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Best Columnist of All Time

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    1
    Anne Applebaum

    Anne Applebaum

    Anne Elizabeth Applebaum (born July 25, 1964 in Washington, D.C.) is an American journalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author who has written extensively about communism and the development of civil society in Central and Eastern Europe. She has been an editor at The Economist, and a member of the editorial board of The Washington Post (2002–2006) and Slate Magazine. She is married to Poland's Minister of Foreign Affairs Radosław Sikorski. Her parents are Harvey M. Applebaum, a Covington and Burling partner, and Elizabeth Applebaum of the Corcoran Gallery of Art. She graduated from the Sidwell Friends School (1982). She earned a B.A. (summa cum laude) at Yale University (1986), where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. As a Marshall Scholar at the London School of Economics she earned a master's degree in international relations (1987). She studied at St Antony's College, Oxford before moving to Warsaw, Poland in 1988 as a correspondent for The Economist. Applebaum was an editor at The Spectator, and a columnist for both the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. She also wrote for The Independent. Working for The Economist, she provided coverage of important social and political
    8.43
    7 votes
    2
    Jeffrey L. Seglin

    Jeffrey L. Seglin

    Jeffrey L. Seglin (b. 1956 in New York) is an American journalist, writer, and teacher. Seglin grew up in Boonton, New Jersey and attended Boonton High School. Seglin writes "The Right Thing," a syndicated weekly column on general ethics that currently runs in newspapers in the United States and Canada. In the column, he regularly offers solutions to ethical dilemmas posed by readers who write to him at rightthing@comcast.net. The column was syndicated by the New York Times Syndicate from February 2004 through August 2010. In September 2010, Tribune Media Services began distributing "The Right Thing" column. Seglin is the author of The Right Thing: Conscience, Profit and Personal Responsibility in Today’s Business. It was named as one of the "Best Business Books of 2003" by the Library Journal. It is a collection of the first four years of “The Right Thing,” which until January 2004 had been a monthly business ethics column he wrote for The Sunday New York Times Money and Business pages since 1998. He is also the author of The Good, the Bad, and Your Business: Choosing Right When Ethical Dilemmas Pull You Apart (Wiley, 2000). In 2011, Seglin became a lecturer in public policy and
    8.29
    7 votes
    3
    Eugene Robinson

    Eugene Robinson

    Eugene Harold Robinson (born 1955, Orangeburg, South Carolina) is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper columnist and the former assistant managing editor of The Washington Post. His columns are syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group, and he is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists. Robinson is a board member of the IWMF (International Women's Media Foundation). Robinson attended Orangeburg Wilkinson High School in the town where he was born and, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the University of Michigan, where he wrote for The Michigan Daily school newspaper. In 1976, he began his journalism career at the San Francisco Chronicle; his assignments included the trial of publishing heiress Patty Hearst. He joined The Washington Post in 1980. Working his way up through the ranks, he was first a city-hall reporter at the paper. He then became the assistant city editor; a foreign correspondent in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and London, England; and, most recently, the assistant managing editor of the paper's style section. He began writing columns for the opinion page of the paper in 2005, also writes a twice-a-week column on politics and culture, and conducts a
    7.25
    8 votes
    4

    Walter Lippmann

    Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow". Walter Lippmann was born on September 23, 1889, in New York City, to Jacob and Daisy Baum Lippmann; his upper-middle class German Jewish family took annual holidays in Europe. At age 17, he entered Harvard University where he studied under George Santayana, William James, and Graham Wallas, concentrating upon philosophy and languages (he spoke German and French), and earned his degree in three years, graduating as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa society. Lippmann was a journalist, a media critic and a philosopher who tried to reconcile the tensions between liberty and democracy in a complex and modern world, as in his 1920 book Liberty and the News. In 1913, Lippmann, Herbert Croly, and Walter Weyl became the founding editors of The New Republic magazine. During World War I, Lippmann
    9.00
    6 votes
    5
    Roger Ebert

    Roger Ebert

    Roger Joseph Ebert ( /ˈiːbərt/; born June 18, 1942) is an American journalist, film critic and screenwriter, who has been described by Forbes as "the most powerful pundit in America". He is the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize, as well as the first to be awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Ebert is known for his film review column (appearing in the Chicago Sun-Times since 1967, and later online) and for the television programs Sneak Previews, At the Movies with Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert, and Siskel and Ebert and The Movies, all of which he co-hosted for a combined 23 years with Gene Siskel. After Siskel's death in 1999, Ebert teamed with Richard Roeper for the television series Ebert & Roeper & the Movies, which began airing in 2000. Although his name remained in the title, Ebert did not appear on the show after mid-2006 after he suffered post-surgical complications related to thyroid cancer, leaving him unable to speak. Ebert ended his association with the show in July 2008, but in February 2009 he stated that he and Roeper would continue their work on a new show. Ebert's most recent show, Ebert Presents: At the Movies, premiered on January 21, 2011, with
    8.67
    6 votes
    6
    David Gergen

    David Gergen

    David Richmond Gergen (born May 9, 1942) is an American political consultant and former presidential advisor who served during the administrations of Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and Clinton. He is currently Director of the Center for Public Leadership and a professor of public service at Harvard Kennedy School. Gergen is the Editor-at-large for U.S. News and World Report and the Senior Political Analyst for CNN. David Gergen was born in Durham, North Carolina. He is the youngest of four children of Aubigne Munger (née Lermond) and Dr. John Jay Gergen, who once chaired Duke University's mathematics department. His brother, Kenneth J. Gergen, is a psychologist and professor at Swarthmore College. David Gergen gave the Duke University Commencement Speech in 1995. Gergen served in the U.S. Navy for three-and-a-half years, serving on a ship home-ported in Japan. Gergen earned his bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1963 and was a member of Manuscript Society. In 1967, he received his law degree from Harvard Law School. In 1967, Gergen married Anne Gergen of England. She is a family therapist; they live in Cambridge, Massachusetts. They have two children, Christopher and Katherine, and
    6.38
    8 votes
    7
    E. J. Dionne

    E. J. Dionne

    Eugene Joseph "E.J." Dionne, Jr. (/diːˈɒn/; born April 23, 1952) is an American journalist and political commentator, and a long-time op-ed columnist for The Washington Post. He is also a Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, a University Professor in the Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown Public Policy Institute, a Senior Research Fellow at Saint Anselm College, and an NPR, MSNBC, and PBS commentator. Dionne was born in Boston, Massachusetts on April 23, 1952. He is the son of Lucie-Anne (née Galipeau), a librarian and teacher, and Eugene J. Dionne, a dentist, and raised in Fall River, Massachusetts. He is of French-Canadian descent. He attended Portsmouth Abbey School, a Benedictine college preparatory school in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. Dionne holds a B.A. in Social Studies from Harvard University (1973), where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and was affiliated with Adams House, and a DPhil in Sociology from Balliol College, Oxford (1982), where he was a Rhodes Scholar. Dionne's published works include the influential 1991 bestseller Why Americans Hate Politics, which argued that several decades of political polarization was
    8.17
    6 votes
    8
    James Surowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    James Michael Surowiecki ( /ˌsʊəroʊˈwɪkiː/ SOOR-oh-WIK-ee; born 1967) is an American journalist. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker, where he writes a regular column on business and finance called "The Financial Page". Surowiecki was born in Meriden, Connecticut and spent several childhood years in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico where he received a junior high school education from Southwestern Educational Society (SESO). On May 5, 1979, he won the Scripps-Howard Regional Puerto Rico Spelling Bee championship. He is a 1984 graduate of Choate Rosemary Hall and a 1988 alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was a Morehead Scholar. Surowiecki pursued Ph.D. studies in American History on a Mellon Fellowship at Yale University before becoming a financial journalist. He lives in Brooklyn, New York and is married to Slate culture editor Meghan O'Rourke. Surowiecki's writing has appeared in a wide range of publications, including The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Motley Fool, Foreign Affairs, Artforum, Wired, and Slate. Before joining The New Yorker, he wrote “The Bottom Line” column for New York magazine and was a contributing editor at Fortune. He
    8.17
    6 votes
    9
    Joseph Nocera

    Joseph Nocera

    Joseph "Joe" Nocera (born May 6, 1952 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an American business journalist and author. He became a business columnist for The New York Times in April 2005. In March 2011, Nocera became a regular opinion columnist for The Times' Op-Ed page, writing on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Nocera is also a business commentator for NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon. Prior to joining The New York Times, Nocera worked at Fortune from 1995 to 2005, in a variety of positions, finally as editorial director. Nocera was the "Profit Motive" columnist at GQ from 1990 to 1995, and wrote the same column for Esquire from 1988 to 1990. In the 1980s, Nocera was an editor at Newsweek; an executive editor of New England Monthly; and a senior editor at Texas Monthly. In the late 1970s he was an editor at The Washington Monthly. Nocera earned a B.S. in journalism from Boston University in 1974, and lives in New York City. Nocera's most recent book is All the Devils Are Here, co-written with Bethany McLean and released in 2010. Nocera's 1994 book, A Piece of the Action: How the Middle Class Joined the Money Class, won the New York Public Library's 1995 Helen Bernstein Award for best
    8.17
    6 votes
    10
    Heidi Fleiss

    Heidi Fleiss

    Heidi Lynne Fleiss (born December 30, 1965) is an American former madam, and also a columnist and television personality regularly featured in the 1990s in American media. She ran a prostitution ring based in Los Angeles, California, and is often referred to as the "Hollywood Madam". As of 2012, she resides in Pahrump, Nevada. Fleiss was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. Her parents, Paul M. Fleiss and Elissa (née Ash), are divorced. Her parents adopted Elissa's sister's baby daughter Kim, then adopted Paul's sister's baby daughter Amy (born 1965). Heidi was born later the same year. Paul and Elissa then had Shana (born 1967), Jason (1968–2009) and Jesse Fleiss (born 1977). On December 28, 2009, 41-year-old Jason drowned in the sea off Hawaii. At the age of 22, Fleiss began managing a prostitution ring under Madam Alex after meeting the famous Madam 90210 in 1987 via film director boyfriend Ivan Nagy. Fleiss stated in 2002 in an interview with Larry King that her relationship with Alex was "a very intense relationship" and that she "was kind of like the daughter she loved and hated, so she was abusive and loving at the same time." In the same interview, Fleiss said she
    7.14
    7 votes
    11
    Thomas L. Friedman

    Thomas L. Friedman

    Thomas Lauren Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist and author. He writes a twice-weekly column for The New York Times. He has written extensively on foreign affairs including global trade, the Middle East,Globalization, and environmental issues and has won the Pulitzer Prize three times. Thomas Friedman was born in St. Louis Park, Minnesota — a suburb of Minneapolis — on July 20, 1953. He is the son of Harold and Margaret Friedman. Harold Friedman, who was vice president of a ball-bearing company, United Bearing, died of a heart attack in 1973, when Tom was nineteen years old. Margaret Friedman, who served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and studied home economics at the University of Wisconsin, was a housewife and a part-time bookkeeper. She also was a Senior Life Master duplicate bridge player and died in 2008. Friedman has two older sisters, Shelly and Jane. From an early age, Friedman, whose father often brought him to the golf course for a round after work, wanted to be a professional golfer. He played a lot of sports, becoming serious about tennis and golf. He caddied at a local country club; in 1970 he caddied for the legendary Chi Chi
    6.71
    7 votes
    12
    Jimmy Breslin

    Jimmy Breslin

    Jimmy Breslin (born October 17, 1930) is an American journalist and author. He currently writes a column for the New York Daily News' Sunday edition. He has written numerous novels, and columns of his have appeared regularly in various newspapers in his hometown of New York City. He served as a regular columnist for the Long Island, NY newspaper Newsday until his retirement on November 2, 2004, though he still publishes occasional pieces for the paper. Born in Jamaica, New York, Breslin was a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, the Daily News, the New York Journal American, Newsday, and other venues. When the Sunday supplement of the Tribune was reworked into New York magazine by editor Clay Felker in 1962, Breslin appeared in the new edition, which became "the hottest Sunday read in town." He has been married twice. His first marriage, to Rosemary Dattolico, ended with her death in 1981. They had six children together: sons Kevin, James, Patrick and Christopher, and daughters Rosemary and Kelly. His daughter Rosemary died June 14, 2004 from a rare blood disease and his daughter Kelly, 44, died on April 21 2009, four days after a cardiac arrhythmia in a New York City
    8.60
    5 votes
    13
    Christopher Hitchens

    Christopher Hitchens

    Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was a British American author and journalist whose career spanned more than four decades. Hitchens, often referred to colloquially as "Hitch", contributed to New Statesman, The Nation, The Atlantic, The London Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, and Vanity Fair. He was an author of twelve books and five collections of essays, and concentrated on the subjects of politics, literature and religion. As a staple of talk shows and lecture circuits, he was a prominent public intellectual, and his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded and controversial figure. Known for his contrarian stance on a number of issues, he critiqued revered figures such as Mother Teresa, and Diana, Princess of Wales. Initially describing himself as a socialist, Hitchens began his break from the established political left after what he called the "tepid reaction" of the Western left to the Rushdie Affair. The September 11 attacks "exhilarated" him, strengthening his internationalist embrace of an interventionist foreign policy, and his criticism of what he called "fascism with an Islamic face." His numerous editorials in
    6.57
    7 votes
    14
    Stephen Jay Gould

    Stephen Jay Gould

    Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. He was also one of the most influential and widely read writers of popular science of his generation. Gould spent most of his career teaching at Harvard University and working at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. In the latter years of his life, Gould also taught biology and evolution at New York University near his home in SoHo. Gould's most significant contribution to science was the theory of punctuated equilibrium, which he developed with Niles Eldredge in 1972. The theory proposes that most evolution is marked by long periods of evolutionary stability, which is punctuated by rare instances of branching evolution. The theory was contrasted against phyletic gradualism, the popular idea that evolutionary change is marked by a pattern of smooth and continuous change in the fossil record. Most of Gould's empirical research was based on the land snail genera Poecilozonites and Cerion. He also contributed to evolutionary developmental biology, and has received wide praise for his book Ontogeny and Phylogeny. In evolutionary theory
    9.75
    4 votes
    15

    Charles Krauthammer

    Charles Krauthammer (/ˈkraʊt.hæmər/; born March 13, 1950) is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist, political commentator, and physician. His column is syndicated to more than 275 newspapers and media outlets. He is a contributing editor to the Weekly Standard and The New Republic. He is also a weekly panelist on the PBS news program Inside Washington and a nightly panelist on Fox News's Special Report with Bret Baier. Krauthammer was born on March 13, 1950, in New York City. He was raised in Montreal, Quebec, where he attended McGill University and obtained an honors degree in political science and economics in 1970. He was a Commonwealth Scholar in politics at Balliol College, Oxford, 1970–1971. Returning to the United States, Krauthammer entered Harvard Medical School. He suffered a paralyzing accident in his first year of medical school, and was hospitalized for a year, during which time he continued his medical studies. He graduated with his class, earning a Doctor of Medicine from Harvard Medical School in 1975, and went on to complete a residency in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital. In 1984 he became board certified in psychiatry by the American
    7.33
    6 votes
    16
    Byron York

    Byron York

    Byron York (born 1958) is a conservative American columnist for the Washington Examiner, Fox News contributor, and author who lives in Washington, D.C. York is the Chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner, a post he joined in early 2009 following his work as White House correspondent for National Review magazine and a columnist for The Hill. He is also a syndicated columnist. He has also written for The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, and New York Post, among other publications. A frequent guest on television and radio, he has appeared on such programs as Meet the Press, The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, The O'Reilly Factor, Tim Russert, Special Report with Brit Hume, Laura Ingraham, and Hardball with Chris Matthews, and has contributed occasional commentaries to National Public Radio. Before working for National Review, York was a news producer at CNN Headline News and an investigative reporter for The American Spectator. In 2001 York explored the misfortunes of his former employer in an essay written for The Atlantic, "The Life and Death of The American Spectator". For a brief period in 2005 he was a contributing blogger at The Huffington
    8.40
    5 votes
    17

    Emily Yoffe

    Emily J. Yoffe (born October 15, 1955) is a journalist and a regular contributor to Slate magazine. She has also written for The New York Times, O, The Oprah Magazine, The Washington Post, Esquire, The Los Angeles Times and many other publications. Yoffe began her career as a staff writer at The New Republic. She writes Slate’s Dear Prudence advice column, which appears twice weekly. She also does a podcast called Manners for the Digital Age with Slate’s technology columnist Farhad Manjoo. She writes a regular feature on Slate called Human Guinea Pig, in which she attempts unusual activities or hobbies. For Human Guinea Pig, she has tried hypnosis, and taken a vow of silence. She has become a street performer, a nude model for an art class, and a contestant in the Mrs. America beauty pageant. In June 2005, Bloomsbury published Yoffe's What the Dog Did: Tales from a Formerly Reluctant Dog Owner. That year it was named Best Book of the Year by Dogwise, and selected as the Best General Interest Dog Book by the Dog Writers Association of America. She has been a guest on The Colbert Report twice. She discussed her experiences as Slate's Human Guinea Pig, and an article about
    8.40
    5 votes
    18
    William Safire

    William Safire

    William Lewis Safire (/ˈsæfaɪər/; December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009) was an American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter. He was perhaps best known as a long-time syndicated political columnist for the New York Times and the author of "On Language" in the New York Times Magazine, a column on popular etymology, new or unusual usages, and other language-related topics from its inception. Safire was born William Lewis Safir in New York City, New York, the son of Ida (née Panish) and Oliver Craus Safir. His family was Jewish, and originated in Romania on his father's side. Safire later added the "e" to his surname for pronunciation reasons, though some of his relatives continue to use the original spelling. Safire graduated from the Bronx High School of Science, a specialized public high school in New York City. He attended Syracuse University but dropped out after two years. He delivered the commencement address at Syracuse in 1978 and 1990, and became a trustee of the university. He was a public relations executive from 1955 to 1960. Previously, he had been a radio and television producer and an Army correspondent. He worked as a publicist for a
    8.40
    5 votes
    19

    Clarence Page

    Clarence Page (born June 2, 1947) is an American journalist, syndicated columnist, and senior member of The Chicago Tribune editorial board. Page was born in Dayton, Ohio, and attended Middletown High School in Middletown where he worked on the school's bi-weekly newspaper. After graduating in 1965, he worked freelance as a writer and photographer for The Middletown Journal and The Cincinnati Enquirer, while he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in journalism from Ohio University. After his graduation from university in 1969, Page took a position with The Chicago Tribune, and was drafted into the military after only six months with the paper. He found himself assigned as an Army journalist with the 212th Artillery Group at Fort Lewis, Washington, when his obligation ended and he made his way back to the Tribune in 1971. Page is an occasional panelist on The McLaughlin Group, a regular contributor of essays to NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, host of several documentaries on the Public Broadcasting Service, and an occasional commentator on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition Sunday. Page often appears as a political analyst on the Chris Matthews Show and Countdown with Keith
    7.17
    6 votes
    20
    Michael Shermer

    Michael Shermer

    Michael Brant Shermer (born September 8, 1954) is an American science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, and Editor in Chief of its magazine Skeptic, which is largely devoted to investigating pseudoscientific and supernatural claims. The Skeptics Society currently has over 55,000 members. Shermer also engages in debates on topics pertaining to pseudoscience and religion in which he promulgates the need for scientific skepticism. Shermer is also the producer and co-host of the 13-hour Fox Family (now ABC Family) television series Exploring the Unknown. Since April 2001, he has been a monthly columnist for Scientific American magazine with his Skeptic column. Shermer states he was once a fundamentalist Christian, but converted from a belief in God during his graduate studies, and has described himself as an agnostic, nontheist, atheist and advocate for humanist philosophy as well as the science of morality. He has expressed reservations about such labels, however, as he sees them being used in the service of "pigeonholing", and prefers to simply be called a skeptic. Shermer grew up in Southern California. His parents divorced when he was four and later
    7.17
    6 votes
    21
    Ezra Klein

    Ezra Klein

    Ezra Klein (born May 9, 1984) is an American journalist, blogger and columnist. He is currently a blogger and columnist for The Washington Post, a columnist for Bloomberg, and a contributor to MSNBC. He was formerly an associate editor of The American Prospect political magazine and a political blogger at the same publication. At The Washington Post, he manages a branded blog called "Wonkblog," which features his writing and the writing of other policy reporters. His writing interests include health care and budget policy. He writes a primer on policy called "Wonkbook," which is delivered by e-mail and on his blog each morning. In 2011, Klein's blog was the most-read blog at The Washington Post. In 2011, he was named one of the 50 most powerful people in Washington by GQ. In 2010, he was named Blogger of the Year by The Week magazine and the Sidney Hillman Foundation. His blog was also named one of the 25 best financial blogs by Time Magazine in 2011. Klein was born and raised in Irvine, California, and went to school at University High School. He attended the University of California, Santa Cruz but later transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles, from which he
    8.20
    5 votes
    22
    Irv Kupcinet

    Irv Kupcinet

    Irv Kupcinet (July 31, 1912 – November 10, 2003) was an American newspaper columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, television talk-show host, and a radio broadcast personality based in Chicago, Illinois. He was popularly known by the nickname "Kup". His daily Kup's Column was launched in 1943 and remained a fixture in the Sun-Times for the next six decades. Kupcinet was youngest of four children born to Russian immigrants in the North Lawndale section of Chicago. While attending high school, he became editor of the school newspaper and the senior class president. He eventually won a football scholarship to Northwestern University, but a scuffle with another student led to his transferring to the University of North Dakota. Upon graduating college, Kupcinet was signed by the Philadelphia Eagles football team in 1935. His football career was cut short due to a shoulder injury, which led him to take a job as a sports writer for the Chicago Daily Times (now known as the Chicago Sun-Times) in 1935. While writing his sports column, Kupcinet also wrote a short "People" section which became officially known as "Kup's Column" in 1948, after The Chicago Sun and the Daily Times merged to form
    9.25
    4 votes
    23

    Roland S. Martin

    Roland Sebastian Martin (born November 14, 1968) is an American journalist and syndicated columnist with Creators Syndicate and author of Speak, Brother! A Black Man's View of America, Listening to the Spirit Within: 50 Perspectives on Faith and The First: President Barack Obama's Road to the White House as originally reported by Roland S. Martin. Martin is a commentator for TV One and the host of Washington Watch with Roland Martin, a one-hour Sunday morning news show on the network. He is also a CNN contributor, appearing on a variety of shows, including The Situation Room, Anderson Cooper's AC360, and many others. In October 2008, he joined the Tom Joyner Morning Show as senior analyst. Martin was born in Houston, Texas, where he attended Jack Yates High School. In 1987, he entered Texas A&M University on an academic scholarship, where he received his bachelor's degree in 1991. In May 2008, he earned a master's degree in Christian Communications at Louisiana Baptist University, a primarily religious, non-accredited institution. Martin pledged the Pi Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity in 1989. During the 1990s, Martin was a contributor on the BET Sunday morning news
    9.00
    4 votes
    24
    Nicholas D. Kristof

    Nicholas D. Kristof

    Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American journalist, author, op-ed columnist, and a winner of two Pulitzer Prizes. He has written an op-ed column for The New York Times since November 2001 and The Washington Post says that he "rewrote opinion journalism" with his emphasis on human rights abuses and social injustices, such as human trafficking and the Darfur conflict. Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa has described Kristof as an "honorary African" for shining a spotlight on neglected conflicts. Nicholas Kristof grew up on a sheep and cherry farm in Yamhill, Oregon. He is the son of Ladis "Kris" Kristof (born Vladislav Krzysztofowicz), who was born of Polish and Armenian parents in former Austria-Hungary and who emigrated to the United States after World War II, and Jane Kristof, both long-time professors at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. Nicholas Kristof graduated from Yamhill Carlton High School, where he was student body president and school newspaper editor, and later became a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard College. At Harvard, he studied government and worked on The Harvard Crimson newspaper; "Alums recall Kristof as one of the
    10.00
    3 votes
    25
    Paul Krugman

    Paul Krugman

    Paul Robin Krugman ( /ˈkruːɡmən/; born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, Centenary Professor at the London School of Economics, and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. In 2008, Krugman won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography. According to the prize Committee, the prize was given for Krugman's work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic concentration of wealth, by examining the impact of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services. Krugman is known in academia for his work on international economics (including trade theory, economic geography, and international finance), liquidity traps, and currency crises. He is the 17th most widely cited economist in the world today and is ranked among the most influential academic thinkers in the US. As of 2008, Krugman has written 20 books and has published over 200 scholarly articles in professional journals and edited volumes. He has also written more
    7.40
    5 votes
    26
    Michael Kimmelman

    Michael Kimmelman

    Michael Kimmelman is an author, critic, columnist and pianist. He is the architecture critic for The New York Times and has written on issues of public housing, public space, infrastructure, community development and social responsibility. He was the paper's longtime chief art critic and, in 2007, created the Abroad column, as a foreign correspondent covering culture, political and social affairs across Europe and elsewhere. He returned to New York from Europe in autumn, 2011, as the paper's senior critic and architecture critic and his articles since then have helped to reshape the public debate about urbanism, architecture and architectural criticism. A fellow at the London School of Economics, he was born and raised in Greenwich Village, the son of a physician and civil rights activist. He attended Friends Seminary in Manhattan, graduated summa cum laude from Yale College and received his graduate degree in art history from Harvard University, where he was an Arthur Kingsley Porter Fellow. A pianist who still regularly performs as a soloist and with chamber groups on concert series in New York and around Europe, he started as a music critic at the paper, then moved into art. A
    8.50
    4 votes
    27

    María Elena Salinas

    María Elena Salinas (born August 1954) is the co-anchor of Noticiero Univision with Jorge Ramos, the most watched newscast by American Hispanics. She is considered one of the most recognized and influential female Hispanic journalists in the United States. Her parents immigrated to the United States from Mexico in the 1940s. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. After a humble beginning as news reader at Radio Xpress XEPRS, a radio station broadcasting to Baja California, Mexico, and Southern California, USA, she promptly jumped into the ranks of KMEX Channel 34 in Los Angeles, California as TV news reporter. Salinas has interviewed some of the world's most politically influential figures, ranging from U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Mexican President Vicente Fox, Zapatista Army of National Liberation spokesman Subcomandante Marcos and U.S. Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Salinas is one of the founders of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. She sponsors the Maria Elena Salinas Scholarship for college students interested in Spanish news broadcasting. She also was inducted into the association's Hall of Fame in 2006. She is also a columnist whose
    9.67
    3 votes
    28
    Craig Crawford

    Craig Crawford

    Craig Crawford (born 1956) is a writer and television political commentator based in Washington, D.C., a columnist for Congressional Quarterly, and the author of Listen Up Mr. President: Everything You Always Wanted Your President to Know and Do (with co-author Helen Thomas), The Politics of Life: 25 Rules for Survival in a Brutal and Manipulative World, and Attack the Messenger: How Politicians Turn You Against the Media. Craig Crawford was born in Owensboro, Kentucky. During his childhood, Crawford moved with his family to Orlando, Florida, where he attended Pineloch Elementary School and Oak Ridge High School. His parents, Tabitha and Bill Crawford, encouraged his interest in public affairs. When he was nine years old, Crawford had the opportunity to meet President Lyndon B. Johnson. While still in high school, Crawford served as a page to Republican Senator Ed Gurney. In 1974, while attending Stetson University, he worked on Jimmy Carter's presidential campaign. After the 1976 election, Crawford transferred to American University in Washington to intern in the Carter White House press office. Crawford graduated from Stetson University (1978) and Stetson University College of
    8.25
    4 votes
    29

    Dan Neil

    Dan Neil is an automotive columnist for The Wall Street Journal and a former contributor to the Los Angeles Times, AutoWeek and Car and Driver. He was a panelist on 2011's short-lived The Car Show with Adam Carolla on Speed Channel, which debuted July 13, 2011. In 1999, Neil received the International Motor Press Association's Ken Purdy Award for automotive journalism, and in 2004 Neil won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, presented annually to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism,' for his LA Times column Rumble Seat. In awarding Mr. Neil, the Pulitzer board noted his "one-of-a-kind reviews of automobiles, blending technical expertise with offbeat humor and astute cultural criticism." Neil was born in Pennsylvania January 12, 1960 and moved with his family to New Bern, North Carolina at age 4. He received a B.A. degree in Creative Writing from East Carolina University and an M.A. degree in English Literature from North Carolina State University. Neil is married to Tina Larsen Neil and has twin daughters, Rosalind and Vivienne. He has a 23-year-old son, Henry Neil, from his first marriage. He lived in Los Angeles before moving again to North Carolina,
    8.25
    4 votes
    30
    Eric Alterman

    Eric Alterman

    Eric Alterman (b. January 14, 1960) is an American English teacher, historian, journalist, author, media critic, blogger, and educator. His political weblog named Altercation was hosted by MSNBC.com from 2002 until 2006, moved to Media Matters for America until December 2008, and is now hosted by The Nation. He earned a B.A. in History and Government from Cornell University, an M.A. in International Relations from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in U.S. History from Stanford University. Alterman began his journalism career in 1983, freelancing originally for The Nation, The Washington Monthly, The New Republic, Harper's, Le Monde diplomatique, and later, Vanity Fair, The New York Times Magazine, and The Atlantic Monthly, among others, while working as a senior fellow for the World Policy Institute in New York City and Washington, DC. He published his first book, Sound & Fury: The Making of the Punditocracy, which won the 1992 George Orwell Award, while studying for his doctorate in US history in Stanford in 1992. Shortly after that he became the Washington Correspondent for Mother Jones, and soon thereafter Rolling Stone, before returning to The Nation as a columnist in 1995. Alterman
    9.33
    3 votes
    31

    Mark Shields

    Mark Shields (born May 25, 1937) is an American political columnist and commentator. Since 1988, Shields has provided weekly political analysis and commentary for PBS' award-winning PBS NewsHour. His current sparring partner is David Brooks of The New York Times. Previous counterparts were the late William Safire, Paul Gigot of the Wall Street Journal and David Gergen. Shields is also a regular panelist on Inside Washington, a weekly public affairs show that is seen on both PBS and ABC. For 17 years, Shields was moderator and panelist on CNN's Capital Gang. Shields was born and raised in Weymouth, Massachusetts in an Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1959. He served as an enlisted man in the United States Marine Corps before coming to Washington in 1965, where he became an aide to Wisconsin Senator William Proxmire. In 1968, Shields went to work for Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign. He later held leadership positions in the presidential campaigns of Edmund Muskie and Morris Udall, and was political director for Sargent Shriver when he ran for vice president on the Democratic ticket in 1972. Over more than a decade, he helped manage
    7.00
    5 votes
    32
    Johann Hari

    Johann Hari

    Johann Eduard Hari (born 21 January 1979) is a British writer and journalist who has written regular columns for The Independent and The Huffington Post and made contributions to several other publications. In 2011, he was suspended from The Independent following multiple charges of plagiarism and was separately accused of making malicious edits of several of his critics' Wikipedia pages under a pseudonym, an allegation he later admitted to. The exposed plagiarism led to him being forced to return his 2008 Orwell Prize and later was a contributing factor in his decision to leave The Independent. Hari is currently believed to be writing a book on the war on drugs. Hari was born in Glasgow and raised in London. He attended John Lyon School, (an independent school affiliated to Harrow School) and then Woodhouse College, a state sixth-form. He graduated from King's College, Cambridge, in 2001 with a double first in Social and Political Sciences. In 2000 he was joint winner of The Times Student News Journalist of the Year award for his work on the Cambridge student newspaper Varsity. After university he joined the New Statesman, where he worked between 2001 and 2003, and then wrote two
    8.00
    4 votes
    33

    Michael Wilbon

    Michael Ray Wilbon (/ˈwɪlbɒn/; born November 19, 1958) is a former sportswriter and columnist for the Washington Post and current ESPN commentator. He serves as an analyst for ESPN and co-hosts Pardon the Interruption on ESPN with former Post writer Tony Kornheiser, and has been doing so since 2001. Wilbon began working for The Washington Post in 1980 after summer internships at the newspaper in 1979 and 1980. He covered college sports, Major League Baseball, the National Football League and the National Basketball Association before being promoted to full-time columnist in February 1990. His column in the Post, which dealt as much with the culture of sports as the action on the court or field, appeared up to four times a week until he left to work full-time for ESPN on December 7, 2010. In his career, Wilbon has covered ten Summer and Winter Olympic Games for The Washington Post, every Super Bowl since 1987, nearly every Final Four since 1982 and each year's NBA Finals since 1987. After contributing to ESPN's The Sports Reporters and other shows on the cable network, he began co-hosting ESPN's daily Pardon the Interruption (PTI) with Tony Kornheiser on October 22, 2001. He is also
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    Katha Pollitt

    Katha Pollitt

    Katha Pollitt (born October 14, 1949) is an American feminist poet, essayist and critic. She is the author of four essay collections and two books of poetry. Her writing focuses on political and social issues, including abortion rights, racism, welfare reform, feminism, and poverty. Pollitt is best known for her bimonthly column "Subject to Debate" in The Nation magazine which The Washington Post called "the best place to go for original thinking on the left." Pollitt has contributed to The Nation since 1980, first serving as editor for the Books & the Arts section before becoming a regular columnist in 1995. She has also published in numerous other periodicals, including The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, Ms. Magazine, The New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Glamour, Mother Jones, and the London Review of Books. Her poetry has been republished in many anthologies and magazines, including The New Yorker and The Oxford Book of American Poetry (2006). She has appeared on NPR's Fresh Air and All Things Considered, Charlie Rose, The McLaughlin Group, CNN, Dateline NBC and the BBC. Much of Pollitt's writing is in defense of contemporary feminism and other forms of 'identity
    6.00
    6 votes
    35
    Barbara Ehrenreich

    Barbara Ehrenreich

    Barbara Ehrenreich ( /ˈɛrɨnraɪk/; born August 26, 1941) is an American feminist, democratic socialist, and political activist who describes herself as "a myth buster by trade", and has been called "a veteran muckraker" by The New Yorker. During the 1980s and early 1990s she was a prominent figure in the Democratic Socialists of America. She is a widely-read and award-winning columnist and essayist, and author of 21 books. Ehrenreich was born Barbara Alexander to Isabelle Oxley and Ben Howes Alexander in Butte, Montana, which she describes as then being "a bustling, brawling, blue collar mining town". In an interview on C-SPAN, she characterized her parents as "strong union people" with two family rules: "never cross a picket line and never vote Republican". In a talk she gave in 1999, Ehrenreich called herself a "fourth-generation atheist". "As a little girl", she told the New York Times in 1993, "I would go to school and have to decide if my parents were the evil people they were talking about, part of the Red Menace we read about in the Weekly Reader. Just because my mother was a liberal Democrat who would always talk about racial injustice." Her father was a copper miner who
    6.80
    5 votes
    36
    Fulton Lewis

    Fulton Lewis

    Fulton Lewis, Jr. (30 April 1903 in Washington D.C. – 20 August 1966 in Washington D. C.) was a prominent conservative American radio broadcaster from the 1930s to the 1960s. Lewis was born into influential circles in the nation's capital. He remained close to the circles of power all his life (President Herbert Hoover and his wife attended the wedding of Lewis and Alice Huston, who was the daughter of former Republican National Committee chairman Claudius Hart Huston) He was an indifferent student; he attended the University of Virginia for three years (where he was a member of the Virginia Glee Club and wrote the words to that school's official fight song, The Cavalier Song). He dropped out of UVa, but soon after enrolled in the George Washington University Law School. He also left that institution when he obtained a reporting job with the Washington Herald newspaper. He found his niche in news reporting, and within three years was the paper's City editor. During that time he met and courted his future wife. Lewis left the Herald to join Universal News Service, run by the Hearst family. Between 1933 and 1936 Lewis wrote a newspaper column called "The Washington Sideshow" which
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    James Martin

    James Martin

    James Martin (born 30 June 1972 in Malton, North Yorkshire), is an English cook who first appeared on television in 1996. Martin's family were farmers on the Castle Howard Estate and he helped his mother in the kitchen, which started his interest in cuisine. He attended Amotherby School in Malton and Malton School, the local comprehensive where he was a member of the school rugby and cricket teams, but did not enjoy academic subjects due to undiagnosed dyslexia. He then studied catering at Scarborough Technical College where he was a star student and upon leaving he was offered jobs by Anthony Worrall Thompson and Brian Turner who were judges for his final exams. He then joined the staff of Worrall Thompson's 'One Ninety Queen's Gate' restaurant in Kensington, London. After three years there he became head chef at the Hotel Du Vin in Winchester. He first started to appear on television in 1996 with various programmes including "James Martin: Yorkshire's Finest" (set in various Yorkshire locations with an emphasis on Yorkshire cuisine) but came to wider public attention on the BBC 2 programme Ready Steady Cook. In 2005 Martin was partnered with Camilla Dallerup in Strictly Come
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Malan Breton

    Malan Breton

    Malan Breton (born June 16, 1973) is a Taiwanese born actor, fashion designer, photographer, singer, dancer, costumer, columnist, producer, director, & media personality, based in New York City. "Malan Breton" also refers to his brands of apparel, and accessories. Breton was born in Taipei, Taiwan. Breton is self taught and never went to design school. He began designing at the age of eleven but grew up, as a performer, in the entertainment industry. In 1996, as a model, Breton moved to New York after a request by Versus and KCD to cast for the New York fashion week Spring 1997 Collection shows at 7th on Sixth. As a model, Breton was photographed by top photographers and directors Len Prince, Hype Williams, Thom Oliphant, Joseph Kahn to name a few. Breton in 1998 was featured in David Barton Gym's "Look Better Naked" campaign, photographed by Len Prince. Living in New York, Breton got his start (in fashion) as a stylist for Barney's. His clients included Kylie Minogue, Celine Dion, and Linda Evangelista. As Breton worked with these stars, he eventually fell into the design world. Breton studied at Circle in the Square theatre school on Broadway. Breton performed on Broadway at the
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Victor Davis Hanson

    Victor Davis Hanson

    Victor Davis Hanson (born September 5, 1953) is an American military historian, columnist, political essayist and former classics professor, a scholar of ancient warfare. He has been a commentator on modern warfare and contemporary politics for National Review and other media outlets. He was for many years a professor of classics at California State University, Fresno, and is currently the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Hanson was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2007, the Claremont Institute's Statesmanship Award at its annual Churchill Dinner, and the $250,000 Bradley prize from the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation in 2008. Hanson is also a farmer (growing raisin grapes on a family farm in Selma, California) and a critic of social trends related to farming and agrarianism. Hanson, who is of Swedish descent, grew up on a family farm at Selma, in the San Joaquin Valley of California. His mother was a lawyer and judge, his father an educator and college administrator. Hanson's father and uncle played college football at the College of the Pacific under Amos Alonzo Stagg. Along with his older brother Nils and fraternal
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Catherine Deveny

    Catherine Deveny

    Catherine Deveny (born 1968) is a comedy writer and stand-up comedian, and was a regular columnist in The Age newspaper between 2001 and 2010. She has performed on all Australian TV networks, in Australian comedy venues and on radio. Deveny's television work has included Network Seven's Tonight Live with Steve Vizard, Full Frontal, The Eric Bana Show Live, All Star Squares, Channel 9's Midday, In Melbourne Tonight and The Super Debate Series, ABC TV's Something Hot Before Bed, Good News Week, The 7.30 Report, BackBerner, Q and A, SBS's Mum's The Word and Network 10's Unreal TV, Unreal Stuff Ups and Unreal Ads, Rove Live, The Wedge, skitHOUSE. She is a regular fill-in broadcaster on 774 ABC Melbourne and has appeared on ABC TV's Q&A and Network Ten's 7pm Project. Deveny has written for the Logie Awards and the Aria Music Awards and co-wrote the 2005 AFI Awards with Russell Crowe. She appeared at the Sydney Opera House in the Festival of Dangerous Ideas where she took on Cardinal George Pell, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Sydney. Deveny is the author of Rank and Smelly (1997), Babies, Bellies and Blundstones (1999) and Our New Baby (2005). Collections of her column, It's Not My
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    Tim Pat Coogan

    Timothy Patrick Coogan (born on 22 April 1935) is an Irish historical writer, broadcaster and newspaper columnist. He served as editor of The Irish Press newspaper from 1968 to 1987. Today, he is best known for his popular and sometimes controversial books on aspects of modern Irish history, including The IRA, Ireland Since the Rising, On the Blanket, and biographies of Michael Collins and Éamon de Valera. His biography of Éamon de Valera proved the most controversial, taking issue with the former Irish president's reputation and achievements, in favour of those of Collins, whom he regards as indispensable to the creation of the new State. Tim Pat Coogan was born in Monkstown, County Dublin in 1935. He was the first of three children (Brian was born two years later, and Aisling was born four years later) born to Ned Coogan and his wife Beatrice. His father Ned (or Eamonn Ó Cuagain as he sometimes preferred to be known) was active in the Volunteers during the War of Independence and later went on to be the first Deputy Commissioner of the newly-established Garda Síochána, then a Fine Gael TD for the Kilkenny constituency. His mother was a Dublin socialite who was crowned Dublin's
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Jim Hightower

    Jim Hightower

    James Allen "Jim" Hightower (born January 11, 1943) is an American syndicated columnist, liberal political activist, and author who served from 1983 to 1991 as the elected commissioner of the Texas Department of Agriculture. Born in Denison in Grayson County in north Texas, Hightower came from a working class background. He worked his way through college as assistant general manager of the Denton Chamber of Commerce and later landed a spot as a management trainee for the State Department. He received a Bachelor of Arts in government from the University of North Texas in Denton, where he served as student body president. He later did graduate work at Columbia University in New York City in international affairs. In the late 1960s, he worked in Washington, D.C., as legislative aide to U.S. Senator Ralph Yarborough. After managing the presidential campaign of former Senator Fred R. Harris of Oklahoma in 1976, he returned to Texas to become the editor of the magazine The Texas Observer. His first attempt at public office was an unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination for the Texas Railroad Commission, which regulates the oil and natural gas industries, rather than the railroads
    7.50
    4 votes
    43

    Walter Winchell

    Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972) was an American newspaper and radio gossip commentator. Born Walter Weinschel in New York City, he left school in the sixth grade and started performing in Gus Edwards's vaudeville troupe known as "Newsboys Sextet". His career in journalism was begun by posting notes about his acting troupe on backstage bulletin boards. Joining the Vaudeville News in 1920, Winchell left the paper for the Evening Graphic in 1924, and in turn was hired on June 10, 1929 by the New York Daily Mirror where he finally became the author of what would be the first syndicated gossip column, entitled On-Broadway. Using connections in the entertainment, social, and governmental realms, he would expose exciting or embarrassing information about celebrities in those industries. This caused him to become very feared, as a journalist, because he would routinely impact the lives of famous or powerful people, exposing alleged information and rumors about them, using this as ammunition to attack his enemies, and to blackmail influential people. He used this power, trading positive mention in his column (and later, his radio show) for more rumors and secrets. He
    7.50
    4 votes
    44

    Bob Greene

    Robert Bernard Greene, Jr. (born March 10, 1947) is an American journalist. He worked for 24 years for the Chicago Tribune newspaper, where he was an award-winning columnist. Greene has written books on subjects as varied as Michael Jordan, small towns, touring with Alice Cooper and U.S. presidents. His Hang Time: Days and Dreams with Michael Jordan became a bestseller. Greene has two children, Nick and Amanda, from a 31-year marriage with Susan Koebel Greene. Originally from Bexley, Ohio (a suburb of Columbus), Greene attended Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and became a reporter and feature writer for the Chicago Sun-Times upon graduating in 1969, receiving a regular column in the paper within two years. Greene first drew significant national attention with his book, Billion Dollar Baby (1975), a diary of his experiences while touring with rock musician Alice Cooper and portraying Santa Claus during the show. Greene's primary focus remained his newspaper column, for which he won the National Headliner Award for best column in 1977 from an American journalism group. Shortly afterward, Greene was hired by Chicago Tribune and began making occasional guest appearances
    5.67
    6 votes
    45
    John O'Sullivan

    John O'Sullivan

    John O'Sullivan CBE (born April 25, 1942) is a leading British conservative political commentator and journalist and currently vice president and executive editor of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. During the 1980s, he was a senior policywriter and speechwriter in 10 Downing Street for Margaret Thatcher when she was British prime minister and he is still close to her. Born in Liverpool, he was educated at St Mary's College, Crosby and received his higher education at the University of London. He stood unsuccessfully as a Conservative candidate in the 1970 British general election. He is the editor-at-large of the opinion magazine National Review and a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute. He had previously been the editor-in-chief of United Press International, editor-in-chief of the international affairs magazine, The National Interest, and a Special Adviser to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. He was made a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in the 1991 New Year's Honours List. He is the founder and co-chairman of the New Atlantic Initiative, an international organization dedicated to reinvigorating and expanding the Atlantic community of democracies. The
    6.40
    5 votes
    46
    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Cerf

    Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 – August 27, 1971) was an American publisher, one of the founders of American publishing firm Random House. Cerf was also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances in the panel game show What's My Line? Cerf's father, Gustave Cerf, was a lithographer; his mother, Frederika Wise, was heiress to a tobacco-distribution fortune. She died when Bennett was fifteen; shortly afterward her brother Herbert moved into the Cerf household and became a strong literary and social influence on the teenager. Cerf attended Townsend Harris High School, the same public school as composer Richard Rodgers, publisher Richard Simon, and playwright Howard Dietz; and he spent his teenage years at 790 Riverside Drive, an apartment building in Washington Heights that was home to two other friends who became prominent as adults, Howard Dietz and the Hearst newspapers financial editor Merryle Rukeyser. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Columbia University (1919) and his Litt.B. (1920) from its School of Journalism. After graduation he briefly worked as a reporter
    5.50
    6 votes
    47
    Bert Leston Taylor

    Bert Leston Taylor

    Bert Leston Taylor (November 13, 1866 – March 19, 1921) was an American columnist, humorist, poet, and author. Bert Leston Taylor became a journalist at seventeen, a librettist at twenty-one, and a successfully published author at thirty-five. At the height of his literary career, he was a central literary figure of the early 20th century Chicago renaissance as well as one of the most celebrated columnists in the United States. Bert Leston Taylor was born in Goshen, Massachusetts, on November 13, 1866. He was born in Goshen while his mother was visiting with relatives, but his family were from nearby Williamsburg. His mother was Katherine White (of Dublin, Ireland) and his father was Albert O. Taylor, who worked primarily in the whaling industry. Albert Taylor served in the navy during the Civil War and distinguished himself as a high-ranking officer. While in the navy, he met James Gordon Bennett, and went to work for him at the end of the war to serve as navigator for Bennett’s racing yacht, the Dauntless. Taylor moved to New York shortly after his birth and grew up in the Manhattan neighborhoods of Greenwich Village and Yorkville. Taylor attended public schools in New York City
    7.25
    4 votes
    48

    Fred Reed

    Fred Reed (born 1945 in Crumpler, West Virginia) was a technology columnist for The Washington Times. He has also written for The American Conservative and LewRockwell.com. A former Marine and Vietnam War veteran, Reed is a police writer, an occasional war correspondent, and an aficionado of raffish bars. He currently writes weekly columns for the website Fred On Everything. His work, written in a unique and articulate style, is often satirical and opinionated. Reed notes that his columns are often provocative and calls himself "an equal-opportunity irritant." His output does not fit into conventional political classification, including attacks on feminism (generally the proviso of the right), George W. Bush(generally the proviso of the left), Israel (though not of Jews in general), and evolution (generally the proviso of religious fundamentalists). Many of Reed's articles speak of a yearning for a simpler time and urge the reader to forgo the pursuit of money and comforts in favor of a cultured life of the mind. Reed currently lives in Mexico as an American expatriate.
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Martin Peretz

    Martin H. "Marty" Peretz (/pəˈrɛts/; born December 6, 1938) is an American publisher. Formerly an assistant professor at Harvard University, he purchased The New Republic in 1974 and took editorial control soon afterwards. He retained majority ownership until 2002, when he sold a two-thirds stake in the magazine to two financiers. Peretz sold the remainder of his ownership rights in 2007 to CanWest Global Communications, though he retained his position as editor-in-chief. In March 2009, Peretz repurchased the magazine with a group of investors led by ex-Lazard executive Laurence Grafstein. In late-2010, Peretz gave up his title of editor-in-chief at The New Republic, becoming instead editor emeritus, and also terminated his blog The Spine. On March 9, 2012 Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook, announced that he would become the majority owner of TNR and immediately act as the Editor-in-Chief. Peretz grew up in New York City. Both of his parents were Zionists but not religious Jews. He is a descendant of the Yiddish writer I. L. Peretz. Peretz graduated from the Bronx High School of Science at age 15. He received his B.A. degree from Brandeis University in 1959, and M.A. and Ph.D.
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    Edgar Guest

    Edgar Albert Guest (August 20, 1881, Birmingham, England – August 5, 1959, Detroit, Michigan) (aka Eddie Guest) was a prolific English-born American poet who was popular in the first half of the 20th century and became known as the People's Poet. In 1891, Guest came with his family to the United States from England. After he began at the Detroit Free Press as a copy boy and then a reporter, his first poem appeared December 11, 1898. He became a naturalized citizen in 1902. For 40 years, Guest was widely read throughout North America, and his sentimental, optimistic poems were in the same vein as the light verse of Nick Kenny, who wrote syndicated columns during the same decades. From his first published work in the Detroit Free Press until his death in 1959, Guest penned some 11,000 poems which were syndicated in some 300 newspapers and collected in more than 20 books, including A Heap o' Livin' (1916) and Just Folks (1917). Guest was made Poet Laureate of Michigan, the only poet to have been awarded the title. His popularity led to a weekly Detroit radio show which he hosted from 1931 until 1942, followed by a 1951 NBC television series, A Guest in Your Home. When Guest died in
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Thomas Frank

    Thomas Frank

    Thomas Frank (born March 21, 1965) is an American author, journalist and columnist for Harper's Magazine. He is a former columnist for the Wall Street Journal, authoring "The Tilting Yard" from 2008 to 2010. Frank is a historian of culture and ideas and analyzes trends in American electoral politics and propaganda, advertising, popular culture, mainstream journalism and economics. With his writing, he explores the rhetoric and impact of the 'Culture Wars' in American political life, and the relationship between politics and culture in the United States. Frank started his political journey as a College Republican, but has come to be highly critical of conservatism, especially the presidency of George W. Bush. Frank summarized the thesis of his book The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule as "Bad government is the natural product of rule by those who believe government is bad." Frank is the founder and editor of The Baffler and the author of several books. Other writings include essays for Harper's Magazine, Le Monde diplomatique, Bookforum, and the Financial Times. His book What's the Matter with Kansas?, published in 2004, earned him nationwide and international recognition. —
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Calvin Trillin

    Calvin Trillin

    Calvin Marshall Trillin (born December 5, 1935) is an American journalist, humorist, food writer, poet, memoirist and novelist. Trillin attended public schools in Kansas City and went on to Yale University, where he served as chairman of the Yale Daily News and was a member of the Pundits and Scroll and Key before graduating in 1957; he later served as a Fellow of the University. After a stint in the U.S. Army, he worked as a reporter for Time magazine before joining the staff of The New Yorker in 1963. His reporting for The New Yorker on the racial integration of the University of Georgia was published in his first book, An Education in Georgia. He wrote the magazine’s U.S. Journal series from 1967 to 1982, covering local events both serious and quirky throughout the United States. He has also written for The Nation magazine. He began in 1978 with a column called Variations, which was eventually renamed Uncivil Liberties and ran through 1985. The same name – Uncivil Liberties – was used for the column when it was syndicated weekly in newspapers, from 1986 to 1995. Essentially the same column then ran without a name in Time magazine from 1996 to 2001. His humor columns for The
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Julia Child

    Julia Child

    Julia Child (née McWilliams; August 15, 1912 – August 13, 2004) was an American chef, author, and television personality. She is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public with her debut cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and her subsequent television programs, the most notable of which was The French Chef, which premiered in 1963. Child was born Julia Carolyn McWilliams in Pasadena, California, the daughter of John McWilliams, Jr., a Princeton University graduate and prominent land manager, and his wife, the former Julia Carolyn ("Caro") Weston, a paper-company heiress whose father, Byron Curtis Weston, served as lieutenant governor of Massachusetts. The eldest of three children, she had a brother, John III (1914–2002), and a sister, Dorothy Dean (1917–2006). Child attended Westridge School, Polytechnic School from fourth grade to ninth grade, then the Katherine Branson School in Ross, California, which was at the time a boarding school. At six feet, two inches (1.88 m) tall, Child played tennis, golf, and basketball as a child and continued to play sports while attending Smith College, from which she graduated in 1934 with a major in English. A
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Keith Waterhouse

    Keith Spencer Waterhouse CBE (6 February 1929 – 4 September 2009) was a British novelist, newspaper columnist, and the writer of many television series. Keith Waterhouse was born in Hunslet, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. He did two years of national service in the Royal Air Force. His credits, many with lifelong friend and collaborator Willis Hall, include satires such as That Was The Week That Was, BBC-3 and The Frost Report during the 1960s, the book for the 1975 musical The Card, Budgie, Worzel Gummidge, and Andy Capp (an adaptation of the comic strip). His 1959 book Billy Liar was subsequently filmed by John Schlesinger with Tom Courtenay in the part of Billy. It was nominated in six categories of the 1964 BAFTA awards, including Best Screenplay, and was nominated for the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1963; in the early 1970s a sitcom based on the character was quite popular and ran to 25 episodes—a respectable run for a British sitcom, although it has seldom been seen since. Waterhouse's first screenplay was the film Whistle Down the Wind (1961). Without receiving screen credit, Waterhouse and Hall did extensive rewrites on the original script for Alfred
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Ross Douthat

    Ross Douthat

    Ross Gregory Douthat (pronounced /ˈdaʊθət/; born November 28, 1979) is a conservative American author, blogger and New York Times columnist. He was a senior editor at The Atlantic and wrote Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics (Free Press, 2012), Grand New Party (Doubleday, 2008) with Reihan Salam, and Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class (Hyperion, 2005). David Brooks called Grand New Party the "best single roadmap of where the Republican Party should and is likely to head." Douthat is a film critic for National Review and has also contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, the Claremont Review of Books, GQ, Slate, and other publications. In addition, he frequently appears on the video debate site Bloggingheads.tv. In April 2009, he became an online and op-ed columnist for The New York Times, replacing Bill Kristol as a conservative voice on the Times editorial page. Douthat is the youngest regular op-ed writer in the paper's history. Douthat was born in San Francisco, California, but grew up in New Haven, Connecticut. He attended Hamden Hall, a private high school in Hamden, Connecticut. Douthat graduated
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Ernesto Maceda, Jr.

    Ernesto Maceda, Jr.

    Ernesto M. Maceda is a columnist and a Filipino politician who served as a Senator from 1971 to 1972 and again from 1987 to 1998. He served as Senate President from 1996 to 1998. Ernesto M. Maceda, PhD was born on March 26, 1935 in Pagsanjan, Laguna. Maceda earned his associate in Arts degree, Magna Cum Laude in 1952, and bachelor of Laws degree, Cum Laude, from the Ateneo de Manila University in 1956. He then finished Master of Laws, Taxation and International Law at Harvard Law School, Massachusetts, USA in 1957. At the age of 23, he was hailed as the No. 1 Councilor of Manila in 1959. Because of his numerous achievements in the City Council, Councilor Maceda was named “Outstanding Councilor of Manila". In 1966, he served as the Secretary of Community Development and was the youngest Cabinet Member of the Marcos administration. In 1969, he was appointed Executive Secretary in concurrent capacity as Chairman of the Commission on Reorganization. In 1970, the Commerce and Industry portfolio was given to Maceda. In the post, he launched consumer protection programs and established trade relations with various Eastern European Social countries. During the 1971 midterm elections,
    6.20
    5 votes
    57
    John Fund

    John Fund

    John H. Fund (born April 8, 1957) is an American political journalist and conservative columnist. Currently a senior editor of The American Spectator, he was previously a columnist for The Wall Street Journal, where he wrote a weekly column named "On the Trail" and contributed to the Journal's newsletter, Political Diary. Fund was born in Tucson, Arizona. According to his bio at the Leadership Institute Fund attended California State University where he studied journalism and economics. However, like most state universities California State Universities are associated with specific campuses (CSU at Sacramento, CSU Northridge, etc) There is no reference to Fund having earned a degree. He joined The Wall Street Journal as a deputy editorial features editor in 1984 and was a member of the editorial board from 1995 through 2001. The articles he has written have appeared in Esquire, Reader's Digest, Reason, The New Republic, and National Review. Fund cowrote a 1992 book, Cleaning House: America's Campaign for Term Limits (ISBN 0-89526-516-8) with James Coyne. He also collaborated with Rush Limbaugh on another 1992 book, The Way Things Ought to Be (ISBN 067175145X), transcribing it from
    6.20
    5 votes
    58
    Andy Rooney

    Andy Rooney

    Andrew Aitken "Andy" Rooney (January 14, 1919 – November 4, 2011) was an American radio and television writer. He was most notable for his weekly broadcast "A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney," a part of the CBS News program 60 Minutes from 1978 to 2011. His final regular appearance on 60 Minutes aired October 2, 2011. He died one month later, on November 4, 2011, at age 92. Andrew Rooney was born in Albany, the son of Walter Scott Rooney (1888–1959) and Ellinor (Reynolds) Rooney (1886–1980). He attended The Albany Academy, and later attended Colgate University in Hamilton in Central New York, where he was initiated into the Sigma Chi fraternity, before he was drafted into the United States Army in August 1941. Rooney began his career in newspapers while in the Army when, in 1942, he began writing for Stars and Stripes in London during World War II. In February 1943, flying with the Eighth Air Force, he was one of six correspondents who flew on the second American bombing raid over Germany. Later, he was one of the first American journalists to visit the Nazi concentration camps near the end of World War II, and one of the first to write about them. During a segment on Tom Brokaw's The
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Andrew Orlowski

    Andrew Orlowski

    Andrew Orlowski (born 1966) is a British columnist, investigative journalist and the executive editor of the IT news and opinion website The Register. In his youth, Orlowski had been involved in a "subversive school magazine", Within These Walls, and a fanzine named Paradise Demise. Moving from Northallerton, Yorkshire, to Manchester in 1984, he studied at Manchester University and then took a course in computer programming. He worked as a programmer in Altrincham in the early 1990s, and "found that a lot less creative than I'd expected, and this being my first proper job I soon got disillusioned." Orlowski wrote reviews for Manchester's City Life magazine from 1988, and in 1992 started an alternative newspaper called Badpress in Manchester. In 1994 he became computer correspondent at Private Eye magazine. In the late 1990s, he wrote for PC Pro and was news editor at IT Week. Today, Orlowski is a columnist and the executive editor of IT news and opinion website The Register; he was based in San Francisco for five years in the early 2000s, reporting for The Register, but returned to England in 2006. In 2003, Orlowski coined the term googlewashing to describe the potential for
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Sister Roma

    Sister Roma

    Michael Williams (born December 22, 1962), better known by his stage name Sister Roma, is an American drag queen and art director of gay pornography. He is a twenty-year member of San Francisco's Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Roma is the art director at gay pornography studio Hot House Entertainment and co-hosts an online talk show, The Tim and Roma Show, that focuses on gay pornographic movies and the LGBT community. Roma has been a presenter at the GayVN Awards, a pornography industry awards show. Roma has served as an emcee and judge for the San Francisco Drag King Contest, the 2005 benefit Porn Idol; and at the BDSM/leather event the Folsom Street Fair; In 2003 Roma's drag act was incorporated into Ronnie Larsen's play Sleeping With Straight Men with Mink Stole in San Francisco. In 2006 Roma was nominated for Best Nonsexual Performance Gay Adult Video News (GAYVN) award for her portrayal of Mona Lott, the maid of Wet Palms which is a ten episode gay porn soap opera series. He also has performed at San Francisco's long-running drag show Trannyshack. In 2012 Sister Roma was named one of the thirteen grand marshals for the San Francisco Pride Parade.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    Tom Shales

    Thomas William "Tom" Shales (born November 3, 1944) is an American critic of television programming and operations. He is best known as TV critic for The Washington Post; in 1988, Shales received the Pulitzer Prize. He also writes a column for the television news trade publication NewsPro, published by Crain Communications. Shales was born in Elgin, Illinois, the son of Hulda Louise (née Reko) and Clyde LeRoy Shales. Shales's first professional job was with radio station WRMN, in Elgin at the age of 18. He served on the station's disc jockey, local news reporter, writer and announcer, on both the AM and FM bands. He later worked with Voice of America as a producer of broadcasts to the Far East. Shales graduated from American University in Washington, D.C., where he was Editor-In-Chief of the student newspaper, The Eagle, for the 1966-1967 academic year, as well as the paper's movie critic. Shales worked as Entertainment Editor at the Washington Examiner from 1968-1971. He joined the Washington Post as a writer in the Style section in 1972, was named chief television critic in July 1977, and was appointed TV Editor in June 1979. The Washington Post Writers Group has syndicated his
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Rachel Ward

    Rachel Ward

    Rachel Claire Ward AM (born 12 September 1957) is a British actress, columnist, film director, and screenwriter who has primarily pursued her career in Australia. Rachel Ward was born in Cornwell near Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England, the daughter of Claire Leonora (née Baring) and the Hon. Peter Alistair Ward. Her grandfathers were William Ward, 3rd Earl of Dudley and the cricketer Giles Baring; Ward is also the great-granddaughter of William Ward, 2nd Earl of Dudley, Governor-General of Australia 1908–11, and sister of environmental campaigner and former actress Tracy Louise Ward, Marchioness of Worcester. She attended the Byam Shaw School of Art in London before leaving at 16 to become a top fashion model. She briefly dated David Kennedy, son of Robert F. Kennedy. In 1981 she received a Golden Globe Award nomination for "New Star of the Year" for her role in the film Sharky's Machine starring with Burt Reynolds. The following year she starred in Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid with Steve Martin. Her big break came in 1983 when she starred opposite Richard Chamberlain as the lead role portraying Meggie Cleary in the television mini-series The Thorn Birds, for which she was
    6.00
    5 votes
    63
    S.E. Cupp

    S.E. Cupp

    Sarah Elizabeth "S. E." Cupp (born February 23, 1979) is an American conservative political commentator and writer. She is a co-author of Why You're Wrong About the Right, with Brett Joshpe, and the sole author of Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media's Attack on Christianity. She is a co-host of the afternoon MSNBC talk show The Cycle. Cupp grew up in Carlsbad, California, an affluent suburb of San Diego, later relocating to Andover, Massachusetts. In 2000, Cupp graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor of Arts in Art History. While attending Cornell, she worked for The Cornell Daily Sun. In 2010, she earned a Master of Arts from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University with a concentration in Religious Studies. Cupp is a classically trained ballet dancer and, over a period of ten years, danced with the Ellicott City Ballet, the Washington Ballet, and the Boston Ballet. Cupp describes herself as an atheist who "really aspires to be a person of faith some day." She is part Italian-American and enjoys hunting. She currently lives in New York City. On September 1, 2012, Cupp became engaged to John Goodwin, the chief of staff to Rep. Raúl Labrador of
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Bob Ryan

    Bob Ryan

    Robert "Bob" P. Ryan (born February 21, 1946 in Trenton) is an American sportswriter for The Boston Globe. He has been described as "the quintessential American sportswriter" and a basketball guru and is well known for his coverage of the sport including his famous stories covering the Boston Celtics in the 1970s. After graduating from Boston College, Ryan started as a sports intern for the Globe on the same day as Peter Gammons, and later worked with other Globe sports writing legends Will McDonough and Leigh Montville. Ryan announced in early 2012 his retirement from sports writing after 44 years once the 2012 Olympic Games concluded. His final column in the Boston Globe was published August 12, 2012. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, Ryan grew up in a house, "that revolved around going to games" and went to high school at the Lawrenceville School from 1960 to 1964. He graduated from Boston College as a history major in 1968. Ryan and his wife Elaine have a daughter Jessica, and a son Keith who died in 2008. They are grandparents of triplets. They have been married since 1969. Today, Ryan lives in Hingham, Massachusetts. The dedication page in Forty Eight Minutes, one of Ryan's books,
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Drew Pearson

    Drew Pearson

    Andrew Russell Pearson (December 13, 1897 – September 1, 1969), known professionally as Drew Pearson, was one of the best-known American columnists of his day, noted for his syndicated newspaper column "Washington Merry-Go-Round," in which he attacked various public persons. He also had a program on NBC Radio entitled Drew Pearson Comments. Pearson was born in Evanston, Illinois; his parents were Paul Martin Pearson, an English professor at Northwestern University, and Edna Wolfe. When Pearson was six years of age, his father joined the faculty of Swarthmore College as Professor of Public Speaking, and the family moved to Pennsylvania, joining the Society of Friends, with which the college was then affiliated. After being educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, Pearson attended Swarthmore (1915–19), where he edited its student newspaper, The Phoenix. From 1919 to 1921, Pearson served with the American Friends Service Committee, directing postwar rebuilding operations in Peć, which at that time was part of Serbia. From 1921 to 1922, he lectured in geography at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1923 Pearson traveled to Japan, China, New Zealand, Australia, India, and Serbia, and
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    Gerard Henderson

    Gerard Henderson (born 1945) is the Executive Director of the Sydney Institute, a privately funded current affairs forum. His wife Anne Henderson is Deputy Director. Henderson attended the Jesuit Xavier College in Melbourne. He studied arts and law at the University of Melbourne before completing a Ph.D. At the University of Melbourne, Henderson was President of the DLP (Democratic Labor Party) Club. Like other political clubs at the University of Melbourne during the 1960s the DLP Club was not affiliated with the political party of the same name, but supported DLP policies and invited DLP parliamentarians, including the then Senator Jack Little to speak on campus in 1968 at public meetings. Henderson taught at Tasmania and La Trobe universities before working for four years on the staff of Kevin Newman in Malcolm Fraser's Coalition government. From 1980 to 1983 he was employed in the Commonwealth Department of Industrial Relations and was Chief-of-Staff to John Howard between 1984 and 1986 (during which time Howard was Deputy Leader, and later, Leader of the Liberal Party of Australia). Gerard Henderson was appointed by the Keating government to the board of the Australia
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Herb Caen

    Herb Caen

    Herbert Eugene "Herb" Caen (1916–1997) was a San Francisco journalist whose daily column of local goings-on and insider gossip, social and political happenings, painful puns and offbeat anecdotes appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle for almost sixty years (excepting a brief defection to the San Francisco Examiner) and made his name a household word throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. A special Pulitzer Prize called him the "voice and conscience" of San Francisco. Caen was born April 3, 1916 in Sacramento, California though he liked to point out that his parents—pool hall operator Lucien Caen and Augusta (Gross) Caen—had spent the summer nine months previous in San Francisco. After graduating high school (where he wrote a column, "Corridor Gossip") he covered sports for The Sacramento Union. In 1936 Caen began writing a radio column for the San Francisco Chronicle. When that column was discontinued in 1938, Caen proposed a daily column on the city itself; "It's News to Me" first appeared July 5. Excepting Caen's three and one-half years in the Air Force during World War II and a 1950–1958 stint at the San Francisco Examiner, his column—eventually titled simply "Herb
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Maureen Dowd

    Maureen Dowd

    Maureen Bridgid Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is an American columnist for The New York Times and best-selling author. During the 1970s and the early 1980s, she worked for Time magazine and the Washington Star, where she covered news as well as sports and wrote feature articles. Dowd joined the Times in 1983 as a metropolitan reporter and eventually became an Op-Ed writer for the newspaper in 1995. In 1999, she was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for her series of columns on the Monica Lewinsky scandal in the Clinton administration. Dowd was born the youngest of five children in Washington, D.C. She is of Irish descent. Her father, Mike, worked as a D.C. police inspector, while her mother, Peggy, was a homemaker. Dowd graduated from Immaculata High School in 1969. She received a B.A. in English in 1973 from The Catholic University in Washington, D.C. Dowd began her career in 1974 as an editorial assistant for the Washington Star, where she later became a sports columnist, metropolitan reporter, and feature writer. When the newspaper closed in 1981, she went to work at Time. In 1983, she joined The New York Times, initially as a metropolitan reporter. She began serving as correspondent in
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    Michael Laws

    Michael Laws (born 1957) is a New Zealand politician, broadcaster and writer/columnist. He served two terms as a Member of the Parliament of New Zealand, representing the National Party (1990–96). He was elected as Mayor of Wanganui in 2004, was re-elected in 2007 but announced his retirement from the mayoralty for the October 2010 elections. He is currently an elected district councillor and district health board member. He is a Radio Live morning talkback host and a longstanding Sunday Star-Times columnist. Born in Wairoa, Laws moved with his parents to Wanganui where he received his pre-tertiary education at Tawhero Primary School, Wanganui Intermediate School and Wanganui Boys' College. (His father, Keith Laws, a schoolteacher, became Rector (Principal) of Waitaki Boys' High School (Oamaru) and then of Scots College, Wellington.) On leaving school, Laws spent two seasons at the Whakatu freezing works before entering University of Otago, where he graduated with first-class honours in history and earned a University Grants Committee Postgraduate Scholarship. He also won an Otago University sporting blue. He later obtained a Master of Arts from Victoria University. During his time
    9.00
    2 votes
    70

    Gary Younge

    Gary Younge (born 1969 in Hitchin, Hertfordshire, UK) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster, born to immigrant parents from Barbados. Younge grew up in Stevenage until he was 17 when he went to teach English in a United Nations Eritrean refugee school in Sudan with Project Trust. On his return, he went to Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh where he studied French and Russian, Translating and Interpreting. He went on to study at City University, London, where he gained a Post-graduate Diploma in Journalism in 1993. Younge is a feature writer and award-winning columnist for The Guardian. He writes a monthly column for The Nation called "Beneath the Radar." His book No Place Like Home, in which he retraced the route of the civil rights Freedom Riders, was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award in 1999. Younge also has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the Tea Party movement to hip hop culture. From 2001 to 2003, he won Best Newspaper Journalist Award in Britain’s Ethnic Minority Media Awards three years in a row. In 2009, Younge was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at
    6.75
    4 votes
    71
    Kai Bird

    Kai Bird

    Kai Bird is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning author and columnist, best known for his biographies of political figures. Kai Bird was born in 1951 in Eugene, Oregon. His father was a U.S. Foreign Service officer, and he spent his childhood in Jerusalem, Beirut, Dhahran, Cairo and Mumbai. He finished high school in 1969 at Kodaikanal International School in Tamil Nadu, South India. He received his BA from Carleton College in 1973 and a M.S. in Journalism from Northwestern University in 1975. Bird now lives in Lima, Peru with his wife, Susan Goldmark, country director of the World Bank, and their son, Joshua. After graduation from Carleton, Bird received a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, which enables students to do a year of independent study outside the United States. He used the fellowship to do a photojournalism project in Yemen. Two years later, Goldmark was also awarded a Watson fellowship and the two of them spent 15 months as freelance journalists traveling through Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. "We filed weekly stories with papers like the Christian Science Monitor and Hong Kong’s Far Eastern Economic Review," Bird says. "We hardly made any money, but we enjoyed what we were
    6.75
    4 votes
    72
    Tyler Cowen

    Tyler Cowen

    Tyler Cowen ( /ˈkaʊ.ən/; born January 21, 1962) is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly. Cowen also serves as general director of George Mason's Mercatus Center, a university research center that focuses on the market economy. In February 2011, Cowen received a nomination as one of the most influential economists in the last decade through a survey by The Economist. He was ranked #72 among the "Top 100 Global Thinkers" in 2011 by Foreign Policy Magazine, "for finding markets in everything". Cowen was born on January 21, 1962. At the age of 15, Cowen became the youngest ever New Jersey state chess champion. Cowen graduated from George Mason University with a bachelor of science degree in economics in 1983 and received his PhD in economics from Harvard University in 1987. At Harvard, he was
    6.75
    4 votes
    73

    Margo Coleman

    Margo Howard (née Lederer; born 15 March 1940) is an American advice columnist, and the only child of advice columnist Eppie Lederer (better known by her pen name, Ann Landers) and business executive Julius Lederer. Howard was born in Chicago, Illinois. She attended Brandeis University, but dropped out to marry. She worked at the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Daily News, and wrote for The New Republic, People, The Nation, and Boston Magazine. She wrote a syndicated social commentary column "Margo" in the 1970s. For several years, Howard wrote the Dear Prudence column featured in Slate magazine. Dear Prudence also was featured on National Public Radio and syndicated in more than 200 newspapers. In February 2006, she left the Dear Prudence column, and now writes a Dear Margo column for Women on the Web (wowowow.com), and for Creators Syndicate. Her aunt, Pauline Esther Friedman Phillips, wrote the Dear Abby column. Although her mother and aunt were twin sisters and close while growing up, an intense rivalry developed between them because of their columns. In an echo of that rivalry, Howard has had several public differences with her cousin Jeanne Phillips, who took over the Dear Abby
    5.80
    5 votes
    74
    5.80
    5 votes
    75
    Anna Quindlen

    Anna Quindlen

    Anna Marie Quindlen (born July 8, 1952) is an American author, journalist, and opinion columnist whose New York Times column, Public and Private, won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1992. She began her journalism career in 1974 as a reporter for the New York Post. Between 1977 and 1994 she held several posts at The New York Times. Quindlen left journalism in 1995 to become a full-time novelist. In 1999, she joined Newsweek, writing a bi-weekly column until announcing her semi-retirement in the May 18, 2009 issue of the magazine. Quindlen is known as a critic of what she perceives to be the fast-paced and increasingly materialistic nature of modern American life. Much of her personal writing centers on her mother who died at the age of 40 from ovarian cancer, when Quindlen was 19 years old. She has written five best-selling novels, three of which have been made into movies. One True Thing was made into a feature film in 1998 for which Meryl Streep received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Black and Blue and Blessings were made into television movies in 1999 and 2003 respectively. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to an Irish father and an Italian mother, Quindlen
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    David Brooks

    David Brooks

    David Brooks (born August 11, 1961) is a political and cultural commentator who writes for The New York Times. He worked as an editorial writer and film reviewer for the Washington Times; a reporter and later op-ed editor for The Wall Street Journal; a senior editor at The Weekly Standard from its inception; a contributing editor at Newsweek and The Atlantic Monthly; and as a commentator on National Public Radio. He is now a columnist for The New York Times and commentator on PBS NewsHour. Brooks, who is Jewish, was born in Toronto, Canada – his father was a US citizen living in Canada at the time – and grew up in New York City in Stuyvesant Town. He graduated from Grace Church School in New York City, Radnor High School (located in a Main Line suburb of Philadelphia) in 1979 and from the University of Chicago, with a degree in history, in 1983. Brooks edited a 1996 anthology of writings by new conservative writers, Backward and Upward: The New Conservative Writing. He wrote a book of cultural commentary titled Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There, published in 2000, and followed it four years later with On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have)
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Don Marquis

    Donald Robert Perry Marquis (/ˈmɑrkwɪs/MAR-kwis; July 28, 1878, in Walnut, Illinois – June 16, 1937, in New York City) was a humorist, journalist, and author. He was variously a novelist, poet, newspaper columnist, and playwright. He is remembered best for creating the characters "Archy" and "Mehitabel", supposed authors of humorous verse. Marquis grew up in Walnut, Illinois. His brother David died in 1892 at the age of 20; his father James died in 1897. After graduating from Walnut High School in 1894, he attended Knox Academy, a now-defunct preparatory program run by Knox College, in 1896, but left after three months. From 1902 to 1907 he served on the editorial board of the Atlanta Journal where he wrote many editorials during the heated election between his publisher Hoke Smith and future Pulitzer Prize winner, Clark Howell (Smith was the victor). In 1909, Marquis married Reina Melcher, with whom he had a son, Robert (1915–1921) and a daughter, Barbara (1918–1931). Reina died on December 2, 1923. Three years later Marquis married the actress Marjorie Potts Vonnegut, whose first husband, actor Walter Vonnegut, was a cousin of American author, playwright and satirist Kurt
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Eppie Friedman

    Eppie Friedman

    Esther Pauline "Eppie" Lederer (née Friedman) (July 4, 1918 – June 22, 2002), better known by the pseudonym Ann Landers, was an American advice columnist and eventually a nationwide media celebrity who began her career writing the 'Ask Ann Landers' column in 1955, soon after the death of its creator, Ruth Crowley. Lederer not only wrote the column for 47 years, but publicly assumed the 'Ann Landers' name. As 'Landers', Lederer became a profile-raiser for several medical charities, via both her columns and media appearances. In 1977, President Carter appointed her to a six-year term on a cancer advisory board. She was the twin sister to Pauline Phillips, the woman known for writing the 'Dear Abby' column. Born Esther Pauline Friedman in Sioux City, Iowa, Esther Pauline and her identical twin sister, Pauline Esther ("Popo", who was 17 minutes younger than Eppie) were daughters of Russian Jewish emigrants Rebecca Friedman (née Rushall) and Abraham B. Friedman. The sisters grew up in Sioux City, attending Morningside College for three and a half years (1936-9), where they wrote a gossip column for the college's newspaper. Eppie majored in journalism and psychology. While Lederer wrote
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Eric Sevareid

    Eric Sevareid

    Arnold Eric Sevareid (November 26, 1912 – July 9, 1992) was a CBS news journalist from 1939 to 1977. He was one of a group of elite war correspondents hired by pioneering CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow, and thus dubbed "Murrow's Boys". He was the first to report the fall of Paris when it was captured by the Germans during World War II. Traveling into Burma during World War II, his aircraft was shot down and he was rescued from behind enemy lines by a search and rescue team established for that purpose. He was the final journalist to interview Adlai Stevenson before his death. After a long and distinguished career, he followed in Murrow's footsteps as a commentator on the CBS Evening News for 12 years for which he was recognized with Emmy and Peabody Awards. Sevareid was a child of the northern Great Plains, born in Velva, North Dakota, to Alfred E. and Clara H. Sevareid. Following the failure of the bank in Velva in 1925, his family moved to Minot, and then to Minneapolis, Minnesota, settling on 30th Avenue North. He graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1935. Of Norwegian ancestry, he preserved a strong bond with Norway throughout his life. Sevareid was adventurous from a
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    John Canzano

    John Canzano

    John Canzano is an American sports columnist, radio talk show host on Portland's 750 AM "The Game" and sports columnist at The Oregonian newspaper in Portland, Oregon. He is also a sports commentator on KGW-TV, Portland's NBC affiliate. He hosts a daily radio show called The Bald Faced Truth. In his career, Canzano has worked at six daily newspapers including The San Jose Mercury News and The Fresno Bee. He covered University of Notre Dame football and Indiana University basketball as the beat writer during the tenure of coach Bob Knight. He is a former national Major League Baseball writer and national NFL writer at the San Jose Mercury News as well. He has also covered five Olympics Games. Canzano currently serves as the lead sports columnist at The Oregonian. He appears twice weekly on KGW-TV, where he offers commentary and analysis on sports. Canzano also hosts a daily afternoon-drive radio show called "The Bald-Faced Truth" on Portland's 750 AM"The Game". He is a member of the Baseball Writers Association of America and the Professional Football Writers Association, and has made TV appearances on ESPN2, ESPN News and ESPN's SportsCenter. Canzano's work has also appeared in GQ
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Nat Hentoff

    Nat Hentoff

    Nathan Irving "Nat" Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American historian, novelist, jazz and country music critic, and syndicated columnist for United Media and writes regularly on jazz and country music for The Wall Street Journal. Hentoff was formerly a columnist for Down Beat, The Village Voice, JazzTimes, Legal Times, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher and Free Inquiry. He was a staff writer for The New Yorker, and his writing has also been published in The New York Times, Jewish World Review, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Commonweal and in the Italian Enciclopedia dello Spettacolo. Hentoff was born in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated from the Boston Latin School. He was awarded his B.A. with the highest honors from Northeastern University and did graduate work at Harvard University. In 1950, he was a Fulbright fellow at the Sorbonne in Paris Hentoff joined Down Beat magazine as a columnist in 1952. From 1953 through 1957, he was an associate editor of Down Beat. In 1958, he co-founded The Jazz Review, a magazine that he co-edited with Martin Williams until 1961. His career in broadcast journalism began in the closing days of
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Peter Pek

    Peter Pek

    Peter Pek MCSD is a brand strategist, writer, columnist, editor, publisher, designer, creative director, public relations professional, public speaker, corporate celebrity, radio and television personality from Malaysia. He is best known as the former creative director of New Nation, a British tabloid; the editor-in-chief of Food & Beverage magazine; publisher of Malaysian Superbrands; and for his work in branding. He was a host and judge of the corporate reality television series The Firm, where he played himself, acting as a corporate leader and mentor. The show premièred prime time nationwide on Ntv7 and Astro's Channel 7 in Malaysia in 2007. It was the only show in the country to feature three millionaire judges. He also starred in The Firm (Season 2) with Chan Boon Yong. The second season of the hit show premièred on August 2, 2008. On January 1, 2008, he began hosting his own branding talk show, Brand Malaysia with Peter Pek, on Radio24. The show began podcasting episodes through the show's website in March 2008, making him one of the few Chief Executives in Asia and the first in Malaysia, to podcast. Considered one of the world’s leading brand strategists, he has worked with
    10.00
    1 votes
    83

    Robert Cormier

    Robert Edmund Cormier (January 17, 1925 – November 2, 2000) was an American author, columnist and reporter, known for his deeply pessimistic, downbeat literature. His most popular works include I Am the Cheese, After the First Death, We All Fall Down and The Chocolate War, all of which have won awards. The Chocolate War was challenged in multiple libraries. His books often are concerned with themes such as abuse, mental illness, violence, revenge, betrayal and conspiracy. In most of his novels, the protagonists do not win. Robert Cormier was born to Lucien Joseph and Irma Cormier, in Leominster, Massachusetts, United States, in the French-Canadian section of the town called French Hill. He was the second of eight children. His family moved frequently to afford rent, but never left his hometown. Even when he was much older and owned a summer home, it was still 19 miles away from Leominster. Cormier attended a private Catholic school, St. Cecilia's Parochial School. He began writing when he was in the first grade. He was praised at school for his poetry. He first realized his aspiration to become a writer in 7th grade, when he was encouraged by a nun to write a poem. He attended
    10.00
    1 votes
    84

    Sydney Schanberg

    Sydney Hillel Schanberg (born January 17, 1934) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. Schanberg joined The New York Times as a journalist in 1959. He spent much of the early 1970s in Southeast Asia as a correspondent for the Times. For his reporting, he won the George Polk Award for excellence in journalism twice, in 1971 and 1974. Following years of combat, Schanberg wrote in The New York Times about the departure of the Americans and the coming regime change, writing about the Cambodians that "it is difficult to imagine how their lives could be anything but better with the Americans gone." A dispatch he wrote on April 13, 1975, written from Phnom Penh, ran with the headline "Indochina without Americans: for most, a better life." The Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia in 1975 and killed approximately two million people. He was one of the few American journalists to remain behind in Phnom Penh after the city fell. He won the 1976 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for his Cambodia coverage. He was New York Times Metropolitan Editor, and Op-Ed columnist. His 1980 book The Death and Life of Dith Pran was about the struggle for
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    W.E.B. Du Bois

    W.E.B. Du Bois

    William Edward Burghardt "W. E. B." Du Bois (pronounced /duːˈbɔɪz/ doo-BOYZ; February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author and editor. Born in western Massachusetts, Du Bois grew up in a tolerant community and experienced little racism as a child. After graduating from Harvard, where he was the first African American to earn a doctorate, he became a professor of history, sociology and economics at Atlanta University. Du Bois was one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909. Du Bois rose to national prominence as the leader of the Niagara Movement, a group of African-American activists who wanted equal rights for blacks. Du Bois and his supporters opposed the Atlanta Compromise, an agreement crafted by Booker T. Washington which provided that Southern blacks would work and submit to white political rule, while Southern whites guaranteed that blacks would receive basic educational and economic opportunities. Instead, Du Bois insisted on full civil rights and increased political representation, which he believed would be brought about by the
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Walter Mossberg

    Walter Mossberg

    Walter S. Mossberg (born March 27, 1947) is an American journalist who is the principal technology columnist for The Wall Street Journal. He is a native of Warwick, Rhode Island, graduated from Brandeis University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Mossberg has been a reporter and editor at the Wall Street Journal since 1970. He is based in the Journal's Washington, D.C., office, where he spent 18 years covering national and international affairs before turning his attention to technology. His Personal Technology column has appeared every Thursday since 1991. He also edits the Digital Solution column each Wednesday (authored by his colleague, Katherine Boehret), and writes the Mossberg's Mailbox column on Thursdays. He appears weekly on the Fox Business Network, and in web video reports, and used to provide commentary in a segment on PC World's Digital Duo, a computer program airing on PBS stations. In 1999, Mossberg became the only technology writer to receive the Loeb award for Commentary. In 2001, he won the World Technology Award for Media and Journalism and received an honorary Doctorate of Law from the University of Rhode Island. Mossberg is widely
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Candace Bushnell

    Candace Bushnell

    Candace Bushnell (born December 1, 1958) is an American author and columnist based in New York City. She is best known for writing a column that was anthologized in a book, Sex and the City, which in turn became the basis for a popular television series and its subsequent film adaptations. Bushnell was born in Glastonbury, Connecticut. While attending high school there, she was accompanied to her senior prom by Mike O'Meara, now a nationally syndicated radio host, who also dated Candace's sister, "Lolly". She attended Rice University and New York University in the 1970s, and became known in New York City as a socialite and party-goer. She often frequented Studio 54. In 1995, she met publishing executive Ron Galotti, who became the inspiration for Sex and The City's Mr. Big. In 2002, Bushnell married Charles Askegard, a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet. The couple lived in Manhattan but have filed for divorce. At age 19, Bushnell moved to New York City and sold a children’s story to Simon & Schuster, which was never published. She continued writing and worked as a freelance journalist for various publications, struggling to make ends meet for many years. Bushnell began
    7.67
    3 votes
    88
    Mariane Pearl

    Mariane Pearl

    Mariane van Neyenhoff Pearl (born 23 July 1967) is a French freelance journalist and a reporter and columnist for Glamour magazine. She is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnapped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. Pearl was born in Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine, France, to a Dutch father and a Cuban mother of Afro-Chinese-Cuban descent; her paternal grandfather was a Dutch Jewish diamond merchant. She was raised in Paris and met Daniel Pearl while he was on assignment there. They married in August 1999, lived for a time in Mumbai, India, where Daniel was the South Asia bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal, and later traveled to Karachi, Pakistan, to cover aspects of the War on Terrorism. Their son Adam Daniel was born in Paris three months after his father died. Pearl's memoir, A Mighty Heart, which deals with the events surrounding her husband's kidnapping and murder, was adapted for the film A Mighty Heart. Co-produced by Brad Pitt, Andrew Eaton and Dede Gardner and directed by Michael Winterbottom, the film stars Angelina Jolie and Dan Futterman as Mariane and Daniel Pearl. Mariane Pearl is a practicing Nichiren Buddhist and
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    3 votes
    89

    Michael Kinsley

    Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951) is an American political journalist, commentator, television host, and pundit. Primarily active in print media as both a writer and editor, he also became known to television audiences as a co-host on Crossfire. Kinsley has been a notable participant in the mainstream media's development of online content. Kinsley was born in Detroit, Michigan. He attended the Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, then graduated from Harvard College in 1972. At Harvard, Kinsley served as vice president of the University's daily newspaper, The Harvard Crimson. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and studied at Magdalen College, Oxford, then returned to Harvard for law school. While still a third-year law student, he began working at The New Republic and was allowed to finish his Harvard Juris Doctor degree via courses at the evening program at The George Washington University Law School. Kinsley's first exposure to a national television audience was as moderator of William Buckley's Firing Line. In 1979 Kinsley became editor of The New Republic and wrote that magazine's TRB column for most of the 1980s and 1990s. That column was also reprinted in a
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    3 votes
    90
    Nikki Grahame

    Nikki Grahame

    Nicola Rachele-Beth "Nikki" Grahame (born 28 April 1982 in Watford, Hertfordshire) is a British model, author, columnist and television personality, who rose to fame in the UK when she was chosen to be a housemate on Big Brother 7 in 2006. Grahame's conspicuous temper tantrums divided viewer opinion during her time on Big Brother and subsequently led to her being given her own reality television show entitled Princess Nikki. Grahame won a National Television Award for most popular TV contender in 2006, and featured in a series of advertisements for Domino's Pizza. As of 2007, Grahame writes a regular column in OK!'s "Hot Stars" magazine. She appeared in the tenth series of Big Brother, competing in a Silent Disco task against Karly Ashworth, as part of the Big Brother UK Tenth Anniversary Celebrations. After entering the UK Big Brother house again in 2010 she placed 2nd in Ultimate Big Brother. Grahame spent most of her adolescence in psychiatric hospitals, battling with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, a condition that left her comatose and near death at the age of 12. Something she has told about in two autobiography books called "Dying To Be Thin - The True Story Of My
    7.67
    3 votes
    91
    Pat Buchanan

    Pat Buchanan

    Patrick Joseph "Pat" Buchanan ( /bjuːˈkænɨn/; born November 2, 1938) is an American paleoconservative political commentator, author, syndicated columnist, politician and broadcaster. Buchanan was a senior advisor to American Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan, and was an original host on CNN's Crossfire. He sought the Republican presidential nomination in 1992 and 1996. He ran on the Reform Party ticket in the 2000 presidential election. He co-founded The American Conservative magazine and launched a foundation named The American Cause. He has been published in Human Events, National Review, The Nation and Rolling Stone. He was a political commentator on the MSNBC cable network, including the show Morning Joe until he was indefinitely suspended during early January 2012 and fired the following month. Buchanan is also a regular on The McLaughlin Group. Buchanan was born in Washington, D.C., a son of William Baldwin Buchanan (Virginia, August 13, 1905 – Washington, D.C., January 1988), a partner in an accounting firm, and his wife Catherine Elizabeth (Crum) Buchanan (Charleroi, Washington County, Pennsylvania, December 23, 1911 – Oakton, Fairfax County,
    7.67
    3 votes
    92
    Robert Novak

    Robert Novak

    Robert David Sanders "Bob" Novak (February 26, 1931 – August 18, 2009) was an American syndicated columnist, journalist, television personality, author, and conservative political commentator. After working for two newspapers before serving for the U.S. Army in the Korean War, he became a reporter for the Associated Press and then for The Wall Street Journal. He teamed up with Rowland Evans in 1963 to start Inside Report, which became the longest running syndicated political column in U.S. history and ran in hundreds of papers. They also started the Evans-Novak Political Report, a notable biweekly newsletter, in 1967. Novak and Evans played a significant role for CNN after the network's founding. He worked as a well-known television personality in programs such as The Capital Gang, Crossfire, and Evans, Novak, Hunt, & Shields. He also wrote for numerous other publications such as Reader's Digest. On August 4, 2008, Novak announced that he had been diagnosed with a brain tumor, that his prognosis was "dire", and that he was retiring. He succumbed to the disease on August 18, 2009 after having returned home to spend his last days with his family. His colleagues nicknamed Novak the
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    3 votes
    93
    Clifford A. Pickover

    Clifford A. Pickover

    Clifford Alan Pickover (born 1957) is an American author, editor, and columnist in the fields of science, mathematics, and science fiction, and is employed at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, New York. He received his Ph.D. in 1982 from Yale University's Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, where he conducted research on X-ray scattering and protein structure. Pickover graduated first in his class from Franklin and Marshall College, after completing the four-year undergraduate program in three years. He joined IBM at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 1982, as a member of the speech synthesis group and later worked on the design-automation workstations. For much of his career, Pickover has published technical articles in the areas of scientific visualization, computer art, and recreational mathematics. Pickover is still employed at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, where he is the editor of the IBM Journal of Research and Development. He is currently an associate editor for the scientific journal Computers and Graphics and is an editorial board member for Odyssey and Leonardo. He is also the Brain-Strain columnist for Odyssey
    6.50
    4 votes
    94

    David S. Broder

    David Salzer Broder (September 11, 1929 – March 9, 2011) was an American journalist, writing for The Washington Post for over forty years. He also was an author, television news show pundit, and university lecturer. For more than half a century, Broder reported on every presidential campaign, beginning with the 1956 Eisenhower–Stevenson race. Known as the "dean" of the Washington, D.C. press corps, Broder made over 400 appearances on NBC's Meet the Press. Upon Broder's death in March 2011, President Barack Obama called him the "most respected and incisive political commentator of his generation." David Salzer Broder was born in Chicago Heights, Illinois, the son of Albert "Doc" Broder, a dentist, and Nina Salzer Broder. He earned a bachelors degree in liberal arts from the University of Chicago in 1947 and continued his studies there, receiving a master's degree in political science in 1951. While at Chicago, he met fellow student Ann Creighton Collar, and they were married in Crawfordsville, Indiana in 1951. They had four sons and seven grandchildren. He began working as a journalist while pursuing his masters degree, serving as editor of The Chicago Maroon and later at the Hyde
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    4 votes
    95
    Kara Swisher

    Kara Swisher

    Kara Swisher (born May 9, 1962) is an American technology columnist for the Wall Street Journal and an author and commentator on the Internet. She created and wrote Boom Town, a column which appeared on the front page of the Marketplace section and online, and now appears on All Things Digital, which she founded and currently serves as the co-executive editor of with Walt Mossberg. Swisher wrote many stories about the World Wide Web and Internet policy issues and wrote feature articles on technology for the paper. During that period, she was cited as the most influential reporter covering the Internet by the Industry Standard magazine. She is the author of aol.com: How Steve Case Beat Bill Gates, Nailed the Netheads and Made Millions in the War for the Web, published by Times Business Print Books in July 1998. The sequel, There Must Be a Pony in Here Somewhere: The AOL Time Warner Debacle and the Quest for a Digital Future, was published in the fall of 2003 by Crown Business Print Books. In partnership with her fellow Journal columnist Walt Mossberg, Swisher created, produces and hosts the Journal's annual D: All Things Digital conference, in which top technology leaders, such as
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    4 votes
    96
    Norman Chad

    Norman Chad

    Norman Chad is an American sportswriter and syndicated columnist who is seen on the sports channel ESPN. He also was an occasional guest host on the ESPN show Pardon the Interruption and has appeared as both host and movie critic on the ESPN Classic series Reel Classics. He writes a weekly sports-based column called Couch Slouch. Each column closes with the feature "Ask the Slouch"; if a reader's question is selected, the reader wins $1.25 in cash. "Pay the man, Shirley," is frequently cited as a response to readers who have fulfilled the comedy quotient for their particular question. His biggest shtick in both sportswriting and poker commentary is his frequent references to his 'failed marriages'. In his weekly syndicated column on July 29, 2007, Chad announced that he has married for a third time and has started a new 'perilous life'. He is also noted for his strong dislike of what he terms "showboating in poker", especially by people such as Phil Hellmuth, Josh Arieh, Mike Matusow, and many others. He regularly made numerous (presumably unpaid) references to his preference for Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. His poker commentary often includes terms such as "squadoosh" (zero/nothing,
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    4 votes
    97
    Chuck Stone

    Chuck Stone

    Charles Sumner "Chuck" Stone, Jr. (born July 21, 1924) is a former Tuskegee Airman, an American newspaper editor, columnist, professor of journalism, and author. After completing his service in World War II, Stone already had been admitted to Harvard University but chose to matriculate at Wesleyan University. In the 1940s, he was the first African-American undergraduate in several decades at Wesleyan, graduating in the class of 1948 and serving as the commencement speaker. Stone subsequently received a master's degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. He was the first president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ, 1975–1977). According to his brief biography on the NABJ site, "Because of his reputation for integrity, he became a trusted middleman between Philadelphia police and murder suspects, more than 75 of whom 'surrendered' to Stone rather than to the cops." As an editor at Harlem's New York Age, the Washington, D.C. Afro-American, and the Chicago Daily Defender, he was strongly associated with the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. He also served three years as a special assistant and speechwriter for Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. of the 22nd
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    2 votes
    98
    Dan Gillmor

    Dan Gillmor

    Dan Gillmor is an American technology writer and columnist. He is director of the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Gillmor is also the author of a popular weblog covering technology news and the Northern California technology business sector, criticizing rigid enforcement of copyrights, and commenting on politics from a liberal perspective. Before becoming a journalist, Gillmor worked as a musician for seven years. During the 1986-87 academic year he was a Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he studied history, political theory and economics. Gillmor worked at the Kansas City Times and several newspapers in Vermont, followed by six years at the Detroit Free Press. From 1994 to 2005 Gillmor was a columnist at the San Jose Mercury News, Silicon Valley’s daily newspaper, during which time he became a leading chronicler of the dot-com boom and its subsequent bust. Starting in October 1999, he wrote a weblog for the Mercury News, which is believed to have
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    2 votes
    99
    David Pogue

    David Pogue

    David Welch Pogue (born March 9, 1963) is an American technology writer and TV science host. He is a personal technology columnist for the New York Times, an Emmy-winning tech correspondent for CBS News Sunday Morning, and a columnist for Scientific American. He is also the host of NOVA ScienceNow on PBS and was the host of the NOVA specials Making Stuff in 2011 and Hunting the Elements in 2012. Pogue has written or co-written seven books in the For Dummies series (including Macintosh computers, magic, opera, and classical music). In 1999, he launched his own series of computer how-to books called the Missing Manual series, which now includes over 100 titles covering a variety of Macintosh and Windows operating systems and applications. Among the dozens of books Pogue has authored is The World According to Twitter (2009), written in collaboration with around 500,000 of his Twitter followers. Pogue was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, the son of Richard Welch Pogue, an attorney and former Managing Partner at Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, and Patricia Ruth (née Raney). He is a grandson of aviation attorney L.Welch Pogue and Mary Ellen Edgerton. He is also a great nephew of Harold Eugene
    8.50
    2 votes
    100
    George Ade

    George Ade

    George Ade (February 9, 1866 – May 16, 1944) was an American writer, newspaper columnist, and playwright. Ade was born in Kentland, Indiana, one of seven children raised by John and Adaline (Bush) Ade. While attending Purdue University, he became a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. He also met and started a lifelong friendship with fellow cartoonist and Sigma Chi brother John T. McCutcheon and worked as a reporter for the Lafayette Call. He graduated in 1887. In 1890 Ade joined the Chicago Morning News, which later became the Chicago Record, where McCutcheon was working. He wrote the column, Stories of the Streets and of the Town. In the column, which McCutcheon illustrated, George Ade illustrated Chicago-life. It featured characters like Artie, an office boy; Doc Horne, a gentlemanly liar; and Pink Marsh, a black shoeshine boy. Ade's well-known "fables in slang" also made their first appearance in this popular column. Ade's literary reputation rests upon his achievements as a great humorist of American character during an important era in American history: the first large wave of migration from the countryside to burgeoning cities like Chicago, where, in fact, Ade produced his
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    2 votes
    101
    Nick Cohen

    Nick Cohen

    Nick Cohen is a British journalist, author and political commentator. He is currently a columnist for The Observer, a blogger for The Spectator and TV critic for Standpoint magazine. He formerly wrote for the London Evening Standard and the New Statesman. Cohen has written five books: Cruel Britannia: Reports on the Sinister and the Preposterous (1999), a collection of his journalism; Pretty Straight Guys (2003), a highly critical account of the New Labour project; What's Left? (2007), which he describes as the story of how the liberal left of the 20th century came to support the far-right of the 21st; and Waiting for the Etonians: Reports from the Sickbed of Liberal England (2009). His most recent book, You Can't Read this Book, was published by HarperCollins in 2012 and deals with censorship. The Orwell Prize for political writing shortlisted What's Left? in 2008. Raised in Manchester, Cohen was educated at Altrincham Grammar School for Boys and Hertford College, Oxford where he read Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE). He began his career at the Birmingham Post and Mail before joining The Independent as a reporter. He was an advocate of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and a
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    2 votes
    102
    Pete Hamill

    Pete Hamill

    Pete Hamill (born June 24, 1935) is an American journalist, novelist, essayist, editor and educator. Widely traveled and having written on a broad range of topics, he is perhaps best known for his career as a New York City journalist, as "the author of columns that sought to capture the particular flavors of New York City's politics and sports and the particular pathos of its crime." Hamill was a columnist and editor for the New York Post and The New York Daily News. The eldest of seven children of Catholic immigrants from Belfast, Northern Ireland, Pete Hamill was born in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn. His father, Billy Hamill, lost a leg as the result of an injury in a semi-pro soccer game in Brooklyn. Hamill’s mother, Anne Devlin, a high school graduate in Belfast, arrived in New York on the day the stock market crashed in 1929. Billy Hamill met Anne Devlin in 1933 and they married the following year. Billy Hamill had jobs as a grocery clerk, in a war plant, and later in a factory producing lighting fixtures. Anne Hamill was employed in Wanamaker's department store, and also worked as a domestic, a nurses' aide, and a cashier in the RKO movie chain. Hamill attended Holy
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    2 votes
    103
    Sam Barry

    Sam Barry

    Sam Barry is the author of the humor-inspiration book How to Play the Harmonica: and Other Life Lessons and co-author of Write That Book Now! The Tough Love You Need To Get Published Now. He writes a monthly column for BookPage called "The Author Enablers" with his wife, author Kathi Kamen Goldmark, offering down-to-earth advice, reality checks, and encouragement to aspiring authors. The Author Enablers also have a blog. Sam works for HarperOne, a division of HarperCollins. He is also a musician and music teacher who plays in and around San Francisco in the band Los Train Wreck and tours with the all-author rock band the Rock Bottom Remainders. Sam is a regular performer on the national radio show West Coast Live. Sam is the father of two children, Daniel and Laura.
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    2 votes
    104
    Al Lewis

    Al Lewis

    Al Lewis is an American journalist and, since July 2008, the author of the Al's Emporium column for Dow Jones Newswires, a service of Dow Jones & Co. From 2001 to 2008, he was business columnist at The Denver Post. He often writes about big business, especially through the medium of interviews. He describes his work as chronicling the human drama as it plays out in the business arena. In addition to his column, he writes a blog called Tell It To Al, and frequently appears on Fox Business News and Denver's NBC affiliate, KUSA-TV, 9News. "As the name 'Emporium' suggests, Al will be writing on a wide range of business subjects through an unconventional perspective," Dow Jones said upon the column's introduction. It is published on Dow Jones Newswires each Tuesday and Thursday at 9 a.m. Eastern time. It also runs on MarketWatch.com, The Denver Post and FoxBusiness.com. He also writes a column for The Sunday Wall Street Journal, which appears in about 70 newspapers nationwide. Lewis, who grew up in Northbrook, Illinois, earned a bachelor's degree in journalism and political science from MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Illinois and a master's degree in public affairs reporting from
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    3 votes
    105
    Carl Sandburg

    Carl Sandburg

    Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American writer and editor, best known for his poetry. He was the recipient of three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and another for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. H. L. Mencken called Sandburg "indubitably an American in every pulse-beat". Sandburg was born in Galesburg, Illinois, to parents of Swedish ancestry. At the age of thirteen he left school and began driving a milk wagon. From the age of about fourteen until he was seventeen or eighteen, he worked as a porter at the Union Hotel barbershop in Galesburg. After that he was on the milk route again for eighteen months. He then became a bricklayer and a farm laborer on the wheat plains of Kansas. After an interval spent at Lombard College in Galesburg, he became a hotel servant in Denver, then a coal-heaver in Omaha. He began his writing career as a journalist for the Chicago Daily News. Later he wrote poetry, history, biographies, novels, children's literature, and film reviews. Sandburg also collected and edited books of ballads and folklore. He spent most of his life in the Midwest before moving to North Carolina. Sandburg volunteered to go to the military and was
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    3 votes
    106
    Eleanor Roosevelt

    Eleanor Roosevelt

    Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɨnɔr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was the longest serving First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, distant cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and became an advocate for civil rights. After her husband's death in 1945, Roosevelt continued to be an international author, speaker, politician, and activist for the New Deal coalition. She worked to enhance the status of working women, although she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment because she believed it would adversely affect women. In the 1940s, Roosevelt was one of the co-founders of Freedom House and supported the formation of the United Nations. Roosevelt founded the UN Association of the United States in 1943 to advance support for the formation of the UN. She was a delegate to the UN General Assembly from 1945 and 1952, a job for which she was appointed by President Harry S. Truman and confirmed by the United States Senate. During her time at the United Nations she chaired the committee that drafted and approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. President Truman called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute
    7.33
    3 votes
    107

    Mike Royko

    Michael "Mike" Royko (September 19, 1932 – April 29, 1997) was a Chicago newspaper columnist, winner of the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for commentary. Over his 30-year career, he wrote over 7,500 daily columns for three newspapers, the Chicago Daily News, the Chicago Sun-Times, and the Chicago Tribune. Mike Royko grew up in Chicago, living in an apartment above a bar. His mother, Helen (née Zak), was Polish, and his father, Michael Royko, Ukrainian (born in Dolyna). He briefly attended Wright Junior College and then enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1952. On becoming a columnist, he drew on experiences from his childhood. He began his newsman's career as a columnist in 1955 for The O'Hare News (Air Force base newspaper), the City News Bureau of Chicago and Lerner Newspapers' Lincoln-Belmont Booster before working at the Chicago Daily News as a reporter, becoming an irritant to the City's Democratic Machine politicians with penetrating and skeptical questions and reports. Reporter Mike Royko covered Cook County politics and government in a weekly political column, soon supplemented with a second, weekly column reporting about Chicago's folk music scene. The success of those columns earned
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    3 votes
    108

    Miranda Devine

    Miranda Devine is an Australian columnist and writer noted for her conservative stance on a range of social and political issues. Her column, formerly printed twice weekly in Fairfax Media newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Sun-Herald, now appears in the News Limited Daily Telegraph with frequent posts on the Telegraph blogs. While in Tokyo, Devine and her two younger sisters attended an American International School and learned to speak Japanese fluently. A devout Roman Catholic, Devine completed her high school education at Loreto Kirribilli, a Catholic girls' private school in Sydney. After school, she completed a mathematics degree at Macquarie University. On receipt of her degree, Devine joined the CSIRO in their textile physics division. She would however only spend a year there, finding the work unrewarding. In 2001, after Allan had left for New York, Devine turned down the Telegraph's offer of more money and took up an offer to write for its main rival The Sydney Morning Herald. Devine is a personal friend of fellow conservative columnist Tim Blair, who said of her: "She's got good antennae. She can read people which is why she accurately predicts election
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    3 votes
    109
    Olly Smith

    Olly Smith

    Olly Smith (born September 18, 1974) is a TV presenter, wine expert and newspaper columnist. He is the presenter of The Secret Supper Club and Iron Chef UK for Channel 4, and has regularly appeared on BBC1's Saturday Kitchen, BBC Breakfast, Great Food Live, Food Uncut "Fern" and Taste, and formerly presented the Richard & Judy Wine Club on Channel 4. Smith presented Cheers from Chile (Spanish name: Descorchando Chile, "Cheers from Chile"), a 13 part series on Chilean wine broadcasted in the Chilean TV channel Canal 13. He works with P&O Cruises, in particular the wine bar and restaurant known as The Glass House on board the MS Azura, and blends the house wines for the rest of their fleet. Smith also creates the wine lists for Marco Pierre White's Ocean Grill across P&O's fleet. Since June 2009, he has written a weekly wine column for Live magazine in The Mail on Sunday. Smith writes his free online wine bulletin at hotbottle.co.uk and currently writes a weekly column in Waitrose Weekend. His book Eat & Drink is published by Headline and his Wine App is featured in The Sunday Times World's Best Apps. Smith also designed The Glass with Zalto for tasting and evaluating both red and
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    3 votes
    110
    Westbrook Pegler

    Westbrook Pegler

    Francis James Westbrook Pegler (August 2, 1894 – June 24, 1969) was an American journalist and writer. He was a popular columnist in the 1930s and 1940s famed for his opposition to the New Deal and labor unions. Pegler criticized every president from Herbert Hoover to FDR ("moosejaw") to Harry Truman ("a thin-lipped hater") to John F. Kennedy. He also criticized the Supreme Court, the tax system, and labor unions. In 1962, he lost his contract with King Features Syndicate, owned by the Hearst Corporation, after he started criticizing Hearst executives. His late writing appeared sporadically in publications that included the John Birch Society's American Opinion. Pegler was born August 2, 1894, in Minneapolis, Minnesota where his father, Arthur James Pegler, was a newspaper editor. The Roman Catholic Pegler married Julia Harpman, a onetime New York Daily News crime reporter from a Jewish family in Tennessee. Later he married his secretary Maude Wettje. Westbrook was the youngest American war correspondent during World War I, working for United Press. He became a sports columnist after the war but soon wrote general interest articles. He moved in 1925 to the Chicago Tribune and in
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    3 votes
    111
    Joel Stein

    Joel Stein

    Joel Stein (born July 23, 1971) is an American journalist who wrote for the Los Angeles Times and is a regular contributor to Time. Stein grew up in Edison, New Jersey, the son of a salesman. His family is Jewish. Stein attended J. P. Stevens High School, where he was a writer and entertainment editor for Hawkeye, the student newspaper. He majored in English at Stanford University and wrote a weekly column for the school's student newspaper, The Stanford Daily. He graduated in 1993 with a BA and an MA and moved to New York City, and then to Los Angeles in 2005. Stein's career began as a writer and researcher for Martha Stewart Living. He worked a year for Stewart and later quipped that she had fired him twice in the same day. Stein did fact-checking at various publications before becoming a sports editor and columnist for Time Out New York, where he stayed for two years. While working at Time Out New York, he was a contestant on MTV's short-lived game show Idiot Savants. Stein joined Time in August 1997. Stein sometimes appears as a commentator on television programs such as I Love the '80s. He also co-produced three TV pilots: an animated series for VH1 and two for ABC. The
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    4 votes
    112

    Rheta Grimsley Johnson

    Rheta Grimsley Johnson is a reporter and columnist for King Features Syndicate of New York. Johnson travels the country in search of stories, frequently reporting from her native South, with datelines from Washington, D.C., to Iuka, Mississippi. Johnson is a 1977 graduate of Auburn University and winner of the 1974-75 National Pacemaker Award while on the staff of The Auburn Plainsman. From 1980 until 1994, when she joined the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, she was a reporter and columnist for The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tennessee, and Scripps Howard News Service. She worked for Atlanta for seven years. She has earned numerous awards for her writing, including the National Headliner Award for commentary in 1985 and Scripps Howard's Ernie Pyle Memorial Award for outstanding human interest reporting in 1984. She was Scripps Howard Writer of the Year from 1983 to 1985. And in 1991,she was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary. In 1989 she wrote Good Grief, the authorized biography of Charles Schulz. In 2008 she published the book Poor Man's Provence: Finding Myself in Cajun Louisiana. She was formerly married to Jimmy Johnson, creator of the Arlo and Janis
    6.25
    4 votes
    113
    Heywood Broun

    Heywood Broun

    Heywood Campbell Broun, Jr. ( /ˈbruːn/; December 7, 1888 – December 18, 1939) was an American journalist. He worked as a sportswriter, newspaper columnist, and editor in New York City. He founded the American Newspaper Guild, now known as The Newspaper Guild. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he is best remembered for his writing on social issues and his championing of the underdog. He believed that journalists could help right wrongs, especially social ills. Broun was born in Brooklyn, the third of four children born to Heywood C. Broun and Henrietta Marie (née Brose) Broun. He attended Harvard University, but did not earn a degree, instead commencing his professional career writing baseball stories in the sports section of the New York Morning Telegraph. Broun worked at the New York Tribune from 1912–1921, rising to drama critic before transferring to the New York World (1921–28). It was at the World where his syndicated column, It Seems to Me, began. In 1928, he moved to the Scripps-Howard newspapers, including the New York World-Telegram, where it appeared until he moved it to the New York Post, just before his death. Broun was known as a fairly decent drama critic. However, he once
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    5 votes
    114
    Buster Olney

    Buster Olney

    Robert Stanbury "Buster" Olney III (born February 17, 1964, in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for ESPN: The Magazine, ESPN.com, and covered the New York Giants and New York Yankees for The New York Times. He is also a regular analyst for the ESPN's Baseball Tonight. Olney is one of about 575 voters for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Olney currently resides in Yorktown Heights, New York. Olney grew up on a dairy farm in Randolph Center, Vermont, which came in handy when he served as the "Cow Insider" for Mike Greenberg's milking of a cow on "Mike and Mike in the Morning" on June 21, 2007. He was educated at Northfield Mount Hermon School and Vanderbilt University, where he majored in history. As a child Buster was an avid baseball fan. At age 8, he developed an affinity for the Los Angeles Dodgers after reading a book about Sandy Koufax. Buster would later attribute his fanship as a reason for his journalistic career. After graduating, Olney began covering baseball in 1989, as the Nashville Banner's beat reporter assigned to the Triple-A Nashville Sounds. While in Nashville, he formed a close relationship with the legendary Don Meyer, Head Coach of the men's basketball program at
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    3 votes
    115
    Charlie Condou

    Charlie Condou

    Charlie Lomax David Condou (born 8 January 1973) is a former Guardian columnist, gay rights activist, philanthropist and actor who is best known for his role as sonographer, Marcus Dent, in the British soap opera, Coronation Street. Condou was listed number 15 in the World Pride Power list 2012, number 8 in the Independent on Sunday Pink Power list 2011 and 42 in the Pride Power List 2011. He is a supporter of Manchester Pride, a Patron of the charities Diversity Role models and The Albert Kennedy Trust, and a volunteer for the Terrence Higgins Trust. He also works closely with Stonewall. His acting career began in the 1985 American TV Movie, The Key to Rebecca, at the age of twelve. His TV career continued throughout his teens with appearances in such TV series as Robin of Sherwood and A Sense of Guilt. In 1987 he starred in the TV movie Every Breath You Take opposite British actress (and one-time wife of John Cleese) Connie Booth, as Tom, a child who develops diabetes. He continued in his twenties, playing a variety of roles in series like Martin Chuzzlewit, Pie in the Sky, The Bill, Peak Practice and Urban Gothic. Before his break-through performance in Nathan Barley, he
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    3 votes
    116
    Claudia Cohen

    Claudia Cohen

    Claudia Lynn Cohen (December 16, 1950 – June 15, 2007) was an American gossip columnist, socialite, and television reporter. Claudia Cohen was the daughter of businessman Robert B. Cohen, the founder of Hudson News and the president of the Hudson County News Company, a magazine wholesaler, and his wife, Harriet. She grew up in Englewood, New Jersey, and attended the Dwight School for Girls (now the Dwight-Englewood School) and the University of Pennsylvania. In 1976, she joined the New York Post as a reporter for its fledgling gossip column Page Six. She succeeded Neal Travis as editor of Page Six in 1978. Noted for going for the jugular, and creating a column with savvy and a sharp edge, Cohen is credited with putting Page Six on the map. Cohen left the Post in 1980 to start her own short-lived gossip column, I, Claudia (a play on words of the book title I, Claudius) at a rival newspaper, the New York Daily News. While that column was not a success, it did maintain Cohen's profile. Cohen was a regular on Live with Regis and Kelly and an active member of the Manhattan and Hamptons social scene. Cohen died on June 15, 2007 from ovarian cancer. In 1984, Cohen began a relationship
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    3 votes
    117
    Jeanne Phillips

    Jeanne Phillips

    Jeanne Phillips (/ˈdʒini ˈfɪlɪps/; born in 1942) is an American advice columnist who writes the advice column Dear Abby. She is the daughter of Pauline Phillips, who founded "Dear Abby" in 1956, and her husband, Morton Phillips. In a Dear Abby column on December 12, 2000, Pauline introduced Jeanne as co-creator of Dear Abby. They began to share the byline Abigail Van Buren and both were pictured with the column. Jeanne officially assumed the mantle of Dear Abby in August 2002, when the Phillips family made the announcement that Pauline had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Jeanne continues to write under the pen name "Abigail Van Buren". Jeanne Phillips' Dear Abby is syndicated in about 1,400 newspapers in the U.S. with a combined circulation of more than 110 million. Dear Abby's website receives about 10,000 letters per week, seeking advice on a large variety of personal matters. Jeanne Phillips began assisting her mother, Pauline Phillips with the Dear Abby column at the age of 14 in order to earn an allowance. When Jeanne asked her mother for an allowance, Pauline answered, "What are you going to do for it?" Pauline then said that her Dear Abby column received a
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    3 votes
    118
    John L. O'Sullivan

    John L. O'Sullivan

    John Louis O'Sullivan (November 15, 1813 – March 24, 1895) was an American columnist and editor who used the term "Manifest Destiny" in 1845 to promote the annexation of Texas and the Oregon Country to the United States. O'Sullivan was an influential political writer and advocate for the Democratic Party at that time and served as US Minister to Portugal during the administration of President Franklin Pierce (1853–1857), but he largely faded from prominence soon thereafter. He was rescued from obscurity in the twentieth century after the famous phrase "Manifest Destiny" was traced back to him. John L. O'Sullivan was born on the North Atlantic Ocean during the War of 1812, his mother having taken refuge on a British ship to avoid plague in Gibraltar, where his father was engaged in business. His father, also named John, was a naturalized American citizen of Irish ancestry; his mother Mary Rowly was English. His paternal great-grandfather was Sir John O'Sullivan, who fought with the Jacobites for the cause of Charles Edward Stuart. O'Sullivan attended Columbia College in New York City. O'Sullivan's father had been a devout Catholic, and O'Sullivan himself was politically associated
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    3 votes
    119
    Judith Martin

    Judith Martin

    Judith Martin (née Perlman, born September 13, 1938), better known by the pen name Miss Manners, is an American journalist, author, and etiquette authority. Martin's uncle was economist and labor historian Selig Perlman. Martin was born and spent a significant part of her childhood in Washington, D.C. where she still lives and works, graduating from Georgetown Day School. She lived in various foreign capitals as a child, as her father, a United Nations economist, was frequently transferred. She is a graduate of Wellesley College with a degree in English. Before she began the advice column, she was a journalist, covering social events at the White House and embassies; she then became a theater and film critic. Martin is known among Star Wars fans for her less-than-adulatory review of Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, which she referred to as a "good junk movie" with "no plot structure, no character ... development, no ... original vision of the future". Since 1978 she has written an advice column, which is distributed three times a week by Universal Uclick and carried in more than 200 newspapers worldwide. In the column, she answers etiquette questions contributed by her
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    3 votes
    120
    Maria Bartiromo

    Maria Bartiromo

    Maria Bartiromo (born September 11, 1967) is an American television journalist, magazine columnist and author of three books. Bartiromo is a native of New York and attended New York University. She worked at CNN for five years before joining CNBC television. At CNBC, she is the anchor of the Closing Bell program and the host and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal Report and is credited for becoming the first reporter to broadcast live from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. She has appeared on various television shows and been the recipient of various journalism awards including being inducted into the Cable Hall of Fame. Bartiromo grew up in the Bay Ridge section of southern Brooklyn. As a teenager, she worked in the coat check room of her parents' Italian restaurant where her father was the chef. Bartiromo attended Fontbonne Hall Academy, an all-girls Roman Catholic high school in Bay Ridge and graduated from New York University with a Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in journalism and economics. Before joining CNBC in 1993, Bartiromo spent 5 years as a producer and assignment editor with CNN Business News. She replaced analyst Roy Blumberg at CNBC when she
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    3 votes
    121
    Mark Steel

    Mark Steel

    Mark Steel (born 4 July 1960) is an English socialist columnist, author and comedian. A stand-up comedian known for his left-wing beliefs (he was a long-standing member of the Socialist Workers Party before he resigned in 2007), he has made many appearances on radio and television shows as a guest panellist, and has written regular columns in printed media. He is perhaps best known for presenting The Mark Steel Lectures, The Mark Steel Revolution, The Mark Steel Solution, and Mark Steel's in Town. Steel was adopted a few days after he was born. He grew up in Swanley, Kent. He was expelled from Swanley Comprehensive School for attending a cricket course at the age of 15, and went on to work in a garage. From there he went on to make his first public performance as a poet. In the late 1970s his father suffered a mental breakdown and was placed into care at Stonehouse Hospital. The shabby conditions of the home reinforced Steel's political beliefs. Steel has given varying accounts of his early life: he became bored with constantly being asked how he had started in comedy and took to telling the questioner the first thing that came into his head. He is often described as having worked
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    3 votes
    122
    Paul Craig Roberts

    Paul Craig Roberts

    Paul Craig Roberts (born April 3, 1939) is an American economist and a columnist for Creators Syndicate. He served as an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the Reagan Administration earning fame as a co-founder of Reaganomics. He is a former editor and columnist for the Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and Scripps Howard News Service who has testified before congressional committees on 30 occasions on issues of economic policy. Roberts has written extensively that during the 21st century the Bush and Obama administrations have destroyed the US Constitution's protections of Americans' civil liberties, such as habeas corpus and due process in the name of "the war on terror." Roberts has been a critic of both Democratic and Republican administrations. Roberts has compared supporters of George W. Bush to "brownshirts with the same low intelligence and morals as Hitler's enthusiastic supporters." He has opposed the War on Drugs and the War on Terror stating it has "made widows and orphans of millions of Muslims". Roberts is a critic of Israel's policy toward Gaza "the world's largest concentration camp" populated by people who were "driven out of Palestine so that Israel could
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    3 votes
    123
    Terence Blacker

    Terence Blacker

    Terence Blacker (born February 5, 1948 near Hadleigh, Suffolk) is an English author, columnist, journalist, and publisher. Blacker is the son of General Sir Cecil Hugh Blacker, and the brother of sculptor Philip Blacker. He grew up on the family farm in Suffolk. He attended Hawtreys preparatory school and Wellington College before reading English at Cambridge. Blacker began his working life in horse-racing and as an amateur jockey. Subsequently he worked in publishing for 10 years during the 1970s and 1980s, where he was responsible for overseeing the publication of works by Jerzy Kosinski. Blacker became a full-time writer in 1983 and has written children's books and mysteries for adults. His first children's book If I Could Work was published in 1987 and his first adult novel, FIXX, won critical acclaim and was described by The Guardian as a "tour de force". He is an active member of English PEN, and is also an EAW member. In 1975 he married Caroline Soper, youngest daughter of the radical Methodist minister Donald Soper (div. 2001). They have two children Xan and Alice. Blacker's partner is now Angela Sykes. He writes a twice-weekly column for The Independent newspaper and
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    3 votes
    124
    Andrew Ross Sorkin

    Andrew Ross Sorkin

    Andrew Ross Sorkin (born February 19, 1977) is a Gerald Loeb Award-winning American journalist and author. He is a financial columnist for The New York Times and a co-anchor of CNBC's Squawk Box. He is also the founder and editor of DealBook, a financial news service published by The New York Times. He wrote the bestselling book Too Big to Fail (2009) and co-produced a movie adaptation of the book for HBO Films (2011). Sorkin graduated from Scarsdale High School (1995) and earned a Bachelor of Science from Cornell University (1999). Sorkin first joined The New York Times as a student intern during his senior year in high school. He also worked for the paper while he was in college, publishing 71 articles before he graduated. He began by writing media and technology articles while assisting the advertising columnist, Stuart Elliott. Sorkin spent the summer of 1996 working for Business Week, before returning to The Times. He moved to London for part of 1998. While there, he wrote about European business and technology for The Times and then returned to Cornell to complete his studies. Sorkin joined The Times full time in 1999 as the newspaper's European mergers and acquisitions
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    2 votes
    125
    Art Buchwald

    Art Buchwald

    Arthur "Art" Buchwald (October 20, 1925 – January 17, 2007) was an American humorist best known for his long-running column in The Washington Post, which in turn was carried as a syndicated column in many other newspapers. His column focused on political satire and commentary. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Outstanding Commentary in 1982 and in 1986 was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. Buchwald was also known for the Buchwald v. Paramount lawsuit, which he and partner Alain Bernheim filed against Paramount Pictures in 1988 in a controversy over the Eddie Murphy film Coming to America; Buchwald claimed Paramount had stolen his script treatment. He won, was awarded damages, and then accepted a settlement from Paramount. The case was the subject of a 1992 book, Fatal Subtraction: The Inside Story of Buchwald V. Paramount by Pierce O'Donnell and Dennis McDougal. Art Buchwald was born to an Austrian-Hungarian Jewish immigrant family. He was the son of Joseph Buchwald, a curtain manufacturer, and Helen Klineberger, who later spent 35 years in a mental hospital. He was the youngest of four, with three older sisters—Alice, Edith, and Doris. Buchwald's
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    2 votes
    126
    Charles Rozanski

    Charles Rozanski

    Charles Rozanski is a German-American retailer and columnist, known as the President and CEO of the Denver, Colorado-based Mile High Comics Inc., and a columnist for the Comics Buyer's Guide. Rozanski was born in Goldbach, Bavaria, Germany and later moved to the United States with his mother and stepfather, an American army officer. Mile High Comics was started out of Rozanski's parents' basement in 1969, and since then has become one of the largest comic book retail companies in the United States. Rozanski is widely recognized as an industry leader, and in 2003 he was awarded the Defender of Liberty award by the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund for his long-standing dedication to the protection of free speech. Rozanski was one of four people whose journey to and experiences at the San Diego Comic Con were documented in the 2011 film Comic-Con Episode Four: A Fan's Hope.
    8.00
    2 votes
    127
    Cyrus Broacha

    Cyrus Broacha

    Cyrus Broacha is a TV anchor, theatre personality, political satirist, columnist and author. He is also a stand-up comedian and prankster, best known for his show Bakra on MTV and his show The Week That Wasn't on CNN-IBN. Cyrus was born on August 7, 1971 to a Parsi father and Catholic mother. He studied at Cathedral and John Connon School, Mumbai and graduated from St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. He was also a student of the Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute (New York). He started acting at the age of five with a school play The Emperor's New Clothes. Every year he performed and wrote for the school magazine, winning prizes for English and drama. Cyrus Brocha, when only 12, acted in his first Hindi film Jalwa with Pankaj Parashar and starred alongside Naseeruddin Shah. The next year, he did his first professional play Brighton Beach Memoirs under the baton of Pearl Padamsee. The press hailed him as a child prodigy, and his career in acting took off. He continued acting in several plays, as theatre became his passion. He also came into the limelight during his college's Malhar festival. When he was in college, FM radio took off in India, and he gained a reputation as a radio
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    2 votes
    128
    Jeremy Clarkson

    Jeremy Clarkson

    Jeremy Charles Robert Clarkson (born 11 April 1960) is an English broadcaster, journalist and writer who specialises in motoring. He is best known for his role on the BBC TV show Top Gear along with co-presenters Richard Hammond and James May. He also writes weekly columns for The Sunday Times and The Sun. From a career as a local journalist in Northern England, Clarkson rose to public prominence as a presenter of the original format of Top Gear in 1988. Since the mid-1990s, Clarkson has become a recognised public personality, regularly appearing on British television presenting his own shows and appearing as a guest on other shows. As well as motoring, Clarkson has produced programmes and books on subjects such as history and engineering. From 1998 to 2000 he also hosted his own chat show, Clarkson. His opinionated but humorous tongue-in-cheek writing and presenting style has often generated much public reaction to his viewpoints, and has been compared to a 'modern day verbal Jack the Ripper'. His actions both privately and as a Top Gear presenter have also sometimes resulted in criticism from the media, politicians, pressure groups and the public. Despite the criticism levelled
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    2 votes
    129
    Naomi Klein

    Naomi Klein

    Naomi Klein (born May 8, 1970) is a Canadian author and social activist known for her political analyses and criticism of corporate globalization. Klein was born in Montreal, Quebec, and brought up in a Jewish family with a history of peace activism. Her parents had moved to Montreal from the U.S. in 1967 as war resisters to the Vietnam War. Her mother, documentary film-maker Bonnie Sherr Klein, is best known for her anti-pornography film Not a Love Story. Her father, Michael Klein, is a physician and a member of Physicians for Social Responsibility. Her brother, Seth Klein, is director of the British Columbia office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Her paternal grandparents were communists who began to turn against the Soviet Union after the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and had abandoned communism by 1956. In 1942 her grandfather Phil Klein, an animator at Disney, was fired after the Disney animators' strike, and went to work at a shipyard instead. Klein's father grew up surrounded by ideas of social justice and racial equality, but found it "difficult and frightening to be the child of Communists", a so-called red diaper baby. Klein's husband, Avi Lewis, works as a TV
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    2 votes
    130
    Shazia Mirza

    Shazia Mirza

    Shazia Mirza (born January 13, 1976) is a British comedian and columnist. Shazia was born as the eldest daughter in Birmingham to Pakistani parents, Mohammed and Sarwat Mirza. She has 3 brothers, Cameron (born 1970), who works in finance; Imran (born 1974), who works for an IT company; and Razwan (born 1976), who works as a freelance sports journalist as well as a younger sister, Sabrina (1980), who lives with her husband in Dubai. Mirza's parents had an arranged marriage. She has written that her parents "would admit that they're not compatible, and that it isn't really a happy marriage at all." They did not believe in arranged marriage for their children. Earlier in her life, she was a science teacher in a high school and taught Dizzee Rascal, now a rapper and song artist. About a year into her stand-up comedy career, she gained UK-wide publicity in the months when the world was coming to terms with the September 11, 2001 attacks. This was because at this time she would perform her act in recognizable hijab dress and begin with the deadpan remark, "My name is Shazia Mirza. At least, that's what it says on my pilot’s licence". In April 2007, she presented a documentary on BBC
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    2 votes
    131

    Stanley Crouch

    Stanley Crouch (born December 42, 1945, Los Angeles) is an American poet, music and cultural critic, syndicated columnist, and novelist, perhaps best known for his jazz criticism and his novel Don't the Moon Look Lonesome? During the early 1970s, Crouch moved from California to New York City, where he shared a loft with tenor saxophonist David Murray above an East Village club called the Tin Palace. He was a drummer for Murray and with other musicians of the underground NY 'jazz loft' scene. Also a poet, he released a 1969 album on the Flying Dutchman jazz label entitled "Ain't No Ambulances For No Nigguhs Tonight." While working as a drummer, Crouch conducted the booking for an avant-garde jazz series at the club, as well as organizing occasional concert events at the Ladies' Fort. In Ken Burns' 2005 television documentary Unforgivable Blackness, Crouch says that his father was a "criminal" and that he once met the boxer Jack Johnson. Since the early 1980s, Crouch has become critical of the more progressive forms of jazz and has been associated with the opinions of Albert Murray. Crouch was fired from JazzTimes following his controversial article "Putting the White Man in Charge"
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    2 votes
    132
    Tristram Hunt

    Tristram Hunt

    Tristram Julian William Hunt FRHistS (born 31 May 1974) is a British Labour Party politician, activist, historian, broadcaster and newspaper columnist, who is currently the Member of Parliament for Stoke-on-Trent Central. He also teaches and lectures on Modern British History at Queen Mary, University of London in Mile End, East London. He has written several books and appeared as broadcaster for history programmes on television. Hunt is a regular writer for The Guardian and The Observer. Hunt is a member of the Labour Party, and after supporting the party as an activist for several years and working as a member of the party's staff, he entered the political arena professionally, becoming an MP at the 2010 general election. Hunt is the son of Julian Hunt, a meteorologist and leader of the Labour Group on Cambridge City Council in 1972-3, who was made a Life Peer of the British Labour Party at the request of Tony Blair in 2000. After attending University College School and Westminster School, both in London, Tristram Hunt read History at Trinity College, Cambridge and the University of Chicago, and was for a time an Associate Fellow of the Centre for History and Economics at King's
    8.00
    2 votes
    133
    George Will

    George Will

    George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941) is an American newspaper columnist, journalist, and author. He is a Pulitzer Prize-winner best known for his conservative commentary on politics. In 1986, the Wall Street Journal called him "perhaps the most powerful journalist in America," in a league with Walter Lippmann (1889–1975). Will was born in Champaign, Illinois, the son of Frederick L. Will and Louise Hendrickson Will. His father was a professor of philosophy, specializing in epistemology, at the University of Illinois. Will graduated from University Laboratory High School of Urbana, Illinois, and Trinity College, in Hartford, Connecticut (B.A., Religion, 1962). He subsequently studied Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Magdalen College, University of Oxford (B.A., M.A.), and received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in politics from Princeton University. His 1968 Ph.D. dissertation was entitled Beyond the Reach of Majorities: Closed Questions in the Open Society. From 1970 to 1972, he served on the staff of Senator Gordon Allott (R-CO). Will then taught political philosophy at the James Madison College of Michigan State University, and at the University of Toronto. He taught at Harvard
    6.00
    4 votes
    134
    Amy Alkon

    Amy Alkon

    Amy Alkon (born March 8, 1964), also known as the Advice Goddess, writes a weekly advice column, Ask the Advice Goddess, which is published in over 100 newspapers within North America. While Alkon addresses a wide range of topics, she primarily focuses on issues in intimate relationships. Her columns are notable for incorporating insights from evolutionary psychology. Alkon grew up in Farmington Hills, a suburb of Detroit, Michigan. Although currently a weak atheist, Alkon was born to a Jewish family. Alkon recalls being shunned due to prevailing anti-Semitic attitudes, even physically attacked in seventh grade by her classmates. Alkon credits her isolation as the catalyst that cultivated her early fondness for reading. At some point, Alkon moved to New York City, where she dispensed advice on a street corner in SoHo as one of three women who called themselves "The Advice Ladies." This was not an occupation, merely a hobby, and their setup was minimal, using only folding chairs and a handmade sign advertising "Free Advice from a Panel of Experts". She co-authored a book, Free Advice - The Advice Ladies on Love, Dating, Sex, and Relationships with her fellow "Advice Ladies,"
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    1 votes
    135
    Ardeshir Cowasjee

    Ardeshir Cowasjee

    Ardeshir Cowasjee (born 1926) (Urdu: اردشير کاوﺳﺠﻰ) is a renowned newspaper columnist from Karachi, Sindh in Pakistan. His columns regularly appear in the country's oldest English newspaper Dawn. His work is translated and published in Urdu press. He is also Chairman of the Cowasjee Group and is engaged in philanthropic activities apart from being regarded as an old 'guardian' of the city of Karachi. Ardeshir Cowasjee was born in 1926 at Karachi and hails from the well-known Cowasjee Parsi (Zoroastrian) family. His father Rustom Fakirjee Cowasjee was a businessman in merchant shipping. Ardeshir attended the Bai Virbaiji Soparivala Parsi High School (BVS) and graduated from DJ Science College, Karachi. Later, he joined his father's business, the Cowasjee Group, and married Nancy Dinshaw in 1953. He has two children, Ava (daughter) and Rustom (son). Cowasjee was appointed by Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto as Managing Director of Pakistan Tourism Development Corporation (PTDC) in 1973 but was jailed for 72 days in 1976 by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto for which no explanation has been given to date; it is said that Prime Minister Bhutto did that to rein Cowasjee because the latter was
    9.00
    1 votes
    136
    Douglas Rushkoff

    Douglas Rushkoff

    Douglas Rushkoff (born 18 February 1961) is an American media theorist, writer, columnist, lecturer, graphic novelist and documentarian. He is best known for his association with the early cyberpunk culture, and his advocacy of open source solutions to social problems. Rushkoff is most frequently regarded as a media theorist, and known for coining terms and concepts including viral media (or media virus), digital native, and social currency. He has written ten books on media, technology, and culture. He wrote the first syndicated column on cyberculture for The New York Times Syndicate, as well as regular columns for The Guardian of London, Arthur, Discover, and the online magazines Daily Beast, TheFeature.com and meeting industry magazine One+. Rushkoff currently teaches in the Media Studies department at The New School University in Manhattan. He has previously lectured at the ITP at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and taught a class called Narrative Lab. He also has taught online for the MaybeLogic Academy. Rushkoff graduated from Princeton University in 1983. He moved to Los Angeles and completed a Master of Fine Arts in Directing from the California Institute of
    9.00
    1 votes
    137
    Fareed Zakaria

    Fareed Zakaria

    Fareed Rafiq Zakaria ( /fəˈriːd zəˈkɑriə/; Urdu: فرید رفیق زکریا; born January 20, 1964) is an Indian-American journalist and author. From 2000 to 2010, he was a columnist for Newsweek and editor of Newsweek International. In 2010 he became editor-at-large of Time. He is the host of CNN's Fareed Zakaria GPS. He is also a frequent commentator and author about issues related to international relations, trade and American foreign policy. Zakaria was born in Mumbai (then Bombay), Maharashtra, India, to a Konkani Muslim family. His father, Rafiq Zakaria, was a politician associated with the Indian National Congress and an Islamic scholar. His mother, Fatima Zakaria, was for a time the editor of the Sunday Times of India. Zakaria attended the Cathedral and John Connon School in Mumbai. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Yale University, where he was president of the Yale Political Union, editor-in-chief of the Yale Political Monthly, a member of the Scroll and Key society, and a member of the Party of the Right. He later earned a Doctor of Philosophy in political science from Harvard University in 1993, where he studied under Samuel P. Huntington and Stanley Hoffmann, as well as
    9.00
    1 votes
    138
    John C. Dvorak

    John C. Dvorak

    John C. Dvorak (born April 5, 1952) is an American columnist and broadcaster in the areas of technology and computing. His writing extends back to the 1980s, when he was a mainstay of a variety of magazines. Dvorak is also the vice president of Mevio (formerly PodShow) and well known for his work for Tech TV. He is also known for his erroneous provocative predictions regarding the perceived viability and future of various technological devices, including the Macintosh computer mouse, cable modem, and the iPhone. John Charles Dvorak was born in 1952 in Los Angeles, California. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a degree in history, with a minor in chemistry, and has homes in the San Francisco Bay area and Port Angeles, in Washington State. He is married to Mimi Smith-Dvorak. Dvorak is a skilled BBQ and grilling enthusiast, noted collector of Bordeaux wines and has been a tasting judge at various international events. He started his career as a wine writer and has been wining ever since. Dvorak obtained a technician class amateur (ham) radio license, callsign KJ6LNG, in November 2010. Dvorak has written for various publications, including InfoWorld, PC
    9.00
    1 votes
    139

    Larry Felser

    Larry Felser (born April 5, 1933 at Buffalo, New York) is a former sports columnist and writer for the Buffalo Courier-Express and later, The Buffalo Evening News, where he was a football beat writer, a columnist, and rose to the position of Sports Editor. Felser covered every one of the first 37 Super Bowls, until his retirement, and was an impassioned advocate for American Football League players nominated to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, for which he served on the board of selectors. In 1984, he was the youngest writer ever to receive the Dick McCann Memorial Award for long and distinguished reporting of Professional Football. In 2000, he was inducted into the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame. Felser, along with NFL Films head Steven Sabol, is among only a few people to have physically been present at every Super Bowl game.
    9.00
    1 votes
    140

    Ralph J. Gleason

    Ralph Joseph Gleason (March 1, 1917 - June 3, 1975) was an influential American jazz and pop music critic. He contributed for many years to the San Francisco Chronicle, was a founding editor of Rolling Stone magazine, and cofounder of the Monterey Jazz Festival. Gleason was born in New York City and attended Columbia University. During World War II he worked for the Office of War Information. In 1947, he moved to San Francisco and began contributing to the San Francisco Chronicle in 1950, initiating the first regular coverage of jazz and pop music in the mainstream US media. Gleason was the first critic to review folk, pop, and jazz concerts with the same attention and space as was given to classical music. He interviewed such luminaries as Frank Sinatra, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, and Fats Domino. Gleason was one of the first critics to perceive the importance of Lenny Bruce, Bob Dylan, and Miles Davis. His liner notes for the 1959 Sinatra album "No One Cares" and later for the 1970 Davis album Bitches Brew set the standard for the form. Gleason was both an observer and a contributor to what is sometimes termed the San Francisco Renaissance, the era of increased cultural
    9.00
    1 votes
    141
    Ron May

    Ron May

    Ron May is a prominent technology columnist covering events the Chicago area. He publishes an influential monthly newsletter called The May Report. He has been described as "a fixture on the Chicago tech scene". He is often seen at Chicago tech community events such as BARcamp Chicago and Tech Cocktail. He is known among the community by his trademark tape recorder which he uses to record many of his conversations.
    9.00
    1 votes
    142

    A. N. Wilson

    Andrew Norman Wilson (born 27 October 1950) is an English writer and newspaper columnist, known for his critical biographies, novels, works of popular history and religious views. He is an occasional columnist for the Daily Mail and former columnist for the London Evening Standard, and has been an occasional contributor to the Times Literary Supplement, New Statesman, The Spectator and The Observer. Wilson was educated at Rugby School and New College, Oxford. Destined originally for ordination in the Church of England, Wilson entered St Stephen's House, the High Church theological hall at Oxford, but left at the end of his first year. In 1971 he married the Shakespeare scholar Katherine Duncan-Jones. They had two daughters - one of whom is Bee Wilson - and divorced in 1990. In the late 1980s he publicly stated that he was an atheist and published a pamphlet Against Religion in the Chatto & Windus CounterBlasts series; however, religious and ecclesiological themes continue to inform his work. For nearly 30 years he continued to be both a sceptic, and a prominent atheist. In April 2009 he published an article in the Daily Mail affirming his rediscovery of faith, and conversion to
    6.67
    3 votes
    143
    Anand Kumar

    Anand Kumar

    Anand Kumar is an Indian mathematician and a columnist for various national and international mathematical journals and magazines. He is best known for his Super 30 programme, which he started in Patna, Bihar in 2002, and which coaches economically backward students for IIT-JEE, the entrance examination for the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs). By 2012, 263 of the 300 had made it to IITs and Discovery Channel showcased his work in a documentary. Anand Kumar was born in Bihar. His father was a post office clerk in Bihar. His father could not afford private schooling for his children, and Anand attended a Hindi medium government school, where he developed his deep interest of Mathematics. During graduation, Kumar submitted papers on Number Theory, which were published in Mathematical Spectrum and The Mathematical Gazette. Anand secured admission to Cambridge University, but could not attend because of his father's death and his financial condition, even after looking for sponsor in 1994-1995, both in Patna and Delhi. Kumar would work on Mathematics during day time and would sell papads in evenings with his mother, who had started a small business from home, to support her
    6.67
    3 votes
    144
    Dale Peck

    Dale Peck

    Dale Peck (born 1967 on Long Island, New York) is an American novelist, critic, and columnist. His 2009 novel, Sprout, won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children's/Young Adult literature, and was a finalist for the Stonewall Book Award in the Children's and Young Adult Literature category. Peck was raised in Kansas, and attended Drew University in New Jersey He graduated in 1989. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1995. He currently teaches creative writing at The New School in New York City. He is openly gay. Peck's first novel, Martin and John, was published in 1993. His subsequent work, which continued to explore issues of identity and sexuality, were met with more mixed reviews. Salon.com described Now It's Time to Say Goodbye as a "hyperpotboiler" with a plot "both sensational and preposterous". The New York Review of Books called Martin and John "surprisingly sophisticated", but said Now It's Time to Say Goodbye "collapsed under the weight of its overladen allegorical structures" and diagnosed Peck's fiction as a "seesaw between a strained "'lyricism' ... and cliché". Peck has also drawn attention as a critic. His reviews for The New Republic, while establishing him
    6.67
    3 votes
    145
    Glenn Greenwald

    Glenn Greenwald

    Glenn Greenwald (born March 6, 1967) is an American political journalist, lawyer, columnist, blogger, and author. In August 2012, he left Salon for a post at The Guardian, for which he has contributed since June 2011. Politically, Greenwald describes himself independent, though others see him politically as a liberal or progressive. Greenwald worked as a constitutional and civil rights litigator before becoming a contributor (columnist and blogger) to Salon.com, where he focused on political and legal topics. He has also contributed to other newspapers and political news magazines, including The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The American Conservative, The National Interest, and In These Times. Greenwald has written four books, three of which have been New York Times bestsellers: How Would a Patriot Act? (2006); A Tragic Legacy (2007), and With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful, released in October 2011. He also wrote Great American Hypocrites (2008). Greenwald has received awards including the first Izzy Award for independent journalism, in 2009, and the 2010 Online Journalism Award for Best Commentary. He
    6.67
    3 votes
    146

    Lester Thurow

    Lester Carl Thurow (born 1938) is a former dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management and author of books on economic topics. Thurow was born in Livingston, Montana. He received his B.A. in political economy from Williams College in 1960, where he was in Theta Delta Chi and Phi Beta Kappa as a junior, and a Tyng Scholar. Thurow was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, and went to Balliol College, Oxford to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating in 1962 with first class honors. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1964. Thurow is on the board of directors of Analog Devices, Grupo Casa Autrey, E-Trade, and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp.. Thurow was also one of the original founders of the Economic Policy Institute in 1986. Thurow is currently an economics columnist for, among others, the Boston Globe and USA Today. He was previously an economics columnist for and on the editorial board of the New York Times, and was a contributing editor to Newsweek. Thurow is a longtime advocate of a political and economic system of the Japanese and European type, in which governmental involvement in the direction of the economy is far more extensive than is
    6.67
    3 votes
    147

    Pauline Phillips

    Pauline Phillips (born July 4, 1918) is an American advice columnist and radio show host who began the "Dear Abby" column in 1956. Married to Morton Phillips, the couple have two children, a son, Edward Jay Phillips, and a daughter, Jeanne Phillips. By 2002, when Phillips suffered from the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, her daughter Jeanne had assumed all the writing responsibilities of Dear Abby. After the family's announcement of Pauline's illness, Jeanne assumed the pen name Abigail Van Buren; from 1987 until her mother's retirement, Jeanne had been co-writing the column with her mother. She is the twin sister of the late Eppie Lederer, professionally known as Ann Landers. Pauline Esther Friedman and her identical twin sister, Esther Pauline Friedman were born in Sioux City, Iowa to Russian Jewish immigrants. The girls grew up in Sioux City with the nicknames "Popo" (Pauline) and "Eppie" (Esther). They are both alumnae of Central High School ("The Castle on the Hill") in Sioux City and Morningside College, where the two sisters wrote for the college newspaper. In 1939, they were married in a double-wedding ceremony on their birthday. An honorary member of Women in
    6.67
    3 votes
    148

    Richard Reeves

    Richard Reeves (born 28 November 1936) is a writer, syndicated columnist and lecturer at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Reeves received his M.E. from Stevens Institute of Technology in 1960. After graduating, he spent a year working as an engineer for Ingersoll-Rand, after which he moved to journalism. From 1961-1965, Reeves co-founded and worked for the Phillipsburg Free Press (New Jersey), then worked for Newark Evening News and the New York Herald Tribune before being assigned the post of Chief Political Correspondent for The New York Times in 1966. In 1971, Reeves left the Times to lecture at Hunter College. Reeves' opinions generally have a liberal bent—he opposed the war to topple Saddam Hussein as "stupid and unnecessary" (column, March 19, 2003)—but shuns "extreme" leftist positions. He pays close attention to happenings overseas and often fills his columns with explanations of current trends based on history. Many of his columns focus on the world's reaction to the United States' political actions. He has also published nine books, mostly about American politics. In 1993, he appeared in the film Dave, one of
    6.67
    3 votes
    149
    Christopher Kimball

    Christopher Kimball

    Christopher Kimball (born June 5, 1951) is an American chef, editor, publisher, and radio/TV personality. Kimball was born and raised in Westchester County, New York. He graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy and then Columbia University (1973) with a degree in Primitive Art. After graduating from Columbia, he went to work with his stepbrother in a publishing company. Soon after, he worked for The Center for Direct Marketing in Westport, Connecticut and also started taking cooking courses. After securing $100,000 in angel investments from friends and family, he started Cook’s Magazine from a tiny office in Weston, Connecticut in 1980 when he was 29 years old. He sold the magazine to the Bonnier Group in 1989 and moved on to other publishing ventures. In 1993, he launched Cook's Illustrated magazine. Kimball is the founder, editor, and publisher of Cook's Illustrated and Cook's Country magazines, and former publisher of the now defunct Cook's Magazine. He is the author of The Cook's Bible, The Yellow Farmhouse Cookbook, Dear Charlie, The Dessert Bible and Fannie's Last Supper, and is a columnist for the New York Daily News and the Boston-based Tab Communications. Kimball also hosts
    5.00
    5 votes
    150
    Bill Speidel

    Bill Speidel

    William C Speidel (1912 – 1988) known as Bill Speidel was a columnist for The Seattle Times and a self-made historian who wrote the books Sons of the Profits and Doc Maynard, The Man Who Invented Seattle about the people who settled and built Seattle, Washington. Speidel is also credited with being one of the leaders of the movement to preserve and restore Pioneer Square, one of Seattle's oldest neighborhoods. By the 1960s, this area was run down and in disrepair, in danger of being demolished and rebuilt. Through the efforts of many people, Pioneer Square is once again a bustling center of activity and tourism with dozens of original buildings that have been restored to their original luster. In 1964, Speidel received and printed a letter from a reader asking about the underground areas of Pioneer Square. He replied via the paper that he did not know much about it, but that he would research it and get back to her. Once he did the research, he printed a response telling her to meet him at 3 p.m. the next Saturday in Pioneer Square, and he would take her on a tour of the underground and what he had found. The reader did show up, along with 500 other people. Speidel quickly took up
    5.75
    4 votes
    151
    Carl Hiaasen

    Carl Hiaasen

    Carl Hiaasen ( /ˈhaɪ.əsɛn/; born March 12, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist, and novelist. Carl Hiaasen was born in 1953 and raised in Plantation, Florida. Hiaasen was the first of four children and the son of a lawyer, Kermit Odell, and a teacher, Patricia. He entered Emory University just after graduating high school in 1970, where he contributed numerous satiric pieces to the school newspaper. In 1972 he transferred to the University of Florida, where he wrote for The Independent Florida Alligator. Hiaasen graduated in 1974 with a degree in journalism. He was a reporter for Cocoa Today (Cocoa, Florida) for two years, beginning in 1974, and then was hired by the Miami Herald in 1976, where he still works. Hiaasen lives in Vero Beach, Florida. After becoming an investigative reporter, Hiaasen began to write novels. His first three were co-written by fellow journalist Bill Montalbano: Powder Burn (1981), Trap Line (1982), and A Death in China (1986). Hiaasen's first venture into writing children's novels was Hoot, which received the Newbery Honor Award and was made into a movie. His second children's novel was Flush then Scat and lastly, Chomp. Hiaasen's young adult
    5.75
    4 votes
    152
    Barkha Dutt

    Barkha Dutt

    Barkha Dutt is an Indian television journalist and columnist. She is currently the group editor with NDTV. Dutt gained prominence for her reportage of the Kargil War. She has won many national and international awards, including the Padma Shri, India's fourth highest civilian honour. She writes a column for the Hindustan Times called "Third Eye". In 2010 she was one of the journalists taped in the 2G lobbying Radia tapes controversy. Barkha Dutt was born in New Delhi to S. P. Dutt, an official in Air India and Prabha Dutt who was a well-known journalist with the Hindustan Times. Barkha credits her journalism skills to her mother, Prabha, a pioneer among women journalists in India. Prabha Dutt died in 1984 due to a brain haemorrhage. Barkha's younger sister, Bahar Dutt, is also a television journalist working for CNN IBN. Barkha graduated from St. Stephen's College, Delhi with a degree in English literature. She received a Master's in Mass Communications from Jamia Millia Islamia Mass Communication Research Center, New Delhi. She started her journalism career with NDTV and later rose to head the English news wing of the organization. She also obtained a master's degree in journalism
    7.50
    2 votes
    153

    Caitlin Moran

    Caitlin Moran (born 5 April 1975 as Catherine Elizabeth Moran) is a British broadcaster, TV critic and columnist at The Times, where she writes three columns a week: one for the Saturday Magazine, a TV review column, and the satirical Friday column "Celebrity Watch". Moran is British Press Awards (BPA) Columnist of the Year for 2010, and both BPA Critic of the Year 2011, and Interviewer of the Year 2011 Moran's father is a rock musician. She is the eldest of 8 children and has four sisters and three brothers. She was born in Brighton and then lived in a three bedroom council house in Wolverhampton with her parents and siblings. She attended Springdale Junior School and was then educated at home from the age of 11, having attended secondary school for only three weeks. At the age of 13 in October 1988 she won a Dillons young readers' contest for an essay on Why I Like Books and was awarded £250 of book tokens. At the age of 15, she won The Observer's Young Reporter of the Year. She began her career as a journalist for Melody Maker, the weekly music publication, at the age of 16. Moran also wrote a novel called The Chronicles of Narmo at the age of 16, inspired by having been part of
    7.50
    2 votes
    154

    Cecil Adams

    Cecil Adams is a name, possibly a pseudonym, designating the American author of The Straight Dope, a popular question and answer column published in The Chicago Reader since 1973. Ed Zotti is Adams' current editor. The column has since been syndicated in 30 newspapers in the United States and Canada and is available online. Billed as the "World's Smartest Human," Adams responds to often unusual inquiries with abrasive humor (often directed against the questioner), and at times exhaustive research into obscure and arcane issues, urban legends, and the like. On more than one occasion, Adams has been forced to retract or modify an answer when confronted by "the Teeming Millions" (Adams's term for his readers), often claiming overwork and staff shortages. On rare occasions, Adams has made appearances on the Straight Dope's Message Board. A subsidiary column concerning questions of local interest in Adams's home city of Chicago has been added. Adams claims that he has "never been photographed," but Ed Zotti, who currently fulfills Adams's publicity engagements, has appeared in at least one photo captioned "Cecil Adams." Previous editors include Mike Lenehan and Dave Kehr. In his
    7.50
    2 votes
    155

    Charles Benedict Driscoll

    Charles Benedict Driscoll (October 19, 1885 – January 15, 1951) was a U.S. journalist and editor. Driscoll was born south of Wichita, Kansas on a farm that was purchased by his father after emigrating from Ireland by way of New York and Ohio. Driscoll wrote of his life in Kansas in the Kansas Irish trilogy; the first two books published in 1943 (Kansas Irish) and 1946 (Country Jake) and the last East and West of Wichita in manuscript. Kansas Irish is to be republished by Rowfant Press March 1, 2011 in an illustrated paperback edition, introduction by Dr. Matthew Jockers. He began his career as a journalist writing for the Wichita Eagle, and is popularly credited as the originator of the "school page" in newspapers. Driscoll became editor of the Wichita Eagle in 1919 but was forced out of his position in the 1920s by the Ku Klux Klan, active in Kansas politics at the time. Driscoll worked as an editor for the McNaught Syndicate from 1928 until his death, and continued the popular New York Day by Day column after the death of its creator O. O. McIntyre in 1938. Dr. Matthew Jockers has written on the importance of Driscoll as a writer on the Irish in the West ["A Window Facing West:
    7.50
    2 votes
    156

    Deborah Bull

    Deborah Bull CBE (born 22 March 1963) is an English dancer, writer, and broadcaster and Creative Director of the Royal Opera House. Born in Derby, and brought up in Kent and Lincolnshire, she studied dance from the age of seven, first locally, and then, on the recommendation of her teacher, at the Royal Ballet School. Whilst at the school she won the 1980 Prix de Lausanne, the prestigious international ballet competition. She was invited to join The Royal Ballet in 1981, having toured with the company as a student during the summer. She was promoted through the ranks and gained principal status in 1992, immediately following the company's opening performance in Japan, at which she danced the role of Gamzatti in La Bayadere. During her twenty years in The Royal Ballet, she danced a wide range of work throughout the repertoire. Her leading roles in the classics included Odette/Odile in Swan Lake, Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty and Kitri in Don Quixote, and she created roles for Ashley Page, David Bintley, Michael Corder, Emma Diamond, Wayne McGregor, Glen Tetley and Twyla Tharp. She received particular praise for her performances in the works of George Balanchine and William Forsythe.
    7.50
    2 votes
    157
    Eugene Field

    Eugene Field

    Eugene Field, Sr. (September 2, 1850 – November 4, 1895) was an American writer, best known for his children's poetry and humorous essays. Field was born in St. Louis, Missouri where today his boyhood home is open to the public as The Eugene Field House and St. Louis Toy Museum. After the death of his mother in 1856, he was raised by a cousin, Mary Field French, in Amherst, Massachusetts. Field's father, attorney Roswell Martin Field, was famous for his representation of Dred Scott, the slave who sued for his freedom. Field filed the complaint in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case (sometimes referred to as "the lawsuit that started the Civil War") on behalf of Scott in the federal court in St. Louis, Missouri, from whence it progressed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Field attended Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. His father died when Eugene turned 19, and he subsequently dropped out of Williams after eight months. He then went to Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, but dropped out after a year, followed by the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri, where his brother Roswell was also attending. He tried acting, studied law with little success, and also wrote for the
    7.50
    2 votes
    158
    James Pinkerton

    James Pinkerton

    James Pinkerton (born March 11, 1958) is a columnist, author, and political analyst. A graduate of Peter Vanleslie High School and Stanford University (1980), he served on the White House staff under both Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush and on each of their presidential campaigns and in January 2008 became a senior adviser to the Mike Huckabee 2008 presidential campaign. Since his time in government he has become a columnist for Newsday, a regular panelist on the Fox News program Fox News Watch, and a regular conservative contributor to The Huffington Post. He is also a senior fellow at both the Free Enterprise Fund and the New America Foundation, a lecturer at the Graduate School of Political Management at The George Washington University, and a contributing editor of The American Conservative and USA Today. He frequently appears on Bloggingheads.tv, often in video discussions with David Corn and other media personalities. In a discussion with economist, Glenn Loury, Pinkerton described his political ideology as "Hamiltonian". He favors a robust US industrial policy that would stimulate industry and calls himself a "big government libertarian". Pinkerton moderated the 2008
    7.50
    2 votes
    159
    Joan Collins

    Joan Collins

    Joan Henrietta Collins, OBE (born 23 May 1933), is a British actress, author and columnist. Born in Paddington and brought up in Maida Vale, Collins grew up during the Second World War. After making her stage debut in A Doll's House at the age of 9, she was trained as an actress at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in London. After eighteen months at the drama school, she was signed to an exclusive contract by the Rank Organisation and appeared in various British films. At the age of 22, Collins headed to Hollywood and landed sultry roles in several popular films, including The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing (1955) and Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys! (1958). While she continued to make films in the US and the UK throughout the 1960s, her career languished in the 1970s, where she appeared in a number of horror flicks. Near the end of the decade, she starred in two films based on best-selling novels by her younger sister Jackie Collins: The Stud (1978) and its sequel The Bitch (1979). Returning to her theatrical roots, she played the title role in the 1980 British revival of The Last of Mrs. Cheyney and later had a lead role in the 1990 revival of Noël Coward's Private Lives. In
    7.50
    2 votes
    160
    Leon de Winter

    Leon de Winter

    Leon de Winter (24 February 1954) is a Dutch writer and columnist. Leon de Winter was born on 24 February 1954 in Den Bosch, in the southern Netherlands. He grew up in an orthodox Jewish family and attended the gymnasium in Den Bosch. After his graduation he attended the academy of Bavaria Film Studios in Munich and the Netherlands Film Academy in Amsterdam. However, the Film Academy was much criticised by De Winter and he left the Film Academy in 1978 without a degree. After leaving the Film Academy, De Winter made some television series, like Junkieverdriet and De (ver)wording van de jonge Dürer. The latter, which was also rewritten into a novel, is the story of an unemployed young boy who does not know how to handle life, and who goes slowly but inevitably insane. Until 1982 De Winter also wrote reviews for the weekly magazine Vrij Nederland. His first successful novel was Zoeken naar Eileen W (1981). A film version of this was made by Rudolf van den Berg. In 1981 De Winter also wrote Place de la Bastille. In 1986 the novel Kaplan was published. The protagonist of this novel is a writer who is searching for the truth about birth, love and death. In 1990 the novel Hoffman's
    7.50
    2 votes
    161

    Marjorie Proops

    Rebecca Marjorie Proops (10 August 1911–10 November 1996), born Rebecca Marjorie Israel, was probably best known as an agony aunt in the United Kingdom, writing the column Dear Marje for the Daily Mirror newspaper. Proops was born in Woking, Surrey to Alfred (a publican) and Martha Israel (Née Rayle). The family moved to London and Margorie was educated at Dalston Secondary School. In 1935 she married Sidney Joseph Proops, with whom she had a son, Robert. In 1939, Proops became a journalist. Her first job was as fashion correspondent for the Daily Mirror. Following the death of the problem page editor, Proops was given the job of reading and answering her correspondence, and soon became the agony aunt herself, a post she held until her own death. As well as being an adviser, she used her column to campaign for numerous causes. One that she advocated for was the establishment of special "suites" for the treatment and interviewing of rape victims, to minimize the stigma of reporting such crimes. It was alleged by fellow newspaper columnist Vernon Coleman that she may have held racist views. Her radio appearances included a guest spot on the BBC Radio 4 comedy programme Just a Minute.
    7.50
    2 votes
    162
    Molly Ivins

    Molly Ivins

    Mary Tyler "Molly" Ivins (August 30, 1944 – January 31, 2007) was an American newspaper columnist, populist, political commentator, humorist and author. Ivins was born in Monterey, California, and raised in Houston, Texas. Her father, Jim Ivins, known as "General Jim" because of his rigid authoritarianism (or sometimes "Admiral Jim" for his love of sailing), was an oil and gas executive, and the family lived in Houston's affluent River Oaks neighborhood. Ivins graduated from St. John's School in 1962. In high school, she was active in extracurricular activities, including the yearbook staff. She had her first pieces of journalism published in The Review, the official student newspaper of St. John's School, though she never wrote any of the political columns that would become her specialty later in life. Ivins later became co-editor of the arts and culture section of the student paper. In addition, she frequently participated in theater productions and earned a lifetime membership in Johnnycake, the drama club. Ivins enrolled in Scripps College in 1962 but was not happy there, and transferred to Smith College in 1963. During this time, she became romantically involved with Henry
    7.50
    2 votes
    163
    Ann Coulter

    Ann Coulter

    Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961) is an American lawyer, conservative social and political commentator, author, and syndicated columnist. She frequently appears on television, radio, and as a speaker at public events and private events. Well known for her conservative political opinions and the controversial ways in which she presents and defends them, Coulter has described herself as a polemicist who likes to "stir up the pot" and does not "pretend to be impartial or balanced, as broadcasters do". Ann Hart Coulter was born in New York City on December 8, 1961, to John Vincent Coulter, a native of Albany, New York, and Nell Husbands Coulter (née Martin), a native of Paducah, Kentucky. The family later moved to New Canaan, Connecticut, where Coulter and her two older brothers, James and John, were raised. She graduated from New Canaan High School in 1980. Coulter's age was disputed in 2002 while she was arguing that she was not yet 40, yet Washington Post columnist Lloyd Grove cited that she provided a birthdate of December 8, 1961, when registering to vote in New Canaan, Connecticut prior to the 1980 Presidential election. Meanwhile, a driver's license issued several years
    5.50
    4 votes
    164
    Leslie Cannold

    Leslie Cannold

    Leslie Cannold, PhD, (born 1 April 1965 in Port Chester, NY) is an author, academic ethicist, columnist, activist, and high-profile Australian public intellectual. Born and raised in Armonk and Scarsdale, New York, Leslie migrated to Melbourne, Australia in her early twenties. She began writing for The Age as an opinion and education section columnist while raising young children and completing her graduate degrees. She is considered a protégé of one of the most influential modern philosophers, Peter Singer, though she does not share his utilitarian views. A twice-published non-fiction author and novelist, Cannold is a familiar voice and face on radio and TV in Australia, discussing ethics, politics, and reproductive rights. In 2005 she was named one of Australia's top twenty public intellectuals by The Age newspaper. In 2011 Cannold was awarded Australian Humanist of the Year by the Council of Australian Humanist Societies. Educated at Wesleyan University where she studied psychology and theatre, Leslie completed a Masters degree in Bioethics at Monash University and worked at the Centre for Human Bioethics during Peter Singer's tenure there. She earned her PhD in Education at the
    5.50
    4 votes
    165
    Eric Asimov

    Eric Asimov

    Eric Asimov (born July 17, 1957) is an American wine critic for The New York Times, with articles subsequently published in the International Herald Tribune. Asimov was born in Bethpage, New York. He is the son of Stanley Asimov, former vice president for editorial administration at Newsday, and Ruth Asimov, a ceramic artist. He is a nephew of author Isaac Asimov. Asimov attended Wesleyan University, graduating in 1980. He did graduate work in American studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Asimov married fellow Wesleyan graduate Jacalyn Lee in 1989; the couple later divorced. Asimov has been married to Deborah Hofmann, editor of the New York Times Best Seller List since 2001. Having previously worked for The Chicago Sun-Times, Eric Asimov began working for The New York Times in 1984, as an editor in National News. From 1991 to 1994, he was the editor of the Living Section and, from 1994 to 1995, he edited the Styles of The Times section. In 1992, Asimov conceived and wrote the "$25 and Under" column, dedicated to "restaurants where people can eat lavishly for $25 and under. For that price, you should be able to get a complete meal: appetizer, main course, and dessert.
    6.33
    3 votes
    166

    James Taranto

    James Taranto (born January 6, 1966) is an American columnist for The Wall Street Journal, editor of its online editorial page OpinionJournal.com and a member of the newspaper's editorial board. He is best known for his daily online column Best of the Web Today. The column typically includes conservative/neoliberal political, social and media commentary in the form of conventional opinion writing as well as wordplay and other recurring themes on news stories crowdsourced from readers. He also appears occasionally on Journal Editorial Report. Prior to joining the Wall Street Journal in 1996, Taranto spent five years as an editor at City Journal. He has also worked for the Heritage Foundation and Reason magazine. Taranto left high school after his sophomore year and attended college for several years at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) but did not graduate from either. While attending CSUN, Taranto worked as news editor and also as one of two opinion page editors for the Daily Sundial student newspaper. On March 5, 1987, Taranto published an opinion piece criticizing a controversy at the University of California, Los Angeles, in which the editor of the Daily Bruin
    6.33
    3 votes
    167

    Claire Rayner

    Claire Berenice Rayner OBE (née Chetwynd; 22 January 1931 – 11 October 2010) was an English nurse, journalist, broadcaster and novelist, best known for her role for many years as an agony aunt. Rayner was born to Jewish parents in London, the eldest of four children. Her father was a tailor and her mother a housewife. Her father had adopted the surname Chetwynd, under which name she was educated at the City of London School for Girls. Her autobiography How Did I Get Here from There? was published in 2003, and revealed details of a childhood marred by physical and mental cruelty at the hands of her parents. After the family emigrated to Canada, in 1945 she was placed in a psychiatric hospital by her parents, and treated for 15 months for a thyroid defect. Returning to the UK in 1951, Rayner trained as a nurse at the Royal Northern Hospital and Guy's Hospital in London. She intended to become a doctor; while training as a nurse, however, she met actor Desmond Rayner, whom she married in 1957. The couple lived in London and Claire worked as a midwife and later nursing sister. Rayner wrote her first letter to Nursing Times in 1958, on nurses' pay and conditions. She then began
    8.00
    1 votes
    168
    David H. Hackworth

    David H. Hackworth

    Colonel David Haskell Hackworth (November 11, 1930 – May 4, 2005) also known as "Hack", was a highly decorated soldier, having received 24 decorations for heroism in combat from the Distinguished Service Cross to the Army Commendation Medal. He was also a prominent military journalist. During his time as a journalist, Hackworth investigated many subjects, including an assertion into the accused improper wearing of ribbons and devices by Admiral Mike Boorda, an investigation which is speculated to have driven Boorda to committing suicide. Hackworth is also known for his role in the creation and command of Tiger Force, a military unit formed during the Vietnam War to apply guerrilla warfare tactics to the fight against Vietnamese guerrillas. Hackworth joined the U.S. Merchant Marine at age 14, towards the end of World War II, when teenagers routinely entered the armed services before their 18th birthday by lying about their age. After the war, he lied again to enlist in the United States Army. He was assigned as a rifleman to the 351st Infantry Regiment, 88th Infantry Division, and stationed on occupation duty in Trieste. His unit, part of TRUST (Trieste United States Troops), at
    8.00
    1 votes
    169

    Franklin Pierce Adams

    Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881, Chicago, Illinois – March 23, 1960, New York City, New York) was an American columnist, well known by his initials F.P.A., and wit, best known for his newspaper column, "The Conning Tower", and his appearances as a regular panelist on radio's Information Please. A prolific writer of light verse, he was a member of the Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s. Adams was born Franklin Leopold Adams to Moses and Clara Schlossberg Adams in Chicago on November 15, 1881. He changed his middle name to "Pierce" when he had a Jewish confirmation ceremony at age 13. Adams graduated from the Armour Scientific Academy in 1899, attended the University of Michigan for one year and worked in insurance for three years. Signing on with the Chicago Journal in 1903, he wrote a sports column and then a humor column, "A Little about Everything". The following year he moved to the New York Evening Mail, where he worked from 1904 to 1913 and began his column, then called "Always in Good Humor", which used reader contributions. During his time on the Evening Mail, Adams wrote what remains his best known work, the poem Baseball's Sad Lexicon, a tribute to the
    8.00
    1 votes
    170
    Gene Siskel

    Gene Siskel

    Eugene Kal "Gene" Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was an American film critic and journalist for the Chicago Tribune. Along with colleague Roger Ebert, he hosted the popular review show Siskel & Ebert At the Movies from 1975 until his death. Born in Chicago, Illinois, Siskel was raised by his aunt and uncle after both his parents died when he was ten years old. He attended Culver Academies and graduated in philosophy at Yale University in 1967, where he studied writing under Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Hersey, who helped him land a job at the Chicago Tribune in 1969. In 1975, Siskel teamed up with Roger Ebert, film reviewer for the Chicago Sun-Times, to host a show on the local Chicago PBS station WTTW which eventually became Sneak Previews. Their "thumbs-up, thumbs-down" system soon became an easily recognizable trademark, popular enough to be parodied on comedy shows such as In Living Color, cartoon strips like Calvin and Hobbes (April, 1988) and in movies such as Hollywood Shuffle and Godzilla. Sneak Previews gained a country-wide audience in 1978 when it was carried on PBS. Siskel and Ebert left WTTW and PBS in 1982 for syndication. Their new show, At the
    8.00
    1 votes
    171
    Ray Stannard Baker

    Ray Stannard Baker

    Ray Stannard Baker (April 17, 1870 – July 12, 1946), also known by his pen name David Grayson, was an American journalist and author born in Lansing, Michigan. After graduating from the State Agricultural College (now Michigan State University), he attended law school at the University of Michigan in 1891 before launching his career as a journalist in 1892 with the Chicago News-Record, where he covered the Pullman Strike and Coxey's Army in 1894. In 1898, Baker joined the staff of McClure's, a pioneer muckraking magazine, and quickly rose to prominence along with Lincoln Steffens and Ida Tarbell. He also dabbled in fiction, writing children's stories for the magazine Youth's Companion and a nine-volume series of stories about rural living in America, the first of which was titled "Adventures in Contentment" under the pseudonym David Grayson. In 1906, Baker, Steffens and Tarbell left McClure's and created The American Magazine. In 1908, he wrote the book Following the Color Line, becoming the first prominent journalist to examine America's racial divide. It was extremely successful. He would continue that work with numerous articles in the following decade. In 1912, Baker supported
    8.00
    1 votes
    172
    Roger Powell

    Roger Powell

    Roger Powell (born March 14, 1949) is a musician, computer programmer and magazine columnist best known for his membership with the rock band Utopia. Powell's musical career started in the late 1960s, programming analog synthesizers for commercials. Powell was the protégé of Robert Moog (who created the Moog synthesizer), as well as Moog's competitor ARP, contributing designs and demonstrating systems. Powell played keyboards and synthesizers with the rock band Utopia, led by Todd Rundgren and featuring players Kasim Sulton and Willie Wilcox, among others, from 1974 until its disbanding in 1985, playing, writing, and singing on ten of the band's eleven albums. For Utopia's live shows, Powell created the Powell Probe; the first remote, hand-held polyphonic synthesizer controller, which featured a custom-made shell used to access a complex stack of sequencers and other peripherals offstage, a device also used in a modified form by Jan Hammer. His first solo album Cosmic Furnace was released in 1973 and described by Billboard magazine's reviewer as "...a fascinating, demanding LP that has all the hypnotic eeriness of the recent Miles Davis approach". He produced several additional
    8.00
    1 votes
    173

    Andrew Weil

    Andrew Thomas Weil, M.D., (born June 8, 1942) is founder, professor, and director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. He received both his medical degree and his undergraduate degree in biology from Harvard University and established the field of integrative medicine which aims to combine alternative and conventional medicine. Weil says that patients should take the Western medicine prescribed by the doctor, and then incorporate alternative therapies such as omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and herbal remedies, meditation and other “spiritual” strategies. Some have criticized Weil for rejecting aspects of evidence-based medicine and promoting unverified beliefs. Weil appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1997 and again in 2005. He has written many books, and a total of 10 million copies have been sold. These books include Spontaneous Healing, 8 Weeks to Optimum Health, Eating Well for Optimum Health, The Healthy Kitchen, Healthy Aging, and Why Our Health Matters. He has been a frequent guest on Larry King Live, Oprah, and the Today Show. Weil received both his medical degree and his undergraduate AB degree in biology (botany) from Harvard
    7.00
    2 votes
    174
    Bob Considine

    Bob Considine

    Robert "Bob" Bernard Considine (November 4, 1906 – September 25, 1975) was an American writer and commentator. He is best known for co-writing Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo and The Babe Ruth Story. As a student, Considine attended Gonzaga College High School and George Washington University, both in his hometown of Washington, DC. He worked as a government employee there, as well. He launched his career as a journalist by his own initiative. In 1930, he purportedly went to the editors of the now defunct Washington Herald to complain when they misspelled his name in a report about an amateur tennis tournament in which he had participated. He was hired as the newspaper's tennis reporter. He later wrote drama reviews and Sunday feature articles. The newspaper was one in a syndicate of major-market daily newspapers owned by media magnate William Randolph Hearst. As such, Considine could and would use this fact to his advantage. He would later become a war correspondent with the International News Service, also owned by Hearst, with the advent of World War II. The wire service was a predecessor to United Press International. And, his column "On the Line" was a well known syndicated
    7.00
    2 votes
    175
    Forrest Mims

    Forrest Mims

    Forrest M. Mims III is an amateur scientist, magazine columnist, and author of the popular Getting Started in Electronics and Engineer's Mini-Notebook series of instructional books that was originally sold in Radio Shack electronics stores. Mims graduated from Texas A&M University in 1966 with a major in government and minors in English and history. He became a commissioned officer in the United States Air Force. Although he has no formal academic training in science, Mims has had a successful career as a science author, researcher, lecturer and syndicated columnist. His series of electronics books sold over 7 million copies and he is widely regarded as one of the world's most prolific citizen scientists. Mims does scientific studies in many fields using instruments he designs and makes and he has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals, often with professional scientists as co-authors. Much of his research deals with ecology and environmental science. A simple instrument he developed to measure the ozone layer earned him a Rolex Award for Enterprise in 1993. In December 2008 Discover Magazine named Mims one of the "50 Best Brains in Science." Mims edited The Citizen
    7.00
    2 votes
    176
    Meghan McCain

    Meghan McCain

    Meghan Marguerite McCain (born October 23, 1984) is an American columnist, author and blogger. She is a daughter of U.S. Senator John McCain and Cindy Hensley McCain. McCain first received media attention in 2007 for her blog, McCain Blogette, on which she documented life on the campaign trail and mused about fashion, music, and pop culture. In 2009, she became a contributing author for The Daily Beast, and in 2011, began appearing as a contributor on MSNBC. McCain is the eldest of the four children of John and Cindy Hensley McCain. She has been a public figure for most of her life, appearing at the 1996 Republican National Convention. She was born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona, and attended Phoenix Country Day School and Xavier College Preparatory, an all-girl Catholic high school. She attended Columbia University, where she earned her bachelor's degree in art history. McCain originally planned to become a music journalist and interned at Newsweek and Saturday Night Live. McCain says that she is "a woman who despises labels and boxes and stereotypes". McCain also has described herself as a Republican who is "liberal on social issues". She registered as an Independent when she was
    7.00
    2 votes
    177

    Susan Quilliam

    Susan Quilliam (born 1950 in Liverpool) is an agony aunt and author noted for bringing systemic psychology to a mass (and generally low-brow) audience. Her areas of expertise include: love, sex, personal psychology, medico-sexual psychology and body language. She came most recently to the fore, both in the US and in the UK, for her reinvention of the classic sex manual The Joy of Sex. Born in Liverpool in 1950, Quilliam gained her Psychology degree at the University of Liverpool followed by a PGCE. She then taught English in secondary schools for several years before moving to London to work in publishing. Since 1996, Quilliam has been agony aunt for that's life magazine. Most recently, Quilliam came to the fore both in the US and UK for her reinvention of the classic sex manual The Joy of Sex. She also co-presents a weekly radio programme, 'Sex in the City' with Jim Davis on LBC 97.3, and provides patient advice on five further medical websites dealing with erectile dysfunction, pre-menstrual syndrome and cervical cancer. Over the course of each year, Quilliam receives up to 25,000 letters through her combined columns. She is author of 20 books on love and sex published in 30
    7.00
    2 votes
    178
    Will Rogers

    Will Rogers

    William Penn Adair "Will" Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was an American cowboy, vaudeville performer, humorist, social commentator and motion picture actor. He was one of the world's best-known celebrities in the 1920s and 1930s. Known as Oklahoma's favorite son, Rogers was born to a prominent Cherokee Nation family in Indian Territory (now part of Oklahoma). He traveled around the world three times, made 71 movies (50 silent films and 21 "talkies"), wrote more than 4,000 nationally-syndicated newspaper columns, and became a world-famous figure. By the mid-1930s, Rogers was adored by the American people. He was the leading political wit of the Progressive Era, and was the top-paid Hollywood movie star at the time. Rogers died in 1935 with aviator Wiley Post, when their small airplane crashed in Alaska. His vaudeville rope act led to success in the Ziegfeld Follies, which in turn led to the first of his many movie contracts. His 1920s syndicated newspaper column and his radio appearances increased his visibility and popularity. Rogers crusaded for aviation expansion, and provided Americans with first-hand accounts of his world travels. His earthy anecdotes and folksy
    7.00
    2 votes
    179
    Dave Barry

    Dave Barry

    David "Dave" Barry (born July 3, 1947) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American author and columnist, who wrote a nationally syndicated humor column for The Miami Herald from 1983 to 2005. He has also written numerous books of humor and parody, as well as comedic novels. Barry was born in Armonk, New York, where his father—also named David Barry—was a Presbyterian minister. He was educated at Wampus Elementary School and Harold C. Crittenden Junior High School (both in Armonk), and Pleasantville High School where he was elected "Class Clown" in 1965. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Haverford College in 1969. In his book, Dave Barry's Greatest Hits, he stated that during college he was in a band called "The Federal Duck." As the son of a minister and an alumnus of a Quaker-affiliated college, Barry avoided military service during the Vietnam War by registering as a religious conscientious objector. After divorcing his college sweetheart, Barry married his second wife, Beth Lenox, in 1976 and they had one child, Robert, in 1980. Barry and Beth worked together at the Daily Local News in West Chester, PA, where they began their journalism careers on the same day in
    6.00
    3 votes
    180
    Fanny Fern

    Fanny Fern

    Fanny Fern, born Sara Willis (July 9, 1811 – October 10, 1872), was an American newspaper columnist, humorist, novelist, and author of children's stories in the 1850s-1870s. Fern's great popularity has been attributed to her conversational style and sense of what mattered to her mostly middle-class female readers. By 1855, Fern was the highest-paid columnist in the United States, commanding $100 per week for her New York Ledger column. A collection of her columns published in 1853 sold 70,000 copies in its first year. Her best-known work, the fictional autobiography Ruth Hall (1854), has become a popular subject among feminist literary scholars. Sarah Payson Willis was born in Portland, Maine, to newspaper owner Nathaniel Willis and Hannah Parker; she was the fifth of nine children. Her older brother Nathaniel Parker Willis became a notable journalist and magazine owner. Her younger brother Richard Storrs Willis became a musician and music journalist, known for writing the melody for "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear". Her other siblings were Lucy Douglas (born 1804), Louisa Harris (1807), Julia Dean (1809), Mary Perry (1813), Edward Payson (1816), and Ellen Holmes Willis
    6.00
    3 votes
    181
    Frank Borzellieri

    Frank Borzellieri

    Frank Borzellieri is an American author, professor of journalism, political columnist and former elected member of a New York City school board. He is best known for his conservative views on immigration, affirmative action, gun control, education, libertarianism, and his opposition to what he terms the lack of morality and the lack of focus on the basics of learning in the New York City public school. He was principal at Our Lady Of Mt. Carmel School. On August 2, 2011, NBC reported that Borzellieri was terminated from his position as a result of his viewpoints on certain issues that were not consistent with the Archdiocese of New York. Borzellieri attended Catholic schools his entire life, and is currently both a professor and a graduate student at Catholic universities. Shortly after graduating from college, he began a career in journalism and was published in major newspapers and magazines such as USA Today and Newsday. He became involved in New York City politics, and began writing opinion pieces, including his newspaper columns and editorials for the Leader-Observer chain of newspapers in New York City. He continues as contributing editor of the Leader-Observer. His writings
    6.00
    3 votes
    182
    Rob Walker

    Rob Walker

    Rob Walker (born 1968) is an American author and freelance journalist. He is a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine and blogger for Design Observer. He is also the former "Consumed" columnist for the New York Times Magazine, and coined the word "murketing." Walker has written for and worked as an editor at such publications as Slate.com, New York Times Magazine, Money, and The American Lawyer. Walker's 2005 book, Letters From New Orleans, was compiled from essays emailed "to interested parties" about life in New Orleans, where he lived in the early 2000s. Subjects covered in the book include celebratory gunfire, rich people, religion, the riddle of race relations in our time, robots, fine dining, drunkenness, urban decay, debutantes, the nature of identity, Gennifer Flowers, and mortality. All author proceeds from Letters from New Orleans went to relief organizations such as the Red Cross and others working with victims of Hurricane Katrina. In 2008, Walker published book exploring themes similar to those in his "Consumed" columns called Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are It was reviewed favorably and received much attention for its
    6.00
    3 votes
    183

    Ellie Tesher

    Ellie Tesher is a Canadian journalist and advice columnist. Born in Toronto, Ontario, Tesher studied sociology at the University of Toronto. She then worked for the Children's Aid Society in Toronto as a caseworker. In 1974, while studying toward a Master's degree in sociology, Tesher began working as a freelance journalist. In 1977, she was hired by the Toronto Star. She has held a variety of positions with the Star, both as a writer and an editor. In September, 2002, following the death of Ann Landers, Tesher debuted as the Star's new advice columnist. Her column has now been syndicated to 31 newspapers in both Canada and the United States, including the Chicago Sun-Times and most of Osprey Media's Ontario dailies. With her daughter Lisi Tesher - also an advice columnist - she briefly hosted a Sunday evening talk radio advice show on CFRB radio in 2005. However, the show was canceled at the end of that year. In 2006/2007, she was the host of the reality show "Outlaw Inlaws" on Slice (formerly Life). The show has now been picked up for a 2nd season.
    5.67
    3 votes
    184

    Hugo Young

    Hugo John Smelter Young (13 October 1938 – 22 September 2003) was a British journalist and columnist and senior political commentator at The Guardian. Born in Sheffield into an old recusant family, he was head boy at Ampleforth College in North Yorkshire during his youth; later, he read law at Balliol College, Oxford, and worked for the Yorkshire Post in Leeds from 1961. In 1963, he spent a year as a Harkness fellow in the USA and he spent the next year working as a congressional fellow. In 1965, Young returned to the United Kingdom. He was recruited by Denis Hamilton of The Sunday Times. In his second year there, he became chief leader writer, a position he kept until 1977. From 1973 to 1984, Young was also the paper's political editor. He established a Sunday column, "Inside Politics", that made him famous. Beginning in 1981, he also held the position of joint deputy editor. However, Young's relationship with The Sunday Times cooled notably when Rupert Murdoch took over the paper in 1981. The conflict culminated in a series of battles with editor Andrew Neil, particularly over the US invasion of Grenada in 1983. This ultimately led to Young's leaving The Sunday Times and joining
    5.67
    3 votes
    185

    Jeane Dixon

    Jeane L. Dixon (January 5, 1904 – January 25, 1997) was one of the best-known American astrologers and psychics of the 20th century, due to her syndicated newspaper astrology column, some well-publicized predictions, and a best-selling biography. Dixon was born as Lydia Emma Pinckert to German immigrants, Gerhart and Emma Pinckert, in Medford, Wisconsin, but raised in Missouri and California. Dixon's birthdate was often reported as 1918 and Dixon would offer this date to reporters, at one point even producing a passport to this effect, but she once testified in a deposition that she was born in 1910. An investigation by a reporter for the National Observer, who interviewed family members and examined official records, concluded she was born in 1904. In Southern California, her father owned an automobile dealership with Hal Roach, an American film and television producer and director. Dixon claimed that while growing up in California, a "gypsy" gave her a crystal ball and read her palm, predicting she would become a famous "seer" and advise powerful people. She was married to James Dixon, a divorced man, from 1939 until his death, but the union was childless. James Dixon was a car
    5.67
    3 votes
    186
    Jug Suraiya

    Jug Suraiya

    Jug Suraiya is a prominent Indian journalist, author and columnist. He is best known as a satirist and columnist. Suraiya is a former Editorial Opinion Editor and Associate Editor of the Times of India. He is Delhi-based and schooled at La Martiniere Calcutta. Suraiya writes two columns for the print edition of the Times of India. Of the two Jugular Vein, appears on Friday and the second column Second Opinion appears every Wednesday. He also writes the script for two cartoon strips for Times of India, "Duniya ke Neta" and "Like that only". Jugular Vein is a satirical column that skewers everything, from the mundane to the serious. Its everyday focus and travel writing are also well known. There is frequent referencing to his wife as 'Bunny' in the articles. Khushwant Singh has referred to Suraiya as "our own Art Buchwald". He is a writer distinguished for satire, wit and humour in his writings. Suraiya reflects on his personal reminiscences while drawing astounding parallels of some of the most famous personalities or gently touching at the absurdities which have become part and parcel of our lives. Post 9/11 Suraiya created a daily cartoon in the Times of India called Dubyaman
    5.67
    3 votes
    187
    Link Byfield

    Link Byfield

    Link Byfield is a news columnist, author and politician. Byfield was editor and publisher for the now defunct Alberta Report magazine for 18 years. He is the son of conservative columnist Ted Byfield. Like his father, Byfield has been a columnist for the Calgary Sun and has also occasionally been published in the Calgary Herald, National Post, Globe and Mail and Winnipeg Free Press. Byfield is the founder of the Citizens Centre for Freedom and Democracy, a lobby group dedicated to "advocating responsible government." Link Byfield was the first to declare his candidacy for the 2004 Senator in waiting election on September 27, 2004. He decided to remain Independent of the other parties, and was one of two Independent Senator-in-waiting candidates—the other being Tom Sindlinger. He was elected to the 4th and final spot in the block vote with 236,382 votes. He is the first independent senator in waiting, and the first independent elected in an Alberta election since Raymond Speaker and Walt Buck in 1982. In 2005, Byfield received the Alberta Centennial Medal. Byfield helped found the Wildrose Party of Alberta in 2007, which merged with the Alberta Alliance Party on January 19, 2008,
    5.67
    3 votes
    188
    Richard Roeper

    Richard Roeper

    Richard E. Roeper (born October 17, 1959) is an American columnist and film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times and now a co-host on The Roe Conn Show on WLS-AM. He co-hosted the television series At the Movies with Roger Ebert from 2000–2008, as the late Gene Siskel's replacement. Roeper was born in Chicago, Illinois, and was raised in south suburban Dolton, Illinois. He attended Thornridge High School and graduated from Illinois State University in 1982. He has described himself as a Catholic, although "not always first in line for Sunday Mass". Roeper began working as a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times in 1987. The topics of his columns range from politics to media to entertainment. In more recent years, he has been widely considered one of the finest newspaper writers in Chicago, just a notch below the city's golden-inked "Mount Rushmore" of John Kass (Tribune), Dave Hoekstra (Sun-Times), Jay Mariotti (Sun-Times) and Roger Ebert (Sun-Times). He has also written seven books, on topics from movies to urban legends to conspiracy theories to the Chicago White Sox. In 2009 Roeper appeared on Howard Stern's show and said he had written a book on gambling, entitled Bet the House,
    5.67
    3 votes
    189

    David Aaronovitch

    David Aaronovitch (born 8 July 1954) is a British author, broadcaster, and journalist. He is a regular columnist for The Times, and author of Paddling to Jerusalem: An Aquatic Tour of Our Small Country (2000) and Voodoo Histories: the role of Conspiracy Theory in Modern History (2009). He won the Orwell Prize for political journalism in 2001, and the What the Papers Say "Columnist of the Year" award for 2003. Aaronovitch is the son of the economist, Communist and intellectual Sam Aaronovitch, and brother of the actor Owen Aaronovitch and scriptwriter and author Ben Aaronovitch. He attended Gospel Oak Primary School until 1965, Holloway County Comprehensive 1965-68, and William Ellis School 1968-72, all in London. He studied Modern History at Balliol College, Oxford from October 1973 until April 1974, when he was sent down (expelled) for failing the German part of his History exams. He completed his education at the Victoria University of Manchester, graduating in 1978 with a 2:1 BA (Hons) in History. While at Manchester, he was a member of the 1975 University Challenge team that lost in the first round after answering most questions with the name of a marxist ("Trotsky", "Lenin",
    6.50
    2 votes
    190
    Dennis Prager

    Dennis Prager

    Dennis Prager (born August 2, 1948) is an American syndicated radio talk show host, syndicated columnist, author, and public speaker. He is noted for his conservative political and social views emanating from conservative Judeo-Christian values. He holds that there is an "American Trinity" of essential principles, which he lists as E Pluribus Unum, In God We Trust, and Liberty. Prager was raised in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Hilda (Friedfeld) and Max Prager. He attended Rambam, a Jewish day school and Yeshiva of Flatbush, where he met his future co-author Joseph Telushkin. He majored in Middle Eastern Studies and History at Brooklyn College, graduating in 1970. He went on to study at the Russian Institute (now Harriman Institute) at Columbia University.. He speaks, and lectures in several foreign languages, including Russian and Hebrew. He taught Jewish and Russian History at Brooklyn College, and was a Fellow at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs, where he did his graduate work at the Russian Institute (now the Harriman Institute) and Middle East Institute from 1970-1972. He is a Media Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He
    6.50
    2 votes
    191
    Dorothy Thompson

    Dorothy Thompson

    Dorothy Thompson (9 July 1893, Lancaster, New York – 30 January 1961, Lisbon, Portugal) was an American journalist and radio broadcaster, who in 1939 was recognized by Time magazine as the second most influential woman in America next to Eleanor Roosevelt. She is notable as the first American journalist to be expelled from Nazi Germany in 1934 and as one of the few women news commentators on radio during the 1930s. Many fondly referred to her as the “First Lady of American Journalism.” She was married three times, most famously to second husband and Nobel Prize in literature winner Sinclair Lewis. Thompson married Sinclair Lewis in 1928 and acquired a house in Vermont. They had one son, Michael Lewis, born in 1930. The couple divorced in 1942. In 1923 she married her first husband, Hungarian Joseph Bard; they divorced in 1927 She married her third husband, the artist Maxim Kopf, in 1945, and they were married until Kopf's death in 1958. Dorothy Thompson was born in Lancaster, New York in 1894 to Margaret and Peter Thompson. Margaret died when Dorothy was seven (in 1901), leaving Peter, a Methodist preacher, to raise his daughter alone. Peter soon remarried, but Dorothy did not
    6.50
    2 votes
    192

    Harry Golden

    Harry Lewis Golden (May 6, 1902–October 2, 1981) was an American Jewish writer and newspaper publisher. He was born Herschel Goldhirsch in the shtetl Mikulintsy, Ukraine, then part of Austria-Hungary. His mother was Romanian and his father Austrian. In 1904 his father, Leib Goldhirsch, emigrated to Winnipeg, Manitoba, only to move the family to New York City the next year. Harry became a stockbroker but lost his job in the 1929 crash. Convicted of mail fraud, Golden served five years in a Federal prison at Atlanta, Georgia. In 1941, he moved to Charlotte, where, as a reporter for the Charlotte Labor Journal and The Charlotte Observer, he wrote about and spoke out against racial segregation and the Jim Crow laws of the time. From 1942 to 1968, Golden published The Carolina Israelite as a forum, not just for his political views (including his satirical "The Vertical Negro Plan", which involved removing the chairs from any to-be-integrated building, since Southern Whites didn't mind standing with Blacks, only sitting with them), but also observations and reminisces of his boyhood in New York's Lower East Side. He traveled broadly: in 1960 to speak to Jews in West Germany and again to
    6.50
    2 votes
    193
    Jeannette Walls

    Jeannette Walls

    Jeannette Walls is an American writer and journalist widely known as former gossip columnist for MSNBC.com — and author of The Glass Castle, a memoir of the nomadic family life of her childhood, which stayed on the New York Times Best Seller list for 100 weeks. Walls was born on April 21, 1960 in Phoenix, Arizona to Rex Walls (deceased 1994), an electrician, and Rose Mary Walls, an artist. As detailed in The Glass Castle, Walls' family life was rootless, with the family shuttling from Phoenix, Arizona, California (including a brief stay in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco), Battle Mountain, Nevada, and Welch, West Virginia, with periods of homelessness. Walls moved to New York at age 17 and graduated in 1984 with honors from Barnard College. Walls is one of five children; she has three sisters and one brother, all living except one sister. Walls married Eric Goldberg in 1988 (divorced, 1996) and now lives outside Culpeper, Virginia, with her second husband, journalist John J. Taylor, a former writer for Esquire and the author of The Count and the Confession: A True Murder Mystery, Falling: The Story of One Marriage, and Circus of Ambition: The Culture of Wealth and Power in
    6.50
    2 votes
    194

    Michael Coren

    Michael Coren (born January 15, 1959) is an English-Canadian columnist, author, public speaker, radio host and television talk show host. He hosted the television talk show The Michael Coren Show on the Crossroads Television System from 1999 to 2011 when he moved to the Sun News Network to host an evening talk show, The Arena with Michael Coren. He has also been a long-time radio personality, particularly on CFRB radio. He has written more than ten books, including biographies of G. K. Chesterton, H. G. Wells, Arthur Conan Doyle, and C. S. Lewis. His latest two books, Heresy: Ten Lies They Spread About Christianity and Why Catholics are Right, were published in 2012 and 2011 respectively. Coren was born in Essex, England. After obtaining a degree in politics from Nottingham University, he moved from the UK to Canada in 1987. For several years, he was a columnist for Frank and then The Globe and Mail, before he began syndicated columns for the Financial Post and Sun Media in 1995. Following his departure from Frank, he became a favourite target of that publication, culminating in a spoof ad contest to "deflower" Michael Coren (a nod to Frank's notorious "Deflower Caroline Mulroney"
    6.50
    2 votes
    195
    Uri Geller

    Uri Geller

    Uri Geller (Hebrew: אורי גלר‎; born 20 December 1946) is a self-proclaimed psychic known for his trademark television performances of spoon bending and other supposed psychic effects. Throughout the years, Geller has been accused of using simple conjuring tricks to simulate the effects of psychokinesis and telepathy. Geller's career as an entertainer has spanned almost four decades, with television shows and appearances in many countries. Geller used to call his abilities "psychic" but now prefers to refer to himself as a "mystifier" and entertainer. Geller's first name is pronounced oori, not yoori. Born in Tel Aviv, British Mandate of Palestine, to Jewish parents from Hungary and Austria, Geller is the son of Itzhaak Geller (Gellér Izsák), a retired army sergeant major, and Manzy Freud (Freud Manci). It is claimed that Geller is a distant relative of Sigmund Freud on his mother's side. At the age of 11, Geller's family moved to Nicosia, Cyprus, where he attended a high school, The Terra Santa College and learned English. At the age of 18 he served in the Israeli Army's Paratroopers Brigade, and was wounded in action during the 1967 Six-Day War. He worked as a photographic model
    6.50
    2 votes
    196
    David Ignatius

    David Ignatius

    David R. Ignatius (May 26, 1950), is an American journalist and novelist. He is an associate editor and columnist for The Washington Post. He also co-hosts PostGlobal, an online discussion of international issues at Washingtonpost.com, with Newsweek 's Fareed Zakaria. He has written eight novels, including Body of Lies, which director Ridley Scott adapted into a film. He has received numerous honors, including the Legion of Honor from the French Republic, the Urbino World Press Award from the Italian Republic, and a lifetime achievement award from the International Committee for Foreign Journalism. Ignatius was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His parents are Nancy Sharpless (née Weiser) and Paul Robert Ignatius, a former Secretary of the Navy (1967–69), president of The Washington Post, and former president of the Air Transport Association. He is of Armenian descent on his father's side, with ancestors from Harput, Elazığ, Turkey; his mother, a descendant of Puritan minister Cotton Mather, is of German and English descent. Ignatius was raised in Washington, D.C., where he attended St. Albans School. He then attended Harvard College, from which he graduated magna cum laude in
    7.00
    1 votes
    197

    Ellis Henican

    Ellis Henican is a columnist at Newsday and AM New York as well as a political analyst on the Fox News Channel. He hosts a nationally syndicated weekend show on Talk Radio Network, is author of a New York Times Bestseller, and is the voice of "Stormy" on the Cartoon Network series Sealab 2021. Henican's award-winning newspaper column—a personal, opinionated look at the news of the day—puts him in the middle of politics, business, crime, race and more than a little tabloid silliness. One day, he is writing from the campaign trail. The next, he's digging into a scandal in New York or poking fun at some self-important celebrity. Before taking on his current assignment, Henican wrote Newsday's subway column, leading the paper to a Pulitzer Prize for covering the 14th Street – Union Square (New York City Subway) train wreck. In recent years, Henican has built a strong presence on TV and radio, appearing on most of the major broadcast and cable networks. He is in his eleventh year at the Fox News Channel, where he appears frequently on The O'Reilly Factor, Fox News Watch, Red Eye w/ Greg Gutfeld and many of the network's other top programs. He also fills in as guest host on network
    7.00
    1 votes
    198

    Gordon Gibson

    Gordon Gibson, OBC (born 1937) is a political columnist, author, and former politician in British Columbia (BC), Canada. He is the son of the late Gordon Gibson Sr, who was a prominent businessman and Liberal Party politician in mid-1950s BC. He received a BA(Honours) in Mathematics & Physics at the University of British Columbia, an MBA from the Harvard Business School, and did research work at the London School of Economics. Gibson served as assistant to the federal Minister of Northern Affairs from 1963 to 1968, and was a special assistant to the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau from 1968 to 1972. He ran as a federal Liberal candidate for the Canadian House of Commons in the 1972 federal election, but lost to Progressive Conservative candidate John Fraser by 3,000 votes. Gibson won election to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia by winning a 1974 by-election as a British Columbia Liberal Party candidate. After three Members of the Legislative Assembly defected to the Social Credit Party three months prior to the 1975 provincial election, party leader David Anderson declined to be renominated for the position. Gibson and Anderson were the only remaining Liberal MLAs. Gibson
    7.00
    1 votes
    199
    H. L. Mencken

    H. L. Mencken

    Henry Louis "H. L." Mencken (September 12, 1880 – January 29, 1956) was an American journalist, essayist, magazine editor, satirist, critic of American life and culture, and a scholar of American English. Known as the "Sage of Baltimore", he is regarded as one of the most influential American writers and prose stylists of the first half of the twentieth century. Many of his books remain in print. Mencken is known for writing The American Language, a multi-volume study of how the English language is spoken in the United States, and for his satirical reporting on the Scopes trial, which he dubbed the "Monkey Trial". He commented widely on the social scene, literature, music, prominent politicians, pseudo-experts, the temperance movement, and uplifters. A keen cheerleader of scientific progress, he was very skeptical of economic theories and particularly critical of anti-intellectualism, bigotry, populism, Fundamentalist Christianity, creationism, organized religion, the existence of God, and osteopathic/chiropractic medicine. In addition to his literary accomplishments, Mencken was known for his controversial ideas. A frank admirer of Nietzsche, he was not a proponent of
    7.00
    1 votes
    200
    Maeve Binchy

    Maeve Binchy

    Maeve Binchy Snell (28 May 1940 – 30 July 2012), known as Maeve Binchy, was an Irish novelist, playwright, short story writer, columnist, and speaker best known for her humorous take on small-town life in Ireland, her descriptive characters, her interest in human nature and her often clever surprise endings. Her novels, which were translated into 37 languages, sold more than 40 million copies worldwide, and her death, announced by Vincent Browne on Irish television late on 30 July 2012, was mourned as the passing of Ireland's best-loved and most recognisable writer. Her books have outsold those of other Irish writers such as Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, W. B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Edna O'Brien and Roddy Doyle. She cracked the U.S. market, featuring on The New York Times bestseller list and in Oprah's Book Club. Recognised for her "total absence of malice" and generosity to other writers, she finished ahead of Jane Austen, Charles Dickens and Stephen King in a 2000 poll for World Book Day. Binchy was born on 28 May 1940 in Dalkey, County Dublin (modern-day Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown), Ireland, the eldest child of four. Her siblings include one brother William Binchy, Regius
    7.00
    1 votes
    201

    Mary McGrory

    Mary McGrory (August 22, 1918 – April 20, 2004) was a liberal American journalist and columnist. She was a fierce opponent of the Vietnam War and was on Richard Nixon's enemies list for writing "daily hate Nixon articles." Born in Roslindale, Boston, Massachusetts to Edward and Mary McGrory, she shared her father's love of Latin and writing, and she graduated from the Girls' Latin School and began her career as a book reviewer at The Boston Herald. She was hired in 1947 by The Washington Star and began her career as a journalist, a path she was inspired to take by reading Jane Arden comic strips. She rose to prominence as their reporter covering the McCarthy hearings in 1954. McGrory won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1975, for her articles about the Watergate scandal. After the Star went out of business in 1981, she went to work for The Washington Post. In 1985, McGrory received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award as well as an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Colby College. She died in Washington, D.C. at the age of 85. McGrory wrote extensively about the Kennedy presidency. She and JFK were close in age, both of Irish descent and from Boston. McGrory's exchange with Daniel
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    1 votes
    202

    Maureen Lipman

    Maureen Diane Lipman, CBE (born 10 May 1946) is a British film, theatre and television actress, columnist and comedienne. Lipman was born in Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, the daughter of Maurice Julius Lipman and Zelma Pearlman. Her father was a tailor; he used to have a shop between the Ferens Art Gallery and Monument Bridge. She attended Newland School for Girls in Hull. Her first performances at home included impersonations of Alma Cogan - ' a nice Jewish girl, she was big in our house' and she was encouraged into an acting career by her mother, who used to take her to the pantomime and push her onto the stage. Lipman trained at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Lipman worked extensively in the theatre following her début in a stage production of The Knack at the Palace Theatre, Watford. In order to get the post she pretended that a documentary producer wanted to follow her finding her first job - this was a lie but it seemed to work. She was a member of Laurence Olivier's Royal National Theatre Company at the Old Vic. She made an early film appearance in Up the Junction. After early appearances in the sitcoms The Lovers, and Doctor at Large, Lipman
    7.00
    1 votes
    203
    Max Lerner

    Max Lerner

    Maxwell "Max" Alan Lerner (December 20, 1902 – June 5, 1992) was an American journalist and educator known for his controversial syndicated column. After immigrating from Russia with his parents in 1907, Lerner earned a B.A. from Yale University in 1923. He studied law there but transferred to Washington University in St. Louis for an M.A. in 1925. He earned a doctorate from the Brookings Institution in 1927 and began work as an editor: Lerner's most influential book was "America as a Civilization: Life and Thought in the United States Today" (1957). Lerner was a staunch opponent of discrimination against African-Americans, but supported the wartime internment of Japanese Americans and backed an American Civil Liberties Union resolution on the issue to "subordinate civil liberties to wartime considerations and political loyalties." During the 30s, Lerner was a strong advocate of the New Deal. His column for the New York Post debuted in 1949. It earned him a place on the master list of Nixon political opponents. During most of his career he was considered a liberal. In his later years however, he was seen as something of a conservative, due to expressing support for the Reagan
    7.00
    1 votes
    204
    Murray Kempton

    Murray Kempton

    James Murray Kempton (December 16, 1917 – May 5, 1997) was an influential American journalist. He won a Pulitzer Prize for journalism in 1985 and won the 1974 U.S. National Book Award in category Contemporary Affairs for The Briar Patch: The People of the State of New York versus Lumumba Shakur, et al. (Its 1997 reprint was subtitled The Trial of the Panther 21.) Kempton was born in Baltimore on December 16, 1917. His mother was Sally Ambler and his father was James Branson Kempton, a stock broker. Kempton's father died of influenza shortly after his birth, leaving the family in financial straits. Kempton worked as a copyboy for H. L. Mencken at the Baltimore Evening Sun. He entered Johns Hopkins in 1935, where he was editor-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins News-Letter. After his graduation in 1939, he worked for a short time as a labor organizer, then joined the staff of the New York Post, earning a reputation for a quietly elegant prose style that featured long but rhythmic sentences, a flair for irony, and gentle, almost scholarly sarcasm. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II and was stationed in New Guinea and the Philippines. He rejoined New York Post in 1949 as
    7.00
    1 votes
    205
    Patricia J. Williams

    Patricia J. Williams

    Patricia J. Williams (born August 28, 1951) is an American legal scholar and a proponent of critical race theory, a school of legal thought that emphasizes race as a fundamental determinant of the American legal system. Williams received her bachelor's degree from Wellesley College in 1972, and her Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School in 1975. She worked as a consumer advocate in the office of the City Attorney in Los Angeles, was a fellow in the School of Criticism and Theory at Dartmouth College and served as associate professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and its department of women's studies. She is currently the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University where she has taught since 1991. Williams is a member of the State Bar of California and the Bar of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Williams has served on the advisory council for the Medgar Evers College for Law and Social Justice of the City University of New York, the board of trustees of Wellesley College, and on the board of governors for the Society of American Law Teachers, among others. She was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, which she held from June 2000
    7.00
    1 votes
    206
    Army Archerd

    Army Archerd

    Armand Andre "Army" Archerd (January 13, 1922 – September 8, 2009) was an American columnist for Variety for over fifty years before retiring his "Just for Variety" column in September 2005. In November 2005, Archerd began blogging for Variety and was working on a memoir when he died. Archerd was born in The Bronx, New York, and graduated from UCLA in 1941. He was hired by Variety to replace columnist Sheilah Graham (former girlfriend of F. Scott Fitzgerald) in 1953. His "Just for Variety" column appeared on page two of Daily Variety and swiftly became popular in Hollywood. Archerd broke countless exclusive stories, reporting from film sets, announcing pending deals, giving news of star-related hospitalizations, marriages, and births. In 1984, he was given a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, in front of Mann's Chinese Theater, where he had emceed dozens of movie premieres. One of his most significant scoops was in his July 23, 1985, column, when he printed that Rock Hudson, despite denials from the actor's publicists and managers, was undergoing treatment for AIDS. Archerd was Jewish and a strong proponent of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Holocaust awareness. He was married to
    5.33
    3 votes
    207

    Ahmed Santos

    Ahmed Abitai Santos (born February 19, 1974 Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico) is a newspaper columnist and former boxer. Santos debuted professionally on October 2, 1992, with a ten-round draw against Francisco Sandoval in Los Mochis. Santos then won seven fights in a row, including a second-round knockout of Sandoval in a rematch held at Culiacán, before moving to Phoenix in 1995. He kept his winning streak going until April 22, 1996, when he lost to former world title challenger David Sample by a ten round decision at Tempe, after having reached thirteen wins in a row. He then won six of his next fights, drawing the other two, with two knockouts. After that, he challenged Pete Talliaferro for the IBA's light welterweight title. He won that belt September 10, 1997, with a nine-round knockout in Las Vegas. He defended the title only once, losing to Antonio Diaz by a twelve round decision on December 20 of the same year. Santos then won three of his next four bouts before challenging for the North American Boxing Federation light welterweight title. Among the three boxers he beat during that span were former world title challenger Billy Irwin and Ricky Quiles. On April 16, 1999, at
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    2 votes
    208

    Erma Bombeck

    Erma Louise Bombeck, née Fiste (February 21, 1927 – April 22, 1996) was an American humorist who achieved great popularity for her newspaper column that described suburban home life from the mid-1960s until the late 1990s. Bombeck also published 15 books, most of which became best-sellers. From 1965 to 1996, Erma Bombeck wrote over 4,000 newspaper columns chronicling the ordinary life of a midwestern suburban housewife with broad, and sometimes eloquent humor. By the 1970s, her columns were read, twice weekly, by thirty million readers of the 900 newspapers of the U.S. and Canada. Erma Fiste was born in Bellbrook, Ohio to a working-class family, and was raised in Dayton. Her father, Cassius Fiste, was the city crane operator; her mother's name was also Erma. Young Erma lived with her elder paternal half-sister, Thelma. She began elementary school one year earlier than usual for her age, in 1932, and became an excellent student and an avid reader. She particularly enjoyed the popular humor writers of the time. After Erma's father died in 1936, she moved, with her mother, into her grandmother's home. In 1938 her mother remarried, to Albert Harris (a moving van owner). Erma practiced
    6.00
    2 votes
    209
    Jeff Gannon

    Jeff Gannon

    James Dale Guckert (born May 22, 1957) is a conservative columnist better known by the pseudonym Jeff Gannon. Between 2003 and 2005, he was given credentials as a White House reporter. He was eventually employed by the conservative website Talon News during the latter part of this period. Gannon first gained national attention during a presidential press conference on January 26, 2005, when he asked United States President George W. Bush a question that some in the press corps considered "so friendly it might have been planted" ("How are you going to work with [Senate Democratic leaders] who seem to have divorced themselves from reality?"). Gannon routinely obtained daily passes to White House briefings, attending four Bush press conferences and appearing regularly at White House press briefings. Although he did not qualify for a Congressional press pass, Gannon was given daily passes to White House press briefings "after supplying his real name, date of birth and Social Security number." Gannon came under public scrutiny for his lack of a journalistic background prior to his work with Talon and his involvement with various homosexual escort service websites using the professional
    6.00
    2 votes
    210

    Louella Parsons

    Louella Parsons (August 6, 1881 – December 9, 1972) was the first American movie columnist. She was retained by William Randolph Hearst, possibly because she had praised Hearst's mistress Marion Davies, and her columns were read by 20 million people in 400 newspapers worldwide. Parsons possessed an uncanny gift for sensing scandal, and her dramatic scoops could make or break an actor's career. She remained the unchallenged Queen of Hollywood until the arrival of Hedda Hopper, who displayed similar talents, and with whom she feuded viciously for years. She was born Louella Rose Oettinger in Freeport, Illinois, the daughter of Joshua Oettinger and Helen Stein, both of German Jewish descent. She had two brothers, Edwin and Fred, and a sister, Rae. In 1890, her widowed mother married John H. Edwards. They lived in Dixon, Illinois, later hometown of Ronald Reagan. As a teenager, Louella was a smart and intelligent young woman. She found little literary outlets to fuel her ambitions. It wasn't until high school that Louella decided to become a writer or a reporter. On June 4, 1901 at her high school graduation, Louella gave foretelling speech entitled “Great Men”. Afterwards her
    6.00
    2 votes
    211
    Chris Morris

    Chris Morris

    Christopher Morris (born 15 June 1962) is an English satirist, known for his black humour and controversial subject matter. He tends to stay out of the public eye and has become one of the more enigmatic figures in British comedy. Morris was born in Cambridgeshire, the son of two GPs. He attended the Catholic boarding school Stonyhurst College in rural Lancashire. After graduating from the University of Bristol with a degree in zoology, he began his career on local BBC radio stations. Morris created a mock news radio programme On The Hour, followed by a television spin off, The Day Today, since hailed as one of the most important satirical shows of the 1990s, which launched the career of Steve Coogan. This was followed by Brass Eye, which developed the satirical news format of The Day Today to focus on themes such as crime and drugs. For many, the apotheosis of Morris' career was a Brass Eye special, which dealt with the moral panic surrounding paedophilia, and became one of the most complained about programmes in British television history, leading The Daily Mail to describe Morris as "the most loathed man on TV". Morris went on to win a BAFTA for Best Short Film for My Wrongs
    5.50
    2 votes
    212
    Froma Harrop

    Froma Harrop

    Froma Harrop (born March 18, 1950 in New York City) is an American writer and author. She is best known for her bi-weekly syndicated column which appears in about 200 newspapers including the Seattle Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, Denver Post, Dallas Morning News, Houston Chronicle, Detroit News, and Miami Herald. Media Matters for America ranks Harrop 20th among the top 100 syndicated columnists for total reader reach and 14th based on average circulation. She is syndicated by Creators Syndicate. She is also a blogger for RealClearPolitics. Born in New York City, Harrop was raised in suburban Long Island. After graduating from New York University, she worked on the financial desk at Reuters, covering business and the Federal Reserve. Harrop later became a business editor for The New York Times News Service. She returned to her reporting roots as a business writer for the Providence Journal in Rhode Island and subsequently joined the Journal’s editorial board, where she remains a member. Harrop currently resides in Providence. Harrop has been a guest on PBS, Fox News, MSNBC, NPR and many other television and radio stations. Specific appearances include the Lou Dobbs Show, The Ed
    5.50
    2 votes
    213
    Dan Savage

    Dan Savage

    Daniel Keenan "Dan" Savage (born October 7, 1964) is an American author, media pundit, journalist and newspaper editor. Savage writes the internationally syndicated relationship and sex advice column Savage Love. Its tone is frank in its discussion of sexuality, often humorous, and hostile to social conservatives and Rick Santorum's views on homosexuality. Savage has clashed with cultural conservatives on the right, and the gay establishment, on the left. He has also worked as a theater director, both under his real name and under the name Keenan Hollahan, using his middle name and his grandmother's maiden name. In 2010, Savage and his husband Terry Miller began the It Gets Better Project to help prevent suicide among LGBT youth. Dan Savage was born to William and Judy Savage in Chicago, Illinois. He is of Irish ancestry. The third of four children, Savage was raised as a Roman Catholic and attended Quigley Preparatory Seminary North, which he has described as "a Catholic high school in Chicago for boys thinking of becoming priests." Though Savage has stated that he is now "a wishy-washy agnostic" and an atheist, he has said that he still considers himself "culturally
    6.00
    1 votes
    214
    E. Jean Carroll

    E. Jean Carroll

    E. Jean Carroll (born December 12, 1943) is an American journalist and advice columnist. Her “Ask E. Jean” column has appeared in Elle magazine since 1993, and was ranked one of the five best magazine columns (along with Anthony Lane of The New Yorker and Lewis Lapham of Harper's Magazine ) by the Chicago Tribune in 2003. Born Elizabeth Jean Carroll in Detroit, Michigan, and nicknamed "Betty Jean" from an early age, Carroll's opinions on sex, her impatient, boisterous counsel that women should “never never” wrap their lives around men, and her compassion for letter-writers experiencing life’s hard knocks, make her column unique in women’s magazines. Amy Gross, former editor-in-chief of Elle and currently the editor-in-chief O, The Oprah Magazine, recalls the “Ask E. Jean” debut. “It was as though we had put her on a bucking bronco and her answers were the cheers and whoops and hollers of a fearless woman having a good ol time.” NBC’s cable channel, America's Talking, produced the Ask E. Jean television show based on the column from 1994-1996 (when the channel became MSNBC). Entertainment Weekly called Carroll “[T]he most entertaining cable talk show host you will never see.” Jeff
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    1 votes
    215
    G. K. Chesterton

    G. K. Chesterton

    Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) was an English writer. He published works on philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox", The Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out." Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both progressivism and conservatism, saying, "The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected." Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify such a position
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    1 votes
    216
    Hammad Husain

    Hammad Husain

    Hammad Husain (b. February 12, 1970) is a Pakistani architect and writer, based in Islamabad. Hammad was born in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. His father, Javed Husain, a retired brigadier, served in the Pakistan Army. Hammad studied at Aitchison College, Lahore and Saint Mary's Academy in Rawalpindi. In 1989, he went to Ankara, Turkey to study architecture at Middle East Technical University (METU). Upon receiving his architecture degree from METU in 1994, Hammad returned home and joined one of the leading architecture firms of the city. In 1996, he set up his own practice, Hammad Husain Associates, Architects. He has designed farmhouses, villas, office buildings, hospitals and many other projects in over fifteen cities of Pakistan. Hammad gained prominence in 2004 when he was commissioned by General Pervez Musharraf, the President of Pakistan and a front line US ally in the War on Terror, to design his farmhouse in Islamabad. After Mr Musharraf’s resignation as president on August 18, 2008, his farmhouse, along with his architect, came under local and international media spotlight amid speculations whether Mr Musharraf would be able to live in his soon-to-be-completed farmhouse or leave
    6.00
    1 votes
    217

    John Waters

    John Waters (born on 28 May 1955) is a columnist with The Irish Times, a former editor of Magill magazine and serial Eurovision Song Contest entrant. Waters's career began in 1981 with the Irish political-music magazine Hot Press. He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin magazine and Magill. Waters has written several books and, in 1998, he devised The Whoseday Book — which contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians — that raised some €3 million for the Irish Hospice Foundation. Waters is an ardent supporter of the fathers' rights movement in Ireland. He writes a weekly Friday column for The Irish Times. He was briefly fired during a dispute with the editor, Geraldine Kennedy, but was shortly thereafter reinstated. He has also stripped off to be painted for the RTÉ programme, simply titled Naked. He was born in Castlerea, County Roscommon. He had a daughter in 1996 named Róisín with singer Sinéad O'Connor. Waters has referred to himself as a "neo-Luddite" or later as a "luddite". At one stage he refused to use e-mail and stated his concern that society ignores the negative aspects of the Internet. In his articles titled
    6.00
    1 votes
    218

    Mary Schmich

    Mary Theresa Schmich (born November 29, 1953) is an American columnist for the Chicago Tribune. Born in Savannah, Georgia, the oldest of eight children, Schmich grew up in Georgia, attended high school in Phoenix, Arizona, and earned a B.A. from Pomona College. After working in college admissions for three years and spending a year and a half in France, Schmich attended journalism school at Stanford. She has worked as a reporter at the Peninsula Times Tribune, at the Orlando Sentinel and, since 1985, at the Tribune. She spent five years as a Tribune national correspondent based in Atlanta. Her column started in 1992 and was interrupted for a year during which she attended Harvard on a Nieman Fellowship for journalists. In addition to writing her column, Schmich was the author of the long-lived comic strip Brenda Starr from 1985 through its final appearance in January 2011, and has worked as a professional barrelhouse and ragtime piano player. About four times a year, Schmich and fellow Tribune metro columnist Eric Zorn write a week of columns that consist of a back-and-forth exchange of letters. Each December, Schmich and Zorn host the "Songs of Good Cheer" holiday caroling parties
    6.00
    1 votes
    219
    Michael Smerconish

    Michael Smerconish

    Michael A. Smerconish is an American radio and television personality, newspaper columnist, author and MSNBC political analyst. His talk radio show is based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Talk Radio 1210 AM WPHT. He began his full-time radio career in 2002. Since January 2009, Smerconish's two daily nationally syndicated radio programs have been heard on 70 stations in the United States, including WOR News Talk Radio 710 in New York City and KFWB News Talk 980 in Los Angeles. Smerconish canceled the morning show in November 2010. On August 20, 2009, Smerconish became the first talk radio host to broadcast live from the Obama White House, a show which included an interview with the President himself. The interview was held in the Diplomatic Reception Room, where President Franklin D. Roosevelt's fireside chats were held. The President took questions from Smerconish and his listeners on a variety of subjects including the recent debates on the pending Healthcare Reform Bill. Smerconish has substituted for Bill O'Reilly on The O'Reilly Factor, Glenn Beck on his CNN Headline News television program, Chris Matthews on Hardball, and for Joe Scarborough on his former MSNBC show
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    1 votes
    220
    Stanley Fish

    Stanley Fish

    Stanley Eugene Fish (born April 19, 1938 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an American literary theorist, legal scholar, academic, and public intellectual. He is often associated with postmodernism, at times to his irritation, as he describes himself as an anti-foundationalist. He is the Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor of Humanities and a professor of law at Florida International University, in Miami, as well as Dean Emeritus of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the author of 12 books. Fish has also taught at the Cardozo School of Law, University of California, Berkeley, Johns Hopkins University, The University of Pennsylvania, Yale Law, Columbia University, The John Marshall Law School, and Duke University. Fish earned a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1959, and an M.A. from Yale University in 1960. He completed his Ph.D. in 1962, also at Yale University. He taught English at the University of California at Berkeley and Johns Hopkins University before becoming Arts and Sciences Professor of English and Professor of Law at Duke University from 1986 to 1998. From 1999 to 2004 he was Dean of the College
    6.00
    1 votes
    221
    Tristan Taormino

    Tristan Taormino

    Tristan Taormino (born May 9, 1971) is a feminist author, columnist, sex educator, activist, editor, speaker, and pornographic film director (she also appeared in three films, two of which she directed, 1999–2000). She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with her Bachelor's degree in American Studies from Wesleyan University in 1993. Tristan Taormino is the niece of author Thomas Pynchon. Taormino is the author of seven books, including the Firecracker Book Award-winning The Ultimate Guide to Anal Sex for Women. She has edited anthologies books including the Lambda Literary Award-winning anthology Best Lesbian Erotica, an annual anthology published by Cleis Press, for which she has collaborated with writers Heather Lewis, Jewelle Gomez, Jenifer Levin, Chrystos, Joan Nestle, Patrick Califia, Amber Hollibaugh, Cheryl Clarke, Michelle Tea, Eileen Myles, Ali Liebegott, Emma Donoghue, Felice Newman, and Joan Larkin. She is a columnist for Taboo, and a former columnist for The Village Voice and Velvetpark. She is the former editor of On Our Backs, the nation's oldest lesbian-produced lesbian sex magazine. Taormino has been featured in publications including The New York Times, Redbook,
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    1 votes
    222
    W. Bruce Cameron

    W. Bruce Cameron

    William Bruce Cameron (born 1960 in Petoskey, Michigan) is an internationally known humor columnist. Cameron attended Westminster College. He is the author of 8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter, a best selling self-improvement book adapted to the short-lived ABC sitcom which aired from 2002 to 2005. His book, 8 Simple Rules for Marrying My Daughter, was released in the spring of 2008, and already had a Hollywood movie deal before its publication, with 89 Films and Wendy Finerman, producer of The Devil Wears Prada. He is author of How to Remodel a Man, which was excerpted in the August 2005 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine, and was the subject of the November 1, 2005 Oprah Show. His novel A Dog's Purpose was published July 2010 by Tom Doherty Associates. It was 19 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list in its hardcover release. The softcover version was released May 24, 2011.
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    1 votes
    223
    Ian O'Doherty

    Ian O'Doherty

    Ian O'Doherty is a columnist who works for the Irish Independent. His "iSpy" column is published Monday – Thursday and contains news articles blended with comedy and shock jock opinions. On Fridays O'Doherty publishes a rather more serious column containing his opinion on a chosen subject in "The World according to Ian O'Doherty". He used to work for the Evening Herald. He was at Hot Press during the "Charlton years". O'Doherty has appeared on high-profile topical shows such as The Late Late Show and The Frontline. He holds "strong opinions about Ireland's growing Muslim population" and in 2011, he presented the RTÉ documentary Now It's Personal, in which he spent a week living with Muslims, and volunteered to sleep on the floor of a Mosque. O'Doherty is a self-proclaimed atheist, and libertarian (which he claims is different from being right-wing). He has been a speaker during at least one Atheist Ireland meeting. Ian O'Doherty has angrily denied that he has a drinking problem. O'Doherty is a married man. He is a fan of British soap opera Coronation Street. O'Doherty has a loathing for Irish republican music and claims to have been beaten up at a Wolfetones concert. He describes
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    2 votes
    224
    Joshua Green

    Joshua Green

    Joshua Green (born 1972) is an American journalist who writes primarily on United States politics. He is currently senior national correspondent at Bloomberg Businessweek and a weekly columnist for the Boston Globe. Green graduated from Connecticut College in 1994 and earned a graduate degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism in 1998. Green began his journalism career in 1995 as an editor at the satirical weekly The Onion. From 2000 to 2001, he was a staff writer at The American Prospect. He then joined The Washington Monthly, where he worked as an editor from 2001 to 2003. Green has also contributed articles to Slate and The New Yorker. Green was with The Atlantic from September 2003 to July 1011. During that time his work has been anthologized in collections ranging from Best American Political Writing 2009 to The Bob Marley Reader. Among his more notable writings for The Atlantic are a November 2006 cover story on Hillary Rodham Clinton and a November 2004 story on George W. Bush presidential adviser Karl Rove. Green also wrote an article for The Atlantic in October 2007 exploring the feasibility of the announced presidential campaign of the comedian
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    2 votes
    225

    Raymond Aron

    Raymond-Claude-Ferdinand Aron (French: [ʁɛmɔ̃ aʁɔ̃]; 14 March 1905 – 17 October 1983) was a French philosopher, sociologist, journalist and political scientist. He is known for his lifelong friendship, sometimes fractious, with Jean-Paul Sartre. He is best known for his 1955 book The Opium of the Intellectuals, the title of which inverts Karl Marx's claim that religion was the opium of the people -- in contrast, Aron argued that in post-war France Marxism was the opium of intellectuals. In the book, Aron chastized French intellectuals for what he described as their harsh criticism of capitalism and democracy and their simultaneous defense of Marxist oppression, atrocities and intolerance. Critic Roger Kimball suggests that Opium is "a seminal book of the twentieth century." Aron also wrote extensively on a wide range of other topics, however. Citing the breadth and quality of Aron's writings, historian James R. Garland suggests that "Though he may be little known in America, Raymond Aron arguably stood as the preeminent example of French intellectualism for much of the twentieth century." Born in Paris, the son of a secular Jewish lawyer, Aron studied at the École Normale
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    226
    Aberjhani

    Aberjhani

    Aberjhani is an American historian, columnist, novelist, poet, and editor. Although well known for his blog articles on literature and politics, he is perhaps best known as co-author of Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance and author of I Made My Boy Out of Poetry. The encyclopedia won a Choice Academic Title Award in 2004. Aberjhani grew up in Savannah, Georgia. Upon graduating from Savannah High School in 1975, he studied journalism, creative writing, and the American community at a variety of colleges: Savannah State College (now University); Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida; Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota; Temple University in Philadelphia; and the New College of California in San Francisco. He completed additional studies in journalism at the Fort Benjamin Harrison School of Journalism in Indianapolis, Indiana. He served a two-year tour of duty with the U.S. Air Force in Fairbanks, Alaska; four years in Suffolk, England; and another two years with the USAF Reserves in [[Charleston, South Carolina. He studied Equal Opportunity and Human Relations Counseling at the DEOMI Institute at Tyndale AFB, Florida. Aberjhani, the name he assumed for publication as
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    227
    Amira Hass

    Amira Hass

    Amira Hass (Hebrew: עמירה הס‎; born 28 June 1956) is an Israeli left-wing journalist and author, mostly known for her columns in the daily newspaper Ha'aretz. She is particularly recognized for her reporting on Palestinian affairs in the West Bank and Gaza, where she has also lived for a number of years. The daughter of two Holocaust survivors, Hass is the only child of a Sarajevo-born Jewish mother, who survived nine months in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, and a Romanian-born Jewish father. Hass was born in Jerusalem, and was educated at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she studied the history of Nazism and the European Left's relation to the Holocaust. Early in her career, she traveled widely and worked in several different jobs. For some years during the 1980s, Hass lived in Amsterdam, being married to a Dutchman. She spoke fluent Dutch and was involved with various Left-wing, Feminist and Jewish dissident groups. However, her marriage broke down and she returned to Israel. Until 1989, Hass wrote occasionally for low-circulation left-wing magazines, but was not known to the general public. Her journalistic career was launched due to the Romanian Revolution of
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    228
    Hedda Hopper

    Hedda Hopper

    Hedda Hopper (May 2, 1885 – February 1, 1966) was one of America's best-known gossip columnists, notorious for feuding with her arch-rival Louella Parsons. She had been a small-time actress of stage and screen for years before being offered the chance to write a column 'Hedda Hopper's Hollywood' in the Los Angeles Times in 1938. This revealed a gift for invective so vicious that it brought physical retaliation from Spencer Tracy and Joseph Cotten, among others, and she also named suspected communists in the McCarthy era. Hopper continued to write gossip to the end, her work appearing in countless magazines and later on radio. She was born Elda Furry in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter of David D. (born 1857) and Margaret Miller (born 1856) Furry, members of the German Baptist Brethren. Her siblings included Dora Furry (born 1880); Sherman Furry (born 1882); Cameron Furry (born 1887); Edgar Furry (1889–1975); Frank M. Furry (born 1891); and Margaret Furry (born 1897). The family moved to Altoona when Elda was three. Her father was a butcher who owned a shop. She eventually ran away to New York and began her career in the chorus on the Broadway stage. Hopper was not
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    229

    Joyce Jillson

    Joyce Jillson (December 26, 1945 — October 1, 2004) was a syndicated newspaper columnist, best-selling author, actress, and astrologer. Her column was syndicated worldwide in over 200 papers and magazines. Born Joyce Twichell in Cranston, Rhode Island, Jillson attended Boston University on an opera scholarship. She began her acting career in New York City, where she appeared on Broadway in the Anthony Newley musical, The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd. She starred as Jill Smith in ABC Television's top rated series Peyton Place. She played the title role in the 1973 exploitation film, Superchick. She began presenting horoscope reports on Los Angeles television in 1973. Jillson was the official astrologer for Twentieth Century Fox Studios, suggesting the most astrologically favorable dates for movie openings, including "Star Wars" on May 25, 1977. She was also the official astrologer for the Los Angeles Dodgers, and was a media consultant to Ford Motor Company on the launch of the Ford Taurus. Joyce was also a best selling non-fiction author, including such books as Real Women Don't Pump Gas, The Fine Art of Flirting, "A Year of Good Luck", and Joyce Jillson's
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    230

    Lynda Lee-Potter

    Lynda Lee-Potter OBE (born Lynda Higginson; 2 May 1935 – 20 October 2004) was a columnist for the British newspaper the Daily Mail. Lynda Higginson was born into a working-class family in the mining town of Leigh, Lancashire, England. Her father was a miner, who would later turn to painting and decorating; her mother worked in a shoe shop. Lynda won a place at Leigh Girls' Grammar School, which she described as "the escape route for ordinary children and the pathway to a new life". Her first ambition was to become an actress and, aged 18, she went to London to attend the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. She later told friends that she lost her Lancashire accent on the train down. After leaving the Guildhall School, and using the stage name Lynda Berrison, she won a part in one of Brian Rix's farces at the Whitehall Theatre. Her life changed, however, when she met Jeremy Lee-Potter, the son of Air Marshal Sir Patrick Lee-Potter. At the time, Jeremy was a medical student at Guy's Hospital. He went on to become an eminent consultant haematologist, based at Poole General Hospital, chairman of the Council of the British Medical Association from 1990 to 1993 and the deputy chairman
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    231
    Mary Roach

    Mary Roach

    Mary Roach is an American author, specializing in popular science. She currently resides in Oakland, California. To date, she has published four books: Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers (2003), Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife (2005) (published in some markets as Six Feet Over: Adventures in the Afterlife), Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex (2008) and Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void (2010). Roach was raised in Etna, New Hampshire. She received a bachelor's degree in psychology from Wesleyan University in 1981. After college, Roach moved to San Francisco, California, and spent a few years working as a freelance copy editor. She worked as a columnist, and also worked in public relations for a brief time. Her writing career began while working part-time at the San Francisco Zoological Society, producing press releases on topics such as elephant wart surgery. On her days off from the SFZS, she wrote freelance articles for the San Francisco Chronicle's Sunday Magazine. From 1996 to 2005 Roach was part of The Grotto, a San Francisco based project and community of working writers and filmmakers. It was in this community, that Roach would
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    232

    Woody Paige

    Woodrow Wilson "Woody" Paige, Jr. (born June 27, 1946) is a sports columnist for The Denver Post, author, and a regular panelist on the ESPN sports-talk program Around the Horn. He was also a co-host of Cold Pizza and its spin-off show 1st and 10 until November 4, 2006, when it was announced that Paige would return to the Post. Paige is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee and is a Baseball Hall of Fame voter. Paige attended the University of Tennessee and joined Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity in 1964. After leaving UT, he began his career with the Whitehaven Press in 1963, and went on to write for the Knoxville Journal, The Commercial Appeal of Memphis, and the Rocky Mountain News of Denver. Paige joined the Denver Post in 1981. As of 2007, he writes four columns per week. In 2001 there was a controversy over one of Paige's articles. He reported that an employee at Invesco, which had the naming rights to the Denver Broncos stadium, Invesco Field at Mile High, claimed that the nickname for the stadium inside the company was "The Diaphragm," after its shape (which slightly resembles a contraceptive device with the same name). The CEO of the company threatened
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    233
    Alexander Cockburn

    Alexander Cockburn

    Alexander Claud Cockburn ( /ˈkoʊbərn/ KOH-bərn; 6 June 1941 – 21 July 2012) was an Irish American political journalist and writer. Cockburn was brought up in Ireland but had lived and worked in the United States since 1972. Together with Jeffrey St. Clair, he edited the political newsletter CounterPunch. Cockburn also wrote the "Beat the Devil" column for The Nation as well as one for The Week in London, syndicated by Creators Syndicate. Born in Scotland, Cockburn grew up in Youghal, County Cork, Ireland. He was the eldest son of the former communist author and journalist, Claud Cockburn, by his third wife, Patricia Byron, née Arbuthnot (who also wrote an autobiography, Figure of Eight). His ancestors included Sir George Cockburn, 10th Baronet. He had one daughter, Daisy Alice Cockburn (5 February 1969), whose mother is the writer Emma Tennant (his wife 13 December 1968 – 1973), and two younger brothers, Andrew Cockburn and Patrick Cockburn, who are also journalists. His half-sister, the barrister and mystery writer Sarah Caudwell, died in 2000. In addition, journalists Laura Flanders and Stephanie Flanders are his half-nieces, daughters of his half-sister Claudia Cockburn and her
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    234
    Andrew Coyne

    Andrew Coyne

    James Andrew Coyne (born December 23, 1960) is a Canadian political columnist with the National Post and a member of the At Issue panel on CBC. Previously, he has been national editor for Maclean's, a weekly national newsmagazine in Canada and a columnist with the Globe and Mail. Coyne was born in Ottawa, Ontario, the son of Hope Meribeth Cameron (née Stobie) and James Coyne, who was governor of the Bank of Canada from 1955 to 1961. His paternal great-grandfather was historian and lawyer James Henry Coyne. His sister is actress Susan Coyne. He is also the cousin of constitutional lawyer Deborah Coyne, who is the mother of Pierre Trudeau's youngest child. Coyne studied at the University of Manitoba where he was editor of The Manitoban before transferring to the University of Toronto's University of Trinity College, from which he received a BA in economics and history. He received his master's degree in economics from the London School of Economics. Coyne has said that he considers the political labels "left" and "right" to be "tribes" of "self-quarantine." He endorses a strong federal government, more market based economic solutions, and a stronger role for Canada in the War on
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    235
    Ed Rosenthal

    Ed Rosenthal

    Ed Rosenthal (born Bronx, New York, 1944) is a California horticulturist, author, publisher, and Cannabis grower known for his advocacy for the legalization of marijuana (cannabis as a drug) use. He served as a columnist for High Times Magazine during the '80s and '90s. He was arrested by federal authorities in 2002 for cultivation of cannabis, who do not recognize the authority of states to regulate the use of medical marijuana. He was convicted in federal court, but the conviction was overturned on appeal. Rosenthal was subsequently convicted again, but was not re-sentenced, since his original sentence had been completed. Rosenthal briefly attended Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio. Rosenthal has been active in promoting and developing policies of civil regulation for medicinal marijuana. With the passage of California's pioneering Proposition 215 in 1996, which authorizes medicinal use of marijuana, he worked with the state and local governments to implement the delivery of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis to patients with a doctor's recommendation to use marijuana. Rosenthal is also the author of numerous books about the cultivation of marijuana. His most recent
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    236

    Irving Kristol

    Irving Kristol (January 22, 1920 – September 18, 2009) was an American columnist, journalist, and writer who was dubbed the "godfather of neoconservatism". As the founder, editor, and contributor to various magazines, he played an influential role in the intellectual and political culture of the last half-century; after his death he was described by The Daily Telegraph as being "perhaps the most consequential public intellectual of the latter half of the 20th century". Kristol was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of non-observant Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. He received his B.A. from the City College of New York in 1940, where he majored in history and was part of a small but vocal Trotskyist anti-Soviet group who eventually became the New York Intellectuals. During World War II, he served in Europe in the 12th Armored Division as a combat infantryman. Kristol was affiliated with the Congress for Cultural Freedom; he wrote in Commentary magazine from 1947 to 1952, under the editor Elliot Cohen (not to be confused with Elliot A. Cohen the writer of today's magazine); co-founder (with Stephen Spender) of the British-based Encounter from 1953 to 1958; editor of The
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    237
    Amy Goodman

    Amy Goodman

    Amy Goodman (born April 13, 1957) is an American progressive broadcast journalist, syndicated columnist, investigative reporter and author. Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, an independent global news program broadcast daily on radio, television and the Internet. Goodman was born in Bay Shore, New York on April 13, 1957 to George, an ophthalmologist, and Dorothy (née Bock) Goodman. She was raised in a Jewish household (her maternal grandfather was an Orthodox Rabbi). She graduated from Bay Shore High School in 1975, and graduated from Radcliffe College in 1984 with a degree in anthropology. Goodman spent a year studying at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine. Goodman had been news director of Pacifica Radio station WBAI in New York City for over a decade when she co-founded Democracy Now! The War and Peace Report in 1996. Since then, Democracy Now! has been called "probably the most significant progressive news institution that has come around in some time" by professor and media critic Robert McChesney. In 2001, the show was temporarily pulled off the air, as a result of a conflict with a group of Pacifica Radio board members and Pacifica staff members and
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    238
    Ann Widdecombe

    Ann Widdecombe

    Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a former British Conservative Party politician and has been a novelist since 2000. She is a Privy Councillor and was the Member of Parliament for Maidstone from 1987 to 1997 and for Maidstone and The Weald from 1997 to 2010. She was a social conservative and a member of the Conservative Christian Fellowship. She retired from politics at the 2010 general election. Since 2002 she has also made numerous television and radio appearances, including as a television presenter. She is a convert from Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism. When an MP Widdecombe was known for her strong socially conservative views, opposing the legality of abortion and supporting the re-introduction of the death penalty. Born in Bath, Somerset, Widdecombe is the daughter of a Ministry of Defence civil servant James Murray Widdecombe and Rita N Plummer. She attended the Royal Navy School in Singapore, and a convent school in Bath. She then read Latin at Birmingham University and later attended Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE). She worked for Unilever (1973–75) and then as an administrator at the University of London (1975–87)
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    239
    Chetan Bhagat

    Chetan Bhagat

    Chetan Bhagat (born 22 April 1974), is an Indian author, columnist, and speaker. Bhagat is the author of five bestselling novels, Five Point Someone (2004), One Night @ the Call Center (2005), The 3 Mistakes of My Life (2008), 2 States (2009) & Revolution 2020: Love, Corruption, Ambition (2011). All five books have remained bestsellers since their release and two have inspired Bollywood films (including the hit film 3 Idiots). In 2008, The New York Times called Bhagat "the biggest selling English language novelist in India's history". Bhagat, an alumnus of Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi and Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, is seen more as a youth icon than as an author. Time magazine named him as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. Bhagat writes op-ed columns for English and Hindi newspapers, including The Guardian, The Times of India and Dainik Bhaskar, focusing on youth, career and issues based on national development. Bhagat voices his opinion frequently at leading events. He quit his investment banking career in 2009, to devote his entire time to writing. Bhagat was born in New Delhi to a middle-class family. His father was in the army and
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    240

    Christie Blatchford

    Christie Blatchford (born May 20, 1951) is a Canadian newspaper columnist, journalist and broadcaster. She has published four non-fiction books. Blatchford was born in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, and attended North Toronto Collegiate Institute. She worked for the student paper of Ryerson University. She worked as a sports reporter for the Globe and Mail, and as a columnist at the Toronto Star, before moving to the Toronto Sun. She remained at the Sun for almost 20 years. In 1999, she received the National Newspaper Award for column writing. She later moved to take up a columnist's job at The Globe and Mail in 2003. She returned to the National Post in 2011. During four trips to Afghanistan in 2006–07, she reported on the experiences of Canadian soldiers. Based on these experiences, she wrote the book Fifteen Days: Stories of Bravery, Friendship, Life and Death from Inside the New Canadian Army. The book went on to garner the 2008 Governor General's Literary Award in Non-fiction. Blatchford's book Helpless: Caledonia's Nightmare of Fear and Anarchy, and How the Law Failed All of Us, an account of the criminal actions of Native Canadians in Caledonia, Ontario, led to some controversy
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    241
    Éric Zemmour

    Éric Zemmour

    Éric Zemmour (born August 31, 1958) is a French writer and political journalist, born in Montreuil, Seine-Saint-Denis. Until 2009, he was a reporter for Le Figaro and has since had a column in Figaro Magazine. He has also appeared as a television personality on the shows On n'est pas couché on France 2 between 2006 and 2011, Ça se dispute on i>TÉLÉ since 2003, and Z comme Zemmour on RTL since January 2010. Starting September 2011, he has hosted Zemmour et Naulleau, a weekly evening talk show on Paris Première, together with Éric Naulleau. Éric Zemmour was born in Montreuil (today in Seine-Saint-Denis) on August 31, 1958, to an Algerian Jewish, family that came to Metropolitan France during the Algerian War. He defines himself as a Jew of Berber origin. and above all as a French Jew. He grew up in Drancy and later in the Paris district of Château Rouge. The son of Roger Zemmour, a paramedic, and his wife Lucette, a housewife, he has said he admires his mother and grandmother: his father was often absent, and he was actually raised by women "who taught [him] to be a man." Zemmour, who graduated from the Institut d'études politiques de Paris, twice failed to gain admission to the
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    242

    Glenn Sacks

    Glenn Sacks is an American men's and fathers' issues columnist and media spokesperson. He is the first columnist specializing in men's and fathers' issues to be published regularly in Top 100 American newspapers. From 2003-2005, His Side with Glenn Sacks ran in a syndicated talk show format in Los Angeles, New York City, Boston, Seattle, and other cities. Sacks is a frequent guest on radio and TV shows, and is often quoted in newspapers and magazines. He began a blog in 2006, and sends out a weekly e-newsletter to 50,000 subscribers. He is the former Executive Director of Fathers & Families. Sacks is also known for his ability to quickly rally support from thousands of his readers in support of his campaigns against anti-male bias. Some examples include his campaigns against "Boys are stupid, throw rocks at them!" children's T-shirts and the Verizon TV ad "Homework," which Sacks says depicts fathers negatively. Both campaigns received national media attention. Sacks is married with two children. In 1999, he received a master's degree in Latin American studies from University of California, Los Angeles. He also worked as an adjunct professor of English as a second language at
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    243

    Herbert Muschamp

    Herbert Mitchell Muschamp (November 28, 1947 – October 2, 2007) was an American architecture critic. Born in Philadelphia, Muschamp described his childhood home life as follows: “The living room was a secret. A forbidden zone. The new slipcovers were not, in fact, the reason why sitting down there was taboo. That was just the cover story. It was used to conceal the inability of family members to hold a conversation. Who knew what other secrets might come tumbling out if they actually sat down and talked? The cause of Mother’s headaches might come up.” This motivated Muschamp to engage in boisterous conversations outside the home in later years, particularly in the company of such up-and-coming architects as Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel, Bernard Tschumi and Tod Williams, which formed the basis for his perceptive and often vehement architectural commentary and criticism. Muschamp attended the University of Pennsylvania but dropped out after two years to move to New York City, where he was a regular at Andy Warhol's Factory. He later attended Parsons School of Design, where he studied architecture, and returned to teach after spending
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    244
    Hugh Samuel Johnson

    Hugh Samuel Johnson

    Hugh Samuel "Iron Pants" Johnson (August 5, 1881 – April 15, 1942) American Army officer, businessman, speech writer, government official and newspaper columnist. He is best known as a member of the Brain Trust of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932-34. He wrote numerous speeches for FDR and helped plan the New Deal. Appointed head of the National Recovery Administration (NRA) in 1933, he was highly energetic in his "blue eagle" campaign to reorganize American business to reduce cut-throat competition and raise wages. Schlesinger (1958) and Ohl (1985) conclude that he was an excellent organizer, but that he was also domineering, abusive, outspoken, and unable to work harmoniously with his peers. The NRA was terminated by a ruling of the Supreme Court, and Johnson left the administration after a little more than a year. He was born in Fort Scott, Kansas in 1881 to Samuel L. and Elizabeth (Mead) Johnson. His paternal grandparents, Samuel and Matilda (MacAlan) Johnson, emigrated to the United States from Ireland in 1837 and originally settled in Brooklyn, New York. Hugh's father was a lawyer, and he attended public school in Wichita, Kansas, before the family moved to Alva, Oklahoma
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    245
    Jean-François Revel

    Jean-François Revel

    Jean-François Revel (19 January 1924, Marseille – 30 April 2006, Kremlin-Bicêtre) was a French journalist, author, prolific philosopher and member of the Académie française from June 1998. A socialist in his youth, Revel later became a prominent European proponent of classical liberalism and free market economics. He was born Jean-François Ricard, but later adopted his pseudonym Revel as his legal surname. During the German occupation of France in WWII, Revel participated in the French Resistance and later noted that the officious but disgraceful manner of French collaborators influenced his writings. He studied at the Lycée du Parc in Lyon and was accepted at the prestigious École normale supérieure where he studied philosophy. He began his career as a philosophy professor, and taught in French Algeria, Italy and Mexico, before settling in Lille. He stopped teaching in 1963 and embarked on his career as an essayist and writer, as well as directing various publications. From 1998 to 2006, he was president of the Institut d'Histoire Sociale. His successor is Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie. In 1986 Revel was honored with an honorary doctorate degree for his commitment to individual
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    246

    Julia Hartley-Brewer

    Julia Hartley-Brewer (born 1968) is a British broadcaster and columnist. She presents the weekday afternoon radio show from 1pm to 4pm on LBC 97.3FM, the talk radio station. She was born in Birmingham and educated at Girls' Comprehensive School in Bath, and Woodhouse Sixth Form College in North London. Hartley-Brewer studied (PPE) at Magdalen College, Oxford, and after graduation at the Centre for Journalism Studies, Cardiff. She began her career in journalism at the East London Advertiser in Bethnal Green. Later she worked as both a news reporter and political correspondent for the London Evening Standard and then joined The Guardian, working at the latter until around September 2000. She was subsequently with the Sunday Express until February 2011. She was Political Editor until 2007 and then Assistant Editor (Politics), also writing a column. In 2006, she presented and narrated two political documentaries for BBC2/BBC4 about the history of British deputy prime ministers, called Every Prime Minister Needs a Willie, and the history of the leader of the opposition in The Worst Job in Politics. She has appeared as a panellist on the comedy quiz show Have I Got News For You seven
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    247
    Manning Marable

    Manning Marable

    William Manning Marable (May 13, 1950 – April 1, 2011) was an American professor of public affairs, history and African-American Studies at Columbia University. Marable founded and directed the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Marable authored several texts and was active in progressive political causes. At the time of his death, Marable had completed a biography of human rights activist Malcolm X, entitled Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for History. Marable was born in Dayton, Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Earlham College (1971) and went on to earn his master's degree (1972) and Ph.D. (1976) in history, at University of Wisconsin, and University of Maryland. Marable served on the faculty of Tuskegee Institute, University of San Francisco, Cornell University, Fisk University, served as the founding director of the Africana and Hispanic Studies Program at Colgate University, Purdue University, Ohio State University, and University of Colorado at Boulder, where he was chairman of the Department of Black Studies. He founded the Institute for Research in African-American Studies (1993) at Columbia
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    248
    Marilyn vos Savant

    Marilyn vos Savant

    Marilyn vos Savant ( /ˌvɒs səˈvɑːnt/; born August 11, 1946) is an American magazine columnist, author, lecturer, and playwright who rose to fame through her listing in the Guinness Book of World Records under "Highest IQ". Since 1986 she has written "Ask Marilyn", a Sunday column in Parade magazine in which she solves puzzles and answers questions from readers on a variety of subjects. Vos Savant was born Marilyn Mach in St. Louis, Missouri, to Joseph Mach and Marina vos Savant, who had immigrated to the United States from Germany and Italy respectively. Vos Savant believes that both men and women should keep their premarital surnames for life, with sons taking their fathers' surnames and daughters their mothers'. The word "savant", meaning a person of learning, appears twice in her family: her maternal grandmother's maiden name was Savant, while her maternal grandfather's surname was vos Savant. Vos Savant is of Italian, German, and Austrian ancestry – she is a descendant of physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. As a teenager, vos Savant spent her time working in her father's general store and enjoyed writing and reading. She sometimes wrote articles and subsequently published
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    249
    Roger L. Simon

    Roger L. Simon

    Roger Lichtenberg Simon (born November 22, 1943) is an American novelist and screenwriter. He is currently CEO of PJ Media (formerly known as Pajamas Media). He is the author of ten novels, including the Moses Wine detective series, and six screenplays. He has served as president of the West Coast branch of PEN, a member of the Board of Directors of the Writers Guild of America, and was on the faculty of the American Film Institute and the Sundance Institute. Simon currently serves as CEO of PJ Media. PJ Media is a media company and operator of an eponymous conservative opinion and commentary website. Founded in 2004 by a network primarily, but not exclusively, made up of conservatives and libertarians led by Simon, it was originally intended as a forum to present blogs "with the intention of... aggregating blogs to increase corporate advertising and creating our own professional news service" but now includes an online television service, PJTV, as well. PJ Media's name, formerly Pajamas Media, is derived from a dismissive comment made by former news executive vice-president Jonathan Klein of CBS during the Killian documents affair involving then-CBS anchorman Dan Rather in the
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    250
    William F. Buckley, Jr.

    William F. Buckley, Jr.

    William Frank Buckley, Jr. (November 24, 1925 – February 27, 2008) was a conservative American author and commentator. He founded the political magazine National Review in 1955, which had a major impact in stimulating the conservative movement. He hosted 1,429 episodes of the television show Firing Line from 1966 until 1999, where his public persona was famous for a wide vocabulary. He also wrote a nationally syndicated newspaper column, and wrote numerous spy novels. George H. Nash, a historian of the modern American Conservative movement, states that Buckley was "arguably the most important public intellectual in the United States in the past half century... For an entire generation, he was the preeminent voice of American conservatism and its first great ecumenical figure." Buckley's primary contribution to politics was a fusion of traditional American political conservatism with laissez-faire economic theory and anti-communism, laying groundwork for the new American conservatism of U.S. presidential candidate Barry Goldwater and President Ronald Reagan. Buckley wrote God and Man at Yale (1951) and over 50 other books on writing, speaking, history, politics and sailing,
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