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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Cheese of All Time

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    1
    Rocamadour

    Rocamadour

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Rocamadour is a French cheese from the southwest part of the country. It is produced in the regions of Périgord and Quercy and takes its name from the village of Rocamadour in the département of the Lot. Rocamadour belongs to a family of goat cheeses called Cabécous and has benefited from being accorded an AOC (appellation d'origine contrôlée) designation since 1996. It is a very small whitish cheese (average weight 35g) with a flat round shape (see illustration). Rocamadour is usually sold very young after just 12-15 days of aging and is customarily consumed on hot toast or in salads. Rocamadour can be aged further. After several months it takes on a more intense flavor and is typically eaten on its own with a red wine toward the end of the meal. Production: 546 tonnes in 1998 (+24.1% since 1996), 100% with raw, unpasteurized goat milk (50% on farms).
    7.56
    9 votes
    2
    Västerbotten cheese

    Västerbotten cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Sweden
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Västerbotten cheese (Västerbottensost) is a cheese from the Västerbotten region of Sweden. It is a hard cow's milk cheese with tiny eyes or holes and a firm and granular texture. As in Cheddar cheese, the curd is heated, cut, and stirred before the cheese is moulded and aged. Strong in flavour, its taste is described as somewhat like Parmesan cheese, salty, but with more bitter notes. It is light yellow in colour and has a fat content of 31%. Many Swedish people consider it the king of cheese and demand for it has often outstripped the limited supply. For this reason, it is roughly twice as expensive as other types of aged cheese. Västerbotten cheese must be aged for at least 12 months, but 14 months is more common. The village of Burträsk (now part of the Skellefteå municipality) claims Västerbotten cheese was invented there in the 1870s, supposedly by a dairy maid, Eleonora Lindström. According to legend, she was left alone to stir the curd of a traditional cheese but was interrupted, either by other chores or an assignation with her lover. This resulted in alternating periods of heating and stirring of the curdling milk. Västerbotten cheese is produced only by Norrmejerier, at
    9.00
    5 votes
    3
    Maytag Blue cheese

    Maytag Blue cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Maytag is a blue cheese produced on the Maytag Dairy Farms outside of Newton, Iowa, the former home of the Maytag Corporation. In 1938, Iowa State University developed a new process for making blue cheese from homogenized cow's milk instead of the traditional sheep's milk. In 1941, production of the cheese was started by Frederick L. Maytag II and Robert Maytag, grandsons of the founder of the Maytag appliance company, Frederick Louis Maytag I. In the beginning, the milk for the cheese came from a prize winning herd of Holstein cattle that was established by E. H. Maytag, a son of the Maytag founder. The company is currently owned by the third and fourth generations of the Maytag family. The process for making Maytag Blue Cheese was discovered and patented by two Iowa State University microbiologists, Clarence Lane and Bernard W. Hammer. Roquefort, another type of blue cheese, had been made for hundreds of years in Europe, but attempts to manufacture a similar cheese in the United States had thus far been unsuccessful. Difficulties encountered in making these types of cheeses produced a less than satisfactory product, and quality control would have been disastrous. The problems
    7.83
    6 votes
    4
    Stracciatella di Bufala

    Stracciatella di Bufala

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Water Buffalo
    Stracciatella di Bufala is a cheese produced from the milk of water buffalo in the Italian province of Foggia. It is a fresh cheese, white in colour, and made in the pasta filata style. The cheese is made the whole year round, but is thought to be at its best during the spring and summer months. This stracciatella (not to be confused with the soup stracciatelle, although in both cases the reference is to the torn, ragged texture) is unusual in that buffalo herds and the cheeses made from their cheeses are much more common over on the western side of the Apennines in Lazio and Campania. prodottitipici.com Stracciatella di Bufala
    7.83
    6 votes
    5
    Colby cheese

    Colby cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Colby is a cow's milk cheese. It was originally called Colby Swiss Cheddar. Joseph F. Steinwand in 1874 developed a new type of cheese at his father's cheese factory near Colby, Wisconsin. The cheese was named after the village, which had been founded three years earlier. An 1898 issue of the "Colby Phonograph" noted that "A merchant in Phillips gives as one of the 13 reasons why people should trade with him, that he sells the genuine Steinwand Colby Cheese." After the turn of the century Wisconsin became known as one of the great cheese producing centers in the United States. Colby is similar to Cheddar, but does not undergo the cheddaring process. Colby is a softer, moister, and milder cheese than Cheddar because it is produced through a washed-curd process. Colby is considered semi-hard (Sans-kendrall). The washed-curd process means that during the cooking time, the whey is replaced by water; this reduces the curd's acidity, resulting in Colby's characteristically mild flavor. Like most other cheeses, it takes a little more than a U.S. gallon of milk to produce just 1 pound (just over 8 liters for a kilogram) of cheese. Monterey Jack cheese is produced almost identically as
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    Banon

    Banon

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: Soft-ripened
    Banon is a French cheese made in the region around the town of Banon in Provence, south-east France. Also known as Banon à la feuille, it is an unpasteurized cheese made from goat's milk and is circular in shape, around 7 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm in height, and weighing around 100 g. This pungent uncooked, unpressed cheese consists of a fine soft white pâte that is wrapped in chestnut leaves and tied with raffia prior to shipping. The Provençal specialty fromage fort du Mont Ventoux is made by placing a young banon in an earthenware jar. The cheese is then seasoned with salt and pepper, doused in vinegar and eau-de-vie and left in a cool cellar to ferment. The concoction will last for many years becoming increasingly fierce in taste. Small goat's cheeses have been made in the dry hills of Provence since Roman times. As it is sold today, the cheese was first made by a couple in the village of Puimichel near to the town of Banon in the département of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence. The affinage period lasts for two weeks, following which it is dipped in eau de vie and wrapped in chestnut leaves that have been softened and sterilized by boiling in a mixture of water and vinegar. The cheese
    8.60
    5 votes
    7
    Harzer

    Harzer

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Harzer cheese is a German sour milk cheese made from low fat curd cheese, which contains only about one percent fat and originates in the Harz mountain region south of Braunschweig. Harzer is often small and round, in which case it is called Handkäse or Taler, or cylindrical, in which case it is called Stangenkäse. Frequently, the small and round variety is sold in a cylindrical package, which is then called Harzer Roller. Harzer cheese is typically flavoured with caraway. Some varieties are white mold cheeses, others red mold cheeses. The latter type generally has a stronger flavour, and both types develop a strong aroma after maturing for a few days or weeks. Harzer has a distinctive strong smell and overpowering flavour. Harzer contains very little fat (less than 1%) but extremely high protein (usually around 30%) and therefore is often used for special diets and sport nutrition.
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Minas cheese

    Minas cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Brazil
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Minas cheese is a type of cheese that has been traditionally produced in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. It comes in three varieties, named frescal (fresh), meia-cura (slightly matured) and curado (matured). A fourth variety, branded queijo padrão (standard cheese) has been developed more recently and can be found in nearly all supermarkets and grocery stores in Brazil. Minas cheese is made from cow's milk according to traditional recipes. It used to be matured naturally in open air or, much less often, over a cooker to dry with the heat. Frescal cheese (as the name implies) is served quite fresh, about 4–10 days after preparation, still white and tender. Good frescal must be juicy, soft, and slightly granulated (instead of rubbery), with a mild taste. It is not good for cooking, except with beef or pork (the juice helps change its taste). It can be used to make sandwiches. Curado cheese is ready for consumption when the juice has evaporated and the cheese has solidified and acquired a yellowish tint. Good curado cheese must have a white core, punctured with tiny bubbles of air, slightly more granulated than frescal and with a stronger taste, tending to bitter. It is excellent
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Cheese curds

    Cheese curds

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Cheese curds in cuisine, or cooking, are the solid parts of soured milk either eaten alone or used in various regional dishes, mostly in Canada and the northeastern and midwestern United States. They are sometimes referred to as "squeaky cheese". Cheese curds are little known in locations without cheese factories because they should ideally be eaten within hours of manufacture. Their flavor is mild, with about the same firmness as cheese, but with a springy or rubbery texture. Fresh curds squeak against the teeth when bitten into, a defining characteristic, due to air trapped inside the porous material. This "squeak" has been described by the New York Times as sounding like "balloons trying to neck". After 12 hours, even under refrigeration, they lose much of their "fresh" characteristic, particularly the "squeak". Keeping them at room temperature can preserve the squeakiness. The curds have a mild flavor and are sometimes somewhat salty. The American variety is usually yellow or orange, like most American Cheddar cheese, but doesn't require the artificial coloring. Other varieties, as in Quebec, Vermont, or New York State, may be naturally un-colored. Fresh cheese curds are often
    8.00
    5 votes
    10
    Herve cheese

    Herve cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Belgium
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Herve is an aged cheese made from unpasteurized cow's milk. It is traditionally aged in humid caves. Herve comes from the Belgian town of the same name. It is a Limburger-like cheese: pungent and soft. It is sometimes flavored with herbs. Herve has a pale yellow interior with a glossy reddish-brown coating created by the bacteria that grow during its 3-month aging. It is usually shaped into a brick when sold. The taste and flavor of the cheese deepens during the period of ripening. When young, the interior is sweet, and with age it becomes spicy. Because it is so strong, Herve is best eaten with dark breads and beers. It is often regarded as one of the most popular cheeses in Belgium.
    6.83
    6 votes
    11
    St Pat

    St Pat

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft
    T PAT is our seasonal springtime cheese. These rounds are made with whole organic milk and are wrapped with stinging nettle leaves. Do not fear the nettles, since they are washed and then frozen to remove the sting before they are wrapped around the cheese. ST PAT, with its distinctive, green wrapping, commemorates the arrival of spring in Marin County. After three weeks of aging, ST PAT is mellow, soft, and full of flavor. The nettle leaves impart a smoky, artichoke flavor. (12-ounce round; case of 6) : Nutrition Info
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Gouda

    Gouda

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gouda (/ˈɡaʊdə/ or /ˈɡuːdə/; Dutch: [ˈɣʌu̯.da] ( listen), from Dutch: Goudse kaas [ˈɣʌu̯t.sə ˈkaːs] "Cheese from Gouda") is an orange cheese made from cow's milk. The cheese is named after the city of Gouda in the Netherlands, but its name is not protected. However, the European Commission has confirmed that "Gouda Holland" is to be protected (although "Gouda" itself is not). Cheese under the name of Gouda is currently made and sold all around the world. The cheese is from cultured milk that is heated until the curds separate from the whey. Some of the whey is then drained, and water is added. This is called "washing the curd", and creates a sweeter cheese, as the washing removes some of the lactic acid. About ten percent of the mixture are curds, which are pressed into circular moulds for several hours. These moulds are the essential reason behind its traditional, characteristic shape. The cheese is then soaked in a brine solution, which gives the cheese and its rind a distinctive taste. The cheese is dried for a few days before being coated to prevent it from drying out, then it is aged. Depending on age classification, it can be aged a number of weeks to over seven years before
    5.86
    7 votes
    13
    Pierce Pt

    Pierce Pt

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-firm
    PIERCE PT
    Some of the best things in life are simply not available all the time. That's the case with Cowgirl Creamery's PIERCE PT, which is produced only in fall and winter. Made from organic whole milk from the Straus Family dairy, PIERCE PT is washed in a muscato wine and rolled in dried herbs from the Tomales Bay coastal region. The result is a delicious cheese - semi-firm yet creamy, complex yet never overpowering - that you'll recall longingly when it's out-of-season. (10-ounce round; case of 6) : Nutrition Info
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Blue cheese

    Blue cheese

    Blue cheese is a general classification of cow's milk, sheep's milk, or goat's milk cheeses that have had cultures of the mold Penicillium added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue, blue-gray or blue-green mold, and carries a distinct smell, either from that or various specially cultivated bacteria. Some blue cheeses are injected with spores before the curds form and others have spores mixed in with the curds after they form. Blue cheeses are typically aged in a temperature-controlled environment such as a cave. Blue cheese can be eaten by itself or can be crumbled or melted over foods. In the European Union many blue cheeses such as Roquefort, Gorgonzola and Blue Stilton carry a protected designation of origin, meaning they can bear the name only if they have been made in a particular region in a certain country. Similarly, individual countries have protections of their own such as France's Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée and Italy's Denominazione di Origine Protetta. Blue cheeses with no protected origin name are designated simply "blue cheese". The characteristic flavor of blue cheeses tends to be sharp and salty. The smell of this food is due
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Cabrales cheese

    Cabrales cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: hard
    Cabrales (Spanish: queso de Cabrales) is a cheese made in the artisan tradition by rural dairy farmers in the north of Spain. This cheese can be made from pure, unpasteurised cow’s milk or blended in the traditional manner with goat and/or sheep milk, which lends the cheese a stronger, more spicy flavor. All of the milk used in the production of Cabrales must come exclusively from herds raised in a small zone of production in Asturias, in the mountains of the Picos de Europa. The milk is first heated and curdled by the addition of rennet. The whey is removed from the curds, which are then packed into cylindrical molds called arnios, salted and left to cure and harden. After the initial curing period of around two weeks, the Cabrales is then aged a further two to five months in natural caves in the limestone mountains of the area. The cheeses are placed on wooden shelves known as talameras, where they are periodically turned and cleaned. Relative humidity in these caves is typically 90% and the temperature is a cool 7–13 °C (45–55 °F), conditions favoring the development of penicillium moulds that produce blue-green veins throughout the cheese. Cabrales has a strong flavour,
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    Aura

    Aura

    • Country Of Origin: Finland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Aura is a type of blue cheese produced in Äänekoski, Finland, by the Finnish dairy company Valio. Aura is made of cow's milk and takes its name from the Aura River, which runs through the city of Turku. The cheese is available in two varieties. The regular variety is aged for six weeks, whereas the stronger 'Aura Gold' variety is aged for 12 weeks. It is marketed in the United States under the name Midnight Blue by Valio's import company, Finlandia Cheese.
    7.20
    5 votes
    17
    Double Gloucester cheese

    Double Gloucester cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United Kingdom
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gloucester is a traditional unpasteurised, semi-hard cheese which has been made in Gloucestershire, England, since the 16th century, at one time made only with the milk of the once nearly extinct Gloucester cattle. There are two types of Gloucester cheese: Single and Double; both are traditionally made from milk from Gloucestershire breed cows farmed within the English county of Gloucestershire. Both types have a natural rind (outer layer) and a hard texture, but Single Gloucester is more crumbly, lighter in texture and lower in fat. Double Gloucester is allowed to age for longer periods than Single, and it has a stronger and more savoury flavour. It is also slightly firmer. In the United Kingdom today, of these two types of cheese, it is the "Double Gloucester" which is more likely to be sold in supermarkets. Both types are produced in round shapes, but Double Gloucester rounds are larger. Traditionally whereas the Double Gloucester was a prized cheese comparable in quality to the best Cheddar or Cheshire, and was exported out of the County, Single Gloucester tended to be consumed within Gloucestershire. Most Double Gloucester sold in UK supermarkets is slab cheese, made in large
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Processed cheese

    Processed cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Processed cheese, process cheese, cheese slice, prepared cheese, cheese singles or cheese food is a food product made from normal cheese and sometimes other unfermented dairy ingredients, plus emulsifiers, extra salt, food colorings, or whey. Many flavors, colors, and textures of processed cheese exist. In the United States, the most recognizable variety of processed cheese is sold under the name American cheese, although this name also has other meanings. American cheese is processed and usually bought sliced at a grocery store. The name American cheese also has a legal definition as a type of pasteurized processed cheese under the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Although processed cheese was first invented in 1911 by Walter Gerber of Thun, Switzerland, it was James L. Kraft who first applied for an American patent for his method in 1916. Kraft Foods also created the first commercially available sliced processed cheese, which was introduced in 1950. This form of sliced cheese and its derivatives have become commonplace in the United States, most notably used for cheeseburgers and grilled cheese sandwiches. The Laughing Cow is an example of European processed cheese. Processed
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Reblochon

    Reblochon

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Reblochon (French pronunciation: [ʁə.blɔ.ʃɔ̃] is a French cheese from the Alps region of Haute-Savoie and has been granted the AOC title. Reblochon was first produced in the Thônes and Arly valleys, in the Aravis massif. Thônes remains the centre of Reblochon production; the cheeses are still made in the local cooperatives. Until 1964 Reblochon was also produced in Italian areas of the Alps. Subsequently the Italian cheese has been sold in declining quantities under such names as Rebruchon and Reblò alpino. Reblochon derives from the word 'reblocher' which when literally translated means 'to pinch a cow's udder again'. This refers to the practice of holding back some of the milk from the first milking. During the 14th century, the landowners would tax the mountain farmers according to the amount of milk their herds produced. The farmers would therefore not fully milk the cows until after the landowner had measured the yield. The milk that remains is much richer, and was traditionally used by the dairymaids to make their own cheese. In the 16th century the cheese also became known as "fromage de dévotion" (devotional cheese) because it was offered to the Carthusian monks of the
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    Fløtemysost

    Fløtemysost

    Fløtemysost or Fløytemysost is a conventional variant of brunost which is made of milk from cows, and has a mild and bright color. The mild flavour has made fløtemysost very popular and about 30% of all brunost sold is fløtemysost. Fløtemysost was the first brunost to be made, when Anne Hov added cow cream to cow whey and it became fløtemysost. Later, she added goat milk and the gudbrandsdalost was born. Geitost is the counterpart to fløtemysost because it is made from goat's milk. Goat cheese has a stronger taste than fløtemysost.
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Ġbejna

    Ġbejna

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Ġbejna (plural ġbejniet) is a small round cheese made in Malta (commonly associated with the island of Gozo ) from goat’s or sheep's milk, salt and rennet. Most sheep's milk and goat's milk produced in Malta is used for the production of these small cheeses. Until the early 20th century, ġbejniet made from unpasteurised milk were one of the causes of the spead of Brucellosis which was so prevalent as to be called "the Maltese fever". Prior to Malta's accession to the European Union, the EU accepted Malta's request to protect the ġbejna along with the traditional variant of ricotta. Ġbejna is shaped in a cheese hurdle made of dried reeds, although now plastic ones are also used. They are traditionally dried in small ventilated rooms, with windows protected by a special mesh mosquito net. It is said that in the past sea water, rather than rennet, was used as a curdling agent. Ġbejniet are prepared and served in a variety of forms: fresh (friski or tal-ilma), sundried (moxxa, bajda or t'Għawdex), salt cured (maħsula) or peppered (tal-bżar). The fresh variety have a smooth texture and a milky flavour and are kept in their own whey in a similar manner to mozzarella. The sundried variety
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Cambozola

    Cambozola

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cambozola is a cow's milk cheese that is a combination of a French soft-ripened triple cream cheese and Italian Gorgonzola. It was patented and industrially produced for the world market by large German company Champignon in the 1970s. The cheese was invented circa 1900 and is still produced by Champignon. In English-speaking countries, cambozola is often marketed as blue brie. It is made from the same blue Penicillium roqueforti mold used to make Gorgonzola, Roquefort, and Stilton. Cream is added to the milk, giving Cambozola a rich consistency. The rind of the cheese is similar to the Camembert rind. Cambozola is considerably milder than Gorgonzola. It features a smooth, creamy texture with a subdued blue flavour. The cheese's name appears to be a portmanteau of Camembert and Gorgonzola, given that its flavour profile combines the moist, rich creaminess of Camembert with the sharpness of blue Gorgonzola. It also refers to the Roman name Cambodunum of the city Kempten, where Champignon is located.
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Comté

    Comté

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Comté (also called Gruyère de Comté) (French pronunciation: [kɔ̃.te] is a French cheese made from unpasteurized cow's milk in the Franche-Comté region of eastern France. Comté is French for county. Comté has the highest production of all French AOC cheeses, around 40,000 tonnes annually. The cheese is made in flat circular discs, each between 40 centimetres (16 in) and 70 centimetres (28 in) in diameter, and around 10 centimetres (4 in) in height. Each disc weighs up to 50 kilograms (110 lb). The fat content is around 45%. The rind is usually a dusty-brown colour, and the internal pâte is a pale creamy yellow. The texture is relatively hard and flexible, and the taste is strong and slightly sweet. The manufacture of the cheese began as early as the 12th century, when shepherds would spend the summer months in their remote huts of the Jura massif. The distance from towns of any size meant that any cheese they made would need to mature over a period of months. The milk was pooled between neighbouring shepherds, and the huge cheeses would be stored until being carried to market at the end of the season. Once summer had ended, so would production of Comté, with the cows' milk instead
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Cotija cheese

    Cotija cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Mexico
    • Source Of Milk: Raw cow milk
    Cotija is a hard cow's milk cheese that originated from Mexico. It is named after the town of Cotija, Michoacán. Cotija comes in two primary versions. El queso Cotija de Montaña or "grain cheese" is dry and firm, with little taste beyond salt (the cheese is usually several times saltier than typical cheese, traditionally for preservative reasons). "Tajo" cheese is a moister, fattier, and less salty version that holds its shape when cut, with a flavor similar to Italian Parmesan and Greek feta. El queso Cotija de Montaña is a seasonal cheese and is of limited production. Cotija cheese is produced only during the months of July through October because the cows are fed only on the rich grass that grows naturally on the mountains during the rainy season, giving the cheese its unique color and flavor. Queso Cotija is an artisan cheese made by hand, thus every cheese has something unique. This cheese usually comes in 17 kilogram cylinders with a creamy color crust. It is a queso de montaña (cheese of the mountains) because the cheese makers live in the mountains as high as 1700 meters (5,500 ft). The production method involves milling the curds into small pieces before pressing and
    6.00
    6 votes
    25
    Camembert

    Camembert

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft-ripened
    Camembert (French pronunciation: [ka.mɑ̃.bɛʁ]) is a soft, creamy, surface-ripened cow's milk cheese. It was first made in the late 18th century at Camembert, Normandy in northern France. The first Camembert was made from unpasteurised milk, and the AOC variety "Camembert de Normandie" is required by law to be made only with unpasteurised milk. Many modern cheesemakers, like the renowned "La Fromagerie Cambert Gilnil", in Charlotte, Normandie, however, use pasteurized milk for reasons of safety, compliance with regulations, or convenience. The cheese is made by inoculating warmed milk with mesophilic bacteria, then adding rennet and allowing the mixture to coagulate. The curd is then cut into roughly 1 cm (1/2 inch) cubes, salted, and transferred to low cylindrical Camembert moulds. The moulds are turned every six to twelve hours to allow the whey to drain evenly from the cut curds; after 48 hours, each mould contains a flat, cylindrical, solid cheese mass weighing approximately 350 grams (about 12 oz). At this point the fresh cheese is hard, crumbly, and bland. The surface of each cheese is then sprayed with an aqueous suspension of the mould Penicillium camemberti and the cheeses
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    Herrgårdsost

    Herrgårdsost

    • Country Of Origin: Sweden
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Herrgårdsost (Manorhouse cheese) is a semi-hard Swedish cheese made from cow's milk. Made since the 1890s, it is still popular in Sweden today. The aged cheese has a mild, sweet, nutty flavor and small round holes. The cheese is usually manufactured in wheels about 40 centimetres in diameter and 12 centimetres wide, weighing around 14 kilograms. Herrgårdsost starts as part-skim milk, usually pasteurized. Bacterial starters are introduced to the milk, including lactic acid bacteria, which acidify the milk, and propionic bacteria, which are responsible for producing the carbon dioxide that creates the holes. The soured milk is curdled with rennet and heated to no higher than 43°C. The whey is drained and the curd is pressed, forming a wheel, which is then salted in brine. Around two weeks later the cheese wheels are coated in wax. They are aged in this state usually for another three or four months, but often up to 12 or even 24 months. The finished product is 39.5% water, 29% fat, 27% protein, and 1.5% salt. Doane, C.F.; Hargrove, Robert C.; Lawson, H.W.; Matheson, K.J.; Sanders, G.P; Walter, Homer E. (1969). Cheese Varieties and Descriptions. U.S. Department of Agriculture.  p. 58
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Little swiss

    Little swiss

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Petit-suisse (meaning little Swiss) is a French cheese from the Normandy region. Petit-suisse is a fromage frais; an unripened, unsalted, smooth and creamy cheese. It is made from cow's milk enriched with cream so that it has approximately 40% fat content. The cheese is then smoothed and drained in a centrifuge. A typical cheese weighs 30 grams, and is packaged in a cylinder approximately 4 cm high and 3 cm diameter. Petit-suisse may be consumed with sugar, as a dessert with jam or honey, or salted and peppered with herbs. It is also used in meat stuffings. A mixture of petit-suisse and mustard is sometimes applied to rabbit to prevent the meat from drying during cooking. Contrary to what its name suggests, petit-suisse did not originate in Switzerland but in Normandy where, in the 1850s, a Swiss employee at a dairy in Auvilliers (Haute-Normandie) suggested adding cream to enrich the curd used for cheese. Originally, it was sold in a thin paper wrapping and packaged in wooden boxes, six to a box. The cheeses weighed 60 grams each and were called simply "suisse" (Swiss). Today, the cheeses are manufactured throughout France and sold as either the regular 30g petit-suisse or the
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Valençay

    Valençay

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Valençay is a cheese made in the province of Berry in central France. Its name is derived from the town of Valençay in the Indre department. Distinctive in its truncated pyramidal shape, Valençay is an unpasteurised goats-milk cheese weighing 200-250g and around 7cm in height. Its rustic blue-grey colour is made by the natural moulds that form its rind, darkened with a dusting of charcoal. The young cheese has a fresh, citric taste, with age giving it a nutty taste characteristic of goats cheeses. The cheese achieved AOC status in 1998 making Valençay the first region to achieve AOC status for both its cheese and its wine. The province Berry has been the home to many cheeses for centuries, and has produced Selles-sur-Cher, Crottin de Chavignol and Pouligny-Saint-Pierre among others. One apocryphal tale has it that Napoleon having returned from his disastrous campaigns in Egypt stopped at the castle at Valençay. Their local pyramidal cheese apparently aroused unpleasant memories as he alleged then cut the top off in fury with his sword leaving the shape that survives to the present. The curd is drained and placed in a mould. After being removed it is covered with charcoal dust and
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Cheshire cheese

    Cheshire cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cheshire cheese /ˈtʃɛʃər/ is a dense and crumbly cheese produced in the English county of Cheshire, and four neighbouring counties, two in Wales (Denbighshire and Flintshire) and two in England (Shropshire and Staffordshire). Cheshire cheese is one of the oldest recorded named cheeses in British history: it is first mentioned, along with Shropshire, by Thomas Muffet in Health's Improvement (c. 1580). Indeed, Cheshire cheese is Britain's oldest cheese. There is no earlier specific mention of the cheese of the county, but the importance of Cheshire as one of the main dairy regions of England is already emphasised by William of Malmesbury in the Chester section of his Gesta pontificum Anglorum ("History of the bishops of England": c. 1125). The claim that Cheshire cheese is referred to in Domesday Book has become widespread but it is "nonsense". Cheshire was the most popular cheese on the market in the late 18th century. In 1758 the Royal Navy ordered that ships be stocked with Cheshire and Gloucester cheeses. By 1823, Cheshire cheese production was estimated at 10,000 tonnes per year; in around 1870, it was estimated as 12,000 tons per year. Until the late 19th century, the different
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Zamorano cheese

    Zamorano cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Zamorano (Spanish: Queso zamorano) is a sheep's milk cheese made in the province of Zamora, Spain. This is a hard cheese which is typically aged about 6 months. The cheeses are turned often and rubbed with olive oil, giving the cheese its characteristic dark color. This cheese owes its flavor character to the breed of sheep, the "small, scruffy" Churra and the Castilian sheep, predominant in the region, to the cold and humid climate conditions, and to its long aging in cellars. Zamorano has a "very creamy, sweet, savory flavor," with "a hint of piquancy." Others describe it as hardy and nutty. The shape is cylindrical with "a distinctive zigzag pattern," similar to Castellano or Manchego, which it resembles in taste also. The size is approximately 11 kg. Zamorano cheese is protected by its Denominación de Origen, which specifies its production, ingredients, and maturation.
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    Castelmagno

    Castelmagno

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-hard
    Castelmagno (DOP) is a cheese with Protected designation of origin status from the north-west Italian region Piedmont. Castelmagno is a cheese which has been made for many centuries: the earliest known mention of it dates to 1277, but in all likelihood its origins are much earlier. The cheese has traditionally been made in the Valle Grana in the south-west of the Province of Cuneo, where production is permitted today within the boundaries of the communes of Castelmagno, Pradleves and Monterosso Grana. Castelmagno is a semi-hard, half-fat cheese produced from whole cows milk, obtained from cattle of the Piedmontese breed fed on fresh forage or hay from mixed meadows or pasture. On occasion some milk from sheep or goats may may be added to the cows’ milk. Aside from being eaten on its own Castelmagno can be part of countless recipes, such as in fondue or veloutees and can be eaten along with rice, pasta, polenta, thinly sliced raw beef meat (carpaccio) or grilled vegetables.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Époisses de Bourgogne

    Époisses de Bourgogne

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: washed-rind
    Époisses de Bourgogne is a cheese made in the village Époisses, which is in the département of Côte-d'Or in France. It is located around halfway between Dijon and Auxerre. Commonly referred to as Époisses, it is a pungent unpasteurized cows-milk cheese. Smear-ripened (washed in marc de Bourgogne, the local pomace brandy), it is circular at around either 10cm or 18cm in diameter, with a distinctive soft red-orange colour. It is sold in a circular wooden box, and is best served with a good dark Trappist beer, or even Sauternes. Napoleon was a particular fan of the cheese, and the famous epicure Brillat-Savarin himself classed it as the "king of all cheeses". At the start of the sixteenth century, the village was home to a Cistercian community at L'Abbaye de Citeaux that, according to oral legend, began production of the cheese. Two hundred years later, when the community left, they left local farmers the recipe, which developed over the next century. Although popular at the start of the 20th century, with over 300 farms manufacturing the cheese, production had all but died out by the end of the Second World War. This resulted from the loss of a significant portion of the male
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Torta del Casar

    Torta del Casar

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Torta del Casar is a cheese made from sheep's milk in the Extremadura region of Spain. It is named after Casar de Cáceres, its city of origin. The milk is curdled using a coagulant found in the pistils of the cardoon, a wild thistle. This ingredient lends a subtle bitterness to the otherwise rich and slightly salty tasting cheese. It is aged for at least sixty days. The fully ripe cheese has a creamy consistency in the center, and is traditionally eaten by slicing off the top and scooping out the inside. In 1999, the cheese was given protected-origin status, regulations that stipulate not only where it can be produced, but also that it can only be made with the milk of Merino and Entrefina sheep. These breeds have a low yield of milk, and it takes the milk of 20 sheep to make a 2.2-pound wheel of Torta del Casar. Torta del Casar is produced commercially today by eight family-run dairies. Only about 10 percent of the production is exported from Spain.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Esrom

    Esrom

    • Country Of Origin: Denmark
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Esrom, or Danish Port Salut cheese is a Trappist-style pale yellow semi-soft cow's milk cheese with a pungent aroma and a full, sweet flavour. It is a porous cheese, with many small holes throughout, and is slightly elastic and buttery in texture. Commonly used as a table or melting cheese, it is also good in casseroles or sandwiches and is similar to havarti or Saint Paulin. Because of its bold flavour, it goes well with dark beers and red wines. It is slow ripened from a starting culture for a period of 10 to 12 weeks, then cured in rectangular moulds. It has a waxy yellow-brown rind. It takes its name from the monastery, Esrom Abbey, where it was produced until 1559. The process for making esrom was rediscovered in 1951. Esrom and Danablu are the only two Danish cheeses that are PGI-marked by the EU, meaning that they may only be produced in Denmark from Danish milk and at approved dairies that produce the cheeses according to the specifications laid down.
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Mottin charentais

    Mottin charentais

    • Country Of Origin: France
    The mottin charentais is a French cheese made of cow's milk produced in the Charente-Maritime département. Very cheap for the quality of this "double-cream" cheese, it can be found in supermarkets across France. Originally called "Crottin charentais" it has been renamed for marketing reasons to "Mottin" as "crottin" means "dung" in French.
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    Goat cheese

    Goat cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Goat cheese, or chèvre (from the French for goat), is cheese made out of the milk of goats. Cow's milk and goat's milk have similar overall fat contents. However, the higher proportion of medium-chain fatty acids such as caproic, caprylic and capric acid in goat's milk contributes to the characteristic tart flavor of goat's milk cheese. (These fatty acids take their name from the Latin for goat, capra.) When chèvre is served hot, it is known as chèvre chaud. Goat milk is often consumed by young children, the elderly, those who are ill, or have a low tolerance to cow's milk. Goat milk is more similar to human milk than that of the cow, although there is large variation among breeds in both animals. Although the West has popularized the cow, goat milk and goat cheese are preferred dairy products in much of the rest of the world. Because goat cheese is often made in areas where refrigeration is limited, aged goat cheeses are often heavily treated with salt to prevent decay. As a result, salt has become associated with the flavor of goat cheese. Goat cheese has been made for thousands of years, and was probably one of the earliest made dairy products. In the most simple form, goat
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Langres

    Langres

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: washed-rind
    Langres is a French cheese from the plateau of Langres in the region of Champagne-Ardenne. It has benefited from a Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) since 1991. Langres is a cow's milk cheese, cylindrical in shape, weighing about 180g. The central pâte is soft, creamy in colour, and slightly crumbly, and is surrounded by a white penicillium candidum rind. It is a less pungent cheese than Époisses de Bourgogne, its local competition. It is best eaten between May and August after 5 weeks of aging, but it is also excellent March through December. Production in 1998 was around 305 tons, a decline of 1.61% since 1996, and 2% on farms.
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    Cheddar cheese

    Cheddar cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United Kingdom
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: semi-hard
    Cheddar cheese is a relatively hard, pale yellow to off-white (unless artificially coloured), and sometimes sharp-tasting, cheese. Originating in the English village of Cheddar in Somerset, it is now produced in several countries around the world. It is the most popular cheese in the United Kingdom, accounting for 51 percent of the country's £1.9 billion annual cheese market, and the second most popular cheese in the United States, behind mozzarella, with an average annual consumption of 10 lb (4.5 kg) per capita. The United States produced 3,233,380,000 lb (1,443,470 long tons; 1,466,640 tonnes) in 2010, and the UK 258,000 long tons (262,000 tonnes) in 2008. The name "Cheddar cheese" is widely used and has no Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) within the European Union, but only Cheddar produced from local milk within four counties of South West England may use the name "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar." The cheese originates from the village of Cheddar in Somerset, South West England. Cheddar Gorge on the edge of the village contains a number of caves, which provided the ideal humidity and constant temperature for maturing the cheese. Cheddar cheese traditionally had to be made
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Liptauer

    Liptauer

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Liptauer is a spicy cheese spread made with sheep milk cheese, goat's milk cheese, quark cheese or cottage cheese. It is a part of the regional cuisine of Slovakia (as Šmirkás, a form of the German Schmierkäse for cheese spread), Hungary (as Liptói túró or Körözött), Austria, Serbia (as Urnebes salata, "chaos salad") and Italy (especially in the province of Trieste). The name is derived from the German name Liptau for the region of Liptov (Hungarian: Liptó) in northern Slovakia, a former county in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Liptauer cheese spread can be made of any soft cheeses. Cottage cheese, cream cheese, quark cheese, soft goat or sheep cheese are all suitable for this purpose. About one third of "traditional" Liptauer consists of bryndza, a sheep milk cheese. The cheese is mixed with local sour cream, butter, margarine or beer and finely chopped onions. Spices are added, like ground paprika, fresh parsley, usually whole caraway seeds (or ground caraway). Other recipes involve prepared mustard, Worcestershire sauce, capers or anchovy paste. Consumed on open sandwich, toast, crackers, bagels or as a filling in cold dishes like filled tomatoes, peppers, or hard boiled
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Manchego cheese

    Manchego cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Manchego (officially Queso Manchego) is a cheese made in the La Mancha region of Spain from the milk of sheep of the Manchega breed. Official Manchego cheese is to be aged for between 60 days and two years. Manchego has a firm and compact consistency and a buttery texture, and often contains small, unevenly-distributed air pockets. The colour of the cheese varies from white to ivory-yellow, and the inedible rind from yellow to brownish beige. The cheese has a distinctive flavour, well developed but not too strong, creamy with a slight piquancy, and leaves an aftertaste that is characteristic of sheep’s milk. The designation Queso Manchego is protected under Spain's Denominación de Origen (DO) regulatory classification system and the cheese has been granted Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status by the European Union. To be designated as Queso Manchego, the cheese must satisfy the following requirements: Manchego cheese can be made from pasteurised or raw milk; if the latter, it may be labelled as Artesano (artisan). The only permitted additives are natural rennet, or another approved coagulating enzyme, and sodium chloride (salt). The moulds in which the cheese is pressed are
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Schabziger

    Schabziger

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Schabziger or sapsago is traditional cheese exclusively produced in the Canton of Glarus in Switzerland. Schabziger is made out of the skimmed cow milk and a special kind of herb, blue melilot (Trigonella caerulea), also called blue fenugreek. The milk and melilot sap are heated to 90°F or 32°C then an acid (lactic, citric or acetic) is added causing curdling. The whey and curd are separated. The whey is further curdled at 90°C and separated. The whey-condensate is called Ziger and is pressed into cones for 6 to 8 days. The cones are then dried for 2 to 6 months. The resulting cheese is hard, green with a strong flavor and aroma. It is usually conditioned as cones of 100 g with a height of 5 cm. It contains less than 3% fat. Schabziger is usually eaten grated, or mixed with butter to make an herb spread ("Ankeziger", "Zigerbutter") that is put on bread or sandwiches. It can also be used in fondue (Zigerfondue), or grated and eaten with noodles (Zigerhörnli) or rösti. A cone of Schabziger can be conserved for weeks in the fridge. Schabziger was first manufactured by the monks in Glarus, in the 8th century. The exact specification on how to make this cheese was laid down during a
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Strained yoghurt

    Strained yoghurt

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Strained yoghurt, yoghurt cheese, labneh, or Greek yoghurt is yoghurt which has been strained in a cloth or paper bag or filter to remove the whey, giving a consistency between that of yoghurt and cheese, while preserving yoghurt's distinctive sour taste. Like many yoghurts, strained yoghurt is often made from milk which has been enriched by boiling off some of the water content, or by adding extra butterfat and powdered milk. However most strained Greek yogurts have no added fats and are made of real milk. Yoghurt strained through muslin is a traditional food in the Levant, Eastern Mediterranean, Near East, and South Asia, where it is often used in cooking, as it is high enough in fat not to curdle at higher temperatures. It is used in both cooked and raw, savoury and sweet dishes. Due to the straining process to remove excess whey, even non-fat varieties are rich and creamy. In Western Europe and the U.S., strained yoghurt has become increasingly popular because it is richer in texture than unstrained yoghurt, but low in fat. Since the straining process removes some of the lactose, strained yoghurt is lower in sugar and carbohydrates than unstrained yoghurt. In fact, most of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Dorset Blue Vinney cheese

    Dorset Blue Vinney cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Dorset Blue Vinney (frequently spelled "vinny") is a traditional blue cheese made near Sturminster Newton in Dorset, England, from skimmed cows' milk. It is a hard, crumbly cheese. "Vinney" is a local Dorset term related to the obsolete word "vinew", which means to become mouldy. Another explanation has it that "vinny" is a corruption of "veiny", referring to the blue veins running throughout the cheese. Historically the cheese was merely a by-product of the much more lucrative butter market. Milk was of little value before the railways as it couldn't be brought to market before it went off, thus cheese and butter production was the main focus of dairy farms. Dorset butter was highly regarded in London where it fetched a premium price but making butter left the farmers with large quantities of skimmed milk which they turned into a hard, crumbly cheese. While the cheese was a common farmhouse cheese in Dorset for hundreds of years, production dried up around 1970 and the cheese became extinct. However, in the 1980s Woodbridge Farm in Dorset revived the old recipe, and it is now producing the cheese again. In his poem Praise O' Do'set, the Dorset poet William Barnes asks, It is often
    9.50
    2 votes
    44
    Livarot

    Livarot

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Livarot is a French cheese of the Normandy region, originating in the commune of Livarot, and protected by an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) since 1975. It is a soft, pungent, washed rind cheese made from cow's milk. It is both beloved and reviled for its earthy aroma, which has been described by some as reminiscent of feces or "barnyard". The normal weight for a round of Livarot is 450 g, though it also comes in other weights. It is sold in cylindrical form with the orangish rind wrapped in 3 to 5 rings of dried reedmace (Typha latifolia). For this reason, it has been referred to as 'colonel', as the rings of dried bullrush resemble the stripes on a colonel's uniform. Sometimes green paper is also used. Its orange colour comes from different sources depending on the manufacturer, but is often annatto. The bacterium Brevibacterium linens is employed in fermentation. Production in 1998 was 1,101 tons, down 12.2% since 1996. Only 12% of Livarot are made from raw, unpasteurized milk. Its period of optimal tasting is spread out from May to September after a refining from 6 to 8 weeks, but it is also excellent from March to December.
    9.50
    2 votes
    45
    Ossau-Iraty

    Ossau-Iraty

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Ossau-iraty is a French cheese made from sheep milk. Ossau-iraty is produced in south-western France, in the Northern Basque Country and in Béarn. Its name reflects its geographical location, the Ossau Valley in Béarn and the Iraty Valley in the Northern Basque Country. It has been recognized as an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) product since 1980. It is one of only two sheep's milk cheeses granted AOC status in France. (The other is Roquefort). Although Ossau-Iraty received AOC status in the 80s, it is of ancient origin, traditionally made by the shepherds in the region. Production techniques are very much in the essence of old world methods whereby the sheep still graze mountain pastures. This is an uncooked cheese made through pressing. According to AOC regulations, this cheese must be made with raw, unpasteurized milk. Ossau-Iraty is rather medium-soft, light in color and has very complex yet delicately smooth flavors. This cheese tastes slightly akin to cow's cheeses of similar texture such as alps cheese. Ossau-Iraty is complex and includes an edible slightly white-moldy tart rind which adds considerably to the experience. This is a creamy, not bitter, not overly
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Rushan

    Rushan

    Rushan (乳扇; pinyin: rǔshān, lit. "milk fan") is a cow's milk cheese of Yunnan, China. It is traditionally made by the Bai people, who call it nvxseiz (or Yenx seinp, in another dialect of Bai), the etymology of which is unclear. A plausible etymology is as follows. Yenx is a merged pronunciation of two words "ye" (eat) and "nox" (able), i.e. edible. "Seinp" means "thread", from the impression of the streching process during the preparation of Rushan. The early Chinese name of rushan is ruxian, literally dairy thread, offering further support for the etymology. The current Chinese name rushan comes obviously from the phonetic translation of seinp to shan (Yunnan dialect of Chinese: san)with Chinese denotation of Ru (dairy). It is flat and has a leathery texture. It may be served fried or grilled and rolled up on a stick. The Mandarin name means "milk fan" as it is said to resemble a folding fan. When served grilled (often as a street food), it is usually spread with various sweet condiments and rolled around a stick, resembling a popsicle. Some of the popular toppings include sweetened condensed milk, rose petal infused honey, chocolate syrup, and fruit preserves. If it is served
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Gorgonzola

    Gorgonzola

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gorgonzola (Italian pronunciation: [ɡorɡonˈdzɔːla]) is a veined Italian blue cheese, made from unskimmed cow's milk. It can be buttery or firm, crumbly and quite salty, with a "bite" from its blue veining. Gorgonzola has reportedly been produced in the town of the same name since AD 879, acquiring its greenish-blue marbling in the eleventh century. However, the town's claim of geographical origin is disputed by other localities. Today, it is mainly produced in the northern Italian regions of Piedmont and Lombardy. Whole cow's milk is used, to which starter bacteria is added, along with spores of the mould Penicillium glaucum. Penicillium roqueforti, used in Roquefort cheese, may also be used. The whey is then removed during curdling, and the result aged at low temperatures. During the aging process metal rods are quickly inserted and removed, creating air channels that allow the mold spores to grow into hyphae and cause the cheese's characteristic veining. Gorgonzola is typically aged for three to four months. The length of the aging process determines the consistency of the cheese, which gets firmer as it ripens. There are two varieties of Gorgonzola, which differ mainly in their
    5.33
    6 votes
    48
    Chabichou

    Chabichou

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Chabichou (also known as Chabichou du Poitou) is a traditional soft, unpasteurized, natural-rind French goat cheese (or Chèvre) with a firm and creamy texture. Chabichou is aged for 10 to 20 days. The legend of Chabichou goes back to 732, at the time of the defeat of the Saracens in the area, in the 8th century, after the Battle of Poitiers. Many of them left the area but some settled there with their families and, in particular, their goat herds. The countryside was appropriate for grazing the "poor man's cow", as the pastures were excellent. The cheese was then named cheblis (“goat”, in Arabic), which would become “chabichou" thereafter. However, the domestication of the goat in this area is supposed to date back to Roman colonization, and extends up to the present. Chabichou du Poitou, made exclusively in the Poitou-Charentes region, acquired its AOC status in 1990 with the assistance of the efforts of Ségolène Royal. It is known for its characteristic label. Its production rose to 555 tons in 2003. Since 1782, Chabichou du Poitou has been mentioned in the French "Guide du voyageur à Poitiers et aux environs". When regional wine production slowed in the late 1800s due to the
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Pont-l'Évêque

    Pont-l'Évêque

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft
    Pont-l'Évêque is a French cheese, originally manufactured in the area around the commune of Pont-l'Évêque, between Deauville and Lisieux in the Calvados département of Basse-Normandie. It is probably the oldest Norman cheese still in production. Pont-l'Évêque is an uncooked, unpressed cow's-milk cheese, square in shape usually at around 10 cm square and around 3 cm high, weighing 400g. The central pâte is soft, creamy pale yellow in colour with a smooth, fine texture and has a pungent aroma. This is surrounded by a washed rind that is white with a gentle orange-brown coloration. The whole is soft when pressed but lacks elasticity. It is generally ranked alongside Brie, Camembert, and Roquefort as one of the most popular cheeses in France. The cheese has been made in Normandy since at least the 12th century, and local legend claims that it was first made in a Norman abbey. A manuscript from the time writes that a fine meal should always end with some "angelot", the name used for the cheese at the time. The cheese became popular across the country from the 16th century onwards, when it obtained the name of the village around which its production was centred. Pont-l'Évêque was
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    Raclette

    Raclette

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Raclette ( /rəˈklɛt/) is both a type of cheese and a Swiss dish based on heating the cheese and scraping off (racler) the melted part. In French, the word for the cheese is masculine, le raclette, whereas the word for the dish is feminine, la raclette. Raclette is a semi-firm, cow's milk cheese - most commonly used for melting. It is usually fashioned into a wheel of about 6 kg (13 lb). Raclette is also a dish indigenous to parts of Switzerland. The Raclette cheese round is heated, either in front of a fire or by a special machine, then scraped onto diners' plates; the term raclette derives from the French word racler, meaning "to scrape". Traditionally, it is accompanied by small firm potatoes (Bintje, Charlotte or Raclette varieties), gherkins, pickled onions, and dried meat, such as jambon cru/cuit and viande des Grisons. “Raclette” comes from the French racler, “to scrape,” a reference to the fact that the melted cheese must be scraped from the unmelted part of the cheese onto the plate. Traditionally the melting happens or happened in front of an open fire with the big piece of cheese facing the heat. One then regularly scrapes off the melting side. In the Swiss canton of
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Rochebarron

    Rochebarron

    • Country Of Origin: France
    Rochebaron is a soft blue cheese made from pasteurised cow's milk, in the town of Beauzac in the Auvergne region, in the Massif Central, France. This cheese is one of several that are made by curdling milk and separating the curds from the whey. Pressed into moulds, Rochebaron is then pierced with wires impregnated with penicillium glaucum to produce blue veins through the soft whitish body of the cheese. The crust of edible ashes is dark matte grey. Rochebaron is usually sold as a single cheese with an average weight of 600 grams (1.3 lb).
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Bundz

    Bundz

    • Country Of Origin: Poland
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Bundz (also known as bunc (Podhale dialect) is Polish sheep milk cheese. It is traditionally produced in Podhale. The drink żętyca is also produced from the whey created in bundz production.
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Chaubier

    Chaubier

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Chaubier is a type of mild, pasteurized French cheese made from half goat's milk and half cow's milk, with an acquired flavor.
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Hoch-Ybrig

    Hoch-Ybrig

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Simmental Cattle
    Hoch-Ybrig is a skiing and hiking area in Canton of Schwyz in Switzerland (Municipalities of Unteriberg, Oberiberg). Hoch-Ybrig is dominated by the mountain range Forstberg - Druesberg (2282 metres) - Twäriberg. These mountains form a boundary between Hoch-Ybrig on one side and Muotathal valley and Canton of Glarus on the other side. A cablecar leads from Weglosen (1035 m) to Seebli (1460 m) at the feet of Roggenstock. From Seebli, there are cablecar connections to Spirstock (1771 m) and Sternen (1856 m).
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Turoš

    Turoš

    • Country Of Origin: Croatia
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Turoš is a type of cheese made from cattle's milk. It is a traditional food in the north Croatian region of Međimurje. Turoš is made by cone-shaping chunks of cottage cheese, with the addition of salt and red paprika. Because it is spiced with red paprika, the cheese is usually light orange or apricot in colour. The height of the cones is usually around 6 centimetres. Upon shaping, the cheese is left to dry in smoke or sunlight over a few days. The name turoš comes from the homophonous Hungarian word túrós, meaning "of cottage cheese" or "of curd cheese". Túró is the Hungarian noun for both "cottage cheese" and "curd cheese".
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Corleggy

    Corleggy

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Corleggy Cheeses is an Irish farmhouse making a selection of cheese in County Cavan. Started by Silke Cropp in 1985 using milk from her own herd of goat; today Corleggy make a variety of different cheese from goat's milk, sheep's milk and cow's milk sourced from local farmers. Corleggy make 2 varieties of goat's cheese, one variety of sheep's cheese and 5 varieties of cow's cheese marketed under the "Drumlin" brand. The herds graze on neighbouring farms on drumlin parstures along the River Erne. The goat's cheese is made from pasteurised milk while the range of cow's cheese is made with raw milk. Vegetarian rennet is used, and for some varieties sea water is used to wash the cheese in salt water and helps form the edible rind. Corleggy is a hard cheese handmade from raw goat's milk. Every individual cheese is matured from 8 weeks to 4 months, depending on the season, weather, humidity and the seasonality of the grass and herbs available to the goats at the time of making the cheese. The rind of Corleggy is natural, formed by bathing the cheeses in sea salt brine. On occasion, a smoked version of Corleggy is available. This is a soft goat's cheese preserved in Greek kalamata olive
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    Edam

    Edam

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Edam (Dutch: Edammer, [ˈeɪ̯.ˌdɑ.mər]) is a Dutch cheese traditionally sold in spheres with a pale yellow interior and a coat of red paraffin wax. It is named after the town of Edam in the province of North Holland, where the cheese is coated for export sale and for the tourist high season. After aging for at least 17 weeks the cheese sphere is coated with black wax, rather than the usual red or yellow. Edam ages and travels well, and does not spoil; it only hardens. These qualities (among others) made it the world's most popular cheese between the 14th and 18th centuries, both at sea and in remote colonies. Most "young" Edam cheese sold in stores has a very mild flavor, is slightly salty or nutty, and has almost no smell when compared to other cheeses. As the cheese ages, its flavor sharpens, and it becomes firmer. It has a significantly lower fat content than many other traditional cheeses; as little as 28 percent of the cheese is made up of fat. Modern Edam is softer than other cheeses, such as Cheddar, due to its low fat content. However, it is not quite as suitable for toasting as are certain other cheeses, such as Cheddar. Mild Edam goes well with fruit such as peaches,
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    Lincolnshire Poacher

    Lincolnshire Poacher

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Lincolnshire Poacher is a hard unpasteurised cow's milk cheese that is generally of a cylindrical shape with its rind resembling granite in appearance. It is made in Lincolnshire, England. The cheese is matured between 14 and 24 months, depending on when the milk was collected. Lincolnshire Poacher Cheese stock The Cheese Shop, Louth with all three of its cheeses, both maturities, and also Lincolnshire Red.
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Munster

    Munster

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: washed-rind
    Munster or Munster-géromé, is a strong tasting, soft cheese made mainly from milk from the Vosges, between Alsace, Lorraine and Franche-Comté in France. The name munster may come from the little town of Munster, where, among Vosgian abbeys and monasteries, the cheese was conserved and matured in monks' cellars. It may also refer to the Latin word for monastery, monasterium. This cheese originated in the Admodiation, an area on the top of the Vosgian mountains, named Chaumes" or "Les grandes Chaumes" (comitatus Calvomontensis). Calvomontensis is the Latin word that describes mountaintops without woods. As early as 1371, and possibly before, these territories were occupied by cattle herds driven by men, called "marcaires", pastured there between May and September. When the herds returned to their valleys, the cattle herdsmen first paid the fees and tithes to the religious and political owners of the summer pastures or simply financiers of this transhumance. During feudal times these owners possessed all goods, living creatures, rights of pasture and cattle. Those who herded were known as serfs. This mountain population paid their debts with cheese and jars of butter. The lords were
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Tomme de Savoie

    Tomme de Savoie

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-firm
    Tomme de Savoie is a variety of Tomme cheese from Savoie in the French Alps. It is a mild, semi-firm cow's milk cheese with a beige interior and a thick brownish-grey rind. Tomme de Savoie, like most Tommes, is usually made from the skim milk left over after the cream is used to make butter or richer cheeses. As a result, the cheese has a relatively low fat content (between 20 and 45%). The cheese is made year-round, and typically has a slightly different character depending on whether the cows are fed on winter hay or summer grass. The cheese normally comes in discs approximately 18 centimetres (7.1 in) across, 5–8 centimetres (2.0–3.1 in) in thickness, and weighing between 1 and 2 kilograms (2.2 and 4.4 lb). It is first pressed, and then matured for several months in a traditional cellar, which produces the characteristically thick rind and adds flavor.
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Grana Padano cheese

    Grana Padano cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Grana Padano (IPA: [ˈɡraːna paˈdaːno]) (Denominazione di Origine Protetta, DOP, in Italian, Protected Designation of Origin, PDO, in English; Denominazione di Origine Controllata, DOC, in Italian, Controlled Designation of Origin, CDO, in English) is one of the most popular cheeses of Italy. The name comes from the noun grana (‘grain’), which refers to the distinctively grainy texture of the cheese, and the adjective Padano, which refers to the valley Pianura Padana. (The reason this cheese is called "Grana Padano" and not "Grana Padana" is because in this case the Italian word grana is the masculine noun, il grana, describing this specific cheese, and not the feminine noun la grana, which means "grain"). Grana Padano is one of the world's first hard cheeses, created nearly 1,000 years ago by the Cistercian monks of Chiaravalle Abbey, founded in 1135 near Milan, who used ripened cheese as a way of preserving surplus milk. By the year 1477, it was regarded as one of the most famous cheeses of Italy. It can last a long time without spoiling, sometimes aging up to two years. It is made in a similar way to the Parmigiano Reggiano of Emilia-Romagna but over a much wider area and with
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Mozzarella di Bufala Campana

    Mozzarella di Bufala Campana

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Water Buffalo
    Buffalo mozzarella (Italian: mozzarella di bufala) is a mozzarella made from the milk of the domestic water buffalo. Apart from Italy, its birthplace, buffalo mozzarella is manufactured in many locations around the world. There are producers in Switzerland, the United States, Australia, Mexico, Brazil, Canada, Venezuela, Argentina, the United Kingdom, near Macroom in Ireland, Spain, Colombia, Thailand, Israel, Egypt, India and South Africa, all using milk from their own herds of water buffaloes. Some scientists believe that Italy and Bulgaria have the best dairy water buffaloes. In Italy, the cheese is produced in areas ranging from Rome in Lazio to Paestum (near Salerno) in Campania, and there is a production area in near Foggia, Puglia. Buffalo mozzarella is a €300m ($430m) a year industry in Italy, which produces around 33,000 tonnes of it every year, with 16 percent sold abroad (mostly in the European Union). France and Germany are the main importers, but sales to Japan and Russia are expanding. Buffalo mozzarella from Campania bears the "Mozzarella di Bufala Campana" trademark. In 1993, it was granted Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) status, in 1996 the trademark
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Mascarpone

    Mascarpone

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Triple cream
    Mascarpone (/ˌmæskɑrˈpoʊniː/ or /ˈmɑːskərpoʊn/; Italian: [maskarˈpoːne]) is an Italian cheese made from cream, coagulated with citric acid or acetic acid. After denaturation, whey is removed without pressing or aging. One can manufacture mascarpone by using cream and tartaric acid, citric acid, or even lemon juice. Mascarpone is recognized as a Prodotto agroalimentare tradizionale (traditional regional food product). Mascarpone is milky-white in color and is easily spread. It is used in various dishes of the Lombardy region of Italy, where it is a specialty. It is a main ingredient of modern Tiramisù. It is sometimes used instead of butter or Parmesan cheese to thicken and enrich risotto. Mascarpone originated in the area between Lodi and Abbiategrasso, Italy, southwest of Milan, probably in the late 16th or early 17th century. The name is said to come from mascarpa, a milk product made from the whey of stracchino (shortly-aged cheese), or from mascarpia, the word in the local dialect for ricotta (although mascarpone is not made from whey, as ricotta is).
    5.00
    6 votes
    64
    Carré de l'Est

    Carré de l'Est

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Carré de l'Est is a French cheese originating from Lorraine. Its place of origin and square shape give it its name (literally "square of the East"). Carré de l'Est is produced from cow's milk and is aged five weeks. It has a smokey bacon flavour.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Gruyère

    Gruyère

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: cooked, pressed, hard
    Gruyère (/ɡruːˈjɛər/ or /ɡrɨˈjɛər/; French pronunciation: [ɡʁyjɛʁ]) is a hard yellow cheese, named after the town of Gruyères in Switzerland, and originated in the cantons of Fribourg, Vaud, Neuchâtel, Jura, and Berne. Before 2001, when Gruyère gained Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) status as a Swiss cheese, some controversy existed whether French cheeses of a similar nature could also be labeled Gruyère (French Gruyère style cheeses include Comté and Beaufort). Gruyère is sweet but slightly salty, with a flavor that varies widely with age. It is often described as creamy and nutty when young, becoming with age more assertive, earthy, and complex. When fully aged (five months to a year) it tends to have small cracks which impart a slightly grainy mouthfeel. Gruyère cheese is generally known as one of the finest cheeses for baking, having a distinctive but not overpowering taste. In quiche, Gruyère adds savoriness without overshadowing the other ingredients. It is a good melting cheese, particularly suited for fondues, along with Vacherin and Emmental. It is also traditionally used in French onion soup, as well as in croque monsieur, a classic French toasted ham and cheese
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Mimolette

    Mimolette

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Mimolette is a cheese traditionally produced around the city of Lille, France. In France, it is also known as Boule de Lille after its city of origin, or vieux Hollande for being made after the tradition of Edam cheese from the Dutch province of Holland. In some areas of Belgium and the Netherlands, such as Flanders, it is also known as commissiekaas. It was originally made by the request of Louis XIV, who - in the context of Jean-Baptiste Colbert's mercantilistic policies - was looking for a native French product to replace the then very popular Edam. To differentiate it from Edam, however, he had it coloured orange. A cow's-milk cheese, it normally weighs about 2 kg (approximately 4.5 pounds). Its name comes from the French word molle, meaning "soft". This refers to the softness of the crust when young - with age it becomes harder. It has a grey crust and orangish flesh. The orange colour comes from the natural colorant, annatto. The cheese has a similar appearance, at first glance, to a cantaloupe melon. The greyish crust of aged Mimolette is the result of cheese mites intentionally introduced to add flavor by their action on the surface of the cheese. Mimolette can be consumed
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Oscypek

    Oscypek

    • Country Of Origin: Poland
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Oscypek, Oszczypek (Polish; plural: oscypki) is a smoked cheese made of salted sheep milk exclusively in the Tatra Mountains region of Poland. Since 2007 Oscypek is a protected trade name under the EU's Protected Designation of Origin geographical indication. The cheeses differ in the ratio of their ingredients, the cheesemaking process and the characteristics of the final product. Oscypek is made using salted sheep's milk, with the addition of cow's milk strictly regulated by the protected recipe. Unpasteurized salted sheep's milk is first turned into cottage cheese, which is then repeatedly rinsed with boiling water and squeezed. After this, the mass is pressed into wooden, spindle-shaped forms in decorative shapes. The forms are then placed in a brine-filled barrel for a night or two, after which they are placed close to the roof in a special wooden hut and cured in hot smoke for up to 14 days. The first mention of cheese production in the Tatra Mountains dates back to the 15th century, in a document from the village of Ochotnica in 1416. The first recorded recipe for oscypek was issued in 1748 in the Żywiec area. There is also a smaller form called redykołka, known as the
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Pimento cheese

    Pimento cheese

    Pimento cheese is a common food in the Southern United States. The basic recipe has few ingredients: sharp cheddar cheese, mayonnaise, pimentos (also spelled "pimientos"), salt and pepper, blended to either a smooth or chunky paste. Regional ingredients include cream cheese, Louisiana-style hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, cayenne pepper, paprika, jalapeños, onions, garlic, and dill pickles. Pimento cheese can be served as a spread on crackers or celery, scooped onto corn chips or tortilla chips, mixed in with mashed yolks for deviled eggs, added to grits, or slathered over hamburgers or hotdogs. Pimento cheese can also be used to replace the sliced cheese in a grilled cheese sandwich. A pimento cheese sandwich may be a quick and inexpensive lunch for children, or it may be served as a cocktail finger food (with crusts trimmed, garnished with watercress, and cut into triangles). Pimento cheese sandwiches are a signature item at The Masters Tournament. It is also a common snack in the Philippines, where it is referred to as cheese pimiento.
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Taleggio cheese

    Taleggio cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Taleggio (IPA: [taˈleddʒo]) is a washed rind and smear-ripened Italian cheese that is named after Val Taleggio. The cheese has a strong aroma, but its flavour is comparatively mild with an unusual fruity tang. Its crust is thin. The name Taleggio has been used before the 10th century in the caves of Val Taleggio. It might be one of the oldest soft cheeses. The production takes place every autumn and winter when the cows are tired (Italian: stracche). First, the acidified milk is brought to the lab from milk calves. The cheese is set on wood shelves in chambers, sometimes in caves as per tradition, and will mature within six to ten weeks. It is washed once a week with a seawater sponge, in order to prevent mold infestation, and to prevent the cheese from forming an orange or rose crust. Today, the cheese is made from pasteurized milk and from raw milk in factories. The factory-made ones are brighter and moderate in flavour. Spices, raisins, nuts and some lemons are also added. The cheese can be eaten grated with salads such as radicchio and rucola and with spices and tomato on bruschetta. It melts well, and can be used in risotto or on polenta.
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Abbaye de Belloc

    Abbaye de Belloc

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: semi-hard
    Abbaye de Belloc is a French, traditional farmhouse, semi-hard cheese from the Pays Basque region, made from unpasteurized sheep milk, with a fat content of 60%. The cheese was first made by the Benedictine monks of the Abbaye de Notre-Dame de Belloc, at the commune of Belloc in the Ariège department of southwestern France, from milk from the local flocks of sheep. Abbaye de Belloc is made in a 5 kg fat wheel with a natural, crusty, brownish colored rind with patches of red, orange and yellow. The cheese was founded by Benedictine monks. For centuries they have made their cheese from milk produced in the locality. The cheese has a firm, dense, rich and creamy texture. The taste resembles burnt caramel and there is a distinctive lanolin aroma.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Berkswell

    Berkswell

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: hard
    Berkswell

    The picturesque village of Berkswell in the central county of Warwickshire, England is named for the Saxon chief, Bercul. In the eighth century, Bercul converted to Christianity and was baptized in village's ancient well and thus the village became known as Bercul's Well. Not only is Warwickshire known to be the birthplace of William Shakespeare, but it is also where the Fletcher family makes their highly sought-after cheese at their Elizabethan farmhouse, Ram Hall.

    When former dairy farmer Steven Fletcher first dipped his hand in the cheesemaking trade, he made Berkswell -- his raw sheep's milk cheese -- using a Caerphilly recipe. However, with Fletcher's careful cultivation and commitment, Berkswell eventually developed a unique character of its own. Today, the dense and rich cheese is more like a very delicate Pecorino or Manchego than the ancient Welsh cheese. Depending on the season -- Berkswell is made between February and October -- the cheese can be milky and nutty with sweet hints of caramel or it can be intensely tangy and fruity with surprising notes of pineapple. Farm/Company: Ram Hall Cheesemaker: Stephen Fletcher & Linda Dutch Proprietor:   Affineur: Neal's Yard Dairy City, State:   Region: Berkswell, West Midlands Country: England Milk: Raw sheep Rennet: Vegetarian Rind: Plasticoat Texture: Hard Aging: 6-9 months Size(s): 8 pound

    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Cashel Blue cheese

    Cashel Blue cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cashel Blue is a hand-made, semi-soft, blue veined, medium-strength blue cheese. Young cheese up to six weeks of age has a crumbly texture and sharp flavour. After this time the cheese develops a rounder and full flavour and a soft and creamy texture. Cashel Blue was the first Irish blue cheese, first marketed in 1984; it was named after the Rock of Cashel overlooking the pastures close to the cheese farm of Jane and Louis Grubb. It has large blue flecks, made by the action of Penicillium roqueforti, the same fungus used in Roquefort, Stilton and other blue cheeses. Made in Cashel, County Tipperary in Ireland, this is one of the country's few blue cheeses, made from pasteurised cow's milk mostly sourced from the Friesian herd on the farm which has been managed and expanded by Pat Morrissey over the last 20 years. It is frequently used in cooking as it is not as salty as other blue cheeses. A sister cheese Crozier Blue is made using sheep's milk. In 2010, Cashel Blue won a Gold medal at the World Cheese Awards In 2006, Cashel Blue also won a Gold Medal at the World Cheese Awards.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Danbo cheese

    Danbo cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Denmark
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Danbo is a semi-soft, aged cow's milk cheese originating in Denmark, where it is a common household cheese. The cheese is typically aged between 12 and 52 weeks in rectangular blocks of 6 or 9 kg, coated with a bacteria culture. The culture is washed off at the end of the aging cycle, and the cheese is packaged for retail sales. Danbo is sold under various trade and brand names, including Lillebror, Gamle Ole, and Riberhus by Arla Foods. Gamle Ole in particular has gained a reputation for being extremely pungent. In the first decades of the 20th century, Danish immigrants, established in the south part of Minas Gerais State in Brazil, discovered a new kind of cheese, after making the traditional Danbo Cheese with Brazilian milk. This cheese is called Queijo prato. Cheese.com
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Jarlsberg cheese

    Jarlsberg cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Norway
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Jarlsberg ( /ˈjɑrlzbərɡ/) is a mild cow's-milk cheese with large irregular holes or what are commonly referred to as "eyes", originating in Jarlsberg, Norway. Jarlsberg has a yellow-wax rind (outer layer) and a semi-firm yellow interior. The flavor is mild, buttery, nutty and slightly sweet. It is an all-purpose cheese, used for both cooking and eating as a snack. It has a characteristic smooth, shiny-yellow body, and a creamy supple texture. Jarlsberg Special Reserve is produced in Norway in limited quantities. It is aged a minimum of one year and is distinguished by medium to large holes. The history of this cheese can be traced back to the middle 1850s. Anders Larsen Bakke (1815–1899) was a farmer and entrepreneur and a pioneer in Norway's dairy industry. He produced cheese in the Våle village in what was then the county of Jarlsberg and Larviks Amt (now Vestfold), 80 km south of Oslo. The cheese shares similarities with Emmental, introduced to Vestfold by Swiss cheese makers during the 1830s. The cheese (and Bakke's accomplishments) was first noted in the annual county report of Jarlsberg and Larviks Amt in 1855. The Jarlsberg cheese known today is a result of a long period of
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    Obatzda

    Obatzda

    Obatzda [ˈoːbatsdɐ] is a Bavarian cheese delicacy. It is prepared by mixing two thirds aged soft cheese, usually Camembert (Romadur or similar cheeses may be used as well) and one third butter. Sweet or hot paprika powder, salt, pepper are the traditional seasonings. An optional amount of onions, garlic, horseradish, cloves, ground cumin or caraway seeds may be used and some cream as well. The cheeses and spices are mixed together into a smooth mass. It is usually eaten spread on bread or pretzels. Obatzda is a classic example of Bavarian biergarten food. A similar Austrian/Hungarian/Slovakian recipe is called Liptauer which uses fresh curd cheese as a substitute soft cheeses and the butter, but uses about the same spice mix.
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Pecorino Romano

    Pecorino Romano

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: hard
    Pecorino Romano is a hard, salty Italian cheese, often used for grating, made out of sheep milk (the Italian word pecora, from which the name derives, means sheep). Pecorino Romano was produced in Latium up to 1884 when, due to the prohibition issued by the city council of salting the cheese inside their shops in Rome, many producers moved to the island of Sardinia. It is produced exclusively from the milk of sheep raised on the plains of Lazio and in Sardinia. Most of the cheese is now produced on the island, especially in Gavoi. Pecorino Romano was a staple in the diet for the legionaries of ancient Rome. Today, it is still made according to the original recipe and is one of Italy's oldest cheeses. Pecorino Romano is most often used on pasta dishes, like the better-known Parmigiano Reggiano (parmesan). Its distinctive aromatic, pleasantly sharp, very salty flavour means that in Italian cuisine, it is preferred for some pasta dishes with highly-flavoured sauces, especially those of Roman origin, such as bucatini all'amatriciana or spaghetti alla carbonara. The sharpness depends on the period of maturation, which varies from five months for a table cheese to at least eight months
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Pecorino Sardo

    Pecorino Sardo

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Pecorino sardo, also known as fiore sardo, is a firm cheese from the Italian island of Sardinia which is made from sheep milk: specifically from the milk of the local Sardinian breed. It was awarded Denominazione d'Origine status in 1991 and granted Protected designation of origin (PDO) protection in 1996, the year in which this European Union certification scheme was introduced. Its flavour is different from that of the Pecorino Romano, which is also made on the island. Sardo is richer while romano is much more biting and salty. Pecorino sardo is delicious in contexts where the romano could overpower, such as in pesto—the Ligurian pesto alla genovese is traditionally made with a mixture of Pecorino sardo and Parmigiano-Reggiano—or with fruit. Pecorino sardo is an uncooked hard cheese made from fresh whole sheep's milk curdled using lamb or kid rennet. The mixture is poured into moulds that will give the cheese its characteristic shape. After a brief period in brine, the moulds are lightly smoked and left to ripen in cool cellars in central Sardinia. The average weight of the finished product is 3.5 kilos: sometimes a bit more, sometimes a bit less depending on the conditions of
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    Provolone

    Provolone

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-hard
    Provolone is an Italian cheese that originated in Casilli near Vesuvius, where it is still produced in various shapes as in 10 to 15 cm long pear, sausage, or cone shapes. A variant of Provolone is also produced in North America and Japan. The most important Provolone production region is currently Northern Italy. The term Provolone (meaning large Provola) appeared around the end of the 19th century, when it started to be manufactured in the Southern regions of Italy, and this cheese assumed its current large size. The smaller sized variant is called Provola and comes in plain and smoked ("affumicata") varieties. Modern Provolone is a full-fat cow's milk cheese with a smooth skin, produced mainly in the Po River Valley regions of Lombardia and Veneto. It is produced in different forms: shaped like large salami up to 30 cm in diameter and 90 cm long; in a watermelon shape; in a truncated bottle shape; or also in a large pear shape with the characteristic round knob for hanging. The average weight is 5 kg (11 pounds). Provolone is a semi-hard cheese with taste varying greatly from Provolone Piccante (piquant), aged for a minimum of four months and with a very sharp taste, to
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Sirene

    Sirene

    • Country Of Origin: Bulgaria
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Sirene/ Sirenje (Bulgarian: сирене, pronounced [ˈsirɛnɛ]; Macedonian: сирење, pronounced [ˈsireɲe]; Serbian/Croatian: сир, sir, Albanian: djath i bardhe) or known as "white brine sirene" (Bulgarian: бяло саламурено сирене, [ˈsirɛnɛ]; is a type of brine cheese made in South-Eastern Europe, especially popular in Serbia, Bulgaria, the Republic of Macedonia and other Balkan countries. It is made of goat milk, cow's milk, sheep milk or a combination of milks. It is slightly crumbly with a fat content of about 30–35%. It is commonly produced in blocks, and has a slightly grainy texture. It is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads and in baking. Sirene, together with yogurt, is a national food of all the countries in Balkans. Many Bulgarians, Serbs, Croats, Macedonians and Greeks regularly eat some sirene or yoghurt in some form. Traditional dishes using sirene are: Soups: Potato or vegetable soup with sirene (сиренява чорба). Salads: Shopska salad with tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, onions and sirene. Ovcharska salad ("shepherd's salad") with the above mentioned vegetables, cheese, ham, boiled eggs and olives. Tomatoes with sirene is a traditional light salad during the
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Adelost

    Adelost

    • Country Of Origin: Sweden
    Ädelost (Swedish for "noble cheese") is blue cheese from Sweden, made from pasteurized cow's milk. Notable characteristics include a light cream color with evenly distributed blue-gray veins and a sharp, salty flavor. The cheese has a slightly mouldy rind and typically comes in cylinders of 18 cm in diameter by 10 cm in height, with a finished weight of 2.5 kg. Ädelost has a fat content of 50% and ripens in 2 to 3 months. It is often used as a table cheese.
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Cream cheese

    Cream cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting, cheese with a high fat content. Traditionally, it is made from unskimmed milk enriched with additional cream. In the United States of America, it is defined by the US Department of Agriculture as containing at least 33% milk fat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content. Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, and so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture, and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone. Early prototypes of cream cheese were referenced in England as early as 1583 and in France as early as 1651. Recipes are recorded soon after 1754, particularly from Lincolnshire and the southwest of England. Cream cheese as we know it today was developed in America by dairyman William Lawrence, who first produced it in 1872 in Chester, New York. He later adopted the name "Philadelphia cream cheese" to associate the cheese with Philadelphia's reputation for high-quality food. US cream cheese tends to have
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Vacherin

    Vacherin

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Vacherin is a cow's-milk (French vache, "cow") cheese. Two main types of French or Swiss Vacherin cheeses exist. One is a soft, rich, seasonal cheese made from cow's-milk in Switzerland or France, usually in villages of the Jura region (an origin that has been officially controlled since 1981), and has a grayish-yellow washed rind and is called Mont d'Or, or Vacherin du Haut-Doubs, from France, or Vacherin Mont d'Or from Switzerland (though it tends to just be called Vacherin in the local shops). It typically contains 45 to 50 percent milk fat (in dry matter), and is produced between August 15 and March 15, and sold between September 10 and May 10, and the Swiss Vacherin Mont d'or is generally made with pasteurised milk, while the French Vacherin du Haut-Doubs is unpasteurised. It is marketed in round boxes of various diameters made of spruce. It is often served warmed in its original packaging and eaten like a fondue. A popular childrens treat, it is often eaten with chocolate spread on special occasions . Officially, the French AOC/PDO allows Artisanal and Coopérative production of Mont d'or. The other Vacherin, a firmer cheese, is called Vacherin Fribourgeois. Originally from
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Big Woods Blue

    Big Woods Blue

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: semi-firm
    Big Woods Blue

    Located in southeastern Minnesota -- one of the richest agricultural regions of the state -- rests Shepherd's Way Farms. On this small farm, a family of six lovingly and tirelessly raises sheep in order to hand make a variety of cheeses. In January 2005, Shepherd's Way Farms suffered an extreme hardship in the form of a very destructive fire. Destroying a nursery barn, the fire killed most of the flock. Aided by an immense outpouring of local support as well as support from various Slow Food communities, the family and farm are still managing to put out their delicious cheeses as they slowly recover from this horrific tragedy.

    Big and beefy, Big Wood's Blue is creamy with an irresistible sharpness that is undeniably blue. However, blue cheese skeptics should not be afraid because the richness of the sheep's milk perfectly balances the intensity.
      Farm/Company: Shepherd's Way Cheesemaker: Jodi Read Proprietor: Steven & Jodi Read Affineur:   City, State: Nerstrand, Minnesota Region: Midwest Country: USA Milk: Raw Sheep Rennet: Vegetarian Rind: None Texture: Semi-firm Aging: 3-4 months Size(s): 6-7 pounds

    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    La Serena cheese

    La Serena cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Queso de La Serena is a cheese made from Merino sheep milk in the comarca (district) of La Serena, in Extremadura, Spain. The pure sheep milk is curdled using a coagulant found in the pistils of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus). This ingredient lends a light bitterness to the otherwise slightly salty taste. It is aged for at least sixty days. The fully ripe cheese has a creamy consistency in the center, and is traditionally eaten by slicing off the top and scooping out the inside. This is the cheese that can be served with a spoon. Some people prefer to eat this cheese with more age when it becomes stronger in taste and consistency.
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Manouri cheese

    Manouri cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Greece
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Manouri (μανούρι) is a Greek semi-soft, fresh white whey cheese made from goat or sheep milk. Manouri has PDO status.
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Beaufort

    Beaufort

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Beaufort (French pronunciation: [bo.fɔʁ] is a firm, raw cow's milk cheese associated with the gruyère family. An Alpine cheese, it is produced in Beaufort, which is located in the Savoie region of the French Alps. There are three varieties of Beaufort: Beaufort is produced in the Beaufortain, Tarentaise and Maurienne valleys, as well as parts of the Val d'Arly valley, all located on 450,000 hectares of the Savoie region. The cheese is prepared using 11 liters of milk for every 1 kg of cheese desired. The milk used in one variety comes from the Tarentaise or Abondance cows that graze in the Alps. To make Beaufort, first, the milk is heated and then cast into a beechwood hoop or mold which gives the cheese its distinctive concave shape. It is pressed for 24 hours, taken out of the hoops and then cooled for another 24 hours. Once cooled, it is soaked in brine and then stored on spruce shelves for one to two months. During this part of the process, one side of the cheese is hand-salted each morning, then turned over and massaged each afternoon. Once the cheese rind has reached a level of maturity, the cheese is smear-ripened with a mixture called morge which produces its strong
    6.25
    4 votes
    87
    Beer cheese

    Beer cheese

    Beer cheese is a cheese spread most commonly found in Kentucky. Similar spreads can be found in other regions of the United States, but beer cheese itself is not widely distributed. Despite this fact, the spread is nearly ubiquitous in Kentucky. There are a number of different brands that are popular, including Hall's, Kentucky Beer Cheese and others - most are similar in taste and texture. Fans of the snack usually have their "favorite" brand, and there are many homemade versions which use a wide variety of ingredients to add personalization. Commercially produced beer cheese usually consists of a processed cheese base with a sharp cheddar flavor, while homemade varieties almost always start with sharp cheddar cheese. To this, enough beer is added to provide flavor and texture, as well as garlic, and a variety of spices including dry mustard, horseradish and cayenne pepper. Most varieties come in "mild" and "hot" versions, but all tend to have a strong garlic flavor. Beer cheese is traditionally served with saltine crackers, though it can be found served with various other crackers and crudités, most often as an appetizer. While there are conflicting stories about beer cheese's
    6.25
    4 votes
    88
    Mató cheese

    Mató cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Mató (Catalan pronunciation: [məˈto]) is a Catalan fresh cheese made from cows' or goats' milk, with no salt added. It is usually served with honey, as a dessert. It is quite similar to non-industrial variants of Italian ricotta, brull (in Maestrat), brossat (in Occitania), brocciu (in Corsica), or curd cheese. The mató from Montserrat mountain is famous. Mató appeared in the Sent Soví, a Catalan cookbook from the 14th century. It was very popular during the Middle Ages, when it was made plain or scented with orange flowers.
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    Banon de Provence

    Banon de Provence

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Raw goats, Semi-soft cheese with a strong flavour. Wrapped in chestnut leaves.
    7.00
    3 votes
    90
    Cottage cheese

    Cottage cheese

    Cottage cheese is a cheese curd product with a mild flavor. It is drained, but not pressed, so some whey remains and the individual curds remain loose. The curd is usually washed to remove acidity, giving sweet curd cheese. It is not aged or colored. Different styles of cottage cheese are made from milks with different fat levels and in small-curd or large-curd preparations. Cottage cheese which is pressed becomes hoop cheese, farmer cheese, pot cheese, or queso blanco. Cottage cheese can be eaten by itself, with fruit and sugar, with salt and pepper, with fruit puree, on toast, with tomatoes, in salads, or used as an ingredient in recipes such as lasagna, jello salad and various desserts. Cottage cheese with fruit such as pears or peaches is a standard side dish in many "home cooking" or meat-and-three restaurants' menus. The term "cottage cheese" is believed to have originated because the simple cheese was usually made in cottages from any milk left over after making butter. The term was first used in 1848. The curds and whey of nursery rhyme fame is another dish made from curds with whey, but it is uncertain what their consistency was, if they were drained at all or how they
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    Fontina

    Fontina

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Fontina is a cow's milk Italian cheese. Fontina cheese has been made in the Aosta Valley, in the Alps since the 12th century. It has a milk fat content of around 45%. As with many original varieties, the name "Fontina" has been imposed upon by such derivatives as "Fontinella", "Fontal", and "Fontella". Italian Fontina can be identified by a Consorzio (Consortium) stamp of the Matterhorn including the script "FONTINA". Although the version from Aosta is the original and the most famous, Fontina production occurs in other parts of Italy, as well as Denmark, Sweden, Quebec, France and the United States. The original Fontina cheese from Italy is fairly pungent and has quite an intense flavor, although cheeses labeled Fontina that are produced in other countries can be much milder. The Danish version is often found in US grocery stores, and can be distinguished from Italian Fontina by the red wax rind (Italian Fontina has a natural rind due to aging, which is usually tan to orange-brown); Danish Fontina is aged less and therefore semi-soft and much milder than its Italian counterpart. Fontina Val d'Aosta must be made from unpasteurised milk from a single milking, with two batches being
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    Beaufort Alpage

    Beaufort Alpage

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Beaufort Alpage Beaufort is made from the milk of cows raised in the high pastures of Savoie stretching over the Beaufortain, Tarentaise, Maurienne, and part of the Val d'Arly regions. It owes its creamy fruity character to the milk of herds grazing in the high mountain pastures of the Alps. It is matured in cheese cellars for at least one year. At this time, a deeper richness in concentration of flavors develops leaving a dense, buttery, and nutty finish, balanced by a slight sweetness. The wheels are turned regularly to allow its reddish brown rind to develop. Beaufort is sometimes referred to as the "Prince of Gruyeres." Farm/Company:   Cheesemaker:   Proprietor:   Affineur: Jean d'Alos City, State:   Region: Rhone-Alps Country: France Milk: Raw Cow Rennet: Traditional Rind: Natural Texture: Hard Aging: 18 months Size(s): 150 pound wheel
    6.00
    4 votes
    93
    Labneh

    Labneh

    Labneh (also spelled Labaneh, Arabic: ￙ト￘ᄄ￙ニ￘ᄅ) is a white Middle East yogurt cheese made from sheep, cow, or occasionally goat milk. It has a consistency between that of yogurt and that of cheese, and has somewhat of a paste texture. In order to keep it for longer, it can also be allowed to dry and harden further, then formed into balls and preserved in olive oil. Labneh may also be flavored by spices like thyme. Labneh is a popular mezze dish and sandwich ingredient. The flavour depends largely on the sort of milk used: labneh from cow's milk has a rather milder flavour. In Lebanon, a type of particularly flavoursome goat labneh is known as Anbariz.
    6.00
    4 votes
    94
    Oaxaca cheese

    Oaxaca cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Mexico
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Queso Oaxaca is a white, semihard cheese from Mexico, similar to unaged Monterey Jack, but with a mozzarella-like string cheese texture. It is named after the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico, where it was first made. It is available in several different shapes. It is also known as quesillo Oaxaca or thread cheese when shaped like a ball. Shaped in bricks for slicing, it is called asadero (meaning "roaster" or "broiler") or queso quesadilla. The production process is complicated and involves stretching the cheese into long ribbons and rolling it up like a ball of yarn. Italian mozzarella is another cheese which is processed by stretching (the pasta filata process). Queso Oaxaca is used in Mexican cuisine, especially in quesadillas and empanadas, where the queso Oaxaca is melted and other stuffings, such as huitlacoche and squash flowers are added to the filling.
    6.00
    4 votes
    95
    Valdeón cheese

    Valdeón cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    Queso de Valdeón (Queisu de Valdión, in Leonese language) is a Spanish blue cheese from León. The cheese is made in Posada de Valdeón, in the northeast of the province of León, and is wrapped in sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus), or chestnut leaves before being sent to market. The cheese has a very intense blue flavor, but is not as yellowed or as biting as its cousin Cabrales. Queso de Valdeón has PGI status.
    6.00
    4 votes
    96
    Beenleigh Blue

    Beenleigh Blue

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Beenleigh Blue

    The emerald green hills of Devon yield not only the richest clotted cream teas found in England, but also some of the most delicious cheeses. Robin Congden can be found making such cheese on the Sharpham Estate, which overlooks the Dart estuary near Totnes.

    Beenleigh Blue is a rich, soft sheep blue that is aged for six months. Often compared to France's signature blue, Roquefort, Beenleigh is mellower and sweeter than Roquefort with a moist and crumbly texture. Beenleigh has gentle blue-green veins shooting through the ivory paste and is one of only three blue ewes' milk cheeses made currently in Britain. Plan ahead with this rich cheese because it is only available from early summer through to winter. Farm/Company: Sharpham Barton Cheesemaker: Robin Congdon & Nick Tranet Proprietor:   Affineur: Neal's Yard Dairy City, State:   Region: Totnes, Devon Country: England Milk: Pasteurized sheep Rennet: Vegetarian Rind: Natural, wrapped in foil. Texture: Semi-soft Aging: 4-9 months Size(s): 6-8 pound cylinders

    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    Bleu de Gex

    Bleu de Gex

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Bleu de Gex (also Bleu du Haut-Jura or Bleu de Septmoncel) is a creamy, semi-soft blue cheese made from unpasteurized milk in the Jura region of France. During production, Penicillium glaucum mold is introduced and the unwashed curds are loosely packed. It is then aged for at least three weeks. To meet Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée guidelines, it must contain only the milk of Montbéliard cows. It is flavorful for a French blue cheese. Each wheel is stamped with the word "Gex".
    8.00
    2 votes
    98
    Brocciu

    Brocciu

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Brocciu is a whey cheese produced from sheep milk or goat milk. This is notable as a substitute for lactose-rich Italian Ricotta, as brocciu does not contain lactose. Produced on the island of Corsica, Brocciu is considered the national food. Like Ricotta, it is a young white cheese and is paired frequently with Corsican white wines. The word brocciu is related to the French word "brousse" and means fresh cheese made with goat or ewe's milk. Production of Brocciu: Brocciu is made from whey. First, the whey is heated to a low temperature of just a few degrees below 100 °F and then ewe's milk is added and further heated to just a bit below 200 °F. After heating, the cheese is drained, the whey removed, and the cheese is finished. Serving of Brocciu: the cheese is ready for consumption immediately, although ripening is acceptable between perhaps a couple weeks to a month. However, the ideal affinage time for Brocciu is 48 hours to one month. Other Corsican sheep's-milk cheeses are Asco, Brin d'amour (also known as Fleur du Maquis), A filetta, Sarteno and Niolo.
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    Casu marzu

    Casu marzu

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: Soft
    Casu marzu (also called casu modde, casu cundídu, casu fràzigu in Sardinian language, or in Italian formaggio marcio, "rotten cheese") is a traditional Sardinian sheep milk cheese, notable for containing live insect larvae. It is found mainly in Sardinia, Italy. Derived from Pecorino, casu marzu goes beyond typical fermentation to a stage most would consider decomposition, brought about by the digestive action of the larvae of the cheese fly Piophila casei. These larvae are deliberately introduced to the cheese, promoting an advanced level of fermentation and breaking down of the cheese's fats. The texture of the cheese becomes very soft, with some liquid (called lagrima, from Latin for "tear") seeping out. The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long. When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in). Some people clear the larvae from the cheese before consuming while others do not. Casu marzu is created by leaving whole Pecorino cheeses outside with part of the rind removed to allow the eggs of the cheese fly Piophila casei to be laid in the cheese. A female Piophila casei can lay more than
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    Idiazabal cheese

    Idiazabal cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Idiazabal is a pressed cheese made from unpasteurized sheep milk, usually from Latxa and Carranzana sheep in the Basque Country and Navarre, Spain. It has a somewhat smokey flavor, but is usually un-smoked. The cheese is handmade and covered in a hard, dark brown, inedible rind. It is aged for a few months and develops a nutty, buttery flavor, eaten fresh, often with quince jam. If aged longer, it becomes firm, dry and sharp and can be used for grating. The Denomination of Origin for Idiazabal cheese was created in 1987 and defines the basic regulations for the product's manufacture. Typically, unpasteurized milk from latxa breed of sheep is used, although in some cases the D.O. permits the use of milk from Carranzana breed, from the Encartaciones in Biscay. The D.O. also stipulates that the milk be curdled with the natural lamb rennet, and permits external smoking of the cheese. The cheeses produced in the following towns in accordance with all the D.O. regulations, are therefore also protected by the Idiazabal D.O. : Urbia, Entzia, Gorbea, Orduña, Urbasa and Aralar. Recently some Basque Country farmers have begun to use hybrid Assaf sheep, which some maintain does not meet the
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Lancashire cheese

    Lancashire cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Lancashire is an English cow's-milk cheese from the county of Lancashire. There are three distinct varieties of Lancashire cheese. Young Creamy Lancashire and mature Tasty Lancashire are produced by a traditional method, whereas Crumbly Lancashire is a more recent creation suitable for mass production. It is traditionally paired with Eccles cakes and Chorley cakes. For centuries, Lancashire dairy farmers' wives have made cheese from surplus milk. On small farms there was insufficient milk from a single day to make a cheese, and so each day's milk was curdled and accumulated for several days until there was enough curd to make a cheese. Uniquely amongst all British cheeses, two or three days' curd of varying maturity are blended together, giving Lancashire cheese a distinctive character. The traditional method was standardised in the 1890s by Joseph Gornall of Garstang and Pilling, a county council employee, who visited many Lancashire farms to establish a method and recipe that is still used today – the "Gornall method". His "Gornall Patent Cheesemaker" was sold between 1892 and 1919. Creamy Lancashire cheese is made by this traditional method and matured for a period of four to
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Mozzarella

    Mozzarella

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Water Buffalo
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Mozzarella is an Italian Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) food product. The term is used for several kinds of Italian cheeses that are made using spinning and then cutting (hence the name, as the Italian verb mozzare means "to cut"): Fresh mozzarella is generally white, but may vary seasonally to slightly yellow depending on the animal's diet. It is a semi-soft cheese. Due to its high moisture content, it is traditionally served the day after it is made, but can be kept in brine for up to a week, or longer when sold in vacuum-sealed packages. Low-moisture mozzarella can be kept refrigerated for up to a month, though some shredded low-moisture mozzarella is sold with a shelf life of up to six months. Mozzarella of several kinds is also used for most types of pizza and several pasta dishes, or served with sliced tomatoes and basil in insalata caprese. Mozzarella di bufala campana is a type of mozzarella made from the milk of water buffalo raised in designated areas of Lazio and Campania, Italy. Unlike other mozzarellas—50% of whose production derives from non-Italian and often semi-coagulated milk—it holds the status of a protected designation of origin (PDO 1996) under the
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Saint Paulin

    Saint Paulin

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Saint Paulin is a creamy, mild, semi-soft French cheese made from pasteurized cow's milk, originally made by Trappist monks. It is a buttery cheese, but firm enough for slicing. Saint Paulin is similar to Havarti and Esrom, and is suited to serving as a table or dessert cheese; it is often served with fruit and light wine. Genuine Saint Paulin has an edible yellow-orange rind. It is ripened in a round loaf with slightly protruding sides, and matures in about four weeks.
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Bucheron

    Bucheron

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Bûcheron (sometimes Boucheron, Bucherone, Boucherond, or Bucherondin) is a goat's milk cheese native to the Loire Valley in France. Semi-aged, ripening for 5 to 10 weeks, Bucheron is produced as short logs that are sliced and sold as small rounds in food stores. Bûcheron has an ivory-colored pâte surrounded by a bloomy white rind. Soft, but semi-firm in texture, this cheese when young provides a somewhat mild flavor that becomes sharper as it matures. As it ages, its texture becomes drier: the mouthfeel of the center is dense and claylike, with the crumb dissolving on the tongue, while the section near the rind is almost creamy and can be gooey at room temperature. It is a good cheese for salads or for snacking with hearty grained breads, crackers and grapes.
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Crottin de Chavignol

    Crottin de Chavignol

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Crottin de Chavignol is the most famous goat cheese of the many varieties produced in the Loire Valley. This cheese is the claim to fame for the village of Chavignol, France, which has only two hundred inhabitants. The small cylindrical goat cheese from the area around Chavignol has been produced since the 16th century, but it wasn't until 1829 that it was first written about. The etymology is dubious: the word "Crot" described a small oil lamp made from burned clay, which resembles the mould used to prepare the cheese. Another explanation is that old Crottin gets harder and browner and tends to look like dung, the French word for an animal dropping being crotte. Protected by the AOC Seal, Crottin de Chavignol is produced today with traditional methods. If a cheese is labelled "Crottin", it is of the Crottin type, but to be labelled "Crottin de Chavignol", it has to be from the area around Chavignol, and it has to meet the stringent AOC production criteria. The flavour of Crottin de Chavignol is subtle and slightly nutty. In its youth, its dough is solid and compact, and its rind is white. As it ripens, the dough becomes crumbly and the mould on the rind matures into a bluish
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    Easy Cheese

    Easy Cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Easy Cheese is the trademark for a processed cheese product distributed by Kraft Foods, also referred to as aerosol cheese, spray cheese or simply Cheese in a Can, and is a descendant of squeeze cheese (a semi-solid cheesefood from the 1970s packaged in a squeezable plastic tube). It comes packaged in a pressurized can, much like canned whipped cream and does not require refrigeration. Easy Cheese has its own entry in Sterns' Encyclopedia of Bad Taste. It was originally marketed from 1965-84 as Nabisco Snack Mate. Easy Cheese contains milk, water, whey protein concentrate, canola oil, milk protein concentrate, sodium citrate, sodium phosphate, calcium phosphate, lactic acid, sorbic acid, sodium alginate, apocarotenal, annatto, cheese culture, and enzymes. Although sometimes called "aerosol cheese", its container is not actually an aerosol spray can, because the cheese does not combine with a propellant (nitrogen) to turn into a fine mist upon being sprayed. Rather, the can contains a piston and a barrier plastic cap which squeezes the cheese through the nozzle in a solid column when the nozzle is pressed and the propellant expands in volume. The propellant, therefore, does not mix
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Emmental

    Emmental

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Emmental or Emmentaler is a cheese from Switzerland. It is sometimes known as Swiss cheese in the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, although Swiss cheese does not always imply Emmentaler. The cheese originally comes from the Emme valley in the canton of Bern. Unlike some other cheese varieties, the denomination "Emmentaler" was not protected ("Emmentaler Switzerland" is, though). Hence, Emmentaler of other origin, especially from France and Bavaria, is widely available and even Finland is an exporter of Emmentaler cheese. Emmentaler is a yellow, medium-hard cheese. It has a savoury, but not very sharp, taste. Three types of bacteria are used in the production of Emmentaler: Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus, and Propionibacterium freudenreichii. In the late stage of cheese production, P. freudenreichii consumes the lactic acid excreted by the other bacteria, and releases carbon dioxide gas, which slowly forms the bubbles that make holes. Failure to remove CO2 bubbles during production, due to inconsistent pressing, results in the large holes ("eyes") characteristic of this cheese. Historically, the holes were a sign of imperfection, and until modern times,
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Gubbeen cheese

    Gubbeen cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gubbeen Cheese is a surface ripened, semi-soft, cows milk cheese with a pink and white rind. The flavours are creamy with mushroom and nutty aftertastes but vary depending on maturity of cheese. Gubbeen Farmhouse Products also produce a Smoked Gubbeen. Gubbeen Cheese has been produced since 1979 by Tom and Giana Ferguson at Gubbeen Farm in Schull, County Cork. The name "Gubbeen" is an anglisation of the Irish word "Gobín" which means a small mouthful, and which a local nearby bay is referred to. All milk used for the cheese comes from their own herd of dairy cows, which is a mixture of several breeds; British Friesian, Simmenthal, Jersey, and Kerry. The milk is stored in vats to which starter culture and rennet are added, causing the milk to set. This is then cut and stirred until the curds develop. The cheese is developed in curing rooms where the rind is washed daily. This is an important part of the process as the washing gives rise to the distinctive surface bloom and develops the characteristic flavours. The cheese develops deeper flavours as it matures. In 2001, a new strain of lactic acid producing bacteria, Microbacterium gubbeenense, was named after a study into the
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Oltermanni

    Oltermanni

    • Country Of Origin: Finland
    Oltermanni is a Finnish cheese that is similar to the Danish cheese Havarti. It is often eaten on rye bread, or with other meals (e.g. rice pies). Oltermanni is manufactured by Valio.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Provel cheese

    Provel cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Provel is a white processed cheese that is popular in St. Louis, Missouri. It is flavored with Cheddar, Swiss, and provolone. Provel has a low melting point and, thus, has a gooey and almost buttery texture at room temperature. It is the traditional topping for St. Louis-style pizza. It is also often used in the preparation of cheese soup and served on salads, chicken and the Gerber sandwich. Some restaurants go a step further and use Provel for their pasta dishes with white sauce instead of the customary fresh Italian cheese and cream. Although popular in the St. Louis area, Provel is rarely used elsewhere. According to St. Louis Post-Dispatch food critic Joe Bonwich, Provel was invented specifically for St. Louis-style pizza more than a half-century ago by the downtown firm Costa Grocery (now Roma Grocery on the Hill, a primarily Italian St. Louis neighborhood), in collaboration with the Hoffman Dairy Company of Wisconsin (now part of Kraft Foods). Bonwich states that Provel was developed to meet perceived demand for a pizza cheese with a "clean bite": one that melts well but breaks off nicely when bitten. Neither of Bonwich's sources at Kraft and Roma had a definitive answer for
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Quark

    Quark

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    Quark is a type of fresh cheese. It is made by warming soured milk until the desired degree of denaturation of milk proteins is met, and then strained. Dictionaries usually translate it as curd cheese or cottage cheese, although most commercial varieties of cottage cheese are made with rennet, whereas traditional quark is not. It is soft, white and unaged, similar to some types of fromage frais. It is distinct from ricotta because ricotta (Italian: "recooked") is made from scalded whey. It is quite similar to the Indian paneer. Quark usually has no salt added. In Germany, quark is sold in small plastic tubs and usually comes in three different varieties, Magerquark (lean quark, virtually fat-free), "regular" quark (20% fat) and Sahnequark (creamy quark, 40% fat) with added cream. While Magerquark is often used for baking and as health food, e.g. as a breakfast spread, Sahnequark also forms the basis of a large number of quark desserts. Much like yoghurts in some parts of the world, these treats mostly come with fruit flavouring (Früchtequark, fruit quark), and are often also simply referred to as quark. As the large popularity of quark desserts is limited to mainly the
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Chaource

    Chaource

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Chaource is a French cheese, originally manufactured in the village of Chaource in the Champagne-Ardenne region. Chaource is a cow's milk cheese, cylindrical in shape at around 10 cm in diameter and 6 cm in height, weighing either 250 or 450 g. The central pâte is soft, creamy in colour, and slightly crumbly, and is surrounded by a white Penicillium candidum rind. The cheese has been made in its namesake village since at least the Middle Ages. Cheese is still manufactured there, ranging from small cheese makers to industrial scale production further away. It is only made in a tightly controlled area in the départements of Aube and Yonne. It was recognised as an AOC cheese in 1970, and has been fully regulated since 1977. The AOC regulations state that: Made using a similar recipe to that of Brie, affinage is usually between two and four weeks and the cheese is generally eaten young. The gently-salted central pâte has a light taste and a characteristic 'melt-in-the-mouth' texture. The fat content is a minimum of 50%. Regulations currently allow both pasteurized or unpasteurized milk to be used during manufacture.
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Coolea

    Coolea

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Coolea is a type of cow's milk cheese that consists of a smooth, Gouda-like texture with rich, sweet, caramelly flavours. Like Gouda, Coolea cheese is covered in a thick, solid wax rind which contributes to the cheese's flavour and texture. Coolea is made from an old Dutch Gouda recipe by the Willems family in Coolea, Ireland. It has won many awards both nationally and internationally.
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    Kaškaval

    Kaškaval

    • Country Of Origin: Bulgaria
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Kashkaval deriving from the Italian Caciocavallo, Romanian: cașcaval, Bulgarian: кашкавал, pronounced [kɐʃkɐˈvɑɫ], Macedonian: кашкавал, pronounced [kaʃkaˈval]; Turkish: kaşkaval, Serbian: качкаваљ or kačkavalj; Albanian : Kaçkavalli is a specific type of yellow cheese made of sheep milk . However, in Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia, Serbia and Romania, the term is often used to refer to all yellow cheeses (or even any cheese other than sirene). In English-language menus in Bulgaria, "кашкавал" is always translated as "yellow cheese" (whereas sirene is usually translated as "white cheese" or simply "cheese"). The taste of the kashkaval is sometimes compared to that of the United Kingdom's cheddar cheese, although variations exist. In Romania, cașcaval (Romanian pronunciation: [kaʃkaˈval]) is used to refer to a number of types of yellow semi-hard cheeses made out of sheep's or cow's-milk. The term is often used by extension as a generic name for all semi-hard yellow cheeses such as the Swiss Emmental cheese, the Dutch Gouda and the British Cheddar, or anything that looks similar to the cașcaval. The name Cașcaval comes from Latin caseus (cheese) and caballus (horse). But another
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Port-Salut cheese

    Port-Salut cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    S.A.F.R Port Salut is a semi-soft pasteurised cow's milk cheese from Brittany, France, with a distinctive orange crust and a mild flavour. The cheese is produced in disks approximately 23 cm (9 inches) in diameter, weighing approximately 2 kg (5 lb). Though Port Salut has a mild flavour, it sometimes has a strong smell because it is a mature cheese. The smell increases the longer the cheese is kept — this however does not affect its flavour. It can be refrigerated and is best eaten within two weeks of opening. The cheese was originally invented by Trappist monks during the 19th century at the abbey of Notre Dame du Port du Salut in Entrammes. The monks, many of whom had left France to escape persecution during the French revolution of 1789, learned cheese-making skills as a means of survival and brought those skills back with them upon their return in 1815. The name of their society, "Société Anonyme des Fermiers Réunis" (S.A.F.R.), later became their registered trademark, and is still printed on wheels of Port Salut cheese distributed today. In 1873, the head of the abbey came to an agreement with a Parisian cheese-seller granting exclusive rights of distribution, and the cheese
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Robiola

    Robiola

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    'Robiola from the Langhe region of northern Italy' is an Italian soft-ripened cheese of the Stracchino family, made with varying proportions of cow’s, goat’s milk and sheep milk. One theory is that the cheese gets its name from the town of Robbio in the province of Pavia; another that the name comes from the word rubeole (ruddy) because of the color of the seasoned rind. Varieties of Robiola are produced across Piedmont from the provinces of Cuneo, Asti and Alessandria and into Lombardy. It is one of the specialties of the Aosta Valley. The taste and appearance of Robiola varies depending upon where it was produced. Robiola di Roccaverano DOP / DOC has no rind and a slightly straw-yellow coloring with a sweet, yielding taste. Robiola Lombardia has a thin, milky-white to pink rind and tends to be shaped like small rolls. The cream-colored cheese underneath its bloomy rind has a smooth lushness to its full, tangy and mildly sour flavor, likely due to the high (52%) fat content. Its rind can be cut away, but is mild with no ammonia and adds a subtle crunch to the cheese. Robiola from the Piedmont region is a fresh cheese, and is usually eaten on its own, or with a little honey. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Rokpol

    Rokpol

    Rokpol is a Polish blue cheese similar to Danish blue cheeses. The name derives from Roquefort and suggests that it is Polish Roquefort.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Appenzeller

    Appenzeller

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Appenzeller cheese is a hard cow's-milk cheese produced in the Appenzell region of northeast Switzerland. A herbal brine, sometimes incorporating wine or cider, is applied to the wheels of cheese while they cure, which flavors and preserves the cheese while promoting the formation of a rind. Appenzeller has a documented history of at least 700 years. Today, about 75 dairies produce it, each with a different recipe for their brine wash. Most of the recipes are trade secrets. The cheese is straw-colored, with tiny holes and a golden rind. It has a strong smell and a nutty or fruity flavor, which can range from mild to tangy, depending on how long it is aged. Three types are sold:
    5.75
    4 votes
    119
    Paški sir

    Paški sir

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Paški sir (English translation, cheese from the Island of Pag) is a hard, distinctively flavored sheep milk cheese from the Croatian island of Pag. It is generally regarded as the most famous of Croatian artisan cheeses and is found in many export markets outside Croatia. In 1774, the travel writer Alberto Fortis, on his way to Dalmatia, wrote about Pag's products of sea salt, sage honey, wool and Paški Sir. Until early in the 20th century, the inhabitants of Pag had their own dry stone huts in which they milked the sheep and made Paški Sir. These stone houses are adorned in sedge and reeds from the nearby fields, the huts were built out of town on the rocky hills above the pastures. The majority of the pastures are located on the hilly parts of the island and are recognizable in that they are surrounded by dry stone walls. From far off, the intricate stone walls resemble the famous Pag Lace (Paška Čipka) as they traverse the rocky summits. Historically, there was no private ownership of the pastures and the sheep freely grazed on all the land. The shepherds kept watch of the sheep and in the stone huts milked them and made Paški Sir. In time, the pastures were slowly becoming
    5.75
    4 votes
    120
    Tetilla

    Tetilla

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    Tetilla is the most characteristic cheese made in Galicia, and since 1993 is one of four cheeses from Galicia with certification of origin. It is now a common element in Galician cuisine, often used as a dessert. Originally produced in small towns along the border between the provinces of A Coruña and Pontevedra such as Arzúa, Melide, Curtis or Sobrado dos Monxes, it is now produced in all of Galicia. The milk used comes mainly from the Galician blonde cow breed. The name tetilla (Galician for small breast) describes the shape of the cheese, a sort of cone topped by a nipple, or a half pear (hence its other denomination, perilla cheese). It weighs from half to one and a half kg, with a diameter and height ranging from 90 to 150 millimeters.
    5.75
    4 votes
    121
    Tillamook Cheddar

    Tillamook Cheddar

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Tillamook Cheddar is a brand of cheddar cheese named for the area where it is produced in the city of Tillamook, in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Oregon, by the Tillamook County Creamery Association. The Tillamook area was ideal for dairy cattle, and excellent butter was made in the region, but transporting the milk and butter was a problem. In the late 1800s, Peter McIntosh came to Tillamook from Canada, and had knowledge of cheesemaking. Dairy cattlemen banded together and built many small cheese factories in various places of the county, all with very high standards of production.
    5.75
    4 votes
    122
    Velveeta

    Velveeta

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Velveeta is the brand name of a processed cheese product having a taste that is identified as a type of American cheese with a texture that is softer and smoother. It was first made in 1918 by Swiss immigrant Emil Frey of the Monroe Cheese Company in Monroe, New York. In 1923, The Velveeta Cheese Company was incorporated as a separate company, and was sold to Kraft Foods in 1927. The product was advertised for its nutrition. According to Kraft's website, in the 1930s, Velveeta became the first cheese product to gain the American Medical Association's seal of approval. It was reformulated in 1953 as a cheese spread. Velveeta is labeled in the United States as a "Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product" (see processed cheese). The name 'Velveeta' is intended to connote a velvety smooth edible product. Smoothness and meltability are promoted as its iconic properties that result by reincorporating the whey with the curd. The product was spun off into a line of food products based on Velveeta. One of the most popular uses for Velveeta is as the base in queso dip. Other popular uses for Velveeta include grilled cheese sandwiches and filler for macaroni and cheese sauce. Milk, water, milkfat,
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Havarti

    Havarti

    • Country Of Origin: Denmark
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Havarti or Cream Havarti (Fløde Havarti in Danish) is a semi-soft Danish cow's milk cheese. It is a table cheese that can be sliced, grilled, or melted. In 1952 Havarti cheese was named after the Havarthigaard in Øverød, north of Copenhagen, where the owner Hanne Nielsen had developed modern cheesemaking in Danish agriculture during the last half of the 19th century. Havarti was, however, not introduced in Denmark until app. 1920. Havarti is made like most cheeses, by introducing rennet to milk to cause curdling. The curds are pressed into cheese molds which are drained, and then the cheese is aged. Havarti is a washed curd cheese, which contributes to the subtle flavor of the cheese. Havarti is an interior-ripened cheese that is rindless, smooth and slightly bright-surfaced with a cream to yellow color depending on type. It has very small and irregular openings ("eyes") distributed in the mass. Havarti has a buttery aroma and can be somewhat sharp in the stronger varieties, much like Swiss cheese. The taste is buttery, and from somewhat sweet to very sweet, and it is slightly acidic. It is typically aged about three months, though when the cheese is older it becomes more salty and
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Humboldt Fog

    Humboldt Fog

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: Soft
    Humboldt Fog is a goat milk cheese made by Cypress Grove Chevre, of Arcata, California, in Humboldt County. It is named for the local ocean fog which rolls in from Humboldt Bay. Humboldt Fog is a mold-ripened cheese with a central line of edible ash much like Morbier. The cheese ripens starting with the bloomy mold exterior, resulting in a core of fresh goat cheese surrounded by a runny shell. As the cheese matures, more of the originally crumbly core is converted to a soft-ripened texture. The bloomy mold and ash rind are edible but fairly tasteless. The cheese is creamy, light, and mildly acidic with a stronger flavor near the rind. This cheese won first-place awards from the American Cheese Society in 1998, 2002 and 2005.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Leicester cheese

    Leicester cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Red Leicester is an English cheese, made in a similar manner to Cheddar cheese, although it is crumblier. Since the 18th century, it has been coloured orange by adding annatto extract during manufacture. It is a cow's milk cheese, originally from Leicestershire, England, and is named after the city of Leicester. It has a firm texture, and a slightly nutty taste. Versions sold in supermarkets are typically made with the added ingredient annatto, which is used as a food colouring, although it is possible to obtain Red Leicester without annatto. Although Red Leicester can be young or "old", aged anywhere from four to nine months, the young Leicesters at the start of that range will be very mild: they often require at least six months to develop a tang. Farmhouse versions are also available. Farmhouse makers will mature it in cloth, the old way, to allow better flavour development. Versions of Red Leicester are also made in America. The cheese was originally made on farms in Leicestershire with milk that was surplus once all the Stilton desired was made. It was originally coloured with carrot or Beet juice. It used to be called Leicestershire Cheese, after the county in which it was
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Mt Tam

    Mt Tam

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft-ripened
    Made by Cowgirl Creamery.

    Just North of the San Francisco Bay, Mt. Tamalpais rises like a monument to Northern California's natural beauty. In deference, Cowgirl Creamery named its signature cheese MT TAM. It's a smooth, creamy, elegant, 8-oz, triple-cream - made with tasty organic milk from the Straus Family Dairy. MT TAM is firm, yet buttery with a mellow, earthy flavor reminiscent of white mushrooms. MT TAM won 1st Prize in the soft-ripened category at this year’s American Cheese Society competition. (10-ounce round; case of 12).  : Nutrition Info


    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Picodon

    Picodon

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Picodon is a goats-milk cheese made in the region around the Rhône river in southern France. The name means "spicy" in Occitan. The cheese itself comes in a number of varieties, each small, flat and circular in shape varying from speckled white to golden in colour. Between 5 and 8 centimetres in diameter and between 1.8 and 2.5 centimetres in height, they range from around 40 to 100 grams. The pâte of the cheese is spicy and unusually dry, whilst retaining a smooth, fine texture. Whilst young the cheese has a soft white rind and has a gentle, fresh taste. If aged for longer, the cheese can lose half of its weight resulting in a golden rind with a much harder centre and a more concentrated flavour. Picodon is manufactured in a number of varieties, each conforming to the AOC regulations. These include: The lower valley of the Rhône is mostly too dry for the production of wine, but ideal for goats to feast on the sparse grass and hardy bushes that are scattered along the hillsides. Picodon is made from milk with only a small quantity of rennet added before being poured into small moulds dotted with tiny holes. Lactic protein, frozen curd, and concentrated or powdered milk are all
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Ricotta cheese

    Ricotta cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: Soft
    Ricotta (Italian pronunciation: [riˈkɔtta]) is an Italian dairy product made from sheep (or cow, goat, or buffalo) milk whey left over from the production of cheese. Although typically referred to as ricotta cheese, ricotta is not properly a cheese because it is not produced by coagulation of casein. Rather, it is made by coagulating other milk proteins, notably albumin and globulin, left over in the whey that separates from the milk during the production of cheese. In fact, ricotta is safely eaten by individuals with casein intolerance. Ricotta (literally meaning "recooked") uses the whey, a limpid, low-fat, nutritious liquid that is a by-product of cheese production. Most of the milk protein (especially casein) is removed when cheese is made, but some protein remains in the whey, mostly albumin. This remaining protein can be harvested if the whey is first allowed to become more acidic by additional fermentation (by letting it sit for 12–24 hours at room temperature). Then the acidified whey is heated to near boiling. The combination of low pH and high temperature denatures the protein and causes it to precipitate out, forming a fine curd. Once cooled, the curd is separated by
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Saint Agur Blue

    Saint Agur Blue

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Saint Agur (pronounced [sɛ̃taɡyʁ]) is a blue cheese made from pasteurized cow's milk from the village of Beauzac in the Monts du Velay, part of the mountainous Auvergne region of central France. Developed in 1988 by the cheese company Bongrain, it is made from pasteurised cow's milk, enriched with cream, and contains 60% butterfat qualifying it as a double-cream cheese. Aged for 60 days in cellars, the cheese becomes stronger and spicier as it ages. The moist, rich, white cheese has characteristic olive green mold veins throughout and a smooth, creamy texture with a subtle mild spicy taste resembling a softer, and finer Roquefort in presentation and taste. It is not as salty as more traditional blue cheese, and its tangy and creamy nature are balanced so not to overpower with a sharp bite, although this is dependent in the age of the cheese. Due to its double-cream nature, this cheese is easily spread and also melts well. Saint Agur is produced in 2-kilogram octagonal cylinders, rendering a shape that makes it easy to cut into wedges. It has no rind and sometimes comes in foil to prevent the cheese from becoming more blue. No saint has ever been named Agur. No village, in France or
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Benedictine

    Benedictine

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: semi-firm
    Benedictine

    Snuggly situated among the softly flowing green hills and fertile pastures of central Wisconsin, the Carr Valley Cheese Company has been making cheese for over a century. Sid Cook, the current fourth-generation owner, is one of a small group of certified Master Cheesemakers in the United States and he, along with the rest of the Carr Valley Cheese Company, makes a select variety of cheeses. From traditional and smoked Cheddars to Colbys and more unknown varieties like Benedictine, Carr Valley Cheese Company pairs old-world traditions with creativity to make each cheese.

    A beautiful example of a mixed milk cheese, Benedictine marries fresh sheep, goat, and cow's milk this washed rind offering. Cellar cured and hand-rubbed for twelve weeks, the cheese is creamy and intense and saturates your taste buds with a tingly unctuousness before finishing with an earthy complexity. Farm/Company: Carr Valley Cheese Co Cheesemaker: Sid Cook Proprietor:   Affineur:   City, State: La Velle, Wisconsin Region: Midwest Country: USA Milk: Pasteurized cow, goat & sheep Rennet:   Rind: No rind Texture: Semi-firm Aging: 4 months Size(s): 9 pound wheel

    5.50
    4 votes
    131
    Afuega'l pitu

    Afuega'l pitu

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Afuega'l pitu is an unpasteurised cow's milk cheese from Asturias, one of four Asturian cheeses (the others being Cabrales, Gamonedo cheese, and Casín cheese) to have been recognized with Protected Designation of Origin (Denominación de Origen, DO) by Spain and the European Union. The name comes from its tendency to stick to a person's palate ("pitu"). It is considered to be one of the oldest Spanish cheeses. Production is centred around the municipalities of Grado, Las Regueras, Morcín, Pravia, Riosa, Salas, and Yernes y Tameza with the municipality of Grado having the largest production and being the headquarters of the council of Denomination of Origin. The cheese is produced all year long although principally in spring and winter due to the elevated fat content in milk in the spring and winter months. The cheese is made from cow's milk from cows milked in the afternoon or evening and heated between 25 °C and 30 °C (77-86 °F) with a coagulant added so the milk forms curds. After midday the following day, the curds are cut and deposited in a mold to drain. From the mold it is passed to a sack or bag ("Fardela") for the "Trapu" version or left with the form given by the mold
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Azeitao

    Azeitao

    • Country Of Origin: Portugal
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Azeitao Azeitao is a handcrafted cheese produced at the base of the Arrabida Mountains in the regions of Setubal, Palmeal, and Sesimbra in Portugal. It is made with raw sheep's milk and, rather than use rennet, it is coagulated with thistle flower. The small 1/2-pound rounds have a strong, earthy aroma and a pale orange rind that opens to a straw color pate with a rich, creamy texture and a sweet, slightly piquant flavor. As the cheeses ages, the interior becomes drier and more dense giving way to deeper flavors and aromas. Farm/Company:   Cheesemaker:   Proprietor:   Affineur:   City, State:   Region:   Country: Portugal Milk: Raw Sheep Rennet: Thistle Flower Rind:   Texture: Semi-soft Aging: 90 days Size(s): 8 ounce round
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Danish Blue cheese

    Danish Blue cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Denmark
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Danish Blue (also known as Danablu) is a strong, blue-veined cheese. This semi-soft creamery cheese is typically drum or block shaped and has a white to yellowish, slightly moist, edible rind. Made from cow's milk, it has a fat content of 25–30% (50–60% in dry matter) and is aged for eight to twelve weeks. Before ageing, copper wires or rods are used to pierce the formed curds to distribute the mould (Penicillium roqueforti) evenly through the cheese. The holes can still be seen when the finished wheel is cut open. Danish Blue was invented early in the 20th century by a Danish cheese maker named Marius Boel with the intention of emulating a Roquefort style cheese. Danish Blue has a milder flavour characterised by a sharp, salty taste. Danish Blue is often served crumbled on salads or as a dessert cheese with fruit. In Denmark, it is often served on bread or biscuits. Danish Blue and Esrom are the only two Danish cheeses that are PGI-marked by the EU, meaning that they may only be produced in Denmark from Danish milk and at approved dairies that produce the cheeses according to the specifications laid down.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Mahón cheese

    Mahón cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Mahón cheese (Catalan: formatge de Maó) is a soft to hard white cheese made from cow's milk, named after the natural port of Mahón on the island of Minorca off the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Minorca is known for its cheese production and is home to one of the most respected dairy plants in Europe. Nearly a century ago, the gatherer-ripeners were said to have emerged as a class of island society in Minorca. Their work consisted of trading and distributing farm products, seeds, utensils, foods, etc. In exchange they would receive fresh cheeses that the farmers brought to their houses. In order to store them, the recogedores had underground caves for the careful and novel aging of the cheeses. They controlled everything in production, from the changing winds and temperature level to the correct handling of the product. In so doing, they obtained the original cheese from Mahón; soft, aired or cured, that they would then sell in diverse markets of the islands and the peninsula. Their careful techniques made famous Mahón cheese, and helped to make it a sought after export. Recently, Minorca's live-stocks of cattle have well designed health and genetic selection, with one of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Pilgrim's Choice

    Pilgrim's Choice

    • Country Of Origin: England
    Pilgrims Choice is a cheese brand owned by Adams Foods Ltd (formerly the North Downs Dairy), based in Wincanton, Somerset, England. It is the UK's number two cheddar brand, worth £72 million, with year on year growth (2007/8) of +60%* (Source: TNS, w/e January 25th 2009)
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Salers

    Salers

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    The Salers (French: Le Salers) is a French cheese from the volcanic region in the mountains of Auvergne, central France. It is a pressed, uncooked cheese made from Salers cow's milk between the 15 April and 15 November. It is similar to Cantal cheese - which is produced from the same cows' milk when they are fed on hay during the remaining months of the year - and has been estimated to have been fabricated in this region for at least 2000 years. It came to prominence when Maréchal de Senneterre served it at the table of Louis XIV of France. Maréchal de Senneterre is also responsible for the introduction of Saint-Nectaire and Cantal. Salers has benefited from the Appellation d'origine contrôlée since 1961. It is best eaten between September and March, after an ageing time of nine months, but it is also excellent all year round. It is circular in shape, weighing around 40 kg. 1,112 tonnes were produced in 1998 (+15.1% since 1996). All was made in local farms from unpasteurized milk by about one hundred producers.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Swiss cheese

    Swiss cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Swiss cheese is a generic name for several related varieties of cheese which resemble the Swiss Emmental. Some types of Swiss cheese have a distinctive appearance, as the blocks of the cheese are riddled with holes known as "eyes". Swiss cheese has a savory, but not very sharp, taste. Swiss cheese without eyes is known as "blind". Three types of bacteria are used in the production of Emmental cheese: Streptococcus salivarius subspecies thermophilus, Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus helveticus or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus), and Propionibacterium (Propionibacterium freudenreichii subspecies shermani). In a late stage of cheese production, the propionibacteria consume the lactic acid excreted by the other bacteria and release acetate, propionic acid, and carbon dioxide gas. The carbon dioxide slowly forms the bubbles that develop the "eyes". The acetate and propionic acid give Swiss its nutty and sweet flavor. Historically, the holes were seen as a sign of imperfection and cheese makers originally tried to avoid them by pressing during production. In modern times, the holes have become an identifier of the cheese. In general, the larger the eyes in a Swiss cheese,
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Babybel

    Babybel

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Babybel is a brand of cheese sold internationally. The Bel Group introduced Babybel in 1952 and in 1977 Mini Babybel was launched in France. In 1979, Mini Babybel was launched in the U.S. under the Laughing Cow umbrella brand. As of 2011, Mini Babybel is sold in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Australia and Asia. As of March 2011, 75% of all Mini Babybel cheese is eaten outside of France. The brand is marketed as a natural, convenient snack. Flavors distributed in the U.S. are created in Leitchfield, Kentucky, and at times in France. ‎ Mini Babybel is known for its unique packaging which consists of a netted bag in which each piece is encased in wax. Numerous flavors of Mini Babybel are offered across the world. The original Mini Babybel and US distributed Mini Babybel light, an Edam variety, is encased in red wax. Other varieties offered in Europe are available such as Mini Babybel Light (diet version of the Edam variety) in white wax with a light blue label, Emmental in yellow wax, Gouda in yellow wax with an orange wrapper, Goat in green wax and Cheddar in purple wax. The original is also available in Kosher and Halal variety in the UK, which come in nets of 5 with
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Black Gold

    Black Gold

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: Soft
    Black Gold

    Elk Creamery is happily situated on the perfumed property of Flowers by the Sea, a certified organic, biodynamic flower, and vegetable farm located slightly south of Fort Bragg, California. Closely following Rudolph Steiner's teachings and methods of cultivation and earth husbandry, Elk Creamery - along with Flowers by the Sea - seeks to establish sustainable and holistic harmony between people, plants, animals, and environment. In order to do this, the people of Elk Creamery and Flowers by the Sea work to maximize the health and vitality of all their crops and animals.

    Made with goat milk, Black Gold is creamy, salty, and tangy, and in the area immediately under its soft, ash-coated rind Black Gold also delivers a signature peppery kick.

    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Coulommiers

    Coulommiers

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Coulommiers is a cheese from Coulommiers in the Seine-et-Marne department of France, is the lesser-known cousin of Brie, although it has been produced longer. It is made from cow's milk, usually in the shape of a disc with white, bloomy edible Penicillium candidum rind. It is smaller and thicker than Brie but otherwise possesses all the characteristics of a Brie, with a similar buttery colour and supple texture, with a nuttier flavour. This cheese can be either farmer-made or industrially produced, though the industrial version lacks the depth of an unpasteurized cheese; the artisanal or "farmhouse" unpasteurised Coulommiers has some reddish blush in parts of the rind. The period of ripening when made of pasteurised whole milk is about four to six weeks. The fat content is 40 per cent.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Gaperon

    Gaperon

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gaperon is a French cheese of the Auvergne region. The Gaperon has been produced for over 1200 years in Auvergne. Gaperon is a cow's milk cheese flavored with cracked peppercorns and garlic. It has a fluffy coat and is shaped into a dome. The inside is ivory to pale yellow in color depending on the season. Gaperon is available all year round with no particular best season, principally because of the pepper and garlic flavoring. The flavor is tart when the cheese is young and under-ripe. As it matures, it develops a soft and buttery consistency and an intense garlic and pepper flavor. Gaperon is a specialty of Auvergne country and originated from the plateau of Limagne, between Clermont-Ferrand and Vichy in the Puy de Dôme region. It was originally made with the babeurre, which is the leftover liquid from making butter (buttermilk). Milk which was left over after butter-making was mixed with fresh milk to make the cheese curds and further mixed with the local pink garlic and pepper. In the old days, the Gaperon was ripened in the fresh air as it was hung in the farmhouse kitchen or the storeroom.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Golka

    Golka

    • Country Of Origin: Poland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gołka is a cheese from Poland that is similar to oscypek/oštiepok, but made with milk from cattle. Gołka also has a different shape; it's cylindrical, while oscypek is tapered at both ends (spindle-shaped).
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Brillat-Savarin cheese

    Brillat-Savarin cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Triple cream
    Brillat-Savarin is a soft, white-crusted cow's milk cheese with at least 75% fat in dry matter (roughly 40% overall), named after the 18th century French gourmet and political figure Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin. The cheese was created in the 1930s by cheese-maker Henri Androuët. Brillat-Savarin is produced all year round in Burgundy and Normandy. It comes in 12–13 cm wheels and approximately 4 cm thick, and is aged for one to two weeks. It is also available as a fresh cheese (non affine) that resembles rich cream cheese. It is a triple cream Brie that is luscious, creamy and faintly sour. It goes well with medjool dates and also champagne. Pairing with red wines is difficult, as any mushroominess or "moldy" taste will bring out the tannins of the wine. Brillat Savarin is also quite salty when ripe, which may disturb the taste of red wine. It does pair well with Pale Ale and Champagne. The carbonation wipes the fattiness from the palate and the malts enhance the creaminess of the cheese. The French cheesemaking company Rouzaire also produces an older Brillat Savarin under the name Pierre Robert. The extra aging time concentrates the proteins and salt in the cheese, resulting in
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    Cabécou

    Cabécou

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Cabécou is a soft goat cheese that comes from the Midi-Pyrénées region of southern France. It has a thin striped rind and after 2 weeks its crust grows blue mold changing its taste.
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Cancoillotte

    Cancoillotte

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cancoillotte or Cancoyotte is a runny French cheese made principally in Franche-Comté, but also Lorraine and Luxembourg, where it is also called Kachkéis (cook-cheese). It is a typical cheese in Franc-Comtois gastronomy. It is eaten all year around, served cold or hot. Made from metton, Cancoillotte is typically sold in quantities averaging 200 grams. The cheese appeared no later than the 16th century. The name dates from the 19th century, from "coille," derived from cailler (to curdle), referring to milk left after cream extraction (resulting in a lower fat content). The cheese is typically served melted over a small flame, with a little water or milk, and salt or butter added before serving. Sometimes garlic is added as well. Cancoillotte is good melted with lots of butter. Recently there are commercial versions with wine, cumin or other additions. While cancoillote made from melting pure metton with a bit of water is almost fat- and calorie-free (therefore good for diets, as it can be a good source of calcium without the fat), commercial versions are higher in fat and calories due to the butter added to make it sweeter and softer and the preservatives added to make it last
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Colby-Jack cheese

    Colby-Jack cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Colby-Jack, or Cojack, is a cheese produced from a mixture of Colby and Monterey Jack cheeses. It is generally sold in a full-moon or a half-moon shape when it is still young and mild in flavor. The cheese has a semi-hard texture. The flavor of Colby-Jack is mild to mellow. Colby-Jack is commonly used on cheese trays, in salads, sandwiches, casseroles, soups, and sauces. Colby-Jack is a popular cheese because of its versatile flavor. Colby-Jack has a shiny orange and white marbled look to it. Colby-Jack is a semi hard cheese with a softness comparable to that of Mozzarella. Colby-Jack, usually sold young, gains its characterization from its ratios of Colby and Monterrey Jack. It is noted as having a range from mild to sharp and non-spicy to spicy flavor. Colby-Jack contains 110 calories in 1 oz (28.0 g) of cheese.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Feta

    Feta

    • Country Of Origin: Greece
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Feta (Greek: φέτα) is a brined curd cheese traditionally made in Greece. Feta is a crumbly aged cheese, commonly produced in blocks, and has a slightly grainy texture. It is used as a table cheese, as well as in salads (e.g. the Greek salad), pastries and in baking, notably in the popular phyllo-based dishes spanakopita ("spinach pie") and tyropita ("cheese pie") and combined with olive oil and vegetables. It can also be served cooked or grilled, as part of a sandwich or as a salty alternative to other cheeses in a variety of dishes. Since 2002, feta has been a protected designation of origin product in the European Union. According to the relevant EU legislation, only those cheeses produced in a traditional way in some areas of Greece (mainland and the island of Lesbos), and made from sheep milk, or from a mixture of sheep and goats’ milk (up to 30%) of the same area, may bear the name "feta". However, similar white brined cheeses (often called "white cheese" in various languages) are found in the eastern Mediterranean and around the Black Sea. Similar brined white cheeses produced outside the EU are often made partly or wholly of cow's milk, and they are sometimes called "feta".
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Queso blanco

    Queso blanco

    • Country Of Origin: Mexico
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Queso blanco (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkeso ˈβlaŋko]), along with other similar cheeses including queso fresco (pronounced: [ˈkeso ˈfɾesko]), is a creamy, soft, and mild unaged white cheese, commonly used in the Iberian Peninsula and in several American countries, including Mexico. The name queso blanco is Spanish for "white cheese", but similar cheeses are used and known throughout the world by different names. It is sometimes made by pressing the whey from cottage cheese, but more often it is made by heating whole fresh milk to near-boiling, adding an acidifying agent such as vinegar, stirring until curds form, then draining the curds in cheesecloth for three to five hours. If it is pressed, and more water is removed, it becomes known as queso seco. It is similar to (if slightly more acidic than) pot cheese and farmer cheese. It has also been compared to Indian paneer and to a mild feta, and is considered one of the easier cheeses to make, as it requires no careful handling and does not call for rennet or a bacterial culture. Queso blanco is traditionally made from cow's milk, whereas queso fresco may be made from a combination of cow's and goat's milk. They may both be eaten
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Roquefort

    Roquefort

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Roquefort (US /ˈroʊkfərt/ or UK /rɒkˈfɔr/; French: [ʁɔk.fɔʁ]; from Occitan ròcafòrt [ˌrɔkɔˈfɔrt]) is a sheep milk blue cheese from the south of France, and together with Bleu d'Auvergne, Stilton and Gorgonzola is one of the world's best known blue-cheeses. Though similar cheeses are produced elsewhere, European law dictates that only those cheeses aged in the natural Combalou caves of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon may bear the name Roquefort, as it is a recognised geographical indication, or has a protected designation of origin. The cheese is white, tangy, crumbly and slightly moist, with distinctive veins of green mold. It has characteristic odor and flavor with a notable taste of butyric acid; the green veins provide a sharp tang. The overall flavor sensation begins slightly mild, then waxes sweet, then smoky, and fades to a salty finish. It has no rind; the exterior is edible and slightly salty. A typical wheel of Roquefort weighs between 2.5 and 3 kilograms, and is about 10 cm thick. Each kilogram of finished cheese requires about 4.5 litres of milk to produce. Legend has it that the cheese was discovered when a youth, eating his lunch of bread and ewes' milk cheese, saw a beautiful
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Serra da Estrela cheese

    Serra da Estrela cheese

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Serra da Estrela cheese (Queijo Serra da Estrela) is a cheese made in mountainous region of Serra da Estrela in Portugal, which has been granted PDO status in the European Union. The region where the Serra da Estrela cheese can be manufactured is limited to an area of 3,143.16 km2, which comprises the municipalities of Celorico da Beira, Fornos de Algodres, Gouveia, Mangualde, Manteigas, Nelas, Oliveira do Hospital, Penalva do Castelo, Carregal do Sal, and Seia. The production of the cheese has to follow very rigorous rules. It is made from sheep's milk, mostly during the months of November to March. Its maturation period has specific norms and must last thirty days at least. The texture of the paste varies depending on its age, from a very soft semi-liquid when young, to a soft but sliceable solid when older. It is a cured cheese created by artisanal producers with a white or slightly yellow color and a uniform creamy consistency with at most a few small holes in it. Its particular qualities result from slow draining of curdled raw sheep's milk which has been coagulated by using local Cynara cadunculus thistle rather than rennet. The cheese is formed into a somewhat irregular
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Bijou

    Bijou

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Bijou

    After learning the delicate craft of European artisanal cheesemaking on a family farm in Brittany, France in the 70s, Allison Hooper was working as a state dairy lab technician in Vermont when she got a call that would materially change her career path. In his capacity as the marketing director of the Vermont Department of Agriculture, Bob Reese was on the hunt for chevre to serve at a special state dinner. Today, that would seem like an easy enough need to fill but in the 80s, things were different. However, Bob had a feeling Allison might be able to help him out. Allison made the chevre herself and so successful was that cheese that Bob and Allison started thinking about making a business out of it. Over twenty years later, Vermont Butter & Cheese Company is still making artisanal dairy products in the European tradition while championing local farms.

    With a delicate mild rind that is gently wrinkled in the French tradition, Bijou is smooth and creamy with fresh, clean, goat flavors. You might also be able to detect notes of fresh flowers and hazelnuts in this rich round. Farm/Company: Vermont Butter & Cheese Cheesemaker:   Proprietor: Allison Hooper & Bob Reese Affineur:   City, State: Websterville, Vermont Region: Northeast Country: USA Milk: Pasteurized Goat Rennet: Vegetarian Rind: Surface Ripened Texture: Soft Aging: 2 weeks Size(s): 2 ounce rounds

    6.00
    3 votes
    152
    Farmer cheese

    Farmer cheese

    Farmer cheese (also farmer's cheese or farmers' cheese) refers most often to an unripened cheese made by adding rennet and bacterial starter to coagulate and acidify milk. Farmer cheese may be made from the milk of cows, sheep or goats, with each giving its own texture and flavor. During coagulation the mixture separates into curds (solid) and whey (liquid), then the whey is drained off. Further pressing out of the moisture yields the malleable solid results of pot cheese, whilst even more pressing makes farmer cheese, which is solid, dry and crumbly. There are many kinds of farmer cheese worldwide. In the Upper Midwest of the USA, farmer's cheese is a semi-soft white cheese made from part-skim milk. In Canada the term farmer's cheese means a kind of hard, rindless white cheese which is firm but springy in texture with a mild, milky and buttery flavor which may be used in a way likened to Colby or Cheddar. In Ghana, farmer's cheese is called wagashi or waagashi. It is made by Fulani women using grass-fed cow milk and Xylopia aethiopica leaves as the curdling agent. Waagashi is fried and eaten with a spicy peanut powder or used as an additive in various soups. Indian paneer is
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    Yunnan Cheese

    Yunnan Cheese

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Rubing (Chinese: 乳饼; pinyin: rǔbǐng) is a firm, fresh goat milk cheese made in the Yunnan Province of China by people of the Bai and Sani (recognized as a branch of the Yi in China) minorities. Its Bai name is youdbap, meaning "goat's milk". It is made by mixing heated goat's milk and a souring agent, traditionally a mixture called năiténg (奶藤; lit. 'milk cane') made from a cultivated vine. It is often served pan fried, and dipped in salt, sugar, or málà powder. It may also be stir fried with vegetables in place of tofu. Much like paneer or queso blanco, it is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese, but with the aroma of fresh goat's milk.
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Spinnenkäse

    Spinnenkäse

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    Milbenkäse ("mite cheese"), called Mellnkase in the local dialect and often (erroneously) known as Spinnenkäse ("spider cheese"), is a German specialty cheese made from quark and produced using the action of cheese mites. Historically, the cheese was produced in the Saxony-Anhalt/Thuringia border region of Zeitz and Altenburg districts; today it is produced exclusively in the village of Würchwitz, in the state of Saxony-Anhalt. The traditional method of making Milbenkäse, which dates back to the Middle Ages, was nearly lost by 1970, with only the elderly Liesbeth Brauer knowing the technique. Local science teacher Helmut Pöschel was taught the proper way to make Milbenkäse and together with his associate Christian Schmelzer managed to revitalize the tradition. A memorial was later erected at Würchwitz to celebrate the renaissance of Milbenkäse production. The rear side of the memorial is hollow and is regularly stocked with small bits of Milbenkäse for passersby and tourists to try. Milbenkäse is said to taste similar to Harzer cheese, but with a bitter note (increasing with age) and a distinctive zesty aftertaste. Mites clinging to the cheese rind are consumed along with the
    5.00
    4 votes
    155
    Triple cream

    Triple cream

    Triple-cream cheese or fromage triple-crème is cheese which contains more than 75% butterfat in its dry matter, that is, roughly 40% fat overall, similar to the fat content of extra-heavy liquid cream. Triple-crème cheeses taste rich and creamy. Some triple-crèmes are fresh, like mascarpone. Others are soft-ripened, like Brillat-Savarin, Boursault, Blue Castello, Explorateur, and St. André.
    5.00
    4 votes
    156
    Asiago cheese

    Asiago cheese

    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: hard
    Asiago ( /ɑːsiˈɑːɡoʊ/) is an Italian cow's milk cheese that can assume different textures, according to its aging, from smooth for the fresh Asiago (Asiago Pressato) to a crumbly texture for the aged cheese (Asiago d'allevo) of which the flavor is reminiscent of Parmesan. The aged cheese is often grated in salads, soups, pastas, and sauces while the fresh Asiago is sliced to prepare panini or sandwiches; it can also be melted on a variety of dishes and cantaloupe. As Asiago has a protected designation of origin (Denominazione di Origine Protetta or DOP, see below), the only "official" Asiago is produced in the alpine area of the town of Asiago, province of Vicenza, in the Veneto region. Asiago cheese is one of the most typical products of the Veneto region. It was, and still is, the most popular and widely used cheese in the DOP area where it is produced. The production area is strictly defined: it starts from the meadows of the Po Valley and finishes in the Alpine pastures between the Asiago Plateau and the Trentino's highlands. The officially designated area where the milk is collected and Asiago DOP cheese is produced, extends to four provinces in the north-east of Italy: the
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Chanco cheese

    Chanco cheese

    Chanco is Chilean cow's milk cheese originally from the Chanco farm in Maule Region. Now it is produced all over south-central Chile, and represents almost 50% of Chilean cheese consumption. It is a semi-hard ripened cheese with reduced lactose content and soft consistency. www.fao.org
    5.67
    3 votes
    158
    Dunlop cheese

    Dunlop cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Scotland
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Dunlop is a mild cheese or 'sweet-milk cheese' from Dunlop in East Ayrshire, Scotland. It resembles a soft Cheddar cheese in texture. It fell out of popularity some time after the end of the Second World War, however it has now appreciated for its value in various recipes and for eating on its own or with a dram of whisky. In the early 18th century Barbara Gilmour successfully manufactured a type of cheese 'til then unknown in Scotland, being made from unskimmed milk from Ayrshire cows. Her process was copied by her neighbours and 'Dunlop cheese' came into such demand, that whether made by Barbara, her neighbours, or by the housewives of adjoining parishes, it found a ready market. It is suggested that the spread of the cheese to other districts was largely through farmers who had settled there from Dunlop parish. Even William Cobbett himself pronounced it 'equal in quality to any cheese from Cheshire, Gloucestershire, or Wiltshire.' Gilmour was something of an evangelist in the matter of making sweet milk (unskimmed milk) cheese, and being a forthright and energetic character she traveled widely to teach the making of her Dunlop cheese, and so stimulated a nation-wide demand. This
    5.67
    3 votes
    159
    Neufchâtel

    Neufchâtel

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Neufchâtel is a soft, slightly crumbly, mould-ripened cheese made in the French region of Normandy. One of the oldest cheeses in France, its production is believed to date back to the 6th century. It looks similar to Camembert, with a dry, white, edible rind, but the taste is saltier and sharper. It has the aroma and taste of mushrooms. Unlike other soft-white-rinded cheeses, Neufchâtel has a grainy texture. It is most usually sold in heart shapes but is also produced in other forms, such as logs and boxes. It is typically matured for 8–10 weeks. In 1872, William Lawrence, a New York dairyman of the township of Chester, created the first American cream cheese as the result of an attempt to create a batch of Neufchâtel. This American Neufchâtel is softer than regular cream cheese due to its approximately 33% lower fat and higher moisture content. Due to this reduced fat content, it is found in most grocery stores as a reduced-fat option to cream cheese. In the United States, this Neufchâtel is sometimes called farmers' cheese.
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Catupiry

    Catupiry

    • Country Of Origin: Brazil
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Catupiry (Portuguese pronunciation: [katupiˈɾi]) is one of the most popular "requeijão" (creamy cheese) brands in Brazil. It was developed by the Italian immigrant Mario Silvestrini in the state of Minas Gerais in 1911. The name derives from the native Tupi word meaning "excellent". Catupiry is a soft, mild-tasting cheese that can be spread over toast and crackers or used in cooking. Because of its low level of acidity, Catupiry has become an ingredient in various dishes. The expression "com Catupiry" (with Catupiry) refers to foods where catupiry is an ingredient, or a filling, such as pizza, coxinhas or Pão de queijo. It is also eaten as a dessert combined with guava jam. In the United States, catupiry can be found in Brazilian stores and restaurants in the states of Texas, New Jersey, Florida, Georgia, California, New York, Illinois and Massachusetts.
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Dubliner cheese

    Dubliner cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Dubliner is a sweet mature cheese (aged over twelve months) manufactured by Carbery and marketed internationally under the auspices of the Irish Dairy Board under the Kerrygold brand. The cheese is named after the city of Dublin, although it is made in County Cork. It combines the sharpness of mature cheddar, the nuttiness of Swiss cheese, and the bite of Parmesan. The cheese was developed by John Lucey and his secret recipe is exclusively held by the company Carbery. Dubliner cheese may contain natural calcium lactate crystals, which appear as small white pieces.
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Dutch Cheese Markets

    Dutch Cheese Markets

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    There are five cheese markets operating in the Netherlands. Woerden is a modern working commercial cheese market. Four, Alkmaar, Gouda, Edam and Hoorn, are like traditional merchant cheese markets as operated in the post-medieval period, re-enacted during the summer months for tourists. The shows are today surrounded by stalls selling all things traditional to the Dutch culture, including cheese. Dutch cheese farmers traditionally brought their cheeses to the market square in town to sell. Teams (vemen) of official guild cheese-porters (kaasdragers), identified by differently coloured straw hats associated with their forwarding company, carried the farmers' cheese on barrows, which typically weighed about 160 kilograms. Buyers then sampled the cheeses and negotiated a price using a ritual system called handjeklap in which buyers and sellers clap each other's hands and shout prices. Once a price is agreed, the porters carry the cheese to the weighing house (Waag), and scale of their company. This large 400-year old cheese market located on the Waagplein ("weighing square") now opens every Friday morning between 10 am and 12:30 pm from the first Friday in April until the first Friday
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Morbier

    Morbier

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Morbier is a semi-soft cows' milk cheese of France named after the small village of Morbier in Franche-Comté. It is ivory colored, soft and slightly elastic, and is immediately recognizable by the black layer of tasteless ash separating it horizontally in the middle. It has a rind that is yellowish, moist, and leathery. Traditionally, the cheese consists of a layer of morning milk and a layer of evening milk. When making Comté (cheese), cheesemakers would end the day with leftover curd that was not enough for an entire cheese. Thus, they would press the remaining evening curd into a mold, and spread ash over it to protect it overnight. The following morning, the cheese would be topped up with morning milk. Nowadays, the cheese is usually made from a single milking with the ash added for tradition. The Jura and Doubs versions both benefit from an appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC), though other non-AOC Morbier exist on the market. The aroma of Morbier is strong, but the flavor is rich and creamy, with a slightly bitter aftertaste.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Oka cheese

    Oka cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Canada
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Oka cheese was originally manufactured by the Trappist monks, who are located in Oka, Quebec, Canada. The cheese is named after the town. It has a distinct flavour and aroma, and is still manufactured in Oka, although now by a commercial company, the rights having been sold in 1996 by Les Peres Trappists. It is also manufactured in Holland, Manitoba, by Trappist Monks at their monastery, which is located 8 miles South East of Holland. It originated in 1893. Since that time, Quebec has become a major producer of Canadian Cheese. Oka cheese has a pungent aroma and soft creamy flavour, sometimes described as nutty and fruity. The cheese, which is made from cow's milk is covered with a copper-orange, hand-washed rind. Its distinct flavour sets it apart from more common cheeses such as colby and cheddar, and does not go through a cheddaring process. There are four types of Oka cheese, regular, classic, light and providence. 'Regular' Oka can be made from both pasteurized and raw cow's milk. It is a pressed, semi-soft cheese that is surface ripened for some 30 days. The 'Classic' is ripened for an additional month. Aging is done in refrigerated aging cellars. The cheese rounds are placed
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Paneer

    Paneer

    • Country Of Origin: India
    Paneer (Hindi: पनीर panīr; Urdu: پنير from Persian: پنير panir) is a fresh cheese common in South Asian cuisine. It is of Indian origin often referred in the Vedas dating back to 6000 BC. In eastern parts of India, it is generally called Chhena. It is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese or curd cheese made by curdling heated milk with lemon juice, vinegar, or any other food acids. To prepare paneer, food acid (usually lemon juice, vinegar, citric acid or yogurt) is added to hot milk to separate the curds from the whey. The curds are drained in muslin or cheesecloth and the excess water is pressed out. The resulting paneer is dipped in chilled water for 2–3 hours to give it a good texture and appearance. From this point, the preparation of paneer diverges based on its use and regional variation. In most cuisines, the curds are wrapped in cloth and placed under a heavy weight, such as a stone slab, for 2–3 hours, and then cut into cubes for use in curries. Pressing for a shorter time (approximately 20 minutes) results in a softer, fluffier cheese. In Eastern Indian and Bangladeshi cuisines, the curds are beaten or kneaded by hand into a dough-like consistency called ছানা
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Raejuusto

    Raejuusto

    • Country Of Origin: Finland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Raejuusto (Trans. "Granular Cheese" also known as grynost by the Swedish speaking Finns) is a Finnish fresh cheese that is rather similar to cottage cheese. In Sweden, raejuusto-type cheese is known as keso, and in Denmark as hytteost. Raejuusto is made from cow's milk. Raejuusto has a low fat content, similar to cottage cheese and a high protein content. It can be enjoyed on its own or together with, for instance, cucumber, olive oil and ground black pepper. Raejuusto is also often used to garnish soups and other dishes.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Sage Derby cheese

    Sage Derby cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Sage Derby ( /ˈdɑrbi/) is a variety of Derby cheese that is mild, mottled green and semi-hard, and has a sage flavour. The colour is from sage and sometimes other colouring added to the curds, producing a marbling effect and a subtle herb flavour. The colour is formed either by mixing sage leaves into the curd before it is pressed or by the addition of "green curd" from green corn or spinach juice. In the latter case, the flavour has to be created with colourless sage extract. The sage gives the cheese an almost minty flavour. Parsley, spinach and marigold leaves, bruised and steeped before use, can also be included instead of the sage leaves. The first production began in the seventeenth century in England. Sage Derby was initially only made for festive occasions such as harvest time and Christmas, but it is now available all year.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Stilton

    Stilton

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Stilton is a type of English cheese, known for its characteristic strong smell and taste. It is produced in two varieties: the well-known blue and the lesser-known white. Both have been granted the status of a protected designation of origin by the European Commission, one of seventeen British products to have such a designation. This PDO status means that only cheese produced in the three counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, and Nottinghamshire and made according to a strict code may be called "Stilton". Thus any cheese produced in Stilton, the village in Cambridgeshire after which the cheese is named, would not be allowed to be called Stilton Cheese. According to the Stilton Cheesemaker's Association, the first Englishman to market blue Stilton cheese was Cooper Thornhill, owner of the Bell Inn on the Great North Road, in the village of Stilton, Huntingdonshire. Traditional legend has it that in 1730, Thornhill discovered a distinctive blue cheese while visiting a small farm near Melton Mowbray in rural Leicestershire – possibly in Wymondham. He fell in love with the cheese and made a business arrangement that granted the Bell Inn exclusive marketing rights to blue Stilton.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Stracchino

    Stracchino

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Stracchino also known as crescenza is a type of Italian cow’s-milk cheese, typical of Lombardy, Piedmont, and Veneto. It is eaten very young, has no rind and a very soft, creamy texture and normally a mild and delicate flavour. It is normally square in form. The name of the cheese derives from the Italian word "stracca", meaning "tired". It is said that the milk from tired cows coming down in the autumn from the alpine pastures, is richer in fats and more acidic. These qualities were discovered, according to legend, in the milk of cows who were moved seasonally, up and down the Alps to different pastures. The milk of such cows gives the cheese its characteristic flavors. Stracchino is usually eaten on its own, but in Recco on the Ligurian riviera east of Genoa it is used as the filing for focaccia col formaggio, and in Romagna (portion of the Emilia Romagna region) and elsewhere (north portion of Marche region, Umbria and east portion of Tuscany) in piadina.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Tête de Moine

    Tête de Moine

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Tête de Moine is a Swiss cheese. Its name, which means "Monk's Head", is derived from its invention and initial production by the monks of the abbey of Bellelay, located in the community of Saicourt, district of Moutier, in the mountainous zone of the Bernese Jura, the French-speaking area of the Canton of Bern. The cheese is eaten in an unusual way: it must be carefully scraped with a knife in order to develop its scented flavours. Tête de Moine is currently produced by fewer than 10 cheese dairies of the Jura Mountains area of Porrentruy, District of Franches-Montagnes, both situated in the Canton of Jura, as well as in Moutier and Courtelary, in the Bernese Jura. The monks started to manufacture this cheese more than eight centuries ago. Writings from 1292 attest that the cheese of the abbots of Bellelay had acquired such a reputation that it was used to pay the royalties of the stockbreeders to the farms' owners, to regulate litigations, being offered as presents to the prince-bishops of Basel or even as currency. The cheese was named Tête de Moine two centuries ago by soldiers of French Revolution, who, having expelled the monks, discovered cheese coins stored at the bottom of
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Anari

    Anari

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Anari is a fresh mild whey cheese produced in Cyprus. Although much less known than other Cypriot cheeses (e.g. halloumi), it has started to gain popularity following recent publicity exposure. One of the main industrial producers on the island won a silver medal award for anari in the 2005 World Cheese Awards in the UK. The whey used is usually a by-product in the production process of other harder cheeses, commonly that of halloumi or kefalotyri cheese. The whey is gradually heated to 65 °C in a large cooking bowl. A small amount of goat or sheep milk (5-10%) can be added at this temperature to improve the end product quality. The temperature is then increased to boiling point, whilst mixing. At 80–85 °C small crumbly curds of anari start forming and are skimmed off the surface using a slotted spoon or a colander. They are placed in a container that allows further drainage and then cut into cubes of roughly 10 cm sides. Excluding the drainage, the above process takes roughly 1 hour. In its simple form produced as above, anari has a chalk-white appearance with a very soft consistency, similar in many ways to the likes of mizithra cheese, cottage cheese and ricotta. Salt is often
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Bleu des Causses

    Bleu des Causses

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Bleu des Causses is a French blue cheese made from cow's milk. It is considered a mild variant of Roquefort. The cheese has a fat content of 45% and is aged for 3–6 months in Gorges du Tarn's natural limestone caves.
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Bryndza

    Bryndza

    • Country Of Origin: Poland
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Bryndza is a sheep milk cheese made in Slovakia and Poland. Recipes differ slightly across the countries. Brânză or brînză (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈbrɨnzə]) is the generic word for "cheese" in Romanian, there is no special type of cheese associated with it. It is a word presumably inherited by the Romanian language from Dacian, the language of the pre-Roman population in the actual Romania (see also List of Romanian words of possible Dacian origin). The word was first recorded as brençe described as "Wallachian cheese" in the Croatian port of Dubrovnik in 1370. Bryndza was first recorded in the Slovakia counties in 1470 and in the adjacent Polish Podhale in 1527. Today, "bryndza", a word descended from the Romanian root, is used in various countries throughout the UkraineCEE region, due to its introduction by migrating Vlachs. In contrast to the original Romanian word, it is exclusively used for the one type of soft crumbly cheese described above. In Slovakia, bryndza serves as the main ingredient to bryndzové halušky, which is regarded the national speciality (halušky - small gnocchi - are mixed with bryndza and topped with fried chops of fatty bacon). Bryndza is therefore
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Fromager d'Affinois

    Fromager d'Affinois

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Fromager d'Affinois pronounced: [fʁɔmaʒe dafinwa] is a French double-cream soft cheese made from cow's milk. It is produced by the Fromagerie Guilloteau company. Fromager d'Affinois is similar to Brie in production, appearance and flavour. Unlike in Brie production however, before cheese making the cow's milk undergoes a process called ultrafiltration. Ultrafiltration removes water from the pasteurised milk, concentrating all other components. One effect of this process is that it allows the acceleration of the cheese making process. Whereas classic Brie takes eight weeks to make, Fromager d'Affinois can be made in two weeks. Ultrafiltration also results in a milk that retains more nutrients and proteins, and the cheese has a relatively high fat content of 60%. The cheese is made in 4.4 pound wheels, and has a soft oozing texture inside with an edible white rind on the outside.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Queijo coalho

    Queijo coalho

    • Country Of Origin: Brazil
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Queijo coalho or Queijo de coalho (Portuguese pronunciation: [keiˈʒu ˈkwaʎu] "coalho cheese") is a firm but very lightweight cheese produced in Northeastern Brazil, with an almost 'squeaky' texture when bitten into. It is a popular and cheap snack on the beach in Brazil, where walking vendors brown rectangular slabs of it in hand-held charcoal ovens, often with a sprinkling of oregano and garlic-flavored sauce. It is eaten off a stick, much like a kebab. Many people also eat it with molasses.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Scamorza cheese

    Scamorza cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Scamorza is an Italian cow's milk cheese, similar to mozzarella. It can also be made from other milks, but that is less common. Scamorza is a plastic (or stretched) curd cheese, in which the fresh curd matures in its own whey for several hours to allow acidity to develop by the process of lactose being converted to lactic acid. Artisanal cheesemakers generally form the cheese into a round shape, and then tie a string around the mass one third of the distance from the top, and hang to dry. The resulting shape is pear-like. This is sometimes referred to as "strangling" the cheese. The cheese is usually white in color unless smoked. When smoked, the color is almond with a lighter interior. Scamorza can be substituted for mozzarella in most dishes; it is reputed to melt better in baking. Using the smoked variety (scamorza affumicata) adds a nice background flavor in replacement of mozzarella. In Italy, scamorza is more commonly made in the south rather than the north. Technically, scamorza is a product of Puglia, where it is made throughout Bari Province. However, it is available across the country, both in the unsmoked and smoked forms. Mario Batali cites grilled scamorza as a
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Selles-sur-Cher

    Selles-sur-Cher

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Selles-sur-Cher is a French goats'-milk cheese made in the Centre region of France. Its name is derived from the commune of Selles-sur-Cher in the Loir-et-Cher department where it was first made in the 19th century. The cheese is sold in small cylindrical units, around 8 cm in diameter at the base (reduced to around 7 cm at the top) and 2-3 cm in height, and weighing around 150 g. The central pâte is typical of goats cheese, rigid and heavy at first but moist and softening as it melts in the mouth. Its taste is lightly salty with a persistent aftertaste. The exterior is dry with a grey-blue mould covering its surface and has a musty odour. The mould is often eaten and has a considerably stronger flavour. Around 1.3 litres of unpasteurized milk are used to make a single 150g cheese. After the milk is soured using the ferment is heated to around 20C. A small amount of rennet is added and left for 24 hours. Unlike most other types of cheese, the curd is ladled directly into its mould which contains tiny holes for the whey to run off naturally. The cheese is then left in a cool ventilated room at 80% humidity (dry compared to a typical cellar at 90-100% humidity) for between 10 and 30
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Shropshire Blue cheese

    Shropshire Blue cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Shropshire Blue is a cow's milk cheese made in the United Kingdom. The cheese was first made in the 1970s at the Castle Stuart dairy in Inverness, Scotland by Andy Williamson, a cheesemaker who had trained in the making of Stilton cheese in Nottinghamshire. The cheese was first known as 'Inverness-shire Blue' or 'Blue Stuart', but was eventually marketed as 'Shropshire Blue', a name chosen to help increase its popularity, despite it having no link to the county of Shropshire. After the Castle Stuart dairy was closed down in 1980, the cheese was revived by Elliot Hulme and Harry Hanlin of Cheshire, but once again the manufacture soon ceased. The cheese is now made by the Long Clawson, Leicestershire and the Cropwell Bishop and Colston Bassett dairies in Nottinghamshire. It is now also being made in the county of Shropshire in a small artisan dairy at the Ludlow Food Centre. Shropshire Blue is a blue cheese made from pasteurised cows' milk and uses vegetable rennet. The orange colour comes from the addition of annatto, a natural food colouring. It has been described as a cross between Stilton and Cheshire. Penicillium roqueforti produces the veining. The cheese has a deep
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Y Fenni

    Y Fenni

    • Country Of Origin: Wales
    Y Fenni (Welsh pronunciation: [əˈvɛni]) is a variety of Welsh cheese, consisting of Cheddar cheese blended with mustard seed and ale. It takes its name from the Welsh language name of Abergavenny, a market town in Monmouthshire, south east Wales. Y Fenni, when coated in red wax, is also known as 'Red Dragon', a name derived from the dragon on the Flag of Wales.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Halloumi

    Halloumi

    • Country Of Origin: Turkey
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: Soft
    Halloumi (Greek χαλούμι, Turkish hellim, Arabic حلوم ḥallūm) is a Cypriot semi-hard, unripened brined cheese made from a mixture of goats' and sheep milk, and sometimes also cows' milk. It has a high melting point and so can easily be fried or grilled. Halloumi is set with rennet and is unusual in that no acid or acid-producing bacterium is used in its preparation. Halloumi is popular in Cyprus, Greece and the Middle East. Halloumi cheese originated in Cyprus and was initially made during the Medieval Byzantine period (AD 395 – 1191), subsequently gaining popularity throughout the Middle East region. The cheese is white, with a distinctive layered texture, similar to mozzarella and has a salty flavour. It is stored in its natural juices with salt-water and can keep for up to a year if frozen below −18 °C (0 °F) and defrosted to +4 °C (39 °F) for sale. It is often garnished with mint to add to the taste. Traditionally, the mint leaves were used as a preservative, this practice arising from the serendipitous discovery that Halloumi kept better and was fresher and more flavoursome when wrapped with mint leaves. In accordance with this tradition, many packages of halloumi contain
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Tintern

    Tintern

    • Country Of Origin: Wales
    Tintern is a blended mature creamy Cheddar cheese flavoured with fresh chives and shallots, made by Abergavenny Fine Foods. Typically produced in wheels of 2.25kg, it is sold in a distinctive lime green wax covering. It takes its name from the village of Tintern on the River Wye, in Monmouthshire, Wales. The monks of Tintern Abbey are said to have farmed shallots in the abbey gardens in the grounds.
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Ardrahan cheese

    Ardrahan cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Ireland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Ardrahan Cheese company create two varieties of cheese. They originate from Ardrahan Farmhouse, Kanturk, County Cork in Ireland. The two varieties are Ardrahan and Duhallow. Eugene and Mary Burns first made Ardrahan cheese on their farm in County Cork in 1983 using traditional techniques. Both varieties are made entirely from the milk of the Burns' cow herd, which is composed of Friesian cows Ardrahan is a semi-soft vegetarian cheese made from pasteurised cow's milk and vegetarian rennet. It has a 25% fat content. It is made into wheels of 400g and 1.5 kg with a ridged brine-washed rind encrusted with moulds. A smoked version is also available. Ardrahan cheese has an earthy, farmhouse taste and aroma, and also a zesty tang that enhances the rich buttery and meaty flavour. It has a smooth texture, a deep yellow interior and an edible, full-bodied rind. Ardrahan's interior is firm and slightly chalky. It matures in four to eight weeks Since 2006, they have also produced Duhallow cheese, a medium hard cheese also made from pasteurised cow's milk using vegetarian rennet. Most is exported to the US. In 1994, Ardrahan won the Irish Food Writers Guild annual Good Food award. Since then,
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Brie

    Brie

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft-ripened
    Brie /ˈbriː/ is a soft cow's cheese named after Brie, the French region from which it originated (roughly corresponding to the modern département of Seine-et-Marne). It is pale in color with a slight grayish tinge under a rind of white mold. The whitish moldy rind is typically eaten, the flavor quality of which depends largely upon the ingredients used and its manufacturing environment. Brie may be produced from whole or semi-skimmed milk. The curd is obtained by adding rennet to raw milk and heating it to a maximum temperature of 37°C. The cheese is then cast into molds, sometimes with a traditional perforated ladle called a pelle à brie. The 20 cm mold is filled with several thin layers of cheese and drained for approximately 18 hours. The cheese is then taken out of the molds, salted, inoculated with cheese mold (Penicillium candidum, Penicillium camemberti) or Brevibacterium linens, and aged in a cellar for at least four to five weeks. If left to mature for longer, typically several months to a year, the cheese becomes stronger in flavor and taste, the pâte drier and darker, and the rind also darker and crumbly, and is called Brie Noir (Fr: black Brie). Around the Île-de-France
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Caciocavallo

    Caciocavallo

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Caciocavallo is a type of stretched-curd cheese made out of sheep's or cow's milk. It is produced throughout Southern Italy, especially mostly on the Apennine Mountains. Shaped like a tear-drop, it is similar in taste to the aged Southern Italian Provolone cheese, with a hard edible rind. The Italian name of the cheese caciocavallo means "Cheese on horseback" and it is thought that the name derives from the fact that two cheese forms are always bound together with rope and then left to mature by placing them 'a cavallo', i.e. straddling, upon a horizontal stick or branch. Apparently caciocavallo was mentioned the first time around 500BC by Hippocrates, emphasising the "Greeks' cleverness in making cheese". Types of cheese with names similar to "caciocavallo" are common throughout the Balkans and Southern Italy. In Sicily, the Ragusano DOP, known locally as "caciocavallo ragusano" had to drop the denomination "caciocavallo" in order to get DOP status. Many different types of caciocavallo exist in Italy and several are recognized as Prodotto agroalimentare tradizionale (traditional regional food product) like Caciocavallo podolico (produced using only milk from the Podolica cattle
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Caerphilly cheese

    Caerphilly cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Wales
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Caerphilly is a hard, white cheese that originates in the area around the town of Caerphilly in Wales, although it is now also made in England, particularly in the South West and on the English border with Wales. It was not originally made in Caerphilly, but was sold at the market there, hence taking the town's name. Caerphilly is a light-coloured (almost white), crumbly cheese made from cow's milk, and generally has a fat content of around 48%. It has a mild taste, with its most noticeable feature being a not unpleasant slightly sour tang. It is rumoured that the cheese was developed over time to provide the coal miners of the area with a convenient way of replenishing the salt lost through hard work over ten hour shifts underground and so was a staple of the diet of the coal-miners. Real Farmhouse Caerphilly production died out during World War II as all milk had to go to the Cheddar factories to help the war effort. After the war these factories started making their version of Caerphilly (initially to help their cash flow as Caerphilly matures quicker than Cheddar), which is how it is mostly known today, dry and crumbly. However, there are now two or three farms making original
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Chaumes cheese

    Chaumes cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Chaumes ( /ˈʃoʊm/) is a cow's milk cheese from Périgord (South West of France), made by traditional cheese-making processes. Translated literally, "chaumes" is French for stubble. Based upon traditional Trappist-style cheeses, it is a rather popular cheese among modern French varieties, in particular with children. It is a soft pale cheese with a rich full-bodied flavour and smooth creamy and quite rubbery texture. Its aroma is generated by the cheese's bright tangerine-orange soft rind. The rind appears after several washings of the crust, along with brushing with some ferments. Maturation of the Chaumes takes four weeks. It is used as a table cheese and also for grilling. It is also available in limited markets around France as a spreadable cream cheese, "Chaumes la Crème".
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Fine Fettle Yorkshire Cheese

    Fine Fettle Yorkshire Cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Fine Fettle Yorkshire (formerly Yorkshire Feta) is a British cheese made from the milk of sheep produced in North Yorkshire by Shepherds Purse Cheeses. The owner, Judy Bell, was forced to change the cheese's name after an EU ruling meant that all Feta cheese must be produced in Greece, its country of origin.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Handkäse

    Handkäse

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Handkäse (pronounced [ˈhantkɛːzə]; literally: hand cheese) is a German regional sour milk cheese (similar to Harzer) and is a culinary speciality of Frankfurt am Main, Offenbach am Main, Darmstadt, Langen and all other parts of southern Hesse. It gets its name from the traditional way of producing it: forming it with one's own hands. It is a small, translucent, yellow cheese with a pungent aroma that many people find unpleasant. It is sometimes square, but more often round in shape. Often served as an appetizer or as a snack with Apfelwein (aka Ebbelwoi), it is traditionally topped with chopped onions, locally known as "Handkäse mit Musik" (literally: hand cheese with music). It is usually eaten with caraway on it (as seen in the first picture). Since many people in Germany do not like this spice, in many areas it is served on the side. Some Hessians say that it is a sign of the quality of the establishment when caraway is in a separate dispenser. As a sign of this many restaurants have, in addition to the salt and pepper, a little pot for caraway seeds. Strangers to this custom will probably ask where the "Musik" is. They will most likely be told that "Die Musik kommt später,"
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Hoop cheese

    Hoop cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Hoop cheese is a firm, dry white cheese (queso blanco), different from cottage cheese, and similar to farmer’s cheese, in that most of the liquid is pressed out. It is different from farmer’s cheese in that farmer’s cheese is made with milk, cream and salt, while hoop cheese is made from milk alone. Hoop cheese is difficult to find commercially in the United States, due to the difficulty of automating the manufacturing process. It was once so popular, however, that a device called a hoop cheese cutter was manufactured and used in general stores during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This object resembled a turntable with a knife blade suspended above it. It was built by scale companies of the period to cut the exact amount of cheese the customer wanted. Hoop cheese can be found at many small restaurants and independent gas stations and grocers throughout the south.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Prästost

    Prästost

    • Country Of Origin: Sweden
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Prästost ("priest cheese", sometimes spelled prastost or prestost) is a Swedish cheese with historical roots in Sweden's one-time custom of paying tithes with agricultural goods including milk. It was common for the church to make cheese from this milk from the 16th though 19th centuries. Today, this style of cheese once produced in churches across Sweden is factory-made from pasteurized cow's milk. Prästost is sometimes soaked or cured in whisky or other spirits; Saaland Pfarr is one such whisky-soaked variant. A version of prästost aged for 12 months and cured in Absolut vodka has been marketed as VODCheese. A 1969 USDA booklet describes the manufacturing technique for one whisky-cured style of prästost:
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Reggianito

    Reggianito

    • Country Of Origin: Argentina
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Reggianito is a very hard, granular, cows' milk cheese from Argentina whose origins lie with immigrant Italians who wished to make a cheese reminiscent of their native Parmigiano Reggiano. The name—the Spanish diminutive of "Reggiano"—refers to the fact that the cheese is produced in small 6.8 kg wheels, rather than the huge Parmigiano-Reggiano drums. The cheese, which is rather saltier than its Italian parent, is generally used for cooking or for grating over pasta dishes. The aging period of 5–6 months, although longer than that of any other South American hard cheese, is shorter than that of Parmigiano-Reggiano. In the years following World War I, Italian cheese makers recognized Reggianito as a serious competitor in the export market and this fact was instrumental in the setting up the Parmigiano-Reggiano consortium. In the United States, it is often sold as Parmesan.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Yarg

    Yarg

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
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    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Muenster cheese

    Muenster cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Muenster is a cheese from the United States, not to be confused with the French variety, Munster. The name Muenster is derived from an English transliteration of Münster, a city in Germany. The original name of the French cheese comes from Alsatian abbey of Munster in the Vosgian mountains. Munster translates as "monastery", altered from Latin monasterium. Its taste is comparable to that of both typical white American cheese and a sharp jack cheese. Muenster is a smooth textured cheese with an orange rind and a white interior. This washed-rind cheese is made from cows’ milk. The orange color is derived from vegetable coloring. It usually has a very mild flavor and smooth, soft texture. In some cases, when properly aged, it can develop a strong flavor with a pungent aroma. This cheese is commonly served as an appetizer. Because it melts well, it is also often used in dishes such as grilled cheese sandwiches, tuna melts, quesadillas, cheeseburgers, macaroni and cheese, and pizza. American versions are sold younger, and with a weaker taste, than European versions.
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    Bayley Hazen Blue

    Bayley Hazen Blue

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-firm
    Bayley Hazen Blue Bayley Hazen Blue is a buttery, natural-rind cow milk blue cheese that is made with whole raw milk. The milk used is primarily from morning milk, which tends to be lower in fat. The milk is taken from their own herd of Ayreshire cows who graze from late spring to early fall. Bayley Hazen Blue is drier than most blues, and the penicillium roqueforti takes a back seat to an array of flavors that hint at nuts and grasses and sometimes licorice. Bayley Hazen Blue won a 2nd place ribbon at the American Cheese Society 2005 Competition in Louisville, KY. Farm/Company: Jasper Hill Cheesemaker: Mateo and Andy Kehler Proprietor:   Affineur:   City, State: Greensboro, Vermont Region: Northeast Country: USA Milk: Pasteurized Cow Rennet: Traditional Rind: Natural Texture: Semi-firm Aging: 3-4 months Size(s): 7 pound wheel
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Geitost

    Geitost

    • Country Of Origin: Norway
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Brunost or mysost (Norwegian), or mesost (Swedish), mysuostur (Icelandic), myseost (Danish) or Braunkäse (German) is a caramelised brown Scandinavian whey cheese. The Norwegian and German names mean brown cheese, and the others mean simply whey cheese. Another variant, made using goat milk, is referred to and sold as geitost (Norwegian for goat cheese) or sometimes elsewhere as gjetost (an older Dano-Norwegian spelling no longer used in Norway). Geitost is made from a mixture of goat's and cow's milk, and ekte geitost (real geitost) is made with goat's milk only. Brunost is made by boiling a mixture of milk, cream and whey carefully for several hours so that the water evaporates. The heat turns the milk sugar into caramel which gives the cheese its characteristic colour and taste. It is ready for consumption as soon as it is packed in suitable sized blocks. A low-fat variant is made by increasing the proportion of whey to milk and cream. If boiled for a shorter time, the soft, spreadable version called prim in Norwegian (or messmör in Swedish and mysingur in Icelandic), similar to dulce de leche, is produced. Prim had been made in Norway for a long time when Anne Haav (Anne Hov in
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Granular cheese

    Granular cheese

    Granular cheese, also known as stirred curd cheese and hard cheese, is a type of cheese produced by repeatedly stirring and draining a mixture of curd and whey. It can refer to a wide variety of cheeses, including the grana cheeses such as Parmigiano-Reggiano (at right) and various others. Many types are commonly used in the production of processed cheese, especially American cheese, which by law must consist of Cheddar cheese, Colby cheese, cheese curd, or granular cheese. In the United States, the FDA mandates certain qualifications for something to be called granular cheese. The maximum allowed moisture content is 39 percent, and the minimum allowed milkfat content is 50 percent by weight of the solids. Regular granular cheese must either use pasteurized dairy products or be cured for at least 60 days at a temperature of at least 35 °F. Either cows' milk or cream may be used as the main ingredient. Other permissible ingredients include clotting enzymes such as rennet, coloring, calcium chloride as a coagulation aid, enzymes used in curing, hydrogen peroxide, and agents used to protect against fungi. The name granular cheese can encompass many types of cheeses; for example,
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Huntsman cheese

    Huntsman cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Huntsman is a brand of Stilchester, which is a combination of the English cheeses, Blue Stilton and Double Gloucester. The two types of cheese are combined in alternating layers. Layering is by hand. Huntsman is made by Long Clawson Dairy in Long Clawson, near Melton Mowbray. It is a trademarked name.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Pecorino

    Pecorino

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Pecorino is the name of a family of hard Italian cheeses made from ewe's milk. The word derives from pecora meaning ‘sheep’, also from the Latin pecora meaning livestock. Of the four main varieties of Pecorino, all of which have Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status under European Union law, Pecorino Romano is probably the best known outside Italy, especially in the United States which has been an important export market for the cheese since the 19th century. Most Pecorino Romano is produced on the island of Sardinia, though its production is also allowed in Lazio and in the Tuscan Province of Grosseto. The other three mature PDO cheeses are the Pecorino Sardo from Sardinia; Pecorino Toscano, whose production was already attested by Pliny the Elder in the Natural History; and Pecorino Siciliano (or Picurinu Sicilianu in Sicilian) from Sicily. All come in a variety of styles depending on how long they have been aged. The more matured cheeses, referred to as stagionato ("seasoned" or "aged" ), are harder but still crumbly in texture and have decidedly buttery and nutty flavours. The other two types semi-stagionato and fresco have a softer texture and milder cream and milk
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Sainte-Maure de Touraine

    Sainte-Maure de Touraine

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Sainte-Maure de Touraine is a French cheese produced in the province of Touraine, mainly in the department of Indre-et-Loire. It is named after the small town of Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine, in the department of Indre-et-Loire, at equal distance from westly Chinon and eastly Loches. Sainte-Maure de Touraine is an unpasteurized cheese made from goat's whole milk. It has the form of a small log, around 16–17 cm in length, and weighs at least 250 g. It is white and soft under a greyish mouldy rind. A remarkable feature is the straw through its centre, marked by the AOC seal and a number indicating the producer. The straw is used, in the making, to keep the roll together. The finished cheese has 45% milkfat. Protected since 1990 by the AOC Seal, Sainte-Maure de Touraine is made with traditional methods. It should not be confused with "Sainte-Maure", also produced in Touraine, but without meeting the stringent AOC production criteria. "Sainte-Maure" is the industrial counterpart of the high-quality, traditionally made, Sainte-Maure de Touraine. Their straw is not marked by a seal, thus differentiating them from AOC cheeses. 1,065 tons of Sainte-Maure de Touraine were produced in 2003, 58%
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Sbrinz

    Sbrinz

    • Country Of Origin: Switzerland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Sbrinz is a very hard cheese produced in central Switzerland. It is often used instead of Parmesan cheese in Swiss cuisine. The cheese is produced in only 42 dairies in central Switzerland. Only local cow's milk is used when producing this cheese. It is kept in the region until ready for consumption. Contrary to popular belief, the name Sbrinz does not originally refer to a particular place or region. Nevertheless, the Swiss Cheese Union added to this myth by launching an advertising campaign in the 1990s. As a result of this campaign, there is now an area called Sbrinz. Sbrinz is an extra hard full fat cheese. It contains approximately 40% to 45% of fat when dry. The cheese must ripen for 16 months before it can be sold as Sbrinz, and the full flavour only develops after about 24–30 months in storage. Sbrinz is claimed to be the oldest European cheese. The Celtic ancestors of the Swiss were making cheese centuries before the recorded birth of Christ; this cheese may have been an ancestor to modern Sbrinz. The official web site claims that the cheese was first mentioned in 70 AD, but does not give any details. Other sources claim that the cheese is mentioned in contracts dated
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    String cheese

    String cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Several different types of cheese are known as string cheese. It is peelable and when peeled, it does so in strings or strips from the larger cheese. In Slovakia, a traditional string cheese called korbáčiky is made which is a salty sheep milk cheese, available smoked or unsmoked. It is traditionally made by hand-pulling steamed sheep's cheese into strings and braiding them. Machine milk versions are also available. In Armenia, traditional string cheese is made with a white base. The type of milk used usually comes from an aged goat or sheep depending upon the production methods of the area of choice. It includes black cumin and a middle-eastern spice known as mahleb, and it comes in the form of a braided endless loop. The cheese forms strings because of the way it is pulled during processing. There is also Syrian cheese processed this way. Other cheeses are only cut and pressed, not pulled, and don't develop strings. Cheese strings became a popular snack in Europe in the early 1990s. They are made from processed cheese by Kerry Group and the mascot is a cartoon character called Mr Strings. The original advert had a theme tune based on the popular song "Bend Me, Shape Me" but with
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Cathare

    Cathare

    • Country Of Origin: France
    Cathare is a goat's milk cheese from the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France. The cheese comes in flat discs whose face is covered in charcoal powder with the Occitan cross inscribed. Under the rind, Cathare is pure white with a soft, creamy texture. Its goat-milk flavor intensifies as it ages, and reaches its prime after two to three weeks, which makes it typically unavailable in the United States, due to the Food and Drug Administration's stance that raw milk soft cheeses can pose as a health risk. The sale of raw milk cheese aged under 60 days is illegal in the United States.
    4.67
    3 votes
    203
    Bocconcini

    Bocconcini

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Water Buffalo
    Bocconcini (Italian pronunciation: [ˌbokkonˈtʃiːni]) (singular Bocconcino, [ˌbokkonˈtʃiːno]) are small mozzarella cheeses the size of an egg. Like other mozzarellas, they are semi-soft, white and rindless unripened mild cheeses which originated in Naples and were once made only from milk of water buffaloes. Nowadays they are usually made from a combination of water buffalo and cow's milk. Bocconcini are packaged in whey or water, have a spongy texture and absorb flavours. This cheese is described by its Italian name which means small mouthfuls. It is made in the pasta filata manner by dipping curds into hot whey, and kneading, pulling and stretching. Each cheese is about the size, shape and colour of a hardboiled egg: indeed an alternative name used is Uova di bufala, or “Buffalo eggs”. Baby ("bambini") bocconcini can also be purchased; these are a smaller version about the size of large grapes. Bocconcini of water buffalo’s milk are still produced in the provinces of Naples, Caserta and Salerno, as bocconcini alla panna di bufala, in a process which involves mixing freshly made Mozzarella di Bufala Campana DOP with fresh cream. A Bocconcino di Bufala Campana DOP is also made,
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Castelo Branco cheese

    Castelo Branco cheese

    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Castelo Branco (Portuguese: Queijo de Castelo Branco) is a cheese named after the city of the same name in Portugal, the chief city of the district where it is produced. The cheese is made from milk produced by either a goat or a ewe, and has a soft texture. Typically, the cheese takes 40 days to mature when made with goat's milk, and 50 days when made with ewe's milk. The fat content is around 45% and the cheese is usually a close-to-white colour. Cheeses sometimes also known as Castelo Branco cheese:
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Green cheese

    Green cheese

    Green cheese is a name applied to several varieties of cheese that are green in colour. The term was first used in English to mean fresh cheese, not thoroughly dried. The Oxford English Dictionary gives a reference from the year 1542 of the four sorts of cheese. The first sort is green cheese, it tells the reader, not green by reason of colour but for its newness, for the whey is not half pressed out of it as yet. Green cheese varieties include: There are many other cheeses which are wholly or partly green in colour due to the addition of herbs. The veins of most so-called blue cheeses, such as gorgonzola, maytag, roquefort, or stilton are in fact green. It is sometimes fancifully claimed that the Moon is made of green cheese. Also there is a popular saying in Scotland 'You can't see green cheese'. This means that you must have whatever someone else has just for the sake of having it. For example a child's friend may get a bike and although the child is unable to ride a bike they will pester their parents to buy one. John Maynard Keynes made a mysterious reference to green cheese in his General Theory: Exactly what Keynes meant is still a topic for discussion in economics.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Pasta filata

    Pasta filata

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    Pasta filata (Italian: "spun paste") is a technique in the manufacture of a family of Italian cheeses also known in English as stretched-curd, pulled-curd, and plastic-curd cheeses. Stretched curd cheeses manufactured from the pasta filata technique are distinguished by "a unique plasticising and kneading treatment of the fresh curd in hot water, which imparts the finished cheese its characteristic fibrous structure and melting and stretching properties.' The cheese-making begins in the normal way. The milk (usually from cows or water buffalo) is warmed and curdled and allowed to rest for an hour before the curds are cut into small pieces and the whey is drained off. The curds are allowed to rest for a number of hours. Then follows the filatura. The curds are steeped for some hours in a bath of very hot whey, or water (for Mozzarella di Bufala Campana the temperature is 95 °C). When they begin to float most of the liquid is removed and the curd is mixed and kneaded until the required soft, elastic, stringy texture is obtained. The mass of curd is divided (often by pulling out a thick strand and chopping it) and shaped into individual cheeses. In the case of mozzarella or fior di
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Blanca Bianca

    Blanca Bianca

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft
    Blanca Bianca

    While spending time in Perugia, Italy, Paula Lambert became enamored of Italian cheese, specifically fresh mozzarella. Once back home in Dallas, Texas, Lambert realized that she would be unable to get her hands or mouth on quality mozzarella unless she made it herself. Thus, twenty-four years ago, Paula Lambert's Mozzarella Company was born. Using milk from local dairies, Mozzarella Company now produces a wide variety of specialty cheeses.

    With a golden rind that formed after a daily massage of white wine, Blanca Bianca is creamy and luscious with a subtle fruitiness. Farm/Company: Mozzarella Company Cheesemaker:   Proprietor:   Affineur: Paula Lambert City, State: Dallas, Texas Region: South Country: USA Milk: Raw Cow Rennet:   Rind: Washed Texture: Soft Aging: 60 days Size(s):  

    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Weisslacker

    Weisslacker

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Weisslacker (German for "whitewashed" due to the rind color) or Beer cheese is a type of cow's milk cheese that originated in Germany, but is now known worldwide. Also produced in the United States, mostly in Wisconsin, it is a pungent and salted surface-ripened cheese that starts out much like brick cheese. It ripens for seven months in highly humid conditions and is related to Limburger cheese, and has a similarly powerful smell, but paradoxically mild taste. Connoisseurs of this delicacy often take it with beer (sometimes dipping the cheese directly in their drinks), hence the name. Many find it too overpowering to serve with wine. This cheese is also served on small slices of rye or pumpernickel bread often with some sliced onion. It is a common item on pub and restaurant menus in the Czech Republic, the country with the highest per-capita beer consumption in the world. Weisslacker is also known as bierkäse, bierkaese, beer kaese and beer cheese. This cheese is a common ingredient in various breads, soups, and dips.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Bleu de Bresse

    Bleu de Bresse

    • Country Of Origin: France
    Bleu de Bresse (French pronunciation: [blø d(ə) bʁɛs] is a blue cheese that was first made in the Bresse area of France following World War II. Made from whole milk, it has a firm, edible coating which is characteristically white in color and has an aroma of mushrooms. Its creamy interior, similar in texture to Brie, contains patches of blue mold. It is shaped into cylindrical rounds weighing from 125 to 500 grams. The curds, inoculated with Penicillium roqueforti, are placed into a perforated mold. After it has formed the desired shape and removed from the mold, the cheese is salted, turned, drained, and covered with pulverized Penicillium camemberti to form the outer coating. Bleu de Bresse originated in 1951 by an agricultural cooperative near Servoz in response to the growing popularity of Italian cheeses. The small packaged rounds were an innovation for the retail market at the time.
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Bel Paese cheese

    Bel Paese cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Bel Paese (Italian pronunciation: [bɛl paˈeːze]) is a semi-soft Italian cheese. It was invented in 1906 by Egidio Galbani who wanted to produce a mild and delicate cheese to sell mainly in Italy. The name Bel Paese comes from the title of a book written by Antonio Stoppani. It is Italian for "Beautiful Country". Originally produced in Melzo, a small village near Milan in the Lombardy region, it is now made in both Italy and the United States. Bel Paese is a cow's milk cheese. It matures for six to eight weeks, and has a creamy and light milky aroma. The color is a pale, creamy yellow. It is made in small discs, and is very similar to the French Saint-Paulin cheese and to German Butterkäse. It has a mild, buttery flavor for which it has been popularly eaten with fruity wines, such as dry red or white. It is favored by many as a snack or dessert cheese and melts easily for use on pizzas or in casseroles. It is often used as a substitute for mozzarella cheese. Genuine bel paese cheese can be determined by the wrapping. It has an image of the Italian geologist and paleontologist Antonio Stoppani, whose geological treatise Il bel paese gave its name to the Galbani cheese; but while on
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Bermuda Triangle

    Bermuda Triangle

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    • Texture: semi-soft
    Bermuda Triangle

    Mary Keehn got started on the goat cheese trail in the 1970s when she decided to raise Alpine goats as a source of healthful milk for her children. Not too long after, Mary started receiving awards for her herd and became recognized as an expert in the field. Blessed with an excess of milk from fifty goats, Mary started making cheese in 1983.

    Situated where the giant redwoods kiss the Pacific Ocean in the rugged northernmost reaches of Humboldt County, California, Cypress Grove Creamery gets unique inspiration from the salt-etched voluminous fog that coolly rolls in nearly every day.

    One of the more unique aged cheeses you'll come across, Bermuda Triangle is a six-inch long triangular prism of pure white goat cheese. Bermuda Triangle's distinctive double rind -- one of ash covered by a layer of velvety white bloom -- encourages a firm, smooth interior. Farm/Company: Cypress Grove Cheesemaker: Mary Keehn Proprietor: Mary Keehn Affineur:   City, State: McKinleyville, California Region: West Country: USA Milk: Pasteurized Goat Rennet: Vegetarian Rind: White mold, with ash Texture: Soft Aging: 2 weeks Size(s): 14 ounces

    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Greve cheese

    Greve cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Sweden
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Grevé is Swedish cow's milk cheese, similar to Emmental. Its fat content is 30-45%. It was first produced in 1964 in Örnsköldsvik.
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Red Windsor cheese

    Red Windsor cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Red Windsor is a pale cream, English cheddar cheese, made using pasteurized cow's milk marbled with a wine, often a Bordeaux wine or a blend of port wine and brandy.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Roncal cheese

    Roncal cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Roncal (Erronkariko gazta in Basque) is a hard, creamy sheep milk cheese. It is made in one of seven villages in the Valle de Roncal of Spain. Roncal enjoys PDO status.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Saint-Nectaire

    Saint-Nectaire

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Saint-Nectaire is a French cheese made in the Auvergne region of central France. The cheese has been made in Auvergne since at least the 17th century. Its name comes from the Marshal of Senneterre (a linguistic corruption of "Saint-Nectaire"), who served it at the table of Louis XIV. The Marshal of Senneterre is also responsible for the introduction of Cantal and Salers. Saint-Nectaire is a pressed, uncooked cheese made from cow's milk, mainly of Holstein and Montbéliarde and sometimes Salers. It is circular in shape, around 21 cm in diameter and 5 cm in height, and weighing around 1.7 kg. A smaller version called Petit Saint-Nectaire is also made, measuring 13 cm in diameter, and weighing around 600 g. Both are made from either pasteurized or unpasteurized milk. It is the first "farmer" AOC cheese in France with 6.000 tons produced each year. The finished cheese has a grey/brown rind, with white, yellow or red patches that surround a semi-hard pâte that is creamy in appearance with occasional residual holes. This dense cheese has a silky texture with soft acidity, and its taste is similar to that of Reblochon, with hints of hazelnut and mushrooms, due to the aromatic flora where
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Tilsit cheese

    Tilsit cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Germany
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Tilsit cheese or Tilsiter cheese is a light yellow semi-hard smear-ripened cheese, created in the mid-19th century by Prussian-Swiss settlers, the Westphal family, from the Emmental valley. The original buildings from the cheese plant still exist in Sovetsk, Russia, formerly Tilsit, on the Neman River in East Prussia. The same ingredients to make the cheese were not available as in their home country and the cheese became colonized by different molds, yeasts, and bacteria in the humid climate. The result was a cheese that was more intense and full flavoured. The settlers named the cheese after Tilsit, the Prussian town they settled at. Tilsiter has a medium-firm texture with irregular holes or cracks. Commercially produced Tilsiter is made from pasteurized cow's milk, ranges from 30 to 60 percent milk fat and has a dark yellow rind. After the main part of its production, the cheese needs to rest for an additional 2 months. Often flavoured with caraway seed and peppercorns, Tilsiter is a complement to hearty brown/rye breads and dark beers. It is a common table cheese, yet versatile. Tilsit can be eaten cubed in salads, melted in sauces, on potatoes, flans, or burgers. Using the
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Bergenost

    Bergenost

    Bergenost is A triple-cream, Norwegian-style butter cheese made by Yancey's Fancy of Corfu, New York using imported Norwegian cultures. This cheese won the company a gold medal in the 1999 New York State Fair Cheese Contest. It is sold in wedges with a distinctive green wax casing. Bergenost is a semi-soft cheese with a mild, smooth flavor and a subtle hint of sourness. The flavor of the cheese makes it a great complement to the tart sweetness of lingonberry, another Norwegian favorite.
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    Cantal

    Cantal

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Cantal cheese is a firm cheese from the Cantal region of France. It is named after the Cantal mountains in the Auvergne region. Cantal obtained its Appellation d'Origine in 1956. One of the oldest cheeses in France, Cantal dates back to the times of the Gauls. It came to prominence when marshal Henri de La Ferté-Senneterre served it at the table of Louis XIV of France. Senneterre is also responsible for the introduction of Saint-Nectaire and Salers. There are two types of Cantal cheese. Cantal Fermier is a farmhouse cheese made of raw milk. Cantal Laitier is the commercial, mass-produced version from pasteurized milk; both have to adhere to the same strict quality controls. Cantal is shaped like a cylinder, and is one foot in diameter. Cantal is made from raw or pasteurized cow's milk of the Salers breed. For Cantal, the milk of cows that are fed on hay (during 15 November to 15 April) is used; the summer milk of the same cows grazing on mountain meadows makes the Salers cheese. This semi-hard cheese is aged for several months. The form is massive, and the cheese has a soft interior. Its flavor, which is somewhat reminiscent of Cheddar, is a strong, tangy butter taste and grows
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Etorki

    Etorki

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Etorki is a cheese made in the French Basque country, at Mauléon-Licharre in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department. It is made from pasteurized sheep milk and pulp pressed, not cooked, then matured for seven weeks. It has a cylindrical shape about 25 cm in diameter and 11 cm in height. It is available throughout the year. For those allergic to cow's milk, Etorki can be substituted for Gouda or Cheddar when cooking with cheese.
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Kesong puti

    Kesong puti

    Kesong puti (lit. "white cheese" in Filipino) or Philippine fresh cheese is a soft, white cheese, similar to cottage cheese, made from unskimmed carabao's milk, salt and rennet. It has a soft, close texture and slight salty taste. Some commercial versions are slightly sour due to the use of vinegar in place of rennet. This cheese originated from and is produced in the provinces of Bulacan, Cebu, Laguna and Samar. In the Philippines, it is a popular breakfast fare eaten with the freshly baked local bread called pan de sal.
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Leyden cheese

    Leyden cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Leyden, from Dutch: Leidse kaas, is a yellow cumin spiced cheese made in the Netherlands from semi-skimmed cow's milk. It is made both in factories and on farms, historically in the Leiden area. Leidse kaas is the most common type of komijnekaas - cheese including cumin as an ingredient - in the Netherlands. The cheese is round and flat like Gouda, but it is made with sharp edges on one side and less roundness to its side. More importantly, it has a lower fat percentage (30 to 40%). Weight of the cheese varies from 3 kg to 9 kg. On the farms, about 5% of buttermilk may be added to the milk, and it is set with rennet at a temperature of 82 to 86°F (28 to 30°C). About 30 minutes later, the curd is cut with a harp, stirred, and warmed to about 92°F (33°C) by pouring in hot whey. The curd is dipped with a cloth and kneaded. Cumin seeds are added to a portion of the curd, and the curd is then put into cloth-lined hoops in three layers, with the spiced curd as the middle layer. The cheese is pressed for about three hours, then it is redressed, inverted, and again pressed overnight. It may be salted with dry salt, or it may be immersed in a brine bath. It is cured in a cool, moist cellar.
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Pepperjack cheese

    Pepperjack cheese

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Pepper jack cheese is a derivative of Monterey Jack that includes spicy hot peppers for flavor. Spicy, delicate and buttery, pepper jack cheese is semi-soft and open textured with a slightly tart flavor. The cheese is often used in dishes such as quesadillas, and is also popular eaten with crackers or on hamburgers. A variation of pepper jack cheese involves using specific peppers. The most common varieties of this specific-pepper jack cheese are jalapeño jack and habanero jack, but other varieties are available.
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Requeijão

    Requeijão

    • Country Of Origin: Brazil
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Requeijão is a milk-derived product, produced in Portugal and Brazil. It is sometimes called Requesón (the Spanish word for ricotta). It is a loose, ricotta-like cheese used to make cheese spreads. A mild, unsalty ricotta can be substituted. This variety is most often sold in the markets wrapped in fresh corn husks. In El Salvador, cheeses such as requesón can sometimes be transported wrapped in banana leaves instead of corn husks. The Portuguese product is white to yellowish-white, solid, and usually having a characteristic strong taste; typically sold in specially designed draining plastic or basket-like weaved containers, or in plastic cups. The Brazilian product is a type of cream cheese white in color (but not similar to the American notion of cream cheese, and may be better understood as "creamy cheese"). It has a mild taste and its consistency can vary from solid to creamy. Traditionally associated with the state of Minas Gerais, nowadays it is produced all over the country. Its most common variant is requeijão cremoso, very creamy in consistency; usually sold in glasses or plastic cups. Skim milk is held until lactic acid bacteria acidify and coagulate its proteins. The
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Saint-André cheese

    Saint-André cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Soft
    Saint-andré is a high (~75%) milk-fat, triple crème cow's milk French cheese in a powdery white, bloomy skin of mold. Traditionally crafted in Coutances, in the Normandy region of northwestern France, the cheese is also made internationally from both raw and pasteurized milk. It has a soft buttery texture, tangy edible rind, and tastes like an intense version of Brie. Extra heavy cream is added to the cheese during manufacture, and the curing process last approximately 30 days. A wheel of Saint-André is smaller and shaped higher than the familiar flat wheel of Brie. It is sold all around the world. The cheese is highly perishable and should be consumed within a week of its purchase. The fat content of Saint-andré is so exceptionally high it can make a white wine taste sour and metallic: a crust of baguette and a light beer or simply a slice of pear are often suggested as better complements.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Tomme cheese

    Tomme cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    Tomme (French pronunciation: [tɔm]) is a type of cheese, and is a generic name given to a class of cheese produced mainly in the French Alps and in Switzerland. Tommes are normally produced from the skim milk left over after the cream has been removed to produce butter and richer cheeses, or when there is too little milk to produce a full cheese. As a result, they are generally low in fat. There are many varieties of Tommes, which are usually identified by their place of origin. The most famous of these is Tomme de Savoie. Other Tommes include Tomme Boudane, Tomme au Fenouil, Tomme de Crayeuse, Tomme d'Aydius, Tomme de Grandmère, Tomme Affinée, and Tomme du Revard. Tomme de Montagne is a collective term for the upland varieties, e.g. Tomme de Savoie but not Tomme de Beaujolais. Tomme is traditionally used to make aligot and truffade, two Auvergnat dishes combining melted cheese and mashed or sautéed potatoes.
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Anthotyros cheese

    Anthotyros cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Greece
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Anthotyros (Greek: Ανθότυρος) (or Anthotyro in modern Greek), is a traditional, unpasteurized fresh cheese. There are two types of Anthotyros, the Dry Anthotyros and the Fresh Anthotyros. The Dry Anthotyros is a matured variant of Mizithra. It is made with milk and whey from sheep and/or goats. The ratio of milk to whey usually is 9 to 1. It is made in various sizes and shapes, most commonly a truncated cone. Anthotyros is made from raw whey and/or goat milk. The milk is boiled for at moderate temperature for 10 minutes and then rennet and salt is added, while ruffling. The mix is left in large shallow tanks resulting in a part skim mixture. The following day, salt is added to the mix which is then poured into α basket with tulle inside and is left to drain. Salt is added every day for another 3–4 days. At this stage, the cheese is still fresh but not as soft as many may imply. If left to mature, thick salt is often added to cover the exterior. Anthotyros is produced in most parts of Greece, more commonly in Thrace, Macedonia, the Ionian Islands and Crete. The Fresh Variant is soft/medium in hardness, dry and white, with a sweet, creamy taste and has no rind and no salt. It is
    0.00
    0 votes
    227
    Bleu d'Auvergne

    Bleu d'Auvergne

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: semi-hard
    Bleu d'Auvergne is a French blue cheese, named for its place of origin in the Auvergne region of south-central France. It is made from cow's milk, and is one of the cheeses granted the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée from the French government. Bleu d'Auvergne is of relatively recent origin, discovered in the mid-1850s by a French cheesemaker named Antoine Roussel. Roussel noted that the occurrence of blue molds on his curd resulted in an agreeable taste, and conducted experiments to determine how veins of such mold could be induced. After several failed tests, Roussel discovered that the application of rye bread mold created the veining, and that pricking the curd with a needle provided increased aeration. It allowed the mold to enter the curd and encouraged its growth. Subsequently, his discovery and techniques spread throughout the region. Today, bleu d'Auvergne is prepared via mechanical needling processes. It is then aged for approximately four weeks in cool, wet cellars before distribution, a relatively short period for blue cheeses. Bleu d'Auvergne has a strong and pungent taste, but to a lesser extent than other blue cheeses; it is less salted, with a creamier and more
    0.00
    0 votes
    228
    Blue Castello

    Blue Castello

    • Country Of Origin: Denmark
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Triple cream
    Castello is a tradename for a range of cheeses produced by Arla Foods amba, an agricultural marketing cooperative based in Denmark. Worldwide, a variety of cheeses are marketed under the Castello name, including semi-soft cheeses, semi-hard cheeses, blue cheeses, and cream cheeses. For the European market, Castello markets soft ripened cheeses called Golden and White; Organic Brie; semi-hard cheeses Herrgård and Prast; blue cheeses Black, Creamy Blue, Danablu, Danablu Gold, Organic Blue, Organic Mild; and a line of cream cheeses. For the North American market, Castello markets a camembert, a brie, and several varieties of blue cheese, named Mellow Blue Cheese, Noble Blue Cheese, Extra Creamy Blue (also available sliced), Crumbled Blue Cheese, and Traditional Blue Cheese. In some markets, the name Blue Castello is used for a triple-cream blue cow's milk cheese. The Tholstrup cheese company was established in 1893 by Rasmus Tholstrup of Denmark. Castello blue cheeses were developed in the 1960s; the washed rind hosts various moulds that add to the cheese's mildly spicy flavour. It has a smooth, rich texture much like Brie. Castello de Rosenborg Cheese
    0.00
    0 votes
    229
    Boursin

    Boursin

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Boursin [buʁsɛ̃] is a trademarked brand of Gournay cheese. It is a soft creamy cheese available in a variety of flavours, with a flavor and texture somewhat similar to cream cheese. Boursin cheese was first developed in 1963 by François Boursin in Normandy, and at one time was produced exclusively in Croisy-sur-Eure, France, by the Boursin company. Groupe Bel purchased Boursin in November 2007 for 400 million euros. The cheese is also produced in the United States for North American distribution by Unilever. The brand was advertised on television in the United Kingdom and France using the slogan: "Du pain, du vin, du Boursin" (English: "Some bread, some wine, some Boursin").
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Burrata

    Burrata

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Water Buffalo
    Burrata is a fresh Italian cheese, made from mozzarella and cream. The outer shell is solid mozzarella while the inside contains both mozzarella and cream, giving it an unusual, soft texture. It is also defined by some sources as an outer shell of mozzarella filled with butter or a mixture of butter and sugar. It is usually served fresh, at room temperature. The name "burrata" means "buttered" in Italian. Burrata is a typical product of the Murgie in Puglia, a region in the south of Italy. It is produced from cow's milk, rennet and cream. Burrata was probably first made around 1920 or possibly 1900 on the Bianchini farm in the city of Andria in Murgia, an area in the Apulia region. In the 1950s, it became more widely available after a few of the local cheese factories began producing it. Generally it is believed that factories found it a way to utilize the ritagli ("scraps" or "rags") of mozzarella. Established as an artisanal cheese, Burrata maintained its premium-product status even after it began to be made in a number of factories throughout Apulia. Burrata starts out much like mozzarella and many other cheeses, with rennet used to curdle the warm milk. But then, unlike other
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    Cheez Whiz

    Cheez Whiz

    • Country Of Origin: United States of America
    Cheez Whiz is a thick processed cheese sauce or spread sold by Kraft Foods. It was developed by a team led by food scientist Edwin Traisman (1915–2007) and was first marketed in 1953. The bright yellow, viscous paste usually comes in a glass jar and is used as a topping for cheesesteaks, corn chips, hot dogs and other foods. It is marketed in Canada, Mexico, the Philippines, the United States and Venezuela. Cheez Whiz is one of a number of "processed cheese foods", a category including some types of individually-wrapped cheese slices. These products contain regular cheese that has been reprocessed along with additional ingredients such as emulsifiers and stabilizing agents, such as xanthan gum or carrageenan. These products derive their tanginess and flavor from additional ingredients such as citric acid and flavoring compounds. Annatto is used for coloring. In some markets, the product has been sold in a narrow jar that tapered towards the base when sold as a spread. When Cheez Whiz is advertised as a dip or a sauce, the jars are larger and more of a squat cylindrical shape. Varieties include: Cheez Whiz can also be found in "Handi Snacks" products such as Ritz Cheez Whiz 'n'
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    232
    Churpee

    Churpee

    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Chhurpi( Nepali: छुर्पी ) is a traditional cheese consumed in the Himalayan region. There are two varieties of chhurpi - soft variety (consumed as a side dish with rice) and hard variety (chewed like a betel nut). Chhurpi is prepared in a local dairy or at home from buttermilk. The buttermilk is boiled and the solid mass that is obtained is separated from the liquid and wrapped and hung in a thin cloth to drain out the water. The product is rather like the Italian riccota, which also is got from whey. It is soft, white and neutral in taste. However, it is often left to ferment a bit to acquire a tangy taste. To prepare the hard variety, the soft chhurpi is wrapped in a jute bag and pressed hard to get rid of the water. After it dries, it is cut into small cuboidal pieces and hung over fire to harden it further. The soft chhurpi is used in a variety of ways. It is used with green vegetables as savoury dishes, as filling for momos, ground with tomatoes and chillies for a tangy chutney or made into a refreshing soup. Dry chhurpi is usually consumed by being kept in the mouth to moisten it, letting parts of its become soft, then chewing it like gum. In this manner, one block of Chhurpi
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    233
    Fourme de Montbrison

    Fourme de Montbrison

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Fourme de Montbrison is a cow's-milk cheese made in the regions of Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne in southern France. It derives its name from the town of Montbrison in the Loire department. The word fourme is derived from the Latin word forma meaning "shape", the same root from which the French word fromage is believed to have been derived. The cheese is manufactured in tall cylindrical blocks weighing between 1.5 and 2 kilograms. The blocks are 13 centimetres in diameter and 19 centimetres tall, although the cheese is most frequently sold in shops in much shorter cylindrical slices. Fourme de Montbrison has a characteristic orange-brown rind with a creamy-coloured pâte, speckled with gentle streaks of blue mould. Its Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée status was granted in 1972 under a joint decree with Fourme d'Ambert, a similar blue cheese also from the same region. In 2002 the two cheeses received AOC status in their own right, recognizing the differences in their manufacture. With a musty scent, the cheese is extremely mild for a blue cheese and has a dry taste. The curd is salted and placed into a mould before being removed and placed on racks made from spruce wood. The cheese is
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    Gamalost

    Gamalost

    • Country Of Origin: Norway
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Gamalost (also Gammelost, Gammalost), which translates as "old cheese", is a pungent traditional Norwegian cheese, which was once a staple of the Norwegian diet. Like many traditional Norwegian foods, such as flat bread, dry salted meats and stockfish, Gamalost could be stored for long periods without refrigeration. To make Gamalost, lactic starter is added to skimmed cow's milk, causing it to sour. After several days of souring, the milk is slowly heated, before the curds are separated and pressed into forms. After removal from the forms, mold is introduced onto the surface of the cheese, rubbed on by hand in the traditional method. The cheese is then allowed to cure for four to five weeks. Gamalost production is very labor intensive, particularly if traditional methods are used. Everything depends on the proper fermentation and maturation. It is not made in sufficient quantity for mass export. As such, it is rare to find the cheese outside Norway. Commercial production has principally been limited to the Tine facility in Vik. Since 2002, the Norwegian food company Synnøve Finden has also engaged in production at the Enebakk plant located in the Oslo area. Gamalost is a
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    235
    Grana

    Grana

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    Grana originally referred to a class of hard, mature cheeses from Italy which have a granular texture and are often used for grating. These cheeses are typically made in the form of large drums. The structure is often described as crystalline, and the drums are divided by being split with a fairly blunt triangular knife designed for the purpose, rather than being sliced, cut or sawed. Within the European Union, the term Grana is now legally protected by Grana Padano Protected Designation of Origin, such that only Grana Padano may be sold using the term in EU countries. The two best-known examples of grana-type cheeses are Parmigiano-Reggiano and Grana Padano. The two cheeses are broadly similar, with the difference that everything that the former is, the latter is less so: less crumbly, less sharp, less grainy, etc. The main difference between the two is that cows producing Parmigiano-Reggiano eat only grass and cereals (no silage), no preservatives and no antibiotics. Cows that have been treated with antibiotics are suspended from production of Parmigiano-Reggiano. Silage is a fermented forage that requires the addition of a natural preservative (lysozyme) to Grana Padano. Other
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    236
    Kefalotyri cheese

    Kefalotyri cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Greece
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Kefalotyri (or Kefalotiri) (Greek: κεφαλοτύρι) is a hard, salty yellow cheese made from sheep milk and/or goat's milk in Greece and Cyprus. A similar cheese Kefalograviera, also made from sheep and/or goat milk, is sometimes sold outside Greece and Cyprus as Kefalotyri. Depending on the mixture of milk used in the process the color can vary between yellow and white. In taste it vaguely resembles Gruyere, except it is harder and quite saltier. A very hard cheese, kefalotyri can be consumed as is, fried in olive oil for a dish called saganaki, or added to foods such as pasta dishes, meat, or cooked vegetables, and is especially suited for grating. It is also used along with feta cheese in the vast majority of recipes for Spanakopita, where many recipes say to substitute romano or parmesan if kefalotyri cannot be obtained. This is a popular and well-known cheese, establishing its roots in Greece during the Byzantine era. It can be found in some gourmet or specialty stores in the U.S. and other non-Greek countries. Young cheeses take two to three months to ripen. An aged kefalotyri, a year old or more, is drier with a stronger flavour, and may be eaten as a meze with ouzo, or grated on
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    237
    Leipäjuusto

    Leipäjuusto

    • Country Of Origin: Finland
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Juustoleipä (bread cheese) or Leipäjuusto, which is also known in English as Finnish squeaky cheese, is a fresh cheese traditionally made from cow's beestings, rich milk from a cow that has recently calved. Reindeer or even goat milk can also be used. Commercially available versions are typically made from regular milk, and they lack some of the colour and flavour because of this. The cheese originally comes from Southern Ostrobothnia, Northern Finland and Kainuu. The milk is curdled and set to form a round disk from two to three centimeters thick. After this, leipäjuusto is baked, grilled or flambéed to give it its distinctive brown or charred marks. In Ostrobothnia, leipäjuusto is called juustoleipä (lit. 'cheese bread'). However, this varies as people have moved around, and both names are used while leipäjuusto is the more commonly known name for this cheese. Other dialects have various names (such as narskujuusto) that refer to the way that fresh leipäjuusto "squeaks" against the teeth when bitten. Traditionally, leipäjuusto was dried and could then be stored for up to several years. For eating, the dry, almost rock hard cheese was heated on a fire which softened it and
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    238
    Limburger cheese

    Limburger cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Limburger is a cheese that originated during the 19th century in the historical Duchy of Limburg, which is now divided among modern-day Belgium, Germany, and Netherlands. The cheese is especially known for its pungent odor commonly compared to body odor. In America, it was first produced in 1867 by Rudolph Benkerts in his cellar from pasteurized goat's milk. A few years later, 25 factories produced this cheese. Today, most Limburger is made in Germany. The Chalet Cheese Cooperative in Monroe, Wisconsin is the only American company that makes this cheese. This cheese also is manufactured in Canada by the Oak Grove Cheese Company in New Hamburg, Ontario. Herve cheese is a type of Limburger cheese still produced in the Land of Herve, in the territory of the old Duchy of Limburg. Herve is located near Liège, and the borders separating Belgium from the Netherlands and Germany. The "Pays de Herve" is a hilly area between the Vesdre and Meuse rivers. In its first month, the cheese is firmer and more crumbly, similar to the texture of feta cheese. After about six weeks, the cheese becomes softer along the edges but is still firm on the inside and can be described as salty and chalky. After
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    239
    Maasdam cheese

    Maasdam cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Netherlands
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Maasdam cheese is a Dutch cheese in a Swiss-style. Made from cow's milk, it is aged for at least 4 weeks. It ripens faster than other Dutch cheeses. Maasdam has internal holes from the ripening process, and a smooth yellow rind. Sometimes it is waxed like Gouda. The cheese was created to compete with the popular Swiss Emmental by being less expensive and quicker to produce. In the process of making a cheese with the same general components as Swiss cheeses, the Dutch ended up with a cheese that is nutty and sweet, but softer than Emmental due to a higher moisture content. The style was introduced in 1984 by the Baars company as the trademarked Leerdammer cheese, though it is now made by other Dutch companies under the name Maasdam.
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    Majorero cheese

    Majorero cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Spain
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic goat
    Majorero (Spanish: [maxoˈɾeɾo]) is a goat milk cheese from Spain. Similar to Manchego, this firm cheese has a milky, nutty flavour that goes well with various pear products. It is pale white in colour, and comes in large wheels. Currently it is protected under European Law with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status. Majorero comes from the island of Fuerteventura in the Canary Islands. The word Mahorero (Majorero) is a Guanche word still used today to describe the people of Fuerteventura. This island has a rich farming tradition, and goats were very important to their economy. It is from the Majorera goat that this particular cheese is made. The goat produces a thick, aromatic and high-fat milk. Majorero cheese is usually available in three ways: in its natural rind rubbed with oil, rubbed with pimenta, or with roasted gofio. The cheese has a slightly gummy texture. The taste is acidic, with a buttery but not salty taste. This cheese is very versatile, and can be used with pastas, potatoes and many vegetables. After milking, lamb rennet is added and after an hour a curdle develops. This curdle must be beaten and drained to remove the whey. The cheese is then heavily pressed
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    241
    Mankwold

    Mankwold

    • Country Of Origin: England
    Mankwold (or more formally, Borsetshire Blue) is fictitious soft cheese created by Helen Archer, a character in The Archers, a long-running Radio 4 soap opera. Among other places, Borsetshire Blue is available in Underwood's cheese department; Underwood's being an upmarket department store in Borchester. Mankwold De Luxe is the hyped-up Christmas version which comes in a gift box with a sprig of plastic holly and a complimentary brown paper bag. It is believed that the name originates as a synthesis of the vulgar English expression "manky" (meaning unappealing or dirty) and the suffix "mold", a play on the name of a cheese called Lymeswold created by the Mold Marketing Board during the 1970s. The name Mankwold was coined by Dusty Substances on the Archers Message Board forum.
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    242
    Olivet cendré

    Olivet cendré

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Olivet cendré, also called cendré d'Olivet, is a French cheese from Olivet, on the Loire river, in the Centre region of France. The cheese is made from cow's milk collected during the spring, when the cows graze along the banks of the Loire, and when their milk is believed to be the most flavorful. The cheese is then aged for at least one month, and preferably two, under charcoal. Traditionally, the cheese was aged in ash made from burning the clippings of grape-vines from the vineyard. The finished cheese has 45% milkfat. The cheese is made in cylinders, which have a gray skin from the ash. Olivet cendré has an earthy scent, and is considered to have a delicate taste.
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    Parmigiano Reggiano

    Parmigiano Reggiano

    • Country Of Origin: Italy
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    • Texture: Granular
    Parmigiano-Reggiano (IPA: [ˌparmiˈdʒaːno redˈdʒaːno]), also known in English as Parmesan ( /ˌpɑrmɨˈzæn/ or  /ˌpɑrmɨˈʒæn/), is a hard, granular cheese, cooked but not pressed, named after the producing areas near Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantova (in Lombardia), Italy. Under Italian law, only cheese produced in these provinces may be labelled "Parmigiano-Reggiano", while European law classifies the name as a protected designation of origin. Parmigiano is the Italian adjective for Parma. Reggiano is the Italian adjective for Reggio Emilia. Parmesan is the French name for it and also serves as the informal term for the cheese in the English language. The name Parmesan is also used for cheeses which imitate Parmigiano-Reggiano, with phrases such as "Italian hard cheese" adopted to skirt legal constraints. The closest legitimate Italian cheese to Parmigiano-Reggiano is Grana Padano. Parmigiano-Reggiano is made from raw cow's milk. The whole milk of the morning milking is mixed with the naturally skimmed milk (it is left in large shallow tanks to allow the cream to separate) of the previous evening's milking, resulting in a part skim mixture.
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    Pizza cheese

    Pizza cheese

    Pizza cheese encompasses several varieties and types of cheeses and dairy products that are designed and manufactured for use specifically on pizza, including processed and modified cheese such as Mozzarella-like processed cheeses and Mozzarella variants. Pizza cheese can also refer to any type of cheese suitable for use on pizza. Estimates have placed 30% of all pizza cheese used in the United States as Mozzarella cheese. The most popular cheeses used in the preparation of pizza are Mozzarella, Provolone, Cheddar and Parmesan. Romano and Ricotta are often used as toppings, and processed cheese manufactured specifically for pizza is used in mass production environments. Processed pizza cheese is manufactured to produce preferable qualities in browning, melting, stretchiness and fat and moisture content. Many studies and experiments have analyzed the impact of vegetable oil, manufacturing and culture processes, denatured whey proteins and other changes to create ideal and economical pizza cheeses. In 1997 it was estimated that annual production of pizza cheese was 2 billion pounds in the United States and 200 million pounds in Europe. It was reported in 2000 that demand for pizza
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    Port-du-Salut cheese

    Port-du-Salut cheese

    • Country Of Origin: France
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Port-du-Salut or Entrammes is a mild variety of smear-ripened cheese manufactured from cow's milk first made by monks in the early 18th century and still produced in monasteries throughout France. A version of the cheese is produced by a major creamery under the name Port-Salut, though there are minor differences between the commercially prepared variety and handmade Port-du-Salut. The origin of Port Salut is closely linked to the French Revolution of 1789. Fleeing from the persecutions, a congregation of Trappist Monks set themselves up abroad and, as a way of supporting themselves financially, learned how to make cheese. When they returned to France in 1815, they built a new abbey at Notre Dame, and continued to make their cheese. Port Salut is a semi-soft natural cheese that is easily recognized by its orange rind. Unlike many other French cheeses, it is rather mild and sweet in flavor. The smooth and velvety texture has a light acidic taste. Port Salut is smooth cheese made in Mayenne which belongs to the old Maine (province). Originally, it was named Port du Salut after the abbey of Notre Dame and made strictly for consumption at the monastery. A visit to Paris by the head of
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    246
    Pot cheese

    Pot cheese

    Pot cheese is a type of soft crumbly, unaged cheese. It is very simple to make and also highly versatile making it a very popular cheese but it may be hard to find in stores. Pot cheese is in the midway stage between cottage cheese and farmer's cheese. It is somewhat dry and crumbly but with a neutral, creamy texture and is very high in protein. It is most similar to cream cheese, ricotta, and the Mexican queso blanco. In Austria, Topfen (pot cheese) is another name for Quark. It is traditionally cut with a sun-shaped object known as a cheese cutter.
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    Primula

    Primula

    Primula is the brand name associated with a range of food products marketed by The Kavli Group. The best known range is Primula Cheese Spread. Primula Cheese Spread was invented in 1924 by Norwegian Olav Kavli. Primula Cheese was the world's first spreadable cheese with a long shelf life and was named after the Primula flower. It was first introduced into the UK in 1929. Primula Cheese is sold in a squeezable tube. Primula cheese in tubes is supplied in varieties flavoured with several ingredients, including plain, chives, ham, and prawns. Dips are also manufactured in several flavours. They are sold in many shops in the UK and Republic of Ireland. The Primula brand is owned by the Norwegian Kavli group owned by The Kavli Trust, manufactured in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Great Britain, and sold in more than 20 countries. The Kavli Trust is a charitable organisation that donates a proportion of profits from The Kavli Group to causes such as research, cultural activities and humanitarian work.
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    Sardo cheese

    Sardo cheese

    • Country Of Origin: Argentina
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Sardo is a hard, grating cow's milk cheese that is similar to Pecorino Romano, although the latter is made from sheep's milk and is sharper. Sardo comes from Argentina, and is not to be confused with Pecorino Sardo, another Italian sheep's cheese. Sardo is traditionally coagulated by animal rennet which is the inner lining of the fourth stomach of calves and other young ruminants. Therefore, it is not a vegetarian cheese. Its flavor is mellow, yet rich, and lightly salty. It is white-yellowish in color and is sold in blocks of about 6.5 pounds. Sardo cheese meets the U.S. Standards of Identity for cow's milk. It makes a good choice for snack cheeses or for cooking purposes.
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    Stinking Bishop cheese

    Stinking Bishop cheese

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Cow
    Stinking Bishop is a soft washed-rind cheese produced since 1972 by Charles Martell and Son at Laurel Farm, Dymock, Gloucestershire in the South West of England. It is made from the milk of Gloucester cattle, which in 1972 consisted of only 68 Gloucester breed heifers. The breed has been revived to make production of the cheese possible, though it is often combined and pasteurised with the milk of Friesian cattle from a nearby county. The fat content is 48%. The colour ranges from white/yellow to beige, with an orange to grey rind. It is moulded into wheels 2 kg (4.4 lb) in weight, 20 cm (8 inch) in diameter, and 4 cm (1.5 inch) deep. Only about 20 tonnes are produced each year. The distinctive odour comes from the process with which the cheese is washed during its ripening; it is immersed in perry made from the local Stinking Bishop pear (from which the cheese gets its name) every four weeks while it matures. The process is said to have links with that used by local Cistercian monks who have long been associated with the production of washed rind cheeses. To increase the moisture content and to encourage bacterial activity, salt is not added until the cheese is removed from its
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    250
    Wensleydale

    Wensleydale

    • Country Of Origin: England
    • Source Of Milk: Domestic sheep
    Wensleydale cheese is a cheese produced in the town of Hawes in Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, England. There are five main types: The Wensleydale pastures give the cheese the unique flavour for which it is renowned. Good Wensleydale has a supple, crumbly, moist texture and resembles a young Caerphilly. The flavour suggests wild honey balanced with a fresh acidity. Wensleydale cheese was first made by French Cistercian monks from the Roquefort region, who had settled in Wensleydale. They built a monastery at Fors, but some years later the monks moved to Jervaulx in Lower Wensleydale. They brought with them a recipe for making cheese from sheep's milk. During the 14th century cows' milk began to be used instead, and the character of the cheese began to change. A little ewes' milk was still mixed in since it gave a more open texture, and allowed the development of the blue mould. At that time, Wensleydale was almost always blue with the white variety almost unknown. Nowadays, the opposite is true, with blue Wensleydale rarely seen. When the monastery was dissolved in 1540 the local farmers continued making the cheese right up until the Second World War, during which most milk in the
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