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Best Canadian Census Division of All Time

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    1
    Timiskaming District

    Timiskaming District

    Timiskaming is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. The district was created in 1912 from parts of Algoma, Nipissing, and Sudbury districts. In 1921, Cochrane District was created from parts of this district and parts of Thunder Bay District. The division had a population of 32,634 in the Canada 2011 Census. The land area is 13,299.92 square kilometres (5,135.13 sq mi); the population density was 2.5 per square kilometre (6.5 /sq mi). The Coureur de bois explored and traded fur in what is now the Timiskaming District, in the 17th century. The district seat is in Temiskaming Shores. Along with portions of the neighbouring district, Cochrane, Timiskaming is represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario by John Vanthof. In the House of Commons of Canada, the district is divided between Nipissing—Timiskaming, represented by Jay Aspin, in the south, and Timmins—James Bay, represented by Charlie Angus, in the north. A very small portion of the district also belongs to the riding of Nickel Belt.
    6.56
    9 votes
    2
    Division No. 14, Alberta

    Division No. 14, Alberta

    Division No. 14 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. The majority of the division is located in the western portion of central Alberta, while the westernmost portion of the division is located within Alberta's Rockies. The division's largest urban community is the Town of Hinton. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 14. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 14 had a population of 28,584 living in 11,250 of its 12,552 total dwellings, a 2.5% change from its 2006 population of 27,881. With a land area of 26,965 km (10,411 sq mi), it had a population density of 1.1 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 14 had a population of 27,881 living in 11,320 dwellings, a 3.8% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 26,964.09 km (10,410.89 sq mi) and a population density of 1.0 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    7.43
    7 votes
    3
    Gatineau

    Gatineau

    Gatineau (/ˈɡætɨnoʊ/, French pronunciation: [ɡatino]) is a city in western Quebec, Canada. It is the fourth largest city in the province. It is located on the northern banks of the Ottawa River, immediately across from Ottawa, and together they form Canada's National Capital Region. Ottawa and Gatineau comprise a single Census Metropolitan Area. As of 2011 Gatineau had a population of 265,349, and metropolitan population of 314,501 for the Quebec part of the Ottawa-Gatineau Census Metropolitan Area; the full census metropolitan area, including Ottawa and the rest of the Ontario part, had a population of 1,236,324. Gatineau is coextensive with a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of the same name, whose geographical code is 81. It is the seat of the judicial district of Hull. The current city of Gatineau is centred on an area called Hull, the oldest non-native settlement in the National Capital Region. It was founded on the north shore of the Ottawa River in 1800 by Philemon Wright at the portage around the Chaudière Falls just upstream (or west) from where the Gatineau and Rideau Rivers flow into the Ottawa. Wright brought his
    8.33
    6 votes
    4
    Division No. 12, Alberta

    Division No. 12, Alberta

    Division No. 12 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. Including the City of Cold Lake, the majority of the division is located in the northeast corner of central Alberta, while the northern portion of the division is located within northern Alberta. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 12. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 12 had a population of 63,427 living in 22,986 of its 26,256 total dwellings, a 5.7% change from its 2006 population of 59,990. With a land area of 30,047 km (11,601 sq mi), it had a population density of 2.1 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 12 had a population of 59,990 living in 24,756 dwellings, a 2.8% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 30,046.71 km (11,601.10 sq mi) and a population density of 2.0 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    7.14
    7 votes
    5
    7.14
    7 votes
    6
    Division No. 1, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 1, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 1, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions with the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the southeast corner of the province, bordering Manitoba and North Dakota. The most populous community in this division is Estevan. According to the Canada 2006 Census, 29,168 people lived in this division, which is a 3.5% decrease from 2001. It has a land area of 14,966.74 km² (5,790.285 sq mi).
    9.20
    5 votes
    7
    Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine, British Columbia

    Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km² (35,486.89 sq mi). Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace. The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat. The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton, the District of New Hazelton and the District of Stewart. Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake, formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007.
    6.57
    7 votes
    8
    Division No. 17, Alberta

    Division No. 17, Alberta

    Division No. 17 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It spans the central and northwest portions of northern Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Slave Lake. Division No. 17 is the largest census division in Alberta according to area and also has the lowest population density. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 17. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 17 had a population of 61,504 living in 19,572 of its 22,683 total dwellings, a 3.7% change from its 2006 population of 59,282. With a land area of 192,116 km (74,176 sq mi), it had a population density of 0.3 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 17 had a population of 59,282 living in 21,347 dwellings, a 3.1% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 192,084.34 km (74,164.18 sq mi) and a population density of 0.3 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.60
    5 votes
    9
    L'Amiante Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Amiante Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Appalaches ((French) Municipalité régionale de comté des Appalaches) is a regional county municipality (RCM) in the Chaudière-Appalaches region in southeastern Quebec, Canada. It was established in 1982 from parts of the historic counties of Beauce, Frontenac, Mégantic, and Wolfe. The county seat and largest city is Thetford Mines. The name of the RCM is linked to its location in the Appalachian Mountains with Mounts Adstock, Caribou, Oak, and Saint-Adrien being the highest. Until 2008, it was known as L'Amiante Regional County Municipality, because of the importance of asbestos mining in the region (amiante is French for "asbestos"). Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census (Statistics Canada, 2006) Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.33
    6 votes
    10
    Regional District of Mount Waddington, British Columbia

    Regional District of Mount Waddington, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Mount Waddington (RDMW) is a regional district in British Columbia. It takes in the lower Central Coast region centred around the Queen Charlotte Strait coast of northern Vancouver Island and the adjoining parts of mainland British Columbia. It has a total land area of 20,288.4 km² (7,833.4 sq mi) and a 2006 census population of 11,651 persons, most of which is in towns on Vancouver Island and adjoining islands. The administrative centre is in the town of Port McNeill. Other municipalities include the district municipality of Port Hardy, the village of Port Alice, and the village of Alert Bay. The region is named for Mount Waddington, which lies on its northeastern boundary and is the highest peak entirely within British Columbia (Fairweather Mountain, on the Alaska boundary, is the highest). Also within the regional district is Mount Silverthrone, the highest volcano in Canada, located in the remote Ha-Iltzuk Icefield. The land boundary of the regional district is largely the divide of the Coast Mountains, inland from which is the Chilcotin District, which is part of the Cariboo Regional District. The RDMW is relatively underpopulated in comparison to
    7.33
    6 votes
    11
    Les Etchemins Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Etchemins Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Etchemins is a regional county municipality in the Chaudière-Appalaches region of eastern Quebec, Canada. It is named for the Etchemin River which finds its source in the region, as well as Etchemin Lake. Lac-Etchemin is the seat of the RCM. Les Etchemins can be found on the Maine border, southeast of Quebec City. Highways in Les Etchemins include:
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Northumberland County, New Brunswick

    Northumberland County, New Brunswick

    Northumberland County (2011 population 48,355), having the largest area of any county in the province, is located in northeastern New Brunswick, Canada. Northumberland County is covered by thick forests, whose products stimulate the economy. The highest peaks in the province, including Mount Carleton lie in the northwestern corner of the county. The county is dominated by the Miramichi River, world famous for its salmon fishing. The lower portion of the river is an estuary which widens into Miramichi Bay, a part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The city of Miramichi is a local service centre for the county and surrounding regions with schools, hospitals and government offices and retail locations. The county has several saw mills in the city of Miramichi and up the Southwest Branch of the Miramichi River. There were formerly two large pulp and paper mills at Miramichi. Chatham was also home to an air force base, CFB Chatham, until 1996. Renous, located along the Southwest Miramichi was also home to an army post - a federal maximum security penitentiary is now located on the site. There are five incorporated municipalities within the county (listed by 2011 population counts and national
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    Haliburton County

    Haliburton County

    Haliburton is a county of Ontario, Canada, known as a tourist and cottage area in Central Ontario for its scenery and for its resident artists. Minden Hills is the county seat. Haliburton County was established in 1983, but had existed as the Provisional County of Haliburton since 1874. Haliburton County and the village of Haliburton are named after Thomas Chandler Haliburton, author, statesman, and the first chairman of the Canadian Land and Emigration Company. The county borders Algonquin Park on the north. Communities in the county include Haliburton, Minden, Wilberforce, Gooderham, Irondale, Cardiff, West Guilford, Eagle Lake and Fort Irwin. Haliburton County is dubbed the "Haliburton Highlands". This is in part attributed to its similarity to the Scottish Highlands, and the Scottish ancestry of the founding population. The Haliburton Highlands region is also one of the higher points on the Canadian Shield, ranging from 1,066 feet (325 m) at the Haliburton/Stanhope Municipal Airport to 1,450 feet (440 m) above sea level at Sir Sam's Ski Resort in Eagle Lake. Haliburton County is spotted with many rivers and lakes, included endorheic lakes fueled by natural springs. Some of the
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    La Vallée-du-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-du-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-du-Richelieu (The Valley of the Richelieu) is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region in southwestern Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Beloeil. It surrounds the Richelieu River as the river makes its way from Lake Champlain in the United States north to the Saint Lawrence River northeast of Montreal at Sorel-Tracy, Quebec. Dramatically different from the mountainous terrain to the south, the river valley is a vast plain with extensive farmlands. The Richelieu River itself is very popular for both U.S. and Canadian recreational boaters, providing a connection that can bring boaters all the way from the outlet of the Saint Lawrence River to New York Harbor. A number of old fortifications existed dating back to the 17th century were built to prevent the Iroquois from using the river as a way to attack the French settlers in the area. Fort Richelieu is at the mouth of the Richelieu River. Fort St. Louis (now Fort Chambly) at Chambly, Fort Sainte-Thérèse, and Fort Saint-Jean at Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, are on the way. Fort St. Anne Isle La Motte, Vermont in Lake Champlain is near its source. The forts were built in order to protect travellers on the river from the
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Peace River Regional District, British Columbia

    Peace River Regional District, British Columbia

    The Peace River Regional District is a regional district in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The regional district comprises seven municipalities and four electoral areas. Its member municipalities are the cities of Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, the district municipalities of Tumbler Ridge, Chetwynd, Taylor, and Hudson's Hope, and the village of Pouce Coupe. Peace River also has four regional district electoral areas: B, C, D and E, six Indian reserves, and one Indian settlement. The district's administrative centre is in Dawson Creek. The regional district is characterized by rolling hills with grain and cattle farms. About 40% of the province's Agricultural Land Reserve is situated within the regional district. The Peace River flows west-to-east through the middle of the district. Its total land area is 119,200.1 km² (46,023.42 sq mi), the largest regional district in British Columbia in area. (The Stikine Region is larger, but is not technically a regional district.) The total population reported in the 2006 census was 58,264 with 24,019 private dwellings, up from 55,080 people in 2001. Westward expansion during the With 18th and 19th centuries pushed First Nation groups
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, British Columbia

    Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, British Columbia

    The Squamish-Lillooet Regional District is a quasi-municipal administrative area in British Columbia, Canada. It stretches from Britannia Beach in the south to Pavilion in the north. Lillooet, Pemberton, Whistler and Squamish are the four municipalities in the regional district. Its administrative offices are in the Village of Pemberton, although the district municipalities of Squamish, Whistler, and Lillooet are all larger population centres. The district covers 16,353.68 km² (6,314.19 sq mi) of land area. The southern end of the regional district comprises the northern part of the traditional territory of the Skwxwu7mesh people, and the northern half constitutes the traditional homeland of the St'at'imc people. Electoral Area A comprises the basin of the Bridge River valley above its confluence with the Yalakom River at Moha. The only towns in the area are Bralorne, Gold Bridge and Brexton. Other communities or localities include Gun Lake, Tyaughton Lake and Gun Creek Road. Population as of 2006 Canadian Census: 207. Electoral Area B comprises the basin of the Bridge River below its confluence with the Yalakom River at Moha, the valley of Seton and Anderson Lakes (excepting
    9.00
    4 votes
    17
    Kawartha Lakes

    Kawartha Lakes

    The city of Kawartha Lakes (2011 population 73,214) is a unitary municipality in Central Ontario, Canada. Although called a city, Kawartha Lakes is the size of a typical Ontarian county and is mostly rural. The main population centres are Bobcaygeon, Fenelon Falls, Lindsay, Omemee and Woodville. The city's name comes from the name of the Kawartha lakes. The term Kawartha is an anglicization of the word Ka-wa-tha (from Ka-wa-tae-gum-maug or Gaa-waategamaag, meaning), a word coined in 1895 by aboriginal Martha Whetung of the Curve Lake First Nations. The word meant "land of reflections" in the Anishinaabe language, according to Whetung. The word was subsequently changed by tourism promoters to Kawartha, meaning "bright waters and happy lands." Prior to its restructuring as a city, the area was known as Victoria County. The city was created in 2001, during the ruling provincial Progressive Conservative party's "Common Sense Revolution". Through provincial legislation, the former Victoria County and its constituent municipalities were amalgamated into one entity named the City of Kawartha Lakes. This act was implemented by the The Victoria County Restructuring Commission, led by
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Lanark County

    Lanark County

    Lanark County is a county located in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its county seat is Perth, which was first settled in 1816. Most European settlement of the county began in 1816, when Drummond, Beckwith and Bathurst townships were named and initially surveyed. The first farm north of the Rideau was cleared and settled somewhat earlier, in 1790. The county took its name from the town of Lanark in Scotland. Nearly all the townships were named after British public and military figures from the era of early settlement. According to Statistics Canada, the county has a total area of 3,033.82 square kilometres (1,171.36 sq mi). It is located in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Eastern Ontario. Geologically, the northern part of the county is in the Canadian Shield and the southern part is in the Great Lakes Basin. The county has two large rivers, the Mississippi and Rideau, each of which empty into the Ottawa River. The landscape is varied including Canadian Shield (with gneiss, granite and marble) as well as limestone plains, with a variety of tills, sands and clays left from the melting of glaciers in the last ice age. At the time of settlement, most of the county was
    7.60
    5 votes
    19
    Division No. 10, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 10, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 10, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the east-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is Wynyard. According to the 2006 census, 17,680 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 12,220.29 km² (4,718.28 sq mi). The five largest ancestries in Division No. 10 are Ukrainian (25.8%), German (20.7%), English (20.2%), Scandinavian (17.2%), Scottish (12.8%). Source: Statistics Canada 2002 2001 Community Profiles.
    6.50
    6 votes
    20
    Essex County

    Essex County

    Essex County is the southern-most county and census division in Canada located in Southwestern Ontario. The administrative seat is the Town of Essex. Essex County has a population of 177,891, and the census division including Windsor has a population of 388,782 as of the Canada 2011 Census. The current municipalities in Essex County are: Towns: Township: The City of Windsor is governed as a separated municipality but is part of the Essex Census division and many services are joint "city/county". Essex County is largely composed of clay-based soils, with sandy soils along the beaches and shores. For the most part, Essex County is flat farmland, with some woodlots. There is a small 30–50 foot (10–15 m) high ridge near Kingsville and Leamington in the southern part of the county, and large marshland near Hillman Marsh Conservation Area, and Point Pelee National park. The most built-up part of the county is the city of Windsor, Ontario. Excluding Windsor (which is a Separated Municipality), Leamington is the most-urbanized part of the county. Essex County hosts some of the warmest summer weather in Canada, noting that it is the most southern part of Canada. The area always has four
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    Les Moulins Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Moulins is a regional county municipality in the Lanaudière region of Quebec, Canada. It is located immediately north of Laval on the north shore of the Rivière des Mille-Îles, and comprises the municipalities of Terrebonne and Mascouche. Historic communities in the region, which are now arrondissements of the two existing cities, include Lachenaie and La Plaine. The population according to the Canada 2011 Census is 148,813
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Victoria County

    Victoria County

    Victoria County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The shire town and largest municipality is the village of Baddeck. Named after Queen Victoria, it was established by statute in 1851. Cape Breton County was divided into two counties in that year, with Victoria County being subdivided at that time. There are several distinctive geographic regions in Victoria county: north of Smokey Mountain, south of Smokey Mountain, St. Ann's Bay, Boularderie Island, Baddeck, Middle River and the Washabuck Peninsula. The county is 2,768 square kilometers in size, 80% of which is covered by forest and the remainder largely by water. The county's population has slowly declined over the last ten years and has also aged, with all age groups under the age of 65 experiencing net out-migration. Half of the county's labor force does not have a high school diploma, and only 5% have college educations. Indian Reserves in Victoria County include Wagmatcook 1. For a list of communities in Victoria County, see List of communities. 71% of the workforce is employed in the services sector. An additional 18% are employed in the primary resources industry, a category that includes both forestry
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Division No. 10, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 10, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Census Division No. 10 is composed of the area of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, called Labrador outside of Nunatsiavut. It has a land area of 269,073.3 km² (103,889.78 sq mi) and, as of the 2001 census, has a population of 27,864. Its two major population centres are the towns of Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Labrador City.
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Division No. 9, Alberta

    Division No. 9, Alberta

    Division No. 9 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the southwest corner of central Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Rocky Mountain House. The boundaries of the division are coextensive with the outer boundaries of Clearwater County. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 9. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 9 had a population of 21,290 living in 7,962 of its 8,935 total dwellings, a 4.6% change from its 2006 population of 20,351. With a land area of 18,922 km (7,306 sq mi), it had a population density of 1.1 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 9 had a population of 20,351 living in 8,151 dwellings, a 4.0% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 18,921.38 km (7,305.59 sq mi) and a population density of 1.1 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Roussillon Regional County Municipality

    Roussillon Regional County Municipality

    Roussillon is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Saint-Constant, Quebec. The region's population was 162,187 as of the Canada 2011 Census. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    La Mitis Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Mitis Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Mitis is a regional county municipality in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region in eastern Quebec, Canada on the Gaspé peninsula. Its seat is in Mont-Joli which is on the Saint Lawrence River. La Mitis is named for the Mitis River (The Mitis) which has its source in the region (at Lac Inférieur) and flows through the central part of the region before emptying into the St. Lawrence.
    6.80
    5 votes
    27
    Division No. 7, Alberta

    Division No. 7, Alberta

    Division No. 7 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the southeast corner of central Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Wainwright. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 7. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 7 had a population of 40,232 living in 15,325 of its 17,303 total dwellings, a 0.8% change from its 2006 population of 39,909. With a land area of 19,210 km (7,420 sq mi), it had a population density of 2.1 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 7 had a population of 39,909 living in 16,606 dwellings, a 1.2% decrease from 2001. The census division has a land area of 19,209.51 km (7,416.83 sq mi) and a population density of 2.1 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    La Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality

    La Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality

    La Haute-Yamaska (meaning The Upper Yamaska) is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Granby. It is named for its position at the height of the Yamaska River which cuts through its southern part and rises at Brome Lake located in neighbouring Brome-Missisquoi Regional County Municipality. On January 1, 2010, the city of Bromont moved from La Haute-Yamaska to Brome-Missisquoi. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Le Haut-Saint-Laurent Regional County Municipality

    Le Haut-Saint-Laurent Regional County Municipality

    Le Haut-Saint-Laurent (Upper Saint Lawrence) is a regional county municipality in southwestern Quebec, Canada in the Montérégie region. Its seat is in Huntingdon and it is named for the Saint Lawrence River which forms its western and northwestern boundary. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    Powell River Regional District, British Columbia

    Powell River Regional District, British Columbia

    The Powell River Regional District is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia. It includes the City of Powell River and a number of unincorporated areas. The District encompasses a land area of 5,092.06 km² (1,966.06 sq mi). The District is bounded by the mainland portion of the Strathcona Regional District to the north, and to the east by the Squamish-Lillooet and Sunshine Coast Regional Districts. On the mainland, this includes the area southeast of Powell River to the ferry terminal at Saltery Bay and northwest of Powell River to Desolation Sound and the terminus of Highway 101 in Lund. Lasqueti Island and Texada Island, along with the southernmost Discovery Islands (including Hernando and Savary), are included as are the largely uninhabited lands to the north and west of this area. As of the 2006 census, 19,599 people lived in the District. Its head offices are located in Powell River. The District is governed by a board of seven directors representing the municipality, along with five others representing the unincorporated areas.
    5.83
    6 votes
    31
    Prince Edward County, Ontario

    Prince Edward County, Ontario

    Prince Edward County (2011 census population 25,258) is a single-tier municipality and a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. Long settled by indigenous peoples, the county has significant archeological sites. These include the LeVescounte Mounds of the Point Peninsula Complex people, built about 2000 years ago. The settlement for European-Canadians was facilitated when the county was created by Upper Canada's founding lieutenant-governor John Graves Simcoe on July 16, 1792. It was named after Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent (the fourth son of King George III) who was commander-in-chief of British North America. Shortly after the American Revolution, the Crown made land grants to some of the earliest United Empire Loyalists to encourage their settlements in Ontario and provide compensation for property lost in the Thirteen Colonies. The county was originally composed of three townships named in honour of three of George III's daughters. For many years Prince Edward County has been closely associated with the wholly mainland Hastings County. Its longtime militia unit has been The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment (locally known as the Hasty Ps), whose most
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Argenteuil Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Argenteuil Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Argenteuil is a regional county municipality located in the Laurentides region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Lachute. In 1682, Charles-Joseph d'Ailleboust was granted by Louis de Buade de Frontenac, Governor General of New France, a domain of 186 square kilometres (72 sq mi) of land. This fiefdom was bounded by the Ottawa River to the south, a line through the center of the hamlet of Carillon in the west and Clear Lake (Lac Clair) to the north. Since Ailleboust already owned a house in Argenteuil near Paris, he called his domain Argenteuil Seigneury. In 1697, the Lord of Ailleboust and his wife Catherine Le Gardeur sold their seigneury to their son Pierre d'Ailleboust d'Argenteuil. Subsequently over the years, the fiefdom was held by Pierre-Louis Panet, and then by Major Murray. After the conquest of New France by the British in 1759 during the Seven Years' War, the British implemented their laws, but maintained certain French seigneurial rights. In 1796, Jedediah Lane, from Jericho, Vermont, bought from Major Murray several thousand acres of land on both sides of the North River (Rivière du Nord), where Lachute is today. In 1809, Thomas Barron bought the land of the territory
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Division No. 19, Alberta

    Division No. 19, Alberta

    Division No. 19 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the west-central portion of northern Alberta and surrounds the City of Grande Prairie. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 19. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 19 had a population of 109,712 living in 41,399 of its 44,851 total dwellings, an 11.1% change from its 2006 population of 98,712. With a land area of 20,520 km (7,920 sq mi), it had a population density of 5.3 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 19 had a population of 98,712 living in 37,685 dwellings, a 14.4% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 20,518.15 km (7,922.10 sq mi) and a population density of 4.8 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34

    Rivière-du-Loup Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Rivière-du-Loup is a regional county municipality in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region of Quebec, Canada. Its most important city is Rivière-du-Loup, which contains more than half of the population. Major industries include pulp and paper, other wood products, peat products, mineral products and textiles. The name comes from the French, "River of the Wolf".
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    Les Jardins-de-Napierville Regional County Municipality

    Les Jardins-de-Napierville Regional County Municipality

    Les Jardins-de-Napierville (English: The Gardens of Napierville) is a regional county municipality (French: Municipalité régionale de comté (MRC)) in southwestern Quebec, Canada in the Montérégie region. Founded on January 1, 1982. Its seat is Napierville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    10.00
    2 votes
    37
    Division No. 14, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 14, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 14, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the east-northeastern part of the province, bordering Manitoba. The most populous community in this division is the city of Melfort. Other important communities are the towns of Nipawin and Tisdale. According to the 2006 census, 36,515 people lived in this division. The land area is 33,817.69 km² (13,057.08 sq mi).
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    Perth County

    Perth County

    Perth County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario, and is located in Southwestern Ontario, 100 kilometres (62 mi) west of Toronto. The county seat is at Stratford. It encompasses 548,179 acres (856.53 sq mi; 2,218.40 km), 90% of which is classified as prime agricultural land (Classes 1, 2, and 3). According to the 2011 census, the population of Perth County was 75,112. The county includes: The City of Stratford and Town of St. Marys are part of the census division, but are separated from the county for municipal purposes. Perth County, area 524,571 acres (820 sq mi; 2,123 km), was mainly settled through the agency of the Canada Company which opened a road from the site of Stratford to Goderich. It was officially created in January 1850 out of the former Huron and Wellington Districts and had 11 original townships: Over time, another five additional towns were incorporated as urban municipalities: Stratford, St. Marys, Mitchell, Listowel and Milverton. On January 1, 1998, the county was restructured by reducing fourteen municipalities to four. Only the City of Stratford and the Town of St. Marys were unaffected. Historic populations: The City of
    6.40
    5 votes
    39
    Division No. 18, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 18, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 18, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It occupies the northern portion of Saskatchewan, and it is the largest division in the province at 270,067.78 km² (104,273.75 sq mi), almost 46 percent of the entire area of the province. The most populous community in this division is the town of La Ronge, at its centre. Other population centres include the town of Creighton and its adjacent interprovincial city of Flin Flon, at the Manitoba border on the east. According to the 2006 census, 33,919 people lived in this division.
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Kings County, Prince Edward Island

    Kings County, Prince Edward Island

    Kings County (2011 population 23,108) is located in eastern Prince Edward Island, Canada. It is the province's smallest, most rural and least-populated county. Kings County is also least dependent upon the agriculture industry compared with the other two counties, while being more heavily dependent on the fishery and forest industry. Comparatively large parts of the county are still forested and it hosts the province's largest sawmill. The only heavy industry, aside from forestry and industrial farming, is a small shipyard, although secondary manufacturing has been established in recent years. The county was named by Capt. Samuel Holland in 1765 for King George III (1738-1820). As such, Kings County's shire town is Georgetown. The largest town is Montague. In 2008, Kings County was the region with the second highest self-reported obesity rate in Canada.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Bellechasse Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Bellechasse Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Bellechasse Regional County Municipality is a regional county municipality in the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec. The county seat is Saint-Lazare-de-Bellechasse. Saint-Lazare was originally chosen as the county seat because of its central location. Other municipalities, such as Saint-Anselme, Sainte-Claire, Saint-Damien originally wanted to be the county seat because of their larger population. The region belongs to the Lévis—Bellechasse federal electoral district. Principal Highways in Bellechasse: Secondary Highways: (Statistics Canada, 2001)
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Parry Sound District

    Parry Sound District

    Parry Sound District is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. Its seat is Parry Sound. Its boundaries are Muskoka to the south, the Sudbury District, the French River and Lake Nipissing in the north, Nipissing District and North Bay in the north and east and parts of Algonquin Park in the northeast. In 2011, the population was 42,162. The land area is 9,322.80 square kilometres (3,600 sq mi); the population density was 4.5 per square kilometre (12 /sq mi). Although geographically in Southern Ontario, the Parry Sound District is the only census division in the southern part of the province which does not have an incorporated county, regional municipality or district municipality level of government, instead serving as a purely territorial division like the districts of Northern Ontario. In lieu of an upper tier of municipal administration, all government services in the district are provided either by the local municipalities or by the provincial government itself. Some communities which are not part of any incorporated municipality are served by local services boards. The district is also included in the service areas of FedNor and the Northern Ontario Heritage
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Stormont

    Stormont

    The United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry is an upper tier county and census division in the Canadian province of Ontario. The county seat is Cornwall. The City of Cornwall and the sovereign Mohawk Nation of Akwesasne are included in the census division, but are politically separated from Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry United Counties. The county borders with Quebec to the east and New York to the south; the only census division in Ontario to border both Quebec and the United States. The sovereign Mohawk Nation of Akwesasne is a territory partly within the county and straddling the border of both Quebec and New York. The area along the Saint Lawrence River had been settled by indigenous peoples for thousands of years. About 2,000 years ago, the Point Peninsula Complex people built earthen mounds, such as those at Serpent Mounds Park and Cameron's Point. They were gradually replaced about 1000-1300 CE by the Owasco people, who had migrated northward. They practiced more settled agriculture. These people are believed to have developed into the Iroquoian-speaking people, of which the St. Lawrence Iroquoians are identified as having settled along the river valley of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Victoria County, New Brunswick

    Victoria County, New Brunswick

    Victoria County (2011 population 19,921) is located in northwestern New Brunswick, Canada. Farming, especially of potatoes, is the major industry in the county. There are five incorporated municipalities within Victoria County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into seven parishes (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): There is one First Nations reserve in Victoria County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings):
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Regional District of North Okanagan, British Columbia

    Regional District of North Okanagan, British Columbia

    The Regional District of North Okanagan (RDNO) is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia, Canada. The Canada 2006 Census population was 77,301. The land area is 7,512.58 km² (2,900.62 sq mi). The regional district's head office is in the district municipality of Coldstream, although the largest population centre by far is its immediate neighbour, the city of Vernon. Cities District municipalities Village Regional district electoral areas Indian reserves NB These are excluded from governance by the regional district and have their own governments (the Spallumcheen Indian Band and the Okanagan Indian Band).
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Nicolet-Yamaska is a regional county municipality in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec, Canada. The county seat is Nicolet. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Division No. 13, Alberta

    Division No. 13, Alberta

    Division No. 13 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. The majority of the division is located in the north-central portion of central Alberta, while the northeast portion of the division is located within northern Alberta. The division's largest urban community is the Town of Whitecourt. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 13. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 13 had a population of 68,919 living in 26,830 of its 32,789 total dwellings, a 2.9% change from its 2006 population of 66,972. With a land area of 24,374 km (9,411 sq mi), it had a population density of 2.8 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 13 had a population of 66,972 living in 31,101 dwellings, a 4.7% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 24,373.37 km (9,410.61 sq mi) and a population density of 2.7 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Division No. 6, Alberta

    Division No. 6, Alberta

    Division No. 6 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. Surrounding the City of Calgary, the majority of the division comprises Alberta's Calgary Region, while the northern portion of the division is located within central Alberta. The division also forms the southern segment of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor. Division No. 6 is the largest census division in Alberta according to population and also has the highest population density. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 6. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 6 had a population of 1,311,022 living in 500,103 of its 527,608 total dwellings, a 12.9% change from its 2006 population of 1,160,936. With a land area of 12,646 km (4,883 sq mi), it had a population density of 103.7 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 6 had a population of 1,160,936 living in 465,473 dwellings, a 13.7% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 12,645.35 km (4,882.40 sq mi) and a population density of 91.8 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut

    Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut

    The Kitikmeot Region of Nunavut in Canada is one of three census division in the territory as used by Statistics Canada. The borders of the region are identical to the Kitikmeot Region.
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    Rouyn-Noranda

    Rouyn-Noranda

    Rouyn-Noranda (2011 population 41,012) is a city on Osisko Lake in northwestern Quebec, Canada. The city of Rouyn-Noranda is coextensive with a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Quebec of the same name. Their geographical code is 86. The city of Rouyn (named for Jean-Baptiste Rouyn, a captain in the Royal-Roussillon regiment of Montcalm) appeared after copper was discovered in 1917. Noranda (a contraction of "North Canada") was created later around the Horne mine and foundry. Both were officially constituted as cities in 1926, then merged in 1986. Since 1966, Rouyn and Noranda constitute the capital of the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region. It is also the seat of public university UQAT since 1983. The population tends to increase or decrease dramatically depending on the economic situation. The city's population dropped by 5 per cent between the 1996 and 2001 census, before increasing slightly by 0.8 per cent for the 2006 census. This more closely parallels the demographic patterns of Northern Ontario than those of Quebec during this period. Rouyn-Noranda also has other cultural affiliations with Northern Ontario, being the only
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Division No. 1, Alberta

    Division No. 1, Alberta

    Division No. 1 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the southeast corner of southern Alberta and surrounds the City of Medicine Hat. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 1. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 1 had a population of 78,694 living in 31,724 of its 34,458 total dwellings, a 5.6% change from its 2006 population of 74,550. With a land area of 20,526 km (7,925 sq mi), it had a population density of 3.8 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 1 had a population of 74,550 living in 31,315 dwellings, a 10.6% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 20,526.14 km (7,925.19 sq mi) and a population density of 3.6 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    9.00
    2 votes
    54
    Division No. 3, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 3, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 3, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the south-southwestern part of the province, adjacent to the border with Montana, USA. The most populous community in this division is Assiniboia. According to the 2006 census, 13,133 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 18,553.99 km² (7,163.73 sq mi).
    9.00
    2 votes
    55
    Division No. 5, Alberta

    Division No. 5, Alberta

    Division No. 5 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the north-central portion of southern Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Strathmore. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 5. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 5 had a population of 53,263 living in 18,858 of its 21,075 total dwellings, a 4.2% change from its 2006 population of 51,104. With a land area of 16,775 km (6,477 sq mi), it had a population density of 3.2 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 5 had a population of 51,104 living in 19,205 dwellings, a 7.3% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 16,775.16 km (6,476.93 sq mi) and a population density of 3.0 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Elgin County

    Elgin County

    Elgin County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario with a current population of approximately 87,461. The county seat is St. Thomas. Elgin County consists of: The City of St. Thomas is geographically within and part of the county's census division, but is separated from county administration. Originally Elgin County was once part of Suffolk County. Elgin County was organized as a separate county in 1851 and named after Lord Elgin, governor-general of Canada. Elgin County has an area of 440,320 acres (688 sq mi; 1,782 km) Aldborough Township 75,197 acres (117 sq mi; 304 km). In the early days it had a forest of oak, chestnut and black walnut. It was first settled in 1804. Bayham Township 56,350 acres (88 sq mi; 228 km). Organized in 1810 and became part of Elgin County in 1851. It was named from Bayham Abbey in Kent, England. Dunwich Township 69,592 acres (109 sq mi; 282 km) First settled in 1803. During the War of 1812 only twelve families lived in the township. In 1817 a company of Selkirk's Highlander settled in the Township The Township is named after a town in Suffolk, England. Malahide Township 69,181 acres (108 sq mi; 280 km) Organized in 1810,
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    Regional Municipality of Halton

    Regional Municipality of Halton

    The Regional Municipality of Halton, or Halton Region, is a regional municipality of Ontario, Canada, located in Southern Ontario in the southwest part of the Greater Toronto Area ("GTA"). It comprises the city of Burlington and the towns of Oakville, Milton, and Halton Hills and is policed by the Halton Regional Police Service. The regional council's headquarters are located in Oakville. The Town of Oakville and the City of Burlington are largely urban, while the Towns of Milton and Halton Hills to the north are significantly more rural. Together with urbanization in the neighbouring Regional Municipality of Peel, the urban area of the GTA is contiguous all the way from the City of Hamilton to the City of Toronto, as is visible on satellite images of the GTA and the Golden Horseshoe. Halton has been ranked by Maclean's national crime ranking report as being the "safest place to live" in the Greater Toronto Area, and one of the top 5 in Canada. Halton Region experienced a growth rate of 17.1% between 2001 and 2006, and 14.2% between 2006 and 2011, giving it one of the highest growth rates in the country. Despite the unprecedented growth in residential development, agriculture and
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Sunbury County

    Sunbury County

    Sunbury County (2011 population 27,143) is located in central New Brunswick, Canada. A large military base (CFB Gagetown) is located in the western part of the county south of the town of Oromocto. The county also hosts forestry and mixed farming. Burton is the county shiretown. There are three incorporated municipalities within Sunbury County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): Much of the Village of Minto lies within Sunbury County, but since most of it is in Queens County, Statistics Canada considers it as part of Queens. Similarly, a small portion of the city of Fredericton lies within Sunbury County, but is counted as part of York. The county is subdivided into seven parishes (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): There is one First Nations reservation in Sunbury County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings):
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Albert County, New Brunswick

    Albert County, New Brunswick

    Albert County (2011 population 28,846) is located in southeastern New Brunswick, Canada on the Chignecto Bay of the Bay of Fundy. Prior to the abolition of county government in 1967, the county seat was Hopewell Cape. The county was established in 1845 from parts of Westmorland County and Saint John County, and named after Prince Albert. There are four incorporated municipalities within Albert County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into six parishes (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): Highways that run through Albert are as follows: Campgrounds/Information centres in Fundy National Park: also:
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Division No. 22, Manitoba

    Division No. 22, Manitoba

    Division No. 22, also informally known as Thompson-North Central, is a census division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The division had a population of 38,421 in the Canada 2006 Census. The economic base of the area is mining, forestry, manufacturing, commercial fishing, trapping and tourism. First Nations communities Community Profile: Census Division No. 22, Manitoba; Statistics Canada
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    Grey County

    Grey County

    Grey County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. The county seat is in Owen Sound. It is located in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Southwestern Ontario. Grey County is also a part of the Georgian Triangle. Grey County was created in 1852 with the first settlement in the vicinity of Collingwood or Meaford. Exploring parties arrived from York in 1825 by traveling from Holland Landing and down the Holland River into Lake Simcoe and Shanty Bay. From there they traveled by land to the Nottawasaga River into Georgian Bay and along the thickly wooded shore. In 1837 the village of Sydenham was surveyed by Charles Rankin, P.L.S. In 1856 it was incorporated as the Town of Owen Sound with an estimated population of 2,000. The county was formed in 1852 and was named in honor of Earl Grey. In 1861-1862 the first gravel roads were constructed into Owen Sound at a cost of $300,000. The four roads graveled were The Garafraxa Road running from Fergus to Owen Sound (now Highway 6); the Durham Road leading east and west from the village of Durham (now County Road 4); the Lake Shore Road from Collingwood to Owen Sound (now Highway 26) and the Toronto and
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Kamouraska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Kamouraska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Kamouraska is a regional county municipality in eastern Quebec, Canada. Regional County municipality seat is Saint-Pascal. The other main town is La Pocatière, Quebec. The area is an important research, development and education centre for agriculture. Factories in the region produce metal products and public transportation equipment. One of the people instrumental in settling and developing this area was Pascal Taché, an early seigneur. The name "Kamouraska" comes from an Algonquin word meaning "where rushes grow at the water's edge".
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Témiscouata Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Témiscouata Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Témiscouata is a regional county municipality in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region of Quebec, Canada. It is located southeast of Rivière-du-Loup, bordering New Brunswick, and is centred around Lake Témiscouata. Its seat is Témiscouata-sur-le-Lac. Major industries include forestry, agriculture and maple syrup products.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Digby County

    Digby County

    Digby County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Taking its name from the Township of Digby , which had been named in honour of Rear Admiral Robert Digby who dispatched HMS Atalanta to convey loyalists from New York City in the spring of 1783 to Conway, which became known as Digby, Digby County was established in 1837. Previously, from August 17, 1759, when Nova Scotia was first divided into counties, this area had been part of Annapolis County. In 1861, Digby County was divided into two districts: the District of Digby and the District of Clare. In addition to these 2 districts, the county contains the town of Digby and part of the Bear River Indian reserve. Also, there is Digby Neck leading into the Bay of Fundy to Long Island and Brier Island. See List of communities in Digby County, Nova Scotia Highways and numbered routes that run through the district, including external routes that start or finish at the district limits: The county's history is preserved at the Admiral Digby Museum as well as several community museums.
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    Division No. 4, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 4, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 4, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen Census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the southwest corner of the province, bordering Alberta and Montana. The most populous community in this division is Maple Creek. According to the 2006 census, 11,086 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 21,364.96 km² (8,249.06 sq mi). The following communities are located in this Census division: Towns Villages Hamlets Indian Reserves
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    Dufferin County

    Dufferin County

    Dufferin County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. The county seat is Orangeville, and the current Warden is Walter Kolodziechuk. The Current Chief Administrative Officer is Sonya Pritchard . Dufferin covers an area of 1,486.31 square kilometres (573.87 sq mi), and its population is 56,881 (2011). Dufferin was formed in 1881 from parts of the counties of Grey and Simcoe, on the north and east, and from the County of Wellington on the south and west. The county gets its name from the Marquess of Dufferin, who was Governor General of Canada between 1872-1878. Originally an agriculturally based economy, Dufferin's economy has diversified to include commercial and retail businesses, industries related to residential and commercial construction (building, supplies, aggregates, real estate) and manufacturing. A portion of Dufferin’s economy still depends on agriculture but tourism is becoming more important as the county takes a more positive role in attracting visitors. Dufferin County is the highest plateau immediately west of Georgian Bay, and as such forms the watershed between the four lakes: Huron, Erie, Ontario and Simcoe. Four rivers — Saugeen,
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Huron County

    Huron County

    Huron County is a census division and county of the province of Ontario, Canada. It is located on the southeast shore of its namesake, Lake Huron, in the southwest part of the province. The county seat is Goderich, also the county's largest settlement. The boundaries of the county's municipalities have been in effect since 2001, after the Progressive Conservative provincial government imposed mergers throughout the province. Historic populations:
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Kent County, New Brunswick

    Kent County, New Brunswick

    Kent County (2011 population 30,833) is located in east-central New Brunswick, Canada. The county features a unique blend of cultures including Mi'kmaq, Acadian and English Speaking Settlers. Some larger tourist attractions include: la dune de Bouctouche, Kouchibouguac National Park and Bonar Law Commons. There are five incorporated municipalities within Kent County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into twelve parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There are three First Nations reserves in Kent County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): Note - Richibucto 15, formerly Big Cove Band is now called Elsipogtog First Nation
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    La Rivière-du-Nord Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Rivière-du-Nord Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Rivière-du-Nord (The Rivière-du-Nord or The River of the North) is a regional county municipality in the Laurentides region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Saint-Jérôme. It is named for the river that runs through it, the Rivière du Nord. The population according to the Canada 2011 Census is 115,165.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Peterborough County

    Peterborough County

    Peterborough County is located in Southern Ontario, Canada. The county seat is Peterborough. The southern section of the county is mix of agriculture, urban and lakefront properties. The northern section of the county is mostly sparsely populated wilderness with numerous rivers and lakes, mostly within the recently expanded Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park. The County contains the Lang Pioneer Village, and the Kawarthas are a major tourist region. The county consists of eight municipalities, called "townships": First Nations reserves: The City of Peterborough is within the Peterborough County census division, but is separated from the county's administration. The county was founded as the District of Colborne in 1838, centred around Peterborough, which became the County of Peterborough in 1850. In 1862, the County was redivided into Haliburton County, Peterborough County, and Victoria County (now the City of Kawartha Lakes). The centre of the County was originally the courthouse, which is still considered an important historical site. The county was named in honor of Col. Peter Robinson, who in 1825 brought 2,000 settlers from Ireland. The route taken was by way of Port Hope,
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Portneuf Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Portneuf Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Portneuf is a regional county municipality in the Capitale-Nationale region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Cap-Santé. The Regional County Municipality of Portneuf was constituted as a regional administrative entity on November 25, 1981 by a Provincial decree creating the supralocal Regional County Municipality administration based on the (...) and therefore replacing the previously existing historic Portneuf County Corporation. While the new administrative boundary included most of the communities from its previous historic limits, a few municipalities were merged with bordering entities: St-Augustin-de-Desmaures, Sainte-Catherine-de-Portneuf, Notre-Dame-de-Montauban, Quebec. Those municipalities yet remained within the Electoral Federal Riding of Portneuf District (all but Notre-Dame-de-Mautauban). The administrative county seat remained in Cap-Santé while moving from the County Corporation building to a newly built one located further east on 185, Route 138 at a slight distance from the historic village of Cap-Santé.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Sunshine Coast Regional District, British Columbia

    Sunshine Coast Regional District, British Columbia

    The Sunshine Coast Regional District of British Columbia is located on the southern mainland coast, across Georgia Strait from Vancouver Island. It borders on the Powell River Regional District to the north, the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District to the east, and, across Howe Sound, the Metro Vancouver District to the south. The regional district offices are located in the District Municipality of Sechelt. The majority of the Sunshine Coast is sparsely populated. The Coast Mountains make up the inland area. Population is concentrated along the coast. Midway up the coast, beginning at the town of Sechelt, the coastal area forms a peninsula separated from the inland area by Sechelt Inlet. The 2001 census reported a total population of 25,599 persons living on a land area of 3,778.17 km² (1,458.76 sq mi). The Sunshine Coast is typically accessed via boat or plane; no roads connect the district with the rest of the province. From Vancouver, ferries run from Horseshoe Bay to Gibsons across Howe Sound. At the northern end of the peninsula, ferries run from Earl's Cove to Saltery Bay. (all population figures from 2006 Census) (Statistics Canada, 2006)
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Greater Vancouver Regional District

    Greater Vancouver Regional District

    Metro Vancouver is the brand name of the board of the inter-municipal administrative body known as the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD), a regional district in British Columbia, Canada. "Greater Vancouver Regional District" is the official name of the regional district and remains in common use. The Metro Vancouver board governs the affairs of the Greater Vancouver Regional District, which is charged with certain aspects of governance for the metropolitan area surrounding and including the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The Greater Vancouver Regional District was incorporated on June 29, 1967. Greater Vancouver as a region and name emerged when the newly born City of Vancouver expanded to become larger than the older New Westminster. The territory under Metro Vancouver's authority is essentially synonymous with what is usually meant by the colloquial term "Greater Vancouver", although wilderness and outlying rural regions within the regional district are not generally meant when the term "Greater Vancouver" is used. Statistics Canada defines the Vancouver CMA (Census Metropolitan Area) as having perfectly coterminal boundaries with the Greater Vancouver
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    Maria-Chapdelaine Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Maria-Chapdelaine Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Maria-Chapdelaine is a regional county municipality in the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is in Dolbeau-Mistassini. It runs from Lac Saint-Jean in the south to the deep interior of northern Quebec in the north. Highways in Maria-Chapdelaine include:
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Division No. 17, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 17, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 17, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the west-northwest part of the province, bordering Alberta. The most populous community in this division is the interprovincial city of Lloydminster. Another important population centre is the town of Meadow Lake. According to the 2006 census, 40,406 people lived in this division. Its land area covers 22,457.80 km² (8,671.00 sq mi).
    8.50
    2 votes
    77
    Division No. 19, Manitoba

    Division No. 19, Manitoba

    Division No. 19, also informally known as North East Manitoba, is a census division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The division had a population of 14,725 in 1996. The division had a population of 15,805 in the Canada 2001 Census.
    8.50
    2 votes
    78
    Division No. 5, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 5, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Census Division No. 5 is a Statistics Canada statistical division composed of the areas of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador called Humber Valley, Bay of Islands, and White Bay. It covers a land area of 10,365.63 km² (4,002.19 sq mi), and had a population of 40,466 as of the 2001 census.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Haldimand County

    Haldimand County

    Haldimand is a rural city-status single-tier municipality (but called a county) on the Niagara Peninsula in Southern Ontario, Canada, on the north shore of Lake Erie, and on the Grand River. Municipal offices are located in Cayuga. Haldimand's history has been closely associated with that of the neighbouring Norfolk County. Haldimand was first created as a county in 1800, from a portion of Norfolk. It was named after the governor of the Province of Quebec Sir Frederick Haldimand. In 1844 the land was surrendered by Six Nations to the Crown in an agreement that was signed by the vast majority of Chiefs in the Haldimand tract. The two counties were separate until 1974, when they were reunited as the Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk. In 2001, the counties were separated again, but the lower-tier municipalities from the former Haldimand-Norfolk were merged into two single-tier municipalities. Although they both retained the name "county" for historical reasons, each is governed as a single municipality without lower-tier governments. Haldimand was formed through the amalgamation of the former Towns of Haldimand and Dunnville, and the eastern half of the City of
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    La Haute-Côte-Nord Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Haute-Côte-Nord Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Haute-Côte-Nord is a regional county municipality in northeastern Quebec, Canada, in the Côte-Nord region. It is located on the Gulf of Saint Lawrence where the Saguenay River flows into it. The seat is Les Escoumins. The municipality has a land area of 11,611.15 square kilometres (4,483.09 sq mi) and a 2006 census population of 12,303 inhabitants. Its largest community is the city of Forestville. Except for Sacré-Coeur, which is located along the Saguenay River, all places and municipalities of the RCM are along Quebec Route 138 directly on the shores of the Saint Lawrence River. The unorganized territory of Lac-au-Brochet makes up some 83% of the interior part of the RCM.
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Leeds and Grenville United Counties

    Leeds and Grenville United Counties

    The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville are located Ontario, Canada, in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Eastern Ontario, and front on the Saint Lawrence River and the international boundary between Canada and the United States. The county seat is Brockville. It has a land area of 3,383.92 square kilometres (1,306.54 sq mi). The United Counties were formed by the administrative union of the historical counties of Leeds and Grenville in 1850. The city of Brockville and towns of Gananoque and Prescott are separated from the county administration, but remain part of the county for census purposes. Historic populations: Ethnic make-up: William Buell granted the land for construction of the Courthouse. It is set atop a hill rising from the Saint Lawrence River. A broad boulevard extends to the main street. The Brockville Courthouse, one of the oldest in Ontario, was erected in 1842. The original plan had been to build a courthouse in the township of Johnstown but the land there was too swampy for construction. Instead, the Courthouse was built in the township of Elizabethtown. The figure of Justice, a blind-folded woman holding the scales of justice, was carved by master
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Queens County, New Brunswick

    Queens County, New Brunswick

    Queens County (2011 population 11,086) is located in central New Brunswick, Canada. The county shire town is the village of Gagetown. The county's geography is dominated by the Saint John River and Grand Lake. Coal mining is a major industry in the Minto area. Forestry and mixed farming dominate the rest of the county. The CFB Gagetown military training area takes in a large portion of the western part of the county. There are four incorporated municipalities within Queens County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into ten parishes (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings):
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Acton Regional County Municipality

    Acton Regional County Municipality

    Acton Regional County Municipality is a regional county municipality located in the Montérégie region of Quebec. The seat is Acton Vale. Founded in 1982, the Acton Regional County Municipality is made up of eight smaller municipalities containing a little fewer than 16,000 people. The average population density is 26.5 per square kilometre. About half of the population is concentrated in the town of Acton Vale. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border: La Campagnarde Trail
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Brome-Missisquoi Regional County Municipality

    Brome-Missisquoi Regional County Municipality

    Brome-Missisquoi is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Cowansville. In Parliament it is covered by the Brome—Missisquoi federal electoral district. On January 1, 2010, the city of Bromont moved from La Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality to Brome-Missisquoi. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Cochrane District, Ontario

    Cochrane District, Ontario

    Cochrane District, Ontario is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1921 from parts of Timiskaming and Thunder Bay districts. In 2011, the population was 81,122. The land area of this district is 141,270.41 square kilometres (54,544.81 sq mi), making it slightly smaller than the US State of Michigan and the second largest district in Ontario after Kenora District. The district seat is Cochrane.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Le Bas-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    Le Bas-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    Pierre-De Saurel is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region in southwestern Quebec, Canada. Originally named Le Bas-Richelieu Regional County Municipality, the name change to Pierre-De Saurel took effect on January 1, 2009. Its seat is in Sorel-Tracy. It is located on the Richelieu River, downstream from La Vallée-du-Richelieu Regional County Municipality at the confluence of the Richelieu and Saint Lawrence River. The RCM is named after Pierre de Saurel, a captain and seigneur who rebuilt Fort Richelieu in 1647. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Manicouagan Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Manicouagan Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Manicouagan is a regional county municipality in the Côte-Nord region of Quebec, Canada. It is located on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River with its seat in Baie-Comeau. It was created in 1981, and named after the Manicouagan River. The Indian reserve of Pessamit is within the boundaries of the regional county but administratively not part of it.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Mirabel

    Mirabel

    Mirabel is a city in Quebec, Canada. It is an off-island suburb north-west of Montreal. Mirabel is also the name of a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Quebec, coextensive with the city of Mirabel. Its geographical code is 74. Prior to 2002, Mirabel was not only a city but also comprised the Mirabel Regional County Municipality. Mirabel's population was 41,957 as of the Canada 2011 Census. It is currently the fastest growing city in Canada, with a growth rate of 21.2% in the 2011 census. The city is home to Montréal-Mirabel International Airport. A recreation and tourist project, named Lac-Mirabel, will be located in Mirabel. It will be an investment of $350 million and will create some 3200 jobs. The city will be served by commuter trains of the Blainville-Saint-Jerome Line of the Agence métropolitaine de transport. Commuter trains to Montreal started to serve the Saint-Jérôme station on Monday January 8, 2007, with four trains in each direction each business day. However, the Mirabel train station has not yet opened, due to delays in rezoning agricultural land for use as a train station. Mirabel was formed through the
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Pontiac Regional County Municipality

    Pontiac Regional County Municipality

    Pontiac is a regional county municipality in the Outaouais region of Quebec, Canada. Campbell's Bay is the county seat. It should not be confused with the municipality of Pontiac, which is located in the neighbouring Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais Regional County Municipality. Population: 14,358 in the Canada 2011 Census, down 1.6% from 2006. Language (2006 census): English is the language most often spoken at home by 64.8% of the MRC Pontiac population, and French is the language most often spoken at home by 34.4%. 41.6% of the population knows only English, 6.6% knows only French, and 51.8% is bilingual. Pontiac RCM comprises 18 communities. Pontiac Tourism
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Renfrew County

    Renfrew County

    Renfrew is a county in the Canadian province of Ontario. In 2011, the population was 101,326 and county covered 7,440.81 square kilometres (2,872.91 sq mi), giving a population density of 13.6 /km (35 /sq mi). There are 17 official municipalities. The seat of county government is in Pembroke, a city that is politically independent of the county. In 2006, the county – along with Pembroke – was represented at the Canadian House of Commons as part of the riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke. Renfrew Country is known for its lakeside cottages and white-water rafting along the Ottawa River, and has more than 900 lakes. It is located in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Eastern Ontario. Renfrew County is also the largest county in terms of area in Ontario, ahead of Hastings County. The county seat, the city Pembroke, is politically independent. At Wilno, Ontario Canada's Kashubian community celebrates their heritage. The county is home to CFB Petawawa and gives its name to The Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Deux-Montagnes Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Deux-Montagnes Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Deux-Montagnes is a regional county municipality in the Laurentides region of Quebec, Canada. It is located immediately north of Laval on the north shore of the Rivière des Mille-Îles and on the north shore of the Lake of Two Mountains. Its seat is Saint-Eustache. The municipality has a land area of 243.39 km² and a Canada 2011 Census population of 95,670 residents. Its largest community is the city of Saint-Eustache.
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    L'Île-d'Orléans Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Île-d'Orléans Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Île-d'Orléans is a regional county municipality in central Quebec, Canada, in the Capitale-Nationale region. Its seat is Sainte-Famille. The population in the 2011 census was 6,711 persons. The RCM consists solely of the Île d'Orléans, an island in the Saint Lawrence River just east of Quebec City. It is the smallest RCM in Quebec in terms of land area (though not in total area including water). According to the Canada 2006 Census: Population trend:
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Arthabaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Arthabaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Arthabaska Regional County Municipality is a regional county municipality located in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec. Its seat is Victoriaville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Charlotte County, New Brunswick

    Charlotte County, New Brunswick

    Charlotte County (2011 population 26,549) is located in the southwestern portion of New Brunswick, Canada. In most of the county, fishing and aquaculture dominate the local economy, although the town of St. Andrews is a tourist mecca and St. Stephen is dominated by the Ganong chocolate factory. There are five incorporated municipalities within Charlotte County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into fifteen parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings):
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Memphrémagog Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Memphrémagog Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Memphrémagog is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada. After the signing of the Treaty of Paris on September 3, 1783, the American Revolutionary War ended with the establishment of the state of Vermont. The border of Upper Canada was then defined at approximately 45 degrees north latitude. The territory immediately adjacent to it became part of Quebec in 1848. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Northern Rockies Regional District, British Columbia

    Northern Rockies Regional District, British Columbia

    The Northern Rockies Regional Municipality, formerly the Northern Rockies Regional District, and before that the Fort Nelson-Liard Regional District, is a regional municipality in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The regional district offices are located in the town of Fort Nelson, which is the only municipality in the district. Fort Nelson and direct surrounding area account for the vast majority of the estimated 6431 residents living in the region. The Regional Board consists of six regional councilors and one regional leader, known as the mayor. The NRRM lies on the east slope of the Rocky Mountains, and comprises approximately 10% of the total area of the province of British Columbia, encompassing 85,151.45 square kilometres (32,877.16 sq mi). Its southern boundary is the 58th Parallel of latitude and the Alaska Highway divides the district from southeast-to-northwest. The Northern Rockies Regional Municipality is primarily made up of heavily forested areas and extremely mountainous terrain. The Northern Rockies Regional Municipality is the first of its kind in which an entire region is governed and headed by a single municipality. Until February 2009, the region was
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Drummond Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Drummond Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Drummond is a regional county municipality in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Drummondville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    Beauce-Sartigan Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Beauce-Sartigan Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Beauce-Sartigan is a regional county municipality in the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec, Canada. The county seat is Saint-Georges. The Chaudière River flows through it. It shares its eastern border with Maine, United States. The name of the RCM is linked to the historical region of which it is part, Beauce. Sartigan is a distortion of Mechatigan (or Msakkikhan), the name given to the Chaudière River by the native Abenakis. Route 108 Route 173 Route 204 Route 269 Route 271 Route 275 (Statistics Canada, 2006)
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    La Vallée-de-l'Or Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-de-l'Or Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-de-l'Or (The Golden Valley) is a regional county municipality in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region in northwestern Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Val-d'Or. It is named for its gold deposits in the Harricana River and Bell River valleys. Before October 11, 2003, it was known simply as Vallée-de-l'Or Regional County Municipality.
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Les Sources Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Sources Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Sources is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is the city of Asbestos. Before April 22, 2006 it was known as Asbestos regional county municipality, and before August 1990 it was known as L'Or-Blanc regional county municipality (French: white gold). The Asbestos Strike, a critical part of Quebec's labour history, occurred in the region. (Statistics Canada, 2001) Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Papineau Regional County Municipality

    Papineau Regional County Municipality

    Papineau is a regional county municipality in the Outaouais region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Papineauville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Richmond County

    Richmond County

    Richmond County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Named in honour of Sir Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, who was Governor General of British North America 1818-1819, Richmond County was created in 1835. Richmond County comprises that territory known as the Southern District which was established in 1824 at the time of the dividing of Cape Breton Island into three districts. The boundaries of the Southern District were defined at the time of its establishment. Those same boundaries were determined to be the boundaries of Richmond County by statute in 1847. The shire town of Richmond Country is Arichat, located on Isle Madame. Indian Reserves in Richmond County include Chapel Island 5. For a list of communities in Richmond County, see List of communities. Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including external routes that start or finish at the county limits:
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Témiscamingue Regional County Municipality

    Témiscamingue Regional County Municipality

    Témiscamingue is a regional county municipality in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of western Quebec, Canada. The county seat is Ville-Marie. Though Témiscamingue borders Pontiac Regional County Municipality to the south, it is not possible to travel between the two within Quebec without taking a major detour north towards Quebec Route 117. The shorter route is to cross into Ontario at Notre-Dame-du-Nord or Témiscaming and travel south on Highway 11, then east on Highway 17, before crossing back at Fort-Coulonge.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Thompson-Nicola Regional District, British Columbia

    Thompson-Nicola Regional District, British Columbia

    The Thompson-Nicola Regional District is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The Canada 2006 Census population was 122,286 and the area covers 45,279 square kilometres. The administrative offices are in the main population centre of Kamloops, which accounts for 75 percent of the regional district's population. The only other city is Merritt; however, there are locally important communities such as the District Municipality of Logan Lake, and the Villages of Chase, Ashcroft, Cache Creek, Clinton and Lytton. The region is named indirectly for the Thompson River by way of the traditional regional names of "the Thompson Country" and "the Nicola Country"; the Nicola Country was named for Chief Nicola and was originally "Nicola's Country", where he held sway; he is also the namesake of that river. The area is governed by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District which operates over 115 services including the region's libraries, solid waste management and recycling, emergency and development services, plus a film commission.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Yukon

    Yukon

    Yukon /ˈjuːkɒn/ is the westernmost and smallest of Canada's three federal territories. The territory was created from the rump of the Hudson's Bay Company's North-Western Territory in 1898. Receiving royal assent on March 27, 2002, the federal government modernized the Yukon Act to confirm "Yukon", rather than "Yukon Territory", as the current usage standard. Though officially bilingual (English and French), the Yukon Government also recognizes First Nations languages. At 5,959 m (19,551 ft), Yukon's Mount Logan, in Kluane National Park and Reserve, is the highest mountain in Canada and the second-highest of North America (after Denali in the U.S. state of Alaska). The territory's climate is Arctic in the north (north of Old Crow), subarctic in the central region, between north of Whitehorse and Old Crow, and has a humid continental climate in the far south, south of Whitehorse and in areas close to the BC border. It was named after the Yukon River. The word Yukon means "Great River" in Gwich’in. The territory is the approximate shape of a right triangle, bordering the U.S. state of Alaska to the west for 1,210 km (752 mi) mostly along longitude 141° W, the Northwest Territories to
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Division No. 3, Alberta

    Division No. 3, Alberta

    Division No. 3 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the southwest corner of southern Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Claresholm. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 3. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 3 had a population of 38,566 living in 13,185 of its 14,764 total dwellings, a 1.9% change from its 2006 population of 37,846. With a land area of 13,866 km² (5,354 sq mi), it had a population density of 2.8 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 3 had a population of 37,846 living in 14,120 dwellings, a 0.7% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 13,866.22 km² (5,353.78 sq mi) and a population density of 2.7 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Lambton County

    Lambton County

    Lambton County is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. The county is located in Southwestern Ontario. It is bordered on the north by Lake Huron, which flows into the St. Clair River, the county's western border and part of the Canada-United States border. To the south is Lake Saint Clair and Chatham-Kent, another county in Ontario. Lambton County's eastern border follows the Ausable River north until it reaches Lake Huron at the beach community of Grand Bend. The county seat is in the Town of Plympton-Wyoming. Lambton County started as a part of the District of Hesse. The district of Hesse included British territories west of Long Point, (practically all of western Ontario). The district was latter divided and renamed using English district names (Essex, Suffolk, Kent, etc.). Lambton was part of Kent county. In 1849 districts were abolished and the County of Lambton was formed. Lambton and Kent first shared the capital city of Sandwich (since renamed as Windsor, Ontario). In 1852 the partnership was dissolved and Lambton become a full county. It is named in honour of the Earl of Durham who lived in Lambton Castle. The largest city in Lambton County is Sarnia,
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Pictou County

    Pictou County

    Pictou County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. It was established in 1835, and was formerly a part of Halifax County from 1759 to 1835. It had a population of 46,513 people in 2006, which represents a decline of 6.3 percent from 1991. It is the sixth most populous county in Nova Scotia. The origin of the name "Pictou" is obscure. Possible Mi'kmaq derivations include "Piktook" meaning an explosion of gas, and "Bucto" meaning fire, possibly related to the coal fields in the area. It might also be a corruption of Poictou, an old province in France. Nicolas Denys named the harbour La rivière de Pictou in the 1660s. Pictou was a receiving point for many Scottish immigrants moving to a new home in northern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island following the Highland Clearances of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Consequently, the town's slogan is "The Birthplace of New Scotland"; the first wave of immigrants is acknowledged to have arrived on September 15, 1773, on the Hector. Pictou County includes the towns of New Glasgow, Stellarton, Pictou, Westville and Trenton. Pictou County is wholly within the federal electoral district of Central Nova. The county has been
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Saint John County, New Brunswick

    Saint John County, New Brunswick

    St. John County (2011 population 76,550) is located in southern New Brunswick, Canada. The city of Saint John dominates the county. In the rest of the county, tourists flock to see the many scenic views on the Bay of Fundy. There are two incorporated municipalities within Saint John County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into three parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings):
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Simcoe County

    Simcoe County

    Simcoe County is located in central portion of Southern Ontario, Canada. The County is situated just north of the Greater Toronto Area stretching from the shores of Lake Simcoe in the east to Georgian Bay in the west. Simcoe County forms part of the Greater Golden Horseshoe area, a densely populated and industrialized region centred around the Greater Toronto Area. The land area of the county is 4,859.16 square kilometres (1,876.13 sq mi). The elevated Niagara Escarpment runs through sections of the western part of the county and the Minesing Wetlands, a Ramsar Convention Wetland Of International Importance, is located in the central area of the County. The county administrative centre is located in Midhurst, outside of Barrie. Although not politically recognized, Simcoe County is informally split into two subregions, “South Simcoe” and “North Simcoe”. The dividing line between these two areas is Simcoe County Road 90 (Mill St.). South Simcoe municipalities are situated at the northern boundary of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and therefore generally have a closer socio-economic association with the GTA. South Simcoe is also within the Toronto commuter-belt as it is home to a
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Toronto

    Toronto

    Toronto (/tɵˈrɒntoʊ/, colloquially /ˈtrɒnoʊ/) is the largest city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located in Southern Ontario on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. A relatively modern city, Toronto's history dates back to the late 18th century, when its land was first purchased by the British monarchy from the Mississaugas of the New Credit. The settlement was later established as the Town of York and proclaimed as the new capital of Upper Canada by its lieutenant-governor, John Graves Simcoe. In 1834, York was incorporated as a city and renamed to its present name. The city was ransacked in the Battle of York during the War of 1812 and damaged in two great fires in 1849 and in 1904. Since its incorporation, Toronto has repeatedly expanded its borders through amalgamation with surrounding municipalities, most recently in 1998. The city has 2.6 million residents, according to the 2011 Census. It is currently the fifth most populous city in North America. The census metropolitan area (CMA) had a population of 5,583,064, and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) had a population of 6,054,191 in the 2011 Census. Toronto is at the heart of the Greater Toronto Area,
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District, British Columbia

    Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District, British Columbia

    The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District (2006 population 30,664) of British Columbia is located on west central Vancouver Island. Adjacent regional districts it shares borders with are the Strathcona and Comox Valley Regional Districts to the north, and the Nanaimo and Cowichan Valley Regional Districts to the east. The regional district offices are located in Port Alberni. NB Indian Reserves are not part of municipal or regional district governance and are outside the regional district's jurisdiction, and also counted separately in the census figures. Population figures here are from the 2006 census: Highways that run through the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District:
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Colchester County

    Colchester County

    Colchester County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The appellation Colchester was applied in 1780 to the district previously called "Cobequid," and was derived from the town of Colchester in Essex. The old name Cobequid was derived from the Mi'kmaq word "Wagobagitk" meaning "the bay runs far up", in reference to the area surrounding the easternmost inlet of the Minas Basin, a body of water called Cobequid Bay. The District of Colchester, which was at first part of Halifax County, was established as a county in its own right in 1835. In 1838 a distinct line of division between Cumberland County and Colchester County was established. Two years later, in 1840, the Township of Parrsboro was divided and part of it annexed to Colchester County. In 1871, the boundaries between the Counties of Hants and Colchester and between the Counties of Halifax and Colchester were established. In 1880 the boundary between the Counties of Halifax and Colchester was revised. Eventually in 1897 a portion of the boundary between the Counties of Colchester and Cumberland was fixed and defined. The question of the boundary between Colchester and Cumberland Counties was the subject of a
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    D'Autray Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    D'Autray Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    D'Autray is a regional county municipality in the Lanaudière region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Berthierville. The municipality has a land area of 1,247.55 km² and a Canada 2011 Census population of 41,650 inhabitants. Its largest community is the city of Lavaltrie.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Division No. 1, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 1, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 1, Newfoundland and Labrador is a census division covering the entire Avalon Peninsula including the Isthmus of Avalon of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Like all census divisions in Newfoundland and Labrador, but unlike the census divisions of some other provinces, the division exists only as a statistical division for census data, and is not a political entity. The area has the largest population of the province, totaling 262,410 in 2011. The total land area is 9,218.54 square kilometres. The coast of the Avalon Peninsula is inundated by four main bays and a number of smaller bays. The four main bays are; Trinity Bay, Conception Bay, St. Mary's Bay and Placentia Bay. The largest bay would be Placentia Bay. The capital St. John's, of the province is located in this division along with the second largest of the three cities of the province, Mount Pearl. The majority of the towns and villages are located along the coast in much of the four main bays as mentioned. Communities include: Admirals Beach, Aquaforte, Arnold's Cove, Avondale, Bauline, Bay Bulls, Bay Roberts, Bay de Verde, Bay Roberts, Biscay Bay, Bishop's Cove, Branch, Brigus, Bryant's Cove,
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Division No. 13, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 13, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 13, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the western part of the province, bordering Alberta. The most populous community in this division is Kindersley. According to the 2006 census, 22,342 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 17,255.30 km² (6,662.31 sq mi).
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Hants County

    Hants County

    Hants County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia which was the home of Henry Alline, Thomas Chandler Haliburton, Alden Nowlan and Noel Doiron. The county of Hants was created June 17, 1781, and consisted of the townships of Windsor, Falmouth and Newport. Originally getting its name from the County of Southamptonshire in England, now known as Hampshire, and abbreviated to Hants, the County was established out of part of what had been Kings County. Subsequently in 1861, Hants County was divided into two Districts called East Hants and West Hants. The Mi'kmaq are the aboriginal people who lived on these lands for centuries. In the course of their historical relationship with the Acadian people, many Mi'kmaq became Catholic and therefore played an active role in the Acadian resistance to the Protestant British annexation of Hants County. They were clearly supporters of Abbe LeLoutre's work in protecting Acadian and Mi'kmaq and ultimately Catholic interests in the region. Within Hants County, they fought in the Battle at St. Croix on the St. Croix River. There is a long history of missionary work in Hants County, such as the work of Silas Tertius Rand's work on a reserve
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    York County

    York County

    York County (2011 population 97,238) is located in west-central New Brunswick, Canada. The county contains the provincial capital, Fredericton. Outside the city, farming and forestry are two major industries in the county, which is bisected by the Saint John River. The Southwest Miramichi River flows through the northern section of the county. York County was established in 1785, named after the second son of King George III, Prince Frederick-Augustus (1763-1827), who was made Duke of York in 1784. By 1831, the top half became so full with settlers, due to the rich soil in the region, that it was split off to become Carleton County. There are nine incorporated municipalities within York County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into fourteen parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There are three First Nations reserves in York County (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings):
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Division No. 8, Alberta

    Division No. 8, Alberta

    Division No. 8 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the south-central portion of central Alberta and surrounds the City of Red Deer. The division forms the central segment of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor. Division No. 8 is the smallest census division in Alberta according to area. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 8. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 8 had a population of 189,243 living in 72,774 of its 80,324 total dwellings, a 7.9% change from its 2006 population of 175,337. With a land area of 9,909 km (3,826 sq mi), it had a population density of 19.1 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 8 had a population of 175,337 living in 71,425 dwellings, a 14.6% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 9,909.31 km (3,826.01 sq mi) and a population density of 17.7 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Norfolk County

    Norfolk County

    Norfolk County ( /ˈnɔrfoʊk/) is a rural city-status single-tier municipality on the north shore of Lake Erie in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The county seat and largest community is Simcoe. The population in 2011 was 63,175. Surrounding its many small communities is some of the most fertile land in Ontario. With a mild climate and lengthy growing season, the region has long been the centre of the Ontario tobacco belt. However, many farmers have begun the process of diversifying their crop selections to include lavender, ginseng, hazelnuts, and wolfberries as tobacco consumption continues to decrease. Dennis' Horseradish is considered to be one of the longest lasting non-tobacco farming businesses in Norfolk County; currently being operated by the Jason Ryder family and operating five minutes south of Delhi and five minutes east of Lynedoch. The area also has an active greenhouse industry. Despite this, farmers have asked governments to reduce the financial losses of moving away from profitable tobacco operations. A significant natural feature of Norfolk is Long Point, a 40 kilometre (25 mi) spit of land projecting into Lake Erie. It plays an important part in eastern North
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Antigonish County

    Antigonish County

    Antigonish County, Nova Scotia is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. It is located in northern Nova Scotia on the Northumberland Strait and its county seat is the town of Antigonish. The County of Sydney was created in 1784. Its boundaries were established by Governor and Council on December 16, 1785. When St. Mary's Township was established in 1818 it was partly in Sydney County and partly in Halifax County. In 1822 that part of St. Mary's Township which had been in Halifax County was annexed to the County of Sydney. In 1836 Sydney County was diminished in size when Guysborough County was established out of what had been part of it . In 1863 the name of the County of Sydney was changed to Antigonish County. The word Antigonish is of Mi'kmaq origin, possibly derived from Nalegitkoonecht meaning "where branches are torn off". It is said that there were bears in the area that broke down branches to get beech nuts. The town of Antigonish is home to Saint Francis Xavier University . Antigonish County is also home to Pomquet Village, a small Acadian village dating back to 1774. For a list of communities in Antigonish County, see List of communities Highways and numbered
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Avignon Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Avignon Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Avignon is a regional county municipality located in the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Nouvelle. Its largest city is Carleton-sur-Mer. It is on the Gaspé peninsula along the Baie des Chaleurs. Route 132 is the primary highway that runs through Avignon. (Statistics Canada, 2001)
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Bécancour Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Bécancour Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Bécancour is a regional county municipality in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Bécancour. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Division No. 1, Manitoba

    Division No. 1, Manitoba

    Division No. 1 is located in the Eastman Region of the Canadian province of Manitoba. It is located in the south-eastern corner of the province, lying between the Lake Winnipeg and Manitoba-Ontario border, and the US-Canada border. The Trans-Canada Highway runs through the Eastman Region.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Division No. 16, Alberta

    Division No. 16, Alberta

    Division No. 16 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the northeast portion of northern Alberta and surrounds the Urban Service Area of Fort McMurray. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 16. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 16 had a population of 67,516 living in 23,653 of its 28,662 total dwellings, a 27.2% change from its 2006 population of 53,080. With a land area of 97,255 km (37,550 sq mi), it had a population density of 0.7 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 16 had a population of 53,080 living in 21,085 dwellings, a 23.5% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 97,267.39 km (37,555.15 sq mi) and a population density of 0.5 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    La Côte-de-Gaspé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Côte-de-Gaspé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Côte-de-Gaspé is a regional county municipality on the Gaspé peninsula in eastern Quebec, Canada, part of the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine region. The seat is Gaspé. The regional county has a land area of 4,097.66 km² (1,581.91 sq mi) and a Canada 2011 Census population of 17,985 inhabitants. Its largest community is the city of Gaspé.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Lévis

    Lévis

    Lévis is a city in eastern Quebec, Canada. It is located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, opposite Quebec City. A ferry links Old Quebec with Old Lévis, and two bridges, the Quebec Bridge and the Pierre Laporte Bridge, connect western Lévis with Quebec City. The Société de transport de Lévis is responsible for public transportation by bus. The population in 2011 was 138,769. Its current incarnation was founded on January 1, 2002, as the result of a merger among ten cities, including the older city of Lévis founded in 1861. Lévis is also the name of a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Quebec, coextensive with the city of Lévis. Its geographical code is 25 as a census division, and 251 as an RCM-equivalent territory. Lévis covers an area of 444 km (171 sq mi): 10% urban, 48% farmlands, 36% forests and 6% wetlands. In addition to the Saint Lawrence River, the Etchemin and Chaudière Rivers also run through the city before ending their journey in the Saint Lawrence. The Chaudière River also boasts a fall with a suspended bridge, which can be accessed from Autoroute 73. Lévis County existed until 1980s when it was divided
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Muskoka District Municipality

    Muskoka District Municipality

    The District Municipality of Muskoka, more generally referred to as the District of Muskoka, Muskoka, but NOT as "the Muskokas", is a Regional Municipality located in Central Ontario, Canada. Muskoka extends from Georgian Bay in the west, to the northern tip of Lake Couchiching in the south, to the western border of Algonquin Provincial Park in the east. Located approximately two hours north of Toronto, Muskoka spans 6,475 km (2,500 sq mi). Muskoka has some 1,600 lakes, making it a popular resort destination. This region, which, along with Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, and Peterborough County is referred to as "cottage country", sees over 2.1 million visitors annually. Muskoka is a scenic area sprinkled with picturesque villages and towns, farming communities, and lakeside vacation hotels and resorts near to golf courses, country clubs, and marinas. The regional government seat is Bracebridge. This area encompasses the townships of Lake of Bays, Georgian Bay and Muskoka Lakes, and the towns of Huntsville, Bracebridge and Gravenhurst. The name of the municipality derives from a First Nations chief of the 1850s. Lake Muskoka was then the hunting grounds of a band led by Chief
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Vaudreuil-Soulanges Regional County Municipality

    Vaudreuil-Soulanges Regional County Municipality

    Vaudreuil-Soulanges is a regional county municipality in Quebec, Canada. It is located on a triangular peninsula in the western Montérégie region of Quebec, surrounded by the Ottawa River to the north, the St. Lawrence River to the south, and Ontario to the west. It is the only county in Quebec south of the Ottawa River, owing to the desire to keep the French-speaking population of the area within Lower Canada during the 1791 division of Upper and Lower Canada (precursors to the provinces of Ontario and Quebec). It is also geographically isolated from the Montérégie region, being its only county north of the St. Lawrence River. Owing to its geographic isolation within Quebec and growing population as a suburb of the city of Montreal, Elections Canada gave the county its own electoral district in 1997. Its name comes from the historical division of the area into two counties: "Vaudreuil" (named after Pierre François de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil-Cavagnal, governor of New France) for the communities along the Ottawa River, and "Soulanges" (named after Pierre-Jacques Joybert de Soulanges from Soulanges, Marne, France) for the communities along the St. Lawrence, a name of Québécois
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Division No. 4, Alberta

    Division No. 4, Alberta

    Division No. 4 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the northeast corner of southern Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Hanna. Division No. 4 is the smallest census division in Alberta according to population. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 4. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 4 had a population of 10,078 living in 3,900 of its 4,274 total dwellings, a -4.9% change from its 2006 population of 10,600. With a land area of 21,467 km (8,288 sq mi), it had a population density of 0.5 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 4 had a population of 10,600 living in 4,295 dwellings, a -6.2% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 21,466.53 km (8,288.27 sq mi) and a population density of 0.5 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Abitibi Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Abitibi Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Abitibi Regional County Municipality is a regional county municipality in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec. The seat is Amos. Highways that run through Abitibi are as follows: (Statistics Canada, 2011) (Statistics Canada, 2006)
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Algoma District, Ontario

    Algoma District, Ontario

    Algoma District is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1858 comprising territory as far west as Minnesota. Since then, it has shrunk, as other districts were created from it by the provincial government: The district seat is Sault Ste. Marie. The rugged scenery of this region has inspired works by Canadian artists, particularly the Group of Seven, who rented a boxcar from the Algoma Central Railway during excursions through this region. Communities within these subdivisions are added in parentheses.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Division No. 16, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 16, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 16, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the north-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is North Battleford. According to the 2006 census, 37,118 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 21,828.48 km² (8,428.02 sq mi).
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Le Rocher-Percé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Rocher-Percé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Rocher-Percé is a regional county municipality in the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Chandler. Prior to July 17, 1999 it was known as Pabok Regional County Municipality. It is named after Percé Rock (the pierced rock), a massive arched sandstone rock rising from the Atlantic just off the tip of the Gaspé peninsula. The region includes the towns of Percé, Grande-Rivière, Port-Daniel–Gascons and Chandler. Major tourist attractions include the Percé Rock and Bonaventure Island.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Madawaska County, New Brunswick

    Madawaska County, New Brunswick

    Madawaska County (2011 population 33,422), also known as the "New Brunswick Panhandle", is located in northwestern New Brunswick, Canada. Over 90% of the county's population speaks French. Its Francophone population are known as "Brayons." Forestry is the major industry in the county. The first inhabitants of what is now called Madawaska County were the Maliseet or Wolastoqiyik, who occupied and used the land along the St. John River Valley north to the St. Lawrence River and south to the Penobscot River. There is debate concerning the true origin of the word "Madawaska". The earliest European settlers were from Quebec. The area was the focus of the bloodless Aroostook War, a border dispute led by businessman and political activist John Baker. The earliest settlers of the Upper St. John River Valley can be clearly verified with http://www.upperstjohn.com/visits/Saint-Vallier1686.htm and http://www.upperstjohn.com/1820/madawaska.htm The second link displays census results taken in 1820 of the Madawaska region where most families had originated from Quebec. There are ten incorporated municipalities within Madawaska County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Nord-du-Québec

    Nord-du-Québec

    Nord-du-Québec (French pronunciation: [nɔʁ dy kebɛk]; English: Northern Quebec) is the largest of the seventeen administrative regions of Quebec, Canada. With nearly 750,000 square kilometres (290,000 sq mi) of land area, and very extensive lakes and rivers, it covers much of the Labrador Peninsula and about 55% of the total land surface area of Quebec and is larger than the U.S. state of Texas. Before 1912, the northernmost part of this region was known as the Ungava District of the Northwest Territories, and until 1987 it was referred to as Nouveau-Québec, or New Quebec. It is bordered by Hudson Bay and James Bay in the west, Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay in the north, Labrador in the northeast, and the administrative regions of Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Mauricie, Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean, and Côte-Nord in the south and southeast. The Nord-du-Québec region is part of the territory covered by the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement of 1975; other regions covered (in part) by this Agreement include Côte-Nord, Mauricie and Abitibi-Témiscamingue administrative regions. Nord-du-Québec region is divided for statistical and other purposes into three territories equivalent to a regional
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Regional District of Kootenay Boundary

    Regional District of Kootenay Boundary

    The Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB) is a regional district in the province of British Columbia, Canada. As of the 2006 census, the population was 30,742. The area is 8,095.62 km² (3,125.74 sq mi). The regional district's offices are in the city of Trail. Other major population centers include the cities of Grand Forks, Rossland, and Greenwood, and the villages of Fruitvale, Warfield, and Montrose.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Stikine Region, British Columbia

    Stikine Region, British Columbia

    The Stikine Region ( /stəˈkiːn/) is an unincorporated area in northwesternmost British Columbia, Canada and is the only area in B.C. not in a regional district. The Stikine Region was left unincorporated following legislation that established the province's regional districts in 1968 and is not classified as a regional district, and contains no municipal governments which normally constitute the majority of seats on the boards of regional districts. There is only one local planning area, the Atlin Community Planning Area, which was combined in 2009 with the Atlin Community Improvement District to provide fire, landfill, water, streetlighting, sidewalks and advisory land use services. All other services not provided privately are administered directly by various provincial government ministries. The area around Dease Lake, formerly in the Stikine Region, is now within the boundaries of the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine following a boundary amendment in 2008. Please see the revised Stikine Region map that shows the change in boundaries]. The Stikine Region has a total population of 1,352 (2004 est.)  including 282 First Nations persons, most from the Taku Tlingit of Atlin and
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Central Coast Regional District, British Columbia

    Central Coast Regional District, British Columbia

    Central Coast Regional District is a regional district in British Columbia, Canada. It has a total land area of 24,559.5 km² (9,482.5 sq mi). When it was created in 1968, it was named the Ocean Falls Regional District, after the then-largest town in the region, the company town Ocean Falls, now a ghost town. The name was confirmed in 1974, but changed to Central Coast Regional District in 1976. The Central Coast Regional District has five Electoral Areas, each of which elect a single director to the District's Board of Directors. According to the 2001 Census, the populations of the electoral areas are:
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Division No. 2, Alberta

    Division No. 2, Alberta

    Division No. 2 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the south-central portion of southern Alberta and includes the City of Lethbridge. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 2. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 2 had a population of 156,536 living in 58,495 of its 63,778 total dwellings, a 9.9% change from its 2006 population of 142,429. With a land area of 17,662 km (6,819 sq mi), it had a population density of 8.9 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 2 had a population of 142,429 living in 56,851 dwellings, a 6.4% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 17,659.92 km (6,818.53 sq mi) and a population density of 8.1 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    La Nouvelle-Beauce Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Nouvelle-Beauce Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Nouvelle-Beauce (New Beauce) is a regional county municipality in the Chaudière-Appalaches region in southeastern Quebec, Canada, south of the Saint Lawrence River. It is located south of Lévis, along the Chaudière River. Established in 1982 as a successor to Dorchester County, La Nouvelle-Beauce is made of 11 municipalities and is mainly French-speaking (99.2% French-speaking in 2006) and rural. Sainte-Marie, the county seat, is the most populous municipality. The name of La Nouvelle-Beauce reminds the one given to the area along the Chaudière River by the French authorities until the end of the French Regime in North America. Autoroute 73 Route 112 Route 171 Route 173 Route 216 Route 218 Route 275
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Le Haut-Saint-François Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Haut-Saint-François Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Haut-Saint-François (The Upper Saint-François [St. Francis]) is a regional county municipality in southeastern Quebec, Canada in the Estrie region. Its seat is in Cookshire-Eaton, and it is named for the Saint-François River which runs though the RCM. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Les Laurentides Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Laurentides Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Laurentides (The Laurentians) is a regional county municipality in the Laurentides region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Saint-Faustin–Lac-Carré. It is named after the Laurentian Mountains. The population is 45,157 according to the Canada 2011 Census.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia

    Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen (RDOS) is a regional district in southern British Columbia, adjacent to the U.S. state of Washington. It is bounded by Fraser Valley Regional District to the west, Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Regional District of Central Okanagan to the north, Regional District of Kootenay Boundary to the east, and by Okanogan County, Washington to the south. As of the 2006 census the population was 79,475. The district covers a land area of 10,413.44 km² (4,020.65 sq mi). The administrative offices are in the city of Penticton. Other important population centres include the district municipality of Summerland, the towns of Oliver, Osoyoos, and Princeton, and the village of Keremeos. Electoral Area A comprises the rural areas surrounding Osoyoos, including Anarchist Mountain. Pop. 1,921. Electoral Area B comprises the valley of the Similkameen River from Cawston downstream to Chopaka, at the US border. Pop. 1,082. Electoral Area C comprises the rural areas surrounding Oliver, including the Mount Baldy Ski Area (though there are no residents there). Pop. 3,899. Electoral Area D comprises rural areas and unincorporated communities south of
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Sherbrooke

    Sherbrooke

    Sherbrooke (/ˈʃɜrbrʊk/; Quebec French pronunciation [ʃɛʁbʁʊk]) is a city in southern Quebec, Canada. Sherbrooke is situated at the confluence of the Saint-François (St. Francis) and Magog rivers in the heart of the Estrie administrative region. Sherbrooke is also the name of a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Quebec, coextensive with the city of Sherbrooke. With 154,601 residents as of the 2011 census, Sherbrooke was the sixth largest city in the province of Quebec and the thirtieth largest in Canada. The Sherbrooke Census Metropolitan Area had 201,890 inhabitants, making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Quebec and nineteenth largest in Canada. Originally known as Hyatt's Mill, it was renamed after Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (1764–1840), a British soldier who was Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia (1812–1816), and Governor General of British North America (1816–1818). Sherbrooke is the primary economic, political, cultural and institutional centre of Estrie, and was known as the Queen of the Eastern Townships at the beginning of the 20th century. Sherbrooke is an important university center with eight institutions
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Abitibi-Ouest Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Abitibi-Ouest Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Abitibi-Ouest Regional County Municipality (Abitibi West) is a regional county municipality located in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec. Its seat is La Sarre. (Statistics Canada, 2006) Antoine Marsh (Roquemaure) Calamite Covered Bridge [1927] (La Sarre) Culture House (La Sarre) Interpretation de la foresterie Centre (La Sarre) La Salle Airport (Clermont) Leclerc Covered Bridge [1927] (La Sarre) l'Ile Covered Bridge [1946] (Clerval) Joseph Berube Collection (Gallichan) Molesworth Covered Bridge [1930] (Macamic Ville) Notre-Dame-des-pauvres Sanctuary (Dupuy) Petit-Quatre Covered Bridge [1950] (Clermont) Rang 11 School (Authier) Rapide-Danseur Church (1942) (Rapide Danseur) Sang-Neuf-Art Gallery (Palmarolle) Parc national d'Aiguebelle Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Brant

    Brant

    The County of Brant (2011 population 35,638) is a single-tier municipality and a census division in the Canadian province of Ontario. Despite its name, it is not a county by the standard definition, as all municipal services are handled by a single level of government. The county has service offices in Burford, Paris and St. George. It is a small, predominantly rural municipality in Southern Ontario, approximately 100 kilometres southwest of Toronto. It is bordered by the Region of Waterloo, the City of Hamilton, Haldimand County, Norfolk County, and Oxford County. The County abuts the Greenbelt. Geographically, the city of Brantford is surrounded by the County of Brant. In Statistics Canada's census data, the Brant census division also includes Brantford and the Six Nations and New Credit reserves, although none of these is part of Brant's municipal government. The census division of Brant, inclusive of all four distinct municipalities, had a population of 136,035 in the 2011 census. The primary centres in Brant are Paris, St. George and Burford. Smaller communities in the municipality include Bishopsgate, Burtch, Cainsville, Cathcart, East Oakland, Etonia, Fairfield, Falkland,
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Frontenac County

    Frontenac County

    Frontenac County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located in the eastern portion of Southern Ontario. The City of Kingston is included in the census division, but is politically separated from the County of Frontenac. Politically, the County of Frontenac is an upper tier municipality in the Canadian province of Ontario. While a traditional Ontario county prior to 1998, it was abolished as part of municipal restructuring and amalgamations, and replaced by a management unit with limited powers, known as the Frontenac Management Board. The management unit became a county again in 2003. The County offers a range of services including the Frontenac Paramedic Service, Fairmount Home, Howe Island Ferry, and other government services such as economic development, planning, administration and finance. County Council includes two representatives from each Township. The Mayor of South Frontenac receives an additional vote, making it an eight member, nine vote Council . The County is the upper-tier level of government for the following municipalities: Historic populations: The City of Kingston makes up the vast majority of the census division's
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Hamilton

    Hamilton

    Hamilton ( /ˈhæməltən/; 2011 population 519,949; UA population 670,580; CMA population 721,053) is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. Conceived by George Hamilton when he purchased the Durand farm shortly after the War of 1812, Hamilton has become the centre of a densely populated and industrialized region at the west end of Lake Ontario known as the Golden Horseshoe. On January 1, 2001, the new City of Hamilton was formed through the amalgamation of the former city and the other constituent lower-tier municipalities of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth with the upper-tier regional government. Residents of the old city are known as Hamiltonians. Since 1981, the metropolitan area has been listed as the ninth largest in Canada and the third largest in Ontario. Hamilton is home to the shared Royal Botanical Gardens, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the Bruce Trail, McMaster University and Mohawk College. The Canadian Football Hall of Fame can be found downtown right beside Hamilton City Hall and across town to the east, the Canadian Football League's Hamilton Tiger-Cats play at Ivor Wynne Stadium. Partly because of its diverse environment, numerous TV
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Inverness County

    Inverness County

    Inverness County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Its territory is almost contiguous with the Municipality of Inverness County, which only excludes the town of Port Hawkesbury and First Nation reserves. Established as the County of Juste au Corps in 1835, Inverness County was given its present name in 1837. It was named after Inverness in Scotland, the land from which many of the early settlers came. The boundaries of Inverness County had been previously defined when Cape Breton Island was divided by statute into three Districts in 1823. In 1996, the county was amalgamated into a single municipality with the exception of Port Hawkesbury. Inverness County was established within the boundaries of the Northwestern District of Cape Breton Island. Indian Reserves in Inverness County include Whycocomagh 2. For a list of communities in Inverness County, see List of communities. Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including external routes that start or finish at the county limits:
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    2 votes
    156
    L'Érable Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Érable Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Érable (Maple) is a regional county municipality in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec, Canada. Named for its maple trees, the area is rural in nature and is located 50 km southwest of Quebec City. Its seat is Plessisville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
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    2 votes
    157
    Maskinongé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Maskinongé Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Maskinongé is a regional county municipality in the Mauricie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Louiseville. It is located adjacent on the west of Trois-Rivières on the Saint Lawrence River. The population according to the Canada 2011 Census is 36,286. The RCM was formed on January 1, 1982, and it consisted of Hunterstown Township (now part of Saint-Paulin); Belleau Municipality (now part of Saint-Alexis-des-Monts); the parish municipalities of Saint-Alexis-des-Monts, Sainte-Angèle (since renamed to Sainte-Angèle-de-Prémont), Sainte-Anne-d'Yamachiche (now part of Yamachiche), Saint-Antoine-de-la-Rivière-du-Loup (now part of Louiseville), Saint-Barnabé, Saint-Édouard (since renamed to Saint-Édouard-de-Maskinongé), Saint-Joseph-de-Maskinongé (now part of Maskinongé), Saint-Justin, Saint-Léon-le-Grand, Saint-Paulin, Saint-Sévère, and Sainte-Ursule; and the village municipalities of Louiseville, Maskinongé, Saint-Paulin, and Yamachiche. On January 1, 2002, the municipalities of Charette, Saint-Boniface-de-Shawinigan (since renamed to Saint-Boniface), Saint-Élie (since renamed to Saint-Élie-de-Caxton), Saint-Étienne-des-Grès, and Saint-Mathieu-du-Parc were transferred to the
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    2 votes
    158
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    2 votes
    159
    Mékinac Regional County Municipality

    Mékinac Regional County Municipality

    Mékinac is a regional county municipality in the Mauricie region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Saint-Tite. City Municipalities Parish Municipalities Village Municipality Unorganized Territories Highways in Mékinac include:
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    2 votes
    160
    Rainy River District

    Rainy River District

    Rainy River District is a district and census division in Northwestern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1885. It is the only division in Ontario that lies completely in the Central time zone. Its seat is Fort Frances. It is known for its fishing and its location on the USA border opposite International Falls, Minnesota and Baudette, Minnesota. In 2011, the population was 20,370. The land area is 15,484.83 square kilometres (5,978.73 sq mi); the population density was 1.3 per square kilometre (3.4 /sq mi). Historic populations:
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    2 votes
    161
    Regional District of East Kootenay, British Columbia

    Regional District of East Kootenay, British Columbia

    The Regional District of East Kootenay (RDEK) is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia, Canada. As of the 2011 census, the population was 56,685. The area is 27,542.69 square kilometres (10,641.16 sq mi). The regional district offices are in Cranbrook, the largest community in the region. Other important population centers include the cities of Kimberley and Fernie, and the district municipality of Invermere and Sparwood Despite its name, the regional district does not include all of the region known as the East Kootenay, which includes the Creston Valley and the east shore of Kootenay Lake. The regional district's dominant landform is the Rocky Mountain Trench, which is flanked by the Purcell Mountains and Rocky Mountains on the east and west, and includes the Columbia Valley region, the southern half of which is in the regional district (its northern half is in the Columbia-Shuswap Regional District. Another distinct area within the regional district is the Elk Valley in the southern Rockies, which is the entrance to the Crowsnest Pass and an important coal-mining region. Other than the Columbia and Kootenay Rivers, whose valleys form the bottomlands of
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    2 votes
    162
    Cowichan Valley Regional District, British Columbia

    Cowichan Valley Regional District, British Columbia

    The Cowichan Valley Regional District is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia is on the southern part of Vancouver Island, bordered by the Nanaimo and Alberni-Clayoquot Regional Districts to the north and northwest, and by the Capital Regional District to the south and east. As of the 2006 Census, the Regional District had a population of 76,929. The regional district offices are in Duncan. The Cowichan Valley Regional District covers an area between the Stuart Channel and Saanich Inlet on the east coast of Vancouver Island and the southern part of the West Coast Trail, with Cowichan Lake located in its central region. It includes the Gulf Islands of Thetis, Kuper and Valdes. The total land area is 3,473.12 km² (1,340.98 sq mi).
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    3 votes
    163
    Division No. 6, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 6, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 6 is a census division in the central part of the island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It is divided into 16 parts; 12 towns and four unorganized subdivisions. The division had a population of 36,208 in both the Canada 2001 Census and the Canada 2006 Census. It was the only census division in Canada to report exactly the same population in both censuses.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Kings County

    Kings County

    Kings County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Kings County is located in central Nova Scotia on the shore of the Bay of Fundy with its northeastern part also forming the western shore of the Minas Basin. The part of the county residing in the Annapolis Valley comprises the agricultural heartland of the province and boasts over 600 farms; the area is famous for its fruit crops, primarily apples. As with most coastal parts of the Maritimes, Kings County's shoreline was home to a productive shipbuilding industry during the 19th century. Wolfville houses the highly ranked Acadia University. Cape Blomidon and the North Mountain preside over the Annapolis Valley, whereas the South Mountain and interior forests to the southern part of the county support a variety of lakes and recreational cottaging areas. The first inhabitants of the coast, valley and interior of Kings County were the Mi'kmaq. Archaeological evidence from sites in the area indicate Mi'kmaq habitation dates back thousands of years. The Mi'kmaq were a semi-nomadic people who followed seasonal food sources. Their lives would be forever changed with the arrival of the Europeans. The colonization of "Les
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    3 votes
    165
    La Vallée-de-la-Gatineau Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-de-la-Gatineau Regional County Municipality

    La Vallée-de-la-Gatineau (The Valley of the Gatineau) is a regional county municipality in the Outaouais region of western Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Gracefield. It is named for its location straddling the Gatineau River north of Low. It was incorporated on January 1, 1983. It consists of two cities, fifteen municipalities, and five unorganized territories. The area also has two Algonquin communities, Kitigan Zibi (south of Maniwaki) and Rapid Lake in the heart of the La Vérendrye Wildlife Reserve. The territory of the Gatineau Valley is bordered to the south by the Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais Regional County Municipality and to the east by the Antoine-Labelle Regional County Municipality. City Municipalities Cantons Unorganized Areas
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Manitoulin District

    Manitoulin District

    Manitoulin District is a district in Northeastern Ontario within the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1888 from part of Algoma District. The district seat is Gore Bay. It comprises Manitoulin Island and a number of small islands around it, making it the smallest district in Ontario. Previously it included the municipality of Killarney on the mainland, until this was transferred to Sudbury District in the late 1990s. Subsequently, more mainland portions were added to Killarney and these, together with Unorganized Mainland Manitoulin District, were also transferred to Sudbury District in 2006, about 1,600 square kilometres (600 sq mi) in all. Like the other districts of Northern Ontario, the Manitoulin District does not have a county or regional municipality tier of government. All services in the district are provided either by the individual municipalities or directly by the provincial government. Services are provided jointly with the Sudbury District from its district seat in Espanola. Manitoulin District is served by only one primary provincial highway, Highway 6. This highway enters the district at the ferry docks in South Baymouth, in the township of Tehkummah,
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Prince County, Prince Edward Island

    Prince County, Prince Edward Island

    Prince County is located in western Prince Edward Island, Canada. The county's defining geographic feature is Malpeque Bay, a sub-basin of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, which creates the narrowest portion of Prince Edward Island's landmass, an isthmus upon which the city of Summerside is located. The geographic division created by Malpeque Bay is informally augmented by a socio-economic division between the more urban East Prince and rural West Prince, although the line of division generally varies. Much of Prince Edward Island's industrial base is concentrated in the eastern part of the county, with three large frozen French fry manufacturing plants, a potato chip manufacturing plant, and an aerospace industry located at a former air force base. Industrial farming for root crops such as potatoes accounts for the majority of rural economic activity, followed by fishing for shellfish such as lobster and crab. The county was named by Capt. Samuel Holland in 1765 for The Prince George Augustus Frederick, Prince of Wales, who would later be crowned King George IV (1762-1830). As such, Prince County's shire town was designated as Princetown, however the inferior harbour for Prince Royalty
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    3 votes
    168
    Shelburne County

    Shelburne County

    Shelburne County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Shelburne County was founded in 1784 shortly following the influx of Loyalist settlers evacuated from the newly independent United States of America. It was originally named Port Roseway, until it became a very busy town and was considered to be the capital of Nova Scotia, in which the name was changed to Shelburne in an attempt to please Lord Shelburne, the British Prime Minister from 1782 to 1783. The boundaries of Shelburne County were established by Governor and Council on December 16, 1785. The first Loyalists arrived in May 1783. They were faced with a somewhat bleak environment in which to make their homes. The land is very rocky with acidic soil. There is also a lot of forest. The area had previously been settled by French-speaking Catholic Acadians, many of whom had been deported to British Colonies. The new arrivals included Black Loyalists who were given substandard land, particularly around Birchtown. In 1796 about 600 Jamaican Maroons were deported to this area of Nova Scotia as well. In 1824, at a time when the lines of a number of counties were being cut out and marked, the boundary between Queens
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    3 votes
    169
    Cape Breton County

    Cape Breton County

    Cape Breton County is a former county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, on Cape Breton Island. It is now a single-tier municipality called Cape Breton Regional Municipality. Taking its name from Cape Breton, the most easterly point of the island which was called after the Bretons of Brittany, the county has what is probably the oldest surviving European name to have been used to designate part of North America. By proclamation of October 17, 1763 after termination of the Seven Years' War, Cape Breton Island was formally annexed to Nova Scotia. For a time thereafter Cape Breton Island was part of Halifax County. On December 10, 1765, Cape Breton Island was set apart as a separate county under the name Cape Breton County. From 1784 to 1820, Cape Breton Island was established as a separate colony with a Lieutenant Governor and a nominated Executive Council, but without an elected house of assembly. Not until after Cape Breton Island was re-annexed to Nova Scotia in 1820 did it receive representation in an elected legislature. Although subdivided into three districts in 1824, Cape Breton County was co-extensive with Cape Breton Island from 1820 to 1835 when the county was
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    5 votes
    170
    Division No. 11, Alberta

    Division No. 11, Alberta

    Division No. 11 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. Surrounding the City of Edmonton, the majority of the division comprises Alberta's Capital Region, while the western and southern portions of the division are located within central Alberta. The division also forms the northern segment of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 11. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 11 had a population of 1,203,115 living in 467,064 of its 500,940 total dwellings, an 11.8% change from its 2006 population of 1,076,103. With a land area of 15,768 km (6,088 sq mi), it had a population density of 76.3 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 11 had a population of 1,076,103 living in 443,275 dwellings, a 10.3% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 15,754.26 km (6,082.75 sq mi) and a population density of 68.3 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Le Granit Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Granit Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Granit (Granite) is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of eastern Quebec, Canada. Located directly south of Quebec City, it borders the region of Chaudière-Appalaches, as well as the US states of New Hampshire and Maine. It is named for its abundance of granite. Created in 1982, Le Granit's seat is Lac-Mégantic. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Queens County

    Queens County

    Queens County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Liverpool, the county seat of Queens County, was founded in 1759 by the New England Planters. Founded for the most part by New England settlers, Liverpool maintained strong ties with the American colonies until the sudden outbreak of the American Revolution. On July 21, 1762 the Lieutenant Governor and Council of Nova Scotia declared that "the Townships of Liverpool, Barrington and Yarmouth together with the intermediate lands should be erected into a county by the name of Queens County". Parts of the new county were taken from Lunenburg County, which now lies to the northeast. In 1784, Shelburne County was formed in part from southwestern portions of Queens County. The new county boundaries were established by an Order-in-Council dated December 16, 1785. Queens County contains substantial portions of Kejimkujik National Park, including the main body of the park inland north of Caledonia and the Seaside Adjunct near Port Joli and Port Mouton. In 1996, the county's municipal government merged with the town of Liverpool to form the Region of Queens Municipality, thus the county is contiguous with the boundaries of the
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    3 votes
    173
    Restigouche County, New Brunswick

    Restigouche County, New Brunswick

    Restigouche County (2011 population 32,594) is located in north-central New Brunswick, Canada. The county is named for the Restigouche River which flows through the county and is famous for its salmon pools, which have attracted wealthy American and Canadian tourists to the region's summer colonies for decades. Forestry dominates the local economy. There are ten incorporated municipalities within Restigouche County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into eight parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There are two First Nations reservations in Restigouche County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including external routes that start or finish at the county limits:
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Columbia-Shuswap Regional District, British Columbia

    Columbia-Shuswap Regional District, British Columbia

    The Columbia-Shuswap Regional District is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia, located in the Southern Interior region on the Trans-Canada Highway between Vancouver and Calgary. The regional district comprises the regions known as the Shuswap Country, which focuses around Shuswap Lake and lies to the north of the Okanagan, and the northern part of the Columbia Country, namely the "Big Bend" of the valley of the Columbia River from the Town of Golden to the City of Revelstoke (Revelstoke is sometimes referred to as being in the North Kootenay, Golden is usually thought of as being part of the East Kootenay sub-region, the Columbia Valley). The Canada 2006 Census population was 50,141. The regional district's offices are in Salmon Arm.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Division No. 6, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 6, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 6, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the south-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is Regina, the provincial capital. According to the 2006 census, 220,688 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 17,548.03 km² (6,775.33 sq mi).
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Fraser Valley Regional District

    Fraser Valley Regional District

    The Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD) is a regional district in British Columbia, Canada. Its headquarters are located in the city of Chilliwack. The FVRD covers an area of 13,361.74 km² (5,159 sq mi). It was created by an amalgamation of the Fraser-Cheam Regional District and Central Fraser Valley Regional District and the portion of the Dewdney-Alouette Regional District from and including the District of Mission eastwards. The FVRD incorporates roughly the eastern half of the Lower Mainland region of southwestern BC, and is bordered by Whatcom County, Washington to the south, the Greater Vancouver Regional District to the west, and the Okanagan-Similkameen Regional District to the east. The northern border with the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District falls just south of the towns of Skookumchuck Hot Springs and Lytton. It also includes unincorporated areas north of the City of Pitt Meadows which were formerly part of the Dewdney-Alouette Regional District but which were not transferred to the Greater Vancouver Regional District when it expanded to take in Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge. The FVRD has a total population of 277,593 people in 6 municipalities and 8 electoral
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Lennox and Addington County

    Lennox and Addington County

    Lennox and Addington County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. The county seat is Greater Napanee. It is located in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Eastern Ontario. The two original counties of Lennox and Addington, joined together in 1860, had been named after Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond and Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, respectively. Unlike most county mergers in the 19th century, Lennox and Addington, which had been split off from the former Midland District in 1849, became a full amalgamation of the two counties into a single government. Other mergers still retained separate records for each of the joined counties, and were therefore known as United Counties. Around the middle of the 19th century, the Addington Road was built by the province to encourage settlement in the northern sections of the county. It includes the following municipalities: Historic populations:
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Annapolis County

    Annapolis County

    Annapolis County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia located in the western part of the province on the Bay of Fundy. The county seat is Annapolis Royal. Established August 17, 1759 by Order in Council, Annapolis County took its name from the town of Annapolis Royal which had been named in honour of Queen Anne of Great Britain. It was near the previous site of Port Royal, the chief Acadian settlement in the area. The Acadians had been forcibly removed by British government officials in the 1755 Grand Dérangement. By 1833, a number of reasons had been advanced for making two counties out of Annapolis County. Two petitions were presented to the House of Assembly in that year requesting that the county be divided. However, it was not until 1837 that Annapolis County was divided into two distinct and separate counties - Annapolis and Digby. There are 10,404 households out of which 26.06% have children living with them, 36.50% are married couples living together, 25.46% are one-person households, and 11.98% are other household types. For a list of communities in Annapolis County, see List of Communities Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including
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    1 votes
    179
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Bruce County

    Bruce County

    Bruce County is a county in western Ontario, Canada, and includes the Bruce Peninsula. The county seat is Walkerton, Ontario. The name of the county is linked to the Bruce Trail and the Bruce Peninsula, which the trail runs through. Officially, Bruce County is named for James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine, sixth Governor General of the Province of Canada. The county contains the Bruce Peninsula National Park. Notable towns include Tobermory and Wiarton, home of the weather predicting groundhog Wiarton Willie. Bruce County is home to one of the most critically endangered of all insects: the Hungerford's crawling water beetle. The only known population of Hungerford's crawling water beetles outside of the United States were discovered in the North Saugeen River near Scone. In 1986, 42 beetles were identified at a site downstream from a dam there. An unspecified number of beetles were last recorded in 2001, but surveys in 2002 uncovered no specimens. As a result, the status of the Bruce County population of Hungerford's crawling water beetles is uncertain at present. Although the Hungerford's crawling water beetle was categorized as endangered on March 7, 1994,
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    1 votes
    181
    Cariboo Regional District

    Cariboo Regional District

    The Cariboo Regional District spans the towns of Quesnel, Williams Lake, 100 Mile House, and Wells in the Central Interior of British Columbia. The Canada 2006 Census population was 62,190 persons living on a land area of 80,629.34 km² (31,129.9 sq mi). It covers the area from 70 Mile House to Hixon, just south of Prince George. Twelve electoral area directors and four municipal directors govern the affairs of the Cariboo Regional District. The electoral area directors are elected by area voters, and municipal directors are appointed by their municipal council. All directors serve for a three-year term. The Cariboo Regional District provides region-wide library services, recreational facilities, and local fire protection. Regional District Electoral Areas are A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K and L. Cariboo A (Red Bluff-Quesnel South) is a regional district electoral area (RDEA) in the Cariboo Regional District, British Columbia, Canada. The electoral area is located in central BC along the east coast of the Fraser River south of Quesnel and west of the Quesnel River. The area represented is also referred to as the North Cariboo, but that term also includes the City of Quesnel, and
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    1 votes
    182
    Division No. 11, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 11, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 11, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the central part of the province and includes the largest city in the province, Saskatoon. According to the 2006 census, 244,273 people lived in this division, making it the most populous one in Saskatchewan. It has a land area of 16,683.11 km² (6,441.38 sq mi).
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Division No. 7, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 7, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 7, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the south-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is Moose Jaw. According to the 2006 census, 45,532 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 18,835.84 km² (7,272.56 sq mi). The following communities are located in this Census division: Cities Towns Villages Hamlets
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Kings County, New Brunswick

    Kings County, New Brunswick

    Kings County (2011 population 69,665) is located in southern New Brunswick, Canada. Its historical shire town is Hampton. Both the Saint John and Kennebecasis rivers pass through the county. Dairy farming is an important industry in the area. On March 18, 2004, at the 48th annual World Cheese and Butter Championships in Madison, Wisconsin, Dairytown Products, a company from Sussex, won first prize for butter, besting 37 entries from the USA, France, Switzerland, Ireland, Denmark and other countries from around the world. Approximately half of the Kings County population lives in suburbs of the nearby city of Saint John. There are seven incorporated municipalities within Kings County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into fifteen parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings):
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    L'Assomption Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Assomption Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    L'Assomption (The Assumption) is a regional county municipality in the Lanaudière region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is L'Assomption. L'Assomption is located directly north of the city of Montreal. It is named for the L'Assomption River which flows through the region from the north before emptying into the Saint Lawrence River in the south of the region at Repentigny.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Les Basques Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Basques Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Les Basques (the Basques) is a regional county municipality in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region in eastern Quebec, Canada. It is located on the south bank of the Saint Lawrence River halfway between Rimouski and Rivière-du-Loup. The seat is in Trois-Pistoles.
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    1 votes
    187
    Regional Municipality of York

    Regional Municipality of York

    The Regional Municipality of York, also called York Region, is a regional municipality in Southern Ontario, Canada, between Lake Simcoe and Toronto. It replaced the former York County in 1971, and is part of the Greater Toronto Area and the inner ring of the Golden Horseshoe. The regional government is headquartered in Newmarket. The 2011 census population was 1,032,524, surpassing the population mark of one million. At the Canada 2006 Census, 50,815 residents inhabited rural areas in the municipality, and 841,897 resided in urban areas. Its growth rate of 22.4% from 2001 to 2006 was the third highest amongst all census divisions in Canada, and the Government of Ontario expects its population to surpass 1.5 million residents by 2031. York Region covers 1,762 square kilometres from Lake Simcoe in the north to the city of Toronto in the south. Its eastern border is shared with Durham Region, to the west is Peel Region, and Simcoe County is to the northwest. A map of the region showing its major roads and communities is available. Towns and cities in York Region include: There is also one First Nation with an Indian reserve, where the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation reside.
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    1 votes
    188
    5.33
    3 votes
    189
    Middlesex County

    Middlesex County

    Middlesex County (2011 population 73,000) is a primarily rural county in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Landlocked, the county is bordered by Huron and Perth counties on the north, Oxford County on the east, Elgin County on the south, and Chatham-Kent and Lambton County on the west. The seat is the city of London, although the city is politically independent from the county. The census division of Middlesex, which consists of the county together with the city of London, had a population of 439,151 in 2011, making it Canada's 16th largest. The county is also included in the London census metropolitan area. Middlesex County is composed of eight incorporated municipalities and three First Nations reserves: Townships and villages: First Nations reserves: Note the demographics below are for the census agglomeration of Middlesex County which includes the politically separate City of London. Historic populations: The City of London, including the annexations below, is now politically independent from Middlesex County:
    5.33
    3 votes
    190

    Prescott and Russell United Counties

    The United Counties of Prescott and Russell (French: Comtés unis de Prescott et Russell) are consolidated counties located in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its county seat is L'Orignal . It was created as a result of a merger between Russell County and Prescott County in 1820. It is located in the subregion of Southern Ontario named Eastern Ontario. According to Statistics Canada, the county has a total area of 2,004.44 square kilometres (773.92 sq mi). It is crossed by the South Nation River that connects the Larose Forest and Alfred Bog. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has designated the Alfred Bog "a provincially significant wetland and an area of natural and scientific interest. Species of interest include the Palm Warbler, Northern Pitcher-plant, Pink Lady's-slipper, cottongrass, Bog Elfin and Bog Copper butterflies, and Ebony Boghaunter dragonfly. It also hosts one of the most southerly herds of moose. The bog is open to the public with a 272 metre boardwalk for nature walks. Municipalities and townships with major unincorporated communities: Historic populations: The median income for a household in the county was $52,664, and the median income for a family was
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Regional District of Central Okanagan, British Columbia

    Regional District of Central Okanagan, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia, Canada, comprising the City of Kelowna and its surrounding bedroom municipalities. Statistics Canada defines the Kelowna CMA (Census Metropolitan Area) as being identical in area with the RDCO. The population in 2005 was 165,221, an increase from the official Canada 2006 Census total of 162,276 (these figures exclude the population of reserves belonging to the Westbank First Nation). The area is 2,904.00 square kilometres. The regional district's offices are located in Kelowna itself. District municipalities & communities Central Okanagan West Electoral Area is formerly known as the Westside Electoral Area. It was created from the merger of Central Okanagan G and Central Okanagan H. The 2005 population. exclusive of anyone living on an Indian Reserve, was 37,638 people. In 2007 most of the electoral area's population transferred to the jurisdiction of the newly-incorporated District Municipality of West Kelowna. Central Okanagan G Central Okanagan H (within the boundaries of, but not part of, the RD)
    5.33
    3 votes
    192
    Division No. 21, Manitoba

    Division No. 21, Manitoba

    Division No. 21, also informally known as Flin Flon—Northwest, is a census division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The division had a population of 21,606 in the Canada 2006 Census. Community Profile: Census Division No. 21, Manitoba; Statistics Canada
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Guysborough County

    Guysborough County

    Guysborough County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Taking its name from the Township of Guysborough, which was named in honour of Sir Guy Carleton, Guysborough County was created when Sydney County (Antigonish County) was divided in 1836. In 1840, the Township of St. Mary's, in Guysborough County, was set off as a separate and distinct District. In 1863 the dividing line between Halifax and Guysborough Counties was altered and a polling district was added to Guysborough County. In 2007, plans were announced for the Melford International Terminal, a 1,500,000 TEU marine terminal on the Strait of Canso in Guysborough County with an expected opening date of 2011. For a list of communities in Guysborough County, see List of communities. Highways and numbered routes that run through the county, including external routes that start or finish at the county limits:
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Hastings County

    Hastings County

    Hastings County is located in the province of Ontario, Canada. It is The Cheese Capital of Canada. Geographically, it is located on the border of Eastern Ontario and Central Ontario. With an area of 6,103.48 square kilometres (2,356.57 sq mi) reaching nearly 100 miles (160 km) from north to south, Hastings County is the second largest county in Ontario. The seat of the county is Belleville. The 14 municipalities within the county are: First Nation reserve: The cities of Belleville and Quinte West are separated municipalities, meaning that they are within the boundaries of the county and included in the census division, but not under the administration of the county government. The first boundaries of Hastings County were established 1792 by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The southern boundary was the Bay of Quinte, the eastern boundary was Lennox County and the western boundary ran from the Trent River to the Ottawa River, in a triangular shape. The County consisted of Sidney, Thurlow, Rawdon, Huntingdon and Hungerford townships as well as the Mohawk Tract. The area was named for Francis Rawdon-Hastings. Three new townships; Elzevir, Madoc and Marmora were created in 1821
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Laval

    Laval

    Laval (French pronunciation: [laval]) is a Canadian city located in southwestern Quebec, north of Montreal. It forms its own administrative region of Quebec. It is the largest suburb of Montreal, the third largest municipality in the province of Quebec, and the thirteenth largest city in Canada with a population of 401,553 in 2011. Laval is geographically separated from the mainland to the north by the Rivière des Mille Îles, and from the Island of Montreal to the south by the Rivière des Prairies. Laval occupies all of Île Jésus as well as the Îles Laval. Laval constitutes region 13 of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec as well as a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) with geographical code 65. It also constitutes the judicial district of Laval. The first European Settlers were Jesuits in 1636 when they were granted a seigneury there. Agriculture first appeared in Laval in 1670. In 1675, François de Montmorency-Laval gained control of the seigneury. In 1702 a parish municipality was founded, and dedicated to Saint-François de Sales (not to be confused with the modern-day Saint-François-de-Sales in Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean). The
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    Division No. 9, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Division No. 9, Newfoundland and Labrador

    Census Division No. 9 is composed of the area of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador called the Northern Peninsula. It has a land area of 13,526.85 km² (5,222.75 sq mi) and a population of 20,091 as of the 2001 census. The largest community is the town of St. Anthony, near its northern tip, on the Atlantic Ocean coast.
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    Capital Regional District, British Columbia

    Capital Regional District, British Columbia

    The Capital Regional District (CRD) is a local government administrative district encompassing the southern tip of Vancouver Island and the southern Gulf Islands in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The CRD is one of several regional districts in British Columbia and had an official population of 345,164 as of the Canada 2006 Census. The CRD encompasses the thirteen municipalities of Greater Victoria and the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area on Vancouver Island, the Salt Spring Electoral Area, and the Southern Gulf Islands Electoral Area. Its headquarters is in the City of Victoria, although there are many office and operational facilities throughout the region. The total land area is 2,341.11 km (903.91 sq mi). The CRD was formed in 1966 as a federation of seven municipalities and five electoral areas to provide coordination of regional issues and local government in rural areas in the Greater Victoria region. *(Map of member municipalities) (map) The Salt Spring Island Electoral Area (Electoral Area F) of the Capital Regional District (CRD) of the Canadian Province of British Columbia consists of unincorporated areas in the CRD located on Salt Spring Island. It is represented
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Carleton County, New Brunswick

    Carleton County, New Brunswick

    Carleton County (2011 population 27,019) is located in west-central New Brunswick, Canada. The county is located in western New Brunswick, it borders on the west, the State of Maine; on the south, York County; on the north, Victoria County and is bisected by the Saint John River. Potato farming is a major industry. The scenic town of Hartland is home to the longest covered bridge in the world. There are five incorporated municipalities within Carleton County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into eleven parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There is one First Nations reserve in Carleton County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): Shown with 2001 populations:
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County

    Cumberland County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The name Cumberland was applied by Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Monckton to the captured Fort Beauséjour on June 18, 1755 in honour of the third son of King George II, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, victor at Culloden in 1746 and Commander in Chief of the British forces. The Mi'kmaq name for the area was "Kwesomalegek" meaning "hardwood point". Cumberland County was founded on August 17, 1759. When the Township of Parrsboro was divided in 1840, one part was annexed to Cumberland County and the other part annexed to Colchester. The dividing line between Cumberland and Colchester was established in 1840. In 1897, a portion of the boundary line between the Counties of Colchester and Cumberland was fixed and defined. The county thrived in the 19th century with the development of lumbering, shipbuilding and coal mining. Deforestation and rural outmigration in the 20th century led to the abandonment of some communities such as Eatonville and New Yarmouth. The county has a total area of 4,271.23 km (1,649.13 sq mi). Cumberland County is rich in natural resources with extensive forest land supporting lumber mills
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Oxford County

    Oxford County

    Oxford County is a regional municipality and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario, located in the Southwestern portion of the province. The regional seat is in Woodstock. Oxford County has functioned as a regional municipality since 2001, despite still containing the word county in its official title. Oxford County comprises In 1788, the Hesse District was established within Upper Canada covering the territory of what is today southwestern Ontario. Four years later it became the Western District with the establishment of Norfolk County which included the territory of present-day Oxford County. In 1793, Abraham Canfield a United Empire Loyalist from Connecticut, settled in the "Township of Oxford on the Thames". In 1798, these lands were included into a new London District. The Brock District, containing the Oxford County territory, was then split off from the London District in 1840, after Upper Canada had been replaced by the Canada West portion of the Province of Canada governance. The boundaries of Oxford county for most of its existence were established in 1850 with the implementation of the Baldwin Act. In 1855, Norwich Township in the county's southeast was
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Regional Municipality of Durham

    Regional Municipality of Durham

    The Regional Municipality of Durham, informally referred to as Durham Region, is a regional municipality located in Southern Ontario east of Toronto, Ontario. It has an area of approximately 2,500 square kilometres. The towns of Pickering and Ajax make up part of the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area with the communities of Oshawa, Whitby, and Clarington making up the Oshawa Census Metropolitan Area. The regional government is headquartered in Whitby. The southern portion of the region, on Lake Ontario is primarily suburban in nature, forming the eastern end of the 905 belt of suburbs around Toronto. The northern area comprises rural areas and small towns. The Region of Durham was established in 1974 as one of several new regional governments in the Province of Ontario, primarily in fast-growing urban and suburban areas. Durham Region encompasses areas that were previously part of Ontario County and the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham. It was the culmination of a series of studies into municipal governance in the "Oshawa-Centred Region" that had begun in the late 1960s. The ultimate boundaries of the region were somewhat different than had been anticipated; for example,
    5.50
    2 votes
    203

    Chatham-Kent

    Chatham-Kent (2011 population 103,671) is a single-tier municipality in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Mostly rural, its centres of population are Blenheim, Chatham, Dresden, Ridgetown, Tilbury and Wallaceburg. The current Municipality of Chatham-Kent was created in 1998 by the merger of Kent County and its municipalities. The former city of Chatham began as a naval dockyard in the 1790s, as it straddles the Thames River. The town was named after Chatham, Kent, England, which was also developed around a naval dockyard. In England, the name Chatham came from the British root ceto and the Old English ham thus meaning a forest settlement. Following the American Revolution and the Gnadenhutten Massacre, a group of Christian Munsee Indians settled in what is now Moraviantown. In the War of 1812, the Battle of the Thames took place between Moraviantown and Thamesville on October 5, 1813. During the 19th century, the area was part of the Underground Railroad. As a result, Chatham-Kent is now part of the African-Canadian Heritage Tour. Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site is a museum of the Dawn Settlement, established in 1841 by Josiah Henson near Dresden as refuge for the many slaves who
    4.67
    3 votes
    204
    Sudbury District

    Sudbury District

    The Sudbury District is a district in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1894 from townships of eastern Algoma District and west Nipissing District. The overwhelming majority of the district (about 92%) is unincorporated and part of Unorganized North Sudbury District. With the exception of Chapleau, all of the district's incorporated municipalities are found in the area immediately surrounding the city of Greater Sudbury to the west, east and south. North of the Greater Sudbury area, the district is sparsely populated; between Sudbury and Chapleau, only unincorporated settlements, ghost towns and small First Nations reserves are found. Because the districts of Northern Ontario are unincorporated territorial divisions, unlike the counties or regional municipalities of Southern Ontario, the city of Greater Sudbury is legally defined as part of the district in the geographic sense. Politically, however, the district and the city are considered two distinct census divisions and two distinct jurisdictions for provincial government services. The district's social services board — which has offices in the district seat of Espanola, as well as
    4.67
    3 votes
    205
    Coaticook Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Coaticook Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Coaticook is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Coaticook. On September 3, 1783, as a result of the signing of the Treaty of Paris the American Revolutionary War ended with Great Britain. Quebec's border with the states of Vermont and New Hampshire was established at 45 degrees north latitude. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Division No. 10, Alberta

    Division No. 10, Alberta

    Division No. 10 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the east-central portion of central Alberta and includes Alberta's portion of the City of Lloydminster. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 10. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 10 had a population of 93,039 living in 36,620 of its 40,083 total dwellings, a 7.2% change from its 2006 population of 86,796. With a land area of 20,450 km (7,900 sq mi), it had a population density of 4.5 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 10 had a population of 86,796 living in 36,102 dwellings, a 4.5% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 20,451.56 km (7,896.39 sq mi) and a population density of 4.2 inhabitants per square kilometre.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    La Haute-Gaspésie Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Haute-Gaspésie Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Haute-Gaspésie is a regional county municipality in the Gaspésie–Îles-de-la-Madeleine region of eastern Quebec, Canada, on the Gaspé peninsula. The regional county municipality seat is in Sainte-Anne-des-Monts. Prior to May 27, 2000, it was known as Denis-Riverin regional county municipality. Principal highways Secondary highways
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    La Matapédia Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Matapédia Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    La Matapédia is a regional county municipality in eastern Quebec, Canada at the base of the Gaspé peninsula, in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region. Its seat is in Amqui. It is named after the Matapédia River which runs through the western part of the RCM. La Matapédia was created on January 1, 1982, succeeding from the former Matapédia County Municipality. The region was subject to one of the last waves of colonization in Quebec, settled mostly by people from the Lower Saint-Lawrence between 1850 and 1950. It is a rural region crossed by the Notre Dame Mountains. Agriculture and logging, and its related industries (forestry and wood products), are the main economic activities. Population trend:
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Lunenburg County

    Lunenburg County

    Lunenburg County is a county located on the South Shore of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, It ranges from Hubbards to the east and Vogler's Cove to the west. Named in honour of the British king who was also the duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Lunenburg County was established in 1759, when peninsular Nova Scotia was divided into five counties. Three years later Lunenburg County was reduced in size when Queens County was established. Following the establishment of Queens County in 1762, Hants County in 1781, and Shelburne and Sydney Counties in 1784, the boundaries of all nine of the counties were defined by the Council of Nova Scotia. By Chapter 52 of the Statutes of 1863 the Township of Chester in the County of Lunenburg was made a separate district for certain specified purposes. That statute provided authority for the appointment of a Custos Rotulorum and for the establishment of a general sessions of the peace for the District of Chester, with the same powers as if it were a separate county. Lunenburg County consists of five municipalities, namely, the towns of Bridgewater, Lunenburg and Mahone Bay and the municipal districts of Chester and Lunenburg. There are also two
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Ottawa

    Ottawa

    Ottawa (/ˈɒtəwɑː/ or /ˈɒtəwə/) is the capital of Canada. It is the second largest city in Ontario and the fourth largest city in the country. The city is located on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of Southern Ontario. Ottawa borders Gatineau, Quebec, located on the north bank of the Ottawa River; together they form the National Capital Region (NCR). Founded in 1826 as Bytown and incorporated as "Ottawa" in 1855, the city has evolved into a political and technological centre of Canada. Its original boundaries were expanded through numerous minor annexations and ultimately replaced by a new city incorporation and major amalgamation in 2001 which significantly increased its land area. The name "Ottawa" is derived from the Algonquin word adawe, meaning "to trade". Initially an Irish and French Christian settlement, Ottawa has become a multicultural city with a diverse population. The 2011 census had the city's population as 883,391, and the metropolitan population as 1,236,324. Mercer ranks Ottawa with the second highest quality of living of any large city in the Americas, and 14th highest in the world. It is also rated the second cleanest city in Canada, and
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako, British Columbia

    Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako (RDBN) is a regional district in the Canadian province of British Columbia, Canada. As of the 2006 census, the population was 38,243. The area is 73,419.01 square kilometres. The regional district offices are in Burns Lake. Its geographical components are the Bulkley Valley, the northern part of the Nechako Country, and the Omineca Country, including portions of the Hazelton Mountains and Omineca Mountains in the west and north of the regional district, respectively. The dominant landform is the Nechako Plateau. Neighbouring regional districts are the Kitimat-Stikine, Central Coast, Cariboo, Fraser-Fort George, and Peace River Regional Districts; on its north the boundary with the southern edge of the remote Stikine Region is separated from the Bulkley-Nechako Regional District by the 56th parallel north. The boundaries of the regional district near-entirely coincide with the territory of the Dakelh or Carrier peoples, and also some of that of the Dunneza (Beaver), but their reserves and governments lie outside the regional district system. Roughly identical in area to the old New Caledonia fur district in the days of the North West Company,
    6.00
    1 votes
    212
    Regional Municipality of Peel

    Regional Municipality of Peel

    The Regional Municipality of Peel (also known as Peel Region) is a regional municipality in Southern Ontario, Canada. It consists of three municipalities to the west and northwest of Toronto: the cities of Brampton and Mississauga, and the town of Caledon. The entire region is part of the Greater Toronto Area and the inner ring of Golden Horseshoe. The regional seat is in Brampton. With a population of 1,296,814 (2011 census), Peel Region is the second-largest municipality in Ontario after Toronto. Owing to immigration and its transportation infrastructure (with seven 400-series highways serving the region, and Toronto Pearson International Airport located completely within its boundaries), Peel Region is a rapidly-growing area with a young population and an increasing profile. Mississauga occupies the southernmost portion of the region, and is, with 713,443 residents, the largest in population (the sixth largest in Canada). It reaches from Lake Ontario north to near Highway 407. In the centre is Brampton, a smaller city of 523,911 (ranked 9th by population). Finally, by far the largest in area and the most sparsely populated part of the region is Caledon, which is home to only
    6.00
    1 votes
    213
    Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District, British Columbia

    Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District, British Columbia

    The Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District is a quasi-municipal administrative area in British Columbia. It is located on British Columbia's west coast and includes Haida Gwaii (formerly Queen Charlotte Islands), the largest of which are Graham Island and Moresby Island. Its administrative offices are in the city of Prince Rupert.
    6.00
    1 votes
    214
    Westmorland County, New Brunswick

    Westmorland County, New Brunswick

    Westmorland County (2011 population 144,158) is located in southeastern New Brunswick, Canada. The county contains the fast-growing commercial centre of Moncton as well as its northern and eastern suburbs. Also located in the county are the university town of Sackville and the tourist destination of Shediac. Westmorland County is centrally located in the Maritimes and is New Brunswick's most populous county. Fishing and tourism are important industries along the Northumberland Strait shore while there is some mixed farming in the Petitcodiac River Valley and in the Tantramar Marsh region. The city of Moncton accounts for half the county's population and has developed as a major transportation, distribution, commercial and retail centre. Dorchester is the historical shire town of the county. There are eleven incorporated municipalities within Westmorland County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into seven parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There is one First Nations reservation in Westmorland County (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings):
    6.00
    1 votes
    215
    Regional District of Central Kootenay, British Columbia

    Regional District of Central Kootenay, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Central Kootenay (RDCK) is a regional district in the province of British Columbia, Canada. As of the 2006 census, the population was 55,883. The area is 22,130.72 square kilometres. The administrative centre is located in the city of Nelson. Other municipalities include the City of Castlegar, the Town of Creston, the Village of Salmo, the Village of Nakusp, the Village of Kaslo, the Village of New Denver, the Village of Silverton, and the Village of Slocan (known locally as Slocan City to distinguish it from the appellation "the Slocan" for the entire Slocan Valley).
    4.33
    3 votes
    216
    Division No. 15, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 15, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 15, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the north-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is Prince Albert. According to the 2006 census, 79,018 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 19,612.51 km² (7,572.43 sq mi).
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Division No. 2, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 2, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 2, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the south-southeastern part of the province, on the United States border. The most populous community in this division is Weyburn. According to the 2006 census, 20,363 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 16,859.18 km² (6,509.36 sq mi).
    5.00
    2 votes
    218
    Division No. 8, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 8, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 8, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the west-southwestern part of the province, bordering Alberta. The most populous community in this division is Swift Current. According to the 2006 census, 29,199 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 22,233.27 km² (8,584.31 sq mi). The following communities are located in this Census division: Cities Towns Villages Hamlets Indian Reserves
    5.00
    2 votes
    219
    Kenora District

    Kenora District

    Kenora District is a district and census division in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. It was created in 1907 from parts of Rainy River District. It is geographically the largest division in that province; at 407,213.01 square kilometres (157,225.82 sq mi), it comprises almost 38 percent of the province's land area, making it larger than Newfoundland and Labrador, and slightly smaller than Sweden. Kenora District also has the lowest population density of any of Ontario's census divisions, although it ranks 38th out of 50 by population. The district seat is the City of Kenora. The northern part, north of the Albany River and known sometimes as the Patricia Portion, became part of Ontario in 1912. It was originally designated as the separate Patricia District, but was added to the Kenora District in 1927. As with the other districts of Northern Ontario, Kenora District has no equivalent to the county or regional municipality level of government that exists in Southern Ontario. All government services in the district are instead provided by the local municipalities, by local services boards in some unincorporated communities, or directly by the provincial government. The climate is very
    5.00
    2 votes
    220
    Lotbinière Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Lotbinière Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Lotbinière is a regional county municipality in the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec. It is an almost exclusively rural RCM, with no village with a population above 4,000. As of the Canada 2011 Census, the RCM had a population of 29,617. Its seat is in Sainte-Croix. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    5.00
    2 votes
    221
    Northumberland County

    Northumberland County

    Northumberland County is situated on the north shore of Lake Ontario, in central Ontario, Canada. It is located east of the Regional Municipality of Durham (formerly Durham County), west of Hastings County, southeast of Kawartha Lakes and south of Peterborough County. The county seat is Cobourg. Together with Durham County, it formed the Newcastle District from 1798 to 1849 and the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham from 1850 to 1973. It was first aggressively settled by United Empire Loyalists fleeing the former 13 British American Colonies in the late 18th century. The Crown provided plots to the settlers for nominal sums (with the stipulation of making the land productive in a set number of years) or free to those who had served against the American Colonial Army. Following the war of 1812 many port towns, Cobourg in particular became important centres for commercial activity and a landing point for European immigrants arriving on steamers. Northumberland County consists of 7 municipalities: First Nations reserves: Historic populations:
    5.00
    2 votes
    222
    Shawinigan

    Shawinigan

    Shawinigan is a city located on the Saint-Maurice River in the Mauricie area in Quebec, Canada. It had a population of 50,060 as of the Canada 2011 Census. Shawinigan is also a territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Quebec, coextensive with the city of Shawinigan. Its geographical code is 36. Shawinigan is the seat of the judicial district of Saint-Maurice. The name Shawinigan has had numerous spellings over time: Chaouinigane, Oshaouinigane, Assaouinigane, Achawénégan, Chawinigame, Shawenigane, Chaouénigane. It may mean "south portage", "portage of beeches", "angular portage", or "summit" or "crest". Before 1958 the city was known as Shawinigan Falls. In 1651, the priest Buteaux was the first European known to have travelled up the Saint-Maurice River to this river's first set of great falls. Afterwards, missionairies going to the Upper Saint-Maurice would rest here. Before Shawinigan Falls was established, the local economy had been largely based on lumber and agriculture. In the late 1890s, Shawinigan Falls drew the interest of foreign entrepreneurs such as John Joyce and John Edward Aldred of the Shawinigan Water & Power Company
    5.00
    2 votes
    223
    Division No. 12, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 12, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 12, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the west-central part of the province. The most populous community in this division is Battleford. According to the 2006 census, 22,452 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 13,887.42 km² (5,361.96 sq mi).
    4.50
    2 votes
    224
    Les Maskoutains Regional County Municipality

    Les Maskoutains Regional County Municipality

    Les Maskoutains is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region in southwestern Quebec, Canada. Its seat is in Saint-Hyacinthe. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    4.50
    2 votes
    225
    Fraser-Fort George Regional District, British Columbia

    Fraser-Fort George Regional District, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Fraser-Fort George (RDFFG) is a regional district located in the Central Interior of British Columbia. It is bounded by the Alberta border to the east, the Columbia-Shuswap and Thompson-Nicola Regional Districts to the south/southeast, Cariboo Regional District to the southwest, the Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako to the west, and the Peace River Regional District to the north/northeast. As of the 2006 Census, the Regional District had a population of 92,264, and a land area of 51,083.73 km² (19,723.54 sq mi). The offices of the regional district are located at Prince George. NB Indian Reserves are not part of municipal or regional district governance and are outside the regional district's jurisdiction, and also counted separately in the census figures. (Statistics Canada, 2001)
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Le Haut-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    Le Haut-Richelieu Regional County Municipality

    Le Haut-Richelieu (Upper Richelieu) is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region in southwestern Quebec, Canada. Its seat is in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. It is named for the Richelieu River which runs south-north through it. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais Regional County Municipality

    Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais Regional County Municipality

    Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais (French for "The hills of the Outaouais") is a regional county municipality in the Outaouais region of western Quebec, Canada. The region nearly encircles the City of Gatineau which is to the south. Its administrative seat is in Chelsea, Quebec. It was created in January 1991 when the Communauté régionale de l'Outaouais (Outaouais Regional Community) was split into Les Collines-de-l'Outaouais RCM and the Communauté urbaine de l'Outaouais (Outaouais Urban Community, now City of Gatineau). The region is home to the majority of Gatineau Park. It is bisected by the Gatineau River which flows from north to south. The Ottawa River forms the southwestern boundary.
    5.00
    1 votes
    228
    Keewatin Region, Nunavut

    Keewatin Region, Nunavut

    The Keewatin Region of Nunavut in Canada is one of three census division in the territory as used by Statistics Canada. The borders of the region are identical to the Kivalliq Region.
    4.00
    2 votes
    229
    Baffin Region, Nunavut

    Baffin Region, Nunavut

    The Baffin Region of Nunavut in Canada is one of three census division in the territory as used by Statistics Canada. The borders of the region are identical to the Qikiqtaaluk Region.
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Beauharnois-Salaberry Regional County Municipality

    Beauharnois-Salaberry Regional County Municipality

    Beauharnois-Salaberry is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec. Its seat is Beauharnois. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
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    Division No. 18, Alberta

    Division No. 18, Alberta

    Division No. 18 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. It is located in the southeast corner of northern Alberta and its largest urban community is the Town of Grande Cache. The boundaries of the division are coextensive with the outer boundaries of the Municipal District of Greenview No. 16. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 18. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 18 had a population of 14,534 living in 5,376 of its 6,066 total dwellings, a 1.5% change from its 2006 population of 14,322. With a land area of 33,205 km² (12,821 sq mi), it had a population density of 0.4 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 18 had a population of 14,322 living in 5,553 dwellings, a 0.2% decrease from 2001. The census division has a land area of 33,205.21 km² (12,820.60 sq mi) and a population density of 0.4 inhabitants per square kilometre.
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    Division No. 5, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 5, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 5, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the east-southeastern part of the province, bordering Manitoba. The most populous community in this division is Melville. According to the 2006 census, 30,529 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 14,782.84 km² (5,707.69 sq mi).
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    Gloucester County, New Brunswick

    Gloucester County, New Brunswick

    Gloucester County (2011 population 77,792) is located in the northeastern corner of New Brunswick, Canada. Fishing, mining and forestry are the major industries in the county. The eastern section of the county is known for its Acadian culture. There are eighteen incorporated municipalities within the county (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings): The county is subdivided into ten parishes (listed by 2006 population counts and national census rankings): There is one First Nations reservation in Gloucester County (listed by 2011 population counts and national census rankings):
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    Greater Sudbury

    Greater Sudbury

    Greater Sudbury (2011 census population 160,274) is a city in Ontario, Canada, which was created in 2001 by merging the cities and towns of the former Regional Municipality of Sudbury with several previously unincorporated geographic townships. It is the largest city in Northern Ontario by population and the 24th largest metropolitan area in Canada. By land area, it is the largest city in Ontario and the seventh largest municipality by area in Canada. Sudbury, as it is commonly known, is administratively separate and thus not part of any district, county or regional municipality. Sudbury has a humid continental climate with warm and often hot summers and long, cold, snowy winters. The population resides in an urban core and many smaller communities scattered around 300 lakes and among hills of rock blackened by historical mining activity. Sudbury was once a major lumber centre and a world leader in nickel mining. Mining and related industries dominated the economy for much of the 20th century. The two major mining companies which shaped the history of Sudbury were Inco, now Vale, which employed more than 25% of the population by the 1970s, and Falconbridge, now Xstrata. Sudbury has
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    Halifax County

    Halifax County

    Halifax County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The Municipality of the County of Halifax was the municipal government of Halifax County, apart from the separately incorporated towns and cities therein. The Municipality was dissolved in 1996, together with those town and city governments, in their amalgamation into Halifax Regional Municipality. Deriving its name from George Montagu-Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax (1716–1771) Halifax County was established by Order-in-Council on August 17, 1759. The boundaries of four other counties - Annapolis, Kings, Cumberland and Lunenburg - were specifically defined at that time, with Halifax County comprising all the part of peninsular Nova Scotia that was not within their limits. Following the Seven Years' War, Cape Breton Island was formally annexed to Nova Scotia. For a time it formed part of Halifax County. The boundaries of Halifax County were modified in 1822. That part of St. Mary's Township (established in 1818) which had been in Halifax County was annexed to and included within Sydney County. The dividing line between the Districts of Halifax and Colchester was confirmed and established on May 3, 1828. In 1835, Halifax
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    Nipissing District

    Nipissing District

    Nipissing District is a district in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was created in 1858. The district seat is North Bay. In 2011, the population was 84,736. The land area is 17,103.52 square kilometres (6,603.71 sq mi); the population density was 5.0 per square kilometre (13 /sq mi), making it the most densely populated district in Ontario. In addition, the eastern part of the town of Kearney is within Nipissing District, but the entire town is enumerated with the Parry Sound District.
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    Queens County

    Queens County

    Queens County is located in central Prince Edward Island, Canada. The county is geographically divided by the Hillsborough River's estuary, a tidal inlet which almost splits the county and Prince Edward Island. It is the richest and most populous county in the province of Prince Edward Island. The county's geography varies from picturesque shorelines of sandstone cliffs, sandy beaches and sheltered bays on the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Northumberland Strait, to extensive farming operations throughout interior regions. Topography ranges from relatively flat to rolling hills in the central hill lands known as the Bonshaw Hills. The county was named by Capt. Samuel Holland in 1765 for the queen consort of King George III, Queen Charlotte (1744-1818). As such, Queens County's county seat is Charlottetown, which was also chosen as the colonial capital because of its central location. Today, urban sprawl extending from Charlottetown in the centre of the county is the region's most dominant feature; many rural parts of the county within the Charlottetown census agglomeration, and outside, are facing increased pressures to subdivide and develop into suburbs and exurbs.
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    Division No. 15, Alberta

    Division No. 15, Alberta

    Division No. 15 is a census division in Alberta, Canada. The majority of the division is located in Alberta's Rockies, while the southernmost portion of the division is located within southern Alberta. The division's largest urban community is the Town of Canmore. The following census subdivisions (municipalities or municipal equivalents) are located within Alberta's Division No. 15. In the 2011 Census, Division No. 15 had a population of 35,983 living in 13,199 of its 17,606 total dwellings, a 5.4% change from its 2006 population of 34,150. With a land area of 28,400 km (11,000 sq mi), it had a population density of 1.3 people per square kilometre in 2011. In 2006, Division No. 15 had a population of 34,150 living in 16,080 dwellings, a 0.2% increase from 2001. The census division has a land area of 28,399.98 km (10,965.29 sq mi) and a population density of 1.2 inhabitants per square kilometre.
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    Division No. 9, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 9, Saskatchewan

    Division No. 9, Saskatchewan, Canada, is one of the eighteen census divisions within the province, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the eastern part of the province, bordering Manitoba. The most populous community in this division is Yorkton. According to the 2006 census, 34,736 people lived in this division. It has a land area of 15,270.84 km² (5,896.10 sq mi).
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    Lajemmerais Regional County Municipality

    Lajemmerais Regional County Municipality

    Marguerite-D'Youville is a regional county municipality located in the Montérégie region of southwestern Quebec, Canada. The seat is in Verchères. The RCM was formerly named Lajemmerais Regional County Municipality, after Christophe du Frost de Lajemmerais, the father of Marguerite d'Youville. On February 12, 2011, the name was changed to honor d'Youville directly. However, Statistics Canada retained the name "Lajemmerais" for the 2011 census because the name change came after its reference date of January 1, 2012. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
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    Le Val-Saint-François Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Val-Saint-François Regional County Municipality, Quebec

    Le Val-Saint-François is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is Richmond. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
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    Regional District of Nanaimo, British Columbia

    Regional District of Nanaimo, British Columbia

    The Regional District of Nanaimo is a regional district located on the eastern coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It is bordered to the south by the Cowichan Valley Regional District, to the west by the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District, and to the northwest by the Comox Valley Regional District. Its administration offices are located in Nanaimo. During the 2011 census, its population was established at 146,567. The Regional District of Nanaimo was incorporated on August 24, 1967. It includes the cities of Nanaimo and Parksville, the town of Qualicum Beach, and the district of Lantzville, as well as the unincorporated communities of Cedar, Extension, South Wellington, East Wellington, Gabriola Island, Mudge Island, Nanoose Bay, Errington, Coombs, Dashwood, Qualicum Bay, Bowser and Deep Bay. These unincorporated communities are found in the Regional district electoral areas of A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. It is 2,034.94 km² (785.69 sq mi) in land area. The region owns and operates Nanaimo Regional Transit, which provides conventional local bus routes and special needs paratransit services.
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    Regional Municipality of Niagara

    Regional Municipality of Niagara

    The Regional Municipality of Niagara, also known as the Niagara Region, or colloquially "Regional Niagara", is a regional municipality comprising twelve municipalities of Southern Ontario, Canada. The region occupies most of the Niagara Peninsula. Its eastern boundary is the Niagara River, which is also the border with the United States. It is bounded on the north by Lake Ontario and on the south by Lake Erie. Unique natural landscapes make the Niagara Region an important centre for agriculture and tourism in Canada. The most important agricultural enterprise in Niagara is viticulture, or winemaking. The Niagara Wine Route, which connects visitors to dozens of wineries, is a growing tourism draw while the internationally-renowned Niagara Falls is one of Canada's major tourist attractions. Along with Shaw Festival, held annually in Niagara-on-the-Lake, and the Welland Canal, the Regional Municipality of Niagara receives up to 12 million visitors each year. Cities Towns Townships Historic populations: Racial groups Religious profile Top ten largest ethnicities West Niagara East Niagara 400-Series expressways: Other highways:
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    Rouville Regional County Municipality

    Rouville Regional County Municipality

    Rouville is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec, Canada. Its seat is Marieville. Mother tongue language from Canada 2006 Census Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, including external routes that start or finish at the county border:
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    Thunder Bay District

    Thunder Bay District

    Thunder Bay District is a district and census division in Northwestern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. The district seat is Thunder Bay. In 2011, the population was 146,057. The land area is 103,719.51 square kilometres (40,046.33 sq mi); the population density was 1.4 per square kilometre (3.6 /sq mi). Most of the district (93.5%) is unincorporated and part of the Unorganized Thunder Bay District. Thunder Bay District was created in 1871 by provincial statute from the western half of Algoma District, named after a large bay on the north shore of Lake Superior. Its northern and western boundaries were uncertain until Ontario's right to Northwestern Ontario was determined by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Until about 1902 it was often called Algoma West from the name of the provincial constituency established in 1885. The following districts include areas that were formerly part of Thunder Bay District: Almost 80 per cent of the district's population lives in the city of Thunder Bay Census Metropolitan Area; no other community in the district exceeds 7,000 in population. Historic populations:
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    Urban agglomeration of Longueuil

    Urban agglomeration of Longueuil

    The urban agglomeration of Longueuil was created on January 1, 2006 as a result of the de-amalgamation process brought upon by the Charest government. It encompasses all the boroughs that were merged into the previous city of Longueuil and still retains the same area as that mega-city. The urban agglomeration of Longueuil is coextensive with the territory equivalent to a regional county municipality (TE) and census division (CD) of Longueuil, whose geographical code is 58. In 2012, Longueuil mayor Caroline St-Hilaire proposed that the Urban agglomeration of Longueuil leave the Montérégie and become its own administrative region. Longueuil merged on January 1, 2002 with the communities of Boucherville, Brossard, Greenfield Park, LeMoyne, Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Saint-Hubert, and Saint-Lambert. These cities became boroughs of the Longueuil megacity. Saint-Lambert and LeMoyne combined to become one borough called Saint-Lambert/LeMoyne. The former city of Longueuil was renamed Le Vieux-Longueuil borough. The former city hall of Brossard, became the city hall for the new city of Longueuil. On June 20, 2004, the former boroughs of Boucherville, Brossard, Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville
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    Wellington County

    Wellington County

    Wellington County is a county located in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The County, which is made up of two towns and five townships, is predominantly rural in nature. However many of its residents commute to Guelph, Kitchener, Brampton, Mississauga, and even Toronto. The City of Guelph is part of the Wellington County census division, but is separated from the county's administration. In 1837 by Act of Parliament the new District of Wellington was formed and a court house and jail in the town of Guelph were authorized. In 1840 the county officials received their commissions. The District Council of the County of Wellington was formed and consisted of eighteen municipalities as follows: the town of Guelph, the villages of Fergus, Elora, Mount Forest and Orangeville, and the following historic townships: Historic populations: In October 2008, the County of Wellington was named one of Canada's Top 100 Employers by Mediacorp Canada Inc. and featured in Maclean's newsmagazine. Later that month, the County was recognized as one of Waterloo Area's Top Employers and featured in the Guelph Mercury newspaper.
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    Yarmouth County

    Yarmouth County

    For the ship built in Yarmouth County, see County of Yarmouth Yarmouth County is a rural county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. It has both traditional Anglo-Scottish and Acadian French culture as well as significant inland wilderness areas, including over 365 lakes and several major rivers. It is composed of three municipalities that make up the county, the town of Yarmouth, the municipality of Yarmouth, and the municipality of Argyle. The name Yarmouth first appeared as a projected township in Nova Scotia in 1759. There is some speculation it was named after Yarmouth, Massachusetts, as some of the earliest English settlers arrived from Cape Cod on 9 June 1761. It is more likely the Township was named after Lady Yarmouth, a mistress of King George II. Originally the area was part of Lunenburg County. In 1761 it became part of Queens County; in 1784 it became part of Shelburne County and finally became a county on its own in 1836. The description of Yarmouth County was modified in 1846. The county was a major international shipbuilding centre in the 19th century, producing hundreds of ships including the namesake County of Yarmouth in 1884. In the 20th Century, Yarmouth
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