Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 2.113 views
  • 621 votes
  • 621 voters
  • 6%
Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time

More about Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time:

Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time has gotten 2.113 views and has gathered 621 votes from 621 voters. O O

Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time is a top list in the Local category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of Local or Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Local on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Norwegian Critics' Association

    Norwegian Critics' Association

    • Award categories presented: Critics Prize for the Years Best Children's or Youth's Literature
    • Awards presented: The Norwegian Critics Prize for Literature
    The Norwegian Critics' Association (Norsk litteraturkritikerlag) is an organization for Norwegian critics in the newspaper and broadcasting professions. Former independent critic teams merged into Norwegian Critics Association in 1998. The oldest team was founded in 1927 as the Norwegian Theatre and Music Critics Association (Norsk Teater- og Musikkritikerforening). Critics teams in literature and art were created respectively in 1946 (Norwegian Literature Critics) and 1949 (Norwegian Art Critics). The association was initially created to promote a high standard of critical ethics. The association aims to safeguard the members' professional and economic interests while promoting quality in the arts and striving for quality and independence in criticism. This organization arranges seminars, meetings, open debates, and writing courses, which mark the critics role in public and creative environments. One of their most significant contributions to Norwegian culture is the award of the Norwegian Critics Prize for Literature (Kritikerprisen for årets beste voksenbok or Kritikerprisen), which has been awarded every year since 1950. The prize is presented to a Norwegian author for a
    7.43
    7 votes
    2
    American Theatre Wing

    American Theatre Wing

    • Award categories presented: Tony Award for Best Musical
    • Awards presented: Tony Award
    The American Theatre Wing (the Wing for short; originally part of the WWII Allied Relief Fund) is a New York City-based organization "dedicated to supporting excellence and education in theatre," according to its mission statement. ATW created and sponsors the Tony Awards in theatrical arts. In 1939, a group of theatrical women led by Rachel Crothers and Antoinette Perry founded the organization in Manhattan. All were active in Broadway theater, as patrons or actors or both, and many had supported the Stage Women's War Relief Fund, an earlier effort. With the entry of the United States into World War II, the Wing established the Stage Door Canteen to entertain American servicemen. After the war, the Wing founded the Community Players to assist war veterans and their families on their return home. The Community Players was co-chaired by Katharine Cornell, who was active on the Stage Door Canteen. With the close of the war, the Wing concentrated on holding seminars about American theater, and on funding numerous scholarship grants. It sponsored the First American Congress of Theatre (FACT) in 1974, and is best known as creator and owner of The American Theatre Wing's Antoinette Perry
    8.00
    6 votes
    3
    Governor-General of New Zealand

    Governor-General of New Zealand

    • Awards presented: Victoria Cross for New Zealand
    The Governor-General of New Zealand (Māori: 'Te Kāwana Tianara o Aotearoa') is the representative of the monarch of New Zealand (currently Queen Elizabeth II). The governor-general acts as the Queen's vice-regal representative in New Zealand and is often viewed as the de facto head of state. The Constitution Act 1986 provides that a "Governor-General appointed by the Sovereign is the Sovereign's representative in New Zealand." There is no specific term, but by convention the Governor-General usually serves for approximately five years. The office's full title is: the Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Realm of New Zealand. The functions and roles of the governor-general are set out in letters patent issued in 1983 (amended in 2006) and include: appointing ministers and judges, dissolving parliament, granting Royal Assent to legislation, issuing writs for elections and bestowing honours. All the governor-general's duties are carried out in the name of the Queen. As of 1 April 2011, the governor-general is paid a salary of NZ$210,309.00. Beyond constitutional functions, the governor-general has an important ceremonial role. He or she travels widely throughout New Zealand
    7.67
    6 votes
    4
    Thorolf Rafto Memorial Prize

    Thorolf Rafto Memorial Prize

    The Professor Thorolf Rafto Memorial Prize (Rafto Prize) is a human rights award established in the memory of the Norwegian human rights activist, Thorolf Rafto. The prize is awarded annually by the Rafto Foundation for Human Rights, which was founded in the humanistic tradition of the Helsinki Accords in order to promote the fundamental human rights of intellectual and political freedom. Today, the foundation is based at the Human Rights House in Bergen, Norway. The major work of the foundation, including the organization of the award ceremony is done by a small team of professional staff and volunteers. The award ceremony takes place at Den Nationale Scene in Bergen annually in November. The initial idea of the Rafto Prize was to provide a basic informative platform for the laureates that would help to receive further attention from the international media and support from political and non-political organisations. By awarding the Rafto Prize, the Rafto Foundation for Human Rights seeks to bring attention to independent voices that due to oppressive and corruptive regimes are not always heard. For example, four Rafto Laureates have subsequently received further international
    6.43
    7 votes
    5
    Library of Congress

    Library of Congress

    • Award categories presented: Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress
    • Awards presented: Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry
    The Library of Congress is the research library of the United States Congress, de facto national library of the United States of America, and the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. Located in four buildings in Washington, D.C., as well as the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, it is the largest library in the world by shelf space and number of books. The head of the Library is the Librarian of Congress, currently James H. Billington. The Library of Congress was instituted for Congress in 1800, and was housed in the United States Capitol for most of the 19th century. After much of the original collection had been destroyed during the War of 1812, Thomas Jefferson sold 6,487 books, his entire personal collection, to the library in 1815. After a period of decline during the mid-19th century the Library of Congress began to grow rapidly in both size and importance after the American Civil War, culminating in the construction of a separate library building and the transference of all copyright deposit holdings to the Library. During the rapid expansion of the 20th century the Library of Congress assumed a preeminent public role, becoming a "library of last
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    Minister of the Environment

    Minister of the Environment

    • Award categories presented: Persons of National Historic Significance
    The Minister of the Environment (French: Ministre de l'Environnement) is the Minister of the Crown in the Canadian Cabinet who is responsible for overseeing the federal government's environment department, Environment Canada. The Minister is also responsible for overseeing Parks Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. Noted environment ministers of the past have included Jack Davis, Roméo LeBlanc, Jean Charest, Stéphane Dion, Sheila Copps and David Anderson The current Minister of the Environment is Peter Kent. Key:
    7.00
    6 votes
    7
    Congressional Gold Medal of Honor

    Congressional Gold Medal of Honor

    A Congressional Gold Medal is an award bestowed by the United States Congress and is, along with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. It is awarded to persons "who have performed an achievement that has an impact on American history and culture that is likely to be recognized as a major achievement in the recipient's field long after the achievement." American citizenship is not a requirement. Only four people have ever been awarded two or more gold medals: Winfield Scott (1814 for War of 1812 and 1848 for Mexican–American War), Zachary Taylor (1846, 1847, and 1848 for Mexican-American War), Lincoln Ellsworth (1928 and 1936 for polar exploration), and Hyman G. Rickover (1958 for the "Nuclear Navy" and 1982 for his entire career). Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. The medal was first awarded in 1776 by the Second Continental Congress to then-General George Washington. Although the first recipients were military figures who participated in the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the Mexican-American
    8.00
    5 votes
    8
    Expresión en Corto International Film Festival

    Expresión en Corto International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Expresión en Corto Best Fiction Short Film
    • Awards presented: Expresión en Corto Film Awards
    The Expresión en Corto International Film Festival is now known as the Guanajuato International Film Festival, or GIFF by its initials, and is an annual international film festival, held since 1998 during the final week of July in the cities of San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Mexico. As a non-profit organization that is a state-sponsored, cultural event that does not charge admission to its viewing audience, GIFF estimates an attendance of more than 90,000 total audience members and receives more than 3,000 submissions from 109 participating countries in its international competition. It presents a variety of films, conferences, workshops, tributes and activities at no cost to the visiting public. More than 400 films are screened from 10am until 4am each day in 20 venues, which include such unusual locations as: the Jardín Principal (main square) of San Miguel de Allende; the classical open-air staircase of the University of Guanajuato; the subterranean streets and tunnels beneath the city of Guanajuato where underground films are screened; as well as horror films in the infamous Museum of the Mummies of Guanajuato and both municipal graveyards (panteónes). There
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    History of Science Society

    History of Science Society

    • Award categories presented: Pfizer Award
    The History of Science Society (HSS) is the primary professional society for the academic study of the history of science.It was founded in 1924 by George Sarton and Lawrence Joseph Henderson, primarily to support the publication of Isis, a journal of the history of science Sarton had started in 1912. The society has over 3,000 members worldwide. It continues to publish the quarterly journal Isis as well as the yearly Osiris, and holds an annual conference. The current president of the HSS is Lynn Nyhart, University of Wisconsin. HSS sponsors two special lectures annually: In addition, the HSS awards a number of prizes:
    9.00
    4 votes
    10
    Jamaica

    Jamaica

    • Awards presented: Order of the Nation
    Jamaica (/dʒəˈmeɪkə/), officially Commonwealth of Jamaica, is the 4th largest island nation of the Greater Antilles, 234 kilometres (145 mi) in length, up to 80 kilometres (50 mi) in width, and 10,990 square kilometres (4,240 sq mi) in area. It is situated in the Caribbean Sea, about 145 kilometres (90 mi) south of Cuba, and 191 kilometres (119 mi) west of Hispaniola, the island harbouring the nation-states of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Jamaica is the 5th largest island country in the Caribbean. The indigenous Arawakan-speaking Taíno name for the island was Xaymaca, meaning the "Land of Wood and Water" or the "Land of Springs". Once a Spanish possession known as Santiago, it became an English, and later British, colony in 1655 under the name Jamaica. It achieved full independence from the United Kingdom on August 6, 1962. With 2.8 million people, it is the third most populous Anglophone country in the Americas, after the United States and Canada. Kingston is the country's largest city, with a population of 937,700, and its capital. Jamaica has a large diaspora around the world consisting of Jamaican citizens migrating from the country. Jamaica is a Commonwealth realm with
    9.00
    4 votes
    11
    The Tech Museum of Innovation

    The Tech Museum of Innovation

    • Awards presented: The Tech Awards
    The Tech Museum of Innovation, or simply The Tech, is a museum located in the heart of Silicon Valley, in downtown San Jose, California USA. Planning began in 1978 by members of the Junior League of Palo Alto and later assistance by the San Jose Junior League. The first 20,000-square-foot (1,900 m) temporary exhibit finally opened in 1990 “The Garage” as it was named, opened in San Jose’s former convention center. On October 31, 1998, it opened a brand-new 132,000-square-foot (12,300 m) facility, and has had 4,000,000 visitors. The museum is composed of three floors, each with its own significance. The ground floor has the main entrance, a gift shop and cafe, the Imax theater, and a recreational area that is reserved for special events. The Tech Store contains various gifts, shirts and souvenirs. Café Primavera offers a varied menu of pasta dishes, sandwiches, pizzas, soups and salads for both adults and children. The ground level is a location where Segway and other robotic demos are displayed and given. The Tech Museum's architecture is the work of Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta. Four major theme galleries fill the upper level and lower level of the museum: Communication,
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Associated Press

    Associated Press

    • Award categories presented: Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year
    • Awards presented: Associated Press Athlete of the Year
    The Associated Press is an American news agency. The AP is a cooperative owned by its contributing newspapers, radio and television stations in the United States, which both contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists. Many newspapers and broadcasters outside the United States are AP subscribers, paying a fee to use AP material without being contributing members of the cooperative. As of 2005, the news collected by the AP is published and republished by more than 1,700 newspapers, in addition to more than 5,001 television and radio broadcasters. The photograph library of the AP consists of over 10 million images. The Associated Press operates 243 news bureaus, and it serves at least 120 countries, with an international staff located all over the world. Associated Press also operates The Associated Press Radio Network, which provides newscasts twice hourly for broadcast and satellite radio and television stations. The AP Radio also offers news and public affairs features, feeds of news sound bites, and long form coverage of major events. As part of their cooperative agreement with The Associated Press, most member news organizations grant automatic
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Academy of American Poets

    Academy of American Poets

    • Award categories presented: James Laughlin Award
    • Awards presented: James Laughlin Award
    The Academy of American Poets is a non-profit organization dedicated to the art of poetry. The Academy was incorporated as a "membership corporation" in New York State in 1934. It sponsors a portfolio of poetry awards, of which the first was a fellowship created in 1946 to support a poet and honor "distinguished achievement." In addition, the Academy fosters the readership of poetry through outreach activities such as National Poetry Month. In 1984 Robert Penn Warren noted that "To have great poets there must be great audiences, Whitman said, to the more or less unheeding ears of American educators. Ambitiously, hopefully, the Academy has undertaken to remedy this plight." In 1998, Dinitia Smith described the Academy of American Poets as "a venerable body at the symbolic center of the American poetry establishment." The academy was created in 1934 in New York City by Mrs. Marie Bullock with a mission to "support American poets at all stages of their careers and to foster the appreciation of contemporary poetry." In 1936, the Academy was officially incorporated as a non-profit organization. Ms. Bullock was the president of the Academy for the next half a century, running the Academy
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Chicago Bears

    Chicago Bears

    • Awards presented: Brian Piccolo Award
    The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears have won nine (9) NFL Championships (eight pre-merger, and one Super Bowl). The Bears hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, with 27 members, and the most retired jersey numbers (13). The Bears have also recorded more regular season and overall victories than any other NFL franchise. The franchise recorded its 700th win on November 18, 2010. The franchise was founded in Decatur, Illinois, in 1919, and moved to Chicago in 1921. Along with the Arizona Cardinals (originally from Chicago), it is one of only two remaining franchises from the NFL's founding. The team played home games at Wrigley Field on Chicago's North Side through the 1970 season. With the exception of the 2002 season, they have played their home games at Chicago's Soldier Field every year since 1971. The stadium is located next to Lake Michigan, and was recently remodeled in a modernization intended to update stadium amenities while preserving a historic Chicago
    7.40
    5 votes
    15
    National Endowment for the Humanities

    National Endowment for the Humanities

    • Award categories presented: Jefferson Lecture
    The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the U.S. government, established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (Pub.L. 89-209), dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities. The NEH is located at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. in the Old Post Office. The NEH provides grants for high-quality humanities projects to cultural institutions such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television, and radio stations, and to individual scholars. The agency is also a base supporter of a network of private, nonprofit affiliates, the 56 humanities councils in the United States. These grants are given in order to strengthen teaching and learning in the humanities in schools and colleges across the nation, facilitate research and original scholarship, provide opportunities for lifelong learning, preserve and provide access to cultural and educational resources and to strengthen the institutional base of the humanities. The Endowment is directed by a chairman, who is appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate, for a
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    Silverdocs

    Silverdocs

    • Award categories presented: SILVERDOCS Sterling Award for a US Feature
    AFI-Discovery Channel Silverdocs Documentary Festival is an American international film festival created by the American Film Institute and Discovery Channel. It is held every year in Silver Spring, Maryland near Washington, D.C.. Started in 2003, the festival is held for eight days in June at the AFI Silver and Discovery Communications World Headquarters. Silverdocs is dedicated to showcasing the best in documentary films. Silverdocs also offers the concurrent 5-day International Documentary Conference, the largest professional conference of its kind in the U.S. It explores the business of documentary filmmaking with 1,200 industry participants and 80 workshops, seminars and networking events. The Conference brings together business leaders, filmmakers, broadcasters, distributors and funders from both established and emerging media markets. Silverdocs bestows awards valued at over $80,000 in cash and prizes. Awards & Grants include: AOL Vice Chairman Emeritus Ted Leonsis, BET Co-Founder Sheila Johnson, former Vice President Al Gore, Academy Award-winning filmmakers Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme, Barbara Kopple, LeBron James, and Alex Gibney. BBC, CPB, Discovery Channel, TLC,
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    Cricket Australia

    Cricket Australia, formerly known as the Australian Cricket Board, is the governing body for professional and amateur cricket in Australia. It was originally formed in 1905 as the "Australian Board of Control for International Cricket". It is incorporated as an Australian Public Company, limited by guarantee. Cricket Australia operates all of the Australian national representative cricket sides, including the Australian cricket team, the Australia national women's cricket team and youth sides as well. CA is also responsible for organising and hosting Test tours and One Day Internationals with other nations, and scheduling the home international fixtures. Cricket Australia is in charge of regional development of cricket in the Pacific region, under the International Cricket Council's development program. Cricket Australia is an administrative organisation responsible for the promotion, development and organisation of cricket in Australia. Cricket Australia has six member organisations that represent each of the Australian states. These organisations are: Cricket ACT and Northern Territory Cricket are non-member associations, although the ACT participates in Cricket Australia
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    TV Land

    TV Land

    • Awards presented: TV Land Award
    TV Land stylized as TVland (originally Nick at Nite's TV Land) is an American cable television network launched on April 29, 1996. It is owned by MTV Networks, a division of Viacom, which also owns Paramount Pictures, and networks such as MTV and Nickelodeon. Originally consisting exclusively of classic television shows, the network now airs a combination of classic television shows, newer shows, originals and movies. Building on the success and popularity of Nick at Nite, TV Land premiered on April 29, 1996, delivering classic situation comedies, dramas, variety shows and memorable TV programming 24 hours a day. The phrase "TV Land" was originally coined by The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show in the 1960s, in which Bullwinkle often introduced his "Bullwinkle's Corner" segments with the greeting, "Hello out there in TV Land!" Occasionally a soundbite of Bullwinkle's phrase is used in TV Land promotions. Shortly after the cable network's debut, MCA sued Viacom. Because MCA's original agreement with Paramount Pictures on the USA Network prohibited either partner from operating cable networks outside the joint venture, Viacom had been in breach of contract ever since they bought Paramount
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    British monarchy

    British monarchy

    • Awards presented: Victoria Cross
    The monarchy of the United Kingdom (commonly referred to as the British monarchy) is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories. The title of the monarch is king or queen. Queen Elizabeth II became monarch on 6 February 1952. The monarch and immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial, diplomatic, and representational duties. As the monarchy is constitutional, the monarch is limited to non-partisan functions such as bestowing honours and appointing the Prime Minister. The monarch is by tradition Commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces. Though the ultimate formal executive authority over the government of the United Kingdom is still by and through the monarch's royal prerogative, these powers may only be used according to laws enacted in Parliament, and, in practice, within the constraints of convention and precedent. The British monarchy traces its origins from the Kings of the Angles and the early Scottish Kings. By the year 1000, the kingdoms of England and Scotland had developed from the petty kingdoms of early medieval Britain. The last Anglo-Saxon monarch (Harold II) was defeated and killed in the Norman invasion of 1066
    7.20
    5 votes
    20

    Mystery Writers of America

    • Award categories presented: The Ellery Queen Award
    • Awards presented: Edgar Award
    Mystery Writers of America is an organization for mystery writers, based in New York. The organization was founded in 1945 by Clayton Rawson, Anthony Boucher, Lawrence Treat, and Brett Halliday. It presents the Edgar Award, a small bust of Edgar Allan Poe, to writers every year. It presents the Raven Award to non-writers who contribute to the mystery genre. The category of Best Juvenile Mystery is also part of the Edgar Award, with such notable recipients as Barbara Brooks Wallace having won the honor twice, for The Twin in the Tavern in 1994 and Sparrows in the Scullery in 1998, and Tony Abbott for his novel The Postcard, which received critical accolades in 2009. The Grand Master Award is the highest honor bestowed by the Mystery Writers of America. It recognizes lifetime achievement and consistent quality. (The award was presented irregularly through 1978; with the exception of 2009, it has been given to one writer annually since then.)
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    National Academy of Design

    National Academy of Design

    • Awards presented: Thomas R. Proctor Prize
    The National Academy Museum and School, founded in New York City as the National Academy of Design – known simply as the "National Academy" – is an honorary association of American artists founded in 1825 by Samuel F. B. Morse, Asher B. Durand, Thomas Cole, Martin E. Thompson, and others "to promote the fine arts in America through instruction and exhibition." Its museum houses a public collection of over 7,000 works of American art from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. The Academy has had several homes over the years. Notable among them was a building built during 1863-1865, designed by architect P. B. Wight in Venetian Gothic style, which was modeled on the Doge's Palace in Venice. Another locale was at West 109th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in Manhattan. Since 1942 the academy has occupied a mansion that was the former home of sculptor Anna Hyatt Huntington and Archer Milton Huntington at Fifth Avenue and Eighty-ninth Street. The school offers studio instruction, master classes, intensive critiques, various workshops, and lunchtime lectures. Scholarships are available. Members of the National Academy may be identified using the post-nominal "NA" (National Academician). One
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Claremont Graduate University

    Claremont Graduate University

    • Award categories presented: Kate Tufts Discovery Award
    • Awards presented: Kate Tufts Discovery Award
    Claremont Graduate University (CGU) is a private, all-graduate research university located in Claremont, California, a city 35 miles (56 km) east of downtown Los Angeles. Founded in 1925, CGU is a member of the Claremont Colleges consortium which includes five undergraduate (Pomona College, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey Mudd College, Scripps College, Pitzer College) and two graduate (CGU and Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences) institutions of higher education. Adjoining and within walking distance of one another (refer to the map), design was based on that of Oxford University and Cambridge University. CGU is the oldest all-graduate institution in the United States, with many notable alumni in different fields all over the world. The university is organized into nine separate schools; the School of Community & Global Health, formed in 2008, is the newest. Deborah Freund took office as University President in fall 2010. Founded in 1925, CGU was the second of the Claremont Colleges to form, following Pomona College and preceding Scripps College. Claremont Graduate University is the oldest remaining all-graduate university in the United States. The school has
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations

    Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations

    • Awards presented: Philip Taft Labor History Book Award
    The New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) is an industrial relations school at Cornell University, an Ivy League university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. ILR specializes in the fields of human resource management, labor relations, and dispute resolution. Established by the state legislature in 1945, the school is a statutory or contract college and receives funding from the State of New York. It was the world's first school for college-level study in workplace issues and remains one of a handful of four-year undergraduate programs focused on work and employment. In addition to its undergraduate curriculum, the school offers professional and doctoral degrees, as well as executive education programs. In 1944, a coalition of leaders in American business, industry, labor, government, and education formed to establish the school. They believed that a new type of school was needed that focused on issues involving the American workplace. More specifically, the State Legislature established the school in 1945 based on the recommendations of the New York State Joint Legislative Committee on Industrial and Labor Conditions. This committee was headed by Irving M.
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    New York University

    New York University

    • Award categories presented: Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award
    New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian American research university based in New York City. NYU's main campus is situated in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan. Founded in 1831, NYU is one of the largest private nonprofit institutions of American higher education. NYU was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1950. The university counts 36 Nobel Prize winners, 3 Abel Prize winners, 10 National Medal of Science recipients, 16 Pulitzer Prize winners, 30 Academy Award winners, 4 Putnam Competition winners, Russ Prize, Gordon Prize, and Draper Prize winners, Turing Award winners, and Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award winners among its faculty and alumni. NYU also has MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowship holders as well as National Academy of Sciences members among its past and present graduates and faculty. NYU is organized into 18 schools, colleges, and institutes, located in six centers throughout Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn, as well as more than a dozen other sites across the world, with plans for further expansion. According to the Institute of International Education, NYU sends more students to study abroad than any other US college
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Beinecke Library

    Beinecke Library

    • Award categories presented: Bollingen Prize
    • Awards presented: Bollingen Prize
    Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (BRBL) was a 1963 gift of the Beinecke family. The building was designed by Pritzker Prize architect Gordon Bunshaft of the firm of Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill, and is the largest building in the world reserved exclusively for the preservation of rare books and manuscripts. It is located at 121 Wall Street in the center of the Yale campus in New Haven, Connecticut, in Hewitt Quadrangle, which is more commonly referred to as "Beinecke Plaza". A six-story above-ground glass-enclosed tower of book stacks is surrounded by a windowless rectangular outer shell, supported only on four massive piers at the corners of the building, which descend 50 feet to bedrock. The outer walls are made of translucent veined marble panels quarried from Danby, Vermont, which transmit subdued lighting and provide protection from direct sunlight. At night, the stone panels transmit light from the interior, giving the exterior of the building an amber glow. The outside dimensions have "Platonic" mathematical proportions of 1:2:3 (height: width: length). The building has been called a precious "jewel box". The building has also been called a
    8.00
    4 votes
    26

    Blockbuster

    • Award categories presented: Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actor - Comedy
    • Awards presented: Blockbuster Entertainment Award
    Blockbuster LLC, formerly Blockbuster Inc., is an American-based provider of home video and video game rental services, originally through video rental shops (both owned and franchised), later adding DVD-by-mail, streaming video on demand, and kiosks. At its peak in 2009, Blockbuster had up to 60,000 employees. There are around 840 Blockbuster stores in the U.S. with locations in 17 countries worldwide. It is headquartered in McKinney, Texas. Because of poor strategic planning and mismanagement as well as competition from other video rental companies such as Netflix, Blockbuster has undergone significant revenue losses. The company filed for bankruptcy on September 23, 2010, and on April 6, 2011, was bought by satellite television provider Dish Network at auction for $233 million and the assumption of $87 million in liabilities and other obligations. The acquisition was completed on April 26, 2011. The first Blockbuster store opened October 1985 in Dallas, Texas at the corner of Skillman and Northwest Highway. The founder of the company was David Cook, who grew the business and brought it public. The innovation was derived from Cook's experience with managing huge databases. After
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    DeMolay International

    DeMolay International

    • Award categories presented: DeMolay Legion of Honor
    • Awards presented: DeMolay Legion of Honor
    DeMolay International (also known as the Order of DeMolay), founded in Kansas City, Missouri in 1919, is an international organization for young men ages 12–21. DeMolay derives its name from Jacques DeMolay, the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar. DeMolay was incorporated in the 1990s and is classified by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization holding a group exemption letter. DeMolay is open for membership to young men between the ages of 12 to 21 of good character who acknowledge a higher power. Currently about 15,000 active members are in the United States and Canada and additional members have active chapters in Italy, Romania, Peru, the Philippines, Australia, Aruba, Bolivia, Serbia, Japan, and Brazil. At present Brazilian DeMolay has more active members than even the United States, making Portuguese the most commonly used language in DeMolay chapters. The group model is of mentoring; adult men and women called advisors, often past DeMolay members or parents of DeMolays, mentor the active DeMolay members. An advisor is referred to as "Dad Smith" instead of "Mr. Smith". Appropriate ways for the young men to address their adult guides were discussed by the members
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Privacy International

    Privacy International

    • Awards presented: Big Brother Award
    Privacy International (PI) is a UK-based non-profit organisation formed in 1990, "as a watchdog on surveillance and privacy invasions by governments and corporations." PI has organised campaigns and initiatives in more than fifty countries and is based in London, UK. During 1990, in response to increasing awareness about the globalisation of surveillance, more than a hundred privacy experts and human rights organizations from forty countries took steps to form an international organization for the protection of privacy. Members of the new body, including computer professionals, academics, lawyers, journalists, jurists and human rights activists, had a common interest in promoting an international understanding of the importance of privacy and data protection. Meetings of the group, which took the name Privacy International (PI), were held throughout that year in North America, Europe, Asia, and the South Pacific, and members agreed to work toward the establishment of new forms of privacy advocacy at the international level. The initiative was convened and personally funded by British privacy activist Simon Davies who has since then been director of the organization. At the time,
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    American Booksellers Association

    • Awards presented: Book Sense Book of the Year Award
    The American Booksellers Association (ABA) is a non-profit industry association founded in 1900 that promotes independent bookstores in the United States and Canada. The ABA and its members support freedom of speech through the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, literacy, and programs that encourage reading. Many independent booksellers are concerned about the potential negative impact on free speech by giant megachains and nationwide web retailers. The concern is that publishers cater to these retailers and that control over what books, and hence what ideas, are available will ultimately rest in the hands of these few companies. The ABA has been shrinking from a peak in 1991 when there were 5200 members. There were 5500 members with 7000 stores in 1995; 3300 members in 1998; 3100 members with 4000 stores in 2000; 2794 members in 2001; 2191 members in 2002; and 1702 members in 2005. In 2010 the number of members increased for the first time in almost two decades, with 1410 members, up nine from the previous year. In recent years, the ABA has released the number of new member bookstores to counter media reports of bookstore closings, with 97 opening in 2006; 115
    6.80
    5 votes
    30

    Cannes Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Palme d'Or
    • Awards presented: Cannes Film Festival Awards
    The Cannes International Film Festival (French: Le Festival International du Film de Cannes or just Festival de Cannes), is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France, which previews new films of all genres including documentaries from around the world. Founded in 1946, it is the world's most prestigious and publicized film festival. The invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès. The 2012 Cannes Film Festival took place from May 16 to May 27, 2012. The President of the Jury was the Italian film director Nanni Moretti. The Cannes Film Festival has its origins in the late 1930s when Jean Zay, the French Minister of National Education, on the proposal of Philippe Erlanger and with the support of the British and Americans, set up an international cinematographic festival. In 1947, the festival was held as the "Festival du film de Cannes", where films from sixteen countries were presented. At that time the principle of equality was introduced, with a jury made up of only one representative per country. The festival is now held at the Palais des Festivals, expressly constructed for the occasion, although for its 1949
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Hollywood Foreign Press Association

    Hollywood Foreign Press Association

    • Award categories presented: Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Musical or Comedy Film
    • Awards presented: Golden Globe Awards
    The Hollywood Foreign Press Association (H.F.P.A.) is an organization composed of working journalists who cover the United States entertainament industry for a variety of outlets, including newspapers and magazines in Europe, Asia, Australia and Central and South America. Today, the close to ninety members of the H.F.P.A. represent at least fifty-five countries and have a combined readership of more than two hundred and fifty million. The organization is best known for its annual Golden Globe Awards ceremony held in Los Angeles every January. The association was founded in the early 1940s by a group of Los Angeles-based foreign journalists in an attempt to gain more clout with the studios and make it easier to obtain access to stars. The organization’s first awards presentation for distinguished achievements in the film industry took place in early 1944 with an informal ceremony at 20th Century Fox. There, Jennifer Jones was awarded Best Actress honors for “The Song of Bernadette,” which also won for Best Film, while Paul Lukas took home Best Actor laurels for “Watch on the Rhine.” Awards were presented in the form of scrolls. The following year members came up with the idea of
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Australian Institute of Architects

    Australian Institute of Architects

    • Awards presented: Sir John Sulman Medal
    The Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional body for architects in Australia. Until August 2008, the Institute traded as the "Royal Australian Institute of Architects", which remains its official name. The institute consists of 9000 members across Australia and overseas. It was formed in 1930, when state architectural institutes combined to form a unified national association. A chapter is maintained in each state, though full federation did not come about immediately, with some states resolutely maintaining their independence. The RVIA was the last to join, in 1968. The AIA is represented on many national and state industry and government bodies, and is affiliated with the International Union of Architects (UIA). The RAIA Gold Medal is the highest award of the Australian Institute of Architects awarded annually since 1960. The AIA National Architecture Awards are presented since 1981. In 2009 the National Architecture Awards or Commendations were: Each of the state chapters also presents awards. In 2006 the chapter award categories were:
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Field Museum of Natural History

    Field Museum of Natural History

    • Award categories presented: Founders' Council Award of Merit
    The Field Museum of Natural History (shortened to Field Museum) is located in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as the Museum Campus Chicago. The museum collections contain over 21 million specimens, of which only a small portion are ever on display. The president of the museum is Richard W. Lariviere. Some prized exhibits in the Field Museum include a large collection of dinosaur skeletons in the Evolving Planet exhibit, a comprehensive set of human cultural anthropology exhibits (with artifacts from ancient Egypt, the Pacific Northwest, the Pacific Islands, and Tibet), a large and diverse taxidermy collection (with many large animals, including two prized African elephants and the infamous Lions of Tsavo featured in the 1996 movie The Ghost and the Darkness), the Ancient Americas exhibit devoted to a large collection of Native American artifacts, and Sue (the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus skeleton currently known). The Field Museum was incorporated in the State of Illinois on September 16, 1893 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago with its purpose the "accumulation and dissemination of knowledge, and
    6.60
    5 votes
    35

    Casting Society of America

    • Award categories presented: Artios for Best Casting for Feature Film, Comedy
    • Awards presented: Artios Award
    Founded in Los Angeles, California in 1982, the Casting Society of America (CSA) is a professional society of about 350 casting directors for film, television, and theatre in Australia, Canada, Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States. The society is not to be confused with an industry union. The Teamsters represent some (though not all) casting directors in Hollywood. Members are entitled to use the post-nominal letters "C.S.A.". The following requirements must be met in order to join the CSA: Casting directors who are also personal managers are not eligible for membership in the CSA. Since October 1985, the Casting Society of America has presented the Artios Awards for excellence in casting. Members are honored in over eighteen different theatrical casting categories in simultaneous events held in New York City and Beverly Hills, California.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Council of Fashion Designers of America

    Council of Fashion Designers of America

    • Award categories presented: CFDA International Award
    The Council of Fashion Designers of America, Inc. (CFDA) is a not-for-profit trade association of over 350 of America’s foremost fashion and accessory designers. As of 2009, Diane von Fürstenberg is the group's President and Steven Kolb is the Executive Director. Founded in 1962, the CFDA continues to advance the status of fashion design as a branch of American art and culture; to raise its artistic and professional standards; to define a code of ethical practices of mutual benefit in public and trade relations; and, to promote appreciation of the fashion arts through leadership in quality and aesthetic discernment. In addition to hosting the annual CFDA Fashion Awards, the organization is committed to nurturing the development of the American fashion industry’s future designers. The CFDA’s Educational Initiatives provide support and resources for students at the high school, collegiate and post-graduate levels. In addition, CFDA supports working designers in the early stages and throughout their careers. Among those efforts include the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, the Business of Fashion and the Business Service Network (BSN). The CFDA, through the CFDA Foundation, Inc., mobilizes its
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Federal government of the United States

    Federal government of the United States

    • Award categories presented: Medal of Honor
    The government of the United States of America is the federal government of the constitutional republic of fifty states that constitute the United States of America, as well as one capitol district, and several other territories. The federal government is composed of three distinct branches: legislative, executive and judicial, which powers are vested by the U.S. Constitution in the Congress, the President, and the federal courts, including the Supreme Court, respectively; the powers and duties of these branches are further defined by acts of Congress, including the creation of executive departments and courts inferior to the Supreme Court. The full name of the republic is "The United States of America". No other name appears in the Constitution, and this is the name that appears on money, in treaties, and in legal cases to which it is a party (e.g., Charles T. Schenck v. United States). The terms "Government of the United States of America" or "United States Government" are often used in official documents to represent the federal government as distinct from the states collectively. In casual conversation or writing, the term "Federal Government" is often used, and the term
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    IBM

    IBM

    • Award categories presented: IBM Fellow
    International Business Machines Corporation, or IBM, is an American multinational technology and consulting corporation, with headquarters in Armonk, New York, United States. IBM manufactures and sells computer hardware and software, and offers infrastructure, hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. The company was founded in 1911 as the Computing Tabulating Recording Company (CTR) through a merger of three companies: the Tabulating Machine Company, the International Time Recording Company, and the Computing Scale Company. CTR adopted the name International Business Machines in 1924, using a name previously designated to CTR's subsidiary in Canada and later South America. Its distinctive culture and product branding has given it the nickname Big Blue. In 2012, Fortune ranked IBM the #2 largest U.S. firm in terms of number of employees (433,362), the #4 largest in terms of market capitalization, the #9 most profitable, and the #19 largest firm in terms of revenue. Globally, the company was ranked the #31 largest in terms of revenue by Forbes for 2011. Other rankings for 2011/2012 include #1 company for leaders (Fortune), #1 green
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    • Award categories presented: Biggest Kerfluffle Over A Relatively Minor Issue
    • Awards presented: Metaweb Technologies Awards
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc. was a United States company based in San Francisco that developed Freebase, described as an "open, shared database of the world's knowledge". The company was founded by Danny Hillis in July, 2005, and operated in stealth mode until 2007. Metaweb was acquired by Google in July, 2010. Although Metaweb no longer exists as a separate corporate entity, Freebase and its associated website freebase.com continue to be provided as an open database under Metaweb's original CC-BY licensing terms. On March 14, 2006, Metaweb received $15 million in funding. Investors included: Benchmark Capital, Millennium Technology Ventures, and Omidyar Network. Kevin Harvey of Benchmark Capital is a member of Metaweb's board of directors. On January 15, 2008, Metaweb announced a $42.5 million Series B round led by Goldman Sachs and Benchmark Capital. On July 16, 2010, Google acquired Metaweb for an undisclosed sum.
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    World Organization of Family Doctors

    World Organization of Family Doctors

    • Award categories presented: WONCA Foundation Award
    The World Organization of National Colleges, Academies (Wonca) and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians or in short World Organization of Family Doctors is an international organization of national colleges, academies or organizations concerned with the academic aspects of general family practice. Wonca was founded in 1972. While this odd acronym is hard to explain, especially in the context of its more modern formal name, the acronym has stuck. Wonca is an affiliate organisation of the World Health Organization (WHO) The WONCA International Classification Committee (WICC) has produced the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC), a clinical coding system for primary healthcare.
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    ASCAP

    ASCAP

    • Award categories presented: ASCAP Adventurous Programming Award
    • Awards presented: ASCAP Film and Television Music Awards
    The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (commonly known as ASCAP (/'æskæp/)) is an American not-for-profit performance-rights organization (PRO) that protects its members' musical copyrights by monitoring public performances of their music, whether via a broadcast or live performance, and compensating them accordingly. ASCAP collects licensing fees from users of music created by ASCAP members, then distributes them back to its members as royalties. In effect, the arrangement is the product of a compromise: when a song is played, the user does not have to pay the copyright holder directly, nor does the music creator have to bill a radio station for use of a song. In 2008, ASCAP collected over US$933 million in licensing fees and distributed $817 million in royalties to its members, with an 11.3 percent operating expense ratio. In the United States, ASCAP competes with two other PROs — Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) and the Society of European Stage Authors and Composers (SESAC). Unlike collecting societies outside of the United States, the ASCAP contract is non-exclusive, and although it's not so simple for a foreign person to join ASCAP, it is possible. ASCAP has an
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Overseas Press Club

    Overseas Press Club

    • Award categories presented: Robert Capa Gold Medal
    The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) was founded in 1939 in New York City by a group of foreign correspondents. The wire service reporter Carol Weld was a founding member. The club seeks to maintain an international association of journalists working in the United States and abroad; to encourage the highest standards of professional integrity and skill in the reporting of news; to help educate a new generation of journalists; to contribute to the freedom and independence of journalists and the press throughout the world, and to work toward better communication and understanding among people. The organization has approximately 500 members, who are media industry leaders. Every April, the OPC holds a dinner to award excellence in journalism for the previous year. The awards are juried by industry peers. The organization also has a foundation that distributes scholarships to college students who want to begin a career as a foreign correspondent. Many scholarship winners secure international assignments at some of the most prestigious news outlets in the world. In April 2008, the OPC relaunched its Web site to include community features for members like forums, commenting, page
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Royal Institute of British Architects

    Royal Institute of British Architects

    • Award categories presented: Royal Gold Medal
    • Awards presented: Stirling Prize
    The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom, but also internationally. Originally named the Institute of British Architects in London, it was formed in 1834 by several prominent architects, including Philip Hardwick, Thomas Allom, William Donthorne, Thomas Leverton Donaldson, John Buonarotti Papworth, and Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey. After the grant of the royal charter it had become known as the Royal Institute of British Architects in London, eventually dropping the reference to London in 1892. In 1934, it moved to its current headquarters on Portland Place, with the building being opened by King George V and Queen Mary. It was granted its Royal Charter in 1837 under King William IV. Supplemental Charters of 1887, 1909 and 1925 were replaced by a single Charter in 1971, and there have been minor amendments since then. The original Charter of 1837 set out the purpose of the Royal Institute to be: '… the general advancement of Civil Architecture, and for promoting and facilitating the acquirement of the knowledge of the various arts and sciences connected therewith…' The operational framework is
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    • Award categories presented: David W. Taylor Medal
    The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) is a professional society that provides a forum for the advancement of the engineering profession as applied to the marine field. Although it particularly names the naval architecture and marine engineering specialties, the society includes all types of engineers amongst its members and is dedicated to advancing the art, science and practice of naval architecture, shipbuilding and marine engineering. Originally founded in 1893 as a United States engineering society, SNAME now has members in almost every seafaring nation and has various international chapters. The society is currently headquartered in Jersey City, New Jersey. SNAME offers various membership grades, including student, affiliate, associate, full member and fellow status. Full members generally have earned a Bachelor of Science degree in naval architecture, marine engineering or hold a degree in engineering and have experience that is associated with ship design, construction or operation. Marine design is inherently a wide ranging engineering design field and SNAME has members with wide experience ranging from electrical engineering, to weapons systems
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    • Award categories presented: Fellow of the AAAS
    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity. It is the world's largest general scientific society, with 126,995 individual and institutional members at the end of 2008, and is the publisher of the well-known scientific journal Science, which has a weekly circulation of 138,549. The American Association for the Advancement of Science was created on September 20, 1848 in Pennsylvania. It was a reformation of the Association of American Geologists and Naturalists. The society chose William Charles Redfield as their first president because he had proposed the most comprehensive plans for the organization. According to the first constitution which was agreed to at the September 20 meeting, the goal of the society was to promote scientific dialogue in order to allow for greater scientific collaboration. By doing so the association aimed to use resources to conduct science with increased efficiency and
    6.40
    5 votes
    46
    Sundance Film Festival

    Sundance Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize - U.S. Dramatic
    • Awards presented: Sundance Film Festival Awards
    The Sundance Film Festival is an American film festival that takes place annually in Utah. It is the largest independent cinema festival in the United States. Held in January in Park City, Salt Lake City, and Ogden, as well as at the Sundance Resort, the festival is a showcase for new work from American and international independent filmmakers. The festival comprises competitive sections for American and international dramatic and documentary films, both feature-length films and short films, and a group of out-of-competition sections, including NEXT, New Frontier, Spotlight, and Park City At Midnight. Sundance began in Salt Lake City in August 1978, as the Utah/US Film Festival in an effort to attract more filmmakers to Utah. It was founded by Sterling Van Wagenen (then head of Wildwood, Robert Redford's company), John Earle, and Cirina Hampton Catania (both serving on the Utah Film Commission at the time). The 1978 festival featured films such as Deliverance, A Streetcar Named Desire, Midnight Cowboy, Mean Streets, and The Sweet Smell of Success. With Chairperson Robert Redford, and the help of Utah Governor Scott M. Matheson, the goal of the festival was to showcase strictly
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    International Film Festival Rotterdam

    International Film Festival Rotterdam

    • Award categories presented: VPRO Tiger Award
    • Awards presented: International Film Festival Rotterdam Awards
    The International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFFR) is an annual film festival held in various cinemas in Rotterdam, Netherlands held at the end of January. It is approximately comparable in size to other major European festivals such as Cannes, Venice, Berlin, and Locarno. The IFFR also hosts CineMart, for film producers to seek funding. The International Film Festival Rotterdam management emphasizes diversity in its film programming and on building relationships with and between film-makers and audiences. Rather than red-carpet events, the festival's design is to encourage film makers to mingle with attendees. As a result, the festival claims having "a unique atmosphere" and a "fiercely loyal following" locally and internationally - around 90% of tickets are sold to regular supporters. The festival is described as having "a serious commitment to film lovers and film making - screenings are shown without 'popcorn breaks', trailers or other commercials. This sense of purpose plays a crucial role in attracting the best directors to the event, allowing it to forge a reputation for diversity, discovery and innovation." The first festival — then called 'Film International' — was organized
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

    Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Crystal Globe
    • Awards presented: Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Awards
    The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Czech: Mezinárodní filmový festival Karlovy Vary) is a film festival held annually in July in Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad), Czech Republic. The Karlovy Vary Festival gained worldwide recognition over the past years and has become one of Europe's major film events. The Karlovy Vary film festival is one of the oldest in the world. The pre-war dream of many enthusiastic filmmakers materialized in 1946 when a non-competition festival of films from seven countries took place in Mariánské Lázně and Karlovy Vary. Above all it was intended to screen the results of the recently nationalized Czechoslovak film industry. After the first two years the festival moved permanently to Karlovy Vary. For several decades after the Communist takeover in February 1948 the festival was entirely under the control of the political establishment. Periods in which the selection of films, the conferral of awards, and the invitation of guests were dominated by Communist propaganda alternated with less restrictive periods, such as the sixties, in which the festival program was able to offer the latest artistic trends in both Czechoslovak and world cinema, including the
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

    • Award categories presented: Nobel Prize in Physics
    • Awards presented: Crafoord Prize
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RSAS) or Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien ("KVA") is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. The Academy is an independent, non-governmental scientific organization which acts to promote the sciences, primarily the natural sciences and mathematics. The Academy was founded on 2 June 1739 by naturalist Carl Linnaeus, mercantilist Jonas Alströmer, mechanical engineer Mårten Triewald, civil servants Sten Carl Bielke and Carl Wilhelm Cederhielm, and politician Anders Johan von Höpken. The purpose of the academy was to focus on practically useful knowledge, and to publish in Swedish in order to widely disseminate the academy's findings. The academy was intended to be different from the Royal Society of Sciences in Uppsala, which had been founded in 1719 and published in Latin. The location close to the commercial activities in Sweden's capital (which unlike Uppsala did not have a university at this time) was also intentional. The academy was modeled after the Royal Society of London and Academie Royale des Sciences in Paris, France, which some of the founding members were familiar with. Committees of the Academy act as selection boards for international
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    ARD

    ARD

    • Awards presented: Deutscher Fernsehpreis
    ARD (full name: Arbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen Rundfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland – "Consortium of public-law broadcasting institutions of the Federal Republic of Germany") is a joint organization of Germany's regional public-service broadcasters. It was founded in 1950 in West Germany to represent the common interests of the new, decentralized, post-war broadcasting services — in particular the introduction of a joint television network. The ARD is the world's second largest public broadcaster after the British Broadcasting Corporation, with a budget of €6.3 billion and 23,000 employees. The budget comes primarily from the licence fees required to use radios and TV sets in Germany. For radio and TV reception, the fee is currently €17.98 per month. These fees are not collected directly by the ARD, but by the GEZ, a common organization of the ARD member broadcasters, the second public TV broadcaster ZDF, and Deutschlandradio. ARD maintains and operates a national television network, called Das Erste ("The First") to differentiate it from ZDF, a.k.a. "das Zweite" ("The Second"), which was founded in 1961. The ARD network began broadcasting on 31 October
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

    • Award categories presented: Budweiser Conservation Scholarship
    The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) was created by the U.S. Congress in 1984 to protect and restore fish and wildlife and their habitats. NFWF directs public dollars to critical environmental needs and matches those investments with private contributions. NFWF supports science-based, results-oriented projects across the United States and the world. NFWF provides grants on a competitive basis to protect imperiled species, promote healthy oceans and waterways, improve wildlife habitat, advance sustainable fisheries and conserve water for wildlife and people. Birds, freshwater fish, marine and coastal ecosystems, wildlife and habitat are focal areas. NWF’s Congressional mandate is to connect government agencies, non-profit organizations, corporations and individuals to combine federal funds with private donations for effective, results-oriented conservation projects. Since its establishment in 1984 through 2011, NFWF has awarded over 11,600 grants leveraging $576 million in federal funds into more than $2 billion for conservation. As part of its Congressional charter, NFWF also serves as a neutral, third-party fiduciary to receive, manage and disburse funds that originate
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    VIVA

    VIVA

    • Awards presented: Comet
    VIVA a free-to-air German language based music television channel went first on the air on 1. December 1993. A consortium of broadcasters and record companies led by Time Warner, Sony Television, Polygram Records and EMI Music, but notably excluding the German based Bertelsmann Music Group, saw their investment in VIVA as an antidote to the "vain posturing power of MTV Networks executives" according to Germany's Süddeutsche Zeitung. Executives at US media giant Time Warner, keen on increasing their market share of its music repertoire and business in Germany, planned the new TV station in 1992. Eventually they recruited DoRo Productions, producers of music videos for notable acts such as Queen, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie, in the design of the music channel. VIVA became an immediate success with the audience, while ultimately providing German artists with a music channel that could help expose their music to the German audience. After many years of fierce competition for audience share, MTV Networks Europe eventually acquired VIVA on 14. January 2005 after it had outran its own efforts for better ratings. MTV today operates VIVA channels across Europe, in Germany, Austria,
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    Fox Broadcasting Company

    Fox Broadcasting Company

    • Awards presented: Teen Choice Awards
    Fox Broadcasting Company, commonly referred to as the Fox Network or simply Fox (and stylized as FOX), is an American commercial broadcasting television network owned by Fox Entertainment Group, part of Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. Launched on October 9, 1986, Fox was the highest-rated broadcast network in the 18–49 demographic from 2004 to 2009. In the 2007–08 season, Fox became the most popular network in America in household ratings for the first time in its history, replacing CBS. CBS took back the top spot in the 2008–09 season. The Fox Broadcasting Company and its affiliates operate many entertainment channels internationally, although these do not necessarily air the same programming as the U.S. network. Most viewers in Canada have access to at least one U.S. Fox affiliate, although most of Fox's primetime programming (as well as NFL on Fox) is subject to Canadian simultaneous substitution regulations. The network is named after sister company 20th Century Fox, and indirectly for producer William Fox, who founded one of the movie studio's predecessors, Fox Film. 20th Century Fox was involved in the television production as early as the 1950s. The company produced
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    World Press Photo

    World Press Photo

    • Awards presented: World Press Photo of the Year
    World Press Photo is an independent, non-profit organization based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Founded in 1955 the organization is known for holding the world's largest and most prestigious annual press photography contest. The awards ceremony is held in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam. After the contest, the prizewinning photographs are assembled into a traveling exhibition that is visited by over a million people in 40 countries. A yearbook presenting all prizewinning entries is published annually in six languages. In addition to selecting the World Press Photo of the Year, the contest determines winners in the following categories: Another primary objective of the organization is to support professional press photography on a wide international scale, to stimulate developments in photojournalism, encourage the transfer of knowledge, help develop high professional standards in photojournalism and promote a free and unrestricted exchange of information. It organizes a number of educational projects throughout the world: seminars, workshops and the annual Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2008, Anthony Suau, of USA, won the World Press Photo of the Year for the second time (the first was in
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Black Entertainment Television

    Black Entertainment Television

    • Awards presented: BET Awards
    Black Entertainment Television (BET, part of BET Networks) is an American, Viacom-owned cable network based in Washington, D.C.. Currently reaching more than 90 million households, it is the most prominent television network targeting African American audiences. The network was launched on January 25, 1980, by its founder, Robert L. Johnson. Programming of the network comprises mainstream music and movies and television series. After stepping down as a lobbyist for the cable industry, Freeport, Illinois, native Robert L. Johnson decided to launch his own cable television network. Johnson would soon acquire a loan for $15,000, and earned a $500,000 investment from John Malone to start the network. BET began broadcasting on January 25, 1980. Initially broadcasting for two hours a week as a block of programming on the Nickelodeon (it wouldn't be until 1983 that BET became a full fledged channel), the network lineup consisted of music videos and reruns of popular black sitcoms. BET launched a news program, BET News, in 1988, with Ed Gordon as the anchor. Gordon would later host other programs and specials on BET, such as Black Men Speak Out: The Aftermath, related to the 1992 Los
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Thrasher magazine

    • Award categories presented: Thrasher Skater of the Year
    Thrasher is a monthly skateboarding magazine, founded in 1981 by Kevin Thatcher, Eric Swenson, and Fausto Vitello, published by the San Francisco, United States-based company, High Speed Productions. The publication consists of articles, skateboard photography, interviews with professional skateboarders, music journalism (primarily reviews and interviews), skatepark reviews, and miscellaneous oddities. The magazine also maintains a website that consists of numerous features, including segments, such as "Firing Line" and "Hall of Meat", a store, a video collection, and a forum for registered users. In 1999, the magazine sponsored a PlayStation game called Thrasher: Skate and Destroy. Since January 2006, a bimonthly French language edition has been produced for francophone Europe. The magazine's website features regularly updated episodes of segments and hosts a forum in which registered users can engage in online discussion. The title of Skater of the Year is given out once a year by Thrasher magazine. The tradition was started in 1990 and has been one of the most respected awards in pro skateboarding. The title is bestowed to the skater who has received the most votes from
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Zoological Society of London

    Zoological Society of London

    • Award categories presented: Zoological Society of London Silver Medal
    The Zoological Society of London (sometimes known by the abbreviation ZSL) is a charity devoted to the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. It was founded in London in April 1826 by Sir Stamford Raffles, the Marquess of Lansdowne, Lord Auckland, Sir Humphry Davy, Robert Peel, Joseph Sabine, Nicholas Aylward Vigors along with various other nobility, clergy, and naturalists. Raffles was also the first chairman and president but died shortly afterwards in July 1826. He was succeeded by the Marquess of Lansdowne who supervised the building of the first animal houses, a parcel of land in Regent's Park having already been obtained from the Crown at the inaugural meeting. It received a Royal Charter from George IV on 27 March 1829. For over 180 years ZSL has played an essential role in wildlife science and conservation by convening experts to address challenging issues. This includes hosting high-profile public meetings and symposia as well as national and international workshops. ZSL works with governments, civil society and the private sector, both at home in the UK and around the globe, to conserve species and their habitats. It contributes to building conservation
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Billboard

    Billboard

    • Award categories presented: DJ of the Year
    • Awards presented: Billboard Music Award
    Billboard is an international newsweekly magazine devoted to the music industry, and is one of the oldest trade magazines in the world. It maintains several internationally recognized music charts that track the most popular songs and albums in various categories on a weekly basis. The two most notable charts are the Billboard Hot 100, which ranks the top 100 songs regardless of genre and is based on digital sales, radio airplay, and internet streaming data; and the Billboard 200, the corresponding chart for album sales. Billboard was founded in Cincinnati on November 1, 1894, by William h. Donaldson and James Hennegan. Originally titled Billboard Advertising it was a trade paper for the bill posting industry, hence the magazine's name. Within a few years of its founding, it began to carry news of outdoor amusements, a major consumer of billboard space. Eventually Billboard became the paper of record for circuses, carnivals, amusement parks, fairs, vaudeville, minstrels, whale shows and other live entertainment. The magazine began coverage of motion pictures in 1909 and of radio in the 1920s. With the development of the jukebox industry during the 1930s, The Billboard began
    6.00
    5 votes
    59
    BFI London Film Festival

    BFI London Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: The Times BFI London Film Festival Best Film Award
    • Awards presented: London Film Festival Awards
    The BFI London Film Festival (also known as just the London Film Festival) is the UK's largest public film event, screening more than 300 features, documentaries and shorts from almost 50 countries. The festival, (the LFF), currently in its 55th year, is run every year in the second half of October under the umbrella of the British Film Institute. The Festival showcases the best of world cinema to champion creativity, originality, vision and imagination, and presents the finest contemporary international cinema from both established and emerging film-makers. Set in the Autumn, the festival hosts high profile awards contenders, screens recently restored archive films, champions new discoveries and combines curatorial strength with red carpet glamour. It also provides an extensive programme of industry events, public forums, education events, lectures, masterclasses and Q&As with film-makers and film talent. In 1953 a group of film critics including Dilys Powell of the The Sunday Times, raised the notion of a film festival for London. They reasoned that with Cannes and Venice having their festivals, as did Edinburgh, so surely London should too. However their aim was to pitch the new
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Kelley School of Business

    Kelley School of Business

    • Award categories presented: First Indiana Bank Integrated Core Team Case Competition
    • Awards presented: First Indiana Bank Integrated Core Team Case Competition
    The Kelley School of Business is a top-ranked American business school operated by Indiana University in the United States. As of 2009, approximately 5,500 full-time students are enrolled on its Bloomington campus, as well as 1,750 students at the Indianapolis campus. In addition, 1,050 students study for graduate degrees through the school's distance-learning program "Kelley Direct". The Kelley School of Business attracts top tier students from around the world and is one of only three in the nation for which all undergraduate and graduate programs rank in the top 20 of the US News & World Report college rankings. Kelley was ranked 10th, tied with Cornell University, for its Undergraduate Business Program according to US News & World Report. Kelley was ranked 18th for its undergraduate B.S. program in business by Bloomberg Businessweek in their 2011 rankings and 19th for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) program by Business Week in 2011; it was ranked fifth for regional MBA programs by the Wall Street Journal in 2007. Bloomberg Businessweek ranked its full-time MBA program at #19 in the 2011 edition (acceptance rate of 31% with average GMAT of 664), and at #6 among all
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Bard College

    Bard College

    • Award categories presented: John and Samuel Bard Award in Medicine and Science
    Bard College, founded in 1860 as St. Stephen's College, is a private liberal arts college in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Bard's main, 600-acre (240 ha), rural campus is located near the town of Red Hook. The campus overlooks the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains, and is within the Hudson River Historic District, a National Historic Landmark. The institution consists of a liberal arts college, a conservatory, as well as 8 graduate programs offering over 20 graduate degrees in the arts and sciences. The undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 10:1. The college has a network of over 35 affiliated programs, institutes, and centers, spanning 12 cities, 5 states, 7 countries, and 4 continents. Bard's Annandale campus serves as an important regional cultural institution. Both the CCS Hessel Museum of Contemporary Art and the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts are located on campus. The college also hosts two acclaimed annual arts festivals, Bard SummerScape, and the Bard Music Festival. During much of the nineteenth century, the land now owned by Bard was mainly composed of several country estates. These estates were called Blithewood, Bartlett, Sands, Cruger's
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Film Independent

    • Award categories presented: Independent Spirit Award for Best Feature
    • Awards presented: Independent Spirit Awards
    Film Independent is a non-profit organization dedicated to independent film and independent filmmakers. We help filmmakers get movies made and seen by audiences. Additionally, we work to increase diversity in the industry by helping filmmakers from underrepresented communities tell their stories.

    Our 6,300 members have access to discounted equipment, editing suites, casting rooms, a valuable resource library, over 120 free screenings, and 150 educational events every year.

    Film Independent also produces the Los Angeles Film Festival, celebrating the best of American and international film, and the Independent Spirit Awards, the premier awards event of the independent film community. Our members attend nominee screenings for the Spirit Awards, view nominated films through Netflix, and vote for the winners.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Hadassah

    Hadassah

    • Award categories presented: Life Achievement Award
    Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America is an American Jewish volunteer women's organization. Founded in 1912 by Henrietta Szold, it is one of the largest international Jewish organizations, with around 300,000 members worldwide, mostly women. In the United States, Hadassah promotes health education, social action and advocacy, volunteerism, Jewish education and research, and connections with Israel. Hadassah was established in New York City by Szold and the Daughters of Zion, a women's study group. The goal was to promote the Zionist ideal through education, public health initiatives, and the training of nurses in what was then the Palestine region of the Ottoman Empire. At the founders' meeting, which coincided with the Jewish holiday of Purim, the group chose the name Hadassah, the Hebrew name of the biblical heroine Esther, central figure in the celebration of Purim. With Szold serving as the first national president, Hadassah chapters soon opened in Baltimore, Cleveland, Chicago, and Boston. According to Nancy K. Falchuk of Newton, Massachusetts, the organization's president from July 2007 to July 2011, Hadassah's missions include health, education, fighting
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Betty Ford Center

    Betty Ford Center

    • Awards presented: Betty Ford Center Visionary Award
    The Betty Ford Center (BFC), is a non-profit, separately licensed residential chemical dependency recovery hospital in Rancho Mirage, California, that offers inpatient, outpatient, and day treatment for alcohol and other drug addictions as well as prevention and education programs for family and children. The Betty Ford Center, which is adjacent to Eisenhower Medical Center, has 100 inpatient beds available on their campus and additional lodging for 84 clients in the Residential Day Treatment program. The Betty Ford Center opened on October 4, 1982. The Center was co-founded by late U.S. First Lady Betty Ford, Leonard Firestone and Dr. James West in 1982. West also served as the Betty Ford Center's first medical director from 1982 until 1989. He left that position to become the Betty Ford Center's director of outpatient services. Betty Ford's decision to undertake such a project followed on the heels of her own battle with alcohol dependence and opioid analgesic addiction, and after her release from the Long Beach Naval Hospital, she pursued the goal of creating a treatment center that emphasized the needs of women. In September 2010, the Center introduced a pain management track.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Country Style

    Country Style

    • Award categories presented: Juno Award for Country Album of the Year
    Country Style, formerly Country Style Donuts, is a fast/casual chain of coffee shops operating primarily in the Canadian province of Ontario (where it ranks second among coffee chains), which serves oatmeal, soup, sandwiches, salads, and coffee. The chain is based in Richmond Hill, Ontario. In January 2006, there were 120 "traditional" locations in Ontario. There are over 420 "non-traditional" locations embedded in other stores such as gas stations, convenience stores, arenas and movie theatres. Over 70% of customer purchases in 2001 were coffee. In total, Country Style has over 1000 locations in Ontario, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick under the Country Style/Bistro name. Country Style has been in business since 1963 when it opened its first location in Toronto. Donut stores only accounted for about 17% of donut sales in Canada at that time so there was still a lot of room for growth (most were sold at supermarkets in bulk). Country Style experienced a lot of growth early on, opening 100 stores in the first 15–20 years of existence. It had 50 outlets in 1974 when it was the leading coffee and donut establishment in Canada above Tim Hortons (which passed it two
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    Directorate of Film Festivals

    • Award categories presented: National Film Award for Best Non-Feature Film Direction
    • Awards presented: National Film Awards
    The Directorate of Film Festivals in India is an organization that initiates and presents the most prestigious film ceremonies in India. These are the International Film Festival of India, the National Film Awards and the Indian Panorama. Although the Directorate helps appoint members of the jury panels each year, it has no input on which films are selected for consideration and which films ultimately win awards at the various functions it initiates. The Directorate set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India, to organize national and international film festivals in India. It was set up by the Government of India in 1973, and works as part of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting.. The Directorate is based in New Delhi and presently headed by Rajeev Kumar Jain, Director. The Directorate facilitates the participation of India in festivals abroad, and arranges for foreign film programmes to be held in the country.
    9.00
    2 votes
    67

    National Society of Film Critics

    • Award categories presented: National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Picture
    • Awards presented: National Society of Film Critics Awards
    The National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) is an American film critic organization. As of December 2007 the NSFC had approximately 60 members who wrote for a variety of weekly and daily newspapers. National Society of Film Critics was founded in 1966 in the New York City apartment of Saturday Review critic Hollis Alpert, one of several co-founding film critics who was refused membership to the New York Film Critics Circle, as it preferred critics who worked for mainstream newspapers. His co-founders included Pauline Kael, a writer for The New Yorker; Joe Morgenstern, then a movie reviewer for Newsweek; and Richard Schickel, a film critic for Life Magazine. The Society was also founded in order to counteract the influence of New York Times critic Bosley Crowther, who dominated the New York City film critic scene for many years. The original founding film critics, who were overwhelmingly based in New York, called their new group a "national" organization because they wrote for a number of magazines and newspapers with a national circulation. The organization is known for their highbrow tastes, and its annual awards are one of the most prestigious film critics awards in the United
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

    United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

    • Award categories presented: Community-Informed Design Award
    • Awards presented: AIA/HUD Secretary's Housing and Community Design Award
    The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, also known as HUD, is a Cabinet department in the Executive branch of the United States federal government. Although its beginnings were in the House and Home Financing Agency, it was founded as a Cabinet department in 1965, as part of the "Great Society" program of President Lyndon Johnson, to develop and execute policies on housing and metropolises. The department was established on September 9, 1965, when Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Department of Housing and Urban Development Act into law. It stipulated that the department was to be created no later than November 8, sixty days following the date of enactment. The actual implementation was postponed until January 13, 1966, following the completion of a special study group report on the federal role in solving urban problems. HUD is administered by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Shaun Donovan, a former New York City housing commissioner and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, is the current Secretary, having been confirmed by the United States Senate unanimously on January
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    National Book Foundation

    • Award categories presented: National Book Award for Nonfiction
    • Awards presented: National Book Award
    The National Book Foundation, established 1989 by National Book Awards, Inc. is an American nonprofit organization established "to raise the cultural appreciation of great writing in America." It does that partly and most visibly as administrator and sponsor of the National Book Awards, a changing set of literary awards inaugurated 1936 and continuous from 1950. It also organizes and sponsors public and educational programs. New York Times Book Notes announced the new foundation, with executive director Neil Baldwin "effective tomorrow", on July 5, 1989. To broaden its scope, the National Book Awards is establishing the National Book Foundation to administer its annual literary awards program and to develop programs to promote reading and literacy. The chairman of the National Book Awards, Al Silverman, said his group intended to take on "a more central and influential role in the literary, intellectual, and publishing life of this country." The National Book Foundation's Board of Trustees comprises representatives of American literary institutions and the book industry. For example, in 2009 the Board included the President of the New York Public Library, the Chief Merchandising
    5.80
    5 votes
    70
    British Independent Film Awards

    British Independent Film Awards

    • Award categories presented: British Independent Film Award for Best British Independent Film
    The Moët British Independent Film Awards is an annual award ceremony celebrating achievement in independently funded British film and cinema. Nominations and jury are announced at the beginning of November with the award ceremony taking place in late November or early December. The British Independent Film Awards were created in 1998 by Raindance founder Elliot Grove. Grove set out to celebrate merit and achievement in independently funded British filmmaking, to honour new talent, and to promote British films and filmmaking to a wider public audience. It forms part of the Raindance Film Festival held each year in September/October. Submissions are required before 23 September each year. The Founding Members are Phillip Alberstat, Chris Auty, Suzanne Ballantyne, André Burgess, Sally Caplan, Pippa Cross, Christopher Fowler, Lora Fox Gamble, Steven Gaydos, Elliot Grove, Norma Heyman, Emma E. Hickox, Fred Hogge, Robert Jones, Steve Kenis, Alberto Lopez, Ollie Madden, Hamish McAlpine, Neil McCartney, Saul Metzstein, Martin Myers, Sarah Radclyffe, Tracey Scoffield, Mark Shivas, Jim Wilson, and Michiyo Yoshizaki. In 2010, BIFA announced a partnership with the climate change organisation
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Dublin City Council

    Dublin City Council

    • Award categories presented: International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award
    • Awards presented: International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award
    Dublin City Council (Irish: Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath) is the authority responsible for local government in the city of Dublin in Ireland. As a city council, it is governed by the Local Government Act 2001. Until 2001, the council was known as "Dublin Corporation". The council is responsible for housing and community, roads and transportation, urban planning and development, amenity and culture, and environment. The council has 52 elected members and is the largest local authority in Ireland. Elections are held every five years and are by single transferable vote. The head of the council has the honorific title of Lord Mayor. The city administration is headed by a City manager, currently John Tierney. The council meets at City Hall, Dublin. As part of the Dublin Region, Dublin City Council is within the geographic remit of the Dublin Regional Authority. Following the enactment of the Local Government Act 2001, the Regional Authority was established. It is one of eight such Authorities in the state. Local government in the region was further regulated by the Local Government Act 1994. This provided for the legal establishment of the following local government
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Phi Beta Kappa Society

    Phi Beta Kappa Society

    • Award categories presented: Phi Beta Kappa Book Award in Science
    • Awards presented: Phi Beta Kappa Book Awards
    The Phi Beta Kappa Society, an academic honor society in the United States, has 280 chapters. It aims to promote and advocate excellence in the liberal arts and sciences, and induct the most outstanding students of arts and sciences at American colleges and universities. Founded at The College of William and Mary on December 5, 1776, as the first collegiate Greek-letter fraternity, it is also the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences and among the oldest undergraduate societies in the United States. Phi Beta Kappa (ΦΒΚ) stands for Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης or philosophia biou kybernētēs — "Love of learning is the guide of life". Each individual chapter determines its specific application of the Phi Beta Kappa Council's 1952 Stipulations Concerning Eligibility for Membership and sets its own academic standards. Since inception, 17 U.S. Presidents, 37 U.S. Supreme Court Justices, and 136 Nobel Laureates have been inducted members. According to the society, "only about 10 percent of the nation's institutions of higher learning have Phi Beta Kappa chapters," and of the institutions with chapters, only about 10 percent of the arts and sciences graduates are elected to
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Riksmålsforbundet

    Riksmålsforbundet

    • Award categories presented: Riksmål Society Literature Prize
    Riksmålsforbundet (official translation: "The Riksmål Society - The Society for the Preservation of Traditional Standard Norwegian") is the main organisation for Riksmål, one of the written standard of the Norwegian language (see Norwegian language struggle). The society was founded by subsequent Nobel laureate Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson on April 7, 1907. Although Riksmålsforbundet was founded in 1907 by poet Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, efforts to organize in support of riksmål date back to 1899. It served as opposition to efforts by Norwegians who were organized to promote landsmål as the single language for the country. Riksmålsforbundet works to preserve and promote riksmål, the traditional form of written language in Norway. It consistently opposed the government samnorsk (roughly translated "collective Norwegian" or "together Norwegian"; the sam- prefix is related to English same) policy, a now-abandoned project to merge the two main standards of Norwegian (Bokmål and Nynorsk) into one standard that would be used everywhere. It also opposes compulsory education in English. Prominent members of the riksmål movement included the author Jens Bjørneboe, his cousin André Bjerke, Terje
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    World Travel and Tourism Council

    World Travel and Tourism Council

    • Award categories presented: World’s Leading Luxury Hotel
    The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) was conceptualized in the early 1980s when a group of CEOs came to the realization that although Travel & Tourism was the largest service industry in the world and the biggest provider of jobs, nobody knew it. There was no consolidated data or voice for the industry to give the message to elected official and policy makers. WTTC was established in 1990 and today the Council is positioned as the global business leaders’ forum for Travel & Tourism, comprising the Chairmen and Chief Executives of 100 of the world’s foremost organizations, representing all regions and sectors of the industry; a membership list is attached. The World Travel & Tourism Council is the forum for business leaders in the Travel & Tourism industry. WTTC works to raise awareness of Travel & Tourism as one of the world's largest industries, supporting 260 million jobs and generating 9 per cent of world GDP. WTTC advocates partnership between the public and private sectors, delivering results that match the needs of economies, local and regional authorities and local communities with those of business, based on: Governments recognising Travel & Tourism as a top
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Academy of Country Music

    Academy of Country Music

    • Award categories presented: Academy of Country Music Album of the Year
    • Awards presented: Academy of Country Music Awards
    The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Los Angeles, California as the Country & Western Music Academy. Among those involved in the founding was Eddie Miller and Tommy Wiggins, who joined Mickey and Chris Christensen. Whereas the Country Music Association, founded in 1958, was based in Nashville, the Academy sought to promote country music in the western states. During the early 1970s, the organization changed its name to the Academy of Country and Western Music and finally to the Academy of Country Music (ACM) to avoid confusion about whether the organization was a music school. As such, its early membership was largely composed of those country performers based in the west. This is evidenced by the early awards shows being dominated by Bakersfield artists Buck and Bonnie Owens, and Merle Haggard. At the first ceremony held in 1966, Buck Owens won Top Male Vocalist and Bonnie Owens won Top Female Vocalist. Haggard was named Top New Male Vocalist, Kay Adams was named Top New Female Vocalist and Buck Owens' band, The Buckaroos, was named Band Of The Year. The most prestigious awards are for Artist of the Decade and Entertainer of the Year. There are a number of
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Academy of Television Arts and Sciences

    Academy of Television Arts and Sciences

    • Award categories presented: Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Original Music And Lyrics
    • Awards presented: Emmy Award
    The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences was founded in the United States in 1946, just one month after American network television was born. It is a nonprofit organization devoted to the advancement of telecommunications arts and sciences and to fostering creative leadership in the telecommunications industry. The Television Academy is the only major U.S. organization devoted entirely to television and is made up of more than 15,000 members representing 28 professional peer groups, including performers, directors, producers, art directors and various other artisans, technicians and executives. In 1949, the Television Academy held the first Emmy Awards ceremony, an annual event created to recognize excellence in U.S. television programming, although the initial event was restricted to programming from the Los Angeles area. The name “Emmy” was derived from “Immy,” a nickname for the image orthicon camera tube, which was instrumental in the development of modern television. The word was feminized as “Emmy” to complement the design chosen for the statuette, which depicted a winged, idealized woman holding an atom. The Emmy Awards are administered by three sister organizations who
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Fulbright Program

    Fulbright Program

    • Award categories presented: Fulbright Award
    The Fulbright Program, including the Fulbright-Hays Program, is a program of competitive, merit-based grants for international educational exchange for students, scholars, teachers, professionals, scientists and artists, founded by United States Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946. Under the Fulbright Program, competitively selected U.S. citizens may become eligible for scholarships to study, conduct research, or exercise their talents abroad and citizens of other countries may qualify to do the same in the United States. The first participating university in the United States was George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Fulbright Program is one of the most prestigious awards programs worldwide, operating in over 155 countries. Forty-three Fulbright alumni have won Nobel Prizes (including two in 2010, Peter A. Diamond and Ei-ichi Negishi) and seventy-eight have won Pulitzer Prizes. More Nobel laureates are former Fulbright recipients than any other award program. The program was established to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills. The Fulbright Program provides
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Institution of Civil Engineers

    Institution of Civil Engineers

    • Award categories presented: Robert Alfred Carr Prize
    • Awards presented: Telford Medal
    Founded on 2 January 1818, the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) is an independent professional association, headquartered in central London, representing civil engineering. Like its early membership, the majority of its current members are British engineers, but it also has members in more than 150 countries around the world. In 2008, its total membership stands at more than 80,000. In November 2011, Richard Coackley assumed office as the current President. As a professional body, it is committed to support and promote professional learning (both to students and existing practitioners), managing professional ethics and safeguarding the status of engineers, and representing the interests of the profession in dealings with government, etc. It sets standards for membership of the body; works with industry and academia to progress engineering standards and advises on education and training curricula. The Institution of Civil Engineers also publishes technical studies covering research and best practice in civil engineering. Under its commercial arm, Thomas Telford Ltd, it delivers training, recruitment, publishing and contract services, such as the NEC Engineering and Construction
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Libertarian Futurist Society

    • Award categories presented: Prometheus Hall of Fame Award
    • Awards presented: Prometheus Award
    The Libertarian Futurist Society was founded in 1982 to recognize and promote libertarian science fiction. LFS presents the annual Prometheus Award for Best Novel, the Prometheus Hall of Fame Award  for best classic literary works of liberty and occasional Prometheus Special Awards for other categories (short fiction, dramatic presentations, life achievement and similar awards) and publishes the quarterly journal, Prometheus.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

    • Award categories presented: NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Motion Picture
    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, usually abbreviated as NAACP, is an African-American civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909. Its mission is “to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination”. Its name, retained in accordance with tradition, uses the once common term colored people. The NAACP bestows the annual Image Awards for achievement in the arts and entertainment, and the annual Spingarn Medals for outstanding positive achievement of any kind, on deserving African Americans. It has its headquarters in Baltimore, Maryland. The NAACP’s headquarters are in Baltimore, Maryland, with additional regional offices in California, New York, Michigan, Colorado, Georgia, Texas and Maryland. Each regional office is responsible for coordinating the efforts of state conferences in the states included in that region. Local, youth, and college chapters organize activities for individual members. In the U.S., the NAACP is administered by a 64-member board, led by a chairperson. The board elects one person as the president and one as chief
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    National Geographic Society

    National Geographic Society

    • Award categories presented: Hubbard Medal
    The National Geographic Society (NGS), headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history. The National Geographic Society’s logo is a yellow portraitframe – rectangular in shape – which appears on the margins surrounding the front covers of its magazines and as its television channel logo. The National Geographic Society's historical mission is "to increase and diffuse geographic knowledge while promoting the conservation of the world's cultural, historical, and natural resources." Its purpose is to inspire people to care about their planet, according to John M. Fahey, Jr., President and CEO since March 1998 and Chairman since January 2010. The Society is governed by a Board of Trustees whose 22 members include distinguished educators, business executives, former government officials, and conservationists. The organization sponsors and funds scientific research and exploration. The Society publishes an official journal,
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    South by Southwest

    South by Southwest

    • Award categories presented: SXSW Grand Jury Award for Best Documentary Feature
    • Awards presented: SXSW Film Awards
    South by Southwest (SXSW) is a set of film, interactive and music festivals and conferences that take place every spring (usually in March) in Austin, Texas, United States. SXSW began in 1987, and has continued to grow in size every year. In 2011, the conference lasted for 10 days, with SXSW Interactive lasting for five, Music for six, and Film running concurrently for nine days. South by Southwest is run by a company, called SXSW Inc., that plans and executes conferences, trade shows, festivals and other events. In addition to the three main South by Southwest festivals, the company runs two other conferences, both also in Austin: SXSWedu, a conference on educational innovation, since 2011; and SXSW Eco, an environmental conference, also since 2011. SXSW Music is one of the largest music festivals in the United States, with more than 2,000 performers playing in more than 90 venues. SXSW Music offers artist-provided music and video samples of featured artists at each festival via their official YouTube channel. SXSW Film is a film festival, focusing on new directing talent. SXSW Interactive is focused on emerging technology, a focus which has earned the festival a reputation as a
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    The New York Times Company

    The New York Times Company

    • Award categories presented: New York Times 100 Notable Books of the Year
    • Awards presented: Boston Globe-Horn Book Award
    The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr. has served as Chairman of the Board since 1997. It is headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York City. The first edition of the newspaper The New York Times, published on September 18, 1851, stated: "We publish today the first issue of the New-York Daily Times, and we intend to issue it every morning (Sundays excepted) for an indefinite number of years to come." The company also owns the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, and several related media properties, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com, and About.com. Since 1967, the company has been publicly traded and listed on the New York Stock Exchange by the symbol NYT. While it offers two kinds of shares of its stock, Class A and Class B, Class B shares are not publicly traded. The Class B shares provide a mechanism by which the descendants of Adolph Ochs, who purchased The New York Times newspaper in 1896, maintain control of the company by holding nearly 90 percent of this
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    University of Tartu

    University of Tartu

    • Award categories presented: Contribution to Estonian National Identity
    The University of Tartu (Estonian: Tartu Ülikool, Latin: Universitas Tartuensis) is a classical university in the city of Tartu, Estonia. University of Tartu is the national university of Estonia; it is the biggest and highest-ranked university in Estonia. The University of Tartu is a member of the Coimbra Group and the Utrecht Network, and was established by King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden in 1632, thus being one of the oldest universities in Northern Europe. The Academia Gustaviana in the then Swedish province of Livonia was the second university founded in the Swedish Empire, following Uppsala University (in Uppsala, Sweden proper) and preceding the Academy of Åbo (in Turku, Finland). A precursor to the academy had been a Jesuit grammar school Gymnasium Dorpatense, founded by Stefan Batory (then king of Poland) in 1583 and existing to 1601, when Tartu (Dorpat) was under Polish rule. The first students immatriculated between 20–21 April 1632. The opening ceremony of Academia Dorpatensis (Academia Gustaviana) took place on 15 October in the same year. The academy in Tartu functioned with Philosophy, Law, Theology and Medical Faculties enjoying the privileges of the University of
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Civic Trust

    Civic Trust

    • Award categories presented: Civic Trust Award
    The Civic Trust of England was a charitable organisation founded in 1957. It ceased operations in 2009 and went into administration due to lack of funds. The Civic Society Initiative was set up in 2009 with the support of The National Trust, CPRE and other organisations to ensure a future for the civic society movement and was formally launched in April 2010 as Civic Voice. Civic Trust's prime purpose was to improve the quality of new and historic buildings and public spaces, and to help improve the general quality of urban life. The trust operated from two main offices, in London and Liverpool and supported a national network of civic societies. These were local groups in which volunteer members helped to improve their surroundings. It ran the Civic Trust Regeneration Unit, which supported urban renewal through programmes addressing issues of concern such as "the night time economy". It ran campaigns to influence and change thinking on civic matters, and change government policy. It helped establish conservation areas and coordinate Heritage Open Days. The Civic Trust Awards was established in 1959 to recognise outstanding architecture, urban design, landscape and public are which
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Norwegian Writers for Children

    Norwegian Writers for Children

    • Award categories presented: NBU-prisen
    • Awards presented: NBU-prisen
    The Norwegian Writers for Children (Norwegian: Norske Barne- og Ungdomsbokforfattere, NBU) was founded in 1947. The association, composed of authors who write fiction for children and young people, promotes the interests of writers of books for children and young people and encourages literature for children and young people. NBU has almost 300 members.
    6.50
    4 votes
    87
    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe

    • Awards presented: Boston Globe-Horn Book Award
    The Boston Globe (and the Boston Sunday Globe) is an American daily newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Boston Globe has been owned by The New York Times Company since 1993. Its chief print rival is the Boston Herald. The Boston Globe has won 21 Pulitzer Prizes. The Boston Globe was founded in 1872 by six Boston businessmen, led by Eben Jordan, who jointly invested $150,000. The first issue was published on March 4, 1872 and cost four cents. Originally a morning daily, it began Sunday publication in 1877. In 1878, The Boston Globe started an afternoon edition called The Boston Evening Globe, which ceased publication in 1979. The Boston Globe was a private company until 1973 when it went public under the name Affiliated Publications. It continued to be managed by the descendants of Charles H. Taylor. In 1993, The New York Times Company purchased Affiliated Publications for US$1.1 billion, making The Boston Globe a wholly owned subsidiary of The New York Times' parent. The Jordan and Taylor families received substantial New York Times Company stock, but the last Taylor family members left management in 2000–2001. Boston.com, the online edition of Boston Globe was launched
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Académie française

    Académie française

    • Award categories presented: René Clair Award
    L'Académie française (French pronunciation: [la.ka.de.mi fʁɑ̃'sɛz]), also called the French Academy, is the pre-eminent French learned body on matters pertaining to the French language. The Académie was officially established in 1635 by Cardinal Richelieu, the chief minister to King Louis XIII. Suppressed in 1793 during the French Revolution, it was restored in 1803 by Napoleon Bonaparte. It is the oldest of the five académies of the Institut de France. The Académie consists of forty members, known as immortels (immortals). New members are elected by the members of the Académie itself. Académicians hold office for life, but they may be removed for misconduct. Philippe Pétain, named Marshall of France after the victory of Verdun in World War I, was elected to the Academy in 1931 and, following his governorship of Vichy France in World War II, was forced to resign his seat in 1945. The body has the task of acting as an official authority on the language; it is charged with publishing an official dictionary of the language. Its rulings, however, are only advisory, not binding on either the public or the government. The Académie's origins occur in an informal literary group that grew
    5.60
    5 votes
    89
    Ecological Society of America

    Ecological Society of America

    • Award categories presented: Eminent Ecologist Award
    The Ecological Society of America (ESA) is a professional organization of ecological scientists. Based in the United States, ESA publishes a suite of publications, from peer-reviewed journals to newsletters, fact sheets and teaching resources. It holds an annual meeting at different locations in the USA and Canada. In addition to its publications and annual meeting, ESA is engaged in public policy, science, and education and diversity issues. ESA's 10,000 members are researchers, educators, natural resource managers, and students in over 90 countries. Members work on a wide range of topics, from agroecology to marine diversity and explore the relationships between organisms and their past, present, and future environments. The Society has over 20 topical sections and seven regional chapters, reflecting the breadth of interests and activities of its members. The first discussions on the formation of the Society took place in 1914 in the lobby of the Hotel Walton in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at a meeting of animal and plant ecologists organized by Henry Chandler Cowles. On December 28, 1915, in Columbus, Ohio at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science,
    5.60
    5 votes
    90
    British Academy of Film and Television Arts

    British Academy of Film and Television Arts

    • Award categories presented: BAFTA Award for Best Film
    • Awards presented: BAFTA Cymru
    The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) is a charity in the United Kingdom that hosts annual awards shows for excellence in film, television, television craft, video games and forms of animation. The British Film Academy was founded in 1947 by David Lean, Alexander Korda, Carol Reed, Laurence Olivier, Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, Roger Manvell and other leading figures in the British film industry. In 1958, the Academy merged with the Guild of Television Producers and Directors to form the Society of Film and Television Arts, which eventually became the British Academy of Film and Television Arts in 1976. BAFTA is an independent charity with a mission to "support, develop and promote the art forms of the moving image, by identifying and rewarding excellence, inspiring practitioners and benefiting the public". In addition to high-profile awards ceremonies BAFTA runs a year-round programme of educational events including film screenings, tribute evenings, interviews, lectures and debates with leading industry figures. BAFTA is supported by a membership of around 6500 people from the film, television and video game industries. BAFTA's main headquarters is on
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    College World Series

    College World Series

    • Award categories presented: College World Series Most Outstanding Player
    The College World Series or CWS is an annual baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska that is the culmination of the NCAA Division I Baseball Championship, which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winner of each bracket playing in the best-of-three championship series. The tournament takes place in June of each year. The NCAA Division II and Division III baseball championships are described below, in the section on other championships. Since 1950, the College World Series (CWS) has been held in Omaha, Nebraska. It was held at Rosenblatt Stadium from 1950 through 2010; starting in 2011, it has been held at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. Earlier tournaments were held at Hyames Field in Kalamazoo, Michigan (1947–48) and Wichita, Kansas (1949). The name "College World Series" (CWS) is derived from that of the Major League Baseball World Series championship; it is currently an MLB trademark licensed to the NCAA. On June 10, 2009, the NCAA and College World Series of Omaha, Inc., which is the non-profit group that actually organizes the event, announced a new 25-year contract
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Jeff Bridges

    Jeff Bridges

    Jeffrey Leon "Jeff" Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an American actor, musician, producer, photographer, cartoonist, storyteller, and occasional vintner. He comes from a well-known acting family and began his first televised acting in 1958 as child with his father, Lloyd Bridges, and brother Beau on television's Sea Hunt. Among his best-known major motion films are: Tron (and its sequel), Fearless, Iron Man, Contender, TheThe Contender, Starman, The Fabulous Baker Boys, Jagged Edge, Against All Odds, Fisher King, TheThe Fisher King, Thunderbolt and Lightfoot, Seabiscuit, Arlington Road, and The Big Lebowski. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Otis "Bad" Blake in the 2009 film Crazy Heart and earned his sixth Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of Rooster Cogburn in 2010's True Grit. He is currently filming in Calgary, Alberta for his next film. Jeffrey Leon Bridges was born in Los Angeles, California on December 4, 1949. He is son of showbiz parents, actor Lloyd Bridges, and actress and writer Dorothy Bridges (née Simpson). His older brother, Beau Bridges, is also an actor. He has a younger sister, Lucinda, and had another brother, Garrett, who died
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    Las Vegas Film Critics Society

    • Award categories presented: Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Visual Effects
    • Awards presented: Las Vegas Film Critics Society Awards
    The Las Vegas Film Critics Society (LVFCS) is a non-profit organization, composed of selected print, television and internet film critics in the Las Vegas Valley. The Las Vegas Film Critics Society presents its "Sierra Awards" each year for the best in film, including "The William Holden Lifetime Achievement Award", which is named for the Academy Award-winning actor.
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Mainichi Shimbun

    Mainichi Shimbun

    • Award categories presented: Mainichi Eiga Concours Award for Best Film
    • Awards presented: Mainichi Film Awards
    The Mainichi Shimbun (毎日新聞, lit. "Daily News") is one of the major newspapers in Japan, published by The Mainichi Newspapers Co., Ltd (株式会社毎日新聞社, Kabushiki-gaisha Mainichi Shinbunsha). The history of the Mainichi Shimbun begins with founding of two papers during the Meiji period. The Tokyo Nichi Nichi Shimbun was founded first, in 1872. The Mainichi claims that it is the oldest existing Japanese daily newspaper with its 136-year-long history. The Osaka Mainichi Shimbun was founded four years later, in 1876. The two papers merged in 1911, but the two companies continued to print their newspapers independently until 1943, when both editions were placed under a Mainichi Shimbun masthead. In 1966, the Tokyo office was moved from Yurakucho to Takebashi, and in 1992, the Osaka office was moved from Dojima to Nishi-Umeda. The Mainichi has 3,200 employees working in 364 offices in Japan and 26 bureaus overseas. It is one of Japan's three largest newspapers in terms of circulation and number of employees, and has 79 associated companies, including Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS), Mainichi Broadcasting System (MBS) and the Sports Nippon Newspaper. Two former Mainichi Newspapers chief
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

    Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

    • Award categories presented: Kavli Prize in Astrophysics
    The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (Norwegian: Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi, DNVA) is a learned society based in Oslo, Norway. The Royal Frederick University in Christiania was established in 1811. The idea of a learned society in Christiania surfaced for the first time in 1841. The city of Throndhjem had no university, but had a learned society, the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters, established in 1760. The purpose of a learned society in Christiania was to support scientific studies and aid publication of academic papers. The idea of the Humboldt-inspired university, where independent research stood strong, had taken over for the instrumental view of a university as a means to produce civil servants. The city already had societies for specific professions, for instance the Norwegian Medical Society which was founded in 1833. However, these societies were open for both academics within medicine as well as physicians outside of academia. The learned society would be open to employed academics only, but from all academic branches. The idea did not come to stay in 1841. Money was a problem; also there were "doubts with regards to the adequacy of the
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Organization of American Historians

    Organization of American Historians

    • Award categories presented: James A. Rawley Prize
    The Organization of American Historians (OAH), formerly known as the Mississippi Valley Historical Association, is the largest professional society dedicated to the teaching and study of American history. OAH's members in the U.S. and abroad include college and university professors; historians, students; precollegiate teachers; archivists, museum curators, and other public historians; and a variety of scholars employed in government and the private sector. The OAH publishes the Journal of American History, the OAH Magazine of History. Among its various programs, OAH conducts an annual meeting each spring, and has a robust roster on its OAH Distinguished Lecturership Program. The organization's mission is to promote excellence in the scholarship, teaching, and presentation of American history, and encourage wide discussion of historical questions and equitable treatment of all practitioners of history. Membership is open to all who wish to support its mission. In 2010 its individual membership is approximately 8,000 and its institutional membership approximately 1,250. For its 2009 fiscal year ending June 30, 2009, the organization's operating budget was approximately $2.9 million
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    Childhelp

    Childhelp

    • Award categories presented: Woman of the World Award
    Childhelp (formerly Childhelp USA) is a national non-profit organization dedicated to helping victims of child abuse and neglect and at-risk children through advocacy, prevention, treatment and community outreach. Founded in 1959 by Sara O'Meara and Yvonne Fedderson, Childhelp is one of the largest non-profit child abuse prevention and treatment agencies in the nation. It operates facilities in seven states around the U.S. and the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline, 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453), that services the entire United States, its territories and Canada. The organization offers a wide variety of services, not only to abused and neglected children, but to treatment professionals, educators, parents, foster care families the community and law enforcement professionals. Through various community outreach efforts, Childhelp has tried to increase awareness about child abuse. As part of those effort in 2000, Childhelp established the National Day of Hope. It is observed every year on the first Wednesday of April during National Child Abuse Prevention Month. In 2009, the organization celebrated its 50th anniversary. Childhelp relies upon private donations to expand its
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Fields Institute

    Fields Institute

    • Award categories presented: CRM-Fields-PIMS prize
    The Fields Institute is an international centre for research in mathematical sciences at the University of Toronto. The institute is named for University of Toronto mathematician John Charles Fields, founder of the Fields Medal. It was established in 1992, and was briefly based at the University of Waterloo before relocating to Toronto in 1995. As a centre for mathematical activity, the institute brings together mathematicians from Canada and abroad. It also supports the collaboration between professional mathematicians and researchers in other domains, such as statistics, computer science, engineering, physical and biological sciences, medicine, economics and finance, telecommunications and information systems. It also holds monthly meetings on mathematics education, attended by participants from secondary school boards, university mathematics departments and the private sector. The institute occupies a building at the university that was specially conceived and constructed for its activities, designed by Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects. It accommodates up to 66 visitors and their support staff, providing office spaces and full access to the mathematics collection of
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    IEEE Computer Society

    IEEE Computer Society

    • Awards presented: Eckert–Mauchly Award
    The IEEE Computer Society (sometimes abbreviated Computer Society or CS) is a professional society of IEEE. Its purpose and scope is “to advance the theory, practice, and application of computer and information processing science and technology” and the “professional standing of its members.” The CS is the largest of 38 technical societies organized under the IEEE Technical Activities Board. The Computer Society sponsors workshops and conferences, publishes a variety of peer-reviewed literature, operates technical committees, and develops IEEE computing standards. It supports more than 200 chapters worldwide and participates in educational activities at all levels of the profession, including distance learning, accreditation of higher education programs in computer science, and professional certification in software engineering. The IEEE Computer Society traces its origins to the Subcommittee on Large-Scale Computing, established in 1946 by the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE), and to the Professional Group on Electronic Computers, established in 1951 by the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE). When the AIEE merged with the IRE in 1963 to form the Institute of
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    National Inventors Hall of Fame

    National Inventors Hall of Fame

    • Award categories presented: National Inventors Hall of Fame Award
    The National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) is a U.S. not-for-profit organization dedicated to recognizing, honoring and encouraging invention and creativity through the administration of its programs. The Hall of Fame honors Americans responsible for great technological advances that make human, social and economic progress possible. As of 2012 there were 470 inductees. New inductee announcements are made in mid-February. The National Inventors Hall of Fame was founded in 1973 on the initiative of H. Hume Mathews, then chairman of the National Council of Patent Law Associations (now called the National Council of Intellectual Property Law Associations). The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office became a cosponsor of the NIHF the following year. Originally housed in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the Hall outgrew its location and moved to Akron, Ohio. The Hall of Fame building in Akron, which also housed hands-on interactive exhibits, opened to the public in 1995 under the name Inventure Place. In 2002 the name was changed to the National Inventors Hall of Fame Museum. In 2008 the NIHF was closed in Akron and reopened in Alexandria. The building in Akron is currently used by the
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    University of Glasgow

    University of Glasgow

    • Award categories presented: T.N. George Medal
    The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, United Kingdom, the university was founded in 1451 and is currently one of nineteen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the world. A major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century, in the 19th century (while continuing to educate the upper classes), Glasgow became a pioneer in British higher education by providing for the needs of students from the growing urban and commercial middle classes. Glasgow served all of these students by preparing them for professions: the law, medicine, civil service, teaching, and the church. It also trained smaller numbers for careers in science and engineering. In 2007, the Sunday Times ranked it as "Scottish University of the Year." The university is a member of the elite Russell Group and of Universitas 21. Since 1870, the main University campus has been located on Gilmorehill in the West End of the city. Additionally, a number of university buildings are located elsewhere: a facility at Loch Lomond, the University Marine Biological Station
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    Cabinet

    Cabinet

    • Award categories presented: Most Phallic Building contest
    Cabinet is a quarterly, Brooklyn, NY-based, non-profit art & culture periodical launched in 2000. Cabinet also operates an event and exhibition space in Brooklyn. Cabinet issues are divided into three sections. Each issue begins with four of Cabinet's recurring columns. Some columns have (or have had) recurring writers. Some columns appear more frequently than others: The Main section features miscellaneous essays, interviews, and artist projects. The third, themed section features essays, interviews, and artist projects related to a specific theme. A theme-based CD is included in issues 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13. Though Cabinet is commonly called "Cabinet magazine" and is distributed to newsstands as a magazine (with ISSN), individual Cabinet issues are also distributed as books (with ISBN). Each issue is printed in two editions: one with a magazine barcode on the front cover and the other with a book barcode on the back cover. The logo was designed by Richard Massey, and is derived from the fragmented elements and ligatures of an early twentieth century stencil often used in Le Corbusier’s architectural drawings and manifestos. In addition to publishing the quarterly, Cabinet
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Academy of Natural Sciences

    Academy of Natural Sciences

    • Award categories presented: F.V. Haydn Medal
    The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, formerly Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, is the oldest natural science research institution and museum in the New World. It was founded in 1812 by many of the leading naturalists of the young republic with an expressed mission of "the encouragement and cultivation of the sciences." For over nearly two centuries of continuous operations, the Academy has sponsored expeditions, conducted original environmental and systematics research, and amassed natural history collections containing more than 17 million specimens. The Academy also has a long tradition of public exhibits and educational programs for both schools and the general public. During the first decades of the United States, Philadelphia was the cultural capital and one of the country's commercial centers. Two of the city's institutions, the Library Company and the American Philosophical Society, were centers of enlightened thought and scientific inquiry. Yet, the increasing sophistication of the earth and life sciences combined with a growing awareness of the great variety of life and landscape in the American wilderness waiting to be discovered merited the
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Committee for Skeptical Inquiry

    Committee for Skeptical Inquiry

    • Award categories presented: In Praise of Reason Award
    The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI), formerly known as the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP), is a program within the U.S. non-profit organization Center for Inquiry (CFI), whose stated purpose is to "encourage the critical investigation of paranormal and fringe-science claims from a responsible, scientific point of view and disseminate factual information about the results of such inquiries to the scientific community and the public." CSI was founded in 1976 by Paul Kurtz to counter what he regarded as an uncritical acceptance of, and support for, paranormal claims by both the media and society in general. Its philosophical position is one of scientific skepticism. CSI's fellows have included many notable scientists, Nobel laureates, philosophers, educators, authors, and celebrities. It is headquartered in Amherst, New York. CSI has been accused of pseudoskepticism and an overly dogmatic and arrogant approach based on a priori convictions. It has been suggested that their aggressive style of skepticism could discourage scientific research into the paranormal. When the organization was formed in 1976, the original name proposed
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Glenn Foundation for Medical Research

    Glenn Foundation for Medical Research

    • Award categories presented: Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging
    • Awards presented: Glenn Award
    The purpose of the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, founded in 1965 by Paul F. Glenn, is to extend the healthy productive years of life through research on the mechanisms of biological aging.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    ITV

    ITV

    • Awards presented: British Comedy Awards
    ITV is a major commercial public service TV network in the United Kingdom. Launched in 1955 under the auspices of the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC, it is also the oldest commercial network in the UK. Since the passing of the Broadcasting Act 1990, its legal name has been Channel 3, the number 3 having no real meaning other than to distinguish it from BBC One, BBC Two and Channel 4. In part, the number 3 was assigned as televisions would usually be tuned so that the regional ITV station would be on the third button, the other stations being allocated to the number within their name. ITV is a network of television channels operating regional television services as well as sharing programmes between each other to be displayed on the entire network. In recent years, several of these companies have merged so that currently, the fifteen franchises are currently in the hands of three companies. ITV is to be distinguished from ITV plc, the company that resulted from the merger of Granada plc and Carlton Communications in 2004 and which holds the Channel 3 broadcasting licences in England, Wales, southern Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Channel
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Musée National d'Art Moderne

    Musée National d'Art Moderne

    • Award categories presented: Marcel Duchamp Prize
    The Musée National d'Art Moderne (French pronunciation: [myze nasjɔnal daʁ mɔdɛʁn], National Museum of Modern Art) is the national museum for modern art of France. It is located in Paris and is housed in the Centre Pompidou in the 4th arrondissement of the city. Created in 1947, it was then housed in the Palais de Tokyo and moved to its current location in 1977. The museum has the second largest collection of modern and contemporary art in the world, after the MOMA in New York, with more than 70,000 works of art. These works include painting, architecture, photography, cinema, new media, sculpture and design. A part of collection is on exhibit in a 14,000 square meters space divided between two floors (4 and 5) of the Centre Pompidou, one for modern art (from 1905 to 1960, on the 5th floor) and the other for contemporary art (from 1960, on the 4th floor). The works displayed often change in order to show to the public the variety and depth of the collection. Many major temporary exhibitions of modern and contemporary art have taken place in a separate floor (the 6th) over the years, among them many one-person exhibitions. Since 2010, the museum displays also unique, temporary
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Hereditary Kingdom of Norway

    Hereditary Kingdom of Norway

    • Award categories presented: Abel Prize
    The Kingdom of Norway as a unified realm was initiated by King Harald I Fairhair in 9th century. His efforts in unifying the petty kingdoms of Norway, resulted in the first known Norwegian central government. The country however fragmented soon, and was collected into one entity in the first half of 11th century. Norway has been a monarchy since then, passing through several eras. Thus was born the medieval (or, as is sometimes said, the first independent) kingdom of Norway, the realm of the Fairhair dynasty. According to traditional view, Norway was the hereditary kingdom of this dynasty, agnatic descendants of the first unifier-king. The throne was inherited by all of Harald's male descendants. In the 13th century, the kingdom was officially declared hereditary by law, contrary to the other Scandinavian monarchies which were elective kingdoms in the Middle Ages. Harald Fairhair was the first king of Norway, as opposed to "in Norway". The traditional date of the first formation of a unified Norwegian kingdom is set to 872 when he defeated the last petty kings who resisted him at the Battle of Hafrsfjord, however the consolidation of his power took many years. The boundaries of
    5.20
    5 votes
    109

    Broadcast Film Critics Association

    • Award categories presented: BFCA Critics' Choice Award for Best Animated Feature
    • Awards presented: Critic's Choice Award
    The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the United States and Canada , representing approximately 250 television, radio and online critics. Founded in 1995, the BFCA presents its Critics' Choice Movie Awards each year to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. A portion of the proceeds from the awards presentation ceremony at the Beverly Hills Hotel is donated to the Starlight Children's Fund. The BFCA also selects a Film of the Month and officially recommends other worthy films throughout the course of the year. As an additional service to moviegoers, each film is given a Critics' Choice Rating (on a 1-10 scale, 10 being the highest), based on the cumulative grades each film receives in the monthly balloting. The BFCA is led by its President and Board of Directors. Joey Berlin is currently serving as President. The Board of Directors are John De Simio, Jim Ferguson, Mark Ramsey and Sara Voorhees. The BFCA also sponsors the interview site and online community Critics Choice. The site features work of professional film critics and broadcast journalists while the online community lets film fans interact with critics and give
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Cosmos Club

    Cosmos Club

    • Award categories presented: The John P. McGovern Award
    The Cosmos Club is a private social club in Washington, D.C., founded by John Wesley Powell in 1878. In addition to Powell, original members included Clarence Edward Dutton, Henry Smith Pritchett, William Harkness, and John Shaw Billings. Among its stated goals is "The advancement of its members in science, literature, and art". Cosmos Club members have included many recipients of the Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, and Presidential Medal of Freedom. Since 1952 the Club's headquarters have been in the Mary Scott (Mrs Richard T.) Townsend house, at 2121 Massachusetts Avenue, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood. The free-standing house, set in almost an acre of garden, was designed in the Beaux Arts French style by architects Carrère and Hastings in 1898 and essentially completed in 1901. Mr. Townsend died shortly thereafter, in 1902. Following the death of Mrs. Townsend in 1931, their daughter Matilde, who was by then Mrs B. Sumner Welles, moved into the house, living there until World War II. It was purchased from Mrs Welles' estate by the Cosmos Club in 1950 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It is a contributing property to the Dupont Circle Historic
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Det Norske Teatret

    Det Norske Teatret

    • Award categories presented: Nynorsk Literature Prize
    Det Norske Teatret is a theatre in Oslo. The theatre was founded in 1912, after an initiative from Hulda Garborg and Edvard Drabløs. It opened in 1913, touring with two plays, Ervingen by Ivar Aasen and Rationelt Fjøsstell by Hulda Garborg. Its first official performance was Ludvig Holberg's comedy Jeppe på berget, with Haakon VII of Norway and the prime minister of Norway among the spectators. Hulda Garborg was the first board manager, and Rasmus Rasmussen was the first theatre director. The theatre primarily performs plays written in or translated into Nynorsk. The theatre has three stages, and about 12–15 productions per year, plus guest plays. Five of Jon Fosse's plays saw their first productions on Det Norske Teatret: Nokon kjem til å komme (1996), Ein sommars dag (1999), Vakkert (2001), 3ogtosaman (2001) and Rambuku (2006). The theatre was awarded Spellemannprisen in 1979 for the musical play Så lenge skuta kan gå. Actor and singer Rasmus Rasmussen was the theatre's first director, from 1912 to 1915. Edvard Drabløs was one of the founders, and served as a director from 1915 to 1916, and later also from 1950 to 1951. Amund Rydland, who had been with the theatre from the start,
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Skatepark of Tampa

    • Award categories presented: Tampa Pro Street
    Skatepark of Tampa is a world-famous skatepark in Tampa, Florida, USA. It is one of the top skateboarding venues on the East Coast of the United States. The name is often abbreviated as SPoT. It is well known for its annual Tampa Am and Tampa Pro competitions. Skatepark Of Tampa was NOT bought on March, 31 2012 by Lil Wayne for 9.3 million dollars, this was an April Fool's joke. On December 28, 1992, SPoT opened only to employees, and on January 2, 1993 the park officially opened to the public. There are two winners of the Tampa Am 2009: January : Ryan Decenzo December : Luan de Olivera The skatepark includes a "pro course", which offers a pyramid and many difficult rails. Outside, there is a full size vert ramp, The "beginner's course" features many smaller rails and ramps to expand skateboarding skills, and also includes the famous bowl. The street course is redesigned every year for the Tampa Am contest. Skatepark of Tampa has a team of some of the best skaters in the Tampa Bay area. Skatepark of Tampa also maintains a party team, a BMX team, a family team of longtime friends, a documentation team, as well as a business team. Skate team- Pro: Anthony Furlong Ed Selego Elissa
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Académie de peinture et de sculpture

    Académie de peinture et de sculpture

    • Award categories presented: Prix de Rome
    The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture), Paris, was founded in 1648, modelled on Italian examples, such as the Accademia di San Luca in Rome. Paris already had the Académie de Saint-Luc, which was a city artist guild like any other Guild of Saint Luke. The purpose of this academy was to professionalize the artists working for the French court and give them a stamp of approval that artists of the St. Luke's guild did not have. In 1661, it came under the control of Jean-Baptiste Colbert who made the arts a main part in the glorification of Louis XIV. From 1683 on, it reached its greatest power under the directorship of Charles Le Brun with its hierarchy of members and strict system of education. In 1749 the École des Élèves Protégés was set up as a separate school within the Académie, to give three years' specialist training to winners of the Prix de Rome so that they might make better use of their time in Rome - its alumni included Pierre Julien, Jean Guillaume Moitte and Jean-Joseph Foucou. On August 8, 1793, the Académie was suspended by the revolutionary National Convention, when the latter decreed the abolition of "toutes les
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Berlin International Film Festival

    Berlin International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Golden Bear Award for Best Short Film
    • Awards presented: Teddy Award
    The Berlin International Film Festival (German: Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin), also called the Berlinale, is one of the world's leading film festivals and most reputable media events. It is held in Berlin, Germany. Founded in West Berlin in 1951 at the initiative of U.S. Film officer Oscar Martay, the festival has been celebrated annually in February since 1978. With 274,000 tickets sold and 487,000 admissions it is considered the largest publicly attended film festival worldwide. Up to 400 films are shown in several sections, representing a comprehensive array of the cinematic world. Around twenty films compete for the awards called the Golden and Silver Bears. Since 2001 the director of the festival has been Dieter Kosslick. The European Film Market (EFM), a film trade fair held simultaneously to the Berlinale, is a major industry meeting for the international film circuit once a year. The trade fair serves distributors, filmbuyers, producers, financiers and co-production agents. The Berlinale Talent Campus, a week long series of lectures and workshops, gathers young filmmakers from around the globe. It partners with the festival itself and is considered to be a forum for
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Boy Scouts of America

    Boy Scouts of America

    • Awards presented: Eagle Scout
    The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is one of the largest youth organizations in the United States, with 2.7 million youth members and over 1 million adult volunteers. Since its founding in 1910 as part of the international Scout Movement, more than 110 million Americans have been members of the BSA. The BSA goal is to train youth in responsible citizenship, character development, and self-reliance through participation in a wide range of outdoor activities, educational programs, and, at older age levels, career-oriented programs in partnership with community organizations. For younger members, the Scout method is part of the program to inculcate typical Scouting values such as trustworthiness, good citizenship, and outdoors skills, through a variety of activities such as camping, aquatics, and hiking. The BSA is a constituent member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement. The traditional Scouting divisions are Cub Scouting for boys ages 7 to 10½ years, Boy Scouting for boys ages 10½ to 18 and Venturing for young men and women ages 14 (or 13 and have completed the 8th grade) through 21. Learning for Life is a non-traditional subsidiary that provides in-school and career
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    New York University School of Medicine

    New York University School of Medicine

    • Award categories presented: Homer Smith Medal
    • Awards presented: Homer Smith Medal
    The New York University School of Medicine is one of the graduate schools of New York University. Founded in 1841 as the University Medical College, the NYU School of Medicine is one of the foremost medical schools in the United States, ranking 26th in research according to U.S. News & World Report. The School of Medicine is part of NYU Langone Medical Center, named after Kenneth Langone, the investment banker and financial backer of the Home Depot. It is located at 550 First Avenue in New York City. The School of Medicine has 1,177 full-time faculty and 3,091 part-time faculty. Additionally, there are 104 endowed professorships, 1,078 residents/fellows, 68 M.D./Ph.D. candidates and 400 postdoctoral fellows as of 2011. The NYU Medical Center is home to the School of Medicine, the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, and the Charles C. Harris Skin & Cancer Pavilion, considered one of the most prestigious dermatology institutes in the United States. In 2012-13, NYU Langone Medical Center was recognized on the U.S. News & World Report "Best Hospitals Honor Roll," ranking 11th among the top hospitals in the nation with 13 nationally ranked specialties including cancer,
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Tribune Company

    Tribune Company

    • Award categories presented: Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science and Technology
    • Awards presented: Los Angeles Times Book Prize
    The Tribune Company is a large American multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. It is the nation's second-largest newspaper publisher, with ten daily newspapers and commuter tabloids including Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Hartford Courant, Orlando Sentinel, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Baltimore Sun, Daily Press and The Morning Call, among others. Through Tribune Broadcasting, the company operates 23 television stations, WGN America on national cable, and Chicago's WGN radio. The group's combined reach is more than 80 percent of U.S. television households. Investment interests include Food Network (31%). Tribune Interactive, another subsidiary, manages the interactive operations of major daily newspapers such as Chicago Tribune and Los Angeles Times and their associated websites. Its national network sites owned with partners include CareerBuilder.com, Cars.com, Apartments.com and Topix.net. With more than 50 websites overall, Tribune Interactive ranks among the nation's leading news and information networks. The sites attract more than 20 million unique visitors per month. Tribune Media Services provides syndicated content to print and electronic media. Key
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    University of Louisville

    University of Louisville

    • Awards presented: Grawemeyer Award
    The University of Louisville is a university in Louisville, Kentucky. When founded in 1798, it was the first city-owned public university in the United States and one of the first universities chartered west of the Allegheny Mountains. The university is mandated by the Kentucky General Assembly to be a "Preeminent Metropolitan Research University". U of L enrolls students from 118 of 120 Kentucky counties, all 50 U.S. states, and 116 countries around the world. The University of Louisville Health Sciences Center participated in the development of a highly effective vaccine against cervical cancer in 2006, the first fully self-contained artificial heart transplant surgery, the first successful hand transplantation, and the development of the Pap smear test. The University Hospital is also credited with the first civilian ambulance, the nation's first accident services, now known as an emergency room (ER), and one of the first blood banks in the US. Since 1999, U of L has made the largest gains of any university in National Institutes of Health research ranking, with its NIH funding increasing 277 percent and its rank increasing 30 places. As of 2006 among public U.S. universities,
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Det Norske Samlaget

    Det Norske Samlaget

    • Award categories presented: Nynorsk Literature Prize
    Det Norske Samlaget is a Norwegian publishing house founded on 24 March 1868 with the aim to promote and publish books in Landsmål, now known as Nynorsk. Det Norske Samlaget is now divided into two institutions: a literature organization, Litteraturselskapet Det Norske Samlaget, which is a culturally focused political-interest organization, and the publishing portion, Forlaget Det Norske Samlaget, which since 1978 has been a non-profit foundation and is responsible for publishing operations. As a political organization, Litteraturselskapet Det Norske Samlaget works to promote the use of Nynorsk and the preparation and publication of books in Nynorsk. It is also responsible for several grants and awards such as the Nynorsk Literature Prize, the Melsom Prize (Melsom-prisen) established in 1922 through the endowment of shipowner Ferd. Melsom and the Blix Prize (Blixprisen) established through the Emma and Elias Blix Endowment. Since 1978 the Forlaget Det Norske Samlaget has been an independent, separately operating nonprofit foundation. This publishing organization publishes the magazine Syn og Segn, books, historical, biographical and literary works, youth and children's books,
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Institution of Structural Engineers

    Institution of Structural Engineers

    • Award categories presented: Supreme Award for Engineering Excellence
    • Awards presented: IStructE Structural Awards
    The Institution of Structural Engineers is a professional body for structural engineering based in the United Kingdom. It has 27,000 members in 105 countries. The Institution provides professional accreditation for structural engineers. The Institution publishes a weekly magazine, The Structural Engineer. The Institution is an internationally recognised source of expertise and information concerning all issues that involve structural engineering and public safety within the built environment. The core work of the Institution is supporting and protecting the profession of structural engineering by upholding professional standards and acting as an international voice on behalf of structural engineers. The Institution gained its Royal Charter in March 1934. It was established at the Ritz Hotel, London on 21 July 1908 as the Concrete Institute, as the result of a need to define standards and rules for the proper use of concrete in construction industry. The first headquarters were established at No. 8, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, London; the first President was the Right Honourable Robert Windsor-Clive, 1st Earl of Plymouth, in whose honour the largest meeting room at the current
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

    • Award categories presented: Avery Fisher Prize
    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. Reynold Levy has been its president since 2002. A consortium of civic leaders and others led by, and under the initiative of John D. Rockefeller III, built Lincoln Center as part of the "Lincoln Square Renewal Project" during Robert Moses's program of urban renewal in the 1950s and 1960s. Respected architects were contacted to design the major buildings on the site, and over the next thirty years the previously blighted area around Lincoln Center became a new cultural hub. Rockefeller was Lincoln Center's inaugural president from 1956 and became its chairman in 1961. He is credited with raising more than half of the $184.5 million in private funds needed to build the complex, including drawing on his own funds; the Rockefeller Brothers Fund also contributed to the project. The center's three buildings, Avery Fisher Hall (formerly Philharmonic Hall), the Metropolitan Opera House and the David H. Koch Theater (formerly the New York State Theater), were opened in 1962, 1964 and 1966, respectively. While the center may have been
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    United States Department of Defense

    United States Department of Defense

    • Award categories presented: Silver Star
    The Department of Defense (also known as the Defense Department, USDOD, DOD, DoD or the Pentagon) is the Executive Department of the Government of the United States of America charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government concerned directly with national security and the United States armed forces. The Department is also the largest employer in the world, with more than 2.13 million active duty Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen, and also civilian workers, and over 1.1 million National Guardsmen and members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Reserves. The grand total is just over 3.2 million servicemen and servicewomen, plus the civilians who support them. The Department – headed by the Secretary of Defense – has three subordinate military departments: the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force. In addition, there are many Defense Agencies such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Missile Defense Agency, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the National Reconnaissance Office
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    VPRO

    VPRO

    • Awards presented: International Film Festival Rotterdam Awards
    The VPRO (originally an acronym for Vrijzinnig Protestantse Radio Omroep, or "Liberal Protestant Radio Broadcasting Company") was established in the Netherlands in 1926 as a religious broadcasting organization. Falling under the Protestant pillar, it represented the Liberal Protestant current. However, in the 1950s and 1960s it became more (social) liberal than protestant, and while the acronym VPRO was kept, its meaning was dropped. It was the first to show a nude woman on Dutch television, Phil Bloom in 1967. It is still considered the most "culturally radical" group on Dutch television. VPRO often collaborates with other broadcasting organisations such as WDR, the BBC, and Arte. Like all Dutch public broadcasters, the VPRO does not have its own dedicated channel. The VPRO started, in late 1996, developing MMBase - a Java based open source web content management system. The first version of the system was in use in 1997. It was released as open source on April 3, 2000.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124

    American Cinema Editors

    • Award categories presented: Eddie Award for Best Edited Feature Film
    • Awards presented: Eddie Awards
    Founded in 1950, American Cinema Editors (ACE) is an honorary society of film editors that are voted in based on the qualities of professional achievements, their education of others, and their dedication to editing itself. The society is not to be confused with an industry union, such as the I.A.T.S.E. (specifically the Motion Picture Editors Guild or MPEG) to which an editor might belong. The current President of ACE is Alan Heim. Eligibility for active membership can be obtained by the following prerequisites: Members are entitled to include the designation "A.C.E." as part of their signatures; thus the president of the Society in August 2007 was Alan Heim, A.C.E. The society publishes its current membership on its website; as of 2008, this website does not include deceased members. Beginning in 1950, the ACE held an annual dinner to honor the film editing Academy Award nominees. When the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) created a film editing category, the ACE invited them to the dinner as well. In 1962, the ACE began giving its own awards. The following awards are either currently given or have been given in the past. An * denotes a film that also won
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Art Institute of Chicago

    Art Institute of Chicago

    • Award categories presented: Logan Medal of the arts
    The Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) is a renowned, encyclopedic art museum located in Chicago's Grant Park. The Art Institute has one of the world's most notable collections of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art in its permanent collection. Its diverse holdings also include significant American art, Old Masters, European and American decorative arts, Asian art and modern and contemporary art. It is located at 111 South Michigan Avenue in the Chicago Landmark Historic Michigan Boulevard District. The museum is associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is overseen by Director and President Douglas Druick. At one million square feet, it is the second largest art museum in the United States behind only the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. In 1866, a group of 35 artists founded the Chicago Academy of Design in a studio on Dearborn Street, with the intent to run a free school with its own art gallery. The organization was modeled after European art academies, such as the Royal Academy, with Academians and Associate Academians. The Academy's charter was granted in March 1867. Classes started in 1868, meeting every day at a cost of $10 per month. The
    5.75
    4 votes
    126
    National Secular Society

    National Secular Society

    • Award categories presented: Secularist of the Year
    The National Secular Society is a British campaigning organisation that promotes secularism and the separation of church and state. It holds that no-one should gain advantage or disadvantage because of their religion or lack of religion. It was founded by Charles Bradlaugh in 1866. The society is a member organisation of the International Humanist and Ethical Union, and endorses the Amsterdam Declaration 2002. The Society campaigns for "Challenging Religious Privilege" the disestablishment of the Church of England; the withdrawal of state subsidies to religious schools; the end of tax exemption for churches and an end to the public funding of chaplains in prisons, hospitals and the armed services, as well as keeping religious influence out of health care, legislation, Human Rights and equality issues. It was recently highly involved in the abolition of the blasphemy laws. Another issue it campaigns about is the conscientious objections by doctors and pharmacists to administer certain procedures or treatments and their refusal to treat certain patients. Although the organisation was explicitly created for those who reject the supernatural, the NSS does not campaign to eradicate or
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Association for Computing Machinery

    Association for Computing Machinery

    • Award categories presented: Turing Award
    • Awards presented: Turing Award
    The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is a US based international learned society for computing. It was founded in 1947 and is the world's largest and most prestigious scientific and educational computing society. It is non-for-profit professional membership group . Its membership is more than 100,000 as of 2011. Its headquarters are in New York City. ACM and the IEEE Computer Society are the primary US umbrella organizations for academic and scholarly interests in computing. Unlike the IEEE, however, the ACM is solely dedicated to computing. ACM is organized into over 170 local chapters and 35 Special Interest Groups (SIGs), through which it conducts most of its activities. Additionally, there are over 500 college and university chapters. The first student chapter was founded in 1961 at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Many of the SIGs, like SIGGRAPH, SIGPLAN, SIGCSE and SIGCOMM, sponsor regular conferences which have become famous as the dominant venue for presenting innovations in certain fields. The groups also publish a large number of specialized journals, magazines, and newsletters. ACM also sponsors other computer science related events such as the
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Royal United Services Institute

    Royal United Services Institute

    • Awards presented: Duke of Westminster's Medal for Military Literature
    The Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies (RUSI), officially still known by its old name, the Royal United Services Institution, is a British defence and security think tank. It was founded in 1831 by the Duke of Wellington. RUSI describes itself as "the leading forum in the UK for national and international Defence and Security". It won Prospect Magazine's Think Tank of the Year Award 2008. In 2009, the same magazine named RUSI Foreign Policy Think Tank of the Year. In 2011, RUSI began to celebrate its 180th Anniversary. RUSI's Director is Professor Michael Clarke and its President is HRH the Duke of Kent. RUSI was founded in 1831, the oldest such institute in the world, at the initiative of the Duke of Wellington. Its original mission was to study naval and military science, what Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz called the 'art of war'. The Duke of Wellington spearheaded the establishment of RUSI in a letter to Colbourn's United Service Journal arguing for a 'a United Service Museum' should be formed, managed entirely by naval and military officers, and under patronage of the monarch, then King George IV, and the commanders-in-chief of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Swedish Film Institute

    Swedish Film Institute

    • Awards presented: Guldbagge Award
    The Swedish Film Institute (Swedish: Svenska Filminstitutet) was founded in 1963 to support and develop the Swedish film industry. The institute is housed in the Filmhuset building located in Gärdet, Östermalm in Stockholm. The building, completed in 1970, was designed by architect Peter Celsing. The Swedish Film Institute supports Swedish filmmaking and allocates grants for production, distribution and public showing of Swedish films in Sweden. It also promotes Swedish cinema internationally. Furthermore, the Institute organises the annual Guldbagge awards. The Swedish Film Database is published by the institute. Through the Swedish Film Agreement, between the Swedish state and the film and media industry, the Government of Sweden, the TV companies which are party to the agreement, and Sweden's cinema owners jointly fund the Film Institute and thus, indirectly, Swedish filmmaking. The current agreement runs from January 1, 2006, until December 31, 2012. The building also contains a large film archive and two theatres, named after Victor Sjöström and Mauritz Stiller, which regularly arrange screenings of classic films.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Swedish Ministry of Justice

    Swedish Ministry of Justice

    • Awards presented: Stockholm Prize in Criminology
    The Ministry of Justice (Swedish: Justitiedepartementet) is a Cabinet level ministry in the Government of Sweden with responsibility for legislation. The ministry is responsible for the Swedish legal system in Constitution and general administrative law, civil law, procedural law and criminal law. The Ministry of Justice also handles matters relating to democratic issues, human rights, integration and minority issues, metropolitan affairs, sports issues and non-governmental organisations. The Ministry is located in the government chancellery Rosenbad. The Ministry of Justice is headed by the Minister for Justice Beatrice Ask. Tobias Billström is the Minister for Migration and Asylum Policy. The political executive also includes the state secretaries, the political advisers and the press secretaries. Other senior officials are the Director-General for Administrative Affairs, three Directors-General for Legal Affairs, the Director-General for International Affairs, the Director of Planning, the Administrative Director, the Head of Personnel and the Head of Information. Below the executive level, the Ministry is divided into 21 divisions. The present Minister for Justice is Beatrice
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    United States National Academy of Sciences

    United States National Academy of Sciences

    • Award categories presented: NAS Award in Chemical Sciences
    • Awards presented: Gibbs Brothers Medal
    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a non-profit organization in the United States. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine". As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. The National Academy of Sciences is part of the National Academies, which also includes: The group holds a congressional charter under Title 36 of the United States Code. The Act of Incorporation, signed by President Abraham Lincoln on March 3, 1863, created the National Academy of Sciences and named 50 charter members. Many of the original NAS members came from the so-called "Scientific Lazzaroni", an informal network of mostly physical scientists working in the vicinity of Cambridge, Massachusetts (c. 1850). In 1863, enlisting the support of Alexander Dallas Bache and Charles Henry Davis, a professional astronomer recently recalled from the Navy to Washington to head the Bureau of Navigation, Louis Agassiz and Benjamin Peirce planned the steps whereby the National Academy of Sciences was to be established. Senator Henry Wilson of
    5.50
    4 votes
    132
    Asian American Writers' Workshop

    Asian American Writers' Workshop

    • Awards presented: Asian American Literary Awards
    The Asian American Writers' Workshop is a nonprofit literary arts organization founded in 1991 to support of writers, literature and community. The Workshop also offers the annual Asian American Literary Awards and sponsors Page Turner: The Asian American Literary Festival. In 2007, The Asian American Writers' Workshop partnered with Hyphen Magazine to start a short story contest called the Hyphen Asian American Short Story Contest, the only national, pan-Asian American writing competition of its kind Previous winners include Preeta Samarasan, Sunil Yapa, Shivani Manghnani, and Timothy Tau. Previous judges include Porochista Khakpour, Yiyun Li, Alexander Chee, Jaed Coffin, Brian Leung, Monique Truong and Monica Ferrell.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Downtown Athletic Club

    Downtown Athletic Club

    • Award categories presented: Heisman Trophy
    The Downtown Athletic Club was a private social club and athletic club in a 35-story building located at 19 West Street, (now 20 West Street) in Lower Manhattan, New York City, USA. The Club was founded in 1926. By 1927, it had purchased this site next to the Hudson River to construct its own building. It was completed in 1930. The high cost of land necessitated a tall building, and the relatively small lot size dictated that the different functions and facilities of the club, including swimming pool, gymnasium, miniature golf course, squash, and tennis courts, as well as dining rooms and living quarters, be accommodated on separate floors. The building was designed in a classic Art Deco decor. Its architects, Starrett & van Vleck are also noted for designing several New York department stores including Lord and Taylor, Bloomingdales and Saks Fifth Avenue shortly before the design of this Club. It has been designated as a landmark in New York, ensuring the building's unique architectural legacy. It was most famous for its annual awarding of the Heisman Trophy in its building, given every year to the most outstanding college football player, and named after John Heisman, the club's
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Geological Society of America

    Geological Society of America

    • Award categories presented: Mary C. Rabbitt History of Geology Award
    • Awards presented: Paul Pellas-Graham Ryder Award
    The Geological Society of America (R) (or GSA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences. The society was founded in New York in 1888 by Alexander Winchell, John J. Stevenson, Charles H. Hitchcock, John R. Proctor and Edward Orton and has been headquartered at 3300 Penrose Place, Boulder, Colorado, USA, since 1968. As of 2007, the society has over 21,000 members in more than 85 countries. The stated mission of GSA is "to advance the geosciences, to enhance the professional growth of its members, and to promote the geosciences in the service of humankind". Its main activities are sponsoring scientific meetings and publishing scientific literature, particularly the journals Geological Society of America Bulletin (commonly called "GSA Bulletin") and Geology. A more recent publication endeavor is the online-only science journal Geosphere. In February 2009, GSA began publishing Lithosphere. GSA's monthly news and science magazine, GSA Today, is open access online. The society has six regional sections in North America, an international section, and seventeen specialty divisions. GSA began with 100 members under its first president, James Hall. Over the
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    John F. Kennedy Library

    John F. Kennedy Library

    • Award categories presented: Profile in Courage Award
    • Awards presented: Profile in Courage Award
    The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is the presidential library and museum of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy. It is located on Columbia Point in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, USA, next to the Boston campus of the University of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Archives. It was designed by the architect I. M. Pei. The building is the official repository for original papers and correspondence of the Kennedy Administration, as well as special bodies of published and unpublished materials, such as books and papers by and about Ernest Hemingway. The library and museum were dedicated in 1979 by President Jimmy Carter and members of the Kennedy family. It can be reached from nearby Interstate 93 or via shuttle bus from the JFK/UMass stop on the Boston subway's Red line. During a weekend visit to Boston on October 19, 1963, President Kennedy, along with John Carl Warnecke — the architect who would design the President’s tomb in Arlington — viewed several locations offered by Harvard as a site for the library and museum. At the time there were only four other Presidential Libraries: the Hoover Presidential Library, the
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Stanford Graduate School of Business

    Stanford Graduate School of Business

    • Award categories presented: Spence Faculty Scholar
    The Stanford Graduate School of Business (also known as Stanford Business School, Stanford GSB, or The GSB) is one of the professional schools of Stanford University, in Stanford, California and is broadly regarded as one of the best business schools in the world. The Stanford GSB offers a general management Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, the Sloan Master's Program (which is a full-time ten-month MS in Management for mid-career executives) and a Ph.D. program, along with a number of joint degrees with other schools at Stanford University including Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law and Medicine. The school is the #1 ranked business school in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. The school was founded in 1925 when Trustee Herbert Hoover formed a committee of Wallace Alexander, George Rolph, Paul Shoup, Thomas Gregory, and Milton Esberg to secure the needed funds for the school's founding becoming the second graduate school of business in the country. There are three Nobel Prize winners on the faculty, two recipients of the John Bates Clark Award, 15 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and three members of the National Academy of
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    University of Southern California libraries

    University of Southern California libraries

    • Awards presented: USC Libraries Scripter Award
    The libraries of the University of Southern California are among the oldest private academic research libraries in California. For more than a century USC has been building collections in support of the university's teaching and research interests. Especially noteworthy collections include American literature, Cinema-Television including the Warner Bros. studio archives, European philosophy, gerontology, German exile literature, international relations, Korean studies, studies of Latin America, natural history, Southern California history, and the University Archives. The USC Warner Bros. Archives is the largest single studio collection in the world. Donated in 1977 to the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts, by Warner Communications, the WBA houses departmental records that detail Warner Bros. activities from the studio’s first major feature, My Four Years in Germany (1918), to its sale to Seven Arts in 1968. Announced in June 2006, the testimonies of 52,000 survivors, rescuers and others involved in the Holocaust will now be housed in the USC College of Letters, Arts & Sciences as a part of the newly formed USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Aschehoug

    Aschehoug

    • Award categories presented: Mads Wiel Nygaard's Endowment
    • Awards presented: Mads Wiel Nygaard's Endowment
    H. Aschehoug & Co (W Nygaard), commonly known as Aschehoug, is one of the largest independent publishing companies in Norway, founded in 1872. Headquartered in Oslo, the publishing house has 480 employees. The Aschehoug group also comprises other publishing houses owned partially or wholly by Aschehoug. Aschehoug literally means "ash hill." Aschehoug was founded as a bookstore in 1872 on Egertorvet in Oslo by cousins, Hieronymus and Halvard Aschehoug. From the start the firm was involved in publishing in a modest way, its output consisting mainly of school books. In 1888, the company was taken over by William Martin Nygaard and Thorstein Lambrechts (1856-1933), who kept the name while expanding its operations. In 1900 William Nygaard withdrew from the bookselling side of the business and established a publishing company, which was given the name H. Aschehoug & Co. (W. Nygaard). In 1935, following the death of William Nygaard, the publishing house turned into a corporation in connection with the inheritance settlement and Williams Nygaard's son, Mads Wiel Nygaard became the Executive Officer. Aschehoug published an increasing number of important books through the years. Important
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Center for Financial Studies

    Center for Financial Studies

    • Award categories presented: Deutsche Bank Prize
    The Center for Financial Studies (CFS), located in Frankfurt, is an independent research institute affiliated to the Goethe University Frankfurt. It is financed via donations and contributions from its members. Its sponsoring body is the Gesellschaft für Kapitalmarktforschung e.V., which counts amongst its members many banks, insurances, consulting firms and commercial enterprises. CFS was founded in 1967 and known until 1996 as Institut für Kapitalmarktforschung. CFS conducts applied research in the areas of financial markets, financial intermediaries and monetary and macroeconomics. It serves as a forum for dialogue between academia, policy-making institutions and the financial community and offers specialized executive training and development. CFS also aims to offer a platform for discussion for certain topical issues, in order to encourage the informal exchange of information, and to stimulate the academic debate in Frankfurt. CFS is headed by its President, Otmar Issing. The management team of CFS consists of three Managing Directors: Michael Haliassos, Jan Pieter Krahnen, and Uwe Walz. The institute’s sponsoring association is chaired by Rolf E. Breuer. Its spectrum of
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    First Fandom

    First Fandom

    • Awards presented: First Fandom Hall of Fame award
    First Fandom is an association of experienced science fiction fans. In 1958 a number of fans at Midwestcon realized amid table-talk that they all had been active in fandom for more than 20 years. This inspired the creation of an organization for longstanding fans under the initial chairmanship of Robert A. Madle. Originally only those fans who were known to have been active in fandom before the cutoff date, January 1, 1938, were eligible. Such fannish activity (or "fanac") including writing to letter columns in science fiction magazines, having been published in fanzines, or having participated in science fiction oriented clubs, or just generally doing fannish things. The term itself is an oblique reference to Olaf Stapledon's classic science fiction epic Last and First Men. In this book the stages of mankind are enumerated. Thus early 1950s historian of fandom Jack Speer began to label successive generations of fans as First Fandom, Second Fandom, Third Fandom, and so forth... all the way to Seventh Fandom and beyond. Currently the organization allows several classes of membership. For example, a Dinosaur is a member who was active before the first Worldcon (World Science Fiction
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Fortune

    Fortune

    • Award categories presented: Fortune Battle of the Corporate Bands
    Fortune is a global business magazine published by Time Inc. Founded by Henry Luce in 1930, the publishing business, consisting of Time, Life, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated, grew to become Time Warner. In turn, AOL grew as it acquired Time Warner in 2000 when Time Warner was the world's largest media conglomerate. Fortune's primary competitors in the national business magazine category are Forbes, which is also published bi-weekly, and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is especially known for its annual features ranking companies by revenue. CNNMoney.com is the online home of Fortune, in addition to Money. Fortune was founded by Time co-founder Henry Luce in February 1930, four months after the Wall Street Crash of 1929 that marked the onset of the Great Depression. Briton Hadden, Luce's partner, wasn't enthusiastic about the idea—which Luce originally thought to title Power—but Luce went forward with it after Hadden's February 27, 1929 death (probably of septicemia). Luce wrote a memo to the Time, Inc. board in November 1929, "We will not be over-optimistic. We will recognize that this business slump may last as long as an entire year." Single copies of that first issue cost
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Honda Motor Company, Ltd

    Honda Motor Company, Ltd

    Honda Motor Company, Ltd. (本田技研工業株式会社, Honda Giken Kōgyō KK, IPA: [honꜜda] ( listen);  /ˈhɒndə/) (TYO: 7267) is a Japanese public multinational corporation primarily known as a manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles. Honda has been the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer since 1959, as well as the world's largest manufacturer of internal combustion engines measured by volume, producing more than 14 million internal combustion engines each year. Honda surpassed Nissan in 2001 to become the second-largest Japanese automobile manufacturer. As of August 2008, Honda surpassed Chrysler as the fourth largest automobile manufacturer in the United States. Honda was the seventh largest automobile manufacturer in the world behind Toyota, General Motors, Volkswagen AG, Hyundai Motor Group, Ford, and Nissan in 2010. Honda was the first Japanese automobile manufacturer to release a dedicated luxury brand, Acura, in 1986. Aside from their core automobile and motorcycle businesses, Honda also manufactures garden equipment, marine engines, personal watercraft and power generators, amongst others. Since 1986, Honda has been involved with artificial intelligence/robotics research and
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Hong Kong International Film Festival

    Hong Kong International Film Festival

    The Hong Kong International Film Festival (HKIFF, Chinese: 香港國際電影節) is a platform for filmmakers, film professionals and filmgoers from all over the world to launch and experience new film work. There are seminars, conferences, exhibitions, and parties celebrating the festival community. The festival is committed to discovering talent, and it is also a major platform to launch films to the Greater China region and Asian market. Previously operated by Urban Council and Leisure and Cultural Services Department from 1977 to 2001, and Hong Kong Arts Development Council from 2002 to 2004, HKIFF is officially corporatized as an independent, charitable organization – Hong Kong International Film Festival Society Limited, after completing its 28th edition. The Hong Kong Government has continued to subsidize the festival through venue provision and funding for up to 7 million Hong Kong dollars. Screening over 300 titles from 50 countries in 11 theatres across Hong Kong, the 33rd HKIFF reached an audience of 580,000 people, including 4,500 business executives who attended the Hong Kong Film and Television Market (FILMART). The 34th HKIFF was held from March 21 to April 6, 2010, the last film
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Hustler

    Hustler

    • Award categories presented: Hustler Honey
    Hustler is a monthly pornographic magazine published in the United States. It was first published in 1974 by Larry Flynt. It was a step forward from the Hustler Newsletter, which was cheap advertising for his strip club businesses at the time. The magazine grew from a shaky start to a peak circulation of around 3 million; it has since dropped to approximately 500,000. It showed explicit views of the female genitalia, becoming one of the first major US-based magazines to do so, in contrast with relatively modest publications like Playboy. Today, Hustler is still considered more explicit (and more self-consciously lowbrow) than such well known competitors as Playboy and Penthouse. It frequently depicts hardcore themes, such as the use of sex toys, penetration and group sex. Larry Flynt Publications also owns the Hustler Casino in Gardena, California, the Hustler Club chain of bars and clubs, and Hustler store chain that sells adult-oriented videos, cIothing, magazines and sex toys. The chain's flagship store is on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. Of particular infamy are Hustler's cartoons, which have often featured blatantly violent and misogynistic themes. Gang rape, botched
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Saint-Amand-Montrond

    Saint-Amand-Montrond

    • Awards presented: Prix Alain-Fournier
    Saint-Amand-Montrond is a commune in the Cher department in the Centre region of France. A small town of farming and a little light industry situated some 26 miles (42 km) southeast of Bourges, at the junction of the D951 with the D300 and D2144 roads. The town was built in the basin of the eastern banks of the Cher River which separates it from the commune of Orval, to which it is connected by two bridges. A small river, the Marmande, joins the Cher here, and the canal de Berry crosses the commune from southeast to southwest. Some flooding is common because of the nearby marshes. The town is the capital of the small region of Boischaut, known for its woodland and cattle pastures. The settlement of Saint-Amand goes back to prehistoric times. Evidence of Roman occupation has also been discovered here. An abbey was founded here around the year 620 by a monk called Theodulph. The commune was created after the French Revolution by the amalgamation of three separate small towns that had grown up during the Middle Ages: Saint Amand le Chastel, Montrond and Saint Amand sous Montrond. Soukouna The town is noted for its goldsmiths and jewellers. Two large printing companies, Bussiere and
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Trannyshack

    Trannyshack

    • Awards presented: Miss Trannyshack
    Trannyshack is a monthly drag club taking place at DNA Lounge in San Francisco. It was started by drag queen Heklina in 1996 as an offshoot of Klubstitute, and was a weekly fixture at The Stud bar in San Francisco for 12 years, drawing large crowds on a regular basis. The Tuesday night performances at The Stud ended on 12 August 2008, with Trannyshack resuming as a monthly event at DNA Lounge in March 2010. The Trannyshack stage has hosted many celebrities including Lady Gaga, Gwen Stefani, Mary Wilson of the Supremes and more. In the early years of the club, Ana Matronic of the Scissor Sisters lived in San Francisco and performed frequently at Trannyshack before moving to New York in 1999. Trannyshack ended as a weekly Tuesday night show on August 12, 2008 with "The Final Tuesday". Heklina has said that she stopped presenting the show after it became so successful that it was being copied by other shows: "I felt like if everyone's trying to copy me, maybe I should try to do something different." The Trannyshack name has become so popular that Heklina has filed six cease-and-desist letters against other clubs using the name. The Miss Trannyshack Pageant is no longer held in a
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    United States Military Academy

    United States Military Academy

    • Award categories presented: Sylvanus Thayer Award
    The United States Military Academy at West Point (also known as USMA, West Point, Army, The Academy or simply The Point) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York. The academy sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, 50 miles (80 km) north of New York City. The entire central campus is a national landmark and home to scores of historic sites, buildings, and monuments. The majority of the campus's neogothic buildings are constructed from gray and black granite. The campus is a popular tourist destination complete with a large visitor center and the oldest museum in the United States Army. Candidates for admission must both apply directly to the academy and receive a nomination, usually from a Senator or Representative. Students are officers-in-training and are referred to as cadets or collectively as the United States Corps of Cadets (USCC). Tuition for cadets is fully funded by the Army in exchange for an active duty service obligation upon graduation. Approximately 1,300 cadets enter the Academy each July with about 1,000 cadets graduating. The academic program grants a bachelor of science degree with a curriculum that
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Writers Guild of America

    • Award categories presented: Writers Guild of America Award for Best Adapted Screenplay
    • Awards presented: Writers Guild of America Award
    The Writers Guild of America is a generic term referring to the joint efforts of two different US labor unions: The WGAE and WGAW negotiate contracts in unison and also launch work stoppages simultaneously: Although each Guild runs independently, they do both perform some activities in parallel:
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    ZDF

    ZDF

    • Awards presented: Deutscher Fernsehpreis
    Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (English: "Second German Television"), ZDF, is a public-service German television broadcaster based in Mainz (Rheinland-Pfalz). It is run as an independent non-profit institution, which was founded by the German federal states (Bundesländer). ZDF is financed by television licence fees and advertising revenues. The ZDF is well known for its famous TV formats heute (newscast; established in 1963) and Wetten Dass..? (entertainment show; established in 1981). ZDF was founded in 1961 by federal treaty, after the West German federal government's plan to set up a TV channel controlled by the federal government caused uproar. West Germany's constitution stipulated that regulation of culture and media was a compentency of the federal states (Bundesländer). The station began broadcasting from Eschborn near Frankfurt am Main on 1 April 1963, with a speech by the first director general (Intendant), Dr. Karl Holzamer. The channel broadcast its first programme in colour in 1967. In 1974, ZDF moved its base of operations to Mainz-Lerchenberg, after briefly being located in Wiesbaden. Thomas Bellut, the current director general, was elected by the ZDF Television Council
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    American Mathematical Society

    • Award categories presented: Cole Prize
    The American Mathematical Society (AMS) is an association of professional mathematicians dedicated to the interests of mathematical research and scholarship, which it does with various publications and conferences as well as annual monetary awards and prizes to mathematicians. The society is one of the four parts of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics (JPBM) and a member of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS). It was founded in 1888 as the New York Mathematical Society, the brainchild of Thomas Fiske who was impressed by the London Mathematical Society on a visit to England. John Howard Van Amringe was the first president and Fiske became secretary. The society soon decided to publish a journal, but ran into some resistance, due to concerns about competing with the American Journal of Mathematics. The result was the Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society, with Fiske as editor-in-chief. The de facto journal, as intended, was influential in increasing membership. In July, 1894, the society reorganized under its present name and became a national society. In 1951, the headquarters moved from New York City to Providence, Rhode Island. The society added an
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Australian Academy of Science

    Australian Academy of Science

    • Award categories presented: Thomas Ranken Lyle Medal
    The Australian Academy of Science was founded in 1954 by a group of distinguished Australians, including Australian Fellows of the Royal Society of London. The first president was Sir Mark Oliphant. The Academy is modelled after the Royal Society and operates under a Royal Charter; as such it is an independent body, but has government endorsement. The Academy Secretariat is in Canberra, at the Shine Dome. The objectives of the Academy are to promote science through a range of activities. It has defined four major program areas: The Australian National Research Council (ANRC) was established in 1919 for the purpose of representing Australia on the International Research Council. The Council ceased to exist in 1954, replaced by the Australian Academy of Science. The Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science is made up of over 420 leading Australian scientists. Scientists judged by their peers to have made an exceptional contribution to knowledge in their field may be elected to Fellowship of the Academy. Twenty new Fellows may be elected every year. No more than two Fellows may be elected every three years on the basis of distinguished contributions to science by means other
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    British Film Institute

    British Film Institute

    • Award categories presented: Sutherland Trophy
    The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to: The BFI runs the BFI Southbank (formerly the National Film Theatre (NFT)) and IMAX theatre, both located on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The IMAX has the largest cinema screen in the UK, and shows popular recent releases and short films showcasing its technology, which includes 3D screenings and 11,600 watts of digital surround sound. BFI Southbank (the National Film Theatre screens and the Studio) shows films from all over the world particularly critically acclaimed historical & specialised films that may not otherwise get a cinema showing. The BFI also distributes archival and cultural cinema to other venues - each year to more than 800 venues all across the UK, as well as to a substantial number of overseas venues. The BFI runs the annual London Film Festival along with the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival and the youth-orientated Future Film Festival. The BFI offers a range of education initiatives, in particular to support the teaching of film and media studies in schools. The BFI maintains the world's largest film archive, the BFI National Archive, previously
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Google

    Google

    • Awards presented: Google O'Reilly Open Source Award
    Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) is an American multinational corporation which provides Internet-related products and services, including internet search, cloud computing, software and advertising technologies. Advertising revenues from AdWords generate almost all of the company's profits. The company was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while both attended Stanford University. Together, Brin and Page own about 16 percent of the company's stake. Google was first incorporated as a privately held company on September 4, 1998, and its initial public offering followed on August 19, 2004. The company's mission statement from the outset was "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful" and the company's unofficial slogan is "Don't be evil". In 2006, the company moved to its current headquarters in Mountain View, California. Rapid growth since incorporation has triggered a chain of products, acquisitions, and partnerships beyond the company's core web search engine. The company offers online productivity software including email, an office suite, and social networking. Google's products extend to the desktop as well, with applications for web
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Government of India

    Government of India

    • Award categories presented: Padma Vibhushan
    The Government of India, officially known as the Union Government, and also known as the Central Government, was established by the Constitution of India, and is the governing authority of the union of 28 states and seven union territories, collectively called the Republic of India. It is seated in New Delhi, the capital of India. The government comprises three branches: the executive, the legislative and the judiciary. The executive branch is headed by the President, who is the Head of State and exercises his or her power directly or through officers subordinate to him. The legislative branch or the Parliament consists of the lower house, the Lok Sabha, and the upper house, the Rajya Sabha, as well as the President. The judicial branch has the Supreme Court at its apex, 21 High Courts, and numerous civil, criminal and family courts at the district level. India is the largest democracy in the world. The basic civil and criminal laws governing the citizens of India are set down in major parliamentary legislation, such as the Civil Procedure Code, the Indian Penal Code, and the Criminal Procedure Code. The union and individual state governments consist of executive, legislative and
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Mathematical Association of America

    Mathematical Association of America

    • Awards presented: Chauvenet Prize
    The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is a professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level. Members include university, college, and high school teachers; graduate and undergraduate students; pure and applied mathematicians; computer scientists; statisticians; and many others in academia, government, business, and industry. The MAA was founded in 1915 and is headquartered at 1529 18th Street, Northwest in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. The organization publishes mathematics journals and books, including the American Mathematical Monthly (established in 1894 by Benjamin Finkel), the most widely-read mathematics journal in the world according to records on JSTOR. The MAA sponsors the annual summer MathFest and cosponsors with the American Mathematical Society the Joint Mathematics Meeting, held in early January of each year. On occasion the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics joins in these meetings. Twenty-nine regional sections also hold regular meetings. The MAA has for a long time followed a strict policy of inclusiveness and non-discrimination. In previous periods it was subject to the same problems
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Museum of Science, Boston

    Museum of Science, Boston

    • Award categories presented: Bradford Washburn Award
    The Museum of Science (MoS) is a Boston, Massachusetts landmark, located in Science Park, a plot of land spanning the Charles River. Along with over 500 interactive exhibits, the Museum features a number of live presentations throughout the building every day, along with shows at the Charles Hayden Planetarium and the Mugar Omni IMAX theater, the only domed IMAX screen in New England. The Museum is also an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and is home to over 100 animals, many of which have been rescued and rehabilitated from various dangerous situations. The Museum is also one of the city's three bases of operations for Boston's privately operated Duck Tours. The Museum began as the Boston Society of Natural History in 1830, founded by a collection of men who wished to share scientific interests. In 1864, after the Society had gone through several temporary facilities, a building was purchased in the Back Bay area of the city and dubbed the "New England Museum of Natural History." It was more commonly called the Boston Museum of Natural History in the 19th century, and this name occurs frequently in the literature. A great deal of scientific work was
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences

    National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences

    • Award categories presented: Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal
    • Awards presented: Grammy Awards
    The Recording Academy, known variously as The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences or NARAS, is a U.S. organization of musicians, producers, recording engineers and other recording professionals dedicated to improving the quality of life and cultural condition for music and its makers. The Recording Academy is headquartered in Santa Monica. Neil Portnow is the current president of The Academy. The Recording Academy, which began in 1957, is famous for its GRAMMY Awards. In 1997, the Recording Academy launched The Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc., which produces the Latin GRAMMY Awards. Michael Greene was the founder and the first President of the Latin Grammys. The origin of the Academy dates back to the beginning of the 1950s Hollywood Walk of Fame project. The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce asked the help of major recording industry executives in compiling a list of people in the music business who should be honored by Walk of Fame stars. The music committee, made up of these executives, compiled a list, but as they worked, they realized there were many more talented industry people who would not qualify to be recognized with a Hollywood Boulevard bronze
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Nickelodeon

    Nickelodeon

    • Awards presented: Kids' Choice Awards
    Nickelodeon, often simply called Nick and originally called The Pinwheel Netwok, is an American children's channel owned by Viacom and operated under its Nickelodeon Kids and Family Group. The channel is primarily aimed at children in grade school and teens, with their weekday morning program block aimed at preschoolers ages 2–5. Since 2004, Nickelodeon has been run by Cyma Zarghami. It had ranked as the No. 1 cable channel as of early 2011 but by the end of that year had suffered a double-digit ratings drop described as "inexplicable" by parent company Viacom. Nickelodeon's broadcast day runs on Sundays-Thursdays from 6 a.m.-8 p.m., Fridays from 6 a.m.-9 p.m., and Saturdays from 6 a.m.-10 p.m. (Eastern and Pacific Time). Since 1985, it shares its channel space with Nick at Nite, a night time channel that airs sitcom reruns during the interim hours. It is treated as a separate channel from Nickelodeon by A.C. Nielsen Co. for ratings purposes. Nickelodeon's pre-history began on December 1, 1970 when QUBE, the first two-way interactive cable TV system was launched in Columbus, Ohio by Warner Cable (owned by Warner Communications, and an ancestor of Warner-Amex Satellite
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Spike

    Spike

    • Award categories presented: Spike Video Game Award for Best Cast
    • Awards presented: Spike TV Video Game Awards
    Spike (formerly Spike TV) is an American general entertainment cable television channel. It launched on March 7, 1983 as The Nashville Network (TNN), a joint venture of WSM, Inc. (a subsidiary of National Life and Accident Insurance Company) and Group W Satellite Communications; Gaylord Entertainment Company acquired the channel a few months later. After several changes of ownership and name, Spike currently operates as part of MTV Networks, owned by Viacom. Spike is available in 98.7 million American homes. It features re-runs of popular shows such as CSI, CSI: NY, Unsolved Mysteries, and The Ren & Stimpy Show, along with various original programs and movies, all targeting males 18-34. It is also the home of Impact Wrestling, the flagship show of professional wrestling organization Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. As of 2006, Spike's viewership was almost half women (45%), although many of them are reported to be watching it with male partners or family members, or were watching the CSI franchise. The average age of the channel's viewers was 42 years old. In October 2007, Kevin Kay was appointed network president after being executive vice president and general manager of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    The Perl Foundation

    The Perl Foundation

    • Award categories presented: White Camel Award - Perl User Groups
    • Awards presented: White Camel Award
    The Perl Foundation (TPF) is dedicated to the advancement of the Perl programming language through open discussion, collaboration, design, and code. The Perl Foundation is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization based in Holland, Michigan. The Perl Foundation supports the use and development of Perl in many ways: The day-to-day business of TPF is run by several committees including the grants committee and conferences committee. These committees report to the TPF steering committee, which directs the operations of TPF. All of these groups are overseen by a board of directors. All TPF members, including the board of directors, are volunteers. The current membership is available on the TPF web site.
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    United States Department of Energy

    United States Department of Energy

    • Award categories presented: Enrico Fermi Award
    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government concerned with the United States' policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation's nuclear weapons program, nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy, energy conservation, energy-related research, radioactive waste disposal, and domestic energy production. DOE also sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other US federal agency; the majority of this research is conducted through its system of United States Department of Energy National Laboratories. The agency is administered by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland. In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The AEC was reinstated and
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    University of Cambridge

    University of Cambridge

    • Awards presented: Smith's Prize
    The University of Cambridge (informally known as Cambridge University or simply as Cambridge) is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after the University of Oxford), and the third-oldest surviving university in the world.. In post-nominals the university's name is abbreviated as Cantab, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge). The university grew out of an association of scholars that was formed in 1209, early records suggest, by scholars leaving Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk. The two "ancient universities" have many common features and are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to cultural and practical associations as a historic part of British society, they have a long history of rivalry with each other. Cambridge has performed consistently in various league tables over the years, achieving the top spot in the world according to the QS World University Rankings in both 2010 and 2011; in 2012, the same editors ranked Cambridge second. Other results include a sixth place in the world in the 2011
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

    Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

    • Award categories presented: Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
    The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League and one of the oldest in the United States and the world. It is one of the professional graduate schools of Columbia University. Founded by Joseph Pulitzer in 1912 on the University's Morningside Heights campus, the school offers Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees in journalism, and a Ph.D. in communications. In addition to graduate degree programs, the Journalism School administers several prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize and the DuPont-Columbia Award. It also co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review, essentially a trade publication for journalists. A faculty of experienced journalists with varying specialties—including politics, arts and culture, religion, science, education, business and economics, investigative reporting, national and international affairs—instruct Journalism School students. Faculty members are preeminent in their fields, and many have won numerous journalism awards including the Pulitzer Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, the duPont-Columbia Award, the National Magazine Award, and the National Book
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation

    • Award categories presented: Ramon Magsaysay Award for Journalism, Literature, and Creative Communication Arts
    The Ramon Magsaysay Award is an annual award established to perpetuate former Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay's example of integrity in government, courageous service to the people, and pragmatic idealism within a democratic society. The Ramon Magsaysay Award is often considered Asia's Nobel Prize. The prize was established in April 1957 by the trustees of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund based in New York City with the concurrence of the Philippine government. Magsaysay Award Foundation the prize to Asian individuals achieving excellence in their respective fields. The awards are given in six categories: In May 1957, seven prominent Filipinos were named to the founding board of trustees of the Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation, the non-profit corporation tasked with implementing the awards program. The RMAF recognizes and honors individuals and organizations in Asia regardless of race, creed, sex, or nationality, who have achieved distinction in their respective fields and have helped others generously without anticipating public recognition. The awards have traditionally been given in five categories: government service; public service; community leadership; journalism,
    6.00
    3 votes
    165

    Anheuser-Busch

    • Award categories presented: Budweiser Conservation Scholarship
    Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. /ˈænhaɪzər ˈbʊʃ/ is an American brewing company and a wholly owned subsidiary of Anheuser-Busch InBev (AB InBev). The company operates 13 breweries in the United States. Until December 2009, it also was one of the largest theme park operators in the United States, operating ten theme parks through the company's family entertainment division, Busch Entertainment Corporation. It is based in St. Louis, Missouri, which is also the headquarters for the AB InBev North America unit. In 1852, St. Louis brewer and saloon operator George Schneider opened the Bavarian Brewery on Carondelet Avenue (later known as South Broadway) between Dorcas and Lynch streets in south St. Louis. Schneider's brewery expanded in 1856 to a new brewhouse near Eighth and Crittenden streets; however, the following year financial problems forced the sale of the brewery to various owners during the late 1850s. In 1860, the brewery was purchased on the brink of bankruptcy by William D'Oench, a local pharmacist, and Eberhard Anheuser, a prosperous German-born soap manufacturer. D'Oench was the silent partner in the business until 1869, when he sold his half-interest in the company. From
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Directors Guild of America

    Directors Guild of America

    • Award categories presented: DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film
    • Awards presented: Directors Guild of America Awards
    Directors Guild of America (DGA) is an entertainment guild which represents the interests of film and television directors in the United States motion picture industry and abroad. Founded as the Screen Directors Guild in 1936, the group merged with the Radio and Television Directors Guild in 1960 to become the modern Directors Guild of America. As a union that seeks to organize an individual profession, rather than multiple professions across an industry, the DGA is a craft union. It represents directors and members of the directorial team (assistant directors, unit production managers, stage managers, associate directors, production associates, technical coordinators, and location managers (New York & Chicago only)) in film, television, documentaries, news, sports, commercials and new media production. The Guild has various training programs whereby successful applicants are placed in various productions and can gain experience working in the film or television industry. As of 2011, its 75th anniversary, the guild had about 14,500 members. The DGA headquarters are located on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, with satellite offices in New York and Chicago and coordinating committees
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Institute of Physics

    Institute of Physics

    • Award categories presented: President's Medal
    • Awards presented: Paul Dirac Medal and Prize
    The Institute of Physics (IOP) is a scientific charity devoted to increasing the practice, understanding and application of physics. It has a worldwide membership of over 45,000. It is the learned society for physics and main professional body for physicists in the United Kingdom and Ireland. As a part of its mission, the IOP works to engage the public with physics and is prominent in its work in policy and advocacy, lobbying for stronger support for physics in education, research and industry in the UK and Ireland. In addition to this, the IOP provides services to its members including careers advice and professional development and grants the professional qualification of Chartered Physicist (CPhys), as well as Chartered Engineer (CEng) as a nominated body of the Engineering Council. The IOP's publishing company, IOP Publishing, publishes more than 60 academic titles. The current president is Peter Knight. and the chief executive of the IOP is Paul Hardaker. The present day Institute of Physics was formed in 1960 from the merger of the Physical Society of London, founded in 1874, and the Institute of Physics, founded in 1920. The Physical Society was founded to provide a forum
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach

    Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach

    • Awards presented: Oberwolfach Prize
    The Mathematical Research Institute of Oberwolfach (German: Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach) in Oberwolfach, Germany, was founded by mathematician Wilhelm Süss in 1944. It organizes weekly workshops on diverse topics where mathematicians and scientists from all over the world come to do collaborative research. The iconic model of the Boy surface was installed in front of the Institute as a gift from Mercedes-Benz on January 28, 1991. The Boy surface is named after Werner Boy who constructed the surface in his 1901 thesis written under the direction of David Hilbert. The Oberwolfach Prize is awarded approximately every three years for excellent achievements in changing fields of mathematics to young European mathematicians not older than 35 years. It is financed by the Oberwolfach Foundation and awarded in cooperation with the institute. Prize winners
    5.67
    3 votes
    169

    Motor Trend

    • Award categories presented: Motor Trend Car of the Year
    Motor Trend is an American automobile magazine. It first appeared in September 1949, issued by Petersen Publishing Company in Los Angeles, and bearing the tag line "The Magazine for a Motoring World". Petersen Publishing was sold to British publisher EMAP in 1998, who sold the former Petersen magazines to Primedia in 2001. As of 2007, it is published by Source Interlink. It has a monthly circulation of over one million readers. One of the earliest and most enduring of the magazine's creations was its Car of the Year award, given almost continuously since its inception, although the phrase itself would not become entrenched until well into the 1950s. The first winner was the 1949 Cadillac; the company turned it down. The award has gone through several splits and permutations over the years, being called the Golden Wheels Award for a while in the 1970s and having given rise to Truck of the Year and Import Car of the Year as well as SUV of the Year. Nevertheless, it is still coveted by manufacturers and is usually covered by the mainstream press as the most important distinction awarded in the American auto industry. The magazine releases a special edition every September and October
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Saint Francis College

    Saint Francis College

    • Award categories presented: St. Francis College Literary Prize
    St. Francis College (also known as SFC) is a private, coeducational college located in Brooklyn Heights, New York, in the United States. The campus is composed of 5 interconnected buildings, occupying half of a city block in Downtown Brooklyn. It was founded in 1859 by the Franciscan friars as the St. Francis Academy. St. Francis College was the first private school in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn. It is mainly an undergraduate institution, yet does have graduate programs in accounting, project management and psychology. The college has 19 academic departments that offer 72 majors and minors. St. Francis College is classified as a small liberal arts college. As of 2012, there are 2,697 undergraduates (11% part-time) and 47 graduates (34% part-time). The student to faculty ratio is 18:1 and 43.6% of classes have 20 or fewer students. The 2,744 students that attend St. Francis College come from over 80 countries. St. Francis College has been ranked by the New York Times as one of the more diverse colleges in the United States. The college has also been ranked by both Forbes Magazine and U.S. News and World Report as one of the top baccalaureate colleges in the north. St.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    ASIFA-Hollywood

    ASIFA-Hollywood

    • Award categories presented: Annie Award for Best Animated Feature
    • Awards presented: Annie Award
    ASIFA-Hollywood, a non-profit organization in Los Angeles, California, USA, is a branch member of the "Association Internationale du Film d'Animation" or "ASIFA" (the International Animated Film Association). Its purpose is to promote the art of film animation in a variety of ways, including its own archive and an annual awards presentation, the Annie Awards. ASIFA-Hollywood was founded in 1957, by Bill Scott, Stephen Bosustow, Ward Kimball, William T. Hurtz, Les Goldman, June Foray, and Bill Littlejohn, and later chartered by UNESCO in 1960. Today, its Board of Directors includes Frank Gladstone (President), Jerry Beck (Vice President), Jeff Wike (Treasurer), Bill Turner (Secretary), Paul Husband (General Counsel), Jamie Kezlarian Bolio, David Derks, Brooke Keesling, Jennifer Klein, Dori Littell-Herrick, Tom Sito, Charles Solomon, Mark Walton and Danny Young. Many branches of ASIFA exist throughout the world; in the US there are chapters in San Francisco, New York City, Atlanta, Seattle, Washington, the Detroit area, and others, while internationally, organizations exist in Annecy, France, in Italy, and Japan. ASIFA also sponsors several animation film festivals throughout the
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Michael Jackson Tribute Portrait

    Michael Jackson Tribute Portrait

    • Award categories presented: Michael Jackson Tribute Portrait VIP Dot
    • Awards presented: Humanitarianism
    In what has been described as the world's largest tribute to The King of Pop, celebrity artist David Ilan launched the Michael Jackson One Millions Dots Tribute Portrait during a ribbon cutting ceremony August 28 at the EDGE Performing Arts Center in Hollywood, California. The one-of-a-kind work of art will be created using a series of dots in a technique called pointillism. The first dots were drawn on the blank portrait canvas at the ribbon cutting ceremony. The very first dot was dedicated to Jackson and then one for each of his children. According to the artist, at least one million dots are needed to complete the image of the King of Pop, and fans worldwide have been invited to become part of Jackson's legacy by getting a free dot in his portrait in their name. A dot is drawn on canvas each time someone signs up for it, with all of the dots eventually coming together to form Jackson's image. The portrait has been in production from the last quarter of 2009 until late 2010.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Museum of Finnish Architecture

    Museum of Finnish Architecture

    • Award categories presented: Alvar Aalto Medal
    The Museum of Finnish Architecture (Finnish: Suomen rakennustaiteen museo, Swedish: Finlands arkitekturmuseum) is an architectural museum in Helsinki, Finland. Established in 1956, it is the second oldest museum of its kind (after Moscow) devoted specifically to architecture. The museum was founded on the basis of the photographic collection of the Finnish Association of Architects (SAFA), which was established in 1949. The museum is on Kasarmikatu street in Ullanlinna, housed in a neo-classical building, designed by architect Magnus Schjerfbeck and completed in 1899. The building was originally in the use of a scientific society and the University of Helsinki. The museum took over use of the building in 1981, before which it had been housed in a former wooden pavilion in Kaivopuisto Park. Occupying the same city block as the Museum of architecture is the Design Museum. In 1984 an architectural competition was arranged for a new building to be built in the gap between the two buildings, this linking them together as a single institution. The competition was won by architects Helin and Siitonen, but the project was abandoned soon afterwards, due to logistics and problems of finance.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    National Council of La Raza

    National Council of La Raza

    • Awards presented: Alma Award
    The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) is a non-profit and non-partisan advocacy group in the United States, focused on improving opportunities for Hispanics. It is sometimes confused with La Raza Unida. According to the organization's website, it is "the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States" and "serves all Hispanic subgroups in all regions of the country". NCLR receives funding from philanthropic organizations, such as the Ford Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, as well as corporations such as Citigroup and Wal-Mart. NCLR serves millions of Americans every year in 41 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico by working with its affiliate network of nearly 300 community-based organizations located throughout the country. The NCLR is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and has eight regional offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, Sacramento, San Antonio, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. Janet Murguía currently serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of NCLR. NCLR works on a variety of different issues affecting the Latino community in the U.S. such as health, housing, education,
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

    • Award categories presented: Hugo Boss Prize
    The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (often referred to as "The Guggenheim") is a well-known art museum located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. It is the permanent home of a renowned and continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art and also features special exhibitions throughout the year. The museum was established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939 as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, under the guidance of its first director, the artist Hilla von Rebay. It adopted its current name after the death of its founder, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1952. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the cylindrical museum building, wider at the top than the bottom, was conceived as a "temple of the spirit" and is one of the 20th century's most important architectural landmarks. The building opened on October 21, 1959, replacing rented spaces used by the museum since its founding. Its unique ramp gallery extends from just under the skylight in the ceiling in a long, continuous spiral along the outer edges of the building until it reaches the ground level. The building underwent extensive expansion and
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    The Times

    The Times

    The Times is a British daily national newspaper, first published in London in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register (it became The Times on 1 January 1788). The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times (founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News International, itself wholly owned by the News Corporation group headed by Rupert Murdoch. The Times and The Sunday Times do not share editorial staff, were founded independently and have only had common ownership since 1967. The Times is the first newspaper to have borne that name, lending it to numerous other papers around the world, including The Times of India (1838), The Straits Times (1845), The New York Times (1851), The Irish Times (1859), the Los Angeles Times (1881), The Seattle Times (1891), The Daily Times (Malawi) (1900), The Canberra Times (1926), The Times (Malta) (1935) and The Times of Israel (Israel) (2012). Outside the UK it is often referred to as the "London Times" or "The Times of London" for distinguishing purposes. The Times is the originator of the ubiquitous Times Roman typeface, originally developed by Stanley Morison of The Times in collaboration with the
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Association for Library Service to Children

    Association for Library Service to Children

    • Award categories presented: Caldecott Medal
    • Awards presented: Newbery Medal
    The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) is a division of the American Library Association. Its members are concerned with the profession of children's Librarianship. The ALSC chooses the recipients of some of the world's most prestigious annual children's literature awards. The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) (a division of the ALA) announces the awards listed below every January at a Monday morning press conference that takes place during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting. In addition to the above listed awards, the ALSC produces four lists of notable media titles
    4.20
    5 votes
    178
    American Historical Association

    American Historical Association

    • Award categories presented: Justin Winsor Prize
    The American Historical Association (AHA) is the oldest and largest society of historians and professors of history in the United States. Founded in 1884, the association promotes historical studies, the teaching of history, and the preservation of and access to historical materials. It publishes The American Historical Review five times a year, with scholarly articles and book reviews. The AHA is the major organization for historians working in the United States, while the Organization of American Historians is the major organization for historians who study and teach about the United States. The group received a congressional charter in 1889, establishing it "for the promotion of historical studies, the collection and preservation of historical manuscripts, and for kindred purposes in the interest of American history, and of history in America." As an umbrella organization for the profession, the AHA works with other major historical organizations and acts as a public advocate for the field. Within the profession, the association defines ethical behavior and best practices, particularly through its "Statement on Standards of Professional Conduct" The AHA also develops standards
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Banco del Libro

    Banco del Libro

    Banco del Libro is a non-profit organization for the promotion of children's literature, with headquarters in Caracas, Venezuela. It was established in 1960 as a centre for the exchange of textbooks – hence the name Banco del Libro (Book Bank). As it has grown it has diversified to promote reading in Venezuela, in every conceivable arena and genre of children’s literature. In 2007 Banco del Libro won the biggest prize in children's literature, the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, recognising its "long-term sustainable work" as a promoter of reading. It is one of two institutions to win the award (2003 to 2012).
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Boehringer-Ingelheim

    Boehringer-Ingelheim

    • Awards presented: Heinrich Wieland Prize
    C.H. Boehringer Sohn AG & Ko. KG is the parent company of Boehringer Ingelheim, which was founded in 1885 by Albert Boehringer in Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. The Boehringer Ingelheim group is one of the world's 20 leading pharmaceutical companies. Still headquartered in Ingelheim, it operates globally with 145 affiliates and more than 42,000 employees. The company's key assets of interest are: respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, HIV, thromboembolic disease and cerebrovascular disease. Since it was founded in 1885, the family-owned company has been committed to researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing novel products of high therapeutic value for human and veterinary medicine. Boehringer Ingelheim is a full member of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations EFPIA. The corporate logo of Boehringer Ingelheim depicts a stylized rendition of the central section of the imperial palace of Charlemagne. The business areas consist of Human Pharmaceuticals and Animal Health. In 2010, 42,224 employees were in 145 affiliated companies worldwide, research and development (R&D) facilities were in seven sites and 20 production
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Boston Society of Architects

    Boston Society of Architects

    • Award categories presented: Harleston Parker Medal
    One of the oldest and largest chapters of the AIA, the Boston Society of Architects (BSA) is a nonprofit membership organization committed to architecture, design and the built environment. On June 20, 1867, approximately 50 architects convened in the City of Boston to sign the articles of association for the Boston Society of Architects. Since this time, the BSA has grown to more than 5,000 members, making it one of the largest branches of the AIA. The BSA became the eastern Massachusetts regional association of the AIA in 1870. It has sister chapters in Central Massachusetts and Western Massachusetts. These three chapters constitute AIA Massachusetts. In 1889, members of the Boston Society of Architects founded the Boston Architectural Club to train future drafters and architects. Over time this club evolved into a fully accredited, degree-granting college in Boston’s historic Back Bay: the Boston Architectural College (BAC), which is now independent of the BSA. The BSA is headquartered in BSA |Space| at 290 Congress Street, Suite 200, Boston MA 02210. The 5,000 members of the BSA include 2,000 architects, 500 young professionals on the path to become licensed architects and
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals

    Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals

    • Award categories presented: Best English-Language Book
    • Awards presented: Tir na n-Og Awards
    The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) is the leading professional body for librarians, information specialists and knowledge managers in the United Kingdom. CILIP’s vision is a fair and economically prosperous society underpinned by literacy, access to information and the transfer of knowledge. CILIP has approximately 15,000 members (May, 2012). It was formed in 2002 by the merger of the Library Association (abbreviated to LA or sometimes LAUK) – founded in 1877 as a result of the first International Conference of Librarians and awarded a Royal Charter in 1898 – and the Institute of Information Scientists, founded in 1958. Membership is not compulsory for practice, but members can work towards Chartered Membership which entitles them to the postnominal letters MCLIP, and subsequently toward Fellowship (FCLIP) [sic]. Affiliated members can also obtain ACLIP upon completing certification. Honorary Fellowship (HonFCLIP or FCLIP(hc)), a qualification akin to an honorary degree, is granted to a small number of people who have rendered distinguished service to the profession. CILIP accredits degree programmes in library and information science at
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Forbes

    Forbes

    Forbes is an American business magazine owned by Forbes, Inc. Published biweekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, and law. Headquarters are in New York City. Its primary competitors in the national business magazine category are Fortune, which is also published biweekly, and Businessweek which recently was sold to Bloomberg. The magazine is well known for its lists, including its lists of the richest Americans (the Forbes 400), highest-paid stars under 30, and its list of billionaires. The motto of Forbes magazine is "The Capitalist Tool." Its editor-in-chief is Steve Forbes. B. C. Forbes, a financial columnist for the Hearst papers, and his partner Walter Drey, the general manager of the Magazine of Wall Street, founded Forbes magazine in 1917. Forbes provided the money and the name and Drey provided the publishing expertise. The original name of the magazine was Forbes: Devoted to Doers and Doings. Drey became vice-president of the B.C. Forbes Publishing Company, while B.C. Forbes became editor-in-chief, a post he held until his death in 1954.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Geological Society of London

    Geological Society of London

    • Award categories presented: Sue Tyler Friedman Medal
    The Geological Society of London (also known as The Geological Society) is a learned society based in the United Kingdom with the aim of :- "Making geologists acquainted with each other,stimulating their zeal,inducing them to adopt one nomenclature, facilitating the communication of new facts and ascertaining what is known in their science and what remains to be discovered". It is the oldest national geological society in the world and the largest in Europe with over 9,000 Fellows entitled to the postnominal FGS (Fellow of the Geological Society), over 2,000 of whom are Chartered Geologists (CGeol). The Society is a Registered Charity, No 210161. It is also a member of the Science Council, and is licensed to award Chartered Scientist to qualifying members. The Society was founded on October 13, 1807 at the Freemasons' Tavern, Great Queen Street, Covent Garden. It was partly the outcome of a previous club known as the Askesian Society and records show that there were 13 founder members:William Babington, James Parkinson, Humphry Davy, George Bellas Greenough, Arthur Aikin, William Allen, Jacques Louis, Comte de Bournon, Richard Knight, James Laird, James Franck, William Haseldine
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Norwegian Booksellers Association

    Norwegian Booksellers Association

    • Award categories presented: Norwegian Booksellers' Prize
    • Awards presented: Norwegian Booksellers' Prize
    The Norwegian Booksellers Association (Norwegian: Den norske Bokhandlerforening) is a Norwegian interest group. Its purpose is "looking after the interests of the booksellers and working to strengthen the position of literature and books in society". It awards the annual Norwegian Booksellers' Prize (Bokhandlerprisen). It was founded on 10 January 1851. The first chairman, who served until 1870, was Jørgen Wright Cappelen. Peter Tidemand Malling succeeded him and served as chair from 1870 to 1878. Later Torger Baardseth was chairman of the Norwegian Booksellers Association from 1902 to 1916. The current board chairman is Siri Strömmevold.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    The Christophers

    The Christophers

    • Award categories presented: Christopher Award
    The Christophers are a Christian inspirational group that was founded in 1945 by Father James Keller. The name of the group is derived from the Greek word "christophoros", which means "Christ-bearer". Although the founders were Maryknoll priests, and the Roman Catholic orientation is overt, The Christophers preach a doctrine of religious tolerance and intend their publications to be generally relevant to those of all faiths. The early hints of the Cold war revived historical suspicion of Roman Catholic loyalty to the United States. In 1949, Time printed a debate between a Jesuit priest and Professor Walter Bowie of New York's Union Theological Seminary. Bowie stated that there was "a clearly stated Roman Catholic purpose to make America Catholic" and to jeopardize "the religious and civil liberties which have been the glory of Protestant countries . . . ." In response, a number of Roman Catholics began to find new ways of commending the Church and its ideal to the public, including the new medium of television. Perhaps the most notable of these men was Bishop Fulton Sheen. The most popular and influential television presentation, however, was The Christophers, a weekly half-hour
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    U.S. National Park Service

    U.S. National Park Service

    • Award categories presented: National Parks Service Excellence in Media Award
    The National Park Service (NPS) is the U.S. federal agency that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service Organic Act. It is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior, a federal executive department whose head, the Secretary of the Interior, is a Cabinet officer nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Most of the direct management of the NPS is delegated by the Secretary to the National Park Service Director, who must also be confirmed by the Senate. The 21,989 employees of the NPS oversee 397 units, of which 58 are designated national parks. National parks and national monuments in the United States were originally individually managed under the auspices of the Department of the Interior. The movement for an independent agency to oversee these federal lands was spearheaded by business magnate and conservationist Stephen Mather, as well as J. Horace McFarland. With the help of journalist Robert Sterling Yard, Mather ran a publicity campaign for the Department of the Interior.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    University of Edinburgh

    University of Edinburgh

    • Awards presented: James Tait Black Memorial Prize
    The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a public research university located in Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. Edinburgh receives approximately 47,000 applications every year, making it the third most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants. Entrance is intensely competitive, with 12 applications per place in the last admissions cycle. Regarded as one of the most prestigious universities in the world, the university is ranked 6th and 7th in Europe according to the 2011 QS and Times Higher Education Ranking and 21st in the world by the 2012 QS rankings. It is a member of both the elite Russell Group, and the League of European Research Universities, a consortium of 21 of Europe's most prominent and renowned research universities. In addition, the University has both historical links and current partnerships with prestigious academic institutions in the United States and Canada, including members of the Ivy League and U15. It has the third largest endowment of any university in the UK. The university played an
    7.00
    1 votes
    189

    World Fantasy Convention

    • Award categories presented: World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement
    The World Fantasy Convention is an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy. It places emphasis on literature and art, while de-emphasizing dramatic presentation, gaming, masquerade, and the like. The World Fantasy Awards are presented at the event. Other features include an art show, a dealer's room, and an autograph reception.
    5.33
    3 votes
    190
    Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge

    Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge

    • Award categories presented: American Patriot Award
    The Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge is a national, non-profit, non-partisan, non-sectarian educational organization, founded in 1949. The Foundation is located adjacent to the Valley Forge National Historical Park, near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, U.S., and sits on ground that was once part of General George Washington's Valley Forge encampment during the American Revolutionary War. In 1985, the Foundation developed a "Bill of Responsibilities" as part of its worldwide educational efforts. It was meant to be a corollary to the Bill of Rights. The Foundation is known for its awards programs honoring Americans from all walks of life, organizations and institutions who set examples in responsible citizenship, free enterprise education, and long-term civic accomplishment. As part of its mission to promote responsible citizenship, character and freedom, the Foundation maintains the nation’s only living testimony dedicated to recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for valor. The Medal of Honor Grove consists of fifty-two acres of woodland. Within the grove, each acre is dedicated to one of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, or the
    4.50
    4 votes
    191

    American Society of Cinematographers

    • Award categories presented: American Society of Cinematographers Lifetime Achievement Award
    • Awards presented: American Society of Cinematographers Awards
    The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is an educational, cultural, and professional organization. Neither a labor union nor a guild, ASC membership is by invitation and is extended only to directors of photography and special effects experts with distinguished credits in the film industry. Members can put the letters A.S.C. after their names. ASC membership has become one of the highest honors that can be bestowed upon a professional cinematographer, a mark of prestige and distinction. The ASC currently has approximately 340 members and continues to grow. Its history goes back to the Cinema Camera Club in New York City founded by Phil Rosen, Frank Kugler, and Lewis W. Physioc and the Static Club in Los Angeles founded by Charles Rosher and Harry H. Harris. Both were created in 1911, and were united into a national organization when Rosher and Rosen moved to Los Angeles in 1911. The ASC was chartered in California in January 1911, and claims to be the "oldest continuously operating motion picture society in the world". The following year, the William S. Hart film Sand! was released on June 27, bearing to Joe August the first cinematographer credit followed by the letters
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Honorary Canadian citizenship

    Honorary Canadian citizenship

    Honorary Canadian citizenship (French: Citoyenneté canadienne honoraire) is an honour wherein Canadian citizenship is bestowed by the Governor-General-in-Council, with the approval of parliament where appropriate, on foreigners of exceptional merit. It is a symbolic honour; the recipient does not take the Oath of Citizenship, and thus does not receive any rights, privileges or duties typically held by a Canadian citizen. To date, the following people have had this honour bestowed upon them:
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Hugo Boss AG

    Hugo Boss AG

    • Award categories presented: Hugo Boss Prize
    Hugo Boss AG is a German luxury fashion and style house based in Metzingen, Germany. It is named after its founder, Hugo Boss (1885–1948). Hugo Boss currently has at least 6,102 points of sale in 110 countries. Hugo Boss AG directly owns over 364 retail stores with over 1,000 stores and shops owned by franchisees. Products are manufactured in a variety of locations, including the company's own production sites in Izmir, Turkey; Radom, Poland; Morrovalle, Cleveland, United States; and Metzingen, Germany. There are two core brands, BOSS and HUGO: Hugo Boss has licensing agreements with various companies to produce Hugo Boss branded products. These include agreements with Samsung and HTC to produce cell phones; C.W.F. Children Worldwide Fashion SAS to produce children's clothing; Procter & Gamble Prestige to produce fragrances and skincare; Movado to produce watches; and Safilo to produce sunglasses and eyewear. In 1985 the company was floated on the stock exchange. In 1991, the Marzotto textile group acquired a 77.5% stake for $165 million. Marzotto spun off its fashion brands into the newly created Valentino Fashion Group in 2005. In 2009, BOSS Black was by far the largest segment,
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    • Award categories presented: ICTP Ramanujan Prize
    • Awards presented: Dirac Medal of the ICTP
    The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) was founded in 1964 by Pakistani scientist and Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. It operates under a tripartite agreement among the Italian Government, UNESCO, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It is located near the Miramare Park, about 10 kilometres from the city of Trieste, Italy. The scientific activities at the centre are conducted in close collaboration with the other bodies present in the Trieste-Miramare area. The research at ICTP is divided into six scientific sections: Research at the centre is carried out by the staff of these sections, postdoctoral fellows and long-term and short-term visitors engaged in independent or collaborative research. Visitor programmes include junior and senior associate fellowships, which enables selected scientists from developing countries to visit the ICTP for limited periods. The scientific sections are also responsible for organizing high-level training courses, workshops, conferences and topical meetings throughout the year. ICTP staff scientists are international experts who do research at the cutting edge of their fields. Constant interactions with a large
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    National Football League

    National Football League

    • Award categories presented: NFL Rookie of the Year Award
    The National Football League (NFL) is the highest level of professional American football in the United States, and is considered the top professional American football league in the world. It was formed by eleven teams in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing its name to the National Football League in 1922. The league currently consists of thirty-two teams from the United States. The league is divided evenly into two conferences—the American Football Conference (AFC) and National Football Conference (NFC), and each conference has four divisions that have four teams each, for a total of 16 teams in each conference. The NFL is an unincorporated 501(c)(6) association, a federal nonprofit designation, comprising its 32 teams. The regular season is a seventeen-week schedule during which each team plays sixteen games and has one bye week. The season currently starts on the Thursday night in the first full week of September and runs weekly to late December or early January. At the end of each regular season, six teams from each conference (at least one from each division) play in the NFL playoffs, a twelve-team single-elimination tournament
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Nikkan Sports

    Nikkan Sports

    • Awards presented: Nikkan Sports Film Award
    Nikkan Sports (日刊スポーツ, Nikkan Supōtsu) is the first-launched Japanese daily sports newspaper founded in 1946. It has a circulation of 1,965,000, and is an affiliate newspaper of Asahi Shimbun.
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    Russian Academy of Sciences

    Russian Academy of Sciences

    • Award categories presented: Lomonosov Gold Medal
    The Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian: Росси́йская акаде́мия нау́к, Rossi'iskaya akade'miya nau'k, shortened to РАН, RAN) consists of the national academy of Russia and a network of scientific research institutes from across the Russian Federation as well as additional scientific and social units like libraries, publishing units and hospitals. With headquarters in Moscow, the Academy (RAS) is declared as a civil, self-governed, non-commercial organization chartered by the Government of Russia. It combines members of RAS (see below) and scientists employed by institutions. There are three types of membership in the RAS: full members (academicians), corresponding members and foreign members. Academicians and corresponding members must be citizens of the Russian Federation when elected. However, some academicians and corresponding members had been elected before the collapse of the USSR and are now citizens of other countries. Members of RAS are elected based on their scientific contributions - election to membership is considered very prestigious. As of 2005-2007 there are just under 500 full members in the academy and a similar number of corresponding members. The RAS consists of
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    O'Reilly Media

    O'Reilly Media

    • Awards presented: Google O'Reilly Open Source Award
    O'Reilly Media (formerly O'Reilly & Associates) is an American media company established by Tim O'Reilly that publishes books and Web sites and produces conferences on computer technology topics. Their distinctive brand features a woodcut of an animal on many of their book covers. The company began in 1978 as a private consulting firm doing technical writing, based in the Cambridge, Massachusetts area. In 1984, it began to retain publishing rights on manuals created for Unix vendors. A few 70-page "Nutshell Handbooks" were well-received, but the focus remained on the consulting business until 1988. After a conference displaying O'Reilly's preliminary Xlib manuals attracted significant attention, the company began increasing production of manuals and books In 1992, O'Reilly Media published one of the first popular books about the Internet, Ed Krol's Whole Internet User's Guide and Catalog. O'Reilly Media also created the first web portal, the Global Network Navigator ("GNN") in 1993; it was sold to AOL in 1995, one of the first large transactions of the dot-com bubble. O'Reilly launched a Perl Conference to raise the profile of the Perl programming language. Many of the company's
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Povel Ramel

    Povel Ramel

    • Award categories presented: Karamelodiktstipendiet
    Baron Povel Karl Henric Ramel ( Povel Ramel (help·info)) (June 1, 1922 – June 5, 2007) was a Swedish entertainer. Ramel was a singer, pianist, vaudeville artist, author and a novelty song composer. His style was characterized by imaginative wit, both verbal and musical. He took inspiration from US and UK 'crazy' style humor and created his own personal Swedish version, unusual combinations of lyrics and music, word play, pastiche and general unexpectedness. He wrote approximately 1700 songs, skits and monologues, and he is regarded as a legend and an institution in Swedish entertainment. Povel Ramel was born in Östermalm, Stockholm into an affluent noble family. His father, Karl Ramel, was a lawyer. At a young age, Ramel found a loving audience for his talents in the family nurses, maids and cooks, and also his parents. His family often went on extensive holidays, and on such an occasion, on a beach in Belgium, when Povel was two years old he stepped on a nail. With the wound infected Povel was not expected to survive, although he recovered, with a slight permanent injury. Ramel's school-life was troubled. He cut classes, often going to Skansen, an open air museum and zoo,
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Country Music Association

    Country Music Association

    • Awards presented: Country Music Association Awards
    The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. It originally consisted of only 233 members and was the first trade organization formed to promote a music genre. The objectives of the organization are to guide and enhance the development of Country Music throughout the world; to demonstrate it as a viable medium to advertisers, consumers and media; and to provide a unity of purpose for the Country Music industry. However the CMA may be best known to most country music fans for its annual Country Music Association Awards broadcast live on network television each fall (usually October or November). Initially, CMA's Board of Directors included nine directors and five officers. Wesley Rose, president of Acuff-Rose Publishing, Inc., served as CMA's first chairman of the board. Broadcasting entrepreneur and executive Connie B. Gay was the founding president. Originally there were nine individual membership categories. The current 15 categories represent all facets of the music industry. Organizational memberships are also available. CMA membership is composed of those persons or organizations that are involved in Country Music, directly and
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication

    • Award categories presented: Peabody Award
    • Awards presented: Peabody Award
    The Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication is a college within the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, United States. Established in 1921, the Grady College is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. The Grady College consists of three departments: Advertising and Public Relations, Journalism, and Telecommunications. The college provides instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels in public relations, advertising, broadcast news, magazines, newspapers, new services, photojournalism, publication management, telecommunications, and new media. Since 1935 the students at Grady College have produced the student written, student edited magazine the UGAzine, which is printed in the UGA printshop. The student magazine is solely self-sufficient and sustains itself by advertising revenue. Due to the increase in advertising revenue in the past years and the subsequent evolution into a 4 color publication, the UGAzine has become a prominent and respected fixture on the UGA campus. Degrees offered by the college include: The college houses the following centers and institutes for research and education: The
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    International Cricket Council

    International Cricket Council

    • Award categories presented: Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy
    • Awards presented: ICC Awards
    The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the international governing body of cricket. It was founded as the Imperial Cricket Conference in 1909 by representatives from England, Australia and South Africa, renamed the International Cricket Conference in 1965, and took up its current name in 1989. The ICC has 106 members: 10 Full Members that play official Test matches, 35 Associate Members, and 60 Affiliate Members. The ICC is responsible for the organisation and governance of cricket's major international tournaments, most notably the Cricket World Cup. It also appoints the umpires and referees that officiate at all sanctioned Test matches, One Day International and Twenty20 Internationals. It promulgates the ICC Code of Conduct, which sets professional standards of discipline for international cricket, and also co-ordinates action against corruption and match-fixing through its Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU). The ICC does not control bilateral fixtures between member countries (which include all Test matches), it does not govern domestic cricket in member countries, and it does not make the laws of the game, which remain under the control of the Marylebone Cricket
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Locarno International Film Festival

    Locarno International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Golden Leopard
    The Film Festival Locarno is an international film festival held annually in August in the city of Locarno, Switzerland since 1946. After Cannes and Venice and together with Karlovy Vary, Locarno is the Film Festival with the longest history. The main feature of the festival is the open-air screening space in the astonishing Piazza Grande, with room for over 8,000 spectators, and with one of the largest open air screens in the world (26x14 metres). The top prize of the Festival is the Golden Leopard awarded to the best film in the international competition. Other awards include the Leopard of Honour for outstanding career achievements, and the Prix du Public UBS, the public choice award. The Locarno Film Festival is well known worldwide to be a festival of discovery. Throughout its history the festival has discovered new trends and launched the career of numerous directors and actors. Although the festival aims at the films, rather than at stars and glamour, several well-known personalities of the international film industry have been to the Locarno International Film Festival in recent years. To name just a few: Willem Dafoe, Terry Gilliam, Anthony Hopkins, Aki Kaurismäki, Abbas
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    Michigan State University

    • Award categories presented: MSU Graduate Enhancement Award
    Michigan State University (MSU) is a public research university located in East Lansing, Michigan, United States and is the first land-grant institution that was created to serve as a model for future land-grant colleges in the country under the 1862 Morrill Act. MSU pioneered the studies of packaging, hospitality business, supply chain management, and telecommunication. Today its study-abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the country, offering more than 200 programs in more than 60 countries on all continents including Antarctica. It is considered to be one of America's Public Ivy universities, which recognizes top public research universities in the United States. Following the introduction of the Morrill Act, the college became coeducational and expanded its curriculum beyond agriculture. Today, MSU is the ninth-largest university in the United States, with 47,800 students and 2,954 faculty members. The school's nuclear physics, engineering, packaging, fisheries and wildlife, forestry, political science, business, journalism, education, economics, law, criminal justice and osteopathic medicine programs are among the nation's best. MSU's Division I
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    PEN American Center

    PEN American Center

    • Awards presented: PEN/Katherine Anne Porter First Amendment Award
    PEN American Center (PEN), founded in 1922 and based in New York City, works to advance literature, to defend free expression, and to foster international literary fellowship. The Center has a membership of 3,300 writers, editors, and translators. PEN American Center is the largest of the 144 centers that belong to International PEN, the worldwide association of writers that defends those who are harassed, imprisoned and killed for their views. PEN American Center is one of two PEN centers located in the USA, the other is PEN Center USA in Los Angeles, it covers the USA west of the Mississippi. Full membership in PEN generally requires the publication of one or more books of a literary character, or one or more play produced in a professional venue. Editors with a career of five years or more are also eligible, as are many publishers, agents, and publicists and other members of the literary publishing community. Recently, PEN created an associate tier of membership, which is open to the general public. Over the years, PEN American Center's membership has included many of the leading lights in the American literary establishment, including Edward Albee, Paul Auster, James Baldwin,
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Slamdance Film Festival

    Slamdance Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Slamdance Grand Jury Prize for Best Dramatic Short
    • Awards presented: Slamdance Film Festival Awards
    The Slamdance Film Festival is a yearly film festival reserved for independent films, created in 1995. As a year-round organization, Slamdance serves as a showcase for the discovery of new and emerging talent in the film industry; it is also the only major film festival fully programmed by filmmakers. Slamdance counts among its alumni many notable writers and directors who first gained notice at the festival, including Christopher Nolan, Marc Forster, Jared Hess and Oren Peli. The festival takes place each year in Utah at the same time as the Sundance Film Festival, competing to provide what its supporters consider a truer representation of independent filmmaking. Slamdance is especially unique because their feature competition is limited to films made with budgets under $1 million dollars and made by first time directors. The festival was founded in 1995 by Dan Mirvish, Jon Fitzgerald, Shane Kuhn and Peter Baxter and has since become a year-round organization championing emerging filmmaking talent and their new work. Slamdance adamantly supports self-governance amongst independents, and claims to deliver what filmmakers go to festivals for: a chance to show their work and a
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    World Science Fiction Society

    World Science Fiction Society

    • Award categories presented: Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form
    • Awards presented: Hugo Awards
    The World Science Fiction Society, or WSFS, is an unincorporated literary society whose purpose is to promote interest in science fiction. WSFS has no standing officers, only small standing committees, and a large membership composed of the members of the current Worldcon.Running the annual convention and awarding the Hugo Award are its main activities. It also awards the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and, from 1974 to 1980, the WSFS presented the Gandalf Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in fantasy writing. *
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

    Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

    • Award categories presented: Academy Award for Best Picture
    • Awards presented: Academy Awards
    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. The Academy's corporate management and general policies are overseen by a Board of Governors, which includes representatives from each of the craft branches. The Academy is composed of over 6,000 motion picture professionals. While the great majority of its members are based in the United States, membership is open to qualified filmmakers around the world. The Academy is known around the world for its annual Academy Awards, informally known as the "Oscars". In addition, the Academy gives Student Academy Awards annually to filmmakers at the undergraduate and graduate level; awards up to five Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting annually; and operates the Margaret Herrick Library (at the Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study) in Beverly Hills, California and the Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. The current president of the Academy is Hawk Koch. The notion of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) began with Louis B. Mayer, head of
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

    Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

    • Award categories presented: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize
    The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG; English: German Research Foundation) is an important German research funding organization and the largest such organization in Europe. The DFG supports research in science, engineering, and the humanities through a large variety of grant programmes, prizes and by funding infrastructure. The self-governed organization is based in Bonn and financed by the German states and the federal government. Only Germany's leading research universities are members of the DFG. In 1937, the Notgemeinschaft der Wissenschaft (NG) was renamed the Deutsche Gemeinschaft zur Erhaltung und Förderung der Forschung ("German Association for the Support and Advancement of Scientific Research"), for short known as the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). By the end of World War II in Germany, in 1945, the DFG was no longer active. In 1949, after formation of the Federal Republic, it was re-founded as the NG and again from 1951 as the DFG. The DFG is a member of the International Council for Science and has numerous counterparts around the globe such as the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the National Science Foundation (USA) and the Royal Society
    5.00
    2 votes
    210

    Norwegian Nobel Committee

    • Award categories presented: Nobel Peace Prize
    The Norwegian Nobel Committee (Norwegian: Den norske Nobelkomité) awards the Nobel Peace Prize each year. Its five members are appointed by the Norwegian Parliament and today roughly represent the political makeup of that body. In his will, Alfred Nobel tasked the Parliament of Norway with selecting the winners of the Nobel Peace Prize. The committee is assisted by the Norwegian Nobel Institute, its secretariat, and the committee holds their meetings in the institute's building, where the winner is also announced. The award ceremony, however, takes places in Oslo City Hall (since 1990). Alfred Nobel died in December 1896, and in January 1897 the contents of his will were unveiled. It was written as early as in 1895. In his will, it was declared that a Nobel Peace Prize should be awarded "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses", and that some of Nobel's money was to be donated to this prize. The Nobel Foundation manages the assets. The other Nobel Prizes were to be awarded by Swedish bodies (Swedish Academy, Royal Swedish
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Poland

    Poland

    • Award categories presented: Virtuti Militari
    Poland /ˈpoʊlənd/ (Polish: Polska), officially the Republic of Poland (Polish: Rzeczpospolita Polska; Kashubian: Pòlskô Repùblika), is a country in Central Europe, bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast, a Russian exclave, to the north. The total area of Poland is 312,679 square kilometres (120,726 sq mi), making it the 69th largest country in the world and the 9th largest in Europe. Poland has a population of over 38.5 million people, which makes it the 34th most populous country in the world and the sixth most populous member of the European Union, being its most populous post-communist member. Poland is a unitary state made up of 16 voivodeships. Poland is a member of the European Union, NATO, the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), European Economic Area, International Energy Agency, Council of Europe, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, International Atomic Energy Agency, European Space Agency, G6, Council of the Baltic Sea States, Visegrád Group, Weimar
    5.00
    2 votes
    212

    Swedish Academy

    • Award categories presented: Nobel Prize in Literature
    • Awards presented: Dobloug Prize
    The Swedish Academy (Swedish: Svenska Akademien), founded in 1786 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. The Swedish Academy was founded in 1786 by King Gustav III. Modelled after the Académie française, it has 18 members. The motto of the Academy is "Talent and Taste" ("Snille och Smak" in Swedish). The primary purpose of the Academy is to further the "purity, strength, and sublimity of the Swedish language" ("Svenska Språkets renhet, styrka och höghet") (Walshe, 1965). To that end the Academy publishes two dictionaries. The first is a one-volume dictionary called Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL). The second is a multi-volume dictionary, edited on principles similar to those of the Oxford English Dictionary, entitled Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB). The SAOL has reached its 13th edition while the first volume of the SAOB was published in 1898 and today (As of 2011) work has progressed to words beginning with the letter "T". Since 1901, the Academy has annually decided who will be the laureate for the Nobel Prize in Literature, awarded in memory of the donor Alfred Nobel. The Academy also awards the Dobloug Prize, a literature prize awarded for Swedish and
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    HASTAC

    HASTAC

    • Award categories presented: Digital Media and Learning Competition
    HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, pronounced "haystack") is a virtual organization of over 7000 individuals and institutions inspired by the possibilities that new technologies offer for shaping how society learns, teaches, communicates, creates, and organizes at the local and global levels. HASTAC members are motivated by the conviction that the digital era provides rich opportunities for informal and formal learning and for collaborative, networked research that extends across traditional disciplines, across the boundaries of the academy and the community, across the "two cultures" of humanism and technology, across the divide of thinking versus making, and across social strata and national borders. A network of networks, HASTAC members are dedicated to transforming and reforming traditional education with peer-to-peer collaborative techniques inspired by the open web. HASTAC administers the annual $2 million MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition. The 2011 Competition, “Badges for Lifelong Learning,” launched in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, will focus on badges as a means to inspire learning, confirm
    4.00
    3 votes
    214
    Man Group

    Man Group

    • Award categories presented: Man Booker International Prize
    • Awards presented: Man Booker Prizes
    Man Group plc (Man) (LSE: EMG) is a British alternative investment management business. It provides a range of funds for institutional and private investors globally. The company manages about US$68 billion (January 2011) and employs around 1,700 people in 15 locations worldwide. Man’s headquarters are at Riverbank House in London, where it is listed on the London Stock Exchange. It also has offices in the Bahamas, Chicago, Dubai, Dublin, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Luxembourg, Miami, Milan, Montevideo, New York, Pfäffikon, Rotterdam, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, and Toronto. In June 2012, Man was demoted from the FTSE 100, due to a decline of market capitalization. The company was founded in 1783, by James Man, a barrel maker. The following year the company secured the contract to supply the Royal Navy with the rum for its daily “rum tot”, a tradition under which all sailors were allocated a daily ration of rum. (This tradition continued until 1970, with Man holding the contract throughout the entire period.) In 1860 Edward Desborough Man and Fredrick Man (grandsons of James Man) gave their initials to the name of the company, ED & F Man. Today, ED & F Man operates separately as a
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    American Academy in Rome

    American Academy in Rome

    • Awards presented: Rome Prize
    The American Academy in Rome is a research and arts institution located on the Gianicolo (Janiculum Hill) in Rome. The academy is a member of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers. In 1893, a group of American architects, painters and sculptors met regularly while planning the fine arts section of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. The group discussed the idea of forming an American school for artists in Europe as a place for American artists to study and further their skills. Led by Charles K. McKim, they decided that Rome - due to the city's being a veritable museum of masterpieces of painting, sculpture, and architecture throughout the ages - would be the best location for the school. The program began with institutions such as Columbia University and University of Pennsylvania, who would provide scholarships to artists to fund their travel to Rome. In October 1894 the American School of Architecture opened temporarily at the Palazzo Torlonia; directed by Austin Lord, it had three fellows, one visiting student, and a library with one volume. In July 1895, the program moved into the larger Villa Aurora. Renting space out to the American School of Classical Studies
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival

    Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Golden Orange Award for Best Actress
    The Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival (Turkish: Antalya Altın Portakal Film Festivali) is a film festival, held annually since 1963 in Antalya, is the most important national film festival in Turkey. Since 2009, the event, which takes place in the autumn months at the Antalya Cultural Center (Antalya Kültür Merkezi, AKM), has been organised solely by the Antalya Foundation for Culture and Arts (Antalya Kültür Sanat Vakfı, AKSAV) and has included an international section within the main body of the festival. The most recent edition of the festival was the 48th International Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival (October 8–14, 2011). The cultural activities like concerts and theater plays, which started to take place in the 1950s at the historical Aspendos Amphitheatre, formed headstone of the Antalya Golden Orange Film Festival today. These events held in the summer months under the honorary patronage of Dr. Avni Tolunay, found ever increasing interest of people and became traditional until the beginning of 1960s. In 1963, the festivities turned into a film festival with the initiation Dr. Avni Tolunay, who became the mayor of Antalya that year. As the logo of the film festival was
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Brussels International Festival of Fantasy Film

    • Award categories presented: Silver Raven for Best Screenplay
    The Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival (BIFFF), previously named Brussels International Festival of Fantastic Film (French: Festival international du film fantastique de Bruxelles, Dutch: Internationaal Festival van de Fantastische Film van Brussel) was created in 1983 as a venue for horror, thriller and science fiction films. It takes place in Brussels, every year in March. Initially organized by Annie Bozzo, Gigi Etienne, Freddy Bozzo, Georges Delmote and Guy Delmote, it now has prizes in both feature length and short films, and also hosts an international body-painting competition. Winners of the grand prize, the Golden Raven statuette, include Army of Darkness, Radioactive Dreams, and Dog Soldiers.
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Edinburgh

    Edinburgh

    • Award categories presented: Edinburgh Medal
    Edinburgh (/ˈɛdɪnbʌrə/ ED-in-burr-ə; Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann) is the capital of Scotland, the seat of the Scottish parliament and government, the largest city by area and the second largest by population in the country. The City of Edinburgh Council governs one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas. The council area includes urban Edinburgh and a 30 square miles (78 km) rural area. Located in the south-east of Scotland, Edinburgh lies on the east coast of the Central Belt, along the Firth of Forth, near the North Sea. The city was one of the historical major centres of the Enlightenment, led by the University of Edinburgh, helping to earn it the nickname Athens of the North. The Old Town and New Town districts of Edinburgh were listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995 in recognition of the unique character of the Medieval Old Town and the planned Georgian New Town. It covers both the Old and New Towns together with the Dean Village and the Calton Hill areas. There are over 4,500 listed buildings within the city. In May 2010, it had a total of 40 conservation areas covering 23% of the building stock and 23% of the population, the highest such ratios of any major
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    John W. Kluge Center

    John W. Kluge Center

    • Award categories presented: Kluge Prize
    The John W. Kluge Center provides senior scholars, post-doctoral fellows, and doctoral candidates opportunities for research and study at the Library of Congress. Established in 2000 within the restored Thomas Jefferson Building, the Center is named for its benefactor, John W. Kluge who donated $60 million to support an academic center where accomplished senior scholars and junior post-doctoral fellows might gather to make use of the Library's collections and to interact with members of Congress. In addition, his gift established a $1 million dollar Kluge Prize to be given in recognition of a lifetime of achievement in the human sciences. The Kluge Center hosts frequent public lectures, conferences, symposia and other events in support of and based on the work of its resident scholars. Past resident scholars have included Vaclav Havel, Klaus Larres, Xiang Lanxin, Melvyn P. Leffler, Ambassador Teresita Schaffer, Mort Kondracke, and Cardinal Theodore Edgar McCarrick. The Center also comprises The Kluge Scholars' Council, a body of distinguished scholars, convened by the Librarian of Congress, to advise on matters related to scholarship at the Library, with special attention to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

    • Awards presented: Fortune Battle of the Corporate Bands
    The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum located on the shore of Lake Erie in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, United States. It is dedicated to archiving the history of some of the best-known and most influential artists, producers, engineers and others who have, in some major way, influenced the music industry through the genre of rock music. The museum is part of the city's redeveloped North Coast Harbor. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a complex located in Cleveland, Ohio devoted to performers, creators, promoters, and others associated with the growth and popularity of rock and roll music. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was created April 20, 1983. However, it had no home. The search committee considered several cities, including Memphis (home of Sun Studios and Stax Records), Detroit (home of Motown Records), Cincinnati (home of King Records), New York City, and Cleveland. Cleveland lobbied hard to be chosen, citing that Cleveland disc jockey Alan Freed is widely credited with promoting the new genre (and the term) of "rock and roll", and that Cleveland was the location of the first rock and roll concert. Civic leaders in Cleveland pledged
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    • Award categories presented: Nierenberg Prize
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography (sometimes referred to as SIO, Scripps Oceanography, or Scripps) in La Jolla, California, founded in 1903, is one of the oldest and largest centers for ocean and Earth science research, public service, undergraduate and graduate training in the world. Hundreds of ocean and Earth scientists conduct research with the aid of oceanographic research vessels and shorebased laboratories. Its Old Scripps Building is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Scripps is part of the University of California, San Diego. The public explorations center of the institution is the Birch Aquarium at Scripps. Since becoming part of the University of California in 1912, the institution has expanded its scope to include studies of the physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and climate of the Earth. A century of Scripps science has had an invaluable impact on oceanography, on understanding of the Earth, and on society. More than 300 research programs are under way today in a wide range of scientific areas in 65 countries. Tony Haymet is the tenth director of Scripps (on sabbatical October 1, 2012 - June 20, 2013). He also serves as UC San Diego's Vice Chancellor for Marine
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Seattle International Film Festival

    Seattle International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Golden Space Needle Audience Award for Best Actress
    • Awards presented: Seattle International Film Festival Awards
    The Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF), held annually in Seattle, Washington since 1976, is among the top film festivals in North America. Audiences have grown steadily; the 2006 festival had 160,000 attendees. In recent years, the SIFF has run for more than three weeks (24 days), in May/June, and features a diverse assortment of predominantly independent and foreign films and, in recent years, a strong contingent of documentaries. SIFF 2006 included 300+ films and was the first SIFF to include a venue in neighboring Bellevue, Washington, after an ill-fated early attempt. However, in 2008, the festival was back to being entirely in Seattle, and had a slight decrease in the number of feature films. The 2010 festival featured over 400 films, shown primarily in downtown Seattle and its nearby neighborhoods, but also in West Seattle, Everett, Kirkland, and Juanita Beach Park. The festival began in 1976 at a then-independent cinema, the Moore Egyptian Theater, now back under its earlier name as the Moore Theater and functioning as a concert venue. When founders Dan Ireland and Darryl Macdonald of the Moore Egyptian lost their lease, they founded the Egyptian theater in a former
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Second Polish Republic

    Second Polish Republic

    • Award categories presented: Virtuti Militari
    The Second Polish Republic, Second Commonwealth of Poland or interwar Poland refers to Poland between the two world wars; a period in Polish history in which Poland was restored as an independent state. Officially known as the Republic of Poland or the Commonwealth of Poland (Polish: Rzeczpospolita Polska), the Polish state was created in 1918, in the aftermath of World War I. It continued to exist until 1939, despite both internal and external pressures, when Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, and the Slovak Republic, marking the beginning of World War II. When the borders of the state were fixed in 1922 after several regional conflicts, the Republic bordered Czechoslovakia, Germany, Free City of Danzig, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania, and the Soviet Union, plus a tiny strip of the coastline of the Baltic Sea, around the city of Gdynia, which itself was built in the 1930s. Furthermore, in the period March 1939 – August 1939, Poland bordered then-Hungarian province of Carpathian Ruthenia. It had an area of 388,634 km (sixth largest in Europe, in October 1938, after the annexation of Zaolzie, the area grew to 389,720 km), and 27.2 million inhabitants according to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Sveriges Riksbank

    Sveriges Riksbank

    • Award categories presented: Nobel Prize in Economics
    Sveriges Riksbank, or simply Riksbanken, is the central bank of Sweden. It is the world's oldest central bank and the world's 3rd oldest bank still in operation. It is sometimes called the Swedish National Bank or the Bank of Sweden (not to be confused with Swedbank, a regular bank). The Riksbank began its operations in 1668, its antecedent being Stockholms Banco (also known as the Bank of Palmstruch), which was founded by Johan Palmstruch in 1656. Although the bank was private, it was the king who chose its management: in a letter to Palmstruch, he gave permission to its operations according to stated regulations. However, Stockholms Banco, the world's oldest note-issuing bank, collapsed as a result of the issuing of too many notes without the necessary collateral. Palmstruch, who was considered responsible for the bank's losses, was condemned to death, but later received clemency. On 17 September 1668, the privilege of Palmstruch to operate a bank was transferred to the Riksens Ständers Bank (translation: Bank of the Estates of the Realm) and was run under the auspices of the parliament of the day. Due to the failure of Stockholm Banco, the new bank was managed under the direct
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Union Cycliste Internationale

    Union Cycliste Internationale

    • Awards presented: National cycling champion jersey
    Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) (English: International Cycling Union) is the world governing body for sports cycling and oversees international competitive cycling events. The UCI is based in Aigle, Switzerland. The UCI issues racing licenses to riders and enforces disciplinary rules, such as in matters of doping. The UCI also manages the classification of races and the points ranking system in various cycling disciplines including mountain biking, road and track cycling, for both men and women, amateur and professional. It also oversees the World Championships. The UCI was founded on 14 April 1900 in Paris by the national cycling organisations of Belgium, the United States, France, Italy, and Switzerland. It replaced the International Cycling Association by setting up in opposition in a row over whether Great Britain should be allowed just one team at world championships or separate teams representing Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Britain found itself outflanked and it was not able to join the UCI - under the conditions the UCI had imposed - until 1903. There were originally 30 countries affiliated to the union. They did not have equal voting power and some had no vote at all.
    5.00
    1 votes
    226

    Filmfare

    • Award categories presented: Filmfare Best Movie Award
    • Awards presented: Filmfare Awards
    Filmfare is an English-language, tabloid-sized magazine about Hindi-language cinema (which is popularly known as Bollywood). The magazine is published by The Times Group, India's largest media services conglomerate. Filmfare is the most popular entertainment magazine in India. Filmfare is the oldest film magazine in India, as are its awards. the founder is nayan rohitas girjasing It was originally a part of The Times Group, India's largest media services conglomerate, which also publishes The Times of India, The Economic Times, Navbharat Times and Maharashtra Times. In the 2005 Filmfare and some other publications, most notably Femina, were split off into a subsidiary. The new ownership, Worldwide Media, is a 50:50 joint venture between The Times Group and BBC Magazines, the publishing division of BBC Worldwide. At the beginning of 2008 the magazine revamped both its look and publishing schedule. Publishing for evry 15 days in a month, Filmfare, under the editorship of Mr. Jitesh Pillai, has updated its regular sections and overall layout. It continues to feature extensive photographic work. The writing staff includes Anuradha Choudary, Sangeeta Angela Kumar, and Faheem
    4.00
    2 votes
    227
    Rotary International

    Rotary International

    • Award categories presented: Lombardi Award
    Rotary International (also known as the Rotary Club) is an international service club whose stated purpose is to bring together business and professional leaders in order to provide humanitarian services, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace in the world. It is a secular organization open to all persons regardless of race, colour, creed, religion, gender, or political preference. There are 34,282 clubs and over 1.2 million members worldwide. The members of Rotary Clubs are known as Rotarians. Members usually meet weekly for breakfast, lunch or dinner, which is a social event as well as an opportunity to organize work on their service goals. Rotary's primary motto is "Service above Self"; an earlier motto, "One profits most who serves best". The object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster: This objective is set against the "Rotary 4-way Test", used to see if a planned action is compatible with the Rotarian spirit. The test was developed by Rotarian and entrepreneur Herbert J. Taylor during the Great Depression as a set of guidelines for
    4.00
    2 votes
    228
    Royal Society

    Royal Society

    • Award categories presented: Copley Medal
    • Awards presented: The Aventis Prizes for Science Books
    The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, known as the Royal Society, is a learned society for science, and is possibly the oldest such society in existence. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a Royal Charter by King Charles II as the "Royal Society of London". The Society today acts as a scientific advisor to the British government, receiving a parliamentary grant-in-aid. The Society acts as the UK's Academy of Sciences, and funds research fellowships and scientific start-up companies. The Society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of Statutes and Standing Orders. The members of Council and the President are elected from and by its Fellows, the basic members of the Society, who are themselves elected by existing Fellows. There are currently 1,314 Fellows, allowed to use the postnominal title FRS (Fellow of the Royal Society), with 44 new Fellows appointed each year. There are also Royal Fellows, Honorary Fellows and Foreign Fellows, the last of which are allowed to use their postnominal title ForMemRS (Foreign Member of the Royal Society). The current Royal Society President is Sir Paul Nurse, who
    4.00
    2 votes
    229
    Agilent Technologies

    Agilent Technologies

    • Award categories presented: Agilent Early Career Professor Award
    Agilent Technologies (NYSE: A), or Agilent, is a global company that designs and manufactures electronic and bio-analytical measurement instruments and equipment for measurement and evaluation. Agilent Technologies has a stock market capitalization of over 15 billion USD and the company's headquarters are in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley region. Many of Agilent's predecessor product lines were developed by Hewlett-Packard, the American computing company founded in 1939. In 1999, the product lines not directly connected with computers, storage, and imaging were grouped into a separate company (Agilent), the stock of which was offered to the public in an initial public offering. The Agilent IPO may have been the largest in the history of Silicon Valley at the time. The company thus created in 1999 was an $8 billion company with about 47,000 employees, manufacturing scientific instruments, semiconductors, optical networking devices, and electronic test equipment for telecom and wireless R&D and production. Agilent's major product lines include: Agilent Technologies has a robust research and development arm, Agilent Laboratories or Agilent Labs, with active research in
    4.00
    1 votes
    230

    Columbia University

    • Award categories presented: Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
    • Awards presented: Pulitzer Prize
    Columbia University in the City of New York, commonly referred to as Columbia University, is an American private Ivy League research university located in New York City, New York, United States. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution. Today the university operates seven Columbia Global Centers overseas in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Paris, Mumbai, Santiago and Nairobi. The university was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain. After the American Revolutionary War, King's College briefly became a state entity, and was renamed Columbia College in 1784. The University now operates under a 1787 charter that places the institution under a private board of trustees, and in 1896 it was further renamed Columbia University. That same year, the university's campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its location in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, where it occupies more than six city blocks, or 32 acres (0.13 km). The university encompasses twenty schools and is affiliated
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    NASA

    NASA

    • Award categories presented: NASA Earth System Science Fellowship
    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation's civilian space program and for aeronautics and aerospace research. Since February 2006, NASA's mission statement has been to "pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research." On September 14, 2011, NASA announced that it had selected the design of a new Space Launch System that it said would take the agency's astronauts farther into space than ever before and provide the cornerstone for future human space exploration efforts by the U.S. NASA was established by the National Aeronautics and Space Act on July 29, 1958, replacing its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The agency became operational on October 1, 1958. U.S. space exploration efforts have since been led by NASA, including the Apollo moon-landing missions, the Skylab space station, and later the Space Shuttle. Currently, NASA is supporting the International Space Station and is overseeing the development of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Commercial Crew vehicles. The agency is also responsible for the
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Social Science Research Council

    Social Science Research Council

    • Awards presented: Albert O. Hirschman Prize
    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is a U.S.-based independent nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing research in the social sciences and related disciplines. Established in Manhattan in 1923, it today maintains a headquarters in Brooklyn Heights with a staff of approximately 70, and small regional offices in other parts of the world on an as-needed basis. Under the leadership of President Craig Calhoun, the SSRC has focused on the public sphere, migration, global security and cooperation, and knowledge institutions as its four thematic areas, with close to twenty active programs within these areas. Topics include the privatization of risk, international migration, media reform, religion and international affairs, and the challenges posed by HIV/AIDS in Russia, Africa and around the world. The SSRC offers several fellowships to young researchers in the social sciences and related disciplines, mostly for overseas fieldwork. The SSRC came into being in 1923 as a result of the initiative of the American Political Science Association's committee on research, headed by the association's president, Charles E. Merriam (1874–1953), who was political science chair at the
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    American Institute of Architects

    American Institute of Architects

    • Award categories presented: AIA Gold Medal
    • Awards presented: AIA/HUD Secretary's Housing and Community Design Award
    The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the AIA offers education, government advocacy, community redevelopment, and public outreach to support the architecture profession and improve its public image. The AIA also works with other members of the design and construction team to help coordinate the building industry. The American Institute of Architects was founded in New York City in 1857 by a group of 13 architects to "promote the scientific and practical perfection of its members" and "elevate the standing of the profession." This initial group included Charles Babcock, Henry W. Cleaveland, Henry Dudley, Leopold Eidlitz, Edward Gardiner, Richard Morris Hunt, Fred A. Petersen, Jacob Wrey Mould, John Welch, Richard M. Upjohn and Joseph C. Wells, with Richard Upjohn serving as the first president. They met on February 23, 1857 and decided to invite 16 other prominent architects to join them, including Alexander Jackson Davis, Thomas U. Walter, and Calvert Vaux. Prior to their establishment of the AIA, anyone could claim to be an architect, as there were no schools of architecture
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    American Institute of Physics

    American Institute of Physics

    • Award categories presented: Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics
    • Awards presented: Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics
    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) promotes science, the profession of physics, publishes physics journals, and produces publications for scientific and engineering societies. The AIP is made up of various member societies. Its corporate headquarters are at the American Center for Physics in College Park, Maryland, but the institute also has an office in Melville, New York and Beijing, China. The focus of the AIP appears to be organized around a set of core activities. The first delineated activity is to support member societies regarding essential society functions. This is accomplished by annually convening the various society officers to discuss common areas of concern. A range of topics is discussed which includes scientific publishing, public policy issues, membership-base issues, philanthropic giving, science education, science careers for a diverse population, and a forum for sharing ideas. Another core activity is publishing the science of physics in research journals, magazines, and conference proceedings. Other core activities are tracking employment and education trends with six decades of coverage, being a liaison between research science and industry, historical
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    American Library Association

    American Library Association

    • Award categories presented: Stonewall Book Award
    • Awards presented: Dartmouth Medal
    The American Library Association (ALA) is a non-profit organization based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. It is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with more than 62,000 members. Founded by Justin Winsor, Charles Ammi Cutter, Samuel S. Green, James L. Whitney, Melvil Dewey (Melvil Dui), Fred B. Perkins and Thomas W. Bicknell in 1876 in Philadelphia and chartered in 1879 in Massachusetts, its head office is now in Chicago. During the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, 103 librarians, 90 men and 13 women, responded to a call for a "Convention of Librarians" to be held October 4–6 at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. At the end of the meeting, according to Ed Holley in his essay "ALA at 100," "the register was passed around for all to sign who wished to become charter members," making October 6, 1876 to be ALA's birthday. In attendance were 90 men and 13 women, among them Justin Winsor (Boston Public, Harvard), William Frederick Poole (Chicago Public, Newberry), Charles Ammi Cutter (Boston Athenaeum), Melvil Dewey, and Richard Rogers Bowker. Attendees came from as far west as Chicago and from
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Association of Canadian Port Authorities

    Association of Canadian Port Authorities

    • Award categories presented: Association of Canadian Port Authorities Medal of Merit
    Founded in 1958, it groups together ports and harbours and related marine interests into one national association. The goal of the Association is to effectively represent the interests of the Canadian port community in building solid bridges to key government officials — at all three levels — allied associations, and valued business partners. Comprised of a Board of Directors, Board Committees and Technical Committees that resolve key issues on it's strategic agenda including issues related to the overall competitiveness of Canada’s national port system.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Goethe-Institut

    Goethe-Institut

    • Award categories presented: Goethe-Medaille für Kunst und Wissenschaft
    • Awards presented: Goethe Medal
    The Goethe-Institut (GI) (German: [ˈɡøːtə ɪnstiˈtuːt]; English: Goethe Institute) is a non-profit German cultural association operational worldwide, promoting the study of the German language abroad and encouraging international cultural exchange and relations. The Goethe-Institut fosters knowledge about Germany by providing information on German culture, society and politics. This includes the exchange of films, music, theatre, and literature. Goethe cultural societies, reading rooms, and exam and language centers have played a role in the cultural and educational policies of Germany for close to 60 years. It is named after German polymath Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. The Goethe-Institut e.V. is autonomous and politically independent. Partners of the institute and its centers are public and private cultural institutions, the federal states, local authorities and the world of commerce. Much of the Goethe-Institut's overall budget consists of yearly grants from the German Foreign Office and the German Press Office. The relationship with the Foreign Office is governed by general agreement. Self-generated income and contributions from sponsors and patrons, partners and friends broaden
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Institute for the Study of Labor

    Institute for the Study of Labor

    • Award categories presented: IZA Prize in Labor Economics
    The Institute for the Study of Labor is a private, independent economic research institute. It was founded under the legal form of a limited liability company. Its German name is Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit hence the abbreviation IZA. IZA is situated in Bonn, Germany. IZA's main focus is the economic analysis of national and international labor markets within a broad range of research areas. Furthermore IZA provides policy advice on crucial labor market issues for national and international policy institutions. The institute’s networks of almost 600 international Research Fellows and influential Policy Fellows from business, politics, society and the media add to the dynamic of IZA. IZA draws substantial financial support from the research-sponsoring activities of the Deutsche Post-Foundation. President is Dr. Klaus Zumwinkel, former CEO of Deutsche Post World Net. Director is Prof. Dr. Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also professor of economics at the University of Bonn and honorary professor at the Free University of Berlin and Renmin University of China as well as an advisor to Fair Observer. Director of Research is Dr. Marco Caliendo. Director of Labor Policy is PD
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    International Association of Mathematical Physics

    International Association of Mathematical Physics

    • Award categories presented: Poincaré Prize
    The International Association of Mathematical Physics (IAMP) was founded in 1976 to promote research in mathematical physics. It brings together research mathematicians and theoretical physicists, including students. The association's ordinary members are individual researchers, although associate membership is available to organizations and companies. The IAMP is governed by an executive committee elected by the ordinary members. The association sponsors the International Congress on Mathematical Physics (ICMP), which takes place every three years, and it also supports smaller conferences and workshops. There is a quarterly news bulletin. IAMP currently awards two kinds of research prizes in mathematical physics at its triannual meetings, the Henri Poincaré Prize (created in 1997) and the Early Career Award (created in 2009). The presidents of the IAMP since its foundation were: The Henri Poincaré Prize is sponsored by the Daniel Iagolnitzer Foundation to recognize outstanding contributions in mathematical physics, and contributions which lay the groundwork for novel developments in this broad field. The Prize was also created to recognize and support young people of exceptional
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    National Center for Atmospheric Research

    National Center for Atmospheric Research

    • Award categories presented: NCAR Award
    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR, pronounced "EN-car") has multiple facilities, including the I. M. Pei-designed Mesa Laboratory headquarters in Boulder, Colorado. NCAR is managed by the nonprofit University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Studies include meteorology, climate science, atmospheric chemistry, solar-terrestrial interactions, environmental and societal impacts. NCAR provides a broad array of tools and technologies to the scientific community for studying Earth’s atmosphere, including, The center is staffed by scientists, engineers, technicians, and support personnel who develop and extend these capabilities. Key research areas include NCAR is organized into five laboratories and two programs: Laboratories Programs NCAR's service to the universities and larger geosciences community is reinforced by the offerings of UCAR's community programs. The Computational and Information Systems Laboratory (CISL) is a laboratory within the National Center for Atmospheric Research. CISL was formerly known as the Scientific Computing Division (SCD). CISL manages and operates NCAR's supercomputers,
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    National Science Foundation

    National Science Foundation

    • Awards presented: National Medal of Science
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. Its medical counterpart is the National Institutes of Health. With an annual budget of about US$6.87 billion (fiscal year 2010), the NSF funds approximately 20% of all federally supported basic research conducted by the United States' colleges and universities. In some fields, such as mathematics, computer science, economics and the social sciences, the NSF is the major source of federal backing. The NSF's director, deputy director, and the 24 members of the National Science Board (NSB) are appointed by the President of the United States, and confirmed by the United States Senate. The director and deputy director are responsible for administration, planning, budgeting and day-to-day operations of the foundation, while the NSB meets six times a year to establish its overall policies. Although many other federal research agencies operate their own laboratories, notable examples being the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), NSF does not.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Norwegian Authors' Union

    Norwegian Authors' Union

    • Award categories presented: Tarjei Vesaas' debutantpris
    The Norwegian Authors' Union (Norwegian: Den norske Forfatterforening, DnF) is an association of Norwegian authors. It was established in 1893 to promote Norwegian literature and protect Norwegian authors' professional and economic interests. DnF also works in solidarity with persecuted writers internationally. As of 2004 the association had 513 members. The author Anne Oterholm has led the organization since March 2005. The Norwegian Authors' Union Literary Council annually awards a number of government and independently established scholarships to both members and non-members. The Literary Council consists of nine members and provides counsel on all matters of literary art, in addition to decisions on awards. A number of famous Norwegian authors have been members of the Council.
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Operations Research: A Journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

    Operations Research: A Journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

    Operations Research was founded after World War II by the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA), which became part of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Science (INFORMS). The refereed journal includes studies related to linear programming, optimization, revenue management, and the many additional tools used by researchers in the field. Its 50th anniversary edition in 2002 included reminiscences and historical pieces by the leading theoreticians in the field.
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Philadelphia

    Philadelphia

    Philadelphia ( /ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the fifth-most-populous city in the United States. It is located in the Northeastern United States along the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, and it is the only consolidated city-county in Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a population of 1,526,006. Philadelphia is the economic and cultural center of the Delaware Valley, home to 6 million people and the country's fifth-largest metropolitan area. Popular nicknames for Philadelphia are Philly and The City of Brotherly Love, the latter of which comes from the literal meaning of the city's name in Greek (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια ([pʰilaˈdelpʰeːa], Modern Greek: [filaˈðelfia]) "brotherly love", compounded from philos (φίλος) "loving", and adelphos (ἀδελφός) "brother"). In 1682, William Penn founded the city to serve as capital of Pennsylvania Colony. By the 1750s it was the largest city and busiest port in British America. During the American Revolution, Philadelphia played an instrumental role as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Constitution in 1787.
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Sakharov Prize

    Sakharov Prize

    The Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named after Soviet scientist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, was established in December 1988 by the European Parliament as a means to honour individuals or organisations who have dedicated their lives to the defence of human rights and freedom of thought. A shortlist of nominees is drawn up by the Foreign Affairs Committee and the Development Committee, with the winner announced in October. As of 2010, the prize is accompanied by a monetary award of €50,000. The first prize was awarded jointly to South African Nelson Mandela and Russian Anatoly Marchenko. The most recent award, in 2011, was given to five representatives of the Arab Spring—Asmaa Mahfouz, Ahmed al-Senussi, Razan Zaitouneh, Ali Farzat, and Mohamed Bouazizi—for their contributions to "historic changes in the Arab world". The prize has also been awarded to different organisations throughout its history, the first being the Argentine Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (1992). The Sakharov Prize is usually awarded annually on or around 10 December, the day on which the United Nations General Assembly ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, also celebrated as Human
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Stockholm International Film Festival

    Stockholm International Film Festival

    • Award categories presented: Bronze Horse
    • Awards presented: Stockholm Film Festival Awards
    The Stockholm International Film Festival (Swedish: Stockholms filmfestival) is an annual film festival held in Stockholm, Sweden. It was launched in 1990 and has been held every year in the second half of November. The film voted by a jury as the best in the competition section receives the Bronze Horse (Bronshästen). The following films have received the top honour at the festival, the Bronze Horse for best film.
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    The Guardian

    The Guardian

    • Award categories presented: Guardian First Book Award
    The Guardian, until 1959 known as The Manchester Guardian (founded 1821), is a British national daily newspaper in the Berliner format. Currently edited by Alan Rusbridger, it has grown from a 19th-century local paper to a national paper associated with a complex organisational structure and international multimedia presence with sister papers The Observer (British Sunday paper) and The Guardian Weekly, as well as a web presence. The Guardian in paper form had a certified average daily circulation of 215,998, behind The Daily Telegraph and The Times. The newspaper's online offering is the second most popular British newspaper website behind the Daily Mail's Mail Online. Founded in 1821 by John Edward Taylor in Manchester, with backing from the non-conformist Little Circle group of local businessmen, The Manchester Guardian replaced the radical Manchester Observer which championed the Peterloo protesters. The paper currently identifies with social liberalism. In the last United Kingdom elections, the paper supported the Liberal Democrats, who went on to form a coalition government with the Conservatives. The paper is also influential in the design and publishing arena, sponsoring
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    United States Congress

    United States Congress

    The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, consisting of the Senate, its upper house, and the House of Representatives, its lower house. Congress meets in the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Both representatives and senators are chosen through direct election. There are 535 voting Members of Congress(the House of Representatives' membership of 435 plus the Senate membership of 100). Members of the House of Representatives serve two-year terms representing the people of a district. Congressional districts are apportioned to states by population using the United States Census results, each state in the union having at least one representative in the Congress. Regardless of population, each of the 50 states has two senators; the 100 senators each serve a six-year term. The terms are staggered so every two years approximately one-third of the Senate is up for election. Each staggered group of one-third of the senators are called 'classes'. No state of the United States has two senators from the same class. Most incumbents seek re-election, and their historical likelihood of winning subsequent elections exceeds 90 percent. In
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    W H Smith

    W H Smith

    • Awards presented: WH Smith Literary Award
    WHSmith plc (known colloquially as Smith's) is a British retailer, headquartered in Swindon, Wiltshire, England. It is best known for its chain of high street, railway station, airport, hospital and motorway service station shops selling books, stationery, magazines, newspapers, and entertainment products. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index. It has been innovative over the course of its history, being the first chain store company in the world and was responsible for the creation of the ISBN book catalogue system. In 1792, Henry Walton Smith and his wife Anna established the business as a news vendor in Little Grosvenor Street, London. After their deaths, the business — valued in 1812 at £1,280 —(about ~63764 in 2012, adjusted by inflation) was taken over by their youngest son William Henry Smith, and in 1846 the firm became W H Smith & Son when his only son, also William Henry, became a partner. The firm took advantage of the railway boom by opening newsstands on railway stations, starting with Euston in 1848. In 1850 the firm opened depots in Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool. The younger W H Smith used the success of the firm
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Award Presenting Organization of All Time

    Top List Voters