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Best Aviation incident of All Time

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    1
    Spanair Flight 5022

    Spanair Flight 5022

    • Operator: Spanair
    • Flight destination: Las Palmas Airport
    Spanair Flight JK 5022, from Madrid-Barajas Airport to Gran Canaria Airport in Gran Canaria, Spain, crashed just after take off from runway 36L of Barajas Airport at 14:24 CEST (12:24 UTC) on 20 August 2008. The aircraft was a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, registration EC-HFP. It was the first fatal accident for Spanair (part of the SAS Group) in the 20-year history of the company, and the 14th fatal accident and 24th hull loss involving MD-80 series aircraft. The accident was the first fatal accident of any aeroplane featuring a full airline alliance special aircraft livery. It was the world's deadliest aviation accident in 2008 and Spain's deadliest in 25 years. 154 people died; six died en route to the hospital, one died overnight and one died in the hospital three days later. Only 18 people survived. When it occurred, it became the deadliest aviation disaster in Spain since the crash of Avianca Flight 011 in 1983. The accident had weakened Spanair's image, which at the time was already negative among the public. The crash augmented financial difficulties at Spanair, which ceased operations on 27 January 2012. The aircraft, named Sunbreeze (registration EC-HFP; manufacturer's serial
    9.00
    6 votes
    2
    TACA Flight 510

    TACA Flight 510

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    TACA Flight 510 was a flight from San Salvador to Guatemala City which, on April 6, 1993, landed too far up the runway and careened off at a speed of 90 knots (104 mph; 167 km/hr) for 300 metres (984 feet). The seven-year-old Boeing 767-2S1ER struck the perimeter fence, went down a hill, crashed through a cinder block house and struck another house before coming to a standstill. Three people on the ground were injured after disembarking. A passenger on board had videotaped the landing and incident out his window: the video suggested that a storm has just passed by, and the runway was soaked. Further examination suggested that the plane landed too far along the runway and its touchdown airspeed was excessive, both of which could contribute to the circumstances of the incident.
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Asian Spirit Flight 123

    Asian Spirit Flight 123

    • Aircraft type: NAMC YS-11
    • Operator: Asian Spirit
    • Flight destination: Masbate Airport
    Asian Spirit Flight 321 (6k321) was a previous domestic Asian Spirit(now Zest Airways) flight from Manila's Ninoy Aquino International Airport to Masbate Airport in Masbate City in Bicol region. On 2 January 2008, just a day after the New Year's Day, an NAMC YS-11 departing from Manila, piloted by Captain Alexandro Tiglao with First Officer Dominick Mendoza as co-pilot, overshot the runway at Masbate Airport at 7:30 a.m., due to heavy tailwinds with gustiness reaching 14 knots while landing on runway 21. Although none of the 47 passengers were seriously injured, the accident destroyed the aircraft’s nozzle, the plane’s right propeller and its right and nose wheel, and caused the plane’s fuel tank to leak. The plane left Manila at 5:45PST and was scheduled to arrive at 6:30PST in Masbate Airport. At 07:20, when Asian Spirit flight 321 was 10 miles out, the Masbate controller reported winds 050 at 11 kts, gusting to 14 kts. At 07:35 the pilot flew a right base and turned onto finals for runway 21. The crew was advised that wind was now 040 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 14 knots and caution advised for landing. The YS-11 overshot the runway and impacted a concrete airport perimeter
    7.57
    7 votes
    4
    2009 Russia Sukhoi Su-27 mid-air collision

    2009 Russia Sukhoi Su-27 mid-air collision

    On 16 August 2009 two Sukhoi Su-27 fighter jets from the Russian Knights collided in mid-air during a test flight southeast of Moscow, killing the Knights' leader, Igor Tkachenko. More people on the ground were injured, and a woman received fatal burns after one of the planes crashed into a house and started a fire. The pilots were training for the 2009 MAKS Airshow. A probe into the crash has been launched; it is thought the accident may have been caused by a "flying skill error", according to the Russian Defense Ministry.
    8.17
    6 votes
    5
    PIA Flight 705

    PIA Flight 705

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Pakistan International Airlines
    • Flight destination: Cairo International Airport
    Pakistan International Airlines Flight 705 was a Boeing 720–040B that crashed while descending to land on Runway 34 at Cairo International Airport on May 20, 1965 resulting in 119 fatalities. Flight 705 departed Dhahran International Airport at 21:22 GMT for Cairo. The flight was uneventful and at 23:40 GMT it was cleared for a left-hand approach circuit for Runway 34. At 23:45 the crew reported turning on finals. The Boeing 720 kept descending and nothing more was heard from the flight until the aircraft struck the ground short of the runway, in a slight left-bank attitude with its undercarriage up and flaps set at 20 degrees.This was an inaugural flight and most of the passengers were journalists and owners of travel agencies. The best crew members were chosen for this flight. Controlled flight into terrain - Level ground "The aircraft did not maintain the adequate height for the circuit and continued to descend until it contacted the ground. The reason for that abnormal continuation of descent is unknown." The aircraft crashed during approach. The plane descended during the approach at triple the normal rate. The aircraft exceeded the recommended descent rate during the final
    7.14
    7 votes
    6
    Eagle Airways Flight 2279

    Eagle Airways Flight 2279

    • Aircraft type: Handley Page Jetstream
    • Operator: Eagle Airways
    • Flight destination: Christchurch International Airport
    Eagle Airways Flight 2279 was a commuter flight operated by Air National on behalf of Eagle Airways, a regional carrier division of Air New Zealand. It was hijacked on 8 February 2008 and was the second aircraft hijacking incident in New Zealand, and the first involving a commercial passenger flight. Ten minutes after takeoff, at about 7:40 a.m., the alleged hijacker attacked both of the pilots and demanded the plane be flown to Australia. One pilot was cut in the arm, the other in the leg. She also tried to wrestle the controls from the pilot. There were six other passengers (four New Zealanders, one Australian and one Indian) on board. One female passenger was also injured. The copilot managed to restrain her eventually. Police alleged the hijacker also mentioned having two bombs on board, but no explosives were found. The plane landed safely at Christchurch International Airport at 8:06 a.m. Asha Ali Abdille, a 33-year-old living in Blenheim, New Zealand, originally a refugee from Somalia, was arrested after the plane landed. There were fears among the New Zealand Somali community that they would be branded terrorists. The government quickly stated "the government will not
    6.25
    8 votes
    7
    Turkish Airlines Flight 981

    Turkish Airlines Flight 981

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: Turkish Airlines
    • Flight destination: London Heathrow Airport
    Turkish Airlines Flight 981 was a McDonnell Douglas DC-10 that crashed outside Paris on March 3, 1974, killing all 346 people on board, the highest-ever death-count of any single plane crash with no survivors. The accident is also known as the "Ermenonville air disaster", from the forest near Senlis, Oise, where the aircraft crashed. The crash resulted from the rear cargo hatch blowing-off, causing decompression and severing cables that left the pilots with almost no control. The hatches used manual procedures to ensure they were locked correctly. Problems with the hatches had previously occurred. Investigation showed that these procedures were open to abuse, by forcing the handle shut without the pins being in place. It was noted that the pins had been filed down, making it easier to close the door, but leaving it less resistant to pressure. Also a support-plate for the handle-linkage had not been installed, although this work had been signed-off. Finally the latching had been performed by a Moroccan baggage-handler who could not read the relevant notices, in Turkish or English. After the disaster, the latches were re-designed and the locking system significantly upgraded. The
    8.80
    5 votes
    8
    Atlantic Southeast Airlines Flight 2311

    Atlantic Southeast Airlines Flight 2311

    • Aircraft type: Embraer EMB 120 Brasilia
    • Operator: Atlantic Southeast Airlines
    Atlantic Southeast Airlines Flight 2311 was a regularly scheduled commuter flight from Atlanta, Georgia to Brunswick, Georgia which suffered an uncontrolled collision with terrain during landing approach to Glynco Jetport (later renamed Brunswick Golden Isles Airport), just north of Brunswick, on April 5, 1991. The aircraft was an Embraer 120RT Brasilia, registered N270AS. None of the 20 passengers and 3 crew on board survived the accident. A few minutes before the aircraft impacted with the ground, controllers at Glynco Jetport cleared flight 2311 for a visual approach to runway 07 at the airport. Witnesses reported that as the airplane approached the airport, it suddenly turned or rolled to the left until the wings were perpendicular to the ground. The airplane then fell in a nose-down attitude and disappeared out of sight behind the trees. Four years later, another Embraer Brasilia of ASA crashed in the Georgia countryside, with 9 fatalities. The aircraft involved in the accident was an Embraer EMB-120 Brasilia, manufactured on November 30, 1990. It was equipped with two Pratt & Whitney PW-118 engines and Hamilton Standard 14RF-9 propellers. The airplane received its U.S.
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Korean Air Flight 902

    Korean Air Flight 902

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: Gimpo International Airport
    Korean Air Lines Flight 902 (KAL902, KE902) was the flight number of a civilian airliner that was shot down April 20, 1978, near Murmansk, USSR, after it violated Soviet airspace and allegedly failed to respond to Soviet interceptors. Tapes released by Rovaniemi Area Control Centre show that the pilots of KAL902 transmitted their call sign three times immediately prior to the shootdown. Two passengers were killed when Soviet aircraft opened fire on the aircraft. 107 passengers and crew survived after the plane made an emergency landing on a frozen lake. The Boeing 707 aircraft (registration HL7429), piloted by Kim Chang Ky, left Paris, France on a course to Anchorage, Alaska, United States where it would refuel and proceed to Seoul, South Korea. The plane initially flew north past Great Britain, Iceland, Greenland, and the Canadian Forces Station Alert, located on Ellesmere Island 400 miles (640 km) from the North Pole. It then changed its course, flying southeast; not toward Anchorage but in the opposite direction toward Murmansk. The aircraft was not fitted with an inertial navigation system, and the pilots failed to note the position of the sun, almost 180 degrees off from where
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    American Eagle Flight 4184

    American Eagle Flight 4184

    • Operator: Simmons Airlines
    • Flight destination: O'Hare International Airport
    American Eagle Flight 4184 was an American Eagle ATR 72 that crashed after flying into unknown icing conditions on October 31, 1994. Control was lost and all aboard were killed. The aircraft, N401AM, was an ATR 72-212 operated by Simmons Airlines on behalf of American Eagle, the banner carrier regional airline branding program of AMR Corporation's regional system, prior to the formation of the fully certificated carrier named American Eagle Airlines. The flight was en route from Indianapolis International Airport, Indiana to O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois. Bad weather in Chicago caused delays, prompting air traffic control to hold Flight 4184 over the nearby LUCIT intersection at 10,000 ft (3,000 m). While holding, the plane encountered freezing rain — a dangerous icing condition where supercooled droplets rapidly cause intense ice buildup. Soon after, they were cleared to descend to 8,000 ft (2,400 m). After this descent the pilots were ordered to make another hold. While in the holding pattern, a warning sound indicating an overspeed warning due to the extended flaps was heard in the cockpit. After the pilot took action by retracting the flaps, a strange noise
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    Southwest Airlines Flight 1248

    Southwest Airlines Flight 1248

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737-700
    • Operator: Southwest Airlines
    • Flight destination: McCarran International Airport
    Southwest Airlines Flight 1248 (WN1248, SWA1248) was a scheduled passenger flight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport, in Baltimore, Maryland, to Chicago Midway International Airport, in Chicago, Illinois, to Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, Utah, and then to McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Nevada. On December 8, 2005, the airplane slid off a runway at Chicago-Midway while landing in a snowstorm and crashed into automobile traffic, killing six-year-old Joshua Woods. This is the only accident involving Southwest Airlines to result in fatalities. On Thursday, December 8, 2005, Southwest Airlines Flight 1248 was scheduled to arrive at Chicago Midway International Airport from Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, and then continue on to Salt Lake City International Airport, then to Las Vegas McCarran International Airport. The flight circled over a small area in northwest Indiana several times before attempting to land in a snowstorm. The snowstorm had reduced visibility to less than one mile. At around 7:15 p.m. CST, the pilot attempted a landing with nearly eight inches of snow on the ground in the area. Airport
    9.25
    4 votes
    12
    Air France Flight 8969

    Air France Flight 8969

    • Aircraft type: http://www.freebase.com/view/m/0j5406y
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Paris Orly Airport
    Air France Flight 8969 was an Air France flight that was hijacked on 24 December 1994 by the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) at Algiers, where they killed three passengers, with the intention to blow up the plane over the Eiffel Tower in Paris. When the aircraft reached Marseille, the GIGN, an intervention group of the French Gendarmerie, stormed the plane and killed all four hijackers. The GIA's plan appeared to foreshadow the 11 September attacks. Thomas Sancton of TIME magazine described the event as "one of the most successful anti-terrorist operations in history." Algeria was in a state of civil war. Aircraft flying to Algiers faced the possibility of missile attacks. As a result Air France's flights to Algiers had crews entirely made of people who volunteered for the route. Air France had asked government officials if it absolutely had to continue flying to Algeria; as of the time of the hijacking there had been no replies. Bernard Dhellemme was the captain of the flight. Jean-Paul Borderie was the copilot, and Alain Bossuat was the flight engineer. The Airbus A300B2-1C, tail number F-GBEC, went on its first flight on 28 February 1980. On 24 December 1994, at Houari Boumedienne
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Alaska Airlines Flight 261

    Alaska Airlines Flight 261

    • Operator: Alaska Airlines
    • Flight destination: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
    Alaska Airlines Flight 261, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 aircraft, experienced a fatal accident on January 31, 2000 over the Pacific Ocean about 2.7 miles (4.3 km) north of Anacapa Island, California. The two pilots, three cabin crewmembers, and 83 passengers on board were killed and the aircraft was destroyed. Alaska 261 was a scheduled international passenger flight from Lic. Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle, Washington, with an intermediate stop at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California. The subsequent investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board determined that inadequate maintenance led to excessive wear and catastrophic failure of a critical flight control system during flight. The probable cause was stated to be "a loss of airplane pitch control resulting from the in-flight failure of the horizontal stabilizer trim system jackscrew assembly's acme nut threads. The thread failure was caused by excessive wear resulting from Alaska Airlines's insufficient lubrication of the jackscrew assembly." The aircraft, manufactured in 1992, had over 26,000 hours of
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    TWA Flight 514

    TWA Flight 514

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727
    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    TWA Flight 514, registration N54328, was a Boeing 727-231 en route from Indianapolis, Indiana, and Columbus, Ohio, to Washington Dulles International that crashed into Mount Weather, Virginia, on December 1, 1974. All 85 passengers and 7 crew members were killed. The flight was originally destined for Washington National Airport. However, the plane diverted to Dulles when high crosswinds, east at 28 knots and gusting to 49, prevented safe operations on the main north-south runway at Washington National. The flight was being vectored for a non-precision instrument approach to runway 12 at Dulles. Air traffic controllers cleared the flight down to 7,000 feet (2,100 m) before clearing them for the approach while not on a published segment. The jetliner began a descent to 1,800 feet (550 m) shown on the first checkpoint for the published approach. The data recorder indicated there was some confusion in the cockpit over whether they were still under a radar controlled approach segment which would allow them to descend safely. After reaching 1,800 feet (550 m) there were some 100 to 200-foot (61 m) altitude deviations which the flight crew discussed as encountering heavy downdrafts and
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    United Airlines Flight 811

    United Airlines Flight 811

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: United Airlines
    • Flight destination: Auckland International Airport
    United Airlines Flight 811 experienced a cargo door failure in flight on Friday, February 24, 1989, after its stopover at Honolulu International Airport, Hawaii. The resulting decompression blew out several rows of seats, resulting in the deaths of 9 passengers. The aircraft involved was a Boeing 747-122 (c/n 19875/89, reg N4713U), delivered to United Airlines on October 20, 1970. Flight 811 took off from Honolulu International Airport bound for Auckland, New Zealand with 3 flight crew, 15 flight attendants, and 337 passengers at approximately 01:52 HST. Its flight crew consisted of Captain David Cronin, First Officer Al Slader, and Flight Engineer Randal Thomas. During the climb, the crew made preparations to detour around thunderstorms along the aircraft's track; anticipating turbulence, the captain kept the seatbelt sign lit. After the plane had been flying for approximately 16 minutes, and was passing between 22,000 and 23,000 feet (6,700–7,000 m), a grinding noise was suddenly heard in the business-class section, followed by a loud thud which rattled the whole aircraft. One and a half seconds later, the forward cargo door blew out abruptly. The pressure differential caved in
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    TWA Flight 529

    TWA Flight 529

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed Constellation
    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles
    TWA Flight 529 was a Lockheed Constellation L-049 propliner, registration N86511, operating as a scheduled passenger service from Boston, Massachusetts to San Francisco, California. On September 1, 1961, at 02:05 CDT, the flight crashed shortly after takeoff from Midway Airport (ICAO: KMDW) in Chicago, killing all 73 passengers and 5 crew on board; it was at the time the deadliest single plane disaster in U.S. history. The accident was investigated by the Civil Aeronautics Board, which concluded its probable cause was the loss of a 5/16 inch bolt which fell out of the elevator control mechanism during the climb from Chicago, resulting in an abrupt pitch up followed by a stall and crash. The four-engine propliner originated in Boston, and after making intermediate stops in New York and Pittsburgh, arrived at Chicago Midway Airport at 01:18 CST, where a new crew took over, and fuel and oil were added. At 02:00 the flight departed from runway 22, bound for Las Vegas, Nevada, the next stop. Five minutes later, while climbing westbound to 5,000 ft, the aircraft suddenly pitched violently upwards, resulting in an accelerated stall from which the crew was unable to recover. The aircraft
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    BOAC flight 911

    BOAC flight 911

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: British Overseas Airways Corporation
    • Flight destination: Kai Tak Airport
    BOAC Flight 911 (Speedbird 911) was a round-the-world flight operated by British Overseas Airways Corporation that crashed near Mount Fuji, Japan on 5 March 1966. The Boeing 707-436 operating this flight was commanded by Captain Bernard Dobson, 45, from Dorset, an experienced 707 pilot who had been flying these aircraft since November 1960. The aircraft, registered G-APFE, disintegrated and crashed near Mount Fuji, Japan shortly after departure from Tokyo International Airport, at the start of the Tokyo-Hong Kong segment. All 113 passengers and 11 crew members were killed in the disaster, including a group of 75 Americans associated with Thermo King of Minneapolis, Minnesota, on a 14-day company sponsored tour of Japan and Southeast Asia. There were 26 couples traveling together in the group, leaving a total of 63 children orphaned. This was the third fatal passenger airline accident in Tokyo in a month. On February 4, 1966, the single worst plane crash in aviation history at the time occurred near the same airport when 133 persons died as a Boeing 727 belonging to All Nippon Airways, then a purely domestic Japanese airline, plunged into Tokyo Bay while preparing to land. Then,
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    PSA Flight 182

    PSA Flight 182

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727
    • Operator: Pacific Southwest Airlines
    Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA) Flight 182, registration N533PS, was a Boeing 727-214 commercial airliner that collided with a private Cessna 172 over San Diego, California on September 25, 1978. It was Pacific Southwest Airlines' first accident involving fatalities. The death toll of 144 makes it the deadliest aircraft disaster in California history. It was also the deadliest plane crash in the history of the United States, until American Airlines Flight 191 went down eight months later, on May 25, 1979. Both aircraft crashed into North Park, a San Diego neighborhood, killing all 135 on board the Boeing 727-214, the two men aboard the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, and seven people on the ground in houses, including two children. Nine others on the ground were injured and 22 homes were destroyed or damaged by the impact and the spreading of debris. The PSA 182 accident caused the revision of air traffic rules applicable to the busiest airports across the U.S., with the intention of improving separation of aircraft operating in the vicinity of large airports. Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 182 was a popular early-morning commuter flight terminating at San Diego's Lindbergh Field. The
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    TWA Flight 3

    TWA Flight 3

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-3
    • Operator: Western Airlines
    • Flight destination: Burbank
    TWA Flight 3 was a twin-engine Douglas DC-3-382 propliner, registration NC1946, operated by Transcontinental and Western Air as a scheduled domestic passenger flight from New York, New York, to Burbank, California, via Indianapolis, Indiana; St. Louis, Missouri; Albuquerque, New Mexico and Las Vegas, Nevada. On January 16, 1942, at 19:20 PST, 15 minutes after takeoff from Las Vegas Airport (now Nellis Air Force Base) bound for Burbank, the aircraft slammed into a sheer cliff on Potosi Mountain, 32 miles southwest of the airport, at an elevation of 7,770 ft above sea level, and was destroyed. All nineteen passengers on board, including movie star Carole Lombard and her mother, and all three crew members, died in the crash. The Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) investigated the accident and determined it was caused by a navigation error by the captain. TWA Flight 3 was flying a transcontinental route from New York to greater Los Angeles with multiple intermediate stops, including Indianapolis, Saint Louis, and Albuquerque, with a final destination at Burbank, California. At 4:00 local time on the morning of January 16, in Indianapolis, Indiana, Carole Lombard, her mother Elizabeth
    6.33
    6 votes
    20
    Mandala Airlines Flight 091

    Mandala Airlines Flight 091

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Mandala Airlines
    On 5 September 2005 (10:06 a.m. UTC+7), a Jakarta-bound Boeing 737-200 jetliner operated by Mandala Airlines crashed into a heavily-populated residential area seconds after taking off from Polonia International Airport in Medan, Indonesia. There were 153 fatalities. Dozens of houses and cars were destroyed, and at least 49 people are reported to have perished on the ground. Later it was reported that at least 16 persons survived the accident, with 104 of those on board known to have died including three babies. Most of the survivors are thought to have been seated at the rear of the aircraft, though some have reportedly since died from their injuries. Most of the dead were Indonesian, although at least one Malaysian, Ti Teow Chuan from Sabah, was reported dead. Rizal Nurdin, the governor of North Sumatra at the time, and Raja Inal Siregar, the former governor, were among the dead. The crash was the sixth major incident involving commercial airliners from August 1, 2005 to the date of the incident. The others were, in chronological order: Air France Flight 358; Tuninter Flight 1153 (an ATR-72 crash in the Mediterranean Sea); Helios Airways Flight 522 crash, killing 121 in Greece;
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    TWA Flight 513

    TWA Flight 513

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed Constellation
    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    TWA Flight 513, registration NC86513, Star of Lisbon, was a Lockheed Constellation operated by Transcontinental and Western Air on a training flight on July 11, 1946 when it crashed near Reading, Pennsylvania. Electrical wiring in the baggage compartment arced, starting a fire. The smoke and intense fire created made it impossible for the pilots to maintain control of the aircraft. Of the six crewmembers aboard, five were killed. This accident is memorable for grounding all Lockheed Constellations from July 12 until August 23, 1946 when cargo fire detection equipment could be installed. The crash was referred to in Martin Scorsese's film The Aviator, based on the life of TWA's then-owner, Howard Hughes.
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    JAT Flight 364

    JAT Flight 364

    • Operator: Jat Airways
    • Flight destination: Belgrade Nikola Tesla Airport
    JAT Yugoslav Airlines Flight 367 was a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 aircraft (registration YU-AHT) which exploded shortly after overflying NDB Hermsdorf, East Germany, while en route from Stockholm to Belgrade on 26 January 1972. The aircraft, piloted by captain Ludvig Razdrih, broke into two pieces and spun out of control, crashing near the village of Srbská Kamenice in Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic). 27 of 28 of those on board were killed upon ground impact; but one crew member, Vesna Vulović, survived. McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 was destroyed in flight by Émigré Croatian terrorists (Ustaše) who had placed a bomb on board. Vesna Vulović was near the rear of the aircraft at the time of the explosion. The tailcone of the aircraft was torn away from the main fuselage and both fell from 10,160 meters (33,000 feet) before impact with the ground. A food cart pinned her to the back of the plane during her fall, acting as a seat belt, thus preventing her from being sucked out of the plane during de-compression or the ensuing fall. Some reports stated she was at the back when the explosion occurred, but she has said she was told that she had been found in the middle section of the
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    United Airlines Flight 624

    United Airlines Flight 624

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-6
    • Operator: United Airlines
    United Airlines Flight 624, a Douglas DC-6 airliner, registration NC37506, was a scheduled passenger flight that originated in San Diego, California with stops in Los Angeles and Chicago en route to LaGuardia Airport in New York City. The four-engine propeller-driven airplane crashed at 1:41 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on June 17, 1948 outside of Aristes, Pennsylvania, killing all 4 crew members and 39 passengers on board. The Douglas DC-6 fleet had been grounded by Civil Aviation authorities for four months during the previous winter as a result of the fatal crash of United Airlines Flight 608 on October 24, 1947. It was determined that the crash had been caused by a design flaw that allowed vented fuel to be drawn into the heater air intake scoop that caused a fire in the cargo compartment. As a result, changes were made and a fire extinguisher system was installed on all DC-6 aircraft, including the accident aircraft. Flight 624 from San Diego had just completed a routine initial descent as part of its approach into the New York area, when the forward cargo hold fire indicator light illuminated, leading the flight crew to believe there was a fire in that cargo hold. Although this
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Northwest Airlines Flight 706

    Northwest Airlines Flight 706

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-188 Electra
    • Operator: Northwest Airlines
    Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 706, registration N137US, was a Lockheed L-188 Electra aircraft which crashed on take-off from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport September 17, 1961. All 37 on board were killed in the accident. Flight 706 began its day in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and was scheduled to stop at Chicago before travelling to Tampa, Fort Lauderdale, and Miami, Florida. It arrived at Chicago in the early morning and left soon afterwards, being cleared for takeoff at 8:55 AM. Takeoff was normal until the aircraft reached the altitude of 100 feet above ground level, when witnesses noticed a slight change in the sound of the Electra's engines. The aircraft began a gentle bank to the right as the starboard wing began to drop. The bank angle increased to 35°; at that point the tower controllers picked up a garbled broadcast believed to be from the pilots. The aircraft climbed to approximately 300 feet but continued to bank, eventually reaching a bank angle of over 50°. At that point, the starboard wing nicked a series of high-tension power lines running along the south boundary of the airport; shortly after that, the aircraft struck an embankment and cartwheeled onto its
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Armavia Flight 967

    Armavia Flight 967

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A320
    • Operator: Armavia
    • Flight destination: Adler-Sochi International Airport
    Armavia Flight 967 was a flight operated by Armavia, the largest international airline of Armenia on May 3, 2006, from Yerevan in Armenia to Sochi, a Black Sea coastal resort city in Russia. The aircraft crashed into the sea while attempting to conduct a go-around following its first approach to Sochi airport, killing all 113 aboard. The accident was the first major commercial airline crash in 2006 and the third highest death toll of any accident involving an Airbus A320 after Gulf Air Flight 072 and TAM Airlines Flight 3054. The aircraft was operating a flight from Zvartnots International Airport (EVN) with a scheduled departure time of 01:45 Armenian Daylight Time (20:45 UTC, May 2) and an arrival time at Adler-Sochi International Airport (AER) of 02:00 Moscow Daylight Time (22:00 UTC, May 2). In order to make their decision for departure, the crew obtained the observed weather data and the weather forecast for the takeoff, landing and alternate aerodromes all of which met the requirements for IFR flights. All the crew were correctly licensed and adequately rested to operate the flight. The airplane took off from Zvartnots airport at 20:47. There were 113 occupants on board: 105
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    10 August 2005 helicopter crash near Tallinn

    10 August 2005 helicopter crash near Tallinn

    • Aircraft type: Sikorsky S-76
    • Operator: Copterline
    Copterline Flight 103 (AAQ103) was a Copterline helicopter flight en route to Helsinki, Finland from Tallinn, Estonia that crashed into the sea on August 10, 2005, at 12:45 pm local time. The Sikorsky S-76C+ crash occurred three to four minutes after taking off. On board were two Finnish crew members and 12 passengers: six Finns, four Estonians and two Americans. There were no survivors. The helicopter was flying at an altitude of about 500 metres when it suddenly lost its steerability and plunged into the sea. The emergency floats failed to operate, and the wreck sank quickly. All those on board perished by drowning. The Sikorsky S-76C+ has emergency pontoons for water landings but they were not deployed, and no distress signals were heard before the crash, although it later emerged that the pilots had tried to send an emergency message shortly before the crash. Rescuers reached the site in less than 10 minutes to find just one main rotor blade and an oil slick on the water. The wreckage of the helicopter itself was located by sonar operators on the Estonian Maritime Administration vessel EVA-320, who indicated that the aircraft was intact at a depth of roughly 43 meters. Two
    6.80
    5 votes
    27
    Ansett New Zealand Flight 703

    Ansett New Zealand Flight 703

    • Operator: Ansett New Zealand
    • Flight destination: Palmerston North International Airport
    Ansett New Zealand Flight 703 was an Ansett New Zealand scheduled passenger transport flight from Auckland Airport to Palmerston North. On 9 June 1995, the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 aircraft flying this route crashed west of the Tararua Ranges and 16 km east of Palmerston North airport, during an instrument approach in bad weather. The aircraft was carrying 18 passengers and three crew members. All passengers were New Zealand citizens except for one United States citizen. The flight attendant and three passengers died as a result of the crash. During the approach to a right turn which would place the aircraft on final approach to runway 25, the right landing gear failed to fully extend so the co-pilot began to manually extend it using a hydraulic pump. The aircraft's power settings had already been reduced to Flight Idle which was normal, but the aircraft was inadvertently allowed to descend too low toward the undulating terrain leading into Palmerston North. Although Flight 703's Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) sounded an alarm four seconds before the aircraft hit the ground, the crew was unable to avoid the accident. According to the Transport Accident Investigation
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    Japan Airlines Flight 123

    Japan Airlines Flight 123

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Japan Airlines
    • Flight destination: Osaka International Airport
    Japan Airlines Flight 123 was a Japan Airlines domestic flight from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda) to Osaka International Airport (Itami). On Monday, August 12, 1985, the Boeing 747-146SR that made this route, registered JA8119, suffered mechanical failures 12 minutes into the flight and 32 minutes later crashed into two ridges of Mount Takamagahara in Ueno, Gunma Prefecture, 100 kilometers (62 mi) from Tokyo. The crash site was on Osutaka Ridge (御巣鷹の尾根, Osutaka-no-One), near Mount Osutaka. All 15 crew members and 505 out of 509 passengers died, resulting in a total of 520 deaths and four survivors. It is the deadliest single-aircraft accident in history, and the second-deadliest accidental plane crash in history behind the Tenerife airport disaster. The aircraft involved, registration number JA8119, was a Boeing 747-100SR. Its first flight was on January 28, 1974. Before it was destroyed, it had 25,030 airframe hours and 18,835 cycles (one cycle equals one takeoff and landing). The flight was around the Obon holiday period in Japan, when many Japanese people make yearly trips to their hometowns or resorts. Twenty-one non-Japanese boarded the flight. The four survivors, all
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Santa Bárbara Airlines Flight 518

    Santa Bárbara Airlines Flight 518

    • Aircraft type: ATR 42
    • Operator: Santa Barbara Airlines
    • Flight destination: Simón Bolívar International Airport
    Santa Bárbara Airlines Flight 518 was an ATR 42-300 twin-turboprop aircraft, registration YV1449, operating as a scheduled domestic flight from Mérida, Venezuela to Caracas that crashed into the side of a mountain on 21 February 2008, shortly after takeoff. There were 43 passengers on board, with a crew of two pilots and a flight attendant. The wreckage was discovered a day later with no survivors. It is the highest death toll of any aviation accident involving an ATR 42. Mérida, a university and tourist town located high in the Andes mountains, is surrounded by higher terrain, with night flights prohibited at the nearby Alberto Carnevalli Airport. On 21 February 2008, Flight 518 was the last scheduled flight out of the airport, departing at about 17:00 local time. Shortly after take-off, the ATR 42-300 twin-turboprop slammed into a sheer 13,000-foot (4,000 m) rock wall called "Indian Face" (Spanish: La Cara del Indio). No distress calls were received from the aircraft prior to impact. Antonio Rivero, national director of civil defense, said rescuers had identified the site of the crash in the south-western state of Mérida. Unión Radio cited civil defense regional chief, Gerardo
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Pan Am Flight 151

    Pan Am Flight 151

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed Constellation
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: New York City
    On June 22, 1951, Pan Am Flight 151, flown by the Lockheed L-049 Constellation propliner Clipper Great Republic (registration N88846) crashed into a West African hill at an elevation of 1,050 ft (320 m) near the village of Sanoyie in Bong County, Liberia. All 31 passengers and nine crew on board were killed. The Johannesburg to New York City flight was on the Accra, Gold Coast (now Ghana), to Monrovia, Liberia leg of its journey. At 0301h during a pre-dawn approach to Monrovia's Roberts Field, the flight crew reported to the tower that the radio beacon at Dakar, Senegal was interfering with the Roberts Field radio beacon. After a 0315h weather report was sent to the pilots, all contact with the aircraft was lost. The flight was reported missing at 0410h on June 22, and an aerial search was conducted, but it was unsuccessful in locating the aircraft. At 1430h on June 23, a foot messenger arrived from the village of Sanoyie to report that an aircraft crashed into the side of a hill one day earlier several miles from the village and that everyone aboard was killed. It was determined that the location where the flight crashed was beyond the effective range of the Roberts Field beacon.
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Air Algérie Flight 702P

    Air Algérie Flight 702P

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Air Algérie
    Air Algérie/Phoenix Flight 702P, ship name Oasis, registration 7T-VEE, was a Boeing 737 owned by Air Algérie and leased by Phoenix Aviation which crashed on 21 December 1994 near Coventry Airport, England. All five on board were killed. On the day of the accident, the aircraft departed Amsterdam for a routine flight to Coventry, where live animals were to be loaded on board for export to the Netherlands and France. Weather at Coventry was poor and deteriorated steadily during the day; by the time the aircraft reached the Coventry area, the runway visual range for the main runway at Baginton Airport was only 700 metres. The aircraft was not properly equipped to receive the updated radio-navigational broadcast for the runway in question, so the pilots elected to be guided in by a radar controller using Surveillance Radar Approach (SRA). This was unsuccessful and the captain elected to call a missed approach and eventually divert to the East Midlands Airport. Approximately 90 minutes after landing at East Midlands, visibility at Coventry improved significantly. The flight departed East Midlands at 9:38 local time in order to make a second attempt to land at the scheduled destination.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Japan Airlines Flight 350

    Japan Airlines Flight 350

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-8
    • Operator: Japan Airlines
    • Flight destination: Tokyo International Airport
    Japan Airlines Flight 350 was a McDonnell Douglas DC-8-61, registered JA8061, on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from Fukuoka, Japan, to Tokyo. The airplane crashed 9 February 1982 on approach to Haneda Airport in Tokyo Bay. Flight 350 was Japan Airlines' first crash of the 1980s. The crew consisted of 35-year old Captain Seiji Katagiri (片桐 清二 Katagiri Seiji), 33-year old First Officer Yoshifumi Ishikawa, and 48-year old flight engineer Yoshimi Ozaki. The cause of the crash was traced to Katagiri's deliberate engaging of the number 2 and 3 engine's thrust-reversers in flight, due to mental illness. The First Officer and Flight Engineer worked to restrain him and regain control. Despite their best efforts, the DC-8's descent could not be completely checked, and it touched down in shallow water 300 meters (980 ft) short of the runway. Among the 166 passengers and 8 crew, 24 passengers were killed, with no losses among the crew. Following the accident, Katagiri, one of the first people to take a rescue boat, reportedly claimed to rescuers that he was an office worker to avoid detection. The captain was later found to be suffering from a mental illness prior to the incident,
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Singapore Airlines Flight 006

    Singapore Airlines Flight 006

    • Operator: Singapore Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    Singapore Airlines Flight 006 (SQ006) was a scheduled passenger flight from Singapore Changi Airport to Los Angeles International Airport via Chiang Kai-shek Airport (now Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport) in Taiwan. On 31 October 2000, at 15:17 UTC, 23:17 Taipei local time, a Boeing 747-412 on the route attempted to take off from the wrong runway in Taipei during a typhoon, destroying the aircraft and killing 83 of the 179 occupants. SQ006 was the first fatal crash of a Singapore Airlines aircraft; prior to the SQ006 crash, the sole fatal incident involving SIA was the crash of SilkAir Flight 185, operated by subsidiary SilkAir. The aircraft involved in the accident was a Boeing 747-400, registration 9V-SPK. It had been delivered to Singapore Airlines on 21 January 1997. It had its last maintenance check on 16 September 2000, and had no defects. At 15:00 UTC, 23:00 Taipei local time on 31 October 2000, 9V-SPK left Bay B5 during heavy rain caused by Typhoon Xangsane. At 23:05:57, the CKS Airport cleared the aircraft to taxi to runway 05L via "taxiway Sierra Sierra West Cross" and "November Papa". At 23:15:22, the airport cleared the aircraft to takeoff at 05L. Many carriers in
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    TAROM Flight 371

    TAROM Flight 371

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A310
    • Operator: Tarom
    • Flight destination: Brussels Airport
    TAROM Flight 371 was an Airbus A310 that crashed near Baloteşti in Romania on 31 March 1995. It was a flight from Bucharest's main Otopeni airport to Brussels. The flight crashed shortly after it took off. Two main reasons are indicated: first the throttle of the starboard engine jammed, remaining in takeoff thrust, while the other engine reduced slowly to idle, creating an asymmetrical thrust condition that ultimately caused the aircraft to roll over and crash. Second, the crew failed to respond to the thrust asymmetry. The captain did not say anything on the flight recording during the emergency and it was concluded that he was either incapacitated or missing from his seat. The first officer expressed concern (it's not clear whether about the captain or the aircraft attitude) and attempted a recovery just some seconds before the crash. The name of the aircraft was Muntenia, named after the region of Romania. None of the 10 crew and 50 passengers survived. 32 of the passengers were from Belgium, 10 from Romania, 2 from Spain, 1 from France, 1 from Thailand and there were 3 Americans aboard.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    China Airlines Flight 140

    China Airlines Flight 140

    • Aircraft type: A300B4-622R
    • Operator: China Airlines
    • Flight destination: Nagoya Airport
    China Airlines Flight 140 was en route from Taipei, Taiwan to Nagoya, Japan. On 26 April 1994, the Airbus A300 on the route was due to land at Nagoya Airport. The Airbus A300 was completing a routine flight and approach, when, just before landing, the First Officer inadvertently pressed the Takeoff/Go-around button (also known as a TO/GA) which raises the throttle position to the same as take offs and go-arounds. Pilot Wang Lo-chi (T: 王樂琦, S:王乐琦, P: Wáng​ Lè​qí​) and copilot Chuang Meng-jung (T: 莊孟容, S:庄孟容, P: Zhuāng Mèng​róng​​) attempted to correct the situation by manually reducing the throttles and pushing the yoke downwards. The autopilot then acted against these inputs (as it is programmed to do when the TO/GA button is activated), causing the plane to have a very nose-high attitude. This nose-high attitude, combined with decreasing airspeed due to insufficient thrust, resulted in an aerodynamic stall of the aircraft. With insufficient altitude to recover from this condition, the subsequent crash killed 264 (15 crew and 249 passengers) of the 271 (15 crew and 256 passengers) people aboard. All passengers who survived the incident were seated in rows 7 through 15. The crash
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Far Eastern Air Transport Flight 103

    Far Eastern Air Transport Flight 103

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Far Eastern Air Transport
    • Flight destination: Kaohsiung International Airport
    Far East Air Transport Flight 103 (callsign FAR EASTERN 103), a Boeing 737-222, had just departed Taipei Songshan Airport for Kaohsiung on 22 August 1981, when the aircraft broke apart in mid-air 14 minutes after take-off. Although the accident was thought to have been caused by an explosive device, an investigation by the Republic of China Civil Aeronautics Board concluded that severe corrosion led to a pressure hull rupture. The aircraft had previously lost cabin pressure on 5 August and also when the crew had been returning it to Taipei for repairs earlier on the day of its fatal flight. The crash occurred 94 miles (151 km) south of Taipei and the wreckage was in an area with the length of 4 miles (6.4 km). A total of 110 passengers and crew including 18 Japanese citizens (including Kuniko Mukōda), and two Americans, died.
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    ValuJet Flight 592

    ValuJet Flight 592

    • Flight destination: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
    ValuJet Flight 592 was a domestic passenger flight between Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, and William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia that crashed in the Everglades on Saturday, May 11, 1996, killing all 110 people on board. The aircraft that crashed, a DC-9 was 27 years old and had been previously owned by Delta Air Lines. Its first flight was April 18, 1969. Delivery date was May 27, 1969. It had suffered a series of incidents in the previous two years, including aborted takeoffs and emergency landings. On the afternoon of May 11, 1996, Flight 592 pushed back from gate G2 in Miami after a delay of 1 hour and 4 minutes due to mechanical problems. There were 105 passengers, mainly from Florida and Georgia, on board, as well as a crew of two pilots and three flight attendants, bringing the total number of people on board to 110. At 2:04 pm, 10 minutes before disaster, the DC-9 took off from runway 9L and began a normal climb. At 2:10 pm, Captain Candi Kubeck and First Officer Richard Hazen heard a loud bang in their headphones, and noticed the plane was losing electrical power. Seconds later, a flight attendant entered the cockpit and
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Aerolinee Itavia Flight 870

    Aerolinee Itavia Flight 870

    • Operator: Aerolinee Itavia
    • Flight destination: Palermo International Airport
    Aerolinee Itavia Flight 870 was an Italian DC-9 jet airline flight which crashed into the Tyrrhenian Sea, killing all passengers and crew, while en route from Bologna, Italy to Palermo, Italy in 1980. The crash has been attributed to either a terrorist bomb or to an air-to-air missile strike. Known in the Italian media as the Ustica Massacre ("Strage di Ustica") - Ustica being a small island near the crash-site - the disaster led to numerous investigations, legal actions, and accusations, and continues to be a source of speculation, including claims of conspiracy by the Italian government and others. Flight 870 was a regularly scheduled transit from Guglielmo Marconi Airport in Bologna to Palermo International Airport in Palermo, Sicily. The flight departed 2 hours late at 20:08 CET on 27 June 1980. At the controls of the McDonnell Douglas DC-9-15 that evening were Captain Domenico Gatti and First Officer Enzo Fontana. The aircraft (registered I-TIGI) crashed into the Tyrrhenian Sea near the island of Ustica, about 130 km southwest of Naples, at 20:59 CET. All 81 people on board - 2 pilots, 2 flight attendants, and 77 passengers - were killed. Two Italian Air Force F-104s were
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    FedEx Flight 705

    FedEx Flight 705

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: FedEx Express
    • Flight destination: San Jose International Airport
    On April 7, 1994, Federal Express Flight 705, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30 cargo jet ferrying electronics across the United States from Memphis, Tennessee to San Jose, California, experienced an attempted hijacking for the purpose of a suicide attack. Auburn Calloway, a FedEx employee facing possible dismissal for lying about his previous flying experience, boarded the scheduled flight as a deadheading passenger with a guitar case carrying several hammers and a speargun. He intended to disable the aircraft's cockpit voice recorder before take-off and, once airborne, kill the crew using the blunt force of the hammers so their injuries would appear consistent with an accident rather than a hijacking. The speargun would be a last resort. He would then crash the aircraft while just appearing to be an employee killed in an accident. This would make his family eligible for a $2.5 million life insurance policy paid by Federal Express. Calloway's plan was unsuccessful. Despite severe injuries, the crew was able to fight back, subdue Calloway and land the aircraft safely. An attempt at a mental health defense was unsuccessful and Calloway was subsequently convicted of multiple charges
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    1978 Icelandic Airlines Crash

    1978 Icelandic Airlines Crash

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-8
    • Operator: Loftleiðir
    • Flight destination: Bandaranaike International Airport
    Icelandic Airlines LL 001, a charter flight, crashed on November 15, 1978 on approach just short of the runway at the international airport of Colombo, Sri Lanka. The Douglas DC-8 crash killed 8 of the 13 Icelandic crew members, 5 reserve crew members and 170 (mostly Indonesian) Muslim pilgrims, out of a total of 262 passengers and crew. The official report by Sri Lankan authorities gave the probable cause of the crash as being failure of the crew to conform to approach procedures; however U.S. and Icelandic authorities officially claim faulty equipment at the airport and air traffic control error as the cause of the crash. It is the worst crash in Icelandic aviation history. The flight departed Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, en route to Surabaya in Indonesia. It was to land at Colombo-Bandaranaike International Airport for a refueling stop and crew rotation. Thunderstorms were in the area, and windshear was an issue. The aircraft involved in the incident was DC-8 chartered for Hajj operations.
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Cubana Flight 455

    Cubana Flight 455

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-8
    • Operator: Cubana de Aviación
    Cubana de Aviación Flight 455 was a Cuban flight from Barbados to Jamaica that was brought down by a terrorist attack on October 6, 1976. All 78 people on board the Douglas DC-8 aircraft were killed in what was then the deadliest terrorist airline attack in the Western Hemisphere. Two time bombs were used, variously described as dynamite or C-4. Evidence implicated several CIA-linked anti-Castro Cuban exiles and members of the Venezuelan secret police DISIP. Political complications quickly arose when Cuba accused the US government of being an accomplice to the attack. CIA documents released in 2005 indicate that the agency "had concrete advance intelligence, as early as June 1976, on plans by Cuban exile terrorist groups to bomb a Cubana airliner." Former CIA operative Posada Carriles denies involvement but provides many details of the incident in his book "Caminos del Guerrero" (Way of the Warrior). Four men were arrested in connection with the bombing and a trial was held in Venezuela: Freddy Lugo and Hernán Ricardo Lozano were sentenced to 20-year prison terms; Orlando Bosch was acquitted because of technical defects in the prosecution evidence, and lived in Miami, Florida until
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Iran Air Flight 655

    Iran Air Flight 655

    • Aircraft type: A300B2-203
    • Operator: Iran Air
    • Flight destination: Dubai International Airport
    Iran Air Flight 655 was a civilian jet airliner shot down by U.S. missiles on 3 July 1988 as it flew over the Strait of Hormuz at the end of the Iran–Iraq War. The aircraft, an Airbus A300B2-203 operated by Iran Air, was flying from Bandar Abbas, Iran to Dubai, United Arab Emirates. While flying in Iranian airspace over Iran's territorial waters in the Persian Gulf on its usual flight path, it was destroyed by the United States Navy guided missile cruiser USS Vincennes (CG-49). All 290 onboard including 66 children and 16 crew perished. The incident is ranked ninth among the deadliest disasters in aviation history. It was the highest death toll of any aviation incident in the Indian Ocean and the highest death toll of any incident involving an Airbus A300 anywhere in the world. The Vincennes had entered Iranian territorial waters after one of its helicopters drew warning fire from Iranian speedboats operating within Iranian territorial limits. The Flight 655 incident was a year after the 17 March 1987, Iraqi Air Force attack on the U.S. Navy guided-missile frigate USS Stark (FFG-31). U.S. naval forces had exchanged gunfire with Iranian gunboats in the fall of 1987. The U.S. Navy
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    2007 Dash 8 landing gear incidents

    2007 Dash 8 landing gear incidents

    • Operator: Scandinavian Airlines System
    • Flight destination: Copenhagen Airport
    In September 2007, two separate incidents of similar landing gear failures occurred within four days of each other on Bombardier Dash 8-Q400 aircraft, all operated by Scandinavian Airlines (SAS). A third incident, again with an SAS aircraft, occurred in October 2007, leading to the withdrawal of the type from the airline's fleet. Scandinavian Airlines Flight 1209, a de Havilland Canada Dash-8-400 (LN-RDK), took off from Copenhagen Airport, Denmark, on September 9, 2007. It was headed to Aalborg Airport, Denmark. Prior to landing, the right main landing gear failed to lock and the crew circled for an hour before attempting a prepared emergency landing. Upon touchdown, the right landing gear collapsed, the right wing touched ground, and a fire broke out. The fire went out before the aircraft came to rest and all passengers and crew were evacuated. Five people suffered minor injuries, some from propeller parts entering the cabin and others from the evacuation. When the handle for lowering the landing gear was activated, the indicator showed two green and one red light. The red light indicated that the right main gear was not locked in position. The landing was aborted. Attempts at
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Adam Air Flight 574

    Adam Air Flight 574

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Adam Air
    • Flight destination: Sam Ratulangi Airport
    Adam Air Flight 574 (KI-574) was a scheduled domestic passenger flight operated by Adam Air between the Indonesian cities of Surabaya (SUB) and Manado (MDC) that disappeared near Polewali in Sulawesi on 1 January 2007. The plane, a Boeing 737-4Q8, was ultimately determined to have crashed into the ocean. All 102 people on board died, the highest death toll of any aviation accident involving a Boeing 737–400. A full national investigation was immediately launched into the disaster. The final report, released on 25 March 2008, concluded that the pilots lost control of the aircraft after they became preoccupied with troubleshooting the inertial navigation system and inadvertently disconnected the autopilot. The crash is one of several transportation accidents, including the subsequent non-fatal crash of Adam Air Flight 172, which among them have resulted in large-scale transport safety reforms in Indonesia, as well as the United States downgrading its safety rating of Indonesian aviation, and of the entire Indonesian fleet being added to the list of air carriers banned in the EU. Adam Air was subsequently banned from flying by the Indonesian government, and would later declare
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Delta Air Lines Flight 1989

    Delta Air Lines Flight 1989

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: Delta Air Lines
    On September 11, 2001, Delta Air Lines Flight 1989 was a regularly scheduled flight offering nonstop morning service from Logan International Airport to Los Angeles International Airport on a Boeing 767-300ER aircraft. This flight was one of several flights considered by the U.S. Government as possibly hijacked. The flight had not been compromised, and soon landed safely in Cleveland, Ohio. The Boston Center air traffic controllers realized that both of the aircraft that had struck the World Trade Center were Boeing 767s departing Logan Airport for Los Angeles and that Delta 1989 fit the same profile as other hijacked flights: it had taken off from Logan International and was a 767 ER. When Delta 1989 failed to acknowledge Boston Center's communications, it was declared a suspected hijacking. Boston Center staff notified the FAA about their suspicions at 9:19 AM Eastern Daylight Time when the FAA’s New England regional office contacted the Herndon Command Center and asked Herndon to relay a request that Cleveland Center notify Delta 1989 to increase cockpit security. Herndon then ordered controllers to send a cockpit warning to Delta 1989. Boston was tracking Delta 1989 and not
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Lady be Good

    Lady be Good

    • Aircraft type: Consolidated B-24 Liberator
    • Flight destination: Naples
    Lady Be Good was an American B-24D Liberator, AAF serial number 41-24301, which flew for the United States Army Air Forces during World War II. Based at Soluch Field in Soluch (today Suluq and Benina International Airport, Libya) as part of the 514th Bomb Squadron, 376th Bomb Group, it failed to return from an April 4, 1943 bombing raid on Naples, Italy. At the time, the plane was assumed to have crashed into the Mediterranean Sea and its nine crew members were classified as Missing in Action. In 1958 the nearly intact Lady Be Good was discovered 710 km (440 miles) inland. Subsequent searches uncovered the remains of all but one of the crew. The crew of Lady Be Good were on their first combat mission, having arrived in Libya on March 18, 1943. The aircraft was also new, having reached the 376th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on March 25. The plane had the identification number 64 stencil-painted on its nose and its given name hand-painted on the starboard, front side of the forward fuselage; it was one of 25 B-24s assigned to bomb Naples late in the afternoon of April 4. The members of the Lady Be Good crew were: The crew took off from Soluch Field shortly after 3 pm., one of the last
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Philippine Airlines Flight 137

    Philippine Airlines Flight 137

    • Operator: Philippine Airlines
    Philippine Airlines Flight 137 was a scheduled passenger flight from Manila's Ninoy Aquino International Airport to Bacolod City Domestic Airport. On March 22, 1998, flight 137 overshot the runway while landing at Bacolod City Domestic Airport. There were no fatalities among the aircraft's crew and passengers, but three people died on the ground as the airliner plowed through a residential area. The aircraft, an Airbus A320-214, tail number RP-C3222, was destroyed. It had been in service for barely three months prior to the accident. A selection by the pilot of the wrong mode on the onboard flight computers prevented power from being reduced to idle, which inhibited thrust reverse and spoilers from being used. The offending engine was shut down, and brakes applied, but the aircraft was unable to stop before the end of the runway.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    El Al Flight 1862

    El Al Flight 1862

    • Operator: El Al
    • Flight destination: Ben Gurion International Airport
    On 4 October 1992, El Al Flight 1862, a Boeing 747 cargo plane of the Israeli airline El Al, crashed into the Groeneveen and Klein-Kruitberg flats in the Bijlmermeer (colloquially "Bijlmer") neighbourhood (part of Amsterdam Zuidoost) of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. For the location in the Bijlmermeer, the crash is known in Dutch as the "Bijlmerramp" ("Bijlmer disaster"). A total of 43 people were killed, including the plane's crew of three, a non-revenue passenger in a jump seat, and 39 people on the ground. Many more were injured. This accident is one of the worst accidents in Dutch aviation (worst being the Tenerife airport disaster). On 4 October 1992, the aircraft, a Boeing 747-258F, registration 4X-AXG, was traveling from John F. Kennedy International Airport to Ben Gurion International Airport and made a stopover at Schiphol. During the flight from New York to Schiphol, three issues were noted: fluctuations in the autopilot speed regulation, problems with the shortwave radio, and fluctuations in the voltage of engine number three. The jet landed at Schiphol at 2:31 pm local time. New cargo was loaded into the plane; the cargo had been approved by customs authorities, but as
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Kam Air Flight 904

    Kam Air Flight 904

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Kam Air
    • Flight destination: Kabul International Airport
    Kam Air Flight 904 was involved in a deadly aviation disaster over the Pamir mountains of Afghanistan in February 2005. The incident took place shortly after 4:00 p.m.local time (UTC+4:30) on February 3, when a private Kam Air Boeing 737-200 jet aircraft went missing in Afghanistan during a domestic flight from the western city of Herat to the capital Kabul. The crash is the deadliest air disaster in the history of Afghanistan. The aircraft lost communication during the worst winter snowstorm in 5 years. The cause of the loss of communication, and the subsequent crash, is presently unknown. Taliban leader Mullah Dadullah stated that his guerrilla fighters had not shot down the plane and expressed sadness at the crash. Air traffic control for the Kabul area is provided by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). Near to Kabul is Bagram Air Base, which has been in control of the U.S. military forces. It was possible for flight 904 to have diverted and land at Bagram Air Base instead of Kabul International Airport. A rescue operation was launched under atrocious weather conditions by the ISAF and Afghan National Army (ANA), and the tail of the plane was sighted from two
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    TACA Flight 110

    TACA Flight 110

    • Operator: Grupo TACA
    • Flight destination: Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport
    TACA Flight 110 was an international scheduled airline flight operated by TACA Airlines, traveling from Belize to New Orleans. On May 24, 1988, the flight lost power in both engines but its pilots made a successful deadstick landing on a grass levee, with no one aboard sustaining more than minor injuries. The captain of the flight, Carlos Dardano of El Salvador, had only one eye due to crossfire on a small flight to El Salvador, which was undergoing a civil war at the time. The aircraft, a Boeing 737-3T0 (tail number N75356, serial number 23838), had first flown on 26 January 1988, and had been in service with TACA for about two weeks. On this day, the flight proceeded normally, taking off from Belize City's Philip S. W. Goldson International Airport and flying over the Gulf of Mexico toward the Louisiana coast. This airliner was the 1,505th Boeing 737 manufactured, and was owned by a previous operator before TACA acquired it in May 1988. The airframe is currently operated by Southwest Airlines, and has been operated by six airlines (including TACA): Investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) revealed that during descent from FL 350 (35,000 feet / 11,000
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 401

    Eastern Air Lines Flight 401

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-1011
    • Operator: Eastern Air Lines
    • Flight destination: Miami International Airport
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 401 was a Lockheed L-1011 Tristar 1 jet that crashed into the Florida Everglades on the night of December 29, 1972, causing 101 fatalities (99 initial crash fatalities, two died shortly afterward). The crash was a result of the flight crew's failure to recognize a deactivation of the autopilot during their attempt to troubleshoot a malfunction of the landing gear position indicator system. As a result, the flight gradually lost altitude and eventually crashed, while the flight crew was preoccupied with solving that problem. It was the first crash of a wide-body aircraft and at the time, the second deadliest single-aircraft disaster in the United States. Eastern Air Lines Flight 401, operated by a four-month-old Lockheed L-1011-1 Tristar (the tenth example delivered to the carrier) carrying 163 passengers and 13 crew members, left New York's JFK Airport on Friday, December 29, 1972 at 9:20 p.m., en route to Miami International Airport. The flight was under the command of captain Robert 'Bob' Loft, 55, a veteran Eastern Air Lines pilot ranked 50th in seniority at Eastern. His flight crew included first officer Albert Stockstill, 39, and second officer (flight
    6.00
    5 votes
    52
    1996 Croatia USAF CT-43 crash

    1996 Croatia USAF CT-43 crash

    • Aircraft type: Boeing T-43
    • Flight destination: Dubrovnik Airport
    On April 3, 1996, a United States Air Force CT-43A crashed on approach to Dubrovnik, Croatia while on an official trade mission. The aircraft, a Boeing 737-253 built as a T-43 navigation trainer, was carrying United States Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown and 34 other people, including The New York Times Frankfurt Bureau chief Nathaniel C. Nash. While attempting an instrument approach to Dubrovnik Airport, the airplane crashed into a mountainside killing everyone on board. Air Force Tech. Sgt Shelly Kelly initially survived the impact of the crash but died from her injuries hours later in an ambulance. The aircraft was operated by the 86th Airlift Wing, based at Ramstein Air Base in Germany. Unlike civilian 737s, the military CT-43A version was equipped with neither a flight data recorder nor a cockpit voice recorder. The official Air Force accident investigation board report noted several reasons that led the CT-43, callsign IFO-21 (short for Implementation Force), to crash. Chief among the findings was a "failure of command, aircrew error and an improperly designed instrument approach procedure". Notably the inclement weather was not deemed a substantial contributing factor in the
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Aerolineas Argentinas Flight 322

    Aerolineas Argentinas Flight 322

    • Aircraft type: De Havilland Comet
    • Operator: Aerolíneas Argentinas
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 322 was a scheduled Buenos Aires–São Paulo–Port of Spain–New York City international passenger service, operated with a Comet 4, registration LV-AHR, that crashed during climbout on the early stages of its second leg, when it collided with tree tops shortly after takeoff from Viracopos-Campinas International Airport on 23 November 1961. There were 52 fatalities, 40 of them passengers. The jetliner arrived from Buenos Aires, Argentina and landed at Viracopos-Campinas International Airport, 62 miles (100 km) north of São Paulo, as an intermediate stop. It took off at 05:38, bound for Piarco International Airport, Trinidad, with New York City as its final destination. After reaching an altitude of about 100 metres (330 ft), the aircraft lost altitude, collided with eucalyptus trees and crashed into the ground; its fuel tanks exploded on impact. All 52 people on board were killed in the disaster. The accident was investigated by the Brazilian government with participation from the government of Argentina, the state of registry of the accident aircraft. The weather conditions at the time of the accident were "dark night due to 7/8 (broken) stratocumulus at
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    China Airlines Flight 120

    China Airlines Flight 120

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: China Airlines
    • Flight destination: Naha Airport
    China Airlines Flight 120 was a regularly scheduled flight from Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport in Taoyuan County, Taiwan to Naha Airport in Okinawa, Japan. On August 20, 2007, the Boeing 737-800 aircraft operating the flight caught fire and exploded after landing and taxiing to the gate area at Naha Airport. Four people (three from the aircraft and one ground crew) sustained injuries in the accident. The China Airlines aircraft, with registration number B-18616, had been delivered in July, 2002. Like other Next Generation Boeing 737 aircraft, it was equipped with CFM56-7B26 engines. There were 157 passengers aboard, including 2 infants. Of the number, 110 passengers were from Taiwan, 23 were from Japan, and 24 were from other countries. The crew of eight were mostly Taiwanese, with one Japanese flight attendant. Most of the Taiwanese passengers had taken packaged tours from travel agencies operating on Taiwan. Travel agencies that sold packages to CI120 passengers included Daiei Travel Service (大榮旅行社), Gloria Tours (喜美旅行社), Mic Travel Co (萬達旅行社), and South East Travel Service (東南旅行社). The plane landed normally at 10:26 a.m. local time and taxied to the gate area by 10:34.
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Pan Am Flight 103

    Pan Am Flight 103

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    Pan Am Flight 103, also commonly referred to as the Lockerbie bombing, was the bombing of a Pan Am transatlantic flight from London Heathrow Airport to New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Wednesday, 21 December 1988. A Boeing 747–121, named Clipper Maid of the Seas, was totally destroyed by an explosive device killing all 243 passengers and 16 crew members. Large sections of the plane crashed into Lockerbie, in southern Scotland, killing a further 11 people on the ground. Following a three-year joint investigation by Scottish police and the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, murder warrants were issued for two Libyan nationals in November 1991. Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi eventually handed over the two men for trial at Camp Zeist, Netherlands in 1999 after protracted negotiations and UN sanctions. In 2001 Libyan intelligence officer, Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, was jailed for the bombing. In August 2009 he was released by the Scottish government on compassionate grounds after being diagnosed with prostate cancer. He died in May 2012 remaining the only person to be convicted for the attack. In 2003 Gaddafi admitted Libya's responsibility for the Lockerbie
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    PMTair Flight U4 241

    PMTair Flight U4 241

    • Aircraft type: Antonov An-24
    • Operator: PMTair
    • Flight destination: Sihanoukville International Airport
    On June 25, 2007, PMTair Flight 241 (U4 241), an Antonov An-24, crashed in southwestern Cambodia, northeast of Bokor Mountain in Kampot Province. All of the 22 people on board, most of whom were South Korean tourists, were killed. The aircraft was making a domestic flight from Angkor International Airport in Siem Reap to Sihanoukville International Airport in Sihanoukville, Cambodia. Of the sixteen passengers, 13 were South Koreans and three were from the Czech Republic. The Korean passengers were part of a tour group. The crew of six was made up of an Uzbekistani pilot and two Cambodian co-pilots, a Cambodian flight engineer and two Cambodian flight attendants. The airplane crashed about five minutes before it was due to land in Sihanoukville. The Cambodian government searched for the crashed plane and possible survivors by mobilizing its military forces and with aid of Thailand based US Naval P-3C. Bad weather and the location of crash site, deep in the jungle, made the efforts of search and rescue teams difficult. Eventually, Prime Minister Hun Sen announced officially that the SAR team located the crash site and confirmed the death of all 22 passengers. Cambodian rescue teams
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Stockport Air Disaster

    Stockport Air Disaster

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-4
    • Operator: bmi
    • Flight destination: Manchester International Airport
    The Stockport Air Disaster was the crash of a Canadair C-4 Argonaut aircraft owned by British Midland Airways, registration G-ALHG, near the centre of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England on Sunday 4 June 1967. 72 of the 84 aboard were killed in the accident. Of the 12 survivors, all were seriously injured. It currently stands as the fourth worst disaster in British aviation history. The aircraft, which had been chartered by Arrowsmith Holidays Ltd, left Palma de Mallorca at 5:00 am, carrying holidaymakers back from the Balearic Islands to Manchester Airport. The approach controller vectored it towards the ILS as soon as it reached the Congleton NDB, but the pilots were apparently unable to put the aircraft on the extended runway centreline and called an overshoot. As the aircraft was making a second approach to the airport, the Nos. 3 and 4 engines suddenly cut out over the town of Stockport and the No. 4 propeller began to windmill. The aircraft became uncontrollable and crashed at 10:09 am local time in an open area between buildings close to the town centre. Despite the crash occurring in an overwhelmingly urban area, there were no fatalities on the ground. Members of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Flash Airlines flight 604

    Flash Airlines flight 604

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: Flash Airlines
    • Flight destination: Charles de Gaulle International Airport
    Flash Airlines Flight 604 was a charter flight operated by Egyptian charter company Flash Airlines. On 3 January 2004, the Boeing 737-300 crashed into the Red Sea shortly after takeoff from Sharm el-Sheikh International Airport, killing all 148 passengers, many of them French tourists, and all six crew members. The findings of the crash investigation are controversial, with accident investigators from the different countries involved not agreeing on the cause. Flight 604's death toll is the highest of any aviation accident in Egypt. It is also the highest of any accident involving a Boeing 737-300. The aircraft, a Boeing 737-3Q8, had originally been delivered to TACA Airlines in 1992. Other operators included Color Air, Egypt-based Mediterranean Airlines, and the prior corporate identity of Flash Airlines, Heliopolis Airlines. The flight took off at 04:42 local time (Eastern European Time) (0242 GMT) from runway 22R at the Egyptian resort en route to Paris via Cairo. The captain was one of Egypt's most experienced pilots, with over 7,000 hours flying experience that included a highly decorated career in the Egyptian Air Force. After taking off, the aircraft should have climbed and
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Air China Flight 129

    Air China Flight 129

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: Air China
    • Flight destination: Gimhae International Airport
    Air China Flight 129 (CCA129, CA129) was a flight from Beijing Capital International Airport, Beijing, People's Republic of China to Gimhae International Airport, Busan, South Korea. On April 15, 2002, the jet on this route crashed into a hill near Busan, killing 129 of 166 on board. CA129, Air China's first aircraft accident, is currently recorded as the deadliest aviation accident in South Korea. The Boeing 767-200 took off at 08:37 local time (0037 UTC). After nearly 2 hours in flight, it arrived near Gimhae airport in light rain and mist. At 11:20 local time (0220UTC), CA129 received clearance to land at runway 36L from Gimhae tower, but the aircraft circled the runway again after a missed approach due to low visibility. After an attempt to circle-to-land on runway 18R (the same runway from the opposite direction), the crew concentrated too much on the weather and ATC communications while going below the Minimum Safe Altitude (MSA), and crashed into a hill at 11:40 local time (0240UTC). The aircraft broke into parts and caught fire. 37 survived, including the captain. The aircraft, delivered in 1985, was Line No. 127. It was previously operated by CAAC and then transferred to
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    China Airlines Flight 676

    China Airlines Flight 676

    • Aircraft type: A300-600R
    • Operator: China Airlines
    • Flight destination: Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
    China Airlines Flight 676 (CAL676, CI676) crashed into a road and residential area near Taoyuan County's Chiang Kai-shek International Airport, Taiwan on the night of February 16, 1998. The Airbus A300-622R jet, registered B-1814, was en route from Ngurah Rai Airport in Bali, Indonesia to Taipei, Taiwan. The weather was inclement with rain and fog when the aircraft approached Chiang Kai-shek International Airport, so the pilot executed a missed approach. After the jet was cleared to land at runway 05L, the autopilot was disengaged, and the pilots then attempted a manual go-around. The jet slowed down, pitched up by 40 degrees, rose 1,000 feet (300 m), stalled, and crashed into a residential neighborhood, bursting into flames. All 196 people on board were killed (including the president of Taiwan's central bank, Sheu Yuan-dong, his wife, Huang Mian-mei, and three central bank officials), along with six people on the ground. Hsu Lu, the manager of the Voice of Taipei radio station, said that one boy was pulled alive from the wreckage and later died. The cockpit voice recording was leaked on the Internet, but has been removed as it is property of the Taiwanese government. The flight
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Comair Flight 5191

    Comair Flight 5191

    • Aircraft type: Bombardier CRJ200
    • Operator: Comair
    • Flight destination: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
    Comair Flight 191, marketed as Delta Connection Flight 5191, was a scheduled United States (US) domestic passenger flight from Lexington, Kentucky, to Atlanta, Georgia, operated on behalf of Delta Connection by Comair. On the morning of August 27, 2006, the Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet 100ER that was being used for the flight crashed while attempting to take off from Blue Grass Airport in Fayette County, Kentucky, four miles (6 kilometers) west of the central business district of the City of Lexington. The aircraft was assigned the airport's Runway 22 for the takeoff, but used Runway 26 instead. Runway 26 was too short for a safe takeoff, causing the aircraft to overrun the end of the runway before it could become airborne. It crashed just past the end of the runway, killing all 47 passengers and two of the three crew. The flight's first officer was the only survivor. Although not the pilot in command, according to the cockpit voice recorder transcript, the first officer was the pilot flying at the time of the accident. The flight was sold under the Delta Air Lines brand as Delta Flight 5191 (DL5191) and was operated by Comair as Comair Flight 191 (OH191). It is usually
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Pan Am Flight 214

    Pan Am Flight 214

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: Philadelphia International Airport
    Pan Am Flight 214, a Boeing 707-121 registered as N709PA, was en route from Baltimore to Philadelphia on December 8, 1963, when it crashed near Elkton, Maryland after being hit by lightning, killing all 81 on board. On December 8, 1963, Pan American 214, operated by Clipper Tradewind departed Isla Verde International Airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico at 4:10pm Eastern Standard Time (EST) for a flight to Baltimore's Friendship Airport (now Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, or BWI), where 69 passengers disembarked. At 8:24 p.m. EST, flight 214 departed for Philadelphia with 73 passengers and 8 crew members on board. Because of high winds in the area, the crew chose to wait in a holding pattern with five other airplanes rather than attempt to land in Philadelphia. At 8:58 p.m. EST, while in the holding pattern, the aircraft was hit by lightning, which ignited fuel vapors in the No. 1 (left) reserve tank, causing an explosion that blew apart the outer portion of the jetliner's port wing. The crew of flight 214 managed to transmit a final message – "Mayday, mayday, mayday ... Clipper 214 out of control ... here we go" – before it crashed near Elkton, Maryland.
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    PIA Flight 268

    PIA Flight 268

    • Aircraft type: A300B4-203
    • Operator: Pakistan International Airlines
    Pakistan International Airlines Flight 268 was an Airbus A300B4-203, registration AP-BCP, which crashed on approach to Kathmandu's Tribhuvan International Airport on 28 September 1992. All 167 on board were killed. It is the 100th aviation disaster with more than 100 fatalities. Flight 268 departed Karachi at 11:13 AM Pakistan Standard Time for Kathmandu. Upon contacting Nepalese air traffic control, the aircraft was cleared for an approach from the south called the Sierra approach. An aircraft cleared to use this approach was at the time directed to pass over a reporting point called "Romeo" located 41 miles south of the Kathmandu VOR (or at 41 DME) at an altitude of 15,000 feet. The aircraft was to then descend in seven steps to 5,800 feet, passing over a reporting point known as "Sierra" located at 10 DME at an altitude of 9,500 feet, before landing at Kathmandu. This approach allowed aircraft to pass over the Chure Hills directly south of Kathmandu (the crest of which is located just north of the Sierra reporting point) at a safe altitude. Although no pertinent flight deck conversation was recovered from Flight 268's cockpit voice recorder by investigators with the
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Royal Air Force Nimrod crash in Afghanistan

    Royal Air Force Nimrod crash in Afghanistan

    • Aircraft type: Hawker-Siddeley Nimrod
    Royal Air Force Nimrod XV230 was the first of 38 Nimrod maritime reconnaissance/strike aircraft to enter operational service with the RAF on October 2, 1969. At a ceremony held at Woodford airfield in Cheshire, the aircraft was handed over by the deputy managing director of Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Sir Harry Broadhurst. Receiving XV230 were the AOC-in Chief of Coastal Command, Air Marshal Sir John Lapsley. At Sir Harry's invitation, Lady Lapsley performed the naming ceremony. Later in the day an RAF crew flew XV230 to its base at RAF St Mawgan, Cornwall, where the Nimrod maritime operational training unit (MOTD) was to be formed. According to Jane's Information Group, XV230 was one of six Nimrods equipped with an L-3 Wescam MX-15 electro-optical turret in 2003. In June/July 2006 XV230 was given the capability to transmit real-time video imagery from the MX-15 to ground stations and commanders. This was implemented under Project Broadsword. During a reconnaissance flight it crashed in Afghanistan on 2 September 2006, killing 14 military personnel in Britain's deadliest single loss since the Falklands War. The aircraft is believed to have suffered a leak during midair refuelling
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    TAM Linhas Aéreas Flight 402

    TAM Linhas Aéreas Flight 402

    • Aircraft type: Fokker F100
    • Operator: TAM Linhas Aéreas
    TAM Transportes Aéreos Regionais Flight 402 was a Fokker 100 airliner, operating as a scheduled domestic flight from Congonhas/São Paulo International Airport in São Paulo, Brazil to Santos Dumont Airport in Rio de Janeiro on October 31, 1996, which crashed shortly after take-off, killing a total of 99 people. While climbing, the No. 2 engine suffered an uncommanded reverse thrust deployment. The aircraft yawed to the right, striking a building and crashing into a populated area, killing all 96 people aboard as well as three on the ground. The aircraft, PT-MRK, wore a TAM Transportes Aéreos Regionais special promotion livery - "Number 1" - at that time instead of the standard TAM livery.
    5.80
    5 votes
    66
    Air Canada Flight 621

    Air Canada Flight 621

    The deadliest accident at Toronto International Airport, now called Pearson International Airport, took place on July 5, 1970, when Air Canada Flight 621, a Douglas DC-8 registered CF-TIW, was flying on a Montreal–Toronto–Los Angeles route. Captain Peter Hamilton and First Officer Donald Rowland had flown on various flights together before, and had an ongoing discussion on when to arm the spoilers. They both agreed they did not like arming them at the beginning of the final approach, fearing it could lead to an inadvertent spoiler deployment. The captain preferred arming them on the ground, while the copilot preferred arming them during the flare. The flare is executed just above the runway, causing the aircraft's nose to rotate up. That ensures the nose wheel does not contact the runway first, and it also reduces the rate of descent so that the main wheels will not impact the runway too hard. The thrust of the engines is reduced to idle at the same time, causing the speed of the aircraft to slow significantly. The pilots made an agreement that, when the captain was piloting the aircraft the first officer would arm the spoilers on the ground, as the captain preferred, and when the
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Air France Flight 447

    Air France Flight 447

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A330
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Charles de Gaulle International Airport
    Air France Flight 447 (abbreviated AF447) was a scheduled commercial flight from Galeão International Airport in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to Charles de Gaulle International Airport in Paris, France. On 1 June 2009, the Airbus A330-200 airliner serving the flight crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, killing all 216 passengers and 12 aircrew. The accident was the deadliest in the history of Air France, and has been described as the worst accident in French aviation history. It was the second fatal accident involving an Airbus A330, the first while in commercial passenger service and, to date, the accident with the highest death toll of any involving the aircraft type anywhere in the world. The aircraft crashed following an aerodynamic stall caused by inconsistent airspeed sensor readings, the disengagement of the autopilot, and the pilot making nose-up inputs despite stall warnings, causing a fatal loss of airspeed and a sharp descent. The pilots had not received specific training in "manual airplane handling of approach to stall and stall recovery at high altitude"; this was not a standard training requirement at the time of the accident. The reason for the faulty readings is unknown, but
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Emirates Airline Flight 407

    Emirates Airline Flight 407

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A340
    • Operator: Emirates Airline
    • Flight destination: Dubai International Airport
    Emirates Airline Flight 407 is an Emirates flight flying from Melbourne to Dubai using the Airbus A340-500. On 20 March 2009, the flight failed to take off properly at Melbourne Airport, hitting several structures at the end of the runway before eventually climbing enough to return to the airport for a safe landing. In spite of the fact that no fatalities or injuries resulted from this accident, it was severe enough to be classified by Australian Transport Safety Bureau as a significant event and thereby categorized as an accident by the authority. The scheduled flight departed from Melbourne as planned at 22:30 using the 3,657-metre (11,998 ft) long Runway 16. However, after exhausting the entire length of the runway, the aircraft failed to become airborne. Reaching the end of the runway, travelling at a speed of 280 kilometres per hour (174 mph), the captain ordered the first officer to rotate. As the aircraft pitched upward and failed to leave the ground, the tail section crashed into the ground and continued to scrape along the runway. According to the crew, the captain took over the controls and applied maximum thrust on all four engines by using the Take-off/Go-around (TOGA)
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Libyan Arab Airlines Flight 114

    Libyan Arab Airlines Flight 114

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727
    • Operator: Libyan Arab Airlines
    • Flight destination: Cairo
    Libyan Arab Airlines Flight 114 was a regularly scheduled flight from Tripoli to Cairo via Benghazi. An aircraft serving this flight was shot down by Israeli fighter jets in 1973. At 10:30 on 21 February 1973, the 727–224 left Tripoli, and became lost due to a combination of bad weather and equipment failure over northern Egypt around 13:44 (1:44 pm local). It entered Israeli-controlled airspace over the Sinai Peninsula, was intercepted by two Israeli F-4 Phantom IIs and shot down. Of the 113 people on board, there were 5 survivors, including the co-pilot. The aircraft was piloted by a French captain and flight engineer and Libyan co-pilot under a contractual arrangement between Air France and Libyan Arab Airlines. After a brief stop at Benghazi in eastern Libya, Flight 114 continued en route to Cairo with 113 people on board. As the airliner cruised over northern Egypt, a large sandstorm below forced the crew to rely completely on instrument navigation. A short time later, around 13:44, the pilot suspected that he had made a navigational error because of a compass malfunction: he could not find an air traffic beacon, and could not ascertain the plane's current location. He did not
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Lufthansa Flight 2904

    Lufthansa Flight 2904

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A320
    • Operator: Lufthansa
    Lufthansa Flight 2904 was an Airbus A320-200 which overran the runway, in Okęcie International Airport on 14 September 1993. It was a flight from Frankfurt, Germany to Warsaw, Poland. Lufthansa Flight 2904 was cleared to land at Okęcie International Airport Rwy 11 and was informed of the existence of wind shear on the approach. To compensate for the crosswind, the pilots attempted to touch down with the aircraft banked slightly to the right. Additionally they landed with a speed about 20 knots (37 km/h) faster than usual. According to the manual, this was the correct procedure for the reported weather conditions. But the weather report was not up to date. At the moment of touch down, the assumed crosswind turned out to be a tailwind. Due to the tailwind of approximately 20 knots (37 km/h) and the increased speed the airplane hit the ground at approximately 170 knots (310 km/h) and far beyond the normal touch down point. The aircraft's right gear touched down 770 m from the runway 11 threshold. The left gear touched down 9 seconds later, 1525 m from the threshold. Only when the left gear touched the runway did the ground spoilers and engine thrust reversers deploy, these automatic
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Saudia Flight 163

    Saudia Flight 163

    • Aircraft type: L-1011-200
    • Operator: Saudi Arabian Airlines
    • Flight destination: King Abdulaziz International Airport
    Saudia Flight 163 was a scheduled passenger flight of Saudia that caught fire after takeoff from Riyadh International Airport (now the Riyadh Air Base) on a flight to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on 19 August 1980. All 287 passengers and 14 crew on board the Lockheed L-1011-200 TriStar registered HZ-AHK, died after the aircraft made an emergency landing back at the Riyadh airport. At the time, the incident was the second deadliest single aircraft disaster in history, after Turkish Airlines Flight 981. It was also the third deadliest aircraft disaster overall, after the Tenerife airport disaster of 1977 and Turkish Airlines Flight 981. It was also the highest death toll of any aviation accident in Saudi Arabia and the highest death toll of any accident involving a Lockheed L-1011 anywhere in the world. It is also the deadliest aviation disaster that does not crash on impact or broke up in mid-flight. Saudi officials said that most of the passengers were Saudis or Pakistanis, with many of the passengers being Pakistani religious pilgrims. The aviation directorate stated that 82 of the passengers boarded in Karachi and, of the passengers who boarded in Riyadh, 32 were religious pilgrims from
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    United Airlines Flight 175

    United Airlines Flight 175

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: United Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    United Airlines Flight 175 was a passenger flight which was hijacked by five al-Qaeda terrorists on September 11, 2001, as part of the September 11 attacks. They deliberately crashed it into the South Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing all 60 people aboard plus the hijackers, and an unconfirmed number in the building's impact zone. The aircraft involved, a Boeing 767–222, was flying United Airlines' daily scheduled morning transcontinental service from Logan International Airport, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Los Angeles International Airport, in Los Angeles, California. Approximately thirty minutes into the flight, the hijackers forcibly breached the cockpit and overpowered the pilot and first officer, allowing lead hijacker and trained pilot Marwan al-Shehhi to take over the controls. Unlike Flight 11 which turned its transponder off, the aircraft's transponder was visible and the aircraft deviated from the assigned flight path for four minutes before air traffic controllers noticed these changes at 08:51 EDT. They made several unsuccessful attempts to contact the cockpit. Several passengers and crew aboard made phone calls from the plane and provided
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    1959 Turkish Airlines Gatwick crash

    1959 Turkish Airlines Gatwick crash

    • Aircraft type: Vickers Viscount
    • Operator: Turkish Airlines
    • Flight destination: London Heathrow Airport
    The 1959 Turkish Airlines Gatwick crash was an air disaster that occurred on 17 February 1959, near London Gatwick Airport to a Turkish Airlines Vickers Viscount Type 793 (registration TC-SEV) on an international charter flight from Esenboğa International Airport in Ankara, Turkey, to London Heathrow Airport United Kingdom, carrying the Turkish prime minister and a party of government officials. The Viscount crashed in a wood 3 miles (4.8 km) from the threshold of Gatwick runway during its final approach to land in extensive fog. Five of the eight crew and nine of the sixteen passengers died in the crash. The prime minister was among the ten survivors. Turkish Prime Minister Adnan Menderes, accompanied by a Turkish delegation, was on his way to the British capital to sign the London Agreement on the Cyprus issue with British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and Greek Prime Minister Constantine Karamanlis, which gave the three sides the right to intervene in Cyprus in case peace was broken by any of the parties. The special flight departed from Ankara Esenboğa International Airport bound for London Heathrow Airport via Istanbul Atatürk International Airport (IATA: IST, ICAO: LTBA)
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Air France Flight 2005

    Air France Flight 2005

    • Aircraft type: Sud Aviation Caravelle
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Casablanca
    Air France Flight 2005 of September 12, 1961 was a scheduled passenger service from Paris-Orly Airport to Casablanca airport with a stop at Rabat-Salé Airport. The Sud Aviation Caravelle aircraft crashed that day at 21:09 GMT near a place called Douar Doum 8.4 km from the threshold of runway 04 and 1.4 km to the left of the extended centreline at a height of 87.5m above sea level, killing all 77 people on board, including 6 crew members. The weather was foggy and unfavourable for landing. The aircraft left Paris (ORY) at 18:26 GMT for the first leg to Rabat with passengers and load within limits and fuel for four hours. The flight was uneventful until approaching Rabat/Salè airport. At 21:09 GMT the aircraft hit the ground before reaching the runway and aside from the airport. It was completely destroyed. The investigation concluded that there was no evidence of technical failure, neither for physical failure of the personnel nor of air traffic control. Weather conditions were very unfavourable for landing at Rabat/Salé and fast changing and deteriorating shortly before the accident. The pilot took advice from the Air France operations agent in Casablanca and considered proceeding
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Bakers Creek air crash

    Bakers Creek air crash

    • Aircraft type: B-17C
    The Bakers Creek air crash was an aviation disaster which occurred on 14 June 1943, when a United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress aircraft crashed at Bakers Creek, Queensland. The aircraft took off from Mackay and crashed approximately 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) south of the airfield. Forty of the 41 military service personnel on board were killed. The crash was Australia's worst aviation disaster by death toll and was the worst accident involving a transport aircraft in the south-western Pacific during World War II. The aircraft, a Boeing B-17C, serial number 40-2072, known as "Miss Every Morning Fixin" took off from Mackay Airfield just before dawn at about 6 am in foggy conditions, headed for Port Moresby. Soon after, it made a low altitude turn and a few minutes later, crashed. The cause of the crash remains a mystery. The six crew and 35 passengers were returning to New Guinea after an R&R break. The aircraft was part of the United States Fifth Air Force and was operated by the 46th Troop Carrier Squadron, part of the 317th Troop Carrier Group. It had formerly been one of the B-17s sent to the Philippines in the autumn of 1941 with the 19th Bomb Group and
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Bukken Bruse disaster

    Bukken Bruse disaster

    • Aircraft type: Short Sandringham
    • Operator: Det Norske Luftfartselskap
    The Bukken Bruse disaster was the crash of a flying boat upon landing at Hommelvik in Malvik municipality, nearby Trondheim, Trøndelag, Norway, on October 2, 1948. The disaster killed 19 people. Among the survivors was the philosopher Bertrand Russell. The flying boat was a Short Sandringham, registration LN-IAW and named Bukken Bruse after the fairy tale "The Three Billy Goats Gruff". The plane, operated by Det Norske Luftfartsselskap (now a part of SAS) was en route from Oslo Airport, Fornebu. The weather upon landing in Hommelvika was poor, and the sea in the bay of Hommelvika was foaming white. When the plane was about to land in the water, it was hit by a wind gust, the pilots lost control of the aircraft, and the right wing float broke as it hit the water. The plane rolled over to the side and the front tipped onto the water. The plane rapidly filled with water. Of the 45 people on board, 19 perished. The survivors were all in the smoking compartment at the back of the plane, near the emergency exit. The 76 year-old philosopher Bertrand Russell was on the flight on his way to give a lecture to the local student society. He was seated at the rear of the smoking compartment. In
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Swissair Flight 111

    Swissair Flight 111

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas MD-11
    • Operator: Swissair
    • Flight destination: Geneva Cointrin International Airport
    Swissair Flight 111 (SR-111, SWR-111) was a Swissair McDonnell Douglas MD-11 on a scheduled airline flight from John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, United States to Cointrin International Airport in Geneva, Switzerland. This flight was also a codeshare flight with Delta Air Lines. On Wednesday, 2 September 1998 the aircraft used for the flight, registered HB-IWF, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean southwest of Halifax International Airport at the entrance to St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia. The crash site was 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from shore, roughly equidistant from the tiny fishing and tourist communities of Peggys Cove and Bayswater. All 229 people on board died. It was the highest-ever death toll of any aviation accident both for Swissair and for the McDonnell Douglas MD-11. The initial search and rescue response, crash recovery operation, and resulting investigation by the government of Canada took over four years and cost CAD 57 million (at that time approximately USD 38 million). The Transportation Safety Board of Canada's (TSB) official report of their investigation stated that flammable material used in the aircraft's structure allowed a fire to spread
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    United Airlines Flight 608

    United Airlines Flight 608

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-6
    • Operator: United Airlines
    • Flight destination: Chicago Midway International Airport
    United Airlines Flight 608 was a Douglas DC-6 airliner, registration NC37510, on a scheduled passenger flight from Los Angeles to Chicago when it crashed at 12:29 pm on October 24, 1947 about 1.5 miles southeast of Bryce Canyon Airport, Utah. There were no survivors among the 5 crew members and 47 passengers on board. It was the first crash of a DC-6, and at the time it was the second deadliest air crash in the United States. United Flight 608 departed from Los Angeles, California, at 10:23 a.m. on a routine flight to Chicago, Illinois. At 12:21 p.m. the plane's pilot, Capt. Everett L. McMillen, radioed that there was a fire in the baggage compartment which they could not control, with smoke entering the passenger cabin. The flight requested an emergency clearance to Bryce Canyon Airport, Utah, which was granted. As the aircraft descended, pieces of the plane, including portions of the right wing, started to fall off and one of the emergency flares on the wing ignited. At 12:27 p.m., the last radio transmission was heard from the plane: "We may make it - approaching a strip." Accounts from observers state the plane passed over the canyon mesa, approximately 1500 yards from the
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    British Airways Flight 38

    British Airways Flight 38

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 777
    • Operator: British Airways
    • Flight destination: London Heathrow Airport
    British Airways Flight 38 (call sign Speedbird 38) was a scheduled flight from Beijing Capital International Airport which crash landed just short of the runway at its destination, London Heathrow Airport, on 17 January 2008 after an 8,100-kilometre (4,400 nmi; 5,000 mi) flight.. There were no fatalities but 47 people sustained injuries; one serious. The 150-tonne aircraft was the first Boeing 777-200ER to be written off in the model's history. The cause of the accident was ice crystals in the fuel, clogging the fuel-oil heat exchanger (FOHE) of each engine. This restricted fuel flow to the engines as thrust was demanded during the final approach to Heathrow. Boeing identified the problem as specific to the Rolls-Royce engine fuel-oil heat exchangers, and Rolls-Royce has subsequently developed a modification to its FOHE; the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) mandated that all affected aircraft were to be fitted with the modification before 1 January 2011. Boeing 777 aircraft powered by GE or Pratt & Whitney engines were not affected by the problem. The aircraft used for the flight was Boeing 777-236ER G-YMMM (manufacturer's serial number 30314, line number 342), powered by two
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Kenya Airways Flight 431

    Kenya Airways Flight 431

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A310
    • Operator: Kenya Airways
    • Flight destination: Jomo Kenyatta International Airport
    Kenya Airways Flight 431 was an international scheduled Abidjan–Lagos–Nairobi passenger service, operated with an Airbus A310-300, that crashed into the sea, off the coast of Côte d'Ivoire, on 30 January 2000 at 21:09:24 GMT, shortly after takeoff from Félix Houphouët-Boigny International Airport. There were 179 people on board, of whom 169 were passengers. It was the first fatal accident for Kenya Airways. Named Harambee Star, the aircraft involved in the accident was an Airbus A310-304, tail number 5Y-BEN, that had been bought new by the airline in 1986. With c/n 426 and equipped with a twin-GE CF6-80C2A2 powerplant, the airframe had its maiden flight on 3 July 1986 with registration F-WWCQ, and was delivered to Kenya Airways on 24 September the same year. It was 700113000000000000013 years and 7002211000000000000211 days old at the time of the accident. The flight originated in Nairobi as Flight KQ430, and was due to land in Abidjan after a stopover in Lagos. Many Nigerians who traveled to Dubai for duty-free shopping used this flight. The aircraft flew directly to Abidjan because of weather conditions over Lagos. More specifically, harmattan winds blowing southwards from the
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Transavia Airlines Flight 462

    Transavia Airlines Flight 462

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: Transavia.com
    • Flight destination: Amsterdam Schiphol Airport
    Transavia Airlines Flight 462 was a Boeing 757-200, registered PH-TKC, that was damaged upon landing at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol in 1997. On 24 December 1997, flight HV462 was damaged severely whilst landing at Amsterdam. The aircraft landed in strong, gusty winds and touched down hard with its right main gear first. On touchdown the nose gear broke out of the doghouse. After gliding over the runway for approximately 3 km, it came to rest in the grass beside the runway. Serious damage was inflicted on some electronic systems and control-cables. The plane was repaired and placed back into service with Transavia Airlines until 2003. PH-TKC later flew for Avianca, an airline based in Colombia as N635AV, before being passed on to AeroGal in 2010.
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Helios Airways Flight 522

    Helios Airways Flight 522

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: Ajet
    • Flight destination: Ruzyně International Airport
    Helios Airways Flight 522 (HCY 522 or ZU522) was a Helios Airways Boeing 737–300 flight that crashed into a mountain on 14 August 2005 at 12:04 EEST, north of Marathon and Varnavas, Greece, whilst flying from Larnaca, Cyprus. A lack of oxygen incapacitated the crew, leading to the plane's eventual crash after running out of fuel. Rescue teams located wreckage near the community of Grammatiko, 40 km (25 mi) from Athens. All 121 on board were killed. With 121 dead, this was the deadliest aviation disaster in Greek history, surpassing the crash of an Olympic Airlines DC-6 in which 90 passengers and crew lost their lives. It is the 69th crash of a Boeing 737 (the most numerous passenger jet aircraft in the world) since it was brought into service in 1968. The aircraft involved in this incident was first flown on 29 December 1997 and had been operated by DBA until it was leased by Helios Airways on 16 April 2004 and nicknamed Olympia, with registration 5B-DBY. Aside from the downed aircraft, the Helios fleet consisted of two leased Boeing 737-800s and an Airbus A319-111 delivered on 14 May 2005. The aircraft had arrived in Larnaca from London Heathrow at 01:25 that morning. The flight
    5.60
    5 votes
    83
    Atlasjet Flight 4203

    Atlasjet Flight 4203

    • Operator: Atlasjet
    • Flight destination: Süleyman Demirel Airport
    Atlasjet Flight 4203 was a scheduled flight from Istanbul's Atatürk International Airport to Isparta Süleyman Demirel Airport in Isparta, Turkey. On November 30, 2007 it crashed outside the town of Keçiborlu, 18 km (11 mi) from Isparta at around 01:36 EET (23:36 UTC on November 29). The flight took off from Istanbul at 00:50 EET with 57 people on board, including a six-week old baby which had not been counted on departure from the airport. Atlasjet Airline's CEO Tuncay Doganer reported that no one had survived the crash. The plane was a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 which Atlasjet leased from World Focus Airlines, whose pilots were flying it when it crashed. Local officials said the plane had broken into two pieces, with its fuselage and rear landing in different places. The Anadolu Agency news service said the plane's wings and engine were at the top of a hill while the fuselage was 150 m (500 ft) lower. A local reporter at the scene described luggage and debris strewn across a large area, which police have cordoned off. It was reported that the plane crashed away from the typical flight path. Officials are confused as to how the plane ended up there. Investigators found the two black
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    ČSA Flight OK-NAB

    ČSA Flight OK-NAB

    • Aircraft type: Ilyushin Il-18
    • Operator: Czech Airlines
    Czechoslovak Airlines Flight 001 was an Ilyushin Il-18B4 engine turboprop airliner, registered OK-NAB, which was operating as a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Prague's Ruzyně airport to Bratislava-Ivanka Airport, both in Czechoslovakia, which crashed into the Zlaté Piesky (Golden Sands) Lake while attempting to land in Bratislava on July 28, 1976. All 6 crew members and 70 out of 73 passengers died. The flight departed Prague airport at 8:52 (CEST) and proceeded routinely to Bratislava. At 9:35:10 (CEST) the flight was cleared by Bratislava tower to land on runway 22. For reasons that are unclear, the crew executed a highly unstabilized ILS instrument approach to runway 22, with rates of descent as high as 22 m/s (72 ft/s) instead of 10 m/s (33 ft/s); speeds varying from 225 to 435 km/h (140 to 270 mph) instead of 269 km/h (167 mph); and flap selection directly from 0 degree to full flaps instead of in gradual increments. As they approached the runway, the crew inadvertently set thrust reversal at the no. 2 and no. 3 engine (inboard engines) while still airborne. The thrust reversal caused the no. 3 engine to fail and the crew then inadvertently feathered the no. 4 prop,
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Flight 19

    Flight 19

    • Aircraft type: PBM Mariner
    Flight 19 was the designation of five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers that disappeared on December 5, 1945 during a United States Navy overwater navigation training flight from Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale, Florida. All 14 airmen on the flight were lost, as were all 13 crew members of a PBM Mariner flying boat assumed by professional investigators to have exploded in mid-air while searching for the flight. Navy investigators could not determine the cause for the loss of Flight 19 but said the aircraft may have become disoriented and ditched in rough seas after running out of fuel. Flight 19 undertook a routine navigation and combat training exercise in VTB-type aircraft. The assignment was called "Navigation problem No. 1", a combination of bombing and navigation, which other flights had completed or were scheduled to undertake that day. The flight leader was United States Navy Lieutenant Charles Carroll Taylor who had about 2,500 flying hours, mostly in aircraft of this type, while his trainee pilots had 300 total, and 60 flight hours in the Avenger. Taylor had recently arrived from NAS Miami where he had also been a VTB instructor. The student pilots had recently completed other
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Korean Air Lines Flight 85

    Korean Air Lines Flight 85

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    On September 11, 2001, Korean Air Flight 85, was a Korean Air flight en route to Ted Stevens International Airport in Anchorage, Alaska ordered to land in Whitehorse, Canada because controllers thought it was hijacked. It was thought to be hijacked because the airline received a text message with "HJK" and the pilots did not say "disregard we are not 7500/hijacked" when ordered to squawk 7500. Due to a number of factors, the plane was considered by authorities to be a potential hijacked aircraft and was authorized by American officials and the Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien to be shot down. The pilots of the civil airliner cooperated and the 747 was forced by American F-15 military jets to land in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. After the September 11 attacks, a call went out for all planes to return to their airports of origin (or if they did not have enough fuel, to land in Canadian territory). While discussing the day's events with the Korean Air office, the pilot of Flight 85 included the letters "HJK" (the code for "hijacked") in an airline text message. When the pilot sent his message, the text messaging service company, Aeronautical Radio, Incorporated (ARINC) noticed the
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Munich air disaster

    Munich air disaster

    • Operator: British European Airways
    The Munich air disaster occurred on 6 February 1958, when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On board the plane was the Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes", along with a number of supporters and journalists. Twenty of the 44 people on board the aircraft died in the crash. The injured, some of whom had been knocked unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in a total of 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia), against Red Star Belgrade, but had to make a stop in Munich for refuelling, as a non-stop trip from Belgrade to Manchester was out of the "Elizabethan" class Airspeed Ambassador aircraft's range. After refuelling, the pilots, Captains James Thain and Kenneth Rayment, attempted to take off twice, but had to abandon both attempts due to boost surging in the port engine. Fearing that they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    TANS Perú Flight 222

    TANS Perú Flight 222

    • Aircraft type: Fokker F28
    • Operator: TANS Peru
    • Flight destination: Chachapoyas Airport
    TANS Peru Flight 222 was a TANS Perú flight of a Fokker F28-1000 Fellowship which crashed near Chachapoyas, Peru on January 9, 2003 while on approach to Chachapoyas Airport. None of the 46 passengers and crew aboard the Fokker F-28 survived.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    2007 Hukou F-5F crash

    2007 Hukou F-5F crash

    • Aircraft type: F-5 Freedom Fighter
    A Republic of China Air Force F-5F fighter jet crashed into a military base in Hukou (湖口), Taiwan on 11 May 2007. The accident killed the two Taiwanese crewmen and three Singaporean soldiers who were part of an unrelated unilateral training stint on the ground. Another eight Singaporeans were injured, with one sustaining serious burn injuries. The fighter jet, designation ROCAF F-5F 5371, was conducting a training flight in a rehearsal for Taiwan's Han Kuang 23 military exercise (漢光演習) in the following week. The twin-seat fighter jet took off with three other aircraft from an airbase in Taitung County; it crashed 30 minutes later during a simulated low-altitude attack while executing an "anti-parachuting" drill. At 9.38 am, the fighter jet crashed at Hukou Army Base about 50 km southwest of the capital Taipei. The base houses the 542nd Armour Brigade of the 6th Army Corps, Republic of China Army, it also hosts a visiting training detachment from the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF). Eyewitnesses say the F-5F aircraft failed to pull up in time, and crashed into the base. The Taiwan Ministry of National Defense reported that the pilot apparently attempted to steer the plane away from
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    BOAC Flight 781

    BOAC Flight 781

    • Operator: British Overseas Airways Corporation
    • Flight destination: London Heathrow Airport
    On 10 January 1954, British Overseas Airways Corporation Flight 781 a de Havilland DH.106 Comet 1 registered G-ALYP, took off from Ciampino Airport in Rome, Italy, en route to Heathrow Airport in London, England, on the final leg of its flight from Singapore. At about 10:00 GMT, the aircraft suffered an explosive decompression at altitude and crashed into the Mediterranean Sea, killing everyone on board. Of the 29 passengers, 10 were children. Chester Wilmot, a prominent Australian journalist and military historian working for the BBC, was one of those killed. Also, Dorothy Beecher Baker, a Hand of the Cause of God for the Baha'i Faith. Gerry Bull, a former BOAC engineer, said that when he inspected the aircraft in Rome he looked for "incidental damage." He did not find any, so he believed Flight 781 was fit for flight. Bull and the same team of engineers later examined South African Airways Flight 201 before its final flight. On 10 January 1954, the flight took off at 09:34 GMT for the final-stage flight to London. 31-year-old Alan Gibson, who served as the captain, was one of the youngest pilots at BOAC. At about 09:50 GMT a passing BOAC Argonaut G-ALHJ piloted by Captain
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Khankala attack

    Khankala attack

    • Aircraft type: Mil Mi-26
    2002 Khankala Mi-26 crash occurred on August 19, 2002, when a team of Chechen separatists with a man-portable air-defense system brought down a Russian Mil Mi-26 helicopter in a minefield and resulted in the death of 127 Russian soldiers in the greatest loss of life in the history of helicopter aviation. It was also the most deadly aviation disaster ever suffered by the Russian armed forces, as well as their worst loss of life in a single day since 1999. On 19 August 2002, Chechen separatist fighters with a Russian-made 9K38 Igla shoulder-fired, heat-seeking surface-to-air missile hit an overloaded Mil Mi-26 heavy transport helicopter, causing it to crash-land and burn at Khankala military air base near Chechnya's capital city of Grozny. The helicopter was ferrying at least 140 soldiers and officers belonging to various units from Russian Air Force base at Mozdok, Republic of North Ossetia–Alania. According to Pavel Felgenhauer, "The missile hit one of the engines as the Mi-26 was approaching Khankala, and the helicopter crash-landed in a minefield that made up part of the federal military headquarters' perimeter defenses. Some of the survivors, attempting to abandon the wrecked
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Southern Airways Flight 242

    Southern Airways Flight 242

    • Operator: Southern Airways
    • Flight destination: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
    Southern Airways Flight 242 was a DC-9-31 jet, registered N1335U, that executed a forced landing on a highway in New Hope, Paulding County, Georgia, United States after suffering hail damage and losing thrust on both engines in a severe thunderstorm on April 4, 1977. At the time of the accident, the Southern Airways aircraft was flying from Huntsville, Alabama to Atlanta, Georgia. Sixty-three people on the aircraft (including the flight crew) and nine people on the ground died; twenty passengers survived, as well as the two flight attendants. One passenger who initially survived died about a month later. The flight crew, consisting of captain Bill McKenzie and co-pilot Lyman Keele, was advised of the presence of embedded thunderstorms and possible tornadoes along their general route prior to their departure from Huntsville, but they were not subsequently told that the cells had since formed a squall line. The flight crew had flown through that same area from Atlanta earlier in the day, encountering only mild turbulence and light rain. The weather system had greatly intensified in the meantime. The peak convective activity was later shown on ground radar to be near Rome, Georgia, to
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Tupolev 124 ditching in Neva river

    Tupolev 124 ditching in Neva river

    • Aircraft type: Tupolev Tu-124
    • Operator: Aeroflot
    • Flight destination: Vnukovo International Airport
    The 1963 Aeroflot Tupolev Tu-124 Neva river ditching was a notable case of water landing that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1963. A Tupolev Tu-124 of Soviet state airline Aeroflot (Moscow division) took off from Tallinn-Ülemiste Airport (TLL) at 08:55 on 21 August 1963 with 45 passengers and 7 crew on board. The aircraft (registration number SSSR-45021) was built in 1962 and was scheduled to fly to Moscow-Vnukovo (VKO) under command of 27 year-old captain Victor Mostovoy. After liftoff it appeared the nose gear undercarriage didn't retract. Ground control diverted the flight to Leningrad (LED) — because of fog at Tallinn — at low altitude. At 10:00 the aircraft started to circle the city at 1,650 feet (500 m), in order to expend fuel, decreasing the risk of fire in the event of a forced landing. The ground services at Pulkovo Airport (LED) were preparing the dirt runway for the forced landing. Each loop in the airspace around the city took the aircraft approximately 15 minutes. During this time the crew attempted to force the nose gear to lock into the fully extended position by pushing it with a pole taken from the cloak closet. While participating in a show aired on Russian
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Dan-Air Flight 0034

    Dan-Air Flight 0034

    • Aircraft type: Avro 748
    • Operator: Dan-Air
    • Flight destination: Aberdeen Airport
    Dan-Air Flight 0034 was a fatal accident involving a Hawker Siddeley HS 748 series 1 turboprop aircraft operated by Dan Air Service Limited on an oil industry charter flight from Sumburgh Airport, Shetland Islands, to Aberdeen Airport. The crash, which occurred on 31 July 1979 50 m (160 ft) offshore following the aircraft's failure to take off, resulted in the aircraft's destruction and 17 deaths of 47 on board (15 of 44 passengers and both pilots). The aircraft, operated by Dan-Air Services Ltd, was a Hawker Siddeley HS 748-105 series 1 (construction/manufacturer's serial number: 1542, registration: G-BEKF) that had its first flight in 1962. It entered service with Aerolíneas Argentinas the same year and was subsequently operated by Argentinian state-owned oil company Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales (YPF). It was one of seven Hawker Siddeley HS 748 series 1 aircraft Dan-Air acquired from YPF for oil industry support work in the North Sea in 1977. At the time of the accident it had flown 29,007 hours. G-BEKF was engaged on regular charter flights between Aberdeen and Sumburgh, carrying oil company personnel. The inbound flight to Sumburgh was made without incident and the crew
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Swissair Flight 330

    Swissair Flight 330

    • Aircraft type: Convair 990
    • Operator: Swissair
    • Flight destination: Ben Gurion International Airport
    Swissair Flight SR330 was a regularly scheduled flight from Zürich International Airport in Kloten, Switzerland to Tel Aviv, Israel. On February 21, 1970, HB-ICD a Convair CV-990 Coronado jet named “Baselland” was flying on the route with 38 passengers and nine crew members. A bomb detonated in the aft cargo compartment of the aircraft about nine minutes after take-off climb-out on southerly course approximately at 12:15 UTC in the area of Lucerne north of the St. Gotthard Pass. The crew tried to turn around and attempt an emergency landing at Zürich but had difficulty seeing the instruments due to smoke in the cockpit. The aircraft deviated more and more to the west and crashed a short time later in a wooded area at Würenlingen near Zürich, Switzerland, due to the loss of electrical power. All aboard the aircraft were killed. A Government air inspector was flown to the scene in a helicopter. He was followed shortly afterward by a team of 50 investigators. The police said that a woman handed in a 9-mm. pistol found at the scene of the crash immediately after the disaster. Some of the wreckage, including pieces of cloth, was strung out on the tops and branches of trees. Sabotage was
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Air Florida Flight 90

    Air Florida Flight 90

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Air Florida
    • Flight destination: Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport
    Air Florida Flight 90 was a U.S. domestic passenger flight that originated at Washington National Airport in Arlington County, Virginia, and was scheduled to terminate at Fort Lauderdale – Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with a stopover at Tampa International Airport in Tampa, Florida. On January 13, 1982, the Boeing 737-200 flying Flight 90 crashed into the 14th Street Bridge over the Potomac River. The aircraft was carrying 74 passengers and five crewmembers. Four passengers and one flight attendant survived the crash. Four motorists from the bridge were killed. The aircraft struck the 14th Street Bridge, which carries Interstate 395 between Washington, D.C. and Arlington County. It crushed seven occupied vehicles on the bridge and destroyed 97 feet (30 m) of guard rail before it plunged through the ice into the Potomac River. The crash occurred less than two miles (3 km) from the White House and within view of both the Jefferson Memorial and The Pentagon. The accident killed 78 people, including four motorists on the 14th Street Bridge. The survivors were rescued from the icy river by civilians and professionals. President Ronald Reagan commended
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    All Nippon Airways Flight 61

    All Nippon Airways Flight 61

    • Operator: All Nippon Airways
    On July 23, 1999, an All Nippon Airways Boeing 747-481D with 503 passengers, including 14 children and 14 crew members on board, took off from Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) in Ota, Tokyo, Japan and was en route to New Chitose Airport in Chitose, Japan, near Sapporo when it was hijacked by Yuji Nishizawa (西沢 裕司, Nishizawa Yūji). About 25 minutes after takeoff, Nishizawa used a kitchen knife, 20 centimetres (7.9 in) long, to force a flight attendant to allow him access into the cockpit. He then forced 34-year old co-pilot Kazuyuki Koga (古賀 和幸, Koga Kazuyuki) out, remaining in the cockpit with captain Naoyuki Nagashima (長島 直之, Nagashima Naoyuki), who managed to notify ATC about the hijacking. Nishizawa stabbed Nagashima in the chest and took control of the plane, at one point descending to an altitude of 300 meters. At 12:09 P.M., crew members managed to subdue Nishizawa, and co-pilot Koga got back into the cockpit, telling the air traffic controllers, "It's an emergency. The captain was stabbed. Prepare an ambulance." The plane made an emergency landing at Haneda Airport at 12:14 P.M. and Nishizawa was immediately arrested. A doctor confirmed the death of Nagashima, of
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Carpatair Flight 128

    Carpatair Flight 128

    • Aircraft type: Saab 2000
    • Operator: Carpatair
    • Flight destination: Traian Vuia International Airport
    Carpatair Flight 128, a Saab 2000 (tail number YR-SBI) going from Chişinău, Moldova to Timişoara carrying 51 people, makes an emergency landing at Traian Vuia International Airport without its forward landing gear, on February 28, 2009 at 09:44 GMT+2, 07:44 UTC. One of the pilots later said they were about six miles (10 kilometers) from the airport when they discovered they had a problem with the landing gear, and alerted the aviation authorities. "We did our job without feeling like heroes," Moldovan pilot Iurie Oleacov told reporters. ... "We weren't scared, we are trained for these kinds of situations." But Oleacov, 37, said he had never encountered this situation outside of training sessions. "All the passengers are OK. They were calm," he added. The company said Oleacov and the other Moldovan pilot, Leonid Babischi, 47, were highly experienced. "The plane came down on the side wheels; it braked sharply and at a low speed it came on its front belly, while the front landing gear remained stuck," Dan Andrei, the airline's vice president, said.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    FedEx Flight 647

    FedEx Flight 647

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: FedEx Express
    • Flight destination: Memphis International Airport
    FedEx Express (FedEx) Flight 647 was a flight between Metropolitan Oakland International Airport (OAK), Oakland, California and Memphis International Airport (MEM), Memphis, Tennessee that crashed during landing on December 18, 2003. The flight touched down at about 12:26 central standard time on runway 36R, and almost immediately the right landing gear collapsed. The plane veered off the right side of the runway, catching fire as it did so. The co-pilot received minor injuries as she evacuated the aircraft, as did one of the five non-revenue FedEx pilots who were on board as passengers. It was later discovered that the non-revenue pilot who activated the slide for the emergency exit had not been adequately trained in its operation, and so accidentally pulled the handle that released the slide as a raft in the event of a landing on water, so that the slide detached from the airplane. The NTSB conducted a full investigation of the accident. It found that although the aircraft had encountered a crosswind during landing, the conditions were well within the safe capabilities of the aircraft. However, it was discovered that the first officer did not properly line up the plane before
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 007

    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 007

    • Aircraft type: Ilyushin Il-62
    • Operator: LOT Polish Airlines
    • Flight destination: Warsaw Frederic Chopin Airport
    LOT Flight 7 crashed near Okęcie Airport in Warsaw, Poland, on 14 March 1980, due to mechanical failure as the crew aborted a landing and attempted to go-around. All 87 crew and passengers died. LOT initiated their transatlantic routes in the early 1970s, for which it decided to purchase the newly introduced Ilyushin Il-62. The aircraft which crashed was the first Il-62 LOT had purchased for this purpose, manufactured in 1971. As all purchased Ilyushins, it was named after a famous Polish historical figure, in this case Nicolaus Copernicus ("Mikołaj Kopernik" in Polish). On its final flight, the aircraft was piloted by Captain Paweł Lipowczan and First Officer Tadeusz Łochocki. Flight 007 was scheduled to depart from Kennedy International Airport at about 19:00 local time on 13 March 1980, but it was delayed because of a heavy snowstorm. It finally departed at 21:18, and after nine hours of an uneventful flight, it was approaching Okęcie Airport at 11:13 local time. During their final approach, about one minute before the landing, the crew reported to Okęcie Air Traffic Control that the landing gear indicator light was not operating, and that they would go-around and allow the
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Pulkovo Airlines Flight 612

    Pulkovo Airlines Flight 612

    • Aircraft type: Tupolev Tu-154
    • Operator: Pulkovo Aviation Enterprise
    • Flight destination: Pulkovo International Airport
    Pulkovo Aviation Enterprise Flight 612 was an aircraft that crashed in eastern Ukraine, near the Russian border, on August 22, 2006, while en route from Vityazevo Airport (Anapa) to Pulkovo Airport (St. Petersburg). The crash incurred the third highest death toll of any aviation accident involving a Tupolev Tu-154, after the crash of Aeroflot Flight 3352 and Aeroflot Flight 7425. Flight 612 was served by a Russian Tupolev Tu-154M airliner (registration: RA-85185), operated by Pulkovo Aviation Enterprise. The aircraft did not refuel in Anapa and departed on time. "The Pulkovo Airlines flight departed Anapa as scheduled. All necessary maintenance was performed as required before departure," said Oleg Tolstyh, General Director of Anapa's Vityazevo Airport. Airline records show that the aircraft, manufactured in 1992, has been in service for approximately 24,215 flight hours. It was part of the Sichuan Airlines fleet until Pulkovo Aviation Enterprise acquired it in 2001. The pilot of the aircraft had over 12,000 hours of flying experience, 6,000 of which were as a pilot of a Tu-154. "On Tuesday, at 15:37 (Moscow Time), a Tu-154 airliner of the St. Petersburg-based Pulkovo Airlines sent
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Southwest Airlines Flight 1455

    Southwest Airlines Flight 1455

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737-300
    • Operator: Southwest Airlines
    Southwest Airlines Flight 1455 (N668SW) was a scheduled passenger flight from McCarran International Airport (LAS), Las Vegas, Nevada to Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport (BUR), Burbank, California that overran the runway during landing on March 5, 2000. The aircraft came to rest on a city street adjacent to a gas station. The National Transportation Safety Board found that the incident was due to the pilots attempting to land with excessive speed. They also blamed the air traffic controller for placing them in a position when their only option was a go around. There were no fatalities either on the plane or on the ground. Two of the flight attendants were seriously injured, and there were many minor injuries. As a result of the incident, the airport installed an Engineered Materials Arrestor System (EMAS) at the east end of the incident runway. Flight 1455 departed McCarran International Airport (LAS), Las Vegas, Nevada at 1650, more than 2 hours behind schedule due to inclement weather in the area. At 1804:02, when the aircraft was 19 nmi (35 km) north of the BUR outer marker, the SoCal approach controller instructed the aircraft to maintain 230 knots (430 km/h) or greater until
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    3 votes
    103
    Thai Airways International Flight 311

    Thai Airways International Flight 311

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A310
    • Operator: Thai Airways International
    Thai Airways International Flight 311 was a flight from Bangkok, Thailand's Don Mueang International Airport to Kathmandu, Nepal's Tribhuvan International Airport. On 31 July 1992, an A310-304 on the route, registration HS-TID, crashed on approach to Tribhuvan. All 113 on board were killed. Flight 311 departed Don Mueang at 10:30 AM local time. After crossing into Nepalese airspace the pilots contacted air traffic control and were cleared to an instrument approach from the south called the "Sierra VOR Circling Approach" for Runway 20. Nepalese ATC at the time was not equipped with radar. Shortly after reporting the Sierra fix ten miles south of the Kathmandu VOR, the aircraft called ATC asking for a diversion to Calcutta, India because of a "technical problem"; before ATC could reply, the flight rescinded their previous transmission. The flight was then cleared for a straight-in Sierra approach to Runway 02 and told to report leaving 9,500 feet. The captain asked numerous times for the winds and visibility at the airport but ATC merely told him that Runway 02 was available. A number of frustrating and misleading communications (due partly to language problems and partly to the
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    3 votes
    104
    West Caribbean Airways Flight 708

    West Caribbean Airways Flight 708

    • Operator: West Caribbean Airways
    • Flight destination: Martinique Aimé Césaire International Airport
    West Caribbean Airways Flight 708 was a West Caribbean Airways charter flight which crashed in a mountainous region in northwest Venezuela on the morning of Tuesday, 16 August 2005, killing all 152 passengers and eight crew. The plane, a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, was en-route from Tocumen International Airport (PTY) in Panama City, Panama to Martinique Aimé Césaire International Airport (FDF) in Fort-de-France, Martinique. The pilots reported trouble with one engine while discussing icing and later the other engine as well. They attempted to divert the plane to Maracaibo for an emergency landing. After a 7,000 feet per minute dive with engines in a flight idle or near flight idle condition, the plane crashed at about 03:45 local time (07:45 UTC) into a field on a cattle ranch near Machiques, in the western Zulia State, Venezuela (about 30 kilometres from the Colombian border). Nearly all the passengers were French citizens from Martinique, with the exception of one Italian, acting as the tour operator. The crew was Colombian. The flight was chartered by the Globe Trotters de Rivière Salée travel agency in Martinique. Most of the passengers were tourists returning from a week's
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    3 votes
    105
    Air France Flight 358

    Air France Flight 358

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A340
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Toronto Pearson International Airport
    Air France Flight 358, a flight from Paris, France, to Toronto, Canada, using an Airbus A340 airliner, departed Paris without incident at 11:53 UTC 2 August 2005, later touching down on runway 24L at Toronto Pearson International Airport at 20:01 UTC (16:01 EDT). The aircraft failed to stop on the runway, plunged into nearby Etobicoke Creek, and came to rest, bursting into flames, approximately 300 metres past the end of the runway. The Airbus A340-300 had 309 people aboard – 297 passengers (two of them infants, without seats) and 12 crew – all of whom survived, with only 12 sustaining serious injuries. The accident highlighted the role played by highly-trained flight attendants during an emergency situation. Due to poor weather, 540 flights departing and arriving at Pearson were cancelled. Many small and mid-size aircraft due to arrive were diverted to other Canadian airports in Ottawa, London, Hamilton, and Winnipeg. Most of the larger aircraft were diverted to Montreal, Syracuse, New York,and Buffalo, New York. Flights from Vancouver were turned back. The crash of Air France Flight 358 was the biggest crisis to hit Toronto Pearson since the airport's involvement in Operation
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    2 votes
    106
    Atlantic Airways Flight 670

    Atlantic Airways Flight 670

    • Aircraft type: BAe 146
    • Operator: Atlantic Airways
    • Flight destination: Molde Airport, Årø
    Atlantic Airways Flight 670 was a chartered flight between Stavanger and Molde with an intermediate landing at Stord Airport in Norway. At 07:35 local time, on October 10, 2006, the aircraft, a BAe 146-200 (registration OY-CRG, C/n / msn: E2075), slid off the runway and burst into flames while landing at Stord. The aircraft had 16 people on board, 12 passengers and a crew of 4. Atlantic Airways chief Magni Arge said that eleven of the passengers were Norwegian and one foreigner. Three of the crew members were Faroese, and one was a Dane. News reports first indicated that 13 people had been rescued. Later it emerged that only 12 people, among them the pilots, had been rescued from the fire and that four died - three Norwegian passengers and one Faroese flight attendant. The aircraft was one of several carrying construction workers for Aker Kværner Stord to construction at Aukra related to the Ormen Lange field. The pilot of another Atlantic Airways flight which landed 20 minutes earlier did not report any unusual landing conditions at the airport though the runway was wet from rain. On September 2, about a month prior to this accident, an Atlantic Airways flight was forced to make
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    2 votes
    107
    Imperial Airlines Flight 201/8

    Imperial Airlines Flight 201/8

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed Constellation
    Imperial Airlines Flight 201/8 was a Lockheed Constellation L-049 four-engine propliner, registration N2737A (c/n 1976), chartered by the United States Army to transport new recruits to Columbia, South Carolina, for training. On November 8, 1961, at 21:24 Eastern Time Zone (EST), the aircraft crashed as it attempted to land at Byrd Field, near Richmond, Virginia. While there were no apparent impact-related injuries, all seventy-four passengers and three crew members died as a result of carbon monoxide asphyxiation in the ensuing fire and smoke. Two crew members—the captain and flight engineer—survived after escaping the burning wreckage. This was the second deadliest accident in American history for a single civilian aircraft. The accident was investigated by the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB), which attributed the cause to numerous errors committed by the flight crew, as well as poor management and improper maintenance by the airline. The CAB concluded that the "flight crew was not capable of performing the function or assuming the responsibility for the job they presumed to do." The Lockheed Constellation L-049, like many airliners of its era, was normally crewed by three
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    2 votes
    108
    Korean Air Flight 007

    Korean Air Flight 007

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: Gimpo International Airport
    Korean Air Lines Flight 007 (KAL 007, KE 007) was a Korean Air Lines civilian airliner that was shot down by a Soviet interceptor Su-15 which was piloted by Major Gennadi Osipovich on Thursday, September 1, 1983, over the Sea of Japan, near Moneron Island just west of Sakhalin Island. All 269 passengers and crew aboard were killed, including Lawrence McDonald, a sitting member of the United States Congress. The aircraft was en route from New York City to Seoul via Anchorage when it strayed into prohibited Soviet airspace around the time of a U.S. reconnaissance mission. The Soviet Union initially denied knowledge of the incident, but later admitted shooting the aircraft down, claiming that it was on a spy mission. The Politburo said it was a deliberate provocation by the United States, to test the Soviet Union's military preparedness, or even to provoke a war. The United States accused the Soviet Union of obstructing search and rescue operations. The Soviet military suppressed evidence sought by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) investigation, notably the flight data recorders, which were eventually released eight years later after the collapse of the Soviet
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    2 votes
    109
    1996 Air Africa crash

    1996 Air Africa crash

    • Aircraft type: Antonov An-32
    The 1996 Air Africa crash occurred on 8 January 1996 when an overloaded Air Africa Antonov An-32B aircraft, wet leased from Moscow Airways and bound for Kahemba Airport, overshot the runway at N'Dolo Airport in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo after failing to take off. The aircraft ploughed into Kinshasa's Simbazikita street market, causing an estimated 300 fatalities (including two on board the aircraft) and 253 serious injuries. This is the largest number of non-passenger ground fatalities caused by the accidental crash of an aircraft. According to the Russian Air Transport Department, the aircraft was operating out of license. After decades of conflicts in sub-saharan Africa, the air transport business is complex and often illegal. As Johan Peleman explained: The relationship between the charterers, who operate the plane, the shipping agent who organises the delivery for his clients and the company that actually owns the plane, is often very complex. This makes it difficult to see which of the contracting parties is actually responsible for the illegal aspects of the transactions. The Antonov that crashed in Kinshasa in January 1996 was operated by African Air. The
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    1 votes
    110
    Air France Flight 1611

    Air France Flight 1611

    • Aircraft type: Sud Aviation Caravelle
    • Operator: Air France
    Air France Flight 1611 was a Sud Aviation SE-210 Caravelle III en route from the island of Corsica to Nice, France on 11 September 1968 when it crashed into the Mediterranean Sea off Nice, killing all 95 on board. According to the official report, the crash was non-survivable. Among the dead was French general René Cogny. The probable cause was attributed to a fire which originated in the rear of the cabin. A radio programme broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on 26 November 2007 advanced the theory that the accident was the result of a missile strike or bomb, and that the true cause has been suppressed by the French Government under secrecy laws. On 10 May 2011 Michel Laty, a former military secretary, declared on French television channel TF1 that a missile, misfired by the French army during a weapon test, in fact caused the crash. English language website with full details of this crash, subsequent investigation and the mysteries that surround it :
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    1 votes
    111
    American Eagle Flight 5401

    American Eagle Flight 5401

    • Operator: American Eagle Airlines
    • Flight destination: Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport
    American Eagle Flight 5401 was a flight between Eugenio María de Hostos Airport in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico (an insular area of the United States) and Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in San Juan. On the afternoon of May 9, 2004, Executive Airlines (doing business as American Eagle) Flight 5401, an Avions de Transport Regional 72-212, ATR-72 airplane (registered as N438AT) took off from Mayagüez and completed a normal flight to San Juan. Upon landing, the aircraft skipped once, bounced hard twice, and then crashed at Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico. The airplane came to a complete stop on a grassy area about 217 feet left of the runway 8 centerline and about 4,317 feet beyond the runway threshold. The captain was seriously injured; the first officer, 2 flight attendants, and 16 of the 22 passengers received minor injuries; and the remaining 6 passengers received no injuries. The captain was the most seriously injured on board. As it turned out, a team of city rescuers was practicing on the beach located one block away from the airport, and they ran to the scene as soon as the airplane crashed. The airport's fire-and-rescue team also helped in the
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    1 votes
    112
    British Airways Flight 9

    British Airways Flight 9

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: British Airways
    • Flight destination: Auckland International Airport
    British Airways Flight 9, sometimes referred to by its callsign Speedbird 9 or Jakarta incident, was a scheduled British Airways flight from London Heathrow to Auckland, with stops in Bombay, Madras, Kuala Lumpur, Perth, and Melbourne. On 24 June 1982, the route was flown by the City of Edinburgh, a 747-236B. The aircraft flew into a cloud of volcanic ash thrown up by the eruption of Mount Galunggung (approximately 180 kilometres (110 mi) south-east of Jakarta, Indonesia), resulting in the failure of all four engines. The reason for the failure was not immediately apparent to the crew or ground control. The aircraft was diverted to Jakarta in the hope that enough engines could be restarted to allow it to land there. The aircraft was able to glide far enough to exit the ash cloud, and all engines were restarted (although one failed again soon after), allowing the aircraft to land safely at the Halim Perdanakusuma Airport in Jakarta. The crew members of the incident segment had boarded the aircraft in Kuala Lumpur, while many of the passengers had been aboard since the flight began in London. Shortly after 13:40 UTC (20:40 Jakarta time) above the Indian Ocean, south of Java, the
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    1 votes
    113
    Crossair Flight 3597

    Crossair Flight 3597

    • Aircraft type: BAe 146
    • Operator: Crossair
    Crossair Flight LX 3597 was an Avro RJ100 regional airliner, registration HB-IXM, on a scheduled flight from Berlin, Germany to Zurich, Switzerland that crashed during its approach to land at Zurich Airport on 24 November 2001. 24 of the 33 people on board were killed. The flight departed Berlin Tegel Airport at 21:01 CET with 28 passengers, 3 flight attendants, and a 2-man cockpit crew consisting of Captain Hans Ulrich Lutz and First Officer Stefan Loehrer. Upon arrival in Zurich about an hour later, it was cleared to approach runway 28 in poor visibility conditions due to low clouds; the cockpit voice recorder captured the transmission of a previously-landing Crossair flight informing the tower that they could not see the runway until 1.3 miles (2.1 km) away. At 22:07 CET, the plane crashed into a wooded range of hills near the small town of Bassersdorf, around 4 km (2.5 miles) short of the runway, where it broke apart and went up in flames. Of the 33 people on board (28 passengers and 5 crew), 24 died (among them the cockpit crew and one flight attendant), while nine (seven passengers and two flight attendants) survived. The investigation concluded that the accident was a
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    1 votes
    114
    Delta Air Lines Flight 1288

    Delta Air Lines Flight 1288

    • Operator: Delta Air Lines
    • Flight destination: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
    Delta Air Lines Flight 1288 was a regularly scheduled flight from Pensacola, Florida to Atlanta, Georgia on a McDonnell-Douglas MD-88 equipped with Pratt & Whitney JT8D-219 turbofan engines. During the flight's takeoff roll from runway 17 at Pensacola on 6 July 1996, the aircraft experienced an uncontained, catastrophic turbine engine failure that caused debris from the front compressor hub of the number one left engine to penetrate the left aft fuselage. The impact left two passengers dead and two severely injured; all were from the same family. The pilot aborted takeoff and the airplane stopped on the runway. Three other passengers sustained minor injuries during the emergency evacuation. Most of the passengers were traveling on vacation. During the pre-flight inspection, the First Officer noted a few drops of oil coming from the "bullet" or tip of the number one (left) engine, although it was said to be "not that serious". The First Officer also noticed a couple of missing rivets on the left wing. The Pilot told NTSB investigators that both problems were observed as non threatening and that the aircraft was airworthy, therefore maintenance was not informed. At 2:23P CDT Delta
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    1 votes
    115
    EgyptAir Flight 990

    EgyptAir Flight 990

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: EgyptAir
    • Flight destination: Cairo International Airport
    EgyptAir Flight 990 (MS990/MSR990) was a regularly scheduled flight from Los Angeles International Airport, United States to Cairo International Airport, Egypt, with a stop at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York City. On 31 October 1999, the Boeing 767 operating the route crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, about 60 miles (97 km) south of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, killing all 217 people on board. As the crash occurred in international waters, the responsibility for investigating the accident fell to the Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority per International Civil Aviation Organization Annex 13. As the ECAA lacked the resources of the much larger American National Transportation Safety Board, the Egyptian government asked the NTSB to handle the investigation. Two weeks after the crash, the NTSB proposed handing the investigation over to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, as the evidence they had gathered suggested a criminal act had taken place and that the crash was intentional rather than accidental. This proposal was unacceptable to the Egyptian authorities, and as such the NTSB continued to lead the investigation. As the evidence of a deliberate crash mounted, the
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    1 votes
    116
    FedEx Flight 14

    FedEx Flight 14

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas MD-11
    • Operator: FedEx Express
    Federal Express (FedEx Express) flight 14 was a flight between Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC), Anchorage, Alaska and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), Newark, New Jersey that crashed during landing on July 31, 1997. Flight 14 crashed while landing on runway 22R at Newark on July 31, 1997. The flight originated in Singapore with intermediate stops in Penang, Malaysia followed by Taipei, Taiwan, and then Anchorage, Alaska. In addition to the Captain and First Officer there were 3 passengers including one riding in the jump seat. During the flight, the pilots were concerned that they would have little stopping distance after landing, and the captain said that he wanted to put the aircraft down early on the runway. The aircraft had departed with one thrust reverser inoperative, and the pilots knew of incidents in the craft's maintenance log where the auto-brakes had failed to activate during landings. They had also misinterpreted the runway data, and so believed they had less stopping distance than was actually available. The landing was normal through the beginning of the flare phase. The MD-11 touched down, bounced, and rolled to the right. On the second
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    1 votes
    117
    Galaxy Airlines Flight 203

    Galaxy Airlines Flight 203

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-188 Electra
    • Operator: Galaxy Airlines
    Galaxy Airlines Flight 203 was a Lockheed L-188 Electra 4-engine turboprop, registration N5532, operating as a non-scheduled charter flight from Reno, Nevada, to Minneapolis, Minnesota. The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff, killing all but one of the 71 on board. The flight took off from runway 16R at Reno-Cannon International Airport (now Reno-Tahoe International Airport) at 1:04 am on January 21, 1985. A short time later, the aircraft crashed about 1.5 mi (2.4 km) from the end of the runway and burst into flames. It landed near a recreational vehicle dealership, and debris was scattered across US Highway 395 and South Virginia Street. Of the 71 people aboard, three survived the initial impact, but one of them died on January 29 and another on February 4. The lone survivor was then 17-year old George Lamson Jr., who was thrown clear of the aircraft and landed upright, still in his seat, on South Virginia Street. Truckee Meadows Fire Department was the first emergency response department to arrive at the scene of the crash. Several other Washoe County and State of Nevada agencies also responded. George Kitchen, who was a captain in the Reno Fire Department leading a crew from
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    1 votes
    118
    JetBlue Airways Flight 292

    JetBlue Airways Flight 292

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A320
    • Operator: JetBlue Airways
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    JetBlue Airways Flight 292 was a scheduled flight from Bob Hope Airport (BUR) in Burbank, California to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in New York City. On September 21, 2005, flight 292 executed an emergency landing at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) after the nose wheels jammed in an abnormal position. No one was injured. Carrying 140 passengers and six crew, the Airbus A320-232 aircraft departed from Burbank at 3:17 pm PDT (UTC-7). The aircraft, which was built in 2002, bore the tail number N536JB and the name "Canyon Blue". It was scheduled to fly 2,465 miles (3,967 km) to JFK airport. After takeoff from Burbank, the pilots realized that they could not retract the landing gear. They then flew low over Long Beach Municipal Airport (LGB) in Long Beach (the location of a JetBlue hub) to allow officials in the airport's control tower to take stock of the damage to its landing gear before attempting a landing. It was found that the nosewheel was rotated ninety degrees to the left, perpendicular to the direction of the fuselage. Rather than land at Long Beach Airport, the pilot-in-command made the decision that the aircraft would land at Los Angeles International
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    1 votes
    119
    Mohawk Airlines Flight 405

    Mohawk Airlines Flight 405

    • Aircraft type: Fairchild Hiller FH-227
    • Operator: Mohawk Airlines
    Mohawk Airlines Flight 405, a Fairchild Hiller FH-227 twin-engine turboprop airliner registered N7818M, was a domestic scheduled passenger flight operated by Mohawk Airlines that crashed into a house on March 3, 1972, on final approach to Albany County Airport (now Albany International Airport), New York, killing 17 people. The flight, which originated in [Santa Monica], New York City, encountered problems during its final approach to runway 01 at Albany. The weather at the airport was reported to the flight crew as "ceiling indefinite, 1,200 feet obscured, 2 miles visibility in light snow, surface winds (from) 360 degrees (north) at 9 knots". As the Fairchild FH227B twin-engine turboprop reached 8.5 miles from the airport, the flight crew contacted Mohawk's operations center via radio and informed them that the left propeller was 'hung up' in the cruise pitch lock, which would prevent normal thrust reduction on that side, needed for landing. At about 5 miles out, the flight crew notified Albany Approach Control that they were trying to perform an emergency 'feathering' of the left propeller. As they continued to descend and struggle with the propeller, they advised the controller
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    1 votes
    120
    One-Two-GO Airlines Flight 269

    One-Two-GO Airlines Flight 269

    • Operator: One-Two-GO
    • Flight destination: Phuket International Airport
    One-Two-GO Airlines Flight 269 (OG269), a McDonnell Douglas MD-82, crashed into a non-frangible embankment beside runway 27 at Phuket International Airport (HKT) bursting into flames upon impact on September 16, 2007, at about 15:41 ICT during an attempted go-around after an aborted landing, killing 89 of the 130 persons on board. (One survivor succumbed to burn injuries several days after the crash.) OG269 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Bangkok to Phuket, Thailand. Thai crash investigators from the Thailand Department of Civil Aviation initially speculated that wind shear was the cause of the crash. Two years later, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) reported that wind shear was not a factor in the crash. A two-year investigation by NTSB resulted in a report mainly incorporated into the crash report published by the Thai Department of Civil Transportation. Both reports found that the Captain and First Officer had worked hours vastly in excess of the legal flight limits; that the first officer attempted to transfer control to the captain during the go-around; that neither pilot initiated a go-around and that the training and safety programs at the airline
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    1 votes
    121
    Pan Am Flight 73

    Pan Am Flight 73

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    Pan Am Flight 73, a Pan American World Airways Boeing 747-121, was hijacked on September 5, 1986, while on the ground at Karachi, Pakistan, by four armed men of the Abu Nidal Organization. The aircraft, with 360 on board, had just arrived from Sahar International Airport in Bombay, India and was preparing to depart Jinnah International Airport in Karachi for Frankfurt Airport in Frankfurt am Main, West Germany, ultimately continuing on to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, United States. Twenty of the passengers were killed during the hijacking, of which 13 were from India and the rest were from United States, Pakistan and Mexico. All the hijackers were arrested and sentenced to death in Pakistan. However, the sentences were later commuted to life in prison against the wishes of the United States and India. The incident began as passengers boarded the Frankfurt-bound aircraft in Karachi. A subsequent FBI investigation revealed that the hijack occurred despite the presence of armed agents near the aircraft. The four hijackers were dressed as Karachi airport security guards and were armed with assault rifles, pistols, grenades, and plastic explosive belts. At
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    1 votes
    122
    Air Canada Flight 797

    Air Canada Flight 797

    • Operator: Air Canada
    • Flight destination: Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport
    Air Canada Flight 797 was a scheduled trans-border flight that flew on a Dallas/Fort Worth-Toronto-Montreal route. On 2 June 1983, the aircraft developed an in-flight fire behind the washroom that spread between the outer skin and the inner decor panels, filling the plane with toxic smoke. The spreading fire also burned through crucial electrical cables that knocked out most of the instrumentation in the cockpit, forcing the plane to divert to an alternative landing field. Ninety seconds after the plane landed and the doors were opened, the heat of the fire and fresh oxygen from the open exit doors created flashover conditions, and the plane's interior quickly became engulfed in flames, killing 23 passengers who were yet to evacuate the aircraft. As a result of this accident, many regulations were implemented around the world to make airplanes safer, including the installation of smoke detectors, emergency lighting leading to exit doors and increased fire fighting training and equipment for crew members. At 16:20 CDT (21:20 UTC) on (1983-06-02)June 2, 1983, the Air Canada aircraft registered C-FTLU took off from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport; it was to make a stop at
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    3 votes
    123
    Air India Flight 182

    Air India Flight 182

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Air India
    • Flight destination: Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport
    Air India Flight 182 was an Air India flight operating on the Montreal–London–Delhi route. On 23 June 1985, the aircraft operating on the route—a Boeing 747-237B (c/n 21473/330, reg VT-EFO) named after Emperor Kanishka—was blown up by a bomb at an altitude of 31,000 feet (9,400 m), and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean while in Irish airspace. A total of 329 people were killed, including 280 Canadians, 27 British citizens and 22 Indians. The incident was the largest mass murder in Canadian history, and the deadliest aviation disaster to occur over a body of water. It was the first bombing of a 747 jumbo jet, preceding the better-known 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, which was also brought down by explosives placed in a radio inside a bag without its passenger boarding. The explosion and downing occurred within an hour of the fatal Narita Airport bombing, which also originated from Canada. In this case, a bag exploded on the ground before being placed on another Air India flight. Evidence from the explosion pointed to an attempt to blow up two airliners simultaneously. Investigation and prosecution lasting almost 20 years made this the most expensive trial in
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    3 votes
    124
    Air West Flight 612

    Air West Flight 612

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Air West
    Air West Flight 612 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight operated by Air West between Khartoum, Sudan and Al-Fashir. On January 24, 2007, with 103 people on board, the flight, operated by a Boeing 737, was hijacked shortly after takeoff by a male individual. The plane landed safely at N'Djamena, Chad, where the hijacker surrendered. On the day of the hijacking the plane had an entirely Sudanese passenger complement, the only exceptions being a British citizen and an Italian military attaché. Mohamed Abdu Altif (also referred to as Mohamed Abdelatif Mahamat), a 26-year-old from Al-Fashir, in North Darfur, entered the cockpit of the aircraft at 09:00 local time (0600 GMT), approximately half an hour after takeoff from Khartoum International Airport. He ordered the pilot to fly to Rome, Italy and then on to London, England. It was originally mistakenly reported that his weapon was an AK-47 assault rifle, but subsequent reports stated that the weapon was in fact a handgun. After the pilot explained that there was not enough fuel on board to reach London, he agreed to fly to Chad. He made no threats or other communication to the passengers, none of whom became aware the aircraft
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    3 votes
    125
    All Nippon Airways Flight 533

    All Nippon Airways Flight 533

    • Aircraft type: NAMC YS-11
    • Operator: All Nippon Airways
    • Flight destination: Matsuyama Airport
    All Nippon Airways Flight 533, registration JA8658, was a NAMC YS-11 en route from Osaka, Japan to Matsuyama on the island of Shikoku. It was the fifth crash in Japan in 1966. The plane left Osaka International Airport in Itami at 19:13. At approximately 20:20 it arrived at Matsuyama Airport and was cleared to land on runway 31. On its final approach, the plane was higher than normal and touched down 460 metres beyond the runway threshold. The plane continued on the ground for 170 metres before taking off again for a go-around. The plane reached a height of 70-100 metres, turned left, lost altitude, and crashed into the Seto Inland Sea at approximately 20:30. The reason for the loss of altitude that caused the crash was never determined. The flight number NH533 is still used on flights today from Tokyo Haneda to Takamtsu Airport.
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    3 votes
    126
    British Airways Flight 5390

    British Airways Flight 5390

    • Aircraft type: BAC One-Eleven
    • Operator: British Airways
    • Flight destination: Málaga Airport
    Flight 5390 was a British Airways flight between Birmingham Airport in England and Málaga, Spain. On 10 June 1990 an improperly installed panel of the windscreen failed, blowing the plane's captain, Tim Lancaster, halfway out of the aircraft, with his body firmly pressed against the window frame. The first officer managed to perform an emergency landing in Southampton with no loss of life. "British Airways Flight 5390" is now used as a Codeshare route between Des Moines, IA USA and Chicago-O'Hare, IL USA operated by American Airlines. The aircraft, captained by Tim Lancaster and co-piloted by Alastair Atchison, was BAC One-Eleven Series 528FL G-BJRT. It took off at 07:20 local time, with 81 passengers, four cabin crew and two flight crew. Co-pilot Atchison handled a routine take-off, and relinquished control to Lancaster as the plane established itself in its climb. Both pilots subsequently released their shoulder harnesses, while Lancaster loosened his lap belt as well. At 07:33, the cabin crew had begun to prepare for meal service. The plane had climbed to 17300 feet over Didcot, Oxfordshire. Suddenly, there was a loud bang, and the fuselage quickly filled with condensation. The
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    3 votes
    127
    Chateau de Sully

    Chateau de Sully

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
    F-BHSM was the registration and callsign of a Boeing 707 named Chateau de Sully used by Air France for Flight 007, a charter flight which crashed on June 3, 1962 while attempting to depart Paris's Orly Airport en route to Atlanta, Georgia via New York City's Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport). The 707 carried 122 passengers and 10 crew, of whom 130 died. The pilot was Captain Roland Hoche, 39, assisted by First Officer Jacques Pitoiset, 40 and Flight Engineer Robert Barres, 42. According to witnesses, during the takeoff roll on runway 8, the nose of Flight 007 rotated off the runway, but the jet failed to lift off, its main landing gear remaining on the ground. A motor driving the elevator trim had failed, leaving the pilots unable to complete rotation and liftoff. With no other choice, the flight crew attempted to abort the take off even though the aircraft had already exceeded V1, the maximum speed at which a takeoff can be aborted and the aircraft stopped within the available runway length. With less than 3,000 feet (910 m) of runway remaining, the pilots attempted to stop the 707 using wheel brakes and reverse thrust. After braking hard enough to
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    3 votes
    128
    Philippine Airlines Flight 434

    Philippine Airlines Flight 434

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Philippine Airlines
    • Flight destination: Narita International Airport
    Philippine Airlines Flight 434 (PAL434, PR434) was the route designator of a flight from Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Pasay City, the Philippines, to New Tokyo International Airport (now Narita International Airport), Narita near Tokyo, Japan, with one stop at Mactan-Cebu International Airport, Cebu, the Philippines. On December 11, 1994 the Boeing 747-283B, tail number EI-BWF, was flying on the second leg of the route, from Cebu to Tokyo, when a bomb planted by terrorist Ramzi Yousef exploded, killing one passenger. It was a part of the unsuccessful Bojinka terrorist attacks. Captain Eduardo "Ed" Reyes, an experienced veteran pilot, was able to land the aircraft, saving the plane and all the remaining passengers and crew. The flight crew also consisted of First Officer Jaime Herrera and Systems Engineer Dexter Comendador. Authorities later discovered that a passenger on the aircraft's preceding leg was Ramzi Yousef. He was later convicted of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. Yousef boarded the flight under the fake Italian name "Armaldo Forlani", an incorrect spelling of the name of the Italian legislator Arnaldo Forlani. Yousef boarded the aircraft for the Manila to
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Turkish Airlines Flight 1951

    Turkish Airlines Flight 1951

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Next Generation
    • Operator: Turkish Airlines
    • Flight destination: Amsterdam Schiphol Airport
    Turkish Airlines Flight 1951 (also known as the Poldercrash) was a passenger flight which crashed during landing to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, Netherlands, on 25 February 2009, killing nine passengers and crew including all three pilots. The aircraft, a Turkish Airlines Boeing 737-800, crashed into a field approximately 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) north of runway 18R, prior to crossing the A9 motorway inbound, at 9:31 UTC (10:31 CET), having flown from Istanbul, Turkey. The aircraft broke into three pieces on impact. The wreckage did not catch fire. A preliminary investigation found that the crash was caused primarily by the aircraft's automated reaction which was triggered by a faulty radio altimeter, which had malfunctioned. This caused the autothrottle to decrease the engine power to idle during approach. The crew noticed this too late to take appropriate action to increase the throttle and recover the aircraft before it stalled and crashed. Boeing has since issued a bulletin to remind pilots of all 737 series and BBJ aircraft of the importance of monitoring airspeed and altitude, advising against the use of autopilot or autothrottle while landing in cases of radio altimeter
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Yeti Airlines Flight 103

    Yeti Airlines Flight 103

    Yeti Airlines Flight 103, was a De Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter Series 300 registered as 9N-AFE. The flight crashed on final approach to Tenzing-Hillary Airport in the town of Lukla in eastern Nepal on 8 October 2008. The flight originated from Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu. The airport is the main access to the Mount Everest region in Nepal, and is a notoriously difficult landing, with only 1,500 feet (460 m) of steeply sloped runway just 65 feet (20 m) wide and a steep approach path. Due to bad weather conditions and heavy fog the pilot could not see anything but still tried to land. He came in too low and too far left, which caused the aircraft to crash into the mountain. 18 of the dead were reported to be tourists. 12 of the passengers on the flight were German and 2 Australian. The only survivor was Surendra Kunwar; the Captain of the aircraft, who was dragged free from the wreckage shortly after the crash and was flown out to Kathmandu for emergency treatment.
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Adam Air Flight 172

    Adam Air Flight 172

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: Adam Air
    Adam Air Flight 172 was a serious incident involving a Boeing 737-300, registered PK-KKV, flying on a scheduled domestic passenger flight in Indonesia between Jakarta and Surabaya. Officials stated the aircraft passed safety checks prior to its departure. On 21 February 2007, the plane bent on landing, with the fuselage cracking in the middle of the passenger section. All six of Adam Air's remaining 737s were immediately grounded, but five of them were back in regular service later that year. This incident has caused further concerns regarding the safety of flights operated by Adam Air, which has received much criticism after the 1 January 2007 crash of Flight 574. The aircraft, a Boeing 737-33A, registration PK-KKV, was acquired by Adam Air (the 10th airline to own the plane) in early-December 2006, having previously been owned by Brazilian operator Varig. The aircraft was manufactured in 1994. The plane bent upon landing at Juanda International Airport, with the fuselage cracking in the middle of the passenger section. It was reported that the landing itself was particularly hard, with baggage being ejected from cabin lockers into the cabin space. The tail section of the plane
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    China Airlines Flight 611

    China Airlines Flight 611

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: China Airlines
    • Flight destination: Hong Kong International Airport
    China Airlines Flight 611 (CAL 611, CI 611, callsign Dynasty 611) was a regularly scheduled flight from Chiang Kai-shek International Airport (now Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport) in Taoyuan to Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong. On 25 May 2002, the Boeing 747-209B disintegrated in mid-air and crashed into the Taiwan Strait just 20 minutes after taking off, killing 225 people. The cause of the crash was improper repairs to the aircraft 22 years earlier. The accident was particularly disturbing to the public because the Taipei to Hong Kong route was and is to this day one of the most heavily-travelled routes on Earth; it is so profitable that it is even referred to as the "Golden Route." The flight on Saturday, 25 May 2002 took off at 14:50 local time and was expected to arrive at Hong Kong at 16:28. The flight crew consisted of Captain Ching-Fong Yi (simplified Chinese: 易清丰; traditional Chinese: 易清豐; pinyin: Yì Qīngfēng), First Officer Yea Shyong Shieh (simplified Chinese: 谢亚雄; traditional Chinese: 謝亞雄; pinyin: Xiè Yàxióng), and Flight Engineer Sen Kuo Chao (simplified Chinese: 赵盛国; traditional Chinese: 趙盛國; pinyin: Zhào Shèngguó). The names of the pilot and first
    5.75
    4 votes
    133
    Mandarin Airlines Flight 642

    Mandarin Airlines Flight 642

    • Operator: Mandarin Airlines
    • Flight destination: Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport
    China Airlines Flight 642 was a flight that crashed at Hong Kong International Airport on 22 August 1999. It was operating from Bangkok (Bangkok International Airport, now renamed Don Mueang International Airport) to Taipei with a stopover in Hong Kong. The plane, an MD-11, was operated by subsidiary Mandarin Airlines on behalf of China Airlines. While landing during a typhoon, it touched down hard, flipped over and caught fire. Of the people on board 312 survived and three were killed. The flight continues to operate today with the flight no longer originating in Bangkok and is strictly a Hong Kong-Taipei route. At about 6:43 P.M. on 22 August 1999, B-150, a McDonnell Douglas MD-11, was making its final approach to runway 25L when Typhoon Sam was 50 km NE of the airport. At an altitude of 700 feet prior to touchdown a further wind check was passed to the crew: 320 deg/28 knots gusting to 36 knots. This results in a crosswind component of 21.4 knots gusting to 27.5 knots, while tested limit for the aircraft was 24 knots. During the final flare to land, the plane rolled to the right, landed hard on its right main gear and the No. 3 engine touched the runway. The right wing separated
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    DHL shootdown incident in Baghdad

    DHL shootdown incident in Baghdad

    • Aircraft type: A300B4-203F
    • Operator: European Air Transport
    On 22 November 2003, shortly after takeoff from Baghdad, Iraq, an Airbus A300 cargo plane owned by European Air Transport ("DHL") was struck on the left wing tip by a surface-to-air missile. Severe wing damage resulted in a fire and complete loss of hydraulic flight control systems. Because outboard left wing fuel tank 1A was full at takeoff, there was no fuel-air vapour explosion. Liquid jet fuel dropped away as 1A disintegrated. Inboard fuel tank 1 was pierced and leaking. Returning to Baghdad, the three-man crew made an injury-free landing of the crippled aircraft, using differential engine thrust as the only pilot input. This is despite major damage to a wing, total loss of hydraulic control, a faster than safe landing speed and a ground path which veered off the runway surface and onto unprepared ground. Paris Match Reporter Claudine Vernier-Palliez accompanied a Fedayeen commando unit on their strike mission against the DHL aircraft. Sara Daniel, a French weekly newsmagazine journalist claimed receipt, from an unknown source, of a video that showed insurgents, faces concealed, firing a missile at the A300. Daniel was researching a feature about Iraqi resistance groups but
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    American Airlines Flight 77

    American Airlines Flight 77

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    American Airlines Flight 77 was a passenger flight which was hijacked by five al-Qaeda terrorists on September 11, 2001, as part of the September 11 attacks. They deliberately crashed it into the Pentagon near Washington, D.C., killing all 59 people on board plus the hijackers, as well as 125 people in the building. The aircraft involved, a Boeing 757-223, was flying American Airlines' daily scheduled morning transcontinental service from Washington Dulles International Airport, in Dulles, Virginia to Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California. Less than 35 minutes into the flight, the hijackers stormed the cockpit and forced the passengers, crew, and pilots to the rear of the aircraft. Hani Hanjour, one of the hijackers who was trained as a pilot, assumed control of the flight. Unknown to the hijackers, passengers aboard were able to make telephone calls to loved ones and relay information on the hijacking. The aircraft crashed into the western side of the Pentagon at 09:37 EDT. Dozens of people witnessed the crash and news sources began reporting on the incident within minutes. The impact severely damaged an area of the Pentagon and caused a large fire. At
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Caledonian Flight 153

    Caledonian Flight 153

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-7
    • Operator: Caledonian Airways
    Caledonian Airways Flight 153 was a multi-leg nonscheduled passenger service from Luxembourg via Khartoum, Lorenzo Marques (nowadays Maputo), Douala and Lisbon, before heading back to Luxembourg. On 4 March 1962 a Douglas DC-7C flying the route, registration G-ARUD, crashed shortly after takeoff from Douala International Airport, Douala, Cameroon in a swamp on the edge of a jungle 1.5 miles off the airport. It is the worst crash of a DC-7. The aircraft was leased from Sabena in November 1961, and was named Star of Robbie Burns. The aircraft had flown more than 14,000 flying hours prior to the accident. The aircraft was scheduled to operate the fourth leg of flight number 153 from Douala to Lisbon, Portugal. On board were a total of 101 passengers and 10 crew. The aircraft lined up with Runway 12 at Douala International Airport and began the takeoff procedure. An air traffic controller in the tower at the airport reportedly saw the aircraft lift off the runway, approximately inline with the instrument landing system transmitter 2400 metres after the release of its brakes. They also noticed that the aircraft did not seem to have its landing lights on. Witnesses reported that the
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Chalk's Ocean Airways flight 101

    Chalk's Ocean Airways flight 101

    • Aircraft type: Grumman Mallard
    • Operator: Chalk's Ocean Airways
    • Flight destination: Bimini
    Chalk's Ocean Airways Flight 101 was an aircraft crash that occurred off Miami Beach, Florida, in the United States on December 19, 2005. All 20 passengers and crew on board the 1947 Grumman G-73T Turbine Mallard died in the crash, which was attributed to metal fatigue on the starboard wing resulting in separation of the wing from the fuselage. On December 19, 2005, Chalk's Ocean Airways Flight 101 from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States to Bimini, Bahamas, with an unscheduled stop at Watson Island, Miami, Florida, crashed off Miami Beach, Florida. Witnesses saw white smoke billowing from the plane, before the right wing ripped off and the plane plunged into the ocean. Twenty people — 18 passengers and two crew members — were on board. There were no survivors. Three of the passengers were lap-held infants under the age of two. Just over half of the passengers were from Bimini and returning from Christmas shopping in Florida. The plane crashed and sank in Government Cut channel, a waterway which connects the Port of Miami with the Atlantic Ocean. Government Cut was closed to shipping until 6:30 p.m. on December 20, stranding at least three cruise ships. The plane was a Grumman
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Continental Airlines Flight 1713

    Continental Airlines Flight 1713

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Continental Airlines
    • Flight destination: Boise Airport
    Continental Airlines Flight 1713 crashed while taking off in a snowstorm from Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado on 15 November 1987. The Douglas DC-9-14 was operated by Continental Airlines and was a scheduled flight to Boise, Idaho. Twenty-five passengers and three crew members died in the crash. Continental Airlines Flight 1713 was scheduled to leave Denver at 12:25 PM MST, but many flights out of Denver that day were delayed by inclement weather. The flight was cleared for takeoff at 2:14 PM Mountain Time. As the plane was taking off, it over rotated; the aircraft descended and the left wing struck the ground, causing the wing to separate. The left side of the plane and cockpit struck the ground next and the plane continued rolling, inverted. Of the 82 occupants on board (77 passengers and 5 crew), 28 were killed while 54 survived. The majority of the passengers who died were in the middle of the aircraft. As the plane skidded, the left side was tilted over and the tail was inverted; this action caused the middle part of the plane to squeeze and crush many of the passengers on board. Of the passengers that died, 16 (including one infant) died of blunt trauma
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    PauknAir Flight 4101

    PauknAir Flight 4101

    • Aircraft type: BAe 146
    • Operator: PauknAir
    • Flight destination: Melilla Airport
    PauknAir Flight 4101 was a British Aerospace BAe 146 that crashed on a flight from Málaga, Spain to the Spanish North African exclave of Melilla. All 38 passengers and crew on board the aircraft were killed in the accident. The aircraft made its first flight in 1983 and was the seventh BAe 146 built. PauknAir had been operating the aircraft since it was established and was the second operator of the aircraft since it was built. The aircraft took off from runway 14 at Malaga's Pablo Ruiz Picasso Airport at 9:23 AM. On board were 34 passengers and a crew of four. The flight proceeded normally, without any problems and with normal weather conditions for those hours of the morning. The descent began at 9:41. In the area of Cape Tres Forcas (the headland on which Melilla is situated), low visibility is common, as clouds accumulate between the valleys formed by the steep mountains of the cape. The descent continued in Instrument meteorological conditions. In communications with Air traffic control, the pilot complained of the fog. Some of his last words were: "I see nothing"'. At 9:49, there were two Terrain awareness and warning system signals in the cockpit of "terrain", which
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    PIA Flight 688

    PIA Flight 688

    • Aircraft type: Fokker F27
    Pakistan International Airlines Flight 688 (PK688, PIA688) was scheduled to operate from Multan to Lahore and Islamabad at 12:05 pm on 10 July 2006. It crashed into a field after bursting into flames a few minutes after takeoff from Multan International Airport. All 41 passengers and four crewmembers on board were killed. The victims included Asmatullah Khan (Manager Legal Services) of PIA, Justice Muhammad Nawaz Bhatti and Justice Nazir Ahmed Siddiqui, who served on the Lahore High Court. Three military personnel, Vice-Chancellor of Bahauddin Zakariya University, Prof. Dr. Muhammad Naseer Khan, internationally renowned Pakistani Neurosurgeon Prof. Iftikhar Ali Raja and eight women, including two flight attendants and three doctors, were also among those killed. One of the flight attendants was pulled out alive, but later died. A list of names of the passengers and crew killed in the plane crash is available on Dawn's website. According to the Daily Jang Lahore newspaper, no one was pulled alive from the plane. The plane lost contact with the Multan International Airport control tower two minutes after takeoff. The aircraft hit an electric power line before crashing into a wheat
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    USAir Flight 427

    USAir Flight 427

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: US Airways
    • Flight destination: Palm Beach International Airport
    US Air Flight 427 was a scheduled flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport to Pittsburgh, with a final destination of West Palm Beach, Florida. The flight crashed on Thursday, September 8, 1994, killing everyone on board. The Boeing 737-3B7 flying the route, registered N513AU, was approaching runway 28R of Pittsburgh International Airport, located in Findlay Township, Pennsylvania. The airport was, at the time, the largest hub for the airline. 45-year-old Captain Peter Germano and 38-year-old First Officer Charles B. "Chuck" Emmett III piloted the aircraft. At about 6,000 feet (1,800 m) and 6 miles (10 km) from the runway, the aircraft experienced a sudden loss of control and slammed into the ground in a nearly vertical nose down position in Hopewell Township, Beaver County, near Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, killing all 127 passengers and 5 crew members. Flight 427 has the third highest death toll of any aviation accident involving a Boeing 737-300 after the crash of Flash Airlines Flight 604 and China Southern Airlines Flight 3943. When it occurred, it was the second deadliest accident involving a Boeing 737 and is currently the sixth worst. It was also the seventh worst
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Winter Hill air disaster

    Winter Hill air disaster

    • Operator: Manx Airlines
    • Flight destination: Manchester International Airport
    The Winter Hill air disaster occurred on 27 February 1958 when the Silver City Airways Bristol 170 Freighter G-AICS, travelling from the Isle of Man to Manchester, England, crashed into Winter Hill (also known as Rivington Moor) several hundred yards away from the Independent Television Authority's Winter Hill transmitting station. Thirty-five people died and seven were injured. The weather that night (note: the ICAO report states that the accident occurred at 09.15 in the morning) was so severe that none of the engineers working in the ITA transmitting station were aware of the crash. Several feet of snow hampered rescue efforts, and a snow cat vehicle had to be diverted from the A6 to cut a path for emergency vehicles though the track had been cleared by people using spades by the time it arrived. The flight was essentially a charter flight from Ronaldsway Airport in the Isle of Man to Manchester Ringway Airport for a group of mainly Motor Traders to visit the Manchester Exide Battery Factory and Manchester car show. The flight of the Silver City Airways Bristol 170 Freighter G-AICS, call sign "Charlie Sierra" was due to fly from Ronaldsway Airport, Ballasalla, on the Isle of Man
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Aer Lingus Flight 712

    Aer Lingus Flight 712

    Flight 712, operated by Aer Lingus crashed en route from Cork to London on 24 March 1968 killing all 61 passengers and crew. The plane, a Vickers Viscount 803 named "St. Phelim", crashed into the sea off Tuskar Rock, County Wexford. Although the investigation into the crash lasted two years, a cause was never determined. There has long been popular speculation that the aircraft was shot down by a British experimental missile. Aberporth in West Wales was at the time the most advanced British missile testing station. The flight left Cork Airport at 10:32 hours for London. The flight proceeded normally until a call was heard with the probable contents "twelve thousand feet descending spinning rapidly". There was no further communications with the aircraft and London ATC informed Shannon ATC that they had no radio contact with EI-AOM. London ATC requested Aer Lingus Flight EI 362 (flying Dublin-Bristol) to search west of Strumble. This search at 500 ft (150 m) in good visibility saw nothing. At 11:25 a full alert was declared. By 12:36 there was a report of wreckage sighted at position 51°57′N, 06°10′W. Searching aircraft found nothing and the report cancelled. Aircraft and ships from
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Aero Flight 311

    Aero Flight 311

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-3
    • Operator: Finnair
    • Flight destination: Vaasa Airport
    Aero Flight 311 (AY311), often referred to as the Koivulahti air disaster, was a scheduled domestic passenger flight operated by Aero O/Y (now Finnair) between Kronoby (Finnish: Kruunypyy), Finland and Vaasa. The aircraft, a Douglas DC-3C, crashed near Kvevlax (Finnish: Koivulahti) on January 3, 1961, killing all twenty-five people on board. The disaster remains the deadliest civilian aviation accident in the history of Finland. The captain of the flight, a World War II fighter ace, was initially the target of the press after the accident, which was to change into blaming him after the police revealed both pilots were intoxicated when flying. The Douglas DC-3, registered OH-LCC, was scheduled to take-off at 7:00, but take-off preparations were late and the plane departed at 7:16. The co-pilot requested free flying altitude from the air traffic control, which was permitted. This allowed Flight 311 to fly at any altitude above the minimum flight altitude for the Kruununkylä-Vaasa route which was 1,500 feet (460 m). The pilots did not follow these regulations for the last 40 kilometres (25 mi), during which they flew below 100 metres (330 ft). Shortly after the flight's last radio
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Arrow Air Flight 1285

    Arrow Air Flight 1285

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-8
    • Operator: Arrow Air
    • Flight destination: Fort Campbell
    Arrow Air Flight 1285 was a McDonnell Douglas DC-8-63CF jetliner, registered N950JW, which operated as an international charter flight carrying U.S. troops from Cairo, Egypt, to their home base in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, via Cologne, Germany and Gander, Newfoundland. On the morning of December 12, 1985, shortly after takeoff from Gander en route to Fort Campbell, the aircraft stalled, crashed, and burned about half a mile from the runway, killing all 256 passengers and crew on board. It is the deadliest aviation accident to occur on Canadian soil and the second deadliest involving a DC-8 after Nigeria Airways Flight 2120. The accident was investigated by the Canadian Aviation Safety Board (CASB), which determined the probable cause of the crash was the aircraft's unexpectedly high drag and reduced lift condition, most likely was due to ice contamination on the wings' leading edges and upper surfaces. A minority report stated that the accident could have been caused by an onboard explosion of unknown origin prior to impact. The aircraft, a McDonnell Douglas DC-8-63CF, was chartered to carry U.S. service personnel, all members of the 101st Airborne Division, United States Army, from
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Delta Air Lines Flight 1141

    Delta Air Lines Flight 1141

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727
    • Operator: Delta Air Lines
    • Flight destination: Salt Lake City International Airport
    Delta Air Lines Flight 1141 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight between Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City, Utah. On August 31, 1988, the flight, operated by a Boeing 727, crashed upon takeoff from Dallas-Fort Worth, killing 14 of the 108 passengers and crew on board, and injuring 76 others. The aircraft was a tri-engined Boeing 727-200 Advanced, registration number N473DA. It was delivered in November 1973, the 992nd Boeing 727 to be manufactured, and had 43,023 flight hours. The flight crew consisted of Captain Larry Davis, 48; First Officer Gary Kirkland, 37; and Flight Engineer Steven Judd, 31. The cabin crew consisted of four flight attendants: Dixie Dunn, 56, Diana George, 40, Rosilyn Marr, 43, and Mary O'Neill, 57. Flight DL1141 to Salt Lake City left Gate 15 at 8:30AM CDT and was instructed to taxi to runway 18L. At 8:57AM DL1141 was cleared to "taxi into position and hold 18L, expect one minute for wake turbulence behind the heavy DC-10." At 8:59:17AM the flight was cleared for takeoff. The takeoff was uneventful until the airplane reached the rotation phase (at 154 knots, 6017 feet down the runway). As
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Korean Air Flight 801

    Korean Air Flight 801

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport
    Korean Air Flight 801 (KE801, KAL801) crashed on August 6, 1997, on approach to Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport, in the United States territory of Guam. Flight 801 was normally flown by an Airbus A300; since Korean Air had scheduled the August 5–6 flight to transport Guamanian athletes to the South Pacific Mini Games in American Samoa, the airline designated HL7468, a Boeing 747-300 delivered to Korean Air on December 12, 1984, to fly the route that night. The aircraft crashed on Nimitz Hill in Asan, Guam while on approach to the airport. Flight 801 departed from Seoul-Kimpo International Airport (now Gimpo Airport) at 8:53 pm (9:53 pm Guam time) on August 5 on its way to Guam. It carried two pilots, a flight engineer, 14 flight attendants, and 237 passengers, a total of 254 people. Of the passengers, three were children between the ages of 2 and 12 and three were 24 months old or younger. Six of the passengers were Korean Air flight attendants who were deadheading. The flight, headed by 42-year old Captain Park Yong-chul (Hangul: 박용철, RR: Bak Yong-cheol, M-R: Pak Yongch'ŏl) 40-year old First Officer Song Kyung-ho (Hangul: 송경호, RR: Song Gyeong-ho, M-R: Song Kyŏngho) and
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Mohawk Airlines Flight 411

    Mohawk Airlines Flight 411

    • Aircraft type: Fairchild Hiller FH-227
    • Operator: Mohawk Airlines
    Mohawk Airlines Flight 411, a Fairchild FH-227B twin-engine turboprop, registered N7811M, was a scheduled domestic passenger service operated by Mohawk Airlines, between Albany and Glens Falls, New York. On November 19, 1969, it crashed into Pilot Knob Mountain, killing all 14 passengers and crew on board. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded that the crash was caused by the captain's improper execution of an instrument approach, combined with a severe downdraft at a low altitude, which resulted in the aircraft descending uncontrollably into terrain. On the evening of November 19, 1969, at about 20:03 EST, Mohawk Airlines Flight 411, a twin engine Fairchild FH-227B turboprop, departed from Albany International Airport near Albany, New York. It was operating as a scheduled passenger/cargo flight on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan to its destination of Warren County Airport in Glens Falls, New York, 37 nautical miles (69 km) northeast, with an estimated flight time of about 15 minutes. At 20:07:32 EST, just 4 minutes after takeoff, Flight 411 was cleared by air traffic control (ATC) for "a VOR approach to runway 19". The aircraft overflew the Glens
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Pan Am Flight 845

    Pan Am Flight 845

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: Unknown Airport, Tokyo
    Pan Am Flight 845 was a Boeing 747-121, registration N747PA, operating as a scheduled international passenger flight between Los Angeles, CA and Tokyo, with an intermediate stop at San Francisco International Airport (ICAO: KSFO). On July 30, 1971, at 15:29 PDT, while taking off from San Francisco bound for Tokyo, the aircraft struck Approach Lighting System structures located past the end of the runway, seriously injuring two passengers and sustaining significant damage. The crew continued the takeoff, flying out over the ocean and circling while dumping fuel, eventually returning for a landing in San Francisco. After coming to a stop, the crew ordered an emergency evacuation, during which 27 passengers were injured while exiting the aircraft, with eight of them suffering serious back injuries. The accident was investigated by the NTSB, which determined the probable cause was the pilot's use of incorrect takeoff reference speeds. The NTSB also found various procedural failures in the dissemination and retrieval of flight safety information, which contributed to the accident. The Boeing 747-121, registration N747PA, manufacturing serial number 19639, was manufactured on January 29,
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Pan Am Flight 943

    Pan Am Flight 943

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 377 Stratocruiser
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    Pan Am Flight 6 (registration N90943, and sometimes erroneously called Flight 943) was an American around-the-world commercial passenger flight that was forced to ditch in the Pacific Ocean on October 16, 1956, after the two of its four engines failed. The service originated in Philadelphia, traveling eastwards around the globe via many stops, with a final scheduled destination at San Francisco. On the evening of October 15, 1956, the flight was operated over its final stages by a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, named "Clipper Sovereign Of The Skies" (Pan Am fleet number 943) and registered N90943. Events from the accident served as the basis for the 1958 film "Crash Landing". The aircraft took off from Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, at 8:26 p.m. HST on the flight's concluding leg to San Francisco. After passing the point of equal time, the flight requested and received permission to climb to an altitude of 21,000 ft. When that altitude was reached, the No. 1 engine began to overspeed as power was reduced. The First Officer, who was flying the plane, immediately slowed the plane by further reducing power and by extending the flaps, and then an attempt was made to feather the propeller.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    TAM Linhas Aéreas Flight 3054

    TAM Linhas Aéreas Flight 3054

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A320
    • Operator: TAM Linhas Aéreas
    TAM Airlines Flight 3054 (JJ 3054) was an Airbus A320 airliner, registration PR-MBK, operating as a scheduled domestic passenger flight between Porto Alegre and São Paulo, Brazil, which crashed upon landing during rain in São Paulo on July 17, 2007. The twin-engined turbofan aircraft overran the runway, crossed a major thoroughfare during rush hour, crashed at high speed into a TAM Express warehouse adjacent to a filling station and exploded. There were 187 people on board: 181 passengers, 19 of them TAM employees, and 6 crew members. All passengers and crew were killed in the crash, in addition to twelve people on the ground. It is the deadliest air disaster in Brazilian territory. It remains the deadliest accident involving an Airbus A320 anywhere in the world. Flight 3054 was an Airbus A320-233 serial number 789, registration PR-MBK, powered by two International Aero V2527E-A5 turbofan engines. According to Flight International, the aircraft was built in February 1998 and first entered service in March flying for Grupo TACA and later in November 2003 by Pacific Airlines. The aircraft was owned by Pegasus Aviation before it was delivered to TAM in December 2006. As of April 20,
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    TWA Flight 800

    TWA Flight 800

    • Flight destination: Leonardo da Vinci International Airport
    Trans World Airlines Flight 800 (TWA 800), a Boeing 747-131, exploded and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near East Moriches, New York, on July 17, 1996, at about 20:31 EDT, 12 minutes after takeoff from John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 230 people on board. It was the second-deadliest U.S. aviation accident after American Airlines Flight 191 until American Airlines Flight 587, which also took off from Kennedy Airport, surpassed it in 2001. It remains the third-deadliest aviation accident to occur in U.S. territory. TWA 800 was a scheduled international passenger flight from New York to Rome, with a stopover in Paris. While accident investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) traveled to the scene, arriving the following morning, there was much initial speculation that a terrorist attack was the cause of the crash. Consequently, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) initiated a parallel criminal investigation. Sixteen months later the FBI announced that no evidence had been found of a criminal act and closed its active investigation. The four-year NTSB investigation concluded with the approval of the Aircraft Accident Report on August 23,
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    United Airlines Chesterton Crash

    United Airlines Chesterton Crash

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 247
    On October 10, 1933, a Boeing 247 propliner operated by United Air Lines and registered as NC13304, crashed near Chesterton, Indiana. The transcontinental flight, carrying three crew and four passengers, had originated in Newark, New Jersey, with its final destination in Oakland, California. It had already landed in Cleveland and was headed to its next stop in Chicago, but exploded en route. All aboard died in the crash, which was proven to have been deliberately caused by an on-board explosive device. Eyewitnesses on the ground reported hearing an explosion shortly after 9 p.m., and told of seeing the plane in flames at an altitude of about 1,000 feet (300 m). A second explosion followed after the plane crashed. The crash scene was adjacent to a gravel road about 5 miles (8 km) outside of Chesterton, centered in a wooded area on the Jackson Township farm of James Smiley. Investigators who combed through the debris were confronted with unusual evidence: The toilet and baggage compartment had been smashed into fragments. Shards of metal riddled the inside of the toilet door while the other side was free of the metal fragments. The tail section had been severed just aft of the toilet
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    B-52 crash at Thule Air Base

    B-52 crash at Thule Air Base

    • Aircraft type: B-52 Stratofortress
    The 1968 Thule Air Base B-52 crash, Thule affair or Thule accident (pronounced /ˈtuːliː/) was an accident on January 21, 1968, involving a United States Air Force (USAF) B-52 bomber. The aircraft was carrying four hydrogen bombs on a Cold War "Chrome Dome" alert mission over Baffin Bay when a cabin fire forced the crew to abandon the aircraft before they could carry out an emergency landing at Thule Air Base. Six crew members ejected safely, but one who did not have an ejection seat was killed while trying to bail out. The bomber crashed onto sea ice in North Star Bay, Greenland, causing the nuclear payload to rupture and disperse, which resulted in widespread radioactive contamination. The United States and Denmark launched an intensive clean-up and recovery operation, but the secondary of one of the nuclear weapons could not be accounted for after the operation completed. USAF Strategic Air Command "Chrome Dome" operations were discontinued immediately after the incident, which highlighted the safety and political risks of the missions. Safety procedures were reviewed and more stable explosives were developed for use in nuclear weapons. In 1995, a political scandal resulted in
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    British European Airways Flight 548

    British European Airways Flight 548

    • Aircraft type: Hawker-Siddeley HS121 Trident
    • Operator: British European Airways
    British European Airways Flight 548 was a scheduled passenger flight from London Heathrow to Brussels on 18 June 1972, which crashed just after take-off, killing all 118 people on board. The accident became known as the Staines disaster, and was the worst air disaster in Britain until the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland in 1988. The Hawker Siddeley Trident suffered a deep stall in the third minute of the flight and crashed near the town of Staines, narrowly missing a busy main road. The ensuing inquest principally blamed the captain for failing to maintain airspeed and configure the high-lift devices correctly. It cited the captain's heart condition and the limited experience of the co-pilot, while also noting an unspecified 'technical problem' that they apparently resolved while still on the runway. The process and findings of the inquiry were considered highly controversial among British pilots and the public. The crash took place against the background of a pilots' strike that had caused bad feelings between crew members. The strike had also disrupted services, causing Flight 548 to be loaded with the maximum weight allowable. Recommendations from the inquiry
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 212

    Eastern Air Lines Flight 212

    • Operator: Eastern Air Lines
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 212 was an Eastern Air Lines Douglas DC-9-31, carrying 78 passengers and 4 crew, operating as a scheduled flight from Charleston, South Carolina to Chicago, Illinois, with an intermediate stop in Charlotte, North Carolina. On the morning of September 11, 1974, while conducting an instrument approach in dense ground fog into Douglas Municipal Airport (now called Charlotte/Douglas International Airport), Charlotte, North Carolina, the aircraft crashed just short of the runway, killing 71 of the occupants. Thirteen people survived the initial impact, including the co-pilot and one flight attendant who walked away with no serious injuries; however, three more ultimately died from severe burn injuries. One of the initial survivors died of injuries 29 days after the accident. Among those who died were the father and two older brothers of future American comedian Stephen Colbert; Navy Rear Admiral Charles W. Cummings, acting commandant of the 6th Naval District; three executives of Charleston's The Post and Courier; WCIV (Sullivan's Island, South Carolina) television station anchorman Wayne Seal; and John Merriman, news editor for the CBS Evening News. The
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Lauda Air Flight 004

    Lauda Air Flight 004

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: Lauda Air
    • Flight destination: Vienna International Airport
    Lauda Air Flight 004 was an international passenger flight that crashed due to a thrust reverser deployment of the number 1 engine in flight. On 26 May 1991, at 23:02 local time, Flight NG004 (originating from Hong Kong's Kai Tak Airport), a Boeing 767-3Z9ER, registration OE-LAV, ship name Mozart, took off from Old Bangkok International Airport (Don Mueang International Airport) for its flight to Vienna International Airport with 213 passengers and 10 crew, under the command of Captain Thomas J. Welch (American) and First Officer Josef Thurner (Austrian). At 23:08, Welch and Thurner received a visual warning indicating that a possible system failure would cause the thrust reverser on the number 1 engine to deploy in flight. Having consulted the aircraft's Quick Reference Handbook, they determined that it was "just an advisory thing" and took no action. At 23:17, the thrust reverser on the number 1 engine deployed while the plane was over mountainous jungle terrain in the border area between Suphanburi and Uthai Thani provinces, Thailand. Thurner's last recorded words were, "Oh, reverser's deployed!". The 767 stalled in mid-air and disintegrated at 4,000 feet (1,200 meters). Most of
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    American Airlines Flight 383

    American Airlines Flight 383

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727-100
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport
    American Airlines Flight 383 was a nonstop flight from New York to Cincinnati on November 8, 1965. The aircraft was a Boeing 727-123 aircraft with 62 people on board. The aircraft crashed on approach to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Only four individuals survived, including three passengers, and one flight attendant. The aircraft involved was a Boeing 727-100, registration number N1996, c/n 18901/153, which made its first flight on 15 June 1965, being delivered to American Airlines on 28 June 1965 and had flown a total of 938 hours at the time of the accident. The flight was delayed for 20 minutes in New York but the flight itself was uneventful. At 18:45, the crew called Cincinnati tower for an ETA of 19:05. The weather was fine near the airport except for thunder clouds developing northwest of the airport across the Ohio River valley. The aircraft approached the airport from the southeast and turned its heading to north to cross the Ohio River. It turned west after crossing to the northern shore of the Ohio River, intending to make a final turn to southeast after crossing the Ohio River (which runs from northwest to southeast) again to the southern shore
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961

    Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: Ethiopian Airlines
    • Flight destination: Port Bouet Airport
    Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961, a Boeing 767-200ER, was hijacked on 23 November 1996, en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi on a Bombay–Addis Ababa–Nairobi–Brazzaville–Lagos–Abidjan service, by three Ethiopians seeking political asylum in Australia. The plane crash-landed in the Indian Ocean near Grande Comore, Comoros Islands, due to fuel starvation, killing 125 of the 175 passengers and crew on board, along with the hijackers; the rest of the people on board survived with injuries. At the time this incident took place, it was the deadliest hijacking involving a single aircraft. However, it fell to second place with the 11 September 2001 attacks. The incident is the only true water landing of a widebody airliner with survivors. The aircraft involved in the accident was a Boeing 767-260ER, registration ET-AIZ, c/n 23916, that had its maiden flight on 17 September 1987. Powered by two Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7R4E engines, it was delivered new to Ethiopian Airlines on 22 October 1987. Except for a short period between May 1991 (1991-05) and February 1992 (1992-02) when it was leased to Air Tanzania, the airplane spent its life in the Ethiopian Airlines fleet. It was
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Kenya Airways Flight 507

    Kenya Airways Flight 507

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Next Generation
    • Operator: Kenya Airways
    • Flight destination: Jomo Kenyatta International Airport
    Kenya Airways Flight 507 was a scheduled Abidjan–Douala–Nairobi passenger service, operated with a Boeing 737-800, that crashed in the initial stage of its second leg on 5 May 2007, immediately after takeoff from Douala International Airport. The plane broke up into small pieces and came to rest mostly submerged in a mangrove swamp, 5.4 kilometres (3.4 mi) to the south (176º) of the end of the Douala International Airport's runway 12. There were no survivors. The investigation by the Cameroon Civil Aviation Authority determined that the pilots failed to notice and correct excessive bank following takeoff. This led to the loss of control and crash of the aircraft. After the crash, the flight route designation was changed from KQ507 to KQ504 for flights between Douala and Nairobi with the same aircraft type. Registered 5Y-KYA, the aircraft involved in the accident was a Boeing 737-8AL that was equipped with a twin CFMI CFM56-7B24 powerplant and had serial number 35069. The airframe first flew on 9 October 2006, and was delivered to Kenya Airways on 27 October the same year. The aircraft was 6 months old at the time of the accident. The pilot in command —who had logged 8,500 hours on
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 5055

    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 5055

    • Aircraft type: Ilyushin Il-62
    • Operator: LOT Polish Airlines
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    LOT Flight 5055 was an Ilyushin Il-62M of LOT Polish Airlines, registered SP-LBG and named the Tadeusz Kościuszko, that crashed in the late morning hours of Saturday, May 9, 1987. The event happened in the Kabaty Woods nature reserve on the outskirts of Warsaw, the Polish capital. All 183 people on board died. It was the highest death toll of any aviation accident involving an Ilyushin Il-62, as well as the deadliest accident for LOT Polish Airlines and the deadliest accident to occur in Poland. The aircraft was an Ilyushin Il-62M bearing the name Tadeusz Kościuszko, after the Polish-Lithuanian military leader of the same name. Notably, two different Polish Il-62s bore this name: one was Il-62 SP-LAB (cn 21105), the second plane of this type purchased by LOT in 1971; the other, which crashed, was an Il-62M purchased in 1984. The chartered plane to New York City took off from runway 33 at Okecie Airport at 10:18 am. The pilots were cleared to climb to 31,000 feet (9,400 m) with a course set to Grudziadz VOR, which was reached at 26,500 feet (8,100 m). The Captain was Zygmunt Pawlaczyk, 59, with 19745 hours in the air (5542 on Ilyushin-62s, and a captain from 11 May 1978). The first
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Pan Am Flight 830

    Pan Am Flight 830

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    Pan Am Flight 830 was a Boeing 747-121, named "Clipper Ocean Rover", flying from Narita International Airport in Tokyo to Honolulu International Airport in Hawaii on August 11, 1982, that was damaged by a bomb placed on board by a terrorist. Captain James E. (Skipper) O'Halloran III safely landed this aircraft in Honolulu after the bombing. One hundred forty miles Northwest of Hawaii, at 36,000 feet (11,000 m), and with 274 people on board, a bomb placed under a seat cushion exploded, killing 16-year-old Toru Ozawa, a Japanese national. The blast also injured 15 other people (including the boy's parents) and caused damage to the floor and ceiling. The aircraft remained airborne and made an emergency landing in Honolulu. It was later put back in service by Pan American World Airways. The bomb was allegedly placed by Mohammed Rashed, a Jordanian linked to the 15 May Organization. In 1988, he was arrested in Greece and was later convicted of murder. He was released in 1996 after serving a partial sentence of 8 years instead of 15. In 2006, he was convicted by a United States court and ordered to serve another 7 years. Abu Ibrahim has been indicted in the 1982 bombing of Pam Am Flight
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Aloha Airlines Flight 243

    Aloha Airlines Flight 243

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Aloha Airlines
    • Flight destination: Honolulu International Airport
    Aloha Airlines Flight 243 (AQ 243, AAH 243) was a scheduled Aloha Airlines flight between Hilo and Honolulu in Hawaii. On April 28, 1988, a Boeing 737-297 serving the flight suffered extensive damage after an explosive decompression in flight, but was able to land safely at Kahului Airport on Maui. The only fatality was flight attendant C.B. Lansing, who was blown out of the airplane. Another 65 passengers and crew were injured. The safe landing of the aircraft despite the substantial damage inflicted by the decompression established Aloha Airlines Flight 243 as a significant event in the history of aviation, with far-reaching effects on aviation safety policies and procedures. The aircraft, Queen Liliuokalani (registration number N73711, named after Liliuokalani), took off from Hilo International Airport (PHTO) at 13:25 HST on 28 April 1988, bound for Honolulu (PHNL). There were 90 passengers and five crew members on board. No unusual occurrences were reported during the take-off and climb. Around 13:48, as the aircraft reached its normal flight altitude of 24,000 feet (7,300 m) about 23 nautical miles (43 km) south-southeast of Kahului, a small section on the left side of the
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Avianca Flight 52

    Avianca Flight 52

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Avianca
    • Flight destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport
    Avianca Flight 52 was a regularly scheduled flight from Bogotá to New York via Medellín, Colombia. On Thursday January 25, 1990, a Boeing 707-321B registered as HK-2016 performing this flight, crashed into the village of Cove Neck, Long Island, New York after running out of fuel. 8 of the 9 crew members and 65 of the 149 passengers on board were killed. The 23-year-old Boeing 707 started its journey in Bogotá, stopping in Medellin at 2:04 pm after flying for half an hour. It then took off at 3:08 pm, a few minutes later than planned. The flight crew included pilot Laureano Caviedes, first officer Mauricio Klotz and flight engineer Matias Moyano. The flight crew did not change at Medellin. On January 25, 1990, Avianca Flight 52 was much delayed in approaching its destination due to congestion and bad weather. It had been in a holding pattern off the coast near New York for over one hour due to fog and wind interfering with smooth arrivals and departures into John F. Kennedy International Airport. During this hold the aircraft was exhausting its reserve fuel supply, which would have allowed it to divert to its alternate, Boston, in case of an emergency or other critical
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Birgenair Flight 301

    Birgenair Flight 301

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: Alas Nacionales
    • Flight destination: Frankfurt International Airport
    Birgenair Flight 301 was a flight chartered by Turkish-managed Birgenair partner Alas Nacionales ("National Wings") from Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic to Frankfurt, Germany via Gander, Canada and Berlin, Germany. On 6 February 1996, the Boeing 757-225 operating the route crashed shortly after take-off from Puerto Plata's Gregorio Luperón International Airport. The crew consisted of 11 Turks and 2 Dominicans. The passengers consisted mainly of Germans, along with a few Poles. Most passengers had booked Caribbean package holidays with Öger Tours; Birgenair held 10% of Öger Tours. In terms of passenger deaths, Flight 301 has the highest death toll of any aviation accident involving a Boeing 757. During takeoff roll at 11:42 p.m, captain Armed Erden, one of Birgenairs' most senior pilots, found that his air speed indicator (ASI) was not working properly, but chose not to abort takeoff. The co-pilot's ASI was functional. While the plane was climbing through 4,700 feet (1,400 m), the captain's airspeed indicator read 350 knots (650 km/h). The autopilot, which was taking its air speed information from the same equipment that was providing faulty readings to the captain's ASI,
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    BOAC Flight 777

    BOAC Flight 777

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-3
    • Operator: British Overseas Airways Corporation
    BOAC Flight 777-A, a scheduled British Overseas Airways Corporation civilian airline flight on 1 June 1943 from Portela Airport in Lisbon, Portugal, to Whitchurch Airport near Bristol, United Kingdom, was attacked by eight German Junkers Ju 88s and crashed into the Bay of Biscay, killing all 17 "souls on board", including several notable passengers, most prominent being actor Leslie Howard. Theories abound that the aircraft, a Douglas DC-3, was attacked because the Germans believed that British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was aboard. Other theories suggest the DC-3 was targeted because several passengers, including Howard, were British spies. During the Second World War, British and German civilian aircraft operated out of the same facilities at Portela and the incoming and outgoing traffic was watched by Allied and Axis spies. The Lisbon–Whitchurch route frequently carried agents and escaped POWs to Britain. While aircraft flying the Lisbon–Whitchurch route had been left unmolested at the beginning of the war, and both Allied and Axis powers respected the neutrality of Portugal, the air war over the Bay of Biscay, north of Spain and off the west coast of France, had begun to
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Delta Air Lines Flight 191

    Delta Air Lines Flight 191

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-1011
    • Operator: Delta Air Lines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    Delta Air Lines Flight 191 was an airline service from Fort Lauderdale, Florida's Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, bound for Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, by way of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. On the afternoon of August 2, 1985, Delta Air Lines Flight 191 crashed while on approach to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport during a thunderstorm, killing 8 of 11 crew members, 126 of 152 passengers on board, and one person on the ground. Two people also died more than 30 days after the crash, bringing the total fatalities to 137. The accident aircraft was N726DA a Lockheed L-1011-385-1 TriStar, a workhorse in Delta's fleet at the time. N726DA was only six years old, having been delivered to Delta in 1979. The flight was piloted by Captain Edward "Ed" Connors, First Officer Rudolph "Rudy" Price and Second Officer Nick Nassick. As the aircraft flew over Louisiana, a thunderstorm formed directly in its path. The aircraft began its descent procedures over Louisiana, heading over the planned descent route. Captain Connors then recognized the forming thunderstorm and took action to change the plane's heading to avoid the
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    LAPA flight 3142

    LAPA flight 3142

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: LAPA
    • Flight destination: Ingeniero Ambrosio L.V. Taravella International Airport
    LAPA Flight 3142 was a scheduled Buenos Aires–Córdoba flight operated by the Argentine airline Líneas Aéreas Privadas Argentinas. The service was operated with a Boeing 737-204C, registration LV-WRZ, that crashed on 31 August 1999 at 20:54 local time while attempting to take off from Aeroparque Jorge Newbery after it failed to get airborne. The crash resulted in 65 fatalities—63 of them occupants of the aircraft—and at least 40 people injured, some of them in serious condition. The death toll makes the accident the second deadliest one in the history of Argentine aviation, behind Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 644. The plane involved in the accident was a Boeing 737-204C, registration LV-WRZ, production number 20389, line 251, with JT8D-9A engines. It first flew on 14 April 1970, and it was delivered by Boeing to Britannia Airways on April 17 of that year. It was listed in the United Kingdom's registry as G-AXNB. Almost 20 years later, on 1 February 1990, the plane was sold to the French airline TAT European Airlines, and registered in France as F-GGPB. Finally, LAPA took possession of the plane on 21 December 1996, and flew it under the Argentine tail number LV-WRZ. At the time of
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Turkish Airlines Flight 1476

    Turkish Airlines Flight 1476

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: Turkish Airlines
    • Flight destination: Atatürk International Airport
    Turkish Airlines Flight 1476 (TK1476) was a Turkish Airlines flight that was hijacked by Hakan Ekinci in Greek airspace on October 3, 2006. Ekinci wanted to go to Rome to speak with the Pope, but Greek and Italian F-16 Fighting Falcon jets intercepted and escorted the aircraft until it landed in Brindisi, Italy. Nobody was harmed, and Ekinci was jailed in Italy while awaiting trial. At first, the hijacking incident was linked with the envisaged visit of Pope Benedict XVI to Turkey, but later it was ascertained that Ekinci was seeking to request political asylum from Italy. On October 4, a Turkish Airlines plane was sent to take the passengers back to Istanbul. The plane was flying from Tirana, Albania to Istanbul, Turkey on October 3, 2006. It was hijacked by Hakan Ekinci in Greek airspace at 14:58 UTC and was intercepted and forced by Italian F-16 Fighting Falcon interceptor jets to land at the southern Italian Adriatic port city of Brindisi. There were 113 people on board: 107 passengers and six crew members. At first it was reported that there were two hijackers, but later it was confirmed that the sole hijacker lied about the existence of an accomplice. An official from Greek
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    American Airlines Flight 11

    American Airlines Flight 11

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    American Airlines Flight 11 was a passenger flight which was hijacked by five al-Qaeda terrorists on September 11, 2001, as part of the September 11 attacks. They deliberately crashed it into the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, killing all 87 people aboard plus the hijackers, and an unconfirmed number in the building's impact zone. The aircraft involved, a Boeing 767-223ER, was flying American Airlines' daily scheduled morning transcontinental service from Logan International Airport, in Boston, Massachusetts, to Los Angeles International Airport, in Los Angeles, California. Fifteen minutes into the flight, the hijackers injured at least three people, killed one, forcibly breached the cockpit, and overpowered the captain and first officer. Mohamed Atta, an al-Qaeda member and trained pilot, took over the controls. Air-traffic controllers noticed the flight was in distress when the crew was no longer responding. They realized the flight had been hijacked when Mohammad Atta mistakenly transmitted his announcements for passengers to air traffic control. On board, flight attendants Amy Sweeney and Betty Ong contacted American Airlines, and provided information
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Korean Air Cargo flight 8509

    Korean Air Cargo flight 8509

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: Malpensa International Airport
    Korean Air Cargo Flight 8509 was a Boeing 747-2B5F, registered HL7451 and bound for Milano-Malpensa Airport, that crashed due to pilot error on 22 December 1999 shortly after take-off from London Stansted Airport. The aircraft crashed into Hatfield Forest near the village of Great Hallingbury close to but clear of some local houses. All 4 crew on board were killed. The aircraft involved was a Boeing 747-2B5F freighter registered HL7451. Built on 4 April 1980, the aircraft had completed 15,451 flights with a total flight time of 83,011 hours before its fatal flight on 22 December 1999. Following the plane's departure from Tashkent on the previous flight segment, one of its inertial navigation units (INUs) had partially failed, providing erroneous roll data to the captain's attitude director indicator (ADI or artificial horizon). The first officer's ADI and a backup ADI were correct, a comparator alarm called attention to the discrepancy, and in daylight the erroneous indication was easily identified. The ADI's input selector was switched to the other INU and the correct indications returned. At Stansted, the engineers who attempted to repair the ADI did not have the correct Fault
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Los Angeles Airways Flight 417

    Los Angeles Airways Flight 417

    • Operator: Los Angeles Airways
    • Flight destination: Disneyland
    Los Angeles Airways Flight 417 was a helicopter that crashed on August 14, 1968 in the city of Compton, California. All eighteen passengers and three crewmembers were fatally injured. The aircraft was destroyed by impact and fire. According to the National Transportation Safety Board the probable cause of the accident was fatigue failure. The accident happened when the yellow blade, one of five main rotor blades, separated at the spindle which attached the blade to the rotor head. Following failure, the helicopter was uncontrollable and it fell to the ground. The fatigue crack originated in an area of substandard hardness and inadequate shot peening. Los Angeles Airways (LAA) Flight 417 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight from Los Angeles International Airport to the Disneyland Heliport in Anaheim, California. The aircraft and crew had completed three round trips to various destinations in the Greater Los Angeles Metropolitan Area beginning at 0607 PDT and departed the ramp at Los Angeles for Flight 417 at 1026. The flight, operating under Visual Flight Rules was cleared by Los Angeles Helicopter Control to take off and proceed eastbound at 10:28:15. At 10:29:30 the flight
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Lufthansa Flight 005

    Lufthansa Flight 005

    • Aircraft type: Convair 240
    • Operator: Lufthansa
    Lufthansa Flight 005 was a scheduled flight en route from Frankfurt to Hamburg with a stopover in Bremen. The aircraft crashed just beyond the runway in Bremen just before 19:00 on January 28, 1966, in a go-around after an aborted landing. All occupants — 42 passengers and 4 crew members — died in the accident. Among others, seven swimmers from the Italian Olympic team, their coach, and an Italian reporter were on board the 53-passenger aircraft. A stone tablet with the names of the dead Italians was placed in their memory in Norderländer Straße near the crash site. The actress Ada Chekhova, daughter of Olga Chekhova and mother of Vera Tschechowa, was also one of the victims. The flight departed Frankfurt Airport on runway 25R at 5:41 PM after a slight delay of 8 minutes. The aircraft's weight at takeoff was 22,148 kg (24.414 tons), only slightly under the maximum of 22,544 kg (24.851 tons). The Convair CV-440 was fueled with 3200 liters (845 gallons) of aviation gasoline, sufficient for a flight of 5 hours, 13 minutes. This extra reserve was necessary because the crew had chosen Stuttgart Airport as their alternate destination due to poor weather conditions. At about 18:40, after
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Mozambican Tupolev Tu-134 air disaster

    Mozambican Tupolev Tu-134 air disaster

    • Aircraft type: Tupolev Tu-134
    • Operator: Linhas Aéreas de Moçambique
    • Flight destination: Maputo International Airport
    The Mozambican presidential Tupolev Tu-134A-3 aircraft crashed just inside South African territory on October 19, 1986. The aircraft was carrying Mozambican president Samora Machel and 43 other occupants on a flight from Mbala in Zambia to the Mozambican capital Maputo when it crashed 35 nautical miles (65 km) west of its destination at Mbuzini in the Lebombo Mountains. Nine passengers and one crew member survived the crash, but President Machel and 33 others died, including ministers and officials of the Mozambique government. While there was widespread suspicion—both nationally and internationally—that the South African government was implicated in the crash, no conclusive evidence to this effect has emerged. The crash happened in the last years of South Africa's racist apartheid government. South Africa at the time funded a large number of rebel organizations in neighboring countries to avoid having countries hostile to South Africa's system. The country was under heavy sanctions due to the apartheid regime. South Africa was also known for a security apparatus that gave little concern to the affects on innocent civilians. The South African Airways Flight 295 crash that happened
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Pan Am Flight 7

    Pan Am Flight 7

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 377 Stratocruiser
    Pan Am Flight 7, registration N90944, Clipper Romance Of The Skies, was an around-the-world flight originating in San Francisco that flew westbound with several stops before arriving in Philadelphia. On the morning of November 8, 1957 the aircraft, a Boeing 377, departed San Francisco on its first leg to Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii at 11:51am PST. Last contact with the aircraft consisted of a routine radio transmission between the pilot in command and a US Coast Guard cutter performing radar surveillance duty at Ocean Station November located at the approximate halfway point between the mainland and Oahu. The flight never arrived in Hawaii. The New York Times reported on November 9, 1957: "The Coast Guard sent out a search plane to look for the airliner, which carried 36 passengers and a crew of eight. The Coast Guard also alerted crews of two cutters to be ready to take part in the search. United Press International (UPI) reported that the Navy submarines Cusk and Carbonaro were the closest vessels to the point where the plane was last reported and were diverted to the search. The last radio report from the plane came when Capt. G. H. Brown made a routine check." The search
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    PIA Flight 544

    PIA Flight 544

    • Aircraft type: Fokker F27
    • Operator: Pakistan International Airlines
    • Flight destination: Hyderabad Airport
    PIA Flight PK-554, a Pakistan International Airlines Fokker F27, was hijacked on May 25, 1998, shortly after it took off from Gwadar International Airport, by three armed men belonging to Baloch Students Organization. The aircraft, with 33 passengers and 5 crew members aboard, had just arrived from Gwadar International Airport, Baluchistan,and was sat to land in Hyderabad Airport, Sindh. The Army's SSG's Haideri Company, 7th Commando Zarrar Battalion, SSG Division, accompanied with elite members of Army Rangers stormed the aircraft, while the Pakistan Police surrounded the plane. The operation concluded with all three hijackers arrested and sentenced to death by Pakistan, with no human casualties. The incident began while the aircraft was flying, carrying 33 passengers with 5 crew members abroad. The Karachi-bound PIA Fokker Aircraft, Flight PK-554, was hijacked shortly after it took off from Gwadar at 5:35pm on Sunday. The hijackers forced the pilot to enter India from anywhere, while the pilot reached the permission from the Indian Government. The Pakistan Air Force had traced the pilot's permission, and soon, PAF fighter jets, F-16 Fighting Falcons of No. 11 Squadron Arrows, had
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Sabena Flight 548

    Sabena Flight 548

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Sabena
    • Flight destination: Brussels Airport
    Sabena Flight 548, registration OO-SJB, was a Boeing 707 aircraft that crashed en route to Brussels, Belgium, from New York City on February 15, 1961, killing the entire United States Figure Skating team on its way to the 1961 World Championships in Prague, Czechoslovakia. The flight, which originated at Idlewild International Airport (New York International Airport, later renamed John F. Kennedy International Airport), crashed on approach to Brussels' Zaventem Airport. All 72 on board were killed, as well as one person on the ground (Theo de Laet, a farmer, was struck by debris). The crash was the first fatal accident involving a Boeing 707 in regular passenger service, 28 months after it was placed into commercial use. There was no indication of trouble on board the plane until it approached the Brussels airport. The pilot had to circle the airport while waiting for a small plane to clear the runway. Then, according to eyewitnesses, the plane began to climb and bank erratically and crashed suddenly in a field near the hamlet of Berg. The wreckage burst into flames. All 72 aboard were killed instantly. A farmer working in the fields was killed by a piece of aluminum debris from
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    SilkAir Flight 185

    SilkAir Flight 185

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: SilkAir
    • Flight destination: Singapore Changi Airport
    SilkAir Flight 185 was a scheduled passenger flight from Jakarta, Indonesia to Singapore, which crashed on 19 December 1997, into the Musi River, killing all 104 people on board. The cause of the crash was investigated by two agencies. The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee (NTSC) was unable to determine a cause of the crash. The American National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded the crash was the result of deliberate flight control inputs, most likely by the captain. Santoso Sayogo, an NTSC investigator who worked on the SilkAir 185 case, said that this opinion was in fact shared by the Indonesian investigators who were overruled by their boss. An additional theory, that the crash was caused by a rudder hardover, was advanced in civil court by the families of several victims. The manufacturer of the aircraft's rudder controls and the families later reached an out of court settlement. The Boeing 737-300 operating as Flight MI 185 was the newest in SilkAir's fleet, delivered to the airline on 14 February 1997, ten months prior to the crash. Carrying 97 passengers and a crew of seven, the Boeing departed Jakarta's Soekarno-Hatta International Airport's
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    USAir Flight 405

    USAir Flight 405

    • Aircraft type: Fokker F28
    • Operator: US Airways
    • Flight destination: Cleveland Hopkins International Airport
    USAir Flight 405 was a regularly scheduled domestic passenger flight between LaGuardia Airport in New York City, and Cleveland, Ohio. On March 22, 1992, a USAir Fokker F28, registration N485US, flying the route, crashed in poor weather in a partially inverted position in Flushing Bay, New York, shortly after liftoff from LaGuardia. The undercarriage lifted off from the runway; however, the airplane failed to gain lift, flying only several meters above the ground. The aircraft then veered off the runway and hit multiple obstructions before coming to rest in Flushing Bay, just beyond end of the runway. Of the 51 people on board, 27 were killed in the accident, including the captain and one of the cabin crew members. The subsequent investigation revealed that due to pilot error, inadequate deicing procedures at LaGuardia, and several lengthy delays, a large amount of ice had accumulated on the wings and airframe. This ice disrupted airflow over the jet, increasing drag and reducing lift, which prevented the jet from lifting off the runway. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded that the flight crew were unaware of the amount of ice that had built up after the jet
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    2000 Australia Beechcraft King Air crash

    2000 Australia Beechcraft King Air crash

    Sierra Kilo Charlie was the call sign for a chartered Beechcraft 200 Super King Air which crashed near Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia on Monday 4 September 2000, killing all 8 occupants. The flight plan for the aircraft called for the pilot to fly between Perth, Western Australia, and the mining town of Leonora, Western Australia. During the flight, the aircraft climbed above its assigned altitude. When air traffic control (ATC) contacted the pilot, the pilot's speech had become significantly impaired and he was unable to respond to instructions. Three aircraft intercepted the Beechcraft but were unable to make radio contact. The aircraft continued flying on a straight heading for five hours before running out of fuel and crashing near Mount Isa. The incident became known in the media as the "Ghost Flight". A subsequent investigation concluded the pilot and the passengers had become incapacitated and had been suffering from hypoxia, a lack of oxygen to the body, meaning the pilot would have been unable to operate the aircraft. Towards the end of the flight, the left engine began to be starved of fuel and the aircraft impacted with the ground. The accident report said due to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 386

    Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 386

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Aerolíneas Argentinas
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    On 14 February 1992, food contaminated with cholera was distributed to the passengers on Aerolíneas Argentinas Flight 386, sometimes referred to as the Valentine's Day flight. One of passengers died from the illness. On 14 February 1992, an Aerolineas Argentinas Boeing 747-287B, registration LV-MLR, arrived in Los Angeles, California, United States, inbound from Ministro Pistarini International Airport, Buenos Aires, Argentina, via a scheduled stopover at Jorge Chávez International Airport, Lima, Perú. There were 336 passengers and 20 crew members on board the Lima–Los Angeles leg of the flight. Out of the 336 passengers, the United States was the final destination for 297 of them. Two passengers selected Canada as their final destination, while 37 selected Japan. Contaminated shrimp entered the aircraft in Lima, a year after a cholera outbreak began in Peru. Five passengers showed signs of the illness immediately after landing at Los Angeles International Airport. Several days later that number rose to 76. One of them, a man in his early seventies, died from the illness. The cholera on the contaminated food did not spread to other areas within the United States. By March 4, 172
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    British Airtours Flight 28M

    British Airtours Flight 28M

    • Operator: British Airtours
    • Flight destination: Corfu International Airport, "Ioannis Kapodistrias"
    British Airtours Flight 28M, was an international passenger flight, originating from Manchester International Airport's Runway 24 in Manchester, England, en-route to Corfu International Airport on the Greek island of Corfu. On 22 August 1985 this flight was being flown by Boeing 737–236 G-BGJL, ("River Orrin"), when take-off from Manchester Airport was aborted due to Engine Failure on Take-Off (EFTO). The aircraft, previously named "Goldie", but at the time of the accident named "River Orrin", had 131 passengers and six crew on the manifest. At 06:12 BST as the plane was on the runway preparing to takeoff, a loud thump was heard. An engine failure had generated a fire and a plume of black smoke subsequently ensued. Takeoff was aborted, with both pilots oblivious to the fire to the engine on the left wing. Passengers who could see the fire started to evacuate the aircraft, with 82 of the 131 passengers escaping. 54 passengers perished, many due to inhalation of toxic smoke which had seeped into the fuselage. After the crash investigation, a number of safety recommendations were made which included fire resistant seat covers, floor lighting, fire-resistant wall and ceiling panels,
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Dan-Air Flight 240

    Dan-Air Flight 240

    • Aircraft type: Avro 748
    • Operator: Dan-Air
    • Flight destination: Nottingham East Midlands Airport
    Dan-Air Flight 240 was a fatal accident involving a Hawker Siddeley HS 748 series 2A turboprop aircraft operated by Dan Air Services Limited on the first stage of a night mail flight from London Gatwick Airport to East Midlands Airport. The crash, which occurred on 26 June 1981 near the village of Nailstone, Leicestershire, following major structural failure caused by the failure of a cabin door, resulted in the aircraft's destruction and the deaths of all three on board (both pilots and a cabin attendant). The aircraft, operated by Dan Air Services Ltd, was a Hawker Siddeley HS 748-108 series 2A (construction/manufacturer's serial number: 1560, registration: G-ASPL) that had its first flight in 1964. Skyways Coach-Air was its original operator. Dan-Air acquired the aircraft from Skyways International, Skyways Coach-Air's successor, in 1972. At the time of the accident it had flown 34,592 hours. The aircraft departed London Gatwick at 17:28 with an estimated time of arrival (ETA) at East Midlands of 18:25. The crew included two pilots and a cabin attendant, in accordance with Dan-Air's policy to carry one attendant in addition to the flightdeck crew on mail flights. (The attendant
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    KLM Flight 867

    KLM Flight 867

    • Operator: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
    • Flight destination: Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport
    On 15 December 1989, KLM Flight 867 en route to Narita International Airport, Tokyo from Amsterdam was descending into Anchorage International Airport, Alaska when all four engines failed. The Boeing 747-400, less than 6 months old, flew through a thick cloud of volcanic ash from Mount Redoubt, which had erupted the day before. All four engines failed leaving only critical systems on backup electrical power. One report assigns the engine shutdown to the turning of the ash into a glass coating inside the engines that fooled the engine temperature sensors and led to an auto-shutdown of all four engines. When all four main generators shut off due to the failure of all the engines, a momentary power interruption occurs when the flight instruments transfer to standby power. Standby power on the 747-400 is provided by two batteries and inverters. The captain performed the engine restart procedure which was not successful on the first few attempts and was repeated until restart was achieved. On some of the attempts, as one or more (but not all) engines started to operate, the main generator would switch back on. This switching on and off caused repeated power transfer interruptions to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    LANSA Cuzco Crash

    LANSA Cuzco Crash

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-188 Electra
    • Flight destination: Jorge Chávez International Airport
    LANSA Flight 502 was a Lockheed L-188A Electra operated by Líneas Aéreas Nacionales Sociedad Anónima (LANSA) which crashed shortly after takeoff from Quispiquilla Airport near Cusco, Peru on August 9, 1970, after losing all power from one of its engines. The four-engine turboprop aircraft, registered OB-R-939, was bound from Cusco to Lima, carrying 8 crew and 92 passengers. All but one of the occupants died from injuries sustained from impact forces and post crash fire. Two people on the ground were also killed. There were 49 American high school exchange students on board, all of whom perished. A Peruvian government investigation concluded that the accident was caused by improper execution of engine-out procedures by the flight crew, aggravated by lack of maintenance and overloading. LANSA was fined and its operations were suspended for 90 days. At the time, the crash was the deadliest ever in Peruvian history. Over half of the passengers belonged to a single group, sponsored by the Buffalo, New York based International Fellowship student exchange program, consisting of 49 American high school exchange students, along with their teachers, family members, and guides, who were
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    United Airlines Flight 826

    United Airlines Flight 826

    • Operator: United Airlines
    On December 28, 1997, Flight 826 was a Boeing 747-100 flying from Narita International Airport, Japan to Honolulu International Airport in Hawaii. Two hours into the flight, at 9400 meters (31,000 ft), the plane received reports of severe clear-air turbulence in the area and the seat belt sign was turned on. Moments later, the aircraft suddenly dropped around 30 meters (100 ft), seriously injuring many passengers, although there was no damage to the aircraft. The plane turned around and landed safely back in Tokyo, but was not put back in service since it had been scheduled to be retired in early 1998. One passenger died of her injuries after landing in Tokyo. United now uses the Flight 826 designation flying from Guam to Tokyo-Narita using a Boeing 777-200 aircraft. The flight route designation, however, for United's flight from Narita to Honolulu is now Flight 880 using a Boeing 747-400.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Air Algérie Flight 6289

    Air Algérie Flight 6289

    • Operator: Air Algérie
    • Flight destination: Noumerate Airport
    Air Algérie Flight 6289, a Boeing 737-200, was a scheduled passenger service of Air Algérie between Tamanrasset, Algeria and Algiers, via Ghardaia. On 6 March 2003 at 3:45 p.m. local time (1445 GMT), the flight attempted departure from the southern Algerian city of Tamanrasset. The aircraft veered off the runway during takeoff and crashed some 600 feet (180 m) from the centerline. Witnesses reported seeing one of the 737's engines in flames as it took off. All but one of the 97 passengers and all of the 6 crew members perished; a total of 102 people died in the accident. The sole survivor of the accident was identified as 28-year-old soldier Youcef Djillali. Takeoff commenced from runway 02 with the co-pilot acting as pilot-in-command. The aircraft rotated and the co-pilot ordered the gear to be raised. At that moment, at a height of 78 feet and a speed of 158 knots (kts.), the nr.1 engine suffered a turbine failure. The captain took over control of the airplane. Three seconds later the co-pilot asked if she should raise the gear, but the captain did not respond. The 737 lost speed and seconds later the speed had dropped to 134 kts. Height at that moment was 398 ft. The aircraft
    5.33
    3 votes
    189
    Lion Air Flight 538

    Lion Air Flight 538

    • Operator: Lion Air
    Lion Air Flight 538 was a flight from Jakarta to Surabaya with a transit in Surakarta, Indonesia carrying 146 passengers. On November 30, 2004 the MD-82 plane crash landed in the Adi Sumarmo Airport in Surakarta. The plane overran the end of the 2600 m (8500 ft) runway. Despite a regular night flight, there were wet conditions in the area at the time due to hard rain. The captain, a flight attendant, and 23 passengers died as a result of the accident, for a total of 25 fatalities.
    5.33
    3 votes
    190
    1952 Farnborough Airshow DH.110 crash

    1952 Farnborough Airshow DH.110 crash

    • Aircraft type: De Havilland Sea Vixen
    The 1952 Farnborough Airshow DH.110 crash was an air show accident that killed 29 spectators, the pilot (John Derry), and the onboard flight test observer (Anthony Richards). The DH.110, a prototype, was being demonstrated when during a manoeuvre, the aircraft broke up. The cause was a faulty wing leading edge design. The DH.110 was grounded and strict safety procedures were subsequently enacted (no member of the public has been killed at a British air show since). After modifications to the design the DH.110 entered service with the Royal Navy as the de Havilland Sea Vixen. The planned demonstration of the DH.110 on that day was nearly cancelled when the aircraft at Farnborough, an all-black nightfighter prototype went unserviceable. It had been taken supersonic over the show on the opening day. Derry and Richards left Farnborough to collect WG 236 and flew it from Hatfield to Farnborough with just enough time to start their slot. Following a low-level supersonic flypast and during a left bank at about 450 knots (830 km/h) toward the air show's 120,000 spectators, the pilot started a climb. The outer starboard wing and, immediately afterward, the outer port wing broke off the
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    2008 Transaven crash in Venezuela

    2008 Transaven crash in Venezuela

    • Aircraft type: L-410
    On 4 January 2008, a scheduled domestic Transaven flight from Simón Bolívar International Airport serving Caracas to Los Roques Airport off shore in the Atlantic Ocean reported 64 miles north of the port of departure that both engines had failed and that it was at altitude 3000 feet and descending. The pilot was to attempt ditching as close as possible to the Los Roques archipelago. Active sea and air searches were called off without finding any trace of the aircraft, but a life-vest associated with the craft was recovered on January 13. Apart from that no other wreckage has been found. The cause is a mystery The aircraft was a Let L-410UVP-E3 (registration number YV2081), built in Czechoslovakia in 1987.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Aeroflot Flight 593

    Aeroflot Flight 593

    • Aircraft type: Airbus A310
    • Operator: Aeroflot
    • Flight destination: Kai Tak Airport
    Aeroflot Flight 593 was an Aeroflot – Russian International Airlines Airbus A310-304 that crashed into a hillside of the Kuznetsk Alatau mountain range, Kemerovo Oblast, on 23 March 1994. The jet was en route from Sheremetyevo International Airport to Hong Kong Kai Tak International Airport with 75 occupants aboard, of whom 63 were passengers. Most of the passengers were businessmen from Hong Kong and Taiwan who were looking for economic opportunities in Russia. There were no survivors. No evidence of technical malfunction was found. Cockpit voice and flight data recorders revealed the presence of the pilot's 12-year-old daughter and 16-year-old son on the flight deck. The latter apparently had unknowingly disabled the A310 autopilot's control of the aircraft's ailerons while seated at the controls. The aircraft had then rolled into a steep bank and near-vertical dive from which the pilots were unable to regain control. Unlike Soviet planes with which the crew had been familiar, no audible alarm accompanied the autopilot's partial disconnection. Because of this they remained unaware of what was happening. The aircraft involved in the accident was a leased Airbus A310-304,
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    SA de Transport Aérien Flight 730

    SA de Transport Aérien Flight 730

    • Aircraft type: Sud Aviation Caravelle
    • Operator: SA de Transport Aérien
    SA de Transport Aérien Flight 730, tail number HB-ICK, was a Sud Aviation SE-210 Caravelle 10R aircraft that crashed on approach to Funchal Airport, Madeira on December 18, 1977. The flight crew consisted of two captains. The pilot in command had never previously landed at Funchal and was being trained to operate from the notoriously difficult airport by the other, more experienced captain, who was acting as co-pilot. The training was intended to take place during daytime, but due to a delay the aircraft reached its destination after dark. The non-scheduled flight departed from Zurich, making its first stop at Geneva Cointrin International Airport at 14:30 UTC. While at Geneva, the aircraft's departure to Funchal was delayed due to a hydraulic pump failure, and it finally took off at 16:26. At 19:38, the crew contacted Madeira control tower, reporting Rose Point at 33,000 feet (10,000 m), and were cleared to descend to 5,000 ft (1,500 m). At 19:55, the crew reported overflying Porto Santo island at 8,500 ft (2,600 m) and were instructed to continue their descent to 5000 ft and then to contact Funchal approach control. At 19:57, Funchal cleared the crew to descend to 3,500 ft
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    USAir Flight 1016

    USAir Flight 1016

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-9
    • Operator: US Airways
    • Flight destination: Charlotte/Douglas International Airport
    USAir Flight 1016 was a regularly scheduled flight between Columbia, South Carolina and Charlotte, North Carolina. On Saturday, July 2, 1994, the plane, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9 registered N954VJ, departed Columbia Metropolitan Airport at 18:15 EST for the 35-minute flight to Charlotte/Douglas International Airport. On board, there were 52 passengers (including two infants), three flight attendants, and two pilots. The flight was uneventful until the approach to Charlotte, where several heavy thunderstorms were in the vicinity of the airport. The flight was cleared by the tower to land on runway 18R. The plane, flown by the first officer, approached the runway in heavy rain conditions. The tower controller issued a windshear warning to all aircraft, but it was on a different radio frequency than Flight 1016. About a minute later, as Flight 1016 was on final approach, the captain, realizing that they were in a serious predicament, instructed the first officer to 'Take it around, go to the right'. He then radioed the control tower and stated 'USAIR ten sixteen's on the go'. The plane struggled to climb due to the severe weather conditions, and immediately veered to the right and
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    United Airlines Flight 232

    United Airlines Flight 232

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: United Airlines
    • Flight destination: Philadelphia International Airport
    United Airlines Flight 232 was a scheduled flight from Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, to O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, with continuing service to Philadelphia International Airport. On July 19, 1989, the DC-10 (registration N1819U) operating the route crash-landed in Sioux City, Iowa, after suffering catastrophic failure of its tail-mounted engine, which led to the loss of all flight controls. 111 people died in the accident while 185 survived. Despite the deaths, the accident is considered a prime example of successful crew resource management due to the manner in which the flight crew handled the emergency, and the high number of survivors considering that the airplane was landed without conventional control. The flight crew became well known as a result of their actions that day, in particular the captain, Alfred C. Haynes, and a DC-10 instructor on board who offered his assistance, Dennis E. Fitch. The manner in which the engine failed resulted in high-speed shrapnel being hurled from the engine; this shrapnel penetrated the hydraulic lines of all three independent hydraulic systems on board the aircraft, which rapidly lost their hydraulic
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    2007 Mogadishu TransAVIAexport Airlines Il-76 crash

    2007 Mogadishu TransAVIAexport Airlines Il-76 crash

    • Aircraft type: Ilyushin Il-76
    • Operator: Transaviaexport Cargo Airline
    On March 23, 2007, a TransAVIAexport Airlines Ilyushin Il-76 aircraft crashed on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia, during the 2007 Battle of Mogadishu. The plane was carrying repair equipment and humanitarian aid. According to a spokesperson for the transport ministry of Belarus, the aircraft was shot down. However, the Somali government insisted that the crash was accidental. All the people on board died in the crash. The aircraft involved was an Ilyushin Il-76, a large Russian-built cargo aircraft. Registered as EW-78849, the Il-76 had been on a chartered cargo flight carrying equipment to Ugandan AMISOM peacekeepers in the Somali capital of Mogadishu. All of the crew members were Belarusian. Four of the personnel on board the accident aircraft were engineers who had worked on repairing another Il-76 that had been the subject of an attempted shootdown 14 days earlier. In that incident, an Il-76 that was carrying Ugandan peacekeepers made a successful emergency landing, after having been struck by a rocket propelled grenade. Somali officials claimed both aircraft incidents occurred due to technical failures rather than armed attacks. Much of the equipment on board Il-76
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Pan Am Flight 6

    Pan Am Flight 6

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 377 Stratocruiser
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    Pan Am Flight 6 (registration N90943, and sometimes called Flight 943) was an American around-the-world commercial passenger flight, that was forced to ditch in the Pacific Ocean on October 16, 1956, after the failure of two of its four engines. Known as Clipper Sovereign Of The Skies (N90943/Pan Am fleet number 943), the flight originated in Philadelphia, flying eastbound with several stops before arriving in San Francisco. On the evening of October 15, 1956 the flight, a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, departed Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii on its final leg to San Francisco at 8:26pm HST. After passing the point of equal time, the flight was cleared to climb to an altitude of 21,000 ft. When that altitude was reached, the number 1 engine entered an overspeeding regime, simultaneously with the reduction of power. The First Officer, who was flying the plane, immediately slowed the plane by further reducing power and by extending the flaps, and then an attempt was made to feather the number one propeller. But, the propeller would not feather and the engine continued to turn at excessive RPM. The captain then decided to cut off the oil supply to the engine. Eventually, the RPM declined and
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Trans-Canada Air Lines Flight 810

    Trans-Canada Air Lines Flight 810

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-4
    • Operator: Trans-Canada Air Lines
    Trans-Canada Air Lines Flight 810 was a Canadair North Star on a scheduled flight from Vancouver to Calgary (continuing to Regina, Winnipeg, and Toronto). The plane crashed into Mount Slesse near Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada, on 9 December 1956 after encountering severe icing and turbulence over the mountains. All 62 people on board died, making this one of the worst airline crashes in the world at that date; it still ranks as the 6th worst air disaster in Canadian history. Due to the remoteness and difficulty of the terrain, the crash site was not located until the following May, when it was discovered by mountaineers Pigou, Walker and Cathcart. Among the victims were five professional Canadian football players on their way home from the annual East–West all-star game in Vancouver. The remains are located in a highly inaccessible area and are protected from disturbance. Flight 810-9 left Vancouver International Airport at 6:10 PM on 9 December 1956, assigned to fly the Green 1 air lane east to Calgary, Alberta, though the pilots asked for and received clearance for a routing via airways Red 44 and Red 75 instead, which took the aircraft past Cultus Lake and into a weather
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    United Airlines Flight 610

    United Airlines Flight 610

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-6
    • Operator: United Airlines
    On June 30, 1951, United Airlines Flight 610, a US transcontinental San Francisco–Oakland–Salt Lake City–Denver–Chicago service flown by the Douglas DC-6 aircraft Mainliner Overland Trail (registration N37543) crashed in Larimer County, northwest of Denver. All 50 on board (45 passengers and 5 crew) were killed. After completing its first two segments, Flight 610 departed Salt Lake City at 12:11 a.m. en route to its next destination of Denver. At around 1:47 a.m. Flight 610 reported to traffic control that it had passed the Cheyenne radio range station and requested lower altitude, which was granted to 8,500 feet. At that point, Flight 610 was scheduled to make a right turn to intercept the 168 degree course line of the DEN low frequency range, and then to proceed to the WONT intersection, which was its next clearance limit. To intercept that course line, the plane turned to a heading of approximately 210 degrees, which was a proper intercept angle of almost 45 degrees. If the pilot had configured his audio selector switches properly, he would have been able to hear the aural Morse code identifier of "A", for the north side of that low frequency range, and then as he neared the
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision

    1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-7
    • Operator: United Airlines
    The 1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision occurred on Saturday, June 30, 1956 at 10:30 AM Pacific Standard Time when a United Airlines passenger airliner struck a Trans World Airlines (TWA) airliner over the Grand Canyon in Arizona, resulting in the crash of both planes, 128 fatalities, and no survivors. It was the first commercial airline crash to result in more than one hundred deaths, and would lead to sweeping changes in the control of flights in the United States. United Airlines Flight 718, a Douglas DC-7 Mainliner named Mainliner Vancouver, and flown by Captain Robert Shirley, First Officer Robert Harms and Flight Engineer Gerard Fiore, departed Los Angeles International Airport at 9:04 AM PST with 53 passengers and five crew members aboard (including two flight attendants), bound for Chicago's Midway Airport. Climbing to an authorized altitude of 21,000 feet, Captain Shirley flew under instrument flight rules (IFR) in controlled airspace to a point northeast of Palm Springs, California where he turned left toward a radiobeacon near Needles, California, after which his flight plan was direct to Durango in southwestern Colorado. The DC-7, although still operating under IFR, was
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    2006 Mercy Air 2 accident

    2006 Mercy Air 2 accident

    • Aircraft type: Bell 412
    • Flight destination: Victorville
    The 2006 Mercy Air helicopter accident occurred on December 10, 2006, about 1755 Pacific standard time, when a Bell 412SP helicopter, call sign "Mercy Air 2," impacted mountainous terrain near Hesperia, California and the Cajon Pass. The commercial helicopter pilot and two medical crew members were killed and the helicopter was destroyed, by the impact and post impact fire. On July 30, 2008, the National Transportation Safety Board released its probable cause report on the accident. According to the NTSB, the probable cause of the crash was "the pilot's inadvertent encounter with instrument meteorological conditions and subsequent failure to maintain terrain clearance." The dark night conditions, fog, and mountainous terrain were ruled to be contributing factors. The Bell 412SP helicopter took off on a cross-country repositioning flight from Loma Linda University Medical Center (94CL), Loma Linda, California, at 1742, with a planned destination of Southern California Logistics Airport (VCV), Victorville, California. Mercy Air 2 had transported a woman injured in a horse-riding accident in Phelan, California, to Loma Linda, and was returning to its assigned base at the time of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    AeroPeru Flight 603

    AeroPeru Flight 603

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: Aeroperu
    • Flight destination: Comodoro Arturo Merino Benítez International Airport
    Aeroperú Flight 603 was a scheduled flight from Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, Peru (SPIM), to Comodoro Arturo Merino Benítez International Airport in Santiago, Chile (SCEL), which crashed on October 2, 1996. The pilots struggled to navigate the aircraft after the failure of all the plane's instruments. With the pilots unaware of their true altitude, the plane's wing hit the water and it crashed shortly afterward. The cause of the instrument failure was a maintenance worker's failure to remove tape covering the static ports necessary to provide correct instrument data to the cockpit. On October 1, 1996, AeroPerú Flight 603 from Miami International Airport, had landed at the Lima airport on a Boeing 727–200 because of technical problems with the Boeing 757. 180 people were on the first leg of the flight. 110 had deplaned, and the remaining passengers were transferred to the Boeing 757 after maintenance checks. On October 2, 1996, shortly after takeoff just past midnight, the Boeing 757 airliner crew discovered that their basic flight instruments were behaving erratically and reported receiving contradictory serial emergency messages from the onboard computer, such as
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    China Airlines Flight 006

    China Airlines Flight 006

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747SP
    • Operator: China Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles International Airport
    China Airlines Flight 006 (callsign "Dynasty 006") was a daily non-stop flight departing from Taipei at 16:15 and scheduled to arrive at Los Angeles International Airport at 07:00 local time. On February 19, 1985, it was involved in an aircraft upset accident after the No. 4 engine flamed out. The plane rolled over and plunged 30,000 ft (9,100 m), experiencing high speeds and g-forces (approaching 5g) before the captain was finally able to recover from the rapid dive, and then to divert to San Francisco International Airport. The accident occurred ten hours into the regular service between Taipei and Los Angeles. The Boeing 747SP-09 was 350 miles (550 km) northwest of San Francisco, cruising at an altitude of 41,000 ft (12,500 m). The flight crew consisted of captain Min-Yuan Ho, first officer Ju Yu Chang, flight engineer Kuo-Win Pei, relief captain Chien-Yuan Liao, and relief flight engineer Shih Lung Suwere. The sequence began when the No. 4 starboard outermost engine stalled at a low thrust setting and flamed out. That engine had failed twice during previous flights (both while cruising at FL 410 & 430, respectively). In each of those cases, the engine was restarted, after
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Continental Connection Flight 3407

    Continental Connection Flight 3407

    • Operator: Continental Connection
    • Flight destination: Buffalo Niagara International Airport
    Colgan Air Flight 3407, marketed as Continental Connection under a codeshare agreement with Continental Airlines, was a Bombardier Dash-8 Q400, registration number N200WQ, on a scheduled regional airline flight from Newark, New Jersey to Buffalo, New York. On February 12, 2009, at 10:17 p.m. EST, the plane went into an aerodynamic stall. All 49 passengers and crew aboard the Q400 were killed when the plane crashed into a house in Clarence Center, New York. One person in the house was also killed. The accident, which triggered a wave of inquiries over the operations of regional airlines in the United States, was the first fatal accident of a U.S. commercial airliner since the August 2006 crash of Comair Flight 191, and remains the most recent as of October 2012. Families of the accident's victims lobbied the U.S. Congress to enact more stringent regulations over regional carriers, and apply greater scrutiny to safe operating procedures and the working conditions of pilots. The accident was investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), with a final report issued on February 2, 2010. The NTSB determined that the accident was caused by the pilots' inability to
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    KLM Flight 1673

    KLM Flight 1673

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    • Operator: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
    • Flight destination: Barcelona International Airport
    On 28 November 2004, the landing gear of KLM Flight 1673 struck a bird, which broke a cable in the nose wheel. The flight continued normally, but when the flight crew attempted to land their jet, they were unable to control the aircraft's movement, and the aircraft veered off the runway before the landing gear collapsed. All 146 passengers on board the Boeing 737-406 survived the accident. The jet was cleared for departure from Amsterdam Airport Schiphol at 16:46. During take-off from runway 18L, the nose gear of the plane hit a bird. This incident was reported to air traffic control, the landing gear was raised normally and the flight continued normally. Upon touching down on runway 25R at Barcelona International Airport, the aircraft started deviating to the left of the runway centreline. The crew applied right rudder, braking and nose wheel steering tiller but could not keep the aircraft on the runway. After it veered off the paved surface of the runway at about 100 knots, the jet went through an area of soft sand where construction works were being carried out. The nose landing gear leg collapsed and the left main landing gear leg detached from its fittings shortly before the
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Llandow air disaster

    Llandow air disaster

    • Operator: Airflight
    • Flight destination: RAF Llandow
    The Llandow air disaster was an aircraft accident in Wales in 1950. At that time it was the world's worst air disaster with a total of 80 fatalities. The aircraft, an Avro Tudor V, had been privately hired to fly rugby union enthusiasts to and from an international game in Ireland; and the crash, which was caused by a stall, happened on the return flight. On 12 March 1950, an Avro 689 Tudor V Star Girl owned by Airflight Limited and being operated under the "Fairflight" name, took off from Dublin Airport in Ireland, on a private passenger flight to Llandow aerodrome in South Wales. The aircraft had 78 passengers and 5 crew on the manifest. The flight had been chartered privately for a trip to Belfast to watch the Welsh rugby union team compete against the Irish in the Five Nations Championship at the Ravenhill Stadium. The aircraft had been initially booked for 72 passengers, but the plane had been stripped to accommodate another six. The weather conditions were clear, and on the outboard journey aboard the same craft no incidents were reported. Eye-witnesses (including police constable John Davies) state that at 3:05 pm the Avro Tudor was approaching runway 28 of Llandow aerodrome
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Tenerife disaster

    Tenerife disaster

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
    The Tenerife airport disaster occurred on Sunday, March 27, 1977, when two Boeing 747 passenger aircraft collided on the runway of Los Rodeos Airport (now known as Tenerife North Airport) on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands. With a total of 583 fatalities, the crash is the deadliest accident in aviation history. After a bomb exploded at Gran Canaria Airport, many aircraft were diverted to Tenerife. Among them were KLM Flight 4805 and Pan Am Flight 1736 – the aircraft involved in the accident. The threat of a second bomb forced the authorities to close the airport while a search was conducted, resulting in many airplanes being diverted to the smaller Tenerife airport where air traffic controllers were forced to park many of the airplanes on the taxiway, thereby blocking it. Further complicating the situation, while authorities waited to reopen Gran Canaria, a dense fog developed at Tenerife, greatly reducing visibility. When Gran Canaria reopened, the parked aircraft blocking the taxiway at Tenerife required both of the 747s to taxi on the only runway in order to get in position for takeoff. Due to the fog, neither aircraft could see the other, nor could the
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    TWA Flight 260

    TWA Flight 260

    • Aircraft type: Martin 4-0-4
    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    • Flight destination: Santa Fe Municipal Airport
    TWA Flight 260 was the Trans World Airlines (TWA) designation for a flight from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Santa Fe, New Mexico in the 1950s. On February 19, 1955, the 40-passenger Martin 4-0-4 prop plane used by TWA for that route crashed into the Sandia Mountains. Initially believed to be the result of pilot error, the cause was revised to imply that the crash was the result of instrument failure. On February 19, 1955 at 7:03 am, TWA flight 260 en route from Albuquerque, New Mexico to Santa Fe, New Mexico received an IFR clearance from the Albuquerque tower ("ATC clears TWA 260 for approach at the Santa Fe Airport via Victor 19 climb northbound on the back course of the ILS localizer"). There were no further communications after the aircraft took off at 7:05. It was last seen in a high speed shallow climb toward the cloud-shrouded Sandia Ridge at an estimated altitude of 3,000 feet above ground level. At 7:13 the flight crashed into the Sandia Mountains killing all 13 passengers and three crew members on board instantly. Due to the complex mountainous terrain, a day after the crash several members of the New Mexico Mountain Club, along with other volunteers assisted the New
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    TWA Flight 599

    TWA Flight 599

    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles
    Transcontinental and Western Air Flight 599 was a Fokker F.10 Trimotor en route from Kansas City, Missouri, to Los Angeles, California, on March 31, 1931. It crashed a few miles southwest of Bazaar, Kansas; all eight on board died. One of those killed was Knute Rockne, the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame, who was on his way to Los Angeles for the film The Spirit of Notre Dame. It is often claimed that Flight 599 went down in or shortly after a thunderstorm, but meteorological records show that there was no significant convective activity at the time. The accident was actually caused by the composition of the aircraft. Fokker Trimotors were manufactured out of wood laminate; in this instance, moisture had leaked into the interior of one wing over a period and had weakened the glue bonding the structural members (called struts or spars) that prevented the wing from fluttering in flight. One spar finally failed; the wing developed uncontrolled flutter and separated from the aircraft. Although the accident is best known for the death of Rockne, the accident also caused numerous changes in the operations of both TWA and the Aeronautics Branch of the US Department of
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    2007 Blue Angels South Carolina crash

    2007 Blue Angels South Carolina crash

    • Aircraft type: F/A-18 Hornet
    The 2007 Blue Angels South Carolina crash occurred on April 21, 2007, when the Number 6 US Navy Blue Angels jet crashed during the final minutes of an air show at the Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort in Beaufort, South Carolina. The sole fatality was confirmed and identified as the pilot, Lieutenant Commander Kevin "Kojak" Davis, by the Blue Angels on April 22, 2007. The body of the pilot and the black box were later recovered and moved to the local coroner's office. There were eight injuries reported on the ground. A report was released on 15 January 2008, ending the investigation by the Navy into the crash. The report states that when Commander Davis pulled back into a 6.8-g pull, he lost control of the aircraft due to the effect of greyout. Early reporting indicated that all six planes were making their final turns into the landing pattern when Blue Angel #6 flew behind the audience and low over a tree-line, three miles away from air show center, and possibly clipped power lines and a tall pine tree near Shanklin Road. This was followed by a large plume of black smoke, which Blue Angel #1 immediately began to circle while the others landed. A local official later said that due
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Bar Harbor Airlines Flight 1808

    Bar Harbor Airlines Flight 1808

    • Aircraft type: Beechcraft Model 99
    • Operator: Bar Harbor Airlines
    Bar Harbor Airlines Flight 1808 was a scheduled flight from Logan International Airport to Bangor International Airport in the United States on August 25, 1985. On final approach to Auburn/Lewiston Municipal Airport, the plane crashed short of the runway, killing all six passengers and two crew on board. Among the passengers was Samantha Smith, a thirteen-year-old American school girl who had become famous as a "Goodwill Ambassador" to the Soviet Union and who had been cast on the television show Lime Street. Flight 1808 normally stopped en route at Augusta and Waterville, Maine. The flight crew flew the aircraft from Bangor to Boston and back earlier that afternoon in worsening weather. On the second trip they were advised at an en route stop in Augusta that because of air traffic control delays in Boston their return flight 1788 via Auburn/Lewiston, Maine was being cancelled. They would instead operate the later flight 1808 with Auburn added as a flag stop to accommodate passengers from flight 1788. Flight 1808 boarded in Boston with 6 passengers; 2 for Auburn, 3 for Augusta* and 1 for Waterville. [*Four passengers had actually checked in for Augusta but the fourth passenger did
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Braniff Flight 352

    Braniff Flight 352

    • Aircraft type: Lockheed L-188 Electra
    • Operator: Braniff International Airways
    • Flight destination: Love Field
    Braniff International Airways Flight 352 was a scheduled domestic flight from William P. Hobby Airport in Houston, Texas, United States to Dallas, Texas; on May 3, 1968 a Lockheed L-188A Electra flying on the route, registration N9707C, broke up in mid air and crashed near Dawson, Texas after flying into a severe thunderstorm. It was carrying a crew of 5 and 80 passengers. There were no survivors. Investigation revealed that the accident was caused by the captain's decision to penetrate an area of heavy weather followed by a structural over-stress and failure of the airframe while attempting recovery from loss of control during a steep 180 degree turn executed in an attempt to escape the weather. Earlier in the day, at 12:40 local time, the crew of the accident flight flew from Dallas to Houston through the same area they were scheduled to fly later on. On that previous flight, a few hours before, they encountered no significant weather along the route. Once they arrived in Houston, there was no record of the crew being briefed about the updated weather by any Weather Bureau or FAA personnel, or by any Braniff dispatcher or weather office. They did, however, receive hardcopy
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Britannia Airways Flight BY226A

    Britannia Airways Flight BY226A

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: Britannia Airways
    Britannia Airways Flight BY226A was an international charter flight from Cardiff, Wales, UK, which crashed on landing at Girona Airport, Spain, on 14 September 1999 and broke apart. Of the 236 passengers and 9 crew on board, two were seriously injured and 41 sustained minor injuries. One of the passengers who had apparently sustained only minor injuries died five days later of unsuspected internal injuries. The Boeing 757-204 aircraft, registration G-BYAG, was damaged beyond economic repair and scrapped. The holiday charter flight was landing at night, through thunderstorms with heavy rain at 21:47 UTC (23:47 local). Several preceding flights had diverted to Barcelona and this was planned as BY226A's alternate. The weather prior to the landing approach was reported as: Surface wind 350/6 kt, visibility 4 km, thunderstorm with heavy rain, cloud 3-4 octas at 1,500 feet, 1-2 octas cumulonimbus at 3,000 feet, 5-7 octas at 4,000 feet, temperature 20°C/ dewpoint 20°C, QNH 1010 mb, remarks recent rain. The crew initially executed the VOR/DME non-precision instrument approach procedure to runway 02. Upon becoming visual, the crew determined that the aircraft was not adequately aligned with
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Pan Am Flight 110

    Pan Am Flight 110

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Pan American World Airways
    • Flight destination: Mehrabad International Airport
    Pan Am Flight 110 was a scheduled Pan American World Airways flight from Rome, Italy to Tehran, Iran by way of Beirut, Lebanon. On December 17, 1973, shortly before takeoff, the airport terminal and the flight aircraft were invaded and the aircraft was set on fire by armed Palestinian gunmen, resulting in the deaths of thirty persons on the plane and two in the terminal. Following the aircraft invasion, the gunmen hijacked a Lufthansa airliner and killed two more people before being taken into custody by the State of Kuwait. Since the ousting of the PLO from Jordan, following the Jordanian-Palestinian civil war, the Palestinian military organizations made South Lebanon into headquarters, enlisting militants from Palestinian refugee camps. South Lebanon was also referred to as Fatahland, due to the almost complete control of Fatah and other military Palestinian organizations over this officially Lebanese area, which they used to stage attacks against Israel, mainly targeting civilians, and to engage in international airflight terror campaign. On December 17, 1973, Pan Am Flight 110 was scheduled to fly from Leonardo Da Vinci International Airport in Rome to Beirut International
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    American Airlines Flight 96

    American Airlines Flight 96

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: LaGuardia Airport
    American Airlines Flight 96 was a regular McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10 flight operated by American Airlines. The flight suffered a cargo door failure on 12 June 1972 while flying over Windsor, Ontario; it is thus sometimes referred to as the Windsor incident. The rapid decompression in the cargo hold caused a partial collapse of the passenger compartment floor, which in turn jammed or restricted some of the control cables which led to various flight control hydraulic actuators. The jamming of the rudder control cable caused the rudder to deflect to its maximum right position. The cable controls to the number two (tail) engine were severed, causing that engine to shut down. Fortunately, there was no rupture of any hydraulic system, so the pilots still had control of the ailerons, the right elevator and the horizontal stabilizer. However, because the right elevator cable was partially restricted, both pilots had to apply back pressure on the yoke for the landing flare. Additionally, the approach and landing had to be made at high speed, to prevent the sink rate from becoming too high. The tendency to turn right was offset by using 45 degrees of left aileron, combined with asymmetrical
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Garuda Indonesia Flight 152

    Garuda Indonesia Flight 152

    • Aircraft type: A300B4-220
    • Operator: Garuda Indonesia
    • Flight destination: Polonia International Airport
    Garuda Indonesia Flight 152 (GA152, GIA152) was a scheduled domestic Indonesian passenger flight from Jakarta to Medan, North Sumatra, operated by state owned flag carrier Garuda Indonesia. On September 26, 1997, the Airbus A300 flying this route, registered PK-GAI, crashed into woodlands 29 km (18 miles) from Medan in low visibility. All 234 passengers and crew were killed in the disaster. The crash site was at an altitude of 3,000 feet (915 m) above sea level, near the village of Pancur Batu, Desa Buah Nabar. It remains the deadliest single-aircraft disaster in Indonesian history, and the deadliest aviation accident and incident in 1997. It was the fourth highest death toll of any aviation accident involving an Airbus A300. The cause of the crash, according to the official report of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), were:
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    Gimli Glider

    Gimli Glider

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 767
    • Operator: Air Canada
    • Flight destination: Edmonton International Airport
    The Gimli Glider is the nickname of an Air Canada aircraft that was involved in a notable aviation incident in July 1983. On July 23rd, Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767-233 jet, ran out of fuel at an altitude of 41,000 feet (12,500 m) ASL, about halfway through its flight from Montreal to Edmonton via Ottawa. The crew was able to glide the aircraft safely to an emergency landing at Gimli Industrial Park Airport, a former Royal Canadian Air Force base in Gimli, Manitoba. The subsequent investigation revealed company failures and a chain of minor human errors that combined to defeat built-in safeguards. In addition, fuel loading was miscalculated due to a misunderstanding of the recently adopted metric system, which replaced the imperial system. On 22 July 1983, Air Canada's Boeing 767 (registration C-GAUN, c/n 22520/47) flew from Toronto to Edmonton where it underwent routine checks. The next day it was flown to Montreal. Following a crew change, it departed Montreal as Flight 143 for the return trip to Edmonton via Ottawa, with Captain Robert (Bob) Pearson and First Officer Maurice Quintal at the controls. At 41,000 feet (12,500 m), over Red Lake, Ontario, the aircraft's cockpit
    4.50
    2 votes
    218
    2007 Africa One Antonov An-26 crash

    2007 Africa One Antonov An-26 crash

    • Aircraft type: Antonov An-26
    • Operator: Malila Airlift
    The 2007 Africa One Antonov An-26 crash occurred when a twin engine Antonov An-26, belonging to the Congolese air carrier Africa One, crashed and burned shortly after takeoff from N'djili Airport in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo on October 4, 2007. The flight left N'djili at 10:43 local time bound for Tshikapa, a distance of 650 km to the east. The flight was variously reported as operated by El Sam Airlines or Malila Airlift, with the aircraft leased from Africa One. Both carriers are on the list of air carriers banned in the EU, as are all of other Congolese airlines. The aircraft, tail number 9Q-COS, is reported to have been certified in a letter 409/cab/MIN/TVC/1264/MN/mg/2007 as having passed safety inspection, according to Hippolyte Muaka, who is the acting head of the DRC's Civil Aviation Authority. The flight was a commercial cargo flight carrying at least 28, including a flight crew of five. The flight manifest stated that there were 16 passengers aboard, but more boarded the flight shortly before takeoff. The Russian foreign ministry reports that the aircraft lost a propeller, then a wing struck an obstacle, shearing the wing off prior to crashing. Striking a
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Aeroflot Flight 3352

    Aeroflot Flight 3352

    • Aircraft type: Tupolev Tu-154
    • Operator: Aeroflot
    • Flight destination: Tsentralny Airport
    Aeroflot Flight 3352 was a Tupolev Tu-154 airline flight on a domestic route from Krasnodar to Novosibirsk, with an intermediate landing in Omsk, in the USSR. While landing at Omsk Airport on 11 October 1984, the aircraft crashed into maintenance vehicles on the runway, killing 174 people on board and 4 on the ground. While a chain of mistakes in airport operations contributed to the accident, its major cause was a ground controller falling asleep on duty. As of 17 July 2012, this remains the deadliest airplane crash on Russian territory. At 5:00 am local time (UTC/GMT + 7 hours), Flight 3352 was preparing to land at Tsentralny Airport in Omsk, a key Russian city in southwestern Siberia, which has a population of over 1 million and is the administrative center of Omsk Oblast. At the time, this was the only aircraft approaching Omsk, and it was cleared for landing when it contacted the airport. At 5:20 am, worried that the continuing rain would make the runway overly slippery, the airport ground maintenance crew requested permission to dry the runway. The ground controller on duty gave permission and proceeded to fall asleep soon after, in the process forgetting to switch on the
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Aeroméxico Flight 498

    Aeroméxico Flight 498

    • Operator: Aeroméxico
    The 1986 Cerritos mid-air collision involved Aeroméxico Flight 498, a chartered DC-9, and N4891F, a Piper PA-28-181 Archer owned by the Kramer family. Aeroméxico Flight 498, registration XA-JED, was a Douglas DC-9-32 on route from Mexico City, Mexico to Los Angeles International Airport, Los Angeles, California, United States (with stops in Guadalajara, Loreto, and Tijuana) on August 31, 1986. N4891F was a privately operated Piper PA-28-181 Archer owned by the Kramer family en route from Torrance to Big Bear City, California. The two aircraft collided in mid-air over Cerritos, California, killing all 67 aboard both aircraft and 15 people on the ground. In addition, eight people on the ground sustained minor injuries from the crash. The Piper aircraft, N4891F, with the pilot and two passengers aboard, had departed Torrance, California at about 11:40 PDT. At about 11:46 Flight 498 began its descent into Los Angeles with 58 passengers and six crew members aboard. At 11:52, the Piper's engine collided with the left horizontal stabilizer of the DC-9, shearing off the top of the Piper's cockpit and decapitating the pilot and both passengers. The heavily damaged Piper fell onto an empty
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    American Airlines Flight 63

    American Airlines Flight 63

    The 2001 shoe bomb plot was a failed bombing attempt that occurred on American Airlines Flight 63 flying from Charles De Gaulle International Airport in Paris, France, to Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, United States, on December 22, 2001. As Flight 63 was flying over the Atlantic Ocean, Richard Reid — an Islamic fundamentalist from the United Kingdom, and self-proclaimed Al-Qaeda operative — carried shoes that were packed with two types of explosives. He had been refused permission to board the flight the day before. Passengers on the flight complained of a smoke smell shortly after meal service. One flight attendant, Hermis Moutardier, walked the aisles of the plane to assess the source. She found Reid sitting alone near a window, attempting to light a match. Moutardier warned him that smoking was not allowed on the airplane, and Reid promised to stop. A few minutes later, Moutardier found Reid leaning over in his seat, and unsuccessfully attempted to get his attention. After she asked him what he was doing, Reid grabbed at her, revealing one shoe in his lap, a fuse leading into the shoe, and a lit match. She tried grabbing Reid twice, but he pushed her to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Operation Entebbe

    Operation Entebbe

    • Aircraft type: A300B4-203
    • Operator: Air France
    • Flight destination: Charles de Gaulle International Airport
    Operation Entebbe was a counter-terrorist hostage-rescue mission carried out by commandos of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) at Entebbe Airport in Uganda on 4 July 1976. A week earlier, on 27 June, an Air France plane with 248 passengers was hijacked, by terrorists of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the German Revolutionary Cells, and flown to Entebbe, near Kampala, the capital of Uganda. The hijackers separated the Israelis and, according to some, Jews from the larger group and forced them into another room. That afternoon, 47 non-Israeli hostages were released. The next day, 101 more non-Israeli hostages were allowed to leave on board an Air France aircraft. More than 100 Israeli and Jewish passengers, along with the non-Jewish pilot Captain Bacos, remained as hostages and were threatened with death. The IDF acted on intelligence provided by the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad. The hijackers threatened to kill the hostages if their prisoner release demands were not met. This threat led to the planning of the rescue operation. These plans included preparation for armed resistance from Ugandan military troops. The operation took place at night. Israeli
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    United Airlines Flight 629

    United Airlines Flight 629

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-6
    • Operator: United Airlines
    United Airlines Flight 629, registration N37559, was a Douglas DC-6B aircraft, named "Mainliner Denver," which was blown up with a dynamite bomb placed in the checked luggage. The explosion occurred over Longmont, Colorado while the airplane was en route from Denver, Colorado to Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, on November 1, 1955. All 39 passengers and five crew members on board were killed in the explosion and crash. The flight had originated at New York City's La Guardia Airport and made a scheduled stop in Chicago before continuing on to Denver's Stapleton Airfield. At Denver there was a crew change, and the captain who assumed command of the flight for the segments to Portland and Seattle, Lee Hall, was a World War II veteran. The flight took off at 6:52 p.m. Mountain time. Eleven minutes later, Stapleton Airport tower controllers saw two bright lights suddenly appear in the sky north-northwest of the airport. Both lights were observed for thirty to forty-five seconds, and both fell to the ground at roughly the same speed. The controllers then saw a very bright flash originating at or near the ground, intense enough to illuminate the base of the clouds above the
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    2007 Romanian Air Force IAR-330 SOCAT crash

    2007 Romanian Air Force IAR-330 SOCAT crash

    • Aircraft type: IAR 330
    On 7 November 2007, a Romanian Air Force IAR-330 SOCAT attack helicopter belonging to the 90th Airlift Base crashed in Ungheni, 30 km south of Piteşti, Argeş county, southern Romania. Immediately after touching the ground, the aircraft exploded, as it was already on fire. All three crew members aboard were killed, including Commander Nicolae Bucur, who was one of the most experienced pilots of the Romanian Air Force, with over 2,700 flying hours. The other two victims were Lt. Ionel Craiu, pilot and Alexandru Adrian Ticea, mechanic. The helicopter was unarmed, performing a night training flight at the moment of the crash. Eye-witnesses declared that smoke came out from the helicopter before the crash. On November 8, the flight recorder of the aircraft was recovered and officials declared that further information and conclusions will be available after 30 days. Approximately 10 minutes after the crash, the first firefighters detachment from the Inspectorate for Emergency situations arrived at the scene and was confronted with 15 meters-tall flames. Paramedics arrived almost at the same time, but where unable to intervene because of the heavy fire. Also, the 90th Airlift Base
    4.00
    2 votes
    225
    Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571

    Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571

    • Aircraft type: Fairchild Hiller FH-227
    • Flight destination: Comodoro Arturo Merino Benítez International Airport
    Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571, also known as the Andes flight disaster, and in South America as Miracle in the Andes (El Milagro de los Andes) was a chartered flight carrying 45 people, including a rugby team, their friends, family and associates that crashed in the Andes on 13 October 1972. More than a quarter of the passengers died in the crash, and several others quickly succumbed to cold and injury. Of the 29 who were alive a few days after the accident, another eight were killed by an avalanche that swept over their shelter in the wreckage. The last 16 survivors were rescued on 23 December 1972, more than two months after the crash. The survivors had little food and no source of heat in the harsh conditions at over 3,600 metres (11,800 ft) altitude. Faced with starvation and radio news reports that the search for them had been abandoned, the survivors fed on the dead passengers who had been preserved in the snow. Rescuers did not learn of the survivors until 72 days after the crash when passengers Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa, after a 10-day trek across the Andes, found Chilean arriero Sergio Catalán, who gave them food and then alerted authorities about the existence of
    4.00
    2 votes
    226
    American Airlines Flight 965

    American Airlines Flight 965

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 757
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport
    American Airlines Flight 965, a Boeing 757 registered N651AA, was a scheduled flight from Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, United States to Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport in Cali, Colombia, which crashed into a mountain in Buga, Colombia on December 20, 1995, killing 151 passengers and 8 crew members. The crash was the first U.S.-owned 757 accident and the highest death toll of any accident in Colombia. It is also the highest death toll of any accident involving a Boeing 757 at that time. It was surpassed by Birgenair Flight 301 which crashed in 1996 with 189 fatalities. Flight 965 was the deadliest air disaster involving a U.S. carrier since the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 in 1988. Five passengers survived the crash, all of whom were seated within 2 rows of each other, but one died 2 days later of his injuries. The Colombian Special Administrative Unit of Civil Aeronautics investigated the accident and determined it was caused by navigational errors by the flight crew. At that time, Flight 965 mainly carried people returning to Colombia for the Christmas holiday, vacationers, and businesspeople. A winter storm in the northeast United States caused the
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Corporate Airlines Flight 5966

    Corporate Airlines Flight 5966

    • Aircraft type: Handley Page Jetstream
    • Operator: RegionsAir
    • Flight destination: Kirksville Regional Airport
    Corporate Airlines Flight 5966 was a flight route from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport in St. Louis, Missouri, United States to Kirksville Regional Airport in unincorporated Adair County, Missouri, near the city of Kirksville. Corporate Airlines (now RegionsAir, defunct) flew the route as part of the AmericanConnection network, an affiliate of American Airlines. On October 19, 2004, a Jetstream 32 twin-engine turboprop flying the route crashed on the approach to Kirksville Airport, killing thirteen people and seriously injuring two. The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the probable cause of the accident was the pilots’ failure to follow established procedures and properly conduct a non-precision instrument approach at night in instrument meteorological conditions, including their descent below the minimum descent altitude before required visual cues were available (which continued un-moderated until the airplane struck the trees) and their failure to adhere to the established division of duties between the flying and non-flying (monitoring) pilot. The NTSB analysis of the Cockpit Voice Recorder suggests that both pilots were looking outside the cockpit
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 663

    Eastern Air Lines Flight 663

    • Aircraft type: Douglas DC-7
    • Operator: Eastern Air Lines
    Eastern Air Lines Flight 663 was a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Boston, Massachusetts, to Atlanta, Georgia, with scheduled stopovers at at New York International/Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), New York; Richmond, Virginia; Charlotte, North Carolina; and Greenville, South Carolina. On the night of February 8, 1965, the aircraft serving the flight, a DC-7, crashed near Jones Beach State Park, New York, just after taking off from JFK Airport. All 79 passengers and five crew aboard perished. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) investigations determined that evasive maneuvers undertaken by Flight 663 to avoid an oncoming Pan Am Boeing 707 caused the pilot to suffer spatial disorientation and lose control of the aircraft. The accident remains the third-worst accident involving a Douglas DC-7. The Douglas DC-7 serving Flight 663 made its first flight in 1958, and had subsequently accumulated a total of 18,500 hours of flight time. It was piloted by Captain Frederick R. Carson, 41, who had been employed by Eastern Air Lines for 19 years and who had accumulated 12,607 hours of flight time. His copilot,
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Korean Air Flight 858

    Korean Air Flight 858

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Korean Air
    • Flight destination: Gimpo International Airport
    Korean Air Flight 858 was a scheduled international passenger flight between Baghdad, Iraq, and Seoul, South Korea that exploded in mid-air on 29 November 1987 after two North Korean agents planted a bomb inside an overhead storage bin in the airplane's passenger cabin. The two agents, acting upon orders from the North Korean government, planted the device in an overhead storage bin before disembarking from the aircraft during the first stop-over in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. While the aircraft was flying over the Andaman Sea to its second stop-over in Bangkok, Thailand, the bomb detonated and destroyed the Korean Air Boeing 707-3B5C. Everybody on board the aircraft, including the 104 passengers and 11 crew members, most of whom were South Koreans, were killed. The attack occurred 34 years after the Korean Armistice Agreement that ended the Korean War on 27 July 1953. The two bombers were traced to Bahrain, where they both attempted to smoke cigarettes laced with cyanide when they realised they were about to be taken into custody. The male of the pair died, but the female, Kim Hyon Hui, confessed to the bombing. She was sentenced to death after being put on trial for the
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Qantas Flight 1

    Qantas Flight 1

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Qantas
    • Flight destination: London Heathrow Airport
    Qantas Flight 1 (QF1, QFA1) was a Qantas passenger flight which was involved in a runway overrun accident at Don Mueang International Airport as it was arriving for a stopover in Bangkok on 23 September 1999. Qantas flights travel between London and Australia on a route known as the "Kangaroo Route". The Kangaroo Route traditionally refers to air routes flown between the countries of Australia and the United Kingdom, via the Eastern Hemisphere. This flight began in Sydney earlier that day at 1645 local time, and after more than eight hours flying was approaching Don Mueang International Airport at 2245 local time. During the approach to Bangkok the weather conditions deteriorated significantly, from 8 km visibility half an hour before landing to 750 m at the time of landing. The flight crew observed a storm cloud over the airport and ground reports were that it was raining heavily. However these conditions are common at Bangkok. Seven minutes prior to landing a Thai Airways Airbus A330 landed normally, but three minutes before landing another Qantas aircraft (QF15, a Sydney-Rome via Bangkok service), a Boeing 747, conducted a "go around" due to poor visibility during final
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    TWA Flight 128

    TWA Flight 128

    • Aircraft type: Convair 880-22-1-21
    • Operator: Trans World Airlines
    • Flight destination: Logan International Airport
    TWA Flight 128 was a domestic U.S. Flight en route from Los Angeles, CA to Boston, MA with scheduled stops at Cincinnati, OH and Pittsburgh, PA. The flight had been cleared for an ILS approach to Runway 18, and had cleared the outer marker. The aircraft struck trees on final approach and crashed 9,357 feet short and 429 feet right of the extended centerline of the runway at Greater Cincinnati Airport (CVG). The aircraft involved was a Convair 880, tail number N821TW. It was the sixth loss of a Convair 880 and at the time the worst accident involving a Convair 880, and 12th worst airline disaster in the U.S. This accident is currently the second worst involving a Convair 880 and 38th worst accident in the United States of America. Upon making the approach to a scheduled landing at Greater Cincinnati Airport, the aircraft struck trees at an elevation of 875 feet. The airport, about 2 miles distant was at an elevation of 890 feet. The plane had descended through a cloud layer at night and the published minimum for these conditions was 1,290 feet. The accident site was remotely located in a wooded area. The aircraft was destroyed by impact and fire. As a result of the crash, 65
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    2008 Farnborough plane crash

    2008 Farnborough plane crash

    • Aircraft type: Cessna Citation I
    • Flight destination: Pau Pyrénées Airport
    On 30 March 2008, a Cessna 501 Citation crashed into a house in Farnborough, London (UK), near Biggin Hill Airport, from where the aircraft had taken off a short time before. There were no survivors among the five people on board, which included former racing drivers Richard Lloyd and David Leslie. The aircraft involved was a Bermudan-registered Cessna 501 Citation, tail number VP-BGE, construction number 500-0287, built in 1975. At the time of the accident, the aircraft had completed 5,844 hours total time and 5,352 cycles. The Citation took off at 14:32 local time from runway 21 at Biggin Hill airport, with destination Pau Pyrénées Airport in France. Less than two minutes into the flight, the pilot radioed an emergency call, reporting "engine vibrations" and requesting an immediate return to Biggin Hill. The aircraft was given permission to land on any runway, and the pilots indicated that they would attempt to return to the departure runway. However, shortly after the radio call the aircraft rapidly lost altitude and at 14:37 crashed into a property in Romsey Close, Farnborough. There were no survivors from the wreckage, which was consumed by fire, as was the house that the
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    233
    Air India Flight 855

    Air India Flight 855

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: Air India
    • Flight destination: Dubai International Airport
    Air India Flight 855 was a scheduled passenger flight that crashed during the evening of 1 January 1978 about 3 km (1.9 mi) off the coast of Bandra, Bombay (now Mumbai), India. All 213 lives on board were lost. The crash is believed to have been caused by the captain having become spatially disoriented after the failure of one of the flight instruments in the cockpit. The aircraft involved was a Boeing 747-237B, registration VT-EBD, named the "Emperor Ashoka". It was the first 747 delivered to Air India. When it was delivered in April 1971, Air India had proclaimed it as the "747th wonder of the world", and in keeping with their Maharaja motif, used the tagline "Your Palace in the Sky" to describe this new aircraft with a detailed external paint scheme and interesting interior design. The departure was from Bombay's Sahar Airport, (now called Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport). The plane's destination was Dubai International Airport in Dubai, with Captain Madan L. Kukar as the Commander. Approximately one minute after takeoff from runway 27, the pilot made a scheduled right turn upon crossing the Bombay coastline over the Arabian Sea, after which the aircraft briefly
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    234
    Air New Zealand Flight 901

    Air New Zealand Flight 901

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: Air New Zealand
    • Flight destination: Christchurch International Airport
    Air New Zealand Flight 901 (TE-901) was a scheduled Air New Zealand Antarctic sightseeing flight that operated between 1977 and 1979, from Auckland Airport to Antarctica and return via Christchurch. On 28 November 1979, the fourteenth flight of TE-901, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30 registered ZK-NZP, collided with Mount Erebus on Ross Island, Antarctica, killing all 237 passengers and 20 crew on board. The accident is commonly known as the Mount Erebus disaster. The initial investigation concluded the accident was caused by pilot error but public outcry led to the establishment of a Royal Commission of Inquiry into the crash. The commission, presided over by Justice Peter Mahon, concluded that the accident was caused by a correction made to the coordinates of the flight path the night before the disaster, coupled with a failure to inform the flight crew of the change, with the result that the aircraft, instead of being directed by computer down McMurdo Sound (as the crew assumed), was re-routed into the path of Mount Erebus. In Justice Mahon's report, he accused Air New Zealand of presenting "an orchestrated litany of lies" and this charge in the end led to changes in senior
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    235
    American Airlines Flight 1

    American Airlines Flight 1

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Los Angeles
    American Airlines Flight 1 was a domestic, scheduled passenger flight from New York International (Idlewild) Airport (later renamed John F. Kennedy International Airport), New York to Los Angeles International Airport, California that crashed shortly after take-off on 1 March 1962. All 87 passengers and eight crew died in the crash. A Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) investigation determined that a manufacturing defect in the automatic pilot system led to an uncommanded rudder control system input, causing the accident. A number of notable people lost their lives in the crash. It was the sixth fatal Boeing 707 crash, and, at the time, the deadliest. Today, American 1 operates as a Boeing 767-200ER from JFK to Los Angeles. This is contrary to the procedure of retiring flight numbers that have crashed. The aircraft was a Boeing 707-123B, U.S. Registry N7506A. It was delivered to American Airlines on 12 February 1959. At the time of the crash, it had accumulated 8,147 flight hours. Its last periodic inspection had occurred on 18 January 1962 at 7,922 hours of air time. The flight crew consisted of Captain James T. Heist, First Officer Michael Barna, Jr., Second Officer Robert J. Pecor,
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    236
    American Airlines Flight 587

    American Airlines Flight 587

    • Aircraft type: A300-600
    • Operator: American Airlines
    • Flight destination: Las Américas International Airport
    American Airlines Flight 587 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight from John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City to Las Américas International Airport in the Dominican Republic. On November 12, 2001 the Airbus A300 operating the route crashed into the Belle Harbor neighborhood of Queens, a borough of New York City shortly after takeoff. All 260 people on board were killed, along with five people on the ground. The accident has the second highest death toll of any incident involving an Airbus A300, after Iran Air Flight 655. The accident is also the second deadliest aviation accident to occur on U.S. soil, after American Airlines Flight 191. When it occurred, it was the deadliest air disaster since the Charkhi Dadri mid-air collision, and, not counting the September 11 attacks, had the highest aviation fatality count in 2001. The accident took place two months after the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in Manhattan. Several factors, such as the date, time, aircraft size, airline, eyewitness accounts, and location in New York, raised concerns that the crash was caused by another terrorist attack. According to Northeast Intelligence Network, Al-Qaeda
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    237
    Avianca Flight 203

    Avianca Flight 203

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 727
    • Operator: Avianca
    • Flight destination: Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport
    Avianca Airlines Flight 203 was a Colombian domestic passenger flight from El Dorado International Airport in Bogotá to Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport in Cali. It was destroyed by a bomb over the municipality of Soacha on November 27, 1989. The aircraft took off from the Colombian capital Bogotá en route to Cali. It was in the air five minutes and flying at a speed of 794 kilometres per hour (493 mph) when an explosive charge detonated on board, igniting fuel vapors in an empty fuel tank. The aircraft was a Boeing 727-21 with registration number HK-1803, it was purchased from Pan Am. The plane took off as scheduled at 7:11 a.m. After 5 minutes into the flight a bomb placed near the fuel tank exploded at 13,000 feet. The blast ripped the airliner apart: the nose section separated from the tail section, which went down in flames. All 107 people on board were killed, as well as three people on the ground who were killed by falling debris. According to the investigations the bomb was placed by a man wearing a suit who was able to bring the bomb inside the plane in a suitcase. The bombing of Flight 203 was the deadliest single criminal attack in the many decades of
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    238
    Continental Airlines Flight 11

    Continental Airlines Flight 11

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 707
    • Operator: Continental Airlines
    • Flight destination: Kansas City Downtown Airport
    Continental Airlines Flight 11, registration N70775, was a Boeing 707 aircraft which exploded in the vicinity of Centerville, Iowa, while en route from O'Hare Airport, Chicago, Illinois, to Kansas City, Missouri, on May 22, 1962. The aircraft crashed in a clover field near Unionville, in Putnam County, Missouri, killing all 45 crew and passengers on board. Flight 11 departed O'Hare at 8:35 p.m. The flight was routine until just before the Mississippi River, when it deviated from its filed flight plan to the north to avoid a line of thunderstorms. In the vicinity of Centerville, Iowa, the radar image of the aircraft disappeared from the scope of the Waverly, Iowa, Flight Following Service. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory, resulting in separation of the tail section from the fuselage. The aircraft broke up and the main part of the fuselage struck the ground about six miles north-northwest of Unionville, Missouri. Witnesses in and around both Cincinnati, Iowa and Unionville reported hearing loud and unusual noises at around 9:20 p.m., and two more saw a big flash or ball of fire in the sky. A B-47 Stratojet bomber out of Forbes Air Force
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    239
    COPA Flight 201

    COPA Flight 201

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: Copa Airlines
    • Flight destination: Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport
    Copa Airlines Flight 201 was a Boeing 737-200 that was making a flight en-route from Tocumen International Airport in Panama City to Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport in Cali, Colombia, on the night of June 6, 1992. Flight 201 flipped and crashed in the Darien Gap just minutes after its departure from the airport. The accident of Flight 201 is the most tragic airliner disaster in the history of Panamanian aviation, and the first and to date the only fatal disaster in the history of Copa Airlines in the last 50 years. Initially, flight 201 seemed to have similarities with other incidents involving the Boeing 737 in the 1990s, such as United Airlines Flight 585. An investigation later determined that the flight crashed due to faulty instrument readings. The aircraft involved in the accident was a 12 year-old Boeing 737-204 Advanced with Pratt & Whitney JT8D-15 engines. The 737 was delivered to Britannia Airways (now defunct) in February 18, 1980 with the nickname of "Jean Baton" and the tail number as G-BGYL. These remained with the jet for 12 years, until April 17, 1992, when it was leased to the Panama´s flag carrier, Copa Airlines, with the tail number as HP-1205 and
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    240
    John F. Kennedy, Jr. airplane crash

    John F. Kennedy, Jr. airplane crash

    • Aircraft type: Piper Saratoga
    • Flight destination: Martha's Vineyard Airport
    On July 16, 1999, John F. Kennedy, Jr. died on impact when the Piper Saratoga light aircraft he was piloting crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. His wife, Carolyn Bessette, and sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette, were also killed. The flight had departed from Essex County Airport (CDW) in Fairfield Township, Essex County, New Jersey. The intended flight path was along the coastline of Connecticut and across Rhode Island Sound to its final destination of Martha's Vineyard Airport (MVY). The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) concluded the crash was caused by: "the pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a descent over water at night, which was a result of spatial disorientation". The NTSB and other aviation professionals also cited numerous interrelated factors that may have contributed to the crash. Hazy conditions existed on the night of the crash. Especially at night, haze can lead to spatial disorientation for pilots. Although the weather was officially listed as VFR (Visual Flight Rules), allowing Kennedy to fly his plane that night despite his lack of an instrument rating, the visibility was poor in Essex
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    241
    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 165 hijacking

    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 165 hijacking

    • Aircraft type: Tupolev Tu-134
    • Operator: LOT Polish Airlines
    • Flight destination: Berlin-Schönefeld International Airport
    LOT Polish Airlines Flight 165 hijacking was the hijacking of a LOT Polish Airlines that occurred on August 30, 1978. The hijackers from East Germany (GDR / DDR) were seeking political asylum in West Germany (FRG / BRD). The plane landed safely, and the primary hijacker was sentenced to time served, the nine months he had already served during pretrial detention. The GDR citizens Hans Detlef Alexander Tiede (aka Detlev Tiede) and his friend Ingrid Ruske and her 12-year-old daughter had travelled to Poland to meet there with Ruske's West German boyfriend Horst Fischer, who planned to bring false West German papers to enable their escape by ferry to West German Travemünde. However, Fischer did not appear, and after four days of waiting for him Ruske and Tiede - not having any information - concluded, that Fischer must have been arrested when travelling through East Germany. Their conclusion was right, Fischer had indeed been arrested and later sentenced to eight years of jail in East Germany for preparing their Republikflucht (escape from GDR), outlawed as a crime by East German legislation. After two years Fischer was released after the West German federal government had paid a
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    242
    Martinair MP 495

    Martinair MP 495

    • Aircraft type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10
    • Operator: Martinair
    • Flight destination: Faro Airport
    Martinair Flight 495 was a Dutch DC-10, registered PH-MBN, that crash-landed in severe weather conditions onto runway 28 at Faro Airport, Portugal, in 1992. The aircraft carried 13 crew members and 327 passengers, mainly holidaymakers from The Netherlands. Fifty-four passengers and 2 crew members died and 106 of the other occupants were badly injured. A large thunderstorm lay in the immediate vicinity of the airport, accompanied by heavy rain, windshear and low cloud. The control tower informed the crew of the thunderstorm activity, in addition stating that there was water on the runway. Following one unsuccessful attempt to land, the crew was executing a VOR/DME procedure approach to runway 11 when the aircraft flew through at least two microbursts. The aircraft landed with a vertical speed exceeding the manufacturer's design limits. Following this hard landing, the starboard main gear collapsed. The starboard wing fuel tank ruptured and the contents ignited. The DC-10 fuselage split in two, coming to rest with the front section lying on its side. The cause of the accident was the bad weather conditions in combination with crew errors. http://www.vliegrampfaro.nl/
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    243
    Mt. San Pietro disaster

    Mt. San Pietro disaster

    • Operator: Adria Airways
    • Flight destination: Campo dell'Oro Airport
    Inex-Adria Aviopromet Flight 1308, registration YU-ANA, was a Yugoslavian charter flight that crashed on Corsica's Mt. San Pietro in early December 1981, killing all 180 people on board. It is the highest death toll of any aviation accident involving a McDonnell Douglas MD-81. On December 1, 1981, the McDonnell Douglas MD-81 took off from Brnik Airport on a chartered flight from Slovenia (at the time Yugoslavia) to Corsica's capital city of Ajaccio with 173 Slovenian tourists and 7 crew members. The tourists were on a 1-day trip to Corsica. When Flight 1308 reached the airspace around Ajaccio's Campo dell'Oro Airport, it entered a holding pattern, awaiting clearance to land. The atmosphere in the plane was relaxed, with everybody already thinking of the day of leisure awaiting them on Corsica. At some point, the co-pilot even let his young son enter the cockpit. While in its holding pattern, the MD-81 was instructed to descend through the minimum holding altitude of 6,800 feet. Weather was bad, visibility was close to zero and the aircraft was descending into the fog. As it descended, its Ground Proximity Warning System gave off several audio warnings, prompting the crew to
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    244
    Polar 3

    Polar 3

    • Aircraft type: Dornier Do 228
    • Flight destination: Arrecife Airport
    Polar 3 was a Dornier Do 228 airplane of the Alfred Wegener Institute that was shot down south of Dakhla by guerrillas of the Polisario Front over Western Sahara on 24 February 1985. Polar 2 and Polar 3 were the first German airplanes to reach the South Pole when they landed there in December 1984 and were returning from a five month mission to the Antarctic, having been based at the Gondwana Research Station. While in Antarctica, Polar 2 was damaged and the bulk of the survey work had to be carried out by Polar 3. Polar 3 (FL 90) and Polar 2 (FL 110) were two survey-and-research airplanes of the Alfred Wegener Institute returning from a mission in Antarctica. On 24 February, at approximately 14:45 local time, the two planes took off from Dakar, Senegal bound for Lanzarote Airport, Canary Islands. Their cruise height was 2750 m (approximately 9,000 ft). The two planes' ultimate destination was the Dornier aircraft facility near Oberpfaffenhofen in Bavaria, Germany. The last radio contact made with Polar 3 occurred at approximately 16:30 GMT. At some point thereafter, it was shot down south of Dakhla by Polisario guerillas. Allegedly, they had mistaken it for a Moroccan spy plane.
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    PSA Flight 1771

    PSA Flight 1771

    • Aircraft type: BAe 146
    • Operator: Pacific Southwest Airlines
    • Flight destination: San Francisco International Airport
    Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 1771 was a commercial flight that crashed near Cayucos, California, United States, on December 7, 1987, as a result of a murder-suicide scheme by one of the passengers. All 43 people on board the aircraft died. The man who caused the crash, David Burke (born May 18, 1952), was an angry former employee of USAir, the parent company of PSA. USAir had recently purchased and was in the process of absorbing Pacific Southwest Airlines. Burke had been terminated by USAir for petty theft of $69 from in-flight cocktail receipts, and had also been suspected of other crimes. After meeting with Raymond F. Thomson, his supervisor, in an unsuccessful attempt to be reinstated, he purchased a ticket on PSA Flight 1771, a daily flight from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Burke's supervisor was a passenger on the flight, which he took regularly for his daily commute to and from work. Using his unsurrendered USAir credentials, Burke, armed with a loaded .44 Magnum revolver that he had borrowed from a co-worker, was able to use the employee security bypass checkpoint at Los Angeles International Airport. After boarding the plane, Burke wrote a message on an airsickness
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    South African Airways Flight 295

    South African Airways Flight 295

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 747
    • Operator: South African Airways
    • Flight destination: Johannesburg International Airport
    South African Airways Flight 295 (flown by a Boeing 747 named Helderberg) was a commercial flight that suffered a catastrophic in-flight fire in the cargo area and crashed into the Indian Ocean east of Mauritius on 28 November 1987, killing everyone on board. An extensive salvage operation was mounted in order to try to recover the flight data recorders, one of which was recovered from a depth of 4,900 metres (16,100 ft)—the deepest successful salvage operation ever conducted. The official inquiry, headed by Judge Cecil Margo, was unable to determine the cause of the fire, leading to a number of conspiracy theories being advanced in the following years. South African Airways Flight 295 was a Boeing 747-244B Combi, named The Helderberg (registration ZS-SAS; serial number 22171) that was delivered to the airline in 1980. The aircraft took off on 27 November 1987 from Chiang Kai Shek International Airport, on a flight to Johannesburg via Mauritius. Dawie Uys served as the captain of the flight. The Boeing 747-244B Combi is a variant of the aircraft that permits the mixing of passengers and airfreight on the main deck according to load factors on any given route and Class B cargo
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    Tuninter Flight 1153

    Tuninter Flight 1153

    • Operator: Tuninter
    • Flight destination: Djerba-Zarzis Airport
    Tuninter Flight 1153 was a Tuninter Airlines flight from Bari International Airport in Bari, Italy, to Djerba-Zarzis Airport in Djerba, Tunisia. On 6 August 2005, the Tuninter ATR-72 ditched into the Mediterranean Sea about 18 miles (29 km) from the city of Palermo. Sixteen of the 39 people on board died. The accident resulted from engine fuel exhaustion due to the installation of fuel quantity indicators designed for the ATR 42, in the larger ATR 72. The Captain was Chafik Al Gharbi (Arabic: شفيق الغربي‎) and the copilot was Ali Kebaier Al-Aswad (Arabic: علي كبيّر الأسود‎). The aircraft, an ATR 72, had its fuel quantity indicator (FQI) replaced the night before the flight, but technicians inadvertently installed a FQI designed for the ATR 42, a similar but smaller airplane with smaller fuel tanks. Ground crews and the flight engineer, relying on the incorrect readings from the newly-installed FQI, loaded the aircraft with an inadequate amount of fuel for the flight. On the flight from Bari to Djerba, both engines cut out in mid-flight. The aircraft's right engine failed at 23,000 feet (7,000 metres). The aircraft began to descend to 17,000 feet, but 100 seconds after the right
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    USAir Flight 427

    USAir Flight 427

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737
    • Operator: US Airways
    • Flight destination: Pittsburgh International Airport
    USAir Flight 427 was a scheduled flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with a final destination of West Palm Beach, Florida. The flight crashed on 8 September 1994, killing everyone on board. The Boeing 737-3B7 flying the route, registered N513AU, was approaching runway 28R of Pittsburgh International Airport, located in Findlay Township, Pennsylvania. Captain Peter Germano and First Officer Charles B. "Chuck" Emmett III piloted the aircraft. At about 6,000 feet (1,830 m) and 6 miles (10 km) from the runway, the aircraft experienced a sudden loss of control and slammed into the ground in a nearly vertical nose down position in Hopewell Township, Beaver County near Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, killing all 127 passengers and 5 crew members. After the longest investigation in aviation history—more than four and a half years—the concluding statement said: The NTSB concluded that similar rudder problems caused the previously mysterious 3 March 1991 crash of United Airlines Flight 585, and the 9 June 1996 incident involving Eastwind Airlines Flight 517, both of which were Boeing 737s. As a result of the investigation, pilots were warned of and
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    USAir Flight 5050

    USAir Flight 5050

    • Aircraft type: Boeing 737 Classic
    USAir Flight 5050 was an "extra section" passenger flight to replace the regularly scheduled but cancelled flight 1846, from New York's La Guardia Airport to Charlotte International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina on September 20, 1989. Michael Martin was a new Boeing 737 captain, logging only about 140 hours in the left seat of the 737. In spite of the fact that the weather was very poor (wet with low visibility, causing the cancellation of many flights that day at La Guardia), Captain Martin permitted First Officer Constantine Kleissas to make the takeoff on a short, wet runway, even though he would be conducting his first non-supervised line takeoff in a 737, and had not conducted any takeoffs during the last 39 days. As the first officer began the takeoff on runway 31, the airplane started to drift to the left. The captain attempted to correct that drift with the use of the nosewheel tiller. Moments later, they heard a "bang" and then a rumbling noise. That was the result of the nose tire flying off its rim, after being damaged by the captain's improper use of that nosewheel steering tiller. The captain then took over control from the first officer and aborted the takeoff,
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    Vaeroy accident

    Vaeroy accident

    • Aircraft type: De Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter
    • Operator: Widerøe
    • Flight destination: Bodø Airport
    Widerøe Flight 839, also known as the Værøy Accident (Norwegian: Værøy-ulykken), was a crash into water of a de Havilland Canada DHC-6-300 Twin Otter just after take-off from Værøy Airport in Norway. The incident occurred on 12 April 1990 at 14:44, and killed all five people on board. The cause of the accident were strong winds that exceeded the structure's tolerance, causing the tail rudder and tailplane to crack so the plane became uncontrollable. Impact occurred 63 seconds after take-off and 8 seconds after the crack. The aircraft crashed into the water, and a search was conducted for several days to find the wreck. Uneven and strong winds had given the airport low regularity, and prior to take-off, wind speeds of 57 knots (106 km/h; 66 mph) had been recorded.The accident caused the airport to be permanently closed, and replaced by Værøy Heliport. The incident was investigated by the Accident Investigation Board Norway, who published their conclusions in 1991. Three years later, a new investigation was conducted, after an engineer had stated that the cause of the accident could instead have been fatigue. The second investigation came to the same conclusion as the first and all
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