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Best Academic institution of All Time

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    4
    Royal Institution

    Royal Institution

    The Royal Institution of Great Britain (often abbreviated as the Royal Institution or RI) is an organization devoted to scientific education and research, based in London. The Royal Institution was founded in 1799 by the leading British scientists of the age, including Henry Cavendish and its first president, George Finch, the 9th Earl of Winchilsea, for Much of its initial funding and the initial proposal for its founding were given by the Society for Bettering the Conditions and Improving the Comforts of the Poor, under the guidance of philanthropist Sir Thomas Bernard and American-born British scientist Sir Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford. Since its founding it has been based on Albemarle Street in Mayfair. Its Royal Charter was granted in 1800. Throughout its history, the Institution has supported public engagement with science through a programme of lectures, many of which continue today. The most famous of these are the annual Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, founded by Michael Faraday. The Institution has had an instrumental role in the advancement of science since its founding. Notable scientists who have worked there include Sir Humphry Davy (who discovered sodium
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    Muséum national d'histoire naturelle

    Muséum national d'histoire naturelle

    The Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (MNHN) is the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France. The museum was formally founded on 10 June 1793, during the French Revolution. Its origins lie, however, in the Jardin royal des plantes médicinales (Royal Medicinal Plant Garden) created by King Louis XIII in 1635, which was directed and run by the royal physicians. The royal proclamation of the boy-king Louis XV on 31 March 1718, however, removed the medical function, enabling the garden—which became known simply as the Jardin du Roi (King's Garden)—to focus on natural history. For much of the 18th century (1739–1788), the garden was under the direction of Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, one of the leading naturalists of the Enlightenment, bringing international fame and prestige to the establishment. The royal institution remarkably survived the French Revolution by being reorganized in 1793 as a republican Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle with twelve professorships of equal rank. Some of its early professors included eminent comparative anatomist Georges Cuvier and evolutionary pioneers Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. The museum's
    6.71
    7 votes
    7

    Ohio State University

    The Ohio State University, commonly referred to as Ohio State or OSU, is a public research university in Columbus, Ohio. Founded in 1870, as a land-grant university and ninth university in Ohio with the Morrill Act of 1862, the university was originally known as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The college began with a focus on training students in various agricultural and mechanical disciplines but was developed into a comprehensive university under the direction of Governor Rutherford B. Hayes and by 1878, the college changed its name to its current name. It has since grown into the third largest university campus in the United States. In 2007, Ohio State was officially designated as the flagship institution of Ohio's public universities as part of the newly centralized University System of Ohio. It is considered to be one of America's Public Ivy universities, which recognizes top public research universities in the United States. Along with its main campus in Columbus, Ohio State also operates a regional campus system with regional campuses in Lima, Mansfield, Marion, Newark, and Wooster. The university is also home to an extensive student life program, with over
    7.17
    6 votes
    8

    Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences

    The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) is an American interdisciplinary research body in Stanford, California focusing on the social sciences and humanities. Fellows are elected in a closed process, to spend a period of residence at the Center, released from other duties. They work on their own research and are able to interact with other Fellows. The Center was founded in 1954, initially funded by the Ford Foundation. The first director from 1954 to 1966 was Ralph W. Tyler. In the first 40 years it supported about 2.000 scientists and scholars. In 2008 it became part of Stanford University. The Center is a member of the group Some Institutes for Advanced Study. The Institute has been home to notable scholars, including:
    8.20
    5 votes
    10

    Columbia University

    Columbia University in the City of New York, commonly referred to as Columbia University, is an American private Ivy League research university located in New York City, New York, United States. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution. Today the university operates seven Columbia Global Centers overseas in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Paris, Mumbai, Santiago and Nairobi. The university was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain. After the American Revolutionary War, King's College briefly became a state entity, and was renamed Columbia College in 1784. The University now operates under a 1787 charter that places the institution under a private board of trustees, and in 1896 it was further renamed Columbia University. That same year, the university's campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its location in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, where it occupies more than six city blocks, or 32 acres (0.13 km). The university encompasses twenty schools and is affiliated
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Fitchburg State College

    Fitchburg State College

    Fitchburg State University, also called Fitchburg State, is a four-year public institution of higher learning with a compact urban campus, in the city of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, United States. Fitchburg State University has over 3,500 undergraduate and over 1650 graduate/continuing education students, for a total student body enrollment over 5200. The College offers postgraduate certificates, bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and MBAs in more than 25 academic disciplines. The main campus, the McKay Campus School, and athletic fields comprise 79 acres (320,000 m²) in the city of Fitchburg; the biological study fields comprise 120 acres (490,000 m²) in the neighboring towns of Lancaster, Leominster, and Lunenburg. Fitchburg State University was founded as the State Normal School in Fitchburg in 1894 by the state legislature. Its first President was John G. Thompson (President 1895–1920). Initially a secondary-education school for women (coeducation arrived in 1911), the Normal School was not authorized to grant Bachelor degrees until 1930, after the presidency of William D. Parkinson (1920–1927), and during Dr. Charles M. Herlihy's (1927–1945) tenure. In 1932, that
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Stanford University Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

    Stanford University Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

    The mission of the Stanford University Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS) is to engage students, faculty and practitioners in scholarship and dialogue that examines ways in which philanthropic institutions, nonprofit organizations and other key elements of civil society work to address public interests, both in the United States and globally.
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    University of Birmingham

    University of Birmingham

    The University of Birmingham (informally Birmingham University) is a British red brick university located in the city of Birmingham, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Birmingham Medical School (1825) and Mason Science College (1875). Birmingham was the first Redbrick university to gain a charter and thus university status. It is a member of the Russell Group of research universities and a founding member of Universitas 21. Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) data (2011) placed Birmingham in the 12 institutions in England with highest entry requirements. The student population includes around 16,500 undergraduate and 8,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university in the West Midlands region, and the 11th largest in the UK. As of 2006–07 it is the fourth most popular English university by number of applications. In 2010 Birmingham was ranked as the 10th most popular British university by graduate employers. The annual income of the institution for 2007–08 was £411.6 million, with an expenditure of £393.2 million. Birmingham has the ninth largest financial endowment of any British university at approximately
    6.83
    6 votes
    14
    St Antony's College, Oxford

    St Antony's College, Oxford

    St Antony's College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. St Antony's is the most international of the seven all-graduate colleges of the University of Oxford, specialising in international relations, economics, politics, and history of particular parts of the world — Europe, Russia and the former Soviet states, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Japan, China, South and South East Asia. The College is located in North Oxford with Woodstock Road to the west, Bevington Road to the south and Winchester Road to the east. As of 2006, St Antony's had an estimated financial endowment of £30m. St Antony's was founded in 1950 as the result of the gift of Antonin Besse of Aden, a merchant of French descent. Its role was "to be a centre of advanced study and research in the fields of modern international history, philosophy, economics and politics and to provide an international centre within the University where graduate students from all over the world can live and work together in close contact with senior members of the University who are specialists in their fields". The College first admitted students in Michaelmas term 1950 and received Royal
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences

    Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences

    The Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences is the heart of the undergraduate program and grants the majority of Stanford University's degrees. The School has 27 departments and 20 interdisciplinary degree-granting programs. The School was officially created in 1948, from the merger of the Schools of Biological Sciences, Humanities, Physical Sciences and Social Sciences. These schools date from the mid-1920s when the university first organized individual departments into schools. The school is divided into three divisions: Humanities and Arts, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences. Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages Biology had a convoluted history. The original departments were Botany, Zoology, Entomology, and Physiology but they changed names and merged. Stanford was set up with a Political Science department but that was almost immediately renamed Economics and Social Science. The forerunner of the current Political Science department was established in 1918. Sociology and Anthropology were originally one department established in 1948. They split in 1957. Anthropology itself was split into Anthropological Sciences and Cultural and Social Anthropology
    8.75
    4 votes
    16

    Sharif University of Technology

    Sharif University of Technology (SUT) (Persian: دانشگاه صنعتی شریف Dāneshgāh-e San'ati-ye Sharif‎) is a university of higher education in technology, engineering and physical sciences in Tehran. Sharif University of Technology is one of the most prestigious universities in Iran. Sharif is one of the best engineering schools in the Middle-East and many outstanding students attempt to pursue their academic activities at Sharif. The university is located in the Tarasht neighborhood of Tehran within walking distance of Azadi Square, and has an international campus in Kish, a resort island in the Persian Gulf. The university is named after Majid Sharif Vaghefi, a former student who was killed in 1975. It was formerly named the Aryamehr University of Technology (Persian: دانشگاه صنعتی آریامهر Dāneshgāh-e San'ati-ye Āryāmehr‎) and for a short period after the 1979 revolution, the university was called Tehran University of Technology. Sharif University of Technology (SUT) provides both undergraduate and graduate programs in 14 main departments. The student body consists of about 6000 undergraduate students and 3700 graduate students from all the 30 provinces of Iran. Funding for Sharif
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    California State University, Chico

    California State University, Chico

    California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the twenty-three-campus California State University system. It is located in Chico, California, about ninety miles north of Sacramento. California State University, Chico is commonly known as Chico State or Cal State, Chico. On March 12, 1887, a legislative act was enacted to create the Northern Branch State Normal School of California. Less than a month later, Chico was chosen as the location. On June 24, 1887, General John Bidwell donated 8 acres (3.2 ha) of land from his cherry orchard. Then on July 4, 1888, the first cornerstone was laid. On September 3, 1889, doors opened for the 90 enrolled students. The library opened on January 11, 1890 with 350 books. On June 20, 1891 the first graduation took place, a class of 15. In 1910, Annie Bidwell donated an additional 2 acres (0.81 ha) of land to be used for work with elementary agriculture. The next year Mrs. Bidwell donated an orange orchard lot 55 × 440 feet (130 m) as the children's playground, which is connected to the Training School. Twenty years later in 1921, legislation was enacted to change the school's name to Chico State Teacher's College. In 1922, Chico
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

    School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

    The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) is a constituent school within Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey's flagship New Brunswick-Piscataway campus. Formerly known as Cook College—which was named for George Hammell Cook, a professor at Rutgers in the 19th Century—it was founded as the Rutgers Scientific School and later College of Agriculture after Rutgers was named New Jersey's land-grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862. Today, unlike the other arts and sciences schools at Rutgers, the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences specializes in environmental science, animal science and other life sciences. Although physically attached to the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, most of the SEBS campus lies in North Brunswick, New Jersey. The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences is also home to the New Jersey Museum of Agriculture, the New Jersey Agriculture Experiment Station and the Rutgers Gardens, a 50-acre (200,000 m) botanical garden. Cook campus is crossed by the Westons Mill Pond section of the scenic Lawrence Brook, which flows along Rutgers vegetable research farm, Rutgers equine research farm, Rutgers Gardens and Rutgers
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Stanford University School of Medicine is the medical school of Stanford University. It is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California. It is the successor to the Medical College of the Pacific, founded in San Francisco in 1858 and later named Cooper Medical College. Due to this descent it ranks as the oldest medical school in the Western United States. The medical school moved to the Stanford campus near Palo Alto, California in 1959. Clinical rotations occur at several hospital sites. In addition to the Stanford University Medical Center (Stanford Hospital and Clinics) and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford has formal affiliations with Kaiser Permanente, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and the Palo Alto Veterans Administration. Stanford medical students also manage two free clinics: Arbor Free Clinic in Menlo Park and Pacific Free Clinic in San Jose. Stanford is a cutting-edge center for translational and biomedical research (both basic science and clinical) and emphasizes medical innovation, novel methods, discoveries, and interventions in its integrated curriculum. The School of Medicine's mission is to be a premier research-intensive
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

    YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

    YIVO, (Yiddish: ייִוואָ), established in 1925 in Wilno, Poland (now Vilnius, Lithuania) as the Yidisher Visnshaftlekher Institut (Yiddish: ייִדישער װיסנשאַפֿטלעכער אינסטיטוט, Yiddish Scientific Institute,) is a source for orthography, lexicography, and other studies related to the Yiddish language. (The word yidisher can mean both "Yiddish" and "Jewish".) The English name of the organization was changed to the Institute for Jewish Research subsequent to its relocation to New York City, although it is still primarily known by its Yiddish acronym. YIVO preserves manuscripts, rare books, and diaries, and other Yiddish sources. The YIVO Library in New York contains over 385,000 volumes dating from as early as the 16th century. The YIVO Archives holds over 24,000,000 documents, photographs, recordings, posters, films, and other artifacts. Together, they comprise the world's largest collection of materials related to the history and culture of Central and East European Jewry and the American Jewish immigrant experience. The Archives and Library collections also hold many works in twelve major languages, including English, French, German, Hebrew, Ladino, Polish, and Russian. YIVO also
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    Medical University of South Carolina

    The Medical University of South Carolina opened in Charleston, South Carolina in 1824 as a small private college for the training of physicians. It is one of the oldest continually operating schools of medicine in the United States and the oldest in the Deep South. The school's main building was designed by Charleston architect Albert W. Todd. The school has expanded into a state university with a medical center and six colleges for the education of health professionals, biomedical scientists and other health care personnel. It also operates as a center for research and has a public hospital. The College of Medicine began in 1823 with the incorporation of the Medical College of South Carolina, a private institution of the Medical Society of South Carolina. Seven Charleston physicians formed the initial faculty with 30 students enrolled in 1824. The first graduation was on April 4, 1825. With the exception of the American Civil War, the college has served continuously to the present, even when there was a total enrollment of two students. To achieve the financial backing for growth in the twentieth century, the college was transferred to state ownership and incorporated into the
    8.25
    4 votes
    22

    Michigan State University

    Michigan State University (MSU) is a public research university located in East Lansing, Michigan, United States and is the first land-grant institution that was created to serve as a model for future land-grant colleges in the country under the 1862 Morrill Act. MSU pioneered the studies of packaging, hospitality business, supply chain management, and telecommunication. Today its study-abroad program is the largest of any single-campus university in the country, offering more than 200 programs in more than 60 countries on all continents including Antarctica. It is considered to be one of America's Public Ivy universities, which recognizes top public research universities in the United States. Following the introduction of the Morrill Act, the college became coeducational and expanded its curriculum beyond agriculture. Today, MSU is the ninth-largest university in the United States, with 47,800 students and 2,954 faculty members. The school's nuclear physics, engineering, packaging, fisheries and wildlife, forestry, political science, business, journalism, education, economics, law, criminal justice and osteopathic medicine programs are among the nation's best. MSU's Division I
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine

    Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine

    The Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), previously known as Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine is located in Antwerp, Belgium. The ITM is one of the world's leading institutes for training and research in tropical medicine and the organisation of health care in developing countries. It also delivers outpatient, clinical and preventive services in tropical pathologies. It was founded by Leopold II of Belgium to work for the then colony Congo; but it has broadened its scope to the tropics and low and mid-income countries. The institute has a strong reputation in AIDS research, travel medicine, public health issues, neglected tropical diseases. Peter Piot and colleagues at the institute were the first to demonstrate that AIDS was a tropical, African, disease. ITM has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a reference centre for AIDS research. ITM also is a national and international reference centre for a series of tropical diseases. At ITM, some 400 scientist and technicians do research on pathogens, people and populations. Yearly, an average of 500 medical doctors, veterinarians and biomedical scientists follow advanced courses; some 100 young researchers
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Ismar Elbogen Network for Jewish Cultural History e.V.

    Ismar Elbogen Network for Jewish Cultural History e.V.

    The “Ismar-Elbogen-Network for Jewish Cultural History e.V.” (Ismar Elbogen Netzwerk für Jüdische Kulturgeschichte e.V.)  was founded in the city of Brandenburg (Germany) by students, graduates and Ph.D.-students from the fields of humanities, social sciences and cultural sciences. The initiative wants to achieve following two mayor aims: 1) the establishment of a international network of (young) scholars and researchers from the named fields, for support and interconnectional help, 2) the development of understanding for aspects of Jewish history and cultures in different regional communities and national societies.
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    San Diego Supercomputer Center

    San Diego Supercomputer Center

    The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) is an organized research unit of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Physically, SDSC is located on the east end of Eleanor Roosevelt College on the campus of UCSD. Founded in 1985, its self-prescribed mission is "developing and using technology to advance science". SDSC is primarily funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and pursues research in the areas of high performance computing, grid computing, computational biology, geoinformatics, computational physics, computational chemistry, data management, scientific visualization, and computer networking. SDSC is internationally recognized for its contribution to computational biosciences and computational approaches to earth sciences and genomics. SDSC is especially known for its role in the creation and maintenance of the Protein Data Bank, the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation Cyberinfrastructure Center (NEESit), cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences (GEON), and the Tree of Life Project (TOL) . SDSC is one of the four original sites involved in the TeraGrid project along with National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA),
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Stanford Electrical Engineering

    Stanford Electrical Engineering

    The mission of the Stanford Department of Electrical Engineering is to offer an EE undergraduate program that augments the liberal education expected of all Stanford undergraduates and imparts a basic understanding of electrical engineering built on a foundation of physical science, mathematics, computing, and technology. Graduates of the undergraduate program are expected to possess knowledge of the fundamentals of electrical engineering and of at least one specialty area. The graduates are expected to have the basic experimental, design, and communication skills to be prepared for continued study at the graduate level or for entry level positions that require a basic knowledge of electrical engineering, science, and technology.
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    University of Waikato

    The University of Waikato (informally Waikato University, or simply Waikato) (Māori: 'Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato') has campuses located in the cities of Hamilton and Tauranga, New Zealand. Established in 1964, it was the first university in New Zealand to be built from the ground up. Waikato is a comprehensive university, made up of seven faculties and schools, with more than 12,000 students at the end of 2011. Waikato was ranked top in 10 out of 30 subject areas in the 2006 New Zealand government’s Performance-Based Research Fund evaluation exercise. In the QS World University Rankings (2011/12), Waikato was ranked 357th in the top 500 universities. In the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (2011–12), Waikato was ranked 318th in the top 400 universities The University of Waikato owes its existence to a determined group of Hamilton locals, who in 1956 launched a petition for a university to serve the needs of the South Auckland region. The group was led by Douglas Seymour, a barrister, and subsequently Anthony (‘Rufus’) Rogers, a Hamilton GP and brother to long-time Hamilton mayor Denis Rogers. Their campaign coincided with a shortage of teachers in the 1950s that
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies is a conglomerate of research centers at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The institute is composed of four research centers: Founded in 1983 as the Institute for International Studies, IIS added Stanford to the beginning of its name in 2003, and is abbreviated as Stanford IIS. On September 1, 2005 Stanford IIS was renamed the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies due to $50 million donation to the Institute from Brad Freeman and Ron Spogli, and is now abbreviated as FSI. IIS was founded by former Stanford President Richard Wall Lyman, who became its first director. In addition to its five centers, the Institute sponsors various programs such as the Program on Energy & Sustainable Development, European Forum, Initiative on Distance Learning, and the Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education. The current director of FSI is Coit D. Blacker, who served as Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Senior Director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council under National Security Advisor Anthony Lake. The deputy director's post
    9.00
    3 votes
    33

    Jewish Historical Society of England

    The Jewish Historical Society of England was founded in 1893 by several Anglo-Jewish scholars, including Lucien Wolf, who became the society's first president. Early president of the JHSE included Hermann Adler, Joseph Jacobs, Frederick David Mocatta, and Isidore Spielmann. The society exists to this day, still promoting research and education about the history of Judaism and Jewish life in England.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    University of Oxford

    The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University or Oxford) is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096. The University grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. In post-nominals the University of Oxford was historically abbreviated as Oxon., from the Latin Universitas Oxoniensis, although Oxf is now used in official university publications. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge, where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two ancient English universities have many common features and are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to their cultural and practical associations, as an historic part of British society, they have a long history of rivalry with each other. Most undergraduate teaching at Oxford is organised around weekly tutorials at self-governing colleges and halls, supported by classes, lectures and
    7.75
    4 votes
    36

    Harvard Medical School

    Harvard Medical School (HMS) is the graduate medical school of Harvard University. It is located in the Longwood Medical Area of the Mission Hill neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. HMS is home (as of Fall 2012) to 705 students in the M.D. program, 147 in the D.M.D. program, 556 in the Ph.D. program, and 155 in the M.D.‑Ph.D program. A typical entering class at Harvard Medical School consists of 165 MD students and 35 DMD students. Upon matriculation, the class of 200 students are divided into five societies named after famous alumni. The majority of first-year students reside in Vanderbilt Hall, across the street from the medical school. Harvard Medical School's M.D.-‑Ph.D. program allows a student to receive an M.D. from HMS and a Ph.D. from either Harvard or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (see Medical Scientist Training Program). Prospective students apply to one of two tracks to the M.D. degree. New Pathway, the larger of the two programs, emphasizes problem-based learning. HST, operated by the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, emphasizes medical research. The school has a large and distinguished faculty to support its missions of education,
    6.60
    5 votes
    37

    King's College London

    King's College London (informally King's or KCL) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third-oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, receiving its royal charter in the same year. In 1836 King's became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London. King's is organised into nine Schools of Study, spread across four Thames-side campuses in central London and another in Denmark Hill, South London. It is one of the largest centres for graduate and post-graduate medical teaching and biomedical research in Europe; it is home to six Medical Research Council centres, the most of any British university, and is a founding member of the King's Health Partners academic health sciences centre. King's has around 18,600 full-time students and 5,030 staff and had a total income of £524.1 million in 2010/11, of which £147.1 million was from research grants and contracts. King's is ranked 27th in the world according to the U.S. News & World Report, 68th in the world (and 19th in Europe) in the 2012
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    University of London

    University of London

    The University of London is a federal public university based in London, United Kingdom. It comprises 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies. It is the second-largest university in the United Kingdom by number of full-time students, with around 135,000 campus-based students and over 50,000 distance learning students in the University of London International Programmes. The university was established by Royal Charter in 1836, which brought together in federation London University (now University College London) and King's College (now King's College London). For most practical purposes, ranging from admissions to funding, the constituent colleges operate as individual universities, and some have recently obtained the power to award their own degrees whilst remaining in the federation. The nine largest colleges of the University are Birkbeck, Goldsmiths, King's College London, the London Business School, Queen Mary, Royal Holloway, the School of Oriental and African Studies, London School of Economics and Political Science and University College London. Formerly a constituent college, Imperial College London left the University of London in
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Stanford University Libraries

    Stanford University Libraries

    Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources (SULAIR) develops and implements resources and services within the University libraries and academic technology units that support research and instruction.
    8.67
    3 votes
    44

    Harvard University

    Harvard University is an American private Ivy League research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, established in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and the first corporation (officially The President and Fellows of Harvard College) chartered in the country. Harvard's history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Harvard was named after its first benefactor, John Harvard. Although never formally affiliated with a church, the college primarily trained Congregationalist and Unitarian clergy. Harvard's curriculum and students became secular throughout the 18th century and by the 19th century had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's forty year tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a centralized research university, and Harvard became a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and
    10.00
    2 votes
    46

    Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (French: Ministre de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation) is a government department in the Canadian province of Quebec. The ministry operates several programs in animal and vegetable production, fishing and commercial aquaculture, food processing and distribution, and storage and retail. The ministry is overseen by the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. As of January 2011, the minister is Laurent Lessard.
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    Stanford University School of Earth Sciences

    Stanford University School of Earth Sciences

    The School of Earth Sciences (often referred to as the SES, or at Stanford as just "The School") is one of three schools at Stanford awarding both graduate and undergraduate degrees. Stanford's first faculty member was a professor of geology as such the School of Earth Sciences is considered the oldest academic foundation of Stanford University. It is composed of four departments and three interdisciplinary programs. Research and teaching within The School spans a wide range of disciplines. Earth Sciences at Stanford can trace its roots to the university's beginnings, when Stanford's first president, David Starr Jordan, hired John Casper Branner, a geologist, as the university's first professor. The search for and extraction of natural resources was the focus of Branner's geology department during that period of Western development. There are four academic departments within The School; Environmental Earth System Science, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Geophysics, and Energy Resources Engineering. There are three interdisciplinary programs housed within The School; Earth Systems Program, Graduate Program in Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate
    6.40
    5 votes
    49
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (U of I, University of Illinois, UIUC, or simply Illinois) is a public research-intensive university in the U.S. state of Illinois. It is the flagship campus of the University of Illinois system. The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign is the second oldest public university in the state, second to Illinois State University, and is a founding member of the Big Ten Conference. It is considered a Public Ivy and is a member of the Association of American Universities. The university is designated as a RU/VH Research University (very high research activities). The campus library system possesses the second-largest university library in the United States and the fifth-largest in the country overall. The university comprises 17 colleges that offer more than 150 programs of study. Additionally, the university operates an extension that serves 2.7 million registrants per year around the state of Illinois and beyond. The campus holds 286 buildings on 1,468 acres (594 ha) in the twin cities of Champaign and Urbana; its annual operating budget in 2011 was over $1.7 billion. The Morrill Act of 1862 granted each state in the United States a
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    Institut d'études politiques de Grenoble

    The Grenoble Institute of Political Studies (French: Institut d'études politiques de Grenoble, IEP), also known as Sciences Po Grenoble, is a political science grande école located in the campus of the University of Grenoble in Saint-Martin-d'Hères, France. It is administratively a subsidiary of the Pierre Mendès-France University, (Université Pierre Mendès-France), also known as Grenoble II, a university of social sciences. The Institut d'études politiques of Grenoble was founded in 1948 with the mission of providing France with public and private sector executives. Its courses and degrees are modelled under the supervision of the National Foundation of Political Sciences. It is currently presided by Jean-Charles Froment since May 2012 (the former president was Olivier Ihl). Because of the highly selective entrance exam (the admission rate was around 11% in 2011) the IEP Grenoble can be considered as a grande école, it is somewhat different due to the pluri-disciplinary curriculum that gives students means of understanding the modern world. The curriculum is meant to give students a strong knowledge in different social sciences fields (Political Science, Public Law, Economics,
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Stanford Department of Philosophy

    Stanford Department of Philosophy

    We are a lively community of philosophers engaged in a fascinating range of philosophical research projects. We offer rigorous and competitive graduate and undergraduate programs which both train students in traditional core areas of philosophy and provide them with opportunities to explore oft-neglected subfields such as the philosophy of literature or nineteenth-century German philosophy. We have a very strong focus on the history of philosophy with one of the best programs in Kant studies in the world. Finally, we continue our tradition of being a top research center in logic and the philosophy of science.
    6.20
    5 votes
    53

    Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

    The Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, also known as IIM Ahmedabad or simply IIMA, is a public business school located in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. It was the second Indian Institute of Management (IIM) to be established, after IIM Calcutta. Established as an autonomous body in 1961, the institute offers Post Graduate Diploma Programme in Management and Agri-Business Management, a Doctoral (Fellowship) Programme and a number of Executive Training Programmes. Research and Consultancy Services to industry form an integral part of the academic structure at IIM Ahmedabad, with several projects commissioned and funded by national and international organizations such as the Ford Foundation, UNO, World Bank, NCERT, Planning Commission, Central and State ministries etc. The Indian Institutes of Management were established in response to the growing need that was felt for nurturing professional managers who could efficiently manage India’s growing industries. They were established with the objectives of providing high quality management education and assisting the industry through research and consulting services. IIM Ahmedabad was the second IIM to be set up in the country. It was
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    University of Liverpool

    University of Liverpool

    The University of Liverpool is a teaching and research university based in the city of Liverpool, England. Founded in 1881 (as a university college), it is also one of the six original "red brick" civic universities. It comprises three faculties organised into 35 departments and schools. The university has an enviable international reputation for innovative research. It is a founding member of the Russell Group of large research-intensive universities and the N8 Group for research collaboration. The university has produced eight Nobel Prize winners and offers more than 230 first degree courses across 103 subjects. It was the world's first university to establish departments in Oceanography, Civic Design, Architecture and Biochemistry. In 2006 the university became the first in the UK to establish an independent university in China making it the world's first Sino-British university. It has an annual turnover of £410 million, including £150 million for research. The University was established in 1881 as University College Liverpool, admitting its first students in 1882. In 1884, it became part of the federal Victoria University. In 1894 Oliver Lodge, a professor at the University,
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Hewlett-Packard

    Hewlett-Packard

    Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ) or HP is an American multinational information technology corporation headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. It provides products, technologies, software, solutions and services to consumers, small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) and large enterprises, including customers in the government, health and education sectors. The company was founded in a one-car garage in Palo Alto by William (Bill) Redington Hewlett and Dave Packard. HP is the world's leading PC manufacturer. It specializes in developing and manufacturing computing, data storage, and networking hardware, designing software and delivering services. Major product lines include personal computing devices, enterprise, and industry standard servers, related storage devices, networking products, software and a diverse range of printers, and other imaging products. HP markets its products to households, small- to medium-sized businesses and enterprises directly as well as via online distribution, consumer-electronics and office-supply retailers, software partners and major technology vendors. HP also has strong services and consulting business around its products and
    7.00
    4 votes
    58

    Microsoft Research

    Microsoft Research (MSR) is the research division of Microsoft created in 1991 for developing various computer science ideas and integrating them into Microsoft products. It currently employs Turing Award winners C.A.R. Hoare, Butler Lampson, and Charles P. Thacker, Fields Medal winner Michael Freedman, MacArthur Fellow Jim Blinn, Dijkstra Prize winner Leslie Lamport and many other highly recognized experts in computer science, physics, and mathematics, including Turing Award winner Jim Gray up until his highly publicized disappearance while sailing. Microsoft research is categorized into the following broad areas: One of the stated goals of Microsoft Research is to "support long-term computer science research that is not bound by product cycles." MSR sponsors the Microsoft Research Fellowship for graduate students and the New Faculty Fellowship for new faculty members. There are laboratories around the world in Aachen, Bangalore, Beijing, Cairo, Cambridge (United Kingdom), Cambridge (Massachusetts), Mountain View, Redmond, San Francisco and New York City. Microsoft Research also collaborates with and jointly operate research centers at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Brown
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    Indiana University

    Indiana University (IU) is a multi-campus public university system in the state of Indiana, United States. Indiana University has a combined student body of more than 100,000 students, including approximately 43,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University Bloomington campus and approximately 31,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) campus. The "core campuses" of Indiana University are located in Bloomington and Indianapolis. In addition to its two core campuses, Indiana University comprises six smaller campuses and three centers/extensions spread throughout Indiana. The smaller campuses are: The centers/extensions are: According to the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), the value of the endowment of the Indiana University and affiliated foundations is over $1.57 billion. Indiana University has three medals to recognize individuals. Indiana University has a number of ways to recognize the accomplishments of faculty.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Oglethorpe University

    Oglethorpe University

    Oglethorpe University is a private liberal arts college in Brookhaven, Georgia, an inner suburb of Atlanta, United States. It was chartered in 1835 and named after James Edward Oglethorpe, the state's founder. Oglethorpe University was chartered in 1835 in Midway, just south of the city of Milledgeville, then the state capital. The school was built and, at that time, governed by the Presbyterian Church, making it one of the South's earliest denominational institutions. The American Civil War led to the school's closing from 1862 to 1866. The college followed the relocation of the capital to Atlanta. In 1870, it began holding classes at the present site of Atlanta City Hall. Plagued by financial difficulties, the school closed its doors two years later. Oglethorpe College was re-chartered as a non-denominational institution in 1913. In 1915 the cornerstone to the new campus was laid at its present location on Peachtree Road in Brookhaven. The person behind rebuilding Oglethorpe was Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, whose grandfather, Professor Ferdinand Jacobs, had served on the faculty of Old Oglethorpe. Jacobs would serve as president for nearly three decades. In the early 1940s Oglethorpe
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies

    Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies

    The Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (OCHJS) is an independent institution of the University of Oxford. Its research fellows teach on a variety of Bachelors and Masters degrees in Oriental Studies, and it publishes the Journal of Jewish Studies. The Centre was founded in 1972 by Dr. David Patterson to help restore Jewish Studies in Europe in the aftermath of the Holocaust. Currently it is located at Yarnton Manor, in Yarnton village, Oxfordshire, four miles north of Oxford. It is a registered charity and a company limited by guarantee incorporated in England, under English law. Today, it is the leading academic Jewish studies centre in Europe. Its Fellows and Lecturers provide courses in Hebrew and Jewish studies for undergraduates and postgraduates up to the doctoral level in many faculties within the University of Oxford. The Centre also promotes Jewish studies based on the Bodleian Library’s Hebrew and Jewish collections by supporting research, by development projects, and by shared staffing with the Centre’s Leopold Muller Memorial Library. The Centre's library is named the Leopold Muller Memorial Library. It is housed in two converted stone barns at Yarnton Manor.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), commonly called Jefferson Lab or JLab, is a U.S. national laboratory located in Newport News, Virginia. Since June 1, 2006, it has been operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, a joint venture between Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., and CSC Applied Technologies, LLC. Until 1996 it was known as the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF); this name is still commonly used for the main accelerator. Founded in 1984, JLab employs over 675 people, and over 2,000 scientists from around the world have conducted research using the facility. Its stated mission is "to provide forefront scientific facilities, opportunities and leadership essential for discovering the fundamental structure of nuclear matter; to partner in industry to apply its advanced technology; and to serve the nation and its communities through education and public outreach." The laboratory's main research facility is the CEBAF accelerator, which consists of a polarized electron source and injector and a pair of superconducting RF linear accelerators 7/8 mile (1400 m) in length, connected to each other by two arc sections which
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    University of Chicago

    University of Chicago

    The University of Chicago (U of C, UC, UChicago, or simply Chicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois, United States. The University consists of the College of the University of Chicago, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. The University enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and about 15,000 students overall. In 2008, the University spent $423.7 million on scientific research. University of Chicago scholars have played a role in the development of the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, the school of political science known as behavioralism, and in the physics leading to the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction. The University is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States. The University of Chicago is affiliated with 87 Nobel Laureates, 49 Rhodes Scholars and 9 Fields Medalists. It was founded by the American
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    University of Southampton

    University of Southampton

    The University of Southampton is a British Russell Group university located in the city of Southampton, United Kingdom. The origins of the university can be dated back to the founding of the Hartley Institution in 1862 following a legacy to the Corporation of Southampton by Henry Robertson Hartley. In 1902, the Institution developed into the Hartley University College, with degrees awarded by the University of London. On 29 April 1952, the institution was granted a Royal Charter to give the University of Southampton full university status. The university is a member of the Russell Group of research universities and the Worldwide Universities Network. It currently has over 17,000 undergraduate and 7,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university by higher education students in the South East region. The University has six campuses - four in Southampton, one in Winchester, and one international branch in Malaysia. A further campus - the Maritime Centre of Excellence - is being developed close to the Highfield Campus. The main campus is located in the Highfield area of Southampton. Three other campuses are located throughout the city - Avenue Campus, National Oceanography
    9.00
    2 votes
    69

    Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs

    The Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs of Yeshiva University seeks to promote international understanding and cooperation by providing an educational forum for the exchange of ideas related to critical international issues. It was founded in March 2004. Drawing on the academic and intellectual resources of Yeshiva University and its affiliates, the Center promotes research and publication by students and faculty and sponsors public lectures by notable world personalities and leaders, as well as educational programs for college and university students, focusing on a broad spectrum of international issues. The Center's director is Ruth A. Bevan, Ph.D., David W. Petegorsky Professor of Political Science at Yeshiva College, a specialist in European politics and contemporary political theory.
    5.80
    5 votes
    70

    Architectural Association School of Architecture

    The Architectural Association School of Architecture, more usually known as the AA, is an architectural school in London, United Kingdom. Its wide-ranging programme of exhibitions, lectures, symposia and publications have given it a central position in global discussions and developments within contemporary architectural culture. The AA is the oldest independent school in the UK and one of the most prestigious and competitive schools of architecture in the world. The Architectural Association, the pre-cursor to the school, was founded in 1847 by two dissatisfied young architects (Robert Kerr, 24, and Charles Grey, 24), to provide a self-directed, independent education at a time when the profession of architecture had yet to appear in the form recognised today. The AA School was formally established in 1890. In 1901, it moved premises to the former Royal Architectural Museum. In 1917, it moved again, to its current premises in Bedford Square, central London (it has since acquired additional London premises in John Street and a 350-acre (1.4 km) site at Hooke Park in Dorset). The school has also acquired property on Morwell Street behind Bedford Square, which it uses as studio space
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    ETH Zurich

    ETH Zürich (German: Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich) is an engineering, science, technology, mathematics and management university in the City of Zurich, Switzerland. Like its sister institution École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), it is an integral part of the ETH Domain that is directly subordinate to Switzerland's Federal Department of Home Affairs. ETH Zurich is consistently ranked by all major World University rankings among the top universities in the world. It is considered the best university in continental Europe by the Shanghai Ranking ARWU, the Times Higher Education Ranking and the QS World University Ranking. It is currently ranked 7th best university in the world in engineering, science and technology. Twenty-one Nobel Prizes have been awarded to students or professors of the Institute in the past, the most famous of which is Albert Einstein in 1921, and the most recent is Richard F. Heck in 2010. It is a founding member of the IDEA League and the International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU). It is a member of the CESAER and Top Industrial Managers for Europe networks. The school was founded by the Swiss Federal Government in 1854
    7.67
    3 votes
    72

    Parkes Institute

    The Parkes Institute is a research centre for the study of Jewish and non-Jewish relations, based at the University of Southampton in England. It includes an extensive archive of books, journals, official documents and other resources donated by James Parkes, a Christian theologian who sought to challenge the damage done by antisemitism. Many of these materials relate to the history of the Holocaust. The centre also provides access to the papers of scholars such as Claude Montefiore. The Parkes Library is now housed within the Hartley Library, the main university library building. The collection was transferred to the University of Southampton in 1964 where it has increased in size to over 20,000 printed items and over 500 collections of manuscripts, containing over one million items.
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts

    Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts

    The Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University, formerly the Stanford University Museum of Art, and commonly known as the Cantor Arts Center, is an art museum on the campus of Stanford University in Stanford, California, USA. The museum, which opened in 1894, consists of over 130,000 square feet of space, including sculpture gardens. The Cantor Center houses the largest collection of Auguste Rodin sculptures, totaling over 400, outside of the Musee Rodin; many are on display in the B. Gerald Cantor Rodin Sculpture Garden. The Leland Stanford Jr. Museum opened in 1894, one of the few founded by a private family with a general art collection. By 1905 the museum would be known for its collection of Asian art. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake would level two wings of the building; destroying the Roman, Egyptian and Asian galleries. Three-quarters of the building were damaged beyond repair. The earthquake, coupled with the death of co-founder Jane Stanford, affected the museums budget. The museum failed to have its own endowment outside of the University, and faculty and administration failed to express interest in saving the museum to focus on academic
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) is a constituent college of the University of London. The college has three faculties, 18 academic departments, and about 9,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students from over 100 different countries. The campus is located slightly west of Egham, Surrey, within the boundary of the Greater London Urban Area, although outside of the M25 motorway and some 20 miles (32 km) from the geographic centre of London. The Egham campus was founded in 1879 by the Victorian entrepreneur and philanthropist Thomas Holloway. Royal Holloway College was a women-only institution, and was officially opened in 1886 by Queen Victoria. Royal Holloway College became a member of the University of London in 1900. In 1945, the college began admitting male postgraduate students, and in 1965, male undergraduates. In 1985, Royal Holloway College merged with Bedford College (another formerly all-women's college in London which was founded in 1849 and, like Royal Holloway College, joined the University of London in 1900 and became fully co-educational in 1965). The merged college was named Royal Holloway and Bedford New College (RHBNC), this remaining the official
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Rutgers University

    Rutgers University /ˈrʌtɡərz/, officially Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey, United States. It was originally chartered as Queen's College in 1766. It is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine Colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. Rutgers was originally a private university affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitted only male students, but evolved into a coeducational public research university. Rutgers is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities, the other being the College of William & Mary. Rutgers was designated The State University of New Jersey by acts of the New Jersey Legislature in 1945 and 1956. The flagship campus is located in both New Brunswick and Piscataway, with additional campuses in Newark and Camden. The Newark campus was formerly the University of Newark, which merged into the Rutgers system in 1946, and the Camden campus was created in 1950 from the College of South Jersey and the South Jersey Law School. The university is the largest state university within
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Stanford Graduate School of Business

    Stanford Graduate School of Business

    The Stanford Graduate School of Business (also known as Stanford Business School, Stanford GSB, or The GSB) is one of the professional schools of Stanford University, in Stanford, California and is broadly regarded as one of the best business schools in the world. The Stanford GSB offers a general management Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, the Sloan Master's Program (which is a full-time ten-month MS in Management for mid-career executives) and a Ph.D. program, along with a number of joint degrees with other schools at Stanford University including Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law and Medicine. The school is the #1 ranked business school in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. The school was founded in 1925 when Trustee Herbert Hoover formed a committee of Wallace Alexander, George Rolph, Paul Shoup, Thomas Gregory, and Milton Esberg to secure the needed funds for the school's founding becoming the second graduate school of business in the country. There are three Nobel Prize winners on the faculty, two recipients of the John Bates Clark Award, 15 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and three members of the National Academy of
    6.50
    4 votes
    82

    Stanford University Department of Communication

    The Department of Communication engages in research in communication and offers curricula leading to the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees. The M.A. degree prepares students for careers in journalism. The Ph.D degree leads to careers in teaching and research-related specialties.
    5.60
    5 votes
    84
    Durham University

    Durham University

    The University of Durham, commonly known as Durham University, is a public research university in Durham, England. It was founded by Act of Parliament in 1832 and granted a Royal Charter in 1837. It was one of the first universities to open in England for more than 600 years and has a claim towards being the third oldest university in England. Durham is a collegiate university, with its main functions divided between the academic departments of the university and 16 colleges. In general, the departments perform research and provide lectures to students, while the colleges are responsible for the domestic arrangements and welfare of undergraduate students, graduate students, post-doctoral researchers and some university staff. The university is considered very prestigious and has been included as part of an unofficial British "Ivy League" of elite universities by both The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Times. It is currently ranked between 3rd and 7th places by the latest league tables of the British universities. "Long established as the leading alternative to Oxford and Cambridge", the university attracts "a largely middle class student body" according to The Times Good University
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    European Geosciences Union

    The European Geosciences Union (EGU) is a non-profit international union in the fields of Earth, planetary, and space sciences. The organisation has headquarters in Munich (Germany). Membership is open to individuals who are professionally engaged in or associated with these fields and related studies, including students and retired seniors. The EGU publishes 14 open-access scientific journals and organises a number of topical meetings, as well as education and outreach activities. Its most prominent event is the EGU General Assembly, an annual conference that brings together over 10,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting’s sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth’s internal structure and atmosphere, climate change, and renewable energies. The EGU was established by the merger of the European Geophysical Society and the European Union of Geosciences on 7 September 2002. Since 2001, the EGU and Copernicus Publications have published a growing number of geoscientific journals. These include 14 peer-reviewed open-access journals,. EGU also publishes books and other materials available in paper and online. The European
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Polytechnic University of Milan

    The Politecnico di Milano is the largest technical university in Italy, with about 38,700 students. The rector of the university is professor Giovanni Azzone. The Politecnico offers undergraduate, graduate and higher education courses in Engineering, Architecture and Design. The university is ranked as the 48th best technical university in the world according to the QS World University Rankings. The logo is a sketch of Raphael's School of Athens. The Politecnico was founded on 29 November 1863 by Francesco Brioschi, secretary of the Ministry of Education and rector of the University of Pavia. It is the oldest university in Milan. Its original name was Istituto Tecnico Superiore ("Higher Technical Institute") and only Civil and Industrial Engineering were taught. Architecture, the second main line of study at Politecnico, was introduced in 1865 in cooperation with the Brera Academy. There were only 30 students admitted in the first year. Over the decades, most of students were men: the first female graduate from the university was in 1913. In 1927 the Politecnico moved to piazza Leonardo da Vinci, in the district now known as Città studi (City of Studies). Politecnico's main
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Tamkang University

    Tamkang University

    Tamkang University (traditional Chinese: 淡江大學; simplified Chinese: 淡江大学; Tongyong Pinyin: Dànjiang Dàsyúe; Hanyu Pinyin: Dànjiang Dàxúe; Wade–Giles: Tàn-chiang Ta-hsüeh; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tām-kang-tōa-ha̍k; abbreviated as TKU) is a private Taiwanese university located in Tamsui District, New Taipei City. Founded in 1950 as a junior college of English literature, the college has expanded into a full university with 11 colleges today. Tamkang University is well known throughout Taiwan and is usually recognized as the oldest and best private university in the country. It is ranked 9th by the Ministry of Education of Taiwan and in Asia's top 50th. Around 29,000 students of fifty nationalities form the diverse student body of the school. The school also has partnerships with over a hundred Universities in 28 countries (known as "Sister Universities"). This university is noted for its scenic campus. Established in 1950 as a Junior College of English, Tamkang first offered a two-year program and then a three-year program. It was not until 1958 that Tamkang, after it was reinstituted as a College of Arts and Sciences, awarded bachelor's degrees to its graduates. In 1980, Tamkang was elevated to
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    University of Dublin

    University of Dublin

    The University of Dublin (Irish: Ollscoil Átha Cliath), corporately designated the Chancellor, Doctors and Masters of the University of Dublin, is a university located in Dublin, Ireland. It was founded in 1592 when Queen Elizabeth I issued a charter for Trinity College, as "the mother of a university", thereby making it Ireland's oldest operating university. It was modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but unlike these only one college was established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. The University of Dublin is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland. It is a member of the Irish Universities Association, Universities Ireland, and the Coimbra Group. The University of Dublin was modelled on University of Oxford and University of Cambridge in the form of a collegiate university, Trinity College being named by the Queen as the mater universitas ("mother of the university"). As no other college was ever established, Trinity is the sole constituent college of the university and so Trinity College and the University of Dublin are for most practical
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (American Academy) is one of the oldest and most prestigious honorary societies and a leading center for independent policy research in the United States. Election to the Academy is considered one of the nation’s highest honors since its founding during the American Revolution by John Adams, John Hancock, James Bowdoin and other scholar-patriots who contributed prominently to the establishment of the new nation, its government, and its Constitution. Today the Academy is with a dual function: to elect to membership finest minds and most influential leaders, drawn from science, scholarship, business, public affairs, and the arts, from each generation, and to conduct policy studies in response to the needs of society. Major Academy projects now have focused on higher education and research, humanities and cultural studies, scientific and technological advances, politics, population and the environment, and the welfare of children. Dædalus, the Academy’s quarterly journal, is widely regarded as one of the world's leading intellectual journals. The Academy is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Academy was established by Massachusetts
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies

    Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies

    The Center for Advanced Judaic Studies (CAJS) at the University of Pennsylvania is the world's only institution exclusively dedicated to post-doctoral research on Jewish Civilization. It is located at 420 Walnut Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The center is directed by Professor David B. Ruderman. The institution now known as CAJS was founded in 1907 as the Dropsie College of Hebrew and Cognate Learning and finally as Dropsie University. It was named after its benefactor, Moses Aaron Dropsie (1821–1905), a wealthy half-Jewish religious convert who willed his entire fortune to "the promotion of and instruction in the Hebrew and cognate languages and their respective literatures." Dropsie granted more than 200 Ph.D.s between its inception and its closing as a degree-granting institution in 1986. Dropsie was also the publisher of the Jewish Quarterly Review, which was at the time the most respected journal on the subject. Although no longer a degree-granting college, it became the Annenberg Research Institute after its 1986 closing and turned into one of the country's most noted interdisciplinary post-doctoral fellowship programs. Annenberg merged with the University of
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Rice University

    Rice University

    William Marsh Rice University, commonly referred to as Rice University or Rice, is a private research university located on a 295-acre (1.19 km) campus in Houston, Texas, United States. The university is situated near the Houston Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. Opened in 1912 after the murder of its namesake William Marsh Rice, Rice is now a preeminent research university with a distinct undergraduate and graduate focus. Its emphasis on education is demonstrated by a small student body and 5:1 student-faculty ratio, among the lowest in the top American universities including the Ivy League. Rice alumni are prominent in every sector of society today. The university has produced 101 Fulbright Scholars, 20 Marshall Scholars, and 12 Rhodes Scholars. The university has a very high level of research activity for its size, with $115.3 million in sponsored research funding in 2011. Rice is noted for its applied science programs in the fields of artificial heart research, structural chemical analysis, signal processing, space science, and nanotechnology. It was ranked first in the world in materials science research by the Times Higher Education (THE) in 2010. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    93

    Ross School of Business

    The Stephen M. Ross School of Business (Ross) is the business school of the University of Michigan. Numerous publications have ranked the Ross School of Business' Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Executive Education programs among the top in the country and the world . The school offers bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees, as well as an executive education program. Ross also offers dual degrees with the colleges and schools of urban planning, engineering, medicine, law, public policy, social work, education, nursing, information, art & design, music, and the School of Natural Resources and Environment (SNRE). The school was founded in 1924. Some highlights from its recent history: B. Joseph White became dean in 1990, and began a transformation of the School's character and image. He led a major MBA curriculum overhaul, which aimed to intensify the development of students' professional and practical skills, teamwork, leadership, and overall ability to turn knowledge and ideas into action. The signature innovation, called MAP (Multidisciplinary Action Project), puts students into "live cases" inside companies for seven
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Institute of Contemporary History

    The Institut für Zeitgeschichte ("Institute of Contemporary History") in Munich was conceived in 1947 under the name Deutsches Institut für Geschichte der nationalsozialistischen Zeit ("German Institute of the History of the National Socialist Era"). Founded by the German government and the State of Bavaria on suggestion by the Allied Forces, it was established in 1949 and renamed in 1952. Its purpose is the analysis of contemporary German history. The Institute is funded by the Republic of Germany, and the German states of Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Brandenburg, Hesse, Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia and Saxony. The first director of the Institute was Hans Rothfels, the second director was Martin Broszat. Representatives of the supporting states are also members of the Institute's board. Since 1953, the Institute has been publishing the journal Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte ("Contemporary History Quarterly"), which is regarded as one of the most important publications of German historical research. The Institute has also published extensive editions of contemporary historical documents, such as The Foreign Policy Files of the Bundesrepublik Deutschland and The Diaries
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    University of Cincinnati

    University of Cincinnati

    The University of Cincinnati (commonly referred to as Cincinnati or UC) is a comprehensive public research university in Cincinnati, in the U.S. state of Ohio, and a part of the University System of Ohio. Founded in 1819 as Cincinnati College, it is the oldest institution of higher education in Cincinnati and has an annual enrollment of over 40,000 students, making it the second largest university in Ohio and one of the largest universities in the United States. In the 2010 survey by Times Higher Education (UK), the university was ranked in the top 100 universities in North America and as one of the top 200 in the world. In the 2012 edition of US News and World Report, the University of Cincinnati was ranked as a Tier One university. In 2011-2012 academic year the Leiden University ranking put the University of Cincinnati at the 93rd place globally and at the 63rd place in North America by the proportion of top-cited publications. The university garners nearly $500 million per annum in research funding, ranking 22nd among public universities in the US. Numerous programs across the university are nationally ranked, including: aerospace engineering, anthropology, architecture,
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    University of Bristol

    The University of Bristol is a public research university located in Bristol, United Kingdom. One of the British red brick universities, it received its Royal Charter in 1909, although its predecessor institution, University College, Bristol, had been in existence since 1876. Bristol has been named inside the global top 28 by the QS World University Rankings. It has an average of 14 applicants for each undergraduate place,and for the most popular courses, such as Economics and Law, the applicant to place ratio is 40:1. The University had a total income of £408.8 million in 2010/11, of which £106.7 million was from research grants and contracts. It is the largest independent employer in Bristol. Current academics include 18 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences, 10 Fellows of the British Academy, 13 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 31 Fellows of the Royal Society. Bristol is a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive British universities, the European-wide Coimbra Group and the Worldwide Universities Network, of which the University's Vice-Chancellor Prof. Eric Thomas was Chairman from 2005 to 2007. The earliest antecedent of the university was the
    5.40
    5 votes
    100

    Emory University

    Emory University is a private research university in metropolitan Atlanta, located in the Druid Hills section of unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. The university was founded as Emory College in 1836 in Oxford, Georgia by a small group of Methodists and was named in honor of Methodist bishop John Emory. A land-grant by Asa Candler, the president of The Coca-Cola Company, allowed the small college to move to metropolitan Atlanta in 1915 and become rechartered as Emory University. The university's mission statement is "to create, preserve, teach, and apply knowledge in the service of humanity." Emory is ranked 20th among national universities in the U.S. News & World Report. The university has nearly 3,000 faculty members; awards and honors recognizing Emory faculty include the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, National Humanities Medal, Guggenheim Fellowship, Fulbright Fellowship, and membership in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. The university has nine academic divisions: Emory College of Arts and Sciences, Oxford College, Goizueta Business School, Laney Graduate School, School of Law, School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    St Catherine's College, Oxford

    St Catherine's College, Oxford

    St Catherine's College, often called Catz, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its motto is Nova et Vetera ("the new and the old"). As of 2006, the college had an estimated financial endowment of £53m. St Catherine's College was founded by the distinguished historian Alan Bullock, who went on to become the first Master of the College, and later Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. The College traces its descent from the Delegacy of Non-Collegiate Students, founded in 1868 to offer university education at Oxford without the costs of college membership. Nonetheless, the social role of a college was re-established by the Delegacy's students, meeting as St Catherine's Club (originally St Catharine's Club), which was named after its meeting place in a hall on Catte Street. The Club was officially recognised by the University in 1931 as St Catherine's Society. It was thus developing the characteristics of a college, and in 1956 the Delegates decided to formalise this change in status. After acquiring 8 acres (32,000 m) from Merton College, Oxford on part of Holywell Great Meadow for £57,690, monies were sought from the University Grants Committee
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Uppsala University

    Uppsala University (Swedish: Uppsala universitet) is a research university in Uppsala, Sweden, and is the oldest university in Sweden, founded in 1477. It ranks among the best universities in Northern Europe in international rankings and is generally considered one of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning in Europe. The university rose to pronounced significance during the rise of Sweden as a great power at the end of the 16th century and was then given a relative financial stability with the large donation of King Gustavus Adolphus in the early 17th century. Uppsala also has an important historical place in Swedish national culture, identity and for the Swedish establishment: in historiography, literature, politics, and music. Many aspects of Swedish academic culture in general, such as the white student cap, originated in Uppsala. It shares some peculiarities, such as the student nation system, with Lund University and the University of Helsinki. Uppsala belongs to the Coimbra Group of European universities. The university has nine faculties distributed over three 'disciplinary domains'. It has about 23 000 full-time students, and about 2,200 doctoral students. It
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    CERN

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: Organisation européenne pour la recherche nucléaire), known as CERN or Cern ( /ˈsɜrn/; French pronunciation: [sɛʁn]; see History) is an international organization whose purpose is to operate the world's largest particle physics laboratory. Established in 1954, the organization is based in the northwest suburbs of Geneva on the Franco–Swiss border, (46°14′3″N 6°3′19″E / 46.23417°N 6.05528°E / 46.23417; 6.05528) and has 20 European member states. The term CERN is also used to refer to the laboratory, which employs just under 2,400 full-time employees, 1,500 part-time employees, and hosts some 10,000 visiting scientists and engineers, representing 608 universities and research facilities and 113 nationalities. CERN's main function is to provide the particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high-energy physics research - as a result, numerous experiments have been constructed at CERN following international collaborations. It is also the birthplace of the World Wide Web. The main site at Meyrin has a large computer centre containing powerful data-processing facilities, primarily for experimental data analysis;
    5.20
    5 votes
    107

    University of Sydney

    The University of Sydney is a public university located in Sydney, New South Wales. The main campus spreads across the suburbs of Camperdown and Darlington on the southwestern outskirts of the Sydney CBD. Founded in 1850, it is the oldest university in Australia and Oceania. It has 32,393 undergraduate and 16,627 graduate students (2011). The University of Sydney is organised into sixteen faculties and schools, through which it offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees. Three Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the University as graduate and faculty. Sydney consistently ranks amongst the top universities in Australia and Oceania. In 2012, it was ranked 39th in the world; 3rd in Australia, behind Australian National University (24th) and the University of Melbourne (36th) in the 2012 QS World University Rankings. The University of Sydney is a member of Australia's Group of Eight, Academic Consortium 21, the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) and the Worldwide Universities Network. The University is also colloquially known as one of Australia's sandstone universities. In 1848, in the New South Wales Legislative Council, William Wentworth
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Haas Center for Public Service

    Haas Center for Public Service

    The Haas Center for Public Service, formerly the Stanford Public Service Center, is the public service center on the campus of Stanford University in Stanford, California. The Hass Center houses many student organizations and projects, including the Stanford Volunteer Network, Stanford in Government and the Ravenswood-Stanford Tutoring Program. Haas Center programs place more than 2,000 students annually in community service projects. The mission of the Center is to "connect academic study with community and public service to strengthen communities and develop effective public leaders. The Center aspires to develop aware, engaged and thoughtful citizens who contribute to the realization of a more just and humane world." In 1984, the original Public Service Center was established by Stanford University President Donald Kennedy. The original Center was located in Owen House. In 1989, the Public Service Center was renamed the Haas Center for Public Service after $5 million contribution by the Haas family to the Center's endowment. The Haas family are descendents of Walter A. Haas, former President of Levi Strauss & Co. In 1993, construction was completed on a new $3.3 million
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    Harvard School of Public Health

    The Harvard School of Public Health is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University, located in the Longwood Area of the Boston, Massachusetts neighborhood of Mission Hill, which is next to Harvard Medical School. HSPH is considered a significant school focusing on health in the United States. It is the country's third-oldest school of public health. Founded in 1922, the Harvard School of Public Health grew out of the Harvard-MIT School for Health Officers, the nation's first graduate training program in population health. Julio Frenk, the Minister of Health of Mexico from 2000 to 2006 and a former executive director of the World Health Organization (WHO), became the new dean of HSPH in January 2009. As one of the most selective public health schools in the world, the middle 50 percent of the class that entered in 2006 had an incoming GPA between 3.50 and 3.75 (out of 4.0). About half of HSPH students already hold an MD degree, with many of the rest holding another advanced degree (typically a PhD, JD, or MBA). HSPH students are drawn from around the world, with about 40 percent of the student body coming from outside of the United States. Overall, HSPH is ranked
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Information Sciences Institute

    Information Sciences Institute

    The Information Sciences Institute (ISI) is a research and development unit of the University of Southern California's Viterbi School of Engineering which focuses on computer and communications technology and information processing. It helped spearhead development of the Internet, including the Domain Name System and refinement of TCP/IP communications protocols that remain fundamental to Internet operations. The ISI conducts basic and applied research for corporations and more than 20 U.S. federal government agencies. It is known for its cross-disciplinary depth, including expertise in computing organizations, interfaces, environments, grids, networks, platforms and microelectronics. The ISI has more than 350 employees, approximately half with doctorate degrees; fifty are faculty at USC. The Institute has a satellite campus in Arlington, Virginia. The ISI is currently led by Herbert Schorr, former executive and scientist at IBM. The ISI is one of 12 organizations that operate or host internet root name servers. ISI's expertise falls into three broad categories. "Intelligent systems," where ISI has world-class artificial intelligence capabilities, include natural language,
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Leo Baeck Institute New York

    The Leo Baeck Institute is a research institute with centres in New York, London and Jerusalem devoted to the study of the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry. The New York centre also has a branch housed in the Jewish Museum Berlin. Founded in 1955, the Institute is named in honor of Leo Baeck, the Rabbi who was the last leader of the Jewish Community under the Nazis. When the Leo Baeck Institute was founded, the era of German-Jewish “Symbiosis” was over. This history could be considered closed and as such the heritage of German-Jewry deserved to be transferred from memory to history for future generations. The process of establishing the LBI Jerusalem began when Chancellor Konrad Adenauer announced that the Federal Republic of Germany would compensate the victims of National Socialism and established the Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany. Acting on behalf of the interests of German-Jewish survivors, the Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland submitted the proposal for what would become the LBI. Once the proposal was approved, some of the most influential scholars of German Zionism met in Jerusalem to discuss what form the LBI would take. The founding
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Royal Society of Edinburgh

    Royal Society of Edinburgh

    The Royal Society of Edinburgh is Scotland's national academy of science and letters. It is a registered charity, operating on a wholly independent and non-party-political basis and providing public benefit throughout Scotland. Established in 1783, it has since then drawn upon the strengths and expertise of its Fellows, of which there are currently more than 1500. The Society covers a broader selection of fields than the Royal Society of London including literature and history. Unlike similar organisations in the rest of the UK, the Fellowship includes people from a wide range of disciplines - science & technology, arts, humanities, medicine, social science, business and public service. This breadth of expertise makes the Royal Society of Edinburgh unique in the UK. At the start of the 18th century, Edinburgh's intellectual climate fostered many clubs and societies (see Scottish Enlightenment). Though there were several that treated the arts, sciences and medicine, the most prestigious was the Society for the Improvement of Medical Knowledge, commonly referred to as the Medical Society of Edinburgh, co-founded by the mathematician Colin Maclaurin in 1731. Maclaurin was unhappy with
    8.00
    2 votes
    115

    University of St Andrews

    The University of St Andrews, informally referred to as "St Andrews", is a public research university in St Andrews, United Kingdom. It is the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the English-speaking world after the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. The university is situated in the town of St Andrews, Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. It was founded between 1410 and 1413, when a Papal Bull was issued by the Avignon Antipope Benedict XIII. In post-nominals the university's name was historically abbreviated as "St And" (from the Latin Sancti Andreae). St Andrews is currently ranked as the fifth best university in the UK according to most recent university league tables, (see Rankings of universities in the United Kingdom) and is described by the Sunday Times as the leading multifaculty alternative to Oxford and Cambridge in the United Kingdom. The Times Higher Education World Universities Ranking names St Andrews among the world’s Top 20 Arts and Humanities universities. St Andrews has a diverse student body and cosmopolitan character due to its over 30% intake of international students from well over 100 countries, with 15% of the current
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    American Jewish Historical Society

    American Jewish Historical Society

    The American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS) was founded in 1892 with the mission to foster awareness and appreciation of the American Jewish heritage and to serve as a national scholarly resource for research through the collection, preservation and dissemination of materials relating to American Jewish history. The American Jewish Historical Society is the oldest national ethnic historical organization in the United States. The Society’s library, archives, photograph, and art and artifacts collections document the American Jewish experience. They are housed in the Center for Jewish History in Manhattan. The society has administrative offices in both New York, New York, and in Boston, Massachusetts. It has served as a public educational and interpretive function by publishing a journal, a newsletter, monographs and reference works on the American Jewish experience. In 2007, it was among over 530 New York City arts and social service institutions to receive part of a $20 million grant from the Carnegie Corporation, which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg. The American Jewish Historical Society publishes a bi-yearly newsletter, Heritage
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    University of Michigan

    University of Michigan

    The University of Michigan (commonly referred to as Michigan, U-M, UMich, or U of M) is a public research university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan in the United States. It is the state's oldest university and the flagship campus of the University of Michigan. It is one of the original eight Public Ivy universities and is one of the founding members of the Association of American Universities. It has been ranked among the top five research universities in the US, and among the top 20 universities in the world, including one ranking, as high as the 4th best university in the world. U-M also has satellite campuses in Flint and Dearborn. The university was founded in 1817 in Detroit as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, about 20 years before the Michigan Territory officially became a state. What would become the university moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university has physically expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 31 million gross square feet (712 acres or 2.38 km²), and transformed its academic program from a strictly
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    University of São Paulo

    University of São Paulo

    Universidade de São Paulo (University of São Paulo, short USP) is a public university in the Brazilian state of São Paulo. It is the largest Brazilian university and the country's most prestigious educational institution. According to reports by the Ministry of Science and Technology, more than 25% of the articles published by Brazilian researchers in high quality conferences and journals are produced at the University of São Paulo. USP is one of the largest institutions of higher education in Latin America, with approximately 90,000 enrolled students. It has eleven campuses, four of them in São Paulo (the main campus is called Campus Armando de Salles Oliveira, with an area of 7,443,770 m²). The other campuses are in the cities of Bauru, Lorena, Piracicaba, Pirassununga, Ribeirão Preto and two in São Carlos. USP is involved in teaching, research and university extension in all areas of knowledge. In 1934, during a period known for the "search for alternatives", along with political centralisation, efforts were carried out to provide Brazil with modern administrative, educational and military institutions. One of the main initiatives included the creation, that same year, of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    Vidal Sassoon International Centre for the Study of Antisemitism

    Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism (SICSA) is a research center affiliated with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. It was named for Vidal Sassoon, who financed its establishment in 1983. The Vidal Sassoon center is as an interdisciplinary research center devoted to the independent, non-political accumulation and dissemination of materials related to anti-Semitism. The director is Robert Wistrich, the Neuberger Chair in Modern Jewish History at the Hebrew University and a world expert in the field of anti-Semitism. Over 120 studies have been conducted under the auspices of the center, covering a wide range of disciplines — history, psychology, sociology, anthropology, literature and art. The center awards Felix Posen Fellowships to doctoral candidates whose dissertation focuses on some aspect of anti-Semitism. The center has produced numerous publications, including book-length studies, collections of papers presented at conferences, occasional papers, and a journal. The ACTA series is an annual report from a special SICSA research unit that provides in-depth analysis of current trends in anti-Semitism and explores the influence of anti-Jewish and
    9.00
    1 votes
    123

    Washington Institute for Near East Policy

    The Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP) is a think tank based in Washington, D.C. focused on United States foreign policy in the Middle East. Established in 1985, the institute's mission statement states that it seeks "to advance a balanced and realistic understanding of American interests in the Middle East." The group is often described as being pro-Israel. Martin Indyk, an Australian-trained academic and former deputy director of research for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), helped found WINEP in 1985. In 1982, following his position as Australian deputy director of current intelligence in the Middle East, Indyk started to set up a research department for AIPAC. Because of his affiliation with AIPAC, Indyk felt his research wasn't being taken seriously and so started WINEP to convey an image that was "friendly to Israel but doing credible research on the Middle East in a realistic and balanced way." Indyk would go on to become an American citizen, U.S. diplomat and its ambassador to Israel. The Washington Institute is registered as a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, and derives 87 percent of its operating revenues through direct public
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    National Science Foundation

    National Science Foundation

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. Its medical counterpart is the National Institutes of Health. With an annual budget of about US$6.87 billion (fiscal year 2010), the NSF funds approximately 20% of all federally supported basic research conducted by the United States' colleges and universities. In some fields, such as mathematics, computer science, economics and the social sciences, the NSF is the major source of federal backing. The NSF's director, deputy director, and the 24 members of the National Science Board (NSB) are appointed by the President of the United States, and confirmed by the United States Senate. The director and deputy director are responsible for administration, planning, budgeting and day-to-day operations of the foundation, while the NSB meets six times a year to establish its overall policies. Although many other federal research agencies operate their own laboratories, notable examples being the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), NSF does not.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

    Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

    The Wharton School is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy League university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Wharton was United States' first business school and the world’s first collegiate business school, established in 1881 through a donation from Joseph Wharton. Alone and in conjunction with the other schools and colleges of the university, Wharton grants B.S. and MBA degrees, offers a Ph.D. program, and houses or co-sponsors several diploma programs. With the most electives of any business school, Wharton offers concentrations in accounting, business and public policy, entrepreneurial management, environmental management, finance, health care systems, human resource and organizational management, insurance and risk management, legal studies and business ethics, management, marketing, multinational management, operations and information management, real estate, retailing, statistics and strategic management. The school currently has 278 faculty members, translating to a 17:1 student-to-faculty ratio. The school's faculty is the world’s most published and most cited among business schools. Business Week and Financial Times have ranked Wharton among the
    6.67
    3 votes
    131

    Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

    The Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Portuguese: Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ) is one of the largest federal universities of Brazil. It is seated in the city of Rio de Janeiro, with three campuses (Fundão island, Praia Vermelha and the humanities core at IFCS downtown) and two more independent buildings in downtown Rio. It was founded on September 7, 1920, by President Epitácio Pessoa, upon gathering a number of independent public institutions of higher education in the city. By then, Rio was the Brazilian capital and the federal government sought to stimulate scientific production in the nation's booming economy. Some of the colleges and schools which form UFRJ date back to the United Kingdom of Portugal and Brazil and to the Brazilian Empire, such as the Escola Politécnica (Polytechnical School - founded in 1792), Faculdade Nacional de Direito (National Law School - founded in 1882 and reestablished in 1891), Escola Nacional de Belas Artes (National School of Fine Arts) and the Faculdade de Medicina (Medicine School). The university was named Universidade do Rio de Janeiro. It was later renamed Universidade do Brasil, on July 5, 1937. On December 17, 1945,
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Materials and Energy Research Center

    The Materials and Energy Research Center started its research work within Sharif University of Technology in 1971 as the "Center for Materials Properties", convering materials engineering, new energies, electronics and environmental pollution. The main theme was on solar energy and the most important section was Division of Electrochemistry under supervision of leading scientists like John Owen, and Ali Eftekhari. After the Islamic Revolution, the center engaged more specialists and expanded its activities. Following the Cultural Revolution the center was renamed "Cenetr for Applied Research in Material Properties and Energy" and in 1986 moved to its present location in Karaj, Meshkin-Dasht. In 1992 the council for expansion of higher education voted to rename the center as the "Materials and Energy Research Center." MERC has 43 faculty members and all the required facilities to carry out basic and applied research, together with the facilities to train specialist manpower. The first masters course in materials engineering was taught at the center in 1993. In 1991, the first PhD course on materials engineering was offer in collaboration with Shanghigh University and three years
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    University Medical Center Groningen

    University Medical Center Groningen

    The University Medical Center Groningen, or UMCG (Dutch: Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen), formerly Groningen University Hospital, is the main hospital of the city of Groningen. The medical centre is affiliated with the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. It is one of the largest hospitals in the world, offering supraregional tertiary care to the northern part of the Netherlands. The medical center employs almost 17000 people and counts almost 1400 beds. It is located in the center of Groningen. The main building was opened in 1997 and its design is based on light and air. It counts 32 elevators that all have a different theme. Art plays an important role in the hospital, there are several exhibitions, statues, and a big fountain in the center of the hospital. The UMCG contains several shops; two coffee shops, a restaurant, a minimart, a candy & card store, a travel agency, a barber, a bookstore, a library for patients, and a Rituals flagstore. The ground floor is designed so that visitors would not feel as if they were in a hospital - the space is airy, there is a lot of green and the glass roofs are opened when the weather is fair. Patient wards are on the outside of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Weizmann Institute of Science

    Weizmann Institute of Science

    The Weizmann Institute of Science (Hebrew: מכון ויצמן למדע‎ Machon Weizmann LeMada) is a university and research institute in Rehovot, Israel. It differs from other Israeli universities in that it offers only graduate and post-graduate studies in the sciences. It is one of the world’s leading multidisciplinary research centers, with around 2,500 scientists, postdoctoral fellows, Ph.D. and M.Sc. students, and scientific, technical, and administrative staff working at the Institute. Founded in 1934 by Chaim Weizmann and Benjamin M. Bloch as the Daniel Sieff Research Institute, it was renamed the Weizmann Institute of Science in his honor on November 2, 1949. Before he became President of the State of Israel, Weizmann pursued his research in organic chemistry at its laboratories. The Weizmann Institute presently has about 2,500 students, postdoctoral fellows, staff, and faculty, and awards M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, biological chemistry and biology, as well as several interdisciplinary programs.The symbol of the Weizmann Institute of Science is the multi-branched ficus tree. In 2011, the magazine The Scientist rated the Weizmann
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Brown University

    Brown University is an American private Ivy League research university located in Providence, Rhode Island, United States. Founded in 1764 prior to American independence from the British Empire as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations early in the reign of King George III (1760–1820), Brown is the third oldest institution of higher education in New England and seventh oldest in the United States. Brown was the first college in the nation to accept students regardless of religious affiliation. Academically, Brown consists of The College, Graduate School, Alpert Medical School, and the School of Engineering. Brown's international programs are organized through the Watson Institute for International Studies. The New Curriculum, instituted in 1969, eliminated distribution requirements and allows any course to be taken on a satisfactory/no credit basis. In addition, there are no pluses or minuses in the letter grading system. The school has the oldest undergraduate engineering program in the Ivy League (1847). Pembroke College, Brown's women's college, merged with the university in 1971. While Brown is considered a small research university with
    4.80
    5 votes
    136
    British Academy

    British Academy

    The British Academy is the United Kingdom's national body for the humanities and the social sciences. Its purpose is to inspire, recognise and support excellence in the humanities and social sciences, throughout the UK and internationally, and to champion their role and value. It receives an annual grant from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). In 2010-11 it had a gross income of £31,050,878, including £26,447,813 from BIS. £25,380,379 was distributed during the year in research grants, awards and charitable activities. The British Academy was established in 1902 and received its Royal Charter in the same year. It is now a fellowship of more than 900 leading scholars spanning all disciplines across the humanities and social sciences. The Academy is a self-governing and independent registered charity, based at 10-11 Carlton House Terrace in London. It is not to be confused with the British Academy of Film and Television Arts or the Royal Academy. The Academy states its fundamental purposes under four headings: The creation of a “British Academy for the Promotion of Historical, Philosophical and Philological Studies” was first proposed in 1899 in order that
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    University of Toronto

    The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, situated on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises twelve colleges that differ in character and history, each retaining substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. Academically, the University of Toronto is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto School. The university was the birthplace of insulin and stem cell research, and was the site of the first practical electron microscope, the development of multi-touch technology, the identification of Cygnus X-1 as a black hole, and the theory of NP completeness. By a significant margin, it receives the most annual research funding of any Canadian university. It is one of two members of the Association of American Universities
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Keele University

    Keele University

    Keele University is a campus university near Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, England. It was the first new British university in the 20th century, founded in 1949 as an experimental college dedicated to a broad curriculum and interdisciplinary study, Keele is most notable for pioneering the dual honours degree in Britain. The university occupies a 620 acre (250 ha) rural campus close to the village of Keele and houses a science park and a conference centre, making it the largest main campus university in the UK. The university's School of Medicine and School of Nursing and Midwifery also operate the clinical part of their courses from a separate campus at the University Hospital of North Staffordshire in Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent. Keele University was established in 1949 as the University College of North Staffordshire, at the initiative of A D Lindsay, then Professor of Philosophy and Master of Balliol College, Oxford. Lindsay was a strong advocate of working-class adult education, who had first suggested a "people's university" in an address to the North Staffordshire Workers' Educational Association in 1925. On 13 March 1946, Lindsay wrote to Sir Walter Moberly, chair of
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    MIT Sloan School of Management

    MIT Sloan School of Management

    The MIT Sloan School of Management (also known as MIT Sloan or Sloan) is the business school of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. MIT Sloan offers bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, as well as non-degree executive education, and has over 20,000 alumni globally. Its largest program is its full-time MBA, which is one of the most selective in the world, with students from more than 60 countries every year, and ranked #1 in more subjects than any other MBA program. MIT Sloan places great emphasis on innovation and invention, and many of the world's most famous management and finance theories—including the Black–Scholes model, the binomial options pricing model, the Modigliani–Miller theorem, the neoclassical growth model, the random walk hypothesis, Theory X and Theory Y, and the field of System Dynamics—were developed at the school. Several Nobel laureates in economics and John Bates Clark Medal winners have been on the faculty. MIT Sloan Management Review, a leading academic journal focused on the management of innovation, has been published by the school since 1959. The MIT Sloan School of Management began in 1914, as the engineering
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Royal College of Physicians

    Royal College of Physicians

    The Royal College of Physicians of London is a British professional body of doctors of general medicine and its subspecialties. It was originally founded as the College of Physicians. It received the royal charter in 1518 from King Henry VIII, affirmed by Act of Parliament in 1523. It was the first medical institution in England to become a Royal College. The college has been continuously active in improving practice medicine since then, primarily though training and qualifying new physicians. The current president of the college is Sir Richard Thompson. A small group of distinguished physicians, led by the scholar and humanist Thomas Linacre, petitioned the King to be incorporated into a College similar to those found in a number of other European countries. The main functions of the College, as set down in the founding Charter, were to grant licenses to those qualified to practice and to punish unqualified practitioners and those engaging in malpractice. This included apothecaries as well as physicians. The College was based at Amen Corner near St Paul's Cathedral, until it was burnt down in the Great Fire of London of 1666. The first Harveian Librarian was Christopher
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    University of Joensuu

    University of Joensuu

    The University of Joensuu was founded in 1969. It operates campuses in Joensuu and Savonlinna and a research station in Ilomantsi. The University offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight different fields: Around 8300 students are currently enrolled, of which 1100 at the Savonlinna campus. The number of staff is currently 1400. The university has the highest % of foreign student in Finland. University of Joensuu and University of Kuopio will form the University of Eastern Finland in January 2010.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    University of Massachusetts Medical School

    The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) is one of five campuses of the University of Massachusetts (UMass) system. It is home to three schools: the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the Graduate School of Nursing; a biomedical research enterprise; and a range of public-service initiatives throughout the state. One of the fastest-growing academic health centers in the country, UMMS is located in Worcester, Massachusetts; other UMass sites are located in Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth and Lowell. UMMS is also known as UMass Worcester. UMMS is ranked 7th in primary-care education and 48th in research among the United States' 125 medical schools in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report annual guide, "America’s Best Graduate Schools”. UMMS is also a research center. During the past four decades UMMS researchers have made advances in a broad range of disease families, from HIV and infectious diseases to cancer, genetic disorders, diabetes and immune disease. UMMS faculty discovered the link between the immune system and type-1 diabetes, found the genetic cause underlying the third-most-common form of the muscular dystrophies, established the
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    USC Center on Public Diplomacy

    The University of Southern California Center on Public Diplomacy is a joint academic research, teaching and training center created and run jointly by the USC Annenberg School for Communication and the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences' School of International Relations. Center leadership is provided by Philip Seib, Director of the USC Center on Public Diplomacy.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

    The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation is a private non-profit operating foundation based in Princeton, New Jersey. It administers programs that support leadership development and build organizational capacity in education. Its current signature program is the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship. It also continues to support a range of other programs. The first Woodrow Wilson Fellowships were created by Dr. Whitney “Mike” Oates, a Princeton University classics professor who served in the Marine Corps during World War II. During his tour of duty, Professor Oates realized that many of his brightest undergraduates who had served in the armed forces were unlikely to go on to doctoral study and college teaching careers when the war was over. As the G.I. Bill took shape, however, it was clear that college enrollments would expand, and the ranks of qualified college instructors must grow. Oates and the Princeton graduate dean, Sir Hugh Taylor, developed a program of fellowships funded by various individual donors to help recruit veterans to Princeton’s Ph.D. programs in the humanities. In 1945, these fellowships were combined into one program and named for Woodrow Wilson, a
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

    Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

    The Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres (German: Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren) is the largest scientific organisation in Germany. It is a union of 18 scientific-technical and biological-medical research center. The official mission of the Association is "solving the grand challenges of science, society and industry". Scientists at Helmholtz therefore focus research on complex systems which affect human life and the environment. The namesake of the association is the German physiologist and physicist Hermann von Helmholtz. The annual budget of the Helmholtz Association amounts to more than 3.4 billion euros, of which about 70% is raised from public funds. The remaining 30% of the budget is acquired by the 18 individual Helmholtz Centres in the form of contract funding. The public funds are provided to by the federal government (90%) and the rest by the States of Germany (10%). Members of the Helmholtz Association are: The works of the centres are categorised into programmes, which are divided into six research groups. The Helmholtz centres are grouped according to which research group they belong to: Eight of the above mentioned Helmholtz centers
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    St. Mary's College of Maryland

    St. Mary's College of Maryland

    St. Mary's College of Maryland, established in 1840, is a public, secular liberal arts college located in St. Mary's City, Maryland. It is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges and designated as a Public Honors College (the only one in the state of Maryland and one of few around the U.S.). St. Mary's College is a small college, with about 2,000 enrolled students. The institution offers baccalaureate degrees in 22 disciplines, of which psychology, biology, and economics are among the most popular. The institution also offers one postgraduate degree, a Masters of Arts in Teaching. The college shares much of its campus with Historic St. Mary's City, the fourth site of colonization in British North America and one of the premier archaeological sites on the East Coast. St. Mary’s College of Maryland came into existence (on paper only) by an act of the Maryland State Board of Higher Education in 1966. The first bachelor’s (B.A.) degrees were awarded in 1971. The predecessor institution was St. Mary’s Seminary Junior College (1949–1968), in turn preceded by St. Mary’s Female Seminary Junior College (1927–1949). Both of these “junior colleges” combined the last two years
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    University of Aberdeen

    The University of Aberdeen is a university located in Aberdeen, Scotland. Founded in 1495, it is an ancient university and Scotland's third-oldest (after the University of St. Andrews and the University of Glasgow). It is the fifth-oldest in the English-speaking world. Its current form is the result of a merger in 1860 between two founding colleges: King's College (founded in 1495 in Old Aberdeen and which referred to itself as the University of Aberdeen) and Marischal College (founded in 1593 in what is now Aberdeen city centre). Today, the University of Aberdeen is a research-focused university and is consistently ranked among the top 150 universities in the world. It is one of two universities in Aberdeen today (the other is The Robert Gordon University). The University plays a significant role in the life of the city, with its iconic buildings acting as symbols of the City of Aberdeen (e.g. Marischal College and the Crown of Kings at King's College). There are two main campuses; most activity takes place at the Kings College campus in Old Aberdeen (consisting primarily of 20th-century buildings clustered around the ancient original), while the medical school and related
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, also known as UNC Charlotte, is a public research university located in Charlotte, North Carolina, United States. UNC Charlotte offers 19 doctoral, 62 master's, and 90 bachelor's degree programs through 9 colleges: the College of Arts + Architecture, the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, the Belk College of Business, the College of Computing and Informatics, the College of Education, the William States Lee College of Engineering, the College of Health and Human Services, the Honors College, and the University College. UNC Charlotte has three campuses: Charlotte Research Institute Campus, Center City Campus, and the main campus, located in University City. The main campus sits on 1,000 wooded acres with approximately 75 buildings about 10 miles (16 km) from Uptown Charlotte. The university is the largest institution of higher education in the Charlotte region, which is the second largest banking center in the United States. The university produces more start-up small businesses than any other college or university in the nation. The city of Charlotte had sought a public university since 1871 but was never able to sustain one. For
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization

    The Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization at Yeshiva University's Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law organizes conferences, publishes texts, and supports travel and research by graduate students and senior scholars in the fields of Jewish law, legal and political theory, and ethics. Suzanne Last Stone, a professor of law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, directs the Center. Previously known as the Program in Jewish Law & Interdisciplinary Studies, the Center was established at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in 2004. Its mission includes fostering a specifically American contribution to the study of Jewish law, complementing already existing institutions for the study of Jewish law in Israel. The Center's three major areas of focus are:
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Hoover Institution

    Hoover Institution

    The Hoover Institution is an American public policy think tank located at Stanford University in California. It is part of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, a library founded in 1919 by Herbert Hoover, Stanford's first student and first alumnus, before he became President of the United States. The library, known as the Hoover Institution Library and Archives, houses multiple archives related to Hoover, World War I, World War II, and other world history. The Hoover Institution is a unit of Stanford University but has its own board of overseers. It is located on the campus. Its mission statement outlines its basic tenets: representative government, private enterprise, peace, personal freedom, and the safeguards of the American system. The Hoover Institution is influential in the American conservative and libertarian movements. The Institution has long been a place of scholarship for high-profile conservatives with government experience. High-profile conservatives Edwin Meese, Condoleezza Rice, George Shultz, Thomas Sowell, Shelby Steele, and Amy Zegart are all Hoover Institution fellows. In 2007 retired U.S. Army General John P. Abizaid, former commander of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Stanford University School of Education

    Stanford University School of Education

    The Stanford University School of Education (SUSE) is one of the seven schools of Stanford University. It is the second-oldest school of education in the United States, after the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. Its mission is, "To continue as a world leader in ground-breaking, cross-disciplinary inquiries that shape educational practices, their conceptual underpinnings, and the professions that serve the enterprise." Many prominent educational theories, policies, and inventions have come from, or been influenced by, the School of Education, including the Stanford-Binet IQ test and various LeapFrog products. The School of Education was founded in 1891 as the Department of the History and Art of Education, and was one of the original twenty-one departments at the newly incorporated Stanford University. It awarded its first Ph.D. in 1916, and in 1917 was renamed the School of Education. The School of Education building and Cubberley Library were built in 1938, and the STEP program was established in 1959. In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation donated $5 million to establish the School Redesign Network. Stanford established
    6.00
    3 votes
    162

    American Association for Artificial Intelligence

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence or AAAI is an international, nonprofit, scientific society devoted to advancing the scientific understanding of the mechanisms underlying thought and intelligent behavior and their embodiment in machines. AAAI also aims to increase public understanding of artificial intelligence (AI), improve the teaching and training of AI practitioners, and provide guidance for research planners and funders concerning the importance and potential of current AI developments and future directions. The organization was founded in 1979 under the name "American Association for Artificial Intelligence" and changed its name in 2007 to "Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence". It has in excess of 6,000 members worldwide. In its early history, the organization was presided over by notable figures in computer science such as Allen Newell, Edward Feigenbaum, Marvin Minsky and John McCarthy. The previous president is Eric Horvitz, the president is Henry Kautz, and the president elect is Manuela Veloso. The AAAI provides many services to the Artificial Intelligence community. The AAAI sponsors many conferences and symposia each
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    University of Paris

    University of Paris

    The University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) was a university located in Paris, France, and one of the earliest to be established in Europe. It was founded in the mid-12th century, and officially recognized as a university probably between 1160 and 1250. After many changes, including a century of suspension (1793–1896), it ceased to exist in 1970 and thirteen autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII) were created from it. The university is often referred to as the Sorbonne or La Sorbonne after the collegiate institution (Collège de Sorbonne) founded about 1257 by Robert de Sorbon. In fact, the university as such was older and was never completely centered on the Sorbonne. Of the thirteen current successor universities, the first four have a presence in the historical Sorbonne building, and three include "Sorbonne" in their names. The universities in Paris are now essentially independent of each other, and some fall under the Académie of Créteil or the Académie of Versailles rather than the Académie of Paris. Some residual administrative functions of the 13 universities are formally supervised by a common chancellor, the Rector of the Académie of Paris, with
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    University of Reading

    University of Reading

    The University of Reading is a university in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. The University was established in 1892 as University College, Reading and received its Royal Charter in 1926. It is based on several campuses in, and around, the town of Reading. The University has a long tradition of research, education and training at a local, national and international level. It offers traditional degrees and also less usual and other vocationally relevant ones. It was awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education in 1998, 2005, 2009 and again in 2011. It is one of the ten most research intensive universities in the UK and ranked in the top 1% of universities in the world by THE. The University owes its first origins to the Schools of Art and Science established in Reading in 1860 and 1870. In 1892 the College at Reading was founded as an extension college by Christ Church, a college of the University of Oxford. The Schools of Art and Science were transferred to the new college by Reading Town Council in the same year. The new college received its first treasury grant in 1901. Three years later it was given a site, now the university's London Road
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Aston University, Birmingham

    Aston University, Birmingham

    Aston University is a British campus university situated at Gosta Green, in the city centre of Birmingham, England. Aston was granted its Royal Charter as Aston University from Queen Elizabeth II on 22 April 1966. In keeping with its background in technology, business, sciences, engineering and applied subjects, Aston continues to have a focus on industry and commerce. The university also has a School of Languages and Social Sciences. A majority of undergraduate students are registered on courses leading to a BSc and 70% of eligible undergraduate students at Aston are enrolled on four-year sandwich courses, spending a year abroad or on industry placements. The university emphasises its focus on industry placements and graduate employment record: in 2010-11, 87% of first degree graduates found graduate level employment within six months of graduation, compared to the UK national average of less than 70%. This was the 5th highest proportion of all UK universities and colleges. In the 2011 QS World University Rankings, Aston is ranked 334th overall, and 51st for ‘Employer Reputation’. Aston has also performed well in the National Student Survey, with the 10th highest average
    6.50
    2 votes
    168

    Energy and Environmental Security Initiative

    Established in 2003, the Energy and Environmental Security Initiative (EESI) is an interdisciplinary Research & Policy Institute located at the University of Colorado Law School. The fundamental mission of EESI is to serve as an interdisciplinary research and policy center concerning the development and crafting of State policies, U.S. energy policies, and global responses to the world's energy crisis; and to facilitate the attainment of a global sustainable energy future through the innovative use of laws, policies and technology solutions. In pursuit of this mission, EESI's primary operational function is that of an enabling environment for teaching, research and policy analysis vis-à-vis the impact of laws and policies on the scientific, technological, sociopolitical, commercial, and environmental dimensions of sustainable energy. ISEA is a comprehensive global database of international treaties dealing with, or relevant to, the following energy categories, inter alia: conventional sources of energy such as oil, natural gas, and coal; renewable energy, such as wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, and hydro; energy efficiency and energy conservation; nuclear power; carbon capture
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    London Business School

    London Business School

    London Business School (LBS) is an international business school and a constituent college of the federal University of London, located in central London, beside Regent's Park. LBS teaches postgraduate programmes in finance and management, in addition to its flagship Master of Business Administration (MBA and EMBA) programme. It also offers the Sloan Fellowship Programme for experienced business executives, a Masters in Finance (also known as MiF, a finance specialist programme), a Masters in Management for students with less than a year's work experience, a PhD, as well as non-masters programmes for business executives. It was established in 1964, after the Franks Report recommended the establishment of two business schools, as part of existing universities (London Business School and Manchester Business School), but with considerable autonomy. It has close collaborations with the nearby University College London and the Modern Language Centre at King's College London. In December 2006 launched its operations in Dubai, which include an executive MBA degree and Executive Education programmes. LBS is ranked among the top business schools in Europe, and among the top 10 business
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Cornell University

    Cornell University ( /kɔrˈnɛl/ kor-NEL) is an American private Ivy League research university located in Ithaca, New York, United States. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge — from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study." The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy. The university also administers two satellite medical campuses, one in New York City and one in Education City, Qatar. Cornell is one of two private land grant universities. Of its seven undergraduate colleges, three are state-supported statutory or contract colleges. As a land grant college, it operates a cooperative extension outreach program in every county of New York and receives annual funding from
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for many post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. GSAS offers several master's degree programs—Master of Arts (AM), Master of Science (SM), Master of Engineering (ME), and Master of Forest Science (MFS)—and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in more than fifty divisions, departments, and committees, spanning subjects in both the sciences and the humanities, including several interdepartmental programs. GSAS also administers the Graduate Special Student Program, which enables individuals who hold the baccalaureate degree to take graduate-level courses on a non-degree basis, and the Visiting Fellow Program, which enables advanced doctoral students and persons who already hold the Ph.D. to conduct research at Harvard. Finally, GSAS also nominally oversees Ph.D. programs in Harvard's professional schools: the Harvard Business School, the basic science departments in Harvard Medical School, the Harvard School of Public Health, the Graduate School of Design, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. The Graduate School of Arts and
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Lowell Observatory

    Lowell Observatory

    Lowell Observatory is an astronomical observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. Lowell Observatory was established in 1894, placing it among the oldest observatories in the United States, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965. In 2011, the Observatory was named one of "The World's 100 Most Important Places" by TIME. The Observatory's original 24-inch (0.61 m) Alvan Clark Telescope is still in use today for public education. Lowell Observatory hosts 85,000 visitors per year at their Steele Visitors Center who take guided daytime tours and view various wonders of the night sky through the Clark Telescope and other telescopes. It was founded by astronomer Percival Lowell, and run for a time by his third cousin Guy Lowell of Boston's well-known Lowell family. The current trustee of Lowell Observatory is William Lowell Putnam III, grandnephew of founder Percival Lowell and son of long-time trustee Roger Putnam. The position of trustee is historically handed down through the family. The observatory operates several telescopes at two locations in Flagstaff. The main facility, located on Mars Hill just west of downtown Flagstaff, houses the original 24-inch (0.61 m) Clark
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Stanford University

    Stanford University

    The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly referred to as Stanford University or Stanford, is an American private research university located in Stanford, California on an 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus near Palo Alto. It is situated in the northwestern Silicon Valley, approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of San Jose and 37 miles (60 km) southeast of San Francisco. Leland Stanford, Governor and Senator of California and leading railroad tycoon, and his wife Jane Lathrop Stanford founded the university in 1891 in honor of their son, Leland Stanford, Jr., who died of typhoid two months before his 16th birthday. The university was established as a coeducational and nondenominational institution. Tuition was free until the 1930s. The university struggled financially after the senior Stanford's 1893 death and after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would become known as Silicon Valley. By 1970, Stanford was home to a linear accelerator, and was one of the original four ARPANET nodes (precursor to
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    University College London

    University College London

    University College London (UCL) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1826, UCL was the first university institution to be founded in London and the first in England to be established on an entirely secular basis, to admit students regardless of their religion and to admit women on equal terms with men. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals located elsewhere in central London. UCL is organised into 10 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL had a total income of £802 million in 2010/11, of which £283 million was from research grants and contracts. For the period 1999 to 2009 it was the 13th most-cited university in the world (and the most-cited in Europe). UCL has around 4,000 academic and research staff and 650 professors, the highest number of any British university. There are 26 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Woods Institute for the Environment

    Woods Institute for the Environment

    The Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University harnesses the expertise and imagination of leading academics and decision-makers to create practical solutions for people and the planet. In the same spirit that inspired Stanford’s role in Silicon Valley’s high-tech revolution, the Woods Institute is pioneering innovative approaches to meet the environmental challenges of the 21st century – from climate change to sustainable food supplies to ocean conservation.
    5.33
    3 votes
    184

    Yahoo! Research Berkeley

    Yahoo! Research Berkeley is a research partnership between Yahoo! Inc. and the University of California, Berkeley to explore and invent social media and mobile media technology and applications that will enable people to create, describe, find, share, and remix media on the web. Yahoo! Research Labs - Berkeley is meant to combine the resources of one of the world's largest internet companies with the researchers and environment of the University. It aims to bring together experts in the fields of media technology, social software, context-aware computing, mobile computing, and user and design research to attempt to shape the future of internet media. In support of these goals, Yahoo! Research Berkeley and UC Berkeley have created a corporate-academic collaboration for research and development.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185

    Holocaust Center of Northern California

    The Holocaust Center of Northern California (HCNC) is a non-profit organization formed to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust never be forgotten. HCNC provides services and programs to fulfill its mission of education, research and remembrance. In 2010, the Holocaust Center of Northern California's collections and programs were relocated to Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and Sonoma Counties to form the JFCS Holocaust Center. The Holocaust Center of Northern California, formerly known as The Holocaust Library and Research Center of San Francisco, was established in 1977 in reaction to the opening of a Nazi bookstore in a neighborhood in San Francisco where a large population of Holocaust survivors lived. Enraged, several Holocaust survivors broke into the bookstore, and set fire to its inventory. Two individuals – Mr. Morris Weiss and his son Allan Weiss – were arrested. The Jewish Community Relations Council intervened on behalf of the Weisses who were released. A Committee of Remembrance was formed, composed of Holocaust survivors and refugees, who decided to initiate three projects: The first Yom HaShoah commemoration was held
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Institute of Jewish Studies at University College London

    The UCL Institute of Jewish Studies is an institute located in London, United Kingdom dedicated to the academic study of all branches of Jewish history and civilization. It is a privately-funded institute within the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London (UCL), the largest department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies in Europe. The Institute is located at the main UCL campus in Bloomsbury, close to the British Library, the Wiener Library, the Warburg Institute, Dr Williams's Library, the library of the School of Oriental and African Studies and the UCL Jewish Studies Collection, which houses the Moccatta Library, the Altman Collection and a substantial collection of unique Yiddish material. The staff and students are mostly Jewish, unlike other UK faculties for Jewish studies in the UK. The Institute was founded by Alexander Altmann in Manchester in 1954 as the Institute of Jewish Studies. In 1959, following the departure of Altmann as director, the Institute moved to UCL. Altmann's justification for the activities of the Institute was given in a 1957 lecture to the Hillel Foundation of London (Ivry, Wolfson & Arkush 1998): Being connected with our past, at
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Keio University

    Keio University

    Keio University (慶應義塾大学, Keiō Gijuku Daigaku),abbreviated as Keio (慶應, Keio) or Keidai (慶大, Keidai), is a Japanese university located in Minato, Tokyo. It is known as the oldest institute of higher education in Japan. Founder Fukuzawa Yukichi originally established it as a school for Western studies in 1858 in Edo (now Tokyo). It has eleven campuses in Tokyo and Kanagawa. It has ten faculties: Letters, Economics, Law, Business and Commerce, Medicine, Science and Technology, Policy Management, Environment and Information Studies, Nursing and Medical Care, and Pharmacy. The alumni include three Japanese prime ministers and prominent corporate leaders. Currently twelve Keio graduates serve as Fortune Global 500 CEOs. Keio traces its history to 1858 when Fukuzawa Yukichi, who had studied the Western educational system at Brown University in the United States, started to teach Dutch while he was a guest of the Okudaira family. In 1868 he changed the name of the school to Keio Gijuku and devoted all his time to education. While Keiō's initial identity was that of a private school of Western studies, it expanded and established its first university faculty in 1890, and became known as a
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

    Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

    The German National Academic Foundation (German: Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes, short: Studienstiftung) is Germany's largest organisation sponsoring students of outstanding academic achievements. It is non-political and non-denominational. Currently supporting about 0.5 percent of university students in Germany, it is sometimes referred to as "Germany's secret Ivy League university". The Studienstiftung is funded by the Federal Government of Germany, the German Federal States and local authorities as well as by a large number of private donors. The foundation's official motto is Leistung, Initiative, Verantwortung (Achievement, Initiative, Responsibility). The Studienstiftung promotes promising undergraduates and graduate students in the areas of science, the humanities, business, public administration, and the arts. Through its scholarship programme it aims at promoting academic consolidation, interdisciplinary dialogue, a cosmopolitan world view and international experience. Currently, the foundation sponsors more than 11,000 undergraduates and about 1,300 PhD students (as of October 2010). Awards are granted after a multi-stage selection process and are based on grades,
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Tel Aviv University

    Tel Aviv University

    Tel-Aviv University (TAU) (Hebrew: אוניברסיטת תל־אביב‎ Universitat Tel Aviv) is a public university located in Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel. With nearly 30,000 students, TAU is Israel's largest university. Located in Israel's cultural, financial and industrial core, Tel Aviv University is a major center of teaching and research, comprising 9 faculties, 27 schools, 98 departments and 128 research institutes and centers. Its origins go back to 1956, when three research institutes – the Tel Aviv School of Law and Economics, the Institute of Natural Sciences, and the Institute of Jewish Studies – joined together to form the University of Tel Aviv. Initially operated by the Tel Aviv municipality, the university was granted autonomy in 1963. The Ramat Aviv campus, covering an area of 170-acre (0.69 km), was established that same year. The university also maintains academic supervision over the Center for Technological Design in Holon, the New Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, and the Afeka College of Engineering in Tel Aviv. The Wise Observatory is located in Mitzpe Ramon. The Center for World University Rankings ranked Tel Aviv University 56th in the world and fourth in Israel in its
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Universidad del Valle

    The University of Valle (Spanish: Universidad del Valle), also called Univalle, is a public, departmental, coeducational, research university based primarily in the city of Cali, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. It is the largest higher education institution by student population in the southwest of the country, and the third in Colombia, with more than 30,000 students. The university was established by ordinance No. 12 of 1945, by the Departmental Assembly as the Industrial University of Valle del Cauca (Spanish: Universidad Industrial del Valle del Cauca), under the leadership of Tulio Ramírez Rojas and Severo Reyes Gamboa. The university has two campuses in Cali. The main one, known as University City of Melendez (Spanish: Ciudad Universitaria Meléndez, CUM), is located in the southern neighborhood of Melendez and hosts the faculties of Engineering, Humanities, Integrated Arts, Sciences, and Social Sciences and Economics, as well as the institutes of Education and Pedagogy, and Psychology. Its second one, located in the centric San Fernando neighborhood, hosts the faculties of Administration Sciences and Health. The university also has several satellite campuses across the department
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

    The Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ was established in 1991 and has about 900 employees in Leipzig, Halle/S. and Magdeburg. They study the complex interactions between humans and the environment in cultivated and damaged landscapes. The scientists develop concepts and processes to help secure the natural foundations of human life for future generations.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

    The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven  listen (help·info), now referring to itself simply as KU Leuven, is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium. It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, home to the university since 1425. The Catholic University of Leuven, to a certain extent Belgium's oldest university, split into the KU Leuven and the French-language Université catholique de Louvain, which moved to Louvain-la-Neuve in Wallonia. Since the fifteenth century, Louvain, as it is still often called, has been a major contributor to the development of Catholic theology. With 38.568 students in 2010–2011, the KU Leuven is the largest university in Belgium and the Low Countries. The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven also has a campus at Kortrijk, formerly known as Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Afdeling Kortrijk (KULAK). The university now also offers several programs in English. Times Higher Education ranked the KU Leuven as the world's 58th best university (2012-2013). The KU Leuven is a strongly research-oriented university. Among its many accolades is to be reckoned among the top universities of Europe. In the 2012-2013 Times Higher Education Supplement (THES)
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    196
    Royal College of Organists

    Royal College of Organists

    The Royal College of Organists or RCO, is a charity and membership organisation based in the United Kingdom, but with members around the world. Its role is to promote and advance organ playing and choral music, and it offers musical education and training for organists and choral directors. The College provides examinations in organ-playing, choral directing and organ-teaching; it runs an extensive education and outreach programme across the UK; and it maintains an internationally important library containing more than 60,000 titles concerning the organ, organ and choral music and organ playing. The RCO was founded as the College of Organists in 1864 by Richard Limpus, the organist of St Michael, Cornhill in the City of London, and received its Royal Charter in 1893. In 1903 it was offered a 99-year lease at peppercorn rent on a remarkable building designed by the architect H. H. Cole in Kensington Gore, West London. When it became clear in the mid 1980s that an economic rent would be charged on expiry of that lease, the lease was sold and the College moved into new accommodation in 1991. In 2003 the college moved again to a temporary home in Millennium Point in the Digbeth area of
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    201

    Institute for Scientific Information

    The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) was founded by Eugene Garfield in 1960. It was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, became known as Thomson ISI and now is part of the Healthcare & Science business of Thomson Reuters. ISI offered bibliographic database services. Its specialty: citation indexing and analysis, a field pioneered by Garfield. It maintains citation databases covering thousands of academic journals, including a continuation of its longtime print-based indexing service the Science Citation Index (SCI), as well as the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), and the Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). All of these are available via ISI's Web of Knowledge database service. This database allows a researcher to identify which articles have been cited most frequently, and who has cited them. The ISI also publishes the annual Journal Citation Reports which list an impact factor for each of the journals that it tracks. Within the scientific community, journal impact factors play a large but controversial role in determining the kudos attached to a scientist's published research record. A list of over 14,000 journals is maintained by the ISI.
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    202

    MacArthur Fellowship

    The MacArthur Fellows Program or MacArthur Fellowship (nicknamed the Genius Grant) is an award given by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation each year to typically 20 to 40 United States citizens or residents, of any age and working in any field, who "show exceptional merit and promise for continued and enhanced creative work". According to the Foundation's website, "the fellowship is not a reward for past accomplishment, but rather an investment in a person's originality, insight, and potential." The current amount of the award is $500,000, paid as quarterly installments over five years. As of 2007, there have been 756 recipients who have received a total of more than $350 million. Recipients have been as young as 18 and as old as 82. The Fellowship has no application. People are nominated anonymously by a body of nominators who submit recommendations to a small selection committee of about a dozen people, also anonymous. The committee then reviews every nominee and passes along their recommendations to the President and the board of directors. Most new MacArthur Fellows first learn that they have been considered when they receive the congratulatory phone call. An
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    203

    MIT Physics Department

    The Physics Department at MIT has over 120 faculty members. It offers academic programs leading to the S.B., S.M., Ph.D. and Sc.D. degrees. As of 2006, the department counts four Nobel Prize winners among its faculty: Samuel C.C. Ting (1976), Jerome I. Friedman (1990), Wolfgang Ketterle (2001) and Frank Wilczek (2004). A few other former faculty members have also been so honored: Clifford Shull (1994), Henry Kendall (1990), Steven Weinberg (1979) and Charles H. Townes (1964). MIT Physics alumni who have received the Nobel Prize for Physics are Adam Riess (2011), George Smoot (2006), Eric A. Cornell and Carl E. Wieman (2001), Robert B. Laughlin (1998), William D. Phillips (1997), Burton Richter (1976), John Robert Schrieffer (1972), Murray Gell-Mann (1969), Richard Feynman (1965) and William Shockley (1956). There are two paths to earning an S.B. in physics from MIT. The first, "Course 8 Focused Option", is for students intending to continue studying physics in graduate school. The second, "Course 8 Flexible Option" is designed for those students who would like to develop a strong background in physics but who do not necessarily want to pursue graduate work in the field. It is an
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    204
    Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    The Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) is a nonpartisan economic research institution housed at Stanford University. It was founded in 1982 as a way to bring together economic scholars from different parts of the University. George Shultz was a key player in its inception. The current director of the program is John Shoven; past directors include Michael Boskin, Lawrence J. Lau, and James Sweeney.
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    205
    Steinhardt Social Research Institute

    Steinhardt Social Research Institute

    The Steinhardt Social Research Institute was created in 2005 from a gift from Michael Steinhardt at Brandeis University as a forum to collect, analyze, and disseminate unbiased data about the Jewish community and about religion and ethnicity in the United States. The first mission of SSRI was to interpret the inherent problems with the National Jewish Population Survey of 2000 (NJPS). Most recently, SSRI has done a Boston Jewish Population Survey of the Greater Boston Jewish community. The results of this study were released on November 9, 2006. The Institute will collect and organize existing socio-demographic data from private, communal, and government sources and will conduct local and national studies of the character of American Jewry and Jewish organizations. The work of the Institute will be done by a multidisciplinary staff of faculty and scholars, working with undergraduate and graduate students, and augmented by visiting scholars and consultants. The Institute works in close collaboration with the Maurice and Marilyn Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies.
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    206
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    207
    University of Bradford

    University of Bradford

    The University of Bradford (informally Bradford University) is a British public research university located in the city of Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. The University received its Royal Charter in 1966, making it the 40th University to be created in Britain, but its origins date back to the early 19th century. There are two campuses: the main campus (which now, following recent development, includes the School of Health), located on Richmond Road and the School of Management, at Emm Lane. The student population includes 10,525 undergraduate and 3,050 postgraduate students. Mature students make up around a third of the undergraduate community. 22% of students are foreign, and come from over 110 different countries. There were 14,406 applications to the university through UCAS in 2010 which 3,421 were accepted. The University of Bradford was the first British University to establish a Department of Peace Studies in 1973, which is currently the world's largest university centre for the study of peace and conflict. The Division has a reputation as a centre of excellence in peace research, international relations, security studies, conflict resolution and development and peace
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    209
    Christ's College, Cambridge

    Christ's College, Cambridge

    Christ's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. With a reputation for high academic standards, Christ's College averaged top place in the Tompkins Table from 1980-2000. In 2011, Christ's was placed sixth. The college grew from God's House, an institution founded in 1437 on land now occupied by King's College Chapel. It received its first royal licence in 1446. It moved to its present site in 1448 when it received its second royal licence. It was renamed Christ's College and received its present charter in 1505 when it was endowed and expanded by Lady Margaret Beaufort, mother of King Henry VII. The original 15th/16th century college buildings now form part of First Court, including the chapel, Master's Lodge and Great Gate tower. The gate itself is disproportionate: the bottom has been cut off to accommodate a rise in street level, which can also be seen in the steps leading down to the foot of L staircase in the gate tower. The college hall, originally built at the very start of the 16th century was restored in 1875-1879 by George Gilbert Scott, the younger. The lawn of First Court is famously round, and an impressive wisteria sprawls up the front of the
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    211
    Israel Democracy Institute

    Israel Democracy Institute

    The Israel Democracy Institute (IDI, Hebrew: המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה‎‎), established in 1991, is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit think tank in Jerusalem, Israel. It goals are to formulate policies and initiate reforms to strengthen the democracy values in Israel. The Israel Democracy Institute was founded in 1991 by Arye Carmon, the current president, and Mr. Bernard Marcus, co-founder of The Home Depot. On the seam line between academia and government, IDI is a forum for research, debate and reform of Israeli democratic institutions and is a leading nongovernmental agent of change in the Israeli body politic. IDI drives the process of Israel's transition from formal to substantive democracy. Its mission is to strengthen the moral, normative, structural and functional foundations of Israel, the homeland of the Jewish people. Recognizing the Arab and other minorities as vital components of Israeli society, IDI aims to foster solidarity while embracing pluralism. Drawing on both Jewish tradition and the universal legacy of humanism, it seeks to generate the ideas, promote the values, and shape the institutions that will ensure Israel's future as a vibrant, participatory
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    212

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Hacks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are practical jokes and pranks meant to prominently demonstrate technical aptitude and cleverness, or to commemorate popular culture and historical topics. The pranks are anonymously installed at night by hackers, usually, but not exclusively undergraduate students. The actions of hackers are governed by an extensive and informal body of precedent, tradition, and ethics. Hacks can occur anywhere across campus, or occasionally off campus; many make use of the iconic Great Dome, Little Dome, Green Building tower, or other prominent architectural features of the MIT campus. Well-known hacker alumni include Nobel Laureates Richard P. Feynman and George F. Smoot. In October 2009, US President Barack Obama made a humorous reference to the MIT hacking tradition during an on-campus speech about clean energy. Although the practice is unsanctioned by the university, and students have sometimes been arraigned on trespassing charges for hacking, hacks have substantial significance to MIT's history and student culture. Student bloggers working for the MIT Admissions Office have often written about MIT hacks, including those occurring during
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    213

    York University

    York University (French: Université York) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is Ontario's second-largest graduate school and Canada's third-largest university. York has a student population of approximately 55,000, 7,000 faculty and staff, and 250,000 alumni worldwide. It has eleven faculties, including the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Faculty of Science, Schulich School of Business, Osgoode Hall Law School, Glendon College, Faculty of Education, the Faculty of Fine Arts, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Lassonde School of Engineering, and 28 research centres. York University participates in the Canadian Space Program. The Faculty of Science and Engineering is Canada's primary research facility into Martian exploration and has designed several space research instruments and applications currently used by NASA. York has pioneered some of the first PhD programs in Canada, in various fields including women's studies. The school of social work is recognized as having one of the most socially responsive programs in the country. York University's business school and law school have continuously been ranked among the top
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    216
    École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

    École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

    The École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) is one of the two Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology and is located in Lausanne, Switzerland. The school was founded by the Swiss Federal Government with the stated mission to: The sister institution in the German-speaking part of Switzerland is the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zürich or ETHZ). Associated with several specialised research institutes, the two sister institutes form the ETH Domain, which is directly dependent on the Federal Department of Home Affairs. EPFL is ranked among the top universities in the world. Founded in 1853 as a private school under the name École Spéciale de Lausanne, it became the technical department of the public Académie de Lausanne in 1869. When the latter was reorganized and acquired the status of a university in 1890, the technical faculty changed its name to École d'Ingénieurs de l'Université de Lausanne. In 1946, it was renamed the École polytechnique de l'Université de Lausanne (EPUL). In 1969, the EPUL was separated from the rest of the University of Lausanne and became a federal institute under its current name. EPFL, like ETHZ, is thus directly controlled by the
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    219

    Linnean Society of London

    The Linnean Society of London is the world's premier society for the study and dissemination of taxonomy and natural history. It publishes a zoological journal, as well as botanical and biological journals. It also issues The Linnean, a review of the history of the society and of taxonomy in general. The Linnean Society, founded in 1788, took its name from the Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus. The Society is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London. Individual membership categories are: Student member, Associate member and full Fellow. All forms of membership require nomination by at least two Fellows and are subject to election. Fellows use the designation FLS after their names. The Linnean Society of London aims to promote the study of all aspects of the biological sciences, with particular emphasis on evolution, taxonomy, biodiversity, and sustainability. Through awarding medals and grants, the Society acknowledges and encourages excellence in all of these fields. The following medals and prizes are awarded by the Linnean Society: Linnaeus' botanical and zoological collections were purchased in 1783 by Sir James Edward Smith, the first President of the society, and are
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    220

    Salomon Ludwig Steinheim Institute of German-Jewish Studies

    The Salomon Ludwig Steinheim Institute of German-Jewish Studies is a research institute of the University of Duisburg-Essen whose research focuses on the cultural and religious history as well as the history of literature and events of the Jewish community in German-speaking areas. The institute has made contributions in teaching in the field of Jewish Studies at the University of Duisburg-Essen. In 2003, the faculty was transferred to the Heinrich Heine University of Düsseldorf and cooperation with the institute has been maintained.
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    222
    Stanford Law School

    Stanford Law School

    Stanford Law School (also known as Stanford Law or SLS) is a graduate school at Stanford University located in the area known as the Silicon Valley, near Palo Alto, California in the United States. The Law School was established in 1893 when former President Benjamin Harrison joined the faculty as the first professor of law. It employs more than 80 faculty and hosts over 500 students who are working towards their Juris Doctor (J.D.) or other graduate legal degrees such as the Master of Laws (LL.M.) and the Doctor of the Science of Law (J.S.D.), giving it the smallest student body of any law school in the top 15 of the U.S. News & World Report annual ranking. Stanford Law School has a small average class size of just 170, and maintains the nation's first Supreme Court litigation clinic. Recently, together with Harvard and Yale, it enacted "grade reform", eliminating traditional letter grades for students. Stanford Law graduates include several of the first women to occupy Chief Justice or Associate Justice posts on supreme courts: current Chief Justice of New Zealand Sian Elias, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, and the late Chief Justice of Washington Barbara
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    223
    Stanford Radiology

    Stanford Radiology

    The Department of Radiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine is advancing early disease detection and personalized medicine using anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging. The high NIH funding rankings reflect its research success, and it is the only U.S. radiology department with four major NIH Centers. The radiologists are national experts who have specialty training in areas such as breast imaging & intervention, CT, MRI, PET/CT, ultrasound, and interventional radiology. Stanford Radiology offers an innovative curriculum for medical students; medical imaging programs at the graduate level; visiting fellowships in all subspecialties; and NIH-funded postdoctoral fellowships.
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    224
    Stanford University School of Engineering

    Stanford University School of Engineering

    Stanford University School of Engineering is one of the schools of Stanford University. The school has had eight deans; the current is James D. Plummer. In addition the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering is an interdisciplinary program. The School of Engineering was established in 1926 when Stanford organized the previous independent academic departments into a school. The original departments in the school were Departments added afterwards:
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    225

    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin, or regionally as UW–Madison, or Madison) is a public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin, United States. Founded when Wisconsin achieved statehood in 1848, UW–Madison is the official state university of Wisconsin, and the flagship campus of the University of Wisconsin System. It was the first university established in Wisconsin and remains the oldest and largest university in the state. It became a land-grant institution in 1866. The 933-acre (378 ha) main campus includes four National Historic Landmarks. UW–Madison is organized into 20 schools which enrolled 29,153 undergraduate, 8,710 graduate, and 2,570 professional students and granted 6,040 bachelor's, 3,328 graduate and professional degrees in 2008. The university employs 2,054 faculty members. Its comprehensive academic program offers 135 undergraduate majors, along with 151 master's degree programs and 107 doctoral programs. The UW is categorized as an RU/VH Research University (very high research activity) in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. In 2010, it had research expenditures of more than
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    226

    Yale University

    Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university located in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 in the Colony of Connecticut, the university is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. Originally chartered as the "Collegiate School", the institution traces its roots to 17th-century clergymen who sought to establish a college to train clergy and political leaders for the colony. In 1718, the College was renamed "Yale College" to honor a gift from Elihu Yale, a governor of the British East India Company. In 1861, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences became the first U.S. institution to award the PhD. Yale became a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. Yale College was transformed, beginning in the 1930s, through the establishment of residential colleges: 12 now exist and two more are planned. Yale employs over 1,100 faculty to teach and advise about 5,300 undergraduate and 6,100 graduate and professional students. Almost all tenured professors teach undergraduate courses, more than 2,000 of which are offered annually. The University's assets include an endowment valued at $19.4 billion as of
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    227
    Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion

    Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion

    The Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (also known as HUC, HUC-JIR, and The College-Institute) is the oldest extant Jewish seminary in the Americas and the main seminary for training rabbis, cantors, educators and communal workers in Reform Judaism. HUC-JIR has campuses in Cincinnati, New York, Los Angeles and Jerusalem. The Jerusalem campus is the only seminary in Israel for training Reform Jewish clergy. HUC was founded in 1875 under the leadership of Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise in Cincinnati, Ohio. The first rabbinical class graduated in 1883. The graduation banquet for this class included food that was not kosher, such as clams, soft-shell crabs, shrimp, frogs' legs and dairy products served immediately after meat. This feast was known as the treifah banquet. At the time, Reform rabbis were split over the question of whether the Jewish dietary restrictions were still applicable. Some of the more traditionalist Reform rabbis thought the banquet menu went too far, and were compelled to find an alternative between Reform Judaism and Orthodox Judaism. This was a major cause of the founding of American Conservative Judaism. In 1950, a second HUC campus was created in New
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    230

    Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations

    The Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations (CJCR) based at Wesley House, Cambridge is an institute for the study and teaching of Jewish-Christian Relations and the promotion of interfaith dialogue. CJCR operates under the auspices of The Woolf Institute and is a sister institute of The Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, established 2006. Founded by Dr Edward Kessler and Rev Dr Martin Forward in 1998, CJCR teaches Cambridge University’s MSt in the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations and offers a variety of other educational programmes. CJCR is an Associate Member of the Cambridge Theological Federation (CTF). The current academic director of CJCR is Dr Lars Fischer. CJCR Website
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    234
    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity. It is the world's largest general scientific society, with 126,995 individual and institutional members at the end of 2008, and is the publisher of the well-known scientific journal Science, which has a weekly circulation of 138,549. The American Association for the Advancement of Science was created on September 20, 1848 in Pennsylvania. It was a reformation of the Association of American Geologists and Naturalists. The society chose William Charles Redfield as their first president because he had proposed the most comprehensive plans for the organization. According to the first constitution which was agreed to at the September 20 meeting, the goal of the society was to promote scientific dialogue in order to allow for greater scientific collaboration. By doing so the association aimed to use resources to conduct science with increased efficiency and
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    235
    Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH, "The Brigham") is the largest hospital of the Longwood Medical and Academic Area in Boston, Massachusetts. It is directly adjacent to Harvard Medical School of which it is the second largest teaching affiliate with 793 beds. With Massachusetts General Hospital, it is one of the two founding members of Partners HealthCare, the largest healthcare provider in Massachusetts. Brigham and Women's is a partner in the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, which has 13 separate cancer treatment centers. Generally, outpatient care for cancer and related diseases takes place at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and inpatient care takes place at BWH, with the two facilities connected by bridges. BWH also treats patients at Faulkner Hospital, a community teaching hospital located in the Jamaica Plain section of Boston, and at Brigham and Women's/Mass General Health Care Center at Foxborough, in Foxborough, Massachusetts. The hospital is a Level I Burn and Trauma Center. A rooftop helipad on the BWH campus accommodates helicopter patients. BWH is part of the consortium of hospitals which operates Boston MedFlight. Construction was recently completed on the Carl J.
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    236

    California Institute of Technology

    The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech) is a private research university located in Pasadena, California, United States. Caltech has six academic divisions with strong emphases on science and engineering. Its 124-acre (50 ha) primary campus is located approximately 11 mi (18 km) northeast of downtown Los Angeles. Although founded as a preparatory and vocational school by Amos G. Throop in 1891, the college attracted influential scientists such as George Ellery Hale, Arthur Amos Noyes, and Robert Andrews Millikan in the early 20th century. The vocational and preparatory schools were disbanded and spun off in 1910, and the college assumed its present name in 1921. In 1934, Caltech was elected to the Association of American Universities, and the antecedents of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which Caltech continues to manage and operate, were established between 1936 and 1943 under Theodore von Kármán. Despite its small size, 31 Caltech alumni and faculty have won the Nobel Prize and 66 have won the United States National Medal of Science or Technology. There are 110 faculty members who have been elected to the National Academies. In addition,
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    238
    Foothill College

    Foothill College

    Foothill College is a community college located in Los Altos Hills, California and is part of the Foothill-De Anza Community College District. It was founded on January 15, 1957 by Founding Superintendent and President Dr. Calvin C. Flint. In July 1956, Henry M. Gunn, superintendent of the Palo Alto School District, called a meeting of local school superintendents that led to the creation of Foothill College. Calvin Flint, then President of Monterey Peninsula College was hired as the first District Superintendent and President; he started work on March 1, 1958. Candidates for the new college's name, besides Foothill, were Peninsula, Junipero Serra, Mid-Peninsula, Earl Warren, Herbert Hoover, North Santa Clara, Altos, Valley, Skyline, Highland, and Intercity. At first the name was Foothill Junior College, but because Flint insisted that his new college would be "not junior to anyone", the Board dropped the "Junior" in September 1958. Foothill held its first classes in the old Highway School campus on El Camino Real in Mountain View on September 15, 1958. It was accredited by March of the next year and was the first school in the state to ever reach full accreditation in less than
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    239

    Harvard Business School

    Harvard Business School (HBS) is the graduate business school of Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The school offers a large full-time MBA program, doctoral programs, and many executive education programs. It owns Harvard Business School Publishing, which publishes business books, online management tools for corporate learning, case studies, and the monthly Harvard Business Review. Founded in 1908, HBS started with 59 students. Once it innovated the case method of research and teaching in 1920, HBS ramped up the class size which reached 500 students during the decade. In 1926, the school moved from the Cambridge side of the Charles River to its present location in Allston (part of Boston)—hence the custom of faculty and students referring to the rest of Harvard University as "across the river." Women were first admitted to its regular two-year Master in Business Administration (MBA) program with the Class of 1965. The HBS campus is located in Allston, across the Charles River from the main Harvard campus in Cambridge. Many of the buildings have red-brick exteriors, as do many buildings in Harvard Yard. HBS maintains a number of facilities, including a
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    241
    IBM

    IBM

    International Business Machines Corporation, or IBM, is an American multinational technology and consulting corporation, with headquarters in Armonk, New York, United States. IBM manufactures and sells computer hardware and software, and offers infrastructure, hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. The company was founded in 1911 as the Computing Tabulating Recording Company (CTR) through a merger of three companies: the Tabulating Machine Company, the International Time Recording Company, and the Computing Scale Company. CTR adopted the name International Business Machines in 1924, using a name previously designated to CTR's subsidiary in Canada and later South America. Its distinctive culture and product branding has given it the nickname Big Blue. In 2012, Fortune ranked IBM the #2 largest U.S. firm in terms of number of employees (433,362), the #4 largest in terms of market capitalization, the #9 most profitable, and the #19 largest firm in terms of revenue. Globally, the company was ranked the #31 largest in terms of revenue by Forbes for 2011. Other rankings for 2011/2012 include #1 company for leaders (Fortune), #1 green
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    243
    Middle East Institute

    Middle East Institute

    The Middle East Institute (MEI) is a non-profit, non-partisan think tank and cultural center in Washington, DC. Founded in 1946, MEI is the oldest institution in Washington dedicated exclusively to the study of the Middle East. The mission of the institute is “to increase knowledge of the Middle East among the citizens of the United States and to promote a better understanding between the people of these two areas.” MEI fulfills this mission by: In 1946, architect George Camp Keiser felt strongly that the Middle East, a region he had traveled through prior to World War II, should be better understood as the United States entered the postwar period. To this end, he brought together a group of like-minded people to form the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C.. His colleagues on the original Board of Governors included Halford L. Hoskins, Director of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); Christian A. Herter, then congressman from Massachusetts and later Dwight Eisenhower's Secretary of State; Ambassador George V. Allen; Harold Glidden, Director of the Islamic Department at the Library of Congress; and Harvey P. Hall, the first Editor of
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    244
    Polytechnic University of Turin

    Polytechnic University of Turin

    The Polytechnic University of Turin (Italian: Politecnico di Torino, POLITO) is an engineering university based in Turin, northern Italy. Established in 1859, Politecnico di Torino is Italy’s oldest Technical University. In 2011 it was ranked among the top 75 engineering universities in the world and 1st in Italy by the Academic Ranking of World Universities. It is a member of The main courses offered are architecture, industrial design, architectural engineering, aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, electronic engineering, environmental engineering, energy engineering, engineering physics, material engineering, mechanical engineering, mechatronics, nuclear engineering, nanotechnology, production engineering, petroleum engineering, telecommunications engineering and textile engineering. The Regio Politecnico di Torino (Royal Turin Polytechnic) was founded in 1906, but its origins go back further. It was preceded by the Scuola di Applicazione per gli Ingegneri (Technical School for Engineers) founded in 1859 after the Casati Act and the Museo Industriale Italiano
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    246
    Stanford Mechanical Engineering

    Stanford Mechanical Engineering

    The Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University. In order to realize the academic and research goals of the Mechanical Engineering department and give tangible expression to it's academic themes, it is organized into five distinct academic Groups & Programs.
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    249

    University of California, Berkeley

    The University of California, Berkeley (also referred to as UC Berkeley, Berkeley, California, or simply Cal) is a public research university located in Berkeley, California, United States. The university occupies 1,232 acres (499 ha) on the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay with the central campus resting on 178 acres (72 ha). Berkeley offers approximately 350 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a wide range of disciplines. Established in 1868 as the result of merger of the private College of California and the public Agricultural, Mining, and Mechanical Arts College in Oakland, Berkeley is the oldest of the ten major campuses affiliated with the University of California (UC). Berkeley has been charged with providing both "classical" and "practical" education for the state's people and is the flagship institution in the University of California system. Berkeley co-manages three United States Department of Energy National Laboratories, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. Berkeley faculty, alumni, and researchers have won 71 Nobel Prizes, 9 Wolf
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    University of Michigan School of Information

    The School of Information (SI) or iSchool at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is a graduate school offering both a Master of Science in Information (MSI) and a Doctor of Information (Ph.D.). Its field of study is information: how it is created, identified, collected, structured, managed, preserved, accessed, processed, and presented; how it is used in different environments, with different technologies, and over time. The school's stated mission is "connecting people, information, and technology in more valuable ways." The School of Information is part of a growing list of i-schools devoted to the study of information as a discipline. These institutions have varied histories, some being newly created, others developing from earlier schools or departments focused on library and information science (as with SI), computer science, communications, or information technology. The school was the first of these institutions to relabel itself a "school of information". In 2008, the School of Information, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and the College of Engineering unveiled a new undergraduate major called informatics. In 2011, the School of Information and the School
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