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Best Award category of All Time

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    1
    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male

    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to male recording artists for quality jazz vocal performances (songs or albums). Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Prior to 1981, the gender-neutral category of Best Jazz Vocal Performance existed. The first award specifically for male performances was presented to George Benson in 1981 for the song "Moody's Mood". The category remained unchanged until 1985, when it was combined with the award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female and presented in the genderless category. Gender-specific awards were once again presented from 1986 until 1991. In 1992, the two categories were combined and presented as the category Best Jazz Vocal Performance. This category was later renamed to Best Jazz Vocal Album beginning in 2001. While the
    7.43
    7 votes
    2
    Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality performances in the heavy metal music genre. The Grammy Awards is an annual ceremony, where honors in several categories are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". It was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. The NARAS recognized heavy metal music artists for the first time at the 31st Grammy Awards (1989). The category was originally presented as Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental, combining two of the most popular music genres of the 1980s. Jethro Tull won that award for the album Crest of a Knave, beating Metallica, which were expected to win with the album ...And Justice for All. This choice led to widespread criticism of the NARAS, as journalists suggested that the music of Jethro Tull did not belong in the hard rock or heavy metal genres. In response, the NARAS created
    7.29
    7 votes
    3
    Mr. Olympia

    Mr. Olympia

    Mr. Olympia is the title awarded to the winner of the professional men's bodybuilding contest at Joe Weider's Olympia Weekend - an international bodybuilding competition that is held annually by the International Federation of BodyBuilding & Fitness (IFBB). Joe Weider created the contest to enable the Mr. Universe winners to continue competing and to earn money. The first Mr. Olympia was held on September 18, 1965 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York City, with Larry Scott winning his first of two straight titles. The record number of wins is eight, held by Lee Haney (1984–1991) and Ronnie Coleman (1998–2005). Phil Heath currently holds the title. The film Pumping Iron (1977), featured the build up to the 1975 Mr. Olympia in Pretoria South Africa and helped launch the acting careers of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Lou Ferrigno. There is also a female bodybuilder crowned, the Ms. Olympia, as are winners of Fitness Olympia and Figure Olympia for fitness and figure competitors. All four contests occur during the same weekend. During the 1990s and early 2000s (decade), a Masters Olympia was also crowned. The 1965 and 1966 Mr. Olympia were won by Larry Scott, a famous bodybuilder of
    7.83
    6 votes
    4
    Grammy Award for Best New Age Album

    Grammy Award for Best New Age Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best New Age Album is presented to recording artists for quality albums in the New Age music genre at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best New Age Recording, the honor was first presented to Swiss musician Andreas Vollenweider at the 29th Grammy Awards in 1987 for his album Down to the Moon. Two compilation albums featuring Windham Hill Records artists were nominated that same year. The record label was founded by William Ackerman, later an award nominee and 2005 winner for the album Returning. From 1988 to 1991 the category was known as Best New Age Performance. Since 1992 the award has been presented as Best New Age Album. Beginning in 2001, award recipients included the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to
    8.80
    5 votes
    5
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Jack Adams Award

    Jack Adams Award

    The Jack Adams Award is awarded annually to the National Hockey League coach "adjudged to have contributed the most to his team's success." It has been awarded 38 times to 33 different coaches. The winner is selected by a poll of the National Hockey League Broadcasters Association at the end of the regular season. Four coaches have won the award two times, while Pat Burns has won three times, the most of any coach. The Jack Adams Award is named in honour of Jack Adams, Hall of Fame player for Toronto, Vancouver and Ottawa, and long-time coach and general manager of the Detroit Red Wings. It was first awarded at the conclusion of the 1973–74 regular season. Jacques Demers is the only coach who has won the award in consecutive seasons. Four coaches in history have won the award with 2 different teams. Jacques Lemaire, Pat Quinn, and Scotty Bowman have won the award twice, while Pat Burns is the only coach to win the award three times. The franchises with the most Jack Adams Award winners are the Philadelphia Flyers, Detroit Red Wings and Phoenix Coyotes with four winners, although the Coyotes had two winners in Winnipeg before they moved to Arizona, followed by the St. Louis Blues
    9.75
    4 votes
    7
    Ashoka Chakra Award

    Ashoka Chakra Award

    The Ashok Chakra is an Indian military decoration awarded for valor, courageous action or self-sacrifice away from the battlefield. It is the peace time equivalent of the Param Vir Chakra, and is awarded for the "most conspicuous bravery or some daring or pre-eminent valour or self-sacrifice" other than in the face of the enemy. The decoration may be awarded either to military or civilian personnel and may be awarded posthumously. Subsequent awards of the Ashoka Chakra are recognized by a bar to the medal ribbon (Flt Lt Suhas Biswas was the first Indian Air Force officer to be awarded with Ashoka Chakra). It is possible for a recipient to be awarded the Kirti Chakra or Shaurya Chakra in addition for separate acts of gallantry. The medal was originally established on 4 January 1952 as the "Ashoka Chakra, Class I" as the first step of a three-class sequence of non-combatant bravery decorations. In 1967, these decorations were removed from the "class-based" system and renamed as the Ashoka Charkra, Kirti Chakra, and Shaurya Chakra. This is an important point in understanding the independent Indian view of decorations. It would also lead to changes in the Padma Vibhushan series, the
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Hugo Award for Best Non-Fiction Book

    Hugo Award for Best Non-Fiction Book

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fantasy
    Winners of the Hugo Award for Best Non-Fiction Book, awarded from 1980 to 1998. This award was replaced by Best Related Book from 1999 to 2009 and by Best Related Work from 2010 onwards. The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and given in various categories. Awards given in one year are for works released during the previous calendar year.
    6.43
    7 votes
    9
    Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance

    The Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance is an honor presented to recording artists at the 31st Grammy Awards in 1989 and the 32nd Grammy Awards in 1990 and again from 2012 for quality rap performances. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The first award for Best Rap Performance was first presented to DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince (the vocal duo consisting of DJ Jazzy Jeff and Will Smith) for "Parents Just Don't Understand". The ceremony was not without controversy; nominees Jeff and Smith led a boycott in protest of the award presentation not being televised, and some members of the rap community felt that more qualified artists were overlooked. After the 1990 ceremony, where Young MC won the award, the category was split into Best Rap Solo Performance and Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group. These two categories were once again combined from 2012, as a result
    9.25
    4 votes
    10
    Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play

    Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play

    • Presenting Organization: American Theatre Wing
    • Category of: Tony Award
    The Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play is an honor presented at the Tony Awards, a ceremony established in 1947 as the Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, to actresses for quality supporting roles in a Broadway play. The awards are named after Antoinette Perry, an American actress who died in 1946. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the Tony Award Productions, a joint venture of The Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, to "honor the best performances and stage productions of the previous year." Originally called the Tony Award for Actress, Supporting or Featured (Dramatic), the award was first presented to Patricia Neal at the 1st Tony Awards for her portrayal of Regina Hubbard in Lillian Hellman's Another Part of the Forest. Before 1956, nominees' names were not made public; the change was made by the awards committee to "have a greater impact on theatregoers". The award was renamed in 1976, with Shirley Knight becoming the first winner under the new title for her role as Carla in Robert Patrick's Kennedy's Children. Its most recent recipient is Judith Light, for the role of Silda Grauman, in Other Desert
    9.25
    4 votes
    11
    Grammy Award for Best Native American Music Album

    Grammy Award for Best Native American Music Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Native American Music Album was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality albums in the Native American music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Following a three-year lobbying effort by Ellen Bello, founder of the Native American Music Awards and the Native American Music Association, the Grammy award was first presented to Tom Bee and Douglas Spotted Eagle in 2001 as the producers of the compilation album Gathering of Nations Pow Wow. Previously, Native American recordings had been placed in the folk, world or New Age music categories. While some Native American artists criticized the award category for being "too narrowly defined to accommodate the breadth of today's Indian music", others took pride in its inclusion. The name of the award remained unchanged between 2001 and
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Heinrich Heine Prize

    Heinrich Heine Prize

    Heinrich Heine Prize refers to two different awards named after the 19th century German poet Christian Johann Heinrich Heine: The Heinrich Heine prize of the city of Düsseldorf was established on the occasion of Heine's 175th birthday. The honor is awarded to personalities who through their work in the spirit of Heine's emphasis on the basic rights of man, advance social and political progress, mutual understanding of the peoples, or spread the idea that all people belong to the same group: mankind. Beginning in 1972, the Heine prize was awarded every three years; since 1981 it was awarded every two years. The assignment of the Heine prize 1995 was shifted to the year 1996. Since that time the Heine prize is again awarded every two years. It is endowed with €25,000; starting from the year 2006, the 150th after the death of the poet, the city of Düsseldorf has doubled the prize sum to €50,000. The jury that decided the prize consisted of 5 members of the city government, 1 representative of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, the rector of the Heinrich Heine University, and 5 other members (critics and literary experts). The 5 members from the city government have 1 vote each, the
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    Grammy Award for Best Male Rap Solo Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Male Rap Solo Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Male Rap Solo Performance was an honor presented to male recording artists at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003 and the 46th Grammy Awards in 2004 for quality rap solo performances. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Beginning in 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. In 2003, the category was split into separate recognitions for Female and Male Rap Solo Performances. The categories remained separated by gender until 2005 when they were combined into the genderless category originally known as Best Rap Solo Performance. American singers Nelly and Eminem received the awards for Best Male Rap Solo Performance. In 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. The category name remained unchanged until 2004 when it was
    6.00
    7 votes
    14
    Copley Medal

    Copley Medal

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Society
    The Copley Medal is an award given by the Royal Society of London for "outstanding achievements in research in any branch of science, and alternates between the physical sciences and the biological sciences". Awarded every year, the medal is the oldest Royal Society medal still being awarded, having first been given in 1731 to Stephen Gray, who received it for "his new Electrical Experiments: – as an encouragement to him for the readiness he has always shown in obliging the Society with his discoveries and improvements in this part of Natural Knowledge". The medal was created following a donation of £100 to be used for carrying out experiments by Sir Godfrey Copley, for which the interest on the amount was used for several years. The conditions for the medal have been changed several times; in 1736, it was suggested that "a medal or other honorary prize should be bestowed on the person whose experiment should be best approved", and this remained the rule until 1831, when the conditions were changed so that the medal would be awarded to the researcher that the Royal Society Council decided most deserved it. A second donation of £1666 13s. 4d. was made by Sir Joseph William Copley in
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    World's Strongest Man

    World's Strongest Man

    The World's Strongest Man is an event in strength athletics which has been described by a number of highly respected authorities in the sport as the premier event in strongman. Organized by TWI, an IMG Media company, it is broadcast around the end of December each year. Competitors qualify based on top placings at the World's Strongest Man Super Series events or are invited based on a top placing in selected national or international competitions. Thirty contestants take part across five heats; the top two in each go through to the ten-man final. The current event sponsor is Met-rx, other past sponsors include Tonka and PartyPoker.com. The event has a number of rival and parallel competitions with which it is often confused including the Strongman Super Series (producing the World Champion), the now defunct IFSA Strongman World Championships (run from 2005-2007 after the International Federation of Strength Athletes parted company with WSM in 2004), Giants Live and Strongman Champions League. However, these are separate competitions. The concept behind "The World's Strongest Men", as it was originally named, was developed in 1977 for CBS by Langstar Inc. David Webster, a Scot who
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Hugo Award for Most Promising New Author

    Hugo Award for Most Promising New Author

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    This short-lived Hugo Award category is effectively subsumed in the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer presented by Dell Publications and administered in conjuction with the Hugo Awards, using the same nominating and voting rules.
    6.67
    6 votes
    17
    Palme d'Or

    Palme d'Or

    • Presenting Organization: Cannes Film Festival
    • Category of: Cannes Film Festival Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Film
    The Palme d'Or (English: Golden Palm) is the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival and is presented to the director of the best feature film of the official competition. It was introduced in 1955 by the organising committee. From 1939 to 1954, the highest prize was the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film. From 1964 to 1974, it was replaced once again, by the Grand Prix du Festival. In 1954 the Jury of the Festival de Cannes suggested awarding an award titled the "Grand Prix of the International Film Festival" with a new design each year from a contemporary artist. At the end of 1954, the Festival's Board of Directors invited several jewellers to submit designs for a palm, in tribute to the coat of arms of the City of Cannes. The original design by the jeweller Lucienne Lazon had the bevelled lower extremity of the stalk forming a heart, and the pedestal a sculpture in terracotta by the artist Sébastien. In 1955, the first Palme d'Or was awarded to Delbert Mann for Marty, and it remained the highest award until 1964, when copyright issues with the Palme led the Festival to return to the Grand Prix. In 1975 the Palme d'Or was reintroduced and has since remained
    7.60
    5 votes
    18
    Distinguished Flying Cross

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    The Distinguished Flying Cross is a medal awarded to any officer or enlisted member of the United States armed forces who distinguishes himself or herself in support of operations by "heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight, subsequent to November 11, 1918." The Distinguished Flying Cross was authorized by Section 12 of the Air Corps Act enacted by the United States Congress on July 2, 1926, as amended by Executive Order 7786 on January 8, 1938. The first award of the Distinguished Flying Cross was made by President Calvin Coolidge on May 2, 1927, to ten aviators of the Air Corps who had participated in the U.S. Army Pan American Flight, which took place from December 21, 1926 to May 2, 1927. Two of the airmen died in a mid-air collision trying to land at Buenos Aires on February 26, 1927, and received their awards posthumously. Since the award had only been authorized by Congress the previous year, no medals had yet been struck, and the Pan American airmen initially received only certificates. Among the ten airmen were Major Herbert A. Dargue, Captains Ira C. Eaker and Muir S. Fairchild, and 1st Lt. Ennis C. Whitehead. Charles Lindbergh
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Pulitzer Prize for the Novel

    Pulitzer Prize for the Novel

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for the Novel was a prize awarded between 1918 and 1947. In 1948, it was replaced by the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
    7.40
    5 votes
    20
    Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album

    Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album was an honor presented to recording artists for quality albums in the Mexican music genre at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Since its inception, the award category has had several name changes. From 1984 to 1991 the award was known as Best Mexican-American Performance. From 1992 to 1994 it was awarded as Best Mexican-American Album. In 1995 it returned to the title Best Mexican-American Performance. From 1996 to 1998 it was awarded as Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance. In 1999, the category name was changed to Best Mexican-American Music Performance, and in 2000 it returned to the title Best Mexican-American Performance once again. From 2001 to 2008 the award was presented as Best Mexican/Mexican-American Album. In 2009, the category was split into
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Lorentz Medal

    Lorentz Medal

    Lorentz Medal is a prize awarded every four years by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. It was established in 1925 on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the doctorate of Hendrik Lorentz. This solid gold medal is given for important contributions to theoretical physics, though in the past there have been some experimentalists among its recipients. Many of the award winners later received a Nobel Prize.
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    Philadelphia Liberty Medal

    Philadelphia Liberty Medal

    The Liberty Medal is an annual award administered by the National Constitution Center of the United States to recognize leadership in the pursuit of freedom. It was originally founded by The Philadelphia Foundation. In 2006 an agreement was made with the National Constitution Center (NCC) that the NCC would take over the organizing, selecting and presenting of the award to recipients. Recipients are now chosen by the NCC and its Board of Trustees.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Otto Hahn Peace Medal in Gold

    Otto Hahn Peace Medal in Gold

    The Otto Hahn Peace Medal in Gold is named after the German nuclear chemist and 1944 Nobel Laureate Otto Hahn, an honorary citizen of Berlin. The medal is in memory of his worldwide involvement in the politics of peace and humanitarian causes, in particular since the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 by the Americans. It was established by his grandson Dietrich Hahn in 1988 and is awarded by the United Nations Association of Germany (Deutsche Gesellschaft für die Vereinten Nationen, DGVN, Berlin-Brandenburg) to persons or institutions that have rendered "outstanding services to peace and international understanding". By tradition, the gold medal, together with a leather-bound diploma inlaid in gold, is presented in Berlin at a biennial ceremony on 17 December by the Governing Mayor of Berlin and the President of the DGVN. On 17 December 1938, in Berlin-Dahlem, Otto Hahn and his assistant Fritz Strassmann had discovered a new reaction in uranium (which exiled Lise Meitner and her nephew Otto Frisch two weeks later correctly interpreted as "nuclear fission") thus laying the scientific and technical foundations of nuclear energy. This 17 December
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children

    Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for works containing quality "spoken word" performances aimed at children. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award was first presented to Audrey Hepburn and producers Deborah Raffin and Michael Viner in 1994 for the album Audrey Hepburn's Enchanted Tales. Its last winners were the artists, producers, audio engineers, and audio mixers who contributed to the album Julie Andrews' Collection of Poems, Songs, and Lullabies in 2011, when it was announced the award would be combined with the Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children to form the Grammy Award for Best Children's Album. Tom Chapin and producer David Rapkin hold the record for the most wins in this category, with a total of three. Artists Bill Harley
    6.17
    6 votes
    25
    Hugo Award for Best New SF Author or Artist

    Hugo Award for Best New SF Author or Artist

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    This category, presented only at the inaugural Hugo Awards, was effectively subsumed by the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, presented by Dell Publications, and administered in conjuction with the Hugo Awards, using the same nominating and voting system and selected on the same ballots.
    6.17
    6 votes
    26
    National Medal of Technology

    National Medal of Technology

    The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (formerly the National Medal of Technology) is an honor granted by the President of the United States to American inventors and innovators who have made significant contributions to the development of new and important technology. The award may be granted to a specific person, to a group of people or to an entire organization or corporation. It is the highest honor the United States can confer to a US citizen for achievements related to technological progress. The National Medal of Technology was created in 1980 by the United States Congress under the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act. It was a bipartisan effort to foster technological innovation and the technological competitiveness of the United States in the international arena. The first National Medals of Technology were issued in 1985 by then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan to 12 individuals and one company. Among the first recipients were technology giants like Steve Jobs and Stephen Wozniak, founders of Apple Computer. The medal has since been awarded annually. On August 9, 2007, President George Bush signed the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    Time's Person of the Year

    Time's Person of the Year

    Person of the Year (formerly Man of the Year) is an annual issue of the United States newsmagazine Time that features and profiles a person, group, idea or object that "for better or for worse, ...has done the most to influence the events of the year." The tradition of selecting a Man of the Year began in 1927 with Time editors contemplating newsworthy stories possible during a slow news week. The idea was also an attempt to remedy the editorial embarrassment earlier that year of not having aviator Charles Lindbergh on its cover following his historic trans-Atlantic flight. By the end of the year, it was decided that a cover story featuring Lindbergh as the Man of the Year would serve both purposes. Since then, individual people, classes of people, the computer, and Planet Earth have all been selected for the special year-end issue. In 1999, the title was changed to Person of the Year. However, the only woman to win the renamed recognition individually have been "The Whistleblowers" (Cynthia Cooper, Coleen Rowley, and Sherron Watkins in 2002) and Melinda Gates (jointly with Bill Gates and Bono in 2005). Before that, four women were granted the title as individuals as Woman of the
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Pritzker Prize

    Pritzker Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Hyatt Foundation
    • Category of: Pritzker Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Architecture
    The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually to honour "a living architect whose built work demonstrates a combination of those qualities of talent, vision and commitment, which has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity and the built environment through the art of architecture". Founded in 1979 by Jay A. Pritzker and his wife Cindy, the award is funded by the Pritzker family and sponsored by the Hyatt Foundation and is considered to be one of the world's premier architecture prizes; it is often referred to as the Nobel Prize of architecture. The prize is awarded "irrespective of nationality, race, creed, or ideology"; the recipients receive US$100,000, a citation certificate, and since 1987, a bronze medallion. The Latin inscription on the reverse of the medallion—firmitas, utilitas, venustas (English: durability, utility, and beauty)—is inspired by Roman architect Vitruvius. Before 1987, a limited edition Henry Moore sculpture accompanied the monetary prize. The Executive Director of the prize, as of 2009, Martha Thorne, solicits nominations from a range of people, including past Laureates, academics, critics and others "with expertise and interest
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album, Female

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album, Female

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Album was an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards from 2001 to 2011 The award was given to a female performer for albums containing at least 51% of new recordings of the pop genre. Since its inception, the award category has had several name changes. In 2000 was known as Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, being awarded for singles or tracks. The following year onwards the award for Best Female Pop Vocal Album was presented. The award has been presented to singers originating from Canada, Colombia, Italy, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States. The award for Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 1st Latin Grammy Awards was earned by Colombian singer-songwriter Shakira for the song "Ojos Así". Shakira was also awarded Female Pop Vocal Album in 2006 for Fijación Oral Vol. 1 (which also received the Latin Grammy for Album of the Year) and in 2011 for her album Sale el Sol. In 2001, the award winners were announced at a press conference, since the 2nd Latin Grammy Awards were scheduled to take place on September 11, 2001. Christina Aguilera received the award for her first Spanish language album Mi Reflejo. Italian
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting

    Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting

    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting is awarded to an example of "local reporting that illuminates significant issues or concerns." This Pulitzer Prize was first awarded in 1948. Like most Pulitzers the winner receives a $10,000 award. The Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting was first awarded from 1948 until 1952. Beginning in 1953, two awards for Local Reporting were given out by the committee, for "Local Reporting, Edition Time" and for "Local Reporting, No Edition Time." In 1964 the Local Reporting Pulitzers were again renamed to "Local Investigative Specialized Reporting" and "Local General or Spot News Reporting." These prizes existed until 1984, when they were done away with. In 1985, several new Pulitzer Prizes were introduced, the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Journalism (later renamed "Explanatory Reporting"), the Pulitzer Prize for General News Reporting (later renamed "Breaking News Reporting"), the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting, and the Pulitzer Prize for Specialized Reporting. None of these prizes were reserved specifically for local reporting. In 2006, the prize committee announced that the Pulitzer Prize for Beat Reporting was going to be replaced by a
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Purple Heart

    Purple Heart

    The Purple Heart is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to those who have been wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917 with the U.S. military. With its forerunner, the Badge of Military Merit, which took the form of a heart made of purple cloth, the Purple Heart is the oldest military award that is still given to members of the U.S. military, the only earlier award being the obsolete Fidelity Medallion. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is located in New Windsor, New York. The original Purple Heart, designated as the Badge of Military Merit, was established by George Washington—then the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army – by order from his Newburgh, New York headquarters on August 7, 1782. The Badge of Military Merit was only awarded to three Revolutionary War soldiers and from then on as its legend grew, so did its appearance. Although never abolished, the award of the badge was not proposed again officially until after World War I. On October 10, 1927, Army Chief of Staff General Charles Pelot Summerall directed that a draft bill be sent to Congress "to revive the Badge of Military Merit". The bill was
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album

    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality contemporary jazz performances. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Performance, the award was first presented to The Manhattan Transfer in 1992. From 1993 to 1994 the category was known as Best Contemporary Jazz Performance (Instrumental), from 1995 to 2000 the name changed to Best Contemporary Jazz Performance, and since 2001 the name of the category has been Best Contemporary Jazz Album. Until 2001, both albums and singles were eligible for this award. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented for albums containing "at least 51% playing time of newly recorded
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography

    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography has been awarded since 1968 for a distinguished example of feature photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, a sequence or an album. Before 1968, there was only one photography category, the Pulitzer Prize for Photography, which was divided into spot news and breaking news and the feature categories. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing

    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing

    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing has been awarded since 1979 for a distinguished example of feature writing giving prime consideration to high literary quality and originality. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in film. Note: Only on six occasions over the past 15 years did the winner of the SAG Award for Best Leading Actress not win the Academy Award for Best Actress. This happened in: Only once has the winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress not been nominated for the SAG Award for Best Leading Actress. In 2008, Kate Winslet won the Oscar for her performance in "The Reader". However, she won the SAG Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role. 2 nominations 3 Nominations 4 nominations 8 nominations
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony conducted by the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences to "recognize excellence and create a wider awareness of the cultural diversity" and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is given to the performers of vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% of newly recorded material. The award was first presented at the 2nd Latin Grammy Awards, since the previous year in the rock field the categories were separated by gender (Female and Male Rock Vocal Performance), ensembles (Rock Duo/Group with Vocal) and an additional award for Best Rock Album. At the Latin Grammy Awards of 2010 two Rock categories were presented, Rock Album and Best Rock Song. No information was released regarding the absence or possible withdrawal of the Best Rock Solo Vocal Album category. Argentinian artists have won the award more times than any other nationality, though award-winning albums have also been performed by musicians originating from Colombia, Mexico and the United States. Colombian singer-songwriter Juanes has
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    AVN Best New Starlet Award

    AVN Best New Starlet Award

    • Category of: AVN Awards
    The AVN (Adult Video News) Best New Starlet Award is presented every January in Las Vegas, Nevada at the AVN Awards ceremony. It is given to the porn actress whom the industry believes has displayed the greatest amount of potential and quality in her debut year. Then-nominee Sunny Lane said of winning the award: "if I won this award, it would be a major effect, because you're looked at different. You're an award winner now for the AVNs. It's the Oscars, it's our big gala, it's our biggest event. So if you win, you're totally respected in the industry. You get different work, your prices go up. You have more say about what you can do."
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Presidential Medal of Freedom

    Presidential Medal of Freedom

    The Presidential Medal of Freedom is an award bestowed by the President of the United States and is—along with the comparable Congressional Gold Medal bestowed by an act of U.S. Congress—the highest civilian award in the United States. It recognizes those individuals who have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors". The award is not limited to U.S. citizens and, while it is a civilian award, it can also be awarded to military personnel and worn on the uniform. It was established in 1963 and replaced the earlier Medal of Freedom that was established by President Harry S. Truman in 1945. The Presidential Medal of Freedom is similar in name to the Medal of Freedom established by President Harry S. Truman in 1945 to honor civilian service during World War II, but much closer in meaning and precedence to the Medal for Merit: the Presidential Medal of Freedom is currently the supreme civilian decoration in precedence, whereas the Medal of Freedom was inferior in precedence to the Medal for Merit; the Medal of Freedom was awarded by any of three Cabinet
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Armed Forces Reserve Medal

    Armed Forces Reserve Medal

    The Armed Forces Reserve Medal is a service medal of the United States Armed Forces that has existed since 1950. The medal recognizes service performed by members of the reserve components and is awarded to both officers and enlisted personnel. The medal is considered a successor award to the Naval Reserve Medal and the Marine Corps Reserve Ribbon, which were discontinued in 1958 and 1967 respectively. If the medal is awarded for periods of service, it is accompanied by an hourglass device. Depending on the length of service, a bronze, silver, gold, or bronze and gold hourglass are worn on the suspension ribbon and service ribbon, indicating 10, 20, 30, or 40 years of service respectively. If the medal is awarded in connection with a mobilization, it is accompanied by an "M" device. Subsequent mobilizations under an unrelated presidential call-up order result in a numeral device being worn to indicate the number of mobilizations. In the Army Reserve and National Guard, a service member qualifies for the medal after completing a total of ten years service in the active reserve. This service may be cumulative, provided that the combined ten years of service was performed over a
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Bagutta Prize

    Bagutta Prize

    The Bagutta Prize is an Italian literary prize that is awarded annually to Italian writers. The prize originated in Milan's Bagutta Ristorante. The writer Riccardo Bacchelli discovered the restaurant and soon he had numerous friends who would dine together and discuss books. They began charging fines to the person who arrived last to an appointed meal, or who failed to appear. At first the funds so collected were spent on miscellaneous items, but on 11 November 1927 they decided to use the funds to create a literary prize. They named it after the restaurant. Other directors of the prize include Emilio Tadini, Mario Soldati, and Isabella Bossi Fedrigotti.
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Grammy Award for Best Hawaiian Music Album

    Grammy Award for Best Hawaiian Music Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Hawaiian Music Album was an honor presented to recording artists from 2005 to 2011 for quality Hawaiian music albums. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Campaigning resulted in the Hawaiian category's establishment in 2005. Prior to its creation, Hawaiian music recordings were eligible for the Best World Music Album category but no Hawaiian musician or group had ever won a Grammy Award. During its seven-year history, awards were presented to Charles M. Brotman for Slack Key Guitar: Volume 2, producers Daniel Ho, Paul Konwiser and Wayne Wong for Masters of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar: Volume One, the same production team plus George Kahumoku, Jr. for Legends of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar: Live from Maui in 2007 followed by Treasures of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar in 2008 and Masters of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar: Volume 2 in 2010, Tia Carrere and
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award

    BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award

    • Category of: British Academy Film Awards
    The BAFTA Fellowship is a lifetime achievement award presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) since 1971 "in recognition of outstanding achievement in the art forms of the moving image", and is the highest honour the Academy can bestow. Fellowship recipients have been mainly film directors, but some have also been awarded to actors, film and television producers, cinematographers, film editors, screenwriters and (since 2007) to contributors to the video game industry. People from the United Kingdom dominate the list, but it includes over a dozen U.S. citizens and several from other countries in Europe, though none of the latter have been recognized since 1996. Shigeru Miyamoto, in 2010, became the first citizen of an Asian country to receive the award, and Rolf Harris the first from Australasia in 2012. The inaugural recipient of the award was film-maker and producer Alfred Hitchcock. Twice the award has been made posthumously: to comedy pair Morecambe and Wise, recipients in 1999, and to Stanley Kubrick, who died that same year and was made a fellow in 2000. The most recent recipient was artist and musician Rolf Harris in 2012.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video

    Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to performers, directors, and producers of quality short form music videos. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Video, Short Form, the award was first presented in 1984, as was a similar award for Best Long Form Music Video. From 1986 to 1997, the category name was changed to Best Music Video, Short Form. However, in 1988 and 1989, the award criteria were changed and the video awards were presented under the categories Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video. The awards were returned to the original format in 1990, and the current category name has remained unchanged since 1998. Award recipients include the performers, directors, and producers associated with the winning videos. Johnny
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Prisoner of War Medal

    Prisoner of War Medal

    The Prisoner of War Medal is a military award of the United States armed forces which was authorized by Congress and signed into law by President Ronald Reagan on 8 November 1985. The United States Code citation for the POW Medal statute is 10 U.S.C. § 1128. The Prisoner of War Medal may be awarded to any person who was a prisoner of war after April 5, 1917, (the date of the United States entry into World War I was the 6th). It is awarded to any person who was taken prisoner or held captive while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing Armed Force; or while serving with friendly forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing Armed Force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. As of an amendment to Title 10 of the United States Code in 1989, the medal is also awarded for captivity by foreign armed forces that are hostile to the United States, under circumstances which the Secretary concerned finds to have been comparable to those under which persons have generally been held captive by enemy armed forces during periods of armed conflict. The person's conduct, while in
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble - Drama Series

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble - Drama Series

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest ensemble acting achievements in dramatic television.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    British Orthodontic Society Technicians Award

    British Orthodontic Society Technicians Award

    • Category of: British Orthodontic Society Technicians Award
    The British Orthodontic Society Technicians Award is awarded annually by the British Orthodontic Society in collaboration with the Orthodontic Technicians Association. The award was established in 1999 and the first prize was awarded in 2000. The award is the only one of its kind in dentistry. It was initially set up to encourage more students and newly qualified professionals to specialise in orthodontics. It could be argued that the award has been successful in its purpose - the majority of the recipients have gone on to have successful careers in the field. The award is open to any student dental technician in the United Kingdom enrolled on a recognised first level dental technology course and to technicians who have been qualified for less than two years at the time of the closing date for entries. The prize of a certificate and a cheque for £700 is awarded at the annual conference of the Orthodontic Technicians Association. The award is judged by three members of the Orthodontic Technicians Association Council. The current judging panel comprises previous award winner James Green, Kerry Lancaster and Paul Mallett. The following table is a complete list of the Winners of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    James Tiptree, Jr. Award

    James Tiptree, Jr. Award

    • Category of: James Tiptree, Jr. Award
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The James Tiptree, Jr. Award is an annual literary prize for works of science fiction or fantasy that expand or explore one's understanding of gender. It was initiated in February 1991 by science fiction authors Pat Murphy and Karen Joy Fowler, subsequent to a discussion at WisCon. The award is named for Alice B. Sheldon, who wrote under the pseudonym James Tiptree, Jr. By choosing a masculine nom de plume, having her stories accepted under that name and winning awards with them, Sheldon helped demonstrate that the division between male and female science fiction writing was illusory. Years after "Tiptree" first published science fiction, Sheldon wrote some work under the female pen name "Raccoona Sheldon"; later, the science fiction world discovered that "Tiptree" had been female all along. This discovery led to widespread discussion over which aspects of writing, if any, have an intrinsic gender. To remind audiences of the role gender plays in both reading and writing, the award was named in Sheldon's honor at the suggestion of Karen Joy Fowler. Fundraising efforts for the Tiptree include publications (two cookbooks), "feminist bake sales", and auctions. (The Tiptree cookbook The
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Nobel Peace Prize

    Nobel Peace Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Norwegian Nobel Committee
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Peace
    The Nobel Peace Prize (Norwegian and Swedish: Nobels fredspris) is one of the five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel, along with the prizes in Chemistry, Physics, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. Since 1901, it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have "done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses." Per Alfred Nobel's will, the recipient is selected by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, a 5-member committee appointed by the Parliament of Norway. Since 1990, the prize is awarded on December 10 in Oslo City Hall each year. The prize was formerly awarded in the Atrium of the University of Oslo Faculty of Law (1947–89), the Norwegian Nobel Institute (1905–46) and the Parliament (1901–04). Due to its political nature, the Nobel Peace Prize has for most of its history been the subject of controversies. According to Nobel's will, the Peace Prize shall be awarded to the person who "shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality jazz fusion performances. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal or Instrumental, the award was first presented to the jazz band Weather Report at the 22nd Grammy Awards in 1980 for the album 8:30. In 1988, the category name changed to Best Jazz Fusion Performance and was moved to a newly created Fusion field. The category name was retired before the 33rd Grammy Awards (1992) with the addition of the award for Best Contemporary Jazz Performance (currently known as Best Contemporary Jazz Album). Pat Metheny holds the record for the most wins in this category, with a total of five (four times with the Pat Metheny
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    The Nordic Council's Literature Prize

    The Nordic Council's Literature Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Nordic Council
    • Category of: The Nordic Council's Literature Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Nordic Council Literature Prize is awarded for a work of literature written in one of the languages of the Nordic countries, that meets "high literary and artistic standards". Established in 1962, the prize is awarded every year, and is worth 350,000 Danish kroner (2008). Eligible works are typically novels, plays, collections of poetry, short stories or essays, or other works that were published for the first time during the last four years, or in the case of works written in Danish, Norwegian, or Swedish, within the last two years. The prize is one of the most prestigious awards that Nordic authors can win. The winner is chosen by an adjudication committee appointed by the Nordic Council. The committee consists of ten members, two each from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The committee members are generally experts in their own country's literature, as well as their neighbouring countries. In addition to the regular members, additional members may be added to the committee if works are nominated from Åland, the Faroe Islands, Greenland or the Sami language area. Apart from the monetary award, the intent of the prize is also to "increase interest in the
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Franz Kafka Prize

    Franz Kafka Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Franz Kafka Society
    • Category of: Franz Kafka Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Franz Kafka Prize is an international literary award presented in honour of Franz Kafka, the German language novelist. The prize was first awarded in 2001 and is co-sponsored by the Franz Kafka Society and the city of Prague, Czech Republic. At a presentation held annually in the Old Town Hall (Prague), the recipient receives $10,000, a diploma, and a bronze statuette. Each award is often called the "Kafka Prize" or "Kafka Award". The criteria for winning the award include the artwork's "humanistic character and contribution to cultural, national, language and religious tolerance, its existential, timeless character, its generally human validity and its ability to hand over a testimony about our times." The award earned some prestige by foreshadowing the Nobel Prize when two of its winners went on to win the Nobel Prize in Literature the same year, Elfriede Jelinek (2004) and Harold Pinter (2005).
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to female recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality vocal performances in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female, the award was first presented to Donna Summer in 1980. Beginning with the 1995 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. However, in 1988, 1992, 1994, and since 2005, this category was combined with the Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and presented in a genderless category known as Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo. The solo category was later renamed to Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance beginning in 2005. This fusion has been criticized, especially when
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female

    Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to female recording artists for quality jazz vocal performances (songs or albums). Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Prior to 1981, the gender-neutral category of Best Jazz Vocal Performance existed. The first award specifically for female performances was presented to Ella Fitzgerald in 1981 for the album A Perfect Match. The category remained unchanged until 1985, when it was combined with the award for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male and presented in the genderless category. Gender-specific awards were once again presented from 1986 until 1991. In 1992, the two categories were combined and presented as the category Best Jazz Vocal Performance. This category was later renamed to Best Jazz Vocal Album beginning in 2001. While the
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Hugo Award for Best American Professional Magazine

    Hugo Award for Best American Professional Magazine

    The 1957 World Science Fiction Convention was held in the United Kingdom, and the organizers of the convention elected to present Hugo Awards for both Best American Professional Magazine and Best British Professional Magazine. (In the early years of the Hugo Awards, the categories were more fluid and subject to the whims of the organizing committees than they later became.)
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography

    Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography, has been awarded since 2000. Before 1968, there was only one photography category, the Pulitzer Prize for Photography, which was divided into the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography (later renamed breaking news) and feature categories. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Rómulo Gallegos Prize

    Rómulo Gallegos Prize

    • Category of: Rómulo Gallegos Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Rómulo Gallegos International Novel Prize (Spanish: Premio internacional de novela Rómulo Gallegos) was created on 6 August 1964 by a presidential decree enacted by Venezuelan president Raúl Leoni, in honor of the Venezuelan politician and President Rómulo Gallegos, the author of Doña Bárbara. The declared purpose of the prize is to "perpetuate and honor the work of the eminent novelist and also to stimulate the creative activity of Spanish language writers". It is awarded by the government of Venezuela, through the offices of the Rómulo Gallegos Center for Latin American Studies (Celarg). The first prize was given in 1967. It was awarded every five years until 1987, when it became a biannual award. The award includes a cash prize of €100,000 making it among the richest literary prizes in the world.
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Royal Medal

    Royal Medal

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Society
    The Royal Medal, also known as The Queen's Medal, is a silver-gilt medal awarded each year by the Royal Society, two for "the most important contributions to the advancement of natural knowledge" and one for "distinguished contributions in the applied sciences" made within the Commonwealth of Nations. The award was created by George IV and first awarded in 1826. Initially there were two medals awarded, both for the most important discovery within the last year, a time period which was lengthened to five years and then shortened to three. The format was supported by William IV and Victoria, who had the conditions changed in 1837 so that mathematics was a subject for which a Royal Medal could be awarded, albeit only every third year. The conditions were changed again in 1850 so that: ... the Royal Medals in each year should be awarded for the two most important contributions to the advancement of Natural Knowledge, published originally in Her Majesty's dominions within a period of not more than ten years and not less than one year of the date of the award, subject, of course, to Her Majesty's approval. ... in the award of the Royal Medals, one should be given in each of the two great
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    National Film Award for Best Actor

    National Film Award for Best Actor

    • Presenting Organization: Directorate of Film Festivals
    • Category of: National Film Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Film
    The National Film Award for Best Actor (officially known as Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Actor) is an honour presented annually at the National Film Awards of India to an actor who has delivered the best performance in a leading role within the Indian film industry. The Directorate of Film Festivals makes awards annually in several categories. The organisation was established by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (Government of India) in 1973 to arrange and manage national and international film festivals in India. The President of India presents the awards "to encourage the production of films of aesthetic and technical excellence and social relevance contributing to the understanding and appreciation of cultures of different regions of the country in cinematic form and thereby also promoting integration and unity of the nation." Called the State Awards for Films when established in 1954, the awards ceremony is older than the Directorate of Film Festivals. The State Awards instituted the individual award in 1968 as the Bharat Award for the Best Actor; in 1975 it was renamed as the Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Actor. Throughout the past 44 years, accounting for ties
    6.00
    5 votes
    60
    Silver Star

    Silver Star

    • Presenting Organization: United States Department of Defense
    • Category of: Military decoration
    The Silver Star, referred to as the Silver Star Medal by the Navy and Marine Corps, is the third highest military decoration for valor that can be awarded to any person serving in any capacity with the United States Armed Forces. The medal is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. The Silver Star medal is the successor award to the Citation Star which was established by an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star to replace the Citation Star. The original Citation Star is incorporated into the center of the Silver Star, and the suspension and service ribbon for the Silver Star is based closely on the Certificate of Merit Medal. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the U.S. Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the U.S. Army on December 15, 1942. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star is Title 10 of the United States Code, 10 U.S.C. § 3746 for the Army, 10 U.S.C. § 8746 for the Air Force, and 10 U.S.C. § 6244 for the Naval Service. The Silver Star is awarded for gallantry not justifying the award of one of the next higher
    6.00
    5 votes
    61
    Fred Biletnikoff Award

    Fred Biletnikoff Award

    • Presenting Organization: Tallahassee Quarterback Club
    The Fred Biletnikoff Award has been presented since 1994 to America's top college football wide receiver by the TQC Foundation, Inc. (The Tallahassee Quarterback Club Foundation, Inc.), an independent not-for-profit organization which created the award in 1994 and has sponsored it since. It is named in honor of Fred Biletnikoff, who starred at Tech Memorial High School in Erie, Pennsylvania, then Florida State University before going on to a Hall of Fame career with the Oakland Raiders. A national selection committee consisting of over 150 journalists, commentators, broadcasters, and former players selects the award winner. No member of the board of trustees of the foundation has a vote. Any college player who receives the football through the forward pass is eligible (wide receiver, running back, tight end) to be selected as the award winner, although every winner since 1994 has been a wide receiver.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists

    Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra) was awarded from 1967 to 1971 and in 1987. Outside of these years the award has been divided into the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) and the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (without orchestra). Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year. Nominees for the 9th Grammy Awards (1967) included Julian Bream for Baroque Guitar, pianist John Browning for Prokofiev: Concert No. 1 in D Flat Major for Piano; Concerto No. 2 in G Minor for Piano (conducted by Erich Leinsdorf with the Boston Symphony Orchestra), pianist Raymond Lewenthal for Operatic Liszt, violinist Yehudi Menuhin for Elgar: Concerto for Violin, Ivan Moravec for Chopin: Nocturnes, Arthur Rubinstein for Rubinstein and Chopin (featuring Frédéric Chopin's Bolero, Tarantelle, Fantaisie in F minor and Trois nouvelles études), violinist Isaac Stern for Dvořák: Concerto in A Minor for Violin (conducted by Eugene Ormandy with the Philadelphia Orchestra), and Australian classical guitarist John
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Grammy Award for Best Urban/Alternative Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Urban/Alternative Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Urban/Alternative Performance was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality urban/alternative performances. Awards in several categories are distributed annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." The award was first awarded to India.Arie at the 45th Grammy Awards (2003) for her song "Little Things". According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award was presented to artists that had made "newly recorded urban/alternative performances with vocals". The award was intended to recognize artists "who have been influenced by a cross section of urban music" and who create music that is out of the "mainstream trends". Two-time recipients include India.Arie, Cee Lo Green (once as part of the duo Gnarls Barkley), and Jill Scott. Erykah Badu, Big Boi (a member of OutKast) and will.i.am (a member of The Black Eyed Peas) share the
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation

    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fantasy
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction"." The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation was given each year for theatrical films, television episodes, or other dramatized works related to science fiction or fantasy released in the previous calendar year. The award was first presented in 1958, and with the exceptions of 1964 and 1966 was given annually through 2002 when it was retired in favor of the newly created Dramatic Presentation (Long Form) and Dramatic Presentation (Short Form) categories, which divided the category depending on whether the work was longer or shorter than 90 minutes. In the 1964 and 1966 awards there were insufficient nominations made to support the category. Prior to 1971 the category was defined as including works from "radio, television, stage or screen", and thereafter was expanded to
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Hugo Award for Best Related Book

    Hugo Award for Best Related Book

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    Winners of the Hugo Award for Best Related Book, awarded from 1999 to 2009. This award was previously Best Non-Fiction Book until 1998 and Best Related Work from 2010 onwards. The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and given in various categories. This award category is defined in Article 3.3.5 of the Constitution of the World Science Fiction Society as a work, "which is either non-fiction or, if fictional, is noteworthy primarily for aspects other than the fictional text". Awards given in one year are for works released during the previous calendar year. This category replaced the Best Non-Fiction category awarded from 1980 to 1998. This category was replaced by Best Related Work from 2010 onwards. Retrospective Hugo Awards (normally abbreviated "Retro Hugos") may be awarded by Worldcons held 50, 75, or 100 years after a Worldcon where no Hugos had been awarded (i.e. 1939–41, 1946–52 and 1954). These Retro Hugos are selected by the same process as the regular Hugos. During
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Academy Award for Best Cinematography

    Academy Award for Best Cinematography

    • Presenting Organization: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
    • Category of: Academy Awards
    The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is an Academy Award awarded each year to a cinematographer for work in one particular motion picture. In its first film season, 1927–28, this award (like others such as the acting awards) was not tied to a specific film; all of the work by the nominated cinematographers during the qualifying period was listed after their names. The problem with this system became obvious the first year, since Karl Struss and Charles Rosher were nominated for their work together on Sunrise but three other films shot individually by either Rosher or Struss were also listed as part of the nomination. The second year, 1929, there were no nominations at all, although the Academy has a list of unofficial titles which were under consideration by the Board of Judges. In the third year, 1930, films, not cinematographers, were nominated, and the final award did not show the cinematographer's name. Finally, for the 1931 awards, the modern system in which individuals are nominated for a single film each was adopted in all profession-related categories. From 1939 to 1967 (with the single exception of 1957), there were also separate awards for color and for
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Aga Khan Award for Architecture

    Aga Khan Award for Architecture

    • Disciplines or subjects: Architecture
    The Aga Khan Award for Architecture (AKAA) is an architectural prize established by Aga Khan IV in 1977. It aims to identify and reward architectural concepts that successfully address the needs and aspirations of Islamic societies in the fields of contemporary design, social housing, community development and improvement, restoration, reuse and area conservation, as well as landscape design and improvement of the environment. It is presented in three-year cycles to multiple projects and has a monetary award, with prizes totalling up to US$ 1 million. Uniquely among architectural awards, it recognizes projects, teams, and stakeholders in addition to buildings and people. The award is associated with the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC), an agency of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). The 11th Award cycle runs from 2008-2010. The award is aimed at societies in which Muslims have a significant presence. It is organized on the basis of a three-year cycle and is governed by a steering committee chaired by the Aga Khan IV. A new committee is constituted each cycle to establish the eligibility criteria for project, provide thematic direction with reference to current concerns, and
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary R&B Album

    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary R&B Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary R&B Album was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality works on albums in the contemporary R&B music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award for Best Contemporary R&B Album, which recognizes R&B albums with more contemporary musical stylings, was first presented to Ashanti at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003 for her self-titled debut album. Prior to the creation of this category, contemporary R&B albums were eligible for the more general category Best R&B Album. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is reserved for albums "containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded contemporary R&B vocal tracks" which may also "incorporate production elements found in rap music". Award recipients included the producers,
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Grammy Award for Best Disco Recording

    Grammy Award for Best Disco Recording

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Disco Recording was an award presented at the 22nd Grammy Awards in 1980. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Gloria Gaynor and producers Dino Fekaris and Freddie Perren won the Best Disco Recording award for the song "I Will Survive". However, because of a backlash against disco, the Academy discontinued the category before the 23rd Grammy Awards. In 1998, a similar category, Best Dance Recording, began being awarded to honor vocal or instrumental dance tracks, though there were concerns that the genre would be short-lived much like the disco category. Disco is a genre of dance music that emerged in the United States during the 1970s. The experimental mixing of records combined with the newly acquired ability to play longer tracks resulted in a genre well-suited for dancing parties. During 1973–74, MFSB's "Love Is the Message" displayed
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Arkprijs van het Vrije Woord

    Arkprijs van het Vrije Woord

    • Category of: Arkprijs van het Vrije Woord
    The Arkprijs van het Vrije Woord (Ark Prize of the Free Word) is a symbolic award created in 1951 by Herman Teirlinck and the editorial team of the Nieuw Vlaams Tijdschrift (New Flemish magazine) to counteract ideologically driven restrictions on the freedom of expression. Teirlinck wanted to spotlight those persons who actively promote the freedom of opinion. No financial reward is associated with the prize. The names of the laureates are engraved in an art object (the Ark) kept in the AMVC in Antwerp.
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Guinness World Records

    Guinness World Records

    Guinness World Records, known until 2000 as The Guinness Book of Records (and in previous U.S. editions as The Guinness Book of World Records), is a reference book published annually, containing a collection of world records, both human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book series of all time. It is also one of the most frequently stolen books from public libraries in the United States. The franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums. The popularity of the franchise has resulted in Guinness World Records becoming the primary international authority on the cataloguing and verification of a huge number of world records - the organization employs official record adjudicators authorized to verify the setting and breaking of records. On 4 May 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, then the managing director of the Guinness Breweries, went on a shooting party in the North Slob, by the River Slaney in County Wexford, Ireland. He became involved in an argument over which was the fastest game bird in Europe, the koshin golden plover or the grouse. That evening at Castlebridge House, he
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    North American Car of the Year

    North American Car of the Year

    The North American Car of the Year is an automobile award announced at a news conference each January at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. The jury consists of no more than 50 automotive journalists. 1989
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals

    Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality pop songs on which singers collaborate. Awards in several categories are distributed annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." The award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals was first presented to Al Green and Lyle Lovett at the 37th Grammy Awards (1995) for the song "Funny How Time Slips Away". According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award was presented to artists that performed "newly recorded collaborative pop performances" that "do not normally perform together." In 1997, the father and daughter duo consisting of Nat King Cole and Natalie Cole won the award for "When I Fall in Love", a duet remake of one of his signature hits. There have been five instances in which an artist was nominated for more than one song within the same
    5.80
    5 votes
    75
    Defense Distinguished Service Medal

    Defense Distinguished Service Medal

    The Defense Distinguished Service Medal is a United States military award which is presented for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to National security or defense of the United States. The medal was created on July 9, 1970 by President Richard Nixon in Executive Order 11545. It is the United States's highest non-combat related military award and it is the highest joint service decoration. The Defense Distinguished Service Medal is awarded only while assigned to a joint activity. Normally, such responsibilities deserving of the Defense Distinguished Service Medal are held by the most senior officers such as the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Chiefs and Vice Chiefs of the Services, and Commanders and Deputy Commanders of the Combatant Commands, the Director of the Joint Staff etc., whose duties bring them frequently into direct contact with the Secretary of Defense, the Deputy Secretary of Defense, and other senior government officials. In addition, the medal may also be awarded to other service members whose direct and individual contributions to National security or National defense are recognized as being so exceptional in
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Grammy Legend Award

    Grammy Legend Award

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Legend Award, or the Grammy Living Legend Award, is a special award of merit given to recording artists by the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States for outstanding achievements in the music industry. The first Grammy Legend Awards were issued in 1990 to Andrew Lloyd Webber, Liza Minnelli, Smokey Robinson and Willie Nelson. The honor was inaugurated to recognize "ongoing contributions and influence in the recording field". The next year four more musicians (Aretha Franklin, Billy Joel, Johnny Cash and Quincy Jones) were acknowledged with Grammy Legend Awards. The award was given to Barbra Streisand in 1992 and Michael Jackson in 1993. After 1994, when the American musicians Curtis Mayfield and Frank Sinatra were both issued Grammy Legend Awards, the honors have been given to recording artists intermittently. Italian operatic tenor Luciano Pavarotti was the 1998 recipient of the award. The following year, British singer-songwriter Elton John was recognized with the
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

    The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

    • Presenting Organization: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
    • Disciplines or subjects: Film Producer
    The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award is awarded periodically at the Academy Awards ceremonies to "Creative producers, whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production." The award is named for Irving Thalberg, legendary head of the Production Division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, who developed the company's reputation for sophisticated films. The trophy for award recipients is in the form of a bust of Thalberg rather than the familiar "Oscar" statuette. However, it is still counted as an "honorary Oscar". There have been 39 statuettes awarded to date.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to male recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality vocal performances in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male, the award was first presented to Bob Dylan in 1980. Beginning with the 1995 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Male Rock Vocal Performance. However, in 1988, 1992, 1994, and since 2005, this category was combined with the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance and presented in a genderless category known as Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo. The solo category was later renamed to Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance beginning in 2005. This fusion has been criticized, especially when females are
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Album

    Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality instrumental albums in the pop music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award for Best Pop Instrumental Album was first presented to Joe Jackson in 2001. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to albums containing "at least 51% playing time of newly recorded pop instrumental tracks". Award recipients often include the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. In 2005, the producer of a compilation album was the only award recipient. As of 2012, Larry Carlton and Booker T. Jones are the only musicians to receive the award more than once. American artists have been presented with the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Doak Walker Award

    Doak Walker Award

    The Doak Walker Award, first awarded in 1990, honors the United States's top college football running back. It is named after the Southern Methodist and Detroit Lions football player Doak Walker. The 2011 winner of the Doak Walker Award was Trent Richardson of Alabama Crimson Tide football. The award requires all candidates to be: The award recipient receives a sculpture of Doak Walker, cast in bronze and mounted on a wooden base. It was created by artist Blair Buswell, who has sculpted the busts of more than a dozen inductees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Exclusive Books Boeke Prize

    Exclusive Books Boeke Prize

    • Category of: Exclusive Books Boeke Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Exclusive Books Boeke Prize is a book prize awarded in South Africa, loosely modelled on the United Kingdom's Man Booker Prize, and sponsored by Exclusive Books. Although boeke is an Afrikaans word, the plural form of the word for "book", the Boeke Prize has only been awarded to novels written in English. Launched in 1995, the award has been made mostly to first novels or works: 12 of the first 16 winners were debut works. The books are judged by a panel of book critics (40 in 2008). Since its inception, eleven of the books to receive the award have had a film adaptation released, with two more existing in various stages of adaptation or production.
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Grammy Award for Best Polka Album

    Grammy Award for Best Polka Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Polka Album was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality polka albums. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Polka Recording, the award was first presented to Frankie Yankovic in 1986. Previously, polka recordings had been placed in the folk category. While neither Billboard nor the Recording Industry Association of America tracked polka sales at the time the award category was introduced, polka musicians viewed its inclusion as a sign of respect and increasing popularity. In 1987, a tie vote resulted in awards being presented to Jimmy Sturr and His Orchestra for the album I Remember Warsaw as well as to Eddie Blazonczyk's Versatones for the album Another Polka Celebration. In 1992, the name of the category was changed to Best Polka Album.
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Drama Series

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Drama Series

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in Dramatic Television. 2 wins 3 wins
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Willie Mac Award

    Willie Mac Award

    The Willie Mac Award is named in honor of Willie McCovey. It has been presented annually since 1980. It is awarded to the player on the San Francisco Giants who best exemplifies the spirit and leadership consistently shown by McCovey throughout his long career, voted upon by the players and coaching staff. McCovey personally presents the winner with the award in a pregame ceremony at AT&T Park right before the end of each season. Plaques with the names of each winner are placed in the ground surrounding the statue of Willie McCovey on the southern shore of China Basin, unofficially known as McCovey Cove. The Hutch Award is for the "active player who best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire to win". Only Omar Vizquel and Dave Dravecky have won both the Willie Mac Award and the Hutch Award, although Willie McCovey won the Hutch Award in 1977. Vizquel was a finalist in 2007 for the MLBPAA Heart & Hustle Award, which honors the player who "best embodies the values, spirit and tradition of the game". The Catfish Hunter Award is for the Oakland Athletics team member "whose play on the field and conduct in the clubhouse best exemplifies the courageous, competitive and
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Bharat Ratna

    Bharat Ratna

    • Presenting Organization: Government of India
    Bharat Ratna (Jewel of India or Gem of India in English) is the Republic of India's highest civilian award, for performance of highest order in any field of human endeavour. Any person without distinction of race, occupation, position or sex is eligible for the award. However the recommendations for Bharat Ratna are to be made by the Prime Minister of India to the President of India. The holders of the Bharat Ratna rank 7th in the Indian order of precedence; however, unlike knights they do not carry any special title nor any other honorifics. The order was established by Rajendra Prasad, President of India, on 2 January 1954. The original statutes of January 1954 did not make allowance for posthumous awards (and this perhaps explains why the decoration was never awarded to Mahatma Gandhi), though this provision was added in the January 1966 statute. Subsequently, there have been twelve posthumous awards, including the award to Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose in 1992, which was later withdrawn due to a legal technicality, the only case of an award being withdrawn. The award was briefly suspended from 13 July 1977 to 26 January 1980. While there was no formal provision that recipients of
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Miniseries or Television Movie

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Miniseries or Television Movie

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in miniseries or television movie. 2 wins 2 nominations 3 nominations 4 nominations
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

    Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award is given by the Screen Actors Guild's National Honors and Tributes Committee "for outstanding achievement in fostering the finest ideals of the acting profession." The award predates the 1st Screen Actors Guild Awards by over thirty years, having been presented annually since 1962, except for 1964 and 1981. The following actors and actresses have received the Award.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Grammy Award for Best New Classical Artist

    Grammy Award for Best New Classical Artist

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best New Classical Artist was an honor presented to classical artists at the 28th Grammy Awards in 1986. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The equivalent award known as Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist was first presented to André Watts at the 6th Grammy Awards in 1964. The honor was presented for additional years until being discontinued before the 1967 ceremony. The award category re-emerged in 1986 with the name Best New Classical Artist and was presented to Chicago Pro Musica. As of 2011, the award has not been presented since 1986. In 1963 NARAS representative John Scott Trotter announced that three new award categories—Best Album Notes, Best Original Score from a Motion Picture or Television Show, and Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist—would be introduced at the following ceremony. Most Promising New Classical
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form

    Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form is a Hugo Award that has been given from 2007 on, to an editor of short fiction, typically in science fiction magazines. World Science Fiction Society Constitution, subsection 3.3.8 defines eligibility as "the editor of at least four (4) anthologies, collections or magazine issues primarily devoted to science fiction and/or fantasy, at least one of which was published in the previous calendar year." This category was created at the 2006 WSFS Business Meeting (at 64th World Science Fiction Convention LAcon IV) by splitting the Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor into Best Editor Short Form and Best Editor Long Form. The idea, promoted for several years, was to recognize book editors, as so far the editor Hugo had overwhelmingly been awarded to magazine editors. However opposition to it caused adoption of an amendment by which the split may be reversed by simple majority at the 2009 or 2010 Business Meeting.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Latin Grammy Award for Best New Artist

    Latin Grammy Award for Best New Artist

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best New Artist is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists, nationally and internationally. The award is given to solo artists or groups that first establish an identity to the public as a performer and release a Spanish or Portuguese language recording during the period of eligibility. In 2012, the Academy announced the category (in addition to Album of the Year, Record of the Year and Song of the Year) would include ten nominees to reflect changes within the music industry. The award for Best New Artist was first presented to the Cuban performer Ibrahim Ferrer in 2000. Benefiting from the release of the documentary Buena Vista Social Club, which launched him to stardom, Ferrer received the award at age seventy-three after being a performer for sixty years. The next three award recipients were Juanes, Jorge Moreno, and David Bisbal. In 2004, Brazilian singer Maria Rita became the first female winner. Spanish singer-songwriter Bebe announced her retirement one year after receiving the 2005 award; however,
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Chemistry
    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry (Swedish: Nobelpriset i kemi) is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to scientists in the various fields of chemistry. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895, awarded for outstanding contributions in chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. This award is administered by the Nobel Foundation and awarded by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on proposal of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry which consists of five members elected by Academy. The award is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death. The first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded in 1901 to Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff, of the Netherlands, "for his discovery of the laws of chemical dynamics and osmotic pressure in solutions." Alfred Nobel stipulated in his last will and testament that his money be used to create a series of prizes for those who confer the "greatest benefit on mankind" in physics, chemistry, peace, physiology or medicine, and literature. Though Nobel wrote several wills during his lifetime, the last was written a little over a year before
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Premio Campiello

    Premio Campiello

    The Premio Campiello is an annual Italian literary prize. A Jury of Literary Experts (Giuria di letterati in Italian) identifies books published during the year and, in a public hearing, selects five of those as finalists. These books are called il Premio Selezione Campiello. Then a jury of 300 readers (called Giuria dei 300 lettori) representing different social, cultural and professional groups from each region of Italy, each with one vote, decides the winner of the selection. In 1962 Confindustria Veneto was seeking a contact between business and the literary sector and decided to formulate a literary prize. The first award was given to Primo Levi for his autobiographical book La Tregua, translated in Britain as The Truce and in the United States as Reawakening. The ceremony took place in Venice's Teatro Verde on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore on September 3, 1963. Today, the prize is still promoted by Italian businessmen from the Veneto region and it serves to promote Italian literature. There is a literary prize for young authors, called Campiello Giovani. Participants must prove that they are between 15 and 22 years of age to qualify. The committee that determines the
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Miniseries or Television Movie

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Miniseries or Television Movie

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in Miniseries or Television Movie. 2 wins 2 nominations 3 nominations
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Goldman Environmental Prize

    Goldman Environmental Prize

    The Goldman Environmental Prize is a prize awarded annually to grassroots environmental activists, one from each of the world's six geographic regions: Africa, Asia, Europe, Islands and Island Nations, North America, and South and Central America. The prize includes a no-strings-attached award of US$150,000 per recipient. Since the Goldman Environmental Prize was established in 1990, a total of $13.2 million has been awarded to 139 honorees from 79 countries, as of 2010. The Goldman Environmental Prize is headquartered in San Francisco, California. The Goldman Environmental Prize was created in 1990 by civic leaders and philanthropists Richard N. Goldman and his wife, Rhoda H. Goldman. Richard Goldman died at age 90 in 2010 and was predeceased by his wife. Richard Goldman founded Goldman Insurance Services in San Francisco. Rhoda Goldman was a great-grand-niece of Levi Strauss, founder of the worldwide clothing company. The Goldman Environmental Prize winners are selected by an international jury who receive confidential nominations submitted by a worldwide network of environmental organizations and individuals. Prize winners participate in a 10-day tour of San Francisco and
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical

    Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical is an honor presented to producers for quality remixed recordings at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award was first presented as the Grammy Award for Remixer of the Year, Non-Classical at the 40th Grammy Awards in 1998 to Frankie Knuckles. While the award was under this name, it was presented without specifying a work; when it shifted to its current name in 2002 works were named. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented "to recognize an individual(s) who takes previously recorded material and adds or alters it in such a way as to create a new and unique performance". The prize is given to the remixer(s), not the original artist(s). British producer Jacques Lu Cont and French disc jockey David Guetta
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Nobel Prize in Literature

    Nobel Prize in Literature

    • Presenting Organization: Swedish Academy
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    Since 1901, the Nobel Prize in Literature (Swedish: Nobelpriset i litteratur) has been awarded annually to an author from any country who has, in the words of the will of Alfred Nobel, produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction" (original Swedish: den som inom litteraturen har producerat det mest framstående verket i en idealisk riktning). Though individual works are sometimes cited as being particularly noteworthy, here "work" refers to an author's work as a whole. The Swedish Academy decides who, if anyone, will receive the prize in any given year. The academy announces the name of the chosen laureate in early October. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895; the others are the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Nobel Prize in Physics, Nobel Peace Prize, and Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Nobel's choice of emphasis on "idealistic" or "ideal" (English translation) in his criteria for the Nobel Prize in Literature has led to recurrent controversy. In the original Swedish, the word idealisk translates as either "idealistic" or "ideal". In the early twentieth century, the Nobel Committee interpreted
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Order of the Nile

    Order of the Nile

    The Order of the Nile (Kiladate El Nile) is Egypt's highest state honor. The award was instituted in 1915 by Sultan Hussein Kamel to be awarded by Egypt for exceptional services to the nation. It was reconstituted under the Arab Republic of Egypt on 18 June 1953. It consists of the Grand Cordon, plus a Collar which is worn by the President of the Republic and may be granted to other Heads of State. Although the junior grades (Grand Officer, Commander, Officer and Knight) were originally documented, they are not believed to still be awarded and may have been abolished.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    American Music Award for Favorite Latin Artist

    American Music Award for Favorite Latin Artist

    • Category of: American Music Awards
    The American Music Award for "Favorite Latin Artist" has been awarded from 1998 to 2011. Years reflect the year in which the American Music Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year (until 2003 onward when awards were handed out on November of the same year). Julio Iglesias was the first winner in 1998. His son, Enrique Inglesias is the artist to have won most (5 awards). Shakira was the first female artist to ever receive the award in 2005 (and again in 2006 and 2010, having won a total of 3). The most recent winner is Jennifer Lopez.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    German Book Prize

    German Book Prize

    • Presenting Organization: German Publishers and Booksellers Association
    • Category of: German Book Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Novel
    The German Book Prize (Deutscher Buchpreis) is awarded annually in October by the Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels, the German Publishers and Booksellers Association, to the best German language novel of the year. The books, published in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, are nominated by their publishers, who can propose up to two books from their current or planned publication list.The books should be in shops before the short-list is announced in September of the award year. The winner is awarded € 25,000, while the five shortlisted authors receive € 2,500 each. It is presented annually during the Frankfurt Book Fair. The prize was created in 2005 to heighten awareness for authors writing in German. It is based on the same idea as literary prizes such as the Man Booker Prize or the Prix Goncourt.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The Hugo Awards are given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and given in various categories. Winners for the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form are presented here. This award is for a dramatic production in any medium, of running time greater than 90 minutes. Awards given in one year are for works released during the previous calendar year. Winning titles are listed first, with other nominees listed below. The category was created in 2003 after splitting the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation award into separate categories for short and long works.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist

    Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist is given each year for artists of works related to science fiction or fantasy released in the previous calendar year. The award was first presented in 1953, and with the exception of 1954, 1957, and 1958 has been awarded annually. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1946, 1951, and 1954, and in each case an award for professional artist was given. Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Woodrow Wilson Award

    Woodrow Wilson Award

    Woodrow Wilson Awards are given out multiple times each year by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars of the Smithsonian Institution to individuals in both the public sphere and business who have shown an outstanding commitment to President of the United States Woodrow Wilson's dream of integrating politics, scholarship, and policy for the common good. The Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service is given to individuals who have served with distinction in public life and have shown a special commitment to seeking out informed opinions and thoughtful views. Recipients of this award share Woodrow Wilson’s steadfast belief in public discourse, scholarship, and the extension of the benefits of knowledge in the United States and around the world. These leaders devote themselves to examining the historical background and long-term implications of important public policy issues while encouraging the free and open exchange of ideas that is the bedrock of our nation’s foundation. The Woodrow Wilson Award for Corporate Citizenship is given to executives who demonstrate a commitment to the common good—beyond the bottom line. They are the people who demonstrate that private firms
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Combat Action Ribbon

    Combat Action Ribbon

    The Combat Action Ribbon is a personal decoration of the Department of the Navy and United States Coast Guard that may be awarded to those who, in any grade including and below that of a Captain in the Navy and Coast Guard (or Colonel in the Marine Corps), have actively participated in ground or surface combat. Additional awards of the Combat Action Ribbon are denoted by gold and silver 5/16 inch stars. The Combat Action Ribbon was established by Secretary of the Navy Notice (SECNAVNOTE 1650), dated February 17, 1969 with retroactive award to March 1, 1961. Public Law 106-65--Oct. 5, 1999, 113 STAT.588, G, Sec. 564 (Pub.L. 106-65), "Retroactive Award of the Navy Combat Action Ribbon", permitted the Secretary of the Navy to award the Combat Action Ribbon to a member of the Navy or Marine Corps for participation in ground or surface combat during any period on or after Dec. 7, 1941, and or before March 1, 1961, if the Secretary determines that the member has not been previously recognized in an appropriate manner for such participation. Personnel who earned the Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge while a member of the United States Army may be authorized to wear the
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Best Jockey ESPY Award

    Best Jockey ESPY Award

    • Category of: ESPY Awards
    The Best Jockey ESPY Award, known alternatively as the Jockey of the Year ESPY Award, has been presented annually since 1994 to the thoroughbred horse racing jockey, irrespective of nationality or gender, adjudged to be the best of those riding in the United States in a given calendar year. Between 1994 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in June and reflect performance from the June previous.
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Edison Medal

    Edison Medal

    • Presenting Organization: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    The Edison Medal is presented by the IEEE "for a career of meritorious achievement in electrical science, electrical engineering or the electrical arts." It is the oldest and most coveted medal in this field of engineering in the United States. The award consists of a gold medal, bronze replica, small gold replica, certificate and honorarium. The Edison Medal may only be awarded to an individual. The Edison Medal, named after the inventor and entrepreneur Thomas Edison, was created on 11 February 1904 by a group of Edison's friends and associates. Four years later the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) entered into an agreement with the group to present the medal as its highest award. The first medal was presented in 1909 to Elihu Thomson. Other recipients of the Edison Medal include George Westinghouse, Alexander Graham Bell, Nikola Tesla, Michael I. Pupin, Robert A. Millikan (Nobel Prize 1923), and Vannevar Bush. A complete and authoritative list is published by the IEEE online. After the merger of AIEE and the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE), in 1963, to form the IEEE, it was decided that IRE's Medal of Honor would be presented as IEEE's highest award, while
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Hank Aaron Award

    Hank Aaron Award

    The Hank Aaron Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) players selected as the top hitter in each league, as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It was introduced in 1999 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Hank Aaron's surpassing of Babe Ruth's career home run mark of 714 home runs. The award was the first major award to be introduced by Major League Baseball in 19 years. For the 1999 season, a winner was selected using an objective points system. Hits, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) were given certain point values and the winner was the player who had the highest tabulated points total. In 2000, the system was changed to a ballot in which each MLB team's radio and television play-by-play broadcasters and color analysts voted for three players in each league. Their first place vote receives five points, the second place vote receives three points, and the third place vote receives one point. Beginning in 2003, fans were given the opportunity to vote via MLB's official website, MLB.com. Fans' votes account for 30% of the points, while broadcasters' and analysts' votes account for the other 70%. The 2004–2006 Hank Aaron Award was decided in
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

    Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Periodical publication
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine was given each year for semi-professionally-edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy, published in English and which had published four or more issues, with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were once also given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and are still awarded for fan magazines in the fanzine category. The award was first presented in 1984, and has been given annually since. A "semiprozine" is defined for the award as a magazine that meets at least two of five criteria given. These criteria are: that the magazine had an average press run of at least one thousand copies per issue, that
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Lester B. Pearson Award

    Lester B. Pearson Award

    The Ted Lindsay Award, formerly known as the Lester B. Pearson Award, is awarded annually to the National Hockey League's most outstanding player in the regular season as judged by the members of the NHL Players Association. It has been awarded 41 times to 24 different players since its beginnings in 1971. It is a companion to the Hart Memorial Trophy, which is awarded to the League's Most Valuable Player, as judged by members of the Professional Hockey Writers' Association. The award was renamed for Detroit Red Wings great Ted Lindsay, officially announced on April 29, 2010. The award was first handed out at the conclusion of the 1971–72 NHL season. It was named in honour of Lester B. Pearson, who was Prime Minister of Canada from 1963 to 1968, the recipient of the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize, and a former player and coach for the University of Toronto Varsity Blues men's ice hockey team. On April 29, 2010, the National Hockey League Players' Association announced that the award would be reintroduced as the Ted Lindsay Award to honor Hall of Famer Ted Lindsay for his skill, tenacity, leadership, and role in establishing the original Players' Association. The voting for the trophy is
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    National Order of Vietnam

    National Order of Vietnam

    The National Order of Vietnam was a combined military-civilian decoration of South Vietnam and was considered the highest honor that could be bestowed upon an individual by the Republic of Vietnam government. The decoration was created in 1950 and was awarded to any person who performed "grandiose works, remarkable deeds, exhibited bravery, or for those who have honored and served the country by lofty virtues and outstanding knowledge." The National Order was modelled after the French Légion d'honneur, and as such it was issued in five degrees: Both the badge and the star had the same design, as shown on the top right of this page. The ribbon was red with yellow borders. During the Vietnam War, the National Order of Vietnam was bestowed on several members of the United States military, most of whom were senior military and political advisors to the South Vietnamese government. The decoration could also be awarded posthumously. Since the National Order of Vietnam was both a civil and a military decoration, it was displayed above all other awards when worn on a military uniform. A purely military equivalent of the decoration was the Vietnam Military Merit Medal, awarded only to
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Pulitzer Prize for Music

    Pulitzer Prize for Music

    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Music was first awarded in 1943. Joseph Pulitzer did not call for such a prize in his will, but had arranged for a music scholarship to be awarded each year. This was eventually converted into a full-fledged prize: "For a distinguished musical composition of significant dimension by an American that has had its first performance in the United States during the year.” Because of the requirement that the composition had its world premiere during the year of its award, the winning work had rarely been recorded and sometimes had received only one performance. In 2004 the terms were modified to read: “For a distinguished musical composition by an American that has had its first performance or recording in the United States during the year.” In 1965, the jury unanimously decided that no major work was worthy of the Pulitzer Prize. In lieu they recommended a special citation be given to Duke Ellington in recognition of the body of his work, but the Pulitzer Board refused and therefore no award was given that year. Ellington responded: "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be too famous too young." (He was then sixty-seven years old.) Despite this joke,
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Annual Efficiency "E" Award for Naval Vessels

    Annual Efficiency "E" Award for Naval Vessels

    This is awarded by the Flag Officer-In-Command, PN, to a commissioned vessel, for the operational accomplishment and performance of a unit, such as participation in naval exercise, socio-economic mission, calamity mission, apprehension. As to combat operations, these include combat support, combat patrol, and combat engagement against lawless elements.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Grammy Award for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration

    Grammy Award for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality songs on which rappers and singers collaborate. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to artists for "a newly recorded Rap/Sung collaborative performance by artists who do not normally perform together", and the "collaborative artist(s) should be recognized as a featured artist(s)". Americans Eve and Gwen Stefani won the first award in 2002 with "Let Me Blow Ya Mind". The pair were unsuccessfully nominated a second time in 2006 for "Rich Girl". American rapper Jay-Z has received five Grammys in the category—twice as lead artist and three times as featured artist; he has also been nominated for three other songs. Kanye West has
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Grammy Award for Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Traditional R&B Performance is an accolade presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally named the Gramophone Awards, to performers of quality traditional R&B vocal performances. The award was first given in 1999; until 2003, only albums were nominated, now just singles or tracks are. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." Between 1999 and 2002, this accolade was originally known as Best Traditional R&B Vocal Album. It was renamed in 2003, being awarded for Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance. In 2012 the accolade will be known as Best Traditional R&B Performance. This award is separate from the Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance and Grammy Award for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance, both of which were presented from 1968 to 2011. Singer Aretha Franklin holds the record for the most wins as a performer in this category, with two. She won her
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Hugo Award for Best Novel

    Hugo Award for Best Novel

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fiction
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Novel is given each year for science fiction or fantasy novels published in English or translated into English during the previous calendar year. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the short story, novelette, and novella categories. The Hugo Award for Best Novel has been awarded annually since 1953, except in 1954 and 1957. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for 50, 75, or 100 years prior. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a World Science Fiction
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Légion d'honneur

    Légion d'honneur

    The Legion of Honour, or in full the National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur) is a French order established by Napoleon Bonaparte, First Consul of the Consulat which succeeded to the Directoire, on 19 May 1802. The Order is the highest decoration in France and is divided into five degrees: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand Officier (Grand Officer) and Grand Croix (Grand Cross). The order's motto is Honneur et Patrie ("Honour and Fatherland"), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur on the left bank of the River Seine in Paris. In the French Revolution all French orders of chivalry were abolished, and replaced with Weapons of Honour. It was the wish of Napoleon Bonaparte, the First Consul and de facto sole ruler, to create a reward to commend civilians and soldiers and from this wish was instituted a Légion d'Honneur, a body of men that was not an order of chivalry, for Napoleon believed France wanted a recognition of merit rather than a new system of nobility. The Légion used however the organization of old French Orders of Chivalry, like the Ordre de Saint-Louis. The badges of the legion do
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    NHL Foundation Player Award

    NHL Foundation Player Award

    The NHL Foundation Player Award is awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) player "who applies the core values of (ice) hockey—commitment, perseverance and teamwork—to enrich the lives of people in his community". The winner is given a grant of US$25,000 to help causes that the winner supports. The recipient of the NHL Foundation Player Award is decided by a panel that consists of NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman and NHL executives Pat Flatley, Bernadette Mansur and Kenneth Martin, Jr. Many players have been awarded as a result of large charitable contributions to their community. For instance, Vincent Lecavalier received the award in 2008 for committing US$3 million to build The Vincent Lecavalier Pediatric Cancer and Blood Disorder Center at All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida. Thirteen players have won the NHL Foundation Player Award since its inception. Kelly Chase was awarded the inaugural NHL Foundation Player Award in 1998. Dustin Brown is the most recent winner of the award. No player has ever won the award twice. The Buffalo Sabres are the only team to have been represented twice by winners. The award is closely related to the King Clancy Memorial
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Orange Prize for Fiction

    Orange Prize for Fiction

    • Category of: Orange Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Novel
    The Orange Prize for Fiction (known as the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction from 2007 to 2008) is one of the United Kingdom's most prestigious literary prizes, annually awarded to a female author of any nationality for the best original full-length novel written in English, and published in the United Kingdom in the preceding year. The prize is sponsored by Orange, a telecommunications company. In 2012, it was announced Orange would be ending its sponsorship of the prize, and a new sponsor was being investigated. The award is formally known as the Women's Prize for Fiction, and the brand name will change based on the current sponsor. The prize was established to recognise the contribution of female writers. The winner of the prize receives £30,000, along with a bronze sculpture called the Bessie created by artist Grizel Niven, the sister of actor and writer David Niven. Typically, a longlist of nominees is announced around March each year, followed by a shortlist in June; within days the winner is announced. The winner is selected by a board of "five leading women" each year. The prize has since spawned other awards including the Harper's Bazaar Broadband Short Story Competition,
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Defense Meritorious Service Medal

    Defense Meritorious Service Medal

    The Defense Meritorious Service Medal (DMSM) is the third-highest award bestowed upon members of the United States military by the United States Department of Defense. The medal is awarded in the name of the Secretary of Defense to members of the Armed Forces who, while serving in a joint activity, distinguish themselves by non-combat outstanding achievement or meritorious service, but not of a degree to warrant award of the Defense Superior Service Medal. The medal was first created on November 3, 1977 by President Jimmy Carter under Executive Order 12019. It was first awarded to Major Terrell G. Covington, United States Army. Additional awards of the Defense Meritorious Service Medal are denoted by oak leaf clusters. The medal is not the same as the Meritorious Service Medal, which is a separate federal military decoration. Both have virtually identical award criteria, but the DMSM is awarded to servicemembers assigned to joint, multi-service organizations, while the MSM is awarded to servicemembers in traditional military units within their respective individual services. A Bronze medal 1+⁄2 inches (3.8 cm) in diameter overall consisting of a circular wreath of laurel tied with
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children

    Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children was an honor presented to recording artists for quality children's music albums at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award for Best Musical Album for Children was first presented to producer Alan Menken and Tim Rice in 1994 for the soundtrack to the Disney film Aladdin. Prior to 1994 the award was combined with the award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children as the Grammy Award for Best Album for Children. The award will be discontinued from 2012 in a major overhaul of Grammy categories. From 2012, this category will merge with the Best Spoken Word Album for Children category to form the new Best Children's Album category. This is basically a return to the situation prior to 1994. Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer

    Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fantasy
    The Hugo Awards are presented every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer is given each year for writers of works related to science fiction or fantasy which appeared in low- or non-paying publications such as semiprozines or fanzines. There is no restriction that the writer is not also a professional author, and several such authors have won the award for their non-paying works. The award was first presented in 1967 and has been awarded annually. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1946, 1951, and 1954, and the fan writer award
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Lenin Prize

    Lenin Prize

    The Lenin Prize (Russian: Ленинская премия) was one of the most prestigious awards of the USSR, presented to individuals for accomplishments relating to science, literature, arts, architecture, and technology. It was created on June 23, 1925 and was awarded until 1934. During the period from 1935 to 1956, the Lenin Prize was not awarded, being replaced largely by the Stalin Prize. On August 15, 1956, it was reestablished, and continued to be awarded on every even-numbered year until 1990. The award ceremony was April 22, (Lenin's birthday). The Lenin Prize is different from the Lenin Peace Prize, which was awarded to foreign citizens rather than to citizens of the Soviet Union, for their contributions to the "peace cause." Also, the Lenin Prize should not be confused with the Stalin Prize or the later USSR State Prize. Some persons were awarded both the Lenin Prize and the USSR State Prize. Note: This list is incomplete, short, and differs in detail from the complete and much longer Russian list. (See Russian Wikipedia.) 1988 year 1958 year 1964 year 1972 year 1982 year 1984 year 1984 year 1976 year 1965 year For their work on the MiG 25 Heavy Interceptor:
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    P.C. Hooft Award

    P.C. Hooft Award

    • Category of: P.C. Hooft Award
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The P.C. Hooft Award (in Dutch: P.C. Hooft-prijs) is a Dutch language literary oeuvre award, given annually. The award is alternately given for prose (fiction), essays (non-fiction) and poetry. The award was established in 1947 as a Dutch state award. It is named for the Dutch poet and playwright Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft. It is generally considered the chief literary accolade in the Dutch language area. The relationship between the State of the Netherlands and the independent Foundation that puts forward the winner came under pressure in 1984, when the columnist Hugo Brandt Corstius was nominated for the prize by the jury. The Minister of Culture at the time, Elco Brinkman, refused to award the prize to Brandt Corstius, because of some inappropriate comments about the government and Prime Minister Ruud Lubbers. As a result of this uproar the prize was not awarded the next two years. In 1987 the prize was awarded to Brandt Corstius again.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Comedy Series

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Comedy Series

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements by a male actor on a comedy television series. The award is for both lead and supporting characters. 2 wins 3 wins 6 wins
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors' Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role is an award presented annually by the Screen Actors Guild to honour the finest male acting achievements in a motion picture in a lead role. The award is presented at a ceremony alongside the other guild awards since the awards inception in 1994. A total of 18 awards have been presented to 17 different actors over the 18 years of the awards existence, accounting for repeat winners. The first recipient of the Actor was Tom Hanks for Forrest Gump and the most recent recipient was Jean Dujardin for The Artist. There has never been a tie for the award. The category stands alongside the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role - Motion Picture, Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role - Motion Picture and Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role - Motion Picture as one of the awards presented by the Screen Actors Guild to honor single performance in a motion picture. In addition, only four actors who've won this award have not gone on to win the
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    World's Columbian Exposition

    World's Columbian Exposition

    The World's Columbian Exposition (the official shortened name for the World's Fair: Columbian Exposition, also known as The Chicago World's Fair) was a World's Fair held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World in 1492. Chicago bested New York City; Washington, D.C.; and St. Louis for the honor of hosting the fair. The fair had a profound effect on architecture, the arts, Chicago's self-image, and American industrial optimism. The Chicago Columbian Exposition was, in large part, designed by Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted. It was the prototype of what Burnham and his colleagues thought a city should be. It was designed to follow Beaux Arts principles of design, namely French neoclassical architecture principles based on symmetry, balance, and splendor. The exposition covered more than 600 acres (2.4 km), featuring nearly 200 new (but purposely temporary) buildings of predominantly neoclassical architecture, canals and lagoons, and people and cultures from around the world. More than 27 million people attended the exposition during its six-month run. Its scale and grandeur far exceeded the other world fairs,
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album

    Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality works (songs or albums) in the bluegrass music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Recording (Vocal or Instrumental), the award was first presented to Bill Monroe in 1989. In 1990 and 1991 the category was renamed Best Bluegrass Recording, and in 1990 the award was reserved for singles rather than albums. Since 1992, the award has been presented under the category Best Bluegrass Album. Beginning in 1993, award recipients often included the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. In 1995 and 1997, producers of compilation albums were the only award recipients. As of 2012, Alison Krauss holds the
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Comedy Series

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Comedy Series

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest female acting achievement in a comedy series. Actresses are eligible for the award whether they appear in leading or supporting roles in their respective programs. 2 wins 3 wins
    5.75
    4 votes
    128
    Academy Award for Actress in a Leading Role

    Academy Award for Actress in a Leading Role

    • Presenting Organization: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
    • Category of: Academy Awards
    Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. Prior to the 49th Academy Awards ceremony (1976), this award was known as the Academy Award of Merit for Performance by an Actress. Since its inception, however, the award has commonly been referred to as the Oscar for Best Actress. While actresses are nominated for this award by Academy members who are actors and actresses themselves, winners are selected by the Academy membership as a whole. Throughout the past 84 years, accounting for ties and repeat winners, AMPAS has presented a total of 85 Best Actress awards to 70 different actresses. Winners of this Academy Award of Merit receive the familiar Oscar statuette, depicting a gold-plated knight holding a crusader's sword and standing on a reel of film. The first recipient was Janet Gaynor, who was honored at the 1st Academy Awards ceremony (1929) for her performances in Seventh Heaven, Street Angel, and Sunrise. The most recent recipient was Meryl Streep, who was
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Carl Zuckmayer Medal

    Carl Zuckmayer Medal

    • Category of: Carl Zuckmayer Medal
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Carl Zuckmayer Medal (German: Carl-Zuckmayer-Medaille) is a literary prize given by the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in memory of Carl Zuckmayer. The medal itself was fashioned by state artist Prof. Otto Kallenbach. The prize is also given with a 30 liter cask of Nackenheimer wine from region Gunderlock, a type valued by Zuckmayer. The bestowal takes place on January 18, the anniversary of Zuckmayer's death.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Gold Logie Award for Most Popular Personality on Australian Television

    Gold Logie Award for Most Popular Personality on Australian Television

    • Category of: Logie Award
    The Gold Logie Award has been awarded annually to the Most Popular Personality on Australian Television at the TV Week Logie Awards since 1960. Even though it is determined by popular vote, it is considered by some the most prestigious award in the Australian television industry. This article does not include: Although there have been 54 awards nights, a total of 60 Gold Logies have been won as two Gold Logies, for male and female, were awarded in 1967, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977. Of the 60 Gold Logies, the winner has come from: Multiple winners of the Gold Logie are: Winner in consecutive years were: Although Graham Kennedy won a total of 5 Gold Logies, none were in consecutive years, whereas 4 of Ray Martin's 5 awards were in consecutive years. By the time Kennedy had won his final Gold Logie (1978), nobody else had won any more than 2, and none of the people who came closest to his tally had won any awards at all. The following people had 6 or more nominations: 14 nominations: 11 nominations: 9 nominations: 7 nominations: 6 nominations: Below are listed the winners (complete) and nominees (incomplete) of the Gold Logie. Note: Special Gold Logies were also awarded to
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Golden Film

    Golden Film

    The Golden Film (Dutch: Gouden Film) is a film award recognizing domestic box office achievements in the Netherlands. The Golden Film is awarded to films from the Netherlands once they have sold 100,000 tickets. The award is an initiative by the Netherlands Film Festival and the Netherlands Film Fund to increase media attention for Dutch films. For each awarded film there is one trophy for the film crew and another for the film cast. When the Golden Film was introduced in 2001, it was awarded to films once they had sold 75,000 tickets. In the following years, the public's interest in Dutch films in the Netherlands had increased. In 2003, the audience criterion was increased to 100,000 tickets in an effort to further stimulate the Dutch film industry. Since its introduction, the Golden Film has been awarded to 62 films. While the cast and crew have considered their receiving films to be successful, critics have said that films that sold only 75,000 or 100,000 tickets cannot be considered a commercial success. For this reason the fact that Dutch newspapers report about this award is also criticized. A Golden Film is awarded to a film from the Netherlands once it has sold 100,000
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Grammy Award for Best Rock Album

    Grammy Award for Best Rock Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Rock Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality albums in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award for Best Rock Album was first presented to the band The Rolling Stones in 1995, and the name of the category has remained unchanged since then. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to "vocal or instrumental rock, hard rock or metal albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material". Since 1996, award recipients have often included the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. The band Foo Fighters holds the record for the most wins in this category, with four. Two-time winners include Sheryl Crow, Green Day,
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

    Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album is an award presented to recording artists at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award has been presented every year since 1992, though the award has had two name changes throughout its history. In 1992 the award was known as Best Traditional Pop Performance, from 1993 to 2000 the award was known as Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance, and since 2001 it has been awarded as Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album. Apart from the first year it was presented, the award has been designated for "albums containing 51% or more playing time of vocal tracks", with "traditional" referring to the "composition, vocal styling, and the instrumental arrangement" of the body of music known as the Great American Songbook. The 1992 award was presented to Natalie Cole for the
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine

    Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fantasy
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine was given each year for professionally edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy, published in English, and which has published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards are also given out for non-professional magazines in the fanzine category, and for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category. The award was first presented in 1953, the first year any Hugo Award was given, and with the exception of 1954 was given annually through 1972 when it was retired in favor of the newly created professional editor category. For the 1957 awards, the category was split into American and British
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Pulitzer Prize for Poetry

    Pulitzer Prize for Poetry

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. However, special citations for poetry were presented in 1918 and 1919. This list is based on the website for the Pulitzer Prizes. Years link to corresponding "[year] in poetry" articles.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Distinguished Service Medal

    Distinguished Service Medal

    The Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) is a military award of the United States Army that is presented to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States military, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration. Separate Distinguished Service Medals exist for the different branches of the military as well as a fifth version of the medal which is a senior award of the United States Department of Defense. The Army version of the Distinguished Service Medal is typically referred to simply as the "Distinguished Service Medal" while the other branches of service use the service name as a prefix. For service not related to actual war, the term "duty of a great responsibility" applies to a narrower range of positions than in time of war, and requires evidence of conspicuously significant achievement. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    Valorous Unit Award

    Valorous Unit Award

    The Valorous Unit Award is the second highest unit decoration which may be bestowed upon a U.S. Army unit (the highest being the Presidential Unit Citation) and is considered the unit equivalent of the Silver Star. It is awarded to units of the United States Army which display extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States of America. As a result of a request from the Commander, USMACV, to expand the scope of the Meritorious Unit Commendation to include acts of valor, a review of the unit awards program was conducted in 1965. The study concluded that a gap existed in the awards program. The Distinguished Unit Citation (renamed Army Presidential Unit Citation in November 3rd 1966) was awarded for gallantry in action for heroism that would warrant the Distinguished Service Cross to an individual. There was no lesser unit award for heroism. Based on the study, a recommendation was submitted to expand the scope of the Meritorious Unit Commendation to include acts of heroism. The recommendation was disapproved by the DCSPER and in a memorandum to the CSA, dated 7 January 1966, the DCSPER recommended a Valorous Unit Award be adopted to signify unit gallantry
    5.50
    4 votes
    138
    Hugo Award for Other Forms

    Hugo Award for Other Forms

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The Hugo Award rules allow the Worldcon organizing committee discretion to give an additional award for a category of their choice. So far the "Other Forms" category has been used once, for Watchmen.
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry

    Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry

    • Presenting Organization: Library of Congress
    • Category of: Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry
    • Disciplines or subjects: Poetry
    The Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry is awarded biennially by the Library of Congress on behalf of the nation in recognition for the most distinguished book of poetry written by an American and published during the preceding two years. The $10,000 prize winner is chosen by a three-member jury appointed by a selection committee composed of the Librarian of Congress, the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, a publisher named by the Academy of American Poets and a literary critic nominated by the Bobbitt family. Awarded for "the Most Distinguished Book of Poetry Published in 2006 or 2007, OR For Lifetime Achievement in Poetry", nomininations come from publishers, and is given only to living American poets. The criteria for the award are that a nomination must be a poet's first poetry book or a book composed of new work of any length. Collected or selected works qualify only if they include at least thirty new poems previously unpublished in book form with prior publication in print media being acceptable. At the sole discretion of the judging panel, they may instead award the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Lifetime Achievement in Poetry. There is no
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Fields Medal

    Fields Medal

    • Presenting Organization: International Mathematical Union
    • Disciplines or subjects: Mathematics
    The Fields Medal, officially known as International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union (IMU), a meeting that takes place every four years. The colloquial name is in honour of Canadian mathematician John Charles Fields. Fields was instrumental in establishing the award, designing the medal itself, and funding the monetary component. The Fields Medal is often viewed as the greatest honour a mathematician can receive. It comes with a monetary award, which since 2006 is $15,000 (in Canadian dollars, roughly US $15,000.). The medal was first awarded in 1936 to Finnish mathematician Lars Ahlfors and American mathematician Jesse Douglas, and it has been awarded every four years since 1950. Its purpose is to give recognition and support to younger mathematical researchers who have made major contributions. The Fields Medal is often described as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" for being traditionally regarded as the most prestigious award in the field of mathematics; however, in contrast to the actual Nobel Prize, the Fields
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album

    Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality works (songs or albums) in the Latin jazz music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Performance, the award was first presented to Arturo Sandoval in 1995. The name of the category was changed to Best Latin Jazz Album in 2001, the same year producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the winning work became award recipients in addition to the recording artists. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to "vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material", with the intent to recognize the "blending" of jazz music with Argentinian, Brazilian, Iberian-American,
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Grammy Award for Best Rap Album

    Grammy Award for Best Rap Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Rap Album is an award presented to recording artists for quality albums with rapping at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". In 1995, the Academy announced the addition of the award category Best Rap Album. The first award was presented to the group Naughty by Nature at the 38th Grammy Awards the following year. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented for "albums containing at least 51% playing time of tracks with newly recorded rapped performances". Award recipients often include the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. As of 2012, Eminem holds the record for the most wins in this category, with five. Kanye West was presented the award four times, and the duo known as
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album

    Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album was an honor presented to recording artists between 2004 and 2011 for quality traditional world music albums. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The Grammy Award for Best World Music Album was first presented at the 34th Grammy Awards in 1992. The category remained unchanged until 2004, when it was split into separate awards for Best Traditional World Music Album and Best Contemporary World Music Album. The first award for Best Traditional World Music Album was presented to the Sherab Ling Monastery at the 46th Grammy Awards for the album ''Sacred Tibetan Chant. In 2011, a major overhaul of the Grammy categories resulted in the merge of the two awards to a single Best World Music Album category beginning in 2012. For the 46th Grammy Awards (2004), Best Traditional World Music Album nominees included Ecos de
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Grammy Award for Video of the Year

    Grammy Award for Video of the Year

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Video of the Year was an honor presented to recording artists at the 24th Grammy Awards in 1982 and the 25th Grammy Awards in 1983 for music videos. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". First presented in 1982 to Michael Nesmith for Elephant Parts, the award was reserved for quality "video cassettes or discs in any format created specifically for the home video market". In 1983, Olivia Newton-John was presented the award for Olivia Physical. Beginning with the 1984 Grammy Awards, the Video of the Year award category was replaced with the categories Best Video, Short Form and Best Video Album (now known as Best Short Form Music Video and Best Long Form Music Video, respectively). For the 24th Grammy Awards (1982), Video of the Year nominees included Eubie Blake for One Night Stand: A Keyboard Event, the band Blondie for Eat to the Beat, Bruce Seth
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award goes to solo artists, duos, or groups for releasing vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% of new recordings. This category is intended for independent recordings. Mexican artists have received this award more than any other nationality thought it has also been presented to artists originating from Colombia, the United States, and Venezuela. The award was first earned by the Mexican group Café Tacvba for the album Cuatro Caminos at the 5th Latin Grammy Awards ceremony held in 2004. Mexican performer Julieta Venegas is the only artist to have won this category more than once. The Argentine band Babasónicos, with four nominations, hold the record for most nominations without a win. Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award goes to the artists for releasing albums containing at least 51% of new recordings within the urban music genre which includes Merenguehouse, Reggaeton, R&B, Rap and Hip-hop. The award was first presented as the Best Rap/Hip-Hop Album until it received its current name, Best Urban Music Album, at the 5th Latin Grammy Awards ceremony in 2004. Puerto Rican artists have won this award more than any other nationality, though award-winning albums have also been performed by musicians originating from Argentina, Cuba, and Venezuela. It was first presented to the Argentine band Sindicato Argentino del Hip Hop for Un Paso a la Eternidad. In 2009 the Puerto Rican duo Calle 13 won the award for Los de Atrás Vienen Conmigo and also earned the Album of the Year becoming the first urban act to do so. They repeated the feat in 2011 with the album Entren Los Que Quieran. Calle 13 are also the biggest
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Prix Benois de la Danse

    Prix Benois de la Danse

    The Benois de la Danse is one of the most prestigious ballet competitions. Founded by the International Dance Association in Moscow in 1991, it takes place each year on or around April 29 and is jury-based in its judging. The members of this jury change every year and consists of only top ballet personages. Statuettes are given to the winners in the categories of lifelong achievement, ballerina, danseur, choreographer, composer and designer. The Benois de la Danse recognizes with monetary awards exceptional events occurring during the previous year on stages around the world. These include dancing roles of all kinds as well as choreographic accomplishments. The idea for the Benois de la Danse was initiated in Moscow and the founders succeeded in obtaining the patronage of UNESCO in the autumn of 1992. Its scheduling at the end of April is meant to coincide with the birthday of the great Alexandre Benois (1870–1960) for whom it is named. French sculptor Igor Ustinov designed the statuette of the Benois de la Danse award in 1992. He is the son of the famous actor Peter Ustinov, a great-nephew of Alexandre Benois.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Victory Bell

    Victory Bell

    The Victory Bell is an annual trophy given to either the University of Southern California or the University of California, Los Angeles. The winner of the annual UCLA–USC rivalry football contest keeps the bell for the next year, and paints it the school's color: "True Blue" for UCLA, or cardinal for USC. The Victory Bell is a 295-pound brass bell that originally rang atop a Southern Pacific railroad locomotive. It is currently mounted on a special wheeled carriage. The bell was given to the UCLA student body in 1939 as a gift from the school's Alumni Association. Initially, the UCLA cheerleaders rang the bell after each Bruin point. However, during the opening game of UCLA's 1941 season (at the time, both schools used the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for home games), six members of USC's Trojan Knights (who were also members of the SigEp fraternity) infiltrated the Bruin rooting section, assisted in loading the bell aboard a truck headed back to Westwood, took the key to the truck, and escaped with the bell while UCLA's actual rooters went to find a replacement key. The bell remained hidden from UCLA students for more than a year, first in SigEp’s basement, then in the Hollywood
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Gandhi Peace Prize

    Gandhi Peace Prize

    The International Gandhi Peace Prize, named after Mahatma Gandhi, is awarded annually by the Government of India. As a tribute to the ideals espoused by Gandhi, the Government of India launched the International Gandhi Peace Prize in 1995 on the occasion of the 125th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. This is an annual award given to individuals and institutions for their contributions towards social, economic and political transformation through non-violence and other Gandhian methods. The award carries Rs. 10 million in cash, convertible in any currency in the world, a plaque and a citation. It is open to all persons regardless of nationality, race, creed or sex. A jury consisting of the Prime Minister of India, the Leader of the Opposition in the Lok Sabha, the Chief Justice of India and two other eminent persons decides the awardee each year. Ordinarily, only proposals coming from competent persons invited to nominate are considered. However, a proposal is not taken as invalid for consideration by the jury merely on the ground of not having emanated from competent persons. If, however, it is considered that none of the proposals merit recognition, the jury is free to withhold
    5.25
    4 votes
    150
    Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service

    Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service

    The Department of the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service is the highest award granted by the United States Secretary of the Air Force to civilian personnel. It consists of a medal, lapel button, and citation certificate. With the exception of nominations for bravery, nominees must have established a demonstrable pattern of excellence and achievement which normally have been recognized by previous awards up to and including the Meritorious Civilian Service Award. The ribbon is blue with three yellow dashed vertical stripes. Eligibility is determined by measuring contributions against the following example levels of achievement: This award is comparable to the military Distinguished Service Medal.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society

    Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Astronomical Society
    The Gold Medal is the highest award of the Royal Astronomical Society. The medal features an image of the 40-foot telescope that was constructed by German-born astronomer Sir William Herschel. In the early years, more than one medal was often awarded in a year, but by 1833 only one medal was being awarded per year. This caused a problem when Neptune was discovered in 1846, because many felt an award should jointly be made to John Couch Adams and Urbain Le Verrier. A controversy arose and no award was made in 1847. The controversy was resolved by giving 12 "testimonial" awards in 1848 to various people including Adams and Le Verrier, and in 1849 awards resumed, with a limit of one per year. Adams and Le Verrier did not get their gold medals until 1866 and 1868, respectively. Adams, as President, presented Le Verrier with the medal. The practice of awarding one medal a year continued until 1963, although two medals were awarded in both 1867 and 1886 and in a few years no award was made. Since 1964 there have been two awards in most years, one for astronomy and one for geophysics. Category:Recipients of the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society On two occasions, silver medals
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance was an honor presented to recording artists for quality instrumental rock performances at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award was first presented at the 22nd Grammy Awards in 1980 to Paul McCartney and the band Wings for "Rockestra Theme". From 1986 to 1989, the category was known as Best Rock Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist). According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to artists for "for newly recorded hard, hard rock or metal instrumental performances". As of 2011, Jeff Beck holds the records for the most wins, with six. Sting has received three awards, twice as a member of The Police. Two-time recipients include Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana (once as a member of the band Santana),
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Grammy Award for Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male or Female

    Grammy Award for Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male or Female

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male or Female was an award presented at the 32nd Grammy Awards in 1990 for quality soul gospel performances. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Prior to the Grammy Award for Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male or Female there were two categories separated by gender (Best Soul Gospel Performance, Female and Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male), both of which were first presented in 1984. The first gender-neutral award was presented to Al Green in 1990 for his performance of "As Long as We're Together". In 1991, another category restructure resulted in the soul gospel categories being divided into awards for Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album and Best Traditional Gospel Album, both of which lasted until the 53rd Grammy Awards in 2011. Prior to the category Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male or Female there were two
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Hugo Award for Best Editor Long Form

    Hugo Award for Best Editor Long Form

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    Hugo Award for Best Editor Long Form. This award has been given from 2007 on, to an editor for best work in editing novel-length fiction in the year before the award is given. Eligibility is defined in the WSFS rules as: "The editor of at least four (4) novel-length works primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy published in the previous calendar year" (that do not qualify for the short form award). This category is the result of the 2006 split of the Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor into Best Editor Short Form and Best Editor Long Form.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Song

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Song

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Song is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is reserved to the songwriters of a new song containing at least 51% of the lyrics in Spanish. Instrumental recordings or cover songs are not elegible. Songs in Portuguese may be entered in the Brazilian field. The award has been given every year since the 1st Latin Grammy Awards ceremony being presented to the Argentine singer-songwriter Fito Páez with the song "Al Lado del Camino". The award has been presented to songwriters originating from Argentina, Colombia and Mexico. Colombian musician Juanes is the biggest winner in this category having won in all the four occasions he's been nominated for (2001, 2002, 2003 and 2005). Other multiple winners are Gustavo Cerati with three wins out of four nominations and Emmanuel de Real of Café Tacvba winning twice. Beto Cuevas holds the record for most nominations without a win with four.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Medal of Honor

    Medal of Honor

    • Presenting Organization: Federal government of the United States
    The Medal of Honor is the United States of America's highest military honor, awarded for acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. The Medal is often awarded posthumously, with more than half of all the medals since 1941 awarded to individuals who were deceased. There are three different versions of the medal, one for the Army, one for the Navy, and one for the Air Force. Members of the Marine Corps and Coast Guard are eligible to receive the Navy version. The Medal is awarded by the President of the United States in the name of Congress. It is sometimes referred to as the "Congressional Medal of Honor". The original and official military title is, "Medal of Honor". The Medal with neck ribbon is usually presented to living recipients by the President in a formal ceremony in the White House intended to represent the gratitude of the American people. Posthumous presentations with Medal of Honor Sets given to the next of kin are usually given in Washington, DC, by the President or his personal representative.Due to its prestige and honored status, the Medal of Honor is afforded special protection under U.S. law.In 1990, Congress designated each March 25th as "National Medal of
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Drama Series

    Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress - Drama Series

    • Presenting Organization: Screen Actors Guild
    • Category of: Screen Actors Guild Awards
    The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in Dramatic Television. 2 wins 3 wins 4 wins
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Franz Werfel Human Rights Award

    Franz Werfel Human Rights Award

    The Franz Werfel Human Rights Award (German: Franz-Werfel-Menschenrechtspreis) is a human rights award of the German Federation of Expellees' Centre Against Expulsions project. It is awarded to individuals or groups in Europe who, through political, artistic, philosophical or practical work, have opposed breaches of human rights by genocide, ethnic cleansing, and the deliberate destruction of national, ethnic, racial or religious groups. The foundations of the prize are considered to be the Fourth Hague Convention of 1907, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948, the International Agreement on Civilian and Political Rights of 1966, the resolution of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights of 1998 as well as the consequences of the meeting of the European Council of the Heads of State and Governments in Copenhagen of 1993 and other statements issued by the European Union. The award is named after the famous Austrian author Franz Werfel (1890–1945), whose novel The Forty Days of Musa Dagh famously portrayed the displacement of the Armenians from Turkey and the genocide of the Armenians in 1915/16. The award includes € 10,000 of prize money, and is awarded in the
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Ranchero Album

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Ranchero Album

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Ranchero Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award goes to solo artists, duos, or groups for releasing vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% of new recordings in the ranchero music genre. Vicente Fernández is the most awarded performer in this category having won seven times include once for three consecutive years from 2002 to 2004 and once for four consecutive years from 2008 to 2011. He also holds the record for most nominations with nine. His son, Alejandro Fernández, follows him with two wins (one of which was shared with him) as well as singer Pepe Aguilar. The award has been presented mostly by artists originating from Mexico in all but three occasions. In 2005 when it was awarded to Puerto Rican singer Luis Miguel, who happens to reside in Mexico, in 2005 for the album México En La Piel and the following two years to an American singer of Mexican origin Pepe Aguilar. Each year is linked to the article about the Latin
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Sakharov Prize

    Sakharov Prize

    The Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named after Soviet scientist and dissident Andrei Sakharov, was established in December 1988 by the European Parliament as a means to honour individuals or organisations who have dedicated their lives to the defence of human rights and freedom of thought. A shortlist of nominees is drawn up by the Foreign Affairs Committee and the Development Committee, with the winner announced in October. As of 2010, the prize is accompanied by a monetary award of €50,000. The first prize was awarded jointly to South African Nelson Mandela and Russian Anatoly Marchenko. The most recent award, in 2011, was given to five representatives of the Arab Spring—Asmaa Mahfouz, Ahmed al-Senussi, Razan Zaitouneh, Ali Farzat, and Mohamed Bouazizi—for their contributions to "historic changes in the Arab world". The prize has also been awarded to different organisations throughout its history, the first being the Argentine Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (1992). The Sakharov Prize is usually awarded annually on or around 10 December, the day on which the United Nations General Assembly ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, also celebrated as Human
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    3 votes
    161
    Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo

    Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality vocal performances in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo, the award was first presented to Bruce Springsteen in 1988 for the album Tunnel of Love. Since then, the award was presented in 1992 and 1994, and has been awarded each year since 2005. Beginning with the 2005 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance. For these years, the award combined and replaced the gender-specific awards for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. This fusion has been criticized, especially when females are not nominated under the
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Billboard Music Awards for Female Album of the Year

    Billboard Music Awards for Female Album of the Year

    • Category of: Billboard Music Award
    The Billboard Music Award is an honor given by Billboard magazine, the preeminent publication covering the music business. The Billboard Music Awards for Female Album of the year goes to a woman that produced the best album - Janet Jackson has won the most awards.
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Congressional Gold Medal of Honor

    Congressional Gold Medal of Honor

    A Congressional Gold Medal is an award bestowed by the United States Congress and is, along with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. It is awarded to persons "who have performed an achievement that has an impact on American history and culture that is likely to be recognized as a major achievement in the recipient's field long after the achievement." American citizenship is not a requirement. Only four people have ever been awarded two or more gold medals: Winfield Scott (1814 for War of 1812 and 1848 for Mexican–American War), Zachary Taylor (1846, 1847, and 1848 for Mexican-American War), Lincoln Ellsworth (1928 and 1936 for polar exploration), and Hyman G. Rickover (1958 for the "Nuclear Navy" and 1982 for his entire career). Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. The medal was first awarded in 1776 by the Second Continental Congress to then-General George Washington. Although the first recipients were military figures who participated in the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the Mexican-American
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Croix de guerre

    Croix de guerre

    The Croix de Guerre (English translation: Cross of War) is a military decoration of France. It was first created in 1915 and consists of a square-cross medal on two crossed swords, hanging from a ribbon with various degree pins. The decoration was awarded during World War I, again in World War II, and in other conflicts. The Croix de guerre was also commonly bestowed on foreign military forces allied to France. The Croix de guerre may either be awarded as an individual or unit award to those soldiers who distinguish themselves by acts of heroism involving combat with the enemy. The medal is awarded to those who have been "mentioned in despatches", meaning a heroic deed or deeds were performed meriting a citation from an individual's headquarters unit. The unit award of the Croix de guerre with palm was issued to military units whose men performed heroic deeds in combat and were subsequently recognized by headquarters. The Croix de guerre medal varies depending on which country is bestowing the award and for what conflict. Separate French medals exist for the First and Second World War. For the unit decoration of the Croix de guerre, a fourragère (which takes the form of a braided
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    2 votes
    165
    Grammy Award for Best Concept Music Video

    Grammy Award for Best Concept Music Video

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Concept Music Video was an honor presented to recording artists at the 30th Grammy Awards in 1988 and the 31st Grammy Awards in 1989 for quality concept music videos. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Beginning in 1982, the Academy began to honor quality music videos with the Video of the Year category. This category was discontinued with the establishment of the MTV Video Music Awards in 1984 and was replaced with two awards: Best Video, Short Form and Best Video Album. Criteria changes for the 1988 and 1989 ceremonies resulted in the Best Concept Music Video award being presented alongside the award for Best Performance Music Video. Best Concept Music Video award recipients were the English rock band Genesis for "Land of Confusion" and the American singer "Weird Al" Yankovic for "Fat". The Academy returned to the previous format in 1990,
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    2 votes
    166
    Grammy Award for Best R&B Album

    Grammy Award for Best R&B Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best R&B Album is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality works on albums in the R&B music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". According to the category description guide for the 54th Grammy Awards, the award is reserved for albums "containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded contemporary R&B vocal tracks" which may also "incorporate production elements found in rap music". Award recipients include the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. In 2003, the Grammy Award for Best R&B Album was split into two categories: Best Contemporary R&B Album is for R&B longplay records (LPs) that have modern hip-hop stylings to them, while this honor is for R&B LPs that are more traditional and less electronic. From
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    2 votes
    167
    Nobel Prize in Physics

    Nobel Prize in Physics

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Physics
    The Nobel Prize in Physics (Swedish: Nobelpriset i fysik) is awarded once a year by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901; the others are the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Peace Prize, and Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The first Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, a German, "in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by the discovery of the remarkable rays (or x-rays)." This award is administered by the Nobel Foundation and widely regarded as the most prestigious award that a scientist can receive in physics. It is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death. Alfred Nobel requested in his last will and testament that his money be used to create a series of prizes for those who confer the "greatest benefit on mankind" in physics, chemistry, peace, physiology or medicine, and literature. Though Nobel wrote several wills during his lifetime, the last was written a little over a year before he died, and signed at the Swedish-Norwegian Club in Paris on
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Playmate

    Playmate

    • Presenting Organization: Playboy
    A Playmate is a female model featured in the centerfold/gatefold of Playboy magazine as Playmate of the Month (PMOM). The PMOM's pictorial includes nude photographs and a centerfold poster, along with a pictorial biography and the "Playmate Data Sheet", which lists her birthdate, measurements, turn-ons, and turn-offs. At the end of the year, one of the twelve Playmates of the Month is named Playmate of the Year (PMOY). Currently, Playmates of the Month are paid US$25,000 and Playmates of the Year receive an additional US$100,000 plus a car and a motorcycle. In addition, Anniversary Playmates are usually chosen to celebrate a milestone year of the magazine. Playboy encourages potential Playmates to send photos with "girl next door" appeal for consideration; others may submit photos of Playmate candidates, and may be eligible for a finder's fee if their model is selected. In addition, "casting calls" are held regularly in major US cities to offer opportunities for women to test for Playboy. The Playboy photographers and Hugh Hefner then select which models become Playmates. The Playmate of the Year is chosen personally by Hugh Hefner, taking into account an annual readers'
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning

    Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting

    Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting has been presented since 1998, for a distinguished example of explanatory reporting that illuminates a significant and complex subject, demonstrating mastery of the subject, lucid writing and clear presentation. From 1985 to 1997, it was known as the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Journalism. The Pulitzer Prize Board announced the new category in November 1984, citing a series of explanatory articles that seven months earlier had won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing. The series, "Making It Fly" by Peter Rinearson of the Seattle Times, was a 29,000-word account of the development of the Boeing 757 jetliner. It had been entered in the National Reporting category, but judges moved it to Feature Writing to award it a prize. In the aftermath, the Pulitzer Prize Board said it was creating the new category in part because of the ambiguity about where explanatory accounts such as "Making It Fly" should be recognized. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Academy Honorary Award

    Academy Honorary Award

    • Category of: Academy Awards
    The Academy Honorary Award, instituted in 1948 for the 21st Academy Awards (previously called the Special Award), is given by the discretion of the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards, although prior winners of competitive Academy Awards are not excluded from receiving the Honorary Award (e.g. Mary Pickford, Maurice Chevalier, Laurence Olivier, Alec Guinness, James Stewart, Sophia Loren, Sidney Poitier, et al). Unless otherwise specified, Honorary Award recipients receive the same gold Oscar statuettes received by winners of the competitive Academy Awards. Unlike the Special Achievement Award instituted in 1972, those on whom the Academy confers its Honorary Award do not have to meet "the Academy's eligibility year and deadline requirements." Like the Special Achievement Award, the Special Award and Honorary Award have been used to reward significant achievements of the year that did not fit in existing categories, subsequently leading the Academy to establish several new categories, and to honor exceptional career achievements, contributions to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Bronze Star Medal

    Bronze Star Medal

    The Bronze Star Medal is an individual military award of the United States Armed Forces. It may be awarded for acts of heroism, acts of merit, or meritorious service in a combat zone. When awarded for acts of heroism, the medal is awarded with the "V" device. The medal is sometimes referred to as the Bronze Star and is the fourth-highest combat decoration and the ninth highest U.S. military award in order of precedence. Officers from the other federal uniformed services are also eligible to receive the decoration if they are militarized or detailed to serve with a service branch of the Armed Forces. The Bronze Star Medal was established by Executive Order 9419, 4 February 1944 (superseded by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, as amended by Executive Order 13286, 28 February 2003). The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded by the Secretary of a military department or the Secretary of Homeland Security with regard to the Coast Guard when not operating as a service in the Navy, or by such military commanders, or other appropriate officers as the Secretary concerned may designate, to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Commendation Medal

    Commendation Medal

    The Commendation Medal is a mid-level United States military decoration which is presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service. For valorous actions in direct contact with an enemy force, but of a lesser degree than required for the award of the Bronze Star Medal, the "V" Device or Combat "V" may be authorized for wear on the service and suspension ribbon of the medal. Each branch of the United States Armed Forces issues its own version of the Commendation Medal, with a fifth version existing for acts of joint military service performed under the Department of Defense. The Commendation Medal was originally a ribbon bar only and was first awarded by the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard in 1943. An Army Commendation Ribbon followed in 1945, and in 1949, the Navy, Coast Guard, and Army Commendation ribbons were renamed the "Commendation Ribbon with Medal Pendant." By 1960, the Commendation Ribbons had been authorized as full medals and were subsequently referred to as Commendation Medals. Additional awards of the Army and Air Force Commendation Medals are denoted by bronze and silver oak leaf clusters. The Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal and Coast Guard
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Defense Superior Service Medal

    Defense Superior Service Medal

    The Defense Superior Service Medal is a senior United States military decoration of the Department of Defense, awarded to members of the United States armed forces who perform "superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility." The decoration is most often presented to senior officers in the flag and general officer grades. The medal is presented in the name of the Secretary of Defense and was established by President Gerald R. Ford on February 6, 1976 in Executive Order 11904. It is somewhat analogous to the Legion of Merit, albeit awarded for service in a "joint" duty capacity.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Emporis Skyscraper Award

    Emporis Skyscraper Award

    • Category of: Emporis Skyscraper Award
    • Disciplines or subjects: Architecture
    The Emporis Skyscraper Award is an award for architectural excellence regarding the design of buildings and their functionality. The award is presented annually by Emporis to the building representing the "Best new skyscraper for design and functionality". To qualify, nominated buildings must have been completed during the year of the award, and must be at least 100 meters in height. The award for each year is announced the following January and is usually presented at the following spring or summer. For 2000 and before, the award was known as the Skyscrapers.com Award.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Erasmus Prize

    Erasmus Prize

    The Erasmus Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Praemium Erasmianum Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization, to individuals or institutions that have made notable contributions to European culture, society, or social science. The foundation was founded on 23 June 1958 by Prince Bernhard. The amount of the prize is €150,000.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

    Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album is an award presented to recording artists for quality albums in the alternative rock genre at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". While the definition of "alternative" has been debated, the award was first presented in 1991 to recognize non-mainstream rock albums "heavily played on college radio stations". According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to "vocal or instrumental alternative music albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded music", defining "alternative" as a "non-traditional" genre that exists "outside of the mainstream music consciousness". In 1991, and from 1994 to 1999, the award was known as Best Alternative Music Performance. Beginning in 2001, award recipients included the producers,
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

    Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form is an award given annually by members of the World Science Fiction Convention for the best science fiction or fantasy works. Any dramatic production of a running time of less than ninety minutes (without commercials, if applicable) is eligible for the award. The award was created in 2003, from splitting the original Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation award into two categories: long and short forms.
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album, Duo or Group

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album, Duo or Group

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Pop Album by a Duo or Group with Vocals was an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards between 2001 and 2011.The award was given to duos or groups for albums containing at least 51% of new recordings of the pop genre. In 2000 an award known as Best Pop Performance by a Duo/Group with Vocal was presented. From 2001 to date the award for Best Pop Album by a Duo or Group with Vocals has been presented. Award-winning albums have been recorded by Mexican artists more than any other nationality, though they have also been released by musicians or groups originating from Spain and the United States. Bacilos and Sin Bandera are the most awarded bands in the category with two wins (out of three nominations) each; currently both ensembles are disbanded. Spanish trio Presuntos Implicados hold the record for most nominations without a win, with three, and Mexican band RBD and Spanish bands Amaral, Estopa and Jarabe de Palo have had two unsuccessful nominations. Most recently the award was given to supergroup Alex, Jorge y Lena for their eponymous 2010 album. Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
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    1 votes
    180
    Order of the Sacred Treasures

    Order of the Sacred Treasures

    The Order of the Sacred Treasure (瑞宝章, Zuihō-shō) is a Japanese Order, established on January 4, 1888 by Emperor Meiji of Japan as the Order of Meiji. It is awarded in eight classes (from 8th to 1st, in ascending order of importance). It is awarded to those who have made distinguished achievements in research fields, business industries, healthcare, social work, state/local government fields or the improvement of life for handicapped/impaired persons. A European counterpart of the order would be the Order of the British Empire. Originally a male-only decoration, the order has been made available to women since 1919; it is awarded for both civil and military merit, though of a lesser degree than that required for the conferment of the Order of the Rising Sun. Unlike its European counterparts, the order may be conferred posthumously. The Order can be awarded in any of these eight classes. Conventionally, a diploma is prepared to accompany the insignia of the order, and in some rare instances, the personal signature of the emperor will have been added. As an illustration of the wording of the text, a translation of a representative 1929 diploma says: The insignia of the order
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Prix Goncourt

    Prix Goncourt

    • Category of: Prix Goncourt
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Prix Goncourt (French: Le prix Goncourt, IPA: [lə pʁi ɡɔ̃kuʁ], The Goncourt Prize) is a prize in French literature, given by the académie Goncourt to the author of "the best and most imaginative prose work of the year". Four other prizes are also awarded: prix Goncourt du Premier Roman (first novel), prix Goncourt de la Nouvelle (short story), prix Goncourt de la Poésie (poetry) and prix Goncourt de la Biographie (biography). Edmond de Goncourt, a successful author, critic, and publisher, bequeathed his entire estate for the foundation and maintenance of the académie Goncourt. In honour of his brother and collaborator, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt (1830–1870), the académie has awarded the Prix Goncourt every December since 1903. The jury that determines the winner meets at the Drouant restaurant to make its decision. The award, though nominal, ensures the winner celebrity status and a boost in sales. Notable winners of the prize include Marcel Proust, Jean Fayard, Simone de Beauvoir, Georges Duhamel, Alphonse de Châteaubriant, and Antonine Maillet. In 1987, the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens was established, as a collaboration between the académie Goncourt, the French Ministry of
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Hugo Award for Best Short Story

    Hugo Award for Best Short Story

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Short story
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Short Story is given each year for science fiction or fantasy short stories published in English or translated into English during the previous calendar year. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a short story if it is fewer than 7,500 words long; awards are also given out for pieces of longer lengths in the novelette, novella, and novel categories. The Hugo Award for Best Short Story has been awarded annually since 1955, except in 1957. The award was titled "Best Short Fiction" rather than "Best Short Story" in 1960–1966. During this time no Novelette category was awarded and the Novella category had not yet been established; the award was defined only as a work "of
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance was an honor presented to female recording artists at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003 and the 46th Grammy Awards in 2004 for quality rap solo performances. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". Beginning in 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. In 2003, the category was split into separate recognitions for Female and Male Rap Solo Performances. The categories remained separated by gender until 2005 when they were combined into the genderless category originally known as Best Rap Solo Performance. American singer Missy Elliott won the award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance both years it was presented. In 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. The category name remained unchanged
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock Performance

    Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock Performance

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock Performance was an award presented to recording artists at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, for works (songs or albums) containing quality performances in the hard rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The Academy recognized hard rock music artists for the first time at the 31st Grammy Awards (1989). The category was originally presented as Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental, combining two of the most popular music genres of the 1980s. Jethro Tull won that award for the album Crest of a Knave, beating Metallica, who were expected to win with the album ...And Justice for All. This choice led to widespread criticism of the Academy, as journalists suggested that the music of Jethro Tull did not belong in the hard rock or heavy metal genres. In response, the Academy created the categories
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition

    International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition

    The International Chopin Piano Competition (Polish: Międzynarodowy Konkurs Pianistyczny im. Fryderyka Chopina), often referred to as the Chopin Competition, is a piano competition held in Warsaw, Poland. It was initiated in 1927 and has been held every five years since 1955. It is one of few competitions devoted entirely to the works of a single composer, this one being those of Frédéric Chopin. The first competition was founded by the Polish pianist and pedagogue Jerzy Żurawlew. Subsequent editions were organised in 1932 and 1937; the post-war fourth and fifth editions were held in 1949 and 1955. In 1957 the competition became one of the founding members of the World Federation of International Music Competitions in Geneva. Traditional special awards include the Polish Radio prize for the best Mazurka performance (since 1927), the Fryderyk Chopin Society in Warsaw prize for the best Polonaise (since 1960), and the National Philharmonic prize for the best performance of a Piano Concerto (since 1980). Past members of the jury have included such names as Martha Argerich, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Stefan Askenase, Wilhelm Backhaus, Paul Badura-Skoda, Nadia Boulanger, Dang Thai Son, Bella
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Song

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Song

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Song is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is reserved to the songwriters of a new song containing at least 51% of the lyrics in Spanish or Portuguese. Instrumental recordings or cover songs are not elegible. The award was first presented to Puerto Rican musicians Eduardo Cabra and René Pérez of the duo Calle 13 in 2007. The award has been presented three times to Puerto Rican songwriters and once to a Panamian, Spaniard and Argentine songwriter in 2008, 2010, and 2011 respectively. The only songwriter to receive this award in more than one occasion is René Pérez. Daddy Yankee holds the record of most nominations without a win with five. In 2010, Spanish rapper La Mala Rodríguez became the first female artist to win in this field.
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Legion of Merit

    Legion of Merit

    The Legion of Merit is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued both to United States military personnel and to military and political figures of foreign governments. The Legion of Merit (Commander degree) is one of only two United States military decorations to be issued as a neck order (the other being the Medal of Honor) and the only United States decoration which may be issued in award degrees (much like an order of chivalry or certain Orders of Merit). The Legion of Merit is sixth in the order of precedence of U.S. Military awards and is worn after the Defense Superior Service Medal and before the Distinguished Flying Cross. In contemporary use in the U.S. Armed Forces, the Legion of Merit is typically awarded to Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force general officers and colonels, and Navy and Coast Guard flag officers and captains occupying command or very senior staff positions in their respective services. It may also be awarded to officers of lesser rank and senior enlisted personnel, but these instances are less frequent and
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Phoenix Points of Pride

    Phoenix Points of Pride

    The Phoenix Points of Pride are 33 landmarks and attractions within the Phoenix, Arizona, city limits that are claimed to represent the best features of the city for both residents and visitors. Each Point of Pride was selected through an election process that involved 40,000 residents voting for their favorite destinations and resources. The Points of Pride include man-made structures, such as St. Mary's Basilica, the Phoenix Zoo and US Airways Center, as well as naturally occurring structures, such as Camelback Mountain and Hole-in-the-Rock at Papago Park. The first 25 Points of Pride were selected in 1992. The program was seen as a way to boost civic morale in the wake of negative national publicity for Phoenix in the wake of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday controversy. Cricket Wireless Pavilion and the Deer Valley Rock Art Center were added in 1996 and 2000 respectively, and the Japanese Friendship Garden, Ben Avery Shooting Facility and the Thomas J. Pappas School were selected in 2004. Arizona State University at the West Campus, Burton Barr Central Library and Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center (the area's first Jewish synagogue) are the most recent Points of Pride,
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    2 votes
    189
    Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

    Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting has been awarded since 1948 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Pulitzer Prize for Public Service

    Pulitzer Prize for Public Service

    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service has been awarded since 1918 for a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources. Those resources, as well as reporting, may include editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, video and other online material, and may be presented in print or online or both. It was meant to be first awarded in 1917, however, no award was given in that year. The most prestigious of the Pulitzer Prizes, it is the only one for which the winner receives a gold medal. As with other Pulitzer Prizes, a committee of jurors narrows the field to three nominees, from which the Pulitzer Board generally picks a winner and finalists. Finalists have been made public since 1980. The Pulitzer Board issues an official citation explaining the reason for the award.
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    2 votes
    191
    Aurealis Award for Best Young Adult Novel

    Aurealis Award for Best Young Adult Novel

    • Category of: Aurealis Award
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Aurealis Awards are presented annually by the Australia-based Chimaera Publications and SpecFaction NSW to published works to "recognise the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy, horror writers". To qualify, a work must have been first published by an Australian citizen or permanent resident between 1 January and 31 December of the current year; the presentation ceremony is held the following year. It has grown from a small function of around 20 people to a two-day event attended by over 200 people. Since their creation in 1995, awards have been given in various categories of speculative fiction. Categories currently include science fiction, fantasy, horror, speculative young-adult fiction—with separate awards for novels and short fiction—collections, anthologies, illustrative works or graphic novels, children's fiction told primarily through words, children's fiction told primarily through pictures, and an award for excellence in speculative fiction. The awards have attracted the attention of publishers by setting down a benchmark in science fiction and fantasy. The continued sponsorship by publishers such as HarperCollins and Orbit has added weight to the
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    3 votes
    192
    Meritorious Service Medal

    Meritorious Service Medal

    The Meritorious Service Medal is a military decoration presented to members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguished themselves by outstanding meritorious achievement or service to the United States subsequent to January 16, 1969. Effective 11 September 2001, this award also may be bestowed for non-combat meritorious achievement in a designated combat theatre. Normally, the acts or services rendered must be comparable to that required for the Legion of Merit but in a duty of lesser, though considerable, responsibility. A higher decoration, known as the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, is intended for similar services performed under joint service with the United States Department of Defense. Today, most MSM recipients are field grade officers (pay grades O-4 to O-6), senior warrant officers (W-3 to W-5), senior noncommissioned officers (E-7 to E-9), foreign military personnel in the ranks of O-6 and below, and individuals who have displayed a level of service that warrants an award of such magnitude. To receive this award the individual must exhibit exceptionally meritorious service at that level of responsibility. At the Tri-Department Awards Conference (February 5,
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    3 votes
    193
    Anton Rubinstein Competition

    Anton Rubinstein Competition

    The Anton Rubinstein Competition is the name of a music competition that has existed in two incarnations. It was first staged in Russia between 1890 and 1910, and prizes were awarded for piano playing and composition. Since 2003 it has been run in Germany as a piano competition only. The original Anton Rubinstein Competition was staged by Anton Rubinstein himself every five years from 1890 to 1910. The winners of the piano competition usually received a white Schroeder piano as the prize. Winners include: According to The Musical Times of October 1, 1910, the Fifth International Competition for the Rubinstein prize commenced on August 22. Two prizes of 5,000 francs were offered, for composition and for piano playing. The two successful competitors were both German musicians - Emil Frey (as composer; he was actually Swiss) and Alfred Hoehn, professor at the Hoschsche Konservatorium in Frankfurt (as pianist; he was actually Austrian). Diplomas for excellence in piano playing were awarded to Arthur Rubinstein, Emil Frey and Alexander Borovsky. The Board of Examiners consisted of only Russian musicians. Alexander Glazunov, Chairman of the Jury, presented the awards. The first prize for
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    2 votes
    194
    European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture

    European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture

    The European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture or Mies van der Rohe award is a prize given biennially by the European Union and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona, 'to acknowledge and reward quality architectural production in Europe'. The prize was created in 1987 as equal partnerships between the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona. The contest is open to all the works completed in Europe within the two-year period before the granting of the Prize.
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    2 votes
    195
    Hugo Award for Best Web Site

    Hugo Award for Best Web Site

    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The World Science Fiction Society allows individual World Science Fiction Conventions to add one Special Hugo Award category at their discretion. The Worldcons shown in this entry used their Special Hugo Award authority to add a category for Best Web Site related to the subjects of science fiction, fantasy, or fandom.
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    2 votes
    196
    Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award

    Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award

    The Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award, officially billed as the MBNA/MasterCard Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award, is an award in ice hockey given annually to the goaltender who finished the regular season with the best save percentage in the National Hockey League (NHL). Only goaltenders who played 25 games or more in the season are eligible for the award. A goaltender's save percentage represents the percentage of shots on goal that he stops, and is calculated by dividing the number of saves by the total number of shots on goal. The award was first presented at the conclusion of the 1999–2000 season, and is named in honor of former Detroit Red Wings, Buffalo Sabres and Washington Capitals goaltender Roger Crozier, a Calder and Conn Smythe Trophy winner who played in the NHL from 1964 to 1977. It is presented by the MBNA corporation in memory of Crozier, who worked for the MBNA America Bank after retiring as a player, and died on January 11, 1996. The winner of the trophy receives a commemorative crystal trophy and is given US$25,000 to donate to a youth hockey or other educational program of their choice. As of 2011, the award has been presented on eleven occasions and won by nine
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    2 votes
    197
    Stirling Prize

    Stirling Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Royal Institute of British Architects
    • Category of: Stirling Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Architecture
    The Royal Institute of British Architects Stirling Prize is a British prize for excellence in architecture. It is named after the architect James Stirling, organised and awarded annually by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The RIBA Stirling Prize is awarded to "the architects of the building which has made the greatest contribution to British architecture in the past year." The architects must be RIBA members, but the building can be anywhere in the European Union. Stirling Prize laureates receive a stipend of GB£20,000. The award was founded in 1996, and is considered to be the most prestigious architecture award in the United Kingdom. It is publicised as the architectural equivalent of the Booker Prize and Turner Prize. The presentation ceremony is televised by Channel 4 and the prize is sponsored by the Architects' Journal. Six short-listed buildings are chosen from a long-list of buildings that have received a RIBA Award. These awards are given to buildings showing "high architectural standards and substantial contribution to the local environment". In 2003, 70 such buildings received RIBA Awards and so made the long-list. In addition to the RIBA Stirling
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    2 votes
    198
    Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video

    Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video is an accolade presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally named the Gramophone Awards, to performers, directors, and producers of quality videos or musical programs. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". To qualify for this category, a video or musical program must be at least twenty minutes in length. Along with the similar honor Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video, this award was first presented in 1984. From 1984 to 1985, it was known as Best Video Album, but in 1986, it was renamed to Best Music Video, Long Form. Since 1998 it has been known as Best Long Form Music Video. In 1988 and 1989, the award criteria were changed and the video accolades were presented under the categories Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video. The awards were returned to the original format in 1990. Except in 1988 and 1989, the
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    3 votes
    199
    Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting

    Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting

    • Presenting Organization: Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
    • Category of: Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting is a Pulitzer Prize awarded for a distinguished example of breaking news, local reporting on news of the moment. It has been awarded since 1953 under several names: Prior to 1953, a Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting combined both breaking and investigative reporting under one category. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award.
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    1 votes
    200
    Hugo Award for Best Novelette

    Hugo Award for Best Novelette

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Novelette is given each year for science fiction or fantasy novelettes published in English or translated into English during the previous calendar year. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novelette if it is between 7,500 and 17,500 words; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the short story category, as well as for longer in the novella and novel categories. The Hugo Award for Best Novelette was first awarded in 1955, and was subsequently awarded in 1956, 1958, and 1959. The category was reinstated for 1967 through 1969, before lapsing again; after returning in 1973 it has remained to date. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in
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    3 votes
    201
    Battle Efficiency Award

    Battle Efficiency Award

    The Battle Effectiveness Award (formerly the Battle Efficiency Award, commonly known as the Battle "E"), is awarded annually to the small number of United States Navy ships, submarines, aviation, and other units that win their battle effectiveness competition. The criterion for the Battle Effectiveness Award is the overall readiness of the command to carry out its assigned wartime tasks, and is based on a year-long evaluation. The competition for the award is, and has always been, extremely keen. To win, a ship or unit must demonstrate the highest state of battle readiness. The Battle Effectiveness Award recognizes sustained superior performance in an operational environment within a command. To qualify for Battle "E" consideration, a ship must win a minimum of three out of four Command Excellence awards (Maritime Warfare, Engineering/Survivability, Command and Control, Logistics Management), and be nominated by their immediate superior in command. Eligibility for the award demands day-to-day demonstrated excellence in addition to superior achievement during the certifications and qualifications conducted throughout the year. A ship’s performance during training exercises, weapons
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    2 votes
    202
    Chopard Diamond award

    Chopard Diamond award

    The Chopard Diamond award, or simply the Diamond award, is a special award of merit given by the World Music Awards to recording artists who have sold over 100 million albums throughout their career. The World Music Awards were established in 1989. Honors are based entirely on worldwide sales figures in the music industry based on the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI). The first Chopard Diamond award was issued in 2002 to British singer-songwriter Rod Stewart. He is known to have sold over 100 million records throughout his career. American entertainer Mariah Carey was honored the following year. She has sold more than 200 million albums, singles and videos worldwide and was named the best-selling female pop artist of the millennium at the 2000 World Music Awards. Canadian songstress Celine Dion became the third recipient of the Chopard Diamond award. She was honored in 2004, and had been previously recognized at the World Music Awards as the best selling female artist of all time. According to her record label, Sony Music Entertainment, Dion has sold over 185 million albums worldwide. The American rock band Bon Jovi became the successors to Dion and the
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    2 votes
    203
    Latin Grammy Award for Record of the Year

    Latin Grammy Award for Record of the Year

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Record of the Year is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is given to the performers, producers, audio engineers and mastering engineer for new songs in Spanish or Portuguese language. The songs included on an album released the previous year of submission are also eligible only if they have not been submitted to competition before. Instrumental songs are also eligible. Due to the increasing musical changes in the industry, from 2012 the category includes 10 nominees, according to a restructuration made ​​by the academy for the four general categories: Song of the Year, Album of the Year, Best New Artist and Record of the Year. Nine of the eleven awarded songs have also earned the Latin Grammy for Song of the Year, which unlike this category, is given to the songwriters. The exceptions to this were in 2000 and 2009, when "Dímelo" by Marc Anthony and "Aquí Estoy Yo" by Luis Fonsi featuring David Bisbal, Noel Schajris and Aleks Syntek, respectively,
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    2 votes
    204
    Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording

    Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for works containing quality vocal performances in the dance music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award for Best Dance Recording was first presented to Donna Summer and Giorgio Moroder in 1998 for the song "Carry On". In 2003, the Academy moved the category from the "Pop" field into a new "Dance" field, which currently contains the category Best Electronica/Dance Album as well. According to the Academy, the award is designated for solo, duo, group or collaborative performances (vocal or instrumental), and is limited to singles or tracks only. Award recipients have often included the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists. Justin Timberlake is the only
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    2 votes
    205
    Nobel Prize in Economics

    Nobel Prize in Economics

    • Presenting Organization: Sveriges Riksbank
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Economics
    The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, commonly referred to as the Nobel Prize in Economics, but officially the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is an award for outstanding contributions to the field of economics, generally regarded as one of the most prestigious awards for that field. Although not one of the Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895, it is consistently identified with them. The Prize in Economics, as it is referred to by the Nobel Foundation, was established and endowed by Sweden's central bank Sveriges Riksbank, in 1968 on the occasion of the bank's 300th anniversary, in memory of Alfred Nobel. Like the Nobel Laureates in Chemistry and Physics, Laureates in Economics are selected by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Prize Committee similar to the Nobel Committees is used. It was first awarded in 1969 to the Dutch and Norwegian economists Jan Tinbergen and Ragnar Frisch, "for having developed and applied dynamic models for the analysis of economic processes." An endowment "in perpetuity" from Sveriges
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    2 votes
    206
    Edward R. Murrow

    Edward R. Murrow

    Edward Roscoe Murrow (born Egbert Roscoe Murrow; April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965) was an American broadcast journalist. He first came to prominence with a series of radio news broadcasts during World War II, which were followed by millions of listeners in the United States and Canada. Fellow journalists Eric Sevareid, Ed Bliss, and Alexander Kendrick considered Murrow one of journalism's greatest figures, noting his honesty and integrity in delivering the news. A pioneer of television news broadcasting, Murrow produced a series of TV news reports that helped lead to the censure of Senator Joseph McCarthy. Murrow was born Egbert Roscoe Murrow at Polecat Creek, near Greensboro, in Guilford County, North Carolina, the son of Roscoe C. Murrow and Ethel F. (née Lamb) Murrow. His parents were Quakers. He was the youngest of three brothers and was a "mixture of English, Scots, Irish, and German" descent. His home was a log cabin without electricity or plumbing, on a farm bringing in only a few hundred dollars a year from corn and hay. When Murrow was six years old, his family moved across the country to Skagit County in western Washington, to homestead near Blanchard, 30 miles (50 km)
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    1 votes
    207
    Grammy Award for Best New Artist

    Grammy Award for Best New Artist

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best New Artist has been awarded since 1959. Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were handed out, for records released in the previous year. The award was not presented in 1967. The official guidelines are as follows: "For a new artist who releases, during the Eligibility Year, the first recording which establishes the public identity of that artist." Note that this is not necessarily the first album released by an artist. It is sometimes asserted, with varying degrees of sincerity, that winning the award is a curse, as several award winners (particularly from the late 70s and early 80s) were never able to duplicate the success they experienced in their debut year. This viewpoint was expressed by former Starland Vocal Band member Taffy Danoff in a 2002 interview for VH1's 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders: "We got two of the five Grammys - one was Best New Artist. So that was basically the kiss of death and I feel sorry for everyone who's gotten it since." The category is also notable for being the only category in which a Grammy Award was revoked. This occurred in 1990 after it was revealed winners Milli Vanilli did not do their own vocals on their
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    1 votes
    208
    Hugo Award for Best Novella

    Hugo Award for Best Novella

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Science Fiction
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Novella is given each year for science fiction or fantasy novellas published in English or translated into English during the previous calendar year. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novella if it is between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the short story and novelette categories, as well as for longer in the novel category. The Hugo Award for Best Novella has been awarded annually since 1968. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro
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    1 votes
    209
    Jabara Award

    Jabara Award

    The Jabara Award for Airmanship, named in memory of Colonel James Jabara (1923-1966), is awarded each year to the United States Air Force Academy graduate whose accomplishments demonstrate superior performance in fields directly involved with aerospace vehicles. With 15 kills, Colonel Jabara was the second leading Air Force ace of the Korean War. Colonel Jabara was the First American Jet Ace. Each year the U.S. Air Force Academy and the Association of Graduates present the Colonel James Jabara Award to an Academy graduate or graduates whose airmanship contributions are of great significance and set them apart from their contemporaries. Each major air command, field operating agency, including the National Guard and Reserve, and direct reporting unit may submit one nomination for the award. The winner of the award is authorized to wear the Air Force Recognition Ribbon.
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    1 votes
    210
    Karlspreis

    Karlspreis

    The Charlemagne Prize (German: Karlspreis; full name originally Internationaler Karlspreis der Stadt Aachen, International Charlemagne Prize of the City of Aachen, since 1988 Internationaler Karlspreis zu Aachen, International Charlemagne Prize of Aachen) is one of the most prestigious European prizes. It has been awarded once a year since 1950 by the German city of Aachen to people who contributed to the ideals upon which it has been founded. It commemorates Charlemagne, ruler of the Frankish Empire and founder of what became the Holy Roman Empire, who resided and is buried at Aachen. Traditionally the award is given to the recipient on the Ascension holiday in a ceremony in the town hall of Aachen. On 19 December 1949, Kurt Pfeiffer presented to the reading group "Corona Legentium Aquensis", which he had founded, his proposals for the prize: "We have the honour of proposing annual presentation of an international prize for the most valuable contribution in the services of Western European understanding and work for the community, and in the services of humanity and world peace. This contribution may be in the field of literary, scientific, economic or political endeavour." The
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    1 votes
    211
    Kleist Prize

    Kleist Prize

    • Category of: Kleist Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Kleist Prize is an annual German literature prize. The prize was first awarded in 1912, on the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of the death of Heinrich von Kleist. The Kleist Prize was the most important literary award of the Weimar Republic, but was discontinued in 1933. In 1985 the prize was awarded for the first time in over fifty years. Between 1994 and 2000 it was awarded biennially. A monetary sum of €20,000 accompanies the award. 1912: Hermann Burte and Reinhard Sorge 1913: Hermann Essig and Oskar Loerke 1914: Fritz von Unruh and Hermann Essig 1915: Robert Michel and Arnold Zweig 1916: Agnes Miegel and Heinrich Lersch 1917: Walter Hasenclever 1918: Leonhard Frank and Paul Zech 1919: Anton Dietzenschmidt and Kurt Heynicke 1920: Hans Henny Jahnn 1921: Paul Gurk 1922: Bertolt Brecht 1923: Wilhelm Lehmann and Robert Musil 1924: Ernst Barlach 1925: Carl Zuckmayer 1926: Alexander Lernet-Holenia and Alfred Neumann (Rahel Sanzara did not accept her prize), Honorable Mention: Martin Kessel 1927: Gerhard Menzel and Hans Meisel 1928: Anna Seghers 1929: Alfred Brust and Eduard Reinacher 1930: Reinhard Goering 1931: Ödön von Horvath and Erik Reger 1932: Richard Billinger and
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    1 votes
    212
    Motor Trend Car of the Year

    Motor Trend Car of the Year

    • Presenting Organization: Motor Trend
    The Motor Trend Car of the Year is an award given by Motor Trend magazine, an American monthly that is published since 1949. Motor Trend magazine, an automobile enthusiast publication that debuted in 1949, was the first to name a Car of the Year in its inaugural year. Since then, the designation has been used to distinguish a variety of vehicles as evaluated by numerous other groups and organizations. Motor Trend's first award went to Cadillac in 1949 for its V8 engine models (the earliest awards were given to the manufacturer, not to a specific vehicle). It has since expanded the award category to include the pickup truck and sport utility vehicle (SUV) of the year, awarding these separately from the Car of the Year. Until 1999, the award was only eligible to American-made cars; imports had their own category, the Import of the Year. The rationale for the combination was explained by editor Angus Mackenzie as "because it's so hard to say that, for example, a Toyota Camry, built in Kentucky and designed in California, is less American than a Ford that may have been built in Canada or Mexico and designed in Europe." Since the combination of the awards, American cars have won the
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    1 votes
    213
    Outland Trophy

    Outland Trophy

    • Presenting Organization: Football Writers Association of America
    The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best United States college football interior lineman by the Football Writers Association of America. It is named after John H. Outland. One of only a few players ever to be named All-America at two positions, Outland garnered consensus All-America honors in 1898 at tackle and consensus All-America honors at halfback in 1899. The past four winners are Barrett Jones (2011), Gabe Carimi (2010), Ndamukong Suh (2009; drafted 2nd overall), and Andre Smith (2008; drafted 6th overall). In the fall of 1895, John Outland entered the University of Kansas. He had previously played football for two seasons and had been team captain at William Penn in Iowa. While watching practice one afternoon at Kansas, he was seen by the varsity captain who induced him to put on a uniform. Three days later, he was playing on the varsity team. After a 6–1 season, he transferred to the University of Pennsylvania where he found his home. From 1897–99, Outland and Hall of Fame teammate Truxton Hare led Penn to a 35–4–3 record. Outland obtained his medical degree and was a surgeon during World War I, rising to the rank of major. He tried his hand at coaching at Franklin &
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    1 votes
    214
    Profile in Courage Award

    Profile in Courage Award

    • Presenting Organization: John F. Kennedy Library
    • Category of: Profile in Courage Award
    • Disciplines or subjects: Courage
    The Profile in Courage Award is a private award given to recognize displays of courage similar to those John F. Kennedy described in his book Profiles in Courage. It is given to individuals (often elected officials) who, by acting in accord with their conscience, risked their careers or lives by pursuing a larger vision of the national, state or local interest in opposition to popular opinion or pressure from constituents or other local interests. The winners of the award are selected by a bi-partisan committee named by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, which includes members of the Kennedy family as well as other prominent Americans. It is generally awarded each year around the time of Kennedy's birthday (May 29) at a ceremony at the Kennedy Library in Boston. The award is generally presented by Kennedy's daughter Caroline Kennedy. Also before his death Senator Edward Kennedy. The winner is presented with a sterling silver lantern made by Tiffany's which was designed by Edwin Schlossberg. The lantern is patterned after the lanterns on USS Constitution, the last sail-powered ship to remain part of the US Navy, which is permanently moored nearby.
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    1 votes
    215
    Vincent Scully Prize

    Vincent Scully Prize

    The Vincent Scully Prize was established in 1999 to recognize exemplary practice, scholarship or criticism in architecture, historic preservation and urban design. Created by the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., the award first honored the distinguished Yale professor and namesake of the award, author and educator, Vincent Scully. The National Building Museum awards two other annual prizes: the Honor Award for individuals and organizations who have made important contributions to the U.S.'s building heritage, and the Henry C. Turner Prize for Innovation in Construction Technology.
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    1 votes
    216
    Davy Medal

    Davy Medal

    The Davy Medal is awarded by the Royal Society of London "for an outstandingly important recent discovery in any branch of chemistry". Named after Humphry Davy, the medal is awarded with a gift of £1000. The medal was first awarded in 1877 to Robert Wilhelm Bunsen and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff "for their researches & discoveries in spectrum analysis", and has since been awarded 131 times. The medal is awarded annually, and unlike other Royal Society medals, such as the Hughes Medal, it has been awarded annually without ever missing a year. The medal was most recently awarded to James Fraser Stoddart "for his contributions in molecular technology". The medal has been awarded to multiple individuals in the same year: in 1882 it was awarded to Dmitri Mendeleev and Julius Lothar Meyer "for their discovery of the periodic relations of the atomic weights"; in 1883 to Marcellin Berthelot and Julius Thomsen "for their researches in thermo-chemistry"; in 1893 to Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff and Joseph Achille Le Bel "In recognition of their introduction of the theory of asymmetric carbon, and its use in explaining the constitution of optically active carbon compounds"; in 1903 to Pierre Curie
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    1 votes
    217
    Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score

    Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score

    • Presenting Organization: Hollywood Foreign Press Association
    • Category of: Golden Globe Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Film score
    The Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score is one of several categories presented by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), an organization of journalists who cover the United States film industry, but are affiliated with publications outside North America, since its institution in 1947. Since the 5th Golden Globe Awards (1947), the award is presented annually, except from 1953 to 1958. The nominations from 1947 and 1948 are not available. The first Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score went to Max Steiner for his compositional work on Life with Father. John Williams is the artist with the most nominations (19); those resulted in 4 wins. Dimitri Tiomkin had the same number of wins, but out of only 5 nominations. Other notable achievers include Maurice Jarre (10 nominations, 3 wins) and Alan Menken (5 nominations, 3 wins). Artists like Jerry Goldsmith (9 nominations) and Michel Legrand (7 nominations) were nominated several times, but never received the award. Additionally, Dimitri Tiomkin received Special Achievement Awards for his services to film music in 1955 and 1957, as did Hugo Friedhofer in 1958. The most recent recipient of this award was Ludovic Bource
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    1 votes
    218
    Grammy Award for Best Rock Song

    Grammy Award for Best Rock Song

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Rock Song is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality songs in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The award, reserved for songwriters, was first presented to English musician Sting in 1992. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award honors new songs (containing both melody and lyrics) or songs "first achieving prominence" during the period of eligibility. Songs containing prominent samples or interpolations are not eligible. Bruce Springsteen holds the records for the most wins and nominations, having won four awards from nine nominations. Other winners of multiple awards include Alanis Morissette as well as the bands Red Hot Chili Peppers and U2, with two. Award-winning songs have been performed by American artists more
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    1 votes
    219
    Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

    Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor was given each year for editors of magazines, novels, anthologies, or other works related to science fiction or fantasy, published in English. The award supplanted a previous award for professional magazine. The award was first presented in 1973, and was given annually through 2006. Beginning in 2007, the award was split into two categories, that of Best Editor (Short Form) and Best Editor (Long Form). The Short Form award is for editors of anthologies, collections or magazines, while the Long Form award is for editors of novels. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded
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    1 votes
    220
    Latin Grammy Award for Album of the Year

    Latin Grammy Award for Album of the Year

    • Presenting Organization: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Album of the Year is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is given to the performers, producers, audio engineers and mastering engineers for vocal or instrumental albums with 51% of new recorded songs. Albums of previously released recordings, such as reissues, compilations of old recordings and greatest hits albums packages are not eligible. Due to the increasing musical changes in the industry, from 2012 the category includes 10 nominees, according to a restructuration made ​​by the academy for the four general categories: Song of the Year, Record of the Year, Best New Artist and Album of the Year. Alejandro Sanz has won the most awards in the category with three wins out of five nominations. Sanz is followed by Juanes, Juan Luis Guerra and Calle 13 with two winning albums. Colombian singer-songwriter Shakira became the first female recipient in 2006. Most nominated albums were recorded in Spanish language, though Gilberto Gil, Ivan Lins, Maria Rita,
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    1 votes
    221
    Man Booker International Prize

    Man Booker International Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Man Group
    • Category of: Man Booker Prizes
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fiction
    The Man Booker International Prize is a biennial international literary award given to a living author of any nationality for a body of work published in English or generally available in English translation. The introduction of the International Prize was announced in June 2004. The award, which is sponsored by the Man Group, complements the Man Booker Prize and rewards one author's "continued creativity, development and overall contribution to fiction on the world stage." Therefore the award is a recognition of the writer's body of work, rather than any one title. The judges for the year compile their own lists of authors and submissions are not invited. While the Man Booker Prize is only open to writers from the Commonwealth, Ireland and Zimbabwe, the International Prize is open to all nationalities. The award is worth £60,000 and an author can only win once. The Man Booker International prize also allows for a separate award for translation. The winning author can choose a translator of their work into English to receive a prize sum of £15,000. A similar prize to the Man Booker International Prize is the Neustadt International Prize for Literature which is like the Man Booker
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    Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany

    Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany

    The Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the only federal decoration of Germany. It was created by the first President of the Federal Republic of Germany, Theodor Heuss, on 7 September 1951. Since then between 2,100 and 5,200 awards are given every year across all classes. Colloquially, the decorations of the different classes of the Order are also known as Federal Cross of Merit (German: Bundesverdienstkreuz). Most of the German federal states (Bundesländer) have each their own order of merit as well, with the exception of the Free and Hanseatic Cities of Bremen and Hamburg, which reject any orders (by old tradition their citizens, particularly former or present senators, will refuse any decoration in the form of an order. Most famous example: former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt). The Order comprises four groups with in total eight classes: The President of the Federal Republic holds the Grand Cross Special Class ex officio. It is awarded to him in a ceremony by the President of the Bundestag, attended by the Chancellor of Germany, the President of the Bundesrat, and the Supreme Court President. Other than the German
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    USSR State Prize

    USSR State Prize

    The USSR State Prize (Russian: Госуда́рственная пре́мия СССР) was the Soviet Union's state honour. It was established on September 9, 1966. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, the prize was followed up by the State Prize of the Russian Federation. The State Stalin Prize (Государственная Сталинская премия), usually called the Stalin Prize, existed from 1941 to 1954 - some sources give an incorrect termination date of 1952. It essentially played the same role; therefore upon the establishment of the USSR State Prize, the diplomas and badges of the recipients of Stalin Prize were changed to that of USSR State Prize. In 1944 and 1945, the last two years of the Second World War the award ceremonies for the Stalin Prize were not held. Instead, in 1946 the ceremony was held twice: in January for the works created in 1943-1944 and in June for the works of 1945. USSR State Prize of 1st, 2nd and 3rd degrees was awarded annually to individuals in the fields of science, mathematics, literature, arts, and architecture to honour the most prominent achievements which either advanced the Soviet Union or the cause of socialism. Often the prize was awarded to specific works rather than to
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    Young Artist Award

    Young Artist Award

    The Young Artist Award (originally known as the Youth In Film Award) is an accolade bestowed by the Young Artist Foundation, a non-profit organization founded in 1978 to recognize and award excellence of youth performers, and to provide scholarships for young artists who may be physically and/or financially challenged. The Young Artist Foundation was the first organization to establish an awards ceremony specifically set to recognize and award the contributions of performers under the age of 21 in the fields of film, television, theater and music. The 1st Youth In Film Awards ceremony was held in November 1979, at the Sheraton Universal Hotel in Hollywood to honor outstanding young performers of the 1978/1979 season. The most recent 33rd Annual Young Artist Awards ceremony, honoring young performers of the year 2011, was held at the Sportsmen's Lodge in Studio City, California on May 6, 2012. The Young Artist Foundation is a non-profit 501(c) organization founded in 1978 by long-standing Hollywood Foreign Press (Golden Globes) member Maureen Dragone and dedicated to presenting scholarships to physically and/or financially challenged aspiring young artists, allowing them to pursue a
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    AFI Life Achievement Award

    AFI Life Achievement Award

    • Category of: American Film Institute Awards
    The AFI Life Achievement Award was established by the Board of Directors of the American Film Institute on February 26, 1973 to honor a single individual for his or her lifetime contribution to enriching American culture through motion pictures and television. The Trustees initially specified that the recipient must be one who fundamentally advanced the art of film and whose achievements had been acknowledged by the general public as well as by film scholars and critics and the individual's peers. The Trustees also specified that the work of the recipient must have withstood the test of time. Director John Ford was the unanimous choice of the Board of Trustees for the first award as he "clearly stands preeminent in the history of motion ." President Richard M. Nixon attended the gala dinner at which Ford was presented the award on March 31, 1973. The Board of Trustees later amended the "test of time" requirement to enable the AFI Life Achievement Award to be presented to individuals with active careers, such as Tom Hanks, who at age 45, was the youngest recipient ever, and Steven Spielberg, who received the award at age 48. All Life Achievement Award ceremonies have been televised.
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    Air Medal

    Air Medal

    The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States Military. The medal was created in 1942 and is awarded for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. The Air Medal was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on 11 May 1942. The Air Medal was awarded retroactive to 8 September 1939. The medal is awarded to anyone who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Armed Forces of the United States, have distinguished themselves by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight. During World War II the medal's award criteria varied widely depending on the theater of operations, the aircraft flown, and the missions accomplished. In Europe some bomber crewmembers received it for five sorties; elsewhere much higher criteria were used. The Air Medal may be awarded to recognize single acts of merit or heroism, or for meritorious service. Award of the Air Medal is primarily intended to recognize those personnel who are on current crew member or non-crew member flying status which requires them to participate in aerial flight on a regular and frequent basis in the performance of their primary duties. However, it may
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    Bambi

    Bambi

    The Bambi, often simply called Bambi Awards and stylised as BAMBI, are presented annually by Hubert Burda Media to recognise excellence in international media and television "with vision and creativity who affected and inspired the German public that year," both domestic and foreign. First held in 1948, they are the oldest media awards in Germany. The award is named after Felix Salten's book Bambi, A Life in the Woods and its statuettes are in the shape of the novel's titular fawn character. They were originally made of porcelain, until 1958 when the organizers switched to using gold, with the casting done by the art casting workshop of Ernst Strassacker in Süßen. Marika Rökk and Jean Marais were the first recipients of the award. Frequent awardees include Heinz Rühmann (12), Peter Alexander and O. W. Fischer (10), Sophia Loren (9), Maria Schell (8). Rock Hudson (6), Franz Beckenbauer and Pierre Brice (5). The awards are judged by Hubert Burda and the editors-in-chief at Hubert Burda Media. In 2002 Michael Jackson won the Pop Artist of the Millennium Award. Award recipients in 2009 included Colombian singer/songwriter and choreographer Shakira, actress Kate Winslet, Austrian actor
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    Broyles Award

    Broyles Award

    The Broyles Award is an annual award given to honor the best assistant coach in college football. First awarded in 1996, it was named after former University of Arkansas men's athletic director Frank Broyles. The award is presented in Little Rock, Arkansas at the Downtown Rotary Club. Every year, 1,500 assistant coaches representing all 117 Division One college football programs vote on their peers in the world of college football, and the five Broyles Award finalists are chosen by the tally of these ballots. Each head coach can nominate one assistant coach from his staff. All nominations are reviewed by a selection committee composed of some of college football's former head coaches. The five finalists meet in Little Rock, Arkansas, where each is presented with a 1,000 dollar check, as well as a set of golf clubs and personalized golf bag. The winner received 2,500 dollars, a watch, the Broyle's Award Jacket custom-made by Tom James, as well as the trophy, valued at around 5,000 dollars. The Broyles Award Trophy, made out of solid bronze, depicts Broyles (kneeling) and longtime University of Arkansas assistant coach Wilson Matthews (standing), watching over a Razorback football
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    Distinguished Service Cross

    Distinguished Service Cross

    The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest military award that can be given to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces), for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force). The Distinguished Service Cross was first awarded during World War I. In addition, a number of awards were made for actions before World War I. In many cases, these were to soldiers who had received a Certificate of Merit for gallantry which, at the time, was the only other honor for gallantry the Army could award, or recommend a Medal of Honor. Others were belated recognition of actions in the Philippines, on the Mexican Border and during the Boxer Rebellion. The Distinguished Service Cross is distinct from the Distinguished Service Medal, which is awarded to persons in recognition of
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    Goethe Prize

    Goethe Prize

    • Category of: Goethe Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Literature
    The Goethe Prize of Frankfurt-am-Main (Goethepreis der Stadt Frankfurt) is a German literary award of high prestige (not restricted to writers, though) named after Johann Wolfgang Goethe. It was initially an annual award, but became triennial. The recipients have been:
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    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album

    Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album was an honor presented to recording artists between 2004 and 2011 for quality contemporary world music albums. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The Grammy Award for Best World Music Album was first presented at the 34th Grammy Awards in 1992. The category remained unchanged until 2004, when it was split into separate awards for Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album and Best Contemporary World Music Album. The first award for Best Contemporary World Music Album was presented to Cesária Évora at the 46th Grammy Awards for the album Voz d'Amor. In 2011, a major overhaul of the Grammy categories resulted in the merge of the two awards to a single Best World Music Album category beginning in 2012. For the 46th Grammy Awards (2004), Best Contemporary World Music Album nominees included Cesária Évora
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    Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental

    Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental was an award presented at the 31st Grammy Awards in 1989 to honor quality hard rock/metal works (albums or songs). The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." The Academy recognized hard rock music artists for the first time in 1989 under the category Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental, combining two of the most popular music genres of the 1980s. Jethro Tull was given that award for the album Crest of a Knave, beating Metallica, who were expected to win with the album ...And Justice for All. This choice led to widespread criticism of the Academy, as journalists suggested that Jethro Tull's music did not belong in the hard rock or heavy metal genres. In response, the Academy created the categories Best Hard Rock Performance and Best Metal Performance, separating the genres. The
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    Grammy Award for Best Latin Rock/Alternative Album

    Grammy Award for Best Latin Rock/Alternative Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for releasing albums in the Latin rock, alternative or urban genres. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The category was originally known as the Grammy Award for Best Latin Rock/Alternative Performance, and was first presented in 1998 to the Argentinian group Los Fabulosos Cadillacs for the album Fabulosos Calavera. In 2009, this category joined the Latin Urban Album category to become known as Best Latin Rock, Alternative or Urban Album. The award was discontinued in 2012 due to a major overhaul of Grammy categories. That year, recordings in this category were shifted to the newly formed Best Latin Pop, Rock or Urban Album category. However in June 2012 the Recording Academy announced that the category will be
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    Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album

    Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album

    • Category of: Grammy Awards
    The Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, to recording artists for quality pop music albums. Awards in several categories are distributed annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." The honor was first presented in 1968 at the 10th Grammy Awards as Best Contemporary Album to The Beatles for Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The category was then discontinued until 1995 where it emerged with the new name Best Pop Album. In 2001, the category became known as Best Pop Vocal Album. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to artists that perform "albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded pop vocal tracks." As of 2011, no performing artist has won the award more than once. Madonna and Sarah McLachlan share the record for the most nominations, with three each. American artists have been
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    Hugo Award for Best British Professional Magazine

    Hugo Award for Best British Professional Magazine

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    The 1957 World Science Fiction Convention was held in the United Kingdom, and the organizers of the convention elected to present Hugo Awards for both Best American Professional Magazine and Best British Professional Magazine. (In the early years of the Hugo Awards, the categories were more fluid and subject to the whims of the organizing committees than they later became.)
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    Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist

    Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist

    • Presenting Organization: World Science Fiction Society
    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fantasy
    The Hugo Awards are presented every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist is given each year for artists of works related to science fiction or fantasy which appeared in low- or non-paying publications such as semiprozines or fanzines. A Hugo Award for professional artists is also given. The fan award was first presented in 1967 and has been awarded annually. Beginning in 1996, Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1946, 1951, and 1954, although the 1954 Retro Hugos received insufficient nominations for the Fan Artist Hugo to make the ballot. Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by
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    Hugo Award for Best Fanzine

    Hugo Award for Best Fanzine

    • Category of: Hugo Awards
    • Disciplines or subjects: Fanzine
    The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Fanzine was given each year for non professionally edited magazines, or "fanzines", related to science fiction or fantasy, published in English, and which has published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were also once given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and since 1984 have been awarded for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category; several magazines that were nominated for or won the fanzine category have gone on to be nominated for or win the semiprozine category since it was established. The award was first presented in 1955, and has been given annually since except for in
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    International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award

    International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award

    • Presenting Organization: IMPAC
    • Category of: International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award
    The International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award (Irish: Duais Liteartha Idirnáisiúnta Bhaile Átha Chliath) is an international literary award for a work of fiction, jointly sponsored by the city of Dublin, Ireland and the company IMPAC. At €100,000 it is one of the richest literary prizes in the world. Nominations are submitted by public libraries worldwide. The Award is a joint initiative of Dublin City Council and the productivity improvement company, IMPAC, and is administered by Dublin City Public Libraries. Described as "the most eclectic and unpredictable of the literary world's annual gongs", Michelle Pauli posed the question in relation to the longlist for the 2004 edition: "Where would you find Michael Dobbs and Tony Parsons up against Umberto Eco and Milan Kundera for a €100,000 prize?" Among the award's recipients are several future Nobel Prize in Literature laureates, including Herta Müller (1998 winner with The Land of Green Plums) and Orhan Pamuk (2003 winner with My Name Is Red). Unsuccessful nominees (in chronological order of earliest nomination) include such established writers as V. S. Naipaul, Cees Nooteboom, José Saramago, Rohinton Mistry, Margaret Atwood, Don
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    James E. Sullivan Award

    James E. Sullivan Award

    • Presenting Organization: Amateur Athletic Union
    The James E. Sullivan Award, presented by the American Amateur Athletic Union (AAU), is awarded annually in April to "the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States". Often referred to as the Oscar of sports awards, it was first presented in 1930. The award is named for the AAU's founder and past president, James Edward Sullivan. Based on the qualities of leadership, character, sportsmanship, and the ideals of amateurism, the AAU Sullivan Award "goes far beyond athletic accomplishments and honors those who have shown strong moral character". Finalists are selected from public nominations following a review by the AAU Sullivan Award Executive Committee. Approximately 10 semi-finalists are chosen, and the eventual winner is determined by votes from various members of the nationwide news media, former winners and AAU personnel. More recently, a proportion of the winner's vote has been determined by the general public. Recipients are eligible for subsequent awards, although this has yet to happen. The inaugural winner of the award was golfer Bobby Jones, winner of 13 majors between 1923 and 1930. The first female recipient, in 1944, was swimmer Ann Curtis, who won more national
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    Knuth Prize

    Knuth Prize

    • Presenting Organization: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    • Category of: Knuth Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Computer Science
    The Donald E. Knuth Prize is a prize for outstanding contributions to the foundations of computer science, named after Donald E. Knuth. The Knuth Prize is awarded since 1996 and includes an award of $5000. The prize is awarded by ACM SIGACT and by IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on the Mathematical Foundations of Computing. Prizes are awarded in alternation at the ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing and at the IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, which are among the most prestigious conferences in theoretical computer science. In contrast with the Gödel Prize, which recognizes outstanding papers, the Knuth Prize is awarded to individuals for their overall impact in the field.
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    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Album, Duo or Group

    Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Album, Duo or Group

    • Category of: Latin Grammy Awards
    The Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Album by a Duo or Group with Vocal is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and creates a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally. The award is given to the performers of vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% of newly recorded material. The award was first presented at the 2nd Latin Grammy Awards, since the previous year in the rock field the categories were awarded to tracks or songs, separated by gender (Female and Male Rock Vocal Performance), ensembles (Rock Duo/Group with Vocal) and an additional award for Best Rock Album. At the Latin Grammy Awards of 2010 two categories were presented, Rock Album and Best Rock Song, without information on the possible withdrawal of the category. Mexican ensembles have won the award more times than any other nationality, though award-winning albums have also been performed by musicians originating from Chile, Colombia and Panama. Molotov and La Ley has won the most awards in the category with two wins each. Mexican bands Maná and Jaguares received the
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    NASCAR's Most Popular Driver Award

    NASCAR's Most Popular Driver Award

    NASCAR's Most Popular Driver Award is awarded to the fans' favorite NASCAR driver in the Sprint Cup Series, Nationwide Series, and Camping World Truck Series every year since 1956. It started as a poll of the drivers and then all NASCAR Sprint Cup Series competitors. Today it is voted for by fans across the United States. The award is presented by the National Motorsports Press Association (NMPA). Sponsored by Hamburger Helper in 2010, it is sponsored by Wheaties in 2011. The ceremony presenting the award is called the Myers Brothers Awards Breakfast, and it is held in Las Vegas, Nevada in December of each year. The winner of the most awards is Bill Elliott with 16 in the Sprint Cup Series. Kenny Wallace and Brad Keselowski are tied at 3 for the most awards in the Nationwide Series, and Johnny Benson, Jr. has the most awards at 3 in the Camping World Truck Series. Dale Earnhardt, Jr. leads the active Sprint Cup drivers with the most awards (9). 1956 Curtis Turner 1957 Fireball Roberts 1958 Jack Smith 1959 Glen Wood 1960 Rex White 1961 Joe Weatherly 1962 Richard Petty 1963 Fred Lorenzen 1964 Richard Petty (2) 1965 Fred Lorenzen (2) 1966 Darel Dieringer 1967 Cale Yarborough 1968
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    National Medal of Arts

    National Medal of Arts

    The National Medal of Arts is an award and title created by the United States Congress in 1984, for the purpose of honoring artists and patrons of the arts. It is the highest honor conferred to an individual artist on behalf of the people. Honorees are selected by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), and ceremoniously presented the award by the President of the United States. The medal was designed for the NEA by sculptor Robert Graham. In 1983, prior to the official establishment of the Medal, the following artists and patrons received a medal from President Reagan, arranged by the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities: 2009 2010 2011 In 1997, poet Adrienne Rich refused her award as a protest against “inconsistencies” between art and “the cynical politics” of the Clinton White House administration.
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    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    • Presenting Organization: Karolinska Institutet
    • Category of: Nobel Prize
    • Disciplines or subjects: Physiology
    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Swedish: Nobelpriset i fysiologi eller medicin) administered by the Nobel Foundation, is awarded once a year for outstanding discoveries in the fields of life sciences and medicine. It is one of five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, in his will. Nobel was personally interested in experimental physiology and wanted to establish a prize for progress through scientific discoveries in laboratories. The Nobel prize is presented to the recipient(s) at an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death, along with a diploma and a certificate for the monetary award. The front side of the medal provides the same profile of Alfred Nobel as depicted on the medals for Physics, Chemistry, and Literature; its reverse side is unique to this medal. As of 2011, 102 Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded to 199 men and 10 women. The first Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1901 to the German physiologist Emil Adolf von Behring, for his work on serum therapy and the development of a vaccine against diphtheria. The first woman to win the Nobel Prize
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    Rumford Medal

    Rumford Medal

    The Rumford Medal is awarded by the Royal Society every alternating year for "an outstandingly important recent discovery in the field of thermal or optical properties of matter made by a scientist working in Europe". First awarded in 1800, it was created after a 1796 donation of $5000 by the scientist Benjamin Thompson, known as Count Rumford, and is accompanied by a £1000 gift. Since its creation, the medal has been awarded to 100 individuals, including Rumford himself in 1800. The medal has been awarded to citizens of the United Kingdom fifty-three times, Germany seventeen times, France fourteen times, the Netherlands seven times, Sweden four times, the United States three times, Italy twice and once each to citizens of Australia, Hungary, Belgium, Luxembourg and New Zealand. The most recent winner was Gilbert Lonzarich in 2010, a physicist from the United Kingdom who was awarded the medal "for his outstanding work into novel types of quantum matter using innovative instrumentation and techniques". General Specific
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    Shaw Prize

    Shaw Prize

    The Shaw Prize is an annual award first presented by the Shaw Prize Foundation in 2004. Established in 2002 in Hong Kong, it honours living "individuals, regardless of race, nationality and religious belief, who have achieved significant breakthroughs in academic and scientific research or application, and whose work has resulted in a positive and profound impact on mankind." The prize, widely regarded as the "Nobel of the East", is named after Sir Run Run Shaw (邵逸夫), a leader in the Hong Kong media industry and a long-time philanthropist. The prize is for recent achievements in the fields of astronomy, life science and medicine, and mathematical sciences; it is not awarded posthumously. Nominations are submitted by invited individuals beginning each year in September. The award winners are then announced in the summer, and receive the prize at the ceremony in early autumn. The winners receive a medal and a certificate. The front of the medal bears a portrait of Shaw as well as the English and the Chinese name of the prize; the back bears the year, the category, the name of the winner and a Chinese quotation of philosopher Xun Zi (制天命而用之, which means "Grasp the law of nature and
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    Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal

    Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal

    • Presenting Organization: Svenska Dagbladet
    • Category of: Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal
    • Disciplines or subjects: Sports
    The Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal (Swedish: Svenska Dagbladets guldmedalj, but usually simply called Bragdguldet, "The Feat Gold") is an annual award "for the most significant Swedish sports achievement of the year". It has been awarded by a jury led by the Swedish morning paper Svenska Dagbladet since 1925. According to its statutes the Medal may be awarded in November or December to either an individual sportsperson or a team. An individual can be awarded the Medal no more than twice, and to receive a second medal, that athlete must be "regarded a class of his own".
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    Templeton Prize

    Templeton Prize

    • Presenting Organization: John Templeton Foundation
    The Templeton Prize is an annual award presented by the Templeton Foundation. Established in 1972, it is awarded to a living person who, in the estimation of the judges, "has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life's spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery, or practical works". The prize is named after Sir John Templeton (1912–2008), an American-born British entrepreneur and businessman, who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1987 for his philanthropic efforts. Until 2001, the name of the prize was "Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion", and from 2002 to 2008 it was called the "Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities". It has typically been presented by Prince Philip in a ceremony at Buckingham Palace. The monetary value of the prize is adjusted so that it exceeds that of the Nobel Prizes, as Templeton felt "spirituality was ignored" in the Nobel Prizes. At £1,000,000, as of 2009, it is the largest single annual financial prize award given to an individual by a philanthropic organization. The prize is awarded "based on the decision of a panel of distinguished judges from various academic disciplines and
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    UNESCO Science Prize

    UNESCO Science Prize

    • Category of: UNESCO Science Prize
    The UNESCO Science Prize is a biennial scientific prize awarded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to "a person or group of persons for an outstanding contribution they have made to the technological development of a developing member state or region through the application of scientific and technological research (particularly in the fields of education, engineering and industrial development)." The candidates for the Science Prize are proposed to the Director-General of UNESCO by the governments of member states or by non-governmental organizations. All proposals are judged by a panel of six scientists and engineers. The prize consists of US$ $15,000, an Albert Einstein Silver Medal, and is awarded in odd years to coincide with UNESCO's General Conference.
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