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Best Chinese prefecture-level city of All Time

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    1
    Tai'an

    Tai'an

    Tai'an (Chinese: 泰安; pinyin: Tài'ān) is a prefecture-level city in western Shandong province, China. Centered around Mount Tai, the city borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the north, Laiwu to the northeast, Zibo to the east, Linyi to the southeast, Liaocheng to the extreme west and Jining to the south. To the west, Tai'an is separated from the province of Henan by the Yellow River. Its population is 5,494,200 at the 2010 census whom 1,594,877 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Xintai and Feicheng). The prefecture-level city of Tai'an administers 6 county-level divisions, including 2 districts, 2 county-level cities and 2 counties. In the neolithic, the area of present day Tai'an was home to the Dawenkou culture. During the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, the region belonged to the states of Qi and Lu. The site of major historical and cultural significance in the area is Mount Tai. Tai'an is centered around the south side of Mount Tai. Tai'an lies in the northern temperate zone and has a continental, semi-humid monsoon climate. The average annual temperatures are -2.6°C (average, in January), 12.9°C (annual average), and 26.4°C (average,
    6.44
    9 votes
    2
    Ma'anshan

    Ma'anshan

    Ma'anshan (simplified Chinese: 马鞍山; traditional Chinese: 馬鞍山; pinyin: Mǎ'ānshān), also written as Maanshan, is a prefecture-level city in the east of Anhui province in Eastern China. An industrial city stretching across the Yangtze River, Ma'anshan borders Hefei to the west, Wuhu to the southwest, and Nanjing to the east. It is a core city of the Nanjing Metropolitan Circle. Maanshan is home to 1,366,302 inhabitants at the 2010 census, all being part of built up area since Dangtu County is now linked to the 3 urban districts. After the August 2011 administrative re-regionalization of Anhui Province, its population becomes 2.283 million, and it administers 2 additional counties (He and Hanshan). The prefecture-level city of Ma'anshan administers 6 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 3 counties. In September 2012, Jinjiazhuang District was dissolved and merged with Huashan District, while part of Dangtu County was split and established as Bowang District. The name of the city means "Horse Saddle Mountain". According to legend, the name came to be when the Western Chu hegemon Xiang Yu was fleeing from the Battle of Gaixia. Rather than be captured, the defeated general
    6.50
    8 votes
    3
    Wuzhong

    Wuzhong

    Wúzhōng (simplified Chinese: 吴忠; traditional Chinese: 吳忠) is a prefecture-level city in the Ningxia autonomous region of the People's Republic of China. A Federation of Industry and Commerce is at Wuzhong. New Area is an important area for Wuzhong's economy. Wuzhong has about 2 million residents. During the early and mid-19th century, the territory of today's Wuzhong - as well as much of northern Ningxia - became a stronghold of the Jahriyya Sufi order (menhuan), which was headquartered in the town of Jinjipu (located a few km south of today's Wuzhong's main urban area). Under the leadership of the order's fourth and fifth shaykhs, Ma Yide (the 1770s-1849) and Ma Hualong (d. 1871), it grew wealthy from the profits of caravan trade across Inner Mongolia, between Baotou, Huhhot and Beijing, and Jinjipu became an important commercial and religious center. During the Muslim Rebellion of 1862-1877, Jinjipu became the headquarter of the rebels in the Ningxia region. The town fell to Zuo Zongtang's troops in January 1871, and over a thousand rebels and residents were massacred; Ma Hualong with his family and Jahriyya officials were executed in March 1871.
    9.20
    5 votes
    4
    Zhoushan

    Zhoushan

    Zhoushan or Zhoushan Archipelago New Area; formerly transliterated as Chusan, is a prefecture-level city and a state-level new area in northeastern Zhejiang province of Eastern China. One of the two prefecture-level cities of the People's Republic of China consisting solely of islands (the other is Sansha in Hainan, however its territory is in dispute), it lies across the mouth of the Hangzhou Bay, and is separated from the mainland by a narrow body of water. On 8 July 2011 the central government approved Zhoushan's status as a state-level new area. The prefecture-level city of Zhoushan administers two districts and two counties. These are further divided into 45 township-level divisions, including 24 towns, 12 townships and 9 subdistricts. The archipelago was inhabited 6,000 years ago during the Neolithic by people of the Hemudu culture. During the Spring and Autumn Period, Zhoushan was called Yongdong (甬东), referring to its location east of the Yong River, and belonged to the State of Yue. The fishermen and sailors who inhabited the islands often engaged in piracy and became recruits for uprisings against the central authorities. At the time of the Eastern Jin Dynasty, Zhoushan
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Nanjing

    Nanjing

    Nanjing (Chinese: 南京; pinyin: Nánjīng; Wade–Giles: Nan-ching) is the capital of Jiangsu province in eastern China and has a prominent place in Chinese history and culture, having been the capital of China on several occasions. Its present name means "Southern Capital" and was widely romanized as Nankin and Nanking until the Pinyin language reform, after which Nanjing was gradually adopted as the standard spelling of the city's name in most languages that use the Roman alphabet. Located in the lower Yangtze River drainage basin and Yangtze River Delta economic zone, Nanjing has long been one of China's most important cities. It is recognized as one of the Four Great Ancient Capitals of China. It was the capital of Sun Quan's Wu during the Three Kingdoms Period and the capital of the Republic of China prior to its flight to Taiwan during the Chinese Civil War. Nanjing is also one of the fifteen sub-provincial cities in the People's Republic of China's administrative structure, enjoying jurisdictional and economic autonomy only slightly less than that of a province. Nanjing has long been a national centre of education, research, transport networks and tourism. The city will host the
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Laiwu

    Laiwu

    Laiwu (simplified Chinese: 莱芜; traditional Chinese: 萊蕪; pinyin: Láiwú) is a prefecture-level city in central Shandong Province, People's Republic of China. The smallest prefecture-level city in the province, it borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the north, Zibo to the east and Tai'an to the southwest. The prefecture-level city of Laiwu administers 2 county-level divisions, both of which are districts. These are further divided into 19 township-level divisions, including 14 towns, 1 townships and 4 subdistricts.
    7.17
    6 votes
    7
    Lianyungang

    Lianyungang

    Lianyungang (simplified Chinese: 连云港; traditional Chinese: 連雲港; pinyin: Liányúngǎng) is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. It borders Yancheng to its southeast, Huai'an and Suqian to its south, Xuzhou to its southwest, and the province of Shandong to its north. Its name derives from Lian Island (formally Dongxilian Island) the largest island in Jiangsu Province which lies off its coastline, and Yuntai Mountain, the highest peak in Jiangsu Province, a few miles from its town center, and the fact that it is a port. Lianyungang (as Yuntai Mountain) was known in the West as Haichow (Wade-Giles romanization). This was one of the four original ports opened up for foreign trade in the 1680s by the Qing Dynasty Government. The others were Ningbo, Xiamen and Guangzhou. Lianyungang is situated between 118°24' and 119°48' east longitude and 34°11' and 35°07' north latitude. Lianyungang covers an area of 7,777 km². The temperature in Lianyungang can reach average highs of 30°C in the summer and drop to as low as -4°C in the winter. The vast majority of precipitation occurs between June and August, where it can measure up to 278mm of rainfall
    9.25
    4 votes
    8
    Lishui

    Lishui

    Lishui (simplified Chinese: 丽水; traditional Chinese: 麗水; pinyin: Líshuǐ) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. It borders Quzhou, Jinhua and Taizhou to the north, Wenzhou to the southeast, and the province of Fujian to the southwest. The name of the city literally means "Beautiful Water", and the pronunciation of its first character is "lí", not the usual "lì". Lishui has a very long history, for during the Liangzhu Culture period 4000 years ago, there were tribes living in the area. In 589, a prefecture called Chuzhou was established by the Sui Dynasty with Kuocang, Songyang, Linhai, Yongjia, Angu and Lechen counties under its jurisdiction. Three years later, the prefecature's name was changed to Kuozhou and then to Yongjia County in 607. The name was changed back to Kuozhou in 621 during the Tang Dynasty, to Jinyun County in the first year of the Tianbao era (742) and back to Kuozhou in the first year of Qianyuan Era (758). In 779, during the Tang Dynasty, it was renamed Lishui County. The name of the area was changed again in the year 1276 during the Yuan Dynasty to Chuzhou Lu and to Annan Fu in the 19th year of rule of
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    Langfang

    Langfang

    Lángfáng (Chinese: 廊坊), Hebei province is a prefecture-level city located approximately midway between Beijing and Tianjin with a total population of 3.85 million and an urban area population of 763,700. Its total area is around 6,429 km (2,482 sq mi). Langfang borders Baoding to the southwest, Cangzhou to the south (both prefecture-level cities of Hebei), Beijing to the north and Tianjin to the east. It is the smallest prefecture-level division in Hebei province by land area. Langfang consists of 2 county-level districts, 2 county-level cities, 5 counties, 1 autonomous county, and one economic development district (开发区). Development district: Considering Langfang's position between these two prominent cities, Langfang is a relatively green city. Every 300 to 500 m (980 to 1,600 ft) along the city's major streets are parks where local people stroll and take exercise. Langfang's five-kilometer long pedestrian street is now the longest in China. The Sanhe exclave, separated from the rest of the province, is a part of Langfang City. The exclave comprises Sanhe City, Xianghe County, and Dachang Hui Autonomous County and is located between the municipalities of Beijing and Tianjin. On
    6.67
    6 votes
    10
    Bozhou

    Bozhou

    Bozhou (Chinese: 亳州; pinyin: Bózhōu) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Anhui province, People's Republic of China. It borders Huaibei to the northeast, Bengbu to the southeast, Huainan to the south, Fuyang to the southwest, and the province of Henan to the north. The prefecture-level city of Bozhou administers 4 county-level divisions, including 1 district and 3 counties. Bozhou features a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa) with four distinct seasons. With an annual average temperature of 14.7 °C (58.5 °F), monthly mean temperatures range from 0.6 °C (33.1 °F) in January to 27.3 °C (81.1 °F) in August. Winters are damp and cold (yet the precipitation is low) while summers are hot and humid. Rainfall is heavily concentrated in the warmer months, as more than half of the annual total occurs from June to August. Bozhou was, in addition to being a prefecture during the Tang Dynasty, once the Qiao Commandry (谯郡) at the time of the Sui Dynasty. In 1355, during the Mongol Dynasty, Han Lin'er (韓林兒) was proclaimed by Liu Futong (劉福通) to be the Emperor of Great Song (大宋, a reference to the extinct Song Empire) with the era name Longfeng (龍鳳 "Dragon and fenghuang"). Chao was
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    Kunming

    Kunming

    Kūnmíng (Chinese: 昆明, UN/LOCODE: CNKMG) is the capital and largest city of Yunnan (云南) Province in Southwest China. It was known as Yunnan-Fou (云南府, Yúnnánfǔ) until the 1920s. A prefecture-level city, it is the political, economic, communications and cultural centre of Yunnan, and is the seat of the provincial government. It is also home to several universities, museums, galleries and other important economic, cultural, and educational institutions. The headquarters of many of Yunnan's large businesses are in Kunming as well. It was important during World War II as a Chinese military center, American air base, and transport terminus for the Burma Road. Located in the middle of the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, Kunming is located at an altitude of 1,900 m above sea level and at a latitude just north of the Tropic of Cancer. It covers an area of 21,473 square kilometres (8,291 sq mi) and its urban area covers 2,081 km (803 sq mi). Kunming has population of 6,432,212 including 3,055,000 in the urban area and is located at the northern edge of the large Lake Dian, surrounded by temples and lake-and-limestone hill landscapes. Kunming consists of an old, previously walled city, a modern
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Zibo

    Zibo

    Zibo (Chinese: 淄博; pinyin: Zībó) is a prefecture-level city in central Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the west, Laiwu and Tai'an to the southwest, Linyi to the south, Weifang to the east, Dongying to the northeast, and Binzhou the north. Located in the middle part of Shandong Province, Zibo is an important transportation hub. Zibo governs 5 districts (Zhangdian, Zichuan, Boshan, Zhoucun and Linzi) and each of these districts has a distinct downtown area of their own. The T-shaped city has a total area of 5,938 square kilometers, including the counties of Huantai, Gaoqing, and Yiyuan. Zibo's total population was 4.53 million at the 2010 census, of which nearly 3 million are in the city proper. Zibo was the centre of the ancient State of Qi, whose capital Linzi was the most populous city in the east about 3000 years ago. Zibo is the birthplace of ancient football Cuju, which according to FIFA, was the earliest form of the sport. Pu Songling, a well-known writer of the Qing Dynasty, is one of the most famous people from Zibo. As the birthplace of Qi Culture and because of the abundant natural resources, it is an excellent
    5.71
    7 votes
    13
    Yueyang

    Yueyang

    Yueyang (simplified Chinese: 岳阳; traditional Chinese: 岳陽; pinyin: Yuèyáng; Wade–Giles: Yüeh-yang; Postal map spelling: Yochow) is a prefecture-level city at the northeastern corner of Hunan province, South Central China, on the southern shores of Dongting Lake. The Yueyang metropolitan area occupies 14,896 km². and the city proper occupies 304 km². The population is 5,477,911 at the 2010 census whom 571,670 live in the built up area made of Yueyanglou District. The city's most famous attraction is the Yueyang Tower (岳阳楼 Yuèyánglóu). City flower: Gardenia. It is twinned with Numazu, Japan and Castlegar, British Columbia, Canada. The Yueyang prefecture is made up of six outlying districts, two special districts and the city proper. The six city districts are Huarong, Linxiang, Xiangyin, Pingjiang, Miluo and Yueyang. The two special (smaller) districts are Junshan and Yunxi, which used to be part of Yueyang city proper but were separated into their own special districts for administrative purposes. The area now called Yueyang has been inhabited for over 3,000 years. It was originally established as a prefecture called Hanchang in 210 AD during the Three Kingdoms period. Under the Song
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Suqian

    Suqian

    Suqian (simplified Chinese: 宿迁; traditional Chinese: 宿遷; pinyin: Sùqiān) is a prefecture-level city in northern Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China. It borders Xuzhou to the northwest, Lianyungang to the northeast, Huai'an to the south, and the province of Anhui to the west. The prefecture-level city of Suqian administers 5 county-level divisions, including 2 districts and 3 counties. These are further divided into 115 township-level divisions, including 111 towns and township, and 4 subdistricts.
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Xiangtan

    Xiangtan

    Xiangtan (Chinese: 湘潭; pinyin: Xiāngtán; Wade–Giles: Hsiang-tan) is a city in China's Hunan Province that is located on the lower reaches of Xiang river. The hometowns of several founding leaders of the Chinese Communist Party, including Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and Peng Dehuai are in the Xiangtan Municipal District, as well as the hometowns of Qing Dynasty painter Qi Baishi and scholar-general Zeng Guofan. It had 2,748,552 inhabitants at the 2010 census of whom 1,779,960 lived in the built-up area (2 urban districts plus Xiangtan county). With four adjoining Zhuzhou urban districts being agglomerated, the joint built-up areas is home to 2,586,948 inhabitants. Relics from Daxi culture indicates that people inhabited the Xiangtan area in the 3rd millennium BC. Shang Dynasty bronzewares have been found in the region, as well as tombs from the Warring States Period. During the Three Kingdoms Period, the kingdom of Eastern Wu built a city in the west of modern Xiangtan City and organized the Hengyang Commandery (Chinese: 衡陽郡) around it. In AD 749, the Tang Dynasty organized the area as Xiangtan County, centered at modern Yisu River (Chinese: 易俗河). By the time of the Northern Song
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Huai'an

    Huai'an

    Huai'an (Chinese: 淮安; pinyin: Huái'ān), formerly called Huaiyin (Chinese: 淮阴; pinyin: Huáiyīn) until 2001, is a prefecture-level city in central Jiangsu province of Eastern China. It borders Lianyungang, Suqian to the north, Yancheng to the northeast, Yangzhou to the southeast, and Nanjing and Chuzhou to the southwest. As of the 2010 census the municipality had 4,799,889 inhabitants, of whom 2,494,013 lived in the four urban districts. The prefecture-level city of Huai'an administers 8 county-level divisions, including 4 districts and 4 counties. These are further divided into 127 township-level divisions, including 84 towns, 33 townships and 10 subdistricts. The area of Huai'an spans over ancient canal of Huai River and the name of Huai'an takes the hope of the residents for lasting peaceful Huai River. Pre-History Chinese mythology recounts that Yu the Great, the Chinese leader with a legendary ability for flood control techniques, was constantly taming the Huai River here in Huai'an area. Traces of the activities of ancient Chinese living in about 5000 to 6000 years ago have been found in the area. The most famous one is the Qingliangang Hill Civilization. Xia, Shang and Zhou
    7.20
    5 votes
    17
    Zhangzhou

    Zhangzhou

    Zhangzhou (Chinese: 漳州; pinyin: Zhāngzhōu; Wade–Giles: Chang-chou; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Chiang-chiu; formerly Lung-ch'i) is a prefecture-level city in southern Fujian province, People's Republic of China. Located on the banks of the Jiulong River (Beixi), Zhangzhou borders the cities of Xiamen (廈門) and Quanzhou (泉州) to the northeast, Longyan City to the northwest and the province of Guangdong to the southwest. Zhangzhou is home to 4,809,983 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom those of Longwen and Xiacheng districts are considered as urban. The built up area now include these 2 previous districts, the city of Longhai and reaches Xiamen 3,531,147 inhabitants. The 2 cities built up area (ie Metro area) is now home to about 5 millions inhabitants in 2010. In older English works, its name may appear as Chang-chow or Changchow and in Southeast Asian contexts it appears as Chiang-chew or Chiang Chew from the Hokkien name. The main dialect spoken in Zhangzhou is Hokkien, one of the major Min Nan languages/topolects. But officially, people use Mandarin in government, commerce and official business. In the early 20th century, Zhangzhou-fu was surrounded by 42 miles (68 km) of wall (in circumference).
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Changde

    Changde

    Changde (Chinese: 常德; pinyin: Chángdé) is a city in the north of Hunan Province, China, with a population of 5,717,218 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 1,232,182 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Dingcheng and Wuling). Changde is known for its many Old Stone and New Stone Age sites. About 500 of them have been discovered to date. In historical times it was also a centre from which governments controlled the mountain tribes of western Hunan. A county, named Linyuan, was established there in the 2nd century BC. In 589 its name was changed to Wuling, and under the Tang Dynasty (618–907) it became the seat of Lang prefecture. Under the Song Dynasty (960–1279) the name of the prefecture was changed to Tingzhou, and in 1164–74 it became a superior prefecture called Changde. This status was retained until 1912, when the superior prefecture was abolished and the city became a county seat. In the late 19th century Changde became a prosperous commercial center and the chief agricultural central market of the Yuan River basin. Many Chinese firms, and — after 1905, when it was opened to foreign trade — foreign firms as well, maintained branches there to buy rice, cotton, tung
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Datong

    Datong

    Dàtóng (Chinese: 大同; Wade–Giles: Ta-t'ung) is a prefecture-level city in northern Shanxi province, People's Republic of China, located a few hundred kilometres west by rail from Beijing with an elevation of 1,040 metres (3,410 ft). It has a population of 3,318,057 at the 2010 census of whom 1,447,150 live in the built up area made of 3 out of 4 urban districts, namely Chengqu, Kuangqu and Nanjiao. Near here was the Beidi kingdom of Tai which was conquered by the Zhou dynasty in 457BC. It bordered on the Hu nomads and traded in horses. Tai was later a commandery or county. The town was founded as Píngchéng (平城) in 200 BC during the Han Dynasty, after the Battle of Baideng between the Han and the Xiongnu. Located near the Great Wall Pass to Inner Mongolia. It blossomed during the following period and became a stop-off point for Camel Caravans moving from China into Mongolia and beyond. It was sacked at the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty. Pingcheng became the capital of Northern Wei from 398 AD until 494 AD. The well-known Yungang Grottoes were constructed during the later part of this period (460 – 494 AD). The city was renamed Datong in 1048 AD and sacked again at the end of the
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Zhanjiang

    Zhanjiang

    Zhànjiāng (Chinese: 湛江; pinyin: Zhànjiāng), formerly known as Fort-Bayard, and Kouang-Tchéou-Wan (Guangzhouwan), is a prefecture-level city at the southwestern end of Guangdong province of Southern China, facing the island of Hainan to the south. Its population is 6,993,304 inhabitants at the 2010 census. 1,400,685 live in the built up area made of 4 urban districts (Chikan, Xiashan, Potou and Mazhang) Zhanjiang has direct juridiction over 9 county-level divisions: Zhanjiang is located to the southwest of the city of Guangzhou on an inlet of the South China Sea. It is located on the eastern coast of the Leizhou Peninsula. The dialect in downtown districts is Cantonese, while the people in most counties speak Hai'nan dialect (or Leizhou dialect as referred locally). The dialect in Lianjiang County is Hakka. During the Qin Dynasty (221BC–206BC), the area of today's belonged to Xiang Shire and the central government of the Han Dynasty (206BC–220AD) set Xuwen County administering the whole Leizhou Peninsular. It was one of the earliest departure points on the Marine Silk Road. The population spiked during the Tang (618–907) and Song (960–1279) dynasties. The region was still a small
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Mudanjiang

    Mudanjiang

    Mudanjiang (Chinese: 牡丹江; pinyin: Mǔdānjiāng; Manchu: Mudan bira ᠮᡠᡩ᠋ᠠᠨ ᠪᡳᡵᠠ) is a prefecture-level city in Heilongjiang province of the People's Republic of China. The administrative seat of the prefecture resides in Mudanjiang City. It was called Botankou when it was under Japanese occuption. It serves as a regional communications hub with a railway junction and an international airport connecting with several major Chinese cities as well as Seoul, Korea. Mudanjiang is also an important border city, located only 248 km from Vladivostok, Russia. In 2011 Mudanjiang had a GDP of RMB 93.48 billion with a 15.1% growth rate. Its population is 2,798,723 at the 2010 census whom 805,584 live in the built up area made of 4 urban districts. Mudanjiang was originally the nomadic area of the Manchu herdsmen from 2,300 years ago. Ancient Sushen(肃慎) lies in nowaday valley of Mudanjiang River, established Mo State(貊国). During Tang Dynasty, Balhae established their permanent capital Sanggyeong near Lake Jingpo in the south of today's Mudanjiang city around 755 AD. On January 14, 926, Sanggyeong was fallen while Balhae was defeated by the Khitans. The city of Mudanjiang is named after for the
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Ganzhou

    Ganzhou

    Ganzhou (Chinese: 赣州; pinyin: Gànzhōu), formerly romanized as Kanchow, is a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangxi province, People's Republic of China. Its administrative seat is at Zhanggong District. In 201, Emperor Gaozu of the Han Dynasty established a county in the territory of modern Ganzhou. In those early years, ethnic Han settlement and authority in the area was minimal and largely restricted to the Gan River basin. The river, a tributary of the Yangtze River via Poyang Lake, provided a route of communication from the north as well as irrigation for rice farming. During the Sui Dynasty the county administration was promoted to prefecture status and the area called Qianzhou (虔州). During the Song Dynasty immigration from the north bolstered the local population and drove local aboriginal tribes further into the hills. Especially after the fall of the Northern Song capital of Kaifeng, migrants increased dramatically. The name was officially changed to Ganzhou in the Southern Song. During the late 1800s Ganzhou was opened as one of the southern treaty ports and became a minor base for foreign companies. Between 1929 and 1934, Ganzhou formed a part of the Jiangxi Soviet,
    9.33
    3 votes
    23
    Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture

    Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture

    Línxià Hui Autonomous Prefecture (simplified Chinese: 临夏回族自治州; traditional Chinese: 臨夏回族自治州; pinyin: Línxià Huízú Zìzhìzhōu) is in Western China's Gansu Province, south of the capital, Lanzhou. It is an autonomous prefecture for the Muslim Hui people, a large Chinese ethnic group. It also includes two autonomous counties for other Muslim groups, namely Dongxiang, Salar, and Bonan. Linxia Prefecture is located in southwestern central Gansu. It is just south of Lanzhou, and borders Qinghai Province in the west, Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in the south, and the Dingxi prefecture-level city in the east. The terrain is highlands, mountains, and loess hills. Elevation averages 2000 meters above sea-level. The Yellow River, which gets its muddy yellow color from the loess, runs through the northwestern part of the prefecture. Dammed at Liujiaxia (Yongjing County), it forms the large Liujiaxia Reservoir in the north-central part of the county. There is also a smaller Yanguoxia Dam (盐锅峡 水电站 Yán-guō-xiá shuǐ-diàn-zhàn) further downstream, also within Yongjing County. The Yellow River's main tributaries within the prefecture are the Daxia River and the Tao River. They flow from the
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Jiayuguan

    Jiayuguan

    Jiāyùguān (simplified Chinese: 嘉峪关(市); traditional Chinese: 嘉峪關) is a prefecture-level city in Gansu, China, with a population of 127,532 as of 2007. It is most famous for the nearby Jiayu Pass, the largest and most intact pass of the Great Wall of China. The Jiayuguan City is a city built near the Jiayuguan Pass. In ancient times, many inns were built near the pass. Gradually, more and more people decided to stay there for business and Jiayuguan City was built. At present, Jiayuguan City is not only famous for Jiayuguan Pass but also for Jiuquan Steel Company built in 1958. The steel company is the largest in Gansu Province. Jiayuguan has 3 management districts with a total population of 231,853. Jiayuguan is served by China National Highway 312, and the Lanzhou-Xinjiang and Jiayuguan-Ceke Railways. Direct air services are available to Xi'an on Shanghai Airlines and Beijing on Air China. The Latitude is 39° 47' N and Longitude: 98° 17' E.
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Liaocheng

    Liaocheng

    Liaocheng (Chinese: 聊城; pinyin: Liáochéng), also known as the Water City, is a prefecture-level city in western Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the southeast, Dezhou to the northeast, Tai'an to the south, and the provinces of Hebei and Henan to the west. The Grand Canal flows through the city center. During the Song dynasty, the area of present-day Liaocheng included the prefectures of Bozhou (博州) and Jizhou (濟州). The prefecture-level city of Liaocheng administers eight county-level divisions, including one district, one county-level city, and six counties. These are further divided into 134 township-level divisions. In August 1949 Liaocheng was detached from Shandong and attached to Pingyuan. In November 1952 Pingyuan was dissolved and Liaocheng returned to Shandong. Liaocheng is a sister city of the following cities.
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Yuxi

    Yuxi

    Yuxi (Chinese: 玉溪; pinyin: Yùxī) is a prefecture-level city in the Yunnan province of the People's Republic of China. The administrative center of Yuxi is Hongta District. Yuxi is approximately 90 kilometres (56 mi) south of Kunming. Juxi is located in the center of Yunnan province, about 90 kilometres (56 mi) south of Kunming, the provincial capital. Like much of the central and eastern parts of the province, it is part of the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau. The area is 15,285 km and the population is approximately 2.5 million. Near Yuxi city is Fuxian Lake, the second-deepest freshwater lake in China, where there have been discovered ancient fossils that are now in the possession of the Yuxi museum. There also are three other lakes around the city. They are Xingyun Lake, Qilu Lake, Yangzong Lake. Tempered by the low latitude and moderate elevation, Juxi has a mild subtropical highland climate (Köppen Cwb), with short, mild, dry winters, and warm, rainy summers. Frost may occur in winter but the days still generally warm up to around 17 °C (63 °F). During summer, a majority of the days features some rainfall, and daytime temperatures rise to 26 °C (79 °F). A great majority of the year's
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Sanmenxia

    Sanmenxia

    Sanmenxia (simplified Chinese: 三门峡; traditional Chinese: 三門峽; pinyin: Sānménxiá; Postal map spelling: Sanmenhsia) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, People's Republic of China. The westernmost prefecture-level city in Henan, Sanmenxia borders Luoyang to the east, Nanyang to the southeast, the province of Shaanxi to the west and the province of Shanxi to the north. The city lies on the south side of the Yellow River at the point where the river cuts through the Loess Plateau on its way to the North China Plain. Its home to 2,233,872 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 548,437 live in the built up area made of Hubin urban district and Pinglu county in Zuncheng, now within the agglomeration The city's name in Chinese (三门峡) means "The Gorge of Three Gateways" and is derived from two islands that split the Yellow River into three parts. According to Chinese mythology, Yu the Great used a divine axe to cut the mountain ridge three times, creating the Sanmenxia gorges to prevent massive flooding. The three "men" or gates were then named "The Gateway of Man" (人门), "The Gateway of Gods" (神门) and "The Gateway of Devils" (鬼门). With the construction of the Sanmenxia Dam in
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    Wuzhou

    Wuzhou

    Wúzhōu (Chinese: 梧州; Jyutping: Ng⁴zau¹), other names include Wuchow (Chinese Postal Map Romanization), and Ngchow (historically romanised name), is a prefecture-level city in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Wuzhou is located in eastern Guangxi bordering Guangdong province. It is at the confluence of the Gui River and the Xun River where they form the Xi River; 85% of all water in Guangxi flows through Wuzhou. The total area of Wuzhou is 12,588 km². Wuzhou is subtropical monsoonal. The Tropic of Cancer bisects the city. Average annual temperature is 21.1°C and precipitation is 1500 mm. There are 1915 hours of sunlight annually. According to the 2010 Census, the prefecture-level city of Wuzhou has 3,273,300 inhabitants and a population density of 260 inhabitants per km². The population is 13.22% higher than in 2000 (the average annual population growth for the period 2000-2010 was of 1.25%). The dominant ethnic group in the prefecture-level city is Han Chinese but there are also Zhuang, Yao and others. Wuzhou traditionally belongs to the Cantonese cultural and linguistic region, so most people speak the Wuzhou dialect of Cantonese and Mandarin as a result of Central
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Zunyi

    Zunyi

    Zūnyì (simplified Chinese: 遵义; traditional Chinese: 遵義) is a prefecture-level city in Guizhou province in southwestern China. Along with Guiyang and Liupanshui, it is one of the most important cities of the province. The two main districts of the city, Huichuan and Honghuagang, have a population of around 800,000 people, and the whole region, including 14 county-level administration area as a whole, has a population of approximately 7 million. Zunyi is located in North Guizhou province, situated at the side of the Xiangjiang River - a branch of Wujiang River. The elevation of the city is approximately 900 metres. Due to its situation on the Yungui Plateau, the city has a monsoon-influenced, four-season humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) that is largely mild and humid. Winters may occasionally feature frost and are generally interminably dreary and grey. Summers are hot and humid, though not as much so as the lower-elevation cities further to the east. Monthly mean temperatures range from 4.5 °C (40.1 °F) in January to 25.1 °C (77.2 °F) in July. Some rainfall occurs during the winter months, but most of the year's total occurs from May to August. The 1999 Zunyi Prefecture
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Tongren

    Tongren

    Tóngrén (simplified Chinese: 铜仁; traditional Chinese: 銅仁) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Guizhou province, People's Republic of China, located within a tobacco planting and crop agricultural area. Tongren was known as Tongren Prefecture (铜仁地区) until November 2011, when it was converted into a prefecture-level city. Tongren comprises 2 districts, 4 counties, and 4 autonomous counties.
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Yongzhou

    Yongzhou

    Yongzhou (Chinese: 永州; pinyin: Yǒngzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in the south of Hunan province, People's Republic of China, located on the southern bank of the Xiang River, which is formed by the confluence of the Xiao and Xiang rivers. With a history of 2000 years, Yongzhou is one of the four ancient counties in Hunan. Its total area is 22,441 square kilometres (8,665 sq mi), and it has a total population of nearly 5.8 million people. Yongzhou has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with a range in the monthly daily average temperature from 6.0 °C (42.8 °F) to 28.8 °C (83.8 °F) in July. Winters are mild and brief, beginning somewhat dry and turning wet and gloomy as the season progresses. Spring is very rainy, especially in May, which is the wettest month. Summer is very hot and humid, with some, albeit unreliable, rain, and generous sunshine; generally, July and August are the only two months where the area receives more than 50% of the possible amount of sunshine. Autumn is the driest season. From January to May, on average, more than half of the days each month receive some precipitation. China National Highway 207 Yongzhou is the home of Chinese supermodel Liu
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Nanping

    Nanping

    Nanping (Chinese: 南平; pinyin: Nánpíng) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Fujian province, People's Republic of China. It borders Ningde City to the east, Sanming City to the south, and the provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangxi to the north and west respectively. Part of the famous Wuyi Mountains range is located in this prefecture. Nanping is a picturesque old city, located on a hill near the fall of the Jianxi (建溪) River into the Min, and surrounded by high stone walls. These high walls were used to prevent artillery fire. They formed a considerable obstacle to anything hostile back in the old days. Eight children were killed in Nanping in March 2010 in a knife attack. The prefecture-level city city of Nanping administers 1 district, 4 county-level cities and 5 counties. Nanping, similar to the rest of the province, has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with short and mild winters (with occasional frost), and long, very hot and humid summers. Monthly average temperatures range from 9.7 °C (49.5 °F) in January to 28.7 °C (83.7 °F) in July. Rainfall peaks from March to June, with autumn and winter being much drier. Summer is the sunniest time of the year. The industry
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Harbin

    Harbin

    Harbin (Chinese: 哈尔滨; pinyin:  Hā'ěrbīn (help·info) [xɑ́ɻpín]; Manchu language: , Harbin; Russian: Харбин́ Kharbin  listen (help·info)), is the capital and largest city of Heilongjiang Province in Northeast China, as well as the tenth most populated city in the People's Republic of China. According to the 2010 China census data, the city's urban area has 5,878,939 inhabitants, while the total population of the sub-provincial city is up to 10,635,971. Harbin serves as a key political, economic, scientific, cultural and communications hub in Northeast China. Harbin, which is originally a Manchu word meaning "a place for drying fishing nets", grew from a small rural settlement on the Songhua River to become one of the largest cities in Northeast China. Founded in 1898 with the coming of the Chinese Eastern Railway, the city first prospered as a region inhabited by an overwhelming majority of the Jewish immigrants. It is known for its bitterly cold winters and is often called the "Ice City." Harbin is notable for its beautiful ice sculptures in winter and its Russian legacy, and still plays an important part in Sino-Russian trade today. In the 1920s, the city was considered China's
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    Yunfu

    Yunfu

    Yúnfú (Chinese: 云浮) is a prefecture-level city in western Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. It borders Zhaoqing to the north, Foshan to the east, Jiangmen to the southwest, Yangjiang to the south, Maoming to the southwest, and the autonomous region of Guangxi to the west. Yunfu is considered sub-tropical and enjoys fine weather year round, characterized by mild air temperatures, plentiful rainfall and sunshine, with an annual average temperature of 22°C, annual average rainfall of 1,670.5mm and annual average sunshine hours of 1,418. The time-space distribution of rainfall is uneven in a year. It is overcast and dry in spring, hot and rainy in the summer, cool in autumn, and dry and sunny in winter. The prefecture-level city of Yunfu administers 5 county-level divisions, including 1 district, 1 county-level city and 3 counties. With 324 National Highway running through the whole prefecture, cement-paved roads are accessible to each single township and village. Guangzhou-Wuzhou Expressway linking Guangdong and Guangxi is also connected to Yunfu which will further be united with Yulin and Wuzhou in Guangxi as well as the expressway network in southwest China.
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Zhoukou

    Zhoukou

    Zhoukou (Chinese: 周口; pinyin: Zhōukǒu; Postal map spelling: Chowkow) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Henan province, People's Republic of China. It borders Zhumadian to the southeast, Xuchang and Luohe to the west, Kaifeng to the northwest, Shangqiu to the northeast, and the province of Anhui on all other sides. The prefecture-level city of Zhoukou administers 1 district, 1 county-level city and 8 counties. For thousands of years, Chen (now at Huaiyang) had been the center of this area and a nationally well-known city. The ancient city site founded at Pingliangtai (near Huaiyang) is over 4600 years old, which is one of the oldest cities in China. According to the legend, Fu Xi, the first of the Three Sovereigns of ancient China, died in the city. During the Spring and Autumn Period, Chen was the capital of Chen State and then annexed by Chu. Therefore, the area was usually referred to as "Chen Chu" in ancient times. The leaders of the first Chinese peasant uprising (the Daze Village Uprising) established the government at Chen. The city's name "Zhoukou" is short for "Zhoujiakou", which literally means "Zhou's ferry". Located at the intersection of Jialu River and Shaying
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Qitaihe

    Qitaihe

    Qitaihe (Chinese: 七台河; pinyin: Qītáihé) is a prefecture-level city in Heilongjiang province. Lying in the eastern part of Heilongjiang Province in Northeast China and covering an area 6,223 square kilometers, Qitaihe is the smallest city among 13 prefecture and prefecture-level cities in this province. Qitaihe also has the second smallest population of the cities in Heilongjiang. At the 2010 census, its total population was 920,419, while 620,935 live in the built up area made of 3 urban districts. Qitaihe's history can be stretched back to 3,000 years ago during the Shang and Zhou Dynasties, when it was inhabited by the ancient Sushen group, the ancestors of the Manchu. In 1910, coal resources was found in Qitaihe. However, coal mining industry did not really start until The CPC Committee of Heilongjiang Province ordered Hegang Mining Bureau to take charge of the Extractive industries in Boli County in 1958. Qitaihe began its development. On Jan 26, 1961, Boli Mining Bureau was established. The CPC Central Committee and State Council approved to establish Qitaihe District(七台河特区) as a pilot of the combination of enterprise management and government administration. In 1970, Qitaihe
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Xianyang

    Xianyang

    Xianyang (simplified Chinese: 咸阳; traditional Chinese: 咸陽; pinyin: Xiányáng; Sienyang; Hsienyang; IPA: [ɕjɛ̌n.jɑ̌ŋ]) is a former capital of China in Shaanxi province, on the Wei River, a few kilometers upstream (west) from Xi'an. It has an area of 10,213 square kilometres (3,943 sq mi). It's part of the Xi'an metropolitan area, one of the main urban agglomerations in inland China with more than 7 million inhabitants. Xianyang was among the capital city's environs during the Western Zhou Dynasty, and was made the capital of the state of Qin in 350 BC during the Warring States Period before becoming the capital of China during the short-lived Qin Dynasty. Because the city lay south of the Jiuzong Mountains and north of the Wei River - both sunlight-rich (yang) orientations - it was named "Xianyang", meaning "fully yang". Under Duke Xiao of Qin, minister Shang Yang designed Xianyang in 350 BC, which was then the capital for over 140 years. It was located in the modern day Shaanxi province on the northern bank of the Wei River, on the opposite side of which Liu Bang would later build the Han Dynasty capital of Chang'an once he became emperor. In 221 BC Qin Shi Huang eliminated all six
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Ya'an

    Ya'an

    Ya'an (Chinese: 雅安; pinyin: Yǎ'ān; Wade–Giles: Ya-an) is a prefecture-level city in the western part of Sichuan province of Southwest China, located just below the Tibetan Plateau. Previously known as Yazhou-fu, the city is first mentioned during the Zhou Dynasty (1122-255 BCE). It served as a county seat during the Qin and Han Dynasties, but was subsequently taken by nomadic tribes. After being reintegrated into the Chinese Empire in the late 5th century, it was made the seat of the Ya Prefecture in 604. The modern Ya'an county was established in 1912. It became the provincial capital of Xikang province in 1951, but has been a municipality under the administration of Sichuan province since 1955, when Xikang province was merged and became a part of Sichuan province. The first giant panda was found in Baoxing County of Ya'an; Ya'an is also the origin of Artificial planting tea of the world; Mengding Mountain in Mingshan County, has been keeping seven tea trees, which are believed to be the origins of tea, for more than 1,000 years. Panda dung tea is also a local speciality. Ya'an is located at the western edge of the Sichuan Basin and on the upper reaches of the Yangtze, covering
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Hainan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Hainan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Qinghai Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 海南藏族自治州; Tibetan: མཚོ་ལྷོ་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་) is an autonomous prefecture of northeastern Qinghai Province in Western China. The prefecture has an area of 45,895 square kilometres (17,720 sq mi) and its seat is located in Gonghe County. Its name literally means "south of Qinghai Lake." According to the 2000 census, the prefecture has 375,426 inhabitants with a population density of 8.18 inhabitants/km². The following is a list of ethnic groups in the prefecture, as of the 2000 census. The prefecture is subdivided into 5 county-level divisions (5 counties):
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Panjin

    Panjin

    Panjin (simplified Chinese: 盘锦; traditional Chinese: 盤錦; pinyin: Pánjǐn) is a prefecture-level city and a major oil-producing city in Liaoning Province, China. It is between 40°40' -41°27' in north latitude and 121°31' -122 °28' in east longitude. It has four distinct seasons, an annual average temperature of 8.6℃ and receives over 2700 hours of sunshine a year. There are over 1.3 million people living in the Panjin area. Panjin has four immediate sub-municipal divisions. There are 2 counties and 2 districts. Panjin was approved the status of a city and its current boundaries by the State Council on June 5, 1984. Panjin sits on the open field between the Liaodong Peninsula and western Liaoning Province. The Shuangtaizi River, which diverts from the Liao River upstream from the city, runs through the city and flows into the Liaodong Bay. The Liao River serves as the border between Panjin and the city of Yingkou. The two other cities that borders Panjin are Jinzhou and Anshan. At the end of 2003, there were a total of 1 243 905 people residing in the Panjin. The urban population was 566 046, that's 45.51% of all residents. They reside mainly in Shuangtaizi District and Xinglongtai
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Pingdingshan

    Pingdingshan

    Pingdingshan (simplified Chinese: 平顶山; traditional Chinese: 平頂山; pinyin: Píngdǐngshān; Postal map spelling: Pingtingshan), also known as the Eagle City, with approximately 5.2 million inhabitants is a prefecture-level city in central Henan province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the north, Xuchang and Luohe to the east, Zhumadian to the southeast, Nanyang to the south, and Luoyang to the west. Pingdingshan was founded in 1957. In Chinese, Pingdingshan means 'flat mountain'; The city is named after a nearby plateau which has a very flat top. The reason for the city's "Eagle City" nickname can be traced back to two thousand years ago during the Spring and Autumn Annals. There was a small country royal named Ying that lived around Pingdingshan. In ancient times, the word "Ying" meant Eagle, therefore people also call Pingdingshan the Eagle City. The prefecture-level city of Pingdingshan administers 4 districts, 2 county-level cities and 4 counties. Pingdingshan, People's Republic of China is twinned with: Pingdingshan has been identified by the Economist Intelligence Unit in the November 2010 Access China White Paper as a member of the
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Guangyuan

    Guangyuan

    Guangyuan (simplified Chinese: 广元; traditional Chinese: 廣元; pinyin: Gǔangyúan; Wade–Giles: Kuang-yüan) is a prefecture-level city in Sichuan Province, China. It has an area of 16313.78 square kilometers and a population of 2,484,123 in 2010 (3,037,600 in 2002.) Guangyuan's economy is based on a diverse array of heavy industry, as well as mining and agriculture. It is an ancient city, notable for its relics and tombs. Plant 821, a large plutonium producing reactor is located near Guangyuan. On May 12, 2008 a magnitude 7.9 earthquake occurred. 4,822 people were killed, 28,245 injured, and 125 missing in the city as of June 7, 2008. Formerly known as Lizhou (利州), Guangyuan was the birthplace of Wu Zetian, the only woman in Chinese history to bear the title Empress Regnant.
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Changchun

    Changchun

    Changchun (Chinese: 长春; pinyin: Chángchūn Manchu: ᠴᠠᠩ ᠴᡠᠨ, Cang cun) is the capital and largest city of Jilin province, located in the northeast of the People's Republic of China, in the center of the Songliao Plain. It is administered as a sub-provincial city with a population of 7,677,089 at the 2010 census under its jurisdiction, including counties and county-level cities. The name, which means "Long Spring", originated from the Jurchen language. The six urban districts of Changchun's city proper have a total population of 3,341,700 in 2010 which correspond to the built up area. Known as China's Automobile City, Changchun is an important industrial base with a particular focus on the automotive sector. Changchun was initially established on Imperial Decree as a small Trading post and frontier village during the reign of the Jiajing Emperor. Trading activities mainly involved furs and other natural products during this period. In 1800, Emperor Jiaqing of the Qing Dynasty selected a small village on the east bank of the Yitong River and named it "Changchun Ting". At the end of 18th century peasants from overpopulated provinces such as Shandong and Hebei began to settle in the
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Yiyang

    Yiyang

    Yiyang (simplified Chinese: 益阳; traditional Chinese: 益陽; pinyin: Yìyáng) is a prefecture-level city at the Zi River in Hunan province, China. According to the 2010 Census, Yiyang has a population of 4,313,084 inhabitants residing in an area of 12,144 km². The last census was in 2000 when it was recorded there were 4,309,143 inhabitants.. Yiyang was founded in the Qin Dynasty. During the Taiping Rebellion its name was changed to DeSheng county. Yiyang administers two districts, one county-level city, and three counties. The information here presented uses the metric system and data from 2010 national census. Yiyang has many hilly farmlands in its vicinity. The primary crop around Yiyang is rice, with tea, and bamboo is also grown. Huaguxi, the local Hunanese opera is very popular in Yiyang. Ho Feng Shan is a famous son of Yiyang. Libo Zhou is a well-known writer in China, who was born in Yiyang. Yiyang has very traditionally religious atmosphere. Buddhism and Taoism both played very important roles in Yiyang people's life in history. Of course, the religion once experienced an obvious decline like many other places in China. Recent years, the religion turns back into Yiyang people's
    5.50
    6 votes
    45
    Jiamusi

    Jiamusi

    Jiamusi (Manchu: Giyamusi ᡤᡳᠶᠠᠮᡠᠰᡳ; Chinese: 佳木斯; pinyin: Jiāmùsī; formerly Kiamusze) is a prefecture-level city in the province of Heilongjiang, in the People's Republic of China. Located on the riverside of the middle and lower reaches of the Songhua River, It faces Russia across the Ussuri River and the Heilongjiang River. In 2007 Jiamusi had a GDP of RMB 34.1 billion with a 14.3% growth rate. Its population is 2,552,097 at the 2010 census whom 850,750 live in the built up area made of 4 urban districts. Jiamusi was first named Giyamusi(甲母克寺噶珊,嘉木寺)during the Kangxi period by the Nanai people. The word Giyamusi originally means Inn in Manchu Language. Because of the harsh climate and short growing season, the region of today's Jiamusi City was largely uncultivated . Since the Qing government opened Manchuria for farming in order to oppose the conquest of Russia, Jiamusi developed as a small trading post under the name Dongxingzhen(东兴镇). When Han Chinese and Manchu settlers began to move into the area, Jiamusi became the seat of a county administration, under the name Huachuan in 1910. However,the county seat was moved to Haoli (Hegang), which is about 30 miles to the north, after
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Lhasa

    Lhasa

    Lhasa ( /ˈlɑːsə/; Tibetan: ལྷ་ས་, Wylie: lha sa, ZYPY: Lhasa, [l̥ásə] or [l̥ɜ́ːsə]; simplified Chinese: 拉萨; traditional Chinese: 拉薩; pinyin: Lāsà; sometimes spelled Lasa) is the administrative capital and a prefecture-level city of the Tibet Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China. It is the second most populous city on the Tibetan Plateau, after Xining, and at an altitude of 3,490 metres (11,450 ft), Lhasa is one of the highest cities in the world. The city contains many culturally significant Tibetan Buddhist sites such as the Potala Palace, Jokhang temple and Norbulingka palaces, many of which are located in Chengguan District, the city seat. Lhasa literally means "place of the gods". Ancient Tibetan documents and inscriptions demonstrate that the place was called Rasa, which either meant "goats' place", or, as a contraction of rawe sa, a "place surrounded by a wall," or 'enclosure', suggesting that the site was originally a hunting preserve within the royal residence on Marpori Hill. Lhasa is first recorded as the name, referring to the area's temple of Jowo, in a treaty drawn up between China and Tibet in 822 C.E. By the mid 7th century, Songtsän Gampo became the leader
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Tongling

    Tongling

    Tongling (simplified Chinese: 铜陵; traditional Chinese: 銅陵; pinyin: Tónglíng; Wade–Giles: T'ung-ling; former names: Tunglinghsien, Tungkwanshan; literally "Copper Hillock") is a prefecture-level city in southern Anhui province, People's Republic of China. A river port along the Yangtze River, Tongling borders Chaohu to the north, Wuhu to the east, Chizhou to the southwest and Anqing to the west. The asteroid 12418 Tongling was named after the city. The prefecture-level city of Tongling administers 4 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 1 county. Tongling has been famous as a beautiful mountain city since its origins in the Han dynasty over 1500 years ago. Owing to its copper and tin deposits, it was an important center in the past for bronze production. The scale of industrial activity gradually increased through the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties, the Japanese occupation of 1938-45, and especially under the Communist government since 1949. Today the city's industrial base still revolves around the several nearby copper mines and copper processing operations. The local mineral resources also include : iron, coal, gold, silver,tin, Iron sulfide, plus
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Huludao

    Huludao

    Huludao (Chinese: 葫芦岛; pinyin: Húludǎo) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Liaoning Province, China. It is one of the two principal cities, along with Jinzhou, in the Liaoxi Corridor. Known as Jinxi (锦西) until 1994, Huludao has a total area of 10,415 square kilometers and a population of 2.87 million, of which some 531,000 live in the city proper. Its name literally means "Gourd Island". The area now occupied by Huludao city has been settled by mankind since ancient times. Archeological evidence indicates that during the Shang and Zhou dynasties, the region enjoyed advanced Bronze Age technology, while urban civilization first developed during the Warring States era. The Ming dynasty saw the construction of the Liaoning section of the Great Wall through Huludao, and it was during this time that the town of Xingcheng was fortified with its defensive wall which still stands today. In 1906, the county of Jinxi was established and later became an important center for resistance during the Japanese occupation. During 1945-1948, it was a battleground between the Kuomintang and Chinese Communist forces, and over one million Japanese prisoners of war were repatriated from its
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Nantong

    Nantong

    Nantong (Chinese: 南通; pinyin: Nántōng; former names: Nan-t'ung, Nantung, Tongzhou, or Tungchow; Qihai dialect: [nie tʰoŋ]) is a prefecture-level city in Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. Located on the northern bank of the Yangtze River, near the river mouth, Nantong is a vital river port bordering Yancheng to the north, Taizhou to the west, Suzhou and Shanghai to the south across the river, and the East China Sea to the east. The population is 7,282,835 at the 2010 census whom 1,994,708 live in the built up area made of 3 urban districts. The prefecture-level city of Nantong administers 8 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 3 county-level cities and 2 counties. These are further divided into 146 township-level divisions. Because the coast of the East China Sea is constantly moving eastward as the Yangtze River adds silt to its delta, the distance between Nantong and the seashore is getting farther than the one in ancient times. From the time of the Han dynasty through to the Tang dynasty, what is now called Nantong was a minor county subordinate to Yangzhou. By 958 AD a city of sufficient importance had developed for a new, independent prefecture called
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Chuxiong Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Chuxiong Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Chǔxióng Yi Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 楚雄彝族自治州; pinyin: Chǔxióng Yízú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture located in Yunnan, China. Chuxiong has an area of 29,256 km². The capital of the prefecture is Chuxiong City. There is one county-level city and 9 counties. According to the 2010 Census, Chuxiong Prefecture has 2,684,000 inhabitants, and according to the 2000 Census, Chuxiong Prefecture has 2,542,530 inhabitants with a population density of 86.91 inhabitants/km².
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Longyan

    Longyan

    Longyan (simplified Chinese: 龙岩; traditional Chinese: 龍岩; pinyin: Lóngyán; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Lêng-nâ; Hakka language: Liùng-ngàm) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Fujian province, People's Republic of China, bordering the provinces of Guangdong to the south and Jiangxi to the west. Longyan is situated in the upper reaches of the Jiulong and Ting Rivers. Longyan borders on the municipalities Sanming to the north, Quanzhou to the east, Zhangzhou to the southeast, and the provinces of Jiangxi and Guangdong to the west and south respectively. The city has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa), with short, mild winters, and long, hot and humid summers. The monthly daily average temperature ranges from 11.6 °C (52.9 °F) in January to 27.5 °C (81.5 °F) in July. Rainfall is greatest in spring and early summer and at its least in autumn and early winter. The prefecture-level city of Longyan had a population of 2,559,545 inhabitants as of 2010, according to the 2010 National Census. The population of Longyan in 2010 was 4.65% inferior than in 2000 (when the inhabitants of the city stand at 2,684,310), giving an average annual rate of growth of
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Jining

    Jining

    Jining (simplified Chinese: 济宁; traditional Chinese: 濟寧; pinyin: Jǐníng) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It borders Heze to the southwest, Zaozhuang to the southeast, Tai'an to the northeast, and the provinces of Henan and Jiangsu to the northwest and south respectively. Jining, which is located right to the north of the Lake Nanyang (Chinese: 南阳湖; pinyin: Nányáng Hú), is today the northernmost city reachable by navigation on the Grand Canal of China. The prefecture-level city of Jining administers 12 county-level divisions, including 2 district, 3 county-level cities and 7 counties. Jining is situated in a coal mining area in the southwest of Shandong. Jining is an industrial city. Jining has a coal-fired power station, the Jining Power Plant. The city is served by Jining Airport.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Shaoguan

    Shaoguan

    Sháoguān (Chinese: 韶关), is a prefecture-level city in the north of Southern China's Guangdong province. It is home to the mummified remains of the sixth Zen Buddhist patriarch Huineng. In 1589, Matteo Ricci relocated his mission house - the first ever Jesuit mission in mainland China - to Shaoguan after a fallout with the authorities in Zhaoqing. He remained in Shaoguan for a few years, eventually benefiting from Shaoguan's location on the important north-south travel route to establish connections with traveling dignitaries that allowed him to move north, to Nanchang, Nanjing, and Beijing. During World War II the city, then called Kukong, was the capital of Guangdong Province. In June 2009, Uyghurs and Han workers clashed at a toy factory in Shaoguan, which was followed by the Ürümqi riots in July. Shaoguan has direct jurisdiction over 2 districts, 2 county-level cities and 5 counties: Shaoguan is located on the Jingguang Railway (Beijing–Guangzhou) about 221 kilometres (137 mi) north of the provincial capital of Guangzhou. Shaoguan is also readily accessible by road as it is adjacent to the Jingzhu Expressway running from Beijing to Zhuhai. At Shaoguan, the Wu River from the
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Linyi

    Linyi

    Linyi (simplified Chinese: 临沂; traditional Chinese: 臨沂; pinyin: Línyí) is a prefecture-level city in the south of Shandong province, People's Republic of China. As of 2011, Linyi is the largest prefecture-level city in Shandong, both by area and population, Linyi borders Rizhao to the east, Weifang to the northeast, Zibo to the north, Tai'an to the northwest, Jining to the west, Zaozhuang to the southwest, and the province of Jiangsu to the south. The city Linyi (临沂) literally means "close to the Yi River". The city recently expanded along the Yi River to Nanfang, under slogan "Grand Linyi, New Linyi". Multiple recreational parks were built, along with new school campuses etc. The development is a consequence of a series of governmental projects, including relocate the city government, which is expected to stimulate the economy. The population is 10,039,400 by the 2010 census, of which 1,876,770 live in Lanshan District, Luozhuang District and Hedong District. The prefecture-level city of Linyi administers 12 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 9 counties. The city is further divided into 181 township-level divisions. Linyi has a history of 2400 years. It is home to
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Zhuhai

    Zhuhai

    Zhūhǎi (Chinese: 珠海) is a prefecture-level city on the southern coast of Guangdong province in the People's Republic of China. Located in the Pearl River Delta, Zhuhai borders Jiangmen to the northwest, Zhongshan to the north, and Macau to the south. Zhuhai was one of the original Special Economic Zones established in the 1980s. Zhuhai is also one of China's premier tourist destinations, being called the Chinese Riviera. The prefecture-level city of Zhuhai administers 3 county-level divisions and 3 special economic districts, all of which are districts. Zhuhai borders the Macau Special Administrative Region (north and west), and 140 km southwest of Guangzhou. Its territory counts 146 islands and a coastline of 690 km. The islands within the prefecture-level city of Zhuhai include a number of near-shore islands, often connected to the mainland by bridges or causeways (such as Hengqin, Qi'ao, or Yeli Islands), as well as some islands further away in the Pearl River estuary (such as the Nei Lingding Island) or the open South China Sea (the Wanshan Archipelago). Some of the latter are actually geographically closer to Hong Kong than to the Zhuhai mainland. Zhuhai has a humid
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Enshi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 恩施土家族苗族自治州; pinyin: Ēnshī Tǔjiāzú Miáozú Zìzhìzhōu) is located in the mountainous southwestern corner of Hubei Province, People's Republic of China. It forms Hubei's southwestern "panhandle", bordering on Hunan in the south and Chongqing Municipality in the west and northwest. The Yangtze River crosses the prefecture's northeastern corner in Badong County. There are two county-level cities: There are six counties: The total area is 24,000 square kilometres (9,300 sq mi), and the population is 3,800,000. 52.6% of the population belong to the Tujia and Miao nationalities. Enshi is the only autonomous prefecture in Hubei province. Enshi is also the only part of Hubei which has been included in the Chinese government's Western exploration programme and over the next 5–10 years they will put 50 billion RMB into its development. The prefecture has only a small amount of Yangtze River frontage, but Badong, in the prefecture's northeast, has a Yangtze River port. The Qingjiang River in the central part of the prefecture, with its cascade of reservoirs, is an important waterway as well. Due to the mountainous terrain, until recently the
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Hegang

    Hegang

    Hegang (simplified Chinese: 鹤岗; traditional Chinese: 鶴崗; pinyin: Hègǎng, also known as Haoli and Heligang, is a prefecture-level city in Heilongjiang province of the People's Republic of China. It is a prefecture-level municipality situated in the southeastern section of the Lesser Khingan Range, facing Jiamusi across the Songhua River to the south and Russia across the Heilongjiang River to the north. Hegang is one of the principal coal-producing cities in China. Hegang city covers an area of 14,784 km² and according to the 2010 Census, has a population of 1,058,665 inhabitants. Its urban is home to 489,232 inhabitants spread out over 4 urban districts excluding Dongshan, which is still largely rural. The region of Hegang was a desolate and uninhabited area until late 1890s. In 1906, the area of Hegang City was under the administration of Tangyuan County under the Qing Dynasty. Since then, the government has been encouraging people to farm in the region. In 1914, coalfield was discovered in Haoli, and Heilongjiang Government approved to set up Xinghua Mines(兴华煤矿) which is jointly invested by merchants including Shen Songnian(沈松年). The area was also renamed Xingshan(兴山) after the
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Huainan

    Huainan

    Huainan (Chinese: 淮南; pinyin: Huáinán) is a prefecture-level city with 2,334,000 inhabitants in central Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Hefei to the south, Lu’an to the southwest, Fuyang to the west, Bozhou to the northwest, Bengbu to the northeast and Chuzhou to the east. Its built up area is home to 1,899,740 inhabitants in 2010 spread out on 4 districts (Tianjia'an, Datong, Xiejiaji, Bagongshan and 1 county Fengtai) nowadays in agglomeration. The name traditionally refers to the entire area south of the Huai River and north of the Yangtze River, which includes the present day central Anhui. The historic political centers of the Huainan area were situated in Yangzhou and Shouchun (present day Shou County). The prefecture-level city of Huainan administers six county-level divisions, including five districts and one county. These are further divided into 66 township-level divisions, including 24 towns, 23 townships and 19 subdistricts. The name Huainan first came into existence in 203 BC, when Liu Bang bestowed upon Ying Bu, one of his most trusted generals, the title of the King of Huainan. The capital of the Kingdom of Huainan was
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Shangrao

    Shangrao

    Shangrao (simplified Chinese: 上饶; traditional Chinese: 上饒; pinyin: Shàngráo) is a medium-sized prefecture-level city located in the northeast of China's Jiangxi province. According to the 2010 Census, Shangrao has a population of 6,579,714 inhabitants. Shangrao itself is at the very western edge of the Wu-speaking areas, while most of its associated counties speak Gan. Shangrao administers one district, one county-level city, and ten counties. The information here presented uses data from 2010 national census.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Wuhu

    Wuhu

    Wuhu (simplified Chinese: 芜湖; traditional Chinese: 蕪湖; pinyin: Wúhú; literally "Weedy Lake") is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Anhui province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the southeast bank of the Yangtze River, Wuhu borders Xuancheng to the southeast, Chizhou and Tongling to the southwest, Hefei to the northwest, Ma'anshan to the northeast, and the province of Jiangsu to the east, and is approximately 90 km (56 mi) southwest of Nanjing. The prefecture-level city of Wuhu administers 8 county-level divisions, including 4 districts and 4 counties. By the end of 2011, the total population of 3,842,100 was estimated to be 5,988,000,of whom 1,450,000 live in the 4 urban districts and the others live in the counties. Vast majority of the local population are Han Chinese, though there are some Muslim Hui people as minorities. Jiang-Huai Mandarin, a branch of Mandarin Chinese, was widely spoken in urban area, while some people in the counties spoke Wu Chinese. Putonghua, or Standard Mandarin was commonly used in this area. Wuhu is known to have been inhabited since at least 770 BCE. It became a strategically important town during the Three Kingdoms period (220-280 AD),
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Nanchong

    Nanchong

    Nanchong (Chinese: 南充; pinyin: Nánchōng; Wade–Giles: Nan-ch'ung ) is a prefecture-level city in the northeast of Sichuan Province of the People's Republic of China, with an area of 12,479 kilometers, and the home to 7,300,000 people. It has the second most populated area and suggested to be one of the eight largest cities of Sichuan Province. The administrative center is Shunqing District. Nanchong was in the territory of the state of Ba before it was conquested by the Qin dynasty in 314 BC. The Qin set up a government at Langzhong city. Anhan city was established in Shunqinq district at the beginning of the Han Dynasty. The name of Anhan city was changed to Guozhou (fruit city) in 621 AD (Tang dynasty), and then to Nanchong in 742 AD. Nanchong is located in the north-east of Sichuan Province. To the east of Nanchong is Dazhou, to the west are Mianyang and Suining and to the north is Guangyuan. The vast majority of this area is hilly. The woodland coverage is 25%. The Jialing River, a tributary of the Yangtze River, crosses the prefecture from north to south, and there are another thirty rivers in the prefecture with a drainage basin of more than 30 square kilometres
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Leshan

    Leshan

    Leshan (simplified Chinese: 乐山; traditional Chinese: 樂山; pinyin: Lèshān; Wade–Giles: Le-shan; literally "Happy mountain"; Sichuanese Pinyin: Nosan; local pronunciation: [nʊʔ˧sã˥]) is a prefecture-level city located at the confluence of the Dadu and Min rivers in Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China. Leshan is located on the southwestern fringe of the Red Basin in southern Sichuan, about 120 km from Chengdu. Leshan has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa) and is largely mild and humid. Winter is short, mild and dry, with a January average of 7.1 °C (44.8 °F), and while frost may occur, snow is rare. Summers are long, hot and humid, with highs often exceeding 30 °C (86 °F), yet extended heat waves are rare. The daily average in July and August is around 26 °C (79 °F). Rainfall is light in winter and can be heavy in summer, and more than 70% of the annual total occurs from June to September. There is a passenger rail line that serves the Mianyang–Chengdu–Leshan inter-city area. The Chengdu-Leshan Freeway with a total length of 160 kilometers, was finished on January 14, 2000. This Freeway has since become very important to the city's development. In
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Linfen

    Linfen

    Línfén (simplified Chinese: 临汾; traditional Chinese: 臨汾) is a prefecture-level city in southern Shanxi province, People's Republic of China. It is situated along the banks of the Fen River. It has an area of 20,275 square kilometres (7,828 sq mi) and according to the 2010 Census, a population of 4,316,612 inhabitants. It was known as Pingyang (平阳) during the Spring and Autumn Period. According to a study by Blacksmith Institute based in New York City in 2006, Linfen is the most polluted city in the world. Prior to 1978, Linfen was famous for its spring water, greenery and rich agriculture and therefore nicknamed "The Modern Fruit and Flower Town". Since then it has been developing into a main industrial center for coal mining, which has been seriously crippling the city's environment, air quality, farming, health and not to mention its past status as a green village. According to legend, the site of present-day Linfen was the capital of Yao, a legendary ruler more than 4000 years ago. In the 1980s, Linfen was nicknamed "The Modern Fruit and Flower Town". However, because of the proliferation of coal-burning power plants, the city has become smoggy and dust-covered. Linfen is
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Shiyan

    Shiyan

    Shiyan (Chinese: 十堰; pinyin: Shíyàn) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hubei province, People's Republic of China. The Wudang Mountain range run approximately east-west through the territory of the "Prefecture-level city" of Shiyan, crossing several of its county-level divisions. The peak commonly referred to as "Wudang Mountain", or in Mandarin Wudangshan, is one of the most important cultural centres of the Taoist faith. The surrounding areas are dotted with up to 200 Taoist monastic temples and religious sites. The main attraction in this area, and also one of the most sacred Taoist sites, which forms an important stop for mainly Chinese tourists bound there, with up to twenty bus loads of visitors per day at peak times is Wudangshan Jiedao of the Danjiangkou county-level city. The prefecture-level city of Shiyan administers 8 county-level divisions, including 2 districts, 1 county-level city and 5 counties. The main urban area of the prefecture-level city of Shiyan is in Maojian District; it is typically labeled on maps simply as "Shiyan". This area is subject to major change as part of the South to North water diversion project of the Han River. Certain areas will see
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Shizuishan

    Shizuishan

    Shízuǐshān (simplified Chinese: 石嘴山; traditional Chinese: 石嘴山) is a prefecture-level city and is the second biggest city in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region in Western China after Yinchuan. Shizuishan is in the North of the region, close to Inner Mongolia. Shizuishan is located on the western bank of the Yellow River at latitude 38° 21′~39° 25′ N and longitude 105° 58′~106° 39′ E, spanning 88.8 kilometres (55.2 mi) from east to west and 119.5 kilometres (74.3 mi) from south to north. Shizuishan City in Western China was once described as the best place to make a film about the end of the world. In 2005, the Chinese government blacklisted the city for its pollution problem and told local leaders to shut down the worst polluting industrial plants. Since then the city has attempted to reinvent itself, but pollution is still taking its toll on the people.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Shuangyashan

    Shuangyashan

    Shuangyashan (simplified Chinese: 双鸭山; traditional Chinese: 雙鴨山; pinyin: Shuāngyāshān Manchu: ᡧᡠᠸᠠᠩ ᠶᠠ ᡧᠠᠨ) is a coal mining prefecture-level city located in the eastern part of China's Heilongjiang province, about 100 km south of the Russian border. The city's name means a pair-of-ducks mountains and refers to two peaks northeast of the city. In 2007 it had a GDP of RMB 20,6 billion with a 14,2% growth rate. Shuangyashan was given its name in AD 1384 during the Ming Dynasty. However, few people lived in the area before coal was discovered there in 1914. In 1928 a major coal mining operation was established on the site and in 1946 the area was first designated a county. Shuangyashan was established as a special mining district in 1954 and officially designated a city by the CPC Central Committee and State Council in 1956. Shuangyashan is rich in coal, magnetite and marble. The proven coal reserves in the city total 11 billion tons, ranking first out of 13 prefecture and prefecture-level cities in the province. The magnetite reserves in Shuangyashan exceed 120 million tons, ranking first in Heilongjiang Province. The city has a cold temperate monsoon climate, with long, cold, windy
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Benxi

    Benxi

    Benxi (Chinese: 本溪; pinyin: Běnxī) is a prefecture-level city located in the east of Liaoning province in Northeast China, south-southeast of Shenyang. Its population is 1,709,538 at the 2010 census whom 959,610 in the built up area It was founded as a metallurgical center in 1915. Benxi Iron and Steel Company ("Bengang") is the largest employer in the city, and used to be the 4th largest steel company in China. The second largest industry in Benxi is coal mining. Benxi has pollution problems due to steel production and coal mining. The worst coal mining disaster in the world took place on April 26, 1942 in Benxihu Colliery. A coal-dust explosion killed 1,549 miners working that day. During the disaster of Air France flight AF447, Benxi Iron and Steel Company lost 5 employees, including the executive Chen Chiping who was the wife of Liaoning's provincial governor. Benxi contains 4 districts and 2 autonomous counties for the Manchu nation: Within these there are 25 counties, 40 villages and towns, 229 communities and 289 village committees. Benxi is located at latitude 40° 49’—41° 35’ N and longitude 123° 34’—125° 46’ E, and has a total area of 8,411.31 square kilometres
    5.80
    5 votes
    68
    Yichun, Heilongjiang

    Yichun, Heilongjiang

    Yichun (Chinese: 伊春; pinyin: Yīchūn; Manchu: ᡳ ᠴᡠᠨ) is a prefecture-level city on the Songhua river north of Tieli in Heilongjiang province in northeast China. The city is separated from Russia by the Heilongjiang River and sharing a boundary of 246 kilometers (153 miles) with the country. At the 2010 census, Yichun has a total population of 1,148,126 while 729,202 people live in 15 districts separated by forests. The greening rate of Yichun is up to 83%. The nickname of Yichun is Lindu (Chinese: 林都; pinyin: Líndū) which means Forest Capital in Chinese Language. Yichun was named after the Yichun River (伊春河), which is a small tributary of Tangwang River (汤旺河). The word Yichun means "nine" in Mongolian language. During the Shang Dynasty Yichun was a nomadic area for the Manchus. Before the Tang Dynasty, the region was inhabited by several nomad tribes in the northeastern border area of China including Sushen and Donghu. During the Qing Dynasty, Yichun was under the administration of Qiqihar and Hulan's Deputy Lieutenant-General(Fudutong) before it became a minor town under Tangyuan County's jurisdiction in the 1890's. The region's real development began after the establishment of
    5.80
    5 votes
    69
    Jiujiang

    Jiujiang

    Jiujiang (Chinese: 九江; pinyin: Jiǔjiāng), formerly transliterated Kiukiang, is a prefecture-level city located on the southern shores of the Yangtze River in northwest Jiangxi Province, China. It is the second-largest prefecture-level city in Jiangxi province, the largest one being Nanchang. Jiujiang literally means "nine rivers". Its population is 4,728,763 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 545,616 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Xunyang and Lushan). There are 235 towns and 11 sub-district offices. The city suffered only slight damage in the 2005 Ruichang earthquake, but there were several deaths reported in outlying areas. In ancient times it was told that nine rivers converged near where Jiujiang sprang up to become Jiangxi’s main water port today. During the Xia through the Shang Dynasties Jiujiang was a capital of several states. In the Spring & Autumn Period (770-476 BCE) Jiujiang bordered between the states of Wu (downstream, to the east) and Chu (upstream, to the west). Tao Yuanming (365-429 CE) a famous Chinese philosopher lived at the base of Lushan. He was once appointed magistrate of nearby Pengze County and after 83 days resigned due to the politics
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Lijiang City

    Lijiang City

    Lìjiāng (simplified Chinese: 丽江; traditional Chinese: 麗江) is a prefecture-level city in the northwest of Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. It has an area of 21,219 square kilometres (8,193 sq mi) and a population of 1,244,769 as of 2010 census. Lijiang City replaced former administrative region Lijiang Prefecture. Lijiang Prefecture no longer exists today. It was under the rule of the Mu family (木氏) local commanders (土司) during the Ming Dynasty and Qing Dynasty. The Baisha Old Town was the political, commercial and cultural center for the local Naxi people and other ethnic people for 400 years from the year 658 AD to 1107 AD. The Dabaoji Palace of the Baisha Fresco where is very close to the Baisha Naxi Hand-made Embroidery Institute was built in the year 658AD in the Tang Dynasty (618 AD to 960 AD). In ancient times, the Baisha Old Town used to be the center of silk embroidery in the southwest of China and the most important place of the Ancient Southern Silk Road, also called the Ancient Tea and Horse Road or Ancient tea route. The Ancient Southern Silk Road started from Myanmar, crossed Lijiang, Shangri-La County, Tibet, then journeyed through the Fertile Crescent
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Tangshan

    Tangshan

    "唐山"redirects here. For an alternative name of China, see Names of China#Tang Tángshān (Chinese: 唐山) is a largely industrial prefecture-level city in northeastern Hebei province, People's Republic of China. It has become known for the 1976 Tangshan earthquake which measured 7.8 on the Richter scale and killed at least 255,000 residents. The city has since been rebuilt and has become a tourist attraction. Tangshan's prefecture population was 7,577,284 at the 2010 census, with over 3 million in the 6 core districts. Tangshan is named after Dacheng Mountain (which is also named Mountain Tang[Tangshan in Chinese]) in the middle of Tangshan city. In A.D. 645, Li Shimin-emperor of Tang Dynasty and his army stationed at Dacheng Mountain on his way back from Korean Peninsula. Unfortunately, Caofei-his beloved concubine died here. In order to commemorate his Caofei, he named the mountain with the name of the state—Tang. Later, the name of the mountain became the name of the city. Tangshan is a place with a long history, where there were ancient humans living as early as 4,000 years ago. Tangshan was in the territory of Guzhu Kingdom (1600 B.C.) in the time of the Shang Dynasty; and then
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Xinyang

    Xinyang

    Xinyang (simplified Chinese: 信阳; traditional Chinese: 信陽; pinyin: Xìnyáng; Postal map spelling: Sinyang) is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Henan province, People's Republic of China, the southernmost such administrative division in the province. At the beginning of 2007, the government of Xinyang implemented a new policy designed to reduce corruption and government spending. Any government employee caught drinking on the job would be immediately fired. Within six months of the implementation of the policy, government spending on business meals had been drastically reduced by more than 42 million dollars, enough to build up to 50 elementary schools. However, as government officials of Xinyang released the information in the third quarter of 2007, there was much more public outrage than praise that such a huge amount of public funds had been wasted. As the news was reported elsewhere, people in other areas began to demand that their own local governments do the same. In February, 2008, an independent audit revealed that the majority of the income of local restaurants from 2005 through 2007 had come from government officials spending public funds to eat out under the guise of
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Fuyang

    Fuyang

    Fuyang (simplified Chinese: 阜阳; traditional Chinese: 阜陽; pinyin: Fǔyáng) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Anhui province, People's Republic of China. It borders Bozhou to the northeast, Huainan to the southeast, Lu'an to the south, and the province of Henan on all other sides. The prefecture-level city of Fuyang administers eight county-level divisions, including three districts, one county-level city and four counties.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Heyuan

    Heyuan

    Héyuán (Chinese: 河源) is a prefecture-level city of Guangdong province in the People's Republic of China. Heyuan has a population of about 207,600. The majority of the people are Hakka. The city includes many rainforests and the largest lake in Guangdong: Xinfengjiang Reservoir. The literal meaning of the city's name is "origin of the river". Heyuan is located in the north-east region of Guangdong, upper reach of Dong River at its confluence with the Xingeng River. It is 114°13'- 115°35' longitude east, and 23°10'-24°50' latitude north. It borders on Huizhou to the south, Ganzhou (Jiangxi province) to the north, Meizhou to the east and Shaoguan to the west. Heyuan is a regional hub that connects the coastal areas of Guangdong and the interior countryside. Heyuan is rich in natural resources and fertile land. There are 1,000 square kilometres (390 sq mi) of cultivated land, 13,600 square kilometres (5,300 sq mi) of hilly land, and 640 square kilometres (250 sq mi) of water area. Many mineral deposits such as iron ore, tungsten, tin, fluorite are found in Heyuan. Heyuan has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild to warm winters, and long, hot,
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Liaoyuan

    Liaoyuan

    Liaoyuan (simplified Chinese: 辽源; traditional Chinese: 遼源; pinyin: Liáoyuán) is a prefecture-level city in the west of Jilin province in Northeast China, bounded on the west by Liaoning province. Liaoyuan city lies some 100 km southeast of Changchun, the capital of Jilin province. Covering an area of 5,125 square kilometers, Liaoyuan is the smallest among the prefecture-level cities in Jilin. Liaoyuan has a toal population of 1,176,645, while the built up area has a population of 462,233. Liaoyuan was an imperial hunting ground during the Qing Dynasty, going by the name Shengjing Paddock(盛京围场). In 1902, Qing government established Xian(西安) County in this region, which became today's Xi'an District. However, this name is a duplicate of Xi'an, Shannxi's capital. It was renamed Liaoyuan in 1952, since Eastern Liao River originates in this region. It was the capital of Liaobei province from 1945 to 1949; from 1949 to 1954 it was part of Liaodong province. After 1954, Liaoyuan was put under Siping Prefecture's jurisdiction. Liaoyuan became a prefecture-level in 1983, administerring two districts and two counties. Liaoyuan has a temperate semi-humid monsoon climate. The average annual
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Shaoyang

    Shaoyang

    Shaoyang (simplified Chinese: 邵阳; traditional Chinese: 邵陽; pinyin: Shàoyáng) is a prefecture-level city in Hunan province, People's Republic of China. Shaoyang is in the south west of Hunan, not far from Hengyang city. Shaoyang has a history of 2500 years and remains an important commercial and transportation city in Hunan. It has a city area and 8 suburban counties, with a population of 7.6 million, the largest in Hunan province. One of the major forest areas in Hunan, Shaoyang has a forest coverage of 42.7%. The 23,000,000 acres (93,000 km) Nan Shan Pastures is one of the biggest in Southern China which provide dairy products and meat for Hunanese. Shaoyang is home to Shaoyang University. The school is composed of former Shaoyang Normal College and Shaoyang College. Shaoyang dialect of Lou Shao group of dialects of Xiang is spoken here. Shaoyang is the setting of Justin Hill's novel The Drink and Dream Teahouse, which was banned in China in 2001.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture

    Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture

    Xishuangbanna (or Sibsongbanna, Tai Lü: [tsɯ˧˥tsɯ˧˥tsəu˧ pʰaː˥˩saː˥tai˥˩ sip˥sɔŋ˥ pan˥˩naː˥˩]; Chinese: 西双版纳傣族自治州; pinyin: Xīshuāngbǎnnà Dǎizú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture in Yunnan Province, China. The capital city is Jinghong, the largest settlement in the area and one that straddles the Mekong River, called the Lancang River in Chinese. Sibsongbanna (cognate to the Thai Sipsongpanna (สิบสองพันนา) meaning "twelve thousand rice fields" is a Tai Lü compound consisting of sibsong "twelve", ban "thousand" and na "rice field". Sibsong derives from Chinese 十 (ten) and 雙 (pair). During the Han Dynasty, Xishuangbanna was subordinate to the Yizhou commandery, after which control passed to the Kingdom of Shu. In the 12th century, a Tai Lue kingdom was established in this area. During the Yuan Dynasty, Xishuangbanna was reorganized as the Cheli Commandery (Chinese: 車里宣慰使司; pinyin: Chēlǐ Xuānwèishǐ Sī) and the local leaders are recognized as tusi. Many of the leaders adopted the Chinese family name Dao (刀). The name Xishuangbanna emerged during the Ming Dynasty. The Xishuangbanna Dai people recognized the Qing Dynasty, as with previous Chinese states, as "Muong Haw", which is
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Chifeng

    Chifeng

    Chifeng, also known as Ulanhadhot (pronounced [ʊlaːnxad xɔt], "red cliff"), is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China. It borders Xilin Gol to the north and west, Tongliao to the northeast, Chaoyang prefecture of Liaoning province to the southeast, and Chengde prefecture of Hebei province to the south. The city has a total administrative area of 90,275 square kilometres (34,855 sq mi) and has a population of 4,341,245 inhabitants. As of the 2010 census, 1,094,970 of these residents reside within in the urban core districts of Hongshan, Yuanboshan and Songshan even though a large part of Songshan is still rural. Chifeng has three districts, two counties and seven banners: In 2004, Chifeng had 4,435,737 inhabitants (49.14 per km²). According to archeology studies, human existence in the Chifeng area can be traced back almost ten thousand years, and the cultural history can be traced back nearly eight thousand years. The representative ruins and relics of Hongshan Culture, Grassland Bronze Culture, Qindan Nationality-Liao Culture and Mongolian-Yuan Culture have been discovered in Chifeng. The ruins of an ancient village, named Xinglonggou,
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Dêqên Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Dêqên Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Dêqên Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (simplified Chinese: 迪庆藏族自治州; traditional Chinese: 迪慶藏族自治州; pinyin: Díqìng Zàngzú Zìzhìzhōu; Tibetan: བདེ་ཆེན་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་, Wylie: Bde-chen Bod-rigs rang-skyong khul) is an autonomous prefecture in Yunnan, China. It has an area of 23,870 km² and its capital is located in Shangri-La County. Diqing is divided into three counties, among which one is an autonomous county. Located in Gezanba, Dêqên Shangri-La Airport is one of the biggest airports in the northwest of the Yunnan Province. There are flights to Lhasa, Chengdu, Beijing(via Kunming), Shanghai Pudong, Shenzhen (via Guiyang), Guangzhou, Kunming and Xishuangbanna. Highways are main means of transportation to reach Diqing Prefecture. Diqing connects Yunnan, Sichuan and Tibet, with a network of highway lines is formed with Yunnan-Tibet highway, Sichuan-Tibet highway and Kangding-Tibet being main roads. There are also direct bus routes to Kunming, Lijiang, Panzhihua (Sichuan) and neighboring Deqin County. Ethnic groups in Diqing, 2000 census
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Hangzhou

    Hangzhou

    Hangzhou (Chinese: 杭州; Hangzhou dialect: ɦaŋ tsei; Mandarin pinyin: Hángzhōu Mandarin pronunciation: [xɑ̌ŋtʂóʊ] ( listen)), formerly transliterated as Hangchow, is the capital and largest city of Zhejiang Province in Eastern China. It is governed as a sub-provincial city. As of 2010, the entire administrative division ("shì", 杭州市) or prefecture had a registered population of 8.7 million people. The built up area of the Hangzhou municipality had a resident population of 6.242 million in 2010 (urban and suburban districts), of which 3.56 million lived in the six urban core districts. A core city of the Yangtze River Delta, Hangzhou has a position on the Hangzhou Bay 180 kilometres (110 mi) southwest of Shanghai that gives it economic power. It has been one of the most renowned and prosperous cities of China for much of the last 1,000 years, due in part to its beautiful natural scenery. The city's West Lake is its best-known attraction. The celebrated Neolithic culture of Hemudu inhabited Yuyao, an area (now a city) 100 kilometers south-east of Hangzhou, as far back as seven thousand years ago when rice was first cultivated in southeastern China. The area immediately surrounding the
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Hengyang

    Hengyang

    Hengyang (simplified Chinese: 衡阳; traditional Chinese: 衡陽; pinyin: Héngyáng) is the second largest city of China's Hunan Province. It straddles the Xiang River about 160 km south of Changsha. Its former name was Hengzhou (衡州, p Héngzhōu). This was the capital of a prefecture in the Tang Dynasty's Jiangnan and West Jiangnan circuits. Li Jingxuan was banished to superintendence of Hengzhou after feigning an illness and attempting to usurp control of the legislative bureau at Chang'an against the Gaozong Emperor's wishes in AD 680. Following the AD 705 coup that removed the Empress Wu Zetian from power, her ally Li Jiongxiu was also briefly demoted to superintendence of this province. During the reign of Emperor Muzong, the chancellor Linghu Chu was also demoted to this province for his underlings' alleged corruption. In the 750s, the superintendent of Hengzhou Chen Xi'ang not only ruled his own region but also used his private army to dominate his nominal superior, the military governor Zhang Weiyi headquartered in Jing Prefecture (modern Jingzhou). Upon Zhang's replacement by the former chancellor Lü Yin in 760, however, Chen was placated and then killed in a surprise attack. During
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Lu'an

    Lu'an

    Lu'an (Chinese: 六安; pinyin: Liù ān), is a prefecture-level city in western Anhui Province, People's Republic of China, with a population of 5,612,590 inhabitants at 2010 census. Its built up area is home to 1,482,729 inhabitants spread out on 2 urban districts. It borders the provincial capital city Hefei to the east, Huainan to the northeast, Fuyang to the north, Chaohu City to the southeast, Anqing to the south, and the province of Henan to the west. Although the character "六" (literally: "six") is normally pronounced "Liù", in this case it changes to "Lù" on account of the local dialect. Not to be confused with Luan County, is a county of Hebei, China. The prefecture-level city of Lu'an administers seven county-level divisions, including two districts and five counties. These are further divided into 196 township-level divisions.
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Nanning

    Nanning

    Nánníng (simplified Chinese: 南宁; traditional Chinese: 南寧, Zhuang: Namzningz, meaning 'South Tranquility') is the capital of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in southern China. It is known as the "Green City" because of its abundance of lush tropical foliage. A county seat called Jinxing was first established at the site in AD 318. This became the administrative seat of a commandery. Nanning was once the territory of the Baiyue people and became the capital of Jinxing Prefecture which was separated from Yulin Prefecture of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. In 589 the Jinxing commandery was dissolved, and the county was renamed Xuanhua. Under the Tang dynasty (618–907) the prefecture of Yong (邕州Yongzhou) was established there; it was garrisoned to control the non-Chinese districts in Guangxi and on the Yunnan–Guizhou provincial border. In the mid-9th century the Tang and the Yunnan state of Nanzhao fought over it, and after 861 it was briefly occupied by Nanzhao. It remained a frontier prefecture throughout the Song dynasty (960–1279), being the scene of a rebellion led by Nong Zhigao in 1052 and thereafter a garrison town. In the Yuan Dynasty in 1324, it was renamed Nanning Lu (an
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Puyang

    Puyang

    Puyang is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Henan province, People's Republic of China. Located on the northern shore of the Yellow River, it borders Anyang in the west, Xinxiang in the southwest, and the provinces of Shandong and Hebei in the east and north respectively. The prefecture-level city of Puyang administers 1 district and 5 counties. Affected by the south-east Asian monsoon circulation around the year and located in the mid-latitude region, the city is categorized as the warm temperate continental monsoon climate which features clearly demarcated seasons. In spring, it is usually dry, windy and sandy. High temperatures and heavy rainfall mark the whole summer. In autumn there are plenty of sunny days as well as long periods of sunshine. In winter, it is characterized by less snow and rainfall. The adequate sunshine meets the needs for crops growing. The annual average temperature stands at 13.3°C, the highest of which reaches 43.1°C, the lowest -21℃. The non-frost period lasts 205 days. The annual precipitation is around 502.3mm~601.3mm. Puyang, a city exuberant with personality and glamour, is like a gem shining bright in the Central Plains. Burial site of
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Simao

    Simao

    Pǔ'ěr (Chinese: 普洱) is a prefecture-level city in southern Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. The name Pu'er dates back to 1729, but was changed to Simao (Chinese: 思茅; pinyin: Sīmaó) in 1950 after the Communist Revolution. In 2007, the original name of Pu'er was restored. By doing so, it has had an effect the size of the official Pu'er tea (普洱茶), a major regional product, production area. The urban administrative center of Pu'er is Simao District, which is also the former name of the city itself. A major downturn in the price of tea in 2007 caused severe economic distress in the area. The price of Pu'er has since recovered and Pu'er tea still contributes much to the income of the area. Pu'er is located in southern/southwestern Yunnan, on the lower reaches of the Mekong (known in China as the Lancang), with the bordering prefectures being Yuxi to the northeast, Honghe to the east, Xishuangbanna to the south, Lincang to the northwest, and Dali and Chuxiong. It also shares borders with Vietnam (Dien Bien province), Laos (Phongsali Province), and Burma (Shan State), being the only prefecture in Yunnan to border all three countries. As with much of the province, mountainous
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Fuxin

    Fuxin

    Fuxin (Chinese: 阜新; pinyin: Fùxīn) is a prefecture-level city in the Liaoning province of northeastern China. The total population of the prefecture at the 2010 census is 1,819,339, of whom 669,317 are resident in the built up area, which comprises four urban districts, collectively known as 'Fuxin City'. Fuxin has direct administration over 7 county-level divisions: 5 districts, 1 county and 1 autonomous county: Fuxin is located west-northwest of Shenyang, the provincial capital of Liaoning Province. It has a monsoon-influenced humid continental climate (Köppen Dwa), with long, cold but dry winters and hot, humid summers. Close to half of the annual precipitation falls in July and August. Fuxin is a mining center in an agricultural region, producing mostly coal and agate. Fuxin is known as China's 'Agate City', with 50% of the nation's known deposits of the mineral being located there. The city also accounts for more than 90% of the country's agate products. The city suffers from the over-mining of coal, which is low in supply while fundamental to Fuxin's economy. As the coal mines run dry, Fuxin is trying to find other industries to keep its economy going. Measures taken have
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Weifang

    Weifang

    Weifang (simplified Chinese: 潍坊; traditional Chinese: 濰坊; pinyin: Wéifāng) is a prefecture-level city in central Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It borders Dongying to the northwest, Zibo to the west, Linyi to the southwest, Rizhao to the south, Qingdao to the east, and looks out to the Laizhou Bay to the north. Weifang is a historical city with well known figures. Emperor Shun of the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors period, the politician Yan Ying of the Spring and Autumn Period, the Confucian scholar Zheng Xuan of the Eastern Han Dynasty and the agriculturist Jia Simiao of the Northern Wei Dynasty were all from Weifang. Kong Rong, Fan Zhongyan, Ouyang Xiu, Su Dongpo, Zheng Banqiao, et al. have worked in Weifang historically. In more recent years, revolutionists, writers and artists, such as Wang Jinmei, Chen Shaomin, Wang Yuanjian, Wang Tongzhao, Zang Kejia are well known in China. Weifang also has numerous historical relics and other tourist sites, such as Shihu Garden (from the Late Ming and early Qing Dynasty), Fangong Pavilion (from the Song Dynasty), fossil sites (including dinosaur fossils, in Shanwang, Linqu), Mount Yi National Forest Park, Mount Qingyun
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Xiangxi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Xiangxi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Xiangxi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 湘西土家族苗族自治州; pinyin: Xiāngxī Tǔjiāzú Miáozú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture of the People's Republic of China. It is located in western Hunan province. Zhangjiajie and Sangzhi used to be parts of this autonomous prefecture. It consists of 1 city, Jishou, and 7 counties:Baojing, Fenghuang, Guzhang, Huayuan, Longshan, Luxi, Yongshun. The capital is Jishou. Twenty-five nationalities gather here, of the total 2,480,000 population, 66.6 per cent are ethnic, including 860,000 Tujia and 790,000 Miao.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Chaoyang District

    Chaoyang District

    Chaoyang District (simplified Chinese: 朝阳区; traditional Chinese: 朝陽區; pinyin: Cháoyáng Qū; lit. "facing the sun") is a district of Beijing, China. Chaoyang is home to the majority of Beijing's many foreign embassies, the well-known Sanlitun bar street, as well as Beijing's growing CBD. The Olympic Green, built for the 2008 Summer Olympics, is also in Chaoyang. Chaoyang extends west to Chaoyangmen on the eastern 2nd Ring Road, and nearly as far east as the Ximazhuang toll station on the Jingtong Expressway. Within the urban area of Beijing, it occupies 475 square kilometers, making it the largest district, with Haidian second. As of 2005, Chaoyang had a total population of 3,642,000, making it the second most populous in Beijing. The district has jurisdiction over 22 subdistrict offices and 20 area offices. Chaoyang is also home to Silk Street, and many other market areas, shopping malls, and restaurant strips. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Culture are headquartered in the district. China National Aviation Holdings Company (parent company of Air China), SOHO China, CITIC Group, Sinopec, and Beijing Capital Airlines have their headquarters in Chaoyang District.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Meishan

    Meishan

    Meishan (Chinese: 眉山; Sichuanese Pinyin: Misan; local pronunciation: [mi˨˩sã˥]; pinyin: Méishān; Wade–Giles: Mei-shan), formerly known as Meizhou (眉州) or Qingzhou (青州), is a prefecture-level city with more than 100,000 inhabitants in Sichuan province of the People's Republic of China. Meishan is in the southwest of Sichuan Basin. It belonged to Leshan City before 1997. Then Meishan Prefecture was founded in 1997 upon approval of state council. It became Meishan City in 2000. Meishan is the seat of Meishan prefecture. Liu Hanyuan, one of the ten richest private persons in the People's Republic of China is a native of Meishan. It has 1 county-level district and 5 counties. Su Shi, Song Dynasty writer and poet (1037-1101), was a native of Meishan, and a historic temple commemorating him and his father and brother, also notable writers (the "three Su") is located in the city.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Shangluo

    Shangluo

    Shangluo (Chinese: 商洛; pinyin: Shāngluò) is a prefecture-level city in Shaanxi province of the People's Republic of China. Shangluo is close to Shangshan mountain. The name, Shangluo, comes from Hai dynasty when four famous people were settled in Shangshan mountain to avoid war and famine.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Shenyang

    Shenyang

    Shenyang (Chinese: 沈阳; pinyin: Shěnyáng; Mandarin pronunciation: [ʂən˧˩jɑŋ˧˥]), or Mukden ( in Manchu), is the capital and largest city of Liaoning Province in Northeast China. Currently holding sub-provincial administrative status, the city was once known as Shengjing (盛京) or Fengtian Fu (奉天府). Shenyang was first used by the Manchu people as their capital in the 17th century and is today the biggest city in the Northeast. Along with its nearby cities, Shenyang is an important industrial centre in China, and serves as the transportation and commercial hub of China's northeast–particularly with Japan, Russia, and Korea. A titan of heavy industry since the 1930s, the city has been diversifying its industry and now has a solid industrial foundation, a good land and air transport network, abundant natural resources, and a skilled workforce. Investment subsidies are granted to multinational corporations (MNCs) that set up offices or headquarters in Shenyang. The sub-provincial city region includes the metropolitan area of Shenyang proper, Xinmin county-level city, and three counties. Greater Shenyang was recently named as one of the 13 emerging megacities or megalopolises in China in a
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Suizhou

    Suizhou

    Suizhou (simplified Chinese: 随州; traditional Chinese: 隨州; pinyin: Suízhōu), formerly Sui County (simplified Chinese: 随县; traditional Chinese: 隨縣; pinyin: Suí Xiàn), is a prefecture-level city in northern Hubei province, People's Republic of China, bordering Henan province to the north and east. The prefecture-level city of Suizhou administers 2 county-level divisions, including 1 district and 1 county-level city. These are further divided into 54 township-level divisions, including 36 towns, 11 townships and 7 subdistricts. Suizhou has a long history. During the Spring and Autumn Period and Warring States Period (771–221 BCE), it was the territory of the State of Sui/Zeng and within the cultural sphere of the State of Chu. As a prefecture-level city Suizhou has a short history with its current status only granted by the State Council in June, 2000. Suizhou is served by the Hankou–Danjiangkou Railway.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Wuhai

    Wuhai

    Wūhǎi is a prefecture-level city and regional center in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. It is located on the Huang He between the Gobi and Ordos deserts. Wuhai became a single city occupying both banks of the Huang He river with the amalgamation on 1976 of left-bank (west) Uda (then administrated by Bayan Nuur League) together with Haibowan on the right (east) bank (then administrated by Ikh Juu league). Wuhai is one of very few cities with an antipode which is not only on land (as opposed to open ocean), but which is another inhabited city; the antipode of Wuhai is almost exactly on the city of Valdivia, Chile. Wuhai has an area of 1,754 km² and, as of 2000, 427,553 inhabitants (243.76 inhabitants/km²). Wuhai city is divided into three districts: The city's economy is heavily based on coal mining, electric power generation, metal-working and chemical industries, but also on fruit (grapes, winemaking) and dairy farming. Wuhai is a stop on the Baotou-Lanzhou rail line, and an airport was opened in 2003. Rock art in six places at the foot of the Zhuozi Shan (Mount Zhuozhi) has been dated back to the Xia, Shang, and Zhou Dynasties, the Warring
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Zigong

    Zigong

    Zigong (simplified Chinese: 自贡; traditional Chinese: 自貢; pinyin: Zìgòng; Wade–Giles: Tzu-kung), ancient name Ziliujing and Gongjing, is a prefecture-level city and the third largest city in Sichuan Province, in southwest China. Zigong is located in the Sichuan Basin, and has an area extension of 4,372.6 km². Granted the recognition as one of the Historical and Cultural Cities of China by the State Council of the People's Republic of China. Zigong has long been renowned as "Salt City" for its brine extraction techniques and the attendant salt-related culture. In ancient China, Salt was regarded as the energy for body and valued higher even than Gold. Therefore, salt trading was always the most profitable business and salt merchants were the wealthiest people. Hence, Zigong had always been one of the richest cities in China until the founding of People's Republic of China with the introduction of new salt producing methods and advancing of technologies. It has had the Zigong Salt Museum since 1736. The Fuxi River, a tributary to the Yangtze River, snakes through the city's core. The area is very humid and the visibility can be reduced dramatically in the area due to ground fog. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Jinhua

    Jinhua

    Jinhua (simplified Chinese: 金华; traditional Chinese: 金華; pinyin: Jīnhuá; Wade–Giles: Chin-hua; lit. "Golden brilliance") is a prefecture-level city in central Zhejiang province of Eastern China. It borders the provincial capital of Hangzhou to the northwest, Quzhou to the southwest, Lishui to the south, Taizhou to the east, and Shaoxing to the northeast. Its population was 5,361,600 at the 2010 census including 1,092,852 in the built up area. One can notice that the cities of Dongyang and Yiwu are now in the same agglomeration, a built up area of 1,757,157 inhabitants bigger than the one of Jinhua itself. Jinhua is rich in red soil and forest resources. The longest river Jinhua River (or Wujiang River) flows through Lanjiang River, Fuchunjiang River and Qiangtang River, and reaches the Grand Canal and other coastal ports. The city is best known in China for its dry-cured Jinhua ham and Subing. The history of Jinhua goes back to the 2nd century BC, when it was a county subordinate to Shaoxing. It was given the name Jinhua under the Sui dynasty in 598, and later became the seat of a prefecture. The present city and its walls date to the time of the Mongol emperors in 1352. The most
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Yingtan

    Yingtan

    Yingtan (simplified Chinese: 鹰潭; traditional Chinese: 鷹潭; pinyin: Yīngtán; literally "Eagle Pond") is a prefecture-level city in the east part of China's Jiangxi province. It borders Fujian province to the east. Its location next to Fujian and its proximity to Zhejiang, have made it a strategically important city for centuries. Today, it continues to be a major rail transport hub. Near the city of Yingtan is the resort area Longhushan (龙虎山; Lónghǔ Shān) which purports to be the birthplace of Taoism (道教) and hence has great symbolic value to Taoists. The region has many interesting temples, cave complexes, mountains and villages. The municipal executive, legislature and judiciary are in Yuehu District (月湖区), together with the CPC and Public Security bureaux. Yingtan also oversees a county and a county-level city :
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    Zhangjiajie

    Zhangjiajie

    Zhangjiajie (simplified Chinese: 张家界; traditional Chinese: 張家界; pinyin: Zhāngjiājiè) is a prefecture-level city in the northwestern part of Hunan province in China. It comprises the district of Yongding (永定) and counties of Cili (慈利) and Sangzhi (桑植). Within it is located Wulingyuan Scenic Area which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992 as well as an AAAAA scenic area by the China National Tourism Administration. The city itself used to be named Dayong (大庸), and has a recorded history dating back to 221 BC. Human beings lived here along both banks of the Lishui river (the mother river in zhangjiajie), now within the boundaries of Zhanagjiajie City, very early during the Stone Age. The history of civilization in this region dates back to 100,000 years ago, rivaling such famous sites as Xi’an, Beijing and others. In 1986, the Academy of Chinese Social Science discovered relics of the Old Stone Age in Cili County, unearthing 108 articles of stoneware; these mainly included: tapered-form, hacked-tamped and plate-shaped wares. According to the archaeological experts’ textual research, all of these wares were produced about 100,000 years ago. What’s more, shortly
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Dandong

    Dandong

    Dandong (simplified Chinese: 丹东; traditional Chinese: 丹東; pinyin: Dāndōng), previously known as Andong and Antung, is a city in Liaoning Province, Northeast China. It lies on the border between China and North Korea, which is marked by the Yalu River, and is the largest border city in China. Also, to the southwest of the city, the river flows into Korea Bay. The city has therefore had a dynamic history because of its strategic location for the northeast's rich natural resources and because of its convenient access to the ocean. Dandong is designated a major export production center in Liaoning province. Dandong is a port city connected by rail with Shenyang and Sinuiju in North Korea. The Hushan (Tiger Mountain) Great Wall, the far Eastern end of the Great Wall of China, is located here. The size of the administrative city (prefecture) is 14,981.4 square kilometres (5,784.4 sq mi); as of 2005, the urban area is 563 square kilometres (217 sq mi) in size and has 780,414 inhabitants. The administrative city covers around 2.4 million inhabitants as of 2009. Maps and artifacts suggest that the area has been settled since the Zhou Dynasty. The area became known as Andong County (安東縣) in
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Dongguan

    Dongguan

    Dōngguǎn (Chinese: 东莞), is a prefecture-level city in central Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. An important industrial city located in the Pearl River Delta, Dongguan borders the provincial capital of Guangzhou to the north, Huizhou to the northeast, Shenzhen to the south, and the Pearl River to the west. It is also home to the world's largest, though mostly empty, shopping mall, New South China Mall. City administration is considered especially progressive in seeking foreign direct investment. The three neighboring municipalities of Guangzhou, Dongguan, and Shenzhen are home to over 25 million residents, accounting for a large proportion of the Pearl River Delta Region's population. Dongguan ranks behind only Shenzhen, Shanghai and Suzhou in exports among Chinese cities, with $65.54bn in shipment. Dongguan has no intermediate county level; instead it is divided into: The urban center of Dongguan is 50 km away from that of Guangzhou to its north, 90 km away from Shenzhen to its south, 47 nautical miles (87 km) away from Hong Kong and 48 nautical miles (89 km) from Macau by waterway. Dongguan is a must-pass-by locality from Guangzhou to Hong Kong by road or waterway.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Hengshui

    Hengshui

    Héngshǔi (Chinese: 衡水) is a prefecture-level city in Hebei province, China. It has an urban population of 460,240 in the built up area and a population of 4,340,373 at the 2010 census in its administrative area. It is on the Jingjiu Railway. Hengshui comprises Hengshui High School is located in Hengshui. Hengshui is also the home of Hengshui University. The Harrison International Peace Hospital is located in Hengshui. This comprehensive teaching and research hospital was named after Dr. Tillson Harrison, a martyr to the Chinese revolution. Dr. Harrison, a Canadian, died in 1947 while transporting medical equipment and supplies. Some of this equipment is on display in an exhibition room in the hospital. The hospital uses both traditional Chinese medicine and modern western diagnostic and therapeutic technology. The city is renowned as the centre for inside painting, mainly of small snuff bottles. Zhang Rucai was born in Hebei Province and since 1972, he started to learn the art of inside painting. In April 1996, he was conferred the title Master of Chinese Folk Arts & Crafts by UNESCO. The city has a fascinating museum and exhibition of the art of the inside painter - many complex
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Liangshan (Chinese: 凉山彝族自治州; pinyin: Liángshān Yízú Zìzhìzhōu; Yi: ꆃꎭ Niep Sha, pronounced [nɛ̀ʂā]), officially the Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture, is an autonomous prefecture in Sichuan, south central China whose capital is Xichang. Liangshan has an area of 60,423 km² and over 4.5 million inhabitants (2010). It is also has the largest population of ethnic Yi people in China. Yi people came into Chinese and western history books as 罗罗 (Lolo) and 夷 in the beginning. After the Chinese Communist Party came into power in mainland China, the government changed the name from 罗罗 to 彝 since the old name was widely regarded as derogatory. The appellations of Lolo, Lolopu, etc. are related to the Yi people’s worship of the tiger, as “lo” in their dialects means "tiger". "Lo" is also the basis for the Chinese exonym Luóluó 猓猓, 倮倮, or 罗罗. The original character 猓, with the "dog radical" 犭and a guǒ 果 phonetic, was considered condescending, comparable to the Chinese name guǒran 猓然 "a long-tailed ape". Languages reforms in the People’s Republic of China replaced the 猓 character in Luóluó twice: first by Luó 倮, with the "human radical" 亻and the same phonetic, but that was a graphic variant for
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Qiqihar

    Qiqihar

    Qiqihar (simplified Chinese: 齐齐哈尔; traditional Chinese: 齊齊哈爾; pinyin: Qíqíhāěr; Manchu: Cicigar ᠴᡳᠴᡳᡤᠠᡵ; formerly Tsitsihar) is a major city in the Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China. The municipal area has 1,514,188 inhabitants, while the total population of the prefecture-level city is 5,367,003 at the 2010 census. These are mainly Han Chinese, though the city is also home to thirty-four minorities including Manchu, Daur, and Mongolians. Close to Qiqihar are numerous wetlands and the Zhalong Nature Reserve, famous in China for being home to numerous red-crowned cranes. Qiqihar is one of the oldest cities in the northeast of China. The region was originally settled by nomadic Daur and Tungus herdsmen. Qiqihar is a Daur word, which means border or natural pasture. The city's original name was Bukui (卜奎), the Chinese transcription of a Daur word meaning "auspicious". The city's oldest mosque, the Bukui Mosque, actually predates the foundation of the city itself by seven years. As the Czarist Russian eastward advance to the Pacific coast, Qiqihar became a major garrison center in 1674. In 1691, a stronghold was constructed in Qiqihar because of the Qing government's
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Suining

    Suining

    Suining (simplified Chinese: 遂宁; traditional Chinese: 遂寧; Sichuanese Pinyin: Xunin; Sichuanese pronunciation: [ɕy˨˦nin˨˩]; pinyin: Sùiníng; Wade–Giles: Sui-ning) is a prefecture-level city of eastern Sichuan province in Southwest China. Suining had 3,477,013 residents in 2000. Most of the area is overwhelmingly rural in character. In several counties there are petroleum, gas and salt resources. Suining is located in the centre of the Sichuan Basin and on the central reaches of the Fu River, bordering Chongqing, Guang'an and Nanchong to the east, Neijiang and Ziyang to the south, the provincial capital of Chengdu to the west, and Deyang and Mianyang to the north. Its prefectural, or administrative, area ranges in latitude from 30° 10' 50" to 31° 10' 50" N, or 108.9 kilometres (67.7 mi) and in longitude from 105° 03' 26" to 106° 59' 49" E, or 90.3 kilometres (56.1 mi). While much of the prefecture is mountainous, the urban area itself, which occupies 40 square kilometres (15 sq mi), is located on flat land. Suining has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa) and is largely mild and humid, with four distinct seasons. Winter is short, mild, and foggy, though actual
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Heze

    Heze

    Heze (simplified Chinese: 菏泽; traditional Chinese: 菏澤; pinyin: Hézé) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. The westernmost prefecture-level city in Shandong, it borders Jining to the east and the provinces of Henan and Anhui to the west and south respectively. The old name of Heze was Caozhou (曹州; Cáozhōu) and now a part of the city bears this name. The first character in the city's name is sometimes incorrectly written as "荷" instead. In August 1949 Heze was detached from Shandong and given to the experimental province of Pingyuan. It returned to Shandong just over three years later. In April 1953 Heze and Jining shared out the counties of Huxi, which is no more. Heze has a monsoon-influenced climate that lies between the humid subtropical and humid continental zones (Köppen Cwa/Dwa), with four well-defined seasons. Conditions are warm and nearly rainless in spring, hot and humid in summer, crisp in autumn and cold and dry in winter. The mean annual temperature is 13.7 °C (56.7 °F), with monthly 24-hour averages ranging from −0.9 °C (30.4 °F) in January to 26.8 °C (80.2 °F) in July. Rainfall mainly occurs in summer; snow
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Xinxiang

    Xinxiang

    Xinxiang (simplified Chinese: 新乡; traditional Chinese: 新鄉; pinyin: Xīnxiāng; Postal map spelling: Sinsiang) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to its southwest, Kaifeng to its southeast, Hebi and Anyang to its north, Jiaozuo to its west, and the provinces of Shanxi and Shandong to its northwest and east respectively. Its population is 5,707,801 at the 2010 census whom 779,775 in the built up area made of 3 urban districts (Weibin, Hongqi and Muye). As the city is expanding very quickly, in a few years, Huixian and Weihui cities as well as Fengquan district and Xinxiang county will be added to the built up area. The prefecture-level city administers 4 districts, 2 county-level cities and 6 counties. Xinxiang was site of the Battle of Muye where the Shang Dynasty was overthrown by the Zhou. Xinxiang dates from the Sui dynasty (581-618) and was a small market center before being developed as an industrial center in the 1950s. It also served as the capital of the short-lived Pingyuan province (平原省),which covers neighbouring cities Anyang,Hebi,Puyang,Jiaozhuo and Heze, between 1949 and 1952,
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Yan'an

    Yan'an

    Yan'an (Chinese: 延安; pinyin: Yán'ān; Wade–Giles: Yen-an), is a prefecture-level city in the Shanbei region of Shaanxi province, People's Republic of China, administering several counties, including Zhidan County (formerly Bao'an), which served as the headquarters of the Chinese Communists before the city of Yan'an proper took that role. Yan'an was near the endpoint of the Long March, and became the center of the Chinese Communist revolution from 1936 to 1948. Chinese communists celebrate Yan'an as the birthplace of the revolution. In medieval China, Yan'an was once called Yanzhou, a location of strategic military importance for the Chinese empire and Tanguts of the Western Xia Dynasty. It was once successfully defended by the Song Dynasty (960–1279) era Chinese scientist, statesman, and general Shen Kuo (1031–1095 AD). However, it was eventually taken over by the Tanguts in 1082 once Shen's defensive victories were marginalized and sacrificed by the new Chancellor Cai Que (who handed the city over to the Tanguts as terms of a peace treaty). Yan'an and the whole of Shaanxi were taken over by the Mongols in the late 1220s, only after their leader Genghis Khan had died during the
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Beihai

    Beihai

    Běihǎi (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Pakhoi; Chinese: 北海) is a prefecture-level city in the south of Guangxi, People's Republic of China. The name of the city means "north of the sea" in Chinese, signifying its status as a seaport on the north shore of the Gulf of Tonkin, which has granted it historical importance as a port of international trade for Guangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Sichuan, Guizhou, and Yunnan. Between the years 2006 and 2020, Beihai is predicted to be the world's fastest growing city. Beihai has a large shipyard, but most of the money generated in the city is derived from trade. The dialect spoken throughout Beihai is "Baihua", a Cantonese dialect; Mandarin is not often used or spoken by the population, though it is the official language used in government, business and post-elementary-level education throughout mainland China. It governs the small islands of Weizhou and Xieyang, and is directly north of Hainan Island. Beihai contains three districts and one county, which are subdivided into five urban sub-districts, 23 towns, 3 townships, 87 neighborhood committees, 343 village committees. (see also Administrative divisions of the People's Republic of
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Meizhou

    Meizhou

    Méizhōu (Chinese: 梅州) is a prefecture-level city of eastern Guangdong province in the south of the People's Republic of China. It has an area of 15,836 km (6,114 sq mi), and a population of 5.05 million. Meizhou is honored with the Hometown of Culture, Hometown of the Overseas Hakka Chinese and Hometown of Football. The name Meizhou comes from the Mei River and plum blossom (mei). Meizhou was established as a prefecture named Jingzhou in the Southern Han (917-971). It was changed into Meizhou in the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127) and Jiaying Prefecture (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Kaying) in the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911). After several subsequent shifts of jurisdiction, it became Meizhou City in 1988. Now Meizhou is a famous historical and cultural city. Meizhou is located in the northeast of Guangdong Province, bordering Fujian Province in the northeast and Jiangxi Province in the northwest. The complex geological structure was formed mainly from granite, spouting rocks, metamorphic rock, shale, sandstone, red rock and limestone. Its administrative area ranges in latitude from 23° 23' to 24° 56' N and in longitude from 115° 18' to 116° 56' E, covering an area of 15,836 km
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Wuxi

    Wuxi

    Wuxi (simplified Chinese: 无锡; traditional Chinese: 無錫; pinyin: Wúxī; former spellings: Wu-shi, Wushi, or Wu-hsi; lit. "Without Tin"; Shanghai dialect: [ɦuɕiɪʔ]) is an old city in Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. Split in half by Lake Tai, Wuxi borders Changzhou to the west and Suzhou to the east. The northern half looks across to Taizhou across the Yangtze River, while the southern half also borders the province of Zhejiang to the south. Wuxi earned its nickname "Pearl of Lake Tai" because it's built on the shore of Lake Tai in a scenic setting. Wuxi was also dubbed "little Shanghai" because of its close proximity to the city, rapid urbanization and booming economy. Wuxi also has a history of business people involved in modern Shanghai commerce since the early 20th century. Although Wuxi means "No tin", scholars suggest the city name may come from "Wuxu" (吳墟), meaning ruins of the State of Wu, or a Baiyue word which may mean "god bird". Wuxi was founded 3,000 years ago by two fugitive princes, Taibo and Zhongyong, of the Zhou from Central China, who intended to give their brother Jili (季歷) the throne. The two princes settled down in Meili (梅里), which is believed to be
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Xiamen

    Xiamen

    Xiamen (Mandarin pronunciation: [ɕjâmə̌n]), also known as Amoy /əˈmɔɪ/, is a major city on the southeast (Taiwan Strait) coast of the People's Republic of China. It is administered as a sub-provincial city of Fujian province with an area of 1699.39 km and population of 3.61 million. Its built up area is now bigger than the old urban island area and covers now all six districts of Xiamen (Huli, Siming, Jimei, Tong'an, Haicang and recently Xiang'an), for a total of 3,531,147 inhabitants. It borders Quanzhou to the north and Zhangzhou making with this city a unique built up area of more than 5 million people. The Jinmen (Kinmen) Islands administered by the Republic of China (Taiwan) are less than 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) away. Xiamen and the surrounding southern Fujian countryside are the ancestral home to large communities of overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia and Taiwan. The city was a treaty port in the 19th century and one of the four original Special Economic Zones opened to foreign investment and trade when China began economic reforms in the early 1980s. It is endowed with educational and cultural institutions supported by the overseas Chinese diaspora. In 2006, Xiamen was ranked
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Yichang

    Yichang

    Yichang (Chinese: 宜昌) is a prefecture-level city located in western Hubei province, People's Republic of China. It is the second largest city in the province after the capital, Wuhan. The Three Gorges Dam is located within its administrative area, in Yiling District. In ancient times Yichang was known as Yiling. There are historical records telling that in the year 278 BC during the Warring States period, the Qin general Bai Qi set fire to Yiling. In 222 AD Yichang was also the site of the Battle of Yiling during the Three Kingdoms Period. Under the Qing Guangxu Emperor, Yichang was opened to foreign trade as a trading port after Qing and Great Britain signed Chefoo Convention, which was signed by Sir Thomas Wade and Li Hongzhang in Chefoo on 21 August 1876. The imperial government set up a navigation company there and built wharfs less than 0.5 kilometres (0.31 mi) in length. Since 1949, more than 50 wharves have been constructed at the port so that its wharf area is now over 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) long. In 1940, during the Second Sino-Japanese War, the Battle of Zaoyang-Yichang took place in the area. Administratively, it is a prefecture-level city; its municipal government has
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Zhengzhou

    Zhengzhou

    Zhengzhou (Chinese: 郑州; pinyin: Zhèngzhōu; Mandarin pronunciation: [tʂɤ̂ŋtʂóu̯]; Postal map spelling: Chengchow), is the capital and largest city of Henan province in north-central China. A prefecture-level city, it also serves as the political, economic, technological, and educational centre of the province, as well as a major transportation hub for Central China. The city lies on the southern bank of the Yellow River, and is one of the Eight Great Ancient Capitals of China. With 8,626,505 inhabitants according to the 2010 census and 3,980,250 in its built-up area (6 urban districts + 5 City + 1 County), the city is one of the main built up areas of Henan region. Zhengzhou is now a rapidly growing city. Greater Zhengzhou was named as one of the 13 emerging megacities or megalopolises in China in a July 2012 report by the Economist Intelligence Unit. The Shang Dynasty established Aodu (隞都) or Bodu (亳都) in Zhengzhou (see also: History of China). This pre-historical city had been long lost even before the time of the First Emperor of China. Since 1950 archaeological finds in a walled city in Eastern Zhengzhou known have provided evidence of Neolithic Shang Dynasty settlements in the
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Liaoyang

    Liaoyang

    Liaoyang (simplified Chinese: 辽阳; traditional Chinese: 遼陽; pinyin: Liáoyáng) is a prefecture-level city of east-central Liaoning province, People's Republic of China, situated on the T'ai-tzu River and, together with Anshan, forms a metro area of 2,057,200 inhabitants in 2010. It is approximately one hour south of Shenyang, the provincial capital, by car. Liaoyang is home to Liaoning University's College of Foreign Studies and a number of vocational colleges. The city hosts a limited number of professional basketball and volleyball games in a modern sports facility. Liaoyang is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in northeast China dating back to before the Spring and Autumn period. During the Chinese Tang dynasty, Liaoyang was part of the northern edge of the Goguryeo kingdom. Remains of Yodong and Baegam cities, the old Goguryeo cities, can still be seen near to the modern city. This was the site of a major battle between the Tang and Goguryeo in 645 AD. Goguryeo (an antecedent of modern Korea) ruled the area for a brief period. Liaoyang rose to prominence druing the Liao dynasty. Several buildings in the city date to this period. Among these is the White Pagoda
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Sanya

    Sanya

    Sanya (simplified Chinese: 三亚; traditional Chinese: 三亞; pinyin: Sānyà) is the second southernmost Chinese city (after Sansha City) and one of the three prefecture-level cities in Hainan Province. According to the 2010 Census, the population of Sanya is of 685,408 inhabitants, living in an area of 1,919.58 square kilometres (741.15 sq mi). The city is renowned for its tropical climate and has emerged as a popular tourist destination, also serving as the training site of the Chinese national beach volleyball team. Sanya is home to small concentrations of Utsul people. The ancient name of Sanya is Yazhou (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Ngaichiu; Chinese: 崖州), which literally means "cliff prefecture". Its history can be dated back to the Qin Dynasty (221 – 206 BC). Since then, it has always been within the territory of the Chinese dynasties. Due to its remoteness, Sanya is sometimes called Tianya Haijiao (天涯海角), meaning "the end of the sky and ocean". Some prime ministers in various dynasties were exiled there and the Buddhist monk Jianzhen accidentally sailed there and used the place as one of his harbors for his missionary journey to Japan. In 1912, the name Yazhou was changed to
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Shijiazhuang

    Shijiazhuang

    Shíjiāzhuāng (Chinese: 石家庄) is the capital and largest city of North China's Hebei province. Administratively a prefecture-level city, it is about 280 kilometres (170 mi) south of Beijing. Shijiazhuang Prefecture contains the 5 districts of Shijiazhuang urban area, the Jingxing Mining District, five county-level cities, and twelve counties. At the 2010 census, it has a total population of 10,163,788, with 2,604,930 in the urban area in 2010 and 3,833,606 in its built up area (metro) made of 5 urban districts plus Luquan city, Zhengding and Luancheng counties. Gaocheng county is about to be part of Shijiazhuang built up area while its urbanisation is still growing. Shijiazhuang is a newly industrialised city. It experienced dramatic growth after the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949. The population of the metropolitan area has more than quadrupled in only 30 years. It is a central hub of transportation routes. The city is home to a large garrison of military troops ready to protect Beijing if required. It has a number of PLA colleges and universities. In pre-Han times (i.e., before 206 BC) it was the site of the city of Shiyi in the state of Zhao, and, from Han (206
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Huizhou

    Huizhou

    Huìzhōu (Chinese: 惠州) is a city located in central Guangdong province of the People's Republic of China. Part of the Pearl River Delta, Huizhou borders the provincial capital of Guangzhou to the west, Shaoguan to the north, Heyuan to the northeast, Shanwei to the east, Shenzhen and Dongguan to the southwest, and looks out to the South China Sea to the south. Administered as a prefecture-level city, it has 4.6 million residents in its area of jurisdiction. Its southern part made of Huiyang district is now part of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen built up area, the biggest built up area in the world with more than 40 million inhabitants encompassing the whole Shenzhen, Dongguan cities and main part of Guangzhou, Foshan, Zhongshan and small parts of Jiangmen and Huizhou cities. There are two main dialects spoken by local people in Huizhou: Hakka (客家话/客家話) and a Cantonese dialect which is Huizhouhua (惠州话/惠州話). The two dialects are somewhat interrelated and similar so people can easily understand each other. As more newcomers from the other provinces come to work in Huizhou, Mandarin has become the other popular language in Huizhou. The prefecture-level city of Huizhou administers 5 county-level
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Jinzhong

    Jinzhong

    Jìnzhōng (simplified Chinese: 晋中; traditional Chinese: 晉中) is a prefecture-level city with 3,249,425 inhabitants at the 2010 census in east central Shanxi province of the People's Republic of China. Before 1999, what is now Jinzhong was Jinzhong Prefecture, with its capital at the county-level city of Yuci (榆次; pinyin: Yúcì; WG: Yu-tz'u). In 1999, Jinzhong Prefecture became Jinzhong Prefecture-level City, and Yuci County-level City became Yuci District (a county-level district). Yuci district is now part of Taiyuan built up area home to 3,775,360 inhabitants in 2010. Jinzhong is divided into the following county-level subdivisions: Lingshi County was the location of the Nanshan Colliery disaster. The prefecture-level city houses several Shanxi Courtyard Houses, businessmen's residences lauded as outstanding civilian residences.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Mianyang

    Mianyang

    Mianyang (simplified Chinese: 绵阳; traditional Chinese: 綿陽; pinyin: Miányáng) is the second largest prefecture-level city of Sichuan province in Southwest China. Its administrative area includes the city proper of Mianyang, with 985,586 inhabitants in the built up area (2 urban counties), the county-level city of Jiangyou, and six counties, covering an area of over 20,281 square kilometres (7,831 sq mi) and a population of 4,613,862 at the 2010 census. Mianyang, called Fujun in ancient times, had advanced in agriculture during the Qin (221–206 BCE) and Han (206 BCE–220 CE) dynasties. It has a history of over 2,200 years since the Emperor Gaozu of Han established the first county in this area in 201 BCE. Due to its advantageous geographic location, it had always been a town of great military importance and formed a natural defence for Chengdu. Mianyang is home to the CAEP and Science City, an immense Military Research Complex which was the site of the development of China first nuclear bomb. The city proper itself was only lightly damaged by the earthquake of 12 May 2008. However, Beichuan County, which is in the prefecture is among the most severely hit of all disaster regions
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Handan

    Handan

    Hándān (simplified Chinese: 邯郸; traditional Chinese: 邯鄲) is a prefecture-level city located in the southwestern part of Hebei Province of China. It borders Xingtai on the north, Shanxi province on the west, Henan province on the south and Shandong province on the east. Handan was the capital of the State of Zhao during the Warring States period (475–221 BCE), after the capital moved from Zhongmu. The city was conquered by the State of Qin after the virtual annexation of Zhao by Qin except for the Dai Commandery. The first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang visited the city once and ordered all enemies of his mother to be buried alive. Handan was still regarded as a commercial centre during the Western and Eastern Han Dynasties (206 BCE–220 CE) but slowly it declined, perhaps because of the numerous battles that ravaged northern China following the Han Dynasty. Handan is now mainly an industrial city. It still has some attractions, most derived from Zhao folklore such as the road into which Lin Xiangru, courier of the precious jade He Shi Bi, backed in order to let his nemesis Lian Po pass first as well as the location in which Lian Po begged for Lin Xiangru's forgiveness. The
    5.75
    4 votes
    121
    Changsha

    Changsha

    Changsha (simplified Chinese: 长沙; traditional Chinese: 長沙; pinyin: Chángshā; Wade–Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital city of Hunan, in south-central China, located on the lower reaches of Xiang river, a branch of the Yangtze River. Its municipality covers an area of 11,819 sq. kilometers and, according to the 2010 Census, a population of 7,044,118 inhabitants. Changsha was important from the time of the Qin dynasty (221–207 BC). In AD 750–1100 Changsha was an important commercial city, and its population increased greatly. Under the Qing dynasty, from 1664, it was the capital of Hunan province, and it was a major rice market. It was besieged during the Taiping Rebellion but never fell. Changsha was the site of Mao Zedong's conversion to communism. It was the scene of major battles in the Sino-Japanese War of 1937–45 and was briefly occupied by the Japanese. Rebuilt since 1949, the city is now a major interior port and a commercial and industrial center. The origins of the name "Changsha" are lost in antiquity. The name first appears in the 11th century BC, during the reign of King Cheng of the Zhou dynasty, a vassal lord from the Changsha area sent a type of softshell turtle known as
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Haixi Mongol and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Haixi Mongol and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Haixi Mongol and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture is an autonomous prefecture in northern Qinghai province of Western China. It has an area of 325,785 square kilometres (125,786 sq mi) and its capital is Delhi. The name of the prefecture literally means "west of Qinghai Lake." Geladandong Mountain, the source of the Yangtze River, is located here. After 1949, the People's Government of Dulan County was founded and the area was renamed Dulan Autonomous District (都兰自治区); in 1954, Dulan was renamed Haixi Mongol, Tibetan and Kazakh Autonomous District (海西蒙藏哈萨克族自治区) and in 1955, Haixi Mongol, Tibetan and Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture (海西蒙藏哈萨克族自治州). In 1963, it was renamed "海西蒙古族藏族哈萨克族自治州" (English the same, "蒙藏哈萨克族"->"蒙古族藏族哈萨克族"). In 1985, after the Kazakhs had returned to Xinjiang, it was again renamed Haixi Mongol and Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. As of the 2010 census, Haixi had 489,338 inhabitants, giving it a population density of 1.5 inhabitants per km². The following is a list of ethnic groups in the prefecture, taken in the 2000 Census Haixi directly governs 2 county-level cities and 3 counties. The southwestern exclave of the Haixi Prefecture, separated from the rest of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture

    Hónghé Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture (simplified Chinese: 红河哈尼族彝族自治州; traditional Chinese: 紅河哈尼族彝族自治州; pinyin: Hónghé Hānízú Yízú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture of Yunnan Province, China. Its name is derived from the Honghe river (Red river) and the two major ethnic minority groups who live there: the Yi and the Hani. Honghe has an area of 32,929 km². The capital of the prefecture is Mengzi. In 2008, the State Administration of Cultural Heritage of the People's Republic of China nominated the Honghe Hani Terraced Fields of Yuanyang County for World Heritage Site status. The prefecture is subdivided into 13 county-level divisions: 2 county-level cities, 8 counties, and 3 autonomous counties: According to the 2000 census, Honghe has 4,130,463 inhabitants (population density: 125.44 inhabitants per km²).
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Jinzhou

    Jinzhou

    Jinzhou (simplified Chinese: 锦州; traditional Chinese: 錦州; pinyin: Jǐnzhōu), is a prefecture-level city of Liaoning province, China. It is a geographically strategic city located in the "Liaoxi Corridor" (辽西走廊), which connects land transportation between North China and Northeast China. Jinzhou is China's northernmost seaport and the coastal economic center of West Liaoning on the north-western shore of the Bohai Sea. The total area under the jurisdiction of Jinzhou is 10,111 km², most of which is rural, encompassing a coastline of 97.7 km. It is one of the biggest cities in Liaoning with a population of 3,126,463 at the 2010 census whom 880,706 in the built up area made of 3 urban districts. Jinzhou is an ancient city boasting over a thousand years of history. Originally known as Tuhe (徒河), it became part of Yan in the Warring States period. Under the Qin, the majority of what is now Jinzhou became part of Liaodong township. It was part of Changli township in Youzhou during the Han and Three Kingdoms periods, but fell under the jurisdiction of Yingzhou in the Beiwei, Dongwei, and Beiqi periods, before becoming part of Liucheng township and then Yan township during the Sui and Tang.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Luoyang

    Luoyang

    Luoyang (simplified Chinese: 洛阳; traditional Chinese: 洛陽; pinyin: Luòyáng; Postal map spelling: Loyang; IPA: [lwɔ̂jɑ̌ŋ]) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province of Central China. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the east, Pingdingshan to the southeast, Nanyang to the south, Sanmenxia to the west, Jiyuan to the north, and Jiaozuo to the northeast. Situated on the central plain of China, one of the cradles of the Chinese civilization, Luoyang was one of the Four Great Ancient Capitals of China. The origin of the name "Luoyang" is the city's location to the north side ("yang") of the Luo River. The river flows from west to east and the sun is on south of the river, so that the sun shine is always on north side of the river. Luoyang has had several names over the centuries, including "Luoyi" (洛邑) and "Luozhou (洛州)", though Luoyang has been its primary name. It has been called, during various periods, "Dongdu" (东都, meaning the Eastern Capital, during the Tang Dynasty), "Xijing" (西京, meaning the West Capital, during the Song Dynasty), or "Jingluo" (京洛, meaning the general capital for China). The greater Luoyang area has been sacred ground since the late
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture

    Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture

    The Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture (Tibetan: རྔ་བ་བོད་རིགས་དང་ཆང་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་; Chinese: 阿坝藏族羌族自治州) is an autonomous prefecture in Sichuan, whose capital is Barkam town (Chinese: 马尔康 Ma'erkang). It has an area of 83,201 km². Ngawa, also known as Ngaba, is the site of the epicenter of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, in which over 20,000 of its residents died. The area has also been at the heart of the wave of self-immolations of ethnic Tibetans in China during the years 2011 and 2012. About half of the self-immolations happened in Ngawa Prefecture; very few of them happened in Tibet Autonomous Region itself. As of 2000, the prefecture's population was 847,468 inhabitants at a density of 10.19 per km²: The three principal languages are Tibetan, Mandarin and Qiang. The region is historically part of the Tibetan region of Amdo. In contemporary history, most part of Ngawa was under the 16th Administrative Prefecture of Szechwan (Chinese:四川省第十六行政督察區), which was established by the Republic of China (ROC). The People's Republic of China (PRC) defeated ROC troops in this area and established the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of Sichuan by the end of 1952. It was renamed
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Pingliang

    Pingliang

    Píngliàng (simplified Chinese: 平凉; traditional Chinese: 平涼) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Gansu Province in China. Pingliang is famous for a local mountain range that includes Kongtong Mountain, a site sacred to Taoism and mythical meeting place of the Yellow Emperor and Guangchengzi, an immortal. Pingliang has a monsoon-influenced, four-season, humid continental climate (Köppen Dwb), with cold but dry winters, and warm and humid summers. Monthly average temperatures range from −4.6 °C (23.7 °F) in January to 21.1 °C (70.0 °F) in July. Much of the annual rainfall occurs from June to September, and the annual mean temperature is 8.8 °C (47.8 °F). In July 2010 13 people died in Huating County in a landslide triggered by heavy rains. 2 people survived.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Pingxiang, Jiangxi

    Pingxiang, Jiangxi

    Pingxiang (simplified Chinese: 萍乡; traditional Chinese: 萍鄉; pinyin: Píngxiāng; Wade–Giles: P'ing-Shang) is a medium-sized prefecture-level city located in western Jiangxi province, China. Pingxiang is located in the remote mountainous region of the border between Jiangxi and Hunan. It is approximately 100 miles from Changsha, the capital of Hunan, and about 200 from Nanchang. Most of the area around the city is hilly and mountainous, though the city itself is relatively flat. The climate is sub-tropical, with mild winters, long, hot summers, and plenty of rain year-round. The annual average temperature is 17°C. Archaeological evidence suggests that Pingxiang was first settled during the Stone Age. During the Han dynasty, it was part of Yichun. In 267, during the time of the Three Kingdoms, it became Pingxiang County, which made it a higher level of administration than what it is today. During the Tang Dynasty (618-907), it was part of the Jiangnanxi Circuit, and was called Yuanzhou. Its name and area of administration were changed many times until 1970, when it assumed its present form. Pingxiang (萍乡) has direct jurisdiction over two urban districts, 1 economic development zone,
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Taizhou

    Taizhou

    Taizhou (Chinese: 泰州; pinyin: Tàizhōu) is a prefecture-level city in central Jiangsu province of eastern China. Situated on the north bank of the Yangtze River, it borders Nantong to the east, Yancheng to the north and Yangzhou to the west. The 2010 census counted its population at 4,618,558 of whom 571,516 live in the urbanized areas in two urban districts, (Hailing and Gaogang). Two county-level cities have urbanized areas with more than 1 million inhabitants, Xinghua with 1,428,790 inhabitants and Taixing with 1,179,904 inhabitants. These are two of the most important county-level cities in China. Taizhou is the hometown of the current CPC General Secretary and Chinese President Hu Jintao. The prefecture-level city of Taizhou administers 6 county-level divisions, including 2 districts and 4 county-level cities. These are further divided into 105 township-level divisions, including 91 towns, 8 townships and 6 subdistricts. Taizhou lies at the confluence of the Yangtze River and the Jinghang Canal (Grand Canal of China), in the mid south of Jiangsu Province, the north bank of lower reaches of the Yangtze river, the south end of Jianghuai Plain. Its latitude ranges from about 32°
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Jingmen

    Jingmen

    Jingmen (simplified Chinese: 荆门; traditional Chinese: 荊門; pinyin: Jīngmén) is a prefecture-level city in central Hubei province, People's Republic of China. Jingmen is within an area where cotton and oil crops are planted. The population of the prefecture is 2,873,687 (2010 population census). The urban area of Jingmen City has a population of about 400,000. Jingmen is so named as in ancient times it was the gateway to Jingzhou, one of the Nine Provinces and means literally Gateway to Jingzhou. Jingmen municipality comprises two districts, one county-level city and two counties : Dongbao District "downtown" is located about 3 hours away from Wuhan by bus or rail. A new train service was introduced from Jingmen to Wuhan in 2004. Jingmen is very close to many great tourist attractions such as Changban Slope of Three Kingdoms fame, the Wudang Mountains, and the Ming Tomb in Zhongxiang (a World Heritage site only an hour away). As it is located in central China, Jingmen is within easy reach of almost anywhere in the country, taking about 18 hours to either Beijing or Guangzhou by train, or two hours by train to Yichang, home of the Gezhouba Dam project and Three Gorges Dam. From here
    5.50
    4 votes
    131
    Xiaogan

    Xiaogan

    Xiaogan (Chinese: 孝感; pinyin: Xiàogǎn) is a prefecture-level city in east-central Hubei province, People's Republic of China, some 60 kilometres (37 mi) northwest of the provincial capital of Wuhan. The city's population is about 300,000 while the prefecture has about 5 million residents.
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    Yantai

    Yantai

    Yantai (Chinese: 烟台; pinyin: Yāntái) is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. Located on the southern coast of the Bohai Sea and the eastern coast of the Laizhou Bay, Yantai borders the cities of Qingdao and Weihai to the southwest and east respectively. The largest fishing seaport in Shandong and a robust economic center today, Yantai used to be known to the West as Chefoo, a misnomer which refers, in Chinese, solely to Zhifu Island, which is historically governed by Yantai. The contemporary name of Yantai came from the watchtowers constructed on Mount Qi in 1398, during the reign of the Hongwu Emperor, founding emperor of the Ming Dynasty (yan—smoke; tai—tower). The towers served to raise alarms against invasions of Japanese pirates. The prefecture-level city of Yantai administers 12 county-level divisions, including 4 districts, 7 county-level cities, 1 county and one development zone. These are further divided into 148 township-level divisions, including 94 towns, 6 townships and 48 subdistricts. The region was inhabited by the non-Han people of the Eastern Yi (東夷), who were believed to have established a small state during the
    5.50
    4 votes
    133
    Hefei

    Hefei

    Hefei (Chinese: 合肥, p Héféi, w Ho-fei) is the capital and largest city of Anhui Province in Eastern China. A prefecture-level city, it is the political, economic, and cultural centre of Anhui. Located in the central portion of the province, it borders Huainan to the north, Chuzhou to the northeast, Chaohu to the southeast and Lu'an to the west. Hefei has an area of 7,048 km² and, as of 2010 Census, a population of 5,702,466 inhabitants. Its built-up area ("metro") is home to 3,352,076 inhabitants encompassing all urban districts. From the 8th to the 6th century BC, Hefei was the site of many small states, later a part of the Chu kingdom. Many archaeological finds dating from this period have been made. The name Hefei was first given to the county set up in the area under the Han dynasty in the 2nd century BC. During the 4th to the 6th century AD, this crucial border region between northern and southern states was much fought over; its name and administrative status were consequently often changed. During the Sui (581–618) and Tang (618–907) periods, it became the seat of Lu prefecture — a title it kept until the 15th century, when it became a superior prefecture named Luzhou. In
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture

    Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture

    Yanbian is a Korean Autonomous Prefecture in Jilin Province, in Northeastern China, just north of the border with North Korea. Yanbian is bordered to the north by Heilongjiang, on the west by Baishan City and Jilin City, on the south by North Hamgyong Province of North Korea, and on the east by Primorsky Krai of Russia. Yanbian is designated as an autonomous prefecture due to the large number of ethnic Koreans living in the region. The prefectural capital is Yanji, and the total area is 42,700 square kilometres (16,500 sq mi). The Prefecture has an important Balhae archaeological site: the Ancient Tombs at Longtou Mountain, which includes the Mausoleum of Princess Jeonghyo. The prefecture is subdivided into eight county-level divisions: six county-level cities and two counties: The above counties and cities are divided into 642 villages (边境村/邊境村). In the Ming Dynasty, Yanbian was governed by the Jianzhou Guard-district (建州衛), and in the late Qing Dynasty the area was divided into the Yanji (延吉廳) and Hunchun (琿春廳) subprefectures. From 1644 to the 1800s the Manchurian administrators of the Qing state attempted to separate northeast China, politically and ethnographically, into a
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Yangzhou

    Yangzhou

    Yangzhou (simplified Chinese: 扬州; traditional Chinese: 揚州; pinyin: Yángzhōu; former spellings: Yang-chou, Yangchow, Yang-chow; literally "Rising Prefecture") is a prefecture-level city in central Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yangtze River, it borders the provincial capital of Nanjing to the southwest, Huai'an to the north, Yancheng to the northeast, Taizhou to the east, and Zhenjiang across the river to the south. Historically it is one of the wealthiest of China's cities, known at various periods for its great merchant families, poets, painters, and scholars. Its population is 4,414,681 at the 2010 census and its built up area is home to 2,146,980 inhabitants including three urban districts plus currently in the agglomeration. The prefecture-level city of Yangzhou administers seven county-level divisions. There are three districts, two county-level cities and one county: These are further divided into 98 township-level divisions, including 87 towns and townships, and 11 subdistricts. In November 2011, Weiyang District (维扬区) was merged into Hanjiang District, while the former county-level Jiangdu City was renamed Jiangdu
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Ankang

    Ankang

    Ankang (Chinese: 安康; pinyin: Ānkāng) is a prefecture-level city in Shaanxi province, China. Ankang is geographically considered to be part of southern China, but appears to be located in central China. However, on administrative terms, as Shaanxi is officially part of Northwestern China, it is considered to be part of the Northwest. Ankang is located in the southeastern part of Shaanxi Province, north of the Ba Mountain and south of the Qinling. Measuring 200 km from east to west and 240 km from north to south, the prefecture-level city of covers an area of 23,500 square kilometers. The Han River (Hanshui) crosses it from west to east, forming a natural landform of "a plain between two mountains". Ankang has a long history, with a recorded history of more than 3,000 years and cultural history which can be traced back to the Stone Age. Ankang County was set up in the first year of Taikang in Western Jin Dynasty (A.D. 280); the name AnKang means "having abundant harvest and happy forever, being peaceful and healthy". In the third year of Feidi in Western Wei Dynasty (A.D. 554), it was changed to "Golden State" because the Yuehe Chuandao Area in Ankang produces flake gold. Control of
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Daqing

    Daqing

    Daqing (simplified Chinese: 大庆; traditional Chinese: 大慶; pinyin: Dàqìng; formerly spelled "Taching") (pronounced Da Tshing) is a prefecture-level city in the west of Heilongjiang province of Northeast China. The name literally means "Great Celebration". Daqing is known as the Oil Capital of China and has experienced a phenomenal boom since oil was discovered here in 1959. Its population is 2,904,532 at the 2010 census whom 1,042,902 in the built up area made of 4 out of 5 urban districts (Sartu, Longfeng, Ranghulu and Honggang). The Daqing oil field was discovered in the late 1950s, and drilling began in 1958. Daqing was founded in 1959 to house workers extracting oil and gas from the Daqing oilfield and to host industries which could take advantage of the energy and petrochemicals. Since its foundation it has been advocated as a model of good practice in industry and healthcare by the Chinese government. The fact that Mao Zedong promulgated his Supreme Directive, In industry, learn from Daqing, in the 1960s reflects how important a role Daqing has historically played in industry in China. The film Entrepreneurial Pioneers (Chinese: 创业), made in the early 1970s, is a literary
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Dongying

    Dongying

    Dongying (simplified Chinese: 东营; traditional Chinese: 東營; pinyin: Dōngyíng), a prefecture-level city, lies on the northern (Bohai Sea) coast of Shandong province, People's Republic of China. At the 2010 census, 2,035,300 people resided within its administrative area of 7,923 square kilometres. Dongying is home to the Shengli Oilfield, which is China's second largest oilfield only after Daqing. The prefecture-level city of Dongying administers 5 county-level divisions, including 2 districts and 3 counties: These are further divided into 43 township-level divisions, including 23 towns, 13 townships and 7 subdistricts. The city was established in 1983, as a base for developing the Yellow River Delta and China's second largest oilfield, Shengli Field. The oilfield was discovered in 1964 near a small village called Dongying, which gave its name to the city. Dongying is located on the banks of the Yellow River Delta of Northern Shandong Province. Bordering prefectures are: The city is located at 36°55′~38°10 north latitude and 118°07′~119°10′ east longitude, and has an total area of 7,923 square kilometers. The city's 350 km (220 mi) coastline borders Laizhou Bay and Bohai Bay to the
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Gānnán Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 甘南藏族自治州; pinyin: Gānnán Zàngzú Zìzhìzhōu; Tibetan: ཀན་ལྷོ་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་, Wylie: Kan-lho Bod-rigs rang-skyong-khul, ZYPY: Gainlho Poirig Ranggyong Kü) is an autonomous prefecture in southern Gansu Province, China. It includes Xiahe and the Labrang Monastery, Luqu, Maqu, and other mostly Tibetan towns and villages. Gannan has an area of 40,898 km² and its capital is Hezuo. According to the 2000 census, Gannan has 640,106 inhabitants (population density: 15.65 inhabitants per km²). 1 county level city, 7 counties.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 海北藏族自治州; Tibetan: མཚོ་བཡྣང་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་) is an autonomous prefecture of northeastern Qinghai province in Western China. The prefecture has an area of 39,354 square kilometres (15,195 sq mi) and its seat is Haiyan County. Its name literally means "north of Qinghai Lake." According to the 2000 census, Haibei has 258,922 inhabitants with a population density of 6.58 inhabitants/km². The following is a list of ethnic groups in the prefecture, 2000 census. The prefecture is subdivided into 4 county-level divisions: 3 counties and 1autonomous county:
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Huangshan Shi

    Huangshan Shi

    Huangshan (Chinese: 黄山; pinyin: Huángshān), is a prefecture-level city in southern Anhui province, east China. Huangshan means Yellow Mountain in Chinese and the city is named after the famously scenic Yellow Mountains which cover much of the city's vast geographic expanse. The prefectural city of Huangshan includes three urban districts and four counties. The urban center of Huangshan was originally the city of Tunxi, and is now called Tunxi District. Locals still call the city Tunxi to distinguish urban core from other parts of Huangshan. Huangshan occupies the southernmost part of Anhui. It is bordered by Chizhou to the northwest, Xuancheng to the northeast, Jiangxi Province to the southwest and Zhejiang Province to the southeast. Huangshan's history dates back to the time of the First Emperor. The city's current jurisdiction covers much of the historical and cultural region of Huizhou (徽州), which together with Anqing formed the name of Anhui Province. Huangshan is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Mount Huangshan and Hongcun and Xidi, the ancient villages of southern Anhui. It is a leading tourist destination in China. The prefecture-level city of Huangshan administers
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Huzhou

    Huzhou

    Huzhou (Chinese: 湖州; pinyin: Húzhōu; Huzhou pronunciation vu ciu) is a prefecture-level city in northern Zhejiang province of Eastern China. Lying south of the Lake Tai, it borders Jiaxing to the east, Hangzhou to the south, and the provinces of Anhui and Jiangsu to the west and north respectively. The prefecture-level city of Huzhou administers six county-level divisions, including one economic development zone and two districts and three counties. These are further divided into 66 township-level divisions, including 50 towns, 10 townships and six subdistricts. Dr. Fred P. Manget (1880-1979) went from Georgia, USA, to Shanghai as a medical missionary in 1909. In 1912, he rented a building in Huzhou to establish a hospital that could hold about 30 beds. At the end of World War I, Dr. Manget returned to Shanghai and discussed with the representative of The Rockefeller Foundation in China about the Foundation’s intention to spread the practice of Western medicine in China. After much negotiation, the Chinese Government agreed to provide 9 acres of land, while the Foundation provided US$30,000 to build a hospital in Huzhou. The remaining needed funds were provided by the Southern
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Jiaozuo

    Jiaozuo

    Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò; Postal map spelling: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north. Its population is 3,539,860 at the 2010 census whom 838,350 live in the built up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun). The prefecture-level city of Jiaozuo administers 4 districts, 2 county-level cities and 4 counties. The city was founded on an industrial site left over from the Opium Wars by the British. Jiaozuo was established as a city in 1953. Mao Zedong has written praise about the hard work of people from Jiaozuo in the coal industry. Jiaozuo is noted for its blast furnaces and machine construction industries. Jiaozuo is the northern terminus of the Jiaozuo-Liuzhou Railway and the southern terminus of the Taiyuan-Jiaozuo Railway. The city is linked via rail to nearby cities Luoyang, Xinxiang and Nanyang in Henan Province and Jincheng in Shanxi Province. Henan Polytechnic
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Kaifeng

    Kaifeng

    Kaifeng (simplified Chinese: 开封; traditional Chinese: 開封; pinyin: Kāifēng; Wade–Giles: K'aifeng), known previously by several names (see below), is a prefecture-level city in east-central Henan province, Central China. Nearly 5 million people live in the metropolitan area. Located along the southern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the west, Xinxiang to the northwest, Shangqiu to the east, Zhoukou to the southeast, Xuchang to the southwest, and the province of Shandong to the northeast. The Chinese Postal Map Romanisation for the city is Kaifeng whilst its abbreviation is biàn (汴). Historically it has also been known as: The name "Kaifeng" first appeared as the area's name after the Qin Dynasty's conquering of China in the 2nd century BC, and literally means "expand the borders". The prefecture-level city of Kaifeng administers five districts and five counties. Kaifeng is one of the Seven Ancient Capitals of China. As with Beijing, there have been many reconstructions during its history. In 364 BC during the Warring States Period, the State of Wei founded a city called Daliang (大梁)as its capital in this area. During this period, the first
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Yibin

    Yibin

    Yibin (simplified Chinese: 宜宾; traditional Chinese: 宜賓; Sichuanese Pinyin: ȵibin; Sichuanese pronunciation: [ɲi˨˩pin˥]; pinyin: Yíbīn; Wade–Giles: I-pin) is a prefecture-level city in the southeastern part of Sichuan province, People's Republic of China, located at the junction of the Min and Yangtze Rivers. Its population is 4,472,001 inhabitants according to the 2010 census of whom 673,413 live in the built-up area. Human habitation of Yibin dates back at least 40,000 years. Yibin was established as a county in the Han dynasty (206 BC – AD 220). It was previously known as Suifu or Suifoo. Yibin is located in the southeast portion of Sichuan, and borders Yunnan (Zhaotong prefecture) to the south, Luzhou to the east, Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture and Leshan to the west, and Zigong to the north. The total area is 13,283 square kilometres (5,129 sq mi). The city ranges in latitude from 27° 50'–29° 16' N, and in longitude from 103° 36'–105° 20' E, stretching 153 kilometres (95 mi) east-west and 150 kilometres (93 mi) north-south. Yibin has a four-season, monsoon-influenced, humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa), with mild winters, and long and hot summers. Monthly average
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Zhangjiakou

    Zhangjiakou

    Zhāngjiākǒu, also known also by several other names, is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hebei province of North China, adjacent to Beijing to the southeast. Its administrative area has a population of 4.35 million, and covers 36,947 square kilometres (14,265 sq mi). The urban area of Zhangjiakou is divided into Qiaoxi and Qiaodong Districts which have 473,193 inhabitants in 2010, but the prefecture-level city is much larger, spanning around 36,800 square kilometres (14,200 sq mi). Zhangjiakou is written 张家口 in simplified Chinese and 張家口 in traditional Chinese. It is Zhāngjiākǒu in pinyin and the name means "Zhang family gate." Older names for the town in Chinese include Zhāngyuán (張垣), used in the Republican era, and Zhāngjiābǎo (張家堡). Zhangjiakou was historically known to the Europeans as Kalgan until the mid 20th century. This name derives from the Mongolian name of the city, , "Chuulalt haalga" or shorter, , "haalgan" which means "the gate" (in the Great Wall). In Manchu, the city is known as (Imiyangga jase). Because of its strategic position above and northwest of Beijing, Zhangjiakou has been nicknamed "Beijing's Northern Door". The water-scarce city was historically
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Anqing

    Anqing

    Anqing (simplified Chinese: 安庆; traditional Chinese: 安慶; pinyin: Ānqìng; literally "Peaceful Celebration", also Anking, formerly Hwaining) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Anhui province, People's Republic of China. It borders Lu'an to the north, Hefei and Wuhu to the northeast, Tongling to the east, Chizhou to the southeast, and the provinces of Jiangxi and Hubei to the south and west respectively. The city was founded during the Han Dynasty in the second century BC. In the Middle Ages it received the name of Anqing. From 1853 to 1861 it was held by the rebels of the Taiping rebellion. It had a nearly impregnable fortifications. Zeng Guofan began his conquest of the Taiping by beseiging the position with double walls. He made it his headquarters after its fall. Several years later Anqing became a centre of the weapons industry. The prefecture-level city of Anqing administers 11 county-level divisions, including 3 districts, 1 county-level city and 7 counties. The people of Anqing have a unique dialect that is quite different from the rest of the province. Anqing is located in the southwestern part of Anhui province, and on the northern shore of the lower Yangtze. To
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Jixi

    Jixi

    Jixi (simplified Chinese: 鸡西; traditional Chinese: 鶏西; pinyin: Jīxī; Russian: Цзиси) is a city in eastern Heilongjiang Province in the People's Republic of China. At the 2010 census, 1,862,161 people resided within its administrative area of 22,351 square kilometers and 757,647 in its built up area made of 4 out of 6 urban districts (including Jiguan, Didao, Hengshan and Chengzihe). Jixi is on Muling River about 30 km from the border with Russia and 120 km from Khanka Lake. The mayor of Jixi is Zhu Deyi (朱德义) since July 2009. The area is one of the important coal mining base in China. A crater on asteroid 253 Mathilde was named after the city. Jixi was a nomadic area of the Jurchen and Goguryeo people. By the Shang Dynasty, dwellers here had began to communicated with people in Central Plain. It was in the Han Dynasty that primitive agriculture in this region had made a great progress. During the Tang Dynasty, Jixi was under the control of the Balhae. As the Manchu conquered the territories occupied by the Ming Dynasty in 1644, the basin of the Amur River was blocked in order to protect the Manchu people's place of origin. In this period, the population of the Jixi region
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    2 votes
    149
    Shantou

    Shantou

    Shàntóu (Chinese: 汕头), also known as Swatow or Suátao, is a prefecture-level city on the eastern coast of Guangdong province, People's Republic of China, with a total population of 5,391,028 as of 2010 and an administrative area of 2,064 square kilometres (797 sq mi). With it and the immediately surrounding cities of Jieyang and Chaozhou, the metropolitan region – known as Chaoshan – covers an area of 10,404 km (4,017 sq mi), and had a permanent population of 13,937,897 at the end of 2010. Shantou, a city significant in 19th-century Chinese history as one of the treaty ports established for Western trade and contact, was one of the original Special Economic Zones of the People's Republic of China established in the 1980s, but did not blossom in the manner that cities such as Shenzhen, Xiamen and Zhuhai did. However, it remains eastern Guangdong's economic centre, and is home to Shantou University, a member of the Project 211 group. Shantou was a fishing village part of Tuojiang City (鮀江都), Jieyang District (揭陽縣) during the Song Dynasty. It came to be Xialing (廈嶺) during the Yuan Dynasty. In 1563, Shantou was a part of Chenghai District (澄海縣) in Chao Prefecture (Chaozhou). As early
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    2 votes
    150
    Shanwei

    Shanwei

    Shànwěi (Chinese: 汕尾) or Swabue is a prefecture-level city in eastern Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. It borders Jieyang to the east, Meizhou and Heyuan to the north, Huizhou to the west, and looks out to the South China Sea to the south. It lies approximately 120 kilometres (75 mi) east of Shenzhen and the locals speak the Haifeng dialect. Shanwei has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa), with short, mild to warm winters and long, hot, humid summers. Because it looks out to the sea, summer temperatures tend to be moderated. Monthly mean temperatures range from 14.8 °C (58.6 °F) in January to 28.1 °C (82.6 °F), with an annual mean of 22.2 °C (72.0 °F). From May to August, humidity is very high and rainfall tends to be heavy, accounting for about two-thirds of the annual total. The prefecture-level city of Shanwei administers 4 county-level divisions, including 1 district, 1 county-level city and 2 counties. These are further divided into 53 township-level divisions, including 40 towns, 10 townships and 3 subdistricts. According to a December 2011 report, officials from Shenzhen considered Shanwei as one of the major destinations to which
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    2 votes
    151
    Tieling

    Tieling

    Tieling (simplified Chinese: 铁岭; traditional Chinese: 鐵嶺; pinyin: Tiělíng) is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Liaoning province of the People's Republic of China. The population is 3 million at the 2nd of 2004. Tieling is a city where coal mining is an important industry. The mayor of Tieling is Li Wenke. An Intermediate People's Court is in Tieling. The actor Zhao Benshan was born in Tieling. The total population was 3 million at the end of 2004. Tieling is a multiethnic area where the majority Han and the minorities Manchu, Korean, Mongolian, Hui, Xibo, Uygur, and ethnic Russians live in a compact community. The minorities make up 23.2% of the total population. Tieling has jurisdiction over 7 divisions: There are several sightseeing spots:
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    2 votes
    152
    Wenshan Zhuang and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Wenshan Zhuang and Miao Autonomous Prefecture

    Wénshān Zhuang and Miao Autonomous Prefecture (simplified Chinese: 文山壮族苗族自治州; traditional Chinese: 文山壯族苗族自治州; pinyin: Wénshān Zhuàngzú Miáozú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture in Yunnan Province, China. Wenshan is highly diverse. According to a local saying, "Han and Hui live by the market, Zhuang and Dai live by the water, Miao and Yi live on the mountains, and Yao live among the bamboos." (汉族、回族住街头,壮族、傣族住水头,苗族、彝族住山头,瑶族住箐头。) Some of Wenshan's ethnic groups include:
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    2 votes
    153
    Xuzhou

    Xuzhou

    Xuzhou (Chinese: 徐州; pinyin: Xúzhōu), otherwise known as Pengcheng (Chinese: 彭城; pinyin: Péngchéng) in ancient times, is a major city in and the fourth largest prefecture-level city of Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. It is known for its convenient location as a transportation hub in northwestern Jiangsu, as it has expressways and railway links connecting directly to the provinces of Henan and Shandong, the neighboring port city of Lianyungang, as well as the economic hub Shanghai. Before the adoption of Hanyu Pinyin, the city's name was typically Romanized as Suchow, although also appearing as Hsu-chou, Hsuchow, and Hsüchow. During the Xia and Shang Dynasties (c. 2200–1600 BC), Xuzhou lay in an area inhabited by the Dongyi or Huaiyi peoples who were constantly at war with the Shang and Zhou Dynasties. The Xuzhou region was called Huaiyang during the Zhou Dynasty (1600 BC–256 BC) since the Huai River crosses the area. During the Spring and Autumn Period (771 BC–426 BC), Xuzhou was a collection of small farming/fishing villages and towns and formed part of the border region between the Zhou vassal States of Chu, Wu and Qu. Both the States of Pi and Peng lay within its
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    2 votes
    154
    Zhumadian

    Zhumadian

    Zhumadian (simplified Chinese: 驻马店; traditional Chinese: 駐馬店; pinyin: Zhùmǎdiàn; Postal map spelling: Chumatien) is a prefecture-level city in southern Henan province, People's Republic of China. It borders Xinyang to the south, Nanyang to the west, Pingdingshan to the northwest, Luohe to the north, Zhoukou to the northeast, and the province of Anhui to the east. Its population is 7,230,744 at the 2010 census whom 503,812 live in the built up area. The prefecture-level city of Zhumadian administers 1 district and 9 counties. Zhumadian was previously known as Yicheng, for it used to be a relay station. In the Tang Dynasty, the emperor ordered his soldiers carry lychees from Guangdong to his charming princess Yang who loved to eat lychees. And Zhumadian was one of the relay stations. Zhumadian is situated at 32° 18' -- 33° 35' N latitude, and 113° 10' -- 115° 12' E longitude, with a maximum east-west width of 191.5 kilometres (119.0 mi), and at most 137.5 kilometres (85.4 mi) long from south to north. The area of the prefecture is 15,083 square kilometres (5,824 sq mi), occupying 8.9% of the total provincial area. Neighbouring prefectures are: The terrain is dominated by mountains,
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    2 votes
    155
    Neijiang

    Neijiang

    Neijiang (Chinese: 内江; Sichuanese Pinyin: Nuijiang; Sichuanese pronunciation: [nuei˨˩˧tɕiaŋ˥]; pinyin: Nèijiāng; Wade–Giles: Nei-chiang) is a prefecture-level city in the Southeast of Sichuan Province, in southwest of China, with a population of about 4,200,000. It is located on the Tuo River and is a transportation and food-processing center. The Neijiang is also a breed of pig. Its population is 3,702,847 at the 2010 census whom 1,254,426 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Shizhong and Dongxing). In medieval times the locality was an important salt-producing area, but in recent times its name has been associated with the cultivation of sugarcane; it is commonly referred to as the sugar capital of Sichuan. During the economic boom of China in the 1990s and early 21st century, Neijiang has been transformed and its industry now range from engineering, electronics, chemicals, construction materials, to consumer goods. It is also the home of Neijiang Normal College and many other educational institutions. Its geographic location puts it in the centre of the transport network in southern Sichuan.
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Tianshui

    Tianshui

    Tiānshuǐ (Chinese: 天水) is the second largest city in Gansu province in northwest China. Its population is approximately 3,500,000. Tianshui lies along the route of the ancient Northern Silk Road at the Wei River, through which much of trade occurred between China and the west. Nearby are the Maijishan Grottoes filled with thousands of Buddhist sculptures, represented by figures as Sakyamuni and Avalokitesvara, produced in as early as the Wei Dynasty and as late as the Song Dynasty by Buddhist monks who first came here via the North Silk Road and, later on, by local Buddhists, for worship purposes. The Qin state, later to become the founding dynasty of the Chinese empire, grew out from this area, and the Qin name itself is believed to have originated, in part, from there Qin tombs have been excavated from Fangmatan near Tianshui, including one 2200 year old map of Guixian County. Tianshui is a diocese of the Roman Catholic church, currently vacant. Tianshui has a monsoon-influenced, four-season, cool semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk), with seasons of comparatively equal length. Winters are cold but dry, with an average January temperature of −2 °C (28.4 °F), while summers are warm and
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    3 votes
    157
    Xiangfan

    Xiangfan

    Xiangyang (simplified Chinese: 襄阳; traditional Chinese: 襄陽; pinyin: Xiāngyáng) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hubei province, People's Republic of China. It was formed from two famous ancient cities, Xiangyang and Fancheng. It was known as Xiangfan (襄樊;; pinyin: Xiāngfán) until December 2, 2010. The prefecture-level city of Xiangyang administers 9 county-level divisions, including 3 districts, 3 county-level cities and 3 counties. Xiangyang city is divided by the Han River, which runs through its heart and divides the city north-south. The city itself is an incorporation of two once separate, ancient cities: Fancheng and Xiangzhou. What remains of old Xianyang is located south of the Han River and contains one of the oldest still-intact city walls in China while Fancheng was located to the north of the Han River. Both cities served prominent historical roles in both the Ancient and Pre-Modern Periods of Chinese history. Today, the city is the second largest in Hubei, located about halfway between Wuhan and Xi'an. Xiangyang has an urban population of around 466,000 while its outlying county contains approximately 5,787,700 people. The government website of Xiangyang City
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    3 votes
    158
    Yinchuan

    Yinchuan

    Yínchuān is the capital of the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China, and former capital of the Western Xia Empire of the Tanguts. It has an area of 4,467 km² and a total population of 1.99 million. Its built up area is home to 1,290,170 inhabitants spread on 3 urban districts. The name of the city literally means "silver river"; the character for "river" (川) is the same as that in Sichuan, but not as those in, for example, the Yellow River (黄河) or Yangtze River (长江). Yinchuan originally was a xian (county) under the name of Fuping in the 1st century BC; its name was changed to Huaiyuan in the 6th century AD. After the fall of the Tang dynasty in 907, it was occupied by the Tangut Xi-Xia dynasty, of which it was the capital. After the destruction of the Xi-Xia dynasty by the Mongols in 1227, it came under the rule of the Mongol Yuan Dynasty. Under the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties, it was a prefecture of Ningxia. In 1928, when the province of Ningxia was formed from part of Gansu, it became the capital city. In 1954, when Ningxia province was abolished, the city was put in Gansu province; but, with the establishment of the Ningxia Hui
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    3 votes
    159
    Binzhou

    Binzhou

    Binzhou (simplified Chinese: 滨州; traditional Chinese: 濱州; pinyin: Bīnzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in northern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River with two arms extended to the southern bank, Binzhou borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the southwest, Dezhou to the west, Zibo to the south, Dongying to the east, and the province of Hebei to the north. The city also has a short coastline bordering the Bohai Bay. Humans have been living in the area around Binzhou since the Neolithic era. It was called “Pugu country” in the Shang Dynasty, and was a county in the Qin Dynasty. It was first called Binzhou in era of the Five Dynasties because it borders the Bohai Sea. Nowadays, it has more than 3.7 million inhabitants. The major Industries are based on oil, chemicals and textiles. The prefecture-level city of Binzhou administers 7 county-level divisions, including 1 district and 6 counties. Prior to 1983, both Binzhou and neighboring Dongying were not considered large or developed enough to be incorporated into cities. Instead, they formed a "di qu" (literally, a "region") managed by the provincial government. BinZhou
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    3 votes
    160
    Guilin

    Guilin

    Guìlín (Chinese: 桂林; Zhuang: Gveilinz) is a prefecture-level city in the northeast of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of far southern China, sitting on the west bank of the Li River. Its name means "forest of Sweet Osmanthus", owing to the large number of fragrant Sweet Osmanthus trees located in the city. The city has long been renowned for its unique scenery. In 314 BC, a small settlement was established along the banks of the Li River (Guangxi). In 111 BC, during the reign of Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty, Shi An County was established, which could be regarded as the beginning of the city. In 507 AD, the town was renamed Guizhou. Guilin prospered in the Tang and Song dynasties but remained a county. The city was also a nexus between the central government and the southwest border, and it was where regular armies were placed to guard that border. Canals were built through the city so that food supplies could be directly transported from the food-productive Yangtze plain to the farthest southwestern point of the empire. In 1921, Guilin became one of the headquarters of the Northern Expeditionary Army led by Dr. Sun Yat-sen. In 1940, the city acquired its present name. In
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    2 votes
    161
    Putian

    Putian

    Putian (Chinese: 莆田; pinyin: Pútián) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Fujian province, People's Republic of China. It borders Fuzhou City to the north, Quanzhou City to the south, and the Taiwan Strait to the east. Putian's municipal executive, legislature and judiciary are in Chengxiang District (城厢区), together with the CPC and Public Security bureaux. The municipal region comprises three other districts and one county: The Han Chinese are the majority ethnic group. Puxian Min is the largest dialect spoken in Putian. It is a dialect of Min, a Chinese language. Putian has become an export base for Fujian products. The main industries are shoe-making, brewing, electronics, garments, fruits, vegetables, and machinery, electrical goods. In particular, the area is known for high-quality counterfeits of shoes. Meizhou Island, most famous for being the legendary birthplace of the goddess Matsu, is located closely offshore of Putian.
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    2 votes
    162
    Qingyuan

    Qingyuan

    Qīngyuǎn (Chinese: 清远), is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. Its total population is 3.7 million, and the primary language spoken is Cantonese. With an area of 19,015 km (7,342 sq mi), Qingyuan is the largest prefecture-level city by land area in the province. It is located on the Bei River, is surrounded by mountainous areas, is directly served by China National Highway 107, which connects the city with Guangzhou. The location of the municipal government is in Qingcheng District. It has jurisdiction over two county-level cities, five counties, and one economic development district. Qingyuan's administrative area ranges in latitude from 23° 31' to 25° 12' N, and in longitude from 111° 55' to 113° 55′ E, located just north of the Tropic of Cancer and about 200 km (120 mi) from the South China Sea coast. More than half of the area is mountainous, and elevations in crease from southeast to northwest. Qingyuan has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate, with an average annual temperature of 20.7 °C (69.3 °F), 1,900 mm (75 in) of rainfall, 1662.2 hours of sunshine, and a frost-free period of 314.4 days. Qingyuan, a
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    2 votes
    163
    Tongliao

    Tongliao

    Tōngliáo is a prefecture-level city in eastern Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China. The area is 59,535 square kilometres (22,987 sq mi) and population is 3,028,419 (as of 31 November 2001); the city proper has 411,625 inhabitants (2001). The city was the administrative centre of the defunct Jurim League (哲里木盟). The original Mongolian name for Tongliao city proper (i.e. Horqin District) is Bayisingtu ('having buildings'), while the original name of the prefecture-level city is Jirem. The Mongolian dialect spoken in this area is Khorchin Mongolian. It borders Jilin province to the east, Liaoning to the south, Chifeng to the southwest, the Xilin Gol League to the west, and the Hinggan League to the north. Not far from Tongliao are silica sands. Tongliao has an total area of 59,535 square kilometers, accounting for 5.4% of Inner Mongolia's total. The city is 315 kilometers away from Beijing, the capital of China. Tongliao has a four-season, monsoon-influenced, continental steppe climate (Köppen BSk), with long, cold, windy, but dry winters, and hot, humid summers. Monthly mean temperatures range from −13.5 °C (7.7 °F) in January to 24.1 °C (75.4 °F) in July, with an annual mean
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    2 votes
    164
    Weihai

    Weihai

    Weihai (Chinese: 威海; pinyin: Wēihǎi) is a city in eastern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It is the easternmost prefecture-level city of the province and a major seaport. Between 1898 and 1930, the town was a British colony known as Weihaiwei or the Weihai Garrison (traditional Chinese: 威海衛; simplified Chinese: 威海卫; pinyin: Wēihǎi Wèi), and sometimes as Port Edward. Weihai was not developed in the way that Hong Kong, the other British colony in the region, was developed, because Shandong Province of which Weihaiwei was part of, was inside Germany's sphere of influence and had only been obtained as a counterbalance to the Russian presence at Port Arthur 130 kilometres across the sea in Manchuria. It was largely used as a naval station and a sanatorium. Weihai borders Yantai to the west and the Yellow Sea to the east. Its population is 2,804,800 at the 2010 census. Of those, 591,982 live in the built up area (Huancui urban district). One can notice that Rongcheng, a county level city, has a built up area with 1,006,795 inhabitants. The prefecture-level city of Weihai administers four county-level divisions, including one district and three county-level cities. These
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    2 votes
    165
    Xuancheng

    Xuancheng

    Xuancheng (Chinese: 宣城; pinyin: Xuānchéng) is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Anhui province of Eastern China. It borders Wuhu to the northwest, Chizhou to the west, Huangshan to the southwest, and the provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangsu to the southeast and northeast respectively. Xuancheng City administers seven county-level divisions, including one district, one county-level city and five counties. These are further divided into 115 township-level divisions, including 61 towns, 44 townships and ten subdistricts. In Xuancheng, the Wu dialect is spoken as well as Mandarin. Xuancheng is served by the Anhui–Jiangxi Railway.
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    2 votes
    166
    Changzhi

    Changzhi

    Chángzhì (simplified Chinese: 长治; traditional Chinese: 長治) is a prefecture-level city in Shanxi Province, People's Republic of China. It lies between the city of Huozhou in Shanxi and the city of Hebi in Henan. A transportation and industrial center, industries include iron, steel and machinery. Coal, iron ore, and asbestos are also mined nearby. An ancient city, dating from at least the Shang (Yin) dynasty (1600?- 1046 BCE), Changzhi was known as Luan until 1912. Changzhi has a population of about half a million. Changzhi Medical College
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    1 votes
    167
    Fuzhou

    Fuzhou

    Fuzhou (Chinese: 福州; pinyin: Fúzhōu, [fǔtʂóʊ] ( listen); Fuzhou dialect: Hók-ciŭ) is the capital and one of the largest cities in Fujian Province, People's Republic of China. Along with the many counties of Ningde, those of Fuzhou are considered to constitute the Mindong (闽东, lit. East of Fujian) linguistic and cultural area. Fuzhou's core counties lie on the north (or left) bank of the estuary of Fujian's largest river, the Min River. All along its northern border lies Ningde, and Ningde's Gutian County lies upriver. Fuzhou's counties south of the Min border on Putian, Quanzhou, Sanming and Nanping municipalities. Its population is 7,115,370 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 4,408,076 inhabitants are urban standing around 61.95%, while rural population is at 2,707,294 standing around 38.05%. In older publications, the name "Fuzhou" was variously romanized as Foochow, Fuchow, Fuh-chau, Fuh-Chow, Hock Chew or Hokchew. The Yuanhe Maps and Records of Prefectures and Counties, a Chinese geographical treatise published in the 9th century, says that Fuzhou's name came from "Mt. Fu", a mountain located northwest of the city. The mountain's name was then combined with -zhou, meaning
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    1 votes
    168
    Garzê Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Garzê Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Garzê Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Tibetan: དཀར་མཛེས་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་; Chinese: 甘孜藏族自治州) — is an autonomous prefecture in Sichuan Province of southwestern China. It is sometimes spelled as "Kardze" and Garzin by non-government sources. The prefecture's area is 151,078 square kilometres (58,332 sq mi). The population is approximately 880,000, with Tibetans accounting for 77.8% of the total population. The capital city of Garzê is Kangding (Dardo). Garzê was traditionally part of the historical region of Kham in eastern Tibet. During the period of rule by the Republic of China (1912–1949), Garzê became nominally part of Xikang province, which included parts of former Kham. In 1930, the Tibetan army invaded Garzê, capturing it without much resistance. However, in 1932, the Tibetan army withdrew after suffering defeats elsewhere at the hands of the warlord of Qinghai, Ma Bufang. Chinese warlord Liu Wenhui reoccupied Garzê, and signed an agreement with the Tibetans formalizing his control of the area east of the upper Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), which corresponds roughly with eastern Kham. In 1950, following the defeat of the Kuomintang forces by the People's Liberation Army,
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    1 votes
    169
    Heihe

    Heihe

    Heihe (Chinese: 黑河; pinyin: Hēihé; "Black River") is a prefecture-level city of northern Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China, located on the Russian border, on the south bank of the Amur River, across the river from Blagoveshchensk. Heihe has a urban population of about 211,313, while the total population of the prefecture-level city is 1,673,893. Heihe marks the northeast terminus of the Heihe–Tengchong Line, which is sometimes used to divide China into east and west. Heihe, formerly Aihui or Aigun, is among one of the five oldest cities in Heilongjiang Province, along with Tsitsihar, Yilan, Acheng and Hulan. Human being started to settle in Heihe region as early as the Paleolithic Age. Later it became home to local tribes. During the Qing Dynasty, Heihe was the first place troops sent to Heilongjiang were stationed. The predecessor of today's Heihe was the town established in 1683 some 30 km south of the modern city site (in today's Aihui District) and was known as Aigun, Heilongjiang, or Saghalien Ula. (The two last names both mean "the Black Dragon River" - the name for the Amur River in Chinese and Manchu, respectively). Aigun was the capital (the seat of the
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    1 votes
    170
    Shenzhen

    Shenzhen

    Shēnzhèn (Chinese: 深圳 Mandarin pronunciation: [ʂə́ntʂə̂n]) is a major city in the south of Southern China's Guangdong Province, situated immediately north of Hong Kong. The area became China's first—and one of the most successful—Special Economic Zones (SEZs). It currently also holds sub-provincial administrative status, with powers slightly less than a province. Shenzhen's modern cityscape is the result of the vibrant economy made possible by rapid foreign investment since the institution of the policy of "reform and opening" establishment of the SEZ in the late 1979, before which it was only a small village. Both Chinese and foreign nationals have invested enormous amounts of money in the Shenzhen SEZ. More than US$30 billion in foreign investment has gone into both foreign-owned and joint ventures, at first mainly in manufacturing but more recently in the service industries as well. Shenzhen is now considered one of the fastest-growing cities in the world. Being southern mainland China's major financial centre, Shenzhen is home to the Shenzhen Stock Exchange as well as the headquarters of numerous high-tech companies. Shenzhen is also one of the busiest container ports in
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    1 votes
    171
    Yangjiang

    Yangjiang

    Yángjiāng (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Yeungkong; Chinese: 阳江) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. It borders Maoming to the west, Yunfu to the north, Jiangmen to the east, and looks out to the South China Sea to the south. It is famous for being the base of Yangjiang Shibazi, a knife manufacturer. The local dialect is the Gaoyang dialect, a branch of Cantonese. The prefecture-level city of Yangjiang administers 4 county-level divisions, including 1 districts, 1 county-level city and 2 counties. Yangjiang enjoys a convenient location, 2:30 hours from Guangzhou by bus. Notable areas include its famous Zhapo Beach and Hailing Island near Shapa Town. Yangjiang has a monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa), with mild to warm winters and long, hot (but not especially) summers, and very humid conditions year-round. The monthly daily average temperature ranges from 15.1 °C (59.2 °F) in January to 28.2 °C (82.8 °F) in July. From May to August, rain is very heavy, accounting for more than 65% of the annual total, and falls on an average 18 to 20 days per month. The city was hit by a magnitude 5.9 earthquake on
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    1 votes
    172
    Zhuzhou

    Zhuzhou

    Zhuzhou (Chinese: 株洲; pinyin: Zhūzhōu), formerly Jianning, is a city in Hunan Province, China, southeast of Changsha beside the Xiangjiang River. It is part of the "ChangZhuTan Golden Triangle" (comprising the cities of Changsha, Zhuzhou and Xiangtan). The city has jurisdiction over 5 counties (Yanling, Chaling, Youxian, Liling, Zhuzhou) and four districts (Hetang, Lusong, Shifeng and Tianyuan, a high-tech industrial development zone), and covers an area of 11,420 km². It has 3,855,609 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 806,988 live in the built up area (4 urban districts). With adjoining Zhuzhou being agglomerated in a few years, the joint built up area is home to 2,586,948 inhabitants. Zhuzhou is located in a subtropical monsoon climate zone and with its abundant mineral and organic resources has one of the highest agricultural yields in Hunan Province. Zhuzhou is a very important transportation junction in South China. The Beijing-Guangzhou Railway, the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Railway and the Hunan-Guizhou Railway meet here, which makes Zhuzhou railway station one of the five special class passenger & goods transportation stations in China. There is a train passing by on average every
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    1 votes
    173
    Ziyang

    Ziyang

    Ziyang (simplified Chinese: 资阳; traditional Chinese: 資陽; pinyin: Zīyáng; Wade–Giles: Tzu-yang) prefecture-level city in eastern Sichuan province, People's Republic of China, with more than 300,000 inhabitants residing in its urban area.
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    1 votes
    174
    Baoding

    Baoding

    Bǎodìng (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Paoting; Chinese: 保定) is a city of Hebei province, People's Republic of China, bordering the national capital Beijing, which lies 140 kilometres (87 mi) to the northeast. The population of Baoding municipality is 11,194,379, out of which 1,665,360 in the urban districts (2010 census). Baoding is a city with a history dating back to the Western Han Dynasty. It was destroyed by the Mongols in the 13th century, but after the Mongols established the Yuan Dynasty, it was rebuilt. It acquired the name "Baoding" during the Yuan dynasty — the name is roughly interpreted as "protecting the capital", referring to the city's proximity to Beijing. Baoding served for many years as the capital of Zhili, and was a significant centre of culture in the Ming Dynasty and early Qing Dynasty. After Zhili province was abolished in 1928 Baoding became the capital of the newly formed Hebei province. During World War II, the city was the site of a headquarters for Japanese occupation forces. In 1958, the role of provincial capital was assumed by Tianjin, which had lost its status as a provincial level municipality, but when Tianjin was elevated again in 1966,
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Chizhou

    Chizhou

    Chizhou (Chinese: 池州; pinyin: Chízhōu) is a prefecture-level city in Anhui province, People's Republic of China. It borders Anqing to the northwest, Tongling and Wuhu to the northeast, Xuancheng to the east, Huangshan to the southeast, and the province of Jiangxi to the southwest. Mount Jiuhua (Jǐuhuáshān), located in Qingyang county, is one of the four sacred mountains of Chinese Buddhism. The prefecture-level city of Chizhou administers four county-level divisions, including one district and three counties. Chizhou is served by the Tongling–Jiujiang Railway.
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Ordos City

    Ordos City

    Ordos (Mongolian: , Ordos; Chinese: 鄂尔多斯; pinyin: È'ěrduōsī) is one of the twelve major subdivisions of Inner Mongolia, China. It is located within the Ordos Loop of the Yellow River. Although mainly rural, Ordos is administered as a prefecture-level city. The administrative seat is at Dongsheng. The area had been administered as Yekhe Juu League (Chinese: 伊克昭盟; pinyin: Yikezhao Meng) since the 17th century, and was redesignated a prefecture-level city and renamed to Ordos on 26 February 2001. "Ordos" means "palaces" in the Mongolian language; the name is sometimes claimed to be related to the eight white yurts of Genghis Khan. Linguistically, the Ordos dialect of Mongolian is quite different from neighboring Chakhar Mongolian. Ordos is known for its lavish government projects, including the new Ordos City, a city of exquisite buildings and abundant infrastructure seldom used by residents. It hosted the 2012 Miss World Final. Ordos's prefectural administrative region occupies 86,752 square kilometres (33,495 sq mi) and covers the bigger part of the Ordos Desert, although the urban area itself is relatively small. The region borders the prefectures of Hohhot to the east, Baotou to
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Qinzhou

    Qinzhou

    Qīnzhōu (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Yamchow or Yenchow; simplified Chinese: 钦州; traditional Chinese: 欽州; Wade–Giles: Ch'in-chou) is a municipal region in Guangxi, People's Republic of China. The municipality lies on the Gulf of Tonkin and has a population of 944, 000. The Qinzhou municipal region comprises two (county-level) districts and two counties. Population data is as of 2009.  Qinzhou has a warm, monsoon-influenced humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa). Summers are long, hot and humid, though somewhat moderated by the proximity to the Gulf of Tonkin, with a July average of 28.4 °C (83.1 °F). Winters are mild and damp, though comparatively dry, with a 13.6 °C (56.5 °F) average in January. In 2004, the GDP totaled 17,5 billion yuans, and the GDP per capita was 5,131 yuans. Grain cultivation, hog husbandry, fruit growing and fishing are of significance in the surrounding areas. The area originally belonged to Guangdong. The city was originally the county Qinxian (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Yamhsien)
    4.50
    4 votes
    178
    Chaohu

    Chaohu

    Chaohu (Chinese: 巢湖; pinyin: Cháohú) was formerly a prefecture-level city and is now a county-level city in central Anhui province, People's Republic of China. Embracing the Lake Chao, from which the city was named, Chaohu borders the provincial capital of Hefei to the northwest, Lu'an to the west, Anqing to the southwest, Tongling to the south, Wuhu to the southeast, and Ma'anshan and the province of Jiangsu to the east. On August 22, 2011, Anhui province government announced in a controversial decision that Chaohu was split into three parts and was absorbed by neighboring cities. Juchao District was renamed to Chaohu as a county-level city under Hefei's administration.
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Luzhou

    Luzhou

    Luzhou (Chinese: 泸州; pinyin: Lúzhōu; Sichuanese Pinyin: Nuzou; Luzhou dialect: [nu˨˩tsəu˥]), formally transliterated as Lu-chou or Luchow, is a major city located in the southeast of Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China. The city, named Jiangyang until the Southern and Northern Dynasties, is known as the "wine city". Situated at the confluence of the Tuo River and the Yangtze River, Luzhou is not only an important port on the Yangtze river, but also the largest port in both size and output in Sichuan province since Chongqing seceded from Sichuan province in 1997. Luzhou, which borders Yunnan, Guizhou and Chongqing, is the only geographic junction of the four provinces, and was therefore the logical place for a port in ancient China. After the PRC was founded in 1949, Luzhou became the capital of southern Sichuan province. In 1983, Luzhou was approved as a prefecture-level city administratively. Luzhou is best known for its alcoholic beverages. Luzhou was incorporated into the Ba state early in the Shang and Zhou period, in the 11th century BC. In 316 BC, during the Qin Dynasty (221 BC-208 BC), Emperor Huiwen established Ba prefecture, which included most of Luzhou, after he
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Shangqiu

    Shangqiu

    Shangqiu (Chinese: 商丘; pinyin: Shāngqiū; Postal map spelling: Shangkiu) is a city in eastern Henan province, Central China. It borders Kaifeng to the northwest, Zhoukou to the southwest, and the provinces of Shandong and Anhui to the northeast and southeast respectively. An ancient city with a rich history, Shangqiu was also the first capital of the Shang dynasty. Once merely a small village, Shangqiu has grown significantly in recent years. It is important geographically because it lies at a confluence of several major railways, making its train station a major regional transportation hub. The history of Shangqiu is closely related to the very beginning of Chinese history. Dates back to the Three August Ones and Five Emperors periods (about 25 century BC), Emperor Shennong, Emperor Zhuanxu and Emperor Ku were living in the present Shangqiu area. The son of Emperor Ku, Qi (契), who helped Yu the Great (禹) to control floods, was enfeoffed the area of Shang (which is the current day Shangqiu area), who also became the ancestor of the ancient nationality of Shang. It is said that the Shang people first started trading with neighboring countries by shipping the goods with ox wagens.
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Suihua

    Suihua

    Suihua (simplified Chinese: 绥化; traditional Chinese: 綏化; pinyin: Suīhuà) is a prefecture-level city in west-central Heilongjiang province of Northeast China, adjacent to Yichun to the east, Harbin, the provincial capital, to the south, Daqing to the west and Heihe to the north. It is in the southern half of Heilongjiang. It has 5,416,439 inhabitants at the 2010 census, of whom 877,682 live in the metro area made of Beilin District. Suihua's history can be streched back to over 10,000 years ago. As early as in the Paleolithic Age, human beings started living in this area. The Sushen people, the ancestors of the Manchu, inhabited in this region During the Xia Dynasty and Shang Dynasty. During the Yuan Dynasty, agriculture developed rapidly in Suihua. Suihua has been inhabited by many ethnic minority groups, such as Mongols and Koreans since the Ming Dynasty. Suihua is approved to become a prefecture-level city in 1999, and officially designated a prefecture-level city on June 14, 2000. Suihua is located in the northern part of the Songnen Plain, and situated in the central part of Heilongjiang Province. Bordering prefecture cities are: The city is located at latitude 45° 3′—48° 02′ N
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Taiyuan

    Taiyuan

    Taiyuan (Chinese: 太原; pinyin: Tàiyuán [tʰâɪɥǎn]) is the capital and largest city of Shanxi province in North China. At the 2010 census, it had a total population of 4,201,591 inhabitants on 6959 km² whom 3,212,500 are urban on 1,460 km². The name of the city literally means "Great Plains", referring to the location where the Fen River leaves the mountains. From around 859 BC the area around modern Taiyuan was occupied by the Rong people. In 662 BC the Rong were driven out by the Beidi people. During the late Spring and Autumn period Taiyuan became the capital of Zhao. It was constructed by Zhao Jianzi (simplified Chinese: 赵简子; traditional Chinese: 趙簡子) in 497 BC. The city's original name in Zhao was "Jinyang" (simplified Chinese: 晋阳; traditional Chinese: 晉陽), but it was renamed "Taiyuan" following its conquest by Qin in 228 BC. During the Later Han dynasty (25-220 AD), Taiyuan was the capital of Bing Province. The city was a secondary capital of the Eastern Wei (534-550) and Northern Qi (550-577) dynasties, during which it grew into a fairly large city and became a center of Buddhism. A new city was built in 562, which was later linked to the old city during the Tang dynasty
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Zaozhuang

    Zaozhuang

    Zaozhuang (simplified Chinese: 枣庄; traditional Chinese: 棗莊; pinyin: Zǎozhuāng) is a prefecture-level city in the south of Shandong province in Eastern China. The second smallest prefecture-level city in the province, it borders Jining to the west and north, Linyi to the east, and the province of Jiangsu to the south. Its population is 3,729,300 at the 2010 census whom 868,445 in the built up area made of Shizhong and Yicheng districts. The prefecture-level city of Zaozhuang administers 6 county-level divisions, including 5 districts and 1 county-level city. These are further divided into 62 township-level divisions, including 44 towns, 2 townships and 16 subdistricts.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Zhaoqing

    Zhaoqing

    Zhàoqìng (Chinese: 肇庆) is a prefecture-level city of Guangdong province, People's Republic of China and is considered part of the Pearl River Delta region. It is well-known for being a regional tourist hub, a medium-sized provincial "college town" as well as an up and coming manufacturing center. Residents from Guangzhou, Shenzhen and other nearby cities, as well as people from Hong Kong and Macao, are known to visit the city on weekend getaways and excursions. The main central city, excluding Seven Star Crags, is fairly flat, but thickly forested mountains lie just outside the city limits. Numerous rice paddies and aquaculture ponds are found on the outskirts of the city. As of 2008, the estimated population of the city proper was 400,000 people. The date of Zhaoqing's founding is uncertain, but it existed as early as the Qin (221–206 BC) and Han (206 BC – 220 CE) Dynasties, when it was known as Gaoyao (高要). In the Sui Dynasty (581–618), Zhaoqing became known as Duanzhou (端州) and served as an important administrative region and military base. In 1118, Northern Song Dynasty Emperor Huizong bestowed its current name upon the city. "Zhaoqing" means "beginning of auspiciousness". By
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Fushun

    Fushun

    Fushun (simplified Chinese: 抚顺; traditional Chinese: 撫順; pinyin: Fǔshùn) is a prefecture level city in Liaoning province, China, about 45 km east from Shenyang, with a population of about 2,138 090 inhabitants at the 2010 census and an area of 11,271 km, including 713 km of the city proper. Fushun is situated on the Hun River or "muddy river" in English. It was formerly called Fouchouen in French. The film The Lover starring Tony Leung Ka Fai described a love story between a young French woman and a young man from Fouchouen. The city was occupied by Russia until 1905 and by Japan until 1945. Fushun is a highly industrialized area. It has developed as a thriving center for fuel, power and raw materials but is also offering more and more opportunities in textiles and electronics. It is connected by rail with nearby Shenyang and with Dalian. The world's largest artificial pit, known as the Magnificent West Pit, is located not far from the downtown. It is an open-pit coal mine, being in operation since about the 12th century. Fushun has a major aluminum-reduction plant and factories making automobiles, machinery, chemicals, cement, and rubber. Fushun is located on the Hun River. It was
    5.00
    3 votes
    186
    Bengbu

    Bengbu

    Bengbu (Chinese: 蚌埠; pinyin: Bèngbù; Wade–Giles: Peng-pu) is a prefecture-level city with a population of 3,164,467 at the last census (including rural residents) in northern Anhui Province, China. Its name means "Oyster Wharf" in Chinese, echoing its former reputation as a freshwater pearl fishery. Its built-up area is home to 802,575 inhabitants spread on the 4 urban districts. This agglomeration is about to include Huaiyuan county in Bengbu as well as Fengyang county in Chuzhou municipality which would soon make an agglomeration of 2,609,820 inhabitants. The prefecture-level city of Bengbu administers seven county-level divisions, including four districts and three counties. These are further divided into 74 township-level divisions, including 36 towns, 19 townships and 19 subdistricts. Bengbu is located 135 kilometres (84 mi) north of Nanjing, on the Huai River. The built up urbanized area is divided into two parts: greater Bengbu on the south bank of the river and little Bengbu on the north bank. Dragon Lake is on the East side of the urbanized area. On the other side of the lake is the university district, containing four institution of higher learning. The area has a
    5.50
    2 votes
    187
    Golog Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Golog Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

    Golog (or Guoluo) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 果洛藏族自治州; pinyin: Guǒluò Zàngzú Zìzhìzhōu; Tibetan: མགོ་ལོག་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་, Wylie: Mgo-log Bod-rigs rang-skyong-khul) is an autonomous prefecture of Qinghai province in China. The prefecture has an area of 76,312 km² and its capital is Maqên County. Golog Prefecture is located in the southeastern part of Qinghai, in the upper basin of the Yellow River. Gyaring Lake and Ngoring Lake on the western edge of the prefecture are considered to be the source of the Yellow River. However, these lakes do receive water from rivers that flow from locations even further west, in Qumarleb County of the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. The lay of the land of the prefecture is largely determined by the Amne Machin mountain range (max elevation 6,282 m), which runs in the general northwest- to-southeast direction across the entire prefecture, and beyond. The existence of the ridge results in one of the great bends of the Yellow River, which first flows for several hundreds of kilometers toward the east and southeast along through the entire Golog Prefecture, along the southern side of the Amne Machin Range, until it reaches the
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Huaibei

    Huaibei

    Huaibei (Chinese: 淮北; pinyin: Huáiběi) is a prefecture-level city in northern Anhui Province, People's Republic of China. It borders Suzhou to the east, Bengbu to the south, Bozhou to the west, and the province of Henan to the north. The prefecture-level city of Huaibei administers 4 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 1 county. These are further divided into 43 township-level divisions, including 20 towns, 8 townships and 15 subdistricts. Situated in western Anhui at 34°09′N 116°39′E / 34.15°N 116.65°E / 34.15; 116.65, Huaibei is located at the junction of Jiangsu, Henan, and Anhui. The city has three districts and one county with a total area of 2.715 km² and a population of 2.04 million. Huaibei has vast quantities of mineral reserves including marble, iron, copper, gold, silver, nickel, cobalt, fire clay and limestone. It also possesses 2.726 million tons of coal. Huaibei is the home to numerous chemical, construction, machinery, textile, power, electronics, and mineral industrial firms. The city has over 2,000 industrial enterprises, of which 22 large and medium-sized ones are run by the state. The annual output of raw coal from Huaibei is 2,000 million tons,
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Jiaxing

    Jiaxing

    Jiaxing (Chinese: 嘉兴; pinyin: Jiāxīng; Wu Chinese: Gāshīng [kɑɕiŋ]) is a prefecture-level city in northern Zhejiang province of Eastern China. Lying on the Grand Canal of China, Jiaxing borders Hangzhou to the southwest, Huzhou to the west, Shanghai to the northeast, and the province of Jiangsu to the north. The prefecture-level city of Jiaxing administers 7 county-level divisions, including 2 districts, 3 county-level cities and 2 counties. These are further divided into 75 township-level divisions, including 60 towns, 2 townships and 13 subdistricts. Jiaxing is known as the 'home of silk', and hence is a producer of textiles as well, including woollens. It is one of the world's largest exporters of leather goods. There are mechanical, chemical and electronic industries there. Jiaxing is an important energy base in East China. Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first self-designed nuclear power station in China, and Fangjiashan Nuclear Power Plant (under construction) are located in Haiyan County. Established in 2003, Jiaxing Export Processing Zone is a state-level export processing zone approved by State Council. It has a built-up area of 2.98 sqkm. Its development goal is to
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Luohe

    Luohe

    Luohe (Chinese: 漯河; pinyin: Luòhé; Postal map spelling: Loho) is a prefecture-level city in central Henan province, People's Republic of China. It is surrounded by the cities of Xuchang, Zhoukou, Zhumadian and Pingdingshan on its north, east, south and west respectively. The prefecture level city of Luohe administers 3 districts and 2 counties. Cultivation of wheat, corn and textile industry are important for the economy of the area. The city is famous for its ham production industry. Shuanghui (双汇) is the biggest ham producer in China. A commercial center since ancient times, Luohe presently is home to light industries including food preparation, paper, leather making / shoes, textiles, cigarettes, and electronics. Nanjie (南街村) Xu Shen (许慎): famous linguist during the Han Dynasty. He compiled the first Chinese character dictionary Shuowen Jiezi.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Panzhihua

    Panzhihua

    Panzhihua (Chinese: 攀枝花; pinyin: Pānzhīhūa; Wade–Giles: P'an-chih-hua) is a prefecture-level city located in the far south of Sichuan province of Southwest China, on the confluence of the Jinsha and Yalong Rivers. It has an administrative area of 7,440.398 square kilometres (2,872.754 sq mi), and a total population of 1,100,800 as of 2007. It is the only city in China having a name of a flower(dict.)(China Daily). Its economy relies almost entirely on its giant mine, one of the biggest in China. The latter makes it a very polluted city where the air condition is quite poor. Activity in Panzhihua is mainly centered around natural resource development, exploitation and industry. The city houses a notable number of migrants. It is a mountain city. In 2005 Panzhihua won the "China Excellent Tourist City" title, in 2008 it won the "National Health City" and the "China Vanadium, Titanium" titles. Panzhihua is a treasure of natural resources, but remained a wasteland until 1960. It was founded on a remote headwater of the Yangtze River in 1966 as a steel production center. It grew rapidly as it remained relatively prosperous while the rest of the country was undergoing the Cultural
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Qingdao

    Qingdao

    Qingdao (help·info) (Chinese: 青岛; pinyin: Qīngdǎo; Mandarin pronunciation: [t͡ɕʰiŋ˥ taʊ̯˨˩˦ ʂɿ˥˩]; German: Tsingtau) also known in the West by its postal map spelling Tsingtao, is a major city with a population of over 8.715 million (2010 census) in eastern Shandong province, Eastern China. Its built up area, made of 7 urban districts and 5 county-level cities, is home to about 4,896,000 inhabitants in 2010. It borders Yantai to the northeast, Weifang to the west and Rizhao to the southwest. The character 青 (qīng) in Chinese means "green" or "lush", while the character 岛 (dǎo) means "island". Qingdao is administered at the sub-provincial level. Lying across the Shandong Peninsula while looking out to the Yellow Sea, Qingdao is a major seaport, naval base, and industrial centre. It is also the site of the Tsingtao Brewery. The world's longest sea bridge, the Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, links the main urban area of Qingdao with Huangdao district, straddling the Jiaozhou Bay sea areas. In 2009 and 2011, Qingdao was named China's most livable city. Human settlement in the area dates back 6,000 years. The Dongyi nationality, one of the important origins of the Chinese nation, lived here and
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Quanzhou

    Quanzhou

    Quanzhou (Chinese: 泉州; pinyin: Quánzhōu; Wade–Giles: Ch'üan-chou; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Chôan-chiu) is a prefecture-level city in southern Fujian province, People's Republic of China. It borders all other prefecture-level cities in Fujian but two (Ningde and Nanping) and faces the Taiwan Strait. In older English works, its name may appear as Chinchew, Chinchu, or Zayton. The prefecture-level city of Quanzhou has an area of 11,245 square kilometres (4,342 sq mi) and, as of the 2010 Census, a population of 8,128,530 inhabitants. Its extended metropolitan (built-up area) is home to 6,070,617 inhabitants, encompassing the Licheng, Fengze, and Luojiang urban districts, Jinjiang, Nan'an, and Shishi cities, Hui'an county, and the Quanzhou District for Taiwanese Investment. Quanzhou is now the 12th largest Chinese extended metropolitan area (as of 2010). The prefecture-level city of Quanzhou administers four districts, three county-level cities, four counties, and two special economic districts. The People's Republic of China claims Jinmen County, more widely known as Quemoy, as part of Quanzhou, but the territory is currently under the jurisdiction of the Republic of China. Quanzhou is a coastal
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Yingkou

    Yingkou

    Yingkou (simplified Chinese: 营口; traditional Chinese: 營口; pinyin: Yíngkǒu) is a prefecture-level city of Liaoning province, in northeastern China. It is a port city of the Bohai Sea. The Liao river (Liao He) goes to the sea at Yingkou. The city has a total area of 4,970 square kilometers, and a population of 2,428,534 at the 2010 census whom 1,340,993 in the built up area made of 3 urban districts (Zhanqian, Xishi and Laobian) and Dashiqiao city now linked to the urban core. Yingkou was formerly known in the west of Newchwang (Chinese: 牛庄; pinyin: Niúzhuāng; Manchu: Ishangga gašan hoton); it was one of the Treaty Ports opened under the Treaties of Tianjin of 1858. In fact the actual town of Niuzhang (牛庄镇) was about thirty miles upstream of Liao He, within today's county-level city of Haicheng. After the treaty had been signed, the British found that the river near Newchwang was too shallow for their ships. Instead, the treaty port was moved to the area nearer to the river mouth where today's Yingkou is located. To avoid confusion between the two locations, careful English writers of the early 20th century would sometimes use "Newchwang" for Yingkou (explaining that "Ying-kow, ...
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture

    Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture

    The Déhóng Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture (Zaiwa:Sikung Sam Zaizo Byumyu Yumsing Upkang Mau; Chinese: 德宏傣族景颇族自治州; pinyin: Déhóng Dǎizú Jǐngpōzú zìzhìzhōu) is located in Yunnan province, China. Dehong stretches 122 km (~73 statute miles) from east to west and 170 km (~103 miles) from north to south, its area is 11,526 km² (~4150 mi²). Dehong is divided into three counties and two county level cities: The prefectural government seat is Mang City. The population of Dehong in 2003 was of 1.02 million, 48.17% of whom were Han Chinese, 51.83% were national minorities, mostly Dai and Jingpo. The area was declared an autonomous region in 1953 and in May 1956 became an autonomous prefecture. In 1960 when farmers from many provinces in China came to Yunnan to farm bananas many Hunanese farmers rebuilt a place, a very long time ago before this many Chinese were in fact very scared of going there because of an illness that lurked there. It was later discovered that it was a tropical disease, these farmers helped to get rid of the disease. They made clearings, roads and made space for fields and plantations. This was during the "Great Leap Forward" when a biologist working for Mao Zedong
    4.67
    3 votes
    196
    Anshan

    Anshan

    Anshan (Chinese: 鞍山; pinyin: Ānshān; literally "saddle mountain") is the third largest prefecture level city in Liaoning province, People's Republic of China. Situated in the central area of the province, Anshan is about 92 kilometres (57 mi) south of Shenyang, the provincial capital. Anshan is on the boundary between the Mountains of eastern Liaoning and the plains of the west. The prefecture has a population of 3,584,000 people and covers an area of about 9,252 km (3,572 sq mi). The distance from the east to the west of the prefecture is 133 km (83 mi). The area contains the famous Qianshan National Park. The city's name is derived from the shape of a nearby mountain that resembles the shape of a horse's saddle, which can be seen on the left (west) about five minutes before the northbound train arrives at Anshan Station. Anshan is home to the Anshan Iron and Steel Group, one of the largest steel producers in China. Anshan has a population of 3.65 million at the 2010 census. Anshan holds one third of the worlds supply of talcum Anshan holds a quarter of the worlds reserves of magnesite Anshan also produced the largest ever jade stone, now a local tourist attraction carved as a
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Jiangmen

    Jiangmen

    Jiāngmén (Chinese: 江门) is a prefecture-level city in Guangdong province in southern China with a population of about 4.48 million in 2010. The 3 urban districts are now part of Guangzhou - Shenzhen conurbation. Jiangmen has various alternative romanisations including Kong-Moon, Kongmun or Kiangmoon. The area is alternately referred to as Sze Yup or Ng Yup. The name Jiangmen is often the butt of jokes because its Cantonese pronunciation is identical to the scientific word for anus (肛門). One example which came to national attention in early 2012 was a colon cleansing service provider whose advertisement stated: "We wish the people of Jiangmen to have happy anuses"; Jiangmen residents complained that this slogan was uncivilised and insulting. As a result there have been some proposals to change the name of the city, for example a 2009 proposal to change it to "Qiaodu" ("City of Overseas Chinese"). The port of Jiangmen, was forced to open to western trade in 1902. One legacy of this period is an historic waterfront district lined with buildings in the treaty port style. The city has an ongoing renewal project which has restored many of these buildings. Jiangmen was proclaimed a city in
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Jieyang

    Jieyang

    Jiēyáng (Chinese: 揭阳) is a prefecture-level city in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China. It borders Shantou to the east, Chaozhou to the northeast, Meizhou to the north, Shanwei to the west, and looks out to the South China Sea to the south. The prefecture-level city of Jieyang administers 5 county-level divisions, including 1 district, 1 county-level city (administered on behalf of the province) and 3 counties. These are further divided into 100 township-level divisions, including 69 towns, 10 townships and 21 subdistricts. Rice cultivation and the textile industry are important to its economy. The new Jieyang Chaoshan Airport (揭阳潮汕机场) is the third largest airport complex in Guangdong Province, after Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport, and Shenzhen Bao'an International Airport. It replaced the Shantou Waisha Airport on the 15th November, 2011. The Teochew dialect is predominantly spoken in this region. The Hakka dialect, however, has its limited presence among Hakka people in Jiexi County. 1930s saw numerous Jieyang inhabitants emigrating overseas. Pontianak and Ketapang, Indonesia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia and Thailand has large Chinese
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Jinan

    Jinan

    Jinan (Chinese: 济南; pinyin: Jǐnán; Mandarin pronunciation: [t͡ɕi˧˩nan˧˥]) is the capital of Shandong province in Eastern China. The area of present-day Jinan has played an important role in the history of the region from the earliest beginnings of civilization and has evolved into a major national administrative, economic, and transportation hub. The city, which holds sub-provincial administrative status, is located in north-western Shandong about 400 kilometres (250 mi) south of the national capital of Beijing, it borders Liaocheng to the southwest, Dezhou to the northwest, Binzhou to the northeast, Zibo to the east, Laiwu to the southeast, and Tai'an to the south. The modern-day name "Jinan" literally means "south of the Ji (Waters)" and refers to the old Ji River that had flowed to the north of the city until the middle of the 19th century. The Ji River disappeared in 1852 when the Yellow River changed its course northwards and took over its bed. The current pronunciation of the character "Ji" with the third tone ("jǐ") was established in the late 1970s. Prior to this, it was pronounced with the fourth tone ("jì"). Older texts spell the name as "Tsinan" (Wade-Giles romanizaton)
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    Jincheng

    Jincheng

    }} Jìnchéng (simplified Chinese: 晋城; traditional Chinese: 晉城) is a prefecture-level city in the southeast of Shanxi province of north China. It was formerly know as Tse-Chou. It is an industrial city in an area where coal mining is an important industry. It has a population of 2.2 million. A recent report issued by the State Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) stated that 2/3 of Chinese cities were polluted. The article mentioned the effects of coal industries in the Shanxi Province where Jincheng is located.
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    Nanyang

    Nanyang

    Nanyang (simplified Chinese: 南阳; traditional Chinese: 南陽; pinyin: Nányáng) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Henan province, People's Republic of China. The city with the largest administrative area in Henan, Nanyang borders Xinyang to the southeast, Zhumadian to the east, Pingdingshan to the northeast, Luoyang to the north, Sanmenxia to the northwest, the province of Shaanxi to the west, and the province of Hubei to the south. It has 10,263,006 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 1,672,171 in the built up area made of 2 urban districts (Wolong and Wancheng). Dinosaur egg fossils have been discovered in the Nanyang Basin. The prefecture-level city of Nanyang administers 3 districts, 1 county-level city and 10 counties. Nanyang (Simplified Chinese: (南阳), Traditional Chinese: (南阳); pinyin: Nányáng) 南 Nán-South,阳 yáng-sun (the south side of a mountain, or the north side of a river, which in Chinese is called Yang meaning "sunny"). Wan (宛) is the abbreviation for Nanyang which in ancient times was known as Wancheng (宛城), meaning "Wan City". Nanyang is located in southwestern Henan, bordering Hubei (Xiangyang, Shiyan, and Suizhou) to the south, Shaanxi (Shangluo) to the
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    Quzhou

    Quzhou

    Quzhou (Chinese: 衢州; pinyin: Qúzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Zhejiang province, China. Sitting on the upper course of the Qiantang River, it borders Hangzhou to the north, Jinhua to the east, Lishui to the southeast, and the provinces of Fujian, Jiangxi and Anhui to the south, southwest and northwest respectively. The prefecture-level city of Quzhou administers 2 districts, 1 county-level city, and 3 counties. The centre of Quzhou sits on a broad agricultural plain based on the Qiantang River. The river is known locally as the Qu River (衢江). It flows roughly southwest for 81.5 km and is flanked on both sides by hills. Almost all the rivers of Quzhou feed into the Qiantang system, which ultimately empties into Hangzhou Bay. The terrain is higher in the west and the east. The territory of Quzhou Municipality is made up of plains (15%), hills (36%), and mountains (49%). In the north is the Qianli Gang (千里岗) mountain range and in the west the Yu Mountains (玉山脉). The highest mountains, the Xianxia Ling (仙霞岭) mountain range, lie in the south. The highest point in the city is at Dalong Gang (大龙岗), which rises to 1,500 m above sea level. It is the birth place of Wensi
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    Xi'an

    Xi'an

    Xi'an (Chinese: 西安; pinyin: Xī'ān; Wade–Giles: Hsi-An, also spelled Hsi-an, Hsian, or Sian) is the capital of the Shaanxi province, and a sub-provincial city in the People's Republic of China. One of the oldest cities in China, with more than 3,100 years of history, the city was known as Chang'an before the Ming Dynasty. Xi'an is one of the Four Great Ancient Capitals of China, having held the position under several of the most important dynasties in Chinese history, including Zhou, Qin, Han, Sui, and Tang. Xi'an is the eastern terminus of the Silk Road and home to the Terracotta Army. Since the 1990s, as part of the economic revival of interior China especially for the central and northwest regions, the city of Xi'an has re-emerged as an important cultural, industrial and educational centre of the central-northwest region, with facilities for research and development, national security and China's space exploration program. It's now one of the most populous metropolitan areas in inland China with more than 8 million inhabitants, including urban parts of Xianyang (Weicheng and Qindu districts). According to a July 2012 report by the Economist Intelligence Unit, it was recently
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    Xuchang

    Xuchang

    Xuchang (simplified Chinese: 许昌; traditional Chinese: 許昌; pinyin: Xǔchāng; Postal map spelling: Hsuchang) is a prefecture-level city in central Henan province in Central China. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the northwest, Kaifeng to the northeast, Zhoukou to the east, Luohe to the southeast, and Pingdingshan to the southwest. Its population is 4,307,199 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 1,139,644 live in the built up area (Weidu district and Xuchang county) The prefecture-level city of Xuchang administers 1 district, 2 county-level cities and 3 counties. According to tradition, the city was named after Xu, an ancient state led by tribal leader Xuyou during the Spring and Autumn Period of the Zhou Dynasty. In ancient times, the city occupied a strategic location in central China. Xuchang served as the warlord Cao Cao's de facto capital during the Three Kingdoms Period. After finding the Han Dynasty capital Luoyang ravaged by war, Cao moved the imperial court and the emperor to what is now Xuchang in 196. In 220, Cao Cao's son and successor Cao Pi officially declared the city as the capital of the newly-established state of Wei. The city was renamed "Xuchang",
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    Yancheng

    Yancheng

    Yancheng (Chinese: 盐城; pinyin: Yánchéng) is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China. The city with the largest jurisdiction area in Jiangsu, Yancheng borders Lianyungang to the north, Huai'an to the west, Yangzhou and Taizhou to the southwest, Nantong to the south, and looks out to the Yellow Sea to the east. Yancheng, literally "Salt City", is named after the salt harvest fields that surround the city. According to historical records, collection and production of sea salt in the region began as early as 119 BC during the Western Han Dynasty, when the settlement on the current location of Yancheng was named Yandu County (盐都县). According to the 2010 Census, Yancheng has a registered population of 8,203,728 — with 7,260,240 permanent residents. The prefecture-level city of Yancheng administers 9 county-level divisions, including 2 districts, 2 county-level cities and 5 counties. The population information here presented uses 2010 census data of permanent residents. Yancheng has a history of 2,100 years since the first canton was founded here in Han Dynasty at year 119 BC. It was named for the salt reserves in rivers around the area, its
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    Chuzhou

    Chuzhou

    Chuzhou (Chinese: 滁州; pinyin: Chúzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Anhui Province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Hefei to the southwest, Huainan to the west, Bengbu to the northwest, Chaohu to the south, and the province of Jiangsu to the east. According to the 2010 Census, the city of Chuzhou has a registered population of 4,533,540 inhabitants, although 7,260,240 persons declared to be permanent residents. The prefecture-level city of Chuzhou administers 8 county-level divisions, including 2 districts, a sub-prefecture-level city (Tianchang), a county-level city and 4 counties. The population information here presented uses 2010 census data of permanent residents. These are further divided into 178 township-level divisions, including 86 towns, 78 townships and 14 subdistricts. Langya temple and the Deep Lake Show, located nearby, are popular tourist destinations.
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    Guiyang

    Guiyang

    Guìyáng (Chinese: 贵阳) is the capital of Guizhou province of Southwest China. It is located in the centre of the province, situated on the east of the Yunnan–Guizhou Plateau, and on the north bank of the Nanming River, a branch of the Wu River. The city has an elevation of about 1,100 meters. It has an area of 8,034 square kilometers. Its population is 4,324,561 at the 2010 census whom 3,037,159 live in the built up area made of 7 urban districts. The city was first constructed as early as 1283 AD during the Yuan Dynasty. It was originally called Shunyuan (順元), meaning obeying the Yuan (the Mongol rulers). Originally the area was populated by non-Chinese. The Sui Dynasty (AD 581–618) had a commandery there, and the Tang dynasty (618–907) a prefecture. They were, however, no more than military outposts, and it was not until the Yuan (Mongol) invasion of southwest China in 1279 that the area was made the seat of an army and a "pacification office." Chinese settlement in the area also began at that time, and, under the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties, the town became the seat of a superior prefecture named Guiyang. Locally Guiyang was an important administrative and
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    Huaihua

    Huaihua

    Huaihua (simplified Chinese: 怀化; traditional Chinese: 懷化; pinyin: Huáihuà) is a prefecture-level city in Hunan province of China. Huaihua lies is in the mountainous west of Hunan, south-east of Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, and shares the same mountain belt. The area's rural poverty is a continuing problem. Railroads provide the main transportation in the region, although an airport was opened in 2004. Huaihua is home to the Second Artillery Corps Base 55, which is charged with maintaining ICBMs. The nuclear assets at Huaihua are intended for small-scale nuclear conflicts (with a limited, but nuclear, exchange), as well as the ability to strike Guam, one of only two B-2 bases.
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    Ningde

    Ningde

    Ningde (simplified Chinese: 宁德; traditional Chinese: 寕德; pinyin: Níngdé; Foochow Romanized: Nìng-dáik), also known as Mindong (simplified Chinese: 闽东; traditional Chinese: 閩東; pinyin: Mǐndōng; Foochow Romanized: Mìng-dĕ̤ng; lit. East of Fujian), is a prefecture-level city located along the northeastern coast of Fujian province, People's Republic of China. It borders Fuzhou to the south, Wenzhou City and Zhejiang province to the north, and Nanping City to the west. The prefecture-level Ningde City administers 1 district, 2 cities, 6 counties, as well as 124 towns, townships and subdistricts. Listed below are the district, cities and counties, first four of which are coastal whereas the rest locate in mountainous areas. Ningde's history dates back to the Stamped Pottery Culture System (海印紋陶文化系統 Hāi-éng-ùng-dò̤ Ùng-huá Hiê-tūng). As early as 10,000 to 20,000 years ago during the late Upper Palaeolithic period of the Stone Age (also known as the Old Stone Age) there were already human beings living and multiplying here. In 282, the Jin Dynasty government established magistrate rule here. During the first twenty-three years of the Yuan Dynasty (1206 – 1368), Funingzhou (福寧州
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    Baishan

    Baishan

    Baishan (Chinese: 白山; pinyin: Báishān) is a prefecture-level city in Jilin province of the People's Republic of China. "白山" literally means "White Mountain", and is named after Baekdu Mountain, which is known as "长白山" (pinyin: Chángbái Shān) in Chinese. Baishan is to be granted the title of China International Mineral Water City. In Baishan is the Baishan Dam. In 1902, Qing imperial government set up the Linjiang County in today's Baishan region. During the Manchukuo period, Linjiang county was under the jurisdiction of Tonghua. In March 1959, Jilin provincial government promoted Linjiang County to a county-level city and renamed it as Hunjiang City, which is still under the administration of Tonghua Prefecture. In 1985, Hunjiang City developed into a prefecture-level city, administerring three districts and three counties including Fusong, Jingyu and Changbai. The city was renamed to Baishan in April, 1994 with the approval of the State of Council.
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    Hanzhong

    Hanzhong

    Hanzhong (simplified Chinese: 汉中; traditional Chinese: 漢中; pinyin: Hànzhōng; Wade–Giles: Hanchung) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Shaanxi, People's Republic of China, occupying a historically significant valley in the mountains between the Xi'an area, home to many Chinese capitals, and the fertile but isolated Sichuan Basin. The total population in 2006 was approximately 3.74 million, residing in a municipal territory of 27,246 square kilometres (10,520 sq mi). There are few references to Hanzhong before the Qin Dynasty's unification of China in 221 BC. The Book of History refers to an area called Liangzhou (Chinese: 梁州), while Sima Qian's book Records of the Grand Historian speaks of a "Bao [River] Kingdom" (Chinese: 褒國), both of which are believed to refer to the area now called Hanzhong. The name Nanzheng (Chinese: 南鄭; literally "Southern Zheng") was used to refer to the area from the 8th century BC throughout much of its history. The ancient geographical treatise Shui Jing Zhu records that Lord Huan of Zheng, a local lord from the Western Zhou Dynasty, was slain in a battle with non-Chinese Rong people, and the citizens fled south to found a new settlement,
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    Jingzhou

    Jingzhou

    Jingzhou (Chinese: 荆州) is a prefecture-level city in southern Hubei, People's Republic of China, located on the banks of the Yangtze River. As of the 2010 census, its total population is 5,691,707, 1,154,086 of whom reside in the built-up area made of 3 urban districts. Jingzhou occupies an area of 14,067 square kilometres (5,431 sq mi) with its topography rising from east to west. It is densely covered by a network of waterways, as well as lakes, and is located in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River on the Jianghan Plain. Downstream to its east lies Wuhan, the provincial capital and to the west the city of Yichang, the Three Gorges, and finally the Chongqing Municipality. Jingmen City, also in Hubei, lies to the north; to its south are Yueyang and Changde, both in Hunan Province. Jingzhou has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa), with hot, humid summers, and damp, chilly, but drier winters. Monthly daily average temperatures range from 4.1 °C (39.4 °F) in January to 28.0 °C (82.4 °F) in July. The area receives 1,800 to 2,000 hours of sunshine per year and has a frost-free period of 242–263 days annually. According to the 2010 Census, the prefecture-level city of Jingzhou
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    Jiuquan

    Jiuquan

    Jiǔquán (Chinese: 酒泉) is a "prefecture-level city" in the westernmost part of the Gansu province in China. The entire "prefecture-level city" (that is, a multi-county administrative unit - an equivalent to the traditional Chinese prefecture) stretches for more than 500 km from east to west, occupying 191,342 km²; its population as of 2002 was 962,000. The city's name came from legendary tale of the young Han general Huo Qubing, who poured a jar of precious wine into a local creek in order to share the taste with his troops, in celebration of their crushing victory against Xiongnu forces. The creek was later named Jiu Quan ("Wine Spring"), which became the name of the Han prefecture established there. It was an active military garrison during the Later Han Dynasty. It is known in popular legend as the place where rhubarb was first grown and is also the town where the Portuguese Jesuit missionary and explorer Bento de Góis (1562–1607) was robbed and died destitute. Jiuquan has a cold desert climate (Köppen BWk), with long, cold winters, and hot, somewhat dry summers. Monthly average temperatures range from −9 °C (15.8 °F) in January to 21.7 °C (71.1 °F) in July, with an annual mean
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    Lanzhou

    Lanzhou

    Lánzhōu (Chinese: 兰州; Postal map spelling: Lanchow) is the capital and largest city of Gansu Province in Northwest China. A prefecture-level city, it is a key regional transportation hub, allowing areas further west to maintain railroad connections to the eastern half of the country. Lanzhou is home to 3,616,163 inhabitants at the 2010 census and 2,177,130 in the built-up area (urban) of 1,088 square kilometres (420 sq mi). Originally in the territory of the Western Qiang peoples, Lanzhou became part of the territory of the State of Qin in the 6th century BC. In 81 BC, under the Han dynasty (206 BC–220 AD), it was taken from the Huns' Huandi Chanyu and made the seat of Jincheng commandery (jùn), and later of the Jincheng county (xiàn), later renamed Yunwu. The city used to be called the Golden City, and since at least the first millennium BC it was a major link on the ancient Northern Silk Road, and also an important historic Yellow River crossing site. To protect the city, the Great Wall of China was extended as far as Yumen. After the fall of the Han Dynasty, Lanzhou became the capital of a succession of tribal states. In the 4th century it was briefly the capital of the
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    Lincang

    Lincang

    Líncāng (simplified Chinese: 临沧; traditional Chinese: 臨滄) is a prefecture-level city located in the west of Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. Lincang covers latitude 23° 05′-25° 02′ N and longitude 98° 40′-100° 33′ E, thus straddling the Tropic of Cancer in the southern part of its administrative area, or prefecture. It is situated on the middle to lower reaches of the Mekong, known as the Lancang in China, and the Salween, or the Nu. Bordering prefectures are Pu'er to the southeast, and Baoshan and Dali to the northwest. It also borders Burma's Shan State. Elevations within the prefecture range from 450 to 3,504 metres (1,480 to 11,496 ft). Located at an altitude of above 1,450 m (4,760 ft) and within 30 arc minutes to the north of the Tropic of Cancer, Lincang has a subtropical highland climate (Köppen Cwb), falling just short of a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cwa), with warm days year-round, although from January to April, temperatures cool off sharply at night, yet frost is rare. From June to August, rainfall is particularly common and relative humidity averages above 80%, pushing sunshine levels to 30% of the possible total. The coolest month is January, with a
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    Nujiang Lisu Autonomous Prefecture

    Nujiang Lisu Autonomous Prefecture

    Nùjiāng Lisu Autonomous Prefecture (Chinese: 怒江傈僳族自治州; pinyin: Nùjiāng Lìsùzú Zìzhìzhōu) is an autonomous prefecture of Yunnan Province, southwestern China. It is named after the Nujiang river (the longest undammed river in South-east Asia) and the Lisu ethnic group. The seat of the prefecture is Liuku Town, Lushui County. The prefecture is subdivided into four county-level divisions: two counties and two autonomous counties: According to the 2000 Census Nujiang has 491,824 inhabitants with a population density of 33.45 inhabitants/km².
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    Rizhao

    Rizhao

    Rizhao (Chinese: 日照; pinyin: Rìzhào; Wade–Giles: Jih-Chao) is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It is situated on the coastline along the Yellow Sea, borders Qingdao to the northeast, Weifang to the north, Linyi to the west and southwest, and faces Korea and Japan across the Yellow Sea to the east. Rizhao is a major seaport and is approximately 620 km north of Shanghai, 170 km southwest of Qingdao, and 120 km north of Lianyungang. The Rizhao seaport's primary business is loading and unloading iron ore and coal. Other products passing through the seaport include cement, nickel, bauxite, and the like. In 2011 the Port of Rizhao, together with three other Chinese ports in East China's Shandong province, signed a strategic alliance with the largest port of the Republic of Korea (ROK). The alliance is jointly formed by Shandong's Qingdao Port, Yantai Port, Rizhao Port, Weihai Port and the ROK's Port of Busan, aiming to build a shipping and logistics center in Northeast Asia. Rizhao City means City of Sunshine in Chinese. The city is known for its sustainability, and it mandates solar-water heaters in all new buildings. Rizhao city
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    Haikou

    Haikou

    Hǎikǒu (Chinese: 海口), is the capital and most populous city of Hainan province, People's Republic of China. It is situated on the northern coast of Hainan, by the mouth of the Nandu River. The northern part of the city is the district of Haidian Island, which is separated from the main part of Haikou by the Haidian River, a branch of the Nandu. Administratively, Haikou is a prefecture-level city, comprising four districts, and covering 2,280 square kilometres (880 sq mi). There are 2,046,189 inhabitants in the built up area all living within the 4 urban districts of the city. Haikou was originally a port city. Today, more than half of the island's total trade still goes through its ports. The city is home to Hainan University, which has its main campus on Haidian Island. The hanzi characters comprising the city's name, 海口, mean ocean/sea and mouth/port, respectively. Thus, the name "Haikou" is also a word for "seaport". Haikou originally served as the port for Qiongshan, the ancient administrative capital of Hainan island, located some 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) inland to the south east. During its early history Haikou was a part of Guangdong province. In the 13th century it was
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    Hohhot

    Hohhot

    Hohhot (Mongolian: , Chinese: 呼和浩特; pinyin: Hūhéhàotè, abbreviated Hū Shì (Chinese: 呼市); also romanized as Huhehot or Huhhot), is a city in north-central China and the capital of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, serving as the region's administrative, economic, and cultural centre. The name of the city in Mongolian means "Blue City" — Kuku-Khoto in Mongolian - although it is also wrongly referred to as the "Green City." The color blue in Mongolian culture is associated with the sky, eternity and purity; in Chinese, the name can be translated as Qīng Chéng (Chinese: 青城), literally, "Blue/Green City." The city was founded in 1581 by the Tumed Mongol ruler Altan Khan, in a marshy oasis on the steppes. The old city grew up around Buddhist temples and monasteries, some of which have been restored. Altan Khan and his successors constructed temples and fortress in 1579, 1602 and 1727. The Tümet Mongols had long been semiagricultural there. Hui merchants gathered north of the gate of the city's fortress, building a mosque in 1693. Their descendants forms the nucleus of the modern Hui people's district. In the 17th century, Han farmers began moving into the rich farmland around the
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    Cangzhou

    Cangzhou

    Cāngzhōu (simplified Chinese: 沧州; traditional Chinese: 滄州) is a prefecture-level city in eastern Hebei province, People's Republic of China. Cangzhou's urban center has a population of approximately 514,074 as of the 2010 national census, while the prefecture-level administrative unit in total has a population of 7,134,053. It lies approximately 90 kilometres (56 mi) from the major port city of Tianjin, and 180 km (110 mi) from Beijing. Cangzhou is reported to have been founded in the Southern and Northern Dynasties period (420-589 CE). Cangzhou City comprises 2 districts, 4 county-level cities, 9 counties and 1 autonomous county. Cangzhou's urban center is a heavily industrial city but the city's administrative territory also includes strongly agricultural areas, and is well known in China for its Chinese jujubes (Chinese dates) and Ya pears (widely known under the export name of Tianjin Ya Pear). The North China Oil Field is within Cangzhou City's jurisdiction. Cangzhou also encompasses a large fishing port and the coal-exporting Huanghua Harbour. Cangzhou is located in eastern Hebei, immediately to the south of Tianjin, near the coast of the Bohai Sea of the Pacific Ocean.
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    Dezhou

    Dezhou

    Dezhou (Chinese: 德州; pinyin: Dézhōu) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Shandong province, People's Republic of China. It borders the provincial capital of Jinan to the southeast, Liaocheng to the southwest, Binzhou to the northeast, and the province of Hebei to the north. The municipality of Dezhou comprises thirteen county-level sub divisions: Cities (县级市 xianji shi) administered by Dezhou are: Counties (县 xian) administered by Dezhou are: Dezhou lies on the main rail route from Beijing to Shanghai,which is known as Jinghu Railway. Dezhou has always been an important transport hub since ancient times(especially after Ming Dynasty), when its reputation of "Junction of Nine Arteries"(九达天衢)and "Portal of Capital City"(神京门户)gradually developed. Except for the two railways(the other is Shide Railway leading to Shijiazhuang), National Highway 104, NH105 and a few provincial roads cross the city as well. The Yellow River and the Grand Canal (China) run through it. Dezhou's biggest historical attraction is the tomb of Sultan Paduka Pahala of Sulu (Philippines), who died in Dezhou on his return journey from a visit to the Yongle Emperor in 1417. The tomb is well preserved and has
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    Maoming

    Maoming

    Màomíng (Chinese: 茂名), also known as Mowming is located in southwestern Guangdong province, People's Republic of China. Facing the South China Sea to the city's south, Maoming city neighbors Zhanjiang in the west and is 362 kilometers (225 mi) from Guangzhou and 121 kilometers (75 mi) from Zhanjiang. The Maoming Port is a Grade I port that handled 16.8 million tons of cargo in 2007. Refined oil and aquatic products are the major export products from the city. Major export destinations include Hong Kong, Macao and ASEAN member nations. As of the end of 2010, Maoming has a population of 5,817,753 inhabitants, 1,217,715 of whom are living in the built up area made up of 2 urban districts (Maonan and Maogang) with a birth rate 11.04‰. The city's GDP (2009) was RMB 123.98 billion (US$18.16 billion), up by 10.3% over the previous year. According to unverified source Maoming's GDP ranked 8th in Guangdong's 21 cities and ranked 70th of China's 656 cities in 2009. Maoming's history traces back to about 4,500 years ago. During the Xia Dynasty (2100-1600BC) and the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100BC), the Baiyue tribes inhabited this region. During the Qin Dynasty (221-206BC), the region was divided
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    Nanchang

    Nanchang

    Nanchang (Chinese: 南昌; pinyin: Nánchāng) is the capital of Jiangxi Province in southeastern China. It is located in the north-central portion of the province. As it is bounded on the west by the Jiuling Mountains, and on the east by Poyang Lake, it is famous for its scenery, rich history and cultural sites. Owing to its central location relative to the Yangtze and Pearl River Delta regions, it is a major railroad hub in Southern China. The modern Jiangxi area – including Nanchang – was first incorporated into Chinese territory during the Qin dynasty, when it was conquered from the Baiyue peoples and organized as Jiujiang Commandery (Chinese: 九江郡). In 201 BC, during the Han dynasty, the city was given the Chinese name Nanchang and became the administrative seat of Yuzhang Commandery (Chinese: 豫章郡), and was governed by Guan Ying (Chinese: 灌嬰), one of Emperor Gaozu of Han's generals. The name Nanchang means "southern flourishing", and is from a motto of developing what is now southern China that is traditionally attributed to Emperor Gaozu himself. In AD 589, during the Sui dynasty, this commandery was changed into a prefecture named Hongzhou (Chinese: 洪州), and after 763 it became the
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    Qinhuangdao

    Qinhuangdao

    Qínhuángdǎo is a port city and prefecture-level city in northeastern Hebei province, People's Republic of China. It is about 300 km (190 mi) east of Beijing, on the Bohai Sea, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea. Its population during the 2010 census was 2,987,605, with 820,800 living in the urban area of 3 districts. In the 19th century, Qinhuangdao included the separate towns of Qinhuangdao and Tanghe. Both were stations along the Peking–Mukden Railway. The design and construction of the new harbour and port of Ching Wang Tao in the Gulf of Pechili was undertaken by the partnership of Sir John Wolfe-Barry and Lt Col Arthur John Barry at the turn of the 20th century. Qinhuangdao sits on the northwest coast of the Bohai Sea and borders Tangshan to the southwest, Chengde to the northwest, and Liaoning to the northeast. Its administrative area ranges in latitude 39° 24' to 40° 37' N and in longitude from 118° 33' to 119° 51' E, and has a total area of 7,812.4 km (3,016.4 sq mi). Since the elevation of Tianjin to a provincial-level municipality, Qinhuangdao is the chief port of Hebei. The Qin emperor Qin Shi Huang is said to have sought immortality on an island in the Haigang
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    Xining

    Xining

    Xining (Chinese: 西宁; pinyin: Xīníng, formerly ཟི་ལིང་། Siling) is the capital of Qinghai province, China, and the largest city on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. It has 2,208,708 inhabitants at the 2010 census whom 1,198,304 live in the built up area made of 4 urban districts. The city was a commercial hub along the Northern Silk Road's Hexi Corridor for over 2000 years, and was a stronghold of the Han, Sui, Tang, and Song dynasties' resistance against nomadic attacks from the west. Although long a part of Gansu province, Xining was added to Qinghai in 1928. Xining holds sites of religious significance to Muslims and Buddhists, including the Dongguan Mosque and Ta'er Monastery. The city lies in the Huangshui River valley, and owing to its high altitude, has a cold semi-arid climate. It is connected by rail to Lhasa in Tibet and Lanzhou in Gansu. Xining has a history of over 2100 years and was a chief commercial hub on the Hexi Corridor caravan route to Tibet, handling especially timber, wool and salt in ancient times. The trade along the Hexi Corridor was part of a larger trade corridor along the Northern Silk Road, whose use was intensified in the 1st century BC after efforts by the
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    Yulin

    Yulin

    Yulin (Chinese: 榆林; pinyin: Yúlín) is a prefecture-level city in the Shaanxi province of the People's Republic of China. It has an area of 43,578 km² and a population of 3,380,000. Yulin is the northernmost prefecture-level city of Shaanxi province, and borders the provincial-level divisions of Inner Mongolia to the north, Shanxi to the east and Ningxia to the west as well as Yan'an City to the south. To the north and northwest of the city lies the Ordos Desert, though the countryside is very green due to the many small shrubs which have been planted to slow the process of desertification. The city is based in a valley which extends north-south, which rises to a very large vantage point to the north east, where a spectacular view of the west and northwest is seen. Yulin has a continental, monsoon-influenced semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk), with very cold, rather long winters, and hot and somewhat humid summers. Monthly averages range from −9.4 °C (15.1 °F) to 23.4 °C (74.1 °F) in July, and the annual mean is 8.29 °C (46.9 °F). Spring is especially prone to sandstorms blowing in from the northwest. There is only 366 millimetres (14.4 in) of precipitation annually, 73% of which occurs
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    Zhenjiang

    Zhenjiang

    Zhenjiang (Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Chenkiang; simplified Chinese: 镇江; traditional Chinese: 鎮江; pinyin: Zhènjiāng; Wade–Giles: Chen-chiang) is a prefecture-level city in the southwest of Jiangsu province in the eastern People's Republic of China (PRC). Sitting on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, it borders the provincial capital of Nanjing to the west, Changzhou to the east, and Yangzhou across the river to the north. Once known as Jingjiang (Chinese: 京江; Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Chingkiang) or Jingkou (Chinese: 京口; Chinese Postal Map Romanisation: Chingkow), Zhenjiang is today an important transportation hub owing to its location near the intersection of the Yangtze River and the Grand Canal. The prefecture-level city of Zhenjiang administers 6 county-level divisions, including 3 districts and 3 county-level cities. These are further divided into 77 township-level divisions, including 66 towns, 1 township and 10 subdistricts. Zhenjiang Export Processing Zone was approved by the State Council on March 10, 2003 with a total planned area of 2.53 square kilometers. The first-phrase project completed in December 2003 covers 0.91 square kilometers and was
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    Anyang

    Anyang

    Anyang (simplified Chinese: 安阳; traditional Chinese: 安陽; pinyin: Ānyáng; IPA: [án.jɑ̌ŋ]) is a prefecture-level city in Henan province, People's Republic of China. The northernmost city in Henan, Anyang borders Puyang to the east, Hebi and Xinxiang to the south, and the provinces of Shanxi and Hebei to its west and north respectively. It has a total population of 5,172,834 as of the 2010 census, 2,025,811 of whom live in the metropolitan area made of 4 urban districts and Anyang County largely agglomerated with the city proper. Xiaonanhai, on the far western edge of the city, was home to prehistoric cavemen during the Stone Age. Over 7,000 artifacts (including stone tools and animal bone fossils) have been unearthed here, representing what has been dubbed the Xiaonanhai culture. Around 2000 BC, the legendary sage-kings Zhuanxu and Emperor Ku are said to have established their capitals in the area around Anyang from where they ruled their kingdoms. Their mausoleums are today situated in Sanyang village south of Neihuang County. At the beginning of the 14th century BC, King Pangeng of the Shang Dynasty established his capital 2 km (1.2 mi) north of the modern city on the banks of the
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    Baicheng

    Baicheng

    Baicheng (Chinese: 白城; pinyin: Báichéng; literally "White City") is a prefecture-level city in the northwestern part of Jilin province, Northeast China, bordering Inner Mongolia to the north and west and Heilongjiang to the east and northeast. At the 2010 census, 2,033,058 people resided within its administrative area of 25,683 square kilometres. The area around present day Baicheng was a nomadic area which was inhabited by several nomad tribes in Northeast China. As Qing Government forsook the settlement of Han Chinese in the 19th century, no farming was allowed until 1902. In 1904 Baicheng became a county going by the name of Jing'an(靖安). In 1914 Jing'an County was renamed Tao'an(洮南). By 1938 it was finally renamed Baicheng, which Mandarin means white town. The name's origin is the Mongolian name of the city Chaghanhot, which also means "white town". Baicheng used to belong to Heilongjiang province before it became a city within Jilin province. Baicheng's importance started to increase after a railway from Qiqihar to Siping through Baicheng was constructed in the 1920s. In the 1930s another railway connecting Baicheng to Ulanhot and the mines at Arxan was opened northwestward.
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    Baotou

    Baotou

    Bāotóu is a mid-sized industrial city in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. Governed as a prefecture-level city, its urban areas are home to a population of approximately 1.78 million, with a total population of over 2.65 million accounting for counties under its jurisdiction. The city's Mongolian name means "place with deer", and an alternate name in Chinese is "Lùchéng" (鹿城), meaning "Deer City". Baotou is divided into 10 county-level divisions, including 7 districts,1 county and 2 banners. The area now known as Baotou was inhabited since ancient times by nomads, most notably the Mongols. Near the end of the Han Dynasty, Lü Bu, a particularly noteworthy warrior, was born here. Compared to the capital, Hohhot, Baotou's construction as a city came relatively late, being incorporated as a town in 1809. The city's site was chosen because it was in an arable region of the Yellow River's Great Bend. A railway from Beijing was constructed in 1931, and the city began spurring some industrial sites. A German-Chinese joint-venture in 1934 constructed the Baotou Airport and opened a weekly route connecting Baotou with Ningxia and Lanzhou. When young Owen
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    Changzhou

    Changzhou

    Changzhou (Chinese: 常州) is a prefecture-level city in southern Jiangsu province of the People's Republic of China. It was previously known as Yanling, Lanling, Jinling, and Wujin. Located on the southern bank of the Yangtze River, Changzhou borders the provincial capital of Nanjing to the west, Zhenjiang to the northwest, Wuxi to the east, and the province of Zhejiang to the south. The city is situated in the affluent Yangtze Delta region of China. "The Ruins of Yancheng" (Chinese: 淹城遗址), comprise the remains of a walled city located in the Wujin district of Changzhou that was founded over 3000 years ago at the beginning of the Western Zhou dynasty. The earliest record of a settlement on the site of modern Changzhou is as a commandery founded in 221 BC at the beginning of the Qin Dynasty. Changzhou got its present name meaning "ordinary prefecture" in AD 589. Following construction of the Grand Canal in AD 609, Changzhou became a canal port and transshipment point for locally-grown grain, and has maintained these roles ever since. The rural counties surrounding Changzhou are noted for the production of rice, fish, tea, silk, bamboo and fruit. During the Taiping Rebellion of the
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    Chaozhou

    Chaozhou

    Cháozhōu (Chinese: 潮州); alternatively spelled Chiuchow, transliterated from its Cantonese pronunciation; also widely known by its Postal map spelling Teochew), is a city in eastern Guangdong province of the People's Republic of China. It borders Shantou to the south, Jieyang to the southwest, Meizhou to the northwest, the province of Fujian to the east, and the South China Sea to the southeast. It is administered as a prefecture-level city with a jurisdiction area of 3,110 square kilometers and a total population of 2,669,844. Chaozhou is part of the Chaoshan region. Chaozhou's municipal executive, legislature and judiciary are situated in Xiangqiao District (湘桥区), together with its CPC and Public Security bureau. Chaozhou is located in the easternmost part of Guangdong Province, north of the coastal Shantou City. It is situated in the north of the delta of the Han River (韩江), which flows throughout the city. Chaozhou territory mountains, at the junction of Wuyishan have Yuemin system, macro mountains offshoot and tidal peaks Mei at the junction of the Lotus Mountain - Phoenix mountains. Phoenix bun for the eastern peak,1497 meters above sea level. The main rivers are the Huanggang
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    Chengde

    Chengde

    Chengde (Chinese: 承德; pinyin: Chéngdé), previously known as Jehol or Rehe (Chinese: 熱河; pinyin: Rèhé), is a prefecture-level city in Hebei province, People's Republic of China, situated northeast of Beijing. It is best known as the site of the Mountain Resort, a vast imperial garden and palace formerly used by the Qing emperors as summer residence. The urban center had a population of approximately 450,000 as of 2009. In 1703, Chengde was chosen by the Kangxi Emperor as the location for his summer residence. Constructed throughout the eighteenth century, the Mountain Resort (避暑山庄; literally "avoiding the heat mountain villa") was used by both the Yongzheng and Qianlong emperors. The site is currently an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Since the seat of government followed the emperor, Chengde was a political center of the Chinese empire during these times. The city of Jehol reached its height under the Qianlong Emperor 1735-1796 (died 1799). The great monastery temple of the Potala, loosely based on the Potala in Lhasa, was completed after just four years of work in 1771. It was heavily decorated with gold and the emperor worshipped in the Golden Pavilion. In the temple itself was a
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    Chengdu

    Chengdu

    Chengdu (Chinese: 成都; Sichuanese: Cendu; pinyin: Chéngdū), formerly transliterated Chengtu, is the capital of Sichuan province in Southwest China. It holds sub-provincial administrative status. The urban area houses 14,047,625 inhabitants: 7,123,697 within the municipality's nine districts and 6,730,749 in the surrounding region. Chengdu is one of the most important economic, transportation, and communication centers in Western China. According to the 2007 Public Appraisal for Best Chinese Cities for Investment, Chengdu was chosen as one of the top ten cities to invest in out of a total of 280 urban centers in China. It was recently named China's 4th-most livable city by China Daily. The fertile Chengdu Plain, on which Chengdu is located, is also known as the "Country of Heaven" (天府之国, Tiānfǔzhiguó), a phrase also often translated as "The Land of Abundance". The discovery of the Jinsha site suggests the area of Chengdu had become the center of the bronze age Sanxingdui culture around the time of the establishment of the state of Shu, prior to its annexation by Qin in 316 BC. Chengdu was recently named as one of the 13 emerging megacities or megalopolises in China in a July 2012
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    Dali

    Dali

    Dali City (Chinese: 大理市; pinyin: Dàlǐ shì; Bai: Darl•lit; Hani: Dafli) is a county-level city in and the seat of the Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture, northwestern Yunnan province of Southwest China. Dali is the ancient capital of both the Bai kingdom Nanzhao, which flourished in the area during the 8th and 9th centuries, and the Kingdom of Dali, which reigned from 937–1253. Situated in a once significantly Muslim part of South China, Dali was also the center of the Panthay Rebellion against the reigning imperial Qing Dynasty from 1856–1863. It was severely damaged during an earthquake in 1925. Dali is also famous for the many types of marble it produces, which are used primarily in construction and for decorative objects. In fact, Dali is so famous for the stone that the name of marble in Chinese is literally "Dali Stone" (Chinese: 大理石; pinyin: dali shi). Dali is now a major tourist destination, along with Lijiang, for both domestic and international tourists. Dali and Yunnan's capital Kunming are only a 40-minute flight apart. Dali's newly finished administrative district that houses the newly opened Dali International Convention Center is in Longshan District. The Dali
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    Dalian

    Dalian

    Dalian (simplified Chinese: 大连; traditional Chinese: 大連; pinyin: Dàlián; Mandarin pronunciation: [ta˥˩ljɛn˧˥]) is a major city and seaport in the south of Liaoning province, Northeast China. It is surrounded by the waters of the Yellow Sea to the east and the Bohai Sea to the west and south. Across the Bohai Sea to the south lies the Shandong peninsula. Holding sub-provincial administrative status, Dalian is the southernmost city of Northeast China and China's northernmost warm water port. The second largest city in Liaoning province, next only to the capital (Shenyang), the city has a significant history of being used by foreign powers for its ports (Dalian's port and Lüshun's port). Today it serves as a regional financial base and an important international shipping centre and logistics hub in Northeast Asia. Modern Dalian originated as Qingniwa (Chinese: 青泥窪; pinyin: Qīngníwā; literally "blue mud swamp") or Qingniwaqiao (Chinese: 青泥窪橋; pinyin: Qīngníwāqiáo; literally "bridge over the blue mud swamp") was a small fishing village near where the Russians chose to build their commercial town for the Kwantung Leased Territory after assuming control in 1898. During the period of
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    Deyang

    Deyang

    Deyang (simplified Chinese: 德阳; traditional Chinese: 德陽; pinyin: Déyáng) is a prefecture-level city in Sichuan province, China. Deyang is a wealthy, mostly industrial city, with the Erzhong Heavy Machinery Company (中国二重), Dongfang Electrical Company (东方电机), and various high-tech industry contributing to its economy. It has a population of around 3,810,000 in 2004 and an area of 5818 km². This county less than 1 hour from Chengdu city is known for a liquor factory called jiannanchun in the county-level city of Mianzhu and the Sanxingdui museum in Guanhan City (county-level) about the ancient Shu culture famous for its bronze mask. Deyang's main city of Jinyang is based on the Jinghu River passing under 7 bridges flowing North to South. The River has been widened and 5 of the bridges are part dams and has assumed the name of Jinghu Lake. A very large proportion of local residents can be found walking or dancing to music every evening along the riverbank's beautiful parks. Although Deyang is not a tourist city this is actually an advantage for a tourist being able to see more traditional Chinese daily culture without roadside sales people or professional beggars in your face every few
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    Foshan

    Foshan

    Fóshān (Chinese: 佛山), is a city in central Guangdong province in southern China. The prefectural area under the city's jurisdiction over an area of about 3,840 km² and currently with a population of 7.1 million of which 3.6 million reside in the city proper. Today many areas of Foshan city are occupied mostly by Chinese migrants coming from different provinces of China and speak only Mandarin, while its native dialect is a Foshan variant of Cantonese. The town of Foshan is many centuries old, and was famous for its porcelain industry. Now, the third largest city in Guangdong, it has become relatively affluent compared to other Chinese cities, and is home to many large private enterprises. Foshan has recently seen a transformation brought by China's booming economy. Foshan is also famous for its martial arts. It contains numerous Wing Chun schools where many come to train and spar. The prefecture-level city of Foshan administers five county-level divisions, all of which are districts. These are further divided into 64 township-level divisions, including 37 towns and 27 subdistricts. Foshan is close to Guangzhou and considers its link with Guangzhou very important. A Guangzhou-Foshan
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    Hebi

    Hebi

    Hebi (simplified Chinese: 鹤壁; traditional Chinese: 鶴壁; pinyin: Hèbì; Postal map spelling: Hopi) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, People's Republic of China. Situated in mountainous terrain at the edge of the Shanxi plateau, Hebi is about 25 miles south of Anyang, 40 miles northeast of Xinxiang and 65 miles north of Kaifeng. Hebi has several coal mines. Hebi New Area is an economic development zone. Panshitou reservoir is not far from Hebi. The prefecture-level city of Hebi administers 3 districts and 2 counties.
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    Hulunbuir

    Hulunbuir

    Hulunbuir or Hūlúnbèi'ěr is a region that is governed as a prefecture-level city in northeastern Inner Mongolia, in the People's Republic of China. Its administrative center is located at Hailar District, its largest urban area. Major scenic features are the high steppes of the Hulun Buir grasslands, the Hulun and Buir lakes (the latter partially in Mongolia), and the Khingan range. Hulun Buir borders Russia, Mongolia, Heilongjiang province and Hinggan League. Hulunbuir is a linguistically diverse area: next to Mandarin Chinese, Mongolian dialects such as Khorchin and Buryat, the Mongolic language Dagur and some Tungusic languages are spoken there. Traditionally, Hulunbuir was a part of Manchuria, and the eastern part of the area was known as Barga. From 1912-1949, during the Republic of China (ROC) period, Hulunbuir was part of Xing'an and Heilongjiang provinces. During the Japanese occupation of China, Hulunbuir became part of the Japanese puppet state Manchukuo, which was not recognized by China. In the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party of China gained the support of Inner Mongol leaders like Ulanhu by promising the irredentist expansion of Inner Mongolia into areas that
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    Jingdezhen

    Jingdezhen

    Jingdezhen, or the Town of Jingde), is a prefecture-level city, previously a town, in Jiangxi Province, China, with a total population of 1,554,000 (2007). It is known as the "Porcelain Capital" because it has been producing quality pottery for 1700 years. The city has a well-documented history that stretches back over 2000 years. Jingdezhen is one of Chinese Historical and Cultural Cities, and was named one outstanding civilization & health city of Jiangxi Province, one tourist city of China by the end of 2007. During the Han Dynasty, Jingdezhen was known as Xinpin. Historical records show that it was during this time that it began to make porcelain. Xinpin then was renamed Changnanzhen (Changnan Town) during the Northern Song Dynasty. It took the era name of the emperor during whose reign its porcelain production first rose to fame. In 1004 CE, during the North Song Dynasty, Changnanzhen became Jingdezhen. In the Ming and Qing dynasties, Jingdezhen was named one of four famous towns in Chinese history, along with Foshan (Guangdong Province), Hankou (Hubei Province) and Zhuxianzhen (Henan Province). "Allegedly, Jingdezhen gave birth to the English name of the country. The ancient
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    Sanming

    Sanming

    Sanming (Chinese: 三明; pinyin: Sānmíng; Foochow Romanized: Săng-mìng)) is a prefecture-level city in western Fujian province, People's Republic of China. It borders Nanping City to the north, Fuzhou City to the east, Quanzhou City to the southeast, Longyan City to the south, and the province of Jiangxi to the west. Sanming lies between Wuyi and Daiyun mountains. The prefecture level city of Sanming has a total area of 22,928.8 square kilometres (8,852.9 sq mi), and 82% of this extension is composed of mountainous areas, 8.3% of arable land and 9.7% of water or other type of terrain. Sanming is well known by its beautiful nature landscape with different landforms, including unique Danxia Landform and abundant Karst topography. The most famous spots include global geopark Taining Golden Lake in Taining County, Yuhua Cave in Jiangle County and Goose Cave in Ninghua County. According to the 2010 Census, Sanming has a population of 2,503,338, 70,687 inhabitants less than in 2000 Census (the average annual population growth for the period 2000-2010 was of -0.28%). The emigration of population from Sanming to other areas of Fujian is a constant process, even encouraged by government
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    Shaoxing

    Shaoxing

    Shaoxing (Chinese: 绍兴; pinyin: Shàoxīng; Shaoxing dialect: Zaushin) is a prefecture-level city in northeastern Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. Located on the south bank of the Qiantang River estuary, it borders Ningbo to the east, Taizhou to the southeast, Jinhua to the southwest, and Hangzhou to the west. It was once known as "越" (pinyin: yuè). Shaoxing central districts of Yuecheng and Shaoxing are now part of Hangzhou built up area which is home for more than 7 million inhabitants. In year 2010, Shaoxing celebrated its 2500 anniversary of the founding of the city. The city was first named Shaoxing in 1131 during the Southern Song dynasty. The name comes from the Shaoxing reign period of Emperor Gaozong of Song, and is a poetic term meaning "continuing prosperity". Modern-day Shaoxing sits on the site of the capital of the Spring and Autumn Period State of Yue. Around the sixth century BC, Yue had a sinicised ruling elite which fought a number of wars against its northern archrival, the State of Wu. Shaoxing was known by the name Kuaiji (Chinese: 會稽) for much of its history. It became a subprefecture during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Under the Republic of China,
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    Siping

    Siping

    Siping (Chinese: 四平; pinyin: Sìpíng), formerly Ssupingkai (Chinese: 四平街; pinyin: Sìpíngjiē), is a prefecture-level city in the west of Jilin province, People's Republic of China. Located in the southwestern part of the province, in the middle of the Songliao Plain and at the intersection of Jilin, Liaoning and Inner Mongolia, Siping covers an area of 14,323 km (5,530 sq mi). At the 2010 census, Siping has a total population of 3,386,325 while the urban population is 613,837. Siping's history can be stretched to 3000 years ago during Shang Dynasty. The Kingdom of Yan Ruins indicate that the Han Chinese People started moving into Northeast region of China during the Spring and Autumn Period. Ancient ethnic tribes such as the Fuyu, the Goguryeo, the Khitans, the Jurchen, the Mongols, the Manchus, and Koreans have left behind cultural artifacts, including Hanzhou, Xinzhou, and the Yehe Tribe Cultural Artifacts . Yehe Town in Siping is also the hometown of two empresses of the Qing Dynasty, Empress Dowager Cixi and Empress Dowager Longyu. However, Siping was a place of little importance until the completion of the railway between Changchun and the port of Dalian in 1902. With a rapidly
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    Suzhou, Anhui

    Suzhou, Anhui

    Suzhou (Chinese: 宿州; pinyin: Sùzhōu) is a prefecture-level city in northern Anhui province. It borders the prefectural cities of Huaibei and Bengbu to the southwest and south respectively, the province of Jiangsu to the east and north, and that of Henan to the northwest. Suzhou was formerly Su County (simplified Chinese: 宿县; traditional Chinese: 宿縣; pinyin: Sù Xiàn). Suzhou administers five county-level divisions, including one district and four counties. These are further divided into 118 township-level divisions.
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    Ulaan Chab

    Ulaan Chab

    Ulanqab or Wūlánchábù (Mongolian: , Ulaγančab; Chinese: 乌兰察布) is a region administered as a prefecture-level city in south-central Inner Mongolia, North China. Its administrative centre is in Jining District, which was formerly a county-level city. It was established as a prefecture-level city on 1 December 2003, formed from the former Ulanqab League. Ulaan Chab city has an area of 54,491 square kilometres (21,039 sq mi). It borders Hohhot to the west, Mongolia to the north, Xilin Gol League to the northeast, Hebei to the east and Shanxi to the south. At the end of 2004, Ulanqab had 2.7 million inhabitants. The western part of Ulaan Chab used to be part of the now defunct Chinese province of Suiyuan. Ulaan Chab has eleven administrative divisions: one district, one county-level city, five counties and four banners: Ulanqab features a cold semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk), marked by long, cold and very dry winters, warm, somewhat humid summers, and strong winds, especially in spring. More than half of the annual precipitation of around 360 millimetres (14.2 in) falls in July and August alone. In the 2000 census, there were 2,284,414 inhabitants: Ulanqab's transportation network is
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    Wuhan

    Wuhan

    Wuhan (simplified Chinese: 武汉; traditional Chinese: 武漢; pinyin: Wǔhàn [wùxân] ( listen)) is the capital of Hubei province, People's Republic of China, and is the most populous city in Central China. It lies at the east of the Jianghan Plain, and the intersection of the middle reaches of the Yangtze and Han rivers. Arising out of the conglomeration of three cities, Wuchang, Hankou, and Hanyang, Wuhan is known as "the nine provinces' leading thoroughfare"; it is a major transportation hub, with dozens of railways, roads and expressways passing through the city. Because of its key role in domestic transportation, Wuhan was sometimes referred to as the "Chicago of China." It is recognized as the political, economic, financial, cultural, educational and transportation center of central China. The city of Wuhan, first termed as such in 1927, has a population of 10,020,000 people (Census 2011), with about 6,434,373 residents in its urban area. In the 1920s, Wuhan was the national capital of a leftist Kuomintang (KMT) government led by Wang Jingwei in opposition to Chiang Kai-shek, as well as wartime capital in 1937. Wuhan was recently named as one of the 13 emerging megalopolises in China
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    Xingtai

    Xingtai

    Xíngtái (simplified Chinese: 邢台; traditional Chinese: 邢臺 or 邢台; Wade–Giles: Hsingtai) is a city in southern Hebei province, North China. The prefecture-level city of Xingtai, with a total area of 12,486 square kilometres (4,821 sq mi), administers 2 districts, 2 county-level cities and 15 counties. In 2004 it had an urban population of 561,400 and a total population of 6.73 million. It borders Shijiazhuang and Hengshui in the north, Handan in the south, and the provinces of Shandong and Shanxi in the east and west respectively. Xingtai is the oldest city in North China. The history of Xingtai can be traced back 3500 years ago. During the Shang Dynasty, Xingtai functioned as a capital city. During the Zhou Dynasty, the State of Xing – from which the present name derives – was founded in the city. During the Warring States Period, the state of Zhao made Xingtai its provisional capital. The city was known as Xindu for most of the Qin Dynasty, but after the 207 BC Battle of Julu (within modern Xingtai), it became known as Xiangguo. During the Sixteen Kingdoms Period, when the Later Zhao was founded by Shi Le of the Jie, the capital was again at Xiangguo. During the Sui and Tang
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    Yuncheng

    Yuncheng

    Yùnchéng (simplified Chinese: 运城; traditional Chinese: 運城) is the southernmost prefecture-level city in Shanxi province, People's Republic of China. It borders Linfen and Jincheng municipalities to the north and east, and Henan and Shaanxi provinces to the south and west. The Olympic Torch Relay went through this city 25 June 2008 on its way to Beijing. In early China, it was the location of the state of Kunwu (昆吾). The Municipal executive, legislature and judiciary are in Yanhu District (盐湖区), together with the CPC and Public Security bureaux. Yuncheng has a continental, monsoon-influenced semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk), with four distinct seasons. Winters are cold and very dry, while summers are hot and humid. Monthly mean temperatures range from −0.9 °C (30.4 °F) in January to 27.4 °C (81.3 °F) in July, and the annual mean is 14.1 °C (57.4 °F). Over 60% of the annual rainfall occurs from June to September. Rural communities in Yuncheng City have been the hunting grounds of Snakeheads, Chinese human trafficking mafia. Rural children, typically middle school students fit for labour, were "recruited" with the promise of jobs in in China's southwest -- Longchuan County in Yunnan's
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    Zhongshan

    Zhongshan

    Zhōngshān (Chinese: 中山), historically known as Xiangshan, is a prefecture-level city in the south of the Pearl River Delta in Guangdong province in southern China. Zhongshan, one of the few cities in China with an eponymous name, is named after Dr. Sun Yat-sen (1866–1925) who was also known as Sun Zhongshan. Sun, the founding father of the Republic of China, was born in Cuiheng village in Nanlang Township of what was then Xiangshan County. After his death in 1925, Xiangshan was renamed Zhongshan in his honor. The main ethnic group in Zhongshan is Han, and the main language is Cantonese. Prior to the 20 century, Zhongshan was generally known as Xiangshan or Heung-san (Chinese: 香山; literally "Fragrant Mountain"), in reference to the many flowers that grew in the mountains nearby. The city was renamed in honor of Dr. Sun Yat-sen, who often went by the name Zhongshan/Zungsaan. Sun is considered by both the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China to be the "Father of Modern China", and was from Cuiheng village – now part of Nanlang Town – just outside of downtown Zhongshan. Zhongshan was historically inhabited by the Yue peoples, a large family of non-Han tribes that once
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