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Best Coat of Arms of All Time

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    1
    Coat of arms of Dalmatia

    Coat of arms of Dalmatia

    The Coat of arms of Dalmatia has two versions. The first and most widely used is azure, with three crowned golden leopards' heads affrontes, langued in gules. The second, older version, is gules, with three silver leopards' heads affrontes, langued and crowned in gold. The three leopards' heads are also known as lions' heads, due to the heraldic use of the term "leopard". The heraldic leopard differs from the real-life leopard (Panthera pardus). It does not have any spots and often has a mane. Therefore, in heraldry, the "leopard" is generally similar, and is often referred to, as a lion (Panthera leo). The reason for this lies in the fact that in the Middle Ages leopards were thought to be a crossbreed between a lion and a panther. This was retained in heraldry.
    6.30
    10 votes
    2
    Coat of arms of Buenos Aires

    Coat of arms of Buenos Aires

    The Coat of arms of Buenos Aires is the official shield used by the different areas and dependencies of the Government of Buenos Aires, Argentina. On October 20, 1580 the government of the city of La Trinidad and the port of Buen Ayre, headed by Juan de Garay, received an insignia sent to it by the crown for their approval. It depicted an eagle which was unfortunately looking to the left (the right of the observer), which in heraldry suggests "illegitimacy". There was another error, in that the crown was royal (which is supposed to be reserved for the highest nobility). Perhaps because of the presumed distaste of heraldry experts, the insignia was not approved until September 20, 1596, and fell out of use quite quickly.
    8.57
    7 votes
    3
    Coat of arms of Crimea

    Coat of arms of Crimea

    The coat of arms of Crimea (Ukrainian: Герб АР Крим, Russian: Герб АР Крым) is the official coat of arms of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea, Ukraine. It is in use since 1992 and was officially adopted on April 21, 1999. The coat of arms consists of a red Varangian shield and a right-facing silver griffin with azure pearl in its right paw. On either sides of the shield are two white pillars. At the top of the shield sits the rising sun. Winding around both columns and under the shield rests the Flag of Crimea, a blue–white–red tricolor ribbon, unto which the Motto of Crimea, Процветание в единстве (translated as Prosperity in unity), is inscribed. The Varangian shield is symbolic of the fact that the region of Crimea was for a long time a crossing of major trade routes. The red field of the coat of arms symbolizes the heroic and dramatic history of Crimea. The Griffin is placed on the coat of arms because it is commonly used to represent the territory north of the Black Sea, and is known as the "coat of arms" of Chersonesos and Panticapaeum, where one can see the griffin on artifacts from the area. Another variation in the symbolism is that the pearl is symbolic of Crimea as a
    6.75
    8 votes
    4
    Coat of arms of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Coat of arms of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

    The coat of arms of St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador was granted on 1 March 1965. Saint John the Baptist is symbolized on the shield by the lamb of God, carrying a banner bearing St George's Cross and scalloped shells. The ship, sailing on waves at the top of the shield, refers to the city’s early discoverers and explorers. The shield is supported on the left by a mariner of the fifteenth century bearing the year 1497, the year the city was discovered by John Cabot. The supporter on the right is a mariner of the late sixteenth century, bearing the date 1583, the year Sir Humphrey Gilbert claimed the region as England's first colony. The stone wall of the crest stands for civic authority, while the lion and roses refer to the city’s British heritage. Avancez (French for “advance”), the city’s motto, can be seen at the base.
    8.17
    6 votes
    5
    Coat of arms of Jelita

    Coat of arms of Jelita

    Jelita is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. One of the oldest Polish coats of arms. Firstly depicted on the seal of Tomisław z Mokrska from 1316. Additionally, the Polish medieval chronicler, diplomat and soldier Jan Długosz referred to those bearing the Jelita coat of arms as "a clan born in Poland of men who are modestly devoted to dogs and hunting." However the legend says that coat of arms was granted by King Władysław Łokietek to a peasant soldier (and his family) after the Battle of Płowce (1331) in which the Polish armies defeated the 40,000-strong force of the Teutonic Knights with minimal casualties. The man fought with great courage and only fell in battle when pierced by three spears in the abdominal region which caused his bowels to fall out. Shortly before death the King ennobled the fatally wounded man. Hence the three crossed spears in the coat of arms as well as the name Jelita - Bowels or Guts. Notable bearers of this coat of arms include:
    8.80
    5 votes
    6
    Coat of arms of Tajikistan

    Coat of arms of Tajikistan

    The State Emblem of Tajikistan is a modified version of the original coat of arms of the Tajik SSR that was in use until the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Like other post-Soviet republics whose symbols do not predate the October Revolution, the current emblem retains some components of the Soviet one. Prior to 1992, Tajikistan had a coat of arms similar to all other Soviet Republics The crown at the center of the emblem is the same as the Tajik national flag, and refers to the Persian word taj, meaning crown, from which the name of the Tajik people is said to be derived, according to one interpretation. The base of the emblem contains a representation of a book and the Pamir Mountains. The emblem is flanked by cotton on one side and wheat on the other, as well a banner of the national red-white-green colors of Tajikistan is wrapped around the cotton and wheat. The first emblem of independent Tajikistan in 1992-1993 was changed by the government of Emomalii Rahmon, which came to power at the end of 1992. The short-lived arms bore a striking resemblance to the Persian Lion and Sun used by Iran before the 1979 revolution.
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Coat of arms of the King of Spain

    Coat of arms of the King of Spain

    The blazoning of the coat of arms of the King of Spain is set out in Title II, Rule 1, of Spanish Royal Decree 1511 of 21 January 1977, by which the Rules for Flags, Standards, Guidons, Banners, and Badges were adopted. The shield is divided into four quarters, blazoned as follows: Argent enté en point, with a pomegranate proper seeded gules, supported, sculpted and leafed in two leaves vert, which is for Granada. Inescutcheon azure bordure gules, three fleurs-de-lys or, which is for Bourbon-Anjou. Joined to the shield, the red saltire of Burgundy and, to the dexter and sinister of the base point, the yoke gules in its natural position with ribbons, of the field, and the sheaf of five arrows gules with the arrowheads inverted and ribbons, of the field, which used to be the symbol of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain. All surrounded by the chain of the Golden Fleece and crowned with a crown of the same metal and precious stones, with eight rosettes, five visible, and eight pearls interspersed, closed at the top by eight diadems also adorned with pearls and surmounted by a cross on a globe, which is the royal crown of Spain. In 1969, General Francisco Franco appointed Juan Carlos I as
    8.60
    5 votes
    8
    Coat of arms of Sri Lanka

    Coat of arms of Sri Lanka

    The national emblem of Sri Lanka is used by the Sri Lankan government in connection with the administration and government of the country. The current emblem has been in use since 1972. The emblem features a gold lion passant, holding a sword in its right fore paw (the same lion from the flag of Sri Lanka) in the centre on a maroon background surrounded by golden petals of a Blue Lotus the national flower of the country. This is placed on top of a traditional grain vase that sprouts sheaves of rice grains that circle the border reflecting prosperity. The crest is the Dharmacakra, symbolizing the country's foremost place for Buddhism and just rule. Traditional Sinhalese heraldic symbols for the sun and the moon form the supporters. The Portuguese had a coat of arms for their occupied territory in Sri Lanka, around 1505–1658. It is not known when the coat of arms for the Dutch occupied territory of Sri Lanka was adopted. The coat of arms is from a manuscript dating from 1717 to 1720. Before independence, Ceylon used the coat of arms of the United Kingdom as the imperial emblem and a unique shield for the colony. When Ceylon was granted independence from Britain as a dominion in 1948,
    7.33
    6 votes
    9
    Coat of arms of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

    The State Emblem of the Russian SFSR was adopted on 10 July 1918 by the government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, and modified several times afterwards. It shows symbols of agriculture (wheat) as well as a rising sun for the future of the Russian nation, the red star (the RSFSR was the last Soviet Republic to include star in its state emblem, in 1978) as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of Communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in Russian (Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! — Proletarii vsekh stran, soyedinyaytes!). The acronym of the RSFSR is shown above the hammer and sickle, and reads PCФCP, for Российская Советская Федеративная Социалистическая Республика ("Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic"). Similar emblems were used by the Autonomous Socialist Soviet Republics (ASSR) within the Russian SFSR; the main differences were generally the use of the republic's acronym and the presence of the motto in the language(s) of the titular nations (with the exception of the state emblem of the Dagestan ASSR, which had the motto in eleven
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    Coat of arms of Topór

    Coat of arms of Topór

    Topór (Polish for "Axe") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Topór coat of arms is said to be one of the oldest Polish szlachta emblems, if not the oldest. Its use dates back to at least as far as a seal of the late 13th century. Before the Union of Horodło (1413) approximately 220 Polish szlachta families - mostly in and around Kraków, Lublin and Sandomierz - used this symbol. Under the Union the coat of arms was represented by Maciej z Wąsocza, the Voivod of Kraków, and by Jan Butrym, a Lithuanian boyar who represented Lithuanian noble families. After the union another 150 families in Lithuania adopted the Topór coat of arms. Due to its antiquity it was sometimes referred to as "Starża", an Old-Polish word denoting great age. Gules, axe Argent. The crest is in the form of an axe embedded in the helm, Argent. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Coat of arms of Northern Ireland

    Coat of arms of Northern Ireland

    The coat of arms of Northern Ireland was granted to the Government of Northern Ireland in 1924, and went out of official use in 1972 when that government was prorogued. Following the partition of Ireland in 1920 and the secession of the Irish Free State from the United Kingdom in 1922, Neville Rodwell Wilkinson, Ulster King of Arms, designed the great seal and flag of Northern Ireland in 1923. In January 1924, he held discussions with Northern Irish officials in London regarding the coat of arms. The final design was completed by Wilkinson's deputy Thomas Ulick Sadleir for approval by the Northern Ireland cabinet in April 1924. The artwork was approved and the Royal warrant signed by George V and issued through the Home Office on August 2, 1924 and registered in the Register of Arms in Dublin as follows: This was the same design as the Ulster Banner which had been designed in the previous year. The supporters were granted in 1925, and consist of a red lion supporting a blue banner bearing a gold harp and crown, and an Irish elk in proper colours, supporting a banner of the arms of the De Burgo Earls of Ulster, the basis for the Flag of Ulster. The supporters were blazoned as
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    Coat of arms of Brazil

    Coat of arms of Brazil

    The coat of arms of Brazil was created on November 19, 1889, four days after Brazil became a republic. The coat of arms consists of the central emblem surrounded by coffee (at the left) and tobacco (at the right) branches, which were important crops in Brazil at that time. In the blue circle in the center, the Southern Cross (Portuguese: Cruzeiro do Sul) can be seen. The ring of 27 stars around it represents Brazil's 26 states and the Federal District. The blue ribbon contains the official name of Brazil (República Federativa do Brasil — Federative Republic of Brazil) in its first line. In the second line, the date of the federative republic's establishment (November 15, 1889) is written. The National Arms of the Republic were instituted by Decree No. 4, with alteration made by Law No. 5443 of 28 May 1968 (Annex No. 8) The making of the National Arms should conform to the proportions of 15 units of height by 14 of width and take into account the following provisions: The Arms of the Empire of Brazil were used by both Emperors Pedro I and Pedro II until the downfall of the monarchy in 1889. These arms (with modifications) are used by the present imperial house. On 18 September 1822,
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Coat of arms of North Dakota

    Coat of arms of North Dakota

    The coat of arms of North Dakota is probably the most obscure symbol of North Dakota. Though nominally created for use by the state government and National Guard units, the arms have seen little use since their creation in 1957. An image of the coat of arms is seen on the flag of the Governor of North Dakota and a short discussion of its use can be found at the North Dakota state government website. Section 54-41-01 of the North Dakota Century Code specifies the design (blazon) of the coat of arms thus; The allusions made in the arms are laid down in section 54-41-02 NDCC: Section 54-41-03 limits use of the symbol to the following:
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Coat of arms of Udmurtia

    Coat of arms of Udmurtia

    The Coat of arms of Udmurtia is one of the official state symbols of Udmurtia. The coat of arms consists of a round red-and-black shield, on which there is a white swan with spread wings. In the emblem, black represents stability and earth; red life and the sun; and white moral purity and space. The white swan is a symbol of revival, wisdom and perfection. It is based on the mythology of the Udmurt people and other nations of Udmurtia. The solar signs are meant to protect man from misfortune. The designer of the National emblem of the Udmurt Republic is Y.Lobanov.
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Coat of arms of the Faroe Islands

    Coat of arms of the Faroe Islands

    The coat of arms of the Faroe Islands first appears in one of the mediæval chairs in Kirkjubøur from around the 15th century. It depicts a Ram (Faroese: Veðrur) on a shield. In blazon, Azure, a ram passant Argent armed and unguled Or. Later uses show a Ram in a seal used by the Løgrættumenn, members of the Old Faroese law Court, the Løgting. The coat of arms went out of use when the Løgting was abolished in 1816. After the Løgting was reestablished in 1852 and even when the Faroe Islands were effectively outside direct Danish rule during the British occupation in World War II the coat of arms was not used. After the Home Rule Act came into force in 1948 the coat of arms came into use again. Not by the Løgting (Parliament) but by the Landsstýri (Government). The old title Løgmaður had been reestablished, but this time as the leader of the government. The coat of arms followed him. On 1 April 2004, the Prime Minister's Office announced that from then on the Prime Minister and the Prime Minister's Office would use a new version of the coat of arms. This new one was based on the original from the chairs from Kirkjubøur. The colours were inspired from the Faroese flag Merkið and golden
    8.75
    4 votes
    16
    Coat of arms of Israel

    Coat of arms of Israel

    The Emblem of the State of Israel (Hebrew: סמל מדינת ישראל) shows a menorah surrounded by an olive branch on each side, and the writing "ישראל" (Hebrew for Israel) below it. Most commonly light blue and white, the coat of arms does appear in different colour combinations depending on the use (see below). The State of Israel adopted the symbol after a design competition held in 1948. The design is based on the winning entry submitted by Gabriel and Maxim Shamir's proposal, with elements taken from other submissions, such as Oteh Walisch and W. Struski's and Itamar David and Yerachmiel Schechter's entries. The image used on the emblem is based on a depiction of the menorah on the Arch of Titus. The menorah was used in the ancient Temple in Jerusalem and has been a symbol of Judaism since ancient times. It symbolizes universal enlightenment. The emblem may also be based on the vision of the biblical prophet Zechariah, chapter 4, where he describes seeing a menorah flanked by two olive trees, one on each side. The olive branches symbolize peace. Media related to Emblem of Israel at Wikimedia Commons
    8.50
    4 votes
    17
    Coat of arms of Piława

    Coat of arms of Piława

    Piława (Polish pronunciation: [piˈwava]) is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The progenitor of the Piława Clan was supposed to have been Żyrosław z Potoka, who was fighting the Prussians, a pagan tribe and brought himself glory in the Battle of Pilawa, where he fought along Bolesław IV the Curly. The legend states that Żyrosław reached the pagan chief, fought him in hand-to-hand combat and killed him. The terrified enemy hordes fled the battle field. The related legend tells also that in 1166, to commemorate the victory, Bolesław IV bestowed a coat of arms upon Żyrosław, naming it for the place, where the battle took place. The Piława coat of arms assumed its final form in the late 14th century. Formerly, there were two differing patterns, and the records from the years 1387, 1388 and 1389 mention that it had to be a letter "Z" with two and a half of a cross, or an arrow with two and a half of a cross. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included: The communist government of Poland was in deep opposition to every rich (specially noble) family. Hundreds of Potockis were
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Coat of arms of Puerto Rico

    Coat of arms of Puerto Rico

    The Coat of Arms of Puerto Rico was first granted by the Spanish Crown in 1511, making it the oldest heraldic achievement still currently in use in the Americas. The territory was ceded by Spain to the United States in accordance to the peace treaty that ended the Spanish-American War in 1899, after which two interim arms were adopted briefly. A law was passed in 1905 that re-established the historical armorial bearings as the arms of the territory; after numerous investigations and amendments, the current version was adopted in 1976. The major symbolism of the coat of arms relates to the dominance of Spain, the strong Roman Catholic influence in the region, and the integrity of Puerto Rico as a colony of Spain. There have been different variations of the coat of arms changing throughout Puerto Rico's history. The current version was officially re-adopted by the Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico in 3 June 1976. On the shield: All of the states and territories of the United States employ a seal to authenticate and ratify documents and accordingly a seal of Puerto Rico exists, but the traditional coat of arms is used as the main emblem of the commonwealth. The seal has most of
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Former Coat of arms of Republika Srpska

    Former Coat of arms of Republika Srpska

    • Supporter: Bicephalic Silver Eagle
    The former coat of arms of the Republika Srpska showed, on a red shield, overheaded by the Karaᅣムorᅣムeviᅣヌ crown, a bicephalic silver eagle in take off, armed with gold, with golden tongue and legs, the chest covered by a red shield with the Serbian cross, a silver cross with four firesteel. The entity is part of the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which has its own coat of arms, while the other entity Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina also had its own coat of arms. The Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina has voted against the use of the current coat of arms of Republika Srpska declaring it unconstitutional.
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Coat of Arms of Bahía Blanca

    Coat of Arms of Bahía Blanca

    The Coat of Arms of the City of Bahía Blanca, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina Created by Enrique Cabré Moré, Honorary Director of the Museum and Archive of History of the City, was officially adopted by municipal decree effective on May 18, 1943. The raising sun and the colours of the Argentine flag are taken from the Coat of Arms of the Nation. The anchor is symbolic of the maritime origin and culture of the city. Mountains (Sierra de la Ventana), the plain of Pampas, the original fortress and the estuary are present as symbols of the city and region where it is located. The Cross points at the Catholic tradition of the City. Copyright of the Seal belongs to the City of Bahía Blanca, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Republica Argentina. Depicted here as illustration of fair use, according to the US laws on copyright and marque déposée according to the laws of copyright of France.
    9.67
    3 votes
    21
    Coat of arms of Lewart

    Coat of arms of Lewart

    Lewart is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was borne by several noble families of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Families that descend from the original medieval clan that assumed this c-of-a as well as those legally adopted into the clan. believed to be of German origin. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: The Counts of Markuszewski landowners in the regions around Novogrudek Krakow and Minsk. Henryk Firlej (1574–1626) was a Polish szlachcic, bishop of Łuck (1616–1617), Archbishop of Gniezno and Primate of Poland from 1624; Deputy Chancellor of the Crown (Polish: Podkanclerzy koronny). Below members of the Lewart Clan. established 1434: (50) many now extinct. in bold notable members. Lewart, Walny, Wali-uszy, Bakowski, Beski, Bielanski-Firlej, Bielanski, Bochotnicki, Broniewski, Bunski, Dubrowski, Firlej, GorskiI, GorskiII, Haupt, Kczewski, Kizewski, Kniazyszcze, Konarski, Krupski, Krwacki-Firlej, Krwacki,Lewandowski, Lewartowicz, Lewartowski, Lewinski, Lwowski, Lakocki, Marcuszowski, Count Markuszewski, Melgiewski, Motycki, Nejmanowski, Opocki, Puchniowski, Podolenski, Pety, Skwarc, Szlapa, Tokarski, Trecyusz, Tretius, Tulowski, Ujezdzki, Wierzchanowski, Wodopol,
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    Coat of arms of Norfolk Island

    Coat of arms of Norfolk Island

    The coat of arms of Norfolk Island is the official symbol of the island and external Australian territory of Norfolk Island. It was granted by a Royal Warrant of HM Queen Elizabeth II on 20 October 1980. The formal description, or blazon, of the Arms is: Per chevron Azure and Argent in chief two Mullets of the last and in base issuant from a Rocky Mount charged with a Book expanded proper edged Or leathered Gules a Norfolk Island Pine proper; And for Crest: Out of a Naval Crown Azure a demi-lion Or gorged with a laurel wreath proper and holding a covered cup Or; And for Supporters: On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister side a Kangaroo proper each resting the exterior foreleg on an Anchor erect Azure; And for the Compartment: a motto "INASMUCH"
    9.67
    3 votes
    23
    Coat of arms of Odrowąż

    Coat of arms of Odrowąż

    Odrowąż - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and is still in use. ARMS Gules, an arrow in pale point to chief, the base double sarcelled and counter embowed, Argent. Out of a crest coronet a panache of peacock plumes proper, charged with the arms in fess. The shield is red, upon which is a silver arrow pointing upward, and the bottom is divided and curved on both ends. Out of a helmeted crown is a display of peacock plumes, upon which can be seen lying on its side the device as pictured on the shield. The tinctures (colors) are: azure = blue; gules = red; sable = black; or = gold; argent = silver; vert = green. In heraldry all charges (pictures) on a shield are assumed to be facing dexter (right side). "Herbarz Polski" (by Kasper Niesiecki, S. J., Leipzig edition, 1839–1846) Okolski tells that the progenitor of this clan cut off both halves of the moustache of an adversary at a jousting match, and the flesh with it, with the arrow. Bogdan Balbin in notes to Epitome "Rerum Bohemicarum" [Summary of Bohemian Affairs], chapter 15, calls the arms of the Odrowaz family Sagitta circumflexa ["bent arrow"],
    9.67
    3 votes
    24
    Coat of arms of Eritrea

    Coat of arms of Eritrea

    The Coat of arms of Eritrea was adopted 24 May 1993 on the occasion of the declaration of independence from Ethiopia. The emblem mainly depicts a camel surrounded by a wreath of laurel. Previously, as a colony of the Kingdom of Italy, traditional European heraldry had been introduced, but by 1952 the European heraldic traditions were abandoned as other emblems were adopted to represent the region. Eritrea was first assigned a coat of arms in 1919 as a colony of the Kingdom of Italy. The shield was parted in half horizontally, with the top portion displaying a red lion charged on his breast with a white star and the bottom half divided into six wavy bars alternating blue and white. The red lion represents the Italian Kingdom, lions alluding to the Italian King who used the beasts as supporters and red being a common colour associated with Italy and also used by the ruling House of Savoy. The star has long been a symbol of the Italian people, known as the Stellone d'Italia, which protects and guards the nation. The bottom portion displaying blue and white wavy bars is a common heraldic depiction representing water, and alludes to the origins of the colony's name. Eritrea is derived
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    Coat of arms of Paprzyca

    Coat of arms of Paprzyca

    Paprzyca - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    7.20
    5 votes
    26
    Coat of arms of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on February 28, 1922 by the government of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is loosely based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture (grapes and wheat). The red star rising above the Caucasus stands for the future of the Georgian nation, and the hammer and sickle for the victory of Communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Georgian and Russian languages. In Georgian, it is "პროლეტარებო ყველა ქვეყნისა, შეერთდით!" (transliterated: "Proletarebo qvela kveqnisa, sheertdit!"). The Abkhaz Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic and the Adjar Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic used variants of this coat of arms (in the Abkhaz case, with the name of the republic and the motto also in Abkhaz). Later version had also inscription in Georgian in the centre of the field. This coat of arms was replaced by a new one on December 11, 1990.
    7.20
    5 votes
    27
    Brisbane Coat of Arms

    Brisbane Coat of Arms

    The Coat of Arms of Brisbane is a historic icon; symbolising aspects of not only the City but also the eponymous Governor of New South Wales, Sir Thomas Brisbane. Sir Thomas' preoccupation with the field of astronomy are indicated by the two mullets. The Stafford knot is the badge of the 38th Foot (Staffordshire Regiment) in which Sir Thomas Brisbane first entered the British Army as an Ensign in 1789. The Caduceus is the symbol of Commerce and Peace, and is the emblem depicted for Hermes in his capacity as God and Protector of Commerce. Two Gryphons support the design, together with the motto "Meliora Sequimur", which means "We aim for the best" in Latin. The Gryphon is one of the principal bearings in heraldry, and is frequently used as a charge or supporter. The chimerical creature is half eagle and half lion and legend states that when it attains full growth, it will never be taken alive. The wavy blue bar around the creatures' necks alludes to the city's location as a port on the river. The palm leaves in the crest are a symbol of victory included as a compliment from the Council to the valour of Australian Armed Forces. Valour, honour and high-mettled attributes are conveyed
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    Coat of arms of Jamaica

    Coat of arms of Jamaica

    Considered as a legacy from the British with slight modifications, the Jamaican Coat of Arms was granted to Jamaica in 1661 under Royal Warrant. The original was designed by William Sancroft, then Archbishop of Canterbury. The motto of the seal has been a matter of discussion for years since inception. The original motto, INDVS VTERQVE SERVIET VNI is the Latin translation for "The two Indians will serve as one", or rather "Both Indies will serve Together", in reference to the collective servitude of the Taino and Arawak Indians to the colonizers. The motto was later replaced with the English motto "Out of Many, One People", as tribute to the unity of the different cultural minorities inhabiting the nation. Perhaps as coincidence, the motto has the same meaning with the motto of the United States; E Pluribus Unum. The Jamaican coat of arms has seen quite a number of changes, but only three are officially recorded. These changes occurred in 1906, 1957 and 1962. done by:demereo smith
    8.25
    4 votes
    29
    Coat of arms of Nałęcz

    Coat of arms of Nałęcz

    Nałęcz (Polish pronunciation: [ˈnawɛnt͡ʂ]) is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the Kingdom of Poland (see Kingdom of Poland (1320–1385), and Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569)) and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. Nałęcz is a Polish coat of arms from the 12th century (like the Abdank, Leliwa, Radwan, and Bogorya coats of arms) that represented unity and harmony. It was used by the Gembiccy, Ostrorogowie, Szamotulscy, Chełmicki, Czarnkowscy, Raczyńscy, Dworniccy, Sadowski, Łowińscy, and other families. It is traditionally described as a silver shawl, tied, on a red background. Most versions had the shawl tied downwards; some were tied upwards. Earlier versions and some modern ones depict the shawl untied. The shawl is similar in the shape to Teutonic image of Rune Othila, the Rune of a Fatherland. The Nałęcz arms were initially connected with Greater Poland. The Nałęcze were accused of murdering Przemysł II in 1296. They also allied with Brandenburg against Władysław I the Elbow-high (Władyslaw Łokietek), and after the death of Louis I of Hungary waged war against the Grzymalits, attempting to put Ziemowit III of Masovia forcibly on the throne of
    8.25
    4 votes
    30
    Wilcza Głowa coat of arms

    Wilcza Głowa coat of arms

    Wilcza Głowa - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families of the Kingdom of Poland and Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and later in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    8.25
    4 votes
    31
    Coat of arms of Thunder Bay, Ontario

    Coat of arms of Thunder Bay, Ontario

    The coat of arms of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, is a combination of the coats of arms of the former cities of Port Arthur and Fort William, with a unifying symbol—the Sleeping Giant—at the base. Retained from the coat of arms of Port Arthur is a moose with a silver collar, a sheaf of wheat and a salmon, and to signify the motto “The Gateway to the West”, “a sun splendor, the face charged with the castellated gateway, the portcullis raised”. The wavy blue and white bars below represent Lake Superior. Fort William’s contribution is the beaver and North West Company slogan "Perseverance", inscribed on a scroll within the branches of a pine tree. Also from the Fort William arms as the shield in chief is a voyageur canoe, and on the dexter side of the shield stands the Voyageur as depicted on the original Fort William arms.
    6.17
    6 votes
    32
    Coat of arms of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on February 10, 1941 by the government of the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture, an outer rim featuring wheat, corn, grapes and clover. The red banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Russian and Moldovan languages. In Moldovan, it was initially "Пролетарь дин тоате цэриле, униць-вэ!", then, from the 1950s "Пролетарь дин тоате цэриле, уници-вэ!", both transliterated as "Proletari din toate ţările, uniţi-vă!". The acronym "MSSR" is shown only in Moldovan ("РССМ"). The emblem was replaced on November 3, 1990 by the present coat of arms of Moldova. The unrecognised Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic (also known as Transnistria) uses a similar state emblem. The coat of arms of Moldavian SSR was adopted on February 10, 1941, as described in the first constitution of the new Soviet republic. The 10th chapter (called "The emblem, the Flag, the Capital"), article 122 stipulates: "The state emblem of Moldavian SSR is the image of hammer and sickle over the rays of the rising
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    Coat of arms of the Soviet Union

    Coat of arms of the Soviet Union

    The State Emblem of the Soviet Union (Russian: Государственный герб СССР, Gosudarstvennyiy gerb SSSR) was adopted in 1923 and was used until the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. Although it technically is an emblem rather than a coat of arms, since it does not follow heraldic rules, in Russian it is called герб (transliteration: gerb), the word used for a traditional coat of arms. The project of the first version of the state emblem was accepted on July 6, 1923 by the 2nd session of the Central Executive Committee (CIK) of the USSR and the version was completed on September 22 of that year. This design was fixed in the 1924 Soviet Constitution:"The State Emblem of the USSR is composed of a sickle and a hammer on a globe depicted in the rays of the sun and framed by ears of wheat, with the inscription "proletariats of the world, unite!" in six languages - Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Georgian, Armenian, Azerbaijani. At the top of the Emblem is a five-pointed star." Ivan Dubasov was an important contributor when creating the emblem. According to the 1936 Soviet Constitution, the USSR consisted of eleven republics. Hence the major new version's difference from the previous
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    Coat of arms of Norway

    Coat of arms of Norway

    The coat of arms of Norway is a crowned, golden lion rampant holding an axe with an argent blade, on a crowned, triangular and red escutcheon. Its elements originate from personal insignias for the royal house in the High Middle Ages, thus being among the oldest in Europe. In Norway, the motif of the coat of arms is often called den norske løve; literally translated, “the Norwegian lion”. The coat of arms of the royal house as well as the Royal Standard uses the lion design from 1905. The shield features the insignia of the Royal Norwegian Order of St Olav around it. The shield is framed by a royal ermine robe, surmounted by the crown of Norway. Magnus Barefoot (1093–1103) may have been the first Norwegian king to use an heraldic lion in his standard, but solid evidence for this assumption is lacking. The first lion to appear in a royal seal belonged to king Sverre Sigurdsson (1177–1202). Håkon the Old (1217–1263), an illegitimate grandson of king Sverre, needed to demonstrate his royal ancestry. In his seal he adopted his grandfather's lion within an escutcheon. Although known only from seals, there is reason to believe that the tinctures were the same as in later versions. His
    6.00
    6 votes
    35
    Coat of arms of Dąbrowski I

    Coat of arms of Dąbrowski I

    Dąbrowski I - Variation of the Coat of arms of Dołęga, is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    Coat of arms of Cluj-Napoca

    Coat of arms of Cluj-Napoca

    The coat of arms of Cluj-Napoca is the heraldic symbol standing for the city of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The city's first recorded coat of arms dates back to 1369, and since then, the coat of arms has mostly kept its features, until 1948. In 1970 a new coat of arms was designed by the communist authorities, inserting the original heraldic symbol. The current design dates from 1996, when the former mayor Gheorghe Funar organised a contest for the new symbol of the city. It is used since 1999 illegally, as the National Committee of Heraldry, Genealogy and Sigillography of Romania does not approve the current design. This is due to the fact that this design does not respect any heraldic rule (regarding tinctures and composition), nor it depicts any link to the history of the city. The current shield of Cluj-Napoca is party per fess; yellow (instead of or), bearing a white (instead of argent) Dacian Draco. The lower part is party per pale. The dexter part is of azure, bearing Goddess Athena - Minerva. The sinister part is of gules, bearing the Monument of the Memorandists. The shield is topped by a mural crown with seven towers, which shows the city's status as a county seat. This is the
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Coat of arms of Mexico

    Coat of arms of Mexico

    The current coat of arms of Mexico has been an important symbol of Mexican politics and culture for centuries. The coat of arms depicts a Mexican Golden Eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a snake. To the people of Tenochtitlan this would have strong religious connotations, but to the Europeans, it would come to symbolize the triumph of good over evil. The national coat of arms is also used in the Seal of the United Mexican States, a modified official version used by the federal, state and municipal governments. The coat of arms recalls the founding of Mexico City, then called Tenochtitlan. The legend of Tenochtitlan as shown in the original Mexica codices, paintings, and post-Cortesian codices do not include a snake. While the Fejérváry-Mayer codex depicts an eagle attacking a snake, other Mexica illustrations, like the Codex Mendoza, show only an eagle, while in the text of the Ramírez Codex, Huitzilopochtli asked the Tenochtitlan people to look for an eagle devouring a snake, perched on an prickly pear cactus. In the text by Chimalpahin Cuauhtlehuanitzin, the eagle is devouring something, but it is not mentioned what it is. Still other versions show the eagle
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Coat of arms of Nabram

    Coat of arms of Nabram

    Nabram is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by a number of szlachta (noble) families in 1292-1386 under Poland's Piast Dynasty. The Nabram coat of arms is also known as Abram, Nabra, Kłobuk, Stańcowie, Waldorff, and Wendorf. The official heraldic description of the Nabram coat of arms is, "Nabram vel Waldorff, cuius insignia in campo albo tres barre nigre, a capite clipei in longum producte." (Translation: Nabram or Waldorff, which character in white area are three black beams, from the head of shield direct on length.) The Nabram coat of arms has three vertical black stripes and three vertical white stripes, starting with white on the left side and alternating across. Three ostrich quills extend from the crowned helmet.
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Coat of arms of Paraguay

    Coat of arms of Paraguay

    The national coat of arms of Paraguay ("Escudo de Armas") has the following construction: Round, white background, red border with the inscription: "República de Paraguay", to the left a green palm branch and to the right a green olive branch, and both are tied together. In the middle there is a five-point yellow star. The reverse of the arms features a lion, in front of a staff and liberty cap, with the inscription "Paz Y Justicia", meaning “peace and justice”. While probably most prominent on the reverse of the national flag, reverse of the seal is also used by the Supreme Court of Paraguay, and is featured alongside the obverse on banknotes of the national currency, the Guaraní. The first design of the coat of arms dates to the year 1820, from the time of the dictatorship of Francia. Media related to Flags of Paraguay at Wikimedia Commons
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Coat of arms of Strzemie

    Coat of arms of Strzemie

    Strzemię (Polish for "Stirrup") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Gules, a stirrup Or. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms have included:
    7.75
    4 votes
    41
    Coat of arms of Trzy Kawki

    Coat of arms of Trzy Kawki

    Trzy Kawki (Polish for "Three Jackdaws") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included: A bearer of the "Trzy Kawki" coat of arms is the fictional knight, Borch, in Andrzej Sapkowski's novel.
    7.75
    4 votes
    42
    Coat of arms of Bucharest

    Coat of arms of Bucharest

    The coat of arms of Bucharest is the heraldic symbol standing for Bucharest, the capital of Romania. The present-day coat of arms was created during the rule of Domnitor Alexandru Ioan Cuza; changed under the Communist regime, it was used again, with minor alterations, since 1994. The coat of arms is a bleu celeste escutcheon charged with an or eagle facing dexter (standing for the historical region of Wallachia - see Coat of arms of Wallachia), crowned bleu celeste, blazoned langued and armed gules with a Latin cross in its beak, standing over the motto PATRIA ŞI DREPTUL MEU ("The Fatherland and My Right") on a scroll tricoloured horizontally red-yellow-blue (the colours of the Romanian flag). The eagle bears in its claws a sword dexter, a Tenné sceptre sinister, and on its breast a gules in the escutcheon with thin azure bordure, charged with the image of Saint Dimitrie Basarabov holding a spear dexter and a Latin cross sinister. The saint, who is the city's patron, is commonly referred to as, and confounded with, Saint Demetrius — today's arms seem to represent the latter, as the person depicted is dressed in a Roman uniform. The escutcheon is adorned with a crest composed of a
    6.60
    5 votes
    43
    Coat of arms of Darwin

    Coat of arms of Darwin

    The Coat of arms of Darwin were granted by the Queen on 9 December 1959 - the same year in which Darwin was granted city status. The Arms is consist of a red shield. Above the shield is the silver helmet with red and white mantling and above the helmet there is silver mural crown, and on crown there is mariner's compass Gules and its northerly point is particularly highlighted. This represents Darwin's position as a northern city. On the left side of the shield there is an Australian Aborigine which representing the early inhabitants of the Darwin area, and on the right side of the shiled a European miner, who depicts an important industry which aided Darwin's growth. The base of the shield is on a grassy green land. A scroll below the arms has a Latin motto Progrediamur which translates as "Let us go forward'."
    6.60
    5 votes
    44
    Coat of arms of Kyrgyzstan

    Coat of arms of Kyrgyzstan

    The emblem of Kyrgyzstan was adopted following the dissolution of the Soviet Union on 2 June 1992. The emblem has a circular form which mostly bears the color blue. Light blue is known as the Kyrgyz color of courage and generosity (c.f. the flag of Kazakhstan and the emblem of Kazakhstan). To the left and right of the coat of arms, wheat and cotton are displayed. In the upper part, the name of the country appears in Kyrgyz "Кыргыз Республикасы" (Kyrgyz Respublikasy). In the middle, the Tian Shan mountains are displayed, below which fields are shown. Behind the mountain panorama, one sees a rising sun. A hawk beating its wings stands under this panorama, which gives the impression that the panorama lies on the shoulders of the hawk. Before independence from the USSR, Kyrgyzstan had a coat of arms similar to all other Soviet Republics. Like other post-Soviet republics whose arms do not predate the October Revolution, the current emblem retains some components of the Soviet one, in this case, the wheat, cotton, rising sun and the Tien Shan.
    6.60
    5 votes
    45
    Coat of arms of San Marino

    Coat of arms of San Marino

    The coat of arms of San Marino probably originated in the fourteenth century. The official establishment took place on 6 April 1862 by a Decree of the Supreme Council; the same act introduced the crown on top of the shield. There is little evidence regarding the official design until the mid 20th century. "The Flag Bulletin" vol. III, no. 2 from the winter of 1963-64 is reproducing on page 31 an "official plate showing the flag and arms of San Marino, [which] was a gift of the San Marinese government, through its Consul in New York." This plate was previously published in an official guide of the republic, from March 1963. In 2011, a new Law on the flag and coat of arms of San Marino presented a slightly simplified design, the main changes being that the branches have no more ramifications, the towers are square instead of round, and the gates are oriented now towards sinister. The coat of arms of San Marino adorns among other things the flag of the country and the logo of the San Marino Football Federation. The official description of the coat of arms is: The components of the coat of arms are in detail:
    6.60
    5 votes
    46
    Coat of arms of Swaziland

    Coat of arms of Swaziland

    The coat of arms of Swaziland is a coat of arms depicting various symbols for traditional Swaziland culture. The lion represents the King and the elephant represents the Queen-mother. They support a traditional Nguni shield which represents "protection". Above the shield is the king's lidlabe, or crown of feathers, normally worn during Ncwala (the festival of the harvest). On a banner below the shield is the Swaziland national motto, Siyinqaba, meaning, "We are the fortress".
    7.50
    4 votes
    47
    Coat of arms of Wakefield

    Coat of arms of Wakefield

    The Coat of arms of Wakefield City Council was granted in 1990. Between 1974 and 1990, the council did not have arms that represented its governance of the expanded metropolitan district of the City of Wakefield, and used the arms of the County Borough of Wakefield. Arms had been granted to the district's constituent city and towns, (Wakefield, Castleford, Horbury, Knottingley, Ossett and Pontefract) but an application to the College of Arms was made for a unifying achievement. The shield of the arms has a background of black and gold. The black represents the coal mining industry that was once widespread and important to the district. In the top, left of the shield is the arms of the city of Wakefield. The compartment shows thirteen acorns which represent the thirteen former local government areas of the West Riding of Yorkshire that merged to form the metropolitan district in 1974. Beneath the compartment is a motto, "Persevere and prosper". The arms used before 1990 had been used in Wakefield for over 500 years. The arms had the simple blazon of "Azure, a fleur-de-lys Or". Despite its history, arms were not officially granted until 1932 when the Ermine fimbriation was added.
    7.50
    4 votes
    48
    Order of the National Coat of Arms

    Order of the National Coat of Arms

    The Order of the National Coat of Arms (Estonian: Riigivapi teenetemärk, French: Ordre du Blason National) was instituted by Konstantin Päts on 7 October 1936 to commemorate 24 February 1918, the day on which Estonian independence was declared. The Order of the National Coat of Arms is bestowed only on Estonian citizens, as a decoration of the highest class for services rendered to the state. The Order of the National Coat of Arms comprises six classes: The greater national coat of arms as part of the decorations of all the classes of the Order of the National Coat of Arms, goldplated on both sides, bears on its reverse the embossed date "24. II 1918". The colour tone of the blue moiré ribands belonging to the decorations of all the classes of the Order of the National Coat of Arms is determined according to the international PANTONE colour-table as 285 C. The collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms is a badge of the office of the President of Estonia. Until 2008, the collar was unique. As, however, Russians during the Soviet occupation had taken that collar to the Armory Chamber (Оружейная палата, Oruzhejjnaja palata) in the Moscow Kremlin as a trophy and never have
    8.67
    3 votes
    49
    Coat of arms of Schleswig

    Coat of arms of Schleswig

    The coat of arms of Schleswig (Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig) depicts two blue lions in a golden shield. It is the heraldic symbol of the former Duchy of Schleswig, originally a Danish province but later disputed between Danes and Germans. The region has been divided between Germany and Denmark since 1920 and the symbol consequently appears in official heraldry in both countries. It is derived from the national coat of arms of Denmark and has been dated to the middle of the 13th century, first known from the arms of Erik Abelsøn, Duke of Schleswig. Throughout the ages, the design has featured both crowned and uncrowned lions, the lions have occasionally been accompanied by hearts and usage between lions and leopards has shifted. The far most common version was to omit both crowns and hearts and this version has been used exclusively for several centuries. The blazon in heraldic terms is: Or, two lions passant in pale Azure armed Or langued Gules. The unmodified arms of Schleswig is represented in the coat of arms of Denmark's royal family. The symbol has been located in the top-right corner since 1819 as specified by royal decree. The current version was specified by royal
    10.00
    2 votes
    50
    Coat of arms of Kościesza

    Coat of arms of Kościesza

    Kościesza - is a Polish Coat of Arms used by szlachta families mostly in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include Szymon Szymonowic (Simon Simonides, Szymonowicz or Bendoński), Jan Karol Dolski, Józef Piłsudski and August Żaba. The complete list of bearers of the Kościesza coat of arms include the families of: Adurowicz, Alexandrowicz, Astotowicz, Astutowicz, Austutowicz, Auzbikowicz, Auzbukiewicz, Aziubekowicz, Bawarski, Bendoński, Berent, Bereszniewicz, Bereźniewicz, Bereżecki, Bereżenicki, Blus, Bodurkiewicz, Bolsanowski, Bołsunowicz, Bołsunowski, Boufał, Bouffałł, Branwicki, Brzeziński, Brzostowski, Bujalski, Butmin, Chałaim, Chodakiewicz, Chodkiewicz, Chodzicki, Chodźkiewicz, Chodźko, Chotkowski, Chotowski, Chrząstowski, Chupicz, Cibor, Ciborowski, Czechowicz, Czelo, Dachlen, Dalewicki, Daliński, Dalwicki, Dąb, Dobrunicki, Dolski, Dorohostajski, Doroszkiewicz, Dylewski, Dylowski, Dyrda, Dyrdat, Dyrwin, Dzainkowski, Dziatłowicz, Dzieńkowski, Dzierżnicki, Dzieszuk, Gapiński, Giecewicz, Ginielewicz, Gniewosz, Gołaszewski, Gołocki, Gombrowicz, Gronostajski, Grzywa, Gubrewicz, Hekendorf, Hermanowicz, Holiński, Horański,
    6.40
    5 votes
    51
    Coat of arms of Wadwicz

    Coat of arms of Wadwicz

    Wadwicz - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. A knight called Wadwicz was dispatched twice in a delegation by King Boleslaw Krywousty or "Wrymouth," 1102-1138. While returning the second time this knight was plunged into the depths during a storm at sea, and he drowned. In reward for his services King Boleslaw bestowed this shield upon his successors. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    6.40
    5 votes
    52
    Coat of arms of El Salvador

    Coat of arms of El Salvador

    The coat of arms of El Salvador has been in use in its current form since 15 September 1912. Its center consists of a triangle, in which five volcanoes rise out of the sea. They symbolize the five member states of the United Provinces of Central America. Above the volcanoes is a red Phrygian cap on a staff before a golden sun and the date 15 September 1821, Independence Day of El Salvador. Over it is a rainbow which means peace. Behind the coat of arms there are five flags representing the flags of the Federal Republic of Central America raised. Under it, there is a scroll which states the national motto of El Salvador: Dios, Unión, Libertad (Span., "God, Union, Liberty"). All of this is surrounded by a laurel garland, which is tied together under the national flag. The garland is divided into 14 different parts, which symbolize the 14 Departaments, the Salvadoran subnational administrative units. All this is surrounded by golden letters, which form the Spanish words REPÚBLICA DE EL SALVADOR EN LA AMÉRICA CENTRAL (English: Republic of El Salvador in Central America).
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Coat of arms of Prussia

    Coat of arms of Prussia

    The state of Prussia developed from the State of the Teutonic Order. The original flag of the Teutonic Knights had been a black cross on a white flag. Emperor Frederick II in 1229 granted them the right to use the black Eagle of the Holy Roman Empire. This "Prussian Eagle" remained the coats of arms of the successive Prussian states until 1947. On January 27, 1701, King Frederick I changed his arms as prince-elector of Brandenburg. The older arms of the electors of Brandenburg depicted a red eagle on a white background. Henceforth, the Prussian eagle, now royally crowned and with 'FR' (Fridericus Rex, "King Frederick") on its breast, was placed in an escutcheon on the shield with 25 quarters instead of the electoral scepter. All the helmets made way for one royal crown. The wild men—figures from Germanic and Celtic mythology representing the 'Lord of the Beasts' or 'Green Man'— that held the arms of Prussia are probably taken from the arms of Pomerania or Denmark. They are also to be found as supporters of the arms of Braunschweig, Königsberg, and the Dutch towns of Anloo, Beilen, Bergen op Zoom, Groede, Havelte, 's-Hertogenbosch, Oosterhesselen, Sleen, Sneek, Vries and Zuidwolde.
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    Coat of arms of Grzymała

    Coat of arms of Grzymała

    Grzymała - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Some authorities believe that this coat of arms was brought to Poland from Germany by a knight named Zylberschweg or Zelberszwecht. It is, however, one of the oldest Polish coats of arms, whose clan's war cry was Grzymała (for Thunder). The original homeland of this clan was the district of Łomz'a in Masovia. The coat of arms was later augmented by a man in full battle armor standing in the gate, whose left arm held a shield, whose right arm held a raised sword. This augmentation was received by Przecław Grzymała, for his courageous defense of the city Płock in 1078 against the Jatwings from Prince Władisław Hermann. Subsequently the coat of arms was also abated: Prince Boleslaw Wstydliwy of Poland (1127–1179), exiled the knight Grzymała, owner of Gos'lice in the Palatinate of Płock, on the suspicion of treacherous dealings with Prince Kazimierz of Kujaw, and as further evidence of the Prince's displeasure closed the gate in this knight's coat of arms. A second (though positive) abatement also occurred: When the Lithuanians along with the Jatwings
    8.33
    3 votes
    55
    Coat of arms of Półkozic

    Coat of arms of Półkozic

    Półkozic - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. According to legend, this coat was assigned to knight Stawisz, who was defending the foreign castle of Etecz (or Eczech) against the pagans. When besieged, he ordered to kill a goat and a donkey, and then use their blood to paint ox's hide. With this hide he then ordered to decorate the walls of the castle. The pagans, seeing that defenders had so much meat as to waste it, lifted the siege and left. The knight was rewarded by the king Bolesław I Chrobry with a coat of arms and returned to Poland. The bearers of the coat were mentioned since early Piast era. Initially they were tied to the land of Lesser Poland, (regions of Sandomierz and Kraków), regions near Lublin, Rawa Mazowiecka, Sieradz and then Red Ruthenia. After the Union of Horodło bearers of the coat of arms appeared also in Lithuania. Gules, donkeys head gardant Argent. Over the helm the crest composed of a goat passant proper Argent. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    8.33
    3 votes
    56
    Coat of arms of the Department of La Guajira

    Coat of arms of the Department of La Guajira

    The coat of arms of the La Guajira was officially adopted by the Departmental Assembly Ordinance 028 of November 29, 1966 after the winning design of a public contest of pseudonymous contestant "Angel Cuervo". The coat of arms has subsequently been modified two occasions by the Ordinance 052 of 1994 and Ordinance 009 of March 10, 1998. The coat of arms of the Department of La Guajira is quarterly divided by four quarters sections of unequal proportions bordered by silver white pearls.
    8.33
    3 votes
    57
    Coat of arms of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on March 1, 1937 by the government of the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture (cotton and wheat). The red star is prominently featured with a small hammer and sickle within it. The rising sun stands for the future of the Tajik nation, and the star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Tajik and Russian languages. In Tajik, it is "Пролетарҳои ҳамаи мамлакатҳо, як шавед!" (transliterated: "Proletarhoi hamai mamlakatho, jak şaved!"). The name of the republic is also shown in both Tajik and Russian. The emblem was changed in 1992 to the present Tajikistan coat of arms, which uses a design similar to that of the Soviet one.
    6.20
    5 votes
    58
    Coat of arms of Achinger

    Coat of arms of Achinger

    Achinger - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Coat of arms of Cher

    Coat of arms of Cher

    The coat of arms of Cher is blazoned as follows: Azure semy de fleur-de-lis Or a bordure engrailed Gules overall a fess wavy Argent.
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Coat of arms of the Bahamas

    Coat of arms of the Bahamas

    The Coat of Arms of the Bahamas contains a shield with the national symbols as its focal point. Divided, in chief azure a rising sun irradiated or, in base, argent a Columbus ship proper surmounts barry nebuly of two azure; Crest: atop a Sovereign's helm or a conch shell proper surrounded by five palm fronds vert on a wreath of the chief's colours, from which issues mantling azure lined argent; Compartment: divided, dexter the sea argent and azure, sinister, the earth vert, overall the motto: Forward, upward, onward together on a band or lined azure; Supporters: a blue marlin dexter, a flamingo sinister both proper. The escutcheon (shield) is supported by a marlin and flamingo. The crest on top of the helm (helmet) is a conch shell, which represents the varied marine life of the island chain. Below the helm is the escutcheon itself, whose main charge is a ship, reputed to represent the Santa María of Christopher Columbus. It is sailing beneath a sun in the chief. The animals supporting the shield are the national animals, and the national motto is found at the bottom. The flamingo is located upon land, and the marlin upon sea, indicating the geography of the islands. The vibrant
    9.50
    2 votes
    61
    Coat of arms of Wigan

    Coat of arms of Wigan

    The coat of arms of Wigan Metropolitan Borough Council was granted by the College of Arms in 1974. The field of the arms consists of alternating gold and black lozenges or diamond shapes. Black lozenges are extensively used in British civic heraldry to symbolise coal mining, while each gold lozenge bears a red rose of Lancaster to represent the union of several Lancashire communities in the metropolitan borough. The chief or top section of the shield displays a couchant lion from the crest of the county borough. On top of the helm is the crest which consists of a crowned castle and mountain ash tree. The castle and crown were in the county borough arms. The tree is included as a reference to the borough's name: the local name for the mountain ash being "Wiggin Tree". The supporters are a gold crowned lion from the county borough arms, and a sparrowhawk from the arms of the Atherton family, and found in the devices of Atherton Urban District council and the Borough of Leigh. The motto is Progress With Unity. The blazon, or technical description of the arms is: The County Borough of Wigan was granted arms in 1922. The design incorporated several elements from a number of ancient
    9.50
    2 votes
    62
    Szaława coat of arms

    Szaława coat of arms

    Szaława is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    Coat of arms of Manitoba

    Coat of arms of Manitoba

    • Supporter: Unicorn
    The original coat of arms of Manitoba was granted to Manitoba by a Royal Warrant of King Edward VII on 10 May 1905. The shield is also featured on the provincial flag. The coat of arms was augmented on 23 October 1992 by a Vice-Regal Warrant of then-Governor General Ramon Hnatyshyn to include a crest, supporters, and motto. Crest Shield Compartment Supporters Motto
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Coat of arms of Madeira

    Coat of arms of Madeira

    The coat of arms of the Autonomous Region of Madeira was established by Regional Legislative Decree n.º 11/91/M, on 24 April 1991. The central shield is blazoned, azure a pale or charged with a Cross of Christ. The monk seals supporting the shield in the coat of arms are an homage to the only large mammals found by the first inhabitants of the island, and allude to the need to preserve this endangered species. The gold armillary sphere represents the Age of Discovery, initiated by the Portuguese, and King Manuel I of Portugal who ordered the settling of the archipelago. The Autonomous Region of Madeira motto, Das Ilhas as Mais Belas e Livres, is Portuguese for "Of all islands, the most beautiful and free".
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Coat of arms of Karelia

    Coat of arms of Karelia

    The coat of arms of Karelia were first used in 1562, although the arms were probably presented at the burial of Gustav Vasa in 1560. The arms were used for the Swedish province of Karelia and they have been used continuously since then. Variations of the arms are still used in two regions of Finland: North Karelia and South Karelia, in which the North Karelian version is the original one. The blazon for the arms may be translated as follows: A golden crown above two duelling arms, the right guantleted arm holding a sword and the left mailed arm a scimitar, all silver except for golden hafts and gauntlet joint. Ducal coronet. The two hands holding a sword and a scimitar are generally seen as symbol of Karelia's position between the Swedish and Russian realms. The coat of arms of Finland use the sword and scimitar in a similar manner.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Coat of arms of Somaliland

    Coat of arms of Somaliland

    The national emblem of Somaliland was introduced on 14 October 1996 along with the flag of Somaliland, when it was approved by the National Conference. Having declared its independence on 18 May 1991, the region's self-declared independence remains unrecognized by any country or international organization. The emblem consists of an equally balanced scales symbolising justice between the Somali people, the coffee-coloured eagle holds the scales as a sign of democracy, two hands shaking representing the equality and freedom between the people of Somaliland, an olive branch symbolising peace amongst the people of Somaliland, a yellow background representing the bright, beautiful culture and people of Somaliland. The Arabic calligraphy above the scales reads the Bismillah which if translated into English means In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. This is to symbolize that Islam is the official religion practised in Somaliland. The Constitution of Somaliland, as approved on May 31, 2001 by referendum reads: Article 7: The Flag, the Emblem and the National Anthem 2. The emblem of the nation shall consist of a coffee coloured falcon with (the words), in Arabic language,
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Coat of arms of Tunisia

    Coat of arms of Tunisia

    The coat of arms of Tunisia displays a ship (symbol of freedom) along with a lion holding a sword (symbol of order), and a balance (symbol of justice). In the centre, just under the ship, is the national motto written in Arabic: Freedom (حرية) - Order (نظام) - Justice (عدالة). The central emblem of the national flag is seen above the shield. The background is gold in all sections. 1956-1957, Kingdom of Tunisia 1957-1963, Republic of Tunisia 1963-1987, Republic of Tunisia
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Coat of arms of Andorra

    Coat of arms of Andorra

    The coat of arms of Andorra has existed for centuries. This coat of arms has been the national coat of arms of Andorra since 1969. Below the shield arms stands Andorra's national motto Virtus Unita Fortior (Latin for United virtue is stronger). The coat of arms also appears on the flag of Andorra. The arms are: Quarterly:
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Coat of arms of Trubetsky

    Coat of arms of Trubetsky

    Trubetsky - is a Ruthenian-Polish-Russian coat of arms. It is used by Trubetsky family in different times. The Trubetsky coat of arms consist of four parts: Notable bearers of this coat of arms include:
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Coat of arms of the Department of Amazonas

    Coat of arms of the Department of Amazonas

    The coat of arms of the Amazonas was officially adopted by means of the Departmental Assembly Ordinance 020 of March 2, 1995. The coat of arms of Amazonas is also featured as a charge in the centre of the upper band of the Flag of Amazonas. The coat of arms of the Department of Amazonas is almost round shield surrounded by an exterior crown of feathers. The principal element is the roundel escutcheon which is shaped to resemble the Victoria amazonica’s big circular leaf which has two indented openings on the top and bottom. It is blazoned vert proper, also a reference to the Amazon Forest. It is charged by a flowing winding river which represents the Amazon River, which is a source of life and of great cultural, religious and political significance to the region. The shield is supported by a feather headdress facing the viewer in warm colours. A feather headdress is of great significance for many Amazonian tribes and symbolize knowledge and hierarchy. In its affronté attitude it also has a triple meaning, representing both the sun and the flora of the Amazon as well.
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Coat of arms of Bulgaria

    Coat of arms of Bulgaria

    The coat of arms of Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Герб на България, [ɡɛrp nɑ bɤ̞ɫˈɡɑrijɐ]) consists of a crowned golden lion rampant over a dark red shield; above the shield is the Bulgarian historical crown. The shield is supported by two crowned golden lions rampant; below the shield there is compartment in the shape of oak twigs and white bands with the national motto "Unity renders power" inscribed on them. The current coat of arms of Bulgaria was adopted in 1997. The current arms are a slightly redesigned version of the coat of arms of Bulgaria from the period 1927–1946. Those arms were based on a similar earlier form, firstly used by Tsar Ferdinand I (1887–1918) as his personal ruler's coat of arms. The previous emblem, which combined the traditional gold lion rampant with the pattern of the coat of arms of the Soviet Union, was abandoned since Communist rule ended in the country in 1989. The new Constitution of Bulgaria, adopted in 1991, describes the Bulgarian coat of arms as follows: For many years, agreement on the design of the coat of arms was a source of great controversy in the Bulgarian government, as different parties argued over the design elements. The final design was
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Coat of arms of Hobart

    Coat of arms of Hobart

    The Coat of Arms of Hobart was formally granted to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Citizens of the City of Hobart on 1 May 1953. The Coat of Arms was designed in the year 1951 by Hobart architect and alderman, I.G. Anderson, and it replaced an earlier unofficial crest used by the Corporation since the 1850's. The shield is of divided into two colours silver and blue. Above the shield is the silver helmet with gold and blue mantling and above the helmet is a silver and blue wreath, upon which is set a gold three-masted ship (the Flying Childers). The helmet has mantling of blue and gold. The helmet is associated with civic heraldry and is often used for municipal authorities. The ship was a whaling ship, built in Battery Point in 1846, and signifies the importance of shipping and whaling to Hobart’s industrial and economic development. On the right side of shield there is an emu, and on the left side a kangaroo, both with their heads looking back, and each with a collar, comprising a small garland of apples and leaves. The Tasmanian Emu and the Forester Kangaroo are taken from the Council’s unofficial crest, used from the 1850s, and also provide a connection with the Australian Coat of
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Coat of arms of Rawa

    Coat of arms of Rawa

    Rawa (Rawicz), is a coat of arms of Polish origin. It was borne by several noble families of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Russian Empire and Ukraine. The ancestry of first bearers of Rawicz (the Rawici clan) is debated. Version supported by Polish chronicler Jan Długosz points out branch of Czech (Bohemian) Vršovci clan, version supported by Polish heraldist Kasper Niesiecki (as better) says that their origin is pagan Polish. Lot of families were later legally adopted into the clan or ennobled with this coat of arms, some misattributed to the clan by similarity of arms, names or by simple error or usurpation. Nowadays it (or its modification) is used as coat of arms of several Polish settlements. Main version (in others colours may differ): Shield Or (gold) with a bear (probably ursus arctos) Sable (black) facing dexter (right) with a maiden on its back. The maiden, vested in royal attire Gules (red) and a crown Or, with flowing hair and hands upraised a little and expanded, all proper. Out of the crest coronet, between two antlers proper, a bear facing dexter. His left arm in front is lowered, and another one holds a rose on a stem, all proper, which the bear carries to his
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Coat of arms of Victoria, British Columbia

    Coat of arms of Victoria, British Columbia

    The coat of arms of the city of Victoria was granted in 1962, and then subsequently registered with the Canadian Heraldic Authority in 2005. While the city employs a logo for common use, the arms are reserved for legal documents and for more historical or traditional purposes and events. Initially granted in 1962 by the College of Arms in London, as Canada fell under the purview of the English heralds at that time, the coat of arms of Victoria was later registered with the Canadian Heraldic Authority in 2005. The design of the shield consists of two piles, one atop the other, that gives the appearance of a white “V” separating the shield into red and blue segments, creating a cypher for the city's namesake and a representation of the peninsula where the city is located and juts into the blue sea. A Royal Crown is placed on the red pile as another allusion to Queen Victoria, for whom the city is named. There is no torse or mantling mentioned in the Canadian registry, yet mantling is depicted in the London grant as red and gold. A mural crown, a common symbol found in municipal arms, is mentioned in the blazon of the crest, which shows a dove descending from and about the rays of the
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Coat of arms of Alberta

    Coat of arms of Alberta

    The original coat of arms of Alberta was granted to Alberta by a Royal Warrant of King Edward VII on 30 May 1907. The shield is also featured on the flag of Alberta. On 30 July 1980, Queen Elizabeth II augmented the armorial bearings by Royal Warrant with a crest, supporters, and a motto. The helmet under the crest was changed from a steel helmet to a gold royal helmet on 15 January 2008. Crest Shield Compartment Supporters Motto
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Coat of arms of Bolívar State

    Coat of arms of Bolívar State

    The coat of arms of Bolívar State is composed of two fields in blue and gold. The blue color symbolizes the sky. The gold one, the wikt:auriferous riches of the Guayana Region. In the upper part of the blue field and forming an arch, eight stars representing the seven provinces that were considered in 1811 to declare the National Independence and, the eighth star symbolizes the emblem of the Guayana Province. In the inferior field runs a gold river representing the Orinoco. Coming out of it, a big rock known as the Middle Rock, on top of it an indigenous female is resting her left arm on a clay vessel, pouring water on the river representing the endless flow of the Orinoco river. To the left of the blue field, a caduceus representing commerce; and to the right, in the same position, a pickaxe symbolizing work and mining industry. Crowning the coat of arms, with a silver background, a radiant triangle with an eye in the middle, representing the eyesight of the Providence protection the Bolívar State territory. The olive branches, emblem of peace, border the coat of arms. At the union point of them there's a golden ribbon with the following dates: to the center, 5 July 1811,
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Coat of arms of Oszyk

    Coat of arms of Oszyk

    Oszyk - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Coat of arms of Oszyk is a Coat of arms of Łabędź variation. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Coat of arms of Panama

    Coat of arms of Panama

    The Panamanian coat of arms is a heraldic symbol for the Central American nation of Panama. These arms were adopted provisionally and then definitively by the same laws that adopted the Panamanian flag. The center section contains the Isthmus of Panama. The chief or top part of the coat of arms comprises two quarters. The top left over a field of silver a sword and a rifle. In 1904, the arms were made official by Law 64 of 4 June 1904 signed by the President of Assembly Dr Genaro Ortega, and sanctioned by the President the Republic, Dr Manuel Amador Guerrero. The official description of the heraldic design is as follows: "On the eagle, in arc form, nine gold stars go in representation of the provinces in which the Republic is divided. Like decorative accessories, to each side of the coat of arms two gathered national flags go on the other hand below" The formal adoption and regulation of the use of the national flag, anthem and coat of arms were decreed by law 34 of 1949. Law 34 of 1949 stated, as noted above, that an eagle was to be on the top of the coat of arms. However, it did not specify what species of eagle, even though in most schools the Harpy Eagle was the eagle species
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Coat of arms of Podgorica

    Coat of arms of Podgorica

    The coat of arms of Podgorica is an official insignia of Podgorica, capital of Montenegro. It is a new coat of arms, adopted as a symbol of the city in 2006. It replaced the old coat of arms, which was outdated aesthetically. The author is Srdjan Marlović. Description of the coat of arms:
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Greece

    Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Greece

    The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Greece was the official symbol of the Greek state during the period of the monarchy (1832–1924 and 1935–1973). The coat of arms was based on that of the Kingdom of Bavaria, and consisted of a shield bearing the Greek national emblem of a white cross on a blue background, topped by a royal crown and supported by two crowned lions rampant. At the centre of the cross lay an escutcheon bearing the characteristic lozenge pattern of Bavaria, as a symbol of the House of Wittelsbach. This emblem was used during the reign of King Otto I, from 1832 to his exile in 1862. After Otto's fall, the young Prince William of Denmark was chosen as king, and the new coat of arms bears a strong resemblance to that of the Danish Royal Family. The central feature of the coat of arms remained a shield bearing the Greek national emblem of a white cross on a blue background. At the centre of the cross lies a shield with the dynastic arms of the Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg family. The shield is topped with a crown and supported by two male figures, depicting the legendary Heracles. The ribbon and medal of the Order of the Redeemer are suspended from the shield.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Coat of arms of West Papua

    Coat of arms of West Papua

    The coat of arms of Netherlands New Guinea (and the OPM) was one of a number of national symbols chosen by the Papuans prior to decolonization by the Netherlands, and prior to integration into Indonesia. The design on the shield was in the form of the flag of Netherlands New Guinea, the Morning Star flag. The shield was supported by two birds of paradise and surrounded by a garland of local flowers and a scroll bearing the motto "Setia, djudjur, Mesra" (Loyal, Honest, Affectionate).
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Coat of arms of Herburt

    Coat of arms of Herburt

    Herburt - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. According to the legend it comes from Westphalia to Moravia and to Poland later. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Coat of arms of Spain

    Coat of arms of Spain

    • Supporter: Pillars of Hercules
    The current coat of arms of Spain, although it has its roots centuries ago, was approved by law in 1981, when the present established replaced the interim version which, in turn, replaced the official arms of Francoist Spain. The coat of arms appears in the flag of Spain. The Spanish coat of arms symbolizes the country, the old kingdoms of Spain, the Royal Crown, the Imperial Crown, the Constitutional monarchy, the Spanish national motto: Plus Ultra, and the Pillars of Hercules with the Spanish geographic situation. The Spanish coat of arms is composed of six other arms and some additional heraldic symbols: The present design, despite criticism by heraldic experts, is regulated by: The Monarch has his own personal arms. The Arms of the Kingdom of Spain was the official coat of arms of the Monarch of Spain from the time of the Catholic Monarchs, and was used as the official arms of the Kingdom until the First Spanish Republic in 1873. Afterwards, the arms became an integral part of the Coat of Arms of Spain. The different governments since (whether republican or monarchist) have led to the arms being changed on various occasions, but always respecting the main heraldic design
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Coat of arms of the Central African Republic

    Coat of arms of the Central African Republic

    The coat of arms of the Central African Republic consists of a shield in the center, with two flags on its edges, and with a sun rising over the shield. Below and above the shield are banners, and there is a medal located below the shield as well. ZO KWE ZO, the motto in Sango, means "A man is a man" or "All people are people". The elephant and the baobab tree represent nature and the backbone of the country. The gold star on a map of Africa symbolizes the position of the Central African Republic. The hand (bottom right quarter) was the symbol of the dominant MESAN party in 1963 when the arms were adopted. The bottom left quarter holds three diamonds, which symbolize the mineral resources of the country. The medal under the shield is the honorific decoration of the Order of Central African Merit An earlier version of the coat of arms had the words "1er DECEMBRE 1958" written within the sun.
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Coat of arms of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on 1940 by the government of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms was designed by Vsevolodas Dobužinskis based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. The new coat of arms replaced the traditional coat of arms of Lithuania, known as Vytis, which was banned until Lithuania declared its independence in 1990. It featured symbols of agriculture (oak branches and wheat). The rising sun stood for the future of the Lithuanian nation, the red star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bore the USSR State motto (Proletarians of all countries, unite!) in both Russian and Lithuanian (Visų šalių proletarai, vienykitės!). The initialism of the Lithuanian SSR is shown only in the Lithuanian language – LTSR, for Lietuvos Tarybų Socialistinė Respublika. The coat of arms differed little from those of Estonian, Latvian, Moldavian or other soviet socialist republics. Earlier version of the coat of arms, until 1970s, had darker oak leaves.
    5.60
    5 votes
    87
    Coat of arms of Belgium

    Coat of arms of Belgium

    • Supporter: Lion
    The coat of arms of Belgium bears a lion or, known as Leo Belgicus (Latin: the Belgian lion), as its charge. This is in accordance with article 193 (originally 125) of the Belgian Constitution: The Belgian nation takes red, yellow and black as colours, and as state coat of arms the Belgian lion with the motto UNITY MAKES STRENGTH. A royal decree of 17 March 1837 determines the achievement to be used in the greater and the lesser version, respectively. The shield is emblazoned: Sable, a lion rampant or, armed and langued gules. It is surmounted by a helmet with raised visor, with mantling or and sable and the royal crown in lieu of a crest. Behind the shield are placed a hand of justice and a sceptre with a lion. The grand collar of the Order of Leopold surrounds the shield. Two lions guardant proper support the shield as well as a lance with the national colours black, yellow and red. Underneath the compartment is placed the motto L'union fait la force in French or Eendracht maakt macht in Dutch. The riband of the motto is red, with black stripes on either side. The lettering is golden. Since the Royal Decree of 1837 never received an official translation, the use of the Dutch
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Coat of arms of Burkina Faso

    Coat of arms of Burkina Faso

    The coat of arms of Burkina Faso contains a shield based on the national flag. Above the shield the name of the country is shown, while below it is the national motto, Unité, Progrès, Justice (French for "Unity, Progress, Justice"). The supporters are two white stallions. This coat of arms is similar to the old Upper Volta coat of arms (see below), with the Burkina Faso flag replacing the Upper Volta flag in the middle. Thomas Sankara's 1983-1987 Burkinabé revolution implemented an emblem featuring a crossed mattock and AK-47 (an allusion to the Hammer and Sickle), with the motto La Patrie ou la Mort, nous vaincrons ("Fatherland or death, we will win"'). This somewhat resembles the current emblem, except that the enclosing shield has a blue background, the inescutcheon is based on the flag of Upper Volta with the superimposed letters "RHV" (for République de Haute-Volta), and the motto was Unité, Travail, Justice ("Unity, Labour, Justice").
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Coat of arms of Gibraltar

    Coat of arms of Gibraltar

    The coat of arms of Gibraltar was first granted by a Royal Warrant passed in Toledo on July 10, 1502, by Isabella I of Castile during Gibraltar's Spanish period. The arms consists of an escutcheon and features a three-towered red castle under which hangs a golden key. The arms were described in the Royal Warrant as consisting of: "...an escutcheon on which two thirds of its upper part shall have a white field; in the said field set a red Castle; underneath the said Castle, on the other third of the escutcheon, which must be a red field in which there must be a white line between the Castle and the said red field; on this a golden key which shall be on that with a chain from the said castle..." The arms consist of a shield parted per fess: The castle has its roots in the heraldry of the Kingdom of Castile, the largest and most important medieval Spanish kingdom, of which Isabella was Queen. The preamble to the warrant granting the coat of arms to Gibraltar said: "...and we, deeming it right, and acknowledging that the said City is very strong and by its situation it is the key between these our kingdoms in the Eastern and Western Seas and the sentinel and defence of the Strait of
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Coat of arms of Kenya

    Coat of arms of Kenya

    The coat of arms of Kenya features two lions, a symbol of protection, holding spears and a traditional East African shield. The shield and spears symbolize unity and defence of freedom. The shield contains the national colors, representing: Rooster holding axe - According to the African tradition, the rooster is the only domestic fowl that announces the dawn of a new day (more like the alarm clock - the wake-up call). That's why they keep them. At the rooster's crow, all awake and head for work at the early dawn. The rooster is also one of the few animals that seldom moves backwards. The rooster holding an axe while moving forward portrays authority, the will to work, success, and the break of a new dawn. It is also the sybol of Kenya Africa National Union (KANU) party that led the country to independence. The shield and lions stand on a silhouette of Mount Kenya containing in the foreground examples of Kenya agricultural produce - coffee, pyrethrum, sisal, tea, maize and pineapples. The coat of arms is supported by a scroll upon which is written the word 'Harambee'. In Swahili, Harambee means "pulling together" or "all for one". It is the cry of the fishermen as they draw their
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Coat of arms of Malawi

    Coat of arms of Malawi

    The coat of arms of Malawi is based on the earlier heraldic arms of Nyasaland. It is supported by a lion and a leopard, above a scroll reading "Unity and Freedom". The Coat of Arms of Malawi are described as: (a) for crest- (b) for arms- (c) for the supporters- (d) with the motto “Unity and Freedom”
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Coat of arms of Somalia

    Coat of arms of Somalia

    The coat of arms of Somalia was adopted on October 10, 1956. The leopards which support the shield and the white star were also found on the arms used during the Italian administration. Formerly, the arms of Somalia from June 8, 1919, featured a shield divided horizontally by a wavy white line (Smith, 1980). The top half of the shield was blue with a leopard in natural color surmounted by a white five-pointed star.
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Coat of arms of Castile-León

    Coat of arms of Castile-León

    The coat of arms of Castile and León depicts the traditional arms of Castile (the yellow castle) quartered with the arms of León (the red lion). It is topped with a royal crown. The lion design is attributed to Alfonso VII of León and Castile, who became king of León and Castile in 1126. The castle symbol is attributed to his grandson Alfonso VIII of Castile, In 1230, Ferdinand III of Castile united the two kingdoms and quartered the arms as a symbol of the union. Until the sixteenth century, a full castle, with walls and three towers, rather than the current town design, was used. Its original elements are used not only in the current autonomous community of Castilla y León, but also in the coats of arms of many places which belonged to the kingdom of Castile and of León, like Jaén or Los Angeles, California. Today, as a symbol of the autonomous community, it represents the two cultural identities, the castle for Old Castile and the lion for the Leonese Country. Before the creation of the comunidades autonomas, the Castilians and the Leonese had their own regions.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Coat of arms of Costa Rica

    Coat of arms of Costa Rica

    The official coat of arms of the Republic of Costa Rica was designed in 1848, with modifications in 1906, 1964, and most recently the 1998 addition of smoke to distinguish three volcanoes ("Se dibujaron los volcanes humeantes para diferenciarlos.") Before 1821, Costa Rica was part of the Spanish Empire and did not have a local coat of arms. The arms of the reigning monarch were used instead. The only city that had a local coat of arms was the City of Cartago, awarded by King Phillip II in 1565. After the independence from Spain in 1821, Costa Rica briefly joined the Mexican Empire, so from 1822 to 1823 the Costa Rican arms were those of the Mexican Empire. In March 1824, when Costa Rica joined the United Provinces of Central America arms promulgated by the new republic's constitution became the arms of the State of Costa Rica. This coat of arms consists of a triangle, in which five volcanoes rise out of the sea symbolizing the five member states of the United Provinces; above the volcanoes is a shining red Phrygian cap and a rainbow. This coat of arms with small changes is still used by the national coat of arms of El Salvador and Nicaragua. On November 2, 1824 Costa Rica adopted
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Coat of arms of Napoleonic Italy

    Coat of arms of Napoleonic Italy

    The coat of arms of the (Napoleonic) Kingdom of Italy was used as coat of arms for the Kingdom of Italy (1805–1814). The coat of arms depicted a Napoleonic eagle wielding a thunderbolt, with superimposed the heraldic shield of the kingdom with the Légion d'honneur, and, over the eagle, the Iron Crown of Lombardy. The heraldic shield of the kingdom has a silver pale charged with the blue Milanese serpent; Both sides of the pale are divided horizontally: The upper right field shows the papal parasol with the keys of Saint Peter; The upper left shows the Venetian lion, but without bible and with a Phrygian cap on its head; The lower right quarter shows the white eagle of the house of Este (for Modena) and the lower left shows the arms of Piedmont, but under to the right charged with a silver tower (for Rovigo and Feltre). The coat of arms was used on the coins minted in the kingdom.
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    96
    Coat of arms of Sweden

    Coat of arms of Sweden

    The coat of arms of Sweden has a lesser and a greater version. The usage of the coats of arms is regulated by Swedish Law, Act 1970:498, which states (in translation) that "in commercial activities, the coats of arms, the flag or other official insignia of Sweden may not be used in a trademark or other insignias for products or services without proper authorisation. This includes any mark or text referring to the Swedish government which thus can give the commercial mark a sign of official endorsement. This includes municipal coats of arms which are registered." Any representation consisting of three crowns ordered two above one are considered to be the lesser coat of arms, and its usage is therefore restricted by law 1970:498. The greater coat of arms is blazoned in Swedish law as follows: A shield azure, quartered by a cross Or with outbent arms, and an inescutcheon containing the dynastic arms of the Royal House. In the first and fourth fields three open crowns Or, placed two above one. In the second and third fields three sinisterbendwise streams argent, a lion crowned with an open crown Or armed gules. The inescutcheon is party per pale the arms for the House of Vasa (Bendwise
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    3 votes
    97
    Coat of arms of the Department of Quindío

    Coat of arms of the Department of Quindío

    The coat of arms of Quindío was designed by Solita Lozano de Goméz, who also designed the Flag of the Department of Quindío. The Coat of arms of Quindío is the union of two shields, and was based very closely on the Coat of arms of Armenia, the capital of the department. The biggest is a roundel bordered in gules, and in a field of argent lays an inescutcheon on top of this there’s a scroll that cointaints the motto of the department Young, Rich, Powerful. Below the inescutcheon the year 1966 is inscribed, this being the year Quindío became a department. And going around the sides, are two branches of coffee in representation of the most important product of the region. The inescutcheon its copied from the inescutcheon of the coat of arms of Armenia. Whitin it, in a field of azure, there's a trunk with an Splitting Axe incrusted in it, symbol of the colonist who built the town.
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    3 votes
    98
    Coat of arms of Krzywda

    Coat of arms of Krzywda

    Krzywda is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The homeland of this coat of arms is probably Krzywda in Podlaskie. This coat of arms is said to have originated as an abatement of the Lubicz. There are two legends of how this coat of arms appeared: It is said that one of two (or three) brothers of the Lubicz clan did wrong (krzywda) to the other with respect to his portion of their inheritance, and as a result half of one cross was taken from his coat of arms and the new coat of arms was called Krzwyda (which translates from Polish as "injustice", "greif"). Polish: "Gdy jeden Lubicz przy majątkowym działe brata skrzywdził, utracił za to jedno ramie górniego krzyża." The other version is that the missing arm was because of a story, which was based on a rule that "The first man to touch a certain piece of land, could claim it". So somebody named Bogucki was in a boat looking for the land, and there were many other boats around him. It looked like others might get to the land first. So in order to claim the land, he cut off his own arm, and threw it to the land, and claimed it as his. In Polish blazon
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    99
    Coat of arms of Odyniec

    Coat of arms of Odyniec

    Odyniec (Polish for "Boar") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Coat of arms of Nepal

    Coat of arms of Nepal

    The coat of arms of Nepal was changed during the reconciliation period following the Nepalese Civil War. On 30 December 2006, a new coat of arms was introduced. It contains the flag of Nepal, Mount Everest, green hills symbolising the hilly regions of Nepal and yellow colour symbolising the fertile Terai region, male and female hands joining to symbolise gender equality, and a garland of rhododendrons (the national flower). Atop this is a white silhouette in the shape of Nepal. At the base of the design a red scroll carries the national motto in Sanskrit: जननी जन्मभूमिश्च स्वर्गादपी गरीयसी (jananī janmabhūmiśca svargādapi garīyasī), which translates as "The mother and the motherland are greater than heaven." The original phrase: In English: Popularly believed to be quoted by Lord Rama when his brother Lakshmana expresses desire to stay back in Lanka. This quote is unconfirmed to be from Ramayana but is cited in Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay's work Anandamath The coat of arms in use before 30 December 2006 consists of a white cow, a green pheasant (Himalayan Monal), two Gurkha soldiers (one carrying a kukri and a bow, and the other a rifle), peaks of the Himalayas, two crossed
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    3 votes
    101
    Coat of arms of Ontario

    Coat of arms of Ontario

    The coat of arms of Ontario was granted by Royal Warrant of Queen Victoria on 26 May 1868. This arms of Canada was shared with the provinces of Quebec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador and also used in the Canadian Red Ensign. The Dominion arms was simple and lacked supporters. The award of arms was augmented with supporters and a crest by Royal Warrant of King Edward VII on 27 February 1909. The province's arms and that of the Northwest Territories are the only province/territory without royal symbols, namely a crown. Crest Shield Supporters Motto
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    3 votes
    102
    Coat of arms of Radomsko County

    Coat of arms of Radomsko County

    The Coat of arms of the Radomsko County was laid out according to the following design: on a blue field one finds a red wall with a visible brick pattern, and two towers, between which is a shield partitioned in two, vertically. On the right red field is a silver half-lion, on the left silver field a black half-eagle, both of these share a golden crown. In each tower a rectangular opening is present. In the gate there stands a knight in silver armour, propped on his spear; he wears a silver helmet without any decorations.
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    3 votes
    103
    Coat of arms of the Republic of the Congo

    Coat of arms of the Republic of the Congo

    The coat of arms of the Republic of Congo has a shield with a rampant red lion holding a torch. The background color of the shield is yellow with a green wavy stripe in the middle. A golden crown sits above the shield. Two large African elephants support the shield. A banner with the national motto "Unité Travail Progrès" ("Unity, Work, Progress" translated from "La Congolaise") is draped from a bar supporting the elephants.
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    5 votes
    104
    Coat of arms of Benin

    Coat of arms of Benin

    The coat of arms of Benin, originally introduced in 1964, was readopted in 1990 after being replaced in 1975. At the top of the emblem is the national crest that consists of two horns with corn in the ear and filled with sand. These are reputed to stand for prosperity. Below the crest is a shield that contains the actual coat of arms of Benin. The shield is broken into four quadrants. The top left quadrant contains a castle in the style of the Somba, representative of the history of Benin. In the top right quadrant, is the Star of Benin, the highest award of the nation. Below this is a ship, that stands for the arrival of Europeans in Benin. In the lower left quadrant is a palm tree. The shield is supported by a pair of leopards, the national animal of Benin. Below the shield is the motto of Benin (Fellowship, Justice, Work) in French. In 1975, the People's Republic of Benin (as the country was then known - see history of Benin for more details) adopted a new coat of arms which reflected the country's adherence to Marxism-Leninism. The symbolism of the flag was as follows: The coat of arms also featured the initials of the country: RPB (French: République populaire du Bénin).
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    4 votes
    105
    Coat of arms of Radwan

    Coat of arms of Radwan

    Radwan is a Polish knights' clan (ród)/gens and a Polish coat of arms.  The coat of arms was used by the szlachta (noble) families/septs within the clan under the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Gules: a Gonfannon or surmounted by a Maltese Cross of the last. Crest - on a crowned helmet - three ostrich feathers proper. Arms: gules, a gonfannon ensigned of a cross in chief, and fringed in base, all or. Issuant of a helmet ducally crowned; for a crest, three ostrich plumes proper. Radwan is among the most ancient coats of arms. Its origins can be traced back to Polish and German nobility. The most ancient seal dates from 1443 and the first record from 1409. This coat of arms was widespread mainly in the regions of Kraków, Płock, Sandomierz, Sieradz, and also in Podlasie, Rawa, Ruthenia and Lithuania. It exists in eight variants. Families of magnate status (możni/high nobility) bearing Radwan arms were the Babski's, and the Magnuszewski's and Uchański's (See: Jakub Uchański), parts of the Mazovian feudal elite; however, many branches of the Radwans never transcended the status of middle and lesser nobility. "In Poland, the Radwanice were noted relatively
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    4 votes
    106
    Coat of arms of York

    Coat of arms of York

    The Coat of arms of York is the official symbol of the city of York. The borough has been extended a number of times from the original city contained within the city walls. However, the arms have remained the same throughout all these changes to the borough. The shield, argent, bears St George's Cross upon which are five lions Passant Guardant. The variations depicting the Monarch's recognition of the City's powers of self-government are represented by a Civic Sword and Mace crossed behind the shield. The Chapeau symbolises the office of Mayor who has the right to bear the Sword and Mace. The use of St George's Cross shows the strong English influences and the former importance of the city of York when King Edward III made it the capital during the fighting against Scotland. The five lions represent acknowledgement of the City's strong support for the Monarchy. It is thought that it was during the reign of Edward III that the coat of arms was first granted. The crossed Sword & Mace with the Cap of Maintenance refer to the creation of the office of Lord Mayor of York in the 14th Century by King Richard II. The King had presented a sword to the City in 1387 to be used in civic
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    107
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    108
    Coat of arms of Mali

    Coat of arms of Mali

    Order #56/CMLN of 20 October 1973 prescribed the coat of arms of the Republic of Mali. The motto of the Republic of Mali is "Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi" (One People, One Goal, One Faith), as bed by article 25 of the Constitution. The emblem of the Republic of Mali has a circular shape. It shows on a light blue background:
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    109
    Coat of arms of Peru

    Coat of arms of Peru

    The coat of arms of Peru is the national symbolic emblem of Peru. Four variants are used: the coat of arms per se (Escudo de Armas); the national coat of arms, or national shield (Escudo Nacional); the great seal of the state (Gran Sello del Estado); and the naval coat of arms (Escudo de la Marina de Guerra). All four share the same escutcheon or shield, consisting of three elements: the top left section shows the vicuña, the national animal, on a light-blue field, representing the fauna of Peru; the tree in the top right section is the cinchona tree (the source of quinine, a powerful anti-malarial drug and the key flavorant in tonic water), on a white background, representing the national flora; and the bottom cornucopia with coins spilling from it, on a red field, represents the mineral resources of the country. . The coat of arms (Escudo de Armas) has a palm branch on its left and an laurel one on its right, tied by a red and white ribbon, as well as a Holm oak Civic Crown above it. These represent victory and glory. This variant is used on the national ensign (Pabellón Nacional) or state flag. Its use on its own is infrequent, except on currency, both on coins and bills, and
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    2 votes
    110
    Coat of arms of Ukraine

    Coat of arms of Ukraine

    • Supporter: Lion
    The state coat of arms of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Державний Герб України) or commonly the Tryzub (Ukrainian: Тризуб, "trident") is the national coat of arms of Ukraine, featuring the same colors found on the Ukrainian flag; a blue shield with yellow trident, called the tryzub. It appears on the Presidential standard of Ukraine. The small coat of arms was officially adopted on 19 February 1992, while constitutional provisions exist for establishing the great coat of arms, which is not yet officially adopted. The small coat of arms was designed by Andriy Grechylo, Olexiy Kokhan and Ivan Turetskyi. The history of the trident symbol as featured in the current Ukrainian coat of arms is more than 1000 years old. The first known archeological and historical evidence of this symbol can be found on the seals of the Rurik dynasty. The tryzub was stamped on the gold and silver coins issued by Prince Vladimir the Great (980–1015), might have inherited the symbol from his ancestors (such as Sviatoslav I Igorevich) as a dynastic coat of arms and passed it on to his sons, Sviatopolk I (1015–19) and Yaroslav the Wise (1019–54). The tryzub was also found on the bricks of the Church of the Tithes in
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Coat of arms of Boston College

    Coat of arms of Boston College

    The Coat of Arms of Boston College refers to the insignia of Boston College, a Jesuit university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States. The Boston College coat-of-arms incorporates the heraldic symbols of knowledge; Boston, Massachusetts; Boston, Lincolnshire; and the Jesuit Order. According to a pamphlet published by Sub Turri, the coat of arms is blazoned as follows: The tinctures, gules and or, are the heraldic equivalents of the Boston College colors, maroon and old gold. The "trimount," represents the city of Boston's early topographical distinction of three hills (Mount Vernon, Beacon Hill, and Pemberton Hill) and its former name, Tremontaine or Tremont. The open book is symbolic of knowledge and is the central charge of the academic shield. The chief is derived from the coat of arms of the town of Boston, Lincolnshire, in England (Saint Botolph's Town) after which the New England city is named, which features a field sable, three crowns, of crosses patté and fleur-de-lis, per pale or. Only two crowns are shown, the place of the third being taken by the badge of the Jesuit order. This badge has a field, azure, rayonne or, enclosing the letters IHS, a
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Coat of arms of Ghana

    Coat of arms of Ghana

    The coat of arms of Ghana, designed by Amon Kotei, was introduced on 4 March 1957 by Elizabeth II. It shows a blue shield, which is divided into four parts by a St George's Cross with a golden edge. In the middle of the cross there is the golden lion of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. This symbolizes the close relationship of Ghana to the Commonwealth and the Kingdom. The first part, on the upper left shows a sword, known as a okyeame, which is used at ceremonies. It is a symbol for the regional governments of Ghana, while the area to the right, which shows a representation of a castle on the sea, the presidential palace in Accra on the Gulf of Guinea, symbolizes the national government. The third part of the shield shows a cacao tree, which embodies the agricultural wealth of Ghana. The fourth and last field - on the lower right - shows a gold mine, which stands for the richness of natural resources in Ghana. Upon the shield there are beads with the national colors red, green, and gold, which the flag of Ghana also bears. Above that, there is a black five-pointed star with a golden border, symbol for the freedom of Africa. Holding the coat of arms are two
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    113
    Coat of arms of Gierałt

    Coat of arms of Gierałt

    Gierałt - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    114
    Coat of arms of Samson

    Coat of arms of Samson

    Samson is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    115
    Coat of arms of the Republic of Macedonia

    Coat of arms of the Republic of Macedonia

    The coat of arms of the Republic of Macedonia is composed of two curved garlands of sheaves of wheat, tobacco leaves and opium poppy fruits, tied by a ribbon decorated with embroidery of traditional Macedonian folk motifs. In the centre of the ovoid frame are depicted a mountain, a lake and a sunrise. These devices are said to represent "the richness of our country, our struggle and our freedom". The Macedonian parliament adopted the proposal to change the country’s coat of arms with 80 votes in favor and 18 against, removing the five-pointed star. The national emblem was modified on 16 November 2009. The Macedonian coat of arms that included the red star had been in use since 1946, shortly after the republic became part of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY). With the recent change, the coat of arms is composed of two curved garlands of wheat sheaves, tobacco leaves and opium poppy fruits, tied by a ribbon decorated with embroidery of traditional Macedonian folk motifs. A lake, a mountain, and a sunrise are depicted in the centre of the ovoid frame. The whole composition and design is based upon the pattern of the coat of arms of the SFR Yugoslavia and does
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    1 votes
    116
    Coat of arms of Trzy Gwiazdy

    Coat of arms of Trzy Gwiazdy

    Trzy Gwiazdy (Polish for "Three Stars") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
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    1 votes
    117
    Allan coat of arms

    Allan coat of arms

    Allan - is a Polish Coat of Arms from British origin. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: This article is a copy of Allan (herb szlachecki) from Polish Wikipedia - see Polish link.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Coat of arms of Chile

    Coat of arms of Chile

    The coat of arms of Chile dates from 1834 and was designed by the English artist Charles Wood Taylor. It is made up by a figurative background divided in two equal parts: the top one is blue and the bottom, red. A five pointed white star is in the centre of the shield. This background is supported in one side by a condor, the most significant bird of prey from the Andes, and in the other, by a huemul, the most singular and rare mammal of the Chilean territory. Both animals have in their heads the navy's golden crown, symbol of the heroic deeds of the Chilean Navy in the Pacific Ocean. The coat of arms is crowned by a three feathered crest; each feather bearing one colour: blue, white and red. This crest was a symbol of distinction that former Presidents of the Republic used to wear on their hats. Underneath the coat of arms and on the ellaborated pedestal, there is a white band with the motto: "Por la Razón o la Fuerza" (By reason or force). This emblem is the last of a series of variations due to diverse circumstances and understandings. The first coat of arms was established during the office of President José Miguel Carrera, in 1812. It was designed over an oval in which center
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Coat of arms of Leszczyc

    Coat of arms of Leszczyc

    Leszczyc (Bróg, Brożek, Brożyna, Laska, Laski, Wyszowie), herb szlachecki - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    120
    Coat of arms of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

    Coat of arms of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

    The coat of arms of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is surmounted by a cotton plant and bears the text "Peace and Justice" in Latin. The centerpiece is based on the colonial badge in use from 1907 to 1979 and features two women in classical Roman dress. The one on the heraldic right stands holding an olive branch, and the one on the left holds scales of justice and kneels before a gold altar situated between them.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Coat of arms of Slovakia

    Coat of arms of Slovakia

    The coat of arms of Slovakia consists of a red (gules) shield, in early gothic style, charged with a silver (argent) double cross standing on the middle peak of a dark blue mountain consisting of three peaks. Extremities of the cross are amplificated, and its ends are concaved. The double cross is a symbol of its Christian faith and the hills represent three symbolic mountain ranges: Tatra, Fatra and Mátra (the last one is in northern Hungary). One of the modern interpretations of the double cross is that it represents Slovakia as an heir and guardian of Christian tradition, brought to the region by St. Cyril and St. Methodius, two missionaries from the Byzantine Empire. The two-barred cross in the Slovak coat of arms originated in the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire in the 9th century. Unlike the Christian cross, the symbolism and meaning of the double cross is not well understood. One interpretation is that the first horizontal line symbolized the secular power and the other horizontal line the ecclesiastic power of Byzantine emperors. Another that the first cross represents the death and the second cross the resurrection of Jesus Christ. In the Byzantine Empire of the 9th
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    3 votes
    122
    Coat of arms of Bogorya

    Coat of arms of Bogorya

    Bogorya - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The coat of arms was first attributed to Michał Bogorya, whose name was first recorded in the papers of Trzemeszno monastery, when he was given the title of count, and in a decree granting privileges to the Holy Cross monastery near Sendomierz around 1069. According to legend, Bolesław II the Bold (Bolesław Śmiały), armed with only 3,000 of his cavalry, attacked a much larger band of Polovtsy near Snowskie, striking down their leader. During the battle a colonel called Michał Bogorya proved extraordinary courage and bravery, bearing several wounds and arrows in his body. Bolesław, upon returning from the battle and hearing of his bravery, saw Bogorya and extracted the arrows from his chest, broke them with his own hands and conferred them on Bogorya and his descendants as an eternal honour. The coat of arms consists of two broken white (or silver) arrows pointig in opposite directions—one up and one down—on a red (or blue/green) field. The helm bears a peacock with its tail spread and its beak pointing to the shield's right, holding an arrow likewise
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Coat of arms of Miskolc

    Coat of arms of Miskolc

    The coat of arms of Miskolc, Hungary was created in 1909 based on the mediaeval seals of the city. The first print of the seal was found in a 1376 document by Arnoldus, the judge of the town. The document was a decree by the town council approving a will concerning a vineyard on St. George Hill (the mediaeval name for Avas). The seal is almost completely undistinguishable on this document. The next print can be found on a document dated 7 July 1389, in yellow sealing wax. Its legend is unreadable, and disputes arose about the identity of its heraldic figure, a king's head with a fleur-de-lis crown – according to one theory it is St. Stephen, the patron saint of the Avas church, but the fleur-de-lis indicates a king of the Angevin dynasty, possibly Louis the Great, who gave Miskolc town rights. The next version is from a document from 1433, found in the archives of the Bárczay family. This seal, also affixed in yellow sealing wax, featured a bearded king, possibly Sigismund of Luxemburg, and the legend was Sigillum Civitas Miskolcz ("Seal of the city of Miskolc"). On the left side of the king's head there is a crescent moon, on the right side there is a six-pointed star. In 1577,
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    2 votes
    124
    Coat of arms of Prus III

    Coat of arms of Prus III

    Herb Prus III - is a Belorussian coat of arms and Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this coat of arms include:
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    2 votes
    125
    Coat of arms of the Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The emblem of the Armenian SSR was devised from an initial prototype sketch by Martiros Saryan, a famous Armenian painter and was adopted in 1937 by the government of the Armenian SSR. The emblem prominently features Mount Ararat, regarded as the national symbol of the Armenia. The grapes shown immediately beneath Ararat represent the traditional Biblical account of the first vineyard that Noah planted upon his descent from his ark as a sign of rebirth of humanity. The inner rim on the sides of the grapes includes wheat, symbolic of the land and natural resources of Armenia. Above Mount Ararat is the hammer and sickle with the red star behind it. Printed on the outer rim are the words "Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic" in Armenian (Հայկական Սովետական Սոցիալիստական Հանրապետություն) while in the center outer rim is the motto "Workers of the world, unite!" in both Armenian (Պրոլետարներ բոլոր երկրների, միացե'ք) and Russian (Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь!). The inclusion of Mount Ararat brought objections from Turkey because the mountain is part of its territory. The Kremlin retorted that although the Turkish symbol was the crescent, surely it did not mean that they laid claim
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    2 votes
    126
    Coat of arms of the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Estonian SSR was adopted in 1940 by the government of the Estonian SSR. It features a sunrise accented by sunbeams, the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states", and the red star to represent the affiliation to communism. The emblem consists mainly of the colors red, yellow and green. In the lower part the interlaced text reads, in Estonian Eesti NSV (for Eesti Nõukogude Sotsialistlik Vabariik, Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic). To the right, wheat stalks encircle the center of the coat of arms, and to the left arcs a branch of a coniferous tree. The banner bears the USSR State motto ("Proletarians of all countries, unite!") in both Estonian (Kõigi maade proletaarlased, ühinege!) and Russian (Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! Proletarii vseh stran, soedinjajtes'!). The coat of arms of independent Estonia was restored in 1990.
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    127
    Coat of arms of Toledo

    Coat of arms of Toledo

    Toledo's arms are allegedly a grant of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (King Charles I of Spain). The coat of arms of the city of Toledo consists of the imperial double-headed eagle sable (black) bearing an escutcheon with the coats of arms of Castile and Leon quartered and Granada in point (a pomegranate as in the current Spanish Arms) surrounded by the collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece, and crowned by the Imperial crown. The eagle is flanked by two figures of kings seated and bearing the attributes of their dignity: sword and sceptre. An old privilege granted by the king, Peter of Castile in the Cortes (Parliament) celebrated in Valladolid in 1351 (1389 of the Spanish era), stated that the arms of Toledo are those of the monarch. During the reign of Charles I, the city definitely adopted the emperor's arms, and those are the present arms for the city, adding the figures of the kings, remembering ancient city symbols. The province of Toledo uses the same arms than the city but flanked by the pillars of Hercules, instead of the figures of kings.
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    128
    Gwiaździcz coat of arms

    Gwiaździcz coat of arms

    Gwiaździcz - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    129
    Coat of arms of Quebec

    Coat of arms of Quebec

    The coat of arms of Quebec was adopted by order-in-council of the Quebec government on 9 December 1939, replacing the arms assigned by royal warrant of Queen Victoria on 26 May 1868. The shield is divided into three horizontal fields: The shield is surmounted by the Tudor Crown, and accompanied by a silver scroll bearing the provincial motto, Je me souviens ("I remember"). The blazon is: Arms were first granted to the province in 1868 by Queen Victoria. They were blazoned as follows: However, in 1939 the Quebec government adopted arms by Order-in-Council, replacing the two blue fleurs-de-lis on the golden field with the royal arms of France Moderne in chief. Quebec is the only Canadian province to have adopted arms by its own authority. The federal government is inconsistent in the use of the two variants: it often uses the 1939 variant, but in some cases, such as on the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill and the badge of the Royal 22 Régiment, it uses the 1868 variant.
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    130
    Coat of arms of Vermont

    Coat of arms of Vermont

    The coat of arms of Vermont is the official armorial bearings of the U.S. state of Vermont. Most of the elements found in the coat of arms originate in the Great Seal of Vermont designed by Ira Allen. Whereas the Great Seal of Vermont is reproduced in a single color and is reserved for embossing and authenticating state documents, the coat of arms is a more naturalistic and colorful representation of many of the same elements. The earliest representation of the coat of arms of Vermont is found on an engraved 1821 state military commission. The exact designer is not known, but it is likely that then Secretary of State Robert Temple worked with an engraver in developing the arms. Considerable liberties were taken in early depictions of the coat of arms. The location of the cow and the sheaves (bundles of cereal grains) moved about the foreground, and the height of the pine tree and size of the buck's head also varied. A state statute was approved in 1840, and modified in 1862, both attempts to codify and create more consistent representation of the arms. The coat of arms was cast in brass to ornament uniforms of Vermont's military regiments before, and through the U.S. Civil War,
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    131
    Coat of arms of Ingushetia

    Coat of arms of Ingushetia

    The coat of arms of Ingushetia was instituted on August 26, 1994. In the center of the circle is an eagle (symbolizing nobility, courage, wisdom, and faith) and a battle tower (symbol of old and young Ingushetia). In the background is Stolovaya mountain ("Matloam") on the left of the tower and Kazbek mountain ("Bashloam") on the right. Above the tower a yellow sun is shining in blue sky. The name of the republic appears above the seal in Russian (Республика Ингушетия) and below the seal in Ingush (ГӀалгӀай Мохк). The small triskelion near the bottom of the seal references the flag of Ingushetia.
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    Coat of arms of Northwest Territories

    Coat of arms of Northwest Territories

    The original coat of arms of the Northwest Territories was granted by a Royal Warrant of Queen Elizabeth II on 7 February 1957. The shield is also featured on the territorial flag. The coat of arms was designed by well known heraldry expert Alan Beddoe in the early 1950s. The territory's arms is one of three, Ontario and Yukon are the other two, regions without royal symbols, namely a crown. The crest consists of two gold narwhals guarding a compass rose, symbolic of the magnetic North Pole. The white upper third of the shield represents the polar ice pack and is crossed by a wavy blue line symbolizing the Northwest Passage. The diagonal line separating the red and green segments of the lower portion of the shield reflects the tree line. The green symbolizes the forested areas south of the tree line, while the red represents the tundra to the north. Minerals and fur, the important bases of the northern wealth, are represented by gold billets in the green portion and the mask of the white fox in the red.
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    Coat of arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands

    Coat of arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands

    The coat of arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands was granted in 1965. The arms consist of a shield bearing a conch shell, lobster, and cactus on a yellow background. The dexter and sinister supporters are flamingos. The crest is a pelican between two sisal plants representing connection to the rope industry. The shield from the arms features on the flag of the Turks and Caicos Islands, and on the defaced Union Flag of the Governor NATIONAL SYMBOLS, from The Official Turks and Caicos Islands Government Website.
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    135
    Coat of arms of Moscow

    Coat of arms of Moscow

    The coat of arms of Moscow depicts a horseman with a spear in his hand slaying a basilisk and is identified with Saint George and the Dragon. The heraldic emblem of Moscow has been an integral part of the coat of arms of Russia since the 16th century. Its three colours — blue, red and white — are believed to have inspired the colours of the flag of Russia. The emblem had its origins in the Byzantine tradition of depicting a patron saint of the ruling monarch on his seal and coins. Yaroslav the Wise was the first Russian ruler whose patron saint was Saint George. Accordingly, he built several cities and churches in the name of that saint. Saint George was also the patron saint of his great grandson, Yury Dolgoruky, who founded the city of Moscow. The name "Yury" is Russian for "George". Yury is thought to have honored his patron saint on his coins which represent a standing warrior holding a sword in his right hand. Yury's elder brother, Mstislav the Great, also used a seal featuring a horseman slaying a basilisk. According to some theory, this might have been a reference to St. George as the patron saint of England, since Mstislav's maternal grandfather was the last Anglo-Saxon
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    136
    Coat of arms of Świnka

    Coat of arms of Świnka

    Świńka (Polish medieval language for "Boar") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Świńka is one of the oldest coats of arms in Poland. According to legend, the history of the Świńka family began in 712, when a certain Biwoj, squire to Queen Libusza, gave her a giant boar that he had hunted down in the forest. The queen rewarded him with the coat of arms, the village of Świny in Silesia, and her daughter. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
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    137
    Coat of arms of Transnistria

    Coat of arms of Transnistria

    The national emblem of Transnistria is a remodeled version of the former Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic emblem, that was substituted by the internationally-recognized Moldovan government after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. The only major change made in the Transnistrian device was the addition of waves, representing Dniester. Also the inscription on the red banner changed: unlike the Moldavian SSR emblem, which bore the acronym "РССМ" (for "Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic") and the USSR state slogan Workers of the world, unite! in Russian and Moldavian languages, the Transnistrian emblem bears the name "Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic" in Moldovan, Russian and Ukrainian languages. In Moldovan, it is "Република Молдовеняскэ Нистрянэ" (transliterated: "Republica Moldoveneascǎ Nistreanǎ"); in Russian, it is "Приднестровская Молдавская Республика" (transliterated: "Pridnestrovskaya Moldavskaya Respublika"); and, in Ukrainian, it is "Придністровська Молдавська Республіка" (transliterated: "Prydnistrovs'ka Moldavs'ka Respublika").
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    138
    Coat of arms of Zaremba

    Coat of arms of Zaremba

    Zaremba is a Russian Coat of Arms. It was used by several families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. A demi lion rampant issuant sable, langued gules. In base three golden bricks 2 and 1 garnished or. For a crest: out of a ducal coronet a lion as in the arms. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    139
    Zawadzki coat of arms

    Zawadzki coat of arms

    Zawadzki - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Variation of Ostoja coat of arms Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: Michael Zawacki II
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    140
    Coat of arms of Chad

    Coat of arms of Chad

    The coat of arms of Chad was adopted in 1970. The center has a shield with wavy blue and yellow lines, with a sun rising over it. The shield is supported by a goat and a lion. Below the shield is a medal and a scroll with the national motto in French, Unité, Travail, Progrès ("Unity, Work, Progress" in English). The wavy lines on the shield are representative of Lake Chad, and the sun rising over it represents a new beginning. The goat on the left represents the northern part of the nation, while the southern part is represented by the lion. Dangling from the bottom of the shield is the medal for the National Order of Chad. There also exists a separate state seal or emblem of Chad, which has a black-and-white design consisting of a circle with the words "République du Tchad – Unité, Travail, Progrès" surrounding a depiction of the head and upper body of a tribal girl with her hair in cornrows. Media related to Coats of arms of Chad at Wikimedia Commons
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    141
    Coat of arms of Abbotsford, British Columbia

    Coat of arms of Abbotsford, British Columbia

    The coat of arms of Abbotsford, British Columbia, was granted by the Canadian Heraldic Authority on 25 October 1995. The grant included the full coat of arms as well as a flag and a badge, both derived from the arms. Incl previous versions Crest Shield Compartment Supporters Motto Other Elements
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    142
    Coat of arms of Baden-Württemberg

    Coat of arms of Baden-Württemberg

    The coat of arms of the German state of Baden-Württemberg features a greater and a lesser version. The coat of arms of Baden-Württemberg was determined after the merging of the former German states Baden, Württemberg-Baden and Württemberg-Hohenzollern, that were divided due to different occupying forces after World War II, in 1952. The creation of the state was not without controversies and thus only the state colours black and gold were determined in 1952, but not yet the arms. The latter were only regulated in the Gesetz über das Wappen des Landes Baden-Württemberg (Law on the Coat of Arms of Baden-Württemberg) of 3 May 1954. Its use is moreover regulated by an order dated 2 August 1954. It was designed by Fritz Reinhardt. The shield shows three black lions with red tongues on a golden background. The arms refer to the coat of arms of the Duke of Swabia whose House of Hohenstaufen had used these arms. The name of Suabia had long been discussed for use with the newly created state but it failed to be adopted due to resistance from parts of Baden. The six small coat of arms at the top stand for the origins of parts of Baden-Württemberg. They are from left to right: Thereby the arms
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    143
    Coat of arms of Dutch Brazil

    Coat of arms of Dutch Brazil

    Coat of arms of New Holland (Dutch Brazil), resulting of the union of the four coats of the main Dutch dominions in Northeastern Brazil: The first quarter represents Pernambuco; the second quarter, on the right, Itamaracá; below, on the left, Paraíba and finally Rio Grande do Norte.
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    144
    Coat of arms of Hong Kong

    Coat of arms of Hong Kong

    The Regional Emblem of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China came into use on 1 July 1997, after Hong Kong's transfer of sovereignty from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China. The emblem features the same design elements as the regional Flag of Hong Kong in a circular setting. The outer white ring is shown with the caption of the official name of the territory in Traditional Chinese and the English short form, "Hong Kong". The colonial badge was in use since 1843 in one version or another until it was replaced by the coat of arms granted in 1959. Throughout several revisions, the idea of the badge remained. It depicted three Chinese merchants and a pile of cargo on a wharf on the left in the foreground. In the background there was a square-rigged ship and a Chinese junk in the harbour backed by conical hills. Above is an older variation of the Coat of arms of the United Kingdom. The arms had been in use in colonial Hong Kong since it was granted on 21 January 1959 and later adopted on the colonial flag in July of that year. The use of the arms (by the Hong Kong Government) ended in 1997 where it was replaced by the regional
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    145
    Coat of arms of Indonesia

    Coat of arms of Indonesia

    The National Emblem of Indonesia is called Garuda Pancasila. The main part of Indonesian national emblem is the Garuda with a heraldic shield on its chest and a scroll gripped by its legs. The shield's five emblems represent Pancasila, the five principles of Indonesia's national philosophy. The Garuda claws gripping a white ribbon scroll inscribed with the national motto Bhinneka Tunggal Ika written in black text, which can be loosely translated as "Unity in Diversity". Garuda Pancasila was designed by Sultan Hamid II from Pontianak, supervised by Sukarno, and was adopted as national national emblem on 11 February 1950. Garuda, the vehicle (vahana) of Vishnu appears in many temples of ancient Indonesia. Temples such as Mendut, Borobudur, Sajiwan, Prambanan, Penataran, Belahan, and Sukuh depict the images (bas-relief or statue) of Garuda. In Prambanan temple complex there is a single temple located in front of Vishnu temple, dedicated to Garuda. However there is no statue of Garuda inside the chamber today. In the Shiva temple, also in Prambanan complex, there is a relief telling an episode of Ramayana about Garuda's nephew who also belongs to the bird-god race, Jatayu, tried to
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    146
    Coat of arms of Lubicz

    Coat of arms of Lubicz

    Lubicz - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Those of Clan Lubicz, adopted to it, misattributed to it or those who simply usurped Clan Lubicz membership. Lubicz- was also named - Luba, Lubow, Łubow, Łuba, Łubik, Łubek, Łubicz Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    147
    Coat of arms of Poraj

    Coat of arms of Poraj

    Poraj is a Polish Coat of Arms. Used by several knighthood families of Medieval Poland and noble families of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth - those descended in the male-line from the Poraj family and those allowed into the heraldic clan by adoption at ennoblement. Gules, a rose Argent barbed Vert seeded Or. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    148
    Coat of arms of the State Union Serbia and Montenegro

    Coat of arms of the State Union Serbia and Montenegro

    The coat of arms of Serbia and Montenegro was the national symbol of Serbia and Montenegro (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 2003). The coat of arms was officially adopted by the federal parliament in 1994. It replaced the coat of arms of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia which had remained as the Federal Republic's coat of arms from 1992 to 1994. Usage of the arms was discontinued in 2006, after the dissolution of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. The legal acts which reconstituted the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia into the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro stipulated that a law was to be passed by the end of 2003 specifying the Union's coat of arms and anthem. Such a law was never brought forward, and unlike with the flag and anthem, no notable proposals for a new coat of arms were ever put forward. Thus the State Union continued to use the Yugoslav arms by inertia until its dissolution in June 2006. Two-headed eagle (silver), with quartered shield with national symbols of Montenegro (Golden lion of the House of Petrović-Njegoš) and Serbia (four firesteels with a cross). The coat of arms was designed after the breakup of the former Socialist Federal
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    149
    Coat of arms of Adelaide

    Coat of arms of Adelaide

    The Coat of Arms of Adelaide was granted by the Heralds College on 20 April 1929. The Arms consist of a blue shield with a gold cross, on which is surmounted a red cross. Above the shield is a golden mural crown; its derives from the crown or garland given to the soldier in early Roman times who was the first to scale the wall of a besieged town. Above the mural crown is a crest of the Corporation. It is a right arm holding miner’s pick, it representing another of the industries of the early years which contributed so much to the wealth of South Australia and Adelaide. The arm is resting on a wreath of the colors of the city blue and gold. On the right side of shield there is a kangaroo, and on the left side a Lion, which guard and uphold the shield. The lion represents the English origin of the settlers who established South Australia and the kangaroo represents the country they helped to build. The base of the shield is on a grassy green field of rising ground. A scroll below the arms has a Latin motto Ut Prosint Omnibus Conjuncti which translates as "united for the common good."
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    150
    Coat of arms of Austria

    Coat of arms of Austria

    The current coat of arms of Austria, albeit without the broken chains, has been in use by the Republic of Austria since 1919. Between 1934 and the German annexation in 1938 Austria used a different coat of arms, which consisted of a double-headed eagle. The establishment of the Second Republic in 1945 saw the return of the original (First Republic) arms, with broken chains added to symbolise Austria's liberation. In translation, the blazon of the Federal Arms of the Republic of Austria reads: Gules a fess Argent, escutcheon on the breast of an eagle displayed Sable, langued Gules, beaked Or, crowned with a mural crown of three visible merlons Or, armed Or, dexter talon holding sickle, sinister talon holding hammer, both talons shackled with chain broken Argent. There are two different versions of the arms: One version in accordance with the Federal Constitution, in which the eagle is represented plain black, and another more artistic version in which the eagle's feathers are detailed. Both versions are used in parallel. The symbols and emblems used in the Austrian arms are as follows: Discussions about the arms have been triggered in the past by differing political interpretations,
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    151
    Coat of arms of Cieleski

    Coat of arms of Cieleski

    Cieleski is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: Coat of arms of Trestka (CoA Cieleski is a variation of CoA Trestka)
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    152
    Coat of arms of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on March 26, 1937, by the government of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture, two sheaves of wheat. The rising Sun stands for the future of the Kazakh nation, the red star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of Communism and the "world-wide Socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Russian and Kazakh languages. In Kazakh, it is Барлық елдеpдің пролетарлары, бірігіңдер! (transliterated: "Barlıq elderdiñ proletarları, birigiñder!"). The acronym "KSSR" is shown in both the Russian and Kazakh alphabets. Since 1978, the sickle was placed over the hammer. A new coat of arms of Kazakhstan was adopted following the dissolving of the Soviet Union on December 26, 1991.
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    153
    Coat of arms of Vilnius

    Coat of arms of Vilnius

    The coat of arms of Vilnius is the coat of arms of the city of Vilnius, Lithuania. It is also used as coat of arms of Vilnius city municipality. The modern version was created in 1991 by Arvydas Každailis, the same artist who drew the modern coat of arms of Lithuania. The design is based on the oldest seals of the Vilnius City Council dating back to the 14th century. There is a great version and a small version. The great version incorporates the small version, which depicts Saint Christopher (sometimes also called Saint Christophorus) with the infant Jesus in his hands. This coat of arms was given to Vilnius in 1330. It was speculated that in pagan times, i.e., until the end of the 14th century, it featured Titan Alkis, a hero of ancient Lithuanian tales, carrying his wife Janterytė on his shoulders across the Vilnia River. The great coat of arms bears the Latin motto "Unitas – Justitia – Spes" ("Unity – Justice – Hope"). The words are echoed by objects held by the shield supporters: the axe and tied rods represent unity; the scale, justice; and the anchor, hope. The coat of arms was banned by the Soviet Union during their occupation of Lithuania. It was confirmed again on April
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    154
    Coat of arms of Dołęga

    Coat of arms of Dołęga

    Dołęga (pronunciation: [dɔˈwɛ̃ɡa]) is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Azure, a downward opened horse-shoe argent with a cross former of the same charged on the edge of its arch. Inside the horse-shoe an argent arrow whose downward point protrudes. Helmet with mantling azure, lined argent. Crowned. Crest: a vulture's wing with an argent arrow shot through. There were three versions of Dołęga Coat of Arms:- Count (Hrabia) - In Russia and Poland, where the title of count was not introduced until Peter The Great's (1672–1725) time, it came to be given usually to officials of a certain rank in the government service. In Poland there were no Counts before the partitions of the late 18th century, when the title was introduced by the Russians, Austrians, and Prussians. The early Komes title was developed in medieval Poland. A Count's crown usually has nine points above its shield. Baron - Nobility title that is lower than the Count, but is higher than a nobleman. The Baron's crown have usually seven points on the crown. (while noblemen only three, Dukes and Princes are decorated with Mitre). . Nobleman -
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    155
    Coat of arms of Birmingham

    Coat of arms of Birmingham

    The coat of arms of Birmingham is the heraldic emblem of the English city of Birmingham. It was first used in 1838 and has been changed several times since, as the former town grew and developed into a city. Following the incorporation of Birmingham as a borough in 1838, the corporation approved the design of a seal comprising "The Birmingham Arms, encircled with a wreath", with the motto "Forward". The arms were those used from about 1413 to 1536 by the de Bermingham family, holders of the manor. The quartered shield featured in the first and fourth quarters five gold lozenges or diamond shapes conjoined in a diagonal "bend". These were the original arms of the de Berminghams until about 1343. The second and third quarters were divided vertically with an "indented" line. This should have been coloured in black and white, but in the version adopted by the corporation it was coloured gold and red. These were in fact the arms of another branch of the family, who became the Barons of Athenry and Earls of Louth in Ireland. In 1867 a new seal was made, and at the time the discrepancy in the colouring of the second and third quarters was noticed. However, it was decided to retain the
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    156
    Coat of arms of Jastrzębiec

    Coat of arms of Jastrzębiec

    Jastrzębiec - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families prior to and during the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and to the present day. During World War II and the communism reform, many families lost their commonwealth status, and to this day have no right to their manors and sometimes vast lands. According to Bartosz Paprocki, this armorial bearing has the name Jastrzebiec because the clan's ancestors, while still pagans, bore on the arms only a Goshawk (Jastrzab). But later, in the days of King Boleslaw the Brave, circa 999, when pagan foes were masters of Lysa Góra - two miles from Bozecin, now called Swiety Krzyz (Holy Cross) and stood secure upon it as if in a fortress, they hurled abuse upon our forces, saying: "Send forth one from among you who is willing to fight for Christ in a challenge against one of our men." Having heard this a knight, one Jastrzebczyk scion of the Jastrzebiec clan, moved by the fervor of faith and the praise of God, invented shoes for the horses' hooves and, having shod a horse with them, succeeded in forcing his way up the mountain. He fought the Pagan, who had hitherto been jeering haughtily, captured him, and brought him
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    157
    Coat of arms of Kortrijk

    Coat of arms of Kortrijk

    The Coat of arms of the city of Kortrijk goes back to the family coat of arms of the 12th century viscounts of Kortrijk. The heraldic description of it goes as follows: In silver and copper and with a sculpted border of deep red. The shield is topped with a city crown with 5 towers of silver and is guarded by two ‘wildemannen’ in flesh colour, each clothed and crowned with oak leaves in emerald and leaning on a club of natural colour.
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    158
    Coat of arms of Mauritania

    Coat of arms of Mauritania

    The seal of Mauritania (Arabic: شعار الجمهورية الإسلامية الموريتانية‎, French: Sceau de la Mauritanie) is based on the national flag of Mauritania adopted on April 1, 1959. The colours of green and gold are considered Pan-African colours. Green is also to symbolize Islam, and the gold for the sands of the Sahara desert. The crescent and star are symbols of Islam, the major religion in the nation. The edges read "Islamic Republic of Mauritania" in Arabic and French.
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    159
    Coat of arms of Nieczuja

    Coat of arms of Nieczuja

    Nieczuja - is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Gules, a Brunâtre stock or tree stub, with three lopped branches on the dexter, and two on the sinister (rarely reversed), all proper, debruised of a cross or sword in chief, also proper. Out of a crest coronet, between two vols, the arms of the shield is repeated. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: Józef Chłopicki Baron, General of Napoleon
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    160
    Coat of arms of Ronald Reagan

    Coat of arms of Ronald Reagan

    When he was Governor of California, future President Ronald Reagan made use of an elaborate coat of arms supposedly traced from powerful Irish aristocrats. When he discovered he was not descended from this family, he hired Adolf F.J. Karlovský, an associate member of the Académie Internationale d'Héraldique, to devise a new coat of arms. In 1984 the new arms were registered in the Solothurn State Archives in Switzerland. They are blazoned as: The crest was blazoned as: Thus there is no wreath or torse. Instead the mantle is a continuation of the crest, as if attached to (or even the hide of) the horse in the crest. The Latin motto is Facta non Verba ("Deeds, not words").
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    161
    Coat of arms of the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on March 23, 1937 by the government of the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture (cotton and wheat) on a backdrop of the Tian Shan mountains, surrounded by a frame of folk art of the Kyrgyz people. The red star was added in 1948. The rising sun stands for the future of the Kyrgyz nation, the star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The higher banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both Russian and Kyrgyz languages. In Kyrgyz, it is "Бардык өлкөлөрдүн пролетарлары, бириккиле!" (transliterated: "Bardıq ölkölördün proletarları, birikkile!"). The emblem was changed in 1992 to the present Kyrgyzstan coat of arms.
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    162
    Coat of arms of the Netherlands

    Coat of arms of the Netherlands

    The Greater Coat of Arms of the Realm, (or "Groot Rijkswapen"), is the personal coat of arms of the monarch of the Netherlands (currently Queen Beatrix). The government of the Netherlands uses a smaller version without the mantle (cloak) or the pavilion or sometimes even only uses the shield and crown. The components of the coats of arms were regulated by Queen Wilhelmina in a Royal decree of 10 July 1907 and were affirmed by Queen Juliana in a Royal decree of 23 April 1980. The blazon is follows: Azure, billetty Or a lion with a coronet Or armed and langued Gules holding in his dexter paw a sword Argent hilted Or and in the sinister paw seven arrows Argent pointed and bound together Or. [The seven arrows stand for the seven provinces of the Union of Utrecht.] The shield is crowned with the (Dutch) royal crown and supported by two lions Or armed and langued gules. They stand on a scroll Azure with the text (Or) "Je Maintiendrai" (French for "I will maintain".) The monarch places this coat of arms on a mantle gules lined with Ermine. Above the mantle is a pavilion gules again topped with the royal crown. In the Royal decree it is stated that the male successors can replace the crown
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    163
    Coat of arms of United Arab Emirates

    Coat of arms of United Arab Emirates

    The emblem of the United Arab Emirates (Arabic: شعار الإمارات العربية المتحدة‎) was officially adopted in 1973. It is similar to the coats of arms and emblems of other Arab states. It consists of a golden falcon. The falcon had a red disk which shows an Arab sailboat in its interior. The disk is surrounded by a chain. The falcon holds with its talons a red parchment bearing the name of the federation in Kufic script. On March 22, 2008, the emblem was modified. The main change was that the Arab sailboat was replaced by the UAE flag and seven stars representing the seven Emirates of the federation.
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    164
    Coat of arms of Australia

    Coat of arms of Australia

    • Supporter: Emu
    • Crest: Commonwealth Star
    The coat of arms of Australia (formally known as Commonwealth Coat of Arms) is the official symbol of Australia. The initial coat of arms was granted by King Edward VII on 7 May 1908, and the current version was granted by King George V on 19 September 1912, although the 1908 version continued to be used in some contexts, notably appearing on the sixpenny coin until 1966. The shield is the focal point of the coat of arms, contained within is the badge of each Australian state: In the top half, from left to right, the states represented are: New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland. In the bottom half, from left to right: South Australia, Western Australia, and Tasmania. Above the shield is the seven-pointed Commonwealth Star or Star of Federation above a blue and gold wreath, forming the crest. Six of the points on the star represent the original six states, while the seventh point represents the combined territories and any future states of Australia. In its entirety the shield represents the federation of Australia. The Red Kangaroo and Emu that support the shield are the unofficial animal emblems of the nation. They owe this recognition to the fact that they are native
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    165
    Coat of arms of Brochwicz

    Coat of arms of Brochwicz

    Brochwicz is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    166
    Coat of arms of Estonia

    Coat of arms of Estonia

    The coat of arms of Estonia is a golden shield which includes three slim blue passant gardant lions in the middle, with oak branches along the side of the shield. The three lions derive from the arms of Danish king Valdemar II who had conquered northern Estonia in 1219. The lions became part of the greater coat of arms of Tallinn, the centre of Danish government in Estonia, and the knightages (ger. ritterschaften) of Harria and Viru. In 1346, Denmark sold its Estonian dominion to the Teutonic Order after its power had been severely weakened during the St. George's Night Uprising of 1343-1346. The three lions, however, remained the central element of the greater coat of arms of Tallinn. In later centuries, the motif of the three lions transferred to the coat of arms of the Duchy of Estonia, the Ritterschaft of Estland, and to the coat of arms of the Governorate of Estonia. The Riigikogu (the state assembly) of the independent Republic of Estonia officially adopted the coat of arms on June 19, 1925. The coat of arms was officially banned following the occupation of Estonia by the Soviet Union in 1940, and replaced with the Soviet-inspired coat of arms of the Estonian SSR. Soviet
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    167
    Coat of arms of Georgia

    Coat of arms of Georgia

    • Supporter: Lion
    The coat of arms of the Republic of Georgia was adopted on 1 October 2004. It is partially based on the medieval arms of the Georgian royal house of Bagrationi. Gules, with an image of Saint George, riding a horse trampling upon a crawling dragon, whose head is pierced by the saint's spear, all of them Argent. It has two lions rampant as supporters of the shield, which is surmounted with the royal crown of Georgia, all of them Or. The motto below the shield reads as : "Strength is in Unity" (Dzala Ertobashia, written in the Mkhedruli script of the Georgian alphabet, ძალა ერთობაშია). This coat of arms was in use by the Democratic Republic of Georgia throughout its existence in 1918-1921. Though the use of Saint George as Georgia's patron saint was by then a long tradition, there were some discussions about other possibilities, the major one being Amiran, as the symbol of Georgia's fight for freedom from the Russian Empire. However, a decision was then made in favor of saint George. Restored in 1991, this coat of arms was replaced by the current one in 2004. Before 1917, when Georgia was part of the Russian Empire, the Georgian coat of arms appeared on the Greater Coat of Arms of the
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    168
    Coat of arms of Junosza

    Coat of arms of Junosza

    Junosza is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    169
    Coat of arms of New Zealand

    Coat of arms of New Zealand

    The coat of arms of New Zealand is the official symbol of New Zealand. The initial coat of arms was granted by King George V on the 26 August 1911, and the current version was granted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1956. Until 1911, New Zealand used the same national coat of arms as the United Kingdom. When New Zealand became a Dominion in 1907, it was decided that a new Coat of Arms was required, and a design competition was held. The winning entry was a design by James McDonald, a draughtsman in the Department of Tourist and Health Resorts. Since being granted its own arms in 1911, New Zealand's arms have remained similar to the current design, with minor changes in 1956. Since 1911, the central shield has remained unaltered: a quartered shield containing in the first quarter four stars representing the Southern Cross constellation, as depicted on the national flag, but with the stars in different proportions; in the second quarter, a golden fleece representing the farming industry; in the third, a wheat sheaf representing agriculture; and in the fourth, two hammers representing mining and industry. Over all this is a pale, a broad vertical strip, with three ships representing the
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    170
    Coat of arms of Pierzchała

    Coat of arms of Pierzchała

    Pierzchała - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    171
    Coat of arms of Sunderland

    Coat of arms of Sunderland

    The Sunderland Corporation first assumed a heraldic device in the 19th century. The first grant of arms was made in 1947, and this was not amended in 1967 when additional territory was incorporated into the County Borough of Sunderland. In 1974, on the creation of the Metropolitan Borough of Sunderland, new arms were granted essentially the old arms with amendments to reflect the new incorporated areas, and in 1992 when Sunderland was created a City an entirely new grant of arms was made, the main charges being quite unlike any previous grant. Sunderland has used Nil desperandum Auspice Deo ("When God is on our side there is no cause for despair." or "Do not despair, have faith in God" or "Don’t despair, in God we trust") as a motto since 1849. It is taken from the Odes of Horace, Book 1, Ode 7, line 27. Argent a sextant Sable on a chief Azure two keys wards upwards and outwards in saltire Argent between as many mitres of the last, both enfiled with a ducal coronet Or For crest: On a wreath Argent and Azure a lymphad Sable, the sail Azure charged with the cross of St Cuthbert Argent flying flags Argent charged with a cross Gules. For supporters: On a mount Or, on either side a lion
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    172
    Coat of arms of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Coat of arms of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    The arms of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has changed several times since 1997. The current one was introduced in 2006 and depicts a leopard head, surrounded by an elephant tusk to the left and a spear to the right. Below are the three words which make up the national motto: Justice, Paix, Travail (Justice, Peace, Work in French). It was adopted on February 18, 2006 by President Joseph Kabila. The arms are described in detail in Section 1, Article 1 of the 2005 constitution. The old emblem, which was introduced in 2003, depicted three interlocked hands surrounded by a garland of corn. At the top is a lion head and at the bottom the motto Démocratie, Justice, Unité (Democracy, Justice, Unity in French). The coat of arms of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from 1999 consists of a light blue shield. In the middle is a yellow star, above which there are six smaller stars. This coat of arms was introduced along with the flag. An even older arms from 1971 to 1997, when the nation was known as Zaire, depicted a leopard head, below it a pair of crossed spears, around it a branch and an elephant tusk. The words Paix, Justice, Travail are written on a white band under the spears.
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    173
    Coat of arms of the Transcaucasian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic

    Coat of arms of the Transcaucasian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic

    The coat of arms of the Transcaucasian SFSR was adopted by the government of the Transcaucasian SFSR. It is uncertain when exactly it was adopted. The coat of arms is based loosely on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It incorporates designs from each of the three major groups that combined in the Transcaucasian SFSR, the Armenians, Azeri and Georgians, and unusually features Islamic art and communist elements side by side. The latticework in the star itself bespeaks the former coat of arms of Georgia from 1918-1921 and adopted again from 1991-2004; the crescent represents the Muslim Azeris, on a background depicting the national symbol of the Armenians, Mount Ararat. The rising sun stands for the future, the star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". In 1936, the republic was dissolved and the three regions became the Georgian, Armenian and Azerbaijan SSR respectively.
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    174
    Coat of arms of Turkey

    Coat of arms of Turkey

    Turkey does not have an official coat of arms or national emblem. The symbol on the cover page of Turkish passports is simply the star and crescent as found in the flag of Turkey. Various official institutions of Turkey use instead their own several emblems, most of which have no legal basis. A circular section of the red Flag of Turkey containing the white star and crescent is used in the current emblems of a number of Turkish ministries and government organizations, in the emblem of the Turkish Parliament, and as the flag badge on the uniforms of Turkish national sports teams and athletes. It was also used on the old (non-digital) Turkish identity cards. The Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs uses a red oval-shaped escutcheon, whose colour is that of the Turkish flag and whose shape echoes the oval shield at the center of the late 19th-century Ottoman coat of arms. The escutcheon contains a gold-tone star and crescent which are vertically oriented (with the star on top) and surrounded by the gold-tone text T.C. Dışişleri Bakanlığı. A variant of this oval escutcheon (containing the gold-tone text Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Büyükelçiliği) is used by the Turkish embassies. The seal of the
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    175
    Coat of arms of Tuxtla Gutiérrez

    Coat of arms of Tuxtla Gutiérrez

    In 1941, at the suggestion of the historian Fernando Castañón Gamboa, the city council of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, presided over by Fidel Martínez, adopted as its municipal coat of arms the local pre-Columbian heraldric figures used in times of Mexica control: The figure of a rabbit standing upright upon a jawbone with three teeth. A similar figure appears in the paintings of the Matriculation of the Aztecan tribute and in the Mendocino Codex. This coat of arms was first published in 1941 in the Municipal Gazette of Tuxtla Gutiérrez and in the book Tuchtlan: Documents and unpublished information for the particular history of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, written by Castañón Gamboa. From 1941 to 1996, the design of the coat of arms of Tuxtla Gutiérrez was modified six times without being actually adopted by the official approval of the city council. At first, the figure of the rabbit appeared inside a shield according to the classic form of royal Spanish blazons; the form was later modified. The coat of arms of Tuxtla was used more as a logo of the city government than as an emblem of the city or area itself. In a regular town hall session on 20 June 1996, the city council announced a competition in
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    176
    Coat of arms of Uruguay

    Coat of arms of Uruguay

    The coat of arms of Uruguay was first adopted by law on March 19, 1829. It consists of an oval, which is divided into four equal sections and crowned by a rising golden sun, the “Sun of May”, symbolizing the rising of the Uruguayan nation. The oval is surrounded by a laurel branch on the left and an olive one on the right, representing honor and peace, joined at the bottom by a blue ribbon. In the upper left quarter there is a scale, symbol of equality and justice, set on a blue background. The upper right quarter contains the Cerro de Montevideo (Montevideo Hill) with its fortress on the summit, which represents strength, on a silver background. In the lower left, also on a silver background, there is a galloping horse, symbolizing liberty. The lower right quarter holds an ox, which is a symbol of abundance, on a blue background.
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    177
    Coat of arms of the Isle of Man

    Coat of arms of the Isle of Man

    The coat of arms of the Isle of Man dates from 12 July 1996. As the Isle of Man is a Crown dependency, the arms are more accurately described as The Arms of Her Majesty in right of the Isle of Man. The Arms of Her Majesty in right of the Isle of Man were granted by Queen Elizabeth II, Lord of Mann on 12 July 1996. The arms are an augmented form of the traditional arms. It has a threefold rotational symmetry. See Frieze group. The traditional arms date back to the 13th century. The arms are recorded in the English Walford's Roll, and Camden Roll, as well as the French Wijbergen Roll. Within the Camden Roll the arms appear illustrated as: gules, three mailed legs embowed, and conjoined at the thighs, argent; the original Norman French blazon reads: "l'escu de gules, a treis iambes armes". The escutcheon is emblazoned: Gules a triskele argent garnished and spurred Or. The triskele (or triskelion) is an ancient symbol, consisting of three branches or legs, that radiate from a centre. The symbol is found on the Isle of Man, and earlier on Sicily. The Manx triskelion is known in the Manx language as Ny Tree Cassyn ("The Three Legs"). The symbol has been associated with the island since
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    178
    Coat of arms of Alabanda

    Coat of arms of Alabanda

    Alabanda - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    179
    Coat of arms of Croatia

    Coat of arms of Croatia

    The coat of arms of Croatia consists of one main shield and five smaller shields which form a crown over the main shield. The main coat of arms is a checkerboard (chequy) that consists of 13 red and 12 silver (white) fields. It's commonly known as šahovnica ("chessboard", from šah, "chess" in Croatian) or grb (literally coat of arms). The five smaller shields represent five different historical regions within Croatia. The checkerboard coat of arms (šahovnica) is first attested as an official symbol of the kingdom of Croatia on an Innsbruck tower depicting the emblem of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor in 1499. In 1525 it was used on a votive medal. It appeared on a seal from the charter that confirmed the 1527 election of Emperor Ferdinand I as king of Croatia at the Parliament on Cetin. The origin of the design has often been purported as being medieval. Historic tradition states it to be the arms of Stephen Držislav in the 10th century. Also, the falcons on a stone plate from the time of Peter Krešimir IV (r. 1058–1074/5) carry something that resembles a traditional Croatian chequy on their wings. The size of the checkerboard ranges from 3×3 to 8×8, but most commonly 5×5, like in
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    180
    Coat of arms of Drogosław

    Coat of arms of Drogosław

    Drogosław - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. This shield was brought to Poland from Silesia. This took place in the year 1333, during the reign of King Kazimierz the Great. The occasion on which these arms were granted to an ancestor of the house was as follows: The enemy had encircled the army and enclosed it in a ring, when this ancestor, gathering his courage, used his sword to open a path and broke through the circle. A Drogoslaw is the first we know of with these arms, and they took their name from him. Gules, upon a demi annulet an arrow in pale, point to chief both Argent. Out of a crest coronet, a panache of five ostrich plumes proper. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: Władysław herbu Drogosław Truszkowski (Lemberg/Lwów, 3 May 1876 - Gaza, 26 March 1917), captain (Hauptmann) and chief commander of the Austro-Hungarian artillery troops in the Palestine front in the First World War. He died a heroic death at the First Battle of Gaza, and was buried in the crypt of the Assumptionist fathers in Jerusalem.
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    181
    Coat of arms of Huddersfield

    Coat of arms of Huddersfield

    The Coat of arms of Huddersfield was the official symbol of the local government of Huddersfield (the Corporation of Huddersfield). The borough was abolished in 1974, 106 years after its incorporation in 1868, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972 whereby control was ceded to Kirklees Metropolitan Council and West Yorkshire Metropolitan County Council. The arms were granted by the College of Arms by letters patent dated October 12, 1868 to the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of the Borough of Huddersfield. The design was based on the arms of the family of Ramsden of Byrom, owners of the manors of Almondbury and Huddersfield: Argent on a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis Sable, as many rams' heads couped at the neck of the first. The crest of a ram's head is similar to that granted to the borough of Barrow-in-Furness in the previous year: this also referred to the Ramsden family arms. The arms feature the motto Juvat Impigros Deus which is Latin for 'God helps the diligent'. The formal description, or blazon, of the arms is: Or on a chevron between three Rams passant Sable as many towers argent. And for the Crest on a Wreath of the Colours a Rams head couped argent
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    182
    Coat of arms of Kiev

    Coat of arms of Kiev

    The coat of arms of Kiev features the Archangel Michael, wielding a flaming sword and a shield on an azure field. The coat of arms traces its history back to the medieval principality of Kievan Rus', where the Archangel Michael was depicted on the seals used by the Kievan grand princes. Initially the coat of arms of Kiev featured Saint George fighting a dragon on an azure field, and this today remains the coat of arms of the Kiev Oblast. In the 16th century, a coat consisting of the Archangel Michael clad in white robes, holding a sword and a scabbard on a red field was adopted for the Kiev Voivodeship. In 1487, along with Magdeburg rights, the city of Kiev received a coat of arms consisting of a hand holding a crossbow. In 1782, a new coat of arms was approved by the order of Catherine II of Russia. In the order the coat of arms is described as "Archangel Michael in a short tunic on an azure field". Later on it was decorated with an imperial crown and other ornaments. No original image of the arms has been recovered to date. Some modern drawings of the arms exist, based on the description in Catherine's order. In 1918, during the short time of Ukrainian independence, a coat of
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    183
    Coat of arms of Latvia

    Coat of arms of Latvia

    The Latvian national Coat of Arms was formed after the proclamation of an independent Republic of Latvia on November 18, 1918, and was officially adopted on June 16, 1921. It was especially created for its independent statehood. The national coat of arms combines symbols of Latvian national statehood, as well as symbols of ancient historical districts. The sun in the upper part of the coat of arms symbolizes Latvian national statehood. A stylized depiction of the sun was used as a symbol of distinction and national identity by the Imperial Russian Army's Latvian Riflemen during World War I. During the war, the sun figure was fashioned with 17 rays that symbolized the 17 Latvian-inhabited districts. The three stars above the coat of arms embody the idea of the inclusion of historical districts (Vidzeme, Latgale and combined Courland-Semigalia (Kurzeme-Zemgale) into the united Latvia. Culturally historical regions are also characterized by older heraldic figures, which already appeared in the 17th century. Courland and Semigalia (Western Latvia) are symbolized by a red lion, which appears as early as 1569 in the coat of arms of the former Duke of Courland and Semigalia. Vidzeme and
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    184
    Coat of arms of the Federated States of Micronesia

    Coat of arms of the Federated States of Micronesia

    The Seal of the Federated States of Micronesia resembles the previous seal of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and reads "Government of the Federated States of Micronesia". The seal had been adopted by the Congress of the Federated States of Micronesia and then accepted by the United States Congress.
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    185
    Coat of arms of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    Coat of arms of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    The emblem of Yugoslavia featured six torches, surrounded by wheat with a red star at its top, and burning together in one flame; this represented the brotherhood and unity of the six federal republics forming Yugoslavia: SR Bosnia and Herzegovina, SR Croatia, SR Macedonia, SR Montenegro, SR Serbia and SR Slovenia. The date imprinted is 29 November 1943 - on this date the Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia (AVNOJ) met in Jajce on its second meeting and formed the basis for post-war organisation of the country, establishing a federal republic (this date was celebrated as Republic Day after World War II). The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (previously called Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes) was an evolution of the Coat of arms of Serbia. Graphically the coat of arms were similar, featuring only two major differences, the first difference being the royal crowns. The royal Serbian coat of arms depicts the Obrenović dynastic crown, while the royal Yugoslav coat of arms depicted the ruling Karađorđević dynastic crown. The second difference was the shield surmounted on the white double-headed eagle. The previous Serbian coat of arms depicted only
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    186
    Coat of arms of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on March 14, 1919 by the government of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic and subsequently modified on November 7, 1928, January 30, 1937 and November 21, 1949. The coat of arms from 1949 is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union and features the hammer and sickle, the red star, a sunrise and stalks of wheat on its outer rims. The rising sun stands for the future of the Soviet Ukrainian nation, the star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Ukrainian and Russian languages. In Ukrainian, it is "Пролетарі всіх країн, єднайтеся!" (transliterated: "Proletari vsikh kraïn, yednaĭtesya!"). The name of the Ukrainian SSR is shown only in Ukrainian, and reads "Українська PCP" (Українська Радянська Соціалістична Республіка). In 1992 after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and Ukraine became independent, the emblem was changed to the present coat of arms of Ukraine the tryzub (trident) coat of arms, which was affirmed in the new Constitution of
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    187
    Coat of arms of Transylvania

    Coat of arms of Transylvania

    The first heraldic representations of Transylvania date from the 16th century. One of the predominant early symbols of Transylvania was the coat of arms of Sibiu city. In 1596 Levinus Hulsius created a coat of arms for the imperial province of Transylvania, consisting of a shield party per fess, with a rising eagle in the upper field and seven hills with towers on top in the lower field. He published it in his work "Chronologia", issued in Nuremberg the same year. The seal from 1597 of Sigismund Bathory, prince of Transylvania, reproduced the new coat of arms with some slight changes: in the upper field the eagle was flanked by a sun and a moon and in the lower field the hills were replaced by simple towers. Transylvania's coat of arms adopted by the Diet of 1659 represents the privileged nations who were subjects of officially accepted religions in the region (Roman Catholics, Calvinists, Lutherans, and Unitarians), while Orthodox Christians (overwhelmingly Romanians; some Ruthenes present in Carpathian Ruthenia), however, were only tolerated. It depicts: The red dividing band was used for the first time by Prince Michael I Apafi, and its first variant was featured on gold coins
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    188
    Coat of arms of Trinidad and Tobago

    Coat of arms of Trinidad and Tobago

    The coat of arms of Trinidad and Tobago was designed by a committee formed in 1962 to select the symbols that would be representative of the people of Trinidad and Tobago. The committee included noted artist Carlisle Chang and the late designer George Bailey. The palm tree at the top of the coat of arms was taken from Tobago’s coat of arms before it was joined in political union with Trinidad. The wreath represents the crown of the monarchy of the United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago’s colonizers at the time of independence. The shield has the same colours (black, red, and white) as the nation’s flag and carry the same meaning. The gold ships represent the Santa María, La Niña, and La Pinta: the three ships Christopher Columbus used on his journey to the “New World”. The two birds on the shield are hummingbirds. Trinidad is sometimes referred to as the “Land of the Hummingbird” because more than sixteen different species of hummingbird have been recorded on the island. “Land of the Hummingbird” is also believed to have been the Native American name for Trinidad. The two larger birds are the Scarlet Ibis (left) and the Cocrico (right), the national birds of Trinidad and Tobago. Below
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    189
    Coat of arms of Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus

    Coat of arms of Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus

    The coat of arms of Northern Cyprus are styled closely on the arms of the Republic of Cyprus, except that the '1960' was removed from the shield underneath the dove and the addition, a depiction of the Turkish star and crescent emblem is placed over the shield with the year '1983' added. The year is in reference to the Declaration of Independence of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. In late 2007, a slight change to the layout of the arms was made. The dove is in a different position/attitude.
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    190
    Gutak coat of arms

    Gutak coat of arms

    Gutak - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    191
    Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

    Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom

    • Supporter: Lion
    • Crest: Lion
    • Compartments: Shamrock
    The Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch of the United Kingdom, and are officially known as her Arms of Dominion. Variants of the Royal Arms are used by other members of the Royal Family; and by the British government in connection with the administration and government of the country. In Scotland, the Queen has a separate version of the Royal Arms, a variant of which is used by the Scotland Office. The shield is quartered, depicting in the first and fourth quarters the three passant guardant lions of England; in the second, the rampant lion and double tressure flory-counterflory of Scotland; and in the third, a harp for Northern Ireland. The crest is a statant guardant lion wearing the imperial crown, himself on another representation of that crown. The dexter supporter is a likewise crowned English lion; the sinister, a Scottish unicorn. According to legend a free unicorn was considered a very dangerous beast; therefore the heraldic unicorn is chained, as were both supporting unicorns in the Royal coat of arms of Scotland. The
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    192
    Coat of arms of Kotwica

    Coat of arms of Kotwica

    Kotwica (Polish for "Anchor") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Kotwica coat of arms was particularly popular among families of foreign origin indigenated in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Gules, an Argent anchor, with three lopped branches on the dexter, all proper, debruised of a loop or anille in chief, also proper. Out of a crest coronet, three feathers. Alternatively the shield is Argent and the anchor Black, Brunatre or Or. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
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    193
    Coat of arms of Myanmar

    Coat of arms of Myanmar

    The state seal of Burma (Burmese: ပြည်ထောင်စုသမ္မတမြန်မာနိုင်ငံတော်အထိမ်းအမှတ်တံဆိပ်) is used in all official government documents, including publications. The coat of arms has two chinthe (mythical lions) facing opposite one another, and at its center is a map of Burma. The coat of arms is surrounded by traditional Burmese flower designs and a star at its top. The new State Seal, as stipulated by Chapter XIII of the 2008 Constitution, was adopted in the 2008 Burmese constitutional referendum. The original coat of arms contained the Burmese text ပြည်ထောင်စုမြန်မာနိုင်ငံတော် on the banner, which translates "Union of Burma", as well as three chinthe (the chinthe at the top was replaced by a star). Additionally, the cogwheel was a circle surrounded by Verse 194 of the Buddhavagga in the Dhammapada in Pali: သမဂ္ဂါနံ တပေါ သုခေါ (samagganam tapo sukho), which translates to "happiness through harmony" or "well-being through unity." However, during Ne Win's Socialist rule, the 1974 Constitution adopted a new state seal with the following changes: the coat of arms was modified to accommodate Socialist symbols: a cogwheel, a star at the top, and dual olive wreaths. The words on the banner
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    194
    Coat of arms of Turkmenistan

    Coat of arms of Turkmenistan

    The State Emblem of Turkmenistan was created after Turkmenistan gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. The eight-point green starburst (known as the Rub El Hizb (۞), a symbol of Islam, to which a majority of Turkmen profess) with golden edges features in its center a red circular disc which carries sheaves of wheat, five carpet guls, and centered upon that a smaller blue circle with a lifelike (rather than heraldized) depiction of an Akhal-Teke horse, a source of pride for the Turkmen people. A round variant of the emblem was used from 1992 until 2003. The five traditional carpet motifs on the red disc represent the five major tribes or houses, and stand for the traditional and religious values of the country. These Turkmen tribes in traditional order are Teke (Tekke), Yomut (Yomud), Arsary (Ersary), Chowdur (Choudur), and Saryk (Saryq). The Salyr (Salor), a tribe that declined as a result of military defeat before the modern period, are not represented, nor are several smaller tribes or subtribes. The green and red colors appear in this shield because they have been venerated historically by the Turkmen. The central elements are surrounded by sheaves of wheat that
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    195
    Coat of arms of Korab

    Coat of arms of Korab

    Korab is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by many szlachta (noble) families under the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1983 the Polish Korab Coat of Arms was unusually incorporated into a Grant of Arms by the English College of Arms in London. These new arms included the Ciolek Arms held by the Zelenski(Zileinski) clan which were used as the crest of the Armorial Bearings with the shield of the Korab remaining the same . The two families were united by marriage in 1977. This was an unusual grant of arms and said to have made heraldic history in England. Notable bearers of this coat of arms have included:
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    196
    Coat of arms of London County Council

    Coat of arms of London County Council

    The London County Council was granted a coat of arms in 1914 and a heraldic badge in 1956. The coat of arms can still be seen on buildings constructed by the council before its abolition in 1965. By 1894 the LCC had adopted a device consisting of "an armed female figure between the armorial bearings of the Cities of London and Westminster". The question of an official coat of arms for the county council was first raised at a meeting of the council in 1897. Despite the opposition of two members on the grounds that it was "an insidious attempt to undermine the democratic character of the Council" and, jokingly, that they should not "degenerate to the level of the City Corporation", the General Purposes Committee were instructed to take steps to obtain a coat of arms. Nothing seems to have come of this, and the unofficial device continued in use. In May 1906 the general purposes committee was asked to consider and report on whether the council should make an "application to the College of Arms or otherwise take steps to obtain a coat of arms, with a view to commemorating worthily its work in connection with public improvements, such as the construction of new streets and bridges, the
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    Coat of arms of Portugal

    Coat of arms of Portugal

    The coat of arms of Portugal was officially adopted on 30 June 1911, along with the republican flag of Portugal. It is based on the coat of arms used by the Portuguese Kingdom since the Middle Ages. The Portuguese coat of arms is the result of almost a millennium of modifications and alterations. Starting with Henry of Burgundy blue cross on a silver shield, successive elements were added or taken, culminating with the complex heraldic design that was officially adopted in 1911 (after the Republican Revolution of 1910). The two stripes bear the colours of the Portuguese flag: red and green. After the official recognition of the Kingdom of Portugal as an independent country in 1143 (it had been declared in 1139), silver bezants were added to the Burgundian flag, symbolising coins and the right the monarch had to issue currency, as leader of a sovereign state. Eventually, and given the enormous dynamism of medieval heraldry, it is believed that the shield degraded and lost some elements in battle, eventually losing the cross format. This is how King Sancho I inherited the shield from his father, Afonso Henriques, with no cross and the quinas (the five escutcheons with the silver
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    Coat of arms of Wrocław

    Coat of arms of Wrocław

    The Coat of arms of the City of Wrocław is divided into quarters. In the centre is the head of John the Baptist, patron saint of the city. The crowned lion rampant in the first (upper left) quarter represents the Kingdom of Bohemia, to which Wrocław belonged from 1336. In the second (upper right) quarter there is the Silesian eagle which comes from the Silesian Piast eagle. The letter "W" in the third quarter stands for both "Wratislavia" (Latin name of the city) and for the name of the legendary founder of the city Wrocislaw. In the fourth quarter there is St. John the Evangelist. Its blazon is: "Quarterly, I: Gules, a lion rampant queue fourch erect facing sinister Argent, armed and langued Or outlined Sable, crowned Or outlined Sable; II: Or, an eagle Sable charged with across its breast and wings a crescent Argent upward pointing with a crosslet Argent attached rising from the middle; III: Or, a capital letter 'W' Sable serifed; IV: head and shoulders of St. John the Evangelist gardant Argent, with youthful face and long hair Argent outlined Sable and with halo Or outlined Sable, issuant from an inverted crown Or outlined Sable. Surmounting all at center a roundel Argent,
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    Coat of arms of the Azores

    Coat of arms of the Azores

    The coat of arms of the Azores is nine gold stars superimposed on a red bordure, representing the nine islands of the archipelago. The bordure surrounds a silver shield on which a blue eagle is displayed with wings elevated and with red feet, beak, and tongue. The crest is a closed helm in gold lined with red, surmounted by a wreath and mantling of silver and blue, topped by another blue eagle on which are superimposed the same nine gold stars. The shield is supported by two chained black bulls, above a scroll containing the motto Antes morrer livres que em paz sujeitos (English: Rather die free than in peace be subjugated). The supporters each hold a flagpole. Their collars, chains, and hooves are gold, their horns silver. The flags bear Christian symbols. The flag dexter, that is, on the viewer's left, is the red cross of the Portuguese Order of Christ on a white field. The flag sinister, that is, on the viewer's right, is a white dove superimposed on gold rays in the shape of a cross - the emblem of the Holy Spirit - on a red field, both flags bordered in gold. Early Portuguese visitors mistook the local variety of buzzard, Buteo buteo rothschildi, for goshawks (Accipiter
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    Coat of arms of Hungary

    Coat of arms of Hungary

    The current coat of arms of Hungary was adopted on July 3, 1990, after the end of communist rule. The arms have been used before, both with and without the Holy Crown of Hungary, sometimes as part of a larger, more complex coat of arms, and its elements date back to the Middle Ages. The shield is split into two parts: Since 1990 the historical crowned small coat of arms has served as the official symbol of the Republic of Hungary. In the first democratically elected Parliament there was considerable debate about the depiction of the Holy Crown on the coat of arms. The liberal opposition party (Alliance of Free Democrats, SZDSZ) proposed the Kossuth-style "Republican" version but the conservative government backed the historical crowned one. After the majority decision, the restored coat of arms with the crown soon became generally accepted by every political party and there is a national consensus concerning it. The three green hills are representing mountain ranges (Tátra, Mátra, Fátra) (strictly in this order) as written in István Werbőczy's Tripartitium, but this is not explained there. The first explanation of the hills are from a Portuguese Jesuit Antonius Macedo in his work
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    Coat of arms of Lviv

    Coat of arms of Lviv

    The coat of arms of the city of Lviv features a golden lion beneath a city gate in a blue field. The current version of the symbol was adopted by the city council in 1990. According to principles of the blazoning it features a lion passant Or, beneath a castle gate Or, in azure field. The lion was a traditional symbol of the city throughout the ages. The first such depictions occurred on 13th century seals of dukes Andrew and Leo of Volhynia, rulers of mediæval Ruthenian duchy of Halych-Volynia. The earliest known emblem of the city features a lion passant through a city gate pointed with three towers. It was featured on a city council seals, used by the magistrate in 1359 and later. In 1526 Polish king Sigismund the Old of Poland formally accepted the coat of arms. To underline that the city belongs to the crown, a royal crown was added in the coronet. In later ages, although the colours and shapes of all the charges varied, their number remained the same. In 1586 bishop Jan Dymitr Solikowski, royal diplomat and a bishop of Lwów, as the city was called back then, was accepted on an audience by the Pope Sixtus V. In the effect, the city was granted with a privilege of adding the
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    Coat of arms of Pljevlja

    Coat of arms of Pljevlja

    The coat of arms of Pljevlja has three lines near the bottom that represents the three rivers that run through the cities: Breznica, Ćehotina, and Vezičnica. First layer is clock tower from the center of Pljevlja and in the back are town-hall and the largest arc of bridge over Tara river which connects municipality of Pljevlja with the rest of the Montenegro. Colours are blue, red and white which represent the pan-Slavic tricolour system.
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    Coat of arms of Roch III

    Coat of arms of Roch III

    Roch III - is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this coat of arms include:
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    Coat of arms of the Crown of Aragon

    Coat of arms of the Crown of Aragon

    The so-called Bars of Aragon, Royal arms of Aragon, Four Bars, Red Bars, Pales of the House of Barcelona or Coat of arms of the Crown of Aragon, which bear four red paletts on gold background, depicts the familiar coat of the Counts of Barcelona and Kings of Aragon. It differs from the flag because this latter uses fesses. It is one of the oldest coats of arms in Europe dating back to a seal of Raymond Berengar IV of Barcelona from 1150. Today, this symbol has been adopted and/or included in their arms by several former territories related to the Crown of Aragon, like the arms of Spain, which wears it in its third quarter whereas the kings of Spain are heirs of those of Aragon; the shield of Andorra, which also shows it in its third quarter. It is also the main element of the arms of the present Spanish Autonomous Communities of Catalonia, Valencian Community and the Balearic Islands; the fourth quarter of the Spanish Autonomous Community of Aragon; of the French regions of Languedoc-Roussillon (Department of the Pyrénées-Orientales, whose territory regroups the old province of Roussillon and French Cerdagne); and in the Italian provinces of Reggio de Calabria, Catanzaro in
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    Coat of arms of the Department of Tolima

    Coat of arms of the Department of Tolima

    The Coat of arms of Tolima is the coat of arms of the Colombian Department of Tolima. The emblem was adopted by Law of December 7, 1815 ordained by the United Chambers of the Mariquita Province and sanctioned by José León Armero, the governor and general in command. In 1861 the coat of arms was adopted for the Sovereign State of Tolima by Decree of April 12 of the same year by General Tomas Cipriano de Mosquera and officially established on September 7.
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    Coat of arms of Belgrade

    Coat of arms of Belgrade

    The coat of arms of Belgrade was designed by painter Đorđe Andrejević-Kun and adopted in 1931. The original coat of arms was commissioned in 1931 by Belgrade mayor Milan Nešić. The winning proposal was sketched by Đorđe Andrejević-Kun. The arms remained in continued use until the conclusion of the Second World War. The use of the arms was amended and regulated in 2003. The arms contain the Serbian national colours (red, blue, and white). The red ground symbolises blood split over the city during its many conflicts. The blue sky symbolizes hope and faith in a better future. The white walls and tower symbolise the "white city" (Belgrade - Beograd literally means "the white city). The white rivers below represent the Danube and Sava and the primordial beginning of Belgrade while the Roman trireme refers to its antiquity. The open gates of the city represent free communication and commerce with the world. The small (or lesser) coat of arms is the original design by Đorđe Andrejević-Kun. It features a simple escutcheon. The middle (or medium) coat of arms is identical to the small, but with the addition of a golden mural crown placed above the escutcheon. The crown features five
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    Coat of arms of Cape Colony

    Coat of arms of Cape Colony

    The coat of arms of the Cape Colony was the official heraldic symbol of the Cape Colony as a British colony from 1875 to 1910, and as a province of South Africa from 1910 to 1994. It is now obsolete. The adoption of the arms was a belated response to a British government request, in 1869, for a design for a flag badge to identify the colony. The laying of the foundation stone of the new parliament building in May 1875 was considered as a good opportunity to introduce it. A Cape Town attorney with a keen interest in heraldry, Charles Aken Fairbridge (1824-1893), was accordingly asked to design arms for the Colony. The foundation stone of the colonial parliament was laid on 12 May 1875. According to the Cape Argus newspaper, "among the conspicuous features of the spectacle was the new colonial flag, hoisted aloft above the corner stone, with the heraldic shielding, surroundings and mottoes blazoned on the Union Jack and the Royal Standard floating in the breeze from the loftiest flagstaff in the centre". Queen Victoria formally granted the arms by Royal Warrant a year later, on 29 May 1876. After the Cape became a province of the Union of South Africa in 1910, the provincial
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    Coat of arms of Guinea

    Coat of arms of Guinea

    The present coat of arms of Guinea was adopted in 1993 and features a dove with a golden olive branch in its beak over a ribbon with "Work justice solidarity". The arms formerly also included a crossed sword and rifle. A Former arms in 1960 features a red and yellow shield with a green elephant on it.
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    Coat of arms of Galmudug

    Coat of arms of Galmudug

    The Coat of arms of Galmudug are nearly identical to the Somali national coat of arms, with the addition of a wreath around the arms to represent peace, and a ribbon underneath with the letters GMS written on it, GMS being Galmudug State.
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    Coat of arms of Gozdawa

    Coat of arms of Gozdawa

    Gozdawa - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    Coat of arms of Pobóg

    Coat of arms of Pobóg

    Pobóg is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The chronicles of the region of Poland, though sometimes shrouded by the mists of time reveal the ancient origins of the Pobog Clan. Careful research by professional analysts using such references as „Herbarz Polski" by Kaspar Niesiecki, „Herbarz Polski" by Adam Boniecki, „Herby Rodów Polskich" and „Rycerstwo polskie wieków średnich" by prof. F. Piekosinski reveal that the Pobóg Clan early origins trace back to the forming of tribal clan of Families system, founded probably by Goths in 150 A.D.. System was associated with ancient Slavonic Family's Community's Structure and Sarmatian Family System. In the struggles for control over agricultural soil, the feudal clan system evolved as the best defense against hordes of invaders sweeping in from the east and west over the countries. According to legend strongly supported by prof. F. Piekosiński, Pobog-Pobodze clan is a junioral branch of the Popielid dynasty, rulers of Poland in 7th–9th centuries, before the era of Bolescic-Piast dynasty (9th–14th c.) another junioral branch of the Popielid dynasty. The junioral
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    Coat of arms of Sudan

    Coat of arms of Sudan

    The national emblem of Sudan was adopted in 1969. It shows a secretarybird bearing a shield from the time of Muhammad Ahmad, the self-proclaimed Mahdi who briefly ruled Sudan in the 19th century. Two scrolls are placed on the arms; the upper one displays the national motto, An-nasr lana النصر لنا ("Victory is ours"), and the lower one displays the title of the state, جمهورية السودان Jumhuriyat as-Sudan ("Republic of the Sudan"). The coat of arms is also the Presidential seal and is found in gold on the flag of the President of Sudan and on the vehicles carrying the President and at his residence. The secretarybird was chosen as a distinctively Sudanese and indigenous variant of the "Eagle of Saladin" and "Hawk of Quraysh" seen in the emblems of some Arab states, and associated with Arab nationalism (see coat of arms of Egypt, etc.). The former state emblem was in use from independence in 1956 to 1970, when the current emblem was adopted. It consisted of a rhinoceros enclosed by two palm-trees and olive branches, with the name of the state, جمهورية السودان Jumhuriyat as-Sudan ("Republic of Sudan"), displayed below.
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    Coat of arms of Sussex

    Coat of arms of Sussex

    A heraldic shield (often erroneously referred to as a coat of arms) has been associated with the historic county of Sussex since the seventeenth century. The device, displaying six martlets or heraldic swallows on a shield, later formed the basis of the flag of Sussex and the armorial bearings granted to the county councils of East and West Sussex. Although often referred to as a coat of arms, the six gold martlets on a blue shield is not an official Coat of Arms and is more of an Emblem, very much the same as the Yorkshire Rose. Under English Heraldic law a Coat of Arms can not be granted to a county, but only the administrative body. As Sussex hasn't had a single administrative body since 1086, the year of the Domesday Book, the device is an emblem. The earliest recorded use of the device appears to be in the atlas Theatrum Imperii Maganae Britanniae produced by John Speed in 1622. The book displays arms for each of the seven kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, and that shown for the Kingdom of the South Saxons was six golden martlets on both a blue (azure) or red (gules) shield. In both cases the device were ensigned by an ancient crown. It is possible that the device had a
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    Coat of arms of the Department of Antioquia

    Coat of arms of the Department of Antioquia

    The coat of arms of Antioquia, in its current form, dates back to August 23, 1812 when it was officially adopted by the Chamber of the Senate of Antioquia by means of Decree 21 of 1812, replacing the Great State Seal of Antioquia that was sanctioned by State President José María Montoya Duque on September 2, 1811. Following the incorporation of Antioquia to the United Provinces of New Granada and subsequently to the Granadine Confederation and the United States of Colombia, the Sovereign State of Antioquia adopted the coat of arms of Colombia as its state arms. Antioquia reverted back to the original coat of arms in 1912 for the occasion of the centenary of the independence of Antioquia and it has been in official use ever since. The coat of arms as is seen today follows the blazon ordered in 1812: The rulers wanted not only to record the autonomy of the New State, but they wanted to symbolize its wealth and virtue with the golden hill, its triumphs and victories with the palm, its abundance with the plantain tree, its freedom with the phrygian cap, and the whole Antioquian race with the matron. Although the coat of arms was adopted and blazoned in 1812, the coat of arms would only
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    Coat of arms of England

    Coat of arms of England

    In heraldry, the Royal Arms of England is a coat of arms symbolising England and all its monarchs. Its blazon is Gules, with three lions passant guardant in pale or armed and langued azure, meaning three identical gold lions with blue tongues and claws, walking and facing the observer, arranged in a column on a red background. This coat, designed in the High Middle Ages, has been variously combined with those of France, Scotland, Ireland, Nassau and Hanover, according to dynastic and other political changes affecting England, but has not itself been altered since the reign of Richard I. Royal emblems depicting lions were first used by the Norman dynasty, later a formal and consistent English heraldry system emerged during the 12th century. The escutcheon, or shield featuring three lions is traced to King Richard I of England's Great Seal of the Realm, which initially used a single lion rampant, or else two lions, but in 1198, was permanently altered to depict three lions passant. In 1340, King Edward III laid claim to the throne of France and signified his pretence by quartering the Royal Arms of England with the Royal Arms of France. This quartering was adjusted, abandoned and
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    Coat-of-arms of Košice

    Coat-of-arms of Košice

    Košice (today in Slovakia; previously part of the Kingdom of Hungary and Austria-Hungary, Kassa in Hungarian, Cassovia in Latin) was the first town in Europe to be granted its own coat of arms. It was granted by King Louis I the Great at the Castle of Diósgyőr near present-day Miskolc in 1369. The original coat of arms featured only the red and silver stripes and three fleur-de-lis on a blue background. The coat of arms used today is virtually unchanged since 1502. Košice is unique in that it was the first city in Europe to gain a royal warrant for a coat of arms. The city is further unique in that by the year 1502, in the period of active heraldry, it had obtained altogether four heraldic warrants from four monarchs. The statue of the first municipal coat of arms in Europe (the work of the eminent Slovak sculptor Arpád Račko) was inaugurated in December 2002 at Hlavná ulica (Main Street).
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    Flag and coat of arms of Kedah

    Flag and coat of arms of Kedah

    The flag and coat of arms of Kedah are the state symbols of Kedah, Malaysia. Very little distinction is present between the flag and coat of arms of the state, as the flag consists of only a red field with the state arms on the upper hoist. The Kedahan flag is essentially a red flag with only the state arms of Kedah charged on its upper hoist, the upper left quarter of the flag. The red, Kedah's traditional colour, signifies prosperity, while the flag's arms is as interpreted with the standalone arms. Kedah's royalty flies a series of Royal Standards that consist of plain coloured flags with the state arms charged at the centre or flags with a canton of a different colour containing the state arms. In addition, similarly designed Standards are also flown by high-ranking governments officials affiliated with the Sultan of Kedah. Like the state flag, all Standards utillise any two of or all three colours: Red, green and yellow; the colours of the arms also vary between Standards. The Standards include: As a formerly independent state, Kedah was known to fly ensigns on its ships. Among them were the state ensign and civil ensign, the former similar in design as a variant of the
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    Coat of arms of Kurdistan Regional Government

    Coat of arms of Kurdistan Regional Government

    The Coat of arms of the Kurdistan Regional Government is an eagle holding a sun on his wings. The sun is formed of the three colors of red, yellow and green which represent the Kurdish flag. In the later version of the warms, the words "Kurdistan Regional Government" are written on it in the Kurdish, Arabic and English languages (top to bottom). The coat of arms of the Kurdistan regional government draws on both modern and ancient symbolism: the eagle itself was the emblem of the ancient Median Empire, whereas the sun has been in use as a symbolic representation of northern Mesopotamia (Kurdistan) in numerous ancient motiffs dating from the early Hurrian period. The banner emblazoned with "KRG" is a more modern borrowing from Western European heraldry. The number 4 is prominent in the design: 4 wing feathers, 4 tail feathers, 4 red compass points and 4 green compass points. This is since greater Kurdistan is divided amongst 4 states (Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria) and because Iraqi Kurdistan is formed from the 4 northern Iraqi governates, Arbil, Duhok, Kirkuk and Sulaymaniyah. An eagle has also come to be associated with the historical the Sultan of Egypt and Syria, Saladin (of
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    Coat of arms of Mozambique

    Coat of arms of Mozambique

    The national emblem of Mozambique, which was adopted in 1990 in the Constitution of Mozambique article 194. The Article clearly states the design and meaning of the device. It shows a gear wheel, bordered by corn stalks and sugarcane. In the middle there is a red sun over a map of Mozambique in green, and blue waves, an AK-47 crossed with a hoe, and a book. The wreath is tied with a ribbon bearing the name of the country. As described in the Mozambican constitution article 194, the various parts of the emblem have a special symbolism, i.e. Article 194 The emblem of the Republic of Mozambique shall contain as its central elements a book, a gun and a hoe, superimposed on a map of Mozambique, representing, respectively, education, defense and vigilance, and the peasantry and agricultural production. Below the map the ocean shall be represented. In the center shall be the rising sun, symbol of the building of a new life. Enclosing all this shall be a toothed wheel, symbolizing labor and industry. Surrounding the toothed wheel there shall be, to the right and left respectively, an ear of maize and a piece of sugar cane, symbolizing agricultural wealth. At the bottom there shall be a red
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    Coat of arms of Ogończyk

    Coat of arms of Ogończyk

    Ogończyk - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Although the coat of arms was first mentioned in an armorial of 1384, it is probable that it stems from early mediaeval Slavic signs for marking the cattle. After the Union of Horodło of 1413 several Lithuanian boyar families were adopted to it. With time it also spread to Prussia, where several Germanized families used it. Gules, half an Argent arrow heading upwards, supported by half of a ring. Out of the crest coronet two bare maiden hands (sometimes armed hands), holding a ring, all proper. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    Coat of arms of Palau

    Coat of arms of Palau

    The seal of Palau depicts a traditional meeting center. It is the same as the seal used by the legislative body, the Palau National Congress (Olbiil era Kelulau). The executive seal, used by overseas missions and by the nation's president, is also of a similar design. The seal also resembles the seal of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the governing body which formerly controlled Palau.
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    Coat of arms of Abkhazia

    Coat of arms of Abkhazia

    There are currently two entities claiming to be the government of Abkhazia, the partially recognised Republic of Abkhazia and the pro-Georgia Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia. The emblem of the Republic of Abkhazia was adopted by the Supreme Soviet of Abkhazia on 23 July 1992, after it declared its secession from Georgia. The emblem of the Republic of Abkhazia is a shield divided vertically into white and green. On this are placed devices outlined in gold: Green symbolizes youth and life, while white symbolizes spirituality. The stars represent the sun, as well as the union of the East and West. The Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia uses the coat of arms of Georgia and has also adopted a logo which is used with Georgian national symbols. The logo carries the name of the autonomous republic in Georgian and Abkhaz and depicts the House of the Government in Sukhumi.
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    Coat of arms of Azerbaijan

    Coat of arms of Azerbaijan

    The state emblem of Azerbaijan mixes traditional and modern symbols. The focal point of the emblem is the fire symbol. This symbol comes from the fact that Azerbaijan has many everlasting fires which also gives the name "land of eternal fire". At the bottom of the emblem is a stalk of wheat, representing the main agricultural product of the nation, which was also part of the earlier arms. The other plant represented at the bottom is oak. The government of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic declared a competition on the national emblem of Azerbaijan on January 30, 1920 and made a decision to present the emblem model on May of the same year. However, due to the collapse of the Azerbaijan democratic Republic On April 28, 1920, the emblem was not approved. The Supreme Medjlis of the Nakhichevan Autonomous Republic discussed the issue connected with the national emblem and raised petition in the Supreme Council of the Azerbaijan SSR on declaration of a new competition on the national emblem of Azerbaijan on November 17, 1990. The competition was declared by the decision of the Supreme Council of the Azerbaijan Republic on February 5, 1991. Tens of projects of the emblem were presented
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    Coat of arms of Baden

    Coat of arms of Baden

    The coat of arms of Baden comes from the personal arms of the Margraves and Grand Dukes of Baden, the traditional rulers of the region. Following the revolution and abolition of the Grand Duchy in 1918, the arms and griffin supporters were usurped from the Grand Dukes by the new republic to represent the people and country. Baden entered as a state of the Weimar Republic the year following the revolution, and subsequently went through several changes and redistricting after World War II. Baden is today part of the federal state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany, where one can still see the arms of Baden represented in the coat of arms of Baden-Württemberg, as a badge atop modern federal state's arms. The House of Baden is a junior branch of the House of Zähringen, which itself is related to the Hohenstaufen family, and was founded by Hermann I of Baden, The Margrave of Verona, son of Berthold I, The Duke of Carinthia, in the eleventh century. The arms of the house of Zähringen share the same tinctures with its junior branch, though they display a red eagle on a yellow shield. The first picture of the coat of arms with the bend dates from the year 1243, but it may have already been in
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    Coat of arms of Calgary

    Coat of arms of Calgary

    The coat of arms of Calgary, Alberta, was adopted in 1902. The arms existed only in black and white until 1984, when an alderman asked the City to develop it in full colour. The Union Flag and the Canadian Red Ensign are crossed under the scroll. The landscape in the chief and the cross in the shield body are a reversal of the coat of arms of Alberta.
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    Coat of arms of Denmark

    Coat of arms of Denmark

    The national coat of arms of Denmark (Danish: Danmarks rigsvåben) consists of three crowned blue lions accompanied by nine red hearts, all in a golden shield. The oldest known depiction of the insignia dates from a seal used by King Canute VI c. 1194. The oldest documentation for the colours dates from c. 1270. Historically, the lions faced the viewer and the number of hearts was not regulated and could be much higher. Historians believe that the hearts originally were søblade (literally: sea-leaves) but that this meaning was lost early due to worn and crudely made signets used during the Middle Ages. A royal decree of 1972 specifies these figures as søblade but Danes normally refer to them as hearts. The current version was adopted in 1819 during the reign of King Frederick VI who fixed the number of hearts to nine and decreed that the heraldic beasts were lions, consequently facing forward. A rare version exists from the reign of king Eric of Pomerania in which the three lions jointly hold the Danish banner, in a similar fashion as in the coat of arms of the former South Jutland County. Until c. 1960, Denmark used both a "small" and a "large" coat of arms, similar to the system
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    Coat of arms of East Timor

    Coat of arms of East Timor

    The coat of arms of East Timor (officially: Timor-Leste) was introduced on 18 January 2007 under the Law 02/2007. It is based on a design first used when the country unilaterally declared independence on November 28, 1975. The motto in Portuguese is "Unidade, Acção, Progresso" ("Unity, Action, Progress"). The arms of Portuguese Timor followed the same format of other Portuguese colonies (later overseas provinces) with the territory being represented by the black and white Dominican cross in recognition of the role played by the Dominican Order in converting the East Timorese to Roman Catholicism. Indonesia invaded East Timor in 1975 and annexed it the following year as its 27th province of Timor Timur. During this period, Timor Timur had its own coat of arms which remained in use until Indonesia rescinded its annexation in 1999. The arms consisted of a golden shield containing wreaths of wheat and cotton enclosing a blue roundel containing a stylized traditional East Timor house. This was surmounted by a blue shield depicting a gold star representing the faith in one God. Below the roundel appeared a traditional Timorese headdress (Kaibauk) bearing the inscription "Timor
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    Coat of arms of Ireland

    Coat of arms of Ireland

    The coat of arms of Ireland is blazoned as Azure a harp Or, stringed Argent (a gold harp with silver strings on a blue background). These arms have long been Ireland's heraldic emblem. References to them as being the arms of the king of Ireland can be found as early as the 13th century. These arms were adopted by Henry VIII of England when he ended the period of Lordship of Ireland and declared Ireland to be a kingdom again in 1541. When the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland were united in 1706, they were integrated into the unified royal coat of arms of kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. The harp was adopted as the emblem of the Irish Free State when it separated from the United Kingdom in 1922. They were registered as the arms of Ireland with the Chief Herald of Ireland on 9 November 1945. The depiction of the harp has changed over time. In the 17th century, during the period of the Kingdom of Ireland, the pillar of the harp began to be depicted as a bare-breasted woman. When the arms were restored as the arms of the independent Irish state in 1922, a late-medieval Gaelic harp (a cláirseach), the Trinity College Harp, was used as a model. Traditionally, the shade of
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    Coat of arms of Laos

    Coat of arms of Laos

    The national emblem of Laos shows the national shrine Pha That Luang. A dam is pictured which as a symbol of power generation at the reservoir Nam Ngun, an asphalt street is also pictured, as well as a stylized watered field. In the lower part is a section of a gear wheel. The inscription on the left reads "Peace, Independence, Democracy" (lao script: ສັນຕິພາບ ເອກະລາດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ) and on the right, "Unity and Prosperity" (lao script: ເອກະພາບ ວັດຖະນາຖາວອນ.) The coat of arms was modified in 1991. The Communist red star and hammer and sickle were replaced with the national shrine at Pha That Luang. The coat of arms is specified in the Laotian constitution:
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    Coat of arms of Liberia

    Coat of arms of Liberia

    The coat of arms of Liberia consists of a shield containing a picture of 19th century ship arriving in Liberia. The ship symbolizes the ships which brought the freed slaves from the United States to Liberia. Above the shield the national motto of Liberia appears on a scroll: The love of liberty brought us here, and below the shield another scroll contains the official name of the country, Republic of Liberia. The plow and the shovel represent the dignity of labor and hard work through which the nation will prosper. The rising sun in the background represents the birth of a nation. The palm tree, the nation's most versatile source of food, represents prosperity. The white dove with a scroll represents the breath of peace.
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    Coat of arms of Liechtenstein

    Coat of arms of Liechtenstein

    The coat of arms of the Princely House of Liechtenstein is also used as the great arms of the nation. As the sovereign emblem of the Principality of Liechtenstein, its use is reserved for the members of the Princely House and state authorities. Private individuals may be authorized to use the great arms, if it is in the interest of the State. The arms are a history of the Princely House, and show the many different areas of Europe with which Liechtenstein has been involved, either by conquest or by marriage. The first quarter is Silesia; the second is the arms of the Kuenring family; the third quarter, the Duchy of Troppau; and the fourth quarter, the arms of the East Frisian family Cirksena representing County of Rietberg. The base is occupied by the arms of the Duchy of Jägerndorf. The small gold and red shield of the Princely House is shown in the middle of the larger shield. The Princely hat crowns a purple cloak with ermine lining behind the large coat-of-arms. However, when the family shield is used as the small national coat-of-arms the hat rests directly on the top of the shield. Arms: Quarterly (1) Or an Eagle displayed Sable crowned and armed of the first charged with a
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    Coat of arms of Prijepolje

    Coat of arms of Prijepolje

    The coat of arms of Prijepolje depicts the mountain Zlatar, with the sign of Saint Sava, whose bones are buried near the monastery of Mileševa. The coat of arms of Prijepolje depicts the mountain Zlatar (zlat from the word zlato which means gold in Serbian language, and "pyramid of Zlatar" is painted with gold color), the sign of Saint Sava and two crowns which symbolise coronations which took place in Prijepolje. The more famous coronation was that of the King of Bosnia and the Serbs, Tvrtko I. Also on the coat of arms there are two white angels from a fresco located in the monastery of Mileševa. The angels are holding flags of Serbia, and Prijepolje. The curved line represents the Lim River.
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    Coat of arms of Rola

    Coat of arms of Rola

    Rola - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Gules, rose encircled by three coulters Argent, one pointed downwards Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include:
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    Coat of arms of Romania

    Coat of arms of Romania

    The coat of arms of Romania was adopted in the Romanian Parliament on 10 September 1992 as a representative coat of arms for Romania. It is based on the Lesser Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Romania (used between 1922 and 1947), redesigned by Victor Dima. As a central element it shows a golden aquila holding a cross in its beak and a mace and a sword in its claws. It also consists of the three colors: red, yellow, and blue, which represent the colors of the national flag. The idea behind the design of the coat of arms of Romania dates since 1859, when the two Romanian countries, Wallachia and Moldavia, united under Prince Alexandru Ioan Cuza. Then the two heraldic symbols, the golden aquila and the aurochs, were officially juxtaposed. Until 1866 there were many variants of the coat of arms, regarding the background color and the number of times the two main elements where represented. In 1866, after Carol I was elected Prince of Romania, the shield was divided into quarters: in the first and fourth an eagle was depicted, and in the second and third the aurochs; above the shield the coat of arms of the reigning Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Family was placed. After the 1872, the coat of
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    Coat of arms of Saudi Arabia

    Coat of arms of Saudi Arabia

    The Saudi Arabian national emblem (Arabic: شعار السعودية‎) was adopted in 1950. According to the Saudi Basic Law it consists of two crossed swords with a palm tree in the space above and between the blades. The swords represent the two kingdoms of Hijaz and Nejd united under Ibn Saud in 1926.
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    Coat of arms of Tamil Eelam

    Coat of arms of Tamil Eelam

    The Coat of Arms of Tamil Eelam is issued by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which has de facto control over Tamil Eelam. The use of a tiger is due to the ancient Chola kings usage of this animal.
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    Coat of arms of the Department of Bolívar

    Coat of arms of the Department of Bolívar

    The Coat of arms of the Department of Bolívar is the official Coat of arms of the Department of Bolívar. The Coat of arms had been in used before 1856, but in that year the Sovereign State of Bolívar was created, and its symbols changed, The new coat of arms, would be the same as the Coat of arms of Colombia but with a red oval around it, that read “ESTADO SOBERANO DE BOLIVAR”. In 1886 the states were suppressed and Departments created instead, the symbols were used once again but the originals were corrupted and so there are some variations on the current coat of arms, and that which was specified on the blazon. The shield is a traditional in Spanish Heraldry, is of a squared form with a small appendage in the lower middle part. It is also tierced in a party per fess, in chief per pale manner, and fimbriated in argent. It is crowned by an Goshawk with a garland of olive, that rests upon the shield, with a scroll behind it, and is mantled in Or on the sides. The first division, occupying the upper left corner, is a field of or charged by Coconut Palm. The Coconut Palm is a distinct feature of the Caribbean. The field represents gold and the richness of the land, the palm tree
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    Coat of arms of the Department of Magdalena

    Coat of arms of the Department of Magdalena

    The coat of arms of Magdalena was officially adopted by the Departmental Assembly out of the winning design presented by native painter Álvaro Corvacho. The elegant shape of the escutcheon or shield is a combination of two distinct designs, the top, with its three tips is from a Swiss design, the bottom with the tip issuing out from the middle is from a French design. The shield is embraced by an olive branch on either side, a symbol of peace. It has a tincture of azure, but in variant versions the field changes of tincture on both chief and base; in the modern version, the azure or blue represent Magdalena River and the Caribbean Sea. The shield is divided in two by a horizontal band which bears the flag of the Department of Magdalena in the background and in front of it the National Pantheon which is a structure located in Magdalena in the Quinta de San Pedro Alejandrino that honours the Libertador and the fallen heroes of the nation, the superimposition of the structure on the flag symbolizes the integrity and firmness in the souls of the Magdalenenses as well as keeping alive his dream. On chief, that is the part that is on the top, bears the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta with
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    Coat of arms of the Karelo-Finnish Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Karelo-Finnish Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Karelo-Finnish Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on February 10, 1941 by the government of the Karelo-Finnish Soviet Socialist Republic and used until it was absorbed into the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic in 1956. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture (pine boughs and rye) and the local terrain (a swift-flowing river from the hills). The rising Sun stands for the future of the Karelo-Finnish nation; and the red star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of Communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The slogan on the banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Russian and Finnish languages. In Finnish, it is "Kaikkien maiden proletaarit, liittykää yhteen!". The name of the Karelo-Finnish SSR is shown in both Russian and Finnish. From 1956 to 1991, the Karelian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic used a variant of the coat of arms of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic.
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    Coat of arms of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth

    Coat of arms of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth

    The Coat of Arms of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth was the symbol of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, representing the union of the Crown of the Polish Kingdom and Grand Duchy of Lithuania. It combined their previously separate coats of arms: During the January Uprising a similar coat of arms was proposed for the restored Commonwealth, with Archangel Michael, the coat of arms of Ukraine added as the third element. However, it was never officially introduced.
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    Coat of arms of the Republic of Karelia

    Coat of arms of the Republic of Karelia

    The coat of arms of the Russian Republic of Karelia is a rectangle on top of a semicircular bottom. It is thrice crossed in equal parts with the colors of the flag of Karelia shield with a profile of a rampant black bear. The golden frame of the shield comes into stylized image of a fir tree on the left and a pine tree on the right. In the upper part of the shield there is an octagonal star (doubled cross) of gold. The coat was created by Yu. S. Nivin. The current coat of arms of Karelia has much resemblance with the coat of arms of the independent Republic of Uhtua, the national symbol of East Karelia created by Finnish artist Akseli Gallen-Kallela. The main difference is that the bear was holding a billhook. The shield had the traditional Varangian colours and there were polar lights above of shield.
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    Coat of arms of the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic

    Coat of arms of the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic

    The coat of arms of the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic was adopted on March 2, 1937 by the government of the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic. The coat of arms is based on the coat of arms of the Soviet Union. It shows symbols of agriculture (cotton, wheat and grapes) and heavy industry (oil derrick and pipeline), as well as a symbol of the Turkmen people, a rug. The rising Sun stands for the future of the Turkmen nation, the red star as well as the hammer and sickle for the victory of Communism and the "world-wide socialist community of states". The banner bears the Soviet Union state motto ("Workers of the world, unite!") in both the Russian and Turkmen languages. In Turkmen, it is "Әxли юртлариң пролетарлары, бирлешиң!" (in the current Turkmen Latin script: "Ähli ýurtlaryň proletarlary, birleşiň!"). Later version of the coat of arms had acronym "TSSR" between red star, above, and hammer and sickle, below. The emblem was changed in 1992 to the present coat of arms of Turkmenistan.
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    Coat of arms of Trąby

    Coat of arms of Trąby

    Trąby (Polish pronunciation: [ˈtrɔmbɨ], "Horns") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by many szlachta (noble) families under the Kingdom of Poland and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The origin of the horn motif lies in the extent of lands conceded being determined by the distance a horn could be heard in all directions. Argent three bugle horns in triangle the mouthpieces conjoined in fess point Sable garnished, virolled and corded Or. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms have included:
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    Coat of arms of Trestka

    Coat of arms of Trestka

    Trestka - is a Polish Coat of Arms. It was used by several szlachta families in the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Notable bearers of this Coat of Arms include: Cieleski (variation of CoA Trestka)
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    Coat of arms of Łodzia

    Coat of arms of Łodzia

    Łodzia (obsolete Polish for "Boat") is a Polish coat of arms. It was used by many noble families of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. A variant serves as the coat of arms of the city of Łódź (the city's name literally means "Boat"). It's a classic example of the so called canting arms well known in European heraldry as it was borne by the medieval lords de Łodzia (a feudal lordship) and their clan. Hence the boat in the shield, clearly alluding to the estate's name literally meaning Boat(town). Also some unrelated families would bear it who were either legally adopted into the clan by its bloodline members or misattributed to the clan by error or usurpation. Łodzia is one of the oldest Polish coats-of-arms. Its earliest appearance (1303) is on a seal belonging to Wojciech of Krośno, Palatine of Kalisz. The first blazon description dates from 1411. The first Łodzia coat-of-arms featured a golden letter M on the shield, and a boat in the crest. That version was used by Mikołaj of Łodzia in 1301. By 1315, however, all the bearers of the coat-of-arms had adopted the version used by Wojciech of Krośno. Initially the coat-of-arms had a checkerboard background, which by 1382 had been
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