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Best 80s fad of All Time

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    1

    Big hair band

    A Big Hair Band was any of a number of rock & roll bands of the 1980s whose trademark was excessive use of make-up, new urban punk fashion (spandex, tight leather pants, torn clothing, shoulder pads, etc.), and really, really Big Hair. Big Hair Bands were mostly male caucasians in their 20's and early 30's. Many were also part of the annual Monsters of Rock tour, and several were also one-hit wonders. Their music was also referred to as headbanger music, and most of them were known for producing at least one heart-wrenching Power ballad, a song with lyrics usually aimed at impressing one or more of the band members' many female admirers (usually adolescent and college-aged women). One of the most famous of these is Every Rose Has Its Thorn. Some Big Hair Bands include:
    6.00
    7 votes
    2

    Wine cooler

    A wine cooler is an alcoholic beverage made from wine and fruit juice, often in combination with a carbonated beverage and sugar. Traditionally home-made, wine coolers have been bottled and sold by commercial distributors since the early 1980s, especially in areas where their lower alcohol content causes them to come under less restrictive laws than wine itself. Because most of the flavor in the wine is obscured by the fruit and sugar, the wine used in wine coolers tends to be of the cheapest available grade. Since January 1991 when United States Congress quintupled the excise tax on wine, most producers of wine coolers dropped wine from the mix, substituting it with cheaper malt. These malt-based coolers, while sometimes referred to as "wine coolers," are in a different category of beverage - sometimes called "malt beverage," "malternative," or just "cooler." Bartles & Jaymes refers to their malt beverage as a "flavored malt cooler". In Germany, however, wine coolers became popular in 2004, when the German Government imposed an extra duty on alcopops (pre-mixed spirits) of 0.80 to 0.90 euro per bottle effective August 1, 2004. To circumvent higher taxation, some German producers
    7.75
    4 votes
    3
    Boombox

    Boombox

    Boombox is a colloquial expression for a portable cassette or CD player with two or more loudspeakers. Other terms known are ghetto blaster, jambox, Brixton briefcase or radio-cassette. It is a device capable of receiving radio stations and playing recorded music (usually cassettes or CDs), usually at relatively high volume. Many models are also capable of recording (onto cassette) from radio and (sometimes) other sources. Designed for portability, most boomboxes can be powered by batteries, as well as by line current. The first Boombox was developed by the inventor of the C-Cassette, Philips of the Netherlands. Their first 'Radiorecorder' was released in 1969. The Philips innovation was the first time that radio broadcasts could be recorded onto C-Cassette tapes without cables or microphones that previous stand-alone cassette tape recorders needed. Early sound quality of tape recordings was poor but as the C-Cassette technology evolved, with stereo recording, Chromium tapes and noise reduction, soon HiFi quality devices become possible. Several European electronics brands such as Grundig also introduced similar devices. Boomboxes were soon also developed in Japan in the early
    6.75
    4 votes
    4

    Pop Rocks

    Pop Rocks is a carbonated candy with ingredients including sugar, lactose (milk sugar), corn syrup, and flavoring. It differs from typical hard candy in that it creates a fizzy reaction when it dissolves in one's mouth. Although still popular, Pop Rocks are regarded nostalgically as an aspect of 1970s pop culture. The concept was patented by General Foods research chemist William A. Mitchell in 1956. The candy was first offered to the public in 1975. In 1983, General Foods withdrew the product owing to its lack of success in the marketplace and to its relatively short shelf life. Distribution was initially controlled to ensure freshness; but with its increasing popularity, unauthorized redistribution from market to market resulted in out-of-date product reaching consumers. After that, Kraft Foods licensed the Pop Rocks brand to Zeta Espacial S.A. who continued manufacturing the product under Kraft´s license. Eventually Zeta Espacial S.A. became the brand´s owner and the only manufacturer of Pop Rocks popping candy in the world. Currently Pop Rocks is distributed in the U.S. by Pop Rocks Inc (Atlanta, GA) and by Zeta Espacial S.A. (Barcelona – Spain) in the rest of the world. Zeta
    6.25
    4 votes
    5
    Moonwalk

    Moonwalk

    The moonwalk is a dance technique that presents the illusion of the dancer being pulled backwards while attempting to walk forward. A popping move, it became popular around the world after Michael Jackson executed the dance move during a performance of "Billie Jean" on Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever on March 25, 1983. It subsequently became his signature move, and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world. An illusion is involved in creating the appearance of the dancer gliding backwards. Initially, the front foot is held flat on the ground, while the back foot is in a tiptoe position. The flat front foot remains on the ground but is slid lightly and smoothly backward past the tip-toe back foot. What is now the front foot is lowered flat, while the back foot is raised into the tiptoe position. These steps are repeated over and over. Variations of this move allow the moon walking to also appear to glide forwards, sideways, and even in a circle. There are many recorded instances of the moonwalk, similar steps are reported as far back as 1932, used by Cab Calloway. In 1985, Calloway said that the move was called "The Buzz" when he and others performed it in the
    8.33
    3 votes
    6
    Mullet

    Mullet

    The mullet is a hairstyle that is short at the front and sides, and long in the back. The mullet began to appear in popular media in the 1960s and 1970s but did not become generally well known until the early 1980s. It continued to be popular until the mid-1990s. The term "mullet" was used frequently by George Kennedy's character Dragline in the 1967 American film Cool Hand Luke. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term mullet was "apparently coined, and certainly popularized, by U.S. hip-hop group the Beastie Boys", who used "mullet" and "mullet head" as epithets in their 1994 song "Mullet Head", although the term was used as early as 1982 in episode 3, season 1 of the situation comedy Cheers. In that episode, the character Sam Malone calls a rude New York Yankees fan a "mullet head". The Beastie Boys' fanzine Grand Royal Magazine was not the first to use the term in print, as that accolade can more likely be granted Mark Twain, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), who, whilst not referring to the "mullet" haircut, nevertheless refers to Tom allaying Huck's fears of being caught by Aunt Polly, by saying: "They're so confiding and mullet-headed they don't take
    7.67
    3 votes
    7

    Pac-Man

    Pac-Man (パックマン, Pakkuman) is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution in the United States by Midway, first released in Japan on May 22, 1980. Immensely popular from its original release to the present day, Pac-Man is considered one of the classics of the medium, virtually synonymous with video games, and an icon of 1980s popular culture. Upon its release, the game—and, subsequently, Pac-Man derivatives—became a social phenomenon that sold a bevy of merchandise and also inspired, among other things, an animated television series and a top-ten hit single. When Pac-Man was released, the most popular arcade video games were space shooters, in particular Space Invaders and Asteroids. The most visible minority were sports games that were mostly derivative of Pong. Pac-Man succeeded by creating a new genre and appealing to both genders. Pac-Man is often credited with being a landmark in video game history, and is among the most famous arcade games of all time. It is also one of the highest-grossing video games of all time, having generated more than $2.5 billion in quarters by the 1990s. The character has appeared in more than 30 officially licensed game spin-offs,
    7.33
    3 votes
    8
    Rubik's Cube

    Rubik's Cube

    Rubik's Cube is a 3-D mechanical puzzle invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. Originally called the "Magic Cube", the puzzle was licensed by Rubik to be sold by Ideal Toy Corp. in 1980 via German businessman Tibor Laczi and Seven Towns founder Tom Kremer, and won the German Game of the Year special award for Best Puzzle that year. As of January 2009, 350 million cubes had been sold worldwide making it the world's top-selling puzzle game. It is widely considered to be the world's best-selling toy. In a classic Rubik's Cube, each of the six faces is covered by nine stickers, each of one of six solid colours (traditionally white, red, blue, orange, green, and yellow). A pivot mechanism enables each face to turn independently, thus mixing up the colours. For the puzzle to be solved, each face must be returned to consisting of one colour. Similar puzzles have now been produced with various numbers of stickers, not all of them by Rubik. Although the Rubik's Cube reached its height of mainstream popularity in the 1980s, many speedcubers continue to practise it and other "twisty puzzles" and compete for the fastest times. Its international
    6.67
    3 votes
    9
    Ouija

    Ouija

    The Ouija board ( /ˈwiːdʒə/ WEE-jə) also known as a spirit board or talking board, is a flat board marked with the letters of the alphabet, the numbers 0-9, the words "yes", "no", "hello" (occasionally), and "goodbye", along with various symbols and graphics. It is a registered trademark of Hasbro Inc., which markets and distributes the Ouija Board as part of its line of board games. It uses a planchette (small heart-shaped piece of wood) or movable indicator to indicate the spirit's message by spelling it out on the board during a séance. Participants place their fingers on the planchette and it is moved about the board to spell out words. It has become a trademark that is often used generically to refer to any talking board. Following its commercial introduction by businessman Elijah Bond on July 1, 1890, the Ouija board was regarded as a harmless parlor game unrelated to the occult until American Spiritualist Pearl Curran popularized its use as a divining tool during World War I. Mainstream religions and some occultists have associated use of the Ouija board with the threat of demonic possession and some have cautioned their followers not to use Ouija boards. While Ouija
    7.00
    2 votes
    10

    L.V.

    Larry Sanders (born October 1, 1957), better known by his showbiz name L.V. whose initials stand for "Large Variety", is an American R&B singer. He is best known for his collaboration with rapper Coolio on the 1995 hit single, "Gangsta's Paradise", and has been featured on multiple soundtracks since then. Having released two solo albums to date, he was also a member of the gangsta rap group South Central Cartel since their beginning, usually singing the vocals and chorus. L.V. grew up with a father who sang gospel music along with the radio every morning, and this helped hook him on singing. He won a high school talent contest by performing L.T.D.'s "Concentrate on You," joined the Los Angeles Trade Technical College choir. He later joined the Los Angeles Southwest College music department where he studied voice, choir and performed in several stage musicals. He also contributed R&B vocals to a neighborhood rap group, the South Central Cartel. Following his success with "Gangsta's Paradise", L.V. landed a contract with Tommy Boy Records, which released his debut album I Am L.V. in 1996. This album spawned the hit single, "Throw Your Hands Up" which featured Treach from Naughty By
    10.00
    1 votes
    11
    Rattail

    Rattail

    A rattail is a hair style that is characterized by a long "tail"-like element of hair growing downward from the back of the head. The rattail usually curls naturally; however, it can be braided, treated as a dread, permed, straightened, or curled with an iron. In some instances, an individual might choose to grow several tails as opposed to a single very long tail. The rattail saw a brief period of mainstream popularity during the 1980s and has rapidly fallen out of vogue. However, it has recently seen renewed popularity. The rattail seems to be rather commonly seen on manga characters. For example, Dr. Tofu (a character in Ranma 1/2) and Masaharu Niou from Prince of Tennis all have small ponytails resembling rattails. Tenchi Masaki also is seen with a rattail. Auron from Final Fantasy X also sports a rattail in a concept art by Tetsuya Nomura (it is not visible in game because of his high-brim collar). However, this may be due to the hairstyle's similarity to the queue. Miroku(Inuyasha) also has a rattail. Some punks and rivetheads have been known to support them also, although in a much more punky style, totally shaven head, except for a tuft of hair at the back, usually dyed in
    6.00
    1 votes
    12

    Teddy Ruxpin

    Teddy Ruxpin is a children's toy talking bear. The bear would move his mouth and eyes while 'reading' stories which were played on an audio tape cassette deck built into his back. It was created by Ken Forsse with later assistance by Larry Larsen and John Davies. Later versions would use a digital cartridge in place of a cassette. At the peak of his popularity, Teddy Ruxpin became the best-selling toy of 1985 and 1986, and the newest version was awarded the 2006 Animated Interactive Plush Toy of the Year by Creative Child Magazine. A cartoon based on the characters debuted in 1987. From his debut in September, 1985, various toy makers have produced Teddy Ruxpin over the years. The first was Worlds Of Wonder from 1985 until its bankruptcy and demise in 1990. The toys rights were then sold to Hasbro, and produced again in the early-90's. Another version debuted in 1998 by YES! Entertainment. In 2006, the final version of Teddy Ruxpin created by BackPack Toys debuted. Shortly after his debut, Teddy Ruxpin was the "Official Spokesbear for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children" in 1985. Teddy Ruxpin was first produced in 1985 by toy manufacturer Worlds of Wonder. There
    6.00
    1 votes
    13
    Spandex

    Spandex

    Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. It is strong, but less durable than its major non-synthetic competitor, natural latex. It is a polyurethane-polyurea copolymer that was invented in 1959 by chemists C. L. Sandquist and Joseph Shivers at DuPont's Benger Laboratory in Waynesboro, Virginia. When first introduced, it revolutionized many areas of the clothing industry. The name "spandex" is an anagram of the word "expands". It is the preferred name in North America; in continental Europe it is referred to by variants of "elastane", i.e. elasthanne (France), elastan (Germany), elastano (Spain and Portugual), elastam (Italy) and Elasthaan (Holland), and is known in the UK and Ireland primarily as Lycra. Brand names for spandex include Lycra (made by Koch subsidiary Invista, previously a part of DuPont), Elaspan (also Invista), Acepora (Taekwang), Creora (Hyosung), ROICA and Dorlastan (Asahi Kasei), Linel (Fillattice), and ESPA (Toyobo). Spandex fibers are produced in four different ways: melt extrusion, reaction spinning, solution dry spinning, and solution wet spinning. All of these methods include the initial step of reacting monomers to
    5.00
    1 votes
    14

    Spuds MacKenzie

    Spuds MacKenzie was a fictional dog character created for use in an advertising campaign marketing Bud Light beer in the late 1980s. The dog first showed up in a Bud Light Super Bowl XXI ad in 1987. During the height of his popularity, large amounts of Spuds merchandise was available, such as plush toys and t-shirts. The dog, a Bull Terrier, existed not without his share of controversy. Shortly after Spuds' rise to fame it was learned that the dog, who was portrayed as male in the commercials, was actually female. The ads were also the subject of attacks and calls for censorship by temperance-oriented groups. In 1992, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, along with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, charged that Anheuser-Busch was pitching the dog to children. Although the Federal Trade Commission found no evidence to support that allegation, the ads were dropped. The dog's real name was Honey Tree Evil Eye (October 7, 1983 - May 31, 1993). She died of kidney failure in North Riverside, Illinois.
    5.00
    1 votes
    15
    Tetherball

    Tetherball

    Tetherball is a North American game for two opposing players. The equipment consists of a stationary metal pole, from which is hung a volleyball from a rope, or tether. The two players stand on opposite sides of the pole. Each player tries to hit the ball one way; one clockwise, and one counter (anti-) clockwise. The game ends when one player manages to wind the ball all the way around the pole so that it is stopped by the rope. It must not bounce. Rules can be found at The World Tetherball Association based in Palm Springs California. The game begins when one player serves the ball, usually by hitting it off the post, or after the opposing player serves it he can't hit it until the other player touches it. The opposing player then attempts to return the serve by hitting it in the opposite direction. The object is to hit the ball in such a way that one's opponent will be unable to alter the ball's direction. This gives the server an advantage since the server has more control over the ball from the beginning. It is generally acceptable to hit the ball with either the fist or the open hand or swing. The Players pick if a "cherrybomb" is legal but is usually legal in official games.
    0.00
    0 votes
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