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Best 90s fad of All Time

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    1

    Tickle Me Elmo

    Tickle Me Elmo is a children's toy from Tyco Preschool, a division of Tyco Toys, based on the character Elmo from the children's television show, Sesame Street. When squeezed, Elmo would chortle. When squeezed three times in a row, Elmo would begin to shake and laugh hysterically. The toy was introduced in the United States in 1996, quickly becoming a fad. Some parents literally fought other parents in stores to purchase one for Christmas. The dolls' short supply due to the unexpected demand led stores to increase their price drastically. Newspaper classifieds sold the plush toy for hundreds of U.S. dollars. People reported that the toy, originally sold at US $28.99, fetched as much as $1500. Tickle Me Elmo was invented by Ron Dubren and Greg Hyman, two veteran toy inventors. In 1992, it was presented to Tyco Preschool as "Tickles The Chimp," which was a toy monkey with a computer chip which laughed when tickled. At the time Tyco did not have rights to make Sesame Street plush, but did have Looney Tunes plush rights so it was worked on for several months as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil. A short time later, Tyco lost rights to do Looney Tunes but gained the rights to Sesame Street,
    9.33
    6 votes
    2

    Big Johnson

    Big Johnson is a brand that is marketed by Maryland Brand Management, Inc. (MBM), known for its T-shirts featuring E. Normus Johnson depicted in comic art featuring humorous sexual innuendos. MBM is the successor company to Maryland Screen Printers Inc. (MSP) and G & C Sales, Inc. At the height of Big Johnson's success in the 1990s, it sponsored a Big Johnson NASCAR automobile and MSP was twice listed in the Inc. list of America's fastest growing companies. The sexual innuendo has been controversial leading to court rulings banning sales in federal buildings and corporate decisions banning wearing the shirts. In 1986, Garrett and Craig Pfeifer created G & C Sales to create and market apparel relying on suppliers. The explosive growth of the company which surpassed the capabilities of the company's suppliers led to the formation of MSP in 1988, which gave the brothers control of their own production. MSP was named to Inc.'s List of Americas fastest growing companies in both 1993 and 1994. Big Johnson T-shirts and apparel are by far the most famous product of MBM. The brand peaked in the 1990s, with 1992 sales of $6.5 million ($10.8 million today); 1994 sales of $16.5 million ($25.9
    8.67
    3 votes
    3
    Macarena

    Macarena

    "Macarena" (Spanish pronunciation: [makaɾena]) is a Spanish dance song by Los del Río about a woman of the same name. Appearing on the 1994 album A mí me gusta, it was an international hit between 1995 and 1996, and continues to have a cult following. One of the most iconic of 1990s dance music, it was ranked the "#1 Greatest One-Hit Wonder of all Time" by VH1 in 2002. The lyrics are completely original, but the music is based, it has been accused of plagiarism, on the song "Tengo una pena" (I have a sorrow, 1975) from the Spanish band "Desmadre 75", at he same time based on a popular children's song known as "Trabajando en las minas de pan duro" (Working in the hard bread mines). The song uses a type of clave rhythm. The song ranks at #5 on Billboard's All Time Top 100. It also ranks at #1 on Billboard's All Time Latin Songs. It is also Billboard's #1 dance song and one of six foreign language songs to hit #1 since 1955's modern rock era began. As a result of their lounge act, Los del Río were invited to tour South America in March 1992 and, while visiting Venezuela, they were invited to a private party held by the Venezuelan empresario Gustavo Cisneros. Many prominent Venezuelans
    8.33
    3 votes
    4
    Slap bracelet

    Slap bracelet

    A slap bracelet (or snap bracelet) is a bracelet consisting of layered, flexible stainless steel bistable spring bands sealed within a fabric or plastic cover. The bracelet can be straightened out, creating tension within the springy metal bands. The straightened bracelet is then slapped against the wearer's forearm, causing the bands to spring back into a curve that wraps around the wrist, securing the bracelet to the wearer. Invented by Wisconsin teacher Stuart Anders and sold under the brand name "Slap Wrap", the slap bracelet was a popular fad among children, pre-teens and teenagers in the late 1980s and early 1990s and was available in a wide variety of patterns and colors. The bracelet was banned in several schools following reports of injuries stemming from improper use. The bracelet was later reintroduced with a plastic spring, but there were still reports of injuries. More recently, slap bracelets have been used as Trouser clips - worn on the lower legs of cyclists to prevent trousers from being tangled in the gear system.
    7.67
    3 votes
    5
    Pogs

    Pogs

    Pogs is a game that was popularized during the early 1990s. The game is played using discs which are also called "pogs". The name originates from POG, a brand of juice made from passionfruit, orange and guava; the use of the POG bottle caps to play the game pre-dated the game's commercialization. The game of pogs possibly originated in Hawaii (Maui, Hawaii) in the 1920s or 1930s, or possibly with origins in a game from much earlier: Menko, a Japanese card game very similar to pogs, has been in existence since the 17th century. Pogs returned to popularity when the World POG Federation and the Canada Games Company reintroduced them to the public in the 1990s. The pog fad soared, and peaked in the mid 1990s before rapidly fading out. Pog typically relies on two types of playing discs: pogs and slammers. Pogs are typically flat circular cardboard discs which are decorated with images on one or both sides. Traditional (or traditional-style) pogs are made of rougher cardboard, are printed with limited colors, and often have a staple in them (as they appeared when used as actual POG bottlecaps), while modern commercial pogs were stiffer, thicker and are often printed with colorful glossy
    7.33
    3 votes
    6

    No Fear

    No Fear is an American lifestyle clothing brand that was created in 1989 by Mark Simo, Brian Simo, and Marty Moates. No Fear Inc. products are sold at various retail stores and company owned stores. It also offers No Fear energy drinks under the same brand, in a joint venture with Pepsi. The company currently employs about 450 people. On February 25, 2011, they filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. No Fear T-shirts were very popular in the mid-1990s. The shirts feature existential slogans or quotes that tout the virtues of extreme sports. Common themes included fear of death, lack of laziness, contempt for social norms and the law. No Fear began distributing a No Fear Energy drink through partnership with SoBe. Flavors and versions currently consist of: No Fear is the official energy drink of the World Extreme Cagefighting, and sponsors fighter Urijah Faber. In Europe they are making a different variety called Extreme Energy in partnership with UK based Aimia Foods. No Fear began a promotion in 2009 to earn No Fear "cred" by entering codes found under the tab of the cans. Participants can use points earned to acquire No Fear Gear. Grand Prizes include admission to: On February 12, 2008,
    7.00
    3 votes
    7

    Pokémon

    Pokémon (ポケモン, Pokemon), abbreviated from the Japanese title of Pocket Monsters (ポケットモンスター, Poketto Monsutā), is a children's anime TV series, which has since been adapted for the international television markets. It is based on the Pokémon video game series and a part of the Pokémon franchise. The Pokémon metaseries is split up into four chronologically sequential series in Japan, split up by the version of the video game series the anime takes inspiration from: the original series (split up into the Orange Islands and Gold-Silver sub-chapters), the Advanced Generation series, the Diamond & Pearl series, and currently the Best Wishes! series which started its Season 2 chapter in June 2012. In the international broadcasts, these four series are split into 15 separate seasons. These anime series are accompanied by spin-off programming, consisting of Pokémon Chronicles, a series of side stories featuring characters in the anime that are not its current cast of main characters, and the live action variety and Pokémon-related news shows of Weekly Pokémon Broadcasting Station, Pokémon Sunday, and the current incarnation of Pokémon Smash!. The series follows Ash Ketchum and his friends
    6.67
    3 votes
    8
    Clackers

    Clackers

    Clackers (also known as Ker-Bangers and numerous other names) are a toy which was popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. They consisted of two plastic spheres suspended on string which were swung up and down so they banged against each other, making a clacking sound. Clackers are similar in appearance to the Argentinian weapons, bolas. They are formed out of two hard plastic balls, each about two inches (5 cm) in diameter, attached to a tab with a sturdy string. The player holds the tab, with the balls hanging below. Through a gentle up-and-down hand motion, the two balls swing apart and back together, making the clacking noise that give the toy its name. With practice, it is possible to make the balls swing so that they knock together above the hand as well as below. Noise making clackers were used to frighten birds away in the nineteenth century. Clackers were discontinued when reports came out of children becoming injured while playing with them. Fairly heavy and fast-moving, and made of hard acrylic plastic, the balls would occasionally shatter upon striking each other. There is an urban legend that the clacker spheres were made of glass. The toy enjoyed a brief renewal of
    6.33
    3 votes
    9
    Discman

    Discman

    Discman was the product name given to Sony's first portable CD player, the D-50, which was the first on the market in 1984, and adopted for Sony's entire portable CD player line. In Japan, all Discman products are referred to as "CD Walkman" and the name was adopted worldwide in 2000 along with a redesigned "Walkman" logo. Prior to the development of the CD, cassette tapes were the dominant form of audio storage in regards to the then-fledgling portable audio industry. In 1979, Sony had introduced the Walkman in Japan. As Sony began to realize the potential of the CD, executives pushed for a means to give the CD player market momentum, moving it from audio enthusiasts to the mainstream. Building on the design of the CDP-101, a CD player, Sony worked towards both improving the design of the player, reducing the power and number of parts needed while decreasing the overall size of the player, as well as reducing the cost of the player to a 50 000 - 60 000 yen range in what was called the "CD CD Project", which stood for Compact Disc Cost Down Project. With the ability to produce a CD player one-tenth the size of its first unit by August 1983, there became potential for a portable
    8.50
    2 votes
    10
    Fanny pack

    Fanny pack

    A fanny pack (US, Canada), belt pack (US), belly bag (US), Buffalo pouch (US), hip sack (US), phany pack (US), waist bag (US), hip pack (UK), bum bag (UK, Oceania, Ireland), cangurera (Mexico), koala (Venezuela), banano (South America), riñonera (Spain, Argentina), pochete (Brazil) or moon bag (South Africa), is a small fabric pouch secured with a zipper and worn by use of a strap around the hips or waist. The name "fanny pack" is derived from the fact that they were traditionally worn facing the rear above the buttocks, for which "fanny" is a slang term in the United States. Despite the name, many do not wear fanny packs on their rear because they are easier to pick pocket and harder to access. In the United Kingdom and Anglophone Oceania, the term "bum bag" or "belt bag" is used, since the word "fanny" means vulva, rather than buttocks, in those countries. Fanny packs reached the peak of their popularity in the late 1980s and early-to-mid 90s. Many consider the fanny pack a sure mark for an out-of-place tourist, evoking the traditional tourist stereotypes known around the world, or as an item worn by unfashionable or older people. Musician "Weird Al" Yankovic mocks the wearing of
    6.00
    3 votes
    11

    Push Pop

    Push Pop (manufactured by Topps) is a brand of fruit flavored lollipops. Push Pop varieties include Original, Triple Power, and Push Pump Spray.
    8.00
    2 votes
    12

    Street Fighter II

    Street Fighter II: The World Warrior (ストリートファイターⅡ -The World Warrior-) is a competitive fighting game originally released for the arcades in 1991. It is the second entry in the Street Fighter series and the arcade sequel to the original Street Fighter released in 1987. It was Capcom's fourteenth title that ran on the CP System arcade hardware. Street Fighter II improved upon the many concepts introduced in the first game, including the use of command-based special moves and a six-button configuration, while offering players a selection of multiple playable characters, each with their own unique fighting style. The success of Street Fighter II is credited for starting the fighting game boom during the 1990s which inspired other game developers to produce their own fighting game franchises, popularizing the genre. Its success led to a sub-series of updated versions (see below), each offering additional features and characters over previous versions, as well as several home versions. In 1993, sales of Street Fighter II exceeded $1.5 billion in gross revenues, and by 1994, the game had been played by at least 25 million Americans in homes and arcades. The video game console ports to
    8.00
    1 votes
    13
    Hi-top fade

    Hi-top fade

    A hi-top fade is a style of haircut where hair on the sides is cut off or kept very short and hair on the top of the head is very long (in contrast, a low fade is when hair on the top is kept shorter). The hi-top has been a trend symbolizing the Golden Era of hip hop and urban contemporary music during the late 1980s and the early 1990s. The hi-top fade was common among young African Americans between 1986 to 1993 and to a lesser extent in the mid-1990s (1994-1996). The style fell completely out of fashion by 1997. In the hip hop community throughout the mid-1980s, young African-Americans leaned towards Jheri curls or simple haircuts without tapers or fades of any sort. In 1986, rappers like Schooly D and Doug E. Fresh had the first, somewhat developed, styles of the hi-top fade in hip hop. However, their hairstyles lacked the geometric precision that characterized the more modern hi-top fade styles. In the hip-hop community, one of the first public appearances of the more modern hi-top fade hairstyles was in the "Tramp" video by Salt-N-Pepa, released early in 1987. In this video, the dancers could be seen with this hairstyle. They can be also seen dancing in a 'New Jack Swing'
    5.50
    2 votes
    14

    Saved by the Bell

    Saved by the Bell is an American television sitcom that aired between 1989 and 1993. The series is a retooled version of the 1988 series Good Morning, Miss Bliss, which was itself later folded into the backstory of Saved by the Bell. The TV series followed the exploits of several students, along with their principal, at the fictional "Bayside High School." During each season the series represented a full academic year of high school for the students, plus summer vacations, ending with their graduation. The sitcom name is an idiom for being "saved" by a school bell ringing, when a student is unprepared to answer a question asked near the end of a classroom period. The show stars Mark-Paul Gosselaar, Dustin Diamond, Lark Voorhies, and Dennis Haskins, who appeared in Good Morning, Miss Bliss, as well as Tiffani-Amber Thiessen, Elizabeth Berkley, and Mario Lopez, who joined the cast for Saved by the Bell. The show brought fame to the cast members and launched most of their careers. However, some of them struggled with typecasting for many years after the series ended. The show often incorporated dramatic elements into episodes by dealing with real teen social issues, such as
    6.00
    1 votes
    15
    Bowl cut

    Bowl cut

    A bowl cut, also known as a pot haircut, a helmet haircut or a mushroom cut, is a haircut where the hair is cut short on the sides and back and looking as though someone put a bowl on the head and cut off all the visible hair. A bowl cut is also known for being a cheap and easy haircut often sported by children. The most well known bowl cut belongs to Moe Howard, who wore it as part of his "Three Stooges" persona until his death from lung cancer in June, 1975. Historically this haircut was popular among common people of various nationalities as an easy and relatively neat cut by a non-professional. Indeed, it was done by putting a cooking pot of a fit size to the level of ears, and all hair below the rim was cut or even shaven off. In some cultures it was a normal type of haircut. In other cultures the bowl cut was viewed as an attribute of wealth, signifying that the wearer could afford to visit a barber. The bowl cut is quite common among the Amish, and is also seen among some indigenous tribes such as the Yanomamo. From the late twentieth century on, the haircut resurfaced as a counterculture style credited to the Beatles' moptop hairstyles and the Ramones' early stylized bowl
    5.00
    1 votes
    16
    Hypercolor

    Hypercolor

    Hypercolor was a line of clothing, mainly T-shirts and shorts, that changed color with heat. They were manufactured by Generra Sportswear Company of Seattle and marketed in the United States as Generra Hypercolor or Generra Hypergrafix and outside the US as Global Hypercolor. They contained a thermochromic (temperature sensitive) pigment made by Matsui Shikiso Chemical of Japan, that changed between two colors – one when cold, one when warm. The shirts were produced with several color change choices beginning in 1991. The effect could easily be permanently damaged, particularly when the clothing was washed in hotter than recommended water, ironed, bleached or tumble-dried. Generra Sportswear Co. had originally been founded as a men's sportswear distributor and importer in Seattle in 1980. The company was sold to Texas-based Farah Manufacturing Co. in 1984 and bought back by its founders in 1989. In 1986, the company added childrenswear and womenswear items to their portfolio. They struggled to meet the overwhelming demand for Hypercolor products. Between February and May 1991 they sold $50 million in Hypercolor garments. Generra went bankrupt due to mismanagement and fading demand
    4.00
    1 votes
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