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Best Academic post title of All Time

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    Assistant Physician

    Assistant Physicians are health care providers in Saudi Arabia. They are similar to Physician Assistants found in the US.
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    Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps

    Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps

    The Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) is a Federal program sponsored by the United States Armed Forces in high schools across the United States. The program was originally created as part of the National Defense Act of 1916 and later expanded under the 1964 ROTC Vitalization Act. According to Title 10, Section 2031 of the United States Code, the purpose of JROTC is "to instill in students in [United States] secondary educational institutions the values of citizenship, service to the United States, and personal responsibility and a sense of accomplishment." Additional objectives are established by the service departments of the Department of Defense. Under 542.4 of Title 32 (National Defense) of the Code of Federal Regulations, the Department of the Army has declared those objectives for each cadet to be: Section 524.5 of the CFR National Defense title states in part that JROTC should "provide meaningful leadership instruction of benefit to the student and of value to the Armed Forces. ... Students will acquire: (1) An understanding of the fundamental concept of leadership, military art and science, (2) An introduction to related professional knowledge, and (3) An
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    Regius Professor of Physic

    The Regius Professorship of Physic is a Regius Professorship in Medicine at the University of Dublin, Trinity College. The seat dates from at least 1637, placing it amongst the oldest academic posts at the university. Mention is made in the college's Register for 1598 of an annual grant of £40 from the government for a "Physitian's pay"; this is sometimes held to be the provision made for the Chair of Physic, but it is possible that it may have been in granted for medical services required by the troops stationed in Dublin. By 1700, the chair was considered part of the senior academic staff, alongside the Provost and Fellows (the professorships in other subjects being confined to Fellows at that time).
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    Sterling Professor

    A Sterling Professorship is the highest academic rank at Yale University, awarded to a tenured faculty member considered one of the best in his or her field. Traditionally, there are only 27 at any one time, though there are currently 40. The professorships are named for and funded by an approximately $10 million endowment left by John William Sterling of the Yale Class of 1864, name partner in the New York law firm Shearman & Sterling. The first Sterling Professor was the chemist John Johnson, who was awarded the rank in 1920. Other past recipients include Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas (Law), Wilbur Lucius Cross (English), Jaroslav Pelikan (history), Nobel Prize winner James Tobin (Economics), C. Vann Woodward (History) and Alvan Feinstein (Medicine and Epidemiology). Among the most famous current Sterling Professors are legal scholar Bruce Ackerman, Nobel Prize-winning biochemists Sidney Altman and Thomas Steitz, literary critic Harold Bloom, economist William Nordhaus, Judge Guido Calabresi, political scientist James C. Scott, political scientist Ian Shapiro, historian of China Jonathan Spence, medieval scholars R. Howard Bloch, Giuseppe Mazzotta, and María Rosa
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    Researcher

    A researcher is somebody who performs research, the search for knowledge or in general any systematic investigation to establish facts. Researchers can work in academic, industrial, government, or private institutions.
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    Lecturer

    A lecturer is, in the broadest sense, a person who gives lectures or other public speeches. However, this article concerns lecturer as an academic rank. In the United Kingdom a lecturer is usually the holder of a permanent position at a university or similar institution, often an academic in an early career stage, who teaches and also leads or oversees research groups. However in the United States, Canada and other countries influenced by their educational systems, the term is used differently and generally denotes academics without tenure who teach full- or part-time but who have few or no research responsibilities. In the Church of England a lecturer can also mean a junior clergyman. A lecturer in UK universities usually holds a permanent position that involves carrying out both teaching and research. After a number of years, a lecturer may be promoted and become a senior lecturer. This position is below reader and professor. It is also common for 'temporary lecturers' to be appointed to cover specific short-term teaching needs; these positions are by-definition non-permanent and non-renewable and should be clearly distinguished from permanent lectureships. Some universities also
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    Professor

    Professor

    A professor is a scholarly teacher; the precise meaning of the term varies by country. Literally, professor derives from Latin as a "person who professes" being usually an expert in arts or sciences, a teacher of high rank. In much of the world, including most Commonwealth nations (such as the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand) and northern Europe professor is reserved only for the most senior academics at a university, typically a department chair, or an awarded chair specifically bestowed recognizing an individual at a university. A professor is a highly accomplished and recognized academic, and the title is awarded only after decades of scholarly work. In the United States and Canada the title of professor is granted to all scholars with Doctorate degrees (typically Ph.D.s) who teach in two- and four-year colleges and universities, and is used in the titles assistant professor and associate professor, which are not considered professor-level positions elsewhere, as well as for full professors. In countries on the northern European mainland, such as The Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries, usage of professor as a legal title is limited much the same way as in most
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    Fellow

    A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded fellowship to work together as peers in the pursuit of knowledge or practice. The fellows may include visiting professors, postdoctoral researchers and doctoral researchers. The title of research fellow is used to denote an academic research position at a university or a similar institution. The title of Teaching fellow is used to denote an academic teaching position at a university or similar institution. The title fellow might be given to an academic member of staff upon retirement who continues to be affiliated to a university institution in the United Kingdom. At Colleges of the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and Dublin, full fellows form the governing body of the college. They may elect a Council to handle day-to-day management. All fellows are entitled to certain privileges within their colleges, which may include dining at High Table (free of charge) and possibly the right to a
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    The Charles A. Holloway Professorship

    Stefanos Zenios, a professor of operations, information, and technology, is the first to hold the Charles A. Holloway Professorship, a chair created by more than two dozen alumni and friends to honor a faculty member who has taught many GSB graduates about entrepreneurship. Douglas Burgum and Robert Kagle, both MBA ’80, provided the idea and seed capital for the chair. Significant lead gifts were provided by Donald Petersen, MBA ’49, and by Tashia and John Morgridge, MBA ’57.
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    University President

    University president is the title of the highest ranking officer within the academic administration of a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as chancellor or rector. The relative seniority varies between institutions. In the Republic of Ireland the president of a university (called the provost in the case of Trinity College Dublin) is essentially the chief executive officer of the university (with the chancellor being a purely ceremonial role). They are usually assisted in this regard by the university registrar. In Sri Lanka, the title of president is equivalent to that of vice-chancellor and therefore is essentially the chief executive officer of the university. In Northern Ireland, the president is the chief academic and administrative officer of the university and is usually also the vice-chancellor of the university. In Wales, the title of president rather than chancellor is given to the ceremonial head of constituent institutions of the University of Wales (which has a single chancellor for the whole federal body) and also of Cardiff University, which retained the usage when it left the University of Wales. In some
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    Jennifer Summit

    Jennifer Summit

    Jennifer Summit is the current chair of the Stanford Department of English. Her scholarly interests bridge the medieval and early modern periods and focus on changing notions of books, literacy, literature, and knowledge, with a special interest in literacy and the disciplines today. Her published work includes Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008), which was awarded the Roland H. Bainton Book Prize by the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) and the John Ben Snow Foundation Book Prize from the North American Conference on British Studies (NCBS), and Lost Property: the Woman Writer and English Literary History, 1380-1589 (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2000). With Caroline Bicks (Boston College) she is co-editor of the forthcoming Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, Vol 2: 1500-1610, and with David Wallace (U. Penn) she co-edited a special issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) on "Rethinking Periodization." With a working group comprising members from UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, and Mills College, she is developing a multi-year research project entitled "What is a Reader?" Supported by the Teagle Foundation's "Big Questions in the Disciplines" initiative, it investigates the new literacy and its implications for literary studies of the future. Her current book project traces the debate over the "active life" versus the "contemplative life" from the medieval and early modern periods to the contemporary academy. Her work has been supported by fellowships from the NEH, the ACLS, and the Stanford Humanities Center. At Stanford she has been awarded the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and is Eleanor Loring Ritch University Fellow in Undergraduate Education.
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    Professor of Anatomy, Cambridge University

    The chair of the Professor of Anatomy at the University of Cambridge was founded by the university in 1707. In 1924, the scope of the professorship was extended from purely human anatomy to cover the anatomy of all vertebrates, as well as embryology.
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    Reader

    The title of reader in the United Kingdom and some universities in the Commonwealth nations like Australia and New Zealand denotes an appointment for a senior academic with a distinguished international reputation in research or scholarship. It is an academic rank above senior lecturer (or principal lecturer in the New Universities), recognising a distinguished record of original research at a level of a full professorship. In the British ranking, for some universities a reader could be seen as a professor without a chair, similar to the distinction between professor extraordinarius and professor ordinarius at some European universities, professor and chaired professor in Hong Kong and professor B and chaired professor in Ireland. Both readers and professors in the UK would correspond to professors in the US. The promotion criteria applied to a readership in the United Kingdom are similar to those applied to a professorship: advancing from senior lecturer (equivalent to associate professor in the United States and Hong Kong) to reader requires evidence of a distinguished record of original research as well as a significant record of teaching excellence and service to the
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    Principal Investigator

    Principal Investigator

    A principal investigator (PI) is the lead scientist or engineer for a particular well-defined science (or other research) project, such as a laboratory study or clinical trial. It is often used as a synonym for "head of the laboratory" or "research group leader", not just for a particular study. In the context of USA federal funding from agencies such as the NIH or the NSF, the PI is the person who takes direct responsibility for completion of a funded project, directing the research and reporting directly to the funding agency. For small projects (which might involve 1-5 people) the PI is typically the person who conceived of the investigation, but for larger projects the PI may be selected by a team to obtain the best strategic advantage for the project. In the context of a clinical trial a PI may be an academic working with grants from NIH or other funding agencies, or may be effectively a contractor for a pharmaceutical company working on testing the safety and efficacy of new medicines. The Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) provides a certification, specific to physician investigators/principal investigators (PIs). ACRP offers the designation "Certified
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    Director

    Titles in academia have been used with varying degrees of consistency in different places and at different times. Some commonly used titles for persons engaged in educating others include:
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    Fellow of the AAAS

    Fellow of the AAAS is an honor accorded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to distinguished persons who are members of the Association. Fellows are elected annually by the AAAS Council for "efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications [which] are scientifically or socially distinguished". Examples of areas in which nominees may have made significant contributions are research; teaching; technology; services to professional societies; administration in academe, industry, and government; and communicating and interpreting science to the public. The association has awarded fellowships since 1874. AAAS publishes annual update of active Fellows list, which also provides email address to verify status of non-active Fellows.
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    Institute Professor

    Institute Professor is the highest title that can be awarded to a faculty member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. It is analogous to the titles of Distinguished Professor, University Professor, or Regents Professor used at other universities in recognition of a professor's extraordinary research achievements and dedication to the school. At MIT, Institute Professors are granted a unique level of freedom and flexibility to pursue their research and teaching interests without regular departmental or school responsibilities; they report only to the Provost. Usually no more than twelve professors hold this title at any one time. The position was created by President James R. Killian in 1951 and Professor John C. Slater was the first to hold the position. Institute Professors are initially nominated by leaders representing either a Department or School. The Chair of the Faculty then consults with the Academic Council and jointly appoints with the President an ad-hoc committee from various departments and non-MIT members to evaluate the qualifications and make a documented recommendation to the
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    Visiting fellow

    A visiting fellow is an academic, often a senior academic, who is undertaking research at a different institution than his or her main institution for a limited period, often but not necessarily at a foreign institution. A visiting fellow can be paid or unpaid; sometimes the salary is paid by the home institution and sometimes by the host institution. The duration of such a visiting fellowship can be a few weeks to a few years in duration. Example Scheme: Oxford University http://www.imi.ox.ac.uk/about-us/visiting-fellows-scheme
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    Emeritus

    Emeritus ( /ɨˈmɛrɨtəs/; plural emeriti; abbreviation emer.) is a post-positive adjective used to designate a retired professor, bishop, or other professional. The female equivalent, emerita (/ɨˈmɛrɨtə/), is also sometimes used, but phrases such as professor emerita are not in proper usage according to Latin grammar rules. In many cases the term is conferred automatically upon all persons who retire at a given rank. This is the usual case for retired professors. In other cases, it is used when a person of importance in a given profession retires or hands over the position so that his former rank can still be used in his title. In the United States, the word is used either as a postpositional adjective (e.g., "professor emeritus"), or as a preposition adjective (e.g., "emeritus professor"). There is a third usage, although not employed as often, in which the word follows a full title (e.g., professor of medicine, emeritus.) It is also commonly used in business and nonprofit organizations to denote perpetual status of the founder of an organization or individuals who moved the organization to new heights as a former key member on the board of directors (e.g., chairman emeritus;
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    NSF-GRF

    The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF-GRFP) is an annual grant awarded by the National Science Foundation to approximately 2,000 doctoral-level students in the natural, social, and engineering sciences at US institutions. The fellowship provides an honorarium of $10,500 to be placed towards the cost of tuition and fees at the university the fellow attends; it also awards the student directly with an annual $30,000 stipend over three years. Each recipient can also apply for a one time only travel award for $1,000. This travel award was previously for international research activities or presenting at an international scientific conference. However, in 2010, this opportunity was converted to the Nordic Research Opportunity, which is intended to facilitate collaborations between U.S. graduate fellows and scholars at Finnish, Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian research institutions. The Graduate Research Fellowship was first awarded in 1952, with the goal of encouraging basic scientific research and ensuring comprehensive, competitive research programs for U.S. students. Since 1952, the NSF has funded over 46,500 Graduate Research Fellowships out of over
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    Distinguished Professor

    Distinguished Professor is an honorary title at many universities for faculty who are recognized by colleagues throughout the world as leaders in their fields. At some universities governed by a board of regents, the title Regents Professor is similarly used. At other universities, the title University Professor or Distinguished University Professor is used. At Duke University, the title of James B. Duke Professor is used, Yale uses Sterling Professor, and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the title of Institute Professor is used. At some schools the title is considered to be a higher rank than (full) Professor, and at others it is considered to be a distinction within that rank.
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    Doctor

    Doctor

    Doctor, as a title, originates from the Latin word of the same spelling and meaning. The word is originally an agentive noun of the Latin verb docēre [dɔˈkeːrɛ] 'to teach'. It has been used as an honored academic title for over a millennium in Europe, where it dates back to the rise of the first universities. This use spread to the Americas, former European colonies, and is now prevalent in most of the world. Abbreviated "Dr" or "Dr.", it is used as a designation for a person who has obtained a doctorate-level degree. Doctorates may be research doctorates or professional doctorates. When addressing several people, each of whom holds a doctoral title, one may use the plural abbreviation "Drs" (or "Drs." in American English) – or in some languages (for example, German) "Dres." may be used – for example, instead of Dr Miller and Dr Rubinstein: Drs Miller and Rubinstein. When referring to relatives with the same surname the form "The Doctors Smith" can be used. The abbreviation Drs. can also mean doctorandus, a Dutch academic title. The doctorate (Latin: doceō, I teach) appeared in medieval Europe as a license to teach (Latin: licentia docendi) at a medieval university. Its roots can
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    Attending physician

    In the United States, an attending physician (also known as an attending, or staff physician) is a physician who has completed residency and practices medicine in a clinic or hospital, in the specialty learned during residency. An attending physician can supervise fellows, residents, and medical students. Attending physicians may also have an academic title at an affiliated university such as "professor". This is common if the supervision of trainees is a significant part of the physician's work. Attending physicians have final responsibility, legally and otherwise, for patient care, even when many of the minute-to-minute decisions are being made by subordinates (physician assistants, resident physicians, and medical students). Attending physicians are sometimes the 'rendering physician' listed on the patient's official medical record, but if they are overseeing a resident or another staff member, they are 'supervising.' Attending doctors may also still be in training, such as a fellow in a subspecialty. For example, a cardiology fellow may function as an internal medicine attending, as he has already finished residency in internal medicine. The term is used more commonly in
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    Chancellor of the University of St Andrews

    The Chancellor is the titular head of the University of St Andrews. His duties include conferring degrees, promoting the University’s image throughout the world, and furthering its interests, both within Scotland and beyond. The Office of the Chancellor has existed since the foundation of the University in the 15th century, and no comprehensive definition of its powers has been made in any modern statute. The most authoritative definition is contained in the return made by the University to the Royal Commission on the Universities and Colleges of Scotland of 1826 which states: "The Chancellor is head of the University. He is consulted on all public matters relative to its welfare, and he is also Conservator of its privileges. The power of conferring degrees is vested in him: this he may exercise either personally when present or by his depute when absent, with the advice of the doctors and masters of the University". The Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 provides that the Chancellor is to be elected by the General Council, to hold office for life, although Sir Kenneth Dover retired in 2005. The Chancellor is the ordinary President of the General Council which meets twice each year,
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    Founder

    A founder is a person involved in the creation of an organization.  Many times the organization is a business, although sometimes it is a non-profit, or even a religious organization.
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    Professor of Engineering, Cambridge University

    The Professorship of Engineering is a professorship at the University of Cambridge. Founded in 1875 as a chair in 'Mechanism and Applied Mechanics', it was renamed to 'Mechanical Sciences' in 1934, and to 'Engineering' in 1966.
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    Associate

    In law firms, accountancy firms and investment banks, an associate is a junior member. The responsibilities of the associate involve higher level decision but usually no supervisory functions.
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    Dean

    In academic administrations such as universities or colleges, a dean is the person with significant authority over a specific academic unit, or over a specific area of concern, or both. Deans are occasionally found in middle schools and high schools as well. The term comes from the Latin decanus, "a leader of ten", taken from the medieval monasteries (particularly those following the Cluniac Reforms) which were often extremely large, with hundreds of monks (the size of a small college campus). The monks were organized into groups of ten for administrative purposes, along the lines of military platoons, headed by a senior monk, the decanus. The term was later used to denote the head of a community of priests, as the chapter of a cathedral, or a section of a diocese (a "deanery"). When the universities grew out of the cathedral and monastery schools, the title of dean was used for officials with various administrative duties. Many junior high schools and high schools have a teacher or administrator referred to as a dean who is in charge of student discipline and to some degree administrative services. In large schools or some boarding schools there may be a dean of men or boys, and a
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    Foreign Member of the Royal Society

    Foreign Member of the Royal Society is an honorary position within the Royal Society. It is a position at the same rank as a Fellow of the Royal Society to which scientists from outside the Commonwealth and the Republic of Ireland may be elected. Someone elected a Foreign Member may use the post-nominal letters ForMemRS.
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    Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society

    An Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society is a person elected under special criteria to Fellowship of the Royal Society. They are ineligible in the other criteria for election as a Fellow or Foreign Member but have "rendered signal service to the cause of science, or whose election would significantly benefit the Society by their great experience in other walks of life". The position of Honorary Fellow replaced that whereby Fellows could be elected under Statute 12. Under this statute, members such as Margaret Thatcher, Clement Attlee and Benjamin Disraeli became fellows. They must be nominated by six fellows and then receive two thirds of votes at the meeting. Only one honorary fellow may be elected per year. Seven Honorary Fellows have been elected since their creation in 2000:
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    Member

    A member is a person who belongs to a social group or an entity such as a company or nation. By extension it can refer to any part of a whole. Member may also refer to:
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    Visiting Scholar

    In the world of academia, a visiting scholar or visiting academic is a scholar from an institution who visits a host university, where he or she is projected to teach (visiting professor), lecture (visiting lecturer), or perform research (visiting researcher or visiting research associate) on a topic the visitor is valued for. The position is often not salaried and typically for one year, though it can be extended. The purpose of the visiting scholars programs is generally to bring to the school or educational institution in question an exceptional senior scholar who can contribute to and enrich the community's intellectual and research endeavors and international projection. Hence, in addition to conducting their own research, visitors are often expected to actively participate in a number of productive institutional activities, such as:
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