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Best Book Character of All Time

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    1
    Professor Filius Flitwick

    Professor Filius Flitwick

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Professor Filius Flitwick (born October 17, year unknown) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter books. His character provides some comic relief in the books. He generally plays small parts in the plot events of the stories. Probably his most significant role is to introduce various spells into the story. Flitwick is the Charms Master at Hogwarts and the Head of Ravenclaw House. His squeaky voice matches his tiny stature; he stands on a stack of books in order to see over the top of his desk and sits on a pile of cushions at the staff table. Flitwick's teaching style seems to be rather laid back in comparison to other professors and he is generally well-liked by students. He has allowed his class to play games during the last class before the Christmas holidays and seems resigned to a fair amount of chaos as students practice new Charms. He is often hit by misaimed or bad spells, often flying around the room or growing boils. Some of the spells he teaches include a levitation charm -Wingardium Leviosa-, Cheering Charms, Summoning Charms, the Banishing Charm, and the Silencing Charm. The Charms classroom is on the third floor of the school , but Flitwick's office is on
    7.43
    7 votes
    2
    Estella Havisham

    Estella Havisham

    • Appears In Books: Great Expectations
    Estella Havisham (best known in literature simply as Estella) is a significant character in the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations. Like the protagonist, Pip, Estella is introduced as an orphan, but where Pip was raised by his sister and her husband to become a blacksmith, Estella was adopted and raised by the wealthy and eccentric Miss Havisham to become a lady. Pip and Estella meet when he is brought to Miss Havisham's ill-kept mansion, Satis House, ostensibly to satisfy the elder Miss Havisham's "sick fancy" to be entertained by watching Pip have his heart broken by Estella. Estella states throughout the text, that she does not love Pip, however this is contradicted by the fact that she shows numerous times in the novel that she holds Pip in a much higher regard compared to other men, and doesn't want to break his heart like she does with the others that she seduces. One of the possible meanings of this is that Estella, even though she doesn't acknowledge the fact, loves Pip. The manner in which Estella was brought up saw that she would undergo strong emotional suppression and is unable to identify her own feelings, let alone express them. In a way, Estella is a character
    6.50
    8 votes
    3
    Robert Langdon

    Robert Langdon

    • Appears In Books: The Da Vinci Code
    Robert Langdon is a fictional Harvard University professor of religious iconology and symbology (a fictional field related to the study of historic symbols, which is not methodologically connected to the actual discipline of Semiotics). The character was created by author Dan Brown for the novels and later movies, Angels & Demons (2000), The Da Vinci Code (2003) and The Lost Symbol (2009). Tom Hanks portrayed Robert Langdon in the 2006 film adaptation of The Da Vinci Code, reprised the role in the 2009 film adaptation of Angels & Demons, and will play the role again in the 2012 film adaptation of The Lost Symbol. The character was created by Dan Brown as a fictional alter ego of himself or "the man he wishes he could be". Brown himself was born June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, and the fictional Langdon is described as having been born on June 22, also in Exeter, and attending the same school as Brown did, Phillips Exeter Academy. Initially we learn that Langdon is a successful scholar that Brown named after John Langdon, a professor of typography at Drexel University who is known for his creation of ambigrams, typographical designs that can be read in multiple ways; for
    8.33
    6 votes
    4
    Moroni

    Moroni

    • Appears In Books: Book of Mormon
    Moroni ( /məˈroʊnaɪ/), according to the Book of Mormon, was the last Nephite prophet, historian, and military commander who lived in North America in the late fourth and early fifth centuries. He is identified as the same angel who presented the golden plates to Joseph Smith, Jr., who claimed to translate the plates upon which the Book of Mormon was originally written. According to the Book of Mormon, Moroni was the son of Mormon, the prophet for whom the Book of Mormon is ostensibly named. Moroni is often easily confused with Captain Moroni, a much earlier Book of Mormon figure that Mormon greatly admired. The Book of Mormon tells that Moroni served under his father, the commander in chief of 23 groups of about ten thousand Nephites each, who battled against the Lamanites. Upon the Nephites' defeat, Moroni was forced to go into hiding and to wander from place to place to avoid being killed by the victorious Lamanites. (See Cumorah for more information on this battle.) Moroni was the last known survivor of the Nephite nation. Moroni had been commanded by his father to complete the Nephite record, which Mormon had abridged from previous records. Moroni is the ascribed author of
    6.25
    8 votes
    5
    Fagin

    Fagin

    • Appears In Books: Oliver Twist
    Fagin ( /ˈfeɪɡɪn/) is a fictional character who appears as an antagonist of the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist, referred to in the preface of the novel as a "receiver of stolen goods", but referred to more frequently within the actual story as the "merry old gentleman" or simply the "Jew". Born in London, Fagin is described as "grotesque" to look at. He is the leader of a group of children, the Artful Dodger and Charley Bates among them, whom he teaches to make their livings by pickpocketing and other criminal activities in exchange for a roof over their heads. A distinguishing trait is his constant—and thoroughly insincere—use of the phrase "my dear" when addressing others. At the time of the novel, he is said by another character, Monks, to have already made criminals out of "scores" of children who grow up to live—or die—committing the same crimes as adults. Bill Sikes, one of the major villains of the novel, is hinted to be one of Fagin's old pupils, and Nancy, Sikes' prostitute, clearly was. Whilst portrayed as relatively humorous, he is nonetheless a self-confessed miser who, despite the amount he has acquired over the years from the work of others, does very little to
    8.00
    6 votes
    6
    Gregory Goyle

    Gregory Goyle

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Gregory Goyle (born c.1980), typically referred to simply as Goyle, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter books. He is friends with Draco Malfoy, generally following him around and doing his bidding. He seems to lack all intelligence, magical talent, and independent thought, and thus uses only his size and strength to bully other students or scare off anyone who threatens Malfoy. Goyle is usually mentioned alongside Vincent Crabbe, who is his friend and fellow lackey of Draco. Goyle is generally represented as the less intelligent of the two. He nearly fails his exams in his first year and is not able to give Dolores Umbridge a simple answer after being questioned about Hagrid's lessons. Goyle, along with Crabbe, fails his Defence Against the Dark Arts O.W.L in his fifth year. His father, Goyle Sr, is a Death Eater. Goyle started his first year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry with Malfoy and Crabbe. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, he joined the Inquisitorial Squad. At the end of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, he and Crabbe are left feeling lonely, after their leader and friend Draco Malfoy leaves the school just before the end of
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Vernon Dursley

    Vernon Dursley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    A character in the Harry Potter series. Vernon Dursley was a Muggle, the husband of Harry Potter's maternal aunt Petunia Dursley (nee Evans) and father of Harry's cousin Dudley Dursley. He lived at Number Four, Privet Drive along with his wife and son for nearly twenty years until they were forced into hiding during the escalation of the second wizarding war. After Petunia's sister Lily and brother-in-law, Harry's father, James Potter, were killed by Lord Voldemort, Vernon and Petunia had to take care of Harry. However, they disliked him and treated him badly, while spoiling Dudley.
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Edward Murdstone

    Edward Murdstone

    • Appears In Books: David Copperfield
    Edward Murdstone (commonly known as Mr. Murdstone) is a fictional character and one of the primary antagonists in the first part of the Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield. He is a travelling con artist who specialises in seducing and marrying rich young women, and with help from his sister Jane, eventually causing their deaths by one way or another and inheriting their vast riches. Through his con games, he becomes the stepfather of David Copperfield when he chooses his mother, Clara, as his next victim. Near the beginning of the novel, Murdstone marries Clara Copperfield when David is about eight years old (David's father died six months before David was born). This arrangement is done secretly (much to Peggotty's disapproval), while David is away at the Yarmouth seashore. Soon after the marriage and David's return home, Murdstone's sister Jane moves into the house at Blunderstone with them. However, the Murdstones begin to show a much darker and more sadistic side to their personalities, and with Clara's generally passive and forgiving demeanour, they quickly dominate the household. Murdstone thrashes David merely for falling behind in his studies, and David retaliates by
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    Paul

    Paul

    • Appears In Books: Eclipse
    Paul is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series.

    Paul is prone to angry outbursts which cause him to burst into his wolf form. Paul is one of the bigger wolves, and has dark gray fur. He is the most volatile member of the pack, and becomes so enraged when he learns that Jacob has told Bella about the pack that he turns into a wolf and attempts to attack her. He currently seems to have no ill feelings towards Bella or Jacob. Early in Book 2 of Breaking Dawn, Paul is shown to have imprinted on Jacob's older sister, Rachel. This annoys Billy and Jacob because he is always at their house eating their food; however, Billy is happy that Rachel is staying at home longer because of Paul.
    Paul will be portrayed by Alex Meraz in the New Moon film.
    8.00
    5 votes
    10
    Saruman

    Saruman

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Saruman the White is a fictional character and a major antagonist in J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. He is leader of the Istari, wizards sent to Middle-earth in human form by the godlike Valar to challenge Sauron, the main antagonist of the tale, but later on aims at gaining power for himself. His schemes feature prominently in the second volume, The Two Towers, and at the end of the third volume, The Return of the King. His earlier history is given briefly in the posthumously published The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Saruman is one of several characters in the book illustrating the corruption of power; his desire for knowledge and order leads to his fall, and he rejects the chance of redemption when it is offered. The name Saruman means "man of skill"; he serves as an example of technology and modernity being overthrown by forces more in tune with nature. Saruman first appears in The Fellowship of the Ring (1954), which is the first volume of The Lord of the Rings. The Lord of the Rings describes a quest to destroy the One Ring, a powerful and evil talisman created by the Dark Lord Sauron to control Middle-earth (the fictional continent on which
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Orodreth

    Orodreth

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Orodreth was an Elf of the First Age, the son of Angrod and nephew of Finrod Felagund, and a ruler of Nargothrond. His name in Quenya was Artaresto. Orodreth was born in Valinor to Angrod and Eldalótë, a Noldorin lady whose name in Sindarin became Edhellos. Together with Turgon's daughter Idril and possibly Curufin's son Celebrimbor, he was one of the few members of the Noldorin royal family in the third generation to come into exile. While he and his father held Dorthonion, his son Gil-galad was sent to relative safety in Nargothrond with his granduncle Finrod. Orodreth held the tower of Minas Tirith on the island of Tol Sirion in the vale of Sirion until Sauron overran the isle and renamed it Tol-in-Gaurhoth. Orodreth then fled south to Nargothrond. Without the aid of Celegorm, and Curufin, who had suddenly attacked the forces of Sauron with whatever forces they could gather, Orodreth might have fallen. When Beren came to Nargothrond, Finrod went with him on his quest for the Silmaril. However Celegorm and Curufin the Sons of Fëanor were also at Nargothrond, and forced Finrod to lay down his crown. Orodreth took it, ruling as regent, but the
    7.80
    5 votes
    12
    Dodo

    Dodo

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Dodo is a fictional character appearing in Chapters 2 and 3 of the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). The Dodo is a caricature of the author. A popular but unsubstantiated belief is that Dodgson chose the particular animal to represent himself because of his stammer, and thus would accidentally introduce himself as "Do-do-dodgson." In this passage Lewis Carroll incorporated references to the original boating expedition of 4 July 1862 during which Alice's Adventures were first told, with Alice as herself, and the others represented by birds: the Lory was Lorina Liddell, the Eaglet was Edith Liddell, the Dodo was Dodgson, and the Duck was Rev. Robinson Duckworth. In order to get dry after a swim, the Dodo proposes that everyone run a Caucus race — where the participants run in patterns of any shape, starting and leaving off whenever they like, so that everyone wins. At the end of the race, Alice distributes comfits from her pocket to all as prizes. However this leaves no prize for herself. The Dodo inquires what else she has in her pocket. As she has only a thimble, the Dodo requests it from her and then awards it to Alice as her
    6.50
    6 votes
    13
    Fleur Delacour

    Fleur Delacour

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
    Fleur Delacour-Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. A student of Beauxbatons Academy in France, Fleur is a talented witch. She first appears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, when she is selected as a champion in the prestigious Triwizard Tournament. She reappears in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Fleur is one-quarter Veela, and while fully magical, is therefore not pure-blood. In the fourth film Delacour is played by Clᅢᄅmence Poᅢᄅsy. . Fleur has a younger sister named Gabrielle. Their grandmother was a Veela. This heritage accounts for Fleur's fair hair, skin and eyes, and her ability to entrance men. Her Veela heritage is never explicitly mentioned in the films. Fleur's wand is nine and a half inches, inflexible, made of rosewood and contains one of her Veela grandmother's hairs. According to Rowling, her name comes from the French phrase fleur de la cour, meaning "flower of the court" or "noblewoman". Selected as one of the champions in the Triwizard Tournement, Fleur is initially aloof and unfriendly. During the second task of the Tournament she attempts to rescue her sister from The Great Lake but
    6.50
    6 votes
    14
    Mrs. Bennet

    Mrs. Bennet

    • Appears In Books: Pride and Prejudice
    Mrs. Bennet (nᅢᄅe Gardiner) is a fictional character created by Jane Austen in the novel Pride and Prejudice. The mother of the protagonist, Elizabeth Bennet, her main concern and motivation throughout the novel is ensuring the marriage of her five daughters to suitable husbands, and she makes many mistakes and displays much social impropriety in her attempts to set the girls up with eligible men. Mrs. Bennet is characterised in the novel as something of a querulous, highly-strung and silly woman, who is constantly complaining about the effects of any pressure on her 'nerves', and as such is a figure of amusement to both her daughter Elizabeth and her husband. Unlike her husband, who choses to distance himself from his family, Mrs. Bennet is all too aware of the unfortunate circumstances that await her daughters should they not be married - as their property is entail to a male heir, they will be impoverished and homeless upon Mr. Bennet's death. As a result, she makes numerous efforts to set her daughters up with eligible bachelors in order to secure their future. Unfortunately, whilst she demonstrates the foresight and pragmatic awareness of what is necessary to secure her
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Renée Dwyer

    Renée Dwyer

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Renée Dwyer is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series.

    Renée Dwyer married Charlie Swan right after high school, but left with their baby, Bella, and divorced him soon after. Renée is an eccentric, silly person who will brave new things (like skydiving) and come to her senses later. Bella always felt that she was the mother of their relationship, having to guide Renée away from doing ridiculous things, and Renée thought of Bella as her middle-aged child. After Renée remarries a much younger baseball player, Phil Dwyer, Bella unselfishly sends herself to live with her dad in Forks so that Renée and Phil can travel together. Edward describes Renée's mind as being insightful and almost childlike. In Breaking Dawn, Bella is scared to tell her mother about her engagement to Edward, but Renée believes Bella to be more mature than other teenagers her age and gives them her blessing. Bella says she and her mother look alike, but that Renée has shorter hair and laugh lines. She lives in Phoenix, Arizona, in Twilight, and in Jacksonville, Florida, throughout the rest of the series. Bella says in Twilight that her mother is her best friend. After Bella becomes a vampire she doesn't contact her mother, knowing Renée couldn't handle her change like Charlie could.
    Renée is portrayed by Sarah Clarke in the Twilight film.
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Angela Weber

    Angela Weber

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Angela Weber is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series. A classmate of Bella's, Angela Weber is described as being kind, shy, and somewhat insightful. She likes to give space to others, and this characteristic is very much appreciated by Bella. She plays a minor role in Twilight, but after Bella's depression in New Moon they become very good friends. She is portrayed as one of the most decent human characters in the series. Angela played a minor part in Twilight, as one of the many friends that Bella Swan made after moving to Forks. She was also in Bella's Biology II class. Angela went shopping with Bella and Jessica for dresses for the spring dance in Port Angeles. She was the one who convinced Jessica to let Bella go with Edward. In New Moon, Angela becomes one of Bella's best friends because of her kind, gentle, and non-judgmental personality. Bella also enjoys that Angela does not talk as much as some other people, such as Jessica, and is a much nicer person than some of the others that she hangs out with. Angela's father is a Lutheran minister, and she has two 9-year-old twin brothers, Joshua and Isaac. Angela and Bella are also fairly close friends in Eclipse and hang out together several times. One example of this is when Bella helps Angela address her graduation invitations. Bella enjoys hanging out with her, but is regretful because she knows that she will soon become a vampire and will not be able to see Angela anymore. She mentions that she will be going to college in Seattle with her boyfriend, Ben. Angela was present in Bella's nightmare along with Bella's other friends. In the dream, it features all of her friends, including Angela, dead, covered in blood. Christian Serratos mentioned in an interview that she cannot wait to film that particular scene. Angela does not play a large part in this novel; she attends Bella and Edward's wedding and catches Bella's bouquet. Her father performs Bella and Edward's wedding as he is a Lutheran minister. Angela was noted and even tolerated by Edward, who described her thoughts as "unusually kind" and often tries to give her as much mental privacy as possible. She was noted to think "Bella seems just as shy as me. I'll bet today is really hard for her. I wish I could say something... but it would probably just sound stupid..." Edward wants to help her in some way for being such a good friend to Bella, but stuggles to find anything she wants for herself in her mind because her thoughts are so selfless. He does, eventually, learn that she is interested in Ben Cheney, and with Emmett's help, gets Ben to ask her out by making him believe that he himself wants to ask Angela out.
    6.33
    6 votes
    17
    Narcissa Malfoy

    Narcissa Malfoy

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Narcissa "Cissy" Malfoy (nᅢᄅe Black) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character is the wife of Lucius Malfoy, mother of Draco Malfoy, sister of Bellatrix Lestrange and Andromeda Tonks, was the cousin of Sirius Black and a Dark witch ¬タヤ all are prominent characters, and as the series continues she takes on a larger role. She has yet to appear in any of the films; her character makes an appearance in Goblet of Fire but was ultimately cut from the film adaptation. Born Narcissa Black to Cygnus Black and his wife, Druella (nᅢᄅe Rosier), Narcissa was the youngest child of three sisters, Bellatrix (who calls Narcissa "Cissy") and Andromeda being her older siblings. She was the cousin of Sirius Black and Regulus Black, and later became an aunt to Nymphadora Tonks, although it is unlikely that she acknowledges the connection due to Nymphadora being the child of Muggle-born Ted Tonks. The Black family was a very old pure-blood wizarding family with firm prejudice against those of "impure" magical blood, and Narcissa was no doubt taught these prejudices from an early age. She is a tall and slim blue-eyed blonde with, at least when
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Ronald Weasley

    Ronald Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Ronald Bilius "Ron" Weasley is a fictional character and one of the three protagonists (the other two being Harry Potter and Hermione Granger) of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. His first appearance was in the first book of the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone as the best friend of Harry Potter and Hermione Granger. He is a member of the Weasley family, a pure blood family, who reside in "The Burrow" outside Ottery St. Catchpole. Along with Harry and Hermione, he is a member of the Gryffindor house. Ron is present in most of the action throughout the series due to his friendship with Harry. According to J. K. Rowling, Ron was among the characters she created "the very first day". Ron is inspired by Rowling's best friend Sean Harris (to whom Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is dedicated), but she has clearly stated that she "never set out to describe Sean in Ron, but Ron has a Sean-ish turn of phrase." Like Harris is to Rowling, Ron is "always there" when Harry needs him. The character of Ron fits many of the stereotypes expected of the sidekick; he is often used as comic relief, is loyal to the hero, and lacks much of the talent Harry possesses, at least
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Superman

    Superman

    • Appears In Books: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns
    Superman is a fictional character, a comic book superhero who appears in comic books published by DC Comics. He is widely considered to be an American cultural icon. Created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian-born American artist Joe Shuster in 1932 while both were living in Cleveland, Ohio, and sold to Detective Comics, Inc. (later DC Comics) in 1938, the character first appeared in Action Comics #1 (June 1938) and subsequently appeared in various radio serials, television programs, films, newspaper strips, and video games. With the success of his adventures, Superman helped to create the superhero genre and establish its primacy within the American comic book. The character's appearance is distinctive and iconic: a blue, red and yellow costume, complete with cape, with a stylized "S" shield on his chest. This shield is now typically used across media to symbolize the character. The origin story of Superman relates that he was born Kal-El on the planet Krypton, before being rocketed to Earth as an infant by his scientist father Jor-El, moments before Krypton's destruction. Discovered and adopted by a Kansas farmer and his wife, the child is raised as Clark Kent and
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Mormon

    Mormon

    • Appears In Books: Book of Mormon
    Mormon ( /ˈmɔrmən/) is believed by followers of Mormonism to have been the narrator of much of the Book of Mormon, a sacred text of the Latter Day Saint movement, which describes him as a prophet-historian and a member of a tribe of indigenous Americans known as the Nephites. According to the Book of Mormon, the prophet Mormon engraved an abridgement of his people's history on golden plates, which were later translated by Joseph Smith, Jr.. Based on the chronology of the book, Mormon lived during the 4th century AD. As a narrator in the text, Mormon presents himself as a redactor. He quotes and paraphrases other writers, collects and includes whole texts by other authors, contributes running commentary, and also writes his own narrative. He writes about the process of making the book, both in terms of compiling the works of other prophets and also in terms of engraving the words on metal plates. He alludes to content that is left out of the book, and refers to a larger collection of records at his disposal. The Book of Mormon states that Mormon was instructed by the prophet Ammaron where to find the records that had been passed down from their ancestors. It also claims that Mormon
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Pomona Sprout

    Pomona Sprout

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Professor Pomona Sprout is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series. She is the herbology teacher and Head of Hufflepuff House at Hogwarts. Her rooms are located in her greenhouses and her office is just behind Greenhouse Three. She is described as a dumpy little witch with fly-away grey hair who wears a patched, frayed hat and shabby robes. Her clothing is often covered in earth due to the time she spends tending plants in the Hogwarts greenhouses, where she holds her classes. Sprout has a brisk, cheerful disposition and is firm but fair with her students, displaying no prejudice based on blood purity or house affiliation. As she demonstrates throughout the series, she is skilled with and knowledgeable about magical plants. Professor Sprout was played by British character actress Miriam Margolyes in the film version of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the only film in which the character has appeared thus far. Sprout is introduced in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, but she plays no active role until Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, in which she teaches her second year students to work with Mandrake plants. She is responsible for raising the
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Neville Longbottom

    Neville Longbottom

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series. He is described as a round-faced Gryffindor student in the central character Harry Potter's year. Throughout the series, Neville is often portrayed as a bumbling and disorganised character, and a rather mediocre student, though he is highly gifted at Herbology. However, the character's personality appears to undergo a transition after he joins Dumbledore's Army in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. The encouragement he receives gives him confidence in his magical abilities, turning him into a more competent wizard. Although a secondary character in the first four books, Neville appears often in the role of comic relief. He is one of Harry's strongest supporters over the course of the series, and becomes close friends with Ron, Hermione, Ginny, and Luna as well. As stated by Rowling, the fifth Harry Potter book "was a real turning point for Neville", due to the bigger role he played in that book. She further hinted that Neville was about to play a significant part in the two final books and the fight against Lord Voldemort. Rowling revealed in an interview that "there's a lot of Neville
    6.00
    6 votes
    23
    Lord Peter Wimsey

    Lord Peter Wimsey

    • Appears In Books: Whose Body?
    Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey is a fictional character in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which he solves mysteries; usually, but not always, murders. A bon vivant who solves mysteries for his own amusement, Wimsey is an archetype for the British gentleman detective. Born in 1890 and aging in real time, Wimsey is described as being at best average height, with straw-coloured hair, a beaked nose, and a vaguely foolish face. Reputedly his looks were patterned after those of academic Roy Ridley. He also possessed considerable intelligence and athletic ability, evidenced by his playing cricket for Oxford University while earning a First. He created a spectacularly successful publicity campaign for Whifflet cigarettes while working for Pym's Publicity Ltd and at aged 40 was able to turn three cartwheels in the office corridor, stopping just short of the boss's open office door (Murder Must Advertise). Among Lord Peter's hobbies, apart from criminology, is collecting incunabula. He is an expert on matters of food (especially wine) and male fashion, and on classical music. He excels at the piano, including Bach's works for keyboard instruments. One
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Percy Weasley

    Percy Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    Percy Ignatius Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. Percy is the third-eldest son of Arthur and Molly Weasley's brood of seven (younger brother of Bill and Charlie, and elder of Fred, George, and Ron, and sister Ginny). He shares his middle name with a member of the Prewett family, Ignatius, who was married to Lucretia Black of the Black family. He entered Hogwarts in 1987, is described as wearing horn-rimmed glasses (although he has not done so in the film adaptions), and, like Arthur, Bill and Ron, is described as being tall and thin. When readers first meet Percy in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, he is a Gryffindor prefect; in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, he becomes Head Boy (of which he is very proud). As a fastidious adherent to regulation and procedure, Percy makes for an overbearing--if well-meaning--prefect and, later, Head Boy, complement to his neurotic, authoritarian boss Barty Crouch. Relatively humourless, he is often the butt of Fred and George's many jokes and pranks. He owns a screech owl, Hermes (named after the Greek mythological messenger of the gods). Hermes was given to Percy
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Nymphadora Tonks

    Nymphadora Tonks

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Nymphadora Tonks is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character first appears in the novel Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003) and the movie Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007) as part of the advanced guard sent to the Dursley' to bring Harry to Grimmauld Place. She is described as having "...a pale heart-shaped face, dark twinkling eyes, and short spiky hair that was a violent shade of violet." She despises her given name and prefers to be called by her surname alone. Tonks explains to Harry that she is an Auror and a member of the Order of the Phoenix. At this point, Rowling introduces a rare magical talent previously unmentioned in the books, being a Metamorphmagus. Tonks explains that: "Metamorphmagi are really rare, they're born, not made." She is a shape-shifter who can change her appearance at will (she seems, however, limited to a human-like form) which she can use not only to disguise herself in the line of duty, but also for experimenting with her appearance, and even for her friends' entertainment. Rowling also adds a comical side to Tonks' character; she is notoriously clumsy and unskilled
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Professor Challenger

    Professor Challenger

    • Appears In Books: Sherlock Holmes' War of the Worlds
    George Edward Challenger, better known as Professor Challenger, is a fictional character in a series of science fiction stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unlike Conan Doyle's laid-back, analytic character, Sherlock Holmes, Professor Challenger is an aggressive, dominating figure. Edward Malone, the narrator of The Lost World, the novel in which Challenger first appeared, described his first meeting with the character: He was also a pretentious and self-righteous scientific jack-of-all-trades. Although considered by Malone's editor, Mr McArdle, to be "just a homicidal megalomaniac with a turn for science", his ingenuity could be counted upon to solve any problem or get out of any unsavoury situation, and be sure to offend and insult several other people in the process. Challenger was, in many ways, rude, crude, and without social conscience or inhibition. Yet he was a man capable of great loyalty and his love of his wife was all encompassing. Like Sherlock Holmes, Professor Challenger was based on a real person — in this case, a professor of physiology named William Rutherford, who had lectured at the University of Edinburgh while Conan Doyle studied medicine there. Sir Arthur
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    Richard Wright

    Richard Wright

    Richard Nathaniel Wright (September 4, 1908 – November 28, 1960) was an African-American author of sometimes controversial novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction. Much of his literature concerns racial themes, especially those involving the plight of African-Americans during the late 19th to mid-20th centuries. His work helped redefine discussions of race relations in America in the mid-20th century. Wright lived with his maternal grandmother in Jackson, Mississippi from early 1920 until late 1925. Here he felt stifled by his aunt and grandmother, who tried to force him to pray that he might find God. He later threatened to leave home because Grandmother Wilson refused to permit him to work on Saturdays, the Adventist Sabbath. Early strife with his aunt and grandmother left him with a permanent, uncompromising hostility toward religious solutions to everyday problems. In 1923, Wright excelled in grade school and was made class valedictorian of Smith Robertson junior high school. Determined not to be called an Uncle Tom, he refused to deliver the principal's carefully prepared valedictory address that would not offend the white school officials and finally convinced the black
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    The Wizard

    The Wizard

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Wizard of Oz, known during his reign as The Great and Powerful Oz, is the epithet of Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkel Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs, a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. The character was further popularized by the classic 1939 movie, wherein his full name is not mentioned. The Wizard is one of the characters in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Unseen for most of the novel, he is the ruler of the Land of Oz and highly venerated by his subjects. Believing he is the only man capable of solving their problems, Dorothy Gale and her friends travel to the Emerald City, the capital of Oz, to meet him. Oz is very reluctant to meet them, but eventually each is granted an audience, one by one. On each of these occasions, the Wizard appears in a different form, once as a giant head, once as a beautiful fairy, once as a ball of fire, and once as a horrible monster. When, at last, he grants an audience to all of them at once, he seems to be invisible—nothing but a disembodied voice. Eventually, it is revealed that Oz is actually none of these things, but rather a kind, ordinary man from Omaha, Nebraska, who has been using a lot
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Treebeard

    Treebeard

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Treebeard (Sindarin: Fangorn) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. The eldest of the species of Ents, he is said to live in the ancient Forest of Fangorn and stands fourteen feet in height and is tree-like in appearance, with leafy hair and a rigid structure. Fangorn Forest lies next to Isengard where Saruman the White resides. His motto is "Do not be hasty." In The Two Towers he meets with Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took, two Hobbits of the Shire known also as Merry and Pippin. Treebeard is known to have a strong hatred of Orcs, and, after Saruman's betrayal of the Ents, of Saruman as well. Spirits were sent by Eru Ilúvatar to inhabit the trees, which the Vala Yavanna had created along with other plants or olvar. The Vala longed for their protection since Morgoth or Melkor was destroying the trees and olvar, which could not defend themselves from him. The Ents were created by Ilúvatar at the behest of Yavanna as the Shepherds of the Forest or Tree-herders. Entwives were also created for the Ents, but, in the Second Age, were driven out by Sauron. Treebeard is the oldest of three remaining original Ents. He is said to have once
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Nessus

    Nessus

    • Appears In Books: Ringworld
    Nessus is a male (of the second type, his species has three sexes) character in Larry Niven's Known Space universe, of the species Pierson's Puppeteer, an herbivorous species noted for two heads whose mouths act as capable hands. Pierson's Puppeteers are technically advanced in most of the physical sciences. Nessus, like all Puppeteers ever met by humans, is insane by Puppeteer standards. Those who are sane are far too sensible (read "cowardly") to go off-world or interact with non-Puppeteers. Nessus demonstrates traits that in humans would be diagnosed as schizophrenia, manic-depressive disorder, displacement, and at times, extreme suggestibility. Nessus is featured in the short story "The Soft Weapon" (printed in the 1968 collection Neutron Star) and is one of the expeditionaries to the Ringworld in the 1970 book of the same name. Nessus is also a central character of the Fleet of Worlds series of Ringworld companion novels (Fleet of Worlds, Juggler of Worlds, Destroyer of Worlds, Betrayer of Worlds, and Fate of Worlds), that opens about 200 years before Ringworld and ends following Ringworld's Children.
    6.60
    5 votes
    31
    Xuanzang

    Xuanzang

    • Appears In Books: Journey to the West
    Xuanzang (Chinese: 玄奘; pinyin: Xuánzàng; Wade–Giles: Hsüan-tsang) is a central character in the classical Chinese novel Journey to the West. The character is based on the historical Buddhist monk Xuanzang. He is mainly referred to as Tang Sanzang (Chinese: 唐三藏; pinyin: Táng Sānzàng; Wade–Giles: Tang San-tsang) in the novel. The title Sanzang (literally: "three collections") refers to his mission to seek the Sanzangjing (simplified Chinese: 三藏经; traditional Chinese: 三藏經; pinyin: Sānzàngjīng), or the "Three Collections of (Buddhist) Scriptures". In some English translations of Journey to the West, the title is rendered as Tripitaka (Sanskrit: Tripiṭaka; Devanagari: त्रिपिटक), which is the original Sanskrit term for the Sanzangjing. He is also widely known as Tang Seng (Chinese: 唐僧; pinyin: Táng Sēng; literally "Tang monk"), which is a courtesy name that, like the former name (Tang Sanzang), reflects his status as an oath brother of Emperor Taizong of the Tang Dynasty. In the novel, Xuanzang is a Chinese Buddhist monk who had renounced his family to join the Sangha from childhood. He is actually a reincarnation of Golden Cicada (simplified Chinese: 金蝉子; traditional Chinese: 金蟬子;
    6.60
    5 votes
    32
    Mr. Bennet

    Mr. Bennet

    • Appears In Books: Pride and Prejudice
    Mr. Bennet is a fictional character in the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. He is the father of Elizabeth Bennet, the heroine of the story. Mr. Bennet possesses an estate in Hertfordshire. He is married with five daughters, a circumstance relevant to his legacy. The terms of Mr. Bennet's inheritance require a male heir. Because he has no son, upon his death his property is to be inherited by his closest male relative, Mr. Collins, a clergyman with whom he has had a poor relationship. Mr. Bennet, a gentle and caring man, is very close to his two elder daughters, Jane and Elizabeth, and favors "Lizzy" above the rest. However, he has a poor opinion of the intelligence and sensibility of his wife and his three younger daughters, frequently declaring them "silly" and visiting them with insulting remarks as well as gentle teasing. "Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment." (page 71-72 in the illustrated novel)This quotation shows Mr. Bennet¬タルs character. Mr. Bennet is a very amiable man but he has a bitingly sarcastic humour. He is possessed of a quick wit and he uses it as
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Peter Pan

    Peter Pan

    • Appears In Books: Peter Pan
    Peter Pan is a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie. A mischievous boy who can fly and who never ages, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the small island of Neverland as the leader of his gang the Lost Boys, interacting with mermaids, Native Americans, fairies, pirates, and occasionally ordinary children from the world outside of Neverland. In addition to two distinct works by Barrie, the character has been featured in a variety of media and merchandise, both adapting and expanding on Barrie's works. Peter Pan first appeared in a section of The Little White Bird, a 1902 novel written by Barrie for adults. The character's best-known adventure debuted on 27 December 1904, in the stage play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up. The play was adapted and expanded somewhat as a novel, published in 1911 as Peter and Wendy (later as Peter Pan and Wendy, and still later as Peter Pan). Following the highly successful debut of the 1904 play, Barrie's publishers, Hodder and Stoughton, extracted chapters 13–18 of The Little White Bird and republished them in 1906 under the title Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, with the addition of
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Molly Weasley

    Molly Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Molly Weasley (nᅢᄅe Prewett) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. She is a witch housewife, married to Arthur Weasley and mother of Bill, Charlie, Percy, Fred, George, Ron and Ginny. She is most probably the niece of Ignatius Prewett (who married Lucretia Black). The name "Molly" may come from the word "mollycoddle", meaning to be overprotective toward. Her husband's nickname for her is "Mollywobbles". Molly Weasley is played by Julie Walters in the films. Her youngest children, Ron and Ginny, are best friends with Harry Potter and Hermione Granger (Ginny dated Harry during her fifth year). Molly seems to have taken Harry and Hermione, both of them without magical families, under her wing and treats them with motherly affection as unofficial members of her family. Harry especially is treated with her over-protective tendencies, because he is an orphan whose adoptive family mistreats him. When Molly hears the false stories about Hermione cheating on Harry with Viktor Krum in The Goblet of Fire, she treats Hermione coldly, until Harry explains that the stories are nothing but lies by Rita Skeeter. (In reality Hermione is never Harry's
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Oliver Twist

    Oliver Twist

    • Appears In Books: Oliver Twist
    Oliver Twist is a title character and the protagonist of the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. He was the first child protagonist in an English language novel. In the novel, Oliver is born in a parish workhouse, in an unnamed town, but his mother died in labour. Old Sally, who was at the birth and death, takes from the dying woman a locket and ring. Bumble, the Beadle, names the boy Oliver Twist. Oliver is sent to an infant farm, run by Mrs. Mann, until he is nine years old, when he is returned to the workhouse. The orphans at the workhouse are starving because of their cruel treatment. They cast lots to decide who will ask for more gruel for them and Oliver is chosen. At evening supper, once the gruel is dished out, Oliver goes to Bumble and makes his famous request, "Please Sir. I want some more." He is then branded as a troublemaker and is offered as an apprentice to anyone willing to take him and he is apprenticed to the undertaker, Sowerberry. Oliver fights with Noah Claypole, an older boy at the undertakers, because Noah mocked Oliver's dead mother. Oliver is then beaten for the offence, but he manages to escape and runs away to London. In London Oliver meets Jack
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    Lehi

    Lehi

    • Appears In Books: Book of Mormon
    According to the Book of Mormon, Lehi ( /ˈliːhaɪ/ LEE-hy) was a prophet who lived in Jerusalem during the reign of king Zedekiah (approximately 600 BC). Lehi was an Israelite of the Tribe of Manasseh, and father to Nephi, another prominent prophet in the Book of Mormon. In the first book of the Book of Mormon, First Nephi, Lehi and Nephi lead their family out of Jerusalem, and across the sea to the "promised land" (the Americas). Mormon scholar Hugh Nibley has suggested that he was a merchant and contemporary of the Seven Wise Men of Greece. The modern-day city of Lehi, Utah, is named after Lehi. According to the Book of Mormon narrative, the families of Lehi, his friend Ishmael and another man named Zoram left Jerusalem some time before its destruction by the Babylonians in approximately 587 BC. Lehi's group proceeded southward down the Arabian Peninsula until they reached a location called Nahom. Ishmael is reported to have died by this time, and he was buried at this location. From Nahom, the group proceeded in an eastward direction across the desert until they reached a fertile coastal region they named Bountiful, where Lehi's son Nephi was instructed by the Lord to build a
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Lucy Westenra

    Lucy Westenra

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    Lucy Westenra is a fictional character in the novel Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker. She is the 19-year-old daughter of a wealthy family. Her father is not mentioned in the novel and her elderly mother is simply stated as being Mrs. Westenra. Lucy is introduced as Mina Murray's best friend. In the 1931 Universal production, she is called Lucy Weston. In the 1958 Hammer horror production, she is called Lucy Holmwood and is engaged to Jonathan Harker. Lucy Westenra is a vivacious young woman who is much praised for her beauty, purity and sweet nature. These qualities earn her three suitors, all of whom propose to her on the same day: (Arthur Holmwood, wealthy son of Lord Godalming; Quincey Morris, an American cowboy; and Doctor John Seward, an asylum psychiatrist.) Lucy accepts Arthur's proposal, but soon begins suffering from severe anemia. She has in fact become the victim of Count Dracula, who is slowly draining her of blood. Despite the best efforts of Dr. Seward and Dr. Abraham Van Helsing, Lucy's condition rapidly deteriorates. Dr. Van Helsing correctly identifies the true cause of her illness, and puts up garlic around her sickbed to repel Dracula. Even after four blood
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    Molly Bloom

    Molly Bloom

    • Appears In Books: Ulysses
    Molly Bloom is a fictional character in the novel Ulysses by James Joyce. The wife of main character Leopold Bloom, she roughly corresponds to Penelope in the Odyssey. The major difference between Molly and Penelope is that while Penelope is eternally faithful, Molly is not, having an affair with Hugh 'Blazes' Boylan after ten years of her celibacy within the marriage. Molly, whose given name is Marion, was born in Gibraltar in 1870, the daughter of Major Tweedy, an Irish military officer, and Lunita Laredo, a Gibraltarian of Spanish Jewish descent. Molly and Leopold were married in 1888. She is the mother of Milly Bloom, who, at the age of 15, has left home to study photography. She is also the mother of Rudy Bloom, who died at the age of 11 days. In Dublin, Molly is an opera singer of some renown. The final chapter of Ulysses, often called "Molly Bloom's Soliloquy", is a long, unpunctuated stream of consciousness passage comprising her thoughts as she lies in bed next to Bloom. Joyce modelled the character upon his wife, Nora Barnacle; indeed, the day upon which the novel is set — June 16, 1904, now called Bloomsday — is that of their first date. Nora Barnacle's letters also
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Nyarlathotep

    Nyarlathotep

    • Appears In Stories: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
    Nyarlathotep is a name used for various characters in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and other writers. The character is commonly known in association with its role as a malign deity in the Cthulhu Mythos fictional universe, where it is known as the Crawling Chaos. First appearing in Lovecraft's 1920 prose poem of the same name, he was later mentioned in other works by Lovecraft and by other writers and in the tabletop roleplaying games making use of the Cthulhu Mythos. Later writers describe him as one of the Outer Gods. In his first appearance in "Nyarlathotep", he is described as a "tall, swarthy man" who resembles an ancient Egyptian pharaoh. In this story he wanders the earth, seemingly gathering legions of followers, the narrator of the story among them, through his demonstrations of strange and seemingly magical instruments. These followers lose awareness of the world around them, and through the narrator's increasingly unreliable accounts the reader gets an impression of the world's collapse. Nyarlathotep subsequently appears as a major character in "The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath" (1926/27), in which he again manifests in the form of an Egyptian Pharaoh when he confronts
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Quasimodo

    Quasimodo

    • Appears In Books: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
    Quasimodo is a fictional character in the novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831) by Victor Hugo. Quasimodo was born with a hunchback and feared by the townspeople as a sort of monster but he finds sanctuary in an unlikely love that is fulfilled only in death. The role of Quasimodo has been played by many actors in film and stage adaptations, including Lon Chaney, Sr. (1923) and Charles Laughton (1939), as well as the 1996 Disney animated adaptation. In 2010, a British researcher found evidence suggesting there was a real-life hunchbacked stone carver who worked at Notre Dame during the same period Victor Hugo was writing the novel and they may have even known one another. Quasimodo is described as "hideous" and a "creation of the devil." He was born with a hunchback, and a giant wart that covers his right eye. He is found abandoned in Notre Dame (on the foundlings' bed, where orphans and unwanted children are left to public charity) on Quasimodo Sunday, the first Sunday after Easter, by Claude Frollo, the Archdeacon of Notre Dame, who adopts the baby, names him after the day the baby was found, and brings him up to be the bell-ringer of the Cathedral. Due to the loud ringing of
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Cheshire Cat

    Cheshire Cat

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Cheshire Cat ( /ˈtʃɛʃər/ or /ˈtʃɛʃɪər/) is a fictional cat popularised by Lewis Carroll's depiction of it in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and known for its distinctive mischievous grin. The phrase appears in print in John Wolcot's pseudonymous Peter Pindar's Pair of Lyric Epistles in 1792: "Lo, like a Cheshire cat our court will grin." Earlier than that, A classical dictionary of the vulgar tongue by Francis Grose (The Second Edition, Corrected and Enlarged, London 1788) contains the following entry: "CHESHIRE CAT. He grins like a Cheshire cat; said of any one who shows his teeth and gums in laughing." A possible origin of the phrase "Grinning like a Cheshire Cat" is from the large number of dairy farms in Cheshire, hence the cats grin because of the abundance of milk and cream. This is the explanation most favoured by the people of Cheshire. Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable says grinning like a Cheshire cat is "an old simile, popularised by Lewis Carroll". According to Brewer's dictionary, "The phrase has never been satisfactorily accounted for, but it has been said that cheese was formerly sold in Cheshire moulded like a cat that looked as though it was grinning".
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Dudley Dursley

    Dudley Dursley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    Dudley Dursley (23 June, 1980[1]) was the Muggle son of Vernon and Petunia Dursley, and cousin of Harry Potter. He was obese and insolent as a result of his parents spoiling him throughout his childhood. He and his gang often tormented Harry, taking after the example set by his parents, as well as other weaker and younger children in their neighbourhood and at school. In 1995, he faced Dementors for the first time, and was saved by Harry, after which he mellowed and became generally kinder to his cousin. He left his house in 1997, along with his family, to hide from Lord Voldemort and his Death Eaters, under the protection of the Order of the Phoenix. After the Second Wizarding War, he married a woman and had several children. He also remained in contact with Harry and his children.
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, also known as The Ghost of Christmas Future, is a fictional character in English novelist Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol. It is the ghost that haunts the miser Ebenezer Scrooge, in order to prompt him to adopt a more caring attitude in life and avoid the horrid afterlife of his business partner, Jacob Marley. Scrooge finds the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come the most fearsome of the spirits; he appears to Scrooge as a figure entirely muffled in a black hooded robe, except for a single gaunt hand with which he points. Although the character never speaks in the story, Scrooge understands him, usually through assumptions from his previous experiences and rhetorical questions. The Ghost's muteness and undefined features (being always covered by his robe) may also have been intended to represent the uncertainty of the future. He is notable that even in satires and parodies of the tale, this spirit nonetheless retains his original look. When the Ghost makes his appearance, the first thing he shows Scrooge is three wealthy gentlemen making light of a recent death, remarking that it will be a cheap funeral, if anyone comes at all. One businessman
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Kreacher

    Kreacher

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Kreacher is a fictional magical creature in the Harry Potter book series by J. K. Rowling and the Warner Bros. film series. He is an ancient house-elf sworn to serve the Black family. Kreacher's name is likely a pun on "creature". It could also be derived from the German kriechen, meaning "to creep" or "kriecher" that means "groveler". Kreacher the house-elf served the Noble and Most Ancient House of Black for decades prior to his first appearance in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. When Sirius Black became the final member of the family after the death of his mother Walburga, Kreacher was forced to serve Sirius against the elf's will. When The Order of the Phoenix was re-formed following the return of Lord Voldemort, Sirius allowed the group to use his family's home at 12 Grimmauld Place as headquarters. Kreacher stayed as caretaker to the house. Eager to betray Sirius and his associates, Kreacher finally got his chance at Christmas. When Sirius ordered him 'out' of the room, Kreacher interpreted this as an invitation to leave the house. Kreacher went to the home of the Malfoy family. Lucius Malfoy, under orders from Lord Voldemort told Kreacher that if Harry
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Morgoth

    Morgoth

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    Morgoth Bauglir (originally Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. He is the main antagonist of The Silmarillion, figures in The Children of Húrin, and is mentioned briefly in The Lord of the Rings. Melkor was the most powerful of the Ainur, but turned to darkness and became Morgoth, the definitive antagonist of Arda from whom all evil in the world of Middle-earth ultimately stems. Sauron, one of the Maiar of Aulë, betrayed his kind and became Morgoth's principal lieutenant. Morgoth was the principal agent of evil in The Silmarillion, and his influence lingered in the world even after he was cast from the world into the outer void. Morgoth's example provided later ages a cautionary tale against pride, wrath, envy, lust for power, and greed — and the destruction these visit upon oneself and others. The name Morgoth is Sindarin (one of Tolkien's invented languages) and means "Black Foe of the World"; Bauglir is also Sindarin, meaning "Tyrant" or "Oppressor". "Morgoth Bauglir" is actually an epithet: his name in Ainulindalë (the creation myth of Middle-earth and first section of The Silmarillion) is Melkor, which means 'He Who Arises In
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Mowgli

    Mowgli

    • Appears In Books: The Second Jungle Book
    • Appears In Stories: Mowgli's Brothers
    Mowgli ( /ˈmaʊɡli/) is a fictional character and the protagonist of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book stories. He is a feral child from India who originally appeared in Rudyard Kipling's short story "In the Rukh" (collected in Many Inventions, 1893) and then went on to become the most prominent and memorable character in his fantasies The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book (1894–1895), which also featured stories about other characters. The Mowgli stories, including In the Rukh, were first collected in chronological order in one volume as The Works of Rudyard Kipling Volume VII: The Jungle Book (1907) (Volume VIII of this series contained the non-Mowgli stories from the Jungle Books), and subsequently in All the Mowgli Stories (1933). In the Rukh describes how Gisborne, an English forest ranger in India at the time of the British Raj, discovers a young man named Mowgli, who has extraordinary skill at hunting and tracking, and asks him to join the forestry service. Later Gisborne learns the reason for Mowgli's almost superhuman talents: he was raised by a pack of wolves in the jungle. Kipling then proceeded to write the stories of Mowgli's childhood in detail. Lost by his
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    George Weasley

    George Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    George Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. He is one of seven children of the Weasley family and twin brother of Fred Weasley.
    6.20
    5 votes
    48
    Allegra Byron

    Allegra Byron

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    Clara Allegra Byron (January 12, 1817 – April 20, 1822), initially named Alba, meaning "dawn," or "white," by her mother, was the illegitimate daughter of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, the stepsister of Mary Shelley. Born in Bath, England, she initially lived with her mother and Mary Shelley and Percy Bysshe Shelley, but was turned over to Byron when she was fifteen months old. She lived most of her short life with boarders chosen by Byron or in a Roman Catholic convent, where she died at age five of typhus or malaria. She was visited only intermittently by her father, who displayed inconsistent paternal interest in her. Allegra was the product of a short-lived affair between the Romantic poet and her starstruck teenage mother, who was living in reduced circumstances in the household of her stepsister and brother-in-law. Claire wrote to Byron during the pregnancy begging him to write back and promise to take care of her and the baby. Byron ignored her. After her birth, she was initially taken into the household of Leigh Hunt as the child of a cousin. A few months later the Shelleys and Claire took the baby back as an "adopted" child. Claire bonded with
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Lyra Belacqua

    Lyra Belacqua

    • Appears In Books: Northern Lights
    Lyra Belacqua ( /ˈlaɪrə bəˈlɑːkwə/), also known as Lyra Silvertongue, is the heroine of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. Lyra is a young girl who inhabits a universe parallel to our own. Brought up in the cloistered world of Jordan College, Oxford, she finds herself embroiled in a cosmic war between Lord Asriel on the one side, and the first angel to come into being, called The Authority, and his Regent, called Metatron, on the other. Lyra Belacqua, age twelve at the beginning of the trilogy, is the daughter of Lord Asriel and Marisa Coulter in an Oxford similar to our own. She was brought up at Jordan College, where the scholars, professors and servants largely treated her as an adopted daughter. She was raised believing that her parents had died in an airship crash, and that Lord Asriel was her uncle, and later learned the truth from John Faa, leader of the Gyptians. Lyra spends most of her time socializing with other children of the city, sometimes harmoniously, frequently mock-violently, and often by way of avoiding school-work. Her closest friend among the other children is a Jordan kitchen boy named Roger Parslow, whose disappearance early in the first book is
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Aegisthus

    Aegisthus

    • Appears In Books: Odyssey
    In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (Ancient Greek: Αἴγισθος ; also transliterated as Aegisthos) was the son of Thyestes and of Thyestes' daughter, Pelopia. Thyestes felt he had been deprived of the Mycenean throne unfairly by his brother, Atreus. The two battled back and forth several times. In addition, Thyestes had an affair with Atreus' wife, Aerope. In revenge, Atreus killed Thyestes' sons and served them to him unknowingly. After eating his own sons' corpses, Thyestes asked an oracle how best to gain revenge. The advice was to father a son with his own daughter, Pelopia, and that son would kill Atreus. When Aegisthus was born, his mother was ashamed of her incestuous act. She abandoned him and he was raised by shepherds and suckled by a goat, hence his name Aegisthus (from αἴξ, buck). Atreus, not knowing the baby's origin, took Aegisthus in and raised him as his own son. In the night in which Pelopia had shared the bed of her father, she had taken from him his sword which she afterwards gave to Aegisthus. This sword became the means by which the incestuous intercourse between her and her father was discovered, whereupon she put an end to her own life. Atreus in his enmity towards
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    4 votes
    51
    Claire Clairmont

    Claire Clairmont

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (27 April 1798 – 19 March 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley and the mother of Lord Byron's daughter Allegra. She was born in 1798 in Brislington, near Bristol, the second child and only daughter of Mary Jane Vial Clairmont. Throughout her childhood she was known as "Jane". In 2010 the identity of her father was discovered: John (later Sir John) Lethbridge of Sandhill Park, near Taunton, Somerset. Her mother had identified him as a "Charles Clairmont", adopting the name Clairmont for herself and her children, to disguise their illegitimacy. It appears that the father of her first child, Charles, was Charles Abram Marc Gaulis, "a merchant and member of a prominent Swiss family, whom she met in Cadiz". When she was three years old, Claire (Jane) Clairmont acquired a stepfamily. In December 1801, her mother married a neighbour, William Godwin, the writer and philosopher. This brought the toddler two step-sisters: Godwin's daughter, Mary (later Mary Shelley), only eight months older than her, and his adopted daughter, Fanny Imlay, a couple of years older. Both of them were the children of Mary
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    4 votes
    52
    Jacob Black

    Jacob Black

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Jacob "Jake" Black is a fictional character in the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer. He is described as a Native American of the Quileute tribe in La Push, near Forks, Washington. In the second book of the series, he undergoes a transformation that allows him to morph into a wolf. For the majority of the series, Jacob competes with Edward Cullen for Bella Swan's love. In the films Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn, Jacob is played by Taylor Lautner. According to Stephenie Meyer, Jacob was originally meant to be a device through which Bella could learn Edward's secret in Twilight. Meyer, her agent, and her editor all liked the character so much that they decided to give him a larger role in the following book, New Moon, with Meyer calling the character, "my favorite gift that New Moon gave to me." "Jacob was my first experience with a character taking over—a minor character developing such roundness and life that I couldn't keep him locked inside a tiny role....From the very beginning, even when Jacob only appeared in chapter six of Twilight, he was so alive. I liked him. More than I should for such a small part." Meyer has said that after Jacob started emerging as a
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    4 votes
    53
    Billy Black

    Billy Black

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Billy Black is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series.
    Billy Black is Jacob Black's father, born and raised in La Push, and an elder of the Quileute tribe. He is described as being heavyset, having a wrinkled face and russet skin, in a wheelchair, and having black hair and black eyes. His other family members include his two daughters, Rachel and Rebecca, and his deceased wife, Sarah. Billy Black is directly descended from the last chief of the Quileute tribe, Ephraim Black, who was his grandfather. One of Billy's best friends in Forks is Bella Swan's father, Charlie Swan. Once Billy is crippled from diabetes[24] and forced to be in a wheelchair, he sells his truck to Charlie to give to Bella. At the end of Twilight, he employed Jacob to try to convince Bella to break up with Edward.
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Steve Austin

    Steve Austin

    • Appears In Books: Cyborg
    Steve Austin is a fictional character created by Martin Caidin for his 1972 novel, Cyborg, who later became a 1970s television icon as portrayed by Lee Majors in the 1974-1978 series The Six Million Dollar Man. As originally conceived by Caidin, Austin is a former US Army helicopter pilot who served in Vietnam before being transferred to the Air Force and then into NASA. As backup Lunar Module Pilot for Apollo 17, he became one of twelve astronauts to walk on the moon when the prime Lunar Module Pilot (LMP) broke an arm before launch. In the pilot episode of The Six Million Dollar Man, Austin's background is adjusted: he is a civilian test pilot who was the only civilian to walk on the Moon. In the regular series, however, Austin once again became a military man, holding the rank of colonel in the Air Force. In both versions of his origin, Austin is testing an experimental lifting body aircraft when a malfunction causes a crash. Austin's injuries are severe: both legs and one arm are lost, and he is also blinded in one eye and his skull is pulverized (the TV version does not suffer the skull injury). One of Austin's best friends is Dr. Rudy Wells, a doctor and scientist who is a
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Bill Bradley

    Bill Bradley

    • Appears In Books: Shall We Tell the President?
    William Warren "Bill" Bradley (born July 28, 1943) is an American hall of fame basketball player, Rhodes scholar, and former three-term Democratic U.S. Senator from New Jersey. He ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic Party's nomination for President in the 2000 election. Bradley was born and raised in a suburb of St. Louis and excelled at basketball from an early age. He was a member of the Boy Scouts, did well academically and was an all-county and all-state basketball player in high school. He was offered 75 college scholarships, but declined them all to attend Princeton University. He earned a gold medal as a member of the 1964 Olympic basketball team and was the NCAA Player of the Year in 1965. After graduating in 1965, he attended Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, delaying a decision for two years on whether or not to play in the NBA. While at Oxford, Bradley played one season of professional basketball in Europe, and eventually decided to join the New York Knicks in the 1967–68 season, after serving six months in the Air Force Reserve. He spent his entire ten-year professional basketball career playing for the Knicks, winning two championship titles. Retiring in 1977, he ran
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Dejah Thoris

    Dejah Thoris

    • Appears In Books: A Princess of Mars
    Dejah Thoris is a fictional character in Edgar Rice Burroughs's series of Martian novels. Princess of the Martian city state/empire of Helium, Dejah Thoris is the love interest and later the wife of John Carter, an Earthman mystically transported to Mars, and subsequently the mother of their son Carthoris and daughter Tara. She plays the role of the conventional damsel in distress who must be rescued from various perils, but is also portrayed as a competent and capable adventuress in her own right, fully capable of defending herself and surviving on her own in the wastelands of Mars. Except for some jewelry, all of the planet's races seem to eschew clothing and look down upon Earth's inhabitants because they do wear clothing. As Burroughs describes Dejah Thoris: Dejah Thoris first appeared as the title character in the initial Mars novel, A Princess of Mars (1917). She reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second, The Gods of Mars (1918), the third, The Warlord of Mars (1919), the eighth, Swords of Mars (1936), and the eleventh, John Carter of Mars (1964). Dejah Thoris is also mentioned or appeared in a minor role in other volumes of the
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    2 votes
    57
    Glaurung

    Glaurung

    Glaurung is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth legendarium. He is introduced in The Silmarillion as the first of the Dragons. He is also a major antagonist in The Children of Húrin. He was known as The Deceiver, The Golden, The Great Worm and the Worm of Greed. Glaurung was a very powerful dragon, if not the most magical. According to Tolkien, he sired the rest of his race, or at least the brood of Urulóki, wingless fire-breathing dragons. He was bred by Morgoth from some unknown stock and was the first dragon to appear outside of Angband. In 455 First Age Glaurung led the attack of fire that defeated the Noldorin Elves and their allies and broke the Siege of Angband in the Battle of Sudden Flame, the Dagor Bragollach. In 472 during the Battle of Unnumbered Tears, Nírnaeth Arnoediad, Glaurung led the final reserve and the beasts of Angband in an attack that prevented the joining of the two Elven-hosts, breaking and routing the Host of the sons of Fëanor, resulting in the total defeat of the Union of Maedhros. During this battle Glaurung was stabbed in his vulnerable belly by the Dwarf-king Azaghâl and fled back to Angband. In 495, Glaurung was given
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    2 votes
    58
    Jack Torrance

    Jack Torrance

    • Appears In Books: The Shining
    Jack Torrance is a fictional character, the protagonist/main antagonist in the 1977 novel The Shining by Stephen King. He was portrayed by Jack Nicholson in the 1980 movie adaptation of the novel, and by Steven Weber in the 1997 miniseries. The American Film Institute rated the character (as played by Nicholson) the 25th greatest film villain of all time. In 2008, Jack Torrance was selected by Empire Magazine as one of The 100 Greatest Movie Characters. Premiere Magazine also ranked Torrance on their list of The 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time. Jack Torrance is a writer and former teacher who is trying to rebuild his and his family's life after his alcoholism and volatile temper cost him his teaching position at a small preparatory school. Having given up drinking, he accepts a position maintaining the isolated Overlook Hotel in Colorado for the winter, in the hope this will salvage his family, re-establish his career, and give him the time and privacy to finish a promising play. He moves to the hotel with his wife, Wendy, and young son, Danny, who is telepathic and sensitive to supernatural forces. Danny receives guidance from an imaginary friend he calls "Tony." It is
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    2 votes
    59
    Dulcinea

    Dulcinea

    • Appears In Books: Don Quixote
    "Dulcinea del Toboso" (real name Aldonza Lorenzo) is a fictional character who is referred to (but does not appear) in Miguel de Cervantes' novel Don Quixote. Seeking the traditions of the knights-errant of old, Don Quixote finds a true love whom he calls Dulcinea. She is a simple peasant in his home town, but Quixote imagines her to be the most beautiful of all women. At times, Quixote goes into detail about her appearance, though he freely admits that he has seen her only fleetingly and has never spoken with her. Don Quixote describes her appearance in the following terms: "... her name is Dulcinea, her country El Toboso, a village of La Mancha, her rank must be at least that of a princess, since she is my queen and lady, and her beauty superhuman, since all the impossible and fanciful attributes of beauty which the poets apply to their ladies are verified in her; for her hairs are gold, her forehead Elysian fields, her eyebrows rainbows, her eyes suns, her cheeks roses, her lips coral, her teeth pearls, her neck alabaster, her bosom marble, her hands ivory, her fairness snow, and what modesty conceals from sight such, I think and imagine, as rational reflection can only extol,
    5.80
    5 votes
    60
    David Copperfield

    David Copperfield

    • Appears In Books: David Copperfield
    David Copperfield is the character after which the 1850 Charles Dickens novel, David Copperfield, was named. The character is widely thought to be based on Dickens himself, incorporating many elements of his own childhood. Scholars believe that David Copperfield's careers, friendships, and love life were most highly influenced by Dickens' experiences, as well as his time working as a child. David's involvement with the law profession and later his career as a writer mirror the experiences of Dickens. Many of David's acquaintances are based on people Dickens actually knew, and David's wives, Agnes Wickfield and Dora Spenlow, are believed to be based upon Dickens' attachment to Mary Hogarth. Dickens keenly felt his deprived education during his time at the blacking factory, and according to the famed Forster biography, it was from these times that he drew David's working period. However there are many differences in the lives of the two. Unlike Dickens, David grew up in the country as an only child; Dickens was a city boy with several brothers and sisters. Also there were never any wicked stepparents and never any great aunt. Throughout the novel, David is rarely called by his birth
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Erik, the Phantom of the Opera

    Erik, the Phantom of the Opera

    • Appears In Books: The Phantom of the Opera
    Erik (also known as The Phantom of the Opera, commonly referred to as The Phantom) is a title character from Gaston Leroux's 1910 novel The Phantom of the Opera. He is also the protagonist and antagonist of many film adaptations of the novel, notably the 1925 film adaptation starring Lon Chaney, Sr., and Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical. In the original novel, few details are given regarding Erik's past, although there is no shortage of hints and implications throughout the book. Erik himself laments the fact that his mother was horrified by his appearance (and is said to have abandoned him), and that his father, a master mason, never saw him. It is also revealed that "Erik" was not, in fact, his birth name, but one that was given or found "by accident", as Erik himself says within the work. Leroux sometimes calls him "the man's voice"; Erik also refers to himself as "The Opera Ghost", "The Angel of Music", and attends a masquerade as the Red Death. Most of the character's history is revealed by a mysterious figure, known through most of the novel as The Persian or the Daroga, whom had been a local police chief in Persia, following Erik to Paris; other details are discussed in the
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    3 votes
    62
    James Potter

    James Potter

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    In J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter Series, James Potter is the father of Harry Potter and husband to Lily Potter. He was murdered by Voldemort when Harry was an infant.
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Knave of Hearts

    Knave of Hearts

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Knave of Hearts is a character from the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. The Knave of Hearts is mentioned first in chapter 8, and chapters 11 and 12 deal with his trial for a tart burglary in which the King of Hearts presides as judge. Alice eventually defends the Knave after the evidence becomes increasingly absurd and she is called as a witness. The White Rabbit announces the charges as: The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, The Knave rarely speaks during the trial. The Mad Hatter is called to give evidence but spends his entire time being nervous in front of the King and Queen of Hearts, and the Duchess's cook is summoned to tell the court what tarts are made of. Neither is a convincing witness, and the Knave does not offer a very good defense. He denies he wrote a letter that mysteriously appears in the court, but that he already knows isn't signed. Fortunately for him, Alice diverts the attention of the court by growing ever and ever larger and arguing more and more, lastly with the Queen over the concept of "sentence first—verdict afterwards". Before a verdict can be reached for the Knave's innocence or guilt, Alice reaches full size and
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Lucky

    Lucky

    • Appears In Books: Waiting for Godot
    Lucky is a character from Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. He is a slave to the character Pozzo. Lucky is unique in a play where most of the characters talk incessantly: he only utters two sentences (one of which is more than seven hundred words long (the monologue). Lucky suffers at the hands of Pozzo willingly and without hesitation. He is "tied" (a favourite theme in Godot) to Pozzo by a ridiculously long rope in the first act, and then a similarly ridiculous short rope in the second act. Both tie around his neck. When he is not serving Pozzo, he usually stands in one spot drooling or sleeping, if he stands there long enough. His props include a picnic basket, a coat, and a suitcase full of sand. Lucky's place in Waiting for Godot has been heavily debated. Even his name is somewhat elusive. Some have marked him as "lucky" because he is "lucky in the context of the play": he does not have to search for things to occupy his time, which is a major pastime of the other characters. Pozzo tells him what to do, he does it, and is therefore lucky because his actions are determined absolutely. Beckett asserted, however, that he is lucky because he has "no expectations". Another
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Mary Russell

    Mary Russell

    • Appears In Books: The Beekeeper's Apprentice
    Mary Russell is a fictional character in a mystery series by American author Laurie R. King. Written over a period of nearly two decades, King's novels are portrayals of a succession of memoirs written and compiled apparently by an aged Mary Russell. A note from the editor (signed by Laurie R. King) tells readers of a mysterious occurrence wherein a collection of written accounts was anonymously delivered to the unsuspecting novelist; the note ends with a plea for information from anyone with information on the identity of Mary Russell. The stories are set between 1915 and the late 1920s, mainly in England but extending to Scotland, Wales, Palestine, northern India and California. They begin with fifteen year-old Mary Russell (she was born on 2 January 1900), who runs into a middle-aged individual she realizes is, in fact, Sherlock Holmes - the former consulting detective of Baker Street, now retired to Sussex, where he keeps bees. However, in the form of Mary Russell's memoirs, Sherlock Holmes stays in the stories mostly through the influence he has in Russell's life. Laurie R. King strives to clarify this, and is quoted on her website, "I did not write Sherlock Holmes stories, I
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    3 votes
    66
    Renesmee Carlie Cullen

    Renesmee Carlie Cullen

    • Appears In Books: Breaking Dawn
    Renesmee Carlie Cullen is a fictional character and is in the last book in Bella point of veiw and the Twilight saga by Stephenie Meyer,Breaking Dawn Renesmee name is derived from the amalgamation of the names of Bella's biological mother, Renᅢᄅe, and Edward's adoptive mother, Esme. Her middle name, Carlie, is a combination of the names Carlisle, Edward's adoptive father, and Charlie, Bella's biological father.Renesmee is half human, half vampire which means she has trates of bella and Edward.She has the same facial features and hair color as Edward, but the curly hair of her grandfather, Charlie. She has pale skin that glows instead of sparkles in the sunlight. Her heart pumps blood, giving her a blush. Renesmee can survive on both blood and human food, but prefers human blood but will carry on the tradition of being a "vegitarian". She does not have venom. Renesmee grows at a fast rate, being able to speak only 7 days after birth. She will reach physical maturity in 7 years and will stop aging. On their honeymoon, Bella and Edward went to Isle Esme make love and soon after Bella finds herself having emotional swings, peculiar eating habits, and vomiting spells. After
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Alec

    Alec

    • Appears In Books: New Moon
    Alec is a member of the Volturi and is one of the highest ranked guards. He has a twin sister named Jane. In the New Moon film adaptation, Cameron Bright has been cast to play Alec. Aro had his eye on the twins for many years, and decided to wait until they were older to change them. This changed when Aro was forced to slaughter the whole village because the humans believed them to be using witchcraft, and tried to burn them at the stake. Aro was now forced to change them while they were still young. They are now the most valued members of the guard, due to them being extremely powerful. It is said, that they are probably a pair of the most, if not the most powerful vampires in the world, and have the ability to take down vampires twice their size. New Moon is the first time Alec is featured. Jane is sent out into the castle to bring Edward to the rest of the guard, and Alec takes delight in teasing Jane for bringing back Alice and Bella too. Alec watched as Jane tests her powers on Edward and Bella and does not use his powers. Once Edward, Alice and Bella are permitted to leave, they must wait until midnight to go. Alec went to tell them when they could leave. Alec does not appear in Eclipse. Only his twin Jane appears. Jane is sent to clean up the newborn army that Victoria created. It is said that only three people came: Jane, Demetri, and Felix. Alec appears towards the end of Breaking Dawn, and plays a larger role. He, alongside his twin, Jane, accompany the rest of The Volturi guard to Forks to deal with the presumed immortal child. Jane and Alec were supposed to use their powers to give The Volturi an advantage. After Jane's powers were unsuccessful due to Bella's shield, Alec tried to use his powers. However, he too was unsuccessful at penetrating Bella's shield. When Jane became infuriated that her powers were useless on Bella, she prepared to spring and attack Bella. Alec stopped Jane by restricting her. After Renesmee Cullen was proven to be a spawn between human and vampire, he retreats to Volterra along with the rest of the Volturi.
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Arete

    Arete

    • Appears In Books: Odyssey
    In Greek mythology, Queen Arete (Greek: Ἀρήτη, Arêtê) of Scheria was the wife of Alcinous and mother of Nausicaa and Laodamas. Arete is a descendant of Poseidon, who, making love to Periboea, begot Nausithous, who in turn had two sons, Rhexenor and Alcinous. Rhexenor later spawned Arete with Apollo. When Odysseus arrived in Scheria, he appealed first to Arete for protection, and she treated him hospitably. He did so on Athena’s instructions, the goddess having described Arete thus: Her Alcinous made his wife, and honored her as no other woman on earth is honored, of all those who in these days direct their households in subjection to their husbands; so heartily is she honored, and has ever been, by her children and by Alcinous himself and by the people, who look upon her as upon a goddess, and greet her as she goes through the city. For she of herself is no wise lacking in good understanding, and for the women to whom she has good will she makes an end of strife even among their husbands. Arete is also depicted as an intelligent and generous hostess by Apollonius in Book 4 of the Argonautica, where he recounts the story of Jason and Medea. When the Argonauts arrived at the island,
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    1 votes
    69
    Boromir

    Boromir

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Boromir is a character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He appears in the first two volumes of The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers), and is mentioned in the last volume, The Return of the King. He was the brother of Faramir and the elder son of Denethor II, the last ruling Steward of Gondor. Boromir is portrayed as an honourable and noble character who believes passionately in the greatness of his kingdom, who would have defended its people to the last. Boromir's great stamina and physical strength, together with a forceful and commanding personality, made him a widely-admired commander in Gondor's army: he was made Captain of the White Tower, and quickly became Captain-General, also bearing the title High Warden of the White Tower. He was also heir apparent to the Stewardship. Boromir led many successful forays against Sauron's forces, prior to his journey north to Rivendell, which brought him great esteem in his father Denethor's eyes. Boromir, as a character, is portrayed as having been born in the year 2978 of the Third Age to Denethor II and Finduilas, daughter of Adrahil of Dol Amroth. His younger brother, Faramir, was born in the year
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    1 votes
    70
    Edward John Trelawny

    Edward John Trelawny

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    Edward John Trelawny (13 November 1792 – 13 August 1881) was a biographer, novelist and adventurer who is best known for his friendship with the Romantic poets Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron. Trelawny was born in England to a family of modest income but extensive ancestral history. Though his father became wealthy while he was a child, Edward had an antagonistic relationship with him. After an unhappy childhood, he was sent away to a school. He was assigned as a volunteer in the Royal Navy shortly before he turned thirteen. Trelawny served on multiple ships as a naval volunteer while in his teen years. He travelled to India and saw combat during engagements with the French Navy. He did not care for the naval lifestyle, however, and left at nineteen years of age without becoming a commissioned officer. After retiring from the Navy he had a brief and unhappy marriage in England. He then moved to Switzerland and later Italy where he met Shelley and Byron. He became friends with the two poets, and helped teach them about sailing. He soon constructed elaborate stories about his time in the navy, and claimed to have deserted and became a pirate in India. After Shelley's death,
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    1 votes
    71
    Hermione Granger

    Hermione Granger

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Hermione Jean Granger ( /hərˈmaɪ.əni ˈdʒiːn ˈɡreɪndʒər/) is a fictional character and one of the three protagonists (the other two being Harry Potter and Ron Weasley) of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. She initially appears in the first novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, as a new student on her way to Hogwarts. After Harry and Ron save her from a mountain troll in the girls' toilets, she becomes close friends with them and often uses her quick wit, deft recall, and encyclopaedic knowledge to help them. Rowling has stated that Hermione resembles her at a younger age, with her insecurity and fear of failure. Hermione Jean Granger is a Muggle-born Gryffindor student, and the best friend of Harry Potter and Ron Weasley. J.K. Rowling states that she was born on 19 September 1979 and she was nearly twelve when she first attended Hogwarts. She is an overachiever who excels academically, and is described by Rowling as a "very logical, upright and good" character. Rowling adds that Hermione's parents, two Muggle dentists, are a bit bemused by their odd daughter but very proud of her all the same." They are well aware of the wizarding world and have visited Diagon Alley
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    John Galt

    John Galt

    • Appears In Books: Atlas Shrugged
    John Galt is a fictional character in Ayn Rand's novel Atlas Shrugged (1957). Although he is not identified by name until the last third of the novel, he is the object of its often-repeated question "Who is John Galt?" and of the quest to discover the answer. As the plot unfolds, Galt is acknowledged to be a creator, philosopher, and inventor who symbolizes the power and glory of the human mind. He serves as a principled counterpoint to the collectivist social and economic structure depicted in the novel. The depiction portrays a society based on oppressive bureaucratic functionaries and a culture that embraces stifling mediocrity and egalitarianism, which the novel associates with socialistic idealism. In the novel, Galt is the son of an Ohio garage mechanic, who leaves home at age twelve and begins college at the fictional Patrick Henry University at age sixteen. There he meets Francisco d'Anconia and Ragnar Danneskjöld, who become his two closest friends. Galt takes a double major in physics and philosophy, and after graduating, he becomes an engineer at the Twentieth Century Motor Company, where he designs a revolutionary new motor powered by ambient static electricity. When
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Legolas

    Legolas

    • Appears In Books: The Fellowship of the Ring
    Legolas (pronounced [ˈlɛɡɔlas]) is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. He is an Elf of the Woodland Realm and one of nine members of the Fellowship of the Ring. Legolas was the son of Thranduil, King of the Woodland Realm of Northern Mirkwood, who appears as "the Elvenking" in The Hobbit. Thranduil ruled over the Silvan Elves or "Wood-elves" of Mirkwood. Although he lived among the Silvan Elves, Legolas was not one himself. His father Thranduil had originally come from Lindon; he and his son were actually Sindar, or "Grey Elves", called in the singular Sinda; "Sindarin" was their language. A small minority of Sindar (headed by Thranduil by the time of The Hobbit) ruled the predominantly Silvan Woodland Realm. Thranduil himself was the son of Oropher. Legolas' mother is never mentioned; the Elves of Mirkwood have no Queen at the time of The Hobbit. The realm's Sindar minority, who should have been more noble and wise than the Silvan Elves, went "native" at the end of the First Age. After Melkor was defeated and all of the grand Elf-kingdoms of Beleriand were destroyed, the Sindar returned to "a simpler time" in their culture.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Natalie Teeger

    Natalie Teeger

    • Appears In Books: Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants
    Natalie Jane Teeger (née Davenport) is a fictional character on the American crime drama/comedy Monk. She becomes Adrian Monk's personal assistant midway through season three. She is portrayed by Traylor Howard. Traylor Howard was introduced after USA Network released actress Bitty Schram, who portrayed Sharona Fleming, mid-way through the show's third season, stating they wanted to take the character in new directions. Natalie was hence introduced in the role of Monk's assistant to fill in the void left by Schram's departure. Natalie first meets Adrian Monk in the episode "Mr. Monk and the Red Herring", when he investigates two men who had broken into her home, after she stabs and kills Brian Lemmon, the second intruder, in self-defense with a pair of scissors. Captain Stottlemeyer and Lieutenant Disher, baffled, suggest to Natalie to take her case to Monk. Monk's former assistant Sharona has just left, and Monk asks Natalie if she would become his new assistant. Initially, she refuses, but over the course of the investigation, Monk proves himself kind to Natalie's daughter Julie, which makes Natalie change her mind and accept the position (not to mention, an opportunity to get
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Ann O'Brien

    Ann O'Brien

    • Appears In Books: Monkeyman & O'Brien
    Ann O'Brien is a comic book superheroine created by American comic book artist Art Adams. Along with Axwell Tiberious, she is one of the two primary characters in Adams' Dark Horse Comics series Monkeyman and O'Brien. The fictional character Ann O'Brien debuted in Dark Horse Presents #80 (December 1993) in a story titled "A Monkeyman & O'Brien Adventure: Tortorus". She next appeared in a backup story entitled "Who Are Monkeyman and O'Brien?" in Mike Mignola's 1994 series Hellboy: Seed of Destruction. The character made further appearances in several short stories in Dark Horse Presents, a three book limited series titled Monkeyman and O'Brien (1996), and a crossover miniseries Gen 13/Monkeyman and O'Brien (1998). The character's last published appearance was in 1999 in a comic strip in Dark Horse Extra, newspaper style comics fanzine. Ann Darrow O'Brien is the daughter of eminent scientist and explorer, Professor William S. O'Brien. Missing for two years, Professor O'Brien left his daughter Ann and her assistant Akiko Oki living in his palatial Bay Area estate. To the surprise of many, the young Ann had been keeping the estate solvent. Ann's amoral half-sister Oniko (who left the
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Gandalf

    Gandalf

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Gandalf ( /ˈɡændɑːlf/) is a character in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. In these stories, Gandalf appears as a wizard, member and later the head (after Saruman's betrayal and fall) of the order known as the Istari, as well as leader of the Fellowship of the Ring and the army of the West. In The Lord of the Rings, he is initially known as Gandalf the Grey, but returns from death as Gandalf the White. Humphrey Carpenter in his 1977 biography relates that Tolkien owned a postcard entitled Der Berggeist (German: "the mountain spirit"), and on the paper cover in which he kept it, he wrote "the origin of Gandalf". The postcard reproduces a painting of a bearded figure, sitting on a rock under a pine tree in a mountainous setting. He wears a wide-brimmed round hat and a long red cloak, and a white fawn is nuzzling his upturned hands. Carpenter said that Tolkien recalled buying the postcard during his holiday in Switzerland in 1911. Manfred Zimmerman, however, discovered that the painting was by German artist Josef Madlener and dates to the mid–1920s. Carpenter acknowledged that Tolkien was probably mistaken about the origin of the postcard. The original
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Nearly Headless Nick

    Nearly Headless Nick

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Sir Nicholas de Mimsy-Porpington, often referred to as Nearly Headless Nick, Nick, or Sir Nicholas, is the Gryffindor House ghost who in life was sentenced to death by beheading after a teeth-straightening spell went awry on Lady Grieve. Unfortunately, the executioner's axe was blunt and Nick's head was still attached to his neck by a thin strip of skin after 45 chops. Harry becomes friends with Nick when he attends his "deathday" party (the 500th anniversary of the event) in a Hogwarts dungeon. Nick's death date (31 October 1492) has the distinction of having served as the basis for the entire chronology of the Harry Potter stories, until the timeline was confirmed by the headstone of James and Lily Potter in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. His greatest wish is to become a member of the Headless Hunt, as mentioned in the second book. However, he is excluded due to the fact that he is not actually headless and would not be able to fully participate in the activities (such as Head Polo). In Chamber of Secrets, Nick is a victim of the Basilisk that Ginny Weasley unleashes under the influence of Tom Riddle. The stare of the Basilisk is lethal to anyone who looks it directly in the eye. All of its living victims meet its gaze indirectly, either from a reflection or by seeing it through something else, and are only petrified rather than killed. Nick is the only one to look directly at the Basilisk, but he too is petrified since he is already dead. The character appears again in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix when Harry has been looking for comfort upon the death of Sirius Black, hoping he can see him later as a ghost. Nick explains that only witches and wizards who fear death and refuse to go on can become ghosts, dashing Harry's hope of communicating with Sirius. He appears briefly in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, when Harry asks him to bring him to the Grey Lady. The character is portrayed in the film series by John Cleese.
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    Thomas Jefferson

    Thomas Jefferson

    Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 (April 2, 1743 O.S.) – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). At the beginning of the American Revolution, he served in the Continental Congress, representing Virginia and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779–1781). Just after the war ended, from mid-1784 Jefferson served as a diplomat, stationed in Paris. In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France. Jefferson was the first United States Secretary of State (1790–1793) serving under President George Washington. With his close friend James Madison he organized the Democratic-Republican Party, and subsequently resigned from Washington's cabinet. Elected Vice President in 1796, when he came in second to John Adams of the Federalists, Jefferson opposed Adams and with Madison secretly wrote the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which attempted to nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts. Elected president in what Jefferson called the Revolution of 1800, he oversaw the purchase of the vast Louisiana Territory from France (1803), and sent the Lewis and
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Ægir

    Ægir

    • Appears In Books: Skáldskaparmál
    Ægir (Old Norse "sea") is a sea giant, god of the ocean and king of the sea creatures in Norse mythology. He is also known for hosting elaborate parties for the gods. Ægir's servants are Fimafeng (killed by Loki) and Eldir. While many versions of myths portray Ægir as a giant, it is curious that many do not. In some texts, he is referred to as something older than the giants, and his origins are not really explained. Both Fundinn Noregr and Snorri Sturluson in Skáldskaparmál state that Ægir is the same as the sea-giant Hlér, who lives on the isle of Hlésey, and this is borne out by kennings. Snorri uses his visiting the Æsir as the frame of that section of the Prose Edda. In Lokasenna, Ægir hosts a party for the gods where he provides the ale brewed in an enormous pot or cauldron provided by Thor and Týr. The story of their obtaining the pot from the giant Hymir is told in Hymiskviða. The prose introduction to Lokasenna and Snorri's list of kennings state that Ægir is also known as Gymir, who is Gerðr's father, but this is evidently an erroneous interpretation of kennings in which different giant-names are used interchangeably. According to Fundinn Noregr, Ægir is a son of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Fezziwig

    Fezziwig

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    Mr. Fezziwig is a character from the novella A Christmas Carol created by Charles Dickens to provide contrast with Ebenezer Scrooge's attitudes towards business ethics. Fezziwig, who apprenticed Scrooge is everything that Scrooge is not and is portrayed as a happy, foppish man with a large Welsh wig. In stave 2 of A Christmas Carol, the Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge to revisit his youthful days in Fezziwig's world located at the cusp of the Industrial Revolution. Dickens used Fezziwig to represent a set of communal values and a way of life which was quickly being swept away in the economic turmoil of the early nineteenth century. Scrooge is reminded how his own values have diverged greatly from those of someone he once admired. Fezziwig is also a capitalist, but he moderates profit maximization with kindness, generosity, and affection for his employees. Fezziwig cannot go too far in ignoring profitability – if his products cost too much he will be out competed. If his margins are too low, he will be unable to secure loans to continue operations. In the early 19th century such small owner-controlled traders were being swept up. In the 1951 screenplay for the movie Scrooge
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Lily Evans Potter

    Lily Evans Potter

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Lily Potter was a Muggle-born witch, the younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Evans and the sister of Petunia. She learned that she was a witch as a child, after Severus Snape, a wizard boy who lived nearby, recognised her as a witch and told her of the existence of magic. The two became close friends, but their friendship became strained over the years due to Snape's irrepressible interest in the Dark Arts and his passion in joining the Death Eaters. Lily ended the friendship in their fifth year, after Snape called her a Mudblood. She attended Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry from 1971 to 1978 and was sorted into Gryffindor house. A talented student, Lily was a member of the Slug Club and was made Head Girl in her seventh year. After Hogwarts, Lily married James Potter and they had a son, Harry. The couple and their best friends (Sirius Black, Remus Lupin and Peter Pettigrew) all joined the Order of the Phoenix during the First Wizarding War; she and her husband defied Lord Voldemort himself three times. However, Lily and James were forced to go into hiding after a prophecy was made concerning Lord Voldemort and their infant son. James and Lily were betrayed by Peter Pettigrew to Lord Voldemort. Lily was murdered by Voldemort in 1981, along with her husband, while they were trying to protect their son. Lily briefly appeared again through the Resurrection Stone, along with James, Sirius and Remus in 1998. After the Second Wizarding War, Lily had three grandchildren through her son, Harry Potter; James Sirius Potter, Albus Severus Potter and Lily Luna Potter, who was named after her grandmother.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Peregrin Took

    Peregrin Took

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Peregrin Took, more commonly known as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. Pippin is introduced as a Hobbit who plays a major role as one of the companions of Frodo Baggins, in his quest to destroy the One Ring. Peregrin was the only son of Paladin Took II and wife Eglantine Banks, and therefore inherited Paladin's title of Thain of the Shire upon his death in F.A. 13. He had three older sisters, Pearl Took, Pimpernel Took, and Pervinca Took. His best friend Meriadoc Brandybuck, more commonly known as Merry, was his cousin, son of Paladin's sister Esmeralda Brandybuck. Pippin's hair colour is mentioned as "almost golden" in The History of Middle-earth, vol. IX, Sauron Defeated, through the eyes of Pippin Gamgee. In the later drafts of this same section Tolkien omitted this statement, leaving the reader to envisage Pippin's appearance. Upon handing over the Thainship to his son Faramir, he and Meriadoc rode together to Rohan and Gondor, and lived in Gondor until they died sometime after S.R. 1484. They were laid to rest in Rath Dínen. Pippin was the only hobbit who had not yet reached his 'coming of age' when his fellow
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Inspector Lestrade

    Inspector Lestrade

    • Appears In Books: A Study in Scarlet
    Inspector G. Lestrade or Mr. Lestrade is a fictional character, a Scotland Yard detective appearing in several of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle used the name of a friend from his days at the University of Edinburgh, a Saint Lucian medical student by the name of Joseph Alexandre Lestrade. In "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box", Lestrade's first initial is revealed to be G. Lestrade is described as "a little sallow rat-faced, dark-eyed fellow" in A Study in Scarlet and "a lean, ferret-like man, furtive and sly-looking," in "The Boscombe Valley Mystery". He was summarised by H. Paul Jeffers in the following words: "He is the most famous detective ever to walk the corridors of Scotland Yard, yet he existed only in the fertile imagination of a writer. He was Inspector Lestrade. We do not know his first name, only his initial: G. Although he appears thirteen times in the immortal adventures of Sherlock Holmes, nothing is known of the life outside the Yard of the detective whom Dr. Watson described unflatteringly as sallow, rat-faced, and dark-eyed and whom Holmes saw as quick and energetic but wholly conventional, lacking in imagination, and normally out of
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    Lucy Pevensie

    Lucy Pevensie

    • Appears In Books: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
    Lucy Pevensie is a fictional major character of C. S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia series. She is the youngest of the four Pevensie children, and the first to find the Wardrobe entrance to Narnia in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Of all the Pevensie children, Lucy is the closest to Aslan. Also, of all the humans who have visited Narnia, Lucy is perhaps the one that believes in Narnia the most. She is ultimately crowned "Queen Lucy the Valiant", co-ruler of Narnia along with her two brothers and her sister. Lucy is the central character of the four siblings in the novels. Lucy is a principal character in three of the seven books (The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Prince Caspian, and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader), and a minor character in two others (The Horse and His Boy and The Last Battle). Lucy is portrayed by Georgie Henley in the 2005 film The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and she returned to reprise her role in the 2008 film The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. Georgie's elder sister, Rachael Henley, portrays the older Queen Lucy at the end of the first film. Georgie Henley also reprised her role in the 2010 film The
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Mad Hatter

    Mad Hatter

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Hatter (called Hatta in Through the Looking-Glass) is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the story's sequel Through the Looking-Glass. He is often referred to as the Mad Hatter, though this term was never used by Carroll. The phrase "mad as a hatter" pre-dates Carroll's works and the characters the Hatter and the March Hare are initially referred to as "both mad" by the Cheshire Cat, with both first appearing in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, in the seventh chapter titled "A Mad Tea-Party". The Hatter explains to Alice that he and the March Hare are always having tea because, when he tried to sing for the Queen of Hearts at her celebration, she sentenced him to death for "murdering the time," but he escapes decapitation. In retaliation, Time (referred to as a "Him") halts himself in respect to the Hatter, keeping him and the March Hare stuck at 6:00 forever. As such, he exclaims "Tea Time!" at random occasions. The tea party, when Alice arrives, is characterised by switching places on the table at any given time, making short, personal remarks, asking unanswerable riddles and reciting nonsensical poetry, all of which eventually
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Queequeg

    Queequeg

    • Appears In Books: Moby-Dick; or, The Whale
    Queequeg is a fictional character presented in the 1851 novel Moby-Dick by U.S. author Herman Melville. He is the first principal character encountered by the narrator, serves as the chief harpooner aboard the Pequod, and plays an important role in many of the events of the book, both in port and during the whaling voyage. Although a "savage" cannibal, he is described with great sympathy and much admiration by Ishmael, by whom he is befriended early in the book. Queequeg is a native of a fictional island in the South Pacific Ocean named Kokovoko or Rokovoko. The island is the home to his primitive tribe, who practice cannibalism, in particular devouring the flesh of enemies slain in battle. Queequeg claims that the only case of indigestion he has suffered was after a feast in which fifty slain enemies were eaten. He displays no shame regarding the practice, describing his people in a matter-of-fact fashion. In port he prefers a diet of rare red meat, but will settle for whatever is on the menu, such as clam chowder -- which is described as "his favorite fishing food". Although the son of a chief, he chose to leave his island out of curiosity to see more of the world and to
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    William Weasley

    William Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
    Bill Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character is the oldest son of Molly and Arthur Weasley and the brother of Charlie, Percy, Fred, George, Ron, and Ginny. Information from Rowling has put the character's birth date as 29 November, 1970. Bill attended Hogwarts as a Gryffindor from 1982 to 1989, becoming both a prefect and Head Boy. Later, he worked for Gringotts Bank in Egypt as a Curse- Breaker (meaning that he took Arithmancy at Hogwarts, and must have passed the subject, as it is revealed in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix in the chapter Career Advice that Gringotts Curse-Breakers must have an O.W.L. at this subject) In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Bill returns to Britain to work for the Order of the Phoenix. After a year of knowing Fleur Delacour and a lot of "private lessons" in English, Bill proposes to Fleur and she accepts. In The Half-Blood Prince, Bill and Fleur are engaged to be married, and the summer before Harry and Ron's sixth year of school Bill brings his fiancᅢᄅe to get to know his family. Prior to the events in the sixth book, he is described as being a good looking
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Colin Creevey

    Colin Creevey

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    Colin and Dennis Creevey are fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. Fellow students of the protagonist, Harry Potter, Colin Creevey was introduced as an excitable first year student in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and Dennis in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Colin and Dennis are Muggle-born: their father is a milkman. Colin is portrayed as an excitable character, delighted at the discovery that he is a wizard and retaining the Muggle habit of taking photographs of memorable people, objects and events. He indulges this habit throughout his first year at Hogwarts, often pursuing Harry for pictures to send home to his family. Harry found Colin's constant attention irksome. Colin is in the same year as Ginny Weasley, and in Harry's second year at Hogwarts he fell victim to the Basilisk released from the Chamber of Secrets by the unwitting Ginny. Fortunately, however, he was saved by his camera: he avoided direct exposure to the Basilisk's fatal stare and suffered only medium-term, curable petrification. Dennis is Colin's younger brother by two years, and, like Colin, is in Gryffindor house. He has a very similar personality to his brother and
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    Devil

    Devil

    • Appears In Books: Paradise Lost
    • Appears In Stories: The Devil and Daniel Webster
    The Devil appears frequently as a character in works of literature and popular culture. In Christianity, the figure of the Devil, or Satan, personifies evil. The musical interval of an augmented fourth, or tritone, was called the Devil's Chord (Latin: Diabolus in musica – the Devil in music) and was banned by the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages. Composers avoided the interval, and although it is sometimes found in secular music of the time, it was used in religious music only in very specific circumstances until the existing system of keys came into use. The Devil is featured as a character in many musical representations from the Middle Ages to modern times. Hildegard of Bingen's 11th-century Ordo Virtutum features him, as do several baroque oratorios by composers such as Carissimi and Alessandro Scarlatti. During the 19th century, Gounod's Faust, in which the Devil goes by the name Mephistopheles, was a staple of opera houses around the world. Highly virtuosic violin music was sometimes associated with the Devil. Tartini's Devil's Trill sonata and Paganini's Devil's Laughter caprice are examples. The theme is taken up by Stravinsky in the "Devil's Dance" from The
    6.25
    4 votes
    90
    Remus Lupin

    Remus Lupin

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
    Remus John Lupin, nicknamed Moony, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. He first appears in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as the new Defence Against the Dark Arts professor. In the films, he is portrayed by David Thewlis as an adult, and James Utechin as a teenager. There is evidence to suggest that Lupin is a more powerful wizard than he lets on. In Prisoner of Azkaban, he produced a handful of flames in his bare hands, a possible show of wandless magic. In Order of the Phoenix, he is the only fighter besides Dumbledore who came through unscathed from the battle at the Department of Mysteries. Similarly, he emerges physically unharmed from the Battle of Hogwarts in Half-Blood Prince, even remarking that a Killing Curse had barely missed him at one point. Lupin often acts as the voice of reason within the Order of the Phoenix. He is more willing than Molly Weasley to let Harry and the other students know what is happening, but he also will not allow them to be inducted into the Order and stops Sirius from telling them too much. Lupin is a half-blood born, according to the series, to a wizard and a muggle woman on
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Bellatrix Lestrange

    Bellatrix Lestrange

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Bellatrix "Bella" Lestrange (nᅢᄅe Black) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. She evolved from an unnamed periphery character in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire into a major antagonist in subsequent novels. Bellatrix was the first female Death Eater introduced in the series, and remained the only woman explicitly identified as such until Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Bellatrix's name has been translated into other languages in a variety of ways. Many of the changes accentuate the evil nature of her character, such as the Norwegian "Bellatrix DeMons" or Dutch "Bellatrix van Detta". In the novels, Bellatrix is described as a tall woman with sleek black hair, a thin mouth, dark, heavily lidded eyes, pale skin, and the Black family's patrician good looks and bearing. However, her looks were somewhat hollowed out after her stay in Azkaban prison. In the film adaptations of the novels, actress Helena Bonham Carter portrays the character. Bellatrix Black was born in 1951 to Cygnus and Druella (Rosier) Black. Her given name translates exactly from Latin as the feminine form of the noun "warrior", though the diminutive "Bella"
    5.40
    5 votes
    92
    Alice Cullen

    Alice Cullen

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Alice Cullen was named, officially, at birth with the name of Mary Alice Brandon. She had a sister named Cynthia and a niece that is still alive. Alice was put into an asylum by her parents for her premonitions and was receiving shock treatment that would have continued for the rest of her life. Supposedly, Alice was James's, a sadistic nomad, singer, so he decided to make her his next meal. A vampire that worked at the asylum and was in love with her decided to save her by biting her. She was said to have not felt a thing and doesn't remember any of her human life. James made the old vampire pay for saving her with his own life. Alice met Jasper Whitlock (at the time he was Whitlock), her mate, in a diner in Philadelphia. She told him that she had been waiting a long time for him. She had foreseen meeting him here. She also saw the Cullens. They found the Cullens together and tried out the unorthodox lifestyle. She moved into the Cullen's home while Edward and Emmett were on a hunting trip. When they got back, she had moved into Edward's room because it had the best view. Role in Books Twilight Alice first sees Bella as her friend and as a vampire. She had a vision of Edward and
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Gollum

    Gollum

    • Appears In Books: The Return of the King
    Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He was introduced in the author's children's fantasy novel The Hobbit, and became an important supporting character in its sequel, The Lord of the Rings. Gollum was a Stoor Hobbit of the River-folk, who lived near the Gladden Fields. Originally known as Sméagol, he was corrupted by the One Ring and later named Gollum after his habit of making "a horrible swallowing noise in his throat". His life was extended far beyond its natural limits by the effects of possessing the Ring, which he frequently referred to as "my precious" and "my birthday present". After Bilbo Baggins took it during the famous Riddle Game, Gollum pursued it for the rest of his life. During his centuries under the Ring's influence, Gollum came to love and hate the Ring, just as he loved and hated himself. Throughout the story, Gollum was torn between his lust for the Ring and his desire to be free of it. Gollum first appears in The Hobbit, when Bilbo Baggins stumbled upon his lair and found the Ring, which Gollum had lost in the network of caves leading to the lake. Gollum lived on a small island in the centre of a lake at the roots of a
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Inspector Lewis

    Inspector Lewis

    • Appears In Books: The Dead of Jericho
    Robert "Robbie" Lewis is a fictional character in the Inspector Morse crime novels by Colin Dexter. The "sidekick" to Morse, Lewis is a Detective Sergeant in the Thames Valley Police, and appears in all 13 Morse novels. In the television adaptation, Inspector Morse, he is played by Kevin Whately. Following the conclusion of the series, Whately reprised the role as the lead character in Lewis, in which the character has been promoted to Inspector. Lewis is a sergeant on the staff of the Thames Valley Police in Oxford, England, and in Inspector Morse is assistant to the titular Detective Chief Inspector Morse. Morse's given name (Endeavour) was kept secret until the end of the series and thus he is almost universally referred to only by his family name. Similarly, although Lewis's given name of Robert (Robbie) was not kept secret, he was rarely referred to as anything but "Sergeant Lewis" or "Lewis." The background and personality of Lewis - a working class, easygoing family man with a Geordie accent - is frequently contrasted with that of Morse - Oxford educated, RP-accented, lifetime bachelor. Morse frequently uses these differences to insult or demean Lewis, perhaps from Morse's
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    John Keats

    John Keats

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    John Keats ( /ˈkiːts/; 31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of romantic poets along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his work only having been in publication for four years before his death. Although his poems were not generally well received by critics during his life, his reputation grew after his death, so that by the end of the 19th century he had become one of the most beloved of all English poets. He had a significant influence on a diverse range of poets and writers. Jorge Luis Borges stated that his first encounter with Keats was the most significant literary experience of his life. The poetry of Keats is characterized by sensual imagery, most notably in the series of odes. Today his poems and letters are some of the most popular and most analyzed in English literature. John Keats was born in Moorgate, London, on 31 October 1795, to Thomas and Frances Jennings Keats. There is no clear evidence of his exact birthplace. Although Keats and his family seem to have marked his birthday on 29 October, baptism records give the date as the 31st. He was the eldest of four surviving
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    John Seward

    John Seward

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    John Seward, M.D. is a fictional character appearing in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula. Seward is the administrator of an insane asylum not far from Count Dracula's first English home, Carfax. Throughout the novel, Seward conducts ambitious interviews with one of his patients, Renfield, in order to understand better the nature of life-consuming psychosis. As a psychiatrist, Seward enjoys using the most up-to-date equipment, including using a recording phonograph to record his interviews with his patients and his own notes. Several chapters of the novel consist of transcriptions of Seward's phonograph recordings. He is best friends with Quincey Morris and Arthur Holmwood. All three propose to Lucy Westenra the same day. Although Lucy turns down Seward's marriage proposal, his love for her remains, and he dedicates himself to her care when she suddenly takes ill. He calls in his mentor, Abraham Van Helsing, to help him with her illness, and he helps Seward to realize that Lucy has been bitten by a vampire and is doomed to become one herself. After she is officially destroyed and her soul can go to Heaven, Seward is determined to destroy Dracula. The novel's epilogue mentions that
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Patchwork Girl

    Patchwork Girl

    • Appears In Books: The Patchwork Girl of Oz
    The Patchwork Girl (aka Scraps) is a character from the fantasy Oz Book series by L. Frank Baum. She first appeared in The Patchwork Girl of Oz. She is a living doll made of patchwork, button eyes, brown yarn hair, a felt tongue, and pearl teeth. She was originally brought to life by a magician who lived in the Munchkin Country named Dr. Pipt by means of his Powder of Life formula to be a servant for his wife. Ojo overloaded her with magic brains in the process of bringing her to life, and as she uncontrollably flopped about she accidentally spilled the Liquid of Petrifaction on Mrs. Pipt and Ojo's uncle, turning them to stone. Much of their first adventure is gathering the ingredients to find a counterspell. She later became the companion of the Scarecrow, who found her quite beautiful. She had major roles in such Oz books as The Gnome King of Oz and The Wonder City of Oz, and was the title character in A Runaway in Oz. The Patchwork Girl was likely influenced by the character of Topsy in Uncle Tom's Cabin, and she may have influenced the character of Raggedy Ann. Despite her popularity, to the point that her image was used in at least two advertisements for student desks, she has
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Professor Severus Snape

    Professor Severus Snape

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J.K. Rowling. In the first novel of the series, he is hostile toward Harry and is built up to be the primary antagonist until the final chapters. As the series progresses, Snape's character becomes more layered and complex. Rowling does not fully reveal the details of his true loyalties until the end of the final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Over the course of the series, Snape's portrayal evolves from that of a malicious and partisan teacher to that of a pivotal character of considerable complexity and moral ambiguity. Snape primarily teaches Potions at Hogwarts, though in the sixth novel he teaches Defence Against the Dark Arts, a position which he was known to have desired throughout the series. He ultimately becomes Headmaster of Hogwarts in the final novel. Rowling has described him as "a gift of a character". In an interview, Rowling described Snape's character as an "antihero". She has said that she drew inspiration for Snape's character from a disliked teacher from her own childhood, and described Snape as a horrible teacher, saying the "worst, shabbiest thing you can do as a
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Wicked Witch of the East

    Wicked Witch of the East

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Wicked Witch of the East is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his Oz series of books. The cruel old witch conquered and tyrannized the Munchkin Country in the East, making the Munchkins slave for her night and day. The magical silver shoes (changed to the Ruby Slippers in the popular 1939 MGM film version) were one of her most prized possessions, and she met her demise when Dorothy Gale's house landed on her. Her dry, withered body quickly turned to dust, leaving only the magic shoes. The Wicked Witch of the East was more powerful than the Good Witch of the North, but not as powerful as Glinda the Good Witch of the South. She was not related to the Wicked Witch of the West, but leagued with her, and also with the Wicked Witch of the North and the Wicked Witch of the South, to conquer and divide Oz among themselves. After the fall of Pastoria the last King of Oz, the old witch conquered the Eastern part of the Land of Oz and held the Munchkins in bondage for a number of decades. Among her exceedingly cruel actions were the enchantments of Nick Chopper's axe and Captain Fyter's sword, which caused the two men to cut up their own
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Frodo Baggins

    Frodo Baggins

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He is the primary protagonist of Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Frodo was a hobbit of the Shire who inherited Sauron's Ring from Bilbo Baggins and undertook the quest to destroy it in the fires of Mount Doom. He is also mentioned in the posthumously published The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Frodo did not appear until the third draft of A Long-Expected Party, when he was named Bingo (after a family of toy koala bears owned by Tolkien's children), son of Bilbo Baggins and Primula Brandybuck. In the fourth draft, he was renamed Bingo Bolger-Baggins, son of Rollo Bolger and Primula Brandybuck. Tolkien didn't change the name to Frodo until the third phase of writing, when much of the narrative, as far as the hobbits' arrival in Rivendell, had already taken shape. Prior to this, the name "Frodo" had been used for the character who eventually became Peregrin Took. Frodo is introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring as the adoptive heir of Bilbo Baggins. The chapter "A Long-expected Party" relates that Frodo's parents Drogo Baggins and Primula Brandybuck had been killed in a boating accident when Frodo was 12;
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Bezu Fache

    Bezu Fache

    • Appears In Books: The Da Vinci Code
    Bezu Fache is a fictional character in the popular 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and the 2006 film based on it. In the film, he was portrayed by Jean Reno. Fache is a captain in the Direction Centrale de la Police Judiciaire (DCPJ), the French criminal investigation police. Tough, canny and persistent, he is in charge of the investigation of Louvre Museum curator Jacques Saunière's murder in the Louvre. From the message left by the dead curator, he is convinced the murderer is Harvard University professor Robert Langdon, whom he summons to the Louvre in order to extract a confession. He is thwarted in this by Sophie Neveu, who knows Langdon to be innocent and surreptitiously notifies Langdon that he is in fact the prime suspect. He then starts pursuing Langdon doggedly in the belief that letting him get away would be career suicide. However, after contact with Opus Dei leader Bishop Manuel Aringarosa about the murder of Sister Sandrine Bieil, he realizes that it was not Langdon who killed Saunière, but Aringarosa's trusted albino monk Silas, who killed the four top members of the Priory of Sion (including Saunière) under the instruction of a mysterious person called The
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Caterpillar

    Caterpillar

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Caterpillar (also known as the Hookah-Smoking Caterpillar) is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carroll's book, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Introduced in Chapter IV ("Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill") and the main center of interest of Chapter V ("Advice from a Caterpillar"), the Caterpillar is a hookah-smoking caterpillar exactly three inches high which, according to him, "is a very good height indeed" (though Alice believes it to be a wretched height). Alice does not like the Caterpillar when they first meet, because he does not immediately talk to her and when he does, it is usually in short, rather rude sentences, or difficult questions. The original illustration by John Tenniel at right, is something of a visual paradox; the caterpillar's human face appears to be formed from the head and legs of a more realistic caterpillar. In another allusion, the flowers on the right of the illustration appear to be a form of tobacco, while the caterpillar is smoking heavily. The caterpillar makes an appearance in a few other places outside Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, such as American McGee's Alice and the novel The Looking-Glass Wars; in both of these spin-offs he
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Draco Malfoy

    Draco Malfoy

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Draco Lucius Malfoy is a fictional character and a major antagonist in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. He is a Slytherin student in Harry Potter's year. He is frequently accompanied by his two accomplices, Vincent Crabbe and Gregory Goyle, who act as henchmen. He is portrayed as a spoiled, cowardly bully who uses magic to get what he wants, often by force. Draco serves as a literary foil to the hero, Harry Potter, and is loosely based on bullies Rowling encountered during her school days. Harry first encounters Draco's snobbish bigotry after their initial encounter at Madam Malkin's. Rowling uses the Malfoys to introduce themes of intolerance and bigotry into a setting where people are often judged solely by their blood lineage rather than their good character or accomplishments. Draco, adhering to his family's beliefs, thinks that Muggle-born witches and wizards, which he and other characters derogatorily describe by the epithet Mudbloods, should be denied a magical education. Harry's first impression that the Wizarding community is a "magical wonderland" is instantly shattered. Says Rowling, "[Harry] found out that many people in power in the wizarding world are just as
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Lady Wang

    Lady Wang

    • Appears In Books: Dream of the Red Chamber
    Lady Wang (王夫人) is a character in the classic Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber. She is the wife of Jia Zheng, and mother of Jia Zhu (dead at the start of the novel), Jia Yuanchun and Jia Baoyu. She is the elder sister of Aunt Xue and hence the maternal aunt to Xue Baochai and Xue Pan. She is on the surface a kind lady and a devout Buddhist, who delegates authority to her niece Wang Xifeng in the everyday running of the Rongguo household. However, she is prone to malicious rumors, and can act with cruelty towards maids she thinks is seducing her son. Lady Wang is one of the culprits resulting in the death of Baoyu's maid, Jingwen.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Professor Albus Dumbledore

    Professor Albus Dumbledore

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a major character of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. For most of the series, he is the headmaster of the wizarding school Hogwarts. As part of his backstory, it is revealed that he is the founder and leader of the Order of the Phoenix, an organisation dedicated to fighting the main antagonist of the series, Lord Voldemort. Rowling stated she chose the name Dumbledore, which is an Early Modern English word for "bumblebee", because of Dumbledore's love of music: she imagined him walking around "humming to himself a lot". The author has stated that she enjoys writing Dumbledore because he "is the epitome of goodness". Rowling said that Dumbledore speaks for her, as he "knows pretty much everything" about the Harry Potter universe. Rowling mentioned that Dumbledore regrets "that he has always had to be the one who knew, and who had the burden of knowing. And he would rather not know." As a mentor to the central character Harry Potter, "Dumbledore is a very wise man who knows that Harry is going to have to learn a few hard lessons to prepare him for what may be coming in his life. He allows Harry to get into what he wouldn’t
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Sancho Panza

    Sancho Panza

    • Appears In Books: Don Quixote
    Sancho Panza [ˈsantʃo ˈpanθa] is a fictional character in the novel Don Quixote written by Spanish author Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra in 1605. Sancho acts as squire to Don Quixote, and provides comments throughout the novel, known as sanchismos, that are a combination of broad humour, ironic Spanish proverbs, and earthy wit. "Panza" in Spanish means "belly" (cf. English "paunch," Italian "pancia"). Sancho Panza is not a servant of Alonso Quijano before his madness turns him into Don Quixote, but a peasant living in the same unnamed village. When the novel begins Sancho has been married for a long time to a woman named Teresa Cascajo and has a daughter, María Sancha (also named Marisancha, Marica, María, Sancha and Sanchica), who is said to be old enough to be married. Sancho's wife is described more or less as a feminine version of Sancho, both in looks and behaviour. When Don Quixote proposes Sancho to be his squire, neither he nor his family strongly oppose it. Sancho is illiterate and proud of it but by influence of his new master he develops considerable knowledge about some books. Sancho instead provides the earthly wisdom of Spanish proverbs, surprising his master.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Susan Pevensie

    Susan Pevensie

    • Appears In Books: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
    Susan Pevensie is a fictional major character of C. S. Lewis's The Chronicles of Narnia series. Susan is the elder sister and the second eldest Pevensie child. She appears in three of the seven books—as a child in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian, and as an adult in The Horse and His Boy. She is also mentioned in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and The Last Battle. During her reign at the Narnian capital of Cair Paravel, she is known as Queen Susan the Gentle or Queen Susan of the Horn. She was the only Pevensie that survived the train wreck (because she was not on the train or at the station) on Earth which sent the others to Narnia after The Last Battle. In Disney's live-action films, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005) and Prince Caspian (2008), Susan is portrayed by actress Anna Popplewell. Actress Sophie Winkleman portrays an older Susan at the end of the first film. In the book Susan is described as having black hair: "And Susan grew into a tall and gracious woman with black hair that fell almost to her feet and the kings of the countries beyond the sea began to send ambassadors asking for her hand in marriage. And she was called Susan the
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Swift Morgan

    Swift Morgan

    Swift Morgan was a British science fiction hero created in 1948 by Denis McLoughlin and his brother Colin and first published by Boardman Books in their series of rotogravure comic books (1948-1954). Swift, with his plucky girl companion Silver, faced all manner of fantastic adventures from other worldly to time travel. Boardman Books also used Swift in text stories published in their children's annuals in the 1950s.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Duchess

    Duchess

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Duchess is a character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, published in 1865. Carroll does not describe her physically in much detail, although her hideous appearance is strongly established in the popular imagination thanks to John Tenniel's illustrations and from context it is clear that Alice finds her quite unattractive. The Duchess is an antagonist of The Queen of Hearts. In her first appearance, the Duchess seems nearly as unpleasant as the Queen herself, but later on treats Alice with friendliness and respect. According to Martin Gardner in The Annotated Alice, John Tenniel's drawings of the Duchess were inspired by Quentin Matsys's The Ugly Duchess (c. 1513) in the National Gallery. It has been said that the painting is a portrait of Margarete Maultasch, a countess of the 14th century who had the reputation of being the ugliest woman who ever existed. The painting, however, was done 200 years after her death. Another possible inspiration for the Duchess is Queen Victoria's mother, the Duchess of Kent, whose pre-coronation machinations and attempts to control her daughter led to her exclusion from her adult daughter's life and near exile. This would
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Faramir

    Faramir

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    In J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium, Faramir is a fictional character appearing in The Lord of the Rings. He is introduced as the younger brother of Boromir of the Fellowship of the Ring and second son of Denethor II, the Steward of the realm of Gondor. The relationships between the three men are revealed over the course of the book and are elaborated in the appendices. Faramir first enters the narrative in person in The Two Towers, where, upon meeting Frodo Baggins, he is presented with a temptation to take possession of the Ruling Ring. In The Return of the King, he led the forces of Gondor during the War of the Ring, coming near to death, and eventually succeeded his father as the Steward and won the love of Éowyn of Rohan. In The History of The Lord of the Rings series Christopher Tolkien described that his father had not foreseen the emergence of Faramir during the writing of the book, only inventing him at the actual point of his appearance in The Two Towers. J. R. R. Tolkien noted that the introduction of Faramir had led to postponement of the book's dénouement and to further development of the background for Gondor and Rohan. Long after completing The Lord of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Gryphon

    Gryphon

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Gryphon is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll in the popular book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. True to the conventional view of a griffin, he has the head, talons, and wings of an eagle and the body of a lion. The Gryphon appears to be somewhat overbearing and dismissive of the obsessions and dismays of other characters, such as the Mock Turtle's sorrow and the Queen of Hearts' executions, neither of which (according to the Gryphon) have any basis in fact. He speaks with a slightly ungrammatical Cockney-like accent and makes demands of the Mock Turtle, which are obeyed despite the latter creature's implicit objections. In addition, he is prone to making cough-like sounds written as "Hjckrrh!", which seem to have little meaning and may be involuntary. In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, the Gryphon features with the Mock Turtle in Chapter 9, "The Mock Turtle's Story", Chapter 10, "The Lobster Quadrille", and briefly at the start of Chapter 11, "Who Stole the Tarts?". The Gryphon was ordered by the Queen to take Alice to meet the Mock Turtle; this he did, and stayed with them for a long time, demanding that the Mock Turtle tell its history, as well as several
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Javert

    Javert

    • Appears In Books: Les Misérables
    Javert (French pronunciation: [ʒavɛʁ]; c. 1775-1832) is a fictional character from the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. He is a prison guard, and later policeman, who devotes his life to the law. He is always referred to simply as "Javert" or "Inspector Javert" by the narrator and other characters throughout the novel; his first name is never mentioned. Javert is the main antagonist of the novel, to Jean Valjean, the novel's protagonist. Some consider Javert misguided rather than evil, although his inflexibility and cruelty throughout the novel moves in parallel to Jean Valjean's kindness. Those who consider Javert misguided believe that the distinction of pure evil in the novel more appropriately belongs to the greedy and treacherous Thénardiers. Javert may also be regarded as one who seeks only blind justice. Javert refuses to acknowledge repentance and will imprison those that break the law or parole, as Jean Valjean did. Others consider the Thénardiers dishonest, petty criminals, whose actual negative impact on the protagonists is minor compared to the significant levels of spite and mercilessness Javert inflicts on those he encounters. Javert was born c. 1780 (he is said
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    John Carter

    John Carter

    • Appears In Books: A Princess of Mars
    John Carter is a fictional character, created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, who appears in Burroughs' Barsoom novels. Although he is actually a Virginian from Earth and only a visitor to Mars, he is sometimes known as John Carter of Mars, in reference to the setting in which his major deeds are recorded. His character is enduring, having appeared in various media since his 1912 debut in a magazine serial. The 2012 Disney-made feature film John Carter marks the centenary of the character's first appearance. John Carter was the lead character in the first novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, set on a fictionalized version of Mars known as Barsoom. Written between July and September 28, 1911, the novel was serialized as Under the Moons of Mars in the pulp magazine The All-Story from February to July 1912. It later appeared as a complete novel only after the success of Burroughs' Tarzan series. For its October 1917 hardcover publication by A.C. McClurg & Company, the novel was retitled A Princess of Mars. Carter reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second (The Gods of Mars, 1918), the third (The Warlord of Mars, 1919), the eighth (Swords of Mars, 1936), the
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Pozzo

    Pozzo

    • Appears In Books: Waiting for Godot
    Pozzo is a character from Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot. His name is Italian for "well" (as in "oil well"). On the surface he is a pompous, sometimes foppish, aristocrat (he claims to live in a manor, own many slaves and a Steinway piano), cruelly using and exploiting those around him (specifically his slave, Lucky and, to a lesser extent, Estragon). He wears similar clothes to Vladimir and Estragon (i.e. a bowler and suit), but they are not in the dire condition theirs are. He sometimes wears a heavy "greatcoat" that is usually carried by Lucky. His props include a whip, a pipe, a monocle, a breath freshener, and a pocket watch. Beckett indicates in the stage directions that he is completely bald, although this direction is rarely taken in most productions of the play. While by no means a villain in a conventional sense of the word, Pozzo is sometimes considered (nominally) the "antagonist" of Waiting for Godot. Although he is not technically in opposition to the so-called heroes of the play (Vladimir and Estragon) he does bring chaos into their sheltered world. Upon his first entrance, he immediately goes about attempting to exert authority on the hapless "Didi" and
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Seth Clearwater

    Seth Clearwater

    • Appears In Books: Breaking Dawn
    Seth Clearwater is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series.

    Seth Clearwater is Leah's younger brother and a member of the La Push pack. He has sandy brown-colored fur. He transforms into a werewolf during the events of New Moon, around the same time as his sister, Leah. In New Moon and Eclipse he is shown to idolize Jacob Black, and is said to remind Bella of a younger Jacob. During the newborn attack in Eclipse, Seth stays with Bella and Edward, due to his young age of only fifteen, to act as a connection to the pack. When Victoria and Riley appear, Seth fights and destroys Riley with Edward's help. In Breaking Dawn he is shown to have developed an unlikely friendship with Edward, and attends his and Bella's wedding. Seth remains a constant presence throughout the final book in the series. He is initially the only werewolf to feel completely comfortable being around the Cullen family. He also has, according to Edward, very honest and pure thoughts, something that endears him to the Cullens, and Edward in particular. After Jacob forms his own pack, Seth quickly follows. For most of Breaking Dawn Seth is Jacob's second-in-command, until he is replaced by Leah at the end of the novel.
    In 2010's Eclipse, Seth will be played by Boo Boo Stewart.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    The Talking Cricket

    The Talking Cricket

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    The Talking Cricket (Italian: Il Grillo Parlante) is a fictional character who appears in Carlo Collodi's 1883 book The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio). The Cricket, who has lived in Geppetto's house for over a century, makes its first appearance in chapter IV where he explains to Pinocchio, whose mischief has landed his creator Geppetto in prison, that he must either attend school or get a job in order to function properly in the world. When Pinocchio refuses to listen, the Cricket expresses sympathy to Pinocchio because "you are a puppet, and what's worse is that you have a head of wood". In response, Pinocchio throws a mallet at the cricket, seemingly killing it. The Cricket reappears subsequently in XIV as a shade. He appears to Pinocchio in a dark wood, telling him to return home rather than keep an appointment with The Fox and the Cat (Il Gatto e la Volpe), who have deceived Pinocchio into following them on a fool's errand. Pinocchio refuses, and is subsequently injured in an encounter with two murderers. The Cricket reappears again in chapter XVI, where he is revealed to be a doctor. He, along with his colleagues the crow and the owl, tends to Pinocchio's
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Bilbo Baggins

    Bilbo Baggins

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Bilbo Baggins is the protagonist and titular character of The Hobbit and a supporting character in The Lord of the Rings, two of the most well-known of J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy writings. In Tolkien's narrative conceit, in which all the writings of Middle-earth are translations from the fictitious volume of The Red Book of Westmarch, Bilbo is the author of The Hobbit and translator of various "works from the elvish", as mentioned in the end of The Return of the King. In The Hobbit Bilbo Baggins, in comfortable middle age at 50 years old, was hired in spite of himself as a "burglar" by the wizard Gandalf and 13 dwarves led by their king Thorin Oakenshield on a quest to reclaim the Lonely Mountain and its treasure from the dragon Smaug. The adventure took Bilbo and the companions through the wilderness, to the elf haven of Rivendell, across the Misty Mountains and the black forest of Mirkwood, to Lake-town in the middle of Long Lake, and eventually to the Mountain itself. Here, after the dragon was killed and the Mountain reclaimed, the Battle of Five Armies took place. In his journey, Bilbo encountered other fantastic creatures, including trolls, elves, giant spiders, a man who can
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Dobby the House Elf

    Dobby the House Elf

    Dobby is a house-elf, who, unlike most other house-elves, wanted to be freed. He has three fingers and one opposable thumb. Dobby was the abused and tormented slave of the Malfoys before the events of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. In his first appearance in the series in Chamber of Secrets, Dobby knew of Lucius Malfoy's plans to re-open the Chamber of Secrets using Tom Riddle's school diary for months before it happened.  As an attempt to discourage Harry from returning to Hogwarts, Dobby begins to intercept the letters that Harry's friends sent him. Dobby then appears at Privet Drive to warn Harry and tell him of the danger of returning to Hogwarts, and attempts to persuade him to stay away so he would be safe from harm. When Dobby's attempts fail to persuade Harry, he smashes a pudding in the Dursley family's kitchen. Being caught in the kitchen with the wreckage, and receiving a warning letter for illegal use of magic, Harry is locked up by the Dursleys, who insist that he would not return to Hogwarts, but Ron, Fred and George Weasley are able to rescue Harry in their father's flying Ford Anglia. Dobby later tries to keep Harry away from Hogwarts by magically sealing off the hidden entrance to Platform 9¾, but Harry and Ron foil that plot by piloting the flying car back to school. During a Quidditch match of Gryffindor vs Slytherin, Dobby enchants a Bludger to chase after only Harry; it manages to break his arm. When Harry – having just returned from the Chamber of Secrets – discovers that Dobby's master was Lucius, Harry tricks Malfoy into setting Dobby free – a feat that secures him the house-elf's undying loyalty.  Dobby reappears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. He has been demanding payment for his services, which makes it difficult for him to find any employment at all. He later obtains a post at Hogwarts, and is the only paid house-elf on the staff (Dumbledore being probably the only employer who would even think of paying a house-elf). In this book, Dobby gives Harry the gillyweed he needs to survive the Second Triwizard Task. Dobby is also the only house-elf who cleans Gryffindor Tower since Hermione begins trying to set the house-elves free, because the house-elves find the clothes insulting. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Dobby shows Harry the hidden Room of Requirement, which Harry uses for his Dumbledore's Army meetings. When Professor Umbridge finds out about the meetings later, Dobby enters the room to warn the group to leave. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Harry entrusts Dobby to help watch Kreacher when he orders him to work in the Hogwarts kitchens with the other house-elves. When Harry needs somebody to follow Draco Malfoy, he is helped by Dobby and Kreacher. When they report back, Kreacher tells Harry only mundane things, such as Malfoy's class schedule, while Dobby cuts to the chase and tells Harry about Malfoy's visits to the Room of Requirement.  Dobby makes his last appearance in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows when Aberforth Dumbledore sends Dobby to rescue Harry, Ron, and Hermione from the cellar of Malfoy Manor. Dobby helps Harry and Ron escape their prison and gets Luna Lovegood, Dean Thomas, and Mr Ollivander out of the manor, then helps Harry and Ron free Hermione and Griphook from torture at the hands of Bellatrix Lestrange. While he succeeds in his task, Bellatrix throws a knife at Harry, but the knife hits Dobby instead, who dies before he can be healed. Harry physically digs the grave without using magic, and writes upon the stone: "Here Lies Dobby, A Free Elf".  Dobby was voiced by Toby Jones in the film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and is confirmed to return for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Some suggest the makers of the Harry Potter films modelled Dobby's appearance after Russian President Vladimir Putin. In the Comic Relief spoof, Harry Potter and the Secret Chamberpot of Azerbaijan, he is played by Basil Brush.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Gimli

    Gimli

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. A Dwarf warrior, he is the son of Glóin (a character from Tolkien's earlier novel, The Hobbit). Gimli is chosen to represent the race of Dwarves in the Fellowship of the Ring. As such, he is one of the primary characters of the novel. In the course of the adventure, Gimli aids the Ring-bearer, participates in the War of the Ring, and becomes close friends with Legolas, overcoming an ancient enmity of Dwarves and Elves. Gimli was a member of Durin's Folk who volunteered to accompany Frodo Baggins as a member of the Fellowship of the Ring on the quest to destroy the One Ring. He was an honourable, wise, and stalwart warrior, favouring the axe as his weapon. Gimli became deeply enamoured upon meeting the Elf-lady Galadriel, and forged a friendship with the Elf Legolas despite his original hostility (due to the fact that Legolas' father had once incarcerated his father); these relationships aided greatly in the rehabilitation of the long-weak relationship between the Elves and the Dwarves of Middle-earth. Gimli was the son of Glóin, one of the former companions of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Mina Harker

    Mina Harker

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    Wilhelmina "Mina" Harker (née Murray) is a fictional character and the protagonist of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. She begins the story as Miss Mina Murray, a young school mistress who is engaged to Jonathan Harker, and best friends with Lucy Westenra. She visits Lucy in Whitby on July 24 of that year, when schools would have closed for the summer. After her fiancé Jonathan escapes from Count Dracula's castle, Mina travels to Budapest and joins him there. Mina cares for him during his recovery from his traumatic encounter with the vampire and his brides, and the two return to England as husband and wife. Back home, they learn that Lucy has died from a mysterious illness stemming from severe blood loss as the result of repeated attacks by an unknown, blood-drinking animal; — the animal, they learn, was none other than Dracula taking a different shape. Mina and Jonathan join the coalition around Abraham Van Helsing, and turn their attentions to destroying the Count. After Dracula learns of this plot against him, he takes revenge by visiting — and biting — Mina at least three times. Dracula also feeds Mina his blood, destining her to become a vampire at her death.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    William Bush

    William Bush

    • Appears In Books: Hornblower and the Hotspur
    • Appears In Stories: Hornblower's Charitable Offering
    Captain William Bush RN is a fictional character in C.S. Forester's Horatio Hornblower series. He is Hornblower's best friend, and serves with Hornblower in the Royal Navy prior to the Peace of Amiens and again during the Napoleonic Wars. Bush's role in the novels is that of Hornblower's best friend and second-in-command. He is characterized chiefly by his loyalty, his patience, good nature, and stolid matter-of-fact outlook. Although Hornblower genuinely cares for Bush, he often frustrates and hurts him through harsh criticism. Hornblower, although a brilliant strategist, is a painfully self-conscious and hyperactively introspective man who tries desperately to conceal from the world what he perceives as "weaknesses". However, Bush sees Hornblower as he is: Bush's loyalty to Hornblower is in fact strengthened by Hornblower's limitations and his attempts to conceal them. As the Hornblower novels progress, Bush often worries that Hornblower is depriving himself not only of food and rest, but also of human contact. Although Bush is an excellent judge of character, he is not a diplomat; and he must often keep his concern for his sensitive friend to himself. The friendship survives
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Becky Sharp

    Becky Sharp

    • Appears In Books: Vanity Fair
    Becky Sharp is the anti-heroine of William Makepeace Thackeray's satirical novel Vanity Fair (1847–48). A cynical social climber who uses her charms to fascinate and seduce upper-class men, Sharp is contrasted with the clinging, dependent heroine Amelia Sedley. She befriends Amelia at an expensive girls school where she is given a place because her father teaches there, and uses her as a stepping stone to gain social position. Sharp functions as a picaroon by being a social outsider who is able to expose the manners of the upper gentry to ridicule. Her name ("sharp" having connotations of a "sharper" or con-man) and function suggest that Thackeray intended her to be unsympathetic, and yet she became one of his most popular creations.
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Jane Eyre

    Jane Eyre

    • Appears In Books: Jane Eyre
    Jane Eyre is the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel of the same name. One evening when Jane is out for a walk, she meets a mysterious man when his horse slips and he falls – and, of course, this is Mr. Rochester. Jane and Rochester are immediately interested in each other. She is fascinated by his rough, craggy, dark appearance as well as his abrupt, almost rude manners, which she thinks are easier to handle than polite flattery. He is very interesting in figuring out how Jane is herself, comparing her to an elf or sprite and admiring her unusual strength and stubbornness. Rochester quickly learns that he can rely on Jane in a crisis – one evening, Jane finds Rochester asleep in his bed with all the curtains and bedclothes on fire, and she puts out the flames and rescues him. Jane and Rochester find that they can have interesting and in-depth conversations, and both fall steadily in love with each other. However, Rochester soon invited some of his acquaintances to Thornfield, including the beautiful Blanche Ingram. Rochester lets Blanche flirt with him constantly in front of Jane to make her jealous and encourages rumors that he’s engaged to Blanche. During the week-long
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Ebenezer Scrooge

    Ebenezer Scrooge

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    Ebenezer Scrooge is the principal character in Charles Dickens's 1843 novel, A Christmas Carol. At the beginning of the novel, Scrooge is a cold-hearted, tight-fisted and greedy man, who despises Christmas and all things which give people happiness. Dickens describes him thus: "The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, made his eyes red, his thin lips blue, and he spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice ..." His last name has come into the English language as a byword for miserliness and misanthropy, traits displayed by Scrooge in the exaggerated manner for which Dickens is well-known. The tale of his redemption by the three Ghosts of Christmas (Ghost of Christmas Past, Ghost of Christmas Present, and Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come) has become a defining tale of the Christmas holiday. Scrooge's catchphrase, "Bah, humbug!" is often used to express disgust with many of the modern Christmas traditions. In his diaries, Dickens states that Scrooge stems from a grave marker which he saw in 1841, while taking an evening walk in the Canongate Kirkyard in Edinburgh. The headstone was for the vintner Ebenezer Lennox Scroggie, a relative of Adam Smith, who had won
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Harry Potter

    Harry Potter

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Harry James Potter is the title character and the protagonist of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. The majority of the books' plot covers seven years in the life of the orphan Potter, who, on his eleventh birthday, learns he is a wizard. Thus, he attends Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry to practice magic under the guidance of the kindly headmaster Albus Dumbledore and other school professors. Harry also discovers that he is already famous throughout the novel's magical community, and that his fate is tied with that of Lord Voldemort, the internationally feared Dark Wizard and murderer of his mother and father. According to Rowling, the idea for both the Harry Potter books and its eponymous protagonist came while waiting for a delayed train from Manchester to London in 1990. She stated that her idea for "this scrawny, black-haired, bespectacled boy who didn't know he was a wizard became more and more real to me". While developing the ideas for her book, she also decided to make Harry an orphan who attended a boarding school called Hogwarts. She explained in a 1999 interview with The Guardian: "Harry had to be an orphan  — so that he's a free agent, with no fear of
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Lassie

    Lassie

    • Appears In Books: Lassie Come-Home
    • Appears In Stories: Lassie Come-Home
    Lassie is a fictional collie dog character created by Eric Knight in a short story expanded to novel length called Lassie Come-Home. Published in 1940, the novel was filmed by MGM in 1943 as Lassie Come Home with a dog named Pal playing Lassie. Pal then appeared with the stage name "Lassie" in six other MGM feature films through 1951. Pal's owner and trainer Rudd Weatherwax then acquired the Lassie name and trademark from MGM and appeared with Pal (as "Lassie") at rodeos, fairs, and similar events across America in the early 1950s. In 1954, the long-running, Emmy winning television series Lassie debuted, and, over the next 19 years, a succession of Pal's descendants appeared on the series. The "Lassie" character has appeared in radio, television, film, toys, comic books, animated series, juvenile novels, and other media. Pal's descendants continue to play Lassie today. Lassie was originally played by a man in a dog suit. According to writer Nigel Clarke, the original Lassie who inspired so many films and television episodes was a rough-haired crossbreed who saved the life of a sailor during World War I. Half collie, Lassie was owned by the landlord of the Pilot Boat, a pub in the
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Toto

    Toto

    • Appears In Books: Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West
    Toto is the name of a fictional dog in L. Frank Baum's Oz series of children's books, and works derived from them. The name is pronounced with a long "O", a homophone of "toe toe". The dog was originally a Cairn Terrier drawn by W.W. Denslow for the first edition of the Wizard of Oz (1900). He reappears in numerous adaptations, such as the famous 1939 Hollywood movie. Toto belongs to Dorothy Gale, the heroine of the first and many subsequent books. In the first book, he never spoke, although other animals, native to Oz, did. In subsequent books, other animals gained the ability to speak upon reaching Oz or similar lands, but Toto remained speechless. In Tik-Tok of Oz, continuity is restored: Toto reveals that he is able to talk, just like other animals in the land of Oz, and simply chooses not to. In The Lost Princess of Oz, he talks a blue streak. Other major appearances include The Road to Oz, The Emerald City of Oz, Grampa in Oz and The Magical Mimics in Oz, in which he is the first to recognize the Mimics. In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum did not specifically state Toto's breed, but describes him as "a little black dog (presumably male except in the 1939 MGM movie a female
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Fitzwilliam Darcy

    Fitzwilliam Darcy

    • Appears In Books: Pride and Prejudice
    Fitzwilliam Darcy, generally referred to as Mr. Darcy, is one of the two central characters in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice. He is an archetype of the aloof romantic hero, and a romantic interest of Elizabeth Bennet, the novel's protagonist. The story's narration is almost exclusively from Elizabeth's perspective; she is portrayed as the sympathetic figure, and Darcy hardly so until the later chapters of the novel—as knowledge and ironic events are revealed to Elizabeth. Usually referred to only as "Mr. Darcy" or "Darcy" by characters and the narrator, his first name is mentioned twice in the novel. In the novel, Mr. Darcy is a wealthy gentleman with an income exceeding £10,000 a year, and the proprietor of Pemberley, a large estate in Derbyshire, England. Darcy first meets Elizabeth Bennet at a ball, where he slights her by refusing to dance with her, and by making rather demeaning remarks about her while she was within earshot. Gradually he becomes attracted to her, and later attempts to court her while simultaneously struggling against his continued feelings of superiority. Ironically, Darcy disapproves when his friend Bingley develops a serious attachment to
    5.50
    4 votes
    129
    Mock Turtle

    Mock Turtle

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Mock Turtle is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll from his popular book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Its name is taken from a dish that was popular in the Victorian period, mock turtle soup. (Alice in Wonderland, chapter 9) Carroll enjoyed such puns on Victorian fashions and etiquette, and showed this frequently. The description and drawing by John Tenniel gives comedic value to the Mock Turtle, as he is clearly an assemblage of creatures, therefore not a real turtle as his name rightly suggests. The Mock Turtle is a very melancholy character, it is thought because he used to be a real turtle. He tells Alice his history of going to school in the sea, but cannot understand the school system that Alice describes to him- least of all the poetry she recites. Ironically, she cannot understand it either. This is a pun on the two meanings of "school", referring in the turtle's usage to a school of fish or marine animals, and by Alice to an institute of learning (see school). He says teacher was an old Sea Turtle called Tortoise and when Alice asks him why he was called Tortoise if he was a Turtle the Mock Turtle answers "We called him tortoise because he taught us!".
    5.50
    4 votes
    130
    Adrian Monk

    Adrian Monk

    • Appears In Books: Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants
    Adrian Monk is a fictional character and the protagonist of the USA Network television series Monk, portrayed by Tony Shalhoub. He is a renowned former homicide detective for the San Francisco Police Department. Monk suffers from severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and multiple phobias, all of which intensified after the murder of his wife Trudy, resulting in his suspension from the department. He works as a private police homicide consultant and undergoes therapy with the ultimate goal of overcoming his grief, taking control of his phobias and disorder, and being reinstated as a police detective. Series co-creator David Hoberman says that he based Monk partly on himself, and also on other fictional detectives, such as Lt. Columbo and Sherlock Holmes. Other actors considered for the role included Dave Foley, John Ritter, Henry Winkler, Stanley Tucci, Alfred Molina and Michael Richards. The network eventually chose Shalhoub because they felt he could "bring the humor and passion of Monk to life." Stanley Tucci and Alfred Molina had guest appearances on Monk, with Tucci appearing in season 5 episode "Mr. Monk and the Actor", and Molina appearing in season 6 episode "Mr. Monk
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    Arthur Weasley

    Arthur Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Arthur Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character is the patriarch of the Weasley family and married to Molly Weasley with whom he has seven children: Bill, Charlie, Percy, Fred, George, Ron, and Ginny. He is most probably the son of Septimus and Cedrella (nᅢᄅe Black) Weasley. Interestingly enough, this makes him a descendant of the wealthy and aristocratic House of Black, but his mother was disinherited for marrying into a family of wizards who were "blood traitors". The evidence for this is Sirius Black's comment that Arthur is his second cousin once-removed, combined with the Black family tree as drawn by Rowling. It also potentially makes him a first cousin of Bartemius Crouch Sr (who may be the son of Caspar Crouch and Cedrella's sister Charis), though given that Cedrella was stricken from the record it is unsurprising that Crouch would not acknowledge this relationship if he was even aware of it. Arthur is described as being tall and thin ¬タヤ a physique inherited by his third and sixth sons Percy and Ron while his first son Bill inherited the tall stature but not the thin build ¬タヤ and as having a receding
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Dirk Gently

    Dirk Gently

    • Appears In Books: Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
    Dirk Gently (born Svlad Cjelli, also known as Dirk Cjelli) is a fictional character created by Douglas Adams and featured in the books Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. He is portrayed as a pudgy man who normally wears a heavy old light brown suit, red checked shirt with a green striped tie, long leather coat, red hat and thick metal-rimmed spectacles. "Dirk Gently" is not the character's real name. It is noted early on in the first book that it is a pseudonym for "Svlad Cjelli". Dirk himself states that the name has a "Scottish dagger feel" to it. Dirk bills himself as a "holistic detective" who makes use of "the fundamental interconnectedness of all things" to solve the whole crime, and find the whole person. This involves running up large expense accounts and then claiming that every item (such as needing to go to a tropical beach in the Bahamas for three weeks) was, as a consequence of this "fundamental interconnectedness", actually a vital part of the investigation. Challenged on this point in the first novel, he claims that he cannot be considered to have ripped anybody off, because none of his clients have ever paid him. His
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Emily Young

    Emily Young

    • Appears In Books: Eclipse
    Emily Young is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series. Emily Young is Sam Uley's fianceé, second cousin to Leah Clearwater and Seth Clearwater, and Claire's aunt. Emily and Leah are second cousins, but they were said to be like sisters. Sam had been dating Leah when he imprinted on Emily, which caused conflict between the two women and ruined their friendship. Emily is like a second mother to the pack as she cooks and cares for them on regular occasions, while being treated like part of the pack in return. Most of her family is close to the pack along with her — Leah and Seth being wolves, while her niece Claire was imprinted on by Quil. She has three long scars on the right hand side of her face, and one long scar reaching down to her arm, which were inflicted by Sam when he lost his temper and changed into a wolf while standing right next to Emily. Everyone was led to believe that the scars are from a bear attack. Emily has black hair and is said to have been beautiful before the scars. According to Jacob, Sam feels pain every time he sees the scars and has never forgiven himself for what he did. She still has beautiful features, though the scars drag them down on one half of her face. Emily Young will be played by Tinsel Korey in New Moon. Emily means "to rival". This could refer Emily's and Leah's 'rivalry' over Sam Uley. Emily was also named after Stephenie Meyer's sister.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Leigh Hunt

    Leigh Hunt

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    James Henry Leigh Hunt (19 October 1784 – 28 August 1859), best known as Leigh Hunt, was an English critic, essayist, poet and writer. Leigh Hunt was born at Southgate, London, where his parents had settled after leaving the USA. His father Isaac, a lawyer from Philadelphia, and his mother, Mary Shewell, a merchant's daughter and a devout Quaker, had been forced to come to Britain because of their loyalist sympathies during the American War of Independence. Hunt's father took holy orders and became a popular preacher, but he was unsuccessful in obtaining a permanent living. Hunt's father was then employed by James Brydges, 3rd Duke of Chandos as tutor to his nephew, James Henry Leigh (father of Chandos Leigh), after whom the boy was named. Leigh Hunt was educated at Christ's Hospital from 1791 to 1799, a period which is detailed in his autobiography. He entered the school shortly after Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Charles Lamb had both left; Thomas Barnes, however, was a school friend of his. One of the current boarding houses at Christ's Hospital is named after him. As a boy, he was an ardent admirer of Thomas Gray and William Collins, writing many verses in imitation of them. A
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Luna Lovegood

    Luna Lovegood

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character first appears in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, in which she is described as having straggly, waist-length dirty-blond hair and a dazed look on her face. Her eyes are "silvery", "misty", and "protuberant" (the last quality serving to give her a "permanently surprised look"). The character is portrayed by Irish actress Evanna Lynch in the film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. On her website, Rowling described the actress as "perfect" for the role. Lynch had to bleach her hair a light blonde colour in order to play the role, and it has been confirmed that she will reprise the role in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Rowling has often said that Luna is the "anti-Hermione", as Luna believes things on faith alone, while Hermione grounds her views on facts and logic. Hermione repeatedly tries to convince Luna that her beliefs are nonsense, but to no avail. This is not to suggest that Luna is unintelligent; indeed, as a Ravenclaw, it is her belief that "wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure". Hermione sees Luna as gullible,
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Monstro

    Monstro

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    The Terrible Dogfish (Italian: Il Terribile Pescecane) is a fictional sea monster which appears in Carlo Collodi's book The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio). It is described as being larger than a five story building, a kilometre long (not including the tail) and sporting three rows of teeth in a mouth that can easily accommodate a train. So fearsome is its reputation, that in chapter XXXIV, it is revealed that the Dogfish is nicknamed "The Atilla of fish and fishermen" (L'Atilla dei pesci e dei pescatori). The Dogfish is first mentioned in chapter XXIV, when Pinocchio, whilst searching for his creator Mister Geppetto, is informed by a dolphin that he has likely been swallowed by the creature which "...for some days has come to wreak extermination and desolation in our waters". The Dogfish is later mentioned in chapter XXVI by Pinocchio's school friends on the Island of the Busy Bees (Isola delle Api Industriose), who tell him that the creature has been sighted on the coast, so to coax Pinocchio away from school. The Dogfish makes its first appearance in chapter XXXIV when Pinocchio, recently transformed from a donkey back to his puppet form, has entered the sea
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Rosalie Hale

    Rosalie Hale

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Rosalie Lillian Hale is a character in Twilight, a young adult series written by author Stephenie Meyer. Rosalie Lillian Hale was born in Rochester, NY in 1915. She had two younger brothers, a housewife for a mother, and a father who worked at a bank. Her father's job helped keep the family wealthy during the Great Depression. She was born beautiful and thus was constantly praised, making her vain and conceited, and like her social-climbing parents, wanting more out of life. One day Rosalie's mother had her dress up to deliver her father's forgotten lunch to him at work, hoping that the son of the bank's owner would take an interest in Rosalie. It worked, and Royce King the Second sent roses to Rosalie and, after making a comment that her eyes were like violets, began sending her those as well. Their relationship was solely based on physical attraction, as Royce was always very busy at the bank. They became engaged, and two months later, just before the wedding, Rosalie visited her good friend Vera, who Rosalie envied for her baby boy, Henry. When she saw Vera's husband kiss Vera, Rosalie finally realized the lack of love in her relationship with Royce, but quickly dismissed it.
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Witch-king of Angmar

    Witch-king of Angmar

    • Appears In Books: The Fellowship of the Ring
    The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character and a major antagonist in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. In Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings, he is the chief of the Nazgûl (Ringwraiths), the chief servants of the Dark Lord Sauron. His true name is not revealed in any of Tolkien's writings, nor are the names of any of the other Nazgûl, except Khamûl. In the manuscript of his notes for translators Tolkien stated that the Witch-king's name and background were not recorded, but that he was probably of Númenórean descent. It is unknown if his association with the realm of Angmar (or use of sorcery) can be traced to a time before he received one of the Rings of Power. In the Second Age, the Rings of Power were forged by the Elves of Eregion under Sauron's direction, and nine of these were given to men of the time, one of whom became the Witch-king. The rings gave them immense power, and they "became mighty in their day, kings, sorcerers, and warriors of old." The rings also made them immortal, but eventually corrupted them, turning them into the ghastly, undead Nazgûl. The Witch-king
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Bill Sikes

    Bill Sikes

    • Appears In Books: Oliver Twist
    William "Bill" Sikes (sometimes Sykes) is a fictional character in the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. He is one of Dickens's most vicious characters and a very strong force in the novel when it comes to having control over somebody or harming others. He is portrayed as a rough and barbaric man. He is a career criminal associated with Fagin, and an eventual murderer. He is very violent and aggressive, prone to sudden bursts of extreme behaviour. He owns a bull terrier named Bull's Eye, whom he beats until the dog needs stitches. Dickens describes his first appearance: The man who growled out these words, was a stoutly-built fellow of about five-and-thirty, in a black velveteen coat, very soiled drab breeches, lace-up half boots, and grey cotton stockings which enclosed a bulky pair of legs, with large swelling calves—the kind of legs, which in such costume, always look in an unfinished and incomplete state without a set of fetters to garnish them. He had a brown hat on his head, and a dirty belcher handkerchief round his neck: with the long frayed ends of which he smeared the beer from his face as he spoke. He disclosed, when he had done so, a broad heavy countenance with a
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Edward Cullen

    Edward Cullen

    • Appears In Books: Eclipse
    Edward Cullen (né Edward Anthony Masen) is a fictional character in Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series. He is featured in the books Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse and Breaking Dawn, and their corresponding film adaptations, and the as yet unfinished novel Midnight Sun - a re-telling of the events of Twilight from Edward's perspective. Edward is a telepathic Vampire who, over the course of the series, falls in love with, marries, and has a child with Bella Swan, a human teenager who later chooses to become a vampire as well. In the Twilight film series, Edward is played by actor Robert Pattinson. Stephenie Meyer stated that the original concept of Edward originated in a dream that she had, in which an "average girl" and a "fantastically beautiful, sparkly ... vampire ... were having an intense conversation in a meadow in the woods." In this dream, the pair "were discussing the difficulties inherent in the facts that ... they were falling in love with each other while ... the vampire was particularly attracted to the scent of her blood, and was having a difficult time restraining himself from killing her." She chose the name "Edward" because she thought it was "a name that had once been
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Laertes

    Laertes

    Laertes ( /leɪˈɜrtiːz/) is a character in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. His name is taken from the father of Odysseus in Homer's Odyssey. Laertes is the son of Polonius and the brother of Ophelia. In the final scene, he kills Hamlet with a poisoned sword to avenge the deaths of his father and sister, for which he blamed Hamlet. While dying of the same poison, he implicates King Claudius. The Laertes character is thought to be originally from Shakespeare, as there is no equivalent character in any of the known sources for the play. In the first Act, Laertes is seen warning Ophelia against Hamlet's romantic pursuit of her, saying Hamlet will soon lose his desire for her, and that it is not Hamlet's own choice but the king's as to whom he will marry. Before Laertes returns to France (he had returned to attend the coronation of King Claudius), his father, Polonius, gives him advice to behave himself in France. During Laertes's absence, Hamlet kills Polonius in Gertrude's parlor. Laertes, informed of his father's death, returns to Denmark, and leads a mob to storm and take the castle. Laertes confronts the King, thinking he was responsible for Polonius' death. The King explains to
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Moist von Lipwig

    Moist von Lipwig

    • Appears In Books: Going Postal
    Moist von Lipwig is a fictional character from Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. He is the protagonist of the novels Going Postal and Making Money. Little is known about Moist von Lipwig's past. He originally comes from Überwald, specifically from a town called Lipwig, and lost both his parents at an early age, and was raised by a grandfather who bred dogs. He was raised in the Potato Church, which apparently states that everything will be alright after you die as long as you have a potato. He attended school in Überwald, and had bad memories of his second year school mistress, Frau Shambers. He was bullied at school but ran away and became a travelling conman. In Making Money he alluded to living through the chaos of the breakup of the Unholy Empire, and having to do anything at all to survive, though he may have been lying. At some point he met and associated with Cribbins, another criminal who taught him everything he (Cribbins) knew. But their association ended, and later Lipwig developed a dislike for Cribbins, reflecting that the teaching took "about ten minutes, and a year to forget some of it," and that Cribbins is "the sort that gives criminals a bad name." During his
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Rita Skeeter

    Rita Skeeter

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. The character is introduced in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire as a reporter for the Daily Prophet and a correspondent for the Witch Weekly, who specialises in yellow journalism. Armed with such magical devices as the Quick-Quotes Quill which automatically misquotes an interviewee even while he or she speaks, the character is clearly intended as satire on such journalists in the real world. As a reporter who fabricated information in order to write an appealing story, she was an antagonist to Harry and his friends throughout Goblet of Fire. Rita Skeeter is played by Miranda Richardson in the film version of the fourth novel, released in 2005. Rita Skeeter's attempts to create controversy are first seen in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and include instances that occurred before Harry returned to Hogwarts for his fourth year. When Rita wrote about the Dark Mark appearing at the Quidditch World Cup, she said that there were rumours that several bodies had been removed from the forest an hour after the attack; Arthur Weasley commented that this report would likely create
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Rose Maylie

    Rose Maylie

    • Appears In Books: Oliver Twist
    Rose Fleming Maylie is a character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist. She is Oliver's maternal aunt. Rose is an orphan raised from childhood by Mrs. Maylie. Bill Sikes and Toby Crackit, two thieves, break into the Maylies' house, accompanied by Oliver. Oliver is shot by the Maylies' butler, Giles, and is abandoned during the flight by Toby and Bill. When Oliver staggers back to the house and collapses on the doorstep, Rose is moved to help him. Upon hearing Oliver's history, Mrs. Maylie, Rose, and their family friend, Dr. Losberne, nurse him back to health while covering up his role in the attempted burglary. When Rose becomes very ill and nearly dies, she is visited by Harry Maylie, Mrs. Maylie's son. Upon her recovery, he asks her to marry him, but she refuses because of the uncertainty about her birth. Harry aspires to a political career, and Rose feels that if her history was known, his success would be jeopardized. She sends Harry away, but agrees that he might, within the year, ask her once again whether her refusal is firm. During this separation, the Maylies visit London. Nancy, having eavesdropped on conversations between Fagin and Monks, discovers a scheme against
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Samwise Gamgee

    Samwise Gamgee

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner and commonly as Sam, is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. Samwise is one of the chief characters in Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings, in which he fills an archetypical role as the sidekick of the primary protagonist, Frodo Baggins. Samwise Gamgee is first introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring. Sam is Frodo Baggins' gardener, having inherited the position as Baggins' gardener from his father, Hamfast "Gaffer" Gamgee. At the time of the War of the Ring, Sam was living in Number 3, Bagshot Row with his father. As "punishment" for eavesdropping on Gandalf's conversation with Frodo regarding the One Ring, Sam was made Frodo's first companion on his journey to Rivendell. They were joined by Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took, Frodo's cousins, and journeyed together to Rivendell where the Council of Elrond took place and Sam joined the Fellowship of the Ring. When the Fellowship was split up at the Falls of Rauros, Sam insisted on accompanying Frodo. As Frodo became progressively weaker under the burden of the Ring, Sam carried most of the luggage, cooked, kept watch at night whenever he could, and rationed
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Yog-Sothoth

    Yog-Sothoth

    • Appears In Books: The Illuminatus! Trilogy
    • Appears In Stories: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
    Yog-Sothoth is a cosmic entity in the fictional Cthulhu Mythos and Dream Cycle of American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Yog-Sothoth's name was first mentioned in Lovecraft's novella, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward (written 1927, first published 1941). The being is said to take the form of a conglomeration of glowing spheres. Imagination called up the shocking form of fabulous Yog-Sothoth — only a congeries of iridescent globes, yet stupendous in its malign suggestiveness. —H. P. Lovecraft, "The Horror in the Museum" Yog-Sothoth is an Outer God and is coterminous with all time and space yet is supposedly locked outside of the universe we inhabit. Its cosmic nature is hinted at in this passage from "Through the Gates of the Silver Key" (1934) by Lovecraft and E. Hoffmann Price: It was an All-in-One and One-in-All of limitless being and self — not merely a thing of one Space-Time continuum, but allied to the ultimate animating essence of existence's whole unbounded sweep — the last, utter sweep which has no confines and which outreaches fancy and mathematics alike. It was perhaps that which certain secret cults of earth have whispered of as YOG-SOTHOTH, and which has been a deity
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Zelda Spellman

    Zelda Spellman

    • Appears In Books: Dream Boat
    Zelda Spellman is a character featured in the Archie comic book Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Zelda is a full witch (as opposed to half or fully mortal) who lives in the fictional town of Greendale (in the 1990s live-action sitcom, Zelda lives in fictional Westbridge, Massachusetts). Zelda lives with her niece Sabrina Spellman, sister Hilda Spellman, and the family cat Salem, a former warlock turned into a cat as punishment for his attempt at world domination. Aunt Zelda first appeared in Archie's Mad House #65 (December 1968). In the original comics, Zelda was short and stout with green hair. Unlike her temperamental sister Hilda, Zelda's personality was helpful and good-natured. Starting in the late 1990s, Zelda (and Hilda)'s appearances and personalities were revamped to make her more contemporary (as well as match the live-action sitcom's take on the character). In modern stories, Zelda has her trademark green hair, but appears to be only physically a few years older than Sabrina and dresses in modern fashions. In the sitcom, Zelda was blonde and a down-to-earth scientist who tries to keep Sabrina and Hilda out of trouble. As a stark contrast to early comic portrayals, she insists
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Hex

    Hex

    • Appears In Books: Hogfather
    Hex is a fictional computer featuring in the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. First appearing in Soul Music, Hex is an elaborate, magic-powered and self-building computer, (not unlike a 'shamble'; a kind of magical device used by the Witches of the Discworld,) and is housed in the basement of the High Energy Magic Building, at the Unseen University (UU), in the Twin city of Ankh-Morpork. Hex is a computer unlike any other the Disc has ever seen, (which is not particularly hard since previously all other "computers" on the Disc had consisted of druidic stone circles). Programmed via 'Softlore', Hex runs and evolves under the watchful eyes of wizard Ponder Stibbons, who becomes the de-facto IT manager at UU because he's the only one who understands what he's talking about. Hex has its origins in a device that briefly appeared in Soul Music, created by Ponder Stibbons and some student Wizards in the High Energy Magic building. In this form it was simply a complex network of glass tubes, containing ants. The wizards could then use punched cards to control which tubes the ants could crawl through, enabling it to perform simple mathematical functions. By the time of the next novel,
    5.25
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    150
    Arthur Holmwood

    Arthur Holmwood

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    Sir Arthur "Art" Holmwood (later Lord Godalming) is a fictional character in Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. He is engaged to Lucy Westenra, and is best friends with the other two men who proposed to her on the very same day—Quincey Morris and Doctor John Seward. In the novel he is the one who drives a wooden stake into Lucy after she becomes a vampire and helps hunt down Count Dracula. In the middle of the story Holmwood's father dies and he succeeds his father as Lord Godalming. It is mentioned in the note at the end of the novel written seven years after Dracula's death, that Holmwood is now happily married. It is of interest to note that Holmwood and Jonathan Harker exchange personality types depending on whose significant other is being terrorized by the Count. In the beginning, Holmwood is emotional and prone to fits of depression while Jonathan attempts to maintain a strong will and recovery after his time in Dracula's castle. After the death of Holmwood's father, he gains a somewhat stronger will, befitting on his new title, while Jonathan is constantly breaking down as his wife is terrorized by the Count. Though a major character in the novel, Arthur Holmwood has often been
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Dream

    Dream

    • Appears In Books: The Sandman: Dream Country
    • Appears In Stories: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Dream is a fictional character and the protagonist of DC Comics' Vertigo comic book series The Sandman, written by Neil Gaiman. One of the seven Endless, inconceivably powerful beings older and greater than gods, Dream is both lord and personification of all dreams and stories, all that is not in reality (which, in turn, Dream may define by his existence). He has taken many names, including Morpheus and Oneiros, and his appearance can change depending on the person who is seeing him. Dream was named the sixth greatest comic book character by Empire Magazine. He was also named fifteenth in the list of 100 Top Comic Book Heroes by IGN. Morpheus usually appears as a tall, thin man with bone-white skin, black hair, and two distant stars looking out from the shadows where his eyes should be. Most often they are silver, blue, or white, but when he becomes angered, they have been known to turn red. Morpheus' appearance ranges widely "depending on who's watching." People generally perceive him as wearing a style of dress appropriate to their region and era. In the Dreaming, he is often seen wearing a grey tee-shirt and dark pants. He appears to be light skinned when interacting with white
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Éponine Thénardier

    Éponine Thénardier

    • Appears In Books: Les Misérables
    Éponine Thénardier ( /ˈɛpɵniːn tɨˈnɑrdi.eɪ/; French: [epɔnin tenaʁdje]; c.1815-1832), also referred to as the "Jondrette girl", is a fictional character in the 1862 novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. As children, Éponine and her younger sister Azelma are described as pretty, well-dressed, charming and a delight to see. They are pampered and spoiled by their parents the Thénardiers. Following their parents' example, they tease and mistreat Cosette. As an adolescent, Éponine and her family descend into poverty due to the bankruptcy of her parents' inn. Éponine becomes a "pale, puny, meagre creature," with a hoarse voice like "a drunken galley slave’s" due to it being "roughened by brandy and by liquors." She now wears dirty and tattered clothing that consists of a chemise and a skirt. She also has missing teeth, mangled hair, bony shoulders, heavy brooding drooping eyes, and a premature-aging face with only a trace of beauty lingering. Éponine brings Marius and Cosette together, even though she herself is in love with him and envious of Cosette. Éponine is the elder daughter of M. and Mme Thénardier, who run an inn in the town of Montfermeil. A woman named Fantine and her
    7.00
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    153
    Gilderoy Lockhart

    Gilderoy Lockhart

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Gilderoy Lockhart is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. He is a wizarding celebrity, having written many books on his fabulous adventures encountering Dark Creatures. He is the author of Magical Me, Break with a Banshee, Gadding with Ghouls, Holidays with Hags, Travels with Trolls, Voyages with Vampires, Wanderings with Werewolves (also called Weekend with a Werewolf) and Year with a Yeti. He has golden, wavy hair and particularly straight shiny teeth. He is narcissistic, self-obsessed, and something of a buffoon. In the film version of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Lockhart is played by Kenneth Branagh. Despite his celebrity status in the wizarding community, Lockhart's fan base consists mostly of middle-aged women and teenage girls (who find him especially attractive). His home is unknown, nor whether he even studied at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. His honours and awards include: Order of Merlin, Third Class; Honorary Member of the Dark Force Defence League; and five-time winner of Witch Weekly's Most Charming Smile Award. In the school year of 1992¬タモ1993, Lockhart is appointed as Hogwarts' new Defence Against the Dark
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Jeeves

    Jeeves

    • Appears In Books: Ring for Jeeves
    • Appears In Stories: Extricating Young Gussie
    Reginald Jeeves is a fictional character in the short stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975), being the valet of Bertie Wooster (Bertram Wilberforce Wooster). Created in 1915, Jeeves continued to appear in Wodehouse's work until his final completed novel Aunts Aren't Gentlemen in 1974. He was Wodehouse's most famous character. The name "Jeeves" comes from Percy Jeeves (1888–1916), a Warwickshire cricketer killed in the First World War. Both the name "Jeeves" and the character of Jeeves have come to be thought of as the quintessential name and nature of a valet or butler inspiring many similar characters (as well as the name of the Internet search engine Ask Jeeves). A "Jeeves" is now a generic term in references such as the Oxford English Dictionary. In a conversation with a policeman in "Jeeves and the Kid Clementina," Jeeves refers to himself as both a "gentleman's personal gentleman" and a "personal gentleman's gentleman." This means that Jeeves is a valet, not a butler—that is, he serves a man and not a household. However, Bertie Wooster has lent out Jeeves as a butler on several occasions, and notes: "If the call comes, he can buttle with the best of them." The
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Puck

    Puck

    • Appears In Books: The Sandman: Dream Country
    • Appears In Stories: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow, is a character in William Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream that was based on the ancient figure in English mythology, also called Puck. Numerous people that have read A Midsummer Night's Dream appear confused about whether Puck's intentions are deliberately done to try to mock and insult others for his own amusements, or because he is generally careless. Puck is a clever, mischievous elf or sprite that personifies the trickster or the wise knave. In the play, Shakespeare introduces Puck as the "shrewd and knavish sprite" and "that merry wanderer of the night" in some scenes it would seem that he is longing for freedom and he is also a jester to Oberon, the fairy king. Puck and ""Bottom"" are the only two characters who interact and progress the three central stories in the whole play, Puck is the one who is first introduced in the fairies story and creates the drama of the lover's story by messing up who loves whom, as well as placing the ass on Bottom's head in his story. Similarly Bottom is performing in a play in his story intending it to be presented in the lover's story as well as interacting with Titania in the fairies' story
    7.00
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    156
    Scarecrow

    Scarecrow

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Scarecrow is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and illustrator William Wallace Denslow. In his first appearance, the Scarecrow reveals that he lacks a brain and desires above all else to have one. In reality, he is only two days old and merely ignorant. Throughout the course of the novel, he demonstrates that he already has the brains he seeks and is later recognized as "the wisest man in all of Oz," although he continues to credit the Wizard for them. He is, however, wise enough to know his own limitations and all too happy to hand the rulership of Oz, passed to him by the Wizard, to Princess Ozma, to become one of her trusted advisors, though he typically spends more time playing games than advising. In Baum's classic 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the living scarecrow encounters Dorothy Gale in a field in the Munchkin Country while she is on her way to the Emerald City. He tells her about his creation and of how he at first scared away the crows, before an older one realised he was a straw man, causing the other crows to start eating the corn. The old crow then told the Scarecrow of the importance of brains. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Seamus Finnigan

    Seamus Finnigan

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Ah, Seamus Finnigan¬タヤthe hardly-ever-mentioned Gryffindor who shares a dormitory with the oh-so-famous Harry Potter. Who is this Irishman? Let's delve into the mysterious world of Irish folklore to find out. We don't know much about Seamus Finnigan (pronounced SHAY-muss)¬タヤhis middle name, his birthday¬タヤonly that he's half-and-half (his 'mam' is a witch, but his father is a Muggle), he's Irish, and he's a Gryffindor. He's first mentioned on page 116 of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, as "a boy with sandy hair." Harry stands behind him as they enter the Great Hall for the first time. Squashed in between Justin Finch-Fletchley and Hermione Granger, J.K. Rowling nevertheless feels the need to mention that the Sorting Hat takes a whole minute to decide to place him in Gryffindor. Seamus' personality is a particularly difficult one to dissect, seeing as he's a supporting, one-dimensional character. However, on page 124 of the Sorcerer's Stone, we see Seamus intensely curious about Hogwarts and its ghosts. We can also make the assumption that his Irish bloodlines are prevalent in that he's prone to arguments and bursts of temper. In the Order of the Phoenix, he doesn't talk
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Shere Khan

    Shere Khan

    • Appears In Books: The Jungle Book
    Shere Khan (IPA: [ʃɪr kɑːn]) is a fictional character who appears in two of Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book stories featuring Mowgli and their adaptations. The word Shere translates as "tiger" in Urdu/Hindi/Punjabi, and Khan translates as "sovereign," "king", or "military leader" and so forth in a number of languages influenced by the Mongols, including Pashto. Despite being born with a crippled leg and derisively nicknamed Lungri (The Lame One) by his own mother, Shere Khan is arrogant and regards himself as the rightful lord of the jungle. It seems, however, that the only creature who looks up to him is Tabaqui, the cowardly, despised golden jackal. In "Mowgli's Brothers", Shere Khan's failed attempt to hunt humans causes a human "cub" to stray from his parents. By the time Shere Khan catches up with the infant it has already been adopted by the Indian wolves Raksha and Father Wolf, who have named the child Mowgli. Despite Shere Khan's bluster, Mowgli is accepted into Akela's wolf pack and protected by Bagheera and Baloo. Furious at losing his kill, the tiger swears that the boy will be his some day. Over the next decade, while Mowgli is growing up, Shere Khan infiltrates the wolf
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Jonathan Harker

    Jonathan Harker

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    Jonathan Harker is a fictional character and one of the protagonists of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. His journey to Transylvania and encounter with Count Dracula and the Brides of Dracula at Castle Dracula constitutes the dramatic opening scenes in the novel and most of the film adaptations. Harker is a recently admitted solicitor from England, who is deputed by his employer, Mr. Peter Hawkins, of Exeter, to act as an estate agent for a foreign client named Count Dracula who wishes to move to England. Harker discovers in Carfax Abbey, near Purfleet, Essex, a dwelling which suits the client's requirements and travels to Transylvania by train in order to consult with him about it. At Bistritz Harker takes a coach to the Borgo Pass where at midnight another coach drawn by four black horses, waits to take him to Castle Dracula high in the Carpathian Mountains. At the castle Harker is greeted by the mysterious and ominous Count Dracula and finalises the property transaction. Soon, however Harker realises he has been made a prisoner by his host who is revealed as a vampire. Harker also has a dangerous encounter with the three seductive Brides of Dracula, whose designs
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Woozy

    Woozy

    • Appears In Books: The Patchwork Girl of Oz
    The Woozy is a four-legged fictional creature from the pages of L. Frank Baum's 1913 Oz book The Patchwork Girl of Oz. The Woozy is described as being dark blue in color and made up of all squares, flat surfaces and edges. Its head is an exact cube and its body is in the shape of a box twice as long as it is wide and high. All four of the Woozy's legs are four-sided, as is its stubby tail. The Woozy hears via two openings in the upper corners of its head, has a flat nose and a mouth formed by an opening on lower edge of its head. When the Woozy gets angry, it has the ability to flash fire with its eyes. The Woozy lives in the Munchkin country in Oz and survives primarily on a diet of honey bees. The Munchkin farmers who raise the honey bees nearby drive the Woozy into the forest and confine it with a fence. Since the Woozy cannot climb, he cannot not escape his prison. (The Woozy does mention in the text that he can jump very high, but also mentions that he has a ferocious roar, which turns out to be completely untrue). The creature is entirely hairless except for three stiff, stubby hairs on the end of its tail. Those three hairs were one of five required ingredients to the
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Alexander von Humboldt

    Alexander von Humboldt

    Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt ( listen (help·info) September 14, 1769 – May 6, 1859) was a Prussian geographer, naturalist and explorer, and the younger brother of the Prussian minister, philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767–1835). Humboldt's quantitative work on botanical geography laid the foundation for the field of biogeography. Between 1799 and 1804, Humboldt travelled extensively in Latin America, exploring and describing it for the first time in a manner generally considered to be a modern scientific point of view. His description of the journey was written up and published in an enormous set of volumes over 21 years. He was one of the first to propose that the lands bordering the Atlantic Ocean were once joined (South America and Africa in particular). Later, his five-volume work, Kosmos (1845), attempted to unify the various branches of scientific knowledge. Humboldt supported and worked with other scientists, including Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac, Justus von Liebig, Louis Agassiz, Matthew Fontaine Maury and, most notably, Aimé Bonpland, with whom he conducted much of his scientific exploration. Humboldt was born in Berlin in the Margraviate
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Fred Weasley

    Fred Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Fred Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. He is one of the seven children of the Weasley family and twin brother of George Weasley.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Ghost of Christmas Past

    Ghost of Christmas Past

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    The Ghost of Christmas Past is a character in the well-known work A Christmas Carol by the English novelist Charles Dickens. The Ghost of Christmas Past was the first of the three spirits (after the visitation by Jacob Marley) that haunted the miser, Ebenezer Scrooge in order to prompt him to repent. It showed him scenes from his past that occurred on or around Christmas, in order to demonstrate to him the necessity of changing his ways, as well as to show the reader how Scrooge came to be the person he was and his particular dislike for Christmas – most of the events which negatively affected Scrooge occurred around the Christmas holiday season. According to Dickens' novel, the Ghost of Christmas Past appears to Scrooge as a white-robed, androgynous figure of indeterminate age. It had on its head a blazing light, reminiscent of a candle flame, and carried a metal cap, made in the shape of a candle extinguisher. While the ghost is often portrayed as a woman in most dramatic adaptations, Dickens describes the Ghost of Christmas Past only as “it”, and gives a curious description of it "being now a thing with one arm, now with one leg, now with twenty legs, now a pair of legs without
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Arthur Gordon Pym

    Arthur Gordon Pym

    • Appears In Books: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket
    Arthur Gordon Pym is a fictional character featured in Edgar Allan Poe's only complete novel, "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket", first published in 1838.

    The character appears again in Jules Verne's sequel to "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket", a two-volume novel titled "An Antarctic Mystery".
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Bree Tanner

    Bree Tanner

    • Appears In Books: Eclipse
    Bree was created by Victoria as part of her newborn vampire army to avenge James' death. She never saw Victoria, as her "assistant", Riley, was the one who told the newborns what to do. During the battle, she surrendered herself to Carlisle Cullen, who planned to spare her life, but she was killed by Felix on Jane's orders for breaking the Volturi's laws; though only after being tortured by Jane herself. She was one of the army who ravaged Seattle, killing many with her fellows under the guise of a serial killer. After she had surrendered, and before the Volturi came, she tried extremely hard to resist Bella's blood, trying to adapt to Carlisle's way of life. She was executed by the Volturi. Bree was described as beautiful and slender with short dark hair to her chin and glowing blood red eyes. She was also young, around the age of 15. When Bree screams she has a high, shrill voice. In the film Eclipse, Bree will be portrayed by Canadian actress Jodelle Ferland.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Jia Baoyu

    Jia Baoyu

    • Appears In Books: Dream of the Red Chamber
    Jia Baoyu (simplified Chinese: 贾宝玉; traditional Chinese: 賈寶玉; pinyin: Jiǎ​ Bǎo​yù; literally "Precious Jade" and his surname is a homophone with "false" or "fictitious") is the principal character in the classic Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber. The first chapter describes how one piece of stone was left over from when the heaven was repaired by the Goddess Nüwa. That stone, changed into a piece of luminous jade, is given a chance to learn the emptiness of human existence by following another incarnation who is to be Jia Baoyu. Baoyu is thus born with a magical jade in his mouth. His name, which literally means "precious jade", was given him in honor of this. The jade and Baoyu share a mystical link, and the Cheng-Gao version ends after the jade is lost for good and Baoyu himself disappears. Baoyu is portrayed as having little interest in learning the Confucian classics, much to the despair of his father, Jia Zheng. He would rather spend his time reading or writing poetry and playing with his numerous female relations. He is nonetheless compassionate and thoughtful (perhaps as a juxtaposition onto the other male characters in the novel). Baoyu's romance with Lin Daiyu forms
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Nick Hornby

    Nick Hornby

    Nick Hornby (born 17 April 1957) is an English novelist, essayist, lyricist, and screenwriter. He is best known for the novels High Fidelity, About a Boy, and for the football memoir Fever Pitch. His work frequently touches upon music, sport, and the aimless and obsessive natures of his protagonists. His books have sold more than 5 million copies worldwide as of 2009. Hornby was born in Redhill, Surrey, England. He was brought up in Maidenhead, and educated at Maidenhead Grammar School and Jesus College, Cambridge, where he read English. His parents divorced when he was 11. Hornby's first published book, 1992's Fever Pitch, is an autobiographical story detailing his fanatical support for Arsenal Football Club. As a result, Hornby received the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award. In 1997, the memoir was adapted for film in the UK, and in 2005 an American remake was released, following Jimmy Fallon's character's obsession with the Boston Red Sox, a baseball team. With the book's success, Hornby began to publish articles in the Sunday Times, Time Out and the Times Literary Supplement, in addition to his music reviews for the New Yorker. High Fidelity — his second book and first
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Ojo the Lucky

    Ojo the Lucky

    • Appears In Books: The Patchwork Girl of Oz
    Ojo is a character from the fictional Oz book series by L. Frank Baum. He first appeared in The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Ojo is a Munchkin who lived with his uncle, Unc Nunkie in the Blue Forest, a remote location in the north of the Munchkin Country. During a trip with his uncle to visit his uncle's friend Dr. Pipt, Ojo learns from Pipt's wife, Dame Margolotte, that he is known to others as "Ojo the Unlucky." Ojo discovers rationalizations for this, including the fact that he was born on Friday the 13th, is left-handed, and has a wart under his arm, and he begins to believe that bad luck follows him wherever he goes. However, the Tin Woodman officially deems him Ojo the Lucky after hearing these reasons because he believes Ojo's bad luck is due to a self-fulfilling prophecy. Ojo later starred in his own book, Ojo in Oz by Ruth Plumly Thompson. In this book, Thompson picked up a dropped thread of Baum's about Ojo being possibly related to royalty and made him the Prince of Seebania, whose family was enchanted by an evil sorcerer named Mooj, causing his father, King Ree Alla Bad, to run around Oz as a bandit called Realbad. Although Ojo is a Munchkin, he seems to be taller than the
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Pinocchio

    Pinocchio

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    Pinocchio (IT: [piˈnɔkkjo]; UK: /pɪˈnəʊkiəʊ/; US: /pɪˈnoʊkioʊ/) is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the 1883 children's novel The Adventures of Pinocchio, by Carlo Collodi, an Italian writer, and has since appeared in many adaptations of that story and others. Carved by a woodcarver named Geppetto in a small Italian village, he was created as a wooden puppet, but dreamed of becoming a real boy. He has also been used as a character who is prone to telling lies and fabricating stories for various reasons. Pinocchio is known for having a short nose that becomes longer when he is under stress (chapter 3), especially while lying. His clothes are made of flowered paper, his shoes are made of wood and his hat is made of bread (page 16 of Collodi's Le Avventure di Pinocchio).
    6.50
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    170
    Tin Man

    Tin Man

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Tin Woodman, sometimes referred to as the Tin Man or (incorrectly) the Tin Woodsman, (the third name appears only in adaptations, the first—and in rare instances, the second—was used by Baum), is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. Baum's Tin Woodman first appeared in his classic 1900 book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and reappeared in many other Oz books. In late 19th century America, men made out of various tin pieces were used in advertising and political cartoons. Baum, who was editing a magazine on decorating shop windows when he wrote The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was reportedly inspired to invent the Tin Woodman by a figure he had built out of metal parts for a shop display. In the books, the origins of the character are rather gruesome. Originally an ordinary man by the name of Nick Chopper (the name first appearing in The Marvelous Land of Oz), the Tin Woodman used to make his living chopping down trees in the forests of Oz, as his father had before him. The Wicked Witch of the East enchanted his axe to prevent him from marrying the girl that he loved, after being bribed by the old woman who kept the girl as a servant, and
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Sabrina Spellman

    Sabrina Spellman

    • Appears In Books: Witch Way Did She Go?
    Sabrina Spellman is the title character from the Archie Comics comic book Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Sabrina was created by writer George Gladir and artist Dan DeCarlo, and first appeared in Archie's Mad House #22 in October 1962. In the comics, Sabrina, a "half-witch" (her mother is an ordinary human, or "mortal" as witches refer to them, while her father is a warlock) lives with her two aunts, Hilda and Zelda Spellman (both witches themselves), in the fictional town of Greendale, which is located somewhere near Riverdale, the home of Archie Andrews. Also living with the three women as the family pet is Salem Saberhagen, a warlock who's been turned into a cat as punishment for world domination attempts. Sabrina first appeared in non-comics media in 1969 in a segment from Filmation's The Archie Comedy Hour, and later gained her own half-hour series in 1971. In the 1990s, Sabrina's comic was made into a live action film and television situation comedy, with an alternate younger version appearing in 2000's Sabrina, the Animated Series (produced by DIC Entertainment). Sabrina has a white blonde hair with a pink headband. She wears a blue dress with a black belt, and black
    4.75
    4 votes
    172
    The Shrike

    The Shrike

    • Appears In Books: Hyperion
    The Shrike is a character from Dan Simmons' Hyperion universe, set far in humanity's future. The Shrike appears in all of the Hyperion books and is something of an enigma; its true purpose isn't 'revealed' until the second book, but even then it is left a malleable purpose. In fact, this explanation is changed significantly in the latter two books (The Endymion duology). The Shrike appears to act both autonomously and as a servant of some unknown force or entity, and in the first two Hyperion books, exists solely in the area around the Time Tombs on the planet Hyperion. In the latter two, it is effectively unfettered. The Shrike stands roughly three meters in height and is described as being composed of razorwire, thorns, blades, and cutting edges, having fingers like scalpels and long, curved toe blades. It is basically a gigantic, bladed killing machine. The Shrike weighs over a ton, though it is apparently capable of modifying its density as it sees fit. Though metallic in appearance ("quicksilver over chrome"), the Shrike is also described as an 'organic' machine, humanoid in a general way, but with four 'oddly jointed' arms and intense, multi-faceted ruby eyes. The Shrike does
    4.75
    4 votes
    173
    Doctor Watson

    Doctor Watson

    • Appears In Books: A Study in Scarlet
    John H. Watson, M.D., known as Dr. Watson, is a character in the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Watson is Sherlock Holmes's friend, assistant and sometime flatmate, and he is the first person narrator of all but four stories in the Sherlock Holmes canon. Doctor Watson's first name is mentioned on only three occasions. Part one of the very first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, is subtitled 'Being a reprint from the Reminiscences of John H. Watson, M.D., Late of the Army Medical Department'. In '"The Problem of Thor Bridge"', Watson says that his dispatch box is labeled 'John H. Watson, M.D'. Watson's wife calls him 'James' in "The Man with the Twisted Lip"; Dorothy L. Sayers speculates that Morstan may be referring to his middle name Hamish (which means James in Scottish Gaelic), though Doyle himself never addresses this beyond including the initial. In every other instance, he is called either Doctor or Watson, or both together, and his first name is never used again. In A Study in Scarlet, Watson, as the narrator, recounts his earlier life before meeting Holmes. It is established that Watson received his medical degree from the University of London
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    Dorothy Gale

    Dorothy Gale

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    Dorothy Gale is the protagonist of many of the Oz novels by American author L. Frank Baum, and the best friend of Oz's ruler Princess Ozma. Dorothy first appears in Baum's classic children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and reappears in most of its sequels. She also is the main character in various adaptations, notably the classic 1939 movie adaptation of the book, The Wizard of Oz. Even when she does not appear in a sequel (as in the case of The Marvelous Land of Oz), she is arguably the most important character in the series, as it is she, through her actions in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, who sparked later events. Dorothy's adventures continue. In later books, Oz steadily becomes more familiar to her than her homeland of Kansas. Indeed, Dorothy eventually goes to live in an apartment in the Emerald City, but only once her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have settled in a farmhouse on its outskirts, unable to pay the mortgage on their house in Kansas. An influence on the creation of Dorothy appears to be the Alice books of Lewis Carroll. Although he found their plots incoherent, Baum identified their source of popularity as Alice herself, a child with whom the child readers could
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Lu-Tze

    Lu-Tze

    • Appears In Books: Thief of Time
    Lu-Tze is a fictional character in the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. His name is based on the Taoist philosopher Lao Tse. He first appeared in the novel Small Gods as a minor character. He is one of the History Monks, a member of a Buddhism-like sect, that maintain Discworld history, based on the huge History Books in their Ramtop monastery. He spends much of the novel in the background, disguised as a simple sweeper. He also deliberately changes the course of history because he didn't like the way things "should" go, replacing a horrific war with a century of peace. Lu-Tze has a more substantial role in Thief of Time, in which we learn that he is not a monk at all, but "merely" a sweeper at the Monastery of Oi-Dong. In fact, he uses the same trick (that no-one notices a sweeper) in the monastery as he does when out in the world, and has learnt as much about the nature of time as some of the higher monks simply by tidying up the classrooms. Everyone knows Lu-Tze's name, as one of the best monks on the field, but few realise who he actually is. He is generally referred to just as "Sweeper." Lu-Tze has a deep respect for the Abbot of Oi-Dong, but apart from him generally
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    176
    Bob Cratchit

    Bob Cratchit

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    Robert "Bob" Cratchit is a fictional character who is the abused, underpaid clerk of Ebenezer Scrooge in the Charles Dickens story A Christmas Carol. The character has come to symbolize poor working conditions, especially long working hours. In the story, Cratchit is first seen at work, where he copies letters by hand in an underheated "dismal little cell", "a sort of tank". He is repeatedly described as "ugly" and clothes himself in a tattered white comforter, since he cannot afford a coat. Cratchit is treated poorly by Scrooge and given a weekly salary of "but fifteen bob", insufficient to feed his family a proper Christmas dinner. Nevertheless, he remains loyal to his employer, even in face of the protestations of his wife, who for years has watched her husband work faithfully for the neglectful and stingy Mr. Scrooge. Scrooge invisibly visits Cratchit and his family in their small Camden Town home on Christmas Day as well as on a future Christmas. He is accompanied on these visits by the Ghost of Christmas Present and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, respectively. It is partly through concern for the plight of Cratchit's youngest son, the frail and crippled Tiny Tim, that
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    177
    Death

    Death

    • Appears In Books: Mort
    Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series and a parody of several other personifications of death. Like most Grim Reapers, he is a black-robed skeleton usually carrying a scythe. His jurisdiction, so to speak, is specifically the Discworld itself; he is only a part, or minion, of Azrael, the universal Death. He has been gently used by Pratchett to explore the problems of human existence, and has become more sympathetic throughout the series. Death's hollow, peculiar voice is represented in the books by unquoted small caps; since he is a skeleton, he has no vocal cords to speak with, and therefore the words enter the head with no involvement from the ears. His "voice" is often described using a morbid metaphor, such as two concrete blocks being rubbed together, or the slamming of coffin lids; these descriptions have become less frequent in recent novels. In the first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, as well as in Eric, all direct written references to Death are proper nouns; thus, for example, "he" is written as "He." This is usually reserved for the Discworld gods and is not featured in any of the other novels. Death is not invisible; however, most
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    178
    Edward Spellman

    Edward Spellman

    • Appears In Books: Witchopoly
    Edward "Ted" Spellman is Sabrina's father, Hilda, Zelda, Vesta and Sophia's brother, Sabrina's mother Diana's ex-husband. He is apart of the Spellman family hence sharing Hilda and Zelda's cousins and other relatives. Ted lives in the Other Realm and is able to communicate with Sabrina via a picture in her magic book. He appears three times in the first 4 seasons; Pilot, Meeting Dad's Girlfriend and No Place Like Home. He appears in the final episode Soulmates for his daughter's wedding. Season 1 When he appears in Pilot he tells Sabrina that she is a witch but she needs some persuading. In Meeting Dad's Girlfriend, he tells Sabrina, Hilda and Zelda about his new girlfriend Gail Kippling. Sabrina doesnt seem to like her because she always wanted her mum and dad back together. She makes Gail feel uncomfortable, but eventually accepts the fact her father has moved on. When Sabrina asks if they are planning on getting married, Gail says yes but Ted says no. This causes a break up between the two. Only when Sabrina convinces Gail to go back to him, they get back together. Season 4 Edward has a very small role in the first episode No Place Like Home. He convinces Sabrina to move in with him in his new Paris home. She moves in with him after finding out Valerie is moving permanantly, her and Harvey have a fight and that Mr. Kraft is now the principal of Westbridge High. She feels nobody cares about her but after relising shes running away from her troubles, she goes back home. Season 7 Edward returns in the very last episode Soul Mates for Sabrina's wedding. Trivia Edward's last line in 'Soul Mates' is in fact the very last line of the series. He points out that Sabrina and Harvey ride away together at 12:36 on the dot.
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    179
    Esmeralda

    Esmeralda

    • Appears In Books: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
    Esmeralda, or La Esmeralda (French: Esméralda), born Agnes, is a fictional character in Victor Hugo's 1831 novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (or Notre Dame de Paris). She is a French Gypsy girl (near the end of the book, it is revealed that her biological mother was a French woman). She constantly attracts men with her seductive dances, and is rarely seen without her clever goat Djali. She is around 16 years old. Esmeralda's birth-name was Agnes. She is the illegitimate daughter of Paquette Guybertaut, nicknamed 'la Chantefleurie', an orphaned minstrel's daughter who lives in Rheims. Paquette has become a prostitute after being seduced by a young nobleman, and lives a miserable life in poverty and loneliness. Agnes's birth makes Paquette happy once more, and she lavishes attention and care upon her adored child: even the neighbours begin to forgive Paquette for her past behaviour when they watch the pair. Tragedy strikes, however, when Gypsies kidnap the young baby, leaving a hideously deformed child (the infant Quasimodo) in place. The townsfolk come to the conclusion that the Gypsies have cannibalised baby Agnes; the mother flees Reims in despair, and the Gypsy child is exorcised
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    180
    Ghost of Christmas Present

    Ghost of Christmas Present

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    The Ghost of Christmas Present is a character in one of the best-known works of the English novelist Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. The Spirit closely resembles Father Christmas from local folklore. The Ghost of Christmas Present was the second of the three spirits (after the visitation by Jacob Marley) that haunted the miser Ebenezer Scrooge, in order to prompt him to repent. According to Dickens' novel, the Ghost of Christmas Present appears to Scrooge as "a jolly giant" with dark brown curls. He wears a fur-lined green robe and on his head a holly wreath set with shining icicles. He carries a large torch, made to resemble a cornucopia, and appears accompanied by a great feast. He states that he has had "more than eighteen hundred" brothers (1,842 to be exact, the story being set on Christmas Eve 1843, the year of its publication) and later reveals the ability to change his size to fit into any space. He also bears a scabbard with no sword in it, a representation of peace on Earth and good will toward men. The spirit transports Scrooge around the city, showing him scenes of festivity and also deprivation that were happening as they watched, sprinkling a little warmth from
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    181
    Jane

    Jane

    • Appears In Books: Eclipse
    Jane Volturi is a fictional charachter and minor antagonist in the twilight saga. Jane is a sadistic vampire guard of the Volturi and a pet of Aro's. She seems rather bitter and easily justifies inflicting pain on anyone with her power. Jane and her twin brother Alec reside in Volterra, Italy. The Volturi had their eyes on Jane and Alec as potential vampires when they were still human, but were waiting until they were older to change them. When frightened humans tried to burn the twins at the stake because of suspected witchcraft, Aro stepped in, slaughtering the whole village. Because of all she went through, Jane gained her power of being able to voluntarily inflict a mental illusion of antagonizing pain. Jane has since become one of the prize members of the Volturi Guard. In New Moon,Aro sends Jane and two other guards to go and bring Edward to their castle. Upon Jane's arrival, Bella realizes immediately that Jane is very dangerous, as Edward does exactly what she says without hesitation. After returning with Edward, Alice and Bella, Alec takes great delight in Jane bringing back more people than she set out for. When Aro realizes he cannot penetrate Bella's shield, he asks
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    182
    Jasper Hale

    Jasper Hale

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Jasper Hale (born Jasper Whitlock) is a fictional character from Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series. Jasper Hale, formerly known as Jasper Whitlock, was born in 1843 and grew up in Houston, Texas. In 1860 when he was almost seventeen, he lied about his age, stating he was 20, and joined the Confederate States Army to serve in the Civil War. Due to his intense charisma, he quickly rose through the ranks and became the youngest Major in Texas, even without considering his real age. Jasper was turned into a vampire in 1863 by a vampire named Maria, when he was 20 years old. Maria was fighting a territorial war for claim on big cities in the south, such as Mexico City. Maria recognized that Jasper was high-ranking in the army, and therefore already had some knowledge of combat skills. She wanted a strong male vampire who could fight alongside her. When Maria found out about his peculiar ability to control the emotions of those around him, she found him even more useful. Jasper's responsibility was to train the young vampires and then kill them when they were no longer useful to Maria, usually after about a year when their strength had begun to fade. After about a century of this, he
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    183
    Peter Pettigrew

    Peter Pettigrew

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Peter Pettigrew, often referred to by his nickname "Wormtail", is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. In the film adaptations, he is played by Timothy Spall as an adult, and by Charles Hughes as a teenager. In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter learns Pettigrew was a friend of his father (James Potter) who confronted Sirius Black after the latter betrayed his parents. Black supposedly murdered Pettigrew, leaving only his ring finger behind as physical evidence and slaughtering a dozen-odd innocent Muggle in the process. For this crime, Black was sent to the wizard prison, Azkaban. At the end of that book, however, Sirius Black and Remus Lupin reveal that Pettigrew is an Animagus who takes the form of a rat ("Scabbers"). Nicknamed "Wormtail", he became the Secret-Keeper for James Potter and his wife Lily Evans when Harry was a baby, in hopes that Lord Voldemort would pursue Black instead. However, Pettigrew betrayed the Potters to Voldemort in order to gain the Dark Lord's favour. During the confrontation with Sirius on that fateful night, it was actually Pettigrew who blasted the Muggles and then transformed
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    184
    Professor Minerva McGonagall

    Professor Minerva McGonagall

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Professor Minerva McGonagall is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. During the series, she is Deputy Headmistress, head of Gryffindor House, Transfiguration professor, and later Headmistress at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, where she began teaching in December 1956. McGonagall considers Transfiguration to be amongst the most complex and dangerous magic taught at Hogwarts. McGonagall served as Headmistress of Hogwarts during Albus Dumbledore's absence from Hogwarts in Harry's second year, and briefly in the sixth book of the series. She acted as headmistress when the Heads of House decided the school would reopen, but before the 1997-98 school year commenced, Professor Severus Snape was appointed Headmaster on Voldemort¬タルs orders. She remained a member of the Order of the Phoenix. She was later reappointed as Headmistress, but Rowling has stated that by the time of the epilogue in 2017 (19 years after the battle), she no longer held the position. Critical responses to the character vary. While Farah Mendelson, in her work "Crowning The King," considers her rash and unfair and clearly secondary to a male character in
    7.00
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    185
    The Green Fisherman

    The Green Fisherman

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    The Green Fisherman (Il Pescatore Verde) is a fictional character who appears in Carlo Collodi's book The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio). He dwells in a sea cave on the coast of Busy Bee Island (Isola delle Api Industriose) where he lives on a diet seemingly composed entirely of sea life. He is described as "...so ugly, he looked like a sea monster. Instead of hair, he had on his head a dense clump of green grass; green was the skin on his body, green were his eyes, green was his long beard which drooped downards. He looked like a great lizard erected on its hind legs." According to Giacomo Maria Prati, The Green Fisherman is one example of the story's parallels with classical mythology, stating that the Fisherman is evocative of the cyclops Polyphemus of Homers Odyssey. He also writes that The Fisherman represents murder through ignorance, referring to the fact that he tries to eat Pinocchio, unaware he was not an edible fish. Encountered in chapter XXVIII, the Fisherman accidentally captures Pinocchio in his net while fishing. He is surprised that Pinocchio is able to talk, but does not understand when he identifies himself as a "puppet". The Fisherman
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    186
    Cho Chang

    Cho Chang

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Cho Chang (¥ᄐᄉ￧ᄃヒ) is a fictional character in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series. She is a Ravenclaw student and a year older than Harry. She is described as being a short, very pretty girl with long, shiny dark hair. She's very popular as she always seems to be followed by a large group of (giggling) girl friends. Cho plays Seeker for the Ravenclaw Quidditch team, and her favorite professional Quidditch team is the Tutshill Tornadoes. Cho's Patronus is also revealed to be a swan. Her name seems to imply Chinese or Korean descent. She first appeared in the third book, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, when the Gryffindor team played the Ravenclaw Quidditch team, but did not become as prominent a character until the fourth book, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, as Harry's first crush and in the fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, as his first girlfriend. Cho was played by Katie Leung in the fourth Harry Potter film, Goblet of Fire and she reprised the role in the fifth movie, Order of the Phoenix. Harry first meets Cho in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, during his third year (her fourth year) during a Gryffindor-Ravenclaw Quidditch
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    187
    Elrond

    Elrond

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. He is introduced in The Hobbit, and plays a supporting role in The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. Elrond was Lord of Rivendell, one of the mighty rulers of old that remained in Middle-earth in its Third Age. His name means "Vault of Stars", "Star-dome", or "Elf of the Cave" (the exact meaning is uncertain, as Tolkien gave different derivations in different places). He was the son of Eärendil and Elwing, and a great-grandson of Lúthien, born in Beleriand in the First Age, making him well over 6,000 years old by the time of the events described in The Lord of the Rings. Elrond's twin brother was Elros Tar-Minyatur, the first High King of Númenor. Although Elrond was considered half-elven, that was not meant to be an exact percentage value; he and his brother Elros were also descended from the Maiar, angelic beings who had come to Middle-earth thousands of years before. Elrond, along with his parents, his brother, and his children, were granted a choice between Elven or human fates by the Valar. Elrond chose to travel into the West and live as an immortal Elf, while his twin Elros chose
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    188
    Éowyn

    Éowyn

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Éowyn is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. She is a noblewoman of Rohan who describes herself as a "shieldmaiden". In The Two Towers, Éowyn, a daughter of the House of Eorl and the niece of King Théoden, is introduced in Meduseld, the king's hall at Edoras. She was the daughter of Théodwyn (sister to Théoden) and Éomund, and the sister of Éomer. When she was only seven years old, her father was killed fighting Orcs and her mother died of grief. Éowyn and Éomer were raised in her uncle's household as if they were his own children. Tolkien writes that she longed to win renown in battle—more so because she was royal—but being female, her duties were reckoned to be at Edoras. When Théoden's mind was poisoned by his adviser Gríma Wormtongue, Éowyn was obliged to care for her uncle, and his deterioration pained her deeply. To make matters worse, she was constantly harassed by Gríma, who lusted after her. However, when Gandalf arrived, he freed Théoden from Wormtongue's influence. Éowyn fell in love with Aragorn, but it soon became clear that he could not return her love (though he did not mention his
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    189
    Lucius Malfoy

    Lucius Malfoy

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Lucius Malfoy is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. A Death Eater and head of a pure-blood wizarding family, he lived with his wife Narcissa (born Narcissa Black) and their son Draco at the Malfoy mansion in Wiltshire prior to his incarceration at Azkaban prison for his role in the attack on the Department of Mysteries in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Malfoy was a governor of the famous Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, until he was fired for threatening the families of the other governors, forcing them to suspend the school's headmaster, Albus Dumbledore. According to Forbes magazine, Lucius Malfoy is currently number 12 on their fictional wealthiest characters list. In the Harry Potter film series, Malfoy is played by Jason Isaacs. Lucius Malfoy (birthdate according to the chronology of the Harry Potter stories 1954) is the son of Abraxas Malfoy. He was educated at Hogwarts from either 1964-1971 or 1965-1972 (depending on birth month), where he was in Slytherin House. Through giving gifts of money to St Mungo's and the Ministry of Magic, Malfoy has become very well connected and frequently uses
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    190
    Randall

    Randall

    • Appears In Books: Breaking Dawn
    Randall is an American nomad Vampire. He appeared in Breaking Dawn to help witness against the Volturi. Randall is not a vegetarian and he does not have any special powers.
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    191
    Sherlock Holmes

    Sherlock Holmes

    • Appears In Books: A Study in Scarlet
    • Appears In Stories: The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton
    Sherlock Holmes ( /ˈʃɜrlɒk ˈhoʊmz/ or  /ˈhoʊlmz/) is a fictional detective created by author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A London-based "consulting detective" whose abilities border on the fantastic, Holmes is famous for his astute logical reasoning, his ability to adopt almost any disguise, and his use of forensic science skills to solve difficult cases. Holmes, who first appeared in publication in 1887, was featured in four novels and 56 short stories. The first novel, A Study in Scarlet, appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual in 1887 and the second, The Sign of the Four, in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine, beginning with A Scandal in Bohemia in 1891; further series of short stories and two novels published in serial form appeared between then and 1927. The stories cover a period from around 1880 up to 1914. All but four stories are narrated by Holmes's friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson; two are narrated by Holmes himself ("The Blanched Soldier" and "The Lion's Mane") and two others are written in the third person ("The Mazarin Stone" and "His Last
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    192
    Sirius Black

    Sirius Black

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. Sirius was first mentioned briefly in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone as a wizard who lent Rubeus Hagrid a flying motorbike shortly after Lord Voldemort killed James and Lily Potter. His character becomes prominent in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, in which he is the titular prisoner, and is also revealed to be the godfather of the central character Harry Potter Sirius Black is the last heir of the House of Black, a once notable Pure-blood Wizarding family. His parents, Orion and Walburga Black, were both Blacks by birth and second cousins. Sirius had a younger brother, Regulus Black(R.A.B) and three older cousins: Bellatrix Lestrange, Andromeda Tonks (his favourite cousin and mother of Nymphadora Tonks), and Narcissa Malfoy (mother of Draco Malfoy). "Sirius" is a traditional Black family name, recurring in at least three generations and following a family tradition of naming children after stars and constellations. Sirius's early life proved unhappy; he had come to hate most of his relatives, in particular his mother. He rejected his family's pure-blood elitism and reverence for the Dark
    6.00
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    193
    Tiresias

    Tiresias

    • Appears In Books: Odyssey
    • Appears In Stories: The Golden Fleece
    In Greek mythology, Tiresias (Greek: Τειρεσίας, also transliterated as Teiresias) was a blind prophet of Thebes, famous for clairvoyance and for being transformed into a woman for seven years. He was the son of the shepherd Everes and the nymph Chariclo. Tiresias participated fully in seven generations at Thebes, beginning as advisor to Cadmus himself. Eighteen allusions to mythic Tiresias, noted by Luc Brisson, fall into three groups: one, in two episodes, recounts Tiresias' sex-change and his encounter with Zeus and Hera; a second group recounts his blinding by Athena; a third, all but lost, seems to have recounted the misadventures of Tiresias. Tiresias was a prophet of Apollo. According to the mythographic compendium Bibliotheke, different stories were told of the cause of his blindness, the most direct being that he was simply blinded by the gods for revealing their secrets. An alternate story told by the poet Pherecydes was followed in Callimachus' poem "The Bathing of Pallas"; in it, Tiresias was blinded by Athena after he stumbled onto her bathing naked. His mother, Chariclo, a nymph of Athena, begged Athena to undo her curse, but the goddess could not; instead, she cleaned
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    194
    Blue Fairy

    Blue Fairy

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    The Fairy With Turquoise Hair (Italian: La Fata dai Capelli Turchini) is a fictional character in Carlo Collodi's book The Adventures of Pinocchio. She repeatedly appears at critical moments in Pinocchio's wanderings to admonish the little wooden puppet to avoid bad or risky behavior. Although the naïvely willful marionette initially resists her good advice, he later comes to follow her instruction. She in turn protects him, and later enables his assumption of human form. The character is the inspiration for the Blue Fairy in Disney's adaptation of the story. The Fairy makes her first appearance in chapter XV, where she is portrayed as a young girl living in a house in the middle of a forest. Pinocchio, who is being chased by The Fox and the Cat (Il Gatto e la Volpe), pleads with the Fairy to allow him entrance. The Fairy cryptically responds that all inhabitants of the house, including herself, are dead, and that she is waiting for her coffin to arrive. The pair catches and hangs Pinocchio from a tree. In the following chapter, it is established that the girl is a fairy who has lived in the forest for more than a thousand years. She takes pity on Pinocchio, and sends a hawk to
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    195
    The Coachman

    The Coachman

    • Appears In Books: The Adventures of Pinocchio
    The Coachman (Italian: Il Conduttiere del Carro), also known as The Little Man (L'Omino), is a fictional character who appears in Carlo Collodi's book The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio). The coachman is introduced in chapter XXXI, and is described as thus: The coachman’s name is never revealed, though he identifies himself in Chapter XXXII as merely “The Little Man” (L’Omino). He drives to Busy Bee Island (Isola delle Api Industriose) on a coach pulled by twenty four donkeys which mysteriously wear white shoes on their hooves. By the time he arrives to take Pinocchio and Candlewick to the Land of Toys (Il Paese dei Balocchi), his carriage is completely packed, leaving Candlewick to sit in front with him and Pinocchio to ride one of the donkeys. The donkey throws Pinocchio off, and is reproached by the coachman, who bites half its right ear off. When Pinocchio remounts the donkey, the animal begins to weep like a human, and warns Pinocchio of the impending danger he faces. The coachman again reproaches the animal by biting off half its other ear. The coachman proceeds to take the children to the Land of Toys, whilst singing to himself: “All night they sleep And
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    196
    Duncan Idaho

    Duncan Idaho

    • Appears In Books: Dune
    Duncan Idaho is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. Introduced in the first novel of the series, 1965's Dune, the character became a breakout character as the readers liked him and was revived by Herbert in 1969's Dune Messiah. He is the only character to feature in all six of Herbert's original Dune novels. Idaho was portrayed by Richard Jordan in David Lynch's 1984 film version of Dune, and by James Watson in the 2000 Sci-Fi Channel miniseries. Edward Atterton assumed the role in the 2003 miniseries Children of Dune. In Dune (1965), Duncan is described as a handsome man with "curling black hair" to whom women are easily attracted. Paul Atreides notes Duncan's "dark round face" and "feline movements, the swiftness of reflex that made him such a difficult weapons teacher to emulate." Lady Jessica calls him "the admirable fighting man whose abilities at guarding and surveillance are so esteemed." Duncan is fiercely loyal to House Atreides, is a skilled pilot, and as a Swordmaster of the Ginaz is a gifted hand-to-hand fighter. In the fight which ends with his death in Dune, Duncan kills an unheard-of 19 Sardaukar, the Padishah Emperor's fearsome
    5.50
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    197
    Gylfi

    Gylfi

    • Appears In Books: Gylfaginning
    In Norse mythology, Gylfi, Gylfe, Gylvi, or Gylve was the earliest recorded king in Scandinavia. He often uses the name Gangleri when appearing in disguise. The traditions on Gylfi deal with how he was tricked by the gods and his relations with the goddess Gefjon. The Ynglinga saga section of Snorri's Heimskringla and the Eddic poem Ragnarsdrápa tell a legend of how Gylfi was seduced by the goddess Gefjon to give her as much land as she could plow in one night. Gefjon transformed her four sons into oxen and took enough land to create the Danish island of Zealand, leaving the Swedish lake Mälaren. Gylfaginning in the Prose Edda and the Ynglinga saga tell how the supposedly historic Odin and his people the Æsir and Vanir, who later became the Swedes, obtained new land where they built the settlement of Old Sigtuna. Gylfi and the remaining older bronze-age inhabitants adapted the religion promulgated by the Æsir. Snorri presents an outline of Norse mythology through a dialogue between Gylfi and three rulers of the Æsir. In Snorri's account Gylfi is deluded by the Æsir into accepting their supposed religious beliefs, hence the name Gylfaginning 'Deluding of Gylfi'. Snori wrote the
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    198
    John Polidori

    John Polidori

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    John William Polidori (7 September 1795 – 24 August 1821) was an English writer and physician of Italian descent. He is known for his associations with the Romantic movement and credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. His most successful work was the 1819 short story, The Vampyre, one of the first vampire stories in English. Although originally and erroneously accredited to Lord Byron, both Byron and Polidori affirmed that the story is Polidori's. John William Polidori was born in 1795 in London, England, the oldest son of Gaetano Polidori, an Italian political émigré scholar, and Anna Maria Pierce, an English governess. He had three brothers and four sisters. His sister Frances Polidori married exiled Italian scholar Gabriele Rossetti, and thus John was the uncle of Maria Francesca Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Michael Rossetti and Christina Rossetti, though they were born after his death. Polidori was one of the earliest pupils at recently established Ampleforth College from 1804, and in 1810 went up to the University of Edinburgh, where he wrote a thesis on sleepwalking and received his degree as a doctor of medicine on 1 August 1815
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    199
    Melian

    Melian

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    Melian the Maia is a fictional character in the fantasy-world Middle-earth of the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. She appears in The Silmarillion, the epic poem The Lay of Leithian, The Children of Húrin, the Annals of Aman and the Grey Annals. A visual description of Melian is given in the Lay of Leithian: There Melian came, the Lady grey, and dark and long her tresses lay, beneath her silver girdle seat and down unto her silver feet. She is a Maia of the race of the Ainur, akin to Yavanna. Before the First Age, in the Years of the Trees, she left the gardens of Lórien and went to Middle-earth, and there she fell in love with the Elven-king Elu Thingol, King Greymantle, and with him ruled the kingdom of Doriath. She had a child with Thingol, a daughter named Lúthien, said to be the fairest and most beautiful of all the Children of Ilúvatar. Melian's line of descent is the half-elven. Her name Melian is Sindarin for Beloved. The name derives from the Quenya "Melyanna", either "Dear Gift" or "Gift of Love" (Q. melya, "dear, lovely"
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    200
    Petunia Evans Dursley

    Petunia Evans Dursley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Petunia Dursley (née Evans) (fl. 1959—1997) was a Muggle, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Evans, and the older sister of the Muggle-born witch Lily. During her childhood, she broke off contact with her sister and refused to have any contact with the wizarding world. She married a Muggle, Vernon Dursley, and they had a son, Dudley. However, when Lily was killed by Lord Voldemort, Petunia became guardian of her nephew, Harry Potter, who was only an infant then. She allowed him a room of his own after receiving his acceptance letters to Hogwarts (prior to this time he had been confined to the cupboard under the stairs), but for the most part neglected him. In 1991, when Harry went to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, she became very angry. She and her family left their home in 1997 in order to be protected from Voldemort and his Death Eaters. After the Second Wizarding War, she had several grandchildren and remained on civil terms with Harry.
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    Théoden

    Théoden

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Théoden is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel, The Lord of the Rings. He appears as a major supporting character in The Two Towers and The Return of the King. Théoden is introduced in The Two Towers, the second volume of The Lord of the Rings, as the King of Rohan. By the time of the War of the Ring, Théoden was growing weak with age, and was largely controlled by his chief advisor Gríma (or Wormtongue as most others in the Mark called him), who was secretly in the employ of the corrupt wizard Saruman. In Unfinished Tales, it is implied that Gríma was accelerating the king's decline with "subtle poisons". As Théoden sat powerless, Rohan was troubled by Orcs and Dunlendings, who operated under the will of Saruman, ruling from Isengard. When his son Théodred was mortally wounded at a battle at the Fords of Isen, Théoden's nephew Éomer became his heir. However, Éomer was out of favour with Wormtongue, who eventually had him arrested. When Gandalf the White and Aragorn appeared before him in The Two Towers, Théoden initially rebuffed the wizard's advice to ride out against Saruman. When Gandalf revealed Wormtongue for what he was, however, Théoden returned to his
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    Baronet

    Baronet

    A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary baronetcy awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 1300s and was used by James I of England in 1611 in order to raise funds. A baronetcy is the only hereditary honour which is not a peerage. A baronet is styled "Sir" like a knight, but ranks above all knighthoods except for the Order of the Garter and, in Scotland, the Order of the Thistle. A baronetcy is not a knighthood and the recipient does not receive an accolade. The term baronet has medieval origins. Sir Thomas de la More, describing the Battle of Battenberg (1321), mentioned that baronets took part, along with barons and knights. According to The Official Roll of the Baronetage: The term baronet was applied to the noblemen who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament, and was used in this sense in a statute of Richard II. A similar rank of lower stature is the banneret. The revival of baronetcies can be dated to Sir Robert Cotton's discovery in the late 16th or early 17th century of
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    203
    Edward Ellerker Williams

    Edward Ellerker Williams

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    Edward Ellerker Williams (22 April 1793 – 8 July 1822) was a retired army officer who became friends with Percy Bysshe Shelley in the final months of his life and died with him. Edward Williams was born in India, the son of an East India Company's army officer, John Williams. His family sent him to England where he attended Eton College, and then, at the age of 14, he entered the Royal Navy. His father died at sea in 1809, and with a comfortable settlement from the will, Williams joined the Eighth Light Dragoons of the East India Company's army in India as a cornet in 1811. He served under his half-brother and was promoted to Lieutenant in 1813. Williams's Sporting Sketches during a Short Stay in Hindustane contains drawings and journal descriptions of places and events during a leave of absence he took in 1814. The original copy of this notebook is in the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. He remained with his regiment until 1817 and retired on half-pay on 28 May 1818. During his time in India he met and served with Thomas Medwin, the cousin of Shelley. Williams returned to England, taking with him the wife of another army officer, Jane Johnson, née Cleveland
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    204
    François Villon

    François Villon

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    François Villon (in modern French, pronounced [fʁɑ̃swa vijɔ̃]; in fifteenth-century French, [frɑnswɛ viˈlɔn]) (c. 1431–1464) was a French poet, thief, killer, barroom brawler, and vagabond. He is perhaps best known for his Testaments and his Ballade des Pendus, written while in prison. The question "Mais où sont les neiges d'antan?", taken from the Ballade des dames du temps jadis and translated by Dante Gabriel Rossetti as "Where are the snows of yesteryear?", is one of the most famous lines of translated secular poetry in the English-speaking world. He was the best and most famous realist poet of the Middle Ages. Villon's real name may have been François de Montcorbier or François Des Loges: both of these names appear in official documents drawn up in Villon's lifetime. In his own work, however, Villon is the only name the poet used, and he mentions it frequently in his work. Villon was born in 1431, probably in Paris. His two longer poems, called "The Legacy" and "The Testament," which form his chief work, have traditionally been read as if they were autobiographical. From what the poems tell us, it appears that Villon was born in poverty and raised by a foster father, but that
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    205
    Hilda Spellman

    Hilda Spellman

    • Appears In Books: Dream Boat
    Hilda Spellman is a character featured in the Archie comic book Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Hilda is a full witch (as opposed to half or fully mortal) who lives in the fictional town of Greendale (in the 1990s live-action sitcom, Hilda lives in fictional Westbridge, Massachusetts). Hilda lives with her niece Sabrina Spellman, sister Zelda Spellman, and the family cat Salem, a former warlock turned into a cat as punishment for his attempt at world domination. Hilda debuted as "Hilda the Witch" in Archie's Mad House #19 (June 1962) as an ugly witch with dark hair and green skin. She was featured throughout the series in solo stories, as well as the "host" of the comic book (in a role similar to the Crypt-Keeper from the Tales from the Crypt comic book series). During her early appearances in Archie's Mad House, she was not connected to the Sabrina stories. However, a prototype of the "Aunt Hilda" character named "Greta the Fairy Witch Mother" (who debuted in Archie's Mad House #28 and was similar in physical appearance to Hilda the Witch) appeared in early Sabrina stories. Eventually, Hilda the Witch and Greta the Fairy Witch Mother evolved into the Aunt Hilda character in Archie's
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    206
    Johannes Vermeer

    Johannes Vermeer

    • Appears In Books: Girl With a Pearl Earring: A Servant's Life, a Master's Obsession, a Matter of Honour
    Johannes, Jan or Johan Vermeer (Dutch pronunciation: [joˈɦɑnəs jɑn vərˈmɪːr];1632 – December 1675) was a Dutch painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle class life. Vermeer was a moderately successful provincial genre painter in his lifetime. He seems never to have been particularly wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death, perhaps because he produced relatively few paintings. Vermeer worked slowly and with great care, using bright colours and sometimes expensive pigments, with a preference for cornflower blue and yellow. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work. Vermeer painted mostly domestic interior scenes. "Almost all his paintings are apparently set in two smallish rooms in his house in Delft; they show the same furniture and decorations in various arrangements and they often portray the same people, mostly women". Recognized during his lifetime in Delft and The Hague, his modest celebrity gave way to obscurity after his death; he was barely mentioned in Arnold Houbraken's major source book on 17th-century Dutch painting (Grand Theatre of Dutch Painters and Women Artists), and was thus omitted
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    207
    Lestat de Lioncourt

    Lestat de Lioncourt

    • Appears In Books: The Queen of the Damned
    Lestat de Lioncourt is a fictional character appearing in several novels by Anne Rice, including The Vampire Lestat. He is a vampire who was the narrator and an antihero in the majority of The Vampire Chronicles. The Vampire Lestat (the second book in The Vampire Chronicles series) is presented as Lestat's autobiography and it follows his exploits from his youth in Paris, France and cities surrounding to his early years as a vampire fledgling. Many of the other books in the series also follow his story, such as The Queen of the Damned, The Tale of the Body Thief, Memnoch the Devil, and also Blood Canticle. According to Rice, the character of Lestat was largely inspired by her husband, the poet and artist Stan Rice, and shared his blond hair and birth date of November 7. In a 2003 interview, Rice noted that the character had also taken on some of her own attributes, stating "Stan was Lestat; he was the inspiration. Perhaps it is best to say Lestat was Stan and me. He was Stan and what Stan taught me. Lestat was inspired by Stan, and then I became Lestat." The name "Lestat" was a misspelling of "Lestan," which Rice believed to be an old French name. According to the characters
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    208
    Mary Shelley

    Mary Shelley

    • Appears In Books: The Stress of Her Regard
    Mary Shelley (née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. Mary Godwin's mother died when she was eleven days old; afterwards, she and her older half-sister, Fanny Imlay, were raised by her father. When Mary was four, Godwin married his neighbour, Mary Jane Clairmont. Godwin provided his daughter with a rich, if informal, education, encouraging her to adhere to his liberal political theories. In 1814, Mary Godwin began a romantic relationship with one of her father’s political followers, the married Percy Bysshe Shelley. Together with Mary's stepsister, Claire Clairmont, they left for France and travelled through Europe; upon their return to England, Mary was pregnant with Percy's child. Over the next two years, she and Percy faced ostracism, constant
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    209
    Mosiah

    Mosiah

    • Appears In Books: Book of Mormon
    There are two individuals named Mosiah ( /moʊˈsaɪ.ə/ or  /moʊˈzaɪ.ə/) in The Book of Mormon. They were grandfather and grandson, respectively, and both served as king of the Nephites at Zarahemla. Mosiah may also refer to:
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    210
    Peter Rabbit

    Peter Rabbit

    • Appears In Books: The Tale of Peter Rabbit
    Peter Rabbit is a fictional anthropomorphic character in various children's stories by Beatrix Potter. He first appeared in The Tale of Peter Rabbit in 1902, and subsequently in five more books between 1904 and 1912. Spinoff merchandise includes dishes, wallpaper, and dolls. He appears as a character in the 1971 ballet film, The Tales of Beatrix Potter, in the animated BBC anthology series, The World of Peter Rabbit and Friends, and the upcoming 2012 animated Nickelodeon TV series. The rabbits in Potter's stories are anthropomorphic and wear human clothes; Peter wears a jacket and shoes. Peter, his mother, Mrs. Josephine Rabbit, and his sisters, Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cotton-tail live in a rabbit hole that has a human kitchen, human furniture, and a shop where Mrs. Rabbit sells various items. Peter's relatives are Cousin Benjamin Bunny and Benjamin's father Mr. Benjamin Bunny. Peter Rabbit was named after a pet rabbit Beatrix Potter had as a child called Peter Piper. The first Peter Rabbit story, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, was originally created in 1893 as a letter to Noel Moore, the five-year-old son of Potter's former governess, Annie Moore. The boy was ill, and Potter wrote him a
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    Quirinus Quirrell

    Quirinus Quirrell

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Professor Quirinus Quirrell is a fictional character in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, the first novel in the Harry Potter series written by JK Rowling. Quirrell was the Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry during Harry's first year at the school. Professor Quirrell is played by the British actor Ian Hart in the film adaptation of the book. Life prior to his employment at Hogwarts, he is said by Hagrid to have had a "brilliant mind", and was a fine teacher "while he was studyin' outta books"; however, around a year before Harry Potter's arrival at Hogwarts, "he took a year off ter get some first-hand experience". There were rumours that he encountered vampires in the Black Forest and one in Romania, and he apparently had "a nasty bit o' trouble with a hag". After that, he was 'never the same' - he appeared perpetually nervous, had developed a stutter and nervous tics, and Hagrid was able to say even before the beginning of the autumn term that he was "scared of the students, scared of his own subject". The length of Quirrell's employment at Hogwarts is uncertain. Some older students are familiar with him: when Harry
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    212
    Abinadi

    Abinadi

    According to the Book of Mormon, Abinadi ( /əˈbɪnədaɪ/) was a prophet who lived on the American continent about 150 BC. In the Book of Mormon account, Abinadi visited the court of King Noah at Lehi-Nephi, and pled for them to repent of their iniquity. Abinadi gave Noah the message of the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ to earth in the flesh, to live among the children of men. Noah and his priests threatened Abinadi that unless he recalls all the words he has said against him and his priests, they would kill him. Abinadi stood by his words and the wicked Noah had him burned with fire. One of Noah's priests, Alma the Elder, adhered to Abinadi's message and eventually became a prophet himself. Abinadi appears to be a derivation of Abinadab, a name cited in the Hebrew Bible several times. This name is also related to Aminadav, Aminadab or Amminadab, the ancestor of David, pictured in the Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. Note: The ancient sound "MB" produces variations such as "Nimrod" (Masoretic) vs. "Nebrod" (LXX) and "Omri" (M) vs. "Ambri" (LXX). Thus, Ambinadab (original) may have become Amminabad and Abinadab in various places.
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    213
    Lord Voldemort

    Lord Voldemort

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Lord Voldemort ( /ˈvoʊldəmɔr/) (born Tom Marvolo Riddle) is a fictional character and the main antagonist of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. Voldemort first appeared in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, which was released in 1997. Voldemort appeared either in person or in flashbacks in each book and film adaptation in the series, except the third, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, where he is mentioned. In the series, Voldemort is the archenemy of Harry Potter, who according to a prophecy has "the power to vanquish the Dark Lord". Almost no witch or wizard dares to speak his name, instead referring to him by epithets such as "You-Know-Who", "He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named" or "the Dark Lord". Voldemort's obsession with blood purity signifies his aim to rid the wizarding world of Muggle (non-magical) heritage and to conquer both worlds, Muggle and wizarding, to achieve pure-blood dominance. Through his mother's family, he is the last descendant of wizard Salazar Slytherin, one of the four founders of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. According to an interview with Rowling, "Voldemort" is pronounced with a silent 't' at the end, as in the French word "mort",
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    214
    March Hare

    March Hare

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The March Hare (called Haigha in Through the Looking-Glass) is a character most famous for appearing in the tea party scene in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The main character, Alice, hypothesises, "Mad as a March hare" is a common British English phrase, both now and in Carroll's time, and appears in John Heywood's collection of proverbs published in 1546. It is reported in The Annotated Alice by Martin Gardner that this proverb is based on popular belief about hares' behavior at the beginning of the long breeding season, which lasts from February to September in Britain. Early in the season, unreceptive females often use their forelegs to repel overenthusiastic males. It used to be incorrectly believed that these bouts were between males fighting for breeding supremacy. Like the character's friend, the Hatter, the March Hare feels compelled to always behave as though it is tea-time because the Hatter supposedly "murdered the time" whilst singing for the Queen of Hearts. Sir John Tenniel's illustration also shows him with straw on his head, a common way to depict madness in Victorian times. The March Hare later appears at the trial for the Knave of Hearts, and
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    215
    Ted Kennedy

    Ted Kennedy

    • Appears In Books: Shall We Tell the President?
    Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy (February 22, 1932 – August 25, 2009) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. He was the second most senior member of the Senate when he died and was the fourth-longest-serving senator in United States history, having served there for almost 47 years. As the most prominent living member of the Kennedy family for many years, he was also the last surviving son of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr.; the youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, both victims of assassination, and Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., killed in action in World War II and the father of Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy. Kennedy entered the Senate in a November 1962 special election to fill the seat once held by his brother John. He was elected to a full six-year term in 1964 and was reelected seven more times before his death. The controversial Chappaquiddick incident on July 18, 1969, resulted in the death of his automobile passenger Mary Jo Kopechne. Kennedy pleaded guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident and the incident significantly damaged his chances of ever becoming President of the United States. His one
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    216
    The Artful Dodger

    The Artful Dodger

    • Appears In Books: Oliver Twist
    Jack Dawkins, better known as the Artful Dodger, is a character in the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. Dodger is a pickpocket, so called for his skill and cunning in that respect. As a result he has become the leader of the gang of child criminals, trained by the elderly Fagin. He becomes Oliver's closest friend (although he betrays him when Oliver is mistakenly caught) and he tries to make him a pickpocket, but soon realizes that Oliver won't, and feels sorry for him, saying "What a pity ain't a prig!" He also has a close relationship with Charley Bates. Ultimately the Dodger is caught with a stolen silver snuff box and presumably sent to a penal colony in Australia (only alluded to in the novel). The Dodger chooses to consider himself a "victim of society," roaring in the courtroom "I am an Englishman; where are my rights?" The judge has little patience with the Dodger's posturing, and orders him out of the courtroom immediately after the jury convicts him of the theft. Dickens describes him this way: "With these last words, the Dodger suffered himself to be led off by the collar, threatening, till he got into the yard, to make a parliamentary business of it, and then
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    217
    Elizabeth Bennet

    Elizabeth Bennet

    • Appears In Books: Pride and Prejudice
    Elizabeth Bennet (later Elizabeth Darcy) is the protagonist in the 1813 novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. She is often referred to as Eliza or Lizzy by her friends and family. Elizabeth has been portrayed by Greer Garson in the 1940 film adaptation of the novel, by Elizabeth Garvie in the 1980 BBC mini-series, by Jennifer Ehle in the 1995 television series, and by Keira Knightley in the 2005 film adaptation. Elizabeth is the second child in a family of five daughters. Though the circumstances of the time and environment require her to seek a marriage of convenience for economic security, Elizabeth wishes to marry for love. Elizabeth is regarded as the most admirable and endearing of Austen's heroines. She is considered one of the most beloved characters in British literature because of her complexity. Austen herself described Lizzy as "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print." Elizabeth is the second eldest of the five Bennet sisters of the Longbourn estate, situated near the fictional market village of Meryton in Hertfordshire, England. She is 20 years old at the beginning of the novel. Elizabeth is described as an intelligent young woman, with "a lively,
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    Gavroche

    Gavroche

    • Appears In Books: Les Misérables
    Gavroche (French pronunciation: [ɡavʁoʃ]) is a fictional character from the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. Gavroche is the eldest son of M. and Mme Thénardier. He has two sisters, Éponine and Azelma, and two unnamed younger brothers. He is also technically unnamed; the reader is told he chooses the name for himself, but is not provided with his real name. Mme. Thénardier only loves her daughters, and M. Thénardier shows no affection for any of his children. Gavroche is told by his parents to live in the street, because he would have a better life there. The Thénardiers sell (or rent) their two youngest sons to a woman named Magnon. Due to a freak accident, the two boys are separated from Magnon without identification, and encounter Gavroche purely by chance. They are unaware of their identities, but Gavroche invites them to live with him and takes care of them. They reside in the hollow cavity of a giant elephant statue, the Elephant of the Bastille conceived by Napoleon as a fountain, but abandoned unfinished. This was no imaginary construction; located at the Place de la Bastille, it had been designed by Jean-Antoine Alavoine. The two boys soon leave him the next morning.
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    Cowardly Lion

    Cowardly Lion

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Cowardly Lion is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. He is a Lion, but he talks and interacts with humans. Since lions are supposed to be "The Kings of Beasts," the Cowardly Lion believes that his fear makes him inadequate. He does not understand that courage means acting in the face of fear, which he does frequently. Only during the aftereffects of the Wizard's gift, when he is under the influence of an unknown liquid substance that the Wizard orders him to drink (perhaps gin) is he not filled with fear. He argues that the courage from the Wizard is only temporary, although he continues to do brave deeds while openly and embarrassedly fearful. The Cowardly Lion makes his first appearance in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He is the last of the companions Dorothy befriends on her way to the Emerald City. When he tries to bite Toto, Dorothy calls him a coward, and he admits that he is. The Cowardly Lion joins her so that he can ask The Wizard for courage, being ashamed that, in his cultural role as the King of the Beasts, he is not indeed brave. Despite outward evidence that he is unreasonably fearful, The Cowardly Lion displays
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    220
    Ginny Weasley

    Ginny Weasley

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
    Ginevra Molly "Ginny" Weasley is a fictional character in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. Ginny's presence early in the series is minor: she is identified solely as the younger sister of Ron Weasley, Harry Potter's best friend, and harbours a crush on Harry, while bashful in his presence. Ginny's role is greatly expanded as the storyline progresses, with Rowling developing her character and eventually including her as an active participant in Harry's adventures and the quest to defeat Lord Voldemort, and as Harry's principal love interest. Ginny is the youngest of the seven Weasley children and the only daughter; she is "the first girl to be born into the Weasley clan for several generations." Rowling's official site states her birthday as 11 August, 1981. In a joint interview with The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet, Rowling revealed that she "always knew" that Ginny and Harry "were going to come together and then part." The author explained that, as the series progresses, Harry, and by extension the reader, discovers that Ginny is in fact the ideal girl for him. Rowling stated that Harry "needs to be with someone who can stand the demands of being with Harry Potter, because
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    221
    Auguste Dupin

    Auguste Dupin

    • Appears In Stories: The Mystery of Marie Roget
    Le Chevalier C. Auguste Dupin [oɡyst dypɛ̃] is a fictional detective created by Edgar Allan Poe. Dupin made his first appearance in Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1841), widely considered the first detective fiction story. He reappears in "The Mystery of Marie Rogêt" (1842) and "The Purloined Letter" (1844). Dupin is not a professional detective and his motivations for solving the mysteries throughout the three stories change. Using what Poe termed "ratiocination", Dupin combines his considerable intellect with creative imagination, even putting himself in the mind of the criminal. His talents are strong enough that he appears able to read the mind of his companion, the unnamed narrator of all three stories. Poe created the Dupin character before the word detective had been coined. The character laid the groundwork for fictitious detectives to come, including Sherlock Holmes, and established most of the common elements of the detective fiction genre. Dupin is from what was once a wealthy family, but "by a variety of untoward events" has been reduced to more humble circumstances, and contents himself only with the basic necessities of life. He now lives in Paris with his
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    222
    Miss Havisham

    Miss Havisham

    • Appears In Books: Great Expectations
    Miss Havisham is a significant character in the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations (1861). She is a wealthy spinster who lives in her ruined mansion with her adopted daughter, Estella. Dickens describes her as looking like "the witch of the place." Although she has often been portrayed in film versions as very elderly, Dickens's own notes indicate that she is only in her mid-fifties. However, it is also indicated that her long life away from the sunlight has in itself aged her, and she is said to look like a cross between a waxwork and a skeleton, with moving eyes. Miss Havisham's mother died when her daughter was a baby. Her father, a wealthy brewer, spoiled their daughter as a result. When he died, he left most of his money as inheritance for her. As an adult, she fell in love with a man named Compeyson, who was only out to swindle her of her riches. Her cousin Matthew Pocket warned her to be careful, but she was too much in love to listen. At twenty minutes to nine on their wedding day, while she was dressing, Havisham received a letter from Compeyson and realized he had defrauded her and she had been left at the altar. Humiliated and heartbroken, from that day on, she
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    223
    Nausicaa

    Nausicaa

    • Appears In Books: Odyssey
    Nausicaa (Greek: Ναυσικάα/Ναυσικᾶ /nɔːˈsɪkiə/; also rendered Nausicaä, Nausikaa) is a character in Homer's Odyssey (Odýsseia). She is the daughter of King Alcinous (Alkínoös) and Queen Arete of Phaeacia. Her name, in Greek, means "burner of ships". In Book Six of the Odyssey, Odysseus is shipwrecked on the coast of the island of Scheria. Nausicaa and her handmaidens go to the sea-shore to wash clothes. Odysseus emerges, after being awoken by their games, from the forest completely naked, scaring the servants away, and begs Nausicaa for aid. Nausicaa gives Odysseus some of the laundry to wear, and takes him to the edge of the town. Realizing that Odysseus being seen with her might cause rumors, she and the servants go ahead into town. But first she advises Odysseus to go directly to Alcinous' house and make his case to Nausicaa's mother, Arete. Arete is known as wiser even than Alcinous, and Alcinous trusts her judgments. Odysseus approaches Arete, wins her approval, and is received as a guest by Alcinous. During his stay, Odysseus recounts his adventures to Alcinous and his court. This recounting forms a substantial portion of the Odyssey. Alcinous then generously provides Odysseus
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    Sauron

    Sauron

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Sauron ( /ˈsaʊərɒn/) is the primary antagonist and titular character of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. In the same work, he is revealed to be the same character as the Necromancer from Tolkien's earlier novel The Hobbit. In Tolkien's The Silmarillion (published posthumously by Tolkien's son Christopher Tolkien), he is also revealed to have been the chief lieutenant of the first Dark Lord, Morgoth. Tolkien noted that the "angelic" powers of his constructed myth "were capable of many degrees of error and failing", but by far the worst was "the absolute Satanic rebellion and evil of Morgoth and his satellite Sauron." The cosmological myth prefixed to The Silmarillion explains how the supreme being Eru initiated his creation by bringing into being innumerable spirits, "the offspring of his thought", who were with him before anything else had been made. The being later known as Sauron thus originated as an "immortal (angelic) spirit." In his origin, Sauron therefore perceived the Creator directly. As Tolkien noted: "Sauron could not, of course, be a 'sincere' atheist. Though one of the minor spirits created before the world, he knew Eru, according to his measure." In the
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    Sue Clearwater

    Sue Clearwater

    • Appears In Books: New Moon
    Sue Clearwater is a fictional character from Stephanie Meyer's Twilight series. Sue Clearwater is a human Quileute woman who lives on the La Push reservation. She is the mother of Leah Clearwater and Seth Clearwater, and a widow since the passing of her husband Harry Clearwater. Sue also has friendships with Billy Black and Charlie Swan. During New Moon, her husband, Harry Clearwater, dies of a heart attack due to the shock of his two children turning into werewolves. He passes that spring leaving Sue as a widow, and then Sue takes Harry's place as a member of the tribal council. Billy states that Sue is a strong woman, as she remains unshaken as ever despite the news of her children. It is her and Charlie who arrange Harry's funeral. For Sue, it did not sink in when she first found out about her husband's death, much like Bella's reaction to trauma. Sue attends the campfire night where Quil Sr. tells the Quileute legends to Bella, Jacob and most of the pack. In Breaking Dawn, Sue attended Bella and Edward's wedding with Billy and her son, Seth. Later on, both Seth and Leah run away to join Jacob Black's renegade pack. According to Jared, Sue was heartbroken, but Jacob knew that she was very strong. Sue is also mentioned to be spending a lot of time with Charlie Swan, being as shocked by his cooking as Bella was when she first came to Forks. She immediately takes on a caretaker role towards Charlie, taking care of him much like Bella does. Bella suspects they have started a romantic relationship by the end of the book.
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    226
    Wicked Witch of the West

    Wicked Witch of the West

    • Appears In Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Wicked Witch of the West is a fictional character and the most significant antagonist in L. Frank Baum's children's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. In Baum's subsequent Oz books, it is the Nome King who is the principal villain; the Wicked Witch of the West is rarely even referred to again after her death in the first book. The witch's most popular depiction was in the classic 1939 movie based on Baum's book. In that film adaptation, as in Gregory Maguire's revisionist Oz novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West and its musical adaptation Wicked, the Witch of the West is the sister of the Wicked Witch of the East, although this is neither stated nor implied in the original novel. The Wicked Witch of the West leagued together with the Wicked Witch of the East, Mombi and the Wicked Witch of the South, to conquer the Land of Oz and divide it among themselves, as recounted in L. Frank Baum's Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. W. W. Denslow's illustrations for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz depict her as a paunched old woman with three pigtails and an eye-patch. L. Frank Baum himself specified that she only had one eye, but that it "was as powerful as a telescope",
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    227
    Alice

    Alice

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    Alice is a fictional character in the literary classic, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass. She is a young girl from Victorian-era Britain. The character has been said to be based on Alice Liddell, a child friend of Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll). Dodgson said several times that his "little heroine" was not based on any real child, but was entirely fictional. Alice is portrayed as a quaintly logical girl, sometimes even pedantic, especially with Humpty Dumpty in the second book. According to the sequel, she is seven and a half years old, but seems to conduct herself like a somewhat older child. The first book takes place on 4 May, Alice Liddell's birthday. The second takes place on 4 November, her half-birthday (and Alice states that she is "seven and a half exactly.") In April 1887, Carroll wrote in "Alice on the Stage:" Alice is popularly depicted wearing a pale blue knee-length dress with a white pinafore overtop, although the dress originally was yellow in The Nursery "Alice", the first coloured version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the illustrations for Through the Looking-Glass her hair is held back with a wide ribbon, and in
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    228
    Aragorn

    Aragorn

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Aragorn son of Arathorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, one of the main protagonists of The Lord of the Rings. He is a Ranger of the North, first introduced by the name Strider, which the hobbits continue to call him. At the end of The Lord of the Rings he is crowned King Elessar Telcontar. The son of Arathorn II and his wife Gilraen, Aragorn was born on 1 March, T.A. 2931. Through his ancestor Elendil (whom he closely resembled) Aragorn was a descendant of the first king of Númenor, Elros Tar-Minyatur; the twin brother of Elrond. When Aragorn was only two years old, his father was killed while pursuing orcs. Aragorn was afterwards fostered in Rivendell by Elrond. At the request of his mother, his lineage was kept secret, as she feared he would be killed like his father and grandfather if his true identity as the heir of Isildur became known. Aragorn was renamed Estel ("hope" in Tolkien's invented language Sindarin) to hide his existence from Sauron and his servants. He was not told about his heritage until he came of age in 2951. Elrond revealed to Aragorn his true name and ancestry, and delivered to him the shards of Elendil's sword Narsil, and also
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    229
    Arwen

    Arwen

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Arwen Undómiel is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkien's legendarium. She appears in his novel, The Lord of the Rings, usually published in three volumes. Arwen is one of the Half-elven who lived during the Third Age. Arwen was the youngest child of Elrond and Celebrían. Her elder brothers were the twins Elladan and Elrohir. Her name Ar-wen means 'noble maiden'. She bore the sobriquet Evenstar (or Evening Star), as the most beautiful of the last generation of High Elves in Middle-earth. As told in "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen", Aragorn in his twentieth year met Arwen for the first time in Rivendell, where he lived under Elrond's protection. Arwen, then over 2700 years old, had recently returned to her father's home after living for a while with her grandmother Lady Galadriel in Lórien. Aragorn fell in love with Arwen at first sight. Some thirty years later, the two were reunited in Lórien. Arwen reciprocated Aragorn's love, and on the mound of Cerin Amroth they committed themselves to marry one another. Arwen first appears in the text of The Lord of the Rings in Rivendell shortly after Frodo awoke in the House of Elrond. She sat beside her father Elrond at the celebratory
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    230
    Beleg

    Beleg

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Beleg is a major character who appears in numerous books, tales and poems about the First Age of Middle-earth such as The Silmarillion, The Lays of Beleriand and the Children of Húrin. Beleg's name means "great" or "mighty" in Sindarin. He is further known as Beleg Cúthalion, or Beleg Strongbow. The nickname (epessë) was bestowed for his skill as an archer and is the same in both cases, one being in Sindarin and the other in Common Speech (cú means "bow" and thalion means "strong" or "steadfast"). Beleg was a Sindarin Elf who served in the army of King Elu Thingol of Doriath. He "followed no man", and "could not be restrained". Together with Mablung he is one of the great captains of Thingol. He describes himself with the following verse: "I am the hunter Beleg - of the hidden people; the forest is my father - and the fells my home." Beleg conducts the defence of the realm of Doriath leading smaller companies in actions along the borders as Chief of the Marchwardens. He has larger commands such as the battle in Brethil against a Legion of Orcs as Captain commanding the axe-armed Sindar with Halmir and the Haladin archers. He leads the front line
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    231
    Bella Swan

    Bella Swan

    • Appears In Books: Twilight
    Isabella Marie "Bella" Swan (later Bella Cullen) is the fictional protagonist of the Twilight series, written by Stephenie Meyer. The Twilight series, consisting of the novels Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn, is primarily narrated from Bella's point of view. In the film series, Bella is portrayed by actress Kristen Stewart. In Twilight, Bella moves to her father's home in Forks, Washington, meets the mysterious Cullen family, and falls in love with Edward Cullen. However, she soon discovers that the family is a coven of vampires. Bella expresses a desire to become a vampire herself, against Edward's wishes. In the second novel, New Moon, Edward and the other Cullens leave Forks in an effort to keep Bella safe from the vampire world. Jacob Black, a member of the Quileute tribe who is also a shape shifter taking a wolf form, comforts the distraught and severely depressed Bella. She comes to care deeply for Jacob, though less than she loves Edward. At the end of Eclipse, Bella becomes engaged to Edward, and they marry in Breaking Dawn. Edward then transforms Bella into a vampire after she nearly dies giving birth to their daughter, Renesmee Cullen. The premise for both
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    232
    Count Dracula

    Count Dracula

    • Appears In Books: Dracula
    Count Dracula is the title character and primary antagonist of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. He is described as an archetypal vampire. Some aspects of the character are inspired by the 15th century Romanian general and Wallachian Prince Vlad III the Impaler. The character appears frequently in popular culture, from films to animated media to breakfast cereals. In Bram Stoker's novel, Count Dracula's characteristics, powers, abilities and weaknesses are narrated in a piecemeal way by multiple narrators, from different perspectives. The most informative of these narrators are Jonathan Harker, John Seward, and Mina Harker. Count Dracula is a centuries-old vampire, sorcerer, and Transylvanian nobleman, who claims to be a Székely descended from Attila the Hun. He inhabits a decaying castle in the Carpathian Mountains near the Borgo Pass. Unlike the vampires of Eastern European folklore, which are portrayed as repulsive, corpse-like creatures, Dracula exudes a veneer of aristocratic charm. In his conversations with Jonathan Harker, he reveals himself as deeply proud of his boyar heritage and nostalgic for the past times, which he admits have become only a memory of
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    233
    Dirk Pitt

    Dirk Pitt

    • Appears In Books: Treasure of Khan
    Dirk Pitt is a fictional character, the protagonist of a series of bestselling adventure novels written by Clive Cussler. The name Dirk Pitt is a registered trademark of Clive Cussler. Dirk is an adventurer that seizes the opportunity to save the day. Through action filled story lines, Pitt is portrayed as a man that is in love with the sea and isn't afraid to push the envelope. The character is an avid collector of cars, a characteristic shared with his creator, Clive Cussler. Dirk Eric Pitt is a renowned adventurer. He's described as tall, 6 ft 3 in (190.5 cm) with craggy looks, dark wavy hair, and possessing a rangy build. His most striking feature is his opaline green eyes, which can be both alluring or intimidating, as need be. Pitt has a commanding presence which, combined with a quick, sly wit, often infuriates those opposed to him. His comical banter with his sidekick Al Giordino during stressful situations leaves the reader with little doubt that both are confident of their abilities. While Dirk may be considered the hero of the two, Al Giordino is the man behind him. Dirk is the son of Senator George Pitt of California. With a woman named Summer Moran, he has twin
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    234
    Elendil

    Elendil

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Elendil is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. He appears in The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Known as Elendil the Tall (Tolkien put his height at "more than man high by nearly half a ranga", almost 8' or 240 cm), Elendil the Faithful ('Elendil Voronda' or 'Vorondo') or Elendil the Fair, he was the father of Isildur and Anárion, last lord of Andúnië, and the first High King of Arnor and Gondor. Elendil is first introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring. He was born in 3119 of the Second Age in Númenor, son of Amandil, Lord of Andúnië and leader of the "Faithful" (those who remained loyal to the Valar), who maintained a strong friendship with the Elves and preserved the old ways against the practices of Ar-Pharazôn and Sauron. Elendil's name means either "Elf-friend" or "Star-lover" in Tolkien's fictional language of Quenya. Elendil, his sons Isildur and Anárion, and their supporters fled to Middle-earth at the downfall of Númenor. Elendil landed in Lindon where he was befriended by Gil-galad. The waves carried Isildur and Anárion south to the Bay of Belfalas and the mouth of the River Anduin. They founded the realms of Arnor and
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    235
    Friar Tuck

    Friar Tuck

    • Appears In Books: Ivanhoe
    Friar Tuck is a companion to Robin Hood in the legends about that character. He is a common character in modern Robin Hood stories, which depict him as a jovial friar and one of Robin's Merry Men. The figure of Tuck was common in the May Games festivals of England and Scotland during the 15th through 17th centuries. He appears as a character in the fragment of a Robin Hood play from 1475, sometimes called Robin Hood and the Knight or Robin Hood and the Sheriff, and a play for the May games published in 1560 which tells a story similar to Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar. (The oldest surviving copy of this ballad is from the 17th century.) It has often been argued that the character entered the tradition through these folk plays, and that he may have originally been partnered with Maid Marian. His appearance in "Robin Hood and the Sheriff" means that he was already part of the legend around the time when the earliest surviving copies of the Robin Hood ballads were being made. A friar with Robin's band in the historical period of Richard the Lion-Hearted would have been impossible, because the period predates friars in England; however, the association of the Robin Hood with Richard I
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    236
    Galadriel

    Galadriel

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    Galadriel is a character created by J.R.R. Tolkien, appearing in his Middle-earth legendarium. She appears in The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales. She was a royal Elf of both the Noldor and the Teleri, being a grandchild of both King Finwë and King Olwë, and was also close kin of King Ingwë of the Vanyar through her grandmother Indis. She was one of the leaders in the rebellion of the Noldor and their flight from Valinor during the First Age, and she was the only prominent Noldo to return at the end of the Third Age. Towards the end of her stay in Middle-earth she was co-ruler of Lothlórien with her husband, Lord Celeborn, and was referred to variously as the Lady of Lórien, the Lady of the Galadhrim, the Lady of Light, or the Lady of the Golden Wood. Her daughter Celebrían was the wife of Elrond and mother of Arwen, Elladan and Elrohir. Tolkien describes Galadriel as "the mightiest and fairest of all the Elves that remained in Middle-earth" (after the death of Gil-galad) and the "greatest of elven women". Stories of Galadriel's life prior to The Lord of the Rings appear in both The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Galadriel was the only daughter and
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    237
    Glinda

    Glinda

    • Appears In Books: Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West
    Glinda (in full, Glinda the Good Witch of the South) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. She is the most powerful sorceress of Oz, ruler of the Quadling Country south of the Emerald City, and protector of Princess Ozma. Baum's 1900 children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz refers to Glinda as the Good Witch of the South. She finally gets Dorothy home by telling her of the power of the silver slippers. She gets the Golden Cap from Dorothy, and uses it to get the Scarecrow back to the Emerald city, the Tin Man to the land of the Winkies, and the Lion to a nearby forest, areas which the characters have been made rulers of. Later books call her a "Sorceress" rather than a "witch." Baum's writings make clear that he did not view witches as inherently wicked or in league with the Devil, so this change was probably meant to signal that Glinda's knowledge and command of magic surpassed that of a witch. In the books, Glinda is depicted as a beautiful young woman with long, rich red hair and blue eyes, wearing a pure white dress. She is much older than her appearance would suggest, but "knows how to keep young in spite of the many years she
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    238
    Jesus Christ

    Jesus Christ

    • Appears In Books: Book of Mormon
    Jesus ( /ˈdʒiːzəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iēsous; 7–2 BC/BCE to 30–36 AD/CE), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth is the central figure of Christianity, whom a majority of Christian denominations worship as God the Son incarnated. Virtually all scholars of antiquity agree that Jesus existed. Most scholars hold that Jesus was a Jewish teacher from Galilee in Roman Judaea, was baptized by John the Baptist, and was crucified in Jerusalem on the orders of the Roman Prefect, Pontius Pilate. Scholars have offered competing descriptions and portraits of Jesus, which at times share a number of overlapping attributes, such as a rabbi, a charismatic healer, the leader of an apocalyptic movement, Messiah, a sage and philosopher, or a social reformer who preached of the "Kingdom of God" as a means for personal and egalitarian social transformation. Scholars have correlated the New Testament accounts with non-Christian historical records to arrive at an estimated chronology of Jesus' life. Christians hold Jesus to be the awaited Messiah of the Old Testament and refer to him as Jesus Christ or simply as Christ, a name that is also used secularly. Christians believe that Jesus was conceived by
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    239
    Joker

    Joker

    • Appears In Books: Inferno
    The Joker is a fictional character, a supervillain who appears in comic books published by DC Comics. He is the archenemy of Batman, having been directly responsible for numerous tragedies in Batman's life, including the paralysis of Barbara Gordon and the death of Jason Todd, the second Robin. Created by Jerry Robinson, Bill Finger and Bob Kane, the character first appeared in Batman #1 (Spring 1940). Throughout his comic book appearances, the Joker is portrayed as a master criminal whose characterization has varied. The original and currently dominant image is of a highly intelligent psychopath with a warped, sadistic sense of humor, while other writers have portrayed him as an eccentric prankster. Similarly, throughout the character's long history, there have been several different origin tales; they most commonly depict him as falling into a tank of chemical waste, which bleaches his skin white and turns his hair green and his lips bright red, giving him the appearance of a clown. He has been repeatedly analyzed by critics as the perfect adversary for Batman; their long, dynamic relationship often parallels the concept of yin and yang. The Joker has been portrayed by Cesar
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    240
    Lazarus Long

    Lazarus Long

    • Appears In Books: The Cat Who Walks Through Walls
    Lazarus Long is a fictional character featured in a number of science fiction novels by Robert A. Heinlein. Born in 1912 in the third generation of a selective breeding experiment run by the Ira Howard Foundation, Lazarus (birth name Woodrow Wilson Smith) becomes unusually long-lived, living well over two thousand years with the aid of occasional rejuvenation treatments. His exact (natural) life span is never determined. In his introduction at the beginning of Methuselah's Children, he admits he is 213 years old. Approximately 75 years pass during the course of the novel; but because large amounts of this time are spent traveling interstellar distances at speeds approaching the speed of light, the 75-year measurement is an expression of the time elapsed in his absence rather than time seen from his perspective. At one point, he estimates his natural life span to be around 250 years; but this figure is not expressed with certainty. Heinlein acknowledged that such a long life span should not be expected as a result of a mere three generations of selective breeding, but offers no alternative explanation except by having a character declare, "A mutation, of course—which simply says
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    241
    Meriadoc Brandybuck

    Meriadoc Brandybuck

    • Appears In Books: The Lord of the Rings
    Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. A lover of boats and maps, Merry was described as one of Frodo Baggins' closest friends and also related to him several times over. When he first appeared, his name was Drogo Took. He was later renamed Vigo, and the name Drogo applied to Frodo's father. After that, he was renamed Marmaduke, and finally Meriadoc. In The Lord of the Rings, Merry was often considered, and was described by Tolkien as, the most perceptive and intelligent of the Hobbits: for example, even before Bilbo Baggins left The Shire, he knew of the One Ring and its power of invisibility. He guarded Bag End after Bilbo's party, protecting Frodo from the various and often unwanted guests. He had a knowing manner and an innocent, teasing sense of humour. In one incident, Lobelia Sackville-Baggins accused Frodo of being a Brandybuck and no true Baggins; Merry assured Frodo, "It was a compliment; and so, of course, not true". Merry also was a force behind "the Conspiracy" of Sam, Pippin, Fredegar Bolger and himself to help Frodo.
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    242
    Professor Horace Slughorn

    Professor Horace Slughorn

    • Appears In Books: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Professor Horace E. F. Slughorn (born between 1898 and 1902) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels written by J.K. Rowling. He is a teacher at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and makes his first appearance in the sixth book of the series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. He is also a good and trusted friend of Albus Dumbledore. Prior to the beginning of the series, Horace Slughorn was the long-serving Potions master at Hogwarts and Head of Slytherin House since at least the 1940. He retired in the 1980s, but returned to both positions, as Potions master at the beginning of Harry's sixth year at Hogwarts and as Slytherin Housemaster at the end of that year. During his long initial period of employment at Hogwarts, Slughorn taught several of the main characters in the Harry Potter story. Among his pupils were the young Severus Snape and Lily Evans, Harry's mother and one of Slughorn's favourite students, whom he repeatedly praises as "one of the brightest I ever taught...vivacious...charming...cheeky". Significantly, however, an earlier cohort of students included Tom Marvolo Riddle. On one occasion, Riddle questioned Slughorn about
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    243
    Psmith

    Psmith

    • Appears In Books: Leave it to Psmith
    Rupert Psmith (or Ronald Eustace Psmith, as he is called in the last of the four books in which he appears) is a recurring fictional character in several novels by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being one of Wodehouse's best-loved characters. The P in his surname is silent ("as in pshrimp" in his own words) and was added by himself, in order to distinguish him from other Smiths. A member of the Drones Club, this monocle-sporting Old Etonian is something of a dandy, a fluent and witty speaker, and has a remarkable ability to pass through the most amazing adventures unruffled. Wodehouse said that he based Psmith on Rupert D'Oyly Carte (1876–1948), the son of the Gilbert and Sullivan impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte, as he put it "the only thing in my literary career which was handed to me on a silver plate with watercress around it". Carte was a school acquaintance of a cousin of Wodehouse at Winchester College, according to an introduction to Leave it to Psmith. Rupert's daughter, Bridget D'Oyly Carte, however, believed that the Wykehamist schoolboy described to Wodehouse was not her father but his elder brother Lucas. Lucas was also at Winchester. Psmith appears in four
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    244
    Queen of Hearts

    Queen of Hearts

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The Queen of Hearts is a character from the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by the writer and mathematician Lewis Carroll. She is a foul-tempered monarch, that Carroll himself pictured as "a blind fury", and who is quick to decree death sentences at the slightest offense. Her most famous line, one which she repeats often, is "Off with their heads!" The Queen is referred to as a card from a pack of playing cards by Alice, yet somehow she is able to talk and is the ruler of the lands in the story, alongside the King of Hearts. She is often confused with the Red Queen from the sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, although the two are very different. Alice observes three playing cards painting white roses red. They drop to the ground face down at the approach of the Queen of Hearts, whom Alice has never met. When the Queen arrives and asks Alice who is lying on the ground (since the backs of all playing cards look alike), Alice tells her that she does not know. The Queen then becomes frustrated and commands that her head be severed. She is deterred by her comparatively moderate husband by being reminded that Alice is only a child. Generally, however, as we are told by Carroll: One
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    245
    Robin Hood

    Robin Hood

    • Appears In Books: Ivanhoe
    Robin Hood was a heroic outlaw in English folklore, a highly skilled archer and swordsman. Although not part of his original character, since the begining of the 19th century he has become known for "robbing from the rich and giving to the poor", assisted by a group of fellow outlaws known as his "Merry Men". Traditionally, Robin Hood and his men are depicted wearing Lincoln green clothes. The origin of the legend is claimed by some to have stemmed from actual outlaws, or from ballads or tales of outlaws. Robin Hood became a popular folk figure in the medieval period continuing through to modern literature, films and television. In the earliest sources, Robin Hood is a yeoman, but he was often later portrayed as an aristocrat wrongfully dispossessed of his lands and made into an outlaw by an unscrupulous sheriff. In popular culture, Robin Hood and his band of "merry men" are usually portrayed as living in Sherwood Forest, in Nottinghamshire, where much of the action in the early ballads takes place. So does the very first recorded Robin Hood rhyme, four lines from the early 15th century, beginning: "Robyn hode in scherewode stod." However, the overall picture from the surviving
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    246
    Roderick Spode

    Roderick Spode

    Roderick Spode, Bt, 7th Earl of Sidcup, often known as Spode or Lord Sidcup, is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves novels of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being an "amateur Dictator" and the leader of a fictional fascist group in London called The Black Shorts. In the 1990s television series, Jeeves and Wooster, he is portrayed by John Turner and depicted as having a rather Hitleresque appearance. Spode is a large and intimidating figure, appearing "as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla, and had changed its mind at the last moment". He is constantly in love with Madeline Bassett, and though he intended to remain a bachelor during his career as a dictator, he nevertheless attempted to protect her from men "playing fast and loose"; to this end, he threatened on several occasions to beat Bertie Wooster and Gussie Fink-Nottle to a jelly. He marches his followers around London and the countryside, preaching loudly to the public on the dissoluteness of modern society until a heckler hits him in the eye with a potato. Spode is modelled after Sir Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists, who were nicknamed the blackshirts. Spode was at first an
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    247
    Sun Wukong

    Sun Wukong

    • Appears In Books: Journey to the West
    Sun Wukong (simplified Chinese: 孙悟空; traditional Chinese: 孫悟空; pinyin: Sūn Wùkōng), also known as the Monkey King, is a main character in the classical Chinese epic novel Journey to the West (Chinese: 西遊記; pinyin: Xīyóujì) written by Wu Cheng'en. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India. Sun Wukong possesses an immense amount of strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (8,100 kg or 17,881 lbs) staff with ease. He is also superbly fast, able to travel 108,000 li (54,000 kilometers or 33,554 mi) in one somersault. Sun knows 72 transformations, which allows him to transform into various animals and objects; he has trouble, however, transforming into other people, because he is unable to complete the transformation of his tail. He is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best generals of heaven. Each of his hairs possesses magical properties, and is capable of transforming either into a clone of the Monkey King himself, or
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    248
    Thingol

    Thingol

    • Appears In Books: The Silmarillion
    Elu Thingol is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. He appears in The Silmarillion, The Lays of Beleriand and Children of Húrin as well as in numerous stories in the many volumes of The History of Middle-earth. He is notably a major character in many of the stories about the First Age of Tolkien's Middle-earth and he is an essential part of the ancestral backgrounding of the romance between Aragorn and Arwen in The Lord of the Rings. Thingol is introduced as the King of Doriath, King of the Sindar, High-king and Lord of Beleriand. He is said to be "the tallest of all the Children of Ilúvatar" and the "mightiest of the Eldar save Fëanor only." In The Silmarillion as Elwë, he is introduced as one of the three chieftains of the Elves who depart from Cuiviénen with Oromë as ambassadors of Valinor and later become Kings. Upon his return, he persuades many of his kindred, the Nelyar, to follow him back to that country. This host becomes known as the Teleri. On the Great Journey to the West the Teleri lag behind, loving Middle-earth and having mixed feelings about leaving it for Valinor, and do not arrive at the coast until after the departure of the moving
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    249
    Tiny Tim

    Tiny Tim

    • Appears In Books: A Christmas Carol
    Timothy Cratchit, called "Tiny Tim", is a fictional character from the 1843 novella A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. He is a minor character, the young son of Bob Cratchit, and is seen only briefly, but serves as an important symbol of the consequences of the protagonist's choices. It is claimed that the character is based on the invalid son of a friend of Dickens who owned a cotton mill in Ardwick, Manchester. When Scrooge is visited by The Ghost of Christmas Present he is shown just how ill Tim really is, and that Tim will die unless he receives treatment (which the family cannot afford due to Scrooge's miserliness). When visited by The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come all he sees of Tim is his crutch, as Tim has died. This, and several other visions, led Scrooge to reform his ways. At the end of the story, Dickens makes it explicit that Tim did not die, and Scrooge became a "second father" to him. In the story, Tiny Tim is known for the statement, "God bless us, every one!" which he offers as a blessing at Christmas dinner. Dickens repeats the phrase at the end of the story. This is symbolic of Scrooge's change in heart. Dickens did not reveal what Tiny Tim's illness was.
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    White Rabbit

    White Rabbit

    • Appears In Books: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
    The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. He appears at the very beginning of the book, in chapter one, wearing a waistcoat, and muttering "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" Alice follows him down the rabbit hole into Wonderland. Alice encounters him again when he mistakes her for his housemaid Mary Ann and she becomes trapped in his house after growing too large. The Rabbit shows up again in the last few chapters, as a herald-like servant of the King and Queen of Hearts. In his article "Alice on the Stage," Carroll wrote "And the White Rabbit, what of him? Was he framed on the "Alice" lines, or meant as a contrast? As a contrast, distinctly. For her 'youth,' 'audacity,' 'vigour,' and 'swift directness of purpose,' read 'elderly,' 'timid,' 'feeble,' and 'nervously shilly-shallying,' and you will get something of what I meant him to be. I think the White Rabbit should wear spectacles. I'm sure his voice should quaver, and his knees quiver, and his whole air suggest a total inability to say 'Boo' to a goose!" Overall, the White Rabbit seems to shift back and forth between pompous behavior toward his underlings, such as
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