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Best Collector of All Time

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    1
    H. B. Hollins

    H. B. Hollins

    Harry Bowly "H. B." Hollins (1854 – February 24, 1938) was an American financier, banker, and railroad magnate. He was responsible for organizing the banking and brokerage firm bearing his name, H.B. Hollins & Co. in 1878. He was born to Francis Hollins and Elizabeth Coles Morris. Hollins, a native New Yorker educated in private schools, was married to socialite Evelina Merseole Knapp on January 25, 1877. The couple had four sons, Harry B. Jr,McKim (Kim), John K. (Jack), Gerald Vanderbilt, and a daughter, Marion. Colloquially known as HBH or HB. He was notable in New York society life. Members of the Hollins family were such prominent figures and were regularly mentioned in the New York Times social diary. Hollins resided between Manhattan at his multiple town residences and at his 600-acre (2.4 km) country estate, Meadow Farm in East Islip, Long Island. Hollins entertained family and friends at Meadow Farm each summer and early autumn; these renowned guests to summer at the estate included Hollins' friend, the future King Edward VIII. Meadow Farm is also believed to be the birthplace of his children. His family's residences, mainly the East Islip mansion were said to contain many
    7.88
    8 votes
    2
    Charlotte von Mahlsdorf

    Charlotte von Mahlsdorf

    Charlotte von Mahlsdorf (18 March 1928 - 30 April 2002) was the founder of the Gründerzeit Museum (a museum of everyday items) in Berlin-Mahlsdorf. Von Mahlsdorf was born Lothar Berfelde, to parents Max Berfelde and Gretchen Gaupp in Berlin-Mahlsdorf, Germany. At a very young age she felt more like a girl, and expressed more interest in the clothing and articles of little girls. She helped a second-hand goods dealer clear out the apartments of deported Jews and sometimes kept items. Max Berfelde, Lothar's father, was already a member of the Nazi Party by the late 1920s and he had become a party leader in Mahlsdorf. In 1942 he forced Malhsdorf to join the Hitler Youth. They often quarrelled, but the situation escalated in 1944 when her mother left the family during the evacuation. Max demanded that Mahlsdorf choose between parents and threatened her with a gun, and left her in a room with an hour to choose; when he came in to kill her, she struck and killed him. In January 1945, after several weeks in a psychiatric institution, Malhsdorf was sentenced by a court in Berlin to four years detention as an anti-social juvenile delinquent. She did not serve the full term because the jails
    8.14
    7 votes
    3
    Steven Spielberg

    Steven Spielberg

    Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, video game designer, and studio entrepreneur. In a career of more than four decades, Spielberg's films have covered many themes and genres. Spielberg's early science-fiction and adventure films were seen as archetypes of modern Hollywood blockbuster filmmaking. In later years, his films began addressing such issues as the Holocaust, slavery, war and terrorism. He is considered one of the most popular and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. He is also one of the co-founders of DreamWorks movie studio. Spielberg won the Academy Award for Best Director for Schindler's List (1993) and Saving Private Ryan (1998). Three of Spielberg's films—Jaws (1975), E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), and Jurassic Park (1993)—achieved box office records, each becoming the highest-grossing film made at the time. To date, the unadjusted gross of all Spielberg-directed films exceeds $8.5 billion worldwide. Forbes puts Spielberg's wealth at $3.0 billion. Spielberg was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, to a Jewish family. His mother, Leah Adler (née Posner, 1920- ), was a restaurateur and concert
    8.00
    7 votes
    4

    Comic Book Guy

    Comic Book Guy (born Jeff Albertson) is a recurring fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. He is voiced by Hank Azaria, and first appeared in the second-season episode "Three Men and a Comic Book", which originally aired on May 9, 1991. He is the proprietor of a comic book store, The Android's Dungeon & Baseball Card Shop. Comic Book Guy is based on "every comic-bookstore guy in America" and represents a stereotypical middle-aged comic-book collector. He has become well known for his distinctive accent and catchphrase, "Worst [noun] ever!" Comic Book Guy (claiming Jeffery Albertson to be his real name in the episode "Homer and Ned's Hail Mary Pass".) is an obese, nerdy and snobby man best known for his eloquence and sarcastic quips. He is obsessed with collecting comic books and is an avid science fiction buff. He holds a master's degree in folklore and mythology (he translated The Lord of the Rings into Klingon as part of his thesis), has an IQ of 170, and is a member of the Springfield branch of Mensa. He has long hair, which he always keeps tied in a ponytail. His catchphrase is the declaration "worst/best [subject] ever", sometimes to the point of
    6.88
    8 votes
    5
    Jal Cooper

    Jal Cooper

    Jal Manekji Cooper FRGS (died August 1972) was an Indian philatelist, and an expert and authenticator of the postage stamps and postal history of India. Cooper was also a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and the author of several philatelic handbooks. He was both a stamp dealer and a collector and was associated with philatelists like C. D. Desai, N. D. Cooper, and Robson Lowe. Cooper is occasionally but erroneously credited with having discovered the Inverted Head 4 Annas. The 1891 reprints show that this error was already known. E. A. Smythies said the error was first discovered at a meeting of the Philatelic Society of London in 1874. The Jal Cooper Philatelic Society, in Varanasi, India, is named after him and India Post issued a 10 rupees commemorative stamp in 1997 depicting Cooper and Indian postmarks, on the occasion of INDEPEX 97.
    8.00
    6 votes
    6

    Josef Rosensaft

    Josef Rosensaft (January 15, 1911 - September 11, 1975) was a Holocaust survivor who led the community of Jewish displaced persons (Sh'erit ha-Pletah through the establishment of a Central Committee of Liberated Jews that first served the interests of the refugees in Bergen-Belsen DP camp and then DP camps throughout the entire British sector. Rosensaft was born to an affluent scrap-metal dealer in Będzin in Poland and was in his youth active in the Zionist Labor Movement. He was deported to Auschwitz in 1943 but escaped the transport by jumping into the Vistula River. He was injured by gunfire during the escape but walked back to Będzin, where he was captured again, given 250 lashes and confined to a chicken cage, before being sent to Auschwitz and several other concentration camps until he was sent on a death march to Bergen-Belsen, where he was liberated on April 15, 1945. He weighed 76 lbs when he was liberated. He was elected by the refugees in the DP camp to the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and served as the chairman of the British sector committee until it was disbanded in 1950. In addition to promoting the rights and interests of the refugees, he was an active
    6.29
    7 votes
    7

    Stephen Carlton Clark

    Stephen Carlton Clark, Sr. (August 29, 1882 – September 17, 1960) was an American art collector, newspaper publisher, benefactor and founder of the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. He was the son of Alfred Corning Clark and grandson of Edward Clark, who was a founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. Stephen Clark graduated from Yale with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1903 and was awarded in 1957 an honorary degree of Doctor of Human Letters. and became a director of the Singer Manufacturing Company. He founded the Clark Foundation to further his philanthropies. In 1922 he received a Distinguished Service Medal for his service in World War I as a lieutenant-colonel. In 1909, Stephen Clark and his brother, Edward Severin Clark, built the Otesaga Resort Hotel in Cooperstown, New York. He was the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of Modern Art from 1939 to 1946, and was a director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He previously had been elected to the New York State Assembly in 1910. During his lifetime he served on numerous corporate boards. Stephen was survived by his wife, Susan Vanderpoel Clark (née Hun), sons Stephen C. Clark, Jr. and Alfred
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Nelson Rockefeller

    Nelson Rockefeller

    Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American businessman, philanthropist, public servant, and politician. He served as the 41st Vice President of the United States (1974–1977), serving under President Gerald Ford, and as the 49th Governor of New York (1959–1973). He also served in the administrations of Presidents Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower in a variety of positions. A member of the Rockefeller family, he was also a noted art collector. Rockefeller, a Republican, was politically moderate. In his time, moderates in the Republican party were called "Rockefeller Republicans". As Governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 his achievements included the expansion of the State University of New York, efforts to protect the environment, the building of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza in Albany, increased facilities and personnel for medical care, and creation of the New York State Council on the Arts. After unsuccessfully seeking the Republican presidential nomination in 1960, 1964, and 1968, he served as Vice President (under the 25th Amendment) from 1974 to 1977 under President Gerald R. Ford. Ford ascended to the
    7.00
    6 votes
    9
    Grant Hill

    Grant Hill

    Grant Henry Hill (born October 5, 1972) is an American professional basketball player who plays for the Los Angeles Clippers of the NBA. As a collegian with Duke University and early in his professional career with the Detroit Pistons, Hill was widely considered to be one of the best all-around players in the game, often leading his team in points, rebounds and assists. His time in the league has been hampered by career-threatening injuries, notably during the prime of his career. At age 40, Hill is the second-oldest player in the NBA, one day younger than the oldest player, Kurt Thomas. Grant Hill was born in Dallas, Texas. His father, Calvin Hill, graduated from Yale University with a degree in history, later attended Southern Methodist University and was a three-time All-Pro running back for the National Football League's Dallas Cowboys, winning the Offensive Rookie of the Year Award in 1969. His mother, Janet, is a Wellesley College graduate. After his father's NFL career ended, the family settled in Reston, Virginia, where Grant became a high-school superstar at South Lakes High School and he was selected for the 1990 McDonald's All-American Team. When the time came to choose
    9.25
    4 votes
    10
    Thomas Lobb

    Thomas Lobb

    Thomas Lobb (1817 - 1894) was a British botanist and, along with his older brother, William Lobb, collected plants for the plant nursery Veitch. Lobb worked in India, Indonesia and the Philippines. In 1845 he discovered the first orchid species of the genus Phalaenopsis growing in the eastern Himalayas, at an altitude of ~1500 m. This plant, Phalaenopsis lobbii, is named in his honour. He was born and raised in Perranarworthal and Egloshayle, near Wadebridge where his father John worked as an estate carpenter at Pencarrow and gamekeeper at Carclew estate, for Sir Charles Lemon. Both brothers, despite varying accounts (neither wrote an autobiography), worked in the stovehouse. Both brothers were encouraged in study of horticulture and botany. Thomas moved to join the Veitch family at Killerton in 1830, aged 13. The Veitch Nurseries moved to Exeter in 1832 and Thomas suggested his brother William as the nursery's first plant hunter in 1840. Thomas' first collecting trip, inspired by the success of his brother William Lobb, was from 1843 to 1847, collecting in Java as well as visiting rainforests in Singapore, Penang and Malaysia. After a rest period working back at the Veitch
    6.00
    7 votes
    11

    Henry Ellis Harris

    Henry Ellis (H.E.) Harris (January 21, 1902 – December 29, 1977) was a philatelist and stamp dealer who through his company, H.E. Harris & Co., popularized philately for many Americans, especially children. Harris began selling stamps at the age of 14 and when the Washington Post offered free advertising, Harris seized the opportunity to begin a mail order stamp business. He opened his first retail store in 1921 at Kenmore Square in Boston. Over the years, H. E. Harris's ads, which offered a quantity of stamps for a small amount of money (usually less than $1) on the condition that additional stamps were sent on approval, became ubiquitous in many magazines and comic books. While the company was noted for selling low-cost packets of stamps, it sold rarities as well. The company developed a fully illustrated postage stamp catalog that sold for a fraction of the cost of the more detailed Scott Stamp Catalogue. Procter & Gamble sponsored the radio show, "Ivory Stamp Club of the Air" during the Great Depression. The show was hosted by "Captain Tim" Healy, an authentic explorer and world traveler. H. E. Harris was contracted by P&G to send each new club member a stamp album, badge and
    7.80
    5 votes
    12

    Pierre Yvert

    Pierre Yvert (30 September 1900 – 13 January 1964) was a French philatelic editor. Son of Louis Yvert, one of Yvert et Tellier's founders, he was manager of magazine L'Écho de la timbrologie and of many philatelic associations. He was born in Asnières-sur-Seine and in 1917, he volunteered in the French army and fought during World War I. For his actions, he received the Cross of War medal. After his studies, during the interwar period, Pierre was appointed by his father Louis, founder of Yvert et Tellier, to be a writer in L'Écho de la timbrologie redaction. Successful in this task, he became manager of the magazine that had been printed by the family company in Amiens since the 1880s. He travelled a lot like his father for philatelic purposes : visiting philatelic exhibitions, participating to the main association meetings. During the German occupation of France, he made the family printer survived with the lack of workers and paper. In 1945 he became a soldier again to free the port of Saint-Nazaire. 1955, he let his place of l'Écho de la philatélie manager to his son Jean. He died in 1964. Pierre Yvert is the founder of a French philatelic press union (Syndicat de la presse
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

    Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

    Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Alfred Ernest Albert; 6 August 1844 – 30 July 1900) was the third Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and reigned from 1893 to 1900. He was a member of the British Royal Family, the second son and fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and between 1866 and 1893 he was known as H. R. H. the Duke of Edinburgh, having been created Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Kent and Earl of Ulster in the peerage of the United Kingdom on 24 May 1866. He succeeded his paternal uncle Ernest II as the reigning Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in the German Empire on 23 August 1893. Alfred was born at Windsor Castle. His mother was the reigning British monarch, Queen Victoria, the only daughter of Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. His father was Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the second son of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. As a son of the monarch, he was styled His Royal Highness The Prince Alfred at birth, and was second in the line of succession behind his elder brother, The Prince of Wales. He was known to his family as "Affie", a childhood mispronunciation of the name
    6.67
    6 votes
    14

    John Hay Whitney

    John Hay Whitney (17 August 1904 – 8 February 1982), colloquially known as "Jock" Whitney, was U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, and a member of the Whitney family. Born on August 17, 1904, in Ellsworth, Maine, Whitney was a descendant of John Whitney, a Puritan who settled in Massachusetts in 1635, as well as of William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower. His father was Payne Whitney, and his grandfathers were William C. Whitney and John Hay, both presidential cabinet members. His mother was Helen Hay Whitney. The Payne Whitneys lived around the corner from James B. Duke, and his wife and daughter Doris. Whitney's uncle, Oliver Hazard Payne, a business partner of John D. Rockefeller, arranged the buyout of Duke's competitors to create the American Tobacco Co. "Jock" Whitney attended Yale College. He joined Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity (Phi chapter), as his father had. Whitney, his father, grandfather, and great-uncle were oarsmen at Yale, and his father was captain of the crew in 1898. He was a member of Scroll and Key. While at Yale, he allegedly coined the term "crew cut" for the haircut that now bears the name. After
    7.40
    5 votes
    15

    L. T. Rose-Hutchinson

    L. T. Rose-Hutchinson (died 1948) was a philatelist and postal historian. Rose-Hutchinson collected postage stamps for most of his life, joining the Royal Philatelic Society London in 1900 and the Postal History Society in 1940. During his Service career he spent most of his time in India, where he purchased collections and accumulations of stamps. Later he purchased most of the notable "Mackenzie-Grieve" collection. Rose-Hutchinson's collecting interests ranged over the postage stamps and postal history of India, India Used Abroad, and Hong Kong and Treaty Ports. The Scinde Dawks and the 1854 classic issues of India (both the lithographed and typographed) held special interest for him, while Hong Kong and the Treaty Ports formed a second major area of interest. His collection included the essays of Thuiller; the 1854 lithographed issues in full sheets and large blocks; many rarities of Malacca, Penang, Singapore, Labuan and Sarawak; as well as Persian Field Force, Burmese Field Force and Abyssinian Field Force covers. The Two annas of 1854, in the rare Blue Green shade, appeared on a Persian Field Force cover of 1857. Robson Lowe lauded Rose-Hutchinson's "discerning taste and
    6.33
    6 votes
    16
    Peter Arrell Brown Widener

    Peter Arrell Brown Widener

    Peter Arrell Brown Widener (November 13, 1834 – November 6, 1915) was an American businessman and head of the prominent Widener family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A merchant who supplied meat to the Union Army during the United States Civil War, Widener grew to prominence in the city and by 1873 had become Philadelphia City Treasurer. In 1883, he became very successful as a result of his investing in trolley cars and public transit systems as a founding partner of Philadelphia Traction Company, which expanded to other major cities in the United States. He and his Philadelphia business partner William L. Elkins invested in public transit systems in other major cities with businessmen such as Charles Tyson Yerkes, the streetcar czar of Chicago. Widener used the great wealth accumulated from that business to become a founding organizer of U.S. Steel and the American Tobacco Company as well as a having substantial holdings in Standard Oil. He is considered to have been one of the 100 wealthiest Americans, having left an enormous fortune. Peter A. B. Widener married Hannah Josephine Dunton (1836–1896), and they had three sons: Harry, George and Joseph. In 1887 he built an ornate
    7.20
    5 votes
    17
    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt ( /ˈroʊzəvɛlt/ ROH-zuh-velt or  /ˈroʊzəvəlt/ ROH-zuh-vlt; January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), also known by his initials, FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States (1933–1945) and a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war. The only American president elected to more than two terms, he facilitated a durable coalition that realigned American politics for decades. With the bouncy popular song "Happy Days Are Here Again" as his campaign theme, FDR defeated incumbent Republican Herbert Hoover in November 1932, at the depth of the Great Depression. Energized by his personal victory over paralytic illness, FDR's unfailing optimism and activism contributed to a renewal of the national spirit. He worked closely with Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin in leading the Allies against Germany and Japan in World War II, but died just as victory was in sight. In his first hundred days in office, which began March 4, 1933, Roosevelt spearheaded major legislation and issued a profusion of executive orders that instituted the New Deal—a variety of programs
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Edward G. Robinson

    Edward G. Robinson

    Edward G. Robinson (Yiddish: עמנואל גאָלדנבערג Emanuel Goldenberg; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was a Romanian-born American actor. A popular star during Hollywood's Golden Age, he is best remembered for his roles as gangsters, such as Rico in his star-making film Little Caesar and as Rocco in Key Largo. Other memorable roles include Barton Keyes in the film noir Double Indemnity, and as Dathan in The Ten Commandments. Robinson was selected for an Honorary Academy Award for his work in the film industry, which was posthumously awarded two months after the actor's death in 1973. He was included in the American Film Institute's list of the 25 greatest male stars in American cinema. Robinson was born as Emanuel Goldenberg to a Yiddish-speaking Romanian Jewish family in Bucharest, the son of Sarah (née Guttman) and Morris Goldenberg, a builder. After one of his brothers was attacked by an antisemitic mob, the family decided to emigrate to the United States. Robinson arrived in New York City on 14 February 1903. He grew up on the Lower East Side, had his Bar Mitzvah at First Roumanian-American congregation, and attended Townsend Harris High School and then the City College of
    6.17
    6 votes
    19
    Gilmore Car Museum

    Gilmore Car Museum

    The Gilmore Car Museum, located in Hickory Corners in the U.S. state of Michigan, houses a collection of classic automobiles. The collection ranges from the 1886 Benz, to the 1899 Locomobile, to muscle cars of the 1960s, as well as alternative fuel cars like the Stanley Steamer, and the Western Michigan University Sunchaser solar race car. It also includes the oversized backseat set from the Disney movie The Gnome-Mobile. The newest is the Blue Moon Diner, recently relocated from Meriden, Connecticut.
    9.33
    3 votes
    20
    Gretchen Osgood Warren

    Gretchen Osgood Warren

    Gretchen Osgood Warren (19 March 1868–September, 1961); the wife of Fiske Warren was an actress, singer and poet. The daughter of Dr. Hamilton Osgood and Margaret Cushing Osgood of Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, her younger sister was Mary Alden Childers wife of writer and Irish nationalist Robert Erskine Childers. She could sing perfectly in pitch, write like an adult and recite poetry on command. Her upbringing in the affluent environment; that was turn of the century Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts; allowed her to pursue music and drama to an extremely high level. Just down the street from the Osgood home was the Boston Athenaeum, where a long line of Osgoods, namely Frances Sargent Osgood and Samuel Stillman Osgood, are all listed on the "Register of the Proprietors" for the institution. Gretchen went on to study at Oxford and graduated with honors. John Singer Sargent, the famed portraitist of Boston's elite, was commissioned by Warren's husband, Fiske Warren to paint her portrait in April 1903. The sitting was done in Fenway Court, then the home of legendary Boston fine arts czar; Isabella Stewart Gardner. Warren is seen seated in a chair with her daughter Rachel
    9.33
    3 votes
    21

    John N. Luff

    John Nicholas Luff (November 16, 1860 - August 23, 1938) of New York City was one of the important philatelists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, notable as an early user of scientific methods in the study of postage stamps. The Luff Award of the American Philatelic Society is named after him. He developed a serious interest in philately in 1890, and joined the Pacific Philatelic Society in San Francisco, California. He moved to New York City in 1893 with the intention of becoming a full-time stamp dealer, and the following year joined the Scott Stamp & Coin Company, at the time one of the largest dealers in the world. At Scott he headed the approval department, edited the American Journal of Philately, and co-edited the Scott catalog. In 1896, he helped establish the Collectors Club of New York, and was later its president for a number of years. He became president of Scott in 1903, but moved to Stanley Gibbons in 1905, shortly after returning to Scott, where he remained for the rest of his life. Luff had become perhaps the most prolific philatelic writer of the age, with works ranging from the tutorial What Philately Teaches Us (1899) to the classic reference work The
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Joseph E. Widener

    Joseph E. Widener

    Joseph Early Widener (August 19, 1871 – October 26, 1943) was a wealthy American art collector who was a founding benefactor of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A major figure in Thoroughbred horse racing, he was head of New York's Belmont Park and builder of Miami, Florida's Hialeah Park racetrack. Born in Philadelphia, he was the second son of Hannah Josephine Dunton (1836 – 1896) and the extremely wealthy transportation and real estate magnate Peter A. B. Widener (1834 – 1915). Joseph Widener attended Harvard University, and for a short time studied architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. He married Ella Pancoast with whom he had two children, Peter A. B. Widener II, born in 1895, and Josephine "Fifi" Pancoast Widener, born in 1902. Joseph Widener raised his family at Lynnewood Hall, his father's 110-room Georgian-style mansion in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. Designed by Horace Trumbauer and Jacques Greber, the mansion, along with its extensive and important art collection, was part of the huge fortune he inherited. In April 1912, Joseph Widener lost his elder brother George Dunton Widener and nephew Harry Elkins Widener when they went down with the RMS
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Louis II, Prince of Monaco

    Louis II, Prince of Monaco

    Louis II (12 July 1870 – 9 May 1949) was Prince of Monaco and Duke of Valentinois from 27 June 1922 until 9 May 1949. Born Louis Honoré Charles Antoine Grimaldi in Baden-Baden, Germany, he was the only child of Prince Albert I of Monaco (1848–1922), and Lady Mary Victoria Hamilton (11 December 1850 – 14 May 1922). His mother was a daughter of William Alexander Anthony Archibald Hamilton, 11th Duke of Hamilton, and his wife, Princess Marie Amélie Elizabeth Caroline of Baden. Within a year of his parents' marriage Louis was born, but his mother, a strong-willed 19-year-old, disliked Monaco and was unhappy with her husband. Shortly thereafter, she left the country permanently, and the princely couple's marriage was annulled in 1880. Louis was raised in Germany by his mother and stepfather, Count -and later Prince- Tassilo Festetics von Tolna, along with his eldest half-sister, Maria-Mathilde (later grandmother of Ira von Fürstenberg), and did not see his father until age 11 when he was obliged to return to Monaco to be trained for his future royal duties. Louis' father, Prince Albert I, was a dominating personality who had made Monaco a center of cultural activity and whose
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Albert C. Barnes

    Albert C. Barnes

    Albert Coombs Barnes (January 2, 1872 – July 24, 1951) was an American physician and chemist, businessman, art collector, writer, and educator, the founder of the Barnes Foundation in Lower Merion, Pennsylvania. With a fortune made from the development of the antiseptic drug Argyrol, used to treat gonorrhea; a business to promote it; and the well-timed sale of his company in 1929, in his 30s Barnes began to study and collect art. He acquired his first 20 pieces by commissioning his friend, the artist William Glackens, to buy modern work for him in Paris. After selling his business, he devoted himself to the study and collecting of art. In 1922, Barnes established the Barnes Foundation, an educational institution, and housed his collection in a mansion built for that purpose in Lower Merion, Pennsylvania. It was an educational institution based on his private collection of art, which was hung according to his theories of aesthetics and without curatorial commentary. The collection has numerous paintings by Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Modernist masters, as well as furniture, ancient artifacts, and highly crafted objects from different time periods. He created numerous
    9.00
    3 votes
    25

    Gavin Walsh

    Gavin Walsh (born 1965 or 1966) is an Irish computer programmer, non-fiction writer, and collector of rare music memorabilia. Walsh began collecting music memorabilia at age 14, travelling from his home town of Sligo to Dublin to purchase rare records and working in hotels to fund his hobby. He is "one of the largest record owners" in the world and, as of 2006, had amassed a collection of approximately 25,000 memorabilia items – up from roughly 20,000 in 2002-2003. The collection includes memorabilia related to The Beatles, Dervish, Madonna, and U2, among others, and contains around 1,100 posters, which Walsh has estimated to be worth as much as €1,000 each. In 2002, he ordered construction of a concrete bunker in his back-garden to hold his collection; the bunker is bomb- and earthquake-proof. Walsh owns the world's largest collection of records and memorabilia linked to the 1970s punk rock group Sex Pistols: in 2002, it included roughly 11,000 items. He has also written two books about the Sex Pistols. In 2003, he published God Save the Sex Pistols as a "definitive guide" to "Sex Pistols memorabilia"; two years later, in 2005, he published The Greatest Sex Pistols Collection.
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Nouriel Roubini

    Nouriel Roubini

    Nouriel Roubini (born March 28, 1959) is an American economist. He anticipated the collapse of the United States housing market and the worldwide recession which started in 2008 and ended in 2009. He teaches at New York University's Stern School of Business and is the chairman of Roubini Global Economics, an economic consultancy firm. The child of Iranian Jews, he grew up in Italy. After receiving a BA in political economics at Bocconi University, Milan and a doctorate in international economics at Harvard University, he became an academic at Yale and a practicing economist at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Federal Reserve, World Bank, and Bank of Israel. Much of his early research focused on emerging markets. During the administration of President Bill Clinton, he was a senior economist for the Council of Economic Advisers, later moving to the United States Treasury Department as a senior adviser to Timothy Geithner, who in 2009 became Treasury Secretary. Roubini's critical and consistently bearish economic views have earned him the nicknames "Dr. Doom" and "permabear" in the media. In 2008, Fortune magazine wrote, "In 2005 Roubini said home prices were riding a
    9.00
    3 votes
    27

    Barry Halper

    Barry Halper (December 3, 1939 - December 18, 2005) was an extensive collector of baseball memorabilia who had been a limited partner owning about 1% of the New York Yankees. During the auction of the collection, Sotheby's Auction House called it the "World Series of Sports Auctions." Halper was born in 1939 and raised in Newark, New Jersey, living near Ruppert Stadium, home of the Newark Bears, then the Triple-A minor league farm team of the New York Yankees. Halper attended the University of Miami, where he was a pitcher for the baseball team. He then went into the his family's paper supply business, where he worked until the company closed in 1992. A resident of New Vernon, New Jersey at the time of his death, Halper had been a longtime resident of Livingston, New Jersey. George Steinbrenner called Halper "a great baseball fan" who was a "dear friend, a valued partner for many years and a decent, genuine person". Barry Halper died at Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, New Jersey at the age of 66, in 2005 due to complications from diabetes. Barry was dear friends with many baseball legends including Joe DiMaggio, Micky Mantle, Pete Rose, Don Mattingly, Tommy Lasorda
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Paul Mellon

    Paul Mellon

    Paul Mellon KBE (June 11, 1907 – February 1, 1999) was an American philanthropist and an owner/breeder of thoroughbred racehorses. He is one of only five people ever designated an "Exemplar of Racing" by the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. He was co-heir to one of America's greatest business fortunes, the Mellon Bank fortune, created by his grandfather Thomas Mellon, his father Andrew W. Mellon, and his father's brother Richard B. Mellon. In 1957, when Fortune prepared its first list of the wealthiest Americans, it estimated that Paul Mellon, his sister Ailsa Mellon-Bruce, and his cousins Sarah Mellon and Richard King Mellon, were all among the richest eight people in the United States, with fortunes of between 400 and 700 million dollars each (around $3,300,000,000 and $5,800,000,000 in today's dollars). Paul Mellon's autobiography, Reflections in a Silver Spoon ISBN 0-688-09723-5, was published in 1992. He died at his home, Oak Spring, in Upperville, Virginia, on February 1, 1999. He was survived by his wife, Rachel (a.k.a. Bunny), his children, Catherine Conover (first wife of John Warner) and Timothy Mellon, and two stepchildren, Stacy Lloyd III and Eliza,
    7.75
    4 votes
    29

    Robert Zoellner

    Robert Zoellner is an American stamp collector and the second person to have formed a complete collection of United States postage stamps. Benjamin K. Miller had assembled a complete collection pre-1925. As of November 2005, one other person, William H. Gross, has also formed a complete collection of US postage stamps. Zoellner collected stamps as a child, but only began building his collection in earnest in 1985. He completed the collection in 1996 and it was auctioned off in 1998. Like many philatelists Zoellner collected stamps as a child and had attempted to fill his US stamp album. However, many US stamps are quite rare, and he eventually put the album aside. His interest was rekindled in 1984, and in 1985 he approached Scott Trepel of Siegel Auctions and asked whether it was possible to assemble a complete collection. At the time all of the major grill rarities were coming on the market and Zoellner had both the "means and the inclination" (to quote the Weill brothers) to obtain them. He purchased the 1 cent Z grill, the rarest US stamp, in November 1986 for $418,000, setting a new record for a US stamp sale. In addition to singles of each type, Zoellner also bought strips,
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Oscar Berger-Levrault

    Oscar Berger-Levrault

    Oscar François George Berger-Levrault (May 9, 1826, in Strasbourg – September 24, 1903, in Nancy) was a French philatelist. The invention of the stamp catalogue is attributed to him and to the Englishman, John Edward Gray. Oscar Berger-Levrault was a bookseller in his birthplace, Strasbourg. Besides his work, he found the time to engage in philately. He was one of the first stamp collectors, who dealt with the scientific and systematic establishment of stamp collections. In the course of his philatelistic work, he published a stamp and postal stationery register ("Description of the stamps known to date") on September 17, 1861, which can definitely be referred to as the world's first stamp catalogue, although it was rather a list than a catalogue because of the complete lack of illustrations. However, it listed all of the 973 postage stamps known to the bookseller which had been issued around the world up to then. Because Berger-Levrault was the first to make such a list, errors had crept in. It was used by Alfred Potiquet as a template for the first illustrated stamp catalogue issued in December 1861. Although Berger-Levrault's philatelistic work was only intended for his friends
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Samuel H. Kress

    Samuel H. Kress

    Samuel Henry Kress (July 23, 1863 – September 22, 1955) was a businessman and philanthropist, founder of the S. H. Kress & Co. five and ten cent store chain. With his fortune, Kress amassed one of the most significant collections of Italian Renaissance and European artwork assembled in the 20th century. In the 1950s and 1960s, a foundation established by Kress would donate 776 works of art from the Kress collection to 18 regional art museums in the United States. Kress was born in the village of Cherryville, near Allentown, Pennsylvania, the second of seven children born to John Franklin Kress and Margaret Dodson (née Conner) Kress. His siblings were Mary Conner Kress, Jennie Weston Kress, Palmer John Kress, Claude Washington Kress, and Rush Harrison Kress. Another sibling, Elmer Kress, died ten days after birth. His father was a retail merchant. Kress never married or had children. He was a Mason. Young Kress worked in the stone quarries. Intelligent, energetic and precocious, he earned his teaching credentials by the age of 17 and began work as a schoolteacher. His first position was instructor for a class of 80 students, and was paid $25 per month. He walked 3 miles each way to
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Daniel Wadsworth

    Daniel Wadsworth

    Daniel Wadsworth (1771–1848) of Hartford, Connecticut, was a traveler, amateur artist and architect, and arts patron. He is most remembered as the founder of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. His ancestors were some of the first Puritan settlers of the Connecticut colony. His father, Jeremiah, was one of the most wealthy men in Hartford and was involved in trade, manufacturing, banking, and insurance. Young Daniel was introduced to the great art and architecture of the royal courts of Europe by his father. Daniel married Faith Trumbull in 1794 and was thus associated with John Trumbull her uncle, one of the period’s most celebrated historical painters. In later years, Wadsworth was a leading patron of painter Thomas Cole, considered at the time America’s greatest landscape painter. Wadsworth donated a lot on Main Street in Hartford for the Wadsworth Atheneum and provided many of the art objects initially displayed. He also helped Lydia Sigourney with the publication of her first books.
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Johnny Depp

    Johnny Depp

    John Christopher "Johnny" Depp II (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, producer and musician. He has won the Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild award for Best Actor. Depp rose to prominence on the 1980s television series 21 Jump Street, becoming a teen idol. Dissatisfied with that status, Depp turned to film for more challenging roles; he played the title character of the acclaimed Edward Scissorhands (1990) and later found box office success in films such as Sleepy Hollow (1999), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), Alice in Wonderland (2010), Rango (2011) and the Pirates of the Caribbean film series (2003–present). He has collaborated with director and friend Tim Burton in eight films; the most recent being Dark Shadows (2012). Depp has gained acclaim for his portrayals of such people as Ed Wood, in Ed Wood, Joseph D. Pistone in Donnie Brasco, Hunter S. Thompson in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, George Jung in Blow, and the bank robber John Dillinger in Michael Mann's Public Enemies. Films featuring Depp have grossed over $3.1 billion at the United States box office and over $7.6 billion worldwide. He has been nominated for top awards many times, winning the
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Powers Boothe

    Powers Boothe

    Powers Allen Boothe (born June 1, 1948) is an American television and film actor. Some of his most notable roles include his Emmy-winning 1980 portrayal of Jim Jones and his turns as Cy Tolliver on Deadwood, as "Curly Bill" Brocious in Tombstone, as well as Vice-President Noah Daniels on 24. He currently stars as Lamar Wyatt in the upcoming ABC musical drama series Nashville. Boothe was born on a farm in Snyder, the seat of Scurry County, Texas, to Emily Kathryn Reeves and Merrill Vestal Boothe. Boothe is the father of actress Parisse Boothe. He resides in Los Angeles, where he raises racing quarter horses. He attended Texas State University (then Southwest Texas State College) in San Marcos as an undergraduate, where he joined Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and received his Master of Fine Arts from Southern Methodist University in Dallas in 1972. After graduating from college, Boothe joined the repertory company of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, with roles in Henry IV, Part 2 (portraying Henry IV of England), Troilus and Cressida, and others. His New York stage debut was in the 1974 Lincoln Center production of Richard III. Five years later, his Broadway theater debut came in a
    8.67
    3 votes
    35

    Larry Gagosian

    Lawrence Gilbert "Larry" Gagosian (born April 19, 1945) is an American art dealer who owns the Gagosian Gallery chain of art galleries. Working in concert with collectors including Douglas S. Cramer, Eli Broad and Keith Barish he developed a reputation for knowing how to push prices upwards as well as for staging museum quality exhibitions. Gagosian was born in Los Angeles, the elder of two siblings, to Armenian immigrant parents. Between 1963 and 1969 he pursued a major in English literature at UCLA. He worked briefly in an entry-level job at the William Morris Agency, but got his start in the art business by selling posters near the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles. He closed his poster shop around 1976, when a former restaurant facility became available in the same complex on Broxton, and upgraded to prints by artists like Diane Arbus and Lee Friedlander. His gallery Prints on Broxton was renamed the Broxton Gallery when he began to show a wider array of contemporary art. The gallery worked with up and coming artists such as Vija Celmins, Alexis Smith, and Elyn Zimmerman, and staged exhibitions such as "Broxton Sequences: Sequential Imagery in Photography", which included the work
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    Isabella Stewart Gardner

    Isabella Stewart Gardner

    Isabella Stewart Gardner (April 14, 1840 – July 17, 1924) – founder of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston – was an American art collector, philanthropist, and one of the foremost female patrons of the arts. Isabella Stewart, daughter of David and Adelia (Smith) Stewart, was born in New York City. Her Stewart ancestry, by tradition, has a descent from King Fergus. Isabella Stewart Gardner had a zest for life, an energetic intellectual curiosity and a love of travel. She was a friend of noted artists and writers of the day, including John Singer Sargent, James McNeill Whistler, Anders Zorn, Henry James, Okakura Kakuzo and Francis Marion Crawford. The Boston society pages called her by many names, including "Belle," "Donna Isabella," "Isabella of Boston," and "Mrs. Jack." Gardner created much fodder for the gossip tabloids of the day with her reputation for stylish tastes and unconventional behavior. Her surprising appearance at a 1912 concert (at what was then a very formal Boston Symphony Orchestra) wearing a white headband emblazoned with "Oh, you Red Sox" was reported at the time to have "almost caused a panic", and remains still in Boston one of the most talked about
    6.40
    5 votes
    37

    Clive Cussler

    Clive Eric Cussler (born July 15, 1931 in Aurora, Illinois) is an American adventure novelist and marine archaeologist. His thriller novels, many featuring the character Dirk Pitt, have reached The New York Times fiction best-seller list more than seventeen times. Cussler is the founder and chairman of the real-life National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA), which has discovered more than sixty shipwreck sites and numerous other notable sunken underwater wreckages. He is the sole author or lead author of more than 50 books. Clive Cussler was born in Aurora, Illinois, and grew up in Alhambra, California. He was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout when he was 14. He attended Pasadena City College for two years and then enlisted in the United States Air Force during the Korean War. During his service in the Air Force, he was promoted to Sergeant and worked as an aircraft mechanic and flight engineer for the Military Air Transport Service (MATS). Clive Cussler married Barbara Knight in 1955, and they remained married for nearly fifty years until her death in 2003. Together they had three children—Teri, Dirk, and Dayna—who have given him four grandchildren. After his discharge from the
    7.25
    4 votes
    38

    J. Paul Getty

    Jean Paul Getty (December 15, 1892 – June 6, 1976) was an Anglo-American industrialist. He founded the Getty Oil Company, and in 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, whilst the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him as the world's richest private citizen, worth an estimated $1.2 billion. At his death, he was worth more than $2 billion. A book published in 1996 ranked him as the 67th richest American who ever lived, based on his wealth as a percentage of the gross national product. Despite his wealth, Getty was known for being a miser. Getty was an avid collector of art and antiquities; his collection formed the basis of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California, and over $661 million of his estate was left to the museum after his death. He established the J. Paul Getty Trust in 1953. The trust is the world's wealthiest art institution, and operates the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, and the Getty Conservation Institute. Born into George Getty's family in the petroleum business in Minneapolis, Minnesota, he was one of the first people in the world with a fortune estimated at over one billion U.S. dollars.
    7.25
    4 votes
    39

    James Negus

    James Negus (22 February 1927 – 22 February 2008) was a British philatelist and book editor. Negus was a student of chemistry and then a civil servant. Later he worked in book editing for British publishing houses. He had already published some philatelic books at Heinemann when he was hired in 1975 by Stanley Gibbons Ltd to manage its philatelic and numismatic publications. In 1977, he was promoted to editor of the Stanley Gibbons stamp catalogue. He decided its thematic and geographic division into 21 volumes but in 1981 he was made redundant as part of an economy plan. An author himself, Negus came back to this activity for Stamp World magazine and new books. he participated to the Connoisseur Catalogue, specialised in the Machin series. As a collector, he was a member of many philatelic associations in the English speaking world, and an editor or a writer to many of their publications. In 1957 he was the first Editor of the Journal of Chinese Philately of the China Philatelic Society of London. He was interested in the first half of the 20th century philately of many countries. In the 1980s, he studied souvenirs created and distributed during British philatelic exhibitions. In
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    Metaweb Technologies, Inc. was a United States company based in San Francisco that developed Freebase, described as an "open, shared database of the world's knowledge". The company was founded by Danny Hillis in July, 2005, and operated in stealth mode until 2007. Metaweb was acquired by Google in July, 2010. Although Metaweb no longer exists as a separate corporate entity, Freebase and its associated website freebase.com continue to be provided as an open database under Metaweb's original CC-BY licensing terms. On March 14, 2006, Metaweb received $15 million in funding. Investors included: Benchmark Capital, Millennium Technology Ventures, and Omidyar Network. Kevin Harvey of Benchmark Capital is a member of Metaweb's board of directors. On January 15, 2008, Metaweb announced a $42.5 million Series B round led by Goldman Sachs and Benchmark Capital. On July 16, 2010, Google acquired Metaweb for an undisclosed sum.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn

    Stephen Alan "Steve" Wynn (born January 27, 1942) is an American business magnate. He played a pivotal role in the 1990s resurgence and expansion of the Las Vegas Strip. His companies refurbished or built what are now widely recognized resorts in Las Vegas, including the Golden Nugget, The Mirage, Treasure Island, Bellagio, Wynn, and Encore. Now, as Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Wynn Resorts, Limited, Wynn has developed Wynn Las Vegas, which opened on April 28, 2005; Wynn Macau, which opened in September 2006; Encore at Wynn Las Vegas, which opened December 22, 2008; and Encore at Wynn Macau, which opened on April 21, 2010. As of March 2012, Wynn is the 491st richest man in the world with a net worth of $2.5 billion. Wynn was born Stephen Alan Weinberg in New Haven, Connecticut. His father, Michael, who ran a string of bingo parlors in eastern United States, changed the family's last name in 1946 from "Weinberg" to "Wynn" when Steve was six months old "to avoid anti-Jewish discrimination". Wynn was raised in Utica, New York, and graduated from The Manlius School, a private boys' school east of Syracuse, New York, in 1959. Steve Wynn studied cultural
    7.25
    4 votes
    42

    Mary Quinn Sullivan

    Mary Quinn Sullivan (November 24, 1877 – December 5, 1939) was born Mary Josephine Quinn in Indianapolis, Indiana to Thomas F. Quinn and Anne E. Gleason Quinn; she was a pioneer modern art collector and one of the founding trustees of the Museum of Modern Art. Sullivan attended public schools in Indianapolis including the Shortridge High School, and in 1899 moved to New York to study art at the Pratt Institute. In 1901 she was hired as an art teacher in the Queens, NY school system. The NY Board of Education sent her abroad to observe the curriculum of art schools in England, Scotland, and Germany. She traveled to France and Italy during this trip and there she was exposed to the modern art movements of the time (Impressionism and Post-Impressionism). Sullivan rented a room in the Brooklyn Heights home of Theodor Dreier during the early 20th c. and was a friend of Katherine Dreier - the two studied old masters in Europe together in 1902-1903 and Sullivan is listed as a member of the Société Anonyme (art) in Dreier's archives. In 1909 Sullivan became the head of the art department at the DeWitt Clinton High School and supervised the drawing curriculum in New York City elementary
    8.33
    3 votes
    43

    Morton D. May

    Morton D. May (25 March 1914 – 13 April 1983) (known as Buster to his friends and colleagues) was an American philanthropist and art collector. He was also at various times director, chairman of the board, and chief executive officer of the May Department Stores Company. Morton D. May was the grandson of David May, who started the family in merchandising from a canvas roofed makeshift shop, in the then populous city of Leadville, Colorado, during a gold strike in 1877. He soon came to the conclusion that there was no future there, and moved his business across the nation a few times finally setting in 1893 in St. Louis, Missouri. He opened a store called Famous Clothing. Later he bought out the William Barr Dry Goods Co., and Famous-Barr was created. Morton J. May, David May's son took over the family enterprise, and ran it successfully for many years during Morton D. May's childhood. Morton D. May lived a life of privilege, attending St. Louis's Country Day school, and then Dartmouth College. Despite his privileged position as heir to May Department Stores fortune, May started out his career with a summer position in the complaints department. After that he held nearly every
    6.20
    5 votes
    44
    David Feldman

    David Feldman

    David Feldman (b. Dublin, 1947) BA, BBS, RDP(I) is a professional philatelist, auctioneer, author, and promoter of valuable art objects. His career began with his first stamp auction in 1967. He is Honorary Chairman of David Feldman SA, a Geneva based auction company, through which he attained record prices for some of the world's most famous postage stamps. In 1993, Feldman auctioned the "Bordeaux Cover", which comprised the 1847 1d Orange-red and the 2d Deep Blue "Post Office" Mauritius stamps, which brought 6'175'000 Swiss francs including all commissions; the highest price ever paid for any philatelic item. He also sold the 1855 Sweden Treskilling Yellow yellow unique stamp at auction in 1996, which was entered in the Guiness Book of Records as the highest price ever paid for a single stamp. In 1987 Feldman joined together with ex-Christies President, Geza Von Habsburg and others to form Habsburg Feldman SA. Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, it held major auctions in paintings, watches, jewellery, art-deco, art nouveau and objets d'arts in centers all over the world. Ranked as the world's third biggest auctioneer [by volume of sales], the company established world records
    5.33
    6 votes
    45
    Sigmund Friedl

    Sigmund Friedl

    Sigmund Friedl (1851, Lipník nad Bečvou, Moravia – 1914, Vienna) was one of the most famous Austrian philatelists. Toward the end of his life he defrauded stamp collectors by selling them forgeries. Sigmund Friedl's interest in postage stamps started already at the age of 13. Only two years later, he started trading them. In 1872, he opened his own stamp shop in Vienna. Soon he became a stamp expert and started working as an examiner. He had great success with his shop, for example, he sold the unique Tre Skilling Banco for a sum of 4000 gulden to the famous collector, Philipp von Ferrary. Through his good relationship with the post, he was able to cheaply obtain the remaining stocks of several postage stamps and resell them. At the same time, he wrote the first Austrian stamp catalogues and enhanced the stamp albums. Finally, Sigmund Friedl established his own stamp museum in his villa in Unterdöbling. In 1881 and 1890, he organised the first major Austrian stamp exhibitions, which also attracted international attention. To Austrian philatelists, Sigmund Friedl is known mainly for his Friedl perforations and the disreputable Friedl forgeries. The Friedl perforations are private
    5.33
    6 votes
    46

    Leon Black

    Leon David Black (born 1951) is an American businessman and money manager, with a focus on leveraged buyouts and private equity. Leon founded the private equity firm Apollo Global Management in 1990. Black is a son of Eli M. Black (1921–1975), a prominent Jewish American businessman who controlled the United Brands Company. His mother was an artist. In 1975, his father committed suicide by jumping from the 44th floor of the Pan Am Building in New York City. It was later made public that federal regulators were investigating allegations of bribery of Honduran government officials by United Brands. Black received a AB in Philosophy and History from Dartmouth College in 1973, and served on the Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College from 2002 to 2011. He received an MBA from Harvard University in 1975. From 1977 to 1990 Leon Black was employed by investment bank Drexel Burnham Lambert, where he served as managing director, head of the Mergers & Acquisitions Group, and co-head of the Corporate Finance Department. Black is married to Debra Black, a Broadway producer. They have four children. Black's wife is a melanoma survivor. In 2007, the couple donated $25 million to form the new
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    Louisine Havemeyer

    Louisine Havemeyer

    Louisine Waldron Elder Havemeyer (July 28, 1855 – January 6, 1929) was an art collector, feminist, and philanthropist. In addition to being a patron of impressionist art, she was one of the more prominent contributors to the suffrage movement in the United States. The impressionist painter Edgar Degas and feminist Alice Paul were among the renowned recipients of the benefactor's support. Louisine W.E. Havemeyer was born in New York to a merchant George W. Elder (1831–1873) and his wife, Mathilda Adelaide Waldron (1834–1907). Shortly after her father's death, her mother elected to tour Europe instead of remarrying, and brought her along with her sister. While studying at Marie Del Sarte's boarding school in Paris, Havemeyer encountered fellow art student (and boarder) — Emily Sartain. Sartain, a Philadelphia native, got along fairly well with Havemeyer, and introduced her to Mary Cassatt — a fellow native of Pennsylvania (Allegheny City, now part of Pittsburgh) whom Sartain had studied with in Parma, Italy. As time passed, Cassatt became an advisor to Havemeyer, and facilitated the working relationship which Havemeyer would eventually have with Degas. Mary Cassatt also persuaded her
    7.00
    4 votes
    48
    Alfred Atmore Pope

    Alfred Atmore Pope

    Alfred Atmore Pope (July 4, 1842, North Vassalboro, Maine – August 5, 1913, Farmington, Connecticut) was an American industrialist and art collector. He was the father of Theodate Pope Riddle, a noted American architect. Alfred Pope’s ancestors came to the New World from Yorkshire, England in 1634 and settled in West Danvers, Massachusetts. Pope’s father Alton was a successful woolen goods manufacturer, winning prizes for his mill’s samples during The Great Exhibition at The Crystal Palace in 1851. In 1861 he moved his family to Baltimore and then to Salem, Ohio, an old Quaker town in the Connecticut Western Reserve. Later in Cleveland, Alton set up a woolen business again with his sons as partners. In 1862, Alfred Pope joined the firm of Alton Pope and Sons and in 1866 married Ada Lunette Brooks of Salem, whose family, like his, had roots in New England. The couple’s only child, Theodate, was born one year later. In 1869 Alfred Pope left the family business and, with loans from his brother-in-law Joshua Brooks and others, bought into the Cleveland Malleable Iron Company, a concern which had been formed a year earlier by five Cleveland men. Pope entered the firm as secretary and
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Charles Lang Freer

    Charles Lang Freer

    Charles Lang Freer (February 25, 1854 – October 25, 1919) was an American railroad-car manufacturer from Detroit, Michigan, who gave to the United States his art collections and funds for a building to house them. The Freer Gallery of Art founded by him is part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Freer was born in Kingston, New York, in 1854 or 1856. As a teen, rather than finish high school, he went to work as a business clerk for a business. There, he was noticed by Frank J. Hecker, the manager of a local railroad, who hired Freer as a bookkeeper. In the 1870s, a group of investors from Detroit decided to build a rail line in Logansport, Indiana; they hired Hecker to manage the project. Hecker brought the younger Freer along. Although the project was eventually merged out of existence, the investors were happy with Hecker and Freer, and invited the two to Detroit. In 1885, using their own capital and that of investors, Hecker and Freer formed the Peninsular Car Company to build rail cars. The investment made both wealthy, as Peninsular became Detroit's second largest car manufacturer, merging to become the Michigan-Peninsular Car Company in 1892. At the time,
    8.00
    3 votes
    50

    Luigi Tarisio

    This page refers to the violin dealer and collector. For the online string instrument auction house, see Tarisio Auctions. Luigi Tarisio (c. 1790 – October 1854) was an Italian violin dealer and collector. He was born at Fontaneto d'Agogna, near Novara, Piedmont, of humble parents and is said to have trained as a carpenter, playing violin as a hobby. He developed an interest in violins themselves, and as a connoisseur with a natural talent for business he began to acquire and resell some of the many fine instruments that were lying unused in the towns and villages of northern Italy. His first journey to Paris, in 1827, was evidently profitable for him and for the dealers there, who gave him every encouragement. In the same year he made his greatest coup, acquiring a number of violins from Count Cozio of Salabue, including a 1716 Stradivari in unused condition. This violin was Tarisio's treasure, and as he spoke of it on every visit to Paris but never actually brought it with him; it came to be known as the 'Messiah'. Tarisio searched indefatigably for violins and had a true love of them. The novelist Charles Reade, who knew Tarisio, wrote of him: 'The man's whole soul was in
    8.00
    3 votes
    51

    Robert Lehman

    Robert Lehman (September 29, 1891 – August 9, 1969) was an American banker, head of Lehman Brothers for decades and a notable race-horse owner, and important art-collector and philanthropist. Born in New York City, he was the son of Philip Lehman (1861–1947), head of Lehman Brothers investment bank and Carrie Lauer. He was a 1913 graduate of Yale University and member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity (Phi chapter). When his father retired in 1925, "Bobbie" Lehman assumed the leadership role of the family-owned business. He took over the bank during a time when Lehman Brothers, like its competitors Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, was essentially a one-office firm. While sound financial principles were essential, Robert Lehman was often quoted as saying that he "bet on people." One of those people he believed in was Juan Trippe who would build Pan American World Airways into an industry powerhouse. Robert Lehman understood that to maximize Lehman Brothers' growth he needed additional investor capital. While still maintaining voting control, he was the first to invite non-family members to become partners. He understood too that the right partners could expand the company's
    8.00
    3 votes
    52

    Victor Ganz

    Victor Ganz (1913–1987) was one of the most important collectors of contemporary art in the 20th century. Victor Wendell Ganz was born in New York on April 7, 1913. The son of Saul Ganz and his wife, the former Ruth Wendell, he attended public schools and the City College of New York before going to work at D. Lisner Company, a costume jewelry business, that had been founded by his uncle in 1875. Lisner costume jewelry was sold all over the United States, but maintained a small sales force of about ten reps throughout the country. As president of Lisner, Victor Ganz was a creative spirit and became involved in every aspect of jewelry production. He traveled weekly between New York and Providence to oversee manufacturing. After his in-house designer, Sidney Welicky retired, Ganz himself and Iraida Garey, vice president of product development, took over the designing responsibilities. Ganz' style could be seen in everything from the actual jewelry to the retail packaging and advertising. Ganz started collecting art in his teenage years with the purchases of watercolors by Louis Eilshemius and Jules Pascin and an oil painting by Raphael Soyer. With these purchases, his fascination
    8.00
    3 votes
    53

    Walter Arensberg

    Walter Conrad Arensberg (April 4, 1878 – January 29, 1954) was an American art collector, critic and poet. His father was part owner and president of a crucible steel company. He majored in English and philosophy at Harvard University. With his wife Louise (born as Mary Louise Stevens, 1879–1953), he collected art and supported artistic endeavors. Walter Arensberg was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the oldest child of Conrad Christian Arensberg and his second wife, Flora Belle Covert. Walter's father was President and partial owner of a successful Pittsburgh crucible company. Between 1896 and 1900, Walter attended Harvard University. Following graduation, he travelled to Europe, where he spent at least two years. In 1903, he returned to Harvard, as a graduate student. He did not complete his degree, but rather moved to New York City to work as a cub reporter from 1904-1906. Arensberg's work The cryptography of Shakespeare (1922) claims to find acrostics and anagrams in the published works of Shakespeare which reveal the name of Bacon. In The secret grave of Francis Bacon and his mother in the Lichfield chapter house (1923) and The Shakespearean mystery (1928) he used a "key
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Chris Webber

    Chris Webber

    Mayce Edward Christopher "Chris" Webber III (born March 1, 1973), nicknamed C-Webb, is a retired American professional basketball player. He is a five-time NBA All-Star, a former All-NBA First Teamer, a former NBA Rookie of the Year, and a former #1 overall NBA Draftee. As a collegiate athlete, he was an NCAA Men's Basketball first team All-American and led the University of Michigan Wolverines' 1991 incoming freshman class known as the Fab Five that reached the 1992 and 1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship games as freshmen and sophomores. However, Webber was indicted by a federal grand jury and stripped of his All-American honors by the NCAA as a result of his direct involvement in the Ed Martin scandal. He is also a former National High School Basketball Player of the Year who led his high school Detroit Country Day to three Michigan State High School Basketball Championships. Webber attended Detroit Country Day School and at the time was the most recruited Michigan high school basketball player since Magic Johnson. Webber led Country Day to three MHSAA State championships. As a senior in high school Webber averaged 29.4 points and 13 rebounds per game. He was
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    John Quinn

    John Quinn

    John Quinn (1870–1924) was a second generation Irish-American corporate lawyer in New York, who for a time was an important patron of major figures of post-impressionism and literary modernism, and collector in particular of original manuscripts. John Quinn became a successful New York lawyer, art patron and collector, and collector of manuscripts. He was the principal supporter and purchaser of manuscripts of Joseph Conrad during his lifetime. He met W. B. Yeats in 1902, and was a major supporter. He was an organizer and spokesperson for the 1913 Armory Show, and later legal defender of James Joyce and T. S. Eliot. He was a friend of Ezra Pound. He was a supporter of the Irish nationalist cause and associated with figures such as John Devoy and Roger Casement, though he worked for British Intelligence services before, during and after World War I. In this role he acted as case officer for, among others, Aleister Crowley who was an agent provocateur posing as an Irish nationalist in order to infiltrate anti-British groups of Irish and Germans in the United States. In 1913, he convinced the United States Congress to overturn the 1909 Tariff Law, which retained the duty on foreign
    6.75
    4 votes
    56

    Norah Sharpe Stone

    Norah Sharpe Stone is a philanthropist, vintner, and collector of modern and contemporary art — a distinction which she shares with husband Norman C. Stone. Norah Sharpe was born in Golden Valley, Alberta, Canada. She earned a nursing degree from the University of Alberta and later a law degree from the San Francisco Law School. She also pursued art studies at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Academy of Art in San Francisco. She has held positions in nursing as well as corporate law. In 1986, she married philanthropist and fellow art connoisseur Norman C. Stone. Since their marriage, the Stones have collected major works of contemporary and modern art. Their private collection, divided between residences in San Francisco and the Napa Valley, feature artists such as Jan de Cock, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Cady Noland, Richard Prince, Richard Serra, Keith Tyson, Christopher Wool, Andy Warhol, Marcel Duchamp, Hans Bellmer and Tony Conrad. The Stones’ Napa Valley wine estate, Stonescape, features a 5,750-square-foot (534 m) art cave designed by Bade Stageberg Cox as well as a pool and pavilion designed by James Turrell. The landscape was designed by Tom Leader Stonescape is located in the
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Sir Ernest De Silva

    Sir Ernest De Silva

    Sir Ernest de Silva (26 November 1887 – 9 May 1957) was a Ceylonese business magnate, banker, barrister and public figure, considered to be the most prominent Sri Lankan philanthropist of the 20th century. A wealthy and influential polymath, he was the founder-chairman of the largest bank in Sri Lanka, the Bank of Ceylon, governor of the State Mortgage Bank and chairman of the Ceylon All-Party committee. He made many contributions to Sri Lankan society and is also considered to be the preeminent philatelist in the history of Sri Lanka. Upon Sri Lanka's independence, he was asked to become the first Ceylonese Governor General (representative of the King in Ceylon, i.e. de facto head of state), an honour he declined for personal reasons. De Silva was at the pinnacle of upper-class society and, as the wealthiest Sri Lankan of his generation, he defined the island's ruling class. His memorials describe him as highly respected for his integrity and honesty. Sir Ernest de Silva was born at the "Royal Palace" to one of the most affluent families in Ceylon. His parents and grandparents were extremely wealthy and owned much land all over the country. His great-grandfather, Emans de Silva
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Pierre Matisse

    Pierre Matisse (June 13, 1900 – August 10, 1989) was an art dealer active in New York City. He was the youngest child of French painter Henri Matisse. Pierre Matisse was born in Bohain-en-Vermandois on June 13, 1900. He exhibited an early interest in the art market, and took a job at the prestigious Galerie Barbazanges-Hodebert in Paris. In 1924, Pierre came to New York, where he began a distinguished career of 65 years as an art dealer. In 1931, Matisse opened his own gallery in the Fuller Building at 41 East 57th Street in New York City. The Pierre Matisse Gallery, which existed until his death in 1989, became an influential part of the Modern Art movement in America. Matisse represented and exhibited many European artists and a few Americans and Canadians in New York, often for the first time. Matisse exhibited Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, Alberto Giacometti, Jean Dubuffet, André Derain, Yves Tanguy, Le Corbusier, Paul Delvaux, Wifredo Lam, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Balthus, Leonora Carrington, Zao Wou Ki, Sam Francis, sculptors Theodore Roszak, Raymond Mason and Reg Butler, and several other important artists, including Henri Matisse. Matisse was married three times. His first marriage,
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Robert Stolz

    Robert Stolz

    Robert Elisabeth Stolz (25 August 1880 – 27 June 1975) was an Austrian songwriter and conductor as well as a composer of operettas and film music. The great-nephew of the soprano Teresa Stolz, Stolz was born of musical parents in Graz. His father was a conductor and his mother a concert pianist. At the age of seven, he toured Europe as a pianist, playing Mozart. He studied at the Vienna Conservatory with Robert Fuchs and Engelbert Humperdinck. From 1899 he held successive conducting posts at Maribor (then called Marburg), Salzburg and Brno before succeeding Artur Bodanzky at the Theater an der Wien in 1907. There he conducted, among other pieces, the first performance of Oscar Straus's Der tapfere Soldat (The Chocolate Soldier) in 1908, before leaving in 1910 to become a freelance composer and conductor. Meanwhile, he had begun to compose operettas and individual songs and had a number of successes in these fields. After serving in the Austrian Army in World War I, Stolz devoted himself mainly to cabaret, and moved to Berlin in 1925. Around 1930, he started to compose music for films, such as the first German sound film Zwei Herzen im Dreivierteltakt (Two Hearts in Waltz Time), of
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Daniel Cooper

    Daniel Cooper

    Sir Daniel Cooper, 1st Baronet GCMG (1 July 1821 – 5 June 1902) was the first speaker of the Legislative Assembly of New South Wales and a noted philatelist. He was born at Bolton, Lancashire, England, the son of Thomas Cooper, merchant, and his wife Jane. He was the nephew of the emancipated convict and extraordinarily successful businessman, Daniel Cooper, who took an interest in the education of his nephew. He was taken to Sydney by his parents when a child, but was sent to England again in 1835 and spent four years at University College London. Cooper began business at Havre, France, but his health failing, he returned to Sydney in 1843. There, he acquired an interest in a mercantile firm, afterwards known as D. Cooper and Company, and bought much property in Sydney and suburbs. This afterwards appreciated in value and Cooper became a wealthy man. He married Elizabeth, daughter of William Hill in 1846. In 1853 he inhertied the bulk of the enormous fortune of his uncle, Daniel, who had no children. He was an early member of the senate of the University of Sydney, to which he gave £500 for a stained glass window, and £1000 to found a scholarship. In 1849 at the age of 28, Cooper
    5.80
    5 votes
    61
    Claribel Cone

    Claribel Cone

    The Cone sisters were Claribel Cone (1864–1929) and Etta Cone (1870–1949) of Baltimore, Maryland. Together they gathered one of the finest collections of modern French art in the United States. They were wealthy socialites during the Gilded Age. Their parents were Herman (Kahn) Cone and Helen (Guggenheimer) Cone, who were German-Jewish immigrants. Herman, who had immigrated from Altenstadt in Bavaria (South of Ulm) changed the spelling of his last name from Kahn to "Cone" almost immediately upon arrival in the United States in 1845, perhaps to become more American. Until 1871 the family lived in Jonesboro, Tennessee, where they had a successful grocery business. This is where the first five of twelve children were born, including Claribel and Etta. They then moved to Baltimore, Maryland. The eldest Cone brothers, Moses and Ceasar [the non-classical spelling is correct], later relocated to Greensboro, North Carolina. They established a textile business they named Proximity Manufacturing Company (long known as Cone Mills Corporation, now a unit of International Textile Group). During World War I the textile mills that "Brother Moses" started would again increase their fortunes. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    62

    E. A. Smythies

    Evelyn Arthur Smythies, CIE (1885-1975), was a distinguished forester and philatelist, born of British parents in India. Smythies was an expert on the ecology of Uttarakhand and Nepal. His careful studies of the earliest postage stamps of India, Jammu and Kashmir, Nepal, and Canada produced groundbreaking handbooks on which philatelists rely, even today. Smythies was educated at Clifton College, and received his degree in geology and a diploma in forestry from Oxford in 1908, then served in the Indian Forest Service from 1908 until 1940, based in Nainital. He was Chief Conservator of the Forest of Nepal from 1940 through 1947. Smythies' The Forest Wealth of India appeared in 1924. That same year, with C. G. Trevor he authored Practical Forestry Management. Smythies and Major Edward James (Jim) Corbett proposed that an area around Ramnagar, Uttarakhand be made a "National Park" to protect the threatened tigers and other living things. These include the tiger, elephant, chital, sambar, nilgai, gharial, King Cobra, Indian muntjac, wild boar, hedgehog, common musk shrew, flying fox, Indian Pangolin, and nearly 600 species of birds. In 1936, the Hailey National Park came into being as
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Eric E. Schmidt

    Eric E. Schmidt

    Eric Emerson Schmidt (born April 27, 1955) is an American software engineer, businessman and the executive chairman of Google. From 2001 to 2011, he served as the chief executive of Google. Additionally, Schmidt was a member on the board of directors for Apple Inc. and sat on the boards of trustees for both Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University. Along with Mike Lesk, Schmidt co-authored the lex analysis software program for the Unix computer operating system. Schmidt was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Blacksburg, Virginia, US. After graduating from Yorktown High School, Schmidt attended Princeton University, where he earned a B.S. in electrical engineering in 1976. At the University of California, Berkeley, Schmidt earned an MS in 1979 for designing and implementing a network linking the campus computer center with the CS and EECS departments, and a PhD in 1982 in EECS with a dissertation about the problems of managing distributed software development and tools for solving these problems. He was joint author of lex (a lexical analyzer and an important tool for compiler construction). He taught at Stanford Graduate School of Business as a part-time
    7.67
    3 votes
    64

    Fletcher R. Jones

    Fletcher Roseberry Jones (January 22, 1931 – November 7, 1972) was an American businessman, computer pioneer and thoroughbred racehorse owner. Born in Bryan, Texas, he was the third of three children of an impoverished Depression era family. He graduated from Allen Military Academy in 1949, then studied at university for two years but did not graduate. His interest in mathematics led to jobs in the fledgling computer departments at aviation companies. Married in 1951, he was transferred to California by his employer, North American Aviation Corp. After time at the company's offices in Columbus, Ohio, Jones and his wife and two small children settled in Los Angeles where he managed a North American Aviation computer center. In 1959, Fletcher Jones went into business with Roy Nutt, a widely respected computer programmer who had been working for United Aircraft Corp. The two founded a software services company named Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), when Jones, who ran the business and marketing end of things, obtained a contract from Honeywell that gave their business profitability and respect within the industry. In 1961, the company made a major move into the space industry when
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Freddie Mercury

    Freddie Mercury

    Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara (Gujarati: ફરોખ બલ્સારા‌); 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, singer and songwriter, best known as the lead vocalist and lyricist of the rock band Queen. As a performer, he was known for his flamboyant stage persona and powerful vocals over a four-octave range. As a songwriter, Mercury composed many hits for Queen, including "Bohemian Rhapsody", "Killer Queen", "Somebody to Love", "Don't Stop Me Now", "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" and "We Are the Champions". In addition to his work with Queen, he led a solo career, and also occasionally served as a producer and guest musician (piano or vocals) for other artists. He died of bronchopneumonia brought on by AIDS on 24 November 1991, only one day after publicly acknowledging he had the disease. Mercury was a Parsi born in Zanzibar and grew up there and in India until his mid-teens. He has been referred to as "Britain's first Asian rock star". In 2002, Mercury was placed at number 58 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons, in 2006, Time Asia named him one of the most influential Asian heroes of the past 60 years, and he continues to be voted one of the greatest
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    George Gustav Heye

    George Gustav Heye

    George Gustav Heye (1874 – January 20, 1957) was a collector of Native American artifacts. His collection became the core of the National Museum of the American Indian. Heye was the son of Carl Friederich Gustav Heye; and Marie Antoinette Lawrence of Hudson, New York. Carl was a German immigrant who earned his wealth in the petroleum industry. George Gustav graduated from Columbia College (now Columbia University) in 1896 with a degree in electrical engineering. While superintending railroad construction in Kingman, Arizona in 1897, he acquired a Navajo deerskin shirt, as his first artifact. He acquired individual items until 1903, then he began collecting material in larger numbers. In 1901, he started a career in investment banking that lasted until 1909. In 1915 Heye worked with Frederick W. Hodge and George H. Pepper on the Nacoochee Mound in White County Georgia. The work was done through the Heye Foundation, the Museum of the American Indian, and the Bureau of American Ethnology, and was some of the most complete work of the time including numerous photographs. In 1918 Heye and his colleagues publish a report entitled The Nacoochee Mound In Georgia. He accumulated the largest
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Kenneth Jay Lane

    Kenneth Jay Lane

    Kenneth Jay Lane (born April 22, 1930) is an American costume jewelry designer. Born in Detroit, Michigan he is an alumnus of Detroit Central High School, the University of Michigan and the Rhode Island School of Design. He was first a shoe designer for Delman and Christian Dior and he used his free time to create fun and flashy baubles. They were such an instant success that Saks Fifth Avenue sold its entire initial inventory in one day. He was one of the persons included for "high fashion" in the Andy Warhol Screen Tests and a guest at Truman Capote's Black And White Ball. He has created unique designs for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Elizabeth Taylor, Diana Vreeland, and Audrey Hepburn. He is probably most well known for his three-strand faux pearl necklace worn by Jacqueline Kennedy during her husband's presidency, a version of which was worn by Barbara Bush to her husband's inaugural ball. Some say that Duchess of Windsor is buried in the jewelled belt he created for her. His continued philosophy is that 'elegance, good taste and luxury never go out of style.'[] Current stars wearing his jewelry include the Olsen twins, Sarah Jessica Parker, Mischa Barton, Jessica Simpson,
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Rachel Lambert Mellon

    Rachel "Bunny" Lowe Lambert Lloyd Mellon (born August 9, 1910) is an American horticulturalist, gardener, philanthropist, fine arts collector, member of the International Best Dressed List and widow of philanthropist, art collector, thoroughbred racehorse owner/breeder, and banking heir Paul Mellon. Known as Bunny, she is the eldest child of Gerard Barnes Lambert, Sr., a president of Gillette Safety Razor Co. and a founder of Warner-Lambert (Warner-Lambert is now part of Pfizer, following a 2000 merger). One of her grandfathers, chemist Jordan Lambert, invented Listerine, although it was her father who commercialized it. Her mother was the former Rachel Lowe. She had two siblings: Gerard Barnes Lambert, Jr. (1912–1947; married Elsa Cover, former wife of Angus D. Mackintosh); and Lily Cary Lambert (1914–2006; married William Wilson Fleming and John Gilman McCarthy). Mellon's parents divorced in 1933, and in 1934, her mother re-married her former brother-in-law, Dr. Malvern Bryan Clopton, the widower of Gerard Lambert, Sr.'s sister, Lily Lambert Walker. In 1936, Gerard Lambert, Sr. also was re-married, to Grace Cleveland Lansing Mull, the former wife of John B. Mull and a daughter of
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Albert M Bender

    Albert M. Bender (1866–1941) was a leading patron of the arts in San Francisco in the 1920s and 1930s, who played a key role in the early career of Ansel Adams and was one of Diego Rivera's first American patrons. By providing financial assistance to artists, writers and institutions he had a significant impact on the cultural development of the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. Albert Maurice Bender was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1866, the son of Rabbi Philip Bender and Augusta Bremer Bender, both of whom were German. In 1881 he immigrated to the United States in the company of one of his maternal uncles, Joseph Bremer. Joseph Bremer and his brother William had already settled in San Francisco, and William hired the young Bender to work in his insurance office. Bender eventually became a very successful insurance broker in his own right. A lover of literature from an early age, Bender began collecting rare books and helped create the Book Club of California in 1912. Inspired by his cousin Anne Bremer, a professional artist, Bender began collecting art, with an emphasis on work by local artists and the arts of China, Japan and Tibet. He became very interested in getting to know
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    David Kennedy

    David Kennedy

    David James Kennedy (born July 8, 1976) is an American guitarist, songwriter and performer. He currently plays guitar for the alternative rock band Angels & Airwaves. He was also a member of Box Car Racer, a musical collaboration launched by Tom DeLonge, along with member Travis Barker, both from Blink-182. Box Car Racer, then a vanity project to Blink-182, put out its only album in 2002. Kennedy was also a member of the hardcore group Over My Dead Body from San Diego, California, and worked with rock group Built to Last. David and bandmember Tom DeLonge are close friends and grew up together in Poway, California. While playing with Angels & Airwaves Kennedy is often seen playing his Gibson Memphis Custom Shop ES-335 Diamond Limited Run Electric Guitars, in all three colors in which they are available. He uses Gibson Dirty Fingers Humbucking Pickups, the same bridge pickup Tom uses in all of his signature ES-333 models, in order to emulate Delonge's signature distorted, over driven tone when playing hand muted octave chords, often with delay effects. David plays through Mesa Boogie triple rectifier heads and matching cabinets. Most of David's rig emulates that of Tom's, including
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Harry Keith

    Harry Keith

    Henry George Keith (1899-1982), known as Harry Keith, was a British forester and plant collector. Keith is credited with starting the process of large-scale conservation of the forests of North Borneo (now Sabah). In 1984 a new species of Rafflesia endemic to Sabah, Rafflesia keithii, was named in his honour. Keith was the husband of author Agnes Newton Keith. Keith was born in New Plymouth, New Zealand, to English parents and grew up there, before being sent abroad to be schooled in England and then in California, United States. Keith served in the United States Navy in the First World War, and then took a degree at the University of California, Berkeley (B.Sc. 1924). In 1925, Keith was appointed the Assistant Conservator of Forests for the government of North Borneo (now Sabah) under the Chartered Company, based at Sandakan, and was promoted to Conservator of Forests in 1931, and later again to Director of Agriculture and Wildlife. He was also Honorary Curator of the Sandakan Museum. In 1934 Keith married Agnes Newton Keith (1901-1982), an American who was later to become a celebrated writer. Keith had been a friend of Agnes’ brother Al when both boys had been at the same school
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Joan Whitney Payson

    Joan Whitney Payson

    Joan Whitney Payson (February 5, 1903 – October 4, 1975) was an American heiress, businesswoman, philanthropist, patron of the arts and art collector, and a member of the prominent Whitney family. She was also co-founder and majority owner of Major League Baseball's New York Mets baseball franchise, and was the first woman to own a major-league team in North America without inheriting it. Joan Whitney was born in New York City, the daughter of Payne Whitney and Helen Julia Hay. Her brother was John Hay Whitney. She inherited a trust fund from her grandfather, William C. Whitney and on her father's death in 1927, she received a large part of the family fortune. She attended what is now the The Chapin School, then studied at Barnard College for a year, as well as taking some courses at Brown. She married lawyer and businessman Charles Shipman Payson, a native of Maine and a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Law School. Her husband was a Board member of Pepperdine University and together they provided the funds to build the university's library that was named for them. In 1943, she established and endowed the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation (named in honor of her mother) for
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Montie Ritchie

    Montgomery Harrison Wadsworth Ritchie (December 2, 1910 – July 19, 1999), known as Montie Ritchie, was a dual British subject and American citizen who became a leading cattle rancher and businessman in the Texas Panhandle during the 20th century. From 1935-1993, he was the manager of his family-owned JA Ranch southeast of Amarillo. The JA has been strictly a cattle operation, with no oil or natural gas found on its acreage. Ritchie was the older of two sons and a daughter born to Montgomery Harrison “Jack” Ritchie (1861–1924) and Ritchie’s English wife. He was a grandson of Cornelia Wadsworth Ritchie Adair, widow of John George Adair, who solely owned the JA Ranch from 1887 until her death in 1921. His paternal grandfather, Montgomery Harrison Ritchie (1826–1864), Cornelia Adair’s first husband, died of illness contracted in the American Civil War. He was the great-grandson of Union general James Samuel Wadsworth, Sr., of New York, who was mortally wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia. Montie Ritchie’s father, Jack Ritchie, was born in Geneseo a village in Livingston County in western New York State. He was educated and reared in England, became an international
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin

    Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin

    Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin and 11th Earl of Kincardine ( /ˈɛlɡɪn/; 20 July 1766 - 14 November 1841) was a Scottish nobleman and diplomat, known for the removal of marble sculptures (also known as the Elgin Marbles) from the Parthenon in Athens. Elgin was born in Broomhall, Fife, the second son of Charles Bruce, 5th Earl of Elgin and his wife Martha Whyte. He succeeded his older brother William, the 6th earl, in 1771 while he was only five. He entered the army as an ensign in the 3rd Guards. He was elected as a Scottish Representative Peer in 1790, remaining one until 1807. In 1791, he was sent as a temporary envoy-extraordinary to Austria, while Sir Robert Keith was ill. He was then sent as envoy-extraordinary in Brussels until the conquest of the Austrian Netherlands by France. After spending time in Britain, he was sent as envoy-extraordinary to Prussia in 1795. On 11 March 1799, shortly before setting off to serve as ambassador at Constantinople, Elgin married Mary, daughter and heir of William Hamilton Nisbet, of Dirleton; Elgin was ambassador to the Ottoman Empire between 1799 and 1803; he showed considerable skill and energy in fulfilling a difficult mission, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    William H. Gross

    William H. Gross

    William Hunt "Bill" Gross (born April 13, 1944) is an American financial manager and author. He co-founded Pacific Investment Management (PIMCO). Gross also runs PIMCO's $270.0 billion Total Return Fund (PTTRX). Gross was born in Middletown, Ohio, the son of Shirley, a homemaker, and Sewell M. Gross, a sales manager for AK Steel Holding. He was raised a Presbyterian. His family moved to San Francisco in 1954. Gross graduated from Duke University in 1966 with a degree in psychology. At Duke he joined Phi Kappa Psi. He then served in the Navy and earned an MBA from the UCLA Anderson School of Management in 1971. Gross briefly played blackjack professionally in Las Vegas, Nevada, and has said that he applies many of his gambling methods for spreading risk and calculating odds to his investment decisions. He is also a CFA Charterholder, earning his credentials while working as an investment analyst for Pacific Mutual Life between 1971 and 1976. Gross manages one of the world's largest mutual funds, focusing mostly on bonds. Called "the nation's most prominent bond investor" by the New York Times, he co-founded Pacific Investment Management (PIMCO) and currently manages PIMCO's Total
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Barbara Piasecka Johnson

    Barbara "Basia" Piasecka Johnson (born as Barbara Piasecka on February 25, 1937 in Poland) is a humanitarian, philanthropist, art connoisseur and collector. Piasecka Johnson was born in Poland. Her father was a farmer. She graduated from Wroclaw University with a M.A. in Art History. She left Poland in 1968, with just $100. Piasecka Johnson was hired as a cook by Esther Underwood Johnson, then wife of John Seward Johnson I. Her cooking was terrible though, so she switched jobs with the Johnsons' chambermaid. A year later, Piasecka Johnson was a curator for Seward Johnson's art collection. During J. Seward Johnson's thirty-two year marriage, he engaged in extramarital affairs with Piasecka Johnson. In 1971, they married with none of Johnson's children in attendance. According to witnesses brought to court by Johnson's children during the proceedings concerning his will, Piasecka Johnson often physically and emotionally abused her husband. She was the primary beneficiary of his will and received the bulk of her husband's fortune after he died in 1983. Excluded from their father's will, Seward Johnson's six children sued on grounds that their father wasn't mentally competent at the
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Curt Schilling

    Curt Schilling

    Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966) is a former American Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993 and won World Series championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2. His .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least 10 decisions. After retiring, he founded Green Monster Games which was renamed 38 Studios. The company released Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning in February 2012, but just three months later, Schilling laid off his entire staff amid severe financial troubles that resulted in the company missing payroll the previous week. Schilling graduated from Shadow Mountain High School in Phoenix, Arizona, in 1985, before attending Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona. Schilling began his professional career in the Red Sox farm system as a second-round pick in what would be the final January draft in MLB. He began his professional career with the Elmira Pioneers, then a Red Sox affiliate. After two and a half years in the minor leagues, he and Brady
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    Henry P. McIlhenny

    Henry Plumer McIlhenny (October 7, 1910 – May 11, 1986) was an American connoisseur of art and antiques, world traveler, socialite, philanthropist and the chairman of the Philadelphia Art Museum. His passion for art and collecting was inculcated by his parents, Frances Galbraith (Plumer) and John Dexter McIlhenny, who also played an active role in the Philadelphia Art Museum. For half a century his involvement with the museum was legendary. First serving as a curator from 1939 – 1964 he became the chairman of the board in 1976. During his years at Harvard, from which he was graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Fine Arts in 1933, Paul J. Sachs also influenced his future collecting. During the World War II he served in the United States Naval Reserve, with one and a half years on the USS Bunker Hill in the Pacific theater. He was photographed in his uniform by George Platt Lynes. During his lifetime his collections of French masterpieces, 18th and 19th century silver, furniture and other decorative arts were housed in both his Rittenhouse Square townhouse and at Glenveagh Castle, his country house in County Donegal, part of the Province of Ulster in Ireland. Many acquisitions
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Ailsa Mellon-Bruce

    Ailsa Mellon-Bruce

    Ailsa Mellon Bruce (June 28, 1901 – August 25, 1969), born in Pittsburgh, was a prominent socialite and the daughter of the banker and diplomat Andrew W. Mellon. She served from 1921 to 1932 as her father's official hostess during his tenure as United States Secretary of the Treasury, and again when he was U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom in 1932-33. She married David K. E. Bruce in 1926, a scion of a prominent Virginia family; he also would become United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom (1961–1969). They divorced in 1945. When their only child, Audrey, and her husband, Stephen Currier, died in a presumed plane crash in 1967 leaving four young children – Andrea, Lavinia, Michael, and an unnamed newborn baby – Ailsa Bruce decided to bequeath her collection of 18th-century English furniture and ceramics to the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Bruce established the Avalon Foundation in 1940, which made grants to colleges and universities, medical schools and hospitals, youth programs and community services, churches, environmental projects, and an array of cultural and arts organizations. In 1947 the Avalon Foundation was instrumental in the establishment of
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Albert H. Wiggin

    Albert H. Wiggin

    Albert Henry Wiggin (February 21, 1868–May 21, 1951) was an American banker. Born in the town of Medfield, Massachusetts, Albert Wiggin was the son of a Unitarian minister and a cousin of Arthur Francis Holme Wiggin CMG. At age seventeen, he went to work for a Boston bank and in 1892 he married Jessie Duncan Hayden with whom he had two daughters. By his early thirties, Wiggin was already a vice president at National Park Bank in New York City. He gained recognition as one of the up-and-coming in the Wall Street banking community for his role in organizing Bankers Trust. In 1904 the quiet, reserved Wiggin became the youngest ever vice president at the prestigious Chase National Bank and in 1911 succeeded Henry W. Cannon as president. Under Albert Wiggin, Chase National Bank entered a period of rapid growth, spurred by the acquisition of several New York financial institutions and the creation of a securities division that made his bank second only to National City Bank. In 1917, Wiggin was made Chairman of the bank and served on the board of directors of more than fifty major American corporations. He was responsible for bringing in members of the Rockefeller family as investors in
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    David Leavitt

    David Leavitt

    David Leavitt (August 29, 1791 – December 30, 1879) was an early New York City banker and financier. As president of the American Exchange Bank of New York during the Financial Panic of 1837 he represented bondholders of the nascent Illinois and Michigan Canal, allowing completion of the historic canal linking the Midwest with the East Coast. For his role in helping prevent the collapse of the canal scheme, Chicago authorities named Leavitt Street after the financier. Leavitt was also an early art collector, and many of the artist Emanuel Leutze's paintings, including that of Washington at Valley Forge, were initially in Leavitt's collection housed at his Great Barrington, Massachusetts estate. David Leavitt was born in Bethlehem, Connecticut on August 29, 1791, to merchant and Connecticut legislator David Leavitt Sr. and his wife Lucy (Clark) Leavitt. The ambitious David Leavitt Jr. left rural Connecticut in 1813 at age 22 for New York City, where he began his career as a clerk in a produce and commission house. Three years later Leavitt's father died and, after inheriting a share of the elder Leavitt's estate, the son David Leavitt set himself up as a New York merchant and
    7.33
    3 votes
    82

    Donald Fisher

    Donald George Fisher (September 3, 1928 – September 27, 2009) was an American businessman who founded The Gap clothing stores. Fisher was born in San Francisco, California, to Jewish parents, Sydney Fisher, businessman, and Aileen Emanuel, a cabinetmaker. He spent his childhood in the then-middle-class Sea Cliff neighborhood of San Francisco. He graduated from Lowell High School in 1946, and then matriculated at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a member of the both the Swimming and Water Polo Teams. He is an alumnus of the Theta Zeta chapter of the national fraternity Delta Kappa Epsilon. He earned a BS degree from the School of Business Administration at the University of California, Berkeley in 1951. Named 2007 Alumnus of the Year, Fisher had a robust college experience at Berkeley where his nickname was ‘Horny Fish’ and where he was caught cheating by then-Professor Clark Kerr. Kerr gave Fisher an F, but did not have him expelled. Had he been expelled, he writes, [it] “would have changed my life completely.” Fisher says he still thinks about his cheating and Kerr's response today. According to Forbes magazine, his net worth was estimated to be US$3.3 billion.
    7.33
    3 votes
    83
    Elon Musk

    Elon Musk

    Elon Musk (born 28 June 1971) is a South Africa-born American entrepreneur and inventor best known for founding SpaceX, and co-founding Tesla Motors and PayPal (initially known as X.com). While at those companies, he oversaw the construction of the first electric car of the modern era, the Tesla Roadster, a private rocket and spaceship successor to the Space Shuttle known as Falcon 9/Dragon, and the world's largest Internet payment system, PayPal. He is currently the CEO and Chief Designer of SpaceX, CEO and Product Architect of Tesla Motors and Chairman of SolarCity. Musk was born and raised in Pretoria, South Africa, the son of a Canadian mother, Maye (née Haldeman), and a South African father, Errol Musk. His mother's heritage include Pennsylvania Dutch; his maternal grandfather was from Minnesota, and had moved to Saskatchewan, where Musk's mother was born. His father is an engineer and his mother is an author, nutritionist and model, appearing on the cover of New York Magazine in 2011 and Time Magazine in 2010. Musk bought his first computer at age 10 and taught himself how to program; by the age of 12 he sold his first commercial software for about $500, a space game called
    7.33
    3 votes
    84

    Josiah Gregg

    |:Not related to John Gregg, Confederate general and namesake of Gregg County, Texas Josiah Gregg (19 July 1806 – 25 February 1850) was a merchant, explorer, naturalist, and author of the American Southwest and Northern Mexico regions. He is most famous for his book Commerce of the Prairies. Josiah Gregg was born on 19 July 1806 in Overton County, Tennessee. When he was six years old, his family moved to Missouri. Gregg was educated in both law and medicine and practiced both with distinction before tuberculosis forced him to retire from urban life. In 1831 he joined a caravan for Santa Fe, New Mexico, on a new trail beginning at Van Buren, Arkansas. Gregg then settled in New Mexico Territory, starting work as a bookkeeper. He made a tour of Indian Territories - Oklahoma Territory. Josiah Gregg's book, "Commerce of the Prairies," which came out in two volumes in 1844 was an account of his time spent as a trader on the Santa Fe Trail from 1831 to 1840 . He describes the geography, botany, geology, and culture of New Mexico. Gregg wrote of some locals, such as Maria Gertrudis Barceló, a Santa-Fe saloon owner. The book established Gregg's literary reputation, and he was hired as a
    7.33
    3 votes
    85

    Oscar Monnig

    Oscar E. Monnig (September 4, 1902 – May 4, 1999) was an American amateur astronomer, acknowledged for his contributions to meteoritics. Monnig was born in Fort Worth, Texas, the United States. In 1925 he received a law degree from the University of Texas. He worked for the family dry goods business and was its president from 1974 to 1981, when it was sold. In 1941 he married Juanita Mickle, who died in 1996. They had no children. Monnig died in the city where he was born on May 4, 1999. In the 1920s Monnig started to be interested in astronomy. He founded the Texas Observers astronomy club and between 1931 and 1947 he published a monthly newsletter – the Texas Observers Bulletin – writing especially about issues of amateur astronomers' interest, such as variable stars, meteors, comets, and the planets. In the late-1920s, Monnig developed an interest in meteorites and their contribution to astronomers' studies on the origins of the Solar System. He was a founding member of the Society for Research on Meteorites (later renamed Meteoritical Society). In the early-1930s he started his own meteoritical collection. After he failed with his requests to be allowed to study meteorites at
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Jay Leno

    Jay Leno

    James Douglas Muir "Jay" Leno /ˈlɛnoʊ/ (born April 28, 1950) is an American stand-up comedian and television host. From 1992 to 2009, Leno was the host of NBC's The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Beginning in September 2009, Leno started a primetime talk show, titled The Jay Leno Show, which aired weeknights at 10:00 p.m. (Eastern Time, UTC-5), also on NBC. After The Jay Leno Show was canceled in January 2010 amid a host controversy, Leno returned to host The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on March 1, 2010. James "Jay" Leno was born in New Rochelle, New York, in 1950. His mother, Catherine (née Muir; 1911–1993), a homemaker, was born in Greenock, Scotland, and came to the United States at age 11. Leno's father, Angelo (1910–1994), who worked as an insurance salesman, was born in New York to immigrants from Flumeri, Italy. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts, and although his high school guidance counselor recommended that he drop out of school, he later obtained a Bachelor's degree in speech therapy from Emerson College, where he started a comedy club in 1973. Leno's siblings include his late older brother, Patrick, who was a Vietnam veteran and a lawyer. During the 1970s, Leno
    6.25
    4 votes
    87

    Michael Ovitz

    Michael S. Ovitz (born December 14, 1946) is an American talent agent who co-founded Creative Artists Agency (CAA) in 1975 and served as its chairman until 1995. Ovitz later served as President of the Walt Disney Company from October 1995 to January 1997. Ovitz was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of a liquor wholesaler. Raised in Encino, California, he attended Birmingham High School in Van Nuys, a classmate of Sally Field. While a premed student at UCLA, he began his entertainment career as a part-time tour guide at Universal Studios. Upon graduation from UCLA in 1968 with a degree in theater, film, and television, he secured a job in the mail room at the William Morris Agency. Within a year he was promoted, becoming a highly successful television agent. Six years later he and four other young colleagues left William Morris to found Creative Artists Agency. Ovitz founded Creative Artists Agency in 1975 along with fellow William Morris Agents Ron Meyer, Bill Haber, Rowland Perkins, and Mike Rosenfeld. Borrowing only $21,000 from a bank, the agents rented a small office, conducting business on card tables and rented chairs, their wives taking turns as agency receptionist. Under
    6.25
    4 votes
    88

    Frederick Baldwin Adams, Jr.

    Frederick Baldwin Adams, Jr. (March 28, 1910 – January 7, 2001) was an American bibliophile and the director of the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York City from 1938–1969. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Ellen Walters Delano (a first cousin of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt) and Frederick Baldwin Adams, he married as his second wife, July 23, 1969, the Swedish Princess Marie-Luise Natalie Engelberta Ludmilla Nancy Julie, Prinzessin von Croÿ, daughter of Nancy Louise Leishman and Karl Rudolf Engelbert Phillipp Leo, Herzog von Croÿ. He was Director Emeritus of the Pierpoint Morgan Library, (New York City), 1948-69; President, 1959-71, Governing Board 1952-, Yale University Press; Member, Yale Corporation, 1964-71; Yale University Council, 1949-58 and President of the New-York Historical Society. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1954. Adams graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the Yale University in 1933, where he was a member of Skull and Bones He amassed one of the largest personal holdings of works by authors Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, as well as one of the leading collections of Karl Marx and left-wing Americana. Adams
    5.40
    5 votes
    89

    Walter A. Coslet

    Walter Allen Coslet (born in Lewistown, Montana on October 31, 1922, died in Helena, Montana on November 29, 1996) was a well known science fiction fan, collector, and fanzine publisher as well as a charter member of the International Society of Bible Collectors, writing many articles for the society's publications. He served the National Fantasy Fan Federation as both a Vice-President (1947) and President (1955). Coslet was the only child of Arthur Allen Coslet and Bessie Fodushia Pickett; at age four his right arm was injured and a bone had to be removed because it failed to heal. The family moved to Sunnyside, Washington when he entered 2nd grade, to avoid having to have him vaccinated, but returned to Denton, Montana after Washington also passed mandatory vaccination laws for school aged children. His interest in science fiction began in his early teens and he began collecting in 1937. When his mother objected to his reading science fiction he began reading it in the barn. He graduated from high school in Denton in 1941. The childhood injury to his right arm kept him out of military service in World War II. Coslet attended Prairie Bible Institute in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan,
    5.40
    5 votes
    90
    Albert I, Prince of Monaco

    Albert I, Prince of Monaco

    Albert I (13 November 1848 – 26 June 1922) was Prince of Monaco and Duke of Valentinois from 10 September 1889 until his death. Born Albert Honoré Charles Grimaldi on 13 November 1848 in Paris, France, the son of Prince Charles III (1818–1889), and Countess Antoinette de Mérode-Westerloo (1828–1864), a Belgian noblewoman, maternal aunt of Donna Maria Vittoria dal Pozzo, Princess della Cisterna, Duchess consort of Aosta and Queen consort of Spain. As a young man, Prince Albert served in the Spanish Navy, but during the Franco-Prussian War, he joined the French Navy where he was awarded the Legion of Honor. He was only 22 years old when he began to develop an interest in the then relatively new science of oceanography. After several years of study, Albert showed his ingenuity by devising a number of techniques and instruments used for measurement and exploration. Accompanied by some of the world's leading marine scientists, he recorded numerous oceanographic studies, maps and charts. He then founded what would become the world renowned Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, that included an aquarium, a museum, and a library plus research facilities in Paris. He also discovered the Princess
    7.00
    3 votes
    91

    Alexander Kennedy Miller

    Alexander Kennedy Miller (1906 – October 23, 1993), also known as A. K. Miller, was an eccentric recluse who operated Miller's Flying Service in 1930, in Montclair, New Jersey, USA. Miller provided mail and other delivery services by means of an autogyro, as well as listing "Expert Automobile Repairing" and "Aeroplanes Rebuilt & Overhauled" on his business card. In his later years he was known for his eccentricities, and his collection of valuable antique cars. Miller was the only child of a wealthy New York stockbroker and wholesale merchant. He purchased his first Stutz automobile while still in high school. He soon purchased more Stutz cars from bankruptcy auctions and a number of autogyros from the military for a small fraction of their actual value. Miller attended Rutgers University on a scholarship to study mechanical engineering. A note alongside his yearbook picture describes an occasion when he rode down the street on a motorcycle, without a coat, in the wintertime, going to the barber shop "for his quarterly haircut". In 1941, Miller married Imogene Raymond (1917–1996), the daughter of William Everett Raymond and Maria Louise Cook. During World War II, when Miller
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    Bertha Palmer

    Bertha Palmer

    Bertha Palmer (May 22, 1849 – May 5, 1918) was an American businesswoman, socialite, and philanthropist. Her next-door neighbor was steel magnate Clayton Mark, the builder of the planned worker community named Marktown in Northwest Indiana. Born Bertha Matilde Honoré in Louisville, Kentucky, her father was businessman Henry Hamilton Honoré. Bertha, known within the family as "Cissie," studied in her home town and achieved a reputation as a skilled musician, a proficient linguist, a brilliant writer, a skilled politician, and a fine administrator. Bertha Honoré married the Chicago millionaire Potter Palmer in 1870. She was twenty-one, he was forty-four. Palmer was a Quaker merchant who had come to Chicago after failing twice in business. In Chicago he learned to please his clients, many of whom were women. He made customer service a priority and carried everything from dry goods to the latest French fashions for ladies. Palmer sold his vast store to a consortium and it would eventually become Marshall Field's. Palmer then opened a luxury hotel, Palmer House and invested in real estate, eventually owning a vast portfolio of properties. Soon after their marriage, the Chicago Fire
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Charles Maries

    Charles Maries

    Charles Maries (18 December 1851 – 11 October 1902) was an English botanist and plant collector who was sent by James Veitch & Sons of Chelsea, London to search for new hardy plants in Japan, China and Taiwan between 1877 and 1879; there he discovered over 500 new species, which Veitch introduced to England. Amongst his finds, several bear his name, including Abies mariesii, Davallia mariesii, Hydrangea macrophylla "Mariesii", Platycodon grandiflorus "Mariesii" and Viburnum plicatum "Mariesii". Maries was born in Hampton Lucy, Warwickshire, the youngest of five sons born to George and Mary Maries. His father was the boot- and shoe-maker for the village, as was his grandfather, Thomas Maries. He was educated at the Hampton Lucy Grammar School, where he learnt about plants from the Reverend George Henslow, who was headmaster between 1861 and 1865. Reverend Henslow went on to become the Royal Horticultural Society's Professor of Botany. Of his brothers, Frederick (the eldest brother) and George followed their father and became cordwainers and shoe-makers, while Henry became a music teacher at Stratford-upon-Avon. The fourth brother, Richard, also had a strong interest in plants and he
    7.00
    3 votes
    94

    Dr. Mark Robson

    Mark Robson is a writer who was born in Scotland and who now lives in New Orleans, Louisiana. He is currently working on film projects with his production partner, Leigh Hennessy, and he also runs No Middle Name Public Relations. Robson holds a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (formerly known as the University of Southwestern Louisiana) and was Assistant Professor of English and Theater at Graceland University in Iowa. He was artistic director of the Eavesdrop Theater in Lafayette, Louisiana, one of the nation’s premier playwrights’ theaters of the era. As a playwright, director, and actor, he was involved in dozens of productions in Louisiana and across the United States. Several of his one-act plays were performed in Off-Off Broadway theaters in New York, including “Home at Last," which won the playwriting award at the Deep South Writers Conference. He also directed and acted in Off-Off Broadway plays in New York. In addition to his work in theater, Robson is an acclaimed expert in United States coins and stamps. He has written extensively about all aspects of coins and stamps, and from 2000 to 2003 he was a guest host on ShopNBC
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Joseph Dalton Hooker

    Joseph Dalton Hooker

    Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker OM, GCSI, CB, FRS (30 June 1817 – 10 December 1911) was one of the greatest British botanists and explorers of the 19th century. Hooker was a founder of geographical botany, and Charles Darwin's closest friend. He was Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, for twenty years, in succession to his father, William Jackson Hooker, and was awarded the highest honours of British science. Hooker was born in Halesworth, Suffolk, England. He was the second son of the famous botanist Sir William Jackson Hooker and Maria Sarah Turner, eldest daughter of the banker Dawson Turner and sister-in-law of Francis Palgrave. From age seven, Hooker attended his father's lectures at Glasgow University where he was Regius Professor of Botany. Joseph formed an early interest in plant distribution and the voyages of explorers like Captain James Cook. He was educated at the Glasgow High School and went on to study medicine at Glasgow University, graduating M.D. in 1839. This degree qualified him for employment in the Naval Medical Service: he joined renowned polar explorer Captain James Clark Ross's Antarctic expedition to the South Magnetic Pole after receiving a commission
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Leo Stein

    Leo Stein

    Leo Stein (1872 – July 29, 1947) was an American art collector and critic. He was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, the older brother of Gertrude Stein. He became an influential promoter of 20th-century paintings. Beginning in 1892, he studied at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for two years. The following year, he traveled the world with his cousin, Fred. In 1897, he transferred to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, where he graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1898. Stein spent a number of years living in Paris with his sister. In 1914, the two split due to Leo's resentment of Gertrude's infatuation with Alice B. Toklas, whom he described as "a kind of abnormal vampire". Stein returned to America to work as a journalist but eventually settled near Florence, Italy, with his long-time love interest, Nina Auzias. They eventually married in 1921. Stein died of cancer in 1947 in Florence. Auzias committed suicide two years later.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    Walter Davis

    Walter Davis (14 September 1847 – 18 November 1930) was an English plant collector, who collected in South America for James Veitch & Sons of Chelsea, London. Davis was born at Sarson Street, now part of Amport, near Andover, Hampshire. According to Hortus Veitchii, he "inherited from his father a taste for Natural History and outdoor pursuits, which later took the form of a love of gardening". At 12 years old, he left school and started work in the gardens of the Marquess of Winchester at Amport House; the house had been rebuilt in 1857, and the gardens were being re-modelled. He then moved to Wilton Park Gardens, at Beaconsfield where he stayed for four years, rising to the rank of departmental foreman. His travels then took him to work for Mr. C. Ryder at Slade, Kent followed by a spell at the gardens of Mr. T. W. Evans at Allestree Hall, Derby, before, in 1870, he joined James Veitch & Sons at Chelsea, London. At Chelsea, he worked under John Dominy in the "New Plant Department" and eventually became foreman in charge of the nepenthes and fine foliage plants. In 1873, following the departures of George Downton and A. R. Endres, Harry Veitch was looking for a plant collector to
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Warren M. Robbins

    Warren Murray Robbins (September 4, 1923 – December 4, 2008) was an American art collector, whose collection of African art led to the formation of the National Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institution. Robbins was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1923, to Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. He attend the University of New Hampshire where he earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1945. He was awarded a master's degree from the University of Michigan in 1949, majoring in history. After graduating from college, he taught briefly at Nurnberg American High School and then became a cultural affairs officer for the Department of State. While working as a cultural attaché for the State Department at the United States Embassy in Bonn, he was walking the streets of Hamburg in the late 1950s or early 1960s with future United States Senator S. I. Hayakawa when he impulsively entered into an antiques shop and spent $15 on a carved-wood figure of a man and woman, the work of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Back in Hamburg a year later, he spent $1,000 on 32 African masks, textiles and other pieces in a different shop. Returning to the United States, Robbins purchased a
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Ima Hogg

    Ima Hogg

    Ima Hogg (July 10, 1882 – August 19, 1975), known as "The First Lady of Texas", was an American philanthropist, patron and collector of the arts, and one of the most respected women in Texas during the 20th century. Hogg was an avid art collector, and owned works by Picasso, Klee, and Matisse, among others. Hogg donated hundreds of pieces of artwork to Houston's Museum of Fine Arts and served on a committee to plan the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. An enthusiastic collector of early American antiques, she also served on a committee tasked with locating historical furniture for the White House. She restored and refurbished several properties, including the Varner plantation and Bayou Bend, which she later donated to Texas arts and historical institutions who maintain the facilities and their collections today. Hogg received numerous awards and honors, including the Louise E. du Pont Crowninshield Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Santa Rita Award from the University of Texas System, and an honorary doctorate in fine arts from Southwestern University. Hogg was the daughter of Sarah Ann "Sallie" Stinson and James Stephen "Big Jim" Hogg, later Attorney
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Angelina Jolie

    Angelina Jolie

    Angelina Jolie ( /dʒoʊˈliː/ joh-LEE, born Angelina Jolie Voight; June 4, 1975) is an American actress and director. She has received an Academy Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards, and was named Hollywood's highest-paid actress by Forbes in 2009 and 2011. Jolie promotes humanitarian causes, and is noted for her work with refugees as a Special Envoy and former Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). She has been cited as the world's "most beautiful" woman, a title for which she has received substantial media attention. Jolie made her screen debut as a child alongside her father Jon Voight in Lookin' to Get Out (1982), but her film career began in earnest a decade later with the low-budget production Cyborg 2 (1993). Her first leading role in a major film was in the cyber-thriller Hackers (1995). She starred in the critically acclaimed biographical television films George Wallace (1997) and Gia (1998), and won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in the drama Girl, Interrupted (1999). Jolie achieved wide fame after her portrayal of video game heroine Lara Croft in Lara Croft: Tomb
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Bernard Lewin

    Bernard Lewin

    Bernard Lewin (September 30, 1906 – January 30, 2003) was a German-born American citizen who amassed the largest private collection of modern Mexican art in the world. Prior to his death in 2003, Lewin and his wife Edith donated more than 2,000 works of art to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Lewin was a personal friend of Rufino Tamayo and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Lewin's collection included the only portrait of Frida Kahlo by Diego Rivera that was not part of mural. Other works donated to the Los Angeles County Museum included Carlos Mérida, José Clemente Orozco, Rafael Coronel, and Francisco Zúñiga.
    8.00
    2 votes
    102

    Daniel J. Terra

    Daniel J. Terra (born 8 June 1911, died 28 June 1996) was a scientist, businessman, and art collector. A first-generation Italian-American, Terra earned a chemical engineering degree from Pennsylvania State University in 1931, and founded Lawter Chemicals in Chicago in 1940. The success of his global enterprise enabled him to pursue his cultural interests, assembling an art collection and participating in several Chicago arts institutions. Daniel J. Terra, the grandson of lithographers who immigrated from Italy, was raised in Pennsylvania. He worked as an apprentice in his family's shop while studying chemistry. Through his undergraduate thesis research, he discovered a new ink vehicle, which allowed printing presses to run faster than ever before, leading to the creation of Life magazine, the first news-picture publication. In 1940, Terra borrowed funds from a friend, John Lawson and founded a printing-chemical firm, Lawter Chemicals, one of the world largest producers of printing inks and chemicals. Terra's interest in art and collecting began in 1937 when he married Adeline Evans Richards, a painter and a student of art history. Terra was finance chairman of Ronald Reagan's 1980
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Edward Perry Warren

    Edward Perry Warren (January 8, 1860 – December 28, 1928), known as Ned Warren, was an American art collector and the author of works proposing an idealized view of homosexual relationships. Warren was born on January 8, 1860, in Waltham, Massachusetts, one of five children born into of a wealthy Boston, Massachusetts family. His father was Samuel Denis Warren, who founded the Cumberland Paper Mills in Maine. He received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1883 and later studied at New College, Oxford, earning his M.S. in Classics. His academic interest was classical archeology. At Oxford he met archeologist John Marshall (1862–1928), a younger man he called "Puppy," with whom he formed a close and long-lasting relationship, though Marshall married in 1907, much to Warren's dismay. Beginning in 1888, Warren made England his primary home. He and Marshall lived together at Lewes House, a large residence in Lewes, East Sussex, where they became the center of a circle of like-minded men interested in art and antiquities who ate together in a dining room overlooked by Lucas Cranach's Adam and Eve, now in the Courtauld Institute of Art. One account said that "Warren's attempts to produce a
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Henry Chesterton

    Henry Chesterton

    Joseph Henry Chesterton (c.1840 – 26 January 1883) was a plant collector who was sent by James Veitch & Sons to search for orchids in South America with much success. Little is known of Chesterton's early life until early 1870, when, as a valet to a gentleman who was travelling through South America, he wrote to Harry Veitch from Chile stating that he had a passion for orchids and had gathered a substantial collection but needed advice on how to pack them in order to bring them back to England. Veitch replied immediately and arranged for Chesterton to meet one of his shipping agents in South America who would demonstrate the proper methods of packing the plants in order that they could be safely conveyed thousands of miles by sea, through various climates and greatly varying temperatures. Nothing more was heard of Chesterton for some time, until, he arrived unannounced at Veitch Nurseries' Chelsea, London headquarters. Harry Veitch and John Heal, the head nurseryman, rushed to meet him and were presented with a collection of Orchids, "so carefully packed and well looked after, that they arrived in the best possible condition". Veitch immediately bought all of Chesterton's plants
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Henry E. Huntington

    Henry E. Huntington

    Henry Edwards Huntington (February 27, 1850, Oneonta, New York–May 23, 1927, Philadelphia) was a railroad magnate and collector of art and rare books. Born in Oneonta, New York, Huntington settled in Los Angeles, where he owned the Pacific Electric Railway as well as substantial real estate interests. In addition to being a businessman and art collector, Huntington was a major booster for Los Angeles in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Henry E. Huntington was the nephew of Collis P. Huntington, one of The Big Four, the men instrumental in creating the Central Pacific Railroad (later called Southern Pacific), one of the two railroads that built the transcontinental railway in 1869. Huntington held several executive positions working alongside his uncle with the Southern Pacific Transportation Company. After Collis P. Huntington's death, Henry E. Huntington assumed Collis Huntington's leadership role with Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in Virginia, and married his widow Arabella Huntington. His divorce from his first wife, Mary Alice Prentice, in 1910 and marriage to Arabella in 1913 after Mary Alice's death shocked San Francisco society. He had four children
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    James F. Ballard

    James Franklin Ballard (July 16, 1851 - April 23, 1931) was an American entrepreneur and art collector specializing in rugs from Asia and the Middle East, and medieval prints by such artists as Albrecht Dürer. During his lifetime his art collection achieved national fame among art critics and collectors. Ballard traveled the world in search of art to buy, but most especially rugs. He started collecting rugs in 1905 He traveled over 470,000 miles through Southeast Asia, China, the Caucasus Mountains, India, Northern Africa, the Middle East, and all over Europe. His travels found him in Egypt during the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. He was briefly imprisoned by the Greek government, and witnessed the Great Fire of Smyrna (now Izmir). The earliest of Ballard’s rugs are from the 10th century. In 1922 Ballard presented to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, a collection of 126 oriental rugs that at the time was valued at half a million dollars. Later he brought an additional two rugs, one of which featured the coat of arms of Tamerlane, the founder of the Timurid Empire. He also gave a substantial collection of rugs to the Saint Louis Art Museum. Ballard was born in
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Jean-Baptiste Moëns

    Jean-Baptiste Moëns

    Jean-Baptiste Philippe Constant Moens (27 May 1833, Tournai – 28 April 1908) was a Belgian philatelist recognized as the first dealer in stamps for collectors. He was one of the original philatelic journalists. Moens began collecting stamps from his family's mail as a boy in Tournai. He was the son of Colette Blangenois and Phillipe Moens, a soldier. He began with a small business in coins. By 1853, at age nineteen, he was buying and selling new and second-hand books, and stamps, from the Galerie Borthier, a covered walkway in central Brussels. Within a decade he was putting out a stamp catalog with illustrated supplements. In March 1862, with Louis Francois Hanciau, Moens published a catalog of stamps, the Manuel des collectionneurs de timbres-poste (Handbook for Stamp Collectors). This work is the first of its kind in Belgium and the second in the French language, following that of the Parisian, Alfred Potiquet. Also in 1862, he published De la falsification des timbres-poste (On the falsification of postage stamps) to alert stamp enthusiasts to the abundance of forgeries. He began the first French language philatelic monthly, Le Timbre-poste, which ran from 1863 until 1900, as
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Leo Castelli

    Leo Castelli (born Leo Krausz; September 4, 1907 – August 21, 1999) was an American art dealer. He was best known to the public as an art dealer whose gallery showcased cutting edge Contemporary art for five decades. Castelli showed Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Op Art, Color field painting, Hard-edge painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, and Neo-expressionism, among other movements. Leo Castelli, whose original name was Leo Krausz, was born as in Trieste, the second of three children of Italian and Austro-Hungarian Jewish origin. His father was Ernest Krauss, a Hungarian by birth, who had gone to Trieste as a young man and married wealthy heiress Bianca Castelli, from a family of coffee importers which had long been established there. After World War I, which the family spent in Vienna (where Leo Castelli learned perfect German), they returned to Trieste. The family changed its name to “Krausz-Castelli” and then “Castelli” in the mid-1930s, when Mussolini’s government required names to be Italianized. After earning a law degree at the University of Milan in 1924, Castelli returned to Trieste, where his father got him a job with an
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Otto Hermann Kahn

    Otto Hermann Kahn

    Otto Hermann Kahn (Mannheim, Germany, February 21, 1867 – New York, United States, March 29, 1934) was an investment banker, collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. He was born on February 21, 1867, and raised in the city of Mannheim, Germany, by Jewish parents. His father had been among the refugees to the United States after the revolution of 1848 and had become an American citizen, but later returned to Germany. Otto Kahn was educated in a gymnasium in Mannheim. Kahn's ambition was to be a musician, and he learned to play several instruments before he graduated from the gymnasium. But he was one of eight children, and his father had set plans for the career of each one. Kahn he destined to be a banker. At 17, Kahn was placed in a bank at Karlsruhe as a junior clerk, where he remained for three years, advancing until he was thoroughly grounded in the intricacies of finance. He then served for a year in the Kaiser's hussars. On leaving the army he went to the London agency of Deutsche Bank, where he remained five years. He displayed such unusual talents that he became second in command when he had been there but a comparatively short time. The English mode of life, both
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Robert Fortune

    Robert Fortune

    Robert Fortune (16 September 1812 – 13 April 1880) was a Scottish botanist, plant hunter and traveller, best known for introducing tea plants from China to India. Robert Fortune was born in Britain on 16 September 1812, at Kelloe, Berwickshire. He was employed in the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, and later in the Horticultural Society of London's garden at Chiswick. Following the Treaty of Nanjing in 1842 Fortune was sent out by the Horticultural Society to collect plants in China. His travels resulted in the introduction to Europe of many new, exotic and beautiful flowers. His most famous accomplishment was the successful transportation of tea from China to India in 1848 on behalf of the British East India Company. Similar to other European travellers of the period, such as Walter Medhurst, Fortune disguised himself as a Chinese merchant during several, but not all, of his journeys beyond the newly established treaty port areas. Not only was Fortune's purchase of tea plants forbidden by the Chinese government of the time, but his travels were also beyond the allowable day's journey from the European treaty ports. Fortune travelled to some areas of China that had seldom been
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Yves Arman

    Yves Arman, born Yves Fernandez on September 18, 1954 in Nice, died on February 15, 1989, in Sarragosa, Spain. Yves was an art dealer, collector, and writer. The son of French-born American artist Arman, and French composer Eliane Radigue, Yves was named after his godfather, Arman's best friend Yves Klein. Yves moved to New York in 1975 and held an art gallery on Madison avenue in the late seventies and early eighties. In 1987 he moved to Monte Carlo where he had one child, a girl named Madison. Yves was a close friend of the American artist Keith Haring, who was Madison's godfather. Yves Arman wrote the book Marcel Duchamp: Plays and Wins, on the work and ideas of Marcel Duchamp which was published by Marval Press in 1984 (ISBN 1299242022). He made a second book of photos with short comments entitled Etant donné qu'Eros c'est la vie, edited in 1888, on the theme of Marcel Duchamp's last work: Etant donnés 1° la chute d'eau, 2° le gaz d'éclairage. Yves's motto was "In art we trust," and as a note to Duchamp, "L'art c'est la vie"--"Art is life." Famously a reckless driver, Yves Arman died in a car crash in 1989, while driving through Spain to meet with his family and Haring. Haring
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Arabella Huntington

    Arabella Huntington

    Arabella Yarrington "Belle" Huntington (c.1850-1924) was the second wife of American railway tycoon and industrialist Collis P. Huntington, and then the second wife of Henry E. Huntington. She was once known as the richest woman in America, and as the force behind the art collection that is housed at the Huntington Library. Arabella Huntington was the second wife of Collis P. Huntington. After his death, she married his nephew Henry E. Huntington, who was also a railway magnate and the founder of the famous Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, in San Marino, California. She had a son, Archer Milton Huntington. Compared to her famous family, information about Arabella is scarce. She was apparently born in 1850 or 1851, probably in Richmond, Virginia (see Wark, p. 312). Her first husband was a Mr. Worsham, of New York, who died shortly after they were married, leaving her with a young son, named Archer. (some other sources have suggested that they were not actually married, but that she was his mistress). (It has also been suggested that Archer's father was actually Collis Huntington, who legally adopted the boy when he was a teenager.). In 1877 she was able to
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Frederick William Burbidge

    Frederick William Burbidge

    Frederick William Thomas Burbidge (1847 in Wymeswold, Leicestershire, England – 1905 in Dublin, Ireland) was a British explorer who collected many rare tropical plants for the famous Veitch Nurseries. Burbidge's first job was as a gardener at Kew Gardens. From 1877 to 1878, however, he was an employee of Messrs Veitch and made many expeditions to South-east Asia in search of ornamental plants. From 1879 onwards he was the curator of the Botanic Gardens at Trinity College, Dublin. In 1894, Burbidge was appointed "Keeper of the College Park". Five years later he was awarded the honorary degree of M.A. at Dublin University and in 1897 granted the Victorian Medal of Honour by the Royal Horticultural Society. Burbidge is credited with introducing the famous pitcher plant Nepenthes rajah into cultivation. He is commemorated in the name of the genus Burbidgea (Hook.f.) and several species including Globba burbidgei (Ridl.). Nepenthes burbidgeae (Hook.f. ex Burb.) is thought to be named after his wife.
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Henryk de Kwiatkowski

    Henryk Richard de Kwiatkowski (February 22, 1924 - March 17, 2003) was a Polish-born member of the Royal Air Force who became an aeronautical engineer and made a fortune in business in North America and who owned Calumet Farm, one of the most prestigious Thoroughbred horse breeding and racing farms in the United States. Born in Poznań, Poland, at age 15 Henryk de Kwiatkowski was captured by the Russian Army and sent to a Siberian labor camp. After being imprisoned for two years he escaped and made his way through Iran then to South Africa where in March 1943 he boarded the troopship Empress of Canada heading for England. The ship was torpedoed and sunk by an Italian submarine but de Kwiatkowski survived and eventually reached England where he joined the Royal Air Force, serving until 1947. According to his son, Henryk de Kwiatkowski was the basis for the character Abel Rosnovski in the Jeffrey Archer novel Kane and Abel. After the War, Henryk de Kwiatkowski worked at a factory job and put himself through university. In 1952 he emigrated to Canada to work as an engineer at the Pratt & Whitney aircraft company in Montreal. In 1957, he went to the United States where he established
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Ian Woodner

    Ian Woodner (January 25, 1903 - November 1, 1990) was an American real estate developer, artist and art collector. Mr. Woodner was born in New York City to a Polish immigrant family. He was raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of Minnesota and a master's from Harvard University. He received a fellowship to study abroad in Europe and the Middle East. He attended the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he won nine medals during his postgraduate work. He was married to Ruth Lyon Woodner of Westport, Connecticut. He had a role in designing the Central Park Zoo and various buildings at the 1939 World's Fair. Mr. Woodner began building houses in Wilmington, Delaware and later concentrated on Washington, D.C. and the New York metropolitan region, where his company erected housing complexes in Manhattan, Flushing, Queens and Yonkers. In 1945 Mr. Woodner founded the Jonathan Woodner Company, which has built residential and commercial properties in New York, the District of Columbia and Atlanta. The company was named for Mr. Woodner's infant son, Jonathan, who later joined the business along with his sisters, Dian and Andrea.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    John Edward Gray

    John Edward Gray

    John Edward Gray, FRS (12 February 1800 – 7 March 1875) was a British zoologist. He was the elder brother of George Robert Gray and son of the pharmacologist and botanist Samuel Frederick Gray (1766–1828). Gray was Keeper of Zoology at the British Museum in London from 1840 until Christmas 1874, before the Natural History holdings were split off to the Natural History Museum. He published several catalogues of the museum collections that included comprehensive discussions of animal groups as well as descriptions of new species. He improved the zoological collections to make them amongst the best in the world. Gray was born in Walsall, but his family soon moved to London, where Gray studied medicine. He assisted his father in writing The Natural Arrangement of British Plants (1821). After being blackballed by the Linnean Society he turned his interest from botany to zoology. He began his zoological career by volunteering to collect insects for the British Museum at age 15. He officially joined the Zoological Department in 1824 to help John George Children catalog the reptile collection. In 1840 he took over from Children as Keeper of Zoology, which he continued for 35 years,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Josh Beckett

    Josh Beckett

    Joshua "Josh" Patrick Beckett (born May 15, 1980) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball. During his career in the playoffs, he won the 2003 World Series with the Florida Marlins and the 2007 World Series with the Boston Red Sox, and received the 2007 ALCS MVP award for his play in that series. A resident of Spring, Texas, Beckett was discovered by Florida Marlins scout Bob Laurie. Beckett had signed a letter of intent to play with the Texas A&M Aggies but went pro. Beckett spent most of his early years with the Marlins as a member of the team's young staff, but injuries (most frequently blister problems) limited him to only 99 starts (102 appearances) from 2002 to 2005. Beckett's major league debut was on September 4, 2001, against the Chicago Cubs, in which he gave up one hit over six shutout innings. He finished 2001 with four games started, a 2–2 record, and an ERA of 1.50. Beckett won the 2003 World Series MVP Award with two strong performances on three days' rest. Teamed up with catcher Iván Rodríguez, he helped the Marlins win the World Series, defeating the New York Yankees. During Game 6 at Yankee Stadium, he shut
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Philipp von Ferrary

    Philipp von Ferrary

    Philip Ferrari de La Renotière (January 11, 1850 - May 20, 1917) was a noted stamp collector, assembling probably the most complete worldwide collection that ever existed, or is likely to exist. Amongst his extremely rare stamps were the unique Treskilling Yellow of Sweden and the 1856 one-cent "Black on Magenta" of British Guiana. Ferrary was born in the sumptuous Hôtel Matignon, Rue de Varenne in Paris, where he resided until his death in 1917. Once the festive gathering place for the Ancien Régime society, at the start of the Bourbon Restauration in 1815, Louis XVIII traded the Hôtel de Matignon for the Élysée Palace. It is now the official residence of the Prime Minister of France. Ferrary was the son of the Duke and Duchess of Gallièra. His father, Raffaele de Ferrari, came from an ancient and rich family of Genovese bankers and was a wealthy businessman made Duke of Galliera in Genoa by Pope Gregory XVI, and Prince de Lucedio by Victor-Emmanuel II, King of Italy. Raffaele de Ferrari was founder of the Crédit Immobilier de France with the Péreire brothers, rivals of the Rothschilds, who financed many of the major construction projects of the second half of the 19th century:
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Sergei Shchukin

    Sergei Shchukin

    Sergei Ivanovich Shchukin (Russian: Серге́й Ива́нович Щу́кин) (27 May 1854, Moscow – 10 January 1936, Paris) was a Russian businessman who became an art collector, mainly of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art, following a trip to Paris in 1897, when he bought his first Monet. He later bought numerous works to a total of 258 paintings decorating the walls of his palatial home in Moscow. By 1914, Shchukin owned thirteen Monet, including the iconic "Lady in the garden" and the smaller but complete version of "Picnic", three Renoir, eight Cezanne, including famous "Carnival" ("Mardi Gras"), four Van Gogh (including the portrait of Dr Rey but the most famous Van Gogh in Russia "Prison Courtyard and "Red Vineyard" were purchased by Shchukin's friend and competitor, Ivan Abramovitch Morozov), sixteen Gauguin of the Tahitian periode which were hanged in his dining room in the manner of an orthodox iconostasis), seven Douanier Rousseau, eight Marquet, sixteen Derain... Shchukin was particularly notable for his long association with Matisse, who decorated his mansion and created one of his iconic paintings, La Danse, specially for Shchukin. La Danse is commonly recognized as "a
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Tim Burton

    Tim Burton

    Timothy Walter "Tim" Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an American film director, film producer, writer and artist. He is famous for his dark, quirky-themed movies such as Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Ed Wood, Sleepy Hollow, Corpse Bride, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, 9 and Dark Shadows, and for blockbusters such as Pee-wee's Big Adventure, Batman, Batman Returns, Planet of the Apes, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Alice in Wonderland, which was the second highest-grossing film of 2010, and the twelfth highest-grossing film of all time. Burton is known for using recurring collaborators on his works; among them are Johnny Depp, who has become a close friend of Burton since their first film together; musician Danny Elfman, who has composed scores for all but five of the films Burton has directed and/or produced; and domestic partner Helena Bonham Carter. He also wrote and illustrated the poetry book The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy & Other Stories, published in 1997, and a compilation of his drawings, sketches and other artwork, entitled The Art of Tim Burton, was released in 2009. Burton has directed 16 films and produced
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Edward Howland Robinson Green

    Edward Howland Robinson Green

    Edward Howland Robinson "Ned" Green (August 22, 1868 – June 8, 1936), also known as Colonel Green, was an American businessman, the only son of the notorious miser Hetty Green (the "Witch of Wall Street"). He was also noted for his stamp and coin collections. Edward Green was the first of two children of Hetty and Edward Henry Green. His sister Harriet Sylvia Ann Howland Green Wilks, called Sylvia, was born in 1871. When Ned was a child, he broke his leg. Hetty tried to have him admitted in a free clinic for the poor. According to Hetty's biographer Charles Slack, the oft-repeated story that when she was recognized, she stormed away vowing to treat the wounds herself is only half true. He relates that having been found out (and perhaps also after procrastinating about seeking treatment for the boy in the first place), Green paid her bill and thereafter brought him to other doctors (while also trying home remedies). Similarly, Slack relates that it is not true that the leg had to be amputated because of gangrene. Rather, it was amputated after years of unsuccessful treatment. In any case, Ned ended up with a cork prosthesis. Despite this mishap, he grew to 6'4" (1.93 m) and 300 lb.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Neil Young

    Neil Young

    Neil Percival Young, OC, OM (born November 12, 1945) is a Canadian singer-songwriter. Young began performing as a solo artist in Canada in 1960, before moving to California in 1966, where he co-founded the band Buffalo Springfield along with Stephen Stills and Richie Furay, and later joined Crosby, Stills & Nash as a fourth member in 1969. He forged a successful and acclaimed solo career, releasing his first album in 1968; his career has since spanned over 40 years and 34 studio albums, with a continual and uncompromising exploration of musical styles. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website describes Young as "one of rock and roll’s greatest songwriters and performers". He has been inducted into the Hall of Fame twice: first as a solo artist in 1995, and second as a member of Buffalo Springfield in 1997. Young's work is characterized by his distinctive guitar work, deeply personal lyrics and signature alto or high tenor singing voice. Although he accompanies himself on several different instruments, including piano and harmonica, his idiosyncratic electric and clawhammer acoustic guitar playing are the defining characteristics of a varyingly ragged and melodic sound. While Young
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Luman Reed

    Luman Reed

    Luman Reed (1787–1836) was a successful American merchant and an important patron of the arts. His support for the painters George Whiting Flagg and Thomas Cole were particularly significant contributions to the development of American painting during the early 19th century. He also commissioned works from artists such as Asher B. Durand. Reed was born on a farm in Green River (in the area that is now Austerlitz), New York. He began his business career as a store clerk in the Hudson River village of Coxsackie, New York, where his family relocated (c. 1789) before moving to New York City in 1815. There he became one of the city's most prominent merchants with the Front Street dry-goods firm he established with various partners, the last being Jonathan Sturges (1802–1874). With his wealth, Reed assembled in the course of six years one of the earliest and most significant collections of European and American art in the United States, which he displayed in a specially designed two-room gallery in his house on Greenwich Street in lower Manhattan. Making his mark as a patron of both established and aspiring contemporary American artists, Reed attempted to nurture the creation of a
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Andrew W. Mellon

    Andrew W. Mellon

    Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855 – August 26, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, art collector, and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921 until February 12, 1932. Mellon was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on March 24, 1855. His father was Thomas Mellon, a banker and judge who was a Scotch-Irish immigrant from County Tyrone, Northern Ireland; his mother was Sarah Jane Negley Mellon. He also had a brother named Richard B. Mellon. He was educated at the Western University of Pennsylvania (now the University of Pittsburgh) and graduated in 1873. Mellon demonstrated financial ability early in life. In 1872 he was set up in a lumber and coal business by his father and soon turned it into a profitable enterprise. He joined his father's banking firm, T. Mellon & Sons, in 1880 and two years later had ownership of the bank transferred to him. In 1889, Mellon helped organize the Union Trust Company and Union Savings Bank of Pittsburgh. He also branched into industrial activities: oil, steel, shipbuilding, and construction. Three areas where Mellon's backing created giant enterprises were aluminum, industrial abrasives ("carborundum"), and coke. Mellon
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    David Burke

    David Burke

    David Burke (1854 – 11 April 1897) was one of the most widely travelled plant collectors, who was sent by James Veitch & Sons to collect plants in British Guiana, Burma and Colombia. In his later life, Burke became rather eccentric, preferring the privations of life away from his native England. Burke was born in Kent and joined Veitch as a gardener at Chelsea, London. In 1880, after expressing a desire to travel, he was asked to accompany Charles Curtis on a trial trip to Borneo, where they were instructed by Harry Veitch to collect specimens of Nepenthes northiana; the search for the elusive pitcher plant was unsuccessful, but the pair discovered many other species, including many interesting stove (hot-house) plants, palms, and orchids. At the end of the trip, Burke returned to England with the collection of plants, including large consignments of slipper orchids, Paphiopedilum stonei and P. lowii, as well as many Vandas, Rhododendrons, and the beautiful Stove-foliage plant, Leea amabilis. In 1881, Burke was sent to British Guiana, where he re-discovered the insectivorous plant Heliamphora nutans, which had not been seen since its discovery on Mount Roraima by the two brothers
    7.50
    2 votes
    126

    Gerald Davis

    Gerald Davis (10 October 1916 – 16 June 2005): architect, graphic designer, postal historian and philatelist. His 1971 Burma Postal History is a classic study, both readable and comprehensive. Davis learned the basics of stamps and philately while helping out with his father's stamp shop in Baker Street, Marylebone, Westminster. As an adult he formed an extraordinary collection of the postal history of Burma, including the Japanese post offices in Burma and the overland routes to China and Thailand. After Dunkirk Davis went to India with the British Fourteenth Army, a multinational force comprising units from Commonwealth countries during World War II. After the Battle of Imphal he served in Burma, present-day Myanmar, where he took part in the Chindwin River valley campaign and the surrender of Rangoon in May, 1945. In 1990, Robson Lowe commented, "Besides acquiring much of his modern collection from villagers who preferred cigarettes to British currency, his negotiations after the formal enemy capitulation in August, with Burmese postal officials, for stamps which have since become collectible, by his own account comprised his most active service." Using the first-hand knowledge
    7.50
    2 votes
    127

    Josephine Porter Boardman

    Josephine Porter Boardman Crane (14 November 1873 – 8 July 1972) was an American socialite and patron of the arts, co-founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and supporter of the Dalton School of New York City. Born Josephine Porter Boardman, in Cleveland, Ohio, she was from a well-to-do family. Her father, William Jarvis Boardman (15 April 1832 - 2 August 1915), a lawyer and active in politics, was the grandson of the Senator Elijah Boardman. Her mother, Florence Sheffield, was the granddaughter of Joseph Earl Sheffield, was a major benefactor of Yale University. She had 5 siblings, including Mabel Thorp Boardman. The family moved from Ohio to Washington, D.C. in 1887-8, although they maintained connections to Ohio politics including a friendship with the Taft family. In 1906, Josephine Boardman married Winthrop Murray Crane, an American millionaire 20 years her senior, a former governor of Massachusetts and US Senator, with whom she had three children: Stephen, Bruce, and Louise. Winthrop M. Crane died in 1920, during his second term of office. After the Senator's death, she moved to New York City, where she was a founder of the Museum of Modern Art and was elected to the Board
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    Peter Lewis

    Peter B. Lewis (born November 11, 1933) is the Cleveland, Ohio-area based chairman of Progressive Insurance Companies. Lewis currently resides in Coconut Grove, Florida. Lewis was raised in a Jewish family in Cleveland Heights, Ohio. He attended Cleveland Heights High School and graduated from Princeton University in 1955. In 1965 Lewis became Progressive's chief executive officer after joining as an underwriting trainee in 1955. (His father, Joe Lewis, who died in 1955, co-founded Progressive with Jack Green in 1937.) In the 1960s Progressive had 100 employees and $6 million in revenues. As of 2005, Progressive had grown to 27,000 employees with sales of $13.4 billion and become the third largest auto insurance company in the United States. In 2000 Lewis retired as CEO of Progressive, though he remains as Chairman of the Board. With an estimated net worth of $1.2 billion dollars, Lewis frequently donates money to charities and political groups. He is a patron of the arts and supports many artistic pursuits. Lewis's personal and corporate contemporary art collection is well known—the corporate collection is displayed at Progressive Insurance offices. Lewis has made donations
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Sherry Alberoni

    Sherry Alberoni

    Sherry (or Sherri) Alberoni (born December 4, 1946) is an American actress and voice artist. Alberoni got her start as a Mouseketeer on the weekday ABC television program The Mickey Mouse Club. As an adult, she became a voice artist for Hanna-Barbera Productions. Besides providing voices for numerous incidental characters in series such as Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! and Jeannie, Alberoni is best known as the voice of both nasty rich-girl Alexandra Cabot from Josie and the Pussycats and "superhero-in-training" Wendy from the first season of Super Friends. In 1971, she starred alongside Patty Andrews in the Sherman Brothers stage musical, Victory Canteen. Sharyn Eileen Alberoni was born December 4, 1946, in Cleveland, Ohio, the youngest of three children. After her family moved to California, Sherry started modeling at age two, and shortly after, took up dancing lessons, joining her older brother Roy. Both kids also learned to play musical instruments; trumpet for Sherry, and drums for her brother. Sherry's biggest hobby was collecting dolls, and by her teenage years she would have several hundred. Early on Sherry displayed a generosity of spirit that would stay with her throughout
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    William Wilson Corcoran

    William Wilson Corcoran

    William Wilson Corcoran (December 27, 1798 – February 24, 1888) was an American banker, philanthropist, and art collector. Corcoran was born in Georgetown in the District of Columbia, the son of a well-to-do father whom the electors of Georgetown twice chose as mayor. His father, Thomas Corcoran, came to Georgetown in 1788 and established a leather business there. William Corcoran was raised in Georgetown. He studied classics and mathematics at local private schools run by Alexander Kirk and the Reverend Addison Belt, and also studied for some time at Georgetown College, the predecessor of Georgetown University. Corcoran was raised as a Master Mason on July 26, 1827 at Potomac Lodge in Georgetown. In 1835, Corcoran eloped and married Louise Morris, who was the daughter of Commodore Charles Morris. His wife died in 1840, but not before they had three children (Harriet Louise, Louise Morris, and Charles Morris). The middle child, Louise Morris (1838–1867), was the only one to survive into adulthood. She married George Eustis, Jr.. Corcoran entered business at the age of 17, working in dry goods store owned by two brothers, and opened his own store two years later. Corcoran later
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Jerry Seinfeld

    Jerry Seinfeld

    Jerome Allen "Jerry" Seinfeld (born April 29, 1954) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and television and film producer, best known for playing a semi-fictional version of himself in the sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), which he co-created and co-wrote with Larry David, and, in the show's final two seasons, co-executive-produced. In his first major foray back into the media since the finale of Seinfeld, he co-wrote and co-produced the film Bee Movie, also voicing the lead role of Barry B. Benson. In February 2010, Seinfeld premiered a reality TV series called The Marriage Ref on NBC. Seinfeld directed Colin Quinn in the Broadway show Long Story Short at the Helen Hayes Theater in New York which ran until January 8, 2011. Seinfeld is known for specializing in observational humor, often focusing on personal relationships and uncomfortable social obligations. Comedy Central ranked Jerry Seinfeld as one of the twelve greatest stand-up comedians of all time in its four-part special The 100 Greatest Standups Of All Time. Seinfeld was born in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. His father, Kalmen Seinfeld (1918–1985), was of Austrian Jewish background and was a sign maker;
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    Anatoly Karpov

    Anatoly Karpov

    Anatoly Yevgenyevich Karpov (Russian: Анато́лий Евге́ньевич Ка́рпов, Anatolij Evgen'evič Karpov; born May 23, 1951) is a Russian chess grandmaster and former World Champion. He was the official world champion from 1975 to 1985 when he was defeated by Garry Kasparov. He played three matches against Kasparov for the title from 1986 to 1990, before becoming FIDE World Champion once again after Kasparov broke away from FIDE in 1993. He held the title until 1999, when he resigned his title in protest against FIDE's new world championship rules. For his decades-long standing among the world's elite, Karpov is considered one of the greatest players of all time. His tournament successes include over 160 first-place finishes. He had a peak Elo rating of 2780, and his 90 total months at world number one is second all-time behind only Garry Kasparov since the inception of the FIDE ranking list in 1971. Since 2005, he has been a member of the Public Chamber of Russia. He has recently involved himself in several humanitarian causes, such as advocating the use of iodised salt. Karpov was born on May 23, 1951 at Zlatoust in the Urals region of the former Soviet Union, and learned to play chess at
    6.33
    3 votes
    133

    C. D. Desai

    Chunnilal Devkaran Nanjee, known as "Desai", was a Twentieth century Indian commodity trader, financier, and philatelist. Desai was a senior partner in the firm of Messrs. Devkaran Nanjee and Sons, stock, cotton, bullion and exchange brokers. He was also the honorary Treasurer of the Bombay Stock Exchange and one of the founding directors of Devkaran Nanjee Banking Co. Ltd. on May 26, 1938, later renamed the Dena Bank, and other allied companies. Desai made many discoveries among the 1854 lithographed stamps of India and formed an outstanding collection of these classic issues with the assistance of Jal Cooper. Desai's collection included many items of extreme rarity. It featured the unique unused block of 14 of the white Scinde Dawk stamp. His collection included the finest known example of the famous 1854 Head Inverted Four Annas stamp, cut square and on cover, as well as a second cut square example of this rarity. As Jal Cooper noted, Collaborating with Sir Eric Studd, he discovered the 1854 1 anna red Die I "Substituted Transfer". He also found the typographed 2 annas yellowish grey-green of 1854 on a previously unknown paper watermarked Stamp Office . The Desai collection was
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Eugene Klein

    Eugene Klein

    Eugene Klein (June 26, 1878 - April 30, 1944) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was an internationally known stamp collector, stamp dealer, and auctioneer who was President of the American Philatelic Society from 1935 to 1937. Klein was the Official Expert of the American Philatelic Society from 1911 to 1931 and its International Secretary from 1928 to 1935 and 1937 to 1944. He also served as President (1935–1937) and International Secretary again from 1937 until his death. He authored the 1940 book United States Waterway Packetmarks: Handstamped and Printed Names of Mail-Carrying Steamboats on the United States of America Inland and Coastal Waters, 1832-1899, called a seminal work by the American Philatelic Society, (APS), in a highly-collectable area. Eugene Klein was inducted into the American Philatelic Society Hall of Fame in 1944. Klein is remembered as the dealer who bought the sheet of the 24-cent Inverted Jenny 1918 United States air mail stamps from its finder, William T. Robey.
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    George Carlyle Marler

    George Carlyle Marler, PC was a politician, notary and philatelist in Quebec, Canada. He was born on September 14, 1901 in Montreal. Marler served as city councillor from 1940 to 1947 and as Deputy Chairman of Montreal Executive Committee in Montreal. Marler successfully ran as a Liberal candidate in the provincial district of Westmount–Saint-Georges in a by-election held on March 23, 1942. He was re-elected in the 1944, 1948 and 1952 elections. In the 1948 election, Liberal Leader Adélard Godbout lost re-election in the district of L'Islet. Marler took over as Leader of the Official Opposition. Godbout resigned as Liberal Leader on July 22, 1949. At the 1950 Quebec Liberal Party leadership convention, Marler declined nomination, and Georges-Émile Lapalme became the new party leader on May 20, 1950. However, Lapalme failed to win a seat in the legislature in the 1952 election, so Marler continued as Leader of the Opposition until Lapalme won a by-election in 1953. Marler resigned from the legislature on June 30, 1954, and was appointed to the federal cabinet of Louis Saint-Laurent as minister of transport. Later that year he won a by-election and became the Member of Pariliament
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    George V of the United Kingdom

    George V of the United Kingdom

    George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 through the First World War (1914–1918) until his death in 1936. George was a grandson of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and the first cousin of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. From 1877 to 1891, he served in the Royal Navy. On the death of Victoria in 1901, George's father became King Edward VII, and George was made Prince of Wales. On his father's death in 1910, he succeeded as King-Emperor of the British Empire. He was the only Emperor of India to be present at his own Delhi Durbar. As a result of the First World War, other empires in Europe fell while his expanded to its greatest extent. In 1917, he became the first monarch of the House of Windsor, which he renamed from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha as a result of anti-German public sentiment. His reign saw the rise of socialism, communism, fascism, Irish republicanism, and the Indian independence movement, all of which radically changed the political landscape. The Parliament Act 1911 established the supremacy of the elected
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (January 9, 1875 – April 18, 1942) was an American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. She was a prominent social figure and hostess, who was born into the United States Vanderbilt family and married into the Whitney family. Gertrude Vanderbilt was born in New York City on January 9, 1875. She was the eldest surviving daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II (1843–1899) and Alice Claypoole Gwynne (1852–1934) and a great-granddaughter of "Commodore" Cornelius Vanderbilt. Gertrude Vanderbilt spent her summers in Newport, Rhode Island, at the family's mansion, The Breakers, where she kept up with the boys in all their rigorous sporting activities. Educated by private tutors and at the exclusive Brearley School in New York City, at age 21 she married the extremely wealthy sportsman Harry Payne Whitney (1872–1930). A banker and investor, Whitney was the son of William C. Whitney, and his mother was the daughter of a Senator, and sister of a Standard Oil Company magnate. Harry Whitney inherited a fortune in oil and tobacco as well as interests in banking. Gertrude and Harry Whitney had
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Leavitt Hunt

    Leavitt Hunt

    Col. Leavitt Hunt (1831–February 16, 1907) was a Harvard-educated attorney and photography pioneer who was one of the first people to photograph the Middle East. He and a companion, Nathan Flint Baker, traveled to Egypt, the Holy Land, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece on a Grand Tour in 1851–52, making one of the earliest photographic records of the Arab and ancient worlds, including the Great Sphinx and the Great Pyramid of Giza, views along the Nile River, the ruins at Petra and the Parthenon in Greece. The youngest son of General Jonathan Hunt of Vermont and the former Jane Maria Leavitt, and brother to architect Richard Morris Hunt and painter William Morris Hunt, Leavitt Hunt was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, but grew up in Paris following the early death of his father Jonathan Hunt, a Vermont Congressman whose father had been the state's Lieutenant Governor. Leavitt Hunt attended the Boston Latin School, and subsequently enrolled in a Swiss boarding school, finally taking a law degree from the University of Heidelberg. He then enrolled at the Swiss Military Academy in Thun. Hunt was a scholar: he was fluent in French, German, Italian, Latin, Greek and Hebrew, and could write in
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    William Sturgis Bigelow

    William Sturgis Bigelow (1850–1926) was an American physician and collector of Japanese art. He was one of the first Americans to live in Japan, and to introduce the American public to Japanese art and culture. He was also among those who adhered to the philosophy of the "White man's burden", and worked to establish protections for Japanese art during a time when some Japanese were willing to sell or destroy elements of their own traditional culture in a fervor of Westernization and modernization. A brilliant medical student, Bigelow received his degree in medicine from Harvard University in 1874, and continued his medical studies in Europe for five years, under Louis Pasteur. Though his primary interest was, accordingly, bacteriology, his father was a surgeon, and so he was pressured to perform surgery as well. Instead, in 1882, Bigelow traveled to Japan with Ernest Fenollosa and Edward Sylvester Morse. This may have been intended originally as simply a vacation from the world of medicine, but in the end, Bigelow remained in Japan for seven years. There, he became an art collector, and traveled the country for some time, exploring it and studying its culture, art, and religion.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Ashton Lever

    Ashton Lever

    Sir Ashton Lever (5 March 1729 – 28 January 1788) was an English collector of natural objects. Ashton Lever was born in 1729 at Alkrington Hall. In 1735, Sir James Darcy Lever, his father, had served as High Sheriff of Lancashire. Lever began by collecting seashells in about 1760, and gradually accumulated one of the richest private collections of natural objects, including live animals. He opened it to the public in April 1766, in Manchester, moving the museum to his family home at Alkrington Hall, near Rochdale, Lancashire, in 1771. In the same year he founded Archers' Hall, Inner Circle, Regent's Park, London for the Archers' Company of the Honourable Artillery Company. In 1774, Lever moved to London, and next year his Holophusicon opened to the public in Leicester Square. Captain James Cook was so impressed by Lever's collection that he donated objects from his own voyages to the museum. Lever continued to buy items until he became bankrupt, at which point the collection contained 28,000 specimens. Both the British Museum and the Empress of Russia declined to buy it, so it was disposed of by lottery, 8,000 tickets were sold at a guinea each. The winner James Parkinson, put the
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Avery Brundage

    Avery Brundage

    Avery Brundage (/ˈeɪvri ˈbrʌndɨdʒ/; September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was the fifth president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), serving from 1952 to 1972. The only American to attain that position, Brundage is remembered as a zealous advocate of amateurism, and for his involvement with the 1936 and 1972 Summer Olympics, both held in Germany. Brundage was born in Detroit in 1887 to a working-class family; when he was five years old, his father moved his family to Chicago and subsequently abandoned his wife and children. Raised mostly by relatives, he attended the University of Illinois to study engineering and became a track star. In 1912, he competed in the Summer Olympics, contesting the pentathlon and decathlon, but did not win any medals; both events were won by Jim Thorpe. He won national championships in track three times between 1914 and 1918, and founded his own construction business. He earned his wealth from this company and from investments, and never accepted pay for his sports involvement. Following his retirement from athletics, Brundage became a sports administrator, rising rapidly through the ranks in United States sports groups. As leader of America's
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    David Rockefeller

    David Rockefeller

    David Rockefeller, Sr. (born June 12, 1915) is an American banker and philanthropist. David is the current patriarch of the Rockefeller family and only surviving child of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and the only surviving grandchild of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, founder of Standard Oil. His five siblings were Abby, John D. III, Nelson, Laurance and Winthrop. Rockefeller was born in New York City and grew up in a nine-story house at 10 West 54th Street, then the largest private residence in the city. The home contained rare, ancient, medieval and Renaissance treasures collected by his father — with some, such as the Unicorn Tapestries, held in an adjoining building at 12 West 54th Street. On the seventh floor was his mother Abby's private modern art gallery. The house was subsequently donated by David's father as a site for a sculpture garden in his wife's name and memory, now part of the Museum of Modern Art. He spent much time as a child at the family estate Kykuit, where, in his memoirs, he recalls visits by powerful associates of his father, including General George C. Marshall, the adventurer Admiral Richard Byrd (whose Antarctic expeditions had
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    1 votes
    143
    Edward Stanley Gibbons

    Edward Stanley Gibbons

    Edward Stanley Gibbons (21 June 1840 - 17 February 1913) was an English philatelist and founder of Stanley Gibbons Ltd, publishers of the famous Stanley Gibbons stamp catalogue and other stamp-related books and magazines. Edward Stanley Gibbons was born at his father William Gibbons' chemist shop at 15 Treville Street, Plymouth on 21 June 1840, interestingly on the same year that Britain issued the Penny Black, which was the world's first postage stamp. Edward’s interest in postage stamps began whilst at Halloran’s Collegiate School. Gibbons owned a book containing stamps for exchange. Some of these stamps included the 1d. black Western Australia and a 1d. Sydney View. He left school at the age of 15 and worked for a short while in the Naval Bank, Plymouth, before joining his father’s business after the death of his eldest brother. William Gibbons encouraged his son's hobby and allowed him to set up a stamp desk in the chemist. Between 1861 and 1871 Gibbons was developing his own stamp business, although there is no evidence to suggest that he had advertised prices prior to 1864. In 1867, Edward’s father died and Edward took over the business. However, by this time he was heavily
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    J. P. Morgan

    J. P. Morgan

    John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 – March 31, 1913) was an American financier, banker, philanthropist and art collector who dominated corporate finance and industrial consolidation during his time. In 1892 Morgan arranged the merger of Edison General Electric and Thomson-Houston Electric Company to form General Electric. After financing the creation of the Federal Steel Company, he merged in 1901 with the Carnegie Steel Company and several other steel and iron businesses, including Consolidated Steel and Wire Company owned by William Edenborn, to form the United States Steel Corporation. Morgan died in Rome, Italy, in his sleep in 1913 at the age of 75, leaving his fortune and business to his son, John Pierpont "Jack" Morgan, Jr., and bequeathing his mansion and large book collections to The Morgan Library & Museum in New York. At the height of Morgan's career during the early 1900s, he and his partners had financial investments in many large corporations and were accused by critics of controlling the nation's high finance. He directed the banking coalition that stopped the Panic of 1907. He was the leading financier of the Progressive Era, and his dedication to efficiency and
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    1 votes
    145
    Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland

    Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland

    Margaret Cavendish Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (Welbeck Abbey, 11 February 1715 – 17 July 1785, Bulstrode Park, Buckinghamshire), styled Lady Margaret Harley before 1734, Duchess of Portland from 1734 to her husband's death in 1761, and Dowager Duchess of Portland from 1761 until her own death in 1785. She was the richest woman in Great Britain of her time. She was a daughter of the 2nd Earl of Oxford and Mortimer, bibliophile, collector and patron of the arts, and the former Lady Henrietta Holles (1694–1755, the only child and heir of the 1st Duke of Newcastle and his wife, the former Lady Margaret Cavendish). She was also great-great-great-great grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II through her mother's side. Lady Margaret grew up at Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire surrounded by books, paintings, sculpture and in the company of writers such as Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift and Matthew Prior as well as aristocrats and politicians. As a child, she collected pets and natural history objects (especially shells) and was encouraged by her father and her paternal grandfather, the 1st Earl of Oxford and Mortimer, to do so. At 20, on 11 July 1734, in Oxford Chapel, Marylebone, she married
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    1 votes
    146

    H. D. S. Haverbeck

    Harrison Donald Seaman Haverbeck or H.D.S. Haverbeck, FRPSL, RDP (October 9, 1913–September 26, 1986 New York), was a noted philatelist and philatelic journalist, whose interests centered on India and Indian states, Tibet and Nepal. From 1948 to 1986 he served on the editorial board of the New York publication, Collectors Club Philatelist and succeeded Henry Goodkind as editor in 1970. He wrote extensively in the journal, and served the Collectors Club of New York in many other offices. It awarded him its Lichtenstein medal in 1966. Haverbeck served on the Expert Committee of the Philatelic Foundation. Haverbeck wrote valuable handbooks for the guidance of collectors and specialists. A definitive article on the Scinde Dawk appeared in 1965. Later, a series of Haverbeck's brief articles about the postage stamps and postal history of the various feudatory states of India appeared in Collectors Club Philatelist. Haverbeck received the The Alfred F. Lichtenstein Memorial Award for Distinguished Service to Philately from Collectors Club of New York in 1966 and signed the Roll of Distinguished Philatelists in 1970. He was inducted into the American Philatelic Society's Hall of Fame in
    5.25
    4 votes
    147
    Jason Kay

    Jason Kay

    Jason Luís "Jay Kay" Cheetham (born 30 December 1969) is a Grammy Award-winning English musician, best known as the lead singer of the band Jamiroquai. Kay was born in Stretford, Greater Manchester, England. Kay's mother, Karen Kay (born Adrianne Judith Pringle), is a former cabaret singer and television personality. Kay's biological father is Luís Saraiva, a Portuguese former professional guitarist, whom Kay did not meet until 2001. After Jay Kay's identical twin, David, died some weeks after they were born, Karen brought Kay up largely alone, which gave him "an itinerant childhood, half of it living in 'rural Suffolk and rural Devon’", according to his 2010 The Daily Telegraph interview and his 1999/1994 television interviews. It is stated in the 1997 Lancashire Evening Telegraph article that Kay "moved with his mother and step-father Mervyn Kay to Manchester as a youngster." James Royal, often misidentified as Kay's stepfather, is Karen Kay's former manager whom she had a relationship with some time during Kay's childhood years. Royal had stated in his 2002 interview in News of the World about 13-year-old Kay's six-month stay in Thailand that he never married Karen Kay, but
    5.25
    4 votes
    148

    Armand Hammer

    Armand Hammer (May 21, 1898 – December 10, 1990) was an American business manager and owner, most closely associated with Occidental Petroleum, a company he ran for decades, though he was known as well for his art collection, his philanthropy, and for his close ties to the Soviet Union. Hammer's business interests around the world and his "citizen diplomacy" helped him cultivate a wide network of friends and acquaintances. He appeared frequently on television, commenting on international relations or agitating for research into a cure for cancer. As of 2008, he has been the subject of five biographies — in 1975 (Considine, authorized biography), 1985 (Bryson, coffee table book), Weinberg 1989, Blumay 1992, and Epstein 1996 — and two autobiographies (1932 and a best seller in 1987). His art collection and his philanthropic projects were the subject of numerous publications as well. Hammer was born in Manhattan, New York, to Russian-born Jewish immigrants Julius and Rose (Lipshitz) Hammer. His father came to the United States from Odessa in the Russian Empire in 1875, and settled in The Bronx, where he ran a general medical practice and five drugstores. Hammer sometimes claimed that
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    2 votes
    149

    Cavanaugh Flight Museum

    The Cavanaugh Flight Museum is an aviation museum in Addison, Texas, with a non-profit 501(c)(3) status for aviation educational. The Museum promotes aviation education, research and American aviation heritage. Further, the Museum provides aircraft restoration, operates and maintains flying aircraft, maintains and displays historically-significant vintage aircraft; with an aviation collections department. The aircraft collection held by the museum began as the personal collection of businessman Jim Cavanaugh. His collection began with the purchase of a half-share in a 1939 Piper J-3 Cub in 1980. The museum opened in October 1993. The flight museum is home to an aviation art gallery that includes pieces from Keith Ferris, Roy Grinnell, William Phillips, John Shaw, Stan Stokes, Robert Taylor, and Nicholas Trudgian. In a joint press release, dated 21 January, 2008, the Commemorative Air Force and the Cavanaugh Flight Museum, announced a pledge of $1.2M USD to re-engine FiFi, a B-29 Superfortress. The pledge was made by Jim Cavanaugh, the founder of the Cavanaugh Flight Museum. As a result of the contribution, FiFi will be returned to flight status, and the B-29/B-24 Squadron of the
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    2 votes
    150
    Edward Burgess Butler

    Edward Burgess Butler

    Edward Burgess Butler (December 16, 1853 – February 20, 1928) was an American businessman who founded Butler Brothers department stores. He served as the first president of the Pasadena Society of Artists. He was born on December 16, 1853 in Lewiston, Maine to Manly Orville Butler and Elizabeth Howe. He had eight siblings: two of them, George H. Butler and Charles H. Butler formed a partnership with Edward. Manly owned a grocery store. In 1858, his family moved to Boston, Massachusetts, and he attended the Boston public school system. With two of his brothers, George Henry Butler and Charles Hamblet Butler, he founded Butler Brothers in Boston in 1877. For five years he sold goods throughout New England and Canada as a traveling salesman. He married Jane Holly in 1880, she was the daughter of William Henry Holly, of Norwalk, Connecticut. With his wealth he collected works by George Inness, and later donated the collection to the Art Institute of Chicago. Having trained under Frank Charles Peyraud, Butler became a landscape painter. For a time he exhibited his works under a pseudonym, "Edward Burgess". In 1908, he exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago. One of his oil paintings
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    2 votes
    151

    Harold LeMay

    Harold E. LeMay (September 4, 1919 – November 4, 2000) was the owner of Harold LeMay Enterprises, a refuse company in the Tacoma, Washington metro area. Harold LeMay amassed the largest privately owned collection of automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, all manner of other vehicles and related memorabilia in the world. At its peak, the LeMay Collection numbered in excess of 3,000 vehicles and thousands of "automobilia" artifacts. The Collection, recognized by many as a national treasure, represents the American experience with the automobile as it spans the 20th century and features virtually every American make, as well as numerous foreign cars. Currently, the bulk of the LeMay Collection is still housed on LeMay property. Many of the automobiles are in the process of being donated to the LeMay Museum in order to be accessible to the public. The LeMay Collection was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records in 1997 as the largest privately owned car collection in the world. Each summer until his death in 2000, Harold LeMay, his wife Nancy, and their family would open their estate for an annual car show. This tradition has continued each summer on the last Saturday in August when
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    2 votes
    152
    Henri Max Corwin

    Henri Max Corwin

    Henri Max Corwin (1903, Oldenzaal, Overijssel – January 1962) was a Dutch businessman, philatelist and humanitarian. He became famous both for his efforts to shield Jewish victims of Nazi persecution during World War II, and later for his efforts to document instruments of propaganda utilized during national conflict. Henri Max Cohen was born in 1903, the youngest of four children, in the eastern Netherlands village of Oldenzaal, where his family had lived since at least 1770. After completing secondary schooling Cohen entered the study of Law at Leiden University, but soon had to return to Oldenzaal to run the family business when his father suffered health problems. As a youth Cohen had two abiding pastimes, stamp collecting and the theater. He wrote plays, directed plays and acted in plays. When the persecution of Jewish people in Germany became apparent in the years before the outbreak of WW2, he began escorting people from that nation to safe havens in the Netherlands. He was often assisted in these trips by his fianceé Geraldine. Soon after the start of WW2, his nation was invaded and occupied by German troops. At that time he became active in providing hiding places for
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    2 votes
    153

    Jean Brown

    Jean Brown (December 12, 1911 – May 1, 1994) was an American art collector of avant-garde materials. Her father, Irving Levy, was a rare book dealer. During the Great Depression, Brown worked in a library in Springfield, Massachusetts, where she was trained in library cataloging. Brown amassed a significant and rich body of materials by many of the most influential and challenging artists of the 20th century. The initial inspiration for the collection was provided by Dada painters and poets: an anthology, 1951, edited by Robert Motherwell. In the 1960s Brown and her husband Leonard traveled to Europe frequently to acquire Dada and Surrealist art works, books, pamphlets and papers, many documented in Motherwell's anthology. When Leonard died in 1971, Brown moved into the Shaker seed house in Tyringham, Massachusetts. From this point on her collection grew rapidly as Brown acquired materials from those movements, especially Fluxus, mail art and concrete poetry, which grew out of Dada and Surrealism. Many of these artists worked on the fringes of the established museum and gallery system and showed their work in alternative spaces or created alternative distribution systems. Brown's
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    2 votes
    154

    John Seward Johnson I

    John Seward Johnson I (July 14, 1895 – May 23, 1983) was one of the sons of Robert Wood Johnson I (co-founder of Johnson & Johnson). He was also known as J. Seward Johnson, Sr. and Seward Johnson. He founded the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution (HBOI), and was the grandfather of Jamie Johnson who directed the documentary Born Rich. He was born on July 14, 1895 in New Brunswick, New Jersey to Robert Wood Johnson I and Evangeline Brewster Armstrong. He had three siblings: Roberta Johnson, Robert Wood Johnson II, and Evangeline Johnson. Johnson's first marriage was to Ruth Dill, the sister of actress Diana Dill. They had four children: Mary Lea Johnson Richards, Elaine Johnson, John Seward Johnson II, and Diana Melville Johnson. Johnson would go on to sexually abuse his eldest daughter from age nine to fifteen. In 1939, Johnson married Esther Underwood. They had two children: Jennifer Underwood Johnson and James Loring Johnson. During his thirty-two year marriage, he engaged in extramarital affairs with his chambermaid Barbara Piasecka. In 1971, they married with none of Johnson's children in attendance. Piasecka Johnson often physically and emotionally abused her husband. He
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    2 votes
    155

    Kjell Hallbing

    Kjell Hallbing (born November 5, 1934 in Bærum, died May 6, 2004 in Tønsberg) was a Norwegian author of Western books. Under the pseudonym Louis Masterson, he wrote a series of books about the fictitious Texas Ranger (later U.S. Marshal) Morgan Kane during 1966-1978. The 83 Morgan Kane books have been sold in more than 20 million copies worldwide. He has also written another nine book series known as the Diablo- and Diablito books. Earlier in his career Hallbing used the pseudonyms Ward Cameron, Leo Manning, Lee Morgan and Colin Hawkins. His debut "Ubåt-kontakt" was released in 1961, written under his real name. The same year he released his first book set in the old West, "Portrett av en revolvermann" ("Portrait of a gunslinger"). In addition Kjell Hallbing was an eager weapon collector, resulting in his collection being one of the biggest privately owned weapon collections in Norway at the time of his death. He also owned a little house at Bolkesjø, where he actually wrote most of the books in the Morgan Kane series. Other "heroes" Hallbing/Masterson wrote about, were Jesse Rawlins, Owen Metzgar and Clay Allison. Before he started to write full-time in 1969, Hallbing worked as a
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    2 votes
    156

    Lewis Evans

    Lewis Evans (1853–1930) was an English businessman and scientific instrument collector. Lewis Evans was the son of Sir John Evans, an archaeologist, and younger brother of the more famous archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans (1851–1941) who excavated Knossos in Crete. He studied chemistry at University College London and became a businessman. During his career, he rose to Chairman of the family paper-making firm John Dickinson & Co. Ltd and lived at Russels, a country house near the company's paper mill, close to Watford. Over the course of about fifty years, Evans also built up an important collection of scientific instruments. In 1924, he presented this collection of sundials, astrolabes, early mathematical instruments and associated library of early books to Oxford University. The Lewis Evans Collection was made accessible to the public in the same year and he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University in 1925. Through the efforts of his friend Robert Gunther, Evans donation helped in the founding of the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford in 1930 by providing what became known as the Lewis Evans Collection of Historic Scientific Instruments, the core of
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    2 votes
    157
    Patrick Russell

    Patrick Russell

    Patrick Russell (6 February 1726, Edinburgh – 2 July 1805, London) was a Scottish surgeon and naturalist who worked in India. He studied the snakes of India and is considered the 'Father of Indian Ophiology'. Russell's viper, Daboia russelii, is named after him. The fifth son of John Russell, a well-known lawyer of Edinburgh and his third wife Mary, Patrick was the half-brother of Alexander Russell, FRS and William Russell, FRS. Patrick studied Roman and Greek classics at Edinburgh high school after which he studied medicine at the University under Alexander Monro. He graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1750 and joined his half-brother, Alexander Russell, who was 12 years senior in Aleppo, Syria. In 1740 Alexader had been made a Physician to the Levant Company's Factory. Alexander was involved in quarantine and disease control and was a keen naturalist with a knowledge of local languages and a close friend of the Pasha. In 1753, Alexander resigned, returning to London and publishing a Natural History of Aleppo and Parts Adjacent in 1756. Patrick took up the position left by Alexander and worked for about 18 years. The Pasha of Aleppo held him in high regard, even honouring him
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    2 votes
    158
    Peter MacOwan

    Peter MacOwan

    Peter MacOwan born Hull, England on 14 November 1830 - died Uitenhage, Cape Province 30 November 1909, was a British colonial botanist and teacher in South Africa. He was the son of Peter McOwan, a Wesleyan Minister from Scotland, and changed his name at some stage. After finishing school he taught at Bath, Colchester and Leeds, and in 1857 taught chemistry at the Huddersfield College Laboratory. That same year he graduated in chemistry from the University of London, becoming Professor of Chemistry at Huddersfield. The year before, he married Amelia Day from Bristol. A severe lung condition, possibly asthma, caused him to move to South Africa and take up the post of principal at the newly established Shaw College in Grahamstown. His health rapidly improved and leaving chemistry behind he resumed studying botany in which he had become interested while still in England, having started a collection of flowers and mosses. This interest was furthered by his association with Dr William Guybon Atherstone, Henry Hutton and Mrs. FW Barber. He entered into a fruitful exchange of specimens and correspondence with Asa Gray of the States, Sir William Hooker of Kew and with Harvey and Sonder who
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    2 votes
    159

    Sam Wagstaff

    Samuel Jones Wagstaff Jr. (4 November 1921 – 14 January 1987) was an American art curator and collector as well as the artistic mentor and benefactor of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe (who was also his lifetime companion) and poet-punk rocker Patti Smith. Wagstaff is known in part for his support of Minimalism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Earthworks, but his aesthetic acceptance and support of photography presaged the acceptance of the medium as a fine art. Born on November 4, 1921, in New York City, Wagstaff was the son of Samuel Jones Wagstaff Sr., a wealthy lawyer from an old New York family, and his second wife, Polish émigré Olga May Piorkowska, a fashion illustrator who had worked for Harper's Bazaar and was previously married to Arthur Paul Thomas. He had one sibling, a sister, Judith (Mrs Thomas Lewis Jefferson). His parents divorced in 1932, and Wagstaff's mother, a daughter of Polish inventor and scientist Col. Arthur Emil Piorkowski, married Donald V. Newhall, an artist. After growing up on Central Park South, attending the Hotchkiss School and graduating from Yale University, and being a fixture on the debutante circuit, Wagstaff joined the US Navy in 1941 as an
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    2 votes
    160

    Sidney Janis

    Sidney Janis (1896-1989) was a wealthy clothing manufacturer and art collector who opened an art gallery in New York in 1948. His gallery quickly gained prominence, for he not only exhibited the work of most of the emerging leaders of Abstract Expressionism, but also that of such important European artists as Pierre Bonnard, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Piet Mondrian. As the critic Clement Greenberg explained in a 1958 tribute to the dealer, Janis' exhibition practices had helped to establish the legitimacy of the Americans, for his policy "not only implied, it declared, that Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Phillip Guston, Mark Rothko, and Robert Motherwell were to be judged by the same standards as Matisse and Picasso, without condescension, without making allowances." Greenberg observed that in the late '40s"the real issue was whether ambitious artists could live in this country by what they did ambitiously. Sidney Janis helped as much as anyone to see that it was decided affirmatively." Sidney Janis was born in 1896 in Buffalo, New York, one of five children of a well-liked traveling salesman. A talented ballroom dancer, he left public high school in his senior
    6.00
    3 votes
    161

    Richard D. Segal

    Richard D. Segal Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Richard D. Segal (Rick) is an investor and philanthropist who is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Seavest Inc., a private financial services firm primarily focused on real estate and private equity investing. The firm has significant investments in health care real estate and growth stage companies in the education, life sciences and consumer technology sectors. Rick has had a career-long focus on healthcare and education in particular, both in business and through extensive work with non-profits and philanthropic efforts. His deeply held commitment in these key areas reflects his view of healthcare and education as the twin pillars of a thriving society. His passions extend to the arts as well. The Seavest Collection of Contemporary Realism is a renowned collection that comprises some of today’s most innovative and exciting artists including paintings by Don Eddy, Robert Longo, Alice Neel, Philip Pearlstein, James Rosenquist and many other artists. Rick serves as a Chairman of the Board of the Association of Hole in the Wall Camps, an international camp-based program established by the actor Paul Newman to create
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    4 votes
    162

    Alfred Lichtenstein

    Alfred F. Lichtenstein (August 6, 1876 – February 24, 1947) was one of the most famous American philatelists. Alfred Lichtenstein's classic stamp collections were one of the most complete, with a passion for stamps issued before 1870. He collected stamps issued by Canadian provinces and the Confederation of Canada, Switzerland, Cape Colony, Ceylon, Gambia, Mauritius, Argentina and Uruguay. Considering the postal history of the United States, his collection was a reference for "Western Express". He was an active member of the Collectors Club of New York which was developed by Lichtenstein and his friend Theodore Steinway. He was also a member of the Royal Philatelic Society of Canada. An international philatelic judge during three decades, he was the commissioner of international philatelic exhibitions of 1913, 1926 and 1936 (the last two in New York). When he died, he was preparing the Centenary International Stamp Exhibition (CIPEX) of 1947. Lichtenstein exhibited the Buenos Aires “barquitos” tete-beche pair at the 1940 exhibition held at The Collectors Club of New York to commemorate 100 years of postage stamps. When he died in New York City in 1947 (also his birthplace) and his
    5.67
    3 votes
    163

    CJ Follini

    CJ Follini (born New York in 1967) is an American digital media entrepreneur, film producer and real estate investor. A native New Yorker who built his group of companies by investing in alternative real estate types such as: digital film studios; healthcare real estate; student housing; and artist residence clubs as well as providing venture capital for early stage digital content creators.. Follini grew up in Westchester County and New York City where he attended the prestigious Jesuit high school - Fordham Preparatory School. Follini received a General Course Degree in Econometrics from the prestigious London School of Economics in the United Kingdom. While in London he played rugby for LSE. From the age of 12, he worked at entry level construction jobs learning the building trade from his father, Charles Follini Sr., a highly decorated former fireman with the FDNY and the CEO the building conglomerate responsible for Idlewild Airport - the Edenwald Group . While Follini’s early accomplishments came as a Senior Executive of Shooting Gallery and as Founder and CEO of Gun For Hire Production Centers, the largest independent film studio and digital media centers in the United
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    3 votes
    164
    Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney

    Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney

    Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney (February 20, 1899 – December 13, 1992) was an American businessman, film producer, writer, and government official, as well as the owner of a leading stable of thoroughbred racehorses. Born in Old Westbury, New York, he was the son of the wealthy and socially prominent Harry Payne Whitney (1870–1932) and Gertrude Vanderbilt (1875–1942). As a scion of both the Whitney and Vanderbilt families, he inherited a substantial fortune. However, Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney proved to be a very capable businessman, using his connections to make investments that played an important role in the development of the American economy. Most often referred to as C.V. Whitney, he was also known widely by the nickname "Sonny." After graduating from Yale University in 1922, he went to work at a Nevada mine owned by his father. His grandfather William C. Whitney was a co-founder and director of the Guaranty Trust Company of New York and in 1926 C.V. Whitney was appointed a director, serving on the bank's board until 1940. In 1927, he joined with William A. Rockefeller and other investors to back Juan Trippe in establishing the Aviation Corporation of America which a year
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    3 votes
    165

    John Wilson

    Sir John Mitchell Harvey Wilson, 2nd Baronet (10 October 1898 – 6 February 1975) was a British philatelist and Keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection from 1938 to 1969. He introduced the division of the collection by reign and, after World War II, loans from the collection to international exhibitions. John Wilson was the second Baronet in his family, the title having been received by his father for his contribution to Scottish agriculture. John inherited an estate near Glasgow. While serving in the Coldstream Guards during the last months of Great War, he was hospitalised in Stirling, Scotland where he first became interested in stamp collecting after his father brought his own collection to help his son pass the time. After the war he was a barrister but retired in the early 1930s to manage his philatelic collection and estate full-time. Generally, he specialised in small countries or in short philatelic periods of a country, studied it, then sold the collection to begin another one. Wilson was President of the Royal Philatelic Society London (RPSL) from 1934. In October 1936 he accepted the offer to succeed Edward Bacon, the Curator of the Royal Philatelic Collection. Wilson
    5.67
    3 votes
    166

    Thomas Gilcrease

    William Thomas Gilcrease (1890–1962) was an American oilman, art collector and philanthropist. During his lifetime, Gilcrease collected more than 10,000 artworks, 250,000 Native American artifacts and 100,000 rare books and documents, including the only surviving certified copy of the Declaration of Independence. He was the founder of Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Thomas Gilcrease was the son of William Lee Gilcrease and Mary "Elizabeth" (Vowell) Gilcrease, and was born in Robeline, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana on February 8, 1890. Mary "Elizabeth" (Vowell) Gilcrease was of Creek ancestry and, shortly after the birth, the family moved to Indian Territory to take advantage of the 160-acre (0.65 km) allotments in the Creek Nation. Tom's mother was of Creek ancestry and a member of the Creek Nation. The family lived on Creek Nation tribal lands near Eufaula, Oklahoma. Gilcrease's father ran a cotton gin in the nearby community of Mounds, Oklahoma. As a boy, he was often called "Indian Tom." At the turn of the century, the federal government dissolved the Indian Nations land by distributing parcels into private ownership. At age nine, Gilcrease's 1/8 Creek heritage entitled
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    William Goetz

    William Goetz (March 24, 1903 – August 15, 1969) was an American Hollywood film producer and studio executive. William Goetz died of cancer in 1969 at his home in Los Angeles and was buried in Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California. Born to a Jewish working-class family in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Goetz was the youngest of eight children. His mother died when he was ten years old and shortly thereafter his father abandoned the family. Raised by older brothers, at the age of twenty-one he followed some of his brothers to Hollywood where he found work as a crew hand at one of the large studios. After a few years, he began doing production work and in 1930 was made an associate producer at Fox Films. That same year he married Edith Mayer (1905–1987), daughter of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio head Louis B. Mayer – who at first was less-than-enthusiastic at the idea. Nevertheless, the marriage worked and they remained together for life. In 1932, Goetz received the financial support necessary from his new father-in-law to become a minor partner with Joseph Schenck, the former president of United Artists, and Darryl F. Zanuck from Warner Brothers to create Twentieth
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Anna Rice Cooke

    Anna Rice Cooke

    Anna Rice Cooke (1853–1934) was a patron of the arts and the founder of the Honolulu Museum of Art. Anna Charlotte Rice was born on September 5, 1853 into a prominent missionary family on Oahu, Hawaii. Her father was teacher William Harrison Rice (1813–1863), and her mother was Mary Sophia Hyde. Anna grew up on the island of Kauaʻi. She attended Punahou School (then called Oahu College) 1867–1868, and Mills College 1871–1872. In 1874, she married Charles Montague Cooke, a successful businessman, and the two eventually settled in Honolulu. Her son was Charles Montague Cooke, Jr. (1874–1948), an American zoologist. Other children were Clarence H. Cooke, George P. Cooke, Richard A. Cooke, Alice T. Cooke and Theodore A. Cooke. In 1882, the Cookes built a home on Beretania Street, across from Thomas Square Park. In the time, they had unobstructed views of Diamond Head and Punahou School from their second-story windows. As Cooke's career prospered, they began to gather their own private fine art collection. Anna's first additions were "parlor pieces" that graced their Beretania Street home. She frequented the shop of furniture maker Yeun Kwock Fong Inn who often had ceramics and textile
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Catharine Lorillard Wolfe

    Catharine Lorillard Wolfe

    Catharine Lorillard Wolfe (8 March 1828 – 4 April 1887) was an American philanthropist and art collector. Though she gave large amounts of money to institutions such as Grace Episcopal Church and Union College, her most significant gifts were two bequests to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. She left her large collection of popular contemporary paintings to the museum, together with $200,000. Wolfe's father was a real-estate developer; her mother Dorothea was partial inheritor of the Lorillard fortune. Wolfe led a private and sheltered life. After the death of her parents, she continued their philanthropic activities. She supported the Newsboys' Lodging House and Industrial School (an outgrowth of Charles Loring Brace's movement to help care for New York's homeless children; she financed archaeological missions, including one that unearthed Nippur; she was also involved with the American Museum of Natural History, which her father had helped to found. The bequest of her art collection was her most significant philanthropic endeavor. Her collection gave the Metropolitan its first significant representation of the kinds of paintings that appealed to the general public.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Cheech Marin

    Cheech Marin

    Richard Anthony "Cheech" Marin (born July 13, 1946) is an American comedian, actor and writer who gained recognition as part of the comedy act Cheech & Chong during the 1970s and early 1980s, and as Don Johnson's partner, Insp. Joe Dominguez on Nash Bridges. He has also voiced characters in several Disney productions, including Oliver and Company, The Lion King, It's Tough to be a Bug!, Cars, Cars 2 and Beverly Hills Chihuahua. Marin's trademark is his character's strong Mexican-accent; this is part of a comic persona, rather than a natural accent since Marin was born and raised in the United States. Marin was born in Los Angeles, California, the son of Elsa (née Meza), a secretary, and Oscar Marin, a policeman in the LAPD. Marin was born with a cleft lip, which has long since been repaired. Although he speaks Spanish and uses it in some of his movies, he is not particularly fluent. Marin's nickname "Cheech" is short for "chicharron", a fried pork skin that is a popular snack in Mexican cuisine and a favorite of marijuana smokers afflicted with "the munchies", and the nickname's alliteration with Chong's surname made "Cheech and Chong" an obvious choice for the name of the duo. The
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Christopher Tsai

    Christopher "Chris" Tsai, (born December 20, 1974, in Greenwich, Connecticut) is an American stock investor, investment advisor and financial analyst. Tsai is the Chief Investment Officer of Tsai Capital Corporation, a registered investment adviser focused on global equities. Tsai is a major collector of contemporary Chinese art and the son of the famous financier Gerald Tsai, who died in July 2008. Tsai was encouraged by his legendary father to start investing at the age of 12. Tsai began his professional career by working with his father and by managing money at the age of 16. At that time, Tsai dispensed unprofessional buy-and-sell advice and managed money for family friends. Tsai worked for John A. Levin, a former partner of Michael Steinhardt, and for Mario Gabelli. He joined Bear Stearns and went on to found Tsai Capital Corporation in 1997 at the age of 22. In Barron’s, Tsai’s father was quoted as saying that his son is a better analyst than he was. Unlike his father who focused on momentum investing, Tsai is a value investor and looks for long-term investments in growing, non-cyclical businesses with conservative balance sheets. Tsai has frequently been sought out for his
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Helen Hay Whitney

    Helen Hay Whitney

    Helen Julia Hay Whitney (1876 - September 24, 1944) was an American poet, writer, racehorse owner/breeder, socialite, and philanthropist. She was a member by marriage of the prominent Whitney family of New York. She was the daughter of Clara Louise Stone and her husband, John Milton Hay who served as the United States Ambassador to Great Britain and United States Secretary of State. Helen Hay was a poet and an author of books for children. A number of her poems were published in Harper's Magazine. A poem of hers, 'Love of the Rose' was used in Leon Ardin's opera, Antony and Cleopatra (Act 2, no. 15). Herbs And Apples (1910) is a collection of poems that she published using what she had given for The Metropolitan Magazine, and Collier's Weekly. "Songs and Sonnets," "Gypsy Verses" are also some of her works produced in such a manner. Several of her works have been republished in the 21st century. In 1902 she married Payne Whitney with whom she had a daughter, Joan, and a son, John. The couple built a home at 972 Fifth Avenue in New York City designed by Stanford White. Helen Hay Whitney lived there until her death in 1944. The government of France acquired the property in 1952 and
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Louis Yvert

    Louis Yvert (born 24 June 1866 in Paris and died 17 April 1950 in Amiens) was the co-founder of French philatelic publisher Yvert et Tellier with printer Théodule Tellier, from the family-printing company established in the 1830s by his grandfather, legitimist journalist Eugène Yvert. Louis Yvert was the son of lawyer Henry Yvert and Mademoiselle de Taisy, first singer at the Paris Opera. He was four years old when his parents moved to Amiens, where his father bought Eugène Yvert's company. Henry founded a new legitimist paper, L'Écho de la Somme. After his baccalauréats es-literature and es-sciences, he served voluntarily in the army. Then, he began his Law studies in Paris, where he lived like a dandy. His father died in 1885, but his mother decided that Louis must finished his studies before becoming the new director of the Yvert company. She associated her family to the chief-printer Théodule Tellier. When Louis came back in Amiens in 1889, he wrote for L'Écho de la Somme. In 1891, the same year he married, he became the director of the paper. While he disliked the political, legimist and conservative way of thinking of the paper and its readers, L'Écho de la Somme remained the
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Wendy Russell Reves

    Wendy Russell Reves (May 2, 1916 – March 13, 2007) was an American philanthropist, socialite, and former fashion model. She was born Wyn-Nelle Russell in Marshall, Texas, and adopted the name Wendy as an adult. Her modeling career began in 1939, and she appeared in Harper's Bazaar and Vogue. Virginia Pope, the fashion critic of The New York Times, described her as "one of New York's most-seen manikins [sic]." Wendy's first husband, Al Schroeder, was a West Point graduate she met when he was stationed in Randolph Field in San Antonio, Texas. Wendy was barely sixteen when they discussed marriage, but was persuaded by her mother to wait until her seventeenth birthday to marry. One year later they had a son, Arnold Leon Schroeder. In 1940, she married Paul Baron (b. 1911), a pianist and conductor who was the leader of the Paul Baron Orchestra, a well-known studio band of the 1930s and 1940s. He was a vocal arranger for Fifi D'Orsay, Nanette Fabray, Jane Froman, Elvira Rios, Mildred Bailey, and Lupe Vélez and was co-writer of the popular song Rum and Cola Cola, which was performed by, among others, The Andrews Sisters. From 1948, she was the mistress of Emery Reves (né Emery Revesz,
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Charles Curtis

    Charles Curtis

    Charles Curtis (1853 – 23 August 1928) was an English botanist who was sent by James Veitch & Sons to search for new plant species in Madagascar, Borneo, Sumatra, Java and the Moluccas, before settling in Penang, where he became the first superintendent of the Penang Botanic Gardens. Curtis was born in Barnstaple, Devon, the youngest of four brothers. His paternal grandfather, a Norman by the name of Courtois, had settled at Barnstaple many years previously. Like his brothers, Curtis worked as a garden boy at the local Bale's Nursery. On completing his education, Curtis joined James Veitch & Sons' Royal Exotic Nursery at Chelsea, London in 1874, where he received his botanical training in the "New Plant Department". In 1878, Harry Veitch despatched him to Mauritius and Madagascar, from where he sent seeds of Nepenthes madagascariensis, a species of pitcher plant, and various other tropical plants, including Angraecum sesquipedale. Unfortunately, following "treachery" by one of the African helpers, who cut the rope which held the raft on which the plants were being floated downriver, the first consignment of plants collected was lost and, as a result, the collecting work had to be
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Charles Richard Crane

    Charles Richard Crane (1858–1939) was a wealthy American businessman, heir to a large industrial fortune and connoisseur of Arab culture, a noted Arabist. His widespread business interests gave him entree into domestic and international political affairs where he enjoyed privileged access to many influential power brokers at the top levels of government. His special arena of interest was Eastern Europe and the Middle East. He was the eldest son of plumbing parts mogul, Chicago manufacturer, Richard T. Crane. In the 1900s, he brought Thomas Masaryk, Maksim Kovalevsky and Pavel Milyukov to lecture at the University of Chicago. After meeting Masaryk, he became interested in Slavic nationalism and sponsored The Slav Epic paintings by Alphonse Mucha When Mucha designed the Czechoslovak bills, he used a previous portrait of Josephine Crane Bradley as Slavia for the 100 koruna bill. In 1931,Crane helped finance the first explorations for oil in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. He was instrumental in gaining the American oil concession there. President William Howard Taft appointed Crane minister to China on July 16, 1909, but on the eve of his departure to his post on October 4, 1909, he was
    7.00
    1 votes
    177

    Christopher James Makins, 2nd Baron Sherfield

    Christopher James Makins, 2nd Baron Sherfield (23 July 1942 – 28 January 2006) was an Anglo-American diplomat, foreign policy expert, and author. Christopher James Makins was born at Southampton, New York on 23 July 1942, the son of a British father Roger Mellor Makins, later 1st Baron Sherfield and an American mother, Alice Brooks Davis, daughter of the American sportsman and politician Dwight F. Davis. Thus he held dual citizenship of the UK and the United States. In the United Kingdom he was known as "Lord Sherfield"; in the United States, as "Mr. Makins". He was educated at St Ronan's School, Winchester College, and New College, Oxford. After taking a first-class degree in Modern History in 1963, he was elected a Fellow of All Souls (1963–77). From 1964 until 1975 he served in H. M. Diplomatic Service. In 1975 he married American photographer, writer, and illustrator Wendy Whitney Cortesi, daughter of John Sargent Whitney of Evergreen, Colorado and jewelry designer Minna Reese Marston. The family lived in Washington, D.C., where he worked for the Trilateral Commission (Deputy Director 1975-76), the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the Aspen Institute (Executive
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater

    Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater

    Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater (21 May 1736 – 8 March 1803), known as Lord Francis Egerton until 1748, was a British nobleman, the younger son of the 1st Duke. He did not marry, and the Dukedom expired with him, although the Earldom was inherited by a cousin, Lieutenant-General John Egerton. He is famous as the originator of British inland navigation, the commissioner of the Bridgewater Canal—often said to be the first true canal in Britain and the modern world (see below for a qualification)—which was built for him by James Brindley to service his coal mines at Worsley, in Lancashire. Scroop Egerton, 1st Duke of Bridgewater (1681–1745) was the son of the 2nd Earl of Bridgewater, and was created a Duke in 1720; he was the great-grandson of John Egerton, 1st Earl of Bridgewater (d. 1649; cr. 1617), whose name is associated with the production of Milton's Comus; and the latter was the son of Sir Thomas Egerton (1540–1617), Queen Elizabeth's Lord Keeper and James I.'s Lord Chancellor, whom was created Baron Ellesmere in 1603, and Viscount Brackley in 1616. Lord Francis Egerton succeeded to the Dukedom at the age of twelve on the death of his brother, the 2nd Duke. As a child
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    John Gould Veitch

    John Gould Veitch

    John Gould Veitch (April 1839 – 13 August 1870) was a horticulturist and traveller, one of the first Victorian plant hunters to visit Japan. A great-grandson of John Veitch, the founder of the Veitch horticulture dynasty, he also visited the Philippines, Australia, Fiji, and other Polynesian islands. He brought back a number of the glasshouse plants in vogue at the time, such as Acalyphas, Cordylines, Codiaeums (Crotons) and Dracaenas, and, from Fiji, a palm of a new genus later named after him, Veitchia joannis. The Veitch family name is honoured by hundreds of plant names, including the genus Veitchia. In Japan, he came across the eminent plant collector Robert Fortune, and their competing collections returned to England on the same ship. For example, both men claimed discovery of a species of Chamaecyparis pisifera. He was married to Jane Hodge soon after his return to England in 1866 and fathered two sons, James Herbert Veitch (1868 – 1907) and John Gould Veitch, Jr. (1869 – 1914) before dying of tuberculosis at the age of 31.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Lincoln Kirstein

    Lincoln Edward Kirstein (May 4, 1907 – January 5, 1996) was an American writer, impresario, art connoisseur, and cultural figure in New York City. According to the New York Times, he was "an expert in many fields." Born in Rochester, New York, the grandson of a successful Rochester clothing manufacturer, he grew up in a wealthy Jewish Bostonian family and attended Berkshire School, graduating in 1926; his father was president of Filene's Department Store when Lincoln entered Harvard. In 1927, while an undergraduate (he graduated in 1930), he was annoyed that the literary magazine The Harvard Advocate would not accept his work. With a friend Varian Fry, who later married his sister Eileen, he convinced his father to finance their own literary quarterly, the Hound & Horn. Moving in 1930 to New York, the quarterly became an important publication in the artistic world and lasted until 1934 when Lincoln decided to fund George Balanchine instead. His interest in Balanchine and ballet started when he saw Balanchine's Apollo performed by the Ballet Russe. He became determined to get Balanchine to America. Together with Edward Warburg (a classmate from Harvard), they started the School of
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Maria Altmann

    Maria Altmann

    Maria Altmann (February 18, 1916 – February 7, 2011) was a Jewish refugee from Nazi Austria, noted for her ultimately successful legal campaign to reclaim five family-owned paintings by the artist Gustav Klimt, stolen by the Nazis during World War II, from the Government of Austria. She was born Maria Victoria Bloch, in Vienna. The family name was changed to Bloch-Bauer the following year. She was a niece of Adele Bloch-Bauer, a wealthy Jewish patron of the arts who served as the model for some of Klimt's best-known paintings, including two of those eventually recovered by her niece. After an Austrian researcher questioned the Austrian state's ownership of the paintings in 1998, Maria Altmann experienced some years of fruitless negotiations and efforts to litigate in the Austrian court system, before a 2004 ruling in her favor by the United States Supreme Court opened the door to an Austrian arbitration process. The arbitration panel of three Austrian judges in turn ruled in 2006 that the art must be returned to Altmann and other family heirs. Altmann died on 7 February 2011, shortly before her 95th birthday. Obituaries appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, and many other
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Nick Mason

    Nick Mason

    Nicholas Berkeley "Nick" Mason (born 27 January 1944) is an English drummer and songwriter, best known for his work with Pink Floyd. He is the only constant member of the band since its formation in 1965. Despite solely writing only a few Pink Floyd songs, Mason has contributed to some of Pink Floyd's most popular compositions such as "Interstellar Overdrive", "A Saucerful of Secrets", "Atom Heart Mother, "Echoes" and "Time". Mason is the only Pink Floyd member to be featured on every one of their albums. It is estimated that as of 2010, the group have sold over 250 million records worldwide, including 74.5 million units sold in the United States. He also competes in auto racing events, such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The son of the documentary film maker Bill Mason, he was born in Birmingham but brought up in Hampstead, London (many online biographies mistakenly cite the street address Downshire Hill – sometimes as "the Downshire Hills" – as a district of Birmingham) and attended Frensham Heights School, near Farnham, Surrey. He later studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster), where he teamed up with Roger Waters, Bob Klose and Richard Wright in
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    William Hamilton

    William Hamilton

    Sir William Hamilton KB, PC, FRS (12 January 1731 – 6 April 1803) was a Scottish diplomat, antiquarian, archaeologist and vulcanologist. After a short period as a Member of Parliament, he served as British Ambassador to the Kingdom of Naples from 1764 to 1800. He studied Mounts Vesuvius and Etna, becoming a Fellow of the Royal Society and recipient of the Copley Medal. Hamilton was born, according to the baptismal register cited by the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, on 12 January 1731 in either London or at Park Place, Berkshire, the fourth son of Lord Archibald Hamilton, governor of Jamaica, and Lady Jane Hamilton, daughter of James Hamilton, 6th Earl of Abercorn. His mother was almost certainly a mistress of the Prince of Wales and William grew up with his son George III, who would call him his "foster brother". After attending Westminster School, he was commissioned into the 3rd Foot Guards in 1747 and was promoted Lieutenant in 1753. He left the Army after his marriage to Catherine Barlow, daughter of politician Hugh Barlow, on 25 January 1758. Catherine died on 25 August 1782. The couple had no children. In 1786, a stunning young lady was sent to Sir William by his
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Denman Ross

    Denman Waldo Ross (1853-1935) was an American painter, art collector, and scholar of art history and theory. He was a professor of art at Harvard University and a trustee of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Ross completed his undergraduate studies at Harvard University in 1875, and earned his doctorate in political economy from the same institution five years later. He came to be interested in art soon after this, and began teaching courses in design and art theory at Harvard by 1889. Ross would spend much of the rest of his life lecturing on these and related topics, working with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston on their burgeoning Oriental Art department, and traveling the world in search of artworks to add to his personal collection. Ross was also a member of some of Boston's elite inner circles, and is known to have brushed elbows not only with other prominent people associated with the Museum of Fine Arts and the art world, but also with the likes of Louis Brandeis, John Singer Sargent, Joseph Lindon Smith and various members of Boston's most prominent families. A number of his students at Harvard, the Museum of Fine Arts, and elsewhere he lectured, went on to become prominent
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Hassanal Bolkiah

    Hassanal Bolkiah

    Hassanal Bolkiah, GCB GCMG (full name: Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu'izzaddin Waddaulah ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Haji Omar Ali Saifuddien Sa'adul Khairi Waddien; born 15 July 1946) is the 29th and current Sultan and Yang Di-Pertuan of Brunei. He is also the first and incumbent Prime Minister of Brunei. The eldest son of the late Sir Muda Omar Ali Saifuddien III and the late Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Damit, he succeeded to the throne as the Sultan of Brunei, following the voluntary abdication of his father on 4 October 1967. The Sultan was born on 15 July 1946 in Brunei Town (now called Bandar Seri Begawan) as Pengiran Muda (Prince) Hassanal Bolkiah. The Sultan received high school education at Victoria Institution in Kuala Lumpur, after which he attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the United Kingdom. In 1961 he was bestowed as the Pengiran Muda Mahkota ("Crown Prince"). His Highness subsequently become the Sultan of Brunei Darussalam on 4 October 1967, after his father had abdicated voluntarily. At his installation ceremony at Istana Darul Hana on 5 October 1967, he said on his first titah to the country, His coronation was held on 1 August 1968 and thus made him the
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Gustav Wallis

    Gustav Wallis

    Gustav Wallis (1 May 1830 – 20 June 1878) was a German plant collector, who introduced over 1,000 plant species to Europe, many of which were named after him. Wallis was born in Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany, where his father was an advocate. Wallis was deaf and mute until six years of age, and it was not until 1836 that he as able to talk. As a consequence, he suffered from a speech defect during his entire life. In about 1836 his father died, leaving his mother a widow with six children. With no means of support, she found it necessary to leave Lüneburg and move to Detmold, her native town. It was here that Wallis attended school and, in the surrounding mountains and forests, developed the love of nature and botany which later gave him the desire to travel abroad and visit the tropics. As a youth, Wallis had great energy and an indomitable will, and despite his speech impediment he acquired considerable proficiency in foreign languages, an accomplishment which stood him in good stead during the course of his career. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to a goldsmith but, disliking the work, he quit and took an apprenticeship with a gardener at Detmold. At the end of his
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

    John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

    John Davison Rockefeller, Jr. (January 29, 1874 – May 11, 1960) was a major philanthropist and a pivotal member of the prominent Rockefeller family. He was the sole son among the five children of businessman and Standard Oil industrialist John D. Rockefeller and the father of the five famous Rockefeller brothers. In biographies, he was invariably referred to as "Junior" to distinguish him from his father, known as "Senior". Rockefeller, Jr. was the fifth and last child of John D. Rockefeller (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937) and his wife, Laura Celestia Spelman. Living in his father's mansion at 4 West 54th Street he attended Park Avenue Baptist Church at 64th Street (now Central Presbyterian Church), and the Browning School, a tutorial establishment set up for him and other children of associates of the family; it was located in a brownstone owned by the Rockefellers, on West 55th Street. Initially he had intended to go to Yale but was encouraged by William Rainey Harper, president of the University of Chicago, among others, to enter the Baptist-oriented Brown University instead. Nicknamed Johnny Rock by his roommates, he joined both the Glee and the Mandolin Clubs, taught a Bible
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Joseph Hirshhorn

    Joseph Hirshhorn

    Joseph Herman Hirshhorn (August 11, 1899 – August 31, 1981) was an entrepreneur, financier and art collector. Born in Mitau, Latvia, the twelfth of thirteen children, Hirshhorn emigrated to the United States with his widowed mother at the age of six. Hirshhorn went to work as an office boy on Wall Street at age 14. Three years later, in 1916, he became a stockbroker and earned $168,000 that year. A shrewd investor, he sold off his Wall Street investments two months before the collapse of 1929, realizing $4 million in cash. Hirshhorn made his fortune in the mining and oil business. In the 1930s, he focused much of his attention on gold and uranium mining prospects in Canada, establishing an office in Toronto in 1933. In the 1950s, he and geologist Franc Joubin were primarily responsible for the "Big Z" uranium discovery in northeastern Ontario and the subsequent founding of the city of Elliot Lake. Hirshhorn Avenue, a residential street in that city, is named after him. By 1960, when he sold the last of his uranium stock, he had made over $100 million in cash from the uranium business. His business dealings in Canada were not without controversy. He was investigated by the Ontario
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Lawrence L. Shenfield

    Lawrence L. Shenfield

    Lawrence Lewis "Larry" Shenfield (October 5, 1891 – October 9, 1974) was an advertising executive who was instrumental in promoting the development of radio broadcasting during its golden age of the 1920's and 1930's. Larry lined up sponsors to help further the popularity of such stars as Orson Welles and Dinah Shore. After his retirement, Larry developed a second career as a prominent philatelist internationally recognized in the field of postal history. His careful studies of the postage stamps and postal history of the Confederate States are relied upon by stamp collectors and experts in philately to the present day. Mr. Shenfield was born in Brooklyn, New York. He received his undergraduate degree in architecture in 1914 from Columbia University in New York City and served in the U.S. Army during World War I, having undergone artillery training in Plattsburgh, New York. After the war, Shenfield worked in New York as an architect for Eggers & Higgins and designed a number of buildings in Brooklyn and Manhattan. Subsequently, Shenfield left architecture for the rapidly growing field of radio and television advertising. He worked for the advertising firm Pedlar & Ryan, where he
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Norton Simon

    Norton Simon

    Norton Winfred Simon (February 5, 1907-June 2, 1993), in the United States was a millionaire industrialist and philanthropist based in California. A significant art collector, he is the namesake of the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California. Born into a successful Jewish family in Portland, Oregon, he attended high school in San Francisco, graduating in 1924. At his father's insistence, in 1925 he enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley, but left his pre-law studies within the first six weeks to found a sheet metal distribution company. He enjoyed early success and invested $7000 in 1927 in an orange juice bottling plant in Fullerton, California which was insolvent and renamed it Val Vita Food Products Company. He soon added other fruit and vegetables to the product lines and purchased canning equipment. As one of the first of his significant corporate moves, Simon sold Val Vita to Hunt's Foods in return for a controlling interest in the combined business. By 1943 he changed the company's name to Hunt's Foods and ran it with strict cost-controls and an unorthodox approach to marketing. During and after World War II, Simon focused on product visibility.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Rainier III, Prince of Monaco

    Rainier III, Prince of Monaco (Rainier Louis Henri Maxence Bertrand Grimaldi, Count of Polignac; 31 May 1923 – 6 April 2005), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, ruled the Principality of Monaco for almost 56 years, making him one of the longest ruling monarchs of the 20th century. Though he was best known outside of Europe for having married American actress Grace Kelly, he was also responsible for reforms to Monaco's constitution and for expanding the principality's economy beyond its traditional gambling base. Gambling accounts for only approximately three percent of the nation's annual revenue today; when Rainier ascended the throne in 1949, it accounted for more than 95 percent. Rainier III's ancestors were born in France, England, Spain, Germany, Mexico, Belgium, Scotland, The Netherlands, Italy, Austria, Algeria, Monaco, and Martinique. Through his great-grandmother Lady Mary Victoria Hamilton, who was briefly Princess of Monaco, he was a descendant of James IV of Scotland (descended from three of his illegitimate daughters). His great-great-great-grandmother was Stéphanie de Beauharnais, the adopted daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte and later the Grand
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Robson Lowe

    John Harry Robson Lowe (7 January, 1905, London – 19 August, 1997, Bournemouth), Robbie to his friends, was an English professional philatelist, stamp dealer and stamp auctioneer. Lowe is regarded by philatelists as the father of postal history, having published many definitive works on the subject and having introduced the term in his first major book Handstruck Postage Stamps of the Empire 1680-1900 in 1948. In 1970 he was awarded the Lichtenstein Medal by the Collectors Club of New York. He started his philatelic career at Fox & Co. in 1926 and then established his own firm, Robson Lowe Ltd. in Regent Street, London in 1926. He moved premises to 50 Pall Mall in 1940 and ran an auction business from Bournemouth starting in 1945. For health reasons he was unable to serve in the military during World War Two. He refused to sign the Roll of Distinguished Philatelists due to the refusal to remove the name of South African Adrian Albert Jurgens, whom he considered a stamp forger. Lowe was regarded as something of a raconteur and a larger-than-life character. According to one story, while playing cards in South Africa, and possibly after several drinks, he won an orange farm, but was
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Thomas Tapling

    Thomas Tapling

    Thomas Keay Tapling (30 October 1855 - 11 April 1891) was an English businessman and politician. He played first class cricket and was also an eminent philatelist who formed one of the greatest stamp collections of his era. Tapling was born in Dulwich, London. He was educated first at home and then at Harrow School from age 15. Later he attended Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating BA and LL.B in 1880 and MA and LL.M in 1883. His father, also Thomas Tapling, was a businessman who made a fortune from the manufacture of carpets and household furnishings. His mother was Annie Elizabeth Tapling (née Keay). Tapling originally intended a career in law, and he was called to the bar at the Middle Temple as a Barrister. In 1882, however, Thomas Tapling senior died and his son was forced to drop his plans and take over the family business of Thomas Tapling & Son. This does not appear to have been a burden and the business prospered and expanded, providing him with the money to travel and build his stamp collection. He had a reputation as an enlightened employer, who emphasised temperance and thrift to his employees. Tapling played first-class cricket at Cambridge University, turning out
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Travis Barker

    Travis Barker

    Travis Landon Barker (born November 14, 1975) is an American musician, producer and entrepreneur, most noted as the drummer for the American pop punk band Blink-182, as well as the alternative rock band +44, the rap rock band The Transplants, and the alternative rock band Box Car Racer. He was a frequent collaborator with the late DJ AM, and together they formed TRV$DJAM. After the split of his first band, Feeble, Barker began playing for The Aquabats in 1996 as The Baron Von Tito. He recorded one album with them, The Fury of The Aquabats!, in 1997. His career took off when he joined up with punk band Blink-182 in 1998. Barker has since established himself as a versatile drummer, producing and making guest appearances in music projects of numerous music genres including hip hop, alternative rock, pop and country. He has gained significant acceptance within the hip-hop community in particular and often collaborates with artists to compose rock-tinged remixes to their songs. He founded clothing company Famous Stars and Straps in 1999 and LaSalle Records in 2004. Companies such as DC Shoes and Zildjian cymbals have co-designed products in his name. Barker collaborated with artists
    6.00
    2 votes
    195

    Charles Goddard Weld

    Charles Goddard Weld (1857–1911), was a Boston-area physician, sailor, philanthropist, and art lover. Weld, a resident of Brookline, Massachusetts and a scion of the Welds of that area, practiced surgery for many years, but ultimately gave it up to manage his family's fortune. He made major contributions to two museums in Greater Boston: Weld is well known for his purchase and donation of the collection of Ernest Fenollosa for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The museum is now home to one of the finest and largest collections of Japanese art outside Japan, numbering over 100,000 objects. In 1886, Weld attempted to sail around the world in his personal yacht. However, while moored in Yokohama, the yacht caught fire and was destroyed. As a result, Weld spent an extended amount of time with his Bostonian friends William Sturgis Bigelow and Ernest Fenollosa. The pair had already been in Japan for some time themselves, exploring the country and collecting art. The Fenollosa-Weld Collection contains many of the most famous pieces in the Museum of Fine Arts' collection. Among them is a handscroll painting (emaki) depicting the 1159 Night Attack on the Sanjō Palace. Others are famous
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom

    Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom

    Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is the constitutional monarch of 16 sovereign states (known as the Commonwealth realms) and their territories and dependencies, as well as head of the 54-member Commonwealth of Nations. She is Supreme Governor of the Church of England and, in some of her realms, carries the title of Defender of the Faith as part of her full title. On her accession on 6 February 1952, Queen Elizabeth became Head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon. From 1956 to 1992, the number of her realms varied as territories gained independence and some realms became republics. At present, in addition to the first four aforementioned countries, Elizabeth is Queen of Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda and Saint Kitts and Nevis. Her reign of 60 years is currently the second longest for a British monarch; only Queen Victoria has reigned longer at 63 years. Elizabeth was born in London and educated
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    James A. Mackay

    James Alexander Mackay (21 November 1936 – 12 August 2007) was a prolific Scottish writer and philatelist whose reputation was damaged by a criminal conviction for theft and repeated accusations of plagiarism. In an obituary by John Holman, Editor of the British Philatelic Bulletin, Mackay was described as a "philatelic writer without equal". Mackay's output was broad and in philatelic works rivalled only by Fred Melville. Mackay was born in Inverness and educated in Glasgow where he also attended the university. Later in life Mackay was awarded a Doctor of Literature (D.Litt) degree by Glasgow University. Interested in stamps and the postal system from an early age, he wrote two acclaimed histories of the Scottish posts; one limited to St. Kilda and, in 1978, his History of Scottish Postmarks, 1693-1978, the definitive work on the subject. He became a prolific philatelic author, especially on English, Irish and Scottish postmarks and also produced popular Postal History Annuals and island series books. He wrote some 200 books and at least 10,000 articles. Mackay's interest in the postal history of St Kilda had been formed during his time stationed there during his army service in
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    Leonard Andrews

    Leonard Edward Bryant Andrews (March 31, 1925 – January 2, 2009) was an American publisher and art collector best known for his purchase of some 240 previously unknown Andrew Wyeth works of a woman known as Helga, including several nudes. Andrews was born in Nacogdoches, Texas on March 31, 1925. He served as a bomber pilot during World War II, after volunteering to enlist in the United States Army at age 17. After attending Southern Methodist University, he served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War, flying bombers. He was employed by a credit card company, the Uni-Serv Corporation, during the 1962 New York City newspaper strike, and approached the company's customers about advertising in a publication he created called The New York Standard, the largest of several alternative papers published during the strike, reaching a peak circulation of more than 400,000 and appearing for 67 issues. He was later employed as an executive at a grocery store chain executive and in the underwriting department of an investment firm. After reading about the bankruptcy of the Penn Central Transportation Company, he came up with the idea of publishing a newsletter with details about
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Philippe II, Duke of Orléans

    Philippe II, Duke of Orléans

    Philippe d'Orléans (Philippe Charles; 2 August 1674 – 2 December 1723) was a member of the royal family of France and served as Regent of the Kingdom from 1715 to 1723. Born at his father's palace at Saint-Cloud, he was known from birth under the title of Duke of Chartres. His father was Louis XIV's younger brother Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, known as Monsieur; his mother was Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate. In 1692, Philippe married his first cousin, Françoise Marie de Bourbon - the youngest legitimised daughter (légitimée de France) of Philippe's uncle Louis XIV and Madame de Montespan. Named regent of France for Louis XV until Louis attained his majority in February 1723, the era of his de facto rule was known as the Regency (1715–1723). He died at Versailles in 1723. He is referred to historically as le Régent. In March 1661, his father married his first cousin Princess Henrietta Anne of England, known as Madame at court. The marriage was stormy; Henriette was a famed beauty, sometimes depicted as flirtatious by those at the court of Versailles. Philippe's father was openly homosexual, his liaisons with men well-known at court. Nonetheless, the marriage produced three
    5.50
    2 votes
    200

    Betsey Cushing Roosevelt Whitney

    Betsey Roosevelt Whitney (May 18, 1908, Baltimore, Maryland – March 25, 1998, Manhasset, New York), was an American philanthropist, the ex-wife of James Roosevelt (the eldest son of President Franklin D. Roosevelt), and later wife of American millionaire and U.S. Ambassador to the Court of St. James's, John Hay Whitney. Betsey Maria Cushing was the middle daughter of the prominent neurosurgeon Dr. Harvey Cushing and his wife Katharine Crowell Cushing, who hailed from a socially prominent Cleveland family. Dr. Cushing was descended from Matthew Cushing, an early settler of Hingham, Massachusetts. Dr. Cushing served as professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins, Harvard and Yale Universities, and the family established itself in Boston. Though Betsey had two brothers, she and her two sisters became well known in the social world as the "Cushing Sisters", heralded for their charm and beauty from their debutante days onward. She and her sisters were schooled by their social-climbing mother to pursue husbands of wealth and prominence, and coached to become socially acceptable to important men. As a result of their mother's coaching to marry well, all three Cushing sisters married into wealth
    6.00
    1 votes
    201

    Widener family

    The American Widener family of Peter Arrell Brown Widener (1834-1915) and his wife Hannah Josephine Dunton (1836-1896) were from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and were one of the wealthiest families in the United States. In 1883 Widener was part of the founding partnership of the Philadelphia Traction Company and used the great wealth accumulated from that business to become a founding organizer of U.S. Steel and the American Tobacco Company. The legacy of Peter and Hannah Widener includes the Widener Library at Harvard University but even more important was the implanting of a social conscience in their children that has been passed down from generation to generation. While the family fortune dwindled over time through estate taxes and the natural division and redivision by inheritors, many of their 21st century descendants continue to be involved in charitable works. Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania, is named after the Wideners as a result of a very large contribution the family made when the college was transitioning from an all-male military college to a co-educational civilian university. Peter and Hannah Widener built Lynnewood Hall in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, a
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    1 votes
    202

    Edward Denny Bacon

    Sir Edward Denny Bacon (29 August 1860 – 5 June 1938) was a British philatelist who helped the enlargement and mounting of collections possessed by rich collectors of his time and became the curator of the Royal Philatelic Collection between 1913 and 1938. Edward Bacon was the son of a malt producer of London, where he worked until it closed in 1895. After 1895 he decided then to become a full-time philatelist. His two main collections were of Japanese stamps (that became Philipp von Ferrary's) and of postal stationery (later Thomas Tapling's). He joined the Philatelic Society, London in 1880, in which he served in every possible main post. He was elected President in 1917. He was known to help some British collectors to manage their philatelic possessions. The first one was Thomas Keay Tapling; when Tapling bequeathed his collection to the British Museum, Bacon mounted the ensemble and wrote its description, a task he achieved for an exhibition in February 1897, after Tapling's death in 1891. After that, he managed Henry J. Duveen's collection, and published in 1911 the catalogue of the Crawford Library. In 1907 Bacon was the first President of the Philatelic Literature Society.
    4.33
    3 votes
    203

    Frederick B. Lindstrom

    Frederick B. Lindstrom (June 8, 1915—January 8, 1998) was an American sociologist specializing in popular culture and demography who spent over four decades, starting in 1953, as professor (later professor emeritus) of sociology at Arizona State University. A Massachusetts native, Lindstrom was born in the town of Palmer, located within the Springfield metropolitan area. His family background was mixed, including Swedish, German-Jewish, and other European forebears; he received a secular upbringing. He attended the University of Chicago, receiving his A.B. in 1938 and A.M. in 1941. Following service in World War II, he returned to the University on the G.I. Bill, earning his Ph.D. in 1950. After teaching for three years at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, he relocated to Arizona, where he chaired the ASU Department of Sociology for a record number of years. He also served multiple terms as Secretary-Treasurer of the Pacific Sociological Association (PSA). Lindstrom was considered to incarnate the outlook and practices of the Chicago school, of which he was a historian, contributing to the special issue of the journal Sociological Perspectives (Vol. 31, No. 3, July 1988)
    4.33
    3 votes
    204

    Bernard Kinsey

    Bernard Kinsey is a Los Angeles philanthropist and entrepreneur with a passion for African-American history and art of the 19th and 20h centuries. He and his wife Shirley, one of the most admired and respected couples in Los Angeles, are famously known for espousing two life principles, “To whom much is given much is required" and live “A life of no regrets”. The couple have one son, Khalil, an aspiring rapper also known as Diz Gibran. Bernard and Shirley are widely heralded for their stewardship of art, books and manuscripts that document and tell the remarkable story of African Americans' triumphs and struggles from 1632 to present. From September 2009 through March 2010, The Kinsey Collection: “Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey, is on display at the Brogan Museum, in Tallahassee, Florida. In 2009, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach hosted their collection entitled "In the Hands of African American Collectors". Through the Norton's partnership with the School District of Palm Beach County, Florida more than 12,000 students visited the exhibit which helped the exhibit garner an award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services that was presented by
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    2 votes
    205

    Clement Greenberg

    Clement Greenberg (January 16, 1909 – May 7, 1994) was an American essayist known mainly as an influential visual art critic closely associated with American Modern art of the mid-20th century. In particular, he is best remembered for his promotion of the abstract expressionist movement and was among the first published critics to praise the work of painter Jackson Pollock. Clement Greenberg was born in the borough of the Bronx, NYC, in 1909. His parents were middle-class Jewish immigrants, and he was the oldest of their three sons. Since childhood, Greenberg sketched compulsively, until becoming a young adult, when he began to focus on literature. Greenberg attended Erasmus Hall High School, the Marquand School for Boys, then Syracuse University, graduating with an A.B. in 1930, cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa. After college, already as fluent in Yiddish as well as English since childhood, Greenberg taught himself Italian and German in addition to French and Latin. During the next few years, Greenberg travelled the U.S. working for his father's dry-goods business, but the work did not suit his inclinations, so he turned to working as a translator. Greenberg married in 1934, had a son
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    2 votes
    206
    Jakob von Uexkull

    Jakob von Uexkull

    Jakob von Uexkull (born 19 August 1944) is a writer, lecturer, philanthropist, activist and former politician. He served as a Member of the European Parliament 1987–1989, representing the German Green Party. In 1980, Uexkull founded the Right Livelihood Award, commonly known as the Alternative Nobel Prize, and in 2006, he co-founded the World Future Council. Born in Sweden, he holds both Swedish and German citizenship, and is a resident of the United Kingdom. Uexkull was born in Uppsala, Sweden but stems from a Baltic German family that left Estonia after World War I. After studying in Sweden and Germany, he won a scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford, graduating in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. His grandfather Jakob von Uexküll was a biologist and the founder of the study of biosemiotics. Uexkull is married and has three children. He lives with his family in London. The Right Livelihood Award evolved from von Uexküll's opinion that the Nobel Prizes were relatively narrow in scope and usually recognised the work of citizens in industrialised countries. Uexküll first approached the Nobel Foundation with the suggestion that it establish two new awards, one for ecology and one
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Roy Neuberger

    Roy Neuberger

    Roy Rothschild Neuberger (July 21, 1903 – December 24, 2010) was an American financier who contributed money to raise public awareness of modern art through his acquisition of pieces he deemed worthy. He was a co-founder of the investment firm Neuberger Berman. Roy Rothschild Neuberger was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and spent his childhood in New York. Born into a wealthy Jewish family, he was orphaned at the age of 12. He describes himself as having been interested during high school in tennis and "the ladies." He matriculated at New York University, originally to study journalism, but grew restless and dropped out without obtaining a degree. His first job was working in the Manhattan department store B. Altman and Company. Among the things he practiced selling were paintings, which nurtured his love of art. He sailed to Europe at age 20 on an inheritance from his parents, and went to live in Paris. He enjoyed a bohemian lifestyle there, visiting the Louvre three times a week, where he met his lifelong friend, 20th century art historian Meyer Schapiro. Neuberger painted and studied art until 1928, when he read Floret Fels' biography of Vincent Van Gogh. He was startled when
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    2 votes
    208
    Walter Annenberg

    Walter Annenberg

    Walter Hubert Annenberg (March 13, 1908 – October 1, 2002) was an American publisher, philanthropist, and diplomat. Walter Annenberg was born to a Jewish family in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 13, 1908. He was the son of Sarah and Moses "Moe" Annenberg, who published The Daily Racing Form and purchased The Philadelphia Inquirer in 1936. The Annenberg family moved to Long Island, New York in 1920, and Walter attended high school at the Peddie School in Hightstown, New Jersey, graduating in 1927. He went on to college at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, not graduating. While in college he was a member of Zeta Beta Tau, a traditionally Jewish fraternity. Annenberg was greatly affected by tax evasion charges and other scandals that involved his father in the 1930s. A significant part of his adult life was dedicated to rehabilitating the family's name, through philanthropy and public service. In 1942, after his father's death, Annenberg took over the family businesses, making successes out of some that had been failing. He bought additional print media as well as radio and television stations, resulting in great success. One of his most prominent successes was the
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    2 votes
    209
    Zack Hample

    Zack Hample

    Zachary Ben Hample (born September 14, 1977, son of Stoo Hample and Naomi Cohen) is an American sports writer and Major League baseball collector. He is best known for having caught more than 6,000 baseballs in the stands at Major League stadiums. Hample has written three books. The first, How to Snag Major League Baseballs, was published by Simon & Schuster in 1999 when he was a junior at Guilford College. The second, Watching Baseball Smarter, was published by Random House in 2007 and was the 8th best selling American sports book that year. His third book, The Baseball, also published by Random House, was released on March 8, 2011. Hample, a writer for minorleaguebaseball.com from 2005 to 2007, contributed the foreword to Major League Baseball: An Interactive Guide to the World of Sports in 2008 and wrote the introduction for Baseball Scorekeeper in 2011. As of September 17, 2012, Hample has collected 6,367 baseballs from 50 different Major League stadiums. He acquired his first ball from a Mets reliever at Shea Stadium on June 20, 1990 and set a personal, one-game record with 36 baseballs at Great American Ball Park on September 14th, 2011. Some of Hample's notable catches
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    2 votes
    210

    Sir Gawaine George Hope Baillie, 7th Baronet

    Sir Gawaine Baillie, 7th Bt (8 March 1934 – 21 December 2003) was an amateur motor racing driver, engineer, industrialist, stamp collector, and the owner of the ancient estate surrounding Leeds Castle, the ancient fortress in Kent. After his death, it was discovered that he had amassed, almost entirely in secret, one of the greatest collections of stamps of the former British Empire. Sir Gawaine was raised at Leeds Castle, the ancient fortress in Kent that his mother Lady Baillie (née Olive Cecilia Paget), a Whitney heiress, had bought with her sister Dorothy Paget in 1928. At age five, after World War II broke out, Baillie went to live with his American cousins, the Whitney family. Soon after returning to England, his father died, and he succeeded to the family title, becoming 7th Baronet of Polkemmet, Linlithgowshire on 8 January 1947. Following education at Eton and Cambridge, he created HPC Engineering in 1959, a company which specializes in sub-contract manufacturing for the automotive, aerospace, computer, defence, medical and machine tool industries. He served as chairman and managing director of the company for the rest of his life. He was also an amateur race car driver,
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    2 votes
    211

    Chester Dale

    Chester Dale (May 3, 1883 – December 16, 1962) was an American banker and patron of the arts. Dale earned large sums from working for the New York Stock Exchange, allowing him to collect a group of 19th and 20th-century French paintings. Although he considered establishing a private museum, he donated a part of his collection to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. in 1941. The rest of his collection was bequeathed to the National Gallery upon his death. Dale was born in 1883, and started his financial career at the age of fifteen, as a runner for the New York Stock Exchange. At the age of 27 he married Maud Murray, a painter and critic, who introduced him to the idea of collecting modern art. In time he acquired assets that included utilities, railroads, and municipal bonds in the USA and Canada. When the National Gallery of Art opened, Dale lent the gallery 22 American pictures, and within a few months, two rooms of French Impressionist paintings were established. Upon the request of painter George Bellows, Dale agreed to sit for an oil on canvas painting in 1922, depicting Dale holding a golf club. Both Dale and Bellows were semi-professional athletes in their younger
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    1 votes
    212
    Edward B. Evans

    Edward B. Evans

    Edward Benjamin Evans, RPS (3 November 1846 – 21 March 1922), a British army officer also known as "Major Evans", was a distinguished philatelist, stamp collector, and philatelic journalist. His philatelic specialization included Mauritius, the Confederate States of America, the Mulready envelopes, and the Indian feudatory states. Evans was born at Norwich, England, and commenced collecting stamps as a student at Uppingham Grammar School in 1861. He was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Artillery in 1867. Posted to Malta, he met Lieutenant Speranza, formerly Secretary of the London Philatelic Society, and studied Italian, which enabled him to translate and introduce Dr. Emilio Diena's work on the postal history of the Italian States to English speaking philatelists. Posted to Mauritius in 1876, Evans assembled an extraordinary collection of that country's stamps. These included a famous example of the One Penny Red "Post Office" Mauritius lightly postmarked on an envelope, which may have contained an invitation to the governor's ball, and several unused Two Pence "Post Paid" in indigo and dark blue. He sent a paper on these issues to the "Congrès International des
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    1 votes
    213
    Electra Havemeyer Webb

    Electra Havemeyer Webb

    Electra Havemeyer Webb (August 16, 1888 – November 19, 1960) was a collector of American antiques and founder of the Shelburne Museum. Electra Havemeyer was born on August 16, 1888 to Henry O. Havemeyer and Louisine Elder, their youngest child. She attended Miss Spence's School and traveled with her family to the American West, France, Italy, Spain, Egypt, Greece and Austria, but did not attend college. Electra married an heir to the Vanderbilt family fortune, James Watson Webb, Sr., in an elaborate society wedding at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, New York in 1910. They had five children, Electra (1910–1982), Samuel (1912–1988), Lila (1913–1961), James Watson, Jr.(1916–2000), and Harry (1922–1975). Electra's in-laws, Dr. William Seward Webb and Lila Vanderbilt Webb had transformed a collection of rambling lakeside farms on the shore of Vermont's Lake Champlain into a model country estate. The core of property, the Shelburne Farms, survives today as a nonprofit foundation dedicated to fostering innovative agricultural practices. Recalling her first visit to the Webb estate as a young girl Webb declared "I felt as though I was in dreamland," she was smitten by the beauty of
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    1 votes
    214
    Fiske Warren

    Fiske Warren

    Frederick Fiske Warren (2 July 1862–2 February 1938) was a successful paper manufacturer, fine arts denizen and major supporter of Henry George's single tax system which he helped develop in Harvard, Massachusetts, United States, in the 1930s. He was the son of Samuel Dennis Warren and Susan Cornelia Warren of Beacon Hill, Boston, and the brother to U.S. Attorney Samuel D. Warren and to Edward Perry Warren. Born in Waltham, Massachusetts, Fiske was raised in a mansion on 67 Mount Vernon Street in Beacon Hill in Boston. As part of a philanthropic and highly educated family, the Warren brothers and sisters all enjoyed tranquil childhoods growing up between the family homes in Boston and Waltham, also known as "Cedar Hill". On 14 May 1891 he married Gretchen Osgood Warren in Boston. The Osgoods were a well-known Beacon Hill family that claimed a direct genealogical line to Anne Hutchinson and John Quincy Adams. Their country house in Harvard, Massachusetts, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.
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    1 votes
    215

    Giles McCrary

    Giles Connell McCrary, Sr. (November 5, 1919 – October 30, 2011), was a self-employed oil operator, investor, art collector, rancher, and the owner of the OS Museum in Post, the seat of Garza County, southeast of Lubbock on the Texas South Plains. McCrary was the mayor of Post from 1969 to 1991; in Texas, all mayors are elected on a nonpartisan ballot. McCrary, however, was a Republican, having contributed in recent years to many GOP candidates as well as the Republican National Committee and the National Republican Senatorial Committee. McCrary was born to I. N. McCrary and the former Nell Connell in Fort Worth, the seat of Tarrant County, in north Texas. In 1940, while still twenty, he married his wife, the former Helen Louise Luton (born 1920). Their children are daughter, Mary L. McCrary of Lubbock, and a son, Giles C. McCrary, Jr. (born 1952), of Fort Worth, and four grandchildren. A second daughter, Pamela McCrary, died in 1979 at the age of thirty-four. In 1942, McCrary graduated from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, an institution headed by General Robert E. Lee from 1865 until Lee's death in 1870. McCrary then entered the United States Army's 63rd
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    1 votes
    216
    Hendrik van Rijgersma

    Hendrik van Rijgersma

    The Dutch naturalist Hendrik Elingsz van Rijgersma (born January 5, 1835 in Lemmer, Province of Friesland, the Netherlands, died March 4, 1877 in St. Martin) was a physician and amateur botanist, malacologist and ichthyologist. He became a physician in 1858, and practiced medicine in the small town of Jisp and on the island of Marken. In 1861 he married Maria Henriette Gräfing; they had seven children. When slavery was abolished in the Dutch colonies in 1863, he was one of six physicians appointed to provide medical care to the liberated slaves on the island of St. Martin in the Netherlands Antilles, where he served as government physician until his untimely death at the age of 42. There he collected many fossils, plants, birds, reptiles, fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and insects. Hendrik van Rijgersma was an excellent painter and left to posterity many, mostly unpublished, drawings, sketches and water colors of plants, shells and other subjects. His animal collections were sent by him to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, of which he was a corresponding member. The plants he sent to the Berlin herbarium were destroyed. There apparently are also plants he collected at
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    1 votes
    217

    Katherine Sophie Dreier

    Katherine Sophie Dreier (September 10, 1877 – March 29, 1952) was an artist and a patron of the arts. Her paintings were abstract with spiritual emphasis, and she was a member of the Abstraction-Création group. She was born in Brooklyn, New York to Dorothea Adelheid and Theodor Dreier. Dorothea and Theodor had emigrated from Bremen, Germany. Katherine was the youngest of their five children, her older sister was the painter Dorothea Dreier. She was treasurer of the German Home for Recreation of Women and Children and was one of the founding members of the Little Italy Neighborhood Association in Brooklyn, New York. She studied at the Brooklyn Art School and at the Pratt Institute, and then studied with Walter Shirlaw with her sister, Dorothea. In 1917 she was a director, and perhaps co-founder, of the Art Center in New York City with William Laurel Harris. Between 1907 and 1914, Katherine spent time abroad studying art from teachers like Raphaël Collin, and exhibiting her work. In 1916 in New York City, while working for the Society of Independent Artists, she met Marcel Duchamp. In January 1920, Dreier, Duchamp, and Man Ray founded the Société Anonyme in Dreier's Manhattan
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Ronald Lauder

    Ronald Lauder

    Ronald Steven Lauder (born February 26, 1944) is an American businessman and philanthropist. Forbes lists Lauder among the richest people of the world with an estimated net worth of $3.3 billion in 2011. Lauder was born in New York City, the son of Estée Lauder and Joseph Lauder, founders of Estée Lauder Companies, and the younger brother of Leonard Lauder, chairman of the board of the Estee Lauder company. He attended the Bronx High School of Science and holds a Bachelors degree in International Business from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He studied at the University of Paris, and received a Certificate in International Business from the University of Brussels. He is married to Jo Carole (Knopf) Lauder, and has two children, Aerin and Jane. Lauder started to work for the Estee Lauder Company in 1964. In 1984 he became a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO policy at The Pentagon. In 1986 Ronald Reagan named him as the US ambassador to Austria, a position he held until 1987. As ambassador, he fired diplomatic officer Felix Bloch, who later became known in connection with Robert Hanssen espionage case. As a Republican, he made a bid to
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    2 votes
    219
    George Washington Vanderbilt II

    George Washington Vanderbilt II

    George Washington Vanderbilt II (November 14, 1862 – March 6, 1914) was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family, which had amassed a huge fortune through steamboats, railroads, and various business enterprises. He built and owned Biltmore, the largest home in the United States. The youngest child of William Henry Vanderbilt and Maria Louisa Kissam. George III was named after his father's youngest brother, George Washington Vanderbilt II, the third son to survive to adulthood of the family founder, Cornelius Vanderbilt. (Uncle George II had died young at age 25 of tuberculosis contracted during his service in the Civil War.) Cornelius' tenth child, George I, was born in 1832 and died in 1836. As the youngest in William's family, George III was said to be his father's favorite and his constant companion. Relatives described him as slender, dark-haired, and pale-complexioned. Shy and introverted, his interests ran to philosophy, books, and the collection of paintings in his father's large art gallery. In addition to frequent visits to Paris, France, where several Vanderbilts kept a home, George traveled extensively, becoming fluent in eight foreign languages. His
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    1 votes
    220

    H. Louis Dousman

    Hercules Louis Dousman II (April 3, 1848 – January 13, 1886), better known as Louis Dousman, was the son of Wisconsin millionaire Hercules Louis Dousman I. After inheriting his father's wealth, Dousman became a prominent Midwestern socialite and art collector. Louis Dousman was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, the son of Hercules and Jane Dousman. As a child he received private tutoring, and he later attended a preparatory school in Madison, Wisconsin. Louis's education was cut short by the death of his father in 1868, an event which forced Louis to return to Prairie du Chien to take care of his father's estate. In 1870, two years after the death of his father, Dousman began using his inheritance, dismantling the house of his childhood and replacing it with a more modern home. This house, which would be come to be called Villa Louis in later decades, was designed in the Italianate style by E. Townsend Mix, but did not function as Louis's home for long. In 1872, Dousman moved to Saint Paul, Minnesota, leaving his mother to occupy the Prairie du Chien estate. Owing to his wealth and his father's previous association with Henry Hastings Sibley, who had earlier served as Governor
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    221
    James Lindsay, 26th Earl of Crawford

    James Lindsay, 26th Earl of Crawford

    James Ludovic Lindsay, 26th Earl of Crawford and 9th Earl of Balcarres (1847 – 31 January 1913) was a British astronomer, politician, bibliophile and philatelist. A member of the Royal Society, Crawford was elected president of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1878. He was a prominent Freemason. The Earl was the son of Alexander the 25th Earl and his wife Margaret. He was asthmatic and spent considerable periods at sea studying the more portable sections of the family library which had been established by his father. Crawford was interested in astronomy from an early age. Along with his father, he built up a private observatory at Dun Echt, Aberdeenshire. He employed David Gill (astronomer) to equip the observatory, using the best available technology. Among his achievements, Gill later made the first photograph of the Great Comet of 1882, pioneering astrophotography and the mapping of the heavens. Crawford mounted expeditions to Cadiz in 1870, to observe the eclipse of the sun; and then to Mauritius in 1874, to observe the transit of Venus. Upon hearing of a threat to close down the Edinburgh Royal Observatory, in 1888 Crawford made a donation of astronomical instruments and his
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    222
    James Macpherson

    James Macpherson

    James Macpherson (Scottish Gaelic: Seumas MacMhuirich or Seumas Mac a' Phearsain) (27 October 1736 – 17 February 1796) was a Scottish writer, poet, literary collector and politician, known as the "translator" of the Ossian cycle of poems. Macpherson was born at Ruthven in the parish of Kingussie, Badenoch, Inverness-shire. In 1753, he was sent to King's College, Aberdeen, moving two years later to Marischal College (the two institutions later became the University of Aberdeen). He then went to Edinburgh for just over a year, but it is unknown whether he studied at the university. He is said to have written over 4,000 lines of verse while a student; some of this was later published, notably The Highlander (1758), which he is said to have tried to suppress afterwards. On leaving college, he returned to Ruthven to teach in the school there. At Moffat he met John Home, the author of Douglas, for whom he recited some Gaelic verses from memory. He also showed him manuscripts of Gaelic poetry, supposed to have been picked up in the Scottish Highlands and the Western Isles. Encouraged by Home and others, he produced a number of pieces translated from the Scottish Gaelic, which he
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    223
    Marie-Gabriel-Florent-Auguste de Choiseul-Gouffier

    Marie-Gabriel-Florent-Auguste de Choiseul-Gouffier

    Marie-Gabriel-Florent-Auguste de Choiseul-Gouffier (27 September 1752, Paris - 20 June 1817, Aix-la-Chapelle) was a member of the Académie Française and the Choiseul-Gouffier family, French ambassador to the Ottoman Empire from 1784 until the fall of the French monarchy and a scholar of ancient Greece. Right from his studies at the collège d'Harcourt, he had a passion for antiquities. He was particularly marked by frequent meetings with Jean-Jacques Barthélemy, author of Voyage d'Anarcharsis, whom he met at the home of his cousin the duc de Choiseul. Another friend was Talleyrand, with whom he participated in court intrigues and by whom he was dissuaded from taking up the religious life. In 1776, he left for Greece on board the frigate Atalante, commanded by Joseph Bernard de Chabert, marquis of Chabert, who was interested in astronomy. With painters and architects in tow, Choiseul-Gouffier thus visited the south Peloponnese, the Cyclades and other Aegean islands, then moved on to Asia Minor. The journey had also had a political goal - explaining the situation in the Aegean between the Ottoman Empire and Imperial Russia. On his return he published the first volume of his Voyage
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    224

    Michael Sefi

    Michael Richard Sefi (born 11 December 1943) is a British philatelist and has been the keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection since 1 January 2003. Sefi was born in London. When he was a child, his grandfather introduced him to stamp collecting. He began collecting stamps again in his early thirties when his own children received stamps and stamp albums as a gift and while he was looking for a hobby to ease the stress from the Deloitte and Touche fusion. He specialized in collecting the first postage stamps of George V's reign. He worked as a chartered accountant until he partially retired in late 1992. He became an associate of Deloitte & Touche in the 1980s. He became an active member of the Philatelic Society of Great Britain of which he was president between 2000 and 2002. Sefi later became the president of the Royal Philatelic Society London where he has been a member of many decision-making bodies since 1990. In September 1996, he was hired as an adjoint to the keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection, who was Charles Goodwyn. He helped him accelerate the mounting of the George VI postage stamp collection. Sefi participated in international philatelic exhibitions of parts
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    225

    Paul Sintenis

    Paul Ernst Emil Sintenis (4. 4. 1847 Seidenberg, Oberlausitz, Prussia - ?. ?. 1907, ?) was a German botanist, pharmacist and plant collector. He studied at the gymnasium in Görlitz, became a pharmacist’s apprentice in 1863 and worked as such in several German cities. His first collecting trip, in the years 1872-1876, was as helper to his brother Max, with whom he collected birds, mammals and plants in the Dobruja. After further pharmaceutical studies in Breslau (now Wrocław) and another short stint as pharmacist, he spent the rest of his professional life as plant collector. Between the years 1880 – 1883 he collected on Rhodes, Cyprus, Northern Italy, and Istria. Sintenis arrived in Puerto Rico in October 1884 and, supported by L. Krug, remained there until June 1887. He subsequently collected in Turkey, Syria, Irak, Turkmenistan, Iran, and Greece. Sintenis's herbarium was acquired by Lund University (Sweden), where it is still kept. The first set of his Puerto Rican collections was mostly destroyed at Dahlem (Berlin) during the Second World War, but duplicates survived in all major herbaria, primarily Kew, the British Museum, Harvard, New York Botanical Garden, and the National
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    226
    Robert Denning

    Robert Denning

    Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005) was an American interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. Born Robert Dennis Besser to Jean (née Rosen) and Jacob Besser, Denning, as he was often called, developed an early interest in his body and health, a characteristic instilled in him by his mother. He was just fifteen when he met Edgar de Evia who was the research assistant to Dr. Guy Beckley Stearns and would go on to become a noted photographer. He became a testing subject for this Homeopathic medical research and when his parents and younger brother moved to Florida, he stayed in New York City living with de Evia and his mother Miirrha Alhambra. He would often say that he saw his first lampshade in this home, as he grew up with a bare bulb being adequate. His first effort with decorating was perhaps in imitation of Syrie Maugham when Edgar and he, painted everything in Miirrha's room white and put her bed on a dais. Her only response was: "Did you have to paint even my Baccarat perfume bottles?" He never used white again. From 1960 the firm of Denning & Fourcade would become known for
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    227
    William Lobb

    William Lobb

    William Lobb (1809 – May 1864) was a Cornish plant collector, employed by Veitch Nurseries of Exeter, who was responsible for the commercial introduction to England of Araucaria araucana (the "Monkey-Puzzle" tree) from Chile and the massive Sequoiadendron giganteum ("Wellingtonia") from North America. He and his brother, Thomas Lobb, were the first collectors to be sent out by the Veitch nursery business, with the primary commercial aim of obtaining new species and large quantities of seed. His introductions of the Monkey-Puzzle tree, "Wellingtonia" and many other conifers to Europe earned him the sobriquet "messenger of the big tree". In addition to his arboreal introductions, he also introduced many garden shrubs and greenhouse plants to Victorian Europe, including Desfontainia spinosa and Berberis darwinii, which are still grown today. Lobb was born in 1809 at Perranarworthal, between Truro and Falmouth, Cornwall and spent his early life at Egloshayle, near Wadebridge. His father, John Lobb, was the estate carpenter at nearby Pencarrow where a notable garden had been developed by Sir William Molesworth. John developed a love of gardening and, after losing his place at Pencarrow,
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    228

    Armand Rousso

    Armand Rousso, also known as Marc Rousso, is a business man who was born in France. He is the founder of Accoona.com, a business-to-business search engine, and X3D Techonology. French born entrepreneur Armand Rousso settled in the United States in 1982, working as a trader of stamps. In 1985 he stated he bartered $45 million (catalog value) in rare stamps. In 1986, when the Internet was little known entity, Rousso started an online stamp exchange website, The International Stamp Exchange, which lasted until 1990. The International Stamp Exchange was part of a network by David N. Glassman who created NaicoNet the first online retail online stock trading system. It was Glassman who realized Rousso was a fraud and closed his "exchange". He thought online advertising revenues could be lucrative enough to make a business dedicated to philatelists profitable. In the mid 1990s, Rousso became involved with Philippe V. Hababou, a Frenchman convicted of check fraud. In 1998, he pleaded guilty to securities fraud and money-laundering charges; in 1999, he was convicted of securities fraud in France and was also caught up in the investigation over illegal campaign contributions to the 1996
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    229
    August Von Spiess

    August Von Spiess

    Col. August Von Spiess, also spelled von Spieß (August 6, 1864 — 1953), formally known as Oberst August Roland von Braccioforte zum Portner und Höflein, was an officer, writer, famous hunter and Hunting Master for the Romanian royal court. Von Spiess was born in Austria and became a Romanian citizen after the Union of Transylvania with Romania, following the dissolution of Austria-Hungary. He was married to Auguste Herbert from Sibiu. Their daughter was the ornithologist Silvia Stein Spiess (1901–1993). In 1875, at 11 years old, he entered the military school of Sankt Pölten, after which he joined the Theresian Military Academy of Wiener Neustadt, Vienna. After 10 years of military studies, in August 1885 he became a lieutenant in the Transylvanian 64th Infantry stationed in the Orăştie-Sebeş-Alba Iulia area. In May 1889 he advanced to the rank of Major and settled in Sibiu, where he acted as drill officer. In 1893 he became a professor at the Military Infantry Cadet School of Sibiu; in 1911 he was named commander of the school. In February 1915, he advanced to the rank of Colonel and took command of the 2nd Regiment Infantry in Sibiu. Von Spiess finished his military career after
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    230

    Charles F. Gunther

    Charles Frederick Gunther (March 6, 1837 – February 10, 1920) was a German-American confectioner and collector. He purchased many of the items now owned by the Chicago History Museum. Gunther and his family moved from Württemberg to Pennsylvania in 1842, then resettled in Peru, Illinois. In 1860, Gunther traveled south and landed a job with Bohlen, Wilson & Company, an ice distributor based in Memphis, Tennessee. When the American Civil War broke out, Gunther pledged to "stick by Memphis", and helped transport Confederate soldiers along the tributaries of the Mississippi River. He was captured by Union troops in 1862, but was released and traveled back to Illinois. During the later years of the war, he worked as a traveling salesman for a Chicago candy manufacturer, mainly selling goods throughout the southern states. After the Civil War, Gunther traveled to Europe to learn from the candymakers there. He started his own candy company in Chicago in 1868, specializing in caramel, which he is sometimes credited with introducing to the United States. Gunther's business was destroyed in the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, but he quickly recovered and built a new factory on State Street. With
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    231
    Colin Mackenzie

    Colin Mackenzie

    Colonel Colin Mackenzie (1754–1821) was Surveyor General of India, and an art collector and orientalist. Mackenzie was born in Stornoway, Outer Hebrides, Scotland. He produced many of the first accurate maps of India, and his research and collections contributed significantly to the field of Asian studies. He began his career as a customs officer in Stornoway, but at age 28, joined the British East India Company as an officer in the engineers. In 1799, he was part of the British force in the Battle of Seringapatam, where Tipu Sultan, Maharaja of Mysore was defeated by the British. He led the Mysore survey between 1800 and 1810. The survey consisted of a team of draftsmen and illustrators who collected material on the natural history, geography, architecture, history, customs, and folk tales of the region. He later spent two years in Java, during the period of British occupation during the Napoleonic Wars. He used his military career and salary to support his research into the history, religion, philosophy, ethnology, folklore, art, and mathematics of India and Java. He hired learned Brahmins to assist him with surveys and translations of manuscripts. He researched Indian
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    232
    David Bautista

    David Bautista

    David Michael Bautista, Jr. (born January 18, 1969), is a former American professional wrestler, bodybuilder and actor best known for his time in World Wrestling Entertainment. In WWE, he became a six-time world champion, winning the World Heavyweight Championship four times, and the WWE Championship two times. He is the longest-reigning World Heavyweight Champion in WWE history. In addition to these championships, Batista has won the World Tag Team Championship three times (twice with Ric Flair and once with John Cena) and the WWE Tag Team Championship once (with Rey Mysterio). Batista was also the winner of the 2005 Royal Rumble match. After trying out at World Championship Wrestling's Power Plant, Batista signed a contract with the WWF in 2000 and was sent to its developmental territory, Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW), where he won the OVW Heavyweight Championship. Batista was born to David Michael Bautista, the son of Filipino immigrants to America and Donna Raye Bautista, who is Greek. His parents separated (and eventually divorced). His paternal grandparents were from the Philippines as his grandfather served in the military, worked as a taxicab driver, barber, and other jobs to
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    233

    David Bowman

    David Bowman (3 September 1838 – 25 June 1868) was a Scottish plant collector who, in 1866, was sent by James Veitch & Sons to collect in Brazil. The species Dieffenbachia bowmanii is named after him. Bowman was born at Arniston near Edinburgh, where his father worked as a gardener. Bowman started his gardening career working with his father, before working at the gardens at Dalhousie Castle, Archerfield, and Dunmore Park, all in Scotland. He later moved to England to take up a position as foreman in the gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society at Chiswick, west London. In 1866, he was recruited by James Veitch & Sons of Chelsea, who, in a joint venture with William Wilson Saunders, sent him to Brazil to search for orchids and other plants. He travelled initially to Rio de Janeiro and travelled across the continent to Colombia. Amongst the plants he discovered and sent to his employers were Dieffenbachia bowmanii and Paullinia thalictrifolia, a climbing hothouse plant with fern-like foliage. He also found two orchids, Odontoglossum crispum "Alexandrae" and Cyanophyllum bowmanii, which was later awarded a first-class certificate by the RHS's Floral Committee. Whilst in Colombia,
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    234
    Eli Broad

    Eli Broad

    Eli Broad (/brɵd/; born June 6, 1933) is an American businessman from Detroit, Michigan who resides in Los Angeles, California. An only child, Broad was born in the Bronx to Lithuanian Jewish immigrant parents. His father was a house painter, and his mother a dressmaker. His family moved to Detroit when he was six years old. In Detroit his father operated five-and-dime stores and his mother resumed work as a dressmaker. Broad attended Detroit Public Schools. In 1951, he graduated from Detroit Central High School. He attended Michigan State University, majoring in accounting with a minor in economics and graduating cum laude in 1954. That same year, the twenty-one year old Broad married eighteen year old Edythe "Edye" Lawson. From 1954 to 2010, Broad held the distinction of being the youngest Michigan resident to become a Certified Public Accountant. Prior to entering the home building business, Broad worked as an accountant for two years. In 1957, Broad went into business with Donald Kaufman, who was a home builder and related to his wife, Edye. Broad financed his end of the enterprise with $25,000 borrowed from his wife's parents. Kaufman and Broad Home Corporation (now KB Home)
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    235

    Eli Wilner

    Eli Wilner (born 1956) is proprietor of Eli Wilner & Company, a New York art gallery specializing in American and European period frames from the 19th through the early 20th century. He is a leading frame dealer, collector, and restorer, as well as an acknowledged and published authority on period frames. Wilner is a graduate of Brandeis University, where he received a BA in Fine Arts in 1976, and of Hunter College, where he received his MA in 1978. He was a Bryant Fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1995 to 1999. He has been an Art Forum member since 1993 and a member of the Director’s Circle of the Smithsonian American Art Museum since 1997. In 1998, Wilner served on the Board of Trustees for the New York Academy of Art. In 1983, Eli Wilner founded Eli Wilner & Company, an art gallery located on New York’s Upper East Side dedicated to the display and sale of American and European frames! The gallery has been primarily responsible for the increased awareness and appreciation of American and European period frames. Committed to the education of curators, collectors, and dealers, Eli Wilner & Company has curated many important frame exhibitions and lectured extensively
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    236
    Frank Crowninshield

    Frank Crowninshield

    Francis Welch Crowninshield (June 24, 1872 – December 28, 1947), better known as Frank or Crownie (informal), was an American journalist and art and theatre critic best known for developing and editing the magazine Vanity Fair for 21 years, making it a pre-eminent literary journal. Crowninshield was born June 24, 1872 in Paris, France, to the Americans Frederic Crowninshield (1845–1918) and his wife, the former Helen Suzette Fairbanks, what he called "poor but good" members of the well-heeled Boston Brahmin Crowninshield family. His father, a man of "independent means", was a poet and a respected painter of landscape and murals. He served for two years as director of the American Academy in Rome. As an adult Frank Crowninshield lived in New York City, where he was active in the high-class life and socialized on a regular basis with the elites of the period, as well as rising artists and writers. He was a member of the exclusive Knickerbocker Club and Union Club. Crowninshield never married. In 1914, Crowninshield – who was considered "the most cultivated, elegant, and endearing man in publishing, if not Manhattan" – was hired by his friend Condé Nast to become editor of the new
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    237

    Guillermo Kalbreyer

    Wilhelm (Guillermo) Kalbreyer (1847–1912) was a German plant collector who was sent by James Veitch & Sons of Chelsea, London to collect new plants in West Africa and South America. According to Hortus Veitchii, the Veitch family history: "Guillermo Kalbreyer, a promising young man, twenty-nine years of age, entered Messrs. Veitch's service as a plant-collector in 1876, and his first trip was to the West Coast of Africa in search of tropical flowering and foliage plants, very popular at that time." Kalbreyer set off from Liverpool in November 1876 and arrived at the island of Fernando Po in the Gulf of Guinea on Christmas Eve before travelling on to Victoria in Cameroon a week later. His travels took him into neighbouring southern Nigeria, including exploring the coastal areas around Calabar and Bonny, as well as the Cameroon mountains and the Sanaga River basin. At that time travelling in the region was difficult, and, owing to the hostility of native traders, foreigners were unable to penetrate far into the country. Whilst in Victoria, Kalbreyer met Rev. George Thomson, a Baptist missionary and amateur plant collector, who assisted him on his plant gathering expeditions. In July
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    238
    Henry O. Havemeyer

    Henry O. Havemeyer

    Henry Osborne Havemeyer (1847–1907) was an American entrepreneur who founded and became president of the American Sugar Refining Company in 1891. Havemeyer, who was born in New York City, inherited sugar refining entities and expanded them with assistance from his brother, Theodore Havemeyer. His companies controlled sugar refining of the United States at the time of his death. After three years (1865–68) of training in the Havemeyer business of sugar refining in the north-west area of Williamsburgh, Brooklyn, he became a partner in the family firm of Havemeyers and Elder at the age of 22. After a fire destroyed the firm's refinery in Brooklyn in 1882, Henry and his brother Theodore built, on the same site, the largest plant in the country, which became the centerpiece of the Sugar Trust in 1887. In 20 years he became the most expert merchandiser of sugar in the industry's most competitive period. Henry was known as the Sugar King, the country's dean of refiners. In 1891 he was made president of the American Sugar Refining Company serving until his sudden death in 1907 at age sixty. During this time the company controlled 80 percent of the sugar refined in the nation and his name
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    239

    John Marriott

    Sir John Brook Marriott (27 July 1922 in Stretford – 3 July 2001 in Godalming) was a British teacher and philatelist. He was the Keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection between 1969 and 1995. A mathematics graduate from the University of Cambridge during World War II, Marriott was quickly sent in 1943 to Bletchley Park, then the United Kingdom's main codebreaking establishment. From 1945 to 1982 Marriott taught mathematics at the Charterhouse School, in Godalming, Surrey, where he was a housemaster from 1960 to 1975. A Stamp collector from the age of twelve, Marriott was a specialist in Trinidad postal history. In 1952 he sold part of this collection in order to set up a new home after his marriage. He rebuilt his collection again and won medals at international philatelic exhibitions. In 1969, John Wilson, Keeper of the Royal Philatelic Collection, suggested Marriott as his successor. As a member since 1965 of the Royal Philatelic Society London's Expert Committee, of which Wilson was Chairman, Marriott was very familiar with the Royal Collection. From 1969 to 1995, he divided his time between Charterhouse and London. His wife replaced him at the boarding house when he was at
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    240
    Jules Bache

    Jules Bache

    Jules Semon Bache (November 9, 1861 – March 24, 1944) was a German-born American banker, art collector and philanthropist. Born in Germany, as a young boy his family emigrated to the United States, settling in New York City. In 1881, he started work as a cashier at Leopold Cahn & Co., a stockbrokerage firm founded by his uncle. In 1886 he was made a minority partner and in 1892 took full control of the business, renaming it J. S. Bache & Co. Jules Bache built the company into one of the top brokerage houses in the United States, outranked only by Merrill Lynch. In the process, he became an immensely wealthy individual, a patron of the arts, and a philanthropist. During World War I, Jules Bache donated money to the American Field Service in France and his wife was the honorary treasurer of the "War Babies' Cradle," a charity that provided aid for mothers and children in distress in war-torn Northern France and Belgium to provide them with food, clothing, heating fuel and medical care. Jules Bache was a shareholder of a number of prominent corporations and sat on the board of directors of many of them. Among his personal holdings, Bache had sizeable interests in Canadian mining
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    241

    Mildred Seeley

    Mildred Seeley (1918 - 10 December 2001) was a doll collector, doll-related entrepreneur, and prolific author on the subjects of doll making and doll collecting. Mildred Seeley lived in a "small village in upstate New York" and in Green Valley, Arizona. She never visited the countries where her beloved dolls were made. Yet, she built "an international network of doll lovers and a world-class doll collection". She is widely recognized as a primary force in raising the profile of antique doll collecting and increasing the value of antique dolls. In 1986, Mildred Seeley initiated the designation of the second Saturday in June as World Doll Day. In 1946 Mildred Seely founded Seeley's, a company which refers to itself as the leader in "the fascinating world of porcelain dollmaking and related arts." In 1977, Mildred Seeley co-founded the Doll Artisan Guild. The Doll Artisan Guild offers special recognition in dollmaking competition, including the "Millie" (named for Seeley). It also publishes the quarterly "DOLLS Beautiful" magazine. Seeley established a chain of franchised "Seeley Doll Studios". She also created lines of limited-edition doll-related collectors' plates, valued by both
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    242

    Ogden Phipps

    Ogden Phipps (November 26, 1908 - April 21, 2002) was an American stockbroker, court tennis champion and Hall of Fame member, thoroughbred horse racing executive and owner/breeder, and an art collector and philanthropist. In 2001, he was inducted into the International Court Tennis Hall of Fame. Born in New York City, Phipps was the son of Henry Carnegie Phipps and Gladys Livingston Mills. His grandfather Henry Phipps was a major philanthropist who had amassed a fortune as the second largest shareholder in the Carnegie Steel Company. Educated at Harvard University, Ogden Phipps became a champion court tennis player, capturing the U.S. championship seven times and the British championship once. During World War II, Ogden Phipps served with the United States Navy. After the war he became a partner in the prominent brokerage firm, Smith Barney & Co. then used his training to head up Bessemer Securities Corporation, a private holding company that managed the fortune left to Phipps family members by their grandfather. In 1962 his son, Henry Ogden Phipps committed suicide. He died on April 21, 2002. Ogden Phipps was named for his mother's brother, Ogden L. Mills. His mother and uncle
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    243
    Peggy Guggenheim

    Peggy Guggenheim

    Marguerite "Peggy" Guggenheim (August 26, 1898 – December 23, 1979) was an American art collector, bohemian and socialite. Born to a wealthy New York City family, she was the daughter of Benjamin Guggenheim, who went down with the Titanic in 1912, and the niece of Solomon R. Guggenheim, who would establish the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Peggy Guggenheim created a noted art collection in Europe and America primarily between 1938 and 1946. She exhibited this collection as she built it and, in 1949, settled in Venice, where she lived and exhibited her collection for the rest of her life. Peggy's father was of Swiss-German Jewish origin, and her mother of German and Dutch-Jewish ancestry. When she turned 21 in 1919, Peggy Guggenheim inherited US$2.5 million, roughly US$20 million in today's currency. Guggenheim's father, Benjamin Guggenheim, died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic and he had not amassed the fortune of his siblings; therefore her inheritance was far less than the vast wealth of her cousins. She first worked as a clerk in an avant-garde bookstore, the Sunwise Turn, where she became enamored with the members of the bohemian artistic community. In 1920 she went to
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    244
    Ralph Lauren

    Ralph Lauren

    Ralph Lauren (born Ralph Lifschitz, October 14, 1939) is an American fashion designer and business executive, best known for his Polo Ralph Lauren clothing brand. Ralph Lauren (pronounced loren) was born Ralph Lifschitz in the Bronx, New York, to Ashkenazi Jewish immigrants, from Pinsk, Belarus: Fraydl (née Kotlar) and Frank Lifschitz, a house painter. Lauren attended the Salanter Academy Jewish Day School followed by MTA (now known as the Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy), before eventually graduating from DeWitt Clinton High School in 1957. In MTA Lauren was known by his classmates for selling ties to his fellow students. In a moment of spontaneity, when asked what he wanted to do in his Clinton yearbook he stated under his picture that he wanted to be a millionaire. At the age of 16, Ralph's brother George Poitras (who was his guardian) changed their last name to Lauren to avoid the unfortunate obscenity reference Lipshitz has in English (although Ralph's brother Lenny retained the name). Apparently Ralph was teased about it in school. “My given name has the word shit in it,” he told Oprah Winfrey. “When I was a kid, the other kids would make a lot of fun of me. It was a tough
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    245
    Seth Swirsky

    Seth Swirsky

    Seth Swirsky (b. August 5, 1960, New Haven, Connecticut) is an American pop music songwriter (including the Grammy-nominated "Tell It To My Heart"), author, recording artist, filmmaker, political writer and baseball memorabilia collector -- a self-described "Manic Expressive." In 1980, at the age of 20, Seth Swirsky wrote the national jingle for Thomas' English Muffins. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1982, Swirsky wrote the Grammy-nominated hit "Tell It To My Heart" with Ernie Gold for Taylor Dayne. The song was on the Billboard Pop Singles Chart for six months in 1988, reaching #7 (gold single pictured left). The song was also a #1 hit in Germany and Sweden and #3 in England. In 2002, Kelly Llorenna’s version of the song went to #9 on the British charts. The song won Swirsky an ASCAP songwriter’s award for being one of the most performed songs of the year. In 2006, the song was recorded by the Royal Gigolos and spent two weeks on the Swiss charts at #2. It was featured as a clue in The New York Times crossword in 1998. Swirsky wrote Dayne's follow-up top ten hit, "Prove Your Love," with Arnie Roman. That song was a #7 Billboard pop hit as well as a #1 Billboard dance
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    246

    Solomon R. Guggenheim

    Solomon Robert Guggenheim (February 2, 1861 – November 3, 1949) was an American businessman, art collector, and philanthropist. He is best known for establishing the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City. Born into a wealthy mining family, Guggenheim founded the Yukon Gold Company in Alaska, among other business interests. He began collecting art in the 1890s, and after World War I, he retired from his business to spend his full time art collecting. Eventually, under the guidance of artist Hilla von Rebay, he focused on the collection of modern and contemporary art, creating an important collection by the 1930s and opening his first museum in 1939. Guggenheim was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, son of Meyer Guggenheim and brother of Simon, Benjamin, Daniel and four other siblings. Following studies in Switzerland at the Concordia Institute in Zürich, he returned to the United States to work in the family mining business, later founding the Yukon Gold Company in Alaska. In 1891, he turned around the Compañia de la Gran Fundición Nacional Mexicana. He married Irene Rothschild in 1895. His children were Eleanor (1896–1992) (later
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    Stanley Marcus

    Stanley Marcus

    Harold Stanley Marcus (April 20, 1905 – January 22, 2002) was an early president (1950–1972) and later chairman of the board (1972–1976) of the luxury retailer Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas, which his father and aunt had founded in 1907. During his tenure at the company, he also became a published author, writing his memoir Minding the Store and also a regular column in The Dallas Morning News. After Neiman Marcus was sold to Carter Hawley Hale Stores, Marcus initially remained in an advisory capacity to that company, but later began his own consulting business, which continued until his death. He served his local community as an avid patron of the fine arts and as a civic leader. In a chapter titled "Mr. Stanley" — the name by which Marcus was known locally for decades — in his 1953 work Neiman-Marcus, Texas, Frank X. Tolbert called him "Dallas' most internationally famous citizen" and worthy of being called "the Southwest's No. 1 businessman-intellectual." Marcus introduced many of the innovations for which Neiman-Marcus became known, creating a national award for service in fashion and hosting art exhibitions in the store itself, as well as weekly fashion shows and an annual
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    Steven A. Cohen

    Steven "Steve" A. Cohen (born June 11, 1956) is an American hedge fund manager. He is the founder of SAC Capital Advisors, a Stamford, Connecticut-based hedge fund focusing primarily on equity market strategies. He has an estimated net worth of $8.3 billion as of March 2012, ranked by Forbes as the 106th richest man in the world. Cohen is 35th overall in the U.S. Cohen grew up in a Jewish family in Great Neck, New York, where his father was a dress manufacturer in Manhattan's garment district, and his mother was a part-time piano teacher. He took a liking to poker as a high school student, often betting his own money in tournaments. Cohen credits the game with teaching him "how to take risks." Cohen received an economics degree from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1978. He was a brother of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity, Theta Chapter. While in school, a friend helped him open a brokerage account with $1,000 of his tuition money. After Wharton, Cohen got a Wall Street job as a junior trader in the options arbitrage department at Gruntal & Co. in 1978, where he eventually managed a $75 million portfolio and six traders. His first day on the job at Gruntal & Co.,
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    249
    Todd McFarlane

    Todd McFarlane

    Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961) is a Canadian cartoonist, artist, writer, toy designer and entrepreneur, best known for his work in comic books, such as the fantasy series Spawn. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, McFarlane became a comic book superstar due to his work on Marvel Comics' Spider-Man franchise. In 1992, he helped form Image Comics, pulling the occult anti-hero character Spawn from his high school portfolio and updating him for the 1990s. Spawn was a popular hero in the 1990s and encouraged a trend in creator-owned comic book properties. Since leaving inking duties on Spawn with issue #70 (February 1998), McFarlane has illustrated comic books less often, focusing on entrepreneurial efforts, such as McFarlane Toys and Todd McFarlane Entertainment, a film and animation studio. In September, 2006, it was announced that McFarlane will be the Art Director of the newly formed 38 Studios, formerly Green Monster Games, founded by major league baseball pitcher Curt Schilling. McFarlane used to be a co-owner of the National Hockey League's Edmonton Oilers but sold his shares to Daryl Katz. He is also a high-profile collector of history-making baseballs. McFarlane was born
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    Walter Pach

    Walter Pach

    Walter Pach (1883-1958) was an artist, critic, lecturer, art adviser, and art historian who wrote extensively about modern art and championed the cause of modern art. Through his numerous books, articles, and translations of European art texts Pach brought the emerging modernist viewpoint to the American public. He organized exhibitions of contemporary art for New York City galleries of the period, as well as the landmark exhibition of 1913, The "International Exhibition of Modern Art," known as the Armory Show. With painters Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn, he brought together leading contemporary European and American artists. Pach helped John Quinn and Walter Arensberg gather their collections. He also secured individual works for museums, such as a portrait by Thomas Eakins for the Louvre, and Jacques-Louis David's The Death of Socrates for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Pach's fluency in French, German, and Spanish made it possible for him to understand and interpret the avant-garde ideas developing in Europe and translate them for the English-speaking audience. He was able to communicate personally with many noted artists in Europe and Mexico and mediate between gallery
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