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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Color of All Time

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    1

    New gamboge

    New gamboge is synthetic yellow pigment. The pigment has a similar hue as genuine gamboge, a natural pigment made from gum.
    8.25
    8 votes
    2
    Sienna

    Sienna

    Sienna is a form of limonite clay most famous in the production of oil paint pigments. Its yellow-brown colour comes from ferric oxides contained within. As a natural pigment, it (along with its chemical cousins ochre and umber) was one of the first pigments to be used by humans, and is found in many cave paintings. The first recorded use of sienna as a colour name in English was in 1760. Sienna, in and of itself, is sometimes referred to as "raw sienna", in order to differentiate it from "burnt sienna", which is a more common pigment than the raw form. The difference is in the process applied to create burnt sienna, which is raw sienna heated to remove the water from the clay and give it a warm reddish-brown colour. The name of this pigment was classically referred to by the French term, "terre de Sienne brulée". The name derives from the most notable Renaissance location for the earth, Siena, Italy, and is short for terra di Siena, "earth of Siena". The mines used to produce this sienna petered out in the 1940s. Much of today's sienna production is still carried out in the Italian islands of Sardinia and Sicily, while other major deposits are found in the Appalachian Mountains,
    8.00
    7 votes
    3

    Davy's grey

    Davy's grey is a dark grey colour, made from powdered slate, iron oxide and carbon black named for Henry Davy. Another name for this colour is steel. The first recorded use of Davy’s grey as a colour name in English was in the 19th century (precise date uncertain).
    7.86
    7 votes
    4

    Aqua

    Aqua is a tone of the color cyan (from Greek: κύανoς (transliterated: kýanos), meaning "blue") which is identical to the color electric cyan, one of the three secondary colors (subtractive primary colors) of the HSV color wheel, along with magenta and yellow. It is precisely halfway between green and blue on the color wheel. It should not be confused with the color process cyan used in printing, which is a deeper tone of cyan; this color is also known as deep aqua. In traditional print media, "aqua" is short for aquamarine, a distinct color from aqua. The words "aqua" and "cyan" are used interchangeably in computer graphics, and especially web design, to refer to the subtractive primary color "electric cyan". Traditionally that color, defined as #00FFFF in hex, or (0,255,255) in RGB, is called "cyan", but X11 color names introduced the alternative name "aqua". Later, W3C popularized the name by using it in the named color palette of HTML 3.2 specifications. Displayed at right is the color pale aqua. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Pale Aqua (color sample #184). Transportation Planning
    6.75
    8 votes
    5
    Indigo

    Indigo

    Indigo is a color named after the blue dye derived from the plant Indigofera tinctoria and related species. The color is placed on the electromagnetic spectrum between about 420 and 450 nm in wavelength, placing it between blue and violet. Although traditionally considered one of seven colors of the rainbow or the optical spectrum, modern color scientists do not usually recognize indigo as a separate division and generally classify wavelengths shorter than about 450 nm as violet. Optical scientists Hardy and Perrin list indigo as between 446 and 464 nm wavelength. The first recorded use of indigo as a color name in English was in 1289. India is believed to be the oldest center of indigo dyeing in the Old World. It was a primary supplier of indigo dye, derived from the plant Indigofera tinctoria, to Europe as early as the Greco-Roman era. The association of India with indigo is reflected in the Greek word for the 'dye,' which was indikon (ινδικόν). The Romans used the term indicum, which passed into Italian dialect and eventually into English as the word indigo. The country of El Salvador has lately been the biggest producer of indigo. The same indigo dye is contained in the woad
    9.20
    5 votes
    6
    Lime

    Lime

    Lime, also traditionally known as lime green or lime-green, is a color three-quarters of the way between yellow and green (closer to yellow than to green), so named because it is a representation of the color of the citrus fruit called limes. It is the color that is half way between the web color chartreuse and yellow on the color wheel. The first recorded use of lime green as a color name in English was in 1890. Lime (color#BFFF00) is a pure spectral color at approximately 564 nanometers on the visible spectrum when plotted on the CIE chromaticity diagram. At right is displayed the color electric lime. This Crayola color was created in 1990. This tint of lime is popular in psychedelic art. At right is displayed the color French lime, which is the tone of lime called lime in the Pourpre.com color list, a color list widely popular in France. This is a color from the pourpre.com color list. The web color named lime actually corresponds to the green primary of an RGB display: it has a different HTML color code (#00FF00). A sample can be seen to the right. See the chart Color names that clash between X11 and HTML/CSS in the X11 color names article to see those colors which are
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    Orange

    Orange

    The colour orange takes its name from the orange fruit. On the spectrum of light, and in the traditional colour wheel used by painters, it is located between red and yellow. In optics, it is the colour you see when you look at light with a wavelength between approximately 585–620 nm. It has a hue of 30° in HSV colour space. In the RGB colour space it is a tertiary color numerically halfway between gamma-compressed red and yellow, as can be seen in the RGB colour wheel. The complementary colour of orange is azure. Orange pigments are largely in the ochre or cadmium families, and absorb mostly blue light. The colour orange is named after the appearance of the ripe orange fruit. Before this word was introduced to the English-speaking world, the colour was referred to as ġeolurēad (yellow-red). The first recorded use of orange as a colour name in English was in 1512, in a will now filed with the Public Record Office. Web colour orange, defined as FFA500, is the only named colour defined in CSS that is not also defined in HTML 4.01. The web colour called dark orange is displayed at right. Displayed to the left is the actual colour of the outer skin of a typical orange. This colour is
    6.86
    7 votes
    8
    Viridian

    Viridian

    Viridian is a blue-green pigment, a hydrated chromium(III) oxide, of medium saturation and relatively dark in value. It is composed more of green than blue. Specifically, it is a dark shade of spring green, the color between green and cyan on the color wheel. Viridian takes its name from the Latin viridis, meaning "green". The first recorded use of viridian as a color name in English was in the 1860s (exact year uncertain).
    7.67
    6 votes
    9

    Denim

    Denim is a shade of blue that resembles the shade of blue used in Denim. Crayola created this color in 1993 as one of the new 16 colors Clothing Politics Symbolism List of colors
    8.20
    5 votes
    10

    Far-red

    Far-red light is light at the extreme red end of the visible spectrum, between red and infra-red light. Usually regarded as the region between 700 and 800 nm wavelength, it is dimly visible to some eyes. It is reflected or transmitted by plants because of the absorbance spectrum of chlorophyll, and it is perceived by the plant photoreceptor phytochrome.
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    Majorelle Blue

    Majorelle Blue

    Majorelle Blue is a clear, intense, fresh blue. In 1924 the French artist Jacques Majorelle constructed his largest art work, the Majorelle Garden in Marrakech, Morocco, and painted the garden walls, fountains, features and villa this very intense shade of blue, for which he trademarked the name Majorelle Blue. He had noticed the colour in Moroccan tiles, in Berber burnouses, and around the windows of buildings such as kasbahs and native adobe homes.
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Brown hair

    Brown hair

    Brown hair is the second most common human hair color, after black hair. It varies from light brown to almost black hair. It is characterized by higher levels of the dark pigment eumelanin and lower levels of the pale pigment pheomelanin. Its strands are thicker than those of fair hair but not as much as those of red hair. People with brown or black hair are often referred to as brunette, the feminine form of the diminutive form brunet from brun (brown, brown-haired or dark-haired), the masculine form. Brown hair is common among populations in West Eurasia and North Africa, especially among those from Central Europe, Southern Europe and West Asia, where it transitions smoothly into blackish-brown and black hair. Because of migration from Europe from the 16th to the 20th centuries, brown-haired people are also found in North America, South America, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Siberia, and other parts of Asia and Oceania. Brunette literally means "little brown-haired girl" or "young brown-haired woman", but, in modern English usage, it has lost the diminutive meaning and usually refers to any brown or black-haired girl or woman, or the associated hair color. Merriam-Webster
    8.00
    5 votes
    13

    Chestnut

    Displayed at right is the color chestnut. Chestnut is a color, a medium brownish shade of red, and is named after the nut of the chestnut tree. Indian red is a similar but separate and distinct color from Chestnut. The name Chestnut derives from the color of the nut of the Chestnut tree. The first recorded use of chestnut as a color term in English was in 1555. Deep chestnut is the color called chestnut in Crayola crayons. This color was also produced in a special limited edition in which it was called Vermont maple syrup. At the request of educators worried that children (mistakenly) believed the name represented the skin color of Native Americans, Crayola changed the name of their crayon color Indian Red, originally formulated in 1958, to Chestnut in 1999. In reality, the color Indian red has nothing to do with American Indians but is an iron oxide pigment the use of which is popular in India. The actual skin color of pure-blooded Native Americans is closest to the color copper.
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Lava

    Lava

    Lava is a color that is a shade of red. It is named after the color of volcanic lava. This is the color of fresh lava pouring out of a volcano. The first recorded use of lava as a color name in English was in 1892.
    8.00
    5 votes
    15

    Asparagus

    Asparagus is a shade of green and is named after the vegetable. Crayola created this color in 1993 as one of the 16 Name The Color Contest.
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Lion

    Lion

    Lion is a color that is a representation of the average color of the fur of a lion. The lion is a feline top predator found in Africa. The lion was poetically called the King of Beasts in the Great Chain of Being, one of the bases of medieval philosophy in Western civilization. The first recorded use of lion as a color name in English was in 1551. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Lion (color sample #76).
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    Non-photo blue

    Non-photo blue

    Non-photo blue (or non-repro blue) is a common tool used in the graphic design and print industry. Non-photo blue is a particular shade of blue that can not be detected by graphic arts cameras. This allows layout editors to write notes to the printer on the print flat (the image that is to be photographed and sent to print) which will not show in the final form. As well as this, it allows artists to lay down sketch lines without the need to erase after inking. As of late, with digital scanning and image manipulation, non-photo blue fulfils its function in a different way. The artist can do his or her sketch and inking in the traditional method and scan the page. Most scanners will detect the light blue lines. However, shifting to greyscale and increasing the contrast and brightness will cause the blue to disappear. Another common approach involves replacing the blue channel with another channel – typically the red channel. The exact processes may differ depending on the scanner, settings and image-editing software, but the concept remains the same. The difference between the non-photo blue and black ink is vast enough that digital image manipulation can separate the two easily. If
    9.00
    4 votes
    19

    Palatinate

    Palatinate is a colour (a pale shade of violet) associated with the University of Durham (and with Newcastle University Medical School, this being the former medical school of Durham University.) A separate colour, 'Palatinate Blue', is derived from the Coat of Arms of the County of Durham. The name 'Palatinate' in both instances alludes to the historic status of Durham as a County Palatine. It is likely that the choice of purple as the University's colour relates to the key role played by the Bishop of Durham in the foundation of the University (purple being an episcopal colour), as well as to the unique historical status of Bishops of Durham as Palatine Earls. The following story, recounted in Whiting's history of the University of Durham, purports to explain precisely how this shade of purple came to be adopted as the University colour. (Whiting himself had heard it from a Canon Whitley, who had been Reader in Natural Philosophy during the early years of the University's existence (1833–55).) "When the colour of the MA hood was discussed by Senate, he [Whitley] had proposed black and amber, but was outvoted on the grounds that people would call it 'Durham Mustard', a reference
    9.00
    4 votes
    20
    Or

    Or

    In heraldry, Or (from the French word for gold) is the tincture of gold and, together with argent (silver), belongs to the class of light tinctures called "metals". In engravings and line drawings, it may be represented using a field of evenly spaced dots. It is very frequently depicted as yellow, though gold leaf was used in many illuminated manuscripts and more extravagant rolls of arms. The word gold is occasionally used in place of Or in blazon, sometimes to prevent repetition of the word Or in a blazon, or because this substitution was in fashion when the blazon was first written down, or when it is preferred by the officer of arms. Or is frequently spelt with a capital letter (e.g. Gules, a fess Or) so as not to confuse it with the conjunction or. Or is said to represent the following:
    6.67
    6 votes
    21
    Lemon

    Lemon

    Lemon is a color somewhat resembling yellow and named after the lemon fruit. The color lemon is a representation of the color of the outer skin of a lemon. The first recorded use of lemon as a color name in English was in 1598. The color lemon yellow is sometimes misinterpreted as a neon color (somewhat like the color chartreuse yellow shown below in the shades of yellow color template but more yellowish) but is actually related closely to the simple, plain yellow because it is a representation of the color of the outer skin of the lemon, which is quite close to and actually somewhat brighter than ordinary yellow. The neon conception of the color lemon yellow is represented by the Crayola crayon color laser lemon, shown below. The web color lemon chiffon is shown at right. The color lemon chiffon was formulated in 1987 as one of the X11 color names. After the invention of the world wide web in 1991, these colors became known as the X11 web colors. Displayed at right is the color lemon meringue. The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #12-0711 TPX—Lemon Meringue. The color laser lemon is shown at right. The color laser lemon was
    7.60
    5 votes
    22

    Royal blue

    Royal blue describes both a bright shade and a dark shade of azure blue. It is said to have been invented by millers in Frome, Somerset, a consortium of which won a competition to make a dress for the British queen, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Traditionally, dictionaries define royal blue as a deep to dark blue, often with a purple or faint reddish tinge. By the 1950s, many people began to think of royal blue as a brighter color, and it is this brighter color that was chosen as the web color "royal blue" (the web colors when they were formulated in 1987 were originally known as the X11 colors, since the World Wide Web did not come into operation until 1991). The World Wide Web Consortium designated the keyword "royalblue" to be this much brighter color, rather than the traditional darker version of royal blue. At right is displayed the color queen blue. Queen blue is a medium tone of royal blue. The first recorded use of queen blue as a color name in English was in 1926. Before that, since 1661, this color had been called queen’s blue.
    8.75
    4 votes
    23

    Camouflage green

    Camouflage green is a color that resembles the gray-green color often used by the military and hunters to camouflage themselves. Thus, this color is often known as military green and is related to hunter green. Military Parapsychology
    6.50
    6 votes
    24

    Feldgrau

    Feldgrau (field grey) was the colour of the field uniform of the German Army from late 1907 until 1945, and of some post-war uniforms of the West German Bundeswehr and the East German NVA armies. Metaphorically, Feldgrau used to refer to the armies of Germany (the Imperial German Army and the Heer [army] component of the Reichswehr and the Wehrmacht). The word feldgrau means "field grey", and by World War I the colour was a light grey-green, though there is no specific colour, rather a colour range of greys to browns, that was one of the first standardised uniforms suitable to the age of smokeless gun powder. First, were the khaki-coloured uniforms of the British Army (the 1885-era troops in India, then the British army during the Second Boer War). Formerly, the Germans wore a Prussian blue shade similar to that of the French. Sweden used a very similar colour for infantry uniforms, for example the grey m/1923 and later on grey-green as the German ones. The last uniform to use the colour was the woollen m/1959 winter uniform.
    6.50
    6 votes
    25
    8.50
    4 votes
    26
    7.20
    5 votes
    27
    Payne's grey

    Payne's grey

    Payne's grey is a dark blue-grey colour used in painting. It can be used as a mixer in place of black. Being less intense than black, it is easier to get the right shade when using it as a mixer. Payne's grey is a mixture of ultramarine and black or of ultramarine and Sienna. The colour is named after William Payne, who painted watercolours in the late 18th century. The first recorded use of Payne’s grey as a colour name in English was in 1835. The source of the colour displayed above is the Robert Ridgway color list, entered onto the Internet from his 1912 book Color Standards and Color Nomenclature. Common variations in colour, darkest to lightest:
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    Bronze

    Bronze

    At right is displayed the color bronze. Bronze is a metallic brown color which resembles the actual alloy bronze. The first recorded use of bronze as a color name in English was in 1753. Displayed at right is the color blast-off bronze. Blast-off bronze is one of the colors in the special set of metallic Crayola crayons called Metallic FX, the colors of which were formulated by Crayola in 2001. At right is displayed the color antique bronze. The first recorded use of antique bronze as a color name in English was in 1910. Art Ethnography Military Mythology Panelology Pre-History Popular Culture Sports
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Lavender

    Lavender

    Lavender is a pale tint of violet. It applies particularly to the color of the flower of the same name. The web color called lavender is displayed at right—it matches the color of the very palest part of the lavender flower; however, the more saturated color shown below as floral lavender more closely matches the average color of the lavender flower as shown in the picture and is the tone of lavender historically and traditionally considered lavender by the average person as opposed to those who are web site designers. The color lavender might be described as a medium violet or a light pinkish violet. The term lavender may also be used in general to apply to a wide range of pale, light, medium, or grayish violet colors, as well as some pale or light pinkish, magenta, or purple colors as well as some pale or light blueish-indigo colors. In paints, the color lavender is made by mixing violet and white paint. The first recorded use of the word lavender as a color term in English was in 1705. Originally, the name lavender only applied to flowers. By 1930, the book A Dictionary of Color identified three major shades of lavender—[floral] lavender, lavender gray, and lavender blue, and in
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Turquoise

    Turquoise

    Turquoise /ˈtɜrkɔɪz/ or /ˈtɜrkwɔɪz/ is a blueish tone of green. The color is based on the gem turquoise. The term comes from the French for Turkish. At right is displayed the X11 color named turquoise. The first recorded use of turquoise as a color name in English was in 1573. Turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral that is a hydrous phosphate of copper and aluminium, with the chemical formula CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O. It is rare and valuable in finer grades and has been prized as a gem and ornamental stone for thousands of years owing to its unique hue. In many cultures of the Old and New Worlds, this gemstone has been esteemed for thousands of years as a holy stone, a bringer of good fortune or a talisman. The oldest evidence for this claim was found in Ancient Egypt, where grave furnishings with turquoise inlay were discovered, dating from approximately 3000 BC. In the ancient Persian Empire, the sky-blue gemstones were earlier worn round the neck or wrist as protection against unnatural death. If they changed color, the wearer was thought to have reason to fear the approach of doom. Meanwhile, it has been discovered that turquoise certainly can change color, but that this is
    7.00
    5 votes
    31

    Bice

    Bice, from the French bis, a word of doubtful origin, originally meaning dark-coloured, was a term applied in English to particular green or blue pigments. In French the terms vert bis and azur bis mean dark green and dark blue respectively. Bice pigments were generally prepared from basic copper carbonates, but sometimes ultramarine or other pigments were used. Jo Kirby of the National Gallery London notes the occurrence of the pigment bice in three grades in an account of Tudor painting at Greenwich Palace in 1527. In this case, the three grades indicate the use of the mineral azurite rather than a manufactured blue copper carbonate. Similarly, green bice in other 16th-records may sometimes have been the mineral malachite. Ian Bristow, an historian of paint, concluded that the pigment Blue Bice found in records of British interior-decoration until the first half of the 17th-century was azurite. The expensive natural mineral azurite was superseded by manufactured Blue Verditer.
    9.33
    3 votes
    32
    Robin egg blue

    Robin egg blue

    The color robin egg blue is displayed at right. It is a web-safe color and an official Crayola color. In the early 1990's, the crayon was originally included unlabeled in Crayola boxes, and purchasers were asked to submit ideas for the color's name. Robin egg blue, also called eggshell blue, approximates the shade of the eggs laid by the American Robin. The first recorded use of robin egg blue as a color name in English was in 1873. Pale robin egg blue is identical to the following tone of the color robin egg blue displayed on the ISCC-NBS color list: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)—Color sample of Robin Egg (color sample #162):. Tiffany blue is the colloquial name for the light medium tone of robin egg blue associated with Tiffany & Co., the New York City jewelry company. Architecture Jewelry Sexuality
    9.33
    3 votes
    33

    Zaffre

    Zaffre, a pre-scientific substance (see List of alchemical substances), is a deep blue pigment obtained by roasting cobalt ore, and is made of either an impure form of cobalt oxide or impure cobalt arseniate. During the Victorian Era, zaffre was used to prepare smalt and stain glass blue. The first recorded use of zaffre as a color name in English was sometime in the 1550s (exact year uncertain).
    9.33
    3 votes
    34
    Iris

    Iris

    Iris is an ambiguous color term, usually referring to shades ranging from blue-violet to violet. However, in certain applications, it has been applied to an even wider array of colors, including pale blue, mauve, pink, and even yellow (the color of the inner part of the iris flower). The name is derived from the iris flower, which comes in a broad spectrum of colors. The first recorded use of iris as a color name in English was in the year 1916.
    8.00
    4 votes
    35
    8.00
    4 votes
    36
    Rosso corsa

    Rosso corsa

    Rosso Corsa is the red international motor racing colour of cars entered by teams from Italy. Since the 1920s Italian race cars of Alfa Romeo, Maserati, Lancia, and later Ferrari and Abarth have been painted in rosso corsa ("racing red"). This was the customary national racing colour of Italy as recommended between the world wars by the organisations that later became the FIA. In that scheme of international auto racing colours French cars were blue (Bleu de France), British cars were green (British racing green), etc. In Formula One, the colour was not determined by the country the car was made in nor by the nationality of the driver(s) but by the nationality of the team entering the vehicle. A yellow Ferrari 156 was entered and driven in the 1961 Belgian Grand Prix by Olivier Gendebien from Belgium, scoring 4th behind 3 other Ferrari 156s painted in red as they were entered by the Scuderia Ferrari itself, and driven by US drivers Phil Hill and Richie Ginther as well as German Wolfgang von Trips. Ferrari won the 1964 World championship with John Surtees by competing the last two races in Ferrari 158 cars painted white and blue -the national colours of the teams from the United
    8.00
    4 votes
    37
    Graphite

    Graphite

    The mineral graphite  /ˈɡræfaɪt/ is an allotrope of carbon. It was named by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1789 from the Ancient Greek γράφω (graphō), "to draw/write", for its use in pencils, where it is commonly called lead (not to be confused with the metallic element lead). Unlike diamond (another carbon allotrope), graphite is an electrical conductor, a semimetal. It is, consequently, useful in such applications as arc lamp electrodes. Graphite is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions. Therefore, it is used in thermochemistry as the standard state for defining the heat of formation of carbon compounds. Graphite may be considered the highest grade of coal, just above anthracite and alternatively called meta-anthracite, although it is not normally used as fuel because it is difficult to ignite. There are three principal types of natural graphite, each occurring in different types of ore deposit: Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) refers to graphite with an angular spread between the graphite sheets of less than 1°. This highest-quality synthetic form is used in scientific research, in particular, as a standard for scanner
    6.00
    6 votes
    38

    Azure

    In heraldry, azure is the tincture with the colour blue, and belongs to the class of tinctures called "colours". In engraving, it is sometimes depicted as a region of horizontal lines or else marked with either az. or b. as an abbreviation. The term azure derives from name of the deep blue stone now called lapis lazuli (stone of Lazhward). The word was adopted into Old French by the twelfth century, from which the word passed into use in the blazon of coats of arms. As an heraldic colour, the word azure simply means "blue". It is one of many concepts with both a French and German word in English, the former being used by the French-speaking nobles following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 and the latter being used by the commoners of Anglo-Saxon stock. So while French-speaking heralds described banners as azure, commoners simply called them blue. Because it comes from a French word that simply means "blue", a wide range of colour values is used in the depiction of azure in armory and flags. In addition to the standard blue tincture called azure, there is a lighter blue sometimes found that is called bleu celeste or "sky blue". Neither azure nor bleu celeste is precisely
    6.80
    5 votes
    39
    Pear

    Pear

    Pear is a desaturated chartreuse yellow that resembles the color of Anjou or Bartlett pear. Marketing
    6.80
    5 votes
    40
    International orange

    International orange

    International orange is a color used in the aerospace industry to set things apart from their surroundings, similar to safety orange, but deeper and with a more reddish tone. At right is displayed the tone of international orange used to paint the Golden Gate Bridge. According to the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District, the tone of international orange used to paint the Golden Gate Bridge is most closely matched by Pantone color 180. Pantone color 180C is equivalent to the hex code #C0362C. The tone of international orange used to paint the Golden Gate Bridge is slightly lighter than the standard International orange used by military contractors and in engineering (shown below) in order to increase its visibility to ships. At right is displayed the generic tone of international orange used by military contractors and in engineering generally. The source of this color is Federal Standard 595, a U.S. Federal Government standard set up in 1956 for paint colors which is mostly used by military contractors and also in engineering. International Orange is designated as Federal Standard 595 color #FS 12197.
    9.00
    3 votes
    41
    Selective yellow

    Selective yellow

    Selective yellow is a colour for automotive lamps. Under ECE regulations, headlamps were formerly permitted to be either white or selective yellow—in France, selective yellow was mandatory until 1993. Both the internationalised European ECE Regulation 19 and North American SAE standard J583 permit selective yellow front fog lamps. ECE Regulation 48 currently requires new vehicles to be equipped with headlamps emitting white light. However, selective yellow headlamps remain permitted throughout Europe on vehicles already so equipped, as well as in non-European locales such as Japan and New Zealand. The intent of selective yellow is to improve vision by removing short, blue to violet wavelengths from the projected light. These wavelengths are difficult for the human visual system to process properly, and they cause perceived dazzle and glare effects in rain, fog and snow. Removing the blue-violet portion of a lamp's output to obtain selective yellow light can entail filter losses of around 15%, though the effect of this reduction is mitigated or countervailed by the increased visual acuity available with yellow rather than white light in bad weather. The UNECE Regulations formally
    9.00
    3 votes
    42

    Carnation

    This article is about notable tints and shades of the color pink. These various colors are shown below. At right is displayed the web color pink. This color is identical to the color Tamarisk, the color of the flowers of the Tamarisk plant. At right is displayed the web color light pink. The name of the web color is written as "lightpink" (no space) in HTML for computer display. Although this color is called "light pink", as can be ascertained by inspecting its hex code, it is actually a slightly deeper, not a lighter, tint of pink than the color pink itself. A more accurate name for it in terms of traditional color nomenclature would therefore be medium light pink. In the bandana code of the gay leather subculture, wearing a light pink bandana means that one is into dildo play. The color at right matches the color that is used in the bandana code. At right is displayed the web color hot pink. The name of the web color is written as "hotpink" (no space) in HTML for computer display. At right is displayed the web color deep pink. The name of the web color is written as "deeppink" (no space) in HTML for computer display. Displayed at right is the color champagne pink. The source of
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    Magenta

    Magenta

    Magenta, a pink hue, is a color evoked by light having less power in green wavelengths than in blue/violet and red wavelengths (complements of magenta have wavelength 500–530 nm). In light experiments, magenta can be produced by removing the lime-green wavelengths from white light. It is an extra-spectral color, meaning it cannot be generated by a single wavelength of light, being a mixture of red and blue or violet wavelengths. The name magenta comes from the dye magenta, commonly called fuchsine, discovered shortly after the 1859 Battle of Magenta near Magenta, Italy. In the Munsell color system, magenta is called red-purple. In the CMYK color model used in printing, it is one of the primary colors of ink. In the RGB color model, the secondary color created by mixing the red and blue primaries is called magenta or fuchsia, though this color differs in hue from printer's magenta. Before printer's magenta was invented in the 1890s for CMYK printing, and electric magenta was invented in the 1980s for computer displays, these two artificially engineered colors were preceded by the color displayed at right, which is the color originally called fuchsine made from coal tar dyes in the
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    Peach

    Peach

    Peach is a color that is named for the pale color of the interior flesh of the peach fruit. Like the color apricot, the color called peach is paler than most actual peach fruits and seems to have been formulated (like the color apricot) primarily to create a pastel palette of colors for interior design. Peach can also be described as pale orange. At right is displayed the color peach. The shade of peach shown at right approximates the color of the interior flesh of that variety of peaches known as white peaches. The first recorded use of peach as a color name in English was in 1588. The etymology of the color peach (and the fruit): the word comes from the Middle English peche, derived from Middle French, in turn derived from Latin persica, i.e., the fruit from Persia. In actuality, the ultimate origin of the peach fruit was from China. Displayed at right is the web color peach puff. Displayed at right is the deep tone of peach called peach in Crayola crayons. This color was formerly called flesh before 1962, until people in the civil rights movement pointed out to Crayola that this color only represented the average color of the flesh of Caucasians.
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    Seal brown

    Seal brown is a rich dark brown color, resembling the color of the dyed fur from the fur seal. The specifications for the U.S. Army Air Corps Type A-2 jacket (regulation summer flying jacket), adopted in 1931 and the most familiar among all leather flight jackets, stated that it should be made of horsehide tanned to seal brown. However, initially, oxidation during the dyeing process caused the jackets to end up russet (a lighter, reddish brown) in color. Later in the decade, they were able to prevent oxidation during dyeing, and the jackets produced were a proper stone brown. Seal brown is one of the official colors of Lehigh University, Brown University, the Cleveland Browns football team, and the engineering honor society, Tau Beta Pi.
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    Silver

    Silver

    Silver is a metallic color tone resembling gray that is a representation of the color of polished silver. The visual sensation usually associated with the metal silver is its metallic shine. This cannot be reproduced by a simple solid color, because the shiny effect is due to the material's brightness varying with the surface angle to the light source. In addition, there is no mechanism for showing metallic or fluorescent colors on a computer without resorting to rendering software which simulates the action of light on a shiny surface. Consequently in art one would normally use a metallic paint that glitters like real silver. A matte grey color like the swatch on this page would not be considered silver. The first recorded use of silver as a color name in English was in 1481. Like orange and purple, silver has no common rhyme. Displayed at right is the web color silver. Since version 3.2 of HTML "silver" is a name for one of the 16 basic-VGA-colors. Pale silver is the pale tone of silver color called silver in Crayola crayons. Silver has been a Crayola color since 1949. Crayola silver is not a neutral grayscale color, but rather a warm gray with a very slight tinge of orange-red.
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    47

    Arylide Yellow

    Arylide yellow, also known as Monoazo yellow is a pigment used primarily in artistic oil paints and watercolors. The pigment is considered a semi-transparent, bright, pale yellow. Chemically, its molecular structure is composed of carbon rings clustered together with nitrogen, and having chlorine atoms attached. The asymmetrical arrangement of these additional atoms create variations in the overall color. Paint manufacturers market arylide yellow by different names; the most common being Hansa yellow, which was created in Germany in 1909. Arylide is also used with other chemical compounds to create different pigments; for instance Maimeri, an Italian paint manufacturer, combines arylide yellow with yellow iron oxide and zinc oxide to create their version of Naples yellow light.
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    48
    Hooker's green

    Hooker's green

    Varieties of the color green may differ in hue, chroma (also called saturation or intensity) or lightness (or value, tone, or brightness), or in two or three of these qualities. Variations in value are also called tints and shades, a tint being a green or other hue mixed with white, a shade being mixed with black. A large selection of these various colors is shown below. Green is common in nature, especially in plants. Many plants are green mainly because of a complex chemical known as chlorophyll which is involved in photosynthesis. Many shades of green have been named after plants or are related to plants. Due to varying ratios of chlorophylls (and different amounts as well as other plant pigments being present), the plant kingdom exhibits many shades of green in both hue (true color) and value (lightness/darkness). The chlorophylls in living plants have distinctive green colors, while dried or cooked portions of plants are different shades of green due to the chlorophyll molecules losing their inner magnesium ion. Asparagus is a tone of green that is named after the vegetable. Crayola created this color in 1993 as one of the 16 to be named in the Name The Color Contest. Dark
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    49
    Coffee

    Coffee

    Coffee is a brownish color that is a representation of the color of an unroasted coffee bean. Different types of coffee beans have different colors when unroasted--the color coffee represents an average. The first recorded use of coffee as a color name in English was in 1695. The source of the color displayed at right is the ISCC-NBS Color List (see Page C, coffee, color sample #58). The color displayed at right is café au lait, also known as coffee and milk or latte. This is a representation of the color of coffee mixed with milk, which when prepared commercially by a barista in a coffee shop is known as a latte. The first recorded use of cafe au lait as a color name in English was in 1839. The source of the color "cafe au lait" displayed above right is the ISCC-NBS Color List (see Page C, cafe au lait, color sample #57). The color displayed at right is café noir, also known as black coffee. It is a representation of the color of brewed black coffee. The first recorded use of cafe noir as a color name in English was in 1928. The source of the color "cafe noir" displayed at right is the ISCC-NBS Color List (see Page C, cafe noir, color sample #81). Ethnography
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    50
    Electric blue

    Electric blue

    Electric blue is a color close to cyan that is a representation of the color of lightning, an electric spark, and argon signs; it is named after the ionized air glow produced during electrical discharges. The first recorded use of electric blue as a color name in English was in 1884. The color electric blue was in vogue in the 1890s. The deep tone of electric blue displayed at right is the color called electric blue in the Pourpre.com color list, a color list widely popular in France. The color displayed at right titled medium electric blue matches the color of the color sample (taken from a textile sample) of the original called electric blue that "had an immense vogue in the latter 19th century". Still today, this tone of electric blue is a typical contemporary "electric blue" fabric color that is used in manufacturing for the mass market. Astrology Computing Physics
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    2 votes
    51
    Fuchsia

    Fuchsia

    Fuchsia (pronunciation: /ˈfjuːʃə/, FEW-shə) is a vivid reddish or pinkish purple color named after the flower of the fuchsia plant, itself named after the German scientist Leonhart Fuchs. Fuchsia is a synonym for magenta. There is also a somewhat redder and slightly less saturated hue termed fashion fuchsia (see below) that is used in women's fashion (it is also called Hollywood cerise). The first recorded use of fuchsia as a color name in English was in 1892. There are a number of colors in the fuchsia/magenta range. Some of them are indicated below and color bands displaying the various shades of magenta for comparison are appended to the variations of magenta article. In 1949, the color names of Crayola crayons were reformed and became more scientific, more of the names of the colors of the crayons being based on the names of colors in the original 1930 edition of the Dictionary of Color and the color names of the Munsell color system. Crayola crayons set up a color naming system similar to that used in the Munsell Color Wheel, except that violet instead of purple was used as the primary color on the color wheel between red and blue. The web color fuchsia is equivalent to the
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    3 votes
    52
    Jasmine

    Jasmine

    The color jasmine is a pale tint of yellow, displayed at right. It is a representation of the average color of the more yellowish lower part of the pale yellowish white colored jasmine flower. The first recorded use of jasmine as a color name in English was in 1925.
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    53
    Yellow

    Yellow

    Yellow (/ˈjɛloʊ/) is the color of gold, butter, or ripe lemons. In the spectrum of light, and in the traditional color wheel used by painters, yellow is located between green and orange. In optics, yellow is the evoked by light that stimulates both the L and M (long and medium wavelength) cone cells of the retina about equally, with no significant stimulation of the S (short-wavelength) cone cells. Light with a wavelength of 570–590 nm is yellow, as is light with a suitable mixture of red and green. Yellow's traditional RYB complementary color is purple, violet, or indigo, while its colorimetrically defined complementary color in both RGB and CMYK color spaces is blue. The word "yellow" comes from the Old English geolu, geolwe, meaning "yellow, yellowish", derived from the Proto-Germanic word gelwaz. The English term is related to other Germanic words for yellow, namely Scots yella, East Frisian jeel, West Frisian giel, Dutch geel, German gelb, and Swedish gul. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the oldest known use of this word in English is from The Epinal Glossary in the year 700. In the English language, yellow has traditionally been associated with jaundice or
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    3 votes
    54

    Buff

    Buff is a pale yellow-brown colour named for the colour of un-dyed leather of several animals. The first recorded use of the word "buff" to describe a colour was in the London Gazette of 1686, describing a uniform to be "...a Red Coat with a Buff-colour'd lining". It referred to the colour of un-dyed buffalo leather suitable for buffing or serving as a buffer between polished objects. It is not clear which animal "buffalo" referred to, but it may not have been any of the animals called "buffalo" today. The word "buff" meaning "enthusiast" or "expert" derives from the colour "buff", specifically from the buff-coloured uniforms of 20th century New York City volunteer firemen who were known as particularly keen fire-watchers. Sand, rock, and loess tend to be buff in many areas. Because buff is effective in camouflage, it is often naturally selected. Many species are named for their buff markings, including the Buff arches moth, the Buff-bellied Climbing Mouse, and at least sixty birds, including the Buff-fronted Quail-Dove, the Buff-vented Bulbul, and the Buff-spotted Flufftail. In areas where buff raw materials are available, buff walls and buildings may be found. Unless bleached or
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    5 votes
    55
    Black

    Black

    Black is the color of coal, ebony, and the night sky. It is the very darkest color, the result of the absence of or complete absorption of light. It is the opposite of white. In Europe and the United States, it is the color most commonly associated with mourning, the end, secrets, magic, power, violence, evil, and elegance.. The word black comes from Old English blæc ("black, dark", also, "ink"), from Proto-Germanic *blakkaz ("burned"), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- ("to burn, gleam, shine, flash"), from base *bhel- ("to shine"), related to Old Saxon blak ("ink"), Old High German blach ("black"), Old Norse blakkr ("dark"), Dutch blaken ("to burn"), and Swedish bläck ("ink"). More distant cognates include Latin flagrare ("to blaze, glow, burn"), and Ancient Greek phlegein ("to burn, scorch"). The Ancient Greeks sometimes used the same word to name different colors, if they had the same intensity. Kuanos' could mean both dark blue and black.. The Ancient Romans had two words for black: ater was a flat, dull black, while niger was a brilliant, saturated black. Ater has vanished from the vocabulary, but niger was the source of the country name Nigeria and the English word
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    56

    Bole

    Bole is a shade of brown. There is an English word bole meaning the trunk of a tree, but according to the American Heritage Dictionary, this word is simply a homograph/homophone that does not share the etymological origin of the color word bole, which derives from Latin bōlus (lump of earth) and refers to a kind of soft fine clay whose reddish-brown varieties are used as pigments, hence its use as a word for a reddish-brown color. Another name for the color bole is terra rosa. The color name terra rosa has been used as a synonym for bole since 1753. The color "terra rosa" is classified a warm red color. In art, it's classified as being similar to Venetian red, but more pink or salmon. Bole is one of the oldest color names in English. The first recorded use of bole as a color name in English was in the year 1386.
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    57

    Charcoal

    Charcoal is a color that is a representation of the dark gray color of burned wood. The first recorded use of charcoal as a color name in English was in 1606. Source of color: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Charcoal (color sample #187).
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    4 votes
    58

    Ao

    Ao (hiragana あお; kanji 青; adjective form aoi (青い)) is a Japanese color word that includes what English-speakers would call blue and green. For example, in Japan, green traffic lights are described as ao shingō (青信号), and blue skies are described as aozora (青空), as in aozora bunko. Modern Japanese has a separate word for green (ja:緑 midori), although its boundaries are not the same as in English. Ancient Japanese did not have this distinction: the word midori only came into use in the Heian period, and at that time (and for a long time thereafter) midori was still considered a shade of ao. Educational materials distinguishing green and blue only came into use after World War II, during the Occupation: thus, even though most Japanese consider them to be green, the word ao is still used to describe certain vegetables, apples and vegetation. Ao is also the name for the color of a traffic light, "green" in English. However, most other objects—a green car, a green sweater, and so forth—will generally be called midori. Japanese people also sometimes use the English word "green" for colors. The language also has several other words meaning specific shades of green and blue. The color ao
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    59

    Cyan

    Cyan ( /ˈsaɪ.ən/ or /ˈsaɪ.æn/; from Greek: κύανoς, transliterated: kýanos, meaning "dark blue substance") may be used as the name of any of a number of colors in the blue/green range of the spectrum. In reference to the visible spectrum cyan is used to refer to the color obtained by mixing equal amounts of green and blue light or the removal of red from white light. As such, cyan is the complement of red in RGB and CMYK color models: cyan pigments absorb red light. Cyan is also called aqua or blue-green, and was formerly known as "cyan blue". The first recorded use of cyan blue (as noted above, "cyan blue" was the name used for the color "cyan" in the 19th century) as a color name in English was in 1879. Some tones of color close to cyan in the cyan color range are teal, turquoise, electric blue and aquamarine. The vivid cyan that is seen on an electronic display device (shown at right) is also referred to as electric cyan to distinguish it from the less vivid turquoise blue-like process cyan used in CMYK color printing (shown below). (Note: while the color is defined by definite RGB values, the display of the color will vary depending on the absolute color space used and the
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    3 votes
    60
    Deep sky blue

    Deep sky blue

    Deep sky blue is an azure-cyan color associated with deep sky blue. Deep sky blue is a web color. This color is the color on the color wheel (RGB/HSV color wheel) halfway between azure and cyan. The traditional name for this color is Capri. The first use of Capri as a color name in English was in 1920. The color Capri in general is named for the azure-cyan color of the Mediterranean sea around the island of Capri off Italy, the site of several villas belonging to the Roman Emperor Tiberius, including his Imperial residence in his later years, the Villa Jovis. Specifically, the color Capri is named after the color of the Blue Grotto on the island of Capri. as it appears on a bright sunny day. Today the island of Capri is a resort island popular with tourists. The color name deep sky blue for this color did not come into use until the promulgation of the X11 color list in 1987. The name Capri is still used for this color as well as the name deep sky blue.
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    3 votes
    61
    Maya Blue

    Maya Blue

    Maya Blue (Spanish: Azul Maya) is a unique bright azure blue pigment manufactured by cultures of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, such as the Maya and Aztec. The Maya blue pigment is a composite of organic and inorganic constituents, primarily indigo dyes derived from the leaves of añil (Indigofera suffruticosa) plants combined with palygorskite, a natural clay. Smaller trace amounts of other mineral additives have also been identified. "Maya blue" first appeared around 800 and it was still used in the 16th century in several Convents of Colonial Mexico, notably in the paintings of the Indian Juan Gerson in Tecamachalco. These paintings are a clear example of the combination of Indian and European techniques sometimes known as Arte Indocristiano. After that, the techniques for its production were lost in Mexico but in Cuba there are examples from 1830. Despite time and the harsh weathering conditions, paintings colored by Maya Blue have not faded over time. What is even more remarkable is that the color has resisted chemical solvents and acids such as nitric acid. Recently, its resistance against chemical aggression (acids, alkalis, solvents, etc.) and biodegradation was tested, and it
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    3 votes
    62
    Camel

    Camel

    Camel is a color that resembles the color of the hair of a camel. The first recorded use of camel as a color name in English was in 1916. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Camel (color sample #76). Fashion
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    63

    Sandy brown

    Sandy brown is a pale shade of brown. Sandy brown is one of the web colors. As its name suggests, it is a shade of brown which is similar to the color of some sands.
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    64
    Lemon cream

    Lemon cream

    Lemon chiffon is the X11 color and web color lemonchiffon, reminiscent of the color of lemon chiffon cake. It was first introduced as a named color in the X Window System; the origins of the names are obscure. These were adopted for the Netscape Navigator web browser for colors in its extended palette, and in turn recognized by Mosaic and Internet Explorer. No specification, however, recognizes it as an official HTML color name.
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    2 votes
    65
    Magnolia

    Magnolia

    Magnolia is a color named after the flowering plant of the genus Magnolia. The first recorded use of magnolia as a color name in English was in 1925. In 1987, magnolia was chosen as one of the X11 colors, which by the early 1990s had become known as the X11 web colors. Internet Real Estate
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    2 votes
    66
    Mauve

    Mauve

    Mauve /ˈmoʊv/ (rhymes with "grove"; from the French form of Malva "mallow") is a pale lavender-lilac color, one of many in the range of purples. Mauve is named after the mallow flower. Another name for the color is mallow with the first recorded use of mallow as a color name in English in 1611. Mauve is more grey and more blue than a pale tint of magenta would be. Many pale wildflowers called "blue" are actually mauve. Sometimes mauve can be considered a purplish pink or a pale purple. Mauve can also be described as pale violet. Mauve was first named in 1856. Chemist Sir William Henry Perkin, then eighteen, was attempting to create artificial quinine. An unexpected residue caught his eye, which turned out to be the first aniline dye – specifically, Perkin's mauve or mauveine, sometimes called aniline purple. Perkin was so successful in recommending his discovery to the dyestuffs industry that his biography by Simon Garfield is titled Mauve. As mauveine faded easily, our contemporary understanding of mauve is as a lighter, less saturated color than it was originally known. At right is displayed the rich tone of mauve that is called mauve in Crayola colored pencils. At right is
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    2 votes
    67

    Burgundy

    Burgundy is a red color associated with the Burgundy wine of the same name, which in turn is named after the Burgundy region of France. The color burgundy is similar to other shades of dark red such as maroon. When referring to the color, "burgundy" is usually not capitalized. The first recorded use of "burgundy" as a color name in English was in 1881. In cosmetology, a brighter tone of burgundy called vivid burgundy is used for coloring hair. At right is displayed the color old burgundy. The color old burgundy is a dark tone of burgundy. The first recorded use of old burgundy as a color name in English was in 1926. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Old Burgundy (color sample #47). Fashion Linens Music Sports Traffic safety Travel
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    4 votes
    68
    Cardinal

    Cardinal

    Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals (although the color worn by cardinals is actually scarlet). The family of birds takes its name from the color. The first recorded use of cardinal as a color name in English was in 1698. The corresponding Pantone Matching System (PMS) color is 200, as seen in the school colors for Wisconsin, Arizona and Wesleyan, and as one of the two official colors of the Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity and the only official color of the sorority Alpha Omicron Pi. However, Stanford's, M.I.T.´s, and U.S.C.´s PMS color is 201, while Carnegie Mellon and Worcester Polytechnic Institute use PMS 187, Brown University uses PMS 192, Iowa State University uses PMS 186, and Ball State University uses PMS 199. The hex triplet for the web-safe version of the color is #CC2233. Fraternities School colors Sports
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    4 votes
    69
    Saffron

    Saffron

    Saffron is a color that is a tone of golden yellow resembling the color of the tip of the saffron crocus thread, from which the spice saffron is derived. The first recorded use of saffron as a color name in English was in 1200. Displayed at right is the color rajah. Rajah is one of the colors on the Resene Color List, a color list widely popular in Australia and New Zealand. The color "rajah" was formulated in 2001. "Rajah" is a bright deep tone of saffron. Deep saffron is the name of color of the upper band of the Indian National Flag (Bharatiya Rashtriya Dhwaj) as specified by the Government of India. Deep saffron, white and what is now called India green were chosen for the three bands, representing courage and sacrifice, peace and truth, and faith and chivalry respectively. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who later became India's first Vice President and second President, described the significance of the Indian National Flag as follows: Plants Birds Art Ethnography Literature Homer's Iliad : Now when Dawn in robe of saffron was hastening from the streams of Okeanos, to bring light to mortals and immortals, Thetis reached the ships with the armor that the god had given her.
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    4 votes
    70

    Copper

    Copper is a reddish brown color that resembles the metal copper. At right is displayed the color copper. The first recorded use of copper as a color name in English was in 1594. At right is displayed pale tone of copper that is called copper in Crayola crayons. This color was formulated by Crayola in 1958. At right is displayed the color copper red. The first recorded use of copper red as a color name in English was in 1590. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Copper Red (color sample #39) At right is displayed the color copper penny. Copper penny is one of the colors in the special set of metallic Crayola crayons called Silver Swirls, the colors of which were formulated by Crayola in 1990. The first recorded use of copper rose as a color name in English was in 1928. At right is displayed the color Kenyan copper. The color name Kenyan copper for this dark tone of copper has been in use since 2001, when it was promulgated as one of the colors on the Xona.com Color List. Plants Snakes Ethnography Geography Kitchenware Marriage Music Politics Pre-History Religion Role playing games
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    3 votes
    71
    International Klein Blue

    International Klein Blue

    International Klein Blue (IKB) is a deep blue hue first mixed by the French artist Yves Klein. IKB's visual impact comes from its heavy reliance on Ultramarine, as well as Klein's often thick and textured application of paint to canvas. International Klein Blue (or IKB as it is known in art circles) was developed by French artist Yves Klein as part of his search for colors which best represented the concepts he wished to convey as an artist. IKB was developed by Klein and chemists to have the same color brightness and intensity as dry pigments, which it achieves by suspending dry pigment in polyvinyl acetate, a synthetic resin marketed in France as Rhodopas M or M60A by the firm Rhône Poulenc. While it is often said that the method for creating International Klein Blue was patented by the artist, this is not entirely true. Klein's 1961 patent had little to do with the chemical composition of the color, instead describing a method by which Klein was able to distance himself from the physical creation of his paintings by remotely directing models covered in the color. Although Klein had worked with blue extensively in his earlier career, it was not until 1958 that he used it as the
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    3 votes
    72

    Light blue

    Light Blue is a web color on the official list of web colors. Sometimes the color light blue is erroneously confused with baby blue. The web color light blue is displayed in the color box at right. The first recorded use of "light blue" as a color term in English is in the year 1915 . Cartography Flags Gender Interior Design Politics '''Sexuality School Colors
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    3 votes
    73
    Purple

    Purple

    Purple is a range of hues of color occurring between red and blue. In additive light combinations it occurs by mixing the primary colors red and blue in varying proportions. It is a secondary color because two colors (blue and red) make up this color. In subtractive pigments it can be equal to the primary color magenta or be formed by mixing magenta with the colors red or blue, or by mixing just the latter two, in which case a color of low saturation will result. Low saturation will also be caused by adding a certain quantity of the third primary color (green for light or yellow for pigment). In color theory, a "purple" is defined as any non-spectral color between violet and red (excluding violet and red themselves). The spectral colors violet and indigo are not purples according to color theory but they are purples according to common English usage since they are between red and blue. In art, purple is the color on the color wheel between magenta and violet and its tints and shades. This color, electric purple, is shown below. In human color psychology, purple is also associated with royalty and nobility (stemming from classical antiquity when Tyrian purple was only affordable to
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    3 votes
    74
    Arsenic

    Arsenic

    Arsenic is the dark bluish-gray color of the element arsenic. It is displayed to the right. Film
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    4 votes
    75
    Chamoisee

    Chamoisee

    Chamoisee ( /ʃæmwɑːˈzeɪ/), also spelled chamoise, is a color most often found in the Oberhasli and sometimes the Alpine goat. A goat that has chamoisee colorings usually has a black face, feet, legs, and sometimes black on the chest. There is also a black dorsal stripe running down the goat's back. The rest of the goat is colored chamoisee.
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    4 votes
    76

    Navajo white

    Navajo White is an orangish white color, or pastel yellow orange, and derives its name from its similarity to the background color of the Navajo Nation flag. The name "Navajo White" is usually only used when referring to paint. From the 1970s to the 1990s it was, along with the color bone, one of the standard interior paint colors used in many tract homes in the United States and especially apartment complexes as, like the color bone, it does not easily show stains from cigarette smoke or fingerprints. In recent years it has lost favor to other shades of off-white, grey, and pastel colors. In 1987, the color "Navaho white" was included in the X11 color list, which, after the invention of the world wide web in 1991, became known as the X11 web colors.
    6.75
    4 votes
    77

    Dodger blue

    Dodger blue is a rich bright tone of the color azure named for its use in the uniform of the Los Angeles Dodgers. It is also a web color used in the design of web pages. The web color is not used in the Dodgers' uniform but rather resembles the lighter blue used throughout Dodger Stadium. The Brooklyn Dodgers were never contemporarily referred to as wearing Dodger Blue, although some now refer to them as representing "True Dodger Blue." The concept of Dodger Blue originated with Manager Tommy Lasorda, who popularized it. Lasorda managed the Los Angeles franchise for many years, and was on the player roster of the Brooklyn Dodgers, though he played for them only very briefly. During his 20-year tenure as manager of the Dodgers, Lasorda piloted them to 8 division titles, 4 National League pennants, and 2 World Series championships in 1981 & 1988. Lasorda was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. The actual blue that the Dodgers currently wear is hex: #005596.
    9.00
    2 votes
    78
    Midnight green

    Midnight green

    Midnight green (sometimes called eagle green) is a dark shade of green. It is also a dark shade of cyan. This can be readily ascertained by noting the fact that this color's red value is zero, and also that its green and blue values are almost equal. Therefore, midnight green is a shade of cyan. The color midnight green is displayed at right. Sports
    9.00
    2 votes
    79

    Naples Yellow

    Naples yellow, also called antimony yellow, can range from a somewhat muted, or earthy, reddish yellow pigment to a bright light yellow, and is the chemical compound lead(II) antimonate. Its chemical composition is Pb(SbO3)2/Pb3(Sb3O4)2. It is also known as jaune d'antimoine. It is one of the oldest synthetic pigments, dating from around 1620. The related mineral pigment, bindheimite, dates from the 16th century BC. However, this natural version was rarely, if ever, used as a pigment. Naples yellow was used extensively by the Old Masters and well into the 20th century. The genuine pigment is toxic, and its use today is becoming increasingly rare. Most paints labeled "Naples yellow" are instead made with a mix of modern, less toxic pigments. The colors of these paints vary considerably from one manufacturer to another. The first recorded use of Naples yellow as a color name in English was in 1738. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Naples Yellow (color sample #83).
    9.00
    2 votes
    80

    Orchid

    Orchid is a bright rich purple color that is a representation of the color of the orchidaceae flower. Various tones of orchid may range from grayish purple to purplish-pink to strong reddish purple. The first recorded use of orchid as a color name in English was in 1915. In 1987, orchid was included as one of the X11 colors. After the invention of the world wide web in 1991, these became known as the X11 web colors. The name originates from the flowers of some species of the vast orchid family (Orchidaceae), such as Laelia furfuracea and Ascocentrum pusillum, which have petals of this color. The word Orchid derives from the Greek word orchis which means testicle, after the appearance of the roots of plants of the genus Orchis. Displayed at right is the color orchid pink. The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #13-2010 TPX—Orchid Pink. Displayed at right is the color light orchid which is the tone of orchid that is called orchid in Crayola crayons. The Crayola crayon "orchid" was formulated in 1949. Displayed at right is the color light medium orchid. This is the color called orchid in Pantone. The source of this color is the
    9.00
    2 votes
    81
    9.00
    2 votes
    82

    Steel blue

    Steel blue is a shade of blue that resembles blue steel, i.e., steel which has been subjected to bluing in order to protect it from rust. It is one of the less vibrant shades of blue; it is usually identified as a blue-grey color. The first recorded use of steel blue as a color name in English was in 1817. In 1987, Steel blue was included as one of the X11 colors when that color list was formulated. After the invention of the world wide web in 1991, these colors became known as the X11 web colors. At right is displayed the web color light steel blue, a light tint of steel blue. Sports
    9.00
    2 votes
    83
    Umber

    Umber

    Umber is a natural brown clay pigment that contains iron and manganese oxides. The color becomes more intense when calcined (heated), and the resulting pigment is called burnt umber. Its name derives from the Latin word umbra (shadow) and was originally extracted in Umbria, a mountainous region of central Italy, but it is found in many parts of the world. Some of the finest umber comes from Cyprus. It has been used as a pigment since prehistoric times. Displayed at the right is the color umber. This is the color achieved when the raw unheated clay earth pigment is processed into refined pigment. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Umber (color sample #61). Burnt umber is both a pigment and a color. This medium brown pigment is made by heating umber, a dark brown clay containing oxides of iron and manganese. It is used for oil and water color paint. The first recorded use of burnt umber as a color name in English was in 1650. Displayed at the right is the color raw umber. This is the color of the raw natural clay earth pigment. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Raw Umber (color
    9.00
    2 votes
    84
    Amethyst

    Amethyst

    The color amethyst is a moderate, transparent violet. The first recorded use of amethyst as a color name in English was in 1572. The name of the color is derived from the stone amethyst, a form of quartz. Though the color of natural amethyst varies from purple to yellow, the amethyst color referred to here is the moderate purple color most commonly associated with amethyst stones. There is disagreement as to the cause of the purple color of the amethyst stone. Some believe that the color is due to the presence of manganese, while others have suggested that the amethyst color could be from ferric thiocyanate or sulfur found in amethyst stones.
    7.67
    3 votes
    85
    Cerulean

    Cerulean

    Cerulean, also spelled caerulean, is a color term that may be applied to a wide range of colors from deep blue, sky-blue, bright blue or azure colors through blueish green colors. The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590. The word is probably derived from the Latin word caeruleus, "dark blue, blue or blue-green", which in turn probably derives from caelulum, diminutive of caelum, "heaven, sky". In classical times, cerulean was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colors were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue (shown in the color box to the right) was invented, it largely superseded all these prior pigments. See also Tekhelet. At right is displayed the color cerulean blue. The first recorded use of cerulean blue as a color name in English was in 1859. Pigments through the ages shows a "Painted swatch of cerulean blue" that is representative of the actual cobalt stannate pigment. This color swatch matches the color shown in the color box at right5. Discovered in 1805 by Andreas Höpfner, the
    7.67
    3 votes
    86
    Garnet

    Garnet

    Garnets /ˈɡɑrnət/ are a group of silicate minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. Garnets possess similar physical properties and crystal forms but different chemical compositions. The different species are pyrope, almandine, spessartine, grossular (varieties of which are hessonite or cinnamon-stone and tsavorite), uvarovite and andradite. The garnets make up two solid solution series: pyrope-almandine-spessarite and uvarovite-grossular-andradite. Garnet species are found in many colors including red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, black, pink and colorless. The rarest of these is the blue garnet, discovered in the late 1990s in Bekily, Madagascar. It is also found in parts of the United States, Russia and Turkey. It changes color from blue-green in the daylight to purple in incandescent light, as a result of the relatively high amounts of vanadium (about 1 wt.% V2O3). Other varieties of color-changing garnets exist. In daylight, their color ranges from shades of green, beige, brown, gray, and blue, but in incandescent light, they appear a reddish or purplish/pink color. Because of their color-changing quality, this kind of garnet
    7.67
    3 votes
    87

    Gules

    In heraldry, gules ( /ˈɡjuːlz/) is the tincture with the colour red, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures called "colours". In engraving, it is sometimes depicted as a region of vertical lines or else marked with gu. as an abbreviation. In Polish heraldry, gules is the most common tincture of the field. Through the sixteenth century, nearly half of all noble coats of arms in Poland had a field gules with one or more argent charges on them. The original coat of arms of the d'Albret family was plain gules. The gules tincture is said to represent the following: The term "gules" derives from the Old French word goules, literally meaning "throats" (related to the English gullet; modern French gueules), but also used to refer to a fur neckpiece, usually made of red fur. For many decades, heraldic authors have believed that the term may have arisen from the Persian word gol "rose" (coming to Europe via Muslim Spain or brought back by returning Crusaders), but according to Brault there is no evidence to support this derivation.
    7.67
    3 votes
    88
    Khaki

    Khaki

    The name of the color khaki coined in British India comes from the Hindustani language (itself a borrowed form of the Persian word khak meaning soil), meaning "soil-like, dust covered or earth colored." It has been used by many armies around the world for uniforms, including camouflage. Most notably, khaki was used by the British Army in India beginning in 1848. In Western fashion, it is a standard color for smart casual dress pants (trousers) for civilians. However, the name is sometimes also used to describe a green color similar to asparagus or pale sea green. In the mid-twentieth century as many Western militaries adopted an olive drab instead of the older, more brownish khaki, the two color names became associated with each other. In French, German and modern British English, "khaki" refers to a much darker olive drab-style military green. Initially, khaki was the characteristic color of British tropical uniforms, having a shade closer to the original Indian idea of 'dusty' brown. To these days, in common parlance of Anglo-Saxon countries, khaki as color brings to mind a brown, even beige, hue. This is not necessarily the case for the military terminology, though, often
    7.67
    3 votes
    89

    Peach-yellow

    Peach-yellow is a mix of the colors peach and yellow. It is sometimes called "Difdred". See the article peach for a complete list of various shades of the color peach.
    7.67
    3 votes
    90
    Rufous

    Rufous

    Rufous ( /ˈruːfəs/) is a colour that may be described as reddish-brown or brownish-red, as of rust or oxidised iron. The first recorded use of rufous as a colour name in English was in the year 1782. Its hex code is #A81C07. The name "rufous" is derived from the meaning of "red" in Latin and is used as an adjective in the names of many animals, especially birds, to describe the colour of their skin, fur or plumage.
    7.67
    3 votes
    91
    Anti-flash white

    Anti-flash white

    Anti-flash white is a brilliant white color commonly seen on United States, British and Soviet nuclear bombers. The purpose of the color was to reflect some of the thermal radiation from a nuclear explosion, protecting the aircraft and its occupants. Anti-flash white was used on the Royal Air Force V bombers force and the Royal Navy Blackburn Buccaneer when used in the nuclear strike role. British nuclear bombers were given – though not at first, until the problem was considered – pale pink and blue roundels rather than the traditional dark red, white, and blue. Anti-flash white was applied to several British prototype aircraft, including the British Aircraft Corporation TSR-2. Many Strategic Air Command nuclear bombers carried anti-flash white without insignia on the under side of the fuselage with light silver-gray or natural metal (later light camouflage) on the upper surfaces. The United States Navy A-5 Vigilante carried anti-flash white without insignia on the under side of the fuselage. Like the United States, some nuclear bombers had the under side of the fuselage painted anti-flash white with the upper surfaces painted light silver-gray. The Tupolev Tu-160 of the 1980s was
    10.00
    1 votes
    92
    Bondi blue

    Bondi blue

    Bondi blue ( /ˈbɒndaɪ/ bon-dy) is a color belonging to the cyan family of blues. It is very similar to the Crayola crayon color "blue-green". Apple, Inc. christened the color of the back of the original iMac computer "bondi blue" when it was introduced in 1998. It is said to be named for the color of the water at Bondi Beach, in Sydney, Australia.
    10.00
    1 votes
    93

    Burnt umber

    Burnt umber is both a pigment and a colour. This medium brown pigment is made by heating umber, a dark brown clay containing oxides of iron and manganese. It is used for oil and water colour paint. The first recorded use of burnt umber as a colour name in English was in 1650. Film Television
    10.00
    1 votes
    94
    Champagne

    Champagne

    The color champagne is a name given for various very pale tints of yellowish-orange that are close to beige. The color's name is derived from the typical color of the beverage Champagne. The color champagne is displayed at right. The first recorded use of champagne as a color name in English was in 1915. At right is displayed the color medium champagne. The medium tone of "champagne" displayed at right is the color called champagne in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955) in color sample #89. The deep tone of "champagne" displayed at right is the color called champagne in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955) in color sample #73. At right is displayed the color dark champagne. The dark tone of "champagne" displayed at right is the color called champagne in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955) in color sample #90. Animal husbandry Astronomy Merchandise Music
    10.00
    1 votes
    95
    Coquelicot

    Coquelicot

    Coquelicot ( /ˈkoʊklɨkoʊ/ KOHK-li-koh) is a French vernacular name for the wild corn poppy, Papaver rhoeas. The flower is distinguished by its bright red color, and orange tint. It eventually passed into English usage as the name of a color based upon that of the flower. The first recorded use of this usage was in the year 1795. Claude Monet painted "Les Coquelicots" or "Poppies Blooming" in 1873. The California poppy is colored a shade of golden called golden poppy.
    10.00
    1 votes
    96

    Emerald

    An emerald color is a shade of green that is particularly light and bright, with a faint bluish cast. The name derives from the typical appearance of the gemstone emerald. Film Geography Literature Military Parapsychology Religion
    10.00
    1 votes
    97

    Glaucous

    Glaucous (from the Latin glaucus, meaning "bluish-grey or green", from the Greek glaukos) is used to describe the pale grey or bluish-green appearance of the surfaces of some plants, as well as in the names of birds, such as the Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus), and Glaucous Tanager (Thraupis glaucocolpa). The term glaucous is also used botanically as an adjective to mean "covered with a greyish, bluish, or whitish waxy coating or bloom that is easily rubbed off" (e.g. glaucous leaves). The first recorded use of glaucous as a color name in English was in the year 1671. The epicuticular wax coating on mature plum fruit gives them a glaucous appearance. Another familiar example is found in the common grape genus (Vitis vinifera). Some cacti have a glaucous coating on their stem(s). Glaucous coatings are hydrophobic, prevent wetting by rain, and hinder climbing of leaves, stem or fruit by insects. On fruits, glaucous coatings may function as a deterrent to climbing and feeding by small insects in favor of increased seed dispersal offered by larger animals such as mammals and birds. The blue-grey
    10.00
    1 votes
    98
    Pink

    Pink

    Pink is any of the colors between bluish red (purple) and red, of medium to high brightness and of low to moderate saturation. Commonly used for Valentine's Day and Easter, pink is sometimes referred to as "the color of love." The use of the word for the color known today as pink was first recorded in the late 17th century. Although pink is roughly considered just as a tint of red, most variations of pink lie between red, white and magenta colors. This means that the pink's hue is somewhat between red and magenta. Roseus is a Latin word meaning "rosy" or "pink." Lucretius used the word to describe the dawn in his epic poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura). The word is also used in the binomial names of several species, such as the Rosy Starling (Sturnus roseus) and Catharanthus roseus. In most Indo-European languages, the color pink is called rosa. In Persian, it is called sourati, meaning "color of the face." In Hindi, it is called gulabi, meaning "color of a rose." The color pink is named after the flowers called pinks, flowering plants in the genus Dianthus. The name derives from the frilled edge of the flowers—the verb "to pink" dates from the 14th century and means
    10.00
    1 votes
    99
    St. Patrick's Blue

    St. Patrick's Blue

    St. Patrick's blue is a name applied to several shades of blue considered as symbolic of Ireland. In British usage, it refers to various sky blue shades associated with the Order of St. Patrick. In modern usage in the Republic of Ireland, it may be a darker shade. While green is now the usual national colour of Ireland, "St. Patrick's blue" is still found in some symbols. In Irish mythology, Flaitheas Éireann, the sovereignty of Ireland, was represented as a woman in a blue robe. Although the flag of the province of Mide has a blue field, when its device was used as the arms of Ireland, the field was sable. When Henry VIII declared himself King of Ireland, the coat of arms was a gold harp on a blue field. This still appears in the lower left quarter of the Royal Standard of the United Kingdom. The Order of St. Patrick was established in 1783 as the senior order of chivalry in the Kingdom of Ireland. The colour of its honours needed to differ from those of the Order of the Garter (dark blue) and the Order of the Thistle (green). Orange was considered, but felt to be too sectarian, so the lighter blue of the Irish arms was chosen. Knights and officers of the order wore a "sky blue"
    10.00
    1 votes
    100
    Teal

    Teal

    Teal is a low-saturated color, a bluish-green to dark medium, similar to medium blue-green and dark cyan. It can be created by mixing green with blue into a white base, or deepened as needed with a little bit of black or gray color. The complementary color of teal is coral. It is also one of the initial group of 16 HTML/CSS web colors formulated in 1987. The first recorded use of Teal as a color name in English was in 1917. Its name is derived from the Middle English tele, a word akin to the Dutch taling and the Middle Low German telink. As a color, its name is believed to have been taken from the small freshwater Common Teal, a member of the duck family whose eyes are surrounded by this color. Teal blue is a medium tone of teal with more blue. The first recorded use of teal blue as a color name in English was in 1927. The source of this color is the Plochere Color System, a color system formulated in 1948 that is widely used by interior designers, and in fact, teal was a heavily used color in the 1950s and 1960's. Teal blue is also the name of a Crayola crayon color (see color #113) Teal Blue, a lighter and brighter tone of teal blue.
    10.00
    1 votes
    101
    Ultramarine

    Ultramarine

    Ultramarine is a blue hue. Its name means "beyond the sea" in Latin. It is also the name of the pigment used to produce it. The pigment was originally made from the mineral lapis lazuli.
    10.00
    1 votes
    102
    Phthalocyanine Blue BN

    Phthalocyanine Blue BN

    Phthalocyanine Blue BN, also called monastral blue, phthalo blue (and others) (CAS 147-14-8, EINECS 205-685-1), is a bright, greenish-blue crystalline synthetic blue pigment from the group of phthalocyanine dyes. It was first developed as a pigment in the mid-1930s. Its brilliant blue is frequently used in paints and dyes. It is highly valued for its superior properties such as light fastness, tinting strength, covering power and resistance to the effects of alkalies and acids. It has the appearance of a blue powder, insoluble in water and most solvents. The anecdotal history of the compound is that a chemist at the ICI phthalimide plant was troubled by blue contamination of the product. This was traced to a by-product formed when the phthalimide reacted with trace amounts of iron from the metal reactor. The chemist took samples of this blue and using sulfuric acid as a solvent, managed to produce a workable pigment. This was converted into the copper centered blue and sold under the trade name Monastral. Difficulty was experienced in forming stable dispersions with the first alpha forms, especially in mixtures with rutile Titanium, where the blue pigment tended to flocculate. The
    6.50
    4 votes
    103
    Grey

    Grey

    Gray or grey is an achromatic or neutral color. Complementary colors are defined to mix to gray, either additively or subtractively, and many color models place complements opposite each other in a color wheel. To produce gray in RGB displays, the R, G, and B primary light sources are combined in proportions equal to that of the white point. In four-color printing, grays are produced either by the black channel, or by an approximately equal combination of CMY primaries. Images which consist wholly of neutral colors are called monochrome, black-and-white or grayscale. The first recorded use of gray as a color name in the English language was in AD 700. Grey is the British, Canadian, Australian, Irish, New Zealand and South African spelling, although gray remained in common usage in the UK until the second half of the 20th century. Gray is the preferred American spelling, although grey is an accepted variant. Gray became the preferred spelling in American English around 1825. Most gray pigments have a cool or warm cast to them, as the human eye can detect even a minute amount of saturation. Yellow, orange, and red create a "warm gray". Green, blue, and violet create a "cool gray".
    5.60
    5 votes
    104

    Fallow

    Fallow is a pale brown color that is the color of sandy soil in fallow fields. Fallow is one of the oldest color names in English. The first recorded use of fallow as a color name in English was in the year 1000. Also rooted in this older color, is Indian tradition in South Africa where it has been dubbed Ravi Brown.
    8.50
    2 votes
    105

    Hansa yellow

    Hansa Yellow is a synthetic Arylide Yellow pigment used in inks, oil paint, acrylic paint and other applications. Hansa yellows were first made in Germany just before World War I and are ASTM II lightfast and semitransparent. Hansa yellow is not a modern synthetic replacement for cadmium yellow. While Cadmium paint is by nature, opaque, Hansa yellow provides a degree of translucence. It makes more intense tints and cleaner secondary colors in mixtures with other synthetic pigments when properly mixed.
    8.50
    2 votes
    106
    Ochre

    Ochre

    Ochre ( /ˈoʊkər/ OH-kər; from Greek: ὠχρός, ōkhrós, pale, also spelled ocher) is the term for both a golden-yellow or light yellow brown color and for a form of earth pigment which produces the color. The pigment can also be used to create a reddish tint known as "red ochre". The more rarely used terms "purple ochre" and "brown ochre" also exist for variant hues. Because of these other hues, the color ochre is sometimes referred to as "yellow ochre" or "gold ochre". Ochres are among the earliest pigments used by mankind, derived from naturally tinted clay containing mineral oxides. Chemically, it is hydrated iron (III) oxide, mineralogically known as limonite. Modern artists' pigments continue to use the terms "yellow ochre" and "red ochre" for specific hues. Ochre clays have been used medicinally from the earliest times. For example, such use is described in the Ebers Papyrus from Egypt, dating to about 1550 BC. Ochres are non-toxic, and can be used to make an oil paint that dries quickly and covers surfaces thoroughly. To manufacture ground ochre, ochre clay is first mined from the ground. It is then washed in order to separate sand from ochre, which can be done by hand. The
    8.50
    2 votes
    107
    Tawny

    Tawny

    Tawny (also called tenné) is a yellowish brown color. The word means "tan-colored", from Anglo-Norman tauné "associated with the brownish-yellow of tanned leather", from Old French tané "to tan hides", from Medieval Latin tannare, from tannum "crushed oak bark", used in tanning leather, probably from a Celtic source (e.g. Breton tann, "oak tree"). Other than CD5700, there are other hex numbers that are used for this color, including CF5300 and CE5600. A digitized version of the 1912 book Color Standards And Color Nomenclature lists tawny as AE6938, tawny-olive as 826644 or 967117, ochraceous-tawny as BE8A3D or 996515, and vinaceous-tawny as B4745E. HP Labs' Online Color Thesaurus, which lists colors found through their Color Naming Experiment, gives tawny as CC7F3B, noting it is "rarely used", and lists its synonyms as: light chocolate, caramel, light brown, and camel. Dictionary of Color lists tawny as AE6938 or A67B5B, and tawny birch as A87C6D, A67B5B or 958070. It also lists "lion tawny" (which it also refers to as just "lion") as C19A6B or 826644. Orange tawny is listed as CB6D51. Resene RGB Values List includes "Resene Tawny Port" as 105, 37, 69 (#692545), while
    8.50
    2 votes
    108

    Thistle

    Thistle is a pale purple-ish color resembling the thistle plant. It closely resembles the color Wisteria. The first recorded use of Thistle as a color name in English was in 1892.
    8.50
    2 votes
    109
    8.50
    2 votes
    110
    Icterine

    Icterine

    Icterine ( /ˈɪktəriːn/) is a colour, described as yellowish, jaundice-yellow or marked with yellow. It is derived from Ancient Greek ikteros (jaundice), via the Latin ictericus. It is used as an adjective in the names of birds with yellowish plumage to describe their appearance, including the Icterine Warbler and Icterine Greenbul.
    7.33
    3 votes
    111
    Ivory

    Ivory

    Ivory is an off-white color that resembles ivory, the material from which the teeth and tusks of animals (such as, notably, the elephant and the walrus) is made. It has a very slight tint of yellow. The first recorded use of ivory as a color name in English was in 1385. The color "ivory" was included as one of the X11 colors when they were formulated in 1987. Plants Birds
    7.33
    3 votes
    112

    Red-violet

    Red-violet is a rich color of high medium saturation about 3/4 of the way between red and magenta, closer to magenta than to red. It is classified in color theory as one of the purple colors—a non-spectral color between red and violet that is a deep version of a color on the line of purples on the CIE chromaticity diagram. Both its saturation and brightness falling short of 100%, red-violet is not a pure chroma. There is a color of similar hue that, however, that comes close to being a pure chroma: process magenta. The pure chroma color composed of equal parts of magenta and red is called rose. In the usage of artists, red-violet is equivalent to purple. However, although the color "purple" is inaccurately used by many people as a synonym for violet or a color close to violet, professional artists who use the RYB color wheel generally use the term "purple" to specifically refer to a pigment color that is equivalent to red-violet (i.e., the tertiary color between violet and red on the RYB color wheel) in order to give themselves a larger and more balanced palette of pigments to work with. The Munsell color system also refers to red-violet as purple; actually in the Munsell color
    6.25
    4 votes
    113
    Cerise

    Cerise

    Cerise ( /səˈriːs/ or /səˈriːz/; French pronunciation: [səˈʁiz]) is a deep to vivid pinkish red. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first recorded use of cerise as a color name in English was in The Times of November 30, 1858. This date of 1858 as the date of first use of the color name is also mentioned in the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color. However, it was used at least as early as 1845 in a book of crochet patterns. The color name comes from the French word "cerise", meaning cherry. The word "cherry" itself comes from the Norman cherise. In the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color it is pointed out that the color cerise has always been depicted as a somewhat bluer color than the actual color of a fresh uncooked cherry, which is a denoted by a different redder color called cherry red. Basically, the color cerise is a depiction of the somewhat bluer color of a cooked cherry, such as the cherries in a cherry pie. There are various tones of cerise. In the 1950s, a popular brand of colored pencils, Venus Paradise, had a colored pencil called Hollywood cerise which was this color. Before being renamed Hollywood cerise in the 1940s, the color had been known, since its
    7.00
    3 votes
    114
    Pumpkin

    Pumpkin

    Pumpkin is a color that resembles pumpkins. The first recorded use of Pumpkin as a color name in English was in 1922. Holidays
    7.00
    3 votes
    115

    Rose madder

    Rose Madder is the commercial name sometimes used to designate a paint made from the pigment Madder Lake - a traditional lake pigment, extracted from the common madder plant (Rubia tinctorum). Madder Lake contains two organic red dyes: alizarin and purpurin. As a paint, it has been described as "a fugitive, transparent, nonstaining, mid valued, moderately dull violet red pigment in tints and medum solutions, darkening to an impermanent, dull magenta red in masstone." Madder has been cultivated as a dyestuff since antiquity in central Asia and Egypt, where it was grown as early as 1500 BC. Cloth dyed with madder root dye was found in the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, in the ruins of Pompeii and ancient Corinth. It was included in the Talmud as well as mentioned in writings by Pliny the Elder, and other literary figures, as 'rubio', used in paintings by J. M. W. Turner, and as a color for ceramics remnants of its use have been found at the Baths of Titus. Madder was introduced and then cultivated in Spain by the Moors. It has been found on an Egyptian tomb painting from the Graeco-Roman period, diluted with gypsum to produce a pink color. The production of a lake pigment from
    7.00
    3 votes
    116
    Safety orange

    Safety orange

    Safety orange (also known as blaze orange, vivid orange, Caltrans orange, or Omaha orange) is a hue. Its deeper, more saturated shade is known as international orange. Safety orange is used to set objects apart from their surroundings, particularly in complementary contrast to the azure color of the sky (azure is the complementary color of orange, and therefore there is a very strong contrast between the two colors). The color is commonly used for high-visibility clothing. ANSI standard Z535.1–1998 states how safety orange is defined in the following notation systems: Note that this CIE color point is outside the gamut of common color spaces like sRGB or Adobe RGB. The closest CIE color point that is still in the sRGB gamut is x=0.54091, y=.40869, Y%=30.05, corresponding to the sRGB-255 coordinates (232,118,0). The Adobe RGB color space is larger than the sRGB color space; the closest "safety orange" CIE color point that is still in the Adobe RGB gamut is x=0.54467, y=.41424, Y%=30.05, corresponding to the AdobeRGB-255 coordinates (206, 118, 0). Safety orange is the same color as blaze orange, the shade of orange (Color No. 12199) required by United States law (U.S. Code of Federal
    7.00
    3 votes
    117
    Chartreuse

    Chartreuse

    Chartreuse (UK /ʃɑːˈtrɜrz/, US /ʃɑːrˈtruːz/ or /ʃɑːrˈtruːs/; French pronunciation: [ʃaʁtʁøz]) (the web color) is a color halfway between yellow and green that was named because of its resemblance to the green color of one of the French liqueurs called green chartreuse, introduced in 1764. Similarly, chartreuse yellow is a yellow color mixed with a small amount of green that was named because of its resemblance to the color of one of the French liqueurs called yellow chartreuse, introduced in 1838. At right is displayed the web color chartreuse. The term chartreuse was first used to refer to "a pale apple-green" in 1884. This was codified to refer to this brighter color when the X11 colors were formulated in 1987; by the early 1990s, they became known as the X11 web colors. The web color chartreuse is the color precisely halfway between green and yellow, so it is 50% green and 50% yellow. It is one of the tertiary colors of the HSV color wheel, also known as the RGB color wheel. Another name for this color is chartreuse green. The color name chartreuse yellow, also known as chartreuse (traditional) or traditional chartreuse, refers to the much more yellowish tone of chartreuse than
    6.00
    4 votes
    118

    Chartreuse yellow

    Chartreuse Yellow is the color that was traditionally known simply as chartreuse before the web color chartreuse (named after green Chartreuse liqueur) was invented in the mid 1990. Chartreuse Yellow is a green-yellow color. Nowadays this color is called chartreuse yellow to distinguish it from the web color. Chartreuse yellow is a color that was named because of its resemblance to the yellow color of one of the French liqueurs called yellow chartreuse, introduced in 1838. At right is displayed the color chartreuse yellow. The first recorded use of chartreuse as a color name in English (in the original sense of chartreuse, meaning what is here called chartreuse yellow) was in 1892. The name of the original color chartreuse, i.e., what is called here chartreuse yellow, came from of one of the French liqueurs called yellow chartreuse, introduced in 1838. The color chartreuse yellow is 87.5% yellow and 12.5% green. The color pear is a medium shade of chartreuse yellow. Alcoholic beverage Art Firefighting Music Safety Clothing Sport Traffic
    6.00
    4 votes
    119
    Sand

    Sand

    Sand is a naturally occurring granular material composed of finely divided rock and mineral particles. The composition of sand is highly variable, depending on the local rock sources and conditions, but the most common constituent of sand in inland continental settings and non-tropical coastal settings is silica (silicon dioxide, or SiO2), usually in the form of quartz. The second most common form of sand is calcium carbonate, for example aragonite, which has mostly been created, over the past half billion years, by various forms of life, like coral and shellfish. It is, for example, the primary form of sand apparent in areas where reefs have dominated the ecosystem for millions of years, like the Caribbean. In terms of particle size as used by geologists, sand particles range in diameter from 0.0625 mm (or ⅟16 mm) to 2 mm. An individual particle in this range size is termed a sand grain. Sand grains are between gravel (with particles ranging from 2 mm up to 64 mm) and silt (particles smaller than 0.0625 mm down to 0.004 mm). The size specification between sand and gravel has remained constant for more than a century, but particle diameters as small as 0.02 mm were considered sand
    6.00
    4 votes
    120
    Blue

    Blue

    Blue is the colour of the clear sky and the deep sea. On the optical spectrum, blue is located between violet and green. Blue is the colour of light between violet and green on the visible spectrum. Hues of blue include indigo and ultramarine, closer to violet; pure blue, without any mixture of other colours; Cyan, which is midway on the spectrum between blue and green, and the other blue-greens turquoise, teal, and aquamarine. Blues also vary in shade or tint; darker shades of blue contain black or grey, while lighter tints contain white. Darker shades of blue include ultramarine, cobalt blue, navy blue, and Prussian blue; while lighter tints include sky blue, azure, and Egyptian blue. include (For a more complete list see the List of colours). Blue pigments were originally made from minerals such as lapis lazuli, cobalt and azurite, and blue dyes were made from plants; usually woad in Europe, and Indigofera tinctoria, or True indigo, in Asia and Africa. Today most blue pigments and dyes are made by a chemical process. The modern English word blue comes from Middle English bleu or blewe, from the Old French bleu, a word of Germanic origin, related to the Old High German word
    8.00
    2 votes
    121

    Eton blue

    Eton blue is a bluish-green colour used since early 19th century by sportsmen of Eton College. It is also used by Geelong Grammar School and is similar to the colour used by the University of Cambridge (Cambridge Blue).
    8.00
    2 votes
    122

    Jungle green

    Displayed at right is the color jungle green. Jungle green is a color that is a rich tone of medium spring green. The specific tone of the color jungle green called "jungle green" by Crayola, displayed at right, was formulated by Crayola in 1990. The first recorded use of jungle green as a color name in English was in 1926. Displayed at right is the color tropical rain forest. The color tropical rain forest was formulated by Crayola in 1993. Displayed at right is the color amazon. The first recorded use of amazon as a color name in English was in 1924. When the Xona.com Color List was formulated in 2001, "Amazon" was included as one of the colors. Displayed at right is the color deep jungle green, that tone of jungle green shown as jungle green on color sample #165 of the ISCC-NBS color list. The source of this color is the following website, the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955) (a site for stamp collectors to identify the colors of their stamps)--Color Sample of [Deep] Jungle Green (color sample #165): Displayed at right is the color medium jungle green, that tone of jungle green shown as jungle green in color sample #147 on the ISCC-NBS color list. The source of this
    8.00
    2 votes
    123
    Maize

    Maize

    The color maize or corn refers to a shade of yellow; it is named for the cereal of the same name—maize (the cereal maize is called corn in the Americas). In public usage, maize can be applied to a variety of shades, ranging from light yellow to a dark shade that borders on orange, since the color of maize may vary. The first recorded use of maize as a color name in English was in 1861. Biology Chemistry Sports
    8.00
    2 votes
    124

    Taupe

    Taupe ( /ˈtoʊp/) or "tay-oop" is a dark brown/tan-ish grey color. The word "taupe" derives from the Latin name for the European Mole, Talpa europaea. Originally, this referred only to the average color of the French mole, but like the colors pink and lavender, the name expanded (in the case of taupe beginning in the 1940s) to encompass a wide range of varying shades. Taupe is a vague, unscientific color term which may be used to refer to almost any grayish-brown, brownish-gray, or warm gray color. It often overlaps with tan and even people who use color professionally (such as designers and artists) frequently disagree as to what "taupe" means. Taupe itself, however, is not directly correlated with such colors as purple or pink. There is no single, generally recognized authority for such terms, but the addition of such colors can create a wider variety of shades which can benefit either art. The color displayed at right matches the color sample called taupe referenced below in the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color, the world standard for color terms before the invention of computers. However, the word taupe may often be used to refer to lighter shades of taupe today, and therefore
    8.00
    2 votes
    125
    Auburn

    Auburn

    Auburn may be described as hair that is of a reddish-brown color. The word "auburn" comes from the Old French word alborne, which meant blond, coming from Latin word alburnus ("off-white"). The first recorded use of auburn in English was in 1430. The word was sometimes corrupted into abram, for example in early (pre-1685) folios of Coriolanus, Thomas Kyd's Soliman and Perseda (1588) and Thomas Middleton's Blurt, Master Constable (1601). The chemical pigments that cause the coloration of auburn hair are frequently pheomelanin with high levels of brown eumelanin. Auburn hair is reasonably common among people of northern and western European descent, but it is rare elsewhere. The color auburn is a reddish brown color similar to chestnut, though auburn is more on the red side while chestnut is on the brown. The two are sometimes used interchangeably, but auburn hair is more pigmented, and chestnut hair is often referred to as "chestnut brown". In describing hair color, "auburn" is frequently misused as a synonym for darker shades of red hair, such as "titian". Auburn hair occurs most frequently in the phenotypes originating in Northern Europe for example, Scandinavia, Ireland, England,
    9.00
    1 votes
    126

    Harley Davidson Orange

    Harley Davidson Orange is a color of the motorcycle corporation Harley-Davidson of the United States. It is extremely difficult to match, because the original paint formula used by Harley Davidson Corporation is purported to be a trade secret. However, an attempt has been made by matching it from this picture of a Harley-Davidson orange cap: Marketing Motorcycles
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    Periwinkle

    Periwinkle

    Periwinkle is a color in the blue family. Its name is derived from the lesser periwinkle or myrtle herb (Vinca minor) which bears flowers of the same color. The color Periwinkle is also called lavender blue. The color periwinkle may be considered a pale tint of blue or indigo – a pastel blue or indigo. The first recorded use of periwinkle as a color name in English was in 1922.
    9.00
    1 votes
    128
    Tenné

    Tenné

    In heraldry, tenné (sometimes termed tawny or tenny) is a "stain" or non-standard tincture, of an orangish brown colour, at least in Continental European use. In Anglophone and South African armory, tenné is orange, as in the shield of Dundee United Football Club (known as the Tangerines), whose field is quarterly tenny and argent. Such a colour is more often blazoned orange, though, as in the shield of Oranjegloed (South Africa) Primary School which features five demi gyrons issuant orange. It was used in the arms of some South African government departments and military units adopted before 1994 (presumably because at that time the national flag was orange, white and blue) and in the bearings of persons and institutions in the Free State, formerly Orange Free State.
    9.00
    1 votes
    129
    Tuscan Red

    Tuscan Red

    Tuscan red is a shade of red that was used on the passenger cars of the Pennsylvania Railroad, as well as on the PRR TrucTrailers. It also was used extensively by the New South Wales Government Railways in Australia, in a similar fashion to the PRR. The Canadian Pacific Railway used it historically and painted its luxury revival cars in this color. It is also a Prismacolor colored pencil. The first recorded use of Tuscan red as a color name in English was in the early 1800s (exact date uncertain). The color was popular in the late 19th century but non-standardized. It became the ‘signature color’ of the Pennsylvania Railroad, which instituted specifications for its formulation. Before the 1880s, pigments extracted from Brazil wood were used in its manufacture, but these proved inadequate in terms of hiding power and stability. A 1916 US National Bureau of Standards circular describes it as based on Indian red, which derives its color from iron oxides. The color was then modified by treatment with an alizarin lake pigment. The pigment’s stability lent itself to hard use in applications such as rail cars and machinery. Lower-cost imitations were made without iron oxides by using
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Bath Stone

    Bath Stone

    Bath Stone is an Oolitic Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. Originally obtained from the Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines under Combe Down, Somerset, England, its warm, honey colouring gives the World Heritage City of Bath, England its distinctive appearance. An important feature of Bath Stone is that it is a freestone, that is one that can be sawn or 'squared up' in any direction, unlike other rocks such as slate, which forms distinct layers. Bath Stone has been used extensively as a building material throughout southern England for churches, houses and public buildings such as railway stations. Some of the quarries from which the stone was taken are still in use; however the majority have been converted to other purposes or are being filled in. During the Jurassic Period (195 to 135 million years ago) the region that is now Bath was under a shallow sea. Layers of Marine sediment built and individual spherical grains were coated with lime as they rolled around the sea bed forming the Bathonian Series of rocks. Under the microscope, these grains or ooliths (egg stone) are sedimentary rock formed from ooids, spherical grains composed of concentric
    5.75
    4 votes
    131

    Eggshell

    The color eggshell is displayed at right. The color eggshell is a representation of the average color of a chicken egg. Since the color of chicken eggs may vary between pale brown and white, this color is an average between those colors, closer to white than pale brown since more chicken eggs are white than are pale brown. The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Eggshell (color sample #92). Interior design
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    Apple candy red

    Apple candy red

    Candy apple red (occasionally known as apple-candy red) is the name code used by manufacturing companies to define a shade of red similar to the red caramelized sugar coating on candied apples. The typical method for producing a candy apple finish is to apply a metallic base-coat, followed by a transparent color coat. A final clear coat adds additional gloss. Displayed at right is the color candy pink. The color candy apple red is not mentioned in the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color by Maerz and Paul. However, a color called candy pink is mentioned, the first recorded use of which as a color name is recorded as being in 1926. Airline Colors Automobiles Monster Trucks Music Race Car Driving
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Burnt sienna

    Burnt sienna

    Burnt sienna is an iron oxide pigment: a warm mid brown color. Chemically, burnt sienna is formed by burning raw sienna (Terra di Siena Naturale).
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    Ceil

    Ceil is a pale blue color, often associated with surgical scrubs. Ceil is from Latin celtium ilsium.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Tamarisk

    Tamarisk is a pink color, named after the color of the flowers of the Tamarisk shrub. List of colors
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    White

    White

    White is a color, the perception of which is evoked by light that stimulates all three types of color sensitive cone cells in the human eye in nearly equal amounts and with high brightness compared to the surroundings. A white visual stimulation will be void of hue and grayness. White light can be generated in many ways. The sun is such a source, electric incandescence is another. Modern light sources are fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes. An object whose surface reflects back most of the light it receives and does not alter its color will appear white, unless it has very high specular reflection. Since white is the extreme end of the visual spectrum (in terms of both hue and shade), and since white objects - such as clouds, snow and flowers - appear often in nature, it has frequent symbolism. Human culture has many references to white, often related to purity and cleanness, whilst the high contrast between white and black is often used to represent opposite extremes. The word white continues Old English hwīt, ultimately from a Common Germanic *χītaz also reflected in OHG (h)wîz, ON hvítr, Goth. ƕeits. The root is ultimately from Proto-Indo-European language *kid-,
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Cerulean blue

    Cerulean blue

    Cerulean blue is a cerulean (light blue or azure) pigment used in artistic painting. It is particularly valuable for painting atmospheric shades because of the purity of the blue (specifically the lack of greenish hue). The pigment is regarded as permanent: in oil, no other blue pigment retains color as well. Discovered in 1805 by Andreas Hᅢᄊpfner, the pigment was first marketed in 1860 as "coeruleum" by George Rowney of the United Kingdom. The primary chemical constituent is cobalt(II) stannate. Cobalt(II)-stannate
    5.50
    4 votes
    139

    Sap green

    Sap green is a green pigment which was traditionally made of unripe blackthorn (sloe) berries, but these days is usually made from a blend of artificial pigments.
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    British racing green

    British racing green

    British racing green, or BRG, a colour similar to Brunswick green, hunter green, forest green or moss green (RAL 6005), takes its name from the green international motor racing colour of Britain. Although there is still some debate as to an exact hue for BRG, currently the term is used to denote a spectrum of deep, rich greens. "British racing green" in motorsport terms meant only the colour green in general – its application to a specific range of shades has developed outside the sport. In the days of the Gordon Bennett Cup, Count Eliot Zborowski, father of inter-war racing legend Louis Zborowski, suggested that each national entrant be allotted a different colour. Every component of a car had to be produced in the competing country, as well as the driver being of that nationality. The races were hosted in the country of the previous year's winner. Britain had to choose a different colour to its usual national colours, red, white and blue, because those colours had already been taken by Italy, Germany and France respectively. When Selwyn Edge won the 1902 race for England in a Napier it was decided that the 1903 race would be held in Ireland, at that time a part of the United
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    Pine Green

    Pine green is a rich shade of spring green that resembles the color of pine trees. It is an official Crayola color (since 1949) that is this exact shade in the Crayola crayon, but in the markers, it's known as crocodile green. The color pine green is a representation of the average color of the leaves of the tree of a coniferous forest. The color pine green was originally known as pine tree. The first recorded use of pine tree as a color name in English was in 1923. Advertising Cartography Consumer product Pine greenPine green
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Red

    Red

    Red is the color of blood and strawberries. It is next to orange at the end of the visible spectrum of light, and is commonly associated with danger, sacrifice, passion, love, anger, socialism and communism, and in China and many other cultures, with happiness. The word red comes from the Old English rēd. The word can be further traced to the Proto-Germanic rauthaz and the Proto-Indo European root reudh-. In Sanskrit, the word rudhira means red or blood. In the Akkadian language of Ancient Mesopotamia and in the modern Inuit language of Eskimos, the word for red is the same word as "like blood". The words for 'colored' in Latin (coloratus) and Spanish (colorado) both also mean 'red.' In the Russian language, the word for red, Кра́сный (krasniy), comes from the same old Slavic root as the words for "beautiful"—красивый (krasiviy) and "excellent"—прекрасный (prekrasniy). Thus Red Square in Moscow, named long before the Russian Revolution, meant simply "Beautiful Square". Red can vary in hue from orange-red to violet-red. and for each hue there are a wide variety of shades and tints, from very light pink to dark burgundy. (Lists of shades of red and variations of pink are found at the
    6.33
    3 votes
    143

    Vert

    In classical heraldry, vert is the name of the tincture roughly equivalent to the colour "green". It is one of the five dark tinctures (colours). The word vert is simply the French for "green". It is used in English in the sense of a heraldic tincture since the early 16th century. In Modern French, vert is not used as a heraldic term. Instead, the French heraldic term for green tincture is sinople. This has been the case since ca. the 16th century. In medieval French heraldry, vert also meant "green" while sinople was a shade of red. Vert is portrayed by the conventions of heraldic "hatching" (in black and white engravings) by lines at a 45-degree angle from upper left to lower right, or indicated by the abbreviation vt. when a coat of arms is "tricked". The colour green is commonly found in modern flags and coat of arms, and to a lesser extent also in the classical heraldry of the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. Green flags were historically carried by the Fatimid Caliphate in the 10th to 12th centuries, and by Ottokar II of Bohemia in the 13th century. In the modern period, a Green Ensign was flown by Irish vessels, becoming a symbol of Irish nationalism in the 19th
    6.33
    3 votes
    144

    Bleu celeste

    Bleu celeste ("sky blue") is a rarely occurring tincture in heraldry (not being one of the seven main colours or metals or the three "staynard colours"). This tincture is sometimes also called ciel or simply celeste. It is depicted in a lighter shade than the range of shades of the more traditional tincture azure, which is the standard blue used in heraldry. Initially considered to be European rather than English or Scottish, after the First World War it became more prevalent in England in badges of coats relating to the Royal Air Force, or the arms of those with some RAF connection. While in the post-WWI period bleu-celeste is depicted as a darker shade, in prior times it was depicted as very light, and has even been treated as a metal, as azure charges have been placed on a bleu celeste field, and vice versa. Bleu celeste can be seen in the coat of arms of Argentina, Peru and also in the arms of the Canadian Governor General Ray Hnatyshyn. In the arms of the University of Natal Athletic Union the azure is defined as "sky blue". In addition to bleu celeste, there is also an apparently unique example in British heraldry of the use of "light blue" in the Municipal Borough of Barnes,
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Brown

    Brown

    Brown is a color term, denoting a range of composite colors produced by a mixture of orange, red, rose, or yellow with black or gray. The term is from Old English brún, in origin for any dusky or dark shade of color. The first recorded use of brown as a color name in English was in 1000. The Common Germanic adjective *brûnoz, *brûnâ meant both dark colors and a glistening or shining quality, whence burnish. The current meaning developed in Middle English from the 14th century. The adjective is applied to naturally occurring colors, referring to animal fur, human hair, human skin pigmentation (tans), partially charred or carbonized fiber as in toasted bread and other foods, peat, withered leaves, etc. In terms of the visible spectrum, "brown" refers to high wavelength (low frequency) hues, yellow, orange, or red, in combination with low luminance or saturation. Since brown may cover a wide range of the visible spectrum, composite adjectives are used such as red brown, yellowish brown, dark brown or light brown. As a color of low intensity, brown is a tertiary color: a mix of the three subtractive primary colors is brown if the cyan content is low. Brown exists as a color perception
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Persian red

    Persian red is a deep reddish orange earth or pigment from the Persian Gulf composed of a silicate of iron and alumina, with magnesia. It is also called artificial vermillion. The first recorded use of Persian red as a color name in English was in 1897. Architecture
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Tomato

    Tomato

    The web color tomato is a medium reddish-orange color that is the color of actual supermarket tomatoes. Many vine-ripened tomatoes are a bit redder. The color of tomato soup is slightly less saturated. The color tomato is displayed at right. The first recorded use of tomato as a color name in English was in 1891. When the X11 color names were invented in the 1987, the color tomato was formulated as one of them. In the early 1990s, the X11 colors became known as the X11 web colors.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    5.25
    4 votes
    149
    Amaranth

    Amaranth

    Amaranth is a reddish-rose color that is a representation of the color of the flower of the amaranth plant. The color shown is the color of the red amaranth flower (the color normally considered amaranth), but there are other varieties of amaranth that have other colors of amaranth flowers; these colors are also shown below. The color amaranth is displayed at right. This color is also called amaranth red to distinguish it from the varying colors of other varieties of the amaranth flower. The color amaranth is similar to printer's magenta (pigment magenta) (but redder). It is the color of the flower of those amaranth plants that have amaranth red colored flowers. The first recorded use of amaranth as a color name in English was in 1690. The name amaranth comes from the Greek a (not) + marainean (to waste away), i.e., a flower believed to grow on Mount Olympus which never died. The color amaranth pink is displayed at right. This color is a representation of the color of pink amaranth flowers. The first recorded use of amaranth pink as a color name in English was in 1905. The Crayola crayon color radical red is displayed at right. The color radical red, which may also be called bright
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Aureolin

    Aureolin (sometimes called Cobalt Yellow) is a pigment used in oil and watercolor painting. Its color index name is PY40 (40th entry on list of yellow pigments). It was first made in 1848 by N. W. Fischer in Breslau and its chemical composition is potassium cobaltinitrite. Aureolin is rated as permanent in oils but darkens and fades easily in watercolors. It is a transparent, lightly staining, light valued, intense medium yellow pigment. It is a rather expensive pigment and sold by several manufacturers of oil paints such as Grumbacher, Michael Harding, and Holbein. However, the pigment was never popular as an oil color and is much more widely available as a watercolor from manufacturers such as: Winsor & Newton, Talens Rembrandt, Rowney Artists, Sennelier, Art Spectrum and Daniel Smith.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Fawn

    Fawn

    Fawn is a light yellowish tan colour. It is usually used in reference to clothing, soft furnishings and bedding, as well as to a dog's coat colour. It occurs in varying shades, ranging between pale tan to pale fawn to dark deer-red. The first recorded use of fawn as a colour name in English was in 1789. The fawn colour is the result of two recessive genes. It is achieved by breeding dogs that one way or another do carry the dilution gene either in its homozygous or heterozygous form, that is the "D" and the chocolate gene "B". Black to black or black to red, red to red or black to blue, or even blue to red colour can produce a fawn coloured offspring, but only if the genes pair correctly and if they are both carrying the recessive form of the "B" and "D" gene.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Flax

    Flax (also known as Light Goldenrod) is a pale yellowish-gray color named after flax seeds. It is similar to the color mustard.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Gamboge

    Gamboge (/ɡæmˈboʊʒ/gam-BOHZH, /ɡæmˈboʊdʒ/gam-BOHJ, or /ɡæmˈbuːʒ/gam-BOOZH) is a partially transparent deep saffron to mustard yellow pigment. It is used to dye Buddhist monks' robes because the color is a deep tone of saffron, the traditional color used for the robes of Theravada Buddhist monks. Gamboge is most often extracted by tapping resin from various species of evergreen trees of the family Guttiferae (also known as Clusiaceae), most often of the gamboge tree (genus Garcinia), including G. hanburyi (Cambodia and Thailand), G. morella (India and Sri Lanka), and G. elliptica and G. heterandra (Myanmar); The orange fruit of Garcinia gummi-gutta (formerly called G. cambogia) is also known as gamboge or gambooge. The trees must be ten years old before they are tapped. The resin is extracted by making spiral incisions in the bark, and by breaking off leaves and shoots and letting the milky yellow resinous gum drip out. The resulting latex is collected in hollow bamboo canes. After the resin is congealed, the bamboo is broken away and large rods of raw gamboge remain. The word gamboge comes from gambogium, the Latin word for the pigment, which derives from Gambogia, the Latin word
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Goldenrod

    Goldenrod is a color that resembles the goldenrod plant. A Crayola crayon with this name and color, although a lighter version, was created in 1958. Displayed at right is the web color goldenrod. The color goldenrod is a representation of the color of some of the deeper gold colored goldenrod flowers. The first known recorded use of goldenrod as a color name in English was in 1915. The web color light goldenrod yellow is displayed at right. The web color pale goldenrod is displayed at right. The web color dark goldenrod is a color that resembles the color goldenrod, but is darker.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Rust

    Rust is a red-brown-orange color resembling iron oxide. It is a commonly used color in stage lighting, and appears roughly the same color as photographic safelights when used over a standard tungsten light source. The color is number 777 in the Lee Filters swatch book. The first recorded use of rust as a color name in English was in 1692. Rust is named after the resulting phenomenon of the oxidation of iron. The word 'rust' finds its etymological origins in the Proto-Germanic word rusta, which translates to "redness." The word is closely related to the term "ruddy," which also refers to a reddish coloring in an object.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Sunset

    Sunset

    At right is displayed the color sunset. The color sunset is a pale tint of orange. It is a representation of the average color of clouds when the sunlight from a sunset is reflected off of them. The first recorded use of sunset as a color name in English was in 1916. Interior Design
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Vermilion

    Vermilion is an opaque red pigment. The first recorded use of vermilion as a color name in English was in 1289. As a naturally occurring mineral pigment, it is known as cinnabar, and has been in use around the world for many thousands of years. The first recorded use of cinnabar as a color name (the color name "cinnabar" is a synonym for vermilion) in English was in 1382. Most naturally produced vermilion comes from cinnabar mined in China, and vermilion is nowadays commonly called 'China red'. The name 'vermilion' is derived from the French vermeil (indicating any red dye), from Latin vermiculum, the ancient insect dye from Kermes vermilio. Words for red hues in Portuguese (vermelho) and Catalan (vermell) arose similarly. 'Cinnabar' and 'vermilion' were used interchangeably to describe either the natural or manufactured pigment until the 17th century when vermilion became the more common name. By the late 18th century 'cinnabar' applied to the unground natural mineral only. The chemical structure of the pigment is HgS mercuric sulfide; like most mercury compounds it is toxic. Vermilion is now produced by reacting mercury with molten sulfur. Mercuric sulfides offer a range of warm
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Violet

    Violet

    The color violet takes its name from the violet flower. On the traditional color wheel used by painters, it is located between blue and red. In the spectrum of light instead, it is located in the frequencies below of blue, the farthest away possible from red, having a wavelength of approximately 380–450 nm. Violet colors composed by blue and red lights are inside the purple colors (the word "purple" is used in the common sense for any color between blue and red) and can be named purple-violet. Violet light from the rainbow, which can be referred as spectral-violet, is monochromatic instead. Spectral-violet looks like purple-violet for the human eye because L-cones have a secondary response in high-frequency blue Violet objects are normally purple-violet. Objects reflecting spectral-violet appear very dark, because human vision is relatively insensitive to those wavelengths. Monochromatic lamps emitting spectral-violet wavelengths can be roughly approximated by the color shown below as electric violet. The first recorded use of violet as a color name in English was in 1370. A pale tint of violet is lavender. Although pure spectrum violet is outside the color gamut of the RGB color
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Carmine

    Carmine

    Carmine is the general term for some deep red colors that are very slightly purplish but are generally slightly closer to red than the color crimson is. Some rubies are colored the color shown below as rich carmine. The deep dark red color shown at right as carmine is the color of the raw unprocessed pigment, but lighter, richer, or brighter colors are produced when the raw pigment is processed, some of which are shown below. The first recorded use of carmine as a color name in English was in 1523. The rich carmine color tone displayed at right matches the color shown as carmine in the 1930 book A Dictionary of Color (cited below). This color is also called Chinese carmine. This is the color usually referred to as carmine in fashion and interior design. Spanish carmine is the color that is called Carmin (the Spanish word for "carmine") in the Guía de coloraciones (Guide to colorations) by Rosa Gallego and Juan Carlos Sanz, a color dictionary published in 2005 that is widely popular in the Hispanophone realm. Pictorial carmine is the color that is called Carmin Pictorio (the Spanish word for "pictorial carmine") in the Guía de coloraciones (Guide to colorations) by Rosa Gallego and
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Cornflower blue

    Cornflower blue, a shade of azure, is a shade of light blue with relatively little green compared to blue. This color was one of the favorites of the Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer, the other being yellow. Cornflowers (Centaurea cyanus) are among the few "blue" flowers that are truly blue, most "blue" flowers being a darker blue-purple. The most valuable blue sapphires are those that are cornflower blue, having a medium-dark violet-blue tone. Robert Boyle reported a blue dye produced from the cornflower. This was also called Boyle's Blue and Cyan Blue. This dye color however, was not widely commercialized. Cornflower blue is a defined color in the X Window (X11) color scheme. As such, it is a color available as a named color for webpages. Cornflower blue is a Crayola color. It was originally introduced in 1949, in the box of 48 crayons. Cornflower blue is the default clear color used in the XNA framework, so it has attained a slight meme status.
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Gold

    Gold

    Gold, also called golden, is one of a variety of yellow-orange color blends used to give the impression of the color of the element gold. The web color gold is sometimes referred to as golden to distinguish it from the color metallic gold. The use of gold as a color term in traditional usage is more often applied to the color "metallic gold" (shown below). The first recorded use of golden as a color name in English was in 1300 to refer to the element gold and in 1423 to refer to blond hair. Metallic gold, such as in paint, is often called goldtone or gold-tone. In model building, the color gold is different from brass. A shiny or metallic silvertone object can be painted with transparent yellow to obtain goldtone, something often done with Christmas decorations. At right is displayed a representation of the color metallic gold (the color traditionally known as gold) which is a simulation of the color of the actual metallic element gold itself—gold shade. The source of this color is the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955), a color dictionary used by stamp collectors to identify the colors of stamps—See color sample of the color Gold (Color Sample Gold (T) #84) displayed on
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Lincoln green

    Lincoln green

    Lincoln green is the colour of dyed woollen cloth associated with Robin Hood and his merry men in Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire. The dyers of Lincoln, a cloth town in the high Middle Ages, produced the cloth by dyeing it with woad (Isatis tinctoria) to give it a strong blue, then overdyeing it yellow with weld (Reseda luteola) or dyers' broom, Genista tinctoria. "Coventry blue" and "Kendall green" were also colours linked with the dyers of English towns. The colour is a deep warm olive green. The first recorded use of Lincoln green as a colour name in English was in 1510. By the late sixteenth century, Lincoln green was a thing of the past, for Michael Drayton provided a sidenote in his Poly-Olbion (published 1612): "Lincoln anciently dyed the best green in England." Cloth of Lincoln green was more pleasing than undyed shepherd's gray cloth: "When they were clothed in Lyncolne grene they kest away their gray", according to A Lytell Geste of Robyn Hode, ca 1510, and Lincoln green betokened an old-fashioned forester even in the fancy dress of Edmund Spenser's The Faery Queene: "All in a woodman's jacket he was clad of Lincolne Greene, belay'd with silver lace." The popular ballad
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    Myrtle

    Myrtle is a variety of the color green. It is immoderately dark, slightly more so than the color spinach.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Olive

    Olive

    Olive is a dark yellowish green color typically seen on green olives. As a color word in the English language, it appears in late Middle English. Shaded toward green, it becomes olive drab. Olivine is the typical color of the mineral olivine. The first recorded use of Olivine as a color name in English was in 1912. Olive drab is the color olive shaded toward a greener color. The first recorded use of olive drab as a color name in English was in 1892. Olive drab was the color of the standard fighting uniform for US GIs and military vehicles during World War II. US soldiers often referred to their uniforms as "OD's" due to the color. The color used at the beginning of the war by the US Army was officially called Olive Drab #3, which was replaced by the darker Olive Drab #7 by 1944, and which was again replaced by Olive Green 107 or OG-107 in 1952 and continued as the official uniform color for combat fatigues through the Vietnam War, until replaced by Engineer Research & Development Laboratories (ERDL) camouflage uniforms. The ERDL uniforms were then replaced by M81 woodland camo fatigues as the primary US uniform scheme in the 1980s, and still retain olive drab as one of the color
    6.00
    3 votes
    166

    Persian blue

    Persian blue (not to be confused with Prussian blue) comes in three major tones: Persian blue proper—a bright medium blue; medium Persian blue (a medium slightly grayish blue that is slightly indigoish); and a kind of dark blue that is much closer to the web color indigo; this darker shade of Persian blue is referred to as Persian indigo, dark Persian blue. or regimental.). Other colors associated with Persia include Persian Pink, Persian red and Persian green. The color Persian blue is named from the blue color of some Persian pottery and the color of tiles used in and on mosques and palaces in Iran and in other places in the Middle East. Persian blue is a representation of the color of the mineral lapis lazuli which comes from Persia and Afghanistan. (The color azure is also named after the mineral lapis lazuli.) The first recorded use of Persian blue as a color name in English was in 1669. The medium tone of Persian blue shown at right is the color called Persian blue in color sample #178 of the ISCC-NBS color list. The source of this color is the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955), a color dictionary used by stamp collectors to identify the colors of stamps, now on the
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    Wheat

    Wheat is a color that resembles wheat. The first recorded use of wheat as a color name in English was in 1711. Wheat is one of the X11 web colors.
    5.67
    3 votes
    168

    Apricot

    Apricot is a light yellowish-orangish color that is similar to the color of apricots. However, it is somewhat paler than actual apricots. The etymology of the color apricot (and the fruit): the word comes from the Arabic Al-birquq (itself from Greek berikokon, ultimately from Latin praecoquum). Apricot has been in use as a color name since 1851. Displayed at right is the light tone of apricot called apricot since 1949 in Crayola crayons. Displayed at right the color mellow apricot. This is one of the colors on the British Standards 5252 color list. This color is #06E50 on the 5252 color list. The 5252 color list is for colors used in color coordination and in building construction. The British Standard color lists were first formulated in 1930 and reached their present form in 1955.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Azure

    Azure

    Azure is a color that is commonly compared to the color of the sky on a bright, clear day. On the RGB color wheel, "azure" (color #007FFF) is defined as the color at 210 degrees, i.e., the hue halfway between blue and cyan. In the X11 color system which became a standard for early web colors, azure is depicted as a pale cyan color. Azure also describes the color of the mineral azurite, both in its natural form and as a pigment in various paint formulations. In order to preserve its deep color, azurite was ground coarsely. Fine-ground azurite produces a lighter, washed-out color. Traditionally, the pigment was considered unstable in oil paints, and was sometimes isolated from other colors and not mixed. Modern investigation of old paintings, however, shows that the pigment is very stable unless exposed to sulfur fumes. In Russian, "голубой" (goluboj, azure or cyan) and "синий" (sinij, blue or navy blue) are not two shades of the same color, but distinguished in the way red and pink are distinct colors in English. A similar distinction exists between "azzurro" (azure, but used to indicate various shades of light blue) and "blu" (blue) in Italian and "ฟ้า (fah, sky blue) and น้ำเงิน
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Carnelian

    Carnelian

    Carnelian is a color named after the carnelian variety of the mineral chalcedony. This semi-precious gemstone is noted for its rich shade of reddish-brown. Buildings Literature University colors
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Claret

    Claret ( /ˈklærɨt/ KLARR-ət) is a name primarily used in British English for the red wine from the region surrounding Bordeaux in France; outside the UK this is usually referred to as Bordeaux wine or simply Bordeaux. Claret derives from the French clairet, a now uncommon dark rosé and the most common wine exported from Bordeaux until the 18th century. It is a protected name within the European Union, describing a red Bordeaux wine, accepted after the British wine trade demonstrated over 300 years' usage of the term. Claret is occasionally used in the United States as a semi-generic label for red wine in the style of the Bordeaux, ideally of varietals authentic to the region. The French themselves do not use the term, except for export purposes. The colour "claret" resembles the red hue of Bordeaux wine. It has become a slang term for blood, as in "tapping the claret" meaning giving someone a bloody nose. The standard style of Bordeaux wine has not always been deep red. It used to be closer to a rosé, hence the French clairet, meaning pale. The Plantagenet kingdom, covering England and much of France from 1152 to 1453, encouraged wine trade between the regions. This trade
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Dark blue

    Dark blue is a shade of blue. The name comes from the word "Dark" (which originated from Old English dark, derk, deork; Anglo-Saxon dearc, and Gaelic and Irish dorch, dorcha) and "Blue" (taken from French and originated from the Indo-European root bhlewos). Displayed at right is the color medium blue. On most wiki, medium blue is the color used to denote internal link on the wiki. Fashion Film Law Enforcement Music Sexuality Sociology
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    School bus yellow

    School bus yellow

    School bus yellow is a color which was especially formulated for use on School buses in North America in 1939. The color is now officially known in Canada and the U.S. as National School Bus Glossy Yellow and was originally called National School Bus Chrome. The pigment used for this color was, for a long time, the lead-containing chrome yellow. In April 1939, Dr. Frank W. Cyr, a professor at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York organized a conference that established national school-bus construction standards for the U.S., including the standard color of yellow for the school bus. It became known officially as "National School Bus Chrome." The color was selected because black lettering on that hue was easiest to see in the semi-darkness of early morning. The conference met for seven days and the attendees created a total of 44 standards, including specifications regarding body length, ceiling height and aisle width. Paint experts from DuPont and Pittsburgh Paints participated. Dr. Cyr's conference, funded by a $5,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, was also a landmark event inasmuch as it included transportation officials from each of the then-48 states, as
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Sinopia

    Sinopia (named after the Turkish city Sinop) is a reddish-brown ochre-like earth color pigment used in traditional oil painting. It is used for the cartoon or underpainting for a fresco; indeed, the term is also synecdochically used to refer to underpainting done in sinopia. It is composed of iron oxides, from a kind of clay or quartz called sinople. Sinopia was written about by Cennino Cennini in "Il libro dell'arte" in the 15th century and described thus: "a natural color known as sinoper, or porphyry, is red; and this color is lean and dry in character. It stands working up well; for the more it is worked up, the finer it becomes. It is good for use on panel or anconas, or on the wall, in fresco or in secco." Cennini follows this discussion with a look at a special kind of sinopia used in Florence for painting flesh colors.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Wisteria

    Wisteria

    Wisteria is a pale tint of violet, named after the Wisteria flower. Crayola introduced a crayon in this color in 1993. The first recorded use of wisteria as a color name in English was in 1892.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Cream

    Cream

    Cream is the colour of the cream produced by cattle grazing on natural pasture with plants rich in yellow carotenoid pigments, some of which are incorporated into the cream, to give a yellow tone to white. Cream is the pastel colour of yellow, much like as pink is to red. By mixing yellow and white, cream can be produced. The first recorded use of cream as a colour name in English was in 1590.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177

    Hunter green

    Hunter green is a color that is a representation of the color worn by hunter in the 19th century. Most hunters began wearing the color olive drab instead of hunter green about the beginning of the 20th century. Today, some hunters still wear hunter green clothes or hunter green bandana. At right is displayed the color hunter green. The first recorded use of hunter green as a color name in English was in 1892. The source of this color is the following website: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of hunter green (color sample #137):
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    Navy Blue

    Navy blue is a very dark shade of the color blue which almost appears as black. Navy blue got its name from the dark blue (contrasted with white) worn by officers in the British Royal Navy since 1748 and subsequently adopted by other navies around the world. It was also worn by the Americans during some wars. When this color, taken from the usual color of the uniforms of sailors, originally came into use in the early 19th century, it was initially called marine blue, but the name of the color soon changed to navy blue. The first recorded use of Navy blue as a color name in English was in 1840. Navy blue is used by numerous professional and collegiate sports teams:
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Phthalocyanine Green G

    Phthalocyanine Green G

    Phthalocyanine Green G, also called phthalo green, Pigment Green 7, Copper Phthalocyanine Green, C.I. Pigment Green 42, Non-flocculating Green G, Polychloro copper phthalocyanine, or C.I. 74260, is a synthetic green pigment from the group of phthalocyanine dyes, a complex of copper(II) with chlorinated phthalocyanine. It is a very soft green powder insoluble in water. Its CAS numbers are [1328-45-6] and [1328-53-6] depending on the extent of chlorine substitition: chemical formula ranges from C32H3Cl13CuN8 to C32HCl15CuN8. It is a bright, high intensity colour used in oil and acrylic based artist's paints, and in other applications. Phthalocyanine green is a phthalocyanine blue pigment where most of the hydrogen atoms are replaced with chlorine. The strongly electronegative chlorine atoms influence the distribution of the electrons in the phthalocyanine structure, shifting its absorption spectrum. It is made by chlorination of the phthalocyanine blue as a melt of sodium chloride and aluminium chloride, to which chlorine is introduced at elevated temperature. The phthalo green molecules are highly stable. They are resistant to alkali, acids, solvents, heat, and ultraviolet
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Salmon pink

    Salmon pink is a color. It is commonly described in two tones, "light salmon pink" and "salmon pink". The color light salmon pink is displayed at the right. Light salmon pink is a light pink color that resembles the color of the cooked flesh of the salmon fish; specifically the name is derived from the flesh color of the pink salmon. The nutrient that imparts the pink flesh color is astaxanthin, that salmon ingest when they feed on other marine organisms, such as krill and small shrimp. The color salmon pink is displayed at the right. This is the color called salmon in Crayola crayons. This color was introduced by Crayola in 1949. See the List of Crayola crayon colors. Salmon pink is one of the official colors of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Splashed white

    Splashed white

    Splashed white or splash is a horse coat color pattern in the "overo" family of spotting patterns that produces pink-skinned, white markings. Many splashed whites have very modest markings, while others have the distinctive "dipped in white paint" pattern. Blue eyes are a hallmark of the pattern, and splash may account for otherwise "solid" blue-eyed horses. Splashed white occurs in a variety of geographically divergent breeds, from Morgans in North America to Kathiawari horses in India. The splashed white pattern is also associated with congenital deafness, though most splashed whites have normal hearing. There now exists a DNA test for three forms of splashed white, and there is speculation that the SW-2 and SW-3 alleles may be an embryonic lethal when homozygous. The splashed white pattern is characterized by blue eyes and the appearance of having been dipped, feet-first, into white paint. The margins of the white markings are crisp, smooth, blocky, and well-defined. The head and legs are white, and the tail is often white or white-tipped. The underside of the body is white, and a connected white patch often spreads smoothly up either side of the thorax. On its own, the splashed
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Green

    Green

    Green is the color of emeralds, jade, and growing grass. In the visible spectrum of light it is located between yellow and blue, and it is one of the three additive colors, along with red and blue, which are combined on computer screens and color televisions to make all other colors. Green is the color most commonly associated with nature and the environmental movement, Islam, spring, hope and envy. (See also Shades of green) The word green comes from the Middle English and Old English word grene, which, like the German word grün, has the same root as the words grass and grow. It is from a Common Germanic *gronja-, which is also reflected in Old Norse grænn, Old High German gruoni (but unattested in East Germanic), ultimately from a PIE root *ghre- "to grow", and root-cognate with grass and to grow. The first recorded use of the word as a color term in Old English dates to ca. AD 700. Latin with viridis (and hence the Romance languages, and English vert, verdure etc.) also has a genuine term for "green". Likewise the Slavic languages with zelenъ. Ancient Greek also had a term for yellowish, pale green, χλωρός, cognate with χλοερός "verdant" and χλόη "the green of new growth". Thus,
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Falu red

    Falu red

    Falu red or Falun red (pronounced "FAH-loo", in Swedish Falu rödfärg (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈfɑːlɵ ˈrøːfærj])) is the name of a Swedish, deep red paint well known for its use on wooden cottages and barns. The paint originated from the copper mine at Falun in Dalarna, Sweden. The traditional colour remains popular today due to its effectiveness in preserving wood. In Finland, it is known as punamulta ("red earth") after the pigment, very finely divided hematite. Since the binder is starch, the paint is permeable to water. The earliest evidence of its use dates from the 16th century. During the 17th century Falu red was commonly used on smaller wooden mansions, where it was intended to imitate buildings with brick facing. Except in bigger cities like Stockholm and Gothenburg, and in the far south of Sweden, wood was the dominating building material. In the Swedish cities and towns, buildings were often painted with Falu red until the early 19th century, when the authorities began to oppose use of the paint. At that point in time more and more wooden buildings in urban areas were either painted in lighter colours (e.g. yellow, white) or sided with stucco. The number of buildings
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Fire engine red

    Fire engine red

    Fire engine red is an intense, bright red commonly used on emergency vehicles in the United States and Canada, mostly on, as the name implies, fire engines. Most traditional older fire departments in larger U.S. central cities of major metropolitan areas use this color for their fire engines, but many smaller cities and also many suburbs now use the color chartreuse yellow for their fire engines because of its supposed greater visibility at night. Some departments have a mix of both. In Europe a different shade of red is used.
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Heliotrope

    Heliotrope

    Heliotrope is a pink-purple tint that is a representation of the color of the heliotrope flower. The first recorded use of Heliotrope as a color name in English was in 1882.
    6.00
    2 votes
    186

    Russet

    Russet is a dark brown color with a reddish-orange tinge. The first recorded use of russet as a color name in English was in 1562. The source of this color is the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color dictionary used by stamp collectors to identify the colors of stamps The name of the color derives from russet, a coarse cloth made of wool and dyed with woad and madder to give it a subdued grey or reddish-brown shade. By the statute of 1363, poor English people were required to wear russet. Russet, a color of Autumn, is often associated with sorrow or grave seriousness. Anticipating a lifetime of regret, Shakespeare's character Biron says: "Henceforth my wooing mind shall be express'd / In russet yeas and honest kersey noes." (Love's Labour's Lost, Act V, Scene 1) The color is mentioned in a famous quote taken from a letter Oliver Cromwell wrote to Sir William Spring in September 1643: "I had rather have a plain, russet-coated captain that knows what he fights for, and loves what he knows, [than that which you call a gentleman and is nothing else]".
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Sable

    In heraldry, sable is the tincture black, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures, called "colours". In engravings and line drawings, it is sometimes depicted as a region of crossed horizontal and vertical lines or else marked with sa. as an abbreviation. The name derives from the black fur of the sable, an animal. Sable is said to represent the following: Sable is considered a colour in British and French heraldry, and contrasts with lighter metals, argent and Or. However, in the heraldry of Germany, Polish heraldry and other parts of central Europe, sable is not infrequently placed on colour fields. As a result, a sable cross may appear on a red shield, or a sable bird may appear on a blue or a red field, as in the arms of Albania. In this regard, it is probably useful to remember the origin of the term sable, which would have placed it among heraldic furs and not colours. In Hungary, for example, one can find examples of sable on gules and azure fields as early as the sixteenth century in the arms of the family Kanizsai (granted in 1519): "álló, csücskös talpú tárcsapajzs kék mezejében, lebegő arany saslábon fekete sasszárny, jobbról ezüst félholdtól, balról nyolcágú arany
    6.00
    2 votes
    188

    Tiffany Blue

    Tiffany Blue is the colloquial name for the light medium robin egg blue color associated with Tiffany & Co., the New York City jewelry company. The color was used on the cover of Tiffany's Blue Book, first published in 1845. Since then Tiffany & Co. has used the color extensively on promotional materials, including boxes and bags. The Tiffany Blue color is protected as a color trademark by Tiffany & Co. in some jurisdictions including the U.S. The color is produced as a private custom color by Pantone, with PMS number 1837, the number deriving from the year of Tiffany's foundation. As a trademarked color, it is not publicly available and is not printed in the Pantone Matching System swatch books.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Mahogany

    Mahogany is a reddish brown color. It is approximately the color of the wood, mahogany. However, the wood itself is not uniformly the same color, and "mahogany" is not a standard HTML color with a standardized RGB value. Mahogany is an official Crayola Crayons color, which is somewhat redder than the hue shown.
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Amber

    Amber

    Amber is a pure chroma color, located on the color wheel midway between yellow, orange and red. The colour-name is derived from the organic material also known as amber, which is commonly found in a range of yellow-orange-brown-red colours; likewise, as a color "amber" can refer to a range of shades of yellow-orange. In the English language, the first documented use of amber specifically as the name of a color, was in 1500. Amber is one of several technically defined colors used in automotive signal lamps. In North America, SAE standard J578 governs the colorimetry of vehicle lights, while outside North America the internationalized European ECE regulations hold force. Both standards designate a range of orange-yellow hues in the CIE color space as "amber". In the past, the ECE amber definition was more restrictive than the SAE definition, but the current ECE definition is identical to the more permissive SAE standard. The SAE formally uses the term "yellow amber", though the color is most often referred to as "yellow". This is not the same as selective yellow, a color used in some fog lamps and headlamps. Previously, ECE amber was defined according to the 1968 Convention on Road
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Beige

    Beige

    Beige is the colour of balls - and may be described as a pale cream color, an off- (sometimes dark) tan color, or an extremely pale yellowish brown color. The term originates from beige cloth, a cotton fabric left undyed in its natural color. It has since come to be used for a range of light tints chosen for their neutral or pale warm appearance. The first recorded use of beige as a color name in English was in 1887, although the term had been used much earlier in French. Beginning in the 1920s, the meaning of the term beige expanded to the point where it is now also used not only for pale yellow colors, but also for a wide range of pale brown shades, some of more notable of which are shown below. It is notoriously difficult to produce in traditional offset CMYK printing due to the low levels of inks used on each plate; often it will print in purple or green and vary within a print run. The color beige is displayed to the right. Cosmic latte is a name assigned in 2002 to the average color of the universe (derived from a sampling of the electromagnetic radiation from 200,000 galaxies), given by a team of astronomers from Johns Hopkins University. Cream is the color of the cream
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Cosmic latte

    Cosmic latte

    Cosmic Latte is a name assigned to the average color of the universe, given by a team of astronomers from Johns Hopkins University. In 2001, Karl Glazebrook and Ivan Baldry determined that the color of the universe was a greenish white, but they soon corrected their analysis in a 2002 paper, in which they reported that their survey of the color of all light in the universe added up to a slightly beigeish white. The survey included more than 200,000 galaxies, and measured the spectral range of the light from a large volume of the universe. The hexadecimal RGB value for Cosmic Latte is #FFF8E7. The finding of the "color of the universe" was not the focus of the study, which was examining spectral analysis of different galaxies to study star formation. Like Fraunhofer lines, the dark lines displayed in the study's spectral ranges display older and younger stars and allow Glazebrook and Baldry to determine the age of different galaxies and star systems. What the study revealed is that the overwhelming majority of stars formed about 5 billion years ago. Because these stars would have been "brighter" in the past, the color of the universe changes over time shifting from blue to red as
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    Olive Drab

    Olive Drab is the color olive shaded green. Olive Drab was the color of the standard fighting uniform for U.S. GI and tanks during World War II. U.S. soldiers often referred to their uniforms as "OD's" due to the color. There are very few countries still issuing Olive Drab uniforms, Israel, India and Austria being the exceptions. The color is currently defined by the FS-595 paint standard. As a solid color, it is not as effective for camouflage as multiple-color camo schemes (i.e. US Army Combat Uniform, tigerstripe, MARPAT, Multicam, etc.), though it is still used by the U.S. military to color webbing and accessories. The military refers to the color as Olive Green 107, or more commonly OG 107.
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    Tyrian purple

    Tyrian purple

    Tyrian purple (Greek, πορφύρα, porphyra, Latin: purpura), also known as royal purple, imperial purple or imperial dye, is a purple-red natural dye, which is a secretion produced by certain species of predatory sea snails in the family Muricidae, a type of rock snail by the name Murex. This dye was possibly first used by the ancient Phoenicians. The dye was greatly prized in antiquity because the color did not easily fade, but instead became brighter with weathering and sunlight. Tyrian purple was expensive: the 4th-century-BC historian Theopompus reported, "Purple for dyes fetched its weight in silver at Colophon" in Asia Minor. The expense meant that purple-dyed textiles became status symbols, and early sumptuary laws restricted their uses. The production of Tyrian purple was tightly controlled in Byzantium and was subsidized by the imperial court, which restricted its use for the colouring of imperial silks, so that a child born to a reigning emperor was porphyrogenitos, "born in the purple", although this term may also refer to the fact that the imperial birthing apartment was walled in the purple-red rock known as porphyry. The dye substance comprises a mucous secretion from
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    Coral

    The various tones of the color coral are representations of the colors of those cnidarians known as corals. The web color coral is a pinkish-orange color. It is displayed at right. The first recorded use of coral as a color name in English was in 1513. The color coral pink is displayed at right, a pinkish color. The complementary color of coral pink is teal. The first recorded use of coral pink as a color name in English was in 1892. The web color light coral is displayed at right.
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    Tan

    Tan is a pale, tawny tone of brown. The name is derived from tannum (oak bark) used in the tanning of leather. The first recorded use of tan as a color name in English was in the year 1590. Colors which are similar or may be considered synonymous to tan include: tawny, tenné, and fulvous. It is a crayon color. Displayed at right is the color windsor tan. The first recorded use of windsor tan as a color name in English was in 1925. Displayed at right is the color Tuscan tan. The first recorded use of Tuscan tan as a color name in English was in 1926. Military Parapsychology Shoes Sunbathing
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    Aquamarine

    Aquamarine is a color that is a bluish tint of cerulean toned toward cyan. It is named after the mineral aquamarine, a gemstone mainly found in granite rocks. The first recorded use of aquamarine as a color name in English was in 1598. Displayed at right is the color medium aquamarine. Interior design Medical
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    Eggplant

    Eggplant

    Aubergine is a dark purple or brownish-purple color that resembles the color of the outer skin of European eggplants. Another name for the color eggplant is aubergine (the French and British English word for eggplant). The first recorded use of eggplant as a color name in English was in 1915. The pinkish-purple-grayish color shown in the color box as eggplant was introduced by Crayola in 1998. Different varieties of eggplant may range from indigo to white (The term eggplant originated as a description of white colored eggplants because they look like eggs). Chinese eggplants are the same shape as a European eggplant, but are colored a dark violet color. Thai eggplants are small, round, and colored forest green.
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    Maroon

    Maroon (/məruːn/ mə-ROON or /məroʊn/ mə-RONE) is a bright, rich, deep, or dark red color, depending on which tone of maroon is in question; could be purplish in color. Maroon is derived from French marron ("chestnut"). The first recorded use of maroon as a color name in English was in 1789. At right is displayed the bright tone of maroon that was designated as maroon in Crayola crayons beginning in 1949. It is a bright medium shade of maroon halfway between red and rose. The color halfway between red and rose is crimson, so this color is also a tone of crimson. At right is displayed the color rich maroon, i.e. maroon as defined in the X11 color names, which is much brighter and more toned toward rose than the HTML/CSS maroon shown above. See the chart Color names that clash between X11 and HTML/CSS in the X11 color names article to see those colors which are different in HTML/CSS and X11. Displayed at right is the web color dark red. Animated cartoons Business Government Military Music Religion School colors Sport Vexillology (The study of Flags)
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    Moss green

    Moss green is a type of green. It is normally a hazy gray-green, close to an earthtone.
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    Mountbatten pink

    Mountbatten Pink, also called Plymouth Pink, is a naval camouflage colour, a shade of grayish mauve, invented by Louis Mountbatten of the British Royal Navy in autumn 1940 during World War II. Mountbatten was escorting a convoy and noted that one ship in the group vanished from view much earlier than the remainder, a Union Castle liner that was still painted in its pre-war medium lavender mauve grey hull colour. Mountbatten became so convinced of its efficacy as a camouflage during the dawn and dusk periods, before the sun was visible but was near enough to the horizon to tint the sky this shade of pink, that he had all of the destroyers of his flotilla (the 5th Destroyer Flotilla) painted with a similar pigment, a medium grey (507B) with a small amount of Venetian Red mixed in. By early 1941 several other ship captains began using the same camouflage, though no formal testing was done to determine how well it worked. One of the anecdotal and possibly apocryphal tales told in support of Mountbatten Pink was the story of the cruiser HMS Kenya (nicknamed "The Pink Lady" at the time due to her Mountbatten Pink paint), which during Operation Archery covered a commando raid against
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    Puce

    Puce (often misspelled as "puse", "peuse" or "peuce") is a color that is defined as ranging from light grayish red-violet (the version shown at right) to medium to dark purplish-brown, with the latter being the more widely accepted definition found in reputable sources. The Oxford English Dictionary dates the use of "puce" (in couleur puce) from 1787. The first recorded use of puce as a color name was in the 14th century, in the French language. Puce is the French word for flea. The color is said to be the color of the bloodstains remaining on linen or bedsheets, even after being laundered, from a flea's droppings or after a flea has been killed. Bedbugs leave the same stains from their droppings as part of their nightly wanderings on the surfaces of bedsheets, pillowcases and blankets. These colored stains on one's bedding after laundering are a bedbug alert. Bottle collecting Comics Games Film History Literature Music Television
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    Sangria

    Sangria is a color that resembles Sangría wine. Sangria can also be described as a burnt red. The word sangria comes from the Spanish word sangre, which means blood. This is an appropriate name considering its color. The color's name is similar to that of orange, as both are derived from a physical object. This is also the case for many other colors. It has a major resemblance to dark carmine, crimson and many other dark reds. It is classed as a red and, less expectedly, a violet. The non-red categorization of this color could be largely up for debate, because its relation to violet is quite vague. If anything; it could be classed as a (dark) pink, just a red or even a slight brown.
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    Yale Blue

    Yale Blue is the dark azure color used in association with Yale University. Since the 1850s, Yale Crew has rowed in blue uniforms, and in 1894, blue was officially adopted as Yale's color, after half a century of being associated as green. Thereafter, there arose problems in defining the exact shade of blue that was meant; the colors used varied from a deep sky blue to navy blue. In 2005, University Printer John Gambell was asked to standardize the color. He had characterized its spirit as "a strong, relatively dark blue, neither purple nor green, though it can be somewhat gray. It should be a color you would call blue." A vault in the university secretary's office holds two scraps of silk, apocryphally from a bolt of cloth for academic robes, preserved as the first official Yale Blue. The university administration defines Yale Blue as a custom color whose closest approximation in the Pantone system is Pantone 289. Yale Blue inks may be ordered from the Superior Printing Ink Co., formulas 6254 and 6255. The hue of Yale Blue is one of the two official colors of University of California, Berkeley, University of Mississippi, and Southern Methodist University. It was Duke University's
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    Sepia

    Sepia

    Sepia is a dark brown-gray color, named after the rich brown pigment derived from the ink sac of the common cuttlefish Sepia. The word sepia is the Latinized form of the Greek σηπία, sēpía, cuttlefish.
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    Crimson

    Crimson

    Crimson is a strong, bright, deep reddish purple color. It originally meant the color of the Kermes dye produced from a scale insect, Kermes vermilio, but the name is now also used as a generic term for slightly bluish-red colors that are between red and rose; besides crimson itself, these colors include carmine, raspberry, ruddy, ruby, amaranth, and cerise. Crimson (NR4) is produced using the dried bodies of the kermes insect, which were gathered commercially in Mediterranean countries, where they live on the Kermes oak, and sold throughout Europe. Kermes dyes have been found in burial wrappings in Anglo-Scandinavian York. They fell out of use with the introduction of cochineal, because although the dyes were comparable in quality and color intensity it needed ten to twelve times as much kermes to produce the same effect as cochineal. Carmine is the name given to the dye made from the dried bodies of the female cochineal, although the name crimson is sometimes applied to these dyes too. Cochineal appears to have been brought to Europe during the conquest of Mexico by the Spaniard Hernán Cortés, and the name 'carmine' is derived from the French carmin. It was first described by
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    Bistre

    Bistre (or bister) is either: 1) A shade of gray, 2) A shade of brown made from soot, and 3) The name for a color resembling the pigment. Bistre's appearance is generally of a dark grayish brown, with a yellowish cast. Beechwood was burned to produce the soot, which was boiled and diluted with water. Many Old Masters used bistre as the ink for their drawings.
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    Lilac

    Lilac

    Lilac is a color that is a pale tone of violet that is a representation of the average color of most lilac flowers. It might also be described as light purple. The colors of some lilac flowers may be equivalent to the colors shown below as pale lilac, rich lilac, or deep lilac. There are other lilac flowers that are colored red-violet. The first recorded use of lilac as a color name in English was in 1775. At right is displayed the pale tone of lilac that is represented as lilac in the ISCC-NBS color list. The source of this color is sample 209 in the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955). The rich tone of lilac called lilac in the Pourpre.com color list, a color list popular in France, is shown at right. The color French lilac is displayed at right. This color was formulated for use in interior design when a medium dark violet color is desired. The first recorded use of French lilac as a color name in English was in 1814. the lilac such as lilac flower
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    Midnight Blue

    Midnight blue is a dark shade of blue named for its resemblance to the identifiably blue color of a moonlit night sky on or near the night of a full moon. Midnight blue is the color of a vat full of Indigo dye; therefore, midnight blue may also be considered a dark shade of indigo. Midnight blue is identifiably blue to the eye in sun-light or full-spectrum light, but can appear black under certain more limited spectrums sometimes found in artificial lighting (especially early 20th century incandescent). As a consequence, it is often colloquially confused with black-blue, which is a black with a blue undertone, or deep navy, which is a blue so dark it is nearly black. There are two major shades of midnight blue—the X11 color and the Crayola color. This color was originally called midnight. The first recorded use of midnight as a color name in English was in 1915. At right is displayed the color midnight blue. This is the X11 web color midnight blue. At right is displayed the dark shade of midnight blue that is called midnight blue in Crayola crayons. Midnight blue has been an official Crayola color since 1958; before that, since having been formulated by Crayola in 1949, it was
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    Straw

    Straw

    Straw ( /ˈstrɔː/) is a colour, a shade of pale yellow, the colour of straw. The first recorded use of straw as a colour name in English was in 1589. The name of the colour straw is used as an adjective in the names of birds and other animals with such colouring to describe their appearance, including:
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    Green tea

    Green tea

    Green tea is made solely from the leaves of Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originates in China and has become associated with many cultures throughout Asia. It has recently become more widespread in the West, where black tea is traditionally consumed. Green tea has become the raw material for extracts which are used in various beverages, health foods, dietary supplements, and cosmetic items. Many varieties of green tea have been created in countries where they are grown. These varieties can differ substantially due to variable growing conditions, horticulture, production processing, and harvesting time. Over the last few decades green tea has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies to determine the extent of its long-purported health benefits, with some evidence suggesting that regular green tea drinkers may have a lower risk of developing heart disease and certain types of cancer. Although green tea does not raise the metabolic rate enough to produce immediate weight loss, a green tea extract containing polyphenols and caffeine has been shown to induce thermogenesis and stimulate fat oxidation, boosting the
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    Jade

    Jade

    Jade is a saturated, slightly bluish green. The name comes from the gemstone called jade, although the stone varies widely in hue. Cultural Associations
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    Liver

    Liver

    Liver is a term used to describe certain types of dark brown color in dogs and horses. In dogs, it is a dark brown shade. In horses, "liver chestnut" is a term used to describe a chocolate-colored chestnut horse. A liver chestnut is the same genetically as a regular chestnut, but the shade is a dark brown rather than the reddish or rust color more typical of chestnut. A horse that appears to be a liver chestnut but has a light colored mane and tail, sometimes colloquially called a "chocolate palomino," could be a horse manifesting the champagne gene. However, "flaxen" or light-colored manes and tails are also seen in chestnuts.
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    Salmon

    Salmon

    Salmon is a range of pale pinkish-orange to light pink colors, named after the color of salmon flesh. The web color salmon is displayed at right. The first recorded use of salmon as a color name in English was in 1776. The actual color of salmon flesh varies from almost white to deep pink, depending on their levels of the carotenoid astaxanthin due to how rich a diet of krill and shrimp the fish feeds on; salmon raised on fish farms are given artificial coloring in their food. The color light salmon is displayed at right. At right is displayed the pinkish tone of salmon that is called salmon in Crayola crayons. This color was introduced by Crayola in 1949. See the List of Crayola crayon colors. The color dark salmon is displayed at the right. This is a color that resembles the color salmon, but is darker. Like the web colors light salmon and salmon shown above, it is used in HTML and CSS.
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    Slate gray

    Slate gray

    Slate gray is a gray color with a slight azure tinge that is a representation of the average color of the material slate. The first recorded use of slate gray as a color name in English was in 1705. Displayed at right is the web color light slate gray. Displayed at right is the web color dark slate gray. Computers
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    Alice blue

    Alice blue is a pale tint of azure that was favored by Alice Roosevelt Longworth, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt and which sparked a fashion sensation in the United States. The hit song "Alice Blue Gown", inspired by Longworth's signature gown, premiered in Harry Tierney's 1919 Broadway musical Irene. The musical was made into a film in 1940 starring Anna Neagle and Ray Milland. The color is specified by the United States Navy for use in insignia and trim on vessels named for Theodore Roosevelt. "AliceBlue" is also one of the original 1987 X11 color names which became the basis for color description in web authoring. The name "Alice Blue" was trademarked in 2001 by a costume company called "Alice Blue Fancy Dress & Costume" in the U.K. but the livery color chosen by them was not the correct Alice Blue shade, but instead a rich royal blue. This particular shade of blue is also referred as white-blue (or blue-white) and ice/icy blue, due to its very pale coloration.
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    Blond

    Blond

    Blond or blonde (see below) or fair-hair is a hair color characterized by low levels of the dark pigment eumelanin. The resultant visible hue depends on various factors, but always has some sort of yellowish color. The color can be from the very pale blond (caused by a patchy, scarce distribution of pigment) to reddish "strawberry" blond colors or golden-brownish ("sandy") blond colors (the latter with more eumelanin). On the Fischer–Saller scale blond color ranges from A to J (blond brown). The word "blond" is first attested in English in 1481 and derives from Old French blund, blont meaning "a colour midway between golden and light chestnut". It gradually eclipsed the native term "fair", of same meaning, from Old English fæġer, to become the general term for "light complexioned". The French (and thus also the English) word "blond" has two possible origins. Some linguists say it comes from Medieval Latin blundus, meaning "yellow", from Old Frankish blund which would relate it to Old English blonden-feax meaning "grey-haired", from blondan/blandan meaning "to mix" (Cf. blend). Also, Old English beblonden meant "dyed" as ancient Germanic warriors were noted for dying their hair.
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    Columbia blue

    Columbia blue, also known as Jordy blue, is a light blue tertiary color named after Columbia University. The color itself derives from the official hue of the Philolexian Society, the university's oldest student organization. The typical Columbia blue is defined by Pantone Columbia Blue 3 (PANTONE 292). Fraternities and Sororities Organizations, fraternities and sororities that use Columbia blue for their colors: School Colors Columbia blue is used as one of the two or three color symbols for the following colleges, universities and high schools: Sports Music
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    Corn

    Corn

    Corn , also called maize, is a color that resembles the color of corn (the name used for the grain maize in the Americas) Maize, one of the official school colors of the University of Michigan Ann Arbor is the exact same as marigold, according to almost all color experts at the university's art school. Marigold is commonly known campus-wide to be used in Official Licensed Michigan Products 10,000 times more often than the next three colors combined: yellow, lemon and Yellow. Marigold is especially popular with the new clothing outfitter of Michigan, Adidas. List of colors
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    Pazel

    Pazel is considered a pastel tint of the color Hazel, used to describe a shade of eye color.
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    Sea green

    Sea green is a shade of green that resembles the sea floor as seen from the surface. Politics
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    Seashell

    Seashell

    Seashell is an off-white color that resembles some of the very pale pinkish tones that are common in many seashells. The first recorded use of seashell as a color name in English was in 1926. In 1987, "seashell" was included as one of the X11 colors.
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    Spring bud

    Spring bud is the color that used to be called spring green before the X11 web color spring green was formulated in 1987 when the X11 colors were first promulgated. This color is now called spring bud to avoid confusion with the web color. The color spring bud is also called soft spring green. Displayed at right is the color spring bud. This color is also called soft spring green and spring green (traditional). As noted above, this was the color that was traditionally called "spring green" before the web color spring green was formulated in 1987. The first recorded use of spring green as a color name in English (meaning the color that is now called spring bud) was in 1766. This pale tone of spring bud is the color called spring green in Crayola crayons. (See spring green on the List of Crayola crayon colors). At right is displayed the medium tone of spring bud that is called "spring bud" on the ISCC-NBS color list. The source of this color is the following website, the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955) (a site for stamp collectors to identify the colors of their stamps)--Color Sample of Spring Bud (color sample #119): At right is the less saturated color june bud. The
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    Tangerine

    Tangerine

    Tangerine is an orange color hue used to give the impression of the tangerine fruit. Just like there are a variety of shades of tangerine fruit, there are a variety of color mixes employed to give the impression. Some tangerine hues may more resemble a tangelo fruit, while tangerine-yellow appears close to the color of school bus yellow, although tangerines of that color do not exist in nature. Hues of tangerine are sometimes important to graphic designers when constructing identities, brand recognition, and stand-out ads for clients. Because of the brightness of the color variants, they are often employed to make a small but centrally important object stand out, especially when surrounded by the flat colors of earth tones. Tangerine hues may also be selected as compliments to other bright hues, and because of their relative rarity of use. One of the original "fruit-flavored" iMacs released in 1999 was the Tangerine iMac (Apple could not call it "Orange" due to the existence of the rival firm Orange Micro).
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    Air force blue

    Air Force blue colours are a variety of colours that are mostly various tones of the colour azure, the purest tones of which are identified as being the colour of the sky on a clear day. Some air force blue colours, notably the air force blue colour used by the United States Air Force and the colour used by the US Air Force Academy, may look like they are tones of blue instead of azure (On the RGB colour wheel, which has 12 major colours, blue is the colour at a hue code of 240 degrees and azure is the colour halfway between blue and cyan at a hue code of 210 degrees.). However, they are actually dark tones of azure, not blue, because their hue (h) codes are between 195 and 225, the signature of a tone of azure. These air force blue colours are used by these various air forces for colour identification. Air Force blue, more specifically Air Force blue (RAF) or RAF blue, is a medium shade of the colour azure. The shade derives from the light blue uniforms issued to the newly formed British Royal Air Force in 1920, which were influential in the design of the uniforms of some other air forces around the world. Similar shades are still used in Royal Air Force uniforms and the Royal Air
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    Baby blue

    Baby blue

    Baby blue is a pale tint of azure, one of the pastel colors. The first recorded use of baby blue as a color name in English was in 1892. Bubbles is a pale tint of baby blue. The color name bubbles has been in use since 2001 when the Xona.com Color List was first promulgated. Beau blue is a light tone of baby blue. The source of this color is the color that is called beau blue in the Plochere Color System, a color system formulated in 1948 that is widely used by interior designers. Baby blue eyes is a rich tone of baby blue. The source of this color is the color that is called baby blue eyes in the Plochere Color System, a color system formulated in 1948 that is widely used by interior designers. Little boy blue is a deep tone of baby blue. The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #16-4132 TPX—Little Boy Blue. Gender Law enforcement
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    Bright green

    Bright green is a bright shade of green. It is on the color wheel approximately one-third of the way between chartreuse and harlequin (closer to chartreuse than to harlequin). Bright green represents a visual stimulus of 556 nanometer on the visual spectrum as measured on the CIE chromaticity diagram. Displayed at right is the color bright green. The HTML color green is somewhat similar to bright green, with a hex triplet of 00FF00, compared to bright green's triplet of 66FF00. List of colors
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    Carolina Blue

    Carolina Blue

    Carolina blue (occasionally referred to as Tar Heel blue) is the shade of blue used as one of the official school colors of the University of North Carolina. The name is derived from the popular usage of "Carolina" to refer to the university. For clarity in branding and marketing, the University Licensing Office has defined the color as Pantone 278. Use of the light blue color at UNC dates from 1795 when the Dialectic (blue) and Philanthropic (white) Societies of the university chose representative colors. Society members would wear a blue or white ribbon at university functions, and blue or white ribbons were attached to the diplomas of graduates. When football became a popular collegiate sport in the 1880s, the UNC football team adopted the light blue and white of the Di-Phi Societies as the school colors.
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    Charleston green

    Charleston green is a very dark green color, nearly indistinguishable from black, commonly applied to exteriors and outdoor furniture in Charleston, South Carolina. Displayed at right is the color Charleston green. The color Charleston green originated after the American Civil War, when the North provided black paint to the South for use in its reconstruction. Charlestonians mixed the black with a little bit of yellow and created Charleston green. The (paint manufacturer) Duron/Sherwin Williams color number for "historic charleston green" is DCR099--the color sample at right was taken from this color swatch, which is on the website accessible below called Colors of Historic Charleston on the "see also" list.. This is the color that is black unless the sun hits it just right, and then the color registers a deep, forest green. From Rustoleum it is 214086 but still looks black on color cards. Rustoleum paint catalog
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    Chestnut hair

    Chestnut hair

    Chestnut hair is a hair color which is a reddish shade of brown hair. In contrast to auburn hair, chestnut is more brown, and it is often referred to as "chestnut brown". The pigments that cause the coloration of chestnut hair are frequently brown eumelanin with stronger levels of pheomelanin.
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    Cobalt blue

    Cobalt blue

    Cobalt blue is the cool blue color of the pigments made using cobalt salts of alumina. Cobalt blue pigments are extremely stable, and have historically been used as colouring agents in ceramics, (especially Chinese porcelain), jewellery, and paint. Transparent glasses are tinted with the silica-based cobalt pigment smalt. Chemically, cobalt blue pigment is a cobalt(II) oxide-aluminium oxide, or cobalt(II) aluminate, CoAl2O4. The compound is made by sintering finely ground CoO and Al2O3 (alumina) at 1200°C. Cobalt blue is lighter and less intense than (iron-cyanide based) Prussian blue. Cobalt blue in impure forms had long been used in Chinese porcelain, but was independently discovered as a pure alumina-based pigment by Louis Jacques Thénard in 1802. Commercial production began in France in 1807. The first recorded use of cobalt blue as a color name in English was in 1777. The leading world manufacturer of cobalt blue in the 19th century was Benjamin Wegner's Norwegian company Blaafarveværket, ("blue colour works" in Dano-Norwegian). Germany was also famous for production, especially the blue colour works (Blaufarbenwerke) in the Ore Mountains of
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    Ecru

    Ecru describes the shade greyish-pale yellow or a light greyish-yellowish brown. It is often used to describe such fabrics as silk and linen in their unbleached state. Ecru comes from the French word écru, which means literally 'raw' or 'unbleached'. In the 1930s and before, ecru was considered to be the same colour as the colour beige (a synonym or alias for beige), but since the 1950s ecru and beige have been regarded as two different colours. Source of colour: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Ecru (colour sample #90): Sports Television
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    Fern green

    Fern green is a color that resembles fern. A Crayola crayon named Fern was created in 1998 which is a lighter shade of the color shown at right.
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    Forest Green

    Forest green refers to a green color said to resemble the color of the trees and other plants in a forest. This web color, when written as computer code in HTML for web site color display, is written in the form forestgreen, with no space). The first recorded use of forest green as a color name in English was in 1810. At right is displayed the color forest green. This web color, when written as computer code in HTML for web site color display, is written in the form forestgreen (no space). Forest green is a representation of the average color of the leaves of the trees of a temperate zone deciduous forest. Forest green is used to represent deciduous forest on maps depicting natural vegetation. It may be used to represent the Green movement, especially in graphic design for environmental literature regarding issues having to do with forest conservation. A forest green environmentalist (also called a dark green environmentalist) is an environmentalist who is seriously committed to environmentalism. Forest green is one of the school colors of The Evergreen State College, Agincourt Collegiate Institute, Wagner College, Cass Technical High School, The Westminster Schools, Canyon Lake
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    Fulvous

    Fulvous

    Fulvous ( /ˈfʊlvəs/) is a colour, sometimes described as dull reddish-yellow, brownish-yellow or tawny, it can also be likened to a variation of buff, beige or butterscotch. As an adjective it is used in the names of many species of birds, and occasionally other animals, to describe their appearance. It is also used as in mycology to describe fungi with greater colour specificity, specifically the pigmentation of the surface cuticle, the broken flesh and the spores en masse. The first recorded use of fulvous as a colour name in English was in the year 1664. Fulvous in English is derived from the Latin "fulvus", a term that can recognised in the scientific binomials of several species, and can provide a clue to their colouration.
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    Mustard

    Mustard

    Mustard is a dark yellow color that resembles culinary mustard. It is similar to the color Flax. Food Games
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    Old Gold

    Old Gold

    Old gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. The widely accepted color "Old gold" is on the darker side of this range. The first recorded use of old gold as a color name in English was in the early 19th century (exact year uncertain).
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    240
    Pearl

    Pearl

    The color pearl is a pale tint of off-white. It is a representation of the average color of a pearl. The first recorded use of pearl as a color name in English was in 1604. Interior Design Religion
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    Pomegranate

    Pomegranate

    Persimmon is a color that closely resembles the tint of a very ripe persimmon fruit. Persimmon can also be described as a medium orange-red. It is very similar to the tints of coral red and vermilion. The first recorded use of persimmon as a color name in English was in 1919. The word persimmon is derived from putchamin, pasiminan, or pessamin, from Cree, an Algonquian language of eastern Canada, meaning "a dry fruit".
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    243

    Powder blue

    Powder blue may refer to two different colors. The paler variant is often associated with powder snow. The web color powder blue is shown on the right. The first recorded use of powder blue (meaning the pale blue color) as a color name in English was in 1774. The original, darker powder blue color referred to smalt, a crushed-glass product used in laundering and dyeing applications and of a deep, dark blue hue. The cobalt blue colored glass was itself made from zaffre. The first recorded use of powder blue (meaning the dark blue color) as a color name in English was in 1707.
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    Rose

    Rose

    Rose is the color halfway between red and magenta on the HSV color wheel, also known as the RGB color wheel, on which it is at hue angle of 330 degrees. Rose is one of the tertiary colors on the HSV (RGB) color wheel. The complementary color of rose is spring green. Sometimes rose is quoted instead as the web-safe color FF00CC, which is closer to magenta than to red, corresponding to a hue angle near 320 degrees, or the web-safe color FF0077, which is closer to red than magenta, corresponding to a hue angle of about 340 degrees. The first recorded use of rose as a color name in English was in 1382. The etymology of the color name rose is the same as that of the name of the rose flower. The name originates from Latin rosa, borrowed through Oscan from colonial Greek in southern Italy: rhodon (Aeolic form: wrodon), from Aramaic wurrdā, from Assyrian wurtinnu, from Old Iranian *warda (cf. Avestan warda, Sogdian ward, Parthian wâr). At right is displayed the web color misty rose. This is written as mistyrose in HTML code for computer display. The color name misty rose first came into use in 1987, when this color was formulated as one of the X11 colors, which in the early 1990s became
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    Ruddy

    Ruddy (also called florid) is a reddish-rosy crimson colour, closer to red than to rose. A brownish shade of ruddy called ruddy brown is often referred to simply as ruddy when referring to animals. A pinkish tone of ruddy called ruddy pink is often referred to simply as ruddy when describing the colour of the cheeks of some Caucasians. The first recorded use of ruddy as a colour name in English was in 1000. Various birds coloured various shades of ruddy brown are described as ruddy: English Language Health
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    246
    Sapphire

    Sapphire

    Sapphire is a saturated shade of blue, referring to the gem of the same name. Sapphire gems are most commonly found in a range of blue shades. Other names for variations of the color sapphire are blue sapphire or sapphire blue, shown below. Displayed at right is the color 'sapphire. The first recorded use of sapphire as a color name in English was in 1430. At right is displayed the color sapphire blue. Medium sapphire is the color called sapphire in Crayola Gem Tones, a specialty set of Crayola crayons introduced in 1994. Displayed as right is the color blue sapphire. The source of this color is the Pantone Textile Paper Extended (TPX) color list color #18-4231 "Blue Sapphire". Alcoholic beverages Given names Religion Television
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    Scarlet

    Scarlet (from the Persian سقرلات saqerlât; see Scarlet (cloth)) is a bright red color with a hue that is somewhat toward the orange and is redder than vermilion. It is a pure chroma on the color wheel one-fourth of the way between red and orange. Scarlet is traditionally the color of flame, or fire. It may also symbolize the color of the blood of a living person, like crimson, although the actual color of blood (from hemoglobin) is closer to crimson than scarlet. An early recorded use of scarlet as a color name in the English language dates to 1250. This is the color now called scarlet in Crayola crayons. It was originally formulated as torch red in 1998 and then renamed scarlet by Crayola in 2000. The color flame, a medium shade of scarlet, is displayed at right. The first recorded use of flame as a color name in English was in 1590. The source of this color is the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955), a Color dictionary used by stamp collectors to identify the colors of stamps—See sample of the color Flame (color sample #34) displayed on indicated page. Displayed at left is the web color fire brick, a medium dark shade of scarlet/red.
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    Spring green

    Spring green

    Spring green is a color included on the color wheel that is precisely halfway between cyan and green. When plotted on the CIE chromaticity diagram it corresponds to a visual stimulus of 505 nanometers on the visible spectrum. Spring green is a pure chroma on the color wheel. In HSV color space, the expression of which is known as the RGB color wheel, spring green has a hue of 150°. Spring green is one of the tertiary colors on the RGB color wheel. The complementary color of spring green is rose. Displayed at right is the color spring green. Spring green is a web color. The first recorded use of spring green as a color name in English was in 1766. In the Crayola markers, spring green is known as sea foam green. Crayola has a colored pencil called guppie green that is the same color as spring green Displayed at right is the web color mint cream, a pale pastel tint of spring green. The color mint cream is a representation of the color of the interior of an after dinner mint (which is disc shaped with mint flavored buttercream on the inside and a chocolate coating on the outside). Displayed at right is the web color honeydew, a pastel tint of spring green. The color honeydew is a
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    True Blue

    True Blue

    True Blue is a tone of blue deeper than powder blue and lighter than royal blue that was developed by the UCLA Athletic Department and Adidas to be the color for all of UCLA's athletic teams starting in the 2003–2004 school year. Previously, the football team had worn powder blue while the basketball team wore royal blue and fan merchandise spanned many shades of blue. The UCLA Marching Band incorporated True Blue into its previous navy blue uniforms in 2007. True Blue used by UCLA Athletics is different from UCLA Blue adopted by the school's academic and administrative units. Distinguishing between academic and institutional graphic identities is common at major universities. True Blue is Pantone Matching System color 285, which is 0073CF in hex. The color True Blue is a deep tone of azure.
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    250

    Venetian red

    Venetian red is a light and warm (somewhat unsaturated) pigment that is a darker shade of scarlet, derived from nearly pure ferric oxide (Fe2O3) of the hematite type. Modern versions are frequently made with synthetic red iron oxide. At right is displayed the color Venetian red. The first recorded use of Venetian red as a color name in English was in 1753. The source of this color is a picture of a bottle of Venetian red car paint with a color sample of Venetian red on the side of the bottle.
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