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Best Canadian aboriginal group of All Time

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    1

    Haisla Nation

    The Haisla Nation is a First Nations government in the North Coast region of the Canadian province of British Columbia, centred on the reserve community of Kitamaat Village, which is near the similarly named town of Kitimat. The Kitlope Valley is rich in natural resources, especially Salmon. The Haisla Nation includes two once-separate peoples, the Kitamaat and the Kitlope. The Kitlope, also spelled Gitlope, means "people of the rocks" or "people from the opening in the mountains" in the Tsimshian language and was the term used for them by the neighbouring Tsimshian people. They call themselves Henaksiala, while the Tsimshian meaning of the name for the Kitamaat group – whose name for themselves is Haisla – means "people of the snow". Despite their common names being in Tsimshian, the Haisla people speak the Haisla language, and were, like their language and along with the neighbouring Heiltsuk and Wuikinuxv peoples, incorrectly known in the past as the "Northern Kwakiutl". The community is renowned for its delicious eulachon grease, and has produced many talented West Coast artists such as Derek Wilson, Hank Robertson, Lyle Wilson and Sammy Robinson. The Haisla Braves still hold
    7.13
    8 votes
    2

    Kwicksutaineuk First Nation

    The Kwicksutaineuk First Nation is a First Nation in British Columbia, Canada, on Vancouver Island. Its citizens have been operating under a boil water advisory for 9 years .
    7.83
    6 votes
    3

    Nuxálk Nation

    {{nocitations|date=June 2011} The Nuxalk Nation (Nuxalk: Nuxálk; pronounced [nuxálk], with the 'x' like German ach), also referred to as the Bella Coola or Bellacoola, are an Indigenous First Nation in Canada, living in the area in and around Bella Coola, British Columbia. Their language is also called Nuxalk. The name Bella Coola, often used in academic writing, is not preferred by the Nuxálk; it is thought to be a derivation of the neighbouring coastal Heiltsuk people's name for the Nuxálk, bḷ́xʷlá (rendered plxwlaq's in Nuxalk orthography), meaning "stranger". The Nuxalk peoples, known collectively as Nuxalkmc, were four tribes (the Kimsquit from Dean Channel, the Tallheo/Talio from South Bentinck, the Stuic (Stuie) from Tweedsmuir Park, and the Kwalhna/Kwatna from King Island) who gathered in their current Bella Coola Valley, settling together based on cultural and linguistic similarities. Not everyone settled within the current Nuxalk Nation, and as such the Nuxalk share many family ties with their neighbours and beyond, most extensively with the Heiltsuk. The Nuxalk Nation is a member of the Oweekeno-Kitasoo-Nuxalk Tribal Council, and until March 2008 was a member of the
    7.67
    6 votes
    4

    Naotkamegwanning First Nation

    Naotkamegwanning First Nation, formerly known as Whitefish Bay First Nation and known in the Ojibwe language as Ne-adikamegwaning (Of the Whitefish Point), is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in Kenora District, Ontario near Sioux Narrows of Lake of the Woods. Total registered population in September, 2010, was 1177, of which the on-reserve population was 713. The First Nation is a member of the Bimose Tribal Council, a regional tribal council that is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3. The First Nation have reserved for themselves four reserves: Naotkamegwanning First Nation is currently governed by Chief Warren White and 4 Councillors: Ryan White, Alana Merrick, Melanie Copenace, and Garnet Namaypoke. Their term of offices expires November 15, 2013.
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Blackfoot

    Blackfoot

    The Blackfoot Confederacy or Niitsítapi (meaning "original people"; c.f. Ojibwe: Anishinaabeg and Quinnipiac: Eansketambawg) is the collective name of three First Nations in Alberta and one Native American tribe in Montana. The Blackfoot Confederacy consists of the North Peigan (Aapátohsipikáni or Piikáni), South Peigan (Aamsskáápipikani or Piegan Blackfeet), the Kainai Nation (Káínaa- “Many Chief people” or Blood), and the Siksika Nation (“Blackfoot”, or more correctly Siksikáwa - "Blackfoot people"). The Siksika called themselves Sao-kitapiiksi - "Plains People". The South Peigan are located in Montana, and the other three are located in Alberta. Together they call themselves the Niitsítapi (the "Original People"). These groups shared a common language of the Algonquian family, as well as a common culture. They also had treaties of mutual defense, and members of the groups freely intermarried. The Sarcee (called by the Blackfoot: saahsi or sarsi - "the stubborn ones") and the Atsina became allies, joined the Confederacy and essentially merged with the Pikuni. The Sarcee are a branch of the Athabascan-language group, or Tinneh (Dene) language family, and had migrated from the
    6.43
    7 votes
    6

    Kluskus First Nation

    The Kluskus First Nation is the band government of the Lhoosk’uz, a Dakelh people whose main reserve located on the Chilcotin Plateau 130 km west of the city of Quesnel, British Columbia, Canada. The First Nation is a member of the Carrier-Chilcotin Tribal Council, which includes both Tsilhqot'in and Carrier (Dakelh) communities (the Kluskus First Nation is Carrier). While the Kluskus First Nation's offices are located near Quesnel. There are several Indian Reserves under the administration of the Kluskus First Nation:
    6.43
    7 votes
    7

    Lennox Island First Nation

    Lennox Island is a Mi'kmaq First Nation on Prince Edward Island, Canada, with its headquarters in Lennox Island, northeast of Tyne Valley. The band consists of a single reserve occupying all of Lennox Island. The Lennox Island First Nation was originally known as "L'nui Minegoo" or the Indian/People's Island, and later known as the Lennox Island Reserve or the Lennox Island Band. It was named after Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, by Samuel Holland; surveyor. It also included the reserves that now comprise the Abegweit First Nation. Original permanent inhabitants included Chief Francis Francis who resided there after the Mi'kmaq were displaced from Cortin Island. The Saint Ann Mission was later established on the island.
    8.40
    5 votes
    8

    Takla Lake First Nation

    Takla Lake Nation is a First Nation based around Takla Lake, 400 km north of Prince George, British Columbia, Canada. The main community is at Takla Landing, at the north end of Takla Lake, but the band services 17 reserves totaling 809 hectares. Takla Lake First Nation has approximately 650 members. It was created by the amalgamation of the Takla Lake and Fort Connelly bands in 1959. The main Takla reserve has a number of facilities The community is also home to the Nuswadeezulh Community School, offering Kindergarten to Grade 10, as well as adult education and alternate education classes. Nuswadeezulh means "Looking into the Future". A Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment was established by agreement with Takla First Nation and opened in October 1999. The detachment has two designated native police officers and one corporal non-commissioned officer in charge. Takla Lake is now accessible by an unpaved forestry road that branches off the Tache Road about 5 km short of the village of Tache. Until fairly recently, access was only by boat or float plane (see Takla Landing Water Aerodrome). Postal service is available at Takla Lake with mail pick-up and delivery once per week.
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Elsipogtog First Nation

    Elsipogtog First Nation

    The Elsipogtog First Nation ( /ɛlzɪˈbʊktʊk/), formerly called the Big Cove Band, is a Mi'kmaq First Nation in New Brunswick, Canada. The First Nation's territory comprises Richibucto Reserve #15, lying 8 kilometres southwest of Rexton, New Brunswick on the Richibucto River off of Route 116. It also comprises Soegao Reserve #35, lying 5 kilometres west of Moncton, New Brunswick. As of 2012, the Mi'kmaq population is 2,383 on-Reserve, and 709 off-Reserve. "Elsipogtog" or "L'sipuktuk" means "River of Fire". The area was also called the stronghold of Sikniktuk. The traditional district was assigned to the Mi'kmaq clan of Alguimou, or L'kimu. Misel Alguimou was baptised Michael Augustine in the 18th century. Chief Michael Augustine signed the Peace and Friendship Treaty with the British in 1761, on behalf of the Richibucto Tribe of Mi'kmaq. The Richibucto Reserve was established in 1802 and later reduced in size. Richibucto Reserve # 15 is also known as the Big Cove Reserve. It was also called Big Cove, Mesigig Oalnei, and currently known as Elsipogtog (Pacifique spelling), or L'sipuktuk (Francis-Smith variation) and Elsipogtog First Nation located in Weldford Parish, New Brunswick In
    6.83
    6 votes
    10

    Boothroyd First Nation

    The Boothroyd First Nation is a First Nations government Fraser Canyon area of the Central Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. Located near Boston Bar, it is a member of the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council along with the Boston Bar First Nation, also located in Boston Bar, and the Ashcroft First Nation near the town of Ashcroft. Other Nlaka'pamux bands belong to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration.
    7.80
    5 votes
    11

    Lil'wat First Nation

    The Lil'wat First Nation, aka the Lil'wat Nation or the Mount Currie Indian Band, is a First Nations government located in the southern Coast Mountains region of the Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Lillooet Tribal Council, which is the largest grouping of band governments of the St'at'imc or Stl'atl'imx people (aka the Lillooet people). Other St'at'imc governments include the smaller In-SHUCK-ch Nation on the lower Lillooet River to the southwest, and the independent N'quatqua First Nation at the near end of Anderson Lake from Mount Currie, which is the main reserve of the Lil'wat First Nation, and also one of the largest Indian reserves by population in Canada. The Lil'wat First Nation's offices are located at Mount Currie, British Columbia, about 5 miles east of Pemberton, British Columbia, which is also located in the Lillooet River valley. Mount Currie is also about 20 miles "as the crow flies" from the luxury destination resort of Whistler, British Columbia. "Lil'wat", which is the origin of the post-colonial name for all St'at'imc peoples (aka the Lillooet people), is from a St'at'imcets word referring to a variety of wild onion,
    7.80
    5 votes
    12

    Stone First Nation

    The Stone First Nation or Yunesit'in First Nation is a band government of the Yunesit'in subgroup of the Tsilhqot'in people, whose territory is the Chilcotin District in the western Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Tsilhqot'in Tribal Council. The people of the Stone First Nation are known as the Yunesit'in in the Chilcotin language. The Stone First Nation's offices are located at the town of Hanceville, about 90 km west of Williams Lake. 51°55′10″N 123°02′30″W / 51.91944°N 123.04167°W / 51.91944; -123.04167 (Hanceville) Indian Reserves under the administration of the Stone First Nation are: Not participating in BC Treaty Process. The Stone First Nation has 400 members with 211 living on reserve. There is a youth centre and maintained hockey rink; the school does not have a gym but there is a ball-hockey court outside.
    7.80
    5 votes
    13

    Carcross/Tagish First Nation

    The Carcross/Tagish First Nation (C/TFN or CTFN) is a First Nation in the Yukon Territory in Canada. Its original population centres were Carcross, Yukon and Tagish, Yukon, and Squanga, Yukon, although many of its citizens also live in Whitehorse. The languages originally spoken by Carcross/Tagish people were Tagish and Tlingit. The original gold discovery that led to the Klondike Gold Rush was made by Tagish people. The First Nation's Self Government Agreement came into effect in 2006. They are 1 of 11 Self Governing First Nations in the Yukon. The First Nation is run on a clan-based system of government. There are six clans represented within the governing structure of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation. The Daklaweidi and Yan Yedi clans are the Wolf Moiety, while the Deisheetaan, Ganaxtedi, Ishkahittaan and Kookhittaan clans are of the Crow Moiety. Each of these six clans select representatives that advise and shape Government policy & processes through various Councils and Teams such as: Elders Council, General Council, Executive Council, Land Use Team, Education Advisory Committee, Family Council, and the Housing Team. C/TFN Government Mission Statement: The Carcross/Tagish
    9.00
    4 votes
    14
    Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation

    Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation

    The Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation, formerly known as the Golden Lake First Nation, are an Algonquin First Nation in Ontario, Canada. Their territory is located in the former township of South Algona (now part of Bonnechere Valley) in the Ottawa Valley on Golden Lake. As of October, 2008, the registered population of the First Nation was 1,992 people, of which only 406 people lived on their own reserve. The name "Pikwàkanagàn" comes from the Algonquin, meaning "[beautiful] hilly country [covered] in evergreens". In September 1856, five families petitioned the Governor General for a grant of 200 acres (81 ha) of land per family since their hunting grounds had been opened up for settlement and sale. Their request was denied. However on September 17, 1873, the Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn received Crown Patent to a total of 1,561 acres (632 ha), which became the First Nation's reserve. Many Algonquin skills are still practiced among the Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn though assimilation with surrounding non-native communities and enforced Residential schooling has had an impact on their people, including several generations of their population raised without their culture, language
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    Tlingit

    Tlingit

    The Tlingit ( /ˈklɪŋkɨt/ or /ˈtlɪŋɡɨt/; also spelled Tlinkit) are an indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast of America. Their name for themselves is Lingít, meaning "People of the Tides" (pronounced [ɬɪŋkɪ́t]). The Russian name Koloshi (Колоши) (from an Alutiiq term for the labret) or the related German name Koulischen may be encountered in older historical literature, such as Shelikhov's 1796 map of Russian America. The Tlingit are a matrilineal society that developed a complex hunter-gatherer culture in the temperate rainforest of the southeast Alaska coast and the Alexander Archipelago. An inland subgroup, known as the Inland Tlingit, inhabits the far northwestern part of the province of British Columbia and the southern Yukon Territory in Canada. The greatest territory historically occupied by the Tlingit extended from the Portland Canal along the present border between Alaska and British Columbia, north to the coast just southeast of the Copper River delta. The Tlingit occupied almost all of the Alexander Archipelago, except the southernmost end of Prince of Wales Island and its surroundings, where the Kaigani Haida moved just before the first encounters with
    7.60
    5 votes
    16

    Ashcroft First Nation

    The Ashcroft First Nation is a First Nations government Thompson Canyon area of the Central Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. Its Indian Reserves are located near the town of Ashcroft, British Columbia, it is a member of the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. Other Nlaka'pamux bands belong to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration. Indian Reserves under the administration of the Ashcroft First Nation are:
    8.75
    4 votes
    17

    Cayoose Creek First Nation

    The Cayoose Creek First Nation also known as the Cayoose Creek Indian Band, the Cayoose Creek Band, and the Sekw’el’wás First Nation, is a First Nations government located in the Central Interior-Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. The Cayoose Creek First Nation is a member government of the Lillooet Tribal Council (also known officially as the Sťáťimc Nation, though without including all Sťáťimc communities. The Cayoose Creek First Nation's offices are located at Lillooet, British Columbia.
    8.75
    4 votes
    18

    Sweetgrass First Nation

    The Sweetgrass First Nation is a First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Their territory is located 35 kilometres west of Battleford, Saskatchewan. The reserve was established as part of Treaty 6. The Nation is led by Chief Wayne Standinghorn..Registred population -1751.
    8.75
    4 votes
    19

    First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun

    The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun (English: First Nation of the Big River People) is a First Nation in the Yukon Territory in Canada. Its main population centre is in Mayo, Yukon, but many of its members live across Canada and the United States. The language originally spoken by the people of this First Nation is Northern Tutchone. The First Nation members are still very traditional, as they continue to live off the land and continue to pursue their traditional lifestyles. Most also hold employment positions where ever they reside. The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun was one of the first four First Nations to sign a Yukon land claims agreement in 1995. The First Nation has a very large traditional territory, that includes many beautiful rivers, lakes and mountain ranges. The potential for Wilderness Tourism is tremendous, as there are some of the most sought after pristine rivers in its backcountry.
    6.50
    6 votes
    20

    Fort McMurray First Nation

    Fort McMurray First Nation is a Cree and Chipewyan nation located near Fort McMurray, Alberta. It is a member of the Athabasca Tribal Council and a Treaty 8 nation. The four Fort McMurray reserves include Reserve #175 (20km east of Fort McMurray), and Reserves #176, 176A and 176B (located near Anzac on Gregoire Lake approximately 50km southeast of Fort McMurray). Reserve #176 is the largest of the four and the most populated. Fort McKay First Nation was originally part of the same Band, but split off in 1942.
    7.40
    5 votes
    21

    Red Bluff First Nation

    The Red Bluff First Nation is a Dakelh First Nations government located in the northern Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Carrier-Chilcotin Tribal Council, which includes both Tsilhqot'in and Carrier (Dakelh) communities. The Red Bluff First Nation reserve community and offices are located near Quesnel. Councillor: Frank Boucher Councillor: Denise Paul Councillor: Wanda Aldred Indian Reserves under the administration of the Red Bluff First Nation are:
    7.40
    5 votes
    22

    Westbank First Nation

    The Westbank First Nation is a First Nations government in the Okanagan region of the Canadian province of British Columbia, located with the District of West Kelowna. They are a member of the Okanagan Nation Alliance. Indian Reserves under the jurisdiction of the Westbank First Nation are:
    7.40
    5 votes
    23

    Beausoleil First Nation

    The Beausoleil First Nation is an Ojibwa (Chippewa) First Nation located in Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada. The Beausoleil First Nations occupies three Indian reserves. Their main Indian Reserve is the Christian Island 30 Indian Reserve, consisting of Christian Island, a large island in Georgian Bay close to the communities of Penetanguishene and Midland, Ontario, along with two other smaller islands. Together with the 7.5 hectares (18.5 acres) Christian Island 30A Indian Reserve located at Cedar Point, Ontario and the 3.1 hectares (7.7 acres) Chippewa Island Indian Reserve located in Twelve Mile Sound, 27.5 kilometres (17.1 mi) north of Christian Island, they form the land base for the Beausoleil First Nation. In September 2008, the Beausoleil First Nation had registered a population of 1798 people, of which 579 people lived on these Reserves. The First Nation elect their leadership through the Act Electoral System for a two-year term. The First Nation's council consists of a chief and six (6) councillors. The current chief is Roland Monague Sr. With Karry Sandy-McKenzie as the Chief Councillor, the First Nation's council consists of Councillors A. Dan Monague, C. Susan Copegog,
    8.50
    4 votes
    24

    Fort William First Nation

    Fort William First Nation is an Ojibway First Nation south of and adjacent to Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. As of January 2008, the First Nation had a registered population of 1,798 people, of which their on-Reserve population was 832 people. Fort William First Nation has a two rink arena which is home to the Thunder Bay Bearcats of the Superior International Junior Hockey League and has a fitness centre overlooking rink 1. A business park in the eastern end of the community is home to the head offices of Wasaya Airways and the band offices, among others. The First Nation have reserved for themselves the 5,815.1 hectares (14,369 acres) Fort William Indian Reserve 52, which serves as the land base for the First Nation. The Fort William Reserve, located on the western end of Lake Superior adjacent to the city of Thunder Bay was set aside under the provisions of the Robinson-Superior Treaty in 1850. The north shore of Lake Superior is the southern edge of the Canadian Shield, vast country of rock scraped clean by glaciers and waterways. The traditional territories occupied and used by the Chippewa’s at Fort William and their residence stretch from Pigeon River to the south, north to
    6.33
    6 votes
    25

    Nooaitch First Nation

    Nooaitch First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Southern Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Nicola Tribal Association, which are two of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The Nooaitch First Nation reserve community and offices are located at Merritt, the main urban centre in the Nicola Country region between the Lower Mainland and Kamloops.
    6.33
    6 votes
    26

    One Arrow First Nation

    One Arrow First Nation is a Canadian Cree First Nation. Its reserve is located just south of Batoche near the South Saskatchewan River about 100 km Northeast of Saskatoon. The One Arrow First Nation is in the aspen parkland biome. It is bordered by the Rural Municipalities of St. Louis No. 431, Fish Creek No. 402, and Duck Lake No. 463. Named after Chief One Arrow, a signatory to Treaty Six at Fort Carlton in 1876, the band had land disputes with the Métis of Batoche in the 1880s, and their supposed role in the Northwest Rebellion is quite controversial. Chief One Arrow himself claimed they were coerced into participating alongside Louis Riel, while the Métis claim they were allied. Currently Chief Kirk Matchap presides over the nation. It is the birthplace of Tom Jackson singer, songwriter, actor, and humanitarian/entrepreneur. Communities near One Arrow First Nation include Batoche, Bellevue, and Wakaw.
    7.20
    5 votes
    27

    Heiltsuk Nation

    The Heiltsuk Nation is a First Nations government in the Central Coast region of the Canadian province of British Columbia, centred on Campbell Island in the community of Bella Bella, British Columbia. The Heiltsuk people speak the Heiltsuk language, and were, like their language, and along with the neighbouring Haisla and Wuikinuxv (Owekeeno) peoples, incorrectly known in the past as the "Northern Kwakiutl". The Heiltsuk were also known as the Bella Bella, after their core community.
    6.17
    6 votes
    28
    Algonquin

    Algonquin

    The Algonquins are aboriginal/First Nations inhabitants of North America who speak the Algonquin language, a divergent dialect of the Ojibwe language, which is part of the Algonquian language family. Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe (Anishinaabe) grouping. The Algonquin people call themselves Omàmiwinini (plural: Omàmiwininiwak) or the more generalised name of Anicinàpe. Though known by several names in the past, the most common term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik (IPA: [ɛlæˈɡomoɡwik]): "they are our relatives/allies". The much larger heterogeneous group of Algonquian-speaking peoples, who stretch from Virginia to the Rocky Mountains and north to Hudson Bay, was named after the tribe. Most Algonquins live in Quebec. The nine Algonquin bands in that province and one in Ontario have a combined population of about 11,000. (Popular usage reflects some confusion on the point. The term "Algonquin" is sometimes used, in the Catholic Encyclopedia, to refer to all Algonquian-speaking societies, although this is not correct.) Many Algonquins still speak the
    7.00
    5 votes
    29
    Yupik

    Yupik

    The Yupik are a group of indigenous or aboriginal peoples of western, southwestern, and southcentral Alaska and the Russian Far East. They are Eskimo and are related to the Inuit and Iñupiat peoples. Yupik peoples include the following: The Central Alaskan Yupik are by far the most numerous of the various Alaska Native groups and speak the Central Alaskan Yup'ik language, a member of the Eskimo–Aleut family of languages. As of the 2000 U.S. Census, the Yupik population in the United States numbered over 24,000, of whom over 22,000 lived in Alaska, the vast majority in the seventy or so communities in the traditional Yup'ik territory of western and southwestern Alaska. Including 2,355 Sugpiaq with another 1,700 Yupik living in Russia. Yup'ik (plural Yupiit) comes from the Yup'ik word yuk meaning "person" plus the post-base -pik meaning "real" or "genuine." Thus, it means literally "real people." The ethnographic literature sometimes refers to the Yup'ik people or their language as Yuk or Yuit. In the Hooper Bay-Chevak and Nunivak dialects of Yup'ik, both the language and the people are given the name Cup'ik. The use of an apostrophe in the name “Yup’ik”, compared to Siberian
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Nakoda

    Nakoda

    The Nakoda (also known as Stoney or Îyârhe Nakoda) are a First Nation group, indigenous to both Canada and, originally, the United States. They used to inhabit large parts of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana, but their reserves are now located in Alberta and in Saskatchewan where they are scarcely differentiated from the Assiniboine. Through their language they are related to the Dakota and Lakota nations of the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains, part of the large Sioux Nation. They refer to themselves in their own language as "Nakoda", meaning friend, ally. The name "Stoney" was given them by white explorers, because of their technique of using fire-heated rocks to boil broth in rawhide bowls. They are very closely related to the Assiniboine who are also known as Stone Sioux (from Ojibwe asinii-bwaan). Alberta's Nakoda First Nation comprises three bands: Bearspaw, Chiniki and Wesley. The Stoney were "excluded" from Banff National Park between 1890 and 1920. In 2010 they were officially "welcomed back". The Stoney are descendants of individual bands of Dakota, Lakota and Nakota, in particular of western groups of Assiniboine, from which they spun out as an
    9.33
    3 votes
    31
    Ucluelet First Nation

    Ucluelet First Nation

    The Ucluelet First Nation, also known as the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ (Yuu-thlu-ilth-aht) is the First Nations treaty government of the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ in the Canadian province of British Columbia, located on the west coast of Vancouver Island on the northwest side of Barkley Sound. Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ's main village is located at Hitacu (Hit-tat-soo), across the bay from the town of Ucluelet (You-clue-let). The Nation’s territory is located at the northern gateway to Barkley Sound with open access to the Pacific Ocean. Being a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council and the Maa-nulth First Nation Treaty Society, the Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ is currently organizing around a post-treaty environment, and actively pursuing social and economic development (visit: www.ucluth.ca). The following introduction to the community is posted on the Nation’s website (www.ufn.ca), one of the most comprehensive and well-maintained community websites in the region. Today, the community lives reasonably within their means. With a downturn of the major forestry industry, shortage of work in the fishing industry and closure of on-shore local processing plants, many members of the community are now employed in the rapidly growing
    9.33
    3 votes
    32

    Thunderchild First Nation

    Thunderchild First Nation is an independent Cree First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada with no affiliation with any Tribal Council and is located approximately 113 kilometers northwest of North Battleford. The reserve was moved here in 1909 when the European settlers decided to take their land which was originally located near Delmas Saskatchewan. Also known as Piyesiw-Awasis,(306)845-3779, the membership population is approximately 1,868 of which approximately 630 reside on the reserve. This reserve came about after Chief Piyesiw-awasis' headmen was forced to sign an adhesion to Treaty Six in August, 1879 at Sounding Lake. Piyesiw-awasis was one of Big Bear's bodyguards until starvation and sickness led his people to adhere to the treaty. However, Piyesiw-awasis did not put his mark to the treaty document . "Outside, The Women Cried" by Jack Funk, 1989.
    8.00
    4 votes
    33

    Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation

    Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation formerly "Cape Croker" is an Ojibway First Nation living on unceded territory in the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario, Canada. Along with the Saugeen First Nation, they form the Chippewas of Saugeen Ojibway Territory. Chippewas of Nawash currently has a population of 700 individuals living on the reserve; however, the band roll has approximately 2080 registered in total. Leaders of the Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation are elected by the population registered on the Band List every two years. Chief and Council are elected every two years. The last election was held August 5, 2011. The next election will be two years from that date. Ralph Akiwenzie served as Chief until his death on March 4, 2011. Head councillor Scott Lee served as Acting Chief until the end of the term. The current Chief and Council, as sworn in August 8, 2011 are: Chippewas of Nawash have three reserves in perpetuity, amassing to 71.83 km² (27.73 sq. mi.): Neyaashiinigmiing Reserve No. 27 (formerly known as Cape Croker Reserve No. 27), Cape Croker Hunting Ground Indian Reserve No. 60B and Saugeen & Cape Croker Fishing Island Indian Reserve No. 1. Of these three, the 63.81
    6.80
    5 votes
    34

    Michipicoten First Nation

    The Michipicoten First Nation is an Ojibwe First Nation in Northern Ontario, located near Wawa. Members of the community have resided at the mouth of the Michipicoten River since before the first arrival of European settlers to the area. The Michipicoten went through several forced moves during the 19th and 20th centuries, causing significant disruption to the community. Members of the First Nation concluded an historic land agreement with the governments of Canada and Ontario in January 2008, after a successful referendum.
    9.00
    3 votes
    35

    N'quatqua First Nation

    The N'Quatqua First Nation, also known as the N'quatqua Nation, the N'Quatqua Nation, the Nequatque First Nation, the Anderson Lake Indian Band, the Anderson Lake First Nation and the Anderson Lake Band , is a First Nations government of the St'at'imc (Stl'atl'imx or Lillooet) people, located in the southern Coast Mountains region of the Canadian province of British Columbia at the community of D'Arcy, where the British Columbia Railway meets the head of Anderson Lake, about midway between the towns of Pemberton and Lillooet. Indian Reserves under the administration of the band are: In 1996, the band had a registered population of 155. In 2001, the band's population had increased 9.7% to 170. Unlike most other St'at'imc governments it is not a member of the Lillooet Tribal Council, the largest grouping of band governments of the St'at'imc people (aka the Lillooet people). Also broken away from the Lillooet Tribal Council are the three bands of the In-SHUCK-ch Nation on the lower Lillooet River and at the head of Harrison Lake. The N'quatqua Nation was originally part of the In-SHUCK-ch breakaway group but has since constituted itself separately, despite close family and cultural
    9.00
    3 votes
    36

    Abegweit First Nation

    Abegweit is a Mi'kmaq First Nation on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Its population numbers 183 people on reserve and 127 off-reserve. under the band's membership codes, people who are registered under section 6(2) of the Indian Act are denied membership in the band. Under the band's election code, off-reserve members are not entitled to vote in band elections. The name Abegweit is the widely known anglicization of Epikwetk, the original word taken from the Míkmaq language for Prince Edward Island. The Abegweit First Nation comprises three reserves: The Abegweit First Nation is headquartered at Scotchfort, known as Skaqmk. This is the location of a historic Míkmaq portage route connecting Mimtugaak (on the Hillsborough River) to Kadotpichk (on Savage Harbour). The 140 acre (54.6 hectare) Scotchfort Reserve 4 was created in 1879 and like all reserves on Prince Edward Island, was administered as part of the Lennox Island First Nation until separating in 1972. The Abegweit First Nation amalgamated the three reserves in the eastern part of the province in the 1990s. Abegweit First Nation owns and operates a number of businesses, including an Ultramar Gas Station, a Robin's Donuts
    6.60
    5 votes
    37

    Couchiching First Nation

    The Couchiching First Nation is a Saulteaux First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario, who live on the Couchiching 16A and Agency 1 reserves in the Rainy River District near Fort Frances. The current band chief is Charles "Chuck" McPherson. A council of six band members governs the band. The council members elect (March 2010-2012 terms) Sara Mainville, Richard "Dick" Bird, Christine Jourdain, Dan Mainville, Edward Yerxa and Eugene McPherson . Chuck McPherson was re-elected as chief for the same term. Couchiching First Nations administers over a dozen programs within the reserve The Giizhikaandag Healing Centre is a unique residential treatment program for male adolescent sex offenders. The vision of the program is to "break the cycle" of sexual abuse and teach young men to develop healthier lifestyles. Capable of housing 8 youth in a home-like environment, each of the services provided to clients is based on what is needed for their health and well being.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    Fox lake cree nation

    Fox Lake Cree Nation is a First Nation located in Fox Lake, Bird, Manitoba, Canada. On November 8, 2007, Fox Lake Cree Nation dedicated a monumental statue in Gillam, Manitoba. This was to honor the Fox Lake Cree Nation members who died during the development of Manitoba Hydro in Fox Lake Cree Nation's territory and did not live to see the signing of an Impact Settlement Agreement between Fox Lake Cree Nation, Manitoba Hydro and the Government of Manitoba in 2004. The Fox Lake Training Centre, offers courses and programs delivered by the University College of the North. Fox Lake Cree Nation's primary reserve is called Bird located in Northern Manitoba.
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    Ulkatcho First Nation

    The Ulkatcho First Nation is a Dakelh First Nations government in the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Carrier Chilcotin Tribal Council, its offices are located in Anahim Lake, British Columbia at the western edge of the Chilcotin District. The Ulkatcho government is responsible for 22 Indian reserves with a population of 729 members living on-reserve, and another 200 living off reserve. Its people are of the Ulkatchot’en ethnic group, a subgroup of the Carrier (Dakelh). Ulkatcho people have intermarried heavily with both Nuxalk and Chilcotin people and share territory in the Coast Range with the Nuxalk. Many distinctively Ulkatcho family names, such as Cahoose, Capoose, Sill, Squinas, and Stilas come from Nuxalk. The name Ulkatcho is an anglicisation of Ulhk'acho, the name of one village, now disused, on Gatcho Lake. Ulhk'acho means "big bounteous place", a place with bountiful fish, game, and other resources. It is based on the root k'a "fat". Previous chiefs were Lynda Price, Alan Weselowski, Cassidy Sill, and Jimmy Stilas. Lance Cahoose Memorial Ball-hockey tournament May 18 to 20 The figures following each reserve name are its area, in hectares.
    8.67
    3 votes
    40

    Esquimalt nation

    The region now known as Esquimalt, British Columbia was settled by First Nations people approximately 400 years before the arrival of Europeans. The treaties of the Hudson's Bay Company, signed in 1843, refer to these people as the Kosampsom group, though they are now known as the Esquimalt Nation. The word Esquimalt is a transliteration of "Ess-whoy-malth," a phrase usually translated as "place of the shoaling waters." The Nation spoke a North Straits Salish dialect called Lekwungen (which is also an alternate name for the Songhees).
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Siksika Nation

    Siksika Nation

    The Siksika Nation is a First Nation in southern Alberta, Canada. The name Siksiká comes from the Blackfoot words sik (black) and iká (foot), with a connector s between the two words. The plural form of Siksiká is Siksikáwa. The Siksikáwa are the northernmost of the Niitsítapi (Original People), all of whom speak dialects of Blackfoot, an Algonquian language. When European explorers travelled west, they most likely met the Siksiká first and assumed all Niitsítapi of the Blackfoot Confederacy were Blackfoot, which is incorrect. The four Niitsítapi nations of the Blackfoot Confederacy are the Siksiká, Káínaa (Kainai or Blood), Aapátohsipikáni (Northern Peigan), and Aamsskáápipikani (South Peigan or Montana Blackfoot). The approximate population of the Siksika Nation, as of 2009, is 6,000 people. The Siksika Nation reserve, Siksika 146 is located one hour's drive east of the city of Calgary, and three kilometres south of the Trans Canada Highway #1. The administrative and business district are strategically located adjacent to the Town of Gleichen to accommodate visitor traffic. The Siksika Nation has had a longstanding land claim dispute with the Government of Canada over events
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Inuit

    Inuit

    The Inuit (Inuktitut: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, "People") are a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada, and the United States. Inuit is a collective noun; the singular is "Inuk". The Inuit language is grouped under the Eskimo-Aleut family. In the United States, the term Eskimo is commonly used in reference to these groups, because it includes both of Alaska's Yupik and Inupiat peoples while "Inuit" is not proper or accepted as a term for the Inupiat. No collective term exists for both peoples other than "Eskimo". However, natives in Canada and Greenland view the name as pejorative and "Inuit" has become more common. In Canada, sections 25 and 35 of the Constitution Act of 1982 named the "Inuit" as a distinctive group of aboriginal Canadians who are not included under either the First Nations or the Métis. The Inuit live throughout most of the Canadian Arctic and subarctic in the territory of Nunavut; "Nunavik" in the northern third of Quebec; "Nunatsiavut" and "Nunatukavut" in Labrador; and in various parts of the Northwest Territories, particularly around the Arctic Ocean. These areas are known in Inuktitut as the "Inuit Nunangat". In the
    9.50
    2 votes
    43

    Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation

    The Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation (formerly the Nelson House First Nation) is a Cree-speaking community of about 4,200 Cree centered in Nelson House, Manitoba, Canada. Nelson House is located about 80 km west of Thompson and is accessible via the mixed paved and gravel Provincial Road 391. Nisichawayasihk means where three rivers meet in Cree and describes Nelson House which is located at the convergence of the Burntwood River, Footprint and Rat Rivers. About 2,500 members of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation (NCN) live in Nelson House and the remaining 1,700 off the reserve lands. NCN is governed by an elected Chief and Council. Elections are held pursuant to NCN's own democratic Election Code. The last election was held in 2010. Until 2005, the community of South Indian Lake on the shores of Southern Indian Lake was also part of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation. In December 2005, this community of about 1,100 persons separated from the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation to form the O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation. The last Elections in Nelson House was in July 2010. The people of Nisichawayasihk are largely ancestral descendants of indigenous Cree peoples who have populated the Canadian Shield
    9.50
    2 votes
    44

    Ucuelet First Nation

    The Ucuelet First Nation is a First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, located in Ucluelet, British Columbia. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council.
    9.50
    2 votes
    45

    Fountain First Nation

    The Xaxli'p First Nation, also known as the Fountain First Nation or the Fountain Indian Band, is a First Nations government located in the Central Interior-Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Lillooet Tribal Council, which is the largest grouping of band governments of the St'at'imc people (aka the Lillooet people). Other St'at'imc governments include the smaller In-SHUCK-ch Nation on the lower Lillooet River to the southwest, and the independent N'Quatqua First Nation at the farther end of Anderson Lake from Seton Portage, which is the location of three of the reserve communities of the Seton Lake First Nation, aka the Seton Lake Indian Band. The Fountain First Nation's offices are located at Fountain, British Columbia, about 10 miles up the Fraser Canyon from the town of Lillooet. Fountain is known in the St'at'imcets language as Cácl'ep or Xaxli'p. The Chief is Darrell Bob and Councillors are Bobby Watkinson, Howard Bob, Isaac Adolph, Nora Billy, Bernard John, and Milton Doss. The Xaxli'p First Nation entered the British Columbia Treaty Process in December 1993. The parties signed a framework agreement (Stage 3 of the
    7.00
    4 votes
    46
    Kyuquot/Cheklesahht First Nation

    Kyuquot/Cheklesahht First Nation

    The Kyuquot/Cheklesath First Nation (officially Ka:'yu:'k't'h'/Che:k:tles7et'h' First Nation) is a First Nations government based at Kyuquot, located on the outer coast of Kyuquot Sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. Amalgamation background: Before 1951, Both the Kyuquot First Nation and the Cheklesath First Nation were separately managed and funded by the then Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. The Cheklesath (people) were very few in numbers and were not receiving adequate funding [for housing and infrastructure] from the Federal Government's Department of Indian and Northern Affairs (funding based on Band Membership). The Chekleset chiefs and elders met with the Kyuquot chiefs and elders to ask if their people could live amongst the Kyuquot people. The Kyuquot chiefs and elders agreed to allow the Cheklesath to live on Č'axwataqt(Mission Island), but were not granted any rights in Kyuquot affairs. They were to remain a separate nation until conditions warranted their return to their own territory.
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    Métis people

    Métis people

    The Métis (/meɪˈtiː/; Canadian French: [meˈtsɪs]; Michif: [mɪˈtʃɪf]) are one of the Aboriginal peoples in Canada who trace their descent to mixed First Nations and European heritage. The term was historically a catch-all describing the offspring of any such union, but within generations the culture syncretised into what is today a distinct aboriginal group, with formal recognition equal to that of the Inuit and First Nations. Mothers were often Cree, Ojibwe, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Menominee, Mi'kmaq or Maliseet. At one time there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis or Countryborn descended from English or Scottish fathers. Today these two cultures have essentially coalesced into one Métis tradition. Other former names—many of which are now considered to be offensive—include Bois-Brûlés, Mixed-bloods, Half-breeds, Bungi, Black Scots and Jackatars. The Métis homeland includes regions scattered across Canada, as well as parts of the northern United States (specifically Montana, North Dakota, and northwest Minnesota). Almost 400,000 people self-identify as Métis in Canada. Most Métis people today are not so much the
    7.00
    4 votes
    48

    O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation

    The O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation is a community of about 1,100 Cree centered in the Southern Indian Lake community of Manitoba, Canada. It is located on the shores of Southern Indian Lake, about 130 km north of the city of Thompson. Created in December 2005, the O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation was formerly part of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation which includes the Cree community of Nelson House. The Southern Indian Lake community, which was founded in 1875, was historically the second largest community of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, with about a quarter of the total population. In 1995, after many decades of discussions, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the federal and provincial governments and First Nation representatives to formalize a process to have the Southern Indian Lake community recognized as a separate Cree Nation. The O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Nation's reserve lands include about 113 km² of lands.
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Hupacasath First Nation

    Hupacasath First Nation

    The Hupacasath First Nation is a First Nations government based in the Alberni Valley on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. An alternate spelling of Hupacasath is Opetchesaht or Opitchesaht.
    6.00
    5 votes
    50
    Kwakiutl First Nation

    Kwakiutl First Nation

    The Kwakiutl First Nation is a First Nations government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focused on the community of Port Hardy, British Columbia in the Queen Charlotte Strait region, and also known as the Fort Rupert Band, known in traditional Kwakwaka'wakw terms as the Kwagu'ł or Kwagyewlth. It is a member of the Kwakiutl District Council. It is not in the British Columbia Treaty Process at present.
    6.00
    5 votes
    51

    Biinjitiwabik Zaaging Anishnabek First Nation

    The Biinjitiwaabik Zaaging Anishinaabek (formerly known as Rocky Bay First Nation, and occasionally known as Biinjitiwaabik Zaagiing Anishinaabeg) is an Ojibway First Nation in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. Their territory is located on the Rocky Bay 1 Indian reserve in Greenstone, Ontario, bordering on the community of Macdiarmid. In October 2008, they had a total registered population of 678 people, of which 327 people lived on their own Indian reserve. The Nation is led by Chief Bart Hardy. The council is a member of Nokiiwin Tribal Council, a Regional Chiefs' Council, and is member of Union of Ontario Indians, a Tribal Political Organization. The First Nation is also a member of Waaskiinaysay Ziibi Inc., an economic development corporation made up of five Lake Nipigon First Nations. The first nation's television series Spirit Bay was filmed here in the 1980s.
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    Ehattesaht First Nation

    Ehattesaht First Nation

    The Ehattesaht First Nation is a First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council.
    8.00
    3 votes
    53

    Long Lake 58 First Nation

    Long Lake 58 First Nation (informally the Little Long Lake First Nation) is a small Anishinaabe (Ojibway) First Nation located in Northern Ontario, located approximately 40 km east of Geraldton, Ontario, Canada, on the northern shore of Long Lake, immediately north of Ginoogaming First Nation and west of the community of Longlac, Ontario. As of January, 2008, their total registered population was 1,248 people, of which their on-Reserve population was 427. In late August 1990, members of Long Lake 58 First Nation blocked the Canadian National Railway (CNR) tracks passing through the 537-acre (217.3 ha) Long Lake 58 Indian reserve. The blockade was mounted both to support the Indian stand during the Oka crisis and to draw attention to the fact that the community's traditional lands have never been the object of treaty negotiations with the Crown. The First Nation maintains the key requirements of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 have never been met by the governments of Ontario and Canada making the CNR Crown Corporation one of a number of trespassers on the community's unceded hunting ground. Because of the Crown's failure to deal with the community in the making of both the Robinson
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    St. Mary's First Nation

    St. Mary's First Nation

    St. Mary's Band or St. Mary's First Nation is one of six Wolastoqiyik or Maliseet Nations on the Saint John River in Canada. The St. Mary's Band lands comprise two reserves (Saint Mary's # 24, 1 ha; Devon # 30, 131.5 ha). The Saint Mary's reserve, established in 1867, lies on the northeast bank of the Saint John River, opposite downtown Fredericton. A second, larger reserve, purchased in 1929, lies 3 km NNE of the St. Mary's reservation. Recent (2002) acquisitions have expanded the reserve lands to 308 ha. Roughly half the members of the St. Mary's First Nation reside on the reserve lands. The founding of the 1867 Reserve is attributed to Gabriel Acquin, a Maliseet hunter, guide and interpreter. First Nations in New Brunswick
    8.00
    3 votes
    55

    Kanaka Bar First Nation

    Kanaka Bar First Nation is a First Nations government located at Kanaka Bar, British Columbia, Canada, between the towns of Boston Bar and Lytton in the Fraser Canyon region. It is a member of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration, one of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other members of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration are the Spuzzum, Skuppah and Nicomen First Nations (the Nicomen First Nation is also a member of the Nicola Tribal Association). . Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. "Kanaka" is the old Chinook Jargon trade language term for a Hawaiian, many of whom were in the employ of the Fraser Canyon. The presence of many Hawaiians, known in their own language also as kanaka (local guy) on the gold workings on the Fraser in this area conferred the name Kanaka Bar on a certain gold-rich sandbar on the Fraser below. The Kanaka Bar First Nation governs these reserves: Source: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada First Nations profiles
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Katzie First Nation

    Katzie First Nation

    The Katzie First Nation or Katzie Nation is the band government of the Katzie people of the Lower Fraser Valley region of British Columbia, Canada. The Katzie Nation manages the affairs of residents of five reserves assigned to the Katzie, focussed on the area of Pitt Meadows, where the band headquarters are located. Other reserves are on Barnston Island and at Yorkson Creek in Langley, British Columbia. These reserves are: The band's population is 499, of whom 297 live on-reserve. The Katzie Nation are negotiating their land treaty independently, and are not part of either Sto:lo tribal councils (the Sto:lo Nation and the Stó:lō Tribal Council). As the new Golden Ears Bridge was in Katzie territory, the nation signed a Benefit Agreement with Translink in September 2004 to establish the responsibilities of both parties.
    6.75
    4 votes
    57

    Da'naxda'xw Awaetlatla Nation

    The Da'naxda'xw Awaetlatla Nation is a First Nation government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focused on the community of Alert Bay, British Columbia in the Queen Charlotte Strait region. It is a member of the Kwakiutl District Council and, for treaty negotiation purposes, the Winalagalis Treaty Group which includes three other members of the Kwakiutl District Council (the Quatsino First Nation, the Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'xw Nation, and the Tlatlasikwala Nation. The Da'naxda'xw Aweatlata Nation were formerly the Tanakteuk First Nation (Tanakteuk is a different anglicization of Da'naxda'xw).
    9.00
    2 votes
    58

    James Smith First Nation

    The James Smith First Nation is a Cree First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. James Smith has one Indian Reserve Fort à la Corne #100 located north of Kinistino, Saskatchewan near Fort de la Corne on the Saskatchewan River. This reserve is shared between three first nations, the other two being the Peter Chapman First Nation and Chakastaypasin First Nation. James Smith has a present population of 2,412, with the on-reserve population estimated to be at 1,592 members. James Smith is part of the Prince Albert Grand Council. Bordering the reserve are the rural municipalities of Kinistino No. 459 and Torchwood No. 488, as well as the Cumberland 100A Indian reserve. Current Chiefs:Robert Head , Calvin Burns, Wally Burns The First Nation takes its name after Chief James Smith, a brother of Chief John Smith who founded the Muskoday First Nation. James Smith signed Treaty Six at Fort Carlton in 1876. The population at the time of the signing was 134 members or 32 families. The original language spoken was Cree. James Smith, alongside John Smith, migrated to the area from the Red River district of Manitoba, and his Cree name has been recorded as `Notaw(k)eecheekanis'. However, the term
    9.00
    2 votes
    59

    Miawpukek First Nation

    Miawpukek First Nation is a Mi'kmaq First Nation in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, with a population of On reserve 787, Off Reserve 1779. (September 1st, 2006) It is the historic name for the community known as present day Conne River (The community as opposed to Conne River, the river). Since 1985, the community has renewed it's traditional culture, which had been put on hold, after the exile of Saqamaw Geodol. A favourite attraction for visitors from near and far is its Annual Powwow, started in 1995 and held the first weekend every July. Miawpukek celebrated its 12th Annual Powwow in 2007.
    9.00
    2 votes
    60

    Wanapitei First Nation

    The Wahnapitae First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario, who primarily reside on the 1,036 hectares (2,560 acres) Wahnapitae 11 reserve on the northwestern shore of Lake Wanapitei. The First Nation is a signatory to the Robinson-Huron Treaty of 1850 as the Tahgaiwenene's Band. The reserve had a resident population of 102 in the Canada 2011 Census; the First Nation also has approximately 200 further registered members who currently live off-reserve. The reserve is an enclave located entirely within the city boundaries of Greater Sudbury, although it is not legally or politically part of the city. However, the reserve is considered part of Greater Sudbury's Census Metropolitan Area and its census division, and for postal delivery and telephone exchange purposes the reserve is within the service area of the Greater Sudbury neighbourhood of Capreol. The main business on the reserve is Rocky's, a bar and restaurant with camping facilities and snowmobiling trails which is popular with recreational and permanent residents of the Lake Wanapitei area. The reserve also should not be confused with the neighbourhood of Wahnapitae within the city of Greater
    9.00
    2 votes
    61

    Cook's Ferry First Nation

    Cook's Ferry First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Nicola Tribal Association, which are two of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council (except for the Lytton First Nation, which is unaffiliated). The Cook's Ferry First Nation reserve community and offices are located near Spences Bridge, a small town on the Trans-Canada Highway (Hwy 1) in the Thompson Canyon between Lytton and Cache Creek, at the confluence of the Nicola River and the Thompson.
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    Huu-ay-aht First Nation

    Huu-ay-aht First Nation

    The Huu-ay-aht First Nations (HFN) is a First Nations community based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. The HFN is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council and is a member of the Maa-nulth Treaty Society. It has recently completed and ratified its community constitution and has successfully ratified the Maa-nulth Treaty on 28 July 2007. The Legislative Assembly of British Columbia passed the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement Act on Wednesday, 21 November 2007 and celebrated with the member-nations of the Maa-nulth Treaty Society that evening. On 8 April 2009, the federal Government of Canada and the provincial Government of British Columbia joined with the Maa-nulth Treaty Society to sign the Maa-nulth Final Agreement in Port Alberni, British Columbia. The HFN and other member-nations of the Maa-nulth Treaty Society now officially enter in the sixth and final stage of the British Columbia Treaty Process, treaty implementation. The HFN government consists of one Chief-Councillor and four Councillors. The Chief-Councillor is the Head of Government and the Councillors are Legislators. Together, this five person group also forms the Executive
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation

    Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation

    Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (Oji-Cree: ᑭᐦᒋᓇᒣᑯᐦᓯᑊ ᐃᓂᓂᐧᐊᐠ (Gichi-namegosib ininiwag); unpointed: ᑭᒋᓇᒣᑯᓯᑊ ᐃᓂᓂᐧᐊᐠ or ᑭᐦᒋᓇᒣᑯᐦᓯᐱᐎᓂᓂᐗᐠ (Gichi-namegosibiwininiwag); unpointed: ᑭᒋᓇᒣᑯᓯᐱᐎᓂᓂᐗᐠ), also known as Big Trout Lake First Nation or KI for short, is a First Nations community in Northwestern Ontario. Part of Treaty 9 (James Bay). The community is about 580 km (360 mi) north of Thunder Bay, Ontario. The First Nation's land-base is a 29,937.6 ha (73,976.38 acre) Kitchenuhmaykoosib Aaki 84 Reserve, located on the north shore of Big Trout Lake. Big Trout Lake is a fly-in community, accessible by air, and winter road in the colder months. The population of Big Trout Lake was 1,322 residents in January 2007, making it one of the largest First Nations communities in the region. The current band chief is Donny Morris and deputy chief is Darryl Sainnawap. Current band councillors are Cecelia Begg, Joseph Mckay, Enos Mckay, Randy Nanokeesic, Bonnie Sanderson and Jack Mckay. Languages spoken: Oji-Cree (Anishininiimowin, Severn Cree or Northern Ojibway), English When Treaty 9 was first signed in Osnaburgh in 1905, KI was located in land that was, at the time, not considered part of Ontario. When
    7.67
    3 votes
    64

    Long Plain First Nation

    The Long Plain First Nation is an Ojibway First Nation located in the Central Plains region of Manitoba, Canada. It is located to the southwest of Portage la Prairie along the Assiniboine River. It lies between the Rural Municipality of Portage la Prairie and the Rural Municipality of South Norfolk. The 2006 census reported a population of 752 residents. The main settlement of Long Plain is located at 49°50′35″N 98°28′30″W / 49.84306°N 98.475°W / 49.84306; -98.475. Long Plain First Nation owns and operates Rez Radio 101.7 FM, which services the Long Plain community. The current chief of the Long Plain First Nation is David Meeches.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65

    Muskrat Dam Lake First Nation

    The Muskrat Dam Lake First Nation is an Oji-Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario. They reside on the 1,939.7 hectares (4,793.1 acres) Muskrat Dam Lake reserve, located on Muskrat Dam Lake in the Kenora District. The community of Muskrat Dam, Ontario, is located on this reserve. In June 2008, their total registered population was 387 people, of which their on-reserve population was around 195. The reserve's primary transportation link is the Muskrat Dam Airport. Muskrat Dam Lake is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service. The Muskrat Dam Lake First Nation is part of the 1929-30 Adhesion to the James Bay Treaty of 1905 - Treaty 9. The Muskrat Dam people have historical links to the people of Bearskin Lake, and several families have relocated from Bearskin Lake to Muskrat Dam Lake. These families that relocated to Muskrat Dam were that of Tommy and Victoria Beardy who were joined by Jeremiah and Juliet Duncan, Moses and Eunice Fiddler, Jake and Esther Beardy and Roderick and Effie Fiddler. Later, Fiddlers' son Billy and Moses Fiddler's mother Nainee also joined the little settlement. Due to abundance of natural resources in the area, the small
    7.67
    3 votes
    66

    Siska First Nation

    The Siska First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Nicola Tribal Association, which are two of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council, although the large Lytton First Nation, north of Siska, does not belong to any of the three. The Siska First Nation reserve community and offices are located adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway (Hwy 1) between Lytton and Boston Bar. Fred Sampson Chief Angela Phillips Councillor Betsy Munro Councillor The location of Siska is most notable for the dual railbridge crossing of the two Canadian transcontinental railways, the CPR and CNR, just above the reserve. Siska is often spelled in historical documents and publications as "Cisco", a spelling which remains on the map for the railway points at this location and also for Cisco Bluff, which the CPR line pierces opposite Siska Flat, which is the location of the main rancherie of the First Nation. The Siska Band has undertaken to develop a line of
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    Mistawasis First Nation

    The Mistawasis First Nation is a Cree First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Their territory is located roughly 68 kilometres west of the city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. The Nation has one reserve with an area of approximately 125.44 square kilometres. The First Nation has a registered population of 2171 people as of November 2005. Approximately 1036 members of the First Nation live on-reserve, and approximately 1135 live off-reserve. The First Nation is affiliated with the Saskatoon Tribal Council, along with six other First Nations. The First Nation takes its name from the name of its first chief, Chief Mistawasis. Mistawasis, or "Big Child" in English, was the first person to sign Treaty 6 in 1876.
    6.50
    4 votes
    68

    Selkirk First Nation

    The Selkirk First Nation is a First Nation in the central Yukon Territory in Canada. Its original population centre was the trading post of Selkirk, Yukon along the Yukon River, but most of its citizens now live in Pelly Crossing, Yukon where the Klondike Highway crosses the Pelly River. The language originally spoken by the Selkirk people was Northern Tutchone. There is a great effort to preserve the language and culture, as can be seen by the popularity of the Selkirk "Keeper of the Songs", Jerry Alfred. The Selkirk First Nation signed a Yukon Land Claims agreement in 1997.
    6.50
    4 votes
    69
    Cree

    Cree

    The Cree are one of the largest groups of First Nations / Native Americans in North America, with 200,000 members living in Canada. The major proportion of Cree in Canada live north and west of Lake Superior, in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories. About 15,000 live in eastern Quebec. In the United States, this Algonquian-speaking people historically lived from Lake Superior westward. Today, they live mostly in Montana, where they share a reservation with the Ojibwe (Chippewa). The documented westward migration over time has been strongly associated with their roles as traders and hunters in the North American Fur Trade. The Cree Nation is generally divided into eight groups (some political, others cultural): Collectively the Cree used the autonym Nēhilawē (those who speak our language). They used "Cree" to refer to their people only when speaking the languages of the European colonists, French or English. Skilled American bison hunters and horsemen, the Plains Cree were allied with the Assiniboine and the Saulteaux before they encountered French settlers in the 18th century. The name "Cree" is derived from the Algonkian-language exonym
    10.00
    1 votes
    70

    Kwantlen First Nation

    The Kwantlen First Nation is the band government of the Kwantlen subgroup of the Stó:lō people in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada, located primarily at Fort Langley. They traditionally speak the Downriver dialect of Halkomelem, one of the Salishan family of languages. They are a member of the Sto:lo Tribal Council, one of two Sto:lo tribal councils. The Kwantlen once resided primarily in villages near present-day New Westminster, although they frequented many locations along the Lower Fraser as far upstream as a village at Hatzic. In particular, the Stave River valley was important for hunting, trapping, and fishing. They moved their main settlement upriver when Fort Langley was established in the 19th century, to control and maintain a trading advantage with the HBC in Fort Langley. The band administers six Indian Reserves: The band also shares the Peckquaylis Indian Reserve with 20 other bands. It is the former St. Mary's Indian Residential School just east of Mission and is now a cultural, government, and aboriginal business centre. The band's population is 204.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Lake Cowichan First Nation

    The Lake Cowichan First Nation government and reserve is located in Lake Cowichan, British Columbia. The Lake Cowichan First Nation, while its own distinct group, is closely linked to the peoples of the Cowichan Tribes band government, and is part of the Hul'qumi'num linguistic group There are over 15 registered tribal members. Early settlers to the Lake Cowichan area described "a small tribe of Indians" living in "houses constructed of bark." During the 19th Century the Lake Cowichan First Nation was decimated by disease and conflict with neighboring groups. In 1887 the surveyor Ashdown Green reported that the Lake Cowichan people had once been a large tribe but had been nearly wiped out by war with the neighboring Cowichan Tribes and Ditidahts. In 1860, a prospetor by the name of Samuel Harris travelled to the area seeking minerals and reported that many of the Natives were dead and dying from smallpox. Archaeological investigations have revealed the historic presence of a village on the north east side of the lake, within the boundaries of the present day Cowichan Lake Indian Reserve.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Mamalilikulla-Qwe'Qwa'Sot'Em First Nation

    The Mamalilikulla-Qwe'Qwa'Sot'Em First Nation is a First Nations band government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focussed in the Queen Charlotte Strait region.. It is a member of the Kwakiutl District Council. Its home territory was situated in Knights Inlet mainly on Village Island.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Okanagan people

    The Okanagan people, also spelled Okanogan, are a First Nations and Native American people whose traditional territory spans the U.S.-Canada boundary in Washington state and British Columbia. Known in their own language as the ʔukʷnaʔqínx, they are part of the Interior Salish ethnological and linguistic groupings, the Okanagan are closely related to the Spokan, Sinixt, Nez Perce, Pend Oreille, Shuswap and Nlaka'pamux peoples in the same region. When the Oregon Treaty partitioned the Pacific Northwest in 1846, the portion of the tribe remaining in what became Washington Territory reorganized under Chief Tonasket as a separate group from the majority of the Okanagans, whose communities remain in Canada. The Okanagan Tribal Alliance, however, also incorporates the American branch of the Okanagans, who are part of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville, a multi-tribal government in Washington state. The bounds of Okanagan territory are roughly the basin of Okanagan Lake and the Okanagan River, plus the basin of the Similkameen River to the west of the Okanagan valley, and some of the uppermost valley of the Nicola River. The various Okanagan communities in British Columbia and
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Pacheedaht First Nation

    Pacheedaht First Nation

    The Pacheedaht First Nation is a First Nation based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. Although the Pacheedaht people are Nuu-chah-nulth-aht by culture and language, they are not a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council and define themselves differently. Our political elite steered our band away from joining any inter-band associations to consolidate local intra-band control of political social process to maintain local control of our relationship to the department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Whitefish Lake First Nation

    Whitefish Lake First Nation

    The Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation (Anishinaabe language: Adikamegosheng Anishinaabeg, syncoped as Dikmegsheng Nishnaabeg), formerly known as the Whitefish Lake First Nation, is an Ojibwa First Nation in Ontario, Canada, who live mainly on the Whitefish Lake reserve, 20 km southwest of Sudbury. Atikameksheng Anishnawbek have hunting and fishing rights within the Robinson-Huron Treaty Area. An annual pow-wow is held in July each year. The current Ogimaa ("chief") of the First Nation is Steve Miller. In May 2008, the Ogimaa and council of Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation announced litigation against Canada and Ontario for violating the Robinson-Huron Treaty, which states that the First Nation should have been granted a reserve much larger than Whitefish Lake 6. In 2010, the community was selected as the host community for Building Homes and Building Skills, a project by television personality Mike Holmes to train First Nations people in construction and building trades. Higgins, Edwin and Whitefish Lake Indian Reserve No. 6 (Ont.), Whitefish Lake Ojibway Memories. Cobalt ON: Highway Book Shop, 1982.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Hesquiaht First Nation

    Hesquiaht First Nation

    The Hesquiaht First Nation (pronounced Hesh-kwit or Hes-kwee-at) is a Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. Hesquiaht is the most northerly and remote of the five Central Region Nuu-chah-nulth Nations. Two of eight Hesquiaht Reserves are occupied by Hesquiaht members, one at Hot Springs Cove and the other at Hesquiaht Harbour. Hot Springs Cove is named after the natural hot springs located at the south end of a narrow peninsula on the east side of the cove. The Reserve Community of Hot Springs (Refuge Cove) village is located on the cove’s west side, home to approximately 80 individuals and 25 families (39 dwellings). The community had to rebuild after a devastating tsunami in 1963. With a population of approximately 150 people living in Hot Springs Cove and a commute of over one hour by boat into Tofino, the Hesquiaht are used to living in isolation. And thus distance from services defines the challenges and opportunities for the Hesquiaht more than for any other community in the Clayoquot region. While for visitors a trip to the hot springs, Hesquiaht
    7.33
    3 votes
    77
    Kainai Nation

    Kainai Nation

    The Kainai Nation (or Káínawa, or Blood Tribe) is a First Nation in southern Alberta, Canada with a population of 7,437 members in 2005, and had a population of 9,035 members as of 9 February 2008. They are part of the Niitsítapi (Blackfoot Confederacy of the Original People). Akáínaa translates directly to "Many Chief" (from aká - "many" and nínaa - "chief") while Káína translates directly to "Many Chief people." The enemy Plains Cree called the Kainai Miko-Ew - "stained with blood", i.e. "the bloodthirsty, cruel", therefore, the common English name for the tribe is the "Blood tribe." At the time treaties such as Treaty 7 were signed, the Kainai were situated on the Oldman, Belly, and St. Mary rivers west of Lethbridge, Alberta. The Kainai reserve Blood 148 is currently the largest in Canada with 3,852 inhabitants on 1,414.03 km² and is located approximately 200 kilometres south of Calgary. The Kainai Nation is governed by an elected council of twelve to fifteen, with one chief. The term of office is four years. Historical chiefs of the Kainai are below: Blood Tribe Elections 2008 Chief Results Name Votes Blood Tribe Elections 2008 Councilor Results Name Vote In 1960, the Kainai
    7.33
    3 votes
    78

    Aroland First Nation

    Aroland (2006 Population 325) is an Ojibwa and Oji-Cree First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in the Thunder Bay District approximately 20 kilometres west of Nakina. Their community, the Aroland Indian Settlement, have Indian reserve status, though the settlement itself is not a reserve. Located along the Canadian National Railway line, the community was originally named after the Arrow Land and Logging Company, which operated in the area from 1933 to 1941. Aroland First Nation's members are former members of the Long Lake 58 First Nation, Long Lac 77 First Nation (now Ginoogaming First Nation), Fort Hope First Nation (now Eabametoong First Nation), Marten Falls First Nation, and Fort William First Nation. In 1972, the settlement briefly was recorded as Aroland 83 Indian Reserve. Aroland is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Eel Ground First Nation

    Eel Ground First Nation

    The Eel Ground Band or Eel Ground First Nation is a Mi'kmaq First Nations community of 977 people located on the Miramichi River in northern New Brunswick, Canada. The community comprises three reserves (Eel Ground #2, Big Hole Tract # 8 (south half), and Renous #12). Eel Ground principally occupies lands adjoining the City of Miramichi, New Brunswick, and members of the two communities have no doubt interacted from the time of earliest European settlement. About 1648, Nicolas Denys, Sieur de Fronsac, established a fort and trading post nearby, "on the North side of the Miramichi, at the forks of the river". His son, Richard Denys, was placed in charge of the fort and trading post. In 1688 Richard describes the establishment as including about a dozen French and more than 500 Indians. The Band was officially recognised by the British in 1783, soon after the French defeat in the Seven Years War. No doubt the First Nation population had long preceded Denys' "establishment", and present-day inhabitants of Eel Ground would largely be descended from Richard Denys' immediate neighbours. For the Mi'kmaq, the nearby junction of the Northwest and Main Southwest branches of the Miramichi
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Kasabonika First Nation

    Kasabonika Lake First Nation or Kasabonika First Nation (Oji-Cree: ᑲᐦᓴᐹᓇᐦᑳ ᓂᐣᑕ ᐊᓂᐦᕈᓂᓂᐧᐋᐟ (Gasabaanakaa Nistam Anišininiwaad); unpointed: ᑲᓴᐸᓇᑲ ᓂᐣᑕ ᐊᓂᕈᓂᓂᐊᐟ) is an Oji-Cree First Nation located north of Sioux Lookout, Ontario. There are no roads into the community and the only access is through Kasabonika Airport. It is part of the Shibogama First Nations Council and the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The First Nation's landbase is the 10,806.5-hectare (26,703.4-acre) Kasabonika Lake Reserve. In September, 2007, the total registered population was 914, of which the on-reserve population was 866. The residents of Kasabonika were professional, and expert, tree planters for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources for many years in the 1960s and 1970s. They worked for several districts, Hearst, Geraldton, and Thunder Bay. Some planters were able to plant as many as 3000 trees per day. The Kasabonika First Nation detachment of the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service was closed in early February 2008 as it lacked running water and relied on a wood fire in a 170 litre drum to heat the facility. Holding cells lacked toilet facilities, requiring detainees to use a slop bucket. Prisoners now must be flown
    8.50
    2 votes
    81

    Lake Babine Nation

    Lake Babine Nation (also Nataotin, Nat'oot'en Nation) is a Babine First Nation originally based around Babine Lake. Its main community has been in Woyenne, near Burns Lake, since many of the nation's members moved there in the 1940s. Other year-round communities include Tachek (or Tachet, Tache or Tachie) on the west side of Babine Lake, and Wit'at (Fort Babine) at the end of the northwest arm of the lake. Seasonal communities include Nedo'ats (Old Fort) at the north end of the lake and Donald's Landing (Pinkut Nation) toward the south end. The nation consists of roughly 2,000 members, living both on and off reserve. Its traditional language is Babine-Witsuwit'en, a Northern Athabaskan language. It was initially created in December 1957 by legislation from the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada which amalgamated the Fort Babine and Old Fort Bands. It is currently at stage 4 of the British Columbia Treaty Negotiation Process. Woyenne, with approximately 940 residents, is adjacent to the community of Burns Lake, British Columbia, but has its own preschool, kindergarten, daycare, and adult learning centre. The Nation's main band office is located in Woyenne. Wit'at (Fort
    8.50
    2 votes
    82

    Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation

    The Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation, formerly known as the Sharbot Mishigama Anishinabe Algonquin First Nation and as the Sharbot Lake Algonquin First Nation, is a non-status Algonquin (Anishinaabe) community located north of Kingston, Ontario. It is currently in negotiation with the federal and provincial governments over claims to Aboriginal title in the area. Its chief is Doreen Davis. The Sharbot community was offered a reservation in Bedford Township in 1844, but declined it. "Our families chose not to go to a reserve," Chief Davis said in a 2000 interview. "They just thought it was an awful place and they chose to stay with their non-native friends in the community." In 2007 and 2008, the Shabot Obaadjiwan First Nation worked closely with the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation to oppose uranium exploration in the Sharbot Lake area. Both communities took part in a non-violent blockade of a proposed mining site, and were involved in legal action against the prospecting company Frontenac Ventures.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Shoal Lake 40 First Nation

    Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in the Eastman Region of Manitoba and the Kenora District of Ontario. The total registered population in August 2011 was 568, of which the on-reserve population was 266. The first Nation is a member of the Bimose Tribal Council, a Regional Chief's Council that is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3. The First Nation's Indian Bay, Manitoba 49°37′31″N 95°11′48″W / 49.62528°N 95.19667°W / 49.62528; -95.19667 community, known as Iskatewi-zaaga'iganiing in the Ojibwe language, is accessible via barge traffic from Iskatewizaagegan 39 First Nation's dock, located in the community of Kejick, Ontario, and in winter by ice roads. Shoal Lake 40 is joining forces with the neighboring Manitoba municipality of Reynolds to encourage the building of an all-weather road by two levels of government, in order to connect with the Trans-Canada Highway. This would help to improve the economic conditions of the Shoal Lake 40 reserve. In earlier years, the community obtained many necessary supplies and goods via the Greater Winnipeg Water District (GWWD) railway as they were shipped to the GWWD water intake site.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    Songhees First Nation

    The Songhees First Nation is a First Nations government on located around Victoria, British Columbia on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Toosey First Nation

    The Toosey First Nation (or Tl'esqox First Nation) is a Tsilhqot'in First Nations government located in the Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Carrier-Chilcotin Tribal Council, which includes both Tsilhqot'in and Carrier (Dakelh) communities. The Toosey First Nation reserve community and offices are located at Riske Creek, which is on the Fraser River just southwest of the city of Williams Lake. Band Manager Luke Doxtator Chief Frances Laceese, Councillor Clayton Palmatier Councillor Georgina Johnny Councillor Violet Tipple Indian Reserves under the administration of the Toosey First Nation are:
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Malahat First Nation

    The Malahat First Nation is a First Nations government located on southeastern Vancouver Island in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Their ancestral tongue is the Hulquminum language. The Malahat First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council.
    6.25
    4 votes
    87

    Nicickousemenecaning First Nation

    Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation, formerly known as the Nicickousemenecaning First Nation and as the Red Gut First Nation, is a Saulteaux First Nation located on the banks of Rainy Lake of the Rainy River District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. As of January, 2008, the First Nation had a population of 290 registered people, of which their on-reserve population was 137. The name Nigigoonsiminikaaning means "Place abundant with Little-Otter berries" The First Nation have an electoral system of government, consisting of a Chief and two councillors forming their council. Chief Gary Allen, and Councillors Jason Jones and Tracy Allan are serving their two-year term that began on July 17, 2008. The First Nation is a member of the Pwi-Di-Goo-Zing Ne-Yaa-Zhing Advisory Services, a regional Chiefs Council, which in turn is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3, a Tribal Political Organization serving many of the First Nations in northwest Ontario and southeast Manitoba. The community has its own voluntary organizations, including a volunteer fire department, Recreation, Education, Housing and Economic Development committees. The Band Administration services the community in the areas
    6.25
    4 votes
    88

    Sturgeon Lake First Nation

    The Sturgeon Lake First Nation is located on the eastern shores of Sturgeon Lake (Saskatchewan) about 29 km northwest of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. The First Nations territory consists of one Indian Reserve, Number 101. It is located in the transition zone between the aspen parkland and boreal forest biomes. The reserve borders the Rural Municipalities of Shellbrook No. 493 and Buckland No. 491, as well as the Little Red River 106C Indian reserve. On August 23, 1876 Chief Ah-yah-tus-kum-ik-im-am (Chief William Twatt) and four headmen signed Treaty Six at Fort Carlton and selected their reserve. The First Nation is today predominately Cree culturally but also has some Saulteaux members. It was originally known as the William Twatt Band after the Orcadian surname of the Treaty Chief, who was the Grandson of Magnus Twatt who came from Orkney (off the North coast of Scotland) in 1771 to work for the Hudsons Bay Company, but changed its name in 1963 to the Sturgeon Lake Band, and later to the Sturgeon Lake First Nation. The 2001 settling of a grievance between the band and the federal government concerning a loss of timber revenue that dated back to 1906 has enabled the community to
    6.25
    4 votes
    89

    Dauphin River First Nation

    Dauphin River First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in Manitoba, Canada. Its landbase is the Dauphin River First Nation Reserve 48A, located at the junction of Dauphin River and Lake Winnipeg. The largest city nearest this community is Winnipeg located approximately 250km (155mi) to the southeast. The current Chief of Dauphin River First Nation is Emery Stagg. The Tribal Council affiliated with this First Nation is Interlake Reserves Tribal Council Inc. Dauphin River First Nation is part of Treaty 2 Adhesion, signed on August 21, 1871. Dauphin River First Nation 48A Reserve is 325.8 hectares (805.0 acres). As of 2008, the total population of registered Indians was 285 (156 female/129 male) with 200 on reserve, and 85 off reserve. The primary language spoken is Ojibwe. Known best for its fishing, Dauphin River is home to many Master Angler Awards from Walleye to Northern Pike. The most popular fishing spots include the Warpath and Mantago Rivers.
    7.00
    3 votes
    90

    Kwanlin Dün First Nation

    The Kwanlin Dün First Nation (KDFN) is located in and around Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory of Canada. It is the largest First Nation in the Yukon. Linguistically, the Kwanlin Dün are affiliated with the Southern Tutchone Tribal Council. The Kwanlin Dün include people of Southern Tutchone, Tagish and Tlingit descent. The Kwanlin Dün First Nation signed a land claims and self-government agreement in 2004. As part of the land claim agreement, KDFN received 1042 km. of Settlement Land within the traditional territory. Over 30 km. of KDFN's Settlement Land are within the City of Whitehorse boundaries. KDFN is building a new cultural centre on the banks of the Yukon River, in downtown Whitehorse. The official opening of the new Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre will be June 2012. As a self-governing First Nation, KDFN has its own constitution. Rick O'Brien was elected as the Chief of the First Nation in March 2011. Council members are: Jessie Dawson, Jennifer Edzerza, Charlene Charlie, Alicia Vance, Ron MacIntosh and Ray Sydney.
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    Mattagami First Nation

    Mattagami First Nation

    The Mattagami First Nation is an Anishnaabe First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario. The First Nation members of the community primarily live on the Mattagami 71 reserve in the Sudbury District near Gogama. The on-reserve population is approximately 100 residents. Mattagami First Nation is part of the Wabun Tribal Council, a political organization which is also part of the Nishnawbe-Aski Nation (NAN), which represents the Treaty 9 area. The current chief of the Mattagami First Nation is Walter Naveau. The reserve has its own elementary school, while high school students are bused to Timmins.
    6.00
    4 votes
    92

    Opaskwayak Cree Nation

    The Opaskwayak Cree Nation is a First Nation in Manitoba, Canada. Opaskwayak means "where the two rivers meet". The First Nation has territory near The Pas, Manitoba, along the Saskatchewan River. The First Nation hosts the Opaskwayak Indian Days annually each August. The OCN Blizzard, a Manitoba Junior Hockey League team is based on the reserve. The Band is governed by the Chief and twelve Councilors who are elected according to the Indian Act for a two- year term. The reserve consists of 17 parcels of land varying in size from 10 to 5200 acres and totaling less then 15,000 acres. The most populated settlements are located in and around the Town of The Pas. Opaskwayak Cree Nation has developed a lot for their people such as, a school well known as Joe. A. Ross school for all grades, a Community Plex for the events of bingo, socials and community events etc. In 1995 construction of a hotel known as Kikiwak Inn was built and completed in July 1996. Otineka Shopping Mall was built in the early 1970's and opened in the 1975. The McGillivary Care Home was constructed in 1982 for the elders and a Six-Plex for the elderly. The community of Opaskwayak Cree Nation has two churches on the
    6.00
    4 votes
    93

    Stó:lō Nation

    The Sto:lo Nation is a First Nations Tribal Council in the Fraser Valley region of the Canadian province of British Columbia that is the tribal council for First Nations band governments in the area of Chilliwack, Abbotsford and at NIcomen Island. This tribal council should not be confused with the Stó:lō Tribal Council, which is composed of different bands of the Stó:lō people. Many Sto:lo communities and their governments are not in either tribal council. Source: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada information page In 1977 twenty-four Stó:lō First Nations banded together to sign the Stó:lō Declaration and creating the Stó:lō Nation. By 1995 when the BC Treaty Process started three First Nations had left the Sto:lo Nation. By 2005 two more nations had left leaving 19 First Nations. In 2005, these 19 Sto:lo First Nations that remained in the Sto:lo Nation underwent an internal re-organization, eventually forming two tribal councils. Eleven of these First Nations stayed in the Sto:lo Nation: Aitchelitz, Leq'a:mel, Matsqui, Popkum, Shxwhá:y Village, Skawahlook, Skowkale, Squiala, Sumas, Tzeachten, and Yakweakwioose. Eight others formed a new tribal council called the Sto:lo Tribal
    6.00
    4 votes
    94

    Boston Bar First Nation

    The Boston Bar First Nation is a First Nations government in the Fraser Canyon region of the Southern Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. Located near the town of Boston Bar, it is a member of the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. Other Nlaka'pamux bands belong either to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration.
    8.00
    2 votes
    95

    Ermineskin Cree Nation

    Ermineskin Cree Nation is a First Nation, a western branch of the large Cree Nation, and a Treaty 6 nation. As of 2008, there are 3,758 registered Ermineskin Cree, of which 2,606 were living on reserve. The Ermineskin Cree Nations two reserves (around Hobbema, Alberta) total about 22,512 hectares and are known in Cree as Maskwacheesihk. While the Ermineskin traditional territory includes the reserve lands, the reserve was formally established in 1885. The land houses substantial oil and gas deposits, agricultural land, and waterfront access to Pigeon Lake. The Canadian Pacific railway line runs through the reserve.
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    Garden River First Nation

    Garden River First Nation

    Garden River First Nation, also known as Ketegaunseebee (Gitigaan-ziibi Anishinaabe in the Anishinaabe language), is an Ojibwa band located at Garden River 14 near Sault Ste. Marie. The Garden River reserve consists of two non-contiguous areas, totaling 20,703.5 hectares. The larger, main area is located along the St. Marys River and Highway 17. The Garden River runs through the reserve as a tributary of the St. Mary's River. Garden River First Nation is governed by a band council consisting of a chief and 12 councillors. Council elections are held biannually. The current chief is Lyle Sayers. Garden River First Nation was created as a legal entity when Lord Elgin, Governor General of the Province of Canada, approved in law the Robinson Huron Treaty on November 29, 1850. The treaty had been negotiated between the British colony's representative William B. Robinson and numerous Ojibwa chiefs from the Lake Huron watershed earlier that year, and had been signed by these representatives on Sept. 9, 1850. The treaty extinguished Ojibwa title to the land in exchange for 17 reserve lands and annual annuities. Each reserve had to register its band members because an increase to annuity
    8.00
    2 votes
    97

    Ginoogaming First Nation

    Ginoogaming First Nation (formerly the Long Lake 77 First Nation) is a small Anishinaabe (Ojibway) First Nation located in Northern Ontario, located approximately 40 km east of Geraldton, Ontario, Canada, on the northern shore of Long Lake, immediately south of Long Lake 58 First Nation and the community of Longlac, Ontario. As of September, 2006, their total registered population was 773 people, of which their on-Reserve population was 168. The leadership of the First Nation is determined through the Act Electoral System. The current Chief is Celia Echum, who is serving along with six Councillors:Blaine Martin,Gwen O'Nabigon, Maurice Waboose, Jerry Echum and David Charles Jr, Joseph Dore Jr. Their two-year elected terms began on August 2009. The First Nation is a member of Matawa First Nations, a Regional Chiefs Council, which in turn is a member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, a Tribal Political Organization representing many of the First Nations in northern Ontario. Government services are provided by the First Nation, the Matawa First Nations and by the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. Services include:
    8.00
    2 votes
    98

    Lytton First Nation

    The Lytton First Nation is a First Nations government headquartered at Lytton in the Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. While it is the largest of all Nlaka'pamux bands, unlike all other governments of the Nlaka'pamux (Thompson) people, it is not a member of any of the three Nlaka'pamux tribal councils, which are the Nicola Tribal Association, the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration and the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The Lytton First Nation figure prominently in the history of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush (1858-1860) and of the associated Fraser Canyon War (1858). At Lytton, then still called Kumsheen, leaders of the miners' regiments from Yale met with the chiefs of the Nlaka'pamux to parley an end to the war. While other chiefs argued for annihilation of the outsiders, the Kumsheen chief Spintlum (Cxpentlm, aka David Spintlum) argued for peace, resulting in a series of six treaties known as the Snyder Treaties, which are lost to history.
    8.00
    2 votes
    99

    Mushuau Innu First Nation

    The Mushuau Innu First Nation is located in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The First Nation has one reserve, it has an area of roughly 43 square kilometres, centred around the community of Natuashish since 2002, when they moved from the prior community of Davis Inlet. The Mushaua Innu and the Naskapi tribe were once the same people, speaking the same dialect and writing in syllabics, but split off and headed to Eastern Labrador, probably for sustainability reasons. Very few (if any) Mushuau Innu are able to write in syllabics any more. The majority of the tribe is Catholic, which use the Montagnais Bible (which does not use syllabics). The chief of this First Nation is Simon Pokue. The First Nation has a registered population of 650 people, of whom 606 live on-reserve.
    8.00
    2 votes
    100

    Pictou Landing First Nation

    Pictou Landing First Nations is a Mi'kmaq First Nation in Nova Scotia, Canada. Their territory spans five reserves that have a combined area of 527.6 hectares. The current Chief is Andrea Paul. As of 2012, the Mi'kmaq population is 459 on-Reserve, and approximately 144 off-Reserve. The current council consists of Anthony (Quise)Nicholas, Crystal Denny, Louie Francis, Wayne Denny, and Dominic Denny. This council was elected on November 24, 2011 and will remain in office for two years. Pictou Landing First Nation is composed of five parts as shown: Pictou Landing First Nation Nova Scotia Mi'kmaw Language
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Sliammon First Nation

    Sliammon First Nation

    The Sliammon First Nation or Tla A'min First Nation is a First Nations government located on the upper Sunshine Coast in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Sliammon, whose proper name is [Tla A'min] are closely related to the Klahoose and Homalco nations and have shared their adjoining territories. The traditional territory of the Sliammon people extends from the vicinity of Stillwater and the northern part of Texada Island, northward along the Malaspina and Gifford Peninsulas to the southern area of Homfray Channel and part of Cortes Island, including also the smaller off-shore islands such as Hernando, Savary and Harwood as well as Powell, Goat and Haslam Lakes. Their ancestral tongue is Ay-Ay-Ju-Thum which is shared with the Klahoose and Homalco peoples. Historically, these three tribes were all one people with no borders or separation. The three communities shared the village of Kah Kay Kay (Grace Harbour) during the winter months and practiced the winter ceremonies that were held by the Coast Salish People. The use of Skway Skway masks, ceremonial songs and dances and potlatching and feasting were common here. Today, Sliammons main village lies at Tishosum (Sliammon
    8.00
    2 votes
    102

    Wuikinuxv Nation

    The Wuikinuxv Nation, also known as the Oweekeno Nation, is a First Nation with territory in the Central Coast region of the Canadian province of British Columbia, in the area south of Bella Bella and north of Queen Charlotte Strait. The Wuikinuxv people a.k.a. the Oweekeno people reside in the area of Rivers Inlet and Owikeno Lake, primarily at a village on the Wannock River. Substantial numbers of Wuikinuxv also reside away from the traditional territory in Port Hardy on Vancouver Island and in larger BC communities such as Campbell River, Vancouver and Victoria. Approximately 80 people reside at the village (Katit Reserve #1) while overall membership is about 300. The First Nation has an elected Chief and Council responsible for modern economic and administrative areas and also continues to respect a more deeply rooted hereditary system. It is a member of the Oweekeno-Kitasoo-Nuxalk Tribal Council. The Wuikinuxv speak the Oowekyala language, a Northern Wakashan language which is a dialect of a language known as Heiltsuk-Oowekyala, the other main dialect of which is Heiltsuk. Their language, and the people, were incorrectly known in the past, as were the Haisla, as "Northern
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Alexis Creek First Nation

    The Alexis Creek First Nation is the band government of the Tsi Del Del subgroup of the Tsilhqot'in people, located in the Chilcotin District in the western Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Tsilhqot'in Tribal Council. The Alexis Creek First Nation reserve community and offices are located on the main reserve, Redstone Reserve. (Redstone is a literal translation of the Tsilhqot'in Tsi Del Del) The nearest post office is Chilanko Forks. It also includes smaller reserves around Redbrush and Puntzi Lake. The long-standing chief is Ervin Charleyboy. He is an active participant in the Tsilhqot'in National Government. Local oral histories are confident that the Alexis Creek First Nation was originally given a reserve at the mouth of the Alexis Creek (i.e. somewhat to the west of the town of Alexis Creek); the band was later moved to a less advantageous position at the Redstone Reserve. There are approximately 400 people living on-reserve, and probably as many living off-reserve. Indian Reserves under the administration of the Alexis Creek First Nation are: The band owns Tsi Del Del Industries, which is active in a number of areas,
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    Alexis Nakota Sioux First Nation

    Alexis Nakota Sioux First Nation

    The Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation no. 437 is a Nakoda First Nation which reserves near Edmonton, Hinton, and Whitecourt, in the Canadian province of Alberta, and headquartered at 54° N and 114°, about 85 kilometres (53 mi) west of Edmonton . The Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation is a member of Treaty 6. As of March, 2012, the total registered population of the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation is 1779 persons. There are 508 registered males, and 459 females living on their own reserve. Members of the Alexis First Nation are of the Stoney (or Assiniboine, from Ojibwe language asinii meaning "stoney" and bwaan meaning "Cooker", a designation referring to the Sioux people). Their traditional language is Nakoda/Stoney, or Isga Iʼabi. Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation has a custom electoral system based on section 10 of the Indian Act. Current chief and council were elected on June 17, 2006, and will hold their positions until June 16, 2010. The Alexis Annual Pow-wow Celebrations and Fastpitch Tournament is held on the Alexis reserve each summer in July. The Fastpitch tournament draws prizes of about $14,000 depending on the number of teams entered. The Pow-wow is generally divided into various categories,
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Halalt First Nation

    Halalt First Nation

    The Halalt First Nation is a First Nations government located at Chemainus in southeastern Vancouver Island of British Columbia, Canada. The historical territory of the Halalt people is the lower Chemainus River valley and Willy Island, which is offshore from today's town of Chemainus. The Halalt First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa Mawt Tribal Council, and affiliated with the Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group
    9.00
    1 votes
    106

    Lac La Ronge First Nation

    Located in north-central Saskatchewan, the Lac La Ronge Indian Band is the largest First Nation in Saskatchewan, and one of the 10 largest in Canada, with a 2010 population of 8,954. Their reserve lands extend from rich farmlands in central Saskatchewan, all the way north through the boreal forest to the Churchill River and beyond. Their central administration office is located in La Ronge, 241 km north of Prince Albert, on the edge of the Pre-Cambrian Shield. La Ronge & Stanley Mission Band of Woods Cree Indians became a signatory to the Treaty 6 on February 11, 1889, signed by Chief James Roberts. In 1900 Peter Ballantyne was allowed to separate from the La Ronge and Stanley Mission Band to form the Peter Ballantyne Band of Cree Indians, the predecessor to the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation. In 1910, the La Ronge & Stanley Mission Band split into two entities: Amos Charles Band of Cree Indians (located in Stanley Mission) and the James Roberts Band of Cree Indians (located in La Ronge). In 1950, the two Bands amalgamated and became the Lac La Ronge Indian Band, the current legal name. Lac La Ronge Indian Band's land-base consists of 18 Indian Reserves, some containing one of six
    9.00
    1 votes
    107

    Liard River First Nation

    The Liard River First Nation, also known s the Liard First Nation is a First Nation in the southeastern Yukon Territory in Canada. Its main centres are Upper Liard, Yukon and Watson Lake, Yukon along the Alaska Highway. The language originally spoken by the people of this First Nation was Kaska and the First Nation is a member of the Kaska Tribal Council which is pursuing land claims in the Yukon and northern British Columbia. Their Indian and Northern Affairs Canada band number is 502. Their registered population is 1,152. Indian Reserves under the governance of the Liard First Nation are:
    9.00
    1 votes
    108

    Muskoday First Nation

    The Muskoday First Nation (formerly the John Smith First Nation) is a First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada, composed of Cree and Saulteaux peoples. The First Nation has a registered population of 1552 people as of December 2007, of which approximately 560 members of the First Nation live on-reserve, and approximately 980 live off-reserve. Muskoday's territory is located in the aspen parkland biome. It is bordered by the rural municipalities of Birch Hills No. 460 and Prince Albert No. 461. The First Nation's land was settled after Chief John Smith of a Cree and Saulteaux band who were originally from the St. Peters Reserve (this was near Selkirk, Manitoba and was dissolved, with the remainder of the band today comprising the Peguis First Nation in Manitoba) settled along the South Saskatchewan River in the 1870s. Chief Smith signed onto Treaty Six at Fort Carlton in 1876 making the settlement legally an Indian reserve. The reserve and First Nation was initially named after their Chief John Smith, who was a brother of Chief James Smith, the founder of the James Smith First Nation. Also during the late 19th century, James Isbister served for a period as a farm instructor at
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Nadleh Whut'en First Nation

    Nadleh Whut'en First Nation

    The Nadleh Whut'en First Nation is a First Nations government of the Dakelh people, whose territory is located in the Central Interior of British Columbia, Canada, around the east end of Fraser Lake. The nation has seven reserves which Indian and Northern Affairs Canada refer to as IR#1-9. (Reserves 5 and 6 split from Nadleh Whut'en and make up Stellat'en First Nation). Until 1990, it was referred to as the Fraser Lake Indian Band. Nadleh Whut'en has 412 registered members, of which half live on reserve. Most of the nation's members reside in Nadleh, the main community, while others (approximately 20) live in Lejac. Nadleh is located along the banks of the Nautley (Nadleh) river, between Fraser Lake and the Nechako River. Lejac is located on the south side of Fraser Lake, on the site of the former Lejac Residential School. The school opened in 1922, and housed children from Vancouver to Dease Lake and everywhere in between. The Nadleh Whut'en speak a dialect of the Carrier language part of the Athapaskan language family. Carrier people refer themselves as Dakelh, which means "people who travel by water." The nation has one elected government chief and four elected government
    9.00
    1 votes
    110

    Spuzzum First Nation

    Spuzzum First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located near Spuzzum, British Columbia. It is a member of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration, one of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other members of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration are the Kanaka Bar, Skuppah and Nicomen First Nations (the Nicomen First Nation is also a member of the Nicola Tribal Association). The Spuzzum First Nation reserve community and offices are located at Spuzzum in the lower Fraser Canyon, near the Alexandra Bridge and about 10 miles north of Yale. . Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The chief of the Spuzzum in 1858, Kowpelst ("White Hat") was one of the first to work Hill's Bar at the onset of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush and was considered a "friendly Indian" during the Fraser Canyon War of that fall between the American miners and the upstream Nlaka'pamux of Camchin. He was appointed as a magistrate by Sir James Douglas. During the Fraser Canyon War, a few thousand miners from bars farther up the canyon thronged at Spuzzum in terror of the upstream Nlaka'pamux, and some villages
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Tlatlasikwala Nation

    The Tlatlasikwala Nation is a First Nations band government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focused on the community of Port Hardy, British Columbia in the Queen Charlotte Strait region.. It is a member of the Kwakiutl District Council and, for treaty negotiation purposes, the Winalagalis Treaty Group which includes three other members of the Kwakiutl District Council (the Quatsino First Nation, the Da'naxda'xw Awaetlatla Nation, and the Gwa'Sala-'Nakwaxda'xw Nation.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112

    Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in First Nation

    The Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in ([ʈʼoⁿdək hwətʃʼin]; formerly the Dawson Indian Band) is a First Nations located in the central Yukon, Canada. Its main population centre is Dawson City, Yukon. Many of today’s Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in, or people of the river, are descendants of the Hän-speaking people who have lived along the Yukon River for thousands of years. They traveled extensively throughout their traditional territory harvesting salmon from the Yukon River and caribou from the Fortymile and Porcupine Herds. Moose, small game, and a variety of plants and berries provided additional food sources. Other raw materials needed to make tools, clothing and shelter were procured from this diverse and rich environment. The Hän traded with neighboring First Nations people and maintained interrelations through family connections and frequent gatherings. In the mid-19th century, European fur traders and missionaries established a presence in the territory. Contact with the newcomers presented new challenges and opportunities for the Hän. Trade increased and new goods and economic practices were introduced. The Hän used a combination of traditional and newly introduced skills, goods and materials to
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Weenusk First Nation

    Weenusk First Nation (Cree: ᐧᐄᓈᐢᑯ ᐃᓂᓂᐧᐊᐠ (Wīnāsko Ininiwak); unpointed: ᐧᐃᓇᐢᑯ ᐃᓂᓂᐧᐊᐠ) is a Cree First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario. In September, 2007, its total registered population was 516. Weenusk First Nation was an independent member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) but now have joined the Mushkegowuk Council, a regional tribal council, who is also a member of NAN. Weenusk First Nation's reserve is the 5310 ha Winisk Indian Reserve 90. Associated with the reserve is their Winisk Indian Settlement also known as Peawanuck, which also holds reserve status. Originally, the Weenusk First Nation was located within their reserve, but they were forced to move 30 km southwest to Peawanuck when on May 16, 1986, spring floods swept away much of the original settlement, which had been located 6 km upriver from Hudson Bay. In the Cree language, "Peawanuck" means "a place where flint is found," while "Weenusk" means "ground hog." The community, being primarily Swampy Cree, speaks the n-dialect of the Cree language. Being that the community is composed of Cree, Oji-cree, Ojibwa and Métis peoples, in addition to Cree, Anishininiimowin and Ojibwemowin are also spoken
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Aamjiwnaang First Nation

    The Aamjiwnaang First Nation (or also known as Chippewas of Sarnia First Nation) is a First Nations community of about 850 Chippewa (Ojibwe) Aboriginal peoples. They live on the Sarnia 45 Indian Reserve, located on the shores of the St. Clair River directly south of Sarnia in southwestern Ontario, Canada – just across the United States border from Port Huron, Michigan. The name Aamjiwnaang, or more fully vocalised as Aamijiwanaang, means "at the spawning stream." The Aamjiwnaang community has expressed concern regarding its proximity to chemical plants in the area, as birth rates of their people have been documented by the American journal Environmental Health Perspectives as deviating from the normal ratio of close to 50% boys, 50% girls. The ratio as found between 1999 and 2003 by the journal was roughly 33% boys, and 67% girls. The First Nation is concerned that this abnormal trend is due to adverse effects of maternal and fetal exposure to the effluent and emissions of the nearby chemical plants. This is the first community in the world to have a birth rate of two girls to every boy. Population trend:
    6.67
    3 votes
    115

    Enoch Cree Nation

    • Canadian Indian Reserve(s): Stony Plain 135
    The Enoch Cree Nation is a First Nations band in Alberta that is part of the Cree language group. It is also part of the larger Yellowhead Tribal Development Foundation tribal council. This band controls two reserves – the larger Stony Plain 135 Indian Reserve on the western edge of the City of Edmonton and the smaller Stony Plain 135A Indian Reserve 43 km south of the Town of Barrhead. Approximately 2,041 band members live on the larger reserve with more residing in the City of Edmonton. The registered total population of the band was 2,075 in January 2008. The band is currently in negotiations with the Canadian Crown regarding land claim settlements and the use of reserve land by the Department of Defence as a bombing range during the Second World War. In October, 2006, the Enoch Cree Nation opened the River Cree Casino and Resort, a $150-million casino, hotel and sports complex located on the northeast corner of the larger reserve adjacent to the City of Edmonton.
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Missanabie Cree First Nation

    Missanabie Cree First Nation is a "Treaty 9" Nation. Evidence and records suggest that by as early as the 1570s, members of the Missanabie Cree had settled in the areas surrounding present day Missinaibi Lake, Dog Lake and Wabatongushi Lake. According to Elders’ testimony and anthropological evidence, the Missanabie Cree had utilized these lands from time immemorial to hunt, fish and trap for food, for ceremonial purposes and to provide for the cultural, spiritual and economic well being of their people. In the 1660s Father Allouez confirmed that the Cree people regularly traveled between Lake Superior and James Bay. In the 1730s Cree speaking people with summer encampments at Bawating (Sault Ste. Marie) gathered to fish, trade and do ceremonies. In 1904 the Indian Affairs Department recognized Missanabie Cree as an Indian band to be ‘treated with’ by Treaty Commissioners for the purpose of adhesions to Treaty 9 scheduled for 1905. In 1905 Canada and Ontario enter into Treaty 9 with various Cree and Ojibwa groups to obtain surrender of 130,000 square miles (340,000 km) of land. In 1906 the Crown did not sign formal adhesions to Treaty 9 with the Missanabie Cree First Nation. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    117

    Nipissing First Nation

    The Nipissing First Nation consists of historic first nation (i.e. aboriginal) people of Ojibwa and Algonquin descent who, following succeeding cultures of ancestors, have lived in the area of Lake Nipissing in the Canadian province of Ontario for about 9,400 years. They are referred to by many names in European historical records, since the colonists often adopted names given to them by other nations. The Nipissing are generally considered part of the Anishinaabe peoples, a grouping of people speaking Algonquian languages, which includes the Odaawaa, Ojibwe and Algonquins. This broad heritage is likely the result of the Nipissings' living at a geographical crossroads, a watershed divide. Lake Nipissing drains via the French River into Georgian Bay and, to the east of Lake Nipissing, Trout Lake drains via the Mattawa River into the Ottawa River. Living at the crossroads between two watersheds, the Nipissing were key to trade to the East, West, North and South of Lake Nipissing. The French portaged the watershed divide extensively to reach the Great Lakes by canoe from their settlements around Montreal on the St. Lawrence River. To the west the Nipissing trade routes extended as far
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    T'sou-ke Nation

    T'sou-ke Nation

    The T'sou-ke Nation is the First Nations government of the T'sou-ke people. The nation is located on Vancouver Island, in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The T'souk-e people are the namesake of the town of Sooke, British Columbia.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119

    Whitesand First Nation

    The Whitesand First Nation is an Ojibwa First Nation in Northern Ontario, Canada. They have reserved for themselves the 249-hectare (615-acre) Whitesand reserve. The community of Armstrong Settlement is their main community, located coterminously with Armstrong, Thunder Bay District, Ontario. In June 2008, their total registered population was 1086 people, of which their on-reserve population was 311. Originally located along the northwest shore of Lake Nipigon near Mount St. John, and near the Whitesand River which gives name to the group, Whitesand First Nation was without a home from 1942 when high water levels began eroding the shoreline and flooding out their buildings and burial grounds. Due to the economic influence of the Canadian National Railway, many Whitesand First Nation members settled along the CNR rail line. Largest of these settlements took place in Armstrong. Consequently, when a new Reserve was negotiated, it was located immediately north of that community. Whitesand is policed by the OPP an agreement made between chief and council and OPP (OPP: Ontario Provincial Police) The current electoral leadership of the council consists of Chief Allan Gustufson and six
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Constance Lake First Nation

    Constance Lake First Nation

    Constance Lake First Nation is an Oji-Cree First Nation in Cochrane District in northeastern Ontario, Canada, directly north of the community of Calstock along a continuation of Ontario Highway 663. In 2010, the First Nation had a total registered population of 1,477 people, of which the on-reserve population was 820. The First Nation elects its leadership for a two-year term through the Act Electoral System. As of 2010, the leadership is held by chief Roger Wesley, together with six (6) councillors: Charlie Baxter, Sr., Allen Ferris, Darius Ferris, Beatrice Ineese, Ken Neegan and Fred Sackaney. As a signatory to Treaty 9, the First Nation is a member of Matawa First Nations, a Regional Chiefs' Council; the Regional Chiefs' Council, in turn, is a member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, a Tribal Political Organization representing many of the First Nations in Northern and Northwestern Ontario. Constance Lake First Nation have two reserves: the 3,110.5-hectare (7,686.2-acre) Constance Lake 92 Indian Reserve and the 3,108-hectare (7,680-acre) English River 66 Indian Reserve, of which Constance Lake 92 serves as the main reserve. The community has existed in this area since the early
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    High Bar First Nation

    The High Bar First Nation is a First Nations government of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation, located in the Fraser Canyon-Cariboo region of the Central Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It was created when the government of the then-Colony of British Columbia established an Indian Reserve system in the 1860s. It is one of three Secwepemc bands that is not a member of either the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council or the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council. The High Bar people are also partly Tsilhqot'in and have links with some Chilcotin First Nations. In the Chilcotin language, the High Bar people are the Llenlleney'ten. The Secwepemc in the Fraser Canyon and on the Chilcotin Plateau are also known as the Canyon Shuswap and have traditionally had close ties with the Tsilhqot'in people. There are three Indian Reserves under the administration of the High Bar First Nation:
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Homalco First Nation

    Homalco First Nation

    The Homalco First Nation is a First Nations government located in Bute Inlet near the upper Sunshine Coast of British Columbia, Canada. The Homalco are also known, with their neighbours the Sliammon and Klahoose and the K'omoks of nearby parts of Vancouver Island, as the Mainland Comox. Their ancestral tongue is the Comox language. The Homalco First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council.
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    Nanoose First Nation

    The Nanoose First Nation is a First Nations government located on southern Vancouver Island in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, in the vicinity of the community of Nanoose Bay. Their ancestral tongue is the Hulquminum language. The Nanoose First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Quatsino First Nation

    Quatsino First Nation

    The Quatsino First Nation is the First Nations band government of the Gwat'sinux subgroup of the Kwakwaka'wakw peoples, based on the west coast of northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focused on the community of Coal Harbour in Quatsino Sound. It is a member of Kwakiutl District Council and, for treaty negotiation purposes, the Winalagalis Treaty Group which includes three other members of the Kwakiutl District Council (the Da'naxda'xw Awaetlatla Nation, Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'xw Nation, and the Tlatlasikwala Nation.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Uchucklesaht First Nation

    Uchucklesaht First Nation

    The Uchucklesaht First Nation is a First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. the Uchucklesaht First Nation is no longer a part of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth Tribal Council, but rather became a Member of the Maa-Nulth First Nations, recently created via Treaty with the Government of Canada.
    7.50
    2 votes
    126

    Xeni Gwet'in First Nation

    The Xeni Gwet'in First Nation is a First Nations government located in the southwestern Chilcotin District in the western Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Tsilhqot'in Tribal Council. The Xeni Gwet'in First Nation reserve community and offices are located at the wilderness community of Nemaia Valley, which lies between Chilko Lake and the Taseko Lakes. Marilyn Baptiste was recently elected chief. Most observers regard this community as one of the best-managed in the area. The band recently won a court decision on its treaty rights (William v. HMTQ), and the process has returned to negotiations. There are about 300 people living on the reserve, with a handful of non-native people in the area. The band has an active business management program, which runs the local roads yard as well as a gas-bar. Many new houses have been built in the subdivsion area near the band office, with an electrical grid. The area is not served by the main BC Hydro grid, and so (except for the subdivision) all houses are run on generators and solar power. The band has taken over the management of its health program, the only one of the Chilcotin
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Curve Lake First Nation

    Curve Lake First Nation

    The Curve Lake First Nation is Mississauga Ojibway First Nation located in Peterborough County of Ontario. The Curve Lake First Nation occupies three reserves; Curve Lake First Nation 35 Reserve, Curve Lake 35A Reserve, and Islands in the Trent Waters Indian Reserve 36A. The last of these reserves is shared with the Hiawatha First Nation and the Scugog First Nation. The Curve Lake First Nation registered a population on these three reserves of 741, with an additional 1,050 registered band members living off-reserve. The Curve Lake Anishinaabe (Ojibway) community trace their origins to 1882 when a small band settled around Curve Lake and Mud Lake. The community officially became a reserve in 1889. Mud Lake Band #35, became Curve Lake First Nation in 1964, with the Mud Lake 35 Indian Reserve becoming the Curve Lake First Nation 35 Indian Reserve. The people of Curve Lake First Nation elect their leadership through the Act Electoral System for a two-year term. The First Nation's council consists of a chief and eight councillors. The current chief is Phyllis Williams. The councillors are Vanessa Boudreault, Ted Coppaway, Jeffrey Jacobs, Jonas Knott, Keith Knott, Arnold Taylor, Shane
    6.33
    3 votes
    128

    O'Chiese First Nation

    The O'Chiese First Nation is a Saulteaux First Nation in Alberta, Canada. The First Nation's homeland is the 14131.9 ha O'Chiese 203A Indian reserve, located approximately 23 kilometres northwest of Rocky Mountain House. Also reserved is the O'Chiese Cemetery 203A. As of May 2008, the First Nation had the population of 954 registed people, of which the on-reserve population was 644 people. The primary language spoken on the reserve is Saulteaux. Though the ancestors of O'Chiese First Nation made the area about Baptiste River their winter camp site where they hunted moose and deer, and trapped small game for the Fur trade, they also migrated as far south as the Milk River in Montana in the summer. The O'Chiese First Nation elect their leadership through the Act Electoral System. The current council consists of Chief Darren Whitford and six Councillors: Douglas Beaverbones, Roy Bremner, Martin Ironbow, Cleon Strawberry, Cedric Whitford and Leslie Yellowface. Their two-year term began on January 6, 2007. The First Nation is affiliated with Yellowhead Tribal Council, a Regional Chiefs' Council. O'Chiese First Nation is a signatory to Treaty 6 adhesion, signed on May 13, 1950.
    6.33
    3 votes
    129

    Dene

    The Dene (Dené) are an aboriginal group of First Nations who live in the northern boreal and Arctic regions of Canada. The Dené speak Northern Athabaskan languages. Dene is the common Athabaskan word for "people" (Sapir 1915, p. 558). The term "Dene" has two usages. More commonly, it is used narrowly to refer to the Athabaskan speakers of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut in Canada, especially including the Chipewyan (Denesuline). Tlicho (Dogrib), Yellowknives (T'atsaot'ine), Slavey (Deh Gah Got'ine or Deh Cho), and Sahtu (the Eastern group in Jeff Leer's classification; part of the Northwestern Canada group in Keren Rice's classification). But it is sometimes also used to refer to all Northern Athabaskan speakers, who are spread in a wide range all across Alaska and northern Canada. Note that Dene never includes the Pacific Coast Athabaskan or Southern Athabaskan speakers in the continental U.S., despite the fact that the term is used to denote the Athabaskan languages as a whole (the Na-Dene language family). The Southern Athabaskan speakers do, however, refer to themselves with similar words: Diné (Navajo) and Indé (Apache). Alexander Mackenzie described aspects of a number
    7.00
    2 votes
    130

    Fort Folly First Nation

    The Fort Folly First Nation is a Mi'kmaq First Nation located near the village of Dorchester, New Brunswick, Canada. The First Nation had a total of 111 people registered as of October 2008, of which 29 lived on their own reserve. The current Chief of the First Nation is Joseph Knockwood. The Councillors of the First Nation are Rebecca Knockwood and Jennifer Knockwood. Their term expires in 2011. The band is a member of the North Shore Micmac District Council and the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nation. The First Nation has one reserve, Fort Folly 1. The reserve has an area of 56.1 hectares (139 acres). This reserve came into existence in 1840, under the New Brunswick Indian Act. First Nations in New Brunswick
    7.00
    2 votes
    131

    Lac Seul First Nation

    Lac Seul First Nation is located on the southeastern shores of Lac Seul, 56 kilometres (35 mi) northeast of the city of Dryden, Ontario. Though Lac Seul First Nation is a treaty signatory to Treaty 3, the First Nation is a member of the Independent First Nations Alliance, a regional tribal council and a member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The registered population of Lac Seul was 2,837 persons in April of 2008, of which the on-reserve population was 774. The First Nation have the 26,821.5 hectares (104 sq mi) Lac Seul 28 Indian Reserve, known as Obishikokaang in the Anishinaabe language, containing three settlements. Frenchmen's Head is accessible by road and is approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Sioux Lookout. Whitefish Bay is also newly accessible by road and is approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) from Sioux Lookout, Ontario. Kejick Bay is approximately 60 kilometres (37 mi) northwest of Sioux Lookout and is accessible by road and water and air. Frenchmen's Head and Kejick Bay each have a population of about 400 each, while Whitefish Bay has a population of about 100. In 1929 Ontario Hydro constructed a dam at Ear Falls to control the level of the lake to produce
    7.00
    2 votes
    132

    North Spirit Lake First Nation

    North Spirit Lake First Nation is a small Oji-Cree community in Northern Ontario, located north of Red Lake, Ontario. It is connected to Sandy Lake First Nation, and Deer Lake First Nation by winter/ice roads. It is part of the Keewaytinook Okimakanak Council (Northern Chiefs) and the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. North Spirit Lake is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service.
    7.00
    2 votes
    133

    Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation

    Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation (Assin 'skowitiniwak or Rocky Cree) is a Cree First Nations group in northern Saskatchewan consisting of eight communities: Amisk Lake, Deschambeault Lake, Kinoosao, Pelican Narrows, Prince Albert, Sandy Bay, Southend and Sturgeon Landing. The administrative center of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation is Pelican Narrows. The current elected Chief is Darrel McCallum. Chief McCallum has a degree in education and is 39 years old. Previously, he was the Education Coordinator in Pelican Narrows before assuming the role of Chief after three tries. The Cree Nation also has 14 other Elected Councilors two each from Southend, Sandy Bay, and Deschambault Lake, five from Pelican Narrows, and one each from Amisk Lake, Sturgeon Landing, and Prince Albert.
    7.00
    2 votes
    134
    Tseshaht First Nation

    Tseshaht First Nation

    Tseshaht First Nation is an amalgamation of many tribes up and down Alberni Inlet and in the Alberni Valley of central Vancouver Island in the Canadian province of British Columbia. They are a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council which includes all other Nuu-chah-nulth-aht peoples except the Pacheedaht First Nation. There are 1008 Tseshaht. The main reserve community is located in Port Alberni, British Columbia. They became the area's dominant tribe through historical warfare. The Tseshaht First nation is one of 14 that make up the Nuu-chah-nulth culture. Their language is a member of the Wakashan family.
    7.00
    2 votes
    135

    Council of the Haida Nation

    The Council of the Haida Nation is the Aboriginal Sovereign Authority and Government of the Haida Nation. The Haida Nation is engaged in a Title dispute of their territories, Haida Gwaii, with the Government of Canada. The Haida Nation also includes portions of Alaska. The Kaigani Haida, who are the Alaskan group, are not part of the same government and are constituted separately within the Central Council Tlingit Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. There are two villages of the Haida Nation within Canada, Old Massett and Skidegate. The Haida Gwaii archipelago is one of the richest marine and terrestrial environments on earth. The Haida culture comes from the land with a distinct language and distinctive and renowned material culture. The Council, formed in 1973, has been involved in many conflicts over the fate of its territories, which have been claimed by Canada since 1871, and by the Colony of British Columbia and the Colony of the Queen Charlotte Islands prior to that. No treaties between the Crown and the governments of the Haida were ever signed, as in most of the rest of the current Canadian province of British Columbia. All Haida territories were in the past also claimed by
    8.00
    1 votes
    136

    Pimicikamak Cree Nation

    Pimicikamak Cree Nation is sometimes used as a name for Pimicikamak, one of the more populous Cree indigenous peoples in Canada. Etymologically, "Pimicikamak Cree Nation" is a polyglot description of this indigenous people, and is not a name. "Pimicikamak" is the Cree name of an indigenous people whose traditional territory was the drainage basin of the upper Nelson River in what came to be known as Rupert's Land. "Cree" is 18th-Century French slang derived from "the Old Algonkin dialect form "kiristino", which was "the name of an obscure band of Indians who roamed the region south of James Bay in the first half of the seventeenth century". It is an exonym that was not used by the Pimicikamak people to describe themselves. Today, "Crees use the name Cree to refer to themselves only when speaking English or French." "Nation" is an English word. The combination of these three terms describes the Pimicikamak people less accurately than its own name "Pimicikamak". "Pimicikamak Cree Nation" may be abbreviated as "PCN" referring erroneously to the Cross Lake Band of Indians or Cross Lake First Nation, not to be confused with the Mexican metal band of that name. Pimicikamak is an
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Seton Lake First Nation

    Seton Lake First Nation

    The Seton Lake First Nation, aka the Seton Lake Indian Band, is a First Nations government located in the Central Interior-Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Lillooet Tribal Council, which is the largest grouping of band governments of the St'at'imc people (aka the Lillooet people). Other St'at'imc governments include the smaller In-SHUCK-ch Nation on the lower Lillooet River to the southwest, and the independent N'quatqua First Nation at the farther end of Anderson Lake from Seton Portage, which is the location of three of the band's reserve communities. The Seton Lake First Nation's offices are located at Shalalth, British Columbia, where a School District #74 public school is in operation, teaching St'at'imcets language and St'at'imc culture in addition to regular curriculum. Chief: Garry John Council Members: Ida Mary Peter, Rodney Louie, Clifford Casper, Phyllis Peters, and Gilbert Shiel Indian Reserves under the administration of the Seton Lake First Nation are: One Indian Reserve is no longer under band title: In addition to this parcel of land, which was transferred out of Indian Reserve as part of the Bridge River Power
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Sunchild First Nation

    The Sunchild First Nation is a Cree First Nation in Alberta, Canada part of Treaty 6, signed on May 25, 1944 under the leadership of Chief Louis Sunchild. The First Nation has one reserve, Sunchild 202. The reserve has an area of 52.18 square kilometres, and is located roughly 40 kilometres northwest of Rocky Mountain House, Alberta and immediately west of the O'Chiese First Nation. As of March 11, 2011 the current governance of the Sunchild Nation is led by Chief Stanley Lagrelle, Councillors Paul Bigchild, Lisa Daychief, James Frencheater, Jonathon Frencheater and Norman Lagrelle. The Mailing address of the Sunchild First Nation is PO BOX 747, ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE, AB, T4T 1A5. The Chief and Council over-see a membership (2008 statistic) of 1209 people, of whom 832 live on their reserve. The Community is served by the Sunchild Band Office, Health Centre, Gas Bar & Convenience, Adult Education Centre, Community Headstart as well as the Sunchild First Nation School.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Ardoch Algonquin First Nation

    Ardoch Algonquin First Nation

    Ardoch Algonguin is a non-status Algonquin (Anishinaabe) community that is located around the Madawaska, Mississippi and Rideau watersheds, north of Kingston, Ontario In 1844, land was reserved for their use at Bobs Lake, but it was destroyed by illegal logging in the 1850s, and sold to Irish immigrants. In the 1930s, the Government of Canada set up a reserve at Golden Lake and gave status to those living there (Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation). Ardoch Algonquins were encouraged to abandon their lands, and move to Golden Lake. In the summer of 1981, the Ardoch Algonquin blockaded a commercial rice-harvesting venture to protect what they saw as their territory and their manoomin (wild rice) which grows in the Mississippi river nearby. At the end of August, the community was raided by the police, and many protesters were arrested. Although the blockade ended, the rice-harvesting venture stopped, and no further attempts to claim it have been made. More recently, Ardoch Algonquin and Shabot Obaadjiwan blocked access to a prospective uranium mining site, near Sharbot Lake, Ontario, on traditional Ardoch territory. Frontenac Ventures Corporation, the company which wishes to do
    6.00
    3 votes
    140

    Black River First Nation

    Black River First Nation (sometimes Little Black River First Nation; Makadewaagamijiwanong in Ojibwe) is a Ojibwa First Nation located around O'Hanley, Manitoba, along the O'Hanley and Black Rivers, on the eastern shore of Lake Winnipeg. It is 32 kilometers north of Pine Falls, and around 150 kilometers north of Winnipeg. In January 2008, the total registered population was 977, of which the on-reserve population was 701. The First Nation have as its reserve the 809.3 ha Black River 9 Indian Reserve. The settlement is accessible by an all-weather road (via PR 304) and 4 km of municipal road. The First Nation's current chief is Sheldon Kent, with Farley Bird serving as the Deputy Chief. Two other councillors also serve the settlement: Timothy Bird and Jonas Peebles. Black River First Nation is a member of Southeast Community Futures Development Corporation
    6.00
    3 votes
    141

    Brunswick House First Nation

    Brunswick House First Nation is an Ojibway-Cree First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in the Sudbury District, 157 kilometres (97.6 mi) northeast of Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. The First Nation have reserved for themselves the 9,054.2 hectares (22,373.4 acres) Mountbatten 76A Indian Reserve and the 259.8 hectares (642.0 acres) Duck Lake 76B Indian Reserve. As of June, 2008, it had a registered population of 639 people, of which their on-Reserve population was 171 people. Brunswick House is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service. Originally known as the New Brunswick House Band of Ojibway, the Ojibway people who during the fur trade era traded primarily at the New Brunswick House posts at Brunswick Lake and Missinaibi Lake became a signatory to Treaty 9. Originally, the Band had reserved for themselves the 17,280 acres (6,993.0 ha) New Brunswick House 76 Indian Reserve, but on June 1, 1925, the Ontario government established the Chapleau Game Preserve which surrounded (and did not explicitly exclude) the New Brunswick House reserve and was closed to all hunting and trapping. The Ontario government subsequently purchased reserve
    6.00
    3 votes
    142

    Dease River First Nation

    The Dease River First Nation, also known as the Dease River Nation, is a band government of the Kaska Dena people in the Cassiar Country of the Northern Interior of British Columbia. Their offices are located in Good Hope Lake, British Columbia, which is on the Stewart-Cassiar Highway to the east of the abandoned mining town of Cassiar. The registered population of the band is 162. Indian Reserves under the administration of the Dease River First Nation are:
    6.00
    3 votes
    143

    Iskut First Nation

    The Iskut First Nation is a band government of the Tahltan people. Their main reserve is Iskut IR No.6, located at Iskut, British Columbia; Kluachon Lake IR No.1 is in the same vicinity, while the band's third reserve, Stikine River IR No. 7 is located one mile west of, and on the opposite side of the Stikine River from, the community of Telegraph Creek. The Iskut First Nation is one of two member bands of the Tahltan Nation, the other member band being the Tahltan First Nation, also known as the Tahltan Indian Band. Indian Reserves under the band's administration are:
    6.00
    3 votes
    144

    Skatin First Nation

    The Skatin First Nations, aka the Skatin Nations, are a band government of the In-SHUCK-ch Nation, a small group of the larger St'at'imc people who are also referred to as Lower Stl'atl'imx. Skatin, the St'at'imcets version of the Chinook Jargon Skookumchuck, is located 4 km south of historic St. Agnes' Well Skookumchuck Hot Springs The community is 28km south of the outlet of Lillooet Lake on the east side of the Lillooet River. It is approximately 75 km south of the town of Pemberton and the large reserve of the Lil'wat branch of the St'at'imc at Mount Currie. Other bands nearby are Samahquam at Baptiste Smith IR on the west side of the Lillooet River at 30 km. and Xa'xtsa First Nations; the latter is located at Port Douglas, near the mouth of the Lillooet River where it enters the head of Harrison Lake. The N'Quatqua First Nation on Anderson Lake, between Mount Currie and Lillooet, was at one time involved in joint treaty negotiations with the In-SHUCK-ch but its members have voted to withdraw, though a tribal council including the In-SHUCK-ch bands and N'Quatqua remains, the Lower Stl'atl'imx Tribal Council. The site of the hot springs was used by travellers on the old Douglas
    6.00
    3 votes
    145

    Red Pheasant First Nation

    Red Pheasant First Nation is a Cree Nation located 33 km south of North Battleford. Chief Wuttunee's people were living along the Battle River when the Numbered Treaties were being negotiated. Wuttunee did not want to sign Treaty 6 but appointed his brother Red Pheasant to sign in his place, and the Department of Indian Affairs henceforth referred to them as the Red Pheasant Band. In 1878, they settled on a reserve in the Eagle hills. A day school and an Anglican church were opened there within a decade. The band has 1,893 registered members, 608 of whom live on the reserve.
    5.00
    4 votes
    146

    Onyota'a:ka First Nation

    The Oneida Nation of the Thames is an Onyota'a:ka (Oneida) First Nation located in southwestern Ontario on what is commonly referred to as the "Oneida Settlement", located about a 30-minute drive from London, Ontario, Canada. The Nation counts approximately 5,209 band members, of whom 2030 live on reserve. The Oneidas, as an Iroquoian people, had a traditional territory that once covered a large section of the eastern part of North America. The territory of the Oneida Settlement is part of the traditional hunting area known as the Beaver Hunting Grounds, which was recognized in the 1701 Nanfan Treaty. The people who live there are descendants of much later migrants, a small group of assimilated/Christian Oneidas who relocated to Southwold, Ontario, Canada from New York state in the 1840s. The original settlers of the Oneida community were associated with two Christian denominations, Methodist and Anglican. One of the leaders in the migration was an ordained Methodist minister. Soon after their arrival in Ontario, the settlers built Methodist and Anglican churches. Since those early days, these two churches have had over half of the population as members. By 1877, some people began
    5.67
    3 votes
    147

    Sheshatshiu Innu First Nation

    The Sheshatshiu Innu First Nation is located in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The First Nation is centred around the community of Sheshatshiu. The current chief of this Innu First Nation is Sebastien Benuen, who succeeded Anastasia Qupee in 2010. The First Nation has a registered population of 981 people.
    5.67
    3 votes
    148

    Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation

    The Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek (formerly known as Sand Point First Nation, and occasionally known as Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabeg) is an Ojibwa First Nation in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. Their traditional territory is the Sand Point, located on the south east shores of Lake Nipigon, in Greenstone near Fairloch, formerly occupied by the Lake Nipigon Provincial Park. In October 2008, they had a total registered population of 185 people, of which only four people lived on Sand Point. The Nation is led by Chief Paul Gladu. The council is a member of Nokiiwin Tribal Council, a Regional Chiefs' Council, and is member of Union of Ontario Indians, a tribal political organization. The First Nation is also a member of Waaskiinaysay Ziibi Inc., an economic development corporation made up of five Lake Nipigon First Nations.
    6.50
    2 votes
    149
    Listuguj Mi'gmaq First Nation

    Listuguj Mi'gmaq First Nation

    The Listuguj Mi'gmaq First Nation (in Francis-Smith orthography Listukuj Míkmaq) is a Canadian First Nations community with a registered population (2003) of 3152 members, most of whom are of Mi'gmaq ancestry. Of these, 1879 persons reside on the federal Indian reserve that was set aside by the legislature of Lower Canada in 1853, for the exclusive use of the majority of Mi'gmaq in this region. The remaining Mi'gmaq live off-reserve in the eastern United States and across Canada, but stay connected to the community through modern communications and travel to Listuguj for annual events such as the salmon harvest in June, St. Ann's Day in July, or the traditional powwow in August. All community members, regardless of residence, participate in democratic elections held every two years to elect one Chief and twelve Councillors in accordance with Canada's Indian Act Election Regulations. The community is also allied to other Mi'gmaq communities in the Gaspé region of Quebec and in northern New Brunswick. Together, their elected Chiefs advance ancestral claims to self-government and to the traditional territory called Gespe'gewa'gi ('Kespékewáki), the last land. Gespe'gewa'gi is the
    6.50
    2 votes
    150

    Nazko First Nation

    The Nazko First Nation is a First Nations government of the Dakelh people in the north-central Interior of British Columbia. Its reserves are located around the community of Nazko, British Columbia, which is 120 km west of Quesnel and southwest of Prince George. Nazko is located on the Nazko River and means "river flowing from the south". Indian Reserves under the administration of the Nazko First Nation are:
    6.50
    2 votes
    151

    Northlands Dene First Nation

    The Northlands Dene First Nation is a first nation located at Lac Brochet, in the northwestern part of Manitoba. The population is about 600 Dené who speak Chipewyan and were sometimes referred to in history as "Caribou-eaters".
    6.50
    2 votes
    152

    Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation

    Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation is a First Nation in southern Manitoba, Canada. It has a registered population of 2,152 individuals. The First Nation has three reserves, of which the Roseau River No. 2 has an area of 22.242 square kilometres (8.59 mi²), while the Roseau Rapids No. 2A is considerably smaller at 3.23 km² (798 acres), and Roseau River No. 2B even smaller at 75.4 acres (305,000 m). Roseau River No. 2 & 2A are located approximately 80 km south of Winnipeg, and Roseau River No. 2B is located at the junctions of Highway 6 & 236 and the Perimeter Hwy on the northwest side of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation is a member of the Dakota Ojibway Tribal Council. The current Chief and Council was elected for a four-year term in 2009: Chief - Terrance Nelson; Councilors June Laroque, Gary Roberts, Keith Henry, Evelyn Patrick. The main reserve of Roseau River 2 is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Franklin and the Rural Municipality of Montcalm.
    6.50
    2 votes
    153

    Wahgoshig First Nation

    Wahgoshig First Nation, formerly known as Abitibi-Ontario Band of Abitibi Indians or simply as Abitibi, is an Anishinaabe (Algonquin and Ojibwa) and Cree First Nation located near Matheson in Cochrane District in northeastern Ontario, Canada. They have reserved for themselves the 7,770.1 hectares (19,200.3 acres) Abitibi 70 Indian Reserve on the south end of Lake Abitibi. In January, 2008, the First Nation had 270 people registered with the nation, of which their on-reserve population was 121. The first recorded reference to the native people about Lake Abitibi was in the House of Commons debates in 1897 when the treaty status was discussed. For centuries prior to that, however, they were a nomadic group of hunter-gatherers, whose traditional territory straddled a large segment of what is now northeastern Ontario and northwestern Quebec. For the peoples about Lake Abitibi, the hunting and trapping grounds extended and still extend east and northeast of Long Sault to Pierre, Harris, and Montreuil Lakes in Ontario, and on a parallel line into Quebec and as far east as Amos. The southernmost limit of the territory was a little south of Kirkland Lake in Ontario and Rouyn In Quebec.
    6.50
    2 votes
    154

    Shackan First Nation

    Shackan First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Nicola Country of the Southern Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Nicola Tribal Association, which is one of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The Shackan First Nation reserve community and offices are located just west of Merritt, the main urban centre in the Nicola Country region between the Lower Mainland and Kamloops. The name Shackan is an adaptation from Sxe'xn'x, which is its name in the local dialect of Nlaka'pamuctsin (the Thompson language). Chief: Percy Joe Councillors: 1) Lennard Joe 2) Sharon Joe The Sxe'xn'x (meaning Little Rocks in Sxe'xn'x dialect of the Nlakapamux ) have occupied their territories in the Nicola Valley and surrounding region since time immemorial. Prior to the arrival of non-Natives, the resources of the Nicola Valley were managed by the Nlakapamux to enhance and maintain settlement, food, and medicine gathering, hunting, fishing, horse grazing, fur trapping, and trade. By the year
    5.33
    3 votes
    155
    Anishinaabe

    Anishinaabe

    Anishinaabe or Anishinabe—or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek, which is the plural form of the word—is the autonym often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonquin peoples. They all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages, of the Algonquian language family. The meaning of Anishnaabegand "First" or "Original-Peoples". Another definition - possibly reflecting a traditionalist's viewpoint with a certain moral dimension - refers to "the good humans", or good people, meaning those who are on the right road/path given to them by the Creator or Gichi-Manidoo (Great Spirit). The Ojibwe scholar, linguist and author Basil Johnston, who explains the name in a creationist context, states that its literal translation is "Beings Made Out of Nothing", or "Spontaneous Beings", since they had been created by divine breath and were made up of flesh and blood and a soul or spirit - instead of rock, or fire, or water, or wind. Not all Anishinaabemowin speakers, however, call themselves Anishinaabeg. The Ojibwe people who moved to what are now the prairie provinces of Canada call themselves Nakawē(-k) and their branch of the Anishinaabe language, Nakawēmowin. (The French
    7.00
    1 votes
    156

    Gordon First Nation

    The George Gordon First Nation is located near the village of Punnichy, Saskatchewan, in Canada. The First Nation has a population of 2,774 people, 1,060 of whom live on-reserve and 1,714 who live off-reserve. Elected Chief Glen Pratt leads the First Nation. Their territory is located on the Gordon 86 reserve, as arranged by Treaty 4. In 1874, Treaty 4 was established between Queen Victoria and the Cree and Saulteaux First Nations. On September 15 of the same year, Kaneonuskatew (or, in his English name of George Gordon) was among the first of the Indigenous leaders to make the agreement, signing as Chief of the George Gordon First Nation. By 1884, half of the families belonging to the nation were farming, a development which had commenced in 1876, and would continue for many years. Although both George Gordon and his son, Moses Gordon, were originally hereditary chiefs, the people have since adopted the practice of democratically voting their chiefs and councillors into office. From 1889 to 1996, George Gordon First Nation was the location of the longest-running residential school in Canada. Attendance there devastated many members of the nation-state as children because of
    7.00
    1 votes
    157

    Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation

    The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation is a First Nation in the central Yukon Territory in Canada. Its original population centre was Little Salmon, Yukon, but most of its citizens live in Carmacks, Yukon. The language originally spoken by the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation people was Northern Tutchone. The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation signed a land claims agreement in 1997. A former chief of the First Nation, Eric Fairclough, was leader of the Yukon New Democratic Party and leader of the opposition in the Yukon Legislative Assembly.
    7.00
    1 votes
    158

    Nicomen First Nation

    Nicomen First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located near Spuzzum, British Columbia. It is a member of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration as well as of the Nicola Tribal Association, which are two of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. The third is the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The Nicomen First Nation reserve community and offices are located near Lytton in the lower Thompson Canyon. The Nicomen First Nation is located near the confluence of the Thompson and Nicoamen Rivers. It was in this area that the first major gold finds of what would become the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush were found, and the first quarrels between First Nations miners and American miners began, which would culminate in the Fraser Canyon War of the fall of 1858.
    7.00
    1 votes
    159

    Skownan First Nation

    Skownan First Nation in a Saulteaux (Ojibway) First Nation located approximately 300 km north of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, on the south shore of Waterhen Lake, between Lake Winnipeg and Lake Winnipegosis. As of May, 2008, the First Nation have 1,236 registered people, of which their on-Reserve population was 677. Originally, the First Nation was known as the Waterhen River Band of Saulteaux (opposed to the Waterhen Lake Band of Cree) and later simply as Waterhen First Nation. The Skownan First Nation is a signatory to Treaty 2. Their name comes from Ne-biimiskonaan, meaning "to turn around the point" or "turning point" in the Anishinaabe language. The Skownan First Nation elect their council on a two-year term under the authority of the Act Electoral System. The current Chief is Cameron Catcheway; the Councillors are Cameron Catcheway, Sterling Catcheway, Joseph Maud and Charlotte Nepinak. The Chief's and Councillors' terms began on November 4, 2010. The Council is a member of West Region Tribal Council, a regional Chiefs' Council. The First Nation have reserved for themselves the 1,856.7 ha Waterhen 45 Indian Reserve. Located on the Reserve are the Skownan Settlement and the
    7.00
    1 votes
    160

    Tahltan Nation

    The Tahltan Nation is a tribal council-type organization (but not a tribal council) combining the governments of two band governments of the Tahltan people in the Stikine Country of the Northern Interior of British Columbia, Canada. The two member governments are the Iskut First Nation and the Tahltan First Nation, which is also known as the Tahltan Indian Band. The Tahltan Nation is governed by the Tahltan Central Council, which is composed of representatives of 10 families from each band and has its offices at Dease Lake. The British Columbia Government Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation webpage describes the status of the Tahltan Nation as: "The overarching Tahltan Central Council (with offices at Dease Lake) is comprised of representatives of 10 families from each band. The TCC links the Tahltan bands and has represented them on issues of joint concern, specifically on asserted inherent rights and title. Neither the Tahltan Indian Band nor the Iskut First Nation are affiliated with a tribal council and are recognized as separate, unaffiliated Indian bands by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. However, the TCC is a registered society under the B.C. Society Act."
    7.00
    1 votes
    161

    Waywayseecappo First Nation

    The Waywayseecappo First Nation is a First Nation located twenty miles (32 km) east of Russell in Manitoba, Canada. The Nation's Reserve is 10,059 hectare (24,856 acres) and is located near the southwestern corner of the Riding Mountain National Park. It is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Rossburn and the Rural Municipality of Silver Creek. The First Nation also hold interest together with 32 other First Nations on the 37.1 hectare (91.7 acre) Treaty Four Reserve Grounds (Indian Reserve No. 77), located adjacent to Fort Qu'Appelle. Its population was 1,658 in 1995. They are home of the MJHL team Waywayseecappo Wolverines. The current chief of the Waywayseecappo First Nation is Murray Clearsky.
    7.00
    1 votes
    162

    Yellow Quill First Nation

    Yellow Quill First Nation (formerly Nut Lake Band of Saulteaux) is a Saulteaux First Nation located twelve (12) miles North West of Kelvington, Saskatchewan, Canada. The Yellow Quill First Nation is a signatory of Treaty No. 4, which was signed by Chief Yellow-quill on August 24, 1876. Total registered population in October 2007, was 2522, of which the on-reserve population was 800+ members, and off-reserve population was 1600+ members. The First Nation is a member of the Saskatoon Tribal Council and have their urban offices in Saskatoon, SK as well as their Tribal Council offices. The First Nation was originally part of the Yellow-quill Saulteaux Band, a Treaty Band named after a Treaty 4 signatory Chief Ošāwaškokwanēpi, whose name means "Green/Blue-quill." However, due to "š" merging with "s" in Nakawēmowin (Saulteaux language), this led to a mistranslation of his name as "Yellow-quill"—"yellow" being osāw-, while "green/blue" being ošāwaško- (or osāwasko- in Saulteaux). Soon after the death of Chief Ošāwaškokwanēpi, the Band divided into three groups, of which the central division about Nut Lake became the Nut Lake Band of Saulteaux, located on the Nut Lake Indian Reserve. In
    7.00
    1 votes
    163

    Zhiibaahaasing First Nation

    Zhiibaahaasing (or Cockburn Island First Nation) is a First Nation in the Canadian province of Ontario. An Ojibwe community located in the Manitoulin District, the First Nation has two distinct parcels of land: the first, on Manitoulin Island and legally designated as Zhiibaahaasing 19A, had a population of 34 in the 2001 Canadian census, and the second, located on Cockburn Island and legally designated as Zhiibaahaasing 19, had no permanent population in the same census. There has been a significant amount of controversy surrounding a stockpile of more than one million tires within the Zhiibaahaasing First Nation. Cockburn Island Tire Recycling plans to process the tires, but due to an equipment malfunction, the facility is not currently operating. Many area residents are concerned about the health and environmental consequences should there be a fire. In September, 2006, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada agreed to provide funding for the removal of the tires.
    7.00
    1 votes
    164

    Alexandria First Nation

    The Alexandria First Nation is a First Nations government located in the North Cariboo region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Tsilhqot'in Tribal Council. The Alexandria First Nation reserve community and offices are located near the city of Quesnel. Chief Bernie Elkins Councillor Thomas Billyboy Councillor Howard Johnny
    6.00
    2 votes
    165
    6.00
    2 votes
    166

    Hollow Water First Nation

    Hollow Water First Nation is an Anishinaabe (Ojibwa) First Nation located on the east side of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, 75 kilometres (47 mi) north of Pine Falls, Manitoba, and 190 kilometres (120 mi) north of Winnipeg. As of February 2009, the First Nation had a registered population of 1,620 people, of which the on-reserve population was 1,021. The main economic base of the community remains hunting, fishing, trapping and wild rice harvesting. The First Nation have reserved for themselves one reserve: Hollow Water First Nation is governed by the Act Electoral System of government. The current leadership is Chief Larry Barker and four Councilors: Furlon Barker, Derek Bushie, Geoffrey Bushie and Henry Moneas, Jr. Their two-year term concludes on January 30, 2010. Hollow Water First Nation is a member of the Southeast Resource Development Council and a signatory to Treaty 5.
    6.00
    2 votes
    167

    Lower Nicola First Nation

    Lower Nicola Indian Band is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. The Lower Nicola Indian Band reserve community and offices are located (Six(6) kilometers west of the Village of Merritt, BC) Shulus, also known as Lower Nicola, just west of Merritt, the main urban center in the region between the Lower Mainland and Kamloops.
    6.00
    2 votes
    168
    Nuchatlaht First Nation

    Nuchatlaht First Nation

    The Nuchatlaht First Nation is a First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council.
    6.00
    2 votes
    169

    Ochiichagwe'Babigo'Ining Ojibway Nation

    Ochiichagwe'Babigo'Ining Ojibway Nation, formerly but still commonly—and incorrectly—known as the Dalles First Nation, is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in Kenora District, Ontario near Sioux Narrows of Lake of the Woods. Total registered population in February, 2008, was 334, of which the on-reserve population was 127. A member of Treaty 3, the First Nation is affiliated with Bimose Tribal Council and Kenora Chiefs Advisory. The First Nation have reserved for themselves two reserves: The First Nation has recently settled two grievances against Hydro One and Ontario Power Generation. The grievance against Hydro One was started because the company arbitrarily cut down trees, and misappropriated land without making any effort to consult the First Nation to install huge steel electricity pylons across the reserve. Hydro One acknowledged liability (without an apology) by settling the claim for an undisclosed amount. The grievance against Ontario Power Generation was a far bigger issue. Many years ago, again without notice or an effort to consult with the First Nation, what used to be called Ontario Hydro arbitrarily flooded over one thousand acres (4 km²) of
    6.00
    2 votes
    170

    Tahltan First Nation

    The Tahltan First Nation, also known as the Tahltan Indian Band, is a band government of the Tahltan people. Their main community and reserves are located at Telegraph Creek, British Columbia. Their language is the Tahltan language, which is an Athabaskan language also known as Nahanni, is closely related to Kaska and Dunneza. Their Indian and Northern Affairs Canada band number is 682. The Tahltan First Nation is joined with the Iskut First Nation in a combined tribal council-type organization known as the Tahltan Nation. Registered band population is 1,668. Indian Reserves under the administration of the Tahltan First Nation are:
    6.00
    2 votes
    171
    Temagami First Nation

    Temagami First Nation

    Temagami First Nation is located on Bear Island, Lake Temagami, Ontario, Canada. It is home to a portion of the Aboriginal (Anishinaabe) community, the Teme-Augama Anishnabai ("the deep water people"). The 1.8-square-mile (4.7 km) island is the seconed largest in Lake Temagami after Temagami Island. It represents only a small portion of the Anishinaabe's Nindakiiminan ("our land"; locally synocped as Ndakiimnan or "n'daki menan"), which includes ten thousand square kilometers of land in the area. The Band Council of Temagami First Nation is Chief Roxanne Ayotte, 2nd Chief John McKenzie, Councillor Arnold Paul, Councillor Jamie Saville, Councillor Marty Pridham and Councillor Steven Laronde. Maple Mountain in Lady Evelyn-Smoothwater Provincial Park is a sacred site of the Temagami First Nation. They called the mountain Chee-bay-jing, meaning "the place where the spirits go". It was the most powerful in their realm.
    6.00
    2 votes
    172
    Tsuu T'ina Nation

    Tsuu T'ina Nation

    • Canadian Indian Reserve(s): Tsuu T'ina Nation 145
    The Tsuu T'ina Nation (also Tsu T’ina, Tsuut’ina, Tsúùtínà - "a great number of people"; formerly Sarcee, Sarsi) is a First Nation in Canada. Their territory is located on the Indian reserve Tsuu T'ina Nation 145, whose east side is adjacent to the southwest city limits of Calgary, Alberta. The land area of the reserve is 283.14 km² (109.32 sq mi), and it had a population of 1,982 in the Canada 2001 Census. The land is a former Canadian Army training camp, active from 1910-1996, when the land was turned over to the Tsuu T'ina Nation. The Tsuu T'ina people have formerly been called the Sarsi or Sarcee, words which are believed to have been derived from a Blackfoot word meaning stubborn ones. This is in reference to territorial conflict between the Tsuu T'ina and the Blackfoot Confederacy. The term is now viewed as offensive by most of the Tsuu T'ina. The proximity of the territory to the city of Calgary has led to disagreement over the city's plans to construct the western leg of a ring road, which, according to city planners, has to pass through Tsuu T'ina land in order to avoid environmentally sensitive areas. As of 2009 a referendum by the tribe has rejected the ring road. Though
    6.00
    2 votes
    173
    Mississaugas

    Mississaugas

    The Mississauga are a subtribe of the Anishinaabe-speaking First Nations people located in southern Ontario, Canada. They are closely related to the Ojibwa. The name "Mississauga" comes from the Anishinaabe word Misi-zaagiing, meaning "[Those at the] Great River-mouth." According to the oral histories of the Anishinaabe, after departing the "Second Stopping Place" near Niagara Falls, the core Anishinaabe peoples migrated along the shores of Lake Erie to what is now southern Michigan. They became "lost" both physically and spiritually. The Mississaugas migrated along a northern route by the Credit River, to Georgian Bay. These were considered their historic traditional lands on the shores of Lake Superior and northern Lake Huron around the Mississagi River. The Mississaugas called for the core Anishinaabe to Midewiwin (return to the path of the good life). The core Anishinaabe peoples formed the Council of Three Fires and migrated from their "Third Stopping Place" near the present city of Detroit to their "Fourth Stopping Place" on Manitoulin Island, along the eastern shores of Georgian Bay. By the time the French explorers arrived in 1634, the Mississaugas were a distinct tribe of
    5.00
    3 votes
    174

    Neutral Nation

    The Neutrals, also known as the Attawandaron, were an Iroquoian nation of North American native people who lived near the northern shores of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the territory of the Attawandaron was mostly within the limits of present-day southern Ontario. There was a single population cluster to the east, across the Niagara River near modern-day Buffalo, New York. The western boundary of their territory was the valley of the Grand River, with population concentrations existing on the Niagara Peninsula and in the vicinity of the present-day communities of Hamilton and Milton, Ontario. Documentary sources indicate that the population of the historic Neutrals ranged from twelve thousand to forty thousand persons, with the lower number indicating the devastating effect of new European infectious diseases and periods of famine during the first part of the seventeenth century. F. Douglas Reville's The History of the County of Brant (1920) stated that the hunting grounds of the Attawandaron ranged from Genesee Falls and Sarnia, and south of a line drawn from Toronto to Goderich. St. Jean de Brébeuf and Chaumonot visited
    5.00
    3 votes
    175

    Coldwater First Nation

    Coldwater First Nation is a Nlaka'pamux First Nations government located in the Central Interior region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Nicola Tribal Association, which are two of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. The Coldwater First Nation reserve community and offices are located near Merritt, the main urban centre in the Nicola Country region between the Lower Mainland and Kamloops.
    5.50
    2 votes
    176

    Halfway River First Nation

    Halfway River First Nation is a Dunneza First Nations government with a 3988 ha reserve located 75 km northwest of Fort St. John, British Columbia. It is a Treaty 8 nation. The Halfway River people were at one point part of the "Hudson Hope Indian Band" but in 1971 they split off, and the remaining people formed West Moberly First Nations. As of January 2008, there were 235 registered members, with 132 living on the reserve. The current chief is Ed Whitford.
    5.50
    2 votes
    177

    Muskowekwan First Nation

    Muskowekwan First Nation is a Saulteaux (Ojibway) First Nation located approximately 100 km northwest of Melville, Saskatchewan, Canada. As of May, 2008, the First Nation have 1,517 registered people, of which their on-Reserve population was 400. Chief Ka-nee-na-wup (Anishinaabe language: Geniinewab, "One Who Sits Like an Eagle") and his Saulteaux band lived along the Upper Qu'Appelle Lakes prior to signing Treaty 4 on September 15, 1874. When Ka-nee-na-wup died, his son Muscowequan or Muskowekwan (Anishinaabe language: Maskawigwan, "Hard Quill") became chief. A reserve was surveyed in 1883, incorporating the settlement where they had already started farming. The Muskowekwan First Nation elect their council on a two-year term under the authority of the Act Electoral System. The current Chief is Reginald Bellerose; the Councillors are Eric Moise, Ernest Moise, Shawn Moise, Rosalie Pambrun, William Pinacie, Dolores Windigo, Calven Wolfe and Leon Wolfe. The Chief's and Councillors' terms began on March 1, 2007. The Council is a member of Touchwood Tribal Agency Council, a regional Chiefs' Council. In 1993 Muskowekwan's Treaty Land Entitlement Claim was ratified, enabling the First
    5.50
    2 votes
    178
    Semiahmoo First Nation

    Semiahmoo First Nation

    Semiahmoo First Nation ( /ˌsɛmiˈɑːmoʊ/ SEM-ee-AH-moh) is the band government of the Semiahmoo people, a Coast Salish subgroup. The band's main community and offices are located on 312 acres (1.3 km) of Indian Reserve just south of White Rock, British Columbia and near the Canada-United States boundary and Peace Arch Provincial Park. In 1790, Europeans estimated the Semiahmoo population at 300. By 1854, the band’s numbers were reduced to 250 due to smallpox and warfare. In 1909 there were 38 band members in British Columbia. In 1963, the number had reached 28 and then just 25 by 1971. Between 1996 and 2001, the reserve population dropped 34.5 per cent, from 200 people to 131. The Semiahmoo remain one of the smallest First Nations in the region with about 74 band members, of which 40 live on Reserve. In fact, Semiahmoo has more non-Aboriginals living on its reserve than band members. As of 2003, the median age of the Semiahmoo population is 42.5 years of age, higher than the average for all people living on Indian Reserves in Greater Vancouver (39.2 years of age). A June 2003 report for the Greater Vancouver Regional District indicated that the Semiahmoo First Nation is not
    5.50
    2 votes
    179
    Slavey

    Slavey

    The Slavey (also Slave or Hare) are a First Nations aboriginal people of the Dene group, indigenous to the Great Slave Lake region, in Canada's Northwest Territories, and extending into northeastern British Columbia and northwestern Alberta. The name "Slave" is an English translation of the Cree name for their traditional enemies, including the people now known as the Slavey, whom they often enslaved; the French Esclave is analogous. However, in order to avoid the connotations of the word slave, the name came to be presented as indigenous, and this was indicated by pronouncing the e. Later the spelling was changed to Slavé, and then Slavey, to capture the new pronunciation. The name is seldom used by the Slavey, who call themselves Dene. Because most Athabaskan peoples call themselves Dene, the word is of little use in English. However, the northern Slavey are also known as the Sahtú. The southern band are known as the Deh Cho. The names of the Slave River, Lesser Slave River, Great Slave Lake and Lesser Slave Lake all derive from this Cree name for their enemies, though not necessarily from the people now known as Slavey in English. The term Esclaves remains incorporated in each
    5.50
    2 votes
    180

    Wet'suwet'en First Nation

    The Wet'suwet'en First Nation is a First Nations band located outside of Burns Lake in the central interior of British Columbia. It was formerly known as the Broman Lake Indian Band and is still usually referred to as Broman Lake although this is no longer its official name. Its members speak the Witsuwit'en dialect of Babine-Witsuwit'en, a Northern Athabaskan language. The main community is on Palling Indian Reserve No. 1. The band has approximately 140 members, about half living on reserve. The band is a member of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council and of the Broman Lake Development Corporation. The Wet'suwet'en First Nation was formerly part of the Omineca Band. In 1984 the Omineca Band split into the Broman Lake and Nee-Tahi-Buhn bands. The Skin Tayi band later split off from Nee-Tahi-Buhn. In 2012 The Wet'suwet'en First Nation created the Yinka Dene At'en Develoemnt Corporation to promote susainable progress within their territory Other Wet'suwet'en nations include the Burns Lake Indian Band, Hagwilget Village First Nation, and Moricetown.
    5.50
    2 votes
    181
    Chemainus First Nation

    Chemainus First Nation

    The Stz'uminus First Nation (formerly known as Chemainus First Nation) is a First Nations government located in southeastern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, near the town of Ladysmith, British Columbia. Stz'uminus First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council. In early 2009, the Chemainus First Nation chief and council unanimously passed a 'band council resolution' to officially change the name from Chemainus to Stz'uminus in order to reflect its original Hul'qumi'num language name. In March 2008, Chemainus First Nation representative George Harris proposed renaming the nearby Strait of Georgia as the Salish Sea, an idea that reportedly met with approval by B.C.'s Aboriginal Relations Minister Mike de Jong, who pledged to put it before the B.C. cabinet for discussion. Renaming would require a formal application to the Geographical Names Board of Canada. The Salish Sea name has been used by the Coast Salish Gathering, (www.coastsalishgathering.com) a trans-boundary organization of Coast Salish leaders, since 2007. The Stz'uminus First Nation is located on Stuart Channel, which is within the Salish Sea ecosystem. The Salish Sea name was originally
    4.67
    3 votes
    182

    Pays Plat First Nation

    Pays Plat First Nation is a small reserve community located near Rossport, Ontario, Canada, about 175 kilometres (109 mi) northeast of Thunder Bay. The Pays Plat reserve is in the boundaries of the territory described the Robinson-Superior Treaty in 1850. The community is located along Highway 17. The Ojibway people living on the North Shore of Lake Superior (ancestors of Pays Plat First Nations people) survived by hunting, trapping, fishing, and gathering food. The area was heavily involved in the fur trade, and the ancestors living near what is now called Pays Plat were key in trapping for furs. Pays Plat was named by French traders and means "Flat land", named after the fact that it's flat land between two mountains.
    6.00
    1 votes
    183

    Pine Creek First Nation

    The Pine Creek First Nation is a Saulteaux First Nation in Manitoba, Canada. The First Nation's homeland is Pine Creek 66A Reserve, located approximately 110 kilometres north of Dauphin along the southwestern shore of Lake Winnipegosis between the communities of Camperville and Duck Bay. The current chief of Pine Creek First Nation is Derek Nepinak, re-elected in January 2011. Tribal Council affiliated with this First Nation is West Region Tribal Council. Pine Creek First Nation is part of Treaty 4. This treaty was signed in 1874 and is also known as the "Qu'Appelle Treaty." Pine Creek 66A Reserve is 8,111.7 hectare (20,044.4 acre). Along with 32 other First Nations, Pine Creek First Nation also hold interest on the 37.1 hectare (91.7 acre) Treaty Four Reserve Grounds (Indian Reserve No. 77), located adjacent to Fort Qu'Appelle. As of July 2006, the First Nation had the population of 2,592 registed people, of which the on-reserve population was 1,202 people. The primary language spoken on the reserve is Saulteaux. The community had a two-storey steeple church erected 1906-1910, but it was destroyed in a fire in 1930. A second church with a single steeple was reconstructed using the
    6.00
    1 votes
    184

    Skway First Nation

    The Skway First Nation, (officially Shxwhá:y Village), is a band government of the Stó:lō people living in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada near the city of Chilliwack. They traditionally speak the Upriver dialect of Halkomelem, one of the Salishan family of languages. The band is a member government of the Sto:lo Nation tribal council, and should not be confused with the Skwah First Nation, which is in the same area but is a different band.. The band administers three Indian Reserves: The band also shares with 20 other bands the Peckquaylis Indian Reserve, formerly St. Mary's Indian Residential School at Mission, which is now a cultural, government and aboriginal business centre. The Skway are at Stage 4 in British Columbia Treaty Process with the rest of the Sto:lo Nation tribal council.
    6.00
    1 votes
    185
    Snuneymuxw First Nation

    Snuneymuxw First Nation

    The Snuneymuxw First Nation (pronounced [snʊˈneɪməxʷ]) is the band government of the Snuneymuxw of east-central Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The Snuneymuxw First Nation have lived along the eastern coast of south-central Vancouver Island, British Columbia for an estimated 5,000 years. They are a Coast Salish people and their ancestral language is the Hul’qumi’num language. The band's traditional territory covers 980 km², but they share 1040 km² of non-exclusive traditional territory with other First Nations of Canada. The band now lives on four reserves near Nanaimo Harbour and Nanaimo River. The reserves were and are the smallest per capita in British Columbia. The band's population is 1,663, but 65 percent of Snuneymuxw people live off the reserve. The Snuneymuxw First Nation is also responsible for the operation of Newcastle Island Marine Provincial Park. The Snuneymuxw have treaty rights pursuant to their Treaty of 1854, confirmed by the landmark R. v. White and Bob litigation of the early to mid 1960s, wherein the treaty was confirmed and enforced, and provincial jurisdiction was ousted. Douglas Treaties. The Snuneymuxw First Nation is a member government of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    186
    6.00
    1 votes
    187
    Toquaht First Nation

    Toquaht First Nation

    The Toquaht First Nation is a First Nations government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. The Toquaht Nation is one of the smallest First Nations in terms of membership within the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council (NTC), and is the smallest of the Central Region First Nations. There are roughly 23 people currently living at the main village of Macoah, which is accessible off Highway 4 on Kennedy Lake, with the remainder of the citizens living in Ucluelet, Port Alberni, and other cities in the Northwest. The Nation has about 150 citizens in total. Despite its small size, the Toquaht Nation has been a leader within the NTC and the Central Region First Nations through active political leadership, business initiatives, cultural events, and as a proponent of the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement. On April 1, 2011, the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement was implemented, the second treaty to be implemented under the BC treaty process. For thousands of years the Toquaht Nation, like many Nuu-chah-nulth Nations, maintained a hereditary system of governance. Under the Maa-nulth First Nations
    6.00
    1 votes
    188

    Wasauksing First Nation

    Wasauksing First Nation (formerly Parry Island First Nation) is an Ojibwa, Odawa and Pottawatomi First Nation located near Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada. Parry Island in Georgian Bay is about 19,000 acres (77 km) with 78 miles (126 km) of lakeshore, making it one of the larger islands in the Great Lakes. The Wasauksing First Nation now occupies the entire island, although the ghost town of Depot Harbour on the island was historically a non-aboriginal settlement. The reserve is home to a community radio station, CHRZ-FM, and the Aboriginal magazine Spirit. The reserve's main road crosses to the mainland via the Wasauksing Swing Bridge, connecting to Rose Point Road in Seguin Township south of Parry Sound. The road continues to Parry Sound itself, becoming Emily Street at the municipal boundary of Parry Sound and Seguin. Notable people from the Wasauksing First Nation include Francis Pegahmagabow, the most highly decorated aboriginal soldier in Canadian military history.
    6.00
    1 votes
    189

    Webequie First Nation

    Webequie First Nation (pronounced Webekway) is located on the northern peninsula of Eastwood Island on Winisk Lake, 540 km (336 mi) north of the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Webequie is a fly-in community with no summer road access. The primary way into the community is by air to Webequie Airport or winter road, which connects to the Northern Ontario Resource Trail. The First Nation have the 34,279 ha Webequie Indian Reserve. The Webequie or Webiqui Indian Settlement also have reserve status. Webequie First Nation is a member of the Matawa First Nations, a Regional Chiefs' Council and a member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The registered population of Webequie was 714 persons in September of 2007, of which the on-reserve population was 253. Webequie is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service. When the Treaties were created between the Canadian government and the Aboriginal people of Canada, Webequie was mistakenly listed as part of the community of Fort Hope. They lived under this error until May 1985, when they were recognized as a distinct band. Despite this, the people of Webequie had to fight until February 15, 2001, to achieve full reserve
    6.00
    1 votes
    190

    White River First Nation

    The White River First Nation (WRFN) is a First Nation in the western Yukon Territory in Canada. Its main population centre is Beaver Creek, Yukon. The language originally spoken by the contemporary membership of the White River First Nation were the Athabaskan languages of Upper Tanana, whose traditional territory extends from the Donjek River into neighbouring Alaska, and Northern Tutchone, whose traditional territories included the lower Stewart River and the area south of the Yukon River on the White and Donjek River drainages. Closely related through traditional marriages between various local bands, these two language groups were merged by the Canadian government into a single White River Indian Band in the early 1950s for administrative convenience. In 1961 the White River Band was amalgamated by the Canadian government with the Southern Tutchone speaking members of the Burwash Band at Burwash on Kluane Lake as the Kluane Band (subsequently the Kluane Tribal Brotherhood and then the Kluane Tribal Council). In 1990, the Kluane Tribal Council split its membership into the Kluane First Nation, centered in Burwash, and the White River First Nation, centered in Beaver Creek. The
    6.00
    1 votes
    191

    Yavapai-Apache Nation

    The Yavapai-Apache Nation is a federally recognized Native American tribe in the Verde Valley, Arizona. Tribal members share two culturally distinct backgrounds and speak two indigenous languages, the Yavapai language and the Western Apache language. The Yavapai-Apache Nation Indian Reservation, at 34°37′10″N 111°53′46″W / 34.61944°N 111.89611°W / 34.61944; -111.89611, consists of four non-contiguous parcels of land located in three separate communities in eastern Yavapai County. The two largest sections, 576 acres (2.33 km) together – almost 90 percent of the reservation's territory, are in the town of Camp Verde. Smaller sections are located in the town of Clarkdale 60.17 acres (243,500 m), and the unincorporated community of Lake Montezuma (5.8 acres). The reservation's total land area is 642 acres (2.60 km). The total resident population of the reservation was 743 persons as of the 2000 census. Of these, 512 lived in Camp Verde, 218 in Clarkdale, and only 13 in Lake Montezuma. The Yavapai-Apache Nation operates the Cliff Castle Casino, a popular gaming, recreation, dining and lodging attraction in the Verde Valley.
    6.00
    1 votes
    192
    Ahousaht First Nation

    Ahousaht First Nation

    The Ahousaht First Nation is a First Nation government based on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focused on the community of Ahousaht, British Columbia. It is a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council. It is led by Chief, A-aap wa-iik (meaning 'always says the right thing') Shawn Atleo and the Tyee Haw'iilth - Maquinna (Lewis George). It has about 1800 members, almost half of whom live in Marktosis Indian Reserve No. 15 ("Marktosis" is an English-style adaptation of Maaqtisiis in the Nuu-chah-nulth language). The Ahousaht Nation is the most populous First Nation on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Ahousaht First Nation is the largest Nuu-chah-nulth Nation. The Nation is a confederation of multiple former tribes: the Ahousaht, Manhousaht, Kelthsmaht, Piniit-thlaht, Qwaacwi-aht, O-inmitisaht, and Otsosaht. This joining of nations began even before the arrival of the Europeans to their respective shores. Ahousaht’s population of approximately 1900 people has been growing at an average rate of 2.6% per year and is projected to increase to 3125 by 2024. Seventy-seven percent of members are under 40 years of age and 41 percent under 19 years.
    5.00
    2 votes
    193

    Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish First Nation

    The Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish First Nation is a First Nations band government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, in the Queen Charlotte Strait region. It is a member of the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council, along with the ‘Namgis First Nation and the Tsawataineuk First Nation. The territory of the Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish First Nation spans the southern Broughton Archipelago and the Gilford Island area just north of the mouth of Knight Inlet. The main village of the Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish is Gwa’yasdams, is a small community located on Gilford Island. Its citizens have been operating under a boil water advisory for 9 years .
    5.00
    2 votes
    194

    In-SHUCK-ch Nation

    The In-SHUCK-ch Nation, also known as Lower Lillooet people, are a small First Nations Tribal Council on the lower Lillooet River south of Pemberton-Mount Currie in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The communities of the In-SHUCK-ch are of the St'at'imcets-speaking St'at'imc people, but in recent years seceded from the Lillooet Tribal Council to form their own organization. The three bands of the In-SHUCK-ch are: Joined with the In-SHUCK-ch in the Lower Stl'atl'imx Tribal Council is the: By August 2007, the In-SHUCK-ch Nation Agreement in Principle had been officially signed by In-SHUCK-ch Nation Chiefs, the provincial Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Michael de Jong and the federal Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Chuck Strahl on behalf of their governments. Land provided to In-SHUCK-ch Nation will be approximately 13,208 ha of provincial Crown land and 1,310 ha of In-SHUCK-ch Nation’s current Indian Reserves. Canada and British Columbia are also negotiating to acquire 59 ha of private land. The capital transfer will be $21.0 million ($2005).
    4.50
    2 votes
    195

    T'it'q'et First Nation

    The T'it'q'et First Nation also known as the T'it'k't First Nation, the Tl'itl'ikt First Nation and as the Lillooet Indian Band, is a First Nations government located in the Central Interior-Fraser Canyon region of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Lillooet Tribal Council (also known as the St'at'imc Nation), which is the largest grouping of band governments of the St'at'imc people (aka the Lillooet people). Other St'at'imc governments include the smaller In-SHUCK-ch Nation on the lower Lillooet River to the southwest, and the independent N'quatqua First Nation at the farther end of Anderson Lake from Seton Portage, which is the location of three of the reserve communities of the Seton Lake First Nation, another member of the Lillooet Tribal Council. The Lillooet First Nation's offices are located at Lillooet, British Columbia. Also located in and immediately around the town of Lillooet are the Cayoose Creek First Nation and the Bridge River Indian Band, although the T'ik'q'et First Nation's reserve and community are located immediately adjacent to the main part of town. Also nearby are the Fountain First Nation, 10 miles up the Fraser River, and the
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    196
    Kashechewan First Nation

    Kashechewan First Nation

    The Kashechewan First Nation is a Cree First Nation located near James Bay in Northern Ontario, Canada. The community is located on the northern shore of the Albany River. Kashechewan First Nation is one of two communities that were established from Old Fort Albany in the 1950s. The other community is Fort Albany First Nation which is now located on the southern bank of the Albany River. The community is connected to other towns along the shore of James Bay by the seasonal James Bay ice road/winter road, linking it to the towns of Attawapiskat, Fort Albany, and Moosonee. Kashechewan is policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service, an Aboriginal based service. A fire at the detachment on January 9, 2006 severely injured an officer and killed two inmates as they could not be rescued. When the community of Kashechewan came into being, the new residents chose the name "Keeshechewan". (This has the meaning, in Cree, of "where the water flows fast".) However, when the sign for the new post office arrived, it had the misspelling "Kashechewan", and this became the official name of the community. This official name has no real meaning in the Cree language. Kashechewan First Nation is a
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    197

    Pehdzeh Ki First Nation

    The Pehdzeh Ki First Nation is a member of the Dehcho First Nations in the Northwest Territories of Canada. In September 2004 David Moses was elected to a two-year term as Chief of the First Nation. The Pehdzeh Ki First Nation is located in Wrigley and the current chief is listed as Tim Lennie Election was done in December 2010 for Chief and 6 council spots. Their term of positions is for two years.. The community is located along the Mackenzie River and the Highway ends at Wrigley. Pehdzeh Ki First Nation have over 300 band members but only a few live in the community..A community Nursing station, confectionery store, Chief Julien Yendo School; Grades k-8, gas station, and a few businesses are all in wrigley. The are a few businesses in Wrigley who are: Ma-Dza-She-Deh Venture; contracting services, bobcat, truck, trailer,etc. M&M Tours; Jet boat tours & Charters Mackenzie Mountain Tours; Tourism & Hospitality Raymonds River Taxi; Boat charters Charlottes Corner Store Beaver Adventures Pehdzeh Ki Contractors Call the band office for more info. The youth in Wrigley are avid drummers and handgame Players., they practice at least twice a week amongst themselves. They are ths future
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    198

    Waterhen Lake First Nation

    Waterhen Lake First Nation (Cree: Sîkîp Sâkahikan) is a Cree First Nation located in northwestern Saskatchewan. As of September 2012 the total membership of the Waterhen Lake First Nation was 1896. There were 953 members living on reserve and 942 members living off reserve. The First Nation is a member of the MLTC Program Services, a regional tribal Chiefs' Council. The First Nation is also a signatory to the Adhesion to Treaty 6. The First Nation has reserved for itself the 7972.2 ha Waterhen 130 Indian Reserve, located 39 km north of Meadow Lake, Saskatchewan and east of the Meadow Lake Provincial Park in northwest Saskatchewan. With a population of approximately 1896 members, the Waterhen Lake First Nation leadership directs their efforts to bringing beneficial opportunities to its band members in the form of capital projects, health and social programming and cultural activities. Within the community a store, an arena, a water treatment facility, a school, a clinic, and Band and postal offices provide services to the community. The community is home to a newly built health center, a nursery to grade twelve school called Waweyekisik [Wow-ee-yeek-isik], confectionary and numerous
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    199

    Eskasoni First Nation

    The Eskasoni First Nation is a First Nation located in Nova Scotia, Canada. As of 2012, the Mi'kmaq population is 3,490 on-Reserve, and 592 off-Reserve. It is the most populous First Nation in Nova Scotia and has its own community radio station, CICU-FM, broadcasting at 94.1 MHz. The Eskasoni First Nation is the home of the Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources, a Mi'kmaq organization devoted to natural resources and the environment. Eskasoni First Nation is composed of three parts as shown:
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    200

    Ahtahkakoop First Nation

    The Ahtahkakoop First Nation is a First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada, composed of mainly of Cree peoples. Ahtahkakoop First Nation is located 72 kilometers northwest of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and is 17,347 hectares in size. The name of this reserve originated from its first chief who was born about 1816 on the vast prairie region that was home to his people. He was named Ahtahkakoop, the cree word for “Starblanket.” He was a Head Chief of the Plains Cree who was part of the signing of Treaty Six in 1876. When the treaty was signed, the population of his band was 185 members. As of January 2003 the registered population of Ahtahkakoop is 2600 band members. The language spoken is Cree.
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    201

    Buffalo Point First Nation

    Buffalo Point First Nation is an Ojibwa or Saulteaux band government located in southeastern corner of Manitoba, along the shores of Lake of the Woods. It is bordered largely by the unorganized portion of Division No. 1, Manitoba. It also has smaller borders with the Rural Municipality of Piney, as well as the northeast corner of Roseau County, Minnesota. The main settlement of Buffalo Point is located at 49°00′40″N 95°14′20″W / 49.01111°N 95.23889°W / 49.01111; -95.23889. Total registered population in September, 2007, was 110, of which the on-reserve Status population was 41. The first Nation is a member of the Southeast Resource Development Council. Though a signatory to Treaty 3, the First Nation is not a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3. The First Nation have reserved for themselves six reserves: The band operates under the leadership of Chief John Thunder. Buffalo Point First Nation is governed by a custom electoral system of government. The current leadership is Chief John Thunder and two Councillors: the former Chief Jim Thunder and Robert Kakaygeesick.
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    202

    Chapel Island First Nation

    The Chapel Island First Nation is a Míkmaq First Nation located in northeastern Nova Scotia. It is situated on Chapel Island in Bras d'Or Lake. As of 2012, the Mi'kmaq population is 521 on-Reserve, and approximately 127 off-Reserve. Chapel Island First Nation is composed of two parts as shown:
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    203
    Saik'uz First Nation

    Saik'uz First Nation

    Saik'uz First Nation (translated as "on the sand") or Stoney Creek is a Dakelh nation whose main community is located on a reserve 9 km south-east of Vanderhoof, British Columbia along Kenney Dam road. The Saik'uz First Nation has a number of amenities, including a band administration office where Chief and council make decisions on issues like housing, education and forestry. The multiplex community hall is a building for traditional native dancing and annual general meetings (which all members of the community may attend). It is also used for extra-curricular activities like volleyball, basketball, floor hockey and other social gatherings. Saik'uz First Nation is also home to local health station, located one block away from the band office, which provides the community with drug and alcohol counseling, parenting programs, and a community kitchen. The reserve also has a volunteer fire hall in case of emergencies, and a store (G&F market) which has a gas bar, and sells canned goods, pizza, snack foods, and fresh milk as well as locally produced native crafts. There are three water pumps located in various parts of the reserve where community members found water before electricity.
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    204
    Assiniboine

    Assiniboine

    The Assiniboines or Assiniboins ( /əˈsɪnɨbɔɪnz/; Ojibwe: Asinaan, "stone Sioux"; also in plural Assiniboine or Assiniboin), also known as the Hohe and known by the endonym Nakota (or Nakoda or Nakona), are a Siouan Native American/First Nations people originally from the Northern Great Plains of the United States and Canada. In modern times, they have been based in present-day Saskatchewan; they have also populated parts of Alberta, southwestern Manitoba, northern Montana and western North Dakota. They were well known throughout much of the late 18th and early 19th century. Images of Assiniboine people were painted by such 19th-century artists as Karl Bodmer and George Catlin. The Assiniboine have many similarities to the Lakota Sioux in culture and language. They are considered to have separated from the central sub-group of the Sioux nation. Scholars believe that the Assiniboine broke away from Yanktonai Dakota in the 16th century. They are more closely linked by language to the Stoney First Nations people of Alberta. The latter two tribes speak varieties of Nakóda, a distant, but not mutually intelligible, variant of the Sioux language. The Assiniboine were close allies and
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    205

    Bigstone Cree Nation

    The Bigstone Cree Nation is a First Nation in Alberta, Canada. As Woodland Cree, they are a western branch of the larger Cree Nation. With lands adjacent to four lakes (North Wabasca, South Wabasca, Sandy, and Calling) in northern Alberta's boreal forest, the First Nation is rich in fishing and wild game. In 2005, there were 5,874 registered Bigstone Cree, of which 2,247 were living on reserve. The Bigstone Cree have six reserves established in northern Alberta, for a total of 21,066.6 hectares. These include 166 A, 166 B, 166 C, 166 D, all in the vicinity of the Hamlet of Wabasca (also known as Wabasca-Desmarais), 166 south of the Hamlet of Sandy Lake, and Jean Baptiste Gambler Reserve 183 surrounded by the Hamlet of Calling Lake. All of these reserves are surrounded by the Municipal District of Opportunity No. 17. The Bigstone Cree First Nation host the annual Treaty Days Festivities in August of each year, celebrating their culture, language and achievements.
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    206
    Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation

    Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation

    The Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation are an Ojibwa (or Anishinaabeg) people located on Georgina Island in Lake Simcoe, Ontario. Of the First Nation's registered population of 666 people, 181 live on their reserve and 485 live outside of it. They are one of a handful of First Nations in the Greater Toronto Area. The reserve consists of three islands on the southern shores of Lake Simcoe: The reserve government consists of 5 member band council with four councillors and a Chief. Fire and emergencies services consists of a single fire truck and ambulance. The department is staffed by a single full time Chief and volunteer responders. Policing is provided by Georgina Island Police Service with assistance from the Ontario Provincial Police. The force has 3 officers replacing the community officers from the RCMP in 1978. Access to Georgina Island is by boat to and from the mainland. A marina is located on the southern tip of the island for the ferry and smaller vessels. Built in 1999, the ferry Aazhaawe can carry 18 cars and 50 passengers. Ferry service is seasonal and not provided when Lake Simcoe is frozen over. Fan boats provide access to Georgina (Fox and Snake) during the
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    207

    Gitxsan Nation

    Gitxsan Nation is one of Canada's First Nations and is a name used when referring to the Office of the Hereditary Chiefs of the Gitxsan, which is the formal governing body of the Gitxsan people. Their territories are located in the Skeena Watershed of British Columbia, Canada, covering 35,016 square kilometers of land.
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    208

    Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'xw Nation

    The Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'xw Nation is a First Nations band government based on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, focussed on the community of Port Hardy, British Columbia in the Queen Charlotte Strait region.. It is a member of the Kwakiutl District Council and, for treaty negotiation purposes, the Winalagalis Treaty Group which includes three other members of the Kwakiutl District Council (the Quatsino First Nation, the Da'naxda'xw Awaetlatla Nation, and the Tlatlasikwala Nation). The Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'xw Nation was originally two distinct First Nations, the Gwa'sala and the 'Nakwaxda'xw. In the mid-1960s the Federal Government relocated the two nations to the current reserve, Tsulquate, and amalgamated them (along with the neighbouring Kwakiutl First Nation) into one group. Eventually the Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'xw and the Kwakiutl separated into the two groups that are recognized by the federal government to this day.
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    209

    Huron-Wendat Nation

    The Huron-Wendat Nation is a Huron-Wendat First Nation whose community and reserve is at Wendake, Quebec, a municipality now enclosed within Quebec City in Canada. In the French language, used by most members of the First Nation, they are known as the Nation Huronne-Wendat. In 2006, historical documents lost since 1824 were recovered. They showed that a large chunk of land named "Seigneurie de Sillery" (now part of Quebec City) was sold to the Hurons in 1792 by the Jesuits. This suggested that the Huron-Wendat's would have a contemporary claim to the valuable land.
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    210
    Iroquois

    Iroquois

    The Iroquois ( /ˈɪrəkwɔɪ/ or  /ˈɪrəkwɑː/), also known as the Haudenosaunee or the "People of the Longhouse", are a league of several nations and tribes of indigenous people of North America. After the Iroquoian-speaking peoples of present-day central and upstate New York coalesced as distinct tribes, by the 16th century or earlier, they came together in an association known today as the Iroquois League, or the "League of Peace and Power". The original Iroquois League was often known as the Five Nations, as it was composed of the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations. After the Tuscarora nation joined the League in 1722, the Iroquois became known as the Six Nations. The League is embodied in the Grand Council, an assembly of fifty hereditary sachems. Other Iroquian peoples lived along the St. Lawrence River, around the Great Lakes and in the American Southeast, but they were not part of the Haudenosaunee and often competed and warred with these tribes. When Europeans first arrived in North America, the Haudenosaunee were based in what is now the northeastern United States, primarily in what is referred to today as upstate New York west of the Hudson River and through
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    211
    Klahoose First Nation

    Klahoose First Nation

    The Klahoose First Nation is a First Nations government located on Cortes Island at the northern end of the Strait of Georgia, and surrounding Toba Inlet, in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Klahoose are part of, with their neighbours the Sliammon, Homalco, whose territory is on the mainland and K'omoks, the larger grouping of the Comox people, which is a subgroup of the Coast Salish. Their ancestral tongue is the Comox language. The Klahoose First Nation is a member government of the Naut'sa mawt Tribal Council (NmTC).
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    212

    Kluane First Nation

    The Kluane First Nation (KFN) is a small First Nation in Yukon in Canada. Its main centre is in Burwash Landing, Yukon along the Alaska Highway on the shores of Kluane Lake, the territory's largest lake. The native language spoken by the people of this First Nation is Southern Tutchone. The Kluane people occupy a traditional territory that extends from the St. Elias Mountains in the south, bounded to the east by the southern end of Kluane Lake and the A'ay Chu (formerly Slims River), by the Ruby Range to the north, extending almost to the Nisling River, and on the west by the Yukon Alaska Border. It includes the Tachal Region of Kluane National Park and Reserve. Within this region, the three main defining topographic feature are the St. Elias Mountains to the south and west, the Shakwak Trench, which includes Kluane Lake, and the Kluane and Ruby Range to the east and north, which are part of the Yukon Plateau. the region is characterized by extremes of elevation, including some of the highest mountains in Canada, extreme temperature (-62C to +32C), low precipitation, wind and widespread permafrost. Kluane First Nation is a Self-Governing First Nation with a Constitutionally
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    213

    Lubicon Lake Indian Nation

    The Lubicon Lake Indian Nation is a Cree First Nation in Northern Alberta, Canada. They are commonly referred to as the Lubicon Lake Nation, Lubicon Cree or the Lubicon Lake Cree. The Nation has been embroiled with the Government of Canada regarding disputed land claims for decades. Their primary complaint is that oil and gas development on or near their land has dangerously threatened their way of life, their culture, and the health of those in their community. Amnesty International has commented on the struggle of the Lubicon by issuing a report imploring the Canadian government to respect the land rights of the Lubicon. The United Nations Commission on Human Rights has found Canada in violation of article 27 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights They have repeated their call for Canada to take immediate action to avoid irreparable damage. This call was first made in 1990 and was repeated in 2003 and 2006. This struggle has been described in a book, Last Stand of the Lubicon Cree, by John Goddard. The current Chief of the Lubicon Lake Indian Nation is Chief Bernard Ominayak. Chief Ominayak has been Chief of the small first nation since the 1970s. Prior to
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    214
    M'Chigeeng First Nation

    M'Chigeeng First Nation

    M'Chigeeng First Nation, also known as West Bay, is an Ojibwe First Nation in the Manitoulin District of Ontario, Canada. Total registered population as of September, 2007, was 2251 people, of which their on-reserve population was 882. The First Nation have reserved for themselves the 3094.7 ha M'Chigeeng 22 Indian Reserve located on Manitoulin Island. M'Chigeeng First Nation leadership are elected on a two-year term. Currently, the First Nation is governed by Chief Isadora Bebamash and 10 Councillors: Brian Bisson, Darren Debassige, Donna Debassige, Martin Debassige, Melanie Debassige, Terry Debassige, Forrest Hare, Elaine Migwans, Victor Migwans and Henry Panamick. The First Nation is a member of the United Chiefs & Councils of Manitoulin Island, a regional tribal Chiefs' council. On February 11, 2010, Anong Migwans Beam, on behalf of a corporation to be incorporated applied to the CRTC for a new English and aboriginal-language Type B Native FM radio programming low-power FM radio station in M’Chigeeng. The applicant proposes a format completely devoted to the recovery and sustainment of the Ojibwe language. Programming would include educational and music programs. The station
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    215

    McDowell Lake First Nation

    McDowell Lake First Nation (Oji-Cree: Misi-zhaaga'iganiing) is a small Oji-Cree First Nation located in Northern Ontario, located approximately 155 km northeast of Red Lake, Ontario, Canada, on the central western shore of McDowell Lake. As of December, 2007, their total registered population was 52. It is part of the Keewaytinook Okimakanak Council (Northern Chiefs) and the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The First Nation's MacDowell Lake Indian Settlement, also known as MacDowell Lake, Ontario, is accessible by float and ski equipped aircraft. Though no winter/ice roads connect this community in the winter, a person can use either snowmobiles or snowshoes to trail off from winter/ice roads and head towards the community. Nearest winter/ice roads from the community connect Red Lake, Ontario, to North Spirit Lake, Deer Lake and Sandy Lake First Nations. The small community of Misi-zhaaga'iganiing was established by trapper Johnny Kenequanash in the 1940's on the central western shore of McDowell Lake, known in Oji-Cree language as Misi-zhaaga'igan, meaning "the grand lake." Misi-zhaaga'igan was the main water way for people travelling by canoes leading North to Windigo Lake or going east
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    216

    Métis Nation British Columbia

    The Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), formerly Métis Provincial Council of British Columbia, is an aboriginal organization representing Métis people in British Columbia, Canada. Its current president is Bruce Dumont, Vice-president is David Hodgson.
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    217

    Northwest Angle 33 First Nation

    Northwest Angle 33 First Nation is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in Kenora District, Ontario near Sioux Narrows of Lake of the Woods. Total registered population in September, 2007, was 438, of which the on-reserve population was 187. The first Nation is a member of the Anishinabeg of Kabapikotawangag Resource Council, a regional tribal council that is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3. The First Nation have reserved for themselves three reserves: Northwest Angle 33 First Nation is governed by Chief David Paul and four Councillors: Geraldine Sandy, Colleen Sandy, Kendall Paul & Kimberly Sandy.
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    218

    Sagkeeng First Nation

    The Sagkeeng First Nation is an Anishinaabe First Nation which holds territory east of Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada. Sagkeeng, which was once called Fort Alexander, has an on-reserve population of approximately 3,000 people. Ojibwe is the name of the tribe that lives in Sagkeeng. There is a long history of the aboriginal people and white explorers/traders in the area. The La Vérendrye's built two forts named Fort Maurepas. The first was north of Selkirk, Manitoba and the second, and more permanent one, on the north side of the Winnipeg River near Lake Winnipeg. Later, on the southside, there was a North West Company fort sometimes called Fort Bas de la Rivière. In 1807 the North West Company built a new fort which became known as Fort Alexander. Recently of note is dance group Sagkeeng's Finest, winners of the first season of Canada's Got Talent. Kakakepenaise (William Mann I) signed Treaty 1 on behalf of the Sagkeeng people in 1871. Although Sagkeeng is a Treaty 1 nation, it is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3. Community Elders speak about "five original families" at the signing of the treaty. Other families were mixed-blood Metis (French and Anishinabe) who became
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    219

    Skuppah First Nation

    The Skuppah First Nation is a First Nations government located near Spuzzum, British Columbia. It is a member of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration, one of three tribal councils of the Nlaka'pamux people. Other members of the Fraser Canyon Indian Administration are the Spuzzum, Kanaka Bar and Nicomen First Nations (the Nicomen First Nation is also a member of the Nicola Tribal Association). . Other Nlaka'pamux governments belong either to the Nicola Tribal Association or the Nlaka'pamux Nation Tribal Council. Kenny Mack is the local painter and is super awesome
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    220

    Tsawataineuk First Nation

    The Tsawataineuk First Nation is a First Nations band government in the Queen Charlotte Strait region north of northern Vancouver Island in the Canadian province of British Columbia. It is a member of the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council, along with the ‘Namgis First Nation and the Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish First Nation. The territory of the Tsawataineuk First Nation spans the whole of Broughton Archipelago on the northern side of Queen Charlotte Strait and adjoining areas of the BC mainland. The main village of the Tsawataineuk people is Gwa'Yi, at the mouth of the Kingcome River. The current number of people living in the community is 59 (as of November 21, 2007).
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    221

    Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

    The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation (VG) is a First Nation in the northern Yukon Territory in Canada. Its main population centre is Old Crow, Yukon. As the name indicates, the language originally spoken by the people is Gwichʼin language. There is a significant population in Eagle, Alaska. A generation ago, many families moved Old Crow, Yukon. The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation was one of the first four First Nations to sign a land claims agreement in 1995.
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    222
    ‘Namgis First Nation

    ‘Namgis First Nation

    The ‘Namgis First Nation is a First Nations band government on northern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, and on adjoining islands in the southern Queen Charlotte Strait region. It is a member of the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council, along with the Kwicksutaineuk-ah-kwa-mish First Nation and the Tsawataineuk First Nation. The people speak Kwak'wala, part of the Wakashan languages of the Northwest Coast. The territory of the ‘Namgis First Nation spans the islands of the southern Queen Charlotte Strait (Malcolm Island and Cormorant Island), which include the town of Alert Bay and the former utopian community of Sointula, established by Finnish immigrants. Both communities are offshore across Broughton Strait from the town of Port McNeill, which is on Vancouver Island. The majority of 'Namgis First Nation territory, however, spans the basin of the Nimpkish River and Nimpkish Lake and adjoining parts of the interior of northern Vancouver Island. The main village of the 'Namgis is Yalis, on Cormorant Island adjacent to Alert Bay. The original village site was at a place called Xwalkw on the north side of the mouth the Nimpkish River, which in the Kwak'wala language is
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