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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Beverage of All Time

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    1
    Unicum

    Unicum

    Unicum is a Hungarian herbal bitters, drunk as a digestif and apéritif. Unicum is an herbal digestif liqueur. The liqueur is today produced by Zwack according to a secret formula of more than forty herbs, and the drink is aged in oak casks. During the Socialist regime in Hungary, the Zwack family lived in exile in New York and Chicago, and during this time, Unicum in Hungary was produced using a different formula. Before moving to the US Janos Zwack had entrusted a family friend in Milan with the production of Unicum based on the original recipe. After the fall of communism, Péter Zwack returned to Hungary and resumed production of the original Unicum. Unicum is regarded as one of the national drinks of Hungary. The production facility offers tours which include a tasting session of the three different varieties (Unicum, Unicum Next, and Millenicum). Though Millenicum was a special edition, it can still be found at a few retailers. It is somewhat stronger than the original, with a slightly sweeter aftertaste. Zwack Frissitők is a pineapple-based version of the drink. Unicum is available through select spirits distributors throughout the US, as is Unicum Next (a thinner-bodied drink
    8.00
    8 votes
    2
    Kool-Aid

    Kool-Aid

    Kool-Aid is a brand of flavored drink mix owned by Kraft Foods. Kool-Aid was invented by Edwin Perkins in Hastings, Nebraska. All of his experiments took place in his mother's kitchen. Its predecessor was a liquid concentrate called Fruit Smack. To reduce shipping costs, in 1927, Perkins discovered a way to remove the liquid from Fruit Smack, leaving only a powder. This powder was named Kool-Aid. Perkins moved his production to Chicago in 1931 and Kool-Aid was sold to General Foods in 1953. Hastings still celebrates a yearly summer festival called Kool-Aid Days on the second weekend in August, in honor of their city's claim to fame. Kool-Aid is known as Nebraska's official soft drink. An agreement between Kraft Foods and SodaStream International in 2012 made Kool-Aid's flavors available for purchase and use with SodaStream's home soda maker machine. Kool-Aid is usually sold in powder form, in either packets or small tubs. The drink is prepared by mixing the powder with sugar and water (typically by the pitcher-full). The drink is then refrigerated and later served. Additionally, there are some sugar-free varieties. Kool-Aid is/was also sold as single-serving packets designed to be
    6.50
    8 votes
    3
    Caipirinha

    Caipirinha

    Caipirinha (Portuguese pronunciation: [kajpiˈɾĩɲɐ]) is Brazil's national cocktail, made with cachaça (pronounced: [kaˈʃasɐ]) (sugar cane rum), sugar and lime. Cachaça is Brazil's most common distilled alcoholic beverage (also known as Pinga or Caninha). Both rum and cachaça are made from sugarcane-derived products. Specifically with cachaça, the alcohol results from the fermentation of sugarcane juice that is afterwards distilled. Caipirinha is based on Poncha, an alcoholic drink from Madeira, Portugal. The main ingredient is aguardente de cana, which is made from sugar cane. Sugar cane production switched from Madeira to Brazil by the Portuguese as they needed more land to plant it on. Before this people in Madeira had already created aguardente de cana (sugar cane), which was the ancestor to cachaça. The caipirinha is the national cocktail of Brazil, and is enjoyed in restaurants, bars, and many households throughout the country. Once almost unknown outside Brazil, the drink has become more popular and more widely available in recent years, in large part due to the rising availability of first-rate brands of cachaça outside Brazil. The International Bartenders Association has
    8.33
    6 votes
    4
    Canadian whisky

    Canadian whisky

    Canadian whisky is a type of whisky produced in Canada. Most Canadian whiskies are blended multi-grain liquors containing a large percentage of corn spirits, and are typically lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Because rye was once a standard ingredient in Canadian whisky, the terms "rye whisky" and "Canadian whisky" are often used interchangeably in Canada. While the lighter and smoother Canadian whiskies are the most widely familiar, the range of products is actually broad and includes some robust whiskies as well. According to the laws of Canada, a Canadian whisky must be mashed, distilled and aged in Canada. To improve marketability, it may contain caramel (as may Scotch whisky) and flavouring, in addition to the distilled mash spirits. As with Scotch and Irish whiskey, the alcohol content of the spirits used may exceed 90%. Thus, much of the spirits used in making a Canadian whisky, prior to aging, may have less grain-derived flavour than typical single malts or U.S. "straight" whiskeys. While this aspect is similar to Scotch and Irish whisky regulations, it contrasts with the maximum alcoholic proof limits on distillation (80% abv) and aging (62.5% abv) purity
    7.67
    6 votes
    5
    Distillation

    Distillation

    Distillation is a method of separating mixtures based on differences in volatilities of components in a boiling liquid mixture. Distillation is a unit operation, or a physical separation process, and not a chemical reaction. Commercially, distillation has a number of applications. It is used to separate crude oil into more fractions for specific uses such as transport, power generation and heating. Water is distilled to remove impurities, such as salt from seawater. Air is distilled to separate its components—notably oxygen, nitrogen, and argon— for industrial use. Distillation of fermented solutions has been used since ancient times to produce distilled beverages with a higher alcohol content. The premises where distillation is carried out, especially distillation of alcohol, are known as a distillery. The first clear evidence of distillation comes from Greek alchemists working in Alexandria in the 1st century AD. Distilled water has been known since at least c. 200, when Alexander of Aphrodisias described the process. Arabs learned the process from the Egyptians and used it extensively in their chemical experiments. Clear evidence of the distillation of alcohol comes from the
    8.80
    5 votes
    6
    Moonshine

    Moonshine

    Moonshine (meaning illicit distillation, also called white lightning, mountain dew, hooch, "Tennessee white whiskey", and many other names) is a very high proof, often 190 proof (95% alcohol), distilled spirit. The word is believed to derive from early English smugglers and illegal Appalachian distillers who clandestinely (i.e., by the light of the moon) produced and distributed whiskey. Moonshine is any distilled spirit made in an unlicensed still. As with all distilled spirits, yeast or naturally occurring bacteria (such as Zymomonas mobilis) is used to ferment a sugar source to produce alcohol; the alcohol is then extracted through the process of distillation. Varieties of moonshine are produced throughout the world. Usually, illicit distillation is associated with the making of ethanol for drinking; however, it is also practiced for creating biofuel. Poorly produced moonshine can be contaminated, mainly from materials used in construction of the still. Stills employing used automotive radiators as a condenser are particularly dangerous; in some cases, glycol products from antifreeze used in the radiator can appear as well. Radiators used as condensers also may contain lead at
    8.80
    5 votes
    7
    Falernum

    Falernum

    Falernum (pronounced fah-learn-um) is a sweet syrup used in Caribbean and tropical drinks. It contains flavors of almond, ginger and/or cloves, and lime, and sometimes vanilla or allspice. It is used in cocktails in a manner similar to orgeat syrup or drunk on the rocks. The syrup form can be alcoholic or nonalcoholic. The consistency is thick, the color can be white to light amber, and it may be clear or translucent. Falernum owes its name to the renowned ancient Roman wine falernian, known as falernum in Latin. Some reports have the origination of falernum dated back to the 18th century, but the earliest known reference in bar manuals seems to be the 1930s. One producer (see below) claims his recipe to date to 1890, winning awards as early as 1923. Famous drinks using falernum include: Fee Brothers produces a nonalcoholic version, and John D. Taylor's Velvet Falernum is an alcoholic version available in the United States. The Bitter Truth released their Golden Falernum in 2011, available in Europe in Asia. Zlama (talk) 05:19, 24 September 2012 (UTC)
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Budweiser Budvar

    Budweiser Budvar

    Budweiser is the name of a pilsner-style beer from the city of ᅣフeskᅢᄅ Budᅣロjovice in Bohemia (Czech Republic), brewed since 1265. Its name is derived from the German name for the town, Budweis (something from Budweis being a Budweiser). For a time the town was the royal brewery for the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Budweiser Budvar is produced in four variations: regular (red label) Budvar, light (blue label) Budvar, non-alcoholic (green label) Budvar Free, and black label Budvar Strong. The lager fermentation for red label Budvar is 72 days; for Budvar Strong, 270 days. Budweiser Budvar has a very rich taste of malt and Saaz hops. The bitter hop presence and distinct malt profile makes it easily distinguishable from an American Budweiser, which also uses rice in its brewing process. The brewery also produces a dark lager style beer, Budvar Dark. The Budᅣロjovickᅢᄑ Budvar brewery offers tours for a small fee. Other breweries in ᅣフeskᅢᄅ Budᅣロjovice are Budweiser Bᅢᄐrgerbrᅢᄂu (trademark Samson), Bohemia Regent and Trebzin. It is claimed that Samson was the model for Anheuser-Busch brand. Although Budᅣロjovickᅢᄑ Budvar was founded in the 13th century, Anheuser-Busch
    8.40
    5 votes
    9
    Cognac

    Cognac

    Cognac ( /ˈkɒnjæk/ KON-yak ; French pronunciation: [kɔ.ɲak]), named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy. It is produced in the wine-growing region surrounding the town from which it takes its name, in the French Departements of Charente and Charente-Maritime. For a distilled brandy to bear the name Cognac, an Appellation d'origine contrôlée, its production methods must meet certain legal requirements. In particular, it must be made from specified grapes (see below), of which Ugni Blanc, known locally as Saint-Emilion, is the one most widely used at the present time. The brandy must be twice distilled in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in French oak barrels from Limousin or Tronçais. Cognac matures in the same way as whiskies and wine when aged in barrels, and most cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement. The region authorised to produce cognac is divided into six zones, including five crus broadly covering the department of Charente-Maritime, a large part of the department of Charente and a few areas in Deux-Sèvres and the Dordogne. The six zones are: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bon
    8.40
    5 votes
    10
    Canton

    Canton

    Domaine de Canton is a ginger-flavored liqueur imported and distributed by Maurice Cooper et Cie., an American firm based in Manhasset, New York. In its earlier formulation (called Canton), it was distributed by Charles Jacquin et Cie, a company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Under the name The Original Canton Delicate Ginger Liqueur the liqueur was produced until 1997 in Doumen, a district of the city of Zhuhai in the Pearl River Delta of China's southern Guangdong province, near Macau. It was sold in limited quantity in the United States before high-end Asian fusion cuisine became popular. In its original formulation, the liqueur's ingredients were advertised to include six varieties of ginger, ginseng, "gentle herbs," "finest spirits," brandy, and honey. Its strength was 20 percent alcohol (40 proof), and it was sold in decorative faceted glass bottles of various sizes. The product's stay on the market lasted from 1992 to 1995. It was officially discontinued after 1997. In 2007, John Cooper (one of N. J. Cooper's two sons) revived the name and idea by producing a new ginger liqueur called Canton Ginger & Cognac Liqueur. Canton Ginger Liqueur follows a new recipe and is
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    Zombie cocktail

    Zombie cocktail

    The Zombie is a cocktail made of fruit juices, liqueurs, and various rums, so named for its perceived effects upon the drinker. It first appeared in the late 1930s, invented by Donn Beach (formerly Ernest Raymond Beaumont-Gannt) of Hollywood's Don the Beachcomber restaurant. It was popularized soon afterwards at the 1939 New York World's Fair. Legend has it that Donn Beach originally concocted the Zombie to help a hung-over customer get through a business meeting. He returned several days later to complain that he had been turned into a zombie for his entire trip. Its smooth, fruity taste works to conceal its extremely high alcoholic content. Don the Beachcomber restaurants limit their customers to two Zombies apiece. According to the original recipe, the Zombie cocktail included three different kinds of rum, lime juice, falernum, Angostura bitters, Pernod, grenadine, and “Don’s Mix,” a combination of cinnamon syrup and grapefruit juice. Beach was very cautious with the recipes of his original cocktails. His instructions for his bartenders contained coded references to ingredients, the contents of which were only known to him. Beach's original recipes for the Zombie and other Tiki
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Appletini

    Appletini

    An apple martini (appletini for short) is a cocktail containing vodka and one or more of apple juice, apple cider, apple liqueur, or apple brandy. Optionally, vermouth may be included, as in a regular martini. Typically, the apple vodka is shaken or stirred with a sweet and sour mix and then strained into a cocktail glass. In its purest form, it would contain: A common variation of the appletini is the "Rumpletini", with a light rum in place of the vodka. The appletini can also be made with "martini bianco" in a long drink glass and filled with apple juice.
    9.25
    4 votes
    13
    Virginia Gentleman

    Virginia Gentleman

    Virginia Gentleman is a brand of bourbon whiskey. Unlike most other bourbons, it is not distilled in Kentucky but in the adjoining state of Virginia. Some insist that it is not a true bourbon because it is not made in Kentucky, but there is no legal requirement that bourbon be produced there and whiskey was actually first distilled in Virginia in the 17th century (Kentucky was part of Virginia until 1792). Virginia Gentleman's former label was a source of controversy as it apparently depicted two wealthy plantation-owners being served by a slave. The label was redesigned somewhat to change this implication; also, the former motto, "The Aristocrat of Them All," was discontinued at the same time, at least from appearing on the label. This beverage has had something of a following typical of some smaller-brand alcoholic beverages. In addition to the 80-proof (40 percent alcohol) presentation, the distillery also offers a 90-proof small batch whiskey. Both are triple-distilled. The Virginia Gentleman small-batch 90-proof whiskey won Double Gold and Best American Whiskey awards at the 2008 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. Although it won a double gold at the same competition in
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Whynatte Bomb

    Whynatte Bomb

    The Whynatte Bomb is a cocktail that is mixed by dropping a shot of Jägermeister into a glass of Whynatte Latte. The terms “depth charge” and “bomb shot” refer to cocktails that are made by dropping a shot glass filled with liquor into another drink. A Whynatte Bomb is usually sold with a can of Whynatte Latte (8 oz) or a half-can of Whynatte Latte (4 oz) poured into a pint glass and separately accompanied by Jägermeister in a shot glass. The glass of Jägermeister is then dropped into the Whynatte. Alternatively, some drinkers will pour equal amounts of Jägermeister and Whynatte into an oversized shot glass, or pub glass. A Jäger-train is a theatric method for preparing the drinks when multiple "Bombs" have been ordered. Glasses of the mixer are lined up, and an empty glass is placed at one end. Shot glasses of Jägermeister are then balanced on the lips of the glasses. The first shot glass (which is on the empty-glass end) is pushed over; it falls into the mixer in the next glass and — if the glasses are correctly positioned — it will simultaneously knock over the next shot glass. A domino effect will be created, causing each shot glass to fall into a glass of the mixer. The world
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    B-52

    B-52

    The B-52 (also B52 or Bifi) cocktail is a layered shot composed of a coffee liqueur (Kahlúa), an Irish Cream (Baileys Irish Cream), and a triple sec (Grand Marnier). When prepared properly, the ingredients separate into three distinctly visible layers. The layering is due to the relative densities of the ingredients. The name refers to the US B-52 Stratofortress long-range bomber. This bomber was used in the Vietnam War for the release of incendiary bombs, which likely inspired today's flaming variant of the cocktail; another hypothesis centers on B-52 combat losses ("Burns like a B-52 over Hanoi"). One story behind the B-52 is that it was invented by Peter Fich, a head bartender at the Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alberta. He named all of his new drinks after favourite bands, albums and songs. This drink was, of course, named after the band of the same name. One of his first customers for a B-52 owned restaurants in various cities in Alberta and liked the drink so much that he put it on the menu. This is why this, the first shooter, is commonly believed to originate at the Keg Steakhouse in Calgary, Alberta in 1977. The B-52 is also rumored to have been created by Adam Honigman,
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Frappé coffee

    Frappé coffee

    Frappé coffee (also Greek frappé or Café frappé) (Greek: φραπές, frapés) is a Greek foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). It is very popular in Greece and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries. Accidentally invented in 1957 in the city of Thessaloniki, it is now the most popular coffee among Greek youth and foreign tourists. The frappé has become a hallmark of the post-war outdoor Greek coffee culture. The word frappé is French and comes from the verb frapper which means to 'beat'; in this context, however, in French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means chilled, as with ice cubes in a shaker. "Café Frappé" originated in France probably in the last decades of the 19th Century, and as early as 1897 the term is used for a sort of coffee granita., and another mention is from 1932, where caffè frappé is indeed an iced coffee: Correct French spelling is "Café Frappé". The word 'frappé is 'borrowed' in Italy and there called 'caffè frappé (note the accents). Just like 'caffè latte' more often than not is misspelled 'café latté', a mishmash of Italian and French, so is 'Café Frappé commonly
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Stellina

    Stellina

    Stellina is a herbal liqueur made by the monastic order of the Sainte Famille (Holy Family) in Belley, France. It is considered similar to Chartreuse, both being made by monks in the same region, to secret recipes, and also coming in both green and yellow. However, Stellina is much younger (dating to 1904, rather than 1605), smaller (the Sainte Famille order has 300 members), and much less-known than Chartreuse.
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    Sambuca

    Sambuca

    Sambuca (Italian pronunciation: [samˈbuka]) is an Italian anise-flavoured, usually colourless, liqueur. Its most common variety is often referred to as white sambuca to differentiate it from other varieties that are deep blue in colour (black sambuca) or bright red (red sambuca). Like other anise-flavoured liquers, the ouzo effect is sometimes observed when combined with water. Sambuca is flavoured with essential oils obtained from anise, star anise, liquorice and other spices. It also contains elderflowers. The oils are added to pure alcohol, a concentrated solution of sugar, and other flavouring. It is commonly bottled at 42% alcohol by volume. The etymology is disputed: the Molinari company states that the name Sambuca comes from an Arabic word: Zammut. This was the name of an anise-flavoured drink that arrived to the port of Civitavecchia by ships coming from the East. The Oxford English Dictionary states, however, that the term comes from the Latin word sambucus, meaning "elderberry". Other proposals are that it could have come from the Tamil name for fennel, soambu, where it is a regular ingredient in cooking, or that it comes from "sambuq", a type of Arabic ship which may
    6.67
    6 votes
    19
    Aperol

    Aperol

    Aperol is an Italian aperitif originally produced by the Barbieri company, based in Padua. Aperol is now produced by the Campari company. While Aperol was originally created in 1919, it did not become successful until after World War II. Its ingredients are, among others, bitter orange, gentian, rhubarb, and cinchona. Although it looks, tastes, and smells much like Campari, Aperol has an alcohol content of 11%—less than half of Campari. Aperol and Campari have the same sugar content. Campari is also slightly darker in color. Aperol to be sold in Germany has an alcohol content of 15% to avoid German container deposit legislation regulations. Aperol is the main ingredient in Spritz. Although it has not been frequently submitted to spirit ratings competitions, in two recent submissions, Aperol received high marks. In 2007, Wine Enthusiast rated Aperol in its 90-95 point category. At the 2010 San Francisco World Spirits Competition, the Aperol received a double-gold medal—the highest available award. As of April 7, 2010, Aperol is the official sponsor of Moto GP, the Grand Prix of Motorcycle racing.
    7.60
    5 votes
    20
    Mekong whiskey

    Mekong whiskey

    Mekhong is Thailand's first domestically produced branded golden spirit. Launched in 1941, it quickly became the most popular brand in Thailand. This was helped by a dispute with the French concerning the border with Laos along the Mekong River which gives the brand its name. It was first created by James Honzatko while living on the banks of the Mekong river. Honzatko was an avid brewer and eventually began producing his favourite whisky on a large scale. After Honzatko's death, his close friend Peter Sawer took over the brewing of Mekong and was ultimately responsible for its mass production. Despite being known as a whisky, Mekhong is in fact much closer to a rum. The distilled spirit is made from 95% sugar cane/molasses and 5% rice. This distilled spirit is then blended with a secret recipe of indigenous herbs and spices to produce its distinctive aroma and taste. Mekhong is distilled, blended and bottled at the Bangyikhan Distillery on the outskirts of Bangkok. Its slightly lower strength of 35% abv means that it mixes well including as an ingredient in cocktails, the most famous of which being the 'Sabai Sabai', known as the Thai Welcome Drink. Mekhong is widely available
    7.60
    5 votes
    21
    Lemonade

    Lemonade

    Lemonade is a lemon-flavored drink, typically made from lemons, water and sugar. It is variously produced fresh directly from fruit, reconstituted from frozen juice, dry powder, or liquid concentrate; and colored in a variety of shades. Artificially sweetened and artificially flavored versions are also popular. The term "lemonade" has a variety of meaning, differing by region. In North America, the term refers to an uncarbonated beverage made from squeezed lemons, water and sugar. In the UK and other places this is called traditional lemonade or homemade lemonade. In the UK, the suffix '-ade' means a 'carbonated sweet soft drink'; hence limeade, orangeade, cherryade, etc. Brown lemonade exists in the Northern Ireland region of the UK. For more information about this form of "lemonade", see Lemon-lime. In the Republic of Ireland, lemonade refers to the carbonated, lemon-flavored soft drink (as in the UK) but is further sub-divided into white (clear) lemonade and red lemonade. White lemonade equates to the colourless fizzy lemonade common in many countries, while red lemonade is particular to Ireland. Red lemonade differs slightly in taste from white lemonade and is either drunk neat
    6.33
    6 votes
    22
    White Russian

    White Russian

    A White Russian, also known as a Caucasian, is a sweet cocktail made with vodka, coffee liqueurs (e.g., Kahlúa or Tia Maria), and cream served with ice in an Old Fashioned glass. Other ingredients are often substituted for cream, the most common of which are milk, half and half, Baileys Irish Cream, and vanilla soymilk. The traditional cocktail known as a Black Russian, which first appeared in 1949, becomes a White Russian with the addition of cream. Neither drink is Russian in origin, but both are so named due to vodka being the primary ingredient. It is unclear which drink preceded the other. The Oxford English Dictionary refers to the first mention of the word "White Russian" in the sense of a cocktail as appearing in California's Oakland Tribune on November 21, 1965. It was placed in the newspaper as an insert: "White Russian. 1 oz. each Southern, vodka, cream", with "Southern" referring to Coffee Southern, a contemporary brand of coffee liqueur. As with all cocktails, various modes of preparation exist, varying according to the recipes and styles of particular bars or mixologists. Most common varieties have adjusted amounts of vodka or coffee liqueur, or mixed brands of coffee
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Prosecco

    Prosecco

    Prosecco is an Italian white wine — generally a Dry or Extra Dry sparkling wine — normally made from Glera ("Prosecco") grapes. DOC prosecco is produced in the regions of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia in Italy, and traditionally mainly in the areas near Conegliano and Valdobbiadene, in the hills north of Treviso. Prosecco is known as the main ingredient of the Bellini cocktail and has more recently become popular as a less expensive substitute for Champagne. Up until the 1960s, Prosecco sparkling wine was generally rather sweet and barely distinguishable from the Asti wine produced in Piedmont. Since then, production techniques have improved, leading to the high-quality dry wines produced today. According to a 2008 New York Times report, Prosecco has sharply risen in popularity in markets outside Italy, with global sales growing by double-digit percentages since 1998, aided also by its comparatively low price. It was introduced into the mainstream US market in 2000 by Mionetto, now the largest importer of Prosecco, who also reported an "incredible growth trend" in 2008. Until the 2008 vintage Prosecco was protected as a DOC within Italy, as Prosecco di Conegliano-Valdobbiadene,
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Cocktail

    Cocktail

    A cocktail is an alcoholic mixed drink that contains two or more ingredients—at least one of the ingredients must be a spirit. Cocktails were originally a mixture of spirits, sugar, water, and bitters. It now means almost any mixed drink that contains alcohol. A cocktail today usually contains one or more kinds of spirit and one or more mixers, such as soda or fruit juice. Additional ingredients may be sugar, honey, milk, cream, and various herbs. The origin of the word cocktail is disputed. The first recorded use of the word cocktail is found in The Morning Post and Gazetteer in London, England on March 20, 1798: The first recorded use of the word cocktail in the United States is said to be in The Farmer's Cabinet on April 28, 1803: A definition of cocktail appeared in the May 13, 1806, edition of The Balance and Columbian Repository, a publication in Hudson, New York, in which an answer was provided to the question, "What is a cocktail?". It replied: Compare the ingredients listed (spirits, sugar, water, and bitters) with the ingredients of an Old Fashioned, which originated as a term used by late 19th century bar patrons to distinguish cocktails made the “old-fashioned” way from
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Yuanyang

    Yuanyang

    Yuanyang or Coffee with tea (often spelled according to the Cantonese pronunciation Yuenyeung, Yinyeung, or Yinyong) is a popular beverage in Hong Kong, made of a mixture of three parts of coffee and seven parts of Hong Kong-style milk tea. It was originally served at dai pai dongs (open air food vendors) and cha chaan tengs (cafe), but is now available in various types of restaurants. It can be served hot or cold. The name yuanyang, which refers to Mandarin Ducks, is a symbol of conjugal love in Chinese culture, as the birds usually appear in pairs and the male and female look very different. This same connotation of a "pair" of two unlike items is used to name this drink. There are disputes if there were independent inventions of coffee-and-tea-mixtures in the Western world, some claiming it to be a Dutch serving. Various individuals have combined coffee with tea, sometimes using the name CoffTea or Tea Espress. The concept was suggested on the Halfbakery in 2000, and singer Peter André claimed to have invented CoffTea in an interview in 2004. In an interview in 2006, Sandra Blund recommended combining Savarin with chamomile tea in a ratio of 2 to 1 or combining organic Bolivian
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Alchermes

    Alchermes

    Alchermes (from the Arab القرمز, al-qirmiz, meaning cochineal and Persian قرمز qermez : bloody, red, cochineal, carmine) is a type of Italian liqueur prepared by infusing neutral spirits with sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and vanilla, and other herbs and flavoring agents. Its most striking characteristic is its scarlet color, obtained by the addition of Kermes, a small parasitic insect from which the drink derives its name. The drink fell out of favor around the turn of the 20th century because people discovered that its colour came from insects. Several proprietary variants are commercially available, with alcoholic contents ranging from 21 to 32%. Its chief use is in coloring pastry, although a quick dessert is sometimes made by adding it to mascarpone and sugar. Alkermes was a modification of an 8th century tonic confectio alchermes. The tonic included raw silk, apple juice, ground pearls, musk, ambergris, gold leaf, rose water, cinnamon, sugar and honey. In pre-modern medicine, it was ranked among the best cardiacs, and was frequently used for the palpitation of the heart, or syncope, sometimes for smallpox and measles and a general restorative. Greenfield AB. Alkermes
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Lionshead

    Lionshead

    Lionshead is a pilsner produced by Lion Brewery, Inc. in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. It is made with American malts, corn and hops. It is primarily available in Pennsylvania, though some retailers in other states carry it. Lionshead is available in 12oz cans, 12oz bottles, 1/2 BBL kegs, and 1/6 BBL kegs. Lionshead also has a sister product of Lionshead Light. Lionshead bottle caps display rebus puzzles originally created by the Falstaff Brewing Corporation. The top of the Lionshead cap has a gold lion's paw on a maroon background and the words "claw off" on it. Lionshead has been displayed in several episodes of The Office, including Launch Party and Goodbye, Toby. The show is set in Scranton, which neighbors Wilkes-Barre in real life. Lionshead is typically known for its cheap price and popularity among college students.
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Moxie

    Moxie

    Moxie is a carbonated beverage that was one of the first mass-produced soft drinks in the United States. It continues to be regionally popular today. Moxie has a unique flavor that is not as sweet as that of most modern soft drinks and that is described by some as "bitter." Moxie is closely associated with the state of Maine and was designated the official soft drink of Maine on May 10, 2005. Its creator, Dr. Augustin Thompson, was born in Union, Maine, but Moxie was invented and first produced in Lowell, Massachusetts. Moxie originated as a patent medicine called "Moxie Nerve Food," which was created around 1876 by Dr. Augustin Thompson in Lowell, Massachusetts. Thompson claimed that it contained an extract from a rare, unnamed South American plant, which had supposedly been discovered by a friend of his, Lieutenant Moxie, who had used it as a panacea. Moxie, he claimed, was especially effective against "paralysis, softening of the brain, nervousness, and insomnia." After a few years, Thompson added soda water to the formula and changed the product's name to "Beverage Moxie Nerve Food." By 1884 he was selling Moxie both in bottles and in bulk as a soda fountain syrup. He marketed
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Neutral grain spirit

    Neutral grain spirit

    Neutral grain spirit (also called pure grain alcohol (PGA) or grain neutral spirit (GNS)) is a clear, colorless, flammable liquid that has been distilled from a grain-based mash to a very high level of ethanol content. The term neutral refers to the spirit's lacking the flavor that would have been present if the mash ingredients were distilled to a lower level of alcoholic purity, and also lacking any flavoring added to it after distillation (as is done, for example, with gin). Other kinds of spirits, such as whisky, are distilled to a lower alcohol percentage in order to preserve the flavor of the mash. The mash from which neutral grain spirit is produced can be any type or mixture of cereal grains. As a defined standard of identification under U.S. law, "neutral spirits" or "neutral alcohol" are distilled spirits produced from any material at or above 95% alcohol by volume. Such a product made from grain is "grain neutral spirit," while such a spirit made from grapes is called "grape neutral spirit," and so on. When the term is used in an informal context rather than as a term of U.S. law, any distilled spirit of high alcoholic purity (e.g., 170 proof or higher) that does not
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Smoothie

    Smoothie

    A smoothie (alternatively spelled smoothy) is a blended and sometimes sweetened beverage made from fresh fruit (fruit smoothie) and in special cases can contain chocolate or peanut butter. In addition to fruit, many smoothies include crushed ice, frozen fruit, honey or contain syrup and ice ingredients. They have a milkshake-like consistency that is thicker than slush drinks. They can also contain milk, yogurt or ice cream. Smoothies are often marketed to health-conscious people, and some restaurants offer add-ins such as soy milk, whey powder, green tea, herbal supplements, or nutritional supplement mixes. Smoothies became widely available in the United States in the late 1960s when ice cream vendors and health food stores began selling them. By the 1990s and 2000s, smoothies became available at mainstream cafés and coffee shops and in pre-bottled versions at supermarkets all over the world. Health food stores on the West Coast of the United States began selling pureed fruit drinks in the 1930s, based on recipes that originated in Brazil. The 1940s-era Waring Blendor cookbooks published recipes for a "banana smoothie" and a "pineapple smoothee." The name "smoothee" or "smoothie"
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Pernod Fils

    Pernod Fils

    Pernod Fils (French pronunciation: [pɛʁnoˈfis]) was the most popular brand of absinthe throughout the 19th century until it was banned in 1915. During the Belle Époque, the Pernod Fils name became synonymous with absinthe, and the brand represented the de facto standard of quality by which all others were judged. The brand's roots can be traced as far back as the 1790s. According to legend, it was during this time in Neuchâtel, Switzerland that Dr. Pierre Ordinaire created a distilled patent medicine that would represent the earliest origins of the drink. The recipe then came into the hands of Henri Louis Pernod through the means of a business deal, and in 1797, he and Daniel Henri Dubied opened the first absinthe distillery in Couvet, Switzerland. Pernod later built a larger distillery in Pontarlier, France in 1805. This set the stage that would cause the sleepy community of Pontarlier to eventually emerge as the home of twenty-eight commercial absinthe distilleries, and the world's center of absinthe production. The popularity of the Pernod Fils brand surged in the decades that followed, its impressive market share spawning a string of knock-offs and imitators with deceptive
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Sex on the beach

    Sex on the beach

    Sex on the Beach is a cocktail that has many variations. There are two general types of the cocktail: The ingredients are shaken together with ice in a shaker and are served in a highball glass. Sometimes they are mixed in smaller amounts and served as a shooter. The earliest known invention of the cocktail and its name dates back to 1987 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Republic National Distributor (National Distribution at the time) had just begun to sell a new product, peach schnapps, in the fall. With the influx of tourism coming shortly for spring break, National devised a contest that would pay the bar that sold the most peach schnapps a bonus of $1000 and the bartender that was responsible at that bar for the highest sales of schnapps would receive $100. A young bartender named Ted Pizio working at Confetti's mixed peach schnapps, vodka, orange juice and grenadine. When Pizio began to sell the sweet and tasty beverage, he was soon asked what it was called. On the spot, Pizio thought what the reason was that thousands of people came to Ft. Lauderdale for spring break was: the beach and sex. "Sex on the Beach!" he replied, and as the drink gained fame that spring, thousands of
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Iced tea

    Iced tea

    Iced tea (sometimes known as ice tea) is a form of cold tea, usually served in a glass with ice. It may or may not be sweetened. Iced tea is also a popular packaged drink. It can be mixed with flavored syrup, with common flavors including lemon, peach, raspberry, lime, passion fruit, strawberry and cherry. While most iced teas get their flavor from tea leaves (Camellia sinensis), other herb-infused beverages are also sometimes served cold and referred to as iced tea. Unsweetened iced tea is sometimes made by a particularly long steeping of tea leaves at lower temperature (one hour in the sun versus 5 minutes at 80-100 °C). Some people call this "sun tea". In addition, sometimes it is also left to stand overnight in the refrigerator. Iced tea is popular in Austria, though the common name is Eistee (ice tea); it is usually drunk heavily sweetened. Rauch is one of the most popular manufacturers. In Belgium, Netherlands and various other parts of Europe, "Ice Tea" is the brand name of a carbonated variety of iced tea marketed by Lipton since 1978. They also market a number of other non-carbonated iced teas under the "Ice Tea" brand. In Canada, iced tea refers to sweetened iced tea,
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Basil Hayden's

    Basil Hayden's

    Basil Hayden's is the lightest bodied bourbon whiskey in the family of Jim Beam small batch bourbons produced by Beam Inc.. It is 80 proof, in contrast with its three sibling brands of higher alcohol concentration (Knob Creek, Booker's, and Baker's). The Basil Hayden's bourbon brand is named in honor of Basil Hayden, Sr., who was a Maryland Catholic that led a group of twenty-five Catholic families from Maryland into what is now Nelson County, Kentucky (near Bardstown) in 1785. This area is home to many of the famous bourbon brands, including Jim Beam. There Hayden donated the land for the first Catholic church west of the Alleghenies and the first Catholic church in what is now the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Hayden was also a distiller, and he used a larger amount of rye in his mash than in some other bourbons. Later, Hayden's grandson Raymond B. Hayden founded a distillery in Nelson County and named his label "Old Grand-Dad" in honor of his grandfather. The picture on the bottle was copied from a rendering of Basil Sr.'s likeness. When Beam Industries introduced their "small batch" collection, among the four was "Basil Hayden's", which the company says uses a mash similar to that
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Brandy

    Brandy

    Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks, while some are simply coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of such aging (and some brandies are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring). Brandy is also produced from fermented fruits other than grapes, but these products are typically named eaux-de-vie, especially in French. In some countries, fruit flavouring or some other flavouring may be added to a spirit that is called "brandy". Brandy may be served neat or on the rocks. It may be added to other beverages to make several popular cocktails; these include the Brandy Alexander, the Sidecar, the Brandy Daisy, and the Brandy Old Fashioned. In western countries, brandy is traditionally drunk neat at room temperature from a snifter or a tulip glass. In parts of Asia, it is usually drunk on the rocks. When drunk at room temperature, it is often slightly warmed by holding the glass cupped in the palm or by gently heating it. However,
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Żubrówka

    Żubrówka

    Żubrówka [ʐuˈbrufka] ( listen), also known in English as Bison Grass Vodka, is an Eastern European variety of dry, herb-flavored vodka that is distilled from rye and bottled at 40% alcohol by volume (80 proof). Its flavor is unique and is described as having woodruff, vanilla, coconut, and almond notes. The rye distillate is flavored with a tincture of buffalo grass (Hierochloe odorata), which also gives the spirit its yellowish color. This grass grows in the Białowieża Forest and elsewhere. A blade of buffalo grass is traditionally placed in each bottle of Żubrówka, though this is largely decorative. The name Żubrówka comes from żubr, the Polish and Belarusian (as well as Ukrainian and Russian) word for the wisent (European bison), which is particularly fond of eating bison grass. Żubrówka has been manufactured in the region of the contemporary Polish-Belarusian (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth) border since the 16th century, and by 18th century was one of the favorite raw drinks of the nobility (szlachta) and the peasantry alike. In 1926 the Polmos company in Brest-Litousk (now Belalco company, Brest, Belarus) invented a method to mass produce Żubrówka, which was then copied by
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Bacardi cocktail

    Bacardi cocktail

    The Bacardi cocktail is an IBA Official Cocktail made primarily with Bacardi Superior. It is served as a "pre-dinner" cocktail. The Bacardi Cocktail was originally the same as the Daiquiri, containing rum, lime juice, and sugar; The Grenadine version of the Bacardi Cocktail originated in the US, while the original non-red Bacardi company recipe originated from Cuba. Shake & strain into a cocktail glass, and add a lime wedge garnish. Bacardi Cocktail Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain and serve. Bacardi Coctel (Daiquiri Bacardi) Agitese con hielo picado y sirvase en vasos de coctel. Puede ser servido colado o sin colar. IMPORTANTE: No altere el orden de los ingredientes. Bacardi Cocktail Correct recipe: Mix thoroughly, then shake well in cracked ice. May be served strained or unstrained. Important: Do not alter the order of the ingredients.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Licor de oro

    Licor de oro

    Licor de oro (English: Gold liqueur) is a typical Chilotan liqueur made of aguardiente and whey. The other ingredients are saffron and lemon peel.
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Macuá

    Macuá

    The Macuá is a cocktail made with white rum and fruit juices, usually lemon and guava juice. The Macuá is noted as the national drink of Nicaragua. The drink is named after a tropical bird native to the country. The Macuá was invented by Dr Edmundo Miranda Saenz, a pediatrician from Granada, a small and historic city on the shores of Lake Nicaragua. Miranda enlisted the help of his immediate family, including his wife, daughter and son-in-law, to perfect the recipe. The Nicaraguan Tour Operator Solentiname Tours and the Association of Restaurants in Nicaragua recognized a need for a national drink. Both invited hotel and restaurant owners across Nicaragua to come together and enlisted the help of CEM-JWT Communications, a Nicaraguan advertising agency, to turn the idea into a reality. The drink rose to fame in October 2006, when it was entered in a competition to choose a national drink of Nicaragua. The competition, sponsored by Flor de Caña, a Nicaraguan rum manufacturer, involved more than twenty different drinks based on the company's products. The judges, including the French ambassador and a cocktail connoisseur from a Swedish development agency, chose the Macuá over other
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Newcastle Brown Ale

    Newcastle Brown Ale

    Newcastle Brown Ale (colloquially "Newkie Brown" (UK), "Newcastle" (US) or "Dog" (North East)) is an English beer owned by Heineken and produced at their John Smith's Brewery in Tadcaster, North Yorkshire. It is the world's best known brown ale and is an icon of the North East of England as a result of its historical links to the region. It was launched in 1927 by Colonel Jim Porter after three years of development. The merger of Newcastle Breweries with Scottish Brewers afforded the beer national distribution, and United Kingdom sales peaked by the early 1970s. The brand underwent a resurgence in the late 1980s - early 1990s with a cult revival in student unions. By the late 1990s the beer was the most widely distributed alcoholic product in the UK. By the 2000s, the majority of sales were in the United States, where the beer has proven extremely popular, although it still sells 100 million bottles annually in the UK. In 2005, brewing was moved from Newcastle upon Tyne to Dunston on the other side of the River Tyne, and in 2010 moved entirely to Tadcaster, North Yorkshire. The beer is perceived in the UK as a working man's beer, with a long association with heavy industry, the
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Sangría

    Sangría

    Sangria is a wine punch typical of Spain, Portugal, México, and Argentina. It normally consists of wine, chopped fruit, a sweetener, and a small amount of added brandy. In the case of fruits, they are chopped or sliced such as orange, lemon, lime, apple, peach, melon, berries, pineapple, grape, kiwi and mango. A sweetener such as honey, sugar, simple syrup, orange juice is added. Instead of brandy, other liquids such as Seltzer, Sprite or 7 Up may be added. Because of the variation in recipes, sangria's alcoholic content can vary greatly, usually from 4 percent up to about 11. The ingredients in sangria vary, particularly in the type of fruit used, the kind of spirits added (if any), and the presence or lack of carbonation. Sangria is served throughout Spain and Portugal during summer, and in the southern and eastern parts of the countries year-round. In these places it is a popular drink among tourists at bars, pubs and restaurants where it is often served in 1-litre pitchers or other containers large enough to hold a bottle of wine plus the added ingredients. A lid or other strainer for the container helps prevent the fruit and ice cubes from falling into the glass. Among the
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Zwack liqueur

    Zwack liqueur

    Zwack is an 80 proof (40% alcohol) herbal liqueur made in Hungary with a secret blend of more than 40 different herbs and spices. It is known as the National Shot of Hungary, is produced by Unicum Zwack, plc, in Budapest, Hungary, and is now imported into the US by Diageo. Unicum was created by Dr. József Zwack, the Royal Physician to the Habsburg Court, for Emperor Joseph II in 1790. It was not until 1840 that his 20-year-old son, Jozsef Zwack founded J. Zwack & Co., the first Hungarian liqueur manufacturer. By the early 1900s, the Zwack company had become one of the leading distilleries in central Europe, producing over 200 liqueurs and spirits, exported all over the world. In 1915, Jozsef’s son, Lajos, took over the factory and left it to his two sons, Bela and Janos, upon his death. During World War II, Budapest and the Zwack factory were completely destroyed. After the war, with the Communist regime, the factory was nationalized in 1948. The Zwack family fled the country. Janos Zwack with his son Peter, great grandson of József, was able to escape with the original Zwack recipe in his pocket. Bela Zwack remained behind to give the communist government a “fake” Zwack recipe and
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Caffè macchiato

    Caffè macchiato

    Caffè macchiato (Italian pronunciation: [kafˈfɛ makˈkjaːto]), sometimes called espresso macchiato, is a coffee drink, made out of espresso with a small amount of milk. 'Macchiato' simply means 'marked' or 'stained', and in the case of caffè macchiato, this means literally 'espresso stained/marked with milk'. Traditionally it is made with one shot of espresso, and the small amount of added milk was the 'stain'. However, later the 'mark' or 'stain' came to refer to the foamed milk that was put on top to indicate the beverage has a little milk in it, usually about a teaspoon. In fact, a caffè macchiato in Portuguese is named café pingado which means coffee with a drop, the drop of milk. The reason this coffee drink got its name was that the baristas needed to show the serving waiters the difference between an espresso and an espresso with a tiny bit of milk in it; the latter was 'marked'. In the United States, 'macchiato' is more likely to describe latte macchiato, thus arises the common confusion that 'macchiato' literally means 'foam', or that a macchiato must necessarily have foam. (As the term 'macchiato' to describe this type of coffee predates the common usage of foam in coffee
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Knob Creek

    Knob Creek

    Knob Creek is a brand of Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey produced by Beam Inc. at the Jim Beam distillery in Clermont, Kentucky. It is one of the four Jim Beam small batch bourbon brands targeted for the high-end liquor market. Its siblings in the line are Booker's, Baker's, and Basil Hayden's. The primary expression of the brand is bottled at 100 proof (higher than the typical 80 that is the minimum required by U.S. Federal labeling requirements) and aged for nine years (which is longer than many Bourbon brands and is longer than the other Jim Beam Small Batch brands). Knob Creek comes in a rectangular bottle with a corked and wax-sealed top. As of 2012, at least some 750ml bottles now use screw caps. The bourbon has a dark, golden-brown color. According to the company, this is due to the relatively long aging process, which allows it to absorb more sugar from the wood than is the case for the other Jim Beam Small Batch brands. The company describes the flavor as "rich, sweet, woody, full-bodied, almost fruity", and the aroma as "toasted nuts, grain, oak". In 2009, Beam ran a campaign to publicize their shortage of Knob Creek bourbon. Demand exceeded the 2000 forecast, when the
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Ramazzotti

    Ramazzotti

    Ramazzotti is a medium style Amaro (Italian potable bitters), bottled at 30% alcohol by volume. It is bottled in Milan by Pernod Ricard. http://www.ramazzotti.it/
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Black Russian

    Black Russian

    The Black Russian is a cocktail of vodka and coffee liqueur. It contains either three parts vodka and two parts coffee liqueur, per the Kahlúa bottle's label, or five parts vodka to two parts coffee liqueur, per IBA specified ingredients. It is sometimes made with cola, in which case it is referred to as a Dirty Black Russian, as opposed to Clean when without it. Traditionally the drink is made by pouring the vodka over ice cubes or cracked ice in an old-fashioned glass, followed by the coffee liqueur. This combination first appeared in 1949, and is ascribed to Gustave Tops, a Belgian barman, who created it at the Hotel Metropole in Brussels in honor of Perle Mesta, then U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg. The cocktail owes its name to the use of vodka, a stereotypical Russian spirit, and the blackness of the coffee liqueur.
    10.00
    2 votes
    47
    Cheeky Vimto

    Cheeky Vimto

    Cheeky Vimto is an alcoholic cocktail. Primarily drunk in nightclubs rather than bars, the "Cheeky Vimto" is a popular drink among Britain's younger population. The drink is reputed to have been invented, in early 2000, by Lee Bardsley, assistant nightclub manager at "Courtyards" nightclub in Warrington. Its popularity quickly spread throughout the north west of England and then the rest of the country.. Despite the name, the soft drink Vimto is not part of the cocktail. It is made up of one or two shots of Ruby port and one 275ml bottle of Blue WKD. However, the resulting mixture does taste very much like a regular Vimto; hence the name "Cheeky Vimto". Many establishments call it by other names, such as 'cheeky V', in order to avoid infringing the trademark of the soft drink. A variant, Extra Cheeky Vimto, replaces one of the port shots with neat vodka.
    10.00
    2 votes
    48
    Mimosa

    Mimosa

    A Mimosa is a cocktail-like drink composed of one part champagne (or other sparkling wine) and one part thoroughly chilled citrus fruit juice, usually orange juice unless otherwise specified (e.g., "grapefruit [juice] mimosa"). It is traditionally served in a tall champagne flute with a morning brunch as hair of the dog or to guests at weddings. It is probably named after the yellow flowers of Acacia dealbata. A Buck's Fizz is a similar cocktail, but with twice as much orange juice as champagne.
    10.00
    2 votes
    49
    Poitín

    Poitín

    Poitín [ˈpˠotʲiːn] (anglicized as poteen or potcheen) is a traditional Irish distilled, highly alcoholic beverage (60%-95% ABV). Poitín was traditionally distilled in a small pot still and the term is a diminutive of the Irish word pota, meaning "pot". Traditionally distilled from malted barley grain or potatoes, it is one of the strongest alcoholic beverages in the world, and for centuries was illegal in Ireland. Irish moonshine, along with all other private distillation not specifically licensed by the state, was outlawed in 1661. On 7 March 1997, the Irish Revenue Commissioners withdrew their opposition to poitín being sold under license in the Republic of Ireland. Production for export has been allowed since 1989. Poitín remains illegal in Northern Ireland however. In 2008, Irish Poitín was accorded (GI) Geographical Indicative Status by the EU Council and Parliament. Today, two distilleries in Ireland are officially licensed to produce poitín: Bunratty Mead and Liqueuer, and Knockeen Hills Poteen. Their products are, however, far removed from the coarse illegal poitín produced in the past. Indeed, Bunratty is single distilled and only 40% or 45% ABV, far weaker than illegally
    10.00
    2 votes
    50
    Kombucha

    Kombucha

    Kombucha is an effervescent fermentation of sweetened tea that is used as a functional food. Sometimes referred to as a "mushroom", the kombucha culture is actually a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY). The kombucha culture is a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast, comprising Acetobacter (a genus of acetic acid bacteria) and one or more yeasts. These form a zoogleal mat. In Chinese, this microbial culture is called haomo, or jiaomu in Mandarin, (Chinese: 酵母; literally "yeast"). A kombucha culture may contain one or more of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. Alcohol production by the yeast(s) contributes to the production of acetic acid by the bacteria. Alcohol concentration also plays a role in triggering cellulose production by the bacterial symbionts. Although the bacterial component of a kombucha culture comprises several species, it almost always includes Gluconacetobacter xylinus (formerly Acetobacter xylinum), which ferments the alcohols produced by the yeast(s) into acetic acid. This increases the acidity while limiting the
    6.40
    5 votes
    51
    Manzana

    Manzana

    Manzana, also known as manzanita and manzana verde, is a liqueur generally made of wild apples. The name refers to the apples and not the alcoholic beverage which is usually clear in color. It has Spanish origins, more precisely of the Basque country. Its name manzana is apple in Spanish; verde is Spanish for "green". Manzana contains from 15 to 20% per volume of alcohol. It is sweet and tastes like green apples, similar in taste to pucker.
    6.40
    5 votes
    52
    Irish coffee

    Irish coffee

    Irish coffee (Irish: Caifé Gaelach) is a cocktail consisting of hot coffee, Irish whiskey, and sugar (some recipes specify that brown sugar should be used), stirred, and topped with thick cream. The coffee is drunk through the cream. The original recipe explicitly uses cream that has not been whipped, although drinks made with whipped cream are often sold as "Irish coffee". Although different variations of coffee cocktails pre-date the now-classic Irish coffee by at least 100 years, the original Irish coffee was according to sources invented and named by Joe Sheridan, a head chef at Foynes, County Limerick but originally from Castlederg, County Tyrone. Foynes' port was the precursor to Shannon International Airport in the west of Ireland. The coffee was conceived after a group of American passengers disembarked from a Pan Am flying boat on a miserable winter evening in the 1940s. Sheridan added whiskey to the coffee to warm the passengers. After the passengers asked if they were being served Brazilian coffee, Sheridan told them it was "Irish coffee". Stanton Delaplane, a travel writer for the San Francisco Chronicle, brought Irish coffee to the United States after drinking it at
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Lassi

    Lassi

    Lassi (Punjabi: ਲੱਸੀ, Hindi: लस्सी, Urdu: لسی, Marathi: ताक, Gujarati: છાસ, Bengali: লস্যি, is a popular and traditional yogurt-based drink of the Indian subcontinent. It is made by blending yogurt with water and Indian spices. Traditional lassi (also known as salted lassi, or, simply lassi) is a savory drink sometimes flavored with ground roasted cumin while sweet lassi on the other hand is blended with sugar or fruits instead of spices. In Dharmic religions, yogurt sweetened with honey is used while performing religious rituals. Less common is lassi served with milk and topped with a thin layer of clotted cream. Lassis are enjoyed chilled as a hot-weather refreshment, mostly taken with lunch. With a little turmeric powder mixed in, it is also used as a folk remedy for gastroenteritis. This form of lassi is more common in the villages of Punjab. It is prepared by blending yogurt with water and adding salt and other spices to taste. The resulting beverage is known as salted lassi. This is similar to ayran or doogh. Sweet lassi is a form of lassi flavored with sugar, rosewater and/or lemon, strawberry or other fruit juices. Saffron lassis, which are particularly rich, are a
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    Navan liqueur

    Navan liqueur

    NAVAN (nah-váhn), made with 100% natural vanilla from Madagascar, is produced by the House of Grand Marnier. One of the world’s most complex spices, natural vanilla contains more than 250 flavor components, and is the second most expensive spice after saffron. NAVAN’s name comes from the city of Navana on Madagascar (pronounced “Nah-vahn” by the local Malagasi people) where the vanilla is grown. Some have also noticed the relation between the name and the spice (NAtural VANilla). The history of the Grand Marnier brand began with the founding, by Jean-Baptiste Lapostolle, of a distillery in Neauphlele-Château near Paris, which quickly acquired a solid reputation for the quality of its eaux-de-vie. When Louis-Alexandre Marnier created his first luxury liqueur in 1880, orange was widely popular, yet also expensive and difficult to find . It took him years to cultivate the perfect oranges for Grand Marnier in his exquisite garden. This same garden that yielded oranges in St Jean Cap-Ferrat would later inspire a quest for the perfect vanilla – his great grand daughter, Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle, current President of Marnier- Lapostolle North America and creator of Casa Lapostolle
    7.25
    4 votes
    55
    Brem

    Brem

    Brem is the traditional fermented food or fermented beverage from Indonesia. There are two types of brem, brem cake (solid) that usually eaten as snack from Madiun and Wonogiri, and brem beverage (liquid) made of rice wine from Bali and Nusa Tenggara, but mostly known from Bali. The time of the appearance of brem in Java is estimated about 1000 A.D., based on investigations which surveyed in the old Javanese inscriptions and literature. Brem beverage consumed and holds important use in temple ceremonies of Hinduism, it called Tetabuhan, an offering beverage for Buto Kala (English Kala the Giant) in order to evoke harmony. Brem can be either white or red depending on the proportions of white and black glutinous rice used in production. Brem liquid is very sweet to semi-sweet, yet acidic, and vary in alcohol content from 5% to 14%. Brem cake is produced in two small villages, Wonogiri and Madium. This kind of brem is believed by Indonesian consumer to be important for stimulating the blood system. It is also reported to prevent dermatitis, probably due to the presence of significant amounts of B vitamins produced by the microorganisms. This product is consumed as a snack and not
    8.33
    3 votes
    56
    Coffee

    Coffee

    Coffee is a brewed beverage with a distinct aroma and flavor prepared from the roasted seeds of the Coffea plant. The beans are found in coffee "cherries", which grow on trees cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in equatorial Latin America, Southeast Asia, South Asia and Africa. Green (unroasted) coffee is one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world. Coffee is slightly acidic (5.0-5.1 pH) and can have a stimulating effect on humans because of its caffeine content. It is one of the most-consumed beverages in the world. Wild coffee's energizing effect was likely first discovered in the northeast region of Ethiopia. Coffee cultivation first took place in southern Arabia; the earliest credible evidence of coffee drinking appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi shrines of Yemen. In East Africa and Yemen, coffee was used in native religious ceremonies that competed with the Christian Church. As a result, the Ethiopian Church banned its secular consumption until the reign of Emperor Menelik II of Ethiopia. The beverage was also banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons and was associated with rebellious political
    6.20
    5 votes
    57
    Calimocho

    Calimocho

    Kalimotxo, also known as cocavino, is a drink consisting of equal parts red wine and cola-based soft drink. In some areas of Spain, kalimotxo is served in bars in short glass tumblers. Plenty of ice is added, then the red wine and cola. In other areas the cocktail is served in tall glasses. Sometimes Ouzo or anise flavoring is added. Another variation calls for a lime twist. A common way of serving kalimotxo is in one liter drinking glasses made of plastic, called minis, cachi, macetas, litros, cubalitros or jarras. The mixture is made directly in this one-liter mini, and often the bottles of cola are reused to make more of the mixture. This is done by emptying half of a two-liter cola bottle and adding one litre of red wine to the bottle. Ice is usually added to the drink. The minis are then shared among the group of drinkers, especially during the botellón drinking street gatherings. In times of fewer available resources, a common occurrence among Spanish youth, (lack of one liter 'mini') drastic measures are taken by young Spaniards in order to save money. One common cheap way of mixing Calimocho involves a plastic bag and the Tetra Brik cartons of cheap red wine (Don Simón is a
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Colombia

    Colombia

    The Colombia is a Cocktail containing vodka and curaçao. The layering effect takes advantage of the variation in density and temperature between the layers. The drink appears as stacked horizontal layers of yellow, blue and red, which matches the three colours of the Colombian flag.
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Kir

    Kir

    Kir is a popular French cocktail made with a measure of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) topped up with white wine. In France it is usually drunk as an apéritif before a meal or snack. Originally the wine used was Bourgogne Aligoté, a lesser white wine of Burgundy. Nowadays, various white wines are used throughout France, according to the region and the whim of the barkeeper. Many prefer a white Chardonnay-based Burgundy, such as Chablis. Originally called blanc-cassis, the drink is now named after Félix Kir (1876–1968), mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who as a pioneer of the twinning movement in the aftermath of the Second World War popularized the drink by offering it at receptions to visiting delegations. Besides treating his international guests well, he was also promoting two vital economic products of the region. Kir initially allowed one of Dijon's producers of crème de cassis to use his name, but subsequently extended the right to their competitors as well. According to Rolland (2004), the reinvention of blanc-cassis (post 1945) was necessitated by the German Army's confiscation of all the local red Burgundy during the war. Faced with an excess of white wine, Kir
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Vodka and Tonic

    Vodka and Tonic

    A vodka tonic is an alcoholic drink made with varying proportions of vodka and tonic water. Vodka tonics are frequently garnished with a slice of lime or lemon. In the UK, the drink is sometimes referred to by the initials of Vodka And Tonic, VAT. This is a play on the more commonly known abbreviation for Value Added Tax. One commonly used recipe is one part vodka and one part tonic water in a tumbler over ice, with a generous lime wedge squeezed into it.
    9.50
    2 votes
    61
    Single malt whisky

    Single malt whisky

    Single malt whisky is a whisky made at one particular distillery from a mash that uses one particular malted grain, which is ordinarily barley. Single malts are typically associated with Scotland, though they are also produced in various other countries. Under the Scotch Whisky Regulations, a "Single Malt Scotch Whisky" must be made exclusively from malted barley (although the addition of E150A caramel colouring is allowed), must be distilled using a pot still, and must be aged for at least three years in oak casks of a capacity not exceeding 700 litres. These constraints may not apply to whisky marketed as single malt that is produced elsewhere. For example, there is no definition of the term single malt in the law of the United States, and some American whisky advertised as single malt is produced from malted rye rather than malted barley. All single malt goes through a similar batch production process, as outlined below. There are several types of Single Malts available from the distilleries including Single Barrel Single Malts which are the product of a single batch that was stored for 3+ years in a single oak barrel. These single barrel variants afford the opportunity for the
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    Cappuccino

    Cappuccino

    A cappuccino (/ˌkæpəˈtʃiːnoʊ/; Italian pronunciation: [kapputˈtʃiːno], meaning "Capuchin" or literally "small capuchin", referring to the robes worn by monks -and the hooded once worn by capuchin monks in particular-) is an Italian coffee drink traditionally prepared with espresso, hot milk, and steamed-milk foam. The name comes from the Capuchin friars, referring to the colour of their habits. A cappuccino is a coffee drink topped with foamed milk. It is made in a steam-producing espresso machine. Espresso is poured into the bottom third of the cup, and is followed by a similar amount of hot milk. The top third of the drink consists of milk foam; this foam can be decorated with artistic drawings made with the same milk called latte art. Shaved chocolate, raw sugar, cinnamon, or other spices can be sprinkled onto the top of the finished drink and one can also melt chocolate into the coffee before pouring the milk. Cappuccinos are served with a teaspoon and then consumed. In a traditional cappuccino, as served in Europe and artisan coffee houses in the United States, the total of espresso and milk/foam make up between approximately 150–180 mL (5–6 imp fl oz; 5–6 US fl oz).
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Gin bucket

    Gin bucket

    A gin bucket is an American mixed drink consisting of gin and typically Fresca placed in a suitably sized bucket, with ice and chopped fruit added. Classically, the gin is drunk by means of a turkey baster, eliminating the need for glasses. Many variations exist among different regions, typically varying the soda with fresh citrus juices, although in some instances Tequila is added to create a "superbucket." Also, several holiday themed containers have replaced the typical bucket, such as replacing the bucket with a plastic Jack-o'-lantern, thus creating a "Jack-o'Gin." The gin bucket is an Indiana University tailgating tradition. A specially themed gin bucket is used during the annual Indiana v. Purdue football game, Old Oaken Bucket, using a wooden bucket, appropriately called the "Old Oaken Bucket O'Gin." Indiana has served as a spawning spot for the Gin Bucket which has since been brought to other Midwestern universities such as University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Missouri, University of Wisconsin–Madison, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern University, University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota,and notably, Indiana Wesleyan
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Rye whiskey

    Rye whiskey

    Rye whiskey can refer to either of two types of whiskey: 1) American rye whiskey, which must be distilled from at least 51 percent rye; 2) Canadian whisky, which is often referred to (and labelled as) rye whisky for historical reasons, although it may or may not actually include any rye in its production process. In the United States, "rye whiskey" is, by law, made from a mash of at least 51 percent rye. (The other ingredients of the mash are usually corn and malted barley.) It is distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% abv), and aged in charred, new oak barrels. The whiskey must be put into such barrels at not more than 125 (U.S.) proof (62.5% abv). Rye whiskey that has been so aged for at least two years may be further designated as "straight", as in "straight rye whiskey". Rye whiskey was the prevalent whiskey of the northeastern states, especially Pennsylvania and Maryland, but largely disappeared after Prohibition. A few brands, such as Old Overholt, survived it. Today Heaven Hill, Four Roses, Jim Beam, Bulleit, and Catoctin Creek (among others) also produce rye whiskeys, as does a distillery at Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington, which sells a version of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Carbomb

    Carbomb

    An Irish Car Bomb is an American beer cocktail that is drunk as a bomb shot, similar to a boilermaker. It is made with Irish stout, Irish cream, and Irish whiskey. To make the drink, whiskey is floated on top of Irish Cream in a shot glass, and the shot glass is then dropped into the stout. Once mixed, it must be drunk quickly because it will curdle. While Kahlúa was part of the original recipe, it is often excluded from the drink today. Some refer to that original recipe as a Belfast Car Bomb. The "Irish" in the name refers to the drink's Irish ingredients; typically Guinness stout, Baileys Irish Cream, and Jameson Irish Whiskey. The "car bomb" refers to the fact that the drink is a "bomb shot" and also to the many car bombings that took place during the Troubles in Ireland. For this reason, the name is sometimes deemed offensive and some bartenders refuse to serve it. The drink is popular in the United States, but virtually unknown in Ireland, and ordering it there is likely to cause confusion or offense. This Irish Car Bomb is thought to have been invented in 1979 at Wilson's Saloon in Norwich, Connecticut. MMA fighter Todd Duffee uses The Irish Car Bomb as his nickname.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Single malt Scotch whisky

    Single malt Scotch whisky

    Single Malt Scotch is whisky made in Scotland using a pot still distillation process at a single distillery, with malted barley as the only grain ingredient. As with any Scotch whisky, a Single Malt Scotch must be distilled in Scotland and matured in oak casks in Scotland for at least three years (most single malts are matured longer). Until the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009 (SWR 2009), the word "blended" only appeared (in the context of Scotch whisky) on bottles of whisky that contained a mixture of both barley and non-barley grain whisky, but this is no longer the case. When reading a label it is important to distinguish between "Blended Scotch Whisky" and "Blended Malt Scotch Whisky". Under the terminology established by the SWR 2009, a "Blended Malt Scotch Whisky" is a mixture of Single Malt Scotch Whiskies, not a mixture of malted barley whisky and non-barley whisky. The term "blended malt" was previously called a "vatted malt" under the prior labelling conventions. All single malt Scotch goes through a similar batch production process, as outlined below. At bottling time various batches are mixed (or vatted) together to achieve consistent flavour from one bottling run to the
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Frappuccino

    Frappuccino

    Frappuccino is a trademarked line of blended coffee beverages sold by Starbucks. It consists of coffee blended with ice and various other ingredients, usually topped with whipped cream. Frappuccinos are also sold as bottled coffee beverages in stores and from vending machines. Frappuccino is a portmanteau of frappé and cappuccino, an espresso coffee with frothed milk. It is unclear whether frappé is taken from frappé, a Greek iced coffee, or from the Boston area term for a thick milkshake frappé (pronounced "frap"), both of which come from the French word frappé. The original Frappuccino beverage was developed, named, trademarked and sold by George Howell's Eastern Massachusetts coffee shop chain, The Coffee Connection. When Starbucks purchased The Coffee Connection in 1994, they also gained the rights to use, make, market, and sell the Frappuccino beverage, and soon after began to sell the beverage chain-wide. In response to the success of Frappuccinos, several Starbucks' competitors have developed similar drinks with similar sounding names, but only Starbucks can legally use the "Frappuccino" trademark. Similar frozen coffee drinks were served starting in 1988 by the Seattle
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Gin and tonic

    Gin and tonic

    A gin and tonic is a highball cocktail made with gin and tonic water poured over ice. It is usually garnished with a slice or wedge of lime, or lemon. The amount of gin varies according to taste. Suggested ratios of gin-to-tonic are 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:3. In some countries, gin and tonic is marketed pre-mixed in single-serving cans. It is commonly referred to as a "G and T" in the UK and Ireland. Some brands will replace the word "gin" with their own brand or initial in recipes. For instance, "Sapphire and Tonic" for Bombay Sapphire, "Hendrick's and Tonic" for Hendrick's Gin (garnished with cucumber to further distinguish it), or "T&T" for Tanqueray. In some parts of the world (e.g., German-language areas, France, Korea, Italy, Spain, Turkey), it is called "Gin Tonic". This cocktail was introduced by the army of the British East India Company in India. In India and other tropical regions, malaria was a persistent problem. In the 1700s it was discovered that quinine could be used to treat the disease, although the bitter taste was unpleasant. British officers in India in the early 19th century took to adding a mixture of water, sugar, lime and gin to the quinine in order to make
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Alcoholic beverage

    Alcoholic beverage

    An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol. Alcoholic beverages are divided into three general classes: beers, wines, and spirits. They are legally consumed in most countries, and over 100 countries have laws regulating their production, sale, and consumption. In particular, such laws specify the minimum age at which a person may legally buy or drink them. This minimum age varies between 16 and 25 years, depending upon the country and the type of drink. Most nations set it at 18 years of age. The production and consumption of alcohol occurs in most cultures of the world, from hunter-gatherer peoples to nation-states. Alcoholic beverages are often an important part of social events in these cultures. Alcohol is a psychoactive drug that has a depressant effect. A high blood alcohol content is usually considered to be legal drunkenness because it reduces attention and slows reaction speed. Alcohol can be addictive and addiction to alcohol is known as alcoholism. Beer and wine are produced by fermentation of sugar- or starch-containing plant material. Beverages produced by fermentation followed by distillation have a higher alcohol content and are
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Cointreau

    Cointreau

    Cointreau (pronounced: [kwɛ̃.tʁo]) is a brand of triple sec (an orange-flavoured liqueur) produced in Saint-Barthélemy-d'Anjou, France. It is drunk as an apéritif and digestif, and is a component of several well-known cocktails. It was originally called "Curaçao Blanco Triple Sec". Cointreau Distillery was set up in 1849 by Adolphe Cointreau, a confectioner, and his brother Edouard-Jean Cointreau from Angers. Their first success was with the cherry liqueur guignolet, but they found success when they blended sweet and bitter orange peels and pure alcohol from sugar beets. The first bottles of Cointreau were sold in 1875. These days, an estimated 13 million bottles are sold each year, and in more than 150 countries. Ninety percent of production is exported. Cointreau & Cie SA was family-owned until 1990, when it merged with Rémy Martin to form Rémy Cointreau, now a publicly-traded company. The production methods and recipe are a family secret, but tours of the facility are open to the public. Photography is restricted in many areas to protect the production process from being copied. Cointreau sources its bitter oranges from all over the world, usually Spain, Brazil, Haiti and
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Cutty Sark

    Cutty Sark

    Cutty Sark is a range of blended Scotch whisky produced by Edrington plc of Glasgow whose main office is less than 10 miles from the birthplace of the famous clipper ship of the same name. The whisky was created on March 23, 1923, with the home of the blend considered to be at The Glenrothes distillery in the Speyside region of Scotland. The name comes from the River Clyde-built clipper ship Cutty Sark, whose name came from the Scots language term cutty-sark, the short shirt prominently mentioned in the famous poem by Robert Burns - "Tam o' Shanter". The drawing of the clipper ship Cutty Sark on the label of the whisky bottles is a work of the Swedish artist Carl Georg August Wallin. He was a mariner painter, and this is probably his most famous ship painting. This drawing has been on the whisky bottles since 1955. The Tall Ships' Races for large sailing ships were originally known as The Cutty Sark Tall Ships' Races, under the terms of sponsorship by the whisky brand. The most popular member of the range, Cutty Sark Original Scots Whisky, is sold in a distinctive green bottle with a yellow label. The range also includes other blends, and premium blends, currently identified by the
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Martini

    Martini

    The martini is a cocktail made with gin and vermouth, and garnished with an olive or a lemon twist. Over the years, the martini has become one of the best-known mixed alcoholic beverages. H. L. Mencken called the martini "the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet" and E. B. White called it "the elixir of quietude". Pouring all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice cubes, the ingredients are mixed then strained and served "straight up" (without ice) in a chilled cocktail glass and garnished with either a green olive or a twist of lemon (a strip of the peel, usually squeezed or twisted to express volatile oils onto the surface of the drink). A martini may also be made on the rocks, that is, with the ingredients poured over ice cubes and served in an old-fashioned glass. Although there are many variations, in modern practice the standard martini is a mix of gin coupled with dry vermouth usually in a five-to-one ratio. Shaker mixing is common due to influences of popular culture, notably the fictional spy James Bond, who sometimes asked for his vodka martini to be "shaken, not stirred". However, stirring has a long history. Harry Craddock's Savoy Cocktail Book (1930)
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Vatted malt

    Vatted malt

    A blended malt, formerly called a vatted malt, or pure malt, is a blend of different single malt (barley-based) whiskies from different distilleries. These terms are most commonly used in reference to Scotch whisky. The term "vatted" is used to describe the blending process—and does not automatically equate to creation of a vatted malt. Likewise, the use of the term "blended" does not necessarily refer to the creation of what is typically referred to as a blended whisky. A blending of different casks or batches of single malt whisky produced from the same distillery is still considered a single malt whisky. The "malt" part of the term refers to the use of a malted grain to make the whisky. In Scotch whisky, this grain is required to be barley. Outside of Scotland, some whisky is made from other types of malted grain, such as malted rye, and the term rye malt whisky is specifically recognized along with (barley-based) malt whisky in the code of federal regulations for whisky in the United States. Moreover, outside of Scotland, whisky is often made using grain that is not malted (for example, using a corn mash). Unless a different grain is specifically mentioned, a malt whisky is
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Bloody Mary

    Bloody Mary

    A Bloody Mary is a popular cocktail containing vodka, tomato juice, and usually other spices or flavorings such as Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, piri piri sauce, beef consomme or bouillon, horseradish, celery, olive, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and celery salt. It has been called "the world's most complex cocktail." The Bloody Mary's origin is unclear. Fernand Petiot claimed to have invented the drink in 1921 while working at the New York Bar in Paris, which later became Harry's New York Bar, a frequent Paris hangout for Ernest Hemingway and other American expatriates. Two other claims have some plausibility. The first is that it was invented in the 1930s at New York’s 21 Club by a bartender named Henry Zbikiewicz, who was charged with mixing Bloody Marys. A second claim attributes its invention to the comedian George Jessel, who frequented the 21 Club. In 1939, Lucius Beebe printed in his gossip column This New York one of the earliest U.S. references to this drink, along with the original recipe: "George Jessel’s newest pick-me-up which is receiving attention from the town’s paragraphers is called a Bloody Mary: half tomato juice, half vodka." Fernand
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Budweiser

    Budweiser

    Budweiser ( /ˈbʌdwaɪzər/) is a 5% abv American-style lager produced by the Belgian-Brazilian beer conglomerate Anheuser–Busch InBev, introduced in 1876 by Adolphus Busch and one of the highest selling beers in the United States. It is made with up to 30% rice in addition to hops and barley malt. Budweiser is produced in various breweries located around the world. It is a filtered beer available in draught and packaged forms. Adolphus Busch left Germany for the United States in 1857. He settled in St. Louis, Missouri, where he eventually established his own brewing supply house. In St. Louis, Busch also met and married a woman named Lilly Anheuser. Lilly’s father, Eberhard Anheuser, owned a small brewery that had been yielding lager beer for some time. In 1864, Busch partnered with his father in-law to form what would eventually become the Anheuser-Busch Company. Busch traveled extensively throughout Europe in order to observe and study the latest brewing techniques. In the 1870s, Anheuser-Busch became the first American brewery to implement pasteurization, which greatly improved the shelf-life and transportability of its beers. In the mid-1800s, most Americans preferred robust,
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Chambord Liqueur Royale de France

    Chambord Liqueur Royale de France

    Chambord Black Raspberry Liqueur (pronounced: [ʃɑ̃.bɔʁ]) is modelled after a raspberry liqueur produced in the Loire Valley of France during the late 17th century. The liqueur was said to have been introduced to Louis XIV during one of his visits to the Château de Chambord. It was common during that time for liqueurs and cognac to be consumed with elegant meals. As of October 2011, the Chambord product brand is owned and produced by the Brown-Forman Corporation. Chambord is made from red and black raspberries, Madagascar vanilla, Moroccan citrus peel, honey and cognac. Chambord is produced on the premises of a traditional Loire Valley chateau, using all natural ingredients. Whole raspberries and blackberries are steeped in French spirits for a period of several weeks to produce a fruit infusion. This infusion produces a distinct raspberry flavour and aroma. After the infusion is extracted, a second set of spirits is added to the fruit and allowed to rest for a few weeks. After this second infusion is drawn off, the remaining fruit is pressed to obtain the natural sugars and juice. The fruit-infused spirits and juices from the final pressing are then combined, and finally, the berry
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Horse's Neck

    Horse's Neck

    A Horse's Neck is an American cocktail recognised by the IBA. It is made with brandy (or sometimes bourbon) and ginger ale, with a long spiral of lemon peel (zest) draped over the edge of an old fashioned or highball glass. When made with Ale-8-One and Maker's Mark this drink is commonly referred to as a Kentucky Gentleman. A similar Canadian drink, the Rye & Ginger, is made with Canadian whisky and ginger ale. Dating back to the 1890s, it was a non-alcoholic mixture of ginger ale, ice and lemon peel. By the 1910s, brandy, sometimes bourbon would be added for a 'Horse's Neck with a Kick' or '~ Stiff'. The non-alcoholic version was still served in upstate New York in the late fifties or early sixties, but eventually it was phased out. The non-alcoholic version of the drink is referenced in the 1950 film noir, "In A Lonely Place" starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame. The hat-check girl, Mildred Atkinson played by Martha Stewart, states that adding bitters to ginger ale is called a “Horse’s Neck”. Horse's Neck became popular in the wardrooms of the Royal Navy in the 1960s, displacing Pink Gin as the officers' signature drink. (An early reference to this is made in the 1957 film
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Kefir

    Kefir

    Kefir (pronounced /kəˈfɪər/ kə-FEER) (or alternatively kefīrs, keefir, kephir, kewra, talai, mudu kekiya, milk kefir, búlgaros) is a fermented milk drink made with kefir grains is believed to have its origins in the Caucasian mountains of the former USSR. It is prepared by inoculating cow, goat, or sheep's milk with kefir grains. Traditional kefir was made in skin bags that were hung near a doorway; the bag would be knocked by anyone passing through the doorway to help keep the milk and kefir grains well mixed. Marco Polo mentioned kefir when recounting his travels. The term kefir , existing in modern Russian since 1884 and English, probably ultimately from Old Turkic köpür → köpük ([milk] foam), and has become the most commonly used name, although it is known in other regions by various names. Kefir grains are a combination of bacteria and yeasts in a matrix of proteins, lipids, and sugars, and this symbiotic matrix forms "grains" that resemble cauliflower. For this reason, a complex and highly variable community of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts can be found in these grains. Kefir grains contain a water-soluble polysaccharide known as kefiran, which imparts a rope-like texture
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Metaxa

    Metaxa

    Metaxa (Greek: Μεταξά) is a Greek distilled spirit invented by Spyros Metaxas in 1888. It is a blend of brandy, spices, and wine, with wine not being present in some of the more expensive editions of the product to allow for a drier taste. It is exported to over 60 countries and was the first liquor consumed in space. The first part of Metaxa production of begins with a double distillation of several different wines (coming mainly from sun-dried Savatiano, Sultana and Rhoditis grapes). The resulting distilates are kept in cellars in relatively small, brand new, 300–350 L limousine oak barrels, usually French. French barrels are considered more desirable than those made in North America due to the fact that French Oak has smaller pores than its American counterpart. This slows down the transfer of flavour between the barrel and the liquor contained within it, resulting in a more subtle and refined end product. Some of the distillates are moved in large barrels of 3 cubic metre volume to mature further. These are then used for the main body of the blend. The maturation period can be anywhere from three (the Three Stars) to 30 years (the Grand Reserve). In the second part of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Pure pot still whiskey

    Pure pot still whiskey

    Pure pot still whiskey is whiskey distilled by a pot still. The term emphasizes that the whiskey contains only spirits produced from a pot still, without being blended with column still whiskey or neutral grain spirits. They are typically distilled from a mixture of malted and unmalted barley, and thus can not be called single malts. Unlike the term “single malt” in Scotch whisky regulations, the terms “pot still” and “pure pot still” are generally not protected terms with well-defined legal meanings. Whiskey producers have sometimes used the term "pot still" in the name or advertising for whiskeys that have actually been distilled using a column still for at least some part the distillation process. Although the pot still was essentially the only distillation method for whiskey prior to the invention of the column still, the invention of the column still made whiskey making substantially more economical, which – along with a number of historical factors including the Irish War of Independence, the Irish Civil War, and Prohibition in the United States – has led to a drastic reduction in the number of pot still distilleries in current operation. Apart from the Scottish single malts,
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Grand Marnier

    Grand Marnier

    Grand Marnier (French pronunciation: [ɡʁɑ̃ maʁnje]) Cordon Rouge is an orange-flavored brandy liqueur created in 1880 by Alexandre Marnier-Lapostolle. It is made from a blend of Cognac brandy, distilled essence of bitter orange, and sugar. Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge is 40% alcohol (70 Proof in UK, 80 Proof in US). Aside from Cordon Rouge, the Grand Marnier line includes other liqueurs, most of which can be consumed "neat" as a cordial or a digestif, and can be used in mixed drinks and desserts. In France this kind of use is the most popular, especially with Crêpes Suzette and "crêpes au Grand Marnier". César Ritz reportedly came up with the name "Grand Marnier" for Marnier-Lapostolle, who in return helped him purchase and establish the Hotel Ritz Paris. Cordon Rouge or "Red Ribbon" is orange-flavored brandy liqueur and the original Grand Marnier liqueur created in 1880 by Alexandre Marnier-Lapostolle. It is consumed neat and is also used in mixed drinks and desserts. Cordon Jaune or "Yellow Ribbon" Grand Marnier is only sold in some European countries and at some major international airports. It is a key ingredient in the regular Cordon Rouge. Cordon Jaune is the triple-sec
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Highball

    Highball

    Highball is the name for a family of mixed drinks that are composed of an alcoholic base spirit and a larger proportion of a non-alcoholic mixer. Originally, the most common highball was made with Scotch whisky and carbonated water, which is today called a "Scotch and Soda". There are many rivals for the fame of mixing the first highball, including the Adams House in Boston. New York barman Patrick Duffy claimed the highball was brought to the U.S. in 1894 from England by actor E. J. Ratcliffe. The Online Etymology Dictionary suggests that the name originated around 1898 and probably derives from ball meaning a "drink of whiskey" and high because it is served in a tall glass. The name may refer to the practice of serving drinks in the dining cars of trains powered by steam locomotives, when the engine would get up to speed and the ball that showed boiler pressure was at its high level, known as "highballing". Or the name may have come from the railroad signal meaning "clear track ahead." Well-known examples of highballs include Bourbon and Coke, Cuba Libre, Scotch and Soda, Seven and Seven, the Moscow Mule, and gin and tonic. A highball is typically served in large straight-sided
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Mojito

    Mojito

    Mojito ( /moʊˈhiːtoʊ/; Spanish: [moˈxito]) is a traditional Cuban highball. Traditionally, a mojito is a cocktail that consists of five ingredients: white rum, sugar (traditionally sugar cane juice), lime juice, sparkling water and mint. The original Cuban recipe uses spearmint or yerba buena, a mint variety very popular on the island. Its combination of sweetness, refreshing citrus and mint flavors is intended to complement the potent kick of the rum, and have made this clear highball a popular summer drink. The cocktail has a relatively low alcohol content (about 10 percent alcohol by volume). When preparing a mojito, lime juice is added to sugar (or syrup) and mint leaves. The mixture is then gently mashed with a muddler. The mint leaves should only be bruised to release the essential oils and should not be shredded. Then rum is added and the mixture is briefly stirred to dissolve the sugar and to lift the mint leaves up from the bottom for better presentation. Finally, the drink is topped with whole ice cubes and sparkling soda water. Mint leaves and lime wedges are used to garnish the glass. The mojito is one of the most famous rum-based highballs. There are several versions
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Squirt

    Squirt

    Squirt is a caffeine-free, citrus-flavored, carbonated soft drink, created in 1938 in Phoenix, Arizona. Squirt was created by Herb Bishop in 1938, after experimenting with a similar citrus drink, Citrus Club. He created a new, carbonated drink which required both less fruit juice and less sugar. Bishop declared that it was the "freshest, most exciting taste in the marketplace". Other sources claim that Squirt was created by Peter Hodde. This claim is validated by referencing the "Hodde Brothers" inscription on antique Squirt bottles. The product received its name because the drink was claimed to "squirt" into one's mouth like a freshly squeezed grapefruit. In 1941, a mascot named "Lil' Squirt" was introduced to the product line's marketing to personify the brand. The mascot proved useful in broadening public awareness of the product. Squirt became a popular soft drink in many parts of the country. In addition to being a well-liked soft drink, Squirt later established itself as a mixer in the 1950s. Ownership of the Squirt brand has changed hands several times. It is currently property of Dr Pepper Snapple Group. Squirt is naturally flavored but contains less than 1% grapefruit
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Cafe Sua Da

    Cafe Sua Da

    Vietnamese iced coffee, also known as Ca phe da or cafe da (Vietnamese: cà phê đá, literally "ice coffee") is a traditional Vietnamese coffee recipe. "Vietnamese iced coffee with milk", also known as ca phe sua da or cà phê sữa đá It is also called ca phe nau da (Vietnamese: cà phê nâu đá, "iced brown coffee") in northern Vietnam. At its simplest, Ca phe da is made with finely ground Vietnamese-grown dark roast coffee individually brewed with a small metal French drip filter (cà phê phin) into a cup containing about a quarter to a half as much sweetened condensed milk, stirred and poured over ice. Coffee was introduced into Vietnam by French colonists in the late 19th century. Vietnam quickly became a strong exporter of coffee with many plantations in the central highlands. The beverage was adopted with regional variations. Because of limitations on the availability of fresh milk, the French and Vietnamese began to use sweetened condensed milk with a dark roast coffee. Vietnamese-Americans introduced the practice of adding chicory to coffee, and many Americans today believe that all true Vietnamese coffee contains chicory. One brand that uses chicory is Cafe du Monde, often cited
    5.60
    5 votes
    86
    Bombay Sapphire

    Bombay Sapphire

    Bombay Sapphire is a brand of gin distributed by Bacardi that was launched in 1987. Its name originates from the gin's popularity in India during the British Raj and the sapphire in question is the Star of Bombay on display at the Smithsonian Institution. Bombay Sapphire is marketed in a flat-sided, sapphire-coloured bottle that bears a picture of Queen Victoria on the label. The flavouring of the drink comes from a recipe of ten ingredients (which the bottle's label boasts as "10 exotic botanicals"): almond, lemon peel, liquorice, juniper berries, orris root, angelica, coriander, cassia, cubeb, and grains of paradise. The spirit is triple distilled using a carterhead still, and the alcohol vapours are passed through a mesh/basket containing the ten botanicals, in order to gain flavour and aroma. This gives a lighter, more floral gin rather than the more-common 'punchy' gins that are distilled using a copper pot still. Water from Lake Vyrnwy is added to bring the strength of Bombay Sapphire down to 40.0% (UK, Australia). In 2011 it was announced that the company is planning to move the distillation process to a new facility in Laverstoke, Hampshire. The plans include the
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Cola

    Cola

    Cola is a carbonated beverage that was originally flavored and caffeinated by the kola nut, as well as by vanilla and other ingredients. However, most colas now use other flavoring (and caffeinating) ingredients with a similar taste. It became popular worldwide after druggist John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola in 1886. His non-alcoholic recipe was inspired by the Coca wine of pharmacist Angelo Mariani, created in 1863; it still contained cocaine. Coca-Cola is a major international brand, and is associated with the United States. It usually contains caramel color, caffeine and sweeteners such as sugar or high fructose corn syrup. Despite the name, the primary modern flavoring ingredients in a cola drink are sugar, citrus oils (from oranges, limes, or lemon fruit peel), cinnamon, vanilla, and an acidic flavorant. Manufacturers of cola drinks add trace ingredients to create distinctively different tastes for each brand. Trace flavorings may include nutmeg and a wide variety of ingredients, but the base flavorings that most people identify with a cola taste remain vanilla and cinnamon. Acidity is often provided by phosphoric acid, sometimes accompanied by citric or other isolated acids.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Hacker-Pschorr Weisse

    Hacker-Pschorr Weisse

    Hacker-Pschorr Weisse is a centuries-old German wheat beer from Bavaria that offers a refreshing taste that is après anything. The top-fermentation and wheat produce hints of clove giving Hacker-Pschorr Weisse a distinct flavor. Hacker-Pschorr Weisse has a cloudy appearance, characteristic of wheat beer. The cloudy appearance is due to yeast that is retained in the beer.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Pauwel Kwak

    Pauwel Kwak

    Bosteels Brewery is a beer brewery in Buggenhout, Belgium. The brewery was founded in 1791 and is still owned and operated by the same family, now its seventh generation. They brew three beers: Tripel Karmeliet, DeuS, and Pauwel Kwak. Tripel Karmeliet is brewed using three types of grain: wheat, oats and barley. DeuS, or Brut des Flandres, is a Bière de Champagne with 11.5% ABV served in 75cl bottles. During the brewing process, it is fermented over a month with two yeasts, re-fermented near Épernay in Champagne, France, and then bottled, after which it is left in a cellar for 9 months and rotated for a week, and then the yeast removed. The process of the second fermentation and storage is also referred to as the "Methode Champagnoise" or "Methode Traditionelle". Pauwel Kwak is an amber ale brewed since the 1980s with 8.4% ABV. Supposedly it is named after an 18th century innkeeper and brewer, Pauwel Kwak. The beer is filtered before packaging in bottles and kegs. As with other Belgian beers, Kwak has a branded glass with its own distinctive shape. It is held upright in a wooden stand; the brewery claims the glass was designed by the innkeeper Pauwel Kwak in the early 19th century
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Sour

    Sour

    A sour is a traditional family of mixed drinks. Common examples of sours are the Margarita and the Sidecar. Sours belong to one of the old families of original cocktails and are described by Jerry Thomas in his 1862 book, How to Mix Drinks Sours are mixed drinks containing a base liquor (bourbon or some other whiskey in the case of a whiskey sour), lemon or lime juice, egg white, and a sweetener (triple sec, simple syrup, grenadine, or pineapple juice are common). The Gin Sour is a traditional mixed cocktail that predates prohibition. In an 1898 book by Finley Dunne, Mr. Dooley includes it in a list of great supposedly American inventions: Popular during the 1940s, Kevin Starr includes it in "an array of drinks (the gin sour, the whiskey sour, the Gin Rickey, the Tom Collins, the Pink lady, the Old Fashioned) that now seem period pieces, evocative of another era." White Lady (also known as a Delilah, Chelsea Side-car and Lillian Forever) is essentially a Sidecar made with gin in place of brandy. The cocktail sometimes also includes additional ingredients, e.g. egg white, sugar and cream. It is disputed who originally invented this cocktail. There are at least two different
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Absolut Vodka

    Absolut Vodka

    Absolut Vodka is a brand of vodka, produced near Åhus, Skåne, in southern Sweden. Absolut is owned by French group Pernod Ricard; they bought Absolut for 5.63 billion Euros in 2008 from the Swedish state. Absolut is the third largest brand of alcoholic spirits in the world after Bacardi and Smirnoff, and is sold in 126 countries. Absolut was established in 1879 by Lars Olsson Smith and is produced in Åhus, Sweden. Smith introduced fractional distillation that produces liquor without fusel alcohol in Sweden in 1877, under the name "Tiodubbelt Renadt Brännvin" (Tenfold Purified Vodka). Brännvin literally means "burn-wine" and is analogous to the German "Branntwein". The term is also used in Norwegian, Danish and Icelandic. ("Vodka" was not used for Swedish liquor until 1958, with the potato-based Explorer Vodka.) The name was changed to "Absolut Rent Brännvin" (Absolutely Pure Vodka) by Smith to market his much improved product. Smith challenged the city of Stockholm's liquor marketing monopoly with his vodka. It was sold at a lower price than the monopoly's product, just outside the city border. Smith even offered free boat rides to the distillery and "Rent Brännvin" made Smith a
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Cider

    Cider

    Cider or cyder ( /ˈsaɪdər/ SY-dər) is a fermented alcoholic beverage traditionally made from apple juice exclusively. There is a trend to add fruit flavours to cider to widen the drink's appeal, and some ciders do in fact include a minority amount of pear juice. Cider varies in alcohol content from 2% ABV to 8.5% or more in traditional English ciders. In some regions, such as Germany and United States, cider may be called "apple wine". In the United States and Canada, "hard cider" usually refers to the alcoholic beverage discussed in this article, while "cider" may refer to non-alcoholic apple juice. When sugar or extra fruit has been added and a secondary fermentation increases the alcoholic strength, a cider is classified as "apple wine". Cider may be made from any variety of apple, but certain cultivars grown solely for use in cider are known as cider apples. Cider is popular in the United Kingdom, especially in South West England and East Anglia. The United Kingdom has the highest per capita consumption of cider, as well as the largest cider-producing companies in the world, including H. P. Bulmer, the largest. As of 2006, the UK produces 600 million litres of cider each year
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Frysk Hynder

    Frysk Hynder

    Frysk Hynder Single Malt is a Dutch single malt whisky, distilled and bottled in the Frisian Us Heit Distillery. Frysk Hynder (Frisian horse) is the first single malt ever produced in The Netherlands, and started off as a hobby project in the Us Heit beer brewery. The daily production is only 77 bottles, which makes Frysk Hynder a collector's item.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Goldwasser

    Goldwasser

    Danziger Goldwasser (Polish: Gdańska wódka (vodka of Gdańsk)), with Goldwasser as the registered tradename, is a strong (35% ABV) root and herbal liqueur which has been produced since at least 1598 in Danzig (Gdańsk). The most prominent characteristic of this alcoholic beverage is small flakes of 22 or 23 karat gold suspended in it. Alcoholic solutions were used by artists for Gilding, which is believed to be the inspiration for the drink. Alchemy, which was at its high point in the late 16th century when Goldwasser appeared, held gold to have many desirable medical properties; while modern medicine disputes this, native gold is known to be non-toxic to humans and to pass through the digestive tract unchanged, unlike most other heavy metals. Since the flakes are extremely small and thin, the price is not prohibitive. When used as a food additive, Gold is labelled as E175; see List of food additives, Codex Alimentarius. The drink was invented by a Dutchman from De Lier, Ambrosius Vermöllen, who became a citizen of Danzig on 6 July 1598. In 1704 Ambrosius' grandson Salomon Vermöllen and his brother-in-law Isaac Wed-Ling moved production to new premises located in the Breitgasse. At
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Minttu

    Minttu

    Minttu liqueur a clear peppermint liqueur produced in Turku by Pernod Ricard Finland (previously owned by Vin & Sprit). Its clear colour is due to a special type of sugar. Minttu has a strong, crisp taste and scent of peppermint. The taste is quite similar to Crème de menthe, but appearance is more like vodka. The Minttu range consists of Minttu Peppermint 40% and 50% alcohol by volume, and Minttu Black Mint 35% alc. Minttu Black Mint is peppermint liqueur spiced with salmiac. Most common ways to enjoy Minttu are to drink it as an ice cold shot or on the rocks. In Finland, it is often consumed together with either hot or cold chocolate.
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Rondo

    Rondo

    Rondo was a citrus-flavored soft drink available in limited U.S. markets in the late 1970s and early 1980s, one which was "blended from fine essences", and "lightly carbonated". It is mostly famous for its slogan - "Rondo---The Thirst Crusher" - as well as its commercials, featuring people crushing the cans in various ways. The cans featured bright yellow packaging for regular Rondo and green packaging for Diet Rondo. Schweppes sold a similar drink in Australia under the name Solo. The drink and its name were parodied in the 2006 film Idiocracy as "Brawndo: The Thirst Mutilator".
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Singapore Sling

    Singapore Sling

    The Singapore Sling is a South-East Asian cocktail that was developed sometime before 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, a bartender working at the Long Bar in Raffles Hotel Singapore. The original recipe used gin, Cherry Heering, Bénédictine, and fresh pineapple juice, primarily from Sarawak pineapples which enhance the flavour and create a foamy top. Most recipes substitute bottled pineapple juice for fresh juice; soda water has to be added for foam. The hotel's recipe was recreated based on the memories of former bartenders and written notes that they were able to discover regarding the original recipe. One of the scribbled recipes is still on display at the Raffles Hotel Museum. Recipes published in articles about Raffles Hotel before the 1970s are significantly different from current recipes, and "Singapore Slings" drunk elsewhere in Singapore differ from the recipe used at Raffles Hotel. The current Raffles Hotel recipe is a heavily modified version of the original, most likely changed sometime in the 1970s by Ngiam Tong Boon's nephew. Today, many of the "Singapore Slings" served at Raffles Hotel have been pre-mixed and are made using an automatic dispenser that combines alcohol and
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Colt 45

    Colt 45

    Colt 45 is a brand of malt liquor introduced by National Brewing Company in the spring of 1963. Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, the National Brewing Company and its brands (including Colt 45) are today owned by the Pabst Brewing Company. Colt 45 is available today in a multitude of packages and sizes. Cans are available in 12, 16 and 24 ounce packages and bottles are available in 7, 12, 16, 18, 22, 32 and 40 ounce packages. Cans are available in multi-packs including: 12, 15, 18, 24, 30, 36 packs of 12 ounce cans. National Brewing Company introduced Colt 45 in 1963. Previously, the only major national brand of malt liquor was Country Club. The label was designed with a kicking horse and horseshoe, a subtle reference to its "extra kick" compared to competing brands. Listed on the Pabst website as a "Fun Fact", Colt 45 was named after running back #45 Jerry Hill of the 1963 Baltimore Colts and not the pistol or the revolver. The label has a long-time advertising association with actor Billy Dee Williams, who has been seen in print ads, on billboards and in television ads for Colt 45 starting in the 1980s. The product's slogan during that era, as stated by Williams in
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    Old Overholt

    Old Overholt

    Old Overholt is a long-produced American rye whiskey distilled by A. Overholt & Co., currently a subsidiary of Beam Inc., at the Jim Beam distillery in Clermont, Kentucky. It is one of the few straight rye whiskies available at most liquor stores in the United States. It is aged for four years and bottled at 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume). Old Overholt was originally distilled in Broad Ford, Pennsylvania, 35 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. The company claims to have been established in 1810. The whiskey is named for Abraham Overholt, a farmer and distiller and later, grandfather of the American Industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Parodied in a Warner Brothers cartoon and in the Terry Pratchett novels The Dark Side of the Sun and Soul Music as "Old Overcoat". It was the so-called "medicinal" alcohol of the United States Navy during World War II. It is reputed to have been the alcoholic beverage of choice of the gunfighter and gambler Doc Holliday.
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    Goldstar beer

    Goldstar beer

    Goldstar is an Israel beer that has been brewed in Israel since the 1950s.It is defined as a Munich-style dark lager beer. It is produced in a traditional way from fine European malt which gives it the deep and rich taste. Goldstar contains 4.9% alcohol. Goldstar is brewed by Tempo Beer Industries Ltd. in Kiryat Nordau, Netanya. In January 2007, Tempo Beer Industries Ltd. began production of "Goldstar Light" brandin an attempt to appeal to a wider consumer spectrum. It launched a commercial starring Moshe Datz, from famous Israeli duet Duo Datz. "Goldstar Light" contains 29 cal. and 4% alc. per 100 ml.The beer is certified kosher by the Chief Rabbinate of Netanya, Israel.
    5.40
    5 votes
    101
    Champagne

    Champagne

    Champagne (French: [ʃɑ̃.paɲ]; English /ˌʃæmˈpeɪn/) is a sparkling wine produced from grapes grown in the Champagne region of France following rules that demand secondary fermentation of the wine in the bottle to create carbonation. Some use the term champagne as a generic term for sparkling wine, but many countries reserve the term exclusively for sparkling wines that come from Champagne and are produced under the rules of the appellation. The primary grapes used in the production of Champagne are Pinot noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier. Champagne appellation law only allows grapes grown according to appellation rules in specifically designated plots within the appellation to be used in the production of Champagne. Some sparkling wines produced in other regions of the world use other grapes. Champagne first gained world renown because of its association with the anointment of French kings. Royalty from throughout Europe spread the message of the unique sparkling wine from Champagne and its association with luxury and power in the 17th, 18th and 19th century. The leading manufacturers devoted considerable energy to creating a history and identity for their wine, associating it and
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Pisco Sour

    Pisco Sour

    A Pisco Sour is a cocktail typical of western South American cuisine. The drink's name is a mixture of the Quechua word Pisco (Bird) and the term Sour (in reference to the mixed drink family of the same name). The Peruvian Pisco Sour requires the use of Peruvian Pisco as the base liquor and the addition of lime (or lemon) juice, syrup, ice, egg white, and Angostura bitters. The Chilean version is similar, but uses Chilean Pisco, sugar instead of syrup, and excludes the bitter. Other variants of the cocktail include those created with fruits like pineapple or plants such as coca leaves. The cocktail originated in Peru, invented in the Peruvian capital of Lima by Victor Vaughn Morris in the early 1920s. An American bartender, Morris left his native United States in 1903 to work in Cerro de Pasco, a city in central Peru. In 1916, he inaugurated in Lima his saloon, Morris' Bar, which became a popular spot for the Peruvian Upper class and English-speaking foreigners. Coincidentally, the oldest mentions of the Pisco Sour so far found come from a 1921 magazine attributing Morris as the inventor and a 1924 advertisement from Morris' Bar published in a newspaper from the port of Valparaiso,
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Tinto de verano

    Tinto de verano

    Tinto de verano (Summer red wine) is a wine-based cold drink similar to sangria and is very popular in Spain. It is simpler than sangria, normally made up of 1 part of table red wine and 1 part gaseosa (or Fanta). Gaseosa is a mild flavored low sugar carbonated lemonade, of which La Casera is the best known brand. However, proportions can vary greatly according to the taste of every individual. Gaseosa can be replicated by mixing Sprite or 7-Up with carbonated water. Rum is sometimes added to the drink. It is served over ice, sometimes with a slice of lemon. The name is Spanish and literally translates to red wine of summer ("tinto" is Spanish for "red" when referred to wine). As the name suggests it is often served during the summertime. It is often home-made, or bought ready-bottled from supermarkets. In the Costa del Sol and other Southern regions of Spain. It is common for locals to drink Tinto de verano as it is easy to make yourself, or has many variations of preprepared varieties for the same price as many cola drinks. Sangria is considered more commercial and "touristy" as it requires more time to make and is often sold in restaurants at a more expensive price, whereas
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Amarula

    Amarula

    Amarula is a cream liqueur from South Africa. It is made with sugar, cream and the fruit of the African marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea) which is also locally called the Elephant tree or the Marriage Tree. It has an alcohol content of 17% by volume. It has had some success at international spirit ratings competitions, winning a gold medal at the 2006 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. Amarula was first marketed by Southern Liqueur Company of South Africa (the current trademark owners) as a liqueur in September 1989, the Amarula spirit having been launched in 1983. It has the taste of slightly fruity caramel. Amarula has received consistently good reviews, with the caveat that, like many cream liqueurs, it is too sweet for some palates. Amarula has become the second largest seller in the cream liqueur category after Bailey's Irish Cream, with particular success in Brazil. It is popular and common throughout Africa, especially the south and east coast. Recently, Amarula has attempted to break into the American market. Elephants enjoy eating the fruit of the marula tree. Because of the marula tree's association with elephants, the distiller has made them its symbol and supports
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Gimlet

    Gimlet

    The gimlet is a cocktail made of gin and lime juice. A 1928 description of the drink was: "gin, a spot of lime, and soda" (D. B. Wesson, I'll Never be Cured III). A 1953 description was: "a real gimlet is half gin and half Rose's lime juice and nothing else" (Terry Lennox in Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye). For the vodka gimlet, replace gin with vodka. Bartenders often answer requests for the gimlet with a vodka gimlet. As the gimlet was director Edward D. Wood, Jr.'s favorite cocktail, he often used the pseudonyms "Telmig Akdov" or "Akdov Telmig" (Vodka Gimlet spelled backwards) for his adult novels. Eric Felten gave this gimlet recipe in his "How's Your Drink Column" in The Wall Street Journal Weekend Edition of August 4, 2006: William L. Hamilton gave this recipe in his "Shaken and Stirred" column in The New York Times on September 15, 2002: A gimlet served at the Fifty Seven Fifty Seven Bar at the Four Seasons Hotel consists of the following, shaken with ice: The Bartender's Bible by Gary Regan lists the recipe as: Regan also states, "... since the Rose's product has such a long and impressive history (which predates the gimlet), I am inclined to think that Rose's was the
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Hpnotiq

    Hpnotiq

    Hpnotiq liqueur is an alcoholic beverage, native to New York but bottled in France by Heaven Hill Distilleries, made from fruit juices, vodka and a cognac. It is 34 proof (17% ABV) and is available in over 70 countries worldwide. Hpnotiq was created by Raphael Yakoby in 2001, a college dropout living with his parents on Long Island, New York, who, after seeing a blue perfume at Bloomingdale's, decided to create a blue liqueur. Within a year, it was a popular drink in New York night clubs. The brand was originally distributed by Wingard Inc. of Great Neck, New York; in January 2003, Yakoby's trademark and the distribution rights were acquired by Heaven Hill Distilleries. The brand earned Yakoby a reported $50 million. Hpnotiq is bottled in France's Cognac region and the vodka is premium, French and distilled three times. It is the fourth best-selling imported liqueur in the United States, according to Adams Beverage Media. The brand primarily targeted an urban audience, and is currently marketed predominantly to women 21-35. It is promoted as an alternative ingredient for cosmopolitans and martinis. Marketing strategies have included hosting events for celebrities such as Lauren
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Calvados

    Calvados

    Calvados (French pronunciation: [kal.va.dos]) is an apple brandy from the French region of Lower Normandy (Basse-Normandie). It is sometimes abbreviated to Calva. Apple orchards and brewers are mentioned as far back as the 8th century by Charlemagne. The first known Norman distillation was carried out by "Lord" de Gouberville in 1554, and the guild for cider distillation was created about 50 years later in 1606. In the 17th century the traditional ciderfarms expanded but taxation and prohibition of cider brandies were enforced elsewhere than Brittany, Maine and Normandy. The area called "Calvados" was created after the French Revolution, but "eau de vie de cidre" was already called "calvados" in common usage. In the 19th century output increased with industrial distillation and the working class fashion for "Café-calva". When a phylloxera outbreak in the last quarter of the 19th century devastated the vineyards of France and Europe, calvados experienced a "golden age". During World War I cider brandy was requisitioned for use in armaments due to its alcohol content. The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942. After the war many
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Cuba Libre

    Cuba Libre

    The Cuba Libre ( /ˈkjuːbə ˈliːbreɪ/; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkuβa ˈliβɾe], "Free Cuba") is a highball made of cola, lime, and white rum. This highball is often referred to as a Rum and Coke in the United States, Canada, the UK and Ireland, where the lime juice may or may not be included. Accounts of the invention of the Cuba Libre vary. One account claims that the drink (Spanish for Free Cuba) was invented in Havana, Cuba around 1901/1902. Patriots aiding Cuba during the Spanish-American War—and, later, expatriates avoiding Prohibition—regularly mixed rum and cola as a highball and a toast to this Caribbean island. According to Bacardi: The world's second most popular drink was born in a collision between the United States and Spain. It happened during the Spanish-American War at the turn of the century when Teddy Roosevelt, the Rough Riders, and Americans in large numbers arrived in Cuba. One afternoon, a group of off-duty soldiers from the U.S. Signal Corps were gathered in a bar in Old Havana. Fausto Rodriguez, a young messenger, later recalled that Captain Russell came in and ordered Bacardi (Gold) rum and Coca-Cola on ice with a wedge of lime. The captain drank the concoction
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Fernet Branca

    Fernet Branca

    Fernet (Italian pronunciation: [fɛrˈnɛt]) is a type of amaro, a bitter, aromatic spirit. Fernet is made from a number of herbs and spices which vary according to the brand, but usually include myrrh, rhubarb, chamomile, cardamom, aloe, and especially saffron, with a base of grape distilled spirits, and colored with caramel coloring. Ingredients rumored to be in fernet include codeine, mushrooms, fermented beets, coca leaf, gentian, wormwood, zedoary, cinchona, bay leaves, absinthe, orange peel, calumba, echinacea, quinine, ginseng, St. John's wort, sage, and peppermint oil. Fernet is usually served as a digestif after a meal but may also be served with coffee and espresso or mixed into coffee and espresso drinks. In Argentina it is commonly mixed with Coca Cola. It typically contains 45% alcohol by volume. It may be served at room temperature or on the rocks (with ice). A mint-flavored version of fernet is also available. Its smell has been described as "like black licorice-flavored Listerine." Popular in Argentina, it is often taken as a national beverage. The production in this country is around 25 million liters, 35% sold in Buenos Aires province and Federal District and 30% in
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Mint Julep

    Mint Julep

    The mint julep is a mixed alcoholic drink, or cocktail, associated with the cuisine of the Southern United States. A mint julep is traditionally made with four ingredients: mint leaf, bourbon, sugar, and water. Traditionally, spearmint is the mint of choice used in Southern states, and in Kentucky in particular. In the use of sugar and mint, it is similar to the mojito. Proper preparation of the cocktail is commonly debated, as methods may vary considerably from one bartender to another. By another method, the mint julep may be considered as one of a loosely associated family of drinks called "smashes" (the brandy smash is another example, as well as the mojito), in which fresh mint and other ingredients are muddled or crushed in preparation for flavoring the finished drink. The step further releases essential oils and juices into the mixture, intensifying the flavor from the added ingredient or ingredients. Traditionally, mint juleps were often served in silver or pewter cups, and held only by the bottom and top edges of the cup. This allows frost to form on the outside of the cup. Traditional hand placement may have arisen as a way to reduce the heat transferred from the hand to
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Rum

    Rum

    Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts such as molasses, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels. Rum can be referred to in Spanish by descriptors such as ron viejo ("old rum") and ron añejo ("aged rum"). The majority of the world's rum production occurs in the Caribbean and Latin America (including the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Belize, Martinique, Guatemala, Colombia, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Bolivia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, Barbados, Jamaica, St.Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Brazil, Haiti, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Peru, and Cuba). Rum is also produced in the Canary Islands of Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Mexico, Hawaii, the Philippines, India, Reunion Island, Mauritius, South Africa, and Canada. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas "golden" and "dark" rums were typically consumed individually (i.e., "straight" or "neat") or for cooking, but are now commonly consumed with mixers. Premium rums are also available, made to be consumed either straight or iced. Rum plays a
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Spritz

    Spritz

    The Spritz (German: "splash" / "sparkling") is a wine-based cocktail commonly served as an aperitif in northern Italy, especially in the Veneto region and surrounding areas. The drink is prepared with Prosecco wine, a dash of some bitter liqueur such as Aperol, Campari, Select or Cynar. The glass is then topped off with sparkling mineral water. It is usually served over ice in a lowball glass (or sometimes a martini glass or wine glass) and garnished a slice of orange, or sometimes an olive, depending on the liqueur. Another variation of the drink uses champagne with the liqueur rather than wine. The drink originated in Venice while it was part of the Austrian Empire, and is based on the Austrian Spritzer, a combination of equal parts white wine and soda water. More recently it became the traditional drink of the students of the University of Padua. In recent years it has also become extremely popular in southern Germany, with Aperol as the aperitif of choice in Munich and Stuttgart.
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    2 votes
    113
    Bourbon whiskey

    Bourbon whiskey

    Bourbon is a type of American whiskey – a barrel-aged distilled spirit made primarily from corn. The name of the spirit derives from its historical association with an area known as Old Bourbon, around what is now Bourbon County, Kentucky (which, in turn, was named after the French House of Bourbon royal family). It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the American South in general, and Kentucky in particular. Bourbon is served straight, diluted with water, over ice cubes, or mixed with soda and into cocktails, including the Manhattan, the Old Fashioned, and the iconic mint julep. It is also used in cooking. Bourbon's legal definition varies somewhat from country to country, but many trade agreements require the name bourbon to be reserved for products made in the United States. The U.S. regulations for labeling and advertising bourbon apply only to products made for consumption within the United States; they do not apply to distilled spirits made for export. Canadian law requires products labeled bourbon to be made in the United States and to also conform to the requirements that apply within
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Cortado

    Cortado

    A cortado is an espresso cut with a small amount of warm milk to reduce the acidity. The ratio of milk to coffee is between 1:1 – 1:2, and the milk is added after the espresso. The word "cortado" is from the Spanish cortar, to cut. A cortado is also known as "Tallat" in Catalan, "Ebaki" in Basque, "Pingo" or "Garoto" in Portugal and "noisette" in France, and sometimes a "Gibraltar" in the United States. In Bristol, UK, it is known as a "long brown" amongst local experts. The steamed milk does not have much foam, but many baristas make some micro foam to make latte art. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America, where it is drunk in the afternoon. In Cuba, it is known as a cortadito. It's usually served in a special glass, often with a metal ring base and a metal wire handle. There are several variations, including cortado condensada, cafe con leche condensada or bombon (espresso with condensed milk) and leche y leche (with condensed milk and cream on top). Brought to the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami, Florida by Cuban-Americans in the 1960s, the drink is now found throughout the city, and is an important part of everyday culture, particularly
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Old Crow

    Old Crow

    Old Crow is a low-priced brand of Kentucky-made straight bourbon whiskey, along with the slightly higher quality, but still inexpensive Old Crow Reserve brand. It is distilled by Beam Inc., which also produces Jim Beam and several other brands of bourbon whiskey. The Old Crow brand has a venerable history as one of Kentucky's earliest bourbons, and is distinctive for being the first sour mash process bourbon whiskey. Old Crow is aged in barrels for three years, and in the United States is 80 proof while Old Crow Reserve is aged for four years and is 86 proof. James Crow, a Scottish immigrant, started distilling what would come to be Old Crow in Frankfort, Kentucky, in the 1830s. Reportedly a very skilled distiller, he made whiskey for various employers, which was sold as "Crow" or, as it aged, "Old Crow" — the brand acquired its reputation from the latter. He died in 1856, and while W.A. Gaines and Company kept the name and continued to distill the bourbon according to his recipe, the original distillation formula died with its creator. The last remaining stock of Old Crow (of which there seemed to have been quite a bit) acquired near-legendary status, and offering drinks of it
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Pelinkovac

    Pelinkovac

    Pelinkovac is a bitter liqueur based on wormwood (Croatian: pelin or pelen), popular in Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, as well as in Slovenia, where it is known as pelinkovec or pelinovec. The alcohol content is 28%-35% by volume. It has a very bitter taste, resembling that of Jägermeister. The most popular brands in Croatia are the Maraska Pelinkovac made by Maraska Distillery (Zadar, Croatia) and the Badel Pelinkovac, made by the Badel Distillery (Zagreb, Croatia). The Badel's pelinkovac is closer to the taste of Jägermeister, but a little sweeter and less bitter. The Maraska's pelinkovac is very popular in Croatia. Alcohol volume in both is 28%. In Serbia, the most popular brand of pelinkovac is Gorki List, which was made until 2009 by the state owned company Suboticanka - (Subotica, province of Vojvodina, Serbia). Since 2009 when Suboticanka went into bankruptcy the production and bottling of this brand has been moved to Slovenia. Currently the brand is the property of the Slovenian company Grenki list. With discrete success Pelinkovac is also produced by a number of small distilleries in Slovenia, Istria and in the city of Trieste. In Bulgaria, pelin (пелин)
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Sake bomb

    Sake bomb

    The sake bomb or sake bomber is a beer cocktail made by pouring sake into a shot glass and dropping it into a glass of beer. Sometimes two chopsticks are placed parallel on top of the glass of beer, and the shot glass is carefully balanced between them. The drinker then chants "sake...sake...sake...SAKE!" and slams the table with his fists, causing the sake to fall into the beer. It should be drunk immediately, and works best with warm sake. Alternatively, the drinker may count to three in Japanese, "ichi...ni...san...SAKE BOMB!" Or he may simply yell "KANPAI!" A variation of the sake bomb is to "bomb" a shot of warm sake into chilled Red Bull energy drink. Media related to Sake bomb at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Sazerac

    Sazerac

    The Sazerac is a local New Orleans variation of an old-fashioned cognac or whiskey cocktail, named for the Sazerac de Forge et Fils brand of cognac that was its original prime ingredient. The drink is some combination of cognac or rye whiskey, absinthe or Herbsaint, and Peychaud's Bitters; it is distinguished by its preparation method. It is sometimes referred to as the oldest known American cocktail, with origins in pre–Civil War New Orleans, Louisiana, though there are much earlier published instances of the word cocktail. The defining feature of the Sazerac is the preparation using Peychaud's Bitters and two chilled old-fashioned glasses, one swirled with a light wash of absinthe for the slight taste and strong scent. The second chilled glass is used to mix the other ingredients, then the contents of that are poured or strained into the first. Various anisettes such as Pastis, Pernod, Ricard and Herbsaint are common substitutes for absinthe when it is not available; in New Orleans Herbsaint is most commonly used. Around 1850, Sewell T. Taylor sold his bar, The Merchants Exchange Coffee House, and went into the imported liquor business. He began to import a brand of cognac named
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    The Dalmore Single Malt

    The Dalmore Single Malt

    The Dalmore is a distillery in Alness, Scotland, located about 20 mi (32 km) north of Inverness. The waters of the River Alness (River Averon), which runs through the village, are used to produce its whiskies. The distillery is best known for producing a single malt scotch whisky of the same name. Its location and flavour qualify it as a "Highland malt". The Dalmore distillery is owned and operated by Whyte and Mackay Ltd, which is owned by United Breweries Group, a large Indian conglomerate. The Distillery was established in 1839 by Alexander Matheson, a trader who made his fortune in illegal opium imports from the Far East. It sits on the banks of the Cromarty Firth overlooking the Black Isle, the "big meadowland", from which it takes its name. The distillery was bought by the MacKenzie family in 1886. It has been passed down that in 1263, a predecessor of the Clan MacKenzie saved King Alexander III from a rampaging stag whilst out hunting. In reward, the King allowed him to bear the Royal emblem of a 12-pointed stag in his coat of arms. Recently, the MacKenzie motto Luceo non Uro or I shine, not burn has also been taken up by Dalmore. In a renewed effort to popularise the brand,
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Advocaat

    Advocaat

    Advocaat is a traditional Dutch / Belgian rich and creamy liqueur made from eggs, sugar and brandy. It has a smooth, custard-like flavor and is similar to eggnog. The typical alcohol content is generally somewhere between 14% and 20% ABV. Its contents may be a blend of egg yolks, aromatic spirits, sugar or honey, brandy, vanilla and sometimes cream (or evaporated milk). Notable makers of advocaat include Warners, Bols, Dwersteg, Verpoorten, Warninks, Cooymans, Jansen and DeKuyper. Thick advocaat is sold almost exclusivly on the Dutch and Belgian market, though in lesser quantities it can also be found Southern German, Austrian and Tyrolean markets. It is often eaten with a little spoon, while a more liquid version is sold as an export. Thick advocaat contains egg yolk, and is used as a waffle topping and as an ingredient for several kinds of desserts such as ice cream, custards and pastries. It is also served as an apéritif or digestif in a wide glass with whipped cream and cocoa powder sprinkled on top. In the export variety whole eggs are used, making it more liquid and particularly well suited for cocktails and long drinks. The best known cocktail using advocaat is the Snowball:
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    3 votes
    121
    Campari

    Campari

    Campari is an alcoholic apéritif (20.5%, 21%, 25% or 28% ABV, depending on the country in which it is sold) obtained from the infusion of herbs and fruit (including chinotto and cascarilla) in alcohol and water. It is a bitters characterized by its dark red color. Campari is often used in cocktails and is commonly served with soda water, wine, or citrus juice. It is produced by the Campari Group, a multi-national company based in Italy. The history of Campari began in 1860 with its invention by Gaspare Campari in Novara, Italy. It was originally coloured with carmine dye, derived from crushed cochineal insects, which gave the drink its distinctive red colour. In 1904, Campari's first production plant was opened in Sesto San Giovanni, near Milan, Italy. The company required bars that bought Campari to display the Campari Bitters sign. Under the direction of Davide Campari, Gaspare's son, the company began to export the beverage, first to Nice in the heart of the French Riviera, then overseas. The Campari brand is now distributed in over 190 countries. In 2006, Gruppo Campari ceased using carmine in its production. In the Italian market, Campari mixed with soda water is sold in
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Iced coffee

    Iced coffee

    Iced coffee is a cold variant of coffee. Brew coffee directly over ice, or brew coffee- any style or brew system works, and pour over ice. In more recent times it has become common for coffee shops to offer 'iced' versions of their most popular coffee drinks. The iced latte and iced mocha are the two most common examples of this. A quick way of preparing such drinks is to make a small quantity of strong, hot espresso, dissolving the required sweetener/flavorings in the hot liquid and then pouring this directly into a cup of ice cold milk. This method is common in busier coffee shops. Depending on the brewing method, iced coffee can be served already chilled, or poured hot, double strength, over an equal amount of ice. Because sugar does not dissolve readily into cold liquids, it must be added either directly to the hot base, or to the finished product in the form of simple syrup, which can be made by mixing quantities of water and sugar, then simmering over low heat until the desired viscosity is attained. Unlike sugar, most synthetic substitutes such as aspartame (Equal, Nutrasweet) or sucralose (Splenda) will dissolve readily into cold coffee. In Australia, many restaurants and
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Ketel One

    Ketel One

    Ketel One, also known as Ketel 1, (Dutch for: Pot still One) is a liquor brand of the Nolet Distillery in Schiedam, the Netherlands. Ketel One Vodka is distilled from 100% wheat in copper pot stills, filtered over loose charcoal, and rests in tile lined tanks until ready. Ketel One Vodka is named after the original copper pot still, “Distilleerketel #1” and is handcrafted in small batches. The alcohol content of this spirit is 40% (80 proof). The Nolet Distillery also makes Ketel One Citroen, Ketel One Oranje and Ketel 1 Jenever. 1691 Joannes Nolet opens a distillery in Schiedam, located close to the North Sea and large grain auctions, which later became the capital for the spirits industry. 1793 Jacobus Nolet (5th generation) acquires glass and cork factories and a printing company, and then builds the windmill, known as 'The Whale.' 1867 The Nolet family acquires an interest in shipping and begins exporting spirits to the USA. 1902 The Nolet family opens a distillery in Maryland, USA but later withdraws from the American market in the Prohibition era. 1979 Carolus Nolet Sr. (10th generation) assumes the role of Chairman. 1983 With family recipes and techniques perfected by his
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Mai Tai

    Mai Tai

    The Mai Tai is an alcoholic cocktail based on rum, Curaçao liqueur, and lime juice, associated with "Polynesian-style" settings. It was purportedly invented at the Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California in 1944. Trader Vic's rival, Don the Beachcomber, claimed to have created it in 1933 at his then-new bar named for himself (later a famous restaurant) in Hollywood. Don the Beachcomber's recipe is more complex than that of Vic's and tastes quite different. "Maita'i" is the Tahitian word for "good"; but the drink is spelled as two words, sometimes hyphenated or capitalized. The Trader Vic story of its invention is that the Trader (Victor J. Bergeron) created it one afternoon for some friends who were visiting from Tahiti. One of those friends, Carrie Guild, tasted it and cried out: "Maita'i roa ae!" (Literally "very good!", figuratively "Out of this world! The Best!") — hence the name. There are many recipes for Mai Tais. Eleven of them, including three different versions of Trader Vic's, as well as the recipe of Don the Beachcomber, can be found at Wikibooks Mai Tai. The Mai Tai became such a popular cocktail in the 1950s and 1960s that virtually every restaurant,
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Orange drink

    Orange drink

    The term orange drink (not to be confused with orange soft drinks) refers to a sweet, sugary, sometimes fizzy, orange-flavored drink. Typically such beverages contain little or no orange juice and are mainly composed of water, sugar or sweeteners, flavor, coloring, and additives, sometimes in that order. As such, they are very low in nutritional value, although many are fortified with vitamin C. In 2002, however, a "cheap, fortified, orange-flavored drink" was developed with the intention of improving nutrition in the third world by adding Vitamin A, Iron, and Iodine to people's diets. Because orange drinks can be confused with orange juice, the U.S. government requires orange drinks, as well as other beverages whose names allude to fruit products, to state the percentage of juice contained above the "Nutrition Facts" label. and requires companies to state them as orange drinks instead of orange juice.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Tequila

    Tequila

    Tequila (Spanish pronunciation: [teˈkila]) is a distilled beverage made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the area surrounding the city of Tequila, 65 kilometres (40 mi) northwest of Guadalajara, and in the highlands (Los Altos) of the western Mexican state of Jalisco. The red volcanic soil in the surrounding region is particularly well suited to the growing of the blue agave, and more than 300 million of the plants are harvested there each year. Agave tequila grows differently depending on the region. Blue agaves grown in the highlands region are larger in size and sweeter in aroma and taste. Agaves harvested in the lowlands, on the other hand, have a more herbaceous fragrance and flavor. Mexican laws state that tequila can be produced only in the state of Jalisco and limited regions in the states of Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas. Mexico has claimed the exclusive international right to the word "tequila", threatening legal actions against manufacturers of distilled blue agave spirits in other countries. The United States officially recognizes that spirits calls "tequila" can only be produced in Mexico, although by agreement bulk amounts can be shipped to be
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Vodka

    Vodka

    Vodka (Russian: водка, Belarusian: Гарэлка, Ukrainian: Горілка, Polish: wódka) is a distilled beverage composed primarily of water and ethanol with traces of impurities and flavorings. Vodka is made by the distillation of fermented substances such as grains, potatoes, or sometimes fruits and/or sugar. Traditionally prepared vodkas had an alcoholic content of 40% by volume. Today, the standard Belarusian, Polish, Russian and Lithuanian vodkas are 40% alcohol by volume (ABV) or 80 proof. The European Union has established a minimum of 37.5% ABV for any "European vodka" to be named as such. Products sold as vodka in the United States must have an alcoholic content of 40% or more. For homemade vodkas and distilled beverages referred to as "moonshine", see moonshine by country. Vodka is traditionally drunk neat in the vodka belt countries of Eastern Europe and around the Baltic Sea. It is also commonly used in cocktails and mixed drinks, such as the Bloody Mary, Screwdriver, Sex on the Beach, Moscow Mule, White Russian, Black Russian, vodka tonic, and in a vodka martini. The name "vodka" is a diminutive form of the Slavic word voda (water), interpreted as little water: root вод- (vod-)
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Bundaberg Rum

    Bundaberg Rum

    Bundaberg Rum is a dark rum produced in Bundaberg, Australia, often referred to as "Bundy". The Bundaberg Distilling Company owns its own cola-producing facility, which supplies the cola for its ready-to-drink Bundaberg Rum and Cola products. Bundaberg Rum originated because the local sugar mills had a problem with what to do with the waste molasses after the sugar was extracted (it was heavy, difficult to transport and the costs of converting it to stock feed were rarely worth the effort). Sugar men first began to think of the profits that could be made from distilling. The vital meeting was held at the Royal Hotel on 1 August 1885, W M C Hickson served as the chairman, and other notables in attendance included all the big sugar mill owners of that time, W G Farquhar, F L Nott, S McDougall, T Penny, S H Bravo and A H Young, all to become the first directors of the Company. They started with a capital of 5,000 pounds. Bundaberg rum was first produced in 1888, production ceased from 1907 to 1914 and from 1936 to 1939 after fires, the second of which caused rum from the factory to spill into the nearby Burnett River. H T Christsen Pty Ltd operated their own Bundaberg Rum bottling
    5.75
    4 votes
    129
    Delirium Tremens

    Delirium Tremens

    Delirium Tremens is a brand of Belgian golden ale produced by Huyghe Brewery in Melle. Delirium Tremens was launched on 26 December 1989. The beer uses three different yeasts and is packaged in a bottle that is painted to resemble cologne ceramics. The label exemplifies different phases of the production of "Delirium Tremens" and that the "Pink Elephant" was up and ready to conquer the world. In 1992, the "Confrerie van de Roze Olifant" (Brotherhood of the Pink Elephant) was founded to promote Delirium Tremens and other beers of Melle. Delirium Tremens was named as "Best Beer in the World" in 2008 at the World Beer Championships in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Stuart Kallen gives it the number one spot in his The 50 Greatest Beers in the World. Delirium tremens is Latin for "trembling madness", commonly nicknamed "the DTs", indicating a violent sickness induced by withdrawal after alcohol abuse. Although it is commonly thought that sufferers hallucinate pink elephants, which may explain its use on the beer's label, the most common animals seen in delirium tremens hallucinations are cats, dogs, and snakes.
    5.75
    4 votes
    130
    Salmiakki Koskenkorva

    Salmiakki Koskenkorva

    Salmiakki Koskenkorva, (also Salmiakkikossu for short or generically as Salmari) is a pre-mixed liqueur popular in Finland during the 1990s. Canonically salmiakkikossu consists of Koskenkorva Viina vodka and ground up Turkish Pepper brand salty liquorice. Very similar drinks are popular in Denmark, but are referred to with names like "Ga-Jol", "små blå" (little blues) or "sorte svin" (black swine) instead. In Northern Germany, there is also another very similar drink with the name "Schwarze Sau" (black sow) which is based on Doppelkorn instead of vodka. It is most popular in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein and often associated with that state. Salmiakki Koskenkorva is a somewhat viscous liquid of characteristic black color, dark grayish brown in thinner layer. At closer view, very fine particulate of carbon black suspended in the liquid is visible. Before the 1990s, Finland had a very thin and stratified cocktail culture. Some Finnish drinking establishments started serving a drink made out of ground ammonium chloride based candy (Salmiakki in Finnish). It became a trendy drink especially amongst the youth of the day, for which some consider and call it a "teenager's
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    Amaro Averna

    Amaro Averna

    Amaro Averna is a Sicilian liqueur in the Amaro category produced in Caltanissetta. It is named after its inventor, Salvatore Averna, who invented the recipe in 1868. This drink is produced on the Island of Sicily and is considered a traditional drink. The herbs, roots and citrus rinds are allowed to soak in the base liquor before caramel is added. Averna is sweet, thick and has a gently herbal bitterness. It is 32% alc/volume (64 proof) and distilled and bottled in Italy. Averna is a classic digestif, often served on the rocks or neat. It also is an ingredient in some cocktails.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Aviation

    Aviation

    The Aviation is a classic cocktail made with gin, maraschino liqueur, crème de violette, and lemon juice. Some recipes omit the crème de violette. It is served straight up, in a cocktail glass. The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin, head bartender at the Hotel Wallick in New York, in the early twentieth century. The first published recipe for the drink appeared in Ensslin's 1916 Recipes for Mixed Drinks. Ensslin's recipe called for 1½ oz. El Bart gin, ¾ oz. lemon juice, 2 dashes maraschino liqueur, and 2 dashes crème de violette, a violet liqueur which gives the cocktail a pale sky-blue color. Harry Craddock's influential Savoy Cocktail Book (1930) omitted the crème de violette, calling for a mixture of two-thirds dry gin, one-third lemon juice, and two dashes of maraschino. Many later bartenders have followed Craddock's lead, leaving out the difficult-to-find violet liqueur.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Bacardi 151

    Bacardi 151

    Bacardi 151 is an over-proof rum. The 151-proof liquor has an alcohol content of 75.5%, compared to the usual 35%–40%. Bacardi's 151-proof rum has been available in the US since at least 1981. Due to its high proof, Bacardi 151 is typically used in very sweet drinks, such as a Hurricane, where a stronger flavored rum helps to counterbalance the sweetness of the drink. As is the case with all distilled spirits, Bacardi 151 is flammable. However, Bacardi 151 has multiple warnings on the label of the bottle stating that it should not be ignited or exposed to an open flame. As an extra precaution, Bacardi 151, as shipped by Bacardi, is equipped with a stainless steel flame arrester crimped onto to the neck of the bottle to prevent the rum from igniting, in case a consumer or bartender ignores the warnings and applies the rum to a source of ignition (e.g. a flaming pan or dish, a flambe). Nevertheless, despite the warnings against ignition and the flame arrester, incidents have been alleged where consumers claim to have been burned by bartenders who ignore the warnings and remove the flame arrestor using a tool strong enough to pry the stainless steel flame arrester from the bottle, and
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Bacardi Superior

    Bacardi Superior

    Bacardi Superior is rum made by the Bacardi Company. In the US it is 80 proof, containing 40% abv (37.5% abv in the UK and Continental Europe). It is colourless and easy flowing and is thin in the body. This rum is mostly used to make cocktails calling for a white rum such as Cuba Libre, Daiquiri, Piña Colada, and Bacardi cocktail. Energy provided by a glass of Bacardi is around 118 calories. The Bacardi Company has a storied history, with its foundation taking place in Cuba and later moving to Puerto Rico and the Bahamas. Even though the headquarters has changed locations, the rum is still made using basically the same recipe from the past. The only things that have changed are the filtering and aging processes. Other common Bacardi rum grades are Oro (Gold) and Black. Bacardi Gold Flavored rums Discontinued flavors
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Bellini

    Bellini

    A Bellini cocktail is a mixture of Prosecco sparkling wine and peach purée. Originating in Venice, it is one of Italy's most popular long drinks. The Bellini was invented sometime between 1934 and 1948 by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry's Bar in Venice, Italy. Because of its unique pink color, which reminded Cipriani of the color of the toga of a saint in a painting by 15th-century Venetian artist Giovanni Bellini, he named the drink the Bellini. The drink started as a seasonal specialty at Harry's Bar, a favorite haunt of Ernest Hemingway, Sinclair Lewis and Orson Welles. Later, it also became popular at the bar's New York counterpart. After an entrepreneurial Frenchman set up a business to ship fresh white peach pureé to both locations, it was a year-round favorite. Today the Bellini is an IBA Official Cocktail, thus indicating its popularity and making it a well-known cocktail to many professional bartenders. The Bellini consists of puréed white peaches and Prosecco, an Italian sparkling wine. Marinating fresh peaches in wine is an Italian tradition. The original recipe was made with a bit of raspberry or cherry juice to give the drink a pink glow. Due, in part, to the
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Bronx cocktail

    Bronx cocktail

    The Bronx Cocktail is essentially a Perfect Martini with orange juice added. It was ranked number three in "The World's 10 Most Famous Cocktails in 1934", making it a very popular rival to the Martini (#1) and the Manhattan (#2). Today, it remains a popular choice in some markets, and is designated as an Official Cocktail by the International Bartender Association. Like the Manhattan, the Bronx is one of five cocktails named for one of New York City's five boroughs, but is perhaps most closely related to the Queens cocktail, which substitutes pineapple for the Bronx's orange. As with several mixed drinks invented prior to prohibition in the United States, more than one story is attributed to the creation of this cocktail. Two sources credit Joseph S. Sormani as the person responsible for the drink. Sormani was credited with creating the drink in his New York Times obituary: According to Albert Stevens Crockett, historian of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, the inventor of the Bronx cocktail was Johnnie Solon (or Solan). Solon, a pre-Prohibition bartender at the Manhattan hotel, was "popular as one of the best mixers behind its bar counter for most of the latter's history." This is
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Ezra Brooks

    Ezra Brooks

    Ezra Brooks is a brand of Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey. It is charcoal filtered and typically bottled at 45% abv (90 proof). The Ezra Brooks brand is owned by Luxco of St. Louis, Missouri (formerly the David Sherman Company); which does not own a distillery. Ezra Brooks is distilled, aged, and bottled in Kentucky by Heaven Hill Distilleries for Luxco. In 2006, the David Sherman Company re-branded itself to Luxco as a tribute to one of its co-founders, Paul Lux, and as a reflection of the current ownership of the company. As Luxco has grown it has remained family-owned. Luxco itself was born of humble beginnings back in 1958 when Paul A. Lux and David Sherman Sr. established the David Sherman Corporation as a private label bottler to serve the needs of distributors, wholesalers and retailers in the mid-west around St. Louis, Chicago and Milwaukee. Since that time, the company has quietly grown into a major producer, bottler, importer and marketer with an impressive portfolio of over 50 wine and spirit brands. Some of the whiskey brands that Luxco produces include: Rebel Yell, Bourbon Supreme, Old Ezra 101, Rebel Reserve, Yellowstone, Wallstreet Whiskey, David Nicholson 1843
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Flat White

    Flat White

    A flat white is a coffee beverage originating from Australia. It is prepared by pouring microfoam (steamed milk from the bottom of a pitcher) over a single or double shot of espresso. It is similar to the latte and the café au lait. Like other espresso-based beverages, it can be interpreted various ways. The beverage is typically served in a small, 150–160 millilitre, ceramic cup. Microfoam is used, resulting in a smooth and velvety texture. A flat white may incorporate latte art. A cappuccino is similar, but in some countries has a head of dry foam rather than microfoam. A flat white is not different from an original Italian cappuccino, which is a single espresso with microfoam served in a 150-160 ml cup. The Spanish cafe con leche is similar to a flat white but uses scalded milk. In a flat white, the milk is steamed to 60–70 °C (typically 150–170 °F). Steaming the milk to a lower temperature retains the fats and proteins in the milk which retain a sweet flavour, lost when milk is steamed to scalding temperatures. A Cafe con Leche also lacks the head of microfoam. The latte is occasionally argued to be similar: "The only difference between the two drinks is the vessel in which
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Gluten-free beer

    Gluten-free beer

    Gluten-free beer is beer made from ingredients that do not contain glycoproteins (gluten). People who have gluten intolerance (including celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis sufferers) have a reaction to certain proteins in the grains commonly used to make beer, barley and wheat. The hordein found in barley and the gliadin found in wheat are types of gluten that can trigger symptoms in sufferers of these diseases. Gluten-free beer is part of a gluten-free diet. Gluten can be found in many common cereal grains including barley and wheat. Even in small quantities, the glutens specifically from barley and wheat (hordein and gliadin respectively) can trigger serious symptoms in those who suffer from Celiac disease. Almost all beer contains levels of gluten that cannot be tolerated by the celiac, but a growing number of breweries now cater to celiacs or those who otherwise cannot tolerate the consumption of one or other of the relevant glycoproteins. Burning Brothers Brewery offers several varieties of all gluten free beer http://www.burnbrosbrew.com/\ Around the world standards of "gluten free" vary. For example, in the United Kingdom a beer with less than 20 parts per million
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Julmust

    Julmust

    Julmust (Swedish jul "Christmas" and must "juice") is a soft drink that is mainly consumed in Sweden around Christmas. During the rest of the year it is usually quite difficult to find in stores, but sometimes it is sold at other times of the year under the name must. At Easter the name is påskmust (påsk "Easter"). The content is the same regardless of the marketing name, although the length of time it is stored before bottling differs; however, the beverage is more closely associated with Christmas, somewhat less with Easter and traditionally not at all with the summer. 45 million litres of julmust are consumed during December (to be compared with roughly 9 million Swedes), which is around 50% of the total soft drink volume in December and 75% of the total yearly must sales. Must was created by Harry Roberts and his father Robert Roberts in 1910 as a non-alcoholic alternative to beer. The syrup is still made exclusively by Roberts AB in Örebro. The original recipe is said to be locked up in a safe with only two persons knowing the full recipe. Must is made of carbonated water, sugar, hop extract, malt extract, spices, caramel colouring, citric acid, and preservatives. The hops and
    7.50
    2 votes
    141
    Lichido

    Lichido

    Lichido is a 36 proof lychee liqueur made with vodka, cognac, lychee and guava essences, and white peach juice. It is imported from the French city of Cognac.
    7.50
    2 votes
    142
    Moscow Mule

    Moscow Mule

    A Moscow Mule is a buck or mule cocktail made with vodka, ginger beer and lime which was popular during the vodka craze in the United States during the 1950s. The name refers to the popular perception of vodka as a Russian product. The cocktail was invented in 1941 by John G. Martin of G.F. Heublein Brothers, Inc., an East Coast spirits and food distributor, and "Jack" Morgan, President of Cock 'n' Bull Products (which produced ginger beer) and proprietor of the Cock 'n' Bull restaurant on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles popular with celebrities. George Sinclair (2007) quotes from an article run in the New York Herald Tribune: The mule was born in Manhattan but "stalled" on the West Coast for the duration. The birthplace of "Little Moscow" was in New York's Chatham Hotel. That was back in 1941 when the first carload of Jack Morgan's Cock 'n' Bull ginger beer was railing over the plains to give New Yorkers a happy surprise... Three friends were in the Chatham bar, one John A. Morgan, known as Jack, president of Cock 'n' Bull Products and owner of the Hollywood Cock 'n' Bull Restaurant; one was John G. Martin, president of G.F. Heublein Brothers Inc. of Hartford, Conn., and the third
    7.50
    2 votes
    143
    Ten High

    Ten High

    Ten High is a brand of American whiskey currently produced by Barton Brands, which is part of the Sazerac Company. According to the label, it was established in 1879, although production of the brand actually began in the 1930s. The 1879 date refers to the founding of the Tom Moore distillery – which was not associated with the Hiram Walker & Sons company that actually started the brand. It has historically been a Kentucky Straight Bourbon whiskey (80 Proof). However, starting in 2009, the brand switched to being a blend rather than a straight whiskey — at least in some bottlings. The name Ten High refers to a barrel storage location at least ten ricks high, as barrels in the upper part of the aging warehouse mature faster. Although the brand name evoked this storage method, the manufacturer did not actually promise that the brand was from barrels aged in such locations. The brand was originally produced by Hiram Walker & Sons (a company owned by Harry C. Hatch at the time) at a distillery in Peoria, Illinois, starting shortly after the end of the Prohibition period of 1920–1933. It was a major brand (and the leading brand of Illinois-made bourbon) until the late 1960s when the
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    Tequila Sunrise

    Tequila Sunrise

    The Tequila Sunrise is a cocktail made in two different ways, the original (tequila, crème de cassis, lime juice and soda water) and the more popular concoction (tequila, orange juice, and grenadine syrup). Originally served at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel, where it was created by Gene Sulit in the 1930s or 1940s, the cocktail is named for the way it looks after it has been poured into a glass. The denser ingredients (cassis or grenadine) settle, creating gradations in color that mimic a sunrise. The more popular version was invented by Bobby Lazoff and Billy Rice at the Trident restaurant in Sausalito, California in the early 1970s. The Tequila Sunrise is considered a long drink and is usually served in a highball glass. The International Bartender Association has designated this cocktail as an IBA Official Cocktail. Suggested mixing: Tequila, Ice then juice and lastly syrup. The catch is getting syrup down without mixing it. Use spoon to pour syrup onto the spoon and glass wall to guide it down with minimal mixing.
    7.50
    2 votes
    145
    Brandy Alexander

    Brandy Alexander

    Brandy Alexander is a sweet, brandy-based cocktail consisting of cognac and crème de cacao that became popular during the early 20th century. It is a variation of an earlier, gin-based cocktail called simply an Alexander. There are many rumors about its origins. It was supposedly created at the time of the wedding of Princess Mary and Viscount Lascelles, in London, in 1922. However, the drama critic and Algonquin Round Table member Alexander Woollcott claimed that it was named after him. Other stories say it was named after the Russian tsar, Alexander II. Evelyn Waugh had a character order four brandy alexanders in his novel Brideshead Revisited. The Granada Television adaptation for television helped repopularize the drink in the 1980s. Christian Kracht also uses the four brandy alexanders motif in his 1995 novel Faserland.
    5.50
    4 votes
    146
    Bijou Cocktail

    Bijou Cocktail

    A bijou is a mixed alcoholic drink composed of gin, vermouth, and chartreuse. Bijou means "jewel" in French. It is said to have been invented by Harry Johnson. This cocktail is called Bijou because it combines the colors of three jewels: gin for diamond, vermouth for ruby, and chartreuse for emerald. An original-style Bijou is made stirred with ice as Harry Johnson's 1900 "New and Improved Bartender Manual" states "mix well with a spoon and serve." This recipe is also one of the oldest in the manual dating back to 1890's. Pour everything into an ice-filled mixing glass. Stir gently for a few seconds. Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. Serve chilled.
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Drambuie

    Drambuie

    Drambuie (/dræmˈbuːi/) is a sweet, golden colored 80-proof liqueur made from malt whisky, honey, herbs, and spices. Produced in Broxburn, West Lothian, Scotland, it is served straight, on the rocks, or added to mixed drinks such as the Rusty Nail. In 2009, Drambuie launched The Royal Legacy of 1745, an upscale malt whisky liqueur. The 40% alcohol by volume spirit won the Drinks International Travel Retail Award for Best Travel Retail Drinks Launch at the TFWA, Cannes, France in October 2009. The name "Drambuie" may derive from the Scottish Gaelic phrase an dram buidheach, meaning "the drink that satisfies", or possibly an dram buidhe meaning "the red drink". After the Battle of Culloden in 1746, Prince Charles Edward Stuart fled to the island of Skye. There, he was given sanctuary by Captain John MacKinnon of Clan MacKinnon. According to family legend, after staying with the captain, the prince rewarded him with this prized drink recipe. This version of events is disputed by historians who believe it to be a story concocted to boost sales of the drink. The legend holds that the recipe was then given in the late 19th century by Clan MacKinnon to James Ross. Ross ran the Broadford
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Nocino

    Nocino

    Nocino is a sticky dark brown liqueur from the Emilia-Romagna region in Northern Italy. It is made from unripe green walnuts. After steeping in spirit, the walnuts are removed and the now-black alcohol is mixed with simple syrup. Nocino has an aromatic but bittersweet flavor. It may be homemade; villages and even individual families often have their own recipes, including different additions like cinnamon or clove. Nocino is also available commercially in bottled form. Commercially available Nocino is typically 40% alcohol by volume, or 80 proof. Nocino is believed to have originally been produced by the Celts, and, during the Middle Ages, Italian monasteries used nocino for its medicinal properties and also as an alcoholic treat. Ordine del Nocino Modenese is an association of Spilamberto, Province of Modena, Emilia-Romagna, Italy which, since 1978, promotes the traditional Nocino of Modena. Nocino is also produced in New Zealand by NewZino, under the name "NutZino Walnut Liqueur and in Australia by Timboon Railway Shed Distillery in Timboon, Victoria. In Modena The Typical Walnut of Modena Roll of Tasters "Il Matraccio“ has for years been operating a no-profit company which aims
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Paloma

    Paloma

    The paloma (Spanish for "dove") is a tequila-based cocktail, most commonly prepared by mixing tequila with a grapefruit-flavored soda such as Fresca, Squirt, or Jarritos and served on the rocks with a lime wedge. Optionally, the glass may also be rimmed with salt. Alternatively, the grapefruit soda can be replaced with fresh white or red grapefruit juice (jugo de toronja), club soda (sugar optional), and fresh-squeezed lime juice. The paloma is the most popular tequila-based cocktail in Mexico. The first published recipe for The Paloma is attributed to Evan Harrison in a pamphlet entitled, "Popular Cocktails of The Rio Grande."
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Galliano

    Galliano

    Liquore Galliano L'Autentico, known more commonly as Galliano, is a sweet herbal liqueur, created in 1896 by Italian distiller and brandy producer Arturo Vaccari of Livorno, Tuscany and named after Giuseppe Galliano, an Italian hero of the First Italo–Ethiopian War. Its vivid yellow color symbolizes the Gold Rushes of the 1890s. Galliano has a large amount of natural ingredients including vanilla, star anise, Mediterranean anise, ginger, citrus, juniper, musk yarrow, and lavender. Neutral alcohol is infused with the pressings from the herbs except vanilla. The liquid is distilled and then infused with pressed vanilla. In the final stage distilled water, refined sugar and pure neutral alcohol are blended with the base. Galliano has been formulated at both 60 proof (30% by volume) and 84.6 proof (42.3% by volume). Galliano is sweet with vanilla-anise flavor with subtle citrus and woodsy herbal under notes. The vanilla top note differentiates Galliano from other anise-flavored liqueurs such as Sambuca, Pernod, or Anisette. It is used both as a digestif (meant for drinking after heavy meals), and as an ingredient for cocktails, most notably the Harvey Wallbanger, Golden Cadillac, and
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Instant coffee

    Instant coffee

    Instant coffee, also called soluble coffee and coffee powder, is a beverage derived from brewed coffee beans. Instant coffee is commercially prepared by either freeze-drying or spray drying, after which it can be rehydrated. Instant coffee in a concentrated liquid form is also available. Advantages of instant coffee include speed of preparation (instant coffee dissolves instantly in hot water), lower shipping weight and volume than beans or ground coffee (to prepare the same amount of beverage), and long shelf life—though instant coffee can also spoil if not kept dry. Instant or soluble coffee was invented and patented in 1889 by Mr David Strang of Invercargill, New Zealand under patent number 3518. It was sold under the trading name Strang's Coffee citing the patented "Dry Hot-Air" process. The invention was previously attributed to Satori Kato, a Japanese scientist working in Chicago in 1901. Kato introduced the powdered substance in Buffalo, New York, at the Pan-American Exposition. George Constant Louis Washington developed his own instant coffee process shortly thereafter, and first marketed it commercially (1910). The Nescafé brand, which introduced a more advanced coffee
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Lapsang souchong

    Lapsang souchong

    Lapsang souchong (Chinese: 拉普山小種/正山小种,; pinyin: lāpǔshān xiǎozhǒng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: l a̍p-pho·-san sió-chéng; literally "Small plant from Lapu mountain"; cantonese: làaipóusàan síujúng) is a black tea (Camellia sinensis) originally from the Wuyi region of the Chinese province of Fujian. It is sometimes referred to as smoked tea (熏茶). Lapsang is distinct from all other types of tea because lapsang leaves are traditionally smoke-dried over pinewood fires, taking on a distinctive smoky flavour. Lapsang souchong is the first black tea in history, even earlier than the famous Keemun tea. After the lapsang souchong tea was used for producing black tea so called Min Hong (meaning "Black tea produced in Fujian"), people started to move the tea bush to different places like Keemun, India and Ceylon. The name means "sub-variety". Lapsang souchong is a member of the Bohea family of teas ("Bohea" is the pronunciation in Minnan dialect for Wuyi Mountains, which is the mountain area producing a large family of tea in South-East China). The story goes that the tea was created during the Qing era when the passage of armies delayed the annual drying of the tea leaves in the Wuyi Mountain. Eager to
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Porchcrawler

    Porchcrawler

    A porchcrawler or porchclimb is a mixed drink made primarily of beer, vodka, gin,and a sweetening agent (for instance, lemonade concentrate). Sometimes rum or whiskey are included as well. The final product is generally a highly-alcoholic, carbonated punch with a fruity taste and a light pink or yellow color. It is typically served from a large cooler of ice and is especially popular with North American college students. A variation, known as Skip and Go Naked, is made with Sprite, and gin instead of vodka. When made with Pink Lemonade, it is termed the Pink Panty Dropper. Steve Willows, the author of Hipster Cola has updated the official recipe, amended the blog and redirected visitors to the new site for the official Porch Crawler recipe. If made with UV Blue and pink lemonade, the drink looks slightly purple, but mostly brown and is called Dishwater. When mixed in a blue plastic tub it's known as the 21 Homestead.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Tennessee whiskey

    Tennessee whiskey

    Tennessee whiskey is straight bourbon whiskey produced in the state of Tennessee. This definition is legally established under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and at least one other international trade agreement that require that Tennessee whiskey be "a straight Bourbon Whiskey authorized to be produced only in the State of Tennessee", and the law of Canada, which states that Tennessee whiskey must be "a straight Bourbon whisky produced in the State of Tennessee". However, most current producers of Tennessee whiskey disclaim references to their products as "Bourbon" and do not label them as such on their product bottlings. Currently, there are four brands of Tennessee whiskey on the market: Jack Daniel's, George Dickel, Collier and McKeel, and Benjamin Prichard's Tennessee Whiskey. Some Tennessee whiskeys undergo a filtering stage called the Lincoln County Process, in which the whiskey is filtered through a thick layer of maple charcoal before it is put into charred new oak barrels for aging. The companies that produce whiskey in this manner say that this step improves the flavor of the whiskey. The filtering process is named for Lincoln County, Tennessee, which
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Eagle Rare

    Eagle Rare

    Eagle Rare is a brand of bourbon whiskey distilled and distributed by the Buffalo Trace Distillery. Eagle Rare was originally a 101-proof ten-year old Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey (not single-barrel) from Seagram created by master distiller Charles L. Beam. Introduced in 1975, Eagle Rare was among the last new bourbon brands introduced prior to current era of 'small-batch bourbons'. Eagle Rare has been distilled, bottled and/or marketed by a number of companies, including the Old Prentice Distillery of Frankfort, KY. The Sazerac Company, a New Orleans-based producer and importer and the parent company of five distilleries, acquired Eagle Rare from Seagram in March 1989. Sazerac's Kentucky distillery was then known as George T. Stagg Distillery. Today the distillery is known as Buffalo Trace Distillery. The original 101-proof ten-year old non-single barrel bourbon has been discontinued as of March 2005. Currently, two basic varieties of Eagle Rare are produced. The first is aged for ten years in charred oak barrels, and bottled at 90-proof. It is a single barrel bourbon. The whiskey from each aging barrel is bottled individually, none of it is blended. This creates a unique
    5.25
    4 votes
    156
    Amaretto

    Amaretto

    Amaretto is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur. It is made from a base of apricot pits or almonds, sometimes both. The name is a diminutive of the Italian amaro, meaning "bitter," indicating the distinctive flavour lent by the mandorla amara--the bitter almond or the drupe kernel. However, the bitterness is not unpalatable, and the flavour is enhanced by sweeteners, and sometimes sweet almonds, in the final products. Therefore, the liqueur's name can be said to describe the taste as "a little bitter". Conflation of amaro and amore ("love") is primarily responsible for the associations with romance. Amaretto should not be confused with amaro, a different family of Italian liqueurs that, while also sweetened, have a stronger bitter flavour from herbs. Despite the known history on the introduction and acceptance of almonds into Italian cuisine, more recent takes on the meanings and origins have come about, further popularized by the two major brands. Though of sometimes questionable factuality, these tales hold a sentimental place in Saronno culture. In 1525, a Saronno church commissioned artist Bernardino Luini, one of Leonardo da Vinci's pupils, to paint their sanctuary with
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Caipiroska

    Caipiroska

    Caipiroska is a form of Caipirinha prepared with vodka instead of the usual cachaça. It is a popular cocktail in Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. It is also sometimes known as Caipivodka and Caipirodka. It has grown in popularity in recent years as access to international vodkas continues to diversify in South America. Although the "proper" way to make a Caipiroska is a matter of quite varied opinion, this is the basic recipe: Use an old fashioned or highball glass. Squeeze juice from lime wedges into the glass. Place one of the lime wedges into the glass and add sugars. Muddle sugar with the lime wedges. Be careful not to overdo the muddling of the lime rind as it may introduce too much of the essential oils from the lime and make the drink too bitter. Pour in vodka and stir well until the sugar is dissolved. Add crushed ice and stir to melt some of the ice. Garnish with lime slice or wedge and serve. Some mixologists advocate placing all of the lime wedges into the glass without squeezing them, adding the sugar and muddling the lime wedges and sugar together well to release the juice and essential oils from the limes. Another variation is to use either all white sugar, or all raw
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Daiquiri

    Daiquiri

    Daiquiri ( /ˈdækəriː/; Spanish: daiquirí [dajkiˈɾi]) is a family of cocktails whose main ingredients are rum, lime juice, and sugar or other sweetener. The Daiquirí is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's classic The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. In the book, he also suggests some variations. A similar cocktail that's very popular in Brazil is the Caipirinha, which includes cachaça, Brazilian sugarcane rum. The name Daiquirí is also the name of a beach near Santiago, Cuba, and an iron mine in that area, and it is a word of Taíno origin. The daiquiri was supposedly invented by an American mining engineer, named Jennings Cox, who happened to be in Cuba at the time of the Spanish-American War. Originally the drink was served in a tall glass packed with cracked ice. A teaspoon of sugar was poured over the ice and the juice of one or two limes was squeezed over the sugar. Two or three ounces of Bacardi rum completed the mixture. The glass was then frosted by stirring with a long-handled spoon. Later the Daiquirí evolved to be mixed in a shaker with the same ingredients but with shaved ice. After a thorough shaking, it was poured into a chilled flute glass. An article in the
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Miller Lite

    Miller Lite

    Miller Lite is a 4.2% abv pale lager brand sold by MillerCoors of Chicago, Illinois, United States. The company also produces Miller Genuine Draft and Miller High Life. Miller Lite was essentially the first mainstream light beer. After its first inception as "Gablinger's Diet Beer," developed in 1967 by Joseph L. Owades, a biochemist working for New York's Rheingold Brewery, the recipe was given (by the inventor of the light beer process) to one of Miller's competing breweries, Chicago's Meister Brau, which came out with the Meister Brau "Lite" brand in the late 1960s. When Miller acquired Meister Brau's labels the recipe was reformulated and relaunched as "Lite Beer from Miller" (which was its official name until the mid 80s) in the test markets of Springfield, IL, Knoxville, TN and San Diego, CA in 1973, and heavily marketed using masculine pro sports players and other macho figures of the day in an effort to sell to the key beer-drinking male demographic. Miller's approach worked where the two previous light beers had failed, and Miller's early production totals of 12.8 million barrels quickly increased to 24.2 million barrels by 1977 as Miller rose to 2nd place in the American
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Mirto

    Mirto

    Mirto is a liqueur popular in Sardinia and in Corsica, obtained from the myrtle plant through the alcoholic maceration of the berries or a compound of berries and leaves. Myrtle grows freely in Sardinia. Mirto rosso (red) is made with the berries and is sweet. Mirto bianco (white) is made from the leaves.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Pastis

    Pastis

    Pastis (French pronunciation: [pa.stis] ; UK /ˈpæstɪs/ or US /pæˈstiːs/) is an anise-flavored liqueur and apéritif from France, typically containing 40–45% alcohol by volume, although alcohol-free varieties exist. Pastis was first commercialized by Paul Ricard in 1932 and enjoys substantial popularity in France, especially in the southern regions of the country. Pastis emerged some 17 years following the ban on absinthe, during a time when the French nation was still apprehensive of high-proof anise drinks in the wake of the absinthe debacle. The popularity of pastis may be attributable to a penchant for anise drinks that was cultivated by absinthe decades earlier, but is also part of an old tradition of Mediterranean anise liquors that includes sambuca, ouzo, arak, rakı, and mastika. By legal definition, pastis is described as an anise flavored spirit that contains the additional flavor of licorice root, and may contain a maximum of 100 grams/l sugar. While pastis was originally artisanally produced from whole herbs like most spirits at the time of its creation, modern versions are typically prepared by mixing base alcohol with commercially prepared flavorings (essences and/or
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Vodka Red Bull

    Vodka Red Bull

    Vodka Red Bull (also known as Vodka and Red Bull, VARB, RBV, VBR, Speedball or Vod-Bomb) is an alcoholic beverage consisting of energy drink Red Bull and varying amounts of vodka. It is popular among 18- to 30-year olds in bars and nightclubs around the world. Red Bull has been used as mixer in Europe since the 1990s, but the drink became especially popular in North America in the 21st century. The ratio of Red Bull to Vodka varies but is usually around 3:1. In some places it is customary to serve an entire can with a single shot of vodka; in others, a can may be split between several glasses, each containing several shots of vodka. The Red Bull dominates so that the flavour of the alcohol is not too strong. Caffeinated alcoholic energy drinks can be hazardous as caffeine can mask the influence of alcohol and may lead a person to misinterpret their actual level of intoxication. However, in 2012 the scientific review paper "Energy drinks mixed with alcohol:misconception, myths and facts" has been published. This review discusses the available scientific evidence on the effects of mixing energy drinks with alcohol. The authors note that excessive and irresponsible consumption of
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Wine

    Wine

    Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes or other fruits. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different types of wine. The well-known variations result from the very complex interactions between the biochemical development of the fruit, reactions involved in fermentation, and human intervention in the overall process. The final product may contain tens of thousands of chemical compounds in amounts varying from a few percent to a few parts per billion. Wines made from other fruits are usually named after the fruit from which they are produced (for example, apple wine and elderberry wine) and are generically called fruit wine. The term "wine" can also refer to the higher alcohol content of starch-fermented or fortified beverages such as barley wine, sake, and ginger wine. Wine has a rich history dating back thousands of years, with the earliest known production occurring around 6000 BC in Georgia. It first appeared in the Balkans about 4500 BC
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Canada Dry

    Canada Dry

    Canada Dry is a brand of soft drinks owned since 2008 by the Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group. For over a century Canada Dry has been known for its ginger ale, though the company also manufactures a number of other soft drinks and mixers. Although Canada Dry originated in its namesake country, it is now produced in many countries around the globe, including the United States, the Middle East, Europe and Japan. The "Dry" in the brand's name refers to not being sweet, as in a dry wine. When John J. McLaughlin, who first formulated "Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale", originally made his new soft drink, it was far less sweet than other ginger ales then available; as a result, he labelled it "dry". In 1890, Canadian pharmacist and chemist John J. McLaughlin of Enniskillen, Ontario opened a carbonated water plant in Toronto. McLaughlin was the oldest son of Robert McLaughlin, founder of McLaughlin Carriage and McLaughlin Motor Car. In 1904, McLaughlin created "Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale"; three years later the drink was appointed to the Royal Household of the Governor General of Canada, and the label featuring a beaver atop a map of Canada was replaced with the present Crown and
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Aberlour Single Malt

    Aberlour Single Malt

    Aberlour is a distiller of single malt Scotch whisky, located on Aberlour town, Speyside, Scotland at the crossing of rivers Lour and Spey near Ben Rinnes. The whisky comes in 10, 12, 15 and 30-year expressions, and most of the variants are aged for a time in American ex-bourbon casks (a standard for most single malt Scotches). Aberlour also releases a range of malts that, after ageing in bourbon casks, are transferred to casks that have been used previously to mature varieties of fortified wines. This process is known as finishing, and Aberlour offers whisky finished in sherry, port wine, madeira, and burgundy casks. Aberlour distillery was founded in 1879 by James Fleming (1830-1895). In 1898, a fire consumed several of the distillery buildings and most of the whisky reservoirs, but eventually the site was rebuilt.
    5.00
    4 votes
    166
    Booker's

    Booker's

    Booker’s bourbon is one of the small batch bourbons produced by the Jim Beam distillery, which is owned by Beam Inc. Having the highest alcohol content of the brands in the Jim Beam "Small Batch Bourbon Collection", it is a cask strength bourbon. It was personally selected from barrels by Jim Beam's grandson, the late distiller emeritus Booker Noe. Noe originally bottled this straight-from-the-barrel bourbon as gifts to close friends and family, but eventually made it available to the general public, starting in 1992. Each barrel of Booker's bourbon was hand-selected by Noe and was aged at the center of the rackhouse, where the company says that the temperature and humidity are the most favorable for fine bourbons. Booker's bourbon is aged between six and eight years and is bottled un-cut and without chill filtering at its natural proof between 121 and 130. While it is not necessary to cut the bourbon with water, a splash or two of distilled water is recommended (by Booker Noe) to unlock some of the flavor. Booker’s has won some tasting awards, including Wine Enthusiast's Gold Medal Bourbon award.
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Liqueur

    Liqueur

    A liqueur (US /lɪˈkʊr/ or UK /lɪˈkjʊər/) is an alcoholic beverage made from distilled alcohol that has been flavored with fruit, cream, herbs, spices, flowers or nuts and bottled with added sugar. Liqueurs are typically quite sweet; they are usually not aged for long but may have resting periods during their production to allow flavors to marry. In the United States, where spirits are often called "liquor", there is often confusion over liqueurs and liquors, especially as many spirits today are available in flavored form (e.g. flavored vodka). The most reliable rule of thumb is that liqueurs are quite sweet and often syrupy in consistency, while liquors are not. In parts of the United States, liqueurs may also be called cordials or schnapps, while in large parts of the British Commonwealth, cordial means a concentrated non-alcoholic fruit syrup that is diluted to taste and consumed as a non-carbonated soft drink, and in Germany and Scandinavia, schnapps means a form of brandy or aquavit. Most liqueurs have a lower alcohol content (15%-30% ABV) than spirits, but some contain as much as 55% ABV. Liqueurs are historical descendants of herbal medicines; they were made in Italy as early
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Porto flip

    Porto flip

    A Porto flip is a type of alcoholic beverage. It is typically made with brandy, ruby port, and one egg yolk.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Blue blazer

    Blue blazer

    A blue blazer is a type of cocktail created by Jerry Thomas, a bartender and author, while he was working at the El Dorado in San Francisco. Reportedly while Thomas was making the drink, President Ulysses S. Grant was so impressed that he gave Thomas a cigar. Thomas would only make the drink if the outside temperature was 50 °F (10 °C) or below or if the person ordering the drink had a cold or the flu, whose symptoms the drink was to alleviate. It is not so much the drink (which is just a simple whisky punch) but the actual mixing that is unique. Originally mixed in two silver cups, the whisky and water were heated up separately and poured into their own cups. The whisky was then lit on fire, and while it was burning, the water and whisky were poured back and forth between the cups without extinguishing the fire. Jerry Thomas held the cups at a meter's distance from each other while mixing, creating a long blue flame between the two cups. The Recipe
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Lakka

    Lakka

    Lakka or Lakkalikööri is a liqueur produced in Finland which derives its flavor from the cloudberry fruit. The word "Lakka" means cloudberry in Finnish. The beverage is produced by soaking the berries in alcohol anywhere between two to six months until sweetened, and is branded by Chymos and Lapponia, both of which are distributed by the Swedish-owned V&S Group, best known for its Absolut Vodka product. Lakka is also the name of one of three main villages within Paxos, Greece.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Punsch

    Punsch

    Punsch (also known as Arrack Punch, Caloric Punch, Punch or Punsch) is a traditional liqueur in Sweden and to a lesser extent some other Nordic countries produced from arrack, neutral spirits, sugar, water, and various flavorings. Arrack, originally a strong Indian liquor, was imported from Java and became the base ingredient for making punsch. Although they both refer to certain kinds of mixed beverages with liquor as a base ingredient, traditional Swedish Punsch is different from punch. Both names probably come from the same source: a Hindi loanword for five, referring to the traditional number of ingredients. The Swedish Historical Museum of Wines and Spirits (see below) states that it is more probable that the word came to Swedish via English, than as a direct loan from Hindi. The Swedish East India Company started to import arrack with the arrival of the ship Fredricus Rex Sueciae to Gothenburg in 1733. It quickly became popular, especially among the wealthy, who could afford the price of imported goods. Later it spread through all levels of society. A testament to the widespread popularity of punsch or rack (arrack) is the songs of Swedish eighteenth century poet and composer
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Ancient Age

    Ancient Age

    Ancient Age is a brand of bourbon whiskey distilled in Frankfort, Kentucky at the Buffalo Trace Distillery. In 1983 the Ancient Age brand was sold by Schenley to Age International.
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Black drink

    Black drink

    The black drink or white drink was a type of ritual beverage brewed by Native Americans in the Southeastern United States such as the Muscogee ássi. It is thought to have been prepared from the roasted leaves and stems of Ilex vomitoria (commonly known as Yaupon Holly) native to the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, though it may also have been a concoction of other roots and herbs. Yaupon beverages, which have caffeine, were often used as a substitute for coffee and tea by colonists under the name cassine or cassina, the latter term derived from the Timucua name for I. vomitoria. The black drink may also have had emetic properties. Prior to the 19th century, the black drink was consumed during the daily deliberations of the village councils and at all other important council meetings. Caddo, Muscogee, Cherokee, Choctaw and others indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands drank it for purification. The black drink was prepared by special village officials and served in large communal cups, frequently made of whelk shell. Councils were served in order of the precedence of individuals present, starting with important visitors. They consumed large quantities and often followed by
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Chopin vodka

    Chopin vodka

    Chopin vodka is a single-ingredient vodka, 4 times distilled from potatoes grown in the Polish region of Podlasie. It is produced by Siedlce-based Podlaska Wytwórnia Wódek Polmos. Chopin was first introduced to North America in 1997. The production is done in small batches. Seven pounds of potatoes are used to make every bottle of Chopin. The vodka is named after the famous Polish Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin. Chopin potato vodka has been submitted to a number of international spirit ratings for evaluation, including the San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Wine Enthusiast, and the Beverage Testing Institute. Outcomes have generally been favorable, particularly in the latest years. For instance, between 2006 and 2011, Chopin potato vodka earned one double gold, three gold, and two silver medals from the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. Proof66's aggregate rating, which incorporates these scores and others, puts the spirit in the Top 90th percentile among all rated vodkas.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Clover Club Cocktail

    Clover Club Cocktail

    The Clover Club Cocktail is a cocktail consisting of Gin, Lemon Juice, Raspberry Syrup (or Grenadine), and an Egg white. The Egg white is not added for the purpose of giving the drink flavor, but rather acts as an emulsifier. Thus when the drink is shaken a characteristic foamy head is formed. The Clover Club Cocktail is a drink that pre-dates Prohibition, and is named for the Philadelphia mens club of the same name, which met in the Bellevue-Stratford hotel. It has a long history dating back to at least 1911, and was enjoyed by the captains of industry who were members of the famous club. In its Heyday the drink was described by Jack Townsend as being enjoyed by the pre-prohibition gentleman who would have fit in with those of the club, and was a "Distinguished patron of the oak-paneled lounge." However, by the time that Townsend was writing about the drink it was becoming unpopular, and was eventually all but forgotten. The drink seems to have been forgotten partly due to the use of raw egg in the cocktail, which many people shy away from, and partly due to the complexity of its preparation (See Below). Despite the use of what some may consider to be strange ingredients the
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Fizz

    Fizz

    A Fizz is a type of mixed drink—a variation on the older Sours family. The defining features of the fizz are an acidic juice (such as lemon or lime juice) and carbonated water. The first printed reference to a fizz (spelled "fiz") is in the 1887 edition of Jerry Thomas' Bartender's Guide, which contains six fizz recipes. The Fizz became widely popular in America between 1900 and the 1940s. Known as a hometown specialty of New Orleans, the Gin Fizz was so popular that bars would employ scrums of bartenders working in teams that would take turns shaking the fizzes. Demand for fizzes went international as evidenced by the inclusion of the cocktail in the French cookbook L'Art Culinaire Francais published in 1950. A Gin Fizz is the best-known cocktail in the Fizz family. A Gin Fizz contains gin, lemon juice, sugar, and carbonated water, served in a highball glass with two ice cubes. Lemon-lime soda can also be used. The drink is similar to a Tom Collins, the difference, contrary to common belief, being that a Tom Collins historically used "Old Tom Gin" (a sweetened version of, and precursor to, London Dry Gin), whereas the kind of gin historically used in a Gin Fizz is unknown. Simple
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Hurricane

    Hurricane

    The hurricane is a sweet alcoholic drink made with rum and fruit juice, syrup or grenadine. It is one of many popular drinks served in New Orleans. The creation of this passion fruit-colored relative of a Daiquiri drink is credited to New Orleans tavern owner Pat O'Brien. In the 1940s, he needed to create a new drink to help him get rid of all of the less popular rum that local distributors forced him to buy before he could get a few cases of more popular liquors such as scotch and whiskey. He poured the concoction into hurricane-lamp-shaped glasses and gave it away to sailors. The drink caught on, and it has been a mainstay in the French Quarter ever since. It is more commonly served in a disposable plastic cup, as New Orleans laws permit drinking in public and leaving a bar with a drink, but prohibit public drinking from glass or metal containers. The hurricane is also the local name of a different cocktail on the islands of the Bahamas. The drink is composed of various measures of coffee liqueur, Rum 151, Irish cream and Grand Marnier, and is commonly found in the bars in and around downtown Nassau. Another variation on the Hurricane cocktail calls for 10 Cane light rum, Navan
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Kilkenny

    Kilkenny

    Kilkenny is a nitrogenated Irish cream ale from the makers of Guinness, which originated in Kilkenny, Ireland. The brand is managed and produced by Diageo. It is available in draught and cans. It is brewed in Ireland and its heritage dates back to the 14th century. Kilkenny is similar to Smithwick's Draught; however, has less hop finish and it has a nitrogenated cream head similar to Guinness. The 'Kilkenny' name was originally used during the 1980s and 1990s to market a stronger version of Smithwick's for the European and Canadian market due to difficulty in pronunciation of the word 'Smithwick's'. It now refers to a similar yet distinct beer. Kilkenny is craft brewed in the oldest operating brewery in Ireland. It is served in similar manner to Guinness; fully risen with a head of 3/4 to 1" approx. The ingredients are: water, malted barley, roasted malted barley, hops, and yeast. While Ireland is the primary market for Kilkenny, Australia and Canada are the two largest importers of Kilkenny. Kilkenny is available on tap in many Australian bars and pubs, where it is served, as with locally brewed draught Guinness, on a mixture of 70% Nitrogen and 30% Carbon Dioxide through a
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Limoncello

    Limoncello

    Limoncello (Italian pronunciation: [limonˈtʃɛllo]) is an Italian lemon liqueur mainly produced in Southern Italy, especially in the region around the Gulf of Naples, the Sorrentine Peninsula and the coast of Amalfi and islands of Procida, Ischia and Capri. It is also produced in Sicily, Sardinia, Menton in France, and the Maltese island of Gozo. Though there is debate about the exact origin of the drink, it is at least one hundred years old. Traditionally, it is made from the zest of Femminello St. Teresa lemons, that are also known as Sorrento lemons. Lemon zest, or peels without the pith, are steeped in grain alcohol until the oil is released. The resulting yellow liquid is then mixed with simple syrup. Clarity and viscosity are affected by factors like the relative temperatures of the two liquids. Most lemons, including the more-common Eureka lemon will produce satisfactory limoncello. Limoncello is traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestivo. Along the Amalfi Coast, it is usually served in small ceramic glasses themselves often chilled, the Amalfi coast being a center of both ceramics and limoncello production. This tradition has been carried into other parts of
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Long Island Iced Tea

    Long Island Iced Tea

    A Long Island Iced Tea is a highball made with, among other ingredients, vodka, gin, tequila, and rum. A popular version mixes equal parts vodka, gin, tequila, rum, and triple sec with 1½ parts sour mix and a splash of cola. Most variants use equal parts of the main liquors but include a smaller amount of triple sec (or other orange-flavored liqueur). Close variants often replace the sour mix with lemon juice, replace the cola with actual iced tea, or add white crème de menthe; however, most variants do not include any tea, despite the name of the drink. Some restaurants substitute brandy for the tequila. The drink has a much higher alcohol concentration (about 22 percent) than most highballs due to the several liquors and the relatively small amount of mixer. Long islands can be ordered "extra long", which further increases the alcohol to mixer ratio. Outside the United States, this highball is often altered, due to the unpopularity of sour mix. Long Island Iced Tea served outside the US is often made of liquors and cola alone (without sour mix), with lemon or lime juice, orange juice or with lime cordial. There is some dispute as to the origin of the Long Island Iced Tea.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Negroni

    Negroni

    The Negroni cocktail is made of one part gin, one part vermouth rosso (red, semi-sweet), and one part bitters, traditionally Campari. It is considered an apéritif. While the drink's origins are unknown, the most widely reported account is that it was invented in Florence, Italy in 1919, at Caffè Casoni, ex Caffè Giacosa, now called Caffè Cavalli. Count Camillo Negroni invented it by asking the bartender, Fosco Scarselli, to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin rather than the normal soda water. The bartender also added an orange garnish rather than the typical lemon garnish of the Americano to signify that it was a different drink. After the success of the cocktail, the Negroni Family founded Negroni Distillerie in Treviso, Italy, and produced a ready-made version of the drink, sold as Antico Negroni 1919. One of the earliest reports of the drink came from Orson Welles in correspondence with the Coshocton Tribune while working in Rome on Cagliostro in 1947, where he described a new drink called the Negroni, "The bitters are excellent for your liver, the gin is bad for you. They balance each other." According to the Corsican newspaper Nice Matin Corse of
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Ward 8

    Ward 8

    The Ward 8 or Ward Eight is a cocktail originating in 1898 in Boston, Massachusetts at the bar of the Gilded Age restaurant Locke-Ober. In 1898 Democratic political czar Martin M. Lomasney hoped to capture a seat in the state's legislature, the General Court of Massachusetts. Lomasney held considerable power in the city for nearly 50 years. The story goes that the drink was created to honor his election, and the city's Ward 8 which historically delivered him a winning margin. Competing, but unfounded myths abound in print and on the Internet. One story reports that it originated in New York in an area known for political corruption, another that the cocktail is a traditional drink of the Scottish Guards. Like the story of its creation, there are several variations of the Ward 8 cocktail. Various recipes call for blended whiskey, bourbon, rye, and even single malt scotch. Some recipes call for lemon juice, lime juice, no juice, grenadine, sour mix, and gomme syrup. Following the end of prohibition, Locke-Ober reopened its bar using this recipe: Shake the rye whiskey, lemon juice, orange juice, and grenadine with ice; then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Cachaça

    Cachaça

    Cachaça (Portuguese pronunciation: [kaˈʃasɐ]) or "Ca-SHAH-sa" is a liquor made from fermented sugarcane juice. It is the most popular distilled alcoholic beverage in Brazil. It is also known as aguardente, pinga, caninha and many other names. Cachaça is mostly produced in Brazil, where, according to 2007 figures, 1.5 billion litres (390 million gallons) are consumed annually, compared with 15 million litres (4.0 million gallons) outside the country. It is typically between 38% and 48% alcohol by volume. When it is homemade it can be as strong as the distiller wants. Up to six grams per litre of sugar may be added." The major difference between cachaça and rum is that rum is usually made from molasses, a by-product from refineries that boil the cane juice to extract as much sugar crystal as possible, while cachaça is made from fresh sugarcane juice that is fermented and distilled. As some rums are also made by this process, cachaça is also known as Brazilian rum. In the beginning of the seventeenth century, the producers of sugar in various European colonies in America started to use the by-products of sugar, molasses and scummings, as the raw material for the alcoholic beverage
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Becherovka

    Becherovka

    Becherovka  listen (help·info) (formerly Karlsbader Becherbitter) is a herbal bitters that is produced in Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic, by the Jan Becher company. The brand is owned by Pernod Ricard. Becherovka is flavored with anise seed, cinnamon, and approximately 32 other herbs. Its alcohol content is 38% ABV (76 proof). It is usually served cold, and is often used as a digestive aid. Some serve it with tonic water, making a drink called a beton (BEcherovka+TONic) (Czech for "concrete"). It is used in several former Eastern Bloc countries as a home remedy for arthritis. The inventor of Becherbitter was Josef Vitus Becher (1769–1840). Apart from trading in spices and colonial goods in his shop, “U tří skřivanů” (“At the Three Skylarks”), he also produced alcoholic beverages. In 1794, he rented a stillhouse and began to experiment with hard alcohol. Following the example of his forefathers, he also served in public office (as councillor, mayor and portreeve). Josef married twice (his first wife died of pneumonia) and had a total of 16 children, though only five daughters and two sons outlived him. Josef’s son, Johann "Jan" Nepomuk Becher, took over in 1838. From 1998 to 2003, a
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Blue Hawaii

    Blue Hawaii

    The Blue Hawaii is a tropical cocktail made of rum, pineapple juice, Curacao, sweet and sour mix, and sometimes vodka as well. It should not be confused with the similarly named Blue Hawaiian cocktail that contains creme of coconut instead of sweet and sour mix. The Blue Hawaii was invented in 1957 by Harry Yee, legendary head bartender of the Hilton Hawaiian Village (formerly the Kaiser Hawaiian Village) in Waikiki, Hawaii when a sales representative of Dutch distiller Bols asked him to design a drink that featured their blue color of Curaçao liqueur. After experimenting with several variations he settled on a version somewhat different than the most popular version today, but with the signature blue color, pineapple wedge, and cocktail umbrella. The name "Blue Hawaii" is related only indirectly to the 1961 Elvis Presley film of the same name, and apparently derives instead from the film's title song, a hit composed by Leo Robin for the 1937 Bing Crosby film Waikiki Wedding. It was Yee who named the drink which, along with the films and songs, many other tropical drinks he invented, and tiki bars such as Trader Vic, did much to popularize a faux Hawaiian tiki culture, both in
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Chivas Regal

    Chivas Regal

    Chivas Regal ( /ˈʃɪvɪs ˈriːɡəl/) is a blended Scotch whisky produced by Chivas Brothers, owned by Pernod Ricard. Chivas Brothers was first established in 1801. The Chivas Regal brand's home is Strathisla Distillery at Keith, Moray in Speyside, Scotland, the oldest operating Highland distillery which was founded in 1786. It is the market-leading Scotch whisky aged 12 years and above in Europe and Asia Pacific. Chivas Regal sales have grown by 61% between 2002 and 2008. The House of Schivas, a large mansion, was built at Schivas in Aberdeenshire in 1640. The name is derived from the Gaelic 'seamhas', meaning narrow place. Chivas Brothers traces its roots to the opening of a grocery store at 13 King St, Aberdeen in 1801. The store sold luxury foodstuffs such as coffee, exotic spices, French brandies, and Caribbean rums to a wealthy clientele. In 1842, Chivas Brothers were retained to supply provisions to the royal family at Balmoral Castle upon Queen Victoria's first visit to Scotland. In 1843, Chivas Brothers were granted a Royal Warrant to supply goods to Queen Victoria. Chivas Brothers was described in 1890 as 'undoubtedly the finest purveying business in the north of Scotland' by
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Cynar

    Cynar

    Cynar ( /tʃɪˈnɑr/) is an Italian bitter liqueur made from 13 herbs and plants. Predominant amongst these is the artichoke (Cynara scolymus), from which the drink derives its name. Cynar is dark brown in color, has a bittersweet flavor, and its strength is 33 proof (16.5% alcohol). Cynar can be taken as either an aperitif (generally over ice), or as a cocktail (mixed with soda water and lemon or orange slice, or with cola, eggnog, tonic water, milk or bitter lemon soda). Europeans often mix it with orange juice, especially in Switzerland where Cynar and orange juice is a very popular combination. A variation of the Negroni cocktail uses Cynar in place of Campari. Because of its artichoke component, Cynar is also regarded as a digestive, as well as an apéritif. Since 1995 Cynar has been manufactured and distributed by the Campari Group.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Dark 'N' Stormy

    Dark 'N' Stormy

    A Dark and Stormy (or Dark 'n' Stormy) is a highball cocktail that is trademarked by Gosling's Export Limited of Bermuda, makers of Goslings Black Seal Rum. The Dark 'N Stormy is Gosling's signature drink. This classic drink is popular worldwide, especially in many British Commonwealth countries, such as Bermuda and Australia. It consists of Gosling's Black Seal Rum and ginger beer over ice. It is optionally accompanied by a slice of lime. In Bermuda, Dark 'N' Stormy is a registered trademark of Gosling's Brothers Limited. It is described as "Bermuda's National Drink", a description often applied to the Rum Swizzle as well. ‎ ‎ Bermuda has played host to Australian rugby players in its annual Classic Tournament since the early 1970s. It is popularly believed that following one of these tournaments, the cocktail was brought back to Australia, where it also proved popular. In Queensland, Australia, Bundaberg Distilling Company Pty Ltd, distillers of Bundaberg Rum have produced a pre-mixed version of the Dark and Stormy since 1993. It is sold in stubbies and 375ml cans. The ginger beer component is produced locally by Bundaberg Brewed Drinks Pty Ltd. The Dark 'N Stormy gained
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Grog

    Grog

    The word grog refers to a variety of alcoholic beverages. The word originally referred to a drink made with water or "small beer" (a weak beer) and rum, which British Vice Admiral Edward Vernon introduced into the Royal Navy on 21 August 1740. Vernon wore a coat of grogram cloth and was nicknamed Old Grogram or Old Grog. Modern versions of the drink are often made with hot or boiling water, and sometimes include lemon juice, lime juice, cinnamon or sugar to improve the taste. Rum with water, sugar and nutmeg was known as bumbo and was more popular with pirates and merchantmen. By contrast, in Australia and New Zealand the word has come to mean any alcoholic drink. In Sweden and some subcultures within the English-speaking world, grog is a common description of drinks not made to a recipe (in Sweden the mixture is usually between 25%-50% spirit and 75%-50% softdrink), but by mixing various kinds of alcohol and soda, fruit juice or similar ingredients (in the USA this would be a highball with no defined proportions). The difference between the Swedish definition of grog and long drinks, mixed drinks or punches is the number of ingredients. The number of ingredients in drinks may
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Manhattan

    Manhattan

    A Manhattan is a cocktail made with whiskey, sweet vermouth, and bitters. Commonly used whiskeys include rye (the traditional choice), Canadian whisky (simply called Rye in Canada), bourbon, blended whiskey and Tennessee whiskey. The cocktail is often stirred with ice and strained into a cocktail glass, where it is garnished with a Maraschino cherry with a stem. A Manhattan is also frequently served on the rocks in an Old Fashioned glass (lowball glass). The whiskey-based Manhattan is one of five cocktails named for one of New York City's five boroughs, but is perhaps most closely related to the Brooklyn cocktail, a mix utilizing dry vermouth and Maraschino liqueur in place of the Manhattan's sweet vermouth, as well as Amer Picon in place of the Manhattan's traditional bitters. It is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's classic The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. A popular history suggests that the drink originated at the Manhattan Club in New York City in the early 1870s, where it was invented by Dr. Iain Marshall for a banquet hosted by Jennie Jerome (Lady Randolph Churchill, Winston's mother) in honor of presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden. The success of the
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Pink lady

    Pink lady

    The Pink Lady is a classic gin-based cocktail with a long history. Its pink color is due to adding grenadine. The exact ingredients for the pink lady vary, but all variations have the use of gin, grenadine and egg white in common. In its most basic form the pink lady consists of just these three ingredients. According to the Royal Cafe Cocktail Book of 1937, it is made with a glass of gin, a tablespoon of grenadine and the white of one egg, shaken and strained the result into a glass. Often lemon juice is added to the basic form as well and in that case the Pink Lady is identical to another cocktail called Clover Club. Some authors argue that the "real" or "original" pink lady differs from the Clover Club by adding applejack to mix, which provides the Pink Lady with its own distinct flavour. Another creamier version of the Pink Lady that has been around at least since the 1920s adds sweet cream to the basic form. In New Orleans this version was also known as Pink Shimmy. In some recipes the cream is not added to the basic form but simply replaces the egg white and sometimes lemon juice is added as well. Usually the ingredients for any of the versions are shaken over ice and after
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Vesper

    Vesper

    The Vesper or Vesper Martini is a cocktail that was originally made of gin, vodka, and Kina Lillet. The drink was invented and named by fictional secret agent James Bond in the 1953 novel Casino Royale. The novel goes on with Bond telling the barman, after taking a long sip, "Excellent ... but if you can get a vodka made with grain instead of potatoes, you will find it still better," and then adds in an aside, "Mais n'enculons pas des mouches" (English: But let's not bugger flies—a vulgar French expression meaning "let's not split hairs"). Bond eventually calls it the Vesper, named after the novel's lead female character, Vesper Lynd. A Vesper differs from Bond's usual cocktail of choice, the martini, in that it uses both gin and vodka, Kina Lillet instead of the usual dry vermouth, and a lemon peel instead of an olive. Although there is a lot of discussion on the Vesper, it is only ordered once throughout Fleming's novels - although Bond drinks the Vesper ("six of them") in the film Quantum of Solace - and by later books Bond is ordering regular vodka martinis, though he also drinks regular gin martinis. In actuality the book version of the Vesper was created by Fleming's friend
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    English whisky

    English whisky

    English whisky is whisky produced in England. There are currently three distilleries producing English whisky. Though England is not very well known for making whisky there were distillers previously operating in London, Liverpool and Bristol until the late 19th century, after which production of English single malt whisky ceased until 2003. England like Scotland has a history of producing single malt whisky. However, the production of English single malt whisky ceased around 1905 with the closure of Lea Valley Distillery by the Distillers Company Limited (D.C.L.) now known as Diageo. In the 1887 book The Whisky Distilleries of The United Kingdom by Alfred Barnard, the following English distilleries were listed: In 2003 St Austell Brewery & Healey Cyder Farm announced the first production of a "Cornish" single malt whisky in 300 years. Although no substantial evidence exists that whisky was ever produced in Cornwall it was the first commercial whisky to be produced in England in almost a century. The partnership released a 7 year old "whiskey" in September 2011. The English Whisky Co. Ltd, founded by farmer James Nelstrop in 2006, started production and released a three-year-old
    4.25
    4 votes
    196
    Chunk

    Chunk

    Tschunk or chunk [ˈtʃʊnk] is the name of a German cocktail consisting of Club-Mate and white or brown rum. It is usually served with limes. The edge of the glass may be covered with salt. As Club-Mate contains plenty of caffeine and sugar, the alcohol expedites the effect of the caffeine, thus the drink has a bracing impact. The vowel in tschunk is pronounced like [u] ("oo"); there is no connection to the English word chunk. The cocktail was originally served in the "Club Forschung" (German for research club) in Rosenthaler Straße, Berlin. The club was also known as "Club for-chunk" Like Club-Mate, the chunk is a typical drink within European hacker culture and can often be found at scene typical events or locations like the Chaos Computer Club or c-base. It's also a typical party-drink at German universities, because of the huge amount of caffeine. As a result of the international audience, today it can be found in other countries such as the United States as well.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Pisco

    Pisco

    Pisco is a colorless or yellowish-to-amber colored grape brandy produced in winemaking regions of Chile and Peru.Pisco was developed by Spanish settlers in the 16th century as an alternative to orujo, a pomace brandy that was being imported from Spain. The first vineyards were planted in the coastal valleys in the Viceroyalty of Peru, when vine plants arrived from the Canary Islands. Even though Spain imposed many restrictions on wine production and commerce, the wine-making industry developed rapidly, such as in the corregimientos of Ica. There are several proposals about the origin of the word pisco. Pisco may have received its name from the town of Pisco, located on the coast of Peru inside of the valley of Pisco, made by the river with the same name. Chilean linguist Rodolfo Lenz have claimed that the word pisco was used all along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Arauco to Guatemala and that the word would be of Quechua origin meaning "bird". This claim is disputed by Chilean linguist Mario Ferreccio Podesta who supports the Real Academia Española etymology that says that pisco was originally a word for a mud container. Other origins for the word pisco have been explored
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Rompope

    Rompope

    Rompope is an eggnog-like drink made with eggs, milk, and vanilla flavouring. The egg yolks impart a yellow hue to the emulsified beverage. It is a traditional drink known as such in Costa Rica, El Salvador and particularly in Mexico, where, it is believed to have been originally made in the convents of the city of Puebla. The word rompope is a derivation of the word rompon, which is used to describe the Spanish version of eggnog that came to Mexico. The Spanish version utilizes rum as its main ingredient, hence the root of both words rom-pon and rom-pope, but in Central America, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, there is also a similar beverage known as rompopo. For example, Salcaja, in Guatemala offers one known version of this rompopo drink and in South America, The country of Chile has among its most popular drinks rompon and cola de mono or monkey’s tail, the latter containing coffee making it dark instead of yellow, but also containing the other ingredients commonly found in rompope. Rompope is one of many versions of the varied combinations of egg yolk, milk, sugar, and alcoholic spirits that are traditionally used for many celebrations mainly in Europe and the Americas.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Beer cocktail

    Beer cocktail

    A beer cocktail is a cocktail that is made by mixing beer with a distilled beverage. In this type of cocktail, the primary ingredient is beer. A mixture of beer with a beverage that does not contain distilled alcohol is called a shandy.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Corn whiskey

    Corn whiskey

    Corn whiskey (sometimes Corn Liquor, "White Dog", or "White Lightning") is an American liquor made from a mash made of at least 80 percent corn. It is based on the typical American moonshine, since illicit whiskey was usually made with corn for the mash (often with some sugar). However, several commercial distillers such as Heaven Hill and Buffalo Trace have started to produce corn whiskies for retail sale. The whiskey is typically distilled to high proof (great than 150 proof). Often, the corn whiskey is then diluted with water to 40 percent alcohol by volume and bottled. However, the whiskey can be aged in used or uncharred oak barrels. Aging usually is brief, six months or less, during which time the whiskey absorbs color and flavor from the barrel while the off-flavors and fusel alcohols are reduced. A variant called "Straight Corn Whiskey" is also produced in which, the whiskey is stored in used or uncharred new oak containers for 2 years or more. Some whiskies produced in this manner can be designated Bottled in Bond.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Fizzy apple cocktail

    Fizzy apple cocktail

    The Fizzy Apple Cocktail, is a cocktail containing apple vodka, lemonade and apple juice. Typically, the drink is stirred and a slice of lemon can be added for aesthetic appeal. This drink is predominantly consumed by the younger Australian generation. It is closely related to the Appletini. The Fizzy Apple Cocktail was created as the traditional Appletini was too strong for the typical Australian palete, and it was a much softer alternative.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Glen Breton Rare

    Glen Breton Rare

    Glen Breton Rare is a Canadian single malt whisky. It is distilled and produced by Glenora Distillers of Glenville, Inverness County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Created by Glenora Distillers, the whisky's name was put into question before it had ever sold a bottle. The Scotch Whisky Association (SWA), a firm representing 57 different Scotch whisky companies from Scotland, felt that the whisky from the village of Glenville, Nova Scotia, Canada, on Cape Breton Island, was misleading potential international buyers by using the term "Glen" in its name—a term used almost exclusively on Scotch whisky labels. The word "Glen" is not uniquely a Scottish one - the word might even come from the Welsh language (see Glen) - and there are Glens all over the world, including in Cape Breton. The packaging and bottle have a large red maple leaf on them which looks very Canadian. The trademark name "Scotch" does not appear on the bottle anywhere. The distillery started production in June 1990, with bottles hitting the shelves in the early 2000s. Around August, 2006, Glenora Distillery introduced the world's first ever single malt aged in Ice Wine barrels, from the Jost Winery of Nova Scotia. The new malt
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Grain whisky

    Grain whisky

    Grain whisky ordinarily refers to any whisky made from at least some grains other than malted barley, such as whisky made using maize (corn), wheat or rye. Some grain whiskies also contain malted barley spirits. Whisky made from only malted barley (or primarily from malted barley) is typically called malt whisky rather than grain whisky. In Scotland, "malt whisky" must use a 100% malted barley mash and must be distilled in a pot still, and grain whisky is typically distilled in a continuous column still in a manner that results in a "lighter" but less flavorful spirit. Because of this practice, grain whisky is seldom bottled by itself in Scotland, where it is instead manufactured explicitly for blending with malt whisky to create blended whisky, which account for over 90% of all Scotch whisky sales. Their comparative lightness of the grain whisky is used to smooth out the often harsh characteristics of single malts. Occasionally well-aged grain whiskies are released as "single grain whisky" or "blended grain whisky" in Scotland, and the best of these can be held in the same league as single malts. Outside of Scotland, these terms may be interpreted as indicating that only a single
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Irish whiskey

    Irish whiskey

    Irish whiskey (Irish: Fuisce or uisce beatha) is whiskey made in Ireland. Key regulations defining Irish whiskey and its production are established by the Irish Whiskey Act of 1980, and are relatively simple (for example, in contrast with those for Scotch and Bourbon whiskey). They can be summarised as follows: There are several types of whiskey common to Ireland, including those referred to as "single pot still",single malt, single grain, and blended Irish whiskey. But in contrast to the Scotch Whisky Regulations of 2009, the Irish Whiskey Act of 1980 does not actually contain a definition of the terms "single malt Irish whiskey" or "single grain Irish whiskey" or specific rules governing their production, so the exact definitions of these terms may not be clearly established. The meaning of such terms can vary substantially from producer to producer. For example, some Scottish whisky that could have been considered "single malt" before 2009 was distilled using continuous stills, and there is an American whiskey marketed as a "Single Malt" that is made from rye grain. Both of these practices would violate the 2009 Scotch Whisky Regulations definition of "Single Malt Scotch Whisky"
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Japanese whisky

    Japanese whisky

    Whisky production in Japan began around 1870, but the first commercial production was in 1924 upon the opening of the country's first distillery, Yamazaki. Broadly speaking the style of Japanese whisky is more similar to that of Scotch whisky than Irish or American styles of whiskey, and thus the spelling typically follows the Scottish convention (omitting the letter "e"). There are several companies producing whisky in Japan. Perhaps the two most well known are Suntory and Nikka. Both of these produce blended as well as single malt whiskies. Two of the most influential figures in the history of Japanese whisky are Shinjiro Torii and Masataka Taketsuru. Torii was a pharmaceutical wholesaler and the founder of Kotobukiya (later to become Suntory). He started importing western liquor and he later created a brand called "Akadama Port Wine", based on a Portuguese wine which made him a successful merchant. However, he was not satisfied with this success and so he embarked on a new venture which was to become his life's work: making Japanese whisky for Japanese people. Despite the strong opposition from the company's executives, Torii decided to build the first Japanese whisky distillery
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Zurracapote

    Zurracapote

    Zurracapote (sometimes abbreviated as zurra) is a popular Spanish alcoholic mixed drink, similar to sangría. It consists of red wine mixed with fruit such as peaches and lemons, sugar, and cinnamon. The concoction is then traditionally left to steep for several days, though some recipes call for the addition of other alcoholic beverages, juices, and fruit extracts. The result is a mild-to-medium alcoholic drink, similar to sangría. The drink is normally prepared in large receptacles during local festivals with many local variations in recipe. It is the typical drink of the La Rioja area and nearby areas such as northern Burgos, Soria, Ribera Navarra, and the Basque Country. It is also prepared in other Spanish provinces, such as Albacete, northern Granada, Ciudad Real, Cuenca, and Guadalajara.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Affogato

    Affogato

    An affogato (Italian, "drowned") is a coffee-based beverage. It usually takes the form of a scoop of vanilla gelato or ice cream topped with a shot of hot espresso. Some variations also include a shot of Amaretto or other liqueur.
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Amaro Montenegro

    Amaro Montenegro

    Amaro Montenegro is a traditional amaro distilled in Bologna, Italy. It is made using over 40 herbs, bottled at 23%vol. The amaro was first produced by Stanislao Cobianchi in the late 19th century and is named after Princess Elena of Montenegro. Popular as an after-coffee drink (ammazzacaffè in Italian) it is one of the few brands of Italian bitters to have carved an image for itself through a series of successful commercials (aired on Italian TV networks) which have linked the brand to images of adventurous, outdoor, manly living and situations.
    4.50
    2 votes
    209
    Bomb shot

    Bomb shot

    A bomb shot, or "depth charge", is a form of alcoholic cocktail created by mixing two separate drinks by dropping a small container holding one drink (typically a shot) into a larger container holding a larger quantity of another drink. The resulting combination is often consumed in its entirety as quickly as possible ("chugged"). The bomb shot is served to the imbiber in two separate glasses, as the ritual of consumption of a bomb shot is that it is mixed by the imbiber just before drinking. Generally, a bomb shot consists of a shot glass filled with liquor or a shooter which is to be dropped into another glass that is partially filled with some other beverage, which is typically beer, but is sometimes another alcoholic cocktail or an energy drink. Examples of popular bomb shots include: The bomb shot is part of a class of showily-consumed drinks, such as the tequila slammer, which are mixed by the imbiber just before drinking to achieve some particular effect or flavor that subsides or disappears if the drink is not consumed immediately.
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Monster Energy

    Monster Energy

    Monster Energy is an energy drink, launched by Hansen Natural in 2002. It comes in a black can with a colored logo. "Monster Java" was the first energy drink to be sold mixed with coffee. There are now 27 different drinks under the Monster umbrella in North America including its core Monster Energy line, Java Monster, Extra Strength, Import and Rehab. Monster Energy is advertised mainly through sponsorship of sporting events, including motocross, flag football, car racing, BMX, snowboarding and skateboarding. In 2006, Hansen Natural Corporation announced a distribution agreement with Anheuser-Busch in the U.S. and Grupo Jumex in Mexico. In 2008, Hansen Natural Corporation announced that they were switching distributors from Anheuser-Busch to Coca Cola. The caffeine content of most Monster Energy drinks is approximately 10 mg/oz (33.81 mg/100ml), or 160 mg for a 16 oz can. The packaging usually contains a warning label advising consumers against drinking more than 48 oz per day (16 oz per day in Australia). The UK and Europe do not have these warning labels. The drinks are not recommended for children, pregnant women or people sensitive to caffeine. The ingredients include
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Old Fashioned

    Old Fashioned

    The Old Fashioned is a type of cocktail made by muddling dissolved sugar with bitters then adding alcohol, such as whiskey or brandy, and a twist of citrus rind. It is traditionally served in a short, round, 8–12 US fl oz (240–350 ml) tumbler-like glass, which is called an Old Fashioned glass, named after the drink. The Old Fashioned is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. The first documented definition of the word "cocktail" was in response to a reader's letter asking to define the word in the May 6, 1806, issue of The Balance and Columbia Repository in Hudson, New York. In the May 13, 1806, issue, the paper's editor wrote that it was a potent concoction of spirits, bitters, water, and sugar; it was also referred to at the time as a bittered sling. The first alleged use of the specific name "Old Fashioned" was for a Bourbon whiskey cocktail in the 1880s, at the Pendennis Club, a gentlemen’s club in Louisville, Kentucky. The recipe is said to have been invented by a bartender at that club, and popularized by a club member and bourbon distiller, Colonel James E. Pepper, who brought it to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel bar in New York
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Americano

    Americano

    Caffè Americano, or Americano (English: American coffee) is a style of coffee prepared by adding hot water to espresso, giving a similar strength but different flavor from regular drip coffee. The strength of an Americano varies with the number of shots of espresso and the amount of water added. In the United States, "Americano" is used broadly to mean combining hot water and espresso in either order, but in a narrower definition it refers to adding water to espresso (espresso on the bottom), while adding espresso to water (espresso on the top) is instead referred to as a long black. The name is also spelled with varying capitalization and use of diacritics: e.g. Café Américano – a hyperforeignism using the French word for coffee and the Italian word for American, but with an additional incorrect accent - café Americano, cafe americano, etc. The name derives its origins from WW2 when American GIs in Europe would pour hot water into an espresso to approximate the coffee to which they were accustomed. It was then adapted in the United States by large chains who sought to create a marketable fusion of drip coffee and espresso to sell to a mass market. The drink consists of a single or
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Disaronno

    Disaronno

    Disaronno Originale (28% abv) is a brand of fruity amaretto, with a characteristic bittersweet almond taste. Disaronno claims its "originale" amaretto's "secret formula" is unchanged from the year 1525, and claims the Luini tale as its own particular history. Its production remains in Saronno, but the product is sold worldwide. The company describes its amaretto as an infusion of "apricot kernel oil" with "absolute alcohol, burnt sugar, and the pure essence of seventeen selected herbs and fruits"; the product does not contain any almonds or other nuts. The amber liqueur is presented in an oblong glass decanter designed by a craftsman from Murano. The product was called "Amaretto di Saronno" (Amaretto from Saronno) before adopting, for marketing reasons, the current name "Disaronno Originale." Disaronno can be served on the rocks, in shots, as part of a cocktail or with a mixer such as Coke or apple and cherry juice.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    Green River

    Green River

    Green River is a bright green, lime-flavored soft drink originating in Chicago. The drink was developed in 1919 by the Schoenhofen Brewery of Chicago as a non-alcoholic product for the Prohibition era. It was popular as a soda fountain syrup, trailing only Coca-Cola in popularity throughout the Midwest. However, after Prohibition ended in 1933 the Schoenhofen Brewery made Green River a second priority to alcoholic drinks. The Brewery then closed in 1950. For a time in the 1980's to 2011 "The Lime Soda, with Just A Touch Of Lemon" was produced by Clover Club Beverages, of Chicago. First around 4700 w. on Archer Ave, then near 3400 s. Ashland Ave, in the former Newport Beverage Plant. The drink is now owned and produced by the WIT Beverage Company. It is frequently marketed as a nostalgia item and can be found in some Chicago area restaurants such as Schoop's Hamburgers, Hackney's, Miller's Pub, Eleven City Dinner, BOZ Hot Dogs, Smashburger, and Pepe's or more generally in supermarkets during the days leading up to St. Patrick's Day. The ingredients of the drink currently are: Carbonated water, Cane sugar, citric acid, natural lime oils, yellow #5, and blue #1. There is also a diet
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Izarra

    Izarra

    Izarra is a sweet liqueur made in Bayonne in the French Basque Country. The distillery is situated in Bayonne, by the river Adour, and is open to visitors. The company headquarters of Distillerie de la Côte Basque however are located in St. Jean de Luz. There are two varieties of Izarra: Pyrenean herbs and other flavourings are used in a fifteen-month process to produce the liqueur. Four different liquids are produced: alcohol distilled with herbal flavorings; a liquid resulting from the soaking of prunes and walnut shells in armagnac; syrup of sugar and local acacia honey; and a colouring infusion of saffron for the yellow and several plants for the green variety. The liqueur matures for six months in barrels before it is bottled. In recent years the company has begun to diversify its range and has added varieties such as Izarra Manzana Verde. Izarra is drunk on its own, on ice or in cocktails, frequently with gin. It can be found in chocolates and desserts. The drink is ubiquitous in the Northern Basque Country and is also found in the rest of France and parts of Europe. Traditionally the company has used the slogan Le soleil et la neige des Pyrénées ("the sun and the snow of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Maker's Mark

    Maker's Mark

    Maker’s Mark is a small-batch bourbon whiskey that is distilled in Loretto, Kentucky, by Beam Inc. It is sold in distinctively squarish bottles, which are sealed with red wax. The distillery offers tours, and is part of the American Whiskey Trail and the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. Production of Maker's Mark started in 1954, after its originator, T. William "Bill" Samuels Sr., purchased the distillery known as "Burks' Distillery" in Loretto, Kentucky for $35,000. The first bottle of Maker's Mark was bottled in 1958 and featured the brand's distinctive dipped red wax seal. Maker's Mark holds a U.S. trademark (serial number 73526578) on the wax seal of their bottles. In the 1960s and 1970s, Maker's Mark was widely marketed with the tag line, "It tastes expensive ... and is." The distillery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 31, 1974, and designated a National Historic Landmark on December 16, 1980, listed as "Burks' Distillery". It was the first distillery in America to be so recognized where the landmark buildings were in active use for distilling. Other historic American distilleries in current use include the Labrot & Graham's Old Oscar Pepper
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Piña Colada

    Piña Colada

    The piña colada (Spanish: piña, pineapple + colada, strained) is a sweet, rum-based cocktail made with rum, cream of coconut, and pineapple juice, usually served either blended or shaken with ice. It may be garnished with a pineapple wedge, a maraschino cherry or both. The piña colada has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico since 1978. The piña colada was created on August 16, 1954 at the Caribe Hilton’s Beachcomber Bar in San Juan, Puerto Rico by its alleged creator, Ramón "Monchito" Marrero. Apparently, the hotel management had expressly requested Monchito to mix a new signature drink that would delight the demanding palates of its star-studded clientele. Monchito accepted the challenge, and after three intense months of blending, shaking and experimenting, the first piña colada was born. This story is credible because the piña colada contains coconut cream as one of the primary ingredients, and the coconut cream of "Coco López" (which is the pioneer) was invented in 1954 in the University of Puerto Rico by Ramón López Irizarry. This story is confirmed by José L. Díaz De Villegas in his book Puerto Rico La Gran Cocina Del Caribe. The bartender widely recognized as being the
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Sea breeze

    Sea breeze

    A Sea Breeze is a cocktail containing vodka with cranberry juice and grapefruit juice. The cocktail is usually consumed during summer months. The drink may be shaken in order to create a foamy surface. It is considered an IBA Official Cocktail. The drink follows the classic cocktail principle of balancing strong (alcohol) with weak (fruit juice) and sweet and sour. A Bay Breeze, or a Hawaiian Sea Breeze, is similar to a Sea Breeze except for the substitution of pineapple juice for grapefruit juice. It is also closely related to the Cape Codder (which lacks the grapefruit juice) and the Salty Dog (which lacks the cranberry juice and is made with a salted rim). The cocktail was born in the late 1920s, but the recipe was different from the one used today, as gin and grenadine were used in the original Sea Breeze. This was near the end of the Prohibition era. In the 1930s, a Sea Breeze had gin, apricot brandy, grenadine, and lemon juice. Later, a Sea Breeze recipe would contain vodka, dry vermouth, Galliano, and blue Curaçao. The cranberry grower's cooperative in the 1930s evolved into Ocean Spray which marketed cranberry juice in the 1950s. Cranberry juice was used as a mixer with
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Stolichnaya vodka

    Stolichnaya vodka

    Stolichnaya (Russian: Столичная, also known as Stoli) is a Russian vodka made of wheat and rye grain. Fermentation of Stolichnaya starts with wheat and rye grains and artesian water from the Russian city of Samara and the Kaliningrad region. The fermentation takes about 60 hours. Once fermentation is complete the resulting liquid is distilled four times to a strength of 96.4% ABV. This spirit is then diluted to bottling strength with more artesial well water. It is then filtered through quartz, sand, activated charcoal, and finally through woven cloth. The brand's logo features the words "Stolichnaya vodka" in gold cursive script, over a drawing of a Moscow landmark currently under re-construction, the Hotel Moskva, where Stalin once stayed and the site of one of the first Metro stations in the capital city. ("Stolichnaya" is the adjectival form of "stolitsa" ["столица"], meaning "capital city".) Stolichnaya has its origins in the Moscow State Wine Warehouse No. 1 which was opened in 1901 by the authorities to ensure higher quality vodka production. There's a confusion about the actual birth date of Stolichnaya vodka. The earliest confirmed production date is 1948, but the label
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Pappy Van Winkle

    Pappy Van Winkle

    Pappy Van Winkle's Family Reserve is the flagship brand of bourbon whiskey owned by the "Old Rip Van Winkle Distillery" company (which does not actually own or operate a distillery), and is distilled and bottled by the Sazerac Company at its Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky. Julian "Pappy" Van Winkle, Sr. began in 1893 at the age of 18 as a salesman for the liquor wholesaler, W.L. Weller & Sons. In 1908 he and another Weller salesman bought the firm. In 1910 they acquired the A. Ph. Stitzel Distillery in Louisville, Kentucky which began operation as a sour mash whiskey distillery 1872. The Stitzel Distillery supplied much of the whiskey sold by the Weller wholesale firm. The consolidation coincided with prohibition during which time the Stitzel-Weller firm was licensed by the government to produce whiskey for medicinal purposes. One of their labels that was introduced on the market just before prohibition was Old Rip Van Winkle. After prohibition, the brand was not reintroduced until after 1972 when the Stitzel-Weller distillery and its current brand names (including W.L. Weller, Old Fitzgerald, Rebel Yell, and Cabin Still) were sold to other companies. The only
    4.00
    2 votes
    221
    Amaro

    Amaro

    Amaro (Italian for "bitter") is an Italian herbal liqueur that is commonly drunk as an after-dinner digestif. It usually has a bitter-sweet flavor, sometimes syrupy, and has an alcohol content between 16% and 35%. Similar liqueurs have traditionally been produced throughout Europe. There are local varieties in Germany (where they are called Kräuterlikör) and in Hungary, the Netherlands, and France. But the term amaro is applied only to Italian products of this kind. Amaro is typically produced by macerating herbs, roots, flowers, bark, and/or citrus peels in alcohol, either neutral spirits or wine, mixing the filtrate with sugar syrup, and allowing the mixture to age in casks or bottles. Dozens of varieties are commercially produced, the most commonly available of which are Averna, Ramazzotti, Lucano, and Montenegro. Many commercial bottlers trace their recipe or production to the 19th century. Recipes often originated in monasteries or pharmacies. Amaro is typically drunk neat, sometimes with a citrus wedge. It may also be drunk on ice or with tonic water. Amaro should not be confused with amaretto, another Italian liqueur that is sweet and flavored with almonds or with the pits
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Cafe Mocha

    Cafe Mocha

    A caffè mocha or café mocha ( /ˈmɒk.ə/ or /ˈmoʊk.ə/) is a variant of a caffè latte, inspired by the Turin Coffee beverage Bicerin. Like a caffe latte, it is based on espresso and hot milk, but with added chocolate, typically in the form of sweet cocoa powder, although many varieties use chocolate syrup. Mochas can contain dark or milk chocolate. Like cappuccino, café mochas contain the well-known milk froth on top, although they are sometimes served with whipped cream instead. They are usually topped with a dusting of either cinnamon or cocoa powder. Marshmallows may also be added on top for flavor and decoration. A variant is white café mocha, made with white chocolate instead of milk or dark. There are also variants of the drink that mix the two syrups; this mixture is referred to by several names, including black and white mocha, tan mocha, marble mocha, tuxedo mocha and zebra. Café mocha takes its name from the Red Sea coastal town of Mocha, Yemen, which as far back as the fifteenth century was a dominant exporter of coffee, especially to areas around the Arabian Peninsula. The caffeine content is approximately 10.9 mg/oz (370 mg/L), which is 175 mg for a 16 oz glass. Mocha is
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Espresso

    Espresso

    Espresso is a concentrated beverage brewed by forcing a small amount of nearly boiling water under pressure through finely ground coffee beans. Espresso often has a thicker consistency than coffee brewed by other methods, a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids, and crema (foam). As a result of the pressurized brewing process the flavours and chemicals in a typical cup of coffee are very concentrated. Espresso is the base for other drinks, such as a latte, cappuccino, macchiato, mocha, or americano. Espresso has more caffeine per unit volume than most beverages, but the usual serving size is smaller—a typical 60 mL (2 US fluid ounce) of espresso has 80 to 150 mg of caffeine, rather less than the 95 to 200  mg of a standard 240 mL (8 US fluid ounces) cup of drip-brewed coffee. Espresso is made by forcing very hot water under high pressure through finely ground, compacted coffee. Tamping down the coffee promotes the water's even penetration of the grounds. This process produces an almost syrupy beverage by extracting both solid and dissolved components. It also produces the definitive crema, by emulsifying the oils in the ground coffee into a colloid, which does not
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Grasshopper

    Grasshopper

    A grasshopper is a sweet, mint-flavored, after-dinner drink. The name of the drink is derived from its green color, which is provided by the crème de menthe. The drink reputedly originated at Tujague's, a landmark bar in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana, and gained popularity during the 1950s and 1960s throughout the American South. A typical grasshopper cocktail consists of equal parts Crème de menthe, Crème de cacao and fresh cream, shaken with ice and strained into a chilled cocktail glass. A "Vodka" or "Flying" Grasshopper substitutes vodka for fresh cream, while a "Brown Grasshopper" additionally contains coffee. A "Frozen" Grasshopper additionally contains Mint Ice Cream to further its dessert qualities. In the North Central US states, especially Wisconsin, Grasshoppers are blended drinks where ice cream is substituted for cream. Also known as a "Grasshopper milkshake," it contains Mint Chocolate Chip ice cream, milk, and crème de menthe. This is blended and served in a tall glass decorated with a miniature or broken cream filled chocolate sandwich cookie.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Harvey Wallbanger

    Harvey Wallbanger

    The Harvey Wallbanger is an alcoholic beverage or cocktail made with vodka, Galliano, and orange juice. The Harvey Wallbanger is reported to have been invented in 1952 by three-time world champion mixologist Donato 'Duke' Antone (Paolantonio). The Harvey Wallbanger was brought to international prominence by then Galliano salesman, George Bednar. Legend has it that the drink was named after a Manhattan Beach surfer who was a regular patron of Duke's 'Blackwatch' Bar on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood during the early 1950s. Among Duke's other cocktail creations were the Rusty Nail, the Flaming Caesar, the White Russian, the Freddie Fudpucker, and the Godfather. The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers, winners of the American League pennant, were nicknamed "Harvey's Wallbangers," because of the team's power hitting (wall banging) under mid-season manager Harvey Kuenn. After a mediocre 23-24 start to the season, manager Buck Rodgers was fired. Under Kuenn, the team went 72-43 (.626), led the Major Leagues in home runs and total bases, and produced the highest team OPS+ since the 1931 New York Yankees. The SAS sometimes referred to C4 explosive charges as "Harvey Wall-bangers." Harvey Wallbanger is
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Krupnik

    Krupnik

    Krupnik, or Krupnikas as it is known in Lithuanian, is a traditional sweet alcoholic drink similar to a liqueur, based on grain spirit and honey, popular in Poland and Lithuania. Mass produced versions consist of 40%-50% (80-100 proof) alcohol, but traditional versions will use 80% - 100% grain alcohol as the base. Honey, in particular clover honey, is the main ingredient to add sweetness, as well as up to 50 different herbs. There are many versions and some recipes are passed down through generations. It originated in the territories of present day Lithuania and is sometimes heated before being served. It is a distant relative of the medovukha (Russian) or miód pitny (Polish), a honey-made spirit popular in all Slavic countries. Legend has it that the recipe was created by the Benedictine monks at a monastery in Niaśviž which was founded by Mikołaj Krzysztof "Sierotka" Radziwiłł. Known in Poland and Lithuania at least since 16th century, it soon became popular among the szlachta of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. There are numerous recipes preserved to our times in countless szlachta diaries. Krupnik was also used as a common medicinal disinfectant to Polish soldiers in World
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Liqueur coffee

    Liqueur coffee

    A liqueur coffee is a coffee drink with a shot of liqueur. It may be served in a special liqueur coffee glass, often with cream and sugar. Liqueur coffee are all variants on what is widely known as Irish coffee, hot coffee with whiskey and a layer of cream (not whipped) floated on top. It's really popular in Galicia, where is considered a traditional drink. Galician liqueur coffee is made from a blend of coffee, sugar and augardente (orujo). This is a list of names sometimes given to liqueur coffees. Some, such as Irish coffee, are widely used and more-or-less standard (there is actually an "official" recipe, but it is not enforced); others local and idiosyncratic. There are many variations in nomenclature: the same name may be used for different combinations:
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Margarita

    Margarita

    The margarita is a Mexican cocktail consisting of tequila mixed with orange-flavoured liqueur and lime or lemon juice, often served with salt on the glass rim. It is the most common tequila-based cocktail in the United States. The drink is served shaken with ice, on the rocks, blended with ice (frozen margarita) or without ice (straight up). The IBA (IBA Official list of Cocktails) standard is 7:4:3, that is, 50% tequila, 29% Cointreau, 21% fresh lime juice. Other orange-flavored liqueurs that might be used include Grand Marnier, triple sec, or blue curaçao yielding the blue margarita. When sweeter fruit juices or freshly puréed fruits are added to the margarita, the amount of orange-flavored liqueur is often reduced or eliminated entirely. In addition to orange-flavored liqueurs, secondary liqueurs may occasionally be added to the cocktail, including melon-flavored or black raspberry-flavored. Freshly squeezed lime juice is the key ingredient. The most common lime in the U.S. is the thick-skinned Persian lime. However, margaritas in Mexico are generally made with Mexican limes (Key limes). These are small, thin-skinned limes and have a more tart and an often bitter flavor compared
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    Raymond Massey

    Raymond Massey

    The Raymond Massey is a cocktail made of rye, ginger syrup, and champagne. The drink’s namesake is Canadian actor Raymond Massey (1896–1983), and the beverage is predominantly consumed in his hometown of Toronto, Ontario. Ginger syrup can be prepared in advance much as simple syrup, but with the inclusion of ¾ cup of peeled and sliced ginger. When gin is substituted for the whisky and lemon juice for the ginger syrup, the drink is called a French 75.
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    Tomato juice

    Tomato juice

    Tomato juice is a juice made from tomatoes. It is usually used as a beverage, either plain or in cocktails such as a Bloody Mary or Michelada. Tomato juice was first served as a beverage in 1917 by Louis Perrin at the French Lick Springs Hotel in southern Indiana, when he ran out of orange juice and needed a quick substitute. His combination of squeezed tomatoes, sugar and his special sauce became an instant success as Chicago businessmen spread the word about the tomato juice cocktail. Many commercial manufacturers of tomato juice also add salt. Other ingredients are also often added, such as onion powder, garlic powder, and other spices. A small scale study in 2000 indicated that tomato juice contains a factor (codenamed P3) that inhibits platelets in blood from clumping together and forming blood clots. The authors suggest this might be beneficial to diabetes sufferers. The actual effect of increased intake of tomato juice by diabetics has never been studied. Tomato juice contains the antioxidant lycopene. Scientific studies have suggested that lycopene consumption may protect against prostate cancer, breast cancer, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease. Epidemiological
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    Arak

    Arak

    Arak, or araq, is a highly alcoholic spirit (~50%-63% Alc. Vol./~100-126 proof) from the anis drinks family. It is a clear, colorless, unsweetened anise-flavored distilled alcoholic drink (also labeled as an Apéritif). It is the traditional alcoholic beverage of Middle Eastern and Levantine nations such as Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, and Syria. The word arak comes from Arabic ′araq ﻋﺮﻕ, meaning "sweat", its pronunciation varies depending on local varieties of Arabic: /ʕaraʔ, ʕaraɡ/. Arak is not to be confused with the similarly named liquor, arrack (which in some cases, such as in Indonesia—especially Bali, also goes by the name arak). Another similarly sounding word is aragh, which in Armenia, Iran, Azerbaijan and Georgia is the colloquial name of vodka, and not an aniseed-flavored drink. Raki and ouzo are aniseed-flavored alcoholic drinks, related to arak, popular in Turkey and Cyprus, and Greece, respectively. Arak is usually mixed in approximately 1/3 arak and 2/3 water in a traditional Levantine water vessel called "Ibrik", in Arabic "ﺇﺑﺮﻳﻖ"; then the mixture is poured in small ice filled cups, like in the picture. This dilution causes the clear liquor to turn a
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    Balsam

    Balsam

    Balsam is a variety of traditional Eastern European herbal, high alcohol content (40-45%) liqueurs originally used for medicinal purposes.
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    Balzam

    Balzam

    Riga Black Balsam (Latvian: Rīgas Melnais balzams) is a traditional Latvian herbal liqueur made with many different natural ingredients mixed in pure vodka, giving a 45% abv (90 proof) drink. It can be had as it is, on the rocks or mixed with schnapps, akvavit, or vodka, or warm, in tea, coffee or black currant juice, or mixed with soda water or a soft drink, or in any variety of cocktails. It is also occasionally enjoyed as a topping on ice-cream. The drink itself is black and very bitter, but with a distinct sweetness. Riga Black Balsam is made by JSC Latvijas Balzams. The traditional recipe was created by Abraham Kunze, a pharmacist living in Riga, and is based on a composition of 24 different plants, flowers, buds, juices, roots, oils and berries prepared in oak barrels. It is sold in ceramic handmade flagons. Over time, Riga Black Balsam has been acknowledged also internationally, as it has received more than 30 awards at international fairs. Black Balsam is also used in traditional medicine. It is considered to be a good cold remedy and is used to treat digestive problems. It has been made in Riga since the middle of the 18th century. According to legend, Empress Catherine
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    Boilermaker

    Boilermaker

    A boilermaker is a beer cocktail consisting of a glass of beer and a shot of whisky . The beer is either served as a chaser or is mixed with the liquor. When the beer is served as a chaser, the drink is often called simply a shot and a beer or a beer and a bump. In the United Kingdom, a boilermaker is a shot of bourbon or rye whiskey dropped into a glass of English pale ale. There are a number of ways to drink a boilermaker:
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    Caesar

    Caesar

    A Caesar or Bloody Caesar is a cocktail created and primarily consumed in Canada. It typically contains vodka, Clamato (a proprietary blend of tomato juice and clam broth), hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce, and is served with ice in a large, celery salt-rimmed glass, typically garnished with a stalk of celery and wedge of lime. It was invented in Calgary, Alberta in 1969 by restaurateur Walter Chell to celebrate the opening of a new Italian restaurant in the city. It quickly became a popular mixed drink within Canada where over 350 million Caesars are consumed annually and it has inspired numerous variants. However, the drink remains virtually unknown outside the country. The Caesar was invented in 1969 by restaurant manager Walter Chell of the Calgary Inn (today the Westin Hotel) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He devised the cocktail after being tasked to create a signature drink for the Calgary Inn's new Italian restaurant. He mixed vodka with clam and tomato juice, Worcestershire sauce and other spices, creating a drink similar to a Bloody Mary but with a uniquely spicy flavour. Chell said his inspiration came from Italy. He recalled that in Venice, they served Spaghetti alle
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    Café au lait

    Café au lait

    Café au lait (French pronunciation: [kafe o lɛ] "coffee with milk") is a French coffee drink. The meaning of the term differs between Europe and the United States; in both cases it means some kind of coffee with hot milk added, in contrast to white coffee, which is coffee with room temperature milk or other whitener added. In Europe, “café au lait” stems from the same continental tradition as “café con leche” in Spain, “kawa biała” (“white coffee”) in Poland, “Milchkaffee” (“milk coffee”) in Germany, “koffie verkeerd” (“incorrect coffee”) in The Netherlands, and “café com leite” (“coffee with milk”) in Portugal and Brazil. In northern Europe, café au lait is the name most often used in coffee shops. At home, café au lait can be prepared from dark coffee and heated milk; in cafés, it has been prepared on espresso machines from espresso and steamed milk ever since these machines became available in the 1940s – thus it refers to the usual “coffee + milk” combination, depending on the location, not to a specific drink. “Café au lait” and “caffè latte” are used as contrasting terms, to indicate whether the beverage is served in the “French” or the “Italian” way – the former being in a
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    Cosmopolitan

    Cosmopolitan

    A cosmopolitan, or informally cosmo, is a cocktail made with vodka, triple sec, cranberry juice, and freshly squeezed lime juice or sweetened lime juice. According to the International Bartenders Association the original recipe is based on vodka citron, lemon-flavored vodka. The cosmopolitan is a relative of cranberry coolers like the Cape Codder. Though often presented far differently, the cosmopolitan also bears a likeness in composition to the kamikaze cocktail. The origins of the cosmopolitan are somewhat disputed. It is likely that the drink was created independently by different bartenders since the 1970s. It is generally recognized that John Caine brought the drink to San Francisco around 1987 from Ohio. The same year in Manhattan, the internationally recognized version of the cocktail was created by Toby Cecchini, based on a poorly described version of Cheryl Cook's creation. One version of the creation of this popular drink credits the accomplishment to the gay community in Provincetown, Massachusetts. An alternate account names the creator as Gaurav Singh, famous for other creations such as Lockshock and Galacticia. John Caine, owner of several popular bars in San
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    Gin

    Gin

    Gin is a spirit which derives its predominant flavour from juniper berries (Juniperus communis). From its earliest beginnings in the Middle Ages, gin has evolved over the course of a millennium from a herbal medicine to an object of commerce in the spirits industry. Today, the gin category is one of the most popular and widely distributed range of spirits, and is represented by products of various origins, styles, and flavor profiles that all revolve around juniper as a common ingredient. The name gin is derived from either the French genièvre or the Dutch jenever, which both mean "juniper". Although several different styles of gin have evolved, it is legally differentiated into four categories in the European Union The official European Union classifications are as follows: In the United States gin is a alcoholic beverage no less than 40% alcohol in content with the characteristic flavour of juniper berries. Indeed any alcohol produced by any means within this stated legal definition regardless of the manufacturing method can be call "gin". Gin produced only through distillation or redistillation of aromatics with a alcoholic wash can be further marketed as "distilled gin". The
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    Gran Classico Bitter

    Gran Classico Bitter

    Gran Classico Bitter Gran Classico Bitter is an alcoholic apéritif/digestif (28% alcohol - 56 proof) created following the "Italian Bitter of Turin" recipe dating from the 1860s. This recipe, which was originally produced under the name Torino Gran Classico, had been purchased in 1925 from a Turin-based distillery by the small Swiss distillery E. Luginbühl, located near Bern. It is made by soaking a mixture of 25 aromatic herbs and roots including wormwood, gentian, bitter orange peel, rhubarb, and hyssop in an alcohol/water solution in order to extract their flavors and aromas. This process is similar to that which was originally employed to make medicinal tinctures. The maceration also creates a natural golden-amber color, which is not modified with additional colorants, although many other producers that use Turin-style recipes did and still do, dye their liquors red. The final liquid is then filtered, reduced in alcoholic strength and sweetened with sugar before bottling. Gran Classico Bitter is consumed straight or with ice, mixed with Seltzer water or beer and as an ingredient in cocktails, in the same fashion as other bitters or amaros. It is most frequently chosen as an
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    Indian filter coffee

    Indian filter coffee

    South Indian Coffee, also known as Filter Coffee is a sweet milky coffee made from dark roasted coffee beans (70–80%) and chicory (20–30%), especially popular in the southern states of Tamil Nadu, Karnataka & Andhra Pradesh. The most commonly used coffee beans are Arabica and Robusta grown in the hills of Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal), Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagaluru and Hassan), and Kerala (Malabar region). Outside India, a coffee drink prepared using a filter may be known as Filter Coffee or as Drip Coffee as the water passes through the grounds solely by gravity and not under pressure or in longer-term contact. Traditionally, the coffee bean varieties Plantation A or Peaberry are used to make Filter Coffee, with Plantation A being considered slightly inferior. South Indian coffee is brewed with a metal device that resembles two cylindrical cups, one of which has a pierced bottom that nests into the top of the "tumbler" cup, leaving ample room underneath to receive the brewed coffee. The upper cup has two removable parts: a pierced pressing disc with a central stem handle, and a covering lid. (A similar device is used to brew Vietnamese coffee.) The
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    KEO

    KEO

    KEO is a Cypriot beer. It is a light straw-colored lager with a thick head, and is sometimes compared to a pilsner in taste. The beer is brewed in Limassol, in Cyprus. The beer won the 1987 brewing industry world bottled lager competition Gold Medal. In 2010, KEO held a 32.4% share of the island's beer market. Currently, its ingredients include malted barley, maize, and hops, but maize is a new addition. In 2010 the appearance of the beer in a pornographic American film sparked a reaction by the largest shareholder in the company, the Orthodox Church of Cyprus. Official site
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    Orangina

    Orangina

    Orangina (French pronunciation: [ɔʁɑ̃ʒina]) is a carbonated citrus beverage made from orange, lemon, mandarin, and grapefruit juices. The concept of Orangina originated at a trade fair in France and was first marketed in Algeria by the French Algerian Léon Beton. It is a popular beverage in Europe and to a much lesser extent in North America. The original Orangina is still produced in Algeria as an Algerian brand. Since November 2009, Orangina has been owned by Suntory in most of the world. In North America, the brand has been owned by the Dr Pepper Snapple Group since 2006. Orangina started as Naranjina, presented at the 1935 Marseille Trade Fair by its Spanish inventor, chemist Dr. Trigo, from Valencia, who invented it in 1933. It was later called TriNaranjus (now, TriNa) for the Spanish market. Léon Beton bought the concept and produced it in colonial Algeria, moving production to France in 1962 after Algeria became independent. The company, created by Beton, joined the Pernod Ricard group in 1984. In 2000 the Orangina brand was acquired by Cadbury Schweppes along with Pernod Ricard's other soda businesses, after an attempt to sell to Coca-Cola was blocked on anti-competitive
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    Perry

    Perry

    Perry is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented pears. Perry has been common for centuries in Britain, particularly in the Three Counties of Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire, and in parts of south Wales; and France, especially Normandy and Anjou. In more recent years, commercial perry has also been referred to as "pear cider", though some organisations (such as CAMRA) do not accept this as a name for the traditional drink. As with apples specifically grown to make cider, special pear cultivars are used: in the UK the most commonly used variety of perry pear is the Blakeney Red. They produce fruit that is not of eating quality, but that produces superior perry. Perry pears are thought to be descended from wild hybrids, known as wildings, between the cultivated pear Pyrus communis subsp. communis, brought to northern Europe by the Romans, and the now-rare wild pear Pyrus communis subsp. pyraster. Perry pears are higher in tannin and acid than eating or cooking pears, and are generally smaller. The majority of perry pear varieties in the UK originate from the counties of Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire in the west of England. Of these, most
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    Scotch whisky

    Scotch whisky

    Scotch whisky (often referred to simply as "Scotch") is malt whisky or grain whisky made in Scotland. All Scotch whisky was originally made from malt barley. Commercial distilleries began introducing whisky made from wheat and rye in the late eighteenth century. Scotch whisky is divided into five distinct categories: single malt Scotch whisky, single grain Scotch whisky, blended malt Scotch whisky (formerly called "vatted malt" or "pure malt"), blended grain Scotch whisky, and blended Scotch whisky. All Scotch whisky must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years. Any age statement on a bottle of Scotch whisky, expressed in numerical form, must reflect the age of the youngest whisky used to produce that product. A whisky with an age statement is known as guaranteed-age whisky. The first written mention of Scotch whisky is in the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, 1495. A friar named John Cor was the distiller at Lindores Abbey in the Kingdom of Fife. As of 23 November 2009, the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009 (SWR) define and regulate the production, labelling, packaging, and advertising of Scotch whisky. They replace previous regulations that focused solely on production. The SWR
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    Sidecar cocktail

    Sidecar cocktail

    The Sidecar is a classic cocktail traditionally made with cognac, orange liqueur (Cointreau, Grand Marnier or another triple sec), and lemon juice. In its ingredients, the drink is perhaps most closely related to the older Brandy Daisy, which differs both in presentation and in proportions of its components. The exact origin of the Sidecar is unclear, but it is thought to have been invented around the end of World War I in either London or Paris. The Ritz Hotel in Paris claims origin of the drink. The first recipes for the Sidecar appear in 1922, in Harry MacElhone's Harry's ABC of Mixing Cocktails and Robert Vermeire's Cocktails and How to Mix Them. It is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948). In early editions of MacElhone's book, he cites the inventor as Pat MacGarry, "the Popular bar-tender at Buck's Club, London", but in later editions he cites himself. Vermiere states, "This cocktail is very popular in France. It was first introduced in London by MacGarry, the celebrated bar-tender of Buck's Club." Embury credits the invention of the drink to an American Army captain in Paris during World War I "and named after the motorcycle
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    Slippery nipple

    Slippery nipple

    The Slippery Nipple is a layered cocktail shooter most commonly composed of Baileys Irish Cream and Sambuca. When prepared properly, the ingredients remain in two distinct visible layers. The layering is due to the relative densities of the ingredients. The Baileys takes the edge off the aniseed-flavored Sambuca. It is unclear who concocted the slippery nipple or named it. The evidence suggests that it originated in the 1980s during a period of renewed popularity of cocktails and mixed drinks. This fad was criticized by New York Times writer William Grimes as "a kind of cult, rallying points for young drinkers in search of fun and not too picky about taste". The drink's name is similar to trend of other drinks invented in 20th century, such as "Sex on the Beach", which were intentionally shocking or humorous. The most common version of the drink consists of Pour the Sambuca into a conical shot glass, then carefully and slowly pour the Baileys down the side of the glass so that the two liquids do not mix and the Baileys floats atop the Sambuca. It takes a knack to do this. The Baileys can also be poured over an upside-down spoon to get it to float. Some recipes call for placing a
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    Strega

    Strega

    Strega (or Liquore Strega), is an Italian herbal liqueur produced since 1860 by the S. A. Distilleria Liquore Strega in Benevento, Campania, Italy. Its yellow color comes from the presence of saffron in its recipe. Liquore Strega is 80 proof (40%) and among its approximately 70 herbal ingredients are mint and fennel. Strega is considered a digestif, meant for drinking after meals. Strega has a similar appearance to Galliano (though less vibrantly yellow). It is slightly sweet, semi-viscous, and has a bold, complex flavor with strong minty or coniferous notes. Strega is used for flavoring torta caprese, a type of cake. Strega is the Italian word for "witch" and since legends of witchcraft at Benevento date back to the time of the Lombard invasion, it was a natural choice of name for the liqueur. The liqueur is sometimes called "the witch" in the English-speaking world. The Premio Strega (Strega Prize), the most prestigious literary award in Italy today, was founded in 1947 by Guido Alberti, then owner of the company, together with his friends the writer Maria Bellonci and her husband Goffredo. The San Francisco World Spirits Competition—one of several international spirit ratings
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    Tom Collins

    Tom Collins

    The Tom Collins is a Collins cocktail made from gin, lemon juice, sugar and carbonated water. First memorialized in writing in 1876 by "the father of American mixology" Jerry Thomas, this "gin and sparkling lemonade" drink typically is served in a Collins glass over ice. In 1874, people in New York, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere in the United States would start a conversation with "Have you seen Tom Collins?" After the listener predictably reacts by explaining that they did not know a Tom Collins, the speaker would assert that Tom Collins was talking about the listener to others and that Tom Collins was "just around the corner", "in a [local] bar," or somewhere else near. The conversation about the nonexistent Tom Collins was a proven hoax of exposure. In The Great Tom Collins hoax of 1874, as it became known, the speaker would encourage the listener to act foolishly by reacting to patent nonsense that the hoaxer deliberately presents as reality. In particular, the speaker desired the listener to become agitated at the idea of someone talking about them to others such that the listener would rush off to find the purportedly nearby Tom Collins. Similar to The New York Zoo hoax of
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    Tuaca

    Tuaca

    Tuaca (Italian pronunciation: [tuˈaːka]) is a brand of liqueur originally produced by the Tuoni and Canepa families of Livorno, Italy, and now produced by the Tuaca Liqueur Company of Louisville, Kentucky. March 31, 2010, marked the closure of Livorno’s historic Tuaca plant. The liqueur is sweet and golden brown in color. Its ingredients include brandy, essence of orange, and vanilla. Vanilla is the dominant flavor. It is bottled at 70 proof (35% ABV). The recipe supposedly dates back to the Renaissance. A legend claims that it was created for Lorenzo the Magnificent. Tuaca has been sold in the United States since the 1950s and can be bought in most liquor stores there. Tuaca is most often served as a chilled shot. It may also be mixed with ginger ale, cola, or hot apple cider. Tuaca Lemon Drop (1.5 oz Tuaca, .5 oz Triple Sec, 1 oz. sour mix, squeezed lemon wedge). Mix all ingredients in a shaker filled with ice. Shake and strain into a sugar-rimmed glass. Tuaca Pineapple (1.5 oz Tuaca, pineapple juice). Pour Tuaca into a highball glass over ice. Fill with pineapple juice. Tuscan Mule. A variation of the Moscow Mule. Substitute Tuaca for the vodka. Renaissance Margarita. Made with
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    Whisky

    Whisky

    Whisky or whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Different grains are used for different varieties, including barley, malted barley, rye, malted rye, wheat, and corn. Whisky is typically aged in wooden casks, made generally of charred white oak. Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many classes and types. The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels. The word whisky (or whiskey) is an anglicisation of the Gaelic word uisce|uisge meaning water. Distilled alcohol was known in Latin as aqua vitae = "water of life". This was translated to Gaelic as Irish: uisce beatha and Scottish Gaelic: uisge beatha = "lively water" or "water of life". Early forms of the word in English included uskebeaghe (1581), usquebaugh (1610), usquebath (1621), usquebae (1715). It is possible that distillation was practised by the Babylonians in Mesopotamia in the 2nd millennium BC, with perfumes and aromatics being distilled but this is subject to uncertain and disputable interpretation of evidence. The earliest certain chemical distillations were by
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