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Best Animal breed of All Time

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    1
    Australian Silky Terrier

    Australian Silky Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Australian Silky Terrier is a small breed of dog of the terrier dog type. The breed was developed in Australia, although the ancestral types and breeds were from Great Britain. It is closely related to the Australian Terrier and the Yorkshire Terrier. The breed is called the Silky Terrier in North America, but is called the Australian Silky Terrier in its country of origin and in the rest of the world. The Australian Silky Terrier is a small and compact short legged terrier, 23 to 26 cm (9.1 to 10 in) at the withers, alert and active. The long silky grey and white or blue and tan coat is an identifying feature, hanging straight and parted along the back, and described as "flat, fine and glossy". All proportions and aspects of the body and head as well as desirable shades of grey and white and placement of markings are extensively described in the breed standard. The Silky Terrier should be slightly longer than tall (about one fifth longer than the height at withers). This is a dog that was historically used for hunting and killing rodents and snakes, so its body should have enough substance to fit this role. The coat requires quite a lot of regular grooming and shampooing to
    7.13
    8 votes
    2
    Bedlington Terrier

    Bedlington Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Bedlington Terrier is a breed of terrier named after the mining town of Bedlington, Northumberland in North East England. The Bedlington Terrier has been described as having the look of a lamb with the heart of a lion, partly due to the lint-textured coat, trimmed in a lamb-like cut. The dogs have blue, liver or sandy colouration, all three of which may have tan points. The breed has the greying gene (located on the G locus) which is a dominant trait, causing the coat colour to change from their birth colours of black (in blue) or dark brown (in sandy and liver) to a silvery (for blue) or mauve (for liver and sandy) colour on their bodies with a lighter coloured topknot and legs. This breed has a wedge-shaped head with almond-shaped eyes. The body shape is different from that of most terriers in construction, resembling a sighthound more than a typical terrier, which enables these dogs to gallop at great speed. However, the shoulders, upper arms and front legs are constructed differently from any other breed in that the front legs are closer together at the feet than at the elbows, creating a triangular shape when viewed from the front. This enables them to turn or pivot
    7.86
    7 votes
    3
    Australian Braford

    Australian Braford

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Australian Braford is a breed of beef cattle, developed in Queensland between 1946 and 1952 in a program to produce cattle that were resistant to cattle ticks and tolerated the heat better than some other breeds. The Braford breed originated at ‘Edengarry’ north of Rockhampton in Queensland in 1946 when the Rea Brothers introduced Brahman bulls into their Hereford breeders to help combat the effects of drought and ticks. Brafords have a small hump, loose skin and a short coat that is red and white, possessing a coat pattern similar to that of Hereford cattle. Australian Brafords may be horned or polled. The genetic background of the breed is approximately 50 per cent Hereford and 50 per cent Brahman. Brafords are mainly found in the eastern states of Australia. Braford semen has been exported into South America and South Africa. Live cattle exports have been made into Indonesia and Thailand.
    6.88
    8 votes
    4
    Saipan Jungle Fowl

    Saipan Jungle Fowl

    • Breed of: Chicken
    The Saipan Jungle Fowl is a breed of domestic chicken. The Saipan male can stand 2-3 feet tall, with tight feathering, shorter tail than most birds and as a 2-3 year old becomes very muscular and upright stature. Hens can weigh as much as 8-9lbs and roosters as much as 9-13 lbs. The Saipan Junglefowl was likely introduced to the island of Saipan by Austronesians seafarers. It is thought to have been brought into The United States of America by returning American servicemen at the end of World War II including B. W. Saylor, who wrote "The Saipan Jungle Fowl" in 1977. Although the birds encountered at that time were both domesticated and wild on Saipan, it is thought that the wild ones were feral and descended from those brought in by the original human inhabitants. An alternative theory is that they were brought in by the Japanese as occurred in other locations such as Taiwan during the Japanese colonial occupation. There were also feral junglefowl introduced to the Solomon Islands which are descended of normally proportioned, wild birds imported from Indonesia and beyond. The combination of the Comoros Island Giant Junglefowl and the domestic descendants of the Red Junglefowl
    7.14
    7 votes
    5
    Hungarian hound

    Hungarian hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Hungary
    The Transylvanian Hound is an ancient Hungarian dog breed, which was primarily used for hunting. The Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local breeds and Polish hounds. He was used in hunting wolf and bear The breed was kept by Hungarian kings and princes for hunting various game (i.e. foxes, boar, etc.). In the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct and in 1968 new efforts began to save it. The only area outside of Hungary where it exists is in Romania. The breed was developed in the Carpathian Mountains, an area rich in forests, meadows, and rivers. Thus it can be used to hunt over any type of terrain, even during frozen winters, or sultry summers. The two varieties are used for different specialised purposes. The long-legged variety is for hunting boar, stag, and lynx, while the short-legged variety is for hunting smaller burrowing animals, especially fox and hare. The breed is of medium size weighing 66-77 pounds. The limbs of this breed are well-constructed, always ready to spring. It has a short but not pointed head, with a straight nose and strong well-developed
    7.83
    6 votes
    6
    Plymouth Rock

    Plymouth Rock

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Plymouth Rock, often called simply Rocks or Barred Rocks (after their most popular color), is a chicken breed that originated in the United States. The Plymouth Rock is a dual-purpose, cold-hardy bird and therefore makes a great breed for the small farm or backyard flock owner. The Barred Rock is often called the Plymouth Rock, but this title correctly belongs to the entire breed, not just the Barred variety. The Plymouth Rock was developed in New England in the middle of the 19th century and was first exhibited as a breed in 1869. Several individuals claimed its invention, using crosses of Dominiques, Black Javas, Cochins, and perhaps Malays and Dorkings. John C. Bennett (1804–1867) has been credited with either creating or popularizing the breed. Plymouth Rocks were bred as a dual-purpose fowl, meaning that they were valued both for their meat and for the hens' egg-laying ability. The first Plymouth Rock was barred and other varieties were developed later. The breed became popular very rapidly, and in fact, until World War II, no breed was ever kept and bred as extensively in the United States as the Barred Plymouth Rock. Its popularity came from its qualities as an
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    Rottweiler

    Rottweiler

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Rottweiler is a medium to large size breed of domestic dog. The dogs were known as "Rottweil butchers' dogs" (German: Rottweiler Metzgerhund) because they were used to herd livestock and pull carts laden with butchered meat and other products to market. Some records indicate that earlier Rottweilers may have also been used for hunting, although the modern Rottweiler has a relatively low hunting instinct. The Rottweiler was employed in its traditional roles until the mid-19th century when railways replaced droving for getting livestock to market. While still used in herding, Rottweilers are now also used as search and rescue dogs, as guide dogs for the blind, as guard dogs or police dogs, and in other roles. Although a versatile breed used in recent times for many purposes, the Rottweiler is primarily one of the oldest, if not the oldest of herding breeds. A multi-faceted herding and stock protection dog, it is capable of working all kinds of livestock under a variety of conditions. The breed's history likely dates to the Roman Empire. In those times, the Roman legion traveled with working dogs to herd the cattle needed to feed the army. One route the army traveled was through
    8.80
    5 votes
    8
    American Foxhound

    American Foxhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The American Foxhound is a breed of dog that is cousin to the English Foxhound. They are scent hounds, bred to hunt foxes by scent. In 1650, Robert Brooke sailed to Crown Colony in America with his pack of hunting dogs, which were the root of several strains of American Hounds. These dogs remained in the Brooke family for nearly 300 years. George Washington received French Foxhounds, Grand Bleu de Gascogne, (which look much like an American Bluetick Coonhound) as a gift from the Marquis de Lafayette. Many of the dogs Washington kept were descended from Brooke's, and when crossed with the French hounds, helped to create the present day American Foxhound. The American Foxhound is known to originate from the states of Maryland and Virginia, and is the state dog of Virginia."Code of Virginia". 1–510. http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+1-510. Retrieved 28 March 2011. Though there has long been a rumor that the new breed was originally used for hunting Indigenous peoples of the Americas, this is not true. The breed was developed by landed gentry purely for the sport of hunting foxes. With the importation (or migration) of the red fox, Irish Foxhounds were added to the
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Azawakh

    Azawakh

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Mali
    The Azawakh is a sighthound dog breed from Africa. Morphology is very similar to that of the Middle Eastern and South Indian sight hounds, all swift, high-bred coursing hounds, although there are several obvious differences. For example, a short, flat back combined with long legs place the hips higher than the withers. The Azawakh is almond eyed and thin. It moves with a distinctly feline gait and can be found in a variety of colors as well as varying degrees of refinement, though format is basically constant. The standards call for a hound from 33 to 55 pounds (15 to 25 kg); its height is 24 to 29 inches (61 to 74 cm). The coat is very short and almost absent on the belly. Its bone structure shows clearly through the skin and musculature. Its muscles are "dry", meaning that they lie quite flat, unlike the Greyhound and Whippet. In this respect it is similar in type to the Saluki. In Africa, Azawakh are found in a variety of colors such as red, blue fawn (that is, with a lilac cast), grizzle, and, rarely, blue and black. The Azawakh in its native land also comes with various white markings including Irish marked (white collar) and particolour (mostly white). Because of this wide
    7.33
    6 votes
    10
    Wagyu

    Wagyu

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Wagyu (和牛, Wagyū, literally Japanese cow) refers to several breeds of cattle genetically predisposed to intense marbling and to producing a high percentage of oleaginous unsaturated fat. The meat from wagyu cattle is known worldwide for its marbling characteristics, increased eating quality through a naturally enhanced flavor, tenderness and juiciness, and a high market value. In several areas of Japan, beef is shipped with area names. Some examples are Kobe, Mishima, Matsusaka, Ōmi, and Sanda beef. Wagyu cattle's genetic predisposition yields a beef that contains a higher percentage of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids than typical beef. The increased marbling also improves the ratio of monounsaturated fats to saturated fats. Because of Japan's rugged terrain and isolated areas, different breeding and feeding techniques were used such as massaging or adding beer or sake to their feeding regimen. It is suggested that this was done to aid in digestion and induce hunger during humid seasons, but it appears to have no effect on the meat's flavor. Massaging may have been introduced to prevent muscle cramping on small farms in Japan where the animals did not have sufficient room to use
    9.50
    4 votes
    11
    Jersey Giant

    Jersey Giant

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Jersey Giant is a breed of chicken originating in the United States in the late 19th century by John and Thomas Black. The intent of the breed was the replace the turkey as the primary meat poultry breed. Named for their state of origin (New Jersey) and their large size. Jersey Giants are the largest purebred chicken breed. Cocks average 13 lbs. and hens 11 lbs. The Black Jersey Giants were pronounced a breed in 1922 by the American Standard of Perfection. Their lineage includes were produced by crossing Black Javas, Black Langshans, and Dark Brahmas. White Jersey Giants arrived many years later during the year 1947. The Black Jersey Giants are averaging a pound heavier than the White Jersey Giants. For a time, they raised as capons and as broilers by the meat industry, they grow much slower than today's more common meat birds, and are thus not widely used in the industry any longer. In Europe the breed fell out of favour to such an extent that they nearly became extinct, however in the mid 80's a breeder in the UK: Sam Hay in Shropshire located the last surviving trio and decided to save them. He built up some stock but was they were suffering the ill effects of inbreeding and
    8.20
    5 votes
    12
    Pekingese

    Pekingese

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Pekingese, or "Peke" (also commonly referred to as "Lion Dog" due to its resemblance to Chinese guardian lions, or "Pelchie Dog") is an ancient breed of toy dog, originating in China. The breed was favored by the Chinese Imperial court, and its name refers to the city of Beijing where the Forbidden City resides. The breed has several characteristics and health issues related to its unique appearance. Because of its desirable characteristics, the Pekingese has been part of the development of designer crossbreeds, such as the Pekeatese. The Pekingese breed is over 2000 years old and has hardly changed in all that time. One exception is that modern breeders and dog-show judges seem to prefer the long-haired type over the more-traditional spaniel-type coat. The Pekingese's flat face and large eyes are some of the breed's most obvious characteristics. The body is compact and low to the ground. Pekingese also have a muscular and durable body. The legs are noticeably bowed and restrict the Pekingese's movement. The breed's unusual rolling gait may have been deliberately developed by breeding to prevent the court dogs from wandering in ancient times. All breed standards allow all sorts
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    Shar Pei

    Shar Pei

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Shar Pei, or Chinese Shar-Pei, is a breed of dog known for its distinctive features of deep wrinkles and a blue-black tongue. The breed comes from China. The name (沙皮, pinyin: shā pí; English name probably derived from British spelling of the Cantonese equivalent, sā pèih) translates to "sand skin" and refers to the texture of its short, rough coat. As puppies, Shar Pei have numerous wrinkles, but as they mature, these wrinkles loosen and spread out as they "grow into their skin". Shar Pei were named in 1978 as one of the world's rarest dog breeds by Time magazine and the Guinness World Records, and the American Kennel Club did not recognize the breed until 1991. Small, triangular ears,and a high-set tail also give the Shar Pei a unique look. For show standard, "the tail is thick and round at the base, tapering to a fine point" (AKC standard February 28, 1998). As puppies, Shar peis are a lot more wrinkly than adults and, although some adults can be wrinklier than their puppy self, an adult pei should have wrinkles mostly on the face, a few on their shoulder and at the base of the tail. A muzzle shaped like hippopotamus (hippo). Their pigmentation resemble the Chow Chow as
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Skye Terrier

    Skye Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Skye Terrier is a breed of dog that is a long, low, hardy terrier and "one of the most endangered native dog breeds in the [United Kingdom]" according to the The Kennel Club. The Skye is double coated, with a short, soft undercoat and a hard, straight topcoat. The shorter hair of the head veils the forehead and eyes, forming a moderate beard. The ears should be well feathered and, in prick-eared examples, the hair should fall like a fringe, accenting the form, and blending with the side locks. Fawn, blue, dark or light grey, blonde, and black with black points (ears and muzzle) all occur. They may have any self colour, allowing for some shading of same colour on the body and a lighter undercoat, so long as the nose and ears are black. There is generally no further patterning on the body, but a small white spot on the chest is relatively common. Except for the shape and size of the ears, there is no significant difference nor preference given between the prick- and drop-eared types. When prick, they are medium sized, carried high on the skull and angled slightly outwards. In the drop type, the ears are set lower, are larger, and should hang flat against the head, with little or
    8.75
    4 votes
    15
    Charolais cow

    Charolais cow

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Charolais cattle (French pronunciation: [ʃaʁɔlɛ]) are a beef breed of cattle (Bos taurus) which originated in Charolais, around Charolles, in France. They are raised for their meat and are known for their composite qualities when crossed with other breeds, most notably Angus and Hereford cattle. The breed tends to be large muscled, with bulls weighing up to 1,100 kilograms (2,400 lb) and cows up to 900 kilograms (2,000 lb). The breed was introduced in the southern US as early as the 1940s. It was the first popular breed after the English breeds and Brahmans. It was known to produce beef animals that had more red meat and less fat. The breed was often crossed with English breeds. In the 1970s Charolais crossbred steers won a number of prominent steer and carcass shows particularly in Texas. The first Charolais steer to win a carcass show was at the San Antonio Livestock Show in 1971. This breed has been quite popular in the Top End of Australia, where they are used for cross breeding. It has also become popular in the southern United States, where Charolais (often crossed with other breeds) have increasingly replaced Herefords. The coat is almost pure white. The Australian and
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Yorkshire Terrier

    Yorkshire Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Yorkshire Terrier is a small dog breed of terrier type, developed in the 19th century in the county of Yorkshire, England to catch rats in clothing mills, also used for ratting or rat-baiting. The defining features of the breed are its size, 3 pounds (1.4 kg) to 7 pounds (3.2 kg), and its silky blue and tan coat. The breed is nicknamed Yorkie and is placed in the Toy Terrier section of the Terrier Group by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale and in the Toy Group or Companion Group by other kennel clubs, although all agree that the breed is a terrier. A popular companion dog, the Yorkshire Terrier has also been part of the development of other breeds, such as the Australian Silky Terrier. For adult Yorkshire Terriers, importance is placed on coat colour, quality, and texture. The hair must be glossy, fine, straight, and silky. Traditionally the coat is grown-out long and is parted down the middle of the back, but "must never impede movement." From the back of the neck to the base of the tail, the coat should be a dark gray to a steel-blue, and the hair on the tail should be a darker blue. On the head, high chest, and legs, the hair should be a bright, rich tan, darker at
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    Braekel

    Braekel

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Braekel or Brakel is one of the older European chicken breeds. Its history dates back to 1416, when it was mentioned as a successful poultry breed of the Brakel region, Belgium. Two distinct types were recognized in the past: the large type living on rich clay soil Flanders, and a light-weight type from the less fertile region, the Kempen. Due to crossbreeding between the different types, this distinction vanished, resulting in a single type. In the UK, USA and Australia, however, one can still find descendants of the Kempische Brakel under its old name 'Campine'. The Campine has evolved differently from the Brakel. The most noticeable difference is the hen-feathering of the rooster and the lower weight. The Brakel is not cultivated for its meat, but merely for its egg-laying qualities. The breed is capable of producing 180 to 200 white eggs a year. Characteristic for the Brakel is the straight banding pattern of the feathers and the uniform, plain neck colour. Several colour variants exist, with the gold and the silver variant being the most common. Old names for the breed are "The Everyday Layer", "The Grey White Neck" and "The Nuns Hen". The Brakel population declined during
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen

    Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen ( /pɛˌtiː bæˌseɪ ɡrɪˌfɒn vɑːndeɪˈɑːn/ pe-TEE bas-SAY gri-FON vahn-day-AHN), or PBGV, is a breed of dog of the scent hound type, bred to trail hares in bramble filled terrain of the Vendée district of France. Both sexes should be of similar size, range between 12.5 and 15.5 inches (32 to 40 cm) at the withers and between 25 and 40 pounds (15 to 20 kilograms). Like the other 3 Griffon Vendéen breeds: the Grand Griffon Vendéen, Briquet Griffon Vendéen, and the Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen; they are solid dogs that appear rough and unrefined yet casual. They have short legs, a sturdy bone structure, and a body that is only slightly longer than it is tall at the withers. The body length is not as extreme as that of a basset hound or dachshund. The dogs have a tousled appearance, with a harsh double coat that is both long and rough.The hair on the face and legs may be softer than body hair. The fur on the face resembles a beard and moustache. They usually have very long eyelashes. The skull is domed, with drop, oval ears like many hounds share, though dogs tend to have higher domes than bitches. The ears are set low and hanging, and if stretched out
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Derbyshire Redcap

    Derbyshire Redcap

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Derbyshire Redcap is a breed of chicken originating in the English county of Derbyshire. The name "Redcap" derives from the breed's unusually large Rose-type comb. British breed standards dictate a length of more than 7 centimeters (3 inches) of length for a Redcap comb. It is covered in small, fleshy points, and has a distinct spike pointing backwards called a "leader". Combs, wattles and earlobes are all ideally bright red. Redcaps are classified as a light fowl, with roosters weighing approximately 3.4 kilos (7.5 pounds), and hens 2.75 kilos (6 pounds). Redcaps can be differentiated from similar looking breeds, especially the more popular Hamburgs, by their red earlobes and larger comb. Beaks are horn colored. Combs which hang to either side of the face, white earlobes, or a lack of points on the comb are undesirable traits according to the breed standards, and result in disqualification from poultry shows. The breed appears in a single variety of plumage, with various dark hues of red, brown and black. Roosters display a greater diversity of color, but both males and females have black tails and a crescent shape of black on the edge of most body feathers. Derbyshire Redcaps
    8.25
    4 votes
    20
    Norwegian Elkhound

    Norwegian Elkhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Norway
    The Norwegian Elkhound is one of the ancient Northern Spitz-type breed of dog and is the National Dog of Norway. The Elkhound has served as a hunter, guardian, herder, and defender. In a land of subzero temperatures, deep snow, thick forests, and rugged mountains, only the hardiest of the breeds could evolve to perform the variety of jobs at which the Elkhound excels. It's known for its courage in tracking and hunting moose and other large game, such as bear or wolf. The Norwegian Elkhound was first presented at a dog exhibition in Norway in 1877. The AKC breed name "Norwegian Elkhound" is a direct translation from its original Norwegian name "Norsk Elghund," meaning "Norwegian moose dog." The breed's goal in the hunt is to independently track down and hold the moose at bay — jumping in and out toward the moose, distracting its attention, while signaling to the hunters by barking very loudly — until the hunter who follows the sound can arrive to shoot it. The dog will only bark while the moose is stationary, but it can also slowly drive the moose towards shooters lying in wait. The Norwegian Elkhound is also used on a leash; in this mode of hunting the dog shows the hunter the
    8.25
    4 votes
    21
    Neapolitan Mastiff

    Neapolitan Mastiff

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Neapolitan Mastiff, Italian Mastiff, (Italian: Mastino Napoletano) is a large, ancient dog breed. This massive breed is often used as a guard and defender of family and property due to their protective instincts and their fearsome appearance. According to American Kennel Club (AKC) standards, male Neapolitan Mastiffs should measure 26–31 inches (66–79 cm) at the withers, weigh 130–155 pounds (60-70 kg), while females should measure 24–29 inches (61–74 cm) and weigh 110–130 pounds (50–60 kg). Body length should be 10–15% greater than height. The Neapolitan Mastiff is fearless and extremely protective of its home and family. They prefer to be with their family and to remain in and around the home at all times. The Neapolitan Mastiff rarely barks unless under provocation, renowned for sneaking up on intruders as opposed to first alerting them of its presence. Neopolitan Mastiffs, as a breed, are extremely intelligent dogs with a tendency to be independent thinkers. They learn quickly, which is both good and bad, since this guardian breed needs extensive proper socialization to learn to accept strangers, especially within the home; without proper early socialization and training,
    6.17
    6 votes
    22
    Havanese

    Havanese

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Cuba
    The Havanese, a breed of Bichon type, is the national dog of Cuba, developed from the now extinct Blanquito de la Habana ("little white dog of Havana"). The Blanquito descended from the also now extinct Bichon Tenerife, which was introduced to the Canary Islands by the Cubans. It is believed that the Blanquito was eventually cross-bred with other Bichon types, including the Poodle, to create what is now known as the Havanese. Sometimes referred to as "Havana Silk Dogs," this was originally another name for the Blanquito de la Habana. The Havanese is small in size and sturdy in structure with a tail carried over its back and ears that drop and fold. The coat is abundant, long, and silky and comes in all colors. The Havanese has a spirited personality and a curious disposition, and is notable for its springy gait, a characteristic that distinguishes the breed from all others. The Havanese is considered an ideal family pet and a true companion dog. They are highly adaptable to almost any environment, and their only desire is to be with their human companions. Because of their strong social needs, Havanese will not thrive in an environment where they are isolated for several hours each
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Belgian Bearded d'Anvers

    Belgian Bearded d'Anvers

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Bearded d'Anvers is a breed of bantam chicken from Belgium. Also called the Antwerp Belgian, both names refer to the breed's origin in Antwerp (the French version being Anvers). The d'Anvers is a true bantam, having no large counterpart from which it was miniaturized. Males weigh 740 grams (26 ounces), and hens weigh 625 grams (22 ounces). The Bearded d'Anvers is closely related to, and may the be the predecessor of, the Belgian Bearded d'Uccle. The exact time of origin for the breed is unknown, but it is likely that it has existed since at least the 17th century. It is probably a descendant of one of the obscure "basket bantams" of Oceania and the Pacific collected by the Dutch. Specimen skins of the ancient Moa Pakeke of Marquesas, the Koro Sea and Easter Island are very similar to the dAnvers. By the middle of the 19th century, several color varieties were in development. The early 20th century saw a considerable surge in interest by breeders, and it was exported to the U.S. and other places abroad in the first of that century. It was first accepted in to the Standard of Perfection of the American Poultry Association in 1949. Also accepted by the American Bantam Association,
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Border Collie

    Border Collie

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Border Collie is a herding dog breed developed in the Anglo-Scottish border region for herding livestock, especially sheep. Typically extremely energetic, acrobatic, and athletic, they frequently compete with great success in dog sports, in addition to their success in sheepdog trials, and are often cited as the most intelligent of all dogs. In January 2011, a Border Collie was reported to have learned 1,022 words, and acts consequently to human citation of those words. The Border Collie is descended from landrace collies, a type found widely in the British Isles. The name for the breed came from its probable place of origin along the Scottish English borders. Mention of the "Collie" or "Colley" type first appeared toward the end of the 19th century, although the word "collie" is older than this and has its origin in Lowland Scots dialects. Many of the best Border Collies today can be traced back to a dog known as Old Hemp. In 1915, James Reid, Secretary of the International Sheep Dog Society (ISDS) in the United Kingdom first used the term "Border Collie" to distinguish those dogs registered by the ISDS from the Kennel Club's Collie (or Scotch Collie, including the Rough
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    German Pinscher

    German Pinscher

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The German Pinscher (original name Deutscher Pinscher, FCI No. 184) is a medium-sized, breed of dog, a Pinscher type that originated in Germany. The breed is included in the origins of the Dobermann, the Miniature Pinscher, the Affenpinscher, the Standard Schnauzer (and by extension the Miniature Schnauzer and Giant Schnauzer). The breed is rising in numbers in the U.S., mainly due to their full acceptance to AKC in 2003. In Australia the breed is established with a rise in popularity becoming evident. The German Pinscher is a moderately small sized dog, usually weighing between 25-35 pounds and typically 17-20 inches in height, with a short coat. Colors for this breed include black and rust, red, fawn, and blue and tan. For all countries where the Fédération Cynologique Internationale standard applies, only black and rust and solid red are allowed colors. Colors that became extinct during the world wars of the twentieth century include solid black, and salt-and-pepper, and harlequin. German Pinschers customarily have their tails docked and ears cropped, as has been done for over 200 years, in countries where the procedures are legal. Historically, tail docking was thought to
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Black and Tan Coonhound

    Black and Tan Coonhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Black and Tan Coonhound is a breed of dog used principally for trailing and treeing raccoon. It's a cross between the Bloodhound, and the Black and Tan Virginia Foxhound. The Black and Tan Coonhound runs its game entirely by scent. The courage of the Coonhound also make it proficient on the hunt for deer, bear, cougar and other big game, although many US states are restricting the hunting of antlered animals with dogs. The general impression is that of power, agility and alertness, with the ability to cover ground swiftly with powerful rhythmic strides. Each hound has its own distinctive voice which is often recognizable to its owners from great distance. The breed standard for Black and Tan Coonhounds is as follows: Generally healthy, but there is some risk of hip dysplasia, ear cancer and other ear infections, and eye problems. Not the prototypical house dog, the Black and Tan Coonhound, nonetheless, makes an exemplary pet. It is mellow, amiable, calm, and obtrusive indoors. Outdoors, its strong hunting instincts take over, and it can be difficult to turn from a track after it starts trailing. As befitting a dog with its heritage, it is strong, independent, and stubborn. The
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Pyrenean Shepherd

    Pyrenean Shepherd

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Pyrenean Shepherd is a medium-small breed of dog native to the Pyrenees mountains in southern France and northern Spain, bred since at least medieval times for herding livestock, especially sheep. It worked as an active herder together with the Great Pyrenees, another mountain dog, which acted as the flock's guardian. The Pyrenean Shepherd is the smallest of the French herding dogs. The breed comes in two varieties: Rough-faced and smooth-Faced. Rough-faced males are 15 ½ (39 cm) to 18 ½ (47 cm) inches at the withers, and rough-faced females are 15 (38 cm) to 18 (46 cm) inches. Smooth-faced males are 15 ½ (39 cm) to 21 (53 cm) inches at the withers, and smooth-faced females are 15 ½ (39 cm) to 20 ½ (52 cm) inches at the withers. The weight is between 15-32 lbs (7–15 kg), aiming for lithe and muscular, never fat. The head is of small proportions in comparison to the dog, with a rather flat skull, and a somewhat short, triangular muzzle. The face is expressive and intelligent, with dark eyes, except in the case of merles or slate grey coat colour. Traditionally the dog's ears are cropped. If natural, the Pyrenean Shepherd should have semi-prick or rose ears. Naturally prick ears
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Rhodesian Ridgeback

    Rhodesian Ridgeback

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Rhodesia
    The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a dog breed developed in Southern Africa. Its European forebears can be traced to the early pioneers of the Cape Colony of southern Africa, who crossed their dogs with the semi-domesticated, ridged hunting dogs of the Khoikhoi. In the earlier parts of its history, the Rhodesian Ridgeback has also been known as Van Rooyen's Lion Dog, the African Lion Hound or African Lion Dog—Simba Inja in Ndebele, Shumba Imbwa in Shona—because of its ability to distract a lion while awaiting its master to make the kill. The original breed standard was drafted by F.R. Barnes, in Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), in 1922. Based on that of the Dalmatian, the standard was approved by the South African Kennel Union in 1926. The Khoikhoi people occupied the Cape Peninsula during the mid 17th century when the Dutch began trading with the area and set up a trading station. These people had a dog which was used for hunting; described as ugly, but noted for its ferocity when acting as a guard dog. This dog measured 18 inches (46 cm) at the withers, with a lean but muscular frame. The ears have been described both as erect and hanging, but the most distinctive feature was
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Smooth Collie

    Smooth Collie

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Smooth Collie is a breed of dog developed originally for herding. It is a short-coated version of the Rough Collie of Lassie fame. Some breed organisations consider the smooth-coat and rough-coat dogs to be variations of the same breed. The early history of the Smooth Collie, like that of many dog breeds, is largely a matter of speculation. The most common view of the breed is that they are descended from a population of shepherds' dogs brought to Scotland by the Romans around the 5th century. Even the origin of the breed's name is unclear, variously claimed to describe the early shepherd dog's dark colour ("coaly"), or derived from the name of a breed of sheep with black faces once commonly kept in Scotland ("Colley"), or derived from an Anglo-Saxon word meaning "useful." The word may could also trace to Gaelic or/and Irish - in which the words for "doggie" are, respectively, càilean and cóilean. This would be more consistent with the breed's origin in the Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlands than an Anglo-Saxon term. The modern history of both the Smooth and Rough Collie began in the reign of Queen Victoria, who became interested in the shepherds' dogs while at Balmoral Castle
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Airedale Terrier

    Airedale Terrier

    • Examples: Kenmare Sorceress
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Airedale Terrier (often shortened to "Airedale") is a breed of the terrier type that originated in Airedale, a geographic area in Yorkshire, England. It is traditionally called the "King of Terriers" because it is the largest of the terrier breeds. Bred from a Black and Tan Terrier and an Otterhound, the breed has also been called the Waterside Terrier, because it was bred originally to hunt otters in and around the valleys of the River Aire which runs through Airedale. In the United Kingdom this breed has also been used as a police dog. The Airedale is the largest of the British Terriers. They weigh 25–30 kilograms (55–66 lb) and have a height at the withers of 58–61 centimetres (23–24 in) for dogs, with females slightly smaller. The American Kennel Club standard specifies a smaller dog. Larger ADTs, up to 55 kilograms (120 lb) can be found in the North America. They are often called "Oorangs." This was the name of a kennel in Ohio in the early 1900s. The Airedale has a medium-length black and tan coat with a harsh topcoat and a soft undercoat. They are an alert and energetic breed, "not aggressive but fearless." It has been claimed that the large "hunting" type or Oorang
    6.00
    6 votes
    31
    Bichon Frisé

    Bichon Frisé

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    A Bichon Frisé (/ˈbiʃɒn ˈfriz/ or /ˈbiʃɒn frɪˈzeɪ/; French, meaning curly white lap dog), is a small breed of dog of the Bichon type. They are popular pets, similar in appearance to but larger than the Maltese. The Bichon Frise descended from the Barbet or Water Spaniel and the Standard Poodle. The word bichon comes from Middle French bichon ("small long-haired dog"), a diminutive of Old French biche ("bitch, female dog"), from Old English bicce ("bitch, female dog"), related to Old Norse bikkja ("female dog") and German Betze ("female dog"). Some speculate the origin of bichon to be the result of the apheresis, or shortening, of the word barbichon ("small poodle"), a derivative of barbiche ("shaggy dog"); however, this is unlikely, if not impossible, since the word bichon (attested 1588) is older than barbichon (attested 1694). The Bichons were divided into four categories: the Bichon Maltese, the Bichon Bolognaise, the Bichon Havanese and the Bichon Tenerife. All originated in the Mediterranean area. Because of their merry disposition, they traveled much and were often used as barter by sailors as they moved from continent to continent. The dogs found early success in Spain and
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Silkie

    Silkie

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: China
    The Silkie (sometimes incorrectly spelled Silky) is a breed of chicken named for its atypically fluffy plumage, which is said to feel like silk. The breed has several other unusual qualities, such as dark blue flesh and bones, blue earlobes, and five toes on each foot (most chickens only have four). They are often exhibited in poultry shows, and come in several colors (red, gold, blue, black, white, and partridge). In addition to their distinctive physical characteristics, Silkies are well known for their calm, friendly temperament. Among the most docile of poultry, Silkies are considered an ideal pet. Hens are also exceptionally broody, and make good mothers. Though they are fair layers themselves, laying about three eggs a week, they are commonly used to hatch eggs from other breeds and bird species. Silkies most likely originated in China, but Southeast Asia is also sometimes proposed. The first western account of the breed comes from Marco Polo, who mentioned chickens with fur-like plumage in his Asian travelogues in the 13th century. The Renaissance author Ulisse Aldrovandi also spoke of chickens akin to Silkies. Today, the breed is recognized for exhibition, and is fairly
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Belgian Bearded d'Uccle

    Belgian Bearded d'Uccle

    • Breed of: Chicken
    The Belgian Bearded d'Uccle (pronounced dew-clay), or Barbu D'Uccle in French, is a breed of bantam chicken originating from the town of Uccle on the outskirts of Brussels, Belgium. The bird is frequently referred to as the Mille Fleur in the U.S., after the most common color variation (which is French for "thousand flowers"). It also has a related variant that is tailless, called the Belgian d'Everberg. The Breed came into being in the early 19th Century from Belgium, and was created by a Belgian man by the name of Michael Van Gelder. Most sources maintain that it originated from crosses of the Antwerp Belgian and the sabelpoot which is known today as the Booted Bantam, and raised as a closely related but separated breed. Barbu D'Uccles have a low posture, a short but well developed neck and a rather open tail-feathering. D'Uccles have a single comb, different from its rose-combed relative the d'Anvers. The weight of a cock is around 26 ounces and a hen weighs roughly 22 ounces. The Belgian Bearded D'Uccles comes in many color variations such as: Mille Fleur, Porcelain, Black mottled, Buff mottled, Blue mottled, Blue Mille Fleur, Buff Colombian, Brown red, Red, White, Black, Buff,
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    Naked Neck

    Naked Neck

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Romania
    The Naked Neck is a breed of chicken that is naturally devoid of feathers on its neck and vent. The breed is also called the Transylvanian Naked Neck, as well as the Turken. Originally from Central Europe, it originated in Hungary and was largely developed in Germany. The name "Turken" arose from the mistaken idea that the bird was a hybrid of a chicken and the domestic turkey. Naked Necks are fairly common in Europe today, but are rare in North America. The trait for a naked neck is a dominant one controlled by one gene and is fairly easy to introduce into other breeds, however these are hybrids rather than true Naked Necks, which is a breed recognized by the American Poultry Association since 1965, it was introduced in the Britain in the 1920s. There are other breeds of naked necked chicken, such as the French naked neck, which is often confused with the Transylvanian, and the naked necked gamefowl. Despite its highly unusual appearance, the breed is not particularly known as an exhibition bird, and is a dual-purpose utility chicken. They lay a respectable number of light brown eggs, and are considered desirable for meat production because they need less plucking and they have a
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Sebright

    Sebright

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Sebright is a breed of chicken named after its developer, Sir John Saunders Sebright. The Sebright is one of the oldest recorded British 'true' bantam (meaning it is a miniature bird with no corresponding large fowl to which it is related), created in the 19th century through a selective breeding program designed to produce an ornamental breed. The first poultry breed to have its own specialist club for enthusiasts, Sebrights were admitted to poultry exhibition standards not long after their establishment. Today, they are among the most popular of bantam breeds. Despite their popularity, Sebrights are often difficult to breed, and the inheritance of certain unique characteristics the breed carries has been studied scientifically. As a largely ornamental chicken, they lay tiny, white eggs and are not kept for meat production. Sir John Saunders Sebright (1767–1846) was the 7th Sebright Baronet, and a Member of Parliament for Hertfordshire . In addition to breeding chickens, cattle and other animals, Sir John wrote several influential pamphlets on animal keeping and breeding: The Art of Improving the Breeds of Domestic Animals (1809), Observations upon Hawking (1826), and
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Buckeye

    Buckeye

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Buckeye is a breed of chicken originating in the U.S. state of Ohio. Created in the late 19th century, Buckeyes are the only breed of American chicken known to have been created by a woman, and the only one to have a small "pea" comb. As of 2008, Buckeyes are extremely rare, and breed conservation organizations have recognized them as critically endangered. The breed's name is derived from Ohio's nickname of "Buckeye state", and their mahogany color is said ideally to resemble the seeds of the Ohio Buckeye plant (Aesculus glabra). They are a dual-purpose chicken that have a decent laying ability and strong meat production characteristics. Buckeyes are yellow skinned chickens who lay brown eggs. The Buckeye was first bred and developed in 1896, by a Warren, Ohio resident named Nettie Metcalf. They are the only American breed of chicken known to have been developed by a woman, despite the fact that women were customarily given charge of the household poultry flock throughout much of U.S. history. Metcalf crossbred Barred Plymouth Rocks, Buff Cochins, and some black breasted red games to produce the Buckeye. Her goal was a functional breed that could produce well in the bitter
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Galloway cattle

    Galloway cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    • Place of origin: Galloway
    The Galloway is one of the world's longest established breeds of beef cattle, named after the Galloway region of Scotland, where it originated. It is now found in many parts of the world. The Galloway was introduced in Canada in 1853, first registered in 1872, and the first Galloway registry was introduced in the USA in 1882. The Galloway is naturally hornless, and instead of horns has a bone knob at the top of its skull called the poll. This breed's shaggy coat has both a thick, woolly undercoat for warmth and stiffer guard hairs that help shed water, making them well adapted to harsher climates. The Galloway breed comes from the cattle native to an entire region of Scotland, and originally there was much variation within this breed, including many different colours and patterns. The original Galloway herdbook only registered black cattle, but the recessive gene for red colour persisted in the population, and eventually dun Galloways were also allowed into the herdbook. As a result, although black is still the most common colour for Galloways, they can also be red and several shades of dun. There are several varieties of the Galloway maintained as consistent strains or breeds. In
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Scottish Terrier

    Scottish Terrier

    • Examples: Fala
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog. Initially one of the highland breeds of Terrier that were grouped under the name of Skye Terrier, it is one of five breeds of terrier that originated in Scotland, the other four being the modern Skye, Cairn, Dandie Dinmont, and West Highland White Terrier. They are an independent and rugged breed with a wiry outer coat and a soft dense undercoat. The First Earl of Dumbarton nicknamed the breed "the diehard." The modern breed is said to be able to trace its lineage back to a single female, named Splinter II. They are a small breed of Terrier with a distinctive shape and have had many roles in popular culture. They have been owned by a variety of celebrities, including the 32nd President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose Scottie "Fala" is included with FDR in a statue in Washington, DC, as well as the 43rd President George W. Bush. They are also well known for being a playing piece in the board game Monopoly. Described as a territorial, feisty dog, they can make a good watchdog and tend to be very loyal to their family. Healthwise, Scottish Terriers can be
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Wyandotte

    Wyandotte

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Wyandotte is a breed of chicken originating in the United States. The first examples of the breed appeared in 1870s. Wyandottes are a docile, dual-purpose breed kept for their brown eggs and for meat. They appear in a wide variety of color patterns, and are popular show birds. The Wyandotte lays pale brown or tan eggs and usually has a white ring of feathers around its neck. Wyandotte hens are devoted mothers. The Wyandotte is a medium sized bird with a rose comb and clean legs. The chicken feathers are broad and loosely fitting. The area around the vent is very fluffy. The legs are yellow, although some silver laced may have grey. There are eight colors recognized by the APA (American Poultry Association) which are golden laced, silver laced, white, black, buff, Columbian, partridge and silver penciled. In bantams there is also buff Columbian, black breasted red, blue red, lemon blue, barred,brown red, and birchen that are recognized by the American Bantam Association. However, there are more colors than that which are either recognised by similar organisations in other countries like the PCGB (Poultry Club of Great Britain). These colors include blue laced red and buff laced.
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    British White

    British White

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The British White is a naturally polled British cattle breed, white with black or red points, used mainly for beef. It has a confirmed history dating back to the 17th century, and may be derived from similar cattle kept in parks for many centuries before that. The British White has shortish white hair, and has dark points – usually black, but sometimes red. The coloured points include the ears, feet, eyelids, nose and often even teats. It is naturally polled (hornless), medium-sized and compactly built. There may be some coloured spots on the body fur, and the skin beneath the fur is usually coloured (grey or reddish), or pink with coloured spots. The colour-pointed pattern is found in many unrelated cattle breeds throughout the world – it is an extreme pale form of the similarly widespread colour-sided or lineback pattern. The red-pointed variant shows in about two percent of British Whites, but since red colouration is genetically recessive to black in cattle, many of the black-pointed animals also carry the red allele. The colour-pointed pattern shows strongly in crosses with other breeds, often with additional dark spotting if the other parent was solid-coloured. As in other
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Rhode Island White

    Rhode Island White

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Rhode Island White is a breed of chicken originating in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Despite their very similar names and shared place of origin, the Rhode Island White is a distinct breed from the Rhode Island Red. However, Rhode Island Reds and Whites can be bred together to create Red Sex Link hybrid chickens, such as the ISA Brown. Rhode Island Whites arose from the work of J. Alonzo Jocoy of Peacedale, Rhode Island, which began in 1888. Developed through crosses of Partridge Cochins, White Wyandottes, and the rose comb type of White Leghorn, it was solidified as a breed by 1903. It was first accepted in to the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection in 1922. Moderately popular up until the 1960s, it is now a relatively rare fowl. It is listed on the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy as a breed to watch, with less than 3,000 birds known to have existed circa 2003. Like most standard breeds, it also appears in a bantam variety. Rhode Island Whites are a dual-purpose fowl suitable for both meat and egg production. Males weigh 8.5 pounds (3.9 kilos) and hens weigh 6.5 pounds (3 kilos). They have a single variety, with pure white plumage, red wattles and
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Australian Charbray

    Australian Charbray

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Australian Charbray is a beef breed of cattle that is the result of the blending of two breeds, the Charolais and the Brahman. The Australian Charbray is within the range of 75% and 25% Charolais and Brahman, either way. The hump of the Brahman is almost non-existent, but the loose skin and enlarged dewlap are indications of the Bos indicus blood in this breed. The Charbray is a large breed that is heavily muscled in the loin and quarters. They have been well accepted in those areas where cattle carrying at least some Brahman breeding are desired because of hot and humid conditions. An Australian Charbray is cream to light red coloured with very good growth rates on their calves. The calves are generally light tan when born but may lighten to a creamy white in a few weeks. The Charbray bull is structurally sound and has the ability to travel the distances required of bulls in hot humid environments. They have been selected for clean, tight sheaths, fertility and early testicular development. The Charbray female is also early maturing, reaching puberty at 14–17 months and calving at or near two years of age with rapid rebreeding and good milk production. The Australian Charbrays
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Beef Shorthorn

    Beef Shorthorn

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Beef Shorthorn breed of cattle was developed from the Shorthorn breed in England and Scotland around 1820. The Shorthorn was originally developed as a dual-purpose breed, suitable for both dairy and beef production. However, different breeders opted to concentrate on one purpose rather than the other, and in 1958, the beef breeders started their own section of the herdbook. Since then, the Beef Shorthorns have been developed as a separate breed to the Dairy Shorthorns. By the early 1970s, the Beef Shorthorn breeders were concerned their cattle were too small and lacked muscle, especially when compared with the continental breeds of cattle, such as the Charolais or Limousin - that were starting to be introduced to the UK. To help remedy this, in 1976, the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society sanctioned the introduction of Maine-Anjou blood into the breed. The Maine-Anjou breed, developed in France, was descended from the same Durham cattle as the Shorthorn. The decision to introduce Maine-Anjou blood into the Beef Shorthorn breed was very controversial at the time, but most breeders now acknowledge it was a necessary step which saved the breed from irrelevance. The herd book was closed
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Booted Bantam

    Booted Bantam

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Booted Bantam, also called the Dutch Booted Bantam, is a bantam breed of chicken. Its name is derived from the bird's extravagant feathering on the feet and hock joints, which are called vulture hocks or "sabels" in Dutch. With no large fowl counterpart from which it was miniaturized, the Booted is one of the true bantams. Males usually weigh in at around 850 grams (30 ounces) and females 750 grams (27 ounces). American standards dictate a smaller ideal size of 740 grams (26 ounces) for males, and 625 (22 ounces) for females. Booted Bantams are angular birds with profuse plumage. They have broad backs, breasts carried well forward, and relatively large, downward-pointing wings following the line of the vulture hocks. They do not quite reach the floor though. Booted Bantams have a single upright comb with five points, horn-colored beaks, red wattles, and red earlobes. Almost exclusively an exhibition chicken raised by poultry fanciers, they appear in more than a twenty colour varieties. Colours accepted in shows include: Barred, Black, Blue, Buff, Cuckoo, Columbian, Gray, Golden Neck, Millefleur (the most common), Mottled, Partridge, Lavender, Lemon Millefleur, Porcelain, Self
    6.40
    5 votes
    45
    Faverolles

    Faverolles

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    The Faverolles is a French breed of chicken. The breed was developed in the 1860s in north-central France, in the vicinity of the villages of Houdan and Faverolles. The breed was given the name of the latter village and, therefore, the singular is also Faverolles, not Faverolle. Faverolles were originally bred in France as a utility fowl, used for both eggs and meat but are now primarily raised for exhibition. When Faverolles reached the UK in 1886, the breed was further altered to meet exhibition standards - British breeders developed a type of Faverolles which possessed longer, higher raised tail feathers than their German and French Cousins. Faverolles are classified as a heavy breed and have a beard, muffs, feathered feet and five toes per foot, rather than the usual four. Faverolles are well adapted both to confinement or free range. When battery cages began to be used at the very beginning of the twentieth century, Faverolles tolerated the close confinement better than the Houdan breed. Thus, the Faverolles was the primary breed which produced eggs for the Paris market during the early part of the century. Although primarily kept today as an ornamental and exhibition breed,
    6.40
    5 votes
    46
    Black Russian Terrier

    Black Russian Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Russia
    The Black Russian Terrier (Russian: Чёрный терьер), abbreviated as BRT, or Stalin's dog (Sobaka Stalina) is a breed of dog, developed to serve as guard dog and police dog. It is rare outside the countries of the former Soviet Union but beginning to be formally recognized elsewhere: in July 2004, for instance, it became one of the AKC's recognized breeds due to the efforts of Trident Kennels now located in Oregon. Despite its name, the Black Russian Terrier is not a true terrier: it is believed that about twenty breeds were used in its development, including the Airedale, the Giant Schnauzer, the Rottweiler, the Newfoundland, the Caucasian Ovtcharka and the now extinct Moscow Water Dog. The Black Russian Terrier gives the impression of great strength, athleticism, and courage. It should be rustic (but not coarse) in appearance, and should not look as though its coat is sculpted or trimmed. It should never appear to lack substance or be weak in any way. The coat is a double coat with a coarse outer guard hair over a softer undercoat. The coat is hard and dense, never soft, woolly, silky or frizzy. It should be between 5 to 15 cm (2-6 inches) [Standard #327, FCI, 2010] in length. It
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Plott Hound

    Plott Hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Plott Hound is a large scent hound, originally bred for hunting boar. The Plott Hound is one of the least known breeds of dog in the United States, even though they are the state dog of North Carolina. The Plott Hound should be athletic, muscular, and agile in appearance. It should be neither low-set and heavy, nor leggy and light: it has medium build. Its expression should be one of intelligence, confidence, and determination. Its skin should not be baggy like that of a Bloodhound. The Plott is a strongly built yet moderate hound, with a distinct brindle-colored coat. Their appearance suggests the capacity for speed, stamina and endurance. The Plott may have an identification mark on the hound used to identify the dog when out hunting. Such a mark is not penalized in conformation shows. The Plott Hound's fur should be fine to medium in texture, short or medium in length, and have a smooth and glossy appearance. According to the National Plott Hound Association, the dog's fur should be brindled. Brindled is defined as "Finely streaked or striped effect or pattern of black or tan hairs with hairs of a lighter or darker background color. Shades of colors accepted: yellow brindle,
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Wire Hair Fox Terrier

    Wire Hair Fox Terrier

    • Examples: Skippy
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The wire fox terrier is a breed of dog, one of many terrier breeds. It is a fox terrier, and although it bears a resemblance to the smooth fox terrier, they are believed to have been developed separately. The wire fox terrier is a sturdy, balanced dog weighing between 7 and 9.5 kg (15 and 21 lb). It should not be more than 15 1/2 in (39.37 cm) in height. Its rough, broken coat is distinctive. Coat color consists of a predominant white base with brown markings of the face and ears, and usually a black saddle or large splotch of color; there may be other black or brown markings on the body. Two of the wire fox terrier's most distinctive traits are its energy and intelligence. It has a low threshold for boredom and requires stimulation, exercise and attention. The wire fox terrier is a companion animal that requires near-constant attention. Most of them enjoy swimming. The dog should be alert, quick and ready to respond swiftly with enthusiasm. However, they should also be friendly, communicative, and playful if they receive the proper care and exercise. Bred to be independent thinkers, they are capable of tactical maneuvering for vermin and other sport. Often, wire fox terriers are
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    La Flèche

    La Flèche

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    La Flèche is a very rare breed of chicken originating in France in the area of Le Mans, where this chicken is still famous for its meat. Their main distinguishing feature is their unusual V-shaped comb. They are of medium size, with males usually weighing between 8 and 10 lb (3.6 to 4.5 kg) and females weighing between 6 and 8 lb (2.7 to 3.6 kg). They have white eggs. They are usually used as ornamental birds, but still are appreciated in high-level restaurants in France for its fine meat.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Buttercup

    Buttercup

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Sicilian Buttercup is a breed of domestic chicken from the island of Sicily. The breed was imported to the United States in the 19th century, and to Britain and Australia early in the 20th century. It derives from the indigenous Siciliana breed of Sicily, but long separation from the original stock has led to marked differences between the two. The Siciliana breed of Sicily appears to derive from ancient inter-breeding of local birds with North African stock such as the rose-combed Berbera breed or the Tripolitana described by Tucci. These birds may have been similar to the "Gallus turcicus" described by Ulisse Aldrovandi in 1600. Similar chickens are depicted in 16th-century paintings in the Vatican Museums and the Galleria Borghese in Rome, and in Florence and Paris. In about 1863 or 1877, a certain Cephas Dawes of Dedham, Mass, captain of the Frutiere, was loading oranges in Sicily and bought a number of chickens to provide meat on his homeward journey. Some of these continued to lay well during the voyage, and were kept for eggs instead. Some of them were later sold to one C. Carroll Loring, also of Dedham, who became the first breeder of what would become the Sicilian
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Sloughi

    Sloughi

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Morocco
    The Sloughi ( /ˈsluːɡi/) is a North African breed of dog, specifically a member of the sighthound family. It is found in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. Sloughis are likely closely related to the Azawakh, but not to the Saluki . The Sloughi belongs to the Sighthound family. In appearance, it is a short-haired, middle-sized, strong sighthound with drooping ears. Its expression is often described to be melancholy. Its muscular system is "dry", that is, the Sloughi has flat and long muscles, which must not be as brawny as those of Greyhounds or Whippets, even when in excellent physical condition. Its back is nearly horizontal (the lumbar region must be slightly vaulted). It has a moderate angulation and a tucked up underline. The Sloughi's eyes are ideally dark brown, though sometimes of amber colour. Its coat colour varies from light-sand, to red-sand, red- or mahogany with or without brindling, black mantle, black mask, black ears. According to the standard, a Sloughi may only have a small white patch on its chest. Extensive white markings and parti-colored coats are not allowed. The Sloughi's gait is feather-light, with a moderate and energy-efficient stride. The Sloughi's
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Bull Terrier (Miniature)

    Bull Terrier (Miniature)

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Bull Terrier (Miniature) is a breed with origins in the English White Terrier, the Dalmatian and the Bulldog. The first existence is documented 1872 in The Dogs of British Island. Miniature Bull Terriers have short, fine, and glossy coats that are very close to the skin, like the Bull Terriers. They are accepted in the ring to be white, white with another color, or fully colored. However, like the Standards, any blue or liver colored coats are undesirable. These dogs require minimal grooming. In the early 1900s, the difference between the breeds was determined by the dog's weight. However, this led to Miniature Bull Terriers becoming so small and fine that they looked more like a Chihuahua than a Bull Terrier. So, in the 1970s, the weight limit was replaced with a height limit of under fourteen inches. They are usually no smaller than ten inches. According to the AKC, miniature bull terriers weight must be proportionate to its height. However, they tend to range anywhere from 20–35 lbs. The Miniature Bull Terriers have a very bold build. They have very muscular shoulders and a full body. Like the Bull Terrier, they have a head described as "egg-shaped." It is flat on top with a
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    New Hampshire

    New Hampshire

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The New Hampshire breed of chicken originated in the state of New Hampshire in the United States. Poultry farmers, starting with Rhode Island Reds and performing generation after generation of selective breeding, intensified the characteristics of early maturity, rapid full feathering, and production of large brown eggs. The mature birds are a rich chestnut red, of a somewhat lighter and more even shade than the Rhode Island Reds. The baby chicks are also a lighter red. A dual purpose chicken, selected more for meat production than egg production. Medium heavy in weight, it dresses a nice, plump carcass as either a broiler or a roaster. New Hampshires are a relatively new breed, having been admitted to the Standard in 1935. They represent a specialized selection out of the Rhode Island Red breed. By intensive selection for rapid growth, fast feathering, early maturity and vigor, a different breed gradually emerged. This took place in the New England states, chiefly in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, from which it takes its name. They possess a deep, broad body, grow feathers very rapidly, are prone to go broody and make good mothers. Most pin feathers are a reddish buff in color
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Pyrenean Mountain Dog

    Pyrenean Mountain Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Spain
    The Pyrenean Mountain Dog, known as the Great Pyrenees in North America, is a large breed of dog used as a livestock guardian dog. It should not be confused with the Pyrenean Mastiff. The Great Pyrenees is a very old breed that has been used for hundreds of years by shepherds, including those of the Basque people, who inhabit parts of the region in and around the Pyrenees Mountains of southern France and northern Spain. One of the first descriptions of the breed dates from 1407, and from 1675 the breed was a favourite of The Grand Dauphin and other members of the French aristocracy. By the early nineteenth century there was a thriving market for the dogs in mountain towns, from where they would be taken to other parts of France. It was developed to guard sheep on steep mountainous slopes with agility. As late as 1874 the breed was not completely standardised in appearance, with two major sub-types recorded, the Western and the Eastern. They are related to several other large white European livestock guardian dogs (LGD), including the Italian Maremma Sheepdog, Kuvasz (Hungary), Akbash Dog (Turkey) and Polish Tatra or Polski Owczarek Podhalański, and somewhat less closely to the
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Standard Schnauzer

    Standard Schnauzer

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Standard Schnauzer is the original breed of the three breeds of Schnauzer, and despite its wiry coat and general appearance, is not related to the British terriers. Rather, its origins are in old herding and guard breeds of Europe. Generally classified as a working or utility dog, this versatile breed is a robust, squarely built, medium-sized dog with aristocratic bearing. It has been claimed that it was a popular subject of painters Sir Joshua Reynolds, Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt, but actual proof remains elusive. Standard Schnauzers are either salt-and-pepper or black in color, and are known for exhibiting many of the "ideal" traits of any breed. These include high intelligence, agility, alertness, reliability, strength and endurance. This breed of dog has been very popular in Europe, specifically Germany where it originated. The breed was first exhibited at a show in Hanover in 1879, and since then have taken top honors in many shows including the prestigious "Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club" in the United States in 1997. In the Middle Ages, schnauzer-type dogs of medium size were developed from herding, ratting and guardian breeds in Western Europe. A dog of the
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Newfoundland

    Newfoundland

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Newfoundland is a Working dog. Newfoundlands can be black, brown, gray, or black and white (Landseer). They were originally bred and used as a working dog for fishermen in the Dominion of Newfoundland, now part of Canada. They are known for their giant size, tremendous strength, calm dispositions, and loyalty. Newfoundland dogs excel at water rescue/lifesaving because of their muscular build, thick double coat, webbed feet, and innate swimming abilities. Newfoundlands ('Newfs', 'Newfies') have webbed feet and a water-resistant coat. Males normally weigh 60–70 kg (130–150 lb), and females 45–55 kg (100–120 lb), placing them in the "Giant" weight range but some Newfoundland dogs have been known to weigh over 90 kg (200 lb) - and the largest on record weighed 120 kg (260 lbs) and measured over 6 feet (1.82 m) from nose to tail, ranking it among the biggest Molossers. They may grow up to 22–28 inches (55-71 cm) tall at the shoulder. The American Kennel Club (AKC) standard colors of the Newfoundland dogs are: black, brown, gray, and Landseer (white dog with black markings) Other colors are not rare, and not recommended because of breeding double recessive genes; The Kennel Club (KC)
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Tibetan Spaniel

    Tibetan Spaniel

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Tibetan Spaniel is a breed of assertive, small, intelligent dogs originating in the Himalayan mountains of Tibet. They share ancestry with the Pekingese, Japanese Chin, Shih Tzu, Lhasa Apso, and Pug. This breed is not a true Spaniel; its breeding and role differs quite a bit (Spaniels are gun dogs.) The name Spaniel may have been given due to its resemblance to the bred-down lapdog versions of the hunting Spaniels, such as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The Tibetan Spaniel has a domed head that is small,in comparison to the body. It has a short blunt muzzle. Teeth meet in an undershot or level bite. The nose is black. The eyes are medium but in keeping with the face and are set wide apart, these are oval in shape. The Tibetan Spaniel does not have extra skin around the eyes and this helps to tell the breed apart from the Pekingese. The ears hang down either side of the head to cheek level and are feathered with a v shape. The neck is covered in a mane of hair, which is more noticeable in the male of the breed. The Tibetan Spaniel's front legs are a little bowed and the feet are hare-like. This dog has a great feathered tail that is set high and is carried over their back.
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    American Eskimo Dog

    American Eskimo Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The American Eskimo Dog is a breed of companion dog originating in Germany. The American Eskimo is a member of the Spitz family. Despite its name and appearance, the American Eskimo dog is not from Alaska; the dog's heritage is traced back to Northern Europe. The breed's progenitors were German Spitz, but due to anti-German prejudice during the First World War, it was renamed "American Eskimo Dog". Although modern American Eskimos have been exported as German Spitz Gross (or Mittel, depending on the dog's height), the breed standards are actually significantly different. In addition to serving as a watchdog and companion, the American Eskimo dog also achieved a high degree of popularity in the 1930s and 1940s United States as a circus performer. There are three size varieties of the American Eskimo breed, the toy, miniature and the standard. They share a common resemblance with Japanese Spitz and Samoyed dog. The American Eskimo Dog was originally bred to guard people and property and, therefore, is territorial by nature and a valiant watchdog. They are not considered an aggressive breed. But, due to the breed's watchdog history, American Eskimos are generally quite vocal, barking
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Basenji

    Basenji

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Congo
    The Basenji is a breed of hunting dog that was bred from stock originating in central Africa. Most of the major kennel clubs in the English-speaking world place the breed in the Hound Group; more specifically, it may be classified as belonging to the sighthound type. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale places the breed in Group 5, Spitz and Primitive types, and the United Kennel Club (US) places the breed in the Sighthound & Pariah Group. The Basenji produces an unusual yodel-like sound commonly called a "barroo", due to its unusually shaped larynx. This trait also gives the Basenji the nickname "Barkless Dog". Basenjis share many unique traits with Pariah dog types. Basenjis, like dingoes and some other breeds of dog, come into estrus only once annually, as compared to other dog breeds which may have two or more breeding seasons every year. Both dingoes and basenji lack a distinctive odor, and are prone to howls, yodels, and other undulated vocalizations over the characteristic bark of modern dog breeds. One theory holds that the latter trait is the result of the selective killing of 'barkier' dogs in the traditional Central African context because barking could lead enemies
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Finnish Spitz

    Finnish Spitz

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Finland
    A Finnish Spitz (Finnish language: Suomenpystykorva) is a breed of dog originating in Finland. The breed was originally bred to hunt all types of game from squirrels and other rodents to bears. It is a "bark pointer", indicating the position of game by barking to attract the hunter's attention. Its original game hunting purpose was to point to game that fled into trees, such as grouse, and capercaillies, but it also serves well for hunting moose and elk. Some individuals have even been known to go after a bear. In its native country, the breed is still mostly used as a hunting dog. The breed is friendly and in general loves children, so it is suitable for domestic life. The Finnish Spitz has been the national dog of Finland since 1979. The Finnish Spitz developed from selectively bred Spitz-type dogs that inhabited central Russia several thousand years ago. Isolated Finno-Ugrian tribes in the far northern regions bred dogs according to their specific needs. These small clans of woodsmen relied on their dogs to help them obtain food, and the excellent hunting ability of the Finnish Spitz made it a favorite choice. By 1880, as advanced means of transportation brought diverse peoples
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Harrier

    Harrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Harrier is a small to medium sized dog breed of the hound class, used for hunting hares by trailing them. It resembles an English Foxhound but is smaller, though not as small as a Beagle. The Harrier is similar to the English Foxhound, but smaller. Harriers stand between 21 and 24 inches at the shoulder, and adults weigh between 45 and 65 lbs. They do shed, have short hair and hanging ears, and come in a variety of color patterns. A humorous, yet fairly accurate short-hand description of a Harrier is that of "a Beagle on steroids." It is a muscular hunting hound with a small, hard coat. It has large bones for stamina and strength. The Harrier is slightly longer than tall, with a level topline. The tail is medium-length, carried high, but is not curled over the back. The skull is broad with a strong square muzzle. The rounded ears are pendant, and the eyes are either brown or hazel. The wide nose is black. The expression is mellow when the dog is relaxed and alert when he is excited. The teeth should meet in a scissors or level bite. The feet are tight and cat-like, and the front toes may turn inward. The Harrier is cheerful, sweet-tempered, tolerant of people, and it is
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Lakenvelder

    Lakenvelder

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    Lakenvelders or Lakenfelders are a breed of chicken developed in the 1830s in Germany despite their Dutch name. Characteristics of the breed are black head, collar, and tail, white body, white skin and slate colored legs. The Lakenvelder is a flighty breed that is a good forager if allowed to free range. While it does well on range, it also bears confinement well. It has a small 4 to 5 pounds (1.8 to 2.3 kg) body and is a good layer of small to medium white or cream eggs, but is a non-setter. The Lakenvelder originated in the Levant from Egyptian Fayoumi and Persian progenitors. It was developed as its own breed for centuries in Palestine where it was known as the Tel Megiddo (Hebrew) or Tell al-Mutesellim (Arabic) fowl. Roman Jewish immigrants brought this ancient breed to the Westfalen area of Germany during the Roman era around 1 CE. Westphalian Jews refined and conserved this breed for centuries before it was widely known to non-Jewish Europeans. The Lakenvelder's eggs were used primarily in baking. It was admitted to the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection in 1939. They are in the Continental class for American Poultry Association showing purposes and are
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Barnevelder

    Barnevelder

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Barnevelder is a medium heavy breed of chicken named after the Dutch town of Barneveld. It is a cross of 19th century Dutch landrace chickens with Asian breeds imported to Europe in the mid-late 19th century such as the Brahma, Cochin, Croad Langshan and Malay. Hans Schippers, the Dutch authority on the breed, reports the following on the development of the Barnevelders: Between c. 1850 and 1875 Cochin, Malay, Brahma and Croad Langshan arrived from Asia and were crossed with local fowl. One particular strain of brown egg laying fowl were like Black Cochins in appearance and were kept as a meat bird (these were not, however, purebred Cochins). Around 1885 these birds were crossed with Brahmas and the offspring of this cross was crossed with Langshan. In 1898 American utility birds ("Amerikaanse Nuthoenders"), a rough version of the Golden Wyandotte (apparently not dissimilar to the American Winnebago, a ‘precursor’ to the Golden-laced Wyandotte) were crossed into the developing breed followed in 1906 by Buff Orpingtons. Overall in the development to follow the Croad Langshan continued to have the biggest influence and contributed hardiness, brown eggs and good winter
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    Belgian d'Everberg

    Belgian d'Everberg

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Belgian d'Everberg is a breed of bantam chicken from the Belgian village of Everberg in the Kortenberg municipality. Called the Barbu d'Everberg in the original French, it is a tailless variant of the Belgian Bearded d'Uccle. It is a rare breed even in its home country, and was developed in 1906. It is a true bantam, with no large counterpart, and weighs an average of 600-700 grams (1.5 pounds).
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small breed of Spaniel-type dog, and is classed as a toy dog by The Kennel Club. It is one of the most popular breeds in the United Kingdom. Since 2000, it has grown in popularity in the United States. It is a smaller breed of spaniel, and Cavalier adults are often the same size as adolescent dogs of other spaniel breeds. It has a silky coat and commonly an undocked tail. The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim, Tricolour (black/white/tan), Black and Tan, and Ruby. The breed is generally friendly, affectionate and good with both children and other animals. The King Charles changed drastically in the late 17th century, when it was interbred with flat-nosed breeds. Until the 1920s, the Cavalier shared the same history as the smaller King Charles Spaniel. Breeders attempted to recreate what they considered to be the original configuration of the breed, a dog resembling Charles II's King Charles Spaniel of the Restoration. Various health issues affect this particular breed, most notably mitral valve disease, which leads to heart failure. This appears in most Cavaliers at some point in their lives and is the most common cause of death.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Dexter cattle

    Dexter cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Dexter cattle are the smallest of the European cattle breeds, being about half the size of a traditional Hereford and about one third the size of a Friesian (Holstein) milking cow. They were considered a rare breed of cattle, until recently, but are now considered a recovering breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. The Dexter breed originated in Ireland. The Dexter breed originated in southwestern Ireland from which it was brought to England in 1882. The breed virtually disappeared in Ireland, but was still maintained as a pure breed in a number of small herds in England. The Dexter is a small breed with mature cows weighing between 600–700 pounds (270–320 kg) and mature bulls weighing about 1,000 pounds (450 kg). Considering their small size, the body is wide and deep with a well-rounded hindquarter. Although usually black, a dark-red or dun Dexter is sometimes found, all animals are always solid, with only very minor white marking on the udder or behind the navel. Horns are rather small and thick and grow outward with a forward curve on the male and upward on the cow. The breed is typically a dual-purpose type, although individual herd owners often concentrated on
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Italian Greyhound

    Italian Greyhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Italian Greyhound is a small breed of dog of the sight hound type, sometimes called an "I.G.", . The Italian Greyhound is the smallest of the sighthounds, typically weighing about 8 to 18 lb (3.6 to 8.2 kg) and standing about 13 to 15 inches (33 to 38 cm) tall at the withers. Though they are in the "toy" group based on their weight, they are larger than other dogs in the category due to their slender bodies, so owners must be careful when sizing clothing or accommodations. The Italian Greyhound's chest is deep, with a tucked up abdomen, long slender legs and a long neck that tapers down to a small head. The face is long and pointed, like a full sized greyhound. Overall, they look like "miniature" Greyhounds, though many Italian Greyhound owners dispute the use of the term "miniature Greyhound", in reference to the breed itself. By definition of the American Kennel Club - they are true genetic greyhounds, with a bloodline extending back over 2000 years. Their current small stature is a function of selective breeding. Their gait is distinctive and should be high stepping and free, rather like that of a horse. They are able to run at top speed with a double suspension gallop, and
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Keeshond

    Keeshond

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Keeshond ( /ˈkeɪz.hɒnd/ KAYZ-hond; plural: Keeshonden) is a medium-sized dog with a plush two-layer coat of silver and black fur with a 'ruff' and a curled tail. It originated in Holland, and its closest relatives are the German spitzes such as the Pomeranian. Originally called the German Spitz, more specifically the Wolfsspitz, the name was officially changed to Keeshond, in 1926 in England, where it had been known as the Dutch Barge Dog. A member of the spitz group of dogs, the Keeshond in American Kennel Club (AKC) standard is 17 inches (43 cm) to 18 inches (46 cm) tall and 19.25 inches (48.9 cm) ± 2.4 inches (6.1 cm) in the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) standard and weighs 35 pounds (16 kg) to 45 pounds (20 kg). Sturdily built, they have a typical spitz appearance, neither coarse nor refined. They have a wedge-shaped head, a medium-length muzzle with a definite stop, small pointed ears, and an expressive face. The tail is tightly curled and, in profile, should be carried such that it is indistinguishable from the compact body of the dog. Like all spitz-type dogs, the Keeshonden have a dense double coat, with a thick ruff around the neck. Typically, the males
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Norwich Terrier

    Norwich Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Norwich Terrier is a breed of dog. It originates in the United Kingdom and was bred to hunt small vermin or rodents. With a friendly personality, Norwich Terriers are today mostly a companion dog breed. One of the smallest terriers, these dogs are generally healthy, but are relatively rare, due in part to their low litter size and the common need for caesarian sections. These terriers are one of the smallest terriers (11-12 lb, 5-5.4 kg; 9-10 inches (24-25.5 cm) at the withers), with prick ears and a double coat, which come in red, tan, wheaten, black and tan, and grizzle. These small but hardy dogs can be courageous, intelligent and affectionate. They can be assertive but it is not typical for them to be aggressive, quarrelsome or shy. They are energetic and thrive on an active life. They are also quite hungry all the time and will eat anything edible. They are eager to please but have definite minds of their own. They are sensitive to scolding but 100% Terrier. They should not usually be kept outside or in a kennel setting because they enjoy the companionship of their owners. Norwich are not given to unnecessary barking, but they will warn of a stranger approaching. Once they
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Rosecomb

    Rosecomb

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Rosecomb is a breed of chicken named for its distinctive comb. Rosecombs are bantam chickens, and are among those known as true bantams, meaning they are not a miniaturized version of a large fowl. Rosecombs are one of the oldest and most popular bantam breeds in showing, and thus have numerous variations within the breed. As an ornamental chicken, they are subsequently poor egg layers, and not suited for meat production. The Rosecomb is one of the oldest bantam breeds of chicken. The earliest surviving records of the breed are from the 14th century in Britain, though it may have another point of origin. Their popularity as an ornamental breed first took flight after King Richard III began to raise them. Their popularity among poultry enthusiasts continued in to the 19th century, and Rosecombs were shown at the first North American poultry exhibition in 1849, as well as being admitted in to the first edition of American Standard of Perfection in 1874. Today their widespread keeping by breeders persists. Rosecombs are almost exclusively kept for competitive poultry showing, and their characteristics reflect this. Males are generally 20–22 ounces (570–620 grams), and females are
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Yurlov Crower

    Yurlov Crower

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Russia
    The Yurlov Crower is an old Russian breed of chicken primarily selected and used for long crowing cock contests in Russia. The Yurlov Crower breed was presumably created in the second half of 19th century by crossing Chinese meat-type breeds, fighting cocks and landraces, but doubtfully with the direct influence of the Malay breed. According to Moiseyeva (1992), the known breed’s plumage color variants are white, silver, scarlet, black with light yellow, or golden, hackle (most of all), and black. The breed was a subject of interest among fancy, commercial and state breeders in Russia and Ukraine for a long time in the 20th century. It has been preserved and studied at few state poultry collection farms since 1970s–1980s. The Geflügel-Börse magazine articles published by two German writers, Rüdiger Wandelt in 1993 and Wolfgang Vits in 1994, introduced the breed to poultry fanciers in Germany. However, the breed was not well known until recent time to a broad community of Western poultry breeders. The continued contacts between German and Russian poultry breeders in 1990s and 2000s led to the import of the Yurlov Crower breed to Western Europe and growth of its popularity first in
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Canaan Dog

    Canaan Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Israel
    The Canaan dog, known in Israel as (Hebrew: כלב כנעני‎, Kelev Kna'ani, lit. "Canaanite dog") and other Levantine countries as (كلب كنعان: Kaleb Kana'an) is a breed of pariah dog recognized as Israel’s national breed. It may have existed in the eastern Mediterranean seaboard for millennia, as referenced in ancient carvings and drawings. There are 2,000 to 3,000 Canaan dogs across the world, mostly in Europe and North America. The Canaan dog is a typical mongrel in appearance. It is a medium-sized dog, with a wedge-shaped head, medium-sized, erect and low set ears with a broad base and rounded tips. Its outer coat is dense, harsh and straight of short to medium-length. The undercoat should be close and profuse according to season. Color ranges from black to cream and all shades of brown and red between, usually with small white markings, or all white with colour patches. Spotting of all kinds is permitted, as well as white or black masks. Rudolphina Menzel, an immigrant to Mandate Palestine from Austria, having studied the desert mongrels and the variations in appearances, classified these canines into four types: 1) heavy, sheepdog appearance, 2) dingo-like appearance, 3) Border
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Highland cattle

    Highland cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Highland cattle (Scottish Gaelic: Bò Ghàidhealach) (Scots: kyloe) are a Scottish breed of cattle with long horns and long wavy coats which are coloured black, brindled, red, yellow or dun. The breed was developed in the Scottish Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland. Breeding stock has been exported to the rest of the world, especially Australia and North America, since the early 20th Century. The breed was developed from two sets of stock, one originally black, and the other reddish. Highlands are known as a hardy breed due to the rugged nature of their native Scottish Highlands, with high rainfall and strong winds. Highland cattle have been successfully established in many temperate countries and indeed in countries where winters are substantially colder than Scotland's such as central Europe and Canada. Their hair provides protection during the cold winters and their skill in browsing for food enables them to survive in steep mountain areas. They both graze and browse and eat plants which many other cattle avoid. The meat tends to be leaner than most beef because Highlands get most of their insulation from their thick shaggy hair rather than subcutaneous fat. The coat makes
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Japanese Chin

    Japanese Chin

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Japanese Chin (Japanese: 狆, chin), also known as the Japanese Spaniel, is the dog of Japanese royalty. A lap dog and companion dog, this toy breed has a distinctive heritage. Japanese Chin stand about 20 to 27 cm (8 to 11 in) in height at the withers and weight can vary from a low of 3 lbs to a high of 15  lbs, with an average of 7 to 9 pounds being the most common. The American Kennel Club and the Fédération Cynologique Internationale give no weight requirement for the Chin. The distinctive Oriental expression is characterized by the large broad head, large wide-set eyes, short broad muzzle, ear feathering, and the evenly patterned facial markings. The coat is low maintenance, long, and smooth/silky to the touch. They are distinctively black & white and red & white in color and have variations in color intensity (lemon & white, mahogany & white, etc.). As of November 11, 2011, any color not listed in the breed standard is grounds for disqualification in competitions. This breed is considered one of the most cat-like of the dog breeds in attitude: it is alert, intelligent, and independent, and it uses its paws to wash and wipe its face. Other cat-like traits include their
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Santa Gertrudis cattle

    Santa Gertrudis cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Santa Gertrudis cattle are a tropical beef breed of cattle developed in southern Texas on the King Ranch. They were named for the Spanish land grant where Captain Richard King originally established the King Ranch. This breed was officially recognized by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1940, becoming the first beef breed formed in the United States. The origin given by King Ranch is that it was formed by mating Brahman bulls with Beef Shorthorn cows, with the final composition being about 3/8 Brahman and 5/8 Shorthorn. In 1918 King Ranch purchased 52 bulls of 3/4 to 7/8 Bos indicus breeding to mate with 2500 pure-bred Shorthorn cows on the ranch. At this time the American Brahman breed as such did not exist nor were there pure-breed Bos indicus available in the United States . Monkey was born in 1920, a son of Vinotero, one of the bulls who was purchased in 1918. This bull became the foundation sire for the breed. With the birth of Monkey and a decision to line-breed came a very uniform and very hearty breed of beef cattle. These cattle are red in color, display a blend of Bos indicus and Bos taurus attributes and may be polled or horned. In addition to being a hardy
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Scots Grey

    Scots Grey

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Scots Grey, originally titled the Scotch Grey, is a breed of chicken originating in Scotland. It is so named because of its striped plumage, which is called either Barred or Cuckoo by poultry enthusiasts. Though superficially similar to breeds such as the Cuckoo Marans and Barred Plymouth Rock, the Scots Grey's feathers have a less distinct pattern with a steel-gray base. It can also be sexually differentiated based on color of the adult birds, as hens usually have a noticeably darker hue. Scots Grey are relatively heavy chickens, with hens weighing 7-9 pounds (3.2-4 kilos), and roosters weighing 9-11 pounds (4-5 kilos). In body type, Scots Grey are tall, upright chickens. Though they share a place of origin and often color with the Scots Dumpy, this height can be used to set the two apart. Scots Grey have white skin, a single comb, and red earlobes. They are considered to be dual-purpose, laying both a good amount of white eggs and producing wholesome meat. In temperament, they are active birds that do best under free range conditions, and may develop destructive habits when confined. They are hardy, and can forage well. Hens are not generally inclined to go broody. They are
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Serama

    Serama

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Malaysia
    The Serama (Malay Ayam Serama), also called the Malaysian Serama is a bantam breed of chicken originated from Malaysia. Serema originate in the Malaysian state of Kelantan, apparently through the crossing of Japanese and Malaysian bantams. Other stories of the birds derived from a gift of some small chickens by the King of Thailand to a local sultan in ancient times. Small chickens have always been popular pets in this area and are often referred to as "ayam katik" (pygmy chickens) and "ayam cantik" (pretty chickens). The modern breed is attributed to the efforts of Wee Yean Een from Kelantan, who named the breed "Serama" after Rama, the title of the Kings of Thailand. The breed was first exhibited in 1990. The breed was hit hard by the Asian bird flu epidemic in 2004 when many birds were culled amid government concerns. There are no written standards for the breed in its native country. However, they do now have an overall guide on scoring and judging for competitions in Malaysia. Many breeders have a style or type that they breed to, but often breeders keep several "styles". These styles are often names given by breeders to describe a blood line of a champion (e.g. Husin, Mat
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Sumatra

    Sumatra

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Indonesia
    The Sumatra is a breed of chicken native of the island of Sumatra. Chickens were originally imported from Sumatra in 1847 to the U.S. and Europe as fighting cocks for the purpose of cockfighting, but today the breed is primarily kept for exhibition. 1883 is the year the Black Sumatra was first inducted into the American Standard of Perfection. Sumatras are primarily an ornamental breed kept for their attractive plumage. Most often they are pitch black with a green sheen throughout the body and tail. The breed additionally comes in blue and white varieties. Males usually weigh between 4 and 5 pounds, and females weigh between 3⁄2 and 4 pounds. Hens lay about 100 white eggs a year. Both males and females have no wattles, and males often have multiple spurs. The breed is considered a primitive one; the Sumatra retains a strong flying ability, unlike most modern chicken breeds. The males will fight for dominance, but unlike most breeds, they usually do not fight to the death. A unique feature of the Sumatra is that males have multiple spurs, with Sumatra sometimes having as many as 3 spurs per leg.
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Texas Longhorn

    Texas Longhorn

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Texas Longhorn is a breed of cattle known for its characteristic horns, which can extend to 7 feet (2.1 m) tip to tip for steers and exceptional cows, and 36 to 80 inches (0.91 to 2.0 m) tip to tip for bulls. Similar cattle were imported by Spanish colonists into other parts of North America, including California and Florida. Horns can have a slight upward turn at their tips or even triple twist. Texas Longhorns are known for their diverse coloring. The Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America and the International Texas Longhorn Association serve as the recognized registries for the breed. Texas Longhorns with elite genetics can often fetch $40,000 or more at auction with the record of $170,000 in recent history for a cow. Due to their innate gentle disposition and intelligence, Texas Longhorns are increasingly being trained as riding steers. The Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry (CTLR), is the recognized breed registry dedicated to preserving the purest Texas Longhorn bloodlines. Using visual inspection of cattle by the most knowledgeable Texas Longhorn breeders and the use of blood type analysis to further identify parentage, CTLR has the ideal of preserving
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Campine

    Campine

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Campine is a breed of chicken originating in Belgium's Campine region. They are a fairly small breed in Silver and Gold varieties, with solid white or golden hackles and iridescent black-green barred bodies. Hens and roosters are nearly identical in feather coloration. They will lay a fair number of white-shelled eggs, but are largely kept for showing today. The Campine's head and neck is gold with the remainder of the bird being beetle–green, it can also have a white head and neck with the remainder also being beetle-green. The Campine biologically has been compared both in appearance and anatomy to the Sebright; a fancy breed of True Bantam that also displays gold and silver feather patterns. Thus it is speculated they could have been used as one of the breeds used to create the Sebright. They are extremely rare and very seldom are seen at shows.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Droughtmaster

    Droughtmaster

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Droughtmaster is a tropical breed of beef cattle developed in North Queensland by several cattlemen from crossing Brahman and British breed cattle, principally the Beef Shorthorn during the early 1900s. The breed was conceived in response to the need in the Australian Tropics for a breed of cattle which had good tick resistance and would be able to utilize the environment and the pastures in the most efficient manner to give higher weight gains and fertility. After many years of crossbreeding and meticulous selection for: The Droughtmaster breed emerged. Other British breeds — mainly Hereford — have since been used in its development to arrive at a fixed tropical breed of approximately 50% Bos indicus and 50% Bos taurus genetics. Droughtmasters are medium to large with good walking and foraging abilities coupled with lower nutritional requirements to give them the ability to retain condition and keep breeding, irrespective of the prevailing conditions. Their short coat is generally red in colour, although variations from golden honey to dark red can occur. The red pigmentation in Droughtmasters helps protect the cattle from cancer eye, sunburnt udders and photosensitization.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Irish Terrier

    Irish Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Ireland
    The Irish Terrier is a dog breed from Ireland, one of many breeds of terrier. The Irish Terrier is considered one of the oldest terrier breeds. The Dublin dog show in 1873 was the first to provide a separate class for Irish Terriers. By the 1880s, Irish Terriers were the fourth most popular breed in Ireland and Britain. The Irish Terrier is an active and compactly sized dog that is suited for life in both rural and city environments. Its harsh red coat protects it from all kinds of weather. Breed standards describe the ideal Irish Terrier as being racy, red and rectangular. Racy: an Irish Terrier should appear powerful without being sturdy or heavy. Rectangular: the outline of the Irish Terrier differs markedly from those of other terriers. The Irish Terrier's body is proportionately longer than that of the Fox Terrier, with a tendency toward racy lines but with no lack of substance. The tail is customarily docked soon after birth to approximately two-thirds of the original length. In countries where docking is prohibited, the conformation judges emphasize tail carriage. The tail should start up quite high, but it should not stick straight up or curl over the back or either side of
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Löwchen

    Löwchen

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Löwchen (German: "little lion") is a breed of dog that once had the dubious distinction, like the Portuguese Water Dog and the Havanese, of being the rarest dog in the world. Even today, the breed generally has fewer than a few hundred new registrations each year worldwide. The Lowchen is a breed with a long and wavy coat that is presented in a lion cut. This means that the haunches, back legs, front legs (except bracelets around the ankles), and the 1/3-1/2 of the tail closest to the body are shaved, and the rest of the coat is left natural to give the appearance of a lion-like form. A small dog, they are considered by some registries as a toy dog and by the AKC as a non-sporting dog. The breed is traceable to as far back as 1442. They are found in many old paintings, drawings and literature. It is possible to trace the Lowchen history to the three countries of what are now known as Belgium, Germany and Holland. It is thought the breeds ancestor was a dog that was brought in by travelers from the far eastern lands of Tibet, that mingled with local dogs such as Spitz and terrier type dogs. Occasionally an genetic throw-back is found. The head of the Löwchen is one of the most
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Smooth Fox Terrier

    Smooth Fox Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Smooth Fox Terrier is a breed of dog, one of many terrier breeds. It was the first breed in the fox terrier family to be given official recognition by The Kennel Club (circa 1875; breed standard 1876). It is well known, and although not a widely popular breed today outside of hunting and show circles, it is extremely significant due to the large number of terriers believed descended from it. The Smooth Fox Terrier's development as a breed is largely undocumented, but the dog has been known as a distinct breed in England since at least the 18th century; the first documented evidence of the Smooth Fox Terrier came in 1790, when a man by the name of Colonel Thornton painted a portrait of his beloved dog, Pitch. The Smooth Fox Terrier entered the show ring during the mid-19th century, making it one of the earliest entrants in such events. The American Kennel Club recognized the Fox Terrier in 1885; one hundred years later, the Smooth Fox Terrier was recognized as being a distinct breed from the Wire Fox Terrier. Conventional wisdom long held that the Smooth Fox Terrier and Wire Fox Terrier are variations of the same breed; in recent years, however, an increasing number of experts
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Blue Hen of Delaware

    Blue Hen of Delaware

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Blue Hen of Delaware is a variety of chicken that was adopted on April 14, 1939, as the state bird of Delaware. The University of Delaware mascot, known as YoUDee, is also modeled after the bird. While it is not a currently recognized chicken breed, the fame of the Blue Hen can be traced back to the Revolutionary War. On December 9, 1775, the Continental Congress resolved that a military battalion was to be raised from Delaware, then known as the Lower Counties on the Delaware. Thus, the Delaware regiment was born—a group composed of eight companies representing New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties. Col. John Haslet's first Delaware regiment reported for duty near the outset of the American Revolution in January 1776. Although often referred to as "The Fighting Delawares," the Delaware soldiers also won the nickname, "The Blue Hen's Chickens." Within the regiment, the second company was composed of men from Kent County and was under the command of Capt. John Caldwell, who was an avid fan and owner of gamecocks. The troops often amused themselves by staging cock fights with a breed known as the Kent County Blue Hen, recognizable for its blue plumage. The renown of these chickens
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Gelbvieh

    Gelbvieh

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Gelbvieh (German "Yellow cattle") is a cattle breed originating in several Franconian districts of Bavaria, Germany in the mid-18th century. Gelbvieh were originally known as “red-yellow Franconian cattle” and were developed from several local breeds. Gelbviehs were originally bred to be triple purpose cattle (used for milk, beef, and draught), but the modern Gelbvieh is primarily used for beef production. Gelbvieh literally means "yellow cattle" in German, and the breed originated as golden brown cattle with dark hooves and full body pigmentation. Through selective breeding, polled and black genetics are now also prevalent in the breed. Gelbvieh cattle are known for their high rate of gain and feed efficiency, and were originally selected for easy growth, quick maturity, length of loin, leanness, docility, and longevity. They are able to adapt to many different rangelands and climate conditions. Gelbvieh females were selected to be very maternal with strong fertility, mothering instincts, good udders, and strong milk production. They are also known to have smaller bodied offspring, allowing for ease of calving. Fullblood Gelbvieh cattle are direct descendents of those registered
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Switzerland
    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog (German: Grosser Schweizer Sennenhund or French: Grand Bouvier Suisse) is a dog breed which was developed in the Swiss Alps. The name Sennenhund refers to people called Senn or Senner, dairymen and herders in the Swiss Alps. Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs are almost certainly the result of indigenous dogs mating with large Mastiff types brought to Switzerland by foreign settlers. At one time, the breed was believed to have been among the most popular in Switzerland. It was assumed to have almost died out by the late 19th century, since its work was being done by other breeds or machines, but was rediscovered in the early 1900s. The breed is large and heavy-boned with incredible physical strength, but is still agile enough to perform the all-purpose farm duties it was originally used for. Its breed standard calls for a black, white, and rust colored coat. The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is sociable, active, calm, and dignified, and loves being part of the family. It is relatively healthy for its size and tends to have far fewer problems than more popular breeds in its size range. Among the four Sennenhund, or Swiss mountain dogs, this breed is considered
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Alaskan Malamute

    Alaskan Malamute

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Alaskan Malamute is a generally large breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) originally bred for use as a utilitarian dog and later an Alaskan sled dog. They are sometimes mistaken for a Siberian Husky due to color and markings, but in fact are quite different in many ways including size, structure and personality. As pets, once mature, Alaskan Malamutes have a very quiet, dignified temperament and are loyal to their owners. The American Kennel Club (AKC) breed standard describes a natural range of size, with a desired freightening size of 23 inches (58 cm) and 75 pounds (34 kg) for females, 25 inches (64 cm) and 85 pounds (39 kg) for males. Heavier individuals (90 lb (41 kg)) and dogs smaller than 75 pounds (34 kg) are commonly seen. There is often a marked size difference between males and females. Weights upwards of 100 pounds (45 kg) are also seen. The coat of the Alaskan Malamute is a double coat. The undercoat has an oily and woolly texture and can be as thick as two inches. The outer guard coat is coarse and stands off the body—longer at the withers but not more than one inch off the sides of the body. Ears are small in proportion to the head and stand firmly
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Blonde d'Aquitaine

    Blonde d'Aquitaine

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Blonde d'Aquitaine is a breed of beef cattle originating from the Aquitaine district in south west of France embracing the area of the Garonne valley and the Pyrenees. The breed is a combination of three local strains, the Garonnais, the Quercy, and the Blonde des Pyrenees. Blondes were predominantly draught animals until the end of the Second World War. This resulted in their muscle development, hardiness and docility. They were always hardy, lean animals with light but strong bone structure. Blondes show some variation of color ranging from almost white to tan. Blondes are the third most popular beef breed in France behind Charolais and Limousin.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Dalmatian

    Dalmatian

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Croatia
    The Dalmatian (Croatian: Dalmatinac, Dalmatiner) is a breed of dog whose roots are often said to trace back to Dalmatia, a region of Croatia where the first illustrations of the dog have been found. The Dalmatian is noted for its unique black- or brown-spotted coat and was mainly used as a carriage dog in its early days. Today, this dog remains a well-loved family pet, and many dog enthusiasts enter their pets into the competitions of many kennel clubs. The Dalmatian is a mid-sized, well-defined, muscular dog with excellent endurance and stamina. When full grown, its weight normally ranges between 35 and 70 pounds (16 and 32 kg) and it stands from 19 to 24 inches (48 to 61 cm) tall, with males usually slightly larger than females. The body is as long from forechest to buttocks as it is tall at the withers, and the shoulders are laid back. The Dalmatian's feet are round with well-arched toes, and the nails are usually white or the same color as the dog's spots. The thin ears taper towards the tip and are set fairly high and close to the head. Eye color varies between brown, amber, or blue, with some dogs having one blue eye and one brown eye, or other combinations. Dalmatian puppies
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Groenendael

    Groenendael

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Groenendael is recognized by all major kennel clubs. In the United States it is recognized under the name Belgian Sheepdog. Like all Belgium Shepherd, the Groenendael is a medium-sized, hard-working, square-proportioned breed of dog in the sheepdog family. The Groenendael is recognized by its distinctive black coat. The Groenendael should be athletic, strong, imposing, rustic, and balanced in appearance. It should look natural, never as though it has been prepared just for the show ring. Its coat should be profuse, but never look as though it would inhibit the dog's working ability in any way. The colour is always black, with small white markings being allowed on the chest. When being shown, its handler should never have to force it into position; ideally the handler should not have to touch the dog at all. The Groenendael should be 60–66 centimetres (24–26 in) at the withers for males, and 56–62 centimetres (22–24 in) for females. The weight should be approximately 25–30 kilograms (55–66 lb) for males, and 20–25 kilograms (44–55 lb) for females. The groenendael has a thick, double coat. The texture should be hard and dense, never woolly, silky, frizzy, fine, or wiry. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Hamburg

    Hamburg

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Hamburg or Hamburgh in Britain, is a type of chicken developed in Germany and Holland prior to 1700. It is comparatively rare, with less than 1000 registered in North America each year. It is a small breed—cocks tend to weigh only 5 pounds and hens about 4 lb (2.25 and 1.75 kg) with slender legs and a neat rose comb. The bird comes in more than ten different varieties, including: Silver Spangled, Golden Spangled, Golden Penciled, Citrone Penciled, Silver Penciled, White, Black, and more recently-Citron Spangled in bantam form. Penciled breeds are smallest and self-colored birds are largest. There are also bantam Hamburgs, which weigh about 1.5 pounds. Hamburgs are hardy, active birds who are capable of flight and often jumpy around humans. Hamburgs mature quickly and are considered good egg producers. Their eggs are rather small with white, glossy shells. Perhaps the most famous devotee of the Hamburg chicken was L. Frank Baum, author of the Oz books. He began a monthly trade journal, Hamburgs, in 1880 and in 1886, published his first and only book on the subject, The Book of the Hamburgs: A Brief Treatise upon the Mating, Rearing, and Management of the Different Varieties of
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Irish Moiled

    Irish Moiled

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Irish Moiled is a rare cattle breed from Ireland. It is a dual-purpose breed, producing both beef and milk. It originated in County Leitrim, County Sligo, and County Donegal, but the breed is now found throughout Ireland. The Irish Moiled Cow is one of the most recognized breeds in Ireland. They are polled cows (which means that they do not grow horns) and are generally red with a white line on the back and stomach. They are usually known to have a flecked face and are dual producers. Dual producing cows are used for beef but also dairies which is not common with most cows. These cows fit within the average height and weight of a typical species, around 650 kg. It originated in County Leitrim, County Sligo, and County Donegal, but the breed is now found throughout in Northern Ireland. The name Irish Moiled Cow originated from the term “Maol.” This term is Gaelic and references to the dome and the fact that these cows do not have horns. It is very distinctive how their head is shaped like a mound. These cows are also extremely endangered, and up until 1970 the decline was substantial. In 1970 one breeder had been keeping the Irish Moiled Cow an actual animal and not just another
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Miniature Pinscher

    Miniature Pinscher

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Miniature Pinscher (Zwergpinscher, Min Pin) is a small breed of dog, originating from Germany. The breed's earliest ancestors may have been a mix of Italian Greyhounds and Dachshunds. The international kennel club, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, lists the Miniature Pinscher in Group 2, Section 1.1 Pinscher, along with the Dobermann, the German Pinscher, the Austrian Pinscher, and the other toy pinscher, the Affenpinscher. Other kennel clubs list the Miniature Pinscher in the Toy Group or Companion Group. The Miniature Pinscher is colloquially known as the "King of the Toys". The misconception that the Miniature Pinscher is a "miniature doberman" occurred because the Doberman Pinscher was introduced to the US before the Miniature Pinscher. In 1919 the Miniature Pinscher was introduced to the AKC show ring. At the time, not knowing that it was referred to officially in Germany as the Zwergpinscher (dwarfpinscher), the AKC referred to the breed as simply "Pinscher" and listed it in the miscellaneous category. When the Miniature Pinscher Club of America (MPCA) was created in 1929 (the year of the breed's official introduction into the AKC), they petitioned for Miniature
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Shih Tzu

    Shih Tzu

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    A Shih Tzu ( /ˈʃiːtsuː/ SHEET-soo; Mandarin: [ʂɨ́tsɨ]) is a breed of dog weighing 4–7.25 kilograms (8.8–16.0 lb) with long silky hair. The breed originated in China. Shih Tzu were officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1969. The name is both singular and plural. The name Shih Tzu comes from the Chinese word for "lion" because this kind of dog was bred to resemble "the lion as depicted in traditional oriental art," such as the Chinese guardian lions. (There is also the Pekingese breed, called "lion dog" in Chinese). "Shih Tzu" is the Wade-Giles romanization the Chinese characters 獅子, meaning lion; Wade-Giles romanization was in use when the breed was first introduced in America, but in modern times Pinyin romanization is used, rendering it shīzi. The Mandarin Chinese pronunciation is approximately SHIRR-tsə. The Shih Tzu is also known as the "Xi Shi dog" (西施犬) because Xi Shi was regarded as one of the most beautiful women of ancient China. Shih Tzus were nicknamed the Chrysanthemum Dog in England in the 1930s. The dog may also be called the Tibetan Lion Dog, but whether or not the breed should be referred to as a "Tibetan" or "Chinese" breed is a source of argument,
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    White Park

    White Park

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The White Park (also known as the Ancient White Park in North America, the White Forest, the White Horned, the Wild White, and simply "the Park") is a rare breed of horned cattle with ancient herds preserved in Great Britain. The White Park is a medium-large, long-bodied bovine . A programme of linear assessment, including 200 bulls and 300 cows, has been carried out in the UK since 1994 to define its size and conformation. Mature bull weights vary from 800 kg to 1,000 kg, depending on the quality of grazing, but bulls in good condition may weigh 1,250 kg. Average withers height is 146 cm, chest depth 88 cm, body length (point of withers to point of pin bone (tuber ischii) 167 cm, hip (tuber coxae) width 64 cm, and scrotal circumference 45 cm. The relevant corresponding measurements for adult cows are 500-700 kg, 132 cm, 76 cm, 148 cm and 60 cm. [1][4/13] The colour is distinctive, being porcelain white with coloured (black or red) points, namely ears, nose, eye rims, hooves, and teats and tips of the long horns. The colour pattern is dominant to other colours. The horns of the cows vary in shape, but the majority grow forwards and upwards in a graceful curve. The horns of bulls
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Border Terrier

    Border Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Border Terrier is a small, rough-coated breed of dog of the terrier group. Originally bred as fox and vermin hunters, Border Terriers share ancestry with Dandie Dinmont Terriers and Bedlington Terriers. Though the breed is much older, the Border Terrier was officially recognized by The Kennel Club in Great Britain in 1920, and by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1930. The border terrier was bred to have long enough legs to keep up with the horses and other foxhounds, which traveled with them, and small enough bodies to crawl in the burrows of foxes and chase them out so the hunters had a blank shot. The foxhounds that traveled with them were not small enough to do the Border terrier's job. In 2006, the Border Terrier ranked 81st in number of registrations by the AKC, while it ranked 10th in the United Kingdom. In 2008, the Border Terrier ranked 8th in number of registrations by the UK Kennel Club. Identifiable by their otter-shaped heads, Border Terriers have a broad skull and short (although many be fairly long), strong muzzle with a scissors bite. The V-shaped ears are on the sides of the head and fall towards the cheeks. Common coat colors are grizzle-and-tan,
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    St. Bernard

    St. Bernard

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The St. Bernard is a breed of very large working dog from the Italian and Swiss Alps, originally bred for rescue. The breed has become famous through tales of alpine rescues, as well as for its enormous size. The St. Bernard is a giant dog. The average weight of the breed is between 140 and 264 lb (64–120 kg) or more and the approximate height at the withers is 27½ inches to 35½ inches (70 to 90 cm). The coat can be either smooth or rough, with the smooth coat close and flat. The rough coat is dense but flat, and more profuse around the neck and legs. The coat is typically a red color with white, or sometimes a mahogany brindle with white. Black shading is usually found on the face and ears. The tail is long and heavy, hanging low eyes should have naturally tight lids, with "haws only slightly visible". Sometimes the eyes, brown usually, can be icy blue, nearly white. The ancestors of the St. Bernard share a history with the Sennenhunds, also called Swiss Mountain Dogs or Swiss Cattle Dogs, the large farm dogs of the farmers and dairymen of the livestock guardians, herding dogs, and draft dogs as well as hunting dogs, search and rescue dogs, and watchdogs. These dogs are thought to
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Appenzeller

    Appenzeller

    • Breed of: Chicken
    The Appenzeller is a breed of chicken originating in Appenzell region of Switzerland. The Appenzeller comes in two varieties. The Spitzhauben, meaning "pointed hood" (which comes from the frilly hat worn by the women in the Appenzeller region in Switzerland. Brought to America by a doctor who successfully introduced the breed for the long term here.) has a V-comb and feather crests in males and females. The Barthuhner ("bearded hen") has a rose comb and no crest. Both types appear in either black, golden spangled and silver spangled plumage. They are mostly a show breed, but are okay egg layers. Today the breed is largely an ornamental one kept for showing, but it lays also a respectable quantity of white eggs. It is a light chicken, with hens weighing an average of 3.5 lbs (1.6 kg) and roosters 4.5 lbs (2 kg). Behaviorally, it is a flighty breed that doesn't do well in confinement, can forage well, and will roost in trees if given the opportunity. In North America, it is very rare and is recognized officially by neither the American Poultry Association or other breed registries. The silver spangled Spitzhauben is the most common variety found abroad. Though there is no standard in
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Bekisar

    Bekisar

    • Breed of: Chicken
    The Bekisar, or Ayam Bekisar, is the first generation hybrid offspring of the Green Junglefowl (Gallus varius) and domesticated Red Junglefowl from Java (Gallus gallus bankiva). The roosters have a glossy blackish green plumage and are highly prized for their loud clear calls and striking colouration, while the hens are usually dull and infertile. Bekisars were traditionally used by the original inhabitants of the Sunda Islands as symbolic or spiritual mascots on outrigger canoes, and consequently spread over a wide area. The original hybrids are rarely fertile (and hens are generally sterile), but backcrosses with domestic chicken are sometimes achieved and thus several landraces of Pacific chickens have some Bekisar ancestry. While the hybrid is only of historical interest in most regions, on Java it is still being produced as a more stereotyped breed with several local varieties, known as Ayam Bekisar. The wild Green Junglefowl is a mangrove forest adapted species. Unlike the Red Junglefowl, the ancestor of most domestic chickens, it is adapted for life with little fresh water. During the dry season, and also on arid volcanic islands, the Green Junglefowl gets most of its water
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Bull Terrier

    Bull Terrier

    • Examples: Abraxas Aaran
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Bull Terrier or English Bull Terrier is a breed of dog in the terrier family. They are known for their large, egg-shaped head, and small triangular eyes. The Bull Terrier is exceptionally powerful for its size, ranking 1st out of all dog breeds in pound-for-pound lean muscle tissue. There is also a miniature version of this breed and is officially known as the Miniature Bull Terrier. The Bull Terrier's most recognizable feature is its head, described as 'egg shaped' when viewed from the front, the top of the skull is almost flat from ear to ear. Profile curves gently downwards from top of skull to tip of nose which should be black and bent downwards at tip. Nostrils are well developed and under-jaw deep and strong snout. The unique triangle-shaped eyes are small, dark, and deep-set. The body is full and round, while the shoulders are robust and very muscular and the tail is carried horizontally. They are generally white in colour and it walks with a jaunty gait, and is popularly known as the 'gladiator of the canine race'. Although there is much discussion regarding the safety of owning a Bull Terrier, the American Temperament Test Society (ATTS), which performs temperament
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    Cubalaya

    Cubalaya

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Cuba
    The Cubalaya is a breed of chicken originating in Cuba. The distinguishing trait of this breed is their long, broad tail—called a lobster tail—carried at a downward angle. In the United States and Europe they are now primarily kept as ornamental and exhibition poultry. In the middle 19th century, the Spaniards brought to Havana, Cuba, several varieties of Asiatic game fowl that originated in the Philippine Islands. The Cubans crossed the Asiatic breeds, and subsequently re-crossed them with birds of European origin. These birds were then selectively bred for wide, extended tails and a curving beak, fierce eyes, and a courageous expression. In this manner the Cubalaya was created, independent from any scientific control. In 1935, the Asociacion Nacional de Avicultura (Cuban National Poultry Association) approved the breed. Their name was chosen in honor of the Republic of Cuba, which had patronized and refined them. First shown in the U.S. at the International Poultry Exhibition in 1939, the Cubalaya breed is currently recognized by the American Poultry Association (APA) and the American Bantam Association (ABA). Cubalayas are characterized by their stately carriage; pea comb;
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Tibetan Mastiff

    Tibetan Mastiff

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Tibetan Mastiff (Wylie: do khyi; Lhasa dialect IPA: [tʰòcʰi]) is an ancient breed and type of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) originating with nomadic cultures of Central Asia. The Tibetan Mastiff also known as do-khyi (variously translated as "home guard", "door guard", "dog which may be tied", "dog which may be kept"), reflects its use as a guardian of herds, flocks, tents, villages, monasteries, and palaces, much as the old English ban-dog (also meaning tied dog) was a dog tied outside the home as a guardian. However, in nomad camps and in villages, the do-khyi is traditionally allowed to run loose at night. The molosser type with which the modern Tibetan Mastiff breed is purportedly linked was known across the ancient world by many names. Bhote Kukur in Nepali as bhote means someone from Tibet and kukur means dog. In Mandarin Chinese, the name is '藏獒' (Zang'Ao), which literally means Tibetan Mastiff or Tibetan "big ferocious dog". In Mongolia, it is called bankhar. The name Tibetan mastiff is a misnomer; it is not a true mastiff. The term "mastiff" was used primarily because it meant "large dog". Early Western visitors to Tibet misnamed several of its breeds: The
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Beagle

    Beagle

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Beagle is a breed of small to medium-sized dog. A member of the Hound Group, it is similar in appearance to the Foxhound, but smaller, with shorter legs and longer, softer ears. Beagles are scent hounds, developed primarily for tracking hare, rabbit, and other game. They have a great sense of smell and tracking instinct that sees them employed as detection dogs for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world. Beagles are intelligent, and are popular as pets because of their size, even temper, and lack of inherited health problems. These characteristics also make them the dog of choice for animal testing. Although beagle-type dogs have existed for over 2,000 years, the modern breed was developed in Great Britain around the 1830s from several breeds, including the Talbot Hound, the North Country Beagle, the Southern Hound, and possibly the Harrier. Beagles have been depicted in popular culture since Elizabethan times in literature and paintings, and more recently in film, television and comic books. Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts has been promoted as "the world's most famous beagle". Dogs of similar size and purpose to the modern Beagle can be
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    California Gray

    California Gray

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The California Gray is a breed of chicken developed in the U.S. state of California in the 1930s by James Dryden, a professor of poultry science at Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. The objective of the breed's creator was to produce a dual–purpose chicken that was suitable for meat production and laid large white eggs. By crossing Barred Plymouth Rocks and White Leghorns, a naturally autosexing breed with gray barred plumage (as adults) was produced. Largely because the breed was never recognized officially for exhibition by the American Poultry Association, California Grays are a rare breed in the 21st century. They were later used to develop the California White, a commercial hybrid.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Dandie Dinmont Terrier

    Dandie Dinmont Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    A Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small Scottish breed of dog in the terrier family. The breed has a very long body, short legs, and a distinctive "top-knot" of hair on the head. A character in Sir Walter Scott's novel Guy Mannering has lent the name to the breed, with "Dandie Dinmont" thought to be based on James Davidson, who is credited as being the "father" of the modern breed. Davidson's dogs descended from earlier terrier owning families, including the Allans of Holystone, Northumberland. There are three breed clubs in the UK supporting the breed, although it is registered as a Vulnerable Native Breed by the Kennel Club due to its low number of puppy registrations on a yearly basis. The breed is friendly, but tough and is suitable for interaction with older children. There are no breed specific health concerns, but they can be affected by spinal issues due to their elongated body and the breed is affected by canine cancer at a higher than average rate. The breed originates from the dogs being used in the border country of Scotland and England. During the 1600s, they were used for hunting badgers and otters. Whilst their ultimate origin remains unknown, dogs owned by the Allans of
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Longhorn cattle

    Longhorn cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    English Longhorn cattle are a long-horned brown and white breed of beef cattle originating from Craven in the north of England. They have a white patch along the line of their spine and under their bellies. They are not to be confused with the Texas longhorn breed, which is also often called "Longhorn cattle" or "Longhorns". Though long-horned oxen were already predominant in Craven in the 16th and 17th centuries, the English Longhorn breed was much improved for beef by Robert Bakewell of Dishley. His selective breeding made the "Dishley Longhorn" very popular towards the end of the 18th century. The breed is still to be found in Leicestershire at the Stanley's Springbarrow Farm, Freddie de Lisle's Quenby Hall and a small herd has been re-introduced at Calke Abbey in Derbyshire where the Harpur-Crewe family had traditionally kept them. English Longhorns have curved horns that can go over the face, whereas Texas Longhorn horns go in any shape and size, though usually up and away from the face. Texas Longhorn cattle can be any colour a cow can be other than blue-roan, while longhorn are only brown and white.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Orpington

    Orpington

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Orpington is a breed of chicken named after Orpington, England, which was made famous in part by this breed. Belonging to the English class of chickens, it was bred to be an excellent layer with good meat quality. Their large size and soft appearance together with their rich color and gentle contours make them very attractive, and as such its popularity has grown as a show bird rather than a utility breed. They go broody very often, and make great mothers. Although being rather heavy, they are able to fly small distances but rarely do, so they work well as backyard birds. Due to their build they do well in very cold climates. The fluff of their feathers allows rain water to penetrate, so they must be kept out of the rain. The original Black Orpington was bred by William Cook in 1886 by crossing Minorcas, Langshans and Plymouth Rocks to create a new hybrid bird. Cook selected a black bird that would exhibit well by hiding the dirt and soot of London. The 1905. When the breed was shown in Madison Square Gardens in 1895, its popularity soared. Cook also gave this name to a breed of duck with a similar purpose, but known simply as the Buff Duck in North America. The original colors
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Otterhound

    Otterhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Otterhound is an old British dog breed. The origins are not known. It is a scent hound, and was developed to hunt otters. It is currently recognised by the Kennel Club as a Vulnerable Native Breed, with around 1000 animals worldwide. The first recorded Otterhounds known to resemble the current breed are in the North-West of England in the first half of the 19th century - for example, the Hawkstone Otter Hunt and Squire Lomax's Otterhounds. In the second half of the 19th century, French Griffons were outcrossed, including one-eighth Wolf cross/Griffon Vendeen from the Comte de Canteleu in Normandy. In the early 20th century the Griffon Nivernais was crossed into the breed, and one particular dog, Boatman, a Grand Griffon Vendeen/Bloodhound cross became an ancestor for several kennels. It is one of the ancestral breeds of the Airedale Terrier. The Otterhound is a large, rough-coated hound with an imposing head. Originally bred for hunting, it has great strength and a strong body with long striding steps. This makes it able to perform prolonged hard work. The Otterhound hunts its quarry both on land and in water and it has a combination of characteristics unique among hounds;
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Toy Fox Terrier

    Toy Fox Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Toy Fox Terrier is a small terrier breed of dog, directly descended from the larger Fox Terrier but considered a separate breed. Toy Fox Terriers are small dogs with a muscular and athletic appearance. Notable characteristic traits include a short glossy and predominantly white coat, coupled with a predominantly solid head, and a short, high-set tail. The breed has been deemed elegant and graceful with V-shaped ears and large eyes. The tail can be short and straight or long and shiny, and breeders often shorten the tail a few days after birth by clipping it about three-fifth of the way from the tip (at the third or fourth joint). The coat is short, fine, and glossy in black with tan, with areas of tan on the face; there are two other variants, one with 'chocolate' replacing the black in areas (the UKC does not allow this variant to be shown), and another which is all white and tan with no black at all. These variants are often known as 'Tri-Color', 'Chocolate', and 'Tan and White', respectively. The height ranges from 8.5–11.5 inches at the shoulder (21.5–29.2 cm) and weight from 3.5-9 pounds. They are in many ways similar to the Miniature Fox Terrier. Toy Fox Terriers, like
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Vorwerk

    Vorwerk

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Vorwerk is a breed of chicken originating in Germany. Though it is unrelated to the German company which produces the Vorwerk vacuum cleaner, it is the only chicken to share its name with a brand of household appliance. A rare fowl, it has distinctive black and gold plumage. Beginning in 1900, poultry breeder Oskar Vorwerk began to create a medium-sized, utilitarian fowl with the belted plumage pattern of the Lakenvelder. The key difference in appearance would be the Vorwerk's dark golden base color, rather than the white of the Lakenvelder. Thus, his chicken is sometimes incorrectly called the Golden Lakenvelder, especially in North America. The Golden Lakenvelder, a plumage variety, is a separate breed from the Vorwerk. Breeds used to create the Vorwerk included the Lakenvelder, Buff Orpington, Buff Sussex and Andalusian. By 1913, the Vorwerk was standardized. However, it never really gained widespread use, and is rare or non-existent outside Continental Europe. In 1966, a U.S. man named Wilmar Vorwerk of New Ulm, MN developed an interest in the breed, but it had not been exported to North America. Thus, he created a bantam version from scratch using Lakenvelders, Buff and
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Angus cattle

    Angus cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Angus cattle (Aberdeen Angus) are a breed of cattle commonly used in beef production. They were developed from cattle native to the counties of Aberdeenshire and Angus in Scotland, and are known as Aberdeen Angus in most parts of the world. They are naturally polled (do not have horns) and solid black or red, although the udder may be white. There have always been both red and black individuals in the population, and in the USA they are regarded as two separate breeds - Red Angus and Black Angus. Black Angus is the most popular beef breed of cattle in the United States, with 324,266 animals registered in 2005. For some time before the 1800s, the hornless cattle in Aberdeenshire and Angus were called Angus doddies. Hugh Watson can be considered the founder of the breed; he was instrumental in selecting the best black, polled animals for his herd. His favorite bull was Old Jock, who was born 1842 and sired by Grey-Breasted Jock. Grey-Breasted Jock was given the number "1" in the Scottish Herd Book when it was founded. Another of Watson's notable animals was a cow, Old Granny, which was born in 1824 and said to have lived to 35 years of age and to have produced 29 calves. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Bernese Mountain Dog

    Bernese Mountain Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Switzerland
    The Bernese Mountain Dog, called in German the Berner Sennenhund, is a large breed of dog, one of the four breeds of Sennenhund-type dogs from the Swiss Alps. The name Sennenhund is derived from the German "Senne" (alpine pasture) and "hund" (dog), as they accompanied the alpine herders and dairymen called Senn. Berner (or Bernese in English) refers to the area of the breed's origin, in the Canton of Bern in Switzerland. This mountain dog was originally kept as a general farm dog. Large Sennenhunds in the past were also used as draft animals, pulling carts. The breed was officially established in 1907. In 1937, the American Kennel Club recognised it as a member of the Working Group. The four breeds of Sennenhund, with the original breed name followed by the most popular English version of the breed name. Like the other Sennenhunds, the Bernese Mountain Dog is a large, heavy dog with a distinctive tricolored coat, black with white chest and rust colored markings above eyes, sides of mouth, front of legs, and a small amount around the white chest. An ideal of a perfectly-marked individual gives the impression of a white horse shoe shape around the nose and a white "Swiss cross" on
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Chow Chow

    Chow Chow

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    Chow Chow is a type of breed originally from China, where it is referred to as Songshi Quan (Pinyin: sōngshī quǎn 鬆獅犬), which means "puffy-lion dog". The Chow Chow is a sturdily built dog, square in profile, with a broad skull and small, triangular, erect ears with rounded tips. The breed is known for a very dense double coat that is either smooth or rough. The fur is particularly thick in the neck area, giving it a distinctive ruff or mane appearance. The coat may be red, black, blue, cinnamon/fawn, or cream. Chow Chows' eyes are typically deep set and almond shaped. The breed is distinguished by its unusual blue-black/purple tongue and very straight hind legs, resulting in a rather stilted gait. The bluish color extends to the Chow Chow's lips; this is the only dog breed with this distinctive bluish color in its lips and oral cavity (other dogs have black or a piebald pattern skin in their mouths). One other distinctive feature is the curly tail. It has thick hair and lies curled on its back. The nose should be black, but blue-coated Chow Chows can have a solid blue or slate-colored nose. According to the American Kennel Club breed standards, any other tone is not acceptable for
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    German Coolies

    German Coolies

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Coolie also known as an Australian Koolie or German Collie is an Australian dog breed. Specifically, it is a herding dog, a subcategory of working dog. Coolies are eye catching, well balanced, medium sized dogs, with unusual markings in form of patches and flecks of colour, creating a mottled effect. The two main colors are red and blue merle though they are also seen as solid and black and white varieties. Eyes can be blue, brown, green or black or a combination of blue and brown. Ears are moderately sized, triangular shaped and are usually pricked or semi-pricked. Colours: Predominantly red and blue merle. Solids are permissible. Dark merle is encouraged. Careful thought must be put into breeding certain colored dogs together due to possibility of deafness and other birth defects. Coat: The coat can be short, medium or long with short being the preferred coat type. The Coolie is active and intelligent with a strong herding instinct. The Coolie is renowned for its biddable and friendly nature and its easy-going, fun-loving personality makes the breed a great choice for a lively family or active individual. Coolies are responsive to commands, easy to train, loyal to their owner
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Ibizan Hound

    Ibizan Hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Spain
    The Ibizan Hound (originally named Podenco Ibicenco), pronounced "I-bee-zan" or "I-beeth-an", is a lean, agile dog of the hound family. There are two hair types of the breed: smooth and wire. The more commonly seen type is the smooth. Some consider there to be a third type, long, but the longhair is most likely a variation of the wire. The Ibizan Hound is an elegant and agile breed, with an athletic and attractive outline and a ground-covering springy trot. Though graceful in appearance, it has good bone girth and is a rugged/hardy breed. Its large upright ears - a hallmark of the breed - are broad at the base and frame a long and elegant headpiece. The neck is long and lean. It has a unique front assembly with well laid-back shoulders and relatively straight upper arm. It comes in both smooth and wire-coated varieties. It is a combination of red and white. Its nose is flesh colored, as are its ears, eye rims, and pads of feet. Its eyes are a striking amber color and have an alert and intelligent expression. The Ibizan may range in height, depending on which Standard you follow, from 22 to 29 inches (56 to 74 cm) and weigh from 45 to 65 pounds (20 to 29 kg), males being larger than
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Kerry Blue Terrier

    Kerry Blue Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Ireland
    The Kerry Blue Terrier is a breed of dog. In Ireland it is often called the Irish Blue Terrier. Originally bred to control "vermin" including rats, rabbits, badgers, foxes, otters and hares, over time the Kerry became a general working dog used for a variety of jobs including herding cattle and sheep, and as a guard dog. Today the Kerry has spread around the world as a companion and working dog. Despite winning Crufts (the most important UK dog show) in 2000, it remains an unfashionable breed, still distinctly uncommon, but not as threatened as some of the other terrier breeds such as Skye Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, and Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Some characteristics of the Kerry Blue Terrier include a long head, flat skull, deep chest, and a soft wavy-to-curly coat that comes in several shades of "blue", the general term outside this breed being progressive grey. Puppies are born black; the blue appears gradually as the puppy grows older, usually up to 2 years of age. The ideal Kerry should be 18-1/2 inches at the withers for a male, slightly less for the female. The most desirable weight for a fully developed male is from 33-40 pounds, females weighing proportionately less. The coat
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Komondor

    Komondor

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Hungary
    The Komondor (Hungarian plural komondorok) is a large, white-colored Hungarian breed of livestock guardian dog with a long, corded coat. Sometimes referred to as 'mop dogs,' the Komondor is a long-established powerful dog breed that has a natural guardian instinct to guard livestock and other property. The Komondor was brought to Europe by the Cumans and it was mentioned for the first time in 1544 in a Hungarian codex. The Komondor breed has been declared one of Hungary’s national treasures, to be preserved and protected from modification. The name Komondor derives from Koman-dor, meaning "Cuman dog". The breed descends from Tibetan dogs and came from Asia with the Cumans, whose homeland was near the Yellow River. In the late 900s, Mongols began to expand their territories at the expense of the Cumans, forcing them to move westwards. Fleeing from the Mongols, they reached the borders of Hungary in the 1100s. Cumans were granted asylum and settled in Hungary in 1239 under Köten Khan. Komondor remains have been found in Cuman gravesites. The Komondor is a large dog (many are over 30 inches tall), making this one of the largest common breeds of dog, or a molosser. The body is covered
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Pembroke Welsh Corgi

    Pembroke Welsh Corgi

    • Examples: Raskal
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Pembroke Welsh Corgi ( /ˈkɔrɡi/) is a herding dog breed, which originated in Pembrokeshire, Wales. It is one of two breeds known as Welsh Corgi: the other is the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is the younger of the two Corgi breeds and is a separate and distinct breed from the Cardigan. The corgi is one of the smallest dogs in the Herding Group. Pembroke Welsh Corgis are famed for being the preferred breed of Queen Elizabeth II, who owns sixteen. These dogs have been favoured by British royalty for more than seventy years. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has been ranked at #11 in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, and is thus considered an excellent working dog. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was ranked as the 25th most popular dog in 2011. The Corgi is proportional to larger breeds but has shorter legs, yet has a sturdy appearance and an athletic body that helps it herd livestock such as poultry, sheep and cattle. They are short so if livestock tries to kick the dog, the hoof goes right over the dog's head. Its body is long, and it has a naturally long, bobbed, or artificially docked tail and erect ears. The corgi's head should be foxy in shape and
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Penedesenca

    Penedesenca

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Penedesenca is a breed of chicken originating in the Spanish province of Catalonia, in the area around Vilafranca del Penedès, which is the main town in the region known as "Penedès". It was developed in the first half of the 20th century from native barnyard chickens, and today is noted for producing copious amounts of very dark brown eggs, said to be among the darkest of any breed of chicken. The earliest variety was the Black Penedesenca, which became standardized in 1946, when it was better known as the Vilafranca chicken. Today, Black, Crele, Partridge, and Wheaten colors exist (the Crele variety shows sexual differentiation at hatching, the males being light ash-grey and the females nut-brown in color). However, no variety has been accepted in to poultry standards. All members of the breed possess red earlobes with a white center, red wattles, and an unusual red comb. Called the king's comb or carnation comb, it is similar to a common single comb but has several lobes at the rear. The breed is rare among poultry fanciers in North America, but is a common breed in Central and South America.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Borzoi

    Borzoi

    • Examples: Nobs
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Russia
    The borzoi ( /ˈbɔrzɔɪ/; literally "fast") is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) also called the Russian wolfhound and descended from dogs brought to Russia from central Asian countries. It is similar in shape to a greyhound, and is also a member of the sighthound family. The system by which Russians over the ages named their sighthounds was a series of descriptive terms, not actual names. "Borzói" is the masculine singular form of an archaic Russian adjective that means "fast" - see Russian wiktionary борзый. "Borzáya sobáka" ("fast dog") is the basic term used by Russians, though "sobáka" is usually dropped. The name "Psovaya" derived from the word Psovina, which means "wavy, silky coat", just as "Hortaya" (as in Hortaya Borzaya) means shorthaired. In Russia today the breed we know as the borzoi is officially known as "Russkaya Psovaya Borzaya". Other Russian sighthound breeds are "Stepnaya Borzaya" (from the steppe), called "Stepnoi"; and "Krimskaya Borzaya" (from the Crimea), called "Krimskoi". The plural "borzois" may be found in dictionaries; however, the Borzoi Club of America maintains that "borzoi" is the preferred form for both singular and plural forms (in
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Boston Terrier

    Boston Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Boston Terrier is a breed of dog originating in the United States of America. This "American Gentleman" was accepted in 1893 by the American Kennel Club as a non-sporting breed. Color and markings are important when distinguishing this breed to the AKC standard. They should be either black, brindle or seal with white markings. Bostons are small and compact with a short tail and erect ears. The AKC says they are highly intelligent and very easily trained. They are friendly and can be stubborn at times. The average life span of a Boston is around 11 to 13 years, though some can live well into their teens. The Boston Terrier breed originated around 1870, when Robert C. Hooper of Boston purchased a dog known as Hooper's Judge, who was of a Bull and Terrier type lineage. Judge's specific lineage is unknown; however, Hooper's Judge is either directly related to the original Bull and Terrier breeds of the 18th and early 19th centuries, or Judge is the result of modern English Bulldogs being crossed into terriers created in the 1860s for show purposes, like the White English Terrier. Judge weighed over 27.5 pounds (13.5 kilos). Their offspring interbred with one or more French
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Malay

    Malay

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Malaysia
    The Malay is a breed of chicken originating in Asia, most likely in northern Pakistan. These birds are cousins of Asil. It is unknown why they were called Malay, but perhaps because of a mistake by the former East India Company, when they introduced that exotic new breed around 1570. In Asia, the Malay chicken is usually found only in rural areas and villages. It is sometimes referred to as "kampung" chicken (kampung means "village" in Malay). In the Borneo region of Sabah, Sarawak and Brunei, the Malay chicken is called Sigun. In north West Pakistan these are called Sadalay meaning big docile or gentle giants. The Malay Chicken is sometimes used as fighting cocks in cockfighting. Today, in the West the Malay is mainly kept for participation in poultry shows by breeders. It is considered a hard-feathered, gamefowl breed. The Malay has an upright stance, a well muscled form and a large skull with a cruel expression. Nowadays they are selected to be better egg-layers than in the 1970s with 70 to 120 eggs annually for a young hen and older hens laying only 30 to 55 eggs. In Malaysia, kampung chicken is considered a premium by people living in urban areas and costs more in supermarkets
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Marans

    Marans

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    The Marans is a breed of chicken originating in France. It is a medium breed compared to others, popular for poultry shows and is a dual purpose fowl known both for its extremely dark eggs as well as for its very fine meat qualities. There are 9 recognized colors in the French Standard: Cuckoo, Golden Cuckoo, Black, Birchen, Black Copper, Wheaton, Black-tailed Buff, White and Columbian; other colours not officially recognized (such as Blue Copper) also exist. Black Copper (black with copper feathers on the neck) and Cuckoo (barred feathers, giving a black and white speckled appearance) are the most common of these. The breed as it was when first brought to England was very variable in appearance. The only colours at this time were the white and brassy black. The breed became more of a standard breed than a country fowl due to the vigorous breeding standards of early British breeders, however this was only started fairly early in the 20th century, To the present day there is still much work to be done as "throw backs" are prevalent in the form of white and black birds being bred from other coloured strains. Sporadically appearing yellow colouration to the legs and beak rather than
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Black Hereford

    Black Hereford

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Black Hereford is a hybrid type of beef cattle produced in the British Isles by crossing Hereford beef bulls with Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Black Herefords are not usually maintained from generation to generation, but are constantly produced as a byproduct of dairy farming as a terminal cross. They are one of the most common types of beef cattle in the British Isles, outnumbering many pure beef breeds. The Black Hereford has a white face like the Hereford, but the red body colour of the Hereford is replaced by black from the Holstein-Friesian – white face and black coat colour are both genetically dominant in cattle. The pied pattern of the Holstein-Friesian does not appear in the offspring. Cattle only produce milk after calving, and so every dairy cow must produce a calf every year. In dairy herds (which in the British Isles are almost all Holstein-Friesians), the best milking cows will normally be bred to a dairy bull, usually by artificial insemination (AI). The female purebred dairy calves from these matings will go on to become replacement dairy cows. Half of the purebred calves will, of course, be male – these are mostly not needed for breeding, and are generally
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Brahman

    Brahman

    • Breed of: Zebu
    The Brahman or Brahma is a breed of Zebu cattle (Bos primigenius indicus), later exported from India to the rest of the world. The main breeds used were Kankrej, Gujarat, Nelore or Ongole and the Gir or Gyr cattle. The American Brahman has a distinct large hump over the top of the shoulder and neck, and a loose flap of skin (dewlap) hanging from the neck. It is also known for its distinctive long, floppy ears. Bulls weigh 1,600 to 2,200 pounds (800 to 1,100 kg) and cows weigh 1,000 to 1,400 pounds (500 to 700 kg). At birth, calves weigh 60 to 65 pounds (30 to 33 kg). Brahman cattle can be gray or red color. Their tail switch is black, and they have black pigmentation on their noses, tips of ears, and hooves. They are primarily a horned breed of cattle however there are some bloodlines of Brahman that are naturally polled (without horns). Brahmans have a greater ability to withstand heat than European cattle. They have more sweat glands, and also an oily skin, thought to help repel pest insects along with a smooth coat. They have a short hair coat. They are also more resistant to parasites and disease. Brahmans have also been extensively crossbred with European cattle in subtropical
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Java

    Java

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Java is a breed of chicken originating in the United States. Despite the breed's name, which comes from the island of Java in Indonesia, it was developed in the U.S. from chickens of unknown Asian extraction. It is one of the oldest American chickens, forming the basis for many other breeds, but is critically endangered today. Javas are large birds with a sturdy appearance. They are hardy, and are well-suited for both meat and egg production, especially by small-scale farms, homesteads, and backyard keepers. Javas are heavy chickens, with roosters weighing around 9.5 pounds (4.3 kilos) and hens 6.5 to 7.5 pounds (2.9 to 3.4 kilos). They have a very long, broad back and a deep breast, which makes for a solid, rectangular build. They have small earlobes and medium size combs and wattles, all of which are red in color. Javas have singe combs, but they have a shape which suggests the influence of a pea-combed breed in their development. Javas appear in three color variations today: Black, Mottled, and White. The Black has black shanks and beaks, though some yellow may appear in the legs. The plumage is a uniform black hue that has a dark green sheen in the light. The Mottled and
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Mangalitsa

    Mangalitsa

    • Breed of: Domestic pig
    • Place of origin: Hungary
    Mangalitsa (US spelling), Mangalitza (UK spelling) or Mangalica (original Hungarian spelling) is a name for three breeds of pig grown especially in Hungary and the Balkans known also as a curly-hair hog. It belongs to European unimproved lard-type breeds (as well as Iberian Black and Alentejana pigs) that are descended directly from wild boar populations. The Mangalitsa pig is unusual as it grows a hairy 'fleece', akin to that of a sheep. The only other pig breed noted for having a long coat is the now extinct Lincolnshire Curly Coat of England. The Mangalitsa was formerly bred as a lard pig, and animals were large and round. Because of the drop in demand for lard, the breed's popularity has declined and it is now regarded as a "rare breed". It is referred to as the "Mangalitza" in the United Kingdom and the "Mangalitsa" in the United States. The blonde Mangalitsa was developed from older hardy types of Hungarian pig (Bakonyi and Szalontai) crossed with the Hungarian Wild Boar breed of Hungarian origin (1833) (and later others like Alföldi. The development took place in Hungary in the early 19th century. The new quick-growing "fat-type" hog did not require any special care, so
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Minorca

    Minorca

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Minorca is a breed of chicken originating in Spain. They are classified in the Mediterranean class by the American Poultry Association. They lay white eggs. Color varieties include buff, black, white with the British recognizing a blue phase. Minorcas mature quickly and begin crowing sooner than other breeds. It closely related to White-faced Black Spanish and Castilian Black. Minorcas tend to be very flighty. The Minorca is the largest of the Mediterranean class of fowl in roosters weighing 9 pounds and hens 7½ pounds. They are utility fowl and were once in the class of widespread large flocks for laying and meat production like the Leghorn breed which is the smallest of this class. This chicken does not go "broody" and are usually very flighty but can be trained if handled regularly while still chicks. The distinction of the Minorca is its rather large white ear patch much like the White Faced Black Spanish, another of this class which makes it recognizable at a distance. The white phase of this breed which once numbered in the thousands is thought now to only have 100 chickens in all of the United States. The breed was developed in England from imported Castilian fowl of
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Polish Lowland Sheepdog

    Polish Lowland Sheepdog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Poland
    The Polish Lowland Sheepdog (Polish: Polski Owczarek Nizinny, also PON), is a medium sized, shaggy-coated, sheep dog breed native to Poland. The PON is a muscular, thick-coated dog. The double coat can be of any color or pattern; white, gray, and brown are most common, with black, gray, or brown markings. It is common for colors to fade as the dogs reach adulthood. The undercoat is soft and dense, while the topcoat is rough and either straight or wavy, but not curly. The hair around the head makes the head appear to be larger than it actually is, and typically covers the eyes. Males are 45 – 50 cm (18 - 20 inches) in height at the withers, while females are 42 – 47 cm (17 - 19 inches). Males typically weigh between 40 - 50 lb, females, 30 - 40 lb. The body is just off square, it appears rectangular due to the abundance of coat on the chest and rear; the ratio of the height to the body length should be 9:10 (a 45 cm tall dog should have a body 50 cm long). The tail is either very short or docked in the United States. European countries have banned docking for the most part and many PONs now have tails of varying lengths. Polish Lowland Sheepdogs are stable and self-confident. They
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Poltava

    Poltava

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Ukraine
    The Poltava is an old Ukrainian dual-purpose breed of chicken named after the Ukrainian city of Poltava. It includes three color varieties: Clay, Cuckoo, and Black. The Poltava Clay variety was included in the studies of genetic diversity and relationships between various chicken breeds: The latter study was done in 1998—2000 within the framework of an international research project entitled «Development of Strategy and Application of Molecular Tools to Assess Biodiversity in Chicken Genetic Resources», or shortly AVIANDIV, that was sponsored by European Commission and co-ordinated by Dr. Steffen Weigend, of the Institute for Animal Breeding, Mariensee, Germany. The AVIANDIV project employed anonymous genetic markers, so called microsatellite loci spread across the whole genome. It was shown that 33 populations had no unique alleles, and 14 populations had one unique allele.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Sultan

    Sultan

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Turkey
    The Sultan is a breed of chicken originating in Turkey. Its English moniker is directly culled from the original Turkish language name of Serai-Tavuk, which translates as "fowls of the Sultan". They have always been primarily ornamental, having been kept in the gardens of Ottoman sultanate. In the West they are bred for competitive showing as part of poultry fancy, and are generally a rare sight. The breed was first exported from its native country in 1854, when a Ms. Elizabeth Watts of Hampstead, London brought a small flock to Britain. It was seen in North America by 1867, and was recognized officially by acceptance in to the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection in 1874. Sultans have a great deal of decorative plumage, including large, puffy crests, beards, long tails, and profuse foot feathering. Their small, V-shaped combs are almost entirely hidden under feathering. Sultans are also one of a minority of breeds to have five toes on each foot. With males weighing approximately 2.7 kilos (6 pounds) and hens 2 kilos (4 pounds), they are relatively small standard breed chickens. They also have a bantam version. Sultans appear in three varieties: Black, Blue, and
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Adaptaur

    Adaptaur

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Adaptaur is a tropically-adapted Bos taurus beef cattle breed which was developed in Australia in the 1950s from crosses between Herefords and Shorthorns. The breed was established on the Belmont Research Station near Rockhampton, Queensland and cattle were selected primarily for increased resistance and/or tolerance to tropical heat and cattle ticks (Boophilus microplus). Adaptaur cattle are early maturing and of a medium size with a short dark red pigmented coat and good resistance to internal parasites. Some Adaptaurs carry a gene that produces extremely high resistance to cattle ticks and the Australian Hereford Society is assisting to increase frequency of the gene by embryo transfer. It is capable of producing substantial hybrid vigor when used for crossbreeding. The F1 progeny grow faster and are more fertile than Brahmans. Adaptaurs have similar resistance to ticks and worms as Brahmans. They are at least 10% more efficient than Brahmans and have the favorable carcase qualities of the Bos taurus cattle. Adaptaur cattle are mainly found in the tropical areas of northern Australia.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Ancona

    Ancona

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Ancona is a breed of chicken originating in the Marches Italy. Called the Marchegiana in Italy they were exported to England in the mid 19th century and named after the sea port of Ancona. It is noted for its ability to produce large white eggs. It is an excellent, economical layer, as it lays an average of 250 - 300 eggs per year. Anconas are hardy fowls that thrive in high & low temperatures. The Ancona's plumage is black with white "V" tips on the end of the feathers. Its dark plumage makes it harder for predators to see, and has a beetle green tint. It is a Mediterranean breed, which refers to its point of origin. Like other Mediterranean breeds, they are closely feathered. Anconas can have either a rose or a single comb, as either are accepted by the American Poultry Association. This breed has four toes on each foot, no feathering on its legs which are yellow mottled with black, and does not possess a crest. Their combs are medium in size, and single comb Ancona females should have a neat comb that falls to one side. Standard males weigh around six pounds, while hens weigh around four and a half pounds. It also comes as a bantam. List of chicken breeds
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Belgian Shepherd Malinois

    Belgian Shepherd Malinois

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Malinois ( /ˈmælɪnwɑː/) or Belgian Shepherd Dog is a breed of dog, sometimes classified as a variety of the Belgian Shepherd Dog classification, rather than as a separate breed. The Malinois is recognized in the United States under the name Belgian Malinois. Its name is the French word for Mechlinian, which is in Dutch either Mechelse herdershond (shepherd dog from Mechelen) or Mechelaar (one from Mechelen). These dogs are popular for K9 use in all forms of services. Examples include detection of odors such as explosives, accelerants (for arson investigation), and narcotics; tracking of humans for suspect apprehension in police work; and search and rescue. Like all Belgian Shepherds, the Malinois is a medium-sized and square-proportioned dog in the sheepdog family. The Malinois has a short mahogany coat with black markings. It has black erect ears and a black muzzle. It has a square build in comparison to the German Shepherd. Due to its history as a working dog (i.e., being bred for function over form), the Malinois can vary greatly in appearance. The acceptable colors of pure-bred Malinois are a base color fawn to mahogany and tan with a black mask and black ears with some
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Cairn Terrier

    Cairn Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Cairn Terrier is one of the oldest of the terrier breeds, originating in the Scottish Highlands and recognized as one of Scotland's earliest working dogs. It is used for hunting and burrowing prey among the cairns. Although the breed had existed long before, the name Cairn Terrier was a compromise suggestion after the breed was originally brought to official shows in the United Kingdom in 1909 under the name Short-haired Skye terriers. This name was not acceptable to The Kennel Club due to opposition from Skye Terrier breeders, and the name Cairn Terrier was suggested as an alternative. They are usually left-pawed, which has been shown in dogs to correlate to superior performance in tasks related to scent. Cairn Terriers are ratters. In Scotland they would search the cairns (man-made pile of stones) for rats and other rodents. Thus if one is kept as a household pet it will do the job of a cat, specifically catching and killing mice, rabbits, and squirrels. The Cairn originated in the Highlands of Scotland and the Isle of Skye, initially grouped in the "Skye Terrier" class alongside the Scottish and West Highland White Terriers. In the early 1900s, the three breeds began to be
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Cochin

    Cochin

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: China
    The Cochin or Cochin China, is a breed of chicken. The name Cochin came from the original Chinese name 九斤黄(in pinyin: jiujin huang, pronounced jil jin hwaang), meaning nine jin yellow, erroneously conflated with the then-current names for what are now parts of southern India and Vietnam, where jin is a traditional Chinese measurement of weight. In China itself, the name 九斤黄 is actually used for any large chicken or even a dish made from one. Cochin ancestors first originated in the United States after the Chinese chicken, which was tight-feathered and had moderate to no feathers on their legs, was brought to the eastern coast around 1845. They soon became a hit, and Shanghai lovers took the fluffiest and most feather legged chickens to breed them for those traits exactly. Their result was vey nice, with the fully feather-legged and fluffy chicken we now call the Cochin. This began what was known as the “hen craze,” which stretched from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s, when people around the world bred chickens purely for their looks, rather than to create a better egg layer and such. The Cochin today is a very large, fluffy feathered bird with fully feathered legs and feet. Their
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Dorking

    Dorking

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Dorking is a breed of chicken that is believed to have originated in Italy during the period of the Roman Empire and was introduced in Britain at the time of the Roman conquest making it one of the oldest English breeds. One of the earliest known mentions of the Dorking was by the Roman agricultural writer Columella during the reign of Julius Caesar. In his text, Rei rusticae libri, he described the breed as, "square-framed, large and broad-breasted, with big heads and small upright combs...the purest breed being five-clawed". Pliny also described a similar bird with an odd number of toes in his Naturalis Historia. Although Caesar noted that poultry was already raised in Britain prior to his invasions in 55–54 BC, the Red Dorking is believed to have been introduced in Great Britain by the Romans at an early date where much of its development continued to take place. They appeared in the first British poultry show in 1845, together with the Sussex breed, which is believed to be derived from the Dorking. The birds are named after the market town of Dorking in Surrey which in the nineteenth century became one of the main centres of production. They were admitted in to the American
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    English Mastiff

    English Mastiff

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The English Mastiff, referred to by most Kennel Clubs simply as the Mastiff, is a breed of large dog perhaps descended from the ancient Alaunt through the Pugnaces Britanniae. Distinguishable by enormous size, massive head, and a limited range of colors, but always displaying a black mask, the Mastiff is noted for its gentle temperament. The lineage of modern dogs can be traced back to the early 19th century, and the modern type was stabilised in the 1880s. Following a period of sharp decline, the Mastiff has increased its worldwide popularity. With a massive body, broad skull and head of generally square appearance, it is the largest dog breed in terms of mass. Though the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane are taller, they are not nearly as robust. The body is large with great depth and breadth, especially between the forelegs, causing these to be set wide apart. The AKC standard height (per their website) for this breed is 30 inches (76 cm) at the shoulder for males and 27.5 inches (70 cm) (minimum) at the shoulder for females. A typical male can weigh 150–250 pounds (68–110 kg), a typical female can weigh 120–200 pounds (54–91 kg), with show specimens tending towards the upper
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Sealyham Terrier

    Sealyham Terrier

    • Examples: Geoffrey
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Wales
    The Sealyham Terrier is a rare Welsh breed of small to medium-sized terrier that originated in Wales as a working dog. It is principally a white-bodied, rough coated breed, developed in the mid to late 18th century by Captain John Edwardes at Sealyham House, Pembrokeshire. Following the First World War, it surged in popularity and was associated with Hollywood stars and members of the British Royal Family. Its numbers have dropped significantly since then, with the breed listed as a Vulnerable Native Breed by the Kennel Club; an all time low was recorded in 2008 when only 43 puppies were registered in the United Kingdom. This decline has been blamed on an influx of foreign and designer breeds, and the Sealyham's reduced usefulness as a working dog. This breed is equally suitable as a family dog or a working terrier, given the right training. It is affected by few breed specific breed disorders, with the only two prevalent conditions being lens luxation and canine degenerative myelopathy. The breed was developed between 1850 and 1891 by Captain John Edwardes, at Sealyham House, Pembrokeshire. It was originally used for pest control to hunt small game and eliminate vermin,
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

    Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Ireland
    The Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier is a breed of dog originating from Ireland. The four coat varieties are: Traditional Irish, Heavy Irish, English, and American. These dogs have a single coat which sheds very little hair, so they can be more easily tolerated by people allergic to other breeds. The Wheaten was bred in Ireland to be an all-purpose farm dog whose duties would have included herding, watching and guarding livestock, and vermin hunting and killing. They are believed to be related to the Kerry Blue Terrier. Today, Wheaten terriers compete in obedience, agility, and tracking, and are occasionally used in animal-assisted therapy, as well. In Ireland, they were commonly referred to as the "Poor Man’s Wolfhound." Their tails used to be docked to avoid taxes, and were often kept to a specific size. Despite its long history, the Wheaten was not recognized as a breed in Ireland by the Irish Kennel Club until 1937. In 1943, the British Kennel Club recognized the breed in the UK, as well. The first Wheatens were exported to Lydia Vogel in the United States in the 1940s, but serious interest in the breed took another ten years to develop. Finally, in 1973, they were recognized by the
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Ameraucana

    Ameraucana

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Ameraucana is a breed of chicken thought to have been developed in the United States, though it is not clear exactly where they were developed (the Ameraucana Standard chicken is often classified under "All Other" as place of origin). The name is a portmanteau term of American and Araucana (a related breed). Ameraucanas come in both a large and bantam variety. Eight colors are officially recognized for poultry shows by the American Poultry Association: Black, Blue, Blue Wheaten, Brown Red, Buff, Silver, Wheaten and White. There are several project colors, including Lavender. Ameraucanas are similar to Araucana chickens because both have pea combs and lay blue shelled eggs. but they are completely different breeds. Ameraucana traits include full tails, muffs, beards, and slate or black legs depending on the variety. Bantam cocks weigh 30 ounces and bantam hens weigh 26 ounces while large fowl cocks weigh 6½ pounds and large fowl hens weigh 5½ pounds. They are exceptional egg layers laying about 250 eggs a year. They lay light blue eggs with the occasional green and start laying at about 5 or 6 months old. The Ameraucana Breeders Club defines an Easter Egg chicken, or Easter
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Belted Galloway

    Belted Galloway

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    • Place of origin: Galloway
    The Belted Galloway is a heritage beef breed of cattle originating from Galloway in South West Scotland, adapted to living on the poor upland pastures and windswept moorlands of the region. The exact origin of the breed is unclear although it is often surmised that the white belt that distinguishes these cattle from the native black Galloway cattle may be as a result of cross breeding with Dutch Lakenvelder belted cattle. Belted Galloways are primarily raised for their quality marbled beef, although they are sometimes milked and purchased to adorn pastures due to their striking appearance. The origin of the white belt is unknown, but generally presumed to come from cross breeding with Dutch Belted cattle. A Polled Herd Book was started in 1852 which registered both Aberdeen-Angus and Galloways. Galloway breeders acquired their own herd book in 1878. The Dun and Belted Galloway Association was formed in Scotland in 1921, and in 1951 the name of the organization was changed to the Belted Galloway Society and dun cattle were no longer registered. It also keeps and records pedigrees for Belted Galloways and oversees the registration of White and Red Galloways. Currently in the UK there
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Chinese Crested Dog

    Chinese Crested Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Chinese crested dog is a hairless breed of dog. Like most hairless dog breeds, the Chinese crested comes in two varieties, both with and without fur, which are born in the same litter: the Hairless and the Powderpuff. This breed is considered small; 10–13 lb (4.5–5.9 kg). At first look, the Hairless and Powderpuff varieties of Chinese crested Dogs appear to be two different breeds, but hairlessness is an incomplete dominant trait within a single breed. The Hairless has soft, humanlike skin, as well as tufts of fur on its paws ("socks") and tail ("plume") and long, flowing hair on its head ("crest"). In addition to being an incomplete dominant gene, the "hairless" gene has a prenatal lethal effect when homozygous. Zygotes affected with double hairless genes (1 in 4) never develop into puppies, and are reabsorbed in the womb. All hairless Cresteds are therefore heterozygous. The Hairless variety can vary in amount of body hair. Fur on the muzzle, known as a beard, is not uncommon. A true Hairless often does not have as much furnishings (hair on the head, tail, and paws). The difference between a very hairy Hairless and a Powderpuff is that the Hairless has a single coat with
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Staffordshire Bull Terrier

    Staffordshire Bull Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Staffordshire Bull Terrier (informally: Staffie, Stafford, Staffy or Staff) is a medium-sized, short-coated breed of dog. It is an English dog, the fifth most popular breed, and related to the bull terrier. Descended from dog-fighting ancestors, it is muscular and loyal. It is the subject of breed specific legislation in some jurisdictions. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a medium-sized, stocky, and very muscular dog, with a similar appearance to the American Staffordshire terrier and American pit bull terrier. It has a broad head (male considerably more so than female), defined occipital muscles, a relatively short foreface, dark round eyes and a wide mouth with a clean scissor-like bite (the top incisors slightly overlap the bottom incisors). The ears are small. The cheek muscles are very pronounced. The lips show no looseness. From above, the head loosely resembles a triangle. The head tapers down to a strong well-muscled neck and shoulders placed on squarely spaced forelimbs. They are tucked up in their loins and the last 1-2 ribs of the ribcage are usually visible. The tail resembles an old fashioned pump handle. The hind quarters are well-muscled and are what give the
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    King Charles Spaniel

    King Charles Spaniel

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The King Charles Spaniel (also known as the English Toy Spaniel) is a small dog breed of the spaniel type. In 1903, the Kennel Club combined four separate toy spaniel breeds under this single title. The other varieties merged into this breed were the Blenheim, Ruby and Prince Charles Spaniels, each of which contributed one of the four colours available in the breed. Thought to have originated in the Far East, toy spaniels were first seen in Europe during the 16th century. They were made famous by their association with Charles II of England (1630–1685) and have been linked with English royalty since the time of Mary Tudor (1516–1558). Members of the breed have been owned by Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia, Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II. The King Charles Spaniel and the other types of toy spaniels were crossbred with the Pug in the early 19th century to reduce the size of the nose, as was the style of the day. The 20th century saw attempts to restore lines of King Charles Spaniels to the breed of Charles II's time. These included the unsuccessful Toy Trawler Spaniel and the now popular Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The Cavalier is slightly larger, with a flat
    5.25
    4 votes
    147
    Whippet

    Whippet

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Whippet is a breed of dog in the sighthound family. They are active and playful and are physically similar to a small Greyhound. Whippets are a medium-size dog averaging in weight from 15 to 30 lb (6.8–14 kg), with height (under the FCI standard) of 18.5 - 20 inches (47 - 51 cm) for males and 17.5–18.5 inches (44–47 cm) for females. Whippets tend to be somewhat larger in the United States and Canada with their population in show, coursing and some race whippets required to be within the AKC standard of 18.5 to 22.5 inches (47 to 57 cm) for males, and 17.5 to 21.5 inches (44 to 55 cm) for females. Because colour is considered immaterial in judging Whippets, they come in a wide variety of colours and marking patterns, everything from solid black to solid white, with red, fawn, brindle, blue, or cream. All manner of spots and blazes and patches are seen, sometimes all in the same litter. Whippets regularly compete in dog shows, lure coursing and racing. They are among the fastest of dogs running a course at 36 mph (58 km/h) and can run 200 yards in under 12 seconds. Whippets are generally quiet and gentle dogs, and may be content to spend much of the day resting. They are loyal
    5.25
    4 votes
    148
    Afghan Hound

    Afghan Hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Afghanistan
    The Afghan Hound is one of the oldest sighthound dog breeds. Distinguished by its thick, fine, silky coat and its tail with a ring curl at the end, the breed acquired its unique features in the cold mountains of Afghanistan,and east of Iran where it was originally used to hunt hares and gazelles by coursing them. Its local name is Sag-e Tāzī (Dari Persian: سگ تازی) or Tāžī Spay (Pashto: تاژي سپی‎). Other alternate names for this breed are Kuchi Hound, Tāzī, Balkh Hound, Baluchi Hound, Barutzy Hound, Shalgar Hound, Kabul Hound, Galanday Hound, or sometimes incorrectly African Hound. Sighthounds are among the oldest recognisable types of dogs, and genetic testing has placed the Afghan Hound breed among those with the least genetic divergence from the wolf on some markers; this is taken to mean that such dogs are descended from the oldest dog types, not that the breeds tested had in antiquity their exact modern form. Today's modern purebred breed of Afghan Hound descends from dogs brought in the 1920s to Great Britain, and are a blending of types and varieties of long haired sighthounds from across Afghanistan and the surrounding areas. Some had been kept as hunting dogs, others as
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Australian Terrier

    Australian Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Australian Terrier is a small breed of dog of the terrier dog type. The breed was developed in Australia, although the ancestral types of dogs from which the breed descends were from Great Britain. The Australian Terrier is a small dog with short legs, weighing around 6.5 kilograms (14 lb) and standing about 25 centimetres (9.8 in) at the withers, with a medium length shaggy harsh double coat that is not normally trimmed. Fur is shorter on the muzzle, lower legs, and feet, and there is a ruff around the neck. The coat colours are shades of blue or red with a lighter coloured topknot, and with markings on face, ears, body and legs of a colour described in the breed standard as "tan, never sandy". The tail was traditionally docked. As with most pet dog breeds, all proportions and aspects of the body and head as well as colours and markings are extensively described in the breed standard. The Australian Terrier is descended from the rough coated type terriers brought from Great Britain to Australia in the early 19th century. The ancestral types of all of these breeds were kept to eradicate mice and rats. The Australian Terrier shares ancestors with the Cairn Terrier, Shorthaired
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Briard

    Briard

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Briard /briːɑrd/ is an ancient breed of large herding dog, originally from France. A Briard-type dog appears in Gaston Febus' Livre de chasse ("Book of the Hunt"), written in the 14th century. According to legend, about the same time, a Briard fought a judicial duel with Robert Macaire to revenge its murdered owner, Aubry of Montdidier. Charlemagne, Napoleon, Thomas Jefferson, and Lafayette are all said to have owned Briards. It became popular after the Paris dog show of 1863, after the breed had been fixed, with crosses with the Beauceron and the Barbet. During the First World War, the Briard was used, almost to the point of extinction, by the French Army as a sentry, messenger, and to search for wounded soldiers. The Briard's modern-day roles include police, military and search-and-rescue work, as well as companion dog. The Briard can be any of several different solid colors or lighter colors with darker or light ears and face. Briards stand 58 to 69 cm (22 to 27 inches) at the withers. Ear cropping has been common in the breed, although more breeders are leaving the ears in their natural state since ear cropping is becoming illegal in most European countries, including the
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    German Shepherd Dog

    German Shepherd Dog

    • Examples: Ace the Wonder Dog
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The German Shepherd Dog (German: Deutscher Schäferhund), also known as an Alsatian or just the German Shepherd, is a breed of large-sized dog that originated in Germany. The German Shepherd is a relatively new breed of dog, with its origin dating to 1899. As part of the Herding Group, the German Shepherd is a working dog developed originally for herding and guarding sheep. Because of its strength, intelligence and abilities in obedience training it is often employed in police and military roles around the world. German Shepherds currently account for 4.6% of all dogs registered with the American Kennel Club. Due to its loyal and protective nature, the German Shepherd is one of the most registered of breeds. In Europe during the 1800s, attempts were being made to standardize breeds. The dogs were bred to preserve traits that assisted in their job of herding sheep and protecting flocks from predators. In Germany this was practiced within local communities, where shepherds selected and bred dogs that they believed had traits necessary for herding sheep, such as intelligence, speed, strength, and keen senses of smell. The results were dogs that were able to perform admirably in their
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    152
    Giant Schnauzer

    Giant Schnauzer

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Giant Schnauzer is a large, powerful breed of dog. It is one of the three Schnauzer breeds. Unlike the smaller verisons which belong to the terrier group, the Giant is a working dog. Like most large breeds, the Giant Schnauzer needs a fair amount of exercise. When hand-stripped, the Giant Schnauzer has either a harsh, wiry outer coat and dense, soft undercoator a soft, smooth coat. Coat color is either black or salt and pepper (gray). It weighs between 70 and 100 lb (32 to 45 kg) and stands 23.5 to 27.5 in (59 to 70 cm) at the withers. Gray giants tend to be more prone to health issues.--Drheidib (talk) 05:36, 24 September 2012 (UTC) When moving at a fast trot, a properly built Giant Schnauzer will single-track. Back remains strong, firm, and flat. The American Kennel Club lists the Giant as low shedding along with both other breeds of Schnauzers. However, Giant Schnauzers, as with almost all dogs, do shed some. When allowed, the hair on a Schnauzer will grow long, and thereby potentially increasing allergens(need relevant source (view source) ). This can be mitigated with consistent grooming to include mostly Long hair. The Giant Schnauzer does not moult nearly as much as
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    153
    Koolie

    Koolie

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Koolie or Coolie, also known as the Australian Koolie or the German Koolie is an Australian dog breed. Specifically, it is a herding dog, a subcategory of a working dog. Koolies have existed in Australia since the early 19th century, established through old photos owned by elder Koolie breeders and personal records such as diaries. The Koolie Club of Australia defines the breed based on its ability to work rather than on its conformation. However, most Koolie breeders refer to the Koolie as a breed rather than as a type, and assert that it "breeds true", with various types or strains within the breed. Many countries will gather their working dogs under the same category like Germany with their herding dog breeds all classed as Altdeutsche Hütehunde (heading dogs). New Zealand not only classify their breeds this way, but they also grade them by their working traits. Koolies in New Zealand are registered as a "heading dog": A dog which has a natural instinct to cast out (i.e., circle widely), round sheep and bring them back to their owner. The Koolie is known as a silent working dog. They are used for “heading” sheep and also for quiet careful work at close quarters at lambing
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    154
    Norwegian Jærhøne

    Norwegian Jærhøne

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Norway
    The Norwegian Jærhøne (Norske Jærhøns) or Jaerhon, is a breed of chicken from Norway. It was developed in the 1920s from native stock around the town of Stavanger on the southern Atlantic coast of Norway. The breed was first imported to North America in 1994 by Dr Bjorn Netland in Washington state. Jaerhons are small, hardy, and active birds that can fly well. Hens don't tend to go broody, and can wear themselves out by laying lots of large white eggs. The standard cock is 5 pounds, and the hen can weigh 3.5 pounds. There are two standard varieties: dark and light (brown-yellow and yellow-brown), and the color patterns are unique for this breed.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Poodle

    Poodle

    • Examples: Nunsoe Duc de la Terrace of Blakeen
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The poodle is a breed of dog. The breed is found officially in toy, miniature, and standard sizes, with many coat colors. Originally bred as a type of water dog, the poodle is skillful in many dog sports, including agility, obedience, tracking, and even herding. Poodles have taken top honors in many conformation shows, including "Best in Show" at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1991 and 2002, and at the World Dog Show in 2007 and 2010. The poodle is believed to have originated in Germany, where it was known as the Pudelhund. Pudel (cognate with the English word "puddle"), is derived from the Low German verb meaning "to splash about", and the word Hund in German means "dog". The breed was standardized in France, where it was commonly used as a water retriever. The European mainland had known the poodle long before it was brought to England. Drawings by German artist Albrecht Dürer established the breed in the 15th and 16th centuries. It was the principal pet dog of the late 18th century in Spain, as shown by the paintings of the Spanish artist Francisco Goya. France had toy poodles as pampered favorites during the reign of Louis XVI at about the same period. The poodle has
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    2 votes
    156
    Puli

    Puli

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Hungary
    The Puli is a small-medium breed of Hungarian herding and livestock guarding dog known for its long, corded coat. The tight curls of the coat, similar to dreadlocks, make it virtually waterproof. A similar looking, but much larger Hungarian dog breed is called Komondor. The Puli is a solid colored dog that is usually black. Other less common coat colors are white, gray, or cream (off white or fakó in Hungarian). A variety of the cream-coated dogs have black masks. The white Pulik are often blue-eyed and called Roxies. The breed standard is for females about 16.5 inches (42 cm) at the withers, and 17 inches for males. Females weigh 23-25 pounds, males slightly more. The coat of some Puli dogs can be different, thinner or thicker cords, either flat or round, depending on the texture of the coat and the balance of undercoat to outer coat. The coat is the result of a controlled matting process. Thin rope-like corded coats are desired and the grooming should control the coat towards the forming of thinner ropes. The Puli's coat needs considerable grooming to keep its cords clean, neat, and attractive. With age the coat can become quite long, even reaching the ground. Alternatively, the
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    2 votes
    157
    Schipperke

    Schipperke

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    A Schipperke (/ˈskɪpərkiː/; Dutch: [ˈsxɪpərkə]) is a small Belgian breed of dog that originated in the early 16th century. There has been a long informal debate over whether this type of dog is a spitz or miniature sheepdog. Their small, pointed ears are erect atop the head. Schipperkes are double coated with a soft, fluffy undercoat that is covered by a harsher-feeling and longer outer coat. One of the breed characteristics is a long ruff that surrounds the neck and then a strip trails down towards the rear of the dog. They also have longer fur on their hind legs called culottes. Dogs of this breed usually weigh 3–9 kg (7–20 lbs). Puppies are born with tails in different lengths; and, in Canada and the United States, the tail is usually docked the day after birth. In countries that have bans on docking, Schipperkes display their natural tails, which vary in type. Known for a stubborn, mischievous, and headstrong temperament, it also chases small animals. The Schipperke is sometimes referred to as the "little black fox", the "Tasmanian black devil", or the "little black devil". They are naturally curious and high-energy dogs and require ample exercise and supervision. Schipperkes
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    158
    Scottish Deerhound

    Scottish Deerhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Scottish Deerhound, or simply the Deerhound, is a breed of hound (a sighthound), once bred to hunt the Red Deer by coursing. The Scottish Deerhound's antecedents will have existed back to a time before recorded history. They would have been kept by the Scots and Picts, and used to help in providing part of their diet, namely hoofed game (archaeological evidence likely supports this in the form of Roman pottery from around 1st Century AD found in Argyll which depicts the deerhunt using large rough hounds (these can be viewed at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh). Other similar evidence can be found on standing stones from around the 7th century AD reflecting a hunt using hounds, such as the Hilton of Cadboll Stone). In outward appearance, the Scottish Deerhound is similar to the Greyhound, but larger and more heavily boned. However, Deerhounds have a number of characteristics that set them apart. While not as fast as a Greyhound on a smooth, firm surface, once the going gets rough or heavy they can outrun a Greyhound. The environment in which they worked, the cool, often wet, and hilly Scottish Highland glens, contributed to the larger, rough-coated appearance of the
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    159
    White-Faced Black Spanish

    White-Faced Black Spanish

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The White-Faced Black Spanish is a Spanish breed of chicken. It is thought to be the oldest breed of fowl in the Mediterranean class. The British have records dating back to 1572 referring to this chicken. This breed was admitted into the American Poultry Association in 1874. This breed originated in Spain, and came to the Americas through the Caribbean Islands. Nicknames of this breed include "Clown Chickens," but they were also called, "The Fowls of Seville." They were very popular in the South during Colonial times. The have glossey black plumage, weigh 6-7 pounds, and are closely related to the Minorca and Castilian breeds. Their most distinguishing feature are their white, low hanging ear lobes, which are actually overdeveloped. They have a single comb, four toes, and no crest. Hens are non-setters that lay eggs that are large, and chalk white in color, with an average of three a week, 150-180 eggs a year.
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    2 votes
    160
    Afrikaner cattle

    Afrikaner cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Afrikaner cattle (Afrikander cattle) are a hardy breed of beef cattle which are popular in South Africa. In Afrikaans, this breed is called Afrikanerbees. The Afrikaner is a native South African breed, belonging to the Sanga type. Huge herds of Sanga type cattle were herded by the Khoikhoi (Hottentots) when the Dutch established the Cape Colony in 1652. Afrikaners are usually deep red with long spreading horns. They have the small cervico-thoracic hump typical of Sanga cattle. The Khoikhoi and the Boers used the Afrikaners for meat and milk and the Boers improved them to use as draft animals. It was Afrikaner oxen which drew the wagons that carried the Voortrekkers on the Great Trek. Afrikaners have been bred into other lines used in the tropics because of their fertility, docility and greater weight gain potential.
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    3 votes
    161
    Dobermann

    Dobermann

    • Examples: Ferry v. Rauhfelsen of Giralda
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Doberman Pinscher (alternatively spelled Dobermann in many countries) or simply Doberman, is a breed of domestic dog originally developed around 1890 by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Doberman Pinschers are among the most common of pet breeds, and the breed is well known as an intelligent, alert, and loyal companion dog. Although once commonly used as guard dogs or police dogs, this is less common today. In many countries, Doberman Pinschers are one of the most recognizable breeds, in part because of their actual roles in society, and in part because of media attention (see temperament). Careful breeding has improved the disposition of this breed, and the modern Doberman Pinscher is an energetic and lively breed suitable for companionship and family life. Kennel club standards describe Doberman Pinschers as dogs of medium-large size with a square build and short coat. They are compactly built and athletic with endurance and swiftness. The Doberman Pinscher should have a proud, watchful, determined, and obedient temperament. The dog was originally intended as a guard dog, so males should have a masculine, muscular, noble appearance. Females are thinner, but should not be
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    French Bulldog

    French Bulldog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The French Bulldog is a small breed of domestic dog, related to the English Bulldog and American Bulldog. The origin of the modern French Bulldog breed descends directly from the dogs of the Molossians, an ancient Greek tribe. The dogs were spread throughout the ancient world by Phoenician traders. British Molossian dogs were developed into the Mastiff. A sub-family of the Mastiff were the Bullenbeisser, a type of dog used for bull-baiting. Blood sports such as bull-baiting were outlawed in England in 1835, leaving these "Bulldogs" unemployed. However, they had been bred for non-sporting reasons since at least 1800, and so their use changed from a sporting breed to a companion breed. Some Bulldogs were crossed with terriers, while others were bred for reduced size. By 1850 the Toy Bulldog had become common in England, and appeared in conformation shows when they began around 1860. These dogs weighed around 16–25 pounds (7.3–11 kg), although classes were also available at dog shows for those that weighed under 12 pounds (5.4 kg). At the same time, lace workers from Nottingham, displaced by the industrial revolution, began to settle in Normandy, France. They brought a variety of dogs
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Pomeranian

    Pomeranian

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Pomeranian (often known as a Pom or Pom Pom) is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe (today part of northern Poland and eastern Germany). Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz. It has been determined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale to be part of the German Spitz breed, and in many countries, they are known as the Zwergspitz (Dwarf Spitz). The breed has been made popular by a number of royal owners since the 17th century. Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian and consequently the smaller variety became universally popular. During Queen Victoria's lifetime alone, the size of the breed decreased by 50%. Overall, the Pomeranian is a sturdy, healthy dog. The most common health issue is Luxating patella. Tracheal collapse can also be an issue. More rarely, the breed can suffer from a skin condition colloquially known as "black skin disease", or alopecia ex. This is a genetic disease which causes the dog's skin to turn black and lose all or most of its hair. The breed is currently among the top 15 most
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Square Meater

    Square Meater

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Square Meater is an Australian breed of small, polled cattle which were developed by Rick Pisaturo of Mandalong Park near Sydney, New South Wales in the early 1990s from a base of Murray Grey genetics. Despite their smaller stature they have excellent muscling and perform well in steer and carcase competitions. Square Meaters are usually silver or grey in colour with dark hooves and a dark skin that reduces the chance of eye cancer and sunburned udders. The breed is noted for its good temperament, early maturity and easy-care attributes, which makes them a popular breed of cattle for smaller farms. To be registered class "A", purebred Square Meater bulls must not be less than 103 cm and not more than 113 cm at the shoulder at 12 months of age. Females must be 107 cm or less at the shoulder at 12 months of age. Mature females will weigh about 450 kg and be around 125 cm tall.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Welsh Black

    Welsh Black

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Welsh Black is a dual-purpose breed of cattle native to Wales. Commercial exploitation of the breed meant that drovers would herd them to English markets. Herds from south west Wales travelled towards Hereford and Gloucester up the Tywi Valley to Llandovery. Herds from South Cardiganshire reached Llandovery through Llanybydder and Llansawel. They would then return to Wales with large amounts of money, which made them targets of bandits and highwaymen. The result was the formation in 1799 of the Banc yr Eidon in Llandovery, the Bank of the Black Ox, which was later purchased by Lloyds Bank. By the turn of the 19th century, 25,000 cattle were being exported from Wales every year. Before the 1960s, few cattle were exported outside the UK, but now can be found in Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Germany as well in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Jamaica and Uganda. It has been speculated that the extinct black cattle of Cornwall were a closely related breed to the Welsh Black. In the nineteenth century they were described as being the same size. As the name suggests, the cattle are naturally black. They generally have white horns with black tips, but these may be removed, and
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    3 votes
    166
    Shetland Sheepdog

    Shetland Sheepdog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Shetland Sheepdog, often known as the Sheltie, is a breed of herding dog. They are small to medium dogs, and come in a variety of colors, such as sable/white, tri-color, and blue merle. They are vocal, excitable, energetic dogs who are always willing to please and work hard. They are partly derived from dogs used in the Shetland Isles for herding and protecting sheep. The breed was formally recognized by the Kennel Club in 1909. The Shetland Sheepdog's early history is not well known. Although of obscure origin, the sheltie is probably a descendant of small specimens of the Scottish collie and the King Charles spaniel. It was developed to tend the diminutive sheep of the Shetland Islands, whose rugged, stormy shores have produced other small-statured animals such as the Shetland pony. Today it is raised as a farm dog and family pet. They were originally a small mixed-breed dog, often 10–13 inches (250–330 mm) in height and it is thought that the original Shetland herding dogs were of Spitz type, and were crossed with collie-type sheepdogs from mainland Britain. In the early 20th century, James Loggie added a small Rough Collie to the breeding stock, and helped establish what
    5.00
    4 votes
    167
    Cardigan Welsh Corgi

    Cardigan Welsh Corgi

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Wales
    The Cardigan Welsh corgi ( /ˈkɔrɡi/) is one of two separate dog breeds known as Welsh corgis that originated in Wales, the other being the Pembroke Welsh corgi. It is one of the oldest herding breeds. Cardigan Welsh corgis can be extremely loyal family dogs. They are able to live in a variety of settings, from apartments to farms. For their size, however, they do need a surprising amount of daily physical and mental stimulation. Cardigans are a very versatile breed and a wonderful family companion. Pembrokes and Cardigans first appeared together in dog shows in 1925 when they were shown under the rules of The Kennel Club in Britain. The Corgi Club was founded in December, 1925 in Carmarthen in South Wales. It is reported that the local members naturally favored the Pembroke breed, so a club for Cardigan enthusiasts was founded a year later (1926). Both groups have worked hard to ensure the appearance and type of breed are standardized through careful selective breeding. Pembrokes and Cardigans were officially recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928 and were lumped together under the heading Welsh Corgis.In 1934, the two breeds were recognized individually and shown
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    Parson Russell Terrier

    Parson Russell Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Parson Russell Terrier is a breed of small white terrier that originates from the Fox Terriers of the 18th century. The breed is named after the person credited with the creation of this type of dog, the Reverend John "Jack" Russell. It is the recognised conformation show variety of the Jack Russell Terrier and was first recognised in 1990 in the United Kingdom as the Parson Jack Russell Terrier. In America, it was first recognised as the Jack Russell Terrier in 1997. The name was changed to its current form in 1999 in the UK and by 2008 all international kennel clubs recognised it under the new name. A mostly white breed with either a smooth or broken coat, it conforms to a narrower range of sizes than the Jack Russell. It is a feisty, energetic terrier, suited to sports and able to get along with children and other animals. It has a range of breed related health issues, mainly relating to eye disorders. This type of small white terrier dates back to the work of the Reverend John Russell, born in 1795. In 1819 he purchased a small white and tan female terrier named Trump from a milkman in the hamlet of Elmsford. She formed the basis for his breeding program, and by the 1850s
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Anatolian Shepherd Dog

    Anatolian Shepherd Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Turkey
    The Anatolian shepherd dog (Turkish: Anadolu çoban köpeği) is a breed of dog which originated in Anatolia (central Turkey) and was further developed as a breed in America. With acute hearing, exceptional eyesight, and the strength to take down wolves, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a superb guardian of his flock. The Turkish Mountain Dog is descended from ancient livestock guardian dog types that migrated with the transhumance, guarding flocks of sheep from wolves, bears, jackals, and even cheetahs. It is probable that dogs of this type existed 6,000 years ago in what is now Turkey. Since Turkic people did not arrive on the Anatolian Peninsula until the 11th century A.D. it seems unlikely that it came in its current form with the Turks from central Asia. The dogs are called Çoban Köpeği (shepherd dog) in Turkish language, and over the centuries, regional variations or landraces developed. Anatolian shepherd dogs are mainly yoruk dogs brought from middle Asia. There are very similar dogs in middle Asia. Turks brought 70 million sheep with them when they came to Anatolia, and that means they had many shepherd dogs with them. There are many types of yoruk dogs in anatolia. Turks call
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Bullmastiff

    Bullmastiff

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Bullmastiff is a large breed of domestic dog. It has a solid build and a short muzzle. The Bullmastiff shares the characteristics of Molosser dogs, and was originally developed by 19th-century gamekeepers in England to pull buses when they broke down. The breed's bloodlines are drawn from the English Mastiff and Old English Bulldog. It was recognized as a purebred dog by the English Kennel Club in 1924. They are a very quiet dog; they very rarely bark. Males should be 25 to 27 inches (63 to 69 cm) tall (AKC Std.) at the withers and 110 to 130 pounds (50 to 59 kg). Females should be 24 to 26 inches (61 to 66 cm) at the withers, and 100 to 120 pounds (45 to 54 kg). Exceeding these dimensions is discouraged by breeders. A bullmastiff's coat may appear in fawn, red, or brindle. These are the only acceptable colors in the AKC standard. The fawn can range from a very light brown to a reddish brown. Red can range from a light red-fawn to a dark rich red. Brindles are a striped overlay of the fawn or red. A Bullmastiff should have no white markings, except for on the chest where a little white is allowed. See breed standard under external links for additional details;}. A UK survey
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Phalène

    Phalène

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Phalène is the drop-eared version of the Papillon, a toy breed also known as the Butterfly Dog or the Continental Toy Spaniel (Epagneul Nain Continental). The Phalène is the earliest form of the Papillon; the appearance of the erect-eared variety was not documented until the 16th century, by which time the Phalène had been portrayed in numerous paintings, particularly in portraits of the wealthy by Old Masters and their students. Belgium, France, Spain, and Italy have all been credited with the creation or development of Butterfly Dogs. The Papillon gained popularity after the turn of the nineteenth century. By the middle of the 20th century, the Papillon’s popularity had far outstripped that of the Phalène, which sank low enough into obscurity to become endangered. Fortunately, the breed had its fanciers and did not slip into extinction. At some point the variety was named phalène, or ‘night moth’. The 21st century has seen a revival of interest in the Phalène, with its fanciers pointing out that in countries where it is judged together with the Papillon, judges must be familiar enough with the breed standard to appreciate the qualities of a well-bred Phalène, and not confuse
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Pug

    Pug

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The pug is a toy dog with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. The breed has a fine, glossy coat that comes in a variety of colors, and a compact square body with well-developed muscle. They have been described as multum in parvo ("much in little"), referring to the pug's personality and small size. Known in ancient China as lo-sze, they may have been responsible for the English Bulldog, the modern Pekingese and King Charles spaniel. They have Chinese origins, but were popularized in Western Europe by the House of Orange of the Netherlands and the House of Stuart of England, Ireland and Scotland. They can suffer from a variety of health issues, including overheating, obesity, pharyngeal reflex and two fatal conditions which are necrotizing meningoencephalitis and hemivertebrae. In addition, care must be taken by their owner to clean their ears, and the folds of skin on their face. The breed is often summarized as multum in parvo ("much in little"), describing the pug's remarkable personality despite its small size. While the pugs appearing in eighteenth century prints tended to be long and lean, modern breed preferences are for a square, cobby body, a compact form, a
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Simmental Cattle

    Simmental Cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Simmental cattle are a versatile breed of cattle originating in the valley of the Simme river, in the Bernese Oberland of western Switzerland. Among the older and most widely distributed of all breeds of cattle in the world, and recorded since the Middle Ages, the Simmental breed has contributed to the creation of several other famous European breeds, including the Montbeliarde (France), the Razzeta d'Oropa (Italy), and the Fleckvieh (Germany). Reports from a variety of sources indicate Simmental cattle arrived in the United States before the turn of the 20th century. Simmentals were reported as early as 1887 in Illinois, according to one source; in 1895 in New Jersey; and in both New York and New Mexico around the 1916 to 1920 period. An advertisement in an 1896 issue of the Breeder's Gazette, published in Chicago, also made reference to "Simmenthal" cattle. However, those early imports did not capture the attention of American cattlemen and the Simmental influence died quietly away until the late 1960s. The breed made its most recent appearance in North America when a Canadian, Travers Smith, imported the famed bull "Parisien" from France in 1967. Semen was introduced into the
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    West Highland White Terrier

    West Highland White Terrier

    • Examples: Wolvey Pattern of Edgerstoune
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The West Highland White Terrier, commonly known as the Westie, is a Scottish breed of dog with a distinctive white coat. The modern breed is descended from a number of breeding programes of white terriers in Scotland prior to the 20th century. Edward Donald Malcolm, 16th Laird of Poltalloch, is credited with the creation of the modern breed from his Poltalloch Terrier, but did not want to be known as such. Other related breeds included George Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll's Roseneath Terrier and Dr. Americ Edwin Flaxman's Pittenweem Terriers. The breeds of small white Scottish terriers were given its modern name for the first time in 1908, with recognition by major kennel clubs occurring around the same time. The breed remains popular in the UK and is in the top third of all breeds in the USA since the 1960s. It has been featured in television and film including in Hamish Macbeth and in advertising by companies such as Cesar dog food and Scottish whisky Black & White. The breed is a medium-sized terrier, although with longer legs than other Scottish breeds of terrier. It has a white double coat of fur which fills out the dog's face giving it a rounded appearance. The breed can be
    4.75
    4 votes
    175
    American Game Fowl

    American Game Fowl

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    American Game is a game breed of chicken originating in the United States. It's colors vary widely, as it has been traditionally bred for reasons other than showing. The American gamefowl should not be confused with Old English Games, another breed once bred for "the pit," though now is an exhibition bird. American gamefowl is a breed of poultry once bred for cockfighting and used as fighting cocks. They played a significant role in American history as they were bred, fought, and raised by many famous political leaders. As Abraham Lincoln used to be a cockfighting referee, the breed indirectly influenced his nickname "honest Abe." Most American gamefowl lines (or strains) consist of Irish Game, Old English, and Oriental Gamefowl. However many others contain Spanish strains, along with gamefowl from other places including the Sumatra breed. The American gamefowl has gained in popularity as a show breed since the outlawing of cock fights. The most common colorations are "Black breasted red" (dubbed reds), "Wheaten" (dubbed reds), "Silver duckwings" (dubbed greys), "Golden duckwings" (called greys), White, black, brown-red, red quil, gold, pumpkin, and blue (in various forms, this
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Araucana

    Araucana

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Chile
    The Araucana, also known in the USA as a South American Rumpless, is a breed of chicken originating in Chile. The Araucana is often confused with other fowl, especially the Ameraucana and Easter Egger chickens, but has several unusual characteristics which distinguish it. They lay blue eggs, have feather tufts near their ears, and no tail (In North America). To comply with the North American standard they must have no tail and are rumpless. The ancestors of the modern Araucana chicken were purportedly first bred by the Araucanian Indians of Chile — hence the name "Araucana." The Araucana is a hybrid of two South American breeds: the Collonca (a naturally blue-egg laying, rumpless, clean-faced chicken) and the Quetro (a pinkish-brown egg layer that is tailed and has ear-tufts). The Collonca male and female are very similar, with very few secondary sexual characteristics like comb, wattles or tail coverts to distinguish them. The European equivalent of the North American show standard variety Araucana is what one comes across in South American villages. Quechua and Mapuche do not have tufts and resemble the Ameraucana. The current world wide Araucana Standard (except North America)
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Australian Cattle Dog

    Australian Cattle Dog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Australian Cattle Dog (ACD or Cattle Dog), is a breed of herding dog originally developed in Australia for driving cattle over long distances across rough terrain. In the 19th century, New South Wales cattle farmer Thomas Hall crossed the dogs used by drovers in his parents' home county, Northumberland, with dingoes he had tamed. The resulting dogs were known as Halls Heelers. After Hall's death in 1870, the dogs became available beyond the Hall family and their associates, and were subsequently developed into two modern breeds, the Australian Cattle Dog and the Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog. Robert Kaleski was influential in the Cattle Dog's early development, and wrote the first standard for the breed. The Australian Cattle Dog is a medium-sized, short-coated dog that occurs in two main colour forms. It has either brown or black hair distributed fairly evenly through a white coat, which gives the appearance of a "red" or "blue" dog. It has been nicknamed a "Red Heeler" or "Blue Heeler" on the basis of this colouring and its practice of moving reluctant cattle by nipping at their heels. Dogs from a line bred in Queensland, Australia, which were successful at shows and at
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    178
    Belgian Blue

    Belgian Blue

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    Belgian Blue is a breed of beef cattle from Belgium. These cattle are referred to in French as Race de la Moyenne et Haute Belgique, or, more commonly, Blanc Bleu Belge. Alternative names for this breed include Belgian Blue-White; Belgian White and Blue Pied; Belgian White Blue; Blue; and Blue Belgian. The Belgian Blue's sculpted, heavily muscled appearance is known as "double-muscling". The double-muscling phenotype is a heritable condition which results in the increased number of muscle fibers (hyperplasia) rather than the normal enlargement of individual muscle fibers (hypertrophy). This particular trait is shared with another breed of cattle known as Piedmontese. Both of these breeds have an increased ability to convert feed into lean muscle, which causes these particular breeds' meat to have a reduced fat content. The Belgian Blue is named after their typically blue-grey mottled hair colour, however its colour can vary from white to black. The condition was first documented in 1807 by a livestock observationist named George Culley. The breed originated in central and upper Belgium in the nineteenth century, from crossing local breeds with a Shorthorn breed of cattle from the
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    179
    Bloodhound

    Bloodhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Bloodhound is a large scent hound originally bred for hunting deer and wild boar, but also used from the Middle Ages onwards for tracking human beings, and now most often bred specifically for that purpose. Thought to be descended from hounds once kept at the Abbey of St Hubert in Belgium, it is known to French speakers as the Chien de Saint-Hubert. It is famed for its ability to discern human odors even days later, over great distances, even across water. Its extraordinarily keen sense of smell is combined with a strong and tenacious tracking instinct, producing the ideal scent hound, and it is used by police and law enforcement all over the world to track escaped prisoners, missing people, lost children and lost pets. Bloodhounds weigh from 33 to 50 kg (80 to 110 lbs), though some individuals weigh as much as 72 kg (160 lb). They stand 58 to 69 cm (23 to 27 inches) high at the withers. Bloodhounds have a typical lifespan of about 9 to 11 years. According to the AKC standard of the breed, larger dogs are preferred by conformation judges. Acceptable colors for bloodhounds are black, liver, tan, or red. Bloodhounds possess an unusually large skeletal structure with most of their
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    180
    Dachshund

    Dachshund

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The dachshund (UK  /ˈdæksənd/ or US /ˈdɑːkshʊnt/ DAHKS-huunt or US /ˈdɑːksənt/; German: [ˈdaksˌhʊnt]) is a short-legged, long-bodied dog breed belonging to the hound family. The standard size dachshund was bred to scent, chase, and flush out badgers and other burrow-dwelling animals, while the miniature dachshund was developed to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits. In the American West they have also been used to hunt prairie dogs. According to the AKC, the dachshund continues to remain one of the top 10 dog breeds in the United States. The name "dachshund" is of German origin and literally means "badger dog", from Dachs ("badger") and Hund ("dog"). The pronunciation varies widely in English: variations of the first and second syllables include /ˈdɑːks-/, /ˈdæks-/, /ˈdæʃ-/ and /-hʊnt/, /-hʊnd/, /-ənd/. In German it is pronounced [ˈdakshʊnt]. Because of their long, narrow build, they are often nicknamed doodle dog, wiener dog or sausage dog. Although "dachshund" is a German word, in modern German they are more commonly known by the name Dackel or, among hunters, Teckel. While classified in the hound group or scent hound group in the United States and Great Britain, there are some who
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    181
    Japanese Bantam

    Japanese Bantam

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Japan
    The Japanese Bantam, also known in many parts of the world as Chabo, is a breed of chicken originating in Japan. They are a bantam breed, with large upright tails that often reach over the chicken's head. The wings angle down and to the back along the sides. The Chabo has graced the gardens of the Japanese aristocracy for well over 350 years. Historical evidence suggests that the Japanese Bantam originated in Southeast Asia, where it is still raised today. They enjoy a high degree of popularity in Malaysia, and are very common in Java, which is now part of Indonesia. Japanese Bantams began to appear in Japanese art around the year 1635, right about the time Japan closed its shores to outside trade. It also appears in Dutch art of the same era. This suggests that Dutch spice traders probably carried the Chabo as gifts to the Japanese from the Asian spice ports, such as Hoi An (Vietnam) and likely from Java, which part of Dutch colonial area on that time. The very word "chabo" originates in Java as chabol (Cebol), where it means "dwarf" and applies both to humans, and to the short-legged Chabo chicken. In Japan, the word would drop the "L," as no speaker of Japanese would be inclined
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    182
    Kuvasz

    Kuvasz

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Hungary
    The Kuvasz (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈkuvɒs], pl. Kuvaszok, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈkuvɒsok]) is an ancient breed of a livestock dog of Hungarian origin. Mention of the breed can be found in old Hungarian texts. It has historically been used to guard livestock, but has been increasingly found in homes as a pet over the last seventy years. The Kuvasz is a large dog with a dense double, odorless coat which is white in color and can range from wavy to straight in texture. Although the fur is white, the Kuvasz’s skin pigmentation should be dark and the nose should be black. The eyes should have an almond shape. Females usually weigh between 35–50 kg (75-90 pounds) while males weigh between 50–70 kg (100-150 pounds) with a medium bone structure. The head should be half as wide as it is long with the eyes set slightly below the plane of the muzzle. The stop (where the muzzle raises to the crown of the head) should be defined but not abrupt. The precise standard varies by country. (See the Breed Standards for a more precise description.) To a casual observer, the Kuvasz may appear similar to a Great Pyrenees, Akbash, a Maremma Sheepdog, Samoyed, a white Poodle and Labrador Retriever
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    183
    Maltese Dog

    Maltese Dog

    • Examples: Chloe
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Malta
    The Maltese is a small breed of dog in the toy group. It descends from dogs originating in the Central Mediterranean Area. The breed name and origins are generally understood to derive from the Mediterranean island nation of Malta; however, the name is sometimes described with reference to the distinct Adriatic island of Mljet, or a defunct Sicilian town called Melita. This ancient breed has been known by a variety of names throughout the centuries. Originally called the "Canis Melitaeus" in Latin, it has also been known in English as the "ancient dog of Malta ," the "Roman Ladies' Dog," the "Maltese Lion Dog." The origin of the common name "Cokie" is unknown, but is believed to have originated in the mid-1960s on the U.S. East Coast and spread in popular use. This breed has been referred falsely as the "Bichon", as that name refers to the family ("small long-haired dog") and not the breed. The Kennel Club settled on the name "Maltese" for the breed in the 19th century. The Maltese is thought to have been descended from a Spitz-type dog found among the Swiss Lake Dwellers and was selectively bred to attain its small size. There is also some evidence that the breed originated in
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    184
    Orloff

    Orloff

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Iran
    The Orloff is a breed of chicken who is named after Alexey Grigoryevich Orlov, a Russian Count. Reflecting this moniker, it is sometimes called the Russian Orloff or simply Russian. For most of its history, the Orloff was considered to be a product of Russia and Orlov, but modern research has discovered that the breed first appeared in Persia, and was distributed across Europe and Asia by the 17th century. However, Count Orlov was a key promoter of the breed in the 19th century, and the breed became known in the West following his efforts. Orloffs were first introduced to Britain in the 1920s, and were also refined a good deal in Germany; Germans created the first miniaturized bantam Orloff by 1925. The breed was once included in the American Poultry Association's breed standard, the Standard of Perfection, but it was removed due a lack of interest from breeders. In the 21st century, the Orloff remains a rare breed in the West. The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy lists the breed as critically endangered. The Orloff is a tall, well-feathered chicken with a somewhat game-like appearance. The head and neck are very thickly feathered. They appear in several recognized color
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    185
    Polish chicken

    Polish chicken

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Polish (Also called the Poland) is a European breed of chicken known for its crest of feathers. The English language name of these birds is a misnomer, as they do not originate in the country of Poland. Instead, the oldest accounts of crested chickens comes from the Netherlands. In addition to combs, their heads are adorned with large crests due to a cone (called a protuberance) on the top of their skull. The crests cover almost their entire heads. They are normally tame chickens, but can be easily timid or frightened because the crests on their heads limits their vision. This limited vision can impact their temperament. Polish chickens are bred primarily as a show bird, but were originally egg layers. Accordingly, Polish rarely go broody and are noted for their white eggs. They may be bearded or non-bearded. Hens weigh around 4.5 pounds, and roosters 6 pounds. Every variety come in Non-Bearded and Bearded varieties. January - September (Egg laying) Granulate, shell grit, curd(Cottage cheese), Celery, grain sprouts February - May (Brooding) Grain, egg, curd, greens, fruits August - December (quiet,calmed down,) Greens, fruits, vegetables, some granulate, seed mix, grit.
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    186
    Samoyed

    Samoyed

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Russia
    The Samoyed dog (/ˈsæməjɛd/ SAM-ə-yed or /səˈmɔɪ.ɛd/ sə-MOY-ed; Russian: Самоедская собака) takes its name from the Samoyedic peoples of Siberia. These nomadic reindeer herders bred the fluffy white dogs to help with the herding, and to pull sleds when they moved. An alternate name for the breed, especially in Europe, is Bjelkier. Males typically weigh between 23–30 kilograms (51–66 lb), while females typically weigh 17–25 kilograms (37–55 lb). Height: AKC Standard : 21–23.5 inches (53–60 cm) at the shoulder for males, 19–21 inches (48–53 cm) for females. UK Kennel Club Standard : 51–56 centimetres (20–22 in) for males, 46–51 centimetres (18–20 in) for females. Samoyed eyes are usually black or brown and are almond in shape. Blue or other color eyes can occur but are not allowed in the show ring. Samoyed ears are thick and covered with fur, triangular in shape, and erect. They are almost always white but can often have a light to dark brown tint (known as "biscuit"), usually around the tips of ears. The Samoyed tail is one of the breed's more distinguishing features. Like the Alaskan Malamute, their tail is carried curled over their back; however, unlike the Malamute, the Samoyed
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    187
    Tibetan Terrier

    Tibetan Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Tibetan Terrier is not a member of the terrier group, the name being given to it by European travelers to Tibet who were reminded of terriers from back home when they first encountered the breed. Its origins are uncertain: Some sources claim them to be lucky temple dogs, whereas others place them as farm dogs. The Tibetan Terrier is able to guard, herd, and also be a suitable companion dog. Their utility in Tibet meant that the first examples of the breed available in the west were generally given as gifts, as the Tibetan Terrier, along with other Tibetan breeds, were too valuable to the people who owned them to casually sell. As such, the early history of the breed is linked to only a handful of foundation dogs. The Tibetan name for the breed, Tsang Apso, roughly translates to "shaggy or bearded (apso) dog, from the province of Tsang". Some old travelers' accounts give the name "Dokhi Apso," or "outdoor" Apso, indicating a working dog which lives outdoors. Other "Apso" dogs from Tibet include the smaller and more familiar Lhasa Apso (called the Lhasa Terrier in the early 1900s) and the very rare Do Khyi Apso (bearded Tibetan Mastiff, sometimes considered as a TT/TM
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    188
    Great Dane

    Great Dane

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Great Dane (18th Cent. French: Grand Danois), also known as German Mastiff (German: Deutsche Dogge) or Danish Hound (German: Dänischer Hund), is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) known for its giant size. The Great Dane is one of the world's tallest dog breeds; the current world record holder, measuring 112 cm (44 in) from paw to shoulder is Zeus. Great danes were originally bred to hunt deer and wild boar. As described by the American Kennel Club, "The Great Dane combines, in its regal appearance, dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. It is one of the giant working breeds, but is unique in that its general conformation must be so well balanced that it never appears clumsy, and shall move with a long reach and powerful drive." The Great Dane is a short haired breed with a strong galloping figure. In the ratio between length and height, the Great Dane should be square. The male dog should not be less than 30 in (76 cm) at the shoulders, a female 28 in (71 cm). Danes under minimum height are disqualified. From year to year, the tallest living dog is typically a Great Dane. Previous record holders include
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    189
    Murray Grey

    Murray Grey

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Murray Grey is a breed of Australian polled beef cattle that was developed in the upper Murray River valley on the New South Wales /Victorian border. They have evolved into a versatile breed that does well in a wide range of environments and produces top quality carcasses. The Murray Grey breed was developed from an initial chance mating of a black Aberdeen Angus bull and a roan Shorthorn cow in 1905 during the Federation drought. The resulting thirteen dun-grey calves from these matings were kept as curiosities and then bred on the Thologolong property along the Murray River in New South Wales by Peter and Ena Sutherland. These unusually coloured cattle grew quickly, were good converters of feed and produced quality carcases. Local cattlemen soon became interested in the greys and began breeding them. The first larger-scale commercial herds were established in the 1940s. In the 1960s several grey cattle breeders were selling them as a commercial enterprise and the Murray Grey Beef Cattle Society was formed to register the cattle and to administer the breed. There are Murray Grey registries in Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In New Zealand Murray
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    190
    Portuguese Water Dog

    Portuguese Water Dog

    • Examples: Cappy
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Portugal
    The Portuguese Water Dog is a breed of working dog as classified by the American Kennel Club. Portuguese Water Dogs are originally from the Portuguese region of the Algarve, from where the breed expanded to all around Portugal's coast, where they were taught to herd fish into fishermen's nets, to retrieve lost tackle or broken nets, and to act as couriers from ship to ship, or ship to shore. Portuguese Water Dogs rode in bobbing fishing trawlers as they worked their way from the warm Atlantic waters of Portugal to the frigid fishing waters off the coast of Iceland where the fleets caught cod to bring home. Portuguese Water Dogs were often taken with sailors during the Portuguese discoveries. In Portugal, the breed is called Cão de Água (IPA: [kɐ̃w dɨ ˈa.gwɐ]; literally "water dog"). In its native land, the dog is also known as the Algarvian Water Dog (Cão de Água Algarvio), or Portuguese Fishing Dog (Cão Pescador Português). Cão de Água de Pêlo Ondulado is the name given to the wavy-haired variety, and Cão de Água de Pêlo Encaracolado is the name for the curly-coated variety. The Portuguese Water Dog is a fairly rare breed; only 15 entrants for Portuguese Water Dogs were made to
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    191
    Akita Inu

    Akita Inu

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Japan
    The Akita Inu (秋田犬) is a Japanese breed of large dog. Named for Akita Prefecture, where it is thought to have originated, it is sometimes called the Akita-ken based on the Sino-Japanese reading of the same kanji. In most countries (with the exception of the Australian, American and Canadian Kennel Clubs), it is considered a separate breed from the American Akita and is also colloquially known as the "Japanese Akita". "Inu" means "dog." Breed standards state that male Akita Inus height should range from 64-70cms (25 ¼-27 ½ ins), and females 58-64 cms (22 ¾-25 ¼ ins) at the withers. The Akita Inu comes in only five colors: Red, Fawn, Sesame, Brindle, and Pure White. All except white must have whitish hair on the sides of the muzzle, on the cheeks, the neck, chest, body and tail, known as "Urajiro". Black masks, as seen in the American Akita, are not permitted in the Japanese Akita Inu. In contrast, all colors are accepted in the American Akita. The Pinto color is not accepted as an Akita Inu color, but is as an accepted American Akita color. There are two coat types in the Akita, the standard coat length and the long coat, which is not eligible for showing. The long coat, also known
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    192
    Beauceron

    Beauceron

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Beauceron is a guard dog and herding dog breed falling into the working dog category whose origins lie in the plains of Northern France. The Beauceron is also known as Berger de Beauce (sheepdog from Beauce) or Bas Rouge (red-stockings). This breed stands 61 to 70 cm (24 to 27.5 inches) in height and weighs 30 to 45 kg (66 to 100 pounds). Its standard colouring is black and tan (referred to in French as "rouge ecureil", squirrel-red) or tan and grey (harlequin). Other colours, such as the once prevalent tawny, grey or grey/black, are now banned by the breed standard. The outer coat is harsh while the undercoat is soft and silky. It comes in black with distinct tan markings and in a less common harlequin coat with patches of gray, black and tan. The harlequin coats should have more black than gray with no white. In the black and tan dogs the tan markings appear in two dots above the eyes, on the sides of the muzzle, fading off to the cheeks, but do not reach the underside of the ears. Also on the throat, under the tail and on the legs and the chest. Tan markings on the chest should appear as two spots but a chest plate is acceptable. Although most breeds may or may not have
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    193
    Norfolk Terrier

    Norfolk Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Great Britain
    The Norfolk Terrier is a British breed of dog. Prior to gaining recognition as an independent breed in 1960, it was a variety of the Norwich Terrier, distinguished from the "prick eared" Norwich by its "drop ears" (or folded ears). Together, the Norfolk and Norwich Terriers are the smallest of the working terriers. The Norfolk Terrier has a wire-haired coat which, according to the various national kennel clubs' breed standards, can be "all shades of red, wheaten, black and tan, or grizzle." They are the smallest of the working terriers. They are active and compact, free moving, with good substance and bone. Good substance means good spring of rib and bone that matches the body such that the dog can be a very agile ratter or earth-dog. Norfolk terriers are moderately proportioned dogs. A too heavy dog would not be agile. A too refined dog would make it a toy breed. Norfolks generally have more reach and drive and a stronger rear angulation, hence cover more ground than their Norwich cousins. Norfolk have good side gait owed to their balanced angulation front and rear and their slightly longer length of back. The ideal height is 9 to 10 in (23 to 25 cm) at the withers and weight is
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    194
    North Devon

    North Devon

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Devon is an ancient breed of cattle from the south western English county of Devon. It is a rich red or tawny colour, and this gives rise to the popular appellation of Devon Ruby or Red Ruby, also used as a marketing brand. The breed is also sometimes referred to as the North Devon to avoid confusion with the more recently developed South Devon cattle breed which is yellowish brown. The native home of the Devon is in southwest England, primarily in the counties of Devon, Somerset, Cornwall, and Dorset. The Devon is one of several modern breeds derived from the traditional red cattle of southern England, together with the Hereford, Sussex, Lincoln Red and Red Poll The early improvers of the Devon breed were Francis Quartly of Great Champson, Molland, North Devon, and his elder brothers Rev. William (of West Molland Barton) and Henry (d.1840), the eldest, who took over William's herd and lease in 1816. Francis had been left the lease of Champson with its herd by his father James (d.1793) and commenced his work in improving the breed the year after his father's death. At that time during the Napoleonic Wars most of the farmers of Devon were taking advantage of the high prices
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    195
    Norwegian Elkhound Black

    Norwegian Elkhound Black

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Norway
    The Black Norwegian Elkhound (Norsk Elghund Sort) is a modern variant of the Grey Norwegian Elkhound. It is a small Spitz breed and is very rare outside the Nordic countries of Scandinavia. It is bred for the same purpose as the Grey Norwegian Elkhound but is smaller, more agile, and easier to recognize in the snow. Historically, it is a much "younger" breed, first bred in Norway during the early 19th century. The AKC breed name "Elkhound," is a direct translation from its original Norwegian name "Elghund," meaning "moose dog." In Norwegian, "elg" means "moose", and "hund" means "dog." The Black Norwegian Elkhound is a typical Spitz breed with a short compact body, dark eyes, ears standing straight up, and a curly tail carried over the back. It has a rich coat that does not stand out from the body. This is an all-weather hunting dog and the coat is very important. It must be able to keep out the heavy autumn rain in Scandinavia and endure the cold weather, which it does very well. It has a dense, short, thick, course, double coat and is solid black. The dog stands about 46-51 centimeters (18"-20") - 47 cm (+3/-4) for males and 44 cm (+3/-4) for females - and weighs about 18
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    196
    Hereford

    Hereford

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Hereford cattle are a beef cattle breed, widely used both in intemperate areas and temperate areas, mainly for meat production. Originally from Herefordshire, England, United Kingdom, more than five million pedigree Hereford cattle now exist in over 50 countries. The Hereford cattle export trade began from United Kingdom in 1817, starting in Kentucky, United States, spreading across the United States and Canada through Mexico to the great beef-raising countries of South America. Today, Hereford cattle dominate the world scene from Australasia to the Russian steppes. They can be found in Israel, Japan and throughout continental Europe and Scandinavia. They are found in the temperate parts of Canada, the United States and Russia, as well as the temperate parts of Australia, the centre and east of Argentina, in Uruguay, and New Zealand, where they make up the largest proportion of registered cattle. They originally found great popularity among ranchers of the American Southwest, testament to the hardiness of the breed; while originating in cool, moist Britain, they have proven to thrive in much harsher climates on nearly every continent. The World Hereford Council is based in the
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    197
    Papillon

    Papillon

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Papillon (from the French word for butterfly, pronounced: [papiˈjɔ̃]), also called the Continental Toy Spaniel, is a breed of dog of the Spaniel type. One of the oldest of the toy spaniels, it derives its name from its characteristic butterfly-like look of the long and fringed hair on the ears. A papillon with dropped ears is called a Phalène (French for moth). The small head is slightly rounded between the ears with a well defined stop. The muzzle is somewhat short, thin tapering to the nose. The dark, medium sized, round eyes have thin black rims, often extending at the junction of the eyelids towards the ears. The large ears can either be erect or dropped with rounded tips. The teeth meet in a scissors bite. The long tail is set high carried over the body, and covered with long, fine hair. Dewclaws are sometimes removed. The straight, long, fine, single coat has extra frill on the chest, ears, back of the legs and the tail. Coat color is white with patches of any color. A mask of a color other than white covers both ears and eyes from back to front. The Papillon is a very intelligent dog that has a very easy time learning new tricks. This dog is great with kids, strangers,
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    198
    Rhode Island Red

    Rhode Island Red

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Rhode Island Red is a breed of chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). They are a utility bird, raised for meat and eggs, and also as show birds. They are a popular choice for backyard flocks because of their egg laying abilities and hardiness. Non-industrial strains of the Rhode Island Red are listed as recovering by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. Three vital variations appeared to have had the largest impact around the Rhode Island Red: Asiatics, Game, and Mediterranean. The Rhode Island Red is the state bird of Rhode Island. The bird's feathers are rust-colored often with white streaks, however darker shades are known, including maroon bordering on black. Their eyes are red-orange and they have yellow feet, with reddish-brown beaks. Chicks are a light red to tan color with two dark brown bars running down their backs. The Roosters usually weigh in at 8.5 pounds (3.9 kg), the Hens slightly less at 6.5 pounds (2.9 kg), cockerel at 7.5 pounds (3.4 kg), and pullets at 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg). Developed in Rhode Island & Massachusetts, early flocks often had both single and rose combed individuals because of the influence of Malay blood. It was from the Malay that the Rhode
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    199
    Chihuahua

    Chihuahua

    • Examples: Tinkerbell
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Mexico
    The  Chihuahua (help·info) /t͡ʃɪˈwɑwɑ/ (Spanish: chihuahueño) is the smallest breed of dog and is named for the state of Chihuahua in Mexico. Chihuahuas come in a wide variety of sizes, head shapes, colors, and coat lengths. The Chihuahua’s history is puzzling and there are many theories surrounding the origin of the breed. Both folklore and archeological finds show that the breed originated in Mexico. The most common and most likely theory is that Chihuahuas are descended from the Techichi, a companion dog favored by the Toltec civilization in Mexico. No records of the Techichi are available prior to the 9th century, although dog pots from Colima, Mexico, buried as part of the western Mexico shaft tomb tradition which date back to 300 B.C. are thought to depict Techichis. It is probable that earlier ancestors were present prior to the Mayans as dogs approximating the Chihuahua are found in materials from the Great Pyramid of Cholula, predating 1530 and in the ruins of Chichen Itza on the Yucatán Peninsula. In fact, wheeled dog toys representing both the "deer head" and "apple head" varieties of Chihuahua have been unearthed across Mesoamerica from Mexico to El Salvador. The
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    200
    Cornish

    Cornish

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Cornish, known as the Indian Game in its native county of Cornwall in England, United Kingdom, is a breed of chicken. Cornish chickens, as well as crosses of Cornishes, are the most-used breed in the chicken meat industry. They are heavy, muscular birds that lay brown eggs and require little feed if allowed free range. It is a large, stocky breed, and is often crossed with other breeds to enhance meat production. There are two varieties, the Cornish Game and the Jubilee Cornish Game. The Cornish Game is dark blue - green in colour, with brown patterning on the hens. Jubilee Cornish Game are much lighter, and less stocky than their counterparts. They are usually light wheaten in colour, with light brown patterning.The Indian game, also known as Cornish, is sometimes called the bulldog among chickens; you can actually see the roast chicken shape in it. It was created because people wanted to cross the Asian game breeds with old English game to create a fantastic fighter. However what they got (though not the right build for fighting) was a fantastic meat bird. It comes in many colours and is quite a popular show bird, though it has a tendency for bad legs due to widely spaced
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    201
    American Staffordshire Terrier

    American Staffordshire Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The American Staffordshire terrier is a medium-sized, short-coated American dog breed. In the early part of the twentieth century the breed gained social stature and was accepted by the American Kennel Club as the American Staffordshire Terrier in 1936. The name was changed to reflect difference from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. The Staffordshire Terrier was first bred in the nineteenth century in the English region of Staffordshire. The early ancestors of this breed came from England, where Until the first part of the 19th century, the Bulldog was bred in England for the purpose of baiting bulls. Bulldogs pictured as late as 1870 resemble contemporary American Staffordshire Terriers to a greater degree than present-day Bulldogs. Some writers contend it was the White English Terrier, Fox Terrier, or the Black and Tan Terrier that was crossed with the Bulldog to develop the Staffordshire Terrier; all three breeds shared many traits, the greatest differences being in color, aggressiveness, and spirit. The cross of Bulldog and Terrier was called by several names, including Bull-and-Terrier Dog, Half and Half, and Pit Dog or Pit Bull terrier. Later, it assumed the name of
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Boxer

    Boxer

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    Bred in Germany, the Boxer is a breed of stocky, medium-sized, short-haired dog. The coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colors are fawn or brindled, with or without white markings, which may cover the entire body. Boxers are brachycephalic (they have broad, short skulls), and have a square muzzle, mandibular prognathism (an underbite), very strong jaws and a powerful bite ideal for hanging on to large prey. The Boxer was bred from the Old English Bulldog and the now extinct Bullenbeisser and is part of the Molosser group. Boxers were first exhibited in a dog show for St. Bernards in Munich in 1895, the first Boxer club being founded the next year. Based on 2011 American Kennel Club statistics, Boxers are the seventh most popular breed of dog in the United States for the second year in a row, moving down from sixth where they were ranked for the previous three years. The head is the most distinctive feature of the Boxer. The breed standard dictates that it must be in perfect proportion to the body and above all it must never be too light. The greatest value is to be placed on the muzzle being of correct form and in absolute proportion to the skull. The length of the muzzle to the
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Catalana

    Catalana

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Catalana, also known as the Catalana del Prat Lleonada, is a breed of chicken that comes from the region of Catalonia. It is also sometimes called the Buff Catalana for its golden plumage, Catalanas are a hardy dual–purpose breed kept for both eggs and meat. Though fairly widespread in Central and South America, the breed is extremely rare in North America but is included in the American Standard of Perfection.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Dogue de Bordeaux

    Dogue de Bordeaux

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Dogue de Bordeaux, Bordeaux Mastiff or French Mastiff or Bordeauxdog is a French Mastiff breed. The Dogue de Bordeaux is one of the most ancient French breeds. They are a typical brachycephalic molossoid type. Bordeaux are very powerful dogs, with a very muscular body. The breed has been utilized in many different forms, from using their brawn to pull carts or haul heavy objects, to guarding flocks and used to protect castles of the European elite. The Dogue de Bordeaux was known in France as early as the fourteenth century, particularly in southern France in the region around Bordeaux. Hence, the city lent its name to these large dogs. A uniform breed type of the Bordeaux Dog did not exist before about 1920. The French placed emphasis on keeping the old breeding line pure. Black masks were considered an indication of the crossing in of the English Mastiff. As an important indication of purity of the breed, attention was paid to the self colored (pink) nose, lighter eye color (dark amber), and red mask. They were originally bred with huge heads; a pioneer for the breed in Germany, Werner Preugschat once wrote: "What am I supposed to do with a dog that has a monstrous skull and
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Leghorn chicken

    Leghorn chicken

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Leghorn (UK /lɛˈɡɔrn/ or US /ˈlɛɡ.hɔrn/), Italian: Livorno or Livornese, is a breed of chicken originating in Tuscany, in central Italy. Birds were first exported to North America in 1828 from the port city of Livorno, on the western coast of Tuscany. They were initially called "Italians", but by 1865 the breed was known as "Leghorn", the traditional anglicisation of "Livorno". The breed was first introduced to Britain from the United States in 1870. White Leghorns are commonly used as layer chickens in many countries of the world. Other Leghorn varieties are less common. The origins of the Leghorn are not clear; it appears to derive from light breeds originating in rural Tuscany. The name comes from Leghorn, the traditional anglicisation of Livorno, the Tuscan port from which the first birds were exported to North America. The date of the first exports is variously reported as 1828, "about 1830" and 1852. Initially called "Italians', they were first referred to as "leghorns" in 1865, in Worcester, Massachusetts. The breed was included in the American Standard of Perfection in 1874, with three colours: black, white and brown (light and dark). Rose comb light and dark brown were
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Limousin

    Limousin

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Limousin cattle are a breed of highly muscled beef cattle originating from the Limousin and Marche regions of France. The breed is known as Limousine in France. Limousins were first exported from France in significant numbers in the 1960s and are now present in about 70 countries. They are naturally horned and have a distinctive lighter wheat to darker golden-red colouring, although international breeders have now bred polled (do not have horns) and black Limousins. DNA analysis indicates that Limousins probably evolved from an introduced subspecies of aurochs domesticated in the Near East. Following a period of mediocrity, when they were used mainly as draft animals, interest in Limousins as a source of high quality meat grew about 200 years ago. The first Limousin herd book was then established in France in 1886 to ensure the breed's purity and improvement by only recording and breeding animals that satisfied a strictly enforced breed standard. Limousins have become popular because of their low birth weights (ease of calving), higher than average dressing percentage (ratio of carcase to live weight) and yield (ratio of meat to carcase), high feed conversion efficiency, and their
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Nelore

    Nelore

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Nelore or Nellore beef cattle originated from Ongole Cattle (Bos indicus) cattle originally brought to Brazil from India. They are named after the district of Nellore in Andhra Pradesh. The Nelore has a distinct large hump over the top of the shoulder and neck. They have long legs which help them to walk in water and when grazing. The Nelore can adapt to all except very cold climates. They are very resistant to high temperatures and have natural resistance to various parasites and diseases. Brazil is the largest breeder of Nelore. Nelore have the shortest ears of most Bos indicus types. There is a naturally polled strain of the breed. The first pair of Ongole Cattle arrived in Brazil in 1868 when they were bought from a ship at Salvador, Bahia. Two more were bought from Hamburg Zoo by Manoel Ubelhart Lemgruber from Rio de Janeiro in 1878. The most recent importations from India were of one hundred animals in the 1960s. The Nelore herd book was founded in 1875. In the first decades of twentieth century, the favored breed of zebu in Brazil was the indubrasil or Indo-Brazilian. From the 1960 onwards, Nelore became the primary breed of beef cattle in Brazil because it is hardy,
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Welsh Terrier

    Welsh Terrier

    • Examples: Flornell-Rare-Bit of Twin Ponds
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Welsh Terrier is a Welsh breed of dog. It was originally bred for hunting fox, rodents and badger, but during the last century it has mainly been bred for showing. Despite this, it has retained its terrier strength of character and therefore requires firm, non-aggressive handling. The Welsh Terrier originates from Wales and has been claimed to be the oldest existing dog breed in the UK according to research. The Welsh Terrier was a latecomer to the British show-ring (being primarily a working dog) and was not officially registered as a breed until the 19th century. It is currently on the UK Kennel Clubs list of breeds that are in danger of dying out, having as few as 300 or so pups registered annually, as compared to the nation's most popular breeds that are registered in the tens of thousands each year. The Welsh Terrier is colored tan on the head, legs and underbelly while having a black or sometimes grizzle saddle.This is not always the case with female terriers as they are sometimes a simple darker tan all over. The breed is a sturdy and compact dog of about medium size that can grow up to 15.5 in (39 cm) with a weight of 20–22 pounds (9.1–10.0 kg). The tail was usually
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Australian Shepherd

    Australian Shepherd

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Australian shepherd is a breed of herding dog that was developed on ranches in the western United States. Despite its name, the breed, commonly known as an Aussie, was not developed in Australia and is American. They acquired their name because some of these dogs were used to herd Australian sheep and were seen in the West as early as the 1800s. The breed rose gradually in popularity with the boom of western riding after World War I. They became known to the general public through rodeos, horse shows, and through Disney movies made for television. For many years, Aussies have been valued by stockmen for their versatility and trainability. They have a similar look to the popular English Shepherd and Border Collie breeds. While they continue to work as stockdogs and compete in herding trials, the breed has earned recognition in other roles due to their trainability and eagerness to please, and are highly regarded for their skills in obedience. Like all working breeds, the Aussie has considerable energy and drive, and usually needs a job to do. It often excels at dog sports such as dog agility, flyball, and frisbee. They are also highly successful search and rescue dogs, disaster
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Bergamasco

    Bergamasco

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Italy
    The Bergamasco is a breed of dog with its origins in the Italian Alps near Bergamo, where it was originally used as a herding dog. The Bergamasco should be a medium size dog, well proportioned and harmonious having a rustic appearance. It is a solidly compact dog with a strong, powerful build that gives it great resistance without taking away any of its agility and speed of movement. Males weigh 32-38kg (70-84lbs) and females weigh 26-32kg (57-71lbs). Their height is around 21-24 inches (54-62 cm) and the life expectancy is 13-15 years. The breed's most distinctive feature is the unusual felted coat, a normal and healthy characteristic of the breed. The coat is characterized by three types of hair: a fine, dense, oily undercoat, long harsher hairs similar to a goat's and a top woolly outer-coat. The three types of hair weave together as the dog gets older to form flat mats or flocks. The mats start from the spine and go down the flanks, growing every year to reach the ground. The color of the coat can be anything from an appearance of gray or silver gray (in fact a merle) to a mixture of black to coal, with brown shades also intermixed. These colors may have served as a camouflage
    4.50
    2 votes
    211
    Brahma

    Brahma

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    Brahmas are an Asiatic breed of chicken, originating in the Brahmaputra region in India where they were known as "Gray Chittagongs." Their heritage is unclear, but they are believed to be closely related to the Jungle Fowl (Gallus Gigantus) and the Cochin. The first Brahmas were brought to the U.S. from British India in 1846, and were used as a utility fowl for their edibility and generous egg laying and hardiness even during the winter months, although today they are kept mainly for ornamental purposes as selection for utility has taken a back seat to selection for appearance. Some of the earliest imports to the U.S. reached weights of nearly 14 pounds, but rarely is such massive size seen today: standard weight for a cock is 11 pounds; hens are 8.5 pounds. By the 1870s Brahmas had become so popular that they were admitted into the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection. Brahmas are calm, friendly birds that make good pets or exhibition fowl. Males are calm and generally not aggressive towards humans. They are not skittish or easily scared, making them a popular choice for families with children. Due to their docile demeanor, Brahmas can be easily trained so that
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Irish Wolfhound

    Irish Wolfhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Ireland
    The Irish Wolfhound (Irish: Cú Faoil, Irish pronunciation: [ˈkuː ˈfˠiːlʲ]) is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris), specifically a sighthound. The name originates from its purpose (wolf hunting with dogs) rather than from its appearance. Irish Wolfhounds are the tallest of dog breeds. The standard of The American Kennel Club describes the breed as "Of great size and commanding appearance, the Irish Wolfhound is remarkable in combining power and swiftness with keen sight. The largest and tallest of the galloping hounds, in general type he is a rough-coated, Greyhound-like breed; very muscular, strong though gracefully built; movements easy and active; head and neck carried high, the tail carried with an upward sweep with a slight curve towards the extremity". The colours allowed by the American Kennel Club are "grey, brindle, red, black, pure white, fawn, wheaten and steel grey". The American Kennel Club allows "any other color that appears in the Deerhound". The size as specified by the AKC is "Minimum height for mature males: 32 inches, females: 30 inches. Minimum weight: 120lbs for males, 105 lbs for females. Great size, including height of shoulder and proportionate
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Poulet de Bresse

    Poulet de Bresse

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    The Bresse (French: Poulet de Bresse ; French pronunciation: [pu.lɛ d(ə) bʁɛs]) is a breed of chicken originating from the Bresse area of the Rhône-Alpes region of France. The birds are highly valued for their gamey depth of flavour, yet with fine, tender flesh and delicious, clean-flowing fat. Roughly 1.2 million are raised annually, but such is the demand inside France that few birds make it out of the country. As a premium product, they sell at a premium price: Poulet de Bresse command around 15 euro ($21) per kilo at fine food markets. The most typical examples, known as Bény, have a distinctive red crown, white feathers and blue feet, making up the colours of the French flag or tricolore, making it an ideal national mascot. Black (Bourg) and grey (Louhans) feather varieties are also quite common. When butchered, the chickens have a clear reddish-pink tone to the flesh and pronounced yellowish fat. Bones are surprisingly light for sturdy, free-range birds. Poulet de Bresse are reared to exacting standards by small farms in a small designated area around the city, protected under French and European law (Appellation d’origine contrôlée) since 1957 - the first livestock to be
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Saluki

    Saluki

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Egypt
    The Saluki, also known as the Royal Dog of Egypt and Persian Greyhound (Arabic: سلوقي, Persian: تازی) is one of the oldest known breeds of domesticated dog. From the period of the Middle Kingdom onwards, Saluki-like animals appear on the ancient Egyptian tombs of 2134 BC. They have connections both to the Bible and Imperial China. Modern breeding in the west began in 1895 when Florence Amherst imported a breeding pair of Salukis from Lower Egypt and began working to popularize the breed. Salukis were recognized by The Kennel Club in 1923, and by the American Kennel Club in 1929. The breed is also the mascot of Southern Illinois University Carbondale. The Saluki is a sighthound and historically travelled throughout the Middle East with nomadic desert tribes over an area stretching from the Sahara to the Caspian Sea. They have been used to hunt quarry such as gazelles in the Middle East. Shaped like a typical sighthound, they come in two varieties, smooth and feathered. The feathered variety is more common, and the breed is known for the fur on its ears, tail and the back of its legs. Though they are an independent breed that needs patient training, they are gentle and affectionate
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Bearded Collie

    Bearded Collie

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Bearded Collie, or Beardie, is a herding breed of dog once used primarily by Scottish shepherds, but now mostly a popular family companion. Bearded Collies have an average weight of 40–60 pounds (18–27 kg). Males are around 21–22 inches (53–56 cm) tall at the withers while females are around 20–21 inches (51–53 cm) tall. The Bearded Collie's history is a mix of fact and legend. Kazimierz Grabski, a Polish merchant, reportedly traded a shipment of grain for sheep in Scotland in 1514 and brought six Polish Lowland Sheepdogs to move them. A Scottish shepherd was so impressed with the herding ability of the dogs that he traded several sheep for several dogs. The Polish sheepdogs were bred with local Scottish dogs to produce the Bearded Collie. It is generally agreed that Mrs. G. Olive Willison founded the modern Bearded Collie in 1944 with her brown bitch, Jeannie of Bothkennar. Jeannie was supposedly a Shetland Sheepdog, but Mrs. Willison received a Bearded Collie by accident. She was so fascinated by the dog that she wanted to begin breeding, so she began searching for a dog for Jeannie. While walking along the beach, Mrs. Willison met a man who was emigrating from Scotland; she
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Brangus

    Brangus

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    A Brangus is a hardy and popular breed of beef cattle, a cross between an Angus and a Brahman. An animal eligible for registration as a Brangus cattle is 5/8 Angus and 3/8 Brahman. (Brangus is a registered trademark of the IBBA) The effort to develop the Brangus breed began as early as 1912 and the first organization of Brangus breeders was chartered in 1949. A review of the development of the Brangus breed would take us back beyond the founding of the American Brangus Breeders Association in 1949; however, registered Brangus descend from the foundation animals recorded that year or registered Brahman and Angus cattle enrolled since then. Much of the early work in crossing Brahman and Angus cattle was done at the USDA Experiment Station in Jeanerette, Louisiana. According to the USDA 1935 Yearbook in Agriculture the research with these crosses started about 1932 During the same period, Clear Creek Ranch of Welch, Oklahoma and Grenada, Mississippi, Raymond Pope of Vinita, Oklahoma, the Essar Ranch of San Antonio, Texas, and a few individual breeders in other parts of the United States and Canada were also carrying on private experimental breeding programs. They were looking for a
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Delaware

    Delaware

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Delaware is a breed of chicken originating in the U.S. state of Delaware. It was once of relative importance to the U.S. chicken industry, but today is critically endangered. It is primarily suited to meat production but also lays reasonably well. It has plumage of a unique pattern, and is accepted in to poultry standards for showing. With males weighing 8.5 pounds (3.9 kilos) and hens 6.5 pounds (3 kilos), the Delaware is a medium sized breed. They have rather large, bright red colored single combs and wattles. Delawares appear in a single color type: a white body and breast, with light black barring on the ends of the hackle, wings and tails. It is similar to the Columbian color seen in some breeds, but has barring in the dark portions, rather than uniform black. Also of note is that all feathers have a white quill and shaft, which, combined with yellow skin, makes for a cleaner appearing carcass. Like most standard breeds of chicken, the Delaware has a miniaturized bantam version; however, these are rarely seen. Delawares are hardy birds that mature quickly. Hens are good layers of large to jumbo brown eggs and will go broody. Unlike the most common commercial meat birds in
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Greyhound

    Greyhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Greyhound is a breed of sighthound that has been primarily bred for coursing game and racing, which has also recently seen a resurgence in its popularity as a pedigree show dog and family pet. It is a gentle and intelligent breed whose combination of long, powerful legs, deep chest, flexible spine, and slim build allows it to reach average race speeds in excess of 18 metres per second (59 feet per second, or 63 kilometres per hour (39 mph)). At maximum acceleration, a greyhound reaches a full speed of 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph) within 30 metres or six strides from the boxes, traveling at almost 20 metres per second for the first 250 metres of a race. The only other animal that can accelerate faster over a short distance is the cheetah, which can reach speeds of 109 kilometres per hour (68 mph) over 3-4 strides from a standing start. Males are usually 71 to 76 centimetres (28 to 30 in) tall at the withers and weigh around 27 to 40 kilograms (60 to 88 lb). Females tend to be smaller with shoulder heights ranging from 68 to 71 centimetres (27 to 28 in) and weights from less than 27 to 34 kilograms (60 to 75 lb). Greyhounds have very short hair, which is easy to maintain.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Luing cattle

    Luing cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Luing cattle are a beef breed developed on the island of Luing in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland by the Cadzow brothers; Ralph, Denis and Shane, after 1947. It was formed by breeding first cross Beef Shorthorn/Highland heifers to a Beef Shorthorn bull. The breed of red-brown cattle are moderately sized and extremely hardy. The intent was to produce a good beef cow with the ability to raise a calf under adverse weather conditions. It was officially recognised as a breed by the British government in 1965 and the Cadzows continue to farm on Luing and the surrounding islands, including Scarba and Torsa. The breed has been exported to countries across the world including Canada and New Zealand, and is highly regarded for hardiness and ease of handling.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Red Poll

    Red Poll

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Red Poll is a dual-purpose breed of cattle developed in England in the latter half of the 19th century. The cattle are red, preferably deep red with white only on the tail switch and udder. They are naturally polled (without horns). Red Poll cattle are mainly used as beef suckler cows, although a few dairy herds are found in England, as well as in the United States in the state of Texas. They are known for easy calving and successfully rearing a high proportion of their calves. They are sometimes used for conservation grazing. The Red Poll originated as a cross between Norfolk Red beef-type cattle and Suffolk Dun dairy cattle (both of these breeds are now extinct). The parent Suffolk breed was also polled; Norfolk cattle had horns, but the gene for horns was bred out in the Red Poll breed. The original name for the breed, adopted in 1863, was Norfolk and Suffolk Red Polled cattle, and the first standard description was agreed upon in 1873, with the first herd book compiled in 1874. The breed became the Red Polled in 1883, and then Red Poll in 1888, when the Red Poll Cattle Society was formed. They are considered to be part of the "Suffolk Trinity" with Suffolk sheep and Suffolk
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Rough Collie

    Rough Collie

    • Examples: Laund Loyalty of Bellhaven
    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Scotland
    The Rough Collie (also known as the 'Long-Haired Collie') is a long coated breed of medium to large size dog that in its original form was a type of collie used and bred for herding in Scotland. Originating in the 1800s, it is now well known through the works of author Albert Payson Terhune, and through the Lassie novel, movies, and television shows. There is also a smooth-coated variety; some breed organisations, including both the American and the Canadian Kennel Clubs, consider the smooth-coat and rough-coat dogs to be variations of the same breed. Rough Collies generally come in shades of sable, merles, and tri-coloured. This breed is very similar to the smaller Shetland Sheepdog which is partly descended from the Rough Collie. Both Rough and Smooth collies are descended from a localised variety of herding dog originating in Scotland and Wales. The Scottish variety was a large, strong, aggressive dog, bred to herd highland sheep. The Welsh variety was small and nimble, domesticated and friendly, and also herded goats. When the English saw these dogs at the Birmingham market, they interbred them with their own variety of sheepdogs producing a mixture of short and long haired
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Shamo

    Shamo

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Japan
    Shamo or Ko-Shamo (軍鶏 or シャモ) is a breed of chicken of Japan which was originated in Thailand. The name "Shamo" was a corruption of "Siam" during the early Edo period but has been selectively bred for several hundred years and is very different from the original stock. Shamo in reality is a strain of the Asil (Kaura), taken to Siam (Thailand) and Taiwan and from there to Japan. Its real place of origin is Sindh, Pakistan and secondary place of origin is present day India (Hyderabad Dakkan and Rampure). This breed is used as fighting cocks for naked heeled cockboxing in Japanese cockfights, where it is still legal. It is also bred all over the world for its show quality. Ko-shamo is mixture of O-shamo with small legged breeds.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Siberian Husky

    Siberian Husky

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Russia
    The Siberian Husky (Russian: сибирский хаски, "Siberian husky") is a medium-size, dense-coat working dog breed that originated in north-eastern Siberia. The breed belongs to the Spitz genetic family. It is recognisable by its thickly furred double coat, sickle tail, erect triangular ears, and distinctive markings. Huskies are an active, energetic, and resilient breed whose ancestors came from the extremely cold and harsh environment of the Siberian Arctic. Siberian Huskies were bred by the Chukchi of Northeastern Asia to pull heavy loads long distances through difficult conditions. The dogs were imported into Alaska during the Nome Gold Rush and later spread into the United States and Canada. They were initially sent to Alaska and Canada as sled dogs but rapidly acquired the status of family pets and show dogs. Because of its efficiency as a working breed, most huskies are bred to be able to withstand long work days on little amounts of food. They can travel 40 miles per day. The Siberian Husky, Samoyed, and Alaskan Malamute are all breeds directly descended from the original "sled dog." Recent DNA analysis confirms that this is one of the oldest breeds of dog. The term "husky" is
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Sussex

    Sussex

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Sussex chicken is a dual purpose breed that originating in England around the time of the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43 that is a popular backyard chicken in many countries. They come in eight colors (with a couple more being developed) and have a bantam version at 1/4 size; the bantams may be any of the eight colors. A Sussex breed club was formed in 1903. The colors found in Sussex chickens are: Brown, Buff, Light, Red, Speckled, Silver, White and Coronation. The Sussex chicken, whatever color, should be graceful with a long, broad, flat back and a rectangular build, the tail should be at a 45 degree angle from the body. The eyes should be red in the darker varieties but orange in the lighter one and they sport a medium sized, single, erect comb. The earlobes are red and the legs and skin white in every variety. Cocks should weigh approx 9 lbs, and the hens (females) 7 lbs. The Brown and red varieties are rare but the others are more common. Brown and red The light Sussex has a white body with a black tail and black wing tips. Its neck is white, striped with black and has a very striking appearance. The feathers around the neck are called hackle feathers and each one is
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Toy Manchester Terrier

    Toy Manchester Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Toy Manchester Terrier is a breed of dog, categorized as a terrier. The breed was bred down in size in North America from the Manchester Terrier, and is placed in the Toy Group by the American Kennel Club and the Canadian Kennel Club (the Manchester Terrier is placed in the Terrier Group.) Neither the Fédération Cynologique Internationale nor the Kennel Club (UK) recognize a Toy variety of the Manchester Terrier. The Manchester Terrier, from which the Toy Manchester Terrier was bred, was developed in the 19th century from crosses between an old Black and Tan Terrier with the Whippet, along with other breeds, primarily for rat-catching. In England, another breed was also developed in the 19th century in Manchester, the English Toy Terrier, as a separate breed from the Manchester Terrier. The English Toy Terrier was a popular pet in Victorian England, and bred to be very small, some weighing as little as 1 kg (2.2 lbs.) The Toy Manchester Terrier breed was developed by breeding down the Manchester Terrier in size. In the United States in the 1920s the breed was called the Toy Black and Tan Terrier. The name was changed to the Toy Manchester Terrier and the American Toy Manchester
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Dutch Bantam

    Dutch Bantam

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    The Dutch Bantam is a breed of chicken originating in the Netherlands. It is also one of the true bantam breeds, meaning it is a naturally small bird with no related large fowl from which it was miniaturized. Dutch Bantams have many color variations, and have grown in popularity as exhibition poultry worldwide. Dutch bantams are also practical chickens, being especially hardy, good layers for their size. They are desirable family pets due to their reputation for thriving on loving care and easy keeping in confined space. Diminutive chickens of similar coloration to today's Dutch Bantams have been seen in the Netherlands for hundreds of years, but the exact origin of the breed is unclear. It is likely that the ancestors of the Dutch Bantam were Southeast Asian bantams brought back by sailors from the Dutch East Indies. Historically, it is supposed that these tiny chickens were selectively bred because only small eggs could be kept by peasant farmers, while larger ones were required to be sent to the kitchens of the landed gentry. The first written referring to Dutch Bantams (as a distinct breed) is from a Hague zoo record dated to 1882, and the Dutch Poultry Club recognized the
    4.00
    2 votes
    227
    Australorp

    Australorp

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Australia
    The Australorp is a chicken breed of Australian origin. It is a large, soft-feathered bird, with white toenails, black legs and beak, and a moderately large and upright single comb, with five distinct points. The Australorp is a hardy, docile, and a good egg-layer as well as meat bird. The original stock used in the development of the Australorp was imported to Australia from England out of the Black Orpington yards of William Cook and Joseph Partington in the period from 1890 to the early 1900s with Rhode Island Red. Local breeders used this stock together with judicious out-crossings of Minorca, White Leghorn and Langshan blood to improve the utility features of the imported Orpingtons. There is even a report of some Plymouth Rock blood also being used. The emphasis of the early breeders was on utility features. At this time, the resulting birds were known as Australian Black Orpingtons (Austral-orp). The origin of the name "Australorp" seems to be shrouded in as much controversy as the attempts to obtain agreement between the States over a suitable national Standard. The earliest claim to the name was made by one of poultry fancy's institutions, Wiliam Wallace Scott, before the
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    Basset Hound

    Basset Hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: France
    The Basset Hound is a short-legged breed of dog of the hound family. One of six recognized Basset Breeds in France, they are scent hounds, originally bred for the purpose of hunting rabbits and hare. Their sense of smell for tracking is second only to that of the Bloodhound. The name Basset is derived from the French word bas, meaning "low", with the attenuating suffix -et, together meaning "rather low". Basset Hounds are usually Bicolors or Tricolors of standard hound coloration. Bassets are large, short, solid and long, with curved sabre tails held high over their long backs. Everett Millais, founder of the modern Basset Hound, is quoted as saying "Oh, he's about 4 feet long and 12 inches high." in reference to his French basset. An adult dog weighs between 20 and 35 kilograms (44 and 77 lb). This breed, like its ancestor the Bloodhound, is known for its hanging skin structure, which causes the face to occasionally look sad; this, for many people, adds to the breed's charm. The dewlap, seen as the loose, elastic skin around the neck, and the trailing ears which along with the Bloodhound are the longest of any breed, help trap the scent of what they are tracking. Its neck is
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    229
    Bulldog

    Bulldog

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    Bulldog is the name for a breed of dog commonly referred to as the English Bulldog. Other Bulldog breeds include the American Bulldog, Olde English Bulldogge, Australian Bulldog and the French Bulldog. The Bulldog is a muscular heavy dog with a wrinkled face and a distinctive pushed-in nose. The American Kennel Club (AKC), The Kennel Club (UK) and the United Kennel Club (UKC) oversee breeding standards. The Bulldog is a breed with characteristically wide head and shoulders along with a pronounced mandibular prognathism. There are generally thick folds of skin on a Bulldog's brow; round, black, wide-set eyes; a short muzzle with characteristic folds called "rope" above the nose; hanging skin under the neck; drooping lips and pointed teeth and occasionally, an underbite. The coat is short, flat and sleek, with colors of red, fawn, white, brindle (mixed colors, often in waves or irregular stripes), and piebald. In the US, a typical mature male weighs approximately 45–55 pounds. Mature females weigh in at approximately 45 pounds. In the United Kingdom, the breed standards are 50 pounds for a male and 40 pounds for a female. Bulldogs are one of the few breeds whose tail is naturally
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    230
    Houdan

    Houdan

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    The Houdan is a breed of chicken native to France. Named after the city of Houdan, near Paris, it is an old breed. It was first exported to England in 1850, and to North America in 1865, where it appeared in the first edition of the American Standard of Perfection in 1874. With an attractive appearance, the Houdan combines a number of distinctive features, giving rise to speculation about the breeds that contributed to its development. The Crèvecœur or perhaps the Polish is suspected to have given the Houdan its crest, and either the Dorking or the native five-toed fowl of France is thought have to resulted in the Houdan's five toes (most chickens have only four). As the actual origins of the Houdan predate modern agricultural writing, little can be said with certainty. Houdans have small earlobes and wattles hidden by the crest and feather bearding. Their combs are V–shaped in the American standard, and butterfly-shaped in the British, Australian and French standards. In terms of plumage, the Houdan comes in two common color varieties: White and Mottled (black with white spotting). The white color was a later development. Originally a dual–purpose fowl kept for both eggs and meat,
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    231
    Lamona

    Lamona

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Lamona is a breed of chicken originating in the United States. It was developed in the early 20th century by Harry S. Lamon, who was the senior poultry expert at the Bureau of Animal Industry, an agency that was eventually replaced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. Working at the Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, Lamon crossed White Plymouth Rocks, Silver-Gray Dorkings and White Leghorns to produce the Lamona. The effort began in 1912 and by 1933 it was recognized as a breed by admittance in to the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection. A bantam version was miniaturized from the standard Lamona, and it was recognized by the APA in 1960. Lamonas weigh more than the light Leghorn, but less than the large Plymouth Rock and Dorking. They have yellow skin and white plumage, which makes them ideal meat birds for the U.S. market. They have single combs and red earlobes, and while chickens with red earlobes usually lay brown eggs, Lamonas lay large white eggs. Also unlike most chickens, Lamonas were once said to retain quality as a meat bird after they had passed their egg laying prime
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    232
    Maine-Anjou

    Maine-Anjou

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    The Maine-Anjou (in French: Maine-Anjou, Rouge des Prés) is a breed of cattle originating in the Anjou region in West France. It was created by the Viscount Olivier de Rougé (see House of Rougé) in 1908 in Chenillé-Changé. It is primarily raised for beef production. Maine-Anjou are red and white (sometimes black or roan) and have horns. They are a large breed, with bulls weighing 998 to 1406 kilos (2200 to 3100 pounds), and cows 680 to 862 kilos (1500 to 1900 pounds). They were first imported live to Canada in 1969, and then later in to the -United States through artificial insemination. The Maine-Anjou evolved as a dual-purpose breed, with the cows used for milk production and the bull calves fed for market, but most people use them for the beef.
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    233
    Miniature Schnauzer

    Miniature Schnauzer

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Germany
    The Miniature Schnauzer is a breed of small dog of the Schnauzer type that originated in Germany in the mid-to-late 19th century. Miniature Schnauzers developed from crosses between the Standard Schnauzer and one or more smaller breeds such as the Poodle and Affenpinscher. The breed remains one of the most popular world wide, primarily for its temperament and relatively small size. Globally, the Miniature Schnauzer comes in four colors: black, salt-and-pepper, black-and-silver, and white. As of 2008 it is the 11th most popular breed in the U.S. Miniature Schnauzers have a squarely proportioned build, measuring 12 to 14 inches (30 to 36 cm) tall and weighing 11 to 15 pounds (5.0 to 6.8 kg) for females and 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg) for males. They have a double coat. The exterior fur is wiry and the undercoat is soft. The coat is kept short on the body, but the hair on ears, legs, and belly are retained. Miniature Schnauzers are often described as non-shedding dogs, and while this is not entirely true, their shedding is minimal and generally unnoticeable. They are characterized by a rectangular head with bushy beard, mustache and eyebrows; teeth that meet in a "scissor bite";
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    234
    Australian Brangus

    Australian Brangus

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Australian Brangus are a polled breed of beef cattle, developed in the tropical coastal areas of Queensland, Australia by crossbreeding Brahman and Angus cattle during the 1950s. Brangus were first developed in the United States and later developed independently in Australia as the Australian Brangus. The breed was produced to establish higher tick and heat tolerance than that of other cattle breeds. They are a widely used source of meat throughout Australia and exported to countries such as Japan and America. The Australian Brangus cattle are about ⁄8 Brahman and ⁄8 Angus in their genetic makeup. The cattle are usually a sleek black in colour, but reds are also acceptable. They have a very low rate of eye cancer, which can be a problem in many white faced breeds. Their head is of a medium length with a broad muzzle and forehead. Australian Brangus are also good walkers and foragers and "do well" in a wide variety of situations. The Australian Brangus Cattle Association Ltd. performance records the herd using the internationally recognized Breedplan for monitoring growth, milk and carcase quality. "The Land Stock Types"
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    235
    Belmont Red

    Belmont Red

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Belmont Red is a breed of beef cattle developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) during 1954 in response to the need in the Australian Tropics for cattle which would improve the fertility of Bos indicus cattle. The breed was conceived at Belmont Research Station as a composite from several Bos taurus breeds: Africander (African Sanga) and Hereford-Shorthorn. Selected traits were a more placid temperament, greater resistance to ticks, and use of the environment and the pastures in the most efficient manner to give higher weight gains. Rigid selection for these traits has resulted in the evolution of well adapted cattle to both a tropical and temperate environment. Belmont Red cattle are heat-tolerant and tick-resistant, requiring little or no dipping, and the cows have a good survival rate in times of drought and do not suffer from eye cancer. Most of these cattle are red in colour. The breed was released to Australian breeders by the CSIRO in 1969. Large commercial herds running on native pastures in both Queensland and the Northern Territory have calving rates above 90% achieved in large breeder groups containing 5,000 head. The cows show
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    236
    Boran cattle

    Boran cattle

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Boran cattle are a popular Zebu beef breed in eastern Africa. Kenyan Boran cattle were developed from the native shorthorned Zebu cattle of the Borana Oromo people of southern Ethiopia. They are usually white or fawn, with the bulls being darker with black point. Their great similarity to the American Brahman cattle is not without basis, they are also descended from cattle from the western coast of India, only much earlier. Since 1951, the Boran Cattle Breeders' Society has been managed and strategically breeding Boran cattle in Kenya. As of 2008, there were approximately 454 beef ranches in the country, which can be classified based on ownership as one of five categories: group ranches, private company ranches, co-operative ranches, public company ranches, and government ranches. Having been in Africa for over a thousand years, they are very well adapted to local conditions and parasites. Boran cattle are known for their fertility, early maturation (moreso than other Zebu breeds), hardiness, and docility. The Orma Boran is the smallest of the Boran breeds, smaller than the Kenyan Boran. Mature male Orma Boran range in size from 225 to 395 kg, while females are from 250 to 355 kg.
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    237
    Crèvecœur

    Crèvecœur

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: France
    The Crèvecœur is a rare breed of chicken originating in France. Named after the town of Crèvecœur in Normandy, it is one of the oldest French chicken breeds, and may be the progenitor of the La Flèche, Houdan, and Faverolles. They have uniformly black plumage, a V-shaped comb and large crests, similar in this last regard to the Houdan and Polish breeds. Their legs are a dark blue–gray. They were first kept in France as dual–purpose chickens, valued for both their white eggs and meat. Abroad in the U.S. and the U.K., where consumers prefer table birds with light-colored legs, Crèvecœurs are primarily bred for poultry exhibition. They were admitted in to the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection in 1874.
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    238
    Croad Langshan

    Croad Langshan

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: China
    The Croad Langshan is an old, heavy, soft-feathered chicken breed which probably originated in China. The first recorded imports came from the Langshan ('Wolf Mountain') District (called after a small hill in the outskirts of Nantong, just north of the lower reaches of the Yangtse-Kiang River in China) in 1872 and were undertaken by Major F.T. Croad who imported the breed into Britain. Major Croad’s niece, Miss A. C. Croad, has been credited with establishing the breed in Britain. The Croad Langshan Club was formed in Britain in 1904. The name ‘Croad’ distinguishes the original type of Langshan, imported by Major Croad, which were a utility fowl of great merit, from the tall Modern Langshans which have been developed for the show pen. As with many other breeds, numbers declined after the Second World War and eventually the breed was left without a breed club in the UK. It was rescued by the Rare Poultry Society until in 1979 the club was reformed. Langshans were also imported to North America in 1878 and admitted to the standard in 1883. White Langshans were admitted to the standard ten years later in 1893. There are three varieties of Langshans that have been accepted to the US
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    239
    Dominique

    Dominique

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United States of America
    The Dominique, also known as Dominicker or Pilgrim Fowl, is a breed of chicken (Gallus gallus) originating in the United States during the Colonial. It is considered America's oldest breed of chicken, probably descending from chickens brought to New England from southern England during colonial times. By the 19th century, they were widely popular and were raised in many parts of the country. Dominiques are a dual purpose breed, being valued for their meat as well as for their brown eggs. They weigh 6 to 8 pounds (2.7 to 3.6 kg) at maturity. In earlier times, their feathers were much sought after as stuffing for pillows and mattresses. Dominiques are quite distinctive in appearance. They have a rose comb and a heavy plumage of irregularly striped black-and-white feathers (a pattern called "barring" or sometimes "hawk coloring"). The breed matures quickly, producing eggs at about six months of age. At first glance, Dominiques and Barred Rocks appear strikingly similar, often leading to confusion when discerning a particular breed. The strongest indicators are the Comb, Plumage, and Colour. Dominiques possess a rose comb while Barred Rocks possess a single comb. This is generally the
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    240
    Egyptian Fayoumi

    Egyptian Fayoumi

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Egypt
    The Fayoumi is a breed of chicken originating in Egypt. Fayoumis are a very old breed in their native region, and are named for the Faiyum Governorate southwest of Cairo and west of the Nile. They have been present in the West since at least the 1940s, when they were imported from Egypt by an Iowa State University Dean of Agriculture. However, they are not officially recognized for exhibition by the American Poultry Association, and are not included in the Standard of Perfection. With their upright tails and forward jutting breast and neck, they are sometimes likened to a roadrunners. They are a light-weight fowl, with roosters weighing in around 2 kilos (4.5 pounds) and hens 1.6 kilos (3.5 pounds). They appear only in a single variety. In roosters, the plumage is silver-white on the head, neck, back and saddle, with the rest in a black and white barring. Hens have heads and necks in the silver-white hue, with the rest barred. Fayoumis have a single comb, earlobes, and wattles are red and moderately large, with a white spot in the earlobes. They have dark horn colored beaks, and slate blue skin. Their appearance is remarkably similar to the Silver variety of the Campine breed of
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    241
    English Foxhound

    English Foxhound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The English Foxhound is one of the four foxhound breeds of dog. They are scent hounds, bred to hunt foxes by scent. The English Foxhound is about 21-25 inches tall to the withers, and weighs anywhere between 65-75 pounds, although some English Foxhounds bred for the show ring can be considerably bigger, with some males weighing over 100 pounds. The skull is wide, the muzzle is long, and eyes carry a sweet expression. The legs are muscular, straight-boned, and the paws are rounded, almost cat-like. The English Foxhound was originally a pack hound, therefore, it gets along well with other dogs and enjoys human companionship. It gets along with horses, children, and other pets, as it is a gentle, social, and tolerant breed. It is a very active breed that enjoys the hunt. Though it is slower than the American Foxhound, it enjoys running and will run all day with very few breaks in between. There are very few health problems in this breed. Occasionally seen are chronic hip dysplasia, renal disease, and epilepsy. The breed's lifespan is typically 10–13 years, although British hunts would routinely put working hounds down after 6–7 years hunting. The English Foxhound was created in the
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    242
    Griffon Bruxellois

    Griffon Bruxellois

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Belgium
    The Griffon Bruxellois or Brussels Griffon is a breed of toy dog, named for their city of origin: Brussels, Belgium. The Griffon Bruxellois may refer to three different breeds, the Griffon Bruxellois, the Griffon Belge and the Petit Brabançon. Identical in standard except for coat and colour differences, in some standards they are considered varieties of the same breed, much like Belgian Sheepdogs. The Griffon Bruxellois is known to have a huge heart, and a strong desire to snuggle and be with his or her master. They display a visible air of self-importance. A Griffon should not be shy or aggressive; however, they are very emotionally sensitive, and because of this, should be socialized carefully at a young age. Griffons should also be alert, inquisitive and interested in their surroundings. Griffons tend to bond with one human more than others. This, along with their small size, may make them unsuitable as a family pet, especially for a family with very small children. Griffons tend to get along well with other animals in the house, including cats, ferrets, and other dogs. However, they can get into trouble because they have no concept of their own relative size and may attempt to
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    243
    Lakeland Terrier

    Lakeland Terrier

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: England
    The Lakeland Terrier is a dog breed, which takes its name from its home of origin, the Lake District in England. The dog is a small to mid-size member of the Terrier family. While independent in personality, it interacts well with owners and all family members, and is mostly hypo-allergenic (non shedding). The breed is not widely owned in the United States. At 15-17 lb (7–8 kg), it is the smallest of the long legged, black and tan terriers. The Lakeland is similar in appearance to the slightly larger Welsh Terrier and is finer-boned. The largest of the threesome in this similar group of Terriers is the Airedale. The Lakeland is a sturdy dog, compact, free moving and able to cover ground with little effort and much quickness. The dog is relatively narrow in the chest and has a broad muzzle, yet slightly narrower than the Welsh Terrier, with small, V-shaped ears. The Lakeland breed has a thick bushy wiry outer coat and a soft undercoat. It comes in a variety of colors though the Kennel Club lists the following as 'Acceptable colours for registration': Black, Black and Tan, Blue and Tan, Dark Grizzle, Grizzle, Grizzle and Tan, Liver and Tan, Red, Red Grizzle, Wheaten. They have an
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    244
    Lhasa Apso

    Lhasa Apso

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: China
    The Lhasa Apso (/ˈlɑːsə ˈæpsoʊ/LAH-sə AP-soh) is a non-sporting dog breed originating in Tibet. It was bred as an interior sentinel in the Buddhist monasteries, who alerted the monks to any intruders who entered. Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet and apso is a word in the Tibetan language meaning "bearded," so Lhasa Apso (ཁྱི་ཨབ་སོག་; Wylie: kyi ab sog; Lhasa dialect IPA: [cí ʔápsoʔ]) simply means "long-haired Lhasa dog," although there are also some who claim that the word "apso" is a corruption of the Tibetan word "rapso," meaning "goat-like", which would make the equivalent translation "wooly Lhasa dog." Male Lhasa Apsos should ideally be 10.75 inches (27.3 cm) at the withers and weigh about 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg). The females are slightly smaller, and weigh between 12 to 14 pounds (5.4 to 6.4 kg). The breed standard requires dark brown eyes and a black nose, although liver-colored lhasas have a brown nose. The texture of the coat is heavy, straight, hard, neither woolly nor silky, and very dense. They come in a wide variety of colors including black, white, red and gold with various shadings. Lhasas can be with or without dark tips at the ends of ears and beard. The
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    245
    Modern Game

    Modern Game

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Modern Game is a breed of a chicken originating in England between 1850 and 1900. Purely an exhibition bird, Modern Game were developed to be most aesthetically pleasing and to epitomize the visual appeal of the gamecock or fighting cock. After the outlawing of cockfights in the U.K. in the mid 19th century, many cockfighting enthusiasts turned to breeding for shows as an alternative poultry hobby, and the Modern Game was developed from crosses of Old English Game and Malays. Despite being classified as game chickens (i.e. of cockfighting derivation) in breed standards, Modern Game were not bred to fight. Today, the ideal show bird should have a body shaped like a flat iron when seen from above, a relatively short back, fine tail, hard feathering, and a very upright carriage. The breed appears in more than a dozen colour variations. The most common being black red, birchen, brown red, duckwing and pyle. The colours can be broadly divided into two groups; those with willow-coloured legs and red eyes, and those with black legs and dark eyes. Like many breeds, Modern Game comes in both a standard large size and a bantam version; according to the British Poultry Standards large
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    246
    Old English Game

    Old English Game

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    The Old English Game Fowl is a breed of chicken. Pure English Game Fowls are prized among Poultry breeders and thus fetch a high sale price. One of the types called standard Old Englishes are larger than the bantams and were originally bred for cockfighting. Old Englishes should not be confused with American games nor should American games be confused with Old Englishes. The Old English Game Bantam is the bantam version of this breed, it is one of the smallest chicken breeds, weighing about 22 oz (650 grams) when they are fully grown. The Old English Game Bantam is one of the most popular bantam breeds. This is especially the case in the United Kingdom, where it has its own specialist shows. The Old English Bantam is similar to the Old English Game in that it has long legs and it is fairly muscular. They are a great pet for children. The bantam was not developed from the larger sized old English but rather from other barnyard bantams of the same area. This explains their lack of length in the sickle feathers that you see in the standard sized O.E.G. The American old English game bantams contain blood from Dutch, and Rosecombs plus other breeds to add feather length and more colors
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    247
    Pharaoh Hound

    Pharaoh Hound

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Malta
    The Pharaoh Hound is a breed of dog and the national hound of the Mediterranean nation of Malta. Its native name is Kelb tal-Fenek (plural: Klieb tal-Fenek) in Maltese, which means "rabbit hound". The dog is traditionally used by some Maltese men for hunting. The breed has no conclusive links with Ancient Egypt and its name in English is a 20th century fabrication. It has variously been classified as a member of the sighthound group, yet its fieldwork description clearly determines it as a hound. At first glance, the Pharaoh Hound should appear both graceful and elegant as well as powerful and athletic. Its build should be one of strength without bulkiness or excessive musculature. Its head is elegant without being fine or extreme. The skull should resemble a blunt wedge, and is long and chiselled with only a slight stop and a muzzle of good length. Its eyes are oval with a keen, noble, alert, and intelligent expression. It has a long, lean, and muscular neck that is slightly arched. Its body is slightly longer than its height at the withers. It has a deep chest that extends down to the elbows and a moderate tuck up. Its shoulders are long and well laid back. Its front legs are
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    248
    Red Angus

    Red Angus

    • Breed of: Beef cattle
    Red Angus is a red coloured breed of beef cattle selected from the population of Aberdeen Angus cattle. Although the black was more fashionable the recessive red gene still produced some red animals. From the founding of the Aberdeen Angus herd book in 1862 red and black animals have been registered without distinction, and this is the case in most of the world. The American Aberdeen Angus Herdbook stopped registering red calves from 1917, leading to reds becoming very uncommon in the American population. Since 1945 some cattlemen have selected out the few red calves, believing them to have advantages of heat tolerance and the ability to cross with other red breeds without introducing the dominant black color. In 1954 the Red Angus Association of America was founded, based in Sheridan, Wyoming. Registration was conditional on meeting performance targets to create a superior breed. This breed is now popular in countries like Australia, and is famous for its beef. Red Angus have all of the characteristics of Black Angus. The cows are hardy, and grow quickly. They produce marbled meat like that of the Black Angus, and their meat is also highly desired in butchers, supermarkets,
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    249
    Shiba Inu

    Shiba Inu

    • Breed of: Dog
    • Place of origin: Japan
    The Shiba Inu (柴犬) is the smallest of the six original and distinct breeds of dog from Japan. A small, agile dog that copes very well with mountainous terrain, the Shiba Inu was originally bred for hunting. It is similar in appearance to the Akita, though much smaller in stature. It is one of the few ancient dog breeds still in existence in the world today. Inu is the Japanese word for dog, but the origin of the prefix "Shiba" is less clear. The word shiba means "brushwood" in Japanese, and refers to a type of tree or shrub whose leaves turn red in the fall. This leads some to believe that the Shiba was named with this in mind, either because the dogs were used to hunt in wild shrubs, or because the most common color of the Shiba Inu is a red color similar to that of the shrubs. However, in an old Nagano dialect, the word shiba also had the meaning of "small", thus this might be a reference to the dog's diminutive stature. Therefore, the Shiba Inu is sometimes translated as "Little Brushwood Dog". The Shiba's frame is compact with well-developed muscles. Males are 14⁄2 inches to 16⁄2 inches (35–43 cm) at withers. Females are 13⁄2 inches to 15⁄2 inches (33–41 cm). The preferred size
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    250
    Welsummer

    Welsummer

    • Breed of: Chicken
    • Place of origin: Netherlands
    Welsummer is a chicken breed originally from the small village of Welsum, in the eastern Netherlands. It was bred at the beginning of the 20th century from local fowls of mixed origin: Rhode Island Reds, Barnevelders, Partridge Leghorns, Cochins, and Wyandottes. In 1922-23 steps were taken to fix a standard after the birds began to show a good deal of uniformity. The eggs were originally exported for the commercial egg trade where they were an instant hit. Soon after stock was imported into England. The breed was added to the British Standard in 1930. It is a light, friendly, and intelligent breed, with rustic-red and orange colour. Representations of cockerels in the media are often based upon the "classic" Welsummer look. The most common example of this would be the Kelloggs Cornflakes rooster. Its eggs are dark-brown and spotty. There are three variations of the standard Welsummer, these are the Partrige, Silver Duckwing and the Gold Duckwing. There is also a Bantam Welsummer breed which is similar but lays light brown eggs. Bantams exist in both Partrige and Silver Duckwing colours. The Welsummer hens usually have gold hair-like feathers on their necks, as the cocks have a
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