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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Character Rank of All Time

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Best Character Rank of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Character Rank of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Character Rank of All Time has gotten 893 views and has gathered 622 votes from 622 voters. O O

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    1

    Reverend Mother

    • Characters of This Rank: Alia Atreides
    A Reverend Mother is both a Bene Gesserit title and a class or level associated with fictional characters from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. A Reverend Mother is generally a woman of the Bene Gesserit order who has completed her training. The Princess Irulan writes (via epigraph) in the original novel Dune: Thus spoke St. Alia-of-the-Knife: "The Reverend Mother must combine the seductive wiles of a courtesan with the untouchable majesty of a virgin goddess, holding these attributes in tension so long as the powers of her youth endure. For when youth and beauty have gone, she will find that the place-between, once occupied by tension, has become a wellspring of cunning and resourcefulness." — from "Muad'Dib, Family Commentaries" by the Princess Irulan At the end of their training, the Bene Gesserit undergoes a ritual involving a significant amount of one of a class of awareness spectrum narcotics. The drug enters her body as a poison. If she survives this, by a conscious transformation of the drug on a molecular level to a non-poisonous substance, she gains the memories of all the preceding Reverend Mothers in her line, resulting in great knowledge and power. The
    8.63
    8 votes
    2
    8.33
    6 votes
    3

    Sergeant First Class

    • Characters of This Rank: Bob Brown
    Sergeant First Class is a military rank in some militaries and other uniformed organizations around the world, typically that of a senior non-commissioned officer. Sergeant First Class (SFC) is the seventh enlisted rank (E-7) in the U.S. Army, above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant and First Sergeant, and is the first senior non-commissioned officer rank. A Sergeant First Class is typically assigned as a Platoon Sergeant at the company level or Battalion Operations Noncommissioned Officer in Charge at the battalion level, but may also hold other positions depending on the type of unit. In a combat arms role, Sergeant First Class is typically in charge of anywhere from 18 soldiers and 4 tanks in an armor platoon to 40 soldiers in a rifle platoon. A Sergeant First Class' primary responsibility is training and mentoring Lieutenants, tactical logistics, tactical casualty evacuations, and the senior tactical advisor to the platoon leader. With today's operations tempo, a Sergeant First Class may fill the role of platoon leader if no suitable officer is available. Sergeant First Class replaced the now defunct rank of Technical Sergeant in 1948. A Sergeant First Class is addressed
    8.17
    6 votes
    4

    Tercera Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Halibel
    Tercera Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    8.17
    6 votes
    5

    Sorcerer Supreme

    Sorcerer Supreme or Sorceress Supreme is a title granted in the fictional Marvel Universe to the "practitioner of the mystic or magic arts who has greater skills than all others or commands a greater portion of the ambient magical energies than any other organism on a given world or dimension". By definition, there can be only one Sorcerer Supreme per world or dimension at a time. In the Marvel Universe, the title has traditionally been synonymous with the mystic Doctor Strange, but it has been bestowed on other mystics in the past and in 2009 was passed down to Brother Voodoo. Doctor Strange has had the role almost continuously since the transcendence of his mentor, the Ancient One. However, Strange later lost the position during the Dark Reign event to Brother Voodoo due to Strange's over-use of black magic. Voodoo also inherited the Eye of Agamotto and the Cloak of Levitation along with the title of Sorcerer Supreme. Past Sorcerers Supreme include the ancestor of Sebastian Shaw: Reverend Hiram Shaw; and the ancestor to Ororo Munroe, Ayesha of Balobedu. Following the demon Zarathos's defeat some twenty-five millennia ago by the supernatural Blood, some among them worshiped him as
    7.83
    6 votes
    7

    Deputy Commander

    • Characters of This Rank: Kaname Ohgi
    Deputy commander was a rank in the London Metropolitan Police which existed between 1946 and 1968. In 1946, the rank of chief constable, which was between superintendent and deputy assistant commissioner, was renamed deputy commander. At the same time, the rank of deputy assistant commissioner was divided into commander and deputy assistant commissioner. From 1949, deputy commander was superior to the new rank of chief superintendent. It was abolished in 1968.
    8.80
    5 votes
    8

    Medicine Cat

    • Characters of This Rank: Leafpool
    Medicine cats in the warriors series look after wounded or sick cats.
    7.33
    6 votes
    9

    Tisroc

    In C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia, a Tisroc is a ruler of Calormen. His position is most like that of a Pharaoh, in that he is an absolute monarch, and is believed to be descended from the Calormen god Tash. Whenever a Calormen citizen speaks of the Tisroc, he adds "may he live for ever," and it is considered blasphemy not to say this. For example, in The Horse and His Boy, Aravis says, "Now this Ahoshta is of base birth, though in these later years he has won the favor of the Tisroc (may he live for ever) by flattery and evil counsels..." Enemies of the Tisroc take pleasure in not saying this, however, especially while in his domain. As the talking horse Bree put it: "Why should I say 'may he live for ever'? I don't want him to live forever, and I know he won't whether I say it or not." Lewis made up a name for the ruler and nobility of Calormen while still referring to the Tisroc's son Rabadash as a prince. Since elsewhere the sons of Tisrocs are styled Tarkaan (lord), the title "Prince" would appear to be reserved for the heir apparent. A female counterpart for the Tisroc is never mentioned. It is implied that the Tisroc has many wives. Other titles for nobility of Calormen
    7.33
    6 votes
    10
    6.29
    7 votes
    11
    Hippeis

    Hippeis

    • Characters of This Rank: Ari
    Hippeis (Ancient Greek: ἱππεῖς) was the Greek term for cavalry. The Hippeus (ἱππεύς) was the second highest of the four Athenian social classes, made of men who could afford to maintain a war horse in the service of the state.(See Solonian Constitution) The rank may be compared to Roman Equestrians and medieval knights. . Among the Spartans, it was the royal guard of honour, consisting of 300 chosen Spartan youth under the age of thirty, who, although originally mounted, afterwards served as heavily-armed foot-soldiers. The cavalry of Athens, which was first formed after the Greco-Persian War, and then consisted of 300 men, from the Periclean period onwards consisted of 1,200 men, including 200 mounted bowmen (hippotoxōtœ), who were slaves belonging to the state and 1,000 citizens of the two highest classes. They were kept together in time of peace, and carefully drilled; at the great public festivals they took part in the processions. They were commanded by two hipparchi, each of whom had five phylai under him and superintended the levy. Subordinate to these were the ten phylarchi in command of ten phylai. Both sets of officers were drawn from the two highest classes. It was the
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Warrior-mage

    Warrior-mage

    • Characters of This Rank: Randal
    Warrior-mage is an occupation in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe.
    7.00
    6 votes
    13
    9.25
    4 votes
    14

    Praetor

    • Characters of This Rank: Marcus Junius Brutus
    Praetor (Classical Latin: [ˈprajtoːr]) was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army (in the field or, less often, before the army had been mustered); or, an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned various duties (which varied at different periods in Rome's history). The functions of the magistracy, the praetura (praetorship), are described by the adjective: the praetoria potestas (praetorian power), the praetorium imperium (praetorian authority), and the praetorium ius (praetorian law), the legal precedents established by the praetores (praetors). Praetorium, as a substantive, denoted the location from which the praetor exercised his authority, either the headquarters of his castra, the courthouse (tribunal) of his judiciary, or the city hall of his provincial governorship. The Classical-era authors do not describe the events leading to the Praetor title origination, but the writings of the late Republican statesman and attorney Cicero explored the philosophy and uses of the term praetor. The prefix prae is a good indication that the title-holder was prior, in some way, in society. Livy mentions
    9.25
    4 votes
    15
    Priest

    Priest

    • Characters of This Rank: Father Bruce Benedict
    A priest or priestess is a person authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or multiple deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities. Their office or position is the priesthood, a term which also may apply to such persons collectively. Priests and priestesses have existed since the earliest of times and in the simplest societies. They exist in all or some branches of Judaism, Christianity, Shintoism, Hinduism and many other religions. They are generally regarded as having positive contact with the deity or deities of the religion to which they subscribe, often interpreting the meaning of events and performing the rituals of the religion. Priests are leaders to whom other believers will often turn for advice on spiritual matters. In many religions, being a priest or priestess is a full-time position, ruling out any other career. In other cases it is a part-time role. For example in the early history of Iceland the chieftains were titled goði, a word meaning "priest". As seen in the saga of Hrafnkell
    8.00
    5 votes
    16

    Undersecretary

    • Characters of This Rank: Dr Cartwright
    An under secretary is an executive government official in many countries, frequently a career public servant, who typically acts as a senior administrator or second-in-command to a politically appointed Cabinet Minister or other government official. The title is used in many different political systems. In the United States executive branch, an undersecretary is a senior official in a government department, junior to a departmental Secretary such as the Secretary of State and usually junior to a Deputy Secretary as well. An Undersecretary is typically a career government official, as opposed to a political appointee; they may head specific sub-departments or agencies such as the Defense Intelligence Agency, or be responsible for a specific area of policy within the department, e.g. the Undersecretary for Management within the Department of State. While the Cabinet Secretary provides vision and direction, undersecretaries run the department and are often considered the government equivalent of a chief operating officer, albeit for a specific branch. Before 1972, "Undersecretary" (also spelled "Under Secretary") signified the senior deputy to a cabinet Secretary, especially of State
    9.00
    4 votes
    17
    5.71
    7 votes
    18

    Lord

    • Characters of This Rank: Fflewddur Fflam
    Lord is a deferential appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others; a master, chief, or ruler. In only a few cases is "lord" a substantive title in itself, most commonly that of the Lord of the Manor and certain vestigial titles from the age of feudalism such as Lord of Mann, in other cases it is a generic term applied, for example, to persons who hold a title of the peerage or persons entitled to courtesy titles, or to refer to a group or body of peers. According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word hlāford which originated from hlāfweard meaning 'bread keeper' or 'loaf-ward', reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers. The appellation "lord" is primarily applied to men, while for women the appellation of "lady" is used. However, this is not universal; the Lord of Mann, a title currently held by the Queen, and female Lord Mayors are examples of women who are styled lord. The word lady originates from a similar structure, believed to have originally meant 'loaf-kneader.' "Lord" may be used in conjunction with a substantive title to
    10.00
    3 votes
    19
    Courtesan

    Courtesan

    • Characters of This Rank: Shawme
    A courtesan was originally a female courtier, which means a person who attends the court of a monarch or other powerful person. In feudal society, the court was the centre of government as well as the residence of the monarch, and social and political life were often completely mixed together. Prior to the Renaissance, courtesans served to convey information untrusted to servants to visiting dignitaries. In Renaissance Europe, courtiers played an extremely important role in upper-class society. As it was customary during this time for royal couples to lead separate lives—commonly marrying simply to preserve bloodlines and to secure political alliances—men and women would often seek gratification and companionship from people living at court. In fact, the verb to court originally meant "to be or reside at court", and later came to mean "to behave as a courtier" and then "to pay amorous attention to somebody". The most intimate companion of a ruler was called the favourite. In Renaissance usage, the Italian word cortigiana, feminine of cortigiano ("courtier") came to refer to "the ruler's mistress", and then to a well-educated and independent woman of loose morals, eventually a
    7.40
    5 votes
    20

    Sha-Dar

    A Sha-Dar is a fictional type of person in David Eddings' series The Belgariad and The Malloreon. A Sha-Dar is sometimes called the Clan Chief of the horses. A Sha-Dar (plural Sha-Darim) is a person with the rare ability to telepathically communicate with horses. They can sense what a horse is thinking as well as being able to calm them down and do many other things as well. A Sha-Dar is hailed as almost royalty in Algaria and the person gains instant nobility and riches when their gift is discovered. In Algaria celebrations go on for weeks at the discovery of a Sha-Dar. The only Sha-Dar named in The Belgariad and The Malloreon is Hettar.
    9.67
    3 votes
    21

    Former Shinigami Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: Yoruichi Shihouin
    Former Shinigami Captain is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    8.25
    4 votes
    23

    Warrior

    • Characters of This Rank: Leafpool
    Warriors in the warriors series are cats who make up the bulk of any clan. They fight, hunt, and train new apprentices.
    8.25
    4 votes
    24

    Matron

    • Characters of This Rank: Miss Foster
    Matron is the job title of a very senior nurse in several countries, including the United Kingdom, its former colonies, and also the Republic of Ireland, although the title Clinical Nurse Manager has become acceptable as an alternative. The word "matron" is derived from the Latin for "mother", via French. The matron was once the most senior nurse in a hospital (in the United Kingdom before ca. 1967). She was responsible for all the nurses and domestic staff, overseeing all patient care, and the efficient running of the hospital, although she almost never had real power over the strategic running of the hospital. Matrons were almost invariably female—male nurses were not at all common, especially in senior positions. They were often seen as fearsome administrators, but were respected by nurses and doctors alike. The role of the matron was abolished in the British National Health Service in the late 1960s as part of the reorganisation recommended by the Salmon report. The NHS matron became memorably associated with the formidable character played by the late actress Hattie Jacques in the 1967 film Carry On Doctor. The matron usually had a very distinctive uniform, with a dark blue
    6.17
    6 votes
    25
    Task Force Leader

    Task Force Leader

    • Characters of This Rank: Grillo, Rankan agent
    "Shoulder to shoulder, to the death, with honor." -- The Sacred Band
    6.17
    6 votes
    26

    Commander

    • Characters of This Rank: Bashir
    In the United States, commander is a military rank that is also sometimes used as a military title, depending on the branch of service. It is also used as a rank or title in some organizations outside of the military, particularly in police and law enforcement. In the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps, commander (CDR) is a senior officer rank, with the pay grade of O-5. Commander ranks above lieutenant commander and below captain. Commander is equivalent to the rank of lieutenant colonel in the other uniformed services. Notably, it is the first rank at which the holder wears an embellished cap, whereas officers of the other services are entitled to embellishment at O-4 rank. A commander in the U.S. Navy may command a frigate, destroyer, submarine, aviation squadron or small shore activity, or may serve on a staff (typically as executive officer) or as executive officer of a larger vessel. An officer in the rank of commander who commands a vessel may also be referred to as "captain" as a courtesy title, or informally referred to as
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    7.00
    5 votes
    28

    Kwisatz Haderach

    • Characters of This Rank: Paul Atreides
    Kwisatz Haderach /ˈkwɪsɑːts ˈhɑːdəræk/ is a term in Frank Herbert's fictional Dune universe which refers to a prophesied messiah and superbeing. In the series, the Bene Gesserit, a matriarchal secret society, hope to create a male who would possess absolute prescience, seeing all possible futures and thus being able to cause select threads of time to be realized through manipulation. The Bene Gesserit intend to use their Kwisatz Haderach to make their order more powerful than the other factions within the Old Empire. Herbert also refers to the Kwisatz Haderach as "the one who can be many places at once." The phrase "Kwisatz Haderach" bears close resemblance to the Hebrew phrase "Kefitzat Haderech" (literally: "The Way's Jump"), a Kabbalic term related to teleportation. Herbert provides the following definition in Terminology of the Imperium, the glossary of the 1965 novel Dune: KWISATZ HADERACH: "Shortening of the Way." This is the label applied by the Bene Gesserit to the unknown for which they sought a genetic solution: a male Bene Gesserit whose organic mental powers would bridge space and time. The Bene Gesserit breeding program had been conducted for centuries to preserve
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Tempus's right-side partner

    Tempus's right-side partner

    • Characters of This Rank: Niko
    "Long ago, Niko's rage had driven him to maat, his discipline of will and equilibrium, justice and balance, and those had driven him on, to the Sacred Band and the Riddler’s service, where he was – finally and correctly, he thought – Tempus’s right-side partner, learning day by day what his commander had to teach." -- The Sacred Band
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    9.33
    3 votes
    31

    Primera Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Stark
    Primera Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    9.33
    3 votes
    32

    Shinigami Lieutenant

    • Characters of This Rank: Chōjirō Sasakibe
    Shinigami Lieutenant is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    Crown Prince

    Crown Prince

    • Characters of This Rank: Macon
    A crown prince or crown princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. The wife of a crown prince is also titled crown princess. The term is now borne as a title only in Thailand and the Scandinavian monarchies; but it may also be used generically to refer to the person or position of the heir apparent in other kingdoms. However, heirs apparent to non-imperial and non-royal monarchies (i.e., wherein the hereditary sovereign holds a title below that of king/queen, e.g., grand duke or prince), crown prince is not used as a title, although it is sometimes used as a synonym for heir apparent. In Europe, where primogeniture governs succession to all monarchies except those of the Papacy and Andorra, the eldest son (Spain and United Kingdom) or eldest child (Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden) of the current monarch fills the role of crown prince or princess, depending upon whether females of the dynasty enjoy personal succession rights. The eldest living child of a monarch is sometimes not the heir apparent or crown prince, because that position can be held by a descendant of a deceased older child who, by "right of
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Gentleman

    Gentleman

    The term gentleman (from Latin gentilis, belonging to a race or gens, and man, cognate with the French word gentilhomme, the Spanish Caballero, the Italian gentil uomo or gentiluomo and the Portuguese gentil-homem), in its original and strict signification, denoted a well-educated man of good family and distinction, analogous to the Latin generosus (its invariable translation in English-Latin documents). In this sense, the word equates with the French gentilhomme ("nobleman"), which latter term was, in Great Britain, long confined to the peerage, but without the strict technical requirements of those traditions, such as quarters of nobility. This was what the rebels under John Ball in the 14th century meant when they repeated: John Selden, in Titles of Honour (1614), discussing the title gentleman, speaks of "our English use of it" as "convertible with nobilis" (an ambiguous word, like noble meaning elevated either by rank or by personal qualities) and describes in connection with it the forms of ennobling in various European countries. To a degree, gentleman signified a man with an income derived from property, a legacy or some other source, and was thus independently wealthy and
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Lieutenant Commander

    Lieutenant Commander

    • Characters of This Rank: Laurel Takashima
    Lieutenant commander (LCDR) is a mid-ranking officer rank in the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps, with the pay grade of O-4 and NATO rank code OF-3. Lieutenant commanders rank above lieutenants and below commanders. The rank is also used in the United States Maritime Service and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, and is equivalent to a major in the other uniformed services. While Lieutenant Commander is the Navy's first commissioned officer to be selected by board, they are still considered to be Junior Officers (JOs) due to their origin as "Lieutenant, Commanding." This can be seen by the fact that Lieutenant Commanders do not wear the oak-leaf gold embellishment (colloquially known as "scrambled eggs") on their combination covers. This is in contrast to other branches, where Majors wear the appropriate covers of field-grade officers. There are two insignia used by Lieutenant Commanders. On service khakis and all working uniforms, LCDRs wear a gold oak leaf collar device, similar to the ones worn by a majors in the USAF and
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    Knight

    Knight

    • Characters of This Rank: Toby Belch
    A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood has been conferred upon mounted warriors. During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Since the Early Modern period, the title of knight is purely honorific, usually bestowed by a monarch, as in the British honours system, often for non-military service to the country. Historically, the ideals of chivalry were popularized in medieval literature, especially the Matter of Britain and Matter of France, the former based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae ("History of the Kings of Britain"), written in the 1130s. Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur ("The Death of Arthur"), written in 1485, was important in defining the ideal of chivalry which is essential to the modern concept of the knight as an elite warrior sworn to uphold the values of faith, loyalty, courage, and honour.
    7.75
    4 votes
    37

    Lieutenant, Junior Grade

    • Characters of This Rank: Number Eight
    Lieutenant (junior grade) (LTJG) is a junior commissioned officer rank in the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps, with the pay grade of O-2. The rank is also used in the United States Maritime Service and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. Lieutenant, junior grade ranks above ensign and below lieutenant and is equivalent to a first lieutenant in the other uniformed services (the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force) and sub-lieutenant in the Royal Navy and the navies of many Commonwealth countries. The time for promotion to LTJG is a minimum of two years after commissioning in the Navy or 18 months in the Coast Guard. Lieutenants, junior grade typically lead petty officers and non-rated personnel, unless assigned to small aircraft or on staff duty. A LTJG's usual shipboard billet is as a Division Officer. Lieutenant, junior grade is often referred to colloquially as JG ("Jay-Gee"). Prior to March 3, 1883, this rank was known in the Navy as master.
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    Captain

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: Captain Whisker
    A sea (or lake/river) captain (also called a master or a shipmaster) is a licensed mariner in ultimate command of the vessel. The captain is responsible for its safe and efficient operation, including cargo operations, navigation, crew management and ensuring that the vessel complies with local and international laws, as well as company and flag state policies. All persons on board, including officers and crew, other shipboard staff members, passengers, guests and pilots, are under the captain's authority and are his ultimate responsibility. A ship's captain commands and manages all ship's personnel, and is typically in charge of the ship's accounting, payrolls, and inventories. The captain is responsible for compliance with immigration and customs regulations, maintaining the ship's certificates and documentation, compliance with the vessel's security plan, as mandated by the International Maritime Organization. The captain is responsible for responding to and reporting in case of accidents and incidents, and in case of injuries and illness among the ship's crew and passengers. A ship's captain must have a master's license or certificate, issued by the ship's flag state, or a
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: Karen Stadtfeld
    In the United States uniformed services, captain is a commissioned officer rank. In keeping with the traditions of the militaries of most nations, the rank varies between the services, being a senior rank in the naval services and a junior rank in the ground and air forces. For the naval rank, a captain is of pay grade O-6 (the sixth officer rank), typically commanding seagoing vessels and shore installations. This rank is used by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, the NOAA Commissioned Corps, and the U.S. Maritime Service. For the ground and air forces rank, a captain is of pay grade O-3 (the third officer rank), usually serving as the commander of a company-sized unit, or serving as an executive officer or staff officer for a larger unit such as a battalion. This rank is used by the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Marine Corps. The rank of captain may also be used in other organizations outside of the military, particularly in fire departments, police, and law enforcement. In the United States Navy, captain (abbreviated CAPT) is a senior officer rank, with the pay grade of O-6. It ranks above commander and below rear admiral (lower
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Major General

    Major General

    • Characters of This Rank: Hank Landry
    Major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. A major general is a high-ranking officer, normally subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general. Where relevant, major general has a NATO code of OF-7, and is considered to be a two-star rank. A major general in most armies commands a division, however in some countries he commands a brigade. In the old Austro-Hungarian Army, the major general was called a generalmajor. Today's Austrian Federal Army still uses the same term. In the Canadian Forces, the rank of major-general (MGen) (major-général or Mgén in French) is an Army or Air Force rank equal to a rear-admiral of the Navy. A major-general is a general officer, the equivalent of a naval flag officer. A major-general is senior to a brigadier-general or commodore, and junior to a lieutenant-general or vice-admiral. Prior to 1968, the Air Force used the rank of air vice-marshal instead. The rank insignia for a major-general is two gold maple leaves beneath crossed sword and baton, all surmounted by St. Edward's Crown. It is worn on the
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Goddess

    Goddess

    • Characters of This Rank: Hebe
    A Goddess is a female deity. In some cultures Goddesses are associated with Earth, motherhood, love, and the household. In other cultures, Goddesses also rule over war, death, and destruction as well as healing. They can be figureheads of religions and can be accessed in modern times by religious statues. In some religions, a sacred feminine archetype can occupy a very central place in prayer and worship. In Hinduism, Sacred Feminine or Shaktism is one of the three major Hindu denominations of worship along with Vishnu and Shiva. In Tibetan Buddhism, the highest achievement any person can achieve is to become like the "great" female Buddhas (e.g. Arya Tara) who are depicted as being supreme protectors, fearless and filled with compassion for all beings. The primacy of a monotheistic or near-monotheistic "Great Goddess" is advocated by some modern matriarchists as a female version of, preceding, or analogue to, the Abrahamic God associated with the historical rise of monotheism in the Mediterranean Axis Age. Some currents of Neopaganism, in particular Wicca, have a bitheistic concept of a single Goddess and a single God, who in hieros gamos represent a united whole. Polytheistic
    6.40
    5 votes
    46
    7.25
    4 votes
    47

    Slayer

    A Slayer, in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel (both created by Joss Whedon), is a young female bestowed with mystical powers that originate from the essence of a pure-demon, which gives her superhuman senses, strength, agility, resilience and speed in the fight against forces of darkness. She occasionally receives prophetic dreams in the few hours that she sleeps. The opening narration in the Buffy series states "Into every generation a slayer is born: one girl in all the world, a chosen one. She alone will wield the strength and skill to fight the vampires, demons, and the forces of darkness; to stop the spread of their evil and the swell of their number. She is the Slayer." While, in the series, they are commonly referred to as "Vampire Slayers", even by Watchers and vampires themselves, the Slayer may operate as a defender against any and all supernatural threats. The reputation of the Slayer is well-known and revered, even throughout other dimensions. The notion of The Slayer has been compared to the equivalent of a Demonic "Boogey-Man", incredibly feared and considered by most to be essentially unconquerable. In every generation there is a Chosen One.
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Magician

    Magician

    • Characters of This Rank: Wizard No Heart
    A magician, which may also be known in various regions as a magic-user, mage, magister, archmage, sorcerer/sorceress, shugenja, witch, wizard, warlock, wu jen, enchanter/enchantress, illusionist, diviner, conjurer, or thaumaturge; depending on the broad contextual range of occult practices or cultural beliefs, is someone who uses or practices magic that derives from supernatural or occult sources. Magicians are common figures in works of fantasy, such as fantasy literature and role-playing games; they draw on a history of such people in mythology, legends, and folklore. Fantasy magicians usually gain their ability through innate talent or study. Most fantasy wizards are depicted as having a special gift which sets them apart from the vast majority of characters in fantasy worlds who are unable to learn magic. Magicians, sorcerers, wizards, and practitioners of magic by other titles have appeared in myths, folktales and literature throughout recorded history, and fantasy draws on this background. They commonly appear in fantasy as mentors and villains, as they did in older works, and more recently as heroes themselves. Although they are often portrayed as wielding great powers,
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Moirae

    Moirae

    • Characters of This Rank: Lachesis
    In Greek mythology, the Moirai (Ancient Greek: Μοῖραι, "apportioners", Latinized as Moerae)—often known in English as the Fates—were the white-robed incarnations of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, euphemistically the "sparing ones", or Fata; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). Their number became fixed at three: Clotho (spinner), Lachesis (allotter) and Atropos (unturnable). They controlled the metaphorical thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The gods and men had to submit to them, but in the case of Zeus he is portrayed in two ways: as the only one who can command them (the Zeus Moiragetes) or as the one who is also bound to the Moiras as incarnation of the fates. In the Homeric poems Moira or Aisa, is related with the limit and end of life, and Zeus appears as the guider of destiny. In the Theogony of Hesiod, the three Moirai are personified, and are acting over the gods. Later they are daughters of Zeus and Themis, who was the embodiment of divine order and law. In Plato's Republic the
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    Shinigami Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: Shigekuni Yamamoto-Genryūsai
    Shinigami Captain is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Stepson trainee

    Stepson trainee

    • Characters of This Rank: Shamshi
    Stepson trainee is an occupation in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe.
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    6.20
    5 votes
    54
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    Judge

    Judge (or street judge) is a title held by several significant characters in Judge Dredd and other series which appear in the British comics 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. In the fictional future history of the series, the role of "Judge" combines those of judge and police officer, thus avoiding long legal wrangles by allowing for criminals to be tried and sentenced on the spot. Since they overthrew the US Constitution in 2070 they have also held supreme political power in Mega-City One. Collectively they are known as the Justice Department. Judges are the product of many years' training and psychological conditioning. Training, which takes place in the Academy of Law, generally begins at age five. The Judges recruit promising children, and grow their own clones. Judge Dredd is himself one of the clones of the Judges' founder, Chief Judge Fargo. The Judges themselves are not above the law – a violation that would earn a citizen a few months in an Iso-Cube would get a Judge a twenty-year sentence, to be served as hard labor on Saturn's moon, Titan, after surgical modification to enable the convict to survive in Titan's atmosphere without needing an expensive space suit. The
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Optio

    Optio

    • Characters of This Rank: Quintus Lucinius Cato
    An optio (plural optiones; Latin: optio, optiōnēs, from optāre, "to choose", because an optio was chosen by his centurion), sometimes anglicized option (though rarely, to avoid confusion with "option"), was a soldier in the Roman army who held a position similar to that of an executive officer in modern armies. The optio seems to have held a rank roughly equivalent to that of a modern lieutenant, reflective of his status as the second in command of the century in which he served. The main function of an optio was as an optio centuriae, the second-in-command of a century, although there were many other positions an optio could hold. Optiones were vital units in the Roman army. An optio was stationed at the rear of the ranks to keep the troops in order. Their duties would include enforcing the orders of the centurion, taking over the centurion's command in battle should the need arise, supervising his subordinates, and a variety of administration duties. Optio pay was double the standard legionary pay and they were the most likely men to be promoted after the retirement, promotion or death of a centurion. Titles held by optiones included: Unlike the centurion, the uniform was not the
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Princes of Dol Amroth

    In the literary works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Princes of Dol Amroth were part-elven princes of Southern Gondor, second only to the Steward of the Realm by the time of the War of the Ring and the Restoration of the Heir of Elendil to the thrones of Arnor and Gondor. The Princes ruled an autonomous southern Fiefdom known as Dor-en-Ernil - the Lands of the Prince, first settled by the Sindar of Lothlórien in the First Age as the Havens of Edhellond, where they set sail for the Undying Lands The line of the Princes was founded by Imrazôr the Númenórean, who took as his wife Mithrellas of Lórien, it is not known how they first came to prominence, although by the time Isildur left Gondor , the Prince of Dol Amroth, although they did not yet hold this title, was already one of the Chief Nobles of the Kingdom and accompanied Isildur on his survey of Gondor's bounds, ending with the burial of Elendil upon Amon Anwar. They remained a power in Gondor until into the Fourth Age, Imrahil, Prince at the time of the War of the Ring, was the most powerful Prince of Dol Amroth, standing in as the Lord of All Gondor, flying the blue banner of Dol Amroth from the White Tower of Minas Tirith whilst
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Secular adept of Maat

    Secular adept of Maat

    • Characters of This Rank: Nameless adepts
    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe, a secular adept of Maat is a warrior-monk who is an initiate into the mystery of balance, justice, and equilibrium as taught by the Bandaran schools. Adepts of Maat undertake years of training to develop mental as well as physical fighting skills and mystic calm. They dedicate their lives to restoring the balance of the universe through combat with the forces of imbalance. Harmonia, the Greek goddess of celestial order, truth and justice, embodies the more ancient ordering principles of Egyptian Maat.
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Randal

    Randal

    • Characters of This Rank: Randal
    Randal, the Tysian Hazard-class mage, first appeared in the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe when Tempus took his warriors north to Tyse (Beyond Sanctuary, 1985). Randal joined the Band in Tyse, becoming the first and only warrior-mage ever to serve with Tempus's Sacred Band of Stepsons. Under orders from the Band's commander, he served as the rightman of Stealth, called Nikodemos. As such, he fought in the Wizard Wars and in the coup at the Festival of Man. After the Wizard Wars, Randal was among a small contingent of Stepsons who returned to Sanctuary. Once there, he took a post as Sanctuary's First Hazard (in Thieves' World universe anthology volumes, 7 -11). After the Stepsons withdrew from Sanctuary for a second time, Randal rejoined the Band at their base of operations in Lemuria. When Tempus brought the Sacred Band of Thebes to Sanctuary for training (The Sacred Band, 2010), he summoned Randal. There Randal was reunited with one of his former apprentices, Merricat, and fought in the Battle of Meridian. Randal can become any kind of animal, but he is allergic to animal fur and this weakness hampered his early career. From Askelon of Meridian, he acquired a charmed handkerchief that for a time kept his allergies in check and a blade called a 'kris' that parts fire and issues hornets from its tip. He briefly possessed the Nisibsi globe of power that was his portion of the spoils from the assault on Wizardwall. Randal has a platonic love for Niko. He is not as robust as the shock troopers in the Band and they call him "Witchy-ears." Randal came up through the Mageguild apprentice system, rising from "Junior Hazard" to "First Hazard." He taught at Mageguild schools in Tyse, Ranke, and in Sanctuary, where the young adept, Merricat, apprenticed to him. Randal's mental skills, bravery, and fierce loyalty more than make up for any lack of physical prowess in the eyes of the Stepsons.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: Dan DeChant
    The army rank of captain (from the French capitaine) is a commissioned officer rank historically corresponding to command of a company of soldiers. The rank is also used by some air forces and marine forces. Today a captain is typically either the commander or second-in-command of a company or artillery battery (or United States Army cavalry troop or Commonwealth squadron). In the Chinese People's Liberation Army, a captain may also command a platoon, or be the second-in-command of a battalion. In NATO countries the rank of captain is described by the code OF-2 and is one rank above an OF-1 (lieutenant or first lieutenant) and one below an OF-3 (major or commandant). The rank of captain is generally considered to be the highest rank a soldier can achieve while remaining in the field. The rank of captain should not be confused with the naval rank of captain or with the Commonwealth Air Force rank of group captain, both of which are equivalent to the army rank of colonel. Prior to the professionalization of the armed services of European nations subsequent to the French Revolution, a captain was a nobleman who purchased the right to head a company from the previous holder of that
    6.75
    4 votes
    61

    Great King

    • Characters of This Rank: Suppiluliumas I
    Great King and the equivalent in many languages is a semantic title for historical titles of Monarchs, suggesting an elevated status among the host of Kings and Princes. This title is most usually associated with the shahanshah (Shah of shahs, i.e. king of kings, indeed translated in Greek Basileus toon basileoon, later adopted by the Byzantine emperors) of Persia under the Achaemenid dynasty whose vast empire in Asia lasted for 200 years up to the year 330 BC, and later adopted by successors of the Achaemenid empire whose monarchial names were also succeeded by "the Great". In the 2nd Millennium BCE Near East, there was a tradition of reciprocally using such addresses between powers as a way of diplomatically recognizing each other as an equal. Only the kings of countries who were not subject to any other king and powerful enough to draw the respect from their adversaries were allowed to use the title of Great King. Those were the kings of Egypt, Hatti, Babylonia, Mitanni (until its demise in the 14th century), Assyria (only after the demise of Mitanni), and for a brief time Myceneans. Great Kings referred to each other as brothers and often established close relationships by
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    King of Athens

    • Characters of This Rank: Aegeus
    Before the Athenian democracy, the tyrants, and the Archons, the city-state of Athens was ruled by kings. Most of these are probably mythical or only semi-historical. This list is based on that given by the fourth century CE historian and Christian bishop, Eusebius of Caesarea. These three kings were supposed to have ruled before the flood of the Deucalion myth. Cecrops was considered the first true king of Athens, although he was a mythical half-man half-serpent. The dates for the following kings were conjectured centuries later, by historians of the Hellenistic era who tried to backdate events by cross-referencing ancient sources such as the Parian Chronicle. None of these chronologies is scientifically verifiable nowadays. Tradition says that King Menestheus took part in the Trojan War, and Codrus, the last king, was the one to repel the Dorian Invasion of Attica. Melanthus having been driven from his kingdom in Pylos came to Athens where Thymoestes resigned the crown to him. After Codrus's death, his sons Medon and Acastus either reigned as kings, or became hereditary archons. In 753 BC the hereditary archonship was replaced by a non-hereditary system (see Archons of Athens).
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Major

    Major

    • Characters of This Rank: Motoko Kusanagi
    Major is a rank of commissioned officer, with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces. When used unhyphenated, in conjunction with no other indicator of rank, the term refers to the rank just senior to that of an army captain and just below the rank of lieutenant colonel. It is considered the most junior of the field ranks. In some militaries, notably France, the rank is referred to as commandant, while in others it is known as captain-major. It is also used in some police forces and other paramilitary rank structures, such as the New York State Police, New Jersey State Police and several others. As a police rank, Major roughly corresponds to the UK rank of Superintendent. When used in hyphenated or combined fashion, the term can also imply seniority at other levels of rank, including general-major or major general, denoting a mid-level general officer, and sergeant major, denoting the most senior NCO of a military unit. It can also be used with a hyphen to denote the leader of a military band such as in pipe-major or drum-major.
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Leader

    • Characters of This Rank: Firestar
    Leaders in the warriors series are given nine lives by StarClan, and lead one of the clans in the series.
    5.80
    5 votes
    66
    Commander

    Commander

    • Characters of This Rank: William Riker
    Commander is a naval rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. Commander is also used as a rank or title in some organizations outside of the armed forces, particularly in police and law enforcement. Commander is a rank used in navies but is very rarely used as a rank in armies (except in special forces where it designates the team leader). The title (originally "master and commander") originated in the 18th century to describe naval officers who commanded ships of war too large to be commanded by a Lieutenant but too small to warrant the assignment of a post-captain, or (before about 1770) a sailing-master; the commanding officer served as his own Master. In practice, these were usually unrated sloops-of-war of no more than 20 guns. The Royal Navy shortened "master and commander" to "commander" in 1794; however, the term "master and commander" remained (unofficially) in common parlance for several years. The equivalent American rank master commandant remained in use until changed to commander in 1838. A corresponding rank in some navies is frigate captain. In the 20th and 21st centuries, the rank has been
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Hoplite

    Hoplite

    • Characters of This Rank: Simon of Athens
    A hoplite was a citizen-soldier of the Ancient Greek city-states. Hoplites were primarily armed as spearmen and fought in a phalanx formation. The word "hoplite" (Greek: ὁπλίτης hoplitēs; pl. ὁπλίται hoplitai) derives from "hoplon" (ὅπλον, plural hopla ὅπλα), the type of the shield used by the soldiers, although, as a word, "hopla" could also denote weapons held or even full armament. In later texts, the term hoplite is used to denote any armoured infantry, regardless of armament or ethnicity. A hoplite was primarily a free citizen who was usually individually responsible for procuring his armour and weapon. In most Greek city-states, citizens received at least basic military training, serving in the standing army for a certain amount of time. They were expected to take part in any military campaign when they would be called for duty. The Lacedaemonian citizens (Sparta) were renowned for their lifelong combat training and almost mythical military prowess, while their greatest adversaries, the Athenians, were exempted from service only after the 60th year of their lives. The exact time when hoplitic warfare was developed is uncertain, the prevalent theory being that it was
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Master Sergeant

    • Characters of This Rank: Mack Gerhardt
    A master sergeant is the military rank for a senior non-commissioned officer in some armed forces. The רב-סמל ראשון Rav samal rishon (Rasar), Master Sergeant is a non-commissioned officers (נגדים) rank in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). Because the IDF is an integrated force, they have a unique rank structure. IDF ranks are the same in all services (army, navy, air force, etc.). The ranks are derived from those of the paramilitary Haganah developed in the British Mandate of Palestine period to protect the Yishuv. This origin is reflected in the slightly-compacted IDF rank structure. A master sergeant is: In the U.S. Army, the rank of master sergeant is usually held by staff members serving as NCOICs as well as commonly held by the motor pool NCOIC as the advisor to the motor pool chief, who is usually a warrant officer. When holding the position of first sergeant, while uncommon, the master sergeant is referred to as "first sergeant", however; when not in the position of first sergeant, master sergeants are addressed as, "sergeant." This is the standard address for all grades E-5 through E-8. Use of the term "top" or "master sergeant" is not a requirement, but is considered
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Chief medical officer

    • Characters of This Rank: Stephen Franklin
    In the fiction Star Trek universe, the chief medical officer (CMO) is a medical professional, typically a physician who is the highest ranking member of a Starfleet installation or vessel's medical staff. This officer occupies a unique position, having complete authority over any patient in placed in his or her care even when it is a superior officer until deemed fit for duty. In addition, if in his or her professional judgement the CMO deems a person in the officer's assigned area or vessel as medically unfit, that officer can remove even a superior officer from duty until that person's condition improves. Notable CMOs include Leonard McCoy, Beverly Crusher, and Julian Bashir. On more recent vessels and installations, the CMO is supported by ¬タモ or, in the case of the starship ''Voyager'', replaced by ¬タモ an Emergency Medical Hologram.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Darth

    In the fictional Star Wars universe, Darth is the traditional title of a Sith Lord or Master, the first part of the new name they take on. One backronym is that is a condensed version of 'Dark Lord of the Sith'. The term first appeared in the original script for Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, which bore little resemblance to the final release of the film. In it, a "Darth Vader" appeared as an Imperial official who would be renamed Grand Moff Tarkin in the final film, with Darth Vader becoming the name of the menacing black-armored villain. However, the title Darth is not given to all Sith. Many important Sith, such as Lumiya and Exar Kun, did not take the title of Darth. In addition, Sith Lords in the Old Sith Empire before the Great Hyperspace War did not hold the title of Darth. When the first Star Wars movie was in production, "Darth" was intended as Vader's actual first name, rather than his title. Because of this, Vader was the only known Sith Lord who carried the name "Darth" prior to the release of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace in 1999. When Darth Sidious and Darth Maul were revealed in The Phantom Menace, the name took on its distinct association with the Sith
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    10.00
    1 votes
    74

    Grand Duke

    • Characters of This Rank: Grand Duke
    The title grand duke is used in Western Europe and particularly in Germanic countries for provincial sovereigns. Grand duke is of a protocolary rank below a king but higher than a sovereign duke. Grand duke is also the usual and established translation of grand prince in languages which do not differentiate between princes who are children of a monarch (e.g. German Prinz) and ruling princes (e.g. German Fürst). English and French also use grand duke in this way. The title grand duke as translation of grand prince and the proper title grand duke have clearly different meanings and a separate background. Compare with the article grand prince. The territory of a grand duke is referred to as a grand duchy. The feminine form of grand duke is grand duchess. Translations for grand duke include: in Latin, magnus dux; in Spanish, gran duque; in Russian, великий князь (velikiy kniaz); in German, Großherzog, Italian gran duca; in French, grand-duc; in Portuguese, grão-duque; in Finnish, suurherttua; in Polish, wielki książę; in Hungarian, nagyherceg; in Swedish, storhertig; in Dutch, groothertog; in Danish, storhertug; in Lithuanian, didysis kunigaikštis; in Czech velkovévoda or
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Oracle

    Oracle

    • Characters of This Rank: Crevis
    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe and the Thieves' World fictional universe, as in many ancient cultures, an oracle is someone who can predict the future. An oracle may also be such a prediction of a future event, or the interpretation by an oracle of an omen. In the Sacred Band of Stepsons, as among the Sacred Band of Thebes, predictions by an oracle were highly prized and oracular guidance given great importance.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Tribal chief

    Tribal chief

    • Characters of This Rank: Pachacamac
    A tribal chief is the leader of a tribal society or chiefdom. Tribal societies with social stratification under a single (or dual) leader emerged in the Neolithic period out of earlier tribal structures with little stratification, and they remained prevalent throughout the Iron Age. In the case of indigenous tribal societies existing within larger colonial and post-colonial states, tribal chiefs may represent their tribe or ethnicity in a form of self-government. The most common types are the chairman of a council (usually of "elders") and/or a broader popular assembly in "parliamentary" cultures, the war chief (may be an alternative or additional post in war time), the hereditary chief and the politically dominant medicineman (in "theocratic" cultures). The term is usually distinct from chiefs at still lower levels, such as village headman (geographically defined) or clan chief (an essentially genealogical notion), as the notion "tribal" rather requires an ethno-cultural identity (racial, linguistic, religious etc.) as well as some political (representative, legislative, executive and/or judicial) expression. Anthropologist Elman Service distinguishes two stages of tribal
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Warrior-monk

    Warrior-monk

    • Characters of This Rank: Nameless adepts
    A warrior-monk is a character rank and character occupation in the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe. Warrior-monks are trained on Bandara in a variety of ancient mysteries and in all fighting forms and all secular metal skills, as well as undergoing training in spiritual developed in order to become capable of using more of their bodies and minds in pursuit of balance and the restoration of celestial order as it manifest among men. On Bandara, the elder gods are venerated, but the pursuit of the Bandaran warrior-monk is the perfection of God in Man, but the Bandarans are a fighting order: they send warrior-monks out into the world on a regular basis..
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Armorer

    • Characters of This Rank: Marc, weaponer
    An armourer is a member of a military or police force who maintains and repairs small arms and weapons systems, with some duties resembling those of a civilian gunsmith. With the renewed interest in traditional armour and weaponry, the occupation also involves working with film, stage, and historical and reenactment societies. Period costumes may require reproduction armour, swords, and related equipment. Armourers are the oldest trade in the British Army and trace their heritage back several centuries. Today they form a core role within the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) and work on an extremely wide variety of weapon systems. Typically Armourers are attached to Infantry Battalions, where the Staff Sergeant Armourer also commands the REME Detachment of other tradesman (including vehicle mechanics and electricians). Within the British Army, Armourers serve with a diverse range of units including: Infantry, Cavalry, Tanks, Special Forces and also in larger REME units providing depth repair. Armourers have the rank of Craftsman upon starting their trade training, which is the equivalent of Private and they have similar ranks of the remainder of the Army
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    6.50
    4 votes
    83

    Barrayaran Imperial Auditor

    Imperial Auditor is a fictional position in the government of Barrayar in Lois McMaster Bujold's sci-fi series the Vorkosigan Saga; alternatively referred to as 'The Emperor's Voice'. On Barrayar, there exist up to eight permanent Auditors and the Ninth Temporary Auditor. These auditors are appointed by the Emperor and speak with his Voice. Voice is a Barrayaran legal concept of proxy which bestows the hierarchical authority of one person upon another of otherwise lesser rank. This bestowed authority is plenipotentiary, but applies only where the person of lesser rank is carrying out his formal duties. Imperial Auditors hold their appointments till death, retirement, impeachment, or until the Emperor rescinds the appointment. Usually, they serve for life. Imperial Auditors were originally the Emperor's financial auditors: They made sure that the Counts were correctly paying the Emperor his taxes. Because they spoke with the Emperor's Voice, they soon became feared. It is said that bandits would ride point for an Auditor and make sure that no one disturbed him on his way. On Barrayar, the appearance of an Auditor is an immediate concern, and Barrayarans usually spend the few minutes
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    Decima Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Yammy
    Decima Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Plebs

    • Characters of This Rank: Lucius Vorenus
    The plebs were the general body of free, land-owning Roman citizens (as distinguished from slaves and the capite censi) in Ancient Rome. They were the non-aristocratic class of Rome and consisted of freed people, shopkeepers, crafts people, skilled or unskilled workers, and farmers. Members of the plebs were also distinct from the higher order of the patricians. A member of the plebs was known as a plebeian ( /plɨˈbiːən/; Latin: plebeius). This term is used today to refer to one who is or appears to be of the middle or lower order; however, in Rome plebeians could become quite wealthy and influential. In Latin the word plebs is a singular collective noun, and its genitive is plebis. Multiple "plebs" are "plebes." The origin of the separation into orders is unclear, and it is disputed when the Romans were divided under the early kings into patricians and plebeians, or whether the clientes (or dependents) of the patricians formed a third group. The nineteenth century historian Barthold Georg Niebuhr held that plebeians began to appear at Rome during the reign of Ancus Marcius and were possibly foreigners settling in Rome as naturalized citizens. In any case, at the outset of the
    8.50
    2 votes
    87

    District Count of Barrayar

    Count is a title and position in the government of Barrayar in Lois McMaster Bujold's science fiction series the Vorkosigan Saga. Barrayar is divided into 60 districts. Each Count owns and governs his district. It appears that only Vor can be counts and only males at that. Countship is hereditary, usually, though each Count can name his own heir. The count is referred to as "Count Vor(name)" while the heir is always "Lord Vor(name)". The count's wife is "Countess Vor(name)" and the heir's wife is "Lady Vor(name)". The counts meet in the Council of Counts which works much like the upper house of a legislature. Emperor Gregor is also Count Vorbarra, holding a position formally known as "first among equals", by virtue of descent from Dorca Vorbarra, who first unified the warring fiefdoms of Barrayar. Although holding a vote in the Council of Counts, by tradition he withholds it, or uses it to break ties in favor of the status quo. One of the most important functions of the Council of Counts is to appropriate money and levy taxes. Without money the Imperium cannot pursue its policies. This is one of the major checks on Imperial power. Other laws are made in parliamentary fashion, with
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Queen

    • Characters of This Rank: Daisy
    In the warriors series, a queen is a she-cat who lives in the nursery, and usually has or is expecting kits.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Quileute

    • Characters of This Rank: Collin
    The Quileute ( /ˈkwɪliːuːt/), also known as the Quillayute ( /kwɨˈleɪ.uːt/), are a Native American people in western Washington state in the United States, currently numbering approximately 2000. The Quileute people settled onto the Quileute Indian Reservation after signing the Quinault Treaty in 1855. It is located near the southwest corner of Clallam County, Washington at the mouth of the Quillayute River on the Pacific coast. The reservation's main population center is the community of La Push, Washington. The 2000 census reported an official resident population of 371 people on the reservation, which has a land area of 4.061 km² (1.5678 sq mi, or 1,003.4 acres).They have their own government inside the United States that consists of a tribal council with staggered terms. The current tribal council consists of: Carol Hatch (chair), Tony Foster (vice-chair), DeAnna Hobson (secretary), and Anna Rose Counsell (treasurer). The Quileute language belongs to the Chimakuan family of languages among Northwest Coast indigenous peoples. The Quileute language is one of a kind, as the only related aboriginal people to the Quileute, the Chimakum, were wiped out by Chief Seattle and the
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    Squadron Leader

    • Characters of This Rank: Shinichirō Tamaki
    Squadron leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF and IAF; SQNLDR in the RAAF and RNZAF, formerly sometimes S/L in all services) is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many countries which have historical British influence. It is also sometimes used as the English translation of an equivalent rank in countries which have a non-English air force-specific rank structure. In these cases a squadron leader ranks above flight lieutenant and immediately below wing commander. It has a NATO ranking code of OF-3, equivalent to a lieutenant-commander in the Royal Navy or a major in the British Army or the Royal Marines. The equivalent rank in the Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), Women's Royal Air Force (WRAF) (until 1968) and Princess Mary's Royal Air Force Nursing Service (PMRAFNS) (until 1980) was squadron officer. The rank originated in the British Royal Air Force and was adopted by several other air forces which use, or used, the RAF rank system. On 1 April 1918, the newly created RAF adopted its officer rank titles from the British Army, with Royal Naval Air Service lieutenant commanders and Royal Flying Corps majors becoming majors in the RAF. In response to the
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Watcher

    In the fictional Buffyverse established by the television series Buffy and Angel, a Watcher is a member of a secret organization, the Watchers' Council, which seeks to prepare the Slayer to fight demonic forces. Watchers are devoted to tracking and combating malevolent supernatural entities (particularly vampires), primarily by locating individuals with the talents required to fight such beings and win. More specifically, Watchers are assigned to Slayers, girls that are part of a succession of mystically powered individuals who are destined to face said foes. Upon a Slayer's demise, the next Slayer is called into duty and is assigned a Watcher. The Watchers' Council trains new Watchers in a private school of some kind. In "Never Kill a Boy on the First Date", Giles implies that Watchers are, to a certain extent, "called" or assigned to become Watchers before going to university. This idea is supported by Watcher families such as the Giles and Wyndam-Pryces. Rupert Giles was Buffy's Watcher in the beginning of the series. It was revealed that he has never been invited to the Watchers' retreat. After being fired by the Council for having "a father's love" for the Slayer in season 3,
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Count

    Count

    • Characters of This Rank: Hasimir Fenring
    Count (male) or Countess (female) is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility. The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning "companion", and later "companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor". The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl (whose wife is a "countess", for lack of an English term). Alternative names for the "Count" rank in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as Graf in Germany and Hakushaku during the Japanese Imperial era. In the late Roman Empire, the Latin title comes, meaning (imperial) "companion", denoted the high rank of various courtiers and provincial officials, either military or administrative: before Anthemius became emperor in the West in 467, he was military comes charged with strengthening defenses on the Danube frontier. In the Western Roman Empire, Count came to indicate generically a military commander, but was not a specific rank. In the Eastern Roman Empire, from about the
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Detective

    Detective

    • Characters of This Rank: Joss Carter
    A detective or investigator is an investigator, either a member of a police agency or a private person. The latter may be known as private investigators or "private eyes". Informally, and primarily in fiction, a detective is any licensed or unlicensed person who solves crimes, including historical crimes, or looks into records. In some police departments, a detective position is not appointed, it is a position achieved by passing a written test after a person completes the requirements for being a police officer. Prospective British police detectives must have completed at least two years as a uniformed officer before applying to join the Criminal Investigation Department. UK Police must also pass the National Investigators' Examination in order to progress on to subsequent stages of the Initial Crime Investigators Development Programme in order to qualify as a Detective. In many other police systems, detectives are college graduates who join directly from civilian life without first serving as uniformed officers. Some people argue that detectives do a completely different job and therefore require completely different training, qualifications, qualities and abilities than
    7.00
    3 votes
    94

    Executive officer

    • Characters of This Rank: Critias
    An executive officer is generally a person responsible for running an organization, although the exact nature of the role varies depending on the organization. While there is no clear line between executive or principal and inferior officers, principal officers are high-level officials in the executive branch of U.S. government such as department heads of independent agencies. In Humphrey's Executor v. United States, 295 U.S. 602 (1935), the Court distinguished between executive officers and quasi-legislative or quasi-judicial officers by stating that the former serve at the pleasure of the president and may be removed at his discretion. The latter may be removed only with procedures consistent with statutory conditions enacted by Congress. The decision by the Court was that the Federal Trade Commission was a quasi-legislative body because of other powers it had, and therefore the president could not fire an FTC member for political reasons. Congress can’t retain removal power over officials with executive function (Bowsher v. Synar). However, statutes can restrict removal if not purely executive (Humphrey’s executor), but can't restrict removal of purely executive officer (Myers
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Fleet Admiral

    Fleet Admiral

    • Characters of This Rank: Terrence Hood
    Fleet Admiral of the United States Navy, or more commonly referred to as Fleet Admiral (FADM), is a five-star flag officer rank, and it is considered to be the highest possible rank attainable in the United States Navy. Fleet Admiral ranks immediately above admiral and is equivalent to General of the Army and General of the Air Force. The Fleet Admiral rank is reserved for wartime use only and the grade is not currently active. A special grade of Admiral of the Navy, which ranks above Fleet Admiral, was once conferred to Admiral George Dewey following the Spanish–American War (1898) in 1903, but it ceased to exist after his death on 16 January 1917. The insignia for a Fleet Admiral is composed of five silver stars in a pentagonal design with a two-inch rank stripe, below four half inch stripes, worn on the service dress uniform. In keeping with a tradition dating back to the 18th-century Royal Navy, a Fleet Admiral is entitled to full Admiral's pay and fringe benefits, including a small staff, for the remainder of his life. The United States rank of Fleet Admiral was created by an Act of Congress on a temporary basis under Pub.L. 78-482 on December 14, 1944, and made permanent by
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Iatros

    Iatros

    • Characters of This Rank: Gayle
    An "Iatros" is a military medic in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe. An iatros may also serve as a hippiatros, or horse doctor.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Senior Member

    • Characters of This Rank: Lazarus Long
    The most imporant and influential rank of the Howard Families organization.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    5.20
    5 votes
    103
    Cup-bearer

    Cup-bearer

    • Characters of This Rank: Hebe
    A cup-bearer was an officer of high rank in royal courts, whose duty it was to serve the drinks at the royal table. On account of the constant fear of plots and intrigues, a person must be regarded as thoroughly trustworthy to hold this position. He must guard against poison in the king's cup, and was sometimes required to swallow some of the wine before serving it. His confidential relations with the king often gave him a position of great influence. The position of cup bearer is greatly valued and given to only a select few throughout history. Qualifications for the job were not held lightly but of high esteem valued for their beauty and even more for their modesty, industriousness and courage. The cup-bearer as an honorific role, for example with the Egyptian hieroglyph for a cup-bearer, was used as late as 196 BC in the Rosetta Stone for the Kanephoros cup-bearer Areia, daughter of Diogenes; each Ptolemaic Decree starting with the Decree of Canopus honored a cup-bearer. A much older role was the appointment of Sargon of Akkad as cup-bearer in the 23rd century BC. Cup-bearers are mentioned several times in the Bible. This officer is first mentioned in Genesis 40:1, where the
    5.20
    5 votes
    104
    Warlord

    Warlord

    • Characters of This Rank: Khal Drogo
    A warlord is a person with power who has both military and civil control over a subnational area due to armed forces loyal to the warlord and not to a central authority. The term can also mean one who espouses the ideal that war is necessary, and has the means and authority to engage in war. Today, the word has a strong connotation that the person exercises far more power than his official title or rank legitimately permits. Under feudalism, by contrast, the local military leader may enjoy great autonomy and a personal army, and still derive legitimacy from formal fealty to a central authority. Warlordism is a term coined to describe chaos at the end of the Qing Dynasty and the birth of the Republic of China, from the death of Yuan Shikai in 1916 until 1928. This period is called the warlord era of China. It can however be used to describe similar periods in other countries or epochs such as in Japan during the Sengoku period, or in China during the Three Kingdoms, or in Somalia during the Somali Civil War. The word "warlord" entered the English language as a translation from the German word "Kriegsherr", which was an official title of the German Emperor. Its use for Chinese
    5.20
    5 votes
    105
    6.00
    4 votes
    106

    Commissioner

    • Characters of This Rank: James Gordon
    Commissioner is in principle the title given to a member of a commission or to an individual who has been given a commission (official charge or authority to do something, the noun's second meaning). In practice, the title of commissioner has evolved to include a variety of senior officials, often sitting on a specific commission. In particular, commissioner frequently refers to senior police or government officials. A High Commissioner is equivalent to an ambassador, originally between the United Kingdom and the Dominions sharing the British Monarch as head of state and now between all Commonwealth states whether Commonwealth Realms, Commonwealth Republics or Commonwealth states having their own monarchs. The title is also sometimes given to senior officials in the private sector, for instance many North American sports leagues. A Commissioner within a modern state generally holds his office by virtue of a commission from the head of state or a council of elected representatives (or appointed by non-elected officials in the case of dictatorships). Senior Public Servants, Commissioners and other high-ranking bureaucrats referred to collectively as Mandarins. Commissioners are the
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Cuarta Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Ulquiorra
    Cuarta Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Duke

    • Characters of This Rank: Leto Atreides I
    A duke (male) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. During the Middle Ages the title signified first among the Germanic monarchies. Dukes were the rulers of the provinces and the superiors of the counts in the cities and later, in the feudal monarchies, the highest-ranking peers of the king. A duke may or may not be, ipso facto, a member of the nation's peerage: in the United Kingdom and Spain all dukes are/were also peers of the realm, in France some were and some were not, while the term is not applicable to dukedoms of other nations, even where an institution similar to the peerage (e.g., Grandeeship, Imperial Diet, Hungarian House of Magnates) existed. During the 19th century many of the smaller German and Italian states were ruled by Dukes or Grand Dukes. But presently, with the exception of the Grand
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Junior Hazard

    Junior Hazard

    • Characters of This Rank: Randal
    Junior Hazard is featured in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Lady

    Lady

    • Characters of This Rank: Maria
    The word lady is a polite term for a woman, specifically the female equivalent to, or spouse of, a lord or gentleman, and in many contexts a term for any adult woman. Once relating specifically to women of high social class or status, over the last 300 years it has spread to embrace all adult women, though in some contexts may still be used to evoke a concept of "ladylike" standards of behaviour. The word comes from Old English hlǣfdige; the first part of the word is a mutated form of hlāf, "loaf, bread", also seen in the corresponding hlāford, "lord". The second part is usually taken to be from the root dig-, "to knead", seen also in dough; the sense development from bread-kneader, or bread-maker, or bread-shaper, to the ordinary meaning, though not clearly to be traced historically, may be illustrated by that of "lord". The primary meaning of "mistress of a household" is now mostly obsolete, save for the term landlady and in set phrases such as "the lady of the house." This meaning is retained in the southern states of the USA, however, in the title First Lady for the wife of an elected official. In many European languages the equivalent term serves as a general form of address
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Margrave

    • Characters of This Rank: Jeremiah Gottwald
    Margrave (man) and Margravine (woman) were the medieval titles for the hereditary nobleman and noblewoman with military responsibility for one of the border provinces of a kingdom. The greater exposure of a border province to military invasion provided the Margrave with military forces greater than the forces of the other lords of the realm, thereby indicating superior noble rank. As a military governor, the margrave often was responsible for a territory greater than the province proper, because of the border expansion subsequent to royal war. In the Middle Ages, the margrave usually exercised greater autonomy of action (tactical, strategic, political) than that granted by the king to the other lords of the realm. Nonetheless, the stable territory borders realised with the political progress achieved by the late middle ages (AD 1300–1500) and the early modern era (AD 1500) gradually diminished the politico-military distinctions of superior rank among margraves and the other hereditary lords of the kingdom. Etymologically, the word margrave (Latin: marchio ca. 1551) is the English and French form of the German noble title Markgraf (Mark “march” + Graf “Count”), which also is
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Emperor of Destruction

    Emperor of Destruction is a fictional rank exclusive to the Japanese Transformers series. It was originally only found in Japanese Transformers series (including the Japanese versions of the U.S. Cartoon that aired in the 1980s) but has occasionally appeared in Western Transformer literature as well. The opposite number of the Emperors of Destruction are the Convoys. The meaning of the title is self-explanatory. "The Emperor of Destruction" leads the Decepticons (called Destrons in the Japanese airings) on their conquests and as such oversees the destruction of all who oppose them. As is well known, it is not the strongest Decepticon who ascends to lead their ranks, but the Decepticon with the proper combination of power, cunning, ambition, ruthlessness and charisma. It is this combination that allows this Transformer to prevail even over others who might be stronger or smarter. In most of the Transformers series, the Emperor of Destruction plays the part of the main villain and as such is often portrayed as the single most dangerous Decepticon of that series. Note: Not all of the characters below have the title "Emperor of Destruction". In the original Japanese Transformers
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Great Fairy

    • Characters of This Rank: Venus
    Great Fairies are fiction fairies found in most games of ''The Legend of Zelda'' series. It is usually assumed that there are more than one in existence. After completing a specific quest or reaching a certain area, a Great Fairy can grant Link with a reward such as extended health, magic or upgraded items. In earlier games they came in two varieties ones that provide upgrades for Link's status and ones that merely replenish Link's health. These separate concepts were combined in the Great Fairies of Ocarina of Time, wherein they would first grant Link the special ability in question and thereafter heal him on any later visits. Great Fairies in The Legend of Zelda series have changed dramatically throughout the games. While they are portrayed as fully dressed, wearing clothes that are similar to a wedding dress in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, they've changed in appearance in others. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time makes them out to be slim, vine covered women, while Great Fairies in The Wind Waker are clothed in a gown and have 4 arms. Why they have changed isn't explained, but like many other Zelda characters, have returned again and again. A possible
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Hipparch

    Hipparch

    • Characters of This Rank: Niko
    "Niko was, is, and always will be a weapon of the god, nothing more." -- The Sacred Band
    9.00
    1 votes
    119

    Intelligence officer

    • Characters of This Rank: Kama
    An intelligence officer is a person employed by an organization to collect, compile and/or analyze information (known as intelligence) which is of use to that organization. Organizations which employ intelligence officers include armed forces, police, civilian intelligence agencies and customs agencies. Intelligence officers make use of a variety of sources of information, including The actual role carried out by an intelligence officer varies depending on the remit of his/her parent organization. Officers of foreign intelligence agencies (e.g. the United States' Central Intelligence Agency, the United Kingdom's Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) and Australia's Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) may spend much of their careers abroad. Officers of domestic intelligence agencies (such as the United States' Federal Bureau of Investigation, the UK's Security Service (MI5) and Australia's Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) are responsible for counter-terrorism, counter-espionage, counter-proliferation and the detection and prevention of serious organized crime within their own countries (although, in Britain, the Serious Organised Crime Agency has been set up to take care of
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Lieutenant

    Lieutenant

    • Characters of This Rank: Donald Thompson
    A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and LEUT) is a junior commissioned officer in many nations' armed forces. The rank of lieutenant has different meanings in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but the majority of cases it is common for it to be sub-divided into a senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) rank. In navies it may relate to a particular post rather than a rank. Typically, the post of lieutenant in naval usage is held by a Captain, while still a junior officer rank, is senior to the army lieutenant rank. It is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces as a rank. Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organizations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command," and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "lieutenant master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "master" in an organization utilizing both such ranks. Notable uses include lieutenant governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. The word lieutenant derives from French;
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Sidekick

    Sidekick

    • Characters of This Rank: Frostbite
    A sidekick is a close companion who is generally regarded as subordinate to the one he accompanies. Some well-known fictional sidekicks are Don Quixote's Sancho Panza, Sherlock Holmes' Doctor Watson, The Lone Ranger's Tonto, The Green Hornet's Kato, and Batman's Robin. The origin of the term comes from pickpocket slang of the late 19th and early 20th century. The "kick" is the front side pocket of a pair of trousers, and was found to be the pocket safest from theft. Some unknown poet of the underworld must have made the connection between the front pocket - the hardest to pick - and an inseparable companion. One of the earliest recorded sidekicks may be Enkidu, who adopted a sidekick role to Gilgamesh after they became allies in the Epic of Gilgamesh. Other early examples include Achilles and Patroclus from the Iliad, and Moses and Aaron from the Bible. Sidekicks can provide one or multiple functions, such as a counterpoint to the hero, an alternate point of view, or knowledge, skills, or anything else the hero does not have. They often function as comic relief, and/or the straight man to the hero's comedic actions. A sidekick can also act as someone that the audience can relate to
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Demigod

    Demigod

    • Characters of This Rank: Hercules
    A demigod (or demi-god), meaning half-god, is a originally Greek mythological figure whose one parent was a god and whose other parent was human; as such, demigods are human-god hybrids. In some mythologies it also describes humans who became gods, or simply extremely powerful figures whose powers approach those of the gods even though they are not gods themselves. Examples of well-known demigods include Greek hero Heracles (Roman Hercules), the Celtic hero Cuchulain, the Sumerian king Gilgamesh (who supposedly was actually two thirds god), and the ancient Germanic woodsman Ansel,. Part of the dual nature of Greek heroes that gave rise to the modern demigod conception of them is that one parent is a mortal, and another is a god. This scenario is also occasionally embellished with the theme of double paternity: the hero's mother lying with king and god in the same night (the mother of Theseus, for example) or to be visited secretly by the god (like Danaë, mother of Perseus), and the seed of the two fathers is mixed in her womb. Thus the heroes have liminal qualities that enable them to have great strength, to cross the threshold between the worlds of the living and the dead yet
    6.67
    3 votes
    126

    Deputy

    • Characters of This Rank: Ashfoot
    Deputies in the warriors series are cats who assist the clan leader in running their clan, and perform tasks such as organizing patrols. When a clan leader dies, the deputy takes his/her place.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127

    Elder

    • Characters of This Rank: Graypool
    An elder is a Clan cat that has served his or her Clan faithfully, but now has retired. They are wise and are held in high respect by the other cats; their counsel and knowledge sought several times even by Clan Leaders, though they are often described as grumpy.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    General of the Gotei 13

    • Characters of This Rank: Shigekuni Yamamoto-Genryūsai
    General of the Gotei 13 is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    6.67
    3 votes
    130

    Spymaster

    • Characters of This Rank: Nicholas Fury
    A spymaster is a ring leader of a spy ring, run by a secret service.
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Viceroy

    Viceroy

    • Characters of This Rank: Nunnally Lamperouge
    A viceroy /ˈvaɪs.rɔɪ/ is a royal official who runs a country, colony, or city province (or state) in the name of and as representative of the monarch. The term derives from the Latin prefix vice-, meaning "in the place of" and the French word roi, meaning king. A viceroy's province or larger territory may be called a viceroyalty. The adjective form is viceregal, less often viceroyal. A vicereine is a woman in a viceregal position, or a viceroy's wife. The title was originally used by the Aragonese Crown, where beginning in the 14th century it referred to the governors of Sardinia and Corsica. The absolutist kings of Spain came to appoint numerous viceroys to rule over various parts of their vast Spanish Empire in Europe, the Americas, and overseas elsewhere. In Europe, until the 18th century the Habsburg crown appointed viceroys of Aragon, Valencia, Catalonia, Navarre, Sardinia, Sicily, Naples. With the ascension of the House of Bourbon to the Spanish throne, the historic Aragonese viceroyalties were replaced by new Captaincies General. At the end of War of the Spanish Succession, the Spanish Monarchy was shorn of its Italian possessions. These Italian territories, however,
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
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    2 votes
    134
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Oyarsa

    Oyarsa (pl. Oyéresu) is a word in the Old Solar language of C. S. Lewis's Space Trilogy. While in Out of the Silent Planet Elwin Ransom thinks it is the name of a god-like character that rules Malacandra, in Perelandra, it is revealed that Oyarsa is its title. When the Oyarsa of Mars visits other worlds, he is known not as "Oyarsa", but simply as "Malacandra". The other planets of the solar system are likewise ruled by their own Oyéresu. The Oyéresu of Viritrilbia (Mercury), Glund (Jupiter), and Lurga (Saturn) appear in That Hideous Strength, along with the Oyarsa of Malacandra and the former Oyarsa of Perelandra. The Oyarsa of Earth is a rebel against God, and is strongly implied to be Satan. Lewis implies in the final chapter of Out of the Silent Planet that he derived his term for these beings from Oyarses, the name given in Bernard Silvestris's Cosmographia to the governors of the celestial spheres. Bernard's word is almost certainly a corruption—or a deliberate alteration—of Greek οὐσιάρχης ("lords of being"), used with the same meaning in the Hermetic Asclepius.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    Padishah Emperor

    • Characters of This Rank: Shaddam Corrino IV
    Padishah Emperor is the title given to the hereditary rulers of the Old Empire in the science fiction Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. In Herbert's originating novel Dune (1965) it is established that the Imperium of the Padishah Emperor encompasses the entire universe known to mankind. While the Emperor is supreme sovereign ruler of the universe, power is shared, in a quasi-feudal arrangement, with the noble houses of the Landsraad and with the Spacing Guild, which possesses a monopoly over interstellar travel. Members of House Corrino sit on the Golden Lion throne as Padishah Emperors from the time of the ancient Battle of Corrin until the events of Dune some 10,000 years later. Dune establishes that Salusa Secundus had been the homeworld of House Corrino, and at some point the Imperial Court had moved to the planet Kaitain. As Dune begins, the 81st Padishah Emperor is Shaddam Corrino IV, successor to Elrood IX; all that is noted of Elrood in Dune is that he had died by chaumurky (poison) and that Shaddam's close friend Count Hasimir Fenring was rumored to have been responsible. During the events of Dune, Shaddam himself is deposed by Duke Paul Atreides in 10,193 A.G.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Rogue

    • Characters of This Rank: Tigerstar
    In the warriors series, a rogue is a cat who has been exiled from the clans and is not taken care of by twolegs. Rogues can also be loners who are hostile to the clans.
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    Softpaw

    • Characters of This Rank: Teller of the Pointed Stones
    In the Warriors Series, Softpaws are cats who are in training to become Sharpclaws in the ancient group of cats.
    7.50
    2 votes
    139

    Special Agent

    • Characters of This Rank: Dana Scully
    Special agent is usually the title for a detective or investigator for a state, county, municipal, federal or tribal government. An agent is generally an administrative worker for some but not all agencies. Within the U.S. government, the title of 'special agent' is used to describe any federal general or criminal investigator in the GS-1801,1810,1811 or FS-2501 job series as so titled according to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) handbook. Agents are typically educated at least as far as the undergraduate level. Such persons are usually armed and have the power to arrest and conduct investigations into the violation of federal laws. Most federal agencies have some type of special agent, including the following: Federal law enforcement training can be divided into various categories, the most common being basic, agency-specific basic (ASB), advanced/specialized, and agency-advanced/specialized. To operate safely and effectively, U.S. special agents and criminal investigators must possess skills and knowledge regarding criminal and civil law and procedure, enforcement operations, physical techniques, and technical equipment, to mention a few. They must also be physically
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    Combatant commander

    Combatant commander

    • Characters of This Rank: Theron, Rankan General
    Combatant commander (CCDR) is the post of a major military leader of United States armed forces, of a Unified Combatant Command. The Goldwater-Nichols Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 added a new level of CCDR to the U.S. military's chain of command. Regional combatant commanders were created in order to have a local supreme commander who could exercise unified command and control across service boundaries, ideally eliminating or diminishing interservice rivalries. CCDRs reported directly to the United States Secretary of Defense, and through him to the President of the United States. The best-known combatant commander was probably Norman Schwarzkopf, Commander, U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) during Operation Desert Storm. The term "Commander in Chief" has a long history of use in English-speaking armed forces, designating an overall multi-service commander in a theater of operations; and the commanders of the unified and specified commands had been called Commanders-in-Chief ("CINCs") for decades until October 24, 2002, when Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld suddenly announced that the title of "Commander-in-Chief" would thereafter be reserved for the President, since
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Patrician

    Patrician

    • Characters of This Rank: Marcus Junius Brutus
    The term patrician (Latin: patricius, Greek: πατρίκιος, patrikios) originally referred to a group of elite families in ancient Rome, including both their natural and adopted members. In the late Roman Empire, the class was broadened to include high council officials, and after the fall of the Western Empire it remained a high honorary title in the Byzantine Empire. Medieval patrician classes were once again formally defined groups of elite burgher families in many medieval Italian republics, such as Venice and Genoa, and subsequently "patrician" became a vaguer term used for aristocrats and elite bourgeoisie in many countries. The word "patrician" is derived from the Latin word patricius (plural patricii), which comes from patrēs, the plural of the Latin word pater (father). Pater was one of the terms applied to the original members of the Roman Senate. The word comes down in English as "patrician" from the Middle English patricion, from the Old French patrician. In modern English, the word patrician is generally used to denote a member of the upper class, often with connotations of inherited wealth, elitism, and a sense of noblesse oblige. According to Livy, the first 100 men
    6.33
    3 votes
    145

    Prince of Demons

    Prince of Demons is a title contested by the greatest demon lords of the Abyss, in the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. At the moment, the title belongs to Demogorgon, a mighty tanar'ri known for his unsurpassed physical prowess and his innovations and experimentations, which have released inventive new horrors upon the multiverse. Though in the chaotic and unorganized Abyss there are no official titles, no other demon lord has simply been able to prove themselves his better yet. Graz'zt, the Dark Prince, is one of if not the most cunning and intelligent demons in the Abyss. He rules over three layers of the Abyss, using a web of intrigue and terror to command his vast armies. Orcus, the Demon Prince of the Undead, is a ram-headed tanar'ri who commands a great cult following on the Material Plane. While he lacks the individual might of Demogorgon or an empire as vast as Graz'zt's, he may actually be the closest to ascending to godhood. Obox-ob, the Prince of Vermin, is a powerful obyrith who now gathers his power back from a disgusting layer deep in the Abyss. He was murdered by the Queen of Chaos when she was trying to rally the obyriths into a united front in the
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Second in Command of the Sacred Band of Stepsons

    Second in Command of the Sacred Band of Stepsons

    • Characters of This Rank: Critias
    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe and the Thieves' World shared fictional universe, the billet of Second in Command of the Sacred Band of Stepsons has been filled at various times by Fox, called Critias; Ace, called Straton; and Stealth, called Nikodemos. Since the commander of the Sacred Band doesn't sleep and heals from mortal wounds, the task effectively serving as second in command in a mercenary unit commanded by an immortalized warlord is a demanding one. Critias takes up the post soon after Tempus inherits ten Sacred Band pairs from Abarsis and augments them with thirty single mercenaries, forming the Stepsons. When Critias is summoned upcountry to fight in the assault on Wizardwall at Tempus's side, Straton becomes the interim commander of Stepsons in Sanctuary, responsible only to Tempus, and holds this post intermittently over the next five years, while Critias serves directly under Tempus throughout the Wizard Wars and during the Mygdonian campaign, until Tempus releases his fighters from service. When Tempus reforms the Band after securing a new base of operations on Lemuria, Critias takes up his old post, recalling the best of the the Sacred Band of Stepsons and 3rd Commando to active duty, including Straton and Niko. After the Battle of Sandia, Tempus promotes Nikodemos to serve as his hipparch and second in command and makes Critias his tetrarch and executive officer. As the Band grows from 50 Stepsons to the elite 360-strong cadre of Lemuria's armed forces, absorbing the Theban Sacred Band and the 3rd Commando and hand-picked shock troops, requirements for the second in command grow apace.
    6.33
    3 votes
    147

    Septima Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Zommari Leroux
    Septima Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    6.33
    3 votes
    148

    Adept in training

    • Characters of This Rank: Merricat
    Adept in training is a character rank in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Consul

    Consul

    • Characters of This Rank: Chi-Fu
    The political title Consul is used for the official representatives of the government of one state in the territory of another, normally acting to assist and protect the citizens of the consul's own country, and to facilitate trade and friendship between the peoples of the two countries. A consul is distinguished from an ambassador, the latter being a representative from one head of state to another. There can be only one ambassador from one country to another, representing the first country's head of state to that of the second, and his or her duties revolve around diplomatic relations between the two countries; however, there may be several consuls, one in each of several main cities, providing assistance with bureaucratic issues to both the citizens of the consul's own country travelling or living abroad and to the citizens of the country the consul resides in who wish to travel to or trade with the consul's country. In Classical Greece, some of the functions of the modern Consul were fulfilled by a Proxenos. Unlike the modern position, this was a citizen of the host polity (in Greece, a city state). The Proxenos was usually a rich merchant who had socio-economic ties with
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    General

    General

    • Characters of This Rank: William Tecumseh Sherman
    In the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, general is a four-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-10. General ranks above lieutenant general and below General of the Army or General of the Air Force; the Marine Corps does not have an established grade above general. General is equivalent to the rank of admiral in the other uniformed services. Since the grades of General of the Army and General of the Air Force are reserved for war-time use only, and since the Marine Corps has no five-star equivalent, the grade of general is currently considered to be the highest appointment an officer can achieve in these three services. U.S. Code of law explicitly limits the total number of four-star officers that may be on active duty at any given time. The total number of active duty general officers is capped at 230 for the Army, 208 for the Air Force, 60 for the Marine Corps. For the Army, Navy, and Air Force, no more than about 25% of the service's active duty general or flag officers may have more than two stars, and statute sets the total number of four-star generals allowed in each service. This is set at 7 four-star Army generals, 9
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    Loner

    • Characters of This Rank: Sasha
    In the warriors series, a rogue (or loner) is a cat who does not belong to any clans and is not taken care of by twolegs.
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Philosopher

    Philosopher

    • Characters of This Rank: Heraclitus
    A philosopher is a person who offers views or theories on questions in logic, ethics, aesthetics, and related fields.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    8.00
    1 votes
    155

    Vedek

    • Characters of This Rank: Winn Adami
    In the fictional Star Trek universe, a Vedek is a senior member of the clergy in the Bajoran religion. Much as with cardinal in Roman Catholicism, the vedeks form an assembly which governs the Bajoran religion; they also form an important voice in Bajoran government as well. (Unlike the Roman cardinals, who personally elect the pope, the Vedek Assembly does not choose their supreme spiritual leader, the kai; instead, a kai is chosen by direct vote from the entire Bajoran populace.) There appear to be many more Vedeks on Bajor than Cardinals however, although this may be due to the increase in use of inter planetary transport. Notable Vedeks include:
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    5.25
    4 votes
    157

    Colonel

    • Characters of This Rank: Colonel Christopher Brandon
    Colonel is a rank of the British forces, ranking below Brigadier, and above Lieutenant Colonel. British Colonels are not usually field commanders; typically they serve as staff officers between field commands at battalion and brigade level. The insignia is two diamond shaped pips (properly called "Bath Stars") below a crown. The crown has varied in the past with different monarchs; the current Queen's reign has used St Edward's Crown. During World War I, colonels wore the following cuff badges: From 1 April 1918 to 31 July 1919, the Royal Air Force maintained the rank of colonel. It was superseded by the rank of group captain on the following day. In the British Army, Colonel may also refer to the ceremonial head of a regiment. This is almost always a general officer, Brigadier or Colonel, often retired, with a close link to the regiment in question. Some non-military personnel may be appointed to the position, thereby holding an Honorary rank of Colonel for the duration of the appointment, though usually with the Territorial Army units. The position is often described as "Colonel of the Regiment", to distinguish it from the rank of Colonel. When attending functions as "Colonel of
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Hippiatros

    Hippiatros

    • Characters of This Rank: Cassander
    In ancient Greece and in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe, a hippiatros was a veterinarian (horse doctor). In the Sacred Band of Stepson fictional universe, the hippiatros of the Unified Sacred Band acted as the unit's 'iatros' and treated human patients as well with cautery, surgery, herbal and topical medicine. In the book "The Sacred Band," Cassander, a Stepson, is the Band's hippiatros and iatros. Once in Sanctuary, Cassander is assisted by Simias, the Theban, and his partner Perses, a trained field nurse.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Prefect

    Prefect

    • Characters of This Rank: Cedric Diggory
    Prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: "make in front", i.e., put in charge) is a magisterial title of varying definition. A prefect's office, department, or area of control is called a prefecture, but in various post-Roman cases there is a prefect without a prefecture or vice versa. The words "prefect" and "prefecture" are also used, more or less conventionally, to render analogous words in other languages, especially Romance languages. Praefectus, often with a further qualification, was the formal title of many, fairly low to high-ranking, military or civil officials in the Roman Empire, whose authority was not embodied in their person (as it was with elected Magistrates) but conferred by delegation from a higher authority. They did have some authority in their prefecture such as controlling prisons and in civil administration. The Praetorian prefect (Praefectus praetorio) began as the military commander of a general's guard company in the field, then grew in importance as the Praetorian Guard became a potential kingmaker during the Empire. From the Emperor Diocletian's tetrarchy (c. 300) they became the administrators of the four Praetorian
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Sergeant

    Sergeant

    • Characters of This Rank: Bob Shaftoe
    Sergeant (normally abbreviated to Sgt) is a rank used in some form by most militaries, police forces, and other uniformed organizations around the world. Its origins are the Latin serviens, "one who serves", through the French term Sergent. In most armies the rank of sergeant OR-5 corresponds to command of a squad (or section). In Commonwealth armies, it is a more senior rank OR-6, corresponding roughly to a platoon second-in-command. In the United States Army, sergeant is a more junior rank, corresponding to a four-man fireteam leader OR-4. More senior non-commissioned ranks are often variations on sergeant, for instance staff sergeant, sergeant first class, master sergeant, first sergeant and sergeant major. The spelling serjeant is used in a few regiments of the British Army. In most non-naval military or paramilitary organizations, the various grades of sergeant are non-commissioned officers (NCOs) ranking above privates and corporals, and below warrant officers and commissioned officers. The responsibilities of a sergeant differ from army to army. There are usually several ranks of sergeant, each corresponding to greater experience and responsibility for the daily lives of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    7.00
    2 votes
    163

    Tribune

    • Characters of This Rank: Mark Antony
    Tribune was a title shared by elected officials in the Roman Republic. Tribunes had the power to convene the Plebeian Council and to act as its president, which also gave them the right to propose legislation before it. They were sacrosanct, in the sense that any assault on their person was prohibited. They had the power to veto actions taken by magistrates, and specifically to intervene legally on behalf of plebeians. The tribune could also summon the Senate and lay proposals before it. The tribune's power, however, was only in effect while he was within Rome. His ability to veto did not affect regional governors. Because it was legally impossible for a patrician to be a tribune of the plebeians, the first Roman emperor, Augustus, was offered instead all of the powers of the tribunate without actually holding the office (tribunicia potestas). This formed one of the two main constitutional bases of Augustus' authority (the other was imperium proconsulare maius). It gave him the authority to convene the Senate. Also, he was sacrosanct, had the authority to veto (ius intercessionis), and could exercise capital punishment in the course of the performance of his duties. Most emperors'
    7.00
    2 votes
    164

    Admiral

    • Characters of This Rank: James T. Kirk
    The rank of Admiral for the Federation's Star Fleet service.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Athlete

    Athlete

    • Characters of This Rank: Grippa, Tysian
    A sportsperson (American English: Sports person), (gendered as sportsman or sportswoman) or athlete is a person trained to compete in a sport involving physical strength, speed or endurance. Sportspeople may be professional or amateur. Most professional sportspeople have particularly well-developed physiques obtained by extensive physical training and strict exercise accompanied by a strict dietary regimen. The word "athlete" is a romanization of the Greek: άθλητὴς, athlētēs, one who participates in a contest; from ἂθλος, áthlos, or ἂθλον, áthlon, a contest or feat. The term may be used as a synonym for sportspeople in general, but it also has stronger connotations of people who compete in athletic sports, as opposed to other sporting types such as horse riding and driving. In British English (as well as other variants in the Commonwealth) athlete can also have a more specific meaning of people who compete in the sport of athletics. An "all-around athlete" is a person who competes in multiple sports at a high level, for instance, someone who plays both basketball and baseball professionally. Examples of people who played numerous sports professionally include Jim Thorpe, Lionel
    6.00
    3 votes
    166

    Chief Judge of Mega-City One

    Chief Judge of Mega-City One is the title of several supporting characters in the Judge Dredd comic strip published in 2000 AD. The chief judge is dictator and head of state of Mega-City One, a fictional future city of around 400 million people in 22nd-century America. The present chief judge (as of June 2012) is Barbara Hershey. Chief Judge is the highest rank in the Mega-City One Justice Department. The founder of the Judge System, Chief Judge Fargo, originally conceived this office as no more than the head of an elite police force whose members had powers to summarily convict and sentence criminals in 21st-century America, but following a coup d'état in 2070 the US Justice Department took control of the United States and formed a new government under the autocratic rule of the chief judge. Since then the chief judges have wielded immense power, although after the coup the USA split into three independent city-states, including Mega-City One (although the three cities had already enjoyed considerable autonomy since 2052). Other mega-cities around the world adopted similar systems of government, usually with the same "Chief Judge" title or with a similar variation (Supreme Judge
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Colonel

    Colonel

    • Characters of This Rank: Jack O'Neill
    In the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, colonel is a senior field grade military officer rank just above the rank of lieutenant colonel and just below the rank of brigadier general. It is equivalent to the naval rank of captain in the other uniformed services, such as the United States Navy, United States Coast Guard and the commissioned corps of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration]] (NOAA). The insignia of the rank of colonel, as seen on the right, is worn on the officer's left side (a mirror-image version is worn on the right side, such that the eagle always faces forward to the wearer's front; the left-side version is also worn centered on fatigue caps, helmets, ACU & ECWCS breasts, inter alia). The pay grade for the rank of colonel or naval captain in the United States is O-6. The insignia for a colonel is a silver eagle which is a stylized representation of the eagle dominating the Great Seal of the United States (which is the coat of arms of the United States). As on the Great Seal, the eagle has a U.S. shield superimposed on its chest and is holding an olive branch and bundle of arrows in its talons. However, in simplification of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    6.00
    3 votes
    170
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    5.00
    4 votes
    172

    Prince of Ravens

    • Characters of This Rank: Mat Cauthon
    Prince of the Ravens is a fictional title in the fantasy series Wheel of Time by author Robert Jordan. The Prince of the Ravens is a Seanchan title given to the husband of the Daughter of the Nine Moons. The title derives from the raven's use as an emblem of the Seanchan imperial family. It can be speculated that this title, like that of the English Prince of Wales, is also granted to any male member of the Seanchan imperial family who stands in line to ascend the Crystal Throne. At the conclusion of the book Knife of Dreams, Mat Cauthon was given the title of Prince of the Ravens when Tuon completed the marriage ceremony between them.
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Captain

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: James T. Kirk
    Captain is a commissioned Starfleet officer rank in the fictional Star Trek universe. According to dialog in "Behind the Lines", "Captain" is also the label given to the master of a starship, regardless of his or her actual rank. The rank first appears in Star Treks initial pilot, "The Cage", and is held by Christopher Pike, who commands the USS ''Enterprise''. Dozens of captains, both seen and unseen, have played minor and major roles throughout Star Trek's various incarnations. Captain Jonathan Archer commands Star Trek: Enterprises titular ship one hundred years before Captains Pike and James T. Kirk command a starship of the same name. The Animated Series states that Captain Robert April preceded Pike as commander of the Enterprise. However, while April's tenure as commander of the Enterprise is generally accepted by fans, Star Trek's producers have never made this canon. Pike wears a single rank stripe, the same as all other officers aboard the USS Enterprise. Kirk, however, wears distinct captain insignia. Other captains who appear in the original Star Trek series include the captain of a merchant commander in "Charlie X", two captains on Kirk's court-martial board
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Chief Executive Officer

    • Characters of This Rank: Iron Man
    A chief executive officer (CEO) is the highest-ranking corporate officer (executive) or administrator in charge of total management of an organization. An individual appointed as a CEO of a corporation, company, organization, or agency typically reports to the board of directors. In British English, terms often used as synonyms for CEO are managing director (MD) and chief executive (CE). In American English, the title executive director (ED) is sometimes used for non-profit organizations. The responsibilities of an organization's CEO (Chief Executive Officer, US) or MD (Managing Director, UK) are set by the organization's board of directors or other authority, depending on the organization's legal structure. They can be far-reaching or quite limited and are typically enshrined in a formal delegation of authority. Typically, the CEO/MD has responsibilities as a communicator, decision maker, leader, manager and executor. The communicator role can involve the press and the rest of the outside world, as well as the organization's management and employees; the decision-making role involves high-level decisions about policy and strategy. As a leader, the CEO/MD advises the board of
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Daughter of the Nine Moons

    Daughter of the Nine Moons is a fictional title in the fantasy series The Wheel of Time by author Robert Jordan. The actual Daughter of the Nine Moons is Tuon Athaem Kore Paendrag, a young woman who is the daughter of the Empress of the Seanchan. Having done some great error, she has been wearing a veil, and until that comes off she is known only as High Lady Tuon. She is of a similar age to Mat, small in stature with a boyish figure and large brown eyes. She has dark skin, and would have black curly hair if she didn't shave her head in compliance with Seanchan noble custom. She makes her first appearance in Winter's Heart, where we see her landing in Ebou Dar just shortly after the city is taken. During her time there she stays in the Tarasin Palace, the residence of Ebou Dar's Queen Tylin and the Seanchan High Lady Suroth. This also allows her to be in the same vicinity as Mat, whom according to the Aelfinn, she is to marry. Mat often observes her watching him, whether passing in a hallway or from a window. When Mat attempts to escape Ebou Dar with some Seanchan prisoners and is caught by Tuon, he grabs her in an attempt to silence her. It is only after this event that he is told
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    Healer

    • Characters of This Rank: Teller of the Pointed Stones
    Healers are serve as both leaders and medicine cats in the Tribe of Rushing Water in the book series "Warriors" by Erin Hunter. All tribe healers are given the name "Teller of the Pointed Stones" or Stoneteller for short.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Ensign

    Ensign

    • Characters of This Rank: Lieutenant Leslie
    Ensign ( /ˈɛnsən/) is a junior rank of a commissioned officer in the armed forces of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. As the junior officer in an infantry regiment was traditionally the carrier of the ensign flag, the rank itself acquired the name. "Ensign" is enseigne in French, Fähnrich in German (whereby despite the fact that "Fähnrich" has a parallel etymology, it is not a junior officer but only an officer cadet rank), and chorąży in Polish, each of which derives from a term for a flag. The Spanish alférez and Portuguese alferes is a junior officer rank below lieutenant associated with carrying the flag, and so is often translated as "ensign". Unlike the rank in other languages, its etymology has nothing to do with flags. The NATO rank code is OF-1 (junior). In Argentina, the rank of ensign is used by both the air force and the gendarmerie. It is, however, used differently in the two services. The air force uses the rank for newly qualified officers, while the gendarmerie uses "ensign" ranks as an equivalent for the army's "lieutenant" ranks. The other armed forces of Argentina have ranks equivalent to ensign: subteniente (which can be translated into English
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Master of the Horse

    Master of the Horse

    • Characters of This Rank: Sync
    The Master of the Horse was (and in some cases, still is) a position of varying importance in several European nations. The original Master of the Horse (Latin Magister Equitum) in the Roman Republic was an office appointed and dismissed by the Roman Dictator, as it expired with the Dictator's own office, typically a term of six months in the early and mid-republic. The Magister Equitum served as the Dictator's main lieutenant. The nomination of the Magister Equitum was left to the choice of the Dictator, unless a senatus consultum specified, as was sometimes the case, the name of the person who was to be appointed. The Dictator could not be without a Magister Equitum to assist him, and, consequently, if the first Magister Equitum either died or was dismissed during the Dictator's term, another had to be nominated in his stead. The Magister Equitum was granted a form imperium, but at the same level as a praetor, and thus was subject to the imperium of the Dictator and was not superior to that of a Consul. In the Dictator’s absence, the Magister Equitum became his representative, and exercised the same powers as the Dictator. It was usually but not always necessary for the man
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Sergeant Major

    Sergeant Major

    • Characters of This Rank: Avery J. Johnson
    Sergeant major non-commissioned rank or appointment in many militaries around the world. In Commonwealth countries, sergeants major are ranks and appointments held by senior non-commissioned officers. In the United States, there are various degrees of sergeant major (command sergeant major, sergeant major of the army, sergeant major of Marine Corps), but they are all of the same pay grade. In the 16th century, the sergeant major or Sargento Mayor was a general officer. He commanded an army's infantry, and ranked about third in the army's command structure; he also acted as a sort of chief of staff to the army's commander. In the 17th century, sergeants major appeared in individual regiments. These were field officers, third in command of their regiments (after their colonels and lieutenant colonels), with a role similar to the older, army-level sergeants major (although obviously on a smaller scale). The older position became known as sergeant major general to distinguish it. Over time, the sergeant was dropped from both titles, giving rise to the modern ranks of major and major general. The full title of sergeant major fell out of use until the latter part of the 18th century,
    7.00
    1 votes
    187

    Grand Poobah

    Grand Poobah is a term derived from the name of the haughty character Pooh-Bah in Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado (1885). In this comic opera, Pooh-Bah holds numerous exalted offices, including "First Lord of the Treasury, Lord Chief Justice, Commander-in-Chief, Lord High Admiral... Archbishop of Titipu, and Lord Mayor" and Lord High Everything Else. The name has come to be used as a mocking title for someone self-important or high-ranking and who either exhibits an inflated self-regard or who has limited authority while taking impressive titles. The formal term for the practice of holding multiple offices is "dual mandate".
    5.33
    3 votes
    188
    4.50
    4 votes
    189
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    King

    King

    • Characters of This Rank: King Eidilleg
    A king is a head of state, who may or may not, depending on the style of government of a nation, exercise monarchal powers over a nation, usually called a kingdom or a realm. A king is the second highest sovereign title, only looking up to an emperor. The female equivalent of king is queen; although the term "queen" may refer to one ruling as a monarch in her own right, a queen regnant, or to the wife of a king, a queen consort. A queen who becomes the reigning monarch because the king has died, has become debilitated, or is a minor, is known as a queen regent. The husband of a queen regnant is sometimes styled the king consort but is more commonly styled the prince consort. A king or queen may wear a crown or carry other regalia (symbols of office). Terms for kings can vary (Sumerian lugal, Semitic melech, Celtic rix, Latin rex, Greek basileus, Sanskrit raja, Germanic kuningaz) and in some cases can be a tribal leader or chief, or the tyrant of a city state. Tribal leaders continue to be referred to as king also into the modern period, e.g. Maquinna, king of perhaps 2000 Nootka people in the early 20th century. Often, the king will not only have a political function, but also a
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    General

    General

    • Characters of This Rank: Susan Ivanova
    A general officer is an officer of high military rank, usually in the army, and in some nations, the air force. The term is widely used by many nations of the world, and when a country uses a different term, there is an equivalent title given. The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer; and as a specific rank. Since the late twentieth century, the rank of general is usually the highest active rank of a military not at war. The various grades of general officer are at the top of the rank structure. Lower-ranking officers are known as field officers or field-grade officers, and below them are company-grade officers. All officers who commanded more than a single regiment came to be known as "general officers". The word "general" is used in its ordinary sense in English (and other languages) as relating to larger, general, military units, rather than smaller units in particular. There are two common systems of general ranks. Variations of one form, the old European system, were once used throughout Europe. It is used in the United Kingdom (although it did not originate there), from which it eventually spread to the Commonwealth and
    5.00
    3 votes
    196

    Staff Sergeant

    • Characters of This Rank: Bob Brown
    Staff sergeant is a rank of non-commissioned officer used in several countries. The origin of the name is that they were part of the staff of a British army regiment and paid at that level rather than as a member of a battalion or company. In the Australian Army, and Cadets the rank of Staff Sergeant is slowly being phased out. It was usually held by the Company Quartermaster Sergeant or the holders of other administrative roles. Staff sergeants are always addressed as "Staff Sergeant" or "Staff", never as "Sergeant" as it degrades their rank. "Chief" is another nickname, usually for those who hold the quartermaster's role. A staff sergeant ranks above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. In the Israel Defense Forces, soldiers are promoted from Sergeant to Staff Sergeant (Samál rishón) after 28 months of service for combat soldiers, and 32 months of service for non-combat soldiers, if they performed their duties appropriately during this time. Soldiers who take a commander's course may become staff sergeants earlier (usually after 24 months of service, or one year from becoming a commander). The rank insignia is composed of three clear-blue stripes (as is the rank of
    5.00
    3 votes
    197

    Chief of Staff

    • Characters of This Rank: Kyoshiro Tohdoh
    The title, Chief of Staff, identifies the leader of a complex organization, institution, or body of persons and it also may identify a Principal Staff Officer (PSO), who is the coordinator of the supporting staff or a primary aide-de-camp to an important individual, such as a president. In general, a chief of staff provides a buffer between a chief executive and that executive's direct-reporting team. The chief of staff generally works behind the scenes to solve problems, mediate disputes, and deal with issues before they bubble up to the Chief Executive. Often Chiefs of Staff act as a confidante and advisor to the Chief Executive, acting as a sounding board for ideas. Ultimately the actual duties depend on the actual position and the people involved. In general, the positions listed below are not "chiefs of staff" as defined at the top of this page. In general, they are the heads of the various forces/commands. Note that, in general, they tend to have subordinates that do fulfill the "chief of staff" roles. The Sovereign is the Commander-in-Chief. The CDS heads the Chiefs of Staff Committee and is assisted by the Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff. The Queen is not the ceremonial
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    5.50
    2 votes
    201

    Segunda Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Barragan Luisenbarn
    Segunda Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
    5.50
    2 votes
    202

    Boomeroid

    In the anime Bubblegum Crisis, any person who has had more than seventy percent of their body replaced with mechanical parts is classified as a boomeroid and is treated as such by the law. As part of the Boomer Law, boomeroids are to be handled (often fatally) by the AD Police, as opposed to the normal law enforcement officers of Megatokyo.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Captain

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: "Soap" MacTavish
    Captain is the name most often given in English-speaking navies to the rank corresponding to command of the largest ships. The NATO rank code is OF-5, equivalent to an army full colonel. The equivalent rank in some navies translates as "ship captain" (e.g. French capitaine de vaisseau and Italian capitano di vascello), "captain of sea and war" (Portuguese capitão de mar e guerra), "captain at sea" (e.g. German Kapitän zur See, Dutch kapitein-ter-zee) or "captain of the first rank" (Russian - капитан 1-го ранга). The command of a ship is often given to the naval rank equivalent to a commissioned officer between commander (OF-4) and commodore or rear admiral (OF-6). The naval rank should not be confused with the army, air force or marine rank of captain, which has a NATO code of OF-2. Any naval officer who commands a ship (titled commanding officer, or CO) is addressed by naval custom as "captain" while aboard in command. Officers with the rank of captain travelling aboard a vessel they do not command should be addressed by their rank and name (e.g., "Captain Smith"), but they should not be referred to as "the captain" to avoid confusion with the vessel's captain. According to US
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    Necromant

    Necromant

    • Characters of This Rank: Ischade, necromant
    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe, Tempus's forces use a necromant to triage the wounded and dispatch the dying on the battlefield.
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    205

    Octava Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Szayel Aporro Granz
    Octava Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
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    206
    Prime minister

    Prime minister

    • Characters of This Rank: Kaname Ohgi
    A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. In many systems, the prime minister selects and may dismiss other members of the cabinet, and allocates posts to members within the government. In most systems, the prime minister is the presiding member and chairman of the cabinet. In a minority of systems, notably in semi-presidential systems of government, a prime minister is the official who is appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives of the head of state. In parliamentary systems fashioned after the Westminster system, the prime minister is the presiding and actual head of the government and head of the executive branch. In such systems, the head of state or the head of state's official representative (i.e. the monarch, president, or governor-general) usually holds a largely ceremonial position, although often with reserve powers. The prime minister is often, but not always, a member of parliament and is expected with other ministers to ensure the passage of bills through the legislature. In some monarchies the monarch may also exercise executive powers (known as the royal
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    First Hazard

    First Hazard

    • Characters of This Rank: Cat
    First Hazard is featured in the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe.
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    209
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    210
    Brigadier general

    Brigadier general

    • Characters of This Rank: Tom Ryan
    A brigadier general in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, is a one-star general officer, with the pay grade of O-7. Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general. Brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services. U.S. Code of law explicitly limits the total number of general officers who may be on active duty. The total of active duty general officers is capped at 230 for the Army, 208 for the Air Force, and 60 for the Marine Corps. Some of these slots are reserved by statute. For promotion to the permanent grade of brigadier general, eligible officers are screened by a promotion board consisting of general officers from their branch of service. This promotion board then generates a list of officers it recommends for promotion to general rank. This list is then sent to the service secretary and the joint chiefs for review before it can be sent to the President, through the defense secretary, for consideration. The President nominates officers to be promoted from this list with the advice of the Secretary of Defense, the service secretary, and if applicable, the service's chief of staff or
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    214

    Kittypet

    • Characters of This Rank: Smudge
    A kittypet is a cat who lives with Twolegs.
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    215

    Demon lord

    In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, demon lords (also known as Abyssal lords in 2E AD&D) are demons who have gained great power and established a position of preeminence among demonkind. Each demon lord has a unique appearance and set of abilities. Most control at least one layer of the Abyss. A demon lord, when slain in a plane other than the Abyss, is banished to the Abyss for 100 years, whereas "ordinary" demons, including the mightiest balors and mariliths, risk being reborn into a lesser form (or not at all). The most powerful demon lords are demon princes. "Demon lord" and "demon prince" are self-proclaimed titles; unlike the archdevils, the chaotic evil demon lords do not have a rigid hierarchy. However, first edition AD&D did claim a demon can only be called a prince if he or she rules an entire plane of the Abyss, thus Orcus implied by his title to rule a least one plane of existence, while lesser lords did not. Demon lords wage eternal war with each other, often seeking ways to expand their holdings into other layers and at the same time defend their personal domains from rival lords and scheming underlings. Demogorgon has for many years been the most
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    216
    Emperor

    Emperor

    • Characters of This Rank: The Emperor of China
    An emperor (through Old French empereor from Latin imperator) is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. Empress, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (empress consort), mother (empress dowager), or a woman who rules in her own right (empress regnant). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honor and rank than kings. Currently, the Emperor of Japan is the only reigning monarch with the title. Both kings and emperors are monarchs. Within the European context, emperor and empress are considered the higher monarchical titles. However, monarchs heading empires have not always used the title—the British sovereign did not assume the title until the incorporation of India into the British Empire, and even then used it only in a limited context. Emperors were once given precedence over kings in international diplomatic relations; currently, precedence is decided by the length a head of state is continuously in office. Outside the European context, emperor is a translation given to holders of titles who are accorded the same precedence as European emperors in diplomatic terms. In reciprocity, these rulers
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    217
    Lieutenant Colonel

    Lieutenant Colonel

    • Characters of This Rank: Cameron Mitchell
    In the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a field grade military officer rank just above the rank of major and just below the rank of colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of commander in the other uniformed services. The pay grade for the rank of lieutenant colonel is O-5. The insignia for the rank consists of a silver oak leaf, with slight stylized differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Navy/Marine Corps version. The rank of lieutenant colonel was first created during the Revolutionary War, when the position was held by aides to Regiment Colonels, and was sometimes known as "lieutenant to the colonel." The rank of lieutenant colonel had existed in the British Army since at least the 16th century. During the 19th century, lieutenant colonel was often a terminal rank for many officers, since the rank of "full colonel" was considered extremely prestigious reserved only for the most successful officers. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, the rank of lieutenant colonel became much more common and was used as a "stepping stone" for officers who commanded small regiments or battalions and were
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    218

    Novena Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Aaroniero Arruruerie
    Novena Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
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    219
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    221

    Sexta Espada

    • Characters of This Rank: Grimmjow Jaggerjack
    Sexta Espada is a fictional rank in the anime and manga franchise Bleach by Tite Kubo.
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    222
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    223

    Stewards of Gondor

    The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium of Middle-earth. Steward (Arandur in Tolkien's Quenya language) was the traditional title of a chief counsellor to the Kings of Gondor. The office arose early in the Third Age during the reign of King Rómendacil I. After the Stewardship of Húrin of Emyn Arnen the office was awarded only to his descendants (the House of Húrin). After Mardil, in the absence of the Kings, the office by custom became hereditary, passing from father to son or nearest male relative, much like the Kingship. The House of Húrin was founded by one Húrin of Emyn Arnen, Steward to King Minardil, the twenty-fifth King of Gondor. They were of high Númenórean blood, but not descendants of Elendil in the ruling line. Although not considered a Ruling Steward, Pelendur was the first to effectively rule the kingdom, doing so for one year after the death of King Ondoher and his sons while fighting the Wainriders. He played a key role in influencing the Council of Gondor to choose Eärnil over Arvedui of Arthedain, thus maintaining the line of the heirs of Anárion. Eärnil's son Eärnur rode against the Witch-king leaving no heir. Eärnur did not
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    224
    Adept of Maat

    Adept of Maat

    • Characters of This Rank: Niko
    "Nikodemos was a secular adept of the Bandaran mystery of maat – of transcendent perception, equilibrium and mystic calm. He was failing himself and all maat’s precepts if he lost control of his temper, of his balance or his heart." -- The Sacred Band
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    225
    Admiral

    Admiral

    • Characters of This Rank: Percy Fitzwallace
    Admiral is the rank, or part of the name of the ranks, of the highest naval officers. It is usually considered a full admiral (equivalent to full general) and above vice admiral and below admiral of the fleet (or fleet admiral). It is usually abbreviated to "Adm" or "ADM". Where relevant, admiral has a NATO code of OF-9, and is a four-star rank. The word "admiral" in Middle English comes from Anglo-French amiral, "commander", from Medieval Latin admiralis, admirallus. These themselves come from Arabic "amir", or amir-al- أمير الـ, "commander of the" (as in amir-al-bahr أمير البحر "commander of the sea"). Crusaders learned the term during their encounters with the Arabs, perhaps as early as the 11th century. The Norman Roger II of Sicily (1095–1154), employed a Greek Christian known as George of Antioch, who previously had served as a naval commander for several North African Moslem rulers. Roger styled George in Abbasid fashion as "Amir of Amirs", i.e. "Commander of Commanders", with the title becoming Latinized in the 13th century as "ammiratus ammiratorum". The Sicilians and later Genoese took the first two parts of the term and used them as one word, amiral, from their Aragon
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    226

    Bajoran Kai

    • Characters of This Rank: Winn Adami
    In the TV show Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the Bajoran Kai was the supreme religious leader of the Bajoran faith. The Kai would be roughly similar in rank to the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church on Earth. However, unlike the Pope this individual could be either male or female, could be married, and could even have children. Unlike the election of the Pope - which is held among the high ranking Cardinals - it appears that the Kai is chosen in an election held by the entire Bajoran people, though typically candidates come from the Vedek assembly of high-ranking clerics. When Starfleet forces initially arrived at Deep Space Nine, the Kai was a woman named Opaka. She introduced Commander Sisko to an Orb or Tear of the Prophets. Later Opaka had to be left behind on a prison planet when she had been infected by nano-machines on the planet. Afterwards, the position of Kai was vacant for about a year. During this time, two leading candidates for the office emerged. One was Vedek Winn Adami - a member of a small conservative order on Bajor who harbored anti-Federation feelings. The other was Vedek Bareil Antos, a kindly man who had a relationship with Major Kira of DS9. Vedek
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    227
    Bartender

    Bartender

    • Characters of This Rank: Widow Maldives
    A bartender, barman, or barmaid or bar attendant is a person who serves usually alcoholic drinks behind a counter in a bar, pub, tavern, or similar establishment. A bartender, in short, "tends the bar". The term barkeeper may suggest that the person is the bar's owner. Bartenders also usually maintain the supplies and inventory for the bar (though some establishments have barbacks who help with these duties). Where cocktails are served, bartenders are expected to be able to mix hundreds to thousands of different drinks. A mixologist is someone who is skilled in mixing cocktails. Bartenders represent the bar they tend, contributing to and reflecting the atmosphere of the bar. Where food is the main focus, the bartender is all but invisible. Alternatively, the bartender may be part of the entertainment, expected to engage in flair bartending or other forms of entertainment, as portrayed in the films Cocktail and Coyote Ugly. Where tipping is a local custom, bartenders depend on tips for most of their income. Bartenders are also usually responsible for confirming that customers are old enough to drink before serving them alcohol. In some countries, bartenders are legally required to
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    230

    Captain

    • Characters of This Rank: John Price
    Captain (Capt) is a junior officer rank of the British Army and Royal Marines. It ranks above lieutenant and below major and has a NATO ranking code of OF-2. The rank is equivalent to a lieutenant in the Royal Navy and to a flight lieutenant in the Royal Air Force. The rank of captain in the Royal Navy is considerably more senior (equivalent to the Army/RM rank of colonel) and the two ranks should not be confused. In the 21st century British Army, captains are often appointed to be second-in-command of a company or equivalent sized unit of up to 120 soldiers. A rank of second captain existed in the Ordnance at the time of the Battle of Waterloo. From 1 April 1918 to 31 July 1919, the Royal Air Force maintained the junior officer rank of captain. RAF captains had a rank insignia based on the two bands of a naval lieutenant with the addition of an eagle and crown above the bands. It was superseded by the rank of flight lieutenant on the following day. Badges of rank for captains were introduced in 30 January 1855 and were worn on shoulder epaulets. After the Crimean War a new rank system was introduced which contained the first complete rank insignia in British Army history. A
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    Centurion

    Centurion

    • Characters of This Rank: Lucius Cornelius Macro
    A centurion (Latin: centurio; Ancient Greek: κεντυρίων), also hekatontarch (ἑκατόνταρχος, hekatontarchos) in Greek sources, or, in middle Byzantine times, kentarch (κένταρχος, kentarchos), was a professional officer of the Roman army after the Marian reforms of 107 BC. Most centurions commanded 60 to 80 men despite the commonly assumed 100, but senior centurions commanded cohorts, or took senior staff roles in their legion. Centurions were also found in the Roman navy. Centuries, or Centuriae, means tribe or company. Theoretically, this word traces its roots to centum which is Latin for one hundred, but that connection is widely disputed or disregarded. In the Roman infantry, centurions initially commanded a centuria or "century". Centuries, or centuriae, developed from the Roman tribal system under the Servian reforms and could contain 200 to 1000 men. Later, generals and Caesars further manipulated these numbers with double and half-strength units. Gaius Julius Caesar, for instance, made the first century double strength. Centurions seemed to receive a much higher pay than the average legionaire. Sometimes as much as twice the pay. Veteran legionaires often worked as tenants of
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    Commander-in-Chief

    Commander-in-Chief

    • Characters of This Rank: Cornelia Li Britannia
    A commander-in-chief is the person exercising supreme command authority of a nation's military forces or significant element of those forces. In the latter case, the force element may be defined as those forces within a particular region or those forces which are associated by function. As a practical term it refers to the military competencies that reside in a nation-state's executive, Head of State and/or Head of Government. Often, a given country's commander-in-chief need not be or have been a commissioned officer or even a veteran, and it is by this legal statute that civilian control of the military is realized in states where it is constitutionally required. The role of commander-in-chief derives from the Latin, imperator. Imperatores (commanders-in-chief) of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire possessed imperium (command) powers. In its modern usage, the term was first used by King Charles of England in 1639. A nation's head of state usually holds the position of national commander-in-chief, even if effective executive power is held by a separate head of government. Colonial governors are also often appointed commander-in-chief of the military forces in their colonies.
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    High Prince

    This is an article about a fictional position. See Grand Prince for the article about a real position. High Prince is a fictional title given to the ruling Prince of the Continent in Melanie Rawn's fantasy novels of the Dragon Prince and Dragon Star trilogies. The High Prince governs the Princes of the Desert, Cunaxa, Dorval, Syr, Gilad, Ossetia, Meadowlord, Grib, Kierst/Isel, Fessenden, and Firon from his seat in Princemarch, the center-most princedom on the Continent. The colors of Princemarch are violet and gold, and its banner is of a leaping brown deer on violet bordered in gold. In the Old Tongue the High Prince's title is Kir'rei. The Lord or Lady of Goddess Keep is the only person who does not bow to the High Prince. They are held in relatively the same esteem, though the Lord or Lady must abide by the laws of the Continent and thus the High Prince. Also, Goddess Keep is held of the High Prince; in other words should the Lord/Lady or his/her faradh'im overstep their bounds or oaths, the High Prince can take Goddess Keep from them. The female equivalent of the High Prince is High Princess. She is the wife of the High Prince and can share his power. In the Old Tongue she is
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    Mayor of Mega-City One

    Mayor of Mega-City One is a fictional office in the Judge Dredd comic strip in 2000 AD. The most significant mayor to appear in the comic was serial killer PJ Maybe, in disguise as Byron Ambrose. The real political power in Mega-City One is not held by the mayor but by the unelected judges, headed by the Chief Judge. However, the citizens are allowed some very limited degree of self-government in the form of a democratically elected council headed by a mayor, with powers over relatively minor matters and the authority to make representations to Justice Department. The office did not really exist in any meaningful sense between the years 2104 and 2117. Mayor Amalfi was mayor until he was implicated in receiving stolen body parts from the morgue, which he used as fertiliser in his private garden. Obese and obnoxious to the Judges, he lived a life of luxury. When his crimes were discovered by Judge Dredd, he accidentally fell to his death while resisting arrest. The true circumstances of his death were covered up to prevent a scandal. Mayor Jim Grubb was mayor from 2093 to 2104. In 2099 Dredd rescued his son from mutants who had kidnapped him. In 2101 Grubb was arrested by Chief
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    239
    Mercenaries' guild representative

    Mercenaries' guild representative

    • Characters of This Rank: Vasili
    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons universe and the Thieves World fictional shared universe, a multi-jurisdictional mercenaries' guild regulates mercenaries who travel among city-states and fight for various interests. Vasili, the Tysian mercenaries' guild representative, is an example of one such ancient bureaucrat, who is killed in the border town of Tyse during preparations for the Rankan assault on Wizardwall by agents of Mygdonia, a rival military alliance.
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    Nobility

    • Characters of This Rank: Daemon Spade
    Nobility is a state-privileged status which is generally hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g. precedence), but are maintained, or at least officially acknowledged, by law or government. Titles of nobility have often been associated with present or past monarchies, but nobility also existed in such republics as the Dutch Provinces, Genoa and Venice, and remains part of the legal social structure of, e.g. San Marino in Europe. Hereditary titles often distinguish nobles from non-nobles, although in many nations most of the nobility have been un-titled, and a hereditary title need not indicate nobility (e.g. baronet). The term derives from Latin nobilis (well-known, famous), indicating those who were "well-known" or "notable" in society, and was applied to the highest social class in pre-modern societies. In the feudal system (in Europe and elsewhere), the nobility were generally those who held a fief, often land or office, under vassalage, i.e., in exchange for allegiance and various, mainly military, services to a suzerain, who might be a monarch or a higher-ranking
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    President

    • Characters of This Rank: President of the United Federation
    A president is a leader of an organization, company, club, trade union, university, or country. Etymologically, a president is one who presides, (from Latin pre- "before" + sedere "to sit"; giving the term praeses). Originally, the term referred to the presiding officer of a ceremony or meeting (i.e., chairman), but today it most commonly refers to an official. Among other things, "President" today is a common title for the heads of state of most republics, whether popularly elected, chosen by the legislature or by a special electoral college. Presidents in countries with a democratic or representative form of government are usually elected for a specified period of time and in some cases may be re-elected by the same process by which they are appointed, i.e. in many nations, periodic popular elections. The powers vested in such presidents vary considerably. Some presidencies, such as that of Ireland, are largely ceremonial, whereas other systems vest the President with substantive powers such as the appointment and dismissal of Prime Ministers or cabinets, the power to declare war, and powers of veto on legislation. In many nations the President is also the Commander-in-Chief of
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    Prime

    Prime is a title in Transformers fiction, the designation given to the leader of the Autobots and bearer of the Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The Japanese equivalent of Prime is Convoy, sometimes explained in Western Transformers folklore as an honorific nickname given to Autobots (called Cybertrons in Japan) who possess the Autobot Matrix of Leadership. The name is derived from their creator, Primus. An Autobot Supreme Commander may be called "Prime" even if he does not possess the Matrix. In such cases the term is a title only and not part of that Autobot’s name (see Ultra Magnus). In other cases an Autobot may serve as a Matrix Templar without being the Supreme Commander (see Vector Prime), however the honorific “Prime” is still attached to their name. In The Transformers: Escalation, when Optimus Prime downloaded his mind into his trailer section to avoid death by Megatron, he had a brief encounter with Nova Prime, leading him to seek answers from Omega Supreme. When he learned the truth in the Spotlight issue, he now knows that the Prime lineage is corrupt. In The Transformers: Devastation, Galvatron is dispatched to Earth from the Dead Universe by an individual he refers to
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    Viscount

    Viscount

    • Characters of This Rank: Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny
    A viscount ( /ˈvaɪkaʊnt/ "vie-count", for male) or viscountess (for female) is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in the United Kingdom) or a count (the earl's continental equivalent). The word viscount, known to be used in English since 1387, comes from Old French visconte (modern French: vicomte), itself from Medieval Latin vicecomitem, accusative of vicecomes, from Late Latin vice- "deputy" + Latin comes (originally "companion; later Roman imperial courtier or trusted appointee, ultimately count). As a rank in British peerage, it was first recorded in 1440, when John Beaumont was created Viscount Beaumont by King Henry VI. The word viscount corresponds in the UK to the Anglo-Saxon shire reeve (root of the non-nobiliary, royal-appointed office of sheriff). Thus early viscounts were originally normally given their titles by the monarch, not hereditary; but soon they too tended to establish hereditary principalities lato sensu (in the wider sense). A viscount is said to hold a "viscountship" or "viscounty", or (more as the area of his jurisdiction) a "viscountcy". The female equivalent of a
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    Vor of Barrayar

    The Vor of Barrayar are a fictional military caste and essentially the aristocracy of the planet Barrayar in the sci-fi book series the Vorkosigan Saga. On Barrayar, there exist two major castes: the Vor and everyone else, occasionally referred to in the books as plebes or proles. Vor status is considered genetic, hereditary, and inescapable. All Vor surnames begin with the syllable Vor-, often prefixed to a recognizable surname from some Earth nation (e.g. Vorsmythe). Because it is an honorific, the prefix Vor- is dropped at the Imperial Service Academy (though not in the service itself) to emphasize the ideal of meritocracy. While the Vor men are generally involved in military or government service the women often lead sheltered lives at home raising children. One Vor privilege is the right to carry weapons, a stunner Hunting weapon, sword or knife. Even low Vor women carry a "Vorfemme" knife, presumably to defend their honor from rapacious males. In the novel Barrayar, when Cordelia Vorkosigan buys the crippled Lt. Koudelka a sword-stick to improve his self-confidence, he protests that he cannot carry it. Admiral Aral Vorkosigan gets around this by "issuing" it to him as his
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