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Best Bridge of All Time

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    1
    Petőfi Bridge

    Petőfi Bridge

    Petőfi híd or Petőfi Bridge (named after Sándor Petőfi, old name is Horthy Miklós Bridge, named after governor Miklós Horthy) is a bridge in Budapest, connecting Pest and Buda across the Danube. It is the second southernmost public bridge in Budapest. Its two ends are The bridge was built between 1933–1937, according to the plans of Hubert Pál Álgyay. It is 514 m in length (along with the sections leading up) and 25.6 m in width and rebuilt after the Second World War.
    5.75
    8 votes
    2
    Trinity Bridge

    Trinity Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Crowland
    Trinity Bridge is a unique three-way stone arch bridge that stands at the heart of Crowland, Lincolnshire, England. While it once spanned the confluence of the River Welland and a tributary, it now spans nothing significant. The current bridge dates to the 14th century (built between 1360 and 1390) and replaced previous wooden bridges. The earliest known mention of the bridge is by King Æthelbald of Mercia in 716. in 943 it was mentioned in the Charter of Eadred. The bridge is now a scheduled monument and grade I listed. The bridge is predominantly built from Barnack stone, which was quarried about 16 km to the west of Crowland, and presumably transported by boat on the Welland. This bridge has three stairways that converge at the top. Originally it spanned the River Welland and a tributary that flowed through the town, although now the rivers have been re-routed and no longer flow anywhere near the bridge. The bridge is an unusual and economical solution to the crossing of two watercourses at their confluence, reducing the need for three separate bridges to a single structure with three abutments. It is one of only a few bridges in the world that does not span any kind of physical
    7.33
    6 votes
    3
    Hungerford Bridge

    Hungerford Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: London
    The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge—sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge—flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are properly named the Golden Jubilee Bridges. The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access. The first Hungerford Bridge, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, opened in 1845 as a suspension footbridge. It was named after the then Hungerford Market, because it went from the South Bank to Hungerford Market on the north side of the Thames. In 1859 the original bridge was bought by the railway company extending the South Eastern Railway into the newly opened Charing Cross railway station. The railway company replaced the suspension bridge with a structure designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, comprising nine spans made of wrought iron lattice girders, which opened in
    8.40
    5 votes
    4
    Centennial Bridge

    Centennial Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Missouri River
    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Leavenworth
    The Centennial Bridge is a through arch bridge road bridge over the Missouri River connecting Leavenworth, Kansas and Platte County, Missouri. Constructed in 1955, it was initially a toll bridge. The bridge opened in 1955, a year after Leavenworth celebrated its centennial as the first city incorporated in Kansas. It is a two-span arch bridge connecting K-92 and Missouri Route 92. Its main span is 419.8 feet with a total length of 2,571.2 feet. During the construction a spur of Route 45 called the "Leavenworth cutoff" was built to speed traffic to Kansas City, Missouri. The two-mile spur is still maintained by the city of Leavenworth even though the highway is in Missouri.
    7.17
    6 votes
    5
    Rainbow Bridge

    Rainbow Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Niagara Falls
    The Rainbow Bridge at Niagara Falls is an international steel arch bridge across the Niagara River gorge, and is a world-famous tourist site. It connects the cities of Niagara Falls, New York, United States (to the east), and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (west). The Rainbow Bridge was built near the site of the earlier Honeymoon Bridge, which had collapsed on January 27, 1938, due to an ice jam in the river. A joint Canadian and American commission had already been considering a new bridge to replace it, and the collapse added urgency to the project. A design by architect Richard (Su Min) Lee was chosen (and later used again for the Lewiston-Queenston Bridge, approximately 10 kilometres (6 mi) downriver). King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, during their visit to Niagara Falls as part of the 1939 royal tour of Canada, dedicated the site of the Rainbow Bridge; a monument was erected to commemorate the occasion. Construction began in May 1940. The bridge was officially opened on November 1, 1941. The origins of the name are speculative, with one possible origin being McQuesten, and another a delivery boy who had forgotten the name of the city. It was likely inspired by Genesis
    7.17
    6 votes
    6
    Gateshead Millennium Bridge

    Gateshead Millennium Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tyne
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Newcastle upon Tyne
    The Gateshead Millennium Bridge is a pedestrian and cyclist tilt bridge spanning the River Tyne in England between Gateshead's Quays arts quarter on the south bank, and the Quayside of Newcastle upon Tyne on the north bank. The award-winning structure was conceived and designed by architects Wilkinson Eyre and structural engineers Gifford. The bridge is sometimes referred to as the 'Blinking Eye Bridge' or the 'Winking Eye Bridge' due to its shape and its tilting method. In terms of height, the Gateshead Millennium Bridge is slightly shorter than the neighbouring Tyne Bridge, and stands as the sixteenth tallest structure in the city. The bridge was lifted into place in one piece by the Asian Hercules II, one of the world's largest floating cranes, on 20 November 2000. It was opened to the public on 17 September 2001, and was dedicated by Queen Elizabeth II on 7 May 2002. The bridge, which cost £22m to build, was part funded by the Millennium Commission and European Regional Development Fund. It was built by Volker Stevin. Six 45 cm (18 in) diameter Hydraulic rams (three on each side, each powered by a 55 kW electric motor) rotate the bridge back on large bearings to allow small
    6.83
    6 votes
    7
    St Ives Bridge

    St Ives Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    St Ives Bridge is a 15th century bridge crossing the River Great Ouse in St Ives, Cambridgeshire, England. It noted for being one of only four bridges in England to incorporate a chapel (the others being at Rotherham, Wakefield, and Bradford-on-Avon). Prior to the first bridge here there was a ford across the Ouse, probably dating back several thousand years. The river was at that time wider and shallower until locks were added to make it navigable. The St Ives settlement was developed by the monks of Ramsey Abbey who built the town's first bridge, a wooden structure, in 1107. In 1414 it was decided to replace this bridge with a stone arch bridge, which was completed in 1425, adding the chapel dedicated to St Leger in 1426. Such chapels were relatively common in medieval times and served as toll-houses, as well as to allow travellers to pray or to give thanks for a safe journey. They also hosted church services. During the English Civil War the bridge was partially blown up by the troops of Oliver Cromwell to prevent King Charles I's troops approaching London from the Royalist base in Lincolnshire. The two arches on the southern side were demolished and a drawbridge installed in
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

    John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Ohio River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Cincinnati
    The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. When the first pedestrians crossed on December 1, 1866, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world at 1,057 feet (322 m) main span. Today, many pedestrians use the bridge to get between the arenas in Cincinnati (Paul Brown Stadium, Great American Ball Park, and U.S. Bank Arena) and the hotels, bars, restaurants, and parking lots in Northern Kentucky. The bar and restaurant district at the foot of the bridge on the Kentucky side is known as Roebling Point. Ramps were constructed leading directly from the bridge to the Dixie Terminal building used for streetcars. These provided Covington-Cincinnati streetcars "with a grade separated route to the center of downtown, and the terminal building was originally intended to connect, via underground pedestrian passages, with the never-built Fountain Square Station of the infamous Cincinnati Subway." When streetcar service ceased in the 1950s the terminal was converted to use as a diesel bus terminal. The ramps were removed in 1998 when it ceased being used as a bus terminal. In the decades before 1856, want and need of a
    7.60
    5 votes
    9
    Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay

    Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Sacramento River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Redding
    The Sundial Bridge (also known as the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay) is a cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge for bicycles and pedestrians that spans the Sacramento River in Redding, California, United States and forms a large sundial. It was designed by Santiago Calatrava and completed in 2004 at a cost of US$23,500,000. The bridge has become iconic for Redding. The Sundial Bridge provides pedestrian access to the north and south areas of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, a complex containing environmental, art and history museums and the McConnell Arboretum and Gardens. It also forms the gateway to the Sacramento River Trail, a 35-mile-long trail completed in 2010 that extends along both sides of the river and connects the bridge to the Shasta Dam. Drift boats of fishermen are often seen passing beneath the bridge as they fish for salmon, steelhead and rainbow trout. In the distance, Mount Shasta is barely visible. Shasta Bally is visible to the West looking upstream the Sacramento. The support tower of the bridge forms a single 217 foot (66 metre) mast that points due north at a cantilevered angle, allowing it to serve as the gnomon of a sundial; it has been billed as the world's
    8.75
    4 votes
    10
    Öland bridge

    Öland bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Kalmar Strait
    • Locale: Kalmar
    The Öland Bridge (Swedish: Ölandsbron) is a road bridge connecting Kalmar on mainland Sweden to Färjestaden on the island of Öland to its east. At 6,072 meters (19,921 ft) long, it is one of the longest in all of Europe. It is supported by 156 pillars, and has a characteristic hump at its western end which was created to provide a vertical clearance of 36 m for shipping. A little to the south of the western end of the bridge a small wooden pedestrian and bicycle bridge, around 150 m in length and connecting the island of Svinö to the mainland, echoes the form of the Öland bridge. This "replica" is clearly visible to anyone crossing to Öland via the main bridge. While the Oresund Bridge linking Sweden with Denmark is longer overall, the Öland Bridge is the longest entirely in Swedish territory. The Öland Bridge was inaugurated on 30 September 1972. Among the speakers at the ceremony, which took place on the island side of the bridge, were the Crown Prince (today king) Carl Gustaf. The bridge cost 80 million Swedish kronor to build. Construction took 4.5 years, and about 100,000 cubic meters of concrete was used. The bridge was also prepared for transporting fresh water from the
    8.25
    4 votes
    11
    Sunderland Bridge

    Sunderland Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Deerfield
    The Sunderland Bridge is a crossing over the Connecticut River in western Massachusetts, connecting the towns of South Deerfield and Sunderland, carrying Massachusetts Route 116. There was at least one preceding bridge at this location, a metal through-truss bridge destroyed by the floating Montague City Covered Bridge during the Flood of 1936. The current Sunderland Bridge is a deck truss bridge completed in 1937. In 1992 a reconstruction of the bridge was completed.
    7.00
    5 votes
    12
    Sydney Harbour Bridge

    Sydney Harbour Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Sydney Harbour
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Milsons Point
    The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, New South Wales, and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed "The Coathanger" because of its arch-based design. Under the directions of Dr J.J.C. Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by British firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough and opened in 1932. The bridge's design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York. It was the world's widest long-span bridge until construction of the new Port Mann Bridge. It is also the fifth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world, and it is the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 metres (440 ft) from top to water level. Until 1967 the Harbour Bridge was Sydney's tallest structure. The southern (CBD) bridge end is located at Millers Point in The Rocks area, and the northern end at Milsons Point in the lower North Shore area. It carries six lanes of road traffic on its
    7.00
    5 votes
    13
    Great Barford Bridge

    Great Barford Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Great Ouse
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Great Barford
    The early fifteenth century Great Barford Bridge, sometimes called simply Barford Bridge, spans the River Great Ouse at Great Barford, Bedfordshire. It is an arch bridge with seventeen arches, originally built from limestone and sandstone. The bridge underwent significant changes in the 19th century, with a widening project in 1818 that used wood being superseded in 1874 with the use of brick. It is Grade I listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.
    8.00
    4 votes
    14
    Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing

    Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Burrard Inlet
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Vancouver
    The Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing, also called the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge and Second Narrows Bridge, is the second bridge constructed at the Second (east) Narrows of Burrard Inlet in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Originally named the Second Narrows Bridge, it connects Vancouver to the north shore of Burrard Inlet, which includes the District of North Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, and West Vancouver. It was constructed adjacent to the older Second Narrows Bridge, which is now exclusively a rail bridge. The First Narrows Bridge, better known as Lions Gate Bridge, crosses Burrard Inlet about 5 miles west of the Second Narrows. The bridge is a steel truss cantilever bridge, designed by Swan Wooster Engineering Co. Ltd. Construction began in November 1957, and the bridge was officially opened on August 25, 1960. It cost approximately $15 million to build. The bridge is 1,292 metres (4,239 ft) long with a centre span of 335 metres (1,099 ft). It is part of the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 1). On June 17, 1958, as a crane stretched from the north side of the new bridge to join the two chords of the unfinished arch, several spans collapsed.
    8.00
    4 votes
    15
    City Island Bridge

    City Island Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Pelham Bay
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: The Bronx
    The City Island Bridge is a bridge in the New York City borough of the Bronx, connecting City Island and Rodman's Neck on the mainland. It is of stone and steel construction, and spans 950 ft (290 m). Construction was begun in 1899 and completed in 1901, at a cost of $200,000. It consists of five fixed spans and a central swing section which was converted to fixed spans in 1963. The city plans to demolish the bridge, due to its deteriorated condition, and replace it with a cable-stayed bridge. The current design calls for a 150 ft (46 m) high tower, 13 ft (4 m) wide at the top, with a base of 26 ft (8 m). Vertical clearance above high water would be 12 ft. The new bridge would be located in the same footprint as the existing bridge, although it would be 17 ft (5.2 m) wider to accommodate three standard-width traffic lanes, a bicycle lane and a pedestrian walkway. The original schedule was for the project to begin in 2007 with completion in 2010. The project is currently scheduled to start in June 2012. Due to the project postponement, during 2010 repairs were made to the existing bridge deck, piers, and west abutment. As of 2005 the estimated cost of the project was $50 million. As
    6.80
    5 votes
    16
    Pons Augustus

    Pons Augustus

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Marecchia
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Rimini
    The Ponte d'Augusto (Latin: Pons Augustus) or Bridge of Tiberius (Italian: Ponte di Tiberio) is a Roman bridge in Rimini, Italy. The bridge features five semicircular arches with an average span length of ca. 8 m. Construction work started during Augustus' reign and was finished under his successor Tiberius in 20 AD; an inscription thus calls the structure as "given by both emperors". The bridge was the only crossing of the Marecchia not destroyed by the retreating German army during the Battle of Rimini and is said to have resisted all attempts at destruction, including the ignition failure of explosive charges. The bridge is still open to pedestrian and vehicular traffic, with the exception of heavy goods vehicles. Media related to Ponte d'Augusto (Rimini) at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    3 votes
    17
    Rainbow Bridge, Oxford

    Rainbow Bridge, Oxford

    Rainbow Bridge (or formally but less used, High Bridge) is a curved footbridge over the River Cherwell in the University Parks, Oxford, England. The bridge is made of concrete with metal railings, in the shape of a rainbow, hence the name. The bridge was constructed in 1923–4, through a project for the unemployed. The bridge was financed by the University of Oxford, colleges at the University, and individual subscribers. In the summer months, there are often punts travelling along the river under the bridge and there is a good view up and down the river from the top. On the other side of the bridge from the Parks there is a footpath that leads across the meadows to the suburb of New Marston.
    9.00
    3 votes
    18
    Salginatobel Bridge

    Salginatobel Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Schiers
    Salginatobel Bridge is a reinforced concrete arch bridge designed by renowned Swiss civil engineer Robert Maillart. It was constructed across an alpine valley in Schiers, Switzerland between 1929 and 1930. In 1991, it was declared an International Historic Civil Engineering Landmark, the thirteenth such structure and the first concrete bridge so designated. As with his Schwandbach Bridge and Vessy Bridge, the structure's fame among civil engineers is a consequence of the techniques involved and the elegance of its design rather than its prominent location: it serves a town of about 2,500 people but is often visited by designers. Maillart had previously designed a three-hinged arch bridge over the Rhine at Tavanasa in 1904. In the 51 metres (167 ft) span Tavanasa bridge, the arch is thinnest at its crown and springing points, thickening in between to reflect the shape of its bending moment diagram. This bridge was destroyed by an avalanche in September 1927. Although Maillart didn't win the contract for a replacement bridge, he entered a competition the following year for the bridge at Salginatobel, with a three-hinged arch spanning 90 metres (300 ft) that used the same overall form
    9.00
    3 votes
    19
    Twickenham Bridge

    Twickenham Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Richmond upon Thames
    Twickenham Bridge crosses the River Thames in southwest London, England. Built in 1933 as part of the newly constructed "Chertsey Arterial Road", the bridge connects the Old Deer Park district of Richmond (historically Surrey) on the south bank of the river to St. Margarets (historically Middlesex) on the north bank, both within the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. Twickenham Bridge gets its name from the fact that it is on the road to the town of Twickenham (also in the same London borough), which is approximately 3 km upstream from Twickenham Bridge, past Richmond Bridge. The bridge forms part of today's A316 (Chertsey Road), which links Central and West London with the M3 motorway at Sunbury. The bridge's architect was Maxwell Ayrton and the head engineer was Alfred Dryland. The proposed design of the bridge envisaged four 70 foot towers to be constructed on the riverbanks with retaining walls of 20 feet above road level. The plans were widely opposed and a local petition was organised by the Daily Telegraph against the design on the grounds that it was inappropriate to the setting in Richmond. The final design of the bridge was of three reinforced-concrete arches
    9.00
    3 votes
    20
    Victoria Bridge

    Victoria Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Saint Lawrence River
    • Bridge Type: Tubular bridge
    • Locale: Saint-Lambert
    Victoria Bridge (French: Pont Victoria), originally known as Victoria Jubilee Bridge, is a bridge over the St. Lawrence River, linking Montreal, Quebec, to the south shore city of Saint-Lambert. Opened in 1859, the bridge was the first to span the St. Lawrence River, and as such is an important historic bridge in Canada. It remains in use to this day, carrying both road and rail traffic, with rails in the middle and roadways (part of Route 112) on both sides. It is actively used by the Canadian National Railway on its Halifax to Montreal main line. It is a major contributor to Montreal's role as a continental hub in the North American rail system. Its designation for the CN is Mile 71.40 subdivision St-Hyacinthe. Originally named the Great Victoria Bridge in honour of Queen Victoria, it was officially rededicated as the Victoria Jubilee Bridge following renovations in 1897 (A.D. MDCCCXCVII). It was returned to the name Victoria Bridge (Pont Victoria) in 1978. The bridge is approximately 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) long, and includes 24 ice-breaking piers. Prior to the construction of the Victoria Bridge, it was difficult and at times impossible to cross the St. Lawrence River during the
    9.00
    3 votes
    21
    Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Bridge

    Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Arthur Kill
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Elizabeth
    The Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Railroad Bridge is a railroad-only, vertical lift bridge connecting Elizabethport, New Jersey and the Howland Hook Marine Terminal on Staten Island. The bridge was built by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1959 to replace an older swing span. It is a single track bridge, used mainly to carry garbage out of New York, diverting traffic off of the parallel Goethals Bridge, which is a section of Interstate 278. It has the distinction of being the largest vertical lift bridge in the world, with two towers of 215 feet (66 m) each, and a truss span of 135 feet (41 m) in height and 558 feet (170 m) in length. As soon as the new bridge opened, rail traffic over the route began to decline due to major manufacturing facilities on Staten Island closing. Bethlehem Steel closed in 1960, U.S. Gypsum in 1972, U.S. Lines-Howland Hook Marine Terminal in 1986, and Procter and Gamble in 1991. A shift to truck traffic also caused a substantial decline of rail traffic over the bridge, and the North Shore branch of rail service went through a series of owners. The three companies that owned the North Branch were B&O Railroad, CSX and the Delaware Otsego Corporation. They
    7.75
    4 votes
    22
    Lewiston-Queenston Bridge

    Lewiston-Queenston Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Queenston, Ontario
    The Lewiston–Queenston Bridge is an arch bridge that crosses the Niagara River gorge just south of the Niagara Escarpment. The bridge was officially opened on November 1, 1962. It is an international bridge between the United States and Canada. It connects Interstate 190 in the town of Lewiston, New York to Highway 405 in the community of Queenston, Ontario. The Lewiston–Queenston Bridge is a replica of the Rainbow Bridge at Niagara Falls. Customs plazas are located on both ends of the bridge, with tolls only being charged on entering Canada (US$3.25 or CAD$3.25 per automobile as of May 1, 2010). Also, two duty-free stores are located between the two plazas. The bridge permits no pedestrians, but licensed taxi service is permitted. The Lewiston–Queenston Bridge lacks expedited border clearance facilities for NEXUS and FAST card holders traveling from Canada to the United States, but does have a NEXUS lane for travel into Canada. The current arch bridge replaced an old suspension bridge called the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge which was located seven-tenths of a mile north. Coincidentally, the suspension bridge was originally built near the location of the present-day Rainbow Bridge,
    7.75
    4 votes
    23
    Madison Avenue Bridge

    Madison Avenue Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Madison Avenue Bridge crosses the Harlem River connecting Madison Avenue in Manhattan with East 138th Street in the Bronx in New York City. The bridge is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation. It was designed by Alfred P. Boller and built in 1910 to replace and double the capacity of another earlier swing bridge dating from 1884. For 2008, the NYCDOT reported an average daily traffic volume in both directions of 41,740; having reached a peak AADT of 49,487 in 2002. The Madison Avenue Bridge carries the Bx33 local bus route operated by MTA New York City Transit, the BxM3 and BxM4 express bus routes operated by the MTA Bus Company, and the BxM4C express bus route operated by Westchester County's Bee Line Bus System. The average weekday ridership of the Bx33 bus route is 3,216. The average weekday ridership on the BxM3 bus route is 718. The average weekday ridership on the BxM4 bus route is 414. Prior to June 27, 2010, the BxM4 was known as the BxM4A and BxM4B. Notes
    7.75
    4 votes
    24
    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Francisco Bay
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: San Francisco
    The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a pair of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay of California, in the United States. As part of Interstate 80 and the direct road route between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries approximately 270,000 vehicles per day on its two decks. It has one of the longest spans in the world. The toll bridge was conceived as early as the gold rush days, but construction did not begin until 1933. Designed by Charles H. Purcell, and built by American Bridge Company, it opened for traffic on November 12, 1936, six months before the Golden Gate Bridge. It originally carried automobile traffic on its upper deck, and trucks and trains on the lower, but after the closure of the Key System, the lower deck was converted to road traffic as well. In 1986, the bridge was unofficially dedicated to James B. Rolph. The bridge consists of two main spans of roughly equal length, a western span connecting downtown San Francisco to Yerba Buena Island and an eastern span connecting the island to Oakland. The main part of the western span is a suspension bridge while the main part of the eastern span is a cantilever bridge. During the 1989
    7.75
    4 votes
    25
    Southwark Bridge

    Southwark Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Southwark
    Southwark Bridge is an arch bridge for traffic linking Southwark and the City across the River Thames, in London, England. It was designed by Ernest George and Basil Mott. It was built by Sir William Arrol & Co. and opened in 1921. The bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the City of London Corporation. A previous bridge on the site, designed by John Rennie, opened in 1819, and was originally known as Queen Street Bridge, as shown on the 1818 John Snow Map of London. The bridge consisted of three large cast-iron spans supported by granite piers. It was known as the "Iron Bridge" in comparison to London Bridge, the "Stone Bridge". The bridge was notable for having the longest cast iron span, 240 feet (73 m), ever made. Halfway along the bridge on the Western side is a plaque which is inscribed: Re-built by the Bridge House Estates Committee of the Corporation of London 1913-1921 Opened for traffic by their Majesties King George V and Queen Mary 6th June 1921 Sir Ernest Lamb CMG, JP Chairman Basil Mott, CB Engineer Sir Ernest George RA Architect The bridge provides access to Upper Thames Street on the north bank and, due to the ring
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Triborough Bridge

    Triborough Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Triborough Bridge (sometimes spelled Triboro Bridge, officially Robert F. Kennedy (RFK) Bridge) (1936), is a complex of three separate bridges in New York City, United States. Spanning the Harlem River, the Bronx Kill, and the Hell Gate (part of the East River), the bridges connect the boroughs of Manhattan, Queens, and The Bronx via Randall's Island and Wards Island, which are joined by landfill. The bridge is owned by the City of New York and operated by the MTA Bridges and Tunnels, an affiliate agency of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (New York). Often still referred to as simply the "Triboro" the spans were officially named after Robert F. Kennedy in 2008. Plans for connecting Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx were first announced by Edward A. Byrne, chief engineer of the New York City Department of Plant and Structures, in 1916. While its construction had long been recommended by local officials, the Triborough Bridge did not receive any funding until 1925, when the city appropriated funds for surveys, test borings and structural plans. Construction had begun on Black Friday in 1929, and the Triborough project's outlook began to look bleak. Othmar Ammann's
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Benicia-Martinez Bridge

    Benicia-Martinez Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Carquinez Strait
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Martinez
    The Benicia–Martinez Bridge refers to three parallel bridges which cross the Carquinez Strait just west of Suisun Bay; the spans link Benicia, California to the north with Martinez, California to the south. The two automobile bridge spans are usually referred to collectively as "The Benicia Bridge". The 1.2 mile (1.9 km) deck truss bridge opened in 1962 as a replacement for the last automotive ferry service in the San Francisco Bay Area. The 1962 bridge consists of seven 528-foot (161 m) spans which provide 138 feet (42 m) of vertical clearance, carrying four lanes of traffic in the southbound direction, as well as a pathway for pedestrians and bicyclists. A 1.7 mile (2.7 km) bridge was built alongside and opened on August 25, 2007 which carries five lanes of northbound traffic. The cost to construct the 1962 span was US$25 million and US$1.3 billion to build the 2007 span. The bridge is part of Interstate 680, itself a major transportation link, and connects several other heavily traveled freeways. Between the two vehicle bridges is a railroad bridge owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad. The railroad bridge was the first bridge at this location, built between April
    7.50
    4 votes
    28
    Elster Valley Bridge Pirk

    Elster Valley Bridge Pirk

    The Elster Viaduct near Pirk (Hof) is one of the most unusual motorway bridges in Germany. The building of this bridge began in 1937, but was stopped in 1940 due to the chaos created by World War II. Since this bridge then was in the restricted area of the East Germany, construction was not restarted until 1990. In June 1990 preliminary investigations began, and finally in September 1990 the building of the bridge began anew. In August 1993 the bridge was opened to traffic. Federal Motorway (Ger. Bundesautobahn) 72 now uses the bridge.
    7.50
    4 votes
    29
    Svinesund Bridge

    Svinesund Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Sweden
    The Svinesund Bridge is a through arch bridge crossing Iddefjord at Svinesund, and joining Sweden and Norway. Svinesund is a sound separating the Swedish municipality of Strömstad from the Norwegian municipality of Halden, and thus it is the border between Sweden and Norway in this region. The bridge is the westernmost border crossing (and one of the southernmost) between the two countries and carries the European route E6 which is a major traffic route in the area, connecting Oslo and the rest of Norway with Gothenburg, Malmö, Copenhagen and the rest of Europe. The New Svinesund Bridge is a highway bridge across the Iddefjord at Svinesund. The total cost of the project, including approach work, customs (this is an EU border) and toll plazas, and new interchanges for E6 (with the old bridge and old E6 becoming local routes) was SEK 1,400 million. The project is a joint venture of the Swedish and Norwegian road authorities, and all costs are to be financed with tolls (some writings refer to them as "road tax") collected. Both bridges are tolled in both directions. The total length of the bridge is 704 metres (2,310 ft) and consists of a substructure in ordinary reinforced concrete
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Throgs Neck Bridge

    Throgs Neck Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Throgs Neck
    The Throgs Neck Bridge is a suspension bridge opened on January 11, 1961, which carries Interstate 295 over the East River where it meets the Long Island Sound. The bridge connects the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx with the Bay Terrace section of Queens. It is the newest bridge across the East River and was built to relieve traffic on the adjacent Whitestone Bridge which opened in 1939. The Throgs Neck Bridge is the easternmost bridge off of Long Island. Due to this and its proximity to both the Cross Bronx Expressway and the New England Thruway, it is the preferred route from Long Island to New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge, upstate New York, Connecticut and other points north and east. Heading northbound, there are views of the Trump Towers in New Rochelle, Westchester County, and heading southbound on a clear day one can see the Manhattan skyline. The Throgs Neck Bridge was planned and managed by Robert Moses. His first plan for a Throgs Neck span dates back to 1945, six years after his previous project, the Bronx–Whitestone Bridge, was completed two miles (3 km) to the west. This bridge was one of the few not intended for the Belt System of highways wrapping
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Tower Bridge

    Tower Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    • Locale: London Borough of Tower Hamlets
    Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London, over the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name. It has become an iconic symbol of London. The bridge consists of two towers tied together at the upper level by means of two horizontal walkways, designed to withstand the horizontal forces exerted by the suspended sections of the bridge on the landward sides of the towers. The vertical component of the forces in the suspended sections and the vertical reactions of the two walkways are carried by the two robust towers. The bascule pivots and operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower. The bridge's present colour scheme dates from 1977, when it was painted red, white and blue for the Queen Elizabeth II's silver jubilee. Originally it was painted a mid greenish-blue colour. Tower Bridge is sometimes mistakenly referred to as London Bridge, which is the next bridge upstream. The nearest London Underground station is Tower Hill on the Circle and District lines, and the nearest Docklands Light Railway station is Tower Gateway. In the second half of the 19th century, increased commercial development in
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    London Bridge

    London Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Box girder bridge
    • Locale: Southwark
    London Bridge refers to several bridges that have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1973, is a box girder bridge constructed from concrete and steel. It replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges; the first was built by the Roman founders of London. The current bridge still stands at the western end of the Pool of London but it is positioned 30 metres (98 ft) upstream from the original alignment. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. The A3, which it carries, is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Outerbridge Crossing

    Outerbridge Crossing

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Arthur Kill
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Perth Amboy
    The Outerbridge Crossing is a cantilever bridge which spans the Arthur Kill. The "Outerbridge", as it is commonly known, connects Perth Amboy, New Jersey, with the New York City borough of Staten Island and carries NY-440 and NJ-440, each road ending at the respective state border. The Outerbridge Crossing is one of three bridges connecting New Jersey with Staten Island, with the Bayonne Bridge (which also carries NJ 440 and NY 440) in Bayonne and the Goethals Bridge in Elizabeth being the other two. The bridge was named for Eugenius Harvey Outerbridge The first chairman of the then-Port of New York Authority and a resident of Staten Island. Rather than call it the "Outerbridge Bridge" the span was labeled a "crossing", but many New Yorkers and others mistakenly assume the name comes from the fact that it is the most remote bridge in New York City and the southernmost crossing in New York state. It is a steel cantilever construction, designed by John Alexander Low Waddell and built under the auspices of the Port of New York Authority, now the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which currently operates it. It opened simultaneously with the Goethals Bridge on June 29, 1928.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Severn Bridge

    Severn Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Severn
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Aust
    The Severn Bridge (Welsh: Pont Hafren) is a motorway suspension bridge spanning the River Severn and River Wye between Aust, South Gloucestershire (just north of Bristol) in England, and Chepstow, Monmouthshire in South Wales, via Beachley, Gloucestershire, a peninsula between the two rivers. It is the original Severn road crossing between England and Wales and took five years to construct at a cost of £8 million. It replaced the Aust ferry. The bridge was opened on 8 September 1966, by Queen Elizabeth II, who hailed it as the dawn of a new economic era for South Wales. The bridge was granted Grade I listed status on 26 November 1999. The first proposal for a bridge across the Severn, approximately in the same location as that eventually constructed, was in 1824 by Thomas Telford, who had been asked to advise on how to improve mail coach services between London and Wales. No action was taken, and over the next few decades the railways became the dominant mode of long-distance travel, with the Severn Railway Bridge at Sharpness being opened in 1879 and the main line Severn Tunnel in 1886. However, the growth of road traffic in the early 20th century led to further calls for
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Battersea Bridge

    Battersea Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Battersea
    Battersea Bridge is a cast-iron and granite five-span cantilever bridge crossing the River Thames in London, England. It is situated on a sharp bend in the river, and links Battersea south of the river with Chelsea to the north. The bridge replaced a ferry service that had operated near the site since at least the middle of the 16th century. The first Battersea Bridge was a toll bridge commissioned by John, Earl Spencer, who had recently acquired the rights to operate the ferry. Although a stone bridge was planned, difficulties in raising investment meant that a cheaper wooden bridge was built instead. Designed by Henry Holland, it was initially opened to pedestrians in November 1771, and to vehicle traffic in 1772. The bridge was poorly designed and dangerous both to its users and to passing shipping, and boats often collided with it. To reduce the dangers to shipping, two piers were removed and the sections of the bridge above them were strengthened with iron girders. Although dangerous and unpopular, the bridge was the last surviving wooden bridge on the Thames in London, and was the subject of paintings by many significant artists such as J. M. W. Turner, John Sell Cotman and
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Battersea Railway Bridge

    Battersea Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    The Battersea Railway Bridge - properly called the Cremorne Bridge, after the pleasure grounds in Chelsea and originally commonly referred to as the Battersea New Bridge - is a bridge across the River Thames in London, between Battersea and Chelsea and forming part of the West London Line of the London Overground from Clapham Junction to Willesden Junction. The bridge was designed by William Baker , chief engineer of the London and North Western Railway, and was opened in March 1863 at a cost of £87,000. It carries two sets of railway lines and consists of five 120-foot (37 m) lattice girder arches set on stone piers. Within Network Rail, this bridge is also referred to as "Chelsea River Bridge" (Engineers Line Reference WLL, Bridge No. 9). Strictly speaking, this structure may be considered a viaduct as it consists of 5 spans (Network Rail Bridge Book definition). There is a three-arch brick viaduct on the north side of the bridge, with one arch having been opened to provide a pedestrian route under the railway, as part of the Thames Path. On the south side there are four arches, two of which are used as storage for the residents of a houseboat community located immediately
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Hampton Court Bridge

    Hampton Court Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: East Molesey
    Hampton Court Bridge crosses the River Thames in England in a north to south direction between Hampton, London and East Molesey, Surrey. It is on the reach above Teddington Lock and about hundred yards upstream of the bridge is Molesey Lock. On the north bank is Hampton Court Palace, Hampton Court Park and Bushy Park. On the south bank is Hampton Court railway station, Molesey Lock and the mouth of the River Mole. The location of the bridge had been a ferry crossing point since at least the Tudor period. The first bridge was built 1752–53, after a 1750 parliamentary bill enabled the construction of a privately owned bridge by James Clarke. It had seven wooden arches, and was built in the Chinoiserie design of the Willow pattern that was popular at the time. It was subsequently replaced by a more sturdy wooden bridge in 1778. By 1840 this bridge had become dilapidated and the owner appealed to the Corporation of London to support reconstruction. Among their arguments were that since the bridge was built, the City had created Molesey Lock and Weir and as a consequence navigation through the bridge was dangerous. The bridge was described at about this time as "crazy, hog-backed,
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    Kingston Bridge, London

    Kingston Bridge, London

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Kingston upon Thames
    Kingston Bridge is a road bridge at Kingston upon Thames in London, England, carrying the A308 across the River Thames. It joins the town centre of Kingston in the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, to Hampton Court Park, Bushy Park, and the village of Hampton Wick in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. As of 2005, it carries approximately 50,000 vehicles per day with up to 2,000 vehicles per hour in each direction during peak times. Kingston Bridge is on the reach above Teddington Lock and close to and downstream of the mouth of the Hogsmill River, a minor tributary of the Thames. It is on the route of the Thames Path and is the end point for the Thames Down Link long distance footpath from Box Hill station. Kingston Bridge was the only crossing of the river between London Bridge and Staines Bridge until Putney Bridge was opened in 1729, with a reference in 1318 describing it as in a dangerous condition. This contributed greatly to Kingston's success as a medieval market town. According to John Leland, writing in under the Tudors there was a bridge in Saxon times. He wrote "And yn the old tyme the commune saying ys that the bridge where the commun passage was over the
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Ravenswood Bridge

    Ravenswood Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    Ravenswood Bridge is a two-lane cantilever bridge in the United States, connecting Ravenswood, West Virginia and rural Meigs County, Ohio, across the Ohio River. It has a total length of 2,710 ft (830 m) with a main span of 900 ft (270 m). The bridge was completed in 1981 as part of a state-bill economic plan to replace narrow two-lane roads in southeastern Ohio with modern, wider roads. This was originally an isolated crossing connecting a winding two-lane Ohio highway to Ravenswood. In 2003, the U.S. 33 bypass in Meigs County was completed, carrying a relocated US 33 that stretches from the bridge to Pomeroy, Ohio.
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Whirlpool Rapids Bridge

    Whirlpool Rapids Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Niagara Falls
    The Whirlpool Rapids Bridge, commonly called the Whirlpool Bridge, and until 1937, known as the Lower Steel Arch Bridge, is a spandrel braced, riveted, two-hinged arch bridge. It crosses the international border between Canada and the United States, connecting the commercial downtown districts of Niagara Falls, Ontario and Niagara Falls, New York. This bridge is located approximately 1.5 kilometres (0.9 mi) north of the Rainbow Bridge and about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) from the Falls. This bridge was acquired by the Niagara Falls Bridge Commission in January 1959. The bridge was designed by Leffert L. Buck and constructed between April 9, 1896, and August 27, 1897. It was constructed around the Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge so as not to interrupt daily traffic. The bridge has two decks. The upper deck carries the railway traffic while the lower deck is a roadway reserved for passenger vehicles only; commercial vehicles and pedestrians are prohibited. The Whirlpool Bridge is reserved for NEXUS members, a joint program implemented by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP). There is one lane of traffic to the United States and one
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Delaware Aqueduct

    Delaware Aqueduct

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Delaware River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Minisink Ford
    The Delaware Aqueduct is the newest of the New York City aqueducts. It takes water from the Rondout Reservoir through the Chelsea Pump Station, the West Branch Reservoir, and the Kensico Reservoir, ending at the Hillview Reservoir in Yonkers, New York. The aqueduct was constructed between 1939 and 1945, and carries approximately half of the New York City water supply of 1.3 billion US gallons (4,900,000 m) per day. The Delaware Aqueduct leaks up to 36 million US gallons (140,000 m) per day. At 85 miles (137 km) long and 13.5 feet (4.1 m) wide, the Delaware Aqueduct is the world's second longest continuous underground tunnel after the Thirlmere Aqueduct in North West England. Since the late 1970s, the New York Department of Environmental Protection has been monitoring two leaks in the Delaware Aqueduct that collectively release between 10 and 36 million US gallons (38,000 and 140,000 m) of water per day. These leaks have caused many problems with flooding and drinking water contamination, particularly for residents of Wawarsing, New York.
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Green Bridge

    Green Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Moika River
    Green Bridge (Russian: Зелёный мост, Zyelyoniy Most) (also known as Police Bridge and People Bridge) is a bridge across Moika River in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It was the first cast iron bridge in the city. In 1713, there was a major road built on the left bank of Neva river, which became the modern Nevsky Prospekt. At the crossing with Moika, in 1716 the original wooden bridge was built. In 1730 it was painted green, therefore it got the name of Green Bridge. In 1768 the bridge was renamed Police Bridge due to the nearby house of St. Petersburg's police general. In 1806 in place of the existing bridge, the architect William Heste built a new cast iron bridge. The strength of cast iron allowed a more elegant and lightweight design, especially compared with heavyweight granite bridges. The design was considered so successful, that it was approved as a standard design for bridges across the Moika. In 1842, the Police Bridge was widened to accommodate growing traffic on Nevsky Prospekt. In 1844 it was the first bridge paved with asphalt in Russia. In 1904-1907, when the tramway tracks were built into the Nevsky Prospekt, the bridge was widened again, and architect Lev Ilyin added
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Huey P. Long Bridge

    Huey P. Long Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Bridge City
    The Huey P. Long Bridge in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, is a cantilevered steel through truss bridge that carries a two-track railroad line over the Mississippi River at mile 106.1 with two lanes of US 90 on each side of the central tracks. Opened in December 1935 to replace the Walnut Street Ferry, the bridge was named for the extremely popular and notorious governor, Huey P. Long, who had just been assassinated on September 8 of that year. The bridge was the first Mississippi River span built in Louisiana and the 29th along the length of the river. It is a few miles upriver from the city of New Orleans. The East Bank entrance is at Elmwood, Louisiana and the West Bank at Bridge City. It was designed by Polish-American engineer Ralph Modjeski. The widest clean span is 790 feet (240 m) long and sits 135 feet (41 m) above the water. There are three navigation channels below the bridge, the widest being 750 feet (230 m). The distinctive rail structure is 22,996 feet (7,009 m) long and extends as a rail viaduct well into the city. It has sometimes been described as the longest rail bridge in the US, but the nearby Norfolk Southern Lake Pontchartrain Bridge, at 5.8 miles (9.3 km), is
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Ladykirk and Norham Bridge

    Ladykirk and Norham Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    • Locale: Norham
    Ladykirk and Norham Bridge, which connects Ladykirk in the Borders, Scotland, with Norham in Northumberland, England, is a bridge in the United Kingdom that spans the River Tweed. It is a late stone road bridge with four arches designed by Thomas Codrington and Cuthbert A. Brereton for the Tweed Bridges Trust to replace an earlier wooden structure. Construction lasted from 1885 to 1887. The bridge is listed at grade II by English Heritage and at category B by Historic Scotland.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Westminster Bridge

    Westminster Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Westminster
    Westminster Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames between Westminster on the north side and Lambeth on the south side, in London. The bridge is painted predominantly green, the same colour as the leather seats in the House of Commons which is on the side of the Palace of Westminster nearest the bridge. This is in contrast to Lambeth Bridge which is red, the same colour as the seats in the House of Lords and is on the opposite side of the Houses of Parliament. In 2005-2007 it underwent a complete refurbishment, including replacing the iron fascias and repainting the whole bridge. It links the Palace of Westminster on the west side of the river with County Hall and the London Eye on the east and was the finishing point during the early years of the London Marathon. The next bridge downstream is Hungerford footbridge and upstream is Lambeth Bridge. The bridge was designated a Grade II* listed structure in 1981. For over 600 years, the nearest bridge to London Bridge was at Kingston. A bridge at Westminster was proposed in 1664, but opposed by the Corporation of London and the watermen. Despite further opposition in 1722 and after a new timber bridge was built
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Lady's Bridge

    Lady's Bridge

    Lady's Bridge is the oldest bridge across the River Don in the City of Sheffield, England. It is located in the central section of the city, linking the Wicker to the north with Waingate to the south. The original wooden bridge at this point was constructed close to Sheffield Castle sometime after 1150 under the orders of William de Lovetot, the Norman baron who had also built the castle along with the town's first church, hospital (at Spital Hill), and corn mill (at millsands). In 1485 the Vicar of Sheffield, Sir John Plesaunce, and William Hill, who was a master mason, both agreed to build a bridge of stone "over the watyr of Dune neghe the castell of Sheffeld" at a cost of about £67. The bridge had five arches, and was 14.5 feet (4.4 m) wide. A small chapel, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was built close to the bridge, and the bridge became known as 'Our Lady's Bridge'. When built it could only be crossed by pedestrians as there were steps at either end of the bridge. The chapel was converted for use as a wool warehouse in 1547, to prevent its demolition as part of the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the reign of Henry VIII, and was subsequently used as an Alms house. In
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Kolbäcks Bridge

    Kolbäcks Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Umeå
    The Kolbäck Bridge (Swedish: Kolbäcksbron) is a bridge crossing the Ume River in the eastern parts of the city of Umeå in northern Sweden. The bridge connects the island Ön in the river to the mainland on both sides. It crosses Lillån on the west side of the island and Storån on the east side. The total length is 700 meters. The bridge was constructed between 1998 and 2001.
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Portland-Columbia Pedestrian Bridge

    Portland-Columbia Pedestrian Bridge

    The Portland–Columbia Pedestrian Bridge (formally known as the Portland-Columbia Toll Supported Pedestrian Bridge) is a footbridge that crosses the Delaware River, at Portland, in Upper Mount Bethel Township, Pennsylvania, connecting to Columbia, in Knowlton Township, New Jersey. The bridge is owned and operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. A vehicular bridge had been located at the site of the present bridge since 1869. The original structure was a four-span timber bridge with wooden arches which was covered by a wooden shed with a slate roof. As of December 1, 1953, the bridge on the site was closed to vehicular traffic, which was shifted to the new Portland-Columbia Toll Bridge, built one-quarter mile downstream of the old bridge. In August 1955, during the remnants of Hurricane Diane, three of the four spans of the timber bridge washed away. Hurricane Diane was the wettest hurricane to ever hit the North American continent and caused record flooding throughout the northeastern US, but particularly the Delaware River watershed. Starting in 1957, the bridge was reconstructed as a four-span steel girder bridge system with concrete piers. New guide rails were
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Wandsworth Bridge

    Wandsworth Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London Borough of Wandsworth
    Wandsworth Bridge crosses the River Thames in west London. It carries the A217 road between the areas of Battersea, near Wandsworth Town Station, in the London Borough of Wandsworth on the south of the river, and the areas of Sands End and Parsons Green, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, on the north side. The first bridge on the site was a toll bridge built by Julian Tolmé in 1873, in the expectation that the western terminus of the Hammersmith and City Railway would shortly be built on the north bank, leading to a sharp increase in the number of people wanting to cross the river at this point. The railway terminus was not built, and problems with drainage on the approach road made access to the bridge difficult for vehicles. Wandsworth Bridge was commercially unsuccessful, and in 1880 it was taken into public ownership and made toll-free. Tolmé's bridge was narrow and too weak to carry buses, and in 1926 a Royal Commission recommended its replacement. In 1937 Tolmé's bridge was demolished. The present bridge, an unadorned steel cantilever bridge designed by Sir Pierson Frank, was opened in 1940. At the time of its opening it was painted in dull shades of blue as
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    First Avenue South Bridge

    First Avenue South Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Duwamish River
    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    • Locale: Seattle
    The First Avenue South Bridge is a pair of double-leaf bascule bridges built between 1956 and 1998 that carry State Route 99 over the Duwamish River about three miles (5 km) south of downtown Seattle, Washington. The northbound span was built in 1956 to connect the industrial areas northeast of the Duwamish to the residential neighborhoods to the south and southwest. Between 1996 and 1998, the drawspan was retrofitted and the approaches completely demolished and rebuilt. The southbound span opened in 1996 and carried traffic in both directions for two years while the northbound span was rebuilt. In 2001, the southbound span was damaged by the Nisqually earthquake, knocking its piers 3 inches out of alignment, and was closed briefly for repairs. From the original construction to February 1995 when the retrofit began, the First Ave S bridge had the highest motor vehicle accident rate in Washington State.
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Fulham Railway Bridge

    Fulham Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    • Locale: London
    Fulham Railway Bridge crosses the River Thames in London. It is very close to Putney Bridge, and carries the London Underground District Line between Putney Bridge station on the North, and East Putney station on the South. Fulham Railway Bridge can also be crossed on foot, on the downstream (east) side. The bridge is of lattice girder construction and 418 metres long, with 5 spans totalling 301 metres actually across the river, two further spans on the southern shore, and one on the north. It was designed by Brunel's former assistant William Jacomb, built by Head Wrightson and opened in 1889.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Manhattan Bridge

    Manhattan Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan (at Canal Street) with Brooklyn (at Flatbush Avenue Extension). It was the last of the three suspension bridges built across the lower East River, following the Brooklyn and the Williamsburg bridges. The bridge was opened to traffic on December 31, 1909 and was designed by Leon Moisseiff, who later designed the infamous original Tacoma Narrows Bridge that opened and collapsed in 1940. It has four vehicle lanes on the upper level (split between two roadways). The lower level has three lanes, four subway tracks, a walkway and a bikeway. The upper level, originally used for streetcars, has two lanes in each direction, and the lower level is one-way and has three lanes in peak direction. It once carried New York State Route 27 and later was planned to carry Interstate 478. No tolls are charged for motor vehicles to use the Manhattan Bridge. The original pedestrian walkway on the south side of the bridge was reopened after forty years in June 2001. It was also used by bicycles until late summer 2004, when a dedicated bicycle path was opened on the north side of the
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Narrows Bridge

    Narrows Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Swan River
    The Narrows Bridge is a freeway crossing of the Swan River in Perth, Western Australia, at The Narrows between Mill Point and Mount Eliza. Made up of two road bridges and a railway bridge, it connects the Mitchell and Kwinana Freeways, linking the city's northern and southern suburbs. The original road bridge was opened in 1959 and was the largest precast prestressed concrete bridge in the world. Construction of the northern interchange for this bridge necessitated the reclamation of a large amount of land from the river. The bridge formed part of the Kwinana Freeway which originally ran for only 2.4 miles (3.9 km). Over the following decades, the freeway system was expanded to the north and south, greatly increasing the volume of traffic using the bridge. As a result, in 2001, a duplicate traffic bridge was opened to the west of the original bridge, and in 2005, the railway bridge was constructed in the gap between the two traffic bridges. Passenger trains first traversed the Narrows in 2007 with the opening of the Mandurah railway line. The close distance between Mill Point and Point Lewis at the foot of Mount Eliza meant the site was suggested as a suitable location for a bridge
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Silverwater Bridge

    Silverwater Bridge

    Silverwater Bridge is one of the major road crossings of the Parramatta River in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The bridge carries Silverwater Road over the river to link Silverwater in the south to Rydalmere and Ermington in the north. Other crossings over the Parramatta River include the Gladesville Bridge and Ryde Bridge. The origin of the suburb's name, and subsequently the bridge's name, is unknown. It may have been a reference to the nearby Parramatta River which could have provided silver reflections of light off the water. Silverwater bridge opened in 1962.
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

    Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: The Narrows
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Staten Island
    The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge that connects the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City at the Narrows, the reach connecting the relatively protected upper bay with the larger lower bay. The bridge is named for both the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano, the first known European navigator in the service of the French crown to enter New York Harbor and the Hudson River, and for the body of water it spans: the Narrows. It has a center span of 4,260 feet (1,298 m) and was the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time of its completion in 1964, until it was surpassed by the Humber Bridge in the United Kingdom in 1981. It now has the ninth longest main span in the world, is still the longest bridge span in the Americas, and its massive towers can be seen throughout a good part of the New York metropolitan area, including from spots in all five boroughs of New York City and in New Jersey. The bridge furnishes a critical link in the local and regional highway system. Since 1976, it has been the starting point of the New York City Marathon. The bridge marks the gateway to New York Harbor; all cruise ships and most container
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Albert Bridge, London

    Albert Bridge, London

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Chelsea
    Albert Bridge is a Grade II* listed road bridge over the River Thames in West London, connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank. Designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873 as an Ordish–Lefeuvre Principle modified cable-stayed bridge, it proved to be structurally unsound, and so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated some of the design elements of a suspension bridge. The Greater London Council carried out further strengthening work in 1973 by adding two concrete piers, which transformed the central span into a simple beam bridge. As a result of these modifications the bridge today is an unusual hybrid of three different design styles. Built as a toll bridge, it was commercially unsuccessful; six years after its opening it was taken into public ownership and the tolls were lifted. The tollbooths remained in place however, and are the only surviving examples of bridge tollbooths in London. Nicknamed "The Trembling Lady" because of its tendency to vibrate when large numbers of people walked over it, signs at the entrances warn troops from the nearby Chelsea Barracks to break step while crossing the bridge. Incorporating a roadway
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    Queensboro Bridge

    Queensboro Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, also known as the 59th Street Bridge – because its Manhattan end is located between 59th and 60th Streets – or simply the Queensboro Bridge, is a cantilever bridge over the East River in New York City that was completed in 1909. It connects the neighborhood of Long Island City in the borough of Queens with Manhattan, passing over Roosevelt Island. It carries New York State Route 25 and is the westernmost of the four East River spans that carry a route number: NY 25 terminates at the west (Manhattan) side of the bridge, which once carried NY 24 and NY 25A as well. The bridge is flanked on its northern side by the freestanding Roosevelt Island Tramway. In December 2010, the city announced that the bridge would be renamed in honor of former Mayor Ed Koch from the Queensboro Bridge to the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge. The renaming decision was unpopular among Queens residents and business leaders, and many locals continue to refer to the bridge by its older name. Serious proposals for a bridge linking Manhattan to Long Island City were first made as early as 1838 and attempts to finance such a bridge were made by a private company beginning in 1867. Its
    6.00
    5 votes
    58
    Dryburgh Bridge

    Dryburgh Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    Dryburgh Bridge refers to two different footbridges erected near Dryburgh Abbey, Borders, Scotland, between the villages of Dryburgh and St. Boswells (part of a ribbon of settlements including Newtown St. Boswells), across the River Tweed. A crossing has existed here for centuries, originally with a ferry service. Dryburgh Abbey Bridge was a cable-stayed bridge of significant historical interest. It had been commissioned by David Stewart Erskine, 11th Earl of Buchan, an eccentric Scottish aristocrat who later died in Dryburgh. It was 79 metres long. At the time, the cable-stayed type of bridge was undergoing a period of rapid growth in popularity. The Earl opened the completed bridge on August 1, 1817, but in January 1818 it collapsed. After a redesign a replacement was built, but this too collapsed in 1838, by which time the Earl had been dead for several years. The 1818 collapse, together with that of a slightly shorter bridge across the Saale River in Germany in 1824, caused the reputation of cable-stayed bridges to decline rapidly, and despite a history dating back to the 17th century, the design was almost completely abandoned for over a century, with suspended-deck suspension
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Kew Bridge

    Kew Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Kew
    Kew Bridge is a bridge in London over the River Thames. The present bridge, which was opened in 1903 by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, was designed by John Wolfe-Barry and Cuthbert A Brereton. The bridge was given Grade II listed structure protection in 1983. Kew Bridge crosses the River Thames between Kew Green in Kew on the south bank and Brentford on the north bank. It is immediately adjacent to the Royal Botanic Gardens on the Kew side of the river and the former Grand Junction Waterworks Company buildings (now Kew Bridge Steam Museum) on the north. The bridge forms the connection between the South Circular and North Circular roads to the west of London, and is nearly always very congested. Beside the bridge on the downstream Kew bank is Kew Pier, which serves tourist ferries operating under licence from London River Services. Richmond Museum has an engraving by John Barnard, architect of the design for the first Kew Bridge, dedicated to George, Prince of Wales and his mother Augusta and dated 1759. Bernard describes it as the Bridge over the River of Thames from Kew in the County of Surry to the opposite shore in the County of Middlesex. Kew and the area around the
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    San Mateo-Hayward Bridge

    San Mateo-Hayward Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Francisco Bay
    • Locale: Foster City
    The San Mateo – Hayward Bridge (commonly called the San Mateo Bridge) is a bridge crossing California's San Francisco Bay, linking the San Francisco Peninsula with the East Bay. The bridge's west end is in Foster City, the most recent urban addition to the eastern edge of San Mateo. The east end of the bridge is in Hayward. It is the longest bridge in the San Francisco Bay Area and the 25th longest in the world by length. The bridge is owned by the state of California, and is maintained by Caltrans, the state highway agency. Further oversight is provided by the Bay Area Toll Authority. The bridge is part of State Route 92, whose western terminus is at the town of Half Moon Bay on the Pacific coast. It links Interstate 880 in the East Bay with U.S. Route 101 on the Peninsula. It is roughly parallel to and lies between the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge and the Dumbarton Bridge, and is sometimes used by commuters to avoid traffic delays due to emergencies on those bridges. The original bridge, known as the San Francisco Bay Toll-Bridge, opened in 1929 and was then the longest bridge in the world. The original bridge was mostly a two-lane causeway with a 300-foot (91 m) vertical
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Shangqing Bridge

    Shangqing Bridge

    Shangqing Bridge (simplified Chinese: 上清桥; traditional Chinese: 上清橋; pinyin: Shàngqīng Qiáo) is an overpass in Beijing. It is an intersection where the northern stretch of the 5th Ring Road and the Badaling Expressway meet. Before tolls on the 5th Ring Road were abolished in early 2004, the bridge received little attention, apart from being the bridge where the first stretch of the 5th Ring Road was opened to traffic. However, as of 2004, it has become a major focus point, as the bridge is, more often than not, home to stunning traffic jams. The problem is that vehicles switching expressways must pick up an entry card when heading in either direction. For cars heading toward the Badaling Expressway from the 5th Ring Road (especially if they are heading towards central Beijing), it is not a big problem (cards are handed and handed back to the Qinghe toll gate, where drivers heading into central Beijing continue without paying a cent; cards are also handed back to a toll gate on the Badaling Expressway if the driver heads out of Beijing). However, the problem is significant for cars entering the 5th Ring Road from the Badaling Expressway, where tolls must be paid before the vehicle
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Victoria Bridge, Brisbane

    Victoria Bridge, Brisbane

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Brisbane River
    • Locale: Brisbane
    The Victoria Bridge is a vehicular and pedestrian bridge over the Brisbane River. The current bridge, opened in 1969, is the third permanent crossing erected at this location. It is shared by vehicular traffic, pedestrians and cyclists. Victoria Bridge connects the South Bank Parklands and Queensland Cultural Centre to the Brisbane central business district (CBD) at North Quay. Half of the road space on the bridge is now given over to the South-East Busway. In the Brisbane City Centre Draft Masterplan, a new crossing immediately adjacent to the Victoria Bridge, tentatively named the Adelaide Street Bridge (the name of the connecting street in the CBD), will carry pedestrian, cyclist, bus and possibly light-rail traffic, freeing up the Victoria Bridge for general road traffic as it was before. Construction of a bridge across the Brisbane River was first agreed to in 1861. The newly formed Legislative Assembly of Queensland forced the council to pay for the costs. £70,000 worth of borrowings was acquired from the Bank of Queensland. Work first began on the foundations for the first bridge across the Brisbane River on 22 August 1864. The bridge, known as the Brisbane Bridge, was a
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Warrington Transporter Bridge

    Warrington Transporter Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Mersey
    • Bridge Type: Transporter bridge
    • Locale: Warrington
    The Warrington Transporter Bridge (or Bank Quay Transporter Bridge) across the River Mersey is a structural steel transporter bridge with a span of 200 feet. It is 30 feet wide, and 76 feet above high water level, with an overall length of 339 feet. It was built in 1915 and, although it has been out of use since circa 1964, it is still standing. It was designed by William Henry Hunter and built by William Arrol. It was originally one of two such bridges across the Mersey at Warrington, the other having been erected in 1905 slightly to the North of the existing bridge, and desctibed in The Engineer in 1908. A third transporter bridge over the Mersey was the Widnes-Runcorn Transporter Bridge (built in 1905). replaced in 1961. It is privately owned and was built to connect the two parts of the large chemical and soap works of Joseph Crosfield and Sons. It was originally used to carry rail vehicles up to 18 tons in weight, and was converted for road vehicles in 1940. In 1953 it was modified to carry loads of up to 30 tons. English Heritage designated the bridge as a Grade II* listed building, and as a scheduled monument. Because of its poor condition it is on their Buildings at Risk
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Bronx Whitestone Bridge

    Bronx Whitestone Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: New York City
    The Bronx–Whitestone Bridge (colloquially referred to as the Whitestone Bridge or simply the Whitestone) is a suspension bridge in New York City that crosses the East River and connects the boroughs of Queens on Long Island and The Bronx via Interstate 678. The bridge was designed by Othmar Ammann and opened to traffic with four lanes on April 29, 1939. The idea for a crossing between the Bronx and Whitestone, Queens had come as early as 1905. At the time, residents around the proposed area of the bridge protested construction in fear of losing the then-rural character of the area. In 1929, however, the Regional Plan Association had proposed another bridge from the Bronx to northern Queens to allow motorists from upstate New York and New England to reach Queens and Long Island without traveling through the traffic-ridden communities of western Queens. On February 25, 1930, influential planner Robert Moses proposed a Ferry Point Park-Whitestone Bridge as a part of his Belt Parkway system around Brooklyn and Queens. As the 1930s progressed, Moses found his bridge increasingly necessary to directly link the mainland to the 1939 New York World's Fair and to LaGuardia Airport (then
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Guldborgsund Bridge

    Guldborgsund Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    The Guldborgsund bridge (Danish: Guldborgbroen) spans the northern end of the Guldborgsund, between the islands of Lolland and Falster in Denmark. The bridge consists of two steel arched spans with a 30m central opening section having two rising bascules. It was built between 1933 and 1934, is 180m long and 7m wide, carrying two road carriageways and was officially opened by Prince Axel 6 October 1934.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Roosevelt Island Bridge

    Roosevelt Island Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Roosevelt Island
    The Roosevelt Island Bridge is a lift bridge that connects Roosevelt Island to Astoria in Queens, crossing the East Channel of the East River. It is the sole route to the island for vehicular and foot traffic (without using public transportation). Construction of the bridge began on March 17, 1952, at a cost of $6.5 million. It opened on May 18, 1955, as the Welfare Island Bridge. The name was changed to the Roosevelt Island Bridge in 1973. When the bridge is open it provides ships with 100 feet (30 m) of vertical clearance. It is 40 feet (12 m) wide, and its total length, including approaches, is 2,877 feet (877 m). The main span is 418 feet (127 m). Before the bridge was constructed, the only way vehicles could access Roosevelt Island was via an elevator on the Queensboro Bridge. The Roosevelt Island Bridge provides direct access to the Motorgate Parking Garage, which was designed to minimize vehicular traffic on the island. The garage was completed in 1974 and later expanded in 1990. In 2001, the New York City Department of Transportation considered converting the Roosevelt Island Bridge into a fixed bridge to reduce the cost of its maintenance. The bridge is rarely opened,
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Thames Gateway Bridge

    Thames Gateway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    The Thames Gateway Bridge was a proposed crossing over the River Thames in east London, England. It was first mooted in the 1970s but never came to fruition. In November 2008, Boris Johnson, the current Mayor of London, formally cancelled the entire £500m scheme. In 2009 a new scaled-down project was launched involving a potentially new crossing between Tower Bridge and the Dartford Crossing. It was planned that the bridge should be built by 2013 and would have connected Beckton in the London Borough of Newham with Thamesmead in the Royal Borough of Greenwich linking the A406 / A13 junction in Beckton with the A2016 Eastern Way and Western Way in Thamesmead and serve the new Thames Gateway development. The bridge was to have a span of about 650 metres (0.4 mi), with a 50-metre (160 ft) vertical clearance for ships, yet be low enough not to impede the flight approach to the nearby London City Airport. The bridge was to have had four lanes for general traffic and two lanes for public transport use. It would also have had a cycle lane, a pedestrian walkway and the facility for a Docklands Light Railway crossing. For pedestrians the nearest other crossings are the Greenwich foot
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    East Channel Bridge

    East Channel Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Lake Washington
    • Bridge Type: Box girder bridge
    The East Channel Bridge is a bridge carrying Interstate 90 from Mercer Island, Washington, to Bellevue, Washington, over the East Channel of Lake Washington, which separates Mercer Island from the rest of the Eastside. The original bridge was opened November 10, 1923, and was the first bridge to reach the island. George Lightfoot, the father of the Floating Bridge, had the charge of opening the bridge for boats. In 1940, it was demolished and replaced. Currently, two parallel bridges carry I-90 traffic at this location. A steel box girder bridge, built in 1981, carries westbound I-90 traffic. Another steel box girder bridge, built in 1988, carries eastbound I-90 traffic. This bridge is featured in World in Conflict in the map, as_bridge. During the course of the single player campaign, the bridge must be held against invading Soviet forces. It is later destroyed to hinder the Soviet advance from Seattle.
    5.80
    5 votes
    69
    Millennium Bridge

    Millennium Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Kazanka River
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Kazan
    The Millennium Bridge (Tatar Cyrillic: Милленниум күпере, Latin: Millennium Küpere, Russian: Мост Милленниум) is a cable-stayed bridge that spans Kazanka River, in Kazan, Tatarstan, Russia. Its name originates from Kazan's thousand anniversary, widely celebrated in 2005 and the shape of its M-like pylon. The construction of the bridge began in 2004, the first part was ready in 2005 and the second part in 2007. The building cost was approximately 94 million euros. The bridge is 831 m long. The main part of this bridge is the 45-m pylon which looks like the letter M. This form originates from Meñyıllıq (Cyrillic: Меңъеллык), the Tatar for thousand years old, or its Latin variant Millennium. The roadway carries three lanes of traffic and a pedestrian walkway in each direction. The bridge connects Gorky park and Fatix Ämirxan Avenue.
    5.80
    5 votes
    70
    Moulsford Railway Bridge

    Moulsford Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Moulsford
    Moulsford Railway Bridge, known locally as "Four Arches" bridge is a pair of parallel bridges located a little to the north of Moulsford and South Stoke in Oxfordshire, UK. It carries the Great Western Main Line from Paddington, London to Wales and the West across the River Thames. It lies between the stations at Goring & Streatley and Cholsey, and crosses the Thames at an oblique angle on the reach between Cleeve Lock and Benson Lock. The original bridge was designed to carry two broad gauge tracks by Isambard Kingdom Brunel for the Great Western Railway and was built between 1838 and 1839, at the same time as Maidenhead and Gatehampton railway bridges. It is constructed from red brick with Bath stone quoins as four elliptical skew arches of 62 feet (19 m) span and a headway height of 21 feet 8 inches (6.60 m). In 1892 the line was converted to quadruple track and a second bridge was built alongside the upstream side of the original and connected to it by girders and brick bridgelets. The second bridge was built to the same profile and dimensions as the original but it lacks the stone quoins of the original and the plain uncut bricks make a jagged pattern where they meet the faces
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Clifton Suspension Bridge

    Clifton Suspension Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Avon, Bristol
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Clifton, Bristol
    The Clifton Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge which spans the Avon Gorge and links Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset, England. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the bridge is a grade I listed building and forms part of the B3129 road. The idea of building a bridge across the Avon Gorge originated in 1753. The original plans were for a stone bridge, and later plans were for a cast iron structure. An attempt to build Brunel's design in 1831 was stopped by the Bristol Riots, and the revised version of his designs was built after his death, and completed in 1864. Although similar in size, the bridge towers are not identical in design, the Clifton tower having side cut-outs, the Leigh tower more pointed arches atop a 110 feet (34 m) red sandstone clad abutment. Roller mounted "saddles" at the top of each tower allow movement of the three independent wrought iron chains on each side when loads pass over the bridge. The bridge deck is suspended by eighty-one matching vertical wrought-iron rods. Two men were killed during the bridge's construction; since opening it has gained a reputation as a suicide bridge. It now has plaques that advertise the telephone
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Henry Hudson Bridge

    Henry Hudson Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Spuyten Duyvil
    The Henry Hudson Bridge is a steel arch toll bridge in New York City across the Spuyten Duyvil Creek. It connects the Spuyten Duyvil section of The Bronx with the northern end of Manhattan to the south. On the Manhattan side, it touches Inwood Hill Park. The bridge was designed by David B. Steinman (in realization of his Ph.D. thesis in civil engineering at Columbia University in 1911) and was the longest plate girder arch and fixed arch bridge in the world when it opened in 1936. The bridge was named to commemorate the voyage of Henry Hudson on the Half Moon, which anchored near the site in 1609. The bridge has two roadway levels carrying an aggregate of seven traffic lanes and a pedestrian walkway and spans Spuyten Duyvil Creek just east of where the tidal strait meets the Hudson River. The bridge is part of the Henry Hudson Parkway placarded as New York State Route 9A. To its west, at five feet above water level, is the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge, which is used by Amtrak trains heading to Albany, New York and other points north. The Spuyten Duyvil Metro-North station is located under Henry Hudson bridge on the Bronx side. A bridge at this location was proposed as early as 1906, but
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Lafranconi Bridge

    Lafranconi Bridge

    Lafranconi Bridge (Slovak: Most Lafranconi, previously Most mládeže or Youth Bridge) is a concrete motorway bridge in Bratislava, Slovakia, located on the D2 motorway. It was built in 1985-1991, with its right half opened in 1990 and the rest in 1992. It is 766 m long (1134 m with access viaducts), and has a 30 m wide four-lane motorway. There are lanes for cyclists and pedestrians as well. It crosses the Danube.
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Michigan Central Railway Bridge

    Michigan Central Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Niagara Falls
    The Michigan Central Railway Bridge is a steel arch bridge spanning the Niagara Gorge between Niagara Falls, Ontario and Niagara Falls, New York. The bridge was designed by William Perry Taylor, Chief Engineer J.L. Delming and consulting Norwegian-born engineer Olaf Hoff. Construction on the bridge began in 1924, and the bridge opened in 1925. This bridge replaced the Niagara Cantilever Bridge that crossed in the same area from 1883 to 1925. The bridge is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway, which purchased the single track structure in 1990. The bridge no longer carries train traffic as the tracks on the bridge and on the Canadian side have been removed. The tracks leading to the bridge end at Robert Moses State Parkway remain in certain sections. There is currently a wall across the centre of the bridge that is topped with barbed wire to prevent people from walking across it. Additional barrier and barbed wire is located on the sides to prevent climbing on the steel arch sections. A wired fence blocks the east side (American) and another wall on the west side (in Canada). The Canadian corridor and bridge are owned by the City of Niagara Falls, Ontario and plans were to have had the
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Newport Southbank Bridge

    Newport Southbank Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Ohio River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Newport
    The Newport Southbank Bridge (popularly known as the "Purple People Bridge") stretches 2,670 feet over the Ohio River, connecting Newport, Kentucky to downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. The original bridge first opened on April 1, 1872, under the name Newport and Cincinnati Bridge, and was Cincinnati's first railroad bridge spanning the Ohio River. The current bridge was constructed in 1896 and accommodated streetcar, pedestrian and automobile traffic. In 1904, the bridge was renamed the L&N (Louisville and Nashville) Railroad Bridge, and this name remained until the bridge was rehabilitated and re-opened as a pedestrian-only bridge in May 2003. The bridge was closed to railroad traffic in 1987, and later closed to automobile traffic in October 2001 after years of neglect and deterioration. On April 17, 2001, the L&N Railroad Bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In late 2001, the city of Newport, Kentucky, and Southbank Partners, an economic development group, used $4 million in state funds to restore the bridge. When it was time to decide on what color to paint it, a variety of options were explored. Computer-generated images of the bridge were shown to
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge

    Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Niagara Falls
    The Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge was the world's first working railway suspension bridge. It spanned 825 feet (251 m) and stood 2.5 miles (4.0 km) downstream of Niagara Falls from 1855 to 1897. Connecting Niagara Falls, Ontario to Niagara Falls, New York (the two cities assimilated the towns at the ends of the bridge by 1892), the bridge carried mixed traffic on its two decks across the Niagara River; trains crossed over the river by way of the bridge's upper deck while pedestrians and carriages used the lower. As the bridge was the result of a collaboration of two companies from two countries, it was also known by its American name, the International Suspension Bridge. The bridge had other names including the Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge and Niagara Suspension Bridge, but the most common and definitive was simply the Suspension Bridge. The Suspension Bridge was part of Canadian politician William Hamilton Merritt's vision to promote trade within his country and with its neighbor the United States. When Merritt and company invited the engineering community to bid for the bridge project, they encountered heavy criticism. Many bridge builders, and the general public, did not
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    American Legion Memorial Bridge

    American Legion Memorial Bridge

    • Locale: Traverse City
    The American Legion Memorial Bridge is a reinforced concrete arch bridge in Traverse City, Michigan. It was completed in 1930. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1929 the city commission called for a public referendum to decide if the city should build a bridge. The referendum passed in May and on June 27, 1929 Aldrich and Cook and Jerome Wilhelm were hired to build the bridge from Daniel Luten's designs. The constructed bridge differed from the design by the removal of the original handrails and by the addition of jersey barricades.
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Angostura Bridge

    Angostura Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    Angostura Bridge is a suspension bridge that spans the Orinoco River at Ciudad Bolívar, Venezuela. The Spanish word Angostura means "narrows". Built in 1967, the bridge has a main span of 712 metres. Until the opening of the Second Orinoco crossing 100 km downstream near Ciudad Guayana on 13 November 2006 it was the only bridge across the Orinoco.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Crescent City Connection

    Crescent City Connection

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: New Orleans
    The Crescent City Connection (CCC), formerly the Greater New Orleans Bridge (GNO), refers to twin cantilever bridges that carry U.S. Route 90 Business over the Mississippi River in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. They are tied as the fifth-longest cantilever bridges in the world. Each span carries four general-use automobile lanes; additionally the westbound span has two reversible HOV lanes across the river. The westbound span, which carries motorists into the city's Central Business District, requires a toll of $1 per passenger vehicle ($0.40 with an electronic toll tag). The eastbound span is free of tolls. It is the farthest downstream bridge on the Mississippi River. It is also the widest and most heavily-traveled bridge on the lower Mississippi; the only other comparable bridges on the Mississippi are in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area (the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge, the Dartmouth Bridge, and once fully expanded, the Wakota Bridge). What later became known as the Crescent City Connection was the second bridge to span the Mississippi south of Baton Rouge after the Huey P. Long Bridge a few miles up river from the city, and the first bridge across the river in New
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Girard Point Bridge

    Girard Point Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Schuylkill River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Philadelphia
    The Girard Point Bridge is a double-decked cantilever bridge carrying Interstate 95 across the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The bridge was opened in 1973. It is the last crossing of the Schuylkill River, which dumps into the Delaware River less than half a mile downstream. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation selected Buckley and Co. as the main contractor and a joint venture between Alpha-Liberty Painting as the paint contractor. The bridge deck was milled and a new surface was poured and the structural steel is being painted in order to extend the life of the steel. Work is scheduled to finish in fall of 2011. List of crossings of the Schuylkill River
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Kincardine Bridge

    Kincardine Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Forth River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Kincardine
    The Kincardine Bridge is a road bridge crossing the Firth of Forth from Falkirk council area to Kincardine-on-Forth, Fife, Scotland. The bridge was constructed between 1932 and 1936, designed by Donald Watson. It was the first road crossing of the River Forth downstream of Stirling, completed nearly thirty years before the Forth Road Bridge, which stands fifteen miles to the south-east. The bridge was constructed with a swinging central section, to allow larger ships to sail upstream to port in Alloa, which remained in use until 1988. The bridge is part of the A985 road (formerly A876), and is a single lane each way. It is the common diversionary route for traffic north from Edinburgh and eastern Scotland when the Forth Road Bridge is closed or under repair. As a result of the high volume of commuter traffic using the bridge, the town of Kincardine is frequently congested. The original bridge, now over 70 years old, has been identified by the Scottish Executive as in need of replacement. A new Upper Forth Crossing was built for opening in 2008. Despite this, the original bridge has been given Category A listed status by Historic Scotland and will be closed in 2011 for around 12
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Royal Border Bridge

    Royal Border Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    Royal Border Bridge spans the River Tweed between Berwick-upon-Tweed and Tweedmouth in Northumberland, England. It is a Grade I listed railway viaduct built between 1847 and 1850, when it was opened by Queen Victoria. The engineer who designed it was Robert Stephenson (son of George Stephenson). It was built for the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway and is still in regular use today, as part of the East Coast Main Line. Despite its name, the bridge does not in fact span the border between England and Scotland which is approximately three miles further north. The bridge is 659 metres (2,162 ft) long. It has 28 arches, constructed of brick but aesthetically faced with stone. The bridge is 38 metres above the river itself. In the 1990s it underwent significant repair work for the first time, in a Railtrack project with some funding from English Heritage.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Sino-Korea Friendship Bridge

    Sino-Korea Friendship Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Yalu River
    • Locale: Dandong
    The Sino-Korea, Sino-Korean, or China-North Korea Friendship Bridge (renamed from Yalu River Bridge in 1990) connects the cities of Dandong, China and Sinŭiju, North Korea. It was constructed by the imperial Japanese between April 1937 and May 1943, during their occupation of Korea and Manchukuo, to span the Yalu River. One of the few ways to enter or leave North Korea, it carries automobile and rail traffic. Pedestrians are not allowed to cross. About 60 m (66 yd) downstream are the remains of an older bridge constructed between May 1909 and October 1911. It was an iron truss bridge of 12 spans on stone piers. The total length was 944.2 m (3,098 ft). The fourth span could be opened with a 90° horizontal rotation to allow easy navigation for tall ships. Both bridges were bombed by American aircraft during the Korean War. From November 1950 to February 1951, the United States used B-29 and B-17 heavy bombers, and F-80 fighter-bombers to repeatedly attack the bridges in an attempt to cut off Chinese supplies to the North Koreans. The bridges were repeatedly repaired. The 1911 bridge was left destroyed and only the newer 1943 bridge repaired and used at the end of the war. The North
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    James River Bridge

    James River Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: James River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Isle of Wight County
    The James River Bridge is a four-lane divided highway lift bridge across the James River in the U.S. state of Virginia. Owned and operated by the Virginia Department of Transportation, it carries U.S. Route 17, U.S. Route 258, and State Route 32 across the river near its mouth at Hampton Roads. The bridge connects Newport News on the Virginia Peninsula with Isle of Wight County in the South Hampton Roads region, and is the easternmost such crossing without a tunnel component. When completed in 1928, the 4.5-mile (7 km) bridge was the longest bridge in the world over water. The original two-lane bridge was replaced from 1975 to 1982 with a wider four-lane bridge that could handle increased traffic volumes. In 2005, the bridge carried an annual average daily traffic of about 30,000 vehicles per day. At the Newport News end, traffic approaches the bridge at a six-ramp partial cloverleaf interchange, where Mercury Boulevard (carrying U.S. Route 17, U.S. Route 258, and State Route 32 onto the bridge) passes over Warwick Boulevard (U.S. Route 60). After an intersection with River Road and the entrance to Huntington Park, the four-lane divided bridge begins, lying to the southeast of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Krasnoluzhsky Bridge

    Krasnoluzhsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    The name Krasnoluzhsky Bridge (Russian: Краснолу́жский мо́ст) refers to three existing bridges across Moskva River, located between Kievsky Rail Terminal and Luzhniki in Moscow. The original Nicholas II Bridge (Мост Николая II) and its twin, Sergievsky Bridge (now known as Andreyevsky Bridge, Андреевский мост) were built in 1903–1907. They carried two tracks of Moscow Inner Ring Railroad across the Luzhniki bend. Both were designed as through arch bridges by Lavr Proskuryakov (structural engineering) and Alexander Pomerantsev (architectural design). The 135-meter steel arch of Nicholas II Bridge (1400 metric tons) was made at Sormovo works. Proskuryakov's work, considered a marvel of engineering, was proven by the 1908 flood: water level exceeded the maximum design specification by a meter and a half; the bridges stood unharmed. After the February Revolution of 1917, the tzarist title was replaced with a politically correct Krasnoluzhsky, literally Red Meadows. In 1926 the builder, Lavr Proskuryakov, was buried at Novodevichy Cemetery - right next to the bridge. In 1952–1956, the arched stone pillars over embankments were extended from one to two spans (each side) to accommodate
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Merivale Bridge, Brisbane

    Merivale Bridge, Brisbane

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Brisbane River
    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Brisbane
    The Merivale Bridge is a double track railway bridge crossing the Brisbane River. It crosses the Milton Reach of the river, slightly to the west of the William Jolly Bridge. Exclusively a railway crossing, it is located between the stations of South Brisbane and Roma Street, linking the northern and southern elements of the Citytrain system. The Merivale Bridge is the only inner-city rail crossing in Brisbane. By 2016 it is expected to be over capacity, leading the Queensland Government to plan for the Cross River Rail project. The Merivale Bridge opened on 18 November 1978 by Queensland Premier Joh Bjelke-Petersen. At the opening, the then Premier, described the occasion as "the start of the second stage in the history of Queensland Railways". It formed a more direct route into the city for Brisbane's southern system suburban trains than the existing route via Corinda. It also carries the standard gauge passenger trains from New South Wales. It was designed by Cameron McNamara Pty Ltd (consulting engineers) and was fabricated and erected by Transfield (Qld) Pty Ltd. The bridge has been recognised with a number of awards. In 1980 it was named the most outstanding engineering
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    New River Gorge Bridge

    New River Gorge Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: New River
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Fayetteville
    The New River Gorge Bridge is a steel arch bridge 3,030 feet (924 m) long over the New River Gorge near Fayetteville, West Virginia, in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States. With an arch 1,700 feet (518 m) long, the New River Gorge Bridge was for many years the world's longest steel single-span arch bridge; it is now the third longest. Part of U.S. Route 19, its construction marked the completion of Corridor L of the Appalachian Development Highway System. The bridge is crossed by an average of 16,200 motor vehicles per day. The roadway of the New River Gorge Bridge is 876 feet (267 m) above the New River, making it the fifth highest vehicular bridge in the world, and the third highest in the Americas (behind the Mike O'Callaghan – Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge over the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada, bypassing the Hoover Dam, and the Royal Gorge Bridge). When it opened in 1977, the New River Gorge Bridge was the highest vehicular bridge in the world, a record it kept until the 2004 opening of the Millau Viaduct in France. Several suspension bridges in China have since surpassed both of these bridges in height, with the current record holder being the Si
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Ward's Bridge

    Ward's Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Wallkill River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Montgomery
    Ward's Bridge carries NY 17K across the Wallkill River at the western end of the village of Montgomery in Orange County, New York, USA. It is named, as its predecessors were, for James Ward, an early settler in the area who established his grist mill on what is now the village side and built the first bridge in the mid-18th century. Originally, Montgomery was even called Ward's Bridge, and today a nearby restaurant calls itself the Ward's Bridge Inn. The mill has long since been demolished, but the earliest buildings in the village that were built around it still stand and are now the Bridge Street Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Another Registered Historic Place, the Daniel Waring House, is located at the corner of 17K and River Road on the western side. The current bridge, a steel through truss, is 231 feet (70 m) long, with a 22-foot (7 m) roadway and small sidewalk on the eastern (downriver) side. It was built in 1940, and renovated in 1982. Traffic on the bridge is very heavy at rush hour, since the bridge is the main connection for travel between two regions of the county. The combination of nearby intersections and the layout of Route
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Blackfriars Bridge

    Blackfriars Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower. The first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995 feet (303 m) long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. Although it was built of Portland stone the workmanship was very faulty. Between 1833 and 1840 extensive
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Chelsea Bridge

    Chelsea Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Chelsea
    Chelsea Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames in west London, connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank. There have been two Chelsea Bridges, on the site of what was an ancient ford. The first Chelsea Bridge was proposed in the 1840s as part of a major development of marshlands on the south bank of the Thames into the new Battersea Park. It was a suspension bridge intended to provide convenient access from the densely populated north bank to the new park. Although built and operated by the government, tolls were charged initially in an effort to recoup the cost of the bridge. Work on the nearby Chelsea Embankment delayed construction and so the bridge, initially called Victoria Bridge, did not open until 1857. Although well received architecturally, as a toll-bridge it was unpopular with the public, and Parliament felt obliged to make it toll-free on Sundays. The bridge was less of a commercial success than had been anticipated, partly because of competition from the newly built Albert Bridge nearby. It was acquired by the Metropolitan Board of Works in 1877, and the tolls were abolished in 1879. The bridge was narrow and structurally unsound, leading
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Hawthorne Bridge

    Hawthorne Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Willamette River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Portland
    The Hawthorne Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, joining Hawthorne Boulevard and Madison Street. It is the oldest vertical-lift bridge in operation in the United States and the oldest highway bridge in Portland. It is also the busiest bicycle and transit bridge in Oregon, with over 8,000 cyclists and 800 TriMet buses (carrying about 17,400 riders) daily. The bridge consists of five fixed spans and one 244 ft (74 m) long vertical-lift span. It is 1,382 feet (421 m) in total length. The 880,000 pound (400,000 kg) counterweights are suspended from the two 165 ft (50 m) tall towers. While the river is at low level the bridge is 49 feet (15 m) above the water, causing it to be raised an average of 200 times per month. As of 2001, the average daily traffic was 30,500 vehicles. The bridge was designed by Waddell & Harrington, which also designed the Steel and Interstate bridges. John Alexander Low Waddell invented the modern-day vertical-lift bridge. The current bridge was built to replace Madison Bridge No. 1 (1891) and Madison Bridge No. 2 (1900), which was destroyed by a fire in 1902. It cost $511,000 to build and was
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Keokuk Rail Bridge

    Keokuk Rail Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Keokuk
    The Keokuk Bridge, also known as the Keokuk Municipal Bridge, carries a double deck single track railway and highway bridge across the Mississippi River in the USA between Keokuk, Iowa and Hamilton, Illinois, just downstream of Mississippi Lock and Dam number 19. It was designed by Ralph Modjeski and constructed 1915–1916 on the piers of its predecessor that was constructed in 1869–1871. Following the completion of the Keokuk-Hamilton Bridge, the upper deck of this bridge, on the Keokuk side, was converted to an observation deck to view the nearby lock and dam; this deck is no longer used for road traffic, but is still used for rail traffic. The bridge was originally owned by the Keokuk & Hamilton Bridge company, but following financial problems in the 1940s, the bridge was given to the City of Keokuk in late 1948. The bridge was originally the western terminus of the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad. Today, it serves the Keokuk Junction Railway with an occasional train crossings for interconnection and river terminal services. Only the Keokuk side of the highway bridge has been converted, the bridge's upper highway deck is abandoned. The river traffic (barges and boats) have the
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Milford-Montague Toll Bridge

    Milford-Montague Toll Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Delaware River
    • Bridge Type: Beam bridge
    • Locale: Milford Township
    The Milford–Montague Toll Bridge (also known as the US 206 Toll Bridge) is a truss bridge crossing the Delaware River, connecting Montague Township, New Jersey to Milford, Pennsylvania on U.S. Route 206. The two-lane bridge, which opened on December 30, 1953, has a total length of 1,150 feet (350 m), and is operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. Tolls are collected only from motorists traveling westbound, into Pennsylvania. Automobile (Base) $ 1.00 E-ZPass (Commuter) $ .60 (40% Discount if 20 or more trips in 35 Days) 2-Axle Truck $ 6.50 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 5.85 3-Axle Truck $ 12.00 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 10.80 4-Axle Truck $ 16.00 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 14.40 5-Axle Truck $ 20.00 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 18.00 6-Axle Truck $ 24.00 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 21.60 7-Axle Truck $ 28.00 E-ZPass - Off-Peak $ 25.20 The bridge was approved in 1951, to replace an existing crossing at the site that dated from 1889. The Delaware Water Gap Toll Bridge, the Portland-Columbia Toll Bridge and the Milford–Montague Toll Bridge were all constructed simultaneously by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, with work on all three started on October 15, 1951, and all three bridge
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Osten Transporter Bridge

    Osten Transporter Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Transporter bridge
    Osten Transporter Bridge is an 80 metre long transporter bridge over the Oste River in Osten (Oste), Lower Saxony, Germany. It was built in 1908-9 and was in regular use until 1974 and is now only used as tourist attraction. The bridge can transport 6 cars or 100 persons simultaneously.
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Tyne Bridge

    Tyne Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tyne
    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Newcastle upon Tyne
    The Tyne Bridge is a through arch bridge over the River Tyne in North East England, linking Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead. It was designed by the engineering firm Mott, Hay and Anderson, who later designed the Forth Road Bridge, and was built by Dorman Long and Co. of Middlesbrough. The bridge was officially opened on 10 October 1928 by King George V and has since become a defining symbol of Tyneside. It currently stands as the tenth tallest structure in the city. The earliest bridge across the Tyne, Pons Aelius, was built by the Romans near the location of the present Tyne Bridge. Built around 122, it fell into disrepair, and a stone bridge was built in 1270. This was in turn destroyed by the great flood of 1771. In 1781, a new stone bridge across the Tyne was completed. Increased shipping activity led to the stone bridge being removed in 1866 to make way for construction of the present Swing Bridge, which opened in 1876. The idea for a bridge at the location of the present Tyne Bridge dates back to 1864, due to concern about the cost of tolls on the High Level Bridge - although the first serious discussions took place in 1883. Committees met over the next three decades, but
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Old Bridge, Huntingdon

    Old Bridge, Huntingdon

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    The old bridge in Huntingdon (now part of Cambridgeshire, England) is a well-preserved medieval stone bridge over the River Great Ouse, connecting Huntingdon to Godmanchester. The town has long been an important bridgehead, with Ermine Street (connecting London to Lincoln and York), as well as various east-west trade routes, crossing the Great Ouse here. Ermine Street would have first crossed the river here via a ford, believed to be some way to the west of the present bridge. Edward the Elder built a wooden bridge in the early 10th century a few yards to the west of the current bridge, and also ordered the nearby Huntingdon Castle to be rebuilt. Until the 1107 construction of the first bridge in St Ives, it is believed that there was no bridge further downstream, and foreign trade would navigate the river as far upstream as Huntingdon. Responsibility for the bridge's repair was for centuries a matter of dispute. In 1259 a court ruling finally ordered that the county should pay to keep it repaired in return for rendering the bridge toll-free. Nonetheless, the bridge remained in a poorly maintained state, and by 1329 was declared to be in severe danger of collapse. The current
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    ANZAC Bridge

    ANZAC Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Johnstons Bay
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Glebe Island
    The ANZAC Bridge or Anzac Bridge (both forms are used by the Roads and Traffic Authority), replacing the earlier Glebe Island Bridge, is a large cable-stayed bridge spanning Johnstons Bay between Pyrmont and Glebe Island (part of the suburb of Rozelle) in proximity to the central business district of Sydney, Australia. The bridge forms part of the Western Distributor freeway leading from the Sydney CBD and Cross City Tunnel to the suburbs of the Inner West and Northern Sydney. There have been two bridges over Johnstons Bay prior to the construction of the ANZAC Bridge. The first bridge was constructed as part of a project to move the abattoirs out of central Sydney, and to construct public abattoirs at Glebe Island. The first pile of the original bridge was driven in October 1860. The bridge was opened in 1862 and was a timber beam bridge 1,045 ft 5 in. (318.6 m) long and 28 feet (8.5 m) wide with a 40-foot (12 m) swing section on the eastern side. It replaced a double steam punt crossing. The second Glebe Island bridge was an electrically operated swing bridge opened in 1903, the year after the opening of the new Pyrmont Bridge over Sydney's Darling Harbour. The bridge was
    5.40
    5 votes
    98
    Cairo Rail Bridge

    Cairo Rail Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Ohio River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Wickliffe
    Cairo Rail Bridge is the name of two bridges crossing the Ohio River near Cairo, Illinois. The original was an 1889 George S. Morison through truss and deck truss bridge replaced by the current bridge in 1952. The second and current bridge is a through truss bridge that reused many of the original bridge piers. As of 2007, trains like the City of New Orleans travel over the Ohio River supported by the same piers whose construction began in 1887. On July 1, 1887 construction began on the first caisson for the foundations of the bridge piers. The first caisson descended into the riverbed at a rate of around 4 inches (100 mm) per day. Two men died and several more were seriously injured sealing the first caisson at a depth of 77 feet (23 m). Despite increased precautions following the deaths, a total of five men died of decompression sickness during construction. February 19, 1889 the last pier was completed. The first train crossed the bridge from Illinois to Kentucky on October 29, 1889. Work continued until it was turned over to the railroad on March 1, 1890. Total cost of the structure exceeded $2.6 million, with nearly $1.2 million for the substructure alone. In order to comply
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Cape Coral Bridge

    Cape Coral Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Caloosahatchee River
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    • Locale: Fort Myers
    The Cape Coral Bridge is a bridge located in Southwest Florida. It spans the Caloosahatchee River connecting Fort Myers and Cape Coral. It is made up of two parallel fixed spans, each 3,400 feet (1,000 m) long. Around 1958, even before the bridge's construction, people had been living in the southern tip of Cape Coral. These people had to travel all the way into North Fort Myers to cross the Caloosahatchee River into Fort Myers, which was roughly 20 miles (32 km). This was the main justification for the construction of a bridge traveling directly between Cape Coral and Fort Myers. In 1959, engineers determined one possible location for the bridge would be to connect Everest Parkway and Colonial Boulevard (which is the site of the present-day Midpoint Memorial Bridge). However, due to construction costs and the additional length needed for this location, the site was moved downstream to where it is today, connecting College Parkway and Cape Coral Parkway. The original span opened for traffic on March 14, 1964, with one lane in each direction. In 1989, a second parallel span opened south of the first span, with two lanes for eastbound traffic, and westbound traffic using both lanes
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Dumbarton Bridge

    Dumbarton Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Francisco Bay
    • Locale: Menlo Park
    The Dumbarton Bridge is the southernmost of the highway bridges that span the San Francisco Bay in California. Carrying over 81,000 vehicles daily, it is also the shortest bridge across San Francisco Bay at 1.63 miles (8,600 feet / 2,622 m). Its eastern terminus is in Fremont, near Newark in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, and its western terminus is in Menlo Park. The bridge has three lanes in each direction, and features a separated bike/pedestrian lane on its south-facing side. Like the San Mateo Bridge to the north, power lines parallel the bridge across the bay. Tolls are collected in the westbound direction at the toll plaza, which is located on the eastern side of the bay; the toll is $5 as of July 1, 2010. There are six toll lanes at the plaza; the leftmost two are dedicated FasTrak lanes. An additional carpool lane to the left of these can be used only during weekday morning and afternoon commute hours using FasTrak by vehicles carrying two or more persons, motorcycles, or hybrid vehicles with a permit decal. When the current bridge was planned in the 1970s, Caltrans conducted extensive environmental research on the aquatic and terrestrial environment.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Oresund Bridge

    Oresund Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Oresund
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Copenhagen
    The Öresund or Øresund Bridge (Danish: Øresundsbroen, Swedish: Öresundsbron, joint hybrid name: Øresundsbron) is a combined twin-track railway and dual carriageway bridge-tunnel across the Øresund strait between Sweden and Denmark. The bridge runs nearly 8 km (5 miles) from the Swedish coast to the artificial island of Peberholm, which lies in the middle of the strait. The remainder of the link is by a 4 km (2.5 mile) tunnel from Peberholm to the Danish island of Amager. The Øresund Bridge is the longest combined road and rail bridge in Europe, and connects two major metropolitan areas: those of the Danish capital city Copenhagen and the major Swedish city Malmö. Furthermore, the Øresund Bridge connects the road and rail networks of Scandinavia with those of Central and Western Europe. The international European route E20 crosses this bridge-tunnel via the road, and the Oresund Line uses the railway. The construction of the Great Belt Fixed Link – which connects Zealand to Funen and thence to the Jutland Peninsula – and the Oresund Bridge have connected Central and Western Europe to Scandinavia by road and rail. The Oresund Bridge was designed by the Danish architectural practice
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Tay Rail Bridge

    Tay Rail Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Firth of Tay
    • Locale: Dundee
    The Tay Bridge (sometimes unofficially the Tay Rail Bridge) is a railway bridge approximately 2.75 miles (3.5 kilometres) long that spans the Firth of Tay in Scotland, between the city of Dundee and the suburb of Wormit in Fife (grid reference NO391277). As with the Forth Bridge, the Tay Bridge has also been called the Tay Rail Bridge since the construction of a road bridge over the firth, the Tay Road Bridge. The rail bridge replaced an early train ferry. "Tay Bridge" was also the codename for the funeral plans for Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother. The original Tay Bridge was designed by noted railway engineer Thomas Bouch, who received a knighthood following the bridge's completion. It was a lattice-grid design, combining cast and wrought iron. The design was well known, having been used first by Kennard in the Crumlin Viaduct in South Wales in 1858, following the innovative use of cast iron in The Crystal Palace. However, the Crystal Palace was not as heavily loaded as a railway bridge. A previous cast iron design, the Dee bridge which collapsed in 1847, failed due to poor use of cast-iron girders. Later, Gustave Eiffel used a similar design to create several large viaducts in
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Vincent Thomas Bridge

    Vincent Thomas Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Pedro Bay
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: San Pedro
    The Vincent Thomas Bridge is a 1,500-foot (460 m) long suspension bridge, crossing the Los Angeles Harbor in the U.S. state of California, linking San Pedro, Los Angeles, with Terminal Island. The bridge is part of State Route 47. The bridge opened in 1963 and is named for California Assemblyman Vincent Thomas of San Pedro, who championed its construction. It is the fourth longest suspension bridge in California and the 76th longest span in the world. The clear height of the navigation channel is approximately 185 feet (56 m). The terminal for ferries and helicopters to Santa Catalina Island is located underneath the western part of the bridge. The bridge was built to replace the ferries that connected San Pedro and Terminal Island, in anticipation of increased traffic volume accompanying growth of the port. State legislator Vincent Thomas, representing San Pedro, was the bridge's champion. A special act of the legislature was required in order to name the bridge after Thomas while he was still in office. Throughout the bridge's construction and in the early years after its opening, it was derided as a "bridge to nowhere". In the 1970s, however, its importance drastically increased
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Williamsburg Bridge

    Williamsburg Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Williamsburg Bridge is a suspension bridge in New York City across the East River connecting the Lower East Side of Manhattan at Delancey Street with the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn at Broadway near the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (Interstate 278). It once carried New York State Route 27A and was planned to carry Interstate 78, though these plans were aborted by the cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway and Bushwick Expressway. No tolls are charged for the use of the bridge. Construction on the bridge, the second to cross this river, began in 1896, with Leffert L. Buck as chief engineer, Henry Hornbostel as architect and Holton D. Robinson as assistant engineer, and the bridge opened on December 19, 1903 at a cost of $24,200,000. At the time it was constructed, the Williamsburg Bridge set the record for the longest suspension bridge span on Earth. The record fell in 1924, when the Bear Mountain Bridge was completed. It is an unconventional structure, as suspension bridges go; though the main span hangs from cables in the usual manner, the side spans leading to the approaches are supported by trusswork, drawing no support from the cables above. The main span of
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge

    Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Charles River
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Boston
    The Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge (or Zakim Bridge) is a cable-stayed bridge across the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. It is a replacement for the Charlestown High Bridge, an older truss bridge constructed in the 1950s, and is the world's widest cable-stayed bridge. Of 10 lanes, the main portion of the Zakim Bridge carries four lanes each way (northbound and southbound) of the Interstate 93 and U.S. Route 1 concurrency between the Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill Jr. Tunnel and the elevated highway to the north. Two additional lanes are cantilevered outside the cables, which carry northbound traffic from the Sumner Tunnel and North End on-ramp. These lanes merge with the main highway north of the bridge. I-93 heads toward New Hampshire as the "Northern Expressway", and US 1 splits from the Interstate and travels northeast toward Massachusetts' north shore, crossing the Mystic River via the Tobin Bridge. The bridge and connecting tunnel were built as part of the Big Dig, the largest highway construction project in the United States until now. The northbound (NB) lanes were finished in March 2003, and the southbound (SB) lanes in December. The bridge's unique styling
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Chertsey Bridge

    Chertsey Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Chertsey
    Chertsey Bridge is a road bridge across the River Thames in England, connecting Chertsey to low-lying riverside meadows in Laleham, Surrey. It is situated 550 yards (500 m) downstream from the M3 motorway bridge over the Thames and is close to Chertsey Lock on the reach above Shepperton Lock.The bridge is a seven-arch tied arch white stone bridge built 1783-1785 and is a Grade II* listed building. The first bridge on the site was built some time after 1299 as in that year the king and his family were carried over the river by a ferry-woman called Sibille. The first reference to a bridge at Chertsey is in 1530, then a "goodly Bridg of Timber newly repaird. By 1580 it was dilapidated and the Crown, who had acquired responsibility from Chertsey Abbey, was trying to find someone on whom they could pin the bill for repairs. The documents record the dimensions as "210 feet in length and 15 feet in breadth". In 1632 the bridge, which was slanted upwards from Middlesex to Surrey, was described as like the work of a left-handed man. The slant was more annoying to navigation and passage was reported in 1774 to be very inconvenient and dangerous. The present stone bridge was first considered
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Pulteney Bridge

    Pulteney Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Avon, Bristol
    • Locale: Bath
    Pulteney Bridge is a bridge that crosses the River Avon, in Bath, England. It was completed in 1773 and is designated by English Heritage as a grade I listed building. The bridge was designed by Robert Adam, whose working drawings are preserved in the Sir John Soane's Museum, and is one of only four bridges in the world with shops across the full span on both sides. Shops on the bridge include a flower shop, antique map shop, and juice bar. It is named after Frances Pulteney, heiress in 1767 of the Bathwick estate across the river from Bath. Bathwick was a simple village in a rural setting, but Frances's husband William could see its potential. He made plans to create a new town, which would become a suburb to the historic city of Bath. First he needed a better river crossing than the existing ferry, hence the bridge. Pulteney approached the brothers Robert and James Adam with his new town in mind, but Robert Adam then became involved in the design of the bridge. In his hands the simple construction envisaged by Pulteney became an elegant structure lined with shops. Adam had visited both Florence and Venice, where he would have seen the Ponte Vecchio and the Ponte di Rialto. But
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Big Four Bridge

    Big Four Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Ohio River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Louisville
    The Big Four Bridge is an abandoned six-span railroad truss bridge that crosses the Ohio River, connecting Louisville, Kentucky, and Jeffersonville, Indiana, United States. It was completed in 1895, and updated in 1929. It has its largest span at 547 feet (167 m), for 2,525 feet (770 m) in total. It gets its name from the defunct Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway, which was nicknamed the "Big Four Railroad". Access to the Big Four Bridge is currently limited, as the access ways onto the bridge for the general public were removed in 1969, earning the Big Four Bridge the nickname "Bridge That Goes Nowhere". The bridge is presently being converted into a bicycle/pedestrian crossing. The George Rogers Clark Memorial Bridge downstream, which carries U.S. 31 across the river, is presently the only bridge allowing bicyclists and pedestrians travel between Louisville and its Indiana suburbs of New Albany, Clarksville, and Jeffersonville. In February 2011, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear and Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels announced that the two states, along with the City of Jeffersonville, will allocate $22 million in funding to complete the Big Four Bridge project–
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Bourne End Railway Bridge

    Bourne End Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Bourne End
    Bourne End Railway Bridge is a railway bridge carrying the Marlow Branch Line, and a footpath over the River Thames in Bourne End, Buckinghamshire, England. It crosses the Thames on the reach between Cookham Lock and Marlow Lock. The bridge was originally constructed in wood by Isambard Kingdom Brunel as part of the Wycombe Railway, opened in 1854 and operated in broad gauge until 1870. The narrow spans were unpopular with river traffic and it was reconstructed in steel in 1895. A footbridge, cantilevered out from the railway bridge was added in 1992, to take the Thames Path across the river.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Craigellachie Bridge

    Craigellachie Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Spey
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    The Craigellachie Bridge is a cast iron arch bridge located at Craigellachie which is near to the village of Aberlour in Moray, Scotland. It was designed by the renowned civil engineer Thomas Telford and built from 1812–1814. The bridge has a single span of approximately 46 metres (151 ft) and was revolutionary for its time, in that it used an extremely slender arch which was not possible using traditional masonry construction. The ironwork was cast at the Plas Kynaston iron foundry at Cefn Mawr, near Ruabon in Denbighshire by William Hazledine, who cast a number of Telford bridges. The ironwork was transported from the foundry through the Ellesmere Canal and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct then by sea to Speymouth, where it was loaded onto wagons and taken to the site. Testing in the 1960s revealed that the cast-iron had an unusually high tensile strength. This was likely specified by Telford because, unlike in traditional masonry arch bridges, some sections of the arch are not in compression under loading. At each end of the structure there are two 15 m (49 ft) high masonry mock-medieval towers, featuring arrow slits and miniature crenellated battlements. The bridge was in regular use
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Kosciusko Bridge

    Kosciusko Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mohawk River
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Halfmoon
    The Thaddeus Kosciusko Bridge, commonly referred to as the Twin Bridges, located in the United States, is a pair of identical through arch bridges, made of steel, which span the Mohawk River between the towns of Colonie, Albany County and Halfmoon, Saratoga County, in New York's Capital District. Each span carries three northbound and southbound lanes of Interstate 87 between exits 7 and 8. The bridge opened in 1959 as part of the Adirondack Northway, a 176-mile highway linking Albany and the Canada-United States border at Champlain. The Interstate 87 section of the highway was formally inaugurated by Governor Nelson Rockefeller on May 26, 1961. The bridge is named (using an anglicized form) in honor of Tadeusz Kościuszko (1746–1817), the preeminent national figure in Poland's fight for independence. Kościuszko arrived in Colonial America a month after the July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence and remained a notable military leader throughout the Revolutionary War, attaining the rank of general as well as honorary American citizenship. He returned to Poland in July 1784.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Maidenhead Railway Bridge

    Maidenhead Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Maidenhead
    Maidenhead Railway Bridge (aka Maidenhead Viaduct, The Sounding Arch) is a railway bridge carrying the main line of the Great Western Railway over the River Thames between Maidenhead, Berkshire and Taplow, Buckinghamshire, England. It crosses the Thames on the reach between Bray Lock and Boulter's Lock at the downstream end of Guards Club Island. The bridge was designed by the Great Western's engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and it was completed in 1838, but not brought into use until 1 July 1839. Brunel's first plan envisaged a triple-arch viaduct, but he then developed the design that is still used today. The railway is carried across the river on two brick arches, which at the time of building were the widest and flattest in the world. Each span is 128 feet (39 m), with a rise of only 24 feet (7 m). The flatness of the arches was necessary to avoid putting a "hump" in the bridge, which would have gone against Brunel's obsession with flat, gentle gradients (1 in 1,320 on this stretch). The Thames towpath passes under the right-hand arch (facing upstream), which is also known as the Sounding Arch, because of its spectacular echo. It has been claimed that the board of the Great
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Port Mann Bridge

    Port Mann Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Fraser River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Coquitlam
    The Port Mann Bridge is a steel tied arch bridge that spans the Fraser River connecting Coquitlam to Surrey in British Columbia near Vancouver. The bridge consists of three spans with an orthotropic deck carrying five lanes of Trans-Canada Highway traffic, with approach spans of three steel plate girders and concrete deck. The total length of the Port Mann is 2,093 m (6,867 ft), including approach spans. The main span is: 366 m (1,201 ft) plus the two 110 m (360 ft) spans on either side. Current volume on the bridge is 127,000 trips per day. Approximately eight percent of the traffic on the Port Mann bridge is truck traffic. The bridge is the longest arch bridge in Canada and 15th longest in the world. The Port Mann Bridge opened on June 12, 1964, originally carrying four lanes. At the time of construction, it was the most expensive piece of highway in Canada. The first "civilian" to drive across the bridge was CKNW reporter Marke Raines. He was not authorized to cross, so he drove quickly. In 2001 a HOV lane eastbound was added by moving the centre divider and by cantilevering the bridge deck outwards in conjunction with a seismic upgrade. On January 31, 2006 the British Columbia
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Sørsund Bridge, Kristiansund

    Sørsund Bridge, Kristiansund

    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Kristiansund
    Sørsund Bridge (Norwegian: Sørsundbrua) is a bridge that crosses the Sørsundet strait between the islands of Kirkelandet and Innlandet in the town of Kristiansund in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The 408-metre (1,339 ft) long bridge has 19 spans, with a main span of 100 metres (330 ft). The bridge opened in 1963.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Third Avenue Bridge

    Third Avenue Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Third Avenue Bridge carries southbound road traffic on Third Avenue over the Harlem River, connecting the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx in New York City. It once carried southbound New York State Route 1A. The bridge was converted to one-way operation southbound on August 5, 1941 on the same day the Willis Avenue Bridge was similarly converted to one-way northbound. The Third Avenue Bridge carries traffic south from Third Avenue, East 135th Street, Bruckner Boulevard, and Lincoln Avenue in the Bronx, to East 128th Street, East 129th Street, Lexington Avenue, and the Harlem River Drive in Manhattan, traveling over the Metro-North Railroad Oak Point Link, the Harlem River, and Harlem River Drive. As part of a major reconstruction project, a new swing span was floated into place on October 29, 2004 and two lanes of Manhattan-bound traffic opened on December 6, 2004. Additional work covered redesign of the approach ramps to the bridge on the Bronx side and off the bridge in Manhattan. Discovery Channel made a television show about the installation. As reconstructed, the Third Avenue Bridge carries five lanes of Manhattan-bound traffic from the Bronx, which split to three
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Berkeley I-80 bridge

    Berkeley I-80 bridge

    The Berkeley I-80 bridge also known as the University Avenue Pedestrian Bridge and the Berkeley Marina Overpass is a 15-foot (4.6 m)-wide bridge spanning the Eastshore Freeway (Interstate 80/580) in Berkeley, California. It was made to allow bicycles, pedestrians, and wheelchair users access to the Berkeley Marina, Eastshore State Park, and the city. In the records of the city, the bridge is referred to as the "City of Berkeley Eastshore Pedestrian Overcrossing". The bridge has two lanes for bikes, and a raised sidewalk. It is also wide enough to carry emergency vehicles, if needed. Opened on February 27, 2002, the bridge was built at a cost of $6.4 million. The bridge created an ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990)-compliant route between Berkeley and its Marina/waterfront park region. Previously, the only wheelchair accessible route was via an undercrossing one mile (1.6 km) to the north. Bicycles and pedestrians could use a dark, hidden, and seldom-used path and stairwell that ran under and along the University Avenue freeway overpass. Since opening, the bridge has seen a much higher use than the previous path and stairwell.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Bolte Bridge

    Bolte Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Yarra River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Melbourne city centre
    The Bolte Bridge is a large twin Cantilever bridge in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It spans the Yarra River and Victoria Harbour in the Docklands precinct to the west of the Melbourne CBD. It forms part of the CityLink system of toll roads that connects the Tullamarine Freeway from the northern suburbs with the West Gate Freeway and the Domain and Burnley tunnels to the Monash Freeway and the south eastern suburbs. The bridge was designed by architects Denton Corker Marshall and was built for head contractor Transurban by Baulderstone Hornibrook, construction taking three years from 1996 to 1999 and costing $75 million. It was named by Jeff Kennett, for former Premier of Victoria, Sir Henry Bolte because of its linking the West Gate, Monash and Tullamarine Freeways - projects commissioned or completed by the Bolte Government. It is one of the largest balanced cantilever cast in situ box girder bridges in Australia. The superstructure is built as two independent bridges of variable depth, prestressed concrete box girders, separated by a 1.15 m clear gap between the structures. The bridge features two 90 metre (295.2 ft) high silver towers, situated on either side of the roadway
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Grosvenor Bridge

    Grosvenor Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    Grosvenor Bridge, originally known as, and alternatively called Victoria Railway Bridge, is a railway bridge over the River Thames in London, between Vauxhall Bridge and Chelsea Bridge. Originally constructed in 1860, and widened in 1865 and 1907, the bridge was rebuilt and widened again in the 1960s as an array of ten parallel bridges. The original bridge was constructed in the mid 19th. century in two stages: the first bridge was built by the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway between 1859 and 1860 at a cost of £84,000 to carry trains into Victoria station; it was the first railway bridge across the Thames in central London. The engineer was Sir John Fowler. The bridge was widened on the eastern side for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway and London, Chatham and Dover Railway between 1865 to 1866, at a cost of £245,000. Sir Charles Fox was the engineer. In 1907 the bridge was widened again, on the western side, for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway. The bridge was rebuilt in 1963–67: the foundations were extended; the original piers encased in concrete; and the spans replaced with ten steel spans. To avoid disrupting traffic, the bridge was re-built with a
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Markland Dam Bridge

    Markland Dam Bridge

    The Markland Locks and Dam is a concrete dam bridge and locks that span the Ohio River. It is 1395 feet (425.2 m) long, and connects Gallatin County, Kentucky, and Switzerland County, Indiana. The locks and dam were reviewed by the Board of Engineers for River and Harbours to replace the Ohio River locks and dams Number 35, 36, 37, 38 and 39. Then the project was approved by the Secretary of the Army on March 11, 1953. Construction on the locks began in March 1956 and they were placed in operation in May 1959. The dam construction began in April 1959 and was finished in June 1964. Federal Power Commission granted a license for Cinergy to operate a hydroelectric power plant at the dam. Cinergy was later bought by Duke Energy. The plant has a capacity of 81,000 kVA. On September 27, 2009, the 1,200-foot lock failed and the gates "mismitered" due to a solenoid malfunction. The lock was repaired and reopened on March 1, 2010. The 1,200-foot lock chamber remained closed for 155 days, but the 600-foot lock continued to lock traffic albeit with delays.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Moodna Viaduct

    Moodna Viaduct

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Moodna Creek
    • Bridge Type: Trestle
    • Locale: Beaverdam Lake-Salisbury Mills
    The Moodna Viaduct is an iron railroad trestle spanning Moodna Creek and its valley at the north end of Schunemunk Mountain in Cornwall, New York, near the village of Salisbury Mills. The bridge was constructed between 1904 and 1908 by the Erie Railroad as part of the Graham Line and was opened for service in January 1909. The trestle spans the valley for 3,200 feet (975m) and is 193 feet (59 m) high at its highest point, making it the highest and longest railroad trestle east of the Mississippi River. The open design of the trestle was used to reduce wind resistance and is a major reason why the trestle is still in service today. The viaduct crosses Orrs Mills Road north of the creek and Otter Kill Road south of the creek. The viaduct carries Metro-North's Port Jervis commuter line and Norfolk Southern freight trains. The Metro-North Salisbury Mills-Cornwall station sits near the north end of the viaduct. In summer 2007, timber replacement on the viaduct caused delays on the line due to slow orders placed on it, and required that service be halted during weekend days. As of October, 2009, repairs were underway to several of the concrete piers; traffic remains uninterrupted. It is
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Newport Transporter Bridge

    Newport Transporter Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Usk
    • Bridge Type: Transporter bridge
    • Locale: Newport
    The Newport Transporter Bridge (Welsh: Pont Gludo Casnewydd) is a transporter bridge that crosses the River Usk in Newport, South Wales. It is a Grade I listed structure. Designed by French engineer Ferdinand Arnodin, it was built in 1906 and opened by Godfrey Charles Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar on 12 September 1906. The span is an example of the very rare transporter bridge concept, of which only eight remain in use worldwide. The bridge is the crossing lowest on the River Usk. The design was chosen because the river banks are very low at the desired crossing point (a few miles south of the city centre) where an ordinary bridge would need a very long approach ramp to attain sufficient height to allow ships to pass under, and a ferry could not be used during low tide at the site. The height of the towers is 242 feet (74 m) and the height of the horizontal beam above the road is 177 feet (54 m). The transporter platform or gondola travels the 645 feet (196.6 m) between the towers at ten feet (three metres) per second, powered from the engine room. This Transporter Bridge is the largest of the eight which remain worldwide, and the oldest of its type in Britain. Today, the bridge is
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Puente de la Mujer

    Puente de la Mujer

    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Buenos Aires
    Puente de la Mujer (Spanish for "Women's Bridge") is a rotating footbridge for Dock 3 of the Puerto Madero commercial district of Buenos Aires, Argentina. It is of the Cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge type and is also a swing bridge, but somewhat unusual in its asymmetrical arrangement. It has a single mast with cables suspending a portion of the bridge which rotates 90 degrees in order to allow water traffic to pass. When it swings to allow watercraft passage, the far end comes to a resting point on a stabilizing pylon. Designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava on a plan very similar to a 250-metre bridge over the Guadalquivir River in Seville, Spain (1992) and a 213-metre bridge over the Sacramento River in Redding, California (2004), it has a forward-, rather than a reverse-angled cantilever, as is seen in those bridges. Started in 1998, it was inaugurated on December 20, 2001, and is the only one of Calatrava's works in Latin America. The architect has described the design as a synthesis of the image of a couple dancing the tango. The 170-metre pedestrian bridge weighs 8 tonnes, is 6.20 m wide and is divided into two fixed portions, 25 m and 32.50 m long
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Pulaski Bridge

    Pulaski Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Newtown Creek
    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    The Pulaski Bridge in New York City connects Long Island City in Queens to Greenpoint in Brooklyn over Newtown Creek. It was named after Polish military commander and American Revolutionary War fighter Kazimierz Pułaski (Casimir Pulaski) because of the large Polish-American population in Greenpoint. It connects 11th Street in Queens to McGuinness Boulevard (formerly Oakland Street) in Brooklyn. The Pulaski Bridge opened to traffic on September 10, 1954. It served as a replacement for the nearby Vernon Avenue Bridge, which had linked Vernon Avenue in Long Island City with Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint. Designed by Frederick Zurmuhlen, the Pulaski Bridge is a bascule bridge, a type of drawbridge. It carries six lanes of traffic and a pedestrian sidewalk over the water, Long Island Rail Road tracks, and the entrance to the Queens-Midtown Tunnel. The pedestrian sidewalk is on the west or downstream side of the bridge, which has good views of the industrial areas surrounding Newtown Creek, the skyline of Manhattan, and of a number of other bridges, including the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Kosciuszko Bridge. The bridge was reconstructed between 1991 and
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Sixth Street Viaduct

    Sixth Street Viaduct

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Los Angeles River
    • Bridge Type: Viaduct
    • Locale: Downtown Los Angeles
    The Sixth Street Viaduct is a viaduct bridge that connects the downtown and Boyle Heights areas of Los Angeles, California. It spans the Los Angeles River, the Santa Ana Freeway (US 101), and the Golden State Freeway (I-5), as well as Metrolink and Union Pacific railroad tracks and several local streets. The viaduct is composed of three independent structures: the reinforced concrete west segment, the central steel arch segment over the river, and the reinforced concrete east segment. In 1986, the Caltrans bridge survey found the 6th Street Viaduct eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. During the construction of the viaduct, an on-site plant was used to supply the concrete for construction. However, the quality of the concrete turned out to have a high alkali content and lead to an alkali-silica reaction which creates cracks in the concrete and saps the strength of the structure. Estimates are that the viaduct has a 70% probability of collapse due to a major earthquake within 50 years. It is one of the only historic LA River bridges to suffer from ASR.
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Texas-Mexican Railway International Bridge

    Texas-Mexican Railway International Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Rio Grande
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Laredo
    The Texas Mexican Railway International Bridge is the only railway international bridge that crosses the U.S.-Mexico border between the cities of Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas. It is owned and operated by Texas Mexican Railway and Kansas City Southern de México. It is also known as the Laredo International Railway Bridge. On January 1, 2005, Kansas City Southern (KCS) took control of The Texas Mexican Railway Company and the U.S. portion of the International Bridge in Laredo, Texas. The railroad is a vital link in KCS's rail network, connecting The KCS and TFM, S.A. de C.V. On the U.S. side the Bridge is located in the western termini of the Texas-Mexican Railway in Laredo, Texas. In Mexico it is located in the northern termini of the Kansas City Southern Railway in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas. When the Laredo International Railway Bridge 2 is completed the Texas-Mexican Railway International Bridge will be converted to either a northbound express lane for trailers and buses, or a railroad track for passenger trains.
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    Thousand Islands Bridge

    Thousand Islands Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Saint Lawrence River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Wellesley Island
    The Thousand Islands Bridge is an international bridge system over the Saint Lawrence River connecting northern New York in the United States with southeastern Ontario in Canada. Constructed in 1937, with additions in 1959, the bridges span the United States-Canada border in the middle of the Thousand Islands region, from which it derives its name. The bridges all carry two lanes of traffic (one in each direction) and pedestrian sidewalks, and is administered by the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority, an international agency. The actual international border bridge crossing is a set of two parallel 90 ft (27 m) long bridges between Wellesley Island in the United States and Hill Island in Canada. The bridge is actually not a single bridge but rather a series of five bridges that span parts of the St. Lawrence River, ultimately connecting both banks. The southern end of the bridge connects with Interstate 81 and the northern end of the bridge connects to Highway 401 via Highway 137. There is also an interchange with the Thousand Islands Parkway on the Ontario side. From ground-breaking ceremonies to completion, the entire Thousand Islands Bridge system took sixteen months to complete,
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    Carquinez Bridge

    Carquinez Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Carquinez Strait
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Crockett
    The Carquinez Bridge refers to parallel bridges spanning the Carquinez Strait, forming part of Interstate 80 between Crockett and Vallejo, California. The name originally referred to a single cantilever bridge built in 1927, helping to form a direct route between San Francisco and Sacramento. A second parallel cantilever bridge was completed in 1958 to deal with the increased traffic. Later, seismic problems of the 1927 span led to the construction and 2003 opening of a replacement: a suspension bridge officially called the Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge. Currently, the Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge carries westbound traffic from Vallejo to Crockett, and the 1958 cantilever span carries eastbound traffic. Toll is only charged to eastbound traffic. The original bridge, a steel cantilever bridge, was designed by Robinson & Steinman and dedicated on May 21, 1927. It cost $8 million to build and was the first major bridge in the San Francisco Bay Area. Upon completion of the 1927 bridge, the Lincoln Highway was rerouted over the span. Its original alignment from Sacramento to San Francisco avoided the un-bridged waterways of the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento Delta by routing itself
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Exchange Bridge

    Exchange Bridge

    Birzhevoy Bridge (also known as Exchange Bridge; Russian: Биржево́й мост) is the bridge across Malaya Neva (distributary of Neva River) in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Its length is 239 meters and width is 27 meters. Birzhevoy bridge connects Vasilievsky Island and Petrogradsky Island. It takes its name from the famous Old Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange (also Bourse, Russian: Биржа) building located on Vasilievsky Island.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Gateway Bridge

    Gateway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Clinton
    The Gateway Bridge (locally called the South Bridge) is a suspension bridge over the Mississippi River in Clinton, Iowa, USA. It carries U.S. Route 30 from Iowa into Illinois just south of Fulton, Illinois. The bridge itself is two travel lanes wide. The Gateway Bridge was closed in March 2006 for repainting and reconstruction of Route 30 on the Illinois side of the river, and reopened in November 2006. Traffic on U.S. Route 30 intending to cross the river was detoured north to the Lyons-Fulton Bridge.
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Goethals Bridge

    Goethals Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Arthur Kill
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Elizabeth
    The Goethals Bridge ( /ˈɡɑːθəlz/) connects Elizabeth, New Jersey to Staten Island (New York City), near the Howland Hook Marine Terminal, Staten Island, New York over the Arthur Kill. Operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the span was one of the first structures built by the authority. On the New Jersey side it is located 2 exits south of the terminus for the New Jersey Turnpike-Newark Bay Extension. The primary use for this bridge is a connection for New York City to Newark Airport. The bridge has been grandfathered into Interstate 278, and named for Major General George Washington Goethals, who supervised construction of the Panama Canal and was the first consulting engineer of the Port Authority. A steel truss cantilever design by John Alexander Low Waddell, who also designed the Outerbridge Crossing. The bridge is 672 ft (205 m) long central span, 7,109 feet (2,168 m) long in total, 62 feet (19 m) wide, has a clearance of 135 feet (41.1 m) and has four lanes for traffic. The Port Authority had $3 million of state money and raised $14 million in bonds to build the Goethals Bridge and the Outerbridge Crossing; the Goethals bridge construction began on
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Swing Bridge, River Tyne

    Swing Bridge, River Tyne

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tyne
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Newcastle upon Tyne
    The Swing Bridge is a swing bridge over the River Tyne, England connecting Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead, and lies between the Tyne Bridge and the High Level Bridge. The hydraulic power to move the bridge is derived from electrically driven pumps. This feeds a hydraulic accumulator sunk into a 60 feet (18 m) shaft below the bridge, the water is then released under pressure which runs the machinery to turn the bridge. The mechanism used for this is still the same machinery originally installed by Armstrong. It has an 281 feet (85.6 m) cantilevered span with a central axis of rotation able to move through 360° to allow vessels to pass on either side of it. The previous bridge on the site was demolished in 1868 to enable larger ships to move upstream to William Armstrong's works. The hydraulic Swing Bridge was designed and paid for by Armstrong, with work beginning in 1873. It was first used for road traffic on 15 June 1876 and opened for river traffic on 17 July 1876. The Swing Bridge stands on the site of the Old Tyne Bridges of 1270 and 1781, and probably of the Roman Pons Aelius.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Matthew E. Welsh Bridge

    Matthew E. Welsh Bridge

    Matthew E. Welsh Bridge is a two-lane, single-deck continuous truss bridge on the Ohio River. The bridge connects Kentucky Route 79 and Indiana State Road 135, as well as the communities of Brandenburg, Kentucky and Mauckport, Indiana. It is 3,098 ft (944 m) long and was built at a cost of 5.5 million dollars, financed mainly by the State of Indiana. The truss portion of the bridge is continuous across two 725 ft (221 m) spans. Construction of the bridge began in August 1964 and the bridge was opened to traffic on November 19, 1966. The bridge was named after Matthew E. Welsh, the 41st governor of Indiana. Although 90% of the bridge is within the Commonwealth of Kentucky, it is owned and maintained by the State of Indiana.
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    Bolshoy Krashokholmsky Bridge

    Bolshoy Krashokholmsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    Bolshoy Krasnokholmsky Bridge (Russian: Большо́й Краснохо́лмский мост) is a steel arch bridge that spans Moskva River in downtown Moscow, Russia, carrying Garden Ring between Tagansky District and Zamoskvorechye Districts. It was completed in 1938 by V.M.Vakhurkin (structural engineering), G.P.Golts and D.M.Sobolev (architectural design). Its main span is the widest arch span in Moscow (168 meters) . Wooden causeway bridges on this site were common since 18th century; 1853 plan shows a wooden bridge on site slightly to the south of current site and at a different angle. Originally, Vodootvodny Canal has a second bypass canal, cutting off the south-eastern tip of The Island. It was located rougnly 100 meters south from the centerline of present-day Garden Ring, spanned by one or two wooden bridges. All bridges, past and present, were built to the north of this bypass canal. The first permanent Krasnoholmsky Bridge across Moskva River was built in 1872, by the Struwe brothers; Amand Struwe was lead engineer and financial promoter. The bridge consisted of two rectangular lattice trusses (a mixed truss and girder type), each 65.5 meters long, with a single main pillar in the middle.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Golden Gate Bridge

    Golden Gate Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Golden Gate
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: San Francisco
    The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. As part of both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1, the structure links the city of San Francisco, on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, to Marin County. It is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge "possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world". Before the bridge was built, the only practical short route between San Francisco and what is now Marin County was by boat across a section of San Francisco Bay. Ferry service began as early as 1820, with regularly scheduled service beginning in the 1840s for purposes of transporting water to San Francisco. The Sausalito Land and Ferry Company service, launched in 1867, eventually became the Golden Gate Ferry Company, a Southern Pacific Railroad subsidiary, the largest ferry operation in the world by the late 1920s. Once for
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Livingston Avenue Bridge

    Livingston Avenue Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Hudson River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Albany
    The Livingston Avenue Bridge is a railroad bridge over the Hudson River in New York connecting Albany and Rensselaer. The original structure was built in 1866 by the Hudson River Bridge Company but was replaced in 1901-02. A rotating swing bridge span allows large ships to proceed up the river. The New York State Department of Transportation (DOT) has identified the bridge as a critical link in its Empire Corridor passenger rail line, and has initiated a study project for bridge rehabilitation or replacement. The bridge is owned by CSX Transportation. It is most frequently used by Amtrak for east-west travel in New York, as well as freight trains of CSX and CP Rail. The bridge hosts an active railroad interlocking tower and Amtrak block operators staff the tower 24 hours a day. They are responsible for directing rail traffic around Amtrak's Rensselaer Terminal as well as opening and closing the bridge. Due to the deteriorated condition of the bridge, trains cross one at a time at 15 miles per hour (24 km/h). DOT considers the swing bridge mechanism to be unreliable and the overall bridge design inadequate for current railroad operating standards. The bridge opens for ship traffic
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Puente del Alamillo

    Puente del Alamillo

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Guadalquivir
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Seville
    The Alamillo Bridge is a structure in Seville, Andalucia (Spain), which spans the Canal de Alfonso XIII, allowing access to La Cartuja, an island between the canal and the Guadalquivir River. The bridge was constructed as part of infrastructure improvements for Expo 92, which was held on a large site on the island. Construction of the bridge began in 1989 and was completed in 1992 from a design by Santiago Calatrava. The bridge is of the cantilever spar cable-stayed bridge type and consists of a single pylon, counterbalancing a 200 m span with thirteen lengths of cables. The original intent was to build two symmetrical bridges on either side of the island, but in the end, the Alamillo's singular design has proved most striking. The Alamillo Bridge was built more as a monument rather than a piece of structural art. While the leaning mast is very suggestive that the bridge is solely supported by the cables, there is controversy that the deck is mostly self-supporting, since the tension in the cables seems lower than would be expected. To be a good example of structural art, the bridge must also be successful at structural engineering design. The Alamillo Bridge, however, lacks the
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Putney Bridge

    Putney Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    Putney Bridge is a bridge crossing of the River Thames in west London, linking Putney on the south side with Fulham to the north. Putney Bridge tube station is located near the north side of the bridge. One story runs that "in 1720 Sir Robert Walpole was returning from seeing George I at Kingston and being in a hurry to get to the House of Commons rode together with his servant to Putney to take the ferry across to Fulham. The ferry boat was on the opposite side, however and the waterman, who was drinking in the Swan, ignored the calls of Sir Robert and his servant and they were obliged to take another route. Walpole vowed that a bridge would replace the ferry." The Prince of Wales apparently "was often inconvenienced by the ferry when returning from hunting in Richmond Park and asked Walpole to use his influence by supporting the bridge." Construction of a bridge was first sanctioned by an Act of Parliament in 1726. Built by local master carpenter Thomas Phillips to a design by architect Sir Jacob Acworth, the first bridge was opened in November 1729, to become the only bridge between London Bridge and Kingston Bridge at the time. A toll bridge, it featured tollbooths at either
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Victoria Falls Bridge

    Victoria Falls Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Zambezi
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Victoria Falls
    The Victoria Falls Bridge crosses the Zambezi River just below the Victoria Falls and is built over the Second Gorge of the falls. As the river is the border between Zimbabwe and Zambia, the bridge links the two countries and has border posts on the approaches to both ends, at the towns of Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe and Livingstone, Zambia. The bridge was the brainchild of Cecil Rhodes, part of his grand and unfulfilled Cape to Cairo railway scheme, even though he never visited the falls and died before construction of the bridge began. Rhodes is recorded as instructing the engineers to "build the bridge across the Zambezi where the trains, as they pass, will catch the spray of the Falls". It was designed by George Anthony Hobson of consultants Sir Douglas Fox and Partners, not as is often stated, Sir Ralph Freeman, the same engineer who contributed to the design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. At the time of the design of the Victoria Falls Bridge, Freeman was an assistant in the firm who, in those pre-computer days, was calculating stresses. The bridge was constructed in England by the Cleveland Bridge & Engineering Company, before being shipped to the Mozambique port of Beira and
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    145th Street Bridge

    145th Street Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The 145th Street Bridge, located in New York City, USA, is a four-lane swing bridge that crosses the Harlem River, connecting 145th Street and Lenox Avenue in Manhattan with East 149th Street and River Avenue in the Bronx. It once carried northbound New York State Route 22 and New York State Route 100. Additionally, this bridge, for its proximity to the eponymous avenue, was once named the "Lenox Avenue Bridge," an original name that has fallen into disuse. The bridge is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation. Construction on the 145th Street Bridge began on April 19, 1901, and the $2.75 million bridge was opened to traffic on August 24, 1905. The designer was Alfred Pancoast Boller. A new swing span for the bridge was assembled in the former Powell & Minnock Brick Yard in Coeymans, New York, in southern Albany County. The span was replaced in early November 2006 The 145th Street Bridge carries the Bx19 bus route operated by MTA New York City Transit. The route's average weekday ridership is 30,534. In an episode of The Jeffersons TV show (The Expectant Father), Lionel and George get drunk and go to paint Lionel's name on the bridge.
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Ben Williamson Memorial Bridge

    Ben Williamson Memorial Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Ohio River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Coal Grove
    Completed in 1932, the two-lane Ben Williamson Bridge connects Coal Grove, Ohio to Ashland, Kentucky, crossing the Ohio River. Named for Senator Ben M. Williamson, it was formerly a two-way span before the parallel Simeon Willis Memorial Bridge was completed upstream in 1985, it is used for Kentucky-bound traffic today. In 1999, the bridge was closed and renovated during which time traffic in both directions was diverted to the Willis Bridge. In early 2007, traffic was again diverted to the Willis bridge in order to renovate and paint the bridge. The bridge was reopened on October 30, 2007.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Bolshoi Kamennyi Bridge

    Bolshoi Kamennyi Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    Bolshoy Kamenny Bridge (Russian: Большой Каменный мост, Greater Stone Bridge) is a steel arch bridge spanning Moskva River at the western end of the Moscow Kremlin. Its predecessor was the first permanent stone bridge in Moscow, Russia. The existing bridge was completed in 1938 by engineer Nikolai Kalmykov. A "live" bridge of boats linked the Kremlin with Zamoskvorechye on a nearby site as early as the 15th century. In 1643, Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich engaged Anie and Jogann Cristler, architects from Strassburg to design a stone bridge. Anie Cristler and Tsar Mikhail died in 1645, construction halted. Sources about the completion of the first Stone Bridge are contradictory. Archive studies by Ivan Kondratiev indicate that original draft had 5 main spans of 40 arshin each. Later, numerous repairs (1707, 1731, 1771, 1788–1792, 1809–1812) changed it to seven spans over eight stone pillars. It is estimated that the river maximum width was 105 meters (50 sazhen), and overall length of the bridge was 70 sazhen, 11 sazhen wide. Its south end terminated with a barbican tower, commonly called Six Gates (two for through traffic, four looking sideways). This ornate tower is believed to be the
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Dubuque Rail Bridge

    Dubuque Rail Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Locale: Dubuque
    The Dubuque Rail Bridge carries a single rail line across the Mississippi River between Dubuque, Iowa, and East Dubuque, Illinois, near river mile 580. The original swing bridge was constructed by Andrew Carnegie and operated by the Dunleith & Dubuque Bridge Company opening in December 1868, primarily used by the Illinois Central Railroad. The bridge was rebuilt in the 1890s and has 5 spans and a swing-span. It is currently operated by Canadian National Railway as a result of their purchase of Illinois Central in 1999.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Rainbow Bridge

    Rainbow Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    The Rainbow Bridge is a cantilever bridge crossing the Neches River in Southeast Texas just upstream from Sabine Lake. It allows State Highway 87 and State Highway 73 to connect Port Arthur in Jefferson County on the southwest bank of the river with Bridge City in Orange County on the northeast bank. Construction on the bridge began in 1936 under the guidance of the Texas State Highway Department. Due to concerns by the upstream city of Beaumont about the bridge posing a threat to ship navigation, the Rainbow Bridge was built with a 680 foot (210 m) main span. In addition, it has a vertical clearance of 177.0 feet (54 m), which was intended to allow the tallest ship in the US Navy, the USS Patoka, passage under the bridge (however, the Patoka never did). The bridge was completed on September 8, 1938. The nearby town of Prairie View took on the name "Bridge City" in response. Initially named the Port Arthur-Orange Bridge, it received its current name in 1957. The bridge was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. In 1988, construction began on the Veterans Memorial Bridge, a cable-stayed bridge. This bridge runs parallel to the Rainbow Bridge, and was dedicated
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Støvset Bridge

    Støvset Bridge

    Støvset Bridge (Støvset bru) is a cantilever bridge that crosses Misværfjorden in Nordland county, Norway. The bridge is 420 metres long, and the main span is 220 metres. The bridge has 3 spans. Støvset Bridge was opened in 1993.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    University Heights Bridge

    University Heights Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The University Heights Bridge crosses the Harlem River, connecting West 207th Street in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan to West Fordham Road in the University Heights section of the Bronx. The bridge is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation. The bridge carries two lanes of traffic in each direction, along with a sidewalk on the south side of the bridge. It may have once carried the now-decommissioned New York State Route 9X. The first swing bridge on this site had been a previous incarnation of the Broadway Bridge that was being replaced by a new double-level bridge. In June 1906, the old bridge was floated down the river and placed on a newly-constructed center pier. After all the approaches and other construction were completed, the bridge opened to traffic on January 8, 1908. The designer was Alfred Pancoast Boller. A new bridge was constructed between 1989 and 1992 to replace the decaying previous structure. On June 12, 2008, the New York City Bridge Centennial Commission organized a parade to mark the centennial anniversary of the bridge. The event was attended by Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrión, Jr. and Manhattan Borough
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Windsor Railway Bridge

    Windsor Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Tied arch bridge
    • Locale: Windsor
    Windsor Railway Bridge is a wrought iron 'bow and string' bridge in Windsor, Berkshire, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. It carries the ex-GWR branch line from Slough to Windsor into Windsor and Eton Central station. It crosses the River Thames on the reach between Romney Lock and Boveney Lock. The bridge is a single-span structure comprising three bowstring trusses which created two bays for the original two GWR tracks. The bridge is the World's oldest wrought iron bridge still in regular service,, and is a forerunner of Brunel's final masterpiece, the Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash. The bridge was Grade II* listed in 1975. The line opened in 1849. The construction of the line was delayed and could not be included in the original Parliamentary Act because of objections from the Provost of Eton College. The brick viaduct was constructed between 1861-65 to replace the original wooden trestle viaduct. The bridge contractor was Mr George Hannet. Although the bridge was built to take two tracks, the track on the upstream side was removed when the line was rationalised in the 1960s. The trackbed on this side now carries a sewage or water main pipe.
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge

    Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Chiques Creek
    • Bridge Type: Covered bridge
    The Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge or Sporting Hill Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Chiques Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Big Chiques #1 Bridge. (Chiques Creek was known as Chickies Creek until 2002) The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color. The bridge's WGCB Number is 38-36-32. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003529. It is located at 40°8′53.4″N 76°24′35.4″W / 40.148167°N 76.409833°W / 40.148167; -76.409833 (40.14817, -76.40983). The bridge is located southwest of Manheim between Rapho and Penn Townships 0.15 miles (0.24 km) southeast of Pennsylvania Route 772 and 1.4 miles (2.25 km) west of Pennsylvania Route 72 on Sun Hill Road. Kauffman's Distillery Covered Bridge was originally built in 1857 at a cost of $1,185 by James C. Carpenter.
    4.60
    5 votes
    148
    Barnes Railway Bridge

    Barnes Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    • Locale: London
    Barnes Railway Bridge crosses the River Thames in London in a northwest to southeast direction at Barnes. It carries the South West Trains Hounslow Loop Line, and lies between Barnes Bridge and Chiswick stations. It can also be crossed on foot, and is one of only three bridges in London to combine pedestrian and rail use; the others being the Fulham Railway Bridge and Hungerford Bridge. The original bridge at this location was built in 1849 to a design by Joseph Locke and looked very similar to the original Richmond Railway Bridge which he also designed. The replacement bridge, designed by Edward Andrews, is three spans of wrought iron bow string girders carrying two railway tracks. The construction work was carried out by Head Wrightson on behalf of the London & South Western Railway and was completed in 1895. The original Locke span still stands unused on the upstream side. The bridge was given protection as a Grade II listed structure in 1983. Barnes Bridge is also a landmark often quoted for the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race, because it is suggested that whichever crew is ahead at this point will win the race. In 2003 the crews were in almost equal position approaching the
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    George Washington Bridge

    George Washington Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Hudson River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Fort Lee
    The George Washington Bridge (known informally as the GW Bridge, the GWB, the GW, or the George) is a suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City to Fort Lee, Bergen County, New Jersey, in the United States. Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1/9 cross the river via the bridge. U.S. Route 46, which is entirely in New Jersey, ends halfway across the bridge at the state border with New York. The bridge, an integral conduit within the New York Metropolitan Area, has an upper level carrying four lanes in each direction and a lower level with three lanes in each direction, for a total of 14 lanes of travel. The speed limit on the bridge is 45 mph (70 km/h), though congestion often slows traffic, especially during the morning and evening rush hours. A path on each side of the bridge's upper level carries pedestrian and bicycle traffic. As of 2007, the George Washington Bridge has the greatest vehicular capacity of any bridge in the world, carrying approximately 106 million vehicles per year, making it the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey -
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Kosciuszko Bridge

    Kosciuszko Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Newtown Creek
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Brooklyn
    The Kosciuszko Bridge is a truss bridge that spans Newtown Creek between the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, connecting Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Maspeth, Queens. It is a part of Interstate 278, which is also locally known as the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. The bridge opened in 1939, replacing the Penny Bridge from Meeker Avenue in Brooklyn to Review Avenue and Laurel Hill Boulevard, and is the only bridge over Newtown Creek that is not a drawbridge. It was named in honor of Tadeusz Kościuszko, a Polish volunteer who was a General in the American Revolutionary War. Two of the bridge towers are surmounted with eagles, one is the Polish eagle, and the other the American eagle. Plans are underway to replace the current structure with a new nine-lane bridge, which will consist of two eastbound spans and one westbound span, and it will include a bike path and a walkway. Four designs were under consideration for the new structure, which include a cable-stayed bridge, a through arch bridge, a box girder bridge and a deck arch bridge, with the cable-stayed design selected after a public review process. Construction is expected to begin in 2013. The bridge can be seen in the
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge

    Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Lake Washington
    • Bridge Type: Pontoon bridge
    • Locale: Seattle
    The Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge is a floating bridge that carries the eastbound lanes of Interstate 90 across Lake Washington from Seattle to Mercer Island, Washington. Westbound traffic is carried by the Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge running parallel to it. The Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge is the second longest floating bridge on Earth at 6,620 ft (2,020 m), whereas the longest is the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge just a few miles to the north on the same lake, built 23 years later. The third longest is the Hood Canal Bridge, also in Washington State, about 30 miles (48 km) to the northwest of the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge. Along with the east portals of the Mount Baker Ridge Tunnel, the bridge is an official City of Seattle landmark. While the bridge originally had an opening span at the center of the bridge to allow a horizontal opening of 202 feet (62 m) for major waterborne traffic, the only boat passages currently are elevated fixed spans at the termini with 29 feet (8.8 m) of vertical clearance. The bridge was the brainchild of George Lightfoot, who came to be called the "father of the bridge". Lightfoot began campaigning for the bridge in 1930, enlisting
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Waterloo Bridge

    Waterloo Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Lambeth
    Waterloo Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge crossing the River Thames in London, England between Blackfriars Bridge and Hungerford Bridge. The name of the bridge is in memory of the Anglo-Dutch and Prussian victory at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Thanks to its location at a strategic bend in the river, the views of London (Westminster, the South Bank and London Eye to the west, the City of London and Canary Wharf to the east) from the bridge are widely held to be the finest from any spot at ground level. The first bridge on the site was designed in 1809-10 by John Rennie for the Strand Bridge Company and opened in 1817 as a toll bridge. The granite bridge had nine arches, each of 120 feet (36.6 m) span, separated by double Grecian-Doric stone columns and was 2,456 feet (748.6 m) long, including approaches. Before its opening it was known as 'Strand Bridge'. During the 1840s the bridge gained a reputation as a popular place for suicide attempts. In 1841 the American daredevil Samuel Gilbert Scott was killed while performing an act in which he hung by a rope from a scaffold on the bridge. In 1844 Thomas Hood wrote the poem The Bridge of Sighs about the suicide of a
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Broadway Bridge

    Broadway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Broadway Bridge in New York City crosses the Harlem River Ship Canal between Inwood and Marble Hill, both parts of Manhattan (the latter on the mainland and attached to the Bronx because of the rerouting of the Harlem River). It is named the Broadway Bridge because it carries Broadway, which is designated as US 9 here. The bridge also carries the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line above the road. Immediately to the north of the bridge along this line is the Marble Hill – 225th Street station. Before the Harlem River was rerouted, the bridge in the area was named Kings Bridge, crossing the river on the border between Marble Hill and the Bronx. The Boston Post Road and Albany Post Road crossed this bridge. A later bridge, opened on January 1, 1895, spanned the canal. The present Broadway Bridge (opened on July 1, 1962) has a navigable channel 304 feet (93 m) wide providing 136 feet (41 m) of vertical clearance when the bridge is in the open position. In the down position, the bridge provides 24 feet (7.3 m) of vertical clearance. An earlier incarnation of the Broadway Bridge, that was being replaced by a new double-level structure**, was reused to create the University Heights
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Forth Road Bridge

    Forth Road Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Firth of Forth
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Edinburgh
    The Forth Road Bridge is a suspension bridge in east central Scotland. The bridge, opened in 1964, spans the Firth of Forth, connecting the capital city Edinburgh, at South Queensferry, to Fife, at North Queensferry. It replaced a centuries-old ferry service to carry vehicular traffic, cyclists, and pedestrians across the Forth; rail crossings are made by the adjacent and historic Forth Bridge. Issues regarding the continued tolling of the bridge, and those over its deteriorating condition and proposals to have it replaced or supplemented by an additional crossing, have caused it to become something of a political football for the Scottish Parliament, which eventually voted to scrap tolls on the bridge with effect from 11 February 2008. The first crossing at what is now the site of the bridge was established in the 11th century by Margaret, queen consort of King Malcolm III, who founded a ferry service to transport religious pilgrims from Edinburgh to Dunfermline Abbey and St Andrews. Its creation gave rise to the port towns of Queensferry and North Queensferry, which remain to this day; and the service remained in uninterrupted use as a passenger ferry for over eight hundred
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Hammersmith Bridge

    Hammersmith Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: London Borough of Richmond upon Thames
    Hammersmith Bridge is a suspension bridge which crosses the River Thames in west London, just south of the Hammersmith area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham on the north side of the river. It allows road traffic and pedestrians to cross to Barnes, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, on the south side of the river. The current bridge is the second permanent bridge on the site. The construction of a bridge was first sanctioned by an Act of Parliament in 1824 and work on site began the following year. It was the first suspension bridge over the River Thames and was designed by William Tierney Clark. The bridge had a clear water-way of 688 feet 8 inches (209.91 m). Its suspension towers were 48 feet (15 m) above the level of the roadway, where they were 22 feet (6.7 m) thick. The roadway was slightly curved upwards, 16 feet (4.9 m) above high water, and the extreme length from the back of the piers on shore was 822 feet 8 inches (250.75 m), supporting 688 feet (210 m) of roadway. There were eight chains, composed of wrought-iron bars, each five inches deep and one thick. Four of these had six bars in each chain; and four had only three, making thirty-six bars,
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge

    Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Jamaica Bay
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Brooklyn
    The Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge in New York City (originally Marine Parkway Bridge) is a vertical lift bridge that crosses Rockaway Inlet and connects the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, with Marine Parkway to Floyd Bennett Field, Flatbush Avenue, and the Marine Park neighborhood in Brooklyn. Opened on July 3, 1937, it carries four motor traffic lanes, and a footpath on the western edge. Cyclepaths along both sides of the Parkway connect to the Shore Parkway Greenway and to Flatbush Avenue. The operation of this bridge includes the maintenance of the Marine Parkway from the toll plaza to Jacob Riis Park. Though a city-owned and operated bridge, it connects two parts of Gateway National Recreation Area, a unit of the National Park System: Floyd Bennett Field and Jacob Riis Park. The bridge is designated as New York State Route 901B, an unsigned reference route. As of December 30, 2010, the crossing charge for a two-axle passenger vehicle is increased to $3.25 (cash), $2.17 (token), and $1.80 ($1.45 discount) for E-ZPass users. The crossing charge for a motorcycle is $2.75 charged in each direction, with a $1.26 discount for E-ZPass users. Certain resident discounts apply
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Millennium Bridge

    Millennium Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: London
    The Millennium Bridge, officially known as the London Millennium Footbridge, is a steel suspension bridge for pedestrians crossing the River Thames in London, England, linking Bankside with the City. It is located between Southwark Bridge (downstream) and Blackfriars Railway Bridge (upstream). The bridge is owned and maintained by the Bridge House Estates, a charitable trust overseen by the City of London Corporation. Construction of the bridge began in 1998, with the opening on 10 June 2000. Londoners nicknamed the bridge the "Wobbly Bridge" after participants in a charity walk on behalf of Save the Children to open the bridge felt an unexpected, and, for some, uncomfortable, swaying motion on the first two days after the bridge opened. The bridge was closed later that day, and after two days of limited access the bridge was closed for almost two years while modifications were made to eliminate the wobble entirely. It was reopened in 2002. The southern end of the bridge is near Globe Theatre, the Bankside Gallery and Tate Modern, the north end next to the City of London School below St Paul's Cathedral. The bridge alignment is such that a clear view of St Paul's south facade is
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Smolensky Metro Bridge

    Smolensky Metro Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    Smolensky Metro Bridge (Russian: Смоленский метромост, Metromost) is a steel arch bridge that spans Moskva River in Dorogomilovo District of Moscow, Russia. It is the first bridge built for the Moscow Metro in 1935–1937, designed by N.P.Polikarpov, P.K.Antonov (structural engineering) and Yakovlev brothers (architectural design). It is one of two (the second one is Mitinsky Metro Bridge) bridges over Moskva River that are used exclusively by Metro (subway) trains, while the other Metro bridges combine road and rail. The first stage of Moscow Metro opened in 1935 terminated at a shallow alignment Smolenskaya station. The second stage (opened in 1937) started with a 1.4 kilometer westward extension from Smolenskaya to Kiyevskaya, a station serving the Kiyevsky Rail Terminal, which required a river crossing. Tunnel crossing was impractical; an open contest for the bridge design was held in spring 1935. Yakovlev brothers won with a relatively modest, reserved prototype . Actual bridge was built without planned statues and portico. The two-track bridge is supported with two 150 meter long, 11 meter high П-shaped steel arches. Arch box profile is 1.2 meter high at extreme points, 2.7
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Wallingford Bridge

    Wallingford Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Wallingford
    Wallingford Bridge is a medieval road bridge over the River Thames in England which connects Wallingford and Crowmarsh Gifford, Oxfordshire (Wallingford was historically in Berkshire until 1974 reorganization). It crosses the Thames on the reach between Cleeve Lock and Benson Lock. The bridge is 900 feet long and has 22 arches but most traffic now crosses Winterbrook Bridge, built as part of the by-pass to the south of the town in 1993. The first reference to a bridge across the Thames between Wallingford and Crowmarsh Gifford is from 1141, when King Stephen besieged Wallingford Castle. The first stone bridge is credited to Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, and four remaining arches are believed to contain 13th century elements. It was the main route to Gloucester and South Wales until the bridges at Abingdon and Burford were built in 1415. Major repairs used stone from the dissolved Holy Trinity Priory in 1530. Four arches were removed so a drawbridge could be inserted during the siege of the castle in the Civil War of 1646, and these were replaced with timber structures until repair in 1751. Following a flood, three arches were rebuilt by Richard Clarke from 1810-1812 to a design by
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Bixby Creek Arch Bridge

    Bixby Creek Arch Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Bixby Creek
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Big Sur
    Bixby Creek Bridge, also known as Bixby Bridge, is a reinforced concrete open-spandrel arch bridge in Big Sur, California. The bridge is located 120 miles (190 km) south of San Francisco and 13 miles (21 km) south of Carmel in Monterey County along California Highway One. Prior to the opening of the bridge in 1932, residents of the Big Sur area were virtually cut off during winter due to the often impassable Old Coast Road that led 11 miles (18 km) inland. At its completion, the bridge was built under budget for $199,861 and was the longest concrete arch span at 320 feet (98 m) on the California State Highway System. Beginning in about 1855, travelers followed a very rough and dangerous track from Carmel south towards Big Sur. At Bixby Creek, the road turned 11 miles (18 km) inland and then led to the Post Ranch on the Rancho El Sur. The 30 miles (48 km) trip could take three days by wagon or stagecoach. The single-lane road was closed in winter when it became impassable. Coast residents would occasionally receive supplies via a hazardous landing by boat from Monterey or San Francisco. Bixby Creek takes its name from Charles Henry Bixby, from Livingston County, New York, who
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Cold Spring Canyon Arch Bridge

    Cold Spring Canyon Arch Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Cold Spring Canyon
    • Locale: Santa Ynez
    The Cold Spring Canyon Arch Bridge in the Santa Ynez Mountains links Santa Barbara, California with Santa Ynez, California. The bridge is signed as part of State Route 154. The current bridge was completed and opened to traffic in 1963 and won awards for engineering, design and beauty. It is currently the 5th-longest span arch bridge of this "supported deck" type in the world. Seismic retrofitting was completed in 1998. Cold Spring Tavern, originally a stagecoach stop, is approximately 600m south of the bridge's west base in the canyon below, on a stub of Old San Marcos Pass Road (now named Stagecoach Rd.) connecting with SR 154 at Camino Cielo and Paradise Roads. The bridge causes concern in the Santa Barbara community as the site of dozens of suicides over the years; and barriers have recently been installed to prevent this.
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Macombs Dam Bridge

    Macombs Dam Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    Macombs Dam Bridge is a swing bridge that spans the Harlem River in New York City, connecting the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx near Yankee Stadium. It is the fifth-oldest bridge in New York City and was designated an official landmark in January 1992. The bridge is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT). The bridge is located 3.2 miles (5.1 km) from the mouth of the Harlem River. Its total length is 2,540 feet (770 m). The main swing span is 408 feet (124 m) long and provides two shipping channels with 150 feet (46 m) of horizontal clearance. When closed the bridge provides 25 feet of vertical clearance. The total cost of construction was $1.3 million and the bridge opened on May 1, 1895. The designer was Alfred Pancoast Boller. This bridge is the most recent of several bridges in the area, the first of which (along with the since-demolished lock-and-dam system) opened in 1814. Immediately to the north of the bridge was another swing bridge along which the now-demolished 9th Avenue El reached the Bronx (and the IRT Jerome Avenue Line). The bridge was demolished sometime after this section of the 9th Avenue El ceased operation in
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Royal Tweed Bridge

    Royal Tweed Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    • Locale: Northumberland
    The Royal Tweed Bridge is a 1920s road bridge in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England crossing the River Tweed. It was intended to divert traffic from the 17th century Old Bridge, and until the 1980s it formed part of the A1 road, the main route from London to Edinburgh. However, the construction of a new bridge to the west of Berwick as part of bypass has since reduced the Royal Tweed Bridge's importance. Construction took place between 1925 and 1928. It was undertaken by L G Mouchel & Partners, who still operate today (as Mouchel Parkman). The design is of reinforced concrete and consists of four unequal arches. The bridge altogether spans a distance just short of 430 metres. However, the spans of the arches themselves (50.1, 74.4, 95.5 and 108.50 metres) vary remarkably, so much so that the longest, northern arch for a while held the record for Great Britain's largest concrete arch. Up until the 2000s, when the road and pavement layout was altered and new lights added, both side of the bridge was used for parking with a smaller pavement in use. This caused a large weight on the deck of the bridge and forced the Berwick Borough Council to adapt a new layout to ease
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    South Grand Island Bridge

    South Grand Island Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Truss arch bridge
    • Locale: Tonawanda
    The South Grand Island Bridge carries Interstate 190 across the Niagara River between Tonawanda, New York and Grand Island, New York. The toll plaza (total of 7 booths) is found on the Tonawanda side of the bridge; Only 2 booths (1 and 7) are EZ-Pass, the remainder are manned booths. The twin Truss arch bridges (with a steel through-arch in the middle) crosses from Tonawanda to Grand Island and was opened in 1935 and 1962. It was acquired by New York State in 1950 and operated by the New York State Thruway. The South Grand Island Bridges have a 93 feet (28 m) navigation clearance, which was designed to allow tall lake freighters and tanker ships to pass beneath it. The northbound south bridge is scheduled to be renovated by American Bridge Company from 2008 to 2010. American Bridge Company will replace the deck (road), sidewalk, and barriers as part of a $48 million project. While the twin bridges were built decades apart, they appear nearly identical. It is clear that builders in the 1960s took great care in matching the original 1930s architecture, but there are slight differences. The 1935 bridge has a stone cutwaters on the piers, while the 1962 bridge has steel-faced
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Waco Suspension Bridge

    Waco Suspension Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Brazos River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Waco
    The Waco Suspension Bridge crosses the Brazos River in Waco, Texas. It is a single-span suspension bridge with a main span of 475 feet (145 m). Opened in 1869, it contains nearly 3 million bricks. It is located north of Downtown Waco, connecting Indian Springs Park (on the southwest side of the river) with Doris D. Miller Park (on the northeast side of the river). Every year on Independence Day, the bridge serves as a place where thousands of locals gather to watch fireworks. The Indian Springs Park marks the location of the origin of the town of Waco, where the Huaco Indians had settled on the bank of the river, at the location of an icy cold spring. Before 1869, crossing the Brazos River was a time-consuming and sometimes dangerous ordeal. The only way to cross the river was via ferry, and due to the location of Waco on the growing Chisholm Trail, local businessmen knew that a bridge was needed to support commerce. A charter was received from the state in 1866. A banking firm called Flint & Chamberlain decided to retain the renowned New York firm of John A. Roebling Co. This was the firm that had originated the suspension span bridge concept, and later oversaw the building of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Blue Water Bridge

    Blue Water Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: St. Clair River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Port Huron
    The Blue Water Bridge is a twin-span international bridge across the St. Clair River that links Port Huron, Michigan, USA and Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. The Blue Water Bridge connects Highway 402 in Ontario with both Interstate 69 and Interstate 94 in Michigan. The original span is a cantilever truss bridge with a total length of 6,178 feet (1,883 m) and a main span of 871 feet (265 m). The second, newer span is a continuous tied-arch bridge with a total length of 6,109 feet (1,862 m) and a main span of 922 feet (281 m). Together, the two bridges are the second-busiest crossing between the United States and Canada, after the Ambassador Bridge at Detroit-Windsor. They also provide one of the four shortest routes of land travel between the eastern seaboard of the United States, and the central United States. The Blue Water Bridges are jointly owned and maintained by Canada and the United States: Blue Water Bridge Canada is in charge of the Canadian side, and the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is in charge of the U.S. side. A toll is charged to cross the bridges, which is used to pay for maintenance and operations. The first bridge was opened to traffic on October 10,
    5.00
    4 votes
    167
    Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge

    Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Lake Washington
    • Bridge Type: Pontoon bridge
    • Locale: Seattle
    The Third Lake Washington Bridge, officially the Homer M. Hadley Memorial Bridge, is the fifth-longest floating bridge in the world, at 5,811 feet (1772 m). It carries the westbound and reversible lanes of Interstate 90 across Lake Washington between Mercer Island, Washington, and Seattle Washington. The bridge was built in 1989 and is named for Homer More Hadley, who designed the bridge's companion span, the Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge. When the bridge was built, parallel to the Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge, two reversible high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes were set up to accommodate the traffic flow between Seattle and the suburban Eastside (westbound in the morning, eastbound in the evenings). Currently, Sound Transit and the Washington State Department of Transportation are relocating HOV lanes from the reversible express lanes to the eastbound and westbound lanes of Interstate 90. This move is necessary to accommodate the East Link light-rail line (under construction) from downtown Seattle to Bellevue and Redmond, Washington. The first phase is expected to be completed in 2009. East Link, scheduled for full completion in 2020, will be the first time that a light-rail
    5.00
    4 votes
    168
    Bolshoy Moskvoretsky Bridge

    Bolshoy Moskvoretsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    Bolshoy Moskvoretsky Bridge (Russian: Большой Москворецкий мост) is a concrete arch bridge that spans the Moskva River in Moscow, Russia, immediately east of the Moscow Kremlin. The bridge connects Red Square with Bolshaya Ordynka street in Zamoskvorechye. Built in 1936-1937, it was designed by V. S. Kirillov (structural engineering) and Alexey Shchusev (architectural design). Wooden bridges east of the Kremlin have existed since the fifteenth century, as witnessed by Venetian Ambrosio de Contarini, who travelled through Moscow in 1476. The first permanent Moskvoretsky bridge was built in 1829, about 50 meters west of the present site. Three wooden arches, each 28 meters long, were supported by stone abutments. It was loosely based on Kamennooostrovsky Bridge in Saint Petersburg designed by Agustín de Betancourt. The bridge burnt down in 1871; after the fire, steel arches and decking were installed on the old abutments. In 1935-1938, all the bridges in downtown Moscow were replaced with high capacity bridges. Moskvoretsky Bridge was the first to be completed, and was the only concrete bridge of the 1930s. The bridge was placed at the narrowest point of the Moskva River, west of
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Kingston Railway Bridge

    Kingston Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Kingston upon Thames
    Kingston Railway Bridge crosses the River Thames near Kingston upon Thames, England carrying the South West Trains looping branch line from London Waterloo to Shepperton and Richmond. It was first discussed in 1860 and completed in 1863. The bridge links Kingston and Hampton Wick stations, and crosses the Thames on the reach above Teddington Lock. There are arches on both sides over dry land and that on the Kingston side has a road running though it. Kingston power stations were located close to the bridge on the Kingston side. The first Kingston power station, Kingston A was situated in Down Hall Road. It opened in November 1893 and did not close until August 1959. Kingston B was officially opened nearby on 27 October 1948 by King George VI with Queen Elizabeth and ceased generation in autumn 1980. Being close to the Thames, coal came up river by barge, and ash was sent away the same way. The Bargedock was constructed at Kingston Railway Bridge close to the present the upstream entrance to Canbury Gardens. A landscaping scheme has been developed to open up this section of riverside that has been closed to the public.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Mackinac Bridge

    Mackinac Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Straits of Mackinac
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Mackinaw City
    The Mackinac Bridge ( /ˈmækɨnɔː/ MAK-in-aw) is a suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac to connect the non-contiguous Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan. Opened in 1957, the bridge (familiarly known as "Big Mac" and "Mighty Mac") is the third longest in total suspension in the world and the longest suspension bridge between anchorages in the Western hemisphere. The Mackinac Bridge carries Interstate 75 and the Lakes Michigan and Huron components of the Great Lakes Circle Tours across the straits and connects the city of St. Ignace on the north end with the village of Mackinaw City on the south. Envisioned since the 1880s, the bridge was designed by engineer David B. Steinman and completed in 1957 only after many decades of struggles to begin construction. The bridge opened on November 1, 1957, ending decades of the two peninsulas being solely linked by ferries. A year later, the bridge was formally dedicated as the "world's longest suspension bridge between anchorages." This designation was chosen because the bridge would not be the world's longest using another way of measuring suspension bridges, the length of the center span between the towers;
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Berwick Bridge

    Berwick Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    • Locale: Northumberland
    Berwick Bridge, also known as the Old Bridge, spans the River Tweed in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England. The current structure is a Grade I listed stone bridge built between 1611 and 1624. Four previous bridges stood on the site, with two destroyed by flooding (in 1199, the original, and in 1294, the third), one by an English attack in 1216 and the last, built 1376, served until James I of England ordered the construction of the present bridge. It was then on the main road from Edinburgh to London, and the king (who was also James VI of Scotland) had had to cross over the then dilapidated wooden bridge in 1603 while travelling to London for his coronation. The bridge is 355 metres (1,165 ft) long and 5 metres (16 ft) wide. The main material is sandstone from Tweedmouth. There are 15 arches (although originally only 13 had been planned) with Doric columns. The bridge's engineer, James Burrell, had to contend with flooding in 1621 when the bridge was almost complete, and that set back completion by several years. The cost of construction was apparently £15,000. The bridge became less important for road traffic as the main route moved westwards, first to the concrete Royal
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Nebraska City Bridge

    Nebraska City Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Pontoon bridge
    The Nebraska City Bridge is a four-lane girder bridge over the Missouri River connecting Otoe County, Nebraska with Fremont County, Iowa at Nebraska City, Nebraska. The bridge built in 1986 bypasses the central business district and replaced the Waubonsie Bridge truss bridge which opened in 1930 and went towards the middle of town. The Waubonsie Bridge built by the Kansas City Bridge Company called itself "The Bridge with a State park at Each End" because Arbor Lodge State Park was on the Nebraska side and Waubonsie State Park was on the Iowa side. The Waubonsie Bridge replaced a pontoon bridge built in 1888 that claimed to be the largest drawbridge of its kind in the world. The pontoon bridge was more than 2,000 feet (610 m) long and the middle of the bridge could swing open providing a 528-foot (161 m)-wide passage. Local usage refers to the new bridge just as "the Missouri River Bridge." The bridge was constructed as part of a highway plan to provide four-lane access between Lincoln, Nebraska and Interstate 29 in Iowa. The bridge connects Nebraska Highway 2 with Iowa Highway 2.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Richmond Lock and Footbridge

    Richmond Lock and Footbridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    Richmond Lock and Footbridge is a lock and pedestrian bridge, situated on the River Thames in south west London, England and is a Grade II* listed structure. It is the furthest downstream of all the Thames locks and is the only one owned and operated by the Port of London Authority. It was opened in 1894 and is situated close to the centre of Richmond in the south western suburbs of London. It connects Richmond on the east bank with the neighbouring district of St. Margarets on the west bank during the day, but is now closed at night to pedestrians - after 19:30 GMT or after 21:30 when BST is in use. The Richmond lock and weir complex was built between 1891 and 1894 by the Thames Conservancy to maintain a navigable depth of water upstream of Richmond. This then ensures that there is always at least a 1.72m depth of water in the River between Richmond and Teddington. In 1908 an Act transferred responsibility for the Thames from a point 350 yards (320 m) below Teddington Lock to the Port of London Authority, and this included Richmond Lock. When the old London Bridge was demolished in 1832, the removal of the palisades, constructed to protect the bridge, resulted in the tides on the
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Windsor Bridge

    Windsor Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Windsor
    Windsor Bridge or Windsor Town Bridge, is a road bridge over the River Thames between the towns of Windsor and Eton in the English county of Berkshire. It now only carries pedestrian and cycle traffic, and crosses the Thames just above Romney Lock. It is likely that the first bridge on this site was built in the 12th century AD. By 1172 it is recorded that Osbert de Bray derived over £4 from tolls levied on vessels passing beneath the bridge. In 1242, permission was granted for oak trees to be felled in Windsor Forest for the purpose of constructing a new bridge between Windsor and Eton. By 1819 the wooden bridge, presumably rebuilt many times over its life, had deteriorated and it was decided to build a new bridge in new materials. Construction on the current bridge was started in 1822 and it opened on June 1, 1824. The bridge has three arches, each comprising seven cast iron segments, and supported in mid-stream by two granite piers. Built as a road bridge, tolls were originally levied on traffic crossing the bridge. Following some protests and a case, The Mayor &c. of New Windsor and ano. v Joseph Taylor which went to Britain's highest court, the House of Lords, these tolls were
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Blue Wonder

    Blue Wonder

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Elbe
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Dresden
    Blue Wonder (German: Blaues Wunder) is the commonly used name for the Loschwitz Bridge (Loschwitzer Brücke), a cantilever truss bridge over the Elbe river in the Saxon capital of Dresden, Germany. It connects the city districts of Blasewitz and Loschwitz, two affluent residential areas, which around 1900 were amongst the most expensive in Europe. It is located close to Standseilbahn Dresden funicular railway and the world's oldest suspension railway Schwebebahn Dresden, as well as near the Dresden TV tower. After a two year construction time, the bridge was completed in 1893 at a cost of 2.25 million Goldmarks and named König-Albert-Brücke in honor of King Albert of Saxony. In the 19th century it was a masterpiece of technology to build a bridge of this length without river piers supporting it. Today its technology is less of a wonder but it is a much-loved symbol of the city. The "blue" in the name comes from the colour of the bridge. An urban legend claims that the bridge was originally painted green, but that the weather (or some say the sun) turned the bridge blue. However, a number of news articles and other sources show that the original colour was really blue; when the
    4.75
    4 votes
    176
    Brooklyn Bridge

    Brooklyn Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Brooklyn Bridge is a bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge. Originally referred to as the New York and Brooklyn Bridge and as the East River Bridge, it was dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since its opening, it has become an icon of New York City, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972. The Brooklyn Bridge was initially designed by German immigrant John Augustus Roebling, who had previously designed and constructed shorter suspension bridges, such as Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct in Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, Waco Suspension Bridge in Waco, Texas, and the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge in Cincinnati, Ohio. While conducting surveys for the bridge project,
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Donghai Bridge

    Donghai Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Hangzhou Bay
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Shanghai
    Donghai Bridge (simplified Chinese: 东海大桥; traditional Chinese: 東海大橋; pinyin: Dōnghǎi Dàqiáo; literally "East Sea Grand Bridge") is one of the longest cross-sea bridges in the world. It was completed on December 10, 2005. It has a total length of 32.5 kilometres (20.2 mi) and connects mainland Shanghai and the offshore Yangshan deep-water port in China. Most of the bridge is a low-level viaduct. There are also cable-stayed sections to allow for the passage of large ships, largest with span of 420 m. Donghai Bridge is part of the S2 Hulu Expressway. The bridge has a long and narrow speedway and does not allow vehicles that do not meet the weight requirements. [[pt:Ponte de Donghai
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    High Level Bridge

    High Level Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tyne
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    The High Level Bridge is a road and railway bridge spanning the River Tyne between Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead in North East England. Designed by Robert Stephenson and built between 1847 and 1849, it is the first major example of a wrought iron tied arch or bow-string girder bridge. It is a fine and long standing engineering solution to a difficult problem; the spanning of 1,337 feet (408 m) of river valley, including 512 feet (156 m) across water. The High Level Bridge has six river spans of 125 feet (38 m) length, sitting on masonry piers 46 by 16 feet (14 by 4.9 m) in section and up to 131 feet (40 m) height. There are also four land spans on each side, of 36 feet 3 inches. The single carriageway road and pedestrian walkways occupy the lower deck of the spans, 85 feet (26 m) above the high water mark, and the railway the upper deck 112 feet (34 m) above the high water mark. The total weight of the structure is 5,000 tons. According to a contemporary encyclopedia: The bridge was built for the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway, and together with Stephenson's Royal Border Bridge at Berwick upon Tweed, completed the line of a London-Edinburgh railway nowadays known as the
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    King Street Bridge

    King Street Bridge

    The King Street Bridge takes King Street over the Yarra River in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The bridge continues south as an elevated viaduct, with the Crown Casino and Entertainment Complex built around it in later years. The bridge was designed in 1959 by Utah Australia for the Country Roads Board, and constructed over the next two years, being opened on 12 April 1961. It was of a welded, deck-girder, suspended-span construction with spans up to 160 feet (49 m) long. Soon after completion, on 10 July 1962, one span collapsed under the weight of a 47 ton semi-trailer, though the weight was within the bridge limits. The failure was due to brittle fracture on a very cold Melbourne winter day. The south end of the bridge has been undergoing differential settlement between the approach ramps resting on fill, and the suspended section supported by bored piles. The embarrassing incident was widely satirised at the time; most notably by the Melbourne TV clowns Zig and Zag and was the inspiration for a Spike Milligan radio comedy. As originally constructed the bridge had 8 lanes across the Yarra River - 2 through lanes in each direction connecting King Street to Kingsway, in addition
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge

    Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tees
    • Bridge Type: Transporter bridge
    • Locale: Middlesbrough
    The Tees Transporter Bridge, often referred to as the Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge, is the furthest downstream bridge across the River Tees, England. It connects Middlesbrough, on the south bank, to Port Clarence, on the north bank. It is a transporter bridge, carrying a travelling 'car', or 'gondola', suspended from the bridge, across the river in 90 seconds. The gondola can carry 200 people, 9 cars, or 6 cars and one minibus. It carries the A178 Middlesbrough to Hartlepool road. Locally the bridge is simply known as the Transporter. Following a 1907 Act of Parliament the bridge was built at a cost of £68,026 6s 8d (£5,330,000 as of 2012), by Sir William Arrol & Co. of Glasgow between 1910 and 1911 to replace an earlier steam ferry. A transporter bridge was chosen because Parliament ruled that the new scheme of crossing the river had to avoid affecting the river navigation. The opening ceremony on the 17 October 1911 was performed by Prince Arthur of Connaught. The Tees Transporter Bridge has an overall length (including cantilevers) of 851 feet (259 m), leaving a span between the centres of the towers of 580 feet (180 m), the beam of the bridge being carried at a height of
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Nowra Bridge

    Nowra Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Shoalhaven River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Nowra
    The Nowra Bridge joins the main area of Nowra to North Nowra and Bomaderry. It carries the Princes Highway over the Shoalhaven River and was originally intended to carry a double railway track. The railway, however, was never extended past Bomaderry station where trains still terminate today. The bridge was designed by American engineer C Shaler Smith and is considered to be of historical significance. It is shadowed by a newer, concrete bridge built to support increased traffic flows in the area. The bridge was completed in 1881 and is built from cast iron and steel. It was originally decked with timber but this was replaced by concrete in 1981. Its full length is 342 m.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Omaha Road Bridge Number 15

    Omaha Road Bridge Number 15

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Saint Paul
    Omaha Road Bridge Number 15 is a swing bridge that spans the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. It was built in 1915 by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway (Omaha Road), though it, and the line from St. Paul to Mendota, was jointly owned with the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. The bridge was designed by I.F. Stern of Chicago. It is unusually shaped, because the swing span is asymmetrical. According to local legend, the original bridge design had equal length spans on either side of the center pivot. Once the bridge was completed, the owner of the property on the south side of the river did not want the swing span crossing his land. In response, the owner removed most of the south end of the swing span and added a concrete counterweight to compensate for the lost material. Legends aside, the reason for the "bobtail" configuration of the bridge is that the section of the river deep enough for navigation at that point is not wide enough to accommodate a full-sized swing bridge. The counterweight is necessary to keep both ends of the bridge in balance over the center pier, which is near the right descending bank. While the legend may be an appealing
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Peace Bridge

    Peace Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Fort Erie
    The Peace Bridge is an international bridge between Canada and the United States at the east end of Lake Erie at the source of the Niagara River, about 20 kilometres (12.4 mi) upriver of Niagara Falls. It connects the City of Buffalo, New York, in the United States to the Town of Fort Erie, Ontario, in Canada. It is operated and maintained by the Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority. The Peace Bridge consists of five arched spans over the Niagara River and a Parker through-truss span over the Black Rock Canal on the American side of the river. The total length is 5,800 feet (1,768 m). Material used in the construction included 3,500 feet (1,067 m) of steelwork, 9,000 tons of structural steel and 800 tons of reinforcing steel in the concrete abutments. The Peace Bridge was named to commemorate 100 years of peace between the United States and Canada. It was constructed as a highway bridge to address the needs of pedestrian and motor vehicle traffic which could not be accommodated on the International Railway Bridge, built in 1873. The building of the Peace Bridge was approved by the International Joint Commission on August 6, 1925. Edward Lupfer served as chief engineer. A
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Rainbow Bridge

    Rainbow Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Tokyo Bay
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Minato, Tokyo
    The Rainbow Bridge (レインボーブリッジ, Reinbō burijji) is a suspension bridge crossing northern Tokyo Bay between Shibaura Pier and the Odaiba waterfront development in Minato, Tokyo, Japan. Construction started in 1987 and was completed in 1993. The bridge is 798 metres (2,618 ft) long with a main span of 580 metres (1,903 ft). Officially called the "Shuto Expressway No. 11 Daiba Route - Port of Tokyo Connector Bridge," the name "'Rainbow Bridge" was decided by the public. The towers supporting the bridge are white in color, designed to harmonize with the skyline of central Tokyo seen from Odaiba. There are lamps placed on the wires supporting the bridge, which are illuminated into three different colors, red, white and green every night using solar energy obtained during the day. The bridge can be accessed by foot from Tamachi Station (JR East) or Shibaura-futō Station (Yurikamome) on the mainland side. The Rainbow Bridge carries three transportation lines on two decks. The upper deck carries the Shuto Expressway's Daiba Route, while the lower deck carries the Yurikamome rapid transit system in the centre, walkways on the outer side, and Tokyo Prefectural Route 482 in-between. Route 482
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Teddington Lock

    Teddington Lock

    Teddington Lock is a complex of three locks and a weir on the River Thames in England at Ham in the western suburbs of London. The lock is on the southern Surrey side of the river. The river downstream of the lock, known as the Tideway, is tidal, though the Richmond Lock barrage downstream limits the fall of water to maintain navigability at low tide. The boundary point between the Port of London Authority, which is the navigation authority downstream, and the Environment Agency, which is the navigation authority upstream is marked by an obelisk on the Surrey bank a few hundred yards below the lock. The lock complex consists of three locks, a conventional launch lock, a very large barge lock and a small skiff lock. The barge lock has an additional set of gates in the middle so it can operate in two sizes. The large bow shaped weir stretches across to Teddington from an island upstream of the lock which also acts as the centre point for the two bridges making up Teddington Lock Footbridge. Construction of the first lock started in 1810 after the City of London Corporation obtained an Act of Parliament allowing them to build locks at Chertsey, Shepperton, Sunbury and Teddington. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Thomas Viaduct

    Thomas Viaduct

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Patapsco River
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Elkridge
    The Thomas Viaduct spans the Patapsco River and Patapsco Valley between Relay and Elkridge, Maryland, USA. It is the first multi-span masonry railroad bridge in the United States to be built on a curve. Construction of the bridge commenced on July 4, 1833, and was completed on July 4, 1835. It was named for Philip E. Thomas, the first president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O), which the viaduct carried. The Thomas Viaduct was the largest bridge in the United States when it was built, and today it remains the world's largest bridge of its kind, as well as the world's oldest multiple arched stone railroad bridge. In 1964 it was designated as a National Historic Landmark. The viaduct is now owned and operated by CSX Transportation and still in use today, making it one of the oldest railroad bridges still in service. This Roman-arch stone bridge is divided into eight spans. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, II, then B&O's assistant engineer, later the chief engineer and built by John McCartney of Ohio under the supervision of Caspar Wever, the railroad's chief of construction. McCartney received the contract after the successful completion of the Patterson Viaduct.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Goring and Streatley Bridge

    Goring and Streatley Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Goring-On-Thames
    Goring and Streatley Bridge is a road bridge across the River Thames in England. The bridge links the twin villages of Goring-On-Thames, Oxfordshire, and Streatley, Berkshire, and is adjacent to Goring Lock. The present bridge was built in 1923, and is in two parts: The western bridge is from Streatley to an island in the river (overlooking The Swan hotel, once owned by Danny La Rue); The eastern bridge is from the island to Goring and overlooks Goring Lock. The bridge consists of timber struts supporting a metal roadway. Both the Thames Path and The Ridgeway cross the Thames on this bridge. A bridge was first built here in 1837 being a flat timber bridge of beams on posts. Prior to this there was a ferry although occasionally people would ride across, even driving in a one-horse chaise. In 1674 the ferry turned over in the weir pool with the loss of sixty lives. In the 1970s a Citroën Dyane crashed through the railings at the Streatley end of the bridge landing on a concrete weir 16 feet below. The local Citroën dealer used the photo to illustrate the inherent strength of their upmarket 2CV
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    3 votes
    188
    Million Dollar Bridge

    Million Dollar Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Fore River
    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    • Locale: Portland
    The Million Dollar Bridge was a bascule bridge built in 1916 which carried traffic on Route 77 over the Fore River in Maine between Portland and South Portland. Permits to construct the Million Dollar Bridge were issued by the Secretary of War in 1893. The bridge was designed in 1914 and opened to traffic in 1916. The bascule span provided a horizontal clearance of 100 ft (30.5 m). Originally owned by Cumberland County, the bridge was transferred to the Maine Department of Transportation in 1959. In 1993, construction began on the higher Casco Bay Bridge; the new bridge is on a new alignment just east of the original bridge, and is also a bascule bridge. During construction of the new bridge, the Million Dollar Bridge was hit by the Liberian Tankship Julie N. on September 27, 1996, and emergency repairs were made. The Casco Bay Bridge opened in 1997.
    5.33
    3 votes
    189
    Árpád Bridge

    Árpád Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Danube
    • Bridge Type: Beam bridge
    • Locale: Budapest
    Árpád Bridge or Árpád híd is a bridge in Budapest, Hungary, connecting northern Buda (Óbuda) and Pest across the Danube. It is the longest bridge in Hungary, spanning about 2 km (1.24 mi) with the sections leading up to the bridge, and 928 m (0.58 mi) without them. It is 35.3 m (116 ft) wide with pedestrian and bicycle paths. At its Óbuda end is Flórián tér, Szentlélek tér (near the Main Square of Óbuda, the Vasarely and Kassák Museums). Margaret Island is connected to Árpád Bridge through an embranchment approximately in the middle of the bridge, and crosses the Southern tip of Óbuda Island as well, although there is no road, pedestrian or any other connection whatsoever between the two. (See Sziget Festival) At the Pest end, the adjoining Line 3 (North-South) metro station is also called "Árpád híd". Construction began in 1939 by the plans of János Kossalka. It was planned to be named "Árpád Bridge" after Grand Prince Árpád, the second Grand Prince of the Magyars. Due to World War II, the bridge was finished only after the war in 1950. Because of the communist regime then ruling Hungary, the bridge was opened as Stalin Bridge (Hungarian: Sztálin híd). The final construction works
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    2 votes
    190
    Bollman Truss Railroad Bridge

    Bollman Truss Railroad Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Patuxent River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Savage
    The Bollman Truss Railroad Bridge at Savage, Maryland is the sole surviving example of a revolutionary design in the history of American bridge engineering. The 160-foot (48.8 m) double-span truss bridge is one of the oldest standing iron railroad bridges in the United States. It was the first successful all-metal bridge design to be adopted and consistently used on a railroad. The type was named for its inventor, Wendel Bollman, a self-educated Baltimore engineer. The bridge was built for an unknown location on the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1852, and was moved to its present location, spanning the Little Patuxent River on the spur to the Savage Mill, in 1887. This spur line dates to around 1840 and originally crossed the river on a stone arch bridge; however, due to alterations to the mill in the 1880s and topographical restrictions, a replacement bridge was needed. The bridge remained in service until the mill closed in 1947; switching crews used additional cars in order to avoid crossing the bridge with locomotives, and thus there was never a need for a more substantial structure. It was the first successful all-metal bridge design to be adopted and
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Chiswick Bridge

    Chiswick Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Mortlake
    Chiswick Bridge is a reinforced concrete deck arch bridge over the River Thames in West London. One of three bridges opened in 1933 as part of an ambitious scheme to relieve traffic congestion west of London, it carries the A316 road between Chiswick on the north bank of the Thames and Mortlake on the south bank. Built on the site of a former ferry, the bridge is 606 feet (185 m) long and faced with 3,400 tons of Portland stone. At the time of its opening its 150-foot (46 m) central span was the longest concrete span over the Thames. The bridge is possibly best known today for its proximity to the end of The Championship Course, the stretch of the Thames used for the Boat Race and other rowing races. The villages of Chiswick and Mortlake, about 6 miles (9.7 km) west of central London on the north and south banks of the River Thames, had been linked by a ferry since at least the 17th century. Both areas were sparsely populated, so there was little demand for a fixed river crossing at that point. With the arrival of railways and the London Underground in the 19th century commuting to London became practical and affordable, and the populations of Chiswick and Mortlake grew rapidly. In
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    2 votes
    192
    Seaway International Bridge

    Seaway International Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Saint Lawrence River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Cornwall
    The Three Nations Crossing is a border crossing connecting the city of Cornwall, Ontario in Canada to Rooseveltown, New York, a neighbourhood within the town of Massena, in the United States. The crossing is traversed by the Seaway International Bridge, which crosses the St. Lawrence River and is 4.7 kilometers (2.9 mi) in total length. The bridge is jointly owned by the Federal Bridge Corporation and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. It is operated by the Seaway International Bridge Corporation, which came under the control of the Federal Bridge Corporation from the Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority in 1998. Previously known as the Cornwall-Massena International Bridge, the SIB was a private bridge whose outstanding stock was purchased by the Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority (Canada) and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (U.S.) in 1957. It was incorporated in Canada five years later. The bridge consists of the South and North Channel Bridges. The South Channel Bridge was opened in 1958, and spans the St. Lawrence Seaway. The North Channel Bridge, opened in 1962, connects the City of Cornwall to Cornwall Island. In 2000, the international border
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    2 votes
    193
    Vizcaya Bridge

    Vizcaya Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Transporter bridge
    The Vizcaya Bridge (Bizkaiko Zubia in Basque, Puente de Vizcaya in Spanish), is a transporter bridge that links the towns of Portugalete and Las Arenas (part of Getxo) in the Biscay province of Spain, crossing the mouth of the Nervion River. People in the area, and even the official website, commonly call it the Puente Colgante (literally "hanging bridge", used for suspension bridge in Spanish), although its structure is quite different from a suspension bridge. It is the world's oldest transporter bridge and was built in 1893, designed by Alberto Palacio, one of Gustave Eiffel's disciples. It was the solution given by the engineer to the problem of connecting the two towns without disrupting the maritime traffic of the Port of Bilbao and without having to build a massive structure with long ramps. The service was only interrupted once, for four years, during the Spanish Civil War, when the upper section was dynamited. From his house in Portugalete, Palacio saw his masterwork partially destroyed just before his own death. On July 13, 2006, it was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The bridge, still in use, is 164 meters long, and its gondola can transport six cars and
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    2 votes
    194
    Harvard Bridge

    Harvard Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Charles River
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    • Locale: Boston
    The Harvard Bridge (also known locally as the MIT Bridge, the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge, and the "Mass. Ave." Bridge) is a steel haunched girder bridge between Back Bay, Boston to Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, carrying Massachusetts Avenue (Route 2A) over the Charles River. It is the longest bridge over the Charles River at 659.82 meters (2,164.8 ft). It is locally known for being measured, inaccurately, in the idiosyncratic unit of length called the smoot. After several legislative attempts fraught with antipathy on the part of Boston, it was finally built between 1887 and 1891 with a swing span by Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts. The bridge was revised over the years until its superstructure was completely replaced in the late 1980s due to unacceptable vibration and the collapse of a similar bridge. The bridge was named for the Reverend John Harvard. In the Acts of 1874, the Massachusetts Legislature passed Chapters 175 and 314 to authorize the construction of a bridge between Boston and Cambridge. Nothing further happened until 1882, when a follow-up law, Acts of 1882, Chapter 155, with more specifics was enacted. The location was expressed as The bridge was to have a
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge

    Richmond-San Rafael Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Francisco Bay
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: San Rafael
    The Richmond – San Rafael Bridge (officially, the John F. McCarthy Memorial Bridge) is the northernmost of the east–west crossings of the San Francisco Bay in California, USA, connecting Richmond on the east to San Rafael on the west end. It opened in 1956 replacing ferry service by the Richmond – San Rafael Ferry Company. The bridge—including approaches—measures 5.5 miles (29,040 feet / 8,851.39 m / 8.9 km) long. At the time it was built, it was one of the world's longest bridges. The bridge spans two principal ship channels and has two separate major spans, each of the cantilever type. To save money, both main cantilever sections were designed identically, including the angles, necessitating the "dip" in the central section, giving the bridge a "roller coaster" appearance and also the nickname "roller coaster span". This appearance has also been referred to as a "bent coat hanger". After it was completed, many were disappointed by the aesthetics of the low budget bridge, especially when compared to the engineering and historical marvels of the neighboring Golden Gate Bridge and the Bay Bridge. According to Dennis McNally, Jerry Garcia conceived the idea for the Grateful Dead song
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Willis Avenue Bridge

    Willis Avenue Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Willis Avenue Bridge is a swing bridge that carries road traffic northbound (and bicycles and pedestrians both ways) over the Harlem River between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx, United States. It connects First Avenue in Manhattan with Willis Avenue in the Bronx. The New York City Department of Transportation is responsible for maintaining and operating the bridge. Runners of the New York Marathon have dubbed it "the wall" because it marks the 20 mile mark on the run. The bridge opened in 1901, at an original construction cost of $1,640,523.11 and a land cost of $803,988.37. Major reinforcing work was done in 1916. It once carried both directions of (no longer designated) New York Route 1A and later northbound NY 1A only. The bridge was converted to one-way operation northbound on August 5, 1941 on the same day the Third Avenue Bridge was similarly converted to one-way southbound. In November 2005, New York City sought to replace the bridge. In an effort to preserve the structure, the city offered it for sale for $1, with free delivery within 15 miles. Due to the difficult logistics of moving the structure, there were no bids as of March 2007. Granite
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    3 votes
    197
    Blackfriars Railway Bridge

    Blackfriars Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    Blackfriars Railway Bridge is a railway bridge crossing the River Thames in London, between Blackfriars Bridge and the Millennium Bridge. There have been two structures with the name. The first bridge was opened in 1864 and was designed by Joseph Cubitt for the London, Chatham and Dover Railway. Massive abutments at each end carried the railway's insignia, preserved and restored on the south side. Following the formation of the Southern Railway in 1924, inter-city and continental services were concentrated on Waterloo, and St Paul's Station became a local and suburban stop. For this reason, the use of the original bridge gradually declined. It eventually became too weak to support modern trains, and was therefore removed in 1985 – all that remains is a series of columns crossing the Thames and the southern abutment, which is a Grade II listed structure. The second bridge, built slightly further downstream (to the east), was originally called St Paul's Railway Bridge and opened in 1886. It was designed by John Wolfe-Barry and Henry Marc Brunel and is made of wrought iron. It was built by Lucas & Aird. When St Paul's railway station changed its name to Blackfriars in 1937 the bridge
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Kingston-Port Ewen Suspension Bridge

    Kingston-Port Ewen Suspension Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Rondout Creek
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Kingston
    The Kingston–Port Ewen Suspension Bridge, sometimes known as the "Rondout Creek bridge", "Old Bridge" or "Wurts Street Bridge", is a steel suspension bridge spanning Rondout Creek, near where it empties into the Hudson River. It connects the City of Kingston to the north, with the village of Port Ewen to the south. Completed in 1921, it was the final link in New York's first north-south highway on the West Shore of the Hudson, and is considered an important engineering accomplishment associated with the development of early motoring. Construction began in 1916, with a view to replacing the Rondout Creek ferry Skillypot, known for sporadic service. The bridge was designed by the firms of Holton D. Robinson and John A. Roebling's Sons Company, with Holton D. Robinson, Daniel E. Moran, William Yates listed as chief engineers Construction was hampered by local political and financial difficulties, as well as material shortages caused by entry by the United States into World War I, and was suspended until 1920. When construction resumed, David B. Steinman was among the engineering staff, acting as Assistant Engineer. Completion took about a year, and local legend has it that the
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    2 votes
    199
    Oberbaumbrücke

    Oberbaumbrücke

    The Oberbaum Bridge (German: Oberbaumbrücke) is a double-deck bridge crossing Berlin's River Spree, considered one of the city landmarks. It links Friedrichshain and Kreuzberg, former boroughs that were divided by the Berlin Wall, and has become an important symbol of Berlin’s unity. The lower deck of the bridge carries a roadway, which connects Oberbaum Straße to the south of the river with Warschauer Straße to the north. The upper deck of the bridge carries Berlin U-Bahn line U1, between Schlesisches Tor and Warschauer Straße stations. The bridge appears prominently in the 1998 film Run Lola Run. The bridge is built on the former boundary of the municipal area with its rural environs, where an excise wall was built in 1732. A wooden drawbridge was built as part of the wall; it served as a gate to the city. The name Oberbaumbrücke stemmed from the heavy tree trunk, covered in metal spikes, that was used as a boom to block the river at night to prevent smuggling. (Baum means tree or wooden beam in German; thus the name means something like "Upper [Upstream] Tree Bridge"; there was another tree-trunk barrier at the western end of the contemporary city limits, close to today's
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    2 votes
    200
    Tatara Bridge

    Tatara Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Hiroshima Prefecture
    The Tatara Bridge (多々羅大橋, Tatara Ōhashi) is a cable-stayed bridge that is part of the Nishiseto Expressway, commonly known as the Shimanami Kaidō しまなみ海道. The bridge has a center span of 890 metres (2,920 ft). As of 2010 it has the fourth longest main span of any cable-stayed bridge after the Sutong Bridge. The expressway is a series of roads and bridges that is one of the three routes of the Honshū-Shikoku Bridge Project connecting the islands of Honshū and Shikoku across the Seto Inland Sea in Japan. The Kurushima-Kaikyō Bridge is on the same route. The bridge, which opened on May 1, 1999, carries two lanes of traffic in each direction and has additional lanes for bicycles, motor bikes, and pedestrians. The Tatara Bridge was originally planned as a suspension bridge in 1973. In 1989 the design was changed to a cable-stayed bridge with the same span. By building a cable-stayed bridge a large excavation for an anchorage would not be needed, thereby lessening the environmental impact on the surrounding area. The steel towers are 220 metres (722 ft) high and shaped like an inverted Y. The side-spans are 164.5 metres (540 ft) and 257.5 metres (845 ft) respectively, and there are also
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    2 votes
    201
    Yeongjong Grand Bridge

    Yeongjong Grand Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Self-anchored suspension bridge
    • Locale: Incheon
    The Yeongjong Grand Bridge is a self-anchored suspension bridge located in Incheon, South Korea, linking Yeongjong Island to the Korean mainland. The bridge is part of the Incheon International Airport Expressway and was completed in 2000. The total length of the bridge is 4,420 metres (14,500 ft), of which the main suspension bridge takes 550 metres (1,800 ft), a truss bridge 2,250 metres (7,380 ft) and a steel box girder bridge 1,620 metres (5,310 ft).
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    2 votes
    202
    Bolshoy Ustinsky Bridge

    Bolshoy Ustinsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    Bolshoy Ustinsky Bridge (Russian: Большой Устьинский мост) is a steel arch bridge that spans Moskva River near the mouth of Yauza River, connecting the Boulevard Ring with Zamoskvorechye district in Moscow, Russia. It was completed in May 1938 by V.M.Vakhurkin (structural engineering), G.P.Golts and D.M.Sobolev (architectural design) . It is surrounded by three lesser bridges, two across Yauza and one across Vodootvodny Canal: Maly Ustinsky Bridge, Astakhovsky (Yauzsky) Bridge, Komissariatsky Bridge, also described on this page. The first Ustinsky Bridge across Moskva River was built in 1881, to a very common triple-span arch design by V.N.Speyer . Three spans were 39.5, 44.5 and 39.5 meters long and 19.2 meters wide (4 lanes, including two tram tracks); each span was suspended by 12 riveted arches. All downtown bridges built in 1880-1911 over Moskva River followed this triple-span shape; none survived in their original shape (Borodinsky and Novospassky still stand on original pylons, but arches were replaced with plate girders). As the archive photo shows, bridge and embankment traffic cross each other in the same level. This was probably the most important reason for replacing
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    1 votes
    203
    Coldstream Bridge

    Coldstream Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    Coldstream Bridge, linking Coldstream, Scottish Borders with Cornhill-on-Tweed, Northumberland, is an 18th century Grade II* listed bridge between England and Scotland, across the River Tweed. A plaque on the bridge commemorates the 1787 visit of the poet Robert Burns to the Coldstream. Of historical note is the toll house on the Scottish side of the bridge, which became infamous for the runaway marriages that took place there, as at Gretna Green. It ceased to be a toll bridge in 1826. The architect for the bridge was the famed John Smeaton (responsible for the third Eddystone Lighthouse), working for the Tweed Bridges Trust. Construction lasted from 1763 to 1767, when it opened. It is a road bridge, the arches having equal length. It currently carries the A697 road across the Tweed. The cost of the bridge was £6,000, with government grants available for the project and the shortfall covered by a mixture of local subscription and loans from Edinburgh's banks, which were to be paid back by the tolling system. There was controversy when the project's resident engineer, Robert Reid (mason) of Haddington, used some of the funds to build accommodation for himself, but the trustees were
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    1 votes
    204
    Forth Bridge

    Forth Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Firth of Forth
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Edinburgh
    The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge over the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, to the east of the Forth Road Bridge, and 14 kilometres (9 mi) west of central Edinburgh. It was opened on 4 March 1890, and spans a total length of 2,528.7 metres (8,296 ft). It is often called the Forth Rail Bridge or Forth Railway Bridge to distinguish it from the Forth Road Bridge, although it has been called the "Forth Bridge" since its construction, and was for over seventy years the sole claimant to this name. The bridge connects Scotland's capital city, Edinburgh, with Fife, leaving the Lothians at Dalmeny and arriving in Fife at North Queensferry; it acts as a major artery connecting the north-east and south-east of the country. Described by the Collins Encyclopaedia of Scotland as "the one immediately and internationally recognised Scottish landmark", it is a Category A listed building and was nominated by the British government in May 2011 for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Scotland. Until 1917, when the Quebec Bridge was completed, the Forth Bridge had the longest single cantilever bridge span in the world. It still has the world's second-longest single span.
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    1 votes
    205
    Lambeth Bridge

    Lambeth Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: London
    Lambeth Bridge is a road traffic and footbridge crossing the River Thames in an east-west direction in central London, the river flows north at the crossing point. Downstream, the next bridge is Westminster Bridge; upstream the next is Vauxhall Bridge. The most conspicuous colour in the bridge's paint scheme is red, the same colour as the leather benches in the House of Lords which is at the southern end of the Palace of Westminster nearest the bridge. This is in contrast to Westminster Bridge which is predominantly green, the same colour as the benches in the House of Commons at the northern end of the Houses of Parliament. On the east side, in Lambeth are Lambeth Palace, the Albert Embankment, St. Thomas' Hospital, and the International Maritime Organization. On the west side, in Westminster, are Thames House (the headquarters of MI5), behind which is Horseferry House (the National Probation Service headquarters), and Clelland House and Abell House (the headquarters of HM Prison Service), and the Millbank Tower and Tate Britain. The Palace of Westminster is a short walk downstream to the north through the Victoria Tower Garden. The current structure, a five-span steel arch,
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    1 votes
    206
    Newport Rail Bridge

    Newport Rail Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Swing bridge
    • Locale: Inver Grove Heights
    The Rock Island Swing Bridge was a swing bridge that spanned the Mississippi River between Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota and St. Paul Park, Minnesota. It was also known as the Newport Rail Bridge, as it had a spur to Newport, Minnesota, and J.A.R. bridge. after previous owners Joan and Al Roman of Chicago. It was one of the few double-decker bridges on the Mississippi, with the top level formerly used for railroad traffic and the bottom level formerly used as a road crossing. It also was one of a few toll bridges in Minnesota, and one of the last remaining ones. It closed to rail traffic in 1980, and road traffic in 1999, when the toll was 75 cents. After closing, the bridge sat dormant in the open position for 10 years before being partially demolished in 2009. It was converted into a recreational pier which opened to the public on June 11, 2011. It was built in 1895 by Pittsburgh Bridge Company. The bridge originally was built for the South St. Paul Beltline Railroad to connect stockyards in nearby South St. Paul, Minnesota to the mail rail lines of the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy, and Milwaukee Road that run on the east bank of the Mississippi River in Washington County,
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    1 votes
    207
    Niagara Cantilever Bridge

    Niagara Cantilever Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Niagara Falls
    The Niagara Cantilever Bridge or Michigan Central Railway Cantilever Bridge was a cantilever bridge across the Niagara Gorge. An international railway-only bridge between Canada and the United States, it connected Niagara Falls, New York, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, located just south of the Whirlpool Bridge, and opened to traffic in 1883, it was replaced by the Michigan Central Railway Steel Arch Bridge in 1925. Although British engineers suggested using the cantilever form as a replacement for non-statically determinate trusses as early as 1846, the first modern cantilever actually built was Heinrich Gerber's Hassfurt Bridge over the Main River in Germany (1867), with a central span of 38 m. The next important cantilever was built by American engineer C. Shaler Smith, ten years later in 1877. It provided the first practical test of the application of the cantilever principle to long-span bridge design. He built what was then the world's longest cantilever for the Cincinnati Southern Railway over a 366 m wide and 84 m deep gorge of the Kentucky River near Dixville, Kentucky. Other important counterbalanced spans are the Michigan Central Railroad bridge over the Niagara Gorge (this
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    1 votes
    208
    Pelham Bridge

    Pelham Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Hutchinson River
    • Bridge Type: Bascule bridge
    • Locale: New York City
    Pelham Bridge is a bascule bridge located in the New York City borough of the Bronx. It carries Shore Road, and a walkway along the downstream side, over the Hutchinson River. The bridge is operated and maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation. Crossing the mouth of the river, it is variously called Pelham Bay Bridge and Pelham Bridge. Pelham Bridge opens frequently; in 2008, it opened a total of 1,446 times. The watercraft traffic is greater than for any other drawbridge in the city. The first bridge at the site was a stone bridge built in 1815 that was destroyed in a storm on April 12, 1816. Another bridge wouldn't be built at the site for eighteen years. The current bridge replaced an older one that required constant, expensive maintenance. The new bridge was opened to traffic on October 15, 1908 before it was fully completed so as to be able to save costs on maintaining the old bridge. During construction, the water main for City Island and Pelham Bay Park had to be interrupted, so water was imported from New Rochelle, costing the city $5,323.93. The bridge was completed on February 17, 1909 at a total cost of $605,274.06. The bridge was reconstructed in
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    1 votes
    209
    Runcorn Widnes Bridge

    Runcorn Widnes Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Mersey
    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Widnes
    The Silver Jubilee Bridge or Runcorn Bridge crosses the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal at Runcorn Gap between Runcorn and Widnes in Cheshire, England. It is a through arch bridge with a main arch span of 1,082 feet (330 m). It was opened in 1961 as a replacement for the Widnes-Runcorn Transporter Bridge, and was initially known simply as the Runcorn Bridge or Runcorn–Widnes Bridge. In 1975–77 it was widened, after which it was given its official name in honour of the Queen's Silver Jubilee. It carries the A533 road and a cantilevered footway. The bridge has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed structure. Until 1868, when Runcorn Railway Bridge was opened, the only means of crossing the Mersey at or near Runcorn Gap were by fording or by ferry. Before that the lowest crossing of the river had been the road bridge at Warrington. The first bridge to carry vehicular traffic across Runcorn Gap was the Widnes-Runcorn Transporter Bridge which opened in 1905. This was an inefficient means of transport and it had become inadequate for the amount of traffic using it before the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1946 the Ministry of Transport agreed that the
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    1 votes
    210
    West Gate Bridge

    West Gate Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Yarra River
    • Bridge Type: Box girder bridge
    • Locale: Melbourne
    The West Gate Bridge is a steel box girder cable-stayed bridge in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It spans the Yarra River, just north of its mouth into Port Phillip, and is a vital link between the inner city and Melbourne's western suburbs with the industrial suburbs in the west and with the city of Geelong, 80 kilometres (50 mi) to the south-west. The main river span is 336 metres (1,102 ft) in length, and the height above the water is 58 metres. The total length of the bridge is 2,582.6 metres (8,473.1 ft). It is the third longest in Australia behind the Houghton Highway and the Hornibrook Bridge, and is twice as long as the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The bridge passes over Westgate Park, a large environmental and recreational reserve created during the bridge's construction. The West Gate Bridge carries five lanes of motor vehicle traffic in each direction. The bridge was originally tolled. Tolls were abolished in 1985, because drivers were using other routes to avoid the toll. Cyclists are prohibited from using the bridge except for special bicycle events, notably the "MS Summer cycle" which is a fundraising event for multiple sclerosis and the "Around the bay in a day" Bicycle
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Andreyevsky Bridge

    Andreyevsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    Andreyevsky Bridge (Russian: Андреевский мост, St.Andrew’s Bridge) name refers to a historical bridge demolished in 1998 and three existing bridges across Moskva River, located between Luzhniki and Gorky Park in Moscow. The original Sergievsky Bridge (Сергиевский мост), named after the late Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich, and its twin, Nicholas II Bridge (Мост Николая II, later Krasnoluzhsky Bridge) were built in 1903-1907, replacing temporary wooden truss bridges of the Moscow Inner Ring Railroad. New bridges were designed as through arch bridges by Lavr Proskuryakov (structural engineering) and Alexander Pomerantsev (architectural design). The 135 meter wide, 15 metre tall steel arch (1400 metric tons) was made at Votkinsk works. Proskuryakov's work, considered a marvel of engineering, was proven by the 1908 flood: water level exceeded the maximum design specification by a metre and a half; the bridges stood unharmed. After the February Revolution of 1917, Romanov names were erased from the map. Sergievsky Bridge was renamed Andreyevsky after nearby St.Andrew’s monastery, Nicholas II Bridge became Krasnoluzhsky Bridge. In 1937, the arched stone pillars over embankments were
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    2 votes
    212
    Chesapeake Bay Bridge

    Chesapeake Bay Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Chesapeake Bay
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Anne Arundel County
    The William Preston Lane Jr. Memorial Bridge (commonly known as the Bay Bridge) is a major dual-span bridge in the U.S. state of Maryland. Spanning the Chesapeake Bay, it connects the state's rural Eastern Shore region with the more urban Western Shore. The original span opened in 1952 and, at the time, with a length of 4.3 miles (6.9 km), it was the world's longest continuous over-water steel structure. The parallel span was added in 1973. The bridge is named after William Preston Lane, Jr. who, as governor of Maryland, initiated its construction. The bridge is part of U.S. Routes 50 and 301, and serves as a vital link in both routes. As part of U.S. Route 50, it connects the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area with Ocean City, Maryland and other coastal tourist destinations. As part of U.S. Route 301, it serves as part of an alternate route for Interstate 95 travelers between northern Delaware and the Washington, D.C. area. Because of this linkage, the bridge is heavily traveled and has become known as a point of traffic congestion, particularly during peak hours and summer months. Studies exploring the possibility of building a bridge across the Chesapeake Bay may have been
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge

    Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    The Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge is a steelsuspension bridge over the Rhine located in Cologne, Germany. Completed in 1954, it has a main span of 378 metres. It was named after the Cologne district of Rodenkirchen. It was built from 1938 to 1941, after the design of Paul Bonatz and the planning of Fritz Leonhardt, for the Autobahn Cologne-Aachen. Today the Bundesautobahn 4 is the southern wing of the Cologne Beltway. The bridge was destroyed due to an airstrike on 14 January 1945. It was rebuilt from 1952 to 1954, with the old pylons re-used. The new bridge was only built from 3350 tons of steel, unlike the old bridge with 6100 tons. Because of the increasing traffic on the bridge, in 1990 it was expanded with an equal bridge. The expansion was finished in 1995. Media related to Rodenkirchener Autobahnbrücke at Wikimedia Commons
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Elvet Bridge

    Elvet Bridge

    Elvet Bridge is a mediaeval masonry arch bridge across the River Wear, in the city of Durham, in County Durham, in England. It links the peninsula in central Durham to the Elvet area of the city, and is a Grade I listed building. The bridge was constructed in 1160 during the time of Bishop Hugh de Puiset (1153–95). Hugh Du Puiset, also known as "Bishop Pudsey" was a powerful Prince Bishop, who instigated a significant amount of building work in northern England. The bridge has a total of ten arches. There is however, some dispute over how many arches exist. Sixteenth century antiquarian John Leland believed the bridge had 14 arches, but this has never been proven. The river flows through four full arches - the remaining are dry or semi-dry. Ten arches have been identified, others may be hidden beneath the street on the Elvet side or beneath Souter Peth. A key reason for the construction of the bridge was because of the urban development taking place in what was the then Elvet borough. The bridge was repaired extensively under Bishop Fox between 1495-1501, and again in 1601. In 1771 a flood badly damaged the bridge. In the mediaeval period Elvet Bridge was guarded by a gate and
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    Gatehampton Railway Bridge

    Gatehampton Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Lower Basildon
    Gatehampton Railway Bridge is a railway bridge carrying the Great Western Main Line over the River Thames in Lower Basildon, Berkshire, England. It takes the line between the stations at Goring and Streatley and Pangbourne, and crosses the Thames on the reach between Whitchurch Lock and Goring Lock. The brick bridge was built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1838, at the same time as Maidenhead Railway Bridge and Moulsford Railway Bridge.
    5.00
    2 votes
    216
    Konohana Bridge

    Konohana Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Self-anchored suspension bridge
    The Konohana Bridge (此花大橋, Konohana Ō-hashi) is a self-anchored suspension bridge located in Osaka, Japan. Opened for traffic in 1990, it has a main span of 300 meters. Its unusual design has only a single main cable. At the time of its completion it was the largest self-anchored suspension bridge in the world. Its center span has been tied by the Yeongjong Grand Bridge in Korea which has slightly larger side spans. The single tower eastern span replacement of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge will have a longer span when completed.
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge

    Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge

    The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge is a pedestrian bridge located within Lynn Canyon Park, in the District of North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 50 metres (160 ft) high from the bottom of the canyon. The bridge was built as a private venture in 1912. The bridge connects the extensive hiking trails on the two sides of the canyon and is part of the Baden-Powell Trail. However, many of the tourists do not hike, and only visit the suspension bridge. The bridge is shorter and not as high as the Capilano Suspension Bridge, but it is narrower and moves around more when people walk on it. It is free to cross, but at one time visitors were charged a toll of ten cents.
    5.00
    2 votes
    218
    Stone Arch Bridge

    Stone Arch Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Mississippi River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Minneapolis
    The Stone Arch Bridge is a former railroad bridge crossing the Mississippi River at Saint Anthony Falls in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. 117 Portland Avenue is the general address of the historic complex. Positioned between the 3rd Avenue Bridge and the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge, the Stone Arch Bridge was built in 1883 by railroad tycoon James J. Hill for his Great Northern Railway, and accessed the former passenger station located about a mile to the west, on the west bank of the river. The structure is now used as a pedestrian and bicycle bridge. It is an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 as a part of the Saint Anthony Falls Historic District, (District #71000438). A plaque near the bridge explains that the bridge was built for the Manitoba Line (St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway), which would be used to bring wheat from the Red River valley and Canada to the Minneapolis mills. It remains as a monument to James J. Hill, his vision, and is a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The bridge has been altered somewhat from its original appearance. When the lock and dam was built at Saint
    5.00
    2 votes
    219
    Ward's Island Bridge

    Ward's Island Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Harlem River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Manhattan
    The Wards Island Bridge, also known as the 103rd Street Footbridge, is a pedestrian bridge crossing the Harlem River between Manhattan Island and Wards Island in New York City. The vertical lift bridge has a total of twelve spans consisting of steel towers and girders. It carries only pedestrian and bicycle traffic. On the Manhattan side of the river, the bridge is located at East 103rd Street, between Exits 14 and 15 of the FDR Drive. The bridge is accessible from the East River Esplanade and a pedestrian overpass across the FDR Drive to the East River Houses apartment complex in Spanish Harlem. The bridge connects to the southwestern corner of Wards Island and provides access to the many playing fields and scenic waterfront of Randall's and Wards Island Park. After being closed to the public for approximately two years for a $16.8 million infrastructure project, Wards Island Bridge was reopened on June 1, 2012 and will be open 24 hours-a-day year-round. Previously, the bridge had only been available for use from April through October during daylight hours. The first known bridge to Wards Island was a wooden drawbridge between East 114th Street in Manhattan to the northwest
    4.50
    2 votes
    220
    Ambassador Bridge

    Ambassador Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Detroit River
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Detroit
    The Ambassador Bridge is a suspension bridge that connects Detroit, Michigan, in the United States, with Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. It is the busiest international border crossing in North America in terms of trade volume: more than 25 percent of all merchandise trade between the United States and Canada crosses the bridge. A 2004 Border Transportation Partnership study showed that 150,000 jobs in the region and US$13 billion in annual production depend on the Windsor–Detroit international border crossing. The bridge is owned by Grosse Pointe billionaire Manuel "Matty" Moroun through the Detroit International Bridge Company in the US and the Canadian Transit Company in Canada, and at one time it was publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange. The bridge is responsible for 60-70% of commercial truck traffic in the region. Moroun also owns the Ammex Detroit Duty Free Stores at both the bridge and the tunnel. After the American Civil War, Detroit–Windsor was a center for railroads in the area. The Michigan Central and the Great Western railroads in addition to others operated on either side of the border connecting Chicago with the Atlantic Seaboard. To cross the Detroit River,
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Bellaire Bridge

    Bellaire Bridge

    The Bellaire Bridge or Interstate Bridge is a privately owned, closed cantilever truss toll bridge that spans the Ohio River between Benwood, West Virginia (near Wheeling) and Bellaire, Ohio (near Martins Ferry). It provided a link for commuters between southern Ohio border towns and West Virginia steel mills from 1926 to 1991. The overall length of the bridge is 2,770 feet (840 m), including the approach of 850 feet (260 m) on the West Virginia side and 670 feet (200 m) on the Ohio side of the river. The highest point in the bridge is 350 feet (110 m) above the water line. Built in 1926, the bridge is likely the oldest cantilever truss bridge in West Virginia, and is the second oldest vehicular truss bridge over the entire Ohio River. It is currently unused, and missing approach spans on the Ohio side. As of August 19, 2012, the bridge remains standing, but is currently scheduled to be demolished. The bridge was designed as a cantilever truss bridge by J. E. Greiner and Company, with the Vang Construction Company as contractors of the substructure; the J.E. Moss Iron Works and the Mt. Vernon Bridge Company as co-contractors of the superstructure. The R. R. Kitchen company of
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Evergreen Point Floating Bridge

    Evergreen Point Floating Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Lake Washington
    • Bridge Type: Pontoon bridge
    • Locale: Seattle
    The Governor Albert D. Rosellini Bridge—Evergreen Point (formerly the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge, and commonly called the SR 520 Bridge or 520 Bridge) is the longest floating bridge on Earth at 2,310 metres (7,580 ft) (floating section) and carries State Route 520 across Lake Washington from Seattle to Medina. Total bridge length is approximately 4,750 metres (15,580 ft). The Evergreen Point of the bridge's original name is the westernmost of the three small Eastside peninsulas that SR-520 crosses. (The other two are Hunts Point and Yarrow Point.) In 1988, it was renamed for Rosellini, who had advocated its construction. The bridge is currently in poor condition. Construction is currently underway to replace it with a new floating bridge. The bridge was opened for commuter traffic on August 28, 1963, after three years of construction. It was built as a four-lane toll bridge to provide easy access from Seattle to Eastside communities such as Bellevue, Kirkland, and Redmond. The total cost of the bridge, in 1961 dollars, was $21 million ($153 million in 2011 dollars). To make up for this cost, commuters paid a 35-cent toll in each direction until 1979. The toll booths were then
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Monroe Street Bridge

    Monroe Street Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Spokane River
    • Bridge Type: Deck arch bridge
    • Locale: Spokane
    Monroe Street Bridge is a deck arch bridge that spans the Spokane River in Spokane, Washington. It was built in 1911 by the city of Spokane and was designed by John Chester Ralston and Kirtland Kelsey Cutter. At the time of completion it was the largest concrete-arch bridge in the United States and the third longest in the world. The current bridge is actually the third bridge in this location. The first bridge, a rather rickety wooden structure, was built in 1889. The bridge was first closed due to arguments in the city over rites of passage and ownership. It then burned down in 1890 and then replaced with a steel bridge. The second bridge vibrated badly and had a noticeable dip in the center. A consultant from the Good Roads Movement considered the bridge unsafe in 1905. The design of the third bridge was largely copied from the Rocky River Bridge in Cleveland, Ohio, but was built one foot longer to make it the largest concrete arch in the United States at the time. The bridge was designed with ornamental features such as bison skulls, covered pavilions, and a chain-link railing motif. The bison skull was an inspiration of Patrick C. Shine who found it in Drumheller, Alberta,
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

    Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Dee, Wales
    The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct (Welsh pronunciation: [ˌpɔntkəˈsəɬtɛ], full name in Welsh: Traphont Ddŵr Pontcysyllte) is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal over the valley of the River Dee in Wrexham County Borough in north east Wales. Completed in 1805, it is the longest and highest aqueduct in Britain, a Grade I Listed Building and a World Heritage Site. When the bridge was built it linked the villages of Froncysyllte, at the southern end of the bridge in the Cysyllte township of Llangollen parish (from where it takes its name), and Trevor, at the northern end of the bridge in the Trevor Isaf township of Llangollen parish. Both townships were later transferred to Wrexham County Borough following local government reorganisation. The name is in the Welsh language and means "Cysyllte Bridge". For most of its existence it was known as Pont y Cysyllte ("Bridge of Cysyllte"). Other translations such as "Bridge of the Junction" or "The Bridge that links" are modern, and incorrect, inventions, from the literal English translation of cysyllte being "junctions" or "links". The aqueduct, built by Thomas Telford and William Jessop, is 1,007 ft (307 m) long, 11 ft (3.4 m) wide
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Richmond Bridge, London

    Richmond Bridge, London

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Richmond upon Thames
    Richmond Bridge is an 18th-century stone arch bridge in south west London, England, which was designed by James Paine and Kenton Couse, and which crosses the River Thames at Richmond, connecting the two halves of the present-day London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. The bridge, which is a Grade I listed building, was built between 1774 and 1777, as a replacement for a ferry crossing which connected Richmond town centre on the east bank with its neighbouring district of East Twickenham (St. Margarets) to the west. Its construction was privately funded by a tontine scheme, for which tolls were charged until 1859. Because the river meanders from its general west to east direction, flowing from southeast to northwest in this part of London, what would otherwise be known as the north and south banks are often referred to as the "Middlesex" (Twickenham) and "Surrey" (Richmond) banks respectively, named after the historic counties to which each side once belonged. The bridge was widened and slightly flattened in 1937–40, but otherwise still conforms to its original design. The eighth Thames bridge to be built in what is now Greater London, it is today the oldest surviving Thames bridge
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Richmond Railway Bridge

    Richmond Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Truss arch bridge
    • Locale: Richmond upon Thames
    Richmond Railway Bridge in Richmond, south-west London crosses the River Thames immediately upstream of Twickenham Bridge. It carries National Rail services operated by South West Trains from London Waterloo to Reading, and lies between Richmond and St. Margarets stations. After the railway came to Richmond station in 1846, the line was extended to Windsor. Joseph Locke and J E Errington designed the original bridgewith three 100-foot cast iron girders supported on stone-faced land arches with two stone-faced river piers. Due to concerns over its structural integrity, the bridge was rebuilt in 1908 reusing the existing piers and abutments to a design by the London & South Western Railway's chief engineer, J W Jacomb-Hood. The bridge was declared a Grade II listed structure in 2008, providing protection to preserve its special character from unsympathetic development.
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Sarah Mildred Long Bridge

    Sarah Mildred Long Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Piscataqua River
    • Bridge Type: Truss bridge
    • Locale: Portsmouth
    The Sarah Mildred Long Bridge is a lift bridge that carries the US 1 Bypass over the Piscataqua River between Portsmouth, New Hampshire and Kittery, Maine. The bridge is a double deck truss bridge, with the US 1 Bypass road deck above and a railroad bed below. The bridge features two separate movable spans. While the main lift span and its towers are the obvious primary moving feature, the second moving span is only apparent to water and rail traffic. On the north side of the bridge, the first non-trussed section of rail bed lifts up and moves south as a retractable bridge, coming to rest on top of the rail tracks inside the truss. This creates a waterway large enough for most recreational boats to pass through without the need for interruption of automobile traffic on the bridge. Completed in 1940, the bridge is the second to carry motor vehicle traffic between Maine and New Hampshire at Portsmouth, and replaced a river crossing dating from 1822. The bridge was the direct result of the work of the Maine-New Hampshire Interstate Bridge Authority, which had been formed in 1937. The major goal of the bridge project was to relieve congestion in downtown Portsmouth and Kittery, where
    5.00
    1 votes
    228
    Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge

    Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: St. Marys River
    • Bridge Type: Truss arch bridge
    • Locale: Sault Ste. Marie
    The Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge, often known just as the International Bridge, spans the St. Marys River between the United States and Canada connecting the twin cities of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. It serves as the northern terminus of Interstate 75. The International Bridge began construction in 1960 and officially opened to traffic on October 31, 1962. Daily operation is carried on by the International Bridge Administration (IBA) under the supervision of the Sault Ste. Marie Bridge Authority (SSMBA). The SSMBA replaced the previous Joint International Bridge Authority (JIBA) in 2009, which in turn had succeeded the International Bridge Authority (IBA, created in 1935) in 2000. In 1954 the state of Michigan created the International Bridge Authority. Canada followed in 1955, creating the St.Mary's River Co. This is a steel truss arch bridge with suspended deck. There are two separate spans, a double arch span on the U.S. side and a single arch span on the Canadian side. The double arch spans cross the four U.S. Soo Locks. The single arch spans the single Canadian Lock. In Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, the bridge connects to a city street in
    5.00
    1 votes
    229
    Upper Hack Lift

    Upper Hack Lift

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Hackensack River
    • Bridge Type: Lift bridge
    • Locale: Secaucus
    Upper Hack Lift is a lift bridge carrying the New Jersey Transit Main Line across the Hackensack River at mile 6.9 between Secaucus, New Jersey and Lyndhurst. It was built by the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad in 1958 and completed in March 1959 to serve the Boonton Line and replaced an older swing span from 1901 on the site, which had been damaged by shifting currents. The new single-track lift bridge cost $5,500,000 Following a 1963 route realignment, Erie Main Line service began using the bridge. It was repainted in 1994 to its current turquoise blue color. Upper Hack is the only single-track lift bridge in New Jersey. It is visible to motorists on the New Jersey Turnpike's western spur between Interchanges 15W and 16W. Remnants of the older swing span are visible just to the north of the current lift span, as concrete abutments and piers remain. The current drawbridge schedule at Upper Hack (as stated by US Coast Guard, 33 CFR 117.723) allows the bridge to open on signal unless the bridge tender is at the nearby HX Draw on the Bergen County Line upstream.
    5.00
    1 votes
    230
    Vauxhall Bridge

    Vauxhall Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Vauxhall
    Vauxhall Bridge is a Grade II* listed steel and granite deck arch bridge in central London. It crosses the River Thames in a south–east north–west direction between Vauxhall on the south bank and Pimlico on the north bank. Opened in 1906, it replaced an earlier bridge, originally known as Regent Bridge but later renamed Vauxhall Bridge, built between 1809 and 1816 as part of a scheme for redeveloping the south bank of the Thames. The original bridge was itself built on the site of a former ferry. The building of both bridges was problematic, with both the first and second bridges requiring several redesigns from multiple architects. The original bridge, the first iron bridge over the Thames, was built by a private company and operated as a toll bridge before being taken into public ownership in 1879. The second bridge, which took eight years to build, was the first in London to carry trams and later one of the first two roads in London to have a bus lane. In 1963 it was proposed to replace the bridge with a modern development containing seven floors of shops, office space, hotel rooms and leisure facilities supported above the river, but the plans were abandoned because of costs.
    4.00
    2 votes
    231
    Wearmouth Bridge

    Wearmouth Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Wear
    • Bridge Type: Compression arch suspended-deck bridge
    • Locale: Sunderland
    The Wearmouth Bridge is a through arch bridge across the River Wear in Sunderland. It is the final bridge over the river before its mouth with the North Sea. The current bridge is the third Wearmouth Bridge in its position. The first opened in 1796, and then was reconstructed in the 19th century. The first Wearmouth Bridge opened in 1796, with the foundation stone having been laid in September 1793. It was sponsored by Rowland Burdon, the MP, and designed by Thomas Paine following a model for a bridge over the Schyulkill River in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the plaque on the current bridge, its construction "proved to be a catalyst for the growth of Sunderland," since access between Monkwearmouth and Bishopwearmouth had previously only been by ferry, with the nearest bridge at Chester-le-Street. There was originally a toll for traffic and pedestrians, although tolls for pedestrians were abolished in 1846. It was the second iron bridge built after the famous span at Ironbridge, but was over twice as long with a nominal span of 240 feet, and only three-quarters the weight. Indeed, at the time of building, it was the biggest single span bridge in the world (72 m),
    4.00
    2 votes
    232
    Galton Bridge

    Galton Bridge

    Galton Bridge (grid reference SP015894) is a canal bridge in Smethwick, West Midlands, England built by Thomas Telford in 1829. It spans Telford's Birmingham Canal Navigations New Main Line carrying Roebuck Lane. When it was constructed, its single span of 151 feet (46 metres) was the highest in the world (the Menai Suspension Bridge was longest). Originally a road bridge it is now restricted to pedestrians. It is a Grade I listed building, and lends its name to the adjacent Smethwick Galton Bridge railway station. It is similar to Holt Fleet Bridge, Telford's Grade II listed bridge over the River Severn at Holt in Worcestershire and was named after Samuel Galton, a member of the Lunar Society. It was cast by Horseley Ironworks.
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    George Street Bridge

    George Street Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Usk
    • Bridge Type: Cable-stayed bridge
    • Locale: Newport
    George Street Bridge is a crossing of the River Usk at Newport, South Wales. It was opened on 9 April 1964 and is the first cable-stayed bridge in the United Kingdom. It is Grade II* listed. Before its opening in 1964 the only crossings of the river Usk in central Newport were the Newport Bridge carrying the main A48 road and Newport Transporter Bridge. Many grand names were proposed for the bridge but it was eventually named after the relatively small George Street on the western bank of the River Usk. Originally the bridge was planned to be six lanes wide, but with the M4 motorway Usk bridge already planned further upstream it was reduced to four lanes. On completion, the A48 route was diverted over the new bridge, making it the preferred route for through traffic, although in 2004 the new City Bridge on the Southern Distributor Road further downstream became the preferred route and assumed the route number.
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    Hell Gate Bridge

    Hell Gate Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: East River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Queens
    The Hell Gate Bridge (originally the New York Connecting Railroad Bridge or The East River Arch Bridge) is a 1,017-foot (310 m) steel through arch railroad bridge between Astoria in the borough of Queens, Randall's/Wards Island (which are now joined into one island and are politically part of Manhattan), and The Bronx in New York City, over a portion of the East River known as Hell Gate. The Hell Gate Bridge runs parallel to the Queens span of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, which connects Queens, the Bronx, and Manhattan, and drivers can see the length of the bridge just east of the roadway. The great arch bridge is the largest of three bridges, along with more than 17,000 feet (3.2 mi; 5.2 km) long of approach spans and viaducts, that form the Hell Gate complex. An inverted bowstring truss bridge with four 300-foot (91.4 m) spans crosses the Little Hell Gate (now filled in); and a 350-foot (106.7 m) fixed truss bridge crosses the Bronx Kill (now narrowed by fill). This bridge was the inspiration for the design of Sydney Harbour Bridge in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia which is about 60% bigger. The bridge was conceived in the early 1900s as a way to link New York and the
    4.00
    1 votes
    235
    Juan Pablo II Bridge

    Juan Pablo II Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Bío-Bío River
    • Locale: Concepción
    The Juan Pablo II Bridge, also known as Puente Nuevo ("New Bridge"), is a bridge in Chile connecting Concepción and Talcahuano with San Pedro de la Paz, through the Biobío River. Since completion in 1974 it has remained the longest bridge in the country. It was significantly damaged in the February 27, 2010 earthquake. The bridge was designed by E.W.H. Gifford & Partners from England. It is 2.310 m. (7.578 ft) in length. It is formed by 70 parts of 33 m. each one and with a width of 21.9 m. (including 2 passerby corridors of 1.6 m.) When the bridge was finished in 1974, it had no official name,. People began calling it "Puente Nuevo" ("New Bridge"), as it was the second bridge across the Biobío River after "Puente Viejo" ("Old Bridge"), now closed. When Pope John Paul II visited Concepción the bridge was named after him as a tribute.
    4.00
    1 votes
    236
    Kingsgate Bridge

    Kingsgate Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Wear
    • Locale: Durham
    Kingsgate Bridge is a striking, modern reinforced concrete construction footbridge across the River Wear, in Durham, England. It is a Grade I listed building. It was personally designed in 1963 by Sir Ove Arup, connecting Bow Lane on the historic peninsula in the centre of Durham to Dunelm House on New Elvet (to which building Arup's studio also contributed), and opened in 1966. Kingsgate Bridge is thought to have been one of Arup's favourite designs of all, he having spent many hours working on every detail of the plans. Its construction was unusual. The two halves were each built parallel to the river, then rotated through 90° to make the crossing. During a university RAG Week in the early 1960s students suspended a car beneath the bridge. In February 1998 the Durham Union Society president, Tom Joyce, fell through the bridge, but caught himself and was uninjured. A bust of Arup, cast in resin, was installed on the side of Dunelm House, the students' union building adjacent to the bridge, in September 2011. The sculpture is a copy of a 1987 bust by Diana Brandenburger, held by the National Portrait Gallery. It is a replacement for a previous copy of the same bust, in bronze,
    4.00
    1 votes
    237
    Krymsky Bridge

    Krymsky Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    Krymsky Bridge or Crimean Bridge (Russian: Крымский мост) is a steel suspension bridge in Moscow. The bridge spans the Moskva River 1,800 metres south-west from the Kremlin and carries the Garden Ring across the river. The bridge links the Crimean Square to the north with Krymsky Val street to the south. The nearby Moscow Metro stations are Park Kultury and Oktyabrskaya. The existing bridge was completed on May 1, 1938, as part of Joseph Stalin's ambitious reconstruction of downtown Moscow. Designed by engineer V. P. Konstantinov and architect A. V. Vlasov, it is the fourth bridge on this site and the only suspension bridge in all of Moscow. The first pontoon Krymsky Bridge was built in wood in 1786. Subsequently, it was rebuilt as a fixed wooden causeway with a 15-metre central span for barges. Both wooden bridges were frequently damaged by ice and floods, and had to be repaired on numerous occasions. The first steel bridge, built in 1873 by Amand Struve to a design by V. K. Speyer, featured two 64-meter truss boxes, supported by the central pillar. Traffic moved inside the truss, which was congested and unsafe. Tram companies issued a rule that only one tram can be on a bridge
    4.00
    1 votes
    238
    Princes Bridge, Melbourne

    Princes Bridge, Melbourne

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Yarra River
    • Bridge Type: Arch bridge
    • Locale: Melbourne
    Princes Bridge, originally Prince's Bridge, is an important bridge in central Melbourne, Australia that spans the Yarra River. It is built on the site of one of the oldest river crossings in Australia. The bridge connects Swanston Street on the north bank of the Yarra River to St Kilda Road on the south bank, and carries road, tram and pedestrian traffic. The present bridge was built in 1888 and is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. Because of its position, Princes Bridge is often a focal point for celebratory events in Melbourne such as the Moomba Festival, New Years Eve and many celebrations taking place on the Yarra River where it flows through the city. When the first European settlers settled in Melbourne in 1835 there was no permanent crossing point of the Yarra River. Over time various punt and ferry operators set up business to ferry people and other traffic across the river. The colonial government in Sydney was unreliable in providing funds for the construction of a bridge, resulting in most of Melbourne’s early infrastructure being provided by private enterprise. On 22 April 1840, a private company was formed to construct a bridge across the Yarra. Traders in
    4.00
    1 votes
    239
    Sannesund Bridge

    Sannesund Bridge

    Sannesund Bridge (Norwegian Sannesundbrua) is a motorway cantilever bridge that crosses Glomma river in the town of Sarpsborg in Østfold county, Norway. The bridge is 1528 metres long, the longest span is 139 metres, and the maximum clearance is 30 metres. The bridge has 48 spans. Sandesund Bridge was opened in 1978. It leads the traffic on the E6 past Sarpsborg. Under the bridge is a narrow pedestrian bridge over Glomma. A new bridge parallel to the old one was opened in May 2008. The old bridge was subsequently closed for renovation. It opened again in November 2008, creating a four-lane motorway.
    4.00
    1 votes
    240
    Shillingford Bridge

    Shillingford Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Locale: Shillingford
    Shillingford Bridge is Grade II* listed road bridge near Shillingford, Oxfordshire, carrying an unclassified road (formerly the A329 road) across the River Thames in England on the reach above Benson Lock. The bridge provides access between Shillingford to the north of the river and Wallingford to the south. Originally the south side was in Berkshire but was transferred from Berkshire to Oxfordshire in 1974. The bridge is single track and vehicular passage is controlled by traffic lights. There are records which suggest the presence of a bridge on the site in the 14th century but this structure was short-lived and crossing was made by ferry from at least 1379 until a timber bridge was built in 1767. The present stone structure dates from 1827. A toll was payable on both the ferry and the subsequent bridges until 1874 when the County Councils of Berkshire and Oxfordshire joined to buy the bridge from its private trustees and scrapped the charges. In the Patent Rolls of 1301 the Earl of Cornwall is recorded as leasing a fishery "downstream of Shillingford Bridge" and in 1370 a bridge at Shillingford is mentioned again as a boundary of another fishery. This however is the last
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    Askøy Bridge

    Askøy Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Bergen
    The Askøy Bridge (Norwegian: Askøybroen) is a suspension bridge which crosses Byfjorden between Bergen and Askøy in Hordaland, Norway. It is 1,057 meters (3,468 ft) long and has a main span of 850 meters (2,789 ft), making it the longest suspension bridge in Norway. It carries two lanes of County Road 562 and a combined pedestrian and bicycle path. The bridge's two concrete pylons are 152 meters (499 ft) tall and are located at Brøstadneset in Bergen and Storeklubben in Askøy. The bridge has seven spans in total, although all but the main span are concrete viaducts. The bridge has a clearance below of 62 meters (203 ft). The first plans to replace the Kleppestø–Nøstet Ferry with a bridge, which would allow the island of Askøy to have a fixed link, was launched in the 1960s. Various proposals were made, including placing the bridge further east and closer to Bergen, and building a submerged floating tunnel. In the early 1970s, a toll company was established to finance the bridge, but too high costs to cover with tolls and the lack of a motorway to Bergen from the west postponed construction. In the early 1980s, there was controversy about whether advanced tolls should be charged on
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    Cannon Street Railway Bridge

    Cannon Street Railway Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Thames
    • Bridge Type: Girder bridge
    • Locale: London
    Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII. The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before. It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.
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    Foresthill Bridge

    Foresthill Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: American River
    • Bridge Type: Cantilever bridge
    • Locale: Sierra Nevada
    The Foresthill Bridge over the North Fork of the American River is the highest (deck height) bridge in the U.S. state of California and the 4th highest in the US. It is also the second tallest in the country after the Golden Gate Bridge. It is sometimes referred to as the Auburn-Foresthill Bridge or the Auburn Bridge. Originally constructed to accompany the unbuilt Auburn Dam, the bridge stands 731 feet above the riverbed. It was fabricated in 1971 by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Japan, built by Willamette Western Contractors, and opened in 1973. The bridge spans the North Fork of the American River in Placer County between the city of Auburn and the town of Foresthill in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Pedestrians can walk the length of the bridge in both directions. There is anti-Auburn Dam graffiti, showing protest of the planned dam, on the bridge's underside. A seismic retrofit project was begun in January 2011 and will cost an estimated 74.4 million dollars. The original bridge cost less than 13 million dollars. The bridge can be seen in the beginning of the action movie xXx in which Vin Diesel's character Xander Cage is seen driving a stolen red Chevrolet Corvette off of it,
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    244
    Lions' Gate Bridge

    Lions' Gate Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Burrard Inlet
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Vancouver
    The Lions Gate Bridge, officially known as the First Narrows Bridge, is a suspension bridge that crosses the first narrows of Burrard Inlet and connects the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, to the North Shore municipalities of the District of North Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, and West Vancouver. The term "Lions Gate" refers to The Lions, a pair of mountain peaks north of Vancouver. Northbound traffic on the bridge heads in their general direction. The total length of the bridge including the north viaduct is 1,823 metres (5,890 feet). The length including approach spans is 1,517.3 m (4,978 ft), the main span alone is 473 m (1,550 ft), the tower height is 111 m (364 ft), and it has a ship's clearance of 61 m (200 ft). Prospect Point in Stanley Park offered a good high south end to the bridge, but the low flat delta land to the north required construction of the extensive North Viaduct. The bridge has three reversible lanes, the use of which is indicated by signals. The centre lane changes direction to accommodate for traffic patterns. The traffic volume on the bridge is 60,000 - 70,000 vehicles per day. Trucks exceeding 13 tonnes (14.3 tons) are prohibited, as are
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    Luzhniki Metro Bridge

    Luzhniki Metro Bridge

    Luzhniki Metro Bridge (Russian: Лужнецкий метромост), also known as Metromost (Метромост), is a concrete two-level arch bridge carrying road and subway over the Moskva River in Moscow, Russia, connecting the city center with Sparrow Hills. The bridge houses Vorobyovy Gory, the only station of Moscow Metro located above water. Originally built in 1958 by V.G. Andreyev and N.N. Rudomasin (structural engineering), the bridge rapidly decayed and was rebuilt in 1997-2002. The bridge was officially opened January 12, 1959. Total length with ramps 1,179 meters, arch spans 45 - 108 - 45 meters. The upper deck, 25.8 meters wide, carried 6 lanes of traffic, the lower deck housed Vorobyovy Gory metro station. The bridge was completed in 19 months . The bridge builders used salt to speed up concrete hydration; in 1959, it was commissioned with incomplete moisture protection . This caused rapid corrosion of rebars and tension cables. July 8, 1959, rain water broke through the station hall roofing and flooded the tracks. In the next years, aluminium and steel parts of the station hall were falling apart, hiding far worse corrosion processes inside the concrete structure. As soon as 1963,
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    North Grand Island Bridge

    North Grand Island Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: Niagara River
    • Bridge Type: Truss arch bridge
    • Locale: Grand Island
    The North Grand Island Bridge carries Interstate 190 across the Niagara River between Grand Island, New York and Niagara Falls, New York. The toll plaza (total of 5 booths) are found on the Grand Island, New York side of the bridge. The twin Truss arch bridges were built separately. The first span opened in 1935 and the second span in 1965. It is operated under the New York State Thruway. Each bridge has two lanes for vehicular traffic in one direction. The south end of bridge has toll plaza (on Grand Island, New York) for inbound traffic from Niagara Falls, New York. Lanes 1, 6 and 7 are for EZ-Pass users and the remaining lanes are manned toll booths.
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    Ogdensburg-Prescott International Bridge

    Ogdensburg-Prescott International Bridge

    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    The Ogdensburg–Prescott International Bridge, also known as the St. Lawrence Bridge and the Seaway Skyway, is a suspension bridge connecting Ogdensburg, New York in the United States to Johnstown, Ontario (a few kilometres east of Prescott) in Canada. Designed by Modjeski & Masters and completed in 1960, it has 6 spans and a main span of 350.75 meters (1,150.8 ft) totaling 1.5 miles across the Saint Lawrence River and Saint Lawrence Seaway. On the Canadian side, the bridge connects to Highway 16, a highway which interchanges with Highway 401 and Highway 416 that continues north to Ottawa. On the American side, the bridge connects to New York State Route 812, which connects with New York State Route 37 a few blocks from the southern end. Route 812 joins Route 37 west into Ogdensburg. It then goes south to Village of Lowville in Lewis County. Route 37 continues west to a fork at Morristown, N.Y. where Route 12 picks up to Alexandria Bay and Route 81. Other suspension bridges in Ontario:
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    248
    Orlov most

    Orlov most

    Eagles' Bridge (Bulgarian: Орлов мост, Orlov most) is a bridge over the Perlovska River in the centre of Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. It gives the name to the important and busy juncture at which it is located. The name of the bridge itself comes from the four statues of eagles on it, which are, symbolically, its protectors and patrons. The bridge and juncture are located in the immediate proximity of the Vasil Levski National Stadium, the Monument to the Soviet Army and the park Borisova gradina. For the traffic entering Sofia from the east by Tsarigrad Road, Eagles' Bridge is the first juncture and the point from where the city centre is accessed. The bridge was constructed in 1891 by Czech architect Václav Prošek, his brother Jozef and his cousins Bohdan and Jiří, who also designed and built together the similar but lion-themed Lavov Most in 1889. The entire construction of the bridge cost 80,000 golden leva. One of the bridge's columns and bronze eagles are depicted on the reverse of the Bulgarian 20 levs banknote, issued in 1999 and 2007. Media related to Orlov most at Wikimedia Commons
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    San Diego-Coronado Bridge

    San Diego-Coronado Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: San Diego Bay
    • Locale: San Diego
    The San Diego-Coronado Bridge, locally referred to as the Coronado Bridge, is a "prestressed concrete/steel" girder bridge, crossing over San Diego Bay in the United States, linking San Diego with Coronado, California. The bridge is signed as part of State Route 75. The 11,179-foot-long (3,407 m or 2.1 mi) bridge ascends from Coronado at a 4.67 percent grade before curving 80 degrees toward San Diego. The span reaches a maximum height of 200 feet (61m), allowing the U.S. Navy ships which operate out of the nearby Naval Station San Diego to pass underneath it. The five-lane bridge featured the longest box girder in the world until it was surpassed by a bridge in Chongqing, China in 2008. The bridge does not form a direct path to Coronado, but rather has a curve. This was done so it would be high enough for all U.S. Navy ships to pass underneath but not too steep for vehicles to ascend and descend. Construction on the San Diego-Coronado Bay Bridge started in February 1967, and opened to traffic on August 3, 1969, during the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the founding of San Diego Originally, the toll was $0.60 in each direction. Several years later, this was changed to a $1
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    Union Bridge

    Union Bridge

    • Body Of Water Spanned: River Tweed
    • Bridge Type: Suspension bridge
    • Locale: Northumberland
    The Union Bridge (also Union Chain Bridge) is a suspended-deck suspension bridge that spans the River Tweed between Horncliffe, Northumberland, England and Fishwick, Borders, Scotland. When it opened in 1820 it was the longest wrought iron suspension bridge in the world with a span of 137 metres (449 ft), and the first vehicular bridge of its type in Britain. Although work started on the Menai Suspension Bridge first, Union Bridge was completed earlier. Today it is the oldest suspension bridge still carrying road traffic. It lies on Sustrans Route 1 and the Pennine Cycleway. The bridge has been maintained by the Tweed Bridges Trust, since the abolition of turnpike tolls in 1883. It is a Category A listed building in Scotland and a Grade I listed building in England. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument in both countries. Before the opening of the Union Bridge, crossing the river at this point involved an 11-mile (18 km) round trip via Berwick-upon-Tweed downstream or a 20-mile (32 km) trip via Coldstream upstream. (Ladykirk and Norham Bridge did not open until 1888.) The bridge's longevity may owe something to the fact that it was designed by a Royal Navy officer, Captain Samuel
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