Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 1.845 views
  • 624 votes
  • 624 voters
  • 7%
Best Canal of All Time

More about Best Canal of All Time:

Best Canal of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Canal of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Canal of All Time has gotten 1.845 views and has gathered 624 votes from 624 voters. O O

Best Canal of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Canal of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Canal of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Canal of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Royal Canal of Ireland

    Royal Canal of Ireland

    • Major Cities: Longford
    The Royal Canal (Irish: An Chanáil Ríoga) is a canal originally built for freight and passenger transportation from the River Liffey at Dublin to the River Shannon at Cloondara in County Longford in Ireland. It fell into disrepair, but has since been restored for navigation. The full length of the canal was reopened on 1 October 2010. Work commenced in 1790 and lasted 27 years before finally reaching the Shannon in 1817, at a total cost of £1,421,954 . The canal passes through Maynooth, Kilcock, Enfield, Mullingar and Ballymahon has a spur to Longford. The total length of the main navigation is 145 kilometres (90 mi), and the system has 46 locks. There is one main feeder (from Lough Owel), which enters the canal at Mullingar. At the Dublin end, the canal reaches the Liffey through a wide sequence of dock and locks at Spencer Dock, with a final sea lock to manage access to the river and sea. In 1843, while walking with his wife along the Royal Canal, Sir William Rowan Hamilton realised the formula for quaternions and carved his initial thoughts into a stone on the Brougham Bridge over the canal. The canal is notable in that the Dublin - Mullingar railway line was built alongside the
    7.71
    7 votes
    2
    Canal de Nantes à Brest

    Canal de Nantes à Brest

    The Nantes-Brest canal (Canal de Nantes à Brest) is a French canal which links the two cities of Nantes and Brest through inland Brittany. It was built during the 19th century and its total length is 385 km with 238 locks from coast to coast. The western portion of the canal is also known as Branche Finistèrienne. The original idea of such a canal is dated from the 16th century but it's only when Brest was blockaded by the English fleet that Napoleon I of France decided to build this canal to assure a safe inland link between the two largest military ports of the French Atlantic front. Building started in 1811, and Napoleon III of France presided over the canal's opening in 1858. In 1923 the route of the canal was broken by the Guerledan dam. Navigation is no longer possible between Maël-Carhaix and Pontivy. The lake flooded the uppermost portion of the canal for some 8 km along with 17 locks. The canal utilizes the following rivers, west to east: Break at Lake Guerlédan Total length on this current route is 337 km and 158 locks. West to East Beginning in Brest on the canalized portion of the Aulne River for 51 km via 8 locks. Continuing on Aulne, now called Canal de Nantes à
    7.43
    7 votes
    3
    Pennsylvania Canal

    Pennsylvania Canal

    Pennsylvania Canal refers generally to a complex system of canals, dams, locks, tow paths, aqueducts, and other infrastructure including, in some cases, railroads in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Assembly of 1824 applied the term to the canals and railroads of the Main Line of Public Works to be built across the southern part of the state, and the term was also applied to canals later added to the state system. Privately built canals, not technically part of the Pennsylvania Canal, linked to the public system and added to its value. Though most of the canals no longer have any function, some segments retain value as historic and recreational sites. The canal era began in Pennsylvania in 1797 with the Conewago Canal, which carried riverboats around Conewago Falls on the Susquehanna River near York Haven. Spurred by construction of the Erie Canal between 1817 and 1825 and the competitive advantage it gave New York State in moving people and materials to and from the interior of the continent, Pennsylvanians built hundreds of miles of canals during the early decades of the 19th century. These included two canals built by Pennsylvania stock companies, the Schuylkill Canal from
    6.00
    8 votes
    4
    Nicaragua Canal

    Nicaragua Canal

    The Inter-Oceanic Nicaragua Canal is a proposed waterway through Nicaragua to connect the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. Such a canal would follow rivers up to Lake Nicaragua and then be constructed to cut some 10+km through the isthmus of Rivas to reach the Pacific. Such construction of a canal along the route using the San Juan River was proposed in the early colonial era. Louis Napoleon wrote an article about its feasibility in the early 19th century. Plans by the United States to build such a canal were abandoned in the early 20th century, after it purchased the French interests in the Panama Canal at a reasonable cost. Speculation on a new canal continues, however; the steady increase in world shipping, together with the possibility of establishing shorter shipping routes, may make this an economically viable project. Alternatively, a railway, or a combined railway and oil pipeline, could be built to link ports on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Nicaragua has let contracts to Korean developers to construct a deepwater port and facilities at Monkey Point on the Atlantic coast to improve capacity there. Several possible routes have been proposed for a
    6.71
    7 votes
    5
    Canale Villoresi

    Canale Villoresi

    Canale Villoresi is a canal in Italy; it was the brainchild of Lombardy engineer Eugenio Villoresi. It originates from the River Ticino near the village of Somma Lombardo, and runs eastwards for 86 km to the Adda River. Construction began in 1877, but Villoresi himself died two years later. The works were completed in 1890 by a consortium. Irrigation was the canal's main reason for being but the addition of locks enabled cargoes of sand to be carried along it. Media related to Canale Villoresi at Wikimedia Commons
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    Market Weighton Canal

    Market Weighton Canal

    The Market Weighton canal ran 9.5 miles (15.3 km) from the Humber estuary to its terminus near Market Weighton. It gained its Act of Parliament in 1772 and opened in 1782. The 3.5 miles (5.6 km) closest to Market Weighton was abandoned in 1900 and the right of navigation through Weighton lock was lost in 1971. However as of 2002 the lock was passable and the canal usable up to the junction with the River Foulness where silt has made it impassable. The canal was conceived as part of a wider scheme to drain the low lying land and fens between the River Humber and Market Weighton. Some 50,000 acres (20,000 ha) of land were threatened by flooding, both from rain and from water flowing into the area from a larger catchment covering 80,000 acres (32,000 ha), including the East Yorkshire wolds, which border the area to the east. Prior to the scheme, most of the lower area was marshland, while the upper area suffered from waterlogging, and was only suitable for grazing of animals. The first scheme was for a line from the Humber to Wholsea, near Sod House lock, with a branch to Pocklington and another to Weighton. It was proposed in October 1765, and again in August 1767. By April 1771, it
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Warren County Canal

    Warren County Canal

    The Warren County Canal was a branch of the Miami and Erie Canal in southwestern Ohio about 20 miles (32 km) in length that connected the Warren County seat of Lebanon to the main canal at Middletown in the mid-19th century. Lebanon was at the crossroads of two major roads, the highway from Cincinnati to Columbus (later U.S. Route 42) and the road from Chillicothe to the College Township (Oxford), but Lebanon businessmen and civic leaders wanted better transportation facilities and successfully lobbied for their own canal, part of the canal fever of the first third of the 19th century. The Warren County Canal was never successful, operating less than a decade before the state abandoned it. The Miami and Erie Canal was authorized by the Ohio General Assembly in 1825. Work began that same year and the canal was navigable from the Ohio River at Cincinnati to Middletown in December 1827. By April 1830, it was open to Dayton. (The entire length to Lake Erie at Toledo opened in 1845.) New York Governor DeWitt Clinton, who was the driving force behind his state's Erie Canal, came to Ohio in 1829 for the groundbreaking ceremonies of the Miami and Erie Canal, which were held in Middletown.
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    First Welland Canal

    First Welland Canal

    The Welland Canal has gone through many incarnations in its history. Today, five distinct canal-construction efforts are recognized. The retronym First Welland Canal is applied to the original canal, constructed from 1824 to 1829 and 1831 to 1833. The Great Lakes form an excellent navigation route into the interior of North America. Downstream from Niagara Falls, ships can reach the port city of Montreal without encountering major difficulties. Upstream, the lakes are navigable all the way to the western end of Lake Superior. Early on during the European settlement of North America, lack of other infrastructure made the Great Lakes the premier route to reach the interior of the continent, and later to ship materials and goods from the new frontiers. The Niagara Falls stood as a mighty barrier. To bypass it, a portage road between Queenston, Ontario and Chippawa was used, but the solution was far from optimal. The cargo had to be unloaded, carried 18 km up the Niagara Escarpment, then loaded onto different ships to continue on its way. The relatively narrow Niagara Peninsula, situated between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, was a natural match to the idea of bypassing the Falls. Indeed,
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    Volga-Baltic Waterway

    Volga-Baltic Waterway

    The Volga–Baltic Waterway, formerly known as the Mariinsk Canal System (Russian: Мариинская водная система), is a series of canals and rivers in Russia which link the Volga River with the Baltic Sea. Its overall length between Cherepovets and Lake Onega is 368 kilometres (229 mi). Originally constructed in the early 19th century, the system was rebuilt for larger vessels in the 1960s, becoming a part of the United Deep Inland Waterway System of European Russia. The original name "Mariinsky" is the credit to Empress Maria Feodorovna, the second wife of Emperor Paul I of Russia. After Peter the Great wrested the Gulf of Finland from Sweden, it was necessary to provide a secure means of river transportation with the Russian hinterland. The earliest Vyshny Volochyok canal system, completed by 1709, was intended to provide for this. It was followed by the ambitious project of the Ladoga Canals. Under Alexander I of Russia, the traditional waterway through Vychny Volochyok was complemented by the Tikhvin canal system (1811) and the Mariinsk canal system (1810), the latter becoming by far the most popular of the three. The Mariinsk canal system was an outstanding monument of early
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Chesterfield Canal

    Chesterfield Canal

    • Canal Tunnels: Drakehole Tunnel
    The Chesterfield Canal is in the north of England and it is known locally as 'Cuckoo Dyke'. It was opened in 1777 and ran 46 miles (74 km) from the River Trent at West Stockwith, Nottinghamshire to Chesterfield, Derbyshire. It is currently only navigable as far as Kiveton Park near Rotherham, South Yorkshire, plus an isolated section near Chesterfield. The canal was built to export coal, limestone, and lead from Derbyshire, iron from Chesterfield, and corn, deals, timber, groceries, etc. into Derbyshire. The stone for the Palace of Westminster was quarried in South Anston, Rotherham, and transported via the canal. The route of the canal was surveyed by James Brindley and John Varley, who estimated the cost at £94,908 17s. Brindley presented his proposals to a meeting in Worksop on 24 August 1769. The investors asked John Grundy to carry out a second survey. He proposed a rather shorter course, from Stockwith in a straight line to Bawtry and then by Scrooby, Blyth and Carlton, to join Brindley's line at Shire Oaks. Grundy's line was 5+⁄2 miles (8.9 km) shorter, and the cost estimated at £71,479, 6s. 9½d. Although Grundy's line was considerably cheaper, it achieved this by missing
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Glastonbury Canal

    Glastonbury Canal

    The Glastonbury Canal ran for just over 14 miles (23 km) through two locks from Glastonbury to Highbridge in Somerset, England, where it entered the River Parrett and from there the Bristol Channel. The canal was authorised by Parliament in 1827 and opened in 1834. It was operated by The Glastonbury Navigation & Canal Company. Most of it was abandoned as a navigation in 1854, when a railway was built along the towpath. Glastonbury is situated in an area of low-lying land, through which rivers and drainage ditches (locally called "rhynes") run. There is evidence that the town was served by a canal connecting it to the river system in the Saxon period, and the waterways were later used by the monks who were located at Glastonbury Abbey, both for draining the land and for transport of produce. In the 1750s, the town became a spa town, when the waters of the Challice Well spring were thought to have medicinal properties, but this did not last for long, while the predominant wool and cloth industries declined as the mills of the north of England took the trade. The area was hit by severe floods in 1794, as a result of which the Commissioners of Sewers obtained the Brue Drainage Act in
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Oder-Havel Canal

    Oder-Havel Canal

    The Oder–Havel Canal is a German canal built between 1908 and 1914, originally known as the Hohenzollern Canal. Together with Hohensaaten-Friedrichsthaler Wasserstraße, the Oderhaltung and the Schwedter Querfahrt it forms the Havel-Oder-Wasserstraße. It runs from the town of Cedynia near the city of Szczecin on the Oder River between Germany and Poland to the Havel, a tributary of the Elbe, near Berlin. It is 82.8 kilometres (51.4 mi) long, and 33 metres (36 yd) wide. In 1934 a ship lift was built on the canal, near Niederfinow. It vertical lift was 16.9 metres (55 ft). The dimensions of the caisson are 85 x 12 x 2.5 m. It could lift vessels of up to 1000 tonnes displacement.
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Glamorganshire Canal

    Glamorganshire Canal

    The Glamorganshire Canal was a canal in south Wales, UK, running from Merthyr Tydfil to Cardiff. Construction started in 1790, and the 25 miles (40 km) of canal was fully opened by 1794. Its primary purpose was to enable the Merthyr iron industries to transport their goods, and it later served the coal industry. It closed progressively between 1898 and 1951, as a result of subsidence and competition from the railways, and much of its course is now buried beneath the A470 Cardiff to Merthyr Tydfil trunk road. The region around Merthyr Tydfil was rich in iron ore, coal and limestone, and this combination resulted in a number of industrialists being attracted to the area in the second half of the 18th century. Four major ironworks, Dowlais, Plymouth, Cyfarthfa and Penydarren, began production between 1759 and 1784, but transport of the finished iron was difficult. In 1786, Richard Crawshay and partners took over the lease of the Cyfarthfa Ironworks, and soon engaged the canal engineer Thomas Dadford to survey a route for a canal to Cardiff. The survey was paid for by Crawshay and three other Merthyr ironmasters, and was completed in 1789. Having engaged the support of Lord Cardiff,
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Grand Canal of Venice

    Grand Canal of Venice

    • Connected Waterways: Saint Mark Basin
    The Grand Canal (Italian: Canal Grande, Venetian: Canałasso) is a canal in Venice, Italy. It forms one of the major water-traffic corridors in the city. Public transport is provided by water buses (Italian: vaporetti) and private water taxis, and many tourists explore the canal by gondola. At one end the canal leads into the lagoon near Santa Lucia railway station and the other end leads into Saint Mark Basin: in between it makes a large S-shape through the central districts (sestieri) of Venice. It is 3,800 m long, 30–90 m wide, with an average depth of five meters (16.5 ft). The banks of the Grand Canal are lined with more than 170 buildings, most of which date to 13th to the 18th century and demonstrate the welfare and art created by the Republic of Venice. The noble Venetian families faced huge expenses to show off their richness in suitable palazzos: this contest reveals the citizens’ pride and the deep bond with the lagoon. Amongst the many are the Palazzi Barbaro, Ca' Rezzonico, Ca' d'Oro, Palazzo Dario, Ca' Foscari, Palazzo Barbarigo and to Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, housing the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. The churches along the canal include the basilica of Santa Maria
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Neath and Tennant Canal

    Neath and Tennant Canal

    The Neath and Tennant Canals are two independent but linked canals in South Wales that are usually regarded as a single canal. The Neath Canal was opened from Glynneath to Melincryddan, to the south of Neath, in 1795 and extended to Giants Grave in 1799, in order to provide better shipping facilities. Several small extensions resulted in in reaching its final destination at Briton Ferry. No traffic figures are available, but it was successful, as dividends of 16 per cent were paid on the shares. The canal was 13.5 miles (21.7 km) long and included 19 locks. The Tennant Canal was a development of the Glan-y-wern Canal, which was built across Crymlyn Bog to transport coal from a colliery on its northern edge to a creek on the River Neath called Red Jacket Pill. It closed after 20 years, but was enlarged and extended by George Tennant in 1818, to provide a navigable link from the River Neath to the River Tawe at Swansea docks. In order to increase trade, he built an extension to Aberdulais basin, where it linked to the Neath Canal. The extension was built without an act of Parliament and Tennant experienced a long delay while he attempted to resolve a dispute with a landowner over the
    8.75
    4 votes
    16
    Gallician

    Gallician

    For the European language, see Galician language Gallician is a village in the commune of Vauvert in the département of Gard, in the region of Languedoc-Roussillon, southern France. It is located some 10 km from Vauvert, and has a population of about 1,000 people. The canal was built in the 18th century. The village is on the canal, "Rhone to Sete" (Canal du Rhône à Sète), and contains a church, three large houses (Mas Beata, Mas du Notaire and Mas de Mourgues), a bakers, a small supermarket and two bar/restaurants, a bullfight arena, a camp site, a cooperative winery and the Van Gogh school for younger children. Media related to Gallician at Wikimedia Commons
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    Dortmund-Ems Canal

    Dortmund-Ems Canal

    The Dortmund–Ems Canal is a 269 km long canal in Germany between the inland port of the city of Dortmund (51°31′30″N 7°26′40″E / 51.525°N 7.44444°E / 51.525; 7.44444) and the sea port of Emden. The artificial southern part of the canal ends after 215 km at the lock of Herbrum near Meppen. From there, the route goes over a length of 45 km over the river Ems until the lock of Oldersum. There, the canal continues with a further artificial part of 9 km. This was made because the types of ships at the time of the construction of the canal were not built for open sea, at the Dollart and the entry to the sea port of Emden. This part of the canal is connected to the Ems-Jade Canal from Emden to Wilhelmshaven. The canal was opened in 1899. The reason for the construction of the canal was to lighten the load on the railways, which could not transport the products of the Ruhr area. Also, the canal was supposed to make the coal from the Ruhr area more competitive, compared to the imported English coal. Furthermore, the steel industry in the eastern Ruhr area needed ores from abroad. The canal was attacked numerous times during World War II due to its strategic importance. An attack in
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Ladoga Canal

    Ladoga Canal

    Ladoga Canal (Russian: Лaдожский канал, Ladozhsky Canal) is a historical water transport route, now situated in Leningrad Oblast, linking the Neva and the Svir River so as to bypass the stormy waters of Lake Ladoga which lies immediately to the north. It is about 117 kilometres (73 mi) long and comprises two distinct but overgrown canals Old Ladoga Canal (built in 1719-1810, previously known as Peter the First Canal) and New Ladoga Canal (built in 1866-1883), running in parallel from Sviritsa on the Svir through Novaya Ladoga on the Volkhov to Shlisselburg on the Neva. The Ladoga Canal was one of the first major canals constructed in Russia. It was one of the projects of Peter the Great, who ordered its construction in 1718. Rapid economic development in Russia required a significant expansion of routes, especially waterways. One part of the Vyshny Volochek waterway (1709) linking the Volga river to the Baltic Sea, passed through Lake Ladoga. The Ladoga section of the route was one of the most difficult and dangerous because the lake is prone to winds and storms which destroyed hundreds of cargo ships. Peter the Great decided to avoid the navigation in the huge and stormy lake by
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Cann Quarry canal

    Cann Quarry canal

    The Cann Quarry canal was a canal in Devon, England which ran for just under 2 miles (3.2 km) from Cann Quarry to the River Plym at Marsh Mills. It opened in 1829, and a short tramway connected it to the Plymouth and Dartmoor Railway at Crabtree Junction. It had been replaced by a tramway within ten years, but continued to be used as a mill leat to supply Marsh Mills corn mill, and most of it is still visible. In 1778, the Cann Slate Quarry was owned by John Parker, and in order to make transport of the slate easier, he asked the engineer John Smeaton to survey a canal, to run from the quarry to the bridge at Marsh Mills. The River Plym between the bridge and Plymouth was navigable by barges. Although Smeaton carried out the work, he concluded that the canal, which would be 2.25 miles (3.62 km) long and would need several locks to accommodate the drop of 30 feet (9.1 m) in level, was unlikely to be economic, since the only trade would be the output from the quarry. He therefore suggested that a tramway would be a better solution, and could be built for about half the cost of the canal. Parker did not proceed with either option. In 1819, an Act of Parliament was obtained which
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Farmington Canal

    Farmington Canal

    The Farmington Canal, also known as the New Haven and Northampton Canal, was a major private canal built in the early 19th century to provide water transportation from New Haven into the interior of Connecticut, Massachusetts and beyond. Its Massachusetts segment was known as the Hampshire and Hampden Canal. With the advent of railroads, it was quickly converted to a railroad in the mid-19th century and in recent years has been converted to a multi-use trail (a rails-to-trails project) after being abandoned for years. The entire length of the canal right of way in Connecticut (covering 25 segments and a total area of 247.6 acres) from Suffield to New Haven was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985 under the name "Farmington Canal-New Haven and Northampton Canal". The 1984 NRHP nomination document provides a detailed history, and describes 45 separate bridges, aqueducts, weirs and other surviving features. The Farmington Canal Lock in Cheshire, Connecticut, and the Farmington Canal Lock No. 13 in Hamden, Connecticut were listed separately on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 1973 and 1982, respectively. Those are locks 12 and 13 out of 28
    6.17
    6 votes
    21
    Grand Canal of Ireland

    Grand Canal of Ireland

    The Grand Canal (Irish: An Chanáil Mhór) is the southernmost of a pair of canals that connect Dublin, in the east of Ireland, with the River Shannon in the west, via Tullamore and a number of other villages and towns, the two canals nearly encircling Dublin's inner city. Its sister canal on the Northside of Dublin is the Royal Canal. The last working cargo barge passed through the Grand Canal in 1960. There are a number of branches off the Grand Canal, some of which have been closed and of these, some subsequently restored and reopened. The idea of connecting Dublin to the Shannon was proposed as early as 1715, and in 1757 the Irish Parliament granted Thomas Omer £20,000 to start construction of a canal. By 1759 he reported that 3 km (1.9 mi) in the Bog of Allen and 13 km (8.1 mi) of canal from the River Liffey near Sallins towards Dublin were complete. By 1763 he had completed 3 locks and 6 bridges towards Dublin and was concentrating on establishing a water supply from the River Morrell near Sallins. At this point the Corporation of Dublin realised that the canal could be used to improve the water supply to the city, and put up the money to complete the canal into the city. But
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Nutbrook Canal

    Nutbrook Canal

    The Nutbrook Canal was a canal in England which ran between Shipley, Derbyshire and the Erewash Canal, joining it near Trowell. It was built to serve the collieries at Shipley and West Hallam, and was completed in 1796. It was initially profitable, but from 1846 faced competition from the railways, and more seriously, subsidence caused by the coal mines that it was built to serve. With the mines failing to pay tolls for goods carried on the canal, and in some cases refusing to accept responsibility for the subsidence, most of it was closed in 1895, although the final 1.5 miles (2.4 km) remained in use until 1949. The part of Derbyshire through which the Nutbrook Canal was built is remote, and although there were collieries at West Hallam and Shipley, it was poorly served by transport links. The construction of the Ilkeston to Nottingham Turnpike road in 1764 brought some improvement, but the road surface was unable to cope with regular heavy loads, and so traffic in the winter was sporadic. Improvements to the River Soar, authorised in 1776, and the construction of the Erewash Canal between 1777 and 1779 resulted in further improvements. A short spur from the Erewash Canal had been
    6.17
    6 votes
    23
    Coombe Hill Canal

    Coombe Hill Canal

    Coombe Hill Canal lies in the Vale of Gloucester, south west England, north of Leigh and runs eastwards 2.75 miles (4.43 km) from Coombe Hill Basin to the River Severn near Wainlode Hill. It opened in 1796 and closed 80 years later in 1876, after the only lock was damaged by flooding. The Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust purchased the Coombe Hill Canal nature reserve in 1985 and the area is managed by the Trust. Adjacent to the Coombe Hill Canal is a large area of wet meadowland situated midway between Gloucester and Tewkesbury to the west of the A38, which was purchased by the Trust in 1999. There is a north and a south meadow. This land and the Canal itself often flood in winter, which attracts hundreds of wildfowl. The canal was authorised in 1792 and was probably open in 1796. The cost of construction was about £5000 and the completed canal could take barges of 60-70 tons. It was meant to carry goods to Cheltenham but the local geography made that impossible. There was a gap of nearly five miles between the canal and the town, so the canal was not as useful as it might have been. In 1810 the canal was leased to a group of three men for £400 per annum. In 1822 the canal was leased
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Hollinwood Branch Canal

    Hollinwood Branch Canal

    The Hollinwood Branch Canal was a canal near Hollinwood, in Oldham, England. It left the main line of the Ashton Canal at Fairfield Junction immediately above lock 18. It was just over 4.5 miles (7.2 km) long and went through Droylsden and Waterhouses to terminate at Hollinwood Basin (Hollinwood Top Wharf). It rose through four locks at Waterhouses (19-22) and another four at Hollinwood (23-26). Immediately above lock 22 at Waterhouses was Fairbottom Junction where the Fairbottom Branch Canal started. Beyond Hollinwood Basin there was a lock free private branch, known as the Werneth Branch Canal, to Old Lane Colliery, which opened in 1797. The Hollinwood Branch Canal was comparatively rural in character apart from mills and factories at Droylsden. Its main purpose was to carry coal from numerous local collieries to the many mills and factories in the neighbourhood of the Ashton Canal. Passengers were also carried along its length. This canal was extensively used until about 1928 when trade began to decline rapidly due to competition from railways and roads. However, this was not the only problem as mining subsidence was becoming serious and it unofficially closed in 1932, although
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Shinnecock Canal

    Shinnecock Canal

    The Shinnecock Canal (also known as the Shinnecock and Peconic Canal) is a canal that cuts across the South Fork of Long Island at Hampton Bays, New York. At 4,700 feet (1,400 m) long, it connects Great Peconic Bay and the north fork of Long Island with Shinnecock Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The canal opened to traffic in 1892. Although "the Hamptons" officially begins about 10 miles (16 km) west at Westhampton, New York, the Shinnecock Canal in popular imagination marks the beginning of the Hamptons since traffic is funneled across two highway bridges (Sunrise Highway and Montauk Highway) or the Long Island Rail Road bridge. Talk of building a canal on Shinnecock Creek had gone on for years and a popular myth says the Shinnecock Indian Nation and Montaukett Native Americans built the original canal in the 17th century. The canal’s location is specifically called Canoe Place because of this. A Canal lock system had to be built in 1919 to alleviate dramatic differences in height between the two bays. The Peconic Bay to the north can be three feet higher than Shinnecock Bay. Further, the two bays have opposite tide cycles. The lock system now is the only navigation lock operating on
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Fairbottom Branch Canal

    Fairbottom Branch Canal

    The Fairbottom Branch Canal was a canal near Ashton-under-Lyne in Greater Manchester, England. The canal left the Hollinwood Branch Canal at Fairbottom Junction immediately above lock 22. It was just over one mile long (1.82 km) and it was lock free. It terminated at Fenny Fields Bridge, Bardsley, which is situated in the Medlock Valley between Ashton-under-Lyne and Oldham. Although this canal was mainly rural, its main purpose was to carry coal so there was a loading stage for coal and a short private branch for the same purpose. There was also a mill. Immediately north east of the terminus at Fenny Fields Bridge an industrial community was founded at Park Bridge and a tramway, which included a small-bore tunnel 150 yards long (137 m), connected the two together. This community was founded in 1783 by Samuel Lees to make rollers for the textile industry. This community expanded rapidly as the demand for textile machinery increased. Following the premature death of Samuel in 1804 the factory was successfully run by his widow Hannah Lees née Buckley and in later years the company was renamed Hannah Lees & Sons in her honour. The last part of this works closed in 1963 due to the
    6.00
    6 votes
    27
    Saint Lawrence Seaway

    Saint Lawrence Seaway

    The Saint Lawrence Seaway (St. Lawrence Seaway), (French: la Voie Maritime du Saint-Laurent), is the common name for a system of locks, canals and channels that permits ocean-going vessels to travel from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes, as far inland as the western end of Lake Superior. The Seaway is named for the Saint Lawrence River, which flows from Lake Ontario to the Atlantic Ocean. Legally, the Seaway extends from Montreal, Quebec, to Lake Erie, and it included the Welland Canal. This section downstream of the Seaway is not a continuous canal, but rather it consists of several stretches of navigable channels within the river, a number of locks, as well as canals along the banks of the St. Lawrence River to bypass several rapids and dams along the way. A number of the locks are managed by the Canadian Saint Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation and others are managed by the American Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. The Saint Lawrence Seaway was preceded by a number of other canals. In 1871, locks on the Saint Lawrence allowed transit of vessels 186 ft (57 m) long, 44 ft 6 in (13.56 m) wide, and 9 ft (2.7 m) deep. The Welland Canal at that time allowed
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    Aberdare Canal

    Aberdare Canal

    The Aberdare Canal (Welsh: Camlas Aberdâr) was a canal in Glamorganshire, Wales which ran from Aberdare to a junction with the Glamorganshire Canal at Abercynon. It opened in 1812, and served the iron and coal industries for nearly 65 years. The arrival of railways in the area did not immediately affect its traffic, but the failure of the iron industry in 1875 and increasing subsidence due to coal mining led to it becoming uneconomic. The Marquess of Bute failed to halt its decline when he took it over in 1885, and in 1900 it was closed on safety grounds. The company continued to operate a tramway until 1944. Most of the route was buried by the construction of the A4059 road in 1923, although a short section at the head of the canal remains in water and is now a nature reserve. The company was wound up in 1955. The Aberdare Canal Company was incorporated by an Act of Parliament in 1793, which authorised the company to build a canal from Aberdare to Abercynon (at the time called Navigation) and a railway from Aberdare to Glyn Neath, on the Neath Canal. The Act also empowered the company to build tramroads to any mines, quarries or works within 8 miles (13 km) of the route of the
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone Canal

    Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone Canal

    The Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan Canal was a canal in the west of Scotland, running between Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone which later became a railway. Despite the name, the canal was never completed down to Ardrossan, the termini being Port Eglinton in Glasgow and Thorn Brae in Johnstone. Within months of opening, the canal was the scene of a major disaster. The canal was first proposed by Hugh Montgomerie, 12th Earl of Eglinton in 1791. He wanted to connect the booming industrial towns of Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone to his new deep sea port at Ardrossan and his Ayrshire coal fields. His fellow shareholders included William Dixon of Govan who wished to export coal from his Govan colliery. The Earl had spent £100,000 on creating Ardrossan's harbour and intended to make it the principal port for Glasgow. Interest was also shown by Lord Montgomerie and William Houston who would also benefit from the canal passing through their lands and connecting their own coal and iron mines to nearby industrial consumers. In this pre McAdam period, the roads around Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire and Ayrshire were not suitable for heavily loaded traffic. The other alternative route, up the Clyde
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    Shropshire Canal

    Shropshire Canal

    The Shropshire Canal was a tub boat canal built to supply coal, ore and limestone to the industrial region of east Shropshire, England, that adjoined the River Severn at Coalbrookdale. It ran from a junction with the Donnington Wood Canal ascending the 316 yard long Wrockwardine Wood inclined plane to its summit level, it made a junction with the older Ketley Canal and at Southall Bank the Coalbrookdale (Horsehay) branch went to Brierly Hill above Coalbrookdale; the main line descended via the 600 yard long Windmill Incline and the 350 yard long Hay Inclined Plane to Coalport on the River Severn. The short section of the Shropshire Canal from the base of the Hay Inclined Plane to its junction with the River Severn is sometimes referred to as the Coalport Canal. Construction of the canal was completed in 1792, and it operated successfully until the 1830s. The construction and operation of the Hay inclined plane was documented by two Prussian engineers who visited it in 1826 or 1827. In the 1840s it was leased by the Shropshire Union Canal, but was suffering from subsidence by the 1850s. Following nine breaches in 1855 and 1856, it was purchased by the London and North Western
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Stratford-upon-Avon Canal

    Stratford-upon-Avon Canal

    The Stratford-upon-Avon Canal is a canal in the south Midlands of England. The canal, which was built between 1793 and 1816, runs for 25.5 miles (41.0 km) in total, and consists of two sections. The dividing line is at Kingswood Junction, which gives access to the Grand Union Canal. Following acquisition by a railway company in 1856, it gradually declined, the southern section being un-navigable by 1945, and the northern section little better. The northern section was the setting for a high-profile campaign by the fledgling Inland Waterways Association in 1947, involving the right of navigation under Tunnel Lane bridge, which required the Great Western Railway to jack it up in order to allow boats to pass. These actions saved the section from closure. The southern section was restored by the National Trust between 1961 and 1964, after an attempt to close it was thwarted. The revived canal was re-opened by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and responsibility for it was transferred to British Waterways in 1988. The Stratford-upon-Avon canal connects the Worcester and Birmingham Canal at Kings Norton to the River Avon at Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire. It consists of two
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Wesel-Datteln Canal

    Wesel-Datteln Canal

    The Wesel-Datteln Canal (German: Wesel-Datteln-Kanal) is a 60 km long canal in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It runs along the northern edge of the Ruhr Area, from the Rhine near Wesel (51°38′21″N 6°36′25″E / 51.63917°N 6.60694°E / 51.63917; 6.60694) to the Dortmund-Ems Canal near Datteln (51°39′45″N 7°21′58″E / 51.6625°N 7.36611°E / 51.6625; 7.36611). It forms an important transport connection between the Lower Rhine and northern and eastern Germany, together with the parallel Rhine-Herne Canal. Construction of the Wesel-Datteln Canal was started in 1915, and the canal was opened in 1930. It runs parallel to the river Lippe. The canal has six locks, at Friedrichsfeld, Hünxe, Dorsten, Flaesheim, Ahsen and Datteln. The main ports along the canal are in Marl (Chemiepark Marl and Auguste-Victoria).
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Fletchers Canal

    Fletchers Canal

    Fletcher's Canal was a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) long canal in Greater Manchester, which connected the Wet Earth Colliery to the Manchester Bolton & Bury Canal at Clifton Aqueduct. The canal is now derelict and no longer used. The canal was built on the south bank of the River Irwell through the area now known as Clifton Country Park. West of Pilkington's long sections of the canal are evident, although none of these sections hold water. As the canal passes through Clifton Country Park a footpath is maintained along the former towpath. Some of the original features are still evident, albeit in extremely poor condition. Between 1752 and 1756, James Brindley devised a method of pumping water from the nearby Wet Earth Colliery using power harnessed from the River Irwell via a water wheel. Around 1790-91 Matthew Fletcher began widening some of the original Brindley water channels to create a new canal, latterly known as Fletcher's Canal. In 1799 Benjamin Outram installed a second lock along the canal, to avoid taking too much water. The canal construction was completed and navigable by 1800. In 1867 the original Brindley water wheel was decommissioned and replaced with a water turbine. This
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Shropshire Union Canal

    Shropshire Union Canal

    The Shropshire Union Canal is a navigable canal in England; the Llangollen and Montgomery canals are the modern names of branches of the Shropshire Union ("SU") system and lie partially in Wales. The canal lies in the counties of Staffordshire, Shropshire and Cheshire in the north-west midlands of England. It links the canal system of the West Midlands, at Wolverhampton, with the River Mersey and Manchester Ship Canal at Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, 66 miles (106 km) distant. The "SU main line" runs south east from Ellesmere Port on the River Mersey to the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal at Autherley Junction in Wolverhampton. Other links are to the Llangollen Canal (at Hurleston Junction), the Middlewich Branch (at Barbridge Junction), which itself connects via the Wardle Canal with the Trent and Mersey Canal, and the River Dee (in Chester). With two connections to the Trent and Mersey (via the Middlewich Branch and the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal) the SU is part of an important circular and rural holiday route called the Four Counties Ring. The SU main line was the last trunk narrow canal route to be built in England. It was not completed until 1835 and was the
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Vodootvodny Canal

    Vodootvodny Canal

    Vodootvodny Canal (Russian: Водоотводный канал, Water bypass canal) is a 4 kilometre long, 30-60 metre wide canal in downtown Moscow, Russia. It was built in 1780s on the old riverbed of Moskva River to control floods and support shipping. Canal construction created an island between Moskva river and the canal. The island acquired its present shape in 1938, with the completion of Moscow Canal megaproject. Canal is spanned by ten bridges, the eleventh is now under construction. Zamoskvorechye, the land on the flat southern bank of Moskva river, was frequently flooded in spring. The river itself used to migrate south from its present site and back, discouraging construction. Low lands on both sides of the river were only suitable for farming. In dry periods, old river bed used to shrink into isolated muddy swamps, spreading disease. Residents had to combat inundation levels by digging small moats and dikes, with little result. The memory of these moats (ровушки, ендовы; rovyshki, yendovy) remains in the names of Raushskaya embankment and Church of St.George v Yendove (literally, in the pot). The most notable, permanent moat was separating St.George from Balchug street. The first
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Rhine-Herne Canal

    Rhine-Herne Canal

    The Rhine–Herne Canal (German: Rhein-Herne-Kanal) is a 45.6-kilometre (28.3 mi) long transportation canal in the Ruhr area of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, with five canal locks. The canal was built over a period of eight years (5 April 1906 - 14 July 1914) and connects the harbour in Duisburg on the Rhine (51°26′59″N 6°46′1″E / 51.44972°N 6.76694°E / 51.44972; 6.76694) with the Dortmund-Ems Canal near Henrichenburg (51°37′1″N 7°19′19″E / 51.61694°N 7.32194°E / 51.61694; 7.32194), following the valley of the Emscher. It was widened in the 1980s. The Rhein-Herne canal ship was designed specifically for this canal; normally of about 1300–1350 ton capacity, it has a maximum draft of 2.50 metres, a length of approximately 80 metres, and maximum beam of 9.50 metres. Originally the Rhine-Herne canal ended in Herne, where it met a branch of the Dortmund-Ems-Kanal running from Henrichenburg to Herne, the intersection situated just above the East Herne lock. After the closure of the last part of the Henrichenburg to Herne canal, the Henrichenburg-Herne section of the Dortmund-Ems was added to the Rhein-Herne Canal. The distribution of water in the canal is realised through five
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Riverside Canal

    Riverside Canal

    The Riverside Canal is an irrigation canal in El Paso County beginning southeast of El Paso, Texas. The canal acquires water from the Riverside Diversion Dam on the Rio Grande River 15 miles (24 km) southeast of El Paso. The canal is managed by the US Bureau of Reclamation. The canal extends for 17.2 miles (27.7 km) with a capacity of 900 cubic feet per second. Water from the canal irrigates about 39,000 acres (160 km²). The canal and diversion dam is the southernmost system on an irrigation project extending along the Rio Grande in New Mexico and Texas. The canal supplies a canal network extending throughout the Upper Rio Grande Valley.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Bijlands Kanaal

    Bijlands Kanaal

    The Bijlands Kanaal (Bijland Canal) is a canal in the Dutch province of Gelderland, near the Dutch-German border. It is currently by far the most important river-stretch of the Rhine when that major river enters the Netherlands. It was dug between 1773 and 1776 to cut off a large bend in river Waal to improve water regulation. This bend, and comparable waters, are currently only minor streams. They are known as the minor Oude Waal and De Bijland, and the larger Oude Rijn. The, more or less, defunct flows now only serve one purpose: to function as a buffer zone between the free flowing Waal and Nederrijn on one side and the abandoned stream-beds on the other side. The defuncts streams are shallow waters for most of the time and serve as an important spawning ground for all kinds of fish (since they remained connected to the main river through small creeks). However, in times of extreme high water-levels the 'dead' waters spring to life again, as the result of artificial overflow-devices. From times to times, the Oude Waal and De Bijland can temporarily taste the freedom of a free-flowing river. The area surrounding the 'dead' rivers is known for its historical significance and is a
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Pawtucket Canal

    Pawtucket Canal

    Completed in 1796, the Pawtucket Canal was originally built as a transportation canal to circumvent the Pawtucket Falls of the Merrimack River in East Chelmsford, Massachusetts. In the early 1820s it became a major component of the Lowell power canal system. with the founding of the textile industry at what became Lowell. The Pawtucket Falls are a mile long series of falls and rapids over which the Merrimack River drops 32 feet. The falls hampered the shipment of inland goods, mostly lumber, to the mouth of the Merrimack and Newburyport, Massachusetts. Newburyport was then one of the largest shipbuilding centers in New England, and a steady supply of wood from New Hampshire was critical to its industry. The original canal was built by wealthy Boston merchants who formed a limited liability corporation called the Proprietors of Locks and Canals, one of the first of its kind in the United States. However, within a decade of its construction the Middlesex Canal was completed, connecting the Merrimack directly with Boston, Massachusetts. Bringing goods directly to Boston was more advantageous for merchants, and the Pawtucket Canal fell out of favor for inland transport. The investors
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Piast canal

    Piast canal

    The Piast Canal (German: Kaiserfahrt, Polish: Kanał Piastowski) - is a canal that connects the Oder Lagoon with the Baltic Sea, more exactly with the northern part of the Świna river. The eastern part of the river is bypassed, providing a more convenient south-north connection for large ships. The canal, approximately 12 km long and ten metres deep, was dug by the German Empire between 1874 and 1880, during the reign of the first Kaiser Wilhelm (1797-1888). Thus it was not named after his grandson Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) which was famous for his interest in seafaring and battleships. Baptized as Kaiserfahrt (German: Emperor Way), the canal allows ships from the Baltic Sea to reach the industrial city of Szczecin more easily. The canal circumvented the eastern branch of the Swine river which was very difficult to navigate. The resulting benefit to shipping between the Baltic Sea and Stettin (Szczecin) saw the ascendancy of the port of Stettin and a decline in the port of Swinemünde, because now ocean-going ships could sail as far as Stettin. Another side effect was that the eastern part of the island Usedom was out off, creating an island that was name after its largest
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Manchester and Salford Junction Canal

    Manchester and Salford Junction Canal

    The Manchester and Salford Junction Canal was a canal in the city of Manchester. It was originally built to provide a direct waterway between the Mersey and Irwell Navigation and the Rochdale Canal. The canal opened in 1839 and was abandoned in 1922. The lack of any direct canal link between the Mersey and Irwell Navigation and the Rochdale Canal meant that goods being transported using both waterways had to be offloaded onto carts and carried across the city, before being loaded back onto boats to continue their journey. This was costly and time-consuming, as well as adding to traffic congestion on the streets of Manchester. In 1799 the nearby Manchester Bolton & Bury Canal company proposed to connect their canal to the Rochdale canal with an aqueduct across the Mersey and Irwell Navigation. Due mainly to strong objections from the Mersey and Irwell Navigation, who would have suffered a loss of trade, the link was not forthcoming. In 1805, John Nightingale was asked by the Mersey and Irwell Navigation Company to estimate the cost of a canal link between Manchester and Salford. Nothing would happen until 1836, when John Gilbert was appointed as engineer. In 1838, just as the canal
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Grand Western Canal

    Grand Western Canal

    The Grand Western Canal ran between Taunton in Somerset and Tiverton in Devon in the United Kingdom. The canal had its origins in various plans, going back to 1796, to link the Bristol Channel and the English Channel by a canal, bypassing Lands End. An additional purpose of the canal was the supply of limestone and coal to lime kilns along with the removal of the resulting quicklime, which was used as a fertiliser and for building houses. This intended canal-link was never completed as planned, as the coming of the railways removed the need for its existence. Construction was in two phases. A level section from Tiverton to Lowdwells on the Devon/Somerset border, opened in 1814, and was capable of carrying broad-beam barges, carrying up to 40 tons. The Somerset section, suitable for tub-boats, which were about 20 feet (6.1 m) long and capable of carrying eight tons, opened in 1839. It included an inclined plane and seven boat lifts, the earliest lifts to see commercial service in the UK. The lifts predated the Anderton Boat Lift by nearly 40 years. The 11 miles of Devon section remains open, despite various threats to its future, and is now a designated country park and local nature
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Danube-Black Sea Canal

    Danube-Black Sea Canal

    The Danube – Black Sea Canal (Romanian: Canalul Dunăre – Marea Neagră) is a canal in Romania, which runs from Cernavodă, on the Danube, to Constanţa (southern arm, as main branch), and to Năvodari (northern arm), on the Black Sea. Administrated from Agigea, it is an important part of the European canal system that links the North Sea (through the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal) to the Black Sea. The main branch of the canal, with a length of 64.4 km (40.0 mi), which connects the Port of Cernavodă with the Port of Constanţa, was built in 1976–1984, while the north branch, known as the Poarta Albă – Midia Năvodari Canal, with a length of 31.2 km (19.4 mi), between Poarta Albă and Port of Midia, was built in 1983–1987. The Canal was notorious as the site of labor camps in 1950s Communist Romania, when, at any given time, several tens of thousands political prisoners worked on its excavation. The total number of people used as a workforce for the entire period is unknown, as is the number of people who died in the construction. These works were later used in the Carasu irrigation system. The course of the canal follows mostly the course of the former Carasu River, originally a tributary of
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Moscow Canal

    Moscow Canal

    The Moscow Canal (Russian: Кана́л и́мени Москвы́), named the Moscow-Volga Canal until the year 1947, is a canal that connects the Moskva River with the Volga River. It is located in Moscow itself and in the Moscow Oblast. The canal connects to the Moskva River 191 kilometers from its estuary in Tushino (an area in the north-west of Moscow), and to the Volga River in the town of Dubna, just upstream of the dam of the Ivankovo Reservoir. Length of the canal is 128 km. It was constructed from the year 1932 to the year 1937 by Gulag prisoners during the early to mid Stalin era, under the direction of Matvei Berman. Thanks to the Moscow Canal, Moscow has access to five seas: the White Sea, Baltic Sea, Caspian Sea, Sea of Azov, and the Black Sea. This is why Moscow is sometimes called the "port of the five seas" (порт пяти морей). Apart from transportation the canal also provides for about half of Moscow's water consumption, and the shores of its numerous reservoirs are used as recreation zones. One of the world's tallest statues of Vladimir Lenin, 25-meter (82 ft) high, built in 1937, is located at Dubna at the confluence of the Volga river and the Moscow Canal. The accompanying statue
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Rochor Canal

    Rochor Canal

    Rochor Canal (Simplified Chinese: 梧槽沟渠) is a canal in the Central Region of Singapore. The canal is about 1.4 km in length. Rochor Canal is a continuation of an unnamed canal that passes through the Bukit Timah area, which starts beneath the junction of Jalan Jurong Kechil and Upper Bukit Timah Road. Officially, Rochor Canal begins beneath Kandang Kerbau Bridge at the junction of Serangoon Road and Selegie Road, and ends at the Victoria Bridge beneath the junction of Kallang Road and Victoria Street. The canal continues as Rochor River which empties into the Kallang Basin.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Welland Canal

    Welland Canal

    • Major Cities: Port Weller, Ontario
    The Welland Canal is a ship canal in Canada that extends 42 km (26 mi) from Port Weller, Ontario, on Lake Ontario, to Port Colborne, Ontario, on Lake Erie. As a part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, this canal enables ships to ascend and descend the Niagara Escarpment and to bypass Niagara Falls. Approximately 40,000,000 tonnes of cargo are carried through the Welland Canal annually by a traffic of about 3,000 ocean and Great Lakes vessels. This canal was a major factor in the growth of the city of Toronto. The original canal and its successors allowed goods from such Great Lakes ports as Detroit, Cleveland, Windsor, and other heavily industrialized areas of the United States and Ontario to be shipped to the port of Montreal or to Quebec City, where they were usually reloaded onto ocean-going vessels for international shipping. The completion of the Welland Canal made the Trent-Severn Waterway, that connected Lake Ontario with Lake Huron, obsolete as a commercial traffic route for Great Lakes navigation. The southern terminus of the Welland Canal on Lake Erie, located at Port Colborne, is 99.5 meters (326.5 feet) higher than the northern terminus of the Canal at Port Weller on Lake
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Wyrley and Essington Canal

    Wyrley and Essington Canal

    The Wyrley and Essington Canal, known locally as "the Curly Wyrley", is a canal in the English Midlands. As built it ran from Wolverhampton to Huddlesford Junction near Lichfield, with a number of branches: some parts are currently derelict. Pending planned restoration to Huddlesford, the navigable mainline now terminates at Ogley Junction near Brownhills. The canal was built to allow transport of coal from coal mines near Wyrley, Essington and New Invention to Wolverhampton and Walsall, but also carried limestone and other goods. An Act of Parliament received the Royal Assent on 30 April 1792, entitled "An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from, or from near, Wyrley Bank, in the county of Stafford, to communicate with the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, at or near the town of Wolverhampton, in the said county; and also certain collateral Cuts therein described from the said intended Canal". As the act's name suggests, this authorised the construction of the canal from the BCN Main Line of the Birmingham Canal Navigations (which would not be known as such until 1794) near Wolverhampton to Wyrley Bank, and the raising of up to £45,000 to pay for
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Liskeard and Looe Union Canal

    Liskeard and Looe Union Canal

    The Liskeard and Looe Union Canal is a derelict broad canal between Liskeard and Looe in Cornwall, United Kingdom. The canal is almost 6 miles (10 km) long and had 24 locks. The Engineer was Robert Coad. Traffic on the canal ceased around 1910. The idea for a canal to Liskeard was first investigated in 1777 when Edmund Leach and a gentleman from Liskeard proposed a manure canal, which would be used to transport lime and sand upwards from Looe. These commodities were at the time transported by pack horse. Leach's canal would run between Bank Mill Bridge, which was some 2.5 miles (4.0 km) from Liskeard, and Sandplace, 2 miles (3.2 km) to the north of Looe. Although the termini were only about 8 miles (13 km) apart by river, the canal would be 15 miles (24 km) long, and incorporate two inclined planes to cope with the difference in levels. The project was estimated to cost £17,495, which would be recouped in seven years, based on expected income, but no further action was taken at the time. In 1823, following a meeting held in East Looe to discuss the way forward, a committee was formed, and the engineer James Green was asked to examine options for a canal, a railway or a turnpike
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Przekop

    Przekop

    Przekop (Polish pronunciation: [ˈpʂɛkɔp]), (German: Weichseldurchstich) located in Poland, is a branch of the Vistula river in its delta. It was artificially created in 1895 to link the Leniwka branch with Gdańsk Bay near the village of Świbno. Currently, the main current of the Vistula reaches the sea through Przekop. It is also referred to as Przekop Wisły (the name literally means Vistula Dug-through in Polish).
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    American Canal

    American Canal

    The American Canal is an irrigation canal in the Upper Rio Grande Valley near El Paso, Texas. The canal acquires water from the Rio Grande from the American Diversion Dam at the Texas-New Mexico-Mexico border, 2 miles northwest of El Paso. The canal travels along the Rio Grande for 2.1 miles where it flows into the Franklin Canal and the rest of the canal network.
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal

    Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal

    The Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal (sometimes known as the Hereford and Gloucester Canal) is a canal in the west of England, which ran from Hereford to Gloucester, where it linked to the River Severn. It was opened in two phases in 1798 and 1845, and closed in 1881, when the southern section was used for the course of the Ledbury and Gloucester Railway. It is the subject of an active restoration scheme. The first plans for a canal between Hereford and Gloucester were made by Robert Whitworth, one of James Brindley's pupils, in 1777. The route was part of a grander plan to link Stourport on Severn and Leominster as well. Twelve years later, Richard Hall submitted plans for a canal via Ledbury. In March 1790, the promoters decided to submit the plans to Parliament. Josiah Clowes, and engineer who had previous experience of working on the Chester Canal and who had worked with Whitworth on the Thames and Severn Canal, was to be the engineer. It appears that he re-surveyed the route, and recommended a change, so that it passed through Ledbury. A branch would be built to Newent where there were minor coalfields, and the canal would be suitable for boats 70 by 8 feet (21 by 2.4
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Barnsley Canal

    Barnsley Canal

    The Barnsley Canal is a canal that ran from Barnby Basin, through Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England to a junction with the Aire and Calder Navigation near Wakefield. It was 14.5 miles (23.3 km) long and included 15 locks. It was taken over by the Aire and Calder Navigation in 1854, and despite competition from the railways, and structural damage from subsidence, remained profitable until 1942. It was abandoned in 1953, after major breaches occurred in 1945 and 1946, and is currently disused, although there are proposals from the Barnsley Canal Consortium to restore and reopen it. The early 1790s were a time when there was an increasing demand for coal, but a shortage in many places because much of the coal being produced was being consumed by industries close to the mines. There were coal reserves near Barnsley, but no transport links to distribute it to the region. In July 1792, the Aire and Calder Canal Company asked William Martin, who was the manager of the canal, to prepare plans for a link from near Wakefield to the Barnsley mines. Hearing of the plans, the River Don Navigation Company proposed an alternative, which involved the canalisation of the River Dearne, to reach the
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Wardle Canal

    Wardle Canal

    The Wardle canal is the shortest canal in the UK at 154 feet (47 m). The canal lies in Middlewich, Cheshire, UK, and connects the Trent and Mersey Canal to the Middlewich Branch of the Shropshire Union Canal, terminating with a single lock known as Wardle Lock. It was built in 1829 so that the navigation authority of the Trent and Mersey Canal could maintain control over the junction.
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Cape Cod Canal

    Cape Cod Canal

    The Cape Cod Canal is an artificial waterway traversing the narrow neck of land that joins Cape Cod to mainland Massachusetts. Part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the canal is approximately 7 miles, or 11.3 km long of which most follow tidal rivers that are widened and deepened into a ship channel. and connects Cape Cod Bay in the north to Buzzards Bay in the south. The town of Sandwich, Massachusetts is near the Massachusetts Bay entrance and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy lies near its entrance to Buzzards Bay. The approximate 20,000 annual users of the canal save about 135 miles (217 km) by not using the route around Cape Cod. A swift running Canal current changes direction every six hours and can reach a maximum velocity of 5.2 miles (8.4 km) per hour, during the receding ebb tide. The canal is maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers and has no toll fees. The canal is 480 feet (150 m) wide and has authorized depth of 32 feet (9.8 m) at mean low water. The canal is spanned by the Cape Cod Canal Railroad Bridge and two highway bridges—the Bourne and the Sagamore. Traffic lights govern the approach of vessels over 65 feet (19.8 m), and are located at
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Strömsholm Canal

    Strömsholm Canal

    The Strömsholm Canal (Swedish: Strömsholms kanal) runs from Smedjebacken to Lake Mälaren near Strömsholm. It is 62 miles long with 26 locks. It consists of a string of lakes connected by short manmade cuts. The canal took 18 years to build, between 1772 and 1795, to plans laid out by Johan Ullström. The main reason for it was the transport of iron produced by the many steelworks sited along the length of the waterway. The opening of the Stockholm Wästerås-Bergslagen railway marked the beginning of its decline and today the restored canal is only used by pleasure craft.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Suez Canal

    Suez Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Red Sea
    The Suez Canal (Arabic: قناة السويس‎ Qanāt al-Sūwais), also known by the nickname "The Highway to India", is an artificial sea-level waterway in Egypt, connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. Opened in November 1869 after 10 years of construction work, it allows transportation by water between Europe and Asia without navigation around Africa. The northern terminus is Port Said and the southern terminus is Port Tawfiq at the city of Suez. Ismailia lies on its west bank, 3 km (1.9 mi) north of the half-way point. When first built, the canal was 164 km (102 mi) long and 8 m (26 ft) deep. After multiple enlargements, the canal is 193.30 km (120.11 mi) long, 24 m (79 ft) deep and 205 metres (673 ft) wide as of 2010. It consists of the northern access channel of 22 km/14 mi, the canal itself of 162.25 km/100.82 mi and the southern access channel of 9 km/5.6 mi. The canal is single lane with passing places in the "Ballah By-Pass" and the Great Bitter Lake. It contains no locks; seawater flows freely through the canal. In general, the canal north of the Bitter Lakes flows north in winter and south in summer. The current south of the lakes changes with the tide at Suez. The canal
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Hillsboro Canal

    Hillsboro Canal

    The Hillsboro Canal is located in the southeastern portion of Florida within the South Florida Water Management District, and for much of its length forms the border between Broward and Palm Beach counties; however, its western end is entirely in Palm Beach County. It begins at Lake Okeechobee at the S-2 water control structure in South Bay west of Belle Glade, Florida. It passes within the southern border of the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge and flows southeast from there along Loxahatchee Road in a rural, lightly populated area. When it reaches the more heavily built-up region further east, it bends to head due eastward, forming the county line. Near its eastern end at the Intracoastal Waterway, with Boca Raton to the north and Deerfield Beach to the south, it departs from its straight course to go around several curves, but the county boundary continues to follow it at this point. 10 miles of the canal is navigable, and it is popular for recreational boating and fishing. Restoration of the Everglades efforts include treatment to remove elevated levels of nutrients. As a part of this restoration effort, Hillsboro Canal flow was diverted at the Loxahatchee Refuge in 2001 to
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Somerset Coal Canal

    Somerset Coal Canal

    The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built around 1800 from basins at Paulton and Timsbury via Camerton, an aqueduct at Dunkerton, Combe Hay, Midford and Monkton Combe to Limpley Stoke where it joined the Kennet and Avon Canal. This gave access from the Somerset coalfield, which at its peak contained 80 collieries, to London. The longest arm was 18 miles (29 km) long with 23 locks. From Midford an arm also ran via Writhlington to Radstock, with a tunnel at Wellow. A feature of the canal was the variety of methods used at Combe Hay to overcome height differences between the upper and lower reaches of the canal, initially by the use of caisson locks and when this failed an inclined plane and then a flight of 22 locks. The Radstock arm was never commercially successful and was replaced first with a tramway in 1815 and later incorporated into the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway. The Paulton route flourished for some years until the coming of the railway and closed in 1898. Much of the course of the canal has since been used for a railway. In October 2006 a grant was obtained from the Heritage Lottery Fund to carry
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Canal du Midi

    Canal du Midi

    The Canal du Midi (Occitan: Canal de las Doas Mars, meaning canal of the two seas) is a 240 km (150 mi) long canal in Southern France (French: le Midi). The canal connects the Garonne River to the Étang de Thau on the Mediterranean and along with the Canal de Garonne forms the Canal des Deux Mers joining the Atlantic to the Mediterranean. The canal runs from the city of Toulouse down to the Étang de Thau. The Canal du Midi was built by Pierre-Paul Riquet. It was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. The Canal du Midi was built to serve as a shortcut between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, avoiding the long sea voyage around hostile Spain, Barbary pirates, and a trip that in the 17th century took a full month to complete. Its strategic value was obvious and it had been discussed for centuries, in particular when King Francis I brought Leonardo da Vinci to France in 1516 and commissioned a survey of a route from the Garonne at Toulouse to the Aude at Carcassonne. The major problem was how to supply the summit sections with enough water. In 1662, Pierre-Paul Riquet, a rich tax-farmer in the Languedoc region, who knew the region intimately, believed he could solve the
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Marne-Rhine Canal

    Marne-Rhine Canal

    The Marne–Rhine Canal (French: Canal de la Marne au Rhin) is a canal in north eastern France. It connects the river Marne in Vitry-le-François with the Rhine in Strasbourg. Combined with the canalised part of the Marne, it allows transport between Paris and eastern France. The original objective of the canal was to connect Paris and the north of France with the Alsace, the Rhine, and Germany. The 313 km (194 mi) long canal was opened in 1853. The canal is suited for small ships (péniches), maximum size 38.5 m long and 5.05 m wide. It has 154 locks, including two in the Moselle River. There are four tunnels. The Saint-Louis-Arzviller inclined plane is located between Arzviller and Saint-Louis and its construction replaced some 17 locks. The Marne–Rhine Canal is connected with the following navigable waterways (from west to east): Its course crosses the following départements and towns: The Voies Navigables France Itinéraires Fluviaux breaks the canal into eastern and western sections. The western sections goes from Vitry-le-François to Toul over 131.4 km (81.6 mi) via 97 locks. The eastern section goes from Frouard to Strasbourg over 159 km (99 mi) via 57 locks. The 23.4 km
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Chichester Canal

    Chichester Canal

    The Chichester Canal is a navigable canal in England. It runs 4.5 miles (7.2 km) from the sea at Birdham Chichester Harbour to Chichester through two locks. The canal (originally part of the Portsmouth and Arundel Canal) was opened in 1822 having taken three years to build. When completed the canal could take ships of up to 100 tons. Dimensions were limited to 85 feet (26 m) long 18 feet (5.5 m) wide and a draft of up to 7 feet (2.1 m). Proposals for a canal linking Chichester directly to the sea go back as least as far as 1585 when an act of parliament was passed allowing a cut linking Chichester with the sea. Further proposals were made in the early 19th century, with schemes being proposed in 1801, 1802, 1803 and 1811, but none of these came to pass and as a result the first link to the sea was via a branch of the Portsmouth and Arundel Canal opened in 1822. In 1817 it had been decided that the section between Chichester and Chichester Harbour, unlike the rest of the canal, would be built large enough to carry boats of 100 tons. Putting this into practice required a new act of parliament which was obtained in 1819. In the same year the construction of the Chichester branch
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Coventry Canal

    Coventry Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Trent and Mersey Canal
    The Coventry Canal is a navigable narrow canal in the Midlands of England. It starts in Coventry and ends 38 miles (65 km) north at Fradley Junction, just north of Lichfield, where it joins the Trent and Mersey Canal. It also has connections with the Oxford Canal, the Ashby Canal, and the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal. Some maps show the canal as a northern and a southern section, connected by a stretch of the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, but others show the through route all as the Coventry Canal. This reflects a complicated period of ownership and re-leasing when the Coventry Canal company was in financial difficulties during construction. It runs through or past the towns of Bedworth, Nuneaton, Atherstone, Polesworth and Tamworth. It is navigable for boats up to 21.9 m (72 ft) length, 2.1 m (7 ft) beam and 1.98 m (6 ft 6) headroom. It forms part of the Warwickshire ring. The canal starts at Coventry Canal Basin. The basin was opened in 1769 and expanded in 1788. It is situated just north of Coventry City Centre and just outside the city's inner ring road. Many of the buildings and the site were restored between 1993 and 1995. The Canal Bridge, Canal House and the warehouses are
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Union Canal

    Union Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Forth and Clyde Canal
    The Union Canal is a 31.5-mile (50.7 km) canal in Scotland, from Lochrin Basin, Fountainbridge, Edinburgh to Falkirk, where it meets the Forth and Clyde Canal. The Union Canal is often described as a contour canal, following a 73-metre (240 ft) contour throughout its length. Originally, the only locks were those at Falkirk, to make the link to the Forth and Clyde canal. Now, there is one lock just before the Falkirk Wheel and a double lock just above. There is also a new tunnel where the canal passes under the Antonine Wall. The canal maintains its level by embankments, cuttings and major aqueducts, rather than following the original contour. The canal has many aqueducts, including the Slateford Aqueduct that takes the canal over the Water of Leith in Edinburgh, the Almond Aqueduct near Ratho and the 810-foot-long (250 m) Avon Aqueduct near Linlithgow, the second longest in the United Kingdom. The Edinburgh end of the canal no longer reaches quite as far as it did (to 'Port Hopetoun' and 'Port Hamilton' basins which were filled in after the canal closed). Instead, the canal stops at Lochrin Basin at Fountainbridge. Many of the stone bridges have keystones on which is engraved the
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Eendracht

    Eendracht

    The Eendracht is a former tidal branch of river Scheldt that has been channelised to form the northern stretch of the Scheldt-Rhine Canal. It flows from the Markiezaatsmeer lake (formerly part of the Oosterschelde) near Bergen op Zoom past the town and eponymous island of Tholen towards the former island of Sint-Philipsland, where it used to end in the Krabbenkreek estuary. The passage to the estuary has been closed off, however, and an additional stretch of canal was dug to connect the Eendracht to the Krammer lake, itself a former estuary closed off from the sea during the Delta Works.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Grand Canal of China

    Grand Canal of China

    The Grand Canal, also known as the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal, is the longest canal or artificial river in the world. Starting at Beijing, it passes through Tianjin and the provinces of Hebei, Shandong, Jiangsu and Zhejiang to the city of Hangzhou. The oldest parts of the canal date back to the 5th century BC, although the various sections were finally combined during the Sui Dynasty (581–618 CE). The total length of the Grand Canal is 1,776 km (1,104 mi). Its greatest height is reached in the mountains of Shandong, at a summit of 42 m (138 ft). Ships in Chinese canals did not have trouble reaching higher elevations after the pound lock was invented in the 10th century, during the Song Dynasty (960–1279), by the government official and engineer Qiao Weiyo. The canal's size and grandeur won it the admiration of many throughout history, including the Japanese monk Ennin (794–864), the Persian historian Rashid al-Din (1247–1318), the Korean official Choe Bu (1454–1504) and the Italian missionary Matteo Ricci (1552–1610). Historically, periodic flooding of the adjacent Yellow River threatened the safety and functioning of the canal. During wartime the high dikes of the Yellow River
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Hampshire and Hampden Canal

    Hampshire and Hampden Canal

    The Hampshire and Hampden Canal was the Massachusetts segment of an 86-mile (138 km) canal that once connected New Haven, Connecticut to the Connecticut River north of Northampton, Massachusetts. Its Connecticut segment was called the Farmington Canal. The canal dates to 1821 when New Haven businessmen began to raise capital and investigate a possible canal route from their harbor to central Massachusetts, and on to Barnet, Vermont and Canada beyond. In this original vision, the canal would pass through Farmington, Connecticut to the border at Southwick, Massachusetts, then join the Connecticut River near Northampton, and from there continue to the St. Lawrence River through Lake Memphremagog and the valley of the St. Francis River. Two side canals were also envisioned: one running from Farmington through Unionville, Connecticut to Colebrook, Connecticut; the other linking to the Erie Canal via the Hudson River or the proposed (but never built) Boston and Albany Canal. Benjamin Wright, the Erie Canal's chief engineer, was hired to conduct a preliminary survey from New Haven to Southwick, Massachusetts. In 1822 he gave a positive report: "The terrain is favorably formed for a great
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Leidsevaart

    Leidsevaart

    The Leidsevaart (also known as Leidse trekvaart, Dutch for "Leiden's Pull-Canal") is a canal between the cities of Haarlem and Leiden in the Netherlands. It was dug in 1657, making it one of the oldest canals in the Netherlands. It was the major means of transport between Leiden and Haarlem for almost two centuries until the rail connection was established in the 19th century. The original stops along the railroad mirrored the toll bridges of the canal. The canal runs through or borders the municipalities of Haarlem, Heemstede, Bloemendaal, Hillegom, Noordwijkerhout, Lisse, Teylingen, Oegstgeest, and Leiden. The Leidsevaart was the extension of the Haarlemmertrekvaart (Haarlem's Pull-Canal) connecting Amsterdam to Haarlem. Travel on these canals was done by trekschuit for people, and by barge for goods, which were pulled by animals (and sometimes by man-power) on a towpath along the canal's edge. It was reliable, comfortable and cheap. The speed was about 7 kilometers per hour, which was faster than walking, and more comfortable than by coach. Many wealthy Amsterdam families had summer homes along the Leidsevaart or Spaarne River, and they arrived with their heavy belongings by
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    River Don Navigation

    River Don Navigation

    The River Don Navigation was the result of early efforts to make the River Don in South Yorkshire, England, navigable between Fishlake and Sheffield. The Dutch engineer Cornelius Vermuyden had re-routed the mouth of the river in 1626, to improve drainage, and the new works included provision for navigation, but the scheme did not solve the problem of flooding, and the Dutch River was cut in 1635 to link the new channel to Goole. The first Act of Parliament to improve navigation on the river was obtained in 1726, by a group of Cutlers based in Sheffield; the Corporation of Doncaster obtained an Act in the following year for improvements to the lower river. Locks and lock cuts were built, and, by 1751, the river was navigable to Tinsley. The network was expanded by the opening of the Stainforth and Keadby Canal in 1802, linking to the River Trent, the Dearne and Dove Canal in 1804, linking to Barnsley, and the Sheffield Canal in 1819, which provided better access to Sheffield. All three were bought out by the Don Navigation in the 1840s, after which the canals were owned by a series of railway companies. The Sheffield and South Yorkshire Navigation Company was created in 1889 and
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Rolle Canal

    Rolle Canal

    The Rolle Canal (also known as the Torrington Canal) in North Devon, England runs 6 miles from Landcross, where it joins the River Torridge, to the limekilns at Rosemoor. It has one sea lock at Landcross, an inclined plane at Weare Giffard – to raise it 60 feet – and a five arch aqueduct (known as the Beam Aqueduct) over the River Torridge. The canal's construction was started as a private venture in 1823 by John Rolle, the then Baron Rolle. In this the canal is unusual as no Act of Parliament had to be obtained. The idea for the canal was originally proposed by his father Denys Rolle but for various reasons nothing had come of those plans. James Green was employed as the lead engineer. The Baron Rolle laid the foundation stone of the aqueduct in an event marked by the firing of a cannon. The cannon burst, resulting in the injury of a man by the name of John Hopgood, who the Baron compensated with a year's salary. Completed in 1827 it was used to carry limestone and coal for the kilns as far inland as possible and to carry Marland clay to the port of Bideford for export. The canal cost between £40,000 and £45,000 to construct. The canal shared many of its design features with the
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Volga-Don Canal

    Volga-Don Canal

    Lenin Volga–Don Shipping Canal (Russian: Волго–Донской судоходный канал имени В. И. Ленина, abbreviated ВДСК, VDSK) is a canal which connects the Volga River and the Don River at their closest points. The length of the waterway is 101 km (45 km through rivers and reservoirs). The canal forms a part of the Unified Deep Water System of European Russia. Together with the lower Volga and the lower Don, the Volga–Don Canal provides the most direct navigable connection between the Caspian Sea and the Sea of Azov, and thus the world's oceans. As the lower course of the Don approaches the lower course of the Volga near today's Volgograd, the idea of connecting the two rivers by an artificial waterway goes back a long way in history. The first recorded canal work was done by the Ottoman Turks in 1569. After capturing Azov in 1696, Peter the Great decided to build the canal, but, because of a lack of resources and other problems, this attempt was abandoned in 1701 without success. In 1701, he initiated a second attempt (the so-called Ivanovsky Canal) under the administration of Knyaz Matvey Gagarin. Instead of connecting the lower course of the Don with the lower course of the Volga near the
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Wendover Arm Canal

    Wendover Arm Canal

    The Wendover Arm Canal is part of the Grand Union Canal in England, and forms part of the British canal system. It originally linked the Grand Union Canal at Bulbourne near Star Top End in Hertfordshire to the town of Wendover in Buckinghamshire. The canal is 6.7 miles (10.8 km) miles long, but has been un-navigable since 1897. It is currently being reconstructed by the Wendover Arm Trust, and Phase 1 of the project, the first 1.3 miles (2.1 km) from the junction at Bulbourne, was completed and reopened in 2005. The Grand Union Canal makes use of the river valleys of the rivers Bulbourne and Gade to pass through Hertfordshire so the canal could easily cross the Chiltern Hills without the need for costly tunnelling works. During its journey through the Chilterns it reaches a height of 390 feet (120 m) at Tring summit before it descends into the Vale of Aylesbury. Each lock uses 50,000 imperial gallons (230 m) of water every time a boat passes so the main canal needs to find an adequate supply from the local watercourses. Fortunately the north-facing escarpment of the Chiltern Hills has an abundance of streams fed by the chalk aquifer. The main line of the canal, then called the
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Black River Canal

    Black River Canal

    The Black River Canal was a canal built in northern New York in the USA to connect the Erie Canal to the Black River. This canal was only 35 miles long, but it had 109 locks. While driving into Boonville on Route 12, you can see the locks that were once part of the Black River Canal. There is a museum dedicated to the Black River Canal, the Black River Canal Museum in Boonville, New York. In 1828, a survey for the Black River Canal Company proposed 34 miles of traffic canal, 11 miles of feeder canal, and 40 miles of navigable river from Rome, NY in Oneida County to Carthage, NY in Jefferson County to allow the communities of Northern New York access to an inexpensive mode of transportation for commerce. Originally the Canal Commission's intent was to complete a route that would terminate at the St. Lawrence river in Ogdensburg at the northern edge of St. Lawrence County. The canal when finished only went to Carthage and yet still possessed all of the traits proposed in 1828 and rose a modest 693 feet (211 m). 109 locks were required to raise and lower the barges in this relatively short distance. Some of the locks were in consecutive series of four and five due to steep grades. The
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Boyne Navigation

    Boyne Navigation

    The Boyne Navigation is a series of canals running 31 km (19 mi) roughly parallel to the River Boyne from Oldbridge to Navan in County Meath, in Ireland. The navigation was once used by horse drawn boats travelling between Navan, Slane and the port of Drogheda; however is now derelict. The Boyne Navigation branch of the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland are restoring the navigation to a usable waterway. The Boyne Navigation comprise of two sections; the Lower Navigation from Drogheda, near mouth of the Boyne, to Slane and the Upper Navigation is from Slane to Navan. The navigation channel is partly the river itself and partly stretches of canal, mostly on the south side of the river. The route uses the river exclusively below Oldbridge while the Upper Navigation is mostly canal. The designers intended that the navigation continue upstream along the Boyne to Trim where it could connect with the Royal Canal. The section from Navan to Trim was never built and the Boyne Navigation remains disconnected from other inland waterways in Ireland. The Boyne Navigation Company began work on on the lower section of the navigation from the sea lock at Oldbridge to Slane in 1748 and was
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Carondelet Canal

    Carondelet Canal

    The Carondelet Canal, also known as the Old Basin Canal, was a canal in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1794 through 1938. Construction of the canal began in June 1794 on the orders of Governor of Louisiana Francisco Luis Hector de Carondelet, for whom the canal was named. The 1.6‑mile long canal started at Bayou St. John, which in turn connected with Lake Pontchartrain, and went inland to what was then the back edge of New Orleans, just in back of the French Quarter in the Treme neighborhood. The first shallow, narrow version of the canal was completed by the end of 1794. Over the next two years further work made the canal wider and deeper. The canal served dual purposes of drainage and shipping. After the United States purchase of Louisiana, James Pitot worked to promote improvements of the canal. Starting in 1805 the Orleans Navigation Company improved the Canal and the Bayou, making it more important in shipping. The 80,000-square-foot (7,400 m) turning basin at the head of the Canal was the inspiration for the naming of Basin Street in New Orleans. Plans to build a connecting canal from the turning basin to the Mississippi River were never realized, in part because of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Ganga canal

    Ganga canal

    The Ganges or Ganga Canal is a canal system that irrigates the Doab region between the Ganges River and the Yamuna River in India. The canal is primarily an irrigation canal, although parts of it were also used for navigation, primarily for its construction materials. Separate navigation channels with lock gates were provided on this system for boats to negotiate falls. Originally constructed from 1842 to 1854, for an original head discharge of 6000 ft³/s. The Upper Ganges Canal has since been enlarged gradually for the present head discharge of 10,500 ft³/s (295 m³/s). The system consists of main canal of 272 miles and about 4000 miles long distribution channels. The canal system irrigates nearly 9,000 km² of fertile agricultural land in ten districts of Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand. Today the canal is the source of agricultural prosperity in much of these states, and the irrigation departments of these states actively maintain the canal against a fee system charged from users. There are some small hydroelectric plants on the canal capable of generating about 33MW if running at full capacity these are at Nirgajini, Chitaura, Salawa, Bhola, Jani, Jauli and Dasna . The canal is
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Grand Canal d'Alsace

    Grand Canal d'Alsace

    The Grand Canal of Alsace (French: Grand Canal d'Alsace, German: Rheinseitenkanal) is a canal in eastern France, channeling the Upper Rhine river. It is 50 kilometers (about 30 miles) long between Kembs and Vogelgrun, and provides access to the region from the Rhine River, Basel in Switzerland, and the North Sea for barges of up to 1,350 metric tons. The Grand Canal is larger than the Suez Canel and permits the navigation of more than 30,000 boats a year between Basel and Strasbourg. Construction of the canal began in 1932 and was completed after World War II in 1959. The canal diverts much of the water from the original bed of the fast-flowing Rhine in this area, which is almost entirely unnavigable by boats. The Grand Canal produces hydroelectric power at Kembs, Ottmarsheim, Fessenheim and Vogelgrun, supplying electricity to one of the most heavily industrialized regions in France and even to Germany. Furthermore, the canal provides enough water throughout the year to a nuclear power plant at Fessenheim, eliminating the need for cooling towers.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Haarlemmertrekvaart

    Haarlemmertrekvaart

    The Haarlemmertrekvaart (Haarlem's Tow-Canal) is a canal between Amsterdam and Haarlem in the province of North Holland, the Netherlands. It was dug in 1631, making it the oldest tow-canal in Holland. Travel on such canals was historically done by barges (or trekschuit in Dutch) which were towed by animals (and sometimes by man-power) on a path along the canal's edge (towpath). Until the beginning of the 17th century, the primary waterway between Amsterdam and Haarlem was the IJ, a bay of the Zuiderzee. The land route was over the twisty dike along this bay. In 1631 construction began and the canal was dug in a virtually straight line to guarantee the shortest route. It shortened the waterway from Haarlem to Amsterdam considerably. Until that time, boats needed to travel up the Spaarne river to pass the narrow sluice gate at Spaarndam, to reach the IJ. Similarly, the towpath shortened the route considerably for land traffic. Prior to this route, coaches traveling by land would leave Haarlem over the Oude Weg up to the Liede, where they would cross at Penningsveer (a ferry for a penny), to Spaarnwoude and along the IJdijk (on older maps, Spaarndammerdijk) to Amsterdam. The first
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Lichfield Canal

    Lichfield Canal

    The Lichfield Canal, as it is now known, was historically a part of the Wyrley and Essington Canal, being the section of that canal from Ogley Junction at Brownhills on the northern Birmingham Canal Navigations to Huddlesford Junction, east of Lichfield, on the Coventry Canal, a length of 7 miles (11.3 km). The branch was abandoned in 1955, along with several other branches of the Wyrley and Essington, and much of it was filled in. Restoration plans were first voiced in 1975, and since 1990, the Lichfield and Hatherton Canals Restoration Society have been actively engaged in excavating and rebuilding sections of the canal as they have become available. Major projects have included an isolated aqueduct over the M6 Toll motorway, ready for when the canal reaches it. The Wyrley and Essington Canal was built under an Act of Parliament passed on 30 April 1792, for a canal which would run from Horseley Junction near Wolverhampton to Sneyd Junction, near Bloxwich. The main line would be level, following the 473-foot (144 m) contour. From this junction, a branch would run to Wyrley Bank and on to Essington, which would include nine locks, and another level branch would run to Birchills,
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Manchester Bolton & Bury Canal

    Manchester Bolton & Bury Canal

    The Manchester Bolton & Bury Canal is a disused canal in Greater Manchester, England, built to link Bolton and Bury with Manchester. The canal, when fully opened, was 15 miles 1 furlong (24.3 km) long. It was accessed via a junction with the River Irwell in Salford. Seventeen locks were required to climb to the summit as it passed through Pendleton, heading northwest to Prestolee before it split northwest to Bolton and northeast to Bury. Between Bolton and Bury the canal was on the same level and required no locks. Six aqueducts were built to allow the canal to cross the rivers Irwell and Tonge, as well as various minor roads. The canal was commissioned in 1791 by local landowners and businessmen and built between 1791 and 1808, during the Golden Age of canal building, at a cost of £127,700 (£7.87 million today). Originally designed for narrow gauge boats, during its construction the canal was altered into a broad gauge canal to allow an ultimately unrealised connection with the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The canal company later converted into a railway company and built a railway line close to the canal's path, which required modifications to the Salford arm of the canal. Most of
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Titford Canal

    Titford Canal

    The Titford Canal (grid reference SO984880) is a narrow (7 foot) canal, a short branch of the Birmingham Canal Navigations (BCN) in Oldbury, West Midlands, England. Authorised under the Birmingham Canal Act 1768 which created the original Birmingham Canal, it was constructed in 1836-7 and opened on 4 November 1837. It now runs from Titford Pool, a reservoir made in 1773-4 which now lies under, and to both sides of, an elevated section of the M5 motorway near the motorway's junction 2, to join the BCN Old Main Line at Oldbury Junction, also under the M5. Beyond Titford Pool was a continuation, abandoned in 1954, as the Portway Branch, which served coal mines in the Titford Valley. Also from Titford Pool was the Causeway Green Branch; opened in 1858 and abandoned, in parts, in 1954 and September 1960. At a height above sea level of 511 ft Titford Pool was one of the original water sources for the James Brindley 491 foot Smethwick Summit Level of his Birmingham Canal (later called the Old Main Line). This feeder was not made navigable until 1837, with the addition of six locks, nicknamed The Crow, which were adjacent to chemical works owned by Jim Crow. These locks, as is usual on the
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Wey and Godalming Navigations

    Wey and Godalming Navigations

    The Wey and Godalming Navigations is the name given to the navigable parts of the River Wey, in Surrey, UK. The navigation runs for around 20 miles (32 km) between the River Thames below Shepperton Lock near Weybridge, to the south-west of London, and the centre of Godalming, in Surrey; it runs through Guildford and Pyrford and is joined by the Basingstoke Canal at West Byfleet, and the Wey and Arun Canal near Godalming. Some parts of the navigation are canal sections and others are the original River Wey which intertwines with the canal sections. The River Wey was one of the first rivers in England to be made navigable. The canal was built by Sir Richard Weston, beginning in 1635. The 25 km from Weybridge to Guildford were made navigable by an Act of 1651, with work completed in 1653, allowing barges to transport goods to London. Further improvements were made under another Act of 1671. Originally the Wey Navigations were used for transporting barge loads of heavy goods via the Thames to London. Timber, corn, flour, wood and gunpowder from the Chilworth Mills were moved up the canal to London whilst coal was brought back. In 1760, another Act authorised the Godalming Navigation,
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Bridgwater and Taunton Canal

    Bridgwater and Taunton Canal

    The Bridgwater and Taunton Canal is a canal in the south-west of England between Bridgwater and Taunton, opened in 1827 and linking the River Tone to the River Parrett. There were a number of abortive schemes to link the Bristol Channel to the English Channel by waterway in the 18th and early 19th centuries. These schemes followed the approximate route eventually taken by the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal, but the canal was instead built as part of a plan to link Bristol to Taunton by waterway. The early years of operation were marred by a series of legal disputes, which were resolved when the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal Company and the Conservators, who managed the River Tone Navigation, agreed that the Canal Company should take over the Tone Navigation. The canal originally terminated at a basin at Huntworth, to the east of Bridgwater, but was later extended to a floating harbour on its western edge. Financially this was a disaster, as the extension was funded by a mortgage, and the arrival of the railways soon afterwards started the demise of the canal. The canal was rescued from bankruptcy by the Bristol and Exeter Railway in 1866. Despite commercial traffic ceasing in 1907,
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Danube-Oder-Canal

    Danube-Oder-Canal

    The Danube-Oder Canal (German: Donau-Oder-Kanal; Polish: Kanał Odra-Dunaj) is a planned and partially constructed artificial waterway in the Lobau floodplain of the Danube at Vienna, that was supposed to stretch along the Morava River to the Oder at the city of Kędzierzyn-Koźle in Poland. The Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV had envisioned a waterway capable of taking ships from the Oder to the Danube in the 14th century. Records of further plans of such a waterway stem from the 19th century. During the Nazi era, the idea was reborn and the project was put into motion. The project would connect the Oder to the Danube through the Moravian region of the Czech Republic, stretching 320 kilometers and spanning an elevation of 124 meters. On December 8, 1939 Rudolf Hess inaugurated the then-named Adolf Hitler Canal, today Gliwice Canal (Polish: Kanał Gliwicki) from Kędzierzyn-Koźle at the Oder River to the city of Gliwice, that replaced the historic Kłodnica Canal finished in 1812. At the same time, Hess also performed the groundbreaking ceremony for the further Donau-Oder-Kanal. The work on the Upper Silesian side already discontinued in 1940. Only a few kilometres of the planned 40-km
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Dingwall Canal

    Dingwall Canal

    The Dingwall Canal was a short tidal canal running from the town of Dingwall to the Cromarty Firth in the county of Ross and Cromarty, Scotland. It was completed by 1819, to provide better access to the town, but was not a commercial success, and was abandoned in the 1880s after the arrival of the railways. In 1578, John Leslie the Bishop of Ross produced a map of Scotland, which was published in Rome. Dingwall was of sufficient importance to be included on the map, and when James VI awarded it a burgh charter in 1587, it mentioned cobbles and small boats. However, there was a problem caused by the deposition of alluvium from the rivers Conon and Orrin, which made access more difficult, and by 1773 the burgh was in a depressed state. There is some indication that improvements were made to the river soon afterwards, on a plan dated 1777, but a major scheme was actioned in 1815. The River Peffery was made deeper and wider, to allow boats to reach the town. The project was designed by the canal engineer Thomas Telford, and involved diverting the river through a temporary cut, so that a new course for it could be constructed. The work was completed by 1819, at a total cost of £4,365,
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Prinsengracht

    Prinsengracht

    The Prinsengracht (Prince's Canal) is one of the main canal in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Most of the canal houses along it were built during the Dutch Golden Age of the United Provinces in the 17th century AD. Interesting sights along the Prinsengracht include the Noorderkerk (Northern Church), the Noordermarkt (Northern Market), the Anne Frank House, the Westerkerk (Western Church, Amsterdam's tallest church) with the Homomonument (Gay Monument).
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Ashton Canal

    Ashton Canal

    The Ashton Canal is a canal built in Greater Manchester in North West England. The Ashton leaves the Rochdale Canal at Ducie St. Junction in central Manchester, and climbs for 6.7 miles (10.8 km) through 18 locks, passing through Ancoats, Holt Town, Bradford-with-Beswick, Clayton, Openshaw, Droylsden, Fairfield and Audenshaw to make a head-on junction with the Huddersfield Narrow Canal (formerly the Huddersfield Canal) at Whitelands Basin in the centre of Ashton-under-Lyne. At Bradford, the canal passes by the venue of the 2002 Commonwealth Games. Apart from the Rochdale and Huddersfield Narrow canals, the Ashton Canal only currently connects with one other canal. Just short of Whitelands, at Dukinfield Junction/Portland Basin a short arm crosses the river Tame on the Tame Aqueduct, and makes a head-on junction with the Peak Forest Canal. There used to be four other important connections to branch canals: the Islington Branch Canal in Ancoats; the Stockport Branch Canal from Clayton to Stockport (Heaton Norris); the Hollinwood Branch Canal from Fairfield to Hollinwood; and the Fairbottom Branch Canal (itself a branch of the Hollinwood Branch Canal) from Waterhouses to Fairbottom.
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Baybridge Canal

    Baybridge Canal

    The Baybridge Canal was a short canal built entirely within the parish of West Grinstead in the English county of Sussex. It opened in 1826, and closed in 1875. The River Adur is formed when the Western Adur and the Eastern Adur join near Henfold. The Western branch starts near Slinfold, and flows through Shipley and West Grinstead. The Eastern branch rises on Ditchling Common, and flows through Haywards Heath and Burgess Hill. Below the junction, the combined stream flows for 10.8 miles (17.4 km) to reach the English Channel at the port of Shoreham-by-Sea. Under an act of Parliament obtained in 1807, the river was improved, to aid both navigation and drainage, and barges could reach Bines Bridge on the Western Adur. In 1824, the civil engineer May Upton produced a plan for extending the navigation northwards to West Grinstead, at a cost of just under £6,000. This formed the basis for another act of Parliament, which was obtained in 1825, and created the Baybridge Canal Company. Seven men were named as proprietors, including Lord Selsey and Sir Charles Merrick Burrell, and they were empowered to raise £6,000 by issuing shares, and an additional £3,000 by mortgages if required.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Bude Canal

    Bude Canal

    • Major Cities: Launceston
    The Bude Canal was a canal built to serve the hilly hinterland in the Devon and Cornwall border territory in the United Kingdom, chiefly to bring lime-bearing sand for agricultural fertiliser. The Bude Canal system was one of the most unusual in Britain. It was remarkable in using inclined planes to haul tub boats on wheels to the upper levels. There were only two conventional locks, in the short broad canal section near the sea at Bude itself. It had a total extent of 35 miles (56 km), and it rose from sea level to an altitude of 433 feet (132 m). The design of the canal influenced the design of the Rolle Canal. The coastal area at Bude has sand unusually rich in minerals and the poor agricultural land of the locality was found to benefit considerably from application of the sand. In the pre-industrial age, actually transporting it was difficult, even to land relatively close to the coast. Several schemes were put forward for canals to bring the sand to the countryside, and these proposals did not lack ambition. One scheme, aimed at distributing Welsh coal from the port as far inland as Calstock on the River Tamar, gained parliamentary approval for construction in 1774, but
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Canal de Brienne

    Canal de Brienne

    The Canal de Brienne (also known as the "Canal de Saint-Pierre") is a French canal connecting the Garonne River with the Canal du Midi and the Canal de Garonne. It has two locks. The lock opening to the Garonne is known as Ecluse Saint-Pierre. The lock nearer to the Canal du Midi usually stands open. The canal is in the centre of Toulouse, in the Midi-Pyrénées region of France. It runs for only 1,560 m (0.97 mi) from its source at Bazacle on the Garonne to its terminal basin where it meets the Canal du Midi. At the joining with the Canal du Midi is the Ponts Jumeaux (English: twin bridges). The canal was inaugurated on 14 April 1776. It was intended to carry water from the Garonne to the Canal latéral à la Garonne and provide a navigable route to the port de la Daurade, situated in the centre of Toulouse on the Garonne. It owes its name to Etienne Charles de Loménie de Brienne (1727–1794), archbishop of Toulouse.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Ellesmere Canal

    Ellesmere Canal

    • Connected Waterways: River Mersey
    Ellesmere Canal was a waterway in England and Wales that was planned to carry boat traffic between the rivers Mersey and Severn. The proposal would create a link between the Port of Liverpool and the mineral industries in north east Wales and the manufacturing centres in the West Midlands. However the canal was never finished as intended. Problems arose because of the project's raising costs and the failure to generate the expected commercial traffic. The Ellesmere Canal, which was first proposed in 1791, would have operated as a waterway between Netherpool and Shrewsbury. However the parts which were completed eventually became sections of the Chester Canal, the Montgomery Canal and the Shropshire Union Canal main line. Although several feats of engineering were overcome, most major building work ceased following the completion of the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct in 1805. The navigation's mainline eventually ended 25 kilometres (16 mi) away from Chester at Trevor Basin near Ruabon and 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) from Shrewsbury. As part of the rebranding of Britain's industrial waterways as leisure destinations, the surviving central section is now called the Llangollen Canal; even though
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Gowanus Canal

    Gowanus Canal

    The Gowanus Canal, also known as the Gowanus Creek Canal, is a canal in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, geographically on the westernmost portion of Long Island. Connected to Gowanus Bay in Upper New York Bay, the canal borders the neighborhoods of Red Hook and South Brooklyn to the west and Park Slope to the east — as well as the neighborhoods of Red Hook to the north and Sunset Park to the south. There are five east-west bridge crossings over the canal, located at Union Street, Carroll Street (a landmark), Third Street, Ninth Street, and Hamilton Avenue. The Gowanus Expressway (Interstate 278) and the IND Culver Line of the New York City Subway, the only above-ground section of the original Independent Subway System, pass over the canal. Once a busy cargo transportation hub, the canal's history has paralleled the decline of domestic shipping via water. A legacy of serious environmental problems has beset the area from the time the canal arose from the local tidal wetlands and fresh water streams. In recent years, there has been a call once again for environmental cleanup. In addition, development pressures have brought speculation that the wetlands of the Gowanus should
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Grantham Canal

    Grantham Canal

    The Grantham Canal is a canal that runs for 33 miles (53 km) from Grantham, falling through 18 locks to West Bridgford where it joins the River Trent. It was built primarily to allow for the transportation of coal to Grantham. It opened in 1797, and its profitability steadily increased until 1841. It was then sold to a railway company, after which it declined, and was finally closed in 1936. Because it was used as a water supply for agriculture, most of the channel remained in water, although bridges were lowered. Since the 1970s, the Grantham Canal Society have been working towards its restoration, and two stretches are navigable to small vessels. Full restoration will require a new route where the canal joins the Trent, as road building has effectively severed the original route. The concept of a canal from the River Trent to Grantham was first raised on 27 August 1791, as a way of supplying the district with cheaper coal. The intent was for the navigation to join the Trent below Nottingham at Radcliffe-on-Trent. As William Jessop was surveying the Nottingham Canal at the time, he was aked to survey the Grantham route as well, and a bill was put before Parliament in 1792. It was
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Strabane Canal

    Strabane Canal

    The Strabane Canal is a short (four mile) canal in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It connected the market town of Strabane to the navigable River Foyle and thence to the port of Londonderry on the north coast of Ireland. The canal opened in 1796 and closed in 1962. The Strabane Canal was conceived by the Marquess of Abercorn as a way of encouraging industrial and commercial development in Strabane and its immediate surroundings, most of which was within his estates. An Act of Parliament was obtained to authorise the construction of the 6.4-kilometre (4.0 mi) canal, although the land required for the canal was bought by the Marquess's agents by agreement with the owners, and the project, which cost £11,858, was privately funded by the Marquess, assisted by a loan of £3,703 from the Irish Parliament. The canal ran from the tidal waters of Lough Foyle at Leck, some 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) upstream from Derry, to Strabane. It left the Foyle just above its junction with the Burndennet River, to enter Crampsie's Lock. The main water supply was from a stream which entered the canal above Devlin's Lock, the only other lock built. Construction began in late 1791, with John Whally of
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Arizona Canal

    Arizona Canal

    The Arizona Canal is a major canal in central Maricopa County that led to the founding of several communities, now among the wealthier neighborhoods of suburban Phoenix, in the late 1880s. Flood irrigation of residential yards is still common in these neighborhoods, using a system of lateral waterways connected via gates to the canal itself. Like most Valley canals, its banks are popular with joggers and bicyclists. The canal, nearly 50 miles (80 km) long, is the northernmost canal in the Salt River Project's 131-mile (211 km) water distribution system. Beginning at Granite Reef dam, northeast of Mesa, it flows west across the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, downtown Scottsdale, Phoenix's Arcadia and Sunnyslope neighborhoods, Glendale, and Peoria before ending at New River near Arrowhead Towne Center. William J. Murphy was hired in 1883 to spearhead its construction, which was completed in May 1885. He then founded Glendale; its downtown Murphy Park is named for him. Nearby Peoria was also founded within the decade. Several miles upstream (east), 640 acres (2.6 km) on the canal's south side were purchased in 1888 by a former Civil War chaplain named Major Winfield Scott,
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal

    Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal

    The Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal is an artificial waterway on the southwest shore of Lake Michigan, in East Chicago, Indiana which connects the Grand Calumet River to Lake Michigan. It consists of two branch canals, the 1.25 mile (2 km) Lake George Branch and the 2 mile (3 km) long Grand Calumet River Branch which join to form the main Indiana Harbor Canal. The Indiana Harbor Canal also functions as a harbor and runs 1.4 miles (2 km) before reaching the Indiana Harbor which connects to Lake Michigan. In 2002, Indiana Harbor was the 45th busiest harbor in the United States, handling almost 13,300,000 short tons (12,000,000 metric tons) of cargo. Foreign trade accounted for only 500,000 short tons (450,000 metric tons) of that. Indiana Harbor is not a state-managed harbor, and it is maintained by the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1913. Marktown, Clayton Mark's planned worker community, is located at Indiana Harbor. The canal and harbor were built over several years beginning in 1901. On March 26, 1901, Inland Steel Company accepted an offer from the Lake Michigan Land Company of 50 acres (200,000 m²) (20
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Morris Canal

    Morris Canal

    • Major Cities: Phillipsburg
    The Morris Canal was an anthracite-carrying canal that incorporated a series of water-driven inclined planes in its course across northern New Jersey in the United States. It was in use for about a century — from the late 1820s to the 1920s. The Morris Canal stretched from Phillipsburg on the Delaware River at its western end to Jersey City on the Hudson River at its eastern end. Completed to Newark in 1831, the canal was extended eastward to Jersey City between 1834 and 1836. It greatly facilitated the transportation of anthracite coal from Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley to northern New Jersey's growing iron industry and other developing industries in New Jersey and the New York City area. It also carried iron ore westward through New Jersey to iron furnaces in western New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania until the development of Great Lakes iron ore caused them to decline. By the 1850s, the canal began to be eclipsed by the construction of railroads, although it remained in heavy use throughout the 1860s. It was leased to the Lehigh Valley Railroad in 1871, taken over by the state of New Jersey late in 1922, and formally abandoned in 1924. Although it was largely dismantled in the
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Varistaipale canal

    Varistaipale canal

    Varistaipale canal (Finnish: Varistaipaleen kanava) is a Finnish canal in Heinävesi. The canal is a part of Heinävesi route (Heinäveden reitti), a route with six canals: Kerma, Vihovuonne, Pilppa, Karvio, Taivallahti and Varistaipale canals. The canal was built in 1911–1913 and has four locks. It is the biggest canal in Finland being the only canal to have this many locks. The height of drop totals 14.5 metres (48 ft) and the length is 1,100 metres (3,600 ft). Next to the canal there is a canal museum. Media related to Varistaipale Canal at Wikimedia Commons
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Birmingham Canal Navigations

    Birmingham Canal Navigations

    • Canal Tunnels: Dudley Tunnel
    Birmingham Canal Navigations (BCN) is a network of canals connecting Birmingham, Wolverhampton, and the eastern part of the Black Country. The BCN is connected to the rest of the English canal system at several junctions. At its working peak, the BCN contained about 160 miles (257 km) of canals; today just over 100 miles (160 km) are navigable, and the majority of traffic is from tourist and residential narrowboats. The first canal to be built in the area was the Birmingham Canal, built from 1768 to 1772 under the supervision of James Brindley from the, then, edge of Birmingham, with termini at Newhall Wharf (since built over) and Paradise Wharf (also known as Old Wharf) near to Gas Street Basin to meet the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal at Aldersley (north of Wolverhampton). The Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, from Birmingham to Tamworth, followed in 1784 with the Birmingham Canal Company merging with the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal Company immediately, to form what was originally called the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazeley Canal Company. This cumbersome name was short-lived, and the combined company became known as the Birmingham Canal Navigations from 1794, as the
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Canals of Amsterdam

    Canals of Amsterdam

    Amsterdam, capital of the Netherlands, has been called the "Venice of the North" for its more than one hundred kilometres of canals, about 90 islands and 1,500 bridges. The three main canals, Herengracht, Prinsengracht, and Keizersgracht, dug in the 17th century during the Dutch Golden Age, form concentric belts around the city, known as the Grachtengordel. Alongside the main canals are 1550 monumental buildings. The 17th-century canal ring area, including the Prinsengracht, Keizersgracht, Herengracht and Jordaan, were placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2010. Much of the Amsterdam canal system is the successful outcome of city planning. In the early part of the 17th century, with immigration at a height, a comprehensive plan was put together, calling for four main, concentric half-circles of canals with their ends resting on the IJ bay. Known as the "grachtengordel", three of the canals are mostly for residential development (Herengracht or ‘’Patricians' Canal’’; Keizersgracht or ‘’Emperor's Canal’’; and Prinsengracht or ‘’Prince's Canal’’), and a fourth, outer canal, Singelgracht, for purposes of defense and water management. The plan also envisaged interconnecting canals
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Crinan Canal

    Crinan Canal

    • Major Cities: Ardrishaig
    • Connected Waterways: Loch Gilp
    The Crinan canal is a canal in the west of Scotland and is operated by Scottish Canals. It takes its name from the village of Crinan at its westerly end. Nine miles (14 km) long, it connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre. The canal is 10 ft (3.0 m) deep and has essentially no height limit. Today it is a popular route for leisure craft between the Firth of Clyde and the west coast of Scotland, used by nearly 2,000 boats annually. The towpath is part of National Cycle Network route 78, which links Campbeltown, Oban, Fort William and Inverness. The canal was originally built for commercial sailing vessels and later Clyde puffers to travel between the industrialised region around Glasgow to the West Highland villages and islands. It was designed by civil engineer John Rennie and work started in 1794, but the canal was not completed until 1801 (two years later than planned). Problems, particularly with the locks, meant that some parts of the canal had to be redesigned - a
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Danube-Tisa-Danube Canal

    Danube-Tisa-Danube Canal

    Danube–Tisa–Danube Canal (DTD) (Serbian: Kanal Dunav-Tisa-Dunav/ Канал Дунав-Тиса-Дунав) is a unique hydro-engineering system for flood control and hydrotechnical, amelioration forestry, water supply, waste water evacuation, navigation, tourism, fishing, hunting. It covers the northern part of Serbia - the territory of Vojvodina (Bačka and Banat regions), with the total area of about 12,700 km². It consists of a number of canals, thereof: The total length of the dug main canals is 929 km, including new and old canals and streams which were completely or partially reconstructed and thus included in the new system. In the basic canal network there are 51 structures - 24 gates, 16 locks, 5 safety gates, 6 pumping stations, and 180 bridges. There are 14 goods ports on the canals. On the new canals of the water system the Danube-the Tisa-the Danube there were built: 84 bridges - 62 carriageway, 19 railway and 3 pedestrian ones. One of the most important structures within this water system is the dam on the river Tisa near Novi Bečej which regulates the water regime in the basic canal network in Banat, for irrigation of about 3,000 km².
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    Kennet and Avon Canal

    Kennet and Avon Canal

    • Connected Waterways: River Kennet
    • Canal Tunnels: Bruce Tunnel
    The Kennet and Avon Canal is a waterway in southern England with an overall length of 87 miles (140 km), made up of two lengths of navigable river linked by a canal. The name is commonly used to refer to the entire length of the navigation rather than solely to the central canal section. From Bristol to Bath the waterway follows the natural course of the River Avon before the canal links it to the River Kennet at Newbury, and from there to Reading on the River Thames. In all, the waterway incorporates more than 100 locks. The two river stretches were made navigable in the early 18th century, and the 57-mile (92 km) canal section was constructed between 1794 and 1810. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the canal gradually fell into disuse after the opening of the Great Western Railway. In the latter half of the 20th century the canal was restored in stages, largely by volunteers. After decades of dereliction and much restoration work, it was fully reopened in 1990. The Kennet and Avon Canal has been developed as a popular heritage tourism destination for boating, canoeing, fishing, walking, and cycling, and is also important for wildlife conservation. The idea of an east to
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Ala Wai Canal

    Ala Wai Canal

    The Ala Wai Canal is an artificial waterway in Honolulu, Hawaii which serves as the northern boundary of the tourist district of Waikīkī. It was created in 1928 for the purpose of draining the rice paddies and swamps which would eventually become the tourist resort area of Waikiki. It also serves as a primary drainage corridor for the rivers and streams that run through central and east Honolulu. The canal runs from just northwest of Kapahulu Avenue along the length of Waikīkī, then turns southwest to empty into the Pacific Ocean. Bridges cross the canal at McCully Street, Kalākaua Avenue, and Ala Moana Boulevard. Ala Wai Boulevard runs parallel to the west side of the canal in Waikiki. Before the canal existed, Waikiki consisted of wetlands which were fed by streams running from the Makiki, Palolo, and Manoa valleys to the sea. In the early 1900s, Lucius Pinkham, then President of the Territorial Board of Health, developed the idea of constructing a drainage canal to drain the wetlands, which he considered "unsanitary." Although the canal proposal was approved by the Board of Health, final approval did not occur until Pinkham became Governor of Hawaii. Construction of the canal,
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Dearne and Dove Canal

    Dearne and Dove Canal

    The Dearne and Dove Canal ran for almost ten miles through South Yorkshire, England from Swinton to Barnsley through nineteen locks, rising 127 feet (39 m). The canal also had two short branches, the Worsbrough branch and the Elsecar branch, both about two miles long with reservoirs at the head of each. The Elsecar branch also has another six locks. The only tunnel was bypassed by a cutting in 1840. The canal was created mainly to carry cargo from the extensive coal mining industry in the area. Other cargo included pig iron, glass, lime, oil products and general merchandise. A combination of railway competition and subsidence caused by the same mines it served forced the canal into a gradual decline, closing completely in 1961. As the local coal industry also collapsed in the 1980s the canal was thrown a lifeline with the forming of the Barnsley Canal Group who are now attempting to restore the whole canal, an effort further boosted by the abandonment of the railway which replaced it. The idea of creating a navigable waterway from the River Don to Barnsley along the course of the River Dearne was first proposed in 1773 by the Marquess of Rockingham. However the idea was not
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Grand Junction Canal

    Grand Junction Canal

    The Grand Junction Canal is a canal in England from Braunston in Northamptonshire to the River Thames at Brentford, with a number of branches. The mainline was built between 1793 and 1805, to improve the route from the Midlands to London, by-passing the upper reaches of the River Thames near Oxford and by shortening the journey. The canal was bought by the Regent's Canal and from 1 January 1929 now forms the southern half of the Grand Union Main Line from London to Birmingham. The canal is now much used by leisure traffic. By 1790, an extensive network of canals was in place in the Midlands, or under construction. However, the only route to London was via the Oxford Canal to the River Thames at Oxford, and then down the river to the capital. The river, particularly the upper reaches, was in a poor condition for navigation compared with the modern canals. The river suffered from shallow sections and shortage of water leading to delays at locks, with conflicts with mill owners over water supplies common. In 1791–1792, two surveys of a route from Brentford on the Thames to Braunston on the Oxford Canal were carried out, first by James Barnes and then by William Jessop. There were
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Lake Biwa Canal

    Lake Biwa Canal

    Lake Biwa Canal (琵琶湖疏水 or 琵琶湖疎水, Biwako Sosui) is a waterway in Japan constructed during the Meiji Period to transport water, freight, and passengers from Lake Biwa to the nearby City of Kyoto. The canal supplied Japan's first public hydroelectric power generator, which served from 1895 to provide electricity for Kyoto's trams. In 1996 the canal was designated a Historic Site. As of 2008, the waterway is not used so much to generate electricity, but rather for water supply, fire-fighting and irrigation purposes. The waterway runs from the vicinity of Mii-dera in Ōtsu, Shiga to its terminus near Nanzen-ji in Kyoto through tunnels under the mountains. Between the two cities, the canal has two routes, the Canal No. 1 (第一疏水, Dai-ichi sosui) and the Canal No. 2 (第二疏水, Dai-ni sosui). Due to the 36 meter difference in elevation between the upstream dam and its terminus, an inclined plane was built, which allowed boats to travel on land via the use of a flat car on which they were placed. Operation of the incline ceased in 1948, but part of its structure has been preserved and is now a tourist attraction, famous for its ornamental cherry trees. Following the Meiji Restoration and the
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Rochdale Canal

    Rochdale Canal

    • Major Cities: Rochdale
    The Rochdale Canal is a navigable "broad" canal in northern England, part of the connected system of the canals of Great Britain. The "Rochdale" in its name refers to the town of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, through which the canal passes. The Rochdale is a Broad canal because its bridges and locks are wide enough to allow vessels of 14 ft width. The canal runs for 32 miles (51 km) across the Pennines from the Bridgewater Canal at Castlefield Basin in Manchester to join the Calder and Hebble Navigation at Sowerby Bridge in West Yorkshire. As originally built, the canal had 92 locks. Whilst the traditional lock numbering has been retained on all restored locks, and on all the relocated locks, the canal now has only 91 locks. The former locks 3 and 4 have been replaced with a single deep lock (Tuel Lane Lock), which is numbered as 3/4. The Rochdale Canal was conceived in 1776, when a group of 48 eminent men from Rochdale raised £237 and commissioned James Brindley to conduct a survey of possible routes between Sowerby Bridge and Manchester. He proposed a route similar to that built, and another more expensive route via Bury. Further progress was not made until 1791, when John Rennie
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Sheffield Canal

    Sheffield Canal

    The Sheffield Canal is a canal in the City of Sheffield, England. It runs 3.9 miles (6.3 km) from Tinsley, where it leaves the River Don, to the Sheffield Canal Basin (now Victoria Quays) in the city centre, passing through 11 locks. Sheffield is on the River Don, but the upper reaches of the river were not navigable. In medieval times, the goods from Sheffield had to be transported overland to the nearest inland port - Bawtry on the River Idle. Later, the lower reaches of the Don were made navigable, but boats could still not reach Sheffield. Proposals to link Sheffield to the navigable Don at Tinsley (and so to the Rivers Ouse and Trent, and to the Humber and the North Sea) were made as early as 1697, but these came to nothing. In 1815, the Sheffield Canal Company was formed by Act of Parliament in order to construct a canal. The surveyors' recommended route was to leave the River Don at Jordan's Lock, opposite where the "Holmes Cut" of the Don Navigation joins the river and follow the north side of the Don Valley to a basin "in or near Savile Street". When this was put forward the Duke of Norfolk's Estate noted that it would preclude coal from their collieries at Tinsley Park
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Tavistock Canal

    Tavistock Canal

    • Major Cities: Tavistock
    • Connected Waterways: Morwellham Quay
    • Canal Tunnels: Morwell Down Tunnel
    The Tavistock Canal is a canal in the county of Devon in England. It was constructed early in the 19th century to link the town of Tavistock to Morwellham Quay on the River Tamar, where cargo could be loaded into ships. The canal is still in use to supply water to a hydro-electric power plant at Morwellham Quay, and forms part of the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site. It is unusual for a canal, as it has a gentle slope over its length, resulting in a considerable flow of water. Morwellham Quay is on the River Tamar, and although it is about 23 miles (37 km) from the sea, the river is still tidal there. The quay was the furthest point inland to which the river was navigable, and it had served Tavistock as a port since the twelfth century. Ships of 200 tons were using the quay by 1800, and there was a growing trade in copper, which was being mined locally, particularly since the Wheal Friendship mine had opened around 1797. In 1802, John Taylor, a local civil engineer with interests in the mining of metal ores, surveyed the route for a canal to run from Tavistock to Morwellham, and it was discussed at a meeting held in March 1803 in Tavistock. The canal
    7.00
    3 votes
    110
    Birmingham and Fazeley Canal

    Birmingham and Fazeley Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Coventry Canal
    The Birmingham and Fazeley Canal is a canal of the Birmingham Canal Navigations in the West Midlands of England. Its purpose was to provide a link between the Coventry Canal and Birmingham and thereby connect Birmingham to London via the Oxford Canal. The story of the Birmingham and Fazeley begins in 1770, when the Birmingham Canal Company was seen as having a monopoly. At the time, the coalfields at Walsall did not have canal access, and a public meeting was held at Lichfield on 18 August, to discuss an independent link from Walsall to Fradley Junction on the Trent and Mersey Canal, passing through Lichfield. Opposition from local landowners resulted in the plan being shelved, but a further plan was proposed at a meeting held in Warwick in August 1781, for a canal to run from Wednesbury through Fazeley to Atherstone, which was the end of the Coventry Canal at the time. The plans were changed somewhat in October, but shareholders in the Birmingham Canal saw it as a serious threat. Two bills were put before Parliament in 1782, one for the Birmingham and Fazeley, and a rival one from the Birmingham Canal for a branch from Wednesbury to Walsall. Both sides opposed the other's
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    Huddersfield Narrow Canal

    Huddersfield Narrow Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Ashton Canal
    • Canal Tunnels: Standedge Tunnels
    The Huddersfield Narrow Canal is an inland waterway in northern England. It runs just under 20 miles (32 km) from Lock 1E at the rear of the University of Huddersfield campus, near Aspley Basin at Huddersfield to the junction with the Ashton Canal at Whitelands Basin in Ashton-under-Lyne. It crosses the Pennines by means of 74 locks and the Standedge Tunnel. The canal was first proposed in 1793 at a meeting in the George Hotel, Huddersfield. Its engineer was Benjamin Outram on the recommendation of William Jessop. His plan was to start from the Huddersfield Broad Canal and follow the River Colne with a climb of 438 feet (134 m) to its summit, where it would pass through a tunnel at Standedge before descending through Saddleworth and the Tame valley to the Ashton Canal near Ashton-under-Lyne. There were many Woollen, worsted and cotton mills along its route which promised ample trade. However there was the possible problem of the loss of their water supplies, so Outram proposed to build a number of reservoirs. Construction began in 1794 with the marking out of the route. The practice was to set up a line of pegs or stakes about 150 feet (46 m) apart so that their tops would indicate
    6.00
    4 votes
    112
    Regent's Canal

    Regent's Canal

    • Major Cities: London
    • Connected Waterways: Limehouse Basin
    • Canal Tunnels: Maida Hill
    Regent's Canal is a canal across an area just north of central London, England. It provides a link from the Paddington arm of the Grand Union Canal, just north-west of Paddington Basin in the west, to the Limehouse Basin and the River Thames in east London. The canal is 13.8 kilometres (8.6 miles) long. First proposed by Thomas Homer in 1802 as a link from the Paddington arm of the then Grand Junction Canal (opened in 1801) with the River Thames at Limehouse, the Regent's Canal was built during the early 19th century after an Act of Parliament was passed in 1812. Noted architect and town planner John Nash was a director of the company; in 1811 he had produced a masterplan for the Prince Regent to redevelop a large area of central north London – as a result, the Regent’s Canal was included in the scheme, running for part of its distance along the northern edge of Regent's Park. As with many Nash projects, the detailed design was passed to one of his assistants, in this case James Morgan, who was appointed chief engineer of the canal company. Work began on 14 October 1812. The first section from Paddington to Camden Town, opened in 1816 and included a 251-metre (274 yd) long tunnel
    6.00
    4 votes
    113
    17th Street Canal

    17th Street Canal

    The 17th Street Canal is a drainage canal in Greater New Orleans, Louisiana, that flows into Lake Pontchartrain. The canal forms a significant portion of the boundary between the city of New Orleans and Metairie, Louisiana. The canal has also been known as the Metairie Outlet Canal and the Upperline Canal. The canal that was to become later known as the 17th Street Canal seems to have had its origin at the start of the 1850s as a canal dug through swampy ground to raise a parallel right of way where the Jefferson and Lake Pontchartrain Railway was built. The railway, in business from 1853 through 1864, connected the town of Carrollton, Louisiana (along the Mississippi River front) with a shipping port on Lake Pontchartrain at what became Bucktown, Louisiana, a distance of about 8 km (5.0 mi). At the time, most of the land between the two terminals was undeveloped swamp. Meanwhile, in 1858, a secondary canal was built to aid in drainage in the low swampy area in "back of town" from Carrollton, with its head at what is now the intersection of Dublin and Palmetto streets, connecting to the Railway canal a short distance on the river side of the Metairie Ridge. The railway was
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Alexandria Canal

    Alexandria Canal

    The Alexandria Canal was a canal in the United States that connected the city of Alexandria to Georgetown in the District of Columbia. In 1830, merchants from Alexandria (which at the time was within the jurisdiction of the federal District of Columbia) proposed linking their city to Georgetown to capitalize on the new Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (C&O Canal). Congress granted a charter to the Alexandria Canal Company in 1830. Construction began soon afterwards on the Aqueduct Bridge, which would enable canal boats from the C&O Canal to cross the Potomac River without first unloading at Georgetown. The boats would then continue their trips downstream on a canal on the southwest side of the Potomac until they reached Alexandria's seaport. Construction of the bridge and of the Alexandria Canal began in 1833. Both were completed a decade later. The canal ran southwards for seven miles through today's Arlington County and City of Alexandria, Virginia, dropping 38 feet through a series of four locks between Washington Street and the Potomac River in the northern portion of Alexandria. The Canal ended at a Tidal Basin (Pool No. 1) and a Tidal Lock (Lift Lock No. 1) located at the north end
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Broad Brook Canal

    Broad Brook Canal

    The Broad Brook Canal is a water-supply canal feeding the Springfield Reservoir in Ludlow, Massachusetts, a public water supply for the city of Springfield, Massachusetts. Its northern segment is also known as the Jabish Canal. The canal was first constructed circa 1875. It was 11,960 feet (3,650 m) in length, and fed the Springfield Reservoir at its eastern side with water collected in the Belchertown Reservoir and swamp. This water, however, was thought to be of poor quality, and thus in 1890-91 the canal was extended north through the Belchertown Reservoir to Jabish Brook, east of Broad Brook. After this addition, the canal's total length was about 8 miles (13 km), of which 1,400 feet (430 m) ran through a cast iron pipe (54 inches in diameter) across the Cherry Valley dam. The entire canal was worked to be 22 feet (6.7 m) wide at the surface, 8 feet (2.4 m) wide at the bottom, with a depth of 4.66 feet (1.42 m).
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Caledonian Canal

    Caledonian Canal

    • Major Cities: Clachnaharry
    • Connected Waterways: North Sea
    The Caledonian Canal is a canal in Scotland that connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William. It was constructed in the early nineteenth century by engineer Thomas Telford, and is a sister canal of the Göta Canal in Sweden, also constructed by Telford. The canal runs some 62 miles (100 km) from northeast to southwest. Only one third of the entire length is man-made, the rest being formed by Loch Dochfour, Loch Ness, Loch Oich, and Loch Lochy. These lochs are part of the Great Glen, a geological fault in the Earth's crust. There are 29 locks (including eight at Neptune's Staircase, Banavie), four aqueducts and 10 bridges in the course of the canal. The canal was conceived as a way of providing much-needed employment to the Highland region. The area was depressed as a result of the Highland Clearances, which had deprived many of their homes and jobs, and faced with laws which sought to eradicate their culture, including the right to wear tartan, to play bagpipes, and to speak Gaelic, many were emigrating to Canada or to the Scottish lowlands. The canal would also provide a safer passage for wooden sailing ships from the north east of
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Canal de Garonne

    Canal de Garonne

    The Canal de Garonne, formerly known as Canal latéral à la Garonne, is a French canal dating from the 19th century which connects Toulouse to Castets-en-Dorthe. The remainder of the route to Bordeaux uses the Garonne River. It is the continuation of the Canal du Midi which connects the Mediterranean with Toulouse. Together they and the Garonne River form the Canal des Deux Mers which connects the Mediterranean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean. The canal skirts the right bank of the Garonne, crosses the river in Agen via the Agen aqueduct, then continues along the left bank. It is connected to the Canal du Midi at its source in Toulouse, and emerges at Castets-en-Dorthe on the Garonne, 54 km southwest of Bordeaux, a point where the river is navigable. The canal is supplied with water from the Garonne by two routes: With the exception of the five locks at Montech, bypassed by the water slope, all of the locks have a length of 40.5m and a width of 6m. The locks at Montech retained the old gauge of 30m. Many bridges cross the canal including eighty-three overbridges. Many were rebuilt in 1933 to allow for the requirements of larger boats. Despite being inaugurated in 1856, the Canal de
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    Chard Canal

    Chard Canal

    The Chard Canal was a 13.5 miles (21.7 km) tub boat canal in Somerset, England, that ran from the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal at Creech St. Michael, over four aqueducts, through three tunnels and four inclined planes to Chard. It was completed in 1842, was never commercially viable, and closed in 1868. The major engineering features are still clearly visible in the landscape. Prior to the construction of the canal, there had been several plans over the previous 50 years to build a ship canal from the Bristol Channel to the English Channel, in order to avoid the route around Cornwall and Devon. The first which would have connected Chard to the canal network was a scheme surveyed in 1769 by Robert Whitworth, to link the River Parrett to Seaton in Devon. Whitworth was asked to reassess this route in the early 1790s, and again thought it was feasible. The plan was revived in 1793, while another route was suggested in 1794 by Josiah Easton, again passing through Chard. The 1793 Chard Canal plan was revived in 1809, by now renamed as the English and Bristol Channels Canal, and the engineer John Rennie was asked to survey it in 1810. He advocated a small ship canal, suitable for vessels
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation

    Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation

    The Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation is the canalisation of the Rivers Chelmer and Blackwater in Essex, in the east of England. The navigation runs for 13.75 miles (22.13 km) from Springfield Basin in Chelmsford to the sea lock at Heybridge Basin near Maldon. It was opened in 1797, and remained under the control of the original company until 2003. It is now run by Essex Waterways Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Inland Waterways Association. The navigation runs from Springfield Basin in Chelmsford to the sea lock at Heybridge Basin near Maldon. It has 13 locks, including a flood lock, six bridges and drops 23 metres (75.4 feet) from the basin to the sea. Prior to the actual construction of the navigation, there had been almost 120 years of proposals for such a scheme, and opposition from the port of Maldon, which anticipated that its revenues would fall if vessels could travel to Chelmsford. The first such scheme was proposed in 1677 by Andrew Yarranton, who published his idea in a work entitled England's Improvements by Sea and Land. Maldon objected and the scheme came to nothing. In July 1733, John Hore, who was involved in the Kennet, Stroudwater, and the Avon Navigation
    8.00
    2 votes
    120
    Cromford Canal

    Cromford Canal

    • Major Cities: Pinxton
    • Connected Waterways: Erewash Canal
    • Canal Tunnels: Butterley Tunnel
    The Cromford Canal ran 14.5 miles (23.3 kilometres) from Cromford to the Erewash Canal in Derbyshire, England with a branch to Pinxton. Built by William Jessop with the assistance of Benjamin Outram, its alignment included four tunnels and 14 locks. From Cromford it ran south following the 300-foot (91 m) contour line along the east side of the valley of the Derwent to Ambergate, where it turned eastwards along the Amber valley. It turned sharply to cross the valley, crossing the river and the Ambergate to Nottingham road, by means of an aqueduct at Bullbridge, before turning towards Ripley. From there the Butterley Tunnel took it through to the Erewash Valley. From the tunnel it continued to Pye Hill, near Ironville, the junction for the branch to Pinxton, and then descended through fourteen locks to meet the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill. The Pinxton Branch became important as a route for Nottinghamshire coal, via the Erewash, to the River Trent and Leicester and was a terminus of the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway. A 6-mile (9.7 km) long section of the Cromford canal between Cromford and Ambergate is listed as a Biological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). In addition
    8.00
    2 votes
    121
    Falsterbo Canal

    Falsterbo Canal

    Falsterbo Canal (Swedish: Falsterbokanalen) is a short canal that allows ships to pass inside Falsterbo, Skanör and Ljunghusen from the Baltic to the Öresund. Falsterbo, Skanör and Ljunghusen lie on the Skanör-Falsterbo peninsula (now essentially an island which is called "Näset"). During the Second World War when the Germans mined extensively outside Falsterbonäset at the Falsterborev (Falsterbo reef) in 1939, Sweden concluded that a canal was needed between Höllviken and Ljunghusen to allow safe passage of coastal traffic. The canal was completed, allowing ship passage on August 1, 1941. There had been previous attempts at canals in this location; in 1884 Mårten Dahn proposed to the riksdag that he would build a canal to allow ships to pass here. In 1896 fishermen in Skanör actually began to construct a canal here, but gave up due because of the difficulty of the task. The canal contains a sluice that can shut in order to prevent high currents through the canal when the difference in water level between the seas is large. On the north mouth of the canal there is a harbour which is well suited for small boats. Today no heavy traffic passes through the canal and it is practically a
    8.00
    2 votes
    122
    Gower Branch Canal

    Gower Branch Canal

    Try waiting a few minutes and reloading. (Cannot contact the database server: No working slave server: Unknown error (10.0.6.43))
    8.00
    2 votes
    123
    Wednesbury Old Canal

    Wednesbury Old Canal

    Wednesbury Old Canal is part of the Birmingham Canal Navigations (BCN) in West Midlands (county), England. It opened in 1769, and although parts of it were abandoned in 1955 and 1960, the section between Pudding Green Junction and Ryder's Green Junction is navigable, as it provides a link to the Walsall Canal, while a short stub beyond Ryder's Green Junction is also navigable. Wednesbury Old Canal leaves the main line Birmingham level at Pudding Green Junction and passes through a completely industrial landscape. At Ryders Green Junction the Walsall Canal begins its descent down the eight Ryder's Green Locks. Just before the locks Wednesbury Old Canal veers off and commences its meandering route through Swan Village and, originally, around the collieries. The canal beyond Swan Bridge Junction was also known as the Balls Hill Branch. This part of the canal is now only open to boat traffic as far as the Black Country Spine Road, following the decision to build a new bridge which didn't allow enough headroom for boats to pass. The Wednesbury Canal is dry from this point, but the Ridgacre Branch continues, watered for most of its original length (without its branches) past the
    8.00
    2 votes
    124
    Lewes and Rehoboth Canal

    Lewes and Rehoboth Canal

    The Lewes and Rehoboth Canal is a canal in Sussex County, Delaware. It connects the Broadkill River to Rehoboth Bay, and forms a portion of the Intracoastal Waterway.
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Rhine–Main–Danube Canal

    Rhine–Main–Danube Canal

    The Rhine–Main–Danube Canal (German: Rhein-Main-Donau-Kanal; also called Main-Danube Canal, RMD Canal or Europa Canal), located in Bavaria, Germany, connects the Main and the Danube rivers across the European Watershed, running from Bamberg via Nuremberg to Kelheim. The canal connects the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean to the Black Sea, providing a navigable artery between the Rhine delta (at Rotterdam in the Netherlands) and the Danube Delta (or Constanţa, through the Danube – Black Sea Canal) in eastern Romania. The present canal was completed in 1992 and is 171 km (106 mi) long. Projects for connecting the Danube and Rhine basins by canal have a long history. In 793, the Emperor Charlemagne ordered the construction of a canal — the Fossa Carolina, or Karlsgraben — connecting the Schwäbische Rezat, a tributary of the Rednitz, to the Altmühl near Treuchtlingen. Between 1836 and 1846 the Ludwig Canal, or Ludwigskanal, named for King Ludwig I of Bavaria, was built between Bamberg and Kelheim. This canal had a narrow channel, with many locks, and a shortage of water in the peak section, so the operation of the waterway soon became uneconomic — especially given the rapidly advancing
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Salem Beverly Waterway Canal

    Salem Beverly Waterway Canal

    The Salem Beverly Waterway Canal, sometimes called the Grand Wenham Canal, is an aqueduct canal in Topsfield and Wenham, Massachusetts. It was never used to transport anything but water and recreational canoists. The canal was built in 1917 to provide water for Beverly, Massachusetts and Salem, Massachusetts, and is owned with its adjacent land by the Salem-Beverly Water Commission. It was dredged and widened in 1974, with gravel roads built on each side of the canal. The canal carries water from the Ipswich River, Topsfield, through the Wenham Swamp to Wenham. From there, a pipeline also constructed in 1917 carries it to Wenham Lake. In 1911 the State Board of Health was directed by the General Court of Massachusetts to investigate the feasibility of diverting water from the Ipswich River to augment the dwindling water supply of the Salem-Beverly region. The resulting House Document No. 1652, January, 1912, caused the legislature in Chapter 85 of the Resolves of 1912 to appoint a three-man commission to study water-supply issues in most of the towns and cities of northeastern Massachusetts. In House Document No. 2200, the commission took a strong stand in favor of diversion. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    Shrewsbury Canal

    Shrewsbury Canal

    The Shrewsbury Canal (or Shrewsbury and Newport Canal) was a canal in Shropshire, England. Authorised in 1793, the main line from Trench to Shrewsbury was fully open by 1797, but it remained isolated from the rest of the canal network until 1835, when the Birmingham and Liverpool Junction Canal built the Newport Branch from Norbury Junction to a new junction with the Shrewsbury Canal at Wappenshall. After ownership passed to a series of railway companies, the canal was officially abandoned in 1944; many sections have disappeared, though some bridges and other structures can still be found. There is an active campaign to preserve the remnants of the canal and to restore the Norbury to Shrewsbury line to navigation. From 1768 several small canals were built in the area of what is now Telford. These canals carried tub boats. The first of these was the Donnington Wood Canal which opened in 1768, to be followed by the Wombridge Canal and the Ketley Canal, both opened in 1788, and the Shropshire Canal, which opened in 1791. The network linked Lilleshall and Pave Lane in the north to Coalbrookdale and Coalport in the south. Following a survey of the route by George Young from Worcester in
    9.00
    1 votes
    128
    Trent and Mersey Canal

    Trent and Mersey Canal

    • Connected Waterways: River Trent
    • Canal Tunnels: Harecastle Tunnel
    The Trent and Mersey Canal is a 93.5-mile long canal (150.5 km) in the East Midlands, West Midlands, and north-west of England. It is a "narrow canal" for the vast majority of its length, but at the extremities to the east of Burton upon Trent and west of Middlewich, it is a wide canal. The narrow locks and bridges are big enough for a single narrowboat 7 ft wide (2.1 m) × 72 ft long (22 m), while the wide locks can accommodate boats 14 ft wide (4.3 m), or two narrowboats next to each other. As its name implies, the Trent and Mersey canal (T & M) was built to link the River Trent at Derwent Mouth (in Derbyshire) to the River Mersey. The second connection is made via the Bridgewater Canal, which it joins at Preston Brook in Cheshire. Note that although mileposts measure the distance to Preston Brook and Shardlow, Derwent mouth is a mile or so beyond Shardlow. The plan of a canal connection from the Mersey to the Trent ("The Grand Trunk") came from canal engineer James Brindley. It was authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1766 and the first sod was cut by Josiah Wedgwood in July that year at Middleport. In 1777, the canal was completed, including more than 70 locks and five tunnels,
    9.00
    1 votes
    129
    Hertford Union Canal

    Hertford Union Canal

    The Hertford Union Canal or Duckett's Canal is a short stretch (c. 1.5 km) of canal in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in east London. It connects the Regent's Canal to the Lee Navigation. It was opened in 1830 but quickly proved to be a commercial failure. It was acquired by the Regents Canal Company in 1857, and became part of the Grand Union Canal in 1927. Like its 1766 predecessor, the Limehouse Cut, the Hertford Union Canal was intended to provide a short-cut between the River Thames and the River Lee Navigation. It allowed traffic on the Lea heading for the Thames to bypass the tidal, tortuous and often silted Bow Back Rivers of the Lea via a short stretch of the Regent's Canal, and provided a short-cut from the Lea to places west along the Regent's Canal. The canal was promoted by Sir George Duckett who succeeded in gaining an Act of Parliament that gained its Royal Assent on 17 May 1824, entitled An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal from the River Lee Navigation, in the parish of St. Mary Stratford Bow, in the county of Middlesex, to join the Regent's Canal at or near a Place called Old Ford Lock, in the parish of St. Matthew Bethnal Green, in the said
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Leominster Canal

    Leominster Canal

    The Leominster Canal was an English canal which ran for just over 18 miles from Mamble to Leominster through 16 locks and a number of tunnels, some of which suffered engineering problems even before the canal opened. Originally the canal was part of a much more ambitious plan to run 46 miles from Stourport to Kington. Following the opening of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal in 1772, which linked the industrial Midlands to the River Severn at Stourport, the engineer Robert Whitworth proposed a canal to link Stourport to Hereford, passing through Pensax and Leominster in 1777. Meetings were held at Leominster and Tenbury in 1789, at which it was decided to survey possible routes from Leominster to Stourport. Thomas Dadford, Jr. carried out the survey, and presented a plan to a meeting in December 1789 for a 31-mile (50 km) canal, costing £83,000, with estimated receipts of £4,300 per year. Three tunnels would be required, at Putnal Field, Southnet and Pensax. Despite the low estimated returns, a meeting in January 1790 decided to proceed with Dadford's canal. A further meeting was held in Kington in April, and there were calls to build a connecting canal to the town. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Buckingham Canal

    Buckingham Canal

    The Buckingham Canal is a 421.55 kilometres (261.9 mi) long fresh water navigation canal, running parallel to the Coromandel Coast of South India from Vijayawada in Andhra Pradesh to Villupuram District in Tamil Nadu. The canal connects most of the natural backwaters along the coast to the port of Chennai (Madras). It was constructed by the British Rule, and was an important waterway during the late nineteenth and the twentieth century. It was first known simply as the North River by the British and was believed to be partly responsible for reducing tsunami and cyclone damage to much of the Chennai-southern Andhra coastline The first segment of the canal was constructed as a salt water navigation canal in 1806, from Madras North to Ennore. Subsequently, it was extended north to Pulicat Lake, 40 kilometres (24.9 mi) north of Madras. The canal was taken over by the government of Madras Presidency in 1837 and further extended, ultimately reaching 315 kilometres (195.7 mi) north of Madras to Vijayawada on the bank of Krishna River in Andhra Pradesh, and 103 kilometres (64.0 mi) south of Chennai to Marakkanam in Tamil Nadu. During 1877 and 1878 the people of Madras suffered from the
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    Canal through Walcheren

    Canal through Walcheren

    The Canal through Walcheren in the Netherlands crosses the east of Walcheren. It connects the Westerschelde and the Oosterschelde. The railroad entering Walcheren from the east does not cross this canal, but bends south and runs along it.
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    Enfield Falls Canal

    Enfield Falls Canal

    Enfield Falls Canal is a canal that was built to circumvent the shallows at Enfield Falls on the Connecticut River. It is situated along the west side of the river, adjacent to the towns of Suffield and Windsor Locks of Hartford County in the state of Connecticut, USA. Windsor Locks is named after the series of locks on the canal. Prior to the opening of the canal, the scows or flat-bottomed boats which plied the Connecticut River could only ascend the falls by engaging local fallsmen to propel the craft forward utilizing set poles. One fallsman was required for each ton of cargo. Not only did the added labor costs make this method of overtaking the falls expensive, but the amount of cargo that could be transported was limited to approximately ten tons. Any additional freight had to be offloaded at Warehouse Point on the east bank and warehoused for later transport or carried around the falls by ox teams. Construction of the canal commenced in 1827 and it was opened on November 11, 1829. The canal was 5+⁄4 miles (8.4 km) long and had a vertical drop of 32 ft (9.8 m). The locks admitted craft up to 90 ft (27 m) long and 20 ft (6.1 m) wide. The canal was unique among canals of the
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    Lake Washington Ship Canal

    Lake Washington Ship Canal

    The Lake Washington Ship Canal, which runs through the City of Seattle, Washington, connects the fresh water body of Lake Washington with the salt water inland sea of Puget Sound. The Hiram M. Chittenden Locks accommodate the approximately 20-foot difference in water level between Lake Washington and the Sound. The Canal runs east/west, and connects Union Bay, Lake Union, the Montlake Cut, Portage Bay, the Fremont Cut, Salmon Bay, and Shilshole Bay, with the Sound, which empties into the Pacific Ocean. The project began in 1911 and was officially completed in 1934. Prior to construction of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, otherwise known as the Salmon Bay Waterway, water used to exit Lake Washington via the Black River which flowed from the south end of Lake Washington into the Duwamish River. As early as 1854, there was discussion of building a navigable connection between the Lake Washington and Puget Sound for the purpose of transporting logs, milled lumber, and fishing vessels. Thirteen years later, the United States Navy endorsed a canal project, which included a plan for building a naval shipyard on Lake Washington. In 1891 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started planning the
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Nieuwe Waterweg

    Nieuwe Waterweg

    The Nieuwe Waterweg ("New Waterway") is a ship canal in the Netherlands from het Scheur (a branch of the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta) west of the town of Maassluis to the North Sea at Hook of Holland: the Maasmond, where the Nieuwe Waterweg connects to the Maasgeul. It is the artificial mouth of the river Rhine. The Nieuwe Waterweg, which opened in 1872 and has a length of approximately 20.5 kilometres (12.7 mi), was constructed to keep the city and port of Rotterdam accessible to seafaring vessels as the natural Meuse-Rhine branches silted up. The Waterway is a busy shipping route since it is the primary access to one of the busiest ports in the world, the Europoort of Rotterdam. At the entrance to the sea, a flood protection system called Maeslantkering has been installed (completed in 1997). There are no bridges or tunnels across the Nieuwe Waterweg. By the middle of the 19th century, Rotterdam was already one of the largest port cities in the world, mainly because of transshipment of goods from Germany to Great Britain. The increase in shipping traffic created a capacity problem: there were too many branches in the river delta, making the port difficult to reach. In 1863, a law
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Saimaa Canal

    Saimaa Canal

    The Saimaa Canal (Finnish: Saimaan kanava; Swedish: Saima kanal; Russian: Сайменский канал) is a transportation canal that connects lake Saimaa with the Gulf of Finland near Vyborg, Russia. The canal was built from 1845 to 1856 and opened on 7 September 1856 (Old Style: 26 August 1856). It was overhauled and widened in 1963–1968. A system of inland waterways and canals in the 120 interconnected lakes of the south-central and south-east part of Finland (Finnish Lakeland) are reached through the canal. The network of deep channels in Lake Saimaa with at least a draught of 4.2 metres (14 ft) covers 814 kilometres (506 mi). The deep channels extend all the way to Kuopio in Central Finland. The canal begins near Lauritsala, Lappeenranta, Finland (61°04′43″N 028°16′24″E / 61.07861°N 28.27333°E / 61.07861; 28.27333) and ends in Vyborg, Russia (60°48′38″N 028°44′13″E / 60.81056°N 28.73694°E / 60.81056; 28.73694), connecting Lake Saimaa and the Vyborg Bay. On the way, it connects Lake Nuijamaa, on the Finnish–Russian border (60°57′6″N 28°34′33″E / 60.95167°N 28.57583°E / 60.95167; 28.57583), and three smaller lakes in Russia. There are three locks in the Finnish part of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Stamford Canal

    Stamford Canal

    The Stamford Canal was part of the Welland Navigation in Lincolnshire, England. It ran for 9.5 miles (15.3 km) from Stamford to Market Deeping and had 12 locks, two of which were on the river section at Deeping St. James. It opened in 1670, long before the canal age. Plans to link it westwards to the Oakham Canal, northwards to the South Forty-Foot Drain and southwards to the River Nene in 1809 came to nothing, and it closed in 1863, soon after the arrival of the Midland Railway in the area. Its course and some of its structures can still be traced in the landscape. The River Welland was one of the earliest on which improvements, in this case to allow navigation to Stamford, were authorised by an act of Parliament. The act was granted in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in 1571, and the preamble explained how Stamford had prospered as a result of the river, but also stated that mills built between Stamford and Deeping had resulted in it no longer being navigable, as they had diverted the water. Powers were granted to restore the river using either the old channel or the new one, although it is not clear exactly what was meant by this. There is no evidence that any work was carried
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    White Sea-Baltic Canal

    White Sea-Baltic Canal

    The White Sea – Baltic Sea Canal (Russian: Беломо́рско–Балти́йский кана́л, Belomorsko–Baltiyskiy Kanal, BBK), often abbreviated to White Sea Canal (Belomorkanal) is a ship canal in Russia opened on 2 August 1933. It connects the White Sea with Lake Onega, which is further connected to the Baltic Sea. Until 1961, its original name was the Stalin White Sea – Baltic Sea Canal (Belomorsko–Baltiyskiy Kanal imeni Stalina). The canal was constructed by forced labour of GULAG inmates and during its construction some 100,000 people died (although various estimates have been stated). The canal runs partially along several canalised rivers and Lake Vygozero. The total length of the route is 227 kilometres (141 mi). As of 2008, the canal sees only light traffic, carrying between ten and forty boats per day. Its economic advantages are limited by its minimal depth of 3.5 m (11.5 ft), inadequate for most sea-going vessels. The total waterway length is 227 kilometres (141 mi), of which 48 kilometres (30 mi) are manmade. The current flows downwards from Lake Onega to the White Sea, and all navigation marks are set according to it. The canal begins near Povenets settlement in Povenets bay of Lake
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Barge Canal

    Barge Canal

    The Canaveral Barge Canal provides an east-to-west link between the Atlantic Ocean and Indian River Lagoon across northern Merritt Island, Florida, in two segments separated by the Banana River. It is located 15 miles south of Titusville, Florida. The canal is 12 feet deep and has entrances to other water systems including Syke's Creek and various marinas. The canal links Port Canaveral along the Atlantic Ocean to the Intracoastal Waterway running down the center of the Indian River Lagoon. The canal was constructed to allow the transport of crude oil by barge to the two power plants south of Titusville, Florida.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Basingstoke Canal

    Basingstoke Canal

    • Canal Tunnels: Greywell Tunnel
    The Basingstoke Canal is a British canal, completed in 1794, built to connect Basingstoke with the River Thames at Weybridge via the Wey Navigation. From Basingstoke, the canal passes through or near Greywell, North Warnborough, Odiham, Dogmersfield, Fleet, Farnborough Airfield, Aldershot, Mytchett, Brookwood, Knaphill and Woking. Its eastern end is at Byfleet, where it connects to the Wey Navigation. This, in turn, leads to the River Thames at Weybridge. Its intended purpose was to allow boats to travel from the docks in East London to Basingstoke. It was never a commercial success and, from 1950, lack of maintenance allowed the canal to become increasingly derelict. After many years of neglect, restoration commenced in 1977 and on 10 May 1991 the canal was reopened as a fully navigable waterway from the River Wey to almost as far as the Greywell Tunnel. Unfortunately, insufficient water supplies, problems with funding, and conservation issues, have so far prevented the Basingstoke Canal from reaching its true potential as a restored waterway. The canal was conceived as a way to stimulate agricultural development in Hampshire. Following a Parliamentary Bill in 1778, problems
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Canal Saint-Martin

    Canal Saint-Martin

    Canal Saint-Martin is a 4.5 km long canal in Paris. It connects the Canal de l'Ourcq to the river Seine and runs underground between Bastille (Paris Métro) and République (Paris Métro). The entrance of the canal is a double lock near Place de Stalingrad. Then, towards the river Seine, the canal is bordered by the quai de Valmy on one side and the quai de Jemmapes on the other. The canal continues to the Seine via the Port de l'Arsenal. The canal widens at Bassin de la Villette, the largest artificial lake in Paris. Along the canal is an unusual hydraulic lifting bridge, the Pont levant de la rue de Crimée. Construction of the canal was ordered by Napoleon I in 1802, in order to create an artificial waterway for supplying Paris with fresh water to support a growing population and to help avoid diseases such as dysentery and cholera. Gaspard de Chabrol, prefect of Paris, proposed to build a canal from the river Ourcq (starting 100 km northeast of Paris). The canal was dug from 1802 to 1825, funded by a new tax on wine. The canal was also used to supply Paris with food (grain), building materials, and other goods, carried on canal boats. Two ports were created in Paris on the canal to
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Delta–Mendota Canal

    Delta–Mendota Canal

    The Delta–Mendota Canal is a 117 mi (188 km) aqueduct in central California, United States. It is part of the Central Valley Project and its purpose is to replace water in the San Joaquin River that is diverted into Madera Canal and Friant-Kern Canal at Friant Dam. The canal begins at the C.W. Bill Jones Pumping Plant (formerly the Tracy Pumping Plant), which pumps water 197 ft (60 m) from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The canal runs south along the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, parallel to the California Aqueduct for most of its journey, but diverges to the east after passing San Luis Reservoir, which receives some of its water. The water is pumped from the canal into O'Neill Forebay, and then is pumped into San Luis Reservoir by the Gianelli Pumping-Generating Plant. Occasionally, water from O'Neill Forebay is released into the canal. The Delta–Mendota Canal ends at Mendota Pool, on the San Joaquin River near the town of Mendota, 30 mi (48 km) west of Fresno. The Delta–Mendota Canal capacity is 4,600 cu ft/s (130 m/s) and gradually decreases to 3,211 cu ft/s (90.9 m/s) at its terminus. The Delta–Mendota Canal was completed in 1951 and is operated by the United
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Merrimack Canal

    Merrimack Canal

    The Merrimack Canal is a power canal in Lowell, Massachusetts. The canal, dug in the 1820s, begins at the Pawtucket Canal just above Swamp Locks, and empties into the Merrimack River near the Boott Cotton Mills. The Merrimack Canal was the first major canal to be dug at Lowell exclusively for power purposes, and delivered 32 feet (9.8 m) of hydraulic head to the mills of the Merrimack Manufacturing Company. The Merrimack Manufacturing Company was the first of the major textile mills constructed in Lowell. It was demolished around 1960. The canal, which runs along the southeast side of Dutton Street and then between the two halves of Lowell High School, is unique in the Lowell Canal System as it delivers the full 32-foot (9.8 m) drop of the Merrimack at once, instead of operating on a 13-foot (4.0 m) and a 17-foot (5.2 m) two-level system.
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Uttoxeter Canal

    Uttoxeter Canal

    The Uttoxeter Canal  pronounced (listen) (help·info) was a thirteen-mile extension of the Caldon Canal running from Froghall as far as Uttoxeter in Staffordshire, England. It was authorised in 1797, but did not open until 1811. With the exception of the first lock and basin at Froghall, it closed in 1849, in order that the Churnet Valley Railway could be constructed along its length. The railway has since been dismantled and there are plans to reinstate the canal. The Uttoxeter Canal was promoted by the Trent and Mersey Canal Company and authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1797. This was a political move, designed to prevent a rival scheme for a canal to Uttoxeter. The planned Commercial Canal was intended to link the Chester Canal at Nantwich to the Ashby Canal at Moira, passing through Stoke on Trent and Uttoxeter, and would have had a serious impact on the profitability of the Trent and Mersey Company if it had been built. Powers to alter the proposed route at Alton were included in an act of Parliament obtained in 1802, but because the new canal was not expected to be profitable, construction was delayed. Ten years after the Act was passed, work began under the direction of
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Danube-Bucharest Canal

    Danube-Bucharest Canal

    The Danube–Bucharest Canal is a 73-kilometre (45 mi) long canal project that is planned to link Bucharest, Romania, to the Danube via Argeş River. The earliest plans, made by engineer Nicolae Cucu in 1880, sought to link Bucharest to the Danube at Olteniţa. In 1927, a study by Alexandru Davidescu was published at the Polytechnic School. Two years later, the Romanian parliament passed Law no. 2749 on the building of the Argeş–Bucharest–Danube Canal and of a port in Bucharest; the law was published in Monitorul Oficial in August 1929. However, the world recession of the early 1930s prevented the government from investing large amounts of money in such projects. Various studies were published, but as World War II began, they were ignored. New plans were made in 1982, the main goal being the regularization of the Argeş River, which flooded in 1970. Communist leader Nicolae Ceauşescu also wanted to have a direct link to Northern Europe, as Rhine-Main-Danube Canal was also built then. The building of the canal began in 1986, the project was supposed to have five locks and four hydroelectric plants (the only one that is currently working is the one at Mihăileşti). The final project was
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Erie Canal

    Erie Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Lake Erie
    The Erie Canal is a waterway in New York that runs about 363 miles (584 km) from Albany, New York, on the Hudson River to Buffalo, New York, at Lake Erie, completing a navigable water route from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. The canal contains 36 locks and encompasses a total elevation differential of approximately 565 ft. (169 m). First proposed in 1807, it was under construction from 1817 to 1825 and officially opened on October 26, 1825. It was the first transportation system between the eastern seaboard (New York City) and the western interior (Great Lakes) of the United States that did not require portage, was faster than carts pulled by draft animals, and cut transport costs by about 95%. The canal fostered a population surge in western New York State, opened regions farther west to settlement, and helped New York City become the chief U.S. port. It was enlarged between 1834 and 1862. In 1918, the enlarged canal was replaced by the larger New York State Barge Canal. Today, it is part of the New York State Canal System. In 2000 the United States Congress designated the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor to recognize the national significance of the canal system
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Kidwelly and Llanelli Canal

    Kidwelly and Llanelli Canal

    The Kidwelly and Llanelly Canal was a canal and tramroad system in Carmarthenshire, Wales, built to carry anthracite coal to the coast for onward transportation by coastal ships. It began life as Kymer's Canal in 1766, which linked pits at Pwll y Llygod to a dock near Kidwelly. Access to the dock gradually became more difficult as the estuary silted up, and an extension to Llanelli was authorised in 1812. Progress was slow, and the new canal was linked to a harbour at Pembury built by Thomas Gaunt in the 1820s, until the company's own harbour at Burry Port was completed in 1832. Tramways served a number of collieries to the east of Burry Port. In 1832 engineer James Green advised on extending the system, and suggested a line with three inclined planes to reach Cwmmawr, further up the Gwendraeth Valley. Although Green had experience with inclined planes on other canals, he underestimated the cost and could not complete the work. He was sacked in 1836, but the canal company finished the new route the following year. The canal was moderately successful, and shareholders received dividends from 1858. In 1865 the company changed its name to become the Kidwelly and Burry Port Railway,
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    London Avenue Canal

    London Avenue Canal

    The London Avenue Canal is a drainage canal in New Orleans, Louisiana, used for pumping rain water into Lake Pontchartrain. The Canal runs through the 7th Ward of New Orleans from the Gentilly area to the Lakefront. The Canal was constructed in the first half of the 19th century, commissioned by Alexander Milne, who owned large tracts of land that would later become part of the city of New Orleans but were at the time mostly swamp. The canal originally served to commerce of small boat traffic from Lake Pontchartrain to the "Back of Town" section of New Orleans in addition to swamp drainage (which early on it did little of). By the end of the 19th century, with most commerce shifted to other canals specifically designed for shipping, the London Avenue Canal had achieved its modern function to take flow of drainage mechanically pumped from the streets of the City. However early on this was mostly just water from the river-side of the Canal head; most of the area along the Canal in back of Gentilly Ridge remained cypress swamp with a few cow-pastures subject to periodic flooding. In the early 20th century the old "London Avenue Machine" steam-pump at the head of the Canal was replaced
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Pannerdens Kanaal

    Pannerdens Kanaal

    The Pannerdens Kanaal (Pannerden Canal) is a canal in the Netherlands that was dredged between 1701 and 1709 to cut off a large, shallow bend of river Rhine and so improve river traffic and water regulation. The canal, now indistinguishable from a "real" river, forks off north from river Waal a few kilometres past the point where the Bijlands Kanaal, a similar canal dug to cut off a Waal bend, ends. It flows past the towns of Pannerden (right bank), which gives the canal its name, and Angeren (left bank) and so north to the point where the old Rhine bend flows into it and the river continues to the sea as Nederrijn (Lower Rhine). The old Rhine bend, cut off at its upstream end, still exists and is called, unsurprisingly, Oude Rijn (Old Rhine).
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Sambre-Oise Canal

    Sambre-Oise Canal

    The Sambre-Oise Canal (French: Canal de la Sambre à l'Oise) is located in northern France. It forms a connection between the river Sambre (Meuse basin) at Landrecies and the Oise (Seine basin) at Tergnier. The canal is 71 km long, and has 38 locks. It is only suited for small boats, maximum length 38.5 m. The Sambre-Oise Canal saw one of the last Allied victories of World War I. The forcing of the Sambre-Oise Canal took place on November 4, 1918. Participating in the operation were the 2nd Battalion Royal Sussex, as well as the 2nd Manchesters, to which the poet Wilfred Owen belonged. The Lancashire Fusiliers also took part in the battle. The British forces were to cross some fields surrounded by high hedges, then cross the canal at a point where there was a lockhouse. The Germans had this area defended with machine guns and rifle teams. As the 2nd Battalion advanced on the canal, the Royal Engineers placed small footbridges across the lock. Some Royal Sussex Regiment men actually climbed up onto the lock gates, one of them firing his Lewis gun from the hip as he went. Eventually the British managed to take the lockhouse and pushed on to their final objective near the Étreux road.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Thames and Medway Canal

    Thames and Medway Canal

    The Thames and Medway Canal is a disused canal in Kent, south east England, also known as the Gravesend and Rochester Canal. It was originally some 11 km (6.8 mi) long and cut across the neck of the Hoo peninsula, linking the River Thames at Gravesend with the River Medway at Strood. The canal was first mooted in 1778 as a shortcut for military craft from Deptford and Woolwich Dockyards on the Thames to Chatham Dockyard on the Medway, avoiding the 74 km (46 mi) journey round the peninsula and through the Thames estuary. The canal was also intended to take commercial traffic between the two rivers. The first practical attempt to build the canal began in 1799, when an engineer named Ralph Dodd published a pamphlet and began to solicit investment for the scheme. Dodd's plan was for a six-mile canal with locks and basins, taking two years to build and costing £24,576, part of the cost to be defrayed by selling the excavated chalk as agricultural lime. Dodd was confident that the canal would be useful to the government but would also attract commercial vessels. In 1800 the canal company received the necessary Act of Parliament and work began at the Gravesend end. The estimated cost had
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    South Hadley Canal

    South Hadley Canal

    The South Hadley Canal was a canal along the Connecticut River in South Hadley, Massachusetts. It is said to be the earliest navigable canal in the United States, with operation commencing in 1795. The canal dates to February 1792, when leading citizens of western Massachusetts proposed to build a canal around the Great Falls at South Hadley, a 53-foot (16 m) drop in the Connecticut River that blocked boat transport. At that time, all cargo needed to be unloaded for 2.5 miles (4.0 km) of land transport around the falls, driving river transport cost for a bushel of wheat from Northampton, Massachusetts to Windsor, Connecticut to more than double its transport costs by sea from Hartford to Boston. John Hancock, then Governor of Massachusetts, signed the charter which incorporated the Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on the Connecticut River. Their corporate seal bore the motto "SIC TRANSIT - Public & Private Good." Funds were raised both locally and internationally, with four Dutch investment houses owning slightly over 50% of the stock. The canal was built by some 240 local workers. In April 1795 it opened to commercial traffic. (Nearby Turners Falls Canal opened three years
    5.25
    4 votes
    153
    Coalport Canal

    Coalport Canal

    The Coalport Canal is an historic canal built to link several Coalport industries with the River Severn. The canal runs from the river past the Coalport China works, the 'Tar Tunnel' leading to the bitumen and coal mines, and up the Hay Inclined Plane, where it continues towards Blists Hill town. It terminates here. There is also another entrance to the mines from the top of the inclined plane at Blists Hill. Today, the canal and inclined plane, along with the Coalport China works, mine, and Blists Hill town, are part of the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. Currently, much of the stretch between Blists Hill and the Hay Inclined Plane is overgrown and impassable. The Coalport Canal is a part of the Shropshire Union Canal.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Dorset and Somerset Canal

    Dorset and Somerset Canal

    The Dorset and Somerset Canal was a proposed canal in the south west of England. The main line was intended to link Poole, in Dorset with the Kennet and Avon Canal near Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire. A branch was to go from the main line at Frome to the southern reaches of the Somerset coalfield at Nettlebridge. Construction of the branch started in 1786, using boat lifts rather than locks to cope with changes of level, but the company ran out of money, and the canal was abandoned in 1803, never to be completed. Plans for a major canal to link Bristol and Poole, and therefore to make travel from the Bristol Channel to the English Channel easier and safer, were proposed in 1792. The suggested route passed through Wareham, Sturminster Newton, Wincanton and Frome, joining the River Avon at Bath. Collieries in the Mendips near Nettlebridge were to be served by a branch canal, while the main trade was seen as coal travelling southwards and clay travelling northwards. A public meeting was held in Wincanton in January 1793, at which a list of subscribers was started. There were several proposals as to the precise route, and so the canal engineer Robert Whitworth was asked to survey a route.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Gloucester and Sharpness Canal

    Gloucester and Sharpness Canal

    • Major Cities: Gloucester
    The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal or Gloucester and Berkeley Canal is a canal in the west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness; for much of its length it runs close to the tidal River Severn, but cuts off a significant loop in the river, at a once-dangerous bend near Arlingham. It was once the broadest and deepest canal in the world. Conceived in the Canal Mania period of the late 18th century, the Gloucester and Berkeley Ship Canal scheme (as it was originally named) was started by architect and civil engineer Robert Mylne. In 1793 an Act of Parliament was obtained authorising the raising of a total of £200,000. The project rapidly encountered financial difficulties - to such an extent that Mylne left the project in 1798. By half way through 1799 costs had reached £112,000 but only 5½ miles of the canal had been completed. Robert Mylne's role was taken over by James Dadford who had originally been engaged as resident engineer on the project in 1795. Lack of funds resulted in the company ceasing to employ Dadford in 1800. Between 1800 and 1810 various attempts were made to raise money to allow further building but they came to nothing. Moneys from tolls and rents allowed
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Huddersfield Broad Canal

    Huddersfield Broad Canal

    The Huddersfield Broad Canal (also called by its original name, the Sir John Ramsden Canal) is a wide-locked navigable canal in Yorkshire in northern England. The waterway is 3¾ miles (6 km) long and has 9 wide locks. It follows the valley of the River Colne and connects the Calder and Hebble Navigation at Cooper Bridge junction with the Huddersfield Narrow Canal at (or near) Aspley Basin in the centre of Huddersfield. The original purpose of the canal was to connect Huddersfield to the other Yorkshire waterways: that is, to the Aire and Calder Navigation via the Calder and Hebble Navigation. It was built by the Ramsden family of Huddersfield, and completed in 1780. The building of the Huddersfield Narrow Canal gave it a heavily-locked Western connection to wool-weaving towns of the upper Colne valley (Golcar, Linthwaite, Slaithwaite, and Marsden) and across the Pennines to Saddleworth, Stalybridge and Manchester via Standedge Tunnel (the longest, deepest and highest on the English Canals). It was never closed, and sections of the canal have been upgraded over a number of years. The canal passed into railway ownership in 1845 when it was bought by the Huddersfield and Manchester
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Islington Branch Canal

    Islington Branch Canal

    The Islington Branch Canal was a short canal branch at Ancoats in north-west England, which joined the main line of the Ashton Canal between locks 1 and 2. Although it was only 1,034 yards long (945m) it was, in its prime, an important industrial branch and it had its own short arm leading to private wharfs. It was lock free and throughout its working life it was extensively used. It had coal, sand and salt wharfs, a scrap iron wharf and various works along its banks. An interesting works was Molineux, Webb, & Company’s Glass Works situated at the head of the branch where flint glass products were made. In 1801, Samuel Oldknow, then the Chairman of the Peak Forest Canal Company, offered an Edward Stelfox £50 towards the cost of building two lime kilns on the banks of the Ashton Canal on the condition that he burned limestone brought along the Peak Forest Canal. The site of these kilns is unknown but it is suspected that they were somewhere on this branch near Limekiln Lane. From the junction with the Ashton Canal, the branch ran to the north-west, until it passed under Mill Street. There was a sharp turn immediately beyond the bridge, and it continued in a north-easterly direction.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    New Junction Canal

    New Junction Canal

    The New Junction Canal is a canal in South Yorkshire, England. It is part of the Sheffield and South Yorkshire Navigation (S&SYN), although it was jointly funded by the Aire and Calder Navigation, and was opened in 1905. It links the River Don Navigation and the Stainforth and Keadby Canal with the Aire and Calder Navigation (Knottingley Canal). It is completely straight, and was the last canal built in England for commercial purposes. The canal has one lock, which was sized to allow the compartment boats of the Aire and Calder to use it, but the owning company failed to raise enough money to upgrade the River Don Navigation beyond, and Long Sandall lock prevented working of such boats through to Doncaster until it was rebuilt in 1959. There is still some commercial traffic on the canal, but most use is now by leisure boaters. One notable feature is the aqueduct over the River Don which is protected by large guillotine gates, which can be lowered when the Don is in spate, to prevent the surrounding countryside from being flooded. The New Junction Canal was conceived at a time when there was dissatisfaction with the state of the waterways in Sheffield and Doncaster, which were then
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Nieuwe Merwede

    Nieuwe Merwede

    The Nieuwe Merwede ("New Merwede") is a canal that was constructed in 1870 to form a branch in the Rhine-Meuse delta. It was dug along the general trajectories of a number of minor Biesbosch creeks to reduce the risk of flooding by diverting the water away from the Beneden Merwede, and to facilitate navigation and regulate river traffic in the increasingly silted-up delta. It is one of several rivers called Merwede. The river Boven Merwede ("Upper Merwede"), itself the continuation of the Rhine-Waal and Meuse (now Afgedamde Maas) rivers after their confluence at Gorinchem, branches near the town of Hardinxveld-Giessendam into River Beneden Merwede ("Lower Merwede") to the northwest and the Nieuwe Merwede to the southwest. The Nieuwe Merwede joins River Bergse Maas near Lage Zwaluwe to form the Hollands Diep estuary, and separates the Island of Dordrecht from the Biesbosch National Park. There are no bridges or tunnels crossing the Nieuwe Merwede, but there is a car ferry from the Island of Dordrecht on the west at "Kop van 't Land" to Brabantse Oever, Werkendam (Biesbosch).
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    North Sea Canal

    North Sea Canal

    The North Sea Canal (Dutch: Noordzeekanaal) is a Dutch ship canal from Amsterdam to the North Sea at IJmuiden, constructed between 1865 and 1876 to enable seafaring vessels to reach the port of Amsterdam. This man-made channel terminates at Amsterdam in the closed-off IJ Bay, which in turn connects to the Amsterdam-Rhine Canal. The drainage of the canal to the North Sea is done through the Spui Locks at IJmuiden, augmented by the largest pumping station in Europe. This system is vital to the groundwater management of the western Netherlands. To improve the connection between the harbour of Amsterdam and the North Sea, the North Holland Canal was built in 1824. But this long and narrow canal was quickly inadequate to handle the growing boat traffic. A few decades later it was decided to dig a new canal at the narrowest point in Holland and thereby providing the shortest route to the sea. Digging began on 8 March 1865, at the dunes of Breesaap and lasted until 1876. Since no Dutch company was willing to take on this task, the project was awarded to an English contractor. The North Sea Canal was built by digging a channel through the old IJ Bay and lining it with dikes, after which
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Royal Military Canal

    Royal Military Canal

    The Royal Military Canal is a canal running for 28 miles (45 km) between Seabrook near Folkestone and Cliff End near Hastings, following the old cliff line bordering Romney Marsh, which was constructed as a defence against the possible invasion of England during the Napoleonic Wars. Construction was started at Seabrook, Kent, near Hythe in Kent on 30 October 1804. The canal was completed in April 1809 at a total cost of £234,000. It was constructed in two sections: the longest section starts at Hythe and ends at Iden Lock in East Sussex; the second, smaller section, runs from the foot of Winchelsea Hill to Cliff End. Both sections are linked by the Rivers Rother and River Brede. Gun positions along the canal were generally located every 500 yards (460 m). Any troops stationed or moving along the Military Road would have been protected by the earthen bank of the parapet, which was piled up during construction. Despite the fact that the canal never saw military action, it was used to try to control smuggling from Romney Marsh. Guard houses were constructed at each bridge along its length. This met with limited success because of corrupt guards. Although a barge service was
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Ulverston Canal

    Ulverston Canal

    The Ulverston Canal is a canal in the town of Ulverston, Cumbria, England. It is claimed to be the deepest, widest and straightest canal in the UK. It is entirely straight and on a single level. It is an isolated canal and does not connect to the main canal network. Despite its location being more than 1 mile (1.6 km) from the shore of Morecambe Bay, the town of Ulverston (often spelt "Ulverstone" at the time) was declared to be a port in 1774. Ships of up to 150 tonnes could reach the shore at high water, and 70 vessels were registered there. Trade in slate and ore was growing, so with canal mania gripping the country, a local solicitor called William Burnthwaite organised a meeting in July 1791 to consider ideas for a canal to improve access to the town. He estimated the cost at £2,000, which had been raised by May 1792, but by this time, the engineer John Rennie had produced proper plans for a ship canal, estimated to cost £3,084, including the construction of a sea lock. By October 1792, around £3,800 had been raised, and the proposers decided to proceed. An Act of Parliament for the canal received Royal Assent on May 8, 1793. The Act was entitled An Act for making and
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Walsall Canal

    Walsall Canal

    The Walsall Canal is a narrow (7 foot) canal, seven miles long, forming part of the Birmingham Canal Navigations, and passing around the western side of Walsall, West Midlands, England. The canal runs from Ryders Green Junction where it meets the Wednesbury Old Canal and the Ridgeacre Branch and immediately drops through the eight Ryders Green Locks to the 408 foot Walsall Level. At Doe Bank Junction (Tame Valley Junction) it meets the Tame Valley Canal and the very short Ocker Hill Tunnel Branch, now private moorings, which fed water to the Ocker Hill pumps to replenish the Wolverhampton Level. It passes northwards, past the junction of the derelict Gospel Oak Branch and under the Midland Metro line, passes the short Bradley Branch at Moorcroft Junction. In this area it passes the huge iron gates of the Patent Shaft factory, which remain despite the factory's closure in 1980. It then passes the short Anson Branch (which once led to the Bentley Canal, abandoned 1961) and under the M6 motorway just south of Junction 10. The very short Walsall Town Arm at Walsall Junction leads into Walsall itself while the main canal rises through eight locks to meet the Wyrley and Essington Canal
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Westport Canal

    Westport Canal

    The Westport Canal was built in the late 1830s to link Westport and Langport in Somerset, England. It was part of a larger scheme involving improvements to the River Parrett above Burrow Bridge. Langport is the point at which the River Yeo joins the River Parrett and the intention was to enable trade via the port at Bridgwater. It remained in use until the 1870s, but closed when the Somerset Drainage Commissioners took over control of the River Parrett. Despite a petition against closure by local people, the Commissioners ruled that navigation of the canal must cease due to their interpretation of the Act which gave them control of it, leaving the canal to serve as a drainage channel since 1878. The channel has survived to the modern day due to its drainage function, and many of the structures associated with the canal can still be seen. A number of them are on the listed building register because of their historic importance. There is some interest in improving the canal for its amenity value. By the 1830's, the village of Westport was well-connected to the surrounding area, as a result of turnpike road construction in 1753, 1759 and 1823. The roads linked Westport to Ilminster
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    Zhengguo Canal

    Zhengguo Canal

    The Zhengguo Canal, Zhengguoqu or Chengkuo Canal (simplified Chinese: 郑国渠; traditional Chinese: 鄭國渠; pinyin: Zhèng Guó Qú), named after its designer, Zheng Guo, is a large canal located in Shaanxi province, China. The canal irrigates the Guanzhong plain, north of Xi'an. Together with the Dujiangyan Irrigation System and Lingqu Canal, it is one of the three biggest water conservation projects before the Qin Dynasty in ancient China. The canal connects the Jing and Luo rivers, northern tributaries of the Wei River. Historian Sima Qian in his Records of the Grand Historian wrote of the Zhengguo Canal: The plan to drain the resources of the State of Qin back-fired as Qin successfully completed the canal, which irrigated c. 27 000 square kilometres of additional agricultural land, providing the kingdom with sufficient resources to increase the size of its already massive armies. To this day the land surrounding the Zhengguo Canal is extremely fertile. By the time of its completion in 246 BC, during the Han Dynasty, the canal was already much silted. Under the supervision of Bai Gong, a new canal was cut to feed the irrigation in 95 BC. For the next 2000 years re-cutting and moving the
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Cross Florida Barge Canal

    Cross Florida Barge Canal

    The Cross Florida Barge Canal was a canal project to connect the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean across Florida for barge traffic. Two sections were built but the project was cancelled, mainly for environmental reasons. It is now a protected green belt corridor, one mile (1.6 km) wide in most places. Named after the leader in the opposition against the canal, it is known as the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway. The planned route of the canal followed the St. Johns River from the Atlantic coast to Palatka, the valley of the Ocklawaha River to the coastal divide, and the Withlacoochee River to the Gulf of Mexico. About 28% of the 107-mile (172 km) project was built—the cross-country section 29°32′15″N 81°44′48″W / 29.5375°N 81.74667°W / 29.5375; -81.74667 from the St. Johns River to the Oklawaha River, part of the route along the Oklawaha, and a small section 29°00′46″N 82°39′54″W / 29.01278°N 82.665°W / 29.01278; -82.665 at the Gulf of Mexico end up to the dammed Lake Rousseau. The canal was intended to connect the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at St. Marks, Florida, with a short run across the open water of Apalachicola
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Muzza Canal

    Muzza Canal

    The Muzza Canal in Lombardy, Italy is one of the oldest European irrigation canals, excavated between 1220 and 1230 on Imperial decree by Lodi townspeople. It begins in Cassano d'Adda, and delivers Adda River water to a wide agricultural area.
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    North Walsham & Dilham Canal

    North Walsham & Dilham Canal

    The North Walsham and Dilham Canal is a waterway in the English county of Norfolk. It is accepted officially that this waterway is the only canal in Norfolk although it is the canalization of the upper reaches of the River Ant. This navigation was constructed with locks a little wider than most canals in the UK to accommodate the use of the Norfolk wherries. It is 8.7 miles (14.0 km) long and runs from Swafield Bridge to a junction with the River Ant at Smallburgh. The River Ant was navigable to Dilham prior to 1810, when consideration was given to extending navigation northwards along the course of the river. Plans were drawn up by William Youard and John Millington in 1811 and it was Millington's plan that formed the basis of a bill presented to Parliament in early 1812. It was opposed by the inhabitants of Worstead and Dilham, who feared that their businesses would collapse if boats could reach North Walsham, but the navigation was nevertheless authorised by an Act of Parliament dated 5 May 1812, which created the Company of Proprietors of the North Walsham and Dilham Canal Navigation. They had powers to raise £30,000 by the issuing of shares, and a further £10,000 if required,
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    Panama Canal

    Panama Canal

    • Major Cities: Colón
    • Connected Waterways: Pacific Ocean
    The Panama Canal (Spanish: Canal de Panamá) is an 77.1-kilometre (48 mi) ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a key conduit for international maritime trade. There are locks at each end to lift ships up to Lake Gatun (85m above sea-level) which was used to reduce the amount of work required for a sea-level connection. The current locks are 33.5m although new larger ones are proposed. Work on the canal, which began in 1881, was completed in 1914, making it no longer necessary for ships to sail the lengthy Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America (via the Drake Passage) or to navigate the dangerous waters of the Strait of Magellan. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut made it possible for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in half the time previously required. The shorter, faster, safer route to the U.S. West Coast and to nations in and along the Pacific Ocean allowed those places to become more integrated with the world economy. During this time, ownership of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    170
    Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal

    Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal

    The Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal is a small network of canals in South Wales. For most of its 35-mile (56 km) length it runs through the Brecon Beacons National Park, and its present rural character and tranquillity belies its original purpose as an industrial corridor for coal and iron, which were brought to the canal by a network of tramways and/or railroads, many of which were built and owned by the canal company. The "Mon and Brec" was originally two independent canals - the Monmouthshire Canal from Newport to Pontymoile Basin (including the Crumlin Arm) and the Brecknock and Abergavenny Canal running from Pontymoile to Brecon. Both canals were abandoned in 1962, but the Brecknock and Abergavenny route and a small section of the Monmouthshire route have been reopened since 1970. Much of the rest of the original Monmouthshire Canal is the subject of a restoration plan, which includes the construction of a new marina at the Newport end of the canal. This canal was authorised by an Act of Parliament, passed on 3 June 1792, which created the Company of Proprietors of the Monmouthshire Canal Navigation and empowered them to raise £120,000 by the issuing of shares, and a further
    5.00
    4 votes
    171
    Oudegracht

    Oudegracht

    The Oudegracht, or "old canal", runs through the center of Utrecht, the Netherlands. It starts in the southeast of the city. Here the Kromme Rijn (the original main bed of the Rhine river) and the Vaartse Rijn (a medieval canal reconnecting Utrecht to the newer main stream of the Rhine, the Lek) arrive to meet the original moat of the fortified town, and the Oudegracht goes from there into the center of town. Parts of the Oudegracht follow the original flow of the river Rhine, but there is some disagreement on what parts. The northern part is most likely an early canal (app. 1000) connecting the Rhine section to the river Vecht. The southern part was started in 1122, after the water level of the Rhine in Utrecht dropped because of the new dam at Wijk bij Duurstede. The ground excavated was used to raise the sides of the canal, to reduce the chance of flooding. When the city's system of locks was finished in 1275 the water level was constant, enabling the creation of permanently dry cellars and new quays at water level, hence the typical wharfs (Dutch: werven) below street level. Warehouses used to line the canal. Today many of these warehouses have been converted into restaurants
    5.00
    4 votes
    172
    Albert Canal

    Albert Canal

    The Albert Canal (Dutch: Albertkanaal, French: Canal Albert) is a canal located in northeastern Belgium, named after King Albert I of Belgium. It connects the major cities Antwerp and Liège and the Meuse and Scheldt rivers. It has a depth of 3.4 metres (11 ft), a free height of 6.7 metres (22 ft) and a total length of 129.5 kilometres (80.5 mi). The maximum capacity is a barge of 10,000 tons. Between Antwerp and Liège, there is a height difference of 56 metres (184 ft), and a total of 6 canal locks were needed to overcome the difference in elevation. Five canal locks each have a height difference of 10 metres (33 ft), located in Genk, Diepenbeek, Hasselt, Kwaadmechelen and Olen, while the canal lock at Wijnegem has a height difference of 5.45 metres (17.9 ft). In the 1930s, it took about 7 days to travel from Antwerp to Liege over water. These days the same distance is covered in 18 hours. Since the completion of the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal in 1992, a barge can now travel from Antwerp all the way across Europe to the Black Sea. The Albert Canal was dug from 1930-1939. The German construction firm Hochtief AG worked on the canal between 1930 and 1934. It was used for the first time
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Andover Canal

    Andover Canal

    • Major Cities: Andover
    The Andover Canal was a canal built in Hampshire, England. It ran 22 miles (35 km) from Andover to Redbridge through Stockbridge and Romsey. The canal had a fall of 179 feet (55 m) through 24 locks, and for much of its length paralleled the River Anton and River Test. It opened in 1794, but was never a commercial success. The only dividend paid to shareholders was in 1859, using the proceeds from the sale of the canal to the London and South Western Railway, who bought it to lay a railway line along much of its course. The railway line is now also defunct. The first survey for an Andover Canal was carried out in 1770 by Robert Whitworth, at a time when there was a great deal of canal building activity in the country. The canal would follow the valley of the River Anton, until it joined the River Test, and then follow that valley down to Redbridge. He produced an estimated price for a narrow canal, and another for a wider canal. The following year, Parliament was approached for permission to bring a bill, quoting an Act of Parliament from the reign of Charles II, which had granted rights to make several rivers, including the Test and the Anton, navigable. The bill was not submitted,
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Manchester Ship Canal

    Manchester Ship Canal

    The Manchester Ship Canal is a river navigation 36 miles (58 km) long in the North West of England. Starting at the Mersey Estuary near Liverpool, it generally follows the original routes of the rivers Mersey and Irwell through the historic counties of Cheshire and Lancashire. Several sets of locks lift vessels about 60 feet (18 m) up to Manchester where the canal's terminus was built. Major landmarks along its route include the Barton Swing Aqueduct, the only swing aqueduct in the world, and Trafford Park, the world's first planned industrial estate and still the largest in Europe. The rivers Mersey and Irwell were first made navigable in the early 18th century. Goods were also transported on the Runcorn extension of the Bridgewater Canal (from 1776) and the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (from 1830). By the late 19th century the Mersey and Irwell Navigation had fallen into disrepair and was often unusable, and Manchester's business community viewed Liverpool's dock and the railway companies' charges as excessive. A ship canal was proposed as a way of giving ocean-going vessels direct access to Manchester. The region was suffering from the effects of the Long Depression, and for
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    Wabash and Erie Canal

    Wabash and Erie Canal

    The Wabash and Erie Canal was a shipping canal that linked the Great Lakes to the Ohio River via an artificial waterway. The canal provided traders with access from the Great Lakes all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. Over 460 miles long, it was the longest canal ever built in North America. The canal known as the Wabash & Erie in the 1850s and thereafter, was actually a combination of four canals: the Miami and Erie Canal from the Maumee River near Toledo, Ohio to Junction, Ohio, the original Wabash and Erie Canal from Junction, Ohio to Terre Haute, Indiana, the Cross Cut Canal from Terre Haute, Indiana to Worthington, Indiana (Point Commerce), and the Central Canal from Worthington to Evansville, Indiana. The United States Congress provided a land grant on March 2, 1827 for the canal's construction. On January 5, 1828, the Indiana General Assembly accepted the grant and appointed three commissioners. These commissioners concluded that the canal would have to extend into Ohio and petitioned that state to appoint a commission of their own. The state legislature approved the plan and new commissioners appointed. After several legislative battles begun by proponents of the railroad,
    5.67
    3 votes
    176
    Cayuga-Seneca Canal

    Cayuga-Seneca Canal

    The Cayuga–Seneca Canal is a canal in New York, USA. It is now part of the New York State Canal System. The Cayuga–Seneca Canal connects the Erie Canal to Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake. It is approximately 20 miles (32 km) long. The Seneca River, now the Cayuga-Seneca Canal, always has been an economic engine for the communities of Waterloo and Seneca Falls. The Seneca Lock Navigation Co., a private enterprise formed in 1813, dammed three sets of rapids and installed locks to allow goods to be transported to the Erie Canal. In 1818, a canal was opened between Cayuga and Seneca Lakes. By 1823, an average of eight boats a day were passing through the lock at Waterloo, carrying flour, potash, pork, whiskey, lumber and wool and returning with other products and merchandise. Job Smith, Seneca Falls’ first businessman, opened a portage company on the eastern end of the river in 1787. The company transported travelers, boats and goods around a mile-long series of rapids with a {42 ft} drop known as “the Falls.” The locks at Seneca Falls were completed in 1818. Improvements between the lakes, completed in 1821, made eight stone locks and nearly two miles of dug canal in addition to sections
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Draget Canal

    Draget Canal

    Draget Canal (Swedish: Dragets kanal) is a Swedish canal in the province of Södermanland. In the 13th century, when the water level then was three meters higher than today, Draget was a strait between the island of Järflotta and the mainland. It was passable by sailing vessels, and the passage was documented by Valdemar Seir, who passed through the strait on the way to his crusade in Estonia. His route is mentioned in a medieval document. In the middle of the 19th century the depth in the strait was only three decimeters (0.3 m), and Gustaf Nerman, got the task to make a canal of the strait. But the canal continued to become shallower, and in the late 19th century it was necessary to dredge it further. The Swedish Navy's new torpedo boats were not so seaworthy that they could pass outside of Landsort, so the Navy straightened and deepened the canal with explosives. In the charts, the depth of the channel is noted as 1.5 meters, although signs at the ends of the canal state it is 2.0 meters. Some unconfirmed rumors suggest the canal has been passable for boats as deep as 2.2 meters.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Florida Canal

    Florida Canal

    The Florida Canal or 40 Arpent Canal is a canal in the New Orleans metropolitan area and land down river. The canal was built in the 18th century colonial era of Louisiana, stretching from what is now the Faubourg Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans, roughly paralleling the Mississippi River on the East Bank down through modern Saint Bernard Parish and part of the East Bank of Plaquemines. Colonial land grants commonly stretched 40 arpents back from the Mississippi River. The canal thus marked the back end of properties, mostly originally plantations. In this area this line happened to generally be about the limit of land useful for cultivation where the higher land of the natural river levee ended in swamp. The "40 Arpent Canal" was used by small vessels for commerce between nearby plantations; larger vessels and longer range shipping used the Mississippi. The earth moved to dig the canal was used to create a raised roadway on the river side of the canal, called the "Florida Walk". With development and the construction of additional perpendicular canals in the 19th and 20th century, the old 40 Arpent Canal was divided into several discontinuous canals. Florida Walk became Florida
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Lechmere Canal

    Lechmere Canal

    Lechmere Canal is a short canal in East Cambridge, Massachusetts. It opens onto the Charles River and used to be an active port for Boston Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The canal was constructed in 1895, essentially by walling off an existing portion of the Charles around which was laid landfill. The area was an active seaport until the Charles River Dam Bridge was interposed between it and Boston Harbor in 1910. The canal's original right of way appears to have been granted by several deeds in 1834, as conveyed by the Proprietors of Canal Bridge, the predecessor of the Charles River Dam Bridge. Landing near Water Street, this was the second bridge to connect eastern Cambridge to western Boston, after the West Boston Bridge. In this area on the south side of what is now Monsignor O'Brien Highway was waterfront property. The deeds conveyed canal passage as well as "the privilege of a dock 100 feet in width on the south-westerly side of the aforegranted premises; said dock to be kept open for ever for the common use and benefit of the owners and occupants of the land or wharves on either side and head thereof." Its south spur seems to have been authorized by the Harbor Commissioners
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Miami and Erie Canal

    Miami and Erie Canal

    The Miami and Erie Canal was a canal that connected the Ohio River in Cincinnati, Ohio with Lake Erie in Toledo, Ohio. Construction on the canal began in 1825 and was completed in 1845. It consisted of 19 aqueducts, three guard locks, and 103 canal locks. Each lock measured 90 feet (27 m) by 15 feet (4.6 m) and they collectively raised the canal 395 feet (120 m) above Lake Erie and 513 feet (156 m) above the Ohio River. The peak of the canal was called the Loramie Summit and extended 19 miles (31 km) between New Bremen, Ohio to lock 1-S in Lockington, north of Piqua, Ohio. The system consisted of 301.49 miles (485.20 km) of canal channel built at a cost of $8,062,680.07. Boats were towed along the canal using either donkeys or horses walking on a prepared towpath along the bank. The boats typically traveled at a rate of four to five miles per hour. A topographical map showing the geography, path, and elevations of the entire canal can be found in the Heritage Museum, located in the building also housing the Shrine of the Holy Relics, in Maria Stein, Ohio, a community 6 mi (10 km) from the canal and just south of Grand Lake St. Marys. Grand Lake St. Marys, a manmade lake west of St.
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Dnieper-Bug Canal

    Dnieper-Bug Canal

    Dnieper–Bug Canal (alternately spelled Dnepr-Bug Canal), or the Dneprovsko-Bugsky Canal is the longest inland ship canal in Belarus that connects the Mukhavets River, a tributary of the Bug River, and the Pina River, a tributary of the Pripyat River. Originally the canal was named the Royal Canal (Polish: Kanał Królewski), after the King of Poland Stanisław August Poniatowski, since he was the initiator of the project. It is an important part of the transportation artery linking the Baltic Sea and the Black Sea. The total length of the canal system from Brest to Pinsk is 196 km (122 mi), including the artificial waterway 105 km (65 mi) long. The canal system comprises the western slope from Brest to Kobrin, a 64 km (40 mi) stretch of the Mukhavets River with regulated water level, a 58 km (36 mi) summit pound, the eastern slope, 47 km (29 mi) stretch of the canal, a 27 km (17 mi) stretch of the Pina River with regulated water level. The drainage area of the canal system totals 8.5 thousand km² (3.3 thousand mi²). Origins Canal building flourished in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the late 18th century. Yet many of the early canals are no longer in active service, having been
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Finow Canal

    Finow Canal

    The Finow Canal (German Finowkanal) is one of the oldest artificial waterways in Europe. The channel is ca 50 km long and located in the German state of Brandenburg in the Barnim district. It was built for the first time in 1605 and connects the Oder and Havel rivers. After completion of the straighter Oder–Havel Canal in 1914, the economic relevance of the Finow Canal decreased. Today it is mainly used for touristic purposes. The Experimental Radio Station Eberswalde is also located at the Finow Canal.
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    James River and Kanawha Canal

    James River and Kanawha Canal

    The James River and Kanawha Canal was a canal in Virginia, which was built to facilitate shipments of passengers and freight by water between the western counties of Virginia and the coast. Personally surveyed and planned by George Washington himself, the canal was begun in 1785 under the James River Company, and later restarted under the James River and Kanawha Canal Company. It was only half completed by 1851. It was an expensive project which failed several times financially and was frequently damaged by floods. By the time it was halted, it had only reached Buchanan, in Botetourt County, Virginia, even though it was largely financed by the Commonwealth of Virginia through the Virginia Board of Public Works. When work to extend the canal further west stopped permanently, railroads were overtaking the canal as a far more productive mode of transportation. After the American Civil War, when funds for continued financial support were not available from the war-torn Commonwealth or private sources, the canal project did poorly against railroad competition, and finally succumbed to damage done by massive flooding in 1877. In the end the canal's right-of-way was bought and the canal
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Navigli

    Navigli

    The navigli was a system of navigable and interconnected canals around Milan, Italy. The system consisted of five canals: Naviglio Grande, Naviglio Pavese, Naviglio Martesana, Naviglio di Paderno, Naviglio di Bereguardo. The first three were connected through Milan via the Fossa Interna, also known as the Inner Ring. The urban section of the Naviglio Martesana was covered over at the beginning of the 1930s, together with the entire Inner Ring, thus sounding the death knell for the north-eastern canals. Commercial carrying continued on the Naviglio Grande, but the decline was steady and by the sixties it was over for good. Today the canals are mostly derelict, unnavigable, or used for irrigation. However, plans are afoot to restore the Naviglio Grande and the Naviglio Pavese.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Stainforth and Keadby Canal

    Stainforth and Keadby Canal

    The Stainforth and Keadby Canal is a navigable canal in South Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, England. It connects the River Don Navigation at Bramwith to the River Trent at Keadby, by way of Stainforth, Thorne and Ealand, near Crowle. The River Don, which flows through Sheffield and Doncaster, had originally split into two channels below Stainforth, one of which emptied into the River Trent near Adlingfleet, close to its junction with the River Ouse, while the other headed north to join the River Aire near Rawcliffe. Following the work of the Dutch drainage engineer Cornelius Vermuyden to drain Hatfield Chase, the Adlingfleet outlet was closed off, and the channel to the River Aire, passing through Newbridge, was improved to take all of the flow. The scheme was not entirely successful, and after severe flooding near Sykehouse, Fishlake and Snaith, accompanied by riots, a new channel was cut between Newbridge and the River Ouse near what became Goole. The old course of the Don gradually silted up. Navigation on the Don was improved by the construction of cuts and locks, with the lowest lock situated at Stainforth. From there to the Ouse, boats used the Dutch River, Vermuyden's
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal

    Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal

    The Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal is a shipping canal connecting Sturgeon Bay on Green Bay with Lake Michigan, across the Door Peninsula, at the city of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. The canal is approximately seven miles in length, and consists of two parts: a dredged portion of Sturgeon Bay, and a 1.3-mile canal dug through the eastern side of the Door Peninsula. This shorter portion was dug by a private group headed by then-president of Chicago and North Western Railway, William B. Ogden, between July 8, 1872 and the late fall of 1881. Although smaller craft began using the canal in 1880, it was not open for large-scale watercraft until 1890. The cost of making the 1.3 mile cut up to 1881 was $291,461.69. In 1893, the Ogden private investors group sold all interest in the canal to the United States government. Since that time, the canal has been maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The original canal was 7,400 feet long (2.3 km), 100 feet wide (32.2 m), and 6 feet deep (1.9 m). As of June 1997 the canal was 7 miles long (11.3 km), 125 feet wide (38m), and 16½ to 21½ feet deep (5 to 6½ m). A jetty extends into Lake Michigan 1,350 feet (410 m) and 800 feet wide (242 m) at the
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Zwanenburgwal

    Zwanenburgwal

    The Zwanenburgwal is a canal and street in the center of Amsterdam. The painter Rembrandt and philosopher Spinoza lived here. In 2006 it was voted one of the most beautiful streets in Amsterdam by readers of Het Parool, a local daily newspaper. The Zwanenburgwal flows from the Sint Antoniessluis sluice gate (between the streets Sint Antoniesbreestraat and Jodenbreestraat) to the Amstel river. The canal was originally named Verversgracht ("dyers' canal"), after the textile industry that once dominated this part of town. Dyed textiles were hung to dry along the canal. The Waterlooplein flea market, a popular tourist attraction, runs along the canal. The city hall and opera house Stopera stands at the intersection of the Zwanenburgwal and the Amstel river. Also on this corner is the Joods Verzetsmonument, a 1988 monument to Jewish resistance during World War II. A remembrance of the Kristallnacht is held at the monument every year. Well-known inhabitants of the Zwanenburgwal include the painters Rembrandt, Karel Appel, Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy, Salomon Meijer, and Cornelis van der Voort, the philosopher Baruch de Spinoza, the architect Michel de Klerk, the writer Arend Fokke Simonsz,
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Greasbrough Canal

    Greasbrough Canal

    The Greasbrough Canal was a private canal built by the Marquess of Rockingham to serve his coal mining interests in and around the village of Greasbrough, near Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. It opened in 1780, and the Newbiggin branch was built some time later. The main line to Greasbrough closed in 1840 with the coming of the Sheffield and Rotherham Railway, and the canal ceased to carry commercial traffic during the First World War. Most of it has been filled in, but a small section near the River Don Navigation remains in water. Collieries to the south of Wentworth Park and near Bassingthorpe had been connected to the River Don Navigation by a waggonway, which had been completed by 1762. In order to improve transport of the coal, the Marquess of Rockingham asked John Varley to survey a route from the Don to either Cinder Bridge or Sough Bridge near Greasbrough. Varley was an assistant to the canal engineer James Brindley. Varley's proposal was for a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) canal, which would require three locks, as there was a fall of around 25 feet (7.6 m) over the route. His survey, which is in the Sheffield Archives Office, was judged to be good by the engineer John Smeaton,
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Stover Canal

    Stover Canal

    The Stover Canal is a canal located in Devon, England. It was opened in 1792 and served the ball clay industry until it closed in the early 1940s. Today it is derelict, but the Stover Canal Society is aiming to restore it and reopen it to navigation. The canal was built at a time when the ball clay industry was expanding, but transport of the bulky product was difficult. James Templer saw this as an opportunity, and began to construct the canal at his own expense in January 1790. He planned to reach Bovey Tracey, passing through Jewsbridge, near Heathfield en route, and to construct a branch to Chudleigh. Having invested over £1,000 in the project, he sought an Act of Parliament which would allow him to raise more capital, but although the Act was passed on 11 June 1792, he did not invoke its powers, as the canal had already reached Ventiford, Teigngrace and he did not extend it further. As built, the canal was 1.7 miles (2.7 km) long and included five locks. It was supplied with water from three feeders, one from Ventiford Brook, a stream which also supplies Stover Lake and one from the River Bovey at Jewsbridge, both of which fed the top pound, and one from the River Teign at
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Titchfield Canal

    Titchfield Canal

    The Titchfield Canal is a canal in Hampshire, England, UK, and Britain's second-oldest man-made waterway. It was built following the decision by the Third Earl of Southampton to build a dike across the entrance to the River Meon, cutting it off from the Solent. The canal enabled boat traffic to continue to reach Titchfield, then a busy port. Today the canal is no longer used for boat traffic, but is still in water and is an important nature reserve.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Canal de Caen à la Mer

    Canal de Caen à la Mer

    Canal de Caen à la Mer (English: Canal from Caen to the sea) also called the "Caen Canal") is a short canal in the department (préfecture) of Calvados, France, connecting the Port of Caen, in the city of Caen, downstream to the town of Ouistreham and the English Channel. Running from north north-east to south south-west, the canal runs parallel to the Orne River which feeds it, it is 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) long, and comprises two locks. Digging began in 1837, and when it was opened on August 23, 1857 it was only 4 metres (13 ft) deep. It was deepened in 1920. The canal began with the dock at St. Peter's Basin (Bassin Saint-Pierre), in the downtown area of Caen. The canal is made up of a group of quays and docks. The current depth is 10 metres (33 ft), and the width can reach 200 metres (660 ft) in the dock of Calix). The quay at Blainville-sur-Orne measures more than 600 metres (2,000 ft). It acts as the fourth commercial French port for the importation of exotic wood, generally coming from the Gulf of Guinea. It also loads and unloads iron, fertilizer, coal, and construction material. The port exports cereals that are produced in the area and has a silo capacity of 33,000
    5.00
    3 votes
    192
    Gliwice Canal

    Gliwice Canal

    The Gliwice Canal (Polish: Kanał Gliwicki, German: Gleiwitzer Kanal) is a canal connecting the Oder (Odra) River to the city of Gliwice in Silesian Voivodeship (Upper Silesian Industrial Region), Poland. Also known as the Upper Silesia Canal (Kanał Górnośląski, Oberschlesischer Kanal), it was built from 1935 to 1939 and replaced the Kłodnicki Canal. The canal length is approximately 41.6 kilometres (26 mi); maximum depth is 3.5 metres (11 ft); canal width is 38 metres (125 ft); allowed speed for ships is 6 kilometres per hour (4 mph), and the difference in height in water levels between its ends is 43.6 metres (143 ft). It has six locks. The canal is accessible from 15 March to 15 December (270 days a year). Locks: The canal starts in Kędzierzyn-Koźle on the Oder and ends in the port of Gliwice. The canal passes through Opole Voivodeship and Silesian Voivodeship in Poland. The water in the canal comes from the Kłodnica River as well as lakes and reservoirs such as Dzierżno Duże and Dzierżno Małe. The Gliwice Canal was originally built in the Province of Upper Silesia within Germany. Because the Klodnitz (Kłodnicki) Canal had become obsolete, it was decided in 1934 that construction
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    Elbe-Havel Canal

    Elbe-Havel Canal

    The Elbe–Havel Canal is a 56-kilometre-long waterway in Germany. It links Magdeburg, on the River Elbe, with Brandenburg on the River Havel. Since 2003, the Elbe-Havel Canal has been connected to the Mittelland Canal by the unique Magdeburg Water Bridge, which crosses above the River Elbe. The Mittelland Canal provides a connection to the west of Germany. To the east, the River Havel connects to the Oder-Havel Canal, and the Elbe–Havel Canal thus forms part of a continuous waterway from the west to Berlin and Poland.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Elbląg Canal

    Elbląg Canal

    Elbląg Canal ([ˈɛlblɔŋk] ( listen), Polish: Kanał Elbląski, German: Oberländischer Kanal) is a canal in Poland, in Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, 80.5 km in length, which runs southward from Lake Drużno (connected by the river Elbląg to the Vistula Lagoon), to the river Drwęca and lake Jeziorak. It can accommodate small vessels up to 50 tons displacement. The difference in water levels approaches 100 m, and is overcome using locks and a remarkable system of tracks between lakes. Today it is used mainly for recreational purposes. It is considered one of the most significant monuments related to the history of technology and was listed by Unesco as a memorial to world culture inheritances. In Poland it has recently been named one of Seven Wonders of Poland. The canal was designed in 1825-1844 by Georg Steenke, carrying out the commission given by the King of Prussia. Construction began in 1844. The difference in height over a 9.5 kilometres / 5.9 miles section of the route between the lakes was too great for building traditional locks; an ingenious system of inclined planes based on those used on the Morris Canal was employed instead, though the canal includes a few locks as well.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Grand Union Canal

    Grand Union Canal

    • Canal Tunnels: Blisworth Tunnel
    The Grand Union Canal in England is part of the British canal system. Its main line starts in London and ends in Birmingham, stretching for 137 miles (220 km) with 166 locks. It has arms to places including Leicester, Slough, Aylesbury, Wendover and Northampton. The Grand Union Canal was also the original name for part of what is now part of the Leicester Line of the modern Grand Union: this latter is now generally referred to as the Old Grand Union Canal in order to avoid ambiguity. With competition from the railways having taken a large share of traffic in the second half of the 19th century, improvements in roads and vehicle technology in the early part of the 20th century meant that the lorry was also becoming a threat to the canals. Tolls had been reduced to compete with the railways, but there was little scope for further reduction. The Regent's Canal and the Grand Junction Canal agreed that amalgamation and modernisation were the only way to remain competitive. The (present) Grand Union Canal came into being on 1 January 1929, extended in 1932. It was formed from the amalgamation of several different canals: At 286.3 miles (461 km) it is by far the longest canal in the UK. A
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Lancaster Canal

    Lancaster Canal

    The Lancaster Canal is a canal in the north of England, originally planned to run from Westhoughton in Lancashire to Kendal in south Cumbria (then in Westmorland). The section around the crossing of the River Ribble was never completed, and much of the southern end leased to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal, of which it is now generally considered part. Of the canal north of Preston, only the section from Preston to Tewitfield near Carnforth in Lancashire is currently open to navigation for 42 miles (67.6 km), with the canal north of Tewitfield having been severed in three places by the construction of the M6 motorway, and by the A590 road near Kendal. The southern part, from Johnson's Hillock to Wigan Top Lock, remains navigable as part of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The planned continuation to Westhoughton was never built. The line of the canal was first surveyed by Robert Whitworth in 1772. In 1791, John Longbotham, Robert Dickinson and Richard Beck resurveyed the proposed line, and a final survey was carried out later the same year by John Rennie. In 1792 the promoters sought an Act of Parliament urgently, as proposals by the Leeds and Liverpool Canal to alter their route would
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Ringvaart

    Ringvaart

    The Ringvaart (known in full as Ringvaart of the Haarlemmermeer Polder) is a canal in the province of North Holland, the Netherlands. The Ringvaart (Dutch meaning "ring canal") is a true circular canal surrounding the Haarlemmermeer polder and forms the boundary of the Haarlemmermeer municipality. Ringvaart is also the name of the dike bordering the canal. Construction of the canal began in 1839 as the first step to reclaim land from Haarlemmermeer (Dutch for Haarlem's Lake). Thousands of laborers dug a canal through the existing land, as much as possible closely following the lake's contour. But at three locations (Vijfhuizen, Lisserbroek, and Huigsloot), the Ringvaart was dug through peninsulas which thereafter became part of Haarlemmermeer. In 1845, the canal was completed and the lake could be drained, using the Ringvaart to drain the excess waters. The canal is 61 kilometres (38 mi) long, and 2.4 metres (8 ft) deep. It encloses an area of more than 180 square kilometres (70 sq mi). The removed earth was used to build a ring dike from 30 to 50 metres (30 to 54 yd) wide around the polder. The Ringvaart is used for commercial and recreational boat traffic. A portion of it forms
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Bumble Hole Branch Canal

    Bumble Hole Branch Canal

    The present day Bumble Hole Branch Canal and Boshboil Branch surround Bumble Hole, a water-filled clay pit, in Bumble Hole and Warren's Hall Nature Reserve, Rowley Regis, West Midlands, England. They formed a looped part of the original Dudley No. 2 Canal until the opening of the Netherton Tunnel in 1858 when the loop was bypassed by a new cut, in line with the new tunnel. Part of the bypassed canal loop, which surrounds Bumble Hole, is now in-filled giving access to the pool of Bumble Hole. Between Windmill End Junction and the tunnel portal stands Cobb's Engine House, built in 1831 to pump water from coal mines into the canal. The Bumble Hole railway used to cross the canal near Windmill End Junction, but was dismantled in 1969.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Bydgoszcz Canal

    Bydgoszcz Canal

    Bydgoszcz Canal - a canal, 24.7 km long, between the cities of Bydgoszcz and Nakło in Poland, connecting Vistula river with Oder river, through Brda and Noteć rivers (the latter ending in the Warta river which itself ends in Oder). The level difference along the canal is regulated with usage of 6 locks. The canal was built in 1772-1775, at the order of Frederick II, king of Prussia (after annexation of western Poland by Kingdom of Prussia in First Partition of Poland).
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Halden Canal

    Halden Canal

    The Halden Canal near Halden, Norway begun construction in 1852. The canal allows boats to travel parallel to the Swedish border of 75 km from Tistedal to Skulerud. Engebret Soot (1786 - 1859) was responsible for this canal, as well as the earlier Soot Canal. Four sets of locks (sluser) control the water in the canal. Between 1857-1860 the Strømsfoss and Ørje locks were built. In 1865 the Stenselv river portion of the canal, with two locks at Krappeto, was completed. The locks in the Halden Canal can pass vessels which are 24 m in length, 6 m in beam and of 1.6 m draft. Ørje sluser is located at the north of the system, near Ørje. These facilities include a canal lock museum and three canal lock chambers with a total elevation difference of 10 meters. The canal lock gates are operated manually. Ørje was built in 1860. At Ørje, a standing stone has been erected for the canal constructor Engebret Soot. Strømsfoss sluse is located near Strømsfoss (in the middle of this system) and has one canal lock gate and 2 meter elevation height. The locks were built in 1860. Brekke sluse (in the south of the system) is Northern Europe's highest canal lock system. Brekke has four canal lock
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Montgomery Canal

    Montgomery Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Llangollen Canal
    The Montgomery Canal (or Montgomeryshire Canal), known colloquially as "The Monty", is a partially restored canal in Powys, in eastern Wales, and in northwest Shropshire, in western England. Originally planned to run from Llanymynech to Newtown via Welshpool, the canal is today considered to run 33 miles (53 km) from the Llangollen Canal (at Frankton Junction) to Newtown. Originally known as the Montgomeryshire Canal, after the former county of Montgomeryshire, along with the adjoining Llanymynech Branch of the Ellesmere Canal, the canal fell in to disuse following a breach in 1936, and was officially abandoned in 1944. With the revival of canal use in the late 20th century, the canal became known as the Montgomery Canal, which was considered to include the Llanymynech Branch of the Ellesmere Canal. At present only 7 miles (11 km) of the northern section, from Frankton Junction to Gronwyn Wharf, a short stretch at Llanymynech, and a central section of the canal around Welshpool are navigable, though restoration work continues to expand this. The canal does not, and never did, go to the town of Montgomery. The Montgomeryshire Canal was devised with a different purpose from most
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Oakham Canal

    Oakham Canal

    The Oakham Canal ran from Oakham, Rutland to Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. It opened in 1802, but it was never a financial success, and it suffered from the lack of an adequate water supply. It closed after 45 years, when it was bought by the Midland Railway to allow the Syston and Peterborough Railway to be built, partly along its course. Most of it is infilled, although much of its route can still be seen in the landscape, and there are short sections which still hold water. From Melton Mowbray, the canal headed broadly eastwards, following the valley of the River Eye, keeping to its north and east bank to reach Wyfordby. The railway, when it was built, followed a much more direct route due east to Wyfordby. The railway then follows the course of the canal much more closely, although there are only a few small sections where it actually followed the canal bed. Near the junction with the dismantled railway branch to Bourne, the canal swept northwards in a loop, to cross the River Eye, near which was Saxby wharf. The canal then headed southwards to the east of Stapleford Park, where there was another wharf, on its way to Station Cottages, which was
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Oxford Canal

    Oxford Canal

    • Major Cities: Rugby
    • Connected Waterways: River Thames
    The Oxford Canal is a 78-mile-long (126 km) narrow canal in central England linking Oxford with Coventry via Banbury and Rugby. It connects with the River Thames at Oxford, to the Grand Union Canal at the villages of Braunston and Napton-on-the-Hill, and to the Coventry Canal at Hawkesbury Junction in Bedworth just north of Coventry. The Oxford Canal passes mainly through the Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Warwickshire countryside, and is often considered to be one of the most scenic canals in Britain. The canal was once an important artery of trade between the English Midlands and London, and is now highly popular among pleasure boaters. North of Napton-on-the-Hill, the canal forms part of the Warwickshire ring. The canal begins near Hawkesbury Village at Hawkesbury Junction, also known as Sutton Stop, where it connects with the Coventry Canal, four miles from the centre of Coventry. From Hawkesbury, it runs south east through the Warwickshire countryside for 15 miles (24 km) to Rugby. The route between Coventry and Rugby is on a level with no locks, apart from the stop lock at the junction. Much of this section of the canal was straightened out in the 1820s, and remains of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Tame Valley Canal

    Tame Valley Canal

    The Tame Valley Canal is a relatively late (1844) canal in the West Midlands of England. It forms part of the Birmingham Canal Navigations. It takes its name from the roughly-parallel River Tame. The canal runs from Tame Valley Junction where it joins the Walsall Canal near Ocker Hill and Toll End, and terminates at Salford Junction where it meets the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal and the Grand Union Canal. It is 8.5 miles (13.7 km) long and has twin towpaths throughout. Between Tame Valley Junction and Rushall Junction it goes under the Midland Metro near Wednesbury and crosses over the former Grand Junction Railway (now part of the Chase Line) by aqueduct, near Tame Bridge Parkway railway station (an unusual case of the railway pre-dating a neighbouring canal). It passes over the M5 motorway near the interchange with the M6 motorway (M6 junction 8) and joins the Rushall Canal at Rushall Junction, inside the triangle formed by the motorway junction. East of Rushall Junction the canal passes under another arm of the M5. At Hamstead the remains of a wharf can be seen, This served the former Hamstead Colliery. Further east, there are two more aqueducts (Spouthouse Lane and Piercy, the
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Thames and Severn Canal

    Thames and Severn Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Stroudwater Navigation
    • Canal Tunnels: Sapperton Canal Tunnel
    The Thames and Severn Canal is a canal in Gloucestershire in the south of England, which was completed in 1789. It was conceived as part of a canal route from Bristol to London. At its eastern end, it connects to the River Thames at Inglesham Lock near Lechlade, while at its western end, it connects to the Stroudwater Navigation, and hence the River Severn, at Wallbridge near Stroud. It has one short arm (branch), from Siddington to the town of Cirencester. It includes Sapperton Tunnel, which when built was the longest canal tunnel in Britain, and remains the third longest. There were always problems with water supply, as no reservoirs were built, while the summit section near the tunnel ran through porous limestone, and there were constant difficulties with leakage. Competition from the railways took much of the canal's traffic by the end of the 19th century, and most of the canal was abandoned in 1927, the remainder in 1941. Since 1972, the Cotswold Canal Trust has been working to restore both the canal and the Stroudwater Navigation, so that it can again provide a navigable link between the Thames and the Severn. A number of the structures have been restored, and some sections
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Charnwood Forest Canal

    Charnwood Forest Canal

    The Charnwood Forest Canal, sometimes known as the "Forest Line of the Leicester Navigation", was opened between Thringstone and Nanpantan, with a further connection to Barrow Hill, near Worthington, in 1794 It marks the beginning of a period of history that saw the introduction of railways to supplement canals and, in the end, superseding them, leading eventually to the Midland Counties Railway. It was also one of the first uses of edge-rails for a wagonway. (This should not be confused with the Charnwood Forest Railway.) Until the end of the eighteenth century the City of Leicester had received its supplies of coal by packhorse from the Charnwood Forest coal mines around Swannington. However, in 1778, the Loughborough Canal opened up the River Soar from the Trent to Loughborough, and the opening of the Erewash Canal the following year allowed a ready supply of coal from the Nottinghamshire coalfields into Leicestershire at reduced prices. In 1785, proposals to extend the Loughborough Canal south from Loughborough to Leicester were opposed by the influential Leicestershire coalmasters, even when a canal linking the mining area to the canal at Loughborough was also proposed.
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Hatherton Canal

    Hatherton Canal

    The Hatherton Canal is a derelict branch of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal in south Staffordshire, England. It was constructed in two phases, the first section opening in 1841 and connecting the main line to Churchbridge, from where a tramway connected to the Great Wyrley coal mines. The second section was a joint venture with the Birmingham Canal Navigations, and linked Churchbridge to the Cannock Extension Canal by a flight of 13 locks, which were opened with the Extension Canal in 1863. The coal traffic was very profitable, and the canal remained in use until 1949. It was fomally abandoned in 1955, after which the Churchbridge flight and much of the Extension Canal were destroyed by open cast mining. Plans for its restoration began in 1975 and the forerunner to the Lichfield and Hatherton Canals Restoration Trust was formed in 1989. Since then they have worked hard to protect and restore the canal, which was threatened by the route of the M6 Toll motorway. Negotiations eventually led to the provision of two culverts, one paid for by the Trust and the other by the road builders, which will be used in due course for the route of the re-aligned canal. In 2006, the
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Leeds and Liverpool Canal

    Leeds and Liverpool Canal

    • Major Cities: Liverpool
    The Leeds and Liverpool Canal is a canal in Northern England, linking the cities of Leeds and Liverpool. Over a distance of 127 miles (204 km), it crosses the Pennines, and includes 91 locks on the main line. It has several small branches, and in the early 21st century a new link was constructed into the Liverpool docks system. In the mid-18th century the growing towns of Yorkshire including Leeds, Wakefield and Bradford, were trading increasingly. While the Aire and Calder Navigation improved links to the east for Leeds, links to the west were limited. Bradford merchants wanted to increase the supply of limestone to make lime for mortar and agriculture using coal from Bradford's collieries and to transport textiles to the Port of Liverpool. On the west coast, traders in the busy port of Liverpool wanted a cheap supply of coal for their shipping and manufacturing businesses and to tap the output from the industrial regions of Lancashire. Inspired by the effectiveness of the wholly artificial navigation, the Bridgewater Canal opened in 1759–60. A canal across the Pennines linking Liverpool and Hull (by means of the Aire and Calder Navigation) would have obvious trade benefits. A
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Monkland Canal

    Monkland Canal

    The Monkland Canal was a 12.25-mile (19.6 km) canal which connected the coal mining areas of Monklands to Glasgow in Scotland. It was opened in 1794, and at first included a steam-powered inclined plane at Blackhill. It was abandoned for navigation in 1942, but its culverted remains still supply water to the Forth and Clyde Canal. Much of it now lies beneath the course of the M8 motorway, but two watered sections remain, and are well stocked with fish. The Monkland Canal was conceived in 1769 as a cheap way of bringing coal into Glasgow from the coalfields of the Monklands area. The engineer James Watt was asked to survey a route, and suggested two alternative schemes; one costing £20,317, with 25 locks which would end at Glasgow Green on the River Clyde, and the other costing £9,653, which would not need any locks, but would include a tramway from its terminus at Germiston into the city. The promoters opted for the second scheme, and started to raise subscriptions. The City of Glasgow offered conditional support, which depended on colliery owners guaranteeing output for 30 years, but were eventually persuaded to support it with less onerous conditions. An Act of Parliament was
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Rushall Canal

    Rushall Canal

    The Rushall Canal is a straight, 2.75-mile (4.43 km), narrow canal suitable for boats which are 7 feet (2.1 m) wide, forming part of the Birmingham Canal Navigations (BCN) on the eastern side of Walsall, West Midlands, England. The Rushall Canal runs from Rushall Junction (which is within the triangle formed by the flyovers of the junction of the M5 and M6 motorways) on the Tame Valley Canal and climbs due north through nine locks to Longwood Junction at Hay Head, where it joins the 5.25-mile (8.45 km) long Daw End Branch, a meandering, lock-free branch of the Wyrley and Essington Canal (W&E) which joins the main W&E at Catshill Junction near Brownhills. A short, non-navigable, arm at Longwood Junction leads to Hay Head Nature Reserve, which was once an area of limestone mines. The canal was built in the, then, county of Staffordshire under an Act of Parliament of April 1844 (four years after the merger of the BCN and W&E) to connect the Daw End Branch to The Tame Valley Canal to take coal from Cannock mines to Birmingham and the Black Country. The engineer was James Walker. It was specified to be 36 feet (11 m) wide with towpaths on both sides. The towpaths were to be 9 feet
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Croydon Canal

    Croydon Canal

    The Croydon Canal ran 9.25 miles (15 km) from Croydon, via Forest Hill, to the Grand Surrey Canal at New Cross in south London, England. It opened in 1809 and closed in 1836, the first canal to be abandoned by an Act of Parliament. Authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1801, the canal was originally intended to extend northwards to Rotherhithe, but the simultaneous construction of the Grand Surrey Canal provided a convenient access route. It was 9.25 miles (15 km) long, and opened on 22 October 1809. The Croydon Canal linked to the Croydon Merstham and Godstone Railway (itself connected to the Surrey Iron Railway), enabling the canal to be used to transport stone and lime from workings at Merstham. The canal was never extended further south-west, as was initially intended, to reach Epsom. The canal was originally planned with two inclined planes but 28 locks, arranged in two flights, were used instead. To keep the canal supplied with water reservoirs was constructed at Sydenham and South Norwood: the latter still exists as South Norwood Lake in a public park. The canal was 34 feet (10 m) wide. It had a maximum depth of 5 feet (1.5 m). By 1811 22 barges plied the canal. The barges
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Oswego Canal

    Oswego Canal

    The Oswego Canal is a canal in the New York State Canal System located in New York, United States. Opened in 1828, it is 23.7 miles (38.1 km) in length, and connects the Erie Canal at Three Rivers (near Liverpool) to Lake Ontario at Oswego. The canal has a depth of 14 ft (4.2 m), with seven locks spanning the 118 ft (36 m) change in elevation. The modern canal essentially follows the route of the Oswego River, canalized with locks & dams. Three locks, with a total lift of 45.6 feet (13.9m) take boats over what had been a steep rapids at the city of Oswego. This is the only route from the Atlantic/Hudson River system to Lake Ontario fully within the US. The following list of locks are provided for the current canal, from upstream (south) to downstream (north): Note: There is no Lock 4 on the canal.
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Canal of Burgundy

    Canal of Burgundy

    The Burgundy Canal (French: Canal de Bourgogne) is a canal in Burgundy in central eastern France. There are two river entrances; to the north the Yonne River allows access in the town of Migennes, and in the south the Saône allows access in the town Saint-Jean-de-Losne. The construction began in 1775 and was completed in 1832. The canal connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea via the Seine and the Yonne to the Saône and Rhône. The canal is 242 km (150 mi) long, with 189 locks. There were originally 191 lock basins but the double-basin locks at Migennes (114-115Y) and Germigny (106-107Y) have had the uppermost set of gates removed and now operate as single locks, though twice as deep as a standard lock (5m13 and 5m14 instead of the usual 2m50 - 3m) It passes through the departments of Yonne and Côte-d'Or. The highest point of the canal is the "partition" at Pouilly-en-Auxois, which is 378m above sea level. At this point the canal passes through a tunnel which is 3,333 metres long. The lowest point is at the junction with the Yonne at 79 m (259 ft) above sea level. The canal begins at Migennes with access via a former double-basin lock. For the next 100 km the canal
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Digbeth Branch Canal

    Digbeth Branch Canal

    The Digbeth Branch Canal in Birmingham, England is a short canal which links the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal at Aston Junction and the Grand Union Canal at Digbeth Junction (or historically, at the adjacent Warwick Bar) in Digbeth. Built under the Birmingham Canal Act 1768 and completed in 1799 the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal Navigations took traffic from the Birmingham and Warwick Junction Canal and the Warwick and Birmingham Canal (now both part of the Grand Union Canal) towards the Worcester and Birmingham Canal at the Worcester Bar (Gas Street Basin). The 1¼ mile long canal has six locks leading down from Aston Junction. It passes through a grade II listed tunnel at the east of Curzon Street railway station (originally carrying the main lines from it) and under the viaduct of today's eastbound railway line from New Street station. It then originally met the Birmingham and Warwick Junction Canal at the Warwick Bar stop lock just to the rear of Birmingham Proof House, at which there is a short branch to the Typhoo Basin. The junction is called Digbeth Junction or Proof House Junction. It has a total fall of 40 feet. All of the canal between Ashted Lock at Jennens Road
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Elbe-Seitenkanal

    Elbe-Seitenkanal

    The Elbe Lateral Canal, or the Elbe-Seitenkanal in German, is a 115 kilometres (71 mi) long canal in Lower Saxony, Germany. It runs from the Elbe near Lauenburg/Elbe to the Mittelland Canal near Gifhorn. It forms an important transport connection between southern and northern Germany, and it provides a bypass of a section of the Elbe with limited navigability. At the construction start it was also thought as a bypass outside the GDR, considered politically unreliable. Construction of the Elbe Lateral Canal was started in 1968, and the canal was opened in June 1976. Due to a dam rupture, it was closed from July 1976 until June 1977. The difference in elevation between the Mitteland Canal and the Elbe is 61 metres (200 ft), which is achieved by a lock (23 metres (75 ft)) in Uelzen, and a boat lift (38 metres (125 ft)) in Scharnebeck. There are small ports along the canal in Lüneburg, Uelzen and Wittingen. At Wulfstorf (near Bienenbüttel) is a landing stage.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Idrovia Ferrarese

    Idrovia Ferrarese

    The Idrovia Ferrarese (waterway of Ferrara) is a 70 km stretch of navigable water in the Italian Province of Ferrara, falling within the Po Delta Park. It links the river Po at Pontelagoscuro (frazione of Ferrara) to the Adriatic at Porto Garibaldi (frazione of Comacchio). The waterway, which is navigable by motor boats, is constituted by the Boicelli Canal from Pontelagoscuro to Ferrara (5.5 km), the Volano branch of the Po from Ferrara to Fiscaglia di Migliarino (34.5 km) and the Migliarino-Porto Garibaldi Canal from Migliarino to the sea (30 km).
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Industrial Canal

    Industrial Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Lake Pontchartrain
    The Industrial Canal is a 5.5 mile (9 km) waterway in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. The waterway's proper name, as used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and on NOAA nautical charts, is Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC). The more common "Industrial Canal" name is used locally, both by commercial mariners and by landside residents. The canal connects the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain. It separates New Orleans East from the rest of the city of New Orleans, and the Lower 9th Ward from the Upper 9th Ward. Approximately half of the waterway's course, from Industrial Lock to a point north of the Florida Avenue Bridge, is confluent with both the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO). The entirety of the canal passes through the 9th Ward of the city. Along the riverfront, the canal constitutes the boundary of the Upper 9th Ward's Bywater neighborhood on the upriver side of the canal and the Lower 9th Ward neighborhood on the downriver side. Near the lake, it is generally considered to be the eastern boundary of the Gentilly neighborhood and the western boundary of New Orleans East. The dream of a shipping canal connecting the
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Midland Canal

    Midland Canal

    The Mittelland Canal, also known as the Midland Canal, (German: Mittellandkanal) is a major canal in central Germany. It forms an important link in the waterway network of that country, providing the principal east-west inland waterway connection. Its significance goes beyond Germany as it links France, Switzerland and the Benelux countries with Poland, the Czech Republic and the Baltic Sea. At 325.7 kilometres (202.4 mi) in length, the Mittelland Canal is the longest artificial waterway in Germany. The Mittelland Canal branches off the Dortmund-Ems Canal at Hörstel (near Rheine, at 52°16′37″N 7°36′18″E / 52.27694°N 7.605°E / 52.27694; 7.605), runs north along the Teutoburg Forest, past Hannover and meets with the Elbe River near Magdeburg (52°14′46″N 11°44′49″E / 52.24611°N 11.74694°E / 52.24611; 11.74694). Near Magdeburg it connects to the Elbe-Havel Canal, making a continuous shipping route to Berlin and on to Poland. At Minden the canal crosses the river Weser over two aqueducts (the second completed in 1998), and near Magdeburg it crosses the Elbe, also with an aqueduct. Connections by side canals exist at Ibbenbüren, Osnabrück, Minden (two canals connecting to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    New Basin Canal

    New Basin Canal

    The New Basin Canal, also known as the New Orleans Canal and the New Canal, was a shipping canal in New Orleans, Louisiana from the 1830s through the 1940s. The New Basin Canal was constructed by the New Orleans Canal and Banking Company, incorporated in 1831 with a capital of 4 million United States dollars. The intent was to build a shipping canal from Lake Pontchartrain through the swamp land to the booming Uptown or "American" section of the city, to compete with the existing Carondelet Canal in the Downtown Creole part of the city. Work commenced the following year. Yellow fever ravaged workers in the swamp in back of the town, and the loss of slaves was judged too expensive, so most of the work was done by Irish immigrant laborers. The Irish workers died in great numbers, but the Company had no trouble finding more workers to take their place, as shiploads of poor Irishmen arrived in New Orleans, and many were willing to risk their lives in hazardous backbreaking work for a chance to earn $1 a day. By 1838, after an expense of $1million, the 60-foot (18 m) wide 3.17-mile (5.10 km) long canal was complete enough to be opened to small vessels drawing 6 feet (1.8 m), with $0.375
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Rideau Canal

    Rideau Canal

    • Major Cities: Ottawa
    • Connected Waterways: Cataraqui River
    The Rideau Canal (French: Canal Rideau), also known as the Rideau Waterway, connects the city of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on the Ottawa River to the city of Kingston, Ontario, on Lake Ontario. The name Rideau, French for "curtain," is derived from the curtain-like appearance of the Rideau River's twin waterfalls where they join the Ottawa River. The canal was opened in 1832 as a precaution in case of war with the United States and is still in use today, with most of its original structures intact. The canal system uses sections of major rivers, including the Rideau and the Cataraqui, as well as some lakes. It is the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America, and in 2007 it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is operated today by Parks Canada as a recreational waterway. The locks on the system open for navigation in mid-May and close in mid-October. The construction of the Rideau Canal was a preventive military measure undertaken after a report that during the War of 1812 the United States had intended to invade the British colony of Upper Canada via the St. Lawrence, which would have severed the lifeline between Montreal and Kingston. The British
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Murray Canal

    Murray Canal

    The Murray Canal is a canal in the Municipalities of Quinte West and Brighton, Ontario, Canada, and runs from the western end of the Bay of Quinte to Presqu’ile Bay which opens into Lake Ontario. It is approximately 8 kilometres (5 mi) in length. The canal shortens the trip by boats by avoiding having to go around the whole of the isthmus of Prince Edward County. The canal was proposed as early as 1796 and land was set aside by the government of Upper Canada. However, the Welland Canal and the Rideau Canal were seen as more important and construction was delayed. Construction was begun in 1882 and because of problems with unstable banks it took till 1889 to complete the canal. The canal is crossed by two swing bridges (Highway 33 and County Rd 64) and an unused railway bridge still exists but is kept permanently open. The canal saw many years of use with coal and other commercial boats but with the advent in the 1950s of the Saint Lawrence Seaway the traffic declined. Since then there has been a steady rise in recreational use and today the Murray Canal is used by boaters who visit the Trent-Severn Waterway.
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    Portsmouth and Arundel Canal

    Portsmouth and Arundel Canal

    The Portsmouth and Arundel Canal was a canal in the south of England that ran between Portsmouth and Arundel, it was built in 1823 but was never a financial success and was abandoned in 1855, the company was wound up in 1888. The canal was part of a larger scheme for the construction of a secure inland canal route from London to Portsmouth, which allowed craft to move between the two without having to venture into the English Channel and possibly encounter enemy ships or natural disaster. It was built by the Portsmouth & Arundel Navigation company. The canal was made up of three sections: a pair of ship canals, one on Portsea Island and one to Chichester, and a barge canal that ran from Ford on the River Arun to Hunston where it joined the Chichester section of the canal. This section of the canal connected the river Arun at Ford to the junction with the Chichester arm of the canal. It had two locks at Ford to allow the canal to drop 12 feet down to the river. This section links to Chichester Harbour at Birdham with the junction at Hunston. It contains two locks one of which is a sea lock. The canal was built to ship canal standards and was built 8 feet deep and 46 feet 8 inches
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    Wilts and Berks Canal

    Wilts and Berks Canal

    The Wilts & Berks Canal is a canal in the historic counties of Wiltshire and Berkshire, England, linking the Kennet and Avon Canal at Semington, near Melksham, to the River Thames at Abingdon. The North Wilts Canal merged with it to become a branch to the Thames and Severn Canal at Latton near Cricklade. Among professional trades boatmen, the canal was nicknamed the Ippey Cut, possibly short for Chippenham. The 52-mile (84 km) canal was opened in 1810, but abandoned in 1914 – a fate hastened by the collapse of Stanley aqueduct in 1901. Much of the canal subsequently became unnavigable: many of the structures were deliberately damaged by army demolition exercises; parts of the route were filled in and in some cases built over. In 1977 the Wilts & Berks Canal Amenity Group was formed with a view to full restoration of the canal. Several locks and bridges have since been restored, and over 8 miles (13 km) of the canal have been rewatered. A plan for the canal was published by Robert Whitworth Snr. along with William Whitworth in 1793. The Bill empowering construction of the canal received Royal Assent in 1795. It allowed the company to raise £111,900 through 1,119 shares at a cost of
    4.00
    2 votes
    224
    Bridgewater Canal

    Bridgewater Canal

    • Major Cities: Manchester
    • Connected Waterways: Rochdale Canal
    • Canal Tunnels: Worsley
    The Bridgewater Canal connects Runcorn, Manchester and Leigh, in North West England. It was commissioned by Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, to transport coal from his mines in Worsley to Manchester. It was opened in 1761 from Worsley to Manchester, and later extended from Manchester to Runcorn, and then from Worsley to Leigh. The canal is connected to the Manchester Ship Canal via a lock at Cornbrook, the Rochdale Canal in Manchester, the Trent and Mersey Canal at Preston Brook, southeast of Runcorn, and to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal at Leigh. It once connected with the River Mersey at Runcorn but has since been cut off by a slip road to the Silver Jubilee Bridge. Often considered to be the first "true" canal, it required the construction of an aqueduct to cross the River Irwell, one of the first of its kind. Its success helped inspire a period of intense canal building, known as "canal mania". It later faced intense competition from the Liverpool and Manchester Railway and the Macclesfield Canal. Navigable throughout its history, it is one of the few canals in Britain not to have been nationalised, and remains privately owned. Pleasure craft now use the canal which
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Cannock Extension Canal

    Cannock Extension Canal

    The current Cannock Extension Canal is a 1.8-mile (2.9 km) canal in England. It runs from Pelsall Junction on the Wyrley and Essington Canal, north to Norton Canes Docks and forms part of the Birmingham Canal Navigations. Historically, it ran to Hednesford, and served a number of collieries, which provided the main traffic. It opened in 1863, and the northern section closed in 1963, as a result of mining subsidence. Following a period of negotiations, the Birmingham Canal Navigations had been leased by the London and Birmingham Railway from November 1845. The lease meant that the railway company had to authorise all new works where the cost exceeded £500. An Act of Parliament was obtained in 1846 to legalise the agreement, by which time the London and Birmingham Railway had become part of the London and North Western Railway. The canal company had made a number of additions to their system in the 1840s, which had been successful in generating new traffic, and they embarked on another programme in 1854. The railway company did not object, although it imposed a condition that dividends paid to shareholders would be restricted to 4 per cent until the cost of the new works had been
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Derby Canal

    Derby Canal

    The Derby Canal ran 14 miles (23 km) from the Trent and Mersey Canal at Swarkestone to Derby and Little Eaton, and to the Erewash Canal at Sandiacre, in Derbyshire, England. The canal was authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1793 and was fully completed in 1796. It featured a level crossing of the River Derwent in the centre of Derby. An early tramroad, known as the Little Eaton Gangway, linked Little Eaton to coal mines at Denby. The canal's main cargo was coal, and it was relatively successful until the arrival of the railways in 1840. It gradually declined, with the gangway closing in 1908 and the Little Eaton Branch in 1935. Early attempts at restoration were thwarted by the closure of the whole canal in 1964. Since 1994, there has been an active campaign for restoration spearheaded by the Derby and Sandiacre Canal Trust and Society. Loss of the Derwent crossing due to development has resulted in an innovative engineering solution called the Derby Arm being proposed, as a way of transferring boats across the river. Although the River Derwent had been used for transport from the Trent since ancient times, it was winding and shallow in many places, silting frequently. The right
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Exeter Canal

    Exeter Canal

    The Exeter Ship Canal, sometimes just called the Exeter Canal, downstream of Exeter, Devon, England was built in the 1560s which means it pre-dates the "canal mania" period and is one of the oldest artificial waterways in the UK. At the start of Exeter's history, the River Exe was tidal and navigable up to the city walls enabling it to be a busy port. In the 1270s or 80s, the Countess of Devon, Isabella de Fortibus, built a weir across the river to power her mills (this weir is remembered in the name of the nearby suburb Countess Wear). This had the effect of cutting off Exeter's port from the sea and damaging its salmon fisheries. In 1290, trade with Exeter's port was restored, only to be blocked by a new weir built in 1317 by Hugh de Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon (Isabella's cousin), who also built a quay at Topsham. Because of the blockages on the river, boats were forced to unload at Topsham and the earls were able to exact large tolls to transport goods to Exeter. For the next 250 years the city petitioned the King to have the waterway reopened, to no avail, until 1550 when Edward VI finally granted permission. However it was by then too late because the river channel had
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Llangollen Canal

    Llangollen Canal

    • Major Cities: Llangollen
    The Llangollen Canal (Welsh: Camlas Llangollen) is a navigable canal crossing the border between England and Wales. The waterway links Llangollen in Denbighshire, north Wales, with Hurleston in south Cheshire, via the town of Ellesmere, Shropshire. In 2009 an eleven-mile section of the canal from Gledrid Bridge near Rhoswiel through to the Horseshoe Falls, which includes Chirk Aqueduct and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO. The waterway, from which the modern canal takes it name, was built when work to complete the Ellesmere Canal was halted in the early 19th century. The Ellesmere Canal was to be a commercial waterway that linked the Port of Liverpool to the West Midlands. However due to a variety of problems, such as rising costs and rival competition, the scheme was never finished as intended. As the waterway never reached its proposed main source of water at Moss Valley, Wrexham, a feeder channel was constructed along the side of the Vale of Llangollen to the River Dee; the work created the Horseshoe Falls at Llantisilio. The Llangollen line became the primary water source from the River Dee for the central section of the incomplete Ellesmere
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Peak Forest Canal

    Peak Forest Canal

    The Peak Forest Canal is a narrow (7-foot (2.13 m) gauge) locked artificial waterway in northern England. It is 14.8 miles (23.8 km) long and forms part of the connected English/Welsh inland waterway network. The canal consists of two level pounds, separated by a flight of 16 locks that raise the canal by 209 feet (64 m) over the course of 1 mile (1.6 km). The two pounds of the canal are generally known as the Upper Peak Forest Canal and Lower Peak Forest Canal. Whilst there is no evidence that these names were used historically, the designation Lower Peak Forest Canal was used in the British Waterways Act 1983, which redesignated the lower part of the canal as a Cruising Waterway. The Lower Peak Forest Canal heads south from Dukinfield Junction at Dukinfield in Greater Manchester, where it makes a junction with the Ashton Canal at the southern end of the Tame Aqueduct (grid reference SJ934984) through Newton, Hyde, Woodley, Bredbury, Romiley, before crossing the River Goyt on Marple Aqueduct, alongside a railway viaduct, to the foot of Marple Locks, a distance of 6.9 miles (11.1 km). The environs are largely rural, passing woods and fields, with some industrial premises
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Shubenacadie Canal

    Shubenacadie Canal

    The Shubenacadie Canal is a Canadian canal in central Nova Scotia, linking Halifax Harbour with the Bay of Fundy by way of the Shubenacadie River and Shubenacadie Grand Lake. Begun in 1826, it was not completed until 1861 and was closed in 1871. Currently small craft use the river and lakes, but only one lock is operational. Three of the nine locks have been restored to preserve their unique fusion of British and North American construction techniques. More extensive restoration is planned. The Shubenacadie Canal was envisioned to facilitate transportation between Halifax, and the agricultural, timber and coal producing areas of northern Nova Scotia and the Annapolis Valley. Construction was started in 1826 by the Shubenacadie Canal Co. which went bankrupt in 1831. Several Scottish and Irish stonemasons had immigrated to Nova Scotia to work on the project but were left stranded in the colony with little resources after the project had halted. Construction started again in 1854 under the Inland Navigation Company. The new company altered the original British stonework lock designs to use more inexpensive North American stone and wooden construction. Steam boats and barges began to
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    Singel

    Singel

    The Singel is a canal in Amsterdam which encircled the city in the Middle Ages. It served as a moat around the city until 1585, when Amsterdam expanded beyond the Singel. The canal runs from the IJ bay, near Central Station, to the Muntplein square, where it meets the Amstel river. It is now the inner-most canal in Amsterdam's semicircular ring of canals. The canal should not be confused with the Singelgracht canal, which became the outer limit of the city during the Dutch Golden Age in the 17th Century. Other Dutch towns also have ring-shaped canals named Singel. Amsterdam's famous flower market, Bloemenmarkt, is located along the Singel between Koningsplein and Muntplein squares. The market stalls are actually boats floating in the canal. Part of the Singel has been designated a red-light district, with prostitutes offering their services from behind red-lit windows. The area, known as the Singelgebied, is located near Lijnbaanssteeg and Oude Nieuwstraat. Yab Yum, one of Amsterdam's most exclusive brothels until closed by the local authority in January 2008, was located at Singel 295. The Singel is lined by many beautiful, richly decorated canal houses built during the Dutch
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Agra canal

    Agra canal

    The Agra Canal is an important Indian irrigation work which starts from Okhla in Delhi. The Agra canal originates from Okhla barrage, downstream of Nizamuddin bridge. It opened in 1874. In the beginning, it was available for navigation, in Delhi, erstwhile Gurgaon, Mathura and Agra Districts, and Bharatpur State. Later, navigation was stopped in 1904 and the canal has since then, been exclusively used for irrigation purposes only. At present the canal does not flow in district Gurgaon, but only in Faridabad, which was earlier a part of Gurgaon. The Canal receives its water from the Yamuna River at Okhla, about 10 KM to the south of New Delhi. The weir across the Yamuna was the first attempted in Upper India upon a foundation of fine sand; it is about 800-yard long, and rises seven-feet above the summer level of the river. From Okhla the canal follows the high land between the Khari-Nadi and the Yamuna and finally joins the Banganga river about 20 miles below Agra. Navigable branches connect the canal with Mathura and Agra. the canal irrigates about 1.5 lakh hectares in Agra, and Mathura in Uttar Pradesh, Faridabad in Haryana, Bharatpur in Rajasthan and also some parts of Delhi The
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Briare Canal

    Briare Canal

    The Canal de Briare is one of the oldest canals in France. It is the first summit level canal in Europe that was built using pound locks, connecting the Loire and Seine valleys. It is 57km long and is part of the Bourbonnais route from Saint-Mammès on the Seine to Chalon-sur-Saône on the Saône River. From Briare to Buges, the canal rises through the first 12 locks some 41 m (135 ft) and then falls 85 m (279 ft) through the remaining 24 locks. The canal was initiated by Maximilien de Béthune, duc de Sully, with support from Henry IV in order to develop the grain trade, and to reduce food shortages. Its construction started in 1604 and was completed in 1642. Between six and twelve thousand workmen worked on this canal which connects the basins of the River Loire and the River Seine. Hugues Cosnier obtained the contract to build the first canal crossing a watershed in Europe. It was thus necessary to use locks. A staircase of seven locks was built in Rogny-les-Sept-Écluses. (This was bypassed in 1887 but is preserved as an ancient monument and floodlit at night.) After Henri IV's assassination, Hugues Cosnier had to give up work in 1611. In 1638, Guillaume Boutheroue and Jacques
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Canal de Berry

    Canal de Berry

    The Canal de Berry is a disused canal in France which links the Canal latéral à la Loire at Marseilles-lès-Aubigny with the Cher at Noyers rejoining the Loire near Tours. With a branch from Montluçon it provided 261 kilometres (162 mi) of canal with locks 2.7 metres (8.9 ft) wide from 1840 until its closure in 1955. There is now a 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) operational segment with six locks between Selles-sur-Cher and Noyers-sur-Cher. Although discussed from 1484, it was not until 1780 when Armand II-Joseph, 6th Duke of Béthune Charost presented the first solid proposal to the provincial assembly. But work did not start until after an imperial decree in 1809 and was not completed until 1839. The work was designed by Joseph-Michel Dutens and mainly carried out by Spanish prisoners of war in the 1820s. Because of the shortage of water near the summit level at Sancoins, the 96 locks of the canal were built to a gauge of only 27.5 metres (90 ft) by 2.7 metres (8.9 ft), similar to British "narrow canal" practice. Barges built to this gauge are called berrichons. They could carry about 60 tonnes of freight over the summit of the Canal de Berry but their draught allowed them to carry up to
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Canal du Centre

    Canal du Centre

    The Canal du Centre is a canal in Belgium, which, with other canals, links the waterways of the Meuse and Scheldt rivers. It has a total length of 20.9 km. It connects the artificial lake Grand Large near Nimy, with the Brussels-Charleroi Canal near Seneffe. The canal begins in the west at Mons, and passes through the towns of Nimy, Obour, Ville-sur-Haine, and Thieu. This section is 15km long, and has a relief of 23.26m. The canal climbs by means of six locks. There are five locks with a relief of 4.2m, and a final lock with a relief of 2.26m at Thieu The next section of the original canal route between Thieu and Houdeng-Goegnies climbs 66m over a distance of 6790m, which is too steep a climb for canal locks. Therefore, this section contains four hydraulic boat lifts, dating from 1888 to 1917, which are now on the UNESCO World Heritage list (see Lifts on the old Canal du Centre). These lifts were designed by Edwin Clark of the British company Clark, Stansfield & Clark. For commercial traffic this stretch of the canal has, since 2002, been replaced by an enlarged parallel canal. For centuries, Belgian people have wanted an inland waterway to connect the Meuse and the Scheldt.
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Chenango Canal

    Chenango Canal

    The Chenango Canal was a towpath canal that was built and operated in the mid-19th century in Upstate New York in the United States. It was 97 miles long and for much of its course followed the Chenango River, along Rt. 12 N-S from Binghamton on the south end to Utica on the north end. It operated from 1834 to 1878 and provided a significant link in the water transportation system of the northeastern U.S., connecting the Susquehanna River to the Erie Canal. The canal was first proposed in the New York Legislature in 1824 during the construction of the Erie Canal, prompted by lobbying from local leaders in the Chenango Valley. It was authorized by the legislature in 1833 and completed in October 1836 at a total cost of $2,500,000- approximately twice the original appropriation. In 1833 a grand ball was held in Oxford, NY, which feted the canal's approval. The great American civil engineer John B. Jervis was appointed Chief Engineer of the project and helped in its design. This was the era of major canal building in the United States, following the English model, in order to provide the first major transportation network for the eastern United States. The excavation began in 1834 and
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Corinth Canal

    Corinth Canal

    • Connected Waterways: Saronic Gulf
    The Corinth Canal (Greek: Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου) is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnesian peninsula from the Greek mainland, thus effectively making the former an island. The builders dug the canal through the Isthmus at sea level; no locks are employed. It is 6.4 kilometres (4.0 mi) in length and only 21.3 metres (70 ft) wide at its base, making it unpassable for most modern ships. It now has little economic importance. The canal was mooted in classical times and an abortive effort was made to build it in the 1st century AD. Construction finally got underway in 1881 but was hampered by geological and financial problems that bankrupted the original builders. It was completed in 1893, but due to the canal's narrowness, navigational problems and periodic closures to repair landslips from its steep walls, it failed to attract the level of traffic anticipated by its operators. It is now used mainly for tourist traffic. Several rulers in antiquity dreamed of digging a cutting through the Isthmus. The first to propose such an undertaking was the tyrant Periander in
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Göta Canal

    Göta Canal

    • Major Cities: Gothenburg
    • Connected Waterways: Vänern
    The Göta Canal (Swedish: Göta kanal) is a Swedish canal constructed in the early 19th century. It formed the backbone of a waterway stretching some 382 miles (614 km), linking a number of lakes and rivers to provide a route from Gothenburg (Swedish:Göteborg) on the west coast to Söderköping on the Baltic Sea via the river Göta älv and the Trollhätte kanal, through the large lakes Vänern and Vättern. The canal itself is 118 miles (190 km) long, of which 54 miles (87 km) were dug or blasted, with a width varying between 23–46 ft (7–14 m) and a maximum depth of about 9 ft (3 m). It has 58 locks and can accommodate vessels up to 105 ft (32 m) long, 21 ft (7 m) wide and 9 ft (2.8 m) in draft. Göta Canal is a sister canal of Caledonian Canal in Scotland, which was also constructed by Thomas Telford. The canal is nicknamed the "divorce ditch." It earned this nickname from the troubles that couples have to endure while trying to navigate the many locks by themselves. The idea of a canal across southern Sweden was first put forward as early as 1516, by Hans Brask, the bishop of Linköping. However, it was not until the start of the 19th century that Brask's proposals were put into action by
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Indira Gandhi Canal

    Indira Gandhi Canal

    The Indira Gandhi Canal is one of the biggest canal projects in India. It starts from the Harike Barrage at Sultanpur, a few kilometers below the confluence of the Sutlej and Beas rivers in Punjab state. Irrigation facilities to the north-western region of Rajasthan, a part of the Thar Desert. It consists of the Rajasthan feeder canal (with the first 167 km in Punjab and Haryana and the remaining 37 km in Rajasthan) and 445 km of the Rajasthan main canal which is entirely within Rajasthan.This canal enters into Haryana from Punjab near Lohgarh village of Haryana,then running in western part of district Sirsa it enters into Rajasthan near Kharakhera village (Tehsil:Tibbi,district:-Hanumangarh) of Rajasthan. The IGNP traverses seven districts of Rajasthan: Barmer, Bikaner, Churu, Hanumangarh, Jaisalmer, Jodhpur, and Sriganganagar. After the construction of the Indira Gandhi Canal, irrigation facilities were available over an area of 6770 km² in Jaisalmer district and 37 km² in Barmer district.Irrigation had already been provided in an area of 3670 km² in Jaisalmer district. The canal has transformed the barren deserts of this district into rich and lush fields. Crops of mustard,
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Macclesfield Canal

    Macclesfield Canal

    The Macclesfield Canal is a canal in east Cheshire, England, one of the six that make up the Cheshire Ring. The canal runs 26 miles (42 km) from Marple Junction at Marple, where it joins the Upper Peak Forest Canal, 16 miles (26 km), southwards (through Bollington and Macclesfield), before arriving at Bosley. Having descended the 12 Bosley Locks over the course of about a mile (1.6 km), the canal continues through Congleton to a junction with the Hall Green Branch of the Trent & Mersey Canal at Hall Green stop lock (the branch itself joins the main line a mile further on at Hardings Wood Junction, near Kidsgrove). The canal was initially proposed at a public meeting held on 22 September 1824 at the Macclesfield Arms in Macclesfield. Unlike earlier canals, the spectre of the arrival of the railways was already in sight, and at least one present at the first meeting suggested that a railway might be built. By the time the canal gained its Act of Parliament in 1826, the estimated cost of building the canal (to be funded by shareholders) was put at £295,000. The authorised share capital was £300,000, and the company had powers to borrow a further £100,000. Construction of the canal
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal

    Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal

    The Mississippi River – Gulf Outlet Canal (also known as MRGO, MR-GO or "Mr. Go") is a 76 mi (122 km) channel constructed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers at the direction of Congress in the mid-20th century that provided a shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and New Orleans' inner harbor Industrial Canal via the Intracoastal Waterway. In 2005, although disputed by the Corps of Engineers, the MRGO channelled Hurricane Katrina's storm surge into the heart of Greater New Orleans, contributing significantly to the subsequent multiple engineering failures experienced by the region's hurricane protection network. In the aftermath the channel was closed. A permanent storm surge barrier was constructed in the MRGO in 2009, and the channel has been closed to maritime shipping. The MRGO begins just east of I-510's crossing of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in New Orleans East and takes a path SSE through St. Bernard Parish wetlands just west of Lake Borgne to the Gulf of Mexico near Gardner Island. Much criticized for its negative environmental effects, such as saltwater intrusion, wetlands erosion and storm surge amplification during Hurricane Katrina, the MRGO was closed
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Naviglio Grande

    Naviglio Grande

    The Naviglio Grande is a canal in Lombardy, northern Italy, joining the Ticino river near Tornavento (23 km south of Sesto Calende) to the Porta Ticinese dock, also known as the Darsena, in Milan. It drops 34 m over 49.9 km. It varies in width from 22 m to 50 m from Tornavento to Abbiategrasso, dropping to 15 m between there and Milan. Initially carries 63 m³ per second, 116 outlets take water to irrigate 500 square kilometres leaving the canal 12 m wide and carrying 12 m³ per second as it enters the dock. The Naviglio Grande was the most important of the Milan “navigli”. Probably originating as a ditch dug in 1157 between Abbiategrasso and Landriano as a defense against Frederick Barbarossa, it was one of the largest post-medieval engineering projects, allowing development of commerce, transport and agriculture. In 1177, construction began near Tornavento, but problems stopped work almost immediately. In 1179 however, a dam was constructed and water from the Ticino was directed towards Turbigo, Castelletto di Cuggiono, Bernate and Boffalora reaching Gaggiano in 1233. This 30 km section, the “Navigium de Gazano” took over 50 years to dig by hand using only pickaxe and shovel.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Northern river reversal

    Northern river reversal

    The Northern river reversal or Siberian river reversal was an ambitious project to divert the flow of the Northern rivers in the Soviet Union, which "uselessly" drain into the Arctic Ocean, southwards towards the populated agricultural areas of Central Asia, which lack water. Research and planning work on the project started in the 1930s, and was carried out on a large scale in the 1960s through the early 1980s. The controversial project was abandoned in 1986, primarily for environmental reasons, without much actual construction work ever done. The project to turn Siberian rivers goes back to the 1830s when tsarist surveyor Alexander Shrenk proposed it when the big canal engineering projects were conceived (i.e. the Suez and Panama canals). The project of turning some of the flow of the northern rivers to the south was discussed, on a smaller scale, in the 1930s. In November 1933, a special conference of the USSR Academy of Sciences approved a plan for a "reconstruction of the Volga and its basin", which included the diversion into the Volga of some of the waters of the Pechora and the Northern Dvina - two rivers in the north of European Russia that flow into the seas of the Arctic
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Nottingham Canal

    Nottingham Canal

    The Nottingham Canal was a 23.6 kilometres (14.7 mi) long canal between Langley Mill in Derbyshire and Nottingham, England. It opened in 1796, and most of it was closed in 1937. The southern section is now part of the River Trent Navigation, and the northern section is a nature reserve. The idea for the canal first rose in 1790. The opening of the Cromford Canal would favour coal transport from Pinxton over pits nearer Nottingham. Moreover transport to Nottingham itself was by the circuitous route down the Erewash Canal and along the River Trent. It was also felt that the canal proprietors would exploit their position. In 1791 the charter group called in surveyor William Jessop, who had experience with the successful Cromford Canal. Jessop himself was ill at the time and employed James Green of Wollaton to carry out the actual survey, with Jessop preparing the report and assisting its passage through Parliament. The canal would begin at the Cromford Canal, just north of its junction with the Erewash, and proceed to the Trent at Nottingham with a branch to the river at Lenton In 1792 the canal was promoted through Parliament, opposed vigorously by the Erewash owners who were fearful
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Scheldt-Rhine Canal

    Scheldt-Rhine Canal

    The Scheldt-Rhine Canal (Schelde-Rijn Kanaal) in Belgium and the Netherlands connects Antwerp with the Volkerak, and thereby the Scheldt with the Rhine. The Scheldt-Rhine canal includes the Eendracht. It crosses the east of Zuid-Beveland, where it is crossed by a railroad bridge (between the stations Rilland-Bath on the west and Bergen op Zoom on the east) and three road bridges, and along Tholen, where it is spanned by three road bridges. Map
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Schuylkill Canal

    Schuylkill Canal

    Schuylkill Canal is the common, but technically inaccurate, name for the Schuylkill Navigation, a 19th-century commercial waterway in and along the Schuylkill River in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The "canal" was actually a system of interconnected man-made canals and slack-water pools in the river, which is called a navigation. The Schuylkill Navigation System opened in 1825 to provide transportation and water power. At the time, the river was the cheapest and most efficient method of transporting bulk cargo. As a result of this improved transportation, anthracite coal-mining grew as the major source of industry between Pottsville and Eastern markets. Mules pulled barges of coal from Port Carbon to Pottsville; to the ports of Philadelphia; and, continuing through additional waterways, to New York City markets. The canal eventually declined due to the rise of rail transport, and was almost completely filled in the 1950s. The two remaining watered reaches are now used for recreation. The Schuylkill Navigation Company was chartered in 1815 to build a series of navigation improvements in the Schuylkill River. A waterway of 108 miles (174 km) was completed in 1827 linking
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Soulanges Canal

    Soulanges Canal

    The Soulanges Canal is an abandoned shipping canal in Quebec, Canada. It follows the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River between Pointe-des-Cascades and Coteaux-Landing, bypassing the rapids between Lake Saint-Louis and Lake Saint-Francis. In between, it passes through the towns of Les Cèdres and Coteau-du-Lac. It superseded the first Beauharnois Canal which was on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence. It is 23 kilometers (14 mi) long and had a 4.3 metres (14.1 ft) draught. Five locks measuring 85.3 m (280 ft) x 14 m (46 ft) give a total rise of 25 meters (82 ft). The Soulanges Canal was named after the Soulanges Seigneury which was granted in 1702 by Governor Louis-Hector de Callière to Pierre-Jacques de Joybert, Knight and Lord of Soulanges. Operation of the Soulanges Canal was powered by a small hydro electric generating station. "Le Petit Pouvoir" is located near the middle of the canal and provided power for the motorized lock gates, electrical operation of the swing bridges, and illumination for the entire length of the canal at night. It was the first canal in the world to have its entire passageway lit by night, allowing round-the-clock operation. It opened in 1899 and
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Telemark canal

    Telemark canal

    The Telemark Canal connects Skien to Dalen in southern Norway by linking up several long lakes using a series of 18 locks. It originally consisted of two canals: The Norsjø-Skien Canal, with locks in Skien and Løveid was built in the period 1854–1861, and is the oldest of the two canals. The other original canal – Bandak-Nordsjø Canal – was opened in 1892 by then-Minister of Labour Hans Hein Theodor Nysom. In Europe, this canal was seen as "the eighth wonder" when it was finished. The Bandak-Nordsjø Canal was mainly built for transport of goods and passengers, log floating and to prevent flooding. Log floating, however, is no longer practiced, due to the closing of Union - a local paper factory. An eastern section gives access to Notodden via Lake Heddalsvatnet. The Telemark Canal consists of 18 locks, is 105 km long and has a total difference in altitude of 72 m. The biggest staircase lock is Vrangfoss which has five chambers and a lifting height of 23 m. The riverboats Henrik Ibsen and Victoria travel with tourists from Skien to Dalen via Kviteseid. Victoria has traveled through the Norsjø-Skien Canal since 1882, and on the Bandak-Norsjø Canal since its opening.
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Turners Falls Canal

    Turners Falls Canal

    The Turners Falls Canal, also historically known as the Montague Canal, was a canal along the Connecticut River in Montague, Massachusetts. It was reconstructed in 1869 and is now known as the Power Canal. The canal was first completed in 1798 by the Proprietors of the Upper Locks and Canals on Connecticut River under a charter granted on February 23, 1792, by the Massachusetts legislature and Governor John Hancock. After completing the South Hadley Canal, many of the earlier Proprietors turned their attention to extending navigation to regions above Turners Falls. Construction work included a log-crib dam extending across the Connecticut River at a place called "Great Falls" (now Turners Falls), a canal 2.5 miles long and 20 feet wide from there to a point downstream near the Deerfield River, and a towpath on its east shore. The canal had ten locks as finally completed. Upstream a dam and single-lock canal near the mouth of the Millers River allowed barges to bypass the French King rapids. The canals were opened for business in 1798 and by 1802 supported regular freight traffic by boat from Long Island Sound to Bellows Falls, Vermont. The canal was profitable for 30 years,
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Wey and Arun Canal

    Wey and Arun Canal

    The Wey and Arun Canal is a 23-mile-long (37 km) canal in the south of England, between the River Wey at Shalford, Surrey and the River Arun at Pallingham, in West Sussex. The canal comprises parts of two separate undertakings – the northern part of the Arun Navigation, between Pallingham and Newbridge Wharf, which opened in 1787, and the Wey and Arun Junction Canal, which connected the Arun at Newbridge to the Godalming Navigation near Shalford, south of Guildford, opened in 1816. The canal was built with 26 locks. Passing through a rural landscape, there was little freight traffic to justify its continued existence, and the canal was officially abandoned in 1871. Without maintenance, the canal gradually became derelict over much of its length. However, since 1970, active restoration by The Wey & Arun Canal Trust has resulted in several miles of the waterway being restored to navigable standard. Work is continuing, with the ultimate aim of re-opening the entire canal to navigation. The River Arun was used in an unimproved condition for centuries, but work was carried out on the river itself and the port of Arundel in the 16th century, which allowed boats to reach Pallingham Quay
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, canal

    Discuss Best Canal of All Time

    Top List Voters