and Marvel's Avengers. In 1979, DC and Marvel agreed to co-publish a crossover series involving the two teams, to be written by Gerry Conway and drawn by George Pérez. The plot of the original crossover was a time travel story involving Marvel's Kang the Conqueror and DC's Lord of Time. Writer/editor Roy Thomas was hired to script the book, based on Conway's plot, and although work had begun on the series in 1981 (Pérez had penciled 21 pages by mid-1983) and it was scheduled for publication in May 1983, editorial disputes - reportedly instigated by Marvel Editor-In-Chief Jim Shooter - prevented the story from being completed. The failure of the JLA/Avengers book also caused the cancellation of a planned sequel to the 1982 The Uncanny X-Men and The New Teen Titans crossover. An agreement was reached between the two companies in 2002,
    6.00
    4 votes
    121
    Seven Brothers

    Seven Brothers

    John Woo's 7 Brothers is a 2006 five-issue comic book limited series published under the Director's Cut imprint of Virgin Comics. The series was produced by John Woo, written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Jeevan Kang. In 2007, the series was followed by a sequel, John Woo's 7 Brothers II, written by Ben Raab and Deric Hughes, with art by Edison George. Six hundred years ago, a mighty treasure fleet set out to sail the oceans of the world. They reached every continent, discovered every land long before history's great explorers stole the credit for their feats. Now, in modern day Los Angeles, seven men with nothing in common but their destinies are drawn together in the service of a mysterious young woman. An ancient prophecy must be fulfilled. Something terrible is reaching out across the centuries. There's a world to be saved... and the only hope for us all is a motley crew of so-called brothers and a power too terrifying to be used.
    6.00
    4 votes
    122

    All Star Batman and Robin

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Frank Miller
    All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder is an American comic book series written by Frank Miller and penciled by Jim Lee. It was published by DC Comics, with a sporadic schedule, between 2005 and 2008. The series was to be rebooted under the title Dark Knight: Boy Wonder in 2011, when both Miller and Lee were to finish the last six issues. This was the first series to be launched in 2005 under DC's All Star imprint. These series are helmed by renowned writers and artists in the American comic book industry and attempt to retell some of the history of prominent DC Universe characters, but outside of DC Universe continuity, and not be restricted by it, in order to appeal to new and returning readers. Each title under the All Star imprint is set in its own continuity and separate universe. In a retelling of the origin of Batman's sidekick, Robin: Bruce Wayne and Vicki Vale are at the circus watching "The Flying Graysons," an acrobat family consisting of twelve-year-old Dick Grayson and his parents. When Grayson's parents are shot to death by a hit man, he is escorted from the scene by several cops of the Gotham City Police Department in a threatening manner. Vicki and Alfred
    5.20
    5 votes
    123
    Concession

    Concession

    Concession is a furry webcomic written and illustrated by Immelmann. It began July 1, 2006 and is still being updated regularly, normally twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays, with a bonus comic on Sundays. For the most part, the series takes place in a world inhabited by both humans and furries (anthropormorphic animals), however through the course of the comic it is implied that the two very rarely interact or mingle, both keeping to their own devices (it is also hinted that although anthropormorphic reptiles and amphibians commonly prefer to hang out with mammal-based furries, they are in fact their own sub-societies). In addition to being a furry-themed webcomic, the premise is also considered as being very homosexual supportive, however the comic is not considered primarily a 'gay webcomic' as many of its characters are also bisexual and heterosexual and does not treat one lifestyle choice as being better than any other. The comic itself and its lack of favoritism is a constant with many of the themes it uses during its run, including sexuality, religion, and ethics, normally providing both sides of the argument, usually between whichever characters or group of characters are
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Hikaru Totomoni

    Hikaru Totomoni

    • Publisher: Akita Shoten
    • Created By: Keiko Tobe
    With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child (光とともに...-自閉症児を抱えて-, Hikari to Tomoni... ~Jiheishouji o Kakaete~) is a josei drama manga by Keiko Tobe. It began serialization in 2000 in For Mrs., and serial chapters were collected in 15 tankōbon volumes by Akita Shoten. The series depicts the struggles of a young mother, Sachiko Azuma, raising her autistic son Hikaru in modern Japan. The series is licensed in English in North America by Yen Press, with eight volumes (each collecting two tankōbon volumes) published as of September 2011. In January 2009, the series went on hiatus due to Tobe's illness and remained uncompleted when she died in January 2010. Her works during her illness were collected and published with some of her earlier works as volume 15 in June 2010. The series received an Excellence Prize for manga at the 2004 Japan Media Arts Festival. It was adapted as a television drama, airing on NTV from April 14, 2004 to June 23, 2004, which won several awards at Japan's 41st Television Drama Academy Awards, including "Best Drama." With the Light: Raising an Autistic Child is about a family whose son Hikaru is autistic. The manga series begins with Hikaru’s birth and how his
    6.67
    3 votes
    125

    Justice League Quarterly

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Justice League Quarterly was a quarterly American comic book series published by DC Comics from Winter 1990 to Winter 1994; it lasted 17 issues. It had a variable cast, pulling from the Justice League membership. The title centred around short stories featuring a differing number of characters, often solo stories, and in later issues often featured a pin-up section of members of the Justice League. Various writers and artists have worked on the title.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    K-On!

    K-On!

    • Featured Characters: Yui Hirasawa
    • Publisher: Houbunsha
    • Created By: Kakifly
    K-On! (けいおん!, Keion!) is a Japanese four-panel comic strip seinen manga written and illustrated by Kakifly. The manga was serialized in Houbunsha's seinen manga magazine Manga Time Kirara between the May 2007 and October 2010 issues. It was also serialized in Houbunsha's magazine Manga Time Kirara Carat. The manga relaunched from April 2011 to June 2012 with two separate storylines published in Manga Time Kirara and Manga Time Kirara Carat. The manga is licensed in North America by Yen Press. A 13-episode anime adaptation produced by Kyoto Animation aired in Japan between April and June 2009. An additional original video animation (OVA) episode was released in January 2010. A 26-episode second season, titled K-On!! (with two exclamation marks), aired in Japan between April and September 2010, with an OVA episode released in March 2011. Bandai Entertainment released the first season in North America in 2011, while the second season has been licensed by Sentai Filmworks. An anime film adaptation was released in Japan on December 3, 2011. The title of the series comes from the Japanese word for light music, keiongaku (軽音楽), which in the Japanese context is similar to pop
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Monkey Typhoon

    Monkey Typhoon

    • Publisher: Kodansha
    • Created By: Tadashi Agi
    Monkey Typhoon (アソボット戦記五九, Asobotto Senki Gokū, literally "Asobot Military History Goku") is a Japanese manga written by Tadashi Agi and illustrated by Romu Aoi. It was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shōnen Magazine between 2001 and 2002. It was later adapted into an anime series produced by the Avex group and anime studio Studio Egg, which premiered between October 1, 2002 and September 30, 2003 on TV Tokyo. It was broadcast by the anime television network, Animax, across its respective networks worldwide, including East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, South Korea, and other regions. It contains several steampunk elements, and is loosely based on the Chinese myth, Journey to the West. The music for Monkey Typhoon was conducted by Kōhei Tanaka, and produced by Avex and Dentsu. Monkey Typhoon tells the story of three asobots — a form of robots whose general title is a portmanteau of the words association and robot — Goku, Tongo, and Joe. They are assisted in their journeys by Sanzo, a human, the son of the creator of the asobots, and Suzie, who joined them after his father was cured from the Destruction Virus. Later on they are joined by their former rivals Miyon and Shiyon.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    Secret Wars II

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Secret Wars II is a nine-issue comic book limited series and crossover published from 1985 to 1986 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Marvel's then Editor-in-chief Jim Shooter and primarily pencilled by Al Milgrom. The series was a sequel to original series Secret Wars, published in 1984 and 1985. The series tied-in with issues of other Marvel titles, with each "tie-in" featuring a "Secret Wars II" logo in the top right hand corner to indicate that it was a part of the overall story. The entity that instigated the first Secret Wars, the Beyonder, visits Earth in search of enlightenment and inevitably comes into conflict with Earth's superhumans and the cosmic entities that exist in the Marvel Universe. At first the Beyonder tries to figure out the meaning of the simple everyday tasks humans do everyday, such as: eating, sleeping, using the bathroom, etc. Then the Beyonder works for a mobster and becomes very powerful and obsessed with gadgets. The Earth's heroes are very suspicious of him and this cause the Beyonder to retreat to a lone island. Mephisto recruits an army of super villains with boosted strength, but the Thing fights them off after he is given augmented
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    BrainBanx

    BrainBanx

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    BrainBanx is a six-issue comic book limited series published in 1997 as part of the short-lived DC Comics imprint, Helix. Written by Elaine Lee and featuring artwork by Jason Temujin Minor, the title narrates the tale of the red-headed Anna Elysian, a telepathic intelligence operative working undercover in a distant future world. Anna is a 'Mount' which means that she is an agent who shares her body and her consciousness with one of the corporeal occupants ('volunteers') of the BrainBanx (or 'pool'), a series of sophisticated life-support tanks administered by the galactic government. In Anna's case, she is joined with Ellis Shepherd (or 'Shep') a former employee of the Organic Ranching Corporation (ORC) who has fled his position upon discovering evidence of certain prohibited cross-breeding experiments that ORC had been performing with sheep. As the series unfolds, Anna uncovers illegal plans to grow human brains in the bodies of animals and must also reconcile her emerging feelings for Shep with whom she shares her mind and body. In her foreword to the series, Elaine Lee described her wish to focus on human relationships in the title:
    5.75
    4 votes
    130

    Extreme Justice

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Extreme Justice was a monthly Justice League spin off title in the DC Comics universe. It replaced the cancelled Justice League International (formerly Justice League Europe) and ran for nineteen issues from 1994 to 1996. Several heroes split from the main Justice League over dissatisfaction with the League's association with the United Nations. These characters form their own Justice League, based out in Mount Thunder, Colorado. The team is led by Captain Atom and consists of Maxima, Blue Beetle (Ted Kord), Booster Gold, and Amazing-Man (Will Everett III). They were later joined by Firestorm (Ronald Raymond), Plastique, and the Wonder Twins (Zan and Jayna). Carol Ferris became the administrator of their Mount Thunder facility. The characters never referred to the team as "Extreme Justice" in the series; however, they were called that in an issue of "Justice League America". Although at one point there were three Justice League groups in action (Extreme Justice itself plus Justice League America and Justice League Task Force), there was very little unity between the teams and a strong sense of rivalry among the respective leaders, Wonder Woman, Captain Atom, and the Martian
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    The Authority

    The Authority

    • Publisher: Wildstorm
    • Created By: Bryan Hitch
    The Authority is a superhero comic book series published by DC Comics under the Wildstorm imprint. It was created by Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, and follows the adventures of the Authority, a superhero team mainly composed of Ellis-created characters from Stormwatch. The founding members of the Authority were: Following the "Outer Dark" storyarc, Jenny Sparks was replaced with: After the "Revolution" maxi-series, new members of the Authority included: Beginning with #18 of volume five the team roster underwent a major change. Jack Hawksmoor, Swift and Engineer remained on the team, where they were joined by new members: The Authority's base of operations is the Carrier, a sentient, gigantic, interdimensional "shiftship" existing everywhere on Earth at the same time and capable of moving through every imaginable plane of existence. In 1999, Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch created the Authority, a team of superheroes who got the job done by any means necessary. The team originally consisted of Jenny Sparks, a British woman who could generate and turn into electricity; Jack Hawksmoor, who was psychically bonded to cities and could communicate with them; Swift, a Tibetan woman who
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    Tango

    Tango

    Tango is a comics anthology published in |Melbourne, Australia by Cardigan Comics. As of December 2009, there have been nine issues of Tango, published intermittently since 1997, and an additional compilation The Tango Collection, published in 2009 by Allen & Unwin. Tango is described as “the Australian romance comics anthology”. Each issue features contributions by comic artists living and working in Melbourne and other parts of Australia and New Zealand. The first three issues of Tango were large format publications, inspired by large format anthologies from the United States such as the early issues of RAW. Later issues became smaller in format, and beginning with the fourth issue in 2001 (Tango Quatro), each has been sub-titled with a theme of “Love and ...”. Respectively, the themes for issues four through nine have been: ‘Love and Death’, ‘Love and the Senses’, ‘Love and Sex’, ‘Love and Sedition’ ‘Love and Food’, and 'Love and War'. Drawing on contributions from the first eight issues of Tango, Allen and Unwin published The Tango Collection in 2009. Bernard Caleo is the creator and editor of Tango, as well as being a contributor to each issue. Caleo is also a performer,
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Ultimate Iron Man

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate Iron Man is the name of two comic book miniseries written by Orson Scott Card and published by Marvel Comics. The stories tell the origins of the Ultimate Marvel version of Iron Man, who appears in The Ultimates. The first volume, published between 2005 and 2006, was a five-part miniseries depicting the early life and origins of Tony Stark, and was drawn by Andy Kubert. The second volume is also a five-part miniseries and had its first issue released on December 12, 2007. This volume follows directly on from the first series and depicts the early uses of the Iron Man armor, art by Pasqual Ferry and Dave McCaig. Ultimate Iron Man #1 reveals that Tony Stark's genius is the result of an accident his mother (brilliant scientist Maria Cerrera, who is the wife of Tony Stark's father and works for him in research and development before he was born) suffered while she was carrying him in her womb. The accident changed the genetic structure of both her and her unborn child, but culminated in her death during childbirth. The child, named Antonio (Tony for short), developed neural tissue normally found only in the brain all throughout his body, causing his entire body to act as one
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Firestar Comics

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: John Romita, Jr.
    Firestar was a four-issue comic book limited series, published in 1986 by Marvel Comics, that established the origin story of the Firestar character within Marvel Comics continuity. Firestar was originally a character created solely for the animated series Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends as a "fire" counterpart for previously established character Iceman, and had no appearances in Marvel comics prior to the animated series. The first Marvel comic that Firestar appeared in was 1981's Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends #1. The first published, in-continuity appearance of Firestar was Uncanny X-Men #193 (May 1985). The limited series presents Firestar's comic book origin for the first time in print, which differs significantly from the animated character's origin. The limited series covers events that happened both before and after the Uncanny X-Men appearance. In 2006, the series was collected into one digest sized paperback, titled X-Men: Firestar (ISBN 0-7851-2200-1). Angelica Jones lives with her middle-aged father and paternal grandmother. "Angel" (her father's pet name for her) is shy and withdrawn, and her family moves frequently, but she gets emotional support from her
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    Hellblazer

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Hellblazer (also known as John Constantine, Hellblazer) is a contemporary horror comic book series, originally published by DC Comics, and subsequently by the Vertigo imprint since March 1993, when the imprint was introduced, where it remains to this day. Its central character is the streetwise magician John Constantine, following his popularity in the Alan Moore run on Swamp Thing. It has been published continuously since January 1988, and is Vertigo's longest running title, the only remaining publication from the imprint's launch. After favorable reader reaction to John Constantine's appearances in the comic book series Swamp Thing, where he had been introduced by Alan Moore during his authorship of the title, the character was given his own comic book series in 1988. The series was intended to bear the title Hellraiser, but this title was revised before publication due to the contemporaneous release of Clive Barker's unrelated film of the same name. The initial creative team was writer Jamie Delano and artist John Ridgway, with Dave McKean supplying distinctive painted and collage covers. Delano introduced a political aspect to the character, about which he stated: "...generally
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Justice League Elite

    Justice League Elite

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Justice League Elite was a twelve-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. The title was created by writer Joe Kelly and penciller Doug Mahnke. The Justice League Elite was formed to attempt black ops that would not be acceptable for the JLA to "sully their hands" with. "The Justice League Elite are a not-exactly-sanctioned, don't-ask-don't-tell, covert operations unit-- newly formed to hunt and eliminate extra-normal threats to the earth before they go public." (JLA Secret Files and Origins 2004) The team was formed at the end JLA #100 from most of the second incarnation of The Elite (only missing Hat), members of the JLA and a couple of spies/assassins. They operated out of Somerset, New Jersey. The group's appearances have been collected in two trade paperbacks:
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Millennium

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Millennium" was a comic book crossover story line that ran through an eight-issue, self-titled, limited series and various other titles cover dated January and February 1988 by DC Comics. The limited series was published weekly, which was a departure for an American series. It was written by Steve Englehart, and with art by Joe Staton and Ian Gibson. The story took place at a time when the Guardians of the Universe had left Earth's dimension along with their mates, the Zamarons. However, one Guardian, Herupa Hando Hu, and his Zamaron mate, Nadia Safir, traveled to Earth and announced to the world that they would select 10 persons who would become the new Guardians of the Universe, and give birth to a new race of immortals. They gathered Earth's superheroes and sent them to find the chosen persons, who came from various parts of the world. One of them turned out to be Hal Jordan's friend, Thomas Kalmaku, while another was the former villain known as the Floronic Man. However, unknown to everyone, the robotic cult known as the Manhunters (whom the Justice League believed had been destroyed years before) had found a sphere that Harbinger had used to store all the information she had
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    Suicide Squad

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Suicide Squad, also known as Task Force X (actually the name of a closely related but independent supervisory organization), is a name for two fictional organizations in the DC Comics Universe. The first version debuted in The Brave and the Bold (vol. 1) #25 (1959), and the second in Legends #3 (1987). An "original" Suicide Squad was retconned into existence in Secret Origins (vol. 2) #14, in order to form a connection between the two Squads. The current Suicide Squad (created by John Ostrander in the aforementioned Legends #3) is an anti-hero team of incarcerated supervillains who act as deniable assets for the United States government, undertaking high-risk black ops missions in exchange for commuted prison sentences. The group operates out of Belle Reve Penitentiary, under the command of swashbuckler Ryan Scott. The original Suicide Squad featured in The Brave and the Bold consisted of Rick Flag, Jr., his girlfriend Karin Grace, Dr. Hugh Evans, and Jess Bright. This team was created by writer Robert Kanigher and artist Ross Andru. Later continuity established that the team's earliest incarnation was expressly formed to fight monstrous menaces as a replacement for the Justice
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    The Beano Annual

    The Beano Annual

    • Publisher: D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd
    The Beano Annual is the current name of the book that has been published every year since 1939, to tie in with the children's comic The Beano. As of 2012 there have been 73 editions. They are traditionally published in August, in time for Christmas, and since 1965 they have had the date of the following year on the cover. Before then, no date was given. From 1942 to 1949 the annuals were called "The Magic-Beano Book", which referred to the short-lived Magic Comic that had ceased publication due to World War II's paper rationing. The name reverted to the original title of "The Beano Book" in the following year and continued, the year changing for each different annual, until the release of the 2003 book in 2002, when its current name was adopted, though the following year still appears at the end. The 2011 Beano Annual is taller and wider than previous editions. Because of his popularity, Dennis the Menace has featured on the front cover of every annual since the 1979 book. The original Beano annuals were not dated. This section gives information on their date, with them being published the August before (for example, the 1950 Beano annual would have been published in August 1949).
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    The Punisher War Journal

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Punisher War Journal is the title of two Marvel Comics comic book series featuring the character Frank Castle, also known as the Punisher. The first volume, published from 1988 to 1995, was spun off of a self-titled series featuring the vigilante's exploits. After this, the character went through a number of incarnations in Marvel's imprints, such as Marvel Knights and MAX, that were outside of regular Marvel continuity. The second volume of War Journal, published between 2007 and 2009 by writer Matt Fraction, placed the character firmly in the ongoing Marvel Universe inhabited by superheroes such as the Avengers and Spider-Man, and super-villains such as Doctor Doom and the Masters of Evil. This was reflected in the series by tying into crossover events of the Marvel Universe proper, including "Civil War", "World War Hulk", and "Secret Invasion". The first volume of The Punisher War Journal ran 80 issues, cover-dated November 1988 to July 1995. Originally written and pencilled by Carl Potts, and inked by Jim Lee, who soon became series penciler, it changed creative teams with issue #25 (December 1990) to writer Mike Baron and penciler-inker Mark Texeira. Chuck Dixon took over
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    Avengers Forever

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Avengers Forever is a twelve-issue comic book limited series published from December 1998 to November 1999 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Kurt Busiek and Roger Stern and drawn by Carlos Pacheco and Jesus Merino. Marvel originally contracted Busiek and Pacheco to produce a series called Avengers: World in Chains, but was too similar to another project (Mutant X) and was cancelled by the company. As Busiek and Pacheco were under contract, the pair instead developed the concept for Avengers Forever. The character Immortus sends his servant Tempus to kill an apparently critically ill Rick Jones, the possessor of the "Destiny Force," a powerful ability utilized during the Kree-Skrull War storyline. Rick, however, is saved by the alien Kree Supreme Intelligence, who urges him to use the Destiny Force to summon aid. With the help of former Zodiac member Libra, Rick pulls various members of the superhero team Avengers from the past, present, and future. The team consists of a very disillusioned Captain America, who is pulled from an adventure in which he discovers a high-ranking government official is the leader of the Secret Empire; Yellowjacket from a time when he is
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    Blackest Night

    Blackest Night

    "Blackest Night" is a 2009–2010 American comic book crossover storyline published by DC Comics, consisting of an eponymous, central miniseries written by Geoff Johns and penciled by Ivan Reis, as well as a number of tie-in books. "Blackest Night" involves Nekron, a personified force of death resurrecting deceased superheroes and seeking to eliminate all life and emotion from the universe. Geoff Johns has identified the series' central theme as "emotion." The crossover was published for eight months via a limited series, as well as in both the Green Lantern and Green Lantern Corps comic titles. Various other limited series and tie-ins were published, including an audio drama from Darker Projects. The storyline was first mentioned at the conclusion of the "Sinestro Corps War" in Green Lantern vol. 4, #25. As the war between the Green Lantern and Sinestro Corps reaches its climax, the four Green Lanterns of Earth (Hal Jordan, Guy Gardner, John Stewart, and Kyle Rayner) are told by the Guardians Ganthet and Sayd of the "Blackest Night" prophecy. According to the prophecy, the two existing Corps would be joined by five new ones, each driven by a specific emotion and empowered by a
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    Final Crisis

    Final Crisis

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Grant Morrison
    "Final Crisis" is a crossover storyline that appeared in comic books published by DC Comics in 2008, primarily the seven-issue miniseries of the same name written by Grant Morrison. Originally DC announced the project as being illustrated solely by J. G. Jones; artists Carlos Pacheco, Marco Rudy and Doug Mahnke later provided art for the series. It directly follows DC Universe #0 after the conclusion of the 51-issue Countdown to Final Crisis weekly limited series. Promotion about the limited series describes its story as "the day evil won". The series deals with alien villain Darkseid's plot to overthrow reality, and the subsequent death and corruption of various DC characters and their universe. Final Crisis came out of several ideas Grant Morrison had when he returned to DC Comics in 2003. Morrison said, "I pitched a huge crossover event called Hypercrisis, which didn’t happen for various reasons. Some of Hypercrisis went into Seven Soldiers, some went into All-Star Superman, some went into 52 and some of it found a home in Final Crisis." According to Grant Morrison, work finally began on Final Crisis #1 in early 2006, with the intention of the series being a thematic and literal
    5.50
    4 votes
    144

    Superman For All Seasons

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Superman for All Seasons was a 4-issue comic book limited series written by Jeph Loeb with art by Tim Sale, and was originally published by DC Comics in 1998. This was made hot off the heels from their previous success, Batman: The Long Halloween, and as that Batman-story dealt with holidays as the theme, this story's theme dealt with seasons. The artwork contains many influences from that of Norman Rockwell. The story also parallels the events from Superman's then-origin story John Byrne's The Man of Steel, though it can be read on its own. Superman For All Seasons was conceived, like all of the Jeph Loeb/Tim Sale books from DC Comics and rival Marvel Comics, as a stand alone, self-contained story that gave a sense of the character of Superman and his supporting cast. Not an origin, but picking up on who the character is and how he came to be. As explained by Loeb, one of the things that he wanted to capture was the grandeur that is Superman, and that was to have double-page spreads with big sky shots. With Sale and Bjarne Hansen on the art and colors, everyone was speechless once Loeb saw the pages, and those same pages came in the office of DC. One of the biggest examples was
    5.50
    4 votes
    145

    Flash Comics

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Flash Comics was an anthology comic book published by All-American Publications and later National Periodicals (DC Comics). The title ran for 104 issues between January 1940 to February 1949. Although the name of the comic book was Flash Comics, the Flash was only one of many different series featured in the magazine. Many DC Comics characters make their first appearances in Flash Comics, including the Flash, Hawkman, Black Canary, and Johnny Thunder. The Flash was later given a solo comic book series, All Flash Quarterly (later All Flash) which ran for 32 issues between Summer 1941 to January 1948. Towards the end of the 1940s, superhero comics fell out of favor and the All-American line of comics were all cancelled. Flash Comics was cancelled in 1949 with issue #104. When DC Comics gave the Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen, his own comic book series, The Flash, the series received the old numbering of Flash Comics starting at issue #105. Series published in Flash Comics include: Several stories from Flash Comics have been reprinted in DC Archive Editions.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Reborn!

    Reborn!

    • Featured Characters: Tsunayoshi Sawada
    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Akira Amano
    Reborn!, known in Japan as Katekyō Hitman Reborn! (家庭教師ヒットマンREBORN!, Katekyō Hittoman Ribōn!, "Katekyō" being a portmanteau of Katei Kyōshi and translated as Home Tutor), is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Akira Amano. The plot revolves around the life of a young boy named Tsunayoshi Sawada, who finds out that he is next in line to become the boss of the most powerful Mafia organization called Vongola, the Vongola Family. As such, the Vongola's most powerful hitman, a gun-toting infant named Reborn, is sent to tutor "Tsuna" on how to become a respectable boss. The individual manga chapters are serialized in Japan in Weekly Shōnen Jump. The individual chapters are collected and published in tankōbon volumes by Shueisha, with twenty-seven volumes released as of October 2, 2009. Viz Media licensed the series for an English language release in North America, shortening the series name to Reborn!. An anime adaptation of the series by Artland aired on TV Tokyo between October 7, 2006 and September 25, 2010. There have also been various video games based on the series, as well as two light novels by Hideaki Koyasu. Reborn! has become one of the best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Superman/Batman

    • Featured Characters: Batman
    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Superman/Batman was a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publisher's two most popular characters: Batman and Superman. Superman/Batman premiered in August 2003 and was an update of the previous series, World's Finest Comics, in which Superman and Batman regularly joined forces. Superman/Batman explored the camaraderie, antagonism, and friendship between its titular characters. Jeph Loeb, the series' first writer, introduced a dual-narrator technique to present the characters' often opposing viewpoints and estimations of each other, which subsequent series writers have maintained. Prior to the 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, the two iconic characters were depicted as the best of friends. Frank Miller's landmark series The Dark Knight Returns was the first DC story that depicts the heroes at odds with each other, as opposed to pre-Crisis incarnations. This dynamic became DC Universe canon with John Byrne's The Man of Steel, a Superman reboot published in 1986. With the exception of the first thirteen issues, most of the story arcs were independent and self-contained from the ongoing or crossover storylines in the other Batman and
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    The Man of Steel

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Man of Steel is a six-issue comic book limited series released in 1986 by DC Comics, several months after the twelve-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths completed. The Man of Steel was written and penciled by John Byrne and inked by Dick Giordano. The mini-series was designed to reboot the Superman mythos. Using the history-altering effects of Crisis on Infinite Earths as an explanation, it was decided by DC editorial to give Superman an updated look and feel by completely rewriting his history, as an attempt to attract more readers. Thus, for modern comics, Man of Steel is the dividing point between the previous canon and the current one; many comic fans refer to the two different versions as "pre-Crisis" and "post-Crisis", per Crisis on Infinite Earths being the major dividing line across DC's universe as a whole. The pre-Crisis stories were drawn to a close in Alan Moore's "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?". From 1986 to 2004, this series was regarded as the "official" origin of Superman; in 2004, it was superseded by Superman: Birthright. However, after the 2006 conclusion of the DCU-spanning Infinite Crisis storyline, the Birthright series' was removed
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Beyond!

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Beyond! was a six-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics. It was written by Dwayne McDuffie and illustrated by Scott Kolins. The first issue of the series was released on July 6, 2006 and the final issue on December 6, 2006. It was edited by Tom Brevoort and lettered by Dave Lamphear. The series follows a group of mismatched superheroes and supervillains — Hank Pym, the Wasp, Gravity, Medusa, Firebird, Alyosha Kravinoff, Venom (Mac Gargan), The Hood and the Space Phantom —who have been abducted by a cosmic entity, supposedly The Beyonder, to the alien Battleworld for unknown purposes. Deathlok was later introduced to the roster. A mysterious man buries three recently killed familiar aliens (Bi-Beast, a Skrull, and a Kree), the newest of many corpses in a huge graveyard. Meanwhile on Earth, the fledgling hero Gravity, defeats Brushfire in a quick fight, then examines a teleportation device that takes him to outer space. He awakens, meeting Spider-Man, Medusa, Firebird, Wasp, Venom (Mac Gargan, formerly the Scorpion), Henry Pym, Kraven the Hunter (Alyosha Kravinoff), and the Hood. Shortly after, a being, apparently the Beyonder, appears and claims that if they
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Daredevil/Bullseye: The Target

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Kevin Smith
    Daredevil/Bullseye: The Target is an unfinished limited series comic book from Marvel Comics featuring the superhero Daredevil in pursuit of nemesis, the assassin Bullseye. The series was written by Kevin Smith with illustrations by Glenn Fabry. It is known for being quite delayed, with the first issue coming out in November 2002, and the second issue never being released. The first issue was released in November 2002 (and then again in February 2003 to coincide with the release of the Daredevil film) without a follow-up issue. Smith, who had become fully involved in the production of his film Jersey Girl, planned on finishing both this and another limited series, Spider-Man/Black Cat: The Evil That Men Do as soon as production on the film concluded. Unfortunately, Smith wound up not returning to either series until 2005. The final three issues of Spider-Man/Black Cat were released during November 2005 to January 2006. In September 2005, Smith answered the controversy on the messageboard of his official website where he revealed panels from issue #2 and stated that the series would return in mid-2006. He also emphasised that the new issues would reflect the changes in Marvel in
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Marvel Team-Up

    Marvel Team-Up

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Marvel Team-Up is the name of several American comic book series published by Marvel Comics. The series featured two or more Marvel characters in one story. The original series was published from March 1972 through February 1985, featuring Spider-Man as the lead "team-up" character in all but nine of its 150 issues; of the remainder Human Torch and Hulk starred in six and three issues, respectively. When cancelled, the title was replaced by Web of Spider-Man. The second series was published for 11 issues from September 1997 through July 1998 and originally featured Spider-Man; Namor the Sub-Mariner was the featured character starting with #8. A quarterly series titled Spider-Man Team-Up fulfilled much the same purpose as the original title from 1995-1997. The third Marvel Team-Up series, written by Robert Kirkman, began publication in January 2005 and frequently featured Spider-Man. This volume often reintroduced lesser-known Marvel characters that had fallen into obscurity. The spirit of Marvel Team-Up continues in Avenging Spider-Man.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Rokudenashi BLUES

    Rokudenashi BLUES

    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Masanori Morita
    Rokudenashi Blues (ろくでなしBLUES, lit. "Good-for-Nothing Blues") is a boxing themed manga series authored by Masanori Morita that was serialized in the Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1988 to 1997. The story stars Taison Maeda (前田太尊, Maeda Taison), delinquent student of Teiken High (帝拳高校), who wishes to become the World Boxing Champion. The manga follows Maeda (and his friends and rivals) as he struggles through 3 years of high school while becoming one of the strongest and best known high school fighters in all of Tokyo. Not just a pure action manga, Rokudenashi Blues is filled with humor and well-crafted story arcs about honor, friendship and the pressures of being a delinquent student in Japan. Short gag-stories with chibi versions of characters are published as 'Rokudenashi Buru-chu'. The manga was originally serialized in the manga magazine Weekly Jump. The manga was also created into a series of Shueisha Original Kanzenban issues. An audio drama CD released by Shueisha in 1991. Two video games entitled Rokudenashi Blues, developed by TOSE and published by Bandai, were released for the Family Computer (1993) and Super Famicom (1994). Five characters of Rokudenashi Blues appear in the
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Suburbia Highschool

    Suburbia Highschool

    Suburbia Highschool (also known as Sub High) is a German comic in manga style written and illustrated by David Füleki and first published by Delfinium Prints in 2008. The humorous Story follows Lizney Maypole, a teenage student whose biggest problems are a mysterious boyfriend and a robot as her math teacher. A lot of the gags focus on clichés about the typical shōjo manga.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    The Crow

    The Crow

    • Created By: James O'Barr
    The Crow is a comic book series created by James O'Barr. The series was originally written by O'Barr as a means of dealing with the death of his girlfriend at the hands of a drunk driver. It was later published by Caliber Comics in 1989, becoming an underground success, and later adapted into a film of the same name in 1994. Three film sequels, a television series and numerous books and comic books have also been subsequently produced. The Crow has been translated into almost a dozen languages and has sold around 750,000 copies worldwide. The story revolves around an unfortunate young man named Eric. He and his fiancée, Shelly, are assaulted by a gang of street thugs after their car breaks down. Eric is shot in the head and is paralyzed, and can only watch as Shelly is savagely beaten and raped. They are then left for dead on the side of the road. He is resurrected by a crow and seeks vengeance on the murderers, methodically stalking and killing them. When not on the hunt, Eric stays in the house he shared with Shelly, spending most of his time there lost in memories of her. Her absence is torture for him; he is in emotional pain, even engaging in self-mutilation by cutting
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born

    The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born is a seven-issue comic book limited series, published in 2007 by Marvel Comics. It is the first story arc of five based on The Dark Tower series of novels by Stephen King. It is plotted by Robin Furth, scripted by Peter David, and illustrated by Jae Lee and Richard Isanove. Stephen King serves as Creative and Executive Director of the project. The first issue of The Gunslinger Born was released at midnight on February 7, 2007. Creators Peter David and Jae Lee, and Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada appeared at a midnight signing at a Times Square, New York comic book store to promote it. The entire Dark Tower comic book series comprises four additional arcs of 6 issues for a total of 31 issues. The Gunslinger Born is an expansion and interpretation of events covered in The Dark Tower series, beginning with Roland Deschain's manhood test against Cort and ending with the last events of the flashback sequences in Wizard and Glass. Later arcs will "cover the time period between Roland leaving Hambry and the fall of Gilead". The Gunslinger Born is followed by The Long Road Home, whose first issue was released on March 5, 2008. To accompany the series,
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Ultimate Human

    Ultimate Human

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate Human (originally titled Ultimate Hulk vs. Iron Man) is an American comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics. The limited series set in the Ultimate Universe, is written by Warren Ellis and pencilled by Cary Nord. The series deals with a desperate Bruce Banner pleading with Tony Stark to cure him of his Hulk affliction. The story begins with Bruce Banner approaching Tony Stark to assist in curing him of the failed super-soldier serum that still runs through his body. The Leader (an Ultimate amalgam of the original Leader and Pete Wisdom) is shown to be attempting to obtain both men's blood. Tony Stark and Bruce Banner travel to a Stark facility and Stark places Banner under extreme environments (simulating conditions on Venus and Mars), causing him to become the Hulk and revealing that the Hulk is inhumanly capable of adjusting to new environments and situations. While the Hulk is on a rampage, Tony manages to get himself inside an Iron Man suit. But due to the lack of weapons, Tony must fight Hulk head on. After Tony uses an electroshock to Hulk's brain to cut off the Hulk's anger, Hulk reverts back into Bruce Banner. No Iron Man suit had survived more than
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    V for Vendetta

    V for Vendetta

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    V for Vendetta is a ten-issue comic book series written by Alan Moore and illustrated mostly by David Lloyd, set in a dystopian future United Kingdom imagined from the 1980s to about the 1990s. A mysterious masked revolutionary who calls himself "V" works to destroy the totalitarian government, profoundly affecting the people he encounters. Warner Bros. released a film adaptation of V for Vendetta in 2006. The series depicts a near-future UK after a nuclear war, which has left much of the world destroyed, though most of the damage to the country is indirect, via floods and crop failures. In this future, a fascist party called Norsefire has exterminated its opponents in concentration camps and now rules the country as a police state. V, an anarchist revolutionary dressed in a Guy Fawkes mask, begins an elaborate, violent, and intentionally theatrical campaign to murder his former captors, bring down the government, and convince the people to rule themselves. The first episodes of V for Vendetta originally appeared in black-and-white between 1982 and 1985, in Warrior, a British anthology comic published by Quality Comics. The strip became one of the most popular in that title; during
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    Armageddon 2001

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Armageddon 2001" was a 1991 crossover event storyline published by DC Comics. It ran through a self titled, two issue limited series and most of the annuals DC published that year from May through October (Legion of Super-Heroes Annual #2 did not tie-in to the storyline). After the event, there were two limited series, Armageddon: The Alien Agenda (which was a direct sequel) and Armageddon: Inferno (which was only tangentially related). Each participating annual explored potential possible futures for its main characters, much in the manner of Marvel Comics' What If?. The guiding hands behind the series were editor and writer Dennis O'Neil, writer Archie Goodwin and artist Dan Jurgens. Monarch was an oppressive tyrant from a bleak, dystopian Earth fifty years in the future. The people were unhappy with his rule, particularly a scientist named Matthew Ryder, an expert on temporal studies, who was convinced he could use his technology to travel back in time and prevent the maniacal ruler from ever coming to power. He learned that in the late 20th century one of Earth's superheroes had become evil. In the year 2001 this hero had killed all of his comrades, assumed the identity of
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    Civil War

    • Featured Characters: Iron Man
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Civil War is a 2006-2007 Marvel Comics crossover storyline built around a self-titled seven-issue limited series written by Mark Millar and penciled by Steve McNiven, which ran through various other titles published by Marvel at the time. The storyline builds upon the events that developed in previous Marvel crossovers, particularly "Avengers Disassembled", "House of M", "Decimation", and "Secret War". The tagline for the series is "Whose Side Are You On?" The premise of Civil War involves the introduction of a Superhuman Registration Act in the United States. Similar acts have been used as literary devices in Uncanny X-Men, DC: The New Frontier, Powers, and Astro City, though never on a scale such as this; permanently altering an entire pantheon of established pop culture icons. Mark Millar, writer for the story, has said: The act requires any person in the United States with superhuman abilities to register with the federal government as a "human weapon of mass destruction," reveal their true identity to the authorities, and undergo proper training. Those who sign also have the option of working for S.H.I.E.L.D., earning a salary and benefits such as those earned by other
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Rush City

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Rush City is a six-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics from September of 2006 until 2007. The series is written by Chuck Dixon with illustrations by Timothy Green II colored by Jose Villarrubia. DC Comics produced a special Zero issue web-comic that is available on the DC Comics website, and was packaged with the August 2006 issue of the GamePro magazine. The title features Diego Zhao, an Asian American private investigator who goes by the street name of Rush. Although the series is a crime drama, it does however take place within the continuity of the greater DC Universe. As illustrated in the web comic, Diego was once a respected firefighter in Brooklyn, New York. One evening, Diego and his fiancée, Maggie Flynn, decided to spend an evening out on the town, leaving Maggie’s daughter Sam at home with a babysitter. Coming home later that evening, the inebriated Zhao discovered Maggie's apartment building on fire. He rushed into the burning building to rescue Sam, but the flames were too intense. Sam died, and Diego suffered massive burns that placed him into a coma for two months. When he awakened, the guilt of losing his would-be stepdaughter consumed
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Scalped

    Scalped

    • Publisher: Vertigo
    Scalped is a critically acclaimed 60 issue crime/western comic book series written by Jason Aaron and illustrated by R. M. Guéra, published monthly by Vertigo Comics. Issue #1 was published on January 3, 2007. The series focuses on the Oglala Lakota inhabitants of the fictional Prairie Rose Indian Reservation in modern-day South Dakota as they grapple with organized crime, rampant poverty and alcoholism, local politics and the preservation of their cultural identity. Scalped originally began as a prospective relaunch of Scalphunter, an older DC character. As development proceeded, much of the original concept was abandoned in favor of the current plot. Jason Aaron has said the plot of the comic is partly inspired by Leonard Peltier, a Native American activist who was arrested for the murder of two FBI agents in a reservation shootout in 1975. After fifteen years of absence, Dashiell Bad Horse returns to the "Rez" and is promptly arrested and taken to Lincoln Red Crow, President of the Oglala Tribal Council and Sheriff of the Tribal Police. Red Crow, bemoaning the prevalence of "half-breed" Indians and desiring more enforcers to counteract the nativists protesting his new Crazy
    6.00
    3 votes
    162

    The 'Nam

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The 'Nam was a war comic book series detailing the U.S. War in Vietnam from the perspective of active-duty soldiers involved in the conflict. It was written by Doug Murray, initially illustrated by Michael Golden, edited by Larry Hama and published by Marvel Comics for seven years beginning in 1986, which was originally intended to roughly parallel the analogous events of the period of major American military involvement in Vietnam from 1966 to 1972. When initially announced, it was described as a "twelve year limited series." The comic is structured as the narrative of a fictional soldier, Private First Class Edward Marks (but sometimes following other characters), as he experiences real events that occurred during the conflict. Each issue of the comic occurs one month after the previous issue, detailing events that occurred approximately 20 years prior to the publication date. The events depicted are sometimes famous ones, such as the Tet Offensive of 1968, and sometimes more personal ones, depicting the interaction between soldiers or between soldiers and the local populace of Vietnam, or between soldiers and their families, friends and others in the United States. Some of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    The Prince of Tennis

    The Prince of Tennis

    • Featured Characters: Ryoma Echizen
    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Takeshi Konomi
    The Prince of Tennis (テニスの王子様, Tenisu no Ōjisama) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Takeshi Konomi. The title is often shortened to TeniPuri (テニプリ), a portmanteau of the two parts in the Japanese pronunciation of the words "Tennis Prince". The manga was first published in Japan in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump in July 1999, and ended publication on March 3, 2008. A total of 379 chapters were serialized, spanning 42 volumes. As of volume 40, the manga has sold over 40 million copies in Japan. News that a sequel to the manga series was going to be developed was announced in the December issue of the Japanese manga magazine Jump Square. The new manga series, entitled New Prince of Tennis, began serialization in the Jump Square magazine on March 4, 2009, with the story taking place several months after the end of the original manga. Viz Media acquired the license to distribute the series in English in North America. The manga was adapted into an anime series directed by Takayuki Hamana, animated by Trans Arts and co-produced by Nihon Ad Systems & TV Tokyo. The anime aired across Japan on the anime satellite television network Animax and the terrestrial TV Tokyo
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    Wraithborn

    • Publisher: Wildstorm
    Wraithborn is an American comic book limited series by Joe Benitez and Marcia Chen, launched in November 2005. It is his largest body of work after his time as regular penciler on Top Cow's The Darkness. Wraithborn was published by WildStorm under its Wildstorm Signature imprint, which replaced the Cliffhanger imprint. The Wraithborn power is normally given to a specially chosen warrior, someone who has trained for decades to wield the power and fight the Immortals. But, due to "unforeseen circumstances", the power is passed on to an ordinary high school girl who doesn't know anything about what's going on, but she's got to figure things out fast because a lot of "people" (including the Immortals) are coming after her. At the heart of things, Wraithborn is about the transformation of a sweet, timid, innocent girl into a tough, badass, seemingly cold and heartless warrior who has to do a lot of things that she may not like to do. And we follow her on this journey, through the many trials she has to face, the mistakes she'll make, and the grievous consequences of those mistakes. In addition, it’s also about the journey made by Valin, the male lead of the story, who is the young man
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Classics Illustrated

    Classics Illustrated

    Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. This series is different from the Great Illustrated Classics, which is an adaptation of the classics for young readers that includes illustrations, but is not in the comic book form. Russian-born publisher Albert Lewis Kanter (1897–1973) created Classic Comics for Elliot Publishing Company in 1941 with its debut issues being The Three Musketeers, followed by Ivanhoe and The Count of Monte Cristo. In addition to the literary adaptations, books featured author profiles, educational fillers, and an ad for the coming title. In later editions, a catalog of titles and a subscription order form appeared on back covers. Albert Lewis Kanter recognizing the appeal of early comic books, believed he could use the new medium to introduce young and reluctant readers to "great literature". The first five titles were published irregularly under the banner "Classic Comics Presents"
    5.00
    4 votes
    166
    Annihilation Conquest

    Annihilation Conquest

    Annihilation: Conquest is a 2007-2008 Marvel Comics crossover storyline and the sequel to 2006's Annihilation. The series again focuses on Marvel's cosmic heroes defending the universe against the Phalanx, now led by Ultron. Nova returns once more in a title role, along with Quasar, Star-Lord, and a new character called Wraith. Other characters featured were Ronan the Accuser, Moondragon, Super-Skrull, Gamora, Mantis and Rocket Raccoon. The series also saw the return of Adam Warlock to the Marvel Universe. The format mirrored that of its predecessor with one minor difference. Instead of four four-issue mini-series preceding the six-issue main series there were three. In place of the fourth there was four issues of the ongoing series Nova. Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning were given the task of overseeing the story, "we were approached by Andy Schmidt, who edited the first Annihilation event, and asked to pilot the next event, which Bill Rosemann is editing." They ended up writing the Prologue, the Nova series crossover and the main Annihilation: Conquest limited series. The remaining mini-series were focused on Quasar by Christos Gage, Star-Lord by Keith Giffen and Wraith, by Javier
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Fantastic Four 2099

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Fantastic Four 2099 was a comic book series published by Marvel Comics, featuring the adventures of the Fantastic Four in the alternate future of Marvel 2099 (Earth-928). It ran for eight issues in 1996. In the year 2099, Mister Fantastic, the Invisible Woman, the Human Torch, and the Thing find themselves in new uniforms and transported to a very different Negative Zone than the one they knew. Returning home, they find the world changed and S.H.I.E.L.D. soldiers chasing after them as laboratory copies of the original Fantastic Four. During a fight with a repo-man crew named Total Recall, a church dedicated to the worship of the 20th century’s Thor is destroyed and the FF escape with an injured Human Torch to an abandoned S.H.I.E.L.D. hideout. They discover, through the repo-men, that the corporation Stark-Fujikawa is claiming them as "experimental subjects". They head to an Alchemax facility to prove their originality. The four encounter the new century's Spider-Man. He helps Reed study the group's DNA. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the 2099 technology, the results were inconclusive, leaving their legitimacy in question. They then break into their old headquarters at Four
    6.50
    2 votes
    168

    Justice

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Jim Krueger
    Justice is a twelve-issue American comic book limited series published bimonthly by DC Comics from August 2005 through June 2007, written by Alex Ross and Jim Krueger, with art also by Ross and Doug Braithwaite. Its story involves the superhero team known as the Justice League of America confronting the supervillain team the Legion of Doom, after every supervillain is motivated by a shared dream that seems to be a vision of the planet's destruction which they intend to avoid. Coming off their previous project, Earth X from Marvel Comics, Alex Ross, Jim Krueger, and Doug Braithwaite started on Justice, a 12-issue bi-monthly series. Ross described the series as a full-on superhero war, the Super Friends versus the Legion of Doom, to the death. In many ways, Justice is a follow-up to Ross' and Paul Dini's The World's Greatest Super-Heroes. Ross had stated that, following Kingdom Come, he wanted to break away from the 1990s fixation with superhuman wars, and focused on The World's Greatest Super-Heroes. It was only following that that he could return to the war stories he is known for, like Kingdom Come. Several supervillains start having recurring nightmares where Earth is destroyed
    6.50
    2 votes
    169

    Marvel Fanfare

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Marvel Fanfare is the title of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics. Both versions of Marvel Fanfare were anthology, showcase titles featuring a variety of characters from the Marvel universe. Marvel Fanfare Volume One featured characters and settings from throughout the Marvel Universe, and included stories of varying lengths by a vast array of different creators. The title was published every two months from 1982-1992 and ran for 60 issues. It was edited throughout its run by Al Milgrom, who also wrote and drew an illustrated column in most issues, entitled "Editori-Al". (Marvel Fanfare's original working title was Marvel Universe, which was later appropriated by Marvel editor-in-chief Jim Shooter for the encyclopedia series The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe.) Marvel Fanfare was envisioned as a showcase of the comics industry's best talent. Each issue featured 36 pages of material with no advertisements and it was printed on magazine-style slick paper. Creators who contributed were paid a bonus 50% over the standard page rate for their work on the title. Consequently it was more than twice as expensive as standard comic books ($1.25 in 1982 when most titles
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Strangehaven

    Strangehaven

    Strangehaven is an acclaimed self-published comic book series created by Gary Spencer Millidge. It is not published to a regular schedule; although the series is ongoing, the last issue was published in 2005. Alex Hunter almost runs over a woman while driving through the British countryside, but swerves and ends up slamming into a tree instead. He wakes to find himself in the picturesque village of Strangehaven, where a pretty young woman named Janey Jones convinces him to stay. He soon finds a spacious cottage and a job as a teacher at the local school, but it soon becomes clear that something is awry in Strangehaven. A secretive cult calling themselves The Knights of the Golden Light have taken over all positions of authority, a pagan coven is plotting something out in the woodlands, the woman Alex saw in the road seems to be haunting his dreams, and no matter how far he drives, the village itself won't seem to let him leave... While Strangehaven appears to be nothing more than another small Devonshire village, it is clear from the earliest issues that something is not quite right about the village. Most obvious to any visitor is the number of people with unusual quirks or gifts,
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again

    • Created By: Frank Miller
    Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also referred to as DK2) is a three-issue comic book limited series about Batman, written and drawn by Frank Miller and colored by Lynn Varley. It was originally published by DC Comics's imprint Elseworld. The series is a sequel to Miller's 1986 miniseries, The Dark Knight Returns, and tells story of an aged Bruce Wayne who comes out of hiding after three years of planning his return and training his followers, though his efforts bring him into conflict with the dictatorial rulers of the American Empire as well as an enigmatic enemy from his past. The series was originally published as a three-issue limited series (November 2001 - July 2002) by DC Comics, and since collected into hardcover and paperback one-volume editions, and Absolute Dark Knight edition (which also features The Dark Knight Returns). Like its predecessor, this story takes place in a timeline that is not considered canonical in the current continuity of DC Comics. After going underground, Batman (Bruce Wayne) and his young sidekick, Catgirl (Carrie Kelly, Robin from Batman: The Dark Knight Returns), train an army of "batboys" to save the world from a "police-state"
    4.75
    4 votes
    172
    Anpanman

    Anpanman

    • Featured Characters: Anpanman
    • Publisher: Froebel-Kan Group
    • Created By: Takashi Yanase
    Anpanman (アンパンマン) is a Japanese picture book series written by Takashi Yanase since 1973. The anime adaptation Soreike! Anpanman (それいけ!アンパンマン, Go! Anpanman) is one of the most popular anime series for young children in Japan. The show has been on the air in Japan continuously since October 1988. On October 4, 1996 (The day that Episode 398 aired) the show began airing on Fridays instead of Mondays. On November 10, 2000 (The day that Episode 588 aired) the show was made with Digital editing. On August 28, 2009 the show had aired 1000 episodes. Since April 2, 2010(The day that Episode 1029 aired) the show has been broadcasted in High-definition. As of 2011, the titular Anpanman is the most popular fictional character among people age 0 to 12 years in Japan in 10 consecutive years, according to 2chan the show was originally going to premiere in 1987 and it was originally going to end with 24 episodes, according to research by Bandai. Heavily merchandised, the Anpanman characters appear on virtually every imaginable children's product, from clothes to video games to toys to snack foods. As of 26 September 2006 (2006 -09-26), the Anpanman books have collectively sold over 50 million
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Day of Judgment

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Day of Judgment was a DC Comics limited series and crossover storyline during the autumn of 1999. The limited series was written by Geoff Johns, with art by Matthew Dow Smith. The main storyline for the series dealt with the Spectre (whose previous host, Jim Corrigan, had left him when he ascended into Heaven) being bonded to a new host, in the form of the then-deceased Hal Jordan. Endeavoring to cause chaos on Earth, as well as to take out rival demon Neron, Etrigan the Demon arranges for the now-hostless Spectre to be bonded to renegade angel Asmodel, who used the Spectre's power to freeze Hell and release hordes of demons on the Earth. This action also results in villains such as the Enchantress being released, and Earth's conventional heroes are powerless against Asmodel's onslaught. With the regular heroes having fallen, it is up to the newly-formed Sentinels of Magic—consisting of Doctor Occult, Zatanna, Phantom Stranger, Madame Xanadu, Deadman, Raven, Ragman, Sentinel and Faust—to stand against the Spectre/Asmodel. To vanquish Asmodel, the Sentinels and other heroes divide into three groups: a 'home front' to defend Earth, a team to reignite the fires of hell, and a team to
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    Doctor Fate

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Doctor Fate (also known by the diminutive, Fate) is the name of a succession of fictional sorcerers who appear in books published by DC Comics. The original version was created by writer Gardner Fox and artist Howard Sherman, and first appeared in More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940). In 1940, the character also became a founding member of the Golden Age superhero group the Justice Society of America. The original Doctor Fate was Kent Nelson, the son of archaeologist Sven Nelson who died after Kent opened the tomb of the ancient wizard Nabu. The orphaned boy was trained by Nabu in the arts of magic. After DC's Crisis on Infinite Earths storyline, several relatively short-lived versions of Doctor Fate were introduced. Doctor Fate's appearances in other media and comics set outside the continuity of the DC Universe tend to be of the original Golden Age Kent Nelson incarnation. More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940) introduced the first Doctor Fate. After a year with no background, his alter ego Kent Nelson and origins were shown in More Fun Comics #67 (May 1941). At this point, the character was shown to be an archaeologist's son who had discovered the tomb of an ancient wizard named
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Just Imagine...

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Just Imagine Stan Lee is a comic book published by DC Comics. It was the first work for DC Comics by Stan Lee, co-creator of numerous popular Marvel Comics characters, in which he reimagined several DC superheroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Aquaman and The Flash. Lee's version of Superman, real name Salden, debuted in Just Imagine Stan Lee with John Buscema Creating Superman (November 2001). Creators Stan Lee and John Buscema based this version on the character created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. His powers include super-strength and super-speed. Salden was the weakest member of the Kryptonian Police Force. He used a flying harness and managed to capture a dangerous criminal in a teleportation lab. However, the criminal put Salden and himself on a one-way trip to an insignificant little blue-green planet: Earth. The two men arrive separately, both discovering they have enhanced physical abilities. The criminal sets himself up as the king of a jungle tribe. Earth is too primitive but it has the potential to develop the technology Salden needs to return to his homeworld. The problem is there are too many obstacles to the peaceful future necessary
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Legion Lost

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Legion Lost is a superhero title published by DC Comics. It was originally published as a 12-issue comic book limited series starring the Legion of Super-Heroes. The series was co-written by Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning, often collectively referred to and interviewed as "DnA", penciled primarily by Oliver Coipel, with Pascal Alixe filling in for some issues, inked by Lanning and colored by Tom McCraw. "Legion Lost" and its companion series "Legion Worlds", was designed mainly as a "jump on" point for the Legion franchise. Per this, the series revolves around a set number of Legionnaires and each issue being told from the point-of-view of a particular Legionnaire. It is the third story in the Abnett and Lanning Legion series, following the events of "Legion of the Damned" and "Widening Rifts". It was followed by "Legion Worlds" and a brand new Legion series, titled "The Legion". The series ran for 12 issues and was collected in a hardcover collection series in 2011. In September, 2011, DC Comics launched a new monthly series (Legion Lost, vol. 2 ). The series replaces "Adventure Comics" as the second Legion title published by DC Comics and focuses on a small group of the original
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Mortadelo y Filemón

    Mortadelo y Filemón

    • Created By: Francisco Ibáñez Talavera
    Mort & Phil (Spanish: Mortadelo y Filemón) is one of the most popular Spanish comics series, published in more than a dozen countries. It appeared for the first time in 1958 in the children's comic-book Pulgarcito drawn by Francisco Ibáñez. The series features Mort (Spanish: Mortadelo), the tall, bald master of disguise named after mortadella, and his bossy partner, the shorter, pudgier Phil (Spanish: Filemón) Pi. Initially, they were private detectives operating as Mortadelo y Filemón, Agencia de Información, but now both serve as secret agents in the Técnicos de Investigación Aeroterráquea (TIA is the Spanish word for "aunt", a spoof on CIA, with T.I.A. translating into "Aeroterraquatic (air, land, sea) Investigation Technicians". Mort and Phil can be described as a pair of walking catastrophes, and no matter what kind of mission they are assigned they always manage to get it wrong. The results are almost invariably extremely violent, and most often directed towards Filemón (Phil). At TIA (Spanish for "aunt", a parody of the CIA), which combats "enemy organizations" like RANA ("frog") or ABUELA ("grandmother"), they interact with their boss, the bad-tempered Superintendente
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    Rocket Raccoon

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Bill Mantlo
    Rocket Raccoon was a four-issue comic book limited series that was published in 1985 and featuring the eponymous character. It was written by Bill Mantlo, penciled by Mike Mignola and inked by Al Gordon (Issue # 3 was inked by Al Milgrom). All covers by Mignola and Gordon. The series took place on half world where Rocket and his anthropomorphic allies fought killer clowns with lethal juggling balls and deadly unicycles and who spoke in a stilted language full of alliteration and rhyme. This series was reprinted as backup stories in the 1980s Transformers (Marvel UK) series. In November, 2008, the Rocket Raccoon limited series was reprinted in the Annihilation Classic books. Rocket and his animal companions were genetically manipulated animals with human level intelligence and a bipedal body construction. They were created to be caretakers of the inmates (or "loonies") on the verdant side of halfworld. Rocket was a guard who protected the colony against various threats. Rocket and his friends ultimately cured the inmates of their mental illnesses and then took off into space for their own adventures. Marvel Age, #25 - April 1985, had a preview of the mini-series and featured Rocket
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    Showcase

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Showcase has been the title of several comic anthology series published by DC Comics. The general theme of these series has been to feature new and minor characters as a way to gauge reader interest in them, without the difficulty and risk of featuring "untested" characters in their own ongoing titles. The original series ran from March 1956 to September 1970 (suspending publication with issue #93), and then was revived for eleven issues from August 1977 to September 1978. The series saw the first appearance of several major characters including the Silver Age Flash, the Challengers of the Unknown, Space Ranger, Adam Strange, Rip Hunter, the Silver Age Green Lantern, the Sea Devils, the Silver Age Atom, the Metal Men, the Inferior Five, the Creeper, Anthro, the Hawk and Dove, Angel and the Ape, and Bat Lash. The Spectre was revived for the Silver Age in Showcase as well. In 1962, DC purchased an adaptation of the James Bond novel and film Dr. No, which had been published in British Classics Illustrated, and published it as an issue of Showcase. It was the first American comic book appearance of the character. The Showcase series was canceled in 1970 with issue #93, featuring
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    The Dome: Ground Zero

    The Dome: Ground Zero

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Dave Gibbons
    The Dome: Ground Zero, is a one-shot graphic novel published in 1998 under the short-lived DC Comics imprint, Helix. Written and laid out by Dave Gibbons and illustrated Angus McKie, The Dome was notable for its innovative use of computer-rendered graphics to augment McKie's illustrations. Despite suffering by its association with the poorly-received Helix line, The Dome won praise both for the high quality of its art and for its well-constructed storyline set in the south Pacific waters of a recognizably contemporary Earth environment, replete with the conflicting ideologies of US techno-military forces and Christian fundamentalist eco-warriors. The US military has successfully test-detonated a Quantum Bomb, an unpredictable new weapon, on a disused island deep in the Pacific ocean despite intervention from Elias Walsh and his hang-gliding congregation of activist ecological protestors. Cities around the Pacific Rim are soon damaged by a variety of seemingly natural phenomena. It becomes apparent to observing military forces that the Quantum Bomb has triggered fallout of a most unexpected kind - a gigantic reflective hemisphere, some ten-miles across and growing, has projected out
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    New Avengers

    • Featured Characters: Wolverine
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Brian Michael Bendis
    The New Avengers is a fictional superhero team that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The team has been featured in two American comic book series. Written by Brian Michael Bendis, both series have depicted a group of superheroes that form a new version of Marvel's premiere super hero team, the Avengers. The New Avengers is a spin-off of the long-running Marvel Comics superhero-team series The Avengers. The first issue, written by Brian Michael Bendis and penciled by David Finch, and dated January 2005, appeared in November 2004. Finch penciled the first six issues and issues #11-13. Succeeding pencilers with multiple-issue runs include Steve McNiven, Leinil Francis Yu, Billy Tan, and Stuart Immonen. The roster at first comprises Captain America, Iron Man, Spider-Man, Spider-Woman, and Luke Cage, however later stretches to include the mutant X-Man Wolverine, the unstable, godlike Sentry, and the deaf ninja Echo, in the guise of Ronin. The team itself was not named "the New Avengers" within the series; a splinter group of Avengers that chose not to comply with federal superhuman registration, the team considers itself the authentic Avengers, as opposed to the
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Terminator: The Burning Earth

    Terminator: The Burning Earth

    Terminator: The Burning Earth was first published in 1990 by NOW comics. It was published as a five part story utilizing characters featured in James Cameron's popular film, The Terminator. The story was written by Ron Fortier and illustrated by Alex Ross, his first published comic work. The story is set as part of the background history of John Connor's future war with the machines. It is also set after the events of the 17 part The Terminator (1988–1989) series also penned by Fortier. The story starts with members of the resistance fighting against the machines with John (nicknamed Bear) giving a commentary on how the war has been. Later he is seen having what could only be described as a loss of faith as he is shown putting a pistol to his mouth. However after watching two lone fighters (one injured) firing on an oncoming Hunter Killer tank only to be run over, John regains his resolve to never stop and never give up. The story continues from Skynet's perspective of completing final tests of the first model 808 Terminator (a female called Aurora). It also shows Skynet initiating its final solution to the human problem, with a co-ordinated mass nuclear carpet bombing of humanity
    5.33
    3 votes
    183

    Newuniversal

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    newuniversal is a comic book series by writer Warren Ellis, artist Salvador Larroca and colorist Jason Keith, published by Marvel Comics. The series is a re-imagining of Marvel's New Universe concepts, launched to coincide with the 20th anniversary of the New Universe's creation in 1986. As with the original New Universe, newuniversal is set in a world where a number of people suddenly develop superhuman abilities. However, where the New Universe began with the 'real' world as its starting point, the world of newuniversal is already markedly different. newuniversal re-imagines concepts and characters originally introduced as part of Marvel's New Universe line in the 1980s. The New Universe was a set of eight linked titles launched in 1986 to celebrate Marvel's 25th anniversary, championed by Marvel's editor-in-chief Jim Shooter. However, the New Universe comics were not a long-term success, with four titles canceled after a year and the entire line canceled by the end of 1989. The original New Universe initially had no links to the Marvel Universe shared setting and did not present traditional superheroes—instead, it offered "the world outside your window," a world that was
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Planet Comics

    Planet Comics

    Planet Comics was a science fiction comic book title produced by Fiction House and ran for 73 issues from January 1940 to Winter 1953. Like many of Fiction House's early comics titles, Planet Comics was a spinoff of a pulp magazine, in this case Planet Stories, which featured space operatic tales of muscular, heroic space adventurers who were quick with their "ray pistols" and always running into gorgeous females who needed rescuing from bug-eyed space aliens or fiendish interstellar bad guys. Planet Comics was considered by noted fan Raymond Miller to be "perhaps the best of the Fiction House group," as well as "most collected and most valued." In Miller's opinion, it "wasn't really featuring good art or stories... in the first dozen or so issues," not gaining most of "its better known characters" until "about the 10th issue." "Only 3 of [its] long running strips started with the first issue... Flint Baker, Auro - Lord of Jupiter, and the Red Comet." Planet Comics #1 was released with a cover-date of January 1940, and ran for 73 issues until Winter 1953. Initially produced on a monthly schedule, issue #8 (Sept. 1940) saw it slip to a bimonthly title, which it held until the end of
    6.00
    2 votes
    185

    Psi-Force

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Psi-Force was a thirty-two-issue comic book series published by Marvel Comics under their New Universe imprint from 1986 to 1989. Along with D.P. 7 and Justice, it was one of the only New Universe titles to last for thirty-two issues. It concerned a group of adolescents who had developed psionic powers following the "White Event" which had created most of the paranormals in the New Universe. These teens, along with federal agent Emmett Proudhawk, could pool their powers into a psychic construct called the "Psi-Hawk". The first issue (November, 1986) was by writer Stephen Perry and penciller Mark Texeira. The title is notable for publishing some of the first comics work of writer Fabian Nicieza (#9, 13, 16-32) and artist Ron Lim (#16-22). Nicieza's stint on the title is well regarded by fans and he stayed on the title until its cancellation with #32 (June, 1989). The main villain in the film Firewalker is seen reading an issue of Psi-Force. Psi-Force was brought together by a paranormal named Emmett Proudhawk. Before the White Event, he worked for the CIA on a project investigating children with higher than usual ESP scores. After the White Event, he gained telepathic powers,
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Rogue

    Rogue

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Chris Claremont
    Rogue is a fictional character in most of the Marvel Comics award-winning X-Men related titles. She was created by author Chris Claremont and artist Michael Golden, and debuted in Avengers Annual #10 (November 1981) as a villain. An earlier story, intended for Ms. Marvel #25 (June 1979) went unpublished until 1992. Rogue was born as a mutant. More so than most, Rogue considers her powers a curse: she involuntarily absorbs and sometimes also removes the memories, physical strength, and (in the case of superpowered persons) the special and unique abilities of anyone she touches. For most of her life, this potentially fatal ability prevented her from making any physical contact with others, including her on-off romantic love interest, Gambit, but after many years Rogue finally gained full control over her mutant ability. Hailing from Caldecott, Mississippi (a fictional county), Rogue is the X-Men's self-described southern belle. A runaway, she was adopted by Mystique of the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants and grew up as a villain. After Rogue permanently absorbed Ms. Marvel's psyche and Kree powers, she reformed and turned to the X-Men, fearing for her sanity. Writer Chris Claremont
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    The Amazing Spider-Man

    • Featured Characters: Spider-Man
    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Stan Lee
    The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, featuring the adventures of the fictional superhero Spider-Man. Being the mainstream continuity of the franchise, it began publication in 1963 as a monthly periodical and was published continuously until it was relaunched with a new numbering order in 1999. In 2003 the series reverted to the numbering order of the first volume. The title has occasionally been published biweekly, and was published three times a month from 2008 to 2010. A film named after the comic was released July 3, 2012. The title will end its 50-year run as a continuously published comic with issue #700 in December 2012. It will be replaced by The Superior Spider-Man as part of the Marvel NOW! relaunch of Marvel's comic lines. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist and co-plotter Steve Ditko, and the pair produced 38 issues from 1963 to 1966. Ditko left after the 38th issue, while Lee remained as writer until issue 100. Since then, many writers and artists have taken over the monthly comic through the years, chronicling the adventures of Marvel's most identifiable hero. The Amazing Spider-Man has been the
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    High Moon

    High Moon

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    High Moon is an award-winning werewolf western webcomic series, developed in 2004 with a debut in 2007 as a part of Zuda, DC Comics' webcomic imprint. The first season concluded on July 8, 2008. Season two ran from August 16 to November 25, 2008. Season three began its run on February 9, 2009. Created by David Gallaher and Steve Ellis High Moon was part of Zuda's initial launch in October 2007. In November 2007, High Moon was awarded a contract with DC Comics, where the strip was serialized on Zuda.com. Scott O. Brown is the production artist and letterer. In the first series, a bounty hunter, Matthew Macgregor, investigates a series of strange happenings in the Texas town of Blest, where drought has brought famine and hardship to most of the town and surrounding ranches. Additionally, the nights are haunted by werewolves. While Macgregor, a former Pinkerton detective, seeks to uncover the town's secrets, he tries desperately to keep secret his own past steeped in witchcraft and the supernatural. The second series finds werewolf-hunter Macgregor in Ragged Rock, Oklahoma, investigating a series of murders following a bizarre train robbery, and finds himself caught in a vendetta and
    5.00
    3 votes
    189

    Ronin

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Frank Miller
    Ronin (formally written as Rōnin) is a comic book limited series published between 1983 and 1984, by DC Comics. The series was written and drawn by Frank Miller with artwork painted by Lynn Varley. It takes place in a dystopic near-future New York in which a ronin is reincarnated. The six-issue work shows some of the strongest influences of manga and bande dessinée on Miller's style, both in the artwork and narrative style. Miller was in part inspired to do Ronin by Kazuo Koike and Goseki Kojima's manga series Lone Wolf and Cub. According to former Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Jim Shooter, Ronin was originally slated to be released as part of Marvel's Marvel Graphic Novel series. Ultimately, however, Miller was wooed by DC by publisher Jenette Kahn, and the first issue of Ronin was published by that company in 1983. Like an earlier DC maxi-series Camelot 3000, Ronin was printed on a higher quality paper stock. Each issue contained 48 pages of story and no advertisements. In feudal Japan, a young, nameless samurai has sworn to protect his master, Lord Ozaki, from assassins. But despite his dedication, Ozaki is assassinated at night by a demon called Agat in the guise of a geisha,
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    Solo

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Solo is an American comic book series that was published bimonthly by DC Comics, beginning in October 2004. Each issue has 48 pages plus covers, with no ads. Solo was canceled in 2006; in total, twelve issues appeared. The title was conceived as an anthology series to spotlight the work of a different comic book artist in each issue. The creators were free to tell stories in any genre and to use DC's library of characters as they saw fit. They could also work with writers if they chose, but the intention of the series was for them to show off the range of their own individual artistic sensibilities and abilities. In some ways it could be seen as a descendant of DC's old Showcase series, though instead of developing new concepts the title highlights the work of established industry professionals. Creators contributing: The series was overseen by painter and DC editor Mark Chiarello. Creators discussed as working on future issues of Solo before the series was canceled include: Brian Bolland, John Cassaday, Dave Gibbons, Adam Hughes, Kevin Maguire, Tony Harris, J. G. Jones, Kevin Nowlan, Bill Sienkiewicz, Walt Simonson, Jill Thompson, Brian Stelfreeze, Bruce Timm, John Van Fleet,
    5.00
    3 votes
    191

    The Dreaming

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Neil Gaiman
    The Dreaming is a fictional place, a comic book location published by DC Comics. The Dreaming first appeared in the Sandman vol. 2 #1, (January 1989), and was created by Neil Gaiman and Sam Kieth. The Dreaming is the domain of Dream of the Endless. The Dreaming was a monthly comic series that ran for 60 issues (June 1996 to May 2001). It is set in the same dimension of the DC universe as The Sandman and the stories occurred primarily within Dream's realm, The Dreaming, concentrating on characters who had played minor roles in The Sandman, including The Corinthian, Matthew the raven, Cain and Abel, Lucien the dream librarian, the faerie Nuala, Eve, and Mervyn Pumpkinhead (janitor of The Dreaming). It also introduced a number of new characters, most notably Echo and a new (white) dream raven, Tethys. There were brief (but often important) appearances by The Endless during the series, including cameos by Dream (both Morpheus and Daniel), Death, Destiny, and Desire. The series was initially conceived as an anthology series edited by Vertigo editor Alisa Kwitney, and as such it was written, drawn and inked by a variety of artists. The covers were all painted by former Sandman
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    3 votes
    192

    Bloodlines

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "Bloodlines" was a 1993 comic book story arc published by DC Comics. It was an intracompany crossover that ran through DC's superhero annuals and concluded with a two-issue 'Bloodbath' miniseries written by Dan Raspler. The antagonists were a race of monstrous xenomorph-like aliens, incorrectly described as "parasites", who killed humans for their spinal fluid. A small fraction of the parasite's victims survived and become super-heroes via their ordeal. This plot device introduced a wave of "New Blood" super-heroes into the DC Universe. Seven DC Comics series were spun out of the event: Blood Pack, Razorsharp and the Psyba-Rats, Hitman, Anima, Loose Cannon, Argus and Gunfire. The villains of the crossover were the formerly imprisoned survivors of a race of alien parasites named Angon, Gemir, Glonth, Lissik, Pritor, Venev, and Slodd that could shapeshift into humanoid form. These humanoid forms were based on the initial entities they first encountered, a squadron of L.E.G.I.O.N. soldiers, most of whom perished. The bite of the Bloodlines Parasites was administered to the back of the neck by a mouth-within-a-mouth. This bite is intended to remove the spinal fluid for sustenance. This
    5.50
    2 votes
    193

    Cable & Deadpool

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Rob Liefeld
    Cable & Deadpool was a comic book series published by Marvel Comics beginning in 2004. The title characters, Cable and Deadpool, shared the focus of the book. The series was launched following the cancellation of the characters' previous ongoing solo series. The book's mix of humor, action, and intricate plotting have won it a devoted fanbase. Marvel Comics canceled the series with issue #50 to make way for a new Deadpool ongoing series that began on September 10, 2008, and a new Cable ongoing series that was launched in March 2008. Cable & Deadpool were ranked #7 on Marvel.com's list of "The 10 Greatest Buddy Teams" of all time. Starting with issue #11, Cable & Deadpool opens each book with a unique recap page. This page, usually presented by Deadpool and occasionally with Cable or by/with the book's supporting characters, villains, and guest stars, breaks the fourth wall and literally talks to the audience. Keeping with the book's tone, the recap page is usually funny, often with Deadpool having to explain what the fourth wall is to other characters on the page. From issue #44, the recap pages have been in the form of an online blog as written by Bob, Agent of HYDRA. Issue #13
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    2 votes
    194

    Doctor Spectrum: Full Spectrum

    • Publisher: MAX
    A six-issue limited series entitled Doctor Spectrum was launched in August 2004 to March 2005 after Supreme Power concluded. The series was written by Samm Barnes, and dealt with Joe Ledger's background, presented in flashback when the power prism was attempting to the take control of Joe's mind while he was in coma. Ledger learns what the power prism's real mission directive is and how much power he and the prism really has, as the US military looks for a way to save the power prism and one doctor looks to save Joe Ledger's life. Joe Ledger was the only candidate who was focused and single minded enough to be able to control the mysterious crystal found in Hyperion's space ship. Shortly after he began testing it, it was absorbed into his skin and he lapsed into a coma. In a dream-state, Joe Ledger meets someone who first looks like an old girlfriend and starts reliving parts of his life. Ledger and his mother Mary, a prostitute, were physically abused by Ledger's stepfather. He has an ex-wife named Mandy and joined the Army at sixteen with a fake identity. Later in life Sergeant Joe Ledger was on a mission in South America, in which he shot and killed a boy and afterwards attacked
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    House of M

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    House of M is an eight-issue comic book limited series and crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2005. Written by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Olivier Coipel, its first issue debuted in June 2005 as a follow-up to the events of the Planet X and Avengers Disassembled storylines, in which the mutant superhero Scarlet Witch suffered a mental breakdown and tried to alter the fabric of reality to recreate her lost children. Scarlet Witch's father, Magneto, and her twin brother, Quicksilver, played major roles in the series. The universe where House of M takes place is designated as Earth-58163. The first issue was released in June 2005, with the series concluding in November 2005. The first two issues were ranked first and second in sales in the June 2005 period, with the first issue selling over 233,000 copies. The final issue, House of M #8, was ranked third in sales for the November 2005 period with sales of 135,462. In addition to the main eight-issue limited series, House of M was preceded by a story in Excalibur #13-14, and had several tie-ins to ongoing series, including Uncanny X-Men, New X-Men: Academy X, and Wolverine, and several mini-series: Fantastic
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Identity Crisis

    • Featured Characters: Batman
    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Brad Meltzer
    Identity Crisis is a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics from June to December in 2004. It was created by writer Brad Meltzer and the artistic team of penciler Rags Morales and inker Michael Bair. One of DC's top-selling series, the first issue was released in June 2004 and was ranked first in comic book sales for that period with pre-order sales of 163,111. The second issue saw a decline in sales and ranked third in comic book sales in July 2004 period with pre-order sales of 129,852. The story also adheres to the continuity changes introduced by Crisis on Infinite Earths, as heroine Wonder Woman was retconned out of the pre-Crisis JLA. In all further references to the JLA's pre-Crisis adventures, including its origin story and the Secret Society incident, Wonder Woman is replaced by Black Canary. Following "Infinite Crisis", however, Wonder Woman is restored as a founding member. One of the major plot threads — the breakdown of relationships within the Justice League of America — is examined in the storyline "Crisis of Conscience" in JLA #115-119 (August–December 2005). The mini-series is followed by the inter-company crossover "Infinite Crisis". Sue
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Serenity: Better Days

    Serenity: Better Days

    • Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
    • Created By: Brett Matthews
    Serenity: Better Days is a 2008 three-issue comic book miniseries published by Dark Horse Comics, based on the 2002 science fiction television series Firefly, and the 2005 feature film into which it was adapted, Serenity. It is the second comic book to be based on Firefly after the 2005 miniseries, Serenity: Those Left Behind. Like Those Left Behind, it is written by Firefly creator Joss Whedon and Brett Matthews, illustrated by Will Conrad, and is set in between the end of the TV series and the feature film. Unlike the previous series, Adam Hughes illustrated all the covers, each of which depicts three of the nine cast members, and when placed side by side, form a triptych. The first issue was published March 12, 2008. Each issue is 40 pages long. A trade paperback volume collecting the entire series was published in October 2008. A demonstration of an armed tactical drone is held before a large group of people by its Builder. Meanwhile, Captain Malcolm Reynolds and his crew are engaging in a heist of ancient artworks. As they attempt to flee with the art, their truck is confronted by the drone, which chases them across the busy highways of an unnamed planet, exchanging weapons
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Teddy and theYeti

    Teddy and theYeti

    Teddy and the Yeti is an American comic book series created by Jeff McClelland and Duane Readhead. Published by Wagon Wheel Comics, the serialized story features a robot and a yeti who defend the earth from external threats. The first issue of the ongoing series was released on December 30, 2009 as part of Indy Comic Book Week. The concept of the book was developed because McClelland liked the rhyming title. Teddy and the Yeti first appeared in the anthology Josh Howard Presents: Sasquatch from Viper Comics April 15, 2007. The story, titled "Presidents and Precedence" and printed in black and white, was a late addition to the book, added after another creative team dropped out, leaving an open spot. In 2008, a black and white preview issue was published featuring the story "To Sleep", and an ad promoting the regular series. Fist of Justice #5 from Digital Webbing Press also ran a back cover ad for the series. The first three issues of the regular series were released in December 2009, February 2010 and April 2010, with more to come in 2011. In August 2010, McClelland announced that Teddy and the Yeti would play a small part in the comic series War of the Independents from Red
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    The Maxx

    • Featured Characters: Mister Gone
    • Publisher: Image Comics
    • Created By: Sam Kieth
    The Maxx is an American comic book series created by Sam Kieth and published originally monthly by Image Comics and now collected in trade paperback collections from DC Comic's Wildstorm imprint. The comic book, which stars a character of the same name, spawned an animated series that aired on the MTV network. The first appearance of The Maxx was in Primer #5, published by Comico Comics. The series follows the adventures of the titular hero in the real world and in an alternate reality, referred to as The Outback. In the real world the Maxx is a vagrant, a "homeless man living in a box", while in the Outback he is the powerful protector of the Jungle Queen. The Jungle Queen is similar to the Maxx in that she also exists in the real world as Julie Winters, a freelance social worker who often bails the Maxx out of jail. While the Maxx is aware of the Outback, Julie is not, though it is integral to both of their stories. Mr. Gone, a serial killer with a telepathic link to Julie and extensive knowledge of and access to people's various Outbacks, starts phoning Julie. She thinks he is merely an obscene phone caller, and ignores him. Eventually, The Maxx gets in Gone's way by
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    2 votes
    200

    The OMAC Project

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Jack Kirby
    The OMAC Project is a six issue American comic book limited series written by Greg Rucka with art by Jesus Saiz and published by DC Comics in 2005. It is one of four miniseries leading up to DC Comics' Infinite Crisis event. The series directly follows the Countdown to Infinite Crisis special, picking up the story where the special left off. While the OMACs look similar to the earlier Jack Kirby creation OMAC, they are quite different, with a different acronym than the original One-Man Army Corps. OMAC originally stood for "Observational Meta-human Activity Construct", but currently stands for "Omni Mind And Community." In the mini-series, the OMACs are modified humans who work as sleeper agents, a product of the Checkmate organization, now led by Maxwell Lord. They possess the Brother Eye spy satellite built by Batman following his realization, after the events of Identity Crisis, that his fellow Justice Leaguers had wiped his memory some years before. The OMAC Project ends with an autonomous Brother Eye having command of over 200,000 OMACs and seemingly planning war on the superheroes, starting with the worldwide broadcast of Maxwell Lord's death at the hands of Wonder Woman. The
    5.50
    2 votes
    201

    X-Men: Deadly Genesis

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    X-Men: Deadly Genesis is a comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in late 2005 and early 2006. The series was written by Ed Brubaker with interior art by Trevor Hairsine and covers by Marc Silvestri. Starring the X-Men, this series celebrates the 30th anniversary of Giant-Size X-Men #1. The plot deals with the X-Men looking for Professor Charles Xavier, who went missing after House of M, as well as the appearance of a new, incredibly powerful mutant threat. Deadly Genesis is a retcon of the classic Giant Size X-Men #1 story of 1975 by Len Wein. In that story, he used the abduction of the original X-Men by the living island Krakoa as an instrument to discard the first-generation X-Men of 1963. Wein wrote that Professor X recruited international characters who substituted the original X-Men in order to rescue them, and who eventually replaced them when most of the original X-Men left Xavier's school following that story. In Deadly Genesis, Ed Brubaker writes that this episode was only half of the truth: the international X-Men had been Professor X's second attempt to rescue the original X-Men. The first attempt to retrieve the missing X-Men was conducted with a team of
    5.50
    2 votes
    202

    Zero Hour: Crisis in Time

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Zero Hour: Crisis in Time is a five-issue comic book limited series and crossover storyline published by DC Comics in 1994. In it, the former hero Hal Jordan, who had until then been a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps, mad with grief after the destruction of his home town of Coast City (during the "Reign of the Supermen" storyline) and having obtained immense power as Parallax, attempted to destroy, and then remake, the DC Universe. The crossover involved almost every DC Universe monthly series published at the time. The issues of the series itself were numbered in reverse order, beginning with issue #4 and ending with #0 (i.e., Counting Down To Zero). The series was written and penciled by Dan Jurgens, with inks by Jerry Ordway. This series is noted for its motif of the DC Universe gradually "fading out" as events reached their climax. Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was intended by DC as a belated follow-up to their landmark limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, and was indeed subtitled "(A) Crisis in Time". It promised to do for the inconsistent future timelines of the DC Universe what Crisis had done for its parallel worlds: unify them
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    America's Best TV Comics

    America's Best TV Comics

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    America's Best TV Comics was a one-shot American comic book published by Marvel Comics in mid-1967 in conjunction with the ABC television network to promote the network's Saturday morning cartoon lineup. The 68-page comic book, bearing a cover price of 25¢ and distributed via mail-order, featured the Marvel characters the Fantastic Four and Spider-Man, who were debuting in half-hour animated series that fall, as well as stories based on the upcoming animated series Journey to the Center of the Earth, King Kong, George of the Jungle, and Casper the Friendly Ghost. The cartoon block, which also included the series The Beatles, ran Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The main cover image and possibly the insert art was penciled by comics-industry notable Jack Kirby and inked by either George Roussos or Joe Sinnott (sources differ). All were Marvel Comics regulars. The image of the Fantastic Four in the top right-hand box is a partial reproduction of the Kirby-Sinnott cover of Fantastic Four #49 (April 1966). The story contents consisted of, in order:
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Brodie's law

    Brodie's law

    Brodie's Law is a comic book series created by Daley Osiyemi and David Bircham which tells the story of anti-hero, Jack Brodie, East end Gangster, expert thief and professional killer, who in a twist of fate gains the ability to steal his victims' souls and take on their appearance, memories and feelings. Brodie’s Law takes place in the gritty underworld, nightclubs and dark alleys of the seedy metropolitan area of London, with an atmosphere akin to the city in The Crow, with a similar portrayal of Blade Runner's Los Angeles. On what appeared to be a routine assignment, Jack was paid to break into a high tech lab and steal a disc that contained a top-secret experiment. His contractor being the CEO and shareholder of the research company, Eugene Della Cruz. A third party gets wind of the job and everything goes horribly wrong. It was a set up. He escapes - barely alive. This makes front-page news and Brodie suddenly becomes the most wanted man in Britain. He goes underground, seeking refuge away from the world and for the first time he fails to see a way out. Things come apart fast as his son is kidnapped and he is framed for his ex-wife’s murder. He begins to lose his sense of
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    M.D.

    M.D.

    • Publisher: EC Comics
    M.D. was a short lived comic book published by EC Comics in 1955, the sixth title in its New Direction line. The bi-monthly comic was published by Bill Gaines and edited by Al Feldstein. It lasted a total of five issues before being cancelled along with EC's other New Direction comics. M.D. was unlike practically any other comic published, focusing on medical stories, surgical practices and the day-to-day work of doctors. Each issue featured four stories, plus at least one text piece about a real-life major medical figure. The frontispiece to the first issue set out its role: ...the Hippocratic Oath was then reprinted in full. The letters page (upon the first of which the above text appeared in lieu of early letters) was titled "The Needles, and contributors to M.D. include Graham Ingels, Marie Severin, George Evans, Joe Orlando, Reed Crandall and Carl Wessler. M.D. was reprinted as part of publisher Russ Cochran's Complete EC Library collection, alongside Valor and Impact as Volume 2 of the "New Direction Part 2" slipcased set (1985). Between September 1999 and January 2000, Cochran and Gemstone Publishing reprinted the five individual issues. This complete run was later rebound,
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Miyuki-chan in Wonderland

    Miyuki-chan in Wonderland

    • Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
    • Created By: CLAMP
    Miyuki-chan in Wonderland (不思議の国の美幸ちゃん, Fushigi no Kuni no Miyuki-chan) is a yuri manga series created by Clamp and serialised by Kadokawa Shoten in its Japanese edition of Newtype from 1993 to 1995. In 1995, an image album and an OVA version of the first two stories was released. The English language version of the manga was published by Tokyopop in 2003. The manga is an erotic, lesbian rendition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The series focuses on Miyuki, a Japanese schoolgirl who finds herself pulled into several nonsensical worlds populated by scantily-dressed females who want to have their way with her. TV Land is based on the 1968 movie Barbarella, starring Jane Fonda Written and illustrated by Clamp, the chapters of Miyuki-chan in Wonderland appeared as a serial in the manga magazine Newtype. Kadokawa Shoten published the chapters in one tankōbon volume on September 10, 1995 and re-released it on May 1, 2001. Tokyopop licensed Miyuki-chan in Wonderland for an English-language release in North America. The manga is also licensed in Italy by Planet Manga, and in Germany by Carlsen Verlag. An image album based on Miyuki-chan in Wonderland was released on
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    The Good Guys

    The Good Guys

    The Good Guys is a comic book series that was published monthly by DEFIANT from November of 1993 until July of 1994. It ran for a total of 9 issues until DEFIANT ceased publication. It was odd for the time in that its characters were created via a "talent search" for interesting character concepts. The story focuses on a group of young kids who were all attending a crowded comic book store on the day when a seeming magic box broke open. Unnoticed by most, many of the people in the store were affected by the box's energies. It is later implied the box was harmless, given out by a mentally sick woman who has done this sort of thing before. Laura Neale gains super-strength and durability. This also gives her the power to leap long distances. She reveals her power to her dad right away, seemingly the only one of the team who tells family. Daniel Jacobs, who has a crush on Laura, gains flight powers. Paul manifests a forcefield. Reggie is able to turn invisible and intangible by accessing an alternate dimension. He doesn't enjoy using his powers as the dimension frightens him. Jenni Lee and Matt Sahs gain identical powers of super-agility. Leaping off a four-story building is no problem
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    The Minions of Ka

    The Minions of Ka

    The Minions of Ka is graphic novel series. In the series, many of history's greatest disasters, such as The Great Fire of London and The Black Plague, are actually attempts to cover-up attacks of the undead. The Minions of Ka Series was created in 2007 by Dave Wilbur, Michael Furno, and Michael Ahearn, collectively Zombie Omega, Inc, and the first book was officially released in August 2008 at DragonCon in Atlanta, GA. The first Minions project was managed by Christian Beranek, features interior art by Chris Moreno and Mario Boon, and was edited by horror author Jack Ketchum, who also contributed The Western Dead, an original short story based on the The Minions of Ka series. The cover is by artist Ken Kelly. The company's trailer for their first offering in the series, voiced by Academy Award-nominated actor Danny Aiello, can be viewed on YouTube. Book Two in The Minions of Ka series is presently in production and is slated for release in 2010. The second book delves even deeper into the lore of Ka and the influence his presence has had on history as we don't know it; including the source of Haitian voodoo, what happened to the Jamestown Colony, and what Madam Curie was
    6.00
    1 votes
    209

    Ultimate Nightmare

    Ultimate Nightmare is a five-issue comic book limited series written by Warren Ellis of Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority fame, after signing an exclusive two-year work-for-hire contract with Marvel Comics). Issues 1, 2, 4 and 5 were penciled by Trevor Hairsine noted for working on the Ultimate Six limited series with Brian Michael Bendis), and inked by Simon Coleby who has previously worked on Marvel UK's Warhead series in the 1990s. The third issue was drawn by Steve Epting. This is the first part of the Ultimate Gah-Lak-Tus trilogy. This series is followed by Ultimate Secret, and then concluded in Ultimate Extinction. About this miniseries writer Warren Ellis wrote (at his column Streaming: part 12, at ''The Pulse'' in 2004) that "Ultimate Nightmare was originally intended as a set-up for a big Ultimate-line event that Mark Millar was going to do. Mark, however, has had health issues for some time, and that and his workload led to him bowing out and me once again being asked to step in and help out. And then, while I was getting into Nightmare, Joe Quesada had the idea of turning this event into a trilogy. (...) So I needed to come up with a credible second
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    HACK/slash

    HACK/slash

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Hack/Slash is an ongoing comic book series, launched from several one shots of the same name, published by Image Comics (previously by Devil's Due Publishing). The series, starting as a series of one-shots, was created by writer and sometime penciller Tim Seeley. The focus of the series is on a horror victim, Cassie, who strikes back at the monsters, known as "slashers", with Vlad, a disfigured "gentle giant" who frequently wears a gas mask. The property started in 2004 as a series of one-shots, starting with the Stefano Caselli-penciled Hack/Slash (later referred to by its story title Euthanized), followed by the Federica Manfredi-penciled Girls Gone Dead. 2005 saw the one-shots Comic Book Carnage and the series stars, Vlad and Cassie, appeared in the Aadi Salman penciled The Final Revenge of Evil Ernie. The "Hack/Slash" one shots were collected as the First Cut trade paperback in the same year. The first "Hack/Slash" miniseries debuted, Land of Lost Toys, penciled by Dave Crosland, followed by a collection of new short stories in a 2006 special issue called Trailers (featuring art by writer stefano caselli and Tim Seeley, original penciler Caselli, Mike Norton, Skottie Young and
    4.67
    3 votes
    211

    Seaguy

    • Publisher: Vertigo
    • Created By: Grant Morrison
    Seaguy is a three-volume comic book miniseries written by Grant Morrison with art by Cameron Stewart and published by the Vertigo imprint of DC Comics. The first volume of Seaguy was released in three issues beginning on May 19, 2004. The second volume, Slaves of Mickey Eye, was released in three issues beginning April 1, 2009. The third and final volume, Seaguy Eternal is yet to be published. The story revolves around Seaguy, an unpowered superhero in a scuba suit, and his best friend and sidekick Chubby Da Choona, a talking, cigar-smoking tuna fish. Morrison has expressed on various occasions that Seaguy represents a deliberate effort to move away from conventions of the current era of comics, "I had the idea to develop Seaguy into a weapon I could use to fight back against the trendy and unconvincing 'bad-ass' cynicism of current comics, most of which are produced by the most un-'bad-ass' men you can possibly imagine". Morrison believes that in this fashion the work represents a new vanguard in the development of comics. He expressed similar sentiments about Zenith, one of the earliest series he worked on, when he said that it "was a reaction against torment superheroes." Seaguy
    4.67
    3 votes
    212

    Civil War: X-Men

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Civil War: X-Men is a four-issue comic book mini-series, published in 2006 by Marvel Comics. Though published as part of the wider Civil War event, its plot is a continuation of the earlier X-Men: The 198 mini-series. Prior to the publication of Civil War: X-Men, the events of House of M reduced the mutant population to only 198 known mutants, and the US government has turned the Xavier Institute into a relocation camp patrolled by Sentinel Squad O*N*E*. In Civil War #3, the X-Men declare official neutrality in the superhero civil war. In X-Men: Civil War #1, X-Force members Domino, Shatterstar and Caliban break the 198 out of the Xavier Institute. Cyclops declines to assist the O*N*E, but Bishop wants mutants to police their own. Bishop is given permission by the government to take Sabra and Micromax to find the escapees. The surviving original X-Men decide to sneak off the grounds to find the escapees before Bishop can arrest them. In issue #2, General Lazer, head of the O*N*E, discovers Johnny Dee's power to control anyone whose DNA he can digest. Cyclops contacts Captain America, who reveals the Nevada bunker Domino has taken the escaped mutants to. Bishop learns that the
    5.00
    2 votes
    213

    The Pro

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    • Created By: Jimmy Palmiotti
    The Pro is a prestige format one-shot comic book written by Garth Ennis, with pencils and lettering by Amanda Conner and inks by Jimmy Palmiotti. It was originally published by Image Comics in 2002. A parody of mainstream superhero comics, it details the brief career of a prostitute given superhuman powers by the Viewer. She reluctantly joins the League of Honor, composed of the Saint, the Knight & the Squire, the Lady, the Lime, and Speedo. Together they fight an array of lackluster villains such as The Noun and The Adverb, until her coarse language and actions, violence, bloody retributions, and her fellating The Saint result in her being expelled from the League. She rejoins them to fight a terrorist attack, flying into space holding a nuclear bomb and facing certain death (more in an effort to save the life of her young child than anyone else in the vicinity). Later editions feature an additional eight-page story entitled "The Pro Vs. The Ho" in which the Pro squares off with a 12-armed prostitute. In the story, the Ho receives powers in much the same way that the Pro does via the alien "Viewer" that orbits the Earth in a cloaked ship. Because the Pro has superpowers, she is
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    2 votes
    214
    Black Summer

    Black Summer

    • Publisher: Avatar Press
    Black Summer is a comic book limited series written by Warren Ellis, illustrated by Juan Jose Ryp, and published by Avatar Press starting in June 2007. The plot revolves around the consequences of a superhero, John Horus, who kills the President of the United States and several of his advisers. The following seven issues detail the aftermath of the assassination. The limited series alternates between flashbacks detailing the origin of a superhero team called The Seven Guns, and the present day, where one of their members kills the President of the United States. The Seven Guns are "an association of politically-aware young scientist-inventors" (according to creator Warren Ellis), who create their own superhuman enhancements through extreme body modification experiments supervised by Tom Noir and Frank Blacksmith. Noir is the brains of the team, but by far the most powerful member is John Horus, whose enhancements make him, for all intents and purposes, "unbeatable" "an entirely different class of human being, in fact". Their first public mission had been to free an unspecified West Coast city from a corrupt police force and the criminal city government backing it. Over time, they
    4.50
    2 votes
    215

    Liberty Meadows

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Liberty Meadows is a comic strip and comic book created, written and illustrated by Frank Cho. It relates the comedic activities of the staff and denizens of the eponymous animal sanctuary/rehabilitation clinic. Liberty Meadows is the evolution of University² (University Squared), a strip Cho wrote during his college years for The Diamondback, the student newspaper at the University of Maryland, College Park. Originally, it was syndicated and appeared in many newspapers, while also being collected in comic books produced by Insight Studios. At the end of 2001, Cho ceased syndication, partly because editors kept censoring it, and announced he would publish it directly in comic book format. Cho self-published the comic book at first, with Image Comics taking over printing and distribution with issue #27. The comic book went on a hiatus in early 2004, after issue #36. June 2006 saw the publication of issue #37, and Cho commented at the time that he would be "trying to have couple of issues of Liberty Meadows out per year". Issue #37 was the first issue that did not contain material previously published in newspapers and is the last issue published to date. From around 2008 until May
    4.50
    2 votes
    216

    Ruins

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ruins is a two-issue comic book mini-series, written by Warren Ellis with painted artwork by Terese Nielsen, her husband Cliff Nielsen, and Chris Moeller, who took over for the last seventeen pages of the second issue. The series, conceived by Ellis as a parody, is set in a dystopian version of the Marvel Universe. The main character, Phil Sheldon, is also the central character of the Marvels series by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross, and this series can be seen as a darker retelling of this story. Like Marvels, the comic was published in prestige format, with fully painted artwork and acetate covers, further creating the impression that it is a more twisted companion piece. Ruins follows former Daily Bugle reporter Phil Sheldon as he explores a dystopian alternate Marvel Universe where, in his words, "everything that can go wrong will go wrong"; a world where the myriad experiments and accidents which led to the creation of superheroes in the mainstream Marvel Universe instead resulted in horrible deformities and painful deaths. Sheldon tours the country investigating the after-effects of these events, researching a book about the strange phenomena in order to prove that the world has
    4.50
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    217

    52

    • Featured Characters: Animal Man
    • Publisher: DC Comics
    52 is a weekly American comic book limited series published by DC Comics that debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. The series was written by Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, and Mark Waid, with layouts by Keith Giffen. 52 also led into a few limited series spin-offs. 52 consists of 52 issues, published weekly for one year, each issue detailing an actual week chronicling the events that took place during the missing year after the end of Infinite Crisis. The series covers much of the DC Universe, and several characters whose disparate stories interconnect. The story is directly followed by the weekly limited series Countdown to Final Crisis. It was the first weekly series published by DC Comics since the short-lived anthology Action Comics Weekly in 1988–1989. The use of a weekly publication format is unusual in the North American comics industry, a model traditionally based upon monthly publication. 52 is the longest weekly comic book series published by a major North American publisher. The record was previously held by Action Comics Weekly. The story was originally conceived of as being a chronicle of what happened in
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    218
    78 Tage auf der Straße des Hasses

    78 Tage auf der Straße des Hasses

    78 Tage auf der Straße des Hasses ("78 Days on the Street of Hate") is a German comic in manga style written and illustrated by David Füleki and first published by Delfinium Prints in 2008. The Story follows the two main protagonists Def and Roy, two charming sociopaths chased by Interpol, on their journey which ends on day 78 with the end of the world. Chapter 1 starts with day 27 but the story jumps from one day to another which means that there isn't really any chronological order. The first main story arc focuses on a tournament with obscure rules called Lausbuben Battle Royal. 40 competitors gather on an island to find out who's the greatest rascal of all time. A limited collector's edition called Sammlers Editiòn was released at the end of 2008. The box contained the first five chapters with slight differences to the original releases. Furthermore chapter five was a prerelease. Especially for the Comic-Salon Erlangen in 2010 a special edition called the Schwarz Editión was released. It consisted of the first seven chapters and two new special issues with short stories and illustrations made by many different German and Austrian artists. The regular issues had colored covers
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Blake and Mortimer

    Blake and Mortimer

    • Publisher: Cinebook Ltd
    • Created By: Edgar Pierre Jacobs
    Blake and Mortimer is a Belgian comics series created by the Belgian writer and comics artist Edgar P. Jacobs. It was one of the first series to appear in the Belgian comics magazine Tintin in 1946, and was subsequently published in book form by Les Editions du Lombard. The main protagonists of the adventures are Philip Mortimer, a leading British scientist, and his friend Captain Francis Blake of MI5. The main antagonist is their sworn enemy, Colonel Olrik, who has appeared in all but one of the books. Their confrontations take them into the realms of detective investigation and science-fiction, dealing with such themes as time travel, Atlantis and espionage. The books by Jacobs himself are generally set in the very period of their writing, but those authored by others after his death are explicitly set in the 1950s only. Since the death of Jacobs, new books have been published by two separate teams of artists and writers. A television series based upon the series was produced in 1997, entitled Blake and Mortimer. When Tintin magazine was launched on September 26, 1946, it included the story, Le secret de l’Espadon (The Secret of the Swordfish) which introduced the characters of
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    220
    Blast of Tempest

    Blast of Tempest

    • Featured Characters: Mahiro Fuwa
    • Publisher: Square Enix
    • Created By: Kyo Shirodaira
    Blast of Tempest (絶園のテンペスト, Zetsuen no Tenpesuto) is a Japanese manga series written by Kyō Shirodaira and illustrated by Arihide Sano and Ren Saizaki. An anime adaptation by Bones began airing on October 4, 2012. It has been licensed by Aniplex USA in North America. The story revolves around Mahiro Fuwa, a teenager whose family was mysteriously murdered one year before, and his friend Yoshino Takigawa. Mahiro is contacted by Hakaze Kusaribe, the leader of the Kusaribe clan who was left stranded on an unknown deserted island by her followers, and agrees to help Hakaze in exchange for her help to find out the culprit for the death of his family. Upon learning of his friend's intentions, Yoshino joins him on his quest to stand against the Kusaribe clan who intends to awaken the "Tree of Zetsuen" whose power can bring ruin to the entire world. Several dialogues and plot elements in Zetsuen no Tempest pay homage to the works of William Shakespeare. The anime began airing on October 4, 2012. The opening theme is "Spirit Inspiration" by Nothing's Carved in Stone and the ending theme is "happy endings" by Kana Hanazawa. On October 1, 2012, it was announced that the anime will be
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    1 votes
    221
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight

    • Featured Characters: Buffy Summers
    • Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
    • Created By: Joss Whedon
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight is a comic book series published by Dark Horse Comics from 2007 to 2011. The series serves as a canonical continuation of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and follows the events of that show's final televised season. It is produced by Joss Whedon, who wrote or co-wrote three of the series arcs and several one-shot stories. The series was followed by Season Nine in 2011. The series was originally supposed to consist of about 25 issues, but eventually expanded to a 40-issue run. The series also spawned a handful of spin-off titles, including a Tales of the Vampires follow-up and one-shots featuring Willow and Riley. The success of the series prompted IDW Publishing and Joss Whedon to publish a concurrent continuation of the Angel television series, titled Angel: After the Fall, and a Spike comic book series, which bridges some aspects of continuity between After the Fall and Season Eight. A motion comic version of the series debuted in 2010. A year after the end of the television series, Buffy and Xander now lead command-central, which is situated at a citadel in Scotland. At their disposal are a wide array of psychics, seers,
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    1 votes
    222

    Ultimate Daredevil and Elektra

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Ultimate Daredevil and Elektra is a four-issue comic book mini-series published by Marvel Comics written by Greg Rucka with art by Salvador Larroca. Marvel characters Daredevil and Elektra are introduced to the Ultimate universe in the series in October 2001. A sequel to the series Ultimate Elektra was released in August 2004. In this story, Matt Murdock and Elektra Natchios are both students in Columbia University, where they meet and start dating. Murdock is blind and studying law. During the course of the story, Elektra and her roommates are harassed by a rich boy, Trey Langstrom, until Elektra, a martial artist fights back. In response, Langstrom and a group of thugs destroys Elektra's father's business. Murdock, also a martial artist and possessor of enhanced senses (which compensate for his blindness), forces the thugs to confess, but couldn't stop Elektra from seriously wounding Langstrom. While Matt reveals his identity to Elektra, she forces him to choose between their love and his sense of duty. He chooses the second and they apparently part ways. The first issue Ultimate Daredevil and Elektra was ranked 13 with pre-order sales of 77,050. Ultimate Daredevil and Elektra #2
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    1 votes
    223

    Web of Spider-Man

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Web of Spider-Man is the name of two different monthly comic book series starring Spider-Man that have been published by Marvel Comics since 1985, the first volume of which ran for 129 issues between 1985 and 1995, and the second of which ran for 12 issues between 2009 and 2010. The first volume of Web of Spider-Man published by Marvel Comics for 129 issues between 1985 and 1995. It replaced Marvel Team-Up as the third major Spider-Man title of the time. Its first issue featured the return of Spider-Man's alien black costume, which attempted to rebond with Peter Parker. Peter managed to rid himself of the costume again using church bells and the alien was presumed to have died after that. For the first several years of its run, and in 1990–1991, Web of Spider-Man had no permanent creative team. As a result, the book's quality was far less consistent than the other two major Spider-Man titles of the time, The Amazing Spider-Man and The Spectacular Spider-Man. From 1984 to 1988, the personnel who contributed to the title included writers Louise Simonson, David Michelinie, Bill Mantlo, James Owsley, Gerry Conway, and Peter David; and pencillers Greg LaRocque, Jim Mooney, Sal Buscema,
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    1 votes
    224

    Powers

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Powers is an American creator-owned police procedural comic book series by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Avon Oeming. The series' first volume was published by Image Comics from 2000 to 2004. In 2004 the series moved to Marvel Comics as a part of its Icon imprint. Combining the genres of superhero fantasy, crime noir and the police procedural, the series follows the lives of two homicide detectives, Christian Walker and Deena Pilgrim, assigned to investigate cases involving people with superhuman abilities, who are referred to colloquially as "powers". Brian Michael Bendis, Michael Avon Oeming and David W. Mack became friends while all three were working on individual small press projects. Bendis says that he also began to "analyz[e] why it was that I [had] never attempted to write a superhero comic" at the time, while he was writing crime books such as Jinx and Goldfish, despite his love of the genre. Concluding that Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen had sufficiently explored the genre, Bendis decided to work in other genres." The series' concept was derived from his love of crime fiction and police procedurals in
    4.00
    1 votes
    225

    Spellbinders

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    Spellbinders is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, as part of that company's Marvel Next imprint. It was a six-issue limited series written by Mike Carey with art by Mike Perkins. It is part of the Marvel Universe, but the story takes no advantage of the fact. Spellbinders is set around John Hawthorne High School, a fictional high school in Salem, Massachusetts, where magic is accepted as a fact. There are rivalries between magical students ('wicks') and non-magical students ('blanks'), and between the various covens. The story centres around Kim Vesco, a girl from Chicago who has strange dreams and an interest in sculpture. In the fist issue Kim and her family move to Salem. On her first day she meets Chad Barrow, her neighbour, who tells her she'll be fine in school, provided she isn't a nerd or a 'wick'. Her first day at school is rough, she is attacked by an air elemental, but is saved by two wicks, Mink and Liza Beth. Later at home, she is attacked by a wall. After the wall attacks her Kim discovers that she can talk to ghosts when she 'spirit walks' and accidentally summons a horde of ghosts. One of the ghosts tells her that she has to wield the Salem covens into a
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    1 votes
    226

    Superman Confidential

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Superman Confidential was a monthly comic book series from DC Comics. The series debuted November 1, 2006, and was canceled in April 2008 after 14 issues. Superman Confidential featured Superman stories set in the early years of the character’s career. The stories illustrated key moments in the character’s past such as first meetings, critical decisions, alliances, confrontations, and events that shaped him into the character he is today. The creative team on the series rotated. The stories in Confidential are the earliest points of reference in the character's newly established continuity, since (according to former monthly Superman writer Kurt Busiek) the character's origin in this new continuity had yet to be established. The first story arc by writer Darwyn Cooke and artist Tim Sale features Superman’s first encounter with Kryptonite. The story occurs in issues #1-5 and is concluded with issue 11. The story begins in a flashback, showing Superman's rocket reaching the Earth, just as depicted in Man of Steel and Birthright, and as it does, a chunk of strange green rock breaks off. Flashing forward to the beginning of Superman's career, in Metropolis, Superman catches a tanker
    4.00
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    227
    Anema

    Anema

    Anima: Age of the Robots is a comic series produced by Singapore writer and artist Johnny Tay. His decision to self-publish after local publishers rejected his work garnered local significance in Singapore. He received front page coverage in local newspapers and started a trend of self-publishing among disgruntled Singapore writers. This series was formerly called 'Anema'. Its first two chapters were published as black-and-white comic books in 2003 and 2004. Anema then converted into a full-colour webcomic under the title Anema Online. Production continued till 2006 and concluded in 18 full-colour chapters. In early 2011 the webcomic was moved to a new site and renamed to Anima. Anima revolves around a global conflict on an imaginary planet called Anima. The natural inhabitants, the Animals (a word play on Earth's own fauna) are locked in a war of survival with the intelligent robots they created, which have turned evil. Anima deviates from standard sci-fi plots of robots-gone-bad and instead centres its story on the Animals, and how they relate to this brave new world. The style of Anima is a mish-mash of different comic genres. Its main art style harkens more to European
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    228

    Blue Beetle

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Blue Beetle is the name of four fictional superheroes that appear in American comic books published by a variety of companies since 1939. The original Blue Beetle, Dan Garret, first appeared in Fox Comics' Mystery Men Comics #1 (cover-dated August 1939), with art by Charles Nicholas Wojtkoski (as Charles Nicholas); though the Grand Comics Database tentatively credits Will Eisner as the scripter. A rookie police officer, he used special equipment, a bulletproof costume and a superstrength-inducing "2-X vitamin", and the assistance of a neighborhood pharmacist to fight crime. He starred in a comic book series, comic strip and radio serial, but like most Golden Age superheroes, he fell into obscurity in the 1950s. The comic book series saw a number of anomalies in publication: 19 issues, #12 through #30, were published through Holyoke Publishing; no issue #43 was published; publication frequency varied throughout the run; and there were gaps where issues were not published, with large ones occurring in early 1947 and between mid-1948 and early 1950. In the mid-1950s, Fox Comics went out of business and sold rights of the Blue Beetle to Charlton Comics. That company published a few
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    229
    Clover

    Clover

    • Publisher: Kodansha
    • Created By: CLAMP
    Clover (クローバー, Kurōbā) is a manga series created by Clamp, a creative team made up by Satsuki Igarashi, Ageha Ohkawa, Tsubaki Nekoi, and Mokona. The manga takes place in a dystopian future, where the government is out to control the "Clovers", a race of children with special powers. Clover was serialized in Kodansha's Amie from 1997 until the magazine's demise in 1999. Clover is primarily about a young girl called Sue (スウ, Sū), whose name was stated to be derived from the Chinese word for four (sì) since she is a "4-leaf Clover". In the futuristic world that she inhabits, the military conducted a search for gifted children nicknamed "Clovers", who seemingly have the magical ability to manipulate technology. Demonstrations of their powers include teleportation and summoning weapons from thin air. Classified according to how powerful they are, the children were then tattooed with a symbol of the Clover Project, with the number of leaves on the Clover indicating their power. To date, Sue is the only "4-leaf Clover" discovered. Along with other "Clovers", Sue was imprisoned to prevent her contact with other humans, as the government feared that she might develop feelings and be used as
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    230
    Dead Space: Salvage

    Dead Space: Salvage

    • Publisher: IDW Publishing
    Dead Space: Salvage is a 2010 comic book interquel in the Dead Space series. It is published by IDW Publishing and is written by Antony Johnston, with art by Christopher Shy. Antony Johnston also wrote the game's dialogue and the previous comic Dead Space. Set between the events of Dead Space and Dead Space: Aftermath, a group of freelance miners, known as "magpies," discover the abandoned USG Ishimura in deep space. Their once-fortunate luck turns into a catastrophe as they realize they are in the middle of a living nightmare. Not only is the Earth Government racing to claim the Ishimura, but the Necromorphs are also reanimating across the ship. Captain Benedykt Malyech of the Magpie ship Black Beak is chased in the halls of the Ishimura by a multitude of Necromorphs and subsequently turns into one before waking up. His adjutant, Julia Copland, comforts him before directing their attention to a motherlode of minerals. In the meantime, the Earth Government's Defense Secretary David Chang arrives at the Aegis VII blockade. He is on orders to find the Marker and the Ishimura, both of which they are unable to locate. In addition, they are joined by the Oracles, who take control of the
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    231

    Dream Police

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: J. Michael Straczynski
    Dream Police is an American comic book one-shot created by writer J. Michael Straczynski with artwork by Mike Deodato. It was published by Marvel Comics, on June 22, 2005, under their Icon imprint for creator-owned titles. Straczynski calls it "Dragnet in the Dreamscape". In the near future Detectives Joe Thursday and Frank Stafford patrol the dreamscape, a surreal landscape in Los Angeles.
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    232
    Fearless

    Fearless

    • Publisher: Image Comics
    Fearless is four-issue limited series is written by Mark Sable and David Roth, with art by PJ Holden, and is published by Image Comics. The seris is the story of Adam Rygert, a superhero who must depend on an anti-fear drug to keep his crippling anxiety at bay.
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    233

    Final Night

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    "The Final Night" was a 1996 comic book crossover storyline that ran through a self titled limited series and most of the comics published by DC Comics with a cover date of November 1996. It featured the main heroes of the DC Universe. At the end of each issue is an in-story text piece written by S.T.A.R. Labs, giving advice and support. The story begins as a young alien woman named Dusk arrives on Earth to warn the population that a giant extraterrestrial being, known as the Sun-Eater, is heading our way. Dusk is a member of an unknown alien race, and does not speak or understand a word of English, so Saturn Girl uses her telepathic powers to translate and teach her the language. Dusk has attempted to warn hundreds of worlds, prior to Earth, about the Sun-Eater. Each planet had tried, in its own way, to stop the Sun-Eater, but every attempt was as unsuccessful as the last one. This has convinced Dusk that the Sun-Eater is indestructible. Despite her warnings, the Justice League still try to stop the Sun-Eater. For their first attempt, Mr. Miracle tries using his boom tube to send it into another dimension. This proves unsuccessful, since they discover that the Sun-Eater is not
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    234
    Fish Police

    Fish Police

    • Publisher: Apple Comics
    • Created By: Steven Moncuse
    Fish Police is a comic book series by cartoonist Steve Moncuse. The plot centers on law and crime in a fictional underwater metropolis with the protagonist, Inspector Gill, trying to solve various, often Mafia-related, crimes while avoiding being seduced by the buxom Angel. The comic featured several marine species as its characters, while the plots and dialogue were reminiscent of film noir. Original Fish Police stories were published from 1985 to 1991, and featured the early work of Sam Kieth (The Maxx) as inker. The story centers on Inspector Gill, a fish detective who is hinted to have been a human. He is met by a female named Angel, who tells him that her uncle has developed a drug called Hairballs. The uncle, Calamari, meets Gill and tells him that he will trade Hairballs for his niece. Fish Police started in 1985 as a self-published black-and-white title by Moncuse through his own Fishwrap Productions. After 12 issues the title was picked up by Comico in 1987, which reprinted issues 1-4 in a trade titled Hairballs, followed by color reprints of the other 8 Fishwrap issues. After issue 13, Comico went bankrupt, but Fish Police was then acquired by Apple Press, which continued
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    235
    Ga-rei

    Ga-rei

    • Featured Characters: Kensuke Nimura
    • Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
    • Created By: Hajime Segawa
    The Enchained Spiritual Beast Ga-Rei (喰霊, Ga-rei), also simply known as Ga-rei, is a supernatural action manga by Hajime Segawa (瀬川 はじめ, Segawa Hajime). It has been serialized by Kadokawa Shoten in the magazine Monthly Shōnen Ace and collected in twelve tankōbon volumes. A prequel anime series, Ga-Rei: Zero, aired from October 5, 2008 to December 21, 2008, which details the backstory of key characters Kagura and Yomi. Life is depressing and normal for high-schooler Kensuke Nimura - except that he can see spirits. This ability generally hinders him more than it helps him, until he encounters Kagura Tsuchimiya while being pursued by evil spirits. They accidentally kiss and fight off the spirits together. A few days later, she transfers into his class. Kagura is an agent of a government agency that defends the public against supernatural enemies. She wields Ga-rei, a spirit beast that kills these spirits. Kensuke's spiritual awareness and his attraction to Kagura compels him to follow her to the agency, where he is recruited to fight the supernatural. Their first enemy is Yomi Isayama, an old friend of Kagura's, now an evil spirit due to a stone known as the sesshōseki. Also
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    236

    Green Lantern: Mosaic

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    • Created By: Cully Hamner
    Green Lantern: Mosaic was an American comic book series published by DC Comics starring the fictional character Green Lantern (John Stewart). The series had its origin in a story arc of the same name in Green Lantern (Volume 3) #14-17, and was set up in earlier issues since that series' launch in 1990. The ongoing series began in June of 1992 and ended in November of 1993, lasting 18 issues. It was written by Gerard Jones and primarily drawn by Cully Hamner. Green Lantern Hal Jordan, investigating the disappearance of Evergreen City on Earth, discovers that Appa Ali Apsa, the lone remaining Guardian left behind after his brothers left our dimension, has been driven insane by loneliness. For companionship, Apsa has been uprooting cities from all the worlds he has visited and transporting them to the planet Oa, creating a patchwork known as the Mosaic World. John Stewart, captured by Apsa, summons Jordan through their power rings and, together with Guy Gardner and the newly-returned Guardians, defeat Apsa. Believing that Apsa's experiment should be allowed to progress to its conclusion, the Guardians elected to maintain his strange mosaic of communities rather than return the
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    237

    Invasion!

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Invasion! was a three issue comic book limited series and crossover event published in late 1988-early 1989 by DC Comics. It was plotted by Keith Giffen, and ties up a great many plotlines from various Giffen-created DC series, including Omega Men, Justice League International, and Legion of Super-Heroes. A trade paperback collection of the three issues was released on September 3, 2008. The series was scripted by Bill Mantlo; it was his first work for DC after a long career at Marvel Comics. Pencils were by Todd McFarlane, Bart Sears, and Giffen himself; inks were by Joe Rubinstein, P. Craig Russell, Tom Christopher, Dick Giordano and Al Gordon. All three covers were pencilled by Bart Sears, including issue 1, contrary to DC's credits listing. The alien coalition consisted of several disparate races. Assembling this alliance was a major diplomatic victory for the Dominators, considering the animosities many of the members shared for one another (particularly the three races of the Vega system). As it worked out, the Dominators provided the overall strategy for the invasion, with input from each member world while the Khunds acted as the shock troops for the first wave of attack
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    238

    JLA: The Nail

    JLA: The Nail is a three-issue comic book mini-series published in the United States by DC Comics. It is a self-contained story by Alan Davis which stands outside of the mainstream continuity of the DC Universe. In this universe, Jonathan and Martha Kent's pickup truck has a tire puncture which is caused by a nail. This prevents them from discovering the spaceship outside of Smallville containing the baby Kal-El, and thus there is no Superman. The theme of the story is set by its first paragraph: For want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, for want of a horse the knight was lost, for want of a knight the battle was lost. So it was a kingdom was lost - all for want of a nail. The setting of the story resembles a combination between Earth-1 and Earth-2. In this world, there is still a Justice League of America, consisting of Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, the Flash (Barry Allen), Hawkwoman, the Atom (Ray Palmer), Martian Manhunter and Green Lantern (Hal Jordan). There is, however, a great degree of xenophobia for the "metahumans," fueled by anti-metahuman propaganda from Perry White, backed by Metropolis mayor Lex Luthor, who gained points for his
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    239

    Justice League Task Force

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Justice League Task Force was an American monthly comic book series published by DC Comics from June 1993 to August 1996; it lasted 37 issues. At the time the Justice League was featured in three separate series: Justice League America, Justice League Europe (JLE) and Justice League Quarterly (JLQ). Justice League Task Force was a spinoff of Justice League Europe, a series which ran from April 1989 to May 1993. Like JLE, this team carried a United Nations charter which sanctioned their activities. In fact, JLTF was composed of several former JLE members. The team was called to action by Hannibal Martin, a representative of the U.N.. He asked that Martian Manhunter select a "strike team" of fellow Justice League members and to "lead them on a very special mission". Because of the varied nature of the missions the Task Force would be employed on, and the versatility of the concept, various writers and artists were featured on this title. Up to issue #13 most writers wrote only up to three issues (even the series' creator David Michelinie only wrote the first three issues, although a misprint on the cover of issue #5 credited him with the story, although it was actually written by
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    240

    Last Hero Standing

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    • Created By: Tom DeFalco
    Last Hero Standing is a 5-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics in 2005. It was written by Tom DeFalco and drawn by Pat Olliffe (who also co-plotted the series). The series stars many characters from the MC2 universe, such as A-Next and the Fantastic Five. Though these characters existed prior to this miniseries, Marvel wished to quickly reintroduce them to the public, following the success of Spider-Girl in digest size format. The series was released weekly and then reprinted as a trade paperback. The series begins with the kidnapping of several well-known superheroes of the MC2 Universe. While “joy-hunting” together in Canada, Wild Thing is shocked to discover her father Wolverine has been kidnapped in front of her eyes. Elsewhere across the world, one of the Ladyhawk sisters is abducted as well. This eventually gets the attention of the Watcher Uatu, who later gives the readers an explanation concerning what the MC2 universe is all about. After the first appearances of the original Fantastic Four and the defeat of Loki, which caused the creation of the first group of Avengers, a new line of heroes have emerged in a possible future timeline. These heroes now
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    241

    Manhunter

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    Manhunter is the name given to several different DC Comics superheroes/antiheroes, as well as the Manhunters, an entire race of androids created by the Guardians of the Universe as a forerunner to the Green Lantern Corps. (Note: None of these should be confused with the more well-known DC Comics superhero called the Martian Manhunter, who is sometimes addressed as Manhunter). The first Manhunter's first appearance was in the Quality Comics title Police Comics #8 and his solo stories ended in issue #101. The Quality Comics characters were purchased by DC Comics when Quality went out of business in 1956. Dan Richards would eventually be featured in Young All-Stars and All-Star Squadron. His origin was retold in Secret Origins (vol. 2) #22. Donald "Dan" Richards attended the police academy with his girlfriend's brother, Jim, who was at the top of the class, while Dan was at the very bottom. After Jim was framed for a crime he didn't commit, Dan took up the identity of Manhunter to track down the actual killer. He caught the perpetrator and cleared Jim's name. Afterwards, however, he continued to operate as Manhunter. His sidekick was a dog named Thor, who was later retconned to be a
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    242

    Midnight Nation

    • Created By: J. Michael Straczynski
    Midnight Nation is a religious-themed twelve-issue American comic book limited series, created by J. Michael Straczynski and published from 2000 to 2002 by Top Cow Productions under their now defunct Joe's Comics imprint. It is about a man who is killed, in a sense, and is on a journey to save his soul. Los Angeles police officer Lieutenant David Grey encounters a brutal murder. When he tracks down a possible lead he encounters strange, goblin-like men who attack him. When he awakes, Grey finds himself in a hospital, and those around him have become translucent and can no longer see him. It is explained to him by his mysterious guide Laurel that he has lost his soul and he has now been plunged into a shadow world that runs parallel to our own. Here is where all the abandoned and forgotten people and things go. David is told that without his soul he will slowly become like "the Walkers", the monstrous people he encountered who attacked him. David must travel on foot to New York where "The Other Guy" (the Devil) holds his soul. Laurel has guided many others on the same journey before, but none have survived the trip. Along the way David encounters various tests, such as fighting
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    243
    Rurouni Kenshin

    Rurouni Kenshin

    • Featured Characters: Himura Kenshin
    • Publisher: Shueisha
    • Created By: Nobuhiro Watsuki
    Rurouni Kenshin: Meiji Swordsman Romantic Story (るろうに剣心 -明治剣客浪漫譚-, Rurōni Kenshin Meiji Kenkaku Rōmantan), also known as Rurouni Kenshin and Samurai X, is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Nobuhiro Watsuki. The fictional setting takes place during the early Meiji period in Japan. The story is about a fictional assassin named Himura Kenshin, from the Bakumatsu who becomes a wanderer to protect the people of Japan. Watsuki wrote this series upon his desire of making a shōnen manga different from the other ones that were published in that time, with Kenshin being a former assassin and the story taking a more serious tone as it continued. The manga initially appeared in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump from April 11, 1994, to November 4, 1999. The complete work consists of 28 tankōbon volumes, while years later it was reprinted into twenty-two kanzenban volumes. Studio Gallop, Studio Deen and SPE Visual Works adapted the manga into an anime series which aired in Japan from January 10, 1996 to September 8, 1998. Besides an animated film, two series of original video animations (OVAs) were also produced. The first adapted stories from the manga that were not featured in the
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    Skin Deep

    Skin Deep

    Skin Deep is a fantasy comic book and webcomic series written and drawn by Missourian Kory Bingaman. The story follows the lives of various mythical creatures, such as a gryphon, a nixie, a satyr, and a sphinx, as they disguise themselves (using magical medallions) into the world of humans. The story's narrative, so far in one completed arc and one in-progress arc, presents the point of view of Michelle, a college-aged Sphinx who has only recently learned that she is not a human, and the various points of view of the citizens of Liverpool's Avalon, an entire magically hidden city. The plot often works to establish a theme of different versions of normalcy, promoting acceptance and diversity. Orientations - Takes place in Missouri, in September 2004. Focuses on the turning (de-spelling of humanity disguise) of Michelle, a member of the supposedly extinct sphinx species. Explains many of the mechanisms of the Skin Deep world. Exchanges - Takes place in Liverpool, England, in August 2004. Focuses on the turning of Anthony Gillis, as well as the interactions between several of the inhabitants of the Liverpool Avalon.
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    245

    Spectre

    • Publisher: DC Comics
    The Spectre is a fictional character, a superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. The character first appeared in a next issue ad in More Fun Comics #51 (Jan. 1940) and received his first story the following month, #52 (Feb.1940). He was created by Jerry Siegel and Bernard Baily, although several sources attribute creator credit solely to Siegel, limiting Baily to being merely the artist assigned to the feature. The Spectre debuted in More Fun Comics #52 (Feb. 1940) when hard-boiled cop Jim Corrigan was murdered by being stuffed into a barrel (which was then filled with cement) and drowned. His spirit was refused entry into the afterlife, however, instead being sent back to Earth to eliminate evil by an entity referred to only as "The Voice". He saw his body when he appeared at the bottom of the waterfront. The Spectre begins by seeking bloody vengeance against Corrigan's murderers in a grim, supernatural fashion. One of them turned to a skeleton upon touching him. The Spectre is eventually awarded charter membership in the first ever superhero team, the Justice Society of America in All Star Comics. Jim Corrigan is resurrected in More Fun #75 (Jan.
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    246

    The Boys

    • Publisher: Wildstorm
    • Created By: Garth Ennis
    The Boys is an American creator-owned comic book series, written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Darick Robertson. It was originally published by Wildstorm before moving to Dynamite Entertainment. The series is set between 2006-2008 in a world where superheroes exist. However, most of the superheroes in the series' universe are corrupted by their celebrity status and often engage in reckless behavior, compromising the safety of the world. For this reason, a superpowered CIA squad, known informally as "The Boys", is charged with monitoring the superhero community. Ennis has said that the series will "out-Preacher Preacher", presumably referring to the extreme violence and sexuality that were that series' hallmark. Ennis has stated that series will end with its seventy-second issue. The first six issues of The Boys were published by Wildstorm, starting in 2006. On January 24, 2007, the series was abruptly canceled with issue 6. Ennis later explained that this was because DC Comics (of whom Wildstorm was an imprint before it was disbanded) were uneasy with the anti-superhero tone of the work. The planned collection of said issues was also canceled. Robertson said that "DC is being
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    247

    The Punisher

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Punisher vol. 2 is the first ongoing comic book series starring the fictional Marvel Comics vigilante The Punisher, following a limited series published the previous year. The series ran 104 issues from July 1987 to July 1995. It became the flagship of a popular franchise that would grow to include such titles as The Punisher War Journal and The Punisher War Zone, as well as several miniseries. This series also spawned seven annuals from 1988–1994, as well as the annuals The Punisher Summer Special #1-4 (1991–1994), The Punisher: Back to School Special #1-3 (1992–1994), and The Punisher Holiday Special #1-3 (1993–1995).
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    248

    The Punisher: The End

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Punisher: The End is a one-shot title published by Marvel Comics under the MAX imprint as part of their The End series. The story focuses on the Punisher's final days in a post-apocalyptic future. The date of the events are described in the opening page of the comic in one word, "soon". The third World War, which began in Iraq, North Korea, and Pakistan, and spread to China, climaxes with a full-scale global nuclear holocaust. Frank Castle, who years before was apprehended and incarcerated in Sing-Sing Prison, survives by taking refuge in the prison's fallout shelter with a handful of other prisoners and prison officers. A year after the bombs fall, Frank leaves the prison and begins his journey to New York City, taking with him Paris Peters, a fellow prisoner who expresses interest in Frank's mission to find another bomb shelter hidden deep beneath the former site of the World Trade Center. Frank and Paris travel across upstate New York, past the ruined remains of civilization, ignoring the radiation they know will kill them. They locate the Manhattan bomb shelter and gain access, where they fall unconscious. Both awaken in the infirmary, where the doctors reveal they will die
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    249

    The Transformers

    • Publisher: Marvel Comics
    The Transformers was an 80-issue American comic book series published by Marvel Comics telling the story of the Transformers. Originally scheduled as a four issue mini-series, it spawned a mythology that would inform other versions of the saga. It also had a UK sister title that spliced in original stories into the continuity, running for 332 issues. There were several main story arcs that ran through the Marvel comics. Issues # 1-4 - The Autobots and Decepticons land on Earth via the Ark, paralleling the cartoon. The Autobots are reformatted by the Ark to resemble cars and trucks; the Decepticons take the form of jets, weapons or in the case of Soundwave, a cassette deck with tapes. The Decepticons wreak havoc, steal energy and build a fortress. The Autobots, seen here as very weak underdogs, unsuited for war, fight valiantly to stop their foes. Ultimately, it's the humans that the Autobots befriend that save the day. Buster Witwicky's father, captured by the Decepticons to formulate a fuel for them, secretly poisons his captors. In the final battle, five Autobots take on the entire Decepticon army. On the cusp of defeat, the tainted fuel concocted by Mr. Witwicky kicks in and the
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    250
    UDON Combo

    UDON Combo

    UDON Combo!, the free online manga & comic anthology featuring a variety of UDON titles, has just opened up in it’s full form. After launching the project with the first volume of original manga series 1520, we’ve now added Capcom titles to the mix including the Street Fighter Alpha and Onimusha mangas, and our own full color Street Fighter comics. More series will be added stories are completed.
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    Discuss Best Comic Book Series of All Time

    • Scott Rogers 25th of March 2015
      What? No Elementals? No Gotham Knights? No Legends of the Dark Knight? No Starman? No Sandman? No Bone? No Hellboy? No All-Star Superman?