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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Candy bar of All Time

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    1
    Picnic

    Picnic

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): New Zealand
    Picnic is a brand of chocolate bar consisting of milk chocolate and peanuts, covering chewy nougat, caramel, biscuit and puffed rice. Picnic bars are lumpy in shape. It is sold in Australia, New Zealand, India, Canada, Ireland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. The UK and Indian versions differ from the Australasian version in that they also contain raisins. The Cadbury Picnic bar was first released in the UK in 1958. A popular slogan for the Picnic, released in the early 2000s, was "Deliciously ugly". During the 1970s the Australian slogan for Picnic was "More like a banquet than a picnic". Picnic is manufactured by Cadbury UK. In Australia, limited-edition variants Picnic Honeycomb (a Picnic bar with honeycomb pieces), Picnic Hedgehog (a picnic bar with biscuit pieces) and Picnic Rocky Road (a Picnic bar with mini marshmallows and gumdrops) have been sold in recent years. In 2010, New Zealand currently has a limited edition Almond Picnic bar. A Picnic ice cream is also manufactured by Cadbury UK. In April 2009 Cadbury altered the weight of the standard Picnic bar from 50 grams down to 48.4 grams. In the UK the bar is also available in multipacks. In 2011, a fruit and nut picnic bar
    8.00
    9 votes
    2

    Banjo

    Banjo is a chocolate bar once available in the UK. Introduced with a substantial television advertising campaign in 1976, Banjo was a twin bar (similar in shape and size to twix) and was the same as a drifter but with a chopped peanut layer and the whole covered in milk chocolate. It was packaged in distinctive navy blue - with the brand name prominently displayed in yellow block text - and was one of the first British snack bars to have a heat-sealed wrapper closure instead of the reverse-side fold common to most domestically-produced chocolate bars at that time. It was available into the 1980s. There was a coconut version also available in a red wrapper with yellow text.
    8.80
    5 votes
    3

    Buttons

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Cadbury Buttons are flat, circular, button-shaped chocolate pieces sold in small packs in Australia, Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom by Cadbury. They are available in Cadbury's Dairy Milk and white chocolate.
    6.29
    7 votes
    4
    Hematogen

    Hematogen

    Hematogen (Гематоген in Russian, sometimes transliterated as Gematogen) is a Russian candy bar, which is notable in that one of its main ingredients is black food albumin taken from processed (defibrinated) cow's blood. Other ingredients may vary, but usually they're sugar, milk, vanillin. It is often considered to be a medicinal product, and is used to treat or prevent low blood levels of iron and vitamin B12 (e.g., for anemia or during pregnancy). Gematogen daily dose (50 grams for an adult) is able to provide the body with the necessary quantity of vitamin A. Available without prescription but in a case of pregnancy or breastfeeding a medical consultation is needed. Hematogen is not recommended for kids under 3 years old.
    7.80
    5 votes
    5
    Mekupelet

    Mekupelet

    Mekupelet (Hebrew: מקופלת‎) (English name: Chocolate Log) is a bar of thinly folded milk chocolate produced in Israel since 1935 by 'Elite' now a subdivision of the Strauss Group. It is similar in texture to the British chocolate bar known as Cadbury Flake. The wrapper of the bar has transparent plastic as well as yellow, blue, red, and some white. In Hebrew, it is known as Mekupelet (meaning, "folded"), and in English, many wrappers have 'Chocolate Log' on them. A caption on the wrapper says, "milk chocolate bar" in Hebrew. It is known for its crumbliness and thin flakes. Mekupelet is exported to overseas markets. Mekupelet is also produced in a 'Mehadrin' version through the 'Magadim' factory of the Strauss Group. Several varieties of Mekupelet have been produced over the years, including:
    7.80
    5 votes
    6
    Choo Choo Bar

    Choo Choo Bar

    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    A Choo Choo Bar is a chewy liquorice flavoured confectionery bar popular in Australia. Available in a 20g bar, packaged in an iconic blue wrapper depicting an old steam train, ("The Choo Choo Funtime Express"), Choo Choo Bars were originally a Nestle product, but are now made by Lagoon. There is also a raspberry flavoured Choo Choo Bar.
    7.60
    5 votes
    7

    Hershey's S'mores

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Hershey's S'mores was a candy bar made by The Hershey Company and introduced in 2003. As the name indicates, the bar was based on s'mores, a popular campfire treat. The bar consisted of a layer of graham cracker bits topped with marshmallow and coated with milk chocolate. The S'mores bar has been discontinued by the manufacturer. Listed by weight: milk chocolate (sugar, milk, cocoa butter, chocolate, soy lecithin, vanillin), sugar, vegetable oils (shea oil, fractionated palm oil), corn syrup, enriched flour (wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), high fructose corn syrup, graham flour, glycerin, maltodextrin, nonfat milk, partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (soybean oil, cottonseed oil), sorbitol, egg whites, brown sugar, natural and artificial flavors, leavening (monocalcium phosphate, sodium bicarbonate), salt, cellulose gel, honey, molasses, malt syrup, annatto, carrageenan, soy lecithin, TBHQ (preservative)
    7.40
    5 votes
    8

    GooGoo Cluster

    • Manufacturer: Standard Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The GooGoo Cluster is an American candy bar sold since 1912 in Nashville, Tennessee. It was developed by Howell Campbell and the Standard Candy Company. The disk-shaped candy bar contains marshmallow, caramel and roasted peanuts covered in milk chocolate. GooGoo Cluster is considered the first combination candy bar, meaning it contained several types of candy rather than an all-chocolate bar. The name is thought to refer to the sound a baby makes; another, somewhat questionable theory is that the candy was sold at the Grand Ole Opry (GOO), except that the Opry was established in 1925, 13 years after the candy's debut. However, Standard Candy (with particular emphasis on the GooGoo Cluster) was a long-time sponsor of the program. During the Great Depression, Goo Goo Clusters were advertised as "a nourishing lunch for a nickel." This slogan was used until the 1950s. Variations include GooGoo Supreme (pecans replace the peanuts) and Peanut Butter GooGoo (peanut butter replaces marshmallow). GooGoo Clusters were given out as prizes on the children's television variety show Wonderama during the 1970s. GooGoo Clusters have appeared in the movies Nashville (film), The Nutty Professor and
    10.00
    3 votes
    9

    Topic

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): France
    Topic is a chocolate bar made by Mars, Incorporated in France and sold throughout Europe. It contains hazelnuts, nougat and caramel. The chocolate bar was promoted in a series of radio advertisements broadcast in 2002 with the strapline "A joy to eat, but a bitch to make". These adverts featured actors Simon Pegg and Mark Heap who both appeared in the cult British TV comedy Spaced. The Topic was removed from boxes of Celebrations in 2006, along with Twix. It has been speculated that the Topic was the least popular chocolate in the box, although others believe that its withdrawal was down to its similarity to the Snickers bar.
    10.00
    3 votes
    10

    Marco Polo Chocolate Bar

    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    The Marco Polo Chocolate Bar is a chocolate covered hazelnut wafer candy which is sold in 1.2 ounce (34 g) bars at some candy retailers. The candy is easily identified by its distinctive green and white wrapper. In Canada, the bar is imported and marketed by Omega Food Importers of Mississauga, Ontario. It is recommended that the bar be kept in a cool, dry place.
    6.00
    6 votes
    11

    ReeseSticks

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Reese's Sticks, formerly called "ReeseSticks," are wafers filled with peanut butter and covered in milk chocolate. First introduced in 1999, they are manufactured by The Hershey Company and are currently still available. They are sold in pairs, similar to Twix. The fact that ReeseSticks digressed from the normal Reese's naming pattern was pointed out by Paul Lukas in his zine Beer Frame. As Lukas noted, even though the official name was Reese Sticks, most people he casually surveyed pronounced it unknowingly as Reese's Sticks. In 2009, Hershey's changed the name officially to Reese's Sticks. They highly resemble Nutty Bars.
    8.25
    4 votes
    12

    Marathon

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Marathon is a chocolate bar consisting of 20cm of braided chocolate and caramel. It was manufactured by Mars Inc and first sold in the United States in August 1973. The bright red packaging contained a ruler with inch markings on the reverse demonstrating that it was as long as it claimed. (The length was the result of its braided shape; it did not weigh more than standard candy bars.) It was discontinued in October 1981. Note: There was also a 15" version of The Marathon Bar sold in Southern California at local 7/11 stores and at Michael's Pharmacy in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. These had the 15" ruler on the back of the red wrapper. Television commercials of the era feature John Wayne's son Patrick as Marathon John who would regularly confront villain Quick Claude. Another braided caramel and chocolate bar available from Cadbury's Curly Wurly candy bar. While these are commonplace in their native UK (as well as Australia), aside from specialty import stores (and World Market) Curly Wurly bars are not widely available in the U.S.
    6.80
    5 votes
    13
    Daim bar

    Daim bar

    • Manufacturer: Marabou
    • Sold in (countries): Sweden
    The Daim bar (originally known as Dajm in the original Swedish, and known as Dime in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland until 2005) is a crunchy butter almond bar covered in milk chocolate. The brand is now owned by Kraft Foods, but originated in Sweden and Norway in 1953, produced by Marabou and Freia respectively. Dajm was created after research into a similar product produced by the American company Heath. Marabou's Vice President, Lars Anderfelt, asked to license the Heath product in the early 1950s. Heath refused, but gave a list of the ingredients to Anderfeldt. It was tested in Stockholm in 1952 with great success, and later in 1953 it was launched in Sweden and Norway, then in Finland (1964) and Denmark (1971). While it is not universally available in the United States, Hershey's produces a similar product called a Skor bar. Daim bars imported from Sweden (manufactured in Upplands Väsby) are sold in all Australian, Belgian, Canadian, Chinese, Dutch, Danish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish IKEA Stores. IKEA America and Europe discontinued the product in 2011. Daim bars were featured in a successful mid-1990s
    8.00
    4 votes
    14

    Polly Waffle

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    Polly Waffle was a 50 gram Australian chocolate bar that was manufactured in Australia by Nestlé. It was a waffle wafer tube filled with marshmallow and coated in compound chocolate. Abel Hoadley (born 10 September 1844, died 12 May 1918) opened a jam factory in South Melbourne, Victoria, in 1889, trading as A. Hoadley & Company. By 1895, business had expanded rapidly and Hoadley built a five-storey premises, the Rising Sun Preserving Works. He produced jams, jellies, preserved fruits, candied peels, sauces, and confectionery and employed a workforce as large as 200. By 1901, there were four preserving factories and a large confectionery works. Hoadley had acquired the firm of Dillon, Burrows & Co. and extended his products to vinegar, cocoa, and chocolate. In 1910, the jam business was sold to Henry Jones Co-operative Ltd and in 1913, Hoadley's Chocolates Ltd was formed. The same year, Hoadley produced his first chocolate assortment. Hoadley's Chocolates made the first Polly Waffle bar in Melbourne. In 1972, Hoadley's Chocolates was acquired by Rowntree Company and became known as Rowntree Hoadley Ltd. In 1988, Nestlé acquired Rowntree Company. The Rowntree chocolate brands were
    8.00
    4 votes
    15

    ZERO bar

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The ZERO candy bar, introduced in 1920, is a candy bar composed of a combination of caramel, peanut and almond nougat covered with a layer of white fudge. Its outwardly white color, an unusual color for a candy bar, has become its trademark. ZERO was first launched by the Hollywood Brands candy company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1920 as the Double Zero Bar and was renamed "ZERO" in 1934. Initial manufacturing of the candy bar began at its factory in Centralia, Illinois and continued through many acquisitions of the company. Hollywood Brands was first sold to Consolidated Foods Corporation in 1967 (which later became Sara Lee) and survived production after a fire destroyed the Centralia plant in 1980. A new production facility opened in 1983, and in 1988 Hollywood Brands was purchased by Huhtamaki Oy of Helsinki, Finland and became part of Leaf, Inc. Hershey Foods Corporation took over Leaf North America confectionery operations in 1996, and with it came the production of the ZERO candy bar.
    6.60
    5 votes
    16

    M-Azing

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    M-Azing is a candy bar manufactured by Mars Incorporated. M-Azing is a milk chocolate candy bar with M&M's Minis chocolate candies inside. It has been available in crunchy and peanut butter flavors, in singles and miniatures varieties. The product was originally introduced in Singles and Funsize formats in 2004. In 2005, a Minis format was launched. In 2006, the company discontinued all but the Crunchy Singles variety of the candy bar, and now has a "Now with better taste" sticker on it. Mars Incorporated stated that they planned to rebrand the bar in 2008, but this did not happen. The M&M's M-Azing candy bar name was created by Mars internal Marketing Director Eric Van De Wal and then tested with consumers for likeability and fit with product. The advertisements for M-Azing bars included people doing amazing things such as a man balancing a washing machine on his teeth.
    7.75
    4 votes
    17

    Snowball

    A snowball is a chocolate cake covered by marshmallow, with coconut sprinkled on top. It was invented by Frederick Raydehl of the Hostess corporation. When Halloween comes, Hostess changes the name of the Snowball to 'Globall' and makes them orange.
    7.75
    4 votes
    18

    Wazoo

    Wazoo (often known as the Wazoo bar) is a candy bar manufactured by Topps incorporated. The candy bar comes in two flavors: "Blue Razz" and "Wild Berriez". The name "Wazoo" was under debate because of the Australian slang word of anus. But the title was considered appropriate since it would only be sold in the U.S.
    7.75
    4 votes
    19
    Crunchie

    Crunchie

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Crunchie is a brand of chocolate bar with a "honeycombed" sugar centre. It is made by Cadbury UK and was originally launched by J. S. Fry & Sons in 1929. Fry had merged with Cadbury in 1919 and Crunchie later became a Cadbury brand. A similar chocolate bar called called the Violet Crumble competes in Australia manufactured by Nestlé. The Crunchie is sold in several sizes, ranging from "snack size" – a small cuboid – through to "king size". The most common portion is a single-serve bar, about 1 inch wide by about 7 inches long, and about 3/4 of an inch deep. In the early 1960s, there were a range of limited edition Crunchies on sale in the UK. These included a lemonade bar and a Tango Orange bar, in which the chocolate contained the different flavourings. A champagne-flavoured bar was launched for New Year's Eve 1999. In South Africa, Cadbury sold a white chocolate version in a blue wrapper until recently. In 2003, a short-lived bourbon Crunchie was launched in test markets across the Nashville, TN area in partnership with 7-Eleven. The bourbon Crunchie was not well received because of a boycott initiated by western factions of the Southern Baptist Coalition and production was
    9.00
    3 votes
    20
    3 Musketeers

    3 Musketeers

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    3 Musketeers is a candy bar made in the United States by Mars, Incorporated. It is a chocolate-covered fluffy whipped chocolate bar. The 3 Musketeers Bar was the third brand produced and manufactured by M&M/Mars, introduced in 1932. Originally, it had three pieces in one package, flavored chocolate, strawberry and vanilla, hence the name. Rising costs and wartime restrictions on sugar saw the phasing out of the vanilla and strawberry pieces to leave only the more popular chocolate. Costing five cents when it was introduced, it was marketed as one of the largest chocolate bars available, one that could be shared by friends. During their 75th anniversary, 3 Musketeers introduced their first candy bar brand extension, 3 Musketeers Mint in August 2007. Also in 2007, 3 Musketeers issued a limited-edition "Autumn Minis Mix." It featured French Vanilla, Mocha Cappuccino and Strawberry. This was followed by Cherry 3 Musketeers for 2008, and Raspberry 3 Musketeers and Orange 3 Musketeers for Easter 2008. Orange was coated in regular chocolate while the cherry and raspberry were coated with dark chocolate. Most recently, the 3 Musketeers bar has been advertised in television spots which
    7.50
    4 votes
    21

    Scorched Peanut Bar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    The Scorched Peanut Bar was an Australian confectionery bar that contained peanuts baked in toffee and covered in chocolate. It was originally manufactured by Mastercraft, then by Nestlé who later discontinued it. The product was promoted as "The Hard Bar" and was advertised using sexually suggestive and masculine imagery. One example of this suggestive advertising is a 1980's television commercial involving a rugged looking lumberjack felling and then straddling a tree and unsheathing a Scorched Peanut Bar on his thigh. An attractive female companion arrives and places her hand on the tree he is straddling. The ad attracted criticism and was subsequently replaced with a less controversial one.
    7.50
    4 votes
    22
    Bit-O-Honey

    Bit-O-Honey

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Bit-O-Honey is an American candy bar. It first appeared in 1924 and was made by the Schutter-Johnson Company of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Bit-O-Honey was a new kind of candy bar consisting of six pieces of candy wrapped in wax paper and then packaged in a wrapper. The candy consists of almond bits embedded in a honey-flavored taffy which makes for a long-chewing candy. Both a large version the size of a candy bar and a small, bite-sized version are available for sale, the latter in bags of multiple units. In 1969, Schutter-Johnson was merged into the Ward Candy Company of New York City, makers of other candies including Chunky, Oh Henry! and Raisinets. Between the mid- and late-1970s, a chocolate-flavored version called Bit-O-Chocolate was made, but this product was later dropped. Other spin-offs included Bit o' Licorice and Bit-O-Peanut Butter. Bit-O-Honey and most of Ward's other brands were acquired by the Nestlé Company in 1984, which continues production. Bit-O-Honey is similar in style and packaging (single pieces) to Mary Jane made by Necco. The current ingredients listed on a package of Bit-O-Honey bought in October 2010: Corn Syrup, Sugar, Sweetened Condensed Skim
    8.67
    3 votes
    23

    Eat-More

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Eat-More is a candy bar made by Hershey. It consists of dark toffee, peanuts and chocolate, and its slogan is "It's unique, but are you unique enough to eat it?". It was created in Canada by the Lowney company, which was acquired by Hershey Canada on July 1st, 1987 from Nabisco Ltd. It is chewy and comes in a yellow wrapper. It is also rectangular and flat, and "stretches" when you eat it. A caramel version was also launched in 1995 which replaced the dark toffee of the original with caramel of similar consistency. It was the same size and shape as the original Eat-More, but it came in a copper coloured wrapper. The caramel version has since been discontinued.
    8.67
    3 votes
    24
    Milky Way bar

    Milky Way bar

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    The Milky Way bar is a chocolate bar distributed by the Mars confectionery company. The American version of the Milky Way bar is made of chocolate-malt nougat topped with caramel and covered with milk chocolate and is very similar to the Mars bar sold in other countries. The non-US Milky Way bar, on the other hand, is not topped with caramel and is therefore similar to the American 3 Musketeers bar. The Milky Way bar was created in 1923 by Frank C. Mars and originally manufactured in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It was the first commercially distributed filled chocolate bar. The name and taste was taken from a famed malted milk drink (milkshake) of the day – not the Earth’s galaxy, as many contend. On March 10, 1925, the Milky Way trademark was registered in the U.S., claiming a first-use date of 1922. In 1924, the Milky Way bar was introduced nationally and sold USD800,000 that year. The chocolate for the chocolate coating was supplied by Hershey's. By 1926 it had two flavors, chocolate and vanilla, each for a nickel. In June 1932, the Milky Way bar was sold as a two piece bar, but just four years later, in 1936, the chocolate and vanilla were separated, naming the vanilla "Forever
    8.67
    3 votes
    25

    Crachi

    Crachi is the trade name of an inexpensive chocolate bar made of locally produced chocolate from the Dominican Republic and sold in that country by Corte, a Dominican chocolatier. Consisting of milk chocolate and crisped rice, the Crachi bar is marketed as a low-cost alternative to more expensive fare, such as the similar Nestlé Crunch bar. A Crachi bar retails for RD$15.00, or about US$0.42.
    7.25
    4 votes
    26
    Flake

    Flake

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Flake is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury and consists of thinly folded Dairy Milk milk chocolate. The product was first developed in 1920 and was founded by an employee of Cadburys. When the excess from the moulds was drained off, it fell off in a stream and created folded chocolate with flaking properties. Since 1922 in Britain, Australia and Ireland ice cream vendors serve "99 Flakes" which are vanilla soft serve ice cream in a wafer cone in which a half size Flake bar is inserted in the top. Screwballs are similar but have a plastic cone rather than a wafer. Several varieties of Flake have been produced over the years, including: In late 2007, the entire Flake range was given a packaging revamp, giving the brand a more contemporary look, geared even further to females. The product gained some notoriety for its highly sensual advertising. In the UK, the adverts showed people - almost always women - enjoying a Flake whilst relaxing. The Flake Girl became famous as a symbol of indulgence and secret pleasure. Her emphasis - to a raspingly emotional jingle ("Only the crumbliest, flakiest chocolate, tastes like chocolate never tasted before"), voted third
    7.00
    4 votes
    27

    Oh Henry!

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Oh Henry! is a candy bar containing peanuts, caramel, and fudge coated in chocolate. It was first introduced in 1920 by the Williamson Candy Company of Chicago, Illinois. According to legend, Oh Henry! was originally named after a boy who frequented the Williamson company, flirting with the girls who made the candy. The name is also said to be a homage to American writer O. Henry. However, there is no definitive explanation as to the exact origin of the name. Another theory is that the candy bar was invented by a man named Tom Henry of Arkansas City, Kansas. Tom Henry ran a candy company called the Peerless candy factory, and in 1919 he started making the Tom Henry candy bar. He sold the candy bar to Williamson Candy Company in 1920, where they later changed the name to "Oh Henry!". Henry's family now runs a candy factory in Dexter, Kansas, that sells "momma henry" bars, which are nearly identical to the original candy bar. In 1923, an employee of Williamson, John Glossinger, announced that he was going to make the Oh Henry! bar a national best seller. Company officials said it was impossible and denied him the funds for an advertising campaign. Glossinger went into the streets and
    7.00
    4 votes
    28
    Starbar

    Starbar

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Star Bar is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury Ireland. The bar has a milk chocolate covering and is filled with caramel and crushed roasted peanuts. Initially popular in the mid-1970s, in the mid-1960s Star Bar was invented by Linda Allison, and was promoted as the "munchiest bar ever". Star Bar was later re-branded as Nudge and in the 1980s it briefly became "peanut Boost", only to return to Star Bar as popularity of the Boost bar waned. It was promoted in the UK in the mid-80's with a postal offer (3 wrappers plus P+P got you a Star Bar Ruler, Pencil and a copy of Douglas Adams' "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe"). In the early 90s Cadburys decided to relaunch the Star Bar as a result of a visit to Percy St Johns Primary School on Tyneside. During the visit a pupil designed a new label for the Star Bar and Cadburys were so impressed that they used the new label and it is still in circulation today. 60 ft art work by the pupil can now be seen in the Cadbury's Factory in Canada. Cadbury produced a limited edition 'Pam Bar' modelled on the Miller McCowan ‘Wham Bar’ as a prize to the pupil for helping with the relaunch but due to copyright
    7.00
    4 votes
    29

    Wonka Bar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The Wonka Bar is both a fictional candy bar, introduced in the 1964 novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl, and a type of real life candy bar inspired by the fictional confection. Wonka Bars appear in both film adaptations of the novel, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), each with different packaging. Varieties of Wonka Bars were subsequently manufactured and sold in the real world, formerly by the Willy Wonka Candy Company, a division of Nestlé. These bars were discontinued in January 2010. In Roald Dahl's novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and its film adaptations, a Wonka Bar is a brand of chocolate made by Willy Wonka, and is said to be the "perfect candy bar". The wrappers of the 1971 version are brown with an orange and pink border with a top hat over the "W" in Wonka, similar to the film's logo. In the 2005 version, the wrappers feature different shades of a color (depending on the type of candy bar) and are also more detailed. In the book, Grandpa Joe mentions that Mr. Wonka had invented over two hundred kinds of Wonka bars. In real life, Wonka Bars are chocolate candy bars inspired by the novel and
    7.00
    4 votes
    30

    Cadbury's Roses

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Cadbury Roses are a selection of individually wrapped chocolates currently made by Cadbury. Introduced in 1938, they are named after the English packaging equipment company "Rose Brothers" (later Rose Forgrove), that manufactured and supplied the machines that wrapped the chocolates. Roses are an inexpensive confectionery, containing a small proportion of cocoa solids, and a high proportion of vegetable fat. A large packet can be bought cheaply, making them a common stand-by gift choice due to the variety of contained chocolates. They are an extremely common gift on Mother's Day and sell well throughout the Christmas period. They are available in tins, boxes, or jars, and in the United Kingdom and Ireland currently contain 10 different varieties of chocolate: In Australia the varieties have changed and are currently (2012): All are in twist-wrappers. Current varieties in New Zealand: All are in twist wrappers. They are most frequently advertised with the classic slogan of "Say 'Thank You', with Cadbury Roses" in the UK, New Zealand, and Australia, and "Thank you very much" on television advertisements. A memorable 1960s UK advertising campaign used the slogan 'Roses Grow On You'
    8.33
    3 votes
    31

    Krembanan

    • Manufacturer: Nidar
    • Sold in (countries): Norway
    Krembanan is a chocolate-banana candy bar in the shape of a banana, made by Nidar, a Norwegian producer and distributor of sweets based in Trondheim, Norway. The Krembanan was first made in 1957, and its appearance today has not changed. It is made of one layer of gel and one layer of banana cream covered by chocolate. All Krembanan bars have the same appearance and all weigh 35g. The manufacturer still uses the original machine to pack these "chocolate with a bend" bars; the machine has been in use since 1957 and is the oldest machine in use by Nidar. Not all shops in Norway carry Krembanan bars, but they can be bought from major confectionery stores or kiosks.
    8.33
    3 votes
    32

    Texan bar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Texan was a nougat/toffee bar covered with chocolate, manufactured during the 1970s and 1980s. It was withdrawn from sale in the 1980s but was briefly re-launched as a limited edition by Nestlé in 2005 during a wave of sweet-related nostalgia. The advertisements for the Texan showed a cartoon cowboy, who was captured and tied to a stake. When asked if he had a last request he was given a Texan bar which took him a long time to eat, meanwhile the bandits fell asleep ensuring his escape. The cowboy's catchphrase was "A Man's gotta chew what a Man's gotta chew", also "Sure is a mighty chew!".
    8.33
    3 votes
    33
    Toffee Crisp

    Toffee Crisp

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    The Toffee Crisp bar is a well known chocolate bar which is produced by Nestlé in the United Kingdom. It consists of puffed rice embedded in soft toffee and shaped into a rectangular cuboid, the whole bar being covered by milk chocolate. Toffee Crisp chocolate bars were first produced in the United Kingdom in 1963. The bars were originally made by Mackintosh's at their Halifax factory but in recent years are now made in a factory in Castleford in West Yorkshire. Toffee Crisp was due to move to Rowntree's Fawdon factory in Newcastle. However, because of a fire at the Fawdon factory (the week before the final production run at Halifax), this did not happen. The staff at Castleford hurriedly reformulated the bar (unofficially because it wasn't intending to make the bar on the extruded plant in Castleford) and the old-style bar which was made in metal moulds, changed into an extruded bar which allowed it to be made without the investment in a moulding plant. Toffee Crisp displaced Texan and Cabana confectionery bars. This factory first opened in 1970 supported by George Philips. The idea for Toffee Crisp bars originated after an idea from John Henderson, the great-nephew of John
    8.33
    3 votes
    34

    Mounds

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Mounds is a candy bar made by Hershey's, and is the sister product of Almond Joy. Like Almond Joy, it consists of a coconut based center; however, it is enrobed with dark chocolate rather than milk chocolate and does not contain almonds. The original slogan, "Indescribably Delicious" was created when Mounds ran a contest to come up with the best two words to sell a candy. Leon Weiss, the person who came up with the slogan, won $10, while Mounds went on to use the slogan in advertising and on the wrappers, still continuing today. Mounds uses a packaging and logo design similar to its sister product, with Almond Joy's blue replaced by red, and the two candies are often advertised together. The candy's famous 1970s ad campaign used a jingle, "Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't / Almond Joy's got nuts / Mounds don't", written by Leon Carr. A limited edition Mounds Island Orange candy bar was introduced in 2006 with orange colored and flavored coconut. A similar coconut filled chocolate bar by the name of Bounty is manufactured by Mars, Incorporated and sold in markets other than the United States. The bars come in light or dark chocolate and are recognized by their blue
    6.75
    4 votes
    36

    Dubble

    • Manufacturer: Divine Chocolate Company
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Dubble is a Fairtrade chocolate bar sold in the United Kingdom. It is produced by Divine Chocolate in association with Comic Relief. The bar consists of two chunks of Fairtrade milk chocolate which contain caramelized crisped rice. Dubble has sold over 10 million bars since 2000 and released seasonal specials including Easter, Red Nose Day and Sports Relief themed chocolate products. Dubble was launched by Divine Chocolate (then the "Day Chocolate Company") and Comic Relief in 2000 following demand for a Fairtrade chocolate product that would appeal to all ages of consumer, including children. The wrapper was designed by Gracie Hadley, the winner of a national competition with CBBC. Part of the prize included a trip to Ghana to meet cocoa farmers from Kuapa Kokoo, the cooperative which grows the cocoa which would be used for the new bar and also co-own Divine Chocolate Ltd. There have been a number of Dubble initiatives aimed at children, including a televised competition to design its wrapper and the Dubble Agents scheme encouraging children to promote fairtrade. Children can sign up to become a Dubble Agent and get their local shop to stock Fairtrade. By becoming an Agent,
    8.00
    3 votes
    37

    Maverick

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Maverick was a chocolate bar snack manufactured by Nestlé Rowntree and marketed in the UK. The snack, which was similar to the Fuse bar sold by Nestlé Rowntree competitor Cadbury, was launched in 1997 and contained caramel, raisins and biscuit and toffee pieces covered in milk chocolate. Three years after its launch, the product was discontinued. Maverick bars are not biscuits. The Maverick bars featured in the British comedy series The League of Gentlemen. In the sketch, a father ("Pop") disowns his adult son because of the son's inability to prevent a theft of Maverick bars from a booth the father owns.
    8.00
    3 votes
    38

    Summit Candy Bar

    Summit Candy Bar was manufactured in the early 1980s by ‎Mars in the United States. The candy bar consisted of two wafers covered with peanuts, all coated in chocolate. In 1983 Mars changed to individual foil wrapping and promoted the bar as having 30% more chocolate. Consumer panelists said the modifications were more gimmicky than substantive. The new bar was longer, thinner, and firmer, and got pretty good but not great reviews. Keeping the bar from melting was noted as a problem. Production of the bar was halted and it is no longer available.
    8.00
    3 votes
    39

    Big Turk

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Big Turk is a chocolate bar manufactured by Nestlé Canada, that consists of pink Turkish delight coated in milk chocolate. The 60-gram bar contains 4 grams of fat, which is advertised as 60% less fat than the average chocolate bar. This is one of the key selling points of the bar. It is typically found in a red, white, and blue striped package (blue on top, white in the middle, and red on the bottom). The other Canadian chocolate bar featuring Turkish delight, Jersey Milk Treasures, was discontinued circa 1980.
    6.50
    4 votes
    40

    Nestlé Crunch

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Nestlé Crunch is the name of a chocolate bar made of milk chocolate with crisped rice mixed in, produced by Nestlé. Its current slogan is, "For the Kid in You." It was first introduced in 1937. Nestlé has recently discontinued the traditional packaging technique of wrapping the bar in aluminum foil, sleeved inside a paper label, in favor of more conventional packaging practices, most likely due to the excessive time it took in double-packaging the bar. The chocolate bar can now commonly be found in a single-ply inner metallised boPET polyester film, typical of convenience foods packaging. Besides the chocolate bar, Nestlé also produces other Nestlé Crunch products:
    6.50
    4 votes
    41
    Snickers

    Snickers

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Snickers is a brand name candy bar made by Mars, Incorporated. It consists of nougat topped with caramel and peanuts, enrobed in milk chocolate. Snickers has annual global sales of $2 billion. In the United Kingdom and Ireland, Snickers was sold under the brand name Marathon until 1990. More recently, Snickers Marathon branded energy bars have been sold in some markets. In 1930, Mars introduced Snickers, named after the favorite horse of the Mars family. The Snickers candy bar consists of nougat, peanuts and caramel with a chocolate coating. The bar was marketed under the name "Marathon" in the UK and Ireland until July 19, 1990, when Mars decided to align the UK product with the global Snickers name. There are also several other Snickers products such as Snickers mini, dark chocolate, white chocolate, ice cream bars, Snickers with almonds and Snickers peanut butter bars . A replacement for the king size Snickers bar was launched in the UK in 2004 and designed to conform to the September 2004 Food and Drink Federation (FDF) "Manifesto for Food and Health". Part of the FDF manifesto was seven pledges of action to encourage the food and drink industry to be more health conscious.
    6.50
    4 votes
    42

    Reese's Peanut Butter Cup

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Peanut butter cup (edit|talk|history|links|watch|logs) Reese's Peanut Butter Cups are a brand of candy filled with peanut butter and coated with chocolate, marketed by The Hershey Company, and pioneered the way to the generic peanut butter cup. They were created in 1928 by H. B. Reese, a former dairy farmer and shipping foreman for Milton S. Hershey. Reese was inspired by Hershey, so he left the dairy farm to start his own candy business. The H. B. Reese Candy Co. was established in the basement of Reese's house in Hershey, Pennsylvania, and used Hershey chocolate in his confections. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were his most popular candy, and Reese eventually discontinued his other lines. Several years after his death, Reese's company was sold to The Hershey Company, then known as Hershey Foods Corporation, in 1963 for $23.5 million. The H.B. Reese Company is maintained as a subsidiary of Hershey because the Reese plant workforce is not unionized, unlike the main Hershey plant. Variations in Reeses cup size affect the chocolate to peanut butter content ratio. Larger Reeses cups typically contain a larger amount of peanut butter. Hershey's produces "limited editions" of the candy
    7.67
    3 votes
    43
    Skor

    Skor

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Skor is a candy bar produced by The Hershey Company. It was first marketed in US in 1981 and later launched in Canada in 1983 under the name of "Rutnam". It was originally intended as competition for the Heath bar produced by the Heath Company and, later, the Leaf Candy Company. Despite Hershey's acquisition of Leaf, Inc., in 1996 and subsequent production of the Heath bar under the Hershey name, the company continues to market the Skor bar. The bar consists of a thin slab of butter toffee covered in a milk chocolate coating. It is similar in style to a Daim bar. Skor is available from retail stores as a single or king size wrapped candy bar in a 1.4 oz (39 gram) portion.
    7.67
    3 votes
    44

    Mr. Big

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Mr. Big is the largest sized candy bar produced by Cadbury, hence the name. The standard bar is made of a long, layered vanilla wafer, coated in caramel, peanuts and rice crisps, which is then covered in the simulated chocolate coating. A Mr. Big bar is the length of two "standard"-sized bars end-to-end – around 20 centimetres long. In Canada, they are very common, and are available at all regular retailers, in an increasing number of varieties. Some of the new varieties available include Mr. Chew Big (with added caramel), Mr. Big Fudge (with a fudgy centre), and Mr. Big with Maple. They are also available in lesser quantities in a few other countries like Australia (though they are only available at the Cadbury factory outlet in Hobart, Tasmania), Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, Poland and in some areas of the United States. Mr. Big has also been commonly offered at convenience stores in South Korea such as Family Mart and 7-11 since the late 1990s. Mr. Big is the only Cadbury chocolate bar to have an ice cream variant made by Nestlé. It was discontinued in May 2002 in the UK, due to poor sales. An ice cream bar version produced by Nestlé is still available in Canada, although
    5.40
    5 votes
    45
    Peppermint Crisp

    Peppermint Crisp

    Peppermint Crisp is a milk chocolate bar filled with a multitude of thin cylinders of mint-flavoured toffee. Invented in South Africa by Wilson-Rowntree, it is now produced by Nestlé. The Peppermint Crisp is sold within Australia and South Africa as a 35 gram bar. It is common for children to bite off both ends of the bar and use the series of mint tubes as a straw to drink milk. The Peppermint Crisp can be used as in ingredient in mint chocolate cheesecakes and slices, and broken-up to decorate the top of pavlova meringue or cheesecake. James and Melanie Maddock used Peppermint Crisp on top of their dessert during a food challenge on the cooking show My Kitchen Rules.
    9.00
    2 votes
    46

    Cadbury Snowflake

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Cadbury Snowflake is a chocolate bar manufactured by Cadbury. Launched in 2000, it is a crumbly flaked white chocolate inside covered in smooth milk chocolate. Weighing approximately 32 g, producing a small bite size bars, it is produced and sold in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Snowflake was promoted at the wedding of TV presenter Anthea Turner and her husband Grant Bovey. Having agreed an exclusive deal for the photographs of the wedding reception to be published in OK! magazine in an exclusive £300,000 deal, pictures appeared which showed the couple (apparently) publicising Snowflake. OK! magazine issued the photo to the media with this caption: ANTHEA TURNER AND GRANT BOVEY exclusive OK! wedding photograph, enjoying Cadbury's new Snowflake. For the complete wedding coverage and a free Cadburys Snowflake, buy OK! magazine this weekend. OK! First for celebrity news. The Sun described it as 'the most sickening wedding photo ever'. Turner received much bad publicity which damaged her career, and the incident is now referred to as Flakegate.
    6.25
    4 votes
    47
    Caramello Koala

    Caramello Koala

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    Caramello Koala is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury Australia. It consists of a chocolate cartoon shaped koala (named "George" in certain advertising material) with a caramel center, similar to that of a Freddo, albeit a fully chocolate bar. The chocolate bar is sold in two sizes: the more common 20 gram size and the "Giant" 40 gram size, usually sold as a fundraiser. 40 million Caramello Koalas are sold in Australia each year, making the product the second most popular in the Australian children's confectionery market, after the Freddo Frog. Cross-over products are occasionally made available featuring the Caramello character, including Cadbury Caramello Koala Choc Caramel flavoured milk in 2003 and Caramello Koala Sundae ice-cream in 1997. They are also sold in South Africa under the name "Caramello Bear", where they are marketed with the Caramello Bear admitting: "Caramel? That's a weakness!" A 20 g Caramello Koala contains 415 kJ of energy and 5.5 g of fat. Caramello Koala was introduced in Australia as the Caramello Bear in 1966. It was reputedly the first mass marketed confection to be modelled on Australian fauna. Television advertisements for the
    6.25
    4 votes
    48

    Salted Nut Roll

    • Manufacturer: Pearson's Candy Company
    Pearson's Salted Nut Roll is a candy made by the Pearson's Candy Company of Saint Paul, Minnesota and is available in the Midwestern United States. It has a nougat center that is surrounded in a layer of caramel and then covered with salted Virginia peanuts. Pearson's use of reduced lactose whey is unique among nut roll manufacturers and makes this confection easier to digest for lactose-sensitive individuals. The Salted Nut Roll is available in a variety of sizes and has had chocolate-covered limited editions. The Salted Nut Roll was introduced by Pearson's in 1933 during the Great Depression and entered into a market that included various types of nut roll candies. After the introduction the name was changed to the Choo Choo Bar to be distinguishable among competitors, but was eventually changed back.
    6.25
    4 votes
    49
    Blue Riband

    Blue Riband

    Blue Riband is a budget chocolate biscuit produced by Nestlé. The bar was launched in 1936/1937 (Nestle is unsure which year) as a real milk chocolate wafer- a crisp wafer biscuit covered in a very thin layer of milk chocolate. It was re-launched in December 2004. The modern version is not as crisp as the original, and the chocolate layer is sweeter and thicker.
    7.33
    3 votes
    50

    Cadburys Tempo

    Tempo is a chocolate bar produced by Cadbury South Africa, described as "Shortcake biscuit and caramel covered in Cadbury's dairy milk chocolate". The chocolate bar is unique to South Africa. Cadbury's South Africa also produces other bars only available in South Africa, such as "P.S", "Astro's" and "Question". Cadbury South Africa
    7.33
    3 votes
    51
    Dotty Turo Rudi Dessert

    Dotty Turo Rudi Dessert

    • Manufacturer: Sole Mizo Zrt
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    This sweet chocolate bar filled with organic curd cheese, comes in 3 different flavors (plain, apricot, & strawberry). Made in Hungary,by Sole Mizo Zrt. You can find it & purchase it : www.dettcris.com For more information about Dotty Turo Rudi: www.bluedotty.com
    7.33
    3 votes
    52

    Idaho Spud

    • Manufacturer: Idaho Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The Idaho Spud is a candy bar made by the Idaho Candy Company. It has been produced since 1918 and is distributed throughout the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. The wrapper of the product bears the slogan "The Candy Bar That Makes Idaho Famous." The candy bar consists of a cocoa-flavored marshmallow center which is covered with compound chocolate (a chocolate replacement made from cocoa, sugar, and vegetable fats) and sprinkled with coconut flakes. The oblong shape of the candy bar resembles a potato. The product has 180 calories and weighs 1.5 ounces or 43 grams. It was featured in Steve Almond's book, Candyfreak, as one of the few successful candies made by a small company.
    7.33
    3 votes
    53

    Crispy Crunch

    Crispy Crunch is a hard chocolate bar with a crispy peanut flake inside that is made by Cadbury. Harold Oswin, an employee of William Neilson, developed Crispy Crunch in 1912. Harold was a candy roller in Neilson's hard candy room and joined the company when he was fourteen years old. Harold was promoted to Candy maker in the late 1920s. He always had wanted to create a candy bar with peanut butter and so when a chocolate bar contest was announced, Harold submitted his concept. Harold won the contest and received a $5.00 prize. The original recipe called for a log-shaped bar. Williams Neilson management made the decision to flatten the bar to the shape we are all familiar with today. Harold died in the mid-1990s. The brand was repositioned in 1988 by Norm Williams, Director of Marketing. The new brief was given to Martin Shewchuck of Leo Burnett Canada who conceived the highly successful Crispy Crunch campaigns ("the only thing better than your Crispy Crunch is someone else's"). The campaign catapulted the brand from #10 to #1, growing volume by 55%. Crispy Crunch is sold in Canada. Crispy Crunches were sold in the United States for a brief time in the 1990s by the food
    8.50
    2 votes
    54
    Prince Polo

    Prince Polo

    • Manufacturer: Olza SA
    • Sold in (countries): Poland
    Prince Polo is a Polish chocolate bar. It is sold in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Lithuania and Ukraine under the name Siesta, and is also sold in Iceland, where it is colloquially known as “Prins Póló”. According to measurements shown by Nielsen, the bar has been the most sold chocolate bar for decades in Iceland and was for many years one of the few chocolate bars available in the country. It has long been Poland's top-selling candy brand, but in recent years the similar Princessa brand (manufactured by Nestlé) has achieved similar popularity. Prince Polo was introduced in 1955, during the early years of the Polish People's Republic, by Olza S.A. in Cieszyn. It is a chocolate-covered wafer, with four layers of wafer joined by three layers of chocolate-flavored filling; it was easily identifiable by its metallic gold-colored wrapper. The company, which was founded in 1920, was purchased by Kraft Jacobs Suchard in 1993. In 1995 the Prince Polo packaging was revised with a new logo; the bar was no longer wrapped in paper and was instead sealed in plastic. Subsequently, several new varieties of Prince Polo were introduced, beginning with Hazelnut (Orzechowy) in 1996, and
    8.50
    2 votes
    55

    Big Hunk

    • Manufacturer: Annabelle Candy Company
    Big Hunk is a candy bar made by Annabelle Candy Company. It is a bar of roasted peanuts covered in honey sweetened nougat. It was featured in Steve Almond’s book, Candyfreak, as being one of the only successful candies made by a small company. Big Hunk was acquired by Annabelle Candy Company when the company purchased Golden Nugget Candy Company in 1970.
    10.00
    1 votes
    56

    Fast Break

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Reese's Fast Break (or, in Canada, Hershey Sidekick) is a candy bar similar to the Reese's Peanut Butter Cup. It is coated with milk chocolate, and filled with peanut butter on top of a nougat layer. While the bar initially had a blue and orange wrapper, the color scheme has since been inverted. Later formulations of Fast Break have a stronger peanut butter taste. This candy bar was intended to replace breakfast, hence the name "Fast Break", a reversal of breakfast. As of September 2006 Hershey has discontinued the Hershey Sidekick bar in Canada.
    10.00
    1 votes
    57
    Fry's Turkish Delight

    Fry's Turkish Delight

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    Fry's Turkish Delight is a chocolate sweet made by Cadbury. It was launched in 1914 by the Bristol chocolate manufacturer J. S. Fry & Sons and consists of a rose-flavoured Turkish delight surrounded by milk chocolate. In Australia and New Zealand the range of "Turkish" products released by Cadbury has expanded to include mini Easter eggs, ice-cream, sectioned family block chocolate bars, and small versions used in boxed chocolates. In the UK, Cadbury also manufacture the Dairy Milk Turkish, using dairy milk chocolate with a slightly different Turkish centre, in the familiar block bar form. As of August 2010 production of Fry's Turkish Delight (along with other products such as Fry's Peppermint Cream, Crunchie etc.) is now based in Poland. They also now contain no artificial colours (changed from E129 Allura Red AC to natural carotenes and beetroot red.) From the late 1950s the slogan 'Full of Eastern Promise' has been used for the product on British TV advertisements. Among those appearing in such advertisements in the 1960s were the model and actress Jane Lumb.
    10.00
    1 votes
    58
    Galaxy

    Galaxy

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Galaxy is a brand of milk chocolate made and marketed by Mars Incorporated sold in the UK and Ireland. It is one of several related products punning upon the name Mars by using an astronomical name. The brand was launched in 1960 and bought by Mars in 1986. The brand is called Dove in many parts of the world including the United States, People's Republic of China, Germany, the Netherlands, Canada, Malaysia, Australia, France and Greece. The Galaxy and Dove brands cover a wide range of products, including chocolate bars - milk chocolate, Caramel (milk chocolate with soft caramel centre), Fruit & Nut, Minstrels, Ripple (milk chocolate with a folded or "rippled" milk chocolate centre), Counters (Minstrels without the shell), Amicelli, Duetto, Promises, Bubbles, cookie and cream and Truffle (milk chocolate with a truffle centre). Related brands in other parts of the world include "Jewels," and "Senzi" in the Middle East. The Galaxy and Dove brands also market a wide range of products, including ready-to-drink chocolate milk, hot chocolate powder, chocolate cakes, ice cream and more.
    10.00
    1 votes
    59
    Kendal mint cake

    Kendal mint cake

    • Manufacturer: George Romney Ltd
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Kendal Mint Cake is a glucose-based confectionery flavoured with peppermint. It originates from Kendal in Cumbria, England. Kendal Mint Cake is said to be popular among climbers and mountaineers, especially those from the United Kingdom, as a source of energy. Kendal Mint Cake is based on a traditional recipe known as mint cake, peppermint tablet and various other similar names. Kendal Mint Cake is well known to mountaineers and explorers for its high energy content. There are currently three companies that still produce Kendal mint cake in Kendal. Romney's was founded in 1918 and used an old recipe to create Mint Cake. This Mint Cake was sold in Kendal and sent by train to other areas of the north west for sale. In 1987, Romney's bought Wiper's Mint Cake from Harry Wiper, who had inherited ownership of Wiper's in 1960 when his father died. Wilson's Mint Cake was founded in 1913, when James Wilson purchased a factory in the Stricklandgate area of the town. He had previously made and distributed types of toffee, but he decided to concentrate on mint cake. In 1966, the firm moved to its current location in the Cross Lane area of Kendal. Wilson's is currently licensed to sell a
    10.00
    1 votes
    60

    Mackintosh's Toffee

    Mackintosh's Toffee is a sweet created by John Mackintosh. Mackintosh opened up his sweets shop in Halifax, Yorkshire, England in 1890, and the idea for Mackintosh's Toffee, not too hard and not too soft, came soon after. In 1969, Mackintosh's merged with rival Rowntree to form Rowntree Mackintosh, which merged with Nestlé in 1988. The product is often credited with being over 100 years old. The toffee is sold in bags containing a random assortment of individual wrapped flavoured toffees. The flavours are (followed by wrapping colour): Malt (Blue), Harrogate (Yellow), Mint (Green), Egg & Cream (Orange), Coconut (Pink), Toffee (Red). The red wrapped toffees do not display a flavour on the wrapper. The product's subtitle is "Toffee De Luxe" and its motto "a tradition worth sharing". The product is known widely throughout Canada under the name 'MACK'. Unlike the European versions, for most of its history MACK was sold as a single rectangular bar in a tartan box. More recently (circa 2008) the Canadian product is individually wrapped and manufactured in Switzerland by Nestlé, and licensed for sale in Canada by Nestlé Canada. Nestlé does not distribute the toffees in the US, but one may
    10.00
    1 votes
    61

    Walnut Whip

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    A Walnut Whip is a whirl-shaped cone of milk chocolate with a whipped vanilla fondant filling, topped with a half-walnut. Launched in 1910 by Duncan's of Edinburgh, Walnut Whip is Nestlé Rowntree's oldest current brand. Over one million walnuts, most of them imported from China and India, are used every week in the manufacture of Walnut Whips at Halifax, West Yorkshire. Nestlé claim that a Walnut Whip is eaten almost every two seconds in the UK. There have been a number of flavours of Walnut Whip over the years, including coffee and maple flavours, but currently only vanilla is widely available. The original Walnut Whip contained a half-walnut placed inside the cone on the thick chocolate base, rather than on top. It was later marketed with an extra walnut on top, and subsequently the walnut inside was removed to leave one walnut outside. The chocolate cone itself and the vanilla fondant filling have altered in recent years; the cone had a more pronounced tightly knit rough surface and the fondant was more dense. Ken Livingstone famously said the London 2012 Summer Olympics will cost Londoners the price of one Walnut Whip (38p) per week. 'Walnut Whip' is rhyming slang for 'kip'
    10.00
    1 votes
    62
    Yorkie

    Yorkie

    Yorkie is a chocolate bar made by Nestlé. It was originally branded by Rowntree's of York, hence the name. In 1976, Eric Nicoli spotted a gap in the confectionery market and used the cocoa from Rowntree's favourable futures market position to launch Yorkie. Production was at York and Norwich (until 1994). The Yorkie bar, a chunkier alternative to Cadbury's Dairy Milk, was aimed at men. In the 1980s for example, toy lorries with the Yorkie bar logo were manufactured by Corgi, and television advertisements for the Yorkie bar featured truck drivers. In 2001, the advertisement campaign made this more explicit with the slogan and wrapper tagline It's not for girls, which caused controversy. Nestlé also received complaints about this campaign from Norwegian and UK people, who found it sexist and distasteful. Special versions for use in Ministry of Defence ration packs read It's not for civvies. In 2006 a special edition that was for girls was sold, wrapped in pink. Aside from the original milk chocolate bar, several variants are available, such as "raisin and biscuit" flavour, "honeycomb" flavour, and Yorkie Ice Cream. For a time, trains arriving at York railway station would pass a
    10.00
    1 votes
    63
    Chomp

    Chomp

    Chomp is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury, popular in Australia and the United Kingdom. There are different versions of the bar available in each location. The Australian Chomp consists of a layer of wafer and caramel, coated in milk chocolate. The Australian chomp is also longer and thinner than the UK version, and comes in a 30g size. The Australian Chomp slogan is 'It's a monster chew!', and the packaging features a green T-rex named Tyrone wearing a hat, who also featured on Australian T.V. commercials riding a skateboard. The Chomp available in the UK contains chewy caramel coated in milk chocolate, and retails for 20p. It is available in a 25g package. In the Republic of Ireland it selling price is 25c. During the 1970s Chomp bars were sold in Australia with the catchphrase "Ten cents never tasted so good". Chomps are also sold in South Africa and Zimbabwe, where packaging features a hippo. In 2009, The UK version of Chomp got a new look, the 'C' resembles a mouth with teeth. Chomp is currently produced in the Keynsham plant in Somerset, UK; however, as of November/ December 2010, production will transfer to Cadbury's new plant in Skarbimierz,
    7.00
    3 votes
    64
    Dairy Milk

    Dairy Milk

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Dairy Milk is a brand of milk chocolate currently manufactured by Cadbury; except in the United States where it is made by The Hershey Company. It was introduced in the United Kingdom in 1905 and now consists of a number of products. Every product in the Dairy Milk line is made with exclusively milk chocolate. In June 1905, Cadbury made its first Dairy Milk bar, with a higher proportion of milk than previous chocolate bars, and it became the company's best selling product by 1913. George Cadbury Junior, responsible for the development of the bar, has said "All sorts of names were suggested: Highland Milk, Jersey and Dairy Maid. But when a customer’s daughter suggested Dairy Milk, the name stuck.". Fruit and Nut was introduced as part of the Dairy Milk line in 1928, soon followed by Whole Nut in 1933. By this point, Cadbury's was the brand leader in the United Kingdom. In 1928, Cadbury's introduced the "glass and a half" slogan to accompany the Dairy Milk bar, to advertise the bar's higher milk content. In September 2012, Cadbury made the decision to change the shape of the bar chunks to a more circular shape to keep the bar current. The bar had not seen such a significant change in
    7.00
    3 votes
    65
    Bertie Beetle

    Bertie Beetle

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    A Bertie Beetle is an Australian chocolate bar manufactured by Nestlé. It consists of chocolate shaped like an anthropomorphised beetle with small pieces of honeycomb throughout. It was created as a way to use up pieces of coconut, and honeycomb left over from the production of Violet Crumble bars . The Bertie Beetle was first produced in 1963 by Hoadley's Chocolates who were later taken over by the Rowntree Company and became Rowntree Hoadley Ltd., when it was launched by VFL footballer Ron Barassi, and was sold in shops until 1970, when manufacturer Nestle entered an exclusive agreement with 'Showbag Marketing' to only sell the chocolate at shows and exhibitions in showbags. Bertie Beetles are most well known for their inclusion in the reliably cheap Bertie Beetle showbag, available around Australia at various Shows. The 'Bertie Beetle Showbag' is one of the most popular showbags ever made. When the bag was withdrawn from sale at Royal Shows, Nestle bowed to the resultant community pressure and recommenced sale of the bag. The bag traditionally cost $2 and came with a few Bertie Beetles and some * Allens lollipops. Until 12pm on the first day of a royal show there is often an
    5.75
    4 votes
    66
    5.75
    4 votes
    67

    Chick-O-Stick

    • Manufacturer: Atkinson Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Chick-O-Stick is a candy produced by Atkinson Candy Company that has been manufactured since the Great Depression. It is made primarily from peanut butter, granulated sugar, corn syrup, and toasted coconut, with colorings and preservatives added. There is also a sugar-free version of the candy. Chick-O-Stick is an orange stick of varying length and thickness, dusted with ground coconut. The interior of the stick is honeycombed with peanut butter and the orange hardened syrup/sugar mixture that also forms the shell. When eaten fresh, the candy is dry and brittle, but it has a tendency to draw dampness and become hard and chewy if left uneaten for a long period. Chick-O-Stick is available in .36 ounce, .70 ounce, 1.0 ounce, and 2.0 ounce sizes, as well as bags of individually wrapped bite-sized pieces. Chick-O-Stick's original wrapper featured a stylized cartoon of a chicken wearing a cowboy hat and a badge in the shape of the Atkinson logo. The chicken is absent from the more recent wrapper; some commentators have indicated that it contributed to confusion over whether the Chick-O-Stick was candy or a chicken-flavored cracker. The Atkinson Candy Company's website states that the
    8.00
    2 votes
    68

    Chokito

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    A Chokito is a chocolate covered chocolate bar containing caramel fudge with crisped rice, manufactured by Nestlé Australia, Nestlé Switzerland and Nestlé Brazil. The current slogan for Chokito in Australia is "big feed, big taste", while in the 1970s the tag line was "Chokito gets you going". Chokito was relaunched in 2010 in Australia with new packaging and a new recipe reformulation. This included moving away from compound chocolate that was in the original formula. Also in 2010 was a new advertisting campaign based around a man barring club bouncers from entering places like bathrooms and a gym, saying the advertising's catchphrase, "No no no." The campaign, targeted at men 24-35, had 380,000 views in two weeks, on sites YouTube & Break.com. The new formulation Chokito was launched in New Zealand in 2012.
    8.00
    2 votes
    69
    Milkybar

    Milkybar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Milkybar is a white chocolate confection that is produced by Nestlé and sold in Australia, New Zealand, India, Ireland, Kuwait, South Africa, Spain, and the United Kingdom. It sold under the name Galak in Ecuador, Brazil, and the rest of Continental Europe. Nestlé have produced white chocolate since the 1930s, and started using the brand Galak in 1967. In many European countries a version with puffed rice is also available. The Milkybar Kid has been used in television advertising promoting Nestlé Milkybar in the countries where it is sold. The Milkybar Kid is a blond, spectacle-wearing young child, usually dressed as a cowboy, whose catchphrase is "The Milkybars are on me!". Until 8 year old Hinetaapora Short of Rotorua was selected in 2010 they had always been boys. The advertisements usually take place in a Wild West setting. Both live-action and animated ads have been produced. In the UK, Australia and New Zealand the advertisements were originally accompanied by a jingle extolling "the goodness that's in Milky Bar". In more recent revivals of the campaign, the jingle has been revised to refer to "the good taste that's in Milkybar". The pronunciation of the company's name has
    8.00
    2 votes
    70

    Nestlé Chunky

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Nestlé Chunky is a candy bar known for its trapezoidal shape and consists of milk chocolate, California raisins and roasted peanuts. It is produced by Nestlé. The Chunky candy bar was introduced in the late 1930s by New York City candy maker, Philip Silvershein. It was then made with cashews, chocolate, raisins and Brazil nuts. Supposedly, the original shape of the candy was a pyramid, but after packaging difficulties developed, the top was cut off, creating the candy's distinctive shape that remains to this day. Silvershein, a friend of William Wrigley Jr., originally had his Chunky bars distributed by the Wrigley Gum Company. It was acquired by Nestlé in 1984. In the 1950s, a Chunky could be purchased for five cents, with a smaller version, the Chunky Cutie, available for two cents. "Chunky Square," a pavilion at the 1964 New York World's Fair, featured a glass-walled automated factory, where visitors could watch the manufacture of Chunky candy bars. An early 1970s TV commercial for Chunky showed a young boy watching TV with his father. The boy amused viewers by claiming that Chunky was "THICKER-ER." Other Chunky advertising slogans included "Chunky, What a Chunk of Chocolate",
    8.00
    2 votes
    71
    Twix

    Twix

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Twix is a chocolate biscuit made by Mars, Inc., consisting of a biscuit finger, topped with caramel and coated in milk chocolate. There is a very thin layer of chocolate between the biscuit and the caramel. Twix bars are typically packaged in pairs. Twix was first produced in the UK in 1967, and introduced in the United States in 1979. Twix was called Raider in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey for many years before its name was changed in 1991 (2000 in Finland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Turkey) to match the international brand name. In North America Twix is produced in Cleveland, Tennessee.
    8.00
    2 votes
    72

    Cadbury Snack

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Australia
    Cadbury Snack can refer to different types of chocolate confectionery, made by Cadbury but marketed in different regions. The Australian Snack is a bar with six chunks, each filled with a different flavour: strawberry, pineapple, orange, coconut ice, Turkish Delight and caramel. The selection of flavours has remained the same since being developed in 1974 by the Cadbury product development team. Prior to this time, blocks of chocolate known as "Snack" was marketed in Australia by MacRobertson's which had exactly the same flavours but different pattern moulds on the "chunks". It is available in 220 g, 110 g and 55 g blocks, and is also available in New Zealand and parts of Asia. In June 2009 Cadbury changed the size of their family blocks down in weight to reflect a more healthy approach, which is what their consumer research has found customers want, although consumers are not happy as to what they see as a reduction in goods for no reduction in cost. Although Snack is now branded as part of Cadbury's Dairy Milk range, the chocolate is sweeter than that used in the standard Dairy Milk bar. The version of Snack now marketed in Australia was formerly available in the United Kingdom.
    6.67
    3 votes
    73

    Zagnut

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Zagnut is a candy bar produced and sold in the United States. It was launched in 1930 by the D. L. Clark Company, which sold it to Leaf later on and acquired by The Hershey Company in 1996. Its main ingredients are peanut butter and toasted coconut, and it weighs 1.75 ounces (50 g). Unlike many other candy bars, it contains no chocolate, though it does have a small amount of cocoa. Since Zagnuts have no chocolate to melt, they have seen a resurgence in popularity among US troops in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. Stateside, candy and convenience stores stock Zagnut unevenly, since it has only a niche market. The origin of the name "Zagnut" is uncertain; the "nut" part presumably comes from either the coconut coating or the peanut center, while the "zag" could be a reference to zigzag, a slang phrase popular when the bar was created in the 1930s. In the 1960s, Zagnut made fun of its unlikely name with a TV commercial created by Stan Freberg. In the spot, a candy-company exec (played by Frank Nelson) is horrified to discover a computer has given the name "Zagnut" to its newest product: "That is without a doubt the lousiest name for a candy bar I've ever heard!" In the end, though,
    5.50
    4 votes
    74
    Bounty

    Bounty

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    Bounty is a chocolate bar manufactured by Mars Incorporated and sold internationally. It is not marketed in the United States (with the exception of World Market and international sections of many supermarkets), where a similar product, Mounds, is marketed by Hershey's. Bounty was introduced in 1951 (UK/Canada). It has a coconut filling enrobed with milk chocolate (sold in a blue wrapper) or dark chocolate (sold in a red wrapper) and is one of the few chocolates to come wrapped in two individual halves. Since 2006, a cherry flavoured version has also been available in Australia. This was originally a limited edition flavor, but then became officially available (Now discontinued). In Europe, a limited edition mango flavour was available in 2004-05 and in Russia and Ukraine in 2010. Its television advertising has tended to feature tropical beaches with coconut palms. In 2003, Mars registered the shape of the Bounty bar as a trademark in the European Union. This was appealed by Ludwig Schokolade, a German confectionery company. In 2009, the European Court of First Instance in Luxembourg upheld the appeal, stating "The allegedly distinctive characteristics, namely the rounded ends of
    9.00
    1 votes
    75
    Cherry Blossom

    Cherry Blossom

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Cherry Blossom is a type of chocolate bar that was produced by Hershey Canada Inc at their Canadian manufacturing facility in Smiths Falls, Ontario. The candy was originally manufactured by The Walter M. Lowney Company of Canada which was taken over by Hershey as a subsidiary brand. It consists of a maraschino cherry and cherry syrup surrounded by a mixture of chocolate, coconut and roasted peanut pieces. The candy is sold in an individually wrapped 45 grams portion, packaged in a close fitting cardboard box. Contrary to common myth, filling is not injected inside the chocolate. The cherry candy is coated with an enzyme that breaks down the solid into a liquid over the next 1 to 2 weeks. The Cherry Blossom candy provides 210 calories of food energy. It contains 31% fat, 9% carbohydrate and 4% fiber by weight and a further 2 grams of protein. It is similar to Kunal's Big Cherries in the United States.
    9.00
    1 votes
    76

    Cup-o-Gold

    Cup-o-Gold is a candy bar in the form of a chocolate cup with a marshmallow center and contains almonds and coconut. It is similar to products such as Mallo Cups or Valomilk. It was invented in the 1950s by the Hoffman Candy Company in Los Angeles and is now distributed by Los Angeles candy company Adams & Brooks. It is available primarily on the West Coast but can also be bought online through the manufacturer's website. Also available from the company are Big Cherries and Good News bars.
    9.00
    1 votes
    77
    Double Decker

    Double Decker

    Double Decker is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury. First introduced in 1976, its name derives from the double-decker bus. The chocolate bar is lightly flavoured with coffee and structured in two layers; an upper whipped nougat layer, with a lower layer of cereal ‘crispies’, these are then coated in milk chocolate. Originally the bar contained raisins within the base layer, however consumer research in the 1980s led to these being removed and the current formulation being introduced. The bar has a mass of approximately 60 g, and typically contains 11.3 g of fat, 41 g of carbohydrates, 2.6 g of protein and 1155 kJ (275 kcal) of energy. The Double Decker no longer contains hydrogenated oil. There also existed a 'Double Decker - Nuts' launched in 2004, which had the advertising slogan "crispy, crunchy, chewy and nutty". This chocolate bar was essentially a Double Decker with nuts contained within the nougat layer; however it has since been discontinued. At the time it was distinctly aimed at males, and featured in Coronation Street credits during 2004. In 2009 the bar received a packaging revamp, for the first time since 2004. Also a Cadbury Double Decker Duo
    9.00
    1 votes
    78

    Peanut Chews

    • Manufacturer: Goldenberg Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Long familiar to residents of the Philadelphia area and neighboring Mid-Atlantic states, Peanut Chews are a family of US candy products manufactured by Just Born. They consist of peanuts and molasses covered in chocolatey coating, and are available in original dark chocolatey flavor and milk chocolatey coatings. The bars are small, similar in size to a "fun size" or Halloween-size bar. Peanut Chews were developed and, during most of their history, manufactured by the Goldenberg Candy Company, which was founded by a Romanian immigrant, David Goldenberg in 1890. Peanut Chews were first introduced in 1917. The candies were originally developed for use by the U.S. military as a ration bar during World War I. The high-energy, high-protein recipe and unique taste made it popular with the troops. In 1921 Harry Goldenberg introduced the first wrapped Peanut Chews candy for retail sales. In the 1930s the candy was converted from a full-size bar to small individual pieces. In 1949 Harry and Sylvia Goldenberg (2nd generation) purchased the Peanut Chews Division of D. Goldenberg, Inc. to focus solely on the production of Peanut Chews candies. In 2003 Just Born, Inc., a Bethlehem,
    9.00
    1 votes
    79
    Cadbury's Creme Egg

    Cadbury's Creme Egg

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    A Cadbury Creme Egg is a chocolate product manufactured in the shape of an egg. The product consists of a thick milk chocolate shell, housing a white and yellow fondant filling which mimics the white and yolk of a real egg. Creme Eggs are the best-selling confectionery item between New Year's Day and Easter in the UK, with annual sales in excess of 200 million and a brand value of approximately £50 million. Creme Eggs are produced by Cadbury UK in the United Kingdom and by Cadbury Adams in Canada. They are sold by Kraft Foods in all markets except the USA, where the Hershey Company has the local marketing rights. At the Bournville factory in Birmingham, in the UK, they are manufactured at a rate of 1.5 million per day. The Creme Egg was also previously manufactured in New Zealand but is now imported into that country from the UK. While filled eggs were first manufactured by the Cadbury Brothers in 1923, the Creme Egg in its current form was not introduced until 1963. Initially sold as Fry's Creme Eggs (incorporating the Fry's brand), they were renamed "Cadbury's Creme Eggs" in 1971. Creme eggs are usually sold individually but are also available in boxes of various sizes. The foil
    6.33
    3 votes
    80

    Hershey bar

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The Hershey's chocolate bar (usually called a "Hershey bar") is a flagship chocolate bar described as "The Great American Chocolate Bar" manufactured by the Hershey Company. Hershey Milk Chocolate and Milk Chocolate with almonds and peanuts were both introduced in 1900. A circular version of the milk chocolate bar called Hershey's Drops was released in 2010. Hershey process milk chocolate is cheaper to make than other types of chocolate as it is less sensitive to the freshness of the milk. The process is a trade secret, but experts speculate that the milk is partially lipolyzed, producing butyric acid, which stabilizes the milk from further fermentation. This compound gives the product a particular sour, "tangy" taste, to which the US public has become accustomed, to the point that other manufacturers often add butyric acid to their milk chocolates. Hershey bars are available in a variety flavors: Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark Chocolate, Cookies 'N' Creme, Symphony, Mr. Goodbar, and Krackel. There were also six limited flavors: Double Chocolate, Nut Lovers, Twosomes Reese's Pieces, Cookies 'N' Chocolate, Twosomes Heath, and Twosomes Whoppers. All flavors
    6.33
    3 votes
    81

    Snickers Marathon

    Snickers Marathon was a chocolate bar made by Mars, Incorporated until it was replaced by the Snickers bar in 1971.
    6.33
    3 votes
    82

    Wonka Xploder

    The Wonka Xploder was a chocolate bar launched by Nestlé in the United States in 2000, and in the UK in 2002.. In Australia, it was released under the "KaBoom" name. Described as "tongue crackling candy", the bar's ingredients included milk chocolate and popping candy. The bar was discontinued in 2005.
    6.33
    3 votes
    83
    Curly Wurly

    Curly Wurly

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Curly Wurly is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury UK and sold in the Australia, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, Malta, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Portugal, Romania, U.A.E and the United Kingdom. It was launched in the UK in 1970. Its shape resembles two flattened, intertwined serpentine strings. The bar is made of chocolate-coated caramel. This design was created by David John Parfitt a long-serving research confectioner while experimenting with some surplus toffee from another piece of work. Also available are "Curly Wurly Squirlies," which come in a bag and are just the cross beams of the ladder. This design was created by Charlie Simmonds, a worker and apprentice at Cadbury. Implementing the design was difficult originally since the nozzles used to extrude the toffee would frequently jam with each other when the toffee strands touched as the middle one moved back and forth to create the pattern. This problem was solved by a mechanical engineer by the name of William Harris. The Curly Wurly Machine was originally designed by Bill Harris, then redesigned in 1982 by Tony Wright at Cadbury's Bournville under contract from Harvey Design Company. His brief was to
    7.50
    2 votes
    84

    Hershey's Snack Barz

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Hershey's Snack Barz is the name of a brand of candy bar produced, marketed, and sold by The Hershey Company. Snack Barz are a combination of crisped rice held together with marshmallow and reinforced with a coating of Hershey's milk chocolate. In 2004, The Hershey Company released three flavors of Snack Barz: Hershey's Chocolate Creme, Reese's Peanut Butter, and Hershey's S'mores Marshmallow Creme. Later, the company began manufacturing and distributing two new flavors of Snack Barz in 2005: Caramel and Cookies 'n Creme. Hershey's Snack Bars are manufactured, packaged, and sold by The Hershey Company. The Snack Barz are made of two layers of a crispy rice and marshmallow mixture. In between these two "rice and marshmallow bars", a "creamy" marshmallow layer is added in between the two pieces to help the layers stick together. The end product is dipped in Hershey's chocolate before it is packaged and boxed. Snack Barz are sold in 1.5 and 2.1 ounce bar sizes. Each 1.5 ounce Snack Bar sells for about 70 cents, while each 2.1 ounce Snack Bar sells for about US$1.05 a bar. Hershey's Snack Bars are advertised as being a healthier candy bar (as compared with traditional candy) as well as
    7.50
    2 votes
    85

    Mountain Bar

    • Manufacturer: Brown & Haley
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Mountain Bar is a chocolate bar made by Brown & Haley, Inc. Mountain Bars consist of chocolate and peanuts molded around one of three flavored fillings: vanilla, peanut butter or cherry. The Mountain Bar was first created in 1915 at the Brown & Haley factory in Tacoma, Washington. Originally called Mount Tacoma Bars, the name was changed in 1925 after Brown & Haley began distribution of the candy in Seattle. Shortly after World War II a cherry version of the Mountain Bar was introduced. This was followed by the peanut butter variety in 1974. Cappuccino and Mint flavored Mountain Bars were briefly available in 2010.
    7.50
    2 votes
    86
    Drifter

    Drifter

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Drifter is a chocolate coated candy bar. Drifter was launched by Rowntree's in 1980, consisting of a biscuit wafer with caramel layered on top. The bar is now produced by Nestlé following their takeover of Rowntree's in 1988. They are becoming increasingly hard to find in most parts of the United Kingdom, with 90 million bars being produced each year. Amongst its advertising slogans, it has been referred to as "the chewy chocolate bar that you really have to get your teeth into." In 2007 Drifter was discontinued by Nestlé before being reintroduced in May 2008, enjoying a similar act of nostalgia as Cadbury's Wispa bar. In June 2011 McDonald's introduced a limited edition Drifter McFlurry which was available from 15th June until the 26th July 2011.
    6.00
    3 votes
    87
    Krackel

    Krackel

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Krackel is a chocolate candy bar made by The Hershey Company. Krackel contains crisped rice, and is similar to the competing Nestlé Crunch bar made by Nestlé. Krackel originally sold as an individual candy bar product, and is now only available as one of the four varieties of Hershey's Miniatures. Introduced in 1938, Krackel originally also had almonds in its formula. Peanuts were then added in 1939, but both the almonds and peanuts were removed in 1941. The product's packaging can be identified by its distinctive red background with white lettering. The Hershey Company started to change the ingredients of some of its products, in order to replace the relatively expensive cocoa butter with cheaper oil substitutes. This was done to cut costs, rather than having to raise prices in the marketplace for products containing cocoa butter. Hershey's changed the description of the product and altered the packaging slightly along with the ingredients. Though the new formula contains chocolate, according to United States Food and Drug Administration food labeling laws, these modified recipes which do not contain cocoa butter can not be legally described as milk chocolate. Other products which
    6.00
    3 votes
    88
    Ritter Sport

    Ritter Sport

    • Manufacturer: Alfred Ritter GmbH & Co. KG
    • Sold in (countries): Germany
    Ritter Sport is a German chocolate bar made by Alfred Ritter GmbH & Co. KG. It is distributed throughout the world. Each 100 gram square-shaped bar is divided into 16 smaller squares, creating a four-by-four pattern. Large bars weighing 250 grams and 16.5 gram mini bars are also available, although in fewer varieties. In 1912, Alfred Ritter and newly wedded wife, Clara, founded a chocolate factory in Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt. Later it introduced its own brand of chocolate named "Alrika (Alfred Ritter Cannstatt)." When production needs required a factory expansion, the company moved to Waldenbuch in 1930, a couple of miles outside Stuttgart. The chocolate brand Ritter's Sport Schokolade produced as the square tablet known today was launched in 1932 after Clara suggested creating a chocolate bar that would fit into every sport jacket pocket without breaking. The company's current 3rd generation owners are Alfred T. Ritter and his sister Marli Hoppe-Ritter. In 1990 they launched project(s) "Cacaonica", which supports organic cocoa agriculture and reforestation in Nicaragua and "Ritter Solar" now the European market leader of solar thermal products and Large solar thermal systems. The
    6.00
    3 votes
    89
    Caramac

    Caramac

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    Caramac is the brand name for a caramel flavoured bar manufactured by Nestlé. Originally it was launched by Mackintosh's (later Rowntree Mackintosh) in 1959. The name is derived from the syllabic abbreviation of Caramel and Macintosh. The name of the product was determined by a competition winner. This was held in what was the Norwich factory of Mackintosh's, and won by Barbara Haistead. It was made at the old Norwich factory until the factory closed in 1996 when production transferred to Fawdon in Tyneside where it is still made. Coloured pale yellow, the bar is made using sweetened condensed milk, butter and various artificial flavourings, as well as sugar. It is packaged in a red and yellow wrapper. A similar confection is used in the covering of McVitie's Gold biscuit bar. A limited edition Caramac KitKat bar was released in the United Kingdom in 2005 and due to popular demand it was brought back in 2007. During the 1980s and 1990s a Caramac easter egg was also available. The Caramac was available in Canada during part of the 1960s and 1970s.
    7.00
    2 votes
    90

    Fruit and Nut

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    Fruit and Nut sometimes marketed as Cadbury Fruit And Nut Bars are bars of milk chocolate with raisins and almonds. Made by Cadbury, this confection is based on their solid Dairy Milk bar but contains nuts and raisins. The Dairy Milk bar has been around since the 1900s and the Fruit and Nut version was the first (of many) variations on a theme. It was introduced in 1928. Right before the depression of 1929. The fruit and nut chocolate bar comes in various sizes. Different segments of the chocolate, contains both fruit and nuts and other segments may contain just one. The Cadbury name is embossed on each segment of chocolate. It is packaged inside a foil easy to open purple wrapper.
    7.00
    2 votes
    91

    Whatchamacallit

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Whatchamacallit is the name of a candy bar in the United States made by The Hershey Company. This candy bar was first introduced in 1978. The "Whatchamacallit" name was devised by Patricia Volk while doing advertising for Hershey. Since 1987, Whatchamacallit has included peanut-flavored crisp that utilizes peanut butter as the flavoring agent, with a layer of caramel and a layer of milk chocolate coating. In the late 1980s, a commercial was created in a New Wave style referring to the bar in various ways to say "whatchamacallit", including names that had been made up, such as "wowzamadoo." Hershey's Whatchamacallit is found in recipes for various food items, including pies, cookies, cheesecakes, and cupcakes. In Canada, an identical candy bar is marketed by Hershey's as Special Crisp, but does not have the wide distribution in Canada that the Whatchamacallit has in the United States. In 2008, the Hershey Company began to change the ingredients for some of its products, replacing the relatively expensive cocoa butter with cheaper oil substitutes. Such cost cutting was done to avoid price increases for the affected products. Hershey's changed the description of the product and
    7.00
    2 votes
    92

    Yankie bar

    • Manufacturer: Toms Gruppen A/S
    • Sold in (countries): Denmark
    The Yankie Bar is a popular chocolate bar in Denmark. This caramel, nougat, and milk chocolate bar is a product of the Toms candy company. Just after the Second World War, the Danish candy producer, Toms, were contacted by the United States high command in Germany, which commissioned Toms to produce a candy bar for the American troops in Germany to avoid transporting such products across the Atlantic. In return, the U.S. would supply Toms with the required amount of cocoa beans. The Yankie Bar is very similar to the European version of the Mars Bar, and both the American troops and the Danish youth found it very tasty. Ten years later, in 1956, Toms launched the Holly bar, similar to the Yankie bar, but with hazelnuts.
    7.00
    2 votes
    93

    PB Max

    PB Max was a candy bar made in the United States by Mars, launched in 1989 or 1990. They were made of creamy peanut butter and oats on top of a square-shaped whole grain cookie, enrobed in milk chocolate. The peanut butter in PB Max was sweetened with sugar and mixed with hydrogenated vegetable oil to prevent separation. The label's serving suggestion was "1 piece" containing 240 calories, 5 g protein, 20 g carbohydrates, 16 g fat, and 150 mg sodium. Early television commercials for PB Max declared that the "PB" in its name didn't stand for things such as "piggy banks", "polka band", "portly ballerina", "platinum blonde", "penguin black-belt", "pig basketball", "plow boy", "pure bliss", "parachuting buffalo", or "pink baboon" — but that it in fact stood for "Peanut Butter." According to former Mars executive Alfred Poe, PB Max was discontinued due to the Mars family's distaste for peanut butter, despite $50 million in sales.
    8.00
    1 votes
    94
    Butterfinger

    Butterfinger

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Butterfinger is a candy bar made by Nestlé. The bar consists of a flaky, orange-colored center — with a somewhat similar texture to crisp caramel, and a taste similar to peanut butter — that is coated in compound chocolate. Butterfinger was invented by the Curtiss Candy Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1923. The company held a public contest to choose the name of the candy. The name is a slang term used to describe a clumsy person, often in sporting events to describe an athlete who cannot hold onto the ball. As an early publicity stunt and marketing ploy, the company dropped Butterfinger and Baby Ruth candy bars from airplanes in cities across the United States which helped increase its popularity. It was also promoted in "Baby Take a Bow", a 1934 film featuring Shirley Temple. The Curtiss Candy Company was owned by Standard Brands Inc which merged with Nabisco in 1981 to become Nabisco Brands, Inc., and, in 1990, Nestlé bought Baby Ruth and Butterfinger from RJR Nabisco. Two of the slogans currently used to advertise the candy bar are "Follow the Finger" and "Break out of the ordinary!" Prior to these, Bart Simpson, and other characters from Fox's The Simpsons, appeared in
    5.67
    3 votes
    95

    NutRageous

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    NutRageous is a candy bar made by the Hershey Company. It consists of Reese's Peanut Butter topped with roasted peanuts, caramel and a chocolate flavoured coating. Developed as a candy bar loosely based on the Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, NutRageous was first sold in 1994. NutRageous was originally called Acclaim, but this name was changed just prior to its release. The target consumer base, children, did not appreciate "Acclaim" as readily as they did "NutRageous." NutRageous is similar to the Baby Ruth and Snickers candy bars in its makeup. All three of these chocolate bars use caramel and peanuts. Baby Ruth and NutRageous share a lumpy texture on top of the bar produced by the covered peanuts. NutRageous, however, utilizes Reese's Peanut Butter for the center instead of nougat.
    5.67
    3 votes
    96

    5th Avenue

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The 5th Avenue is a candy bar currently marketed by The Hershey Company. The candy bar was reportedly introduced in 1936 by Luden's, at the time a subsidiary of Food Industries of Philadelphia. This date is uncertain because information about this product has been subject to misinformation from The Hershey Company for marketing and perhaps legal reasons. It is difficult to find marketing material for this product before 1962. Hershey Foods Corporation acquired Luden's brands from the Dietrich Corporation, a successor to Food Industries of Philadelphia, in 1986. For many years, the bar included two whole almonds on top of the bar but these were taken out in the 1990s. This candy appeared in the 1994 sci-fi movie Stargate and the 1998 Seinfeld episode "The Dealership".
    6.50
    2 votes
    97
    Sugar Mama

    Sugar Mama

    • Manufacturer: James O. Welch Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Sugar Mamas were originally produced by the James O. Welch Company in 1965, as a companion candy to the already produced Sugar Baby and Sugar Daddy. They had a distinctive red and yellow wrapper, the opposite of the Sugar Daddy's yellow and red wrapper. They have not been produced since the 1980s. Description: chocolate-covered caramel suckers, essentially Sugar Daddy covered in chocolate.
    6.50
    2 votes
    98
    U-No Bar

    U-No Bar

    • Manufacturer: Annabelle Candy Company
    The U-No Bar is produced by the Annabelle Candy Company. It is a truffle type bar with almond bits covered in chocolate and comes wrapped in a silver foil-like wrapper. It is comparable to a 3 Musketeers except it has a much higher fat content compared to 3 Musketeers with a much thinner chocolate shell and more moussy nougat. U-no bars used to come in two flavors: Original and mint. Annabelle Candy Company has since discontinued the mint flavor. It was first produced by the Cardinet Candy Company, which was later acquired by the Annabelle Candy Company.
    6.50
    2 votes
    99
    Violet Crumble

    Violet Crumble

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): New Zealand
    Violet Crumble is an Australian chocolate bar manufactured in Campbellfield near Melbourne, Australia, by Nestlé. Violet Crumble is also common in Hawaii and is available in other places, including Hong Kong. The bar is a crumbly honeycomb toffee center coated in compound chocolate. It was similar to the Crunchie made by Cadbury. The slogan for the chocolate bar was "It's the way it shatters that matters" (replacing the previous slogan, "Nothing else matters"). Abel Hoadley (born 10 September 1844, died 12 May 1918) opened a jam factory in South Melbourne, Victoria, in 1889, trading as A. Hoadley & Company. By 1895, business had expanded rapidly and Hoadley built a five-storey premises, the Rising Sun Preserving Works. He produced jams, jellies, preserved fruits, candied peels, sauces, and confectionery and employed a workforce as large as 200. By 1901, there were four preserving factories and a large confectionery works. Hoadley had acquired the firm of Dillon, Burrows & Co. and extended his products to vinegar, cocoa, and chocolate. In 1910, the jam business was sold to Henry Jones Co-operative Ltd. and in 1913, Hoadley's Chocolates Ltd was formed. The same year, Hoadley produced
    6.50
    2 votes
    100
    Charleston Chew

    Charleston Chew

    • Manufacturer: Fox-Cross Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Charleston Chew is a candy bar consisting of flavored nougat covered in chocolate flavor coating. It was created in 1922 by the Fox-Cross Candy Company, and the candy was named for the Charleston, a popular dance at that time. The company was purchased in 1957 by Nathan Sloane and later sold to Nabisco in 1980. Although he did not invent the Charleston Chew, he did change the candy's original blueprint, chocolate-covered vanilla taffy. In the 1970s, he introduced such new flavors as chocolate and strawberry. Warner-Lambert purchased Charleston Chew from RJR Nabisco in 1988; Tootsie Roll Industries purchased the brand from Warner-Lambert in 1993. The candy is available in vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry flavors. At one time, there was a fourth flavor, banana. "Mini Charleston Chews" are a bite-sized, similarly-shaped version of the candy bar, introduced in 1998. The original packaging for Charleston Chews was a grey box that had the brand name in small red font at the bottom of the box. Freezing results in them shattering with ease when chewed. Some people prefer eating them frozen. Charleston Chew candy bars have been used to demonstrate rheology (the effects of temperature and
    6.00
    2 votes
    101
    PayDay

    PayDay

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    PayDay is a candy bar consisting of salted peanuts around a center of caramel, currently produced by The Hershey Company. PayDay was first introduced in 1932 by Frank Martoccio. Martoccio founded the F.A. Martoccio Macaroni Company, and also later served as head of the Hollywood Candy Company. Hollywood also produced the ZERO bar. Hollywood moved to Centralia, Illinois, in 1938. In 1967, the Martoccio family sold Hollywood Brands to Consolidated Foods, which later became Sara Lee. Fire destroyed the Centralia plant in 1980. Production of the PayDay bar continued with help from the L.S. Heath and Sons Company until a new facility could be constructed. In 1988, Hollywood Brands was acquired by the Leaf Candy Company, then later became part of The Hershey Company in 1996. There have been several variations on the PayDay bar. They include the Honey-Roasted limited edition in 2003, the PAYDAY PRO, a high protein energy bar in 2005, and the PayDay Chocolatey Avalanche, a chocolate-covered version, in 2007. For a promotion in 1989, PayDays each contained an individually wrapped nickel.
    6.00
    2 votes
    102

    Abba-Zaba

    • Manufacturer: Annabelle Candy Company
    Abba-Zaba are taffy candy bars with peanut butter centers, made by Annabelle Candy Company in Hayward, California. According to the Candy Wrapper Museum, the first Abba Zaba bars were manufactured beginning in 1922 by Colby and McDermott. Before Annabelle Candy Co. started manufacturing Abba-Zaba, the packaging featured imagery which some now consider to be racially biased. Annabelle Candy Co. will only say that the wrapper has been the same for as long as they have manufactured the candy. A favorite snack of a young Don Van "Captain Beefheart" Vliet, it lent its name to a song that appears on his 1967 Safe as Milk album. In fact, the album itself was originally to be entitled "Abba Zaba", changed only when the company would not allow the usage of their trademark name. The bar was later manufactured by the Cardinet Candy Co. along with U-No Bar. Annabelle Candy Purchased the Cardinet Candy Co. in 1978. Annabelle now manufactures both candy bars in addition to others. Abba-Zaba bars are kosher pareve. Abba-Zaba bars can be found almost exclusively west of the Rockies. The wrapper features a yellow and black checkerboard "taxi" pattern. They can be purchased in bulk on the web.
    7.00
    1 votes
    103

    Clark Bar

    • Manufacturer: NECCO
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The Clark Bar is a milk chocolate peanut butter bar that is similar to a Butterfinger or Crispy Crunch made by Cadbury in Canada. It is manufactured by the New England Confectionery Company (NECCO). Today, the Clark Bar uses its original formula. It comes in milk and dark chocolate varieties. It was acquired by Leaf, then became independent again in 1996 when Hershey acquired Leaf's North American operations. NECCO bought it in 1999.
    7.00
    1 votes
    104

    Fry's Chocolate Cream

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Fry's Cream is a chocolate bar made by Cadbury's, and formerly by J. S. Fry & Sons. It consists of a fondant centre enrobed in dark chocolate and is available in a plain version, and also peppermint or orange fondant. Fry's Chocolate Cream was one of the first chocolate bars ever produced, launched in 1866. Like the first chocolate bars they are dairy-free and vegan. There are currently three variants of Fry's Cream: Over the years, other variants existed: An unsuccessful mid-1990s relaunch attempt also saw new variants available under the modernised "Fry's Spirit" branding for a while: Whether the Five Centre title was dropped briefly and relaunched as Fruit Medley (then changed back again) or they sat alongside each other despite being basically the same bar is unclear. Cadbury's also produced a solid milk chocolate bar called Five Boys using the Fry's trademark from the early 20th century right up until the 1970s. Cadbury's produced milk and plain chocolate sandwich bars under the Fry's branding also. Fry's chocolate bar was promoted by model George Lazenby, who later portrayed James Bond, in 1967. The Fry's chocolate bar was first produced in Union Street, Bristol, England in
    7.00
    1 votes
    105
    Kismet

    Kismet

    Kismet is a Finnish chocolate bar produced by Fazer. Kismet is a flat, rectangular bar. It is about 15 cm long, 5 cm wide and 1 cm thick. It is divided into four sections that are easy to break from each other. It weighs about 55 g. Kismet is made of crisp waffle and nougat covered in milk chocolate. In late 2009, early 2010 Fazer began an advertising campaign for the new Raspberry flavoured Kismet bar. The current advertising slogan for Kismet is "Niin hyvää, ettei sanotuksi saa" ("So good it can't be said"). Advertisements of Kismet bars often feature someone asking someone else exactly how good a Kismet bar is, and the other being unable to reply. Fazer even licensed the comic strip Blondie for a magazine advertisement of Kismet, reproducing a previous Blondie strip but having all the word balloons completely empty. Since the introduction of the new flavour variety of Kismet, a new consumer-proposed slogan is beginning to take off: "jos se ei oo rikki, ni älä korjaa!" ("If it aint broke, don't fix it!"). A previous advertisement campaign was "Jotain uutta sanottavaa" ("Something new to say") where the commercials presented situations where certain lines have gone beyond cliché.
    7.00
    1 votes
    106
    Lion Bar

    Lion Bar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Lion Bar is a chocolate bar made by Nestlé, previously a Rowntree's product. The Lion Bar was originally designed by Alan Norman, Experimental Confectioner, Fawdon factory. It consists of a filled wafer, caramel (30%) and crisp cereal (in the original recipe this was Kellog's Special K)(4%) covered in milk chocolate (41%). It was introduced by Eric Nicoli of Rowntree's in the 1970s, after a trial in the Dorset area in 1977. It was in some areas known as Big Cat until the late 1990s. When Nestlé acquired the brand in 1988, the recipe was changed, as was the packaging. In Europe, both White Lion and Peanut Butter Lion limited edition bars have also been available, as well as a "king size" variety. The bar is occasionally found in the U.S. and Canada in European import shops. A Lion Bar Cereal was made and was sold in Europe, later the UK and Ireland. In recent years the Lion bar has been dramatically reduced in size, which has caused controversy among fans. Ingredients Sugar, Glucose-fructose syrup, Sweetened condensed milk, Skimmed milk powder, Cocoa butter, Lactose, Crisped cereals [5%] (Wheat flour, Sugar, Wheat starch, Vegetable fat, Raising agent: Sodium carbonate, Salt,
    7.00
    1 votes
    107

    Mary Jane

    • Manufacturer: NECCO
    Mary Jane is a peanut butter and molasses flavored taffy-type candy with peanut butter in the center. Originally made in 1914 by The Charles N. Miller Co., and later by Stark Candy Co., it now manufactured by Necco. Mary Jane is dairy-free, egg-free, and gluten-free and is similar in style and packaging to Bit-O-Honey, which contains almonds, eggs and milk.
    7.00
    1 votes
    108

    Secret

    • Manufacturer: Rowntree's
    Secret was a chocolate bar that was manufactured by Nestlé during the 1980s and the 1990s that was popular in the UK. It consisted of a bird's nest-styled chocolate coating with a creamy mousse centre similar to the filling of a Walnut Whip. It was packaged in a gold-coloured wrapper with the product's name printed on it in purple and white. See image A television advert for the product, first shown in 1990, and set in a 1940s mystery film style featured an elegant lady riding a train when a man rushes into her cabin and hands her a Secret bar saying, "guard this with your life". He then runs off to divert the two mysterious men who've been following him, but while he's away, the woman eats the secret bar because she couldn't resist such a delicious temptation. When the man returns to retrieve it, it's gone, because she had eaten it. At the end of the advert the words accompanied by a voice-over says, "You can't trust anyone to keep a Secret." The product was discontinued a couple of years later, due to high production costs and low volume of sales. In more recent years there have been a number of petitions, on websites such as Facebook, asking Nestle to relaunch the Secret bar.
    7.00
    1 votes
    109

    Tupla

    • Sold in (countries): Finland
    Tupla is a Finnish chocolate bar made by Leaf. It consists of milk chocolate with a nougat-flavoured filling, coated with bits of almond. The name "Tupla", meaning "double", comes from the fact that there are always two Tupla bars in a single wrapper. Unlike Twix, however, the bars are placed end-to-end, not parallel. The original Tupla dates back to the 1970s and is still one of the most popular chocolate bars in Finland. In the 1990s and 2000s two variants have been introduced: Tupla White, with a coating of white chocolate instead of milk chocolate, and Tupla Black, with bits of liquorice added into the filling. There were even Tupla Easter eggs available in the 1990s. Despite the name, however, there weren't two chocolate eggs nested inside each other. In 2008 a new side-brand was issued, Tupla Sport. Tupla Sport has a high fibre content and comes in two flavours: apple and raspberry. Its main ingredients are chocolate, muesli, almonds and nougat.
    7.00
    1 votes
    110
    Wispa

    Wispa

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Wispa is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury UK. The bar was launched in 1981 as a trial version in North East England and with its success it was introduced nationally in 1983. It was seen as a competitor to Rowntree's Aero (now owned by Nestlé). In 2003, as part of a relaunch of the Cadbury Dairy Milk brand, the Wispa brand was discontinued and the product relaunched as "Dairy Milk Bubbly". As part of the relaunch, the product was reshaped as a standard moulded bar (similar to other 'Dairy Milk' products) instead of a whole-bar count-line. However, in 2007, helped by an internet campaign, the Wispa bar was relaunched, albeit for a "limited period". In October 2008 Wispa returned again to shops in the UK and Ireland due to the chocolate bar's popularity during the previous limited period release. A product known as Cadbury's Wispa, resembling a moulded Dairy Milk bar with bubbles and with different packaging, is available in some other countries, including Romania. The tiny bubbles within the chocolate are formed by aerating the molten chocolate with gas, typically carbon dioxide or nitrogen, while at a high pressure, which causes microscopic gas bubbles to
    7.00
    1 votes
    111
    Kvikk Lunsj

    Kvikk Lunsj

    • Manufacturer: Freia
    • Sold in (countries): Norway
    Kvikk Lunsj (Norwegian for "Quick Lunch") is a confection created by the Norwegian chocolate brand Freia in 1937. It consists of a thick bar, composed of wafer covered with milk chocolate, and divided into four fingers. Each finger can be snapped from the bar, one at a time. The Kvikk Lunsj XXL introduced in 1999, has one large finger, approximately 2.5 cm wide. In shape and composition, Kvikk Lunsj is almost identical to Kit Kat, which was introduced two years earlier, in 1935. On average a Norwegian eats approximately nine Kvikk Lunsjs every year, three of them at Easter. This means 4,500 tons of chocolate during the holidays. During the 1960s, Freia printed fjellvettreglene (Norwegian for “mountain sense/hiking sense”) on the back of the chocolate. Kvikk Lunsj is strongly associated in Norway with family hikes and (cross-country) ski trips in the mountains, which accounts for the increased consumption during Easter, when families often get together and ski trips are traditionally compulsory. Kvikk Lunsj is produced by Kraft Foods Nordic, and is sold in Norway and Sweden.
    4.67
    3 votes
    112

    Miniature Heroes

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Ireland
    Heroes (previously Miniature Heroes) is a brand of boxed/tinned confectionery currently manufactured by Cadbury. Introduced in September 1999, they were a response to rival Mars' "Celebrations". The product contains miniature versions of various Cadbury chocolate bars and is known as "Favourites" in Australia and New Zealand.
    4.67
    3 votes
    113

    Almond Joy

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    An Almond Joy is a candy bar manufactured by Hershey's. It consists of a coconut-based center topped with two almonds, the combination enrobed in a layer of milk chocolate. Almond Joy is the sister product of Mounds, which is essentially the same confection but without the almond and coated instead with dark chocolate; it also features similar packaging and logo design, but in a red color scheme instead of Almond Joy's blue. Peter Paul Halajian was a candy retailer in the New Haven, Connecticut area in the early 20th century. Along with some other Armenian investors, including Dutch candy manufacturer Winjamy, he formed the Winjamy Candy Manufacturing Company in 1919. The company at first sold various brands of candies, but following sugar and coconut shortages in World War II, they dropped most brands and concentrated their efforts on the Mounds bar. The Almond Joy bar was introduced in 1946 as a replacement for the Dream Bar (created in 1936) that contained diced almonds with the coconut. In 1978, Peter Paul merged with the Cadbury company. Hershey’s then purchased the United States portion of the combined company in 1988. During the 1970s, the Peter Paul company used the jingle,
    6.00
    1 votes
    114

    Mars Bar

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Mars (also Mars bar) is a chocolate bar manufactured by Mars, Incorporated. It was first manufactured in Slough, Berkshire in the United Kingdom in 1932 as a sweeter version of the US Milky Way bar which Mars, Inc. produced (not to be confused with the European version of Milky Way, which is similar to the US 3 Musketeers). It was advertised to the trade as being made with Cadbury's chocolate as 'couverture'. In the United States, a different confection bears the Mars bar name. Featuring nougat, soft caramel, and almonds coated in milk chocolate, the American Mars bar was relaunched in 2010 after being discontinued in 2002. In 1932, Forrest Mars, son of American candy maker Frank C. Mars, rented a factory in Slough and with a staff of twelve people, began manufacturing a chocolate bar consisting of nougat and caramel covered in milk chocolate, modelled after his father's Milky Way bar, which was already popular in the U.S. Today the basic recipe is unaltered but the size of the bar and the proportions of the main components have changed over the years. With minor variations, this version is sold worldwide, except for the U.S., and is packaged in a black wrapper with red lettering.
    6.00
    1 votes
    115
    Twirl

    Twirl

    Twirl is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury. Introduced by Cadbury Ireland as a single bar in the early 1970s, it was repackaged in 1984 as a twin bar and from the 1990s onwards. Although still produced in Ireland it has been marketed internationally and is now one of the best-selling chocolate single bar Cadbury owns. It consists of two Flake-style bars covered in Dairy Milk, milk chocolate.
    6.00
    1 votes
    116

    Flyte

    • Manufacturer: Mars, Incorporated
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Flyte is a chocolate bar manufactured by Mars, Incorporated weighing 45 grams. Each bar comes wrapped in two individual halves. It consists of a chocolatey, whipped nougat-style centre coated in milk chocolate. It is essentially the same as a UK Milky Way bar before the filling in Milky Way bars was changed from chocolate to vanilla flavour in 1993.
    5.00
    2 votes
    117
    Túró Rudi

    Túró Rudi

    Túró Rudi is the name of a chocolate bar popular in Hungary since 1968. The bar is composed of a thin outer coating of chocolate and an inner filling of túró (curd). The "Rudi" in the product name comes from the Hungarian "rúd", which translates to rod or bar (and is also a nickname for the name Rudolf). Túró Rudi can be made in different flavours and sizes. The basic (plain, "natúr") bar is by far the most popular amongst Hungarians and comes in two sizes: the classic 30-gram bar and the larger ("óriás", giant) 51-gram bar. There are also less popular differently-flavoured varieties of the bar, like apricot or peanut butter. The plain bar can be found with dark chocolate outer coating. The "pöttyös" (spotty or spotted) theme is part of the marketing scheme of the bar, and the distinctive red polka-dots are readily associated with Túró Rudi by regular consumers. Friesland Hungária, Inc. (which claims to be the manufacturer of the "original" Túró Rudi) released its product in Slovakia, Romania, Spain and Italy under the name DOTS in 2003. The version sold in Western Europe is said to be sweeter and comes with a milk chocolate coating to suit the taste of locals. Its first public
    5.00
    2 votes
    118
    Aero

    Aero

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Aero is a milk chocolate bar filled with bubbles of air (see air chocolate), made by Nestlé and primarily sold in the United Kingdom (where it originated), Ireland, Mainland Europe, Brazil, South Africa, Argentina, Australia, Middle East and Canada. The process of manufacture was patented in 1935 by Rowntree's. Registration of the trademark and manufacture to market started soon after. In 1935, Rowntree's launched Aero into the UK, followed by the mint variation in the 1970s. Wrapping was brown (green in the mint version) and displayed the "Rowntree's" script logo and the large word "AERO", along with the slogan "Hold on tight or I'll fly away!" below the "AERO" name. The words "Aerated Milk Chocolate" ("Aerated Milk-Mint Chocolate" for the mint version) were seen multiple times in the word "AERO." In the 1970s, an advertisement was aired in which kids flying a kite thought the kite was an Aero bar. Then, brown and white bubbles would fly out of the imaginary bar to form the Aero wrapper. In 1988, Rowntree Mackintosh (as it then was, having merged with Mackintosh's in the 1960s) was losing money and was sold to Swiss company Nestlé, who was already famous for its own Nesquik
    5.00
    1 votes
    119

    Brunch Bar

    Brunch Bar is a bar of cereals (oats, bran flakes and crispies) bound with honey and half covered in milk chocolate. They come in a variety of flavours: Raisin, Hazelnut, Apricot & Almond, Cranberry & Orange, Fruit & Nut, Mixed Berry, Chocolate Chip and Toasted Coconut and is made by Cadbury. They are breakfast type bars that are quick to eat in, and ideally as a slightly healthier and more wholesome snack option to chocolate bars.
    5.00
    1 votes
    120
    Kit Kat

    Kit Kat

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Kit Kat is a chocolate-covered wafer biscuit bar confection that was created by Rowntree's of York, England, and is now produced worldwide by Nestlé, which acquired Rowntree in 1988, except in the United States where it is made under licence by The Hershey Company. Each bar consists of fingers composed of three layers of wafer, covered in an outer layer of chocolate. Each finger can be snapped from the bar separately. Bars typically have 2 or 4 fingers. Single fingered larger Kit Kat Chunky bars are also popular. Use of the name "Kit Kat" or "Kit Cat" for a type of food goes back to the 18th Century, when mutton pies known as a Kit-Kat were served at meetings of the political Kit-Cat Club in London. The origins of what is now known as the "Kit Kat" brand go back to 1911, when Rowntree's, a confectionery company based in York in the United Kingdom, trademarked the terms "Kit Cat" and "Kit Kat". Although the terms were not immediately utilised, the first conception of the Kit Kat appeared in the 1920s, when Rowntree launched a brand of boxed chocolates entitled "Kit Cat". This continued into the 1930s, when Rowntree's shifted focus and production onto its "Black Magic" and "Dairy
    5.00
    1 votes
    121
    Moro

    Moro

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Ireland
    Moro is the brand name of two different versions of chocolate bar made by Cadbury plc. One bar consists of nougat, biscuit and caramel filling and chocolate covering. The wrapper is blue, with the 'Moro' logo in yellow. It is available in Ireland. In May 2006, Moro Peanut was launched, with the words "Formerly Starbar" displayed prominently on the label, the wrapper on this variant is red. (The same bar continues to be known as Starbar in the United Kingdom.) In the summer of 2007 a Coconut Moro bar was released as a limited edition in Ireland. The wrapper is white with the Moro logo in yellow with a blue outline. The bar was commonly referred to as a "Bounty Moro", although Bounty bars are manufactured by Mars, Incorporated and not Cadbury. The New Zealand bar has a black wrapper with 'Moro' in yellow (see side photo). The slogan is 'Get more go' due to its high energy content. This bar has a whipped nougat and caramel centre and is covered in chocolate. There are three different types of Moro sold in New Zealand, the aforementioned 'standard Moro', the Moro Double Nut containing peanuts and hazelnuts, and the recently released Moro Gold, which is similar to the Irish Moro and
    5.00
    1 votes
    122
    Freddo Frog

    Freddo Frog

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): Zimbabwe
    Freddo (sometimes called Freddo Frog) is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury. It was invented in 1930 by Harry Melbourne, an 18 year old moulder employed by MacRobertson's; an Australian confectionery company. It is sold in Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, the United Kingdom and Zimbabwe. Each chocolate is shaped like a cartoon frog, standing up and dressed. Though primarily available as solid milk fingers, certain versions of the product have a cream or caramel centered flavouring. These include Dairy Milk, white chocolate, rice crisp, strawberry, peppermint, Crunchie (with bits of Cadbury's 'Crunchie' bar put in), pineapple (Only in 'twin-packs'), "Rainbow Crunch" and "Milky Top" (the top half being white chocolate and the bottom milk chocolate, in the style of Cadbury's "Top Deck" products). In 1930, the MacRobertson's chocolate company were looking to add a new product to their children's range. Initial designs for chocolate mouse were rejected, as Harry Melbourne felt that women and children were afraid of mice and would dislike the product. It was instead decided to produce a chocolate frog, branded as "Freddo Frog". There were four varieties available:
    4.00
    2 votes
    123

    Nut Goodie

    • Manufacturer: Pearson's Candy Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Nut Goodie is a candy bar manufactured by Pearson's Candy Company of Saint Paul, Minnesota and available in the United States. It is a concoction of chocolate, maple, and peanuts and is distantly related in construction to Pearson's Bun candy bars. The Nut Goodie was once a 2 oz. bar and then shrunk to 1.75 oz., which has been its current size for the past 30 years. The Nut Goodie was introduced in 1912 as one of the first manufactured products of Pearson's Candy Company for the cost of 5¢. It went on to become of the companies most successful products and is still available today, outlasting other Pearson's candy bars like the Seven-Up Bar. At some point during its history the recipe and wrapper were slightly changed, but restored to the original recipe and wrapper when two Pearson's employees bought the company in 1985. Bonny Wolf, a weekend food commentator on National Public Radio, stated that "Nut Goodies are to Minnesota what Goldenberg's Peanut Chews are to Pennsylvania. The Nut Goodie is known as "A Minnesota Classic".
    4.00
    2 votes
    124
    Baby Ruth

    Baby Ruth

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Baby Ruth is an American candy bar made of peanuts, caramel and chocolate-flavored nougat covered in chocolate. In 1921, the Curtiss Candy Company refashioned its Kandy Kake into the Baby Ruth. The bar was a staple of the Chicago-based company for some seven decades. Curtiss was purchased by Nabisco in 1981. In 1990, RJR Nabisco sold the Curtiss brands to Nestlé. Although the name of the candy bar sounds like the name of the famous baseball player Babe Ruth, the Curtiss Candy Company traditionally claimed that it was named after President Grover Cleveland's daughter, Ruth Cleveland. The candy maker, located on the same street as Wrigley Field, named the bar "Baby Ruth" in 1921, as Babe Ruth's fame was on the rise, over 30 years after Cleveland had left the White House, and 17 years after his daughter, Ruth, had died. The company did not negotiate an endorsement deal with Ruth, and many saw the company's story about the origin of the name to be a devious way to avoid having to pay the baseball player any royalties. Curtiss successfully shut down a rival bar that was approved by, and named for, Ruth, on the grounds that the names were too similar. In the trivia book series
    4.00
    1 votes
    125

    Cadbury Spira

    Cadbury Spira was a milk chocolate product in the form of a hollow twisted spiral produced by Cadbury, hence the name. It was discontinued in late May 2005 for unknown reasons.
    4.00
    1 votes
    126

    Cadbury's Fudge

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Fudge is a brand of candy bar manufactured by Cadbury. It is a bar of fudge in a semi-circular cross-section covered in a layer of milk chocolate. Produced in small bite size bars and in larger bars, the Fudge continues to be produced and sold in countries such as the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. It was launched in the 1950s, originally under the name "Milk Fudge" which later became just Fudge. In the 1970s through to the early 1990s Fudge was advertised with the famous slogan "A finger of fudge is just enough to give your kids a treat", conceived by singer and songwriter Mike d'Abo. Its accompanying jingle was based on the English folk song "The Lincolnshire Poacher". Fudge is currently produced in the Keynsham plant in Somerset, however, as of November/ December 2010, production will transfer to Cadbury's new plant in Skarbimierz, Poland. Labels for these products do not state a country of origin, instead stating "Made in the EU under license from Cadbury UK Ltd"
    4.00
    1 votes
    127
    Cherry Mash

    Cherry Mash

    Cherry Mash is an American candy bar consisting of a soft, cherry-flavored center containing maraschino cherries, covered in a mixture of chopped roasted peanuts and chocolate. The Cherry Mash was formulated in 1918 by Dr. George Washington Chase's son, Ernest. The candy consisted of a quarter-pound mound of chopped roasted peanuts, blended with chocolate coating over a smooth cherry fondant center. The candy bar was originally called Cherry Chase, and then Cherry Chaser, before becoming known as Cherry Mash. Today, Cherry Mash remains the Chase Candy Company's best-selling product. It is produced in a factory in Saint Joseph, Missouri and can be found throughout the Midwest in most grocery and convenience stores and mass-merchandise outlets. To this day, Cherry Mash continues to be the best-selling cherry candy bar in the United States according to the Chase Candy website.
    4.00
    1 votes
    128
    Toblerone

    Toblerone

    • Manufacturer: Kraft Foods
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Toblerone ( /ˈtoʊbləroʊn/; German: [tobləˈroːnə]) is a chocolate bar brand owned by Kraft Foods, who acquired the product from former owner Jacobs Suchard in 1990. It is well known for its distinctive prism shape (triangular prism or pentahedron). Toblerone was created by Theodor Tobler (1876–1941) Bern, Switzerland in 1908. Theodor Tobler together with Emil Baumann (Theodor Tobler’s cousin) developed a unique milk chocolate including nougat, almonds and honey with a distinctive triangular shape. The product's name is a portmanteau combining Tobler's name with the Italian word torrone (a type of nougat). The image of a bear is hidden in the Matterhorn mountain symbolizing the town of its origin. The triangular shape of the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps is commonly believed to have given Theodor Tobler his inspiration for the shape of Toblerone. However, according to Theodor's sons, the triangular shape originates from a pyramid shape that dancers at the Folies Bergères created as the finale of a show that Theodor saw. Theodor Tobler applied for a patent for the Toblerone manufacturing process in Bern in 1909. The Toblerone brand was trademarked in 1909, at the Federal Institute for
    4.00
    1 votes
    129

    100 Grand Bar

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    100 Grand Bar (formerly known as $100,000 Bar) is a candy bar produced by Nestlé in the United States. It weighs 1.5 ounces (42 grams) and includes chocolate, caramel and crisped rice. The bar contains 190 calories; it is low in cholesterol and sodium, but high in saturated fat and sugar. Its slogan is "That's Rich!" In May 2005, a Kentucky woman sued a radio station for a prank in which a Radio DJ gave away one of the bars, leading (so the woman claims) listeners to believe the DJ was giving away 100,000 United States dollars.
    0.00
    0 votes
    130
    Boost

    Boost

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Boost is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury. The bar is sold in the United Kingdom and South Africa by Cadbury UK and in Australia and New Zealand by Cadbury Australia. Its wrapper says that it consists of milk chocolate with caramel and biscuit filling. The wrapper also states that Boost is "Charged with glucose." Boost was launched in 1985 as a tough coconut and caramel bar, coated in chocolate. It was then relaunched in a further two variants: a peanut version with peanut butter (yellow wrapper) and a biscuit version. The coconut version is no longer available. The peanut variant is now called a Starbar. Starbar originally existed before peanut Boost but was taken off the market and rebranded. Then they changed their mind and rebranded it as Starbar again. The biscuit version is now the standard Boost bar. A further version was launched in the UK in 2002 with a green wrapper: this contained guarana; was marketed alongside the biscuit Boost; and advertised with the slogan "Boost Guarana: One Step Ahead". For a while Boost was advertised on television by comedy duo Reeves and Mortimer. This led to the unconventional advertising slogan "It's slightly rippled
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    131
    Coffee Crisp

    Coffee Crisp

    • Manufacturer: Nestlé
    • Sold in (countries): Canada
    Coffee Crisp is a popular chocolate bar created in Canada. The origins of the bar are in the UK in the 1930s with a chocolate bar named Rowntree's Wafer Crisp. This was later renamed to Chocolate Crisp. The bar was later introduced to Canadians as Biscrisp. In 1938, a coffee variation (Coffee Crisp) was added to the line of flavoured Biscrisps (which included fruit flavours). It is presently marketed by Nestlé Canada. The bar is a combination of coffee cream, cookie wafers and milk chocolate coating. It does contain a small amount of coffee, although much of its coffee taste comes from flavouring. In 2001, the first variation of the Coffee Crisp brand was introduced, a limited edition "Coffee Crisp Orange" flavour. A limited amount of the orange flavour was reissued in 2002. 2002 also saw the release of a limited edition "Coffee Crisp Raspberry" flavour. "Coffee Crisp Café Caramel" was sold in the summer of 2004 and once again in the summer of 2006 and a limited edition "Coffee Crisp White" was launched in the autumn that same year. A limited edition maple flavored bar was available from April to September 2005. For much of the 2000s, Coffee Crisp was available in "French Vanilla"
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    132

    Cow Tales

    • Manufacturer: Goetze
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Cow Tales are a candy made by Goetze's Candy Company. They are long, thin cylinders of soft caramel with a vanilla creme center. In addition to the original vanilla, there are three other flavors: caramel apple, chocolate, and strawberry.
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    133
    Heath bar

    Heath bar

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    The Heath bar is an American candy bar made of toffee, marketed by L.S. Heath beginning in 1914, subsequently by Leaf, Inc., and since 1996 by Hershey. Shaped as a thin hard slab with a milk chocolate coating, the toffee originally contained sugar, butter, and almonds, and was a small squarish bar weighing 1 ounce. The Heath bar is similar to Skor, also marketed under the Hershey brand, and the Daim bar. The Heath bar ranked 56th nationally in the US and 110th on the US East Coast in a 1987 popularity survey, and has become a popular add-in ingredient to ice cream, cookies and other confections. In 1913, L.S. Heath, a school teacher, bought an existing confectionery shop in Robinson, Illinois as a likely business opportunity for his oldest sons, Bayard Heath and Everett Heath. The brothers opened a combination candy store, ice cream parlor, and manufacturing operation there in 1914. With the success of the business, the elder Heath became interested in ice cream, and opened a small dairy factory in 1915. His sons worked on expanding their confectionery business. At some point they reportedly acquired a toffee recipe, via a traveling salesman, from a Greek confectioner in another
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    134
    Hershey's Miniatures

    Hershey's Miniatures

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    Hershey’s Miniatures are packaged assortments of miniature-sized candy bars sold by The Hershey Company. Hershey’s Miniatures were originally packaged as an assortment in 1939, and featured the most popular Hershey chocolate bars of that time. The product currently contains traditional Hershey bars, Mr. Goodbars, Hershey's Special Dark, and Krackel bars. Krackel bars are now only available in this assortment. Each Miniature weighs roughly 8.6g and contains 42 calories. A line extension called Hershey’s Miniatures Nut Lovers featuring four kinds of chocolate paired with four varieties of nuts was introduced in 2004 along with La Dulceria Thalia Hershey’s Miniatures, a cookie and candy assortment.
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    135
    Mr. Goodbar

    Mr. Goodbar

    • Manufacturer: The Hershey Company
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Mr. Goodbar is a chocolate candy bar containing peanut, whose packaging can be easily identified by its distinctive yellow background and red text. It is manufactured by The Hershey Company and was introduced in 1925. Hershey initially did not want its name associated with a chocolate bar that contained nuts, so it was introduced as being produced by the Chocolate Sales Corporation who was named Samueol Hinkle. It is currently available both as an individual product and as one of the varieties of Hershey's Miniatures. Looking for Mr. Goodbar was also the title of a 1975 novel by Judith Rossner, and an Oscar-nominated 1977 movie. The formula was modified in 1995 to add more peanuts. The Hershey Company began to change the ingredients of some of its products in 2008, in order to replace some of the relatively expensive cocoa butter with cheaper oil substitutes. This was done to cut costs, rather than having to raise prices in the marketplace for products containing cocoa butter. The result of this change was a tremendous reduction in flavor. Hersheys changed the description of the product and altered the packaging slightly along with the ingredients. Though the new formula contains
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    136
    Sky Bar

    Sky Bar

    • Manufacturer: NECCO
    • Sold in (countries): United States of America
    Sky Bar is an American candy bar, produced since 1938 by Necco. Each Sky Bar has four sections, each with a different filling: caramel, vanilla, peanut and fudge, all covered in milk chocolate. In 1938, the Sky Bar was first announced to the public by means of a dramatic skywriting advertising campaign. Necco was the first candy manufacturer in the United States of America to introduce a molded chocolate bar, having four distinctly different centers enrobed in chocolate. The originator of the Sky Bar was a candy maker working for Necco named Joseph Cangemi. In 1945, the blackout and curfew in Times Square, NY was lifted on VE Day, after three years of darkness. Only six display signs had their lighting equipment ready for operation and Necco’s Sky Bar was one of them. The peanut section of the Sky Bar is not filled with peanut butter, but in fact a peanut-flavored caramel. The vanilla section is not quite nougat or marshmallow, but similar to the consistency of a Valomilk cup. The Sky Bar has become difficult to find, but it is still produced by Necco and can be found in certain stores - especially in New England, at Cracker Barrel and old fashioned candy stores on the Internet. On
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    137
    Time Out

    Time Out

    • Manufacturer: Cadbury
    • Sold in (countries): United Kingdom
    Time Out is a brand of chocolate bar currently manufactured by Cadbury. It was introduced in the United Kingdom and Ireland in 1992, followed by Australia and New Zealand in 1995. Mainly sold in pairs, it consists a ripple of milk chocolate between two wafers, smothered in Dairy Milk, milk chocolate. In Europe, Time Out is available for the Irish and UK markets and is produced by Cadbury Ireland. It was given a new look in 2010 with lighter blue packaging and the new slogan "Everyone needs some Time Out". The bar is also available in Australia, New Zealand and Japan. It was also introduced to Canada and South Africa in 2001, but was discontinued three years later due to lagging sales. When Time Out was first introduced, it was a substantial snack (about 25 grams), then suddenly it was down-sized to 20.5g. The newly released single-finger bar has now shrunk down to 16g. The current main twin finger bar has a combined weight of 32g (40g for Australia and New Zealand) and is suitable for vegetarians.
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