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Best Cemetery of All Time

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    1
    La Recoleta Cemetery

    La Recoleta Cemetery

    La Recoleta Cemetery (Spanish: Cementerio de la Recoleta) is a cemetery located in the Recoleta neighbourhood of Buenos Aires, Argentina. It contains the graves of notable people, including Eva Perón, presidents of Argentina, Nobel Prize winners, the founder of the Argentine Navy and a granddaughter of Napoleon. The monks of the Order of the Recoletos arrived in this area, then the outskirts of Buenos Aires, in the early eighteenth century. The cemetery is built around their convent and a church, Our Lady of Pilar (Iglesia de Nuestra Señora del Pilar), built in 1732. The order was disbanded in 1822, and the garden of the convent was converted into the first public cemetery in Buenos Aires. Inaugurated on 17 November of the same year under the name of Cementerio del Norte (Northern Cemetery), those responsible for its creation were the then-Governor Martin Rodríguez, who would be eventually buried in the cemetery, and government minister Bernardino Rivadavia. The 1822 layout was done by architect and civil engineer Próspero Catelin, who also designed the current facade of the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral. The cemetery was last remodeled in 1881, while Torcuato de Alvear was
    8.50
    6 votes
    2
    Natchez National Cemetery

    Natchez National Cemetery

    Natchez National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Natchez overlooking the Mississippi River in Adams County, Mississippi. It encompasses 25.7 acres (10.4 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 7,154 interments. The original site of the cemetery was purchased from local residents in 1866, to inter Union soldiers who died in the Civil War. Remains from battlefield and post cemeteries from around the region were brought to the cemetery to be reinterred. In 1866 a large number of soldiers who were buried in the levees of the west bank of the Mississippi River were exhumed and transferred to the National Cemetery. Natchez National Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.
    7.29
    7 votes
    3
    Crown Hill Cemetery

    Crown Hill Cemetery

    Crown Hill Cemetery, located at 700 West 38th Street in Indianapolis, is the third largest non-governmental cemetery in the United States at 555 acres (225 ha). It contains 25 miles (40 km) of paved road, over 150 species of trees and plants, over 200,000 graves, and services roughly 1,500 burials per year. It sits on the highest geographic point within the pre-Unigov city limits of Indianapolis. Section 10 of the cemetery is designated as the Crown Hill National Cemetery. Prior to the establishment of Crown Hill Cemetery, the primary cemetery in Indianapolis was the 25-acre (10 ha) Greenlawn Cemetery on the southwest side of the city. The demand placed on it by the normal demands of a growing city, along with the burials of both Union soldiers and Confederate prisoners of war resulting from the American Civil War prompted the creation of a private board in 1863 to develop a new and larger cemetery. The board bought a farm outside the city limits and hired John Chislett, who was a landscape architect and cemetery superintendent of Pittsburgh, to design the grounds. Chislett retained many of the natural features and laid out winding roads to create a landscape in the Victorian
    9.40
    5 votes
    4
    Notre-Dame Cemetery

    Notre-Dame Cemetery

    Notre Dame Cemetery, located at 455 Montreal Rd., in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, opened in 1872. It is the most prominent Catholic cemetery in Ottawa. The cemetery's western edge is located in Vanier, just south of Beechwood Cemetery. Its eastern limit is St. Laurent Blvd. The cemetery is the final resting place for more than 114,000 persons.
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    Lychakivskiy Cemetery

    Lychakivskiy Cemetery

    Lychakiv Cemetery (Polish: Cmentarz Łyczakowski we Lwowie; Ukrainian: Личаківський цвинтар, translit. Lychakivs’kyi tsvyntar) is a famous and historic cemetery in Lviv, Ukraine. Since its creation in 1787 as Łyczakowski Cemetery, it has been the main necropolis of the city's inteligentsia, middle and upper classes. Initially the cemetery was located on several hills in the borough of Lychakiv, following the imperial Austro-Hungarian edict ordering that all cemeteries be moved outside of the city limits. The original project was prepared by Karol Bauer, the head of the Lviv University botanical garden. In mid-1850s the cemetery was expanded significantly by Tytus Tchórzewski, who created the present network of alleys and round-abouts. It then became the main city cemetery, and soon most other cemeteries were closed. The two largest that remained were the Yanivskiy Cemetery (Polish: cmentarz Janowski), with many working class graves) and the adjacent New Jewish Cemetery. Lychakivskiy Cemetery was used by all Christian sects in the city: in addition to Roman Catholics, it also included Eastern Rite Catholics, Protestants and Orthodox. In 1925 the ashes of one of the unknown defenders
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    Wood National Cemetery

    Wood National Cemetery

    Wood National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It encompasses 50.1 acres (20.3 ha), and as of the end of 2005, it had 37,661 interments. It is closed to new interments. A part of the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Association Medical Center, the cemetery was established in 1871 as Soldier Home Cemetery to inter the remains of soldiers who died while under care in the medical center. In 1937, it was renamed Wood Cemetery in honor of General George Wood, a long-time member of the Board of Managers for the center. It became a National Cemetery in 1973 and is currently operated by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Greenwood Cemetery, New Orleans

    Greenwood Cemetery, New Orleans

    Greenwood Cemetery is a cemetery in New Orleans, Louisiana. The cemetery was opened in 1852, and is located on City Park Avenue (formerly Metairie Road) in the Navarre neighborhood. The cemetery has a number of impressive monuments and sculptures. Notables interred here include several mayors of New Orleans, Confederate Generals Young Marshall Moody, who died of yellow fever in 1866, Thomas M. Scott and James Argyle Smith, Confederate supporter and resister of Union occupation William Bruce Mumford, who was hanged for tearing down a United States flag during Union Army occupation of New Orleans during the American Civil War, Union Army Brigadier General and Brevet Major General William Plummer Benton, who was Collector of Internal Revenue in the City of New Orleans after the Civil War and died of yellow fever in 1867, jazz legend Leon Roppolo and novelist John Kennedy Toole.
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    Sanctuary Wood Cemetery

    Sanctuary Wood Cemetery

    Sanctuary Wood Cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) cemetery for the dead of the First World War, 5 km east of Ypres, Belgium in the commune of Zillebeke. Located off the main Ieper-Menin Road on Canadalaan (Canada Lane). The Canadian Hill 62 Memorial is 100 metres further down the road from the cemetery. Sanctuary Wood itself was named by British troops in November 1914 when it was used to shelter troops. Fighting took place in it in September 1915 and it was fought over by Canadian and German soldiers during the Battle of Mount Sorrel in early June 1916. Three small commonwealth cemeteries were established in it between May and August 1915 but were largely obliterated during the Battle of Mount Sorrel. When the war finished, traces of one of them were found, containing 137 graves, and became the core of the present Sanctuary Wood Cemetery. It was greatly expanded between 1927 and 1932 with graves being moved in from surrounding areas, with a few being moved from as far away as Nieuport. The majority of these graves were from the battles around Ypres in 1914 and the Allied offensive in late 1917. One of the 637 identified graves belongs to Lieutenant Gilbert
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Lexington National Cemetery

    Lexington National Cemetery

    Lexington National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Lexington, Kentucky. It encompasses less than 4050 square metres (1 acre), and as of the end of 2005 had 1,390 interments. It is closed to new interments. Lexington National Cemetery was originally a military section of the Lexington Cemetery which was first used to inter American Civil War casualties in 1861. After the war, several makeshift battlefield cemeteries had their remains moved to Lexington. In 1863, the lot was officially designated a National Cemetery, and in 1867, an additional 1500 square metres (0.38 acres) were purchased by the federal government to increase the lot to its current size. Lexington National Cemetery was listed on National Register of Historic Places in 1998.
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Ross Bay Cemetery

    Ross Bay Cemetery

    Ross Bay Cemetery is located at 1516 Fairfield Road in Victoria, British Columbia, on Vancouver Island, Canada. The cemetery was opened in 1873. The 27.5 acre (111,000 m²) cemetery is part of a public park and its south side faces Ross Bay on the Pacific Ocean. In 1911, a sea wall had to be constructed because of the severe erosion that occurred as a result of the relentless pounding of the ocean's waves. During the 1930s, the City began planting a large number of trees and today the cemetery is quite different from the original that was mainly barren ground. The Victorian-style Ross Bay Cemetery, contains numerous elaborate mausoleums and tall pillars from the early elite. Because the city of Victoria is the capital of the province of British Columbia, until the second quarter of the 20th century when improved ferry service and air travel made mobility to and from the island much easier, most senior politicians made Victoria their permanent home. As such, Ross Bay Cemetery is the burial site for many of the province's premiers. Although the Ross Bay Cemetery had long been considered full, the City of Victoria discovered approximately 270 unused plots in the cemetery in the late
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Woodlawn Cemetery

    Woodlawn Cemetery

    Woodlawn Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City and is a designated National Historic Landmark. A rural cemetery located in the Bronx, it opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was annexed to New York City in 1874. The cemetery covers more than 400 acres (160 ha) and is the resting place for more than 300,000 people. There is a memorial to the victims of the 1912 RMS Titanic disaster, called The Annie Bliss Titanic Victims Memorial. Built on rolling hills, its tree-lined roads lead to some unique memorials, some designed by McKim Mead & White, John Russell Pope, James Gamble Rogers, Cass Gilbert, Carrère and Hastings, Sir Edwin Lutyens, Beatrix Jones Farrand, and John LaFarge. As of 2007, plot prices at Woodlawn were reported as $200 per square foot, $4,800 for a gravesite for two, and up to $1.5 million for land to build a family mausoleum. In 2011, Woodlawn Cemetery was designated a National Historic Landmark, since it shows the transition from the rural cemetery popular at the time of its establishment to the more orderly 20th-century cemetery style. Woodlawn was the destination for many human remains disinterred from
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Springvale Cemetery railway station, Melbourne

    Springvale Cemetery railway station, Melbourne

    Spring Vale Cemetery station was a railway station in Melbourne, Australia, serving the Springvale Cemetery. It had its own branch line, which split from the Cranbourne and Pakenham lines at Springvale station. It was opened on 7 February 1904, to transport coffins, passengers and staff to the cemetery, and closed during 1952, at a time when many small branch lines were being closed by Victorian Railways.
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Calverton National Cemetery

    Calverton National Cemetery

    Calverton National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in eastern Long Island, the hamlet of Wading River, the Town of Riverhead in Suffolk County, New York. It encompasses 1,045 acres (423 ha) and as of the end of 2008 had 212,000 interments. It has the largest area of any national cemetery in the United States, and the busiest (in terms of daily burials) conducting more than 7,000 burials each year as of 2011. When the National Cemetery System constructed Calverton National Cemetery in 1978, the cemetery became the third national cemetery to be located on Long Island. The other national cemeteries situated on Long Island are Cypress Hills National Cemetery, in Brooklyn, New York, which was established in 1862 and Long Island National Cemetery, in Farmingdale, New York, established in 1936. In 1974, Long Island National Cemetery was the only national cemetery on Long Island with available space for burials—but its maximum burial capacity was soon to be exhausted. As a result, plans were developed by the National Cemetery System to construct a new regional cemetery to serve the greater New York area——home, then, to nearly three million veterans and their
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Gerald B. H. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery

    Gerald B. H. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery

    Gerald B.H. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the Town of Saratoga in Saratoga County, New York. It encompasses 351.7 acres (142.3 ha), and as of the end of 2005 had 5,012 interments. Dedicated on July 9, 1999 as Saratoga National Cemetery, it was the 116th National Cemetery. It was renamed to Gerald B. H. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery on January 24, 2002, in honor of Congressman Gerald B. H. Solomon, who was known for his support of veterans' causes, and who is interred there. During his tenure in the U.S. House of Representatives, he sponsored the legislation which created the Department of Veterans Affairs and secured approval for the creation of the national cemetery now named for him. He served in Congress from 1979-1998, and was Chairman of the powerful Rules Committee in the House at the time of his retirement. As of the end of 2005, only the first 60 acres (240,000 m) were developed for interments.
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Girod Street Cemetery

    Girod Street Cemetery

    The Girod Street Cemetery was a large above-ground cemetery established in 1822 for Protestant residents of the Faubourg St. Mary in predominantly Catholic New Orleans, Louisiana. It consisted of 2,319 wall vaults and approximately 1,100 tombs. Notables interred there included Congressman Henry Adams Bullard, Zulu Social Club King Joseph J. Smith, and California governor John B. Weller. Girod Cemetery was laid out along a central artery with side aisles, and was noted for its so-called "society tombs," which could rise seven or eight tiers above ground. Societies of slaves owned their own tombs: the First African Baptist Association, the Home Missionary Benevolent Society, and the Male and Female Lutheran Benevolent Society. The New Lusitanos Benevolent Association owned the largest society tomb in Girod Cemetery, which was designed by J.N.B. de Pouilly in 1859. The cemetery fell into disrepair in the 20th century and it was deconsecrated on January 4, 1957. According to local historian Leonard Huber, between January and March 1957, the human remains were moved elsewhere: the interred whites to Hope Mausoleum; and African Americans to Providence Memorial Park. The Louisiana
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Honolulu Catholic Cemetery

    Honolulu Catholic Cemetery

    The Honolulu Catholic Cemetery (also known as the King Street Catholic Cemetery) is a cemetery in Honolulu, Hawaii. The cemetery is for Roman Catholics and is located at 839-A South King Street, 21°18′15″N 157°51′9″W / 21.30417°N 157.8525°W / 21.30417; -157.8525. It is maintained by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Honolulu and has been the final resting place for many Roman Catholics from Honolulu before 1930. The cemetery is open from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. daily. The cemetery is closed to further burials by the Department of Health. The origins of the cemetery were two separate lots. The first lot was given by the Kingdom of Hawaii to the Roman Catholic mission during the 1840s and was identified by the title "Claim No. 4". The second lot was purchased by several wealthy Catholics and given to the Roman Catholic mission. Originally on the outskirts of the village of Honolulu, with the makai side consisting of estuarine wetlands and man-made ponds for the harversting of sea salt (or paʻakai in Hawaiian). The Waikiki side of the cemetery was the old Plantation and rice paddies. In 1889, the cemetery consisted of scattered graves and overrunning paths. Wealthier Catholics ensured that
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Mobile National Cemetery

    Mobile National Cemetery

    Mobile National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Mobile, Alabama. It encompasses 5.2 acres (2.1 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 5,326 interments. It is an annex to the larger Magnolia Cemetery. Mobile National Cemetery is administered by Barrancas National Cemetery in Pensacola, Florida, and is currently closed to new interments. Mobile National Cemetery was established in 1865, when Union troops occupied the city of Mobile after the Battle of Mobile Bay, during the Civil War. Initially, casualties of the battle were interred in a section of the city owned Magnolia Cemetery, but they quickly had a need for more space and a plot of 3 acres (1.2 ha) was granted to the Army by the city in 1866. By 1871, the cemetery had 841 interments, mostly soldiers whose remains were moved from other nearby battlefield sites. Mobile National Cemetery was listed, along with the rest of Magnolia Cemetery, on the National Register of Historic Places on 13 June 1986.
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    Van Liew Cemetery, New Brunswick

    Van Liew Cemetery, New Brunswick

    The Van Liew Cemetery is a cemetery located in North Brunswick, New Jersey, United States. Around 1966, Alfred Yorston removed 520 bodies from the First Presbyterian Church, New Brunswick's cemetery to Van Liew Cemetery to make way for new construction at the church.
    7.80
    5 votes
    19
    Winchester National Cemetery

    Winchester National Cemetery

    Winchester National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia. It encompasses 4.9 acres (2.0 ha), and as of the end of 2005, it had 5,561 interments. It is closed to new interments. The land around Winchester National Cemetery was used for burials as early as 1862, but after the Civil War additional land was appropriated by the federal government and it was officially dedicated on April 8, 1866. The land was not legally transferred to the U.S. government until Dec. 1, 1870, when the landowner, Jacob Baker, was paid $1,500 for the 4.89-acre (1.98 ha) tract and the deed was signed and executed. Numerous Union soldiers from surrounding battlefields were reinterred here, including those from the different battles of Winchester, the Battle of Front Royal, Battle of New Market, Battle of Harpers Ferry, as well as actions at Snickers Gap, Martinsburg, West Virginia, and Romney, West Virginia. The cemetery grounds underwent significant renovations during the 1930s, adding walls, maintenance buildings, and improving the headstones. Winchester National Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.
    6.67
    6 votes
    20
    Oakland Cemetery

    Oakland Cemetery

    Oakland Cemetery is the oldest cemetery, as well as one of the largest green spaces, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Founded as "Atlanta Cemetery" in 1850 on six acres (2.4 hectares) of land southeast of the city, it was renamed in 1872 to reflect the large number of oak and magnolia trees growing in the area. By that time, the city had grown and the cemetery had enlarged correspondingly to the current 48 acres (190,000 m). Since then, Atlanta has continued to expand, so that the cemetery is now located in the center of the city. Oakland is an excellent example of a Victorian-style cemetery, and reflects the "garden cemetery" movement started and exemplified by Mount Auburn Cemetery in Massachusetts. The original 6 acres (24,000 m) of Oakland remains one of the oldest historical plots of land in Atlanta, most of the rest of the city having been burned in 1864. Because of its age and location, the cemetery directly reflects the history and changing culture of the City of Atlanta and the significant events it has seen. Names of Atlanta streets, buildings, parks, subdivisions, and more can be found within the cemetery gates. An estimated 70,000 people are interred at Oakland, and while the
    7.60
    5 votes
    21
    Finn's Point National Cemetery

    Finn's Point National Cemetery

    Finn's Point National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Pennsville, New Jersey in Salem County, New Jersey. It encompasses 4.6 acres (1.9 ha), and as of February 2009, had 3,033 interments. Adjacent to Fort Mott, it is administered by the Beverly National Cemetery. Originally purchased by the federal government to build a battery to protect the port of Philadelphia, the land became a cemetery by 1863 for Confederate prisoners of war who died while in captivity at Fort Delaware. One hundred and thirty five Union soldiers who died while serving as guards at the prison camp are also buried here. The death toll among prisoners of war and the guards was high, especially in the latter part of 1863 and throughout 1864. By July 1863, there were 12,595 prisoners on the island at nearby Fort Delaware which was only about 75 acres (30 ha) in size. Disease was rampant and nearly 2,700 prisoners died from malnutrition or neglect. Confederate prisoners interred at the cemetery totaled 2,436 and all are in general unmarked graves. Officially made a National Cemetery on October 3, 1875 by request of Virginia Governor James L. Kemper, who criticized the poor maintenance of
    7.40
    5 votes
    22
    Danville National Cemetery

    Danville National Cemetery

    Danville National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Danville, in Boyle County, Kentucky. It has 394 interments and is currently closed to new interments. The Danville National Cemetery is located within the Bellevue Cemetery in Danville. The national cemetery site is located in the north-west corner and containing 0.3-acre (0.12 ha). It consists of 18 cemetery lots laid off in the form of a rectangle. Near the center of the north side is a bronze plaque inscribed with "Danville National Cemetery" and the seal of the Veterans Administration (now the Department of Veterans Affairs). A square limestone post, with the letters “U. S.” inscribed on the upper face, is situated at each corner of the national cemetery. A flagpole, 70 feet high, constructed in 1971, is located just south of the bronze plaque identifying the national cemetery. There are no buildings, walls, or fences within the national cemetery. Graves are marked with upright marble headstones. When the American Civil War started, the federal government appropriated 18 cemetery lots from what was then Danville City Cemetery. The small lot was designated a National Cemetery in 1862. It is
    8.50
    4 votes
    23
    Fort Bayard National Cemetery

    Fort Bayard National Cemetery

    Fort Bayard National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in the Fort Bayard Historic District, near Silver City, New Mexico. It encompasses 18.8 acres (7.6 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 3,732 interments. It is one of only two National Cemeteries in New Mexico (the other being Santa Fe National Cemetery), and is administered by Fort Bliss National Cemetery. Fort Bayard was established as a United States Army installation in 1866 to protect miners and other settlers in the area along the Apache Trail. The first interment in the cemetery was made the same year the post was founded. The fort was named for Brigadier General George Dashiell Bayard, who was mortally wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg in 1862. Fifteen square miles of land were set aside as the Fort Bayard Military Reservation by presidential order in 1869. In 1886, then-Second Lieutenant John Pershing arrived at Fort Bayard and oversaw the installation of a heliograph, linking the fort to an Army communications network from Arizona to Texas. Fort Bayard was one of many installations throughout the Southwest that was garrisoned by the so-called Buffalo Soldiers. Company B of the 25th United States
    8.50
    4 votes
    24
    Marietta National Cemetery

    Marietta National Cemetery

    Marietta National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Marietta in Cobb County, Georgia. It encompasses 23.3 acres (9.4 ha), and as of the end of 2006, had 18,742 interments. It is closed to new interments, and is now maintained by the new Georgia National Cemetery. Originally established in 1866 by General George Henry Thomas as Marietta and Atlanta National Cemetery, it was intended to provide interment for nearly 10,000 Union dead from General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign. The land for the cemetery was donated by local resident Henry Cole, as a place to inter both Union and Confederate soldiers. His idea was that by burying together those who had fallen together in battle, it could help foster a kind of peace. Both sides rejected his proposal, and the land was used primarily to inter Union soldiers, while the others were buried in the Marietta Confederate Cemetery. As part of the land sale agreement, the Cole family has their own plot within the National Cemetery. Marietta National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on September 18, 1998.
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    Chattanooga National Cemetery

    Chattanooga National Cemetery

    Chattanooga National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located near the center of the city of Chattanooga in Hamilton County, Tennessee. It encompasses 120.9 acres (48.9 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 43,534 interments. The cemetery was established in 1863, by an order from Major General George Henry Thomas after the Civil War Battles of Chattanooga, as a place to inter Union soldiers who fell in combat. 75 acres (30 ha) of land was initially appropriated from two local land owners, but later purchased. It became a Chattanooga National Cemetery in 1867. By 1870 more than 12,000 interments had been made, most of whom were unknown. Many nearby battlefield burials were also reinterred in Chattanooga, including nearly 1,500 burials from the Battle of Chickamauga. During World War I several German prisoners of war who died while in captivity were buried in Chattanooga National Cemetery. After the war, the German government paid to have other POWs disinterred from Hot Springs National Cemetery and moved to Chattanooga. Chattanooga National Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. Originally the site was expected to close for new burials in
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Huguenot cemetery

    Huguenot cemetery

    The Huguenot Cemetery (Irish: Reilig na nÚgóineach) is a small cemetery dating from 1693 located near St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, Ireland, beside the Shelbourne Hotel. Although often described as being on the green, it is actually on the north side of Merrion Row, a small street linking St. Stephen's Green with Upper Merrion Street and Ely Place. Those buried there are descendants of Huguenots who fled persecution in France following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes which had guaranteed religious freedom. They were encouraged to come to Ireland by James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who had spent twelve years in exile in France, after the Irish and Royalist forces were defeated by those of Oliver Cromwell. Ormonde's return to Ireland as Viceroy in 1662 coincided with the consolidation of power by Louis XIV, which put extra pressure on the Huguenots in France. Ormonde had come into contact with Huguenots in Paris and Normandy, and hoped that their skills and capital could help stimulate the Irish economy and introduce new industries. The Huguenots quickly established a thriving community in Dublin and elsewhere in Ireland based on their skills in textiles, watchmaking and
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery is a cemetery in Juneau, the capital of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was established in 1887 to replace the older cemetery on Chicken Ridge, near Main Street, when that location was staked as a gold mine. Most of the graves in this older cemetery were moved to the new cemetery between 1889 and 1892 and the rest were moved about 1915. The grounds were deeded by Evergreen Cemetery Association to the City of Juneau on May 23, 1907. Evergreen Cemetery is operated by the Juneau Department of Parks and Recreation, and was Juneau's main cemetery from 1887 until Alaskan Memorial Park in Mendenhall Valley opened in the 1970s.
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Old Chapel Hill Cemetery

    Old Chapel Hill Cemetery

    Old Chapel Hill Cemetery is a graveyard located on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The land was a land grant to the University of North Carolina by the State of North Carolina. The land encompassed 125 acres (51 ha), and was sold for five shillings on October 21, 1776. The cemetery currently covers 6.98 acres (2.82 ha). The first recorded burial was George Clarke, a Burke County student at the university, who died September 28, 1798. His headstone was not placed until several years later. By January 28, 1994, 1,621 burials had been performed. The cemetery is now almost full, and all of the plots have already been bought. In 1922, the town took over responsibility for maintaining the cemetery, and in 1988, the ownership changed over to the University. A low rock wall was built around the cemetery in 1835 at the cost of $64.41. The school officially named the cemetery "College Graveyard," as opposed to "Village Cemetery," like the Chapel Hill residents called it. Five sidewalks divide the cemetery into six sections. Two of the sections were reserved for African-American burials because there were no black church cemeteries
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Kanchanaburi War Cemetery

    Kanchanaburi War Cemetery

    The Kanchanaburi War Cemetery (known locally as the Don-Rak War Cemetery) is the main Prisoner of War (POW) cemetery associated with victims of the Burma Railway. It is located on the main road (Saeng Chuto Road) through the town of Kanchanaburi, Thailand, adjacent to an older Chinese cemetery. It was designed by Colin St Clair Oakes and is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. There are 6,982 former POWs buried there, mostly Australian, British and Dutch. It contains the remains of prisoners buried beside the south section of the railway from Bangkok to Nieke apart from those identified as Americans, whose remains were repatriated. There are 1,896 Dutch war graves, the rest being from Britain and the Commonwealth. Two graves contain the ashes of 300 men who were cremated. The Kanchanaburi Memorial gives the names of 11 from India who are buried in Muslim cemeteries. The central Bangkok railway station (Hualamphong)offers weekend day trips by rail to The Burma Death Railway in Kanchanaburi. It does however stop at the main railway station in Kanchanaburi for approx 45 mins to let passengers visit the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery. Exit the station and walk to the main
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Vale Cemetery, Schenectady

    Vale Cemetery, Schenectady

    Vale Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Schenectady, New York. It opened on 21 October 1857 when the Rev. Julius Seely dedicated what was then termed "the Vale". It has tripled its size since opening and today it holds the remains of some of the most notable persons in Upstate New York. In 1973, a 35-acre tract of unused and abandoned cemetery land around the ponds of Coehorn Creek was sold to the city of Schenectady to form Vale Park. The cemetery and park were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. The history of the cemetery begins shortly after 1850, at this time the old burying ground on Green and Front Streets was being overrun with weeds and was described as being in an unsanitary condition. The result of this was that the Common Council resolved on 2 July 1856 to use the grounds of the old Hospital Farm on Nott Terrace, as a 38-acre (150,000 m) public cemetery. On 16 June 1857, Mayor Benjamin V S Vedder appointed a committee to oversee the work. In order to gain access off one of the main streets in Schenectady, Nott Terrace, Dr Eliphalet Nott, the President of Union College donated an avenue from Nott Terrace into the grounds. Later in 1863, two
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Wuzhi Mountain Military Cemetery

    Wuzhi Mountain Military Cemetery

    The Wuzhi Mountain Military Cemetery (Chinese: 五指山國軍示範公墓, literally Wuzhi Mountain National Military Model Public Cemetery) is Taiwan's most prominent military cemetery. The cemetery is located on Wuzhi Mountain (五指山) in Xizhi, New Taipei City and borders Taipei City's Neihu District and Yangmingshan National Park. General Chiang Wei-kuo, the adopted son of Chiang Kai-shek, conceived and designed the cemetery. The cemetery has a wide open view ranging from the Taipei 101 over at Taipei's Xinyi District to the Keelung Harbor. The cemetery, which has 9,417 grave plots, is nearly full; further deceased military officials will need to be cremated and their ashes stored in the columbarium.
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery

    Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery

    Camp Nelson Confederate Cemetery is a historic cemetery located near Cabot in northern Lonoke County, Arkansas and is the site of Confederate military camp where 1,500 Confederate soldiers died during an epidemic during the fall of 1862. Camp Nelson is located on Rye Drive, just off Cherry Road, just off Mt. Carmel Road in north Lonoke County about 2 miles east of Cabot. Camp Nelson was a central staging point in central Arkansas for Confederate troops gathering from Texas and Arkansas. The camp was named for Brigadier General Allison Nelson who was in command of the 10th Texas Infantry Regiment. During the fall of 1862 an epidemic of measles and typhoid fever ran rampant through the troops congregated there. Approximately 1,500 Arkansas and Texas soldiers died of disease during a two month period including Brigadier General Nelson himself. Approximately 1,500 of these soldiers were buried in unmarked graves in the surrounding hills. During the early years of the 20th century Confederate veterans placed markers in honor of the unknown soldiers and erected a 12-foot obelisk to their memory at the site. The cemetery was not properly maintained and was soon overtaken by the forest
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    West Point Cemetery

    West Point Cemetery

    West Point Cemetery is a historic cemetery on the grounds of the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. It overlooks the Hudson River, and served as a burial ground for American Revolutionary War soldiers and early West Point inhabitants long before 1817 when it was officially designated as a military cemetery. Prior to 1817, the area was known as "German Flats" before it was formally designated as the official cemetery. Until that time several small burial plots scattered in mid-post also served as places of interment. The graves from these plots and the remains subsequently found during building excavations were removed to the new site. An improved road to the cemetery was constructed in 1840, and the caretaker's cottage was erected in 1872. Besides offices for the cemetery management, the caretaker's cottage now also houses West Point's Inspector General office. The cemetery is home to several monuments, to include Dade Monument, the Cadet Monument, Wood's Monument, and Margaret Corbin Monument.
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Berks Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery Extension

    Berks Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery Extension

    Berks Cemetery Extension is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in Ploegsteert in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. The cemetery was founded by Commonwealth troops in June 1916 as an extension to Hyde Park Corner (Royal Berks) Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery which lies across the road. The cemetery was still small at the time of the Armistice. It was englarged in 1930 when it became clear that Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery and Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery Extension, approximately one kilometre away, could not be acquired in perpetuity and the graves were moved to the Berks Cemetery Extension. Inside the cemetery is the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing. The cemetery was designed by H(arold) Chalton Bradshaw, who also designed the Cambrai Memorial in France.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Highgate Cemetery

    Highgate Cemetery

    Highgate Cemetery is a place of burial in north London, England. It is designated Grade I on the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. It is divided into two parts, named the East and West cemetery. There are approximately 170,000 people buried in around 53,000 graves at Highgate Cemetery. Highgate Cemetery is notable both for some of the people buried there as well as for its de facto status as a nature reserve. The cemetery is located on both sides of Swain's Lane in Highgate, N6, next to Waterlow Park. The Main Gate is located just north of Oakshott Avenue. There is another entrance on Chester Road. The cemetery is in the London Boroughs of Camden, Haringey and Islington. The nearest transport link is Archway tube station. The cemetery in its original form – the northwestern wooded area – opened in 1839, as part of a plan to provide seven large, modern cemeteries, known as the "Magnificent Seven", around the outside of London. The inner-city cemeteries, mostly the graveyards attached to individual churches, had long been unable to cope with the number of burials and were seen as a hazard to health and an undignified way to treat
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery

    Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery

    Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery is an American military cemetery located in St. Louis County, Missouri, just on the banks of the Mississippi River. The cemetery was established after the American Civil War in an attempt to put together a formal network of military cemeteries. It started as the Jefferson Barracks Military Post Cemetery in 1826 and became a United States National Cemetery in 1866. The first known burial was Elizabeth Ann Lash, the infant child of an officer stationed at Jefferson Barracks. The cemetery is currently administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs on the former site of Jefferson Barracks. The cemetery currently covers 331 acres (1.3 km²) and the number of interments as of 2005 is approximately 158,762. The cemetery is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. As well, there are three veterans of the American Revolution buried in the Old Post Section:
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Nashville National Cemetery

    Nashville National Cemetery

    Nashville National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Madison, a suburb of Nashville, in Davidson County, Tennessee. It encompasses 64.5 acres (26.1 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 34,637 interments. The initial land for for Nashville National Cemetery was acquired in July 1866. A tract of 45 acres was transferred to the United States from Morton B. Howell, Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court of Davidson County, in accordance with a decree of the court in the case of Anderson v. McRoberts & McKee, docket # 2153. The deed was recorded in January of 1867, Davidson County deed book 38, page 648. Another 17 acres was conveyed by the Clerk and Master, from the same case, in January 1867 and recorded in Davidson County deed book 38, page 650. In October of 1879 a small tract was deeded from from J. Watts Judson and recorded in Davidson County deed book 63, page 360. The original interments were transferred from the Nashville City Cemetery, veteran hospital cemeteries around the region, as well as battlefield cemeteries, such as those from the Battle of Franklin. There are over four thousand unknowns buried in Nashville National Cemetery. Nashville National
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    San Fernando Mission Cemetery

    San Fernando Mission Cemetery

    The San Fernando Mission Cemetery is a Catholic cemetery located at 11160 Stranwood Avenue in the Mission Hills community of the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California, near the San Fernando Mission. The cemetery has been operated by the Los Angeles Archdiocese since 1800. Mission Hills Catholic Mortuary is also located on the grounds of the cemetery. (Note: This is a partial list.) Use the following alphabetical links to find someone.
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Florida National Cemetery

    Florida National Cemetery

    Florida National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located near the city of Bushnell in Sumter County, Florida. It encompasses 512.9 acres (207.6 ha), and began interments in 1988. Florida National Cemetery is located in the Withlacoochee State Forest, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Tampa. The forest was acquired by the federal government from private landowners between 1936 and 1939 under the provisions of the U.S. Land Resettlement Administration. The United States Forest Service managed the property until a lease-purchase agreement transferred it to the Florida Board of Forestry in 1958. Currently, Withlacoochee State Forest is the second-largest state forest in Florida, divided into eight distinct tracts of land. In 1842, Congress encouraged settlement here by establishing the Armed Occupation Act. The law granted a patent for 160 acres (0.65 km) to any man who kept a gun and ammunition, built a house, cultivated 5 acres (20,000 m) of the land and remained there for at least five years. Settlers moved in to take advantage of the generous offer. The area contained abundant timber and suitable farmland, appealing attributes to frontiersmen. In 1845 Florida
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    Oakwood Cemetery

    Oakwood Cemetery

    Oakwood Cemetery, originally called City Cemetery, is the oldest city-owned cemetery in Austin, Texas. Situated on a hill just east of I-35 that overlooks downtown Austin, just north of the Swedish Hill Historic District and south of Disch-Falk Field, the once-isolated site is now in the center of the city. The cemetery dates from the mid-1850s. It may have begun even earlier, as legend states that its first tenants were victims of a Comanche attack whose bodies were laid to rest on the same hill. The cemetery was renamed Oakwood in 1907 per city ordinance. It spreads over 40 acres (160,000 m), including an annex across Comal Street to the east, and includes sections historically dedicated to the city's black, Latino, and Jewish populations. Paupers were historically buried in unmarked graves on the cemetery's south side. Graves without permanent markers were subject to reburial after a given period. The cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985; its annex was added on October 30, 2003. Despite its protected status, the cemetery has been subject to crime, vandalism, and decay for decades.
    6.60
    5 votes
    41
    Anfield Cemetery

    Anfield Cemetery

    Anfield Cemetery, also known as the City of Liverpool Cemetery, is on Priory Road, Anfield, Liverpool, England (grid reference SJ365940). Anfield Cemetery opened in 1863. Anfield Crematorium opened in 1896. It covers an area of some 110 acres (45 ha) and includes axial and circular paths, two chapels and a Gothic style catacomb. The layout of the cemetery was designed by Edward Kemp. The cemetery is adjacent to Stanley Park and close to the stadiums of Everton F.C. and Liverpool F.C. Notable individuals to have been buried or cremated there include: Bill Shankly, the former manager of Liverpool FC who was cremated there in 1981; former Everton captain Brian Labone; Boer War hero Donald Dickson Farmer VC (died 1956), and Labour MP Bessie Braddock (died 1970). The cemetery has been placed on the Heritage at Risk Register because of the poor condition of the one (out of three) remaining chapels and the two catacombs. The cemetery itself was upgraded to Grade II* in 2009. The cemetery contains burials or special memorials of servicemen and women of both World Wars who are commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). The majority are buried in two war graves plots in
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Cypress Hills Cemetery

    Cypress Hills Cemetery

    Cypress Hills Cemetery was the first non-sectarian/non-denominational cemetery corporation organized in the Brooklyn/Queens area of New York City. The Cemetery is run as a non-for-profit organization and is located at 833 Jamaica Avenue in Brooklyn. The Cemetery occupies both Kings and Queens counties and its 225 acres are divided by the Jackie Robinson Parkway (formally the Interboro Parkway). Cypress Hills retains its two primary entrances at Jamaica Avenue (Brooklyn) and Cooper Avenue (Queens). The Cemetery reveals its historical significance through an extensive record of New York's most notable figures buried there. Established in 1848 east of the Ridgewood Reservoir, a section of the cemetery was designated as the Cypress Hills National Cemetery in 1862 as a military burial ground for soldiers of the American Civil War, which in 1941 received the bodies of 235 Confederate prisoners who died on Hart Island. The cemetery features: Cypress Hills Cemetery was opened for burials in 1851 and was designed to emulate a "rural cemetery" setting. The Cemetery features lush surroundings, rolling hills, and centuries old Cypress trees. Its location in one of the busiest areas in
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery

    Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery

    Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in the city of San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas. It encompasses 154.7 acres (62.6 ha), and as of the end of 2008, had 120,982 interments. Although the Army post in the area was established in 1875, and construction of Fort Sam Houston was constructed the following year no burials were made in the area that is currently the cemetery until 1926. In 1931 an additional 60 acres (24 ha) were added, and it was considered to be an addition to San Antonio National Cemetery. In 1937, it was made a National Cemetery in its own right and renamed to Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery. In 1947 several other Forts in Texas, including Fort McIntosh, were closed and their cemetery interments were transferred to Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery. Interred at the Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery are 140 axis prisoners of war (POWs) from World War II who Died in captivity. 133 are German, 4 are Italian, and 3 are Japanese. After the end of hostilities most POWs who died in captivity were returned to their respective countries, these 140 were disinterred from various Texas prisoner of war camps and reburied at Fort Sam
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    Rosedale Cemetery

    Rosedale Cemetery

    Rosedale Cemetery is a cemetery located in Orange, in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. Cyrus Baldwin drew up the original plan for the cemetery in 1840.
    7.50
    4 votes
    45
    Green-Wood Cemetery

    Green-Wood Cemetery

    Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Brooklyn, Kings County , New York. It was granted National Historic Landmark status in 2006 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood". Inspired by Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where a cemetery in a naturalistic park-like landscape in the English manner was first established, Green-Wood was able to take advantage of the varied topography provided by glacial moraines. Battle Hill, the highest point in Brooklyn, is on cemetery grounds, rising approximately 200 feet above sea level. As such, there on that spot in 1920, was erected a Revolutionary War monument by Frederick Ruckstull, Altar to Liberty: Minerva. From this height, the bronze Minerva statue gazes The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. The cemetery was the idea of Henry Evelyn
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Indiantown Gap National Cemetery

    Indiantown Gap National Cemetery

    Indiantown Gap National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Union Township, in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. It occupies approximately 677 acres (2.74 km), and is site to 26,323 interments, as of the end of 2005. Indiantown Gap derives its name from the various Native American communities that resided the region. Starting in the 1930s, it became a training area for the United States Army and control of the facility was turned over to the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1998. In 1975 it also served as a refugee camp for southeast Asian refugees. For eight months, more than 22,000 Vietnamese and Cambodian refugees were resettled through the facility. Indiantown Gap derives its name from the various Native American communities that resided the region. Starting in the 1930s, it became a training area for the United States Army and control of the facility was turned over to the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1998. In 1975 it also served as a refugee camp for southeast Asian refugees. For eight months, in accordance with the Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act, more than 22,000 Vietnamese and Cambodian refugees were resettled through the facility. In 1976,
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    Beechwood Cemetery

    Beechwood Cemetery

    Beechwood Cemetery, located in Ottawa, Ontario, is the National Cemetery of Canada. It is the final resting place for over 75,000 Canadians from all walks of life, such as important politicians like Governor General Ramon Hnatyshyn and Prime Minister Sir Robert Borden, Canadian Forces Veterans, War Dead, members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and men and women who have made a mark on Canadian history. A woodland cemetery founded in 1873, it is 64.7 hectares (160 acres) and is the largest cemetery in the city of Ottawa. It was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 2001. The cemetery also serves as the National Military Cemetery and the RCMP National Memorial Cemetery. Beechwood has received these various honours and designations because it is recognized as a beautiful example of 19th-century rural cemeteries and as a place of national significance and importance as a depository of Canadian history. Since the Northwest Rebellion of 1885, soldiers who were killed in the line of duty and veterans of war have been buried in Beechwood Cemetery. The cemetery contains the National Military Cemetery which consists of two sections managed by the Commonwealth War Graves
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Flushing Cemetery

    Flushing Cemetery

    Flushing Cemetery is a cemetery in Flushing in the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. The cemetery is the final resting place for:
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    English Cemetery, Florence

    English Cemetery, Florence

    The English Cemetery in Florence, Italy is at Piazzale Donatello. Its names, 'Cimitero Inglese' and 'Cimitero Protestante' are somewhat misleading, as the cemetery holds bodies of Orthodox Christians as well as those of many Reformed Churches; but the majority of those buried here were of the Anglophone British and American communities of Florence. Before 1827 non-Catholics and non-Jews who died in Florence could be buried in Livorno only. In 1827 the Swiss Evangelical Reformed Church bought land outside the medieval wall and gate of Porta a' Pinti at Florence from Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany for an international and ecumenical cemetery, Russian and Greek Orthodox burials joining the Protestant ones. Carlo Reishammer, a young architectural student, landscaped the cemetery, then Giuseppe Poggi shaped it as its present oval when Florence became capital of Italy. He surrounded it with studios for artists, including that of Michele Gordigiani (who painted the portraits of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, now in the National Portrait Gallery, London). Among the many Swiss, Russians, Americans and British buried here, those of the English-speaking British and Americans are
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Florence National Cemetery

    Florence National Cemetery

    Florence National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Florence, South Carolina. It encompasses 24.9 acres (10.1 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 8,853 interments. The cemetery was originally created on land appropriated, and later purchased, by the federal government. The land was first owned by James H. Jarrott and was a quarter of a mile from the Florence Stockade. It became a National Cemetery in 1865, and remains from nearby Civil War battlefield cemeteries were transferred and reinterred there. Florence National Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Oak Ridge Cemetery

    Oak Ridge Cemetery

    Oak Ridge Cemetery is a cemetery located in Springfield, Illinois in the United States. Lincoln's Tomb, which serves as the final resting place of Abraham Lincoln, his wife and all but one of his children, is located at Oak Ridge. A number of other prominent politicians and persons from Illinois are also buried at the cemetery. As a result of Lincoln's Tomb, Oak Ridge is the second-most visited cemetery in the United States, after Arlington National Cemetery. The Cemetery has memorials for the Korean War, World War II and the Illinois Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Puerto Rico National Cemetery

    Puerto Rico National Cemetery

    Puerto Rico National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Bayamón, in the commonwealth of Puerto Rico. It encompasses 108.2 acres (43.8 ha) of land, and as of the end of 2005, had 44,722 interments. It is the only National Cemetery in Puerto Rico, and the only one outside of the mainland United States. The land in which the cemetery is located was under the jurisdiction of the United States Navy since 1898, when Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the United States as a consequence of the treaties signed which officially ended the Spanish-American War. The area was used as a machine gun firing range during World War II. The Government of the United States decided that the site, which is located in Bayamon and is approximately 13 miles from San Juan, would be suitable for the construction of a new cemetery. The land was transferred to the stewardship of the United States Department of the Army and the private firm of Font & Montilla was contracted to build the cemetery. The cemetery was dedicated on Veterans Day in 1949, in a ceremony attended by Luis Munoz Marin, the Governor of Puerto Rico, and Major General Herman Feldman, the Quartermaster of the U.S.
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    Invalidenfriedhof Cemetery

    Invalidenfriedhof Cemetery

    The Invalids' Cemetery (German: Invalidenfriedhof) is one of the oldest cemeteries in Berlin. It was the traditional resting place of the Prussian Army, and is regarded as particularly important as a memorial to the German Wars of Liberation of 1813-15. The cemetery was established in 1748 to provide burial grounds for those veterans wounded in the War of the Austrian Succession, who inhabited a nearby hostel (Invalidenhaus) built on the orders of King Frederick the Great. A royal decree of 1824 declared that the Invalidenfriedhof should become the burial ground for all distinguished Prussian military personnel, including Bogislav Count Tauentzien von Wittenberg. One of the most notable tombs from this period is that of Gerhard von Scharnhorst (a hero of the Napoleonic Wars), designed by Schinkel with a sculpture of a slumbering lion cast out of captured cannon by Rauch. The cemetery was also the resting place of the soldiers killed during the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states. By 1872, approximately 18,000 funerals had taken place in the cemetery. Numerous commanders and officers who fought in World War I, such as Max Hoffmann, Helmuth von Moltke and Ludwig von
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Metairie Cemetery

    Metairie Cemetery

    Metairie Cemetery is a cemetery in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. The name has caused some people to mistakenly presume that the cemetery is located in Metairie, Louisiana, but it is located within the New Orleans city limits, on Metairie Road (and formerly on the banks of the since filled in Bayou Metairie). This site was previously a horse racing track, Metairie Race Course, founded in 1838. The race track was the site of the famous Lexington-Lecomte Race, April 1, 1854, billed as the "North against the South" race. Former President Millard Filmore attended. While racing was suspended because of the American Civil War, it was used as a Confederate Camp (Camp Moore) until David Farragut took New Orleans for the Union in April 1862. Metairie Cemetery was built upon the grounds of the old Metairie Race Course after it went bankrupt. The race track, which was owned by the Metairie Jockey Club, refused membership to Charles T. Howard, a local resident who had gained his wealth by starting the first Louisiana State Lottery. After being refused membership, Howard vowed that the race course would become a cemetery. Sure enough, after the Civil War and Reconstruction, the track
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Mount Calvary Cemetery

    Mount Calvary Cemetery

    Mount Calvary Cemetery is one of the two main cemeteries for Catholics in the Dubuque, Iowa area. The cemetery is located at 1111 Davis St, Dubuque, Iowa. It is in the northern part of the city. The cemetery is located near two other cemeteries - St. John's Cemetery, and Linwood Cemetery. The cemetery offers regular burial and mausoleum entombment. It also has lawn crypts. Mt. Calvary has an area set aside for the burial of cremated remains, and also maintains columbarium niches in its original chapel space. On July 19, 1861 William Rumpf and Herman Bruening sold 5 acres (20,000 m) of land to the Dubuque Diocese in order to establish a cemetery for German immigrants. For the next three years this cemetery served the members of Holy Trinity (now St. Mary's) Church. In 1864, in response to the increasing size of the German community in Dubuque, the present St. Mary's Church was constructed. The cemetery was then called St. Mary's Cemetery. It mainly served the parishioners of St. Mary's Church as well as other German Catholics living in the area. The pastor of St. Mary's also directed the operation of the cemetery. After the population explosion of the late 19th century, St. Mary's
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Weißensee Cemetery

    Weißensee Cemetery

    The Weißensee Cemetery is a Jewish cemetery located in the neighborhood of Weißensee in Berlin, Germany. It is the second largest Jewish cemetery in Europe. The cemetery covers approximately 42 ha (100 acres) and contains approximately 115,000 graves. It was dedicated in 1880. The main entrance is at the end of the Herbert-Baum-Straße. In 1924, a second entrance was constructed off Indira-Gandhi-Straße. Directly in front of the entrance is a Holocaust memorial, a commemorative stone, surrounded by further stones, each with the names of concentration camps. Next to this, there is a memorial to Jews who lost their lives during World War I (which was dedicated in 1927) and also a commemorative plaque to those who fought Nazism. The plot of land was bought by the Jewish community of Berlin (German: Jüdische Gemeinde zu Berlin), comprising - besides congregants of orthodox and reform affiliation - mostly observants of mainstream Judaism (in today's term described at best as conservative Judaism). The old Jewish cemetery in Große Hamburger Straße, opened 1672, had reached its full capacity in 1827. The second cemetery in Schönhauser Allee, opened in the same year, reached its capacity in
    9.50
    2 votes
    57
    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery is a Catholic cemetery located at 10378 Military Road in Key West, Iowa approximately 4 mi (6.4 km) south of Dubuque. It is one of the two large Catholic cemeteries located in the Dubuque area. The cemetery is located near Saint Joseph's Catholic Church in Key West, but is operated independently. The cemetery offers in-ground burial, as well as columbarium and mausoleum entombment. The cemetery began in 1856 and was known as the Key West Burying Ground. In 1901, the Mt. Olivet Cemetery Association was formed and the cemetery was renamed Mount Olivet. One of the first tasks the board of 11 trustees undertook was to relocate graves from the Third Street Cemetery, was adjacent to St Raphael's Cathedral, to Mt. Olivet. Although the Third Street Cemetery was declared closed in the 1870s and remains moved, several graves were discovered in 2007 when the property was being redeveloped. In November 2010, authorities announced that many of the graves would be moved to Mt. Olivet. The board then hired O. C. Simonds to improve the cemetery grounds. Simmonds, who was the superintendent of Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois and was widely recognized as a landscape
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Protestant Cemetery, Rome

    Protestant Cemetery, Rome

    The Protestant Cemetery (Italian: Cimitero protestante) now officially called the Cimitero acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") and often referred to as the Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery") is a cemetery in Rome, located near Porta San Paolo alongside the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. The presence of Mediterranean cypress, pomegranite, and other trees, and a grassy meadow suggests the more naturalistic landscape style of northern Europe, where cemeteries sometimes incorporate grass and other greenery. As the official name indicates, it is the final resting place of non-Catholics (not only Protestants or English people). The earliest known burial is that of an Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The most famous graves are those of English poets John Keats (1795–1821) and Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822). Keats died in Rome of tuberculosis at the age of 25. His epitaph, which does not mention him by name, is by his friends Joseph Severn and Charles Armitage Brown: "This grave contains all that was mortal, of a YOUNG ENGLISH
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    St Sepulchre's Cemetery

    St Sepulchre's Cemetery

    St Sepulchre's Cemetery is located in Jericho, central Oxford, England. The cemetery was opened in 1849, initially as an overflow for north Oxford because existing cemeteries were overcrowded with corpses from epidemics such as cholera. St Sepulchre's Cemetery itself became overcrowded later in Victorian times. The cemetery was established along with Osney Cemetery and Holywell Cemetery. In 1855, new burials were forbidden at all Oxford city churches, apart from in existing vaults. It is now unused and many graves and headstones are in a state of disrepair. The cemetery was surrounded on two sides by the Lucy factory, the former Eagle Ironworks, but this industrial site has now been redeveloped for up-market housing. Access to the cemetery is through iron gates off Walton Street. Before the cemetery was created, Walton Manor Farm used to be on this site. People buried here include:
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    York Cemetery, York

    York Cemetery, York

    York Cemetery is a cemetery located in the city of York, England. Founded in 1837, it now encompasses 24 acres (97,000 m2) and is owned and administered by The York Cemetery Trust with support of the Friends of York Cemetery. It is situated on Cemetery Road in the Fishergate area of York. It has approximately 28,000 graves, over 17,000 monuments, 6 of which are Grade II listed. The chapel is a Grade II* listed building while the gatehouse, gate and railings are Grade II. The architect of these buildings and the grounds was James Pigott Pritchett. The York Public Cemetery Company was formed in 1837 to provide better burial facilities for the citizens of York - whatever their station in life - than those offered by the overcrowded parish and non-conformist graveyards in the city, . At first it had to compete with the other graveyards in the city, but, because of their unsatisfactory condition, they were all closed by an Order in Council in December 1854. From 1855 then, until the 1940s, the cemetery expanded to its present size of 24 acres (97,000 m) by buying all the adjacent land that was available. As a result it prospered and paid good dividends to its shareholders. By the 1960s,
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Brompton Cemetery

    Brompton Cemetery

    Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl's Court in South West London, England (postal districts SW 5 and 10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks and is one of the Magnificent Seven. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Brompton Cemetery, consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, is one of the Britain's oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, now mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a 'Garden of Remembrance' for the deposit of cremated remains. The official address of Brompton Cemetery is Old Brompton Road in West Brompton, SW10, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. The Main Gate (or North Gate) is near the junction with Kempsford Gardens. There is another gate (the South
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Calvary Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Calvary Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Calvary Cemetery is the oldest existing Roman Catholic cemetery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Owned by the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, it is the final resting place for many of the city's early influential figures. The cemetery was designated a Milwaukee Landmark in 1981. With 75 acres (30 ha) and approximately 80,000 interments, the Victorian landscape contains many ornate statues, crypts and monuments. On November 2, 1857, a tract of 55 acres (22 ha) for Calvary Cemetery was consecrated by Archbishop John Henni four miles (6 km) west from the downtown area on Bluemound Road, the first road to be constructed by the Wisconsin Territory. It was filled with the remains of the 10-acre (4.0 ha) "Old Cemetery," which also contained the remains from Milwaukee's first cemetery established in the First Ward. By 1880 Calvary had 10,307 recorded burials and an additional 20 acres (8.1 ha) were added. Both the Gothic Revival style gate house and Romanesque chapel were designed by architect Erhard Brielmaier, who also designed the Basilica of St. Josaphat. A service building was constructed sometime after 1890 in Queen Anne style using Cream City brick, a distinct light colored brick made locally.
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery

    Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery

    The Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery and Memorial (French:Le Cimetière de Guerre Canadien Groesbeek) is located about three kilometres north of the village of Groesbeek, Netherlands. The cemetery contains 2,338 Canadian soldiers of World War II. The cemetery is unique in that many of the dead were brought here from nearby Germany. It is one of the few cases where bodies were moved across international frontiers. It is believed that all fallen Canadian soldiers of the Rhineland battles, who were buried in German battlefields, were reinterred here (except for one who is buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery). General H.D.G. Crerar, who commanded Canadian land forces in Europe, ordered that Canadian dead were not to be buried in German soil. Thousands of Dutch children tend the graves of the soldiers buried here as they do throughout the Netherlands. Within the cemetery stands the Groesbeek Memorial, which commemorates members of the Commonwealth land forces who died during the campaign in north-west Europe between the time of crossing the Seine River at the end of August 1944 and the end of the war in Europe. There are 1,103 names on the memorial; although since the date of
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Old Saint Paul's Cemetery

    Old Saint Paul's Cemetery

    Old Saint Paul's Cemetery is a cemetery located in downtown Baltimore, Maryland, United States. It is noted for the several important historical figures that are interred in its grounds. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The first cemetery of Saint Paul's Church in Baltimore was located at intersection of Sollers Road and North Point Road in what is now Dundalk. Organized in 1692 this churchyard is the oldest cemetery that is known to have existed in the Baltimore area. About 1760 those remains were moved to Saint Paul's Burial Ground which surrounded the original church at Charles Street and Jones Falls Bluffs which stood from 1739 to 1817. That building was replaced by another which burned in 1854 and was later replaced by the present building which fills that entire property, at the current intersection of Charles and Saratoga Streets. In the late 18th century, the Vestry of Old St. Paul's Church was faced with the need for a third cemetery. Cemeteries had never been viewed as good neighbors, aside from the fact that they contained the bodies and souls of the departed (who, it was believed, had the ability to wander the land), they could become
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Zachary Taylor National Cemetery

    Zachary Taylor National Cemetery

    Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, located at 4701 Brownsboro Road (US-42), in northeast Louisville, Kentucky (near Saint Matthews, Kentucky) is a national cemetery where former President of the United States Zachary Taylor and his first lady Margaret Taylor are buried. Zachary Taylor National Cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on November 3, 1983. Presently, the cemetery has 13,486 interments. It is one of seven national cemeteries in the commonwealth of Kentucky, and one of 112 in the entire United States of America. Those buried at the national cemetery served in six wars: Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. The cemetery started as the family cemetery of Zachary Taylor's family. Also buried at the site are Taylor's parents, Richard Taylor, who was a colonel in the American Revolutionary War, and Sarah Strother Taylor. President Taylor's son, Richard Taylor, who was a general for the Confederate States of America, is buried at Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans. The land which became Zachary Taylor National Cemetery was part of Richard Taylor's 400-acre (160 ha) estate, known as Springfield,
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery is a privately owned rural cemetery with approximately 12,000 interments and the namesake of Cemetery Hill of the Gettysburg Battlefield. The cemetery was a Union artillery position during the Battle of Gettysburg and was damaged by artillery fire, etc. Evergreen Cemetery's mission as an all-citizens' cemetery has been demonstrated throughout its history (with one notable exception). In its earliest days, 500 lots were donated for reception of the poor, and several intown, church-associated cemeteries have been completely relocated to Evergreen without concern for creed. Gettysburg's founder, the two attorneys who contended during the formation of the National Cemetery, past gravediggers of Evergreen, and numerous soldiers lie together in peace and harmony. Following a November 29, 1853, meeting to establish the Evergreen Cemetery Association of Gettysburg, the members' first payments were due April 3, 1854. Opening ceremonies on November 7, 1854, included the "Sale of Lots" (118) after the first interment on October 29. The association managed the property and oversaw selection of its caretakers (the gatehouse was the caretaker residence). During the Battle of
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Linden Grove Cemetery

    Linden Grove Cemetery

    Linden Grove Cemetery is located along Holman Street, between 13th and 15th streets in Covington, Kentucky, United States. It is the second public cemetery in Covington, the city's first public burial ground being Craig Street Cemetery, which dates to 1815. Craig Street Cemetery closed in 1872. Most of the bodies were moved to Linden Grove. Trustees of the nearby Western Baptist Theological Institute which was formed to train Baptist ministers founded the cemetery in 1842, and from the beginning allowed burials without regard to race or religion. The Western Baptist Theological Institute had been formed in 1833 to train Baptist ministers and at one time its grounds covered several hundred acres. Some accounts say burials at Linden Grove began in 1842, but the Licking Valley Register reported on September 9, 1843, that elaborate plans had been proposed for dedicating "this beautiful spot of ground" on September 11. Plans called for music and talks by ministers and groups from Presbyterian, Episcopal and Methodist churches in Covington. The writer described Linden Grove as about "60 acres of high table land, overlooking the city of Cincinnati and situated in the midst of the most
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Merry Cemetery

    Merry Cemetery

    The Merry Cemetery (Romanian: Cimitirul Vesel pronounced [t͡ʃimiˈtirul ˈvesel]) is a cemetery in the village of Săpânţa, Maramureş county, Romania. It is famous for its colourful tombstones with naïve paintings describing, in an original and poetic manner, the persons that are buried there as well as scenes from their lives. The Merry Cemetery became an open-air museum and a national tourist attraction. The unusual feature of this cemetery is that it diverges from the prevalent belief, culturally shared within European societies – a belief that views death as something indelibly solemn. Connections with the local Dacian culture have been made, a culture whose philosophical tenets presumably vouched for the immortality of the soul and the belief that death was a moment filled with joy and anticipation for a better life (see also Zalmoxianism). The cemetery's origins are linked with the name of Stan Ioan Pătraş, a local artist who sculpted the first tombstone crosses. In 1935, Pătraş carved the first epitaph and, as of 1960s, more than 800 of such oak wood crosses came into sight. The inscription on his tombstone cross says:
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery

    San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery

    San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located at 32053 West McCabe Road, Santa Nella, California, in Merced County, California. This cemetery has space available to accommodate casketed and cremated remains over 322 acres (130 ha) of land. The number of interments through fiscal year 2008 is 30,054. In 1989, the Romero Ranch Company donated land to the Department of Veterans Affairs for the creation of a National Cemetery. The first phase developed 105 acres (0.42 km) of the land, and was completed in May 1992, giving enough space for the interment of over 20,000 remains. There is a small military museum on site, which has exhibits of uniforms, medals, and other memorabilia.
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Warstone Lane Cemetery

    Warstone Lane Cemetery

    Warstone Lane Cemetery, (grid reference SP059877), also called Brookfields Cemetery, Church of England Cemetery, or Mint Cemetery, is a cemetery dating from 1847 in Birmingham, England. It is one of two cemeteries located in the city's Jewellery Quarter, in Hockley (the other being Key Hill Cemetery). It is no longer available for new burials. A major feature is the two tiers of catacombs, whose unhealthy vapours led to the Birmingham Cemeteries Act which required that non-interred coffins should be sealed with lead or pitch. The foundation stone for the chapel (demolished 1954) was laid on 6 April 1847. The blue brick lodge gate (Hamilton & Medland 1848) building survives and is grade II listed. The cemetery is itself grade II on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. On the night of 11th December 1940, all but the fine tower and classical west portico of St Thomas' Church, Bath Row, was destroyed by German bombs. The church was never rebuilt. The grounds were laid out for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 when the gravestones were removed and the dead reinterred at Warstone Lane Cemetery. The gardens were re-designed as the St. Thomas's Peace
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Farkasréti Cemetery

    Farkasréti Cemetery

    Farkasréti Cemetery or Farkasrét Cemetery (Hungarian: Farkasréti temető) is one of the most famous cemeteries in Budapest. It opened in 1894 and is noted for its spectacular sight towards the city (several people wanted it more to be a resort area than a cemetery). It comprises tombs of numerous Hungarian notables and it is the most preferred place for actors and actresses and other artists (opera singers, musicians, painters, sculptors, architects, writers, poets). It also includes the tombs of several scientists, academicians and sportspeople. Graves are often decorated with noteworthy sculptures. It was provided with parks in the 1950s, when it took on its present appearance and extent. The mortuary hall and the new chapel were built in the 1980s to the plans of Imre Makovecz. In the Socialist era, church funerals were forbidden in Kerepesi Cemetery, so it became the only place for those who wanted a religious funeral. It is located in Buda (the Western part of Budapest), approximately 3 km away from the downtown. Its oldest grave that is still located at the original place is that of the mechanical engineer Ferenc Cathry Szaléz, the designer of the Rack railway in Budapest and
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Forest Hills Cemetery

    Forest Hills Cemetery

    Forest Hills Cemetery is a historic 275-acre (1.1 km) cemetery, greenspace, arboretum and sculpture garden located in the Forest Hills section of the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. The cemetery was designed in 1848. The cemetery has a number of interesting or impressive monuments, including some by famous sculptors. Among these are Daniel Chester French's Death Staying the Hand of the Sculptor and John Wilson (sculptor) who made the Firemen's Memorial. On March 28, 1848, Roxbury City Council (the municipal board in charge of the area at that time) gave an order for the purchase of the farms of the Seaverns family to establish a rural municipal park cemetery. Inspired by the Mount Auburn Cemetery, Forest Hills Cemetery was designed by Alexander Dearborn to provide a park-like setting to bury and remember family and friends. In the year the cemetery was established, another 14½ acres were purchased from John Parkinson. This made for a little more than 71 acres (290,000 m) at a cost of $27,894. The area was later increased to 225 acres (0.9 km). In 1893, a crematorium was added to the cemetery, along with other features like a scattering garden, an indoor
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Fort Gibson National Cemetery

    Fort Gibson National Cemetery

    Fort Gibson National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located inside of the town of Fort Gibson, in Muskogee County, Oklahoma. It encompasses 48.3 acres (19.5 ha), and through fiscal year 2008 there were 19,102 interments. Fort Gibson was established in 1833, on a plot of land within the Cherokee nation. It is at what is considered to be the end of the Trail of Tears. Frontier life was hard, yellow fever was common, and at least three separate cemeteries were created between 1833 and 1857 when the Fort was abandoned. In 1863 the Fort was remanned by Brigadier General James G. Blunt. In 1868 the National Cemetery was established in a 7-acre (2.8 ha) plot, and all of the nearby cemeteries had their interments transferred to it. This included the remains of many civilians. Fort Gibson National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 20, 1999.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Knoxville National Cemetery

    Knoxville National Cemetery

    Knoxville National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Knoxville, Tennessee, United States. Established in 1863, the cemetery currently encompasses 9.8 acres (4.0 ha), and as of the end of 2007, had 9,006 interments. The 60-foot (18 m) Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. Knoxville National Cemetery was established by Major General Ambrose Burnside, whose Union forces had occupied Knoxville in September 1863 at the height of the Civil War. Burnside assigned the task of layout out the cemetery to his assistant quartermaster, Captain E.B. Chamberlain. The cemetery's first burials were Union dead exhumed and moved from Cumberland Gap and other parts of the region. Chamberlain's plan was so effective, that the cemetery was one of the few in the nation that required no alterations upon being designated a national cemetery at the end of the war. The graves at Knoxville National Cemetery are arranged in a circular pattern,
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Soviet military cemetery in Warsaw

    Soviet military cemetery in Warsaw

    The Soviet Military Cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, is the burial place of over 20,000 Soviet soldiers who died fighting against Nazi Germany. It contains one of the first major monuments to be built in Warsaw to those who fought in the Second World War. It includes examples of Socialist Realist art showing workers (with tools) and other civilians greeting the victorious soldiers. The monument is located in Warsaw's Mokotów district, near the center of the area where the 1944 Warsaw Uprising took place. An individual in yellow standing in the middle of the photo gives a sense of the monument's vast scale. The dedication on the monument (in the center of the photograph) reads: More than 20,000 Soviet soldiers lie in the Cemetery, mostly in mass graves to the left and right of the obelisk. The cemetery was built soon after the war (exact date needs confirmaton). The cemetery dedication on the right side lists (in Polish) the units to which the dead belonged. The same dedications appears on the left, in Russian, along with another relief.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Flanders Field

    Flanders Field

    Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War I cemetery on the southeast edge of the town of Waregem, Belgium. The memorial was designed by architect Paul Cret. This is the only American World War I cemetery in Belgium and 411 American servicemen are buried or commemorated there. Many of them fell at Spitaals Bosschen, an action of the Ypres-Lys Campaign by the 91st Infantry Division in the closing days of World War I. This cemetery is administered by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) and occupies a six acre (24,000 m²) site. As with all Allied war cemeteries, the land was provided in perpetuity by the Belgian government. The headstones are aligned in four symmetrical areas around the white stone chapel that stands in the center of the cemetery. The side walls of the chapel are inscribed with the names of 43 missing American servicemen who have no known graves. It is open daily from 09:00 to 17:00 except 25 December and 1 January. The ABMC also administers two American cemeteries in Belgium for World War II casualties: Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial; and Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial. The cemetery is in the area known as
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Igualada Cemetery

    Igualada Cemetery

    Igualada Cemetery or New Cemetery (Catalan: Cementiri Nou) is a cemetery in Igualada, near Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, designed by the architects Enric Miralles and Carme Pinós after winning an architectural competition in 1984. Constructed between 1985 and 1994 as a replacement for the Old Cemetery (Catalan: "Cementiri Vell"), the cemetery became widely regarded as one of the most poetic works of twentieth century Catalan architecture. Enric Miralles, who died in the year 2000 is buried in one of the tombs. Miralles and Pinós were concerned, not just to design a cemetery, but to explore poetic ideas regarding the acceptance of the cycle of life to enable a link between the past, the present, and the future. The project is conceived, in part, as an earthwork that transforms the surrounding landscape and also, in part, as a metaphor for the river of life. A processional "street" descends from the entrance, where crossed, rusting, steel poles doubling as gates and likened to the crosses at Calvary, proclaim the start of a winding pathway towards the burial area. The route is lined with repeatable concrete loculi forming retaining walls and the floor of the path has railway sleepers
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira

    Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira

    Woodlawn Cemetery is the name of a cemetery in Elmira, New York, United States. The most famous person buried in it is Mark Twain. Many members of the United States Congress, including Jacob Sloat Fassett are also interred there. Within Woodlawn Cemetery is the distinct Woodlawn National Cemetery, begun with the interment of Confederate prisoners from the nearby Elmira Prison (dubbed "Hellmira" by its inmates) during the American Civil War. It is run by the United States Veterans Administration. Both cemeteries are still active and together were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Flower Hill Cemetery, North Bergen

    Flower Hill Cemetery, North Bergen

    Flower Hill Cemetery is located in North Bergen, New Jersey. It is cojoined with Hoboken Cemetery and Machpelah Cemetery. In 1900, many who died in the fire of the SS Saale, and SS Bremen on the North River (Hudson River) at Hoboken were interred at the cemetery. Some of the others who perished in the massive fire on the Hoboken piers in 1900 were buried at the adjacent cemeteries in gravesites purchased by the shipping company.
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Goodleburg Cemetery

    Goodleburg Cemetery

    Goodleburg Cemetery is a cemetery located in Wales, New York. It is an old, inactive village lot whose use has been discontinued. Many of the original settlers of Wales and the surrounding areas are buried here. The cemetery stood relatively peacefully until the late 1990s, when word spread about ghost stories and ghastly apparitions. Various paranormal research organizations, intent on capturing the paranormal activities at Goodleberg paraded carloads of investigators from neighboring counties, intent on capturing evidence of the paranormal. To date, there has been one death, which in part was blamed on the founder of a Western New York paranormal investigation team known as Paranormal and Ghost Society. At 11:15PM on June 21st 2003, a member of that group was struck by an oncoming car. The cause was officially listed as DUI related, but in part was blamed on the group being on the road at that time of night, which has many known blind curves. Folklore has it that a Dr. Goodleberg had been performing illegal abortions then burying the unborn children and patients who did not survive the procedure behind his home located on a small hill overlooking the cemetery. In recent years, it
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Witton Cemetery

    Witton Cemetery

    Witton Cemetery (grid reference SP082921), which opened in Witton in 1863 as Birmingham City Cemetery, is the largest cemetery in Birmingham, England. Covering an area of 103 acres (0.42 km), it once had three chapels, however, two of these were demolished in 1980. The cemetery would perform up to 20 burials a day, however, it now carries out just four burials a day. The cemetery office was opened in 1999. Started in May 1860 and consecrated by the Bishop of Worcester on 23 May 1863, it was the only cemetery owned by the Corporation of Birmingham until 1911, when an expansion of the city boundary brought in others. Key Hill and Warstone Lane Cemetery were private concerns. It opened in 1863 with an area of 106 acres (0.43 km). In 1869, 2 acres (8,100 m) were bought by the Jewish community for their own interments. The surrounding brick walls are 2 miles (3.2 km) long, the longest in the Midlands.. The cemetery contains 459 Commonwealth service war graves from World War I, over 200 of whom form three denominational war graves plots marked by Screen Walls bearing names of those buried within the plots and elsewhere in the cemetery whose graves could not be marked by headstones. There
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Camp Butler National Cemetery

    Camp Butler National Cemetery

    Camp Butler National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located a few miles northeast of Springfield and a few miles southwest of Riverton, a small town nearby to Springfield, in Sangamon County, Illinois. It was named for Illinois State Treasurer at the time of its establishment, William Butler. It occupies approximately 53 acres (21 ha), and is the site of 19,824 interments as of the end of 2005. Camp Butler National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. During the Civil War, Camp Butler was the second largest military training camp in Illinois, second only to Camp Douglas in Chicago. After President Lincoln's call for troops in April, 1861, the U.S. War Department sent then Brigadier-General William T. Sherman to Springfield, Illinois to meet with Governor Richard Yates for the purpose of selecting a suitable site for a training facility. Since Governor Yates was unfamiliar with the land around Springfield, the state capital of Illinois, he enlisted the aid of then-State Treasurer William Butler, who along with Oziah M. Hatch, Secretary of State of Illinois, took a carriage ride with William T. Sherman to examine land about 5 and 1/2
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Melbourne General Cemetery

    Melbourne General Cemetery

    The Melbourne General Cemetery is a large (43 hectare) necropolis located 2 km (1.2 mi) north of the city of Melbourne in the suburb of Carlton North. The cemetery was established in 1852 and opened on 1 June 1853, and the Old Melbourne Cemetery (on the site of what is now the Queen Victoria Market) was closed the next year. The grounds feature several heritage buildings, many in bluestone, including a couple of chapels and a number of cast iron pavilions. The gatehouses are particularly notable. Four Australian Prime Ministers have headstones in the Melbourne General Cemetery: James Scullin, Sir Robert Menzies, Harold Holt and Sir John Gorton. Holt's stone is a memorial as his body was never recovered after he disappeared at sea. The tomb of famous Australian explorers Robert O'Hara Burke and William John Wills (see Burke and Wills expedition) is also located in the cemetery, with an inscription reading "Comrades in a great achievement and companions in death." Also buried here is Sir Isaac Isaacs, the first Australian-born Governor General and John Pascoe Fawkner, one of the founders of Melbourne. Walter Lindrum, a prodigious billiards player, has a distinctive tombstone in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Okopowa Street Jewish Cemetery

    Okopowa Street Jewish Cemetery

    The Okopowa Street Jewish Cemetery is one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in Europe. Located on Warsaw's Okopowa street and abutting the Powązki Cemetery at 52°14′51″N 20°58′29″E / 52.2475°N 20.97472°E / 52.2475; 20.97472, the Jewish Cemetery was established in 1806 and occupies 33 hectares (83 acres) of land. The cemetery contains over 200,000 marked graves, as well as mass graves of victims of the Warsaw Ghetto. Many of these graves and crypts are overgrown, having been abandoned after the German invasion of Poland and subsequent Holocaust. Although the cemetery was closed down during World War II, after the war it was reopened and a small portion of it remains active, serving Warsaw's small remaining Jewish population. As the cemetery was established to replace many smaller cemeteries closer to the city centre, it was designed to serve all Jewish communities of Warsaw, regardless of their affiliation. Because of that it is subdivided onto several districts dubbed quarters (kwatery), historically reserved for various groups. Among them are three Orthodox (for men, women and one for holy scriptures), Reform Judaism, children, military and Ghetto Uprising victims. The cemetery,
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Saint Raymond's Cemetery, Bronx

    Saint Raymond's Cemetery, Bronx

    Saint Raymond's Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery at 2600 Lafayette Avenue in the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx, New York City. The cemetery is composed of two separate locations: the older section (main entrance is located at 1201 Balcom Avenue), and the newer section (where most present-day burials now take place), both east of the Hutchinson River Parkway. The Bronx–Whitestone Bridge is located adjacent to the cemetery's newer section, while the neighboring Throgs Neck Bridge can be seen from a distance. The cemetery is owned and operated by the Archdiocese of New York. It is the only Catholic cemetery in the Bronx and is one of the busiest cemeteries in the United States with nearly 4,000 burials each year. The cemetery provides in-ground burials, in-ground crypt burials in the new Holy Cross section, Mausoleum burials and niches for cremains and burials in the base of the gigantic granite Cross located in the Holy Cross section. There is also a special Garden of Innocents where still-born and young babies are laid to rest. A portion of the St. Peters section was set aside in 1964 for the burial of the Archdiocese's clergymen. The cemetery land was originally the
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio

    Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio

    Woodland Cemetery and Arboretum (200 acres), located at 118 Woodland Avenue, Dayton, Ohio, is one of the oldest "garden" cemeteries in the United States. Woodland was founded in 1841 by John Whitten Van Cleve (July, 1801–6 September 1858), the first male child born in Dayton. He was the son of Benjamin Van Cleve and Mary Whitten Van Cleve. The cemetery began with 40 acres (160,000 m) southeast of Dayton and has been enlarged to its present size of 200 acres (0.81 km). Over 3,000 trees and 165 specimens of native Midwestern trees and woody plants grace the rolling hills. Many of the trees are more than a century old and 9 have been designated "Ohio Champions." The highest point in Dayton is within the cemetery, and during the Great Dayton Flood of 1913, it became a place of refuge. The Romanesque gateway, chapel and office, completed in 1889, are on the National Register of Historic Places. The buildings were constructed of the stone from the original cemetery wall. The chapel has one of the finest original Tiffany windows in the country. A mausoleum, with a rock and bronze exterior, features twenty-two varieties of imported marble and twelve large stained glass windows inspired by
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Colon Cemetery, Havana

    Colon Cemetery, Havana

    The Colon Cemetery or more fully in the Spanish language Cementerio de Cristóbal Colón was founded in 1876 in the Vedado neighbourhood of Havana, Cuba on top of Espada Cemetery. Named for Christopher Columbus, the 140 acre (57 ha) cemetery is noted for its many elaborately sculpted memorials. It is estimated that today the cemetery has more than 500 major mausoleums, chapels, and family vaults. Colon Cemetery has a 75-foot (23 m)-high monument to the firefighters who lost their lives in the great fire of May 17, 1890. As baseball is a leading sport in Cuba, the cemetery has two monuments to baseball players from the Cuban League. The first was erected in 1942 and the second in 1951 for members of the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame. In February 1898, the recovered bodies of sailors who died on the United States Navy battleship Maine were interred in the Colon Cemetery. In December 1899 the bodies were disinterred and brought back to the United States for burial at Arlington National Cemetery. With more than 800,000 graves and 1 million interments, space in the Colon Cemetery is currently at a premium and as such after three years remains are removed from their tombs, boxed and placed
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Preobrazhenskoye Cemetery

    Preobrazhenskoye Cemetery

    Preobrazhenka Cemetery (Russian: Преображенка, Преображенское кладбище, English: Transfiguration Cemetery) is a cemetery in the northern part of Moscow long associated with Old Believers. It was inaugurated by a Fedoseevtsy merchant in 1777 as a plague quarantine disguising the Bespopovtsy monastery. At that time the territory of the cemetery was located outside Moscow, but near its border. The cemetery soon became the spiritual and administrative center of all the Fedoseevtsy in Russia (just like the Rogozhskoe cemetery became an administrative and cultural centre for most Popovtsy Old Believers). The cloister consisted of two equal square areas, a monastery for men and a nunnery for women, separated by a road to the cemetery. Construction work was in progress throughout the 1790s and the first decade of the 19th century. At that time, the monastery asylum was home to 1,500 people, while the chapels were attended by as many as 10,000 Old Believers. Every church within the monastery was styled a chapel; like other Bespopovtsy, the Fedoseevtsy reject priesthood, and so even their largest temples are called chapels rather than churches, since they have no altar. The area was
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Assistens Cemetery

    Assistens Cemetery

    Assistens Cemetery (Danish: Assistens Kirkegård) in Copenhagen, Denmark, is the burial site of a large number of Danish notables as well as an important greenspace in the Nørrebro district. Inaugurated in 1760, it was originally a burial site for the poor laid out to relieve the crowded graveyards inside the walled city, but during the Golden Age in the first half of the 19th century it became mundane and many leading figures of the epoch, such as Hans Christian Andersen, Søren Kierkegaard, Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, and Christen Købke are all buried on the premises. Late in the century, as Assistens Cemetery had itself become crowded, a number of new cemeteries were established around Copenhagen, including Vestre Cemetery, but up through the 20th century it has continued to attract notables. Among the latter are the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Niels Bohr and a number of American jazz musicians who settled in Copenhagen during the 1950s and 1960s, including Ben Webster and Kenny Drew. An Assistens Cemetery is originally a generic term in Danish, used to refer to cemeteries which were laid out to assist existing burial sites, usually those located in urban settings in
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Lexington Cemetery

    Lexington Cemetery

    Lexington Cemetery is a private, non-profit 170-acre (69 ha) cemetery and arboretum located at 833 W. Main Street, Lexington, Kentucky. It is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Lexington Cemetery was established in 1849 as a place of beauty and a public cemetery, in part to deal with burials from the cholera epidemic in the area. It now contains more than 64,000 interments. Its plantings include boxwood, cherries, crabapples, dogwoods, magnolias, taxus, as well as flowers such as begonias, chrysanthemums, irises, jonquils, lantanas, lilies, and tulips. Also on the grounds is an American basswood (Tilia Americana), which the cemetery claims to be the largest in the world. However, this claim is not supported by the National Register of Big Trees, which claims that the largest American Basswood is located in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Within the cemetery are three places that are listed separately on the National Register of Historic Places from the main cemetery: Confederate Soldier Monument in Lexington, the Ladies' Confederate Memorial, and Lexington National Cemetery. The Lexington Cemetery maintains a list of notable interments , others are listed here:
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Mikveh Israel Cemetery

    Mikveh Israel Cemetery

    Mikveh Israel Cemetery is the oldest Jewish cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, although the oldest in the United States is the Second Cemetery of the Congregation Shearith Israel in New York. The site, less than 0.2 acres (810 m) in size, is a registered historic place in Philadelphia and a national historic site administered by Independence National Historical Park (even though the expense of maintaining the cemetery is borne by sponsoring Congregation Mikveh Israel). It is located in the center city section of Philadelphia, on Spruce Street, near 8th Street, about two blocks west and four blocks south of Independence Hall. Mikveh Israel Cemetery was originally a private burial ground for the family of Nathan Levy, whose ship, Myrtilla was long reputed to have transported the Liberty Bell from England to Philadelphia (though the snow Hibernia, captained by William Child, may actually have transported the bell in 1752). In 1738, one of Levy's children died. Rather than bury the child in unsanctified ground, he applied to John Penn (chief of Pennsylvania's proprietary government at that time) for "a small piece of ground" with permission to make it a family cemetery. This
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Los Angeles National Cemetery

    Los Angeles National Cemetery

    The Los Angeles National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in West Los Angeles, California, located at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Sepulveda Boulevard. The cemetery was dedicated on May 22, 1889. Interred on its 114 acres (46 ha) are war veterans, from the Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, and other American conflicts. An annual ceremony commemorating the birthday of Abraham Lincoln is held at the cemetery on or near February 12. The chapel at the cemetery was renamed the Bob Hope Veterans Chapel on May 29, 2002 (Hope's 99th birthday), in "celebration of his lifelong service to our American Veterans". Fourteen Medal of Honor recipients are buried at the cemetery: Los Angeles National Cemetery has been closed to new interments since about 2002, with the exception of spouses of those already buried. In order to accommodate future community need, United States Department of Veterans Affairs has acquired another 13 acres (5.3 ha) to permit the cemetery to expand. Future interments will be in urns of cremated ashes placed in columbarium walls built on the new land. By eliminating ground burials, the new acreage will permit about as
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    96
    Mount Holly Cemetery

    Mount Holly Cemetery

    Mount Holly Cemetery is the original cemetery in the Quapaw Quarter area of downtown Little Rock, Arkansas, and is the burial place for numerous Arkansans of note. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been nicknamed "The Westminster Abbey of Arkansas". The cemetery is the burial place for 10 former Governors of Arkansas, 6 United States Senators, 14 Arkansas Supreme Court Justices, 21 Little Rock Mayors, numerous Arkansas literary figures, Confederate Generals, and other worthies. Some of the notables buried at Mount Holly are: There are also several slaves who are buried there, marked by extremely modest gravestones. Every year in October several drama students from Parkview Arts and Science Magnet High School are each given a person buried in the cemetery to research. They then prepare short monologues or dialogues, complete with period costumes, to be performed in front of the researched person's grave. Audiences are led through the cemetery from grave to grave by guides with candles. The event is called "Tales of the Crypt". Although it takes place around the same time as the American holiday Halloween, the event is meant to be historic rather than
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    97
    Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Newark

    Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Newark

    Mount Pleasant Cemetery is a large Victorian-era cemetery in Newark's North Ward. It is located on the west bank of the Passaic River in Newark's Broadway neighborhood, opposite Kearny. It occupies approximately 40 acres (162,000 m²) and is widely used as a park. The cemetery is listed on both the New Jersey Register (ID #1284, since 1987) and the National Register of Historic Places (Reference #87000836, since 1988). The graves of some of Newark's most eminent citizens are within Mount Pleasant Cemetery. The cemetery is dominated by the marble mausoleum of John Fairfield Dryden, the founder of Prudential Financial. Other notable interees include Marcus Lawrence Ward, Governor of New Jersey; Seth Boyden, inventor of patent leather; and Mary Stillman, first wife of Thomas Edison. Mount Pleasant also contains graves of members of the Kinney, Ballantine, and Frelinghuysen families. The cemetery itself was opened and incorporated in 1844, but there are graves that date back to the mid-17th century, which were moved from older graveyards that were crowded out due to development.
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    98
    Norton Cemetery

    Norton Cemetery

    Norton Cemetery is one of the city of Sheffield's many cemeteries. It was opened on 6 June 1869, and covers 6 acres (24,000 m). Norton is a smaller cemetery running along two alleys spanning to the right and the left from the two gate houses (not listed). From the furthest graves and along the boundary wall are stunning views of the Sheaf valley and the moors. The cemetery contains 34 graves of Commonwealth service personnel, registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, 27 from World War I and 7 from World War II.
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    99
    Vagankovo Cemetery

    Vagankovo Cemetery

    Vagan'kovskoye Cemetery (Ваганьковское кладбище), established in 1771, is located in the Krasnaya Presnya (Красная Пресня) district of Moscow. It is the burial site for a number of people from the artistic and sports community of Russia and the old Soviet Union.
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    100
    Valley Cemetery

    Valley Cemetery

    The Valley Cemetery (or the Valley Street Cemetery) is a public cemetery located in Manchester, New Hampshire, USA. It is bounded on the east by Pine Street, on the north by Auburn Street, on the west by Willow Street, and on the south by Valley Street, from which it derives its name. It came into existence in 1840, when the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company donated 20 acres (81,000 m) of land in downtown Manchester to the city for the purpose of creating a public burial ground. In 1841, the city created the Valley Street Cemetery. It was designed as a "garden cemetery", meant to be a place where the public could stroll along its walkways, carriage paths and bridges. In this Victorian Era, "garden cemeteries", in which not only the dead resided, but the living communed with each other and with nature, were popular. By the late 1850s, the cemetery was nearly filled, and the much larger Pine Grove Cemetery was created. That cemetery lies to the west of Calef Road and to the east of the Merrimack River. A receiving tomb was built at Valley Cemetery in 1888, used to store the deceased during winter when the ground was frozen. In 1907, Mrs. Hannah Currier donated gates at Auburn and
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    101
    Barrancas National Cemetery

    Barrancas National Cemetery

    Barrancas National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located at Naval Air Station Pensacola, in the city of Pensacola, Florida. It encompasses 94.9 acres (38.4 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 32,643 interments. The area has been used as a burial ground since the construction of Fort Barrancas. In 1838 it was established as a United States Navy cemetery. During the Civil War, Pensacola was hotly contested, as it was considered to be the best port for access to the Gulf of Mexico. Numerous soldiers on both sides were interred in the cemetery after falling in combat, or dying in nearby hospitals. After the war, in 1868, Barrancas was officially made a National Cemetery and many other nearby makeshift burial grounds were disinterred and relocated to Barrancas. In each year, 1944, 1950, 1986, and 1990, more area was transferred from NAS Pensacola to expand the facilities for the cemetery. Barrancas National Cemetery has a monument honoring those soldiers who died from yellow fever. It was erected in 1884 by the Marine Guard of the Pensacola Navy Yard.
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    102
    Arlington National Cemetery

    Arlington National Cemetery

    Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, is a military cemetery in the United States of America, established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a great grand-daughter of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is served by the Arlington Cemetery station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro system. In an area of 624 acres (253 ha), veterans and military casualties from each of the nation's wars are interred in the cemetery, ranging from the American Civil War through to the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Pre-Civil War dead were reinterred after 1900. Arlington National Cemetery and United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery are administered by the Department of the Army. The other national cemeteries are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or by the National Park Service. Arlington House (Custis-Lee Mansion) and its grounds are administered by the National Park Service as a memorial to Lee. George
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    103
    Cave Hill Cemetery and Arboretum

    Cave Hill Cemetery and Arboretum

    Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre (1.20 km) Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky. It is open daily to the public from 8:00 AM to 4:45 PM (weather permitting). Its main entrance is on Baxter Avenue and there is a secondary one on Grinstead Drive. Both former Louisville mayors for whom these streets are named (James F. Grinstead and John G. Baxter), are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. It is the largest cemetery by area and number of burials in Louisville. Cave Hill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Cave Hill National Cemetery, containing military graves, is also on the National Register, added in 1998. Cave Hill was chartered in 1848 on what was William Johnston's Cave Hill Farm, then a rural property some distance east of Louisville. Johnston, who died in 1798, had built the first brick house in Louisville on the grounds circa 1788. City officials had purchased part of the land in the 1830s in anticipation of building a railroad through it, and a workhouse was built there. The railroad was built elsewhere, and the land was leased to local farmers. In 1846, Mayor Frederick A. Kaye began
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    104
    City Road Cemetery

    City Road Cemetery

    The City Road Cemetery is a cemetery in the City of Sheffield, England that opened in May 1881 and was originally Intake Road Cemetery. Covering 100 acres (0.40 km) it is the largest and is the head office for all the municipally owned cemeteries in Sheffield. The cemetery contains Sheffield Crematorium, whose first cremation was on 24 April 1905. The cemetery is located to the east of central Sheffield. It is in the district called Manor, on a gentle hillside. The cemetery is mainly bordered by housing, on the north, east and south faces, and by City Road on the west. On City Road is the main entrance which features Grade II listed gatehouse which houses the reception and halls of remembrance. There are 220 burials or commemorations of Commonwealth servicemen at the cemetery who died in the First World War. A Screen Wall memorial in Section Q, near the main entrance, lists those buried in graves that could not be individually marked by headstones There are 147 burials or commemorations of servicemen and women who died in the Second World War, many in a war graves plot in Section H. The plot has a Screen Wall memorial listing servicemen buried in the defunct Sheffield General
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    105
    Dean Cemetery

    Dean Cemetery

    The Dean Cemetery is a prominent cemetery in the Dean Village, in Edinburgh, Scotland. It stands on the site of Dean House (built 1614), part of Dean Estate which had been purchased in 1609 by Sir William Nisbet, who became in 1616 Lord Provost of Edinburgh. The Nisbets of Dean held the office of Hereditary Poulterer to the King. The famous herald, Alexander Nisbet, of Nisbet House, near Duns, Berwickshire, is said to have written his Systems of Heraldry in Dean House. The estate house was demolished in 1845, and Sculptured stones from it are incorporated into the south terrace wall supporting the edge of the cemetery. Dean Cemetery, also known as Edinburgh Western Cemetery, was laid out by David Cousin (an Edinburgh architect who also laid out Warriston Cemetery) in 1846 and became a fashionable burial ground, its monuments becoming a rich source of Edinburgh and Victorian history, but mainly middle and upper-class. Many bear witness to Scottish achievement in peace and war, at home and abroad. The cemetery is privately owned by the Dean Cemetery Trust Limited, making it one of the few cemeteries still run as it was intended to be run. The resultant layout, with its mature
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    106
    Key Hill Cemetery

    Key Hill Cemetery

    Key Hill Cemetery, (OS grid reference SP059882), originally called Birmingham General Cemetery, a Nonconformist (non-denominational) cemetery, is the oldest cemetery (not being in a churchyard) in Birmingham, England. It opened on 23 May 1836. Located in Hockley, the city's Jewellery Quarter, it is one of two cemeteries there (the other being Warstone Lane Cemetery). It is no longer available for new burials. Many of the fittings and memorials are of architectural and artistic merit - the entrance gates (piers by Charles Edge) and railings are Grade II listed. The Greek Doric chapel by Charles Edge has been demolished. The cemetery is itself grade II* on the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. A campaign group, the Friends of Key Hill & Warstone Lane Cemeteries, lobby to have the cemetery restored. The entrance piers and gates on Icknield Street have now been restored and further works to the entrance at Key Hill are planned to commence in 2010/2011. A comprehensive record of memorial inscriptions of existing memorials (and of some of those removed by B'ham City Council) may be consulted through The Jewellery Quarter Research Group's web site at:
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    107
    Mount Carmel Cemetery

    Mount Carmel Cemetery

    Mount Carmel Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery located in the Chicago suburb of Hillside, Illinois. Mount Carmel is an active cemetery, located within the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago. The cemetery is located near the Eisenhower Expressway (Interstate 290) at Wolf and Roosevelt Roads. It is adjacent to one other cemetery, being Queen of Heaven Cemetery, another Catholic Cemetery. In 1901 Mount Carmel Cemetery was consecrated. The cemetery maintained its own office until 1965, when it combined operations with Queen of Heaven Cemetery. The cemetery is currently 214 acres (0.87 km) in size. There are over 226,275 people buried at Mount Carmel, and about 800 people are interred annually at Mount Carmel. The Bishops' Mausoleum is located at Mount Carmel Cemetery, designed by William J. Brinkmann is the final resting places of the Bishops and Archbishops of Chicago. Most recently, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin was buried here after his 1996 death. Also on the cemetery grounds are the final resting places of a number of local organized crime figures, most notably Al Capone. There are over 400 family mausoleums located on the cemetery grounds. The majority of
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    108
    Rock Island National Cemetery

    Rock Island National Cemetery

    Rock Island National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located within Rock Island Arsenal near the city of Rock Island, Illinois. It encompasses 66 acres (27 ha), and as of the end of 2006, had 24,525 interments. The cemetery is also nearing compliance with the National Shrine guidelines, due to its use of college students during the summer to reset and realign stones. When looking from any one stone there should be seven lines visible and all should be straight. The cemetery was established in 1863 as a place to inter the remains of American Civil War Union army soldiers. Its initial placement interfered with expansion of the Arsenal's facilities, so it was moved to a location on the northern end of the island. Civil War veterans who were interred in Oakdale Cemetery in Davenport, Iowa, were later disinterred and moved to the National Cemetery. Property transfers from the Arsenal in 1926, 1936, and 1950 increased the cemetery's area. There are plans for further expansion of this cemetery including an addition pavilion, more land, and a wall for cremations near the tank track. A second, 2-acre (0.81 ha) cemetery was established near Rock Island National Cemetery to bury
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    109
    Ypres Reservoir Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Ypres Reservoir Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Ypres Reservoir Cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. The cemetery was founded by Commonwealth troops in October 1915 and remained in use until after the Armistice in November 1918. It was originally one of three cemeteries in the immediate area. At the end of the war, the Ypres Reservoir South Cemetery (formerly known as "Broadley's Cemetery" and "Prison Cemetery No 1") and the Ypres Reservoir Middle Cemetery (formerly "Middle Prison Cemetery" and "Prison Cemetery No 2") were concentrated into the North cemetery. The cemetery at the Infantry Barracks was also concentrated into the North cemetery, with additional scattered graves from nearby areas added later. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield who was also responsible for the nearby Menin Gate memorial. The cemetery contains the graves of some 2702 soldiers. Amongst these are the
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    110
    Calvary Cemetery

    Calvary Cemetery

    Calvary Cemetery is a 40-acre (16 ha) cemetery in Seattle, Washington, USA, located in the Ravenna/Bryant neighborhood. Dedicated on December 1, 1889, it is on the southwest slope of a hill overlooking University Village. The cemetery, which is square-shaped, is bounded on the north by N.E. 55th Street, on the east by 35th Avenue N.E., on the south by N.E. 50th Street, and on the west by 30th Avenue N.E. Among the 40,000 buried there are William Piggott, founder of PACCAR; Hec Edmundson, basketball and track coach at the University of Washington; Dave Beck, former president of the Teamsters; Jacob Nist, founder of Queen City Manufacturing Company, now the Seattle-Tacoma Box Company; and Walter Galbraith, former president of Galbraith and Co. and director of Washington Mutual.
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    111
    Hietaniemi cemetery

    Hietaniemi cemetery

    The Hietaniemi cemetery (in Swedish language Sandudds begravningsplats) is located in the Töölö district of Helsinki, the capital of Finland. It is the location for Finnish state funeral services. The cemetery includes a large military cemetery section for soldiers from the capital fallen in the wars against the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany: in the Winter War (1939–1940), the Continuation War (1941–1944) and the Lapland War (1944–1945). In the centre of the military cemetery are the tombs of the unknown soldier and Marshal C.G.E. Mannerheim. Other notable sections of the cemetery are the cemetery of the Finnish Guard, the Artist's Hill and the Statesman's Grove. Hietaniemi means "sand spit" and is a headland located centrally in Helsinki. The cemetery is partly located at a promontory, and partly directly adjacent to the Hietaniemi Beach. Nightly parties, flirting, petting, and more, are recurrent concerns in letters to the editor alarmed by alleged dishonourable conduct at the gravestones. Because of its obvious association with death, the cemetery sometimes also attracts fans of goth or heavy metal culture. The cemetery is a popular tourist attraction, especially amongst Finns
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    112
    Hyde Park Corner Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Hyde Park Corner Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Hyde Park Corner (Royal Berks) Cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. This small cemetery was founded by 1st and 4th Royal Berkshire Regiment troops in April 1915. The cemetery later expanded across the road, where the Berks Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery Extension was built. The cemetery was designed by H(arold) Chalton Bradshaw, who also designed the Cambrai Memorial in France. The cemetery contains the graves of 87 soldiers. Amongst these graves lies Rifleman Samuel McBride of the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, who was executed for desertion on 7 December 1916. It is now felt by many that these "shot at dawn" men were unfairly tried and executed as they may have been suffering from combat stress reaction rather than acting in cowardice.
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    113
    Indian Mound Cemetery

    Indian Mound Cemetery

    Indian Mound Cemetery is a cemetery located along the Northwestern Turnpike (U.S. Route 50) on a promontory of the "Yellow Banks" overlooking the South Branch Potomac River and Mill Creek Mountain in Romney, West Virginia, United States. The cemetery is centered around a Hopewellian mound, known as the Romney Indian Mound. Indian Mound Cemetery is also the site of Fort Pearsall, the First Confederate Memorial, Parsons Bell Tower, and reinterments from Romney's Old Presbyterian Cemetery. The cemetery is currently owned and maintained by the Indian Mound Cemetery Association, Inc. Indian Mound Cemetery is the burial site of two governors of West Virginia, a United States House Representative, a United States Secretary of the Army, an owner of the Washington Redskins, and descendants of the family of George Washington. The Romney Indian mound is a burial mound that measures 7 feet (2.1 m) in height and approximately 15 feet (4.6 m) in diameter, according to the site marker. Since this marker was erected, further research indicates the mound has been opened at some point in the past. It is the largest of the remaining mounds discovered in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle. The Romney
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    114
    Massachusetts National Cemetery

    Massachusetts National Cemetery

    Massachusetts National Cemetery is a U.S. National Cemetery located in Bourne, Massachusetts, in Barnstable County on Cape Cod, approximately 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Boston, Massachusetts and adjacent to the Otis Air National Guard Base. As of fiscal year 2008, 46,380 have been interred there. On June 18, 1973, Congress passed the National Cemetery Act which transferred 82 of the United States Army’s national cemeteries to the Veteran's Administration (VA). The following year, the VA’s National Cemetery System adopted the regional cemetery concept plan in which one large national cemetery would be built within each of the 10 standard federal regions, as established by the General Services Administration. A policy was established that new cemeteries would only be created on land already owned by the federal government. During the mid-1970s, when the National Cemetery System was looking to expand, it determined that the largest veteran population in the northeast was centered in the Boston area. A search soon commenced to find a suitable site for a national cemetery, nearby. The difficult task of locating land which would be available to the government at no cost eventually
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    115
    Milltown Cemetery

    Milltown Cemetery

    Milltown Cemetery (Irish: Reilig Bhaile an Mhuilinn) is a large cemetery in west Belfast, Northern Ireland. It lies within the townland of Ballymurphy, between Falls Road and the M1 motorway. Milltown Cemetery opened in 1869 and there are now approximately 200,000 of Belfast's citizens buried there. Most of those buried there are Irish Catholic. Within the cemetery there are three large sections of open space, each about the size of a football field, designated as "poor ground". Over 80,000 people are buried in the cemetery's poor grounds, many of whom died in the flu pandemic of 1919. Since 2007, the 55-acre (220,000 m) cemetery has undergone extensive work, reversing years of neglect. The cemetery, located in the heart of West Belfast has become synonymous with Irish republicanism. Irish Republican Army volunteer Bobby Sands, who died on hunger strike on 5 May 1981, is buried in the cemetery. Fellow hunger-strikers, Kieran Doherty, Joe McDonnell and Pat McGeown (who died a number of years later from ill-health brought about by the hunger strike) are also buried there. In total, 77 IRA volunteers are buried in what is known as the 'New Republican Plot', a further 34 volunteers are
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    116
    Oak Hill Cemetery

    Oak Hill Cemetery

    Oak Hill Cemetery is a historic 22-acre (8.9 ha) cemetery and botanical garden located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It includes the Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel and Van Ness Mausoleum which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Oak Hill began in 1848 as part of the rural cemetery movement, directly inspired by the success of Mount Auburn Cemetery, when William Wilson Corcoran (also founder of the Corcoran Gallery of Art) purchased 15 acres (6.1 ha) of land. He then organized the Cemetery Company to oversee Oak Hill; it was incorporated by act of Congress on March 3, 1849. Oak Hill's chapel was built in 1849 by noted architect James Renwick, who also designed the Smithsonian Institution's Castle on Washington Mall and St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York. His one story rectangular chapel measures 23 by 41 feet (7×12 m) and sits on the cemetery's highest ridge. It is built of black granite, in Gothic Revival style, with exterior trim in the same red Seneca sandstone used for the Castle. By 1851, landscape designer Captain George F. de la Roche finished laying out the winding paths and terraces descending into Rock Creek valley. When initial
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    117
    Powązki Cemetery

    Powązki Cemetery

    Powązki Cemetery (Polish pronunciation: [pɔˈvɔ̃skʲi]; Polish: Cmentarz Powązkowski), also known as the Stare Powązki (English: Old Powązki) is a historic cemetery located in the Wola district, western part of Warsaw, Poland. It is the most famous cemetery in the city, and one of the oldest. Found here are the graves of many illustrious individuals from Polish history, including those interred along the "Avenue of Notables" (Aleja Zasłużonych) established in 1925. The cemetery is often confused with the newer Powązki Military Cemetery, which is located to the north-west of the Powązki Cemetery. The Powązki Cemetery was established on 4 November 1790, it was consecrated on 20 May 1792 and initially covered the area of only about 2.5 ha. In the same year the Saint Karol Boromeusz Church, designed by Dominik Merlini, was built at the cemetery. The catacombs were also soon built. Soon afterwards, several other cemeteries were founded in the area: Jewish, Calvinist, Lutheran, Caucasian and Tatar. The Orthodox cemetery is located not far from the Powązki necropolis. Like many of the old European cemeteries, Powązki's tombstones were created by some of the most renowned sculptors of the
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    118
    Rasos Cemetery

    Rasos Cemetery

    Rasos Cemetery (Lithuanian: Rasų kapinės, Polish: cmentarz Na Rossie w Wilnie) is the oldest and most famous cemetery in the city of Vilnius, Lithuania. It is named after the Rasos district where it is located. It is separated into two parts, the old and the new cemeteries, by a narrow Sukilėliai Street. The total area is 10.8 ha. Since 1990 new burials are allowed only to family graves. The year 1769 is widely cited in many sources as the date when the cemetery was founded. However, some historians believe it is a typo and the real date should be 1796. On April 24, 1801 the new cemetery was consecrated. Two days later John Muller, the mayor of Vilnius, became the first person to be buried there. A formal document was signed in July 1801. It specified that the cemetery received 3.51 ha of land and that the cemetery will be free of charge to all city residents. It was the first cemetery in Vilnius not located next to a church. In 1802-1807 two columbariums were built. They reached up to five stories in height and were joined at a right angle. At the end of the 19th century the columbariums began deteriorating. Instead of restoring them, the Soviet authorities demolished the right
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    119
    Salem Fields Cemetery, Brooklyn

    Salem Fields Cemetery, Brooklyn

    Salem Fields Cemetery at 775 Jamaica Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, United States, was founded in 1852 by the Central Synagogue. It is the final resting place for many of the prominent German-Jewish families of New York City including members of the Fox family, founders of 20th Century Fox Film Corp., the Guggenheim family of mining, newspaper and museum fame, the Lewisohn family of mining, banking and philanthropic interests, and the Shubert family, builders of the largest theatre empire in the 20th century. Architectural historian Fredric Bedoire, Professor at the Royal University of Fine Arts in Stockholm, compares the "beautiful" Salem fields to the architecturally notable mausoleums and undulating landscape to Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Architect Henry Beaumont Herts designed the Guggenheim family mausoleum, modeled after the Tower of the Winds at Athens.
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    120
    Tower Hamlets Cemetery

    Tower Hamlets Cemetery

    Tower Hamlets Cemetery is a cemetery located in the East End of London; its nearest tube station is Mile End. The cemetery opened in 1841 and closed for burials in 1966. It is now a nature reserve, and other land has been added to the park, including "Scrapyard Meadow". It was originally named The City of London and Tower Hamlets Cemetery but was called Bow Cemetery by locals. Tower Hamlets Cemetery was formally consecrated by the Bishop of London previous to its being opened for the reception of bodies. The Main Gate is on Southern Grove (on the crossing with Hamlets Way) in the Bow area of London, E3 and is in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. There are also small gates on Hamlet Way and Cantrell Road. Before the Victorian Era, all of London's dead were buried in small urban churchyards, which were so overcrowded and so close to where people lived, worked and worshipped that they were causing disease and ground water contamination. An Act of Parliament was passed which allowed joint-stock companies to purchase land and set up large cemeteries outside the boundaries of the City of London. There were seven great cemeteries (the "Magnificent Seven") laid out about the same time
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    121
    World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

    World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

    The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery and memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, that honors American soldiers who died in Europe during World War II. On June 8, 1944, the U.S. First Army established the temporary cemetery, the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. After the war, the present-day cemetery was established a short distance to the east of the original site. Like all other overseas American cemeteries in France for World War I and II, France has granted the United States a special, perpetual concession to the land occupied by the cemetery, free of any charge or any tax. This cemetery is managed by the American government, under Congressional acts that provide yearly financial support for maintaining them, with most military and civil personnel employed abroad. The U.S. flag flies over these granted soils. The cemetery is located on a bluff overlooking Omaha Beach (one of the landing beaches of the Normandy Invasion) and the English Channel. It covers 70 ha (172 acres), and contains the remains of 9,387 American military dead, most of whom were killed during the invasion of Normandy and ensuing military
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    122
    Beaufort National Cemetery

    Beaufort National Cemetery

    Beaufort National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Beaufort County, in the city of Beaufort, South Carolina. It encompasses 33.1 acres (13.4 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 18,511 interments. The original interments in the cemetery were men who died in nearby Union hospitals during the occupation of the area early in the Civil War, mainly in 1861, following the Battle of Port Royal. Battlefield casualties from around the area were also reinterred in the cemetery, including over 100 Confederate soldiers. It became a National Cemetery with the National Cemetery Act by Abraham Lincoln in 1863. The remains of 27 Union prisoners of war were reinterred from Blackshear Prison following the war. Beaufort National Cemetery now has interments from every major American conflict, including the Spanish-American War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Gulf War. On May 29, 1989, nineteen Union soldiers of the all black Massachusetts 54th Infantry, whose remains were found on Folly Island, South Carolina in 1987, were buried in the cemetery with full military honors. Members of the cast of the film Glory served as honor guard. Beaufort National Cemetery was listed
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    123
    Belvidere Cemetery

    Belvidere Cemetery

    Belvidere Cemetery is a cemetery located in Belvidere, in Warren County, New Jersey that was founded in 1834. It includes many graves of people who fought in the American Revolutionary War.
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    124
    Passy Cemetery

    Passy Cemetery

    The Passy Cemetery (Fr: Cimetière de Passy) is a cemetery located at 2, rue du Commandant Schlœsing in Passy, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, France. In the early 19th century, on the orders of Napoleon I, Emperor of the French, all the cemeteries in Paris were replaced by several large new ones outside the precincts of the capital. The Montmartre Cemetery was built in the north, the Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and the Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. The Passy Cemetery was a later addition, but has its origins in the same edict. Opened in 1820 in the expensive residential and commercial districts of the Right Bank near the Champs-Élysées, by 1874 the small Passy Cemetery had become the aristocratic necropolis of Paris. It is the only cemetery in Paris to have a heated waiting-room. The retaining wall of the cemetery is adorned with a bas relief commemorating the soldiers who fell in the Great War. Sheltered by a bower of chestnut trees, the cemetery is in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower. Among its more famous residents are: The street in which it is situated is named for a Free French pilot, Squadron Leader Jacques-Henri Schloesing (1919–1944) fr:Jacques-Henri
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    125
    San Francisco National Cemetery

    San Francisco National Cemetery

    San Francisco National Cemetery is a U.S. National Cemetery, located in the Presidio of San Francisco, California. Because of the name and location, it is frequently confused with Golden Gate National Cemetery, a few miles south of the city. About 1937, San Francisco residents voted to no longer build cemeteries within the city proper and, as a result, the site for a new national cemetery was selected south of the city limits. The cemetery is one of only three within San Francisco city limits (the others being the Columbarium of San Francisco and the historic graveyard next to Mission Dolores.) When Spain colonized what would become California, this area was selected as the site for a fort, or presidio, to defend San Francisco Bay. About 40 families traveled here from northern Mexico in 1776 and built the first settlement, a small quadrangle, only a few hundred feet west of what is now Funston Avenue. Mexico controlled the Presidio following 1821, but the fort became less important to the Mexican government. In 1835, most soldiers and their families moved north to Sonoma, leaving it nearly abandoned. During the Mexican-American War, U.S. troops occupied and repaired the damage to
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    Springvale Cemetery railway line, Melbourne

    Springvale Cemetery railway line, Melbourne

    The Spring Vale Cemetery railway line, in Melbourne, Australia, branched from the now Pakenham Line at Springvale railway station, for a short 1.16 mi (1.87 km) journey to the Necropolis. The terminus was a railway station of the same name. The Spring Vale Cemetery branch line and associated station were opened on 7 February 1904 following completion of construction in December 1902. The line was used to transport corpses, funeral cortèges and visitors to the Necropolis. Special hearse vans were constructed to transport the coffins and wreaths. The line was electrified in December 1922. Mortuary services ceased in 1943 and the visitor's service was suspended from 10 December 1950, following the end of the statewide 55-day coal strike. Formal closure was only a book date, being 19 December 1951. Throughout the first few months of 1951, the line was dismantled back to the western boundary of the Sandown Park Racecourse, and eventually back to the station side of Sandown Park Road. The visible remains of this branch line include the short stub and former electrical sub-station at Springvale where the branch junctioned, a short section of the alignment between Sandown Park Road and the
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    St. Pancras and Islington Cemetery

    St. Pancras and Islington Cemetery

    St Pancras and Islington Cemetery in East Finchley, North London while situated in the London Borough of Barnet is actually two cemeteries, owned by two other London Boroughs, Camden (formerly St Pancras) and Islington. The fence along the boundary which runs west to east between the two parts of the cemetery has been removed, although the line of it is still marked. Although Brookwood Cemetery in London is the country's biggest cemetery by area with over 2,000 acres, the St Pancras and Islington Cemetery in North London accommodates over three times the number interred at Brookwood and more than any other cemetery in the UK. Two conjoined cemeteries, St Pancras and Islington, form the third largest single cemetery in London after Brookwood Cemetery and City of London Cemetery and Crematorium and in burial numbers, the largest in the UK with around one million interments and cremations. St Pancras and Islington Cemetery is designated Grade II on the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. It is an operating cemetery with new burial plots available. St Pancras and Islington, located in Finchley, is also one of London's historically
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    Texas State Cemetery

    Texas State Cemetery

    The Texas State Cemetery (TSC) is a cemetery located on about 22 acres (8.9 ha) just east of Downtown Austin, the capital of the U.S. state of Texas. Originally the burial place of Edward Burleson, Texas Revolutionary general and Vice-President of the Republic of Texas, it was expanded into a Confederate cemetery during the Civil War. Later it was expanded to include the graves of prominent Texans and their spouses. The cemetery is divided into two sections. The smaller one contains around 900 graves of prominent Texans, while the larger has over 2,000 marked graves of Confederate veterans and widows. There is room for 7,500 interments; the cemetery is about half full; meaning, people who are eligible for burial have chosen their plots. The cemetery is not a military cemetery. The current guidelines on who may be buried within the Texas State Cemetery were established in 1953. Persons must be one of the following: After the death of Edward Burleson in 1851, the Texas Legislature arranged for his burial on land formerly belonging to Andrew Jackson Hamilton. In 1854, the Legislature established a monument at Burleson's grave-site for $1,000 and purchased the surrounding land. The
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    Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery

    Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery

    Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery is located at 10621 Victory Boulevard in North Hollywood, California. The cemetery has a special section called the Portal of the Folded Wings Shrine to Aviation that is the final resting place for a number of aviation pioneers — barnstormers, daredevils and sundry architects of aviation. There is a memorial to Amelia Earhart and others, honoring their accomplishments. Among those interred here are some celebrities from the entertainment industry. The shrine, with a colorful tile dome and female figures stretching their arms to the heavens, originally was built as an impressive entrance to Valhalla Memorial Park cemetery. It was named for the palace of Odin, the Norse god of slain heroes. Valhalla was founded in 1923 by two Los Angeles financiers, John R. Osborne and C. C. Fitzpatrick. The Spanish Mission Revival entrance structure was designed by architect Kenneth McDonald Jr. For the decorative stone castings, McDonald hired Italian-born sculptor Federico A. Giorgi, who had created 30-foot (9.1 m)-tall statues of elephants and lions for the 1917 epic film Intolerance and crafted the exterior of downtown's Million Dollar Theater. The gateway to the
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    Arnos Vale Cemetery

    Arnos Vale Cemetery

    Arnos Vale Cemetery (grid reference ST606716) (sometimes written Arno's Vale Cemetery), located in Arno's Vale in Bristol, England, was established in 1837. Its first burial was in 1839. The cemetery followed a joint-stock model, funded by shareholders. It was laid out as an Arcadian landscape with buildings by Charles Underwood. Arnos Vale cemetery is located on the road from Bristol to Bath (A4). The cemetery is located just before Edward Road and Brislington, about a mile from Temple Meads railway station and about 2 miles from Bristol bus station. The cemetery includes a number of listed buildings and monuments, including the Grade II* listed Church of England Mortuary Chapel, Nonconformist Mortuary Chapel, and entrance lodges and gates and screen walls to main entrance. During the 20th century the cemetery fell into disrepair, and local groups began campaigning for its restoration. In 2003 it was featured on the BBC programme Restoration. The cemetery was a South West region runner-up and has since received a £4.8 million Heritage Lottery Fund grant. The cemetery is undergoing restoration, however the Mortuary Chapel, Entrance Lodges and Gates and Nonconformist Mortuary Chapel
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    Bayview Cemetery, Jersey City

    Bayview Cemetery, Jersey City

    Bayview Cemetery, which used to be called Greenville Cemetery, is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. It has been combined with New York Bay Cemetery and now has the combined name of Bayview - New York Bay Cemetery. The cemetery is located in the Greenville Section near Danforth Avenue Station. A former turnpike, the Bergen Point Plank Road, now Garfield Avenue, runs through the cemetery. The cemetery contains a memorial and several plots of people who died that were employees of the Cunard Shipping Line. Ziegler served as president of the Cemetery, from 1935 to 1957. The cemetery contains a section which is an early Jewish burial ground, unique to Hudson County
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    Fairmount Cemetery, Newark

    Fairmount Cemetery, Newark

    Fairmount Cemetery is a 150-acre (0.61 km) Victorian cemetery in the West Ward of Newark, New Jersey, in the neighborhood of Fairmount. It opened in 1855, shortly after the Newark City Council banned burials in the central city due to fears that bodies spread yellow fever. The first burial in Fairmount Cemetery was a 24-year-old man named Lewis J. Pierson. Fairmount is still accepting interments. Along with Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Fairmount has the graves of Newark’s most eminent turn of the century citizens, including Clara Maass, who gave her life in the investigation of yellow fever. A high proportion of the graves belong to German families. Fairmount Cemetery includes large trees, rolling hills, and intricately carved monuments. Featured near the old South Orange Avenue entrance is the recently restored zinc Settlers' Monument, commemorating the founders of Newark. There is also a Civil War memorial. The modern entrance to Fairmount Cemetery is on Central Avenue.
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    Floral Park Cemetery

    Floral Park Cemetery

    A Jewish cemetery in South Brunswick Township, New Jersey, where many prominent Hassidic Rabbis are buried, including Rabbi Shlomo Halberstam and Rabbi Naftali Halberstam of Bobov, Rabbi Samuel Hirsch Horowitz of Spinka, Rabbi Moses Josef Rubin of Cimpulung and Rabbi Yitzchok Issac Langner the Stretiner Rebbe of New York City. The cemetery contains many holocaust survivors including Gisella (Roth) Green, Irving (Israel) Green, Ruchma Lesser & sister Rivka Gutter, and many others from Poland, Hungary and Germany. One of the many societies represented is the first wodzislaw society. Across the street from the Floral Park Cemetery is the Washington Cemetery. Washington Cemetery is a separate cemetery from the Floral Park Cemetery, but both are under the same management. Contrary to popular belief, many of the prominent Rabbis said to be buried in Floral Park Cemetery are actually buried in Washington Cemetery. Directions to the cemetery can be found here: Google Maps
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    Ixelles Cemetery

    Ixelles Cemetery

    The Ixelles Cemetery (French: Cimetière d'Ixelles, Dutch: begraafplaats van Elsene), located in Ixelles in the southern part of Brussels, is one of the major cemeteries in Belgium. The Ixelles Cemetery also refers to a neighbourhood with a lot of bars and restaurants for students, north of the actual cemetery. It is in fact located between the two main campuses of the Université Libre de Bruxelles (Solbosch and La Plaine). Personalities buried here include:
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    La Chacarita Cemetery

    La Chacarita Cemetery

    Cementerio de la Chacarita in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is known as the National Cemetery and is the largest in Argentina. The cemetery is in the barrio or district of Chacarita, in the northern part of Buenos Aires. Its main entrance is on Avenida Guzmán. The cemetery owes its existence to a yellow fever epidemic in 1871, when existing cemeteries were strained beyond capacity (the upscale La Recoleta Cemetery refused to allow the burial of victims of the epidemic). Students of the College of San Carlos appropriated 5 hectares (12 acres) in the adjoining Colegiales area for this purpose, but had their facility closed by the city in 1886. The New Chacarita Cemetery began to function in 1887 and was formally designated as such in 1896. Chacarita Cemetery has designated areas for members of the Argentine artistic community, including writers, prominent composers and actors. The late justicialist leader Juan Perón was buried here until his remains were relocated in 2006 to a mausoleum in his former home in San Vicente. In the 19th century a large number of Britons came to Argentina to work in the many areas of the economy in which England then had extensive interests. At first the
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    Memphis National Cemetery

    Memphis National Cemetery

    Memphis National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the Nutbush neighborhood of the City of Memphis, in Shelby County, Tennessee. It encompasses 44.2 acres (17.9 ha), and as of the end of 2007, had 42,184 interments. Several Civil War battlefield cemeteries were transferred to the Memphis National Cemetery after the war. Memphis National Cemetery was originally established as Mississippi River National Cemetery when the Union Army forces took control of Memphis during the American Civil War. The cemetery served to inter veterans who died while in the many military hospitals in the delta region of the Mississippi River. After the war, several battlefield cemeteries were transferred to Memphis National Cemetery. In 1867, about 250 bodies of both Confederate and Union soldiers, some of whom were casualties of the Battle of Fort Pillow in Lauderdale County, were moved from a battlefield cemetery south of Fort Pillow to Memphis National Cemetery to be re-interred in a designated field. On the night of April 26, 1865, the steamboat Sultana, overloaded with Union soldiers who had recently been liberated from Confederate POW camps, exploded due to a boiler rupture on
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    Mount Pleasant Cemetery

    Mount Pleasant Cemetery

    Mount Pleasant Cemetery is a cemetery located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. In the early 19th century, the only authorized cemeteries within the city of Toronto (then known as York) were limited to the members of either the Roman Catholic Church or the Church of England. Deceased citizens who did not belong to either of these Christian denominations had no choice but to find burial arrangements outside of the city. In 1873, a new cemetery available to all citizens was conceived. Originally a 200 acres (0.81 km) farm, on the far outskirts of Toronto, Mount Pleasant Cemetery opened on November 4, 1876 with more than twelve miles (19 km) of carriage drives along rolling hills and ponds. Mount Pleasant Road was later constructed to pass through the centre of the cemetery and is named after this cemetery. With the growth in population, today the cemetery is located in the centre of the city. While the watercourses have since been filled in, the cemetery still has many miles of walking paths, interspersed with fountains, statues, botanical gardens, and rare and distinct trees. As the final resting place of more than 168,000 persons, Mount Pleasant Cemetery contains remarkable architecture
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    Novodevichy Cemetery

    Novodevichy Cemetery

    Novodevichy Cemetery (Russian: Новодевичье кладбище) in Saint Petersburg is a historic cemetery in the South-West part of the city near the Moscow Triumphal Gate. The cemetery is named after the historical Resurrection (Novodevichy) Convent. In the 19th century it was the second most prestigious cemetery after the Tikhvin Cemetery in Alexander Nevsky Monastery. The cemetery was started in 1845 when the Smolny Convent was moved there. First burials date to 1849. In 1920 - 1930 the cemetery church was demolished by the Soviet authorities (1929) and many tombs destroyed, while other burials were transferred to the Tikhvin Cemetery. In 1989 there were major restorations of the cemetery. Notable people formerly interred at the Novodevichy Cemetery include the poets Nikolay Nekrasov and Fyodor Tyutchev, the painter Mikhail Vrubel, the architect Leon Benois, the composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, the philologist Yakov Grot, the publisher A. F. Marx, the chess-player Mikhail Chigorin, the politician Vyacheslav Pleve, and the explorer Gennady Nevelskoy. Many people (even Saint-Peterburgians) confuse the cemetery with the Novodevichy Cemetery at the Novodevichy Convent in Moscow. Media
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    Mountain View Cemetery

    Mountain View Cemetery

    The Mountain View Cemetery is a large 226-acre (91 ha) cemetery in Oakland, California. It was established in 1863 by a group of East Bay pioneers under the California Rural Cemetery Act of 1859. The association they formed still operates the cemetery today. Mountain View was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who also designed New York City's Central Park and much of UC Berkeley and Stanford University. Many of California's important historical figures, drawn by Olmsted's reputation, are buried here and there are many grandiose crypts in tribute to the wealthy who are buried there, so many that one section is known as "Millionaires' Row." Because of this, and its beautiful setting, the cemetery is a tourist draw and docents lead semi-monthly tours. Olmsted's intent was to create a space that would express a harmony between man and the natural setting. In the view of 19th century English and American romantics, park-like cemeteries, such as Mountain View, represented the peace of nature, to which man's soul returns. Olmsted, drawing upon the concepts of American Transcendentalism, integrated Parisian grand monuments and broad avenues. Adjoining Mountain View
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    Ramparts Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Ramparts Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Ramparts Cemetery (Lille Gate) is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. This small cemetery is the only CWGC burial ground within the ancient walls of Ieper. The cemetery was begun in November 1914 by French troops defending the city and was used by Commonwealth troops from February 1915 until April 1918, by which time the Western Front had moved away from Ypres. At the end of the war, the French graves were removed and concentrated in the nearby Ypres Necropole National French cemetery. Of the British and Commonwealth troops buried here, all but ten are named; in the case of five of the unidentified, the nationality could not be assertained. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield who was also responsible for the nearby Menin Gate memorial. The cemetery contains the graves of 198 soldiers. Amongst these are the graves of six Australian troops killed
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    Salt Lake City Cemetery

    Salt Lake City Cemetery

    The Salt Lake City Cemetery is in The Avenues neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah. Approximately 120,000 persons are buried in the cemetery. Many religious leaders and politicians, particularly many leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) lie in the cemetery. It encompasses over 250 acres (1.0 km) and contains 9⁄2 miles of roads. It is the largest city-operated cemetery in the United States. The first burial occurred on September 27, 1847, when George Wallace buried his child, Mary Wallace. The burial was two months after the Mormon pioneers had settled the Salt Lake Valley. In 1849, George Wallace, Daniel H. Wells, and Joseph Heywood surveyed 20 acres (81,000 m) at the same site for the area's burial grounds. In 1851, Salt Lake City was incorporated and the 20 acres (81,000 m) officially became the Salt Lake City Cemetery with George Wallace as its first sexton. As of July 1, 2009, prices for plots have increased to $1,044 for residents and $1,736 for non-residents. As of mid 2012, only 1,000 cemetery plots remain unsold. Cemetery officials predict that the cemetery will be completely sold out in 10 years.
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    West Norwood Cemetery

    West Norwood Cemetery

    West Norwood Cemetery is a 40-acre (16 ha) cemetery in West Norwood in London, England. It was also known as the South Metropolitan Cemetery. One of the first private landscaped cemeteries in London, it is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries of London, and is a site of major historical, architectural and ecological interest. Its grounds are a mixture of historic monumental cemetery and modern lawn cemetery, but it also has catacombs, cremation plots and a columbarium for cinery ashes. The cemetery's crematorium still operates, and cremation plots are still available, but all the conventional burial plots have been allocated and hence it is closed to new burials pending further agreement under current burial legislation. The Main gate is located on Norwood Road near the junction with Robson Road, where Norwood Road forks into Norwood High Street and Knights' Hill. It is in the London Borough of Lambeth, (SE27). The local authority are the current owners. The site, with some of its neighbouring streets, forms part of a conservation area. Reckoned to hold the finest collection of sepulchral monuments in London, it features 69 Grade II and Grade II* listed buildings and structures,
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    Abeele Aerodrome Military Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Abeele Aerodrome Military Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Abeele Aerodrome Military Cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. The cemetery, at Abeele in Belgium but metres from the border with France, was founded by French troops in April 1918, receiving Commonwealth and American burials between July and September 1918. After the Armistice, the French and American graves were concentrated at other cemeteries, leaving just Commonwealth burials. These were increased by concentrating 25 graves from the nearby Boeschepe churchyard in France. The cemetery is named for the wartime aerodrome established in nearby fields although the cemetery itself contains no Royal Air Force graves. The cemetery was designed by G H Goldsmith, who also designed Orient House in Manchester. Reference works point to two unusual inscriptions on gravestones in this cemetery. One asks the poignant question "Old Pal, why don’t you answer me",
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    Allerton Cemetery

    Allerton Cemetery

    Purchase of the land for Allerton Cemetery was completed in October 1906, the Church of England section was consecrated by the Bishop of Liverpool on 24 September 1909, and the first burial in the cemetery took place on 29 December 1909. It is still in operation. In August 2003 the total customer number was 74,109. Burials by religion: The cemetery contains graves of 399 Commonwealth services personnel from both World Wars. Notable individuals buried here include: Allerton Cemetery has a natural woodland burial area. This provides an alternative to the traditional type of burial area as is offers an area with mature trees and a variety of natural plants and grasses. Graves are excavated to accommodate one full earth burial, so as not to damage tree roots. An adjacent grave may be purchased in reserve where family members wish to be buried together. Burials in this area can only take place in biodegradable coffins. The grave is marked with an inscribed marker with an inscription being chosen by family members. This is as opposed to traditional headstones, which are not permitted in the woodland area. The principle behind the natural burial option, is to provide an environmentally
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    Bath National Cemetery

    Bath National Cemetery

    Bath National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located the village of Bath, in Steuben County, New York. It encompasses 28.9 acres (117,000 m²), and as of the end of 2005, had 13,048 interments. The area was originally part of the New York State Soldiers and Sailors Home, which was established in 1877; the cemetery was officially dedicated in on December 25, 1879. In 1930, it became part of the National Cemetery system. In 1987, archaeologists digging in Fort Erie discovered the remains of 28 American soldiers who died at the time of the Niagara campaign during the War of 1812. They were reinterred in Bath National Cemetery.
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    Brussels Cemetery

    Brussels Cemetery

    The Brussels Cemetery (French: Cimetière de Bruxelles, Dutch: Begraafplaats Van de Stad Brussel) is a cemetery situated in Evere (Brussels), Belgium. It located in the neighbouring municipality of Evere, rather than in the City of Brussels proper. It is adjacent to Schaerbeek Cemetery and Evere Cemetery, but should not be confused with either. The grounds include many war memorials, including a large monument to the soldiers of the Battle of Waterloo by Belgian sculptor Jacques de Lalaing. The idea of bringing together the remains of British officers that had been killed during the Waterloo Campaign of 1815, was first suggested in 1861. In 1882, the City Council of Brussels approved a suggestion to donate 30 square metres of the cemetery to re-bury British officers whose graves were in Brussels or around the battlefields of Waterloo and Quatre Bras. In 1888, a public subscription was launched by Queen Victoria in the United Kingdom to finance a suitable monumemt. The resulting sculpture by Jacques de Lalaing is a large edifice of bronze figures on a plinth of rusticated stone blocks. It depicts Brittannia with lowered hemet and trident, surrounded by discarded British weapons,
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    Holywell Cemetery

    Holywell Cemetery

    Holywell Cemetery is next to St Cross Church in Oxford, England. The cemetery is behind the church in St Cross Road, north of Longwall Street. In the mid 19th century, the graveyards of the six parishes in central Oxford became full, so Merton College made some of its land available to form the cemetery in 1847. The cemetery was established along with Osney Cemetery and St Sepulchre's Cemetery. In 1855, new burials were forbidden at all Oxford city churches, apart from in existing vaults. The cemetery is now a wildlife refuge with many birds (including pheasants that nest there) and butterflies, as well as small and larger mammals, including Muntjac deer and foxes. Hedgehogs are also known to live there. A number of well-known people are buried in the cemetery, including: A wooden grave marker that was used to mark the grave of the England Rugby captain Ronald Poulton-Palmer at Ploegsteert wood is affixed to a wall in the cemetery. The cemetery contains three war graves that are maintained and registered by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission - two British Army officers of World War I and a Royal Air Force officer of World War II. A Friends of Holywell Cemetery has been
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    Kensal Green Cemetery

    Kensal Green Cemetery

    Kensal Green Cemetery is a cemetery in Kensal Green, in the west of London, England, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Inspired by the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and founded in 1833 by the barrister George Frederick Carden, Kensal Green Cemetery comprises 72 acres of beautiful grounds including two conservation areas and an adjoining canal. Kensal Green Cemetery is home to 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has a host of different of memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and even includes special areas dedicated to the very young. With three chapels catering for people of all faiths and social standing, the General Cemetery Company has provided a haven in the heart London for more than 170 years for its inhabitants to remember their loved one in a tranquil and dignified environment. It was immortalised in the lines of G. K. Chesterton's poem The Rolling English Road from his book The Flying Inn: "For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen; Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green." The cemetery is located in the London Borough of Kensington &
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    Kerepesi Cemetery

    Kerepesi Cemetery

    Kerepesi Cemetery (Hungarian: Kerepesi úti temető or Kerepesi temető, official name: Fiumei úti nemzeti sírkert, i.e. "Fiume Road National Graveyard") is the most famous cemetery in Budapest. It is one of the oldest cemeteries in Hungary which has been almost completely preserved as an entity. Founded in 1847, Kerepesi is located in outer Józsefváros, near Keleti pályaudvar (Eastern Railway Station), and can be reached via Budapest Metro line 2. It is the innermost cemetery of Budapest, although it still lies about 2 km from the downtown centre. Kerepesi is one of the biggest National Pantheons in Europe and the biggest outdoor statue park with its area of about 56 hectares. It is sometimes referred to as the Père Lachaise of Budapest. The cemetery's first burial took place some two years after its opening, in 1849. Since then numerous Hungarian notables (statesmen, writers, sculptors, architects, artists, composers, scientists, actors and actresses etc.) have been interred there, several of them in ornate tombs or mausoleums. This was encouraged by the decision of the municipal authorities to declare Kerepesi a 'ground of honour' in 1885. The first notable burial was that of
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    Mirogoj Cemetery

    Mirogoj Cemetery

    The Mirogoj Cemetery (pronounced [mîrɔɡɔːj]) is considered to be one of the most beautiful cemetery parks in Europe and, because of its design, numbers among the more noteworthy landmarks in the City of Zagreb. The cemetery inters members of all religious groups: Catholic, Orthodox, Muslim, Jewish, Protestant, Latter Day Saints and irreligious graves can all be found. In the arcades are the last resting places of many famous Croatians. The cemetery was created in 1876 on a plot of land owned by the linguist Ljudevit Gaj. Architect Hermann Bollé designed the main building. The construction of the arcades, the cupolas, and the church in the entryway was begun in 1879. Work was finished in 1929. It is located today in the Gornji Grad - Medveščak city district, on Mirogojska Road and Hermann Bollé Street. ZET bus line 106 runs between the cemetery and the Kaptol bus terminal in the heart of Zagreb.
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    Mount Auburn Cemetery

    Mount Auburn Cemetery

    Mount Auburn Cemetery in Massachusetts, was founded in 1831 as "America's first garden cemetery" or "rural cemetery". With classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain, it marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery", derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodies by old graveyards and church burial plots. The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum. Most of the cemetery is located in Watertown, Massachusetts, though the 1843 granite Egyptian revival entrance lies in neighboring Cambridge, adjacent to the Cambridge City and Sand Banks Cemeteries. The land that became Mount Auburn Cemetery was originally named Stone's Farm, though locals referred to it as "Sweet Auburn" after the 1770 poem "The Deserted Village" by Oliver Goldsmith. Mount Auburn Cemetery was inspired by Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and was itself an inspiration to cemetery designers, most notably at
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    Oise-Aisne Cemetery

    Oise-Aisne Cemetery

    The Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial is an American military cemetery in northern France. Plots A through D contains the graves of 6,012 American soldiers who died while fighting in this vicinity during World War I, 597 of which were not identified, as well as a monument for 241 Americans who were missing in action during battles in the same area and whose remains were never recovered. Included among the soldiers here who lost their lives is poet Joyce Kilmer. A graveyard for former soldiers that were dishonorably discharged and executed for crimes committed during World War II, referred to as Plot E, is nearby. Private Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion during World War II, was buried there until 1987. The Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial lies one and a half miles east of Fère-en-Tardenois, Aisne, Picardy, France and about 14 miles (23 km) northeast of Château-Thierry. It is approximately 70 miles (110 km) northeast of Paris. The grounds extend to 36.5 acres (14.8 ha) and this is the second of eight large permanent American World War I military cemeteries that are not in the United States. It was initially established on August 2, 1918
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    Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague

    Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague

    The Old Jewish Cemetery (Czech: Starý židovský hřbitov, German: Alter Jüdischer Friedhof) lies in the Josefov, the Jewish Quarter of Prague in the Czech Republic. It was in use from the early 15th century (the oldest preserved tombstone, the one of Avigdor Kara, dates back to 1439) until 1787. Its ancestor was a cemetery called "The Jewish Garden", which was found in archaeological excavations under the Vladislavova street, New Town. The numbers of grave stones and numbers of people buried there are uncertain, because there are layers of tombs. However, it has been estimated that there are approximately 12,000 tombstones presently visible, and there may be as many as 100,000 burials in all. The most notable personalities buried in the Old Jewish Cemetery are Yehuda ben Bezalel known as the Maharal Rabbi Löw (d. 1609), Mordechai Maisel (d. 1601), David Gans (d. 1613) and David Oppenheim(d. 1736). It is not clear when exactly the cemetery was founded. This has been the subject of discussion of many scholars. Some claim that the cemetery is over 1000 years older than the accepted date, which is the first half of the 15th century. The oldest grave belongs to the Prague rabbi and poet
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    Wolvercote Cemetery

    Wolvercote Cemetery

    Wolvercote Cemetery is a cemetery close to the north Oxford suburb of Wolvercote, England, off the Banbury Road. Unusually, this single cemetery is divided into areas to accommodate graves of the Jewish and Muslim communities, as well as all categories of Christians. Many Russians, Poles and other East Europeans who did not belong to Oxford parishes are buried here. The cemetery is equipped with toilet facilities, car parking spaces and a beautiful chapel. Near the chapel is a large area set aside for the burial of cremated remains. There is also an area at the back of the cemetery set aside for green burials and an area set aside for the burial of stillborns and infants. It is a working cemetery and there are more than 15,000 people buried there. It was opened in 1889. The following people are buried at Wolvercote Cemetery, many of them academics at Oxford University: The cemetery contains the graves of 44 Commonwealth service personnel, 21 from World War I and 23 from World War II.
    5.25
    4 votes
    156
    Camp Hill Cemetery

    Camp Hill Cemetery

    In 1844 Camp Hill Cemetery on Robie Street in the heart of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada replaced the city's first cemetery known as the Old Burying Ground that had been established almost 100 years earlier in 1749. Originally run by private company, the cemetery is now owned and administered by the Halifax Regional Municipality. As a cemetery in the provincial capital, Camp Hill became the final resting place for many of Nova Scotia's elite. Officials did allow for the burial of Black Canadians, albeit in a segregated section of the cemetery. In the 1990s it was pointed out that the graves of African-Canadian veterans of World War I, unlike other white Canadian veterans, were marked by nothing more than flat white stones. This situation has since been rectified by the federal department of Veterans Affairs. There are also 17 graves of Norwegian sailors, soldiers and merchant seamen in Camp Hill Cemetery who died in Nova Scotia during World War II. These men were at sea when Germany invaded Norway in 1940. The King and government of Norway ordered the more than 1,000 ships at sea to go to Allied ports.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery

    Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery

    Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located on Fort Leavenworth, a United States Army installation north of Leavenworth, Kansas. It was officially established in 1862, but was used as a burial ground as early as 1844. The cemetery is the resting place of eight Medal of Honor recipients, but most are the unknown soldiers of war. It was named for Brigadier General Henry Leavenworth, who was re-interred there in 1902 from Woodland Cemetery in Delhi, New York. It occupies approximately 36.1 acres (14.6 ha) and was site to 22,679 interments, as of the end of 2005. It is maintained by Leavenworth National Cemetery. On July 17, 1862, Congress enacted legislation that authorized the purchase of cemetery grounds to be used "for soldiers who shall have died in the service of the country". By 1870, the remains of nearly 300,000 Union dead had been buried in 73 national cemeteries. Most of the cemeteries were located near former battlefields or what were once war time camps. Fort Leavenworth National cemetery was one of the largest, at 36.1 acres. The Leavenworth cemetery was also closely associated with the Western Branch National Military Home, "old
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery

    Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery

    Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery is situated in the city of San Diego, California, on the Fort Rosecrans Military Reservation. The cemetery is located approximately 10 miles west of downtown San Diego, overlooking the bay and the city. Fort Rosecrans is named after William Starke Rosecrans, a Union general in the American Civil War. Many Fort Rosecrans interments date to the early years of the California Republic, including the remains of the casualties of the Battle of San Pasqual. Shortly after the United States declared war on Mexico in May 1846, Brigadier Stephen W. Kearny was tasked with conquering Mexico's northern provinces, New Mexico and California. While Kearny demonstrated his considerable gift for administrative command with his acquisition of the New Mexican territory, he faced a more difficult task in California. Expecting a show of force from the Mexican Californios, Kearny set out west from New Mexico. Upon reaching California, Kit Carson intercepted him and his men, who informed him the territory had been taken by American settlers in the Bear Flag Revolt. Kearny sent 200 of his men back to New Mexico with the news and continued forward with one-third of his force.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    German Waldheim Cemetery

    German Waldheim Cemetery

    German Waldheim Cemetery, previously known as Waldheim Cemetery, and currently named Forest Home Cemetery is located at 863 Des Plaines Ave. in Forest Park, a suburb of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois. It was originally founded in 1873 as a non-religion specific cemetery, where Freemasons, Roma, and German-speaking immigrants to Chicago could be buried without regard for religious affiliation. In 1969, it merged with the adjacent Forest Home Cemetery, with the combined cemetery being called Forest Home. Because it was unassociated with any religious institution, it was chosen as burial place of the Haymarket Martyrs. After they were buried there, the cemetery became a place of pilgrimage for anarchists and leftists. Because of its role as a pilgrimage site for the international left, the Haymarket memorial there was the first cemetery memorial to be designated a National Historic Landmark. The Haymarket Martyrs' Monument by sculptor Albert Weinert is located here. In homage to the Haymarket Martyrs, many other anarchists and socialists are buried at Waldheim, including: The English part of the cemetery—that is, Forest Home—includes the graves of:
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Golden Gate National Cemetery

    Golden Gate National Cemetery

    Golden Gate National Cemetery is a U.S. National Cemetery, located in the city of San Bruno, San Mateo County, 12 miles (19 km) south of San Francisco. Because of the name and location, it is frequently confused with San Francisco National Cemetery, which dates to the 19th century and is in the Presidio of San Francisco, in view of the Golden Gate. Around 1937, San Francisco residents voted to bar the opening of new cemeteries within the city proper and, as a result, the site for the new national cemetery was selected south of the city limits. Congress authorized construction of the facility in 1937, with the first interments in 1941. The cemetery was officially dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, 1942. California Attorney General Earl Warren (later Governor of California and Chief Justice of the United States) was keynote speaker at the ceremony. Golden Gate is one of a large number of U.S. Army-planned cemeteries started in the 1930s and completed during the 1940s. They were designed specifically to provide abundant burial opportunities in locations around the nation in cities with very large veteran populations. As of 2005, the cemetery held 137,435 interments. Over the years,
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Holy Name Cemetery, Jersey City

    Holy Name Cemetery, Jersey City

    Holy Name Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery in Jersey City, New Jersey administered by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark. It was established in 1866 and at the end of calendar year 2002 has accepted 264,984 burials. The cemetery parcel is 63 acres (250,000 m) and all but 0.3 acres (1,200 m) has been developed and sold for burials. It is no longer selling new plots, but accepts burials in existing plots.
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Manila American Cemetery and Memorial

    Manila American Cemetery and Memorial

    The Manila American Cemetery and Memorial is located in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City in Metro Manila, Philippines. The cemetery, 152 acres (62 ha) or 615,000 square metres in area, is located on a prominent plateau, visible at a distance from the east, south and west. With a total of 17,206 graves, it is the largest cemetery in the Pacific for U.S. personnel killed during World War II, and also holds war dead from the Philippines and other allied nations. Many of the personnel whose remains are interred or represented were killed in New Guinea, or during the Battle of the Philippines (1941-42) or the Allied recapture of the islands. The headstones are made of marble which are aligned in eleven plots forming a generally circular pattern, set among masses of a wide variety of tropical trees and shrubbery. The chapel, a tall stone structure enriched with sculpture and mosaic, stands near the center of the cemetery. In front of it on a wide terrace are two large hemicycles with rooms at each end. Twenty-five large mosaic maps in these four rooms recall the achievements of the United States Armed Forces in the Pacific, China, India and Burma. On rectangular Trani limestone piers within
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    United States Naval Academy Cemetery

    United States Naval Academy Cemetery

    The United States Naval Academy Cemetery and Columbarium is a cemetery at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. In 1868 the Naval Academy purchased a sixty-seven acre piece of land called Strawberry Hill as part of their efforts to expand after the American Civil War. Within a year of its acquisition part of the property became the cemetery. Since its beginning the cemetery has become the final resting place for Medal of Honor recipients, Superintendents of the Naval Academy, midshipmen, and former employees of the Academy and hundreds more of the nation's veterans. The cemetery is also home to monuments that do not mark remains, but commemorate the heroism of individuals who gave their life in service to their country. The Jeannette Monument, erected in 1890, is the most notable such monument it was built in memory of the men who lost their lives in the Jeannette Arctic Expedition. In 1987, the Naval Academy constructed a columbarium adjacent to the cemetery on College Creek. The columbarium was built by the Naval Academy Alumni Association with $500,000 in gifts from alumni and friends of the Academy. This included a major grant from the George and Carol Olmsted
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Biloxi National Cemetery

    Biloxi National Cemetery

    Biloxi National Cemetery is a U.S. National Cemetery that is located in Biloxi, Mississippi on the grounds of the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), near Keesler Air Force Base. It occupies approximately 54 acres (22 ha), and is site to 15,278 interments as of the end of 2005. Biloxi National Cemetery was established in 1934 and its first burial was held on March 24, 1934. From 1934 to 1973 the purpose of Biloxi National Cemetery was to provide a final resting place solely for veterans who died in the adjoining medical center. In 1973 with the passage of the National Cemetery Act, the burial ground was opened to all honorably discharged veterans, active duty personnel, and their dependents regardless of where they died. Since its establishment, the grounds have increased in size twice as the result of land transfers from the VAMC. Originally 25 acres (10 ha), in 1982, 17 acres (6.9 ha) were added and in 1996, 12 more were added for a total of 54 acres (22 ha). A granite marker located in front of the cemetery's administration building was donated by the National Association of Atomic Veterans on November 9, 1990, in memory of the veterans who participated in the
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Glenwood Cemetery

    Glenwood Cemetery

    The Glenwood Cemetery is located at 2525 Washington Avenue in Houston, Texas. It was the first cemetery in Houston to be professionally designed and opened in 1871. The cemetery is situated between Washington Avenue on the North side and Memorial Drive on the South side, the latter overlooking Buffalo Bayou. Buried in the cemetery is William P. Hobby, after whom Hobby Airport in Houston, Texas, is named. In 1938, the William P. Hobby Airport in Houston, known at the time as Houston Municipal Airport, was renamed “Howard Hughes Airport,” but the name was changed back after people objected to naming the airport after a living person. This is also the location of pioneering heart surgeon Dr. Denton Cooley’s family gravesite. Anson Jones, the last president of the Republic of Texas, is also buried here. This historic cemetery is the final resting place of a number of individuals who were citizens of the short-lived Republic of Texas. The grave sites of those individuals have been designated with metal markers and are frequently decorated with the flag of the Republic and State of Texas. Keith Rosen, a Houston area history professor quoted in the San Antonio Express-News, said that the
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Loew's Cemetery, New Brunswick

    Loew's Cemetery, New Brunswick

    The Mary Ellis grave is in New Brunswick, New Jersey in the parking lot of the Loew's Movie Theatre. Her family home eventually became the site for the Route 1 Flea Market, and later the Loews Movie Theatre. Her grave now sits in what became the parking lot, and now rests about seven feet above the level of the parking lot after the site was regraded for development. Mary Ellis (1750–1828) was a spinster in New Brunswick, New Jersey. According to oral tradition, she was seduced by a sea captain who vowed to return to marry her. He never returned and she would come to the spot where her grave now stands, each day, to look for his ship in the Raritan River in New Brunswick. Her story has been suggested as the inspiration for the 1972 pop song Brandy (You're a Fine Girl). The lyrics tell of Brandy, a barmaid in a port town. She wins the admiration of many of the sailors, but cannot return their feelings — the love of her life was unwilling to abandon his true love, the sea. Eliza Mary White (1792–1861) was the second wife of Thomas M. Evans (c1790–1820). Thomas was previously married to Mildred Moody (1746–1816). Eliza appears in the 1860 US Census as "Eliza Evans". Mildred Moody
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Vladslo

    Vladslo

    Vladslo German war cemetery is about three kilometres north east of Vladslo, near Diksmuide, Belgium. Established during World War I, the cemetery holds 3,233 wartime burials. In 1956, burials from many smaller surrounding cemeteries were concentrated in Vladslo, and it now contains the remains of 25,644 soldiers. Each stone bears the name of twenty soldiers, with just their name, rank, and date of death specified. The cemetery is administered by the German War Graves Commission (Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge). They also look after the three other German war cemeteries in Belgium: Langemark, Menen and Hooglede. The cemetery also contains a statue – The Grieving Parents – by Käthe Kollwitz, a noted German sculptress in the 1930s. She made the statue as a tribute to her youngest son, Peter, who was killed in October 1914 and is buried nearby. The eyes on the father-figure gaze on the ninth stone before him, on which his son's name is written.
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Brion-Vega Cemetery

    Brion-Vega Cemetery

    The Brion Cemetery is in San Vito d'Altivole near Treviso, Italy. Carlo Scarpa (1909-1978) designed the addition to a previous cemetery. The cemetery is a monumental tomb designed for the Brion family, founder of the Brionvega group. Scarpa himself is buried in this cemetery in a well hidden spot, within the interstitial space created by the walls of the old and new cemeteries. The site also includes a small chapel with a special entrance for caskets. The cemetery includes many design features. The perimeter walls are the same height as the surrounding corn, which deemphasizes the cemetery. It also includes an island which the visitor cannot access (arguably a metaphor for the afterlife). The window of the pavilion of meditation is in the form of a vesica piscis, a repeated leitmotif in Scarpa's architecture.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma

    Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma

    Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in Colma, California is an American Roman Catholic cemetery operated by the Archdiocese of San Francisco. Established in 1887 on 300 acres (1.2 km) of a former potato farm, it is the oldest and largest cemetery established in Colma to serve the needs of San Francisco. Several notable historical figures are interred at Holy Cross. One of the cemetery sequences in the film Harold and Maude was filmed here.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Houston National Cemetery

    Houston National Cemetery

    Houston National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in the city of Houston in Harris County, Texas. It encompasses 419.2 acres (169.6 ha) only about half of which is developed. The cemetery had 67,793 interments as of the end of 2008. First established on December 7, 1965 as a Veterans Administration Cemetery, it became Houston National Cemetery in 1973 after the passage of the National Cemetery Act. It was the only government cemetery constructed in the United States during the 1960s was the largest of its kind at the time of construction. At 419.2 acres (169.6 ha), the cemetery was slightly smaller than the 450 acres (180 ha) of Arlington National Cemetery. The Hemicycle, a large semi-circular monument which surrounds a chapel and a 75' high bell tower, with a large courtyard for open air ceremonies. The Hemicycle is the largest memorial and the most visible structure at the cemetery. The memorial is the only NCA-managed hemicycle memorial and is one of three hemicycles located in national cemeteries. The others are located at Arlington National Cemetery and Manila American Cemetery and Memorial in the Philippines. Located in the center of the hemicycle are the chapel,
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Lake View Cemetery

    Lake View Cemetery

    Lake View Cemetery is a cemetery located on Seattle, Washington, Capitol Hill just north of Volunteer Park. It is named for its view of Lake Washington to the east. It was founded in 1873 as the Seattle Masonic Cemetery. The cemetery contains the Nisei War Memorial Monument, dedicated in 1949 to Japanese American veterans, some of whom are buried there. Just north of the cemetery is Seattle's Grand Army of the Republic Cemetery.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Saints Innocents Cemetery

    Saints Innocents Cemetery

    The Saints Innocents Cemetery (French: Cimetière des Saints-Innocents or Cimetière des Innocents) is a defunct cemetery in Paris that was used from the Middle Ages until the late 18th century. It was the oldest and largest cemetery in Paris and had often been used for mass graves. It was closed because of overuse in 1780, and in 1786 the bodies were exhumed and transported to the unused subterranean quarries near Montparnasse known as the Catacombs. The place Joachim-du-Bellay in the Les Halles district now covers the site of the cemetery. The cemetery took its name (referring to the Biblical Massacre of the Innocents) from the attached church of the Saints Innocents that has now also disappeared. Sources describe the burial ground, then called Champeaux, and associated church in the 12th century. It was located next to the central market (the origin of Les Halles). Under the reign of Philip II the cemetery was enlarged and surrounded by a three-meter-tall wall. Les Innocents had begun as a cemetery of individual sepulchres, but had become a site for mass graves by then. People were buried together in the same pit (a pit could hold about 1,500 dead at a time); only when it was full
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Camp Nelson National Cemetery

    Camp Nelson National Cemetery

    Camp Nelson National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in southern Jessamine County, Kentucky. It was originally a graveyard associated with the U.S. Army's Camp Nelson, which was active during the U.S. Civil War and its aftermath. The camp was named for Major General William "Bull" Nelson, commander of the Civil War Army of Kentucky, who was murdered by a fellow officer in 1862. The cemetery encompasses 30.2 acres (12.2 ha), has a capacity for 15,000 graves, and currently contains over 12,000 interments, nearly all of which were, at death, either U.S. Armed Forces personnel on active duty, veterans of the Armed Forces, or their dependent family members. There are 2,452 burials that date to the U.S. Civil War, and of those, 837 are known to be the graves of African-American soldiers. Their gravestone are marked with the letters "USCT" over their names; the designation stands for "United States Colored Troops". The cemetery was created in 1863 as a place to bury Union soldiers who died while serving in and around Camp Nelson during the Civil War. The first cemetery was located near the camp hospital, and 379 people were buried there between June 1863 and July
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Grafton National Cemetery

    Grafton National Cemetery

    Grafton National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Grafton, Taylor County, West Virginia. It encompasses a total of 3.2 acres (1.3 ha). Along with West Virginia National Cemetery, it is one of the two national cemeteries in the state of West Virginia, both of which are located in Grafton. The first interments took place in 1867 for casualties of the American Civil War in West Virginia. The Grafton cemetery is closed to most new interments due to inadequate space. Interments are made at nearby West Virginia National Cemetery since it was dedicated in 1987. In 1867, the United States Department of War directed Major R. C. Bates to find a location to bury remains of Union casualties of the American Civil War throughout West Virginia. West Virginia was a member of the Union, after seceding from the rest of Confederate Virginia and forming a new state in 1863. Bates found a site adjacent to the town of Grafton's Maple Avenue Cemetery, where many soldiers had already been buried. The terrain was also relatively level, unusual for the mountainous region. The 39th Congress appropriated a 3 acres (1.2 ha) site that same year. The cemetery was dedicated in 1868 by
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Montparnasse Cemetery

    Montparnasse Cemetery

    Montparnasse Cemetery (French: Cimetière du Montparnasse) is a cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, part of the city's 14th arrondissement. Created from three farms in 1824, the cemetery at Montparnasse was originally known as Le Cimetière du Sud. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery. Montparnasse Cemetery is the eternal home of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris. Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction. Among those interred here are:
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery is a cemetery in Frederick, Maryland. The cemetery is located at 515 South Market Street and is operated by the Mount Olivet Cemetery Company, Inc. On October 4, 1852 a group of citizens from Maryland were incorporated as the Mount Olivet Cemetery Company. The company purchase 32 acres of land, which was designed by James Belden to incorporate walkways and driveways throughout the grounds. The cemetery was conceived primarily to provide several of the downtown Frederick churches more room for interments, after their cemeteries became full. Over time some of these smaller cemeteries were also relocated to Mount Olivet. Initial shares were sold for US$20 with the intention that after the cemetery was laid out that each share would be exchanged for 12 grave lots. Mrs. Ann Crawford was the first interment at the cemetery, she was buried on May 28, 1854. Mount Olivet Cemetery has had many monuments constructed on the grounds since its establishment. These monuments honor significant historical people, events and the men and women who fought in many of the military conflicts the United States has been involved in. On August 7, 1879, a meeting was held to organize a
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Mount Royal Cemetery

    Mount Royal Cemetery

    Opened in 1852, Mount Royal Cemetery is a 165-acre (668 000 m²) terraced cemetery on the north slope of Mount Royal in the borough of Outremont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The burial ground shares the mountain with the much larger adjacent Roman Catholic cemetery -- Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges. Mount Royal Cemetery is now bordered on the southeast by Mount Royal Park, on the west by Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery and on the north by two Jewish cemeteries. Mount Royal Cemetery is in operation and even the old portion of the cemetery still has some burial sites available. In the middle of the 1800s, the cemeteries located downtown needed space desperately. Concerned with epidemics and public health issues, these cemeteries had to be developed elsewhere.The Protestant community of Montreal purchased, in 1851, a section of Mount Royal that belonged to Dr. Michael McCulloch. The Mount Royal Cemetery, one of the first rural cemeteries in North America, was incorporated in 1847 under an Act of the Provincial Parliament of Canada. Following the trend of the American rural cemetery movement, the purpose of choosing land on the mountain was to use the natural surroundings to combine
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Notre Dame des Neiges Cemetery

    Notre Dame des Neiges Cemetery

    Founded in 1854, Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges is a 343-acre (1.39 km) cemetery located in the borough of Côte-des-Neiges–Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The entrance and the grounds run along a part of Côte-des-Neiges road and up the slopes of Mount Royal. Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Canada and the third-largest in North America. Created on property purchased from Dr. Pierre Beaubien, the new cemetery was a response to growing demand at a time when the old Saint-Antoine Cemetery (near the present Dominion Square) had become too small to serve Montreal’s rapidly increasing population. On May 29, 1855, Mrs. Jane Gilroy, wife of Thomas McCready, then a Montréal municipal councilor, was the first person to be buried in the new cemetery. Notre-Dame-des-Neiges is the largest cemetery in Canada with more than 55 kilometres of lanes and one million people interred. The Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery site has over 65,000 monuments and 71 family vaults. The cemetery was originally open only to Roman Catholics; it is now open to any Christian, though it continues to be a Catholic institution and serve a primarily Catholic community. Primarily
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Port Hudson National Cemetery

    Port Hudson National Cemetery

    Port Hudson National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Port Hudson, 20 miles (32 km) north of the city of Baton Rouge in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. It encompasses 19.9 acres (8.1 ha), and as of the end of 2007, had 12,718 interments. The Port Hudson Battlefield, including the cemetery, is a National Historic Landmark. It is also a designated site on the Louisiana African American Heritage Trail. The cemetery is located on the site which was the main battleground of the Siege of Port Hudson, during the American civil war. Nearly 4,000 Union troops fell during the fighting, and most were buried in the cemetery, many as unknowns. After the war another 8.4 acres (3.4 ha) was appropriated to inter those who died in the local veterans' facilities. The Confederate soldiers who died were primarily buried in the trenches where they fell. There is however, a Confederate Cemetery in the Port Hudson area that is currently inaccessible to the public. The battlefield at Port Hudson is one of the only naturally preserved Civil War battlegrounds. The breastworks, gun pits, and trenches remain today almost as they were during the battle. The area has never been
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Santa Fe National Cemetery

    Santa Fe National Cemetery

    Santa Fe National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery in the city of Santa Fe, in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. It encompasses 78.6 acres (31.8 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 39,695 interments. It is one of only two national cemeteries in New Mexico (the other being Fort Bayard National Cemetery). Though New Mexico only played a small part in the American Civil War, the cemetery was created after the war to inter the Union soldiers who died fighting there, primarily at the Battle of Glorieta Pass. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe donated the land to the federal government in 1870. In 1876 its status was changed to a post cemetery, but in 1885 it became a national cemetery once again.
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Crookes Cemetery

    Crookes Cemetery

    Crookes Cemetery is a cemetery between Crosspool and Crookes in the city of Sheffield, England. It was opened in 1906, and covers 29 acres (120,000 m). The cemetery's chapel was Grade II listed on 12 December 1995. Over 29,000 burials have taken place since its opening. Seventy of the older graves, registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, are those of service personnel who died serving in and during World War I and World War II. A central alley runs through the cemetery and separates the consecrated grounds to the north and the unconsecrated grounds to the south.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Culpeper National Cemetery

    Culpeper National Cemetery

    Culpeper National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the town of Culpeper, in Culpeper County, Virginia. It encompasses 29.6 acres (120,000 m) of land, and as of the end of 2005, had 9,880 interments. During the American Civil War, the territory around the city of Culpeper was defended vigorously by both sides, as it was a strategic point almost exactly between Washington D.C. and the capital of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia. Numerous battles took place in the region, including the Battle of Cedar Mountain and the Battle of Chancellorsville. The dead from those conflicts were buried nearby in makeshift grave sites. After the war a reburial program was initiated, and in 1867, Culpeper National Cemetery was established to reinter many of the remains from the makeshift sites. The original cemetery comprised 6 acres (2.4 ha), bought from Edward B. Hill of Culpeper for $1,400. The original Second Empire Victorian caretakers lodge was built in 1872 and was designed by Montgomery C. Meigs. Many improvements to the grounds and facilities at the cemetery were made during the 1930s as part of the New Deal. These make-work improvements included replacing the
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Forest Park Cemetery, Brunswick

    Forest Park Cemetery, Brunswick

    Forest Park Cemetery, also known colloquially as Pinewoods Cemetery due to its location on Pinewoods Avenue, is an abandoned cemetery, located in Brunswick, New York, United States just east of the city of Troy. It is famous for the numerous urban legends regarding ghosts. Forest Park Cemetery was first incorporated in 1897 by a group of wealthy Troy businessmen under the Forest Park Cemetery Corporation, though based on older gravestones, the cemetery had apparently been in use since at least 1856. The original area chosen for the cemetery occupied over 200 acres (81 ha) of farmland in what was then rural Brunswick. Meant to outgrow and even outclass Troy's Oakwood Cemetery, it was originally designed by Garnet Baltimore, the first African-American graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Baltimore planned on the cemetery to offer visitors a park-like experience, complete with statuary, winding trails, and a large receiving tomb near the entrance. The Forest Park Cemetery Corporation went bankrupt in 1914 and the cemetery was never completed to the original plans. The only structure that had been built was the receiving tomb, which still stands today, albeit in a dilapidated
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Lamington Cemetery, Bedminster

    Lamington Cemetery, Bedminster

    Lamington Cemetery is an African American cemetery in the Lamington section of Bedminster Township, New Jersey, located on Cowperthwaite Road. It is sometimes called Lamington Black Cemetery or Cowperthwaite African American Cemetery. The cemetery is on the National Register of Historic Places.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Lowell Cemetery

    Lowell Cemetery

    Lowell Cemetery is a cemetery located in Lowell, Massachusetts. Founded in 1841 and located on the banks of the Concord River, the cemetery is one of the oldest garden cemeteries in the nation, inspired by Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Many of Lowell's wealthy industrialists are buried here, under ornate Victorian tombstones.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    St James Cemetery

    St James Cemetery

    St James's Cemetery is an urban park behind the Liverpool Cathedral that is below ground level. Until 1825, the space was a stone quarry, and until 1936 it was used as the Liverpool city cemetery. It has been designated a Grade I Historic Park by English Heritage. The workings and operation of the cemetery predate the Cathedral to which it does not belong. The Cathedral, which began construction in 1903, occupies most of rock outcrop above the cemetery known as St James Mount (also known as Quarry Hill or Mount Zion) that in 1771 was established as Liverpool's first public park. The cemetery has two entrances which are always open. At the north side a stone path lined with recycled grave stones descends through a short tunnel between The Oratory and the main entrance of the cathedral. The southern entrance near Upper Parliament street is through a stone arch between the Garden Lodge and the steps up to the Mount. Notable features include the Huskisson memorial, a natural spring and a system of broad ramps lined with catacombs. There is no access from Hope Street. The original stone quarry began operation in the 16th century. The tunnel workings (most of which are blocked) probably
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Swan Point Cemetery

    Swan Point Cemetery

    Swan Point Cemetery is a cemetery located in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. Established in 1846 on a 60 acre (0.24 km²) plot of land. It has approximately 40,000 interments. First organized under the Swan Point Cemetery Company, with a board of trustees. In 1858, a new charter was developed to make the cemetery administration non-profit, and it was taken over by a group known as the Proprietors of Swan Point Cemetery. In 1886, landscape architect H.W.S. Cleveland was hired to redesign the area. Among the first to make use of a tract of land within the cemetery was the First Congregational Society (now First Unitarian Society). They moved several interments from older plots in Providence to Swan Point. Over the years additional land acquisition has expanded the cemetery to 200 acres (0.81 km), and is still open to new interments today. Swan Point Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. Swan Point has the burials of many notable Rhode Island figures:
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    188
    Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo

    Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo

    Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, New York was founded in 1849 by Charles E. Clark. It covers over 250 acres (1 km²) and over 152,000 are buried there. Notable graves include U.S. President Millard Fillmore, singer Rick James, and inventor Lawrence Dale Bell. Forest Lawn is on the National Register of Historic Places. Since its inception, Forest Lawn has served as a cemetery, park, arboretum, and outdoor museum. Monuments, mausoleums, and sculptures have attracted visitors for over 150 years. The first sculpture of Seneca Indian chief Red Jacket was erected in 1851. Red Jacket is depicted wearing the richly embroidered scarlet coat presented to him by a British officer, while on his breast is displayed the large silver peace medal awarded to him by President George Washington. Every summer Forest Lawn offers "Sundays in the Cemetery" tours, each with a particular theme. Past examples have included the Pan-American Exposition Bus Tour, Forest Lawn History Bus Tour, Forest Lawn History Walk, African American Bus Tour, Civil War Bus Tour, and the Forest Lawn Nature Walk. In 2004, Frank Lloyd Wright’s 1928 design for the Blue Sky Mausoleum was realized. The Mausoleum contains 24 crypts,
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    3 votes
    189
    Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

    Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio

    Green Lawn Cemetery is a large and historically significant burial ground in Central Ohio, United States. Located in the southern section of Columbus, Ohio (at the western terminus of Greenlawn Avenue), it is the final resting place for many local notables and well-known figures from national history. Green Lawn was the most fashionable and sought after final address in Columbus, and still maintains that reputation today. Founded in 1848, the facility covers over 360 acres (1.5 km) and contains nearly 150,000 interments. The crypts span the breadth of late-Victorian and turn-of-the-century architectural movements, including some styled in the Mesopotamian–Egyptian style favored during the burst of "Egyptian mania" enjoyed after Howard Carter's discovery of King Tut's tomb in 1922. Some of the largest family crypts that can be seen are those of the Hayden, Battelle, and Packard families. Also entombed here with their own private burial plots surrounding the central crypt is the Lazarus family, the patriarchal line that founded and ran the popular department store chains known as The F&R Lazarus & Company, The John Shillito Company, and Federated Department Stores. There are
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    3 votes
    190
    Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, East Orange

    Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, East Orange

    Holy Sepulchre Cemetery is located in East Orange and Newark, New Jersey. The Garden State Parkway runs through the two halves of the cemetery (Exit 144 and Exit 145, respectively). This cemetery was established in 1859 and is maintained by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.
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    191
    Moravian Cemetery, Staten Island

    Moravian Cemetery, Staten Island

    The Moravian Cemetery at 2205 Richmond Road in New Dorp on Staten Island, New York is the largest cemetery on the island. Opened in 1740, it is situated on the southeastern foot of the Todt Hill ridge, and to its southwest is High Rock Park, one of the constituent parks of the Staten Island Greenbelt. In what was a purely farming community, the 113 acre (457,000 m²) cemetery was originally made available as a free cemetery for the public in order to discourage families from using farm burial plots. The Moravian Cemetery is the burial place for a number of famous Staten Islanders, including members of the Vanderbilt family. In the 19th century Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt gave the Moravian Church 8½ acres (34,000 m²) and later his son William Henry Vanderbilt gave a further 4 acres (16,000 m²) and constructed the residence for the cemetery superintendent. The Vanderbilt mausoleum, designed by Richard Morris Hunt and constructed in 1885–1886, is part of the family's private section within the cemetery. Their mausoleum is a replica of a Romanesque church in Arles, France. The landscaped grounds around the Vanderbilt mausoleum were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. The Vanderbilt
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    3 votes
    192
    Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago

    Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago

    Rosehill Cemetery is a Victorian era cemetery on the North Side of Chicago, Illinois, USA, and at 350 acres (1.4 km), is the largest cemetery in the City of Chicago. The name "Rosehill" resulted from a City Clerk's error – the area was previously called "Roe's Hill", named for nearby farmer Hiram Roe. He refused to sell his land to the city until it was promised that the cemetery be named in his honor. Rosehill's Joliet-limestone entrance gate was designed by William W. Boyington, the architect of the Chicago Water Tower and the Old University of Chicago, who is buried in Rosehill. The Rosehill Cemetery Administration Building and Entry Gate was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Like its sister cemetery Graceland, Rosehill is the burial place of many well-known Chicagoans. The cemetery contains many monuments that are notable for their beauty and eccentricity, such as that of Lulu Fellows. Several graves from the old City Cemetery, originally located in what is now Lincoln Park were relocated to Rosehill. Some of the gravestones and monuments were also moved to Rosehill Cemetery and can be seen. Monuments relocated from City Cemetery are generally
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    3 votes
    193
    Campo di Verano cemetery

    Campo di Verano cemetery

    The Campo Verano (Italian: Cimitero del Verano) is a cemetery in Rome that was founded in the early nineteenth century. The cemetery is currently divided into sections: the Jewish cemetery, the Catholic cemetery, and the monument to the victims of the First World War. Media related to Campo Verano at Wikimedia Commons
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    194
    Katyn war cemetery

    Katyn war cemetery

    Katyn war cemetery (Polish: Polski Cmentarz Wojenny w Katyniu) is a Polish military cemetery located in Katyn, a small village 22 kilometres away from Smolensk, Russia, on the road to Vitebsk. It contains the remnants of 4,412 Polish officers of the Kozelsk prisoner of war camp, who were murdered in 1940 in what is called the Katyn massacre. Except for bodies of two Polish generals exhumed by German authorities in the 1940s and then buried separately, all Polish officers murdered in Katyn were buried in six large mass graves. There is also a Russian part of the cemetery, where some 6,5 thousand victims of the Soviet Great Purges of the 1930s were buried by the NKVD. The cemetery was officially opened in 2000. The cemetery is a large, irregular area covering roughly 22 hectares of forest. All mass graves are located on both sides of the main alley. There is also a circular alley with thousands of names of the officers who perished in the massacre. At the end of the main alley there is a war memorial and an altar with a memorial bell located underground. Initially, after the exhumation of 1943, the Germans had permitted the Polish Red Cross to build a cemetery on the spot. However,
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    2 votes
    195
    Larch Wood Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Larch Wood Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery

    Larch Wood (Railway Cutting) Cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. The cemetery was founded by Commonwealth troops in April 1915 and remained in use until April 1918, when the Western Front had moved away from the area. Most of the dead are from the defence of the nearby Hill 60. After the Armistice, the cemetery was enlarged with the concentration of graves from the battlefield, smaller cemeteries in the area (Brussels General, Ghistelles Churchyard, Oudenburg Churchyard, Wervik Communal) and Commonwealth troops buried in from German war cemeteries (America Cross Roads, Kortemark, Eernegem, Groenenberg, Handzaame, Ichtegem, Leffinghe, Marckhove, Tenbrielen Communal, Tourhout No 2, Vladsloo, Warneton Sud-et-Bas, Wijnendaele, Zantvoorde). The graves of 86 people are defined as "special memorials" — that is, they are either recorded as being buried here
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    2 votes
    196
    Linwood Cemetery

    Linwood Cemetery

    Linwood Cemetery is located in Dubuque, Iowa. It is located on Windsor Avenue in the north end of Dubuque. The cemetery is one of the main cemeteries in Dubuque. Originally established for the Protestants of the city, the cemetery now serves members of all faiths. If current burial procedures are followed in the future, the cemetery is estimated to have enough room for the next 1,200 years. The cemetery is noted for the large gates at the entrance to the cemetery. The gates were given in memory of a local businessman and banker. It is also noted for the well cared for grounds, part of which sit on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. A number of famous people have been interred at Linwood Cemetery. These include Iowa Governor Stephen P. Hempstead, for whom Hempstead High School is named, a U.S. Senator William Boyd Allison, and former Speaker of the US House David Bremner Henderson. Other notable local people buried at the cemetery include local tailor Rocco Buda, and former city councilman Donald Deich. Oran H. Pape - the only member of the Iowa State Patrol to have been murdered in the line of duty, as well as the first State Trooper to die in the line of duty - is also
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    2 votes
    197
    Maple Hill Cemetery

    Maple Hill Cemetery

    Maple Hill Cemetery is the oldest and largest cemetery in Huntsville, Alabama. Founded on two acres (8,000 m²) in about the year 1822, it now encompasses nearly 100 acres (400,000 m²) and contains over 80,000 burials. It was added to the Alabama Historical Commission's Historic Cemetery Register in 2008, and to the National Register of Historic Places in 2012. Its occupants include five governors of Alabama, five United States senators, and numerous other figures of local, state, and national note. It is located east of the Twickenham Historic District. The original two acres (8,000 m²) of the cemetery were sold to the city of Huntsville on September 14, 1822 by planter LeRoy Pope. Though early burials are difficult to document, there is substantial evidence that the land had been in use as a cemetery for some time prior to its official establishment. The oldest grave with marker intact is that of Mary Frances Atwood, infant daughter of William and Martha Caroline Atwood, who died September 17, 1820. Headstones are sparse in the oldest section, many having decayed over time and been discarded, and it is likely that many unmarked graves share a similarly early date. The cemetery was
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    2 votes
    198
    Mount Hope Cemetery

    Mount Hope Cemetery

    Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York, founded in 1838, is the United States' first municipal rural cemetery. Situated on 196 acres (793,000 m²) (0.3 square miles) of land adjacent to the University of Rochester on Mount Hope Avenue, the cemetery is the permanent resting place of over 350,000 people. The annual growth rate of this cemetery is 500-600 burials per year. About 12,000 to 14,000 years ago, Mount Hope was covered with ice one to two miles thick. As the glacier receded, cracks appeared in the ice, and these crevasses became rivers of water and gravel. When the miles-high ice sheets finally melted, these river beds were left as ridges created from all the rock and rubble that had been deposited by the flowing river. In geological terms, these ridges are called eskers. One such esker snakes its way through much of Mount Hope Cemetery. The Seneca Indians used it as a trail from the Bristol Hills south of Rochester to Lake Ontario on the city's northern border. For them, it provided a continuous high path through the moraine and visibility of valleys around them. Today, this esker is a principal vehicular lane through the cemetery and is called Indian Trail
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    199
    Riverside National Cemetery

    Riverside National Cemetery

    Riverside National Cemetery (RNC) is a cemetery located in Riverside, California, dedicated to the interment of United States military personnel. The cemetery covers 921 acres (373 ha), making it the third-largest cemetery managed by the National Cemetery Administration. Since 2000 it has been the most active cemetery in the system, based on the number of interments. RNC was established in 1976 through the transfer of 740 acres (300 ha) from March Air Force Base, a section that during World War II was called Camp William G. Haan. During WWII, Camp Haan was used as a training base for coast artillery and anti-aircraft and also housed a prisoner-of-war camp for captured Italian soldiers. The site was selected in 1976 to provide full burial options for Southern California veterans and their families by President Ford’s Commission for National Cemeteries and Monuments. The cemetery was dedicated and opened for burials November 11, 1978. An additional 181 acres (73 ha) was transferred by the U.S. Air Force in 2003. With 15 Medal of Honor recipients in attendance and the Marine Corps’ greatest fighter ace Joe Foss as featured speaker, RNC was dedicated and opened for burials Veterans
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    2 votes
    200
    Glasnevin Cemetery

    Glasnevin Cemetery

    Glasnevin Cemetery (Irish: Reilig Ghlas Naíon), officially known as Prospect Cemetery, is the largest non-denominational cemetery in Ireland with an estimated 1.5 million burials. It first opened in 1832, and is located in Glasnevin, Dublin. Prior to the establishment of Glasnevin Cemetery, Irish Catholics had no cemeteries of their own in which to bury their dead and, as the repressive Penal Laws of the eighteenth century placed heavy restrictions on the public performance of Catholic services, it had become normal practice for Catholics to conduct a limited version of their own funeral services in Protestant cemeteries. This situation continued until an incident at a funeral held at St. Kevin's Cemetery in 1823 provoked public outcry when a Protestant sexton reprimanded a Catholic priest for proceeding to perform a limited version of a funeral mass. The outcry prompted Daniel O'Connell, champion of Catholic rights, to launch a campaign and prepare a legal opinion proving that there was actually no law passed forbidding praying for a dead Catholic in a graveyard. O'Connell pushed for the opening of a burial ground in which both Irish Catholics and Protestants could give their dead
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    3 votes
    201
    Resurrection Catholic Cemetery

    Resurrection Catholic Cemetery

    Resurrection Catholic Cemetery (also known as St. Philomena Cemetery) is a Roman Catholic cemetery located in the Dubuque, Iowa suburb of Asbury. The cemetery is operated by Resurrection Parish, and is located within the jurisdiction of the Archdiocese of Dubuque. Today the cemetery is known as Resurrection Cemetery; in the past when Resurrection Parish was known as St. Philomena Parish the cemetery was also named St. Philomena. The actor Don Ameche is buried in an unmarked grave in the cemetery. Thomas James Mulgrew II and his wife Joan Virginia Kiernan Mulgrew - the parents of actress Kate Mulgrew - are also buried in the cemetery.
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    202
    Richmond National Cemetery

    Richmond National Cemetery

    Richmond National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located three miles (5 km) east of the city of Richmond in Henrico County, Virginia. It encompasses 9.7 acres (3.9 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 9,322 interments. It is currently closed to new interments. Richmond National Cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. The cemetery lies within what was once Richmond's wartime fortification lines built when the Confederate army defended Richmond during the American Civil War. The cemetery was established by the United States Congressional legislation in 1866 but the original plot of land was not formally purchased from local resident William Slater until 1867. Additional land purchases in 1868 and 1906 brought the cemetery to its current physical size. The original burials in the cemetery were re-interments from Oakwood Cemetery and Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond. Those re-interments were primarily of Federal Union soldiers who perished from the effects of wounds while prisoners of war in the Richmond area military hospitals. Federal dead from the prisoner of war cemetery at Belle Island Prison Camp in the James River were also
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    2 votes
    203
    Sleepy Hollow Cemetery

    Sleepy Hollow Cemetery

    Sleepy Hollow Cemetery is a cemetery located on Bedford Street near the center of Concord, Massachusetts. The cemetery is the burial site of a number of famous Concordians, including some of the United States' greatest authors and thinkers, especially on a hill known as "Author's Ridge." Sleepy Hollow was designed in 1855 by noted landscape architects Cleveland and Copeland, and has been in use ever since. It was dedicated on September 29, 1855; Ralph Waldo Emerson gave a dedication speech and would be buried there decades later. Both designers of the cemetery had decades-long friendships with many leaders of the Transcendentalism movement, and their design reflects that. "Sleepy Hollow was an early natural garden designed in keeping with Emerson's aesthetic principles," writes Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn in his Nature and Ideology. In 1855, landscape designer Robert Morris Copeland delivered an address he entitled The Usefull [sic] and The Beautiful, tying his principles of naturalistic, organic garden design to Emerson's Transcendentalist principles. Shortly, afterward, Copeland and his partner were retained by the Concord Cemetery Committee, of which Emerson was an active member,
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    204
    Bachelor's Grove Cemetery, Chicago

    Bachelor's Grove Cemetery, Chicago

    Bachelor's Grove Cemetery is a small, abandoned cemetery in section 8 of Bremen Township, Cook County, Illinois. The location is just northwest of Midlothian and Oak Forest, and near the Rubio Woods Forest Preserve on the Midlothian Turnpike, in the Southeast Chicago Suburbs. It is well known for its haunted reputation and supposed ghost sightings. Bachelor's Grove Cemetery was chosen to be a burial ground in 1844, settled by "Yankee farmers" as Clarence Fulton, the now deceased caretaker of the cemetery claimed in a 1977 newspaper article. However, at least a few tombstones note death dates before 1844. The earliest death date noticed on a tombstone was that of William Nobles who died in 1838, per an article in the Blue Island Sun-Standard from 1935. Currently, the cemetery is inactive, but it was used for burials until the last recorded burial in 1989. Due to the isolated location of the cemetery along an old, small, chained-off road, vandalism and Satanic rituals have been reported. The small entrance road was once a branch of the Midlothian Turnpike until the early 1960s, when the smaller branch was left in favor of letting traffic go onto 143rd street. The closing of the road
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    1 votes
    205
    Stanley Military Cemetery

    Stanley Military Cemetery

    Stanley Military Cemetery is located near St. Stephen Bay in Stanley, Hong Kong. Along with the larger Hong Kong (Happy Valley) Cemetery, it is one of two military cemeteries of the early colonial era, used for the burials of the members of the garrison and their families between 1841 and 1866. There were no further burials here until the second world war. The cemetery is roughly triangular in shape and stands on ground rising sharply from the road side. It is approached by a flight of steps leading up to the Cross of Sacrifice with steep grassy slopes on either side. On December 8, 1941, Japan launched the invasion on Hong Kong, which resulted in the British surrendering on Christmas Day of that year. Stanley Village was one of the last battlefields of the defence. The Royal Rifles of Canada, many elements of the Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps, and sections from the Middlesex were stationed there. Fighting occurred in the cemetery itself on the afternoon of Christmas Day, when D Company Royal Rifles of Canada tried to force the advancing Japanese from Bungalow C. At the British surrender, the majority of the western civilians in Hong Kong were confined at Stanley Internment
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    1 votes
    206
    Bayside Acacia Cemetery, Queens

    Bayside Acacia Cemetery, Queens

    The Bayside Cemetery is a cemetery in Queens, New York. It is one of the oldest Jewish cemeteries in New York City. It was founded in the mid-nineteenth century, and among those buried there are many military veterans from the Civil War onward. It is bordered on the east by Acacia Cemetery and on the west by Mokom Sholom Cemetery. Both Acacia Cemetery and Mokom Sholom Cemetery are well maintained by their respective administrations and professional ground crews. However, in the last several decades Bayside Cemetery has fallen into extensive disrepair. It is owned by Congregation Shaare Zedek, which is located several miles away on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The Congregation Shaare Zedek claims that the cost of maintaining Bayside Cemetery is more than the congregation can bear; it used funds collected for the improvement of this desecrated cemetery to repair the roof on its synagogue. CAJAC - The Community Association for Jewish At-Risk Cemeteries - has begun a major project to restore and maintain Bayside Cemetery. CAJAC, a non-profit organization established to rescue and maintain Jewish cemeteries, has hired MC Landscaping to perform the major cleanup, while groups of
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    2 votes
    207
    Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial

    Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial

    Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial is a cemetery and chapel between the villages of Coton and Madingley in Cambridgeshire. It was opened in 1956, and commemorates the American servicemen who died in World War II. It is run by the American Battle Monuments Commission. The cemetery contains 3,809 headstones, with the remains of 3,812 servicemen, including airmen who died over Europe and sailors from North Atlantic convoys. The inscribed Wall of the Missing includes four representative statues of servicemen, sculpted by American artist Wheeler Williams. The wall records the names of 5,127 missing servicemen, most who died in the Battle of the Atlantic or in the strategic air bombardment of northwest Europe. Besides personnel of the United States Forces there are also buried 18 members of the British Commonwealth armed services, who were American citizens serving chiefly in the Royal Air Force and Air Transport Auxiliary, besides an officer of the Royal Canadian Air Force and another of the British Royal Armoured Corps, whose graves are registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. The memorial building is 85 ft long, 30 ft wide and 28 ft high; it is
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    2 votes
    208
    Fort Leavenworth Military Prison Cemetery

    Fort Leavenworth Military Prison Cemetery

    Fort Leavenworth Military Prison Cemetery (also known as the United States Disciplinary Barracks Cemetery) is a cemetery maintained by the Fort Leavenworth Military Prison. The purpose of this cemetery is for the burial of unclaimed bodies of soldiers who died in the United States Disciplinary Barracks. It is the final resting place for 298 soldiers who died in the prison, 58 of which lie in unmarked graves. The majority of the soldiers who are buried in Fort Leavenworth Military Prison Cemetery died between 1898 and 1905. The last known burial in the cemetery was in 1957, ten years after the one preceding it. Since families are expected to claim the bodies these days, the U.S. military does not have any plan for a burial if the situation arises again. Fourteen German prisoners of war who were executed in 1945 (for the murders of fellow-POWs Johannes Kunze, Horst Günther and Werner Drechsler) in the military prison are buried in the northwest corner of the cemetery. An unknown lady of German descent, who resides in the nearby city of Leavenworth, visits the cemetery periodically to place flowers on their graves. The cemetery is difficult to find and visitors who are not aware of
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    2 votes
    209
    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery is a 250-acre (100 ha) cemetery located in Nashville, Tennessee. Mount Olivet has been continuously operated since its establishment in 1856. It serves as the final resting place for many of Middle Tennessee's political and business leaders, including several former governors of Tennessee, U.S. Senators, and U.S. Congressional Representatives. After the American Civil War, women of Nashville formed an association to raise funds to purchase a separate plot of land at the cemetery for the interment of Confederate dead. It became known as "Confederate Circle". It was used for the interment of Confederate soldiers who had died on nearby battlegrounds and as a memorial to their sacrifice. Women organized such memorial associations and raised money for interment of Confederate soldiers in major cities across the South and areas where there were concentrations of bodies. The memorial association arranged for burials of about 1,500 soldiers at Confederate Circle. Confederate veterans were also eligible for interment there. For many years, interments at Mount Olivet were limited to white Protestants. Although this policy was officially eliminated decades ago, tradition
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    2 votes
    210
    Philadelphia National Cemetery

    Philadelphia National Cemetery

    The Philadelphia National Cemetery is a cemetery in Pennsylvania north of Germantown managed by the National Cemetery Administration from offices at the Washington Crossing National Cemetery. In addition to a Revolutionary War Memorial, the cemetery has a 1911 Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument and a Mexican-American War Monument for 38 interred veterans. Established in 1862 for deceased from nearby hospitals and as 1 of 14 of the original National Cemeteries, the cemetery was increased 13 acres (5.3 ha) in 1885 to reinter soldiers from numerous small plots throughout the region. A federal superintendent had been appointed by 1869 for the "number of burials in seven incorporated cemeteries near the city of Philadelphia." At the end of 2005, Philadelphia National Cemetery had 13,143 interments. Notable interments include Hall of Fame catcher Louis Santop, actor Joseph Sweeney, and Medal of Honor recipients Major General Galusha Pennypacker and Seaman Alphonse Girandy.
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    2 votes
    211
    Elmwood Cemetery

    Elmwood Cemetery

    Historic Elmwood Cemetery is the oldest active cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. It was established in 1852 as one of the first rural garden cemeteries in the South. Elmwood Cemetery was established as part of the Rural Cemetery Movement of the early-to-mid-19th century. A classic example of a garden cemetery, it is notable for its park-like setting, sweeping vistas, shady knolls, large stands of ancient trees, and magnificent monuments. On 28 August 1852, fifty prominent Memphis citizens each contributed $500 for stock certificates in order to purchase 40 acres (160,000 m) of land for the cemetery; they envisioned that this land would be a park for the living as well as the dead, where family outings, picnics, and social gatherings could occur. It was meant to be a place where beautiful gardens were tended and individual monuments celebrated both life and death. The name for the place was chosen in a drawing: several proposed names were put into a hat and Elmwood was drawn out, with the stockholders stating they were "well pleased" with the selection. Ironically, they had to hurriedly order some elms trees from New York to place among the native oaks of Memphis, since there were no
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    2 votes
    212
    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery

    Evergreen Cemetery, in Bloomington, Illinois, is also known as Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. The cemetery was originally two separate cemeteries, adjacent to each other. The first was the Bloomington Cemetery, founded in 1850 by the Bloomington Cemetery Association; the other was Evergreen Cemetery, founded in 1860. The Bloomington Cemetery was funded by city tax dollars, while Evergreen was privately funded and maintained. The website of the current cemetery claims Evergreen was founded in the early 1820s. Over the years, Evergreen suffered from vandalism and deterioration. Community action in the 1950s and 1960s forced the city of Bloomington to buy out the owners of Evergreen Cemetery in 1963, creating the merged Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. The grounds of Evergreen Memorial Cemetery, which are maintained by staff and community members, include a Civil War burial section. The McLean County Museum offers tours of the cemetery the last Saturday & Sunday of September and the first Saturday & Sunday of October. Funds raised by the tour are used to preserve the cemetery. The Evergreen Cemetery Discovery Walk combines historical research by Museum volunteers, costumed actors from
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    2 votes
    213
    Hoboken Cemetery, North Bergen

    Hoboken Cemetery, North Bergen

    The Hoboken Cemetery is located at 5500 Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen, New Jersey. It is bordered by Flower Hill Cemetery. Originally when the Secaucus Junction was built on land that was the Hudson County Burial Grounds, bodies exhumed were to be re-interred at the Hoboken Cemetery. In 2007, the cemetery was found to have been recycling graves and selling them as virgin plots to unsuspecting buyers.
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    214
    Père Lachaise Cemetery

    Père Lachaise Cemetery

    Père Lachaise Cemetery (French: Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, [simtjɛːʁ dy pɛːʁ laʃɛːz]; officially, cimetière de l'Est, "East Cemetery") is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris, France (44 hectares (110 acres)), though there are larger cemeteries in the city's suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement, and is reputed to be the world's most visited cemetery, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors annually to the graves of those who have enhanced French life over the past 200 years. It is also the site of three World War I memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. The cemetery takes its name from the confessor to Louis XIV, Père François de la Chaise (1624–1709), who lived in the Jesuit house rebuilt in 1682 on the site of the chapel. The property, situated on the hillside from which the king during the
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    215
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    216
    Cypress Hills National Cemetery

    Cypress Hills National Cemetery

    Cypress Hills National Cemetery is the only United States National Cemetery in New York City and has more than 21,100 interments of veterans and civilians. There are 24 Medal of Honor recipients buried in the cemetery, including three men who won the award twice. Although Cypress Hills was established to honor Civil War veterans, its grounds include the graves of soldiers who fought in the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, Korean War and Vietnam War. Cypress Hills National Cemetery opened in 1862 and gravesites were exhausted in 1954. However, burials of veteran’s spouses continues at the rate of approximately ten per year. The two sections of this national cemetery are located approximately one half mile apart (see below, three sections of Cypress Hills). The cemetery is located in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn, and encompasses 18.2 acres (7.4 ha). It is easily reached on the J line at the Cypress Hills station, approximately 45 minutes from Manhattan. In 1849 the private Cypress Hills Cemetery was established as a nonsectarian burial ground. On April 21, 1862, the cemetery’s board of directors acted upon the request of undertaker A. J. Case to establish a place for
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    1 votes
    217
    Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery

    Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery

    Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Dallas, Texas (USA). It encompasses 638.4 acres (258.4 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 13,166 interments. Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery was established in 2000 on the eastern shore of Mountain Creek Lake north of Dallas Baptist University. It is the sixth National Cemetery created in Texas and was created to meet the future needs of American veterans, nearly 1.5 million of whom live in the state of Texas. It currently has space for over 280,000 interments. It already serves as the resting place for several soldiers who have died in the Iraq War.
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    218
    Greenmount Cemetery

    Greenmount Cemetery

    Green Mount Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Established on March 15, 1838, and dedicated on July 13, 1839, it is noted for the large number of historical figures interred in its grounds as well as a large number of prominent Baltimore-area families. It retained the name Green Mount when the land was purchased from the heirs of Baltimore merchant Robert Oliver. Green Mount is a treasury of precious works of art, including striking works by major sculptors including William H. Rinehart and Hans Schuler. The cemetery was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Guided tours are available at various times of the year. A Baltimore City Landmark plaque at the entrance reads: In addition to John Wilkes Booth, two other conspirators in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are buried here, Samuel Arnold and Michael O'Laughlen. It is common for visitors to the cemetery to leave pennies on the graves of the three men: the one cent coin features the likeness of president they successfully sought to murder. Until a 1965 agreement with Queen Elizabeth II, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor had planned for a burial in a purchased plot in Rose
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    1 votes
    219
    Memorial Park Cemetery

    Memorial Park Cemetery

    Memorial Park Cemetery was founded in 1924 by E. Clovis Hinds on initial 54 acres (.22 km). It is located at 5668 Poplar Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee Different species of trees of different ages, as well as bushes, can be found throughout the cemetery, enhancing the atmosphere of a park-like setting. The cemetery is noted for its Crystal Shrine Grotto, a hand-built cave depicting Biblical scenes built by artist Dionicio Rodriguez. The cemetery is owned by the private death care industry company, Northstar Memorial Group, based in Houston. In 1935 Mexican artist Dionicio Rodriguez was hired to beautify the park with sculptures. Annie Laurie’s Wishing Chair, Broken Tree Bench, Abrahams Oak, Pool of Hebron and Cave of Machpelah are some of the most important sculptures that can be found in different locations throughout the cemetery. In 1938 construction of the Crystal Shrine Grotto begins. The grotto is a 60 ft (18.3 m) deep, hand-built cave in a hillside near the center of the cemetery, filled with 5 tons (4.5 t) of quartz crystal, hence the name Crystal Shrine Grotto. The grotto was completed after Rodriguez' death in 1955. The shrines in the grotto illustrate the stages of
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    Rogozhskoye Cemetery

    Rogozhskoye Cemetery

    Rogozhskoe cemetery (Russian: Рогожское кладбище) in Moscow, Russia, is the spiritual and administrative center of the largest Old Believers denomination, called the Russian Orthodox Old-Rite Church. Historically, the name cemetery was applied to the whole Old Believer community, with living quarters, cathedral, almshouses, libraries, archives and the Old-Rite Institute (established in 1907). Actual 12 hectare cemetery is now a non-denominational municipal burial site; the Old Believers operate a closed spiritual community in the southern part of the historical Rogozhsky township, while Russian Orthodox church operates church of Saint Nicholas, located between the cemetery and Old Believer territory. In 1762, the first year of her reign, Catherine II of Russia opened Russia to settlers of all confessions, excluding Jews, in particular inviting the Old Believer fugitives, whose spiritual center at that time was based in present-day Belarus. A group of fugitives who returned to Moscow became the nucleus of future Rogozhskoe community. Moscow Old Believers operated two cemeteries within the city borders - on near Serpukhov Gates, another on the Tverskaya road. After a devastating
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    St. Marx Cemetery

    St. Marx Cemetery

    St. Marx Cemetery (Sankt Marxer Friedhof) is a cemetery in the Landstraße district of Vienna, used from 1784 until 1874. It contains the unmarked burial of the famous composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The cemetery was named after a nearby almshouse. It opened in 1784 following a decree by Emperor Joseph II that forbade further burials in cemeteries within the outer walls of the city of Vienna. He also ordered that bodies should be buried in mass graves, without coffins or embalming. Thus the common assumption that Mozart's grave was unmarked because he was too poor is false. His burial in 1791 after a funeral in the Stephansdom simply followed the regulations of the day. It includes the graves of The most famous person to be buried in the St. Marx Cemetery is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Later attempts to locate his mass grave all failed, including a search by his widow, 17 years after Mozart's death, and by Vincent Novello in 1829. In 1855 a gravestone was erected at what was presumed to be the correct spot. Later the stone was transferred to a group of famous musician graves at Zentralfriedhof. At St. Marx Cemetery, a worker replaced the gravestone with a memorial tablet, which was
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    Bay Pines National Cemetery

    Bay Pines National Cemetery

    Bay Pines National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in Pinellas County, northwest of the city of St. Petersburg, Florida. It encompasses 27.3 acres (11.0 ha), and as of the end of 2008, had 27,369 interments. Bay Pines address is 10,000 Bay Pines Blvd., North, Bay Pines, Florida in Pinellas County, adjacent to Bay Pines Veterans Administration Medical Center. The site is believed to have been used as a burial ground as early as the Indian Wars, but did not become an official cemetery until March 15, 1933, when it was used to inter those who died in the nearby veterans' hospitals. The first modern interment was made on April 25, 1933. By 1964, all available plots had been filled. In 1984 it was relandscaped and reorganized to allow for more space. In the same year, on May 28, administration of the cemetery was transferred to the Department of Veterans Affairs and it became a National Cemetery. It is now closed to casketed remains unless there is room at the existing gravesite of other family members. There are several monuments at the cemetery entrance. The oldest is large in size and made of pink Etowah marble. It was erected in 1937 and dedicated to "the
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    Graceland Cemetery

    Graceland Cemetery

    Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at the intersection of Clark Street and Irving Park Road. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station. In the 19th century, a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point, the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and some of the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island was once lined with broken headstones and coping transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb", containing the remains of Ira Couch. The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early 19th century "graveyard". Instead of
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    Labuan War Cemetery

    Labuan War Cemetery

    Labuan War Cemetery (Malay: Tanah Perkuburan Perang Labuan) is a Commonwealth World War II graveyard in Labuan, Malaysia. Many of the personnel buried in this cemetery, including Indian and Australian troops, were killed during the Japanese invasion of Borneo or the Borneo campaign of 1945. Others were prisoners of war in the region. This graveyard was erected by Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
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    Novodevichy Cemetery

    Novodevichy Cemetery

    Novodevichy Cemetery (Russian: Новоде́вичье кла́дбище, Novodevichye kladbishche) is the most famous cemetery in Moscow. It lies next to the southern wall of the 16th-century Novodevichy Convent, which is the city's third most popular tourist site. It should not be confused with the Novodevichy Cemetery in Saint Petersburg. The cemetery was designed by Ivan Mashkov and inaugurated in 1898. Its importance dates from the 1930s, when the necropoleis of the medieval Muscovite monasteries (Simonov, Danilov, Donskoy) were scheduled for demolition. Only the Donskoy survived the Joseph Stalin era relatively intact. The remains of many famous Russians buried in other abbeys, such as Nikolai Gogol and Sergey Aksakov, were disintered and reburied at the Novodevichy. A 19th-century necropolis within the walls of the Novodevichy convent, which contained the graves of about 2000 Russian noblemen and university professors, also underwent reconstruction. The vast majority of graves were destroyed. It was at that time that the remains of Anton Chekhov were moved outside the monastery walls. His grave served as the kernel of the so-called "cherry orchard" - a section of the cemetery which contains
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    Spring Grove Cemetery

    Spring Grove Cemetery

    Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum (733 acres) is a nonprofit garden cemetery and arboretum located at 4521 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. It is the second largest cemetery in the United States and is recognized as a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The cemetery dates from 1844, when members of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society formed a cemetery association. They took their inspiration from contemporary rural cemeteries such as Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, and Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. On December 1, 1844 Salmon P. Chase and others prepared the Articles of Incorporation. The cemetery was formally chartered on January 21, 1845, and the first burial took place on September 1, 1845. In 1855 Adolph Strauch, a renowned landscape architect, was hired to renovate the grounds. His sense and layout of the "garden cemetery", made of lakes, trees and shrubs, is what visitors today still see. In 1987, the association officially changed its name to "Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum" to better represent its remarkable collection of both native and exotic trees, as well as its State and National Champion Trees. On March 29, 2007, the cemetery was
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    Annapolis National Cemetery

    Annapolis National Cemetery

    Annapolis National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Annapolis, in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. It encompasses 4.1 acres (1.7 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 2,994 interments. It is operated and maintained by the Baltimore National Cemetery. Annapolis National Cemetery is one of the 14 national cemeteries established by Abraham Lincoln in 1862 to accommodate the dead from the Civil War. The original plot of land was leased from Judge Nicholas Brewer, for a period of 99 years, but eventually Brewer’s heirs sold the land to the federal government. During the Civil War, Annapolis was a Union recruit training center. There was also a parole camp nearby (approximately three miles from what was then the city line) where Union prisoners who had been exchanged for Confederate prisoners were held until they could be returned to their own units. The conditions in the camp were crowded and were not particularly sanitary; many soldiers wound up in one of the army field hospitals at the U.S. Naval Academy and at St. John's College in downtown Annapolis. A large number succumbed to wounds they bore when they arrived, small pox, typhoid fever, dysentery or
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    Calvary Cemetery, Atuona

    Calvary Cemetery, Atuona

    Calvary Cemetery (French: Cimetière Calvaire) is the main cemetery in Atuona, Hiva ‘Oa, French Polynesia. It is located on a hillside on the eastern edge of town, overlooking the anchorage on Atuona Bay. The cemetery is the final resting place of French Post-Impressionist painter Paul Gauguin, as well as of Belgian singer Jacques Brel.
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    Calvary Cemetery, Queens

    Calvary Cemetery, Queens

    Calvary Cemetery is a cemetery in Queens, New York City, New York, United States. With more than 3 million burials, it has the largest number of interments of any cemetery in the United States; it is also one of the oldest cemeteries in the United States. It is owned by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York and managed by the Trustees of St. Patrick's Cathedral. Calvary Cemetery is divided into four sections, spread across the neighborhoods of Maspeth and Woodside. The oldest, First Calvary, is also called "Old Calvary." The Second, Third and Fourth sections are all considered part of "New Calvary." In 1817, the Trustees of Old St. Patrick's Cathedral on Mott Street realized that their original cemetery on Mulberry Street was almost full. In 1847, faced with cholera epidemics and a shortage of burial grounds in Manhattan, the New York State Legislature passed the Rural Cemetery Act authorizing nonprofit corporations to operate commercial cemeteries. On October 29, 1845 Old St. Patrick's Cathedral trustees had purchased 71 acres of land from John McMenoy and John McNolte in Maspeth and this land was used to develop Calvary Cemetery. The cemetery was named after Mount Calvary,
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    Crown Hill National Cemetery

    Crown Hill National Cemetery

    Crown Hill National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Indianapolis in Marion County, Indiana. It encompasses 1.4 acres (0.57 ha) of Crown Hill Cemetery, and as of the end of 2005, had 795 interments. It is administered by the Marion National Cemetery. Crown Hill National Cemetery was established on September 25, 1863 as a place to reinter Union soldiers who died in the Civil War camps and hospitals near Indianapolis, which were originally buried in Green Lawn Cemetery. Section 10 of Crown Hill Cemetery is section designated as Crown Hill National Cemetery. During the war, Camp Morton, located north of Indianapolis, was a large prisoner of war camp, and a section was created in Green Lawn Cemetery to inter those prisoners that died, but after the war they were moved to Crown Hill and interred in a mass grave. The cemetery "was designed by Adolf Scherrer, an Indianapolis architect of Swiss origins. It was completed in November 1885 in time for the funeral of Vice-President Thomas A. Hendricks. This is an excellent example of high Victorian Gothic architectural design." In 1993 a Confederate Memorial was erected to mark the grave. Crown Hill
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    Fairview Lawn Cemetery

    Fairview Lawn Cemetery

    Fairview Cemetery in Halifax, Nova Scotia, is a Canadian cemetery that is perhaps best known as the final resting place for over one hundred victims of the sinking of the RMS Titanic. Officially known as Fairview Lawn Cemetery, the non-denominational cemetery is run by the Parks Department of the Halifax Regional Municipality. Fairview Lawn Cemetery is located in the North End of Halifax at the Northern End of Windsor Street. It is bordered by the Saint John Anglican cemetery on one side and the Baron de Hirsch Cemetery on another. A blockhouse was built at the site in the 1750s to protect Halifax from attacks by the Mi'kmaq people. The land was subsequently developed as small farms. In 1893, the land was acquired by a private company, the Fairview Lawn Cemetery Limited, for a non-denominational cemetery because the Camp Hill Cemetery in the centre of the city was running out of room. The city of Halifax took over the cemetery in 1944. Fairview contains a cross section of Halifax's 20th century residents including a Greek section and a Chinese section as well as a mass grave of victims from the Halifax Explosion and many other graves. One hundred and twenty-one victims of the RMS
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    Fort Logan National Cemetery

    Fort Logan National Cemetery

    Fort Logan National Cemetery is a National cemetery in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A. Fort Logan was named after Union General John A. Logan, commander of US Volunteer forces during the American Civil War. It contains 214 acres (87 ha) and has had 95,905 interments through fiscal year 2008. Fort Logan was established on October 31, 1887, and was in continuous use until 1960 when most of the acreage except for the cemetery was turned over to the state of Colorado. The national cemetery was created in 1950. Below is a scanned image of a map provided by Fort Logan National Cemetery.
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    Gettysburg National Cemetery

    Gettysburg National Cemetery

    The Gettysburg National Cemetery is a Gettysburg Battlefield site designated as a district of the Gettysburg National Military Park. Originating as an 1863 state-owned "national cemetery" with Union reinterments from Battle of Gettysburg graves, the cemetery has subsequent sections for Spanish-American War, World War I, and other wars' soldiers and their spouses and children. The cemetery's historic district contributing structures include the stone walls (structure number CM01), iron fences and gates (CM02, CM03), burial and section markers (CM04, CM05, CM06), the brick sidewalk (CM07), and various battlefield monuments, memorials, and exhibits. After the July 1863 battle, land preservation began by August 5 with attorney David McConaughy's purchases including "the heights of Cemetery Hill" which he planned for a soldiers' cemetery where lots could be purchased for reinterring soldiers. Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin's agent, attorney David Wills, acquired the land for the commonwealth, commissioned the landscape architect, William Saunders, contracted for the reinterments, and planned the November consecration--inviting Abraham Lincoln who delivered the Gettysburg Address.
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    Green River Cemetery

    Green River Cemetery

    Green River Cemetery is a cemetery in the hamlet of Springs, New York within the Town of East Hampton. The cemetery was originally intended for the blue collar local families (called Bonackers) of the Springs neighborhood who supported the ocean mansions in East Hampton (village), New York. Families with long histories in the region are interred there, including the Millers, Kings, Bennetts, and Talmages. However, after Jackson Pollock was buried on a hill there in 1956, it became famous as the artists' and writers' cemetery. Headstones have become works of art. There are no rivers -- much less a Green River -- near the cemetery.
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    Hollywood Cemetery

    Hollywood Cemetery

    Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery located at 412 South Cherry Street in Richmond, Virginia. Characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River, it is the resting place of two United States Presidents, James Monroe and John Tyler, as well as the only Confederate States President, Jefferson Davis. It is also the resting place of 25 Confederate generals, more than any other cemetery in the country. Included are George Pickett and J.E.B. Stuart. Hollywood Cemetery was opened in 1849, constructed on land known as "Harvie's Woods" that was once owned by William Byrd II. It was designed in the rural garden style, with its name, "Hollywood," coming from the holly trees dotting the hills of the property. In 1869, a 90-foot (27 m) high granite pyramid was built as a memorial to the more than 18,000 enlisted men of the Confederate Army buried in the cemetery. Hollywood Cemetery is one of Richmond's major tourist attractions. There are many local legends surrounding certain tombs and grave sites in the cemetery, including one about a little girl and the black iron statue of a dog standing watch over her grave. Other notable legends rely on ghosts
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    Keokuk National Cemetery

    Keokuk National Cemetery

    Keokuk National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Keokuk in Lee County, Iowa. It encompasses 22.7 acres (9.2 ha), and as of the end of 2005, had 4,638 interments. It is administered by Rock Island National Cemetery. Keokuk National Cemetery was created in a separate, donated plot of Oakland Cemetery during the American Civil War as a place to inter veterans who died in the five military hospitals in the area. By the end of the Civil War, the cemetery had the interments of over 600 Union soldiers, and 8 Confederate prisoners of war. In 1908 when Fort Yates, North Dakota was abandoned, the remains in its post cemetery were moved to Keokuk National Cemetery. In 1948, another post cemetery, in Des Moines, Iowa, also had its remains moved to the National Cemetery. Keokuk National Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.
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    Kinghorn Methodist Episcopal Cemetery

    Kinghorn Methodist Episcopal Cemetery

    Kinghorn Methodist Episcopal Cemetery is located in the Kinghorn community of King, Ontario. The cemetery sits on a hill 300 meters south of King road, on the east side of Jane street. It was established in 1848. Of the 30 headstones that are visible on the site only 24 are still standing. Many have cracked and fallen over with age, and have later been restored and reinforced.
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    Lakewood Cemetery

    Lakewood Cemetery

    Lakewood Cemetery is a large private, non-sectarian cemetery located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is located at 3600 Hennepin Avenue at the southern end of the Uptown area. It is noted for its chapel which is on the National Register of Historic Places and was modeled after the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey. Lakewood has long been considered one of the most beautiful cemeteries in the country. It was modeled after the rural cemeteries of 19th-century France, such as the famous Père-Lachaise in Paris. When Lakewood was established in 1871, these spacious cemeteries were flourishing in the United States. In July 1871 Colonel William S. King, local businessman and newspaper publisher, proposed to community leaders of the city that they work together to establish a cemetery in Minneapolis where "the encroachments of the city would never seriously interfere". On August 7, 1871, a group of fifteen held a meeting and established the Lyndale Cemetery Association. According to the minutes of the original meeting recorded by Thomas Lowry, "that after an examination of various localities they had chosen the land owned by William S. King lying between Lakes Calhoun and Harriet". Colonel
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    Laurel Hill Cemetery

    Laurel Hill Cemetery

    Laurel Hill Cemetery, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the second major garden or rural cemetery in the United States. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1998, one of only a few cemeteries to receive the distinction. The cemetery has spectacular vistas and thousands of 19th- and 20th-century marble and granite funerary monuments on 74 acres (300,000 m) terraced above the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia's East Falls section. Obelisks dot the rolling terrain, which is highlighted by elaborately sculpted hillside tombs and mausoleums. Overall, Laurel Hill contains more than 33,000 monuments and more than 11,000 family lots. The cemetery was founded in 1836 by John Jay Smith, a librarian and editor with interests in horticulture and real estate who was distressed at the way his deceased daughter was interred in a Philadelphia churchyard. He and other prominent citizens decided to create a rural garden cemetery five miles north of Philadelphia, a location that was viewed as a haven from urban expansion and a respite from the increasingly industrialized city center. The city later grew past Laurel Hill, but the cemetery retained its rural character. Famous Revolutionary
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    Montmartre Cemetery

    Montmartre Cemetery

    Montmartre Cemetery (French: Cimetière de Montmartre) is a cemetery in the 18th arrondissement of Paris, France. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the shutting down of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786, as they presented health hazards. Several new cemeteries replaced all the Parisian ones, outside the precincts of the capital, in the early 19th century: Montmartre in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, Passy Cemetery in the west and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. Located west of the Butte, near the beginning of Rue Caulaincourt in Place de Clichy, the cemetery in the Montmartre quarter of Paris is built below street level in the hollow of an old quarry with its entrance on Avenue Rachel under Rue Caulaincourt. A popular tourist destination, it is the final resting place of many famous artists who lived and worked in the Montmartre area.
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    Mount Moriah Cemetery

    Mount Moriah Cemetery

    Mount Moriah Cemetery on Mount Moriah in Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota is the burial place of Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane and Seth Bullock, and other notable figures of the Wild West. By tradition, the American flag flies over the cemetery 24 hours a day, rather than merely from sunrise to sunset. In the early years of Deadwood, there were two graveyards: The Ingelside Cemetery, which was part of the way up Mount Moriah and was filled quickly in the first few years it was open, and the Catholic Cemetery. Many prospectors, miners, settlers, prostitutes and children were buried within the Ingelside Cemetery, alongside Wild Bill Hickok and Preacher Smith. In the 1880s it was determined that the land where Ingelside Cemetery was located could be better used for housing. Most of the bodies there were moved up the mountain to Mount Moriah and re-interred. However, since many graves were unmarked or unknown some were not moved. Today it is not uncommon for people working in their garden or remodelling a basement or shed to find human bones as a left over from the Ingelside Cemetery days. Mount Moriah's main attraction is Wild Bill's gravesite. Calamity Jane and Potato Creek
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    Rock Creek Cemetery

    Rock Creek Cemetery

    Rock Creek Cemetery — also Rock Creek Church Yard and Cemetery — is an 86-acre (350,000 m) cemetery with a natural rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE in Washington, D.C.'s Michigan Park neighborhood, near Washington's Petworth neighborhood. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers' Home and the Soldiers' Home Cemetery. It was first established in 1719 as a churchyard within the glebe of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish. The Vestry later decided to expand the burial ground as a public cemetery to serve the city of Washington and this was established through an Act of Congress in 1840. The expanded Cemetery was landscaped in the rural garden style, to function as both cemetery and public park. It is a ministry of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish with sections for St. John's Russian Orthodox Church and St. Nicholas Latvian Church. Rock Creek Cemetery's park-like setting has many notable mausoleums and tombstones. The best known is Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Stanford White's Adams Memorial, a contemplative androgynous bronze sculpture seated before a block of granite. It marks the
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    Rookwood Cemetery railway line, Sydney

    Rookwood Cemetery railway line, Sydney

    The Rookwood Cemetery Line used to be a part of the Sydney suburban network now known as CityRail. The line serviced Rookwood Cemetery and was built in 1864, opening on 22 October 1864. With the closure of the Town Hall and Devonshire Cemeteries by the mid-19th century and an ever increasing population, a decision was made to purchase a huge area of land (250 acres) in 1862 to establish the Necropolis at Haslem's Creek in 1867. The term "necropolis" comes from the Greek "nekropolis" or "city of the dead". As this location was some distance from the centre of Sydney and from the main-line train station at Haslem's Creek, it was considered necessary to establish a railway station at the centre of the cemetery. This line would run as a spur line from the existing station at Haslem's creek and allow easier movement into and out of the cemetery. The railway line construction began in November 1864 and from 1 January 1865 trains began their run into the cemetery. However, The Sydney Morning Herald advertised the first regular services from 1 April 1867. The times advertised were for services at 8.30am and 4.15pm. Later this was changed to 9.15am and 3pm. It stopped at prearranged
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    Sai Wan War Cemetery

    Sai Wan War Cemetery

    Sai Wan War Cemetery (Chinese: 西灣國殤紀念墳場) is a military cemetery located in Chai Wan, Hong Kong. The cemetery contains the graves of the dead of the Second World War, mostly soldiers from the Commonwealth and Allied Forces who fell during the Battle of Hong Kong. The Sai Wan Bay Memorial includes the names of 228 Canadians who died in the defence of Hong Kong. On 8 December 1941 -- less than eight hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor -- Japanese forces launched an invasion into Hong Kong, then a British Crown colony. The invasion started a lesser-known chapter of World War II when Commonwealth forces -- mainly British and Canadian -- began the futile defense of the territory. The Japanese forces easily crossed Sham Chun River, and entered into the territory through the Mainland in the north. They successively forded two lines of defense and eventually crossed Victoria Harbour. Intense battles were fought on Hong Kong Island until the British surrendered the territory at the end of the month on Christmas Day. The surrender marked the beginning of the Japanese occupation of the territory and would last until the Japanese unconditionally surrendered three years later. Casualties
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    Sheffield General Cemetery

    Sheffield General Cemetery

    The General Cemetery is a cemetery in the City of Sheffield, England that opened in 1836, and closed for burial in 1978. It was the principal cemetery in Victorian Sheffield with over 87,000 burials. Today it is a conservation area (one of only six in South Yorkshire), and it is listed on the English Heritage National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens. It is owned by the City of Sheffield and managed on behalf of them by local community group Sheffield General Cemetery Trust. The cemetery (grid reference SK342859) is located to the south-west of central Sheffield. It is in the district called Sharrow, on a north-facing hillside between Sharrow Vale and Sharrow Head. The Porter Brook runs along its north-western edge, the south-eastern boundary is Cemetery Road. The General Cemetery was one of the first commercial landscape cemeteries in Britain. Its opening in 1836 as a Nonconformist cemetery was a response to the rapid growth of Sheffield and the relatively poor state of the town's churchyards. The cemetery, with its Greek Doric and Egyptian style buildings, was designed by Sheffield architect Samuel Worth (1779–1870) on the site of a former quarry. Landscaping was managed by
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    Tinsley Park Cemetery

    Tinsley Park Cemetery

    Tinsley Park Cemetery is one of the city of Sheffield's many cemeteries. It was opened in 1882, and covers 19 acres (77,000 m). The cemetery is still open to burials, and since the first burial on 2 June 1882 over 59,000 burials have taken place. There are buried in the cemetery 42 Commonwealth service personnel from World War I and 32 from World War II. The entranceway to the cemetery is flanked by a pair of Grade II listed Gothic style chapels, where services can be held prior to the burial. Other listed structures in the cemetery include the lodge, gateway and boundary wall and a war memorial, 250m east of the chapel.
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    Toxteth Park Cemetery

    Toxteth Park Cemetery

    Toxteth Park Cemetery is a graveyard on Smithdown Road, Liverpool, United Kingdom. It was opened on Monday 9 June 1856. It was the responsibility of the Toxteth Park Burial Board, which had been established by at least 1855. The opening ceremony was performed by the then Lord Bishop of Chester, and the first interment took place, that of an Elizabeth Watling on 17 June 1856. The cemetery was built with consecrated and unconsecrated areas, and the layout, featuring walks, was by a "Mr Gay of Bradford cemetery". It was taken over by Liverpool Corporation on 1 January 1905. The cemetery's records are held on microfilm in the Liverpool Record Office, and provide the Burial Registers and the Order Books. Various buildings at the cemetery are Grade II listed buildings. In addition to the significant number of obelisk and Celtic cross gravestones in the cemetery, there is a derelict chapel, and a pair of lodges or gatehouses at the Smithdown Road entrance. The cemetery also contains Toxteth War Memorial. To the rear, the cemetery bounds the back gardens of houses on Arundel Avenue, and can be accessed through turnstiles in an ornate gateway set back from that road at the end of a short
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    Waverley Cemetery

    Waverley Cemetery

    The Waverley Cemetery opened in 1877 and is a cemetery located on top of the cliffs at Bronte in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. It is noted for its largely intact Victorian and Edwardian monuments. The cemetery contains the graves of many significant Australians including the poet Henry Lawson and Australia's first Prime Minister, Sir Edmund Barton, who is interred at South Head. Funerals are conducted Monday to Saturday. The cemetery is self-funded, deriving its income from interments – including burial, cremation, memorials and mausolea – of which there has been over 86,000. Waverley Cemetery was used during the filming of the 1979 Mel Gibson film Tim. The Cemetery was designed to function along similar lines to Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and Kensal Green Cemetery in London. The need for a cemetery in the Waverley area was discussed as early as 1863. In 1866, a delegation of representatives was sent to the Minister of Lands to talk about the proposal. In 1868, Waverley Council committed to the cemetery's management on the provision that it would "incur no cost in doing so", and a government grant of £1200 was provided. In the 1870s the government of New South Wales purchased
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    Westview Cemetery

    Westview Cemetery

    Westview Cemetery, located in Atlanta, Georgia, is the largest cemetery in the South East, comprising over 582 acres (2.36 km), 50% of which is undeveloped. Westview includes the graves of more than 100,000 people. The land that would become Westview Cemetery was the site of a portion of the Battle of Ezra Church, a Civil War battle. The cemetery was established in 1884 on Atlanta's west side when Oakland Cemetery was mostly filled out. Over 582 acres (2.36 km) were purchased by a private corporation, headed by E. P. McBurney. The main gate is one of the oldest standing structures in Atlanta. Westview Cemetery at one time had a "strict requirement that all who came there- both visitors and permanent residents- be white." The cemetery is located at 1680 Westview Dr SW, Atlanta, GA 30310. Its telephone number is (404) 691-4124. The office is open Monday thru Thursday 8AM to 5PM, Friday 8AM to 430PM, until 2PM on Saturday and is closed on Sunday. Gates are open from 8AM until 5:30PM every day except Christmas and Thanksgiving. The site is a fifteen minute walk from the West Lake MARTA station
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