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  • Nov 27th 2012
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  • 408 votes
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Best Beer style of All Time

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Best Beer style of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Beer style of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Beer style of All Time has gotten 569 views and has gathered 408 votes from 408 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

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    1
    8.25
    8 votes
    2
    9.40
    5 votes
    3
    8.20
    5 votes
    4
    Lite American Lager

    Lite American Lager

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Lager
    • Representative Beers: Miller Lite

    Aroma: Little to no malt aroma, although it can be grainy, sweet or corn-like if present. Hop aroma may range from none to a light, spicy or floral hop presence. Low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness) are optional but acceptable. No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Very pale straw to pale yellow color. White, frothy head seldom persists. Very clear.

    Flavor: Crisp and dry flavor with some low levels of sweetness. Hop flavor ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low level. Balance may vary from slightly malty to slightly bitter, but is relatively close to even. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry "sting." No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

    Mouthfeel: Very light body from use of a high percentage of adjuncts such as rice or corn. Very highly carbonated with slight carbonic bite on the tongue. May seem watery.

    Overall Impression: Very refreshing and thirst quenching.

    Comments: A lower gravity and lower calorie beer than standard international lagers. Strong flavors are a fault. Designed to appeal to the broadest range of the general public as possible.

    Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley with high percentage (up to 40%) of rice or corn as adjuncts. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.030 – 1.040 IBUs: 8 – 12 FG: 0.998 – 1.008 SRM: 2 – 3 ABV: 3.2 – 4.2%

    Commercial Examples: Miller Lite, Bud Light, Coors Light, Amstel Light

    8.00
    5 votes
    5

    Vienna lager

    • BJCP Style Category: European Amber Lager
    Vienna lager is a style of lager beer. It was developed by brewer Anton Dreher in Vienna in 1841. Austrian brewers who emigrated to Mexico in the late 19th century took the style with them. Vienna lager is a reddish brown or copper colored beer with medium body and slight malt sweetness. The malt aroma and flavor may have a toasted character. Hop bitterness should be clean and crisp. Noble-type hop aroma and flavor should be low or mild.
    8.00
    5 votes
    6
    Altbier

    Altbier

    Altbier is a German top-fermenting beer brewed in Düsseldorf and other parts of North Rhine-Westphalia. The name Altbier, which means old beer, refers to the pre-lager brewing method of using a warm top-fermenting yeast. Over time the Alt yeast adjusted to lower temperatures, and the Alt brewers would store or lager the beer after fermentation, leading to a cleaner, crisper beer than is the norm for some other top-fermented beers such as British pale ale. The Bavarian Reinheitsgebot (beer purity law) of 1516 did not affect brewers of the Rhineland. As such, the brewing traditions in this region developed slightly differently. For example, brewing during the summer was illegal in Bavaria, but the cooler climate of the Rhineland allowed Alt brewers to brew all year long and to experiment with storing fermented beer in cool caves and cellars. The first brewery to use the name Alt was Schumacher which opened in 1838. Alt is a dark, lagered, top-fermented beer that has some of the lean dryness of a lager but with fruity notes. Well known German Altbier that does not come from Düsseldorf is produced by the Pinkus Müller brewery in Münster, the Diebels brewery in Issum, the Gleumes
    7.60
    5 votes
    7
    7.60
    5 votes
    8
    6.50
    6 votes
    9
    Bock

    Bock

    • Representative Beers: Creemore Springs
    Bock is a strong lager of German origin. Several substyles exist, including maibock or helles bock, a paler, more hopped version generally made for consumption at spring festivals; doppelbock, a stronger and maltier version; and eisbock, a much stronger version made by partially freezing the beer and removing the water ice that forms. Originally a dark beer, a modern bock can range from light copper to brown in colour. The style is very popular, with many examples brewed internationally. The style known now as bock was a dark, malty, lightly hopped ale first brewed in the 14th century by German brewers in the Hanseatic town of Einbeck. The style from Einbeck was later adopted by Munich brewers in the 17th century and adapted to the new lager style of brewing. Due to their Bavarian accent, citizens of Munich pronounced "Einbeck" as "ein Bock" ("a billy goat"), and thus the beer became known as "bock". To this day, as a visual pun, a goat often appears on bock labels. Bock is historically associated with special occasions, often religious festivals such as Christmas, Easter or Lent. Bocks have a long history of being brewed and consumed by Bavarian monks as a source of nutrition
    8.75
    4 votes
    10
    Saison

    Saison

    • BJCP Style Category: Belgian and French Ale
    • Representative Beers: Saison Dupont Vieille Provision
    Saison (French, "season") is the name originally given to low-alcohol pale ales brewed seasonally in farmhouses in Wallonia, the French-speaking region of Belgium, for farm workers during harvest season. Modern-day saisons are also brewed in other countries, particularly the USA, and are generally bottle conditioned, with an average range of 5 to 8% abv, though saisons at the more traditional 3.5% strength can still be found. Although saison has been described as an endangered style, there has been a rise in interest in this style in recent years, with Saison Dupont being named “the Best Beer in the World” by the magazine Men’s Journal in July 2005. Historically, saisons did not share identifiable characteristics to pin them down as a style, but rather were a group of refreshing summer ales. Each farm brewer would make his own distinctive version. Modern saisons brewed in the USA tend to copy the yeast used by Brasserie Dupont, which ferments better at warmer temperatures—29 to 35 °C (84 to 95 °F)—than the standard 18 to 24 °C (64 to 75 °F) fermenting temperature used by other Belgian saison brewers. "Saison" is French for season, because these ales were traditionally brewed in the
    8.50
    4 votes
    11
    7.20
    5 votes
    12
    Lager

    Lager

    • Representative Beers: Steinlager
    Lager (German: storage) is a type of beer that is fermented and conditioned at low temperatures. Pale lager is the most widely-consumed and commercially available style of beer in the world. Bock, Pilsner, Dortmunder Export and Märzen are all styles of lager. There are also dark lagers, such as Dunkel and Schwarzbier. The term Lager is a cognate of ligrs, Gothic for "place of lying (down)". While cold storage of beer, "lagering", in caves for example, was a common practice throughout the medieval period, bottom-fermenting yeast seems to have emerged as a hybridization in the early fifteenth century. However, in 2011 an international team of researchers writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences claimed to have discovered that Saccharomyces eubayanus, a yeast native to Patagonia, is responsible for creating the hybrid yeast used to make lager. Based on the numbers of breweries, lager brewing displaced ale brewing in Bohemia in the period from 1860 to 1870, as shown in the following table: The average lager in worldwide production is a pale lager in the Dortmunder or Pilsner styles. The flavor of these lighter lagers is usually mild, and the producers often
    6.17
    6 votes
    13

    Dortmunder Export

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Lager

    Aroma: Low to medium noble (German or Czech) hop aroma. Moderate malt aroma; can be grainy to somewhat sweet. May have an initial sulfury aroma (from water and/or yeast) and a low background note of DMS (from pils malt). No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Light gold to deep gold, clear with a persistent white head.

    Flavor: Neither malt nor hops dominate, but both are in good balance with a touch of sweetness, providing a smooth yet crisply refreshing beer. Balance continues through the finish and the hop bitterness lingers in aftertaste (although some examples may finish slightly sweet). Clean, no fruity esters, no diacetyl. Some mineral character might be noted from the water.

    Mouthfeel: Medium body, medium carbonation.

    Overall Impression: Balance is the hallmark of this style. It has the malt profile of a Helles, the hop character of a Pils, and is slightly stronger than both. Hard, minerally water can often be tasted.

    History: A style indigenous to the Dortmund industrial region, Dortmunder has been on the decline in Germany in recent years.

    Comments: Brewed to a slightly higher starting gravity than other light lagers, providing a firm malty body and underlying maltiness to complement the sulfate-accentuated hop bitterness. The term “Export” is a beer strength category under German beer tax law, and is not strictly synonymous with the “Dortmunder” style. Beer from other cities or regions can be brewed to Export strength, and labeled as such.

    Ingredients: Minerally water with high levels of sulfates, carbonates and chlorides, German or Czech noble hops, Pilsner malt, German lager yeast. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.048 – 1.056 IBUs: 23 – 30 FG: 1.010 – 1.015

    SRM: 4 – 6 ABV: 4.8 – 6.0%

    Commercial Examples: DAB Export, Dortmunder Union Export, Dortmunder Kronen, Ayinger Jahrhundert, Great Lakes Dortmunder Gold, Saratoga Lager, Dominion Lager, Gordon Biersch Golden Export


    8.25
    4 votes
    14

    Oud bruin

    Oud Bruin, also known as Flanders Brown, is a style of beer originating from the Flemish region of Belgium. The Dutch name literally translates as "old brown", referring to the long aging process which can take up to a year. It undergoes a secondary fermentation, which takes several weeks to a month, and is followed by bottle aging for several more months. The extended aging allows residual yeast and bacteria to develop a sour flavor characteristic for this style. While some examples of an Oud Bruin may be aged in oak, typical beers in this style are not, and this is what helps Flanders Brown ales distinguish themselves from the more sour Flanders Red ales. This style of beer is medium bodied, reddish-brown, and has a gentle malty flavor and no hop bitterness. The aroma is a complex mixture of fruits and estery smells of plum, raisin and cherry. The flavor is sweet, caramel, fruity, tart, and slightly acidic, caused by various bacteria in the maturation process. In a good example, the tartness is often balanced with a malty character, tasting of toffee and a giving a "sweet-and-sour" impression. Commercial versions may mix aged beer with younger, sweeter beer to temper the acidity
    8.25
    4 votes
    15
    8.25
    4 votes
    16
    Wheat beer

    Wheat beer

    • Representative Beers: Hacker-Pschorr Weisse
    Wheat beer is a beer that is brewed with a large proportion of wheat in addition to malted barley. Wheat beers are usually top-fermented (as required by law in Germany). The main varieties are weissbier (includes hefeweizen), witbier, and the sour varieties, such as lambic, Berliner Weisse and gose. Two common varieties of wheat beer are witbier (Dutch – "white beer") based on the Belgian tradition of using flavourings such as coriander and orange peel which was revived by Pierre Celis at the Hoegaarden Brewery, and the Celis Brewery in Austin Texas and weissbier (German – "white beer") based on the German tradition of mixing at least 50% wheat to barley malt to make a light coloured top-fermenting beer. Both the Belgian witbier and the German weissbier were termed "white beers" because "wheat" has the same etymological root as "white". Belgian white beers are often made with raw unmalted wheat, as opposed to the malted wheat used in other varieties. German wheat beers are called "Weizen" (wheat) in the western (Baden-Württemberg) and northern regions, and "Weißbier" or "Weiße" (white beer or white) in Bavaria. Hefeweizen (the prefix "Hefe" is German for yeast) is the name for
    7.00
    5 votes
    17
    6.80
    5 votes
    18
    6.80
    5 votes
    19

    Standard/Ordinary Bitter

    • BJCP Style Category: English Pale Ale

    Aroma: The best examples have some malt aroma, often (but not always) with a caramel quality. Mild to moderate fruitiness is common. Hop aroma can range from moderate to none (UK varieties typically, although US varieties may be used). Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

    Appearance: Light yellow to light copper. Good to brilliant clarity. Low to moderate white to off-white head. May have very little head due to low carbonation.

    Flavor: Medium to high bitterness. Most have moderately low to moderately high fruity esters. Moderate to low hop flavor (earthy, resiny, and/or floral UK varieties typically, although US varieties may be used). Low to medium maltiness with a dry finish. Caramel flavors are common but not required. Balance is often decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the malt flavor, esters and hop flavor. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

    Mouthfeel: Light to medium-light body. Carbonation low, although bottled and canned examples can have moderate carbonation.

    Overall Impression: Low gravity, low alcohol levels and low carbonation make this an easy-drinking beer. Some examples can be more malt balanced, but this should not override the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of the style; emphasis is still on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the aggressive middle and late hopping seen in American ales.

    History: Originally a draught ale served very fresh under no pressure (gravity or hand pump only) at cellar temperatures (i.e. “real ale”). Bitter was created as a draught alternative (i.e. running beer) to country-brewed pale ale around the start of the 20th century and became widespread once brewers understood how to “Burtonize” their water to successfully brew pale beers and to use crystal malts to add a fullness and roundness of palate.

    Comments: The lightest of the bitters. Also known as just “bitter.” Some modern variants are brewed exclusively with pale malt and are known as golden or summer bitters. Most bottled or kegged versions of UK-produced bitters are higher-alcohol versions of their cask (draught) products produced specifically for export. The IBU levels are often not adjusted, so the versions available in the US often do not directly correspond to their style subcategories in Britain. This style guideline reflects the “real ale” version of the style, not the export formulations of commercial products.

    Ingredients: Pale ale, amber, and/or crystal malts, may use a touch of black malt for color adjustment. May use sugar adjuncts, corn or wheat. English hops most typical, although American and European varieties are becoming more common (particularly in the paler examples). Characterful English yeast. Often medium sulfate water is used. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.032 – 1.040 IBUs: 25 – 35 FG: 1.007 – 1.011 SRM: 4 – 14 ABV: 3.2 – 3.8%

    Commercial Examples: Boddington's Pub Draught, Fuller's Chiswick Bitter, Oakham Jeffrey Hudson Bitter (JHB), Young's Bitter, Brakspear Bitter, Adnams Bitter

    6.80
    5 votes
    20
    6.40
    5 votes
    21

    Munich Helles

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Lager

    Aroma: Grain and sweet, clean malt aromas predominate. May also have a very light noble hop aroma, and a low background note of DMS (from pils malt). No esters or diacetyl.

    Appearance: Medium yellow to pale gold, clear, with a creamy white head.

    Flavor: Slightly sweet, malty profile. Grain and malt flavors predominate, with a low to medium-low hop bitterness that partially offsets the malty palate. Very slight hop flavor acceptable. Finish and aftertaste remain malty. Clean, no fruity esters, no diacetyl.

    Mouthfeel: Medium body, medium carbonation, smooth maltiness with no trace of astringency.

    Overall Impression: Malty but fully attenuated.

    History: Created in Munich in 1895 at the Spaten brewery by Gabriel Sedlmayr to compete with Pilsner-style beers.

    Comments: Unlike Pilsner but like its cousin, Munich Dunkel, Helles is a malt-accentuated beer that is not overly sweet, but rather focuses on malt flavor with underlying hop bitterness in a supporting role.

    Ingredients: Moderate carbonate water, Pilsner malt, German noble hop varieties. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.045 – 1.051

    IBUs: 16 – 22 FG: 1.008 – 1.012

    SRM: 3 – 5 ABV: 4.7 – 5.4%

    Commercial Examples: Hacker-Pschorr Münchner Helles, Paulaner Premium Lager, Spaten Premium Lager, Andechser Hell, Augustiner Lagerbier Hell, Weihenstephaner Original, Stoudt’s Gold Lager

    7.50
    4 votes
    22
    8.67
    3 votes
    23

    Primo Schincariol

    Schincariol is the third largest Brazilian brewery and beverage company, after AmBev and Grupo Petrópolis. The company was founded in 1939 and since 2011 is a subsidiary of Japanese beverage company Kirin Brewery Company and have many competitors such as AmBev, FEMSA, Grupo Petrópolis, Heineken and others. There are 13 Schincariol factories/breweries around Brazil and 10 distribution centers, with the company headquarters situated at the city of Itu, São Paulo state. The company produces about 3.0 billion liters of beer a year, and exports its products to the Mercosul, Europe, United States, Asia and Oceania. By 2011, it had 10.4% of the beer market share in Brazil. The brewery uses the brand names Nova Schin, Glacial, Nobel, Devassa, Baden-Baden. The cerveja (beer, in Portuguese) Nova Schin Pilsen is Schincariol's main product in the hot Brazilian beer market. Nova Schin has 14% of the Brazilian beer market. They also make Nobel, a premium beer made with hops from Hallertau, Germany, and Glacial, a lighter and cheaper beer. The brand Nobel was acquired by Schincariol in 2007. Nova Schin Malzbier (a black and sweeter beer), Nova Schin Munich (a light darker beer), the
    6.20
    5 votes
    24
    Helles

    Helles

    • Representative Beers: Big Helga
    Helles is a pale lager brewed in Munich. The word Helles is short for Hellbier or Helles Bier (meaning pale beer), in order to distinguish it from Dunkel or Dunkles Bier (dark beer), which is another type of beer typical for the region, being darker in colour and sweeter than Helles.
    7.25
    4 votes
    25

    Fruit Cider

    • BJCP Style Category: Specialty Cider and Perry
    • Representative Beers: Bellwether Cherry Street
    6.00
    5 votes
    26
    Malt liquor

    Malt liquor

    • Representative Beers: Colt 45
    Malt liquor is a North American term referring to a type of beer with high alcohol content. In legal statutes, the term often includes any alcoholic beverage not lower than 5% alcohol by volume made with malted barley. In common parlance, however, it is used for high-alcohol beers (6–7% and more) or beer-derived mixes made with ingredients and processes resembling those in American-style lager. However, this label is subject to the viewpoint of the brewer, and there are examples of brews containing high-quality, expensive ingredients that brewers have chosen to label as "malt liquors." In parts of Canada, the term "malt liquor" (French: liqueur de malt) is used to refer to any malt beverages in general. Malt liquor is a strong lager or ale in which sugar, corn or other adjuncts are added to the malted barley to boost the total amount of fermentable sugars in the wort, and thus the final alcoholic strength produced. These beers tend to be mildly hopped, that is, they are not very bitter. Malt liquor is typically straw to pale amber in color. While typical beer is both made primarily from barley, water, and hops, malt liquors tend to make much greater use of inexpensive adjuncts such
    6.00
    5 votes
    27
    8.33
    3 votes
    28
    7.00
    4 votes
    29
    7.00
    4 votes
    30
    Pale lager

    Pale lager

    • Representative Beers: Budweiser
    Pale lager is a very pale to golden-coloured beer with a well attenuated body and a varying degree of noble hop bitterness. The brewing process for this beer developed in the mid 19th century when Gabriel Sedlmayr took pale ale brewing techniques back to the Spaten Brewery in Germany and applied it to existing lagering methods. This approach was picked up by other brewers, most notably Josef Groll of Bavaria who produced Pilsner Urquell in the city of Pilsen, now in the Czech Republic. The resulting pale coloured, lean and stable beers were very successful and gradually spread around the globe to become the most common form of beer consumed in the world today. Bavarian brewers in the sixteenth century were required by law to brew beer only during the cooler months of the year. In order to have beer available during the hot summer months, beers would be stored in caves and stone cellars, often under blocks of ice. In the period 1820-1830, a brewer named Gabriel Sedlmayr II the Younger, whose family was running the Spaten Brewery in Bavaria went around Europe to improve his brewing skills. When he returned, he used what he had learned to get a more stable and consistent lager beer.
    9.50
    2 votes
    31
    8.00
    3 votes
    32

    Framboise

    Framboise (French pronunciation: [fʁɑ̃bwaz]) is the French word for raspberry, and is often used to refer to alcohol distilled with the fruit. Primarily framboise is used in reference to a Belgian lambic beer that is fermented using raspberries, and in Dutch is referred to as Frambozenbier. It is one of many modern fruitbeer types that have been inspired by the more traditional kriek beer, made using sour cherries. Framboise is usually served in a small glass that resembles a champagne glass, only shorter (could also be a goblet). Most framboise beers are quite sweet, though the Cantillon brewery produces a tart version called Rosé de Gambrinus that is based on the traditional kriek style. The Liefmans brewery uses Oud bruin beer instead of lambic to make its high quality framboise beer, resulting in a very different taste. Recently, Framboise has become popular outside of Belgium, and can now be found in pubs and supermarkets all over the world. Framboise is also commonly used to refer to eau de vie distilled with raspberries.
    8.00
    3 votes
    33

    Malzbier

    Malzbier is a form of sweet, low-alcohol (0 - 1%) beer that is brewed like normal beer but without fermentation by adding the yeast at or about 0 °C. CO2 and sugar is added later. It's a common beverage in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. It is often used as a vitamin and energy drink or a nutritional supplement. The closest American drink with some similarity of appearance is root beer, however root beer tends to have a strong sassafras, vanilla, and spice flavor, and no vitamin content, which is quite different from the grainy, sweet malt flavors, vitamin content, and bitter hops flavors in Malzbier. Malted milk or chocolate malted milks like Ovaltine have been a more common American use of malt in a nutrient rich drink.
    8.00
    3 votes
    34
    8.00
    3 votes
    35

    Winter Warmer

    • Representative Beers: Lost Coast Brewery Winterbraun
    Winter warmer is a traditional malty-sweet English Strong Ale that is brewed in the winter months. It is usually quite dark, but not as dark as a stout, with a big malt presence. Sometimes, winter warmer has a few spices, especially in the United States, and the average alcohol content by volume ranges from 6.0% to 8.0%.
    8.00
    3 votes
    36
    6.75
    4 votes
    37
    6.50
    4 votes
    38

    Summer ale

    • Representative Beers: Hydes Golden Brown
    Summer ale is a category of extremely pale, golden-blonde ale, generally designed to be served cooler than "normal" ale. It is usually accepted that the style was invented in 1989 by John Gilbert, a former brewer at Watney in Mortlake, London, who had opened his own operation, the Hop Back Brewery, in Salisbury, England. His aim was to develop an ale that could be as refreshing as lager, which was quickly gaining popularity at that time. The result was a drier and hoppier pale ale he called "Summer Lightning", after a novel by PG Wodehouse; it won several awards and inspired numerous imitators. A Summer ale may contain spices such as lemon peel or coriander, but only lightly and not to the extent of a spiced beer. British examples of the style are often made with American hops, which give a pronounced citrus flavour and aroma.
    6.50
    4 votes
    39
    6.50
    4 votes
    40

    American Brown Ale

    • BJCP Style Category: American Ale
    • Representative Beers: Brooklyn Brown Ale

    Aroma: Malty, sweet and rich, which often has a chocolate, caramel, nutty and/or toasty quality. Hop aroma is typically low to moderate. Some interpretations of the style may feature a stronger hop aroma, a citrusy American hop character, and/or a fresh dry-hopped aroma (all are optional). Fruity esters are moderate to very low. The dark malt character is more robust than other brown ales, yet stops short of being overly porter-like. The malt and hops are generally balanced. Moderately low to no diacetyl.

    Appearance: Light to very dark brown color. Clear. Low to moderate off-white to light tan head.

    Flavor: Medium to high malty flavor (often with caramel, toasty and/or chocolate flavors), with medium to medium-high bitterness. The medium to medium-dry finish provides an aftertaste having both malt and hops. Hop flavor can be light to moderate, and may optionally have a citrusy character. Very low to moderate fruity esters. Moderately low to no diacetyl.

    Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. More bitter versions may have a dry, resiny impression. Moderate to moderately high carbonation. Stronger versions may have some alcohol warmth in the finish.

    Overall Impression: Can be considered a bigger, maltier, hoppier interpretation of Northern English brown ale or a hoppier, less malty Brown Porter, often including the citrus-accented hop presence that is characteristic of American hop varieties.

    History/Comments: A strongly flavored, hoppy brown beer, originated by American home brewers. Related to American Pale and American Amber Ales, although with more of a caramel and chocolate character, which tends to balance the hop bitterness and finish. Most commercial American Browns are not as aggressive as the original homebrewed versions, and some modern craft brewed examples. IPA-strength brown ales should be entered in the Specialty category.

    Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt, either American or Continental, plus crystal and darker malts should complete the malt bill. American hops are typical, but UK or noble hops can also be used. Moderate carbonate water would appropriately balance the dark malt acidity. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.045 – 1.060 IBUs: 20 – 40+ FG: 1.010 – 1.016 SRM: 18 – 35 ABV: 4.3 – 6.2%

    Commercial Examples: Brooklyn Brown Ale, Great Lakes Cleveland Brown Ale, Avery Ellie’s Brown Ale, Left Hand Deep Cover Brown Ale, Bell’s Best Brown, North Coast Acme Brown, Lost Coast Downtown Brown, Big Sky Moose Drool Brown Ale

    7.67
    3 votes
    41
    9.00
    2 votes
    42
    9.00
    2 votes
    43

    American pilsner

    • Representative Beers: Budweiser
    The American pilsner or "classic American pilsner" is the direct ancestor of the American lager but is a distinct style. This style was developed in the 19th century by German immigrants in response to the barley that was available to them in the United States. American six-row barley had a higher tannic acid and protein content and had greater husk per weight than the continental Europe barleys. In addition, the Tettnanger and Saaz hops of Europe were not available. Therefore, the grain mixture was adjusted by adding up to 30% corn to the barley malt mash. However, the beer was brewed to full-fledged European strength and to the practices of a pale lager style. The result was a full-bodied and slightly sweet beverage that can be immediately distinguished from its less flavorful descendant. The style was commercially destroyed by Prohibition, and when beer production resumed in the USA, it was a lighter, thirst-quenching style with up to 50% corn or rice content that came to dominate the market. Currently, there are no large-scale commercial representatives of this style in the United States, although there are several Canadian brands such as Pilsner and Labbatt mass producing
    6.25
    4 votes
    44

    Special/Best/Premium Bitter

    • BJCP Style Category: English Pale Ale
    • Representative Beers: Brains SA Best Bitter

    Aroma: The best examples have some malt aroma, often (but not always) with a caramel quality. Mild to moderate fruitiness. Hop aroma can range from moderate to none (UK varieties typically, although US varieties may be used). Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

    Appearance: Medium gold to medium copper. Good to brilliant clarity. Low to moderate white to off-white head. May have very little head due to low carbonation.

    Flavor: Medium to high bitterness. Most have moderately low to moderately high fruity esters. Moderate to low hop flavor (earthy, resiny, and/or floral UK varieties typically, although US varieties may be used). Low to medium maltiness with a dry finish. Caramel flavors are common but not required. Balance is often decidedly bitter, although the bitterness should not completely overpower the malt flavor, esters and hop flavor. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

    Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Carbonation low, although bottled and canned commercial examples can have moderate carbonation.

    Overall Impression: A flavorful, yet refreshing, session beer. Some examples can be more malt balanced, but this should not override the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of the style; emphasis is still on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the aggressive middle and late hopping seen in American ales.

    History: Originally a draught ale served very fresh under no pressure (gravity or hand pump only) at cellar temperatures (i.e. “real ale”). Bitter was created as a draught alternative (i.e. running beer) to country-brewed pale ale around the start of the 20th century and became widespread once brewers understood how to “Burtonize” their water to successfully brew pale beers and to use crystal malts to add a fullness and roundness of palate.

    Comments: More evident malt flavor than in an ordinary bitter, this is a stronger, session-strength ale. Some modern variants are brewed exclusively with pale malt and are known as golden or summer bitters. Most bottled or kegged versions of UK-produced bitters are higher-alcohol versions of their cask (draught) products produced specifically for export. The IBU levels are often not adjusted, so the versions available in the US often do not directly correspond to their style subcategories in Britain. This style guideline reflects the “real ale” version of the style, not the export formulations of commercial products.

    Ingredients: Pale ale, amber, and/or crystal malts, may use a touch of black malt for color adjustment. May use sugar adjuncts, corn or wheat. English hops most typical, although American and European varieties are becoming more common (particularly in the paler examples). Characterful English yeast. Often medium sulfate water is used. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.040 – 1.048 IBUs: 25 – 40 FG: 1.008 – 1.012 SRM: 5 – 16 ABV: 3.8 – 4.6%

    Commercial Examples: Fuller's London Pride, Coniston Bluebird Bitter, Timothy Taylor Landlord, Robinson’s Northern Glory, Shepherd Neame Masterbrew Bitter, Greene King Ruddles County Bitter, RCH Pitchfork Rebellious Bitter, Brains SA, Harviestoun Bitter and Twisted, Goose Island Honkers Ale, Rogue Younger’s Special Bitter

    6.25
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    45
    7.33
    3 votes
    46
    Stout

    Stout

    • Representative Beers: Guinness
    Stout is a dark beer made using roasted malt or roasted barley, hops, water and yeast. Stouts were traditionally the generic term for the strongest or stoutest porters, typically 7% or 8% produced by a brewery. There are a number of variations including Baltic porter, dry stout and imperial stout. The name porter was first used in 1721 to describe a dark brown beer popular with street and river porters of London that had been made with roasted malts. This same beer later also became known as stout though the word stout had been used as early as 1677. The history and development of stout and porter are intertwined. Porter originated in London in the early 1720s. The style quickly became popular in the city: it had a strong flavour, took longer to spoil than other beers, increased in alcohol content with age, was significantly cheaper than other beers, and was not easily affected by heat. Within a few decades, porter breweries in London had grown "beyond any previously known scale". Large volumes were exported to Ireland, where it was later (1776) brewed also. In the 19th century, the beer gained its customary black colour through the use of black patent malt, and became stronger in
    7.33
    3 votes
    47
    10.00
    1 votes
    48
    Bitter

    Bitter

    • Representative Beers: Wadsworth 6x
    Bitter is an English term for pale ale. Bitters vary in colour from gold to dark amber and in strength from 3% to 7% alcohol by volume. Pale ale was a term used for beers made from malt dried with coke. Coke had been first used for roasting malt in 1642, and in around 1703 the term pale ale was first used. By 1784, advertisements were appearing in the Calcutta Gazette for "light and excellent" pale ale. By 1830, the expressions bitter and pale ale were synonymous in England where breweries would tend to designate beers as pale ale, though customers in the pub would commonly refer to the same beers as bitter. It is thought that customers used the term bitter to differentiate these pale ales from other less noticeably hopped beers such as porter and mild. By the mid to late 20th century, while brewers were still labelling bottled beers as pale ale, they had begun identifying cask beers as bitter, except those from Burton on Trent, which tend to be referred to as pale ales regardless of the method of dispatch. Bitter belongs to the pale ale style and can have a great variety of strength, flavour and appearance from dark amber to a golden summer ale. It can go under 3% abv - known as
    10.00
    1 votes
    49
    5.20
    5 votes
    50
    8.50
    2 votes
    51
    8.50
    2 votes
    52
    Bière de Garde

    Bière de Garde

    • BJCP Style Category: Belgian and French Ale
    Bière de Garde ("beer for keeping") is a strong pale ale or keeping beer traditionally brewed in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France. These beers were originally brewed in farmhouses during the winter and spring, to avoid unpredictable problems with the yeast during the summertime. Farmhouse production is now supplemented by commercial production, although most Bière de Garde brewers are small businesses. Typically, beers of this tradition are of a copper colour or golden colour, and as the name suggests the origins of this style lies in the tradition that it was matured/cellared for a period of time once bottled (and most sealed with a cork), to be consumed later in the year, akin to a Belgian Saison. Most varieties are top-fermented and unfiltered, although bottom-fermented and/or filtered versions exist. Particularly authentic products, using only regional ingredients, are entitled to use the Appellation d'origine contrôlée, "Pas de Calais/Region du Nord. Some of the better known brands include Brasserie de Saint-Sylvestre, Trois Monts (8.5%abv), Brasseurs Duyck, Jenlain (7.5%abv), Brasserie Castelain, Ch'Ti and Brasserie La Choulette, Ambrée (7.5%abv).
    8.50
    2 votes
    53
    8.50
    2 votes
    54
    8.50
    2 votes
    55
    Pale ale

    Pale ale

    • Representative Beers: Henry Weinhard's Blue Boar
    Pale ale is a beer which uses a warm fermentation and predominantly pale malt. It is one of the world's major beer styles. The higher proportion of pale malts results in a lighter colour. The term "pale ale" was being applied around 1703 for beers made from malts dried with coke, which resulted in a lighter colour than other beers popular at that time. Different brewing practices and hop levels have resulted in a range of taste and strength within the pale ale family. Pale ale was a term used for beers made from malt dried with coke. Coke had been first used for roasting malt in 1642, but it wasn't until around 1703 that the term "pale ale" was first used. By 1784, advertisements were appearing in the Calcutta Gazette for "light and excellent" pale ale. By 1830, the expressions "bitter" and "pale ale" were synonymous. Breweries would tend to designate beers as pale ale, though customers would commonly refer to the same beers as bitter. It is thought that customers used the term bitter to differentiate these pale ales from other less noticeably hopped beers such as porter and mild. By the mid to late 20th century, while brewers were still labeling bottled beers as pale ale, they had
    8.50
    2 votes
    56
    8.50
    2 votes
    57

    Abbey beer

    • Representative Beers: Jolly Abbot
    Abbey beer is the term for several Belgian brands of beer which in name are connected to abbeys. Like Trappist beer, abbey beer is not so much a style of beer but covers in fact several styles. Under each brand name, typically a range of several beers is presented, with blonde or brown versions of typically 6,5% ABV which are also available on draught, and stronger bottled beers in the dubbel or tripel styles. Unlike Trappist beers, abbey beers are not made under control of monk. Officially recognized abbey beers are made under license by a commercial brewery, using the name and recipes of an abbey that has ceased brewing itself. Only a couple of brands, including Val-Dieu and Abbaye d'Aulne, are actually made within the walls of an abbey. Popular brands of abbey beer include:
    6.00
    4 votes
    58
    7.00
    3 votes
    59
    Dubbel

    Dubbel

    • Representative Beers: Pauwel Kwak
    The dubbel (also double) is a Belgian Trappist beer naming convention. The origin of the dubbel was a beer brewed in the Trappist Abbey of Westmalle in 1856. The abbey had, since 10 December 1836, brewed a witbier that was quite sweet and light in alcohol for consumption by the paters. The new beer, however, was a strong version of a brown beer. In 1926, the formulation was changed and it became even stronger. The first written record of its sale by the abbey was on 1 June 1861. Following World War Two, abbey beers became popular in Belgium and the name "dubbel" was used by several breweries for commercial purposes. Westmalle Dubbel was imitated by other breweries, Trappist and secular, Belgian and worldwide, leading to the emergence of a style. Dubbels are now understood to be a fairly strong (6%-8% ABV) brown ale, with understated bitterness, fairly heavy body, and a pronounced fruitiness and cereal character. Chimay Red/Premiere, Koningshoeven/La Trappe Dubbel and Achel 8 Bruin are examples from Trappist breweries. Affligem and Grimbergen are Belgian abbey breweries that produce dubbels. Ommegang and New Belgium's Abbey Ale are examples from the USA.
    7.00
    3 votes
    60
    7.00
    3 votes
    61
    Gueuze

    Gueuze

    • BJCP Style Category: Sour Ale
    Gueuze (or Geuze) is a type of lambic, a Belgian beer. It is made by blending young (1-year-old) and old (2- to 3-year-old) lambics, which is then bottled for a second fermentation. Because the young lambics are not fully fermented, the blended beer contains fermentable sugars, which allow a second fermentation to occur. Lambic that undergoes a second fermentation in the presence of sour cherries before bottling results in kriek lambic, a beer closely related to gueuze. Since gueuze is made by blending lambics, it tastes different from traditional ale and lager style beers. Because aged hops are used to produce these lambics, the beer has little to none of the traditional hop flavor and aroma that can be found in most other styles of beer. Furthermore, the wild yeasts that are specific to lambic-style beers give gueuze a dry, cidery, musty, sour, acetic acid, lactic acid taste. Many describe the taste as sour and "barnyard-like." In modern times, some brewers have added sugar to their gueuzes to sweeten them and make the beer more appealing to a wider audience. Because of its carbonation, gueuze is sometimes called "Brussels Champagne." Traditionally, gueuze is served in champagne
    7.00
    3 votes
    62
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    63
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    3 votes
    64
    7.00
    3 votes
    65

    Kentucky Common Beer

    Kentucky Common Beer is a once-popular style of ale from the area in and around Louisville, Kentucky, that is rarely brewed commercially today. Cheaper than imported beers, it was popular among the working class. It was usually made with barley and approximately 25 to 30 percent maize, and a percentage of rye with some artificial coloring, caramel, or roasted malt to give it a dark color. It had an original gravity of 1.040-1.050, an average bitterness of 27 IBU. Brewers basically inverted a bourbon grain bill, conducted a sour mash (similar to bourbon) and instead of distilling the mash, they ran off the sweet (and sour) wort and boiled it with hops. When cooled, brewers yeast was pitched and within a few weeks they had a very interesting beer style. When made properly, the beer is an easy-drinking, slightly sour brown ale. It is rumored that this style was born out of necessity. Coal miners in the Louisville area would often drink bourbon (sour mash whiskey) on their lunch breaks and become too inebriated to return to work. This forced brewers to create a "lower alcohol" version of the miners' favorite beverage. The grain bill for a sour mash whiskey does not lend itself to
    5.75
    4 votes
    66
    5.75
    4 votes
    67
    8.00
    2 votes
    68
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    69
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    70
    Trappist beer

    Trappist beer

    • Representative Beers: Jolly Abbot
    Trappist beer is brewed by Trappist monks. Seven monasteries — six in Belgium and one in the Netherlands — currently brew beer and sell it as Authentic Trappist Product. The Trappist order originated in the Cistercian monastery of La Trappe, France. Various Cistercian congregations existed for many years, and by 1664 the Abbot of La Trappe felt that the Cistercians were becoming too liberal. He introduced strict new rules in the abbey and the Strict Observance was born. Since this time, many of the rules have been relaxed. However, a fundamental tenet, that monasteries should be self-supporting, is still maintained by these groups. Monastery brewhouses, from different religious orders, have existed across Europe since the Middle Ages. From the very beginning, beer was brewed in French cistercian monasteries following the Strict Observance. For example, the monastery of La Trappe in Soligny already had its own brewery in 1685. Breweries were later introduced in monasteries of other countries as the trappist order spread from France into the rest of Europe. The Trappists, like many other religious people, originally brewed beer to feed the community, in a perspective of
    8.00
    2 votes
    71
    Weissbier

    Weissbier

    Weissbier (German Weißbier, "white beer"), also known as Weizenbier ("wheat beer"), is a Bavarian specialty beer in which a significant proportion of malted barley is replaced with malted wheat: a wheat beer. By German law, Weissbiers brewed in Germany must be top-fermented. Specialized strains of yeast are used which produce overtones of banana and clove as by-products of fermentation. Weissbier is so called because it was, at the time of its inception, paler in color than Munich brown beer. It is well-known throughout Germany, though better known as Weizen (literally, "wheat") outside Bavaria. Weissbiers feature fermentation by-products such as esters (which lend fruity flavors and aromas), especially amyl acetate, reminiscent of bananas, and the phenolic compound guaiacol, a metabolite of ferulic acid, which smells and tastes like cloves. Other phenolics sometimes found in Weissbiers evoke medicinal or smoky sensations. The bittering level of most Weissbiers is close to 15 International Bitterness Units, a relatively low level. Hop flavor and aroma are typically low. The ester and phenolic aspects are produced by the special type of yeast, rather than the high fraction of wheat
    8.00
    2 votes
    72
    6.67
    3 votes
    73

    Oatmeal stout

    • BJCP Style Category: Stout
    • Representative Beers: Alaskan Stout
    Oatmeal stout has oats added to it during the brewing process. The practise of adding oatmeal to the wort used to brew stout is mostly found in England and Scotland, but can also be found in New England. Oatmeal stout has more body than standard stout, and is smoother, slightly sweeter, and typically higher in alcohol. The flavor is roasted and malty, with almost no noticeable bitterness, and a texture some describe as "chewy" or "silky" due to the oats; oats contribute significantly to the protein content of the beer. Oatmeal stout was, in the past, often recommended as a restorative drink for invalids, the elderly, and pregnant women.
    6.67
    3 votes
    74
    Schwarzbier

    Schwarzbier

    • BJCP Style Category: Dark Lager
    • Representative Beers: Monschof Schwarz
    Schwarzbier, or "black beer", is a German dark lager beer. It has an opaque, black colour and a full, chocolatey or coffee flavour similar to stout or porter. Schwarzbiers are bottom-fermented beers, though originally top-fermenting yeast was used in brewing them. The alcohol content usually ranges from 4.8%–5%. They get their dark colour from the use of particularly dark malts in brewing. The malt in turn gets its colour during the roasting procedure. The roots of the Schwarzbier lie in Thuringia and Saxony; the oldest known Schwarzbier is Braunschweiger Mumme ("Brunswick Mum") brewed since the Middle Ages (the first documented mention is from 1390) in Braunschweig. The earliest documented mention in Thuringia is of Köstritzer from 1543, a popular Schwarzbier still produced today. The East of present-day Germany has many unique varieties of this style from regional breweries. It is often served with dark, chunky breads with cream cheese. It also pairs well with marinated meats like brisket and is an excellent companion to German Sauerbraten.
    6.67
    3 votes
    75
    Steam beer

    Steam beer

    Steam beer is a highly effervescent beer made by brewing lager yeasts at warm fermentation temperatures. It has two distinct but related meanings: Historic steam beer, associated with San Francisco and the U.S. West Coast, was brewed with lager yeast without the use of refrigeration. It was an improvised process, originating out of necessity, perhaps as early as the Gold Rush. It was considered a cheap and low-quality beer, as shown by references to it in literature of the 1890s and 1900s. Modern steam beer, also known as California common beer, was originated by Anchor Brewing Company, which trademarked the name Anchor Steam Beer in 1981. Although the modern company has corporate continuity with a small brewery which was still making traditional steam beer in the 1950s, Anchor Steam beer is a craft-brewed lager. The company does not claim any close similarity between its present day product and turn-of-the-20th-century steam beer. Explanations of the word "steam" are all speculative. The carbon dioxide pressure produced by the process was very high, and one possibility is that it was necessary to let off "steam" before attempting to dispense the beer. According to Anchor Brewing,
    6.67
    3 votes
    76
    6.67
    3 votes
    77
    Tripel

    Tripel

    • Representative Beers: New Holland Black Tulip Tripel Ale
    Tripel is a term used in the Low Countries to describe a strong pale ale. The term was used in 1956 by the Trappist brewery at Westmalle to rename the strongest beer in their range, although both the term Tripel and the style of beer associated with the name existed before then. Westmalle Tripel was widely copied by the breweries of Belgium, and in 1987 another Trappist brewery, Koningshoeven in the Netherlands, also expanded their range with La Trappe Tripel. The term is applied by a range of secular brewers to a strong pale ale in the style of Westmalle Tripel. The term Tripel comes from the Low Countries - that is the modern Netherlands and Belgium; though the origin of the term is unknown. The two main theories are that it indicates strength, either by a series of marks, such as crosses, on a cask - X for the weakest strength, XX for medium strength, and XXX for the strongest beer, or by reference to the original gravity of a beer which roughly corresponds to 3% abv, 6% abv and 9% abv. The modern origin of tripels lies in Belgium, in the 1930s. According to brewing historian Michael Jackson, the first golden strong pale ale associated with the term was brewed by Hendrik
    6.67
    3 votes
    78
    Barley wine

    Barley wine

    • Representative Beers: Tärnö Bryggeri Nils Oscar Barley Wine
    Barley wine or Barleywine is a beer style of strong ale originating in England. The first beer to be marketed as Barley Wine was Bass No. 1 Ale, around 1870. In ancient Greece it was known as "κρίθινος οἶνος" (krithinos oinos), "barley wine" and it is mentioned amongst others by Greek historians Xenophon in his work Anabasis and Polybius in his work The Histories, where he mentions that Phaeacians kept barleywine in silver and golden kraters. A barley wine typically reaches an alcohol strength of 8 to 12% by volume and is brewed from specific gravities as high as 1.120. It is called a barley wine because it can be as strong as wine; but since it is made from grain rather than fruit, it is, in fact, a beer. There are two primary styles of barley wine, the American which tends to be more hoppy and thus more bitter with colors ranging from amber to light brown and the English style which tends to be less hoppy and thus less bitter with more variety in color ranging from red-gold to opaque black. Until the introduction of amber coloured Whitbread Gold Label in the 1950s, British barley wines were always dark in colour. The Anchor Brewing Company introduced the style to the United
    9.00
    1 votes
    79
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    84
    5.50
    4 votes
    85

    American Pale Ale

    • BJCP Style Category: American Ale
    • Representative Beers: Stone Pale Ale

    Aroma: Usually moderate to strong hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is very common, but not required. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

    Appearance: Pale golden to deep amber. Moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

    Flavor: Usually a moderate to high hop flavor, often showing a citrusy American hop character (although other hop varieties may be used). Low to moderately high clean malt character supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balance is typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the malt presence can be substantial. Caramel flavors are usually restrained or absent. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

    Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates.

    Overall Impression: Refreshing and hoppy, yet with sufficient supporting malt.

    History: An American adaptation of English pale ale, reflecting indigenous ingredients (hops, malt, yeast, and water). Often lighter in color, cleaner in fermentation by-products, and having less caramel flavors than English counterparts.

    Comments: There is some overlap in color between American pale ale and American amber ale. The American pale ale will generally be cleaner, have a less caramelly malt profile, less body, and often more finishing hops.

    Ingredients: Pale ale malt, typically American two-row. American hops, often but not always ones with a citrusy character. American ale yeast. Water can vary in sulfate content, but carbonate content should be relatively low. Specialty grains may add character and complexity, but generally make up a relatively small portion of the grist. Grains that add malt flavor and richness, light sweetness, and toasty or bready notes are often used (along with late hops) to differentiate brands. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.045 – 1.060 IBUs: 30 – 45+ FG: 1.010 – 1.015 SRM: 5 – 14 ABV: 4.5 – 6%

    Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Stone Pale Ale, Great Lakes Burning River Pale Ale, Full Sail Pale Ale, Three Floyds X-Tra Pale Ale, Anderson Valley Poleeko Gold Pale Ale, Left Hand Brewing Jackman’s Pale Ale, Pyramid Pale Ale, Deschutes Mirror Pond

    7.50
    2 votes
    86
    7.50
    2 votes
    87
    Cider

    Cider

    • Representative Beers: Oliver's Choice
    Cider or cyder ( /ˈsaɪdər/ SY-dər) is a fermented alcoholic beverage traditionally made from apple juice exclusively. There is a trend to add fruit flavours to cider to widen the drink's appeal, and some ciders do in fact include a minority amount of pear juice. Cider varies in alcohol content from 2% ABV to 8.5% or more in traditional English ciders. In some regions, such as Germany and United States, cider may be called "apple wine". In the United States and Canada, "hard cider" usually refers to the alcoholic beverage discussed in this article, while "cider" may refer to non-alcoholic apple juice. When sugar or extra fruit has been added and a secondary fermentation increases the alcoholic strength, a cider is classified as "apple wine". Cider may be made from any variety of apple, but certain cultivars grown solely for use in cider are known as cider apples. Cider is popular in the United Kingdom, especially in South West England and East Anglia. The United Kingdom has the highest per capita consumption of cider, as well as the largest cider-producing companies in the world, including H. P. Bulmer, the largest. As of 2006, the UK produces 600 million litres of cider each year
    7.50
    2 votes
    88
    7.50
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    89
    7.50
    2 votes
    90
    7.50
    2 votes
    91
    7.50
    2 votes
    92

    Old ale

    • BJCP Style Category: Strong Ale
    Old ale is a term commonly applied to dark, malty beers in England, generally above 5% abv, also to dark ales of any strength in Australia. Sometimes associated with stock ale or, archaically, keeping ale, in which the beer is held at the brewery. Historically, old ales served as a complement to mild ales, and in pubs of the era typically the landlord would serve the customer a blend of the sharper stock ale with the fruitier, sweeter mild ale to the customer's taste. In London especially, the aged ale would take on a tart note from a secondary fermentation with brettanomyces yeast which was present either in the pitching yeast or in the wooden equipment. Because of the time required for the aging process, some investors would buy mild ale from brewers, age it into old ale, and sell it at the higher price. Eventually, brewers began to keep some beer behind at the brewery, age it themselves and sell it to the pubs. In some cases old ale was a blend of young and old. The "stock ale" was the brewery's very aged ale and was used to inject an "old" quality, and perhaps acidity to the blend. Winter warmer is a traditional malty-sweet English Strong Ale that is brewed in the winter
    7.50
    2 votes
    93
    Old Style Pilsner

    Old Style Pilsner

    Old Style Pilsner is brewed by Molson Inc. at its Vancouver and Edmonton breweries. Created in the pilsner style, it has been brewed in western Canada since 1926. The beer appeared in the movie Fubar and also sponsors the Saskatchewan Roughriders football team, who play in the Canadian Football League (CFL). Old Style Pilsner was first brewed in 1926 by Fritz Sick at the Sick's Lethbridge, Alberta brewery. An acidic, acquired taste, the beer was and still is brewed after the famous formula of the House of Lethbridge, which can be seen in the top left hand side of the label. The Sick's Breweries Ltd. grew in the early half of the century to include breweries located throughout western Canada and the United States. In 1958 Sick's Breweries Ltd. along with the Old Style Pilsner Brand was bought by Molson Inc. The first beer consumed by many young western Canadian males, "Pil" has become famous for crossing lines of age, wealth and taste. This beer is referred to as "Saskatchewan Champagne" by its devotees and has also appeared on CTV's Corner Gas as the brew of choice at the local bar. To some it is known affectionately as a "Sner", "Pill","Green diesel" "Vitamin P" or "Pilly Pop".
    7.50
    2 votes
    94
    7.50
    2 votes
    95

    Cream ale

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Hybrid Beer
    • Representative Beers: Kitsilano Maple Cream Ale
    Cream ale is a style of top-fermented American beer resembling a German Kölsch. A cream ale is related to pale lager. They are generally brewed to be light and refreshing with a straw to pale golden color. Hop and malt flavor is usually subdued but like all beer styles it is open to individual interpretation, so some breweries give them a more assertive character. The most notable example being Genesee Cream Ale (made by Genesee Brewing Company of Rochester, NY), & Schoenling Little Kings, brewed by The Little Kings Brewing Company, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, & coming in seven ounce 'pony' bottles. While cream ales are top-fermented ales, they typically undergo an extended period of cold-conditioning or lagering after primary fermentation is complete. This reduces fruity esters and gives the beer a cleaner flavor. Some examples also have a lager yeast added for the cold-conditioning stage or are mixes of ales and lagers. Adjuncts such as corn and rice are used to lighten the body and flavor, although all-malt examples are available. Smooth flow (also known as "cream flow" or just "smooth") are descriptive names some brewers sometimes give to beers pressurized with nitrogen
    6.33
    3 votes
    96
    Maerzen/Oktoberfest Beer

    Maerzen/Oktoberfest Beer

    Märzen or Märzenbier (German: March beer) is a pale lager that originated in Bavaria. Märzen has its origins in Bavaria, probably before the 16th century. A Bavarian brewing ordinance decreed in 1539 that beer may be brewed only between 29 September and 23 April. The original Märzen was described as "dark brown, full-bodied". The beer was often kept in the cellar until late in the summer, and remaining bottles were served at the Oktoberfest. In order to last so long, either the original gravity and alcohol were increased or the hopping was strengthened. The style is characterized by a medium to full body, a malty flavour and a clean dry finish. In Germany, the term covers beers which vary in colour from pale (Helles Märzen), through amber to dark brown (Dunkles Märzen). Common names for Märzen include Märzenbier, Wiener Märzen, Festbier, and Oktoberfestbier. The Austrian style is light in colour, body, and flavour balance, and is the most popular beer style among the beers in Austria. Austrian Märzenbiers often use caramel malts that impart a sweeter flavour than their German counterparts. Brewers in the Czech Republic also produce pale, amber and dark beers in the Märzen style,
    6.33
    3 votes
    97
    6.33
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    6.00
    3 votes
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    100
    7.00
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    101
    8.00
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    8.00
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    103

    Extra Special/Strong Bitter

    • BJCP Style Category: English Pale Ale
    • Representative Beers: Fuller's ESB

    Aroma: Hop aroma moderately-high to moderately-low, and can use any variety of hops although UK hops are most traditional. Medium to medium-high malt aroma, often with a low to moderately strong caramel component (although this character will be more subtle in paler versions). Medium-low to medium-high fruity esters. Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed. May have light, secondary notes of sulfur and/or alcohol in some examples (optional).

    Appearance: Golden to deep copper. Good to brilliant clarity. Low to moderate white to off-white head. A low head is acceptable when carbonation is also low.

    Flavor: Medium-high to medium bitterness with supporting malt flavors evident. Normally has a moderately low to somewhat strong caramelly malt sweetness. Hop flavor moderate to moderately high (any variety, although earthy, resiny, and/or floral UK hops are most traditional). Hop bitterness and flavor should be noticeable, but should not totally dominate malt flavors. May have low levels of secondary malt flavors (e.g., nutty, biscuity) adding complexity. Moderately-low to high fruity esters. Optionally may have low amounts of alcohol, and up to a moderate minerally/sulfury flavor. Medium-dry to dry finish (particularly if sulfate water is used). Generally no diacetyl, although very low levels are allowed.

    Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium-full body. Low to moderate carbonation, although bottled commercial versions will be higher. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth but this character should not be too high.

    Overall Impression: An average-strength to moderately-strong English ale. The balance may be fairly even between malt and hops to somewhat bitter. Drinkability is a critical component of the style; emphasis is still on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the aggressive middle and late hopping seen in American ales. A rather broad style that allows for considerable interpretation by the brewer.

    History: Strong bitters can be seen as a higher-gravity version of best bitters (although not necessarily “more premium” since best bitters are traditionally the brewer’s finest product). Since beer is sold by strength in the UK, these beers often have some alcohol flavor (perhaps to let the consumer know they are getting their due). In England today, “ESB” is a brand unique to Fullers; in America, the name has been co-opted to describe a malty, bitter, reddish, standard-strength (for the US) English-type ale. Hopping can be English or a combination of English and American.

    Comments: More evident malt and hop flavors than in a special or best bitter. Stronger versions may overlap somewhat with old ales, although strong bitters will tend to be paler and more bitter. Fuller’s ESB is a unique beer with a very large, complex malt profile not found in other examples; most strong bitters are fruitier and hoppier. Judges should not judge all beers in this style as if they were Fuller’s ESB clones. Some modern English variants are brewed exclusively with pale malt and are known as golden or summer bitters. Most bottled or kegged versions of UK-produced bitters are higher-alcohol versions of their cask (draught) products produced specifically for export. The IBU levels are often not adjusted, so the versions available in the US often do not directly correspond to their style subcategories in Britain. English pale ales are generally considered a premium, export-strength pale, bitter beer that roughly approximates a strong bitter, although reformulated for bottling (including containing higher carbonation).

    Ingredients: Pale ale, amber, and/or crystal malts, may use a touch of black malt for color adjustment. May use sugar adjuncts, corn or wheat. English hops most typical, although American and European varieties are becoming more common (particularly in the paler examples). Characterful English yeast. “Burton” versions use medium to high sulfate water. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.048 – 1.060+ IBUs: 30 – 50+ FG: 1.010 – 1.016 SRM: 6 – 18 ABV: 4.6 – 6.2%

    Commercial Examples: Fullers ESB, Adnams Broadside, Shepherd Neame Bishop's Finger, Samuel Smith’s Old Brewery Pale Ale, Bass Ale, Whitbread Pale Ale, Shepherd Neame Spitfire, Marston’s Pedigree, Black Sheep Ale, Vintage Henley, Mordue Workie Ticket, Morland Old Speckled Hen, Greene King Abbot Ale, Bateman's XXXB, Gale’s Hordean Special Bitter (HSB), Ushers 1824 Particular Ale, Hopback Summer Lightning, Redhook ESB, Great Lakes Moondog Ale, Shipyard Old Thumper, Alaskan ESB, Geary’s Pale Ale, Cooperstown Old Slugger

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    Lambic

    Lambic

    Lambic is a very distinctive type of beer brewed traditionally in the Pajottenland region of Belgium (southwest of Brussels) and in Brussels itself at the Cantillon Brewery and museum. Lambic is now mainly consumed after refermentation, resulting in derived beers such as Gueuze or Kriek lambic. Unlike conventional ales and lagers, which are fermented by carefully cultivated strains of brewer's yeasts, lambic beer is produced by spontaneous fermentation: it is exposed to the wild yeasts and bacteria that are said to be native to the Senne valley, in which Brussels lies. It is this unusual process which gives the beer its distinctive flavour: dry, vinous, and cidery, usually with a sour aftertaste. Today the beer is generally brewed from a grist containing approximately 70% barley malt and 30% unmalted wheat. When the wort has cooled, it is left exposed to the open air so that fermentation may occur spontaneously. While this exposure is a critical feature of the style, many of the key yeasts and bacteria are now understood to reside within the brewery and its (usually timber) fermenting vessels in numbers far greater than any delivered by the breeze. Over eighty microorganisms have
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    106

    Seasonal beer

    • Representative Beers: Lagunitas Olde GnarlyWine
    Seasonal beer is a beer which is released at certain times of the year. Examples are Winter Warmers, Bocks (Spring), Barley Wines (winter), Summer Ales and other limited bottlings that are not produced or distributed throughout the year. The recipe for a particular label may vary from release to release depending on the availability of ingredients and the brewer's whim.
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    107
    Amber ale

    Amber ale

    • Representative Beers: Alaskan Amber
    North America amber ales are beer which range from light copper to light brown in color (with some termed red ales if the color warrants). They are characterized by American-variety hops used to produce high hop bitterness, flavor, and medium-to-high aroma. Amber ales have medium-high to high maltiness with medium to low caramel character. They usually have medium to medium-high body. The style may have a slight fruity (ester) flavor and aroma. The butter-like influences of diacetyl may be barely perceived. A little haze from yeast is acceptable for bottle-conditioned products. Commercial examples include Full Sail Amber Ale, Red Tail Ale, and Saint Arnold Amber Ale.
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    Hefeweizen

    • Representative Beers: Robson Street Hefeweizen
    Hefeweizen, is a variety of wheat beer in which the yeast is not filtered out. Though Kristallweizen (clear), Dunkelweizen (dark) and Weizenstarkbier (higher alcohol content) varieties are available, they are not considered true hefeweizen unless left unfiltered. The filtration which takes the yeast out of Kristallweizen also strips the wheat proteins which make Hefeweizen cloudy. Bavarian weizen beers are fermented with a special strain of top-fermenting yeast, which is largely responsible for the distinctive flavor. Hefeweizen is the most popular variety of wheat beer in the United States, though most American hefeweizen has a lower wheat content (the difference being made up by the inclusion of barley malt). Hefeweizens are frequently served with a slice of lemon or orange in the U.S., but this practice is frowned upon in Germany, where the lemon slice is common only for Kristallweizen. The addition of a lemon or orange wedge is also frowned upon by beer connoisseur because it eliminates the head. American Hefeweizen is usually lighter in color than the parent variety. Leo.org's online dictionary translates das Hefeweizen as "beer brewed from wheat." Die Hefe is translated
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    110

    Apple wine

    • BJCP Style Category: Specialty Cider and Perry
    • Representative Beers: Uncle John’s Fruit House Winery Fruit House Apple
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    Berliner Weisse

    Berliner Weisse

    • BJCP Style Category: Sour Ale
    Berliner Weisse (alternative German spelling, Berliner Weiße) is a cloudy, sour wheat beer of around 3% abv. It is a regional beer from Northern Germany, mainly Berlin, dating back to the 16th century. By the 19th century, Berliner Weisse was the most popular alcoholic drink in Berlin, and 700 breweries produced it. By the late 20th century there were only two breweries left in Berlin producing the beer, and a handful in other parts of Germany. The name "Berliner Weisse" is protected in Germany, so it can only be applied to beers brewed in Berlin. However, there are a number of American and Canadian brewers who make a beer in the Berliner Weisse style, and use the name. Most beer authorities trace the origins of Berliner Weisse to an unknown beer being produced in Hamburg which was copied and developed by the 16th century brewer Cord Broihan. Broihan's beer, Halberstädter Broihan, became very popular, and a version was being brewed in Berlin by the Berlin doctor J.S. Elsholz in the 1640s. An alternative possibility, given by Protz among others, is that migrating Huguenots developed the beer from the local red and brown ales as they moved through Flanders into Northern Germany. Some
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    Golden ale

    • Representative Beers: Alaskan Pale
    In the United Kingdom, a golden ale is a style of beer developed in the late 20th century by breweries to compete with the large light lager market. A typical golden ale has an appearance similar to that of a Pilsener. Malt character is subdued and the hop profile ranges from spicy to citrus; common hop additions include Styrian Golding and Cascade. Alcohol is in the 4% to 5% range ABV. Some examples of the style include:
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    Strong golden ale

    Strong golden ales and strong golden pale ales are golden yellow beer types. They are crisp, and dry, with medium to high bitterness, slight sourness and aroma from hops. Unlike in darker style high alcohol content beers, which often use the sweetness of their malt to balance out the alcohol bite, strong golden ales are balanced against their high alcohol content by the bitter and sour flavor of their hops. Strong golden ales are definitely not introduction beers for those not used to drinking stronger, or Belgian style ales. Known for their unique flavor, Duvel is often recognized as the quintessential example of this style, and many others have attempted to imitate it, with similar references to The Devil. Based on Brewers own beer classifications.
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    American Amber Ale

    • BJCP Style Category: American Ale
    • Representative Beers: Full Sail Amber Ale

    Aroma: Low to moderate hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is common, but not required. Moderately low to moderately high maltiness balances and sometimes masks the hop presentation, and usually shows a moderate caramel character. Esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Amber to coppery brown in color. Moderately large off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

    Flavor: Moderate to high hop flavor from American hop varieties, which often but not always has a citrusy quality. Malt flavors are moderate to strong, and usually show an initial malty sweetness followed by a moderate caramel flavor (and sometimes other character malts in lesser amounts). Malt and hop bitterness are usually balanced and mutually supportive. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Caramel sweetness and hop flavor/bitterness can linger somewhat into the medium to full finish. No diacetyl.

    Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth.

    Overall Impression: Like an American pale ale with more body, more caramel richness, and a balance more towards malt than hops (although hop rates can be significant).

    History: Known simply as Red Ales in some regions, these beers were popularized in the hop-loving Northern California and the Pacific Northwest areas before spreading nationwide.

    Comments: Can overlap in color with American pale ales. However, American amber ales differ from American pale ales not only by being usually darker in color, but also by having more caramel flavor, more body, and usually being balanced more evenly between malt and bitterness. Should not have a strong chocolate or roast character that might suggest an American brown ale (although small amounts are OK).

    Ingredients: Pale ale malt, typically American two-row. Medium to dark crystal malts. May also contain specialty grains which add additional character and uniqueness. American hops, often with citrusy flavors, are common but others may also be used. Water can vary in sulfate and carbonate content. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.045 – 1.060 IBUs: 25 – 40+ FG: 1.010 – 1.015 SRM: 10 – 17 ABV: 4.5 – 6%

    Commercial Examples: Mendocino Red Tail Ale, North Coast Red Seal Ale, St. Rogue Red Ale, Avery Redpoint Ale, Anderson Valley Boont Amber Ale, Bell's Amber, Hoptown Paint the Town Red, McNeill’s Firehouse Amber Ale

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    Gose

    Gose is a top-fermented beer style of Leipzig, Germany, brewed with at least 50% of the grain bill being malted wheat. Dominant flavours in Gose include a lemon tartness, a herbal characteristic, and a strong saltiness (the result of either local water sources or added salt). Gose beers typically do not have prominent hop bitterness, flavours, or aroma. The beers typically have a moderate alcohol content of 4 to 5% ABV. Because of the use of coriander and salt, Gose does not comply with the Reinheitsgebot. It is allowed an exemption on the grounds of being a regional specialty. It acquires its characteristic sourness through inoculation with lactic acid bacteria after the boil. Gose belongs to the same family of sour wheat beers which were once brewed across Northern Germany and the Low Countries. Other beers of this family are Belgian Witbier, Berliner Weisse, Broyhan, Grätzer and Gueuze. Gose was first brewed in the early 18th century in the town of Goslar, from which its name derives. It became so popular in Leipzig, that local breweries started to make it themselves. By the end of the 1800s it was considered to be the local style of Leipzig and there were countless Gosenschänke
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    Mild ale

    • BJCP Style Category: English Brown Ale
    • Representative Beers: Festival Mild
    Mild ale is a low-gravity beer, or beer with a predominantly malty palate, that originated in Britain in the 17th century or earlier. Modern mild ales are mainly dark coloured with an abv of 3% to 3.6%, though there are lighter hued examples, as well as stronger examples reaching 6% abv and higher. The term mild originally meant young beer or ale as opposed to "stale" aged beer or ale with its resulting "tang". In more recent times it has been interpreted as denoting "mildly hopped". Light mild is generally similar, but pale in colour, for instance Harveys Brewery Knots of May. There is some overlap between the weakest styles of bitter and light mild, with the term AK being used to refer to both. The designation of such beers as "bitter" or "mild" has tended to change with fashion. A good example is McMullen's AK, which was re-badged as a bitter after decades as a light mild. AK (a very common beer name in the 19th century) was often referred to as a "mild bitter beer" interpreting "mild" as "unaged". Once sold in every pub, mild experienced a catastrophic fall in popularity after the 1960s and was in danger of completely disappearing. However, in recent years the explosion of
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    Porter

    Porter

    • Representative Beers: Jämtlands Bryggeri Oatmeal Porter
    Porter is a dark style of beer originating in London in the 18th Century, descended from brown beer, a well hopped beer made from brown malt. The name came about as a result of its popularity with street and river porters. The history and development of stout and porter are intertwined. The name "stout" for a dark beer is believed to have come about because a strong porter may be called "Extra Porter" or "Double Porter" or "Stout Porter". The term "Stout Porter" would later be shortened to just "Stout". For example, Guinness Extra Stout was originally called "Extra Superior Porter" and was only given the name Extra Stout in 1840. In 1802, a writer named John Feltham wrote a version of the history of porter that has been used as the basis for most writings on the topic. However, very little of Feltham's story is backed up by contemporary evidence. His account is based upon a letter written by Obadiah Poundage (who had worked for decades in the London brewing trade) in the 1760s. Unfortunately, Feltham badly misinterpreted parts of the text, mainly due to his unfamiliarity with 18th-century brewing terminology. Feltham claimed that in 18th-century London a popular beverage called
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    Dark American Lager

    • BJCP Style Category: Dark Lager
    • Representative Beers: Yuengling Traditional Amber Lager

    Aroma: Little to no malt aroma. Medium-low to no roast and caramel malt aroma. Hop aroma may range from none to light spicy or floral hop presence. Hop aroma may range from none to light, spicy or floral hop presence. Can have low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness). No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Deep amber to dark brown with bright clarity and ruby highlights. Foam stand may not be long lasting, and is usually light tan in color.

    Flavor: Moderately crisp with some low to moderate levels of sweetness. Medium-low to no caramel and/or roasted malt flavors (and may include hints of coffee, molasses or cocoa). Hop flavor ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low to medium levels. No diacetyl. May have a very light fruitiness. Burnt or moderately strong roasted malt flavors are a defect.

    Mouthfeel: Light to somewhat medium body. Smooth, although a highly-carbonated beer.

    Overall Impression: A somewhat sweeter version of standard/premium lager with a little more body and flavor.

    Comments: A broad range of international lagers that are darker than pale, and not assertively bitter and/or roasted.

    Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley, corn or rice as adjuncts. Light use of caramel and darker malts. May use coloring agents.
    Vital Statistics: OG: 1.044 – 1.056 IBUs: 8 – 20 FG: 1.008 – 1.012 SRM: 14 – 22 ABV: 4.2 – 6%

    Commercial Examples: Dixie Blackened Voodoo, Shiner Bock, San Miguel Dark, Beck's Dark, Saint Pauli Girl Dark, Warsteiner Dunkel, Crystal Diplomat Dark Beer

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    Dunkel

    Dunkel

    • Representative Beers: Frankenmuth Munich Style Dunkel Lager
    Dunkel, or Dunkles, is a type of dark German lager. Dunkel is the German word meaning dark, and dunkel beers typically range in colour from amber to dark reddish brown. They are characterized by their smooth malty flavour. Dunkel, along with helles, is a traditional style brewed in Munich and popular throughout Bavaria. With alcohol concentrations of 4.5% to 6% by volume, dunkels are weaker than Doppelbocks, another traditional dark Bavarian beer. Dunkels are produced using Munich malts which give the Dunkel its colour. Other malts or flavours may also be added. Dunkels were the original style of the Bavarian villages and countryside. Lighter-coloured lagers were not common until the later part of the 19th century when technological advances made them easier to produce. Dunkels have a distinctive malty flavour that comes from a special brewing technique called decoction mashing. Most commonly, dunkel beers are dark lagers, but the term is also used to refer to dark wheat beers such as Franziskaner Hefe-Weisse Dunkel. Dunkel weizen is another term used to refer to dark wheat beers, which are fruity and sweet with more dark, roasted malts than their lighter counterpart, the
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    Scotch ale

    • Representative Beers: Antares Scotch Ale
    Scotch Ale is the name given to a strong ale believed to have originated in Edinburgh in the 19th century. Beers using the designation Scotch Ale are popular in Belgium and the USA where most examples are brewed locally. Examples of Scotch Ale brewed in Scotland are exported to the USA, though may be available in Scotland under a different name. For example, Caledonian's Edinburgh Scotch Ale is sold from the cask in Scotland as Edinburgh Strong Ale or as Edinburgh Tattoo. Strong Scotch Ale is also known as Wee Heavy. Examples of beers brewed in the USA under the name Wee Heavy tend to be 7% ABV and higher, while Scottish brewed examples, such as Belhaven's Wee Heavy, are typically between 5.5% and 6.5% ABV. As with other examples of strong pale ales, such as Barley Wine, these beers tend toward sweetness and a full body, with a low hop flavour. Examples from the Caledonian brewery would have toffee notes from the caramelising of the malt from the direct fired copper. This caramelising of Caledonian's beers is popular in America and has led many American brewers to produce toffee sweet beers which they would label as a Scotch Ale. Even though the malt used by brewers in
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    138

    Enkel

    Enkel, meaning "single", is a term formerly used by Trappist breweries to describe the basic recipe of their beers. There are now no Trappist (or secular) breweries using the term.
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    Kellerbier

    Kellerbier

    Kellerbier, also Zwickelbier, or Zoigl, is a type of German beer which is not clarified or pasteurised. Kellerbier can be either top- or bottom-fermented. The term Kellerbier literally translates as "cellar beer", referring to its cool lagering temperatures, and its recipe likely dates to the Middle Ages. In comparison with most of today's filtered lagers, Kellerbier contains more of its original brewing yeast, as well as vitamins, held in suspension. As a result, it is distinctly cloudy, and is described by German producers as naturtrüb (naturally cloudy). Kellerbier and Zwickelbier are often served directly from the barrel (for example, in a beer garden) or bottled. Originally the term Zwickelbier, which is often used to describe a weaker and less full-flavored Kellerbier, was used to refer to the small amount of beer taken by a brewmaster from the barrel with the aid of a special siphon called the Zwickelhahn. Nowadays in Germany Zwickelbier is commercially available in large amounts, usually as a bottom-fermented, but often also as a top-fermented (Kellerweizen).
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    141
    Kölsch

    Kölsch

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Hybrid Beer
    • Representative Beers: Atwater D-Light
    Kölsch (also spelled Koelsch) is a local beer specialty that is brewed in Cologne, Germany. It is a clear beer with a bright, straw-yellow hue, and has a prominent, but not extreme, hoppiness. It is less bitter than the standard German pale lager. Kölsch is warm-fermented at a temperature around 13 to 21°C (55 to 70°F) and then cold-conditioned, or lagered. This manner of fermentation links Kölsch with some other beer styles of central northern Europe, such as the Altbiers of northern Germany and the Netherlands. Kölsch is strictly defined by the Kölsch Konvention, an agreement between the members of the Cologne Brewery Association. It is a pale, highly attenuated, hoppy, clear, top-fermenting beer with an original gravity of between 11 and 16 degrees Plato (1.044—1.065). In practice almost all Kölsch brands have a very similar gravity near the middle of this range. In the year 1396, the Brewer Gaffel signed, with 21 other guilds, a document called the Kölner Verbundbrief, that set up a new democratic constitution of the free city, which terminated the rule of the nobles over the citizens, and held until 1796, when the army of Napoleon Bonaparte conquered Cologne. The term Kölsch
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    Rye beer

    Rye beer

    • Representative Beers: New Holland Charkoota Rye Smoked Doppelbock
    Rye beer refers to any beer in which rye (generally malted) is substituted for some portion of the barley malt. One example of this is roggenbier which is a specialty beer produced with up to sixty percent rye malt. The style originated in Bavaria, in southern Germany and is brewed with the same type of yeast as a German hefeweizen resulting in a similar light, dry, spicy taste. In the United States another style of rye beer is being developed by homebrewers and microbreweries. In some examples, the hop presence is pushed to the point where they resemble American India pale ales. This style is often called a "Rye-P-A," a take-off of the abbreviation for an India Pale Ale, "IPA." Finnish sahti is another style of rye beer, produced by brewing rye with juniper berries and wild yeast. Another type of rye beer is kvass, although the alcohol is low enough to be considered an NA in many cases. In theory, a rauchroggen could be made by drying some rye malt over an open flame rather than in a kiln, although there are currently no commercial examples. Until the 15th Century, it was common in Germany, particularly in Bavaria, to use rye malt for brewing beer. However, after a period of bad
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    Irish red ale

    Irish red ale

    • BJCP Style Category: Scottish and Irish Ale
    • Representative Beers: Kilkenny
    Irish red ale is a type of ale originating in Ireland. The slightly reddish colour comes from the use of roasted barley, in addition to the malt. The beers are typically fairly low in alcohol (3.5% ABV typically), although stronger export versions are brewed. A red ale tastes less bitter or hoppy than an English ale, with a pronounced malty, caramel flavor. In America the name can describe a darker amber ale, and some large commercial breweries produce a "red" beer that is actually a lager with artificial coloring.
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    Standard American Lager

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Lager
    • Representative Beers: Pabst Blue Ribbon

    Aroma: Little to no malt aroma, although it can be grainy, sweet or corn-like if present. Hop aroma may range from none to a light, spicy or floral hop presence. Low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness) are optional but acceptable. No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Very pale straw to medium yellow color. White, frothy head seldom persists. Very clear.

    Flavor: Crisp and dry flavor with some low levels of sweetness. Hop flavor ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low to medium-low level. Balance may vary from slightly malty to slightly bitter, but is relatively close to even. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry "sting." No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

    Mouthfeel: Light body from use of a high percentage of adjuncts such as rice or corn. Very highly carbonated with slight carbonic bite on the tongue.

    Overall Impression: Very refreshing and thirst quenching.

    Comments: Strong flavors are a fault. An international style including the standard mass-market lager from most countries.

    Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley with high percentage (up to 40%) of rice or corn as adjuncts. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.040 – 1.050 IBUs: 8 – 15 FG: 1.004 – 1.010 SRM: 2 – 4 ABV: 4.2 – 5.1%

    Commercial Examples: Miller High Life, Budweiser, Kirin Lager, Molson Golden, Corona Extra, Foster’s Lager

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    Imperial stout

    Imperial stout

    • Representative Beers: Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout
    Imperial stout, also known as "Russian Imperial Stout" or "Imperial Russian Stout," is a strong dark beer or stout that was originally brewed by Barclays brewery in London, England for export to the court of the Tsar of Russia. It has a very high alcohol content (nine or ten percent is not uncommon) intended to preserve it during long trips and to provide a more bracing drink against cold climates. The colour is very dark, almost always opaque black. Imperial stout exhibits enormously powerful malt flavours, hints of dark fruits, and is often quite rich, resembling a chocolate dessert.
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    India Pale Ale

    India Pale Ale

    • Representative Beers: Wild Goose IPA
    India Pale Ale or IPA is a beer style within the broader category of pale ale. It was first brewed in England in the 19th century. The first known use of "India pale ale" is an advertisement in the Liverpool Mercury in 1835. It was also referred to as "pale ale as prepared for India", "India Ale", "pale India ale" or "pale export India ale". The term "pale ale" originally denoted an ale that had been brewed from pale malt. The pale ales of the early 18th century were lightly hopped and quite different from later pale ales. By the mid-18th century, pale ale was mostly manufactured with coke-fired malt, which produced less smoking and roasting of barley in the malting process, and hence produced a paler beer. One such variety of beer was October beer, a pale well-hopped brew popular among the landed classes, who brewed it domestically; once brewed it was intended to cellar two years. Among the earliest-known named brewers whose beers were exported to India was George Hodgson of the Bow Brewery, on the Middlesex-Essex border. Bow Brewery beers became popular among East India Company traders in the late 18th century because of the brewery's location and Hodgson's liberal credit line of
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    Ale

    Ale

    • Representative Beers: Fuller's London Pride
    Ale is a type of beer brewed from malted barley using a warm-fermentation with a strain of brewers' yeast. The yeast will ferment the beer quickly, giving it a sweet, full bodied and fruity taste. Most ales contain hops, which help preserve the beer and impart a bitter herbal flavour that balances the sweetness of the malt. Historically the terms beer and ale respectively referred to drinks brewed with and without hops. It has often now come to mean a bitter-tasting barley beverage fermented at room temperature. In some British usage, however, in homage to the original distinction, it is not now used except in compounds (such as "pale ale" (see below)) or as "real ale", a term adopted in opposition to the pressurised beers developed by industrial brewers in the 1960s, and used of a warm-fermented unpasteurised beer served from the cask (though not stout or porter). Ale typically has bittering agent(s) to balance the sweetness of the malt and to act as a preservative. Ale was originally bittered with gruit, a mixture of herbs (sometimes spices) which was boiled in the wort prior to fermentation. Later, hops replaced the gruit blend in common usage as the sole bittering agent. Ale,
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    Blonde ale

    Blonde ale

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Hybrid Beer
    • Representative Beers: Arran Brewery Blonde
    Blonde ales, also called golden ales range in color from that of straw to golden blond. They are clear, crisp, and dry, with low-to-medium bitterness and aroma from hops, and some sweetness from malt. Fruitiness from esters may be perceived but do not dominate the flavor or aroma. A lighter body from higher carbonation may be noticed.
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    Brown ale

    Brown ale

    • Representative Beers: Newcastle Brown Ale
    Brown ale is a style of beer with a dark amber or brown colour. The term was first used by London brewers in the late 17th century to describe their products, such as mild ale, though the term had a rather different meaning than it does today. 18th-century brown ales were lightly hopped and brewed from 100% brown malt. Today there are brown ales made in several regions, most notably England, Belgium and North America. Beers termed brown ale include sweet, low alcohol beers such as Manns Original Brown Ale, medium strength amber beers of moderate bitterness such as Newcastle Brown Ale, and malty but hoppy beers such as Sierra Nevada Brown Ale. In the 18th century, British brown ales were brewed to a variety of strengths, with gravities ranging from around 1.060º to 1.090º. These beers died out around 1800 as brewers moved away from using brown malt as a base. Pale malt, being cheaper because of its higher yield, was used as a base for all beers, including Porter and Stout. The term "brown ale" was revived at the end of the 19th century when London brewer Mann introduced a beer with that name. However, the style only became widely brewed in the 1920s. The brown ales of this period
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    Cask ale

    Cask ale

    Cask ale or cask-conditioned beer is unfiltered and unpasteurised beer which is conditioned (including secondary fermentation) and served from a cask without additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide pressure. Cask ale may also be referred to as real ale, a term coined by the Campaign for Real Ale, often now extended to cover bottle-conditioned beer as well. Cask means container. The word comes from the Spanish cáscara which means tree bark or husk, in the sense that the bark surrounds and holds the tree in the way that a cask surrounds and holds the beer. The Histories of Herodotus, written in 424 BC, refers to "casks of palm-wood filled with wine" being moved by boat to Babylon, though clay vessels would also have been used. Stout wooden barrels held together with an iron hoop were developed by the north European Celts during the Iron Age for storing goods. Over the centuries other methods have been developed for preserving and storing beer but this method is still used, particularly in Britain. Bottled beers were commonplace by the 17th century for the well off who wished to drink outside of public inns, or who wanted to take a beer with them when fishing. Such as the famous story
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    Flanders red ale

    Flanders red ale

    • BJCP Style Category: Sour Ale
    Flanders red ale or Flemish red is a style of sour ale usually brewed in Belgium. Although sharing a common ancestor with English porters of the 17th century, the Flanders red ale has evolved along a different track: the beer is often fermented with organisms other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae, especially Lactobacillus, which produces a sour character attributable to lactic acid. Long periods of aging are employed, a year or more, often in oaken barrels, to impart an acetic acid character to the beer. Special red malt is used to give the beer its unique color and often the matured beer is blended with a younger batch before bottling to balance and round the character. Flanders reds have a strong fruit flavor similar to the aroma, but more intense. Plum, prune, raisin and raspberry are the most common flavors, followed by orange and some spiciness. All Flanders red ales have an obvious sour or acidic taste, but this characteristic can range from moderate to strong. There is no hop bitterness, but tannins are common. Consequently, Flanders red ales are often described as the most "wine-like" of all beers. Notable examples include Duchesse de Bourgogne and Rodenbach.
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    Kriek

    Kriek

    Kriek lambic, or kriek (pronounced 'creek') in short, is a style of Belgian beer, made by fermenting lambic with sour Morello cherries. The name is derived from the Dutch word for this type of cherry (kriek). Traditionally "Schaarbeekse krieken" (a rare Belgian Morello variety) from the area around Brussels are used. As the Schaarbeek type cherries have become more difficult to find, some brewers have replaced these (partly or completely) with other varieties of sour cherries, sometimes imported. Traditionally, kriek is made by breweries in and around Brussels using lambic beer to which sour cherries (with the pits) are added. A lambic is a sour and dry Belgian beer, fermented spontaneously with airborne yeast said to be native to Brussels; the presence of cherries (or raspberries) predates the almost universal use of hops as a flavoring in beer. A traditional kriek made from a lambic base beer is sour and dry as well. The cherries are left in for a period of several months, causing a refermentation of the additional sugar. Typically no sugar will be left so there will be a fruit flavour without sweetness. There will be a further maturation process after the cherries are
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    Pilsener

    Pilsener

    • Representative Beers: KEO
    Pilsner (also pilsener or simply pils) is a type of pale lager. It took its name from the city of Pilsen (Plzeň in Czech), Bohemia, now Czech Republic, where it was first produced in 1842. The original Pilsner Urquell beer is still produced there today. Until the mid-1840s, most Bohemian beers were top-fermented. The taste and standards of quality often varied widely, and in 1838, consumers dumped whole barrels to show their dissatisfaction. The officials of Pilsen founded a city-owned brewery in 1839, called Bürger Brauerei (Citizens' Brewery - now Plzeňský Prazdroj), brewing beer according to the pioneering Bavarian style of brewing. Bavarian brewers had begun aging beer made with bottom-fermenting yeasts in caves (i.e. German: 'gelagert'), which improved the beer's clarity and shelf-life. Part of this research benefited from the knowledge already expounded on in a book (printed in German in 1794, in Czech in 1801), written by František Ondřej Poupě (Ger: Franz Andreas Paupie) (1753–1805) from Brno. The Bürger Brauerei recruited the Bavarian brewer Josef Groll (1813–1887) who, using new techniques and paler malts, presented his first batch of modern pilsner on 5 October 1842. The
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    Premium American Lager

    • BJCP Style Category: Light Lager
    • Representative Beers: Cerpa

    Aroma: Low to medium-low malt aroma, which can be grainy, sweet or corn-like. Hop aroma may range from very low to a medium-low, spicy or floral hop presence. Low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness) are optional but acceptable. No diacetyl.

    Appearance: Pale straw to gold color. White, frothy head may not be long lasting. Very clear.

    Flavor: Crisp and dry flavor with some low levels of sweetness. Hop flavor ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low to medium level. Balance may vary from slightly malty to slightly bitter, but is relatively close to even. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry "sting." No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

    Mouthfeel: Medium-light body from use of adjuncts such as rice or corn. Highly carbonated with slight carbonic bite on the tongue.

    Overall Impression: Refreshing and thirst quenching, although generally more filling than standard/lite versions.

    Comments: Premium beers tend to have fewer adjuncts than standard/lite lagers, and can be all-malt. Strong flavors are a fault, but premium lagers have more flavor than standard/lite lagers. A broad category of international mass-market lagers ranging from up-scale American lagers to the typical “import” or “green bottle” international beers found in America.

    Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley with up to 25% rice or corn as adjuncts. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.046 – 1.056 IBUs: 15 – 25 FG: 1.008 – 1.012 SRM: 2 – 6 ABV: 4.7 – 6%

    Commercial Examples: Miller Genuine Draft, Michelob, Coors Extra Gold, Heineken, Beck’s, Stella Artois, Singha

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    Quadrupel

    • Representative Beers: Rochefort 10
    Quadrupel is the brand name of a strong seasonal beer La Trappe Quadrupel brewed by De Koningshoeven Brewery in the Netherlands, the only Trappist brewing abbey not in Belgium. In other countries, particularly the United States, 'quadrupel' or 'quad' may refer to an especially strong style of dark ale, with a characteristic spicy, ripe fruit flavor. A quadrupel is intended to be stronger than a Tripel, so the ABV strength will be 10% or more. Beyond that, there is little agreement on the status of Quadrupel as a style. Beer writer Tim Webb notes that similar beers are also called 'Grand Cru' in Belgium and Holland.
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