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Best Comic Book Issue of All Time

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Best Comic Book Issue of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Comic Book Issue of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Comic Book Issue of All Time has gotten 471 views and has gathered 622 votes from 622 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    The Sandman: The Wake

    • Part Of Series: Sandman
    The Wake is the tenth and final collection of issues in the comic book series The Sandman. Written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Michael Zulli, Jon J. Muth and Charles Vess, and lettered by Todd Klein. The collection opens with James Elroy Flecker's poem "The Bridge of Fire," which acts as a prologue and description of the events that occur. The stories in the collection first appeared in 1996. The collection first appeared in paperback and hardback in 1996. As a collection it more or less stands alone. It forms an epilogue to the entire series, its mood being restrained and reflective. The first half of the collection is a storyline which follows the wake for Morpheus, who died at the end of the ninth collection, The Kindly Ones. Many characters from the series appear. A series of speakers, ending with Death, appear to give their point of view on Morpheus' life. Meanwhile, the new aspect of Dream, who used to be the child Daniel, starts to build relationships with the inhabitants of the Dreaming. After this come three seemingly unrelated short stories. "Sunday Mourning" follows the immortal Hob Gadling and his girlfriend at a Renaissance fair in modern day America. Hob, now going
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    6.83
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    7.60
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    8.75
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    7.40
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    12

    X-wing Rogue Squadron 25: The Making of Baron Fel

    X-Wing Rogue Squadron 25: The Making of Baron Fel is the twenty-fifth issue of the Star Wars: X-wing Rogue Squadron comic book series. It was originally published on 3 December 1997, and later collected in the Star Wars: X-Wing Rogue Squadron - Blood and Honor trade paperback, and in June 2007 will be collected in the Omnibus: X-wing Rogue Squadron Volume 3 trade paperback. The events in this story take place in the Star Wars galaxy approximately four years after the events in Episode IV: A New Hope. Baron Soontir Fel has been captured by the Rebel Alliance after they shoot him down in the skies of Brentaal. While in an interrogation chamber, the infamous Empire pilot tells a tale of Imperial corruption and deception. He also slowly puts in a plan to defect to the very Alliance that shot him down.
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    6.33
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    7.20
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    8.25
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    8.25
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    7.00
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    7.00
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    9.33
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    8.00
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    The Sandman: The Kindly Ones

    • Part Of Series: Sandman
    The Kindly Ones (1996) is the ninth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. Written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Marc Hempel, Richard Case, D'Israeli, Teddy Kristiansen, Glyn Dillon, Charles Vess, Dean Ormston and Kevin Nowlan, coloured by Danny Vozzo, and lettered by Todd Klein. The issues in the collection first appeared in 1993, 1994 and 1995. The collection first appeared in paperback and hardback in 1996. Marc Hempel is the primary penciller, inked variously by himself, D'Israeli and Richard Case. He is relieved at different points in the story by Teddy Kristiansen, Glyn Dillon and Dean Ormston, and Charles Vess draws a story-within-a-story sequence. Kevin Nowlan draws a short story which originally appeared in a Vertigo promo book. The Kindly Ones belongs with the second collection, The Doll's House, and the seventh, Brief Lives, in that it finishes off a story that mostly originated in these collections. Parts from other collections are also important to its story, however, notably elements from Season of Mists and the story of Orpheus, told mostly in Fables and Reflections. The most structurally ambitious of the collections, The Kindly Ones is a single
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    Outer Limits

    • Characters On Cover: Bruce Shoop
    Join Captain Curtis as he travels around the Global Webisphere reporting on the most interesting stories and news he can find in the Science and Space community! As an avid stargazer and science buff, Capt. Curtis is often seen peering through his telescope to the stars and planets above, just searching for that new Emerging Star visible from PlanetWebSite.
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    9.00
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    The Uncanny X-Men #142

    The Uncanny X-Men #142

    • Editor: Louise Jones
    • Part Of Series: Uncanny X-Men
    • Characters On Cover: Wolverine
    The Uncanny X-Men #142 is the first X-men comic to officially be titled "Uncanny".  The issue contains the concluding chapter of the Days of Future Past storyline, "Mind Out of Time!"
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    7.50
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    7.50
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    1938

    Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar.
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    7.25
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    Jaka's Story

    Jaka's Story is a trade paperback written and drawn by Dave Sim, with background art by Gerhard. The fifth book in the Cerebus the Aardvark series, it is regarded by many as the series' highpoint and a classic of the medium, thanks to its subtle characterisation, expert pacing and innovative use of the comic-book medium. The comic-style pages of the book are cinematic, with many long wordless passages and 'pans' imitating the movement of a movie camera. Jaka's Story collects issues 114-136 of the monthly Cerebus comic book. The title character of the series is relegated to the sidelines in Jaka's Story. Instead, the action focuses on Jaka, the love of Cerebus' life. Supporting characters include Rick Nash, her naive, enthusiastic husband; Pud Withers, the harmless-seeming, but emasculated and mother-worshipping landlord who lusts after her; and Oscar, a flamboyant poet based on Oscar Wilde who is friends with Rick. The plot of the book is almost entirely driven by the interactions of these characters until, at the end of the second act, the matriarchial Cirinists who rule the city-state of Iest arrest Rick, Jaka and Oscar and kill Pud. Jaka and Rick are freed due to Jaka's
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    Action Comics #1

    • Part Of Series: Action Comics
    • Characters On Cover: Superman
    Action Comics #1 (June 1938) is the first issue of the comic book series Action Comics. It features the first appearance of several comic book heroes, most notably the Jerry Siegel/Joe Shuster creation Superman. For this reason it is widely considered both the beginning of the super-hero genre and the most valuable comic book of all time: as of 2011 it is the only comic to have sold for more than $2 million for a single original copy. Action Comics #1 was an anthology, and contained eleven features: Published on April 18, 1938 (cover-dated June), by National Allied Publications, a corporate predecessor of DC Comics, it is considered the first true superhero comic; and though today Action Comics is a monthly title devoted to Superman, it began, like many early comics, as an anthology. Action Comics was started by publisher Jack Liebowitz. The first issue had a print run of 200,000 copies, which promptly sold out although it took some time for National to realize that the "Superman" strip was responsible for sales of the series that would soon approach 1,000,000 a month. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster were paid $10 per page, for a total of $130 for their work on this issue. Starting in
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    Christmas on Bear Mountain

    Christmas on Bear Mountain (1947) is a Donald Duck story by Carl Barks, first published in Dell Comics Four Color Comics #178. It was the first appearance of Scrooge McDuck. The story was the inspiration for a lot of future Scrooge stories. The story's title is based on Night on Bald Mountain by Modest Mussorgsky (the source of a scene in Fantasia featuring Chernabog). Scrooge did not yet have his familiar characteristics in his first comic story. In "Christmas on Bear Mountain", Scrooge was a bearded, bespectacled, reasonably wealthy old man, visibly leaning on his cane. He was living in isolation in a "huge mansion", which is said to be influenced by Xanadu from Orson Welles's Citizen Kane. Scrooge has always been a somewhat bitter character, but his misanthropic thoughts in this first story are probably less characteristic of Scrooge than those of his rival Flintheart Glomgold: "Here I sit in this big lonely dump, waiting for Christmas to pass! Bah! That silly season when everybody loves everybody else! A curse on it! Me—I'm different! Everybody hates me, and I hate everybody!" As usual, Donald has not enough money to celebrate Christmas with his nephews Huey, Dewey and Louie.
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    Detective Comics #27

    • Part Of Series: Detective Comics
    • Characters On Cover: Batman
    The first appearance of Batman (referred to then as "The Bat-Man"), as well as James Gordon.
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    8.00
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    9.00
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    Batman #1

    • Editor: Whitney Ellsworth
    • Part Of Series: Batman
    • Characters On Cover: Batman
    The first title devoted to Batman, and the first appearance of the Joker.
    7.67
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    Holy Knight

    Holy Knight (ホーリーナイト) is a Japanese manga by Maya Miyazaki. It was adapted into an OVA.
    7.67
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    Dark Horse Presents

    Dark Horse Presents was the first comic book published by Dark Horse Comics in 1986 and was their flagship title until its September 2000 cancellation. The second incarnation was published on MySpace, running from July 2007 until August 2010. A third incarnation began in April 2011, released in print form once again. Dark Horse Presents was conceived as an anthology title and was the first comic to be released by the newly formed Dark Horse Comics in 1986. The first issue featured Black Cross on the cover and was notable for the first appearance of Paul Chadwick's Concrete. The title became successful thanks to the increasing popularity of Concrete which quickly became the regular cover feature for much of the first few years of the title. Concrete eventually spun off into its own title, and this was something which would happen to several characters and stories appearing in Dark Horse Presents. These included John Byrne's "Next Men" comic book, as well as Frank Miller's Sin City stories, with the very first "Sin City" story (Later retitled "The Hard Goodbye") being serialized within the pages of the comic. The title also contained stories featuring Dark Horse's licensed comics,
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    Amazing Fantasy #15

    Amazing Fantasy #15

    • Editor: Stan Lee
    • Part Of Series: Amazing Fantasy
    • Characters On Cover: Spider-Man
    This issue had the first appearance of Spiderman.
    8.50
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    That Yellow Bastard

    • Part Of Series: Sin City
    That Yellow Bastard is a six-issue comic book limited series, and the sixth in the Sin City series. It was published by Dark Horse Comics in February–July 1996, It follows the usual black and white noir style artistry of previous Sin City novels, with the exception of yellow on Roark Junior late in the story. It is one of the comics adapted into the Sin City film. The story begins more than eight years before any other Sin City book takes place, with policeman John Hartigan on his final mission before his forced retirement (he suffers from severe angina). Roark Junior, son of one of the most powerful and corrupt officials in Basin City, is indulging his penchant for raping and murdering pre-pubescent girls. It is Hartigan's mission to rescue Junior's latest quarry, an 11-year-old named Nancy Callahan. Hartigan succeeds in rescuing Nancy by disabling Junior's getaway car, which was being guarded by Burt Schlubb and Douglas Klump, two guns-for-hire with "delusions of eloquence". Hartigan knocks them out and kills the twin guards Benny and Lenny. He chases the escaping Junior to the pier and then proceeds to use his revolver to surgically shoot off Junior's left ear, right hand, and
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    Star Wars Republic 27: Star Crash

    Star Crash is the 27th issue in the Star Wars: Republic ongoing comic series. The story was written by Doug Petrie, and the art done by Randy Green. It is set in the Star Wars galaxy one year after the events in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, and 31 years before the Battle of Yavin in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Republic 27
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    5.75
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    127

    Betty And Veronica Summer Fun

    Betty And Veronica Summer Fun was a comic book published by Archie Comics, and was a spin-off of Betty and Veronica. It started in 1994, and ended in 1997. It was part of Archie Giant Series which also included World of Archie, and Everything's Archie.
    7.50
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    Family Values

    • Part Of Series: Sin City
    Family Values was first published in (October 1997) and was the fifth "yarn" in Frank Miller's Sin City series. Unlike the previous four stories, Family Values was released as a 128-page graphic novel rather than in serialized issues that would later be collected in a trade paperback volume. Dwight McCarthy is on a mission from Gail to dig up information about a recent mob hit at a small diner. After being hit on by a female cop, (who he manages to get rid of by pretending to be a bisexual masochist), he goes into a bar near where the hit happened and tries to charm one of the local drinkers there named Peggy. Dwight also spots Fat Man and Little Boy, which makes his job easier later on. As Dwight keeps charming Peggy, she realizes he's not interested in any company that night and only looking for information behind the recent hit. It's revealed that Bruno, the target, was killed by Vito; one of Don Magliozzi's nephews and also one of his hitmen. This was done in retaliation on Don Magliozzi's part as Bruno killed his beloved niece years ago. Going against his family's treaty with mob boss Wallenquist, he orders Vito to kill Bruno, who is on Wallenquist's payroll, immediately.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    Giant-Size X-Men

    • Editor: Marv Wolfman
    • Part Of Series: Giant-Size X-Men
    • Characters On Cover: Storm
    Giant-Size X-Men #1 was a special issue of the X-Men comic book series, published by Marvel Comics in 1975. It was written by Len Wein and illustrated by Dave Cockrum. Though not a regular issue, it jump-started the series after a five-year hiatus. The issue serves as a link between the original X-Men and a new team. Chronologically it is placed before The Uncanny X-Men #94. The 68-page issue was published with a May 1975 cover date and distributed to newsstands in February of that year. Following the May publication of Giant-Size X-Men #1, Marvel published one more issue of Giant-Size X-Men later in the year. The second issue had nothing to do with the preceding one, instead featuring reprints of stories from X-Men #57 and #58, written by Roy Thomas and illustrated by Neal Adams. The story links the old X-Men team with the new, as the original team (Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Beast, Angel, and Iceman) and recent recruits Havok and Lorna Dane ventures to the island of Krakoa and vanishes. Cyclops is allowed to return to tell Professor X what has happened. This prompts the professor to assemble a new team of X-Men to stage a rescue. The new team includes Sunfire and Banshee, who had been
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Madman Atomic Comics #14

    • Editor: Jamie S. Rich
    • Part Of Series: Madman Atomic Comics
    • Characters On Cover: Madman
    This issue begins a series of self contained stories.
    The main cover was Darwyn Cooke & J. Bone. It was also publised with an alternate cover by J. Bone.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Nexus Meets Madman #1

    • Part Of Series: Nexus Meets Madman
    • Characters On Cover: Nexus
    A one-off Nexus/Madman crossover collaboration by Mike Baron, Steve Rude, and Mike Allred. 
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Ronin

    Ronin (formally written as Rōnin) is a comic book limited series published between 1983 and 1984, by DC Comics. The series was written and drawn by Frank Miller with artwork painted by Lynn Varley. It takes place in a dystopic near-future New York in which a ronin is reincarnated. The six-issue work shows some of the strongest influences of manga and bande dessinée on Miller's style, both in the artwork and narrative style. Miller was in part inspired to do Ronin by Kazuo Koike and Goseki Kojima's manga series Lone Wolf and Cub. According to former Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Jim Shooter, Ronin was originally slated to be released as part of Marvel's Marvel Graphic Novel series. Ultimately, however, Miller was wooed by DC by publisher Jenette Kahn, and the first issue of Ronin was published by that company in 1983. Like an earlier DC maxi-series Camelot 3000, Ronin was printed on a higher quality paper stock. Each issue contained 48 pages of story and no advertisements. In feudal Japan, a young, nameless samurai has sworn to protect his master, Lord Ozaki, from assassins. But despite his dedication, Ozaki is assassinated at night by a demon called Agat in the guise of a geisha,
    7.50
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    137
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    6.33
    3 votes
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    3 votes
    140
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    141

    Maris the Chojo

    • Part Of Series: Weekly Shōnen Sunday
    Maris the Chojo (ザ・超女, Za Sūpāgyaru), literally translated as "The Supergal", and originally titled Supergal in U.S. markets, is a one shot manga story by Rumiko Takahashi. It ran in the October 1980 special edition of Shōnen Sunday and was later made into an anime OVA. In North America, it was released on VHS and laserdisc by Central Park Media under the "Rumik World" series (which also included OVAs Laughing Target, Fire Tripper, and Mermaid Forest). It was originally released under the title "Supergal", but this was changed for allegedly legal reasons. Maris doesn't exactly have the greatest life. Her father's an alcoholic, her mother's an airhead, and to top it off, she's always broke. Why? Maris is a Thanatosian, and Thanatosians have six times the strength of a normal human being. Generally, this would not be a bad thing, except that the planet Thanatos blew up years ago, and the rest of the galaxy is not set up for people who are six times as strong as everyone else. (Thanatos blowing up is similar to Krypton's fate, except that Superman is usually the only survivor of Krypton, while the entire population of Thanatos escaped.) So to keep the destruction her race does to a
    6.33
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    142
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    1 votes
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    155

    Monster Magazine

    Monster Magazine is a Lordi comic book published in 2002. There were only 500 copies of the magazine made, and it was only available to the people who had bought a copy of Lordi's first single "Would You Love a Monsterman?". Nowadays Monster Magazine is a rarity and is highly sought after amongst Lordi collectors. The comic includes fake adverts for Lordi products which include: There is however one real advertisement for the Would You Love a Monsterman? single. Story, pencils, inks and colour by Lordi Cover, letter and layout by Lordi and Mika Lindberg
    7.00
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    176

    Madman Atomic Comics #1

    • Editor: Jamie S. Rich
    • Part Of Series: Madman Atomic Comics
    • Characters On Cover: Madman
    Madman's run with Image Comics begins as Madman / Frank Einstein finds himself in a horrifying scenario: the last person alive, and then told that the world he knows is an illusion of his own devising. He reviews all that he remembers as he tries to come to grips with what's happening around him - which serves as a recap of his history in previous series.
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    183

    The Big Fat Kill

    • Part Of Series: Sin City
    The Big Fat Kill is a five-issue comic book limited series published by Dark Horse Comics in November 1994–March 1995. The story opens in Shellie's apartment, where a drunken former fling is furiously rapping on her door, demanding to be let in. Shellie is obviously scared, but is comforted by Dwight who has since gotten a new face (see A Dame To Kill For). Dwight tells the barmaid to let the man and his ensuing entourage in, expressing confidence in his ability to 'handle them'. When the man outside threatens to break down her door, Shellie reluctantly opens it while Dwight hides in the bathroom. The drunken man, named Jack, talks about his plans to barhop and insists Shellie call in some of her co-workers to come along. Shellie refuses and Jack hits her. He goes to the bathroom where Dwight is hiding in the shower stall. Getting the jump on him, Dwight holds a straight razor to his eye and tells him to stop bothering Shellie. When Jack scoffs at the threat Dwight dunks his head into the toilet (where Jack had been urinating the minute before) until his body goes limp. Jack awakens a few seconds later and storms out, demanding that his group not mention these events. Shellie
    5.33
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    184

    Tintin in the Land of the Soviets

    • Part Of Series: The Adventures of Tintin
    • Characters On Cover: Tintin
    Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (in the original French, Les Aventures de Tintin, reporter du "Petit Vingtième", au pays des Soviets) is the first title in the comic book series The Adventures of Tintin, written and drawn by Belgian cartoonist Hergé (1907–1983). Originally serialised in the Belgian children's newspaper supplement Le Petit Vingtième between 10 January 1929 and 8 May 1930, it was subsequently published in book form in 1930. Designed to be a work of anti-communist propaganda for children, it was commissioned by Hergé's boss, the Abbé Norbert Wallez, who ran the right wing Roman Catholic weekly Le XXe Siècle in which Le Petit Vingtième was published. The plot revolves around the young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel, via Berlin, to the Soviet Union, to report back on the policies instituted by the state socialist government of Joseph Stalin and the Bolsheviks. However, an agent of the Soviet secret service, the OGPU, attempts to prevent Tintin from doing so, and sets traps to get rid of him. Despite this, the young reporter is successful in discovering that the Bolsheviks are stealing the food of the Soviet people, rigging elections and
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    Amy and Jordan

    Amy and Jordan (Pantheon, 2004) is a comic book by Mark Beyer, featuring a dysfunctional couple who are victimized by each other and by blind circumstance. The characters Amy and Jordan appear in other works by Beyer, including Agony and Dead Stories (comic-strip) in Raw Magazine (New York: Pantheon, 1987). It was listed in Time Magazine's "Best Comix of 2004". Dead Stories in Raw Magazine
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    The Sandman: The Doll's House

    The Doll's House is the second trade paperback of the DC comic series The Sandman. It collects issues #9-16. It was written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Mike Dringenberg, Malcolm Jones III, Chris Bachalo, Michael Zulli and Steve Parkhouse, coloured by Robbie Busch and lettered by Todd Klein. The Doll's House was the first Sandman paperback collection. The first edition printed in 1990 collected issues #8-16. Its success led to the printing of Preludes and Nocturnes, which collected issues #1-8. Later editions of The Doll's House would omit issue #8. The collection was later reissued in hardcover in 1995. The collected edition features a foreword by Gaiman's friend Clive Barker. As part of a manhood ritual, an old man in the desert tells a younger man an ancient story, detailing the tragic love between Dream and Queen Nada. Fearing the consequences of loving an immortal, Nada spurns Dream. In anger, Dream sends Nada to Hell, where she remains to the present day. Meanwhile, Dream's androgynous sibling Desire calls upon its twin, Despair, to inform her there is a new dream vortex. The two of them allude to a scheme against Dream. Dream reviews a census of his realm, and discovers
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    Superman: War of the Worlds

    • Part Of Series: Elseworlds
    Superman: War of the Worlds is a DC Comics Elseworlds published in 1999. Written by Roy Thomas with Michael Lark as the artist, Willie Schubert as the letterer and Noelle Giddings as the colorist. The story is a rough adaptation of the H. G. Wells novel The War of the Worlds, but is primarily based on the Superman mythology. Wells' story is transported from early 20th-century Britain to 1938 Metropolis where the Martian invasion is met with a Golden Age Superman, who is not blessed with the full range of powers he has in modern times. Most characters of the story are based on the cast from The War of the Worlds or DC Comics characters. (Note that until Superman #7, George Taylor was Editor-in-Chief of the Daily Star at which Clark Kent and Lois Lane worked. Perry White replaced him). Earth is being watched by the envious eyes of Mars. On the red planet a cold and unsympathetic civilization plans to invade our world. Far away, an even older world, Krypton, sends its last son to Earth. The baby Kal-El is found by the Kents and develops super strength, the ability to run faster than a railway engine, leap an eighth of a mile and has near-impenetrable skin. After the passing away of
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    217
    The Tenderfoot

    The Tenderfoot

    • Part Of Series: Lucky Luke
    Le Pied-tendre is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. The original comic in French was published by Dargaud in 1968. English translations titled The Tenderfoot have been published by Dargaud
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    Asterix in Britain

    Asterix in Britain (French: Astérix chez les Bretons) is the eighth in the Asterix comic book series. It was published in serial form in Pilote magazine, issues 307-334, in 1965, and in album form in 1966. It tells the story of Asterix and Obelix's journey to Roman-occupied Britain. Julius Caesar has invaded Britain and succeeded in his conquest, mainly because the British soldiers under Cassivelaunos stop fighting every day to drink hot water (with a drop of milk) and they refuse to fight over the weekend. Caesar, using his military genius, decides only to fight when they stop to drink hot water and at weekends. As with Gaul, a single village remains independent, defying the Romans. One member of the village, Anticlimax, is dispatched to Gaul to enlist the help of Getafix the druid in providing magic potion for the British rebels. It is decided that Asterix (Anticlimax's second cousin twice removed) and Obelix should accompany him back to his village to help transport a barrel of the potion. However, while beating up a Roman galley in the British channel, Obelix mentions the mission, which is reported to the Roman high command in Britain. In Britain, the barrel of potion is
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    A Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner

    A Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner

    Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner is the comic book adaptation of the film Blade Runner, published by Marvel Comics in 1982. It was written by Archie Goodwin with art by Al Williamson, Carlos Garzon with Dan Green and Ralph Reese. The Jim Steranko cover leads into a 45-page adaptation which includes one possible explanation of the title's significance in story context: the narrative line, "Blade runner. You're always movin' on the edge." This was issue 22 of the Marvel Comics Super Special series of titles which by this time only printed Marvel's movie adaptations. It was reprinted in a two issue mini series but without the feature content contained in the special.In some printings,several pages of the comic were published out of order.Other printing set these pages in the correct order. In the UK it was reprinted as the Blade Runner Annual published by Grandreams. Again, the feature content of the original special was not reprinted.
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    A Midsummer Night's Dream

    • Editor: Karen Berger
    • Part Of Series: Sandman
    The Sandman: A Midsummer Night's Dream is a comic book story heavily based on Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.  It won the 1991 World Fantasy Award for Best Short Fiction.
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