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    1

    Blood, Sweat & Tears

    Blood, Sweat & Tears is the second album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1968. It was a huge commercial success, rising to the top of the U.S. charts for a collective seven weeks and yielding three successive Top 5 singles. It received a Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 1970 and has been certified quadruple platinum by the RIAA with sales of more than four million units in the U.S. In Canada, it enjoyed four runs and altogether eight weeks at #1 on the RPM national album chart. Bandleader Al Kooper and two other members had left Blood, Sweat & Tears after their first album. Bobby Colomby and Steve Katz searched for a replacement singer and selected David Clayton-Thomas. Three more musicians joined to bring the band to nine members. Columbia assigned James William Guercio (who was simultaneously working with new band Chicago) to produce a new album. The song selection was much more pop-oriented than the first album, with more compositions from outside the band. It was recorded at the then state of the art CBS Studios in New York City. The studio had just taken delivery of one of the first of the model MM-1000 16-track tape recorders, built by Ampex. The new
    6.33
    9 votes
    2

    In Concert

    In Concert is a double live album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, that was released in Europe and Japan in 1976. This album was later remixed and released in the United States as Live And Improvised in 1991. This collection was recorded live at four different venues over five nights during the summer of 1975. The lineup for this album is the same as the New City album they were supporting on that tour with the exception of Steve Kahn and Mike Stern on guitar. The songs in this collection were recorded at the Schaeffer Music Festival in New York City; City Hall Plaza in Boston; National Arts Centre in Ottawa, Ontario; and at the Monterey Jazz Festival in Monterey, California.
    7.67
    6 votes
    4

    New City

    New City is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1975. It peaked at Number 47 on the Billboard Pop Albums charts. New City marks the return to the line-up of lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas. Writing for Allmusic, critic Jason Elias wrote the album "It does sound promising, but, in all honesty, New City's fortunes seemed doomed from the start." Production notes Album - Billboard (North America)
    7.00
    5 votes
    7
    8.33
    3 votes
    8
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    3 votes
    9

    Mirror Image

    Mirror Image is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1974. Founding member Jim Fielder left the band prior to the recording of Mirror Image. Long-time horn player Lew Soloff also left the group. Jerry LaCroix, previously of Edgar Winter's band White Trash joined on saxophone and occasional lead vocals. This album was produced by veteran Motown producer Henry Cosby, best known for his work on early Stevie Wonder songs. Mirror Image was re-released on CD in 2005 on the Wounded Bird label. Writing for Allmusic, critic Ross Boissoneau called the album "the most atypical Blood, Sweat & Tears album ever." Album - Billboard (North America)
    5.75
    4 votes
    10

    Live

    Live is a live album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, that was recorded in 1980 and released on compact disc in 1995 by Avenue Records through Rhino Records. This album was recorded at the Street Scene in Downtown Los Angeles on October 12, 1980. This set was recorded five years after the Live In Concert/Live And Improvised album. The band's hit songs included in this collection were compressed into a 15 minute medley instead of the full length versions that were included on their previous live album. The rest of the songs here are from the Nuclear Blues album they were touring to support at the time of this recording. One exception was an eleven and a half minute version of "Gimme That Wine" that was originally released on the Brand New Day album in 1977. 1. "Intro" – :25 2. "Agitato" (Bruce Cassidy) – 6:19 3. "Nuclear Blues" (David Clayton-Thomas) – 4:08 4. "Manic Depression (Jimi Hendrix) – 4:45 Medley: 5. "God Bless The Child" (Arthur Herzog, Billie Holiday) – 2:57 6. "Lucretia Mac Evil" (David Clayton-Thomas) – 1:12 7. "Hi-De-Ho" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) – 5:33 8. "And When I Die" (Laura Nyro) – 1:36 9. "Spinning Wheel" (David Clayton-Thomas) – 1:12 10. "You've Made Me So
    7.00
    3 votes
    11

    Nuclear Blues

    Nuclear Blues is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1980. This was the band's eleventh studio album and their first release for MCA/LAX Records. Nuclear Blues was produced by Jerry Goldstein, who had previously been known for his work with the band War. Even though it had only been three years since they released their last album Brand New Day, the band contained a new line-up with David Clayton-Thomas being the only remaining member from that period. This album failed to make it on the Billboard Album Charts. 1. "Agitato" (Bruce Cassidy) – 5:51 2. "Nuclear Blues" (David Clayton-Thomas) – 4:24 3. "Manic Depression (Jimi Hendrix) – 4:18 4. "I'll Drown In My Own Tears" (Henry Glover) – 7:21 5. "Fantasy Stage" (David Clayton-Thomas, Robert Piltch) – 5:41 6. Spanish Wine Suite: – 15:11 7. "Spanish Wine (Reprise)" (Bruce Cassidy)– 1:42
    7.00
    3 votes
    12

    Blood, Sweat & Tears Greatest Hits

    Greatest Hits is a compilation album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, initially released in 1972. Although Blood, Sweat & Tears continued to record and tour for several more years, the band's lineup changed dramatically after Blood, Sweat & Tears 4. This compilation album includes all of the group's best-known material, and it was their last album to go gold. Columbia initially chose to incorporate the single edits of the radio hits, a decision which was poorly received by some fans; later CD releases extended the singles to full-length album versions. Writing for Allmusic, critic William Ruhlman wrote the album "captures the band's peak in 11 selections—seven singles chart entries, plus two album tracks from the celebrated debut album when Al Kooper helmed the group, and two more from the Grammy-winning multi-platinum second album... For the millions who learned to love BS in 1969 when they were all over AM radio, this is the ideal selection of their most accessible material." Music critic Robert Christgau's commented "their pop success does them more good in Vegas than on the radio, and only four of these eleven cuts made top twenty." The original LP release included the
    8.50
    2 votes
    14

    The Owl and the Pussycat

    The Owl and the Pussy Cat (Soundtrack Album) The Owl and the Pussy Cat is a soundtrack album containing dialog from the motion picture with the background music performed by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. The music was composed and arranged by Blood, Sweat & Tears' Dick Halligan. The album peaked at #186 on the Billboard Album Charts in 1971. William Ruhlmann's Allmusic review stated "the album consists of dialogue from the movie, endless bickering between Streisand and George Segal, accompanied by snippets of background music played by Blood, Sweat & Tears in their characteristic jazz-rock style." Side One Side Two
    5.67
    3 votes
    15

    Child Is Father to the Man

    Child Is Father to the Man is the debut album by Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in February 1968. It reached number 47 on Billboard's (North America) Pop Albums chart. Widely regarded as a classic fusion of jazz, rock and roll, psychedelia and classical music, Child Is Father to the Man is one of bandleader Al Kooper's most enduring works. The album introduced the idea of the big band to rock and roll and paved the way for such groups as Chicago. Kooper left the band after this album, changing the nature of the group. Child Is Father to the Man peaked at #47 on Billboard's (North America) Pop Albums chart. It failed to generate any Top 40 singles in the United States, although "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" and "I Can't Quit Her" found some play on progressive rock radio. In 2003, the album was ranked number 264 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The title is a quotation from a similarly titled poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins, slightly misquoting a poem by William Wordsworth called "My Heart Leaps Up". The album was re-released in the UK in 1973, entitled "The First Album" on Embassy Records, a subsidiary of Columbia Records (catalogue
    7.50
    2 votes
    16

    New Blood

    New Blood is the fifth album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1972. With David Clayton-Thomas leaving as lead vocalist to pursue a solo career after the release of BS 4, a nearly wholesale personnel change occurred for New Blood. Difficulties had arisen inside the group between its pop-rock and jazz factions, with Clayton-Thomas choosing to leave in early January 1972. He was briefly replaced by Bobby Doyle, and then Jerry Fisher. Founding member, Dick Halligan, also departed, as well as Fred Lipsius. The album reached the top-40 charts (the last BS LP to do so) and spawned a single, "So Long Dixie", which peaked at number 44. New Blood was re-released on CD in 2005 on the Wounded Bird label. Writing for Allmusic, critic Ross Boissoneau wrote of the album "The band vocals on "Touch Me" and the arrangement of Herbie Hancock's "Maiden Voyage" are among the highlights, but then there's Bob Dylan's "Down in the Flood" and Steve Katz's "Velvet" (about a horse, for Pete's sake!). Gerry Goffin and Carole King's "Snow Queen" almost makes up for it, with sensational solos from Dave Bargeron on trombone and Lou Marini on sax." Album - Billboard (North America)
    7.50
    2 votes
    18
    5.33
    3 votes
    19

    No Sweat

    No Sweat is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1973. By mid-1973, Steve Katz, one of the founding members of BS had left the band as the members leaned further towards jazz fusion. No Sweat continued in the jazz-fusion vein and featured intricate horn work. No Sweat was re-released on CD in 2005 on the Wounded Bird label. Writing for Allmusic, critic Ross Boissoneau wrote the album "may be the jazziest BS ever." Additional musicians Album - Billboard (North America)
    7.00
    2 votes
    20

    More Than Ever

    More Than Ever is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in July 1976. This was the band's ninth studio album and their last for Columbia Records. This album peaked at #165 on the Billboard album charts. The personnel changes in the band continued with Mike Stern replacing George Wadenius on electric guitar, Danny Trifan replacing Ron McClure on bass, and Forest Buchtell replacing Joe Giorgianni on trumpet. Don Alias left the band (percussion) and Mike Corbett was added on background vocals. More Than Ever was produced by Bob James who brought in such legendary session players as Steve Khan on guitar, Richard Tee on keyboards, Eric Gale on guitar, Hugh McKracken on guitar, and Eric Weissberg on banjo and dobro along with vocalist Patti Austin on background vocals to compliment the regular BS lineup. More Than Ever was re-released on CD in 2003 on the Wounded Bird label along with Sony Music. The Allmusic review by Bruce Eder says it all: "For the first time since its second album, the group -- with only drummer Bobby Colomby left from the original lineup and Bob James producing -- sounds bold, enthused, and fully positive in its approach. The sound is a little more
    9.00
    1 votes
    21

    Live And Improvised

    Live And Improvised is a two compact disc live album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, that was originally released in 1976 as a live album entitled In Concert by Columbia Records in Europe and Japan. This album was later remixed and released in the United States as Live And Improvised in 1991. This collection was recorded live at four different venues over five nights during the summer of 1975. The lineup for this album is the same as the New City album they were supporting on that tour with the exception of Steve Kahn and Mike Stern on guitar. The songs in this collection were recorded at the Schaeffer Music Festival in New York City; City Hall Plaza in Boston; National Arts Centre in Ottawa, Ontario; and at the Monterey Jazz Festival in Monterey, California. Writing for Allmusic, critic Bruce Eder wrote, "What's also lacking is some excitement -- in the group's evident desire to emphasize their jazz side while minimizing any rock elements in their playing, they've also banished any tension, or the interplay between rock and jazz elements upon which their original appeal was founded. Numbers like "Spinning Wheel," "Lucretia MacEvil," "And When I Die," and "I Love You More Than
    6.50
    2 votes
    22

    Blood, Sweat & Tears 3

    Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 is the third album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1970. After the huge success of their previous album, Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 was highly anticipated and it rose quickly to the top of the US album chart. It also yielded two hit singles: a cover of Carole King's "Hi-De-Ho," and "Lucretia MacEvil." However, the album relied heavily on cover material and it received lukewarm reviews (this may also have been influenced by the band's participation in an unpopular U.S. government-sponsored tour of Eastern Europe). Writing for Allmusic, critic William Ruhlman wrote called the album "a convincing, if not quite as impressive, companion to their previous hit. David Clayton-Thomas remained an enthusiastic blues shouter, and the band still managed to put together lively arrangements... although their pretentiousness, on the extended "Symphony/Sympathy for the Devil," and their tendency to borrow other artists' better-known material rather than generating more of their own, were warning signs for the future." Music critic Robert Christgau wrote "Just figured out how David Clayton-Thomas learned vocal projection: by belching. That's why when he gets really
    6.00
    2 votes
    23
    8.00
    1 votes
    25

    Brand New Day

    Brand New Day is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1977. This was the band's tenth studio album and their first and only release for ABC Records. Brand New Day was produced by Roy Halee and former BS drummer Bobby Colomby. Colomby and Halee had also co-produced the group's fourth album, Blood, Sweat & Tears 4 in 1971. This collection failed to chart on the Billboard Album Charts in the top 200 even though it did reach #205 under the chart. The group's lineup stayed constant between this album and 1976's More Than Ever with the exception of the departure of original BS drummer Bobby Colomby. Colomby had been the sole remaining original member of the group at the time of his departure in 1976. Roy McCurdy took over the drums beginning on this release. This album has not been released on compact disc except for a brief period in Russia where the legitimacy of that release is still in question. Writing for Allmusic, critic Jason Elias wrote, "For the most part, Brand New Day wasn't as innovative or as grand as previous releases, but fans will enjoy some of the better moments." Elias also stated "by 1977, the musical landscape had changed, so this is closer to
    6.00
    1 votes
    27

    Blood, Sweat & Tears 4

    BS 4 is the fourth album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1971. It peaked at number 10 on the Billboard Pop albums chart. David Clayton-Thomas left as lead vocalist to pursue a solo career after the release of BS 4, as did founding members Dick Halligan and Fred Lipsius. Clayton-Thomas would return to the lineup for New City. Writing for Allmusic, critic William Ruhlman wrote "the band's cohesion seemed to be disintegrating. Although the album scraped the Top Ten briefly and went gold, it marked the end of BS's period of wide commercial success on records." Music critic Robert Christgau's only comments were "Aww-shuck! heck." Additional musicians Album - Billboard (North America) Singles - Billboard (North America)
    4.00
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