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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Body Of Water of All Time

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    1
    Lake Nasser

    Lake Nasser

    Lake Nasser (Arabic: بحيرة ناصر‎ Boħēret Nāṣer, Egyptian Arabic: [boˈħeːɾet ˈnɑːsˤeɾ]) is a vast reservoir in southern Egypt, and northern Sudan, and is one of the largest man-made lakes in the world. Strictly, "Lake Nasser" refers only to the much larger portion of the lake that is in Egyptian territory (83% of the total), with the Sudanese preferring to call their smaller body of water Lake Nubia (Egyptian Arabic: بحيرة نوبية Boħēret Nubeyya, [boˈħeːɾet nʊˈbejjæ]). The area of Sudan-administered Wadi Halfa Salient was largely flooded by Lake Nasser. The lake is some 550 km long and 35 km across at its widest point, which is near the Tropic of Cancer. It covers a total surface area of 5,250 km² and has a storage capacity of some 157 km³ of water. The lake was created as a result of the construction of the Aswan High Dam across the waters of the Nile between 1958 and 1971. The lake is named after Gamal Abdel Nasser, one of the leaders of the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, and the second President of Egypt, who initiated the High Dam project. Sportfishing among tourists, especially for Nile Perch, has become increasingly popular, both on the shore and from boats, as the west bank of
    8.83
    6 votes
    2
    Lake Saint Clair

    Lake Saint Clair

    • Islands: Gull Island
    Lake St. Clair (French: Lac Sainte-Claire) is a fresh-water lake named after Clare of Assisi that lies between the Province of Ontario and the State of Michigan, and its midline also forms the boundary between Canada and the United States of America. Lake St. Clair includes the Anchor Bay along the Metro Detroit coastline. This lake is situated about 6.0 miles (9.7 km) northeast of Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario. With about 430 square miles (1,100 km) of water area, this lake is part of the Great Lakes System. It links the Great Lakes system, but is rarely included in the listings of the Great Lakes. There are ongoing proposals for its official recognition as a Great Lake, which would affect its inclusion in scientific research projects, etc., designated as being for "The Great Lakes". Along with the St. Clair River and Detroit River, Lake St. Clair connects Lake Huron (to its north) with Lake Erie (to its south). Lake Saint Clair is about 26 miles (42 km) from north to south and about 24 miles (39 km) from east to west. This is a rather shallow lake for its size with an average depth of about 11 feet (3.4 m), and a maximum natural depth of 21.3 feet (6.5 m). However, it is
    8.83
    6 votes
    3
    Hornavan

    Hornavan

    Hornavan [′hu:rna:van] is a lake in northern Sweden. It is located in Arjeplog Municipality in the province of Swedish Lapland, administratively known as Norrbotten County. It is situated among the Scandinavian mountain range, at a height of 425 meters. The town Arjeplog is located by its south-western shore. The lake then extends 70 kilometers northwest up to the town of Jäckvik, containing about 400 islets, many of which have distinguishable floras and faunas. Research on the ecosystems comparing larger islands with smaller islets in Hornavan and Uddjaur are popular due to their unpolluted environment, and have given rewarding results. An international study was published in Nature entitled Effects of species and functional group loss on island ecosystem properties. On its southern end, the lake attaches with the lake Uddjaure. The surface area fluctuates between 220 and 283 km², but some sources give it as constant 251 km²; in any case, it is the eighth largest lake in Sweden. With a largest depth of 221 meters it is also the deepest. The lake has been cultivated for water power. All lakes in Arjeplog Municipality have drinkable water. Animalwise, it has 5 native kinds of
    8.33
    6 votes
    4
    Great Slave Lake

    Great Slave Lake

    Great Slave Lake (French: Grand lac des Esclaves) is the second-largest lake in the Northwest Territories of Canada (after Great Bear Lake), the deepest lake in North America at 614 metres (336 fathoms; 2,010 ft), and the ninth-largest lake in the world. It is 480 km (300 mi) long and 19 to 109 km (12 to 68 mi) wide. It covers an area of 27,200 km (10,502 sq mi) in the southern part of the territory. Its given volume ranges from 1,070 km (260 cu mi) to 1,580 km (380 cu mi) and up to 2,088 km (501 cu mi) making it the 10th or 12th largest. The lake shares its name with the Slavey First Nations. Towns situated on the lake include: Yellowknife, Hay River, Behchoko, Fort Resolution, Lutselk'e, Hay River Reserve, Dettah and N'Dilo. The only community in the East Arm is Lutselk'e, a hamlet of about 350 people, largely Chipewyan Aboriginals of the Dene Nation and the now abandoned winter camp/Hudson's Bay Company post, Fort Reliance. North American Aboriginal Peoples were the first settlers around the lake, building communities including Dettah, which still exists today. British fur trader Samuel Hearne explored the area in 1771 and crossed the frozen lake, which he initially named Lake
    6.13
    8 votes
    5
    Round Lake

    Round Lake

    Round Lake National Natural Landmark lies within Green Lakes State Park in the town of Manlius, just east of Syracuse within New York State. Round Lake itself and the adjoining 59 acres (24 ha) of old-growth forest were designated a National Natural Landmark in 1973 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Hubert W. Vogelmann, a professor of botany at the University of Vermont, wrote the evaluation to the National Park Service that concurred with the recommendation of National Natural Landmark status for the region around Round Lake. Vogelmann's evaluation noted the "outstanding virgin mesophytic forest" adjoining Round Lake on its southwestern side; this text became part of the citation when the landmark was created. Vogelmann also noted Round Lake's importance as an extremely rare, "meromictic" lake. It shares this distinction with Green Lake, which lies a few hundred meters to the east. The virgin quality of the forest near Round Lake was already considered unusual by 1855, when Ledyard Lincklaen noted that this "dense body of woodland had hardly felt the axe." The region of Upstate New York in which Round Lake lies was heavily forested through the 18th Century, but by 1855 the
    8.80
    5 votes
    6
    Keuka Lake

    Keuka Lake

    Keuka Lake (/ˈkjuːkə/KEW-kə) is an unusual member of the U.S. state of New York's Finger Lakes because it is Y-shaped, instead of long and narrow. Because of its shape, it was referred to in the past as Crooked Lake. Keuka means "canoe landing" in the Iroquois language and "lake with an elbow" in the Seneca language. Keuka Lake empties into another Finger Lake, Seneca Lake, from a stream, called Keuka Lake Outlet, at the lake's northeastern end in Penn Yan, New York. The stream empties into Seneca Lake at the village of Dresden. At one time the outlet was developed into a canal, the Crooked Lake Canal, connecting the lakes. This canal was later replaced by a railroad branch line which is now a hiking and cycling trail. The lake is about 20 miles (32 km) long and varies in width from a half mile to two miles (1–3 km). The length of the shoreline is about 60 miles (96 km). It has a surface area of 11,730 acres (47 km²), and a maximum and mean depth of 186 feet (57 m) and 101 feet (31 m) respectively. This body of water possesses large and healthy populations of lake trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, landlocked salmon, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, and yellow perch. The
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Lake Constance

    Lake Constance

    • Islands: Mainau
    Lake Constance (German: Bodensee) is a lake on the Rhine at the northern foot of the Alps, and consists of three bodies of water: the Obersee ("upper lake"), the Untersee ("lower lake"), and a connecting stretch of the Rhine, called the Seerhein. The lake is situated in Germany, Switzerland and Austria near the Alps. Specifically, its shorelines lie in the German federal states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg, the Austrian federal-state of Vorarlberg, and the Swiss cantons of Thurgau and St. Gallen. The Rhine flows into it from the south following the Austro-Swiss frontier. Lake Constance was first mentioned by the Roman geographer Pomponius Mela about 43AD. He noted that the Rhine flows through two lakes, and gave them the Latin names Lacus Venetus (Obersee) and Lacus Acronius (Untersee). Pliny the Elder used the name Lacus Brigantinus, after the Roman city of Brigantium (today Bregenz). The lake is also colloquially known as the Swabian Sea (das schwäbische Meer). The freshwater lake sits at 395 m (1,296 ft) above sea level and is Central Europe's third largest, after Lake Balaton and Lake Geneva. It is 63 km (39 mi) long, and at its widest point, nearly 14 km (8.7 mi). It
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Lake Drummond

    Lake Drummond

    Lake Drummond is located at the center of the Great Dismal Swamp, a marshy region on the Coastal Plain of southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina between Norfolk, Virginia, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina in the United States. Surface area of the lake is approximately 3,142 acres (13 km) and the maximum depth is six feet. Management of the lake is the responsibility the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Scientists think the Great Dismal Swamp was created when the Continental shelf made its last big shift. The whole swamp has peat underneath. Several theories exist on the origin of Lake Drummond. People have argued the Lake was made by a big underground peat burn about 3,500 to 6,000 years ago. Native American legend talks about "the fire bird" creating Lake Drummond. Other theories regarding the lake's origin include a meteorite and a tectonic shift. Lake Drummond is one of only two natural freshwater lakes in Virginia. The other, Mountain Lake in Giles County is also of unknown origin. Curiously, both are lakes essentially on top of a hill. Lake Drummond is the highest point in the Dismal Swamp, with nine ditches flowing out of it. The time of the Great
    7.33
    6 votes
    9
    Coleto Creek Reservoir

    Coleto Creek Reservoir

    Coleto Creek Reservoir is a reservoir on Coleto Creek and Perdido Creek located in Fannin, Texas, 15 miles (24 km) southwest of Victoria, Texas. The surface of the lake extends into Victoria and Goliad counties. The reservoir was formed in 1980 by the construction of a dam by the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority to provide a power station cooling pond for electric power generation. Coleto Creek Reservoir is a venue for outdoor recreation, including fishing and boating. Coleto Creek Reservoir has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in the reservoir include white bass, hybrid striped bass, catfish, crappie, sunfish, bluegill, and largemouth bass. Vegetation in the lake includes cattail, pondweed, American lotus, rushes, and hydrilla. The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority maintains a public park at the reservoir with recreational facilities for boating and fishing. The reservoir has camp sites, picnic areas, cabins, a boat ramp for access to the water, a 200 feet (60 m) long lighted fishing pier, a 1.5 miles (2.4 km) hiking path, and restroom facilities.
    6.83
    6 votes
    10
    Fretheimsdalsvatnet

    Fretheimsdalsvatnet

    Fretheimsdalsvatnet is a lake in the municipality of Aurland in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The 3.88-square-kilometre (1.50 sq mi) lake is located at an elevation of 929 metres (3,048 ft) above sea level. Fretheimsdalsvatnet is located at the end of the Låvisdalen valley, about 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) southeast of Aurlandsvangen, about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) southeast of Flåm, and about 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) northeast of Myrdal Station. There is a hydroelectric dam at the north end of the lake.
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    Lake Te Anau

    Lake Te Anau

    Lake Te Anau is in the southwestern corner of the South Island of New Zealand. Its name was originally Te Ana-au, Maori for 'The cave of swirling water'. The lake covers an area of 344 km², making it the second-largest lake by surface area in New Zealand (after Lake Taupo) and the largest in the South Island. Lake Te Anau is however the largest lake in Australasia by fresh water volume. The main body of the lake runs north-south, and is 65 km in length. Three large fiords form arms to the lake on its western flank: North Fiord, Middle Fiord and South Fiord. These are the only inland Fiords that New Zealand has, the other 14 are out on the coast. Several small islands lie in the entrance to Middle Fiord, which forks partway along its length into northwest and southwest arms. The lake lies at an altitude of 210 m, and since its maximum depth is 417 m much of its bed lies below sea level. Several rivers feed the lake, of which the most important is the Eglinton River, which joins the lake from the east, opposite the entrance to North Fiord. The outflow is the Waiau River, which flows south for several kilometres into Lake Manapouri. The town of Te Anau lies at the south-eastern corner
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Lake Roxburgh

    Lake Roxburgh

    Lake Roxburgh is an artificial lake, created by the Roxburgh Dam, the earliest of the large hydroelectric projects in the southern South Island of New Zealand. It lies on the Clutha River, some 160 kilometres from Dunedin. It covers an area of some 6 km², and extends for nearly 30 kilometres towards the town of Alexandra. The town of Roxburgh lies five kilometres south of the Dam.
    8.75
    4 votes
    13
    Lake Tarawera

    Lake Tarawera

    Lake Tarawera is the largest of a series of lakes which surround the volcano Mount Tarawera in the North Island of New Zealand. Like the mountain, it lies within the Okataina caldera. It is located 18 kilometres to the east of Rotorua, and five kilometres to the west of the mountain. The lake's surface area is 39 km². The lake was substantially affected by the eruption of Mount Tarawera on 10 June 1886. The eruption killed over 150 people, and buried the Māori village of Te Wairoa on the southwest shore of the lake. Tarawera means "Burnt Spear", named by a visiting hunter who left his bird spears in a hut and on returning the following season found both the spears and hut had been burned down completely. The lake is filled primarily by sources from the nearby Blue (Lake Tikitapu) and Green (Lake Rotokakahi) lakes. Lake Tarawera is home to eels and rainbow trout. During the summer it is popular for both fishing and water sports, and also camping as there a number of hot water beaches. Lake Tarawera's outflow is at its north end, into the Tarawera River, which flows northeast into the Bay of Plenty.
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Mondsee

    Mondsee

    Mondsee (Moonlake) is a lake in the Upper Austrian part of the Salzkammergut and neighbour to the larger Attersee. Its southwestern shore marks the border between the states of Upper Austria and Salzburg, and also between the Northern Limestone Alps in the South and the Sandstone zone of the Northern Alps. The Drachenwand (Dragonwall) at the southern shore of the lake is an impressive sight. Mondsee is one of Austria's last privately-owned lakes. In August 2008, Nicolette Waechter (owner) announced it was up for sale. In 1864, remains of neolithic pile dwellings were discovered in the lake. Ian Fleming mentions the Mondsee in one of his James Bond novels, Moonraker. In chapter six, Blofeld reports to the members of SMERSH that their German unit has successfully retrieved in secret Himmler's hoard of jewels from the Mondsee. Fish living in the lake:
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    Chiemsee

    Chiemsee

    • Islands: Schalch
    Chiemsee (German pronunciation: [ˈkiːmzeː]) is a freshwater lake in Bavaria, Germany, between Rosenheim, Germany, and Salzburg, Austria. It is often called the Bavarian Sea. The rivers Tiroler Achen and Prien flow into the lake; the river Alz, out of it. The Chiemsee is divided into the bigger, north section, in the northeast, called Weitsee, and the Inselsee, in the southwest. The region around the Chiemsee is Chiemgau and is a famous recreation area. The Chiemsee was formed, like many other pre-alpine lakes, at the end of the last ice age about 10,000 years ago from a hollow carved out by a glacier (a Zungenbecken). Originally the lake covered an area of almost 240 km², which is about three times its present area. Within 100 years its area shrank to around 200 ha. Before 1904 the water level was lowered by about a metre. As a result, large areas of dry land were reclaimed. Two of the main islands on the lake are Herrenchiemsee (biggest island) and Frauenchiemsee, also called Herreninsel (gentleman's island) and Fraueninsel (lady's island), respectively. The third main island, Krautinsel (herb island), is smaller than Frauenchiemsee and is uninhabited. There are also three very
    9.67
    3 votes
    16
    Caspian Sea

    Caspian Sea

    • Islands: Batkachnyy Island
    The Caspian Sea (Azerbaijani: Xəzər dənizi, Persian: دریای کاسپین /دریای مازندران /دریای خزر‎, Russian: Каспийское море, Kazakh: Каспий теңізі, Turkic: Hazar deňizi) is the largest enclosed inland body of water on Earth by area, variously classed as the world's largest lake or a full-fledged sea. The sea has a surface area of 371,000 km (143,200 sq mi) (not including Garabogazköl Aylagy) and a volume of 78,200 km (18,800 cu mi). It is in an endorheic basin (it has no outflows) and is bounded to the northwest by Russia, to the west by Azerbaijan, to the south by Iran, to the southeast by Turkmenistan, and to the northeast by Kazakhstan. The ancient inhabitants of its littoral perceived the Caspian Sea as an ocean, probably because of its saltiness and seeming boundlessness. It has a salinity of approximately 1.2%, about a third the salinity of most seawater. Like the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea is a remnant of the ancient Paratethys Sea. The Caspian Sea became landlocked about 5.5 million years ago due to tectonic uplift and a fall in sea level. During warm and dry climatic periods, the landlocked sea has all but dried up, depositing evaporitic sediments like halite that have become
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    Lake Wohlen

    Lake Wohlen

    Lake Wohlen (German: Wohlensee) is a reservoir in the Canton of Berne, Switzerland. Its surface is approximately 3.65 km² and its maximum depth is 20 m. It lies between the towns of Bremgarten bei Bern and Mühleberg. Lake Wohlen was completed in 1920. Media related to Lake Wohlen at Wikimedia Commons
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Tyin

    Tyin

    Tyin is a lake in the southwest part of the Jotunheimen mountain range in Norway. The lake lies in Vang municipality in Oppland county, although a small portion extends into Årdal municipality in Sogn og Fjordane county. The western border follows, for a large part, the border between Vang and Årdal. In area it is 33.02 km². The lake serves as a reservoir for Tyin kraftverk and the water level is regulated between 1082.84 and 1072.50 m above sea level. The volume is 0.313 km³. Along the south side of the lake goes the national highway, riksvei 53, (Tyin–Årdal) and along the east side goes riksvei 252 (Tyin–Eidsbugarden). The riksvei 252 is accessible from European route E16 via a 3 km link. In 1869 the Norwegian Mountain Touring Association (DNT) built its first hut, which was located on the shores of Lake Tyin. Today the DNT’s tourist huts make this area, just to the south of Jotunheim National Park, one of the best developed touring areas in Europe. There are also a restricted number of private cabins by the lake. The name of the lake is derived from the name of the river Tya - the river that connects the lake to Årdalsvatnet and the Sognefjord. The meaning of the rivername is
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Lake Malawi

    Lake Malawi

    • Islands: Likoma Island
    Lake Nyasa (also known as Lake Malawi, or Lake Nyassa, Lake Niassa, or Lago Niassa in Mozambique), is an African Great Lake and the southernmost lake in the East African Rift system. This lake, the third largest in Africa and the eighth largest lake in the world, is located between Malawi, Mozambique, and Tanzania. It is the second deepest lake in Africa, although its placid northern shore gives no hint of its depth. This great lake's tropical waters are reportedly the habitat of more species of fish than those of any other body of freshwater on Earth, including more than 1000 species of cichlids. Lake Nyasa was officially declared a reserve by the Government of Mozambique on June 10, 2011 in an effort to protect one of the largest and most bio-diverse freshwater lakes in the world Lake Nyasa or Lake Malawi is between 560 and 580 kilometres long, and about 75 kilometres wide at its widest point. The total surface area of the lake is about 29,600 square kilometres (11,400 sq mi). The lake has shorelines on western Mozambique, eastern Malawi, and southern Tanzania. The largest river flowing into it is the Ruhuhu River, and there is an outlet at its southern end, the Shire River, a
    6.17
    6 votes
    20
    Honeoye Lake

    Honeoye Lake

    Honeoye Lake is one of the Finger Lakes of New York State in the USA. The lake is in Ontario County. Honeoye (pronounced /ˈhʌni.ɔɪ/ "honey-oy") is a Seneca word translated as "a lying finger," or "where the finger lies." Most of the lake is within the town of Richmond but a smaller southwestern part is in the town of Canadice. The hamlet of Honeoye is just north of the lake. Honeoye Lake is the second smallest of the Finger Lakes and is located to the west of the major lakes. To its west are other minor Finger Lakes: Canadice Lake, Hemlock Lake, and Conesus Lake. As with the other Finger Lakes, Honeoye Lake was created by the advance and subsequent melting of continental glaciation. The surface is about 245 meters above sea level. The lake is long and narrow with a roughly north-south orientation. Its surface area is slightly more than 7 square kilometers. It is also relatively shallow and warmer than the other Finger Lakes. Its outlet is Honeoye Creek, which flows northward. A major feeder stream, called Honeoye Inlet, enters the lake at the south end. Honeoye is 10th in size of the 11 finger lakes The hamlet of Honeoye in the Town of Richmond is located at its northern end. The
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Tysdalsvatnet

    Tysdalsvatnet

    Tysdalsvatnet is a lake in the municipalities of Hjelmeland and Strand in Rogaland county, Norway.
    7.00
    5 votes
    22
    Zuidlaardermeer

    Zuidlaardermeer

    Zuidlaardermeer is a lake in the northern part of the Netherlands The lake runs northwards of the village of Zuidlaren and southwards of the city of Hoogezand-Sappemeer and is called Zuidlaardermeer (Dutch for: Lake of Zuidlaren). The lake is largely situated in the provinces of Groningen and Drenthe. It was formed 5,000-8,000 years ago. The lake is fed by the river Hunze. This river enters the lake in the south-east and exits the lake in the north. The lake is shallow (about 3 ft deep), but some parts are deeper, like the fairway. The lake is popular by tourists, but in particular by yachtsmen. Many sailboats are moored in the lake, because the Zuidlaardermeer is one of the few suitable lakes for sailing in the outline. Large parts of the lake and nearby polders are conducted by the Groninger Landschap foundation.
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Lake Turkana

    Lake Turkana

    • Islands: North Island
    Lake Turkana ( /tɜrˈkɑːnə/ or /tɜrˈkænə/), formerly known as Lake Rudolf, is a lake in the Kenyan Rift Valley, with its far northern end crossing into Ethiopia. It is the world's largest permanent desert lake and the world's largest alkaline lake. By volume it is the world's fourth-largest salt lake after the Caspian Sea, Issyk-Kul, and Lake Van (passing the shrinking South Aral Sea), and among all lakes it ranks 24th. The water is potable, but not palatable. It supports a rich lacustrine wildlife. The climate is hot and very dry. The rocks of the surrounding area are predominantly volcanic. Central Island is an active volcano, emitting vapors. Outcrops and rocky shores are found on the east and south shores of the lake, while dunes, spits and flats are on the west and north, at a lower elevation. On-shore and off-shore winds can be extremely strong, as the lake warms and cools more slowly than the land. Sudden, violent storms are frequent. Three rivers (the Omo, Turkwel and Kerio) flow into the lake, but lacking outflow, its only water loss is by evaporation. Lake volume and dimensions are variable. For example, its level fell by 10 metres between 1975 and 1993. Due to
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Gopło

    Gopło

    Gopło [ˈɡɔpwɔ] is a lake in Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, north-central Poland, near the city of Gniezno. It gives its name to the protected area called Gopło Landscape Park. In early Middle Ages, the shores of Lake Gopło were home to a West Slavic tribe of Goplanie. At the northern end of the lake stands the Mouse Tower of Kruszwica. Its name derives from a legend of the corrupt Prince Popiel, whose fled to the tower from his rebelling population, and was devoured there by mice. Some historians and archaeologists consider the area the heart of the first state of the Polanie, the "founding" tribe of Poland.
    7.75
    4 votes
    25
    Zeller See

    Zeller See

    Lake Zell (German: Zeller See; Italian: Lago di Zell) is a small freshwater lake in the Austrian Alps. It takes its name from the city of Zell am See which is located on a small delta protruding into the lake. The lake is 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) long and 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) wide. It is up to 69 metres deep and at an elevation of 750 metres above sea level. The lake is fed by numerous small mountain streams in summer, but only one stream flows out of it into the river Salzach. In winter the lake completely freezes and is used for winter sports. In summer the lake is used for pleasure boating (boats powered by combustion engines are not allowed except for the ferries which cross the width of the lake from Zell to Thumersbach, so "elektroboots" can be hired instead). The water is very clear and suitable for swimming or diving, but can be chilly. The southern end of the lake, near Schüttdorf, is shallower and mostly filled with water weed, making it unsuitable for boating or swimming.
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Evangervatnet

    Evangervatnet

    Evangervatnet or Lake Evanger is a lake in the municipality of Voss in Hordaland county, Norway. The Vosso River flows through both Vangsvatnet and Evangervatnet before it empties into Bolstadfjord by the village of Bolstadøyri. Lake Evanger is named for the village Evanger. The last element vatnet is the definite form of vatn meaning lake.
    5.83
    6 votes
    27
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    San Francisco Bay

    San Francisco Bay

    • Bridges: San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge
    • Islands: Treasure Island
    San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining from approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. Specifically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay. However, the entire group of interconnected bays is often referred to as “San Francisco Bay”. San Francisco Bay is located in the U.S. state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area (often simply "the Bay Area"), dominated by the large cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose. The waterway entrance to San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean is called the Golden Gate. Across the strait spans the Golden Gate Bridge. The Bay covers somewhere between 400 and 1,600 square miles (1,040 to 4,160 square kilometers), depending on which sub-bays (such as San Pablo Bay), estuaries, wetlands, and so on are included in the measurement. The main part of the Bay measures 3 to 12 miles (5 to 20 km) wide east-to-west
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Lake Ellesmere

    Lake Ellesmere

    Lake Ellesmere / Te Waihora is located in the Canterbury Region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is actually a broad, shallow lagoon located directly to the west of Banks Peninsula, separated from the Pacific Ocean by a long narrow sandy spit called Kaitorete Spit, or more correctly Kaitorete Barrier. It lies partially in extreme southeastern Selwyn District and partially in the southwestern extension of the former Banks Peninsula District, which now (since 2006) is a ward in the city of Christchurch. The lake holds high historical and cultural significance to the indigenous Māori population and the traditional Māori name Te Waihora, means spreading waters. It has officially had a dual English/Māori name since at least 1938. Currently Lake Ellesmere / Te Waihora is a brackish bar-type lagoon. The lake covers an area of 198 square kilometres (76 sq mi), and is New Zealand's 5th largest lake (by area). Lagoons of this type form an interlinked chain of habitats or corridor, which run the length of the east coast of the South Island, from Wairau Lagoon and Lake Grassmere in Marlborough, through Lake Ellesmere / Te Waihora and Coopers Lagoon in Central Canterbury, Washdyke and
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Lake Monoun

    Lake Monoun

    Lake Monoun is a lake in West Province, Cameroon, that lies in the Oku Volcanic Field 5°35′N 10°35′E / 5.58°N 10.59°E / 5.58; 10.59. On August 15, 1984, the lake exploded in a limnic eruption, which resulted in the release of a large amount of carbon dioxide that killed 37 people. At first, the cause of the deaths was a mystery, and causes such as terrorism were suspected. Further investigation and a similar event two years later at Lake Nyos led to the currently accepted explanation. Several people reported hearing a loud noise on August 15, 1984 around 22:30. A gas cloud reportedly emanated from a crater in the eastern part of the lake. The resulting deaths of residents in a low-lying area are believed to have occurred between 03:00 and dawn. The victims were said to have skin burns, which reports later clarified as "skin damage" such as discoloration. Survivors reported that the whitish, smoke-like cloud smelled bitter and acidic. Vegetation was flattened around the eastern part of the lake, probably by a tsunami. Although Lake Monoun is near the center of a volcanic field that includes at least 34 recent craters, the subsequent investigation found that the event was not
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Lake Wakatipu

    Lake Wakatipu

    • Islands: Pig Island
    Lake Wakatipu is an inland lake (finger lake) in the South Island of New Zealand. It is in the southwest corner of Otago Region, near its boundary with Southland. Lake Wakatipu comes from the original Māori word Whakatipu wai-māori. With a length of 80 kilometres (50 mi), it is New Zealand's longest lake, and, at 291 km (112 sq mi), its third largest. The lake is also very deep, its floor being as low as 100 metres (330 ft) below sea level, giving it a depth of between 378 metres (1,240 ft) and 420 metres (1,380 ft) making it New Zealand's third or forth deepest lake and ranked 32nd deepest in the world, putting it just behind Lake Hauroko-462m, Manapouri-444m, and possibly Te Anau-418m and Hawea-392m. It is at an altitude of 310 metres (1,020 ft), towards the southern end of the Southern Alps. The general topography is a reversed "N" shape or "dog leg". The Dart River flows into the northern end, the lake then runs south for 30 kilometres before turning abruptly to the east. Twenty kilometres (12.4 mi) further along, it turns sharply to the south, reaching its southern end 30 kilometres (19 mi) further south, near Kingston. The lake is drained by the Kawarau River, which flows out
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Plansee

    Plansee

    Plansee is a lake in the Tyrol, Austria, located at 47°28′10″N 10°48′20″E / 47.46944°N 10.80556°E / 47.46944; 10.80556. Its surface is approximately 2.87 km² and its maximum depth is 78 metres. It lies on Austrian Federal Highway B 179, which crosses the Ammersattel into Germany. During World War II, a subcamp of Dachau concentration camp was located here.
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Adriatic Sea

    Adriatic Sea

    • Bridges: Krk Bridge
    • Islands: Brač
    The Adriatic Sea ( /ˌeɪdriˈætɨk/) (Albanian: Deti Adriatik, Bosnian, Croatian and Montenegrin: Jadransko more, Italian: mare Adriatico, Slovene: Jadransko morje) is a body of water separating the Apennine Peninsula of Italy from the Balkan peninsula and the Apennine Mountains from the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. The Adriatic is the northernmost arm of the Mediterranean Sea, extending from the Strait of Otranto (where it connects to the Ionian Sea) to the northwest and the Po Valley. The countries with coasts on the Adriatic are Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia and Italy. The Adriatic contains over 1,300 islands, mostly located along its eastern coast. It is divided into three basins, the northern being the shallowest and the southern being the deepest, with a maximum depth of 1,233 metres (4,045 ft). The Otranto Sill, an underwater ridge, is located at the border between the Adriatic and Ionian Seas. The prevailing currents flow counterclockwise from the Strait of Otranto, along the eastern coast and back to the strait along the western (Italian) coast. Tidal movements in the Adriatic are slight, although larger amplitudes are known to occur
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Lake Edward

    Lake Edward

    Lake Edward or Edward Nyanza is the smallest of the African Great Lakes. It is located in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift, on the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda, with its northern shore a few kilometres south of the Equator. The lake was named by the explorer Henry Morton Stanley in honour of Prince Albert Edward, The Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII. Stanley first saw the lake in 1875, and thinking it was part of Lake Albert, named it Beatrice Gulf. On his second visit in 1888 through 1889, he realized that there were two independent lakes, and gave it its current name. In 1973, Uganda and Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo) renamed it Lake Idi Amin or Lake Idi Amin Dada after Ugandan dictator Idi Amin. After his overthrow in 1979, the name was changed back to Lake Edward. Lake Edward lies at an elevation of 920 metres, is 77 km long by 40 km wide at its maximum points, and covers a total surface area of 2,325 km (898 sq mi), making it the 15th-largest on the continent. The lake is fed by the Nyamugasani River, the Ishasha River, the Rutshuru River, the Ntungwe River and the Rwindi River. It
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    Langisjór

    Langisjór

    Langisjór is a lake in the Highlands of Iceland. It is around 20 km in length and up to 2 km wide, with a total surface area of about 26 km² and a depth of 75m at its deepest point. The lake is situated rather far from civilisation at the south-western border of Vatnajökull at an altitude of 670 m above sea level. Environmental campaigners have expressed concern at government plans to site an industrial dam on the lake.
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Sandsvatn

    Sandsvatn

    The Sandsvatn is the largest lake on the island of Sandoy and the third largest in the Faroe Islands, measuring 0.8 km with a depth of 5 metres. It is situated in a valley between Skopun and Sandur, just north of the latter on Road 30. At the northern end of the lake are the island's school centre and a copse (plantation) which was badly damaged by a 1988 hurricane. The lake used to be rich in trout, lake trout and salmon.
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Lake Manapouri

    Lake Manapouri

    Lake Manapouri is located in the South Island of New Zealand . The lake is situated within the Fiordland National Park and the wider region of Te Wahipounamu South West New Zealand World Heritage Area . According to Māori legend Lake Manapouri was created by the tears of two sisters, Moturua and Koronae, who were daughters of an old chief in the region . Koronae journeyed deep into the forest one day only to become stranded after a fall . Her sister Moturua went looking for her and when she found Koronae she realised that Koronae could not be rescued . Moturua lay with Koronae and there they lay until they died, their tears creating Lake Manapouri . Lake Manapouri means anxious or sorrowful heart because of the grief of the two sisters however the present name was given by mistake . An early settler accidentally called it by the name of one of the Mavora Lakes, which lie between Lake Te Anau and Lake Wakatipu . The original name of the lake is believed to have been Roto-ua which translates to Rainy Lake and later Moturau which means Many Islands . Māori have a long history in the area, finding the lake and its surroundings offering an abundance of food in the form of eels and bird
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    Lake of Egypt

    Lake of Egypt

    Lake of Egypt is a reservoir in the Little Egypt region of the U.S. state of Illinois. It is located six miles (10 km) south of Marion, Illinois and covers 2,300 acres (9 km²) with 90 miles (140 km) of shoreline. The lake has an average depth of 18 feet (5.5 m) with a maximum depth of 52 feet (16 m) . The lake is owned by the Southern Illinois Power Cooperative (SIPC), who created the impoundment in 1962, by damming the South fork of the Saline River, to supply cooling water for a coal-burning electric power plant. As a privately owned lake, it is subject to regulation by its owners and the state. Terms of use from the SIPC are in the "Official Lake of Egypt Rules and Regulations". Public access is allowed as are all size boat motors. Waterskiing and jet skis are also permitted in most of the lake. Fishing includes Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Channel Catfish, Striped Bass, and Crappie. Camping at the lake is allowed at Buck Ridge Campground, part of the Shawnee National Forest.
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Lake Tikitapu

    Lake Tikitapu

    Lake Tikitapu or Blue Lake, is the smallest of four small lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Rotokakahi (Green Lake), Lake Okareka, and Lake Okataina. Along with the others, Lake Tikitapu lies within a volcanic caldera formed within the last 300,000 years. The blue colour of the lake can be attributed to rhyolite and pumice on the lake bed. The lake has no visible outlet, however subsurface flow drains towards Lake Tarawera. In summer, the lake is used for recreational purposes, with many sports events being held such as water skiing and triathlons. Like many of the lakes in the Rotorua district, it is also used for trout fishing.
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Golden Gate

    Golden Gate

    • Bridges: Golden Gate Bridge
    The Golden Gate is the North American strait connecting San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean. Since 1937 it has been spanned by the Golden Gate Bridge. Technically, the 'gate' is defined by the headlands of the San Francisco Peninsula and the Marin Peninsula, while the 'strait' is the water flowing in between. During the last Ice Age, when sea level was several hundred feet lower, the waters of the glacier-fed Sacramento River and the San Joaquin River scoured a deep channel through the bedrock on their way to the ocean. The strait is well known today for its depth and powerful tidal currents from the Pacific Ocean. Many small whirlpools and eddies can form in its waters. With its strong currents, rocky reefs and fog, the Golden Gate has been the site of over 100 shipwrecks. Before the arrival of Europeans in the 18th century, the area around the strait and the bay was inhabited by the Ohlone to the south and Coast Miwok people to the north. Descendants of both tribes remain in the area. The Golden Gate is often shrouded in fog. During the summer, the heat in the California Central Valley causes the air there to rise. This can create strong winds which pull cool moist air in from
    8.33
    3 votes
    41
    Lake Buchanan

    Lake Buchanan

    Lake Buchanan was formed by the construction of Buchanan Dam by the Lower Colorado River Authority to provide a water supply for the region and to provide hydroelectric power. Buchanan Dam, a structure over 2 mi (3.2 km) in length, was completed in 1939. Lake Buchanan was the first of the Texas Highland Lakes to be formed, and with 22,333 acres (34.9 sq mi; 90.4 km) of surface water, it is also the largest. The surface of the lake includes area in both Burnet County and Llano County. The lake is west of the city of Burnet, Texas. The other reservoirs on the Colorado River are Inks Lake, Lake LBJ, Lake Marble Falls, Lake Travis, Lake Austin, and Lady Bird Lake. The lake is named for Representative James P. Buchanan (1867–1937) who is credited with securing the funding to build the lake and dam. Lake Buchanan has been stocked with several species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Lake Buchanan include largemouth bass, catfish, white bass, and striped bass. Lake Buchanan is a level-controlled reservoir, and will not be allowed to flood during periods of heavy rain. The lake level can, however, drop significantly during
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Lake Huron

    Lake Huron

    • Islands: Manitoulin Island
    Lake Huron (French: Lac Huron) is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the wide Straits of Mackinac. It is bounded on the east by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the west by the state of Michigan in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. By surface area, Lake Huron is the second-largest of the Great Lakes, with a surface area of 23,000 square miles (59,600 km) making it the third-largest fresh water lake on Earth (and the fourth-largest lake, if the Caspian Sea is counted as a lake). By volume however, Lake Huron is only the third largest of the Great Lakes, being surpassed by Lake Michigan in this aspect. When measured at the Low Water Datum, the lake contains a volume of 850 cubic miles (3,540 km) and a shoreline length (including islands) of 3,827 miles (6,157 km). The surface of Lake Huron is 577 feet (176 m) above sea level. The lake's average depth is 195 feet (59 m), while the maximum depth is 750
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Possum Kingdom Lake

    Possum Kingdom Lake

    'Possum Kingdom Lake (popularly known as P.K.), is a reservoir on the Brazos River located primarily in Palo Pinto County Texas. It was the first water supply reservoir constructed in the Brazos River basin. The lake has an area of approximately 17,000 acres (69 km) with 310 miles (500 km) of shoreline. It holds 750,000 acre feet (930,000,000 m) of water with 550,000 acre feet (680,000,000 m) available for water supply. The lake is impounded by the Morris Sheppard Dam which was a project of the Brazos River Authority and the Works Progress Administration. Construction was begun in 1938 and completed in 1941. The dam is 2,700 feet (820 m) long and 190 feet (58 m) high. The construction is unique with buttressed arched wings on either side of the nine spillway gates rather than the usual filled concrete. It has two 11,250 kilowatt generators which are used during peak demand periods. Morris Sheppard was in 1938 one of Texas’ United States Senators. The dam was named for him in honor of his efforts in obtaining funding for the project. The lake is located where the Brazos River cuts through the Palo Pinto Hills. The canyon thus formed provided a favorable site for impoundment of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Štrbské pleso

    Štrbské pleso

    Štrbské pleso (Hungarian: Csorbató or Csorba-tó, German: Tschirmer See, Polish: Szczyrbskie jezioro) is a picturesque mountain lake of glacial origin and a top tourist destination in the High Tatras, Slovakia. It is the second largest glacial lake on the Slovak side of the High Tatras, after Hincovo pleso. Maximum depth is 20 meters. Štrbské pleso is now part of the neighborhood of Štrbské Pleso (spelled with a capital P). It is on the municipal lands of the village of Štrba, after which Štrbské pleso ("Lake Štrba") is now named. The word pleso ("tarn") is applied only to mountain lakes. The locals used to call it "the puddle" or "pond" (mláka) in the past. It is the second largest glacial lake on the Slovak side of the High Tatras, after Hincovo pleso to which it loses by 0.8 acres (3,200 m). It is fed by underground springs and has no visible outflow stream. Its surface remains frozen for around 155 days per year.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Chilka Lake

    Chilka Lake

    • Islands: Kalijai Hill
    Chilka Lake (Chilika Lake) is a brackish water lagoon, spread over the Puri, Khurda and Ganjam districts of Orissa state on the east coast of India, at the mouth of the Daya River, flowing into the Bay of Bengal, covering an area of over 1,100 sq. km. It is the largest coastal lagoon in India and the second largest lagoon in the World. It is the largest wintering ground for migratory birds on the Indian sub-continent. The lake is home to a number of threatened species of plants and animals. The lake is an ecosystem with large fishery resources. It sustains more than 150,000 fisher–folk living in 132 villages on the shore and islands. The lagoon hosts over 160 species of birds in the peak migratory season. Birds from as far as the Caspian Sea, Lake Baikal, Aral Sea and other remote parts of Russia, Kirghiz steppes of Mongolia, Central and southeast Asia, Ladakh and Himalayas come here. These birds travel great distances; migratory birds probably follow much longer routes than the straight lines, possibly up to 12,000 km, to reach Chilika Lake. In 1981, Chilika Lake was designated the first Indian wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. According to a survey,
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Lake Biel

    Lake Biel

    Lake Biel or Lake Bienne (German: Bielersee, French: Lac de Bienne) is a lake in the west of Switzerland. Together with Lake Morat and Lake Neuchâtel, it is one of the three large lakes in the Jura region of Switzerland. It lies approximately at 47°5′N 7°10′E / 47.083°N 7.167°E / 47.083; 7.167 (Lake Biel), at the language boundary between German & French speaking areas. The lake is 15 km long and up to 4.1 km wide. Its surface area is 39.3 km², the maximum depth 74 m. The lake is located at 429 metres above sea level. Lake Biel has a catchment area of about 8,305 km². Water remains in the lake for an average of 58 days. The river Aare, the river Zihl/Thielle flowing from Lake Neuchâtel, the Twannbach draining water down from the surplombing first Jura mountain range and the river Suze draining water down from the Vallon de St. Imier, are the main tributaries. The river Aare was redirected into the lake in 1878, in order to prevent the flooding of the nearby area called "Seeland", and drains the water out of the lake down to Büren through a simultaneously man-made channel. The level of all three lakes is being controlled by a dam built across the channel, in Port. The largest
    7.00
    4 votes
    47
    Lake Caliraya

    Lake Caliraya

    Lake Caliraya is a man-made lake situated in the municipalities of Lumban, Cavinti, and Kalayaan in Laguna province, Philippines. Created in 1939, the lake has developed as a popular spot for water sports and outdoor recreation including fishing. Surrounding the lake are a number of resorts catering to tourists and vacation homes abound because of the beautiful scenery and favorable climate. Lake Caliraya was created after the construction of Caliraya Dam, an embankment dam started in 1939 by US Army Corps of Engineers Chief in the Philippines, Major General Hugh J. Casey, with the approval of Philippine Commonwealth President Manuel L. Quezon. The Caliraya River was dammed at its outlet from a large flat plateau area providing a large water reservoir for generating hydroelectric power for Southern Luzon. The dam was over 100 feet (30 m) high from which a diversion canal was constructed several miles to the head of a steep slope about 950 feet above Laguna de Bay. Large penstocks were constructed diverting water down to the powerhouse below, with tailrace to the bay. The high head permitted the use of high-speed turbines and generators at relatively low unit costs. Initial estimate
    6.00
    5 votes
    48
    Canandaigua Lake

    Canandaigua Lake

    • Islands: Squaw Island,
    Canandaigua Lake /ˌkænəˈdeɪɡwə/ is the fourth largest of the Finger Lakes, in the U.S. state of New York. The city of Canandaigua is located at the northern shore of the lake and the village of Naples is just a few miles south of the southern end. Travelling west to east in the Finger Lakes region, it is the first of the major, or larger Finger Lakes (or coming from east to west, it is the last major Finger Lake). The name Canandaigua is derived from the Seneca name spelled variously Kanandarque, Ganondagan, Ga-nun-da-gwa, or in a modern transcription, tganǫdæ:gwęh, which means "the chosen spot", or "at the chosen town". Canandaigua Lake is 15.5 miles (24.9 km) long, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide, and has a shoreline of 35.9 miles (57.8 km). Near the northern end is Squaw Island. About fifty percent of the surrounding land is in forest, but most of the remainder is under agriculture. Of 35.9 miles of shoreline, 34.7 miles (55.8 km) (97%) are private and 1.2 miles (1.9 km) (3%) are public. Canandaigua Lake State Marine Park is located in the City of Canandaigua on the north end. It offers a boat launch for powerboats and fishing access from May to mid-October. The first steamboat in the
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Cedar Lake

    Cedar Lake

    Cedar Lake is a lake just north of Lake Winnipegosis in Manitoba, Canada. Cedar Lake's water level is controlled by the Grand Rapids dam. The town of Grand Rapids and the First Nations town of Easterville are nearby. The lake is known to have excellent examples of prehistoric amber fossil of cretaceous age. This type of amber is called as "Chemawinit", according to a Indian tribe which lives in this area. Another name of this amber is "Cedarit". This amber contains many organic inclusions. To date, these inclusions have not been thoroughly researched. The lake's main source is the Saskatchewan River, which forms a delta on the northwest side of the lake.
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Samara Reservoir

    Samara Reservoir

    Kuybyshev Reservoir or Kuybyshevskoye Reservoir (Russian: Ку́йбышевское водохрани́лище, Kuybyshevskoye Vodokhranilishche, Tatar Cyrillic: Куйбышев сусаклагычы, Latin: Kuybışev susaqlağıçı), sometimes called Samara Reservoir and informally called Kuybyshev Sea, is a reservoir of the middle Volga and lower Kama in the Chuvash Republic, Mari El Republic, Republic of Tatarstan, Samara Oblast and Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia. The Kuybyshev Reservoir has a surface area of 6,450 km² and a volume of 58 billion cubic meters. It is the largest reservoir in Europe and third in the world by surface area. The major cities of Kazan, Ulyanovsk, and Tolyatti are adjacent to the reservoir. The reservoir was created by the dam of Zhiguli Hydroelectric Station (formerly, V.I. Lenin Volga Hydroelectric Station), located between the cities of Zhigulevsk and Togliatti in Samara Oblast. It was filled in 1955–1957. With the filling of the reservoir some villages and towns were rebuilt on higher ground. One district of Ulyanovsk is below water level and is protected from the reservoir by an embankment.
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    Detroit Lake

    Detroit Lake

    • Islands: Piety Knob
    Detroit Lake is a reservoir impounded by the Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River 46 miles (74 km) southeast of Salem, Oregon, United States. The lake is adjacent to Oregon Route 22 near the city of Detroit. This mesotrophic lake stores water for use by the city of Salem and other nearby communities. Detroit Lake is situated over a historical road bed of the former Oregon Pacific Railroad. This route was built by Colonel T. Egenton Hogg as a proposed transcontinental railroad. Because of a lack of funding, the line terminated in Idanha, southeast of the lake. Idanha had rail service until the 1950s, when the track was removed for installation of the Detroit and Big Cliff reservoirs. Detroit Lake was created in 1953 after the completion of the dam. Part of the Willamette Valley Projects, the lake was intended primarily for flood control and power generation but has become one of the major recreation resources in western Oregon. The reservoir has a capacity of 455,000 acre feet (561,000,000 m) of water when full and 281,600 acre feet (347,300,000 m) in the summer when drawn down. Located in the North Santiam Canyon, the 9-mile (14 km) long lake has shoreline of 32 miles (51 km)
    6.75
    4 votes
    52
    Lake Waihola

    Lake Waihola

    Lake Waihola is a tidal freshwater lake located 15 km north of Milton in Otago, in New Zealand's South Island. Its area is some 9 square kilometres, with a maximum length of 6 kilometres. It is the larger of a pair of existing lakes - the other being Lake Waipori - which lie in a small area of low hills between the Taieri and Tokomairiro. Waihola is drained by the Waipori River, a tributary of the Taieri. Both lakes are very shallow and surrounded by wetlands, including the internationally renowned and protected Sinclair Wetlands which are the home to many species of wading birds. This shallowness is reflected in the name Waihola, the southern Maori form of the word waihora, which means "spreading waters". Lake Waihola is a popular day trip for holidaymakers from Dunedin, 40 km to the north. The small township of Waihola (population 200), nestled against the lake's eastern edge, has facilities for fishing, yachting, and waterskiing, and the lake is an important rowing venue. Lake Waihola was used in the Central Otago goldrush. Ships used to travel up the Taieri River and across to the southern side of the lake where prospectors would traverse the hills and on to Gabriel's Gully. In
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    Au Train Bay

    Au Train Bay

    Au Train Bay is a small bay, approximately 4 mi (6 km) across, on the southern shore of Lake Superior at 46°26′47″N 86°50′43″W / 46.44639°N 86.84528°W / 46.44639; -86.84528, along the coast of Alger County in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The town of Au Train sits along the middle of the south shore of the bay.
    9.00
    2 votes
    54
    Choke Canyon Reservoir

    Choke Canyon Reservoir

    Choke Canyon Reservoir is a reservoir in southern Texas, USA. The lake and the dam that creates it are owned by the United States Bureau of Reclamation and managed by the City of Corpus Christi. Choke Canyon Reservoir is 4 miles (6 km) west of the town of Three Rivers and about 65 miles (105 km) south of the city of San Antonio. It impounds water from the Frio River shortly before the river's confluence with the Nueces River. The reservoir covers 25,670 acres (103.9 km²) in Live Oak and McMullen counties, and has a capacity of more than 695,000 acre feet (857,000,000 m) of water. Choke Canyon Reservoir provides drinking water for the city of Corpus Christi. The reservoir also provides good fishing opportunities, especially for largemouth bass and catfish. Choke Canyon State Park, located in two places on the south shore of the lake, provides access to the lake and a number of other recreational activities. Choke Canyon Reservoir has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Choke Canyon Reservoir include alligator gar, white bass, white crappie, catfish, and largemouth bass, sunfish, and bluegill.
    9.00
    2 votes
    55
    Elgygytgyn Lake

    Elgygytgyn Lake

    Lake El'gygytgyn (Chukchi: Эльгыгытгын) is an impact crater lake located in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug in north-east Siberia, about 150km southeast of Chaunskaya Bay. It is drained to the southeast by the Enmybaam branch of the Belaya River. It is approximately 12 km in diameter and has a maximum depth of 174 m +/- 2m. The lake is centered within an impact crater with a rim diameter of 18 km that formed 3.6 million years ago (Pliocene). The lake is of particular interest to scientists because it has never been covered by glaciers. This has allowed the uninterrupted build-up of 400 m of sediment at the bottom of the lake, recording information on prehistoric climate change. In 2009, scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst drilled into the lake sedimentary cores to analyze past climates. The conditions in the El'gygytgyn lake are extremely severe for fish life. Therefore there are only three species permanently inhabiting the lake's harsh aquatic environment. These are three types of char: Salvelinus boganidae, S. elgyticus (Small-mouth char) and Salvethymus svetovidovi (long-finned char). The two latter species are endemic to the El'gygytgyn lake. The golets
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Niagara River

    Niagara River

    • Bridges: Peace Bridge
    The Niagara River is a river which flows north from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario. It forms part of the border between the Province of Ontario in Canada (on the west) and New York State in the United States. There are differing theories as to the origin of the name of the river. According to Iroquoian scholar Bruce Trigger, "Niagara" is derived from the name given to a branch of the locally residing native Neutral Confederacy, who are described as being called the "Niagagarega" people on several late-17th-century French maps of the area. According to George R. Stewart, it comes from the name of an Iroquois town called "Ongniaahra", meaning "point of land cut in two". The river, which is occasionally described as a strait, is about 56 kilometres (35 mi) long and includes Niagara Falls in its course. The falls have moved approximately 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) upstream from the Niagara Escarpment in the last 12,000 years, resulting in a gorge below the falls. Today, the diversion of the river for electrical generation has significantly reduced the rate of erosion. Power plants on the river include the Sir Adam Beck Hydroelectric Power Stations on the Canadian side, and the Robert Moses
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    Sobradinho

    Sobradinho

    Sobradinho is a municipality located in the state of Bahia, in Brazil. It has a population of approximately 38,000 with a land area of 1.324 km (0.5 sq mi). Once part of the municipality of Juazeiro it grew with the construction of the Sobradinho Dam and the flooding of the huge Sobradinho Reservoir. With the creation of the reservoir, the inhabitants of four cities and thirty villages had to leave their homes. In all 11,853 families (more than 70 thousand people) abandoned the old towns before the end of 1977. Of this total, 5,806 families remained in rural lots around the lake and 3,851 families moved to the new towns, including Sobradino.
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Vättern

    Vättern

    Vättern is the second largest lake (by surface area) in Sweden, after Lake Vänern and the sixth largest lake in Europe. It is a long, finger-shaped body of fresh water in south central Sweden to the southeast of Vänern pointing at the tip of Scandinavia. One of the etymologies for name Vättern is from "vatten", the Swedish word for water. This origin is, however, unclear and in dispute. It has also been suggested that the archaic term "vätter", meaning forest or lake spirits, is the origin of the lake's name. The lake's total surface area is about 1,912 km (738 sq mi), with a drainage basin a little over double that, about 4,503 km (1,739 sq mi). The deepest known point, located to the south of the island of Visingsö, is 128 meters (420 ft). The average depth is 41 meters (135 ft). The lake has a perimeter of about 642 km (399 mi). The volume is 77.0 km (18.5 cu mi). These numbers tend to be fixed, as the level of the lake is regulated. Situated in Götaland, the lake is drained by Motala ström, starting at Motala, and flowing ultimately through a controlled canal into the Baltic Sea. The lake includes the scenic island of Visingsö, located outside Gränna. Other towns on the lake
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    O'Higgins/San Martín Lake

    O'Higgins/San Martín Lake

    The lake known as O'Higgins in Chile and San Martín in Argentina is located around coordinates 48°50′S 72°36′W / 48.833°S 72.6°W / -48.833; -72.6 in Patagonia, between the Aysén del General Carlos Ibáñez del Campo Region and the Santa Cruz Province. It has a surface area of 1,013 km², an elevation of 250 metres above mean sea level, and a shoreline length of 525 km. Viewed from above, the lake consists of a series of finger-shaped flooded valleys, of which 554 km² are in Chile and 459 km² in Argentina, although sources differ on the precise split, presumably reflecting water level variability. The lake is the deepest in the Americas with a maximum depth of 836 metres near O'Higgins Glacier, and its characteristic milky light-blue color comes from rock flour suspended in its waters. It is mainly fed by the Mayer River and other streams, and its outlet, the Pascua River, discharges water from the lake towards the Pacific Ocean at a rate of 510 m³/s. The O'Higgins Glacier flows eastwards towards the lake, as does the Chico Glacier. Both of these glaciers are part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field which extends for approximately 350 kilometres in a north-south direction to the
    5.80
    5 votes
    60
    Clear Lake

    Clear Lake

    • Islands: Fruit Island
    Clear Lake is the largest natural freshwater lake entirely in California, and has the largest surface area of any freshwater lake entirely in California, the tenth largest by capacity. It is located in Lake County and is fed by runoff flowing into many streams as well as springs in Soda Bay. Its sole outlet is Cache Creek. There is a dam on Cache Creek to increase the lake's capacity and to regulate outflow. Clear Lake is 19 mi (31 km) by 8 mi (13 km) at its widest point, with surface area of 43,785 acres (17,719 ha) and a 1,155,000 acre·ft (1.425×10 m) capacity. Average depth is 27 ft (8.2 m), maximum is 60 ft (18 m), lake elevation is 1,329 ft (405 m), average water temp is 40 °F (4 °C) in winter and 76 °F (24 °C) in summer. Clear Lake is believed to be one of the oldest lakes in North America, due to a geological fluke. The lake sits on a huge block of stone which slowly tilts in the northern direction at the same rate as the lake fills in with sediment, thus keeping the water at roughly the same depth. Core samples of the lake's sediments, taken by U.S. Geological Survey geologists in 1973 and 1980, indicate that the lake is at least 480,000 years old. Some experts feel that
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Dead Sea

    Dead Sea

    The Dead Sea (Arabic: البحر الميت‎  al-Baḥr al-Mayyit (help·info), Hebrew: יָם הַ‏‏מֶּ‏‏לַ‏ח‎‎, Yām HamMélaḥ, "Sea of Salt", also Hebrew: יָם הַ‏‏מָּוֶת‎‎, Yām HamMā́weṯ, "The Sea of Death"), also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 423 metres (1,388 ft) below sea level, Earth's lowest elevation on land. The Dead Sea is 377 m (1,237 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 33.7% salinity, it is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, though Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have reported higher salinities. It is 8.6 times saltier than the ocean. This salinity makes for a harsh environment in which animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    Laacher See

    Laacher See

    Laacher See (German pronunciation: [ˈlaːxɐ ˈzeː]) or Laach Lake (in English) is a caldera lake and a potentially active volcano, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, situated close to the cities of Koblenz, about 24 km (15 mi) away, and Bonn, about 37 km (23 mi) away, and closest to the towns Andernach, 8 km (5.0 mi), and Mayen 11 km (6.8 mi). The caldera lake lies just 8 km (5.0 mi) from the river Rhine at Andernach. Just like the nearby 'Wehrer Kessel' volcano and Rieden volcano, the Laacher See volcano forms a volcanic caldera in the Eifel mountain range. It is part of the area called "East Eifel volcanic field". The great Eifel lake takes its name from the Old High German word "lacha" which in turn is derived from Latin "lacus" as English "lake". Thus the name literally means "Lake of the Lake" similar to the "Loch Lochy" in the Scottish Highlands with the same meaning. The lake lies 259 m (850 ft) above sea level, is 8 km (5.0 mi) in circumference, and surrounded by a ring of high hills. The water is blue, very cold and bitter to the taste. The lake has no natural outlet and so the water level changes considerably due to evaporation and rainfall conditions. On the western side
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Lac de Paladru

    Lac de Paladru

    Lake Paladru (Lac de Paladru) is a small lake located in the Isère département, near Charavines, in France. The lake was formed by the glacier of the Rhône. It is 6 km long and 1.2 km wide when full. Maximum depth: 33m.
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Lake Asveja

    Lake Asveja

    Lake Asveja or Dubingiai Lake (Lithuanian: Asveja or Dubingių ežeras) is the longest lake in Lithuania (length: 21.9 km or 29.7 km counting the Žalktynė, Vyriogala and Dubingiai bights). It covers 9.78 km² area and reaches a depth of 50.2m which makes it the third deepest lake in Lithuania. It lies partly in Molėtai district, Švenčionys district and Vilnius district. The alternative name comes from the historical Dubingiai Castle, constructed on the former island, and the small town of Dubingiai situated on the lake. The town is a popular tourist destination. Žeimena River flows through the lake and people rent boats or kayaks to go down the river to the Neris River. The lake formed when water flowed under the melting icecaps during the last glacial period. Such lakes are similar to rivers: they are long, narrow (the greatest width of Asveja is only 880 m.), and deep. Other such lakes in Lithuania include Tauragnas, Sartai, and Aisetas. In 1992 Asveja Regional Park was established to protect the ecosystem and landscape. One of the curiosities is a wooden bridge across the lake. It was built in 1934 and is still in use. President Antanas Smetona participated in the opening of the
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Lake Rotoaira

    Lake Rotoaira

    Lake Rotoaira (sometimes written Lake Roto-aira) is a small lake to the south of Lake Taupo on the North Island Volcanic Plateau in New Zealand. It covers an area of 13 km². Lake Rotoaira is one of the few privately owned lakes in New Zealand being administered by the Lake Rotoaira Trust on behalf of its owners. An access permit must be held by those using the lake for fishing and similar activities. The lake is located in a graben between the broad volcanic dome of Mount Tongariro to the south and the smaller volcanic peak of Pihanga to the northwest. It is naturally drained by the Poutu Stream into the Tongariro River. However the Tongariro Power Scheme utilised Rotoaira as a storage lake for the Tokaanu Hydropower Station. Extensive engineering works were carried out including the diversion of a number of other streams (including Whanganui River) into Rotoaira via the Otamangakau Hydro Lake and construction of a tunnel through Pihanga to the Tokaanu Power Station.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Lake Rotokakahi

    Lake Rotokakahi

    Lake Rotokakahi or Green Lake, is one of four small lakes lying between Lake Rotorua and Lake Tarawera in the Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand's North Island. The others are Lake Tikitapu (Blue Lake), Lake Okareka, and Lake Okataina. All lie within the Okataina caldera, along its western edge. Named for its abundance of kakahi (freshwater mussels), it flows to Lake Tarawera via the Te Wairoa waterfalls. From the air the lake looks emerald green due to its shallow, sandy bottom. The lake is 1302 feet above sea level and 69 feet below the level of the neighbouring Lake Tikitapu. Rotokakahi remains under the authority of Te Arawa iwi, Tūhourangi, and remains largely undisturbed as it is considered to be tapu. This small island in the lake is notable as the site of the 1822 slaughter of a part of Ngāpuhi, that led to the revenge raid of Hongi Hika in 1823—and also as the resting place of the bones of Hinemoa.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Lake Tisza

    Lake Tisza

    Lake Tisza (Hungarian: Tisza-tó), also known as Kisköre Reservoir (Hungarian: Kiskörei-víztározó), is the largest artificial lake in Hungary. It is located at the southeastern edge of Heves county, next to counties Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén, Hajdú-Bihar and Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok. As part of the ongoing Tisza River flood control project, it was built in 1973. Its filling was finished in the 1990s, resulting a 127 km² lake. The lake is 27 km in length, with an average depth of 1.3 m and a maximum depth of 17 m; it contains 43 km² of small islands. Following the reservoir's completion, Hungarians began to flock to the site for holidays, since it compared favorably with the crowded and expensive Lake Balaton, the traditional holiday site. As a result, tourist infrastructure has been developed on the reservoir—renamed Lake Tisza—and the government has designated it an official tourism destination. The lake (or reservoir) has a new local ecology with a diversity of birds, plants, and animals. Webpage of the lake
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Rotsee

    Rotsee

    The Rotsee is a natural rowing lake on the northern edge of Lucerne, Switzerland. It is 2,400 m long with virtually no current and protected from winds by nearby hills making it an ideal rowing venue. The first regatta was hosted here in 1933 and since been the venue of a large number of international rowing events (including the first ever World Rowing Championships). The lake is the venue for the final leg of the Rowing World Cup series. When a World Championships is also being held in Lucerne (as happened in 2001) then no World Cup Race is held on the lake. Media related to Rotsee at Wikimedia Commons
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Tsomoriri

    Tsomoriri

    Tsomoriri or Lake Moriri (official name: Tsomoriri Wetland Conservation Reserve), in the Changthang (literal meaning, northern plains) area, is a High Altitude Lake (HAL) with an altitude of 4,595 m (15,075 ft) in Ladakh, India and is the largest of the High Altitude Lakes in the Trans-Himalayan biogeographic region, entirely within India. It is hemmed between Ladakh in the North and Tibet in the east and Zanskar in the west; the Changthang plateau is the geographical setting with snow peaks that provides the source of water for the Lake. Accessibility to the lake is limited to summer season only. Tsokar means salty lake in local language and salt was extracted from this lake in earlier times, till the end of 1959, for consumption by the local people. It is oligotrophic in nature and its waters are alkaline. The lake formerly had an outlet to the south, but it has contracted considerably and has become land locked; as a result; the water is now brackish to saline. The lake is fed by springs and snow-melt in two major stream systems, one entering the lake from the north, the other from the southwest. Both stream systems create extensive marshes where they enter the lake. As per a
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Atlin Lake

    Atlin Lake

    Atlin Lake is a lake in northwestern British Columbia and is that province's largest natural lake. The northern tip of the lake is in the Yukon, as is Little Atlin Lake. However, most of the lake lies within the Atlin District of British Columbia. Atlin Lake is considered the source of the Yukon River although it is actually drained via the short Atlin River into Tagish Lake. The name comes from Áa Tlein (in Canadian spelling  Tłèn), the Tlingit name meaning simply "big lake". The community of Atlin, British Columbia, is located on the eastern shore of the lake. The southern part of the lake is in the Atlin Provincial Park and Recreation Area.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Aursjøen

    Aursjøen

    Aursjøen is a lake in Norway on the border between the municipality of Lesja in Oppland county and the municipality of Nesset in Møre og Romsdal county. The 36.38-square-kilometre (14.05 sq mi) lake sits at an elevation of 856 metres (2,808 ft) above sea level and is about 70.67 kilometres (43.91 mi) around. The lake was dammed up in 1953 to provide water for the Aura power station. It flooded together with the nearby lake Gautsjøen. The water in lake Aursjøen flows out to the river Aura in Eikesdalen and eventually to the lake Eikesdalsvatnet.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Étang de Thau

    Étang de Thau

    Étang de Thau (French pronunciation: [etɑ̃ də to]; Occitan: Estanh de Taur) or Bassin de Thau is the largest of a string of étangs (lakes) that stretch along the Languedoc-Roussillon, French coast from the Rhône River to the foothills of the Pyrenees which form the border to Spain. It is the second largest lake in France. It is about 21 km long and 8 km wide, with an area of 7,012 hectares. The mean depth of the étang is 4.5m, but in the central navigation channel it can be 10 metres deep. Near Bouzigues there is a 100 metre diameter depression of 30 metres. This 'Fosse de la Vise' is the source of a hot spring that feeds the spa in Balaruc. Its size and depth, which distinguish it from other lagoons of the region, is explained by the geomorphology of the region: it is the anticline formed from folding which produced the corresponding syncline of the Gardiole in the north east. Until relatively recently the étangs from Marseillan to the Rhône were a continuous stretch of inland waterway. Early settlers described this as 'une petite mer intérieure et tranquille'. It provided access to, in particular, Marseillan - a fishing village that became a trade centre. Linked, now, by the
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Kluane Lake

    Kluane Lake

    Kluane Lake is located in the southwest area of the Yukon. At approximately 400 km (150 sq mi), and 70 km (43 mi) long, it is the largest lake contained entirely within the territorial border. Kluane Lake is fed by the A'ay Chu, which is composed of meltwater from the Kaskawulsh Glacier, located within Kluane National Park. It drains into the Kluane River, whose waters flow into the Donjek River, White River, Yukon River, and eventually the Bering Sea. The Alaska Highway follows most of Kluane Lake's southern border, and the drive offers many spectacular views of the lake. The Yukon communities of Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay are located on the southern shore of the lake. The lake is also known for its whitefish and lake trout fishing.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Lake Lauerz

    Lake Lauerz

    Lake Lauerz (German: Lauerzersee, old spelling: Lowerzer See) is a lake in the Canton of Schwyz, Switzerland. Its area is about 3 km² and its maximum depth is 13 m. There are two small islands in the lake (the Schwanau and the Roggenburg). Media related to Lake Lauerz at Wikimedia Commons
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Lake Nicaragua

    Lake Nicaragua

    • Islands: Zapatera
    Lake Nicaragua or Cocibolca or Granada or (Spanish: Lago de Nicaragua, Lago Cocibolca, Mar Dulce, Gran Lago, Gran Lago Dulce, or Lago de Granada) is a vast freshwater lake in Nicaragua of tectonic origin. With an area of 8,264 km (3,191 sq mi), it is the largest lake in Central America, the 19th largest lake in the world (by area) and the 9th largest in the Americas. It is slightly smaller than Lake Titicaca. With an elevation of 32.7 metres (107 ft) above sea level, the lake reaches a depth of 26 metres (85 ft). It is intermittently joined by the Tipitapa River to Lake Managua. The lake drains to the Caribbean Sea via the San Juan River, historically making the lakeside city of Granada, Nicaragua, an Atlantic port although it is closer to the Pacific. The lake has a history of Caribbean pirates who assaulted nearby Granada on three occasions. Despite draining into the Caribbean Sea, the Pacific Ocean is near enough to be seen from the mountains of Ometepe (an island in the lake). Before construction of the Panama Canal, a stagecoach line owned by Cornelius Vanderbilt's Accessory Transit Company connected the lake with the Pacific across the low hills of the narrow Isthmus of
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Lake Ozette

    Lake Ozette

    • Islands: Tivoli
    Ozette Lake is the largest unaltered natural lake in Washington state at 29.5 km² (2,954 ha). The Makah name for Lake Ozette was Kahouk meaning "large lake." Eight miles long and three miles wide, Ozette Lake is contained within the northern boundary of the Olympic National Park's coastal strip. It is 29 feet (~9 m) above sea level and is drained by the Ozette River in the north end. Ozette, Washington lies at the north end of the lake. At 331 feet deep, its bottom lies more than 300 feet below sea level. There are three islands on Ozette Lake: Tivoli, Garden Island, and Baby Island. Tivoli's sandy shore is a favorite kayaking and canoeing destination for overnight tent campers willing to make the long trip down the lake. Beware of unpredictable weather conditions, as the large surface of the lake is known to fetch large waves rather quickly. Ozette Lake features several trails leading to the Pacific Coast Marine Sanctuary. Three of these trails are continuous cedar boardwalks maintained by the Olympic National Park Service. The two most traveled trails depart from the Olympic National Park information kiosks and restrooms at the north end of Ozette Lake. The northern trail, (3.2
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Lake Taupo

    Lake Taupo

    • Islands: Motutaiko Island
    Lake Taupo is a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. With a surface area of 616 square kilometres (238 sq mi), it is the largest lake by surface area in New Zealand, and the second largest freshwater lake by surface area in geopolitical Oceania after Lake Murray (Papua New Guinea). Lake Taupo has a perimeter of approximately 193 kilometres, a deepest point of 186 metres. It is drained by the Waikato River (New Zealand's longest river), while its main tributaries are the Waitahanui River, the Tongariro River, and the Tauranga Taupo River. It is a noted trout fishery with stocks of introduced brown trout and rainbow trout. Lake Taupo lies in a caldera created by a supervolcanic eruption which occurred approximately 26,500 years ago. According to geological records, the volcano has erupted 28 times in the last 27,000 years. It has ejected mostly rhyolitic lava, although Mount Tauhara formed from dacitic lava. The initial event 26,500 years ago is the largest eruption and is known as the Oruanui eruption. It ejected an estimated 1170 cubic kilometres of material and caused several hundred square kilometres of surrounding land to collapse and form the caldera. The caldera
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Lough Gowna

    Lough Gowna

    Lough Gowna (from Irish: Loch Gamhna meaning "calf lake") is a fresh water lake which is the uppermost lake on the River Erne. It is located on the border between County Longford and County Cavan, with the largest part of the lake being in County Longford. Lough Gowna is a moraine-dammed lake formed at the end of the last glaciation, and owes its complex indented shape to the underlying drumlin landscape. This results in a large number of bays and inlets on the lake, often connected by narrow channels. The river Erne enters the system in a western direction into the easternmost part of the lake (locally known as Derries Lough) and exits northward through County Cavan. However, the damming caused by the moraines that gave rise to the lake result in large bodies of water to the north-west and south-west which form the bulk of the area of the lake. A number of other small rivers also flow into the lake. The county border runs through the north-western part of the lake, and then turns eastwards, with the western and southern parts of the lake being in Longford and the north-eastern parts being in Cavan. The north-western and south-western portions of the lake are connected by a narrow
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Okanagan Lake

    Okanagan Lake

    • Bridges: William R. Bennett Bridge
    • Islands: Grant Island, Okanagan Lake
    Okanagan Lake is a large, deep lake in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia. The lake is 135 km long, between 4 and 5 km wide, and has a surface area of 351 km². The lake's maximum depth is 232 meters near Grant Island (also called "Whiskey Island" or "Seagull Island" by locals). There is one other island known as Rattlesnake Island, much farther south by Squally Point. Some areas of the lake have up to 750 meters of glacial and post-glacial sediment fill which were deposited during the Pleistocene Epoch. The lake is composed of three basins, a larger North basin, a central or mid basin, and a Southern basin. The lake is drained by the Okanagan River, which exits the lake's south end in Penticton, after flowing over a small dam. Notable features of the Okanagan Valley include terraces which were formed due to the periodic lowering of the lake's predecessor, glacial Lake Penticton. These terraces are now used extensively for agriculture such as fruit cultivation. Cities bordering the lake include Vernon in the north, Penticton in the south, Kelowna and West Kelowna in the centre, as well as the smaller municipalities of Lake Country (north of Kelowna), Peachland (south of West
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    West Hawk Lake

    West Hawk Lake

    West Hawk Lake is located in the Whiteshell Provincial Park in southeastern Manitoba, Western Canada. The central portion of the lake is formed by the West Hawk crater, caused by a meteor impact into an ancient rock bed composed of mostly granite. Granite cliffs surround parts of the lake. This area is also known as part of the Canadian Shield that was formed billions of years ago. Parts of the Whiteshell park have elaborate petroforms that were made by First Nation peoples, possibly over a thousand years ago. There are petroform shapes of turtles, snakes, humans and geometrical patterns, often found upon pink granite ridges that were shaped during the last ice age. The lake has private cottages, public beaches, campgrounds and other tourism amenities, and extensive undeveloped shoreline, and is popular for boating, sailing, Wakeboarding and scuba diving. It is just off the Trans-Canada Highway, and on the Trans Canada Trail, on the border of Manitoba and Ontario. With 115 m / 360 ft, it is the deepest lake in Manitoba.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Hreðavatn

    Hreðavatn

    Hreðavatn is a lake in the west of Iceland. It is situated near Route 1 (the Ring Road) between Borgarnes and the pass of Holtavörtuheiði. Nearby is the university faculty of Bifröst and the Grábrók craters as well as the mountain Baula. The surface of the lake is 1.14 km², it lies 56 m above sea level, its length is about 5 km and its greatest depth 20 m. It is embedded in a scenic landscape of heath and small forest plantations.
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Frøylandsvatnet

    Frøylandsvatnet

    Frøylandsvatnet is a lake located in the district of Jæren in Norway. It forms part of the division line between the municipalities of Klepp and Time. The origin of the name is from the Norse god Frey. The lake is quite shallow, with an average depth of 5.5 m. The town of Bryne, and the villages Klepp stasjon and Kvernaland are all located close to the lake. The lake is located in an area with very intensive agriculture. Early in the 1980s the lake was identified as being one of the worst cases of eutrophication in Norway. Algal bloom was a widespread problem, and there were cases reported of poisonous algea causing cattle to die from drinking the water. The release of substances containing nitrogen and phosphorus has since been reduced, but large collections of sediment in the shallow lake causes the problems to decline rather slowly.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Lac du Bourget

    Lac du Bourget

    Lac du Bourget (Lake Bourget), also locally known as Lac Gris (Grey Lake), is a lake at the southernmost end of the Jura Mountains in the department of Savoie, France. It is the largest and the deepest lake located entirely within France. The most important town on its shore is Aix-les-Bains. Chambéry, the capital of Savoie, lies about 10 km south of the lake. It is mainly fed by the river Leysse (and other small rivers), and drains towards the river Rhône through the Canal de Savières, an artificial channel. It is a Ramsar site. The extinct bezoule was found only in this lake. The lake was formed during the last period of global glaciation in the Alps (Würm glaciation) during the Pleistocene epoch. It has a surface area of 44.5 km2 (4,450 hectares). The long and narrow north-south axis of the lake extends 18 km in length, and ranges between 1.6 km and 3.5 km in width. The lake's average depth is 85 m, and its maximum depth in 145 m. The lake is bordered by the steep summits of the Mont du Chat and the Chaîne de l'Épine on the west, and Bauges Mountains on the east, which form its shores. Lac du Bourget was made famous by several romantic poems of Alphonse de Lamartine, including
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Lake Albert

    Lake Albert

    Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa's seventh-largest lake, and the world's twenty-seventh largest lake by volume. Lake Albert is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. It is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level. Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters South Sudan). At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki comes in, there are swamps. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Lake Macatawa

    Lake Macatawa

    Lake Macatawa is a lake in Ottawa County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The lake is about 6 miles (10 km) long with a maximum width of 1.2 miles (1.9 km) and a surface area of 1,700 acres (2.83 mi², 7.317 km²) The average depth of the lake is variable but generally less than 10 feet (3 m), excluding a navigation channel of fixed depth that crosses the lake to allow deep draft ships to access the dock at the City of Holland. The lake occupies portions of Park Township, Holland Township, and the City of Holland. The lake contains two bays of significant size: Big Bay, and the smaller Pine Creek Bay to the east. The lake is the drowned river mouth of the Macatawa River (formerly known as the Black River), which feeds into the lake's eastern end in the City of Holland. Other tributaries include Pine Creek, which feeds into Pine Creek Bay, and Winstrom Creek, which feeds into Big Bay. The lake discharges into Lake Michigan at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers channel near Holland State Park. The lake and its watershed encompass 114,560 acres (464 km) of Ottawa and Allegan counties. The eastern end of the lake is marked by industrial development within the City of Holland, and includes a
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Lake Vostok

    Lake Vostok

    Lake Vostok (Russian: озеро Восток, Ozero Vostok, lit. "Lake East") is the largest of Antarctica's more than 140 sub-glacial lakes. Lake Vostok is located at the southern Pole of Cold, beneath Russia's Vostok Station under the surface of the central East Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is at 3,488 metres (11,444 ft) above mean sea level. The surface of this fresh water lake is approximately 4,000 m (13,100 ft) under the surface of the ice, which places it at approximately 500 m (1,600 ft) below sea level. Measuring 250 km (160 mi) long by 50 km (30 mi) wide at its widest point, and covering an area of 15,690 km (6,060 sq mi) and an average depth of 344 m (1,129 ft). It has an estimated volume of 5,400 km (1,300 cu mi). The lake is divided into two deep basins by a ridge. The liquid water over the ridge is about 200 m (700 ft), compared to roughly 400 m (1,300 ft) deep in the northern basin and 800 m (2,600 ft) deep in the southern. The lake is named after Vostok Station, which in turn is named after the Vostok (Восток), a sloop-of-war, which mean "East" in Russian. The existence of a subglacial lake in the Vostok region was first suggested by Russian geographer Andrey Kapitsa based on
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Crawford Lake Conservation Area

    Crawford Lake Conservation Area

    Crawford Lake Conservation Area is a conservation area owned and operated by Conservation Halton near the community of Campbellville in Milton, Halton, Ontario, Canada. It is categorized as a regional environmentally sensitive area, an Ontario area of natural scientific interest, and part of the Niagara escarpment world biosphere reserve. The conservation area contains Crawford Lake, a meromictic lake, which makes the lake a prime site for archeological and geochemical studies. The site was first discovered in 1971 after a study of the sediment of Crawford Lake. Using pollen analysis, reconstruction of the history of the area over several hundred years was possible. The lake was named after the Crawford family, who originally lived on the site. Their house remained there until a group of teenagers burned it down, all that survived was the front porch that was constructed of cement. Photographs of the original house and members of the Crawford family exist. The Crawford family also owned a cedar tree farm on the opposite side of the lake. The pollen analysis revealed the agricultural history of the native Iroquois Indians and the presence of their village. The Wendat village has
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Green Lake

    Green Lake

    Green Lake is the larger of the two lakes in Green Lakes State Park, which lies about 9 miles (14 km) east of downtown Syracuse in Onondaga County, New York. Round Lake is the smaller lake located west of Green Lake. Both lakes are meromictic, which means that there is no seasonal mixing of surface and bottom waters. Meromictic lakes are fairly rare; they've been extensively studied, in part because their sediments can preserve an historical record extending back thousands of years, and because of the euxinic (anoxic, sulfidic) conditions which can form in the deep water. Green Lake reaches a maximum depth of 195 feet. Deep lakes tend to appear bluish because the wavelengths of light that can penetrate (and be dispersed at) great depths are those closer to the blue end of the spectrum. Because of its depth and the high salinity of the basin waters, the lake is Meromictic and does not turn over and intermix waters like many other lakes in this region do. Green Lake's cold and dense bottom waters tend to stay separate from the shallower, warmer waters. Because of this, sediment sinks and collects in the bottom and virtually doesn't decay. Since the sediment is not kicked up by
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Lake Travis

    Lake Travis

    Lake Travis is a reservoir on the Colorado River in central Texas in the United States. The reservoir was formed in 1942 by the construction of Mansfield Dam on the western edge of Austin, Texas by the Lower Colorado River Authority. Lake Travis has the largest storage capacity of the seven reservoirs known as the Highland Lakes, and stretches 65 miles (105 km) upriver from western Travis County in a highly serpentine course into southern Burnet County to Max Starcke Dam, southwest of the town of Marble Falls. The Pedernales River, a major tributary of the Colorado River, flows into the lake from the southwest in western Travis County. The lake is used for flood control, water supply, electrical power generation and recreation. The other reservoirs on the Colorado River are Lake Buchanan, Inks Lake, Lake LBJ, Lake Marble Falls, Lake Austin, and Lady Bird Lake. Because of its volume, the lake serves as the primary flood control reservoir of the Highland Lake chain. The level of the lake can therefore vary dramatically, depending on the amount of rainfall in the Colorado River basin upstream. Despite this, the lake furnishes one of the most desired locations in the region for outdoor
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Wachusett Reservoir

    Wachusett Reservoir

    The Wachusett Reservoir is the second largest body of water in the state of Massachusetts. It is located in central Massachusetts, northeast of Worcester. It is part of the water supply system for metropolitan Boston maintained by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA). It has an aggregate capacity of 65 billion US gallons (250,000,000 m) and an area of almost 7 square miles (18.2 km²). Water from the Wachusett flows to the covered Norumbega Storage Facility via the Cosgrove Tunnel and the MetroWest Water Supply Tunnel. The reservoir has a maximum depth of 120 feet (36.5 m) and a mean depth of 48 feet (14.6 m). The reservoir is fed by the Nashua, Quinapoxet, and Stillwater rivers, along with the Quabbin Aqueduct, which carries water from the Quabbin Reservoir. It is part of the Nashua River Watershed. In 1897, the Nashua River above the town of Clinton was impounded by the Wachusett Dam. 4,380 acres (17.5 km²) were flooded in the towns of Boylston, West Boylston, Clinton, and Sterling. Work was completed in 1905 and the reservoir first filled in May 1908. Its water was originally delivered to the Sudbury Reservoir via the Wachusett Aqueduct, with the Cosgrove Tunnel
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Blue Lake

    Blue Lake

    The Blue Lake in Mount Gambier, South Australia is a large monomictic lake located in an extinct volcanic maar associated with the Mount Gambier maar complex. It is one of four crater lakes on Mount Gambier. Of the four lakes, only two remain, as the other two (Leg of Mutton and Brown) have dried up over the past 30 to 40 years as the water table has dropped. Conflicting dates have been estimated for its last eruption, of 28,000 years ago, 4300 years ago., and, most recently, a little before 6000 years ago. If the youngest date is correct, this could be the most recent volcanic eruption on the Australian mainland. Blue Lake is thought to be of an average depth of 72 metres, but in places reaches 75 metres deep (250 feet). The crater rim measures 1,200 metres (3,937 feet) by 824 metres (2,703 feet), however, the lake itself measures 1,087 metres (3,566 feet) by 657 metres (2,155 feet). The bottom of the lake is 30 metres (100 feet) below the level of the main street of the nearby town. The Blue Lake supplies the town with drinking water, providing approximately 3,500 megalitres (2,800 acre·ft) per year from its 36,000 ML (29,000 acre·ft) store. Bathymetric surveys located the
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Øyeren

    Øyeren

    Øyeren is a lake in the Glomma river watershed, southeast of Lillestrøm. It is located within the municipalities of Enebakk, Skedsmo, Fet and Rælingen in Akershus county and Spydeberg and Trøgstad municipalities in Østfold county. Øyeren lake is the ninth largest lake by area in Norway with a surface area of 84.7 km². It is 101 meters above sea level and 71 meters deep. The name of the lake (Norse Øyir) is derived from øy f 'island; flat and fertil land along a waterside'. An area which includes parts of the northern ("nordre") end of the lake is an established nature preserve, listed as a Ramsar site.
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Balmorhea Lake

    Balmorhea Lake

    Balmorhea Lake is a reservoir on Sandia Creek 2 miles (3 km) southeast of downtown Balmorhea, Texas. Water from Toyah Creek, fed by the nearby San Solomon Springs, is also fed into the reservoir, as is excess water in the Phantom Lake Canal. The reservoir was built in 1917 by the construction of a dam by the Reeves County Water Improvement District. The reservoir provides water for irrigation, and is a popular recreational spot for locals. Balmorhea Lake is also known as Lower Parks Reservoir. Balmorhea Lake has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Balmorhea Lake include sunfish, crappie, catfish, and largemouth bass. Balmorhea Lake is used for swimming and fishing.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Kakhovka Reservoir

    Kakhovka Reservoir

    The Kakhovka Reservoir (Ukrainian: Каховське водосховище, Kakhovs’ke vodoskhovyshche) is a water reservoir located on the Dnieper River. It covers a total surface area of 2,155 square kilometres in the territories of the Kherson, Zaporizhia, and the Dnipropetrovsk Oblasts of Ukraine. The reservoir was created in 1956 when the Kakhovka Hydroelectric Power Plant was built. The reservoir is 240 km long, up to 23 km wide, and has an average depth of 8.4 meters (with depth varying from 3 to 26 m). The total water volume is 18.2 km³. It is mainly used to supply hydroelectric stations, the Krasnoznamianka Irrigation System and the Kakhivka Irrigation System, industrial plants, freshwater-fish farms, the North Crimean Canal and the Dnieper–Kryvyi Rih Canal. With its creation, it has created a deep-water route, allowing deep-sea ships to sail up the Dnieper. The lands of the former Zaporizhian Host now lay under the Kakhovka Reservoir.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Lake Mapourika

    Lake Mapourika

    Lake Mapourika is located on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. It lies north of Franz Josef Glacier, and drains into the Okarito Lagoon. It is the largest of the West Coast lakes, a glacier formation from the last ice age. Since the water from glacial melts no longer drains into the lake, it is filled with fresh rain water which runs though the surrounding forest floor, collecting tannins, giving it its dark colour. As the winds of the region sweep high above the mountains of the Southern Alps, the water is left unruffled and quite reflective of the forest on the lake fringes.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Lake Maurepas

    Lake Maurepas

    Lake Maurepas is located in southeastern Louisiana approximately halfway between New Orleans and Baton Rouge directly west of Lake Pontchartrain. Lake Maurepas was named for Jean-Frédéric Phélypeaux, comte de Maurepas, an eighteenth-century French statesman, chief adviser to King Louis XVI. Lake Maurepas is a round-shaped, shallow, brackish tidal estuarine system. It is approximately 240 km. in area and has a mean depth of about 3.0 meters. The lake receives freshwater input through four river systems: Blind River, Amite River, Tickfaw River, and the Natalbany River. The average freshwater input to Lake Maurepas from these rivers and other minor terrestrial sources is
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Lake Superior

    Lake Superior

    • Islands: Slate Islands
    Lake Superior (French: Lac Supérieur) is the largest of the five traditionally demarcated Great Lakes of North America. It is bounded to the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of Minnesota, and to the south by the U.S. states of Wisconsin and Michigan. It is generally considered the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area. It is the world's third-largest freshwater lake by volume. The Ojibwe call the lake Gichigami, meaning "big water." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote the name as "Gitche Gumee" in The Song of Hiawatha, as did Gordon Lightfoot in his song, "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald". The first French explorers approaching the great inland sea by way of the Ottawa River and Lake Huron during the 17th century referred to their discovery as le lac superieur. Properly translated, the expression means "Upper Lake," that is, the lake above Lake Huron. The lake was also called Lac Tracy by 17th century Jesuit missionaries. The English, upon taking control of the region from the French in the 1760s, following the French and Indian War, anglicized the lake's name to Superior, "on account of its being superior in magnitude to any of the lakes
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Rybinsk Reservoir

    Rybinsk Reservoir

    Rybinsk Reservoir (Russian: Ры́бинское водохрани́лище, tr. Rybinskoye vodokhranilishche; IPA: [ˈrɨbʲɪnskəjə vədəxrɐˈnʲilʲɪɕːə]), informally called the Rybinsk Sea, is a water reservoir on the Volga River and its tributaries Sheksna and Mologa, formed by Rybinsk Hydroelectric Station dam, located on the territories of Tver, Vologda, and Yaroslavl Oblasts. At the time of its construction, it was the largest man-made body of water on Earth. It is the northernmost point of the Volga. The Volga-Baltic Waterway starts from there. The principal ports are Cherepovets in Vologda Oblast and Vesyegonsk in Tver Oblast. The construction of the dam in Rybinsk started in 1935. The filling of the reservoir started on April 14, 1941, and continued until 1947. Some 150,000 people had to be resettled elsewhere, and the historic town of Mologa in Yaroslavl Oblast along with 663 villages have completely disappeared under water. As the time goes by, however, it has been increasingly viewed as a typical sample of Stalinist voluntarism. Today the dam is less important for electric power supply (output is 346 MW) than it used to be, and the ecological damage caused by the reservoir is being reassessed.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Waterton Lake

    Waterton Lake

    Waterton Lake is a mountain lake in southern Alberta, Canada and northern Montana, USA. The lake is composed of two bodies of water, connected by a shallow channel known locally as the Bosphorus. The two parts are referred to as Lower Wateron Lake, and Upper Waterton Lake, the latter of which is crossed at the tip by the Canada-United States border. The United States Geological Survey gives the geocoordinates of 49°03′00″N 113°54′03″W / 49.05°N 113.90083°W / 49.05; -113.90083 for Upper Waterton Lake. The northern, lower end of the main lake lies in Waterton Lakes National Park while the upper, southern part of the lake is located in Glacier National Park. In 1979, UNESCO established the Waterton Biosphere Reserve to protect the diverse habitats including prairie grasslands, aspen parkland, subalpine forests, alpine tundra and freshwater fens that surround the lake. Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park was created by the US and Canada in 1932, and in 1976 it was designated an International Biosphere Reserve. Later, in 1995, it was inscribed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The upper and middle Waterton Lake system has a surface of 10.1 km (3.9 sq mi), while the lower
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Lake Athabasca

    Lake Athabasca

    Lake Athabasca ( /ˌæθəˈbæskə/; French: lac Athabasca; from Woods Cree: aðapaskāw, "[where] there are plants one after another") is located in the northwest corner of Saskatchewan and the northeast corner of Alberta between 58° and 60° N. The name in the Dene language originally referred only to the large delta formed by the confluence the Athabasca River at the southwest corner of the lake. In 1791, Philip Turnor, cartographer for the Hudson’s Bay Company, wrote in his journal, "low swampy ground on the South side with a few willows growing upon it, from which the Lake in general takes its name Athapison in the Southern Cree tongue which signifies open country such as lakes with willows and grass growing about them". Peter Fidler originally recorded the name for the river in 1790 as the Great Arabuska. By 1801, the name had gained a closer spelling to the current name—Athapaskow Lake. By 1820, George Simpson referred to both the lake and the river as "Athabasca". The lake covers 7,850 km (3,030 sq mi), is 283 km (176 mi) long, has a maximum width of 50 km (31 mi), and a maximum depth of 124 m (407 ft), and holds 204 km (49 cu mi) of water, making it the largest and deepest lake in
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Lake Chungará

    Lake Chungará

    Chungará is a lake situated in the extreme north of Chile, in the Altiplano of Arica y Parinacota Region in the Lauca National Park. It is the 29th highest lake in the world (and the 10th highest in South America). It is near the volcanos Parinacota (20,827 feet or 6,348 metres) and Pomerape (20,413 feet or 6,222 metres). It was formed 8000 years ago, when a major collapse of the edifice of Parinacota produced an avalanche of 6 km³ of debris which blocked drainage pattern, thus creating the lake.
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Lake Tanganyika

    Lake Tanganyika

    Lake Tanganyika is an African Great Lake. It is estimated to be the second largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, and the second deepest, after Lake Baikal in Siberia; it is also the world's longest freshwater lake. The lake is divided among four countries – Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanzania and Zambia, with the DRC (40%) and Tanzania (46%) possessing the majority of the lake. The water flows into the Congo River system and ultimately into the Atlantic Ocean. The lake is situated within the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the geographic feature known as the East African Rift, and is confined by the mountainous walls of the valley. It is the largest rift lake in Africa and the second largest lake by volume in the world. It is the deepest lake in Africa and holds the greatest volume of fresh water. It extends for 676 km (420 mi) in a general north-south direction and averages 50 km (31 mi) in width. The lake covers 32,900 km (12,700 sq mi), with a shoreline of 1,828 km (1,136 mi) and a mean depth of 570 m (1,870 ft) and a maximum depth of 1,470 m (4,820 ft) (in the northern basin) it holds an estimated 18,900 cubic kilometres (4,500 cu mi). It
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Morskie Oko

    Morskie Oko

    Morskie Oko (Slovak Morské oko; Hungarian Halastó literally "Marine Eye") is the largest and fourth deepest lake in the Tatra Mountains. It is located deep within the Tatra National Park, Poland, in the Rybi Potok Valley, at the base of the Mięguszowiecki Summits, in Lesser Poland Voivodeship. The peaks that surround the lake rise about 1,000 meters above its surface; one of them is Rysy (2,499 meters), the highest peak in the Polish Tatras. Beside Mięguszowiecki Summits (including Mięguszowiecki Szczyt Wielki, 2,438 meters), farther away and slightly to the left, is the distinctive, slender Mnich (“Monk,” 2,068 meters). Many Swiss Pines also grow around the lake. In the past, Morskie Oko was called "Rybie Jezioro" ("Fish Lake") due to its natural stock of fish, which are uncommon in Tatra lakes and ponds. In the clear depths of the water, one can easily notice trout - so called "famine" trout - that live in the lake. The name "Morskie Oko" translates to "Eye of the Sea"; this is derived from an old legend, according to which the lake was connected to the sea via an underground passage. The hut of the Polish Tourist Country-Lovers' Society (PTTK) stands on the moraine that closes
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Rødenessjøen

    Rødenessjøen

    Rødenessjøen is a lake in the municipalities of Aurskog-Høland in Akershus county and Marker in Østfold county, Norway.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Fagnano Lake

    Fagnano Lake

    Cami Lake (also called Fagnano Lake, Spanish: Lago Fagnano or Lago Cami) is a lake located on the main island of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, and shared by Argentina and Chile. The 645 km² lake runs east-west for about 98 kilometres, of which 72.5 km (606 km²) belong to the Argentine Tierra del Fuego Province, and only 13.5 km (39 km²) belong to the Chilean Magallanes y la Antártica Chilena Region. It has a maximum depth of 200 meters. The southern bank is steep compared to the northern, and expands in a considerably wide and flat piedmont from which both levels of the plateaus can be appreciated. From its western end, the Azopardo River drains towards the Almirantazgo Fjord. On its eastern end is the town of Tolhuin. The lake is located in a pull-apart basin developed along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault zone.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Hańcza

    Hańcza

    Hańcza is a lake in Suwałki Region, Podlaskie Voivodeship, Poland. It is 311.4 ha large, 4.5 km long and 1.2 km wide. It is the deepest lake in Poland with maximum depth of 108.5 m.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Kiev Reservoir

    Kiev Reservoir

    The Kiev Reservoir (Ukrainian: Київське водосховище, Kyyivs’ke vodoskhovyshche), locally the Kiev Sea, is a large water reservoir located on the Dnieper River in Ukraine. Named after the city of Kiev, which lies to the south, it covers a total area of 922 square kilometres within the Kiev Oblast. The reservoir was formed in 1960-1966, as a result of the Kiev Hydroelectric Power Plant dam being built at Vyshhorod. The reservoir is mainly used for hydroelectricity generation, industrial and public consumption, and irrigation. The reservoir is 110 km in length, 12 km in width, has a depth of four to eight meters, a volume of 3.7 km³, and a usable volume of 1.2 km³. The reservoir, together with the Kakhovka Reservoir, the Dnieper Reservoir, the Dniprodzerzhynsk Reservoir, the Kremenchuk Reservoir, and the Kaniv Reservoir, has created a deep-water route on the river. However, the construction has also contributed to significant environmental problems such as the diminished flow velocity which reduces water oxygenation, and has a negative result on the balance of aquatic life forms. Also, during its construction some nearby villages were flooded. One of these was Teremtsi, where the
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Lake Eğirdir

    Lake Eğirdir

    Eğirdir (Turkish: Eğirdir Gölü, formerly Eğridir) is the name of a lake and of the town situated on the shore of that lake (Eğirdir) in Turkey. The lake lies in the Turkish Lakes Region and is 186 kilometers (116 mi) north of Antalya. With an area of 482 square kilometres (186 sq mi) it is the fourth largest (second largest freshwater) lake in Turkey. The town and the lake were formerly called Eğridir, a Turkish pronunciation of the town's old Greek name Akrotiri. Unfortunately, Eğridir means "it is crooked" in Turkish. Therefore, to remove the negative connotations of the name, in the 1980s the “i” and the “r” were transposed in a new official name, thus creating Eğirdir, a name that evokes spinning and flowers, although many people in Turkey still call both the town and the lake by its former name. Lake Eğirdir has two islands, connected to the mainland by a long causeway into the town of Eğirdir:
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Lake Manitoba

    Lake Manitoba

    Lake Manitoba is Canada's thirteenth largest lake (4,624 km) and the world's 33rd largest freshwater lake. It is in central North America, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, which is named after the lake. It is located about 75 km northwest of the province's capital, Winnipeg, at 51°0′N 98°45′W / 51°N 98.75°W / 51; -98.75. The lake, its shores populated by the Assiniboine and Cree, was made known to Europeans by La Vérendrye in the mid-1730s. He and his sons travelled from Fort La Reine through this lake to explore the Saskatchewan River and its environs. Forts were established on both the Saskatchewan and Cedar Lake. It also was part of the route of the fur trade to Hudson Bay. The name derives from Cree manitou-wapow or Ojibwa manidoobaa, both meaning "straits of Manitou, the Great Spirit", a toponym referring to what are now called The Narrows in the centre of the lake. The lake was known to French explorers as Lac des Prairies. The irregularly shaped lake, about 200 km long, is the smallest of a group of three large lakes, the other two being Lake Winnipeg (the largest) and Lake Winnipegosis, which are found on the floor of the prehistoric Glacial Lake Agassiz. The lake
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Lake Vesijärvi

    Lake Vesijärvi

    Vesijärvi is a lake of 111 square kilometres (43 sq mi) near Lahti in southern Finland. It suffered severe effects of eutrophication in the 1960s and a restoration programme began in the 1970s. The Enonselkä Basin is a part of Vesijärvi. The name of the lake means The Water Lake. Media related to Vesijärvi at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Lake Victoria

    Lake Victoria

    • Islands: Ssese Islands
    Lake Victoria (Nam Lolwe in Luo) is one of the African Great Lakes. The lake was named after Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, by John Hanning Speke, the first European to discover this lake. With a surface area of 68,800 square kilometres (26,600 sq mi), Lake Victoria is Africa’s largest lake by area, and it is the largest tropical lake in the world. Lake Victoria is the world's second largest freshwater lake by surface area; only Lake Superior in North America is larger. In terms of its volume, Lake Victoria is the world's ninth largest continental lake, and it contains about 2,750 cubic kilometers (2.2 billion acre-feet) of water. Lake Victoria receives most of its water from direct precipitation or from thousands of small streams. The largest stream flowing into this lake is the Kagera River, the mouth of which lies on the lake's western shore. Two rivers leave the lake, the White Nile (known as the "Victoria Nile" as it leaves the lake), flows out at Jinja, Uganda on the lake's north shore, and the Katonga River flows out at Lukaya on the western shore connecting the lake to Lake George. Lake Victoria occupies a shallow depression in Africa and has a maximum depth of 84 m
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Lake Waitaki

    Lake Waitaki

    Lake Waitaki is the smallest, oldest and farthest downstream of the three man-made lakes of the Waitaki hydroelectric project in New Zealand's South Island. It lies below lakes Aviemore and Benmore on the Waitaki River, close to the town of Kurow. It is part of the traditional boundary of the Canterbury and Otago regions (although the official border has been moved southward to include the entire lake, as well as the entire northwest portion of Waitaki District within the Canterbury Region. The lake is created by Waitaki Dam, a 36m high spill weir dam built between 1928 and 1934. The Waitaki power station has an installed capacity of 105MW. Waitaki was the last dam built in New Zealand with excavation done with pick and shovel, not heavy machinery. The power station is to be upgraded by Meridian Energy between 2011 and 2016 at a projected cost of $NZ 60 - 80 million.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Nakaumi

    Nakaumi

    Nakaumi (中海) is a brackish lake located between Tottori and Shimane prefectures in Japan. The lake is enclosed by the Shimane Peninsula to the north and Yumigahama Peninsula to the east. It is the fifth largest lake in surface area in Japan. Nakaumi connects Lake Shinji (宍道湖 Shinji-ko) and the Sea of Japan, and is surrounded by the municipalities Matsue, Yasugi, Yonago and Sakaiminato. There are two large islands in the lake, Daikon Island (大根島 Daikonjima, lit. "radish island") and Eshima Island (江島 Eshima, "river island"). There are bridges and roads that connect the east and west shores of the lake through the two islands. Nakaumi is a brackish lake because it is connected to the Sea of Japan by a short channel, the Sakai Channel, and lies so low that the tides reverse the flow of the rivers all the way into Lake Shinji. Nakaumi (中海) literally means "middle sea". Even though Nakaumi is a lake, it was likely named a sea because of its saline water and proximity to the actual sea. In Japanese, the lake is usually referred to simply as Nakaumi, not as Nakaumi-ko (Lake Nakaumi).
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Pinehurst Lake

    Pinehurst Lake

    Pinehurst Lake is a lake in Northeastern Alberta. Located 245 kilometres (152 mi) northeast of Edmonton, in the Lakeland Provincial Recreation Area just east of the Lakeland Provincial Park, it is a popular destination for anglers and hunters alike. Pinehurst Lake has a water surface of 40.7 km (15.7 sq mi), and drains by Punk Creek into the Sand River, a tributary in the Beaver River basin. The lake has a catchment area of 285 km (110 sq mi).
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Ponto Lake

    Ponto Lake

    Ponto Lake is a 347-acre (1.4 km²) lake located 2 miles (3.2 km) north and 8 miles (13 km) east of Backus, Minnesota. A public access is located on the southeast shore just north of State Highway 84. The Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources (MNDNR) has classified Minnesota's lakes into 43 different classes based on physical, chemical and other characteristics. Ponto Lake is in Lake Class 23; lakes in this class generally have hard water, are very deep and clear, and have a low amount of lake area less than 15 feet deep. This lake is managed primarily for walleye and northern pike and secondarily for bluegill, black crappie, largemouth bass, and yellow perch. Ponto Lake has an abundant population of naturally reproducing walleye. The average length of these walleye was 17 inches (43 cm), and the largest sampled was 27 inches (69 cm). Northern pike were also abundant, averaged about 18 inches (46 cm) long, and had a maximum length of 37 inches (94 cm). Ponto Lake has a good population of largemouth bass, and fish up to 16 inches (41 cm) were sampled. Bluegill, black crappie and yellow perch are available for anglers, however numbers sampled in the 2002 assessment were low.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Tisleifjorden

    Tisleifjorden

    Tisleifjorden is a lake which lies in Nord-Aurdal municipality in Oppland county, Norway as well as Gol and Hemsedal municipalities in Buskerud county. Tisleifjorden is regulated for hydroelectric power; the height can vary up to 11 meters. It is 13.54 km² in area and 32.53 km around. It has an elevation of 819 m above sea level.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Breimsvatn

    Breimsvatn

    Breimsvatn (or Breimsvatnet) is a lake in the municipalities of Gloppen and Jølster in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. At 22.52 square kilometres (8.70 sq mi), it is the largest lake in Gloppen (followed by the lake Emhjellevatnet). The highway E39 runs along the north end of the lake, connecting the two nearby areas of Sandane and Byrkjelo. On the shores of the 17-kilometre (11 mi) long lake lie several villages including Breim and Kandal. The lake flows into the Gloppenelva river which flows into the Gloppenfjorden, an arm of the Nordfjord.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Heggmovatnet

    Heggmovatnet

    Heggmovatnet is a lake that lies in the municipality of Bodø in Nordland county, Norway. The 9.38-square-kilometre (3.62 sq mi) lake is located about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) northeast of the village of Løding. The lake is regulated and it is the main water source for the town of Bodø. The water flows out of the lake into the river Heggmoelva, which then flows into the lake Vatnvatnet.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Lake of Zug

    Lake of Zug

    Lake Zug (German: Zugersee) is a lake in Central Switzerland, situated between Lucerne and Zurich. The Lorze as the main feeder river empties its waters into the lake at its northern extremity, but 1 km (0.6 mi) further west issues from the lake to pursue its course towards the Reuss. Due to this poor feeding, Environmental protection is very important as the lake would suffer long term damage if polluted as the second of the rivers, Rigiaa, feeds only a marginal amount into the lake at its southern end. The lake is mostly within the borders of the Canton of Zug, with about 10 square kilometres (3.9 sq mi) at its southern end in the canton Schwyz, while the Canton of Lucerne claims about 2 km (0.77 sq mi) to the north of Immensee. Toward the south-west extremity of the lake the Rigi descends rather steeply to the water's edge, while part of its east shore forms a narrow level band at the foot of the 1,583 m (5,194 ft) Rossberg, and the Zugerberg. At its northern end, the shores are nearly level, while on the west shore the wooded promontory of Buonas (with its castles, old and new) projects picturesquely into the waters. The principal place on the lake is the town of Zug. Three
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Lake Toba

    Lake Toba

    • Islands: Samosir
    Lake Toba (Indonesian: Danau Toba) is a lake and supervolcano. The lake is 100 kilometres long and 30 kilometres wide, and 505 metres (1,666 ft) at its deepest point. Located in the middle of the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra with a surface elevation of about 900 metres (2,953 ft), the lake stretches from 2°53′N 98°31′E / 2.88°N 98.52°E / 2.88; 98.52 to 2°21′N 99°06′E / 2.35°N 99.1°E / 2.35; 99.1. It is the largest lake in Indonesia and the largest volcanic lake in the world. Lake Toba is the site of a supervolcanic eruption that occurred an estimated 69,000 to 77,000 years ago, a massive, climate-changing event. It is estimated to have been a VEI 8 eruption. It is the largest known explosive eruption anywhere on Earth in the last 25 million years. According to the Toba catastrophe theory, it had global consequences, killing most humans then alive and creating a population bottleneck in Central Eastern Africa and India that affected the genetic inheritance of all humans today. However, this hypothesis is not widely accepted due to lack of evidence for any other animal decline or extinction, even in environmentally sensitive species. However, it has been
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Storsjön

    Storsjön

    Storsjön (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈstuːʂœn], lit. "The Great Lake") is the fifth largest lake in Sweden, with an area of 464 km² and a greatest depth of 74 m. It is located in the province of Jämtland in modern Jämtland County. From Storsjön runs the river Indalsälven and the lake contains the major island Frösön. The city of Östersund is located on the east shore of the lake, opposite Frösön. Storsjön is said to be the home of the sea creature Storsjöodjuret, not unlike Nessie, and every now and then there are new reports of people having spotted it. Descriptions of the creature have varied over the years. Some have described it as being serpentine in appearance, with multiple humps, a feline or canine-like head and grayish skin. Others have claimed that the creature is short in stature and morbidly obese, with a roundish skull. The ferry company Vägverket Färjerederiet (run by the Swedish Road Authority) provides two ferry lines crossing the lake, one from Norderön to Håkansta and one from Isön to Norderön. They are replaced by ice roads during the winter, usually January-April .
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Adams Lake

    Adams Lake

    Adams Lake is a large, deep, coldwater lake. The southern end of the lake is approximately 30 km (19 mi) north of the town of Chase in the Shuswap Country region of British Columbia, Canada. The lake's upper reaches lie in the northern Monashee Mountains, while its lower end penetrates the Shuswap Highland. The lake is 63 km (39 mi) long and between 1.6 km and 3.2 km (1 to 2 miles) wide. The surface elevation is 404 meters (1,326 feet) above sea level. The lake is very deep; it is the second deepest lake in British Columbia next to Quesnel Lake with a maximum depth of 500 meters (1500 feet). Water flows into the lake though many tributaries (most notably the Upper Adams River, Momich River, and Bush Creek). The water drains from the lake into the Lower Adams River which is home to a very large and famous sockeye salmon run which attracts many visitors to the region each year. From there the water flows into Shuswap Lake, and down the Thompson River. Though a few villages exist along Adams Lake, the vast majority of the lake is undeveloped. The lack of development is partially due to the nature of the shoreline, which is mostly sheer rock faces or steep, stony beaches. Few
    5.75
    4 votes
    126
    Buckingham Lake

    Buckingham Lake

    Buckingham Lake, commonly referred to as Buckingham Pond or Rafts Pond, is a body of water located in a residential area of Albany, New York. It has a surface area of 5 acres (20,000 m) and a mean depth of three feet. The lake is adjacent to Buckingham Lake Park, a small recreation area with picnic tables and playground equipment. Three fountains help aerate water during the warmer months, while ice-skating often takes place on the lake's frozen surface during the winter. Wildlife at the lake includes ducks, Canada geese and Red-winged Blackbirds. The lake is surrounded by a gravel path that is a few feet wide. Streets that border the lake include Berkshire Boulevard, Euclid Avenue, Lenox Avenue, and Colonial Avenue.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Grinnell Lake

    Grinnell Lake

    Grinnell Lake is located in Glacier National Park, in the U. S. state of Montana. Named after George Bird Grinnell, the lake has an opaque turquoise appearance from the rock flour (silt) which is transported to the lake from Grinnell Glacier. Grinnell Lake is accessible via the Grinnell Glacier Trail and is 3.2 miles (5.1 km) from the Many Glacier Hotel. List of lakes in Glacier County, Montana
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Lake Austin

    Lake Austin

    • Bridges: Pennybacker Bridge
    Lake Austin is a reservoir on the Colorado River in Austin, Texas in the United States. The reservoir was formed in 1939 by the construction of Tom Miller Dam by the Lower Colorado River Authority. Lake Austin is one of the seven Highland Lakes created by the Lower Colorado River Authority, and is used for flood control, electrical power generation, and recreation. Loop 360 spans the lake at the Pennybacker Bridge. The other reservoirs on the Colorado River are Lake Buchanan, Inks Lake, Lake LBJ, Lake Marble Falls, Lake Travis, and Lady Bird Lake. Lake Austin is a popular fishing and boating destination. The lake is considered to have an excellent stock of large-mouth bass, however, the lake is considered best utilized for pleasure boating during the day. Lake Austin has been stocked with several species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Lake Austin include largemouth bass, catfish, and sunfish. Lake Austin is one of the Texas Highland Lakes infested with hydrilla, a non-native aquatic plant species. The Lower Colorado River Authority has intentionally lowered the water levels in the lake in the months of January and
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Lake Kariba

    Lake Kariba

    • Islands: Maaze Island
    Lake Kariba is the world's largest artificial lake and reservoir by volume. It lies 1300 kilometers upstream from the Indian Ocean, along the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. Lake Kariba was filled between 1958 and 1963 following the completion of the Kariba Dam at its northeastern end, flooding the Kariba Gorge on the Zambezi River. The Zimbabwean town of Kariba was built for construction workers on the lake's dam, while some other settlements such as Mlibizi in Zimbabwe and Siavonga and Sinazongwe in Zambia have grown up to house people displaced by the rising waters. Lake Kariba is over 220 kilometers (140 mi) long and up to 40 kilometers (20 mi) in width. It covers an area of 5,580 square kilometers (2,150 sq mi) and its storage capacity is an immense 185 cubic kilometers (44.4 cu mi). The mean depth of the lake is 29 meters (95 ft); the maximum depth is 97 meters (320 ft). It is the world's largest human-made reservoir, four times as large as the Three Gorges Dam. The enormous mass of water (approximately 180,000,000,000,000 kilograms, or 180 petagrams [200 billion tons]) is believed to have caused induced seismicity in the seismically active region, including over 20
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Lake Sumner

    Lake Sumner

    Lake Sumner, known as Hokakura in Māori, is a lake situated 100 km northwest of Christchurch in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. The lake is located in the Lake Sumner Forest Park; the Hurunui River and several other lakes (Loch Katrine, Lake Sheppard, Lake Taylor and Lake Mason) also lie within the park. The Lake Sumner region is a popular area for hunting, tramping, trout fishing, whitewater kayaking, and mountainbiking. Several Department of Conservation tramping huts in the region make it a common destination for overnight trips; however, the area's comparatively remote location and difficult vehicle access mean it is seldom crowded.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Osensjø

    Osensjø

    Osensjø (also Osensjøen or Ossjøen) is a lake in the municipalities of Åmot and Trysil in Hedmark County, Norway. The lake has its outlet through Søre Osa to the Rena river and then to the Glomma.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Owasco Lake

    Owasco Lake

    Owasco Lake /oʊˈwɑːskoʊ/ is the sixth largest and third easternmost of the Finger Lakes of New York in the United States of America (USA). The name Owasco can be roughly translated from a Mohawk and Iroquois term meaning "crossing". The lake is eleven miles (17 km) long and the city of Auburn is located at the northern end and takes its drinking water from the lake. The lake lies entirely within the boundaries of Cayuga County. Its width ranges from one half mile at its southern end to one mile (1.6 km) near the northern tip. Owasco Lake's deepest point is 177 feet (54 m), has a volume of 212 billion US gallons (800,000,000 m), and has a watershed of 208 square miles (540 km). Owasco's surface is roughly 712 feet (217 m) above sea level, controlled by a dam on the lake's outlet, located in the city of Auburn. Located at the south end of the lake is the hamlet of Cascade, which consists of a community of cottages, South Shore Marina, and a restaurant, Cascade Grill. Owasco Lake is an excellent recreation spot. Because it is smaller and shallower than many other Finger Lakes, its waters warm up much more quickly, so swimming, skiing, and boating are popular. At the lake's northern
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Proctor Lake

    Proctor Lake

    Proctor Lake is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir along the Leon River located in Comanche County in the U.S. state of Texas. Around 3 miles (5 km) west of Proctor, Texas, USA. Proctor Lake Dam and the reservoir are managed by the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The reservoir was officially impounded in 1963, and serves to provide flood control and drinking water for the communities downstream. Proctor Lake is a popular recreational destination. Proctor Lake is also known as Proctor Reservoir. Proctor Lake has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Proctor Lake include largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, catfish, and white crappie. In addition to maintaining the dam that creates the reservoir, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers maintains recreational facilities at the lake, including Copperas Creek Park, Sowell Creek Park, Promontory Park, and High Point Park. Camping, boating, and fishing are very popular.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Tyrifjorden

    Tyrifjorden

    • Islands: Utøya
    Tyrifjorden (Lake Tyri) is Norway's fifth largest lake with an area of 137 km. It has a volume of 13 km, is 295 meters deep at its deepest, and lies 63 meters above sea level. The lake's primary source is the Begna river, which discharges into Tyrifjorden at Hønefoss where the river forms the waterfall of Hønefossen. Its primary outlet is at Geithus near the lake's southwest corner, where Tyrifjorden discharges into the Drammenselva river. Tyrifjorden is located in the county of Buskerud and borders the municipalities of Hole, Lier, Modum, and Ringerike. Tyrifjorden is a landlocked fjord. It consists of a main body, Storfjorden, along with the Holsfjorden, Nordfjorden, and Steinsfjorden branches. The Old Norse form of the name was just Tyri (or Tyrvi). This uncompounded name is also the first element in the name Tyristrand. The name is derived from the word tyri meaning "old/dead pine (wood)", referring specifically to the woods of the western side of the lake. The last element -fjorden (the finite form of fjord) is a later addition. On 22 July 2011, an island in the lake, Utøya, was the site of a shooting spree during a youth camp held by the Norwegian Labour Party.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Uglich Reservoir

    Uglich Reservoir

    Uglich Reservoir or Uglichskoye Reservoir (Russian: У́гличское водохрани́лище) is an artificial lake in the upper part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam built in 1939 in the town of Uglich. It is located in Tver and Yaroslavl Oblasts in central Russia. The Uglich Reservoir has a surface area of 249 km² and a water volume of 1.2 km. Its length is 143 km, it maximum width is 5 km, and average depth is 5 m (with maximum depth equaling 23 m). The Uglich Reservoir was created for the benefit of transportation, energy, and water supply. It also performs seasonal flow regulation. The towns of Uglich, Kalyazin, and Kimry are located along the reservoir. The construction of the dam led to a 15th-century monastery in Uglich and 16th-century monastery in Kalyazin being submerged by the artificial lake. The Flooded Belfry is an example of a submerged landmark. This article includes content derived from the Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 1969–1978, which is partially in the public domain.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Øgderen

    Øgderen

    Øgderen is a lake in the municipalities of Aurskog-Høland in Akershus county and Trøgstad in Østfold county, Norway.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Malham Tarn

    Malham Tarn

    Malham Tarn is a glacial lake near the village of Malham in the Yorkshire Dales, England. It is 377 metres (1,237 ft) above sea level, making it the highest lake in England. The lake is one of only eight upland alkaline lakes in Europe. Its geology, flora and fauna have led to it being listed under a number of conservation designations. The site is currently owned by the National Trust, who lease part of the site to the Field Studies Council who offer residential and non-residential field courses there. The site was the inspiration for Charles Kingsley's 1863 novel, The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby. Malham Tarn is situated in the Yorkshire Dales, a national park in the Yorkshire Pennines. It lies approximately 25 miles (40 km) north-west of Bradford and about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) north of the nearest settlement, Malham. At 377 metres (1,237 ft) above sea level it is the highest lake in England and the highest marl lake in Great Britain. The lake is one of only eight upland alkaline lakes in Europe having a pH between 8.0 and 8.6. The catchment area of the lake is 600 hectares (6.0 km; 2.3 sq mi) and the main inflow is a stream at the lake's north-west corner. The lake
    5.50
    4 votes
    138
    Bala Lake

    Bala Lake

    Bala Lake (Welsh: Llyn Tegid) is a large lake in Gwynedd, Wales. It was the largest natural body of water in Wales prior to the level being raised by Thomas Telford to help support the flow of the Ellesmere Canal. (It still is the largest natural body of water in Wales). It is 4 miles (6.4 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, and is subject to sudden and dangerous floods. The River Dee runs through it and the waters of the lake are famously deep and clear. The town of Bala sits at its northern end and the narrow gauge Bala Lake Railway runs for several kilometres along the lake's southern shore. George Borrow wrote of the lake in Wild Wales in 1856, "The lake has certainly not its name, which signifies 'Lake of Beauty', for nothing". In English the lake is named after the nearby town of Bala, whose name means "outlet of a lake" in Welsh. An older, now unused, English name for the lake is Pemble Mere or Pimble Mere. (Many variant spellings are recorded.) Bala Lake has abundant pike, perch, brown trout, Roach, eel. It also contains the endemic gwyniad, now listed as critically endagered by the IUCN due to the introduction of the invasive and non native ruffe. It also contains the very
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Hengsteysee

    Hengsteysee

    The Hengsteysee (Lake Hengstey) is a reservoir on the Ruhr river between the cities of Hagen, Dortmund and Herdecke, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It was built in 1929 and is one of five reservoirs on the Ruhr. The reservoir is about 4.2 km (2.6 mi) long and has an average width of 296 meters (971 ft). It begins near the point where the Lenne flows into the Ruhr, and ends with the weir and hydroelectric plant of Hengsteysee. The Klusenberg, a hill that is part of the Ardey range, is located just north of the Hengsteysee. There is also a pumped-storage plant on this reservoir, named Koepchenwerk after Arthur Koepchen. Hengsteysee fulfills the following four functions:
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Lake Balaton

    Lake Balaton

    Lake Balaton, or the Balaton, is a freshwater lake in the Transdanubian region of Hungary. It is the largest lake in Central Europe, and one of its foremost tourist destinations. As Hungary is landlocked (its coastline was severed after World War I), Lake Balaton is often affectionately called the "Hungarian Sea". The Zala River provides the largest inflow of water to the lake, and the canalized Sió is the only outflow. The mountainous region of the northern shore is known both for its historic character and as a major wine region, while the flat southern shore is known for its resort towns. Balatonfüred and Hévíz developed early as resorts for the wealthy, but it was not until the late 19th century when landowners, with their vines destroyed by lice, began building summer homes to rent out to the burgeoning middle classes. In Hungarian, the lake is known simply as a Balaton, or "the Balaton". This name derives from the Slavic blato meaning 'mud' or 'swamp' (from earlier Proto-Slavic boltьno, Slovene: Blatno jezero, Slovak: Blatenské jazero). Slavic prince Pribina began to build in January 846 a large fortress as his seat of power and several churches in the region of Lake Balaton,
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Lake Lanier

    Lake Lanier

    • Bridges: Browns Bridge
    Lake Lanier (officially Lake Sidney Lanier) is a reservoir in the northern portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. It was created by the completion of Buford Dam on the Chattahoochee River in 1956, and is also fed by the waters of the Chestatee River. The lake encompasses 38,000 acres (150 km) or 59 square miles of water, and 692 miles (1,114 km) of shoreline at normal level, a "full summer pool" of 1,071 feet (326 m) above mean sea level. It was named for poet Sidney Lanier, and was built and is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It is patrolled by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR). The lake is in Hall, Forsyth, Dawson, Gwinnett, and Lumpkin counties, split about 60%, 30%, 5%, 4%, and 1% respectively, filling the valley into numerous small arms and fingers. The former thalweg of the Chestatee and the Chattahoochee south of it form the county line between Hall and a tiny corner of Gwinnett to the east, and Dawson and Forsyth to the west. One of the main purposes of the lake is flood control downstream of the lake, mainly protecting metro Atlanta. There have only been two major flooding events on the downstream section since the construction of Buford Dam.
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Lake Neuchâtel

    Lake Neuchâtel

    Lake Neuchâtel (French: Lac de Neuchâtel; German: Neuenburgersee) is a lake primarily in Romandy, Switzerland (French-speaking Switzerland). The lake lies mainly in the canton of Neuchâtel, but is also shared by the cantons of Vaud, of Fribourg, and of Bern. With a surface of 218.3 km², it is the largest lake entirely in Switzerland and the 59th largest lake in Europe. Lake Neuchâtel lies approximately at coordinates 46°54′N 6°51′E / 46.9°N 6.85°E / 46.9; 6.85. It is 38.3 km long and no more than 8.2 km wide. Its surface is 429 m above sea-level, with a maximum depth of 152 m. The total water volume is 14.0 km³ and its drainage area is approximately 2,670 km². The lake receives the Orbe River (called Thielle or Thièle from the city of Orbe onwards), the Arnon, the Areuse (which traverses the Val de Travers), Seyon (flowing through the Val de Ruz), the canal de la Sauge (which drains Lake Murten and receives the Broye River), and the Mentue (at Yvonand). The canal of Thielle (or Zihlkanal in German) drains the lake into Lake Biel-Bienne and is part of regulation system for the lakes and the rivers of the Seeland region. From Yverdon to Marin (Southwest to Northeast): From
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Mjøsa

    Mjøsa

    Mjøsa is Norway's largest lake, as well as one of the deepest lakes in Norway and in Europe as a whole, after Hornindalsvatnet. It is located in the southern part of Norway, about 100 km north of Oslo. Its main tributary is Gudbrandsdalslågen in the north; the only distributary is Vorma in the south. From its southernmost point at Minnesund in Eidsvoll to its northernmost point in Lillehammer it is 117 km long. At its widest, near Hamar, it is 15 km wide. It is 365 km² in area and its volume is estimated at 56 km³; normally its surface is 123 metres above sea level, and its greatest depth is 468 metres. Its total coastline is estimated at 273 km, of which 30% is built up. Dams built on the distribuary of Vorma in 1858, 1911, 1947, and 1965 raised the level by approximately 3.6 metres in total. In the last 200 years, 20 floods have been registered that added 7 metres to the level of Mjøsa. Several of these floods inundated the city of Hamar. The cities of Hamar, Gjøvik, and Lillehammer were founded along the shores of the lake. Before the construction of railways past the lake, it was an important transport route. Today, aside from minor leisure boating and the steamship Skibladner,
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Puula

    Puula

    Puula (or Puulavesi) is a lake in the Kymi River area in the Finnish municipalities of Hirvensalmi, Kangasniemi and Mikkeli. Puula is 94.7 metres above sea level, the area is 331 km² it is 60 m deep at its deepest point, located near Porttisalmi at Simpiänselkä, which is the biggest open area of the lake.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Holsavatnet

    Holsavatnet

    Holsavatnet is a lake which lies in the municipality of Førde in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The lake is located about 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) east of the municipal center of Førde and about 9.5 kilometres (5.9 mi) east of the village of Bruland. The highway E39 passes 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) west of the lake. The lake eventually flows into the Jølstra river.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Lake Tuakitoto

    Lake Tuakitoto

    Lake Tuakitoto is a small lake in South Otago, in the South Island of New Zealand. It is located to the northeast of Balclutha, close to the small town of Kaitangata. The smallest of South Otago's three main lakes, it is, like the others (Lake Waihola and Lake Waipori) very shallow. The lake drains into the lower reaches of the Clutha River.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Lough Neagh

    Lough Neagh

    • Islands: Coney Island Flat
    Lough Neagh, sometimes Loch Neagh, (/ˌlɒx ˈneɪ/) is a large freshwater lake in Northern Ireland. It is the biggest lake in Northern Ireland, supplying 40% of its water; the biggest on the island of Ireland, and the biggest in the British Isles. Its name comes from Irish: Loch nEathach, meaning "Lake of Eathach" (Irish: [ɫ̪ɔx ˈn̠ʲahax]). With an area of 392 square kilometres (151 sq mi), it is the largest lake on the Island of Ireland and the 15th largest freshwater lake within the European Union. and is ranked 31st in the List of largest lakes of Europe. Located twenty miles (30 km) to the west of Belfast, it is approximately twenty miles (30 km) long and nine miles (15 km) wide. It is very shallow around the margins and the average depth in the main body of the lake is about 9 m (30 ft); although at its deepest the lough is about 25 metres (80 ft) deep. Of the 4550 km² catchment area, around 9% lies in the Republic of Ireland and 91% in Northern Ireland; altogether 43% of the land area of Northern Ireland is drained into the lough, which itself flows out northwards to the sea via the River Bann. As one of its sources is the Upper Bann, the Lough can itself be considered a part of
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    American Falls

    American Falls

    The American Falls is one of three waterfalls that together are known as Niagara Falls on the Niagara River along the Canada-U.S. border. Unlike the much larger Horseshoe Falls, of which two-thirds of the falls is located in Ontario, Canada and one-third in New York State, United States, the American Falls is completely within the U.S. state of New York. The falls receive approximately 10% of the flow from Niagara River, with most of the rest going over Horseshoe Falls, from which it is separated by Goat Island. It has a straight line crest width of about 830 feet (250 m). If measured along the jagged lip of the falls, the crest is about 950 feet (290 m) long. The torrent of water passing over the crest of the falls is about 2 feet (0.61 m) deep. The height of the American Falls ranges between 70 to 110 feet (21–34 m). This measurement is taken from the top of the Falls to top of the rock pile (talus). The height of the Falls from the top of the Falls to the river is 188 feet (57 m). The falls are viewable from a steep angle on the American side, where it is possible to approach to within several meters of the edge of the falls. One can view the falls from the bank of the river, as
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Balvatnet

    Balvatnet

    Balvatnet (Lule Sami: Bállávrre) is a lake that lies in the municipality of Saltdal in Nordland county, Norway. The 41.46-square-kilometre (16.01 sq mi) lake is located on the border of Junkerdal National Park, about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) west of the border with Sweden. The lake is regulated for hydroelectric power at the Daja power station 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) to the north in Sulitjelma.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls

    The Bridal Veil Falls is the smallest of the three waterfalls that make up Niagara Falls. It is located on the U.S. side (in New York State); Luna Island separates it from the American Falls and Goat Island separates it from the Horseshoe Falls. The Bridal Veil Falls faces to the northwest and has a crest 56 feet (17 m) wide. Luna Island being very small, the Bridal Veil is similar in appearance to the American Falls, starting with a vertical fall of 78 feet (24 m), followed by the water violently descending the talus boulders to the Maid of the Mist Pool 103 feet (31 m) below. The total vertical drop is 181 feet (55 m). The crest elevation of the Falls is 508 feet (155 m). The Cave of the Winds attraction allows visitors to walk up to the base of Bridal Veil Falls. A pedestrian bridge crosses from Goat Island to Luna Island several yards (meters) upstream from the crest of the falls. The waterfall has also been known in the past as Luna Falls and Iris Falls.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Lake Kizaki

    Lake Kizaki

    Lake Kizaki (木崎湖, Kizaki-ko) is a lake, situated near Ōmachi, Nagano, Japan, and located at the foot of the northern Japanese Alps mountain range. Mesotrophic and subalpine in nature, numerous lakeside attractions surround the lake, with the locale being a popular lakeside resort. Kizaki is also one of the "Nishina Three Lakes", which include Lake Aoki and Lake Nakatsuna. Lake Kizaki has a maximum length of 2.7 km and a maximum width of 1.2 km, with the altitude of its surface reaching 764 m and its catchment area being 22 square kilometers. There are three train stations located near Kizaki Lake: Shinano-Kizaki, Inao, and Uminokuchi, all on the JR Ōito Line.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Lake Nyos

    Lake Nyos

    Lake Nyos is a crater lake in the Northwest Region of Cameroon, located about 315 km (196 mi) northwest of Yaoundé. Nyos is a deep lake high on the flank of an inactive volcano in the Oku volcanic plain along the Cameroon line of volcanic activity. A volcanic dam impounds the lake waters. A pocket of magma lies beneath the lake and leaks carbon dioxide (CO2) into the water, changing it into carbonic acid. Nyos is one of only three known exploding lakes to be saturated with carbon dioxide in this way, the others being Lake Monoun, 100 km (62 mi) away SSE, and Lake Kivu in Democratic Republic of Congo. On August 21, 1986, possibly as the result of a landslide, Lake Nyos suddenly emitted a large cloud of CO2, which suffocated 1,700 people and 3,500 livestock in nearby towns and villages. Though not completely unprecedented, it was the first known large-scale asphyxiation caused by a natural event. To prevent a recurrence, a degassing tube that siphons water from the bottom layers of water to the top allowing the carbon dioxide to leak in safe quantities was installed in 2001, though additional tubes are needed to make the lake safe. Today, the lake also poses a threat because its
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Lake of the Woods

    Lake of the Woods

    • Bridges: Sioux Narrows Bridge
    • Islands: Magnuson's Island
    Lake of the Woods (French: lac des Bois) is a lake occupying parts of the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Manitoba and the U.S. state of Minnesota. It separates a small land area of Minnesota from the rest of the United States. The Northwest Angle and the town of Angle Township can only be reached from the rest of Minnesota by crossing the lake or by traveling through Canada. The Northwest Angle is the northernmost part of the contiguous United States. Lake of the Woods is fed by the Rainy River, Shoal Lake, Kakagi Lake and other smaller rivers. The lake drains into the Winnipeg River and then into Lake Winnipeg. Ultimately, its outflow goes north through the Nelson River to Hudson Bay. Lake of the Woods is over seventy miles long and wide, and contains more than 14,552 islands and 65,000 miles (105,000 km) of shoreline. It would amount to the longest coastline of any Canadian lake, except that the lake is not entirely within Canada. Lake of the Woods is also the 6th largest freshwater lake located (at least partially) in the United States- after the five Great Lakes. The lake's islands provide nesting habitat for the piping plover and large numbers of American white pelicans.
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    2 votes
    154
    Lake Paranoá

    Lake Paranoá

    • Bridges: Juscelino Kubitschek bridge
    Paranoá Lake, or Lago do Paranoá, is an artificial lake located in Brasília, the capital of Brazil. On the east side of the city, the Paranoá River has been dammed to form this large lake, which has a circumference of 80 km (50 mi). Around its shores are embassies and consulates, sports clubs, restaurants, the northern and southern residential areas Setor Habitacional Norte and Sul, the University of Brasília, the Olympic Center, and the Palácio da Alvorada (Palace of the Dawn), the official residence of the President of the Republic.
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    2 votes
    155
    Lake Rotoehu

    Lake Rotoehu

    Lake Rotoehu is the smallest in a chain of three lakes to the northeast of Lake Rotorua in New Zealand's North Island. It is located between the city of Rotorua and town of Whakatane. The southern end of the lake occupies part of the Okataina caldera. It is fed (underground seepage) by Lake Rotoma to the east, and flows westward joining Lake Rotoiti. The lake is one of the least visited, but offers great Kayaking and fishing (rainbow trout). It has two access points, Otautu Bay and Kennedy bay and is well located centrally to many other places e.g. the ocean, mountain biking, hiking etc. It has very good wildlife and birdlife with several rarely seen birds. In particular the endagered Kokako is located close by.
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    2 votes
    156
    Lake Singkarak

    Lake Singkarak

    Lake Singkarak (Indonesian: Danau Singkarak) is a lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. It is located between the cities of Padang Panjang and Solok. It has an area of 107.8 km², being approximately 21 km long and 7 km wide. The natural outlet for excess water is the Ombilin river which flows eastward to the Strait of Malacca. A hydroelectric project however has diverted most of the lake outflow to the Anai river which flows westward into the Indian Ocean near Padang. This Singkarak power station uses this water to generate power for the West Sumatra and Riau provinces. A species of fish called ikan bilih (Mystacoleucus padangensis) is endemic to the lake, and is harvested for human consumption. A railway line, which connects Padang and Sawahlunto-Sijunjung, skirts the length of the lake on the eastern side.
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    2 votes
    157
    Pyramid Lake

    Pyramid Lake

    • Islands: Anaho Island
    Pyramid Lake is the geographic sink of the Truckee River Basin and is located 40 mi (64 km) northeast of Reno. The inflow is moderately high silt-loaded surface runoff. Pyramid Lake is fed by the Truckee River after leaving Lake Tahoe and enters the lake from its southern end. There is no outlet, with water leaving only by evaporation, or sub-surface seepage. The lake has about 10% of the area of the Great Salt Lake, but it has about 25% more volume. The salinity is approximately 1/6 that of sea water. Although clear Lake Tahoe forms the headwaters that drain to Pyramid Lake, the Truckee River delivers more turbid waters to Pyramid Lake after traversing the steep Sierra terrain and collecting moderately high silt-loaded surface runoff. A remnant of the Pleistocene Lake Lahontan (~890 feet deep), the lake area was inhabited by the 19th century Paiute, which used the Tui chub and Lahontan cutthroat trout from the lake (the former is now endangered and the latter is threatened). The lake was first mapped in 1844 by John C. Frémont, the American discoverer of the lake who also gave it its English title. In the 19th century two battles were fought near the lake, a marker was placed in
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    2 votes
    158
    Spirit Lake

    Spirit Lake

    Spirit Lake is a lake north of Mount St. Helens in Washington State. The lake was a popular tourist destination for many years until the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. With the eruption and resulting megatsunami, thousands of trees were torn from the surrounding hillside after lake water was displaced 800 feet up the hillside. Lahar and pyroclastic flow deposits from the eruption then blocked the North Fork Toutle River valley at its outlet, raising the surface elevation of the lake by over 200 ft (60 m). The newly raised lake, once it reappeared, was also 10 percent smaller and much shallower. After the eruption, Spirit Lake contained highly toxic water with volcanic gases seeping up from the lake bed. A month after the eruption, the bacteria-carrying water was devoid of oxygen. Scientists predicted that the lake would not recover quickly, but the reemergence of phytoplankton starting in 1983 began to restore oxygen levels. Amphibians such as frogs and salamanders recolonized the lake, and fish (reintroduced by fishermen) thrived. The water level of Spirit Lake is maintained at about 3,406 feet (1,038 meters) by draining water through a gravity-feed tunnel completed in 1985.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Swiftcurrent Lake

    Swiftcurrent Lake

    Swiftcurrent Lake is located in the Many Glacier region of Glacier National Park, in the U. S. state of Montana. The Many Glacier Hotel, the largest hotel in the park, is along the east shore of the lake. Many hiking trails originate from the area and scenic tour boats provide access to the lake for visitors. Swiftcurrent Lake lies at 4,878 feet (1,487 m) above sea level. Nearby lakes include the much larger Lake Sherburne to the east and Lake Josephine to the immediate southwest. The mountains immediately west of the lake rise 3,000 feet (910 m) above the lake. The fast disappearing Grinnell Glacier is one of several glaciers and snowfields that provide water for the streams that replenish the lake. Mount Gould, Grinnell Point and Mount Wilbur are the largest mountains immediately west of the lake. List of lakes in Glacier County, Montana
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    2 votes
    160
    Wigry Lake

    Wigry Lake

    Wigry is a lake located in north-eastern part of Poland, in Podlaskie Voivodeship. Wigry lake is situated in the forests of the Augustów Wilderness – trees grow on about 80% of its shoreline. There are 19 smaller and bigger islands on the lake, in its waters thrive as many as 26 species of fish including pike, trout and bass. The lake and its adjacent area belong to the Wigry National Park which means there are several regulations which ought to be respected by tourists. Wigry is also regarded as the so-called “zone of silence”. Tents and bonfires are allowed only in designated areas. The lake is revered by canoeing and yachting aficionados. Wigry, as well as the Czarna Hańcza River, are part of a famous canoe trail of John Paul II. Wigry is also the name of a Polish youth bicycle popular in the 1970s and the 1980s, as well as the name of a Polish 3rd Division soccer team – Wigry Suwałki.
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    2 votes
    161
    Yellowstone Lake

    Yellowstone Lake

    Yellowstone Lake is the largest body of water in Yellowstone National Park, The lake is 7,732 feet (2,376 m) above sea level and covers 136 square miles (350 km) with 110 miles (177 km) of shoreline. While the average depth of the lake is 139 feet (42 m) its deepest spot is at least 390 feet (118 m). Yellowstone Lake is the largest freshwater lake above 7,000 feet (2,133 m) in North America. In winter, ice nearly 3 feet (1 m) thick covers much of the lake, except where shallow water covers hot springs. The lake freezes over by early December and can remain frozen until late May or early June. The forest and valleys surrounding Yellowstone Lake had been populated with Native Americans since pre-historic times. The first human of European descent to see the lake was trapper John Colter in the early 19th century. During the fur trading era of 1820 - 1840, the lake was probably visited by many trapping parties moving through the park region. In trapper Osborne Russell's diary he describes a visit to the lake in 1836: Interesting Description of What Is Known as Yellowstone National Park: 16th [August] -Mr. Bridger came up with the remainder of the party. 18th-The whole camp moved down
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    2 votes
    162
    Nedre Fiplingvatnet

    Nedre Fiplingvatnet

    Nedre Fiplingvatnet (Southern Sami: Fijhpelogkoe) is a lake that lies in the municipality of Grane in Nordland county, Norway. The 10.5-square-kilometre (4.1 sq mi) lake lies just west of Børgefjell National Park. The village of Leiren is located about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) north of the lake.
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    3 votes
    163
    Skaneateles Lake

    Skaneateles Lake

    Skaneateles Lake (/ˌskæniˈætləs/ or local /ˌskɪniˈætləs/) is one of the Finger Lakes in central New York in the United States. The name Skaneateles means long lake in one of the local Iroquoian languages. The lake is sometimes referred to as "The Roof Garden of the Lakes" because its altitude (863.27 ft/263.12 m) is higher than the other Finger Lakes. It is 16 mi (26 km) long (17 mi/27 km long including the bogs at the south end of the lake) and on average 0.75 mi (1.21 km) wide, with a surface area of 13.6 sq mi (35 km), and a maximum depth of 315 ft (96 m). The cleanest of the Finger Lakes, its water is so pure that the city of Syracuse and other municipalities use it unfiltered. The City of Syracuse spends about 2.3 million dollars a year to protect lake quality, sixteen people inspecting (usually twice a year) each of the 2600 properties in the watershed, which is relatively small, compared to other Finger Lakes. William Henry Seward called it "The most beautiful body of water in the world." The shores of Skaneateles Lake are in three counties: Onondaga, Cayuga, and Cortland. The village of Skaneateles (population about 2500) is at the northern end of the lake. Summer cottages
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    3 votes
    164
    Storsjø, Nord-Odal

    Storsjø, Nord-Odal

    Storsjø (or Storsjøen) is a lake in the municipalities of Sør-Odal and Nord-Odal in Hedmark county, Norway. The lake is a popular tourist destination for German tourists who camp.
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    3 votes
    165
    Vänern

    Vänern

    Vänern (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈvɛːnəɳ]) is the largest lake in Sweden, the largest lake in the European Union and the third-largest lake in Europe after Ladoga and Onega in Russia. It is located in the provinces of Västergötland, Dalsland, and Värmland in the southwest of the country. Geologically, the lake was formed after the last ice age about 10,000 years ago; when the ice melted, the entire width of Sweden was covered in water, creating a strait between Kattegat and the Gulf of Bothnia. Due to the ensuing isostatic rebound, lakes such as Vänern and Vättern became pursed off. As a result, there are still species remaining from the ice age not normally encountered in fresh water lakes, such as the amphipod Monoporeia affinis. A Viking ship was found on the lake's bottom on May 6, 2009. A story told by the thirteenth-century Icelandic mythographer Snorri Sturluson in his Prose Edda about the origin of Lake Mälaren was probably originally about Lake Vänern: the Swedish king Gylfi promised a woman, Gefjun, as much land as four oxen could plough in a day and a night, but she used oxen from the land of the giants, and moreover uprooted the land and dragged it into the sea, where it
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Võrtsjärv

    Võrtsjärv

    Lake Võrtsjärv (German: Wirzsee) is a lake in southern Estonia with an area of 270 km² (104 mi²). It is the second largest lake of Estonia. The shallow lake is 33.7 m (111 ft) above sea level. The river Emajõgi flows from Lake Võrtsjärv to Lake Peipus.
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    3 votes
    167
    Maligne Lake

    Maligne Lake

    • Islands: Spirit Island
    Maligne Lake is a lake in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. It is famed for the colour of its water, the surrounding peaks, the three glaciers visible from the lake and Spirit Island, one of the most photographed locations in the world. The lake is located 44 km (27 mi) south of Jasper town, and is accessible by motor vehicle, including shuttle buses from Jasper. Boat tours run to Spirit Island in the spring to autumn season. The 44 km Skyline Trail, Jasper's most popular, highest and above treeline, multi-day hike, begins at Maligne Lake and finishes near the town of Jasper. Other popular day hikes include the Opal Hills and Bald Hills loops. Winter activities include cross-country skiing. Maligne Lake is approximately 22.5 km (14.0 mi) long and is 97 m (318 ft) at its deepest point, in the south end of the lake. It averages 35 m (115 ft) in depth. It sits at approximately 1,670 m (5,480 ft) asl. Easily visible from the Maligne Lake Day Lodge are Leah and Samson Peaks and Mount Paul to the east, and Mounts Charlton, Unwin, Mary Vaux and Llysfran Peak to the south and west. The Charlton, Unwin and Maligne glaciers are visible from the lake, which boasts a self sustaining
    5.00
    4 votes
    168
    Lake Bicaz

    Lake Bicaz

    The Lake Izvorul Muntelui, also known as Lake Bicaz, is the largest artificial lake on the interior waters of Romania; it was created after the completion of a dam built on the Bistriţa River. The dam is located a few kilometers north of the town of Bicaz. The dam was built between 1950 and 1960 and is used to generate hydroelectricity at the Bicaz-Stejaru hydro-plant. It has a height of 127 meters, a length of 435 meters, and a maximum width of 119 meters. The lake has a length of 40 kilometers, an area of 33 km² and a maximum volume of 1,250 million m³. The lake is a popular tourist destination in the region, especially in summertime, when visitors can take the ferryboat from the Bicaz port for a short trip on the lake, enjoying the magnificent view of Mount Ceahlău on the west shore. In the 1960s and 1970s there was regular ferry service between the Bicaz port and the villages on the lake shore. At Potoci, a few kilometers north of the town of Bicaz, there is a biological research facility, equipped with a small submersible used for underwater explorations. The facility was visited by the marine biologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1984.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Lake Erie

    Lake Erie

    • Islands: Johnson's Island
    Lake Erie ( /ˈɪri/; French: Lac Érié) is the fourth largest lake (by surface area) of the five Great Lakes in North America, and the tenth largest globally. It is the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume of the Great Lakes and therefore also has the shortest average water residence time. It is bounded on the north by Ontario, on the south by Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York, and on the west by Michigan. The lake is named after the Erie tribe of Native Americans who lived along its southern shore. The outflow from the lake provides hydroelectric power to Canada and the U.S. as it spins huge turbines at Niagara Falls. Lake Erie (42.2° N, 81.2° W) has a mean elevation of 571 feet (174 m) above sea level. It has a surface area of 9,940 square miles (25,745 km) with a length of 241 miles (388 km) and breadth of 57 miles (92 km) at its widest points. It is the shallowest of the Great Lakes with an average depth of 62 feet (19 m) and a maximum depth of 210 feet (64 m). For comparison, Lake Superior has an average depth of 483 feet (147 m), a volume of 2,900 cubic miles (12,100 km) and shoreline of 2,726 miles (4,385 km). Because it is the shallowest, it is also the warmest of
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Pacific Ocean

    Pacific Ocean

    • Islands: Pentecost Island
    The Pacific Ocean is the largest of the Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic in the north to the Southern Ocean (or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south, bounded by Asia and Australia in the west, and the Americas in the east. At 165.25 million square kilometres (63.8 million square miles) in area, this largest division of the World Ocean – and, in turn, the hydrosphere – covers about 46% of the Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of the Earth's land area combined. The equator subdivides it into the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean, with two exceptions: the Galápagos and Gilbert Islands, while straddling the equator, are deemed wholly within the South Pacific. The Mariana Trench in the western North Pacific is the deepest point in the world, reaching a depth of 10,911 metres (35,797 ft). The eastern Pacific Ocean was first sighted by Europeans early in the 16th century. Spanish explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of Panama in 1513 and named it Mar del Sur (South Sea). The ocean's current name was given by Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan during the Spanish
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    3 votes
    171
    Tulsi Lake

    Tulsi Lake

    Tulsi Lake is a fresh water lake in northern Mumbai. It is stated to be the second largest lake in Mumbai and supplies part of the city’s potable water. This is one of the three lakes located in the Salsette Island; the other two being Powai Lake and Vihar Lake. Both Tulsi lake and Vihar lake are located within the densely forested Sanjay Gandhi National Park or also known popularly as the Borivali National Park (BNP). Tulsi Lake was built by damming the River Tasso, and redirecting the flow to the nearby Vihar Lake. Rain water from the catchment area of 676 hectares of Powai-Kanheri hill ranges drains into the lake. During the rainy season the flood flows out flows into the Powai Lake and further down in to the Mithi River. The maximum height of hill in the catchment is about 400 m. The southwest monsoon sets in by mid June and lasts till September. The maximum rainfall is normally recorded in the months of July and August. The mean annual rainfall is reported to be 2500 mm. The plan to create the lake was conceived in 1872 A.D and construction completed 1897 A.D. It was designed as a backup for the Vihar Lake. The lake has surface area of 1.35 km² (135 hectares). The average
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Elliðavatn

    Elliðavatn

    Elliðavatn is a lake in Iceland. It is situated in the area of Reykjavík. Not far from it, there is the well known natural park Heiðmörk with its hiking and biking trails, small forests and lava formations. The eastern shores of Elliðavatn are part of Heiðmörk nature reserve, protected by the state. Coming on the hringvegur (Route 1) over the Hellisheiði in the direction of the capital city, travelers pass by the lake.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Hallstätter See

    Hallstätter See

    Lake Hallstatt or Hallstätter See is a lake in the Salzkammergut, Austria, located at 47°34′43″N 13°39′38″E / 47.57861°N 13.66056°E / 47.57861; 13.66056. Its surface is approximately 8.55 km² and its maximum depth is 125 metres. It is a popular destination for tourists, especially scuba divers.
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    2 votes
    174
    Indian Ocean

    Indian Ocean

    • Islands: Java
    The Indian Ocean is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering approximately 20% of the water on the Earth's surface. It is bounded by Asia—including India, after which the ocean is named—on the north, on the west by Africa, on the east by Australia, and on the south by the Southern Ocean (or, depending on definition, by Antarctica.) As one component of the World Ocean, the Indian Ocean is delineated from the Atlantic Ocean by the 20° east meridian running south from Cape Agulhas, and from the Pacific Ocean by the meridian of 146°55' east. The northernmost extent of the Indian Ocean is approximately 30° north in the Persian Gulf. The ocean is nearly 10,000 km (6,200 mi) wide at the southern tips of Africa and Australia, and its area is 73,556,000 km² (28,350,000 mi²), including the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf. The ocean's volume is estimated to be 292,131,000 km³ (70,086,000 mi³). Small islands dot the continental rims. Island nations within the ocean are Madagascar (the world's fourth largest island), Comoros, Seychelles, Maldives, Mauritius, and Sri Lanka. The archipelago of Indonesia borders the ocean on the east. The African, Indian, and Antarctic crustal
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    2 votes
    175
    Jølstravatn

    Jølstravatn

    Jølstravatn (or Jølstravatnet) is a lake in the municipality of Jølster in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The lake empties its water into the 20-kilometre (12 mi) long Jølstra river which then flows into the Førdefjorden. The impressive eastern arm of Jølstravatn is called Kjøsnesfjorden, although it is not a true fjord that is part of the sea. The villages of Skei, Ålhus, and Vassenden are located on the shores of the lake. The 39-square-kilometre (15 sq mi) lake is located at an elevation of 207 metres (679 ft) above sea level, and the deepest point in the lake is 233 metres (764 ft) below the water level. The lake is about 30 kilometres (19 mi) long and about 1 to 1.5 kilometres (0.62 to 0.93 mi) wide. Jølstravatn is a very good fishing lake.
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    2 votes
    176
    Karikkoselkä

    Karikkoselkä

    Karikkoselkä is a lake formed in an impact crater in Petäjävesi, Finland. Karikkoselkä is located approximately 30 km east from the centre of Keurusselkä, a much older and larger impact crater. Most lakes in the region are elongated in northwest-southeast direction due to glaciation, but Karikkoselkä is strikingly round. Many shatter cones, rock formations that form under the extreme pressures of impact, have been found around the lake. Further evidence comes from aeromagnetic maps, which show a clear magnetic anomaly in the impact crater area. In addition, samples collected from deep drillings into the lake bottom confirm the impact origin of the structure. The crater is the smallest identified in Finland, 1.4 km diameter and 150 m deep. Due to sediments the lake has a maximum depth of 26m which is unusually deep for a lake in the region. Karikkoselkä is estimated to be between 230 Ma and 450 Ma (million years old), most likely near 240 Ma (Triassic or earlier). Some sources give an unreasonably young age of 1.88 Ma, which is likely a misquotation – the discovery paper mentions that the bedrock in the region (known as the Central Finland Granite Complex) formed about 1.88 Ga
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    2 votes
    177
    Lake Wilkie

    Lake Wilkie

    Lake Wilkie is a small, scenic lake near Tautuku Bay in the Catlins, south of Dunedin, New Zealand. It formed behind sand dunes after the last ice age, and has gradually shrunk to its current size of 1.7 hectares (4.2 acres). Bog lakes like Lake Wilkie are uncommon in this part of the country. Lake Wilkie is also unusual in being populated by a tiny introduced frog. The lake is only a short walk from the road. Along the track are several signs explaining the succession of different plants as land is slowly reclaimed. The full transition from sphagnum moss to mature forest occurs in only 65 m (210 ft).
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    2 votes
    178
    Lough Ree

    Lough Ree

    Lough Ree (Irish: Loch Rí or Loch Ríbh) is a lake in the midlands of Ireland, the second of the three major lakes on the River Shannon. Lough Ree is the second largest lake on the Shannon after Lough Derg. The other two major lakes are Lough Allen to the north, and Lough Derg to the south, there are also several minor lakes along the length of the river. The lake serves as a border between the counties of Longford and Westmeath (both in the province of Leinster) on the eastern side and County Roscommon in the province of Connacht on the western side. The lake is popular for fishing and boating. The lake supports a small commercial eel fishery and is locally famous for its eels on wheels truck. The town of Athlone is situated at the southern end of the lake, and has a harbour for boats going out on the lake. The small town of Lanesboro is at the northern end of the lake. The island of Inchcleraun (Inis Cloithreann) in the northern part of the lake is the site of a monastery founded in the early Christian era and contains the remains of several ancient churches. In Irish legends, it was on this island that Queen Maeve was killed. The Viking Turgesius controlled a ringfort on the
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    2 votes
    179
    Slidrefjord

    Slidrefjord

    Slidrefjord is a lake which lies in the municipalities of Vestre Slidre and Vang in Oppland county, Norway. The lake is part of the Begna Watershed. Slidrefjord has a surface area of 11.29 km² and a shore length of 46.34 km. It is at an elevation of 366 m above sea level.
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    2 votes
    180
    Torneträsk

    Torneträsk

    Torneträsk or Torne träsk (Saami: Duortnosjávri, Finnish/Meänkieli: Tornio or Torniojärvi) is a lake in Kiruna Municipality, Lapland, Norrbotten County in Sweden, in the Scandinavian mountain range. Träsk is the local word for lake (in Standard Swedish it means "swamp"). It is the seventh largest lake in Sweden, with a total area of 330 square kilometres (130 sq mi) and a length of 70 kilometres (43 mi). The lake drains to the south-east through Torne älv. South-west of the lake lies the Abisko National Park and the UNESCO World Heritage Site Laponian area. Torneträsk originated from the remnant of a glacier, which has given the lake its depth of 168 metres (551 ft), making it the second deepest lake in Sweden. It is usually ice-covered from December through June, with variations dependent on temperature variations. Media related to Torneträsk at Wikimedia Commons
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    Øvre Sjodalsvatnet

    Øvre Sjodalsvatnet

    Øvre Sjodalsvatnet is a lake that is part of the river Sjoa in the municipality of Vågå in Oppland county, Norway. Near the top of the lake is Maurvangen campground and Bessheim mountain lodge. Sjoa is a river that flows from the lake Gjende by Gjendesheim through Øvre Sjodalsvatnet, Nedre Sjodalsvatnet and the town of Sjoa in Gudbrandsdalen, where the river flows into Gudbrandsdalslågen. Sjoa is a popular river for rafting and kayak trips. The river is also known for the tourist attraction Ridderspranget
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    2 votes
    182
    Þingvallavatn

    Þingvallavatn

    Þingvallavatn is a lake in south-western Iceland. With a surface of 84 km² it is the largest natural lake in Iceland. Its greatest depth is at 114 m. At the northern shore of the lake, at Þingvellir (after which the lake is named), the Alþingi, the national parliament, was founded in the year 930. The lake is part of the Þingvellir National Park. The volcanic origin of the islands in the lake is clearly visible. The cracks and faults around it, of which the famous Almannagjá canyon is the largest, is where the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates meet. Silfra fissure is a popular SCUBA and snorkeling site. The only outflow from lake Þingvallavatn is the Sog River.
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    2 votes
    183
    Ammersee

    Ammersee

    Ammersee (English: Lake Ammer) is a Zungenbecken lake in Upper Bavaria, Germany, southwest of Munich between the towns of Herrsching and Dießen am Ammersee. With a surface area of approximately 47 square kilometres (18 sq mi), it is the sixth largest lake in Germany. The lake is at an elevation of 520 metres (1,710 ft), and has a maximum depth of 81 metres (266 ft). Like other Bavarian lakes, Ammersee developed as a result of the ice age glaciers melting. Ammersee is fed by the River Ammer, which flows as the Amper out of the lake. Like neighbouring Lake Starnberg, which is similar in size and shape, it is a popular location for watersports. The lake's water generally is of very good quality since a circular sewerage system has been introduced in the 1960s collecting all wastewater from around the lake and transporting it to a treatment plant below the lake's outlet at Eching. Ammersee and the Amper are part of the ancient Celtic amber trading route leading to the Brenner Pass. The word Ammer is a 13th-century form of Amper, the Celtic *ambra, deriving from the Indo-European *ombh-, *mbh- "wet, Water". Passenger services have operated on the lake since 1879. Today they are operated
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Canyon Lake

    Canyon Lake

    Canyon Lake is a reservoir on the Guadalupe River in the Texas Hill Country in the United States. Canyon Lake is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir formed on the Guadalupe River in Comal County by Canyon Dam, which is located about sixteen miles northwest of New Braunfels. The dam, lake, and all adjacent property are managed by the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers. Water rights, waste water treatment, and hydroelectric generating facilities are managed by the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority. Construction of the dam began in 1958 and was completed in 1964. The reservoir serves to provide flood control and water conservation for the communities downstream from the dam. The lake is also a popular recreational destination. Canyon Lake is located at 29°52′53″N 98°14′24″W / 29.88139°N 98.24°W / 29.88139; -98.24. It is located in northern Comal County, Texas, on the northeastern fringe of the San Antonio-New Braunfels MSA. It is about 35 mi (56 km) northeast of Downtown San Antonio and 40 mi (64 km) southwest of Austin. Towns in the immediate vicinity of the lake include Canyon City, Crane's Mill, Hancock, Fischer, Sattler, and Startzville, all part of the census-designated place
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Kingsley lake

    Kingsley lake

    Kingsley Lake is an almost circular lake of about 2,000 acres (8.1 km) in North Central Florida, about six miles (10 km) east of Starke, Florida. According to some sources, it is the oldest and highest lake in Florida, located on the edge of the Trail Ridge formation. The lake is a very stable lake with a sandy bottom. Its deepest part is about 90 feet (27 m). Kingsley lake is so nearly circular that pilots call it the Silver Dollar lake. There are several hundred docks on the north and west sides of the lake and Camp Blanding is on the East and South sides (Florida National Guard). The lake is famous for its clear waters, water skiing, fishing, and its stability. It forms the headwaters for the North Fork of Black Creek (Florida). The lake is thought to be formed as a Sinkhole.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Lac de la Cavayère

    Lac de la Cavayère

    Lac de la Cavayère is an artificial lake in the Languedoc-Roussillon région of France, close to the mediaeval town of Carcassonne. The lake, also known as Carcassonne Plage (in English, Carcassonne Beach), was created by the building of a 23 metre high dam in 1988 after severe forest fires affected the area in 1985. The surface area of the lake, which is fed by the creeks of Montirat, Bazalac and Mitgé, is 180,000 m² and it is 1.5 million cubic metres in volume. It is a short distance from the town of Carcassonne and has been made into a popular recreation area. Ducks and wildfowl are common and the 400,000 m² surrounding area is notable for a diversity of habitats, flora and fauna. The beaches slope gently and there are supervised bathing areas. Boats are available for rent and there are picnic areas and a crazy golf course as well as a nearby chateau. During 2005 the lake was closed to bathing due to strong algal blooms.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Lake Voulismeni

    Lake Voulismeni

    Lake Voulismeni (Greek: Λίμνη Βουλισμένη, Límni Voulisméni) is a former sweetwater small lake, later connected to the sea, located at the centre of the town of Agios Nikolaos on the Greek island of Crete It has a circular shape of a diameter of 137 m and depth 64 m. The locals refer to it as just "the lake". The lake connects to the harbour of the town by a channel dug in 1870. A panoramic view of the lake can be seen from a small park situated above it. According to legend, the goddess Athena bathed in it. Every year at midnight turning to Orthodox Christian Easter day, the majority of the population of the town gathers around the lake to celebrate with fireworks, and firecrackers thrown by the people attending that highlight event. It was reported that the German army during their withdrawal from the area at WW2, disposed parts of their weaponry and/or vehicles into the deep lake. A local urban legend has it that the lake is bottomless. That notion is potentially based on its impressively disproportional high depth compared to its width (64m depth on only 134m width) or/and on locals noticing disturbances at the surface or also the level of the water during the Santorini (Thera)
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Randsfjorden

    Randsfjorden

    Randsfjorden is Norway's fourth largest lake with an area of 138 km (53 sq mi). Its volume is estimated at just over 7 km (1.7 cu mi), and its greatest depth is 120 metres (390 ft). The lake is 135 metres (443 ft) above sea level. It is located in the county of Oppland and borders the municipalities of Gran, Jevnaker, Nordre Land, and Søndre Land in the districts of Land and Hadeland. It is drained by the Randselva river. Although the term fjord usually describes a saltwater inlet, Randsfjorden is actually a fresh water lake with a narrow shape, approximately aligned on a north-south axis. The Icelandic chronicler Snorri Sturluson recorded that Halfdan the Black, father of the first King of Norway, journeyed over the lake while returning home from a visit to Hadeland. Travelling with a horse and sleigh while the lake was frozen, he fell through the ice (which had been weakened by cattle dung after a watering hole had been dug on the lake) and drowned. In modern times, many golf courses have been set up on the edge of the lake. There is a car ferry connection between Horn on the east side and Tangen on the west, which is Norway's last remaining and regularly operating car ferry
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Zegrze Reservoir

    Zegrze Reservoir

    The Zegrze Reservoir (or Zegrze Lake, in Polish officially Jezioro Zegrzyńskie, unofficially Zalew Zegrzyński) is a man-made reservoir in Poland, located just north of Warsaw, on the lower course of the Narew river. It is formed by a dam constructed in 1963 with a hydroelectric complex producing 20 Megawatts of energy. Its total area is about 33 km². The name originates from the nearby Zegrze village, featuring the historic Radziwiłł Palace (Pałac Zegrzyński) built in 1847 by the noble Krasiński family. Due to its attractive location near the Polish capital and natural beauty, Zalew Zegrzyński is a very popular place of recreation for the residents of Warsaw. Media related to Zegrzyńskie Lake at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Lake Narač

    Lake Narač

    Lake Narach (Belarusian: Нарач, pronounced [ˈnaratʂ]; Russian: Нарочь­, Naroch; Polish: Narocz; Lithuanian: Narutis) is a lake in north-western Belarus (Myadzyel Raion, Minsk Region), located in the basin of the Viliya river. It is the largest lake in Belarus (in 1921–39 it was the largest lake of Poland). Narach is a part of the Narach lake group (the others being Miastra (Belarusian: Мястра), Batoryn (Belarusian: Баторын), Blednaje (Belarusian: Бледнае)). It was formed about 11 thousand years ago after the Pleistocene ice ages. It has a surface area of 79.6 km, a wider length of 12.8 km, a maximum depth of 24.08 m, a volume of 710 million cubic meters. The lake is surrounded with pine forests. The Narach River flows out of it. Narach is an abode of 22 genera of fish, as the eel, pike, burbot, etc. The shore and islets are nested by different birds, as the mute swan, fish hawk, tarrock, dabchick. People settled near the lake about 10 thousand years ago. Linguists think that its name comes from the Proto-Indo-European language. Archaeologists have excavated many burial mounds of the Baltic and Slavic people that lived around Narach. Since the Middle Ages, local inhabitants lived
    5.33
    3 votes
    191
    Öskjuvatn

    Öskjuvatn

    Öskjuvatn is a lake in the Highlands of Iceland. Its surface area is about 11 km². With a depth of 217 m (712 ft), it is the second deepest lake in Iceland after Jökulsárlón. The lake is situated in the crater of the volcano Askja in the north-east of the glacier Vatnajökull. Its name simply means the lake of Askja. Like the neighbouring crater Víti, it was created by an enormous volcanic eruption in 1875. On July 10, 1907, two German scientists, Walter von Knebel and Max Rudloff disappeared while exploring the lake in a small boat. Knebel's fiancée, Ina von Grumbkow, led an expedition in search of them with a vulcanologist Hans Reck, but no trace of them was ever found. Suppositions at the time suggested that seismic volcanic disturbances could have caused a landslip or similar occurrence, and recorded that only two days previously the telegraph cable to Iceland had been broken by deep water disturbances for the first time since it was laid, close to the Icelandic coast.
    5.33
    3 votes
    192
    San Pablo Bay

    San Pablo Bay

    San Pablo Bay is a tidal estuary that forms the northern extension of San Francisco Bay in northern California in the United States. Most of the Bay is shallow; however, there is a deep water channel approximately in mid bay, which allows access to Sacramento, Stockton, Benicia, Martinez, and other smaller Delta ports. It receives the waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, via Suisun Bay and the Carquinez Strait on its northeast end, and it connects to the Pacific Ocean via the San Francisco Bay on its southern end. The bay is heavily silted from the contributions of the two rivers, which themselves drain most of the Central Valley of California. San Pablo Bay also receives the waters of Sonoma Creek through the Napa Sonoma Marsh, San Rafael Creek, and the Petaluma River directly, and the Napa River which flows into the Carquinez Strait via the Mare Island Strait near its entrance into the bay. All tributaries except for Sonoma Creek are commercially navigable and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The bay is approximately 10 mi (16 km) across and has an area of approximately 90 sq mi (230 km). Two peninsulas separate San Pablo Bay from San Francisco Bay. The
    5.33
    3 votes
    193
    Stillhouse Hollow Lake

    Stillhouse Hollow Lake

    Stillhouse Hollow Lake is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir on the Lampasas River in the Brazos River basin, 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Belton, Texas, USA. Stillhouse Hollow Dam and the reservoir are both managed by the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The reservoir was officially impounded in 1968, and serves to provide flood control for the communities downstream. The lake also functions as a water supply for several of the surrounding communities. Stillhouse Hollow Lake is a popular recreational destination. Stillhouse Hollow Lake is also commonly known as Stillhouse Hollow Reservoir. Due to the extraordinary drought condition in Central Texas, Stillhouse Hollow experienced the lowest ever recorded lake level in 2011, significantly exceeding its prior minimum of 610ft set in 1989. At the close of 2011, the level of the lake stood at just over 605ft. Stillhouse Hollow Lake has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Stillhouse Hollow Lake include largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, white bass, catfish, and crappie. In addition to maintaining the dam that creates the
    5.33
    3 votes
    194
    Chautauqua Lake

    Chautauqua Lake

    Chautauqua Lake is located entirely within Chautauqua County, New York, USA. The lake is approximately 17 miles (27 km) long and 2 miles (3.2 km) wide at its greatest width. The surface area is approximately 13,000 acres (53 km). The maximum depth is about 78 feet (23 m). The shoreline is about 41.1 miles (66 km) of which all but 2.6 mi (4 km) are privately owned. The lake's name has various meanings, based on a variety of translations of the original native words. One translation means Bag Tied in the Middle, referring to the narrow portion between shore lines halfway down the lake. Other translations include Place Where Fish are Taken as well as Place of Easy Death. The water from the lake drains to the south, emptying first into the Chadakoin River in Jamestown, New York before traveling east into the Conewango Creek. The creek goes south, entering the Allegheny River in Warren, Pennsylvania and the Ohio River in Pittsburgh, instead of flowing north into the Great Lakes. The drainage area is about 180 square miles (470 km). At the southern end is the City of Jamestown. The Village of Mayville is at the northern end. Other villages located on the lake are Bemus Point, Lakewood,
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Jeziorak

    Jeziorak

    Jeziorak (German: Geserichsee) is a lake in the Iława Lakeland in Warmia-Masuria, Poland. Its area is 3,219 ha (including 20 islands with area of 240 ha). It is 27.45 km long and 2.4 km wide. Maximum depth is 13 m. It is the longest lake in Poland, and ranks 6th by area. The lake was formed by filling a glacial tunnel valley.
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Lake Inari

    Lake Inari

    Lake Inari (Finnish: Inarijärvi/Inarinjärvi, Northern Sami: Anárjávri, Inari Sami: Aanaarjävri, Skolt Sami: Aanarjäuˊrr, Swedish: Enare träsk, Norwegian: Enaresjøen) is the third largest lake in Finland and the largest lake in Sápmi. It is located in the northern part of Lapland, north of the Arctic Circle. The lake is 117–119 meters above sea level and it is regulated at the Kaitakoski power plant in Russia. The freezing period normally extends from November to early June. The most well known islands of the lake are Hautuumaasaari ("Graveyard Island"), which served as cemetery of ancient Sami people and Ukonkivi ("Ukko's Stone"), a historical sacrifice place of the ancient inhabitants of the area. There are over 3,000 islands in total. Trout, lake salmon, white fish, perch and pike are found in Lake Inari's waters. The lake covers 1,040 square kilometres. It empties northwards through the Paatsjoki at the mouth of the Varangerfjord, which is a bay of Barents Sea. Philip Pullman, author of the His Dark Materials book series, chose this lake to be the home of the witch Serafina Pekkala. Media related to Inarijärvi at Wikimedia Commons
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    Lake Lucerne

    Lake Lucerne

    • Islands: Altstad-Insel
    Lake Lucerne (German: Vierwaldstättersee, lit. "Lake of the Four Forested Cantons") is a lake in central Switzerland and the fourth largest in the country. The lake has a complicated shape, with bends and arms reaching from the city of Lucerne into the mountains. It has a total area of 114 km² (44 sq mi), an elevation of 434 m (1,424 ft), and a maximum depth of 214 m (702 ft). Its volume is 11.8 km³. Much of the shoreline rises steeply into mountains up to 1,500 m above the lake, resulting in many picturesque views including those of Mount Rigi and Mount Pilatus. The Reuss River enters the lake at Flüelen (in the canton of Uri, the part called Urnersee) and exits at Lucerne. The lake also receives the Muota (at Brunnen) Engelberger Aa (at Buochs), the Sarner Aa (at Alpnachstad). It is possible to circumnavigate the lake by road, though the route is slow, twisted, and goes through tunnels part of the way. Steamers and other passenger boats ply between the different towns on the lake. It is a popular tourist destination, both for native Swiss and foreigners, and there are many hotels and resorts along the shores. In addition, the meadow of the Rütli, traditional site of the founding
    6.00
    2 votes
    198
    Lake Waipori

    Lake Waipori

    Lake Waipori is the smaller and shallower of the pair of lakes located in the wetlands to the south west of Dunedin in New Zealand on the Waipori River. The Waipori River is a major tributary of the Taieri River, and these wetlands form the southern edge of the Taieri Plains. The lake is inhabited by various waterfowl and wetland birds. It is however too shallow and inaccessible (due to being surrounded with wetlands) to allow for recreation other than fishing and duck hunting in season. It is possible to travel from the Waipori River at Berwick through the lake and through to Lake Waihola in a flat bottomed dinghy or jetboat. The lake is too shallow for other forms of motorboat. The lake is bordered to the southwest by the Sinclair Wetlands.
    6.00
    2 votes
    199
    Lake Walen

    Lake Walen

    The Walensee is one of the larger lakes in Switzerland, for about 2/3 of its surface in the Canton of St. Gallen and for 1/3 in the Canton of Glarus. It is also known as Lake Walen or Lake Walenstadt, after Walenstadt. Other towns and villages at the lake include: Weesen, Quinten, Quarten, and Murg. The three main rivers leading to this lake are the Seez, Murgbach, and Linth. The latter continues its course from Walensee to Lake Zurich. The Churfirsten range raises steeply on the North side from the lake's level at 419 m to 2,300 m above sea level. The lake provided the inspiration for a solo piano piece by Hungarian romantic composer Franz Liszt, called Au lac de Wallenstadt. The piece is part of a collection of solo piano works inspired by the composer's travels in 1830s Switzerland. Media related to Walensee at Wikimedia Commons
    6.00
    2 votes
    200
    Tinnsjå

    Tinnsjå

    Tinnsjå (Tinnsjø, Tinnsjøen, Lake Tinn) is one of the largest lakes in Norway. It is located between the municipalities of Tinn and Notodden in Telemark county. At its source in the west, the Måna river flows out of Møsvatn and past Rjukan into Tinnsjå. From the north, the river Mår flows from the Mår, Gøystavatn, and Kalhovdfjorden lakes into Tinnsjå. Tinnsjå is part of the Skiensvassdrag, and drains via the Tinnelva river in the south, down to Heddalsvatn. In 1944, during the German occupation of Norway, the ferry SF Hydro was sunk in Tinnsjå by the Norwegian resistance. The Germans were using the ferry to transport a large quantity of heavy water to Germany, where it was to be used for nuclear weapon research. The heavy water had been produced at Vemork, a factory located in Rjukan. The wreck of the ferry was discovered in 1993. In 2004, it was investigated and filmed for an episode of NOVA; heavy water samples were recovered and deuterium isotopic enrichment was confirmed. In April 2005, a previously unknown species of fish was discovered in Tinnsjå. A film crew shooting footage for a new documentary on the heavy water sabotage became aware of an unusual fish, swimming near the
    6.00
    2 votes
    201
    Big Moose Lake

    Big Moose Lake

    Big Moose Lake, at the head of the Moose River, is a large lake about five miles (8 km) north of Fourth Lake in the Adirondacks in upstate New York. It is a popular spot amongst tourists all year round: boating, water skiing and hiking in the summer; cross-country skiing and snowmobiling in the winter. The lake's popularity derives from its remoteness, climate and beauty, as well as its notoriety as the location of the Murder of Grace Brown in 1906. Alleged ghost sightings and subsequent media attention have added to the allure. Located in the central-western part of the Adirondack region, Big Moose Lake covers 1,265 acres (512 ha) in surface area. It is approximately three miles long and almost a mile wide (4.8x1.25 km), running in an east-west direction along its major axis. The lake ranges in depth from 30 to 70 feet (9 to 21 m) in its deepest parts. With minimal road access, the lake is not heavily populated, experiencing its peak during the summer months (June – August) when vacationers arrive at their summer homes or stay at local rustic resorts. In the summer, temperatures average from nightly lows of 45 °F (7 °C) to daytime highs of 75 °F (7 – 24 °C). In winter, the lake
    5.00
    3 votes
    202
    Lake Corangamite

    Lake Corangamite

    Lake Corangamite is Victoria’s largest natural lake, located near Colac in south-west Victoria, Australia in the Lakes and Craters region of the Victorian Volcanic Plains. The lake is hypersaline, and salinity levels have increased dramatically as the lake level has dropped in recent decades. It is Australia's largest permanent saline lake, covering approximately 230 km with a circumference of about 150 km. It forms part of the Ramsar-listed Western District Lakes wetland site. The waterbody is surrounded to the south and east by rocky outcrops (known locally as the stony rises) which were formed by lava flows from Mount Porndon to the south-west and Mount Warrion to the east. The spectacular 'Red Rocks' maar crater complex overlooks the south west shore. The Mount Warrion flows caused the lake to form by blocking drainage to the east. As is typical of lakes in the area, the eastern flanks of the lake consist of lunettes formed by wind borne sediments blown from the lake during periods with dry climates. Flow into the lake is extremely variable and negligible in the driest years. Currently it is endorheic (there is no outflow) but during the wet decade of the 1950s the lake flooded
    5.00
    3 votes
    203
    Baker Lake

    Baker Lake

    Baker Lake (Inuktitut: Qamani’tuaq; "where the river widens") is a lake in Kivalliq Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is fed by the Thelon River from the west and the Kazan River from the south. Its outflows into Chesterfield Inlet. The lake is approximately 1,887 km (729 sq mi) in size. It has several named bays, and a few islands. The Inuit hamlet of Baker Lake is situated at the west end of the lake near the mouth of the Thelon River. Although the Inuit had been in the area for some time, the first outside presence was the Royal Canadian Mounted Police post at the east end of the lake in 1915. This was followed in 1916 by the Hudson's Bay Company post set up at the Kazan River delta until 1930 when it moved to the present location. The lake's area is home to Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou herds, as well as other wildlife associated with northern Canada's Arctic.
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    Blöndulón

    Blöndulón

    At 57 km², Blöndulón is one of Iceland's largest lakes. It was created in 1984-1991 as a reservoir for the Blönduvirkjun power plant, and has a greatest depth of 39 m. It is situated near Kjölur highland road in the Highlands of Iceland. The hot springs of Hveravellir are situated some 25 km to the south.
    5.50
    2 votes
    205
    Lac de Vouglans

    Lac de Vouglans

    The Lac de Vouglans is the reservoir of the hydro-electric power station at Vouglans on the River Ain in the département of Jura in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France. The dam, the Barrage de Vouglans is at coordinates 46°23′51″N 5°39′56″E / 46.3975°N 5.66556°E / 46.3975; 5.66556 (Barrage de Vouglans). The lake lies on Jurassic rock crushed into north to south ridges by the Alpine orogeny. It is therefore long and narrow, though rather sinuous in plan. It is about 30 kilometres long though only 21 km in a straight line. It lies in the valley of the Ain, impounded by the dam at Cernon. The old village of Vouglans was displaced by its construction in 1968 by Électricité de France (EDF). The buildings of the Carthusian monastery of Vaucluse were also moved to make way for the rising waters. The lake is arranged for tourism with view-points scattered through the woods which cover the hillsides along its shores and places set up for bathing and boating. The annual mean flow of water at the dam is 40.80 cubic metres per second.
    5.50
    2 votes
    206
    Lake Diatas

    Lake Diatas

    Lake Diatas (Indonesian: Danau Diatas, means: Upper Lake; Minangnese: Danau Diateh) is a lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. It is located at 1°4′37″S 100°45′17″E / 1.07694°S 100.75472°E / -1.07694; 100.75472. This lake together with Lake Dibawah, are known as the Twin Lakes (Danau Kembar).
    5.50
    2 votes
    207
    Lake Kaniere

    Lake Kaniere

    Lake Kaniere is located on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island. It lies 30 kilometres southeast of Hokitika, and drains into the Tasman Sea via the Kaniere and Hokitika rivers. At 22 km², it is second only to Lake Brunner in size among the West Coast's lakes. A small hydroelectric station is located on the Kaniere River close to the lake's outflow. Lake Kaniere is a popular location for leisure activities such as boating, fishing, picnicking, and water skiing.
    5.50
    2 votes
    208
    Lake Viedma

    Lake Viedma

    Viedma Lake (Spanish: Lago Viedma), approximately 50 miles (80 kilometers) long in southern Patagonia near the border between Chile and Argentina. It's a major elongated trough lake formed from melting glacial ice. The name of the lake comes from the Spanish explorer Antonio de Viedma, who in 1783 reached its shores, being the first European to do so. The town of El Chaltén and the Andes peaks Cerro Torre and Fitz-Roy lie in the proximity of Lake Viedma. Lake Viedma is fed primarily by the Viedma Glacier at its the western end. The Viedma Glacier measures 3 miles (5 kilometers) wide at its terminus at Lake Viedma. The brown landscape is a result of ice scouring, which left virtually no vegetation on the steep-walled valleys. Water from lake Viedma flows into Lake Argentino through the La Leona River, and eventually from there into the Atlantic Ocean through the Santa Cruz River. Although most of the lake lies in Argentine territory, the western shores of the lake reach the Southern Patagonian Ice Field in an area where the border remains undefined. Even if the Chilean territorial claims don't reach the shores, that could change as the glacial tongue in the lake melts.
    5.50
    2 votes
    209
    Pielinen

    Pielinen

    Pielinen is the fourth largest lake of Finland, with a drainage basin area of 12,823 km (4,951 sq mi) that is equally distributed between eastern Finland and Russia. The creation of the lake and its outlet is attributed to a post-glacial isostatic rebound, which resulted in uplift of the land. As is common in Finnish lakes, the water colour of the lake is dark on account of the high proportion of bogs present in the catchment of the drainage basin that drains humic substances. Pielinen Lake is in the northernmost part of Karelia, which is the land of the Karelian peoples, a Northern European area of historical significance not only for Finland, but also for Russia and Sweden. Apart from the lake, several attractions on the shores of the lake are the Koli National Park known for its scenic beauty in summer and the winter sports of skiing, the whitewater rafting centre at Ruunaa, the active centres of Lieksa and Nurmes. The lake is located at an elevation of 93.7 m (307 ft) in the North Karelia region in eastern Finland. It has a water spread area of 894.21 km (345.26 sq mi) and a shore length of 610 m (2,000 ft), and is bound within geographical coordinates of 62°54–63°33N and
    4.67
    3 votes
    210
    Bouchet lake

    Bouchet lake

    Bouchet lake (or Lake of Bouchet; French: Lac du Bouchet) is located in Haute-Loire, France next to Le Puy-en-Velay. It is about 1.6 km (one mile) north of the village of Le Bouchet-Saint-Nicolas. It is located on the territory of the communes of Cayres and Le Bouchet-Saint-Nicolas Bouchet is a crater lake formed from an old volcano, and thus roughly circular. It is a little more than half a mile from rim to rim and surrounded by woodlands. It is at an altitude of 1,208 m (3,963 feet).
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Grand Lake

    Grand Lake

    Grand Lake is Colorado's largest and deepest natural lake. It is located in the headwaters of the Colorado River in Grand County, Colorado. On its north shore is located the historic and eponymous town of Grand Lake. The lake fills a glaciated valley that is dammed in part by glacial till from the Pinedale Glaciation, and is younger than about 12,000 years. Natural tributaries to the lake are the North Inlet and East Inlet, both of which flow out of Rocky Mountain National Park, which surrounds the lake on three sides: Grand Lake is located 1 mile from the Park's western entrance. Grand Lake was named Spirit Lake by the Ute Tribe because they believed the lake's cold waters to be the dwelling place of departed souls. As part of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, Grand Lake forms a continuous body of water with the man-made reservoir Shadow Mountain Lake, which under natural conditions then flows into another man-made reservoir, Lake Granby. The elevation of Grand Lake is maintained between 8,367 feet (2,550 meters) and 8,366 feet (2,549.8 meters). When the Colorado-Big Thompson (C-BT) project is diverting water to northeastern Colorado, water collected in Lake Granby can be pumped
    6.00
    1 votes
    212
    Lake St. Catherine

    Lake St. Catherine

    Lake St. Catherine (French: Lac Sainte-Catherine) is a brackish-water lake that is located in eastern Orleans Parish, within the city limits of New Orleans, between Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Borgne in Louisiana. Between Lake St. Catherine and Lake Borgne was the original Town of Lake Catherine. Established between Unknown Pass and Miller's Ditch, it was settled for railroad workers, trappers, hunters and fishermen. The 1915 Hurricane destroyed the town and thirty-five people lost their lives by remaining in the town. It was rebuilt with a number of hunting and fishing clubs being established along with the railroad workers and the Rigolets Train Station. During the Great Depression, clubs like the Winchester Club, which was for gentlemen only, The Rosemary and St. James Place were boarding houses for families and sportsmen to stay and hunt and fish the area. There were a number of families who owned camps in the area prior to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Some of their family members worked for the railroad and helped maintain the line. The town was built next to the railroad track; the last known resident of the town was Mr. Acy. The entire area was heavily damaged during Katrina.
    6.00
    1 votes
    213
    Rosskreppfjorden

    Rosskreppfjorden

    Rosskreppfjorden is a lake on the border between the municipalities of Valle (in Aust-Agder county) and Sirdal (in Vest-Agder county), Norway. The lake is part of the Kvina river system and has a hydroelectric power plant in a dam on the south end of the lake. The lake has an area of 29.51 square kilometres (11.39 sq mi) and sits at an elevation of about 929 to 890 metres (3,048 to 2,920 ft) above sea level. The lake flows south into the Øyarvatnet lake. Rosskreppfjorden is located about 21 kilometres (13 mi) southwest of the village of Valle. The lakes Kolsvatnet and Botnsvatnet are located just to the northeast of Rosskreppfjorden, and the mountain Urddalsknuten is just to the north of the lake.
    6.00
    1 votes
    214
    Lagarfljót

    Lagarfljót

    Lagarfljót (also called Lögurinn) is a lake situated in the east of Iceland near Egilsstaðir. Its surface measures 53 square kilometres (20 sq mi) and it is 25 kilometres (16 mi) long; its greatest width is 2.5 km (1.6 mi) and its greatest depth 112 m (367 ft). The River Lagarfljót flows through this lake. The biggest forest in Iceland, Hallormsstaðarskógur is to be found near the lake as well as a nice waterfall, Hengifoss. Hengifoss, at 118 m (387 ft), is one of the tallest waterfalls in the country. Below it is another waterfall called Litlanesfoss. As in the Scottish lake Loch Ness, a cryptid serpent, called Lagarfljótsormurinn by locals, is believed by some to live in the depths of Lagarfljót.
    4.33
    3 votes
    215
    Lake Titicaca

    Lake Titicaca

    • Islands: Suriqui
    Lake Titicaca is a lake in the Andes on the border of Peru and Bolivia. By volume of water, it is also the largest lake in South America. Lake Maracaibo has a larger surface area, but is often regarded as a large brackish bay due to its direct connection with the sea. It is often called the highest navigable lake in the world, although this refers to navigation by large boats, generally considered to mean commercial craft. At least two dozen bodies of water around the world are at higher elevations, but all are much smaller and shallower. The lake is located at the northern end of the endorheic Altiplano basin high in the Andes on the border of Peru and Bolivia. The western part of the lake lies within the Puno Region of Peru, and the eastern side is located in the Bolivian La Paz Department. The lake is composed of two nearly separate sub-basins that are connected by the Strait of Tiquina which is 800 m (2,620 ft) across at the narrowest point. The larger sub-basin, Lago Grande (also called Lago Chucuito) has a mean depth of 135 m (443 ft) and a maximum depth of 284 m (932 ft). The smaller sub-basin, Wiñaymarka (also called Lago Pequeño, "little lake") has a mean depth of 9 m
    4.33
    3 votes
    216
    Belton Lake

    Belton Lake

    Belton Lake is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir on the Leon River in the Brazos River basin, 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Belton, Texas, USA. The lake extends into both Bell County and Coryell County. Belton Dam and the lake are both managed by the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The reservoir was officially impounded in 1954, and serves to provide flood control and drinking water for Belton, Temple, and the surrounding communities. Belton Lake is a popular recreational destination. Belton Lake has been stocked with species of fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Belton Lake include largemouth bass, white bass, smallmouth bass, hybrid striped bass, catfish, sunfish, bluegill, crappie, longnose gar and alligator gar. In addition to maintaining the dam that creates the reservoir, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers maintains recreational facilities at the lake, including Live Oak Ridge Park, Cedar Ridge Park, Winkler Park, White Flint Park, and Westcliff Park. Boating and fishing are very popular. The Girl Scouts' Camp Kachina is on the shores of the lake.
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Lake Mainit

    Lake Mainit

    Lake Mainit is the fourth largest lake in the Philippines, having a surface area of 173.40 square kilometers. The lake is also the deepest lake in the country with maximum depth reaching 223 meters. It is located in northeastern part of Mindanao and shared between the provinces of Surigao del Norte and Agusan del Norte. The name of the lake is a Cebuano word "mainit", which means hot.
    5.00
    2 votes
    218
    Lake Seliger

    Lake Seliger

    Seliger (Russian: Селиге́р; IPA: [sʲɪlʲɪˈgʲer]) is a lake in Tver Oblast and, in the extreme northern part, Novgorod Oblast of Russia, in the northwest of the Valdai Hills, a part of the Volga basin. Absolute height: 205 m, area 212 km², average depth 5.8 m. Seliger is a large system of lakes linked by effluents, has many small islands and is surrounded by forests, including pine woods with many berries and mushrooms. Seliger is situated within a picturesque landscape of forests and hills. The lake is a protected nature reserve and is sometimes known as the "European Baikal" due to the diversity of its unique flora and fauna, similar to Lake Baikal. Ostashkov is the only town on the lake and is one of the most popular resorts in central Russia.
    5.00
    2 votes
    219
    Näsijärvi

    Näsijärvi

    Näsijärvi is a lake 95 metres (312 ft) above sea level, in Pirkanmaa region, Finland. Näsijärvi is the biggest lake in the Tampere region at 256 square kilometres (99 sq mi) in size. The city of Tampere was built around the rapids of Tammerkoski, through which the lake drains into Pyhäjärvi. The water quality of the lake has improved as forest industry has decreased the amount of waste water. There are boat cruising services on Näsijärvi. The steamer SS Kuru suffered the most severe Finnish inland shipping disaster on lake Näsijärvi. During the winter, usually during February and March, the lake is frozen in its entirety. Näsijärvi is then used for Nordic walking, cross-country skiing, and everyday pleasure walking. There is a small, rocky island upon which a lighthouse resides – it is the most popular walking destination on the lake. In the north Näsijärvi has a wide catchment area that includes among others the lakes Ruovesi, Kuorevesi, Keurusselkä, Tarjanne, Pihlajavesi, Toisvesi and Ähtärinjärvi. Media related to Näsijärvi at Wikimedia Commons
    4.50
    2 votes
    220
    Wolfgangsee

    Wolfgangsee

    Wolfgangsee is a lake in Austria that lies mostly within the state of Salzburg and is one of the best known lakes in the Salzkammergut resort region. The municipalities on its shore are Strobl, St. Gilgen with the villages of Abersee and Ried as well as the market town of St. Wolfgang in the state of Upper Austria. The town and the lake are named after Saint Wolfgang of Regensburg, who, according to legend, built the first church here in the late 10th century. The Wolfgangsee stretches about 10.5 kilometres from the northwest to the southeast. It is divided into two parts by a peninsula, called die Enge (the Narrow), situated roughly in the middle of its southern shore opposite St. Wolfgang, where the breadth is no more than 200 metres. The western portion of the lake at St. Gilgen is known as the Abersee. The lake has an area of about 12.9 to 13.1 km² and is surrounded by the Salzkammergut mountain range. On the northern side, the Schafberg is located. A rack railway, the Schafbergbahn leads up to the summit at 1,782 m. Due to the steep shore at its foot only a footpath connects St. Wolfgang and the village of Ried with St. Gilgen along the Falkensteinwand, the set of the
    4.50
    2 votes
    221
    Wörthersee

    Wörthersee

    • Islands: Kapuzinerinsel
    The Wörthersee (Slovene: Vrbsko jezero) is an alpine lake in the southern Austrian state of Carinthia. The lake is elongated, about 20 km long and 1–2 km wide. It stretches from the Carinthian capital Klagenfurt in the east to Velden in the west. It is flanked to the north and south by steep alpine foothills covered with dense forests, beyond which snow-capped alpine peaks are visible. The lake's water is a distinctive blue-green colour and transparent. In the early nineteenth century the marshy shores were home only to a handful of poor peasants. The construction of the Austrian Southern Railway (Südbahn), in the middle of the nineteenth century quickly turned the Wörthersee into an exclusive summer retreat for Vienna's nobility. The northern shore is densely built-up. The motorway and railway mainline occupy the narrow space between the steep hills and the shore. Main towns are Krumpendorf, Pörtschach and Velden. The southern shore is quieter and less developed. In winter, the region is often covered by snow and approximately every 10 years the lake freezes over, attracting numerous ice skaters. The Mediterranean climate and clean, warm water make the lake a popular tourist
    4.50
    2 votes
    222
    Dniprodzerzhynsk Reservoir

    Dniprodzerzhynsk Reservoir

    The Dniprodzerzhynsk Reservoir (Ukrainian: Дніпродзержинське водосховище, Dniprodzerzhyns'ke vodoskhovyshche) is a water reservoir located on the lower part of the Dnieper River in Ukraine. Named after the city of Dniprodzerzhynsk, it covers a total area of 567 square kilometres within the Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. It was formed in 1963-1965. The reservoir is mainly used for generating hydroelectric power, transportation, fish farming, and human consumption The reservoir is 114 km in length, 5 km in width (8 km max.); has a depth of 15 meters, and a volume of 2.45 km³. During winter, the reservoir freezes over. The ports of Kremenchuk and the Dnieper Mineral Enrichment Complex in Komsomolsk are located on the reservoir. The Dniprodzerzhynsk Hydroelectric Station, constructed during 1956–1965, is also located on the reservoir.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Drevvatnet

    Drevvatnet

    Drevvatnet is a lake that lies in the municipality of Vefsn in Nordland county, Norway. The village of Drevvassbygda lies at the northeastern end of the lake, in the Drevjedalen valley. The Nordlandsbanen railway line follows the southern coast of the lake. The first element is the name of the river Drevja and the last element is the finite form of vatn which means "lake".
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Helin

    Helin

    Helin is a lake which lies in the municipalities of Vestre Slidre and Vang in Oppland county, Norway. The lake is regulated for power production by Åbjøra kraftverk. Helin has an area of 9,47 km² and its circumference is 27.17 km. It is located at 870 m above the sea, and has a volume of 18.6 million m³. In 1930 a 35 km² area between Helin and the Syndin lakes to the east was recognized as a botanical plant national park.
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Lake Hauroko

    Lake Hauroko

    Lake Hauroko is located in a mountain valley in Fiordland National Park in the South Island of New Zealand. The long S-shaped lake is 30 kilometres in length and covers an area of 63 km². The surface is at an altitude of 150 metres above sea level, and the lake is 463 metres deep. It is New Zealand's deepest lake. Mystery In the 1960s a group of men went fishing and hunting near and around the lake. Two men stayed on shore and the three other went out on the lake with their dog, packs and guns. The two men on shore listened as the boat went out on the lake as there was a thick fog enclosing it, after awhile the boat cut out and the men where never heard from again. A few days later their packs, guns and the dog were found on shore unharmed and dry in the inside, even though the boat cut out in the middle of the lake and the men were never seen again. One of the country's southernmost lakes, it is 35 kilometres northwest of Tuatapere, between the similarly-sized lakes Monowai and Poteriteri. It drains via the 20 kilometre-long Wairaurahiri River into Foveaux Strait 10 kilometres to the west of Te Waewae Bay. The only island on the lake, Mary Island, is the focus of several local
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Lake Iseo

    Lake Iseo

    Lake Iseo or Lago d'Iseo or Sebino is the fourth largest lake in Lombardy, Italy, fed by the Oglio river. It is in the north of the country in the Val Camonica area, near the cities of Brescia and Bergamo. The lake is almost equally divided between the Provinces of Bergamo and Brescia. This is a heavily industrialised part of the world, but the area remains one of outstanding natural beauty. The road north to Switzerland used to run along the side of the lake, and stories about entire families being swallowed up by the murky waters abound. A much safer road, carved into the side of the mountains, now exists. In the middle of the lake is Monte Isola (or Montisola). Around the shore of the lake are a number of small towns:- On the Brescian side: On the Bergamo side: and on Montisola (Province of Brescia): Two smaller islands, Loreto and San Paolo, are privately owned.
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Lake Lanao

    Lake Lanao

    Lake Lanao (Maranao: Ranao or Ranaw) is a large lake in the Philippines, located in Lanao del Sur province in the country's southern island of Mindanao. With a surface area of 340 km². (131 square miles), it is the largest lake in Mindanao, and the second largest lake in the Philippines and counted as one of the 15 ancient lakes in the world. The lake was formed by the tectonic-volcanic damming of a basin between two mountain ranges and the collapse of a large volcano. It has a maximum depth of 112 meters, and a mean depth of 60.3 meters. The basin is shallowest towards the north and gets progressively deeper towards the south. The lake is fed by four rivers. Its only outlet is the Agus River, which flows southwest into Iligan Bay via two channels, one over the Maria Cristina Falls and the other over the Linamon Falls. A hydroelectric plant installed on the Lanao Lake and Agus River system generates 70% of the electricity used by the people of Mindanao. The lake is a home of myths and legends of the Maranao tribe. The name Maranao was derived from the name of the lake and it means "the people living around the lake". Lake Lanao was proclaimed as a watershed reservation in 1992
    5.00
    1 votes
    228
    Lake Sevan

    Lake Sevan

    Lake Sevan (Armenian: Սևանա լիճ Sevana lich) is the largest lake in Armenia and the Caucasus region. It is one of the largest fresh-water high-altitude lakes in the world. Lake Sevan is situated in the central part of the Republic of Armenia, inside the Gegharkunik Province, at the altitude of 1,900m above sea level. The total surface area of its basin is about 5,000 km, the lake itself is 940 km, and the volume is 34.0 bln cubic meters. It is fed by 28 rivers and streams. Only 10% of the outgoing water is drained by the Hrazdan (Razdan) river, while the remaining 90% evaporates. Before human intervention dramatically changed the Lake Sevan ecosystem, the lake was 95 metres deep, covered an area of 1,360 km² (5% of Armenia's entire area), had a volume of 58 km³ and a perimeter of 260 km. The lake surface was at an altitude of 1,916 m above sea level. Along with Lake Van and Lake Urmia, Sevan was considered one of the three great lakes of the historical Armenian Kingdom, collectively referred to as the Seas of Armenia; it is the only one within the boundaries of today's Republic of Armenia. The Sevanavank peninsula (formerly an island) is the historic area of the lake at its
    5.00
    1 votes
    229
    Titisee

    Titisee

    Titisee is a lake in the southern Black Forest in Baden-Württemberg. It is said it got its name from Roman Emperor Titus. It covers an area of 1.3 km² and has an average depth of 20 m. It owes its creation to the Feldberg glacier, the moraine ploughed up by which in the Pleistocene epoch nowadays forms the lake's shores. The lake's outflow, at 840 m above sea level, is the river Gutach (or as it is called farther downstream, the Wutach). On the north shore lies the spa town of the same name, today a part of the municipality of Titisee-Neustadt. Titisee takes a long time to freeze in the winter owing to the winds, which almost always keep the surface water moving. For the lake to be opened for use, ice samples must reach a thickness of at least 16 cm. When the outlook favours opening the lake, daily ice measurements are taken by the Titisee-Neustadt city works department at three or four places. If opening the ice to public use is possible, and those responsible give it their blessing, then specific, demarcated areas of the lake are opened, but never the whole lake. These regulations were put in place in the early 1980s after there had been an accident. Until that time, the lake had
    5.00
    1 votes
    230
    Lake Winnipeg

    Lake Winnipeg

    • Islands: Black island
    Lake Winnipeg is a large, 24,514-square-kilometre (9,465 sq mi) lake in central North America, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, with its southern tip about 55 kilometres (34 mi) north of the city of Winnipeg. It is the largest lake within the borders of southern Canada, and it is part of the most undeveloped large watershed of southern Canada. Lake Winnipeg is the sixth-largest freshwater lake in Canada, and the third-largest freshwater lake contained entirely within Canada, but it is relatively shallow (mean depth of 12 m (39 ft)) excluding a narrow 36 m (118 ft) deep channel between the northern and southern basins. It is the eleventh-largest freshwater lake on Earth. The east side of the lake has pristine boreal forests and rivers that are being promoted as a potential United Nations World Heritage Park. The lake is elongated in shape and is 416 km (258 mi) from north to south, with remote sandy beaches, large limestone cliffs, and many bat caves in some areas. Manitoba Hydro uses the lake as one of the largest reservoirs in the world. There are many islands in the lake, most of them undeveloped. The lake's watershed measures about 984,200 square kilometres (380,000 sq mi),
    4.00
    2 votes
    231
    Quabbin Reservoir

    Quabbin Reservoir

    The Quabbin Reservoir is the largest inland body of water in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and was built between 1930 and 1939. Today along with the Wachusett Reservoir, it is the primary water supply for Boston, some 65 miles (105 km) to the east, as well as 40 other communities in Greater Boston. It also supplies water to three towns west of the reservoir and acts as backup supply for three others. It has an aggregate capacity of 412 billion US gallons (1.56 km) and an area of 38.6 square miles (99.9 km²). Quabbin Reservoir water flows to the Wachusett Reservoir using the Quabbin Aqueduct. The Quabbin watershed is managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, while the water supply system is operated by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. The Winsor Dam and the Goodnough Dike form the reservoir from impoundments of the three branches of the Swift River. The Quabbin Reservoir is part of the Chicopee River Watershed, which in turn feeds the Connecticut River. Metropolitan Boston's demands for fresh water began to outstrip its local supplies in the early part of the nineteenth century. Many possible sources of water were explored, including
    4.00
    2 votes
    232
    Vangsvatnet

    Vangsvatnet

    Vangsvatnet is a lake in the municipality of Voss in Hordaland county, Norway. The lake is used for various water based extreme sports activities like Kite surfing and boat dragged paragliding. The Vosso River flows through both Vangsvatnet and Evangervatnet before it empties into Bolstadfjord by the village of Bolstadøyri. Vangsvatnet is named after the place Vangen - the center and old churchsite of Voss. The last element is the finite form of vatn, meaning lake.
    4.00
    2 votes
    233
    Heiterwanger See

    Heiterwanger See

    Lake Heiterwang is a lake in the Tirol, Austria, located at 47°27′30″N 10°46′50″E / 47.45833°N 10.78056°E / 47.45833; 10.78056. Its surface is approximately 1.37 km² and its maximum depth is 61 metres. It is well-known Heiterwanger See is good for fishing. Kaiser Maximilian I of Austria often fished here.
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    Java Sea

    Java Sea

    • Islands: Java
    The Java Sea (Indonesian: Laut Jawa) is a large (320,000 km²) shallow sea on the Sunda Shelf. It was formed as sea levels rose at the end of the last ice age. The Java Sea lies between the Indonesian islands of Borneo to the north, Java to the south; Sumatra to the west, and Sulawesi to the east. Karimata Strait to its northwest, links it to the South China Sea. Fishing is an important economic activity in the Java Sea. There are over 3,000 species of marine life in the area. A number of national parks exist in the area such as Karimunjawa. The Thousand Islands are located north of the mainland Jakarta. The area around the Java Sea is a popular tourist destination. Scuba diving offers a chance to explore and photograph underwater caverns, wrecks, coral, sponges, and other marine life. The Battle of the Java Sea, during February and March 1942, was one of the costliest naval battles of World War II. The naval forces of the Netherlands, Britain, Australia, and the U.S. were nearly completely destroyed trying to defend Java from Japanese attack. The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) defines the Java Sea as being one of the waters of the East Indian Archipelago. The IHO
    4.00
    1 votes
    235
    Jenny Lake

    Jenny Lake

    Jenny Lake is located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The lake was formed approximately 12,000 years ago by glaciers pushing rock debris which carved Cascade Canyon during the last glacial maximum, forming a terminal moraine which now impounds the lake. The lake is estimated to be 423 feet (129 m) deep and encompasses 1,191 acres (482 ha). Jenny Lake is considered to be a major focal point in Grand Teton National Park, with many hiking trails, scenic boat rides and a quick access to the major climbing routes into the tallest peaks of the Teton Range. Jenny and Jackson Lakes, are the only lakes in Grand Teton National Park where motorboats are permitted and both lakes have scenic tours available. A 2005 study of the water quality of the lakes in Grand Teton National Park indicated that all the lakes in the park were still considered pristine and that they had not been impacted by air or water pollution. Jenny Lake is a starting point for many day and overnight hiking trips. The 7.1 miles (11.4 km) Jenny Lake Trail loops around the lake and considered to be relatively easy due the small altitude gain of 700 feet (210 m). However, the altitude increases
    4.00
    1 votes
    236
    Lake Barrine

    Lake Barrine

    Lake Barrine is a freshwater lake situated on the eastern parts of Atherton Tableland in Far North Queensland, Australia, close to Lake Eacham. The lake and surrounds are protected within the Crater Lakes National Park and are accessible via the Gillies Highway. Lake Barrine was formed over 17,000 years ago when a large volcano erupted, leaving a crater that over time filled up with water to create a lake. The crater or maar was formed as a result of a series of volcanic explosions. These explosions were caused by the hot molten rock coming into contact with groundwater. This caused a build-up of steam, gases and pressure which blasted the central core from the volcano. This massive explosion left a huge crater, which filled with rainwater to create Lake Barrine. Local Aboriginals called the lake Barany. The largest of the natural volcanic lakes in the area, Lake Barrine is 730 m above sea level. It is about 1 km in diameter, with a shoreline of almost 4.5 km and an average depth of 65 m. No streams or springs feed the crystal clear lake; it is filled only by rainwater. During the wet season a small creek flows out of the lake. It joins Toohey Creek which is a tributary of the
    4.00
    1 votes
    237
    Lake Ontario

    Lake Ontario

    • Bridges: Burlington Bay James N. Allan Skyway
    • Islands: Thousand Islands
    Lake Ontario (French: Lac Ontario) is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. It is bounded on the north and southwest by the Canadian province of Ontario, and on the south by the American state of New York. Ontario, Canada's most populous province, was named for the lake. In the Wyandot (Huron) language, ontarío means “Lake of Shining Waters”. It is the last in the Great Lakes chain and serves as the outlet to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence River. Lake Ontario is also the only one of the five Great Lakes not to share a coast with the state of Michigan. Lake Ontario is the easternmost of the Great Lakes and the smallest in surface area (7,340 sq mi, 18,960 km), although it exceeds Lake Erie in volume (393 cu mi, 1,639 km). It is the 14th largest lake in the world. When its islands are included, the lake has a shoreline that is 712 miles (1,146 km) long. As the last lake in the Great Lakes' hydrologic chain, Lake Ontario has the lowest mean surface elevation of the lakes at 243 feet (74 m) above sea level; 326 feet (99 m) lower than its neighbor upstream. Its maximum length is 193 statute miles (311 km; 168 nmi) and its maximum width is 53 statute miles (85 km;
    4.00
    1 votes
    238
    Cahora Bassa

    Cahora Bassa

    The Cahora Bassa lake is Africa's fourth-largest artificial lake, situated in the Tete Province in Mozambique. The name Cabora Bassa is an earlier misspelling of the name. In Africa, only Lake Volta in Ghana, Lake Kariba, on the Zambezi upstream of Cahora Bassa, and Egypt's Lake Nasser are bigger in terms of surface water. The Cahora Bassa System started in the late 1960s as a project of the Portuguese in the Overseas Province of Mozambique. South African Governments were also involved in an agreement stating that Portugal would build and operate a hydroelectric generating station at Cahora Bassa together with the high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission system required to bring electricity to the border of South Africa. South Africa, on the other hand, undertook to build and operate the Apollo converter station and part of the transmission system required to bring the electricity from the South African/Mozambican border to the Apollo converter station near Midrand. South Africa was then obliged to buy electricity that Portugal was obliged to supply. During its construction, the dam site was repeatedly attacked without success by Frelimo guerrilla insurgents in an attempt to
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Crater Lake

    Crater Lake

    Crater Lake is a caldera lake located in the south-central region of the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the main feature of Crater Lake National Park and famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot (655 m) deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. On June 12, 1853, John Wesley Hillman was reportedly the first person of European descent to see what he named "Deep Blue Lake" in Oregon. The lake was renamed at least three times, as Blue Lake, Lake Majesty, and finally Crater Lake. Crater Lake is known for the "Old Man of the Lake", a full-sized tree which is now a stump that has been bobbing vertically in the lake for more than a century. The low temperature of the water has slowed the decomposition of the wood, hence the longevity of the bobbing tree. While having no indigenous fish population, the lake was stocked from 1888 to 1941 with a variety of fish. Several species have formed
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Faaker See

    Faaker See

    Faaker See or Lake Faak (German: Faaker See, Slovene: Baško jezero) is an alpine lake in the Austrian state of Carinthia. With a surface of approximately 2.2 km² it is the state's fifth largest lake. Faaker See is a popular vacation and bathing destination, known for its clear turquoise water. Fishing, especially for whitefish (Reinanke) is also quite popular. It is located south of Villach and the Drava river at the northern slope of the Karawanken mountain range. The settlements of Drobollach and Egg on the northern shore belong to the City of Villach. The village of Faak in the southwest, after which the lake is named, is part of the Finkenstein municipality. In 1855, the Faaker Lake inspired the Slovene composer and priest Franc Treiber to compose the song Nmav čez izaro ("Over the Lake"), which soon became one of the most famous Slovene folk songs, and it's considered to these days the unofficial anthem of Carinthian Slovenes.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Formarinsee

    Formarinsee

    Formarinesee is a lake in the Austrian Alps. It lies in the Bundesland of Vorarlberg and is the source of the River Lech.
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Issyk Kul

    Issyk Kul

    Issyk Kul (also Ysyk Köl, Issyk-Kol: Kyrgyz: Ысык - Көл [ɯsɯqkœl]; Russian: Иссык-Куль) is an endorheic lake in the northern Tian Shan mountains in eastern Kyrgyzstan. It is the tenth largest lake in the world by volume and the second largest saline lake after the Caspian Sea. Although it is surrounded by snow-capped peaks, it never freezes; hence its name, which means "hot lake" in the Kyrgyz language. The lake is a Ramsar site of globally significant biodiversity (Ramsar Site RDB Code 2KG001) and forms part of the Issyk-Kul Biosphere Reserve. It was the site of an ancient metropolis 2500 years ago, and archaeological excavations are ongoing. Lake Issyk Kul has a length of 182 kilometres (113 mi), a width of up to 60 kilometres (37 mi), and covers an area of 6,236 square kilometres (2,408 sq mi). This makes it the second largest mountain lake in the world behind Lake Titicaca in South America. Located at an altitude of 1,607 metres (5,272 ft), it reaches 668 metres (2,192 ft) in depth. About 118 rivers and streams flow into the lake; the largest are the Djyrgalan and Tyup. It is fed by springs, including many hot springs, and snow melt-off. The lake has no current outlet, but some
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Lake Aviemore

    Lake Aviemore

    Lake Aviemore or Mahi Tikumu is a man-made lake in New Zealand's South Island, part of the Waitaki hydroelectric scheme. Immediately upstream is Lake Benmore and downstream Lake Waitaki. Aviemore lies on both sides of the border between the Waimate and Waitaki districts. It is part of the traditional boundary of the Canterbury and Otago regions, although, officially, the border has been moved southward to include the lake, as well as the entire northwestern portion of the Waitaki District in the Canterbury Region. The Otematata settlement situated on State Highway 83 is just west of the lake, and was built in 1958 as a base for the construction of the Aviemore and Benmore Dams. Closer to the lake the old village Wharekuri which encompasses Aviemore was populous in the 1860s. The Aviemore Dam, completed in 1968, is the newest of the three dams on the Waitaki river. It is made out of both earth and concrete. By continuing the sinuous course of the river after the lake, one encounters Parsons Rock, named after Reverend J.C. Andrew (The Parson) who usually gave Christmas day sermon there. A story goes to say that stolen gold taken from the Wharekuri Hotel was hidden near Parsons
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    0 votes
    244
    Lake Chelan

    Lake Chelan

    Lake Chelan is a narrow, 55-mile-long lake in Chelan County, northern Washington state, U.S. It is the largest natural lake in Washington state. The name Chelan is a Salish Indian word Tsi - Laan, meaning deep water. Fed by streams from the Cascade Range, Lake Chelan has maximum depth of 1,486 ft (453 m) (though some sources cite 1,420 feet), making it the third deepest lake in the country and the 26th deepest in the world. The surface of the lake is 1,098 feet (335 m) above sea level, while the average width of the lake is one mile. The city of Chelan sits at the southeast tip of the lake, where its water flows into the Chelan River through the hydroelectric Lake Chelan Dam. At the northwest end of the lake is the town of Stehekin, where the town's namesake river, the Stehekin River, flows into the lake. The Stehekin is the lake's largest inflow stream. Access to the far end of the lake is limited to boat, float plane, or hiking. Lake Chelan State Park lies along the southern shore of the lake, and can be accessed from the city of Chelan by road. The northern portion of the lake is protected by Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.
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    Lake Marble Falls

    Lake Marble Falls

    Lake Marble Falls is a reservoir on the Colorado River in the Texas Hill Country in the United States. The reservoir was formed in 1951 by the construction of Max Starcke Dam by the Lower Colorado River Authority. Originally named Marble Falls Dam, the dam was renamed in 1962 for Max Starcke, the second general director of the LCRA. Located near the town of Marble Falls, the lake is used as a venue for aquatic recreation and for the purpose of generating hydroelectric power. It is the newest of the Texas Highland Lakes, and at 611 acres (247 ha) it is the second smallest lake in the Texas Highland Lakes behind Lady Bird Lake. The other reservoirs on the Colorado River are Lake Buchanan, Inks Lake, Lake LBJ, Lake Travis, Lake Austin, and Lady Bird Lake. Unlike some of its immediate neighbors in the Texas Highland Lakes reservoir system, Lake Marble Falls is not infested with hydrilla, a non-native invasive plant from Asia thought to have been introduced to the U.S. via the tropical fish industry. Lake Marble Falls has been stocked with several species of native fish intended to improve the utility of the reservoir for recreational fishing. Fish present in Inks Lake include
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    Lake Wairarapa

    Lake Wairarapa

    Lake Wairarapa is a lake at the southern end of the North Island of New Zealand, 50 kilometers east of Wellington. The lake covers an area of 78 km², and is the third largest in the North Island, fractionally smaller than Lake Rotorua. The nearest town to the lake is Featherston, which is located five kilometres from its northern shore. The lake's catchment area is large, and includes the eastern slopes of the Rimutaka and Tararua Ranges. The lake takes water from several rivers and was originally the main outflow for the Ruamahanga. This in turn drained slowly into Palliser Bay and Cook Strait ten kilometres south near the settlement of Lake Ferry, via what is now Lake Onoke. The river, however, was diverted in the 1960s to assist flow, thereby reducing flooding for farmers. The lake today therefore covers an area significantly smaller than its historical size of around 210 km² The area around the lake is low-lying and swampy, and recent efforts have been made to preserve its important wetland features and restore wildlife habitat that has been degraded through human use. Agriculture and river development, flood control, and waterway diversions have resulted in the drainage of
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    Lough Corrib

    Lough Corrib

    Lough Corrib (pronounced lokh KOR-ib, Irish: Loch Coirib) is a lake in the west of Ireland. The River Corrib or Galway river connects the lake to the sea at Galway. It is the second largest lough in the island of Ireland (after Lough Neagh). It covers 178 km² and lies mostly in County Galway with a small area of its northeast corner in County Mayo. The first canal on the island of Ireland was cut in the 12th century. Known as the Friar's Cut, it allowed boats to pass from Lough Corrib to the sea at Galway. William Wilde, father of Oscar Wilde wrote a book about the lake, first published in 1867. He built a summerhouse on the banks of the lake, called Moytura House. Lough Corrib was designated a Ramsar site on June 16, 1996. It has also been designated a Special Area of Conservation. Loch Coirib is a corruption of Loch nOirbsean, which according to placename lore is named after the Tuatha Dé Danann figure Orbsiu Mac Alloid (commonly called Manannán Mac Lir). In Irish the lough is also called An Choirib ("the Corrib"). Surveys have been undertaken since 2007 by a local surveyor / cartographer using sidescan sonar. These have uncovered a great many objects of historical significance,
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    Sarsang reservoir

    Sarsang reservoir

    The Sarsang reservoir is a large lake located de-jure in Tartar Rayon of Azerbaijan and de-facto in Martakert Province of Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, formed by a hydroelectric dam. It is one of Azerbaijan's 61 water reservoirs, however Azerbaijan does not control the territory it is located on. Sarsang reservoir was built on Tartar river in 1976. The area of the reservoir is 14.2 km (5.5 sq mi). The overall volume of the reservoir is 575 million m. The height of the dam at the reservoir is 125 m (410 ft). The reservoir has the tallest dam out of all dams in Azerbaijan. Since opening, the reservoir has provided irrigation water for 100,000 ha (1,000,000 km) of agricultural lands in Tartar, Agdam, Barda, Goranboy, Yevlakh and Aghjabadi raions of Azerbaijan. Sarsang Hydro Power Plant with capacity of 50 megawatt is based on the reservoir and operated by Artsakh HEK OJSC. It is the main source of electric energy for Nagorno-Karabakh Republic (40-60%). With its beautiful surrounding nature, Sarsang reservoir is expected to be one of the major tourism centers of Nagorno-Karabakh Republic in the long run.
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    Schluchsee

    Schluchsee

    The Schluchsee is a reservoir lake in the district of Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald, southeast of the Titisee in the Black Forest near Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany. The Schluchsee, with its height of 930 metres above sea level, is the highest reservoir in Germany and also the largest lake in the Black Forest. By contrast the Hornberg Basin (Hornbergbecken), is 1,048 metres above sea level, but is the upper basin of a pumped storage hydropower station, rather than a reservoir. The water of the reservoir is relatively cool even in summer because of its high elevation. The best-known settlements around the Schluchsee are on its northern shores and include the eponymous town of Schluchsee and the hamlets of Seebrugg by the dam itself and Aha. The Three Lakes Railway, an extension of the Höllentalbahn, runs from Titisee station along the northern shore to the terminus at Seebrugg. The surface of the original, undammed Schluchsee, a glacier lake, was around 30 metres lower than that of today's reservoir. Despite the dam, the Schluchsee appears natural. The lake is 7.3 long by 1.4 kilometres across. Its 63.5 m high dam was built between 1929 and 1932, impounding the river Schwarza. In order
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    Seneca Lake

    Seneca Lake

    Seneca Lake is the largest of the glacial Finger Lakes of the U.S. state of New York, and the deepest lake entirely within the state. It is promoted as being the lake trout capital of the world, and is host of the National Lake Trout Derby. Because of its depth and relative ease of access, the US Navy uses Seneca Lake to perform test and evaluation of equipment ranging from single element transducers to complex sonar arrays and systems. The lake takes its name from the Seneca nation of Native Americans. At the north end of Seneca Lake is the city of Geneva, New York, home of Hobart and William Smith Colleges and the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, a division of Cornell University. At the south end of the lake is the village of Watkins Glen, New York, famed for auto racing and waterfalls. Due to Seneca Lake's unique macroclimate it is home to over 50 wineries, many of them farm wineries and is the location of the Seneca Lake AVA. (See Seneca Lake wine trail). At 38 miles (61 km) long, It is the second longest of the Finger Lakes and has the largest volume, estimated at 4.2 trillion US gallons (16 km³), roughly half of the water in all the Finger Lakes. It has a
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